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Sample records for severe heat stroke

  1. Pretreatment with indomethacin results in increased heat stroke severity during recovery in a rodent model of heat stroke.

    PubMed

    Audet, Gerald N; Dineen, Shauna M; Stewart, Delisha A; Plamper, Mark L; Pathmasiri, Wimal W; McRitchie, Susan L; Sumner, Susan J; Leon, Lisa R

    2017-09-01

    It has been suggested that medications can increase heat stroke (HS) susceptibility/severity. We investigated whether the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) indomethacin (INDO) increases HS severity in a rodent model. Core temperature (Tc) of male, C57BL/6J mice (n = 45) was monitored continuously, and mice were given a dose of INDO [low dose (LO) 1 mg/kg or high dose (HI) 5 mg/kg in flavored treat] or vehicle (flavored treat) before heating. HS animals were heated to 42.4°C and euthanized at three time points for histological, molecular, and metabolic analysis: onset of HS [maximal core temperature (Tc,Max)], 3 h of recovery [minimal core temperature or hypothermia depth (HYPO)], and 24 h of recovery (24 h). Nonheated (control) animals underwent identical treatment in the absence of heat. INDO (LO or HI) had no effect on physiological indicators of performance (e.g., time to Tc,Max, thermal area, or cooling time) during heating or recovery. HI INDO resulted in 45% mortality rate by 24 h (HI INDO + HS group). The gut showed dramatic increases in gross morphological hemorrhage in HI INDO + HS in both survivors and nonsurvivors. HI INDO + HS survivors had significantly lower red blood cell counts and hematocrit suggesting significant hemorrhage. In the liver, HS induced cell death at HYPO and increased inflammation at Tc,Max, HYPO, and 24 h; however, there was additional effect with INDO + HS group. Furthermore, the metabolic profile of the liver was disturbed by heat, but there was no additive effect of INDO + HS. This suggests that there is an increase in morbidity risk with INDO + HS, likely resulting from significant gut injury.NEW & NOTEWORTHY This paper suggests that in a translational mouse model, NSAIDs may be counterindicated in situations that put an individual at risk of heat injury. We show here that a small, single dose of the NSAID indomethacin before heat stroke has a dramatic and highly damaging effect on the gut, which ultimately leads to

  2. Point-of-care cardiac troponin test accurately predicts heat stroke severity in rats.

    PubMed

    Audet, Gerald N; Quinn, Carrie M; Leon, Lisa R

    2015-11-15

    Heat stroke (HS) remains a significant public health concern. Despite the substantial threat posed by HS, there is still no field or clinical test of HS severity. We suggested previously that circulating cardiac troponin (cTnI) could serve as a robust biomarker of HS severity after heating. In the present study, we hypothesized that (cTnI) point-of-care test (ctPOC) could be used to predict severity and organ damage at the onset of HS. Conscious male Fischer 344 rats (n = 16) continuously monitored for heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), and core temperature (Tc) (radiotelemetry) were heated to maximum Tc (Tc,Max) of 41.9 ± 0.1°C and recovered undisturbed for 24 h at an ambient temperature of 20°C. Blood samples were taken at Tc,Max and 24 h after heat via submandibular bleed and analyzed on ctPOC test. POC cTnI band intensity was ranked using a simple four-point scale via two blinded observers and compared with cTnI levels measured by a clinical blood analyzer. Blood was also analyzed for biomarkers of systemic organ damage. HS severity, as previously defined using HR, BP, and recovery Tc profile during heat exposure, correlated strongly with cTnI (R(2) = 0.69) at Tc,Max. POC cTnI band intensity ranking accurately predicted cTnI levels (R(2) = 0.64) and HS severity (R(2) = 0.83). Five markers of systemic organ damage also correlated with ctPOC score (albumin, alanine aminotransferase, blood urea nitrogen, cholesterol, and total bilirubin; R(2) > 0.4). This suggests that cTnI POC tests can accurately determine HS severity and could serve as simple, portable, cost-effective HS field tests.

  3. Cooling Methods in Heat Stroke.

    PubMed

    Gaudio, Flavio G; Grissom, Colin K

    2016-04-01

    Heat stroke is an illness with a high risk of mortality or morbidity, which can occur in the young and fit (exertional heat stroke) as well as the elderly and infirm (nonexertional heat stroke). In the United States, from 2006 to 2010, there were at least 3332 deaths attributed to heat stroke. To summarize the available evidence on the principal cooling methods used in the treatment of heat stroke. Although it is generally agreed that rapid, effective cooling increases survival in heat stroke, there continues to be debate on the optimal cooling method. Large, controlled clinical trials on heat stroke are lacking. Cooling techniques applied to healthy volunteers in experimental models of heat stroke have not worked as rapidly in actual patients with heat stroke. The best available evidence has come from large case series using ice-water immersion or evaporation plus convection to cool heat-stroke patients. Ice-water immersion has been shown to be highly effective in exertional heat stroke, with a zero fatality rate in large case series of younger, fit patients. In older patients with nonexertional heat stroke, studies have more often promoted evaporative plus convective cooling. Evaporative plus convective cooling may be augmented by crushed ice or ice packs applied diffusely to the body. Chilled intravenous fluids may also supplement primary cooling. Based on current evidence, ice packs applied strategically to the neck, axilla, and groin; cooling blankets; and intravascular or external cooling devices are not recommended as primary cooling methods in heat stroke. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Heat Stroke: Role of the Systemic Inflammatory Response

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    including delirium, seizures, or coma and severe hyperthermia. Rapid cooling and support of multi-organ function are the most effective clinical...exertional heat stroke while performing strenuous physical activity in temperate or hot climates. Factors that predispose to heat stroke collapse...organ function are the most effective clinical treatments, but many patients experience permanent neurological impairments or death despite these

  5. Severe stroke: which medicine for which results?

    PubMed

    Woimant, F; Biteye, Y; Chaine, P; Crozier, S

    2014-02-01

    In face of any severe stroke, the questions for health professionals in charge of the patient are: will the handicap be acceptable for the patient? But can we predict an acceptable handicap for the patient? For his family? When we know that the cognitive disorders, consequences of severe stroke often modify, in a major way, the behaviour of these patients? Given these difficulties for estimate vital and functional prognosis and even more the quality of life of patients with severe stroke, collective reflexions between physicians and nurses are essential, reflexions taking into account preferences and values of patients. Use of resuscitation resources for severe stroke patients implies to offer them the best rehabilitation. So, questions about health pathways for severe stroke are essential: which structures for these patients, which technologies, which medical, medico-social and social supports, which human accompaniment the society can propose to the patients and to their family, so that they have an acceptable quality of life.

  6. Exertional heat stroke, rhabdomyolysis and susceptibility to malignant hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Thomas, J; Crowhurst, T

    2013-09-01

    Unexpectedly severe exertional heat stroke and rhabdomyolysis should prompt a clinician to look for susceptibility to malignant hyperthermia. We report a case of exertional heat stroke and rhabdomyolysis in a man later determined to have the malignant hyperthermia phenotype. We review the existing literature regarding this association and suggest future research that could address areas of remaining clinical uncertainty. © 2013 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  7. Pre-stroke living situation and depression contribute to initial stroke severity and stroke recovery

    PubMed Central

    Aron, Abraham W.; Staff, Ilene; Fortunato, Gilbert; McCullough, Louise D.

    2014-01-01

    Substantial evidence from both experimental and clinical studies has demonstrated that social isolation can increase stroke incidence and impair recovery. Social isolation leads to higher rates of recurrent stroke but is often not reported as a risk factor. We examined prospectively collected stroke center database variables, which included pre-stroke living situation, to determine if social isolation could be determined from existing data using living arrangement as a proxy. Patients were categorized into 4 groups hypothesized to represent increasing levels of social isolation: Living with Spouse, Living with Family, Living alone with visiting services and Living Alone. Initial stroke severity and recovery were measured using the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and Barthel Index, respectively. A multivariate model was used to determine the relationship between pre-stroke living situation, stroke severity and functional outcome. Patients living alone had less severe strokes on admission and better recovery at 3 months compared to the other cohorts. Patients living alone or those that lived with a spouse had less severe strokes on presentation and better recovery at both 3 and 12 months after stroke compared to the other cohorts. However, upon detailed examination, it was found that these patients also had significantly higher pre-stroke function. Pre-existing depression was significantly higher in women and depressed patients had poorer outcomes 3 months after stroke. Information regarding isolation is notably absent from most large stroke databases. A more comprehensive evaluation of social interaction should be obtained to more accurately measure social isolation. PMID:25524014

  8. IV thrombolysis in very severe and severe ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lees, Kennedy R.; Collas, David; Rand, Viiu-Marika; Mikulik, Robert; Toni, Danilo; Wahlgren, Nils; Ahmed, Niaz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the safety of off-label IV thrombolysis in patients with very severe stroke (NIH Stroke Scale [NIHSS] scores >25) compared with severe stroke (NIHSS scores 15–25), where treatment is within European regulations. Methods: Data were analyzed from 57,247 patients with acute ischemic stroke receiving IV tissue plasminogen activator in 793 hospitals participating in the Safe Implementation of Thrombolysis in Stroke (SITS) International Stroke Thrombolysis Registry (2002–2013). Eight hundred sixty-eight patients (1.5%) had NIHSS scores >25 and 19,995 (34.9%) had NIHSS scores 15–25. Outcome measures were parenchymal hemorrhage, symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage, mortality, and functional outcome. Results: Parenchymal hemorrhage occurred in 10.7% vs 11.0% (p = 0.79), symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage per SITS-MOST (SITS–Monitoring Study) in 1.4% vs 2.5% (p = 0.052), death at 3 months in 50.4% vs 26.9% (p < 0.001), and functional independence at 3 months in 14.0% vs 29.0% (p < 0.001) of patients with NIHSS scores >25 and NIHSS scores 15–25, respectively. Multivariate adjustment did not change findings from univariate comparisons. Posterior circulation stroke was more common in patients with NIHSS scores >25 (36.2% vs 7.4%, p < 0.001), who were also more often obtunded or comatose on presentation (58.4% vs 7.1%, p < 0.001). Of patients with NIHSS scores >25, 26.2% were treated >3 hours from symptom onset vs 14.5% with NIHSS scores of 15–25. Conclusions: Our data show no excess risk of cerebral hemorrhage in patients with NIHSS score >25 compared to score 15–25, suggesting that the European contraindication to IV tissue plasminogen activator treatment at NIHSS levels >25 may be unwarranted. Increased mortality and lower rates of functional independence in patients with NIHSS score >25 are explained by higher stroke severity, impaired consciousness on presentation due to posterior circulation ischemia, and longer treatment delays. PMID

  9. Aspirin resistance is more common in lacunar strokes than embolic strokes and is related to stroke severity.

    PubMed

    Englyst, Nicola A; Horsfield, Gill; Kwan, Joseph; Byrne, Christopher D

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between aspirin resistance, ischaemic stroke subtype, stroke severity, and inflammatory cytokines. Aspirin resistance was assessed by thrombelastography in 45 people with ischaemic stroke and 25 controls. Plasma interleukin (IL)-6 was measured. Stroke severity was assessed using the modified Rankin scale and National Institute of Health Stroke Score within 72 h of stroke. Aspirin resistance was more common in the stroke than the control group (67% versus 40%, P=0.028), and within the stroke group the aspirin-resistant group had a higher Rankin score (4.0 versus 2.0, P=0.013). Aspirin resistance was greater in lacunar than embolic strokes (platelet activation 79% versus 59%, P=0.020). The stroke aspirin-resistant group had higher levels of IL-6 than the stroke aspirin-sensitive group (2.4+/-1 versus 1.8+/-0.9 ng/mL, P=0.037). Using multivariate analysis, we examined the interrelationships between aspirin resistance, IL-6, and stroke severity. These analyses showed that IL-6 was independently associated with stroke severity as the outcome (B=3.738, P=0.036), and aspirin resistance was independently associated with IL-6 (B=0.765, P=0.005) as the outcome. In conclusion, aspirin resistance is related to stroke severity and aspirin resistance is more common in lacunar strokes than embolic strokes.

  10. Dual-stroke heat pump field performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veyo, S. E.

    1984-11-01

    Two nearly identical proprototype systems, each employing a unique dual-stroke compressor, were built and tested. One was installed in an occupied residence in Jeannette, Pa. It has provided the heating and cooling required from that time to the present. The system has functioned without failure of any prototypical advanced components, although early field experience did suffer from deficiencies in the software for the breadboard micro processor control system. Analysis of field performance data indicates a heating performance factor (HSPF) of 8.13 Stu/Wa, and a cooling energy efficiency (SEER) of 8.35 Scu/Wh. Data indicate that the beat pump is oversized for the test house since the observed lower balance point is 3 F whereas 17 F La optimum. Oversizing coupled with the use of resistance heat ot maintain delivered air temperature warmer than 90 F results in the consumption of more resistance heat than expected, more unit cycling, and therefore lower than expected energy efficiency. Our analysis indicates that with optimal mixing the dual stroke heat pump will yield as HSFF 30% better than a single capacity heat pump representative of high efficiency units in the market place today for the observed weather profile.

  11. [Relationship between weather factors and heat stroke in Ningbo city].

    PubMed

    Gu, S H; Wang, A H; Bian, G L; He, T F; Yi, B; Lu, B B; Li, X H; Xu, G Z

    2016-08-10

    To explore the main effects of weather factors on heat stroke. Data from case report on heat stroke was collected in Ningbo city during 2011 to 2014. Temperature threshold, lag effects and interaction of weather factors on heat stroke had been analyzed, using the piecewise regression model, distributed lag non-linear model, response surface model and other methods. RESULTS showed that temperature and humidity were more correlated with heat stroke than other weather-related factors. Through different models, daily average temperature always presented a better role in predicting the heat stroke, rather than maximum or minimum temperature. Positive association between daily average temperature and heat stroke was obvious, especially at lag 0-1 days, with its threshold as 29.1 (95% CI: 28.7-29.5) ℃ . The cumulative RR of heat stroke at 90(th) percentile of daily average temperature versus 10(th) percentile was 14.05 (95% CI: 7.23-27.31) in lag 0-1 days. The effects of daily relative humidity on heat stroke appeared nonlinear, with low humidity showing a negative effect on heat stroke and could lag for 1-4 days. However, the effect of high humidity was not significant, with the cumulative RR of low humidity and high humidity as 2.35 (95%CI: 1.27-4.33) and 0.86 (95%CI: 0.40-1.85) in lag of 0-4 days, respectively. We also noticed that there was an interactive effect of both temperature and humidity on heat stroke. Under high temperature and low humidity, the risk of heat stroke showed the highest. Temperature and humidity showed obvious relationship with heat stroke in Ningbo city, with the threshold temperature as 29.1 ℃. Under high temperature and low humidity, the risk of heat stroke became the highest.

  12. Do Women With Atrial Fibrillation Experience More Severe Strokes? Results From the Austrian Stroke Unit Registry.

    PubMed

    Lang, Clemens; Seyfang, Leonhard; Ferrari, Julia; Gattringer, Thomas; Greisenegger, Stefan; Willeit, Karin; Toell, Thomas; Krebs, Stefan; Brainin, Michael; Kiechl, Stefan; Willeit, Johann; Lang, Wilfried; Knoflach, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Ischemic strokes associated with atrial fibrillation (AF) are more severe than those of other cause. We aim to study potential sex effects in this context. In this cross-sectional study, 74 425 adults with acute ischemic stroke from the Austrian Stroke Unit Registry were included between March 2003 and January 2016. In 63 563 patients, data on the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale on admission to the stroke unit, presence of AF, vascular risk factors, and comorbidities were complete. Analysis was done by a multivariate regression model. Stroke severity in general increased with age. AF-related strokes were more severe than strokes of other causes. Sex-related differences in stroke severity were only seen in stroke patients with AF. Median (Q25,75) National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score points were 9 (4,17) in women and 6 (3,13) in men (P<0.001). The interaction between AF and sex on stroke severity was independent of age, previous functional status, vascular risk factors, and vascular comorbidities and remained significant in various subgroups. Women with AF do not only have an increased risk of stroke when compared with men but also experience more severe strokes. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Dancing to death: A case of heat stroke.

    PubMed

    Nadesan, K; Kumari, Chandra; Afiq, Mohd

    2017-08-01

    Heat stroke is a medical emergency which may lead to mortality unless diagnosed early and treated effectively. Heat stroke may manifest rapidly, hence making it difficult to differentiate it from other clinical causes in a collapsed victim.(1) We are presenting a case report of twelve patients who were admitted to our emergency department from a music festival held on 13-15th of March 2014. They developed complications arising from a combination of severe adverse weather condition, prolonged outdoor physical exertion due to long hours of dancing and drug-use, resulting in heat stroke. Three of them died while the remaining patients survived. Their condition was initially misdiagnosed as a classical illicit drug overdose. This was based on the history of drug ingestion by some of the patients who attended the music festival on that day. The information in this case report aims, to create awareness amongst members of the medical team on duty in outdoor events, pre hospital responders and ED physicians when treating and managing similar cases in the future. In addition it is intended to warn the organizers of such events to take adequate precautions to avoid such tragedies in the future. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Patients living in impoverished areas have more severe ischemic strokes.

    PubMed

    Kleindorfer, Dawn; Lindsell, Christopher; Alwell, Kathleen A; Moomaw, Charles J; Woo, Daniel; Flaherty, Matthew L; Khatri, Pooja; Adeoye, Opeolu; Ferioli, Simona; Kissela, Brett M

    2012-08-01

    Initial stroke severity is one of the strongest predictors of eventual stroke outcome. However, predictors of initial stroke severity have not been well-described within a population. We hypothesized that poorer patients would have a higher initial stroke severity on presentation to medical attention. We identified all cases of hospital-ascertained ischemic stroke occurring in 2005 within a biracial population of 1.3 million. "Community" socioecomic status was determined for each patient based on the percentage below poverty in the census tract in which the patient resided. Linear regression was used to model the effect of socioeconomic status on stroke severity. Models were adjusted for race, gender, age, prestroke disability, and history of medical comorbidities. There were 1895 ischemic stroke events detected in 2005 included in this analysis; 22% were black, 52% were female, and the mean age was 71 years (range, 19-104). The median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale was 3 (range, 0-40). The poorest community socioeconomic status was associated with a significantly increased initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale by 1.5 points (95% confidence interval, 0.5-2.6; P<0.001) compared with the richest category in the univariate analysis, which increased to 2.2 points after adjustment for demographics and comorbidities. We found that increasing community poverty was associated with worse stroke severity at presentation, independent of other known factors associated with stroke outcomes. Socioeconomic status may impact stroke severity via medication compliance, access to care, and cultural factors, or may be a proxy measure for undiagnosed disease states.

  15. Elevated admission blood pressure and stroke severity in acute ischemic stroke: the Bergen NORSTROKE Study.

    PubMed

    Kvistad, Christopher Elnan; Logallo, Nicola; Oygarden, Halvor; Thomassen, Lars; Waje-Andreassen, Ulrike; Naess, Halvor

    2013-01-01

    Transient elevated blood pressure (BP) is frequent in patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke. The pathophysiology of this response is not clear and its effect on clinical outcome has shown contradictory results. Some studies have suggested that BP elevation may represent a protective response to enhance perfusion in ischemic brain tissue. In this study, we aimed to explore the association between elevated admission BP and stroke severity in the acute phase of ischemic stroke. If it is true that elevated BP represents a protective response in acute ischemia, we expected an inverse association between elevated BP and admission stroke severity, and a positive association between elevated BP and complete neurological recovery within 24 h and/or favorable short-term outcome. Patients with ischemic stroke with hospital admission <6 h after symptom onset were prospectively included in a stroke registry (Bergen NORSTROKE Registry). BP was measured immediately after admission in all patients. Elevated BP was defined as systolic BP ≥140 mm Hg or diastolic BP ≥90 mm Hg. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) was used to assess stroke severity upon admission. Mild stroke was defined as NIHSS score <8, moderate stroke as NIHSS score 8-14, and severe stroke as NIHSS score ≥15. Complete neurological recovery (CNR) was defined as no persistent ischemic stroke symptoms at 24 h after admission. Favorable short-term outcome was defined as a modified Rankin Scale score of 0 or 1 at day 7. A total of 749 patients with ischemic stroke were included, of which 621 patients (82.9%) presented with elevated BP. Elevated BP was independently associated with mild stroke (odds ratio, OR: 2.12; 95% CI: 1.39-3.24; p < 0.001), whereas lack of elevated BP was independently associated with severe stroke (OR: 0.41; 95% CI: 0.25-0.68; p < 0.001). There was a nonsignificant association between elevated BP and CNR (OR: 2.11; 95% CI: 0.96-4.68; p = 0.063), yet no association

  16. Exertional heat stroke: the runner's nemesis.

    PubMed Central

    Hart, L. E.; Egier, B. P.; Shimizu, A. G.; Tandan, P. J.; Sutton, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    Heat stroke in distance runners is increasing in frequency. A case is reported of a 41-year-old man who collapsed during a 10-km "fun run" held when the temperature was 31.6 degrees C and the humidity 80%. Acute renal failure (serum creatinine level 1530 mumol/l [17.3 mg/dl]), rhabdomyolysis, disseminated intravascular coagulation and hepatic damage complicated the clinical picture. Repeated peritoneal dialysis and one cycle of hemodialysis because of a very high serum level of uric acid (1.23 mmol/l [20.7 mg/dl]) were required. Although the illness was prolonged, recovery was almost complete, and 4 months after the man's collapse the serum creatinine level had fallen to 133 mumol/l (1.5 mg/dl). PMID:7388706

  17. Heat stroke and multi-organ failure with liver involvement in an asylum-seeking refugee.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Melanie; Koskinas, John; Emmanuel, Theodoros; Kountouras, Dimitris; Hadziyannis, Stephanos

    2006-10-01

    Heat stroke is the result of exposure to high environmental temperature and strenuous exercise representing a medical emergency characterized by an elevated core body temperature and central nervous system disorders. Slightly elevated liver enzymes, lacking clinical significance, seem to be frequent in heat stroke, whereas severe, clinically relevant, hepatocellular injury has been observed in only a minority of cases. In the present report we describe the case of an otherwise healthy young asylum-seeking refugee from East Timor, who developed severe heat stroke during his transportation to Greece in a closed container on a ship under unusually high temperatures. He was admitted to the hospital with severe multi-organ failure. After a short period of initial improvement, he developed severe hepatocellular injury and hepatic encephalopathy. Other causes of liver damage were excluded. The patient completely recovered.

  18. Temporal profile of body temperature in acute ischemic stroke: relation to stroke severity and outcome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pyrexia after stroke (temperature ≥37.5°C) is associated with poor prognosis, but information on timing of body temperature changes and relationship to stroke severity and subtypes varies. Methods We recruited patients with acute ischemic stroke, measured stroke severity, stroke subtype and recorded four-hourly tympanic (body) temperature readings from admission to 120 hours after stroke. We sought causes of pyrexia and measured functional outcome at 90 days. We systematically summarised all relevant previous studies. Results Amongst 44 patients (21 males, mean age 72 years SD 11) with median National Institute of Health Stroke Score (NIHSS) 7 (range 0–28), 14 had total anterior circulation strokes (TACS). On admission all patients, both TACS and non-TACS, were normothermic (median 36.3°C vs 36.5°C, p=0.382 respectively) at median 4 hours (interquartile range, IQR, 2–8) after stroke; admission temperature and NIHSS were not associated (r2=0.0, p=0.353). Peak temperature, occurring at 35.5 (IQR 19.0 to 53.8) hours after stroke, was higher in TACS (37.7°C) than non-TACS (37.1°C, p<0.001) and was associated with admission NIHSS (r2=0.20, p=0.002). Poor outcome (modified Rankin Scale ≥3) at 90 days was associated with higher admission (36.6°C vs. 36.2°C p=0.031) and peak (37.4°C vs. 37.0°C, p=0.016) temperatures. Sixteen (36%) patients became pyrexial, in seven (44%) of whom we found no cause other than the stroke. Conclusions Normothermia is usual within the first 4 hours of stroke. Peak temperature occurs at 1.5 to 2 days after stroke, and is related to stroke severity/subtype and more closely associated with poor outcome than admission temperature. Temperature-outcome associations after stroke are complex, but normothermia on admission should not preclude randomisation of patients into trials of therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:23075282

  19. [Heat stroke related to the use of topiramate. The importance of prevention].

    PubMed

    Rosich Del Cacho, M; Pareja Grande, J; Martínez Jiménez, M D; Latorre Latorre, J F; Bejarano Ramírez, N; López-Menchero Oliva, C

    2014-09-01

    Heat stroke is the most severe pathology related to heat. It is defined as an increase in core body temperature accompanied by signs of neurological dysfunction. In the absence of an early treatment, it has a very high mortality rate. Topiramate is a well known drug widely used in epilepsy treatment and migraine prevention. Oligohydrosis has been described amongst topiramate side effects, favouring the risk of hyperthermia and heatstroke. We present the case of a patient who developed heat stroke due to physical exercise while under topiramate treatment. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Tracheostomy after severe ischemic stroke: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Brian P; Kamel, Hooman; Castro, Brandyn; Kimberly, W Taylor; Sheth, Kevin N

    2014-01-01

    Stroke can result in varying degrees of respiratory failure. Some patients require tracheostomy in order to facilitate weaning from mechanical ventilation, long-term airway protection, or a combination of the two. Little is known about the rate and predictors of this outcome in patients with severe stroke. We aim to determine the rate of tracheostomy after severe ischemic stroke. Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database from 2007 to 2009, patients hospitalized with ischemic stroke were identified based on validated International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision, Clinical Modification codes. Next, patients with stroke were stratified based on whether they were treated with or without decompressive craniectomy, and the rate of tracheostomy for each group was determined. A logistic regression analysis was used to identify predictors of tracheostomy after decompressive craniectomy. Survey weights were used to obtain nationally representative estimates. In 1,550,000 patients discharged with ischemic stroke nationwide, the rate of tracheostomy was 1.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2-1.4%), with a 1.3% (95% CI, 1.1-1.4%) rate in patients without decompressive craniectomy and a 33% (95% CI, 26-39%) rate in the surgical treatment group. Logistic regression analysis identified pneumonia as being significantly associated with tracheostomy after decompressive craniectomy (odds ratio, 3.95; 95% CI, 1.95-6.91). Tracheostomy is common after decompressive craniectomy and is strongly associated with the development of pneumonia. Given its impact on patient function and potentially modifiable associated factors, tracheostomy may warrant further study as an important patient-centered outcome among patients with stroke. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Small heat-shock proteins protect from heat-stroke-associated neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Kourtis, Nikos; Nikoletopoulou, Vassiliki; Tavernarakis, Nektarios

    2012-10-11

    Heat stroke is a life-threatening condition, characterized by catastrophic collapse of thermoregulation and extreme hyperthermia. In recent years, intensification of heat waves has caused a surge of heat-stroke fatalities. The mechanisms underlying heat-related pathology are poorly understood. Here we show that heat stroke triggers pervasive necrotic cell death and neurodegeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans. Preconditioning of animals at a mildly elevated temperature strongly protects from heat-induced necrosis. The heat-shock transcription factor HSF-1 and the small heat-shock protein HSP-16.1 mediate cytoprotection by preconditioning. HSP-16.1 localizes to the Golgi, where it functions with the Ca(2+)- and Mn(2+)-transporting ATPase PMR-1 to maintain Ca(2+) homeostasis under heat stroke. Preconditioning also suppresses cell death inflicted by diverse insults, and protects mammalian neurons from heat cytotoxicity. These findings reveal an evolutionarily conserved mechanism that defends against diverse necrotic stimuli, and may be relevant to heat stroke and other pathological conditions involving necrosis in humans.

  2. Transcriptome Sequencing Reveals Astrocytes as a Therapeutic Target in Heat-Stroke.

    PubMed

    Niu, Bing; Zhang, Tao; Hu, Huaiqiang; Cao, Bingzhen

    2017-07-11

    Heat-stroke is a serious form of hyperthermia with high mortality, and can induce severe central nervous system disorders. The neurovascular unit (NVU), which consists of vascular cells, glial cells, and neurons, controls blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and cerebral blood flow, and maintains the proper functioning of neuronal circuits. However, the detailed function of each BBB component in heat-stroke remains unknown. In order to interpret alterations caused by heat stress, we performed transcriptome comparison of neuron and astrocyte primary cultures after heat treatment. Differentially-expressed genes were then selected and underwent Gene Ontology annotation and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis. Gene-act networks were also constructed, and the expression of pivotal genes was validated by quantitative PCR, as well as single-cell qPCR in heat-stroke rats. Our work provides valuable information on the transcriptional changes in NVU cells after heat stress, reveals the diverse regulatory mechanisms of two of these cellular components, and shows that a cell-type-specific approach may be a promising therapeutic strategy for heat-stroke treatments.

  3. Tracheostomy following severe ischemic stroke: a population based study

    PubMed Central

    Walcott, Brian P.; Kamel, Hooman; Castro, Brandyn; Kimberly, W. Taylor; Sheth, Kevin N.

    2013-01-01

    Goal Stroke can result in varying degrees of respiratory failure. Some patients require tracheostomy in order to facilitate weaning from mechanical ventilation, long-term airway protection, or a combination of the two. Little is known about the rate and predictors of this outcome in patients with severe stroke. We aim to determine the rate of tracheostomy after severe ischemic stroke. Materials & Methods Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database from 2007–2009, patients hospitalized with ischemic stroke were identified based on validated International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification codes. Next, patients with stroke were stratified based on whether they were treated with or without decompressive craniectomy, and the rate of tracheostomy for each group was determined. A logistic regression analysis was used to identify predictors of tracheostomy after decompressive craniectomy. Survey weights were used to obtain nationally representative estimates. Findings In 1,550,000 patients discharged with ischemic stroke nationwide, the rate of tracheostomy was 1.3% (95% CI, 1.2–1.4%), with a 1.3% (95% CI, 1.1–1.4%) rate in patients without decompressive craniectomy and a 33% (95% CI, 26–39%) rate in the surgical-treatment group. Logistic regression analysis identified pneumonia as being significantly associated with tracheostomy after decompressive craniectomy (OR 3.95; 95% CI 1.95–6.91). Conclusion Tracheostomy is common following decompressive craniectomy and is strongly associated with the development of pneumonia. Given its impact on patient function and potentially modifiable associated factors, tracheostomy may warrant further study as an important patient-centered outcome among patients with stroke. PMID:24103666

  4. Dehydration, Heat Stroke, or Hyponatremia? The Recognition, Treatment, and Prevention of Hyponatremia Caused by High Exercise Outdoor Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Brent

    Hyponatremia (severe sodium depletion) has symptoms similar to heat exhaustion and heat stroke and can easily be misdiagnosed. The number of wilderness users and extreme adventure activities has increased in recent years, and more cases are being diagnosed. Given that a 1993 study found that 1 in 10 cases of heat-related illnesses were…

  5. Dehydration, Heat Stroke, or Hyponatremia? The Recognition, Treatment, and Prevention of Hyponatremia Caused by High Exercise Outdoor Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Brent

    Hyponatremia (severe sodium depletion) has symptoms similar to heat exhaustion and heat stroke and can easily be misdiagnosed. The number of wilderness users and extreme adventure activities has increased in recent years, and more cases are being diagnosed. Given that a 1993 study found that 1 in 10 cases of heat-related illnesses were…

  6. Neuroanatomical correlates of severe cardiac arrhythmias in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Frank; Kallmünzer, Bernd; Gutjahr, Isabell; Breuer, Lorenz; Winder, Klemens; Kaschka, Iris; Kloska, Stephan; Doerfler, Arnd; Hilz, Max-Josef; Schwab, Stefan; Köhrmann, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Neurocardiological interactions can cause severe cardiac arrhythmias in patients with acute ischemic stroke. The relationship between the lesion location in the brain and the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias is still discussed controversially. The aim of the present study was to correlate the lesion location with the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Cardiac arrhythmias were systematically assessed in patients with acute ischemic stroke during the first 72 h after admission to a monitored stroke unit. Voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping (VLSM) was used to correlate the lesion location with the occurrence of clinically relevant severe arrhythmias. Overall 150 patients, 56 with right-hemispheric and 94 patients with a left-hemispheric lesion, were eligible to be included in the VLSM study. Severe cardiac arrhythmias were present in 49 of these 150 patients (32.7%). We found a significant association (FDR correction, q < 0.05) between lesions in the right insular, right frontal and right parietal cortex as well as the right amygdala, basal ganglia and thalamus and the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias. Because left- and right-hemispheric lesions were analyzed separately, the significant findings rely on the 56 patients with right-hemispheric lesions. The data indicate that these areas are involved in central autonomic processing and that right-hemispheric lesions located to these areas are associated with an elevated risk for severe cardiac arrhythmias.

  7. Exertional heat stroke in navy and marine personnel: a hot topic.

    PubMed

    Goforth, Carl W; Kazman, Josh B

    2015-02-01

    Although exertional heat stroke is considered a preventable condition, this life-threatening emergency affects hundreds of military personnel annually. Because heat stroke is preventable, it is important that Navy critical care nurses rapidly recognize and treat heat stroke casualties. Combined intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors can quickly lead to heat stroke if not recognized by deployed critical care nurses and other first responders. In addition to initial critical care nursing interventions, such as establishing intravenous access, determining body core temperature, and assessing hemodynamic status, aggressive cooling measures should be initiated immediately. The most important determinant in heat stroke outcome is the amount of time that patients sustain hyperthermia. Heat stroke survival approaches 100% when evidence-based cooling guidelines are followed, but mortality from heat stroke is a significant risk when care is delayed. Navy critical care and other military nurses should be aware of targeted assessments and cooling interventions when heat stroke is suspected during military operations.

  8. Cortex Integrity Relevance in Muscle Synergies in Severe Chronic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    García-Cossio, Eliana; Broetz, Doris; Birbaumer, Niels; Ramos-Murguialday, Ander

    2014-01-01

    Background: Recent experimental evidence has indicated that the motor system coordinates muscle activations through a linear combination of muscle synergies that are specified at the spinal or brainstem networks level. After stroke upper limb impairment is characterized by abnormal patterns of muscle activations or synergies. Objective: This study aimed at characterizing the muscle synergies in severely affected chronic stroke patients. Furthermore, the influence of integrity of the sensorimotor cortex on synergy modularity and its relation with motor impairment was evaluated. Methods: Surface electromyography from 33 severely impaired chronic stroke patients was recorded during 6 bilateral movements. Muscle synergies were extracted and synergy patterns were correlated with motor impairment scales. Results: Muscle synergies extracted revealed different physiological patterns dependent on the preservation of the sensorimotor cortex. Patients without intact sensorimotor cortex showed a high preservation of muscle synergies. On the contrary, patients with intact sensorimotor cortex showed poorer muscle synergies preservation and an increase in new generated synergies. Furthermore, the preservation of muscle synergies correlated positively with hand functionality in patients with intact sensorimotor cortex and subcortical lesions only. Conclusion: Our results indicate that severely paralyzed chronic stroke patient with intact sensorimotor cortex might sculpt new synergy patterns as a response to maladaptive compensatory strategies. PMID:25294998

  9. Exploratory Environmental Tests of Several Heat Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, George P.; Betts, John, Jr.

    1961-01-01

    Exploratory tests have been conducted with several conceptual radiative heat shields of composite construction. Measured transient temperature distributions were obtained for a graphite heat shield without insulation and with three types of insulating materials, and for a metal multipost heat shield, at surface temperatures of approximately 2,000 F and 1,450 F, respectively, by use of a radiant-heat facility. The graphite configurations suffered loss of surface material under repeated irradiation. Temperature distribution calculated for the metal heat shield by a numerical procedure was in good agreement with measured data. Environmental survival tests of the graphite heat shield without insulation, an insulated multipost heat shield, and a stainless-steel-tile heat shield were made at temperatures of 2,000 F and dynamic pressures of approximately 6,000 lb/sq ft, provided by an ethylene-heated jet operating at a Mach number of 2.0 and sea-level conditions. The graphite heat shield survived the simulated aerodynamic heating and pressure loading. A problem area exists in the design and materials for heat-resistant fasteners between the graphite shield and the base structure. The insulated multipost heat shield was found to be superior to the stainless-steel-tile heat shield in retarding heat flow. Over-lapped face-plate joints and surface smoothness of the insulated multi- post heat shield were not adversely affected by the test environment. The graphite heat shield without insulation survived tests made in the acoustic environment of a large air jet. This acoustic environment is random in frequency and has an overall noise level of 160 decibels.

  10. Outcomes in severe middle cerebral artery ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Brian P; Miller, Jennifer C; Kwon, Churl-Su; Sheth, Sameer A; Hiller, Marc; Cronin, Carolyn A; Schwamm, Lee H; Simard, J Marc; Kahle, Kristopher T; Kimberly, W Taylor; Sheth, Kevin N

    2014-08-01

    Severe middle cerebral artery stroke (MCA) is associated with a high rate of morbidity and mortality. We assessed the hypothesis that patient-specific variables may be associated with outcomes. We also sought to describe under-recognized patient-centered outcomes. A consecutive, multi-institution, retrospective cohort of adult patients (≤70 years) was established from 2009 to 2011. We included patients with NIHSS score ≥15 and infarct volume ≥60 mL measured within 48 h of symptom onset. Malignant edema was defined as the development of midline brain shift of ≥5 mm in the first 5 days. Exclusion criterion was enrollment in any experimental trial. A univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to model and predict the factors related to outcomes. 46 patients (29 female, 17 male; mean age 57.3 ± 1.5 years) met study criteria. The mortality rate was 28% (n = 13). In a multivariate analysis, only concurrent anterior cerebral artery (ACA) involvement was associated with mortality (OR 9.78, 95% CI 1.15, 82.8, p = 0.04). In the malignant edema subgroup (n = 23, 58%), 4 died (17%), 7 underwent decompressive craniectomy (30%), 7 underwent tracheostomy (30%), and 15 underwent gastrostomy (65%). Adverse outcomes after severe stroke are common. Concurrent ACA involvement predicts mortality in severe MCA stroke. It is useful to understand the incidence of life-sustaining procedures, such as tracheostomy and gastrostomy, as well as factors that contribute to their necessity.

  11. The Role of Arginase 1 in Post-Stroke Immunosuppression and Ischemic Stroke Severity.

    PubMed

    Petrone, Ashley B; O'Connell, Grant C; Regier, Michael D; Chantler, Paul D; Simpkins, James W; Barr, Taura L

    2016-04-01

    A balanced immune system response plays an important role in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) recovery. Our laboratory has previously identified several immune-related genes, including arginase 1 (ARG1), with altered expression in human AIS patients. The neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) may be a marker of the degree of immune dysregulation following AIS; however, the molecular mechanisms that may mediate the NLR are unknown. The purpose of this study was to (1) examine the relationship between ARG1, NLR, and AIS severity and (2) to utilize principal component analysis (PCA) to statistically model multiple gene expression changes following AIS. AIS patients and stroke-free control subjects were recruited, and blood samples were collected from AIS patients within 24 h of stroke symptom onset. White blood cell differentials were obtained at this time to calculate the NLR. Gene expression was measured using real-time PCR. PCA with varimax rotation was used to develop composite variables consisting of a five-gene profile. ARG1 was positively correlated with NLR (r = 0.57, p = 0.003), neutrophil count (r = 0.526, p = 0.007), NIHSS (r = 0.607, p = 0.001), and infarct volume (r = 0.27, p = 0.051). PCA identified three principal components that explain 84.4 % of variation in the original patient gene dataset comprised of ARG1, LY96, MMP9, s100a12, and PC1 was a significant explanatory variable for NIHSS (p < 0.001) and NLR (p = 0.005). Our study suggests a novel relationship between ARG1, NLR, and stroke severity, and the NLR is an underutilized clinically available biomarker to monitor the post-stroke immune response.

  12. [Sequential enteral nutrition support for patients with severe cerebral stroke].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiefang; He, Xudong; Zhang, Lisan; Hu, Xingyue

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of sequential enteral nutrition support in patients with severe cerebral stroke. Forty-nine patients with severe cerebral stroke met the inclusion criteria were randomly divided into sequential enteral nutrition group (Group A, n=24) and conventional enteral nutrition group (Group B, n=25). Patients in Group A received short-peptide-based enteral nutrition support first, then gradually transferred to intact protein enteral nutrition. Meanwhile, patients in Group B constantly received intact protein enteral nutrition support. The nutritional indexes and the rate of complications were compared between two groups. The nutritional indexes were decreased in both groups within 4 weeks after admission, but the decreasing levels of hemoglobin and albumin in Group A were significantly lower than those in Group B (P<0.05), and the incidence of infections and gastrointestinal hemorrhage in Group A was also lower than that in Group B (P<0.05). However, there were no significant differences in body weight, BMI, triceps skinfold thickness, biceps circumference, arm muscle circumference between two groups (P>0.05). Sequential enteral nutritional support can improve the nutritional status and decrease the incidence of complications in critical patients with cerebral stroke.

  13. Sex Differences in Stroke Subtypes, Severity, Risk Factors, and Outcomes among Elderly Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Yu, Changshen; An, Zhongping; Zhao, Wenjuan; Wang, Wanjun; Gao, Chunlin; Liu, Shoufeng; Wang, Jinghua; Wu, Jialing

    2015-01-01

    Although the age-specific incidence and mortality of stroke is higher among men, stroke has a greater clinical effect on women. However, the sex differences in stroke among elderly patients are unknown. Therefore, we aimed to assess the sex differences in stroke among elderly stroke patients. Between 2005 and 2013, we recruited 1484 consecutive acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients (≥75 years old) from a specialized neurology hospital in Tianjin, China. Information regarding their stroke subtypes, severity, risk factors, and outcomes at 3 and 12 months after stroke were recorded. Comparing with men, women had a significantly higher prevalence of severe stroke (17.20 vs. 12.54%), hypertension (76.42 vs. 66.39%), dyslipidemias (30.35 vs. 22.76%), and obesity (18.40 vs. 9.32%), P < 0.05. Comparing with women, men had a significantly higher prevalence of intracranial artery stenosis (23.11 vs. 17.45%), current smoking (29.60 vs. 13.05%), and alcohol consumption (12.15 vs. 0.47%), P < 0.05. Moreover, dependency was more common among women at 3 and 12 months after stroke, although the sex difference disappeared after adjusting for stroke subtypes, severity, and risk factors. Elderly women with AIS had more severe stroke status and worse outcomes at 3 and 12 months after stroke. Thus, elderly female post-AIS patients are a crucial population that should be assisted with controlling their risk factors for stroke and changing their lifestyle.

  14. An autopsy case of infant death due to heat stroke.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, T; Maeda, H; Takayasu, T; Fujioka, Y; Nakaya, T

    1992-09-01

    We report an autopsy case of infant death due to heat stroke. On a winter day, a 52-day-old female baby was placed under a Japanese electric foot warmer with a coverlet (kotatsu) on an electric carpet warmer in a heated room at home. After about 5 h, the mother noticed that the baby was unconscious and took her to a hospital. Spontaneous respiration, however, was already absent, and the pupils were dilated. The trunk was hot; body temperature was 41.3 degrees C. The skin of the whole body was dry. Autopsy revealed second-degree burn injuries on the left side of the face and the dorsum of the left hand. Numerous marked petechiae and ecchymoses were found in the thymus (capsule and parenchyma), pleurae (visceral and parietal), pericardial cavity (internal and external surfaces), epicardium, and beneath the serosa at the origin of the aorta. In addition, there was congestion in various organs, edema in the brain and lungs, and hemorrhage in the lungs. Histopathologically, macrophages without hemosiderin granules were present in the alveoli. When the heating conditions at the accident were reproduced experimentally, the temperature in the electric kotatsu warmer rose to 50-60 degrees C. Thus, we concluded that misuse of the electric kotatsu caused heat stroke in this infant.

  15. Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Stroke About Stroke Stroke -- A Serious Event A stroke is serious, just ... lifestyle can help you prevent stroke. What Is Stroke? A stroke is sometimes called a "brain attack." ...

  16. Dissociation of severity of stroke and aphasia recovery early after intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Christine; Kappelin, Johan; Perren, Fabienne

    2014-10-01

    Clinical observation suggested to us that aphasia recovers relatively better than other deficits early after intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (IV-rtPA) treatment in stroke patients with minor deficits, while the reverse seemed the case in those with severe deficits. Retrospective analysis of acute ischemic stroke patients with aphasia admitted within 3 hours from symptom onset and treated with IV-rtPA was carried out. Stroke severity, aphasia and global neurological impairment were assessed at admission and 24 hours after thrombolysis. Improvement of aphasia (gain of ⩾ 1 point on the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale [NIHSS] aphasia score) and global neurological improvement (gain of ⩾ 4 points on the NIHSS) were compared in minor strokes (NIHSS ⩽ 7), moderate strokes (NIHSS 8-15), and major strokes (NIH ⩾ 16). Sixty-nine of 243 stroke patients suffered from aphasia. Improvement of aphasia occurred in 7/16 minor strokes, 11/25 moderate strokes, and 7/28 severe strokes. Improvement of ⩾ 4 points on the NIHSS occurred in 3/16 minor strokes, 17/25 moderate strokes and 15/28 severe strokes. There is a significant (X(2)=4.073, p<0.05) dissociation of recovery of aphasia and that of other neurological deficits between minor versus severe strokes. This confirms the clinically suspected dissociation between a good early recovery from aphasia in minor strokes relative to recovery of other neurological deficits, as opposed to a better recovery from other neurological deficits than from aphasia in patients with severe strokes.

  17. Uncooled two-stroke gas engine for heat pump drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badgley, Patrick; McNulty, Dave; Woods, Melvin

    This paper describes the design and analysis of a family of natural gas fueled, uncooled, two-stroke, lean burn, thermal-ignition engines. The engines were designed specifically to meet the requirements dictated by the commercial heat pump application. The engines have a power output ranging from 15 to 100 kW; a thermal efficiency of 36 percent; a mean time between failure greater than 3 years; and a life expectancy of 45,000 hours. To meet these specifications a family of very simple, uncooled, two-stroke cycle engines were designed which have no belts, gears or pumps. The engines utilize crankcase scavenging, lubrication, stratified fuel introduction to prevent raw fuel from escaping with the exhaust gas, and use of ceramic rolling contact bearings. The Thermal Ignition Combustion System (TICS) is used for ignition to enable the engines to operate with a lean mixture and eliminate spark plug erosion.

  18. Mediterranean Diet in patients with acute ischemic stroke: Relationships between Mediterranean Diet score, diagnostic subtype, and stroke severity index.

    PubMed

    Tuttolomondo, Antonino; Casuccio, Alessandra; Buttà, Carmelo; Pecoraro, Rosaria; Di Raimondo, Domenico; Della Corte, Vittoriano; Arnao, Valentina; Clemente, Giuseppe; Maida, Carlo; Simonetta, Irene; Miceli, Giuseppe; Lucifora, Benedetto; Cirrincione, Anna; Di Bona, Danilo; Corpora, Francesca; Maugeri, Rosario; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo; Pinto, Antonio

    2015-11-01

    Adherence to a Mediterranean Diet appears to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease, as well as the risk of death due to cardiovascular disease. No study has addressed the association between diagnostic subtype of stroke and its severity and adherence to a Mediterranean Diet in subjects with acute ischemic stroke. To evaluate the association between Mediterranean Diet adherence, TOAST subtype, and stroke severity by means of a retrospective study. The type of acute ischemic stroke was classified according to the TOAST criteria. All patients admitted to our ward with acute ischemic stroke completed a 137-item validated food-frequency questionnaire adapted to the Sicilian population. A scale indicating the degree of adherence to the traditional Mediterranean Diet was used (Me-Di score: range 0-9). 198 subjects with acute ischemic stroke and 100 control subjects without stroke. Stroke subjects had a lower mean Mediterranean Diet score compared to 100 controls without stroke. We observed a significant positive correlation between Me-Di score and SSS score, whereas we observed a negative relationship between Me-Di score and NIHSS and Rankin scores. Subjects with atherosclerotic (LAAS) stroke subtype had a lower mean Me-Di score compared to subjects with other subtypes. Multinomial logistic regression analysis in a simple model showed a negative relationship between MeDi score and LAAS subtype vs. lacunar subtype (and LAAS vs. cardio-embolic subtype). Patients with lower adherence to a Mediterranean Diet are more likely to have an atherosclerotic (LAAS) stroke, a worse clinical presentation of ischemic stroke at admission and a higher Rankin score at discharge. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Mesenchymal stem cell-based treatments for stroke, neural trauma, and heat stroke.

    PubMed

    Hsuan, Yogi Chang-Yo; Lin, Cheng-Hsien; Chang, Ching-Ping; Lin, Mao-Tsun

    2016-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation has been reported to improve neurological function following neural injury. Many physiological and molecular mechanisms involving MSC therapy-related neuroprotection have been identified. A review is presented of articles that pertain to MSC therapy and diverse brain injuries including stroke, neural trauma, and heat stroke, which were identified using an electronic search (e.g., PubMed), emphasize mechanisms of MSC therapy-related neuroprotection. We aim to discuss neuroprotective mechanisms that underlie the beneficial effects of MSCs in treating stroke, neural trauma, and heatstroke. MSC therapy is promising as a means of augmenting brain repair. Cell incorporation into the injured tissue is not a prerequisite for the beneficial effects exerted by MSCs. Paracrine signaling is believed to be the most important mediator of MSC therapy in brain injury. The multiple mechanisms of action of MSCs include enhanced angiogenesis and neurogenesis, immunomodulation, and anti-inflammatory effects. Microglia are the first source of the inflammatory cascade during brain injury. Cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-6, are significantly produced by microglia in the brain after experimental brain injury. The proinflammatory M1 phenotype of microglia is associated with tissue destruction, whereas the anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype of microglia facilitates repair and regeneration. MSC therapy may improve outcomes of ischemic stroke, neural trauma, and heatstroke by inhibiting the activity of M1 phenotype of microglia but augmenting the activity of M2 phenotype of microglia. This review offers a testable platform for targeting microglial-mediated cytokines in clinical trials based upon the rational design of MSC therapy in the future. MSCs that are derived from the placenta provide a great choice for stem cell therapy. Although targeting the microglial activation is an important approach to

  20. Heat stroke internet searches can be a new heatwave health warning surveillance indicator

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tiantian; Ding, Fan; Sun, Qinghua; Zhang, Yi; Kinney, Patrick L.

    2016-01-01

    The impact of major heatwave shocks on population morbidity and mortality has become an urgent public health concern. However, Current heatwave warning systems suffer from a lack of validation and an inability to provide accurate health risk warnings in a timely way. Here we conducted a correlation and linear regression analysis to test the relationship between heat stroke internet searches and heat stroke health outcomes in Shanghai, China, during the summer of 2013. We show that the resulting heatstroke index captures much of the variation in heat stroke cases and deaths. The correlation between heat stroke deaths, the search index and the incidence of heat stroke is higher than the correlation with maximum temperature. This study highlights a fast and effective heatwave health warning indicator with potential to be used throughout the world. PMID:27869135

  1. Heat stroke internet searches can be a new heatwave health warning surveillance indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tiantian; Ding, Fan; Sun, Qinghua; Zhang, Yi; Kinney, Patrick L.

    2016-11-01

    The impact of major heatwave shocks on population morbidity and mortality has become an urgent public health concern. However, Current heatwave warning systems suffer from a lack of validation and an inability to provide accurate health risk warnings in a timely way. Here we conducted a correlation and linear regression analysis to test the relationship between heat stroke internet searches and heat stroke health outcomes in Shanghai, China, during the summer of 2013. We show that the resulting heatstroke index captures much of the variation in heat stroke cases and deaths. The correlation between heat stroke deaths, the search index and the incidence of heat stroke is higher than the correlation with maximum temperature. This study highlights a fast and effective heatwave health warning indicator with potential to be used throughout the world.

  2. [Psychiatric drugs as risk factor in fatal heat stroke].

    PubMed

    Fijnheer, R; van de Ven, P J; Erkelens, D W

    1995-07-08

    Two men aged 33 and 31 years suffered a fatal heat stroke on a warm summer day. One of them used pimozide and clomipramine, the other zuclopenthixol, dexetimide, droperidol, promethazine and propranolol as psychiatric medication. Both of them had a body temperature > 42.3 degrees C, without perspiring. At first only a comatose situation with practically normal laboratory values existed; this was rapidly followed by massive liver damage, disseminated intravascular coagulation, anaemia, thrombopenia and acute renal failure. In spite of adequate and rapid treatment these complications were fatal. Both patients used medication with an antidopaminergic and anticholinergic (side) effect. The set point of the temperature regulation centre can be elevated by the antidopaminergic activity of antipsychotics. Use of anticholinergic medication can disturb the thermoregulation via inhibition of the parasympathicomimetically mediated sweat secretion. It is recommended to point out the danger of unusually high outdoor temperatures to patients using this medication.

  3. Exertional rhabdomyolysis and heat stroke: Beware of volatile anesthetic sedation

    PubMed Central

    Heytens, Karel; De Bleecker, Jan; Verbrugghe, Walter; Baets, Jonathan; Heytens, Luc

    2017-01-01

    In view of the enormous popularity of mass sporting events such as half-marathons, the number of patients with exertional rhabdomyolysis or exercise-induced heat stroke admitted to intensive care units (ICUs) has increased over the last decade. Because these patients have been reported to be at risk for malignant hyperthermia during general anesthesia, the intensive care community should bear in mind that the same risk of life-threatening rhabdomyolysis is present when these patients are admitted to an ICU, and volatile anesthetic sedation is chosen as the sedative technique. As illustrated by the three case studies we elaborate upon, a thorough diagnostic work-up is needed to clarify the subsequent risk of strenuous exercise, and the anesthetic exposure to volatile agents in these patients and their families. Other contraindications for the use of volatile intensive care sedation consist of known malignant hyperthermia susceptibility, congenital myopathies, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and intracranial hypertension. PMID:28224104

  4. Cortisol levels and the severity and outcomes of acute stroke: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Barugh, Amanda Jayne; Gray, Paul; Shenkin, Susan Deborah; MacLullich, Alasdair Maurice Joseph; Mead, Gillian Elizabeth

    2014-03-01

    Studies in non-stroke patients have shown an association between dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and morbidity and mortality. We conducted a systematic review to evaluate cortisol levels in acute stroke and their associations with outcome. We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE for articles up to April 2013 and PsychINFO for articles up to July 2013, using the keywords "cortisol" and "stroke" and associated terms or synonyms. We included studies published in peer-reviewed journals that recruited 10 or more participants and measured cortisol at least once in the first year following stroke. Data were extracted regarding cortisol levels, including changes over time and their relationship to stroke severity, and outcome. Of 11,240 abstracts, 101 full texts were obtained and 48 fulfilled our inclusion criteria. Cortisol levels were high in the first week after stroke in the majority of studies (26 studies, n = 1,340). Higher cortisol was associated with dependency (8/11 studies, n = 822), delirium (5/6 studies, n = 269) depression (3/5 studies n = 117) and mortality (8/10 studies, n = 856). Five studies adjusted for stroke severity; one found an association between higher cortisol and dependency, and three found an association between higher cortisol and mortality. Cortisol levels are high for at least 7 days after stroke. Elevated cortisol after stroke is associated with dependency, morbidity, and mortality; however, there is insufficient evidence to conclude that these relationships are independent of stroke severity.

  5. A bibliometric analysis of exertional heat stroke research in Web of Science.

    PubMed

    Mao, Zhi; Liu, Chao; Chen, Shuo; Zhu, Zheng-Guo; Kang, Hong-Jun; Zhou, Fei-Hu

    2016-01-01

    Exertional heat stroke is a fatal condition and remains a health problem. This paper evaluates the publication trend regarding exertional heat stroke research between 1996 and 2015 using a bibliometric method. Articles regarding exertional heat stroke research published between 1996 and December 2015 were searched for in the SCI-EXPANDED database of Web of Science. The search results were analyzed with regard to publication year; publication quantity regarding countries/regions, and authors; citation frequency; and journal distribution. CiteSpace (v3.6) was used for a document co-citation visualization analysis. In total, 289 publications on heat stroke were located. After selection, 209 original articles conducted across 28 countries/regions and published in 83 journals were included in the analysis. The USA, Isreal, and France were the most common locations for exertional heat stroke studies. The CiteSpace visualization cluster analysis showed that exertional heat stroke-related mortality and protective measures were constant concerns of research. Research related to exertional heat stroke has been continuous concerned. USA is still the leading country in this field.

  6. Heat and mortality for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in 12 cities of Jiangsu Province, China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lian; Chen, Kai; Chen, Xiaodong; Jing, Yuanshu; Ma, Zongwei; Bi, Jun; Kinney, Patrick L

    2017-12-01

    Little evidence exists on the relationship between heat and subtypes of stroke mortality, especially in China. Moreover, few studies have reported the effect modification by individual characteristics on heat-related stroke mortality. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effect of heat exposure on total, ischemic, and hemorrhagic stroke mortality and its individual modifiers in 12 cities in Jiangsu Province, China during 2009 to 2013. We first used a distributed lag non-linear model with quasi-Poisson regression to examine the city-specific heat-related total, ischemic, and hemorrhagic stroke mortality risks at 99th percentile vs. 75th percentile of daily mean temperature in the whole year for each city, while adjusting for long-term trend, season, relative humidity, and day of the week. Then, we used a random-effects meta-analysis to pool the city-specific risk estimates. We also considered confounding by air pollution and effect modification by gender, age, education level, and death location. Overall, the heat-related mortality risk in 12 Jiangsu cities was 1.54 (95%CI: 1.44 to 1.65) for total stroke, 1.63 (95%CI: 1.48 to 1.80) for ischemic stroke, and 1.36 (95%CI: 1.26 to 1.48) for hemorrhagic stroke, respectively. Estimated total, ischemic, and hemorrhagic stroke mortality risks were higher for women versus men, older people versus younger people, those with low education levels versus high education levels, and deaths that occurred outside of hospital. Air pollutants did not significantly influence the heat-related stroke mortality risk. Heat exposure significantly increased both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke mortality risks in Jiangsu Province, China. Females, the elderly, and those with low education levels are particularly vulnerable to this effect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Cortisol levels and the severity and outcomes of acute stroke: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Paul; Shenkin, Susan Deborah; MacLullich, Alasdair Maurice Joseph; Mead, Gillian Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Studies in non-stroke patients have shown an association between dysregulation of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis and morbidity and mortality. We conducted a systematic review to evaluate cortisol levels in acute stroke and their associations with outcome. We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE for articles up to April 2013 and PsychINFO for articles up to July 2013, using the keywords “cortisol” and “stroke” and associated terms or synonyms. We included studies published in peer-reviewed journals that recruited 10 or more participants and measured cortisol at least once in the first year following stroke. Data were extracted regarding cortisol levels, including changes over time and their relationship to stroke severity, and outcome. Of 11,240 abstracts, 101 full texts were obtained and 48 fulfilled our inclusion criteria. Cortisol levels were high in the first week after stroke in the majority of studies (26 studies, n = 1,340). Higher cortisol was associated with dependency (8/11 studies, n = 822), delirium (5/6 studies, n = 269) depression (3/5 studies n = 117) and mortality (8/10 studies, n = 856). Five studies adjusted for stroke severity; one found an association between higher cortisol and dependency, and three found an association between higher cortisol and mortality. Cortisol levels are high for at least 7 days after stroke. Elevated cortisol after stroke is associated with dependency, morbidity, and mortality; however, there is insufficient evidence to conclude that these relationships are independent of stroke severity. PMID:24477489

  8. [Association between heat wave and stroke mortality in Jiang'an District of Wuhan, China during 2003 to 2010: a time-series analysis].

    PubMed

    Wu, Kai; Zhang, Yunquan; Zhu, Cihua; Ma, Lu; Tan, Xiaodong

    2015-12-01

    wave increased the risk of stroke mortality in Jiang'an District of Wuhan. The effect of heat wave lasted for several days and lagged patterns of the effects of heat wave on stroke mortality were different between females and males and people of different age groups.

  9. Quercetin protects against heat stroke-induced myocardial injury in male rats: Antioxidative and antiinflammatory mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaojing; Lin, Cheng-Hsien; Zhao, Tingbao; Zuo, Dan; Ye, Zhujun; Liu, Lin; Lin, Mao-Tsun

    2017-03-01

    Heat stroke is characterized by hyperthermia, systemic inflammation, and multiple organ failure including arterial hypotension. This definition can be fulfilled by a rat model of heat stroke used in the present study. Anesthetized animals were exposed to heat exposure (43 °C for 70 min) and then returned to room temperature (26 °C) for recovery. One hour before heat exposure, an intraperitoneal dose of quercetin (30 mg/kg) or vehicle (normal saline 1 ml/kg) was administered to the experimental groups of rats. Additional injection was administered immediately after the onset of heat stroke. Immediately after the onset of heat stroke. Vehicle-treated rats displayed (i) hyperthermia; (ii) suppressed left ventricular function; (iii) decreased contents of cardiac total antioxiant capacity (e.g., superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, catalase); (iv) increased contents of cardiac oxidative capacity malondialdehyde and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances; (v) increased cardiac levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6; and (vi) decreased cardiac levels of an anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 10. Histopathologic and survival observation provided supportive evidence for biochemical analyses. These heat stroke reactions all can be significantly attenuated by quercetin therapy. Our data suggest that quercetin therapy might improve outcomes of heat stroke in rats by attenuating excessive hyperthermia as well as myocardial injury. The protective effects of quercetin could be attributed to anti-lipid peroxidative, anti-oxidant, and anti-inflammatory properties.

  10. Synergism of Short-Term Air Pollution Exposures and Neighborhood Disadvantage on Initial Stroke Severity.

    PubMed

    Wing, Jeffrey J; Sánchez, Brisa N; Adar, Sara D; Meurer, William J; Morgenstern, Lewis B; Smith, Melinda A; Lisabeth, Lynda D

    2017-09-27

    Little is known about the relation between environment and stroke severity. We investigated associations between environmental exposures, including neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage and short-term exposure to airborne particulate matter <2.5 μm and ozone, and their interactions with initial stroke severity. First-ever ischemic stroke cases were identified from the Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi project (2000-2012). Associations between pollutants, disadvantage, and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale were modeled using linear and logistic regression with adjustment for demographics and risk factors. Pollutants and disadvantage were modeled individually, jointly, and with interactions. Higher disadvantage scores and previous-day ozone concentrations were associated with higher odds of severe stroke. Higher levels of particulate matter <2.5 μm were associated with higher odds of severe stroke among those in higher disadvantage areas (odds ratio, 1.24; 95% confidence interval, 1.00-1.55) but not in lower disadvantage areas (odds ratio, 0.82; 95% confidence interval, 0.56-1.22; P interaction =0.097). Air pollution exposures and neighborhood socioeconomic status may be important in understanding stroke severity. Future work should consider the multiple levels of influence on this important stroke outcome. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Heat stroke leading to acute liver injury & failure: A case series from the Acute Liver Failure Study Group

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Brian C.; Tillman, Holly; Chung, Raymond T.; Stravitz, Richard T.; Reddy, Rajender; Fontana, Robert J.; McGuire, Brendan; Davern, Timothy; Lee, William M.

    2017-01-01

    Background & Aims In the United States, nearly 1000 annual cases of heat stroke are reported but the frequency and outcome of severe liver injury in such patients is not well described. The aim of this study was to describe cases of acute liver injury (ALI) or failure (ALF) caused by heat stroke in a large ALF registry. Methods Amongst 2675 consecutive subjects enrolled in a prospective observational cohort of patients with ALI or ALF between January 1998 and April 2015, there were eight subjects with heat stroke. Results Five patients had ALF and three had ALI. Seven patients developed acute kidney injury, all eight had lactic acidosis and rhabdomyolysis. Six patients underwent cooling treatments, three received N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), three required mechanical ventilation, three required renal replacement therapy, two received vasopressors, one underwent liver transplantation, and two patients died—both within 48 hours of presentation. All cases occurred between May and August, mainly in healthy young men because of excessive exertion. Conclusions Management of ALI and ALF secondary to heat stroke should focus on cooling protocols and supportive care, with consideration of liver transplantation in refractory patients. PMID:28128878

  12. Exertional heat stroke management strategies in United States high school football.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Zachary Y; Marshall, Stephen W; Comstock, R Dawn; Casa, Douglas J

    2014-01-01

    The 5-year period of 2005-2009 saw more exertional heat stroke-related deaths in organized sports than any other 5-year period in the past 35 years. The risk of exertional heat stroke appears highest in football, particularly during the preseason. To estimate the incidence of exertional heat stroke events and assess the utilization of exertional heat stroke management strategies during the 2011 preseason in United States high school football programs. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. A self-administered online questionnaire addressing the incidence of exertional heat stroke events and utilization of exertional heat stroke management strategies (eg, removing athlete's football equipment, calling Emergency Medical Services [EMS]) was completed in May to June 2012 by 1142 (18.0%) athletic trainers providing care to high school football athletes during the 2011 preseason. Among all respondents, 20.3% reported treating at least 1 exertional heat stroke event. An average of 0.50 ± 1.37 preseason exertional heat stroke events were treated per program. Athletic trainers responding to exertional heat stroke reported using an average of 6.6 ± 1.8 management strategies. The most common management strategies were low-level therapeutic interventions such as removing the athlete's football equipment (98.2%) and clothing (77.8%) and moving the athlete to a shaded area (91.6%). Few athletic trainers reported active management strategies such as calling EMS (29.3%) or using a rectal thermometer to check core body temperature (0.9%). Athletic trainers in states with mandated preseason heat acclimatization guidelines reported a higher utilization of management strategies such as cooling the athlete through air conditioning (90.1% vs 65.0%, respectively; P < .001), immersion in ice water (63.0% vs 45.4%, respectively; P = .01), or fans (54.3% vs 42.0%, respectively; P = .06) and monitoring the athlete's temperature (60.5% vs 46.2%, respectively; P = .04). Preseason

  13. A longitudinal study investigating how stroke severity, disability, and physical function the first week post-stroke are associated with walking speed six months post-stroke.

    PubMed

    Aaslund, Mona Kristin; Moe-Nilssen, Rolf; Gjelsvik, Bente Bassøe; Bogen, Bård; Næss, Halvor; Hofstad, Håkon; Skouen, Jan Sture

    2017-08-17

    To investigate to which degree stroke severity, disability, and physical function the first week post-stroke are associated with preferred walking speed (PWS) at 6 months. Longitudinal observational study. Participants were recruited from a stroke unit and tested within the first week (baseline) and at 6 months post-stroke. Outcome measures were the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), the Barthel Index (BI), modified Rankin Scale (mRS), PWS, Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke (PASS), and the Trunk Impairment Scale modified-Norwegian version. Multiple regression models were used to explore which variables best predict PWS at 6 months, and the Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) curves to determine the cutoffs. A total of 132 participants post-stroke were included and subdivided into two groups based on the ability to produce PWS at baseline. For the participants that could produce PWS at baseline (WSB group), PASS, PWS, and age at baseline predicted PWS at 6 months with an explained variance of 0.77. For the participants that could not produce a PWS at baseline (NoWSB group), only PASS predicted PWS at 6 months with an explained variance of 0.49. For the Walking speed at baseline (WSB) group, cutoffs at baseline for walking faster than 0.8 m/s at 6 months were 30.5 points on the PASS, PWS 0.75 m/s, and age 73.5 years. For the NoWSB group, the cutoff for PASS was 20.5 points. PASS, PWS, and age the first week predicted PWS at 6 months post-stroke for participants with the best walking ability, and PASS alone predicted PWS at 6 months post-stroke for participants with the poorest walking ability.

  14. Role of Acute Lesion Topography in Initial Ischemic Stroke Severity and Long-Term Functional Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ona; Cloonan, Lisa; Mocking, Steven J T; Bouts, Mark J R J; Copen, William A; Cougo-Pinto, Pedro T; Fitzpatrick, Kaitlin; Kanakis, Allison; Schaefer, Pamela W; Rosand, Jonathan; Furie, Karen L; Rost, Natalia S

    2015-09-01

    Acute infarct volume, often proposed as a biomarker for evaluating novel interventions for acute ischemic stroke, correlates only moderately with traditional clinical end points, such as the modified Rankin Scale. We hypothesized that the topography of acute stroke lesions on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging may provide further information with regard to presenting stroke severity and long-term functional outcomes. Data from a prospective stroke repository were limited to acute ischemic stroke subjects with magnetic resonance imaging completed within 48 hours from last known well, admission NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS), and 3-to-6 months modified Rankin Scale scores. Using voxel-based lesion symptom mapping techniques, including age, sex, and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging lesion volume as covariates, statistical maps were calculated to determine the significance of lesion location for clinical outcome and admission stroke severity. Four hundred ninety subjects were analyzed. Acute stroke lesions in the left hemisphere were associated with more severe NIHSS at admission and poor modified Rankin Scale at 3 to 6 months. Specifically, injury to white matter (corona radiata, internal and external capsules, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and uncinate fasciculus), postcentral gyrus, putamen, and operculum were implicated in poor modified Rankin Scale. More severe NIHSS involved these regions, as well as the amygdala, caudate, pallidum, inferior frontal gyrus, insula, and precentral gyrus. Acute lesion topography provides important insights into anatomic correlates of admission stroke severity and poststroke outcomes. Future models that account for infarct location in addition to diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging volume may improve stroke outcome prediction and identify patients likely to benefit from aggressive acute intervention and personalized rehabilitation strategies. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Modeling the Intra- and Extracellular Cytokine Signaling Pathway under Heat Stroke in the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Fernandez, Maria; Grosman, Benyamin; Yuraszeck, Theresa M.; Helwig, Bryan G.; Leon, Lisa R.; Doyle III, Francis J.

    2013-01-01

    Heat stroke (HS) is a life-threatening illness induced by prolonged exposure to a hot environment that causes central nervous system abnormalities and severe hyperthermia. Current data suggest that the pathophysiological responses to heat stroke may not only be due to the immediate effects of heat exposure per se but also the result of a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). The observation that pro- (e.g., IL-1) and anti-inflammatory (e.g., IL-10) cytokines are elevated concomitantly during recovery suggests a complex network of interactions involved in the manifestation of heat-induced SIRS. In this study, we measured a set of circulating cytokine/soluble cytokine receptor proteins and liver cytokine and receptor mRNA accumulation in wild-type and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor knockout mice to assess the effect of neutralization of TNF signaling on the SIRS following HS. Using a systems approach, we developed a computational model describing dynamic changes (intra- and extracellular events) in the cytokine signaling pathways in response to HS that was fitted to novel genomic (liver mRNA accumulation) and proteomic (circulating cytokines and receptors) data using global optimization. The model allows integration of relevant biological knowledge and formulation of new hypotheses regarding the molecular mechanisms behind the complex etiology of HS that may serve as future therapeutic targets. Moreover, using our unique modeling framework, we explored cytokine signaling pathways with three in silico experiments (e.g. by simulating different heat insult scenarios and responses in cytokine knockout strains in silico). PMID:24039931

  16. Modeling the intra- and extracellular cytokine signaling pathway under heat stroke in the liver.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Fernandez, Maria; Grosman, Benyamin; Yuraszeck, Theresa M; Helwig, Bryan G; Leon, Lisa R; Doyle, Francis J

    2013-01-01

    Heat stroke (HS) is a life-threatening illness induced by prolonged exposure to a hot environment that causes central nervous system abnormalities and severe hyperthermia. Current data suggest that the pathophysiological responses to heat stroke may not only be due to the immediate effects of heat exposure per se but also the result of a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). The observation that pro- (e.g., IL-1) and anti-inflammatory (e.g., IL-10) cytokines are elevated concomitantly during recovery suggests a complex network of interactions involved in the manifestation of heat-induced SIRS. In this study, we measured a set of circulating cytokine/soluble cytokine receptor proteins and liver cytokine and receptor mRNA accumulation in wild-type and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor knockout mice to assess the effect of neutralization of TNF signaling on the SIRS following HS. Using a systems approach, we developed a computational model describing dynamic changes (intra- and extracellular events) in the cytokine signaling pathways in response to HS that was fitted to novel genomic (liver mRNA accumulation) and proteomic (circulating cytokines and receptors) data using global optimization. The model allows integration of relevant biological knowledge and formulation of new hypotheses regarding the molecular mechanisms behind the complex etiology of HS that may serve as future therapeutic targets. Moreover, using our unique modeling framework, we explored cytokine signaling pathways with three in silico experiments (e.g. by simulating different heat insult scenarios and responses in cytokine knockout strains in silico).

  17. The Effects of Exercise, Heat, and Microclimate Cooling on Terminal Stroke Volume in Men and Women

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    NAVAL HEALTH RESEARCH CENTER THE EFFECTS OF EXERCISE, HEAT AND MICROCLIMATE COOLING ON TERMINAL STROKE VOLUME IN MEN AND WOMEN...20372-5300 THE EFFECTS OF EXERCISE, HEAT AND MICROCLIMATE COOLING ON TERMINAL STROKE VOLUME IN MEN AND WOMEN Naval Health Research Center...We have previously reported that in lieu of the more common end-of-test criteria such as core temperature < 39°C, and heart rate (HR) < 180 bpm

  18. Mitochondrial Impairment in Cerebrovascular Endothelial Cells is Involved in the Correlation between Body Temperature and Stroke Severity

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Heng; Doll, Danielle N.; Sun, Jiahong; Lewis, Sara E.; Wimsatt, Jeffrey H.; Kessler, Matthew J.; Simpkins, James W.; Ren, Xuefang

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is the second leading cause of death worldwide. The prognostic influence of body temperature on acute stroke in patients has been recently reported; however, hypothermia has confounded experimental results in animal stroke models. This work aimed to investigate how body temperature could prognose stroke severity as well as reveal a possible mitochondrial mechanism in the association of body temperature and stroke severity. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) compromises mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in cerebrovascular endothelial cells (CVECs) and worsens murine experimental stroke. In this study, we report that LPS (0.1 mg/kg) exacerbates stroke infarction and neurological deficits, in the mean time LPS causes temporary hypothermia in the hyperacute stage during 6 hours post-stroke. Lower body temperature is associated with worse infarction and higher neurological deficit score in the LPS-stroke study. However, warming of the LPS-stroke mice compromises animal survival. Furthermore, a high dose of LPS (2 mg/kg) worsens neurological deficits, but causes persistent severe hypothermia that conceals the LPS exacerbation of stroke infarction. Mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I inhibitor, rotenone, replicates the data profile of the LPS-stroke study. Moreover, we have confirmed that rotenone compromises mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in CVECs. Lastly, the pooled data analyses of a large sample size (n=353) demonstrate that stroke mice have lower body temperature compared to sham mice within 6 hours post-surgery; the body temperature is significantly correlated with stroke outcomes; linear regression shows that lower body temperature is significantly associated with higher neurological scores and larger infarct volume. We conclude that post-stroke body temperature predicts stroke severity and mitochondrial impairment in CVECs plays a pivotal role in this hypothermic response. These novel findings suggest that body temperature is prognostic for

  19. Mitochondrial Impairment in Cerebrovascular Endothelial Cells is Involved in the Correlation between Body Temperature and Stroke Severity.

    PubMed

    Hu, Heng; Doll, Danielle N; Sun, Jiahong; Lewis, Sara E; Wimsatt, Jeffrey H; Kessler, Matthew J; Simpkins, James W; Ren, Xuefang

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is the second leading cause of death worldwide. The prognostic influence of body temperature on acute stroke in patients has been recently reported; however, hypothermia has confounded experimental results in animal stroke models. This work aimed to investigate how body temperature could prognose stroke severity as well as reveal a possible mitochondrial mechanism in the association of body temperature and stroke severity. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) compromises mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in cerebrovascular endothelial cells (CVECs) and worsens murine experimental stroke. In this study, we report that LPS (0.1 mg/kg) exacerbates stroke infarction and neurological deficits, in the mean time LPS causes temporary hypothermia in the hyperacute stage during 6 hours post-stroke. Lower body temperature is associated with worse infarction and higher neurological deficit score in the LPS-stroke study. However, warming of the LPS-stroke mice compromises animal survival. Furthermore, a high dose of LPS (2 mg/kg) worsens neurological deficits, but causes persistent severe hypothermia that conceals the LPS exacerbation of stroke infarction. Mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I inhibitor, rotenone, replicates the data profile of the LPS-stroke study. Moreover, we have confirmed that rotenone compromises mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in CVECs. Lastly, the pooled data analyses of a large sample size (n=353) demonstrate that stroke mice have lower body temperature compared to sham mice within 6 hours post-surgery; the body temperature is significantly correlated with stroke outcomes; linear regression shows that lower body temperature is significantly associated with higher neurological scores and larger infarct volume. We conclude that post-stroke body temperature predicts stroke severity and mitochondrial impairment in CVECs plays a pivotal role in this hypothermic response. These novel findings suggest that body temperature is prognostic for

  20. Wolf Motor Function Test for Characterizing Moderate to Severe Hemiparesis in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hodics, Timea M.; Nakatsuka, Kyle; Upreti, Bhim; Alex, Arun; Smith, Patricia S.; Pezzullo, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To extend the applicability of the Wolf Motor Function test (WMFT) to describe the residual functional abilities of moderate-to-severely affected stroke patients. The WMFT is a motor function test for mild to moderate upper extremity weakness in stroke patients, but it has not been routinely used for evaluation of more severe hemiparetic stroke patients due to its numerical characteristics. Design Data was collected as part of two double-blind sham controlled randomized interventional studies, the Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) in Chronic Stroke Recovery and tDCS Enhanced Stroke Recovery and Cortical Reorganization. Stroke patients were evaluated with the upper-extremity Fugl-Meyer (UFM) and the WMFT in the same setting prior to treatment. Setting University inpatient rehabilitation and outpatient clinic. Participants 32 stroke patients with moderate-to-severe hemiparesis enrolled in the tDCS in Chronic Stroke Recovery and tDCS Enhanced Stroke Recovery and Cortical Reorganization studies. Intervention Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures WMFT scores were calculated using 1) median performance times, 2) new calculation using the mean rate of performance. We compared the distribution of values from the two methods and examined the WMFT-UFM correlation for the traditional and the new calculation. Results WMFT rate values were more evenly distributed across their range than median WMFT time scores. The association between the WMFT rate and UFM was as good as the association between the median WMFT time scores and UFM (Spearman rs 0.84 vs −0.79). Conclusions The new WMFT mean rate of performance is valid and a more sensitive measure in describing the functional activities of the moderate to severely affected upper extremity of stroke subjects and avoids the pitfalls of the median WMFT time calculations. PMID:22579647

  1. Use of Antihypertensive Drugs and Ischemic Stroke Severity - Is There a Role for Angiotensin-II?

    PubMed

    Hwong, Wen Yea; Bots, Michiel L; Selvarajah, Sharmini; Abdul Aziz, Zariah; Sidek, Norsima Nazifah; Spiering, Wilko; Kappelle, L Jaap; Vaartjes, Ilonca

    2016-01-01

    The increase in angiotensin II (Ang II) formation by selected antihypertensive drugs is said to exhibit neuroprotective properties, but this translation into improvement in clinical outcomes has been inconclusive. We undertook a study to investigate the relationship between types of antihypertensive drugs used prior to a stroke event and ischemic stroke severity. We hypothesized that use of antihypertensive drugs that increase Ang II formation (Ang II increasers) would reduce ischemic stroke severity when compared to antihypertensive drugs that suppress Ang II formation (Ang II suppressors). From the Malaysian National Neurology Registry, we included hypertensive patients with first ischemic stroke who presented within 48 hours from ictus. Antihypertensive drugs were divided into Ang II increasers (angiotensin-I receptor blockers (ARBs), calcium channel blockers (CCBs) and diuretics) and Ang II suppressors (angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and beta blockers). We evaluated stroke severity during admission with the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). We performed a multivariable logistic regression with the score being dichotomized at 15. Scores of less than 15 were categorized as less severe stroke. A total of 710 patients were included. ACEIs was the most commonly prescribed antihypertensive drug in patients using Ang II suppressors (74%) and CCBs, in patients prescribed with Ang II increasers at 77%. There was no significant difference in the severity of ischemic stroke between patients who were using Ang II increasers in comparison to patients with Ang II suppressors (OR: 1.32, 95%CI: 0.83-2.10, p = 0.24). In our study, we found that use of antihypertensive drugs that increase Ang II formation was not associated with less severe ischemic stroke as compared to use of antihypertensive drugs that suppress Ang II formation.

  2. [Disability after stroke: a longitudinal study in moderate and severe stroke patients included in a multidisciplinary rehabilitation program].

    PubMed

    Noe-Sebastian, E; Balasch-Bernat, M; Colomer-Font, C; Moliner-Munoz, B; Rodriguez Sanchez-Leiva, C; Ugart, P; Llorens, R; Ferri-Campos, J

    2017-05-01

    Stroke is a recognized cause of disability among adults. However the impact that the deficits that occur after a moderate/severe stroke have on long-term disability, as well as the response of the resultant deficits to rehabilitation, are not completely understood. A total of 396 patients with a modified Rankin score >= 3 after an ischemic (n = 221) or hemorrhagic (n = 175) stroke were included in this study. All patients were assessed with cognitive, behavior, emotional, motor and functional domains. All patients were assessed at baseline and six months after inclusion in a multidisciplinary rehabilitation program. Risk of falling (Berg Balance Scale < 45 in 83.1% of the sample at baseline and 49.5% at follow-up) and functional problems (82.8% with a Barthel Index < 75 at baseline and 53% at follow-up) were the most prevalent deficits. Emotional disturbances were those that most improved while behavioral problems were those that did less. Although global disability improved during treatment among most patients, only 11% of our patients, especially those with preserved cognitive function at baseline, could be classified as patients with mild disability at follow-up. Stroke consequences are multidimensional. The symptoms that the stroke can cause in multiple domains, as well as the pattern of recovery are widely diverse, with prevalence of behavioral long-term disturbances.

  3. Developing a stroke severity index based on administrative data was feasible using data mining techniques.

    PubMed

    Sung, Sheng-Feng; Hsieh, Cheng-Yang; Kao Yang, Yea-Huei; Lin, Huey-Juan; Chen, Chih-Hung; Chen, Yu-Wei; Hu, Ya-Han

    2015-11-01

    Case-mix adjustment is difficult for stroke outcome studies using administrative data. However, relevant prescription, laboratory, procedure, and service claims might be surrogates for stroke severity. This study proposes a method for developing a stroke severity index (SSI) by using administrative data. We identified 3,577 patients with acute ischemic stroke from a hospital-based registry and analyzed claims data with plenty of features. Stroke severity was measured using the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). We used two data mining methods and conventional multiple linear regression (MLR) to develop prediction models, comparing the model performance according to the Pearson correlation coefficient between the SSI and the NIHSS. We validated these models in four independent cohorts by using hospital-based registry data linked to a nationwide administrative database. We identified seven predictive features and developed three models. The k-nearest neighbor model (correlation coefficient, 0.743; 95% confidence interval: 0.737, 0.749) performed slightly better than the MLR model (0.742; 0.736, 0.747), followed by the regression tree model (0.737; 0.731, 0.742). In the validation cohorts, the correlation coefficients were between 0.677 and 0.725 for all three models. The claims-based SSI enables adjusting for disease severity in stroke studies using administrative data. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Social deprivation and stroke severity on admission: a French cohort study in Burgundy and the West Indies - Guyana region.

    PubMed

    Béjot, Y; Guilloteau, A; Joux, J; Lannuzel, A; Mimeau, E; Mislin-Tritsch, C; Fournel, I; Bonithon-Kopp, C

    2017-05-01

    Although there is growing and convincing evidence that socially deprived patients are at higher risk of stroke and worse outcomes, it remains controversial whether or not they suffer more severe stroke. This study aimed to evaluate the influence of social deprivation on initial clinical severity in patients with stroke. A total of 1536 consecutive patients with an acute first-ever stroke (both ischaemic stroke and intracerebral hemorrhage) were prospectively enrolled from six French study centers. Stroke severity on admission was measured by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score. Social deprivation was assessed at the individual level by the Evaluation de la Précarité et des Inégalités de santé dans les Centres d'Examen de Santé (EPICES) score, a validated multidimensional questionnaire, and several additional single socioeconomic indicators. Polytomous logistic regression analyses were performed to evaluate the association between social deprivation and stroke severity. In univariate analysis, the EPICES score (P = 0.039) and level of education (P = 0.018) were the only two socioeconomic variables associated with stroke severity. Multivariate analysis of the association between EPICES and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores showed that more deprived patients presented a significantly higher risk of both mild and moderate/severe stroke (odds ratio for mild versus minor stroke, 1.39; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.84; odds ratio for moderate/severe versus minor stroke, 1.44; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-1.92). A non-significant trend towards a higher risk of both mild and moderate/severe stroke in less educated patients was observed. Social deprivation was associated with a more severe clinical presentation in patients with stroke. These findings may contribute to the worse outcome after stroke in deprived patients, and underline the need for strategies to reduce social inequalities for stroke. © 2017 EAN.

  5. Stroke Severity and Comorbidity Index for Prediction of Mortality after Ischemic Stroke from the Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive-Acute Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Phan, Thanh G; Clissold, Benjamin; Ly, John; Ma, Henry; Moran, Chris; Srikanth, Velandai

    2016-04-01

    There is increasing interest in the use of administrative data (incorporating comorbidity index) and stroke severity score to predict ischemic stroke mortality. The aim of this study was to determine the optimal timing for the collection of stroke severity data and the minimum clinical dataset to be included in models of stroke mortality. To address these issues, we chose the Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive (VISTA), which contains National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) on admission and at 24 hours, as well as outcome at 90 days. VISTA was searched for patients who had baseline and 24-hour NIHSS. Improvement in regression models was performed by the net reclassification improvement (NRI) method. The clinical data among 5206 patients were mean age, 69 ± 13; comorbidity index, 3.3 ± .9; median NIHSS at baseline, 12 (interquartile range [IQR] 8-17); NIHSS at 24 hours, 9 (IQR 8-15); and death at 90 days in 15%. The baseline model consists of age, gender, and comorbidity index. Adding the baseline NIHSS to model 1 improved the NRI by 0.671 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.595-0.747) [or 67.1% correct reclassification between model 1 and model 2]. Adding the 24 hour NIHSS term to model 1 (model 3) improved the NRI by 0.929 (95% CI 0.857-1.000) for model 3 versus model 1. Adding the variable thrombolysis to model 3 (model 4) improve NRI by 0.1 (95% CI 0.023-0.178) [model 4 versus model 3]. The optimal model for the prediction of mortality was achieved by adding the 24-hour NIHSS and thrombolysis to the baseline model. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Severe edentulism is a major risk factor influencing stroke incidence in rural Ecuador (The Atahualpa Project).

    PubMed

    Del Brutto, Oscar H; Mera, Robertino M; Zambrano, Mauricio; Del Brutto, Victor J

    2017-02-01

    Background There is no information on stroke incidence in rural areas of Latin America, where living conditions and cardiovascular risk factors are different from urban centers. Aim Using a population-based prospective cohort study design, we aimed to assess risk factors influencing stroke incidence in community-dwelling adults living in rural Ecuador. Methods First-ever strokes occurring from 1 June 2012 to 31 May 2016, in Atahualpa residents aged ≥40 years, were identified from yearly door-to-door surveys and other overlapping sources. Poisson regression models adjusted for demographics, cardiovascular risk factors, edentulism and the length of observation time per subject were used to estimate stroke incidence rate ratio as well as factors influencing such incidence. Results Of 807 stroke-free individuals prospectively enrolled in the Atahualpa Project, follow-up was achieved in 718 (89%), contributing 2,499 years of follow-up (average 3.48 ± 0.95 years). Overall stroke incidence rate was 2.97 per 100 person-years of follow-up (95% CI: 1.73-4.2), which increased to 4.77 (95% CI: 1.61-14.1) when only persons aged ≥57 years were considered. Poisson regression models, adjusted for relevant confounders, showed that high blood pressure (IRR: 5.24; 95% CI: 2.55-7.93) and severe edentulism (IRR: 5.06; 95% CI: 2.28-7.85) were the factors independently increasing stroke incidence. Conclusions Stroke incidence in this rural setting is comparable to that reported from the developed world. Besides age and high blood pressure, severe edentulism is a major factor independently predicting incident strokes. Public awareness of the consequences of poor dental care might reduce stroke incidence in rural settings.

  7. The association between OPG rs3102735 gene polymorphism, microembolic signal and stroke severity in acute ischemic stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongqin; Cao, Yanyan; Chen, Honghua; Xu, Wanqun; Sun, Ximei; Pan, Xudong

    2017-05-20

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily and is involved in the progress of atherosclerosis. We chose a gene polymorphism locus, OPG rs3102735, to explore how OPG gene polymorphisms relate to the occurrence of ischemic stroke and microembolic signals and to evaluate their relationship with the severity of neurologic deficits at admission and the degree of vascular stenosis. We studied 251 patients diagnosed with large artery atherosclerosis (LAA) stroke and 121 controls. The LAA stroke patients were divided into clinical subgroups according to the presence of microembolic signals, severity of neurologic deficits at admission, and the degree of vascular stenosis. The OPG rs3102735 gene polymorphism was examined by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism. The microembolic signals (MES) were monitored by transcranial Doppler (TCD) for 60min within 72h of stroke onset. The severity of neurologic deficits at admission was evaluated by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). The CC+CT genotypes and allele C frequencies of the rs3102735 gene polymorphism were significantly higher in the LAA group than in the control group (39% vs. 25.6%, P=0.026; 21.7% vs.13.2%, P=0.006), higher in MES-positive compared to MES-negative patients (58.7% vs. 32.4%, P<0.01; 34.1% vs.17.6%, P<0.01), and higher in patients with an NIHSS Score (≥6) than in those with an NIHSS Score (<6) (46.9% vs.33.3%, P=0.031; 43.4% vs.18.3%, P=0.04). However, the genotypes and allele frequencies of SNPs in rs3102735 did not show significant differences in the degree of vascular stenosis (P>0.05). Our findings suggest that the OPG rs3102735 gene polymorphism might be related to the occurrence of LAA ischemic stroke, microembolic signals and stroke severity and not the degree of vascular stenosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Validation of a novel claims-based stroke severity index in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Ling-Chien; Sung, Sheng-Feng; Hsieh, Cheng-Yang; Hu, Ya-Han; Lin, Huey-Juan; Chen, Yu-Wei; Yang, Yea-Huei Kao; Lin, Sue-Jane

    2016-01-01

    Background Stroke severity is an important outcome predictor for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) but is typically unavailable in administrative claims data. We validated a claims-based stroke severity index (SSI) in patients with ICH in Taiwan. Methods Consecutive ICH patients from hospital-based stroke registries were linked with a nationwide claims database. Stroke severity, assessed using the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), and functional outcomes, assessed using the modified Rankin Scale (mRS), were obtained from the registries. The SSI was calculated based on billing codes in each patient's claims. We assessed two types of criterion-related validity (concurrent validity and predictive validity) by correlating the SSI with the NIHSS and the mRS. Logistic regression models with or without stroke severity as a continuous covariate were fitted to predict mortality at 3, 6, and 12 months. Results The concurrent validity of the SSI was established by its significant correlation with the admission NIHSS (r = 0.731; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.705–0.755), and the predictive validity was verified by its significant correlations with the 3-month (r = 0.696; 95% CI, 0.665–0.724), 6-month (r = 0.685; 95% CI, 0.653–0.715) and 1-year (r = 0.664; 95% CI, 0.622–0.702) mRS. Mortality models with NIHSS had the highest area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, followed by models with SSI and models without any marker of stroke severity. Conclusions The SSI appears to be a valid proxy for the NIHSS and an effective adjustment for stroke severity in studies of ICH outcome with administrative claims data. PMID:28135194

  9. The real estate factor: quantifying the impact of infarct location on stroke severity.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Nina M; Ay, Hakan; Wang Zhu, Ming; Lopez, Chloe J; Singhal, Aneesh B; Karonen, Jari O; Aronen, Hannu J; Liu, Yawu; Nuutinen, Juho; Koroshetz, Walter J; Sorensen, A Gregory

    2007-01-01

    The severity of the neurological deficit after ischemic stroke is moderately correlated with infarct volume. In the current study, we sought to quantify the impact of location on neurological deficit severity and to delineate this impact from that of volume. We developed atlases consisting of location-weighted values indicating the relative importance in terms of neurological deficit severity for every voxel of the brain. These atlases were applied to 80 first-ever ischemic stroke patients to produce estimates of clinical deficit severity. Each patient had an MRI and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) examination just before or soon after hospital discharge. The correlation between the location-based deficit predictions and measured neurological deficit (NIHSS) scores were compared with the correlation obtained using volume alone to predict the neurological deficit. Volume-based estimates of neurological deficit severity were only moderately correlated with measured NIHSS scores (r=0.62). The combination of volume and location resulted in a significantly better correlation with clinical deficit severity (r=0.79, P=0.032). The atlas methodology is a feasible way of integrating infarct size and location to predict stroke severity. It can estimate stroke severity better than volume alone.

  10. Effect of prior medical treatments on ischemic stroke severity and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Sacco, Simona; Toni, Danilo; Bignamini, Angelo A.; Zaninelli, Augusto; Gensini, Gian Franco; Carolei, Antonio

    Summary Antiplatelets, antihypertensives, and statins might reduce the severity of the event or improve outcome in patients who, despite prior medical treatment, have a stroke. We evaluated, in patients who had an ischemic stroke, the effect, on stroke severity and outcome, of prior treatment with antiplatelets, antihypertensives, and statins, used either alone or in a three-drug combination. Stroke in Italy and Related Impact on Outcome (SIRIO) was a prospective, nationwide, multicenter, hospital-based, observational study that included patients aged ≥18 years with acute ischemic stroke. We studied 2,529 acute ischemic stroke patients from the SIRIO population: 887 were antiplatelet users, 1,497 antihypertensive users, 231 statin users, and 138 three-drug combination users prior to the index event. The adjusted logistic regression analysis showed an association between prior treatment with statins and good functional outcome at discharge, while prior treatment with antiplatelets, antihypertensives or the three-drug combination did not influence severity or outcome. The absolute probability of a good functional outcome was 46.3% (95% CI: 40.3%–53.2%) in statin users and 36.7% (95% CI: 34.7%–38.7%) in non-users of statins; the absolute risk difference was 9.6% (95% CI: 2.9%–16.4%; p=0.004). Prior treatment with antiplatelets, antihypertensives, or the three-drug combination did not influence stroke severity or outcome, while prior treatment with statins did not influence stroke severity but was associated with a better functional outcome. PMID:22152434

  11. ["Heat stroke" and/or "Malin's syndrome" in a patient treated with fluphenazine decanoate].

    PubMed

    Ginestet, D; Plumecoq, C; Farine, K; Brion, S

    1977-01-01

    The role of the "heat stroke" is discussed on account of an observation of hyperthermia (42 degrees C or 107.6 Farenheit) that occured with a patient under fluphenazine decanoate, during the summer 1976 heat wave. Contrary to the American descriptions of heat strokes, the patient kept his perspiring ability. Moreover, there was no hypertonic extrapyramidal syndrome, but hypotonia instead. It is to be noted that the preliminary treatment by the corresponding standard neuroleptic (fluphenazine chlorhydrate) did not prevent that hyperthermia whose evolution was rapidly favorable.

  12. Duration of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation in cryptogenic stroke is not associated with stroke severity and early outcomes.

    PubMed

    Liantinioti, Chrissoula; Tympas, Konstantinos; Katsanos, Aristeidis H; Parissis, John; Chondrogianni, Maria; Zompola, Christina; Papadimitropoulos, Georgios; Ioakeimidis, Michael; Triantafyllou, Sokratis; Roussopoulou, Andromaxi; Voumvourakis, Konstantinos; Lekakis, John; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Stefanis, Leonidas; Tsivgoulis, Georgios

    2017-05-15

    The current definition of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF) requires an arbitrary cut-off of >30s, but in clinical practice cryptogenic stroke (CS) patients with PAF duration of ≤30s are not usually excluded from anticoagulation therapy. We sought to evaluate the clinical relevance of short-duration (≤30s) PAF in CS. Consecutive CS patients with no prior AF history and sinus-rhythm on baseline electrocardiography (ECG) were prospectively evaluated over a three-year period. Baseline stroke severity was assessed by NIHSS-scores. All patients underwent 24-hour Holter-ECG during hospitalization. ECG recordings were analyzed by two blinded investigators using dedicated analysis software. Total time in AF was calculated as the sum of each individual AF episode for patients with multiple episodes during monitoring. Patients were dichotomized in two groups using PAF total duration (≤30s & >30s). Early recurrent stroke and favorable functional outcome (FFO, defined as mRS-grades of 0-1) were evaluated during a three-month follow-up period. A total of 184 patients (66% men, mean age 57±11years) with CS (median NIHSS-score 4, IQR: 2-7) were evaluated. PAF of any duration was detected in 23 individuals (13%; 95%CI: 8%-18%). Among these patients the prevalence of brief PAF was 57% (n=13). The two groups did not differ (p>0.2) in terms of demographics, vascular risk factors and NIHSS-scores. Early recurrent stroke and FFO rates were similar (p>0.4) in the two groups. Duration of PAF is not associated with baseline stroke severity and early outcomes in patients with CS and should not influence anticoagulation decision in these patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Severity and outcome of acute stroke in women: relation to adrenal sex steroid levels.

    PubMed

    Pappa, Theodora; Vemmos, Konstantinos; Saltiki, Katerina; Mantzou, Emilia; Stamatelopoulos, Kimon; Alevizaki, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Adrenal sex steroids exert diverse metabolic and neurobiological actions. Their levels have been associated with cardiovascular disease, but data concerning cerebrovascular disease are lacking. The objective of our study was to investigate the role of adrenal sex steroids in a female population suffering an acute stroke. We addressed the question of whether their levels are associated with disease severity and prognosis. A 2-year cohort study was performed in 2 tertiary hospitals, where we prospectively studied 302 consecutive postmenopausal female patients hospitalized for an acute stroke. Neurological severity on admission was assessed by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale; and handicap 1 month after stroke, with the modified Rankin Scale. Δ4-androstenedione levels were positively and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate was inversely associated with stroke severity (r = 0.142, P = .014 and r = -0.153, P = .008, respectively), and both parameters remained as significant determinants even after entering other confounders in the multivariate model (r = 0.118, P = .039 and r = -0.150, P = .011, respectively). Levels of Δ4-androstenedione were significantly associated with 1-month mortality in the multivariate analysis (odds ratio with 95% confidence intervals: 1.540 [1.107-2.138)], P = .010). Δ4-androstenedione and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate levels were associated with poor outcome in the univariate analysis, that is, combined severe handicap (modified Rankin Scale ≥4) and death, 1 month poststroke, although this was not significant in the multivariate analysis. Adrenal sex steroids, and especially Δ4-androstenedione, are significantly associated with stroke severity on admission and short-term prognosis among female stroke subjects. Well-designed prospective studies will further clarify their role in cerebrovascular disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A systems biology approach to heat stress, heat injury, and heat stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stallings, Jonathan D.; Ippolito, Danielle L.

    2015-05-01

    Heat illness is a major source of injury for military populations in both deployed and training settings. Developing tools to help leaders enhance unit performance while reducing the risk of injury is of paramount importance to the military. Here, we review our recent systems biology approaches to heat stress in order to develop a 3-dimensional (3D) realistic thermoregulation model, identify the molecular basis and mediators of injury, and characterize associated biomarkers. We discuss the implications of our work, future directions, and the type of tools necessary to enhance force health protection in the future.

  15. Predicting recovery of voluntary upper extremity movement in subacute stroke patients with severe upper extremity paresis.

    PubMed

    Koh, Chia-Lin; Pan, Shin-Liang; Jeng, Jiann-Shing; Chen, Bang-Bin; Wang, Yen-Ho; Hsueh, I-Ping; Hsieh, Ching-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Prediction of voluntary upper extremity (UE) movement recovery is largely unknown in patients with little voluntary UE movement at admission. The present study aimed to investigate (1) the extent and variation of voluntary UE movement recovery, and (2) the best predictive model of the recovery of voluntary UE movement by clinical variables in patients with severe UE paresis. Prospective cohort study. 140 (out of 590) stroke patients with severe UE paresis completed all assessments. Voluntary UE movement was assessed using the UE subscale of the Stroke Rehabilitation Assessment of Movement (STREAM-UE). Two outcome measures, STREAM-UE scores at discharge (DC(STREAM-UE)) and changes between admission and discharge (Δ(STREAM-UE)), were investigated to represent the final states and improvement of the recovery of voluntary UE movement. Stepwise regression analyses were used to investigate 19 clinical variables and to find the best predictive models of the two outcome measures. The participants showed wide variation in both DC(STREAM-UE) and Δ(STREAM-UE). 3.6% of the participants almost fully recovered at discharge (DC(STREAM-UE) > 15). A large improvement (Δ(STREAM-UE) >= 10) occurred in 16.4% of the participants, while 32.9% of the participants did not have any improvement. The four predictors for the DC(STREAM-UE) (R(2) = 35.0%) were 'baseline STREAM-UE score', 'hemorrhagic stroke', 'baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score', and 'cortical lesion excluding primary motor cortex'. The three predictors for the Δ(STREAM-UE) (R(2) = 22.0%) were 'hemorrhagic stroke', 'baseline NIHSS score', and 'cortical lesion excluding primary motor cortex'. Recovery of voluntary UE movement varied widely in patients with severe UE paresis after stroke. The predictive power of clinical variables was poor. Both results indicate the complex nature of voluntary UE movement recovery in patients with severe UE paresis after stroke.

  16. Fatal heat stroke in children found in parked cars: autopsy findings.

    PubMed

    Adato, Berliz; Dubnov-Raz, Gal; Gips, Hadas; Heled, Yuval; Epstein, Yoram

    2016-09-01

    A common and unfortunate cause for heat stroke-related deaths in children is entrapment in closed vehicles. The aim of this study was to analyze the pathological consequences of such grave events. Autopsy reports of all children that were brought to a national forensic medicine center after being found dead in closed vehicles over a 21-year period (1995-2015) were reviewed. Data extracted were the circumstances of the events, child age, sex, height and weight, time, date and duration of entrapment, and environmental temperatures at the time of entrapment and the autopsy findings. Eight deceased children were brought to the forensic medicine center for autopsy, and seven families consented to the procedure. Autopsy findings included diffuse petechiae and hemorrhages of serosal membranes (n = 7/7) and lung congestion (n = 3/7). Typical autopsy findings following classical heat stroke in children include diffuse petechiae and hemorrhages and lung involvement. These findings are similar to those reported in adults that had died following exertional heat stroke-a very different mechanism of heat accumulation. Prevention of future events can possibly be obtained by public education on the rapid heating of closed vehicles, the vulnerability of children to heat, and the caregiver role in child entrapment. • A common and unfortunate cause for heat stroke-related deaths in children is entrapment in closed vehicles. The pathological consequences of such grave events have not been previously reported. What is New: • This study is the first to describe autopsy findings from children who were found dead in parked cars. • Autopsy findings included diffuse petechiae hemorrhages of serosal membranes and lung congestion. • These findings are identical to those seen in adults following exertional heat stroke.

  17. Antiretroviral Treatment with Efavirenz Disrupts the Blood-Brain Barrier Integrity and Increases Stroke Severity

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Luc; Dygert, Levi; Toborek, Michal

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of antiretroviral drugs (ARVd) changed the prognosis of HIV infection from a deadly disease to a chronic disease. However, even with undetectable viral loads, patients still develop a wide range of pathologies, including cerebrovascular complications and stroke. It is hypothesized that toxic side effects of ARVd may contribute to these effects. To address this notion, we evaluated the impact of several non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI; Efavirenz, Etravirine, Rilpivirine and Nevirapine) on the integrity of the blood-brain barrier, and their impact on severity of stroke. Among studied drugs, Efavirenz, but not other NNRTIs, altered claudin-5 expression, increased endothelial permeability, and disrupted the blood-brain barrier integrity. Importantly, Efavirenz exposure increased the severity of stroke in a model of middle cerebral artery occlusion in mice. Taken together, these results indicate that selected ARVd can exacerbate HIV-associated cerebrovascular pathology. Therefore, careful consideration should be taken when choosing an anti-retroviral therapy regimen. PMID:28008980

  18. American football and fatal exertional heat stroke: a case study of Korey Stringer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundstein, Andrew; Knox, John A.; Vanos, Jennifer; Cooper, Earl R.; Casa, Douglas J.

    2017-03-01

    On August 1, 2001, Korey Stringer, a Pro Bowl offensive tackle for the Minnesota Vikings, became the first and to date the only professional American football player to die from exertional heat stroke (EHS). The death helped raise awareness of the dangers of exertional heat illnesses in athletes and prompted the development of heat safety policies at the professional, collegiate, and interscholastic levels. Despite the public awareness of this death, no published study has examined in detail the circumstances surrounding Stringer's fatal EHS. Using the well-documented details of the case, our study shows that Stringer's fatal EHS was the result of a combination of physiological limitations, organizational and treatment failings, and extreme environmental conditions. The COMfort FormulA (COMFA) energy budget model was used to assess the relative importance of several extrinsic factors on Stringer's EHS, including weather conditions, clothing insulation, and activity levels. We found that Stringer's high-intensity training in relation to the oppressive environmental conditions was the most prominent factor in producing dangerous, uncompensable heat stress conditions and that the full football uniform played a smaller role in influencing Stringer's energy budget. The extreme energy budget levels that led to the fatal EHS would have been avoided according to our modeling through a combination of reduced intensity and lower clothing insulation. Finally, a long delay in providing medical treatment made the EHS fatal. These results highlight the importance of modern heat safety guidelines that provide controls on extrinsic factors, such as the adjustment of duration and intensity of training along with protective equipment modifications based on environmental conditions and the presence of an emergency action plan focused on rapid recognition and immediate on-site aggressive cooling of EHS cases.

  19. American football and fatal exertional heat stroke: a case study of Korey Stringer.

    PubMed

    Grundstein, Andrew; Knox, John A; Vanos, Jennifer; Cooper, Earl R; Casa, Douglas J

    2017-03-17

    On August 1, 2001, Korey Stringer, a Pro Bowl offensive tackle for the Minnesota Vikings, became the first and to date the only professional American football player to die from exertional heat stroke (EHS). The death helped raise awareness of the dangers of exertional heat illnesses in athletes and prompted the development of heat safety policies at the professional, collegiate, and interscholastic levels. Despite the public awareness of this death, no published study has examined in detail the circumstances surrounding Stringer's fatal EHS. Using the well-documented details of the case, our study shows that Stringer's fatal EHS was the result of a combination of physiological limitations, organizational and treatment failings, and extreme environmental conditions. The COMfort FormulA (COMFA) energy budget model was used to assess the relative importance of several extrinsic factors on Stringer's EHS, including weather conditions, clothing insulation, and activity levels. We found that Stringer's high-intensity training in relation to the oppressive environmental conditions was the most prominent factor in producing dangerous, uncompensable heat stress conditions and that the full football uniform played a smaller role in influencing Stringer's energy budget. The extreme energy budget levels that led to the fatal EHS would have been avoided according to our modeling through a combination of reduced intensity and lower clothing insulation. Finally, a long delay in providing medical treatment made the EHS fatal. These results highlight the importance of modern heat safety guidelines that provide controls on extrinsic factors, such as the adjustment of duration and intensity of training along with protective equipment modifications based on environmental conditions and the presence of an emergency action plan focused on rapid recognition and immediate on-site aggressive cooling of EHS cases.

  20. American football and fatal exertional heat stroke: a case study of Korey Stringer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundstein, Andrew; Knox, John A.; Vanos, Jennifer; Cooper, Earl R.; Casa, Douglas J.

    2017-08-01

    On August 1, 2001, Korey Stringer, a Pro Bowl offensive tackle for the Minnesota Vikings, became the first and to date the only professional American football player to die from exertional heat stroke (EHS). The death helped raise awareness of the dangers of exertional heat illnesses in athletes and prompted the development of heat safety policies at the professional, collegiate, and interscholastic levels. Despite the public awareness of this death, no published study has examined in detail the circumstances surrounding Stringer's fatal EHS. Using the well-documented details of the case, our study shows that Stringer's fatal EHS was the result of a combination of physiological limitations, organizational and treatment failings, and extreme environmental conditions. The COMfort FormulA (COMFA) energy budget model was used to assess the relative importance of several extrinsic factors on Stringer's EHS, including weather conditions, clothing insulation, and activity levels. We found that Stringer's high-intensity training in relation to the oppressive environmental conditions was the most prominent factor in producing dangerous, uncompensable heat stress conditions and that the full football uniform played a smaller role in influencing Stringer's energy budget. The extreme energy budget levels that led to the fatal EHS would have been avoided according to our modeling through a combination of reduced intensity and lower clothing insulation. Finally, a long delay in providing medical treatment made the EHS fatal. These results highlight the importance of modern heat safety guidelines that provide controls on extrinsic factors, such as the adjustment of duration and intensity of training along with protective equipment modifications based on environmental conditions and the presence of an emergency action plan focused on rapid recognition and immediate on-site aggressive cooling of EHS cases.

  1. Subacute default mode network dysfunction in the prediction of post-stroke depression severity.

    PubMed

    Lassalle-Lagadec, Saioa; Sibon, Igor; Dilharreguy, Bixente; Renou, Pauline; Fleury, Olivier; Allard, Michèle

    2012-07-01

    To identify patterns of rest functional connectivity (FC) in the whole brain with the default mode network (DMN) soon after stroke and to explore the predictive accuracy of the strength of rest FC in specific areas on poststroke severity of depression and anxiety symptoms. The protocol was accepted by the local ethics board, and all patients provided informed consent to participate. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance (MR) images were acquired 10 days after a first stroke in 24 patients without a history of psychiatric illness. Independent component analysis was used to isolate the DMN in each subject. Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) 17 and Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HARS) were recorded 10 days and 3 months after the stroke. Associations between severity of anxiety or depression symptoms and DMN functional connectivity were investigated with whole-brain analyses by using statistical parametric mapping software and were adjusted for age, sex, manual laterality, and National Institutes of Health Stroke Severity scores. Correlations were considered significant if P<.001, with a cluster size of more than 50 voxels. Ten days after stroke, anxiety severity was correlated with functional connectivity in the middle temporal cortex and the anterior midcingulate cortex, while at 3 months after stroke, a correlation was observed with the middle temporal cortex and the posterior cingulate cortex. Poststroke depressive symptom severity did not correlate with functional connectivity changes at 10-day follow-up, while the HDRS 17 score was correlated with functional connectivity in the left middle temporal cortex and precuneus at 3-month follow-up. These results suggest that a dysfunction of DMN functional connectivity involved in emotional control is associated with the severity of poststroke depression. Further studies are necessary to determine the mechanisms of this functional impairment. © RSNA, 2012.

  2. Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... emergency. Strokes happen when blood flow to your brain stops. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die. There are two kinds ... blocks or plugs a blood vessel in the brain. The other kind, called hemorrhagic stroke, is caused ...

  3. Cerebrolysin combined with rehabilitation promotes motor recovery in patients with severe motor impairment after stroke.

    PubMed

    Chang, Won Hyuk; Park, Chang-hyun; Kim, Deog Young; Shin, Yong-Il; Ko, Myoung-Hwan; Lee, Ahee; Jang, Shin Yi; Kim, Yun-Hee

    2016-03-02

    Cerebrolysin is a neuropeptide preparation with neuroprotective and neurorestorative effects. Combining Cerebrolysin treatment with a standardized rehabilitation program may have a potential synergistic effect in the subacute stage of stroke. This study aims to evaluate whether Cerebrolysin provides additional motor recovery on top of rehabilitation therapy in the subacute stroke patients with moderate to severe motor impairment. This phase IV trial was designed as a prospective, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study. A total of 70 patients (Cerebrolysin n = 35, placebo n = 35) with moderate to severe motor function impairment were included within 7 days after stroke onset and were randomized to receive a 21-day treatment course of either Cerebrolysin or placebo, given in addition to standardized rehabilitation therapy. Assessments were performed at baseline, immediately after treatment as well as 2 and 3 months after stroke onset. The plasticity of motor system was assessed by diffusion tensor imaging and with resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging. Both groups demonstrated significant improvement in motor function (p < 0.05); however, no significant difference was found between the two groups. In the stroke patients with severe motor impairment, the Cerebrolysin group exhibited significantly more improvement in motor function compared with the placebo group (p < 0.05). Effects of Cerebrolysin were demonstrated as restricted increments of corticospinal diffusivity and as recovery of the sensorimotor connectivity. The combination of standard rehabilitation therapy with Cerebrolysin treatment in the subacute stroke has shown additional benefit on motor recovery and plastic changes of the corticospinal tract in patients with severe motor impairment. NCT01996761 (November 5, 2013).

  4. Design and validation of a clinical scale for prehospital stroke recognition, severity grading and prediction of large vessel occlusion: the shortened NIH Stroke Scale for emergency medical services.

    PubMed

    Purrucker, Jan Christoph; Härtig, Florian; Richter, Hardy; Engelbrecht, Andreas; Hartmann, Johannes; Auer, Jonas; Hametner, Christian; Popp, Erik; Ringleb, Peter Arthur; Nagel, Simon; Poli, Sven

    2017-09-01

    To develop an NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS)-compatible, all-in-one scale for rapid and comprehensive prehospital stroke assessment including stroke recognition, severity grading and progression monitoring as well as prediction of large vessel occlusion (LVO). Emergency medical services (EMS) personnel and stroke physicians (n=326) rated each item of the NIHSS regarding suitability for prehospital use; best rated items were included. Stroke recognition was evaluated retrospectively in 689 consecutive patients with acute stroke or stroke mimics, prediction of LVO in 741 consecutive patients with ischaemic stroke with acute vessel imaging independent of admission NIHSS score. Nine of the NIHSS items were rated as 'suitable for prehospital use.' After excluding two items in order to increase specificity, the final scale (termed shortened NIHSS for EMS, sNIHSS-EMS) consists of 'level of consciousness', 'facial palsy', 'motor arm/leg', 'sensory', 'language' and 'dysarthria'. Sensitivity for stroke recognition of the sNIHSS-EMS is 91% (95% CI 86 to 94), specificity 52% (95% CI 47 to 56). Receiver operating curve analysis revealed an optimal cut-off point for LVO prediction of ≥6 (sensitivity 70% (95% CI 65 to 76), specificity 81% (95% CI 76 to 84), positive predictive value 70 (95% CI 65 to 75), area under the curve 0.81 (95% CI 0.78 to 0.84)). Test characteristics were non-inferior to non-comprehensive scales. The sNIHSS-EMS may overcome the sequential use of multiple emergency stroke scales by permitting parallel stroke recognition, severity grading and LVO prediction. Full NIHSS-item compatibility allows for evaluation of stroke progression starting at the prehospital phase. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. Design and validation of a clinical scale for prehospital stroke recognition, severity grading and prediction of large vessel occlusion: the shortened NIH Stroke Scale for emergency medical services

    PubMed Central

    Purrucker, Jan Christoph; Härtig, Florian; Richter, Hardy; Engelbrecht, Andreas; Hartmann, Johannes; Auer, Jonas; Hametner, Christian; Popp, Erik; Ringleb, Peter Arthur; Nagel, Simon; Poli, Sven

    2017-01-01

    Objective To develop an NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS)-compatible, all-in-one scale for rapid and comprehensive prehospital stroke assessment including stroke recognition, severity grading and progression monitoring as well as prediction of large vessel occlusion (LVO). Methods Emergency medical services (EMS) personnel and stroke physicians (n=326) rated each item of the NIHSS regarding suitability for prehospital use; best rated items were included. Stroke recognition was evaluated retrospectively in 689 consecutive patients with acute stroke or stroke mimics, prediction of LVO in 741 consecutive patients with ischaemic stroke with acute vessel imaging independent of admission NIHSS score. Results Nine of the NIHSS items were rated as ‘suitable for prehospital use.’ After excluding two items in order to increase specificity, the final scale (termed shortened NIHSS for EMS, sNIHSS-EMS) consists of ‘level of consciousness’, ‘facial palsy’, ‘motor arm/leg’, ‘sensory’, ‘language’ and ‘dysarthria’. Sensitivity for stroke recognition of the sNIHSS-EMS is 91% (95% CI 86 to 94), specificity 52% (95% CI 47 to 56). Receiver operating curve analysis revealed an optimal cut-off point for LVO prediction of ≥6 (sensitivity 70% (95% CI 65 to 76), specificity 81% (95% CI 76 to 84), positive predictive value 70 (95% CI 65 to 75), area under the curve 0.81 (95% CI 0.78 to 0.84)). Test characteristics were non-inferior to non-comprehensive scales. Conclusions The sNIHSS-EMS may overcome the sequential use of multiple emergency stroke scales by permitting parallel stroke recognition, severity grading and LVO prediction. Full NIHSS-item compatibility allows for evaluation of stroke progression starting at the prehospital phase. PMID:28864702

  6. Promoting Best Practices regarding Exertional Heat Stroke: A Perspective from the Team Physician

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Pagnotta, Kelly D.; McDowell, Lindsey; Casa, Douglas J.; Armstrong, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    Context: Knowing the team physician's perspective regarding the use of evidence-based practice (EBP) for treatment of exertional heat stroke (EHS) may help increase the number of athletic trainers (ATs) implementing best practices and avoiding the use of improper assessment tools and treatment methods. Objective: To ascertain team physicians'…

  7. Professional Preparation regarding the Recognition and Treatment of Exertional Heat Stroke: The Student Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Pagnotta, Kelly D.; Casa, Douglas J.; Armstrong, Lawrence; Maresh, Carl

    2011-01-01

    Context: Current evidence suggests rectal temperature(T[subscript re] and cold-water immersion (CWI) are the most effective means to diagnose and treat exertional heat stroke (EHS), respectively. Educators, clinicians, and students should be apprised of this evidence to guide their practice. Objective: Investigate what athletic training students…

  8. Professional Preparation regarding the Recognition and Treatment of Exertional Heat Stroke: The Student Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Pagnotta, Kelly D.; Casa, Douglas J.; Armstrong, Lawrence; Maresh, Carl

    2011-01-01

    Context: Current evidence suggests rectal temperature(T[subscript re] and cold-water immersion (CWI) are the most effective means to diagnose and treat exertional heat stroke (EHS), respectively. Educators, clinicians, and students should be apprised of this evidence to guide their practice. Objective: Investigate what athletic training students…

  9. Promoting Best Practices regarding Exertional Heat Stroke: A Perspective from the Team Physician

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Pagnotta, Kelly D.; McDowell, Lindsey; Casa, Douglas J.; Armstrong, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    Context: Knowing the team physician's perspective regarding the use of evidence-based practice (EBP) for treatment of exertional heat stroke (EHS) may help increase the number of athletic trainers (ATs) implementing best practices and avoiding the use of improper assessment tools and treatment methods. Objective: To ascertain team physicians'…

  10. Guillain-Barre Syndrome Induced by Heat Stroke: a Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Wen, Huijun

    2017-09-01

    Heat stroke is a potentially fatal condition that is caused by elevated core temperature. GuillainBarre syndrome (GBS) induced by heat stroke is extremely rare, and its manifestation with damage to multiple cranial nerves has not been described. We describe a rare case of GBS induced by heat stroke with damage to multiple cranial and peripheral nerves. The clinical, radiological, and electrophysiological profiles were presented and analyzed. A 41-year-old man presented with aggressive speech difficulty, dysphagia, right blepharoptosis, and quadriplegia following coma. A diagnosis of glossopharyngeal, vagus, oculomotor, and peripheral nerve damage was made. After immunoglobulin administration, the patient's neurological deficiencies were relieved significantly. During a follow-up period of 3 months, the patient experienced complete remission. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of GBS induced by heat stroke presenting with damage to multiple cranial and peripheral nerves. The early diagnosis and timely immunological treatment of GBS should be emphasized, as they facilitate a favorable prognosis.

  11. Severity of Post-stroke Aphasia According to Aphasia Type and Lesion Location in Koreans

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Eun Kyoung; Sohn, Hae Min; Han, Moon-Ku; Kim, Won; Han, Tai Ryoon

    2010-01-01

    To determine the relations between post-stroke aphasia severity and aphasia type and lesion location, a retrospective review was undertaken using the medical records of 97 Korean patients, treated within 90 days of onset, for aphasia caused by unilateral left hemispheric stroke. Types of aphasia were classified according to the validated Korean version of the Western Aphasia Battery (K-WAB), and severities of aphasia were quantified using WAB Aphasia Quotients (AQ). Lesion locations were classified as cortical or subcortical, and were determined by magnetic resonance imaging. Two-step cluster analysis was performed using AQ values to classify aphasia severity by aphasia type and lesion location. Cluster analysis resulted in four severity clusters: 1) mild; anomic type, 2) moderate; Wernicke's, transcortical motor, transcortical sensory, conduction, and mixed transcortical types, 3) moderately severe; Broca's aphasia, and 4) severe; global aphasia, and also in three lesion location clusters: 1) mild; subcortical 2) moderate; cortical lesions involving Broca's and/or Wernicke's areas, and 3) severe; insular and cortical lesions not in Broca's or Wernicke's areas. These results revealed that within 3 months of stroke, global aphasia was the more severely affected type and cortical lesions were more likely to affect language function than subcortical lesions. PMID:20052357

  12. Severity of post-stroke aphasia according to aphasia type and lesion location in Koreans.

    PubMed

    Kang, Eun Kyoung; Sohn, Hae Min; Han, Moon-Ku; Kim, Won; Han, Tai Ryoon; Paik, Nam-Jong

    2010-01-01

    To determine the relations between post-stroke aphasia severity and aphasia type and lesion location, a retrospective review was undertaken using the medical records of 97 Korean patients, treated within 90 days of onset, for aphasia caused by unilateral left hemispheric stroke. Types of aphasia were classified according to the validated Korean version of the Western Aphasia Battery (K-WAB), and severities of aphasia were quantified using WAB Aphasia Quotients (AQ). Lesion locations were classified as cortical or subcortical, and were determined by magnetic resonance imaging. Two-step cluster analysis was performed using AQ values to classify aphasia severity by aphasia type and lesion location. Cluster analysis resulted in four severity clusters: 1) mild; anomic type, 2) moderate; Wernicke's, transcortical motor, transcortical sensory, conduction, and mixed transcortical types, 3) moderately severe; Broca's aphasia, and 4) severe; global aphasia, and also in three lesion location clusters: 1) mild; subcortical 2) moderate; cortical lesions involving Broca's and/or Wernicke's areas, and 3) severe; insular and cortical lesions not in Broca's or Wernicke's areas. These results revealed that within 3 months of stroke, global aphasia was the more severely affected type and cortical lesions were more likely to affect language function than subcortical lesions.

  13. Use of telemedicine to manage severe ischaemic strokes in a rural area with an elderly population.

    PubMed

    Richard, Sébastien; Lavandier, K; Zioueche, Y; Pelletier, S; Vezain, A; Ducrocq, X

    2014-05-01

    The rural district of the Meuse (East France) has a high number of elderly patients for whom prognosis of ischaemic strokes is poor with high-haemorrhagic transformation risk of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA). This disadvantage is made worse by the distances a patient has to travel to the nearest stroke unit. We set out to assess the effectiveness of a telestroke system implemented in this area. Between October 2010 and February 2012, data from each "tele-expertised" patient were collected. 53 patients were examined. Diagnosis of ischaemic stroke was confirmed in 43 cases (81 %), and intravenous rt-PA treatment performed in 21 cases (40 %). In the treated patient group, median age was 73 years, with 29 % of octogenarians. Baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) was 16, with 29 % ≥ 20. The median onset to needle time was 169 min, and the median door to needle time was 69 min. Intracranial haemorrhage occurred in 3 cases (14 %), and was symptomatic in two (10 %). At 3 months, median NIHSS was 6, 6 patients (29 %) presented a favourable outcome (modified Rankin scale ≤ 1) and 3 (14 %) had died. In rural areas, for elderly patients with severe ischaemic strokes, telemedicine appears to be a way of improving accessibility and benefits of rt-PA treatment.

  14. Red cell distribution width does not predict stroke severity or functional outcome.

    PubMed

    Ntaios, George; Gurer, Ozgur; Faouzi, Mohamed; Aubert, Carole; Michel, Patrik

    2012-01-01

    Red cell distribution width was recently identified as a predictor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in patients with previous stroke. Red cell distribution width is also higher in patients with stroke compared with those without. However, there are no data on the association of red cell distribution width, assessed during the acute phase of ischemic stroke, with stroke severity and functional outcome. In the present study, we sought to investigate this relationship and ascertain the main determinants of red cell distribution width in this population. We used data from the Acute Stroke Registry and Analysis of Lausanne for patients between January 2003 and December 2008. Red cell distribution width was generated at admission by the Sysmex XE-2100 automated cell counter from ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid blood samples stored at room temperature until measurement. An χ(2) -test was performed to compare frequencies of categorical variables between different red cell distribution width quartiles, and one-way analysis of variance for continuous variables. The effect of red cell distribution width on severity and functional outcome was investigated in univariate and multivariate robust regression analysis. Level of significance was set at 95%. There were 1504 patients (72±15·76 years, 43·9% females) included in the analysis. Red cell distribution width was significantly associated to NIHSS (β-value=0·24, P=0·01) and functional outcome (odds ratio=10·73 for poor outcome, P<0·001) at univariate analysis but not multivariate. Prehospital Rankin score (β=0·19, P<0·001), serum creatinine (β=0·008, P<0·001), hemoglobin (β=-0·009, P<0·001), mean platelet volume (β=0·09, P<0·05), age (β=0·02, P<0·001), low ejection fraction (β=0·66, P<0·001) and antihypertensive treatment (β=0·32, P<0·001) were independent determinants of red cell distribution width. Red cell distribution width, assessed during the early phase of acute ischemic stroke

  15. Electrocardiographic findings in heat stroke and exhaustion: A study on Makkah pilgrims.

    PubMed

    Mimish, L

    2012-01-01

    Over two million pilgrims perform annual rituals in Makkah region, which when coincides with summer months, exposes them to outdoor temperatures exceeding 45 °C and humidity approaching 80%. Accordingly, heat illnesses are common including explicit heat strokes and heat exhaustion. No previous studies elaborated on electrocardiographic changes among this unique cohort. To compare electrocardiographic changes in three groups exposed to high outdoor temperatures, namely, patients with heat stroke compared to patients with heat exhaustion and a control group exposed to the same outdoor temperatures without clinical manifestations. Through case control design, two case groups of patients were selected. The first group (G1) was 34 patients admitted to the cooling units with clinical picture of heat stroke and the second group (G2) comprised 28 patients admitted with heat exhaustion. The control group (G3) included 31 patients selected from relatives of patients and outdoor workers. The outcome for comparison was 12-lead electrocardiographic changes done for all selected individuals. For (G1), the ECG was done while they were prepared for cooling or immediately when cooling was started. In G1, 18 were females and 16 males with ages of 20-76 years (59 ± 11 years). Their heart rates ranged from 64 to 160 beats per minute (mean 120 ± 24 per minute). Only 5/34 ECGs were completely normal. Sinus tachycardia was present in 27/34 patients (79%), with ischemic changes in 9/34 ECGs. In G2, 24 were males and four females with ages of 25-80 (mean 47 ± 15 years), the heart rate ranged from 64 to 170 per minute (mean 97 ± 16 per minute). Seven out of 28 ECGs were normal (25%) while 21/28 had some abnormalities. None had ischemic changes. Control group (G3), was five females and 26 males ages 18-80 years (mean 38 ± 15 years), 22/31 had normal ECGs (71%). All had normal sinus rhythm, 56-98 beats per minute (74 ± 11). Nine patients had some electrocardiographic

  16. Changes in air temperature and its relation to ambulance transports due to heat stroke in all 47 prefectures of Japan.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Shoko; Miyatake, Nobuyuki; Sakano, Noriko

    2012-09-01

    Changes in air temperature and its relation to ambulance transports due to heat stroke in all 47 prefectures, in Japan were evaluated. Data on air temperature were obtained from the Japanese Meteorological Agency. Data on ambulance transports due to heat stroke was directly obtained from the Fire and Disaster Management Agency, Japan. We also used the number of deaths due to heat stroke from the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan, and population data from the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications. Chronological changes in parameters of air temperature were analyzed. In addition, the relation between air temperature and ambulance transports due to heat stroke in August 2010 was also evaluated by using an ecological study. Positive and significant changes in the parameters of air temperature that is, the mean air temperature, mean of the highest air temperature, and mean of the lowest air temperature were noted in all 47 prefectures. In addition, changes in air temperature were accelerated when adjusted for observation years. Ambulance transports due to heat stroke was significantly correlated with air temperature in the ecological study. The highest air temperature was significantly linked to ambulance transports due to heat stroke, especially in elderly subjects. Global warming was demonstrated in all 47 prefectures in Japan. In addition, the higher air temperature was closely associated with higher ambulance transports due to heat stroke in Japan.

  17. Deaths from heat-stroke in Japan: 1968-1994

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, S.; Itoh, T.; Morimoto, T.

    Global warming is increasingly recognized as a threat to the survival of human beings, because it could cause a serious increase in the occurrence of diseases due to environmental heat during intermittent hot weather. To assess the direct impact of extremely hot weather on human health, we investigated heat-related deaths in Japan from 1968 through 1994, analyzing the data to determine the distribution of the deaths by age and their correlation to the incidence of hot days in summer. Vital Statistics of Japan, published by the Ministry of Health and Welfare of Japan, was the source of the heat-related mortality data employed in this study. Meteorological data were obtained from the District Meteorological Observatories in Tokyo and Osaka, the two largest cities in Japan. Heat-related deaths were most prone to occur on days with a peak daily temperature above 38°C, and the incidence of these deaths showed an exponential dependence on the number of hot days. Thus, even a small rise in atmospheric temperature may lead to a considerable increase in heat-related mortality, indicating the importance of combating global warming. Furthermore, half (50.1%) of the above-noted deaths occurred in children (4 years and under) and the elderly (70 years and over) irrespective of gender, indicating the vulnerability of these specific age groups to heat. Since a warmer climate is predicted in the future, the incidence of heat waves will increase, and more comprehensive measures, both medical and social, should be adopted for children of 4 years and younger the elderly to prevent heat-related deaths in these age groups.

  18. Deaths from heat-stroke in Japan: 1968-1994.

    PubMed

    Nakai, S; Itoh, T; Morimoto, T

    1999-11-01

    Global warming is increasingly recognized as a threat to the survival of human beings, because it could cause a serious increase in the occurrence of diseases due to environmental heat during intermittent hot weather. To assess the direct impact of extremely hot weather on human health, we investigated heat-related deaths in Japan from 1968 through 1994, analyzing the data to determine the distribution of the deaths by age and their correlation to the incidence of hot days in summer. Vital Statistics of Japan, published by the Ministry of Health and Welfare of Japan, was the source of the heat-related mortality data employed in this study. Meteorological data were obtained from the District Meteorological Observatories in Tokyo and Osaka, the two largest cities in Japan. Heat-related deaths were most prone to occur on days with a peak daily temperature above 38 degrees C, and the incidence of these deaths showed an exponential dependence on the number of hot days. Thus, even a small rise in atmospheric temperature may lead to a considerable increase in heat-related mortality, indicating the importance of combating global warming. Furthermore, half (50.1%) of the above-noted deaths occurred in children (4 years and under) and the elderly (70 years and over) irrespective of gender, indicating the vulnerability of these specific age groups to heat. Since a warmer climate is predicted in the future, the incidence of heat waves will increase, and more comprehensive measures, both medical and social, should be adopted for children of 4 years and younger the elderly to prevent heat-related deaths in these age groups.

  19. Increased levels of antibodies against heat shock proteins in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Banecka-Majkutewicz, Zyta; Grabowski, Michał; Kadziński, Leszek; Papkov, Aliaksei; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Banecki, Bogdan

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is the second leading cause of death worldwide. One of the main risk factors of the ischemic stroke is atherosclerosis which is a chronic inflammatory and immune-mediated disease. Bacterial infections generate specific human antibodies against various antigens, including Hsps. It has been demonstrated that Hsps are selectively overexpressed in the atherosclerotic lesions. The amino acid sequence homology between human and bacterial Hsps may lead to an autoimmune response by immunological cross-reaction. Such immune response against Hsps overexpressed in the blood vessels under stressful conditions may contribute to inflammatory processes and subsequent development of atherosclerosis. In this study we determined the antibody levels against bacterial and human Hsp by ELISA in blood plasma obtained from stroke patients. Using ANOVA we analyzed levels of Hsp-antibodies in control and patient groups and correlate them with several stroke risk factors. The group of stroke patients had elevated levels of anti-Hsp antibodies compared to the control group. We also discovered an antibody level increase in patients that previously underwent another stroke. Our data provide evidence that autoimmunity could underlie formation of atherosclerosis plaque leading to stroke.

  20. Outdoor air pollution, subtypes and severity of ischemic stroke – a small-area level ecological study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Evidence linking outdoor air pollution and incidence of ischemic stroke subtypes and severity is limited. We examined associations between outdoor PM10 and NO2 concentrations modeled at a fine spatial resolution and etiological and clinical ischemic stroke subtypes and severity of ischemic stroke. Methods We used a small-area level ecological study design and a stroke register set up to capture all incident cases of first ever stroke (1995–2007) occurring in a defined geographical area in South London (948 census output areas; population of 267839). Modeled PM10 and NO2 concentrations were available at a very fine spatial scale (20 meter by 20 meter grid point resolution) and were aggregated to output area level using postcode population weighted averages. Ischemic stroke was classified using the Oxford clinical classification, the Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST) etiological classification, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score and a pragmatic clinical severity classification based on Glasgow coma score, ability to swallow, urinary continence and death <2 days of stroke onset. Results Mean (SD) concentrations were 25.1 (1.2) ug/m3 (range 23.3-36.4) for PM10 and 41.4 (3.0) ug/m3 (range 35.4-68.0) for NO2. There were 2492 incident cases of ischemic stroke. We found no evidence of association between these pollutants and the incidence of ischemic stroke subtypes classified using the Oxford and TOAST classifications. We found no significant association with stroke severity using NIHSS severity categories. However, we found that outdoor concentrations of both PM10 and NO2 appeared to be associated with increased incidence of mild but not severe ischemic stroke, classified using the pragmatic clinical severity classification. For mild ischemic stroke, the rate ratio in the highest PM10 category by tertile was 1.20 (1.05-1.38) relative to the lowest category. The rate ratio in the highest NO2 category was 1.22 (1

  1. Use of a Portable Assistive Glove to Facilitate Rehabilitation in Stroke Survivors With Severe Hand Impairment.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Heidi C; Triandafilou, Kristen M; Thielbar, Kelly O; Ochoa, José M; Lazzaro, Emily D C; Pacholski, Kathleen A; Kamper, Derek G

    2016-03-01

    Treatment options for stroke survivors with severe hand impairment are limited. Active task practice can be restricted by difficulty in voluntarily activating finger muscles and interference from involuntary muscle excitation. We developed a portable, actuated glove-orthosis, which could be employed to address both issues. We hypothesized that combining passive cyclical stretching (reducing motoneuronal hyperexcitability) imposed by the device with active-assisted, task-oriented training (rehabilitating muscle activation) would improve upper extremity motor control and task performance post-stroke. Thirteen participants who experienced a stroke 2-6 months prior to enrollment completed 15 treatment sessions over five weeks. Each session involved cyclically stretching the long finger flexors (30 min) followed by active-assisted task-oriented movement practice (60 min). Outcome measures were completed at six intervals: three before and three after treatment initiation. Overall improvement in post-training scores was observed across all outcome measures, including the Graded Wolf Motor Function Test, Action Research Arm Test, and grip and pinch strength (p ≤ 0.02), except finger extension force. No significant change in spasticity was observed. Improvement in upper extremity capabilities is achievable for stroke survivors even with severe hand impairment through a novel intervention combining passive cyclical stretching and active-assisted task practice, a paradigm which could be readily incorporated into the clinic.

  2. Endovascular Treatment of a Severe Stroke Occurring in a Commercial Airplane Over the Sahara.

    PubMed

    Foerch, Christian; Mayer, Christoph A; Berkefeld, Joachim; You, Se-Jong

    2016-09-01

    The occurrence of an acute stroke syndrome during a long-distance flight demands critical decisions from the crew and attendant physicians. One in particular is whether the flight should be continued or be detoured to a nearby airport. We describe a 42-yr-old woman who suffered from a severe stroke in a commercial airplane over the Sahara. The captain, together with a physician aboard and the next of kin, decided not to detour to north African or south European airports, but to continue flying to Frankfurt, Germany (final destination; remaining flight time 4 h), where an efficient transfer infrastructure and an advanced medical standard were presumed. At the hospital, the patient was successfully treated by means of catheter-based mechanical thrombus extraction. The patient was free of neurological deficits at discharge. The geographically unbalanced availability of complex but highly effective therapies such as mechanical recanalization in acute stroke challenges decision making in aviation medicine. In selected cases it might be beneficial to continue flying to cities with advanced medical standards instead of deviating to nearby airports. Foerch C, Mayer CA, Berkefeld J, You S-J. Endovascular treatment of a severe stroke occurring in a commercial airplane over the Sahara. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2016; 87(9):825-829.

  3. Heat stroke with multiple organ failure treated with cold hemodialysis and cold continuous hemodiafiltration: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wakino, Shu; Hori, Shingo; Mimura, Takuya; Fujishima, Seitaroh; Hayashi, Koichi; Inamoto, Hajime; Saruta, Takao; Aikawa, Naoki

    2005-10-01

    A 23-year-old comatose man was presented in the emergency room. He had been working inside a building under construction on a hot summer's day. His core body temperature was 42.1 degrees C and he was diagnosed with heat stroke. Urgent cooling procedures, including applying cold vapor to the patient's skin, a gastric lavage with cold water and an intravenous cold saline infusion, were not completely successful and his body temperature remained above 40 degrees C. Because his high temperature was refractory to conventional cooling procedures and we suspected that acute renal failure (ARF) by rhabdomyolysis would develop, we applied hemodialysis (HD) using cold dialysate (initially 30 degrees C and later 35 degrees C), followed by continuous hemodiafiltration (CHDF) with cold dialysate (35 degrees C) at a high flow rate of 18,000 mL per hour. The patient's body temperature fell below 38.0 degrees C within 3 h and was kept below 38.0 degrees C. Continuous hemodiafiltration was continued for one week. During the first week, the patient suffered from multiple organ failure (MOF) involving renal failure, as well as the failure of heart, liver, lung, and central nervous systems. Disseminated intravascular coagulation also developed. However, by virtue of cold CHDF, he almost recovered 3 weeks after the onset, except for remaining mild liver and renal dysfunction. In severe heat stroke, cold HD and high flow, cold CHDF should be a therapeutic choice for cooling and treatment of MOF. Considering mild liver and renal dysfunction still remained, this case suggested these procedures should be initiated at the very beginning of the treatment of severe heat stroke.

  4. Prediction of Independent Walking Ability for Severely Hemiplegic Stroke Patients at Discharge from a Rehabilitation Hospital.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Yoshitake; Hayashi, Takeshi; Nitta, Osamu; Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Nishio, Daisuke; Minakawa, Tomoya; Kigawa, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    It is important to predict walking ability for stroke patients, because rehabilitation programs are planned on such predictions. We therefore examined predictive factors that are available before discharge from a rehabilitation hospital. Seventy-two consecutive patients with a first attack of stroke with severe hemiplegia were included in this study. We retrospectively evaluated background factors (age, gender, time from stroke onset, paresis side, and stroke type). Other neurological and physical parameters were collected by means of the modified National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, the Mini-Mental State Examination, the Trunk Control Test (TCT), and the knee extension strength/body weight ratio on the unaffected side (KES/BW-US) at the time of admission. We divided the patients into 2 groups, the independent group (n = 49) and the dependent group (n = 23), on the basis of the Barthel Index of mobility at the time of discharge. We then compared the 2 groups with respect to the aforementioned parameters. We also performed stepwise discriminant analyses to ascertain which parameters are the best predictors of walking ability at the time of discharge. Age, TCT score, and the KES/BW-US ratio were significantly different between the groups. Discriminant analysis revealed that younger age and a higher KES/BW-US ratio were significantly associated with walking ability at discharge, which could be precisely predicted using the following formula: Y = .093 × (age) - 4.316 × (KES/BW-US) - 4.984. At the time of admission, age and the KES/BW-US ratio permit the prediction of independent walking ability at the time of discharge. Our formula predicts walking ability with an accuracy of more than 91%. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Mirror therapy for patients with severe arm paresis after stroke--a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Thieme, Holm; Bayn, Maria; Wurg, Marco; Zange, Christian; Pohl, Marcus; Behrens, Johann

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the effects of individual or group mirror therapy on sensorimotor function, activities of daily living, quality of life and visuospatial neglect in patients with a severe arm paresis after stroke. Randomized controlled trial. Inpatient rehabilitation centre. Sixty patients with a severe paresis of the arm within three months after stroke. Three groups: (1) individual mirror therapy, (2) group mirror therapy and (3) control intervention with restricted view on the affected arm. Motor function on impairment (Fugl-Meyer Test) and activity level (Action Research Arm Test), independence in activities of daily living (Barthel Index), quality of life (Stroke Impact Scale) and visuospatial neglect (Star Cancellation Test). After five weeks, no significant group differences for motor function were found (P > 0.05). Pre-post differences for the Action Research Arm Test and Fugl-Meyer Test: individual mirror therapy: 3.4 (7.1) and 3.2 (3.8), group mirror therapy: 1.1 (3.1) and 5.1 (10.0) and control therapy: 2.8 (6.7) and 5.2 (8.7). However, a significant effect on visuospatial neglect for patients in the individual mirror therapy compared to control group could be shown (P < 0.01). Furthermore, it was possible to integrate a mirror therapy group intervention for severely affected patients after stroke. This study showed no effect on sensorimotor function of the arm, activities of daily living and quality of life of mirror therapy compared to a control intervention after stroke. However, a positive effect on visuospatial neglect was indicated.

  6. Classic heat stroke in a case of simple hypohydrosis with "bad prognostic indicators" but a remarkable recovery.

    PubMed

    Sinha, A K; Ghacha, R; Youmbissi, J T; Khursany, I A

    2001-09-01

    Heat stroke occurs in the desert area of Saudi Arabia quite frequently and manifest in different patterns including coagulopathy. Frequently encountered complications include renal or hepatic failure, rhabdomyolysis, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), and seizure. Not all of these complications usually occur in the same patient, in case it occurs the mortality reported is significantly high. We describe a case of heat stroke that had nearly all the known complications of heat stroke but recovered from all, except minor neurological deficit in the form of dysarthria and exaggerated deep reflexes.

  7. Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Is a Stroke? A stroke occurs if the flow of oxygen-rich blood to a portion of the brain ... pressure from the leaked blood damages brain cells. High blood pressure and ... A TIA occurs if blood flow to a portion of the brain is blocked ...

  8. Optimal control of the power adiabatic stroke of an optomechanical heat engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bathaee, M.; Bahrampour, A. R.

    2016-08-01

    We consider the power adiabatic stroke of the Otto optomechanical heat engine introduced in Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 150602 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.150602. We derive the maximum extractable work of both optomechanical normal modes in the minimum time while the system experiences quantum friction effects. We show that the total work done by the system in the power adiabatic stroke is optimized by a bang-bang control. The time duration of the power adiabatic stroke is of the order of the inverse of the effective optomechanical-coupling coefficient. The optimal phase-space trajectory of the Otto cycle for both optomechanical normal modes is also obtained.

  9. Low Temperature Heat Capacity of a Severely Deformed Metallic Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bünz, Jonas; Brink, Tobias; Tsuchiya, Koichi; Meng, Fanqiang; Wilde, Gerhard; Albe, Karsten

    2014-04-01

    The low temperature heat capacity of amorphous materials reveals a low-frequency enhancement (boson peak) of the vibrational density of states, as compared with the Debye law. By measuring the low-temperature heat capacity of a Zr-based bulk metallic glass relative to a crystalline reference state, we show that the heat capacity of the glass is strongly enhanced after severe plastic deformation by high-pressure torsion, while subsequent thermal annealing at elevated temperatures leads to a significant reduction. The detailed analysis of corresponding molecular dynamics simulations of an amorphous Zr-Cu glass shows that the change in heat capacity is primarily due to enhanced low-frequency modes within the shear band region.

  10. Movement related slow cortical potentials in severely paralyzed chronic stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Ozge; Birbaumer, Niels; Ramos-Murguialday, Ander

    2015-01-01

    Movement-related slow cortical potentials (SCPs) are proposed as reliable and immediate indicators of cortical reorganization in motor learning. SCP amplitude and latency have been reported as markers for the brain's computational effort, attention and movement planning. SCPs have been used as an EEG signature of motor control and as a main feature in Brain-Machine-Interfaces (BMIs). Some reports suggest SCPs are modified following stroke. In this study, we investigated movement-related SCPs in severe chronic stroke patients with no residual paretic hand movements preceding and during paretic (when they try to move) and healthy hand movements. The aim was to identify SCP signatures related to cortex integrity and complete paralysis due to stroke in the chronic stage. Twenty severely impaired (no residual finger extension) chronic stoke patients, of whom ten presented subcortical and ten cortical and subcortical lesions, underwent EEG and EMG recordings during a cue triggered hand movement (open/close) paradigm. SCP onset appeared and peaked significantly earlier during paretic hand movements than during healthy hand movements. Amplitudes were significantly larger over the midline (Cz, Fz) for paretic hand movements while contralateral (C4, F4) and midline (Cz, Fz) amplitudes were significantly larger than ipsilateral activity for healthy hand movements. Dividing the participants into subcortical only and mixed lesioned patient groups, no significant differences observed in SCP amplitude and latency between groups. This suggests lesions in the thalamocortical loop as the main factor in SCP changes after stroke. Furthermore, we demonstrated how, after long-term complete paralysis, post-stroke intention to move a paralyzed hand resulted in longer and larger SCPs originating in the frontal areas. These results suggest SCP are a valuable feature that should be incorporated in the design of new neurofeedback strategies for motor neurorehabilitation. PMID:25642177

  11. Protecting against ischaemic stroke in rats by heat shock protein 20-mediated exercise.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Min; Chang, Cheng-Kuei; Chang, Ching-Ping; Hsu, Yu-Chih; Lin, Mao-Tsun; Lin, Jia-Wei

    2015-12-01

    Exercise preconditioning (EP(+) ) has been widely accepted as a being of safe and effective preventive measure for stroke. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether EP(+) improves outcomes of ischaemic stroke by promoting neuronal and glial expression of heat shock protein (HSP) 20. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (288 in number) were used to investigate the contribution of HSP20-containing neurons and HSP20-containing glial cells in the exercise-mediated neuroprotection in the stroke condition using middle cerebral artery occlusion. Exercise preconditioning, in addition to increasing the numbers of both the HSP20-containg neurons (88 ± 8 vs. 43 ± 4; n = 8 each group; P < 0·05) and the HSP20-containg astrocytes (102 ± 10 vs. 56 ± 5; n = 8; P < 0·05) significantly attenuated stroke-induced brain infarct (140 ± 9 vs. 341 ± 20 mm(3) ; n = 8 per group; P < 0·01), neuronal apoptosis (20 ± 5 vs. 87 ± 7; n = 8 per group; n = 8; P < 0·01), glial apoptosis (29 ± 5 vs. 101 ± 4; n = 8; P < 0·01), and neurological deficits (6·6 ± 0·3 vs. 11·7 ± 0·8; n = 8 per group; P < 0·01). Reducing the numbers of both HSP20-containing neurons and HSP20-contaiing glia by intracerebral injection of pSUPER small interfering RNAί expressing HSP20 significantly reversed the beneficial effects of EP(+) in attenuating stroke-induced cerebral infarct, neuronal and glial apoptosis, and neurological deficits. The numbers of both the HSP20-containing neurons and the HSP20-containing glia inversely correlated with the outcomes of ischaemic stroke. In addition, preischaemic treadmill exercise improves outcomes of ischaemic stroke by increasing the numbers of both the HSP20-containing neurons and the HSP20-containing glia. © 2015 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  12. Severe hemiparesis as a prehospital tool to triage stroke severity: a pilot study to assess diagnostic accuracy and treatment times.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rishi; Manuel, Marissa; Owada, Kumiko; Dhungana, Samish; Busby, Leslie; Glenn, Brenda A; Brown, Debbie; Zimmermann, Susan A; Horn, Christopher; Rochestie, Dustin; Hormes, Joseph T; Johnson, Andrew K; Khaldi, Ahmad

    2016-08-01

    With the publication of the recent trials showing the tremendous benefits of mechanical thrombectomy, opportunities exist to refine prehospital processes to identify patients with larger stroke syndromes. We retrospectively reviewed consecutive patients who were brought via scene flight from rural parts of the region to our institution, from December 1, 2014 to June 5, 2015, with severe hemiparesis or hemiplegia. We assessed the accuracy of the diagnosis of stroke and the number of patients requiring endovascular therapy. Moreover, we reviewed the times along the pathway of patients who were treated with endovascular therapy. 45 patients were brought via helicopter from the field to our institution. 27 (60%) patients were diagnosed with an ischemic stroke. Of these, 12 (26.7%) were treated with mechanical thrombectomy and 6 (13.3%) with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator alone. An additional three patients required embolization procedures for either a dural arteriovenous fistula or cerebral aneurysm. Thus a total of 15 (33%) patients received an endovascular procedure and 21/45 (46.7%) received an acute treatment. For patients treated with thrombectomy, the median time from first medical contact to groin puncture was 101 min, with 8 of the 12 patients (66.7%) being discharged to home. We have presented a pilot study showing that severe hemiparesis or hemiplegia may be a reasonable prehospital tool in recognizing patients requiring endovascular treatment. Patients being identified earlier may be treated faster and potentially improve outcomes. Further prospective controlled studies are required to assess the impact on outcomes and cost effectiveness using this methodology. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  13. Preservation of structural brain network hubs is associated with less severe post-stroke aphasia.

    PubMed

    Gleichgerrcht, Ezequiel; Kocher, Madison; Nesland, Travis; Rorden, Chris; Fridriksson, Julius; Bonilha, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Post-stroke aphasia is typically associated with ischemic damage to cortical areas or with loss of connectivity among spared brain regions. It remains unclear whether the participation of spared brain regions as networks hubs affects the severity of aphasia. We evaluated language performance and magnetic resonance imaging from 44 participants with chronic aphasia post-stroke. The individual structural brain connectomes were constructed from diffusion tensor. Hub regions were defined in accordance with the rich club classification and studied in relation with language performance. Number of remaining left hemisphere rich club nodes was associated with aphasia, including comprehension, repetition and naming sub-scores. Importantly, among participants with relative preservation of regions of interest for language, aphasia severity was lessened if the region was not only spared, but also participated in the remaining network as a rich club node: Brodmann area (BA) 44/45 - repetition (p = 0.009), BA 39 - repetition (p = 0.045) and naming (p <  0.01), BA 37 - fluency (p <  0.001), comprehension (p = 0.025), repetition (p <  0.001) and naming (p <  0.001). Disruption of language network structural hubs is directly associated with aphasia severity after stroke.

  14. Resting Energy Expenditure in Patients with Stroke during the Subacute Phases - Relationships with Stroke Types, Location, Severity of Paresis, and Activities of Daily Living.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Michiyuki; Liu, Meigen; Wada, Ayako; Otsuka, Tomoyoshi; Nishimura, Atsuko

    2015-01-01

    The energy demands in patients with stroke during the subacute phases are unclear. However, this information is essential for appropriate clinical and nutritional management. The aims of this study were to determine the resting energy expenditure (REE) during the subacute phases, examine its relationships with stroke types, location, severity of hemiparesis, and activities of daily living (ADL), and evaluate whether estimation of REE from the Harris-Benedict equation (HB) requires the addition of a 'stress factor' to capture possible additional REE imposed by stroke. We measured REE in 95 patients with subacute stroke (53.5 ± 16.6 days post-stroke) with indirect calorimetry, and compared it with predicted values of energy expenditure estimated from the HB (expressed as percentage). Patients were admitted for rehabilitation of their first ischemic or nonsurgical hemorrhagic stroke. The severity of hemiparesis was assessed with the motor items of the Stroke Impairment Assessment Set (SIAS). The ADL was assessed with the Functional Independence Measure (FIM). We compared REE and %HB of the two groups divided by hemiparesis severity and ADL limitation using the Student's t-test, and those of the five groups divided by stroke location. The correlations between REE and the motor items of the SIAS and the FIM score were assessed with the Spearman rank correlation test. A multiple regression analysis for REE was conducted. The average body weight (BW) was 57.1 ± 11.3 kg. The average body mass index (BMI) was 22.5 ± 4.0. The mean REE (%HB) was 1,271 ± 284 kcal/day (106.0 ± 17.3%). REE and %HB of the low ADL group was less than that of the high ADL group (p < 0.05). The REE had a positive correlation with the FIM score (rs = 0.51, p < 0.01). The motor items of the SIAS were not significantly correlated with REE. BW, FIM, and stroke location were independent predictors of REE. Analysis of energy expenditure suggests that stroke patients are not hypermetabolic during the

  15. Tissue and Circulating Expression of IL-1 Family Members Following Heat Stroke

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    understanding the pathophysiology and SIRS -like responses associated with HS. In addition, future studies de- signed to measure tissue protein levels...for public release; distribution unlimited. Interleukin-1 (IL-1) is thought to have a significant role in the pathophysiology of heat stroke (HS...published August 9, 2011; doi:10.1152/physiolgenomics.00076.2011.—Interleukin-1 (IL-1) is thought to have a significant role in the pathophysiology of

  16. Brain regions important for recovery after severe post-stroke upper limb paresis.

    PubMed

    Rondina, Jane M; Park, Chang-Hyun; Ward, Nick S

    2017-09-01

    Background The ability to predict outcome after stroke is clinically important for planning treatment and for stratification in restorative clinical trials. In relation to the upper limbs, the main predictor of outcome is initial severity, with patients who present with mild to moderate impairment regaining about 70% of their initial impairment by 3 months post-stroke. However, in those with severe presentations, this proportional recovery applies in only about half, with the other half experiencing poor recovery. The reasons for this failure to recover are not established although the extent of corticospinal tract damage is suggested to be a contributory factor. In this study, we investigated 30 patients with chronic stroke who had presented with severe upper limb impairment and asked whether it was possible to differentiate those with a subsequent good or poor recovery of the upper limb based solely on a T1-weighted structural brain scan. Methods A support vector machine approach using voxel-wise lesion likelihood values was used to show that it was possible to classify patients as good or poor recoverers with variable accuracy depending on which brain regions were used to perform the classification. Results While considering damage within a corticospinal tract mask resulted in 73% classification accuracy, using other (non-corticospinal tract) motor areas provided 87% accuracy, and combining both resulted in 90% accuracy. Conclusion This proof of concept approach highlights the relative importance of different anatomical structures in supporting post-stroke upper limb motor recovery and points towards methodologies that might be used to stratify patients in future restorative clinical trials. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. The Thermoregulatory Consequences of Heat Stroke: Are Cytokines Involved

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    Acknowledgements I thank A.M. Bastille, M . Blaha, J. Castor, and L.D. Walker for their technical assistance with the gene knock- out studies. D.A. Dubose and M.N...151, 564–575. Aoki, K., Kondo, N., Shibasaki, M ., Takano, S., Katsuura, T., 1998. Circadian variation in skin blood flow responses to passive heat...sepsis study group. Crit. Care Med. 27, 699–707. Attia, M ., Khogali, M ., El-Khatib, G., Mustafa, M.K.E., Mahmoud, M.A., Eldin, A.N., Gumaa, K., 1983

  18. The role of acute lesion topography in initial ischemic stroke severity and long-term functional outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ona; Cloonan, Lisa; Mocking, Steven JT.; Bouts, Mark JRJ.; Copen, William A.; Cougo-Pinto, Pedro; Fitzpatrick, Kaitlin; Kanakis, Allison; Schaefer, Pamela W.; Rosand, Jonathan; Furie, Karen L.; Rost, Natalia S.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Acute infarct volume, often proposed as a biomarker for evaluating novel interventions for acute ischemic stroke (AIS), correlates only moderately with traditional clinical endpoints such as the modified Rankin Scale (mRS). We hypothesized that the topography of acute stroke lesions on diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) may provide further information with regard to presenting stroke severity and long-term functional outcomes. Methods Data from a prospective stroke repository were limited to AIS subjects with MRI completed within 48 hours from last known well, admission NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS), and 3-to-6 months mRS scores. Using voxel-based lesion symptom mapping techniques including age, sex and DWI lesion volume as covariates, statistical maps were calculated to determine the significance of lesion location for clinical outcome and admission stroke severity. Results 490 subjects were analyzed. Acute stroke lesions in the left hemisphere were associated with more severe NIHSS at admission and poor mRS at 3 to 6 months. Specifically, injury to white matter (corona radiata, internal and external capsules, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and uncinate fasciculus), post-central gyrus, putamen, and operculum were implicated in poor mRS. More severe NIHSS involved these regions as well as the amygdala, caudate, pallidum, inferior frontal gyrus, insula, and pre-central gyrus. Conclusions Acute lesion topography provides important insights into anatomical correlates of admission stroke severity and post-stroke outcomes. Future models that account for infarct location in addition to DWI volume may improve stroke outcome prediction and identify patients likely to benefit from aggressive acute intervention and personalized rehabilitation strategies. PMID:26199314

  19. Hemodynamic comparison of mild and severe preeclampsia: concept of stroke systemic vascular resistance index.

    PubMed

    Scardo, J; Kiser, R; Dillon, A; Brost, B; Newman, R

    1996-01-01

    Our purpose was to compare baseline hemodynamic parameters of mild and severe preeclampsia. Patients admitted to the Medical University Labor and Delivery Unit with the diagnosis of preeclampsia who had not received prior antihypertensive or magnesium sulfate therapy were recruited for noninvasive hemodynamic monitoring with thoracic electrical bioimpedance. After stabilization in the lateral recumbent position, hemodynamic monitoring was begun. Baseline hemodynamic parameters, mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI), cardiac index (CI), and stroke index (SI) were recorded. Stroke systemic vascular resistance index (SSVRI), the resistance imposed by vasculature on each beat of the heart, was calculated for each patient by multiplying SVRI by HR. For statistical analysis, unpaired Student's t-tests (two-tailed) were utilized (P < 0.01). Forty-one preeclamptic patients (20 mild, 21 severe) were enrolled. Mean gestational age of severe patients was 32.2 +/- 4.0 and of mild patients was 37.0 +/- 3.5. MAP, SBP, diastolic blood pressure, HR, and SSVRI were higher in the severe group. SVRI, CI, cardiac output, and SI did not differ significantly between groups. Severe preclampsia appears to be a more intensely vasoconstricted state than mild preeclampsia. Although CI is inversely proportional to SVRI, increased HR in severe preeclampsia prevents this expected decrease in cardiac output.

  20. Advanced electric heat pump dual-stroke compressor and system development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veyo, S. E.; Fagan, T. J.

    1983-12-01

    The development of an advanced electric heat pump is discussed. A two-capacity, residential, advanced electric heat pump utilizing a unique dual-stroke compressor was developed. Two nearly identical preprototype split systems of nominally 3.5 tons maximum cooling capacity were designed, built and laboratory tested. The estimated annual energy efficiency of this advanced system is 20 percent better than a two-speed electric heat pump available at contract inception in 1979. This superior performance is due to the synergism of a high-efficiency, dual-stroke reciprocating compressor, a dual-strength high-efficiency single-speed single-phase hermetic drive motor, a single-width, single-entry high-efficiency indoor blower with backward curved cambered plate blades, a high-efficiency multivane axial flow outdoor fan, high-efficiency two-speed air mover motors and a microprocessor control system. The relative proportions of heat exchangers, air flows and compressor size as well as the ratio between high and low capacity were optimized so as to minimize the annual cost of ownership in a northern climate. Constraints placed upon the optimization and design process to ensure comfort provide heating air with a temperature of at least 90(0)F and provide cooling with a sensible-to-total capacity ratio of not more than 0.7. System performance was measured in the laboratory in accordance with applicable codes and procedures. Performance data plus hardware details are provided.

  1. Risk Factors for Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome in Severe Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shuna; Li, Yue; Yuan, Junliang; Yang, Lei; Li, Shujuan; Hu, Wenli

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe stroke patients have poor clinical outcome which may be associated with development of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). Therefore, the aim of our study was to investigate independent risk factors for development of MODS in severe stroke patients. Methods Ninety seven severe stroke patients were prospective recruited from Jan 2011 to Jun 2015. The development of MODS was identified by Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score (score ≥ 3, at least two organs), which was assessed on day 1, 4, 7, 10 and 14 after admission. Baseline characteristics, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, Glasgow coma score (GCS) and cerebral imaging parameters were collected at admission. Cox regression was performed to determine predictors for the development of MODS. Medical complications after admission and in-hospital mortality were also investigated. Results 33 (34%) patients were in MODS group and 64 (66%) were in non-MODS group within 14 days after admission. Patients in MODS group had more smoker (51.5% vs 28.1%, p = 0.023), higher NIHSS score (23.48 ± 6.12 vs 19.81 ± 4.83, p = 0.004), higher APACHE II score (18.70 ± 5.18 vs 15.64 ± 4.36, p = 0.003) and lower GCS score (6.33 ± 2.48 vs 8.14 ± 2.73, p = 0.002). They also had higher rate of infarction in multi vascular territories (36.4% vs 10.9%, p = 0.003). The most common complication in all patients was pulmonary infection, while complication scores were comparable between two groups. Patients with MODS had higher in-hospital mortality (69.7% vs 9.4%, p = 0.000). In Cox regression, NIHSS score (RR = 1.084, 95% CI 1.019–1.153) and infarction in multi vascular territories (RR = 2.345 95% CI 1.105–4.978) were independent risk factors for development of MODS. Conclusions In acute phase of stroke, NIHSS score and infarction in multi vascular territories predicted MODS in severe stroke patients. Moreover, patients with MODS had higher in-hospital mortality

  2. Risk Factors for Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome in Severe Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Qin, Wei; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Yang, Shuna; Li, Yue; Yuan, Junliang; Yang, Lei; Li, Shujuan; Hu, Wenli

    2016-01-01

    Severe stroke patients have poor clinical outcome which may be associated with development of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). Therefore, the aim of our study was to investigate independent risk factors for development of MODS in severe stroke patients. Ninety seven severe stroke patients were prospective recruited from Jan 2011 to Jun 2015. The development of MODS was identified by Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score (score ≥ 3, at least two organs), which was assessed on day 1, 4, 7, 10 and 14 after admission. Baseline characteristics, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, Glasgow coma score (GCS) and cerebral imaging parameters were collected at admission. Cox regression was performed to determine predictors for the development of MODS. Medical complications after admission and in-hospital mortality were also investigated. 33 (34%) patients were in MODS group and 64 (66%) were in non-MODS group within 14 days after admission. Patients in MODS group had more smoker (51.5% vs 28.1%, p = 0.023), higher NIHSS score (23.48 ± 6.12 vs 19.81 ± 4.83, p = 0.004), higher APACHE II score (18.70 ± 5.18 vs 15.64 ± 4.36, p = 0.003) and lower GCS score (6.33 ± 2.48 vs 8.14 ± 2.73, p = 0.002). They also had higher rate of infarction in multi vascular territories (36.4% vs 10.9%, p = 0.003). The most common complication in all patients was pulmonary infection, while complication scores were comparable between two groups. Patients with MODS had higher in-hospital mortality (69.7% vs 9.4%, p = 0.000). In Cox regression, NIHSS score (RR = 1.084, 95% CI 1.019-1.153) and infarction in multi vascular territories (RR = 2.345 95% CI 1.105-4.978) were independent risk factors for development of MODS. In acute phase of stroke, NIHSS score and infarction in multi vascular territories predicted MODS in severe stroke patients. Moreover, patients with MODS had higher in-hospital mortality, suggesting that early identification of MODS

  3. Predicting Recovery of Voluntary Upper Extremity Movement in Subacute Stroke Patients with Severe Upper Extremity Paresis

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Chia-Lin; Pan, Shin-Liang; Jeng, Jiann-Shing; Chen, Bang-Bin; Wang, Yen-Ho; Hsueh, I-Ping; Hsieh, Ching-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective Prediction of voluntary upper extremity (UE) movement recovery is largely unknown in patients with little voluntary UE movement at admission. The present study aimed to investigate (1) the extent and variation of voluntary UE movement recovery, and (2) the best predictive model of the recovery of voluntary UE movement by clinical variables in patients with severe UE paresis. Design Prospective cohort study. Methods 140 (out of 590) stroke patients with severe UE paresis completed all assessments. Voluntary UE movement was assessed using the UE subscale of the Stroke Rehabilitation Assessment of Movement (STREAM-UE). Two outcome measures, STREAM-UE scores at discharge (DCSTREAM-UE) and changes between admission and discharge (ΔSTREAM-UE), were investigated to represent the final states and improvement of the recovery of voluntary UE movement. Stepwise regression analyses were used to investigate 19 clinical variables and to find the best predictive models of the two outcome measures. Results The participants showed wide variation in both DCSTREAM-UE and ΔSTREAM-UE. 3.6% of the participants almost fully recovered at discharge (DCSTREAM-UE > 15). A large improvement (ΔSTREAM-UE >= 10) occurred in 16.4% of the participants, while 32.9% of the participants did not have any improvement. The four predictors for the DCSTREAM-UE (R2 = 35.0%) were ‘baseline STREAM-UE score’, ‘hemorrhagic stroke’, ‘baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score’, and ‘cortical lesion excluding primary motor cortex’. The three predictors for the ΔSTREAM-UE (R2 = 22.0%) were ‘hemorrhagic stroke’, ‘baseline NIHSS score’, and ‘cortical lesion excluding primary motor cortex’. Conclusions Recovery of voluntary UE movement varied widely in patients with severe UE paresis after stroke. The predictive power of clinical variables was poor. Both results indicate the complex nature of voluntary UE movement recovery in patients

  4. The relationship of patent foramen ovale location with severity of stroke: A new risk factor for paradoxical embolism.

    PubMed

    Erkoç, Mustafa Fatih; Öztoprak, Bilge; Okur, Aylin; Ede, Hüseyin; Örsçelik, Özcan; Kantarcı, Mecit; Kızrak, Yeşim

    2016-06-01

    Patent foramen ovale (PFO) is a common developmental anomaly and is well associated with paradoxical embolism and cryptogenic stroke. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship of PFO location with severity of cryptogenic stroke. Fifty patients with cryptogenic stroke and echocardiographically proven PFO were classified according to the severity of stroke. In order to define the location of PFOs, an imaginary line dividing the length of interatrial septum vertically into two equal parts was drawn manually at axial plane on cardiac multidetector computed tomography. PFOs located at superior part of this imaginary line was defined as superiorly located PFO, while PFOs located at inferior part of this imaginary line was defined as inferiorly located PFO. Fourteen patients (28%) revealed mild, 20 patients (40%) revealed moderate and 16 patients (32%) had severe stroke. Based on PFO location, there were 34 patients (68%) with superiorly (group 1), and 16 patients (32%) with inferiorly (group 2) located PFO. It was found that patients of group 1 had significantly higher frequency of moderate or severe stroke compared to those of group 2 (p < 0.005) CONCLUSION: In conclusion, the patients with superiorly located PFO had higher frequency of severe stroke compared to the patients with inferiorly located PFO. Since this is a preliminary study, clinical application and importance of this finding necessitates further large-scale interventional studies.

  5. Use of Antihypertensive Drugs and Ischemic Stroke Severity – Is There a Role for Angiotensin-II?

    PubMed Central

    Bots, Michiel L.; Selvarajah, Sharmini; Abdul Aziz, Zariah; Sidek, Norsima Nazifah; Spiering, Wilko; Kappelle, L. Jaap; Vaartjes, Ilonca

    2016-01-01

    Background The increase in angiotensin II (Ang II) formation by selected antihypertensive drugs is said to exhibit neuroprotective properties, but this translation into improvement in clinical outcomes has been inconclusive. We undertook a study to investigate the relationship between types of antihypertensive drugs used prior to a stroke event and ischemic stroke severity. We hypothesized that use of antihypertensive drugs that increase Ang II formation (Ang II increasers) would reduce ischemic stroke severity when compared to antihypertensive drugs that suppress Ang II formation (Ang II suppressors). Methods From the Malaysian National Neurology Registry, we included hypertensive patients with first ischemic stroke who presented within 48 hours from ictus. Antihypertensive drugs were divided into Ang II increasers (angiotensin-I receptor blockers (ARBs), calcium channel blockers (CCBs) and diuretics) and Ang II suppressors (angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and beta blockers). We evaluated stroke severity during admission with the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). We performed a multivariable logistic regression with the score being dichotomized at 15. Scores of less than 15 were categorized as less severe stroke. Results A total of 710 patients were included. ACEIs was the most commonly prescribed antihypertensive drug in patients using Ang II suppressors (74%) and CCBs, in patients prescribed with Ang II increasers at 77%. There was no significant difference in the severity of ischemic stroke between patients who were using Ang II increasers in comparison to patients with Ang II suppressors (OR: 1.32, 95%CI: 0.83–2.10, p = 0.24). Conclusion In our study, we found that use of antihypertensive drugs that increase Ang II formation was not associated with less severe ischemic stroke as compared to use of antihypertensive drugs that suppress Ang II formation. PMID:27846309

  6. Low body temperature associated with severe ischemic stroke within 6 hours of onset: The Bergen NORSTROKE Study.

    PubMed

    Kvistad, Christopher E; Thomassen, Lars; Waje-Andreassen, Ulrike; Naess, Halvor

    2012-01-01

    Hypothermia is considered neuroprotective and a potential treatment in cerebral ischemia. Some studies suggest that hyperthermia may promote clot lysis. We hypothesized that low body temperature would prolong time to spontaneous clot lysis resulting in an association between low body temperature and severe neurological deficits in the early phase of ischemic stroke. In this prospective study, patients (n = 516) exhibiting ischemic stroke with symptom onset within 6 hours were included. Body temperature and National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score were registered on admission. Because low body temperature on admission may be secondary to immobilization due to large stroke, separate analyses were performed on patients with cerebral hemorrhage admitted within 6 hours (n = 85). Linear regression showed that low body temperature on admission was independently associated with a high NIHSS score within 6 hours of stroke onset in patients with ischemic stroke (P < 0.001). The association persisted when NIHSS was measured at 24 hours after admission. No such associations were found in patients with cerebral hemorrhage admitted within 6 hours of stroke onset. Our study suggests that low body temperature within 6 hours of symptom onset is associated with severe ischemic stroke. This is in support of our hypothesis, although other contributing mechanisms cannot be excluded.

  7. Decoding of motor intentions from epidural ECoG recordings in severely paralyzed chronic stroke patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spüler, M.; Walter, A.; Ramos-Murguialday, A.; Naros, G.; Birbaumer, N.; Gharabaghi, A.; Rosenstiel, W.; Bogdan, M.

    2014-12-01

    Objective. Recently, there have been several approaches to utilize a brain-computer interface (BCI) for rehabilitation with stroke patients or as an assistive device for the paralyzed. In this study we investigated whether up to seven different hand movement intentions can be decoded from epidural electrocorticography (ECoG) in chronic stroke patients. Approach. In a screening session we recorded epidural ECoG data over the ipsilesional motor cortex from four chronic stroke patients who had no residual hand movement. Data was analyzed offline using a support vector machine (SVM) to decode different movement intentions. Main results. We showed that up to seven hand movement intentions can be decoded with an average accuracy of 61% (chance level 15.6%). When reducing the number of classes, average accuracies up to 88% can be achieved for decoding three different movement intentions. Significance. The findings suggest that ipsilesional epidural ECoG can be used as a viable control signal for BCI-driven neuroprosthesis. Although patients showed no sign of residual hand movement, brain activity at the ipsilesional motor cortex still shows enough intention-related activity to decode different movement intentions with sufficient accuracy.

  8. Changes in auditory feedback connections determine the severity of speech processing deficits after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, T.M.; Penny, W.D.; Stephan, K.E.; Crinion, J.T.; Thompson, A.J.; Price, C.J.; Leff, A.P.

    2012-01-01

    We compared brain structure and function in two sub-groups of 21 stroke patients with either moderate or severe chronic speech comprehension impairment. Both groups had damage to the supra-temporal plane; however, the severe group suffered greater damage to two unimodal auditory areas: primary auditory cortex and the planum temporale. The effects of this damage were investigated using fMRI while patients listened to speech and speech-like sounds. Pronounced changes in connectivity were found in both groups, in undamaged parts of the auditory hierarchy. Compared to controls, moderate patients had significantly stronger feedback connections from planum temporale to primary auditory cortex bilaterally, while in severe patients this connection was significantly weaker in the undamaged right hemisphere. This suggests that predictive feedback mechanisms compensate in moderately affected patients but not in severely affected patients. The key pathomechanism in humans with persistent speech comprehension impairments may be impaired feedback connectivity to unimodal auditory areas. PMID:22442088

  9. Enhanced estimations of post-stroke aphasia severity using stacked multimodal predictions.

    PubMed

    Pustina, Dorian; Coslett, Harry Branch; Ungar, Lyle; Faseyitan, Olufunsho K; Medaglia, John D; Avants, Brian; Schwartz, Myrna F

    2017-08-07

    The severity of post-stroke aphasia and the potential for recovery are highly variable and difficult to predict. Evidence suggests that optimal estimation of aphasia severity requires the integration of multiple neuroimaging modalities and the adoption of new methods that can detect multivariate brain-behavior relationships. We created and tested a multimodal framework that relies on three information sources (lesion maps, structural connectivity, and functional connectivity) to create an array of unimodal predictions which are then fed into a final model that creates "stacked multimodal predictions" (STAMP). Crossvalidated predictions of four aphasia scores (picture naming, sentence repetition, sentence comprehension, and overall aphasia severity) were obtained from 53 left hemispheric chronic stroke patients (age: 57.1 ± 12.3 yrs, post-stroke interval: 20 months, 25 female). Results showed accurate predictions for all four aphasia scores (correlation true vs. predicted: r = 0.79-0.88). The accuracy was slightly smaller but yet significant (r = 0.66) in a full split crossvalidation with each patient considered as new. Critically, multimodal predictions produced more accurate results that any single modality alone. Topological maps of the brain regions involved in the prediction were recovered and compared with traditional voxel-based lesion-to-symptom maps, revealing high spatial congruency. These results suggest that neuroimaging modalities carry complementary information potentially useful for the prediction of aphasia scores. More broadly, this study shows that the translation of neuroimaging findings into clinically useful tools calls for a shift in perspective from unimodal to multimodal neuroimaging, from univariate to multivariate methods, from linear to nonlinear models, and, conceptually, from inferential to predictive brain mapping. Hum Brain Mapp, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Recovery-related indicators of motor network plasticity according to impairment severity after stroke.

    PubMed

    Lee, J; Park, E; Lee, A; Chang, W H; Kim, D-S; Kim, Y-H

    2017-10-01

    Brain connectivity analysis has been widely used to investigate brain plasticity and recovery-related indicators of patients with stroke. However, results remain controversial because of interindividual variability of initial impairment and subsequent recovery of function. In this study, we aimed to investigate the differences in network plasticity and motor recovery-related indicators according to initial severity. We divided participants (16 males and 14 females, aged 54.2 ± 12.0 years) into groups of different severity by Fugl-Mayer Assessment score, i.e. moderate (50-84), severe (20-49) and extremely severe (<20) impairment groups. Longitudinal resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data were acquired at 2 weeks and 3 months after onset. The differences in network plasticity and recovery-related indicators between groups were investigated using network distance and graph measurements. As the level of impairment increased, the network balance was more disrupted. Network balance, interhemispheric connectivity and network efficiency were recovered at 3 months only in the moderate impairment group. However, this was not the case in the extremely severe impairment group. A single connection strength between the ipsilesional primary motor cortex and ventral premotor cortex was implicated in the recovery of motor function for the extremely severe impairment group. The connections of the ipsilesional primary motor cortex-ventral premotor cortex were positively associated with motor recovery as the patients were more severely impaired. Differences in plasticity and recovery-related indicators of motor networks were noted according to impairment severity. Our results may suggest meaningful implications for recovery prediction and treatment strategies in future stroke research. © 2017 EAN.

  11. Katanin spiral and ring structures shed light on power stroke for microtubule severing.

    PubMed

    Zehr, Elena; Szyk, Agnieszka; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Szczesna, Ewa; Zuo, Xiaobing; Roll-Mecak, Antonina

    2017-09-01

    Microtubule-severing enzymes katanin, spastin and fidgetin are AAA ATPases important for the biogenesis and maintenance of complex microtubule arrays in axons, spindles and cilia. Because of a lack of known 3D structures for these enzymes, their mechanism of action has remained poorly understood. Here we report the X-ray crystal structure of the monomeric AAA katanin module from Caenorhabditis elegans and cryo-EM reconstructions of the hexamer in two conformations. The structures reveal an unexpected asymmetric arrangement of the AAA domains mediated by structural elements unique to microtubule-severing enzymes and critical for their function. The reconstructions show that katanin cycles between open spiral and closed ring conformations, depending on the ATP occupancy of a gating protomer that tenses or relaxes interprotomer interfaces. Cycling of the hexamer between these conformations would provide the power stroke for microtubule severing.

  12. Communication impairment and activity limitation in stroke patients with severe aphasia.

    PubMed

    Darrigrand, Benedicte; Dutheil, Sabine; Michelet, Valerie; Rereau, Stephanie; Rousseaux, Marc; Mazaux, Jean-Michel

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated how patients with severe aphasia communicated in daily living, which verbal and non-verbal communication skills were spared and which were impaired, and whether activity limitations in communication are related to verbal impairments. Twenty-seven patients with severe aphasia and 9 with moderate aphasia originating from a sample of 102 aphasic persons followed up in a French regional survey were assessed with a communication test and a communication activity limitation questionnaire 12-18 months after a first stroke. Patients with severe aphasia suffered severe activity limitations in communication, with performance 3-fold lower than that of patients with moderate aphasia, and 4-fold lower than scores attained by normals. Both aphasia severity and communication disability at follow-up were related to the initial severity of aphasia. Using a phone, credit card and a chequebook, reading and filling in administrative documents, and communication behaviours involved in social life were the most severely impaired. Non-verbal communication performance was not related to aphasia severity. We conclude that there is a great need for speech therapy research to develop new compensatory or alternative strategies for patients with severe aphasia.

  13. No evidence that severity of stroke in internal carotid occlusion is related to collateral arteries

    PubMed Central

    Mead, G E; Wardlaw, J M; Lewis, S C; Dennis, M S

    2006-01-01

    Background/Aim The neurological effects of internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion vary between patients. The authors investigated whether the severity of symptoms in a large group of patients with ipsilateral or/and contralateral ICA occlusion at presentation with ocular or cerebral ischaemic symptoms could be explained by patency of other extra or intracranial arteries to act as collateral pathways. Methods The authors prospectively identified all patients (n = 2881) with stroke, cerebral transient ischaemic attack (TIA), retinal artery occlusion (RAO), and amaurosis fugax (AFx) presenting to our hospital over five years, obtained detailed history and examination, and examined the intra and extracranial arteries with carotid and colour‐power transcranial Doppler ultrasound. For this analysis, all those with intracranial haemorrhage on brain imaging and cerebral events without brain imaging were excluded. Results Among 2228/2397 patients with brain imaging (1713 ischaemic strokes, 401 cerebral TIAs, 193 AFx, and 90 RAO) who underwent carotid Doppler, 195 (9%) had ICA occlusion. Among those patients with cortical events, disease in potential collateral arteries (contralateral ICA, external carotid, ipsilateral or contralateral vertebral or intracranial arteries) was equally distributed among patients with severe and mild ischaemic presenting symptoms. Conclusion The authors found no evidence that the clinical presentation associated with an ICA occlusion was related to patency of other extra or intracranial arteries to act as collateral pathways. Further work is required to investigate what determines the clinical effects of ICA occlusion. PMID:16488923

  14. [Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty for progressing stroke caused by severe basilar artery stenosis: case report].

    PubMed

    Yamamura, A; Takamura, Y; Yamaki, T; Nakagawa, T; Hashi, K

    1994-03-01

    We encountered one case of progressing stroke caused by severe basilar artery stenosis. The patient was treated with emergent percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) with satisfactory results. A 54 year-old woman was admitted 15 minutes after the sudden onset of rt. hemiparesis, rt. hemidysesthesia, dysarthria and consciousness disturbance. CT scan on admission showed no abnormal findings. The consciousness level of the patient deteriorated rapidly from JCS 1 to JCS 20 within 30 minutes from the ictus. An emergent angiogram revealed severe basilar artery stenosis at its middle portion and poorly developed collateral circulation. One hour after the stroke occurred, PTA was performed. Using a 3mm diameter balloon catheter, we introduced the balloon into the stenotic lesion and inflated it 6 times from 4 atm to 8 atm pressure. The patient recovered immediately on the operating table improving from JCS 20 to JCS 1. Rt. hemiparesis also improved. Follow-up MRI showed a small area of ischemic change in the brain stem, but no large infarction appeared. The patient was discharged with no neurosurgical deficits after 30 days of PTA. PTA for basilar artery stenosis is still a controversial subject. One reason is the risk of basilar artery perforating branches occlusion by balloon catheter and the other is the difficulty of introducing a flexible balloon catheter into the basilar artery beyond the acute angulation of the vertebral artery. If those two problems were solved, PTA would be the first-choice therapy for basilar artery stenosis in both acute and chronic stages.

  15. Serum Levels of Substance P and Mortality in Patients with a Severe Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lorente, Leonardo; Martín, María M.; Almeida, Teresa; Pérez-Cejas, Antonia; Ramos, Luis; Argueso, Mónica; Riaño-Ruiz, Marta; Solé-Violán, Jordi; Hernández, Mariano

    2016-01-01

    Substance P (SP), a member of tachykinin family, is involved in the inflammation of the central nervous system and in the appearance of cerebral edema. Higher serum levels of SP have been found in 18 patients with cerebral ischemia compared with healthy controls. The aim of our multi-center study was to analyze the possible association between serum levels of SP and mortality in ischemic stroke patients. We included patients with malignant middle cerebral artery infarction (MMCAI) and a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) lower than 9. Non-surviving patients at 30 days (n = 31) had higher serum concentrations of SP levels at diagnosis of severe MMCAI than survivors (n = 30) (p < 0.001). We found in multiple regression an association between serum concentrations of SP higher than 362 pg/mL and mortality at 30 days (Odds Ratio = 5.33; 95% confidence interval = 1.541–18.470; p = 0.008) after controlling for age and GCS. Thus, the major novel finding of our study was the association between serum levels of SP and mortality in patients suffering from severe acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27338372

  16. Aggressive surgical interventions for severe stroke: Impact on quality of life, caregiver burden and family outcomes.

    PubMed

    Green, Theresa; Demchuk, Andrew; Newcommon, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Decompressive hemicraniectomy, clot evacuation, and aneurysmal interventions are considered aggressive surgical therapeutic options for treatment of massive cerebral artery infarction (MCA), intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), and severe subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) respectively. Although these procedures are saving lives, little is actually known about the impact on outcomes other than short-term survival and functional status. The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of personal and social consequences of surviving these aggressive surgical interventions in order to aid acute care clinicians in helping family members make difficult decisions about undertaking such interventions. An exploratory mixed method study using a convergent parallel design was conducted to examine functional recovery (NIHSS, mRS & BI), cognitive status (Montreal Cognitive Assessment Scale, MoCA), quality of life (Euroqol 5-D), and caregiver outcomes (Bakas Caregiver Outcome Scale, BCOS) in a cohort of patients and families who had undergone aggressive surgical intervention for severe stroke between the years 2000-2007 Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, univariate and multivariate analysis of variance, and multivariate logistic regression. Content analysis was used to analyze the qualitative interviews conducted with stroke survivors and family members. Twenty-seven patients and 13 spouses participated in this study. Based on patient MOCA scores, overall cognitive status was 25.18 (range 23.4-26.9); current functional outcomes scores: NIHSS 2.22, mRS 1.74, and BI 88.5. EQ-5D scores revealed no significant differences between patients and caregivers (p = 0.585) and caregiver outcomes revealed no significant diferences between male/female caregivers or patient diagnostic group (MCA, SAH, ICH; p = 0.103). Overall, patients and families were satisfied with quality of life and decisions made at the time of the initial stroke. There was consensus among study

  17. [An analysis of laboratory results of parameters of organ function in patients with heat stroke].

    PubMed

    Ye, Jun; Mo, Weiming; Chen, Yan; Yang, Aiping

    2015-08-01

    To explore the role of parameters of organ function during heat stroke ( HS ) on the prognosis, and to form the treatment strategy through an analysis of parameters of organ function during HS. A retrospective study was conducted. Thirty-seven patients with HS ( HS group ) and 54 patients with mild-to-moderate stroke ( stroke group ) admitted to Zhejiang Xiaoshan Hospital from 2011 to 2014 were enrolled. The experimental results of organs function indicators for patients were recorded including: (1) cardiac markers: troponin I ( TnI ); (2) myocardium zymogram: creatine kinase ( CK ), MB isoenzyme of creatine kinase ( CK-MB ), lactate dehydrogenase ( LDH ), and aspartate aminotransferase ( AST ); (3) renal function indexes: blood urea nitrogen ( BUN ), uric acid ( UA ), and serum creatinine ( SCr ); (4) electrolyte: serum K(+), Na(+), and Cl(-); (5)coagulation function: prothrombin time ( PT ), international normalized ratio ( INR ), activated partial thromboplastin time ( APTT ), thrombin time ( TT ), fibrinogen ( FIB ), and D-dimer; (6) blood gas analysis: pH value, arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide ( PaCO(2)), base excess ( BE ), standard bicarbonate ( SB ), and actual bicarbonate ( AB ); (7) routine blood test: blood platelet count ( PLT ); (8) hepatic function: alanine aminotransferase ( ALT ). Abnormal rates of laboratory parameters of 37 HS patients were statistically analyzed. Various laboratory parameters of organs function as well as the initial value and extreme value ( maximum or minimum value ) during treatment of CK and PLT in HS patients were compared between two groups. The abnormal rates of 37 HS patients were more than 70%, including incipient value of TnI, CK, LDH, AST, serum Na(+), ALT, D-dimer, PaCO(2), AB, maximum value of CK, and minimum value of PLT, the abnormal rates being 73.0%, 70.3%, 81.1%, 78.4%, 78.4%, 70.3%, 70.3%, 70.3%, 75.7%, 81.1%, 75.7%, respectively. The abnormal rates of other parameters were less than 70%. There were

  18. Open Heart Surgery Does Not Increase the Incidence of Ipsilateral Ischemic Stroke in Patients with Asymptomatic Severe Carotid Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Castaldo, John E; Yacoub, Hussam A; Li, Yuebing; Kincaid, Hope; Jenny, Donna

    2017-06-13

    We evaluated the incidence of perioperative stroke following the institution's 2007 practice change of discontinuing combined carotid endarterectomy and open heart surgery (OHS) for patients with severe carotid stenosis. In this retrospective cohort study, we compared 113 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting, aortic valve replacement, or both from 2007 to 2011 with data collected from 2001 to 2006 from a similar group of patients. Our aim was to assess whether the practice change led to a greater incidence of stroke. A total of 7350 consecutive patients undergoing OHS during the specified time period were screened. Of these, 3030 had OHS between 2007 and 2011 but none were combined with carotid artery surgery (new cohort). The remaining 4320 had OHS before 2007 and 44 had combined procedures (old cohort). Of patients undergoing OHS during the 10-year period of observation, 230 had severe (>80%) carotid stenosis. In the old cohort (before 2007), carotid stenosis was associated with perioperative stroke in 2.5% of cases. None of the 113 patients having cardiac procedures after 2007 received combined carotid artery surgery; only 1 of these patients harboring severe carotid stenosis had an ischemic stroke (.9%) during the perioperative period. The difference in stroke incidence between the 2 cohorts was statistically significant (P = .002). The incidence of stroke in patients with severe carotid artery stenosis undergoing OHS was lower after combined surgery was discontinued. Combined carotid and OHS itself seems to be an important risk factor for stroke. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Validating imaging biomarkers of cerebral edema in patients with severe ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Albert J; Sheth, Kevin N; Kimberly, W Taylor; Chaudhry, Zeshan A; Elm, Jordan J; Jacobson, Sven; Davis, Stephen M; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Albers, Gregory W; Stern, Barney J; González, R Gilberto

    2013-08-01

    There is no validated neuroimaging marker for quantifying brain edema. We sought to test whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based metrics would reliably change during the early subacute period in a manner consistent with edema and whether they would correlate with relevant clinical endpoints. Serial MRI studies from patients in the Echoplanar Imaging Thrombolytic Evaluation Trial with initial diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) lesion volume >82 cm(3) were analyzed. Two independent readers outlined the hemisphere and lateral ventricle on the involved side and calculated respective volumes at baseline and days 3 to 5. We assessed interrater agreement, volume change between scans, and the association of volume change with early neurologic deterioration (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score worsening of ≥ 4 points), a 90-day modified Rankin scale (mRS) score of 0 to 4, and mortality. Of 12 patients who met study criteria, average baseline and follow-up DWI lesion size was 138 cm(3) and 234 cm(3), respectively. The mean time to follow-up MRI was 62 hours. Concordance correlation coefficients between readers were >0.90 for both hemisphere and ventricle volume assessment. Mean percent hemisphere volume increase was 16.2 ± 8.3% (P < .0001), and the mean percent ventricle volume decrease was 45.6 ± 16.9% (P < .001). Percent hemisphere growth predicted early neurologic deterioration (area under the curve [AUC] 0.92; P = .0005) and 90-day mRS 0 to 4 (AUC 0.80; P = .02). In this exploratory analysis of severe ischemic stroke patients, statistically significant changes in hemisphere and ventricular volumes within the first week are consistent with expected changes of cerebral edema. MRI-based analysis of hemisphere growth appears to be a suitable biomarker for edema formation. Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Use of calcitonin to prevent complex regional pain syndrome type I in severe hemiplegic patients after stroke.

    PubMed

    Matayoshi, Satoru; Shimodozono, Megumi; Hirata, Yoshifumi; Ueda, Toshie; Horio, Shinya; Kawahira, Kazumi

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of calcitonin in preventing complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS) in patients with severe hemiplegia following stroke. In this observer-blinded, controlled study comparison with historical controls between April 2003 and May 2004, subjects comprised consecutive patients with post-stroke hemiplegia admitted between June 2004 and September 2005, with any upper limb or finger graded as Brunnstrom stage (BrST) III or below. One group was administered intramuscular injection of 20 units of elcatonin (EL) (Asu(1-7) eel calcitonin) weekly from immediately after admission to discharge, together with rehabilitation therapy. The control group received rehabilitation therapy alone. Patients were observed during the in-hospital rehabilitation period. The main outcome measure was onset of CRPS. Incidence of CRPS in all patients with post-stroke hemiplegia during the control period was about 8.2%, similar to recent studies. Limited to serious hemiplegic patients graded as BrST III or below, incidence of CRPS was significantly lower in the EL group (12.5%) than in controls (57.1%). No significant differences in patient background were seen between groups. CRPS was completely prevented when EL injection was started stroke, but prophylactic effects were weak when EL was started >6 weeks after stroke. Intramuscular calcitonin appears to suppress onset of CRPS after stroke, particularly when started early after stroke.

  1. A comparison of stroke severity proxy measures for claims data research: a population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Sung, Sheng-Feng; Chen, Solomon Chih-Cheng; Hsieh, Cheng-Yang; Li, Chung-Yi; Lai, Edward Chia-Cheng; Hu, Ya-Han

    2016-04-01

    Confounding by disease severity has been viewed as an intractable problem in claims-based studies. A novel 7-variable stroke severity index (SSI) was designed for estimating stroke severity by using claims data. This study compared the performance of mortality models with various proxy measures of stroke severity, including the SSI, in patients hospitalized for acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) were analyzed. Three proxy measures of stroke severity were evaluated: Measure 1, the SSI; Measure 2, intensive care unit admission and length of stay; and Measure 3, surgical operation, mechanical ventilation, hemiplegia or hemiparesis, and residual neurological deficits. We performed logistic regression by including age, sex, vascular risk factors, Charlson comorbidity index, and one of the proxy measures as covariates to predict 30-day and 1-year mortality after AIS. Model discrimination was evaluated using the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC). We identified 7551 adult patients with AIS. Models using the SSI (Measure 1) outperformed models using the other proxy measures in predicting 30-day mortality (AUC 0.892 vs 0.851, p < 0.001 for Measure 2; 0.892 vs 0.853, p < 0.001 for Measure 3) and 1-year mortality (AUC 0.816 vs 0.784, p < 0.001 for Measure 2; 0.816 vs 0.782, p < 0.001 for Measure 3). Using the SSI facilitated risk adjustment for stroke severity in mortality models for patients with AIS. The SSI is a viable methodological tool for stroke outcome studies using the NHIRD. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Endovascular Therapy Is Effective and Safe for Patients With Severe Ischemic Stroke: Pooled Analysis of Interventional Management of Stroke III and Multicenter Randomized Clinical Trial of Endovascular Therapy for Acute Ischemic Stroke in the Netherlands Data.

    PubMed

    Broderick, Joseph P; Berkhemer, Olvert A; Palesch, Yuko Y; Dippel, Diederik W J; Foster, Lydia D; Roos, Yvo B W E M; van der Lugt, Aad; Tomsick, Thomas A; Majoie, Charles B L M; van Zwam, Wim H; Demchuk, Andrew M; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J; Khatri, Pooja; Lingsma, Hester F; Hill, Michael D; Roozenbeek, Bob; Jauch, Edward C; Jovin, Tudor G; Yan, Bernard; von Kummer, Rüdiger; Molina, Carlos A; Goyal, Mayank; Schonewille, Wouter J; Mazighi, Mikael; Engelter, Stefan T; Anderson, Craig S; Spilker, Judith; Carrozzella, Janice; Ryckborst, Karla J; Janis, L Scott; Simpson, Kit N

    2015-12-01

    We assessed the effect of endovascular treatment in acute ischemic stroke patients with severe neurological deficit (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, ≥20) after a prespecified analysis plan. The pooled analysis of the Interventional Management of Stroke III (IMS III) and Multicenter Randomized Clinical Trial of Endovascular Therapy for Acute Ischemic Stroke in the Netherlands (MR CLEAN) trials included participants with an National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score of ≥20 before intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) treatment (IMS III) or randomization (MR CLEAN) who were treated with intravenous tPA ≤3 hours of stroke onset. Our hypothesis was that participants with severe stroke randomized to endovascular therapy after intravenous tPA would have improved 90-day outcome (distribution of modified Rankin Scale scores), when compared with those who received intravenous tPA alone. Among 342 participants in the pooled analysis (194 from IMS III and 148 from MR CLEAN), an ordinal logistic regression model showed that the endovascular group had superior 90-day outcome compared with the intravenous tPA group (adjusted odds ratio, 1.78; 95% confidence interval, 1.20-2.66). In the logistic regression model of the dichotomous outcome (modified Rankin Scale score, 0-2, or functional independence), the endovascular group had superior outcomes (adjusted odds ratio, 1.97; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-3.56). Functional independence (modified Rankin Scale score, ≤2) at 90 days was 25% in the endovascular group when compared with 14% in the intravenous tPA group. Endovascular therapy after intravenous tPA within 3 hours of symptom onset improves functional outcome at 90 days after severe ischemic stroke. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00359424 (IMS III) and ISRCTN10888758 (MR CLEAN). © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Effects of heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) on evolution of astrocyte activation following stroke in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Barreto, George E; White, Robin E; Xu, Lijun; Palm, Curtis J; Giffard, Rona G

    2012-12-01

    Astrocyte activation is a hallmark of the response to brain ischemia consisting of changes in gene expression and morphology. Heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) protects from cerebral ischemia, and although several protective mechanisms have been investigated, effects on astrocyte activation have not been studied. To identify potential mechanisms of protection, microarray analysis was used to assess gene expression in the ischemic hemispheres of wild-type (WT) and Hsp72-overexpressing (Hsp72Tg) mice 24 h after middle cerebral artery occlusion or sham surgery. After stroke both genotypes exhibited changes in genes related to apoptosis, inflammation, and stress, with more downregulated genes in Hsp72Tg and more inflammation-related genes increased in WT mice. Genes indicative of astrocyte activation were also upregulated in both genotypes. To measure the extent and time course of astrocyte activation after stroke, detailed histological and morphological analyses were performed in the cortical penumbra. We observed a marked and persistent increase in glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and a transient increase in vimentin. No change in overall astrocyte number was observed based on glutamine synthetase immunoreactivity. Hsp72Tg and WT mice were compared for density of astrocytes expressing activation markers and astrocytic morphology. In animals with comparable infarct size, overexpression of Hsp72 reduced the density of GFAP- and vimentin-expressing cells, and decreased astrocyte morphological complexity 72 h following stroke. However, by 30 days astrocyte activation was similar between genotypes. These data indicate that early modulation of astrocyte activation provides an additional novel mechanism associated with Hsp72 overexpression in the setting of ischemia.

  4. Quantum four-stroke heat engine: thermodynamic observables in a model with intrinsic friction.

    PubMed

    Feldmann, Tova; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2003-07-01

    The fundamentals of a quantum heat engine are derived from first principles. The study is based on the equation of motion of a minimum set of operators, which is then used to define the state of the system. The relation between the quantum framework and the thermodynamical observables is examined. A four-stroke heat engine model with a coupled two-level system as a working fluid is used to explore the fundamental relations. In the model used, the internal Hamiltonian does not commute with the external control field, which defines the two adiabatic branches. Heat is transferred to the working fluid by coupling to hot and cold reservoirs under constant field values. Explicit quantum equations of motion for the relevant observables are derived on all branches. The dynamics on the heat transfer constant field branches is solved in closed form. On the adiabats, a general numerical solution is used and compared with a particular analytic solution. These solutions are combined to construct the cycle of operation. The engine is then analyzed in terms of the frequency-entropy and entropy-temperature graphs. The irreversible nature of the engine is the result of finite heat transfer rates and frictionlike behavior due to noncommutability of the internal and external Hamiltonians.

  5. Improved status following behavioural intervention in a case of severe dysarthria with stroke aetiology.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Catherine; Lowit, Anja

    2012-08-01

    There is little published intervention outcome literature concerning dysarthria acquired from stroke. Single case studies have potential for more detailed specification and interpretation than is generally possible in larger studies so are informative for clinicians dealing with similar cases. Such research also contributes to planning of larger scale investigations. Behavioural intervention is described which was carried out between 7-9 months after stroke with a 69-year-old man with severe dysarthria. Pre-intervention stability between 5-7 months contrasted with post-intervention gains. Significant improvement was demonstrated using randomized, blinded assessment by 10 judges on measures of word and reading intelligibility and communication effectiveness in conversation. A range of speech analyses were undertaken (rate, pause, and intonation characteristics in connected speech and single word phonetic transcription), with the aim of identifying speech components which might explain the listeners' perceptions of improvement. Changes were detected mainly in parameters related to utterance segmentation and intonation. The basis of post-intervention improvement in dysarthria is complex, both in terms of the active therapeutic dimensions and also the specific speech alterations which account for changes to intelligibility and effectiveness.

  6. Prediction of the survival and functional ability of severe stroke patients after ICU therapeutic intervention

    PubMed Central

    Riachy, Moussa; Sfeir, Frida; Sleilaty, Ghassan; Hage-Chahine, Samer; Dabar, Georges; Bazerbachi, Taha; Aoun-Bacha, Zeina; Khayat, Georges; Koussa, Salam

    2008-01-01

    Background This study evaluated the benefits and impact of ICU therapeutic interventions on the survival and functional ability of severe cerebrovascular accident (CVA) patients. Methods Sixty-two ICU patients suffering from severe ischemic/haemorrhagic stroke were evaluated for CVA severity using APACHE II and the Glasgow coma scale (GCS). Survival was determined using Kaplan-Meier survival tables and survival prediction factors were determined by Cox multivariate analysis. Functional ability was assessed using the stroke impact scale (SIS-16) and Karnofsky score. Risk factors, life support techniques and neurosurgical interventions were recorded. One year post-CVA dependency was investigated using multivariate analysis based on linear regression. Results The study cohort constituted 6% of all CVA (37.8% haemorrhagic/62.2% ischemic) admissions. Patient mean(SD) age was 65.8(12.3) years with a 1:1 male: female ratio. During the study period 16 patients had died within the ICU and seven in the year following hospital release. The mean(SD) APACHE II score at hospital admission was 14.9(6.0) and ICU mean duration of stay was 11.2(15.4) days. Mechanical ventilation was required in 37.1% of cases. Risk ratios were; GCS at admission 0.8(0.14), (p = 0.024), APACHE II 1.11(0.11), (p = 0.05) and duration of mechanical ventilation 1.07(0.07), (p = 0.046). Linear coefficients were: type of CVA – haemorrhagic versus ischemic: -18.95(4.58) (p = 0.007), GCS at hospital admission: -6.83(1.08), (p = 0.001), and duration of hospital stay -0.38(0.14), (p = 0.40). Conclusion To ensure a better prognosis CVA patients require ICU therapeutic interventions. However, as we have shown, where tests can determine the worst affected patients with a poor vital and functional outcome should treatment be withheld? PMID:18582387

  7. Bowel Ischemia from Heat Stroke: A Rare Presentation of an Uncommon Complication

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Anuj; Syed, Wajihuddin; Manocha, Divey

    2016-01-01

    A healthy 27-year-old female presented to the hospital after she collapsed an hour into her first marathon run on a hot humid day. On presentation, she was hyperthermic, encephalopathic, tachycardic, and hypotensive. On admission, she was found to have lactic acidosis, rhabdomyolysis, and acute kidney injury and was treated with cold normal saline and cooling blankets. She subsequently started having abdominal pain and bloody bowel movements. Computed tomography of the abdomen revealed ascending colon thickening. Furthermore, her lab findings showed transaminitis and elevated coagulation parameters. Due to the acute hypotensive state from the heat stroke, patient had developed bowel ischemia, ischemic hepatitis, and disseminated intravascular coagulation, all of which are uncommon complications of heat stroke. She was managed aggressively with intravenous fluid hydration with resolution of her symptoms over the course of 4 days. In addition to the uncommon complications, early presentation of this bowel ischemia despite adequate hydration in such a healthy individual is another unique aspect of the case. PMID:27840645

  8. Evaluation of exercise capacity after severe stroke using robotics-assisted treadmill exercise: a proof-of-concept study.

    PubMed

    Stoller, O; de Bruin, E D; Schindelholz, M; Schuster, C; de Bie, R A; Hunt, K J

    2013-01-01

    Robotics-assisted treadmill exercise (RATE) with focus on motor recovery has become popular in early post-stroke rehabilitation but low endurance for exercise is highly prevalent in these individuals. This study aimed to develop an exercise testing method using robotics-assisted treadmill exercise to evaluate aerobic capacity after severe stroke. Constant load testing (CLT) based on body weight support (BWS) control, and incremental exercise testing (IET) based on guidance force (GF) control were implemented during RATE. Analyses focussed on step change, step response kinetics, and peak performance parameters of oxygen uptake. Three subjects with severe motor impairment 16-23 days post-stroke were included. CLT yielded reasonable step change values in oxygen uptake, whereas response kinetics of oxygen uptake showed low goodness of fit. Peak performance parameters were not obtained during IET. Exercise testing in post-stroke individuals with severe motor impairments using a BWS control strategy for CLT is deemed feasible and safe. Our approach yielded reasonable results regarding cardiovascular performance parameters. IET based on GF control does not provoke peak cardiovascular performance due to uncoordinated walking patterns. GF control needs further development to optimally demand active participation during RATE. The findings warrant further research regarding the evaluation of exercise capacity after severe stroke.

  9. Severe Spastic Trismus without Generalized Spasticity after Unilateral Brain Stem Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jong-Hyun; Kang, Si Hyun; Seo, Kyung-Mook; Seok, Ju Won

    2012-01-01

    A 62-year-old female patient diagnosed with left brain stem stroke 2 months ago was admitted to our clinic for rehabilitation. She had no generalized spasticity on both extremities, but could open her mouth only approximately 2 mm between her upper and lower teeth due to severe trismus. On needle electromyography, the left masseter muscle showed paradoxically increased muscle activity during mouth opening. We injected 50 units of type A botulinum toxin (Botox®) into the left masseter muscle, and 20 units into the left temporalis muscle with guidance of ultrasonography. The interincisal distance increased to 8 mm on the 3rd day after injection, and 9 mm on the 4th day. One month later, the interincisal distance increased to 14 mm. The increased interincisal distance was maintained for 13 months after injection, and the quality of hygienic care and compliance of oral stimulation therapy also improved. PMID:22506250

  10. Slow Versus Fast Robot-Assisted Locomotor Training After Severe Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Thais Amanda; Goroso, Daniel Gustavo; Westgate, Philip M; Carrico, Cheryl; Batistella, Linamara R; Sawaki, Lumy

    2017-10-01

    Robot-assisted locomotor training on a bodyweight-supported treadmill is a rehabilitation intervention that compels repetitive practice of gait movements. Standard treadmill speed may elicit rhythmic movements generated primarily by spinal circuits. Slower-than-standard treadmill speed may elicit discrete movements, which are more complex than rhythmic movements and involve cortical areas. Compare effects of fast (i.e., rhythmic) versus slow (i.e., discrete) robot-assisted locomotor training on a bodyweight-supported treadmill in subjects with chronic, severe gait deficit after stroke. Subjects (N = 18) were randomized to receive 30 sessions (5 d/wk) of either fast or slow robot-assisted locomotor training on a bodyweight-supported treadmill in an inpatient setting. Functional ambulation category, time up and go, 6-min walk test, 10-m walk test, Berg Balance Scale, and Fugl-Meyer Assessment were administered at baseline and postintervention. The slow group had statistically significant improvement on functional ambulation category (first quartile-third quartile, P = 0.004), 6-min walk test (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.8 to 49.0, P = 0.040), Berg Balance Scale (95% CI = 7.4 to 14.8, P < 0.0001), time up and go (95% CI = -79.1 to 5.0, P < 0.0030), and Fugl-Meyer Assessment (95% CI = 24.1 to 45.1, P < 0.0001). The fast group had statistically significant improvement on Berg Balance Scale (95% CI = 1.5 to 10.5, P = 0.02). In initial stages of robot-assisted locomotor training on a bodyweight-supported treadmill after severe stroke, slow training targeting discrete movement may yield greater benefit than fast training.

  11. Acute Ischemic Stroke After Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: Incidence and Impact on Outcome.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Robert G; Haarbauer-Krupa, Juliet K; Bell, Jeneita M; Corrigan, John D; Hammond, Flora M; Torbey, Michel T; Hofmann, Melissa C; Dams-O'Connor, Kristen; Miller, A Cate; Whiteneck, Gale G

    2017-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) leads to nearly 300 000 annual US hospitalizations and increased lifetime risk of acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Occurrence of AIS immediately after TBI has not been well characterized. We evaluated AIS acutely after TBI and its impact on outcome. A prospective database of moderate to severe TBI survivors, admitted to inpatient rehabilitation at 22 Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems centers and their referring acute-care hospitals, was analyzed. Outcome measures were AIS incidence, duration of posttraumatic amnesia, Functional Independence Measure, and Disability Rating Scale, at rehabilitation discharge. Between October 1, 2007, and March 31, 2015, 6488 patients with TBI were enrolled in the Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems National Database. One hundred and fifty-nine (2.5%) patients had a concurrent AIS, and among these, median age was 40 years. AIS was associated with intracranial mass effect and carotid or vertebral artery dissection. High-velocity events more commonly caused TBI with dissection. AIS predicted poorer outcome by all measures, accounting for a 13.3-point reduction in Functional Independence Measure total score (95% confidence interval, -16.8 to -9.7; P<0.001), a 1.9-point increase in Disability Rating Scale (95% confidence interval, 1.3-2.5; P<0.001), and an 18.3-day increase in posttraumatic amnesia duration (95% confidence interval, 13.1-23.4; P<0.001). Ischemic stroke is observed acutely in 2.5% of moderate to severe TBI survivors and predicts worse functional and cognitive outcome. Half of TBI patients with AIS were aged ≤40 years, and AIS patients more often had cervical dissection. Vigilance for AIS is warranted acutely after TBI, particularly after high-velocity events. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Heat stroke induces autophagy as a protection mechanism against neurodegeneration in the brain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tsung-Ta; Hu, Chou-Hui; Tsai, Chu-Dang; Li, Chuan-Wang; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Wang, Jia-Yi

    2010-12-01

    Heat stroke (HS) is defined clinically as a condition when core body temperature rises above 40°C and is accompanied by central nervous system abnormalities. In this study, we established a rat model of HS by exposing anesthetized rats to elevated ambient temperature (40°C) until core temperature reaching 40.5°C (HS onset). The rat was immediately removed from heating chamber, allowed recovery for various time periods, and killed for histological and biochemical studies. Our results indicated neuronal shrinkage and pyknosis of the nucleus and sustained up to 12 h recovery time in cerebral cortex. Elevated expression of autophagy-related proteins, including microtubule associated protein light chain 3 and beclin 1 in cortical tissue at various times (3, 6, 12 h) of recovery was observed. In addition, the number of autophagosomes stained by monodansylcadaverine, a specific autophagosome marker, increased after heat exposure but was reduced by pretreatment with 3-methyladenine, an autophagy inhibitor. Furthermore, heat exposure increased neuronal degeneration in cortical tissue, as evidenced by staining with the fluorescent dye Fluoro-Jade B for degenerating neuron. Pretreatment with 3-methyladenine in HS rats aggravated neurodegeneration. Taken together, these results suggest that HS induces autophagy as a protection mechanism against neurodegeneration. Modulation of autophagy may provide a potential therapeutic approach for HS and await further research.

  13. A Highly Efficient Six-Stroke Internal Combustion Engine Cycle with Water Injection for In-Cylinder Exhaust Heat Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Conklin, Jim; Szybist, James P

    2010-01-01

    A concept is presented here that adds two additional strokes to the four-stroke Otto or Diesel cycle that has the potential to increase fuel efficiency of the basic cycle. The engine cycle can be thought of as a 4 stroke Otto or Diesel cycle followed by a 2-stroke heat recovery steam cycle. Early exhaust valve closing during the exhaust stroke coupled with water injection are employed to add an additional power stroke at the end of the conventional four-stroke Otto or Diesel cycle. An ideal thermodynamics model of the exhaust gas compression, water injection at top center, and expansion was used to investigate this modification that effectively recovers waste heat from both the engine coolant and combustion exhaust gas. Thus, this concept recovers energy from two waste heat sources of current engine designs and converts heat normally discarded to useable power and work. This concept has the potential of a substantial increase in fuel efficiency over existing conventional internal combustion engines, and under appropriate injected water conditions, increase the fuel efficiency without incurring a decrease in power density. By changing the exhaust valve closing angle during the exhaust stroke, the ideal amount of exhaust can be recompressed for the amount of water injected, thereby minimizing the work input and maximizing the mean effective pressure of the steam expansion stroke (MEPsteam). The value of this exhaust valve closing for maximum MEPsteam depends on the limiting conditions of either one bar or the dew point temperature of the expansion gas/moisture mixture when the exhaust valve opens to discard the spent gas mixture in the sixth stroke. The range of MEPsteam calculated for the geometry of a conventional gasoline spark-ignited internal combustion engine and for plausible water injection parameters is from 0.75 to 2.5 bars. Typical combustion mean effective pressures (MEPcombustion) of naturally aspirated gasoline engines are up to 10 bar, thus this

  14. Early sitting, standing, and walking in conjunction with contemporary Bobath approach for stroke patients with severe motor deficit.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qingping; Tan, Lihong; Li, Baojun; Huang, Xiaosong; Ouyang, Chunhong; Zhan, Hailan; Pu, Qinqin; Wu, Lixiang

    2014-01-01

    The commonly used therapeutic approach, the contemporary Bobath approach (CBA), is not sufficient to restore independent locomotion for individuals with severe motor deficit (SMD) after stroke. Therefore, we propose that the early sitting, standing, and walking in conjunction with the CBA (ECBA) be used to treat individuals with SMD after stroke. To investigate whether ECBA may enhance mobility and balance in subjects with SMD after stroke. Thirty-three men and 15 women, aged 60 to 74 years, with SMD after stroke were recruited for the study. CBA or ECBA was performed with the subjects 5 times per week in 50-minute sessions for 8 weeks. The Stroke Rehabilitation Assessment of Movement (STREAM) and the Berg Balance Scale were implemented before treatment and at 4 and 8 weeks after treatment, respectively. The STREAM scores indicated that ECBA was more efficient than the CBA intervention for lower extremity mobility, F(1, 46) = 24.0, P < .001, and basic mobility, F(1, 46) = 102.6, P < .001. Overall STREAM scores were higher in the ECBA group, F(1, 46) =24.1, P < .001, after 8 weeks of therapy. Balance scores of the ECBA subjects were higher than those of the CBA subjects after 8 weeks of therapy, F(1, 46) = 73.1, P < .001. However, there was no difference in upper extremity mobility between the 2 groups. ECBA is a valuable intervention to improve lower extremity mobility, basic mobility, and balance ability for individuals with SMD after stroke.

  15. Heat Acclimation Regulates the Autophagy-Lysosome Function to Protect Against Heat Stroke-Induced Brain Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Yi, Junfeng; He, Genlin; Yang, Ju; Luo, Zhen; Yang, Xuesen; Luo, Xue

    2017-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the protective role of heat acclimation (HA) in heat stroke (HS)-induced brain injury are still unclear. The autophagy-lysosome pathway is known to pay an important role in protecting stressed or diseased cells from death. Nevertheless, whether autophagy and lysosomes are involved in HA-mediated neuroprotection following HS exposure remains unclear. The protective effects of HA were assessed by rectal temperature, hematoxylin-eosin staining, transmission electron microscopic analysis, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling staining, and Fluoro Jade B staining, after mice were subjected to HS. The effects of HA on autophagy and lysosomes were assessed in the presence of the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3MA). Autophagy and lysosome-associated proteins were analysed by Western blotting. We found that HA protected against HS-induced death and brain injury. HS can robustly induce autophagy and impair lysosome function. HA pre-conditioning significantly modulated the autophagy level, and improved lysosome function in HS mice. Furthermore, 3MA completely abolished the neuroprotective effect of HA on HS. HS may induce brain injury through lysosomal dysfunction and impaired autophagic flux. HA protected against HS-induced brain injury via a mechanism involving the autophagy-lysosome pathway. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Percutaneous Recanalization of Acute Internal Carotid Artery Occlusions in Patients with Severe Stroke

    SciTech Connect

    Dabitz, Rainer; Triebe, Stefan; Leppmeier, Ullrich; Ochs, Guenther; Vorwerk, Dierk

    2007-02-15

    Background. Sudden symptomatic occlusions of the proximal internal carotid artery (ICA) resulting in severe middle cerebral artery (MCA) ischemia and stroke are usually not accessible by rt-PA thrombolysis and the prognosis is usually very poor. Mechanical recanalization of the proximal ICA combined with intravenous and intra-arterial thrombolysis was therefore used as a rescue procedure. Methods. Ten patients (9 men, 1 woman; mean age 56.1 years) were treated with emergency recanalization of the proximal carotid artery by using stents and/or balloon angioplasty as a rescue procedure. Three patients showed dissection, and 7 had atherothrombotic occlusions. Nine of 10 presented with an initial modified Rankin Scale (mRS) of 5, the remaining patient with mRS 4 (average NIHSS 21.4). After sonographic confirmation of ICA with associated MCA/distal ICA occlusion and bridging with rt-PA (without abciximab) an emergency angiography was performed with subsequent mechanical recanalization by percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) (n = 1) or primary stenting (n = 9) using self-expanding stents. Distal protection was used in 1 of 10 patients. Results. Recanalization of the proximal ICA was achieved in all. At least partial recanalization of the intracerebral arteries was achieved in all, and complete recanalization in 5. In 4 of 10 patients limited hemorrhage was detected during CT controls. Major complications included 2 patients who had to undergo hemicraniectomy. One patient died from malignant infarction. At the time of discharge from the stroke unit 9 of 10 patients had improved markedly, 5 patients having an mRS of {<=}2, and 3 patients a mRS of 3. At control after a mean of 20 weeks, 7 of 8 (88%) patients had a mRS {<=}2, and 1 a mRS of 3. Conclusions. Primary mechanical recanalization of ICA occlusions by stent and PTA combined with fibrinolysis and/or GPIIb/IIIa-receptor antagonists seems to be feasible to improve patient outcome significantly.

  17. Cortical activation during robotic therapy for a severely affected arm in a chronic stroke patient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Saeki, Satoru; Matsushima, Yasuyuki; Hachisuka, Kenji

    2008-06-01

    The use of robotic-aided therapy in a patient with residual damage from a previous stroke was an attempt to improve function in a moderate to severe hemiparetic arm. Cortical activities associated with motor recovery are not well documented and require investigation. A chronic stroke patient with a severely affected arm underwent a robotic-training program for 12 weeks. The robotic-aided therapy improved motor control and spasticity in the proximal upper-limb. An increased oxygenated hemoglobin level was observed at the motor-related area in the affected hemisphere. A 12-week robotic-aided training program used in a chronic stroke patient demonstrated elements of motor recovery, and was also associated with direct activation of the affected hemisphere.

  18. Genetic variation in retinal vascular patterning predicts variation in pial collateral extent and stroke severity

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakar, Pranay; Zhang, Hua; Chen, De; Faber, James E.

    2015-01-01

    The presence of a native collateral circulation in tissues lessens injury in occlusive vascular diseases. However, differences in genetic background cause wide variation in collateral number and diameter in mice, resulting in large variation in protection. Indirect estimates of collateral perfusion suggest wide variation also exists in humans. Unfortunately, methods used to obtain these estimates are invasive and not widely available. We sought to determine if differences in genetic background in mice result in variation in branch-patterning of the retinal arterial circulation, and if these differences predict strain-dependent differences in pial collateral extent and severity of ischemic stroke. Retinal patterning metrics, collateral extent, and infarct volume were obtained for 10 strains known to differ widely in collateral extent. Multivariate regression was conducted and model performance assessed using K-fold cross-validation. Twenty-one metrics varied with strain (p<0.01). Ten metrics (eg, bifurcation angle, lacunarity, optimality) predicted collateral number and diameter across 7 regression models, with the best model closely predicting (p<0.0001) number (± 1.2-3.4 collaterals, K-fold R2=0.83-0.98), diameter (± 1.2-1.9μm, R2=0.73-0.88) and infarct volume (± 5.1 mm3, R2=0.85-0.87). These metrics obtained for the middle cerebral artery tree in a subset of the above strains also predicted (p<0.0001) collateral number and diameter and diameter, although with less strength (K-fold R2=0.61-0.78) and 0.60-0.86, respectively). Thus, differences in arterial branch-patterning in the retina and the MCA trees are specified by genetic background and predict variation in collateral extent and stroke severity. If also true in human retina, and since genetic variation in cerebral collaterals extends to other tissues at least in mice, a similar “retinal predictor index” could serve as a non-or minimally invasive biomarker for collateral extent in brain and other

  19. Plasticity of premotor cortico-muscular coherence in severely impaired stroke patients with hand paralysis.

    PubMed

    Belardinelli, Paolo; Laer, Leonard; Ortiz, Erick; Braun, Christoph; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2017-01-01

    Motor recovery in severely impaired stroke patients is often very limited. To refine therapeutic interventions for regaining motor control in this patient group, the functionally relevant mechanisms of neuronal plasticity need to be detected. Cortico-muscular coherence (CMC) may provide physiological and topographic insights to achieve this goal. Synchronizing limb movements to motor-related brain activation is hypothesized to reestablish cortico-motor control indexed by CMC. In the present study, right-handed, chronic stroke patients with right-hemispheric lesions and left hand paralysis participated in a four-week training for their left upper extremity. A brain-robot interface turned event-related beta-band desynchronization of the lesioned sensorimotor cortex during kinesthetic motor-imagery into the opening of the paralyzed hand by a robotic orthosis. Simultaneous MEG/EMG recordings and individual models from MRIs were used for CMC detection and source reconstruction of cortico-muscular connectivity to the affected finger extensors before and after the training program. The upper extremity-FMA of the patients improved significantly from 16.23 ± 6.79 to 19.52 ± 7.91 (p = 0.0015). All patients showed significantly increased CMC in the beta frequency-band, with a distributed, bi-hemispheric pattern and considerable inter-individual variability. The location of CMC changes was not correlated to the severity of the motor impairment, the motor improvement or the lesion volume. Group analysis of the cortical overlap revealed a common feature in all patients following the intervention: a significantly increased level of ipsilesional premotor CMC that extended from the superior to the middle and inferior frontal gyrus, along with a confined area of increased CMC in the contralesional premotor cortex. In conclusion, functionally relevant modulations of CMC can be detected in patients with long-term, severe motor deficits after a brain-robot assisted

  20. [Withdrawal of artificial nutrition and hydration in severe stroke: medical, legal and ethical considerations].

    PubMed

    Tannier, C; Crozier, S; Zuber, M; Constantinides, Y; Delezie, E; Gisquet, E; Grignoli, N; Lamy, C; Louvet, F; Pinel, J-F

    2015-02-01

    In the majority of cases, severe stroke is accompanied by difficulty in swallowing and an altered state of consciousness requiring artificial nutrition and hydration. Because of their artificial nature, nutrition and hydration are considered by law as treatment rather basic care. Withdrawal of these treatments is dictated by the refusal of unreasonable obstinacy enshrined in law and is justified by the risk of severe disability and very poor quality of life. It is usually the last among other withholding and withdrawal decisions which have already been made during the long course of the disease. Reaching a collegial consensus on a controversial decision such as artificial nutrition and hydration withdrawal is a difficult and complex process. The reluctance for such decisions is mainly due to the symbolic value of food and hydration, to the fear of "dying badly" while suffering from hunger and thirst, and to the difficult distinction between this medical act and euthanasia. The only way to overcome such reluctance is to ensure flawless accompaniment, associating sedation and appropriate comfort care with a clear explanation (with relatives but also caregivers) of the rationale and implications of this type of decision. All teams dealing with this type of situation must have thoroughly thought through the medical, legal and ethical considerations involved in making this difficult decision.

  1. Severe Cerebral Vasospasm and Childhood Arterial Ischemic Stroke After Intrathecal Cytarabine.

    PubMed

    Tibussek, Daniel; Natesirinilkul, Rungrote; Sun, Lisa R; Wasserman, Bruce A; Brandão, Leonardo R; deVeber, Gabrielle

    2016-02-01

    We report on 2 patients who developed widespread cerebral vasospasm and arterial ischemic strokes (AIS) after application of intrathecal (IT) cytarabine. In a 3-year-old child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), left leg weakness, hyperreflexia, and clonus were noted 4 days after her first dose of IT cytarabine during the induction phase of her chemotherapy. Cerebral MRI revealed multiple acute cerebral ischemic infarcts and widespread cerebral vasospasm. A 5-year-old girl complained of right arm and leg pain and began limping 11 days after IT cytarabine. Symptoms progressed to right dense hemiplegia, left gaze deviation, headache, and speech arrest. MRI revealed 2 large cortical areas of diffusion restriction in the right frontal and left parietal lobes. Cerebral magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) showed irregular narrowing affecting much of the intracranial arterial circulation. Although the first child fully recovered from her neurologic symptoms, the second patient had persistent hemiplegia on follow-up. Including this report, there are now 4 pediatric ALL cases of severe cerebral vasospasm and AIS in the context of IT cytarabine administration, strongly suggesting a true association. Differential diagnosis and management issues are discussed. Along with the more widespread use of MRI and MRA, the true frequency of this severe adverse effect will become clearer in future. For any child with neurologic symptoms within hours or days of receiving IT cytarabine, a low threshold for cerebral imaging with MRI and MRA is recommended.

  2. [Effects of different intakes of protein on nutritional status in severe stroke patients].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Li, Zebin; Luo, Bin; Li, Zengning; Lei Min; Jing, Yongmin

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the effects of different intake of protein on nutritional indicators in severe stroke patients. 89 patients with severe stroke and NRS-2002 scores not less than 3 were enrolled. The patients were divided into group A, group B and group C by random, and 28 cases were in group A with protein intake at 0.9 g/kg, 30 cases were in group B with protein intake at 1.2 g/kg and 31 cases were in group C with protein intake at 1.6 g/kg, all patients were given the same calories support (25 kcal/kg). On the day of pre-intervention, the 7th and 14th day of post-intervention, fasting blood samples were collected from every subjects. The total protein (TP), albumin (ALB), hemoglobin (Hb), creatinine (Cr), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), midarm circumference (MAC) and calf circumference (CC) were recorded. (1) The MAC and CC of health side body decreased on the 14th day post-intervention in group A and group B, the differences were significant compared with pre-intervention and on the 7th day post-intervention (P < 0.05), but there were no statistical differences between group A and group B. The index of group C had no significant changes from pre-intervention to the 14th day post-intervention. The differences among the three groups were statistically significant on the 14th day post-intervention (P < 0.05). (2) TP, ALB and Hb in group A were decreased from pre-intervention to the 14th day post-intervention, the differences were statistically significant. The levels of TP and Hb decreased in group B during the observation period, the differences were statistically significant. ALB in group B was decreased on the 7th day post-intervention, but it was increased on the 14th day post-intervention, there was no statistical difference compared with pre-intervention. The levels of TP, ALB and Hb in group C had no significant differences on the 7th day post-intervention, but they all increased on the 14th day post-intervention. The differences of ALB and Hb in group C were

  3. Machine-based, self-guided home therapy for individuals with severe arm impairment after stroke: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Zondervan, DK; Augsburger, R; Bodenhoefer, B; Friedman, N; Reinkensmeyer, DJ; Cramer, SC

    2015-01-01

    Background Few therapeutic options exist for the millions of persons living with severe arm impairment after stroke to increase their dose of arm rehabilitation. This study compared self-guided, high-repetition home therapy with a mechanical device (the Resonating Arm Exerciser - RAE) to conventional therapy in patients with chronic stroke, and explored RAE use for patients with subacute stroke. Methods Sixteen participants with severe upper extremity impairment (mean Fugl-Meyer (FM) score = 21.4 ± 8.8 out of 66) > 6 months post stroke were randomized to three-weeks of exercise with RAE or conventional exercises. Primary outcome measure was FM score one month post-therapy. Secondary outcome measures included MAL, Visual Analog Pain scale, and Ashworth spasticity scale. After a one-month break, individuals in the conventional group also received a three-week course of RAE therapy. Results The change in FM score was significant in both the RAE and conventional groups after training (2.6 ± 1.4 and 3.4 ± 2.4, p = 0.008 and 0.016, respectively). These improvements were not significant at one-month. Exercise with RAE led to significantly greater improvements in distal FM score than conventional therapy at the one-month follow-up (p = 0.02). In a separate cohort of patients with subacute stroke, RAE was found feasible for exercise. Discussion In subjects with severe arm impairment after chronic stroke, home-based training with RAE was feasible and significantly reduced impairment without increasing pain or spasticity. Gains with RAE were comparable to those found with conventional training, and also included distal arm improvement. PMID:25273359

  4. Oxygen uptake response to cycle ergometry in post-acute stroke patients with different severity of hemiparesis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Kai; Weng, Ming-Cheng; Chen, Tien-Wen; Huang, Mao-Hsiung

    2013-11-01

    This study evaluated the impact of severity of hemiparesis on oxygen uptake (VO2) response in post-acute stroke patients. Sixty-four patients with a mean poststroke interval of 8.6 ± 3.8 days underwent a ramp cardiopulmonary exercise test on a cycling ergometer to volitional termination. Mean peak VO2 (VO2peak) and work efficiency (ΔVO2/ΔWR) were measured by open-circuit spirometry during standard upright ergometer cycling. Severity of the hemiparetic lower limb was assessed by Brunnstrom's motor recovery stages lower extremity (BMRSL). VO2peak was 10% lower in hemiparetic leg with BMRSL V than in that with BMRSL VI, 20% lower in BMRSL IV, and 50% lower in BMRSL III. ΔVO2/ΔWR was higher for the group with increased BMRSL. The relations were consistent after adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, stroke type, hemiparetic side, modified Ashworth Scale, time poststroke, comorbidities, and medications. Our findings revealed that O2peak is dependent on the severity of hemiparesis in leg, and along with ΔO2/ΔWR closely related to the severity of hemiparesis in post-acute stroke patients, regardless of the types and locations of lesion after stroke, as well as the differences in comorbidities and medications. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Synergy effects of combined multichannel EMG-triggered electrical stimulation and mirror therapy in subacute stroke patients with severe or very severe arm/hand paresis.

    PubMed

    Schick, Thomas; Schlake, Hans-Peter; Kallusky, Juliane; Hohlfeld, Günter; Steinmetz, Maria; Tripp, Florian; Krakow, Karsten; Pinter, Michaela; Dohle, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Neurorehabilitation requires the development of severity-dependent and successful therapies for arm/hand rehabilitation in stroke patients. To evaluate the effectiveness of adding mirror therapy to bilateral EMG-triggered multi-channel electrostimulation for the treatment of severe arm/hand paresis in stroke patients. The subjects of this randomized, controlled, multicentre study were stroke patients who had suffered their first insult between 1 and 6 months before study start and had severe or very severe arm/hand paresis, as classified by Fugl-Meyer-Assessment. Subjects were randomly allocated to an intervention group (n = 16) or control group (n = 17). Both groups were treated for 3 weeks (5x week, 30 minutes) with bilateral EMG-triggered multi-channel electrostimulation. The intervention group additionally received mirror feedback of the unaffected limb. The primary outcome measure was motor recovery of the upper extremities, as measured by the Fugl-Meyer Assessment. The Intervention Group with very severe paresis had significantly better motor recovery in total Fugl-Meyer Assessment (p = 0.017) at a medium effect size (Cohen) of d = 0.7, due to a significant recovery of shoulder and elbow function (p = 0.003) in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment Part A subtest. For subjects with severe paresis, additional mirror therapy did not significantly influence outcome. Additional mirror therapy in combination with EMG-triggered multi-channel electrostimulation is therapeutically beneficial for post-acute stroke patients with very severe arm/hand paresis.

  6. Changes in Quadriceps Muscle Thickness, Disease Severity, Nutritional Status, and C-Reactive Protein after Acute Stroke.

    PubMed

    Nozoe, Masafumi; Kanai, Masashi; Kubo, Hiroki; Kitamura, Yuka; Yamamoto, Miho; Furuichi, Asami; Takashima, Sachie; Mase, Kyoshi; Shimada, Shinichi

    2016-10-01

    Lower leg muscle wasting is common in stroke patients; however, patient characteristics in the acute phase are rarely studied. This study aimed to examine the relationship between changes in quadriceps muscle thickness and disease severity, nutritional status, and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels after acute stroke. Thirty-one consecutive patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage or ischemic stroke had quadriceps muscle thickness measured in the paretic and nonparetic limbs within 1 week after admission (first week) and 2 weeks after the first examination (last week) using ultrasonography. We also determined the relationship between the percentage change in muscle thickness and disease severity, nutritional status, and CRP levels on admission. There was a significant correlation between changes in muscle thickness for both paretic and nonparetic sides and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores (paretic limb: r = -.46, P = .01; nonparetic limb: r = -.54, P = .002, respectively); however, there was no significant correlation with nutritional status on admission. Quadriceps muscle thickness was reduced more in the CRP-positive (≥.3 mg/dL) patients than in the CRP-negative (<.3 mg/dL) patients in the nonparetic limb (positive: -21.4 ± 12.1, negative: -11.4 ± 16.4%; P = .039), but not in the paretic limb (positive: -23.4 ± 9.0, negative: -19.1 ± 15.7; P = .27). A high NIHSS score and a positive CRP on admission were both significantly correlated with decreased quadriceps muscle thickness after acute stroke. Nutritional status on admission was not correlated with changes in quadriceps muscle thickness for these patients. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Role of contralesional hemisphere in paretic arm reaching in patients with severe arm paresis due to stroke: A preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, Sambit; Harrington, Rachael; Chan, Evan; Dromerick, Alexander W; Breceda, Erika Y; Harris-Love, Michelle

    2016-03-23

    Stroke is highly prevalent and a leading cause of serious, long-term disability among American adults. Impaired movement (i.e. paresis) of the stroke-affected arm is a major contributor to post-stroke disability, yet the mechanisms of upper extremity motor recovery are poorly understood, particularly in severely impaired patients who lack hand function. To address this problem, we examined the functional relevance of the contralesional hemisphere in paretic arm motor performance in individuals with severe arm paresis. Twelve individuals with severe stroke-induced arm paresis (Upper Extremity Fugl-Meyer Assessment=17.1 ± 8.5; maximum score=66) participated in the study. Participants performed a reaching response time task with their paretic arm. At varying time intervals following a 'Go' cue, a pair of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) pulses were delivered to contralesional hemisphere primary motor (M1) or dorsal pre-motor cortex (PMd) to momentarily disrupt the pattern of neural firing. Response time components and hand-path characteristics were compared across the 2 sites for trials with and without TMS disruption. There was no significant effect of TMS disruption on overall Response time or Reaction time, but Movement time was significantly longer (i.e. slower) with disruption of the contralesional hemisphere (p=0.015), regardless of which area was stimulated. Peak hand-path velocity and hand-path smoothness were also significantly lower (p=0.005 and p<0.0001, respectively) with TMS disruption of the contralesional hemisphere. The data from this study provide evidence supporting a functionally relevant role of contralesional hemisphere motor areas in paretic arm reaching movements in individuals with severe post-stroke arm impairment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Prophylactic antibiotic treatment in severe acute ischemic stroke: the Antimicrobial chemopRrophylaxis for Ischemic STrokE In MaceDonIa-Thrace Study (ARISTEIDIS).

    PubMed

    Tziomalos, Konstantinos; Ntaios, George; Miyakis, Spiros; Papanas, Nikolaos; Xanthis, Andreas; Agapakis, Dimitrios; Milionis, Haralampos; Savopoulos, Christos; Maltezos, Efstratios; Hatzitolios, Apostolos I

    2016-10-01

    Infections represent a leading cause of mortality in patients with acute ischemic stroke, but it is unclear whether prophylactic antibiotic treatment improves the outcome. We aimed to evaluate the effects of this treatment on infection incidence and short-term mortality. This was a pragmatic, prospective multicenter real-world analysis of previously independent consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke who were >18 years, and who had at admission National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) >11. Patients with infection at admission or during the preceding month, with axillary temperature at admission >37 °C, with chronic inflammatory diseases or under treatment with corticosteroids were excluded from the study. Among 110 patients (44.5 % males, 80.2 ± 6.8 years), 31 (28.2 %) received prophylactic antibiotic treatment, mostly cefuroxime (n = 21). Prophylactic antibiotic treatment was administered to 51.4 % of patients who developed infection, and to 16.4 % of patients who did not (p < 0.001). Independent predictors of infection were NIHSS at admission [relative risk (RR) 1.16, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.08-1.26, p < 0.001] and prophylactic antibiotic treatment (RR 5.84, 95 % CI 2.03-16.79, p < 0.001). The proportion of patients who received prophylactic antibiotic treatment did not differ between patients who died during hospitalization and those discharged, or between patients who died during hospitalization or during follow-up and those who were alive 3 months after discharge. Prophylactic administration of antibiotics in patients with severe acute ischemic stroke is associated with an increased risk of infection during hospitalization, and does not affect short-term mortality risk.

  9. Role of corpus callosum integrity in arm function differs based on motor severity after stroke.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Jill Campbell; Dewanjee, Pritha; Tran, George; Quinlan, Erin Burke; Dodakian, Lucy; McKenzie, Alison; See, Jill; Cramer, Steven C

    2017-01-01

    While the corpus callosum (CC) is important to normal sensorimotor function, its role in motor function after stroke is less well understood. This study examined the relationship between structural integrity of the motor and sensory sections of the CC, as reflected by fractional anisotropy (FA), and motor function in individuals with a range of motor impairment level due to stroke. Fifty-five individuals with chronic stroke (Fugl-Meyer motor score range 14 to 61) and 18 healthy controls underwent diffusion tensor imaging and a set of motor behavior tests. Mean FA from the motor and sensory regions of the CC and from corticospinal tract (CST) were extracted and relationships with behavioral measures evaluated. Across all participants, FA in both CC regions was significantly decreased after stroke (p < 0.001) and showed a significant, positive correlation with level of motor function. However, these relationships varied based on degree of motor impairment: in individuals with relatively less motor impairment (Fugl-Meyer motor score > 39), motor status correlated with FA in the CC but not the CST, while in individuals with relatively greater motor impairment (Fugl-Meyer motor score ≤ 39), motor status correlated with FA in the CST but not the CC. The role interhemispheric motor connections play in motor function after stroke may differ based on level of motor impairment. These findings emphasize the heterogeneity of stroke, and suggest that biomarkers and treatment approaches targeting separate subgroups may be warranted.

  10. [Nutritional status in acute stage ischemic stroke and its relation to disease severity and prognosis of patients].

    PubMed

    Hong, Qing; Zhang, Li-San; Chen, Yin; He, Xu-Dong; Hu, Xing-Yue

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the nutritional status in acute stage ischemic stroke and its relation to disease severity and prognosis of patients. Fifty patients with ischemic stroke were admitted in hospital within 48 h after onset. National Institute of Health stroke scale (NIHSS) was used to assess the severity of stroke. Physical index and laboratory index were measured on d1, d7 and d14 after admission. Physical index included body weight, body mass index, triceps skin folds, upper arm circumference and arm muscle circumference. Laboratory index included prealbumin, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), complement C3 and cortisol. The severity of metabolic disturbance was expressed as the difference of biochemical indexes between the d7 and d1. All cases were followed up for 6 months. The prognosis of stroke was evaluated with modified Rankin (mRankin) scores. No significant changes of physical indexes were found between d7 and d1. The levels of prealbumin and complement C3 on d7 after admission were significantly decreased compared to d1 (198.8 mg/L±20.3 mg/L vs 286.7 mg/L±23.8 mg/L and 0.6 g/L±0.1 g/L vs 1.0 g/L±0.1 g/L, respectively, both P<0.05). The levels of hs-CRP and cortisol at d7 were significantly increased compared to d1 (495.2 nmol/L±39.5 nmol/L vs 24.1 mg/L±5.2 mg/L and 396.4 nmol/L±41.3 nmol/L vs 5.1 mg/L±1.2 mg/L, respectively, both P<0.05). On d14 after admission hs-CRP (13.2 mg/L±4.5 mg/L) and cortisol levels (463.4 nmol/L±32.1 nmol/L) were still significantly higher than d1 (both P<0.05). However, there were no difference in prealbumin (259.2 mg/L±22.8 mg/L) and complement C3 (0.8 g/L±0.2 g/L) levels between d1 and d14 after admission. Correlation analysis revealed that the NIHSS scores and mRankin scores were correlated with nutrition metabolism disturbances (P<0.05). Nutrition metabolism disturbances in patients with acute ischemic stroke are related to the disease duration, the severity and prognosis of stroke.

  11. Predictive factors of brain death in severe stroke patients identified by organ procurement and transplant coordination in Lorrain, France.

    PubMed

    Humbertjean, Lisa; Mione, Gioia; Fay, Renaud; Durin, Laurent; Planel, Sophie; Lacour, Jean-Christophe; Enea, Ana-Maria; Richard, Sébastien

    2016-03-01

    There are no established predictive factors to identify patients at the acute phase of severe stroke with a high probability of presenting brain death (BD). We retrospectively collected clinical and paraclinical data of consecutive patients at the acute phase of severe stroke with a potential progression to BD through the hospital organ procurement and transplant coordination system in five centres in Lorrain (France) between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2013. Final endpoint was adjudicated BD. Of 400 included patients, 91 (23%) presented adjudicated BD. Initial Glasgow Coma Scale score ≤6 (P = 0.008), herniation (P = 0.009), hydrocephalus (P = 0.019), initial systolic blood pressure >150 mmHg (P = 0.002), past history of alcohol abuse (P = 0.019) and stroke volume >65 ml (P = 0.040) were significantly associated with BD progression. Two prognostic scores for stroke with unquantifiable or quantifiable volume were built according to the number of risk factors presented. Following internal validation, the respective bias-corrected predictive performance (c-index) of the two scores was 72% (95% confidence interval: 67-78%) and 77% (95% confidence interval: 72-82%). These scores could form the basis of a simple tool of six criteria to help physicians make the difficult decision of intensive care unit management to preserve organs in potential donors.

  12. Field Validation of the Los Angeles Motor Scale as a Tool for Paramedic Assessment of Stroke Severity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joon-Tae; Chung, Pil-Wook; Starkman, Sidney; Sanossian, Nerses; Stratton, Samuel J; Eckstein, Marc; Pratt, Frank D; Conwit, Robin; Liebeskind, David S; Sharma, Latisha; Restrepo, Lucas; Tenser, May-Kim; Valdes-Sueiras, Miguel; Gornbein, Jeffrey; Hamilton, Scott; Saver, Jeffrey L

    2017-02-01

    The Los Angeles Motor Scale (LAMS) is a 3-item, 0- to 10-point motor stroke-deficit scale developed for prehospital use. We assessed the convergent, divergent, and predictive validity of the LAMS when performed by paramedics in the field at multiple sites in a large and diverse geographic region. We analyzed early assessment and outcome data prospectively gathered in the FAST-MAG trial (Field Administration of Stroke Therapy-Magnesium phase 3) among patients with acute cerebrovascular disease (cerebral ischemia and intracranial hemorrhage) within 2 hours of onset, transported by 315 ambulances to 60 receiving hospitals. Among 1632 acute cerebrovascular disease patients (age 70±13 years, male 57.5%), time from onset to prehospital LAMS was median 30 minutes (interquartile range 20-50), onset to early postarrival (EPA) LAMS was 145 minutes (interquartile range 119-180), and onset to EPA National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale was 150 minutes (interquartile range 120-180). Between the prehospital and EPA assessments, LAMS scores were stable in 40.5%, improved in 37.6%, and worsened in 21.9%. In tests of convergent validity, against the EPA National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, correlations were r=0.49 for the prehospital LAMS and r=0.89 for the EPA LAMS. Prehospital LAMS scores did diverge from the prehospital Glasgow Coma Scale, r=-0.22. Predictive accuracy (adjusted C statistics) for nondisabled 3-month outcome was as follows: prehospital LAMS, 0.76 (95% confidence interval 0.74-0.78); EPA LAMS, 0.85 (95% confidence interval 0.83-0.87); and EPA National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, 0.87 (95% confidence interval 0.85-0.88). In this multicenter, prospective, prehospital study, the LAMS showed good to excellent convergent, divergent, and predictive validity, further establishing it as a validated instrument to characterize stroke severity in the field. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Differences in initial stroke severity between Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic whites vary by age: the Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi (BASIC) project

    PubMed Central

    Wing, Jeffrey J.; Baek, Jonggyu; Sánchez, Brisa N.; Lisabeth, Lynda D.; Smith, Melinda A.; Morgenstern, Lewis B.; Zahuranec, Darin B.

    2014-01-01

    Background A wide variety of racial and ethnic disparities in stroke epidemiology and treatment have been reported. Race-ethnic differences in initial stroke severity may be one important determinant of differences in outcome after stroke. The overall goal of this study was to move beyond ethnic comparisons in the mean or median severity, and instead investigate ethnic differences in the entire distribution of initial stroke severity. Additionally, we investigated whether age modifies the relationship between ethnicity and initial stroke severity as this may be an important determinant of racial differences in outcome after stroke. Methods Ischemic stroke cases were identified from the population-based Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi (BASIC) project. National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) was determined from the medical record or abstracted from the chart. Ethnicity was reported as Mexican American (MA) or non-Hispanic white (NHW). Quantile regression was used to model the distribution of NIHSS score by age category (45–59, 60–74, 75+) to test whether ethnic differences exist over different quantiles of NIHSS (5 percentile increments). Crude models examined the interaction between age category and ethnicity; models were then adjusted for history of stroke/transient ischemic attack, hypertension, atrial fibrillation, coronary artery disease, and diabetes. Results were adjusted for multiple comparisons. Results There were 4,366 ischemic strokes, with median age 72 years (IQR: 61–81), 55% MA and median NIHSS of 4 (IQR: 2–8). MAs were younger, more likely to have a history of hypertension and diabetes, but less likely to have atrial fibrillation compared to NHWs. In the crude model, the ethnicity-age interaction was not statistically significant. After adjustment, the ethnicity-age interaction became significant at the 85th and 95th percentiles of NIHSS distribution. MAs in the younger age category (45–59) were significantly less

  14. Environmental Conditions and the Occurrence of Exertional Heat Illnesses and Exertional Heat Stroke at the Falmouth Road Race

    PubMed Central

    DeMartini, Julie K.; Casa, Douglas J.; Belval, Luke N.; Crago, Arthur; Davis, Rob J.; Jardine, John J.; Stearns, Rebecca L.

    2014-01-01

    Context: The Falmouth Road Race is unique because of the environmental conditions and relatively short distance, which allow runners to maintain a high intensity for the duration of the event. Therefore, the occurrence of exertional heat illnesses (EHIs), especially exertional heat stroke (EHS), is 10 times higher than in other races. Objective: To summarize the occurrence and relationship of EHI and environmental conditions at the Falmouth Road Race. Design: Descriptive epidemiologic study. Setting: An 11.3-km (7-mile) road race in Falmouth, Massachusetts. Patients or Other Participants: Runners who sustained an EHI while participating in the Falmouth Road Race. Main Outcome Measure(s): We obtained 18 years of medical records and environmental conditions from the Falmouth Road Race and documented the incidence of EHI, specifically EHS, as related to ambient temperature (Tamb), relative humidity, and heat index (HI). Results: Average Tamb, relative humidity, and HI were 23.3 ± 2.5°C, 70 ± 16%, and 24 ± 3.5°C, respectively. Of the 393 total EHI cases observed, EHS accounted for 274 (70%). An average of 15.2 ± 13.0 EHS cases occurred each year; the incidence was 2.13 ± 1.62 cases per 1000 runners. Regression analysis revealed a relationship between the occurrence of both EHI and EHS and Tamb (R2 = 0.71, P = .001, and R2 = 0.65, P = .001, respectively) and HI (R2 = 0.76, P < .001, and R2 = 0.74, P < .001, respectively). Occurrences of EHS (24.2 ± 15.5 cases versus 9.3 ± 4.3 cases) and EHI (32.3 ± 16.3 versus 13.0 ± 4.9 cases) were higher when Tamb and HI were high compared with when Tamb and HI were low. Conclusions: Because of the environmental conditions and race duration, the Falmouth Road Race provides a unique setting for a high incidence of EHS. A clear relationship exists between environmental stress, especially as measured by Tamb and HI, and the occurrence of EHS or other EHI. Proper prevention and treatment strategies should be used during periods

  15. The efficacy of SMART Arm training early after stroke for stroke survivors with severe upper limb disability: a protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recovery of upper limb function after stroke is poor. The acute to subacute phase after stroke is the optimal time window to promote the recovery of upper limb function. The dose and content of training provided conventionally during this phase is however, unlikely to be adequate to drive functional recovery, especially in the presence of severe motor disability. The current study concerns an approach to address this shortcoming, through evaluation of the SMART Arm, a non-robotic device that enables intensive and repetitive practice of reaching by stroke survivors with severe upper limb disability, with the aim of improving upper limb function. The outcomes of SMART Arm training with or without outcome-triggered electrical stimulation (OT-stim) to augment movement and usual therapy will be compared to usual therapy alone. Methods/Design A prospective, assessor-blinded parallel, three-group randomised controlled trial is being conducted. Seventy-five participants with a first-ever unilateral stroke less than 4 months previously, who present with severe arm disability (three or fewer out of a possible six points on the Motor Assessment Scale [MAS] Item 6), will be recruited from inpatient rehabilitation facilities. Participants will be randomly allocated to one of three dose-matched groups: SMART Arm training with OT-stim and usual therapy; SMART Arm training without OT-stim and usual therapy; or usual therapy alone. All participants will receive 20 hours of upper limb training over four weeks. Blinded assessors will conduct four assessments: pre intervention (0-weeks), post intervention (4-weeks), 26 weeks and 52 weeks follow-up. The primary outcome measure is MAS item 6. All analyses will be based on an intention-to-treat principle. Discussion By enabling intensive and repetitive practice of a functional upper limb task during inpatient rehabilitation, SMART Arm training with or without OT-stim in combination with usual therapy, has the potential to

  16. The efficacy of SMART Arm training early after stroke for stroke survivors with severe upper limb disability: a protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Brauer, Sandra G; Hayward, Kathryn S; Carson, Richard G; Cresswell, Andrew G; Barker, Ruth N

    2013-07-02

    Recovery of upper limb function after stroke is poor. The acute to subacute phase after stroke is the optimal time window to promote the recovery of upper limb function. The dose and content of training provided conventionally during this phase is however, unlikely to be adequate to drive functional recovery, especially in the presence of severe motor disability. The current study concerns an approach to address this shortcoming, through evaluation of the SMART Arm, a non-robotic device that enables intensive and repetitive practice of reaching by stroke survivors with severe upper limb disability, with the aim of improving upper limb function. The outcomes of SMART Arm training with or without outcome-triggered electrical stimulation (OT-stim) to augment movement and usual therapy will be compared to usual therapy alone. A prospective, assessor-blinded parallel, three-group randomised controlled trial is being conducted. Seventy-five participants with a first-ever unilateral stroke less than 4 months previously, who present with severe arm disability (three or fewer out of a possible six points on the Motor Assessment Scale [MAS] Item 6), will be recruited from inpatient rehabilitation facilities. Participants will be randomly allocated to one of three dose-matched groups: SMART Arm training with OT-stim and usual therapy; SMART Arm training without OT-stim and usual therapy; or usual therapy alone. All participants will receive 20 hours of upper limb training over four weeks. Blinded assessors will conduct four assessments: pre intervention (0-weeks), post intervention (4-weeks), 26 weeks and 52 weeks follow-up. The primary outcome measure is MAS item 6. All analyses will be based on an intention-to-treat principle. By enabling intensive and repetitive practice of a functional upper limb task during inpatient rehabilitation, SMART Arm training with or without OT-stim in combination with usual therapy, has the potential to improve recovery of upper limb function

  17. Initial Body Temperature in Ischemic Stroke: Non-Potentiation of TPA Benefit and Inverse Association with Severity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seo Hyun; Saver, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Body temperature (BT) is an important physiologic factor in acute ischemic stroke. However, the relation of initial BT to stroke severity and degree of benefit from thrombolytic therapy has been incompletely delineated. Methods We analyzed the public data set of the two National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke tissue plaminogen activator (TPA) stroke trials, comparing patients with lower (<37.0°C) and higher (≥37.0°C) presenting BT. Results Among 595 patients (297 placebo- and 298 tPA-treated) with documented initial BT, 77.1% had initial BT <37.0°C and 22.9% ≥37.0°C. Patients with higher initial BT had lower baseline stroke severity in both tPA-treated patients (the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale median, 11 versus 15; p = 0.05) and placebo-treated patients (median, 13 versus 16; p <0.01). Patients with higher initial BT also had lower infarction volume on CT at 3 months in both tPA-treated patients (median, 9.6 versus 16.7 cm3; p = 0.08) and placebo-treated patients (median, 13.1 versus 28.1 cm3; p = 0.02), but no clinical outcome differences. Analysis of lytic treatment effect found no heterogeneity in the degree of tPA benefit in both higher and lower BT groups (≥37.0°C: odds ratio [OR] for the modified Rankin Scale 0-1 outcome 2.55, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05-6.21; <37.0°C: OR 2.30, 95% CI 1.38-3.84; heterogeneity p = 0.83). Conclusions In hyperacute stroke patients, higher presenting temperatures are associated with less severe neurological deficits and reduced final infarct volumes. Presenting temperature does not modify the benefit of tPA on 3-month favorable outcome. Clinical Trial Registration This trial was not registered because enrollment began prior to July 1, 2005. PMID:25424482

  18. Homocysteine, heat shock proteins, genistein and vitamins in ischemic stroke--pathogenic and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Banecka-Majkutewicz, Zyta; Sawuła, Wojciech; Kadziński, Leszek; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Banecki, Bogdan

    2012-01-01

    Stroke is one of the most devastating neurological conditions, with an approximate worldwide mortality of 5.5 million annually and loss of 44 million disability-adjusted life-years. The etiology of stroke is often unknown; it has been estimated that the etiology and pathophysiology remains unexplained in more than 40% of stroke cases. The conventional stroke risk factors, including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, and cardiac diseases, do not fully account for the risk of stroke, and stroke victims, especially young subjects, often do not have any of these factors. It is very likely that inflammation, specific genetic predispositions and traditional risk factors interact with each other and may together increase the risk of stroke. Inflammatory and immune responses play important roles in the course of ischemic stroke. Hyperhomocysteinemia (hcy) is considered a modifiable risk factor for stroke, possibly through an atherogenic and prothrombotic mechanism. Both genetic and environmental factors (e.g., dietary intake of folic acid and B vitamins) affect homocysteine level. Identification of the role of hcy as a modifiable risk factor for stroke and of HSPs as regulators of the immune response may lead to more effective prevention and treatment of stroke through dietary and pharmacological intervention. Dietary modification may also include supplementation with novel preventive compounds, such as the antioxidative isoflavones--genistein or daidzein.

  19. Stem cell-like dog placenta cells afford neuroprotection against ischemic stroke model via heat shock protein upregulation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Seongjin; Tajiri, Naoki; Franzese, Nick; Franzblau, Max; Bae, Eunkyung; Platt, Simon; Kaneko, Yuji; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the dog placenta as a viable source of stem cells for stroke therapy. Immunocytochemical evaluation of phenotypic markers of dog placenta cells (DPCs) cultured in proliferation and differentiation medium revealed that DPCs expressed both stem cell and neural cell markers, respectively. Co-culture with DPCs afforded neuroprotection of rat primary neural cells in a dose-dependent manner against oxygen-glucose deprivation. Subsequent in vivo experiments showed that transplantation of DPCs, in particular intravenous and intracerebral cell delivery, produced significant behavioral recovery and reduced histological deficits in ischemic stroke animals compared to those that received intra-arterial delivery of DPCs or control stroke animals. Furthermore, both in vitro and in vivo studies implicated elevated expression of heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) as a potential mechanism of action underlying the observed therapeutic benefits of DPCs in stroke. This study supports the use of stem cells for stroke therapy and implicates a key role of Hsp27 signaling pathway in neuroprotection.

  20. Validating Imaging Biomarkers of Cerebral Edema in Patients with Severe Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Albert J.; Sheth, Kevin N.; Kimberly, W. Taylor; Chaudhry, Zeshan A.; Elm, Jordan J.; Jacobson, Sven; Davis, Stephen M.; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Albers, Gregory W.; Stern, Barney J.; González, R. Gilberto

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose There is no validated neuroimaging marker for quantifying brain edema. We sought to test whether MRI-based metrics would reliably change during the early subacute period in a manner consistent with edema and whether they would correlate with relevant clinical endpoints. Methods Serial MRI studies from patients in the EPITHET trial with initial diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) lesion volume >82 cm3 were analyzed. Two independent readers outlined the hemisphere and lateral ventricle on the involved side and calculated respective volumes at baseline and day 3 to 5. We assessed inter-rater agreement, volume change between scans and the association of volume change with early neurological deterioration (END: NIHSS score worsening ≥4 points), 90-day modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score 0–4 and mortality. Results Of 12 patients who met study criteria, average baseline and follow-up DWI lesion size was 138 cm3 and 234 cm3, respectively. Mean time to follow-up MRI was 62 hours. Concordance correlation coefficients between readers were >0.90 for both hemisphere and ventricle volume assessment. Mean percent hemisphere volume increase was 16.2±8.3% (p<.0001), and mean percent ventricle volume decrease was 45.6±16.9% (p<0.001). Percent hemisphere growth predicted END (area under the curve [AUC]=0.92, p=0.0005) and 90-day mRS 0–4 (AUC 0.80, p=0.02). Conclusions In this exploratory analysis of severe ischemic stroke patients, statistically significant changes in hemisphere and ventricular volumes within the first week are consistent with expected changes of cerebral edema. MRI-based analysis of hemisphere growth appears to be a suitable biomarker for edema formation. PMID:22325573

  1. OBESITY INCREASES BLOOD PRESSURE, CEREBRAL VASCULAR REMODELING, AND SEVERITY OF STROKE IN THE ZUCKER RAT

    PubMed Central

    Osmond, Jessica M.; Mintz, James D.; Dalton, Brian; Stepp, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for stroke, but the mechanisms by which obesity increases stroke risk are unknown. Because microvascular architecture contributes to the outcome of stroke, we hypothesized that middle cerebral arteries (MCA) from obese Zucker rats (OZR) undergo inward remodeling and develop increased myogenic tone compared to lean Zucker rats (LZR). We further hypothesized that OZR have an increased infarct following cerebral ischemia and that changes in vascular structure and function correlate with the development of hypertension in OZR. Blood pressure was measured by telemetery in LZR and OZR from 6 to 17 weeks of age. Vessel structure and function were assessed in isolated MCAs. Stroke damage was assessed after ischemia was induced for 60 minutes followed by 24 hours of reperfusion. While mean arterial pressure (MAP) was similar between young rats (6–8 weeks old), MAP was higher in adult (14–17 weeks old) OZR than LZR. MCAs from OZR had a smaller lumen diameter and increased myogenic vasoconstriction compared to those from LZR. Following ischemia, infarction was 58% larger in OZR than LZR. Prior to the development of hypertension, MCA myogenic reactity and lumen diameter as well as infarct size were similar between young LZR and OZR. Our results indicate that the MCAs of OZR undergo structural remodeling and that these rats have greater cerebral injury following cerebral ischemia. These cerebrovascular changes correlate with the development of hypertension and suggest that the increased blood pressure may be the major determinant for stroke risk in obese individuals. PMID:19104000

  2. Preventing increased blood pressure in the obese Zucker rat improves severity of stroke

    PubMed Central

    Osmond, Jessica M.; Mintz, James D.

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for stroke, but the determinants of increased stroke risk in obesity are unknown. We have previously reported that obese Zucker rats (OZRs) have a worse stroke outcome and display evidence of remodeling of the middle cerebral artery (MCA), in parallel with hypertension, compared with lean controls. This study tested the hypothesis that hypertension is an essential determinant of cerebral vascular remodeling and increased stroke damage in OZRs. Blood pressure was measured by telemetery in lean and obese rats with and without hydrochlorthiazide (HCT; 2 mg·kg−1·day−1) from 8 to 15 wk of age. A separate group of rats was also chronically fed a low-sodium (LS) diet. Vessel structure was assessed in isolated, pressurized MCAs. Cerebral ischemia was induced for 60 min using an intralumenal suture technique, followed by 24 h of reperfusion. HCT treatment effectively prevented the increase in blood pressure in obese rats; however, the LS diet did not lower pressure. Importantly, infarct size was normalized by HCT after ischemia-reperfusion injury. Additionally, HCT improved the changes in MCA structure observed in untreated OZRs. There were no benefits of the LS diet on stroke injury or vessel structure. These results indicate that increased pressure is essential for driving the changes in infarct size in OZRs. PMID:20418477

  3. Differential effects of sympathetic nervous system and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis on systemic immune cells after severe experimental stroke.

    PubMed

    Mracsko, Eva; Liesz, Arthur; Karcher, Simone; Zorn, Markus; Bari, Ferenc; Veltkamp, Roland

    2014-10-01

    Infectious complications are the leading cause of death in the post-acute phase of stroke. Post-stroke immunodeficiency is believed to result from neurohormonal dysregulation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. However, the differential effects of these neuroendocrine systems on the peripheral immune cells are only partially understood. Here, we determined the impact of the hormones of the SNS and HPA on distinct immune cell populations and characterized their interactions after stroke. At various time points after cortical or extensive hemispheric cerebral ischemia, plasma cortisone, corticosterone, metanephrine and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels were measured in mice. Leukocyte subpopulations were flow cytometrically analyzed in spleen and blood. To investigate their differential sensitivity to stress hormones, splenocytes were incubated in vitro with prednisolone, epinephrine and their respective receptor blockers. Glucocorticoid receptor (GCR) and beta2-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) on leukocyte subpopulations were quantified by flow cytometry. In vivo effects of GCR and selective β2-AR blockade, respectively, were defined on serum hormone concentrations, lymphopenia and interferon-γ production after severe ischemia. We found elevated cortisone, corticosterone and metanephrine levels and associated lymphocytopenia only after extensive brain infarction. Prednisolone resulted in a 5 times higher cell death rate of splenocytes than epinephrine in vitro. Prednisolone and epinephrine-induced leukocyte cell death was prevented by GCR and β2-AR blockade, respectively. In vivo, only GCR blockade prevented post ischemic lymphopenia whereas β2-AR preserved interferon-γ secretion by lymphocytes. GCR blockade increased metanephrine levels in vivo and prednisolone, in turn, decreased β2-AR expression on lymphocytes. In conclusion, mediators of the SNS and the HPA axis differentially affect the systemic

  4. Relationship between plasma metalloproteinase-9 levels and volume and severity of infarct in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Demir, Recep; Ulvi, Hızır; Özel, Lütfi; Özdemir, Gökhan; Güzelcik, Metin; Aygül, Recep

    2012-12-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) constitute an endopeptidase family involved in various physiological and pathological processes. It was demonstrated that plasma MMP-9 level was increased in patients with acute ischemic stroke. In this study, it was investigated whether there was a relationship between the levels of plasma MMP-9 and the severity of stroke and infarct volume in patients with acute ischemic stroke. A total of 32 patients with acute ischemic stroke, (16 males and 16 females) and 30 healthy controls were included in the study. Plasma MMP-9 levels were measured using ELISA method. Computed tomography was performed at 48th hour and infarct volume was calculated using the Cavalieri method. The National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) was checked at baseline, 12, 24, and 48th hour. Plasma MMP-9 levels of the patient group at baseline, 12, 24, and 48th hour were found significantly higher compared to the control group (p < 0.05). An important correlation between MMP-9 levels and the infarct volume was observed at baseline, 12, 24, and 48th hour (p < 0.001). Furthermore, a positive correlation was recorded between plasma MMP-9 levels and NIHSS scores at baseline, 12, 24, and 48th hour (p < 0.001). Plasma MMP-9 levels of those of suffering medium and heavy damages were found significantly higher when compared to those of having slight damage (p < 0.05). A significant relationship was also observed between infarct volumes and neurological deficits (p < 0.05). Plasma MMP-9 levels of the patients at 48th hour were found to be significantly lower in recovered patients compared to those who did not improved or worsened (p < 0.05). A positive correlation was recorded between the infarct volume and infarct progression (p < 0.05). In conclusion, this study showed that plasma MMP-9 level substantially increased during the acute period of ischemic cerebrovascular disease and correlated with the severity of the disease and infarct volume. The

  5. Effectiveness of finger-equipped electrode (FEE)-triggered electrical stimulation improving chronic stroke patients with severe hemiplegia

    PubMed Central

    Inobe, Jun-ichi; Kato, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Electric stimulation (ES) has been recognized as an effective method to improve motor function to paralysed patients with stroke. It is important for ES to synchronize with voluntary movement. To enhance this co-ordination, the finger-equipped electrode (FEE) was developed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate FEE in improving motor function of upper extremities (UEs) in patients with chronic stroke. Methods and subjects: The study participants included four patients with chronic stroke who received FEE electronic stimulation (FEE-ES) plus passive and active training and three control patients who underwent training without FEE-ES. The patients were treated five times weekly for 4 weeks. UE motor function was evaluated before and after treatment using Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) and Brunnstrom recovery staging. Results: The mean age of patients in each group was 60-years and there was a mean of 49 months since the onset of symptoms. All patients had severe UE weakness. The patients receiving FEE-ES had greater improvement in UE function than control patients (total, proximal and distal FMA, p < 0.05; Brunnstrom staging of UE, p < 0.05). Discussion: The results indicate that FEE-ES may be an effective treatment for patients with chronic stroke. PMID:23252442

  6. Effectiveness of finger-equipped electrode (FEE)-triggered electrical stimulation improving chronic stroke patients with severe hemiplegia.

    PubMed

    Inobe, Jun-ichi; Kato, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Electric stimulation (ES) has been recognized as an effective method to improve motor function to paralysed patients with stroke. It is important for ES to synchronize with voluntary movement. To enhance this co-ordination, the finger-equipped electrode (FEE) was developed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate FEE in improving motor function of upper extremities (UEs) in patients with chronic stroke. The study participants included four patients with chronic stroke who received FEE electronic stimulation (FEE-ES) plus passive and active training and three control patients who underwent training without FEE-ES. The patients were treated five times weekly for 4 weeks. UE motor function was evaluated before and after treatment using Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) and Brunnstrom recovery staging. The mean age of patients in each group was 60-years and there was a mean of 49 months since the onset of symptoms. All patients had severe UE weakness. The patients receiving FEE-ES had greater improvement in UE function than control patients (total, proximal and distal FMA, p < 0.05; Brunnstrom staging of UE, p < 0.05). The results indicate that FEE-ES may be an effective treatment for patients with chronic stroke.

  7. Life-and-death decision-making in the acute phase after a severe stroke: Interviews with relatives.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Marike E; Depla, Marja; Wojtkowiak, Joanna; Visser, Marieke C; Widdershoven, Guy A M; Francke, Anneke L; Hertogh, Cees M P M

    2015-05-01

    Decision-making in the acute phase after a severe stroke is complex and may involve life-and-death decisions. Apart from the medical condition and prognosis, quality of life and the deliberation of palliative care should be part of the decision-making process. Relatives play an important role by informing physicians about the patient's values and preferences. However, little is known about how the patients' relatives experience the decision-making process. To elicit the perspective of relatives of severe stroke patients with regard to the decision-making process in the acute phase in order to understand how they participate in treatment decisions. An exploratory qualitative interview approach guided by the principles of grounded theory. Relatives of severe stroke patients (n = 15) were interviewed about their experiences in the decision-making process in the acute phase. Four categories reflecting relatives' experiences were identified: (1) making decisions under time pressure, (2) the feeling of 'who am I' to decide, (3) reluctance in saying 'let her die' and (4) coping with unexpected changes. Following the treatment proposal of the physician was found to be the prevailing tendency of relatives in the decision-making process. A better understanding of the latent world of experiences of relatives that influence the decision-making process may help physicians and other health-care providers to better involve relatives in decision-making and enhance the care, including palliative care, for patients with severe stroke in line with their values and preferences. Communication between physician and relatives seems vital in this process. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. A Characterization Study of Several Heat Resistant Explosives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-10-04

    explosives appear to be performing as expected. The velocities are of the same magnitude as other heat-resistant explosives such as HNS . They are lower than...the same shock sensitivity as HNS . UNCLASSIFIED 11 NOLTR 74-177 10- 10- 6 o CI1- w 0 10- 7 AH s (MOLAR) = 43.9 kCal/mole AH s (SPECIFIC) 61.5Cal/gm 10...BURNING, AND/OR EXPLOSION. [2 25 NOLTR 74 -177 TABLE I11 ELECTROSTATIC SPARK SENSITIVITY TEST RESULTS HNS -TEFLON 7C Y (ID11)TT(D182 N (D103 CAP. 90/10

  9. The relation between ambulance transports stratified by heat stroke and air temperature in all 47 prefectures of Japan in August, 2009: ecological study.

    PubMed

    Miyatake, Nobuyuki; Sakano, Noriko; Murakami, Shoko

    2012-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate the link between ambulance transports stratified by heat stroke and air temperature in August 2009 in Japan. Monthly observations for ambulance transports stratified by heat stroke in August 2009, in all 47 prefectures of Japan were obtained from the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications. Daily air temperature data from the Japan Meteorological Agency in August 2009 for all 47 prefectures in Japan were also used. The effect of high air temperatures on ambulance transports stratified by heat stroke was analyzed in an ecological study. Various air temperature parameters , i.e., the mean of the mean air temperature, mean of the highest air temperature, mean of the lowest air temperature, the highest air temperature, and the lowest air temperature in August 2009 were significantly and positively correlated with ambulance transports stratified by heat stroke (per total number of ambulance transports and per 10,000 persons) in the 47 prefectures of Japan. The correlation coefficient between the mean of the highest air temperature in August 2009 and ambulance transports stratified by heat stroke (per 10 000 persons) was the highest among the examined parameters (r = 0.799, p < 0.0001). Higher air temperatures were closely associated with higher numbers of ambulance transports stratified by heat stroke in August 2009 in Japan.

  10. Comparison of Several Methods of Cyclic De-Icing of a Gas-Heated Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Vernon H.; Bowden, Dean T.

    1953-01-01

    Several methods of cyclic de-icing of a gas-heated airfoil were investigated to determine ice-removal characteristics and heating requirements. The cyclic de-icing system with a spanwise ice-free parting strip in the stagnation region and a constant-temperature gas-supply duct gave the quickest and most reliable ice removal. Heating requirements for the several methods of cyclic de-icing are compared, and the savings over continuous ice prevention are shown. Data are presented to show the relation of surface temperature, rate of surface heating, and heating time to the removal of ice.

  11. Radiant heating tests of several liquid metal heat-pipe sandwich panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarda, C. J.; Basiulis, A.

    1983-01-01

    Integral heat pipe sandwich panels, which synergistically combine the thermal efficiency of heat pipes and the structural efficiency of honeycomb sandwich construction, were conceived as a means of alleviating thermal stress problems in the Langley Scramjet Engine. Test panels which utilized two different wickable honeycomb cores, facesheets with screen mesh sintered to the internal surfaces, and a liquid metal working fluid (either sodium or potassium) were tested by radiant heating at various heat load levels. The heat pipe panels reduced maximum temperature differences by 31 percent with sodium working fluid and 45 percent with potassium working fluid. Results indicate that a heat pipe sandwich panel is a potential, simple solution to the engine thermal stress problem. Other interesting applications of the concept include: cold plates for electronic component and circuit card cooling, radiators for large space platforms, low distortion large area structures (e.g., space antennas) and laser mirrors.

  12. Radiant heating tests of several liquid metal heat-pipe sandwich panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarda, C. J.; Basiulis, A.

    1983-01-01

    Integral heat-pipe sandwich panels, which synergistically combine the thermal efficiency of heat pipes and the structural efficiency of honeycomb sandwich construction, were conceived as a means of alleviating thermal stress problems in the Langley Scramjet Engine. Test panels which utilized two different wickable honeycomb cores, facesheets with screen mesh sintered to the internal surfaces, and a liquid metal working fluid (either sodium or potassium) were tested by radiant heating at various heat-load levels. The heat-pipe panels reduced maximum temperature differences by 31 percent with sodium working fluid and 45 percent with potassium working fluid. Results indicate that a heat-pipe sandwich panel is a potential, simple solution to the engine thermal stress problem. Other interesting applications of the concept include: cold plates for electronic component and circuit card cooling, radiators for large space platforms, low-distortion large area structures (e.g., space antennas) and laser mirrors.

  13. Radiant heating tests of several liquid metal heat-pipe sandwich panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarda, C. J.; Basiulis, A.

    1983-01-01

    Integral heat-pipe sandwich panels, which synergistically combine the thermal efficiency of heat pipes and the structural efficiency of honeycomb sandwich construction, were conceived as a means of alleviating thermal stress problems in the Langley Scramjet Engine. Test panels which utilized two different wickable honeycomb cores, facesheets with screen mesh sintered to the internal surfaces, and a liquid metal working fluid (either sodium or potassium) were tested by radiant heating at various heat-load levels. The heat-pipe panels reduced maximum temperature differences by 31 percent with sodium working fluid and 45 percent with potassium working fluid. Results indicate that a heat-pipe sandwich panel is a potential, simple solution to the engine thermal stress problem. Other interesting applications of the concept include: cold plates for electronic component and circuit card cooling, radiators for large space platforms, low-distortion large area structures (e.g., space antennas) and laser mirrors.

  14. Radiant heating tests of several liquid metal heat-pipe sandwich panels

    SciTech Connect

    Camarda, C.J.; Basiulis, A.

    1983-08-01

    Integral heat pipe sandwich panels, which synergistically combine the thermal efficiency of heat pipes and the structural efficiency of honeycomb sandwich construction, were conceived as a means of alleviating thermal stress problems in the Langley Scramjet Engine. Test panels which utilized two different wickable honeycomb cores, facesheets with screen mesh sintered to the internal surfaces, and a liquid metal working fluid (either sodium or potassium) were tested by radiant heating at various heat load levels. The heat pipe panels reduced maximum temperature differences by 31 percent with sodium working fluid and 45 percent with potassium working fluid. Results indicate that a heat pipe sandwich panel is a potential, simple solution to the engine thermal stress problem. Other interesting applications of the concept include: cold plates for electronic component and circuit card cooling, radiators for large space platforms, low distortion large area structures (e.g., space antennas) and laser mirrors.

  15. Automating arm movement training following severe stroke: functional exercises with quantitative feedback in a gravity-reduced environment.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Robert J; Liu, Jiayin; Rao, Sandhya; Shah, Punit; Smith, Robert; Rahman, Tariq; Cramer, Steven C; Bobrow, James E; Reinkensmeyer, David J

    2006-09-01

    An important goal in rehabilitation engineering is to develop technology that allows individuals with severe motor impairment to practice arm movement without continuous supervision from a rehabilitation therapist. This paper describes the development of such a system, called Therapy WREX or ("T-WREX"). The system consists of an orthosis that assists in arm movement across a large workspace, a grip sensor that detects hand grip pressure, and software that simulates functional activities. The arm orthosis is an instrumented, adult-sized version of the Wilmington Robotic Exoskeleton (WREX), which is a five degrees-of-freedom mechanism that passively counterbalances the weight of the arm using elastic bands. After providing a detailed design description of T-WREX, this paper describes two pilot studies of the system's capabilities. The first study demonstrated that individuals with chronic stroke whose arm function is compromised in a normal gravity environment can perform reaching and drawing movements while using T-WREX. The second study demonstrated that exercising the affected arm of five people with chronic stroke with T-WREX over an eight week period improved unassisted movement ability (mean change in Fugl-Meyer score was 5 points +/- 2 SD; mean change in range of motion of reaching was 10%, p < 0.001). These results demonstrate the feasibility of automating upper-extremity rehabilitation therapy for people with severe stroke using passive gravity assistance, a grip sensor, and simple virtual reality software.

  16. Lipoprotein(a), ferritin, and albumin in acute phase reaction predicts severity and mortality of acute ischemic stroke in North Indian Patients.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Baidarbhi; Vishnoi, Gaurav; Goswami, Binita; Gowda, Srinivas H; Chowdhury, Debashish; Agarwal, Sarita

    2013-10-01

    Inflammation plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis and prognosis of stroke. We studied the behavior of lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)], ferritin, and albumin as acute phase reactants and their roles in the severity and mortality of stroke. We recruited 100 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke and 120 controls. Blood samples were drawn on days 1 and 7 and at both 3 and 6 months. Stroke was classified using Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment classification. Stroke severity was assessed using the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale. Prognosis at 6 months was assessed using the modified Rankin Scale, and mortality was assessed using the Kaplan-Meier analysis. Serum levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), Lp(a), ferritin, and albumin were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunoturbidimetry, and chemiluminescence commercial kits, respectively. Levels of IL-6, Lp(a), and ferritin were consistently higher among cases than controls (P < .0001). Serum Lp(a) levels peaked at day 7 after stroke and tapered thereafter. Albumin levels were lower than controls on admission day and increased subsequently. In our study, Lp(a) acted as an acute phase reactant while albumin acted as a negative acute phase reactant. There was no association between Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment subtype and elevated serum levels of Lp(a), albumin, and ferritin. Lp(a) and ferritin were high in patients with severe stroke. Albumin was negatively correlated with stroke severity. Serum levels of Lp(a) ≥ 77 mg/dL, albumin ≤ 3.5 g/dL, and ferritin ≥ 370 ng/dL is associated with a significantly increased risk of having a poorer outcome in stroke. Serum levels of Lp(a) >77 mg/dL and albumin <3.5 g/dL were also associated with increased mortality. High levels of Lp(a) and ferritin and low levels of albumin are associated with increased severity and poorer long term prognosis of stroke. Patients with admission levels of Lp(a) >77 mg/dL and albumin <3.5 g/dL had

  17. A discussion of the several types of two-stroke-cycle engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venediger, Herbert J

    1935-01-01

    This report discusses different types of two-stroke engines as well as the three most important design factors: volume of scavenge and charge delivery, scavenging process (scavenging result), and result of charge. Some of the types of engines discussed include: single cylinder with crank-chamber scavenge pump and auxiliary suction piston linked to working connecting rod; and two cylinder engines with a rotary scavenge pump arrangement. Three and four cylinder engines are also discussed in various designs.

  18. Training-induced changes in the pattern of triceps to biceps activation during reaching tasks after chronic and severe stroke.

    PubMed

    Barker, Ruth Nancy; Brauer, Sandra; Carson, Richard

    2009-07-01

    This exploratory study was undertaken to investigate the mechanisms that contributed to improvements in upper limb function following a novel training program. Surface electromyography (EMG) was used to examine training-induced changes in the pattern of triceps and biceps activation during reaching tasks in stroke survivors with severe paresis in the chronic stage of recovery. The EMG data were obtained in the context of a single blind randomised clinical trial conducted with 42 stroke survivors with minimal upper limb muscle activity and who were more than 6 months post-stroke. Of the 33 participants who completed the study, 10 received training of reaching using a non-robotic upper limb training device, the SMART Arm, with EMG triggered functional electrical stimulation (EMG-stim), 13 received training of reaching using the SMART Arm alone, and 10 received no intervention. Each intervention group engaged in 12 1-h training sessions over a 4-week period. Clinical and laboratory measures of upper limb function were administered prior to training (0 weeks), at completion (4 weeks) and 2 months (12 weeks) after training. The primary outcome measure was 'upper arm function' which is Item 6 of the Motor Assessment Scale (MAS). Laboratory measures consisted of two multijoint reaching tasks to assess 'maximum isometric force' and 'maximum distance reached'. Surface EMG was used to monitor triceps brachii and biceps brachii during the two reaching tasks. To provide a comparison with normal values, seven healthy adults were tested on one of the reaching tasks according to the same procedure. Study findings demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in upper limb function for stroke participants in the two training groups compared to those who received no training however no difference was found between the two training groups. For the reaching tasks, all stroke participants, when compared to normal healthy adults, exhibited lower triceps and biceps activation and

  19. The Secondary School Football Coach's Relationship With the Athletic Trainer and Perspectives on Exertional Heat Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Adams, William M.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Casa, Douglas J.; Huggins, Robert A.; Burton, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Context: Prior researchers have examined the first-aid knowledge and decision making among high school coaches, but little is known about their perceived knowledge of exertional heat stroke (EHS) or their relationships with an athletic trainer (AT). Objective: To examine secondary school football coaches' perceived knowledge of EHS and their professional relationship with an AT. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: Web-based management system. Patients or Other Participants: Thirty-eight secondary school head football coaches (37 men, 1 woman) participated in this study. Their average age was 47 ± 10 years old, and they had 12 ± 9 years' experience as a head football coach. Data Collection and Analysis: Participants responded to a series of online questions that were focused on their perceived knowledge of EHS and professional relationships with ATs. Data credibility was established through multiple-analyst triangulation and peer review. We analyzed the data by borrowing from the principles of a general inductive approach. Results: Two dominant themes emerged from the data: perceived self-confidence of the secondary school coach and the influence of the AT. The first theme highlighted the perceived confidence, due to basic emergency care training, of the coach regarding management of an emergency situation, despite a lack of knowledge. The second theme illustrated the secondary school coach's positive professional relationships with ATs regarding patient care and emergency procedures. Of the coaches who participated, 89% (34 out of 38) indicated positive interactions with their ATs. Conclusions: These secondary school coaches were unaware of the potential causes of EHS or the symptoms associated with EHS, and they had higher perceived levels of self-confidence in management abilities than indicated by their perceived knowledge level. The secondary school football coaches valued and understood the role of the AT regarding patient and emergency care. PMID:24933433

  20. Higher on-admission serum triglycerides predict less severe disability and lower all-cause mortality after acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Pikija, Slaven; Trkulja, Vladimir; Juvan, Lucija; Ivanec, Marija; Dukši, Dunja

    2013-10-01

    High(er) on-admission triglyceride (TG) levels have been suggested as an independent predictor of better outcomes of the acute ischemic stroke. Data regarding poststroke physical disabilities have been contradictory. We aimed to investigate the relationship between fasting on-admission TG and development of disability and all-cause mortality over a 2.5-year period. This prospective observational study included 83 acute ischemic stroke patients (29 cardioembolic; 41% men; median age 76 years) followed-up for 28 to 30 months and assessed for physical disability using the Modified Rankin scale (mRS) at 1 week and 3, 12, and 24 months poststroke. TGs were considered as a continuous and a binary variable (≤ 1.27 [n = 43] and >1.27 mmol/L [n = 43]). Higher TGs (continuous or binary) were independently (default adjustments: stroke type, severity at presentation, age, atrial fibrillation, preindex event antiplatelet use, infarct volume, postindex event antiplatelet, statin and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor use, on-admission fasting cholesterol, mean platelet volume, and glomerular filtration rate) were associated with: (1) higher odds of mRS 0 to 2 (none/mild disability) across the assessments (overall odds ratio [OR] 2.73 [95% confidence interval {CI} 1.15-6.38] and OR 3.57 [95% CI 1.04-12.3], respectively); (2) lower odds of mRS worsening between any 2 consecutive assessments (overall OR 0.44 [95% CI 0.20-0.96] and OR 0.35 [95% CI 0.16-0.77], respectively); (3) lower risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 0.47 [95% CI 0.23-0.96] and hazard ratio 0.45 [95% CI 0.21-0.98], respectively). These data suggest that higher fasting TGs on-admission predict less severe disability, reduced disability progression, and all-cause mortality in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Severe summer heat waves over Georgia: trends, patterns and driving forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keggenhoff, I.; Elizbarashvili, M.; King, L.

    2015-11-01

    During the last 50 years Georgia experienced a rising number of severe summer heat waves causing increasing heat-health impacts. In this study, the 10 most severe heat waves between 1961 and 2010 and recent changes in heat wave characteristics have been detected from 22 homogenized temperature minimum and maximum series using the Excess Heat Factor (EHF). A composite and Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) have been performed to study summer heat wave patterns and their relationships to the selected predictors: mean Sea Level Pressure (SLP), Geopotential Height at 500 mb (Z500), Sea Surface Temperature (SST), Zonal (u-wind500) and Meridional Wind at 500 mb (v-wind500), Vertical Velocity at 500 mb (O500), Outgoing Longwave Radiation (OLR), Relative Humidity (RH500), Precipitation (RR) and Soil Moisture (SM). Most severe heat events during the last 50 years are identified in 2007, 2006 and 1998. Largest significant trend magnitudes for the number, intensity and duration of low and high-impact heat waves have been found during the last 30 years. Significant changes in the heat wave predictors reveal that all relevant surface and atmospheric patterns contributing to heat waves have been intensified between 1961 and 2010. Composite anomalies and CCA patterns provide evidence of a large anticyclonic blocking pattern over the southern Ural Mountains, which attracts warm air masses from the Southwest, enhances subsidence and surface heating, shifts the African Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) northwards, and causes a northward shift of the subtropical jet. Moreover, pronounced precipitation and soil moisture deficiency throughout Georgia contribute to the heat wave formation and persistence over Georgia. Due to different large- to mesoscale circulation patterns and the local terrain, heat wave effects over Eastern Georgia are dominated by subsidence and surface heating, while convective rainfall and cooling are observed in the West.

  2. Heat transfer model of hyporthermic intracarotid infusion of cold saline for stroke therapy.

    PubMed

    Neimark, Matthew A; Konstas, Angelos-Aristeidis; Laine, Andrew F; Pile-Spellman, John

    2006-01-01

    A 3-dimensional hemispheric computational brain model is developed to simulate infusion of cold saline in the carotid arteries in terms of brain cooling for stroke therapy. The model is based on the Pennes bioheat equation, with four tissue layers: white matter, gray matter, skull, and scalp. The stroke lesion is simulated by reducing blood flow to a selected volume of the brain by a factor of one-third, and brain metabolism by 50%. A stroke penumbra was also generated surrounding the core lesion (blood volume reduction 25%, metabolism reduction 20%). The finite difference method was employed to solve the system of partial differential equations. This model demonstrated a reduction in brain temperature, at the stroke lesion, to 32 degrees C in less than 10 minutes.

  3. Recent severe heat waves: how to view them in a 'global warming' perspective?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kysely, J.

    2010-03-01

    The area of western and central Europe has recently been affected by several long-lasting and severe heat waves, particularly in July-August 2003, June-July 2006, and July 2007. The heat waves influenced various sectors of human activities, with enormous socio-economic impacts. With an estimated death toll exceeding 50000 over Europe, the August 2003 heat wave was the worst natural disaster in Europe during the last 50 years, yielding an example of how seriously may also high-income countries be affected by climate change. The aims of the study are to assess whether recent occurrences of severe heat waves in central Europe were exceptional in the context of past fluctuations, and to estimate their recurrence probabilities under future climate change scenarios. We focus on analogs of the 2006 heat wave which lasted 33 consecutive days in Prague and was the longest and most severe heat wave since the beginning of air temperature measurements in 1775. Probabilities of long and severe heat waves are estimated from daily temperature series generated by a first-order autoregressive model with a deterministic component, incorporating the seasonal cycle and the long-term trend. The model is validated with respect to the simulation of heat waves in present climate (1961-2006) and subsequently run under several assumptions reflecting various rates of summer warming over the 21st century, based on climate model projections. The return period of a heat wave reaching or exceeding the length of the 2006 heat wave is estimated to be around 120 years in 2006. Due to an increase in mean summer temperatures, probabilities of very long heat waves have already risen by an order of magnitude over the recent 25 years, and they are likely to increase by another order of magnitude by around 2040 under the summer warming rate assumed by the mid-scenario. Even the lower-bound scenario yields a considerable decline of return periods associated with intense heat waves. Although positive socio

  4. Frequency of early remodeling of left ventricle and its comparison between patients with stroke volume ≥97 Ml versus patients with stroke volume <97 Ml after aortic valve replacement for severe aortic regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Ali Rizvi, Hafiz Muhammad Farhan; Khalid, Zaigham Rasool; Baksh, Allah; Raza Baig, Mirza Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the frequency of early remodeling in patients of severe aortic regurgitation after aortic valve replacement and to see the incidence of early remodeling in patients with stroke volume >97 ml versus < 97 ml before aortic valve replacement. Method: This was a prospective comparative study conducted from August 2013 to December 2014 in a tertiary care hospital. Fifty seven (57) patients of isolated chronic aortic regurgitation were included in this study. SPSS v23 was used for data analysis. Independent sample t-test was used for analysis of continuous variables and chi-square test for qualitative variables. Results: Out of fifty seven patients, early remodeling occurred in 34 (59.64%) patients after surgery. The mean pre-operative stroke volume of patient in whom remodeling occurred was 110.3+9.66 ml while mean pre-operative stroke volume of patients who did not undergo remodeling was 86.65+7.63 ml. There were 28 (82.4%) patients with stroke volume >97 ml in whom Remodeling occurred where as in patients with stroke volume <97 ml remodeling occurred only in 6 (17.6%) patients (p value 0.004). There was no in-hospital mortality. Conclusion: There is an association between stroke volume and early LV remodeling after Aortic valve replacement. Stroke volume >97 ml is a good predictor of early LV remodeling. PMID:28083026

  5. Interleukin-6 gene -174 G/C promoter polymorphism predicts severity and outcome in acute ischemic stroke patients from north India.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Baidarbhi; Chowdhury, Debashish; Vishnoi, Gaurav; Goswami, Binita; Kishore, Jugal; Agarwal, Sarita

    2013-07-01

    A guanine/cytosine (G/C) substitution occurring in position -174 of the interleukin-6 (IL-6) gene promoter changes the expression of IL-6 circulating proteins. We evaluated the occurrence of IL-6 -174 G/C polymorphism in patients with acute ischemic stroke and studied its association with stroke severity, outcome, and mortality. One hundred patients with acute ischemic stroke and 120 age and sex-matched healthy controls were studied. Genotyping was performed using polymerase chain reaction and restriction enzyme analysis. Serum levels of IL-6 were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Stroke was classified using Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST) classification. Severity was assessed by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale. Outcome measures included modified Rankin Scale (mRS) and Barthel Index (BI) scores at 7 days and 3 and 6 months. Mortality/survival was assessed using the Kaplan-Meier analysis. The frequency of GG, GC, and CC genotypes did not differ significantly between cases and controls. No association was seen between TOAST subtype and genotype. At the time of admission, stroke was more severe in patients with the GC genotype (P = .03) and less severe in the GG genotype (P = .04). The GC genotype was also associated with higher serum IL-6 levels and poor short-term (BI P = .001; mRS P = .003) and long-term outcomes (BI P = 9 × 10(-5); mRS P = 9 × 10(-5)), while the GG genotype had significantly lower serum IL-6 levels and better short and long-term outcomes (BI P = 3 × 10(-5); mRS P = 2 × 10(-4)). There was significantly lesser mortality in the GG genotype and more in the GC genotype based on the Kaplan-Meier analysis. Patients with the GC genotype had more severe strokes with poorer short and long-term outcomes and increased mortality. The GG genotype was associated with less severe strokes, better short and long-term prognosis, and survival. The GG genotype appears to be protective against stroke severity

  6. The Impact of Heat Waves on Occurrence and Severity of Construction Accidents

    PubMed Central

    Rameezdeen, Rameez; Elmualim, Abbas

    2017-01-01

    The impact of heat stress on human health has been extensively studied. Similarly, researchers have investigated the impact of heat stress on workers’ health and safety. However, very little work has been done on the impact of heat stress on occupational accidents and their severity, particularly in South Australian construction. Construction workers are at high risk of injury due to heat stress as they often work outdoors, undertake hard manual work, and are often project based and sub-contracted. Little is known on how heat waves could impact on construction accidents and their severity. In order to provide more evidence for the currently limited number of empirical investigations on the impact of heat stress on accidents, this study analysed 29,438 compensation claims reported during 2002–2013 within the construction industry of South Australia. Claims reported during 29 heat waves in Adelaide were compared with control periods to elicit differences in the number of accidents reported and their severity. The results revealed that worker characteristics, type of work, work environment, and agency of accident mainly govern the severity. It is recommended that the implementation of adequate preventative measures in small-sized companies and civil engineering sites, targeting mainly old age workers could be a priority for Work, Health and Safety (WHS) policies. PMID:28085067

  7. The Impact of Heat Waves on Occurrence and Severity of Construction Accidents.

    PubMed

    Rameezdeen, Rameez; Elmualim, Abbas

    2017-01-11

    The impact of heat stress on human health has been extensively studied. Similarly, researchers have investigated the impact of heat stress on workers' health and safety. However, very little work has been done on the impact of heat stress on occupational accidents and their severity, particularly in South Australian construction. Construction workers are at high risk of injury due to heat stress as they often work outdoors, undertake hard manual work, and are often project based and sub-contracted. Little is known on how heat waves could impact on construction accidents and their severity. In order to provide more evidence for the currently limited number of empirical investigations on the impact of heat stress on accidents, this study analysed 29,438 compensation claims reported during 2002-2013 within the construction industry of South Australia. Claims reported during 29 heat waves in Adelaide were compared with control periods to elicit differences in the number of accidents reported and their severity. The results revealed that worker characteristics, type of work, work environment, and agency of accident mainly govern the severity. It is recommended that the implementation of adequate preventative measures in small-sized companies and civil engineering sites, targeting mainly old age workers could be a priority for Work, Health and Safety (WHS) policies.

  8. [Impact of daily mean temperature, cold spells, and heat waves on stroke mortality a multivariable Meta-analysis from 12 counties of Hubei province, China].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y Q; Yu, C H; Bao, J Z

    2017-04-10

    Objective: To assess the acute effects of daily mean temperature, cold spells, and heat waves on stroke mortality in 12 counties across Hubei province, China. Methods: Data related to daily mortality from stroke and meteorology in 12 counties across Hubei province during 2009-2012, were gathered. Distributed lag nonlinear model (DLNM) was first used, to estimate the county-specific associations between daily mean temperature, cold spells, heat waves and stroke mortality. Multivariate Meta-analysis was then applied to pool the community-specific relationships between temperature and stroke mortality (exposure-response relationship) as well as both cold- and- heat-associated risks on mortality at different lag days (lag-response relationship). Results: During 2009-2012, a total population of 6.7 million was included in this study with 42 739 persons died of stroke. An average of 2.7 (from 0.5 to 6.0) stroke deaths occurred daily in each county, with annual average mean temperature as 16.6 ℃ (from 14.7 ℃ to 17.4 ℃) during the study period. An inverse J-shaped association between temperature and stroke mortality was observed at the provincial level. Pooled mortality effect of cold spells showed a 2-3-day delay and lasted about 10 days, while effect of heat waves appeared acute but attenuated within a few days. The mortality risks on cold-spell days ranged from 0.968 to 1.523 in 12 counties at lag 3-14, with pooled effect as 1.180 (95%CI:1.043-1.336). The pooled mortality risk (ranged from 0.675 to 2.066) on heat-wave days at lag 0-2 was 1.114 (95%CI: 1.012-1.227). Conclusions: An inverse J-shaped association between temperature and stroke mortality was observed in Hubei province, China. Both cold spells and heat waves were associated with increased stroke mortality, while different lag patterns were observed in the mortality effects of heat waves and cold spells.

  9. C-Terminus of Heat Shock Cognate 70 Interacting Protein Increases Following Stroke and Impairs Survival Against Acute Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Stankowski, Jeannette N.; Zeiger, Stephanie L.H.; Cohen, Evan L.; DeFranco, Donald B.; Cai, Jiyang

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The decision to remove or refold oxidized, denatured, or misfolded proteins by heat shock protein 70 and its binding partners is critical to determine cell fate under pathophysiological conditions. Overexpression of the ubiquitin ligase C-terminus of HSC70 interacting protein (CHIP) can compensate for failure of other ubiquitin ligases and enhance protein turnover and survival under chronic neurological stress. The ability of CHIP to alter cell fate after acute neurological injury has not been assessed. Using postmortem human tissue samples, we provide the first evidence that cortical CHIP expression is increased after ischemic stroke. Oxygen glucose deprivation in vitro led to rapid protein oxidation, antioxidant depletion, proteasome dysfunction, and a significant increase in CHIP expression. To determine if CHIP upregulation enhances neural survival, we overexpressed CHIP in vitro and evaluated cell fate 24 h after acute oxidative stress. Surprisingly, CHIP overexpressing cells fared worse against oxidative injury, accumulated more ubiquitinated and oxidized proteins, and experienced decreased proteasome activity. Conversely, using small interfering RNA to decrease CHIP expression in primary neuronal cultures improved survival after oxidative stress, suggesting that increases in CHIP observed after stroke like injuries are likely correlated with diminished survival and may negatively impact the neuroprotective potential of heat shock protein 70. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 14, 1787–1801. PMID:20677910

  10. Challenging Return to Play Decisions: Heat Stroke, Exertional Rhabdomyolysis, and Exertional Collapse Associated With Sickle Cell Trait.

    PubMed

    Asplund, Chad A; O'Connor, Francis G

    2016-01-01

    Sports medicine providers frequently return athletes to play after sports-related injuries and conditions. Many of these conditions have guidelines or medical evidence to guide the decision-making process. Occasionally, however, sports medicine providers are challenged with complex medical conditions for which there is little evidence-based guidance and physicians are instructed to individualize treatment; included in this group of conditions are exertional heat stroke (EHS), exertional rhabdomyolysis (ER), and exertional collapse associated with sickle cell trait (ECAST). The MEDLINE (2000-2015) database was searched using the following search terms: exertional heat stroke, exertional rhabdomyolysis, and exertional collapse associated with sickle cell trait. References from consensus statements, review articles, and book chapters were also utilized. Clinical review. Level 4. These entities are unique in that they may cause organ system damage capable of leading to short- or long-term detriments to physical activity and may not lend to complete recovery, potentially putting the athlete at risk with premature return to play. With a better understanding of the pathophysiology of EHS, ER, and ECAST and the factors associated with recovery, better decisions regarding return to play may be made. © 2015 The Author(s).

  11. Kinematic measures for upper limb motor assessment during robot-mediated training in patients with severe sub-acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Duret, Christophe; Courtial, Ophélie; Grosmaire, Anne Gaelle

    2016-01-01

    Kinematic assessments are increasingly used as motor outcome measures during upper limb robot-assisted training, in addition to clinical scales. However, their relevance has not been evaluated much. Thirty-eight patients with severe sub-acute stroke (age 56 ± 17 [19-87] years; time since stroke, 55 ± 22 days) carried out 16 sessions (average 3/week, 35 ± 15 days) of upper limb robot-assisted training combined with standard therapy. Pre/post motor performance was evaluated using the Fugl-Meyer Assessment scale, Motor Status Scale (MSS) and kinematic measures. Motor outcomes were compared and relationships between clinical and kinematic outcomes were analyzed. All clinical and kinematic outcomes improved after training (p <  0.01). FM score increased from 17.7 ± 10.0 to 28.6 ± 15.4. All baseline kinematic measures were strongly correlated with clinical scores. Correlations between clinical and kinematic changes were moderate (r = -0.65 for change in FM Proximal score and change in accuracy measure). However, smoothness and accuracy indicators were shown to be responsive measures. This study demonstrated that baseline kinematic measures and their pre/post training changes were significantly correlated with clinical motor outcome measures. However, even if kinematic measures are valid for the evaluation of motor impairment we cannot propose to substitute common clinical measures of motor function which also evaluate functional abilities of the upper limb.

  12. Neural Substrates of Motor Recovery in Severely Impaired Stroke Patients With Hand Paralysis.

    PubMed

    Harris-Love, Michelle L; Chan, Evan; Dromerick, Alexander W; Cohen, Leonardo G

    2016-05-01

    In well-recovered stroke patients with preserved hand movement, motor dysfunction relates to interhemispheric and intracortical inhibition in affected hand muscles. In less fully recovered patients unable to move their hand, the neural substrates of recovered arm movements, crucial for performance of daily living tasks, are not well understood. Here, we evaluated interhemispheric and intracortical inhibition in paretic arm muscles of patients with no recovery of hand movement (n = 16, upper extremity Fugl-Meyer Assessment = 27.0 ± 8.6). We recorded silent periods (contralateral and ipsilateral) induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation during voluntary isometric contraction of the paretic biceps and triceps brachii muscles (correlates of intracortical and interhemispheric inhibition, respectively) and investigated links between the silent periods and motor recovery, an issue that has not been previously explored. We report that interhemispheric inhibition, stronger in the paretic triceps than biceps brachii muscles, significantly correlated with the magnitude of residual impairment (lower Fugl-Meyer scores). In contrast, intracortical inhibition in the paretic biceps brachii, but not in the triceps, correlated positively with motor recovery (Fugl-Meyer scores) and negatively with spasticity (lower Modified Ashworth scores). Our results suggest that interhemispheric inhibition and intracortical inhibition of paretic upper arm muscles relate to motor recovery in different ways. While interhemispheric inhibition may contribute to poorer recovery, muscle-specific intracortical inhibition may relate to successful motor recovery and lesser spasticity.

  13. Flexion synergy overshadows flexor spasticity during reaching in chronic moderate to severe hemiparetic stroke.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Michael D; Schut, Ingrid; Dewald, Julius P A

    2017-07-01

    Pharmaceutical intervention targets arm flexor spasticity with an often-unsuccessful goal of improving function. Flexion synergy is a related motor impairment that may be inadvertently neglected. Here, flexor spasticity and flexion synergy are disentangled to determine their contributions to reaching dysfunction. Twenty-six individuals participated. A robotic device systematically modulated shoulder abduction loading during ballistic reaching. Elbow muscle electromyography data were partitioned into windows delineated by elbow joint velocity allowing for the separation of synergy- and spasticity-related activation. Reaching velocity decreased with abduction loading (p<0.001) such that velocity was 30% slower when lifting the arm at 50% of abduction strength compared to when arm weight was supported. Abnormal flexion synergy increased with abduction loading (p<0.001) such that normalized activation ranged from a median (interquartile range) of 0.07 (0.03-0.12) when arm weight was supported to 0.19 (0.12-0.40) when actively lifting (large effect size, d=0.59). Flexor spasticity was detected during reaching (p=0.016) but only when arm weight was supported (intermediate effect size, d=0.33). Flexion synergy is the predominant contributor to reaching dysfunction while flexor spasticity appears only relevant during unnaturally occurring passively supported movement. Interventions targeting flexion synergy should be leveraged in future stroke recovery trials. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Heat transfer and pressure drop of supercritical carbon dioxide flowing in several printed circuit heat exchanger channel patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, M.; Kruizenga, A.; Anderson, M.; Corradini, M.

    2012-07-01

    Closed-loop Brayton cycles using supercritical carbon dioxide (SCO{sub 2}) show potential for use in high-temperature power generation applications including High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGR) and Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors (SFR). Compared to Rankine cycles SCO{sub 2} Brayton cycles offer similar or improved efficiency and the potential for decreased capital costs due to a reduction in equipment size and complexity. Compact printed-circuit heat exchangers (PCHE) are being considered as part of several SCO{sub 2} Brayton designs to further reduce equipment size with increased energy density. Several designs plan to use a gas cooler operating near the pseudo-critical point of carbon dioxide to benefit from large variations in thermophysical properties, but further work is needed to validate correlations for heat transfer and pressure-drop characteristics of SCO{sub 2} flows in candidate PCHE channel designs for a variety of operating conditions. This paper presents work on experimental measurements of the heat transfer and pressure drop behavior of miniature channels using carbon dioxide at supercritical pressure. Results from several plate geometries tested in horizontal cooling-mode flow are presented, including a straight semi-circular channel, zigzag channel with a bend angle of 80 degrees, and a channel with a staggered array of extruded airfoil pillars modeled after a NACA 0020 airfoil with an 8.1 mm chord length facing into the flow. Heat transfer coefficients and bulk temperatures are calculated from measured local wall temperatures and local heat fluxes. The experimental results are compared to several methods for estimating the friction factor and Nusselt number of cooling-mode flows at supercritical pressures in millimeter-scale channels. (authors)

  15. Are we armed with the right data? Pooled individual data review of biomarkers in people with severe upper limb impairment after stroke.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Kathryn S; Schmidt, Julia; Lohse, Keith R; Peters, Sue; Bernhardt, Julie; Lannin, Natasha A; Boyd, Lara A

    2017-01-01

    To build an understanding of the neurobiology underpinning arm recovery in people with severe arm impairment due to stroke, we conducted a pooled individual data systematic review to: 1) characterize brain biomarkers; 2) determine relationship(s) between biomarkers and motor outcome; and 3) establish relationship(s) between biomarkers and motor recovery. Three electronic databases were searched up to October 2, 2015. Eligible studies included adults with severe arm impairment after stroke. Descriptive statistics were calculated to characterize brain biomarkers, and pooling of individual patient data was performed using mixed-effects linear regression to examine relationships between brain biomarkers and motor outcome and recovery. Thirty-eight articles including individual data from 372 people with severe arm impairment were analysed. The majority of individuals were in the chronic (> 6 months) phase post stroke (51%) and had a subcortical stroke (49%). The presence of a motor evoked potential (indexed by transcranial magnetic stimulation) was the only biomarker related to better motor outcome (p = 0.02). There was no relationship between motor outcome and stroke volume (cm(3)), location (cortical, subcortical, mixed) or side (left vs. right), and corticospinal tract asymmetry index (extracted from diffusion weighted imaging). Only one study had longitudinal data, thus no data pooling was possible to address change over time (preventing our third objective). Based on the available evidence, motor evoked potentials at rest were the only biomarker that predicted motor outcome in individuals with severe arm impairment following stroke. Given that few biomarkers emerged, this review highlights the need to move beyond currently known biomarkers and identify new indices with sufficient variability and sensitivity to guide recovery models in individuals with severe motor impairments following stroke.

  16. Nerve Stimulation Enhances Task-Oriented Training in Chronic, Severe Motor Deficit After Stroke: A Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Carrico, Cheryl; Chelette, Kenneth C; Westgate, Philip M; Powell, Elizabeth; Nichols, Laurie; Fleischer, Anne; Sawaki, Lumy

    2016-07-01

    A sensory-based intervention called peripheral nerve stimulation can enhance outcomes of motor training for stroke survivors with mild-to-moderate hemiparesis. Further research is needed to establish whether this paired intervention can have benefit in cases of severe impairment (almost no active movement). Subjects with chronic, severe poststroke hemiparesis (n=36) were randomized to receive 10 daily sessions of either active or sham stimulation (2 hours) immediately preceding intensive task-oriented training (4 hours). Upper extremity movement function was assessed using Fugl-Meyer Assessment (primary outcome measure), Wolf Motor Function Test, and Action Research Arm Test at baseline, immediately post intervention and at 1-month follow-up. Statistically significant difference between groups favored the active stimulation group on Fugl-Meyer at postintervention (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-6.9; P=0.008) and 1-month follow-up (95% CI, 0.6-8.3; P=0.025), Wolf Motor Function Test at postintervention (95% CI, -0.21 to -0.02; P=0.020), and Action Research Arm Test at postintervention (95% CI, 0.8-7.3; P=0.015) and 1-month follow-up (95% CI, 0.6-8.4; P=0.025). Only the active stimulation condition was associated with (1) statistically significant within-group benefit on all outcomes at 1-month follow-up and (2) improvement exceeding minimal detectable change, as well as minimal clinically significant difference, on ≥1 outcomes at ≥1 time points after intervention. After stroke, active peripheral nerve stimulation paired with intensive task-oriented training can effect significant improvement in severely impaired upper extremity movement function. Further confirmatory studies that consider a larger group, as well as longer follow-up, are needed. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02633215. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. High-Intensity, Unilateral Resistance Training of a Non-Paretic Muscle Group Increases Active Range of Motion in a Severely Paretic Upper Extremity Muscle Group after Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Urbin, M. A.; Harris-Love, Michelle L.; Carter, Alex R.; Lang, Catherine E.

    2015-01-01

    Limited rehabilitation strategies are available for movement restoration when paresis is too severe following stroke. Previous research has shown that high-intensity resistance training of one muscle group enhances strength of the homologous, contralateral muscle group in neurologically intact adults. How this “cross education” phenomenon might be exploited to moderate severe weakness in an upper extremity muscle group after stroke is not well understood. The primary aim of this study was to examine adaptations in force-generating capacity of severely paretic wrist extensors resulting from high intensity, dynamic contractions of the non-paretic wrist extensors. A secondary, exploratory aim was to probe neural adaptations in a subset of participants from each sample using a single-pulse, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) protocol. Separate samples of neurologically intact controls (n = 7) and individuals ≥4 months post stroke (n = 6) underwent 16 sessions of training. Following training, one-repetition maximum of the untrained wrist extensors in the control group and active range of motion of the untrained, paretic wrist extensors in the stroke group were significantly increased. No changes in corticospinal excitability, intracortical inhibition, or interhemispheric inhibition were observed in control participants. Both stroke participants who underwent TMS testing, however, exhibited increased voluntary muscle activation following the intervention. In addition, motor-evoked potentials that were unobtainable prior to the intervention were readily elicited afterwards in a stroke participant. Results of this study demonstrate that high-intensity resistance training of a non-paretic upper extremity muscle group can enhance voluntary muscle activation and force-generating capacity of a severely paretic muscle group after stroke. There is also preliminary evidence that corticospinal adaptations may accompany these gains. PMID:26074871

  18. A Characterization Study of Several Heat Resistant Explosives in Mild Detonating Cords

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-08-30

    formation of 2,i*,6-tripicryltriazine (TPT) was determined by combustion calorimetry , using a platinum-lined rotating- bomb calorimeter. A mixture...were conducted on TPT with several solvents in a Parr stationary adiabatic- bomb calorimeter to determine the heat auxiliary material to use with...TPT. Also, the proper weight ratios to approximate the heat released for initial temperature settings on the rotating bomb , and to test for

  19. Brain-computer interface with somatosensory feedback improves functional recovery from severe hemiplegia due to chronic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Takashi; Shindo, Keiichiro; Kawashima, Kimiko; Ota, Naoki; Ito, Mari; Ota, Tetsuo; Mukaino, Masahiko; Fujiwara, Toshiyuki; Kimura, Akio; Liu, Meigen; Ushiba, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) based brain-computer interface (BCI) has a great potential for motor rehabilitation in stroke patients with severe hemiplegia. However, key elements in BCI architecture for functional recovery has yet to be clear. We in this study focused on the type of feedback to the patients, which is given contingently to their motor-related EEG in a BCI context. The efficacy of visual and somatosensory feedbacks was compared by a two-group study with the chronic stroke patients who are suffering with severe motor hemiplegia. Twelve patients were asked an attempt of finger opening in the affected side repeatedly, and the event-related desynchronization (ERD) in EEG of alpha and beta rhythms was monitored over bilateral parietal regions. Six patients were received a simple visual feedback in which the hand open/grasp picture on screen was animated at eye level, following significant ERD. Six patients were received a somatosensory feedback in which the motor-driven orthosis was triggered to extend the paralyzed fingers from 90 to 50°. All the participants received 1-h BCI treatment with 12–20 training days. After the training period, while no changes in clinical scores and electromyographic (EMG) activity were observed in visual feedback group after training, voluntary EMG activity was newly observed in the affected finger extensors in four cases and the clinical score of upper limb function in the affected side was also improved in three participants in somatosensory feedback group. Although the present study was conducted with a limited number of patients, these results imply that BCI training with somatosensory feedback could be more effective for rehabilitation than with visual feedback. This pilot trial positively encouraged further clinical BCI research using a controlled design. PMID:25071543

  20. Cerebral Hemodynamics and Vascular Reactivity in Mild and Severe Ischemic Rodent Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion Stroke Models

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Jeongeun; Jo, Areum; Kang, Bok-Man; Lee, Sohee; Bang, Oh Young; Heo, Chaejeong; Jhon, Gil-Ja; Lee, Youngmi

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia can cause decreased cerebral neurovascular coupling, leading to a failure in the autoregulation of cerebral blood flow. This study aims to investigate the effect of varying degrees of ischemia on cerebral hemodynamic reactivity using in vivo real-time optical imaging. We utilized direct cortical stimulation to elicit hyper-excitable neuronal activation, which leads to induced hemodynamic changes in both the normal and middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) ischemic stroke groups. Hemodynamic measurements from optical imaging accurately predict the severity of occlusion in mild and severe MCAO animals. There is neither an increase in cerebral blood volume nor in vessel reactivity in the ipsilateral hemisphere (I.H) of animals with severe MCAO. The pial artery in the contralateral hemisphere (C.H) of the severe MCAO group reacted more slowly than both hemispheres in the normal and mild MCAO groups. In addition, the arterial reactivity of the I.H in the mild MCAO animals was faster than the normal animals. Furthermore, artery reactivity is tightly correlated with histological and behavioral results in the MCAO ischemic group. Thus, in vivo optical imaging may offer a simple and useful tool to assess the degree of ischemia and to understand how cerebral hemodynamics and vascular reactivity are affected by ischemia. PMID:27358581

  1. Aphasia severity in chronic stroke patients: a combined disconnection in the dorsal and ventral language pathways.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Charlotte; Vargas, Patricia; Valabregue, Romain; Arbizu, Céline; Henry-Amar, François; Leger, Anne; Lehéricy, Stéphane; Samson, Yves

    2015-01-01

    The contribution of lesion size and location in poststroke aphasia is debated, especially the extent to which aphasia severity is affected by damage to specific white matter areas. To identify specific white matter areas critical for poststroke aphasia global severity and to determine whether injury to these areas had more impact on aphasia severity than the infarct volume. Twenty-three chronic poststroke aphasic patients were assessed with the Aphasia Rapid Test (ART) and the Boston Diagnosis Aphasia Examination (BDAE) global severity scales and underwent diffusion tensor and structural imaging. Voxel-based diffusion tensor imaging regression analysis was used to determine in which areas fractional anisotropy (FA) abnormalities were correlated with ART and BDAE severity scales. The relationships between aphasia severity, FA values, and infarct volumes were investigated using global and partial correlations. We found a critical area associated with aphasia severity overlapping with the arcuate and the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculi, resulting in a combined disconnection of the dorsal and ventral pathways. ART scores were inversely correlated with FA values in this region, with greater severity present with lower FA values (correlation coefficient = -0.833, P < .0001). The proportion of variance explained by the FA value was higher than the proportion of variance explained by the infarct volume (R (2) = 68% vs 27%, P = .01). The impact of infarct volume on aphasia severity disappeared when damage to this critical white matter area was taken into account (P = .38). The assessment of the integrity of this region may potentially have a clinical impact in neurorehabilitation and acute decision making. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Early Trajectory of Stroke Severity Predicts Long-Term Functional Outcomes in Ischemic Stroke Subjects: Results From the ESCAPE Trial (Endovascular Treatment for Small Core and Anterior Circulation Proximal Occlusion With Emphasis on Minimizing CT to Recanalization Times).

    PubMed

    Sajobi, Tolulope T; Menon, Bijoy K; Wang, Meng; Lawal, Oluwaseyi; Shuaib, Ashfaq; Williams, David; Poppe, Alexandre Y; Jovin, Tudor G; Casaubon, Leanne K; Devlin, Thomas; Dowlatshahi, Dar; Fanale, Chris; Lowerison, Mark W; Demchuk, Andrew M; Goyal, Mayank; Hill, Michael D

    2017-01-01

    The trajectory of neurological improvement after stroke treatment is clinically likely to be an important prognostic signal. We compared the accuracy of early longitudinal National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) measurement versus other early markers of stroke severity post treatment in predicting subjects' 90-day stroke outcome. Data are from the Endovascular treatment for Small Core and Anterior circulation Proximal occlusion with ESCAPE trial (Endovascular Treatment for Small Core and Anterior Circulation Proximal Occlusion With Emphasis on Minimizing CT to Recanalization Times). Stroke severity was assessed at baseline, 1, 2, 5, 30, and 90 days. Subjects' functional outcome was assessed using the modified Rankin Scale at baseline, 30 days, and 90 days. Group-based trajectory model was used to identify distinct subgroups of longitudinal trajectories of NIHSS measured over the first 2, 5, and 30 days. The accuracy of baseline NIHSS, infarct volume, 24-hour change in NIHSS, infarct volume, and disease severity trajectory subgroups in predicting 90-day stroke outcome were assessed using logistic regression analysis. Group-based trajectory model of the 2-day longitudinal NIHSS data revealed 3 distinct subgroups of NIHSS trajectories-large improvement (41.6%), minimal improvement (31.1%), and no improvement (27.3%) subgroups. Individuals in the large improvement group were more likely were more likely to exhibit good outcomes after 90 days than those in the minimal improvement or no improvement subgroup. Among candidate predictors, the 2-day trajectory subgroup variable was the most accurate in predicting 90-day modified Rankin Scale at 84.5%. Early trajectory of neurological improvement defined by 2-day longitudinal NIHSS data predicts functional outcomes with greater accuracy than other common variables. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01778335. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. [Japan stroke scales and its application for stroke].

    PubMed

    Amano, Takahiro

    2002-11-01

    There are many stroke scales currently available for estimating the severity and outcome of stroke. However, none of the stroke scales have been able to objectively quantify the severity of stroke. The Japan Stroke Society formed a subcommittee to task force the development of an innovative, quantifiable stroke scale. Conjoint analysis was utilized to compile this data. Finally, they developed a novel, and quantifiable Japan Stroke for the acute phase of stroke (JSS) (Stroke 32: 1800-1807, 2001). In addition to standard JSS, the Japan Stroke Scale Motor Function and Japan Stroke scale--Higher Cortical Function were finalized. These stroke scales are all parametric stroke scales. We utilize the stroke scales to monitor stroke patients, to start clinical pathway on patients with lacunas infarction after deciding whether severity of stroke is suitable for the clinical pathway by JSS. We use the JSS for the clinical studies of stroke patients. Furthermore, the JSS was utilized in the phase 2 trial of a new treatment in stroke patients which had significant statistical power. The scales were also introduced to the stroke databank. Therefore, these scales are useful to monitoring the neurological damage of stroke patients in the acute and chronic phase and to estimating the severity of stroke symptoms and predicting stroke outcome in clinical studies. They also have a potential to prove the efficacy of treatments through parametric analysis.

  4. Survey Instrument Validity Part II: Validation of a Survey Instrument Examining Athletic Trainers' Knowledge and Practice Beliefs Regarding Exertional Heat Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Laura J.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this article is to discuss the process of developing and validating an instrument to investigate an athletic trainer's attitudes and behaviors regarding the recognition and treatment of exertional heat stroke. Background: Following up from our initial paper, which discussed the process of survey instrument design and…

  5. Survey Instrument Validity Part II: Validation of a Survey Instrument Examining Athletic Trainers' Knowledge and Practice Beliefs Regarding Exertional Heat Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Laura J.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this article is to discuss the process of developing and validating an instrument to investigate an athletic trainer's attitudes and behaviors regarding the recognition and treatment of exertional heat stroke. Background: Following up from our initial paper, which discussed the process of survey instrument design and…

  6. Modeling the inflammatory response in the hypothalamus ensuing heat stroke: iterative cycle of model calibration, identifiability analysis, experimental design and data collection.

    PubMed

    Klett, Hagen; Rodriguez-Fernandez, Maria; Dineen, Shauna; Leon, Lisa R; Timmer, Jens; Doyle, Francis J

    2015-02-01

    Heat Stroke (HS) is a life-threatening illness caused by prolonged exposure to heat that causes severe hyperthermia and nervous system abnormalities. The long term consequences of HS are poorly understood and deeper insight is required to find possible treatment strategies. Elevated pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines during HS recovery suggest to play a major role in the immune response. In this study, we developed a mathematical model to understand the interactions and dynamics of cytokines in the hypothalamus, the main thermoregulatory center in the brain. Uncertainty and identifiability analysis of the calibrated model parameters revealed non-identifiable parameters due to the limited amount of data. To overcome the lack of identifiability of the parameters, an iterative cycle of optimal experimental design, data collection, re-calibration and model reduction was applied and further informative experiments were suggested. Additionally, a new method of approximating the prior distribution of the parameters for Bayesian optimal experimental design based on the profile likelihood is presented.

  7. Solar energy absorption characteristics and the effects of heat on the optical properties of several coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowery, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    The solar energy absorption characteristics of several high temperature coatings were determined and effects of heat on these coatings were evaluated. Included in the investigation were an electroplated alloy of black chrome and vanadium, electroplated black chrome, and chemically colored 316 stainless steel. Each of the coatings possessed good selective solar energy absorption properties at laboratory ambient temperature. Measured at a temperature of 700 K (800 F), the emittances of black chrome, black chrome vanadium, and colored stainless steel were 0.11, 0.61, and 0.15, respectively. Black chrome and black chrome vanadium did not degrade optically in the presence of high heat (811 K (1000 F)). Chemically colored stainless steel showed slight optical degradation when exposed to moderately high heat (616 K (650 F)0, but showed more severe degradation at exposure temperatures beyond this level. Each of the coatings showed good corrosion resistance to a salt spray environment.

  8. Monitoring of the bed time body temperature and body weight to prevent the occurrence of heat stroke in the Royal Thai Army recruits, Lopburi Province, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Pumchandh, Norawee; Tedsana, Vanida; Ngow, Supak; Rangsin, Ram; Aimpun, Pote; Mungthin, Mathirut; Srilennawat, Nareerut

    2012-05-01

    Heat stroke is still an important health problem in Thai army recruits. The authors aimed to evaluate a new method for preventing heat stroke in the newly army recruits during basic training in May-June 2006, by monitoring the bed time body temperature and body weight. One thousand one hundred and fifteen recruits from five army units in Lopburi Province, Thailand were enrolled in the present study. Standardized questionnaire was used for data collection including unit information, personal information, environmental information and daily activity information. Bed time body temperature and body weight were recorded daily. Anyone who had a body temperature > 37.8 degrees C or body weight lossing > 10% in 24 h had to stop training until these indicators were normal. There was no incidence of heat stroke in these army units during this training period. There were 191 recruits who had a body temperature > 37.8 degrees C. The mean duration of the fever was 3.3 +/- 3.3 days. The incidence of fever was 21.4 per 100 persons-month. There were 30 recruits with the body weight lossing > 10%. The duration of body weight loss was one day. Analyzed by mixed model using STATA program, there was statistically significant difference of the body temperature (p < 0.001) but not the body weight (p = 0.644) among the period of time. This monitoring of the bed time body temperature and body weight seems to be effective for the prevention of the occurrence of heat stroke because there was no case of heat stroke in the present study. However, further large-scale study with a control group should be performed.

  9. EEG-Triggered Functional Electrical Stimulation Therapy for Restoring Upper Limb Function in Chronic Stroke with Severe Hemiplegia

    PubMed Central

    Marquis, Aaron; Popovic, Milos R.

    2016-01-01

    We report the therapeutic effects of integrating brain-computer interfacing technology and functional electrical stimulation therapy to restore upper limb reaching movements in a 64-year-old man with severe left hemiplegia following a hemorrhagic stroke he sustained six years prior to this study. He completed 40 90-minute sessions of functional electrical stimulation therapy using a custom-made neuroprosthesis that facilitated 5 different reaching movements. During each session, the participant attempted to reach with his paralyzed arm repeatedly. Stimulation for each of the movement phases (e.g., extending and retrieving the arm) was triggered when the power in the 18 Hz–28 Hz range (beta frequency range) of the participant's EEG activity, recorded with a single electrode, decreased below a predefined threshold. The function of the participant's arm showed a clinically significant improvement in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment Upper Extremity (FMA-UE) subscore (6 points) as well as moderate improvement in Functional Independence Measure Self-Care subscore (7 points). The changes in arm's function suggest that the combination of BCI technology and functional electrical stimulation therapy may restore voluntary motor function in individuals with chronic hemiplegia which results in severe upper limb deficit (FMA-UE ≤ 15), a population that does not benefit from current best-practice rehabilitation interventions. PMID:27882256

  10. Accessing Inpatient Rehabilitation after Acute Severe Stroke: Age, Mobility, Prestroke Function and Hospital Unit Are Associated with Discharge to Inpatient Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hakkennes, Sharon; Hill, Keith D.; Brock, Kim; Bernhardt, Julie; Churilov, Leonid

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the variables associated with discharge to inpatient rehabilitation following acute severe stroke and to determine whether hospital unit contributed to access. Five acute hospitals in Victoria, Australia participated in this study. Patients were eligible for inclusion if they had suffered an acute severe…

  11. Accessing Inpatient Rehabilitation after Acute Severe Stroke: Age, Mobility, Prestroke Function and Hospital Unit Are Associated with Discharge to Inpatient Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hakkennes, Sharon; Hill, Keith D.; Brock, Kim; Bernhardt, Julie; Churilov, Leonid

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the variables associated with discharge to inpatient rehabilitation following acute severe stroke and to determine whether hospital unit contributed to access. Five acute hospitals in Victoria, Australia participated in this study. Patients were eligible for inclusion if they had suffered an acute severe…

  12. [Clinical severity and functionality of acute stroke patients attended at the physiotherapy public services of Natal, Rio Grande do Norte State, Brazil].

    PubMed

    da Costa, Fabrícia Azevêdo; da Silva, Diana Lídice Araújo; da Rocha, Vera Maria

    2011-01-01

    This article investigates the severity and functional independence of hemiplegics patients' post-acute stroke by means of a multidisciplinary clinical staff. It is a descriptive study composed by 40 hemiplegics attended at the four largest physiotherapy public services in Natal, Rio Grande do Norte State. The methods used were an evaluation form, Functional Independence Measure and NIHSS. The results showed a sample predominantly female (55%), stroke ischemic (90%), right brain hemisphere (52.5%) and Hypertension Risk Factor (90%). The mean of clinical severity and functional independence was 13.32±4.7 and 54.6±17.15 respectively. There was no significant difference between the mean of functionality about stroke side (pvalue = 0.66). There is a significant relation between clinical severity and functional independence (r = -0.45 pvalue=0.003). It can be concluded that the level of clinical severity and functional dependence of stroke patients that make use of public physiotherapy services is significant and show the necessity, beyond the classic treatment, to be encouraged preventive educational actions to improve knowledge of this population.

  13. Nitric Oxide does not Contribute to the Hypotension of Heat Stroke

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-03-01

    instrumented for the measurement of arterial blood pressure , electrocardiogram, and temperature at four sites. Rats were exposed to EH (ambient...temperature, 40 6 1°C) until mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) decreased to 75 mmHg, which was arbitrarily defined as the induction of heatstroke. In...environmental heating; hyperthermia; heat stress; blood pressure HEATSTROKE IS A MEDICAL EMERGENCY characterized by profound hypotension, delirium

  14. Eprosartan reduces cardiac hypertrophy, protects heart and kidney, and prevents early mortality in severely hypertensive stroke-prone rats.

    PubMed

    Barone, F C; Coatney, R W; Chandra, S; Sarkar, S K; Nelson, A H; Contino, L C; Brooks, D P; Campbell, W G; Ohlstein, E H; Willette, R N

    2001-06-01

    Eprosartan is a selective angiotensin II type I receptor antagonist approved for the treatment of hypertension. In the present studies, eprosartan's ability to provide end-organ protection was evaluated in a model of cardiomyopathy and renal failure in stroke-prone rats (SP). SP were fed a high fat (24.5% in food) and high salt (1% in water) diet (SFD). Eprosartan (60 mg/kg/day) or vehicle (saline control) (n = 25/group) was administered by intraperitoneally-implanted minipumps to these SP on the SFD for 12 weeks. Normal diet fed SP and WKY rats (n = 25/group) were also included for comparison (i.e. served as normal controls). Mortality, hemodynamics, and both renal and cardiac function and histopathology were monitored in all treatment groups. Eprosartan decreased the severely elevated arterial pressure (-12%; P < 0.05) produced by SFD but did not affect heart rate. Vehicle-treated SP-SFD control rats exhibited significant weight loss (-13%; P < 0.05) and marked mortality (50% by week 6 and 95% by week 9; P < 0.01). Eprosartan-treated SP-SFD rats maintained normal weight, and exhibited zero mortality at week 12 and beyond. Eprosartan prevented the increased urinary protein excretion (P < 0.05) that was observed in vehicle-treated SP-SFD rats. Echocardiographic (i.e. 2-D guided M-mode) evaluation indicated that SP-SFD vehicle control rats exhibited increased septal (+22.2%) and posterior left ventricular wall (+30.0%) thickness, and decreased left ventricular chamber diameter (-15.9%), chamber volume (-32.7%), stroke volume (-48.7%) and ejection fraction (-22.3%), and a remarkable decrease in cardiac output (-59.3%) compared to controls (all P < 0.05). These same parameters in eprosartan-treated SP-SFD rats were normal and differed markedly and consistently from vehicle-treated SP-SFD rats (i.e. treatment prevented pathology; all P < 0.05). Cardiac-gated MRI data confirmed the ability of eprosartan to prevent cardiac pathology/remodeling (P < 0

  15. Does attenuated skin blood flow lower sweat rate and the critical environmental limit for heat balance during severe heat exposure?

    PubMed

    Cramer, Matthew N; Gagnon, Daniel; Crandall, Craig G; Jay, Ollie

    2017-02-01

    What is the central question of this study? Does attenuated skin blood flow diminish sweating and reduce the critical environmental limit for heat balance, which indicates maximal heat loss potential, during severe heat stress? What is the main finding and its importance? Isosmotic hypovolaemia attenuated skin blood flow by ∼20% but did not result in different sweating rates, mean skin temperatures or critical environmental limits for heat balance compared with control and volume-infusion treatments, suggesting that the lower levels of skin blood flow commonly observed in aged and diseased populations may not diminish maximal whole-body heat dissipation. Attenuated skin blood flow (SkBF) is often assumed to impair core temperature (Tc ) regulation. Profound pharmacologically induced reductions in SkBF (∼85%) lead to impaired sweating, but whether the smaller attenuations in SkBF (∼20%) more often associated with ageing and certain diseases lead to decrements in sweating and maximal heat loss potential is unknown. Seven healthy men (28 ± 4 years old) completed a 30 min equilibration period at 41°C and a vapour pressure (Pa ) of 2.57 kPa followed by incremental steps in Pa of 0.17 kPa every 6 min to 5.95 kPa. Differences in heat loss potential were assessed by identifying the critical vapour pressure (Pcrit ) at which an upward inflection in Tc occurred. The following three separate treatments elicited changes in plasma volume to achieve three distinct levels of SkBF: control (CON); diuretic-induced isosmotic dehydration to lower SkBF (DEH); and continuous saline infusion to maintain SkBF (SAL). The Tc , mean skin temperature (Tsk ), heart rate, mean laser-Doppler flux (forearm and thigh; LDFmean ), mean local sweat rate (forearm and thigh; LSRmean ) and metabolic rate were measured. In DEH, a 14.2 ± 5.7% lower plasma volume resulted in a ∼20% lower LDFmean in perfusion units (PU) (DEH, 139 ± 23 PU; CON, 176 ± 22 PU; and SAL, 186 ± 22

  16. Local Heat Stroke Prevention Plans in Japan: Characteristics and Elements for Public Health Adaptation to Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Gerardo Sanchez; Imai, Chisato; Masumo, Kanako

    2011-01-01

    The adverse health effects from hot weather and heat waves represent significant public health risks in vulnerable areas worldwide. Rising temperatures due to climate change are aggravating these risks in a context of fast urbanization, population growth and societal ageing. However, environmental heat-related health effects are largely preventable through adequate preparedness and responses. Public health adaptation to climate change will often require the implementation of heat wave warning systems and targeted preventive activities at different levels. While several national governments have established such systems at the country level, municipalities do not generally play a major role in the prevention of heat disorders. This paper analyzes selected examples of locally operated heat-health prevention plans in Japan. The analysis of these plans highlights their strengths, but also the need of local institutions for assistance to make the transition towards an effective public health management of high temperatures and heat waves. It can also provide useful elements for municipal governments in vulnerable areas, both in planning their climate change and health adaptation activities or to better protect their communities against current health effects from heat. PMID:22408589

  17. Stroke Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... Association.org About Stroke for Stroke Association.org Life After Stroke for Stroke Association.org Stroke Connection Magazine ... that may be treatable during recovery. Visit our Life After Stroke section for support and to learn more. ...

  18. Variants of Rab GTPase-Effector Binding Protein-2 Cause Variation in the Collateral Circulation and Severity of Stroke.

    PubMed

    Lucitti, Jennifer L; Sealock, Robert; Buckley, Brian K; Zhang, Hua; Xiao, Lin; Dudley, Andrew C; Faber, James E

    2016-12-01

    The extent (number and diameter) of collateral vessels varies widely and is a major determinant, along with arteriogenesis (collateral remodeling), of variation in severity of tissue injury after large artery occlusion. Differences in genetic background underlie the majority of the variation in collateral extent in mice, through alterations in collaterogenesis (embryonic collateral formation). In brain and other tissues, ≈80% of the variation in collateral extent among different mouse strains has been linked to a region on chromosome 7. We recently used congenic (CNG) fine mapping of C57BL/6 (B6, high extent) and BALB/cByJ (BC, low extent) mice to narrow the region to a 737 Kb locus, Dce1. Herein, we report the causal gene. We used additional CNG mapping and knockout mice to narrow the number of candidate genes. Subsequent inspection identified a nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphism between B6 and BC within Rabep2 (rs33080487). We then created B6 mice with the BC single nucleotide polymorphism at this locus plus 3 other lines for predicted alteration or knockout of Rabep2 using gene editing. The single amino acid change caused by rs33080487 accounted for the difference in collateral extent and infarct volume between B6 and BC mice attributable to Dce1. Mechanistically, variants of Rabep2 altered collaterogenesis during embryogenesis but had no effect on angiogenesis examined in vivo and in vitro. Rabep2 deficiency altered endosome trafficking known to be involved in VEGF-A→VEGFR2 signaling required for collaterogenesis. Naturally occurring variants of Rabep2 are major determinants of variation in collateral extent and stroke severity in mice. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Discrete four-stroke quantum heat engine exploring the origin of friction.

    PubMed

    Kosloff, Ronnie; Feldmann, Tova

    2002-05-01

    The optimal power performance of a first-principle quantum heat engine model shows friction-like phenomena when the internal fluid Hamiltonian does not commute with the external control field. The model is based on interacting two-level systems where the external magnetic field serves as a control variable.

  20. Quantum lubrication: suppression of friction in a first-principles four-stroke heat engine.

    PubMed

    Feldmann, Tova; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2006-02-01

    A quantum model of a heat engine resembling the Otto cycle is employed to explore strategies to suppress frictional losses. These losses are caused by the inability of the engine's working medium to follow adiabatically the change in the Hamiltonian during the expansion and compression stages. By adding external noise to the engine frictional losses can be suppressed.

  1. Superior neuroprotective effects of cerebrolysin in heat stroke following chronic intoxication of Cu or Ag engineered nanoparticles. A comparative study with other neuroprotective agents using biochemical and morphological approaches in the rat.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Hari Shanker; Muresanu, Dafin Fior; Patnaik, Ranjana; Stan, Adina Dora; Vacaras, Vitalie; Perju-Dumbrav, Laura; Alexandru, Badisor; Buzoianu, Anca; Opincariu, Iulian; Menon, Preeti Kumaran; Sharma, Aruna

    2011-09-01

    The possibility that cerebrolysin, a mixture of several active fragments of neurotrophic factors and peptides induces neuroprotection following nanoparticles induced exacerbation of brain damage in heat stroke was examined in a rat model. For this purpose, the therapeutic efficacy of Cerebrolysin (2.5 or 5 ml/kg) recommended for stroke treatment was used in comparison with other drugs in standard doses recommended for such therapy in clinical situations e.g., levetiracetam (44 mg/kg), pregabalin (200 mg/kg), topiramate (40 mg/kg,i.p.) and valproate (400 mg/kg). Rats subjected to 4 h heat stress in a biological oxygen demand (BOD) incubator at 38 degrees C (Rel Humid 45-47%; Wind vel 22.4 to 25.6 cm/sec) developed profound behavioral symptoms of heat stroke e.g., hyperthermia, profuse salivation, prostration and gastric ulcerations in the stomach. These rats also exhibited marked brain pathology at this time. Thus, breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to proteins associated with brain edema formation could be seen in these heat stressed rats as compared to control groups. The edematous brain areas showed profound neuronal damage and/or distortion in large areas of the neuropil. These pathological symptoms were further exacerbated in Cu or Ag nanoparticles treated group (50-60 nm particle size, 50 mg/kg, i.p./day for 7 days) after identical heat stress on the 8th day. Pretreatment with cerebrolysin (2.5 ml/kg, i.v.) daily for 3 days in normal rats before heat stress significantly reduced the behavioral stress symptoms and the breakdown of the BBB function, edema formation and neuronal injuries. However, the magnitude and intensity of these neuroprotective effects were much less intense in all other drug treated rats after similar heat stress. On the other hand, almost double dose of cerebrolysin (5 ml/kg) was needed to achieve comparable neuroprotection in nanoparticles treated animals after heat stress. Whereas, double dose of all other compounds was much less

  2. Training of reaching in stroke survivors with severe and chronic upper limb paresis using a novel nonrobotic device: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Barker, Ruth N; Brauer, Sandra G; Carson, Richard G

    2008-06-01

    Severe upper limb paresis is a major contributor to disability after stroke. This study investigated the efficacy of a new nonrobotic training device, the Sensorimotor Active Rehabilitation Training (SMART) Arm, that was used with or without electromyography-triggered electrical stimulation of triceps brachii to augment elbow extension, permitting stroke survivors with severe paresis to practice a constrained reaching task. A single-blind, randomized clinical trial was conducted with 42 stroke survivors with severe and chronic paresis. Thirty-three participants completed the study, of whom 10 received training using the SMART Arm with electromyography-triggered electrical stimulation, 13 received training using the SMART Arm alone, and 10 received no intervention (control). Training consisted of 12 1-hour sessions over 4 weeks. The primary outcome measure was "upper arm function," item 6 of the Motor Assessment Scale. Secondary outcome measures included impairment measures; triceps muscle strength, reaching force, modified Ashworth scale; and activity measures: reaching distance and Motor Assessment Scale. Assessments were administered before (0 weeks) and after training (4 weeks) and at 2 months follow-up (12 weeks). Both SMART Arm groups demonstrated significant improvements in all impairment and activity measures after training and at follow-up. There was no significant difference between these 2 groups. There was no change in the control group. Our findings indicate that training of reaching using the SMART Arm can reduce impairment and improve activity in stroke survivors with severe and chronic upper limb paresis, highlighting the benefits of intensive task-oriented practice, even in the context of severe paresis.

  3. Stroke vision, aphasia, neglect (VAN) assessment—a novel emergent large vessel occlusion screening tool: pilot study and comparison with current clinical severity indices

    PubMed Central

    Teleb, Mohamed S; Ver Hage, Anna; Carter, Jaqueline; Jayaraman, Mahesh V; McTaggart, Ryan A

    2017-01-01

    Background Identification of emergent large vessel occlusion (ELVO) stroke has become increasingly important with the recent publications of favorable acute stroke thrombectomy trials. Multiple screening tools exist but the length of the examination and the false positive rate range from good to adequate. A screening tool was designed and tested in the emergency department using nurse responders without a scoring system. Methods The vision, aphasia, and neglect (VAN) screening tool was designed to quickly assess functional neurovascular anatomy. While objective, there is no need to calculate or score with VAN. After training participating nurses to use it, VAN was used as an ELVO screen for all stroke patients on arrival to our emergency room before physician evaluation and CT scan. Results There were 62 consecutive code stroke activations during the pilot study. 19 (31%) of the patients were VAN positive and 24 (39%) had a National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score of ≥6. All 14 patients with ELVO were either VAN positive or assigned a NIHSS score ≥6. While both clinical severity thresholds had 100% sensitivity, VAN was more specific (90% vs 74% for NIHSS ≥6). Similarly, while VAN and NIHSS ≥6 had 100% negative predictive value, VAN had a 74% positive predictive value while NIHSS ≥6 had only a 58% positive predictive value. Conclusions The VAN screening tool accurately identified ELVO patients and outperformed a NIHSS ≥6 severity threshold and may best allow clinical teams to expedite care and mobilize resources for ELVO patients. A larger study to both validate this screening tool and compare with others is warranted. PMID:26891627

  4. Numerical simulation of supercritical heat transfer under severe axial density gradient in a narrow vertical tube

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Y. Y.; Hong, S. D.; Kim, Y. W.

    2012-07-01

    A number of computational works have been performed so far for the simulation of heat transfer in a supercritical fluid. The simulations, however, faced a lot of difficulties when heat transfer deteriorates due either to buoyancy or by acceleration. When the bulk temperature approaches the pseudo-critical temperature the fluid experiences a severe axial density gradient on top of a severe radial one. Earlier numerical calculations showed, without exception, unrealistic over-predictions, as soon as the bulk temperature exceeded the pseudo-critical temperature. The over-predictions might have been resulted from an inapplicability of widely-used turbulence models. One of the major causes for the difficulties may probably be an assumption of a constant turbulent Prandtl number. Recent research, both numerical and experimental, indicates that the turbulent Prandtl number is never a constant when the gradient of physical properties is significant. This paper describes the applicability of a variable turbulent Prandtl number to the numerical simulation of heat transfer in supercritical fluids flowing in narrow vertical tubes. (authors)

  5. Heat up and potential failure of BWR upper internals during a severe accident

    SciTech Connect

    Robb, Kevin R

    2015-01-01

    In boiling water reactors, the steam dome, steam separators, and dryers above the core are comprised of approximately 100 tons of stainless steel. During a severe accident in which the coolant boils away and exothermic oxidation of zirconium occurs, gases (steam and hydrogen) are superheated in the core region and pass through the upper internals. Historically, the upper internals have been modeled using severe accident codes with relatively simple approximations. The upper internals are typically modeled in MELCOR as two lumped volumes with simplified heat transfer characteristics, with no structural integrity considerations, and with limited ability to oxidize, melt, and relocate. The potential for and the subsequent impact of the upper internals to heat up, oxidize, fail, and relocate during a severe accident was investigated. A higher fidelity representation of the shroud dome, steam separators, and steam driers was developed in MELCOR v1.8.6 by extending the core region upwards. This modeling effort entailed adding 45 additional core cells and control volumes, 98 flow paths, and numerous control functions. The model accounts for the mechanical loading and structural integrity, oxidation, melting, flow area blockage, and relocation of the various components. The results indicate that the upper internals can reach high temperatures during a severe accident; they are predicted to reach a high enough temperature such that they lose their structural integrity and relocate. The additional 100 tons of stainless steel debris influences the subsequent in-vessel and ex-vessel accident progression.

  6. An Exertional Heat Stroke Survivor's Return to Running: An Integrated Approach on the Treatment, Recovery, and Return to Activity.

    PubMed

    Adams, William M; Hosokawa, Yuri; Huggins, Robert A; Mazerolle, Stephanie M; Casa, Douglas J

    2016-08-01

    Evidence-based best practices for the recognition and treatment of exertional heat stroke (EHS) indicate that rectal thermometry and immediate, aggressive cooling via cold-water immersion ensure survival from this medical condition. However, little is known about the recovery, medical follow-up, and return to activity after an athlete has suffered EHS. To highlight the transfer of evidenced-based research into clinical practice by chronicling the treatment, recovery, and return to activity of a runner who suffered an EHS during a warm-weather road race. Case study. Warm-weather road race. 53-y-old recreationally active man. A runner's treatment, recovery, and return to activity from EHS and 2014 Falmouth Road Race performance. Runner's perceptions and experiences with EHS, body temperature, heart rate, hydration status, exercise intensity. The runner successfully completed the 2014 Falmouth Road Race without incident of EHS. Four dominant themes emerged from the data: predisposing factors, ideal treatment, lack of medical follow-up, and patient education. The first theme identified 3 predisposing factors that contributed to the runner's EHS: hydration, sleep loss, and lack of heat acclimatization. The runner received ideal treatment using evidence-based best practices. A lack of long-term medical care following the EHS with no guidance on the runner's return to full activity was observed. The runner knew very little about EHS before the 2013 race, which drove him to seek knowledge as to why he suffered EHS. Using this newly learned information, he successfully completed the 2014 Falmouth Road Race without incident. This case supports prior literature examining the factors that predispose individuals to EHS. Although evidence-based best practices regarding prompt recognition and treatment of EHS ensure survival, this case highlights the lack of medical follow-up and physician-guided return to activity after EHS.

  7. Hypothesis: exertional heat stroke-induced myopathy and genetically inherited malignant hyperthermia represent the same disorder, the human stress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xuesheng; Song, Qing; Gao, Yan

    2014-11-01

    Exertional heat stroke is usually experienced as a result of a prolonged and intensive exercise. It is a life-threatening condition that is characterized by an increase in core body temperature and rhabdomyolysis. The associated hyperkalemia and metabolic acidosis may lead to an acute renal, cardiac, and hemostatic failure. Exactly, the same symptoms are noticed in case of the anesthesia-induced malignant hyperthermia (MH), an inherited disorder of the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor. This receptor is a Ca(2+) channel that is activated by the volatile anesthetic agents and depolarizing muscle relaxant. The presence of MH-associated ryanodine receptor variant in the individuals who suffered from EH and improvement of the symptoms with dantrolene has frequently raised the question as to whether the two disorders actually represent one and the same disease. Nevertheless, an exact explanation of the susceptibility of the genetically predisposed MH individuals to ER remains elusive. We have attempted to review the published clinical reports to explore the possibility that ER and EH represent one and the same disorder.

  8. Therapeutic treatment with ascorbate rescues mice from heat stroke-induced death by attenuating systemic inflammatory response and hypothalamic neuronal damage.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Yu; Chen, Jen-Yin; Chen, Sheng-Hsien; Cheng, Tain-Junn; Lin, Mao-Tsun; Hu, Miao-Lin

    2016-04-01

    The impact of ascorbate on oxidative stress-related diseases is moderate because of its limited oral bioavailability and rapid clearance. However, recent evidence of the clinical benefit of parenteral vitamin C administration has emerged, especially in critical care. Heatstroke is defined as a form of excessive hyperthermia associated with a systemic inflammatory response that results in multiple organ dysfunctions in which central nervous system disorders such as delirium, convulsions, and coma are predominant. The thermoregulatory, immune, coagulation and tissue injury responses of heatstroke closely resemble those observed during sepsis and are likely mediated by similar cellular mechanisms. This study was performed by using the characteristic high lethality rate and sepsis-mimic systemic inflammatory response of a murine model of heat stroke to test our hypothesis that supra-physiological doses of ascorbate may have therapeutic use in critical care. We demonstrated that parenteral administration of ascorbate abrogated the lethality and thermoregulatory dysfunction in murine model of heat stroke by attenuating heat stroke-induced accelerated systemic inflammatory, coagulation responses and the resultant multiple organ injury, especially in hypothalamus. Overall, our findings support the hypothesis and notion that supra-physiological doses of ascorbate may have therapeutic use in critical care.

  9. Effect of treatment delay, age, and stroke severity on the effects of intravenous thrombolysis with alteplase for acute ischaemic stroke: a meta-analysis of individual patient data from randomised trials

    PubMed Central

    Emberson, Jonathan; Lees, Kennedy R; Lyden, Patrick; Blackwell, Lisa; Albers, Gregory; Bluhmki, Erich; Brott, Thomas; Cohen, Geoff; Davis, Stephen; Donnan, Geoffrey; Grotta, James; Howard, George; Kaste, Markku; Koga, Masatoshi; von Kummer, Ruediger; Lansberg, Maarten; Lindley, Richard I; Murray, Gordon; Olivot, Jean Marc; Parsons, Mark; Tilley, Barbara; Toni, Danilo; Toyoda, Kazunori; Wahlgren, Nils; Wardlaw, Joanna; Whiteley, William; del Zoppo, Gregory J; Baigent, Colin; Sandercock, Peter; Hacke, Werner

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Alteplase is effective for treatment of acute ischaemic stroke but debate continues about its use after longer times since stroke onset, in older patients, and among patients who have had the least or most severe strokes. We assessed the role of these factors in affecting good stroke outcome in patients given alteplase. Methods We did a pre-specified meta-analysis of individual patient data from 6756 patients in nine randomised trials comparing alteplase with placebo or open control. We included all completed randomised phase 3 trials of intravenous alteplase for treatment of acute ischaemic stroke for which data were available. Retrospective checks confirmed that no eligible trials had been omitted. We defined a good stroke outcome as no significant disability at 3–6 months, defined by a modified Rankin Score of 0 or 1. Additional outcomes included symptomatic intracranial haemorrhage (defined by type 2 parenchymal haemorrhage within 7 days and, separately, by the SITS-MOST definition of parenchymal type 2 haemorrhage within 36 h), fatal intracranial haemorrhage within 7 days, and 90-day mortality. Findings Alteplase increased the odds of a good stroke outcome, with earlier treatment associated with bigger proportional benefit. Treatment within 3·0 h resulted in a good outcome for 259 (32·9%) of 787 patients who received alteplase versus 176 (23·1%) of 762 who received control (OR 1·75, 95% CI 1·35–2·27); delay of greater than 3·0 h, up to 4·5 h, resulted in good outcome for 485 (35·3%) of 1375 versus 432 (30·1%) of 1437 (OR 1·26, 95% CI 1·05–1·51); and delay of more than 4·5 h resulted in good outcome for 401 (32·6%) of 1229 versus 357 (30·6%) of 1166 (OR 1·15, 95% CI 0·95–1·40). Proportional treatment benefits were similar irrespective of age or stroke severity. Alteplase significantly increased the odds of symptomatic intracranial haemorrhage (type 2 parenchymal haemorrhage definition 231 [6·8%] of 3391 vs 44 [1·3

  10. Heat up and failure of BWR upper internals during a severe accident

    DOE PAGES

    Robb, Kevin R.

    2017-02-21

    In boiling water reactors, the shroud dome, separators, and dryers above the core are made of approximately 100,000 kg of stainless steel. During a severe accident in which the coolant boils away and exothermic oxidation of zirconium occurs, gases (steam and hydrogen) are superheated in the core region and pass through the upper internals. In this scenario, the upper internals can also be heated by thermal radiation from the hot degrading core. Historically, models of the upper internals have been relatively simple in severe accident codes. The upper internals are typically modeled in MELCOR as two lumped volumes with simplifiedmore » heat transfer characteristics and no structural integrity considerations, and with limited ability to oxidize, melt, and relocate. The potential for and the subsequent impact of the upper internals to heat up, oxidize, fail, and relocate during a severe accident was investigated. A higher fidelity representation of the shroud dome, steam separators, and steam driers was developed in MELCOR v1.8.6 by extending the core region upwards. The MELCOR modeling effort entailed adding 45 additional core cells and control volumes, 98 flow paths, and numerous control functions. The model accounts for the mechanical loading and structural integrity, oxidation, melting, flow area blockage, and relocation of the various components. Consistent with a previous study, the results indicate that the upper internals can reach high temperatures during a severe accident sufficient to lose their structural integrity and relocate. Finally, the additional 100 metric tons of stainless steel debris influences the subsequent in-vessel and ex-vessel accident progression.« less

  11. Attenuating brain inflammation, ischemia, and oxidative damage by hyperbaric oxygen in diabetic rats after heat stroke.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kai-Li; Niu, Ko-Chi; Lin, Mao-Tsun; Niu, Chiang-Shan

    2013-08-01

    Alternating hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis mechanisms would lead to multiple organs dysfunction or failure. Herein, we attempt to assess whether hypothalamic inflammation and ischemic and oxidative damage that occurred during heatstroke (HS) can be affected by hyperbaric oxygen (HBO₂) therapy in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. In this study, anesthetized diabetic rats, immediately after the onset of HS, were divided into two major groups and given the normobaric air (21% O₂ at 1.0 atmospheres absolute) or HBO₂ (100% O₂ at 2.0 atmospheres absolute). HS was induced by exposing the animals to heat stress (43°C). Another group of anesthetized diabetic rats was kept at normothermic state and used as controls. The survival time values for the HBO2-treated HS-diabetic rats increased form the control values of 78-82 minutes to new values of 184-208 minutes. HBO₂ therapy caused a reduction of HS-induced cellular ischemia (e.g., increased cellular levels of glutamate and lactate/pyruvate ratio), hypoxia (e.g., decreased cellular levels of PO₂), inflammation (e.g., increased cellular levels of interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-6, and myeloperoxidase), and oxidative damage (e.g., increased values of nitric oxide, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid, glycerol, and neuronal damage score) in the hypothalamus of the diabetic rats. Our results suggest that, in diabetic animals, HBO2 therapy may improve outcomes of HS in part by reducing heat-induced activated inflammation and ischemic and oxidative damage in the hypothalamus and other brain regions. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Passive decay heat removal by natural air convection after severe accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Erbacher, F.J.; Neitzel, H.J.; Cheng, X.

    1995-09-01

    The composite containment proposed by the Research Center Karlsruhe and the Technical University Karlsruhe is to cope with severe accidents. It pursues the goal to restrict the consequences of core meltdown accidents to the reactor plant. One essential of this new containment concept is its potential to remove the decay heat by natural air convection and thermal radiation in a passive way. To investigate the coolability of such a passive cooling system and the physical phenomena involved, experimental investigations are carried out at the PASCO test facility. Additionally, numerical calculations are performed by using different codes. A satisfying agreement between experimental data and numerical results is obtained.

  13. Heat and mass transfer in turbulent flows with several recirculated flow eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baake, E.; Nacke, B.; Jakovics, A.; Umbrashko, A.

    2001-06-01

    Numerical modeling of the concentration and temperature distribution in axial symmetrical systems with several recirculated flow eddies, which is based on various 2D stationary k-ɛ models and commercial codes, e.g. ANSYS and FLUENT, leads to results, which are significantly different from experimental data. Therefore additional user-defined subroutines were included in the commercial program code to improve the turbulent heat and mass transfer in the zone between the recirculated flow eddies. In addition transient 3D calculations were performed to investigate scientifically the flow dynamics. Figs 9, Refs 8.

  14. Current Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices of Certified Athletic Trainers Regarding Recognition and Treatment of Exertional Heat Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Scruggs, Ian C.; Casa, Douglas J.; Burton, Laura J.; McDermott, Brendon P.; Armstrong, Lawrence E.; Maresh, Carl M.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Context: Previous research has indicated that despite awareness of the current literature on the recommended prevention and care of exertional heat stroke (EHS), certified athletic trainers (ATs) acknowledge failure to follow those recommendations. Objective: To investigate the current knowledge, attitudes, and practices of ATs regarding the recognition and treatment of EHS. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Online survey. Patients or Other Participants: We obtained a random sample of e-mail addresses for 1000 high school and collegiate ATs and contacted these individuals with invitations to participate. A total of 498 usable responses were received, for a 25% response rate. Main Outcome Measure(s): The survey instrument evaluated ATs' knowledge and actual practice regarding EHS and included 29 closed-ended Likert scale questions (1  =  strongly disagree, 7  =  strongly agree), 2 closed-ended questions rated on a Likert scale (1  =  lowest value, 9  =  greatest value), 8 open-ended questions, and 7 demographic questions. We focused on the open-ended and demographic questions. Results: Although most ATs (77.1%) have read the current National Athletic Trainers' Association position statement on heat illness, only 18.6% used rectal thermometers to assess core body temperature to recognize EHS, and 49.7% used cold-water immersion to treat EHS. Athletic trainers perceived rectal thermometers as the most valid temperature assessment device when compared with other assessment devices (P ≤ .05), but they used oral thermometers as the primary assessment tool (49.1%). They identified cold-water immersion as the best cooling method (P ≤ .05), even though they used other means to cool a majority of the time (50.3%). Conclusions: The ATs surveyed have sound knowledge of the correct means of EHS recognition and treatment. However, a significant portion of these ATs reported using temperature assessment devices that are invalid with athletes

  15. Endovascular Therapy is Effective and Safe for Patients with Severe Ischemic Stroke: Pooled Analysis of IMS III and MR CLEAN Data

    PubMed Central

    Broderick, Joseph P.; Berkhemer, Olvert A.; Palesch, Yuko Y.; Dippel, Diederik W.J.; Foster, Lydia D.; Roos, Yvo B.W.E.M.; van der Lugt, Aad; Tomsick, Thomas A.; Majoie, Charles B.L.M.; van Zwam, Wim H.; Demchuk, Andrew M.; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J.; Khatri, Pooja; Lingsma, Hester F.; Hill, Michael D.; Roozenbeek, Bob; Jauch, Edward C.; Jovin, Tudor G.; Yan, Bernard; von Kummer, Rüdiger; Molina, Carlos A.; Goyal, Mayank; Schonewille, Wouter J.; Mazighi, Mikael; Engelter, Stefan T.; Anderson, Craig S.; Spilker, Judith; Carrozzella, Janice; Ryckborst, Karla J.; Janis, L. Scott; Simpson, Kit

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose We assessed the effect of endovascular treatment in acute ischemic stroke patients with severe neurological deficit (NIHSS ≥20) following a pre-specified analysis plan. Methods The pooled analysis of the IMS III and MR CLEAN trial included participants with an NIHSS ≥20 prior to intravenous (IV) t-PA treatment (IMS III) or randomization (MR CLEAN) who were treated with IV t-PA ≤ 3 hours of stroke onset. Our hypothesis was that participants with severe stroke randomized to endovascular therapy following IV t-PA would have improved 90-day outcome (distribution of modified Rankin scale [mRS] scores), as compared to those who received IV t-PA alone. Results Among 342 participants in the pooled analysis (194 from IMS III, 148 from MR CLEAN), an ordinal logistic regression model showed that the endovascular group had superior 90-day outcome compared to the IV t-PA group (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.78; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.20-2.66). In the logistic regression model of the dichotomous outcome (mRS 0-2, or ‘functional independence’), the endovascular group had superior outcomes (aOR 1.97; 95% CI 1.09-3.56). Functional independence (mRS ≤2) at 90 days was 25% in the endovascular group as compared to 14% in the IV t-PA group. Conclusions Endovascular therapy following IV t-PA within 3 hours of symptom onset improves functional outcome at 90 days after severe ischemic stroke. PMID:26486865

  16. Stroke in Minorities

    PubMed Central

    Trimble, Brian; Morgenstern, Lewis B.

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Minorities in the United States have higher stroke risks, stroke occurrence at an earlier age, and for some groups, more severe strokes than non-Hispanic whites. Factors contributing to this disparity are explored. Characteristics of African American, Hispanic, and Native American stroke risk and incidence are reviewed. We mention recent interventions to raise the awareness of stroke risk factors and symptoms in minorities. The importance of the problem is discussed, and we suggest ways stroke in minorities may be reduced. PMID:19026907

  17. Stroke in centenarians.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Tom Skyhøj; Andersen, Klaus Kaae

    2014-01-01

    Reports on centenarians with stroke have thus far been casuistic. We present clinical characteristics and 1-month mortality in 39 centenarians admitted to Danish hospitals with acute stroke within 2000-2010. A Danish stroke registry (2000-2010) contains information about 61 935 acute stroke patients among which 39 patients were centenarians. Data included age, sex, civil and housing status, stroke severity (Scandinavian Stroke Scale [SSS], 0 worst to 58 best), computed tomography scan, cardiovascular risk factors and death within 1 month after stroke. Data in centenarians were compared with similar data in stroke patients aged 40-69 years (n = 25 023), 70-79 years (n = 16 048), 80-89 years (n = 16 274) and 90-99 years (n = 3379). Of the 39 centenarians, 87% were women, 82% were living alone and 64% were living in their own home before the stroke. In general, the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors was lower in centenarians, particularly with regard to previous myocardial infarction, previous stroke and diabetes mellitus. Strokes were significantly more severe (SSS 25.4), and 1-month mortality (38.5%) was significantly higher in centenarians when compared with other age groups. Centenarians with stroke are from a cardiovascular standpoint healthier than their younger counterparts. Yet, strokes in centenarians are more severe and associated with very high mortality. © 2013 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  18. Shared decision making after severe stroke-How can we improve patient and family involvement in treatment decisions?

    PubMed

    Visvanathan, Akila; Dennis, Martin; Mead, Gillian; Whiteley, William N; Lawton, Julia; Doubal, Fergus Neil

    2017-01-01

    People who are well may regard survival with disability as being worse than death. However, this is often not the case when those surviving with disability (e.g. stroke survivors) are asked the same question. Many routine treatments provided after an acute stroke (e.g. feeding via a tube) increase survival, but with disability. Therefore, clinicians need to support patients and families in making informed decisions about the use of these treatments, in a process termed shared decision making. This is challenging after acute stroke: there is prognostic uncertainty, patients are often too unwell to participate in decision making, and proxies may not know the patients' expressed wishes (i.e. values). Patients' values also change over time and in different situations. There is limited evidence on successful methods to facilitate this process. Changes targeted at components of shared decision making (e.g. decision aids to provide information and discussing patient values) increase patient satisfaction. How this influences decision making is unclear. Presumably, a "shared decision-making tool" that introduces effective changes at various stages in this process might be helpful after acute stroke. For example, by complementing professional judgement with predictions from prognostic models, clinicians could provide information that is more accurate. Decision aids that are personalized may be helpful. Further qualitative research can provide clinicians with a better understanding of patient values and factors influencing this at different time points after a stroke. The evaluation of this tool in its success to achieve outcomes consistent with patients' values may require more than one clinical trial.

  19. 70-kDa Heat Shock Protein Downregulates Dynamin in Experimental Stroke: A New Therapeutic Target?

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Youl; Kim, Nuri; Zheng, Zhen; Lee, Jong Eun; Yenari, Midori A

    2016-08-01

    The 70-kDa heat shock protein (Hsp70) protects brain cells in models of cerebral ischemia. Proteomic screening of mice subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion identified dynamin as a major downregulated protein in Hsp70-overexpressing mice (Hsp70 transgenic mice). Dynamin-1 is expressed in neurons and participates in neurotransmission, but also transports the death receptor Fas to the cell surface, where it can be bound by its ligand and lead to apoptosis. Mice were subjected to distal middle cerebral artery occlusion. Neuro-2a cells were subjected to oxygen glucose deprivation. Hsp70 transgenic and Hsp70-deficient (Hsp70 knockout) mice were compared with wild-type mice for histological and behavioral outcomes. Some mice and neuro-2a cell cultures were given dynasore, a dynamin inhibitor. Hsp70 transgenic mice had better outcomes, whereas Hsp70 knockout mice had worse outcomes compared with wild-type mice. This correlated with decreased and increased dynamin expression, respectively. Dynamin colocalized to neurons and Fas, with higher Fas levels and increased caspase-8 expression. Hsp70 induction in neuro-2a cells was protected from oxygen glucose deprivation, while downregulating dynamin and Fas expression. Further, dynamin inhibition was found to be neuroprotective. Dynamin may facilitate Fas-mediated apoptotic death in the brain, and Hsp70 may protect by preventing this trafficking. Dynamin should be explored as a new therapeutic target for neuroprotection. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Some Effects of Surface Heating and Topography on the Regional Severe Storm Environment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjamin, Stanley George

    A combined synoptic and numerical investigation demonstrates several effects of surface heating and topography on the evolution of the regional-scale severe storm environment. A hypothesized elevated mixed layer effect, summarized in a conceptual model, is found downstream of the Mexican plateau both in observations and in three-dimensional modeling simulations of two cases of the 1979 SESAME field program, 10-11 April and 9-10 May. In both of these cases, the occurrence of thunderstorms was prevented over a large area where a strong elevated mixed layer restraining inversion (or 'lid') was present. Deep convective storms were instead focused in the region where a southeasterly low-level current flowed under a sharp northern and western boundary of the strong capping inversion. While the low-level flow has been generally thought of as a source of moisture for severe thunderstorms, it is shown that differential advection becomes particularly important as a process of static destabilization when the low-level flow beneath the lid edge possesses a large ageostrophic component. Such a configuration occurred in both of the case studies, and in each case, a migrating upper-level wave (jet streak) was associated with the development of low-level ageostrophic flow. Further, it was determined in numerical experiments that the strength of the underrunning low-level flow was itself enhanced by boundary layer processes in that (1) the lee trough to the east of the Mexican plateau and southern Rockies intensified as a result of differential heating and differential mixing of momentum, (2) jet streak transverse circulations strengthened as surface heating destabilized the lower troposphere, and (3) differential advection was maintained as the strong stability at the base of the elevated mixed layer decreased vertical mixing between the southeasterly flow beneath the lid and the southwesterly flow above it. Both the elevated mixed layer effect and the enhancement of the lee

  1. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting for severe stenosis of the intracranial extradural internal carotid artery causing transient ischemic attack or minor stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Jun Kyeung; Choi, Chang Hwa; Cha, Seung Heon; Choi, Byung Kwan; Cho, Won Ho; Kang, Tae Ho; Sung, Sang Min; Cho, Han Jin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the technical feasibility and clinical efficacy of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting (PTAS) for symptomatic stenosis of the intracranial extradural (petrous and cavernous) internal carotid artery (ICA). Review of medical records identified 26 consecutive patients who underwent PTAS using a balloon-expandable coronary stent (n = 15, 57.7%) or a Wingspan self-expandable stent (n = 11, 42.3%) for treatment of severe stenosis (>70%) involving the intracranial extradural ICA. The inclusion criteria were transient ischemic attack with an ABCD2 score of ≥3 (n = 12, 46.2%) or minor stroke with an NIHSS score of ≤4 (n = 14, 53.8%). Technical success rates, complications, and angiographic and clinical outcomes were analyzed retrospectively. PTAS was technically successful in all patients. The mean stenosis ratio decreased from 77.1% to 10.0% immediately after PTAS. The overall incidence of procedural complications was 23.1%, and the postoperative permanent morbidity/mortality rate was 7.7%. A total of 22 patients were tracked over an average period of 29.9 months. During the observation period, 20 patients (90.9%) had no further cerebrovascular events and stroke recurrence occurred in two patients (9.1%), resulting in an annual stroke risk of 3.7%. Two cases (11.1%) of significant in-stent restenosis (>50%) were found on follow-up angiography (n = 18). PTAS for severe stenosis (>70%) involving the intracranial extradural ICA showed a good technical feasibility and favorable clinical outcome in patients with transient ischemic attack or minor stroke. PMID:26063697

  2. Airplane stroke syndrome.

    PubMed

    Humaidan, Hani; Yassi, Nawaf; Weir, Louise; Davis, Stephen M; Meretoja, Atte

    2016-07-01

    Only 37 cases of stroke during or soon after long-haul flights have been published to our knowledge. In this retrospective observational study, we searched the Royal Melbourne Hospital prospective stroke database and all discharge summaries from 1 September 2003 to 30 September 2014 for flight-related strokes, defined as patients presenting with stroke within 14days of air travel. We hypothesised that a patent foramen ovale (PFO) is an important, but not the only mechanism, of flight-related stroke. We describe the patient, stroke, and flight characteristics. Over the study period, 131 million passengers arrived at Melbourne airport. Our centre admitted 5727 stroke patients, of whom 42 (0.73%) had flight-related strokes. Flight-related stroke patients were younger (median age 65 versus 73, p<0.001), had similar stroke severity, and received intravenous thrombolysis more often than non-flight-related stroke patients. Seven patients had flight-related intracerebral haemorrhage. The aetiology of the ischaemic strokes was cardioembolic in 14/35 (40%), including seven patients with confirmed PFO, one with atrial septal defect, four with atrial fibrillation, one with endocarditis, and one with aortic arch atheroma. Paradoxical embolism was confirmed in six patients. Stroke related to air travel is a rare occurrence, less than one in a million. Although 20% of patients had a PFO, distribution of stroke aetiologies was diverse and was not limited to PFO and paradoxical embolism.

  3. Electrolyte supplementation during severe energy restriction increases exercise capacity in the heat.

    PubMed

    James, Lewis J; Mears, Stephen A; Shirreffs, Susan M

    2015-12-01

    This study examined the effects of sodium chloride and potassium chloride supplementation during 48-h severe energy restriction on exercise capacity in the heat. Nine males completed three 48-h trials: adequate energy intake (100 % requirement), adequate electrolyte intake (CON); restricted energy intake (33 % requirement), adequate electrolyte intake (ER-E); and restricted energy intake (33 % requirement), restricted electrolyte intake (ER-P). At 48 h, cycling exercise capacity at 60 % VO2 peak was determined in the heat (35.2 °C; 61.5 % relative humidity). Body mass loss during the 48 h was greater during ER-P [2.16 (0.36) kg] than ER-E [1.43 (0.47) kg; P < 0.01] and CON [0.39 (0.68) kg; P < 0.001], as well as greater during ER-E than CON (P < 0.01). Plasma volume decreased during ER-P (P < 0.001), but not ER-E or CON. Exercise capacity was greater during CON [73.6 (13.5) min] and ER-E [67.0 (17.2) min] than ER-P [56.5 (13.1) min; P < 0.01], but was not different between CON and ER-E (P = 0.237). Heart rate during exercise was lower during CON and ER-E than ER-P (P < 0.05). These results demonstrate that supplementation of sodium chloride and potassium chloride during energy restriction attenuated the reduction in exercise capacity that occurred with energy restriction alone. Supplementation maintained plasma volume at pre-trial levels and consequently prevented the increased heart rate observed with energy restriction alone. These results suggest that water and electrolyte imbalances associated with dietary energy and electrolyte restriction might contribute to reduced exercise capacity in the heat.

  4. Hippocampal stroke.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    The first to link disturbance of memory and lesions of the medial temporal lobe was the Russian neurologist von Bechterew, who in 1989 presented the brain of a 60-year-old man who had suffered from severe amnesia. Autopsy showed bilateral damage of the medial temporal lobe. Several following postmortem case studies confirmed the association between permanent amnesia and bitemporal stroke. Reports of transient memory deficits in unilateral stroke in combination with other neurological and neuropsychological deficits followed. With the advent of brain imaging, persistent or transient amnesia as the sole or primary manifestation of acute - mostly left-sided - hippocampal stroke was described. With the use of modern MRI techniques the identification of typical ischemic stroke lesion patterns affecting the hippocampus has become possible. Although overt cognitive deficits in unilateral hippocampal stroke seem to be rare, a careful neuropsychological examination might be necessary to detect resulting neuropsychological deficits including disturbances of verbal and nonverbal episodic long-term memory and spatial orientation.

  5. Use of a Robotic Device for the Rehabilitation of Severe Upper Limb Paresis in Subacute Stroke: Exploration of Patient/Robot Interactions and the Motor Recovery Process

    PubMed Central

    Courtial, Ophélie; Grosmaire, Anne-Gaëlle; Hutin, Emilie

    2015-01-01

    This pioneering observational study explored the interaction between subacute stroke inpatients and a rehabilitation robot during upper limb training. 25 stroke survivors (age 55 ± 17 years; time since stroke, 52 ± 21 days) with severe upper limb paresis carried out 16 sessions of robot-assisted shoulder/elbow training (InMotion 2.0, IMT, Inc., MA, USA) combined with standard therapy. The values of 3 patient/robot interaction parameters (a guidance parameter: Stiffness, a velocity-related parameter: Slottime, and Robotic Power) were compared between sessions 1 (S1), 4 (S4), 8 (S8), 12 (S12), and 16 (S16). Pre/post Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) scores were compared in 18 patients. Correlations between interaction parameters and clinical and kinematic outcome measures were evaluated. Slottime decreased at S8 (P = 0.003), while Guidance decreased at S12 (P = 0.008). Robotic Power tended to decrease until S16. FMA scores improved from S1 to S16 (+49%, P = 0.002). Changes in FMA score were correlated with the Stiffness parameter (R = 0.4, P = 0.003). Slottime was correlated with movement velocity. This novel approach demonstrated that a robotic device is a useful and reliable tool for the quantification of interaction parameters. Moreover, changes in these parameters were correlated with clinical and kinematic changes. These results suggested that robot-based recordings can provide new insights into the motor recovery process. PMID:25821804

  6. Use of a robotic device for the rehabilitation of severe upper limb paresis in subacute stroke: exploration of patient/robot interactions and the motor recovery process.

    PubMed

    Duret, Christophe; Courtial, Ophélie; Grosmaire, Anne-Gaëlle; Hutin, Emilie

    2015-01-01

    This pioneering observational study explored the interaction between subacute stroke inpatients and a rehabilitation robot during upper limb training. 25 stroke survivors (age 55 ± 17 years; time since stroke, 52 ± 21 days) with severe upper limb paresis carried out 16 sessions of robot-assisted shoulder/elbow training (InMotion 2.0, IMT, Inc., MA, USA) combined with standard therapy. The values of 3 patient/robot interaction parameters (a guidance parameter: Stiffness, a velocity-related parameter: Slottime, and Robotic Power) were compared between sessions 1 (S1), 4 (S4), 8 (S8), 12 (S12), and 16 (S16). Pre/post Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) scores were compared in 18 patients. Correlations between interaction parameters and clinical and kinematic outcome measures were evaluated. Slottime decreased at S8 (P = 0.003), while Guidance decreased at S12 (P = 0.008). Robotic Power tended to decrease until S16. FMA scores improved from S1 to S16 (+49%, P = 0.002). Changes in FMA score were correlated with the Stiffness parameter (R = 0.4, P = 0.003). Slottime was correlated with movement velocity. This novel approach demonstrated that a robotic device is a useful and reliable tool for the quantification of interaction parameters. Moreover, changes in these parameters were correlated with clinical and kinematic changes. These results suggested that robot-based recordings can provide new insights into the motor recovery process.

  7. Recovery of post stroke proximal arm function, driven by complex neuroplastic bilateral brain activation patterns and predicted by baseline motor dysfunction severity

    PubMed Central

    Pundik, Svetlana; McCabe, Jessica P.; Hrovat, Ken; Fredrickson, Alice Erica; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Feng, I Jung; Daly, Janis J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Neuroplastic changes that drive recovery of shoulder/elbow function after stroke have been poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between neuroplastic brain changes related to shoulder/elbow movement control in response to treatment and recovery of arm motor function in chronic stroke survivors.Methods: Twenty-three chronic stroke survivors were treated with 12 weeks of arm rehabilitation. Outcome measures included functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) for the shoulder/elbow components of reach and a skilled motor function test (Arm Motor Abilities Test, AMAT), collected before and after treatment.Results: We observed two patterns of neuroplastic changes that were associated with gains in motor function: decreased or increased task-related brain activation. Those with significantly better motor function at baseline exhibited a decrease in brain activation in response to treatment, evident in the ipsilesional primary motor and contralesional supplementary motor regions; in contrast, those with greater baseline motor impairment, exhibited increased brain activation in response to treatment. There was a linear relationship between greater functional gain (AMAT) and increased activation in bilateral primary motor, contralesional primary and secondary sensory regions, and contralesional lateral premotor area, after adjusting for baseline AMAT, age, and time since stroke.Conclusions: Recovery of functional reach involves recruitment of several contralesional and bilateral primary motor regions. In response to intensive therapy, the direction of functional brain change (i.e., increase or decrease in task-related brain recruitment) for shoulder/elbow reach components depends on baseline level of motor function and may represent either different phases of recovery or different patterns of neuroplasticity that drive functional recovery. PMID:26257623

  8. The role of several heat transfer mechanisms on the enhancement of thermal conductivity in nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machrafi, H.; Lebon, G.

    2016-09-01

    A modelling of the thermal conductivity of nanofluids based on extended irreversible thermodynamics is proposed with emphasis on the role of several coupled heat transfer mechanisms: liquid interfacial layering between nanoparticles and base fluid, particles agglomeration and Brownian motion. The relative importance of each specific mechanism on the enhancement of the effective thermal conductivity is examined. It is shown that the size of the nanoparticles and the liquid boundary layer around the particles play a determining role. For nanoparticles close to molecular range, the Brownian effect is important. At nanoparticles of the order of 1-100 nm, both agglomeration and liquid layering are influent. Agglomeration becomes the most important mechanism at nanoparticle sizes of the order of 100 nm and higher. The theoretical considerations are illustrated by three case studies: suspensions of alumina rigid spherical nanoparticles in water, ethylene glycol and a 50/50w% water/ethylene glycol mixture, respectively, good agreement with experimental data is observed.

  9. The effect of cyclical and severe heat stress on growth performance and metabolism in Afshari lambs.

    PubMed

    Mahjoubi, E; Yazdi, M Hossein; Aghaziarati, N; Noori, G R; Afsarian, O; Baumgard, L H

    2015-04-01

    lambs' ADG was more than 2-fold greater than the PFTN controls. These results indicate that HS markedly alters the energetics of weight gain during growth and that the effects of HS are dependent on the severity of the heat load.

  10. Pre-admission CHADS2, CHA2DS2-VASc, and R2CHADS2 Scores on Severity and Functional Outcome in Acute Ischemic Stroke with Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Koji; Yamada, Takeshi; Torii, Takako; Furuta, Konosuke; Matsumoto, Shoji; Yoshimura, Takeo; Takase, Kei-ichiro; Wakata, Yoshifumi; Nakashima, Naoki; Kira, Jun-ichi; Murai, Hiroyuki

    2015-07-01

    We examined the association between pre-admission risk scores and severity on admission and functional outcome in acute ischemic stroke with atrial fibrillation (AF). Between September 2011 and April 2014, we retrospectively extracted consecutive ischemic stroke patients with AF whose pre-admission modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score was 2 or less from our prospective database. Pre-admission CHADS2, CHA2DS2-VASc, and R2CHADS2 scores were calculated in each patient, and their association with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score on admission or unfavorable outcome (mRS ≥ 3 at 3 months from the onset) was assessed. A total of 344 patients (189 were men; age, 77.7 ± 10.0 years) were included in the analysis. The median pre-admission CHADS2, CHA2DS2-VASc, and R2CHADS2 scores were 2, 4, and 4, respectively. NIHSS score on admission was positively correlated with pre-admission CHADS2 (ρ = .116, P = .031), CHA2DS2-VASc (ρ = .166, P = .020), and R2CHADS2 scores (ρ = .106, P = .049). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis revealed that pre-admission CHADS2 score of 2 or more (sensitivity, 80%; specificity, 45%; area under the ROC curve [AUC], .654), CHA2DS2-VASc score of 3 or more (sensitivity, 86%; specificity, 44%; AUC, .683), and R2CHADS2 score of 4 or more (sensitivity, 61%; specificity, 62%; AUC, .657) were associated with unfavorable outcome. The pre-admission CHA2DS2-VASc score was better than the pre-admission CHADS2 score in estimating unfavorable outcome (P = .017). In multivariate analysis, cutoffs of these scores, female sex, higher NIHSS score, and internal carotid artery occlusion were associated with unfavorable outcome. Pre-admission CHADS2, CHA2DS2-VASc, and R2CHADS2 scores were associated with onset severity and functional outcome in acute ischemic stroke with AF. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Sonographic stroke templates.

    PubMed

    Govaert, Paul

    2009-10-01

    This chapter provides arterial and venous stroke templates, designed with neonatal brain ultrasound as the viewpoint and adult stroke templates as the basis. Images change with maturation of the stages of infarction: swelling, necrosis, organisation and tissue loss. Adult templates permit recognition of well-delineated stroke types observed in the newborn brain. All circle of Willis arteries can be involved, as can their perforator branches. Middle cerebral artery (MCA) truncal stroke (anterior or posterior) is an important entity, with different prognosis than complete MCA stroke. Knowledge of these templates also aids in the definition of combinations of infarction (e.g. internal carotid artery stroke or pial plus perforator stroke) and of interarterial watershed injury. Venous templates, even if still under development around the time of birth, permit us to understand brain injury associated with sinus or deep vein thrombosis, especially several types of intracranial haemorrhage. Hindbrain stroke templates are scarcely applied to perinatal lesions.

  12. Reduced severity of ischemic stroke and improvement of mitochondrial function after dietary treatment with the anaplerotic substance triheptanoin.

    PubMed

    Schwarzkopf, T M; Koch, K; Klein, J

    2015-08-06

    Triheptanoin, an oily substance, consists of glycerol bound to three molecules of heptanoic acid, a C7 odd-chain fatty acid. A triheptanoin-rich diet has anaplerotic effects because heptanoate metabolism yields succinate which delivers substrates to the Krebs cycle. While previous studies on the effects of triheptanoin focused on metabolic disorders and epilepsy, we investigated triheptanoin's effect on ischemic stroke. Mice were fed a triheptanoin-enriched diet for 14days; controls received soybean oil. Only mice fed triheptanoin had measurable quantities of odd-numbered fatty acids in the plasma and brain. Transient ischemia was induced in the brain by occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCAO) for 60min. One day later, mice were tested for neurological function (chimney, rotarod and corner tests) which was found to be better preserved in the triheptanoin group. Microdialysis demonstrated that the strong, neurotoxic increase of extracellular glutamate, which was observed in the mouse striatum during MCAO, was strongly reduced in triheptanoin-fed mice while glucose levels were not affected. Triheptanoin diet reduced the infarct area in stroked mice by about 40%. In ex vivo-experiments with isolated mitochondria, ischemia was found to cause a reduction of mitochondrial respiratory activity. This reduction was attenuated by triheptanoin diet in complex II and IV. In parallel measurements, ATP levels and mitochondrial membrane potential were reduced in control animals but were preserved in triheptanoin-fed mice. We conclude that triheptanoin-fed mice which sustained an experimental stroke had a significantly improved neurological outcome. This beneficial effect is apparently due to an improvement of mitochondrial function and preservation of the cellular energy state. Our findings identify triheptanoin as a promising new dietary agent for neuroprotection.

  13. Transcranial magnetic stimulation in mild to severe hemiparesis early after stroke: a proof of principle and novel approach to improve motor function

    PubMed Central

    Anjos, Sarah M.; Saposnik, Gustavo; Mello, Eduardo A.; Nagaya, Erina M.; Santos, Waldyr; Ferreiro, Karina N.; Melo, Eduardo S.; Reis, Felipe I.; Scaff, Milberto; Cohen, Leonardo G.

    2016-01-01

    Low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the unaffected hemisphere can enhance function of the paretic hand in patients with mild motor impairment. Effects of low-frequency rTMS to the contralesional motor cortex at an early stage of mild to severe hemiparesis after stroke are unknown. In this pilot, randomized, double-blind clinical trial we compared the effects of low-frequency rTMS or sham rTMS as add-on therapies to outpatient customary rehabilitation, in 30 patients within 5–45 days after ischemic stroke, and mild to severe hand paresis. The primary feasibility outcome was compliance with the interventions. The primary safety outcome was the proportion of intervention-related adverse events. Performance of the paretic hand in the Jebsen–Taylor test and pinch strength were secondary outcomes. Outcomes were assessed at baseline, after ten sessions of treatment administered over 2 weeks and at 1 month after end of treatment. Baseline clinical features were comparable across groups. For the primary feasibility outcome, compliance with treatment was 100% in the active group and 94% in the sham group. There were no serious intervention-related adverse events. There were significant improvements in performance in the Jebsen–Taylor test (mean, 12.3% 1 month after treatment) and pinch force (mean, 0.5 Newtons) in the active group, but not in the sham group. Low-frequency rTMS to the contralesional motor cortex early after stroke is feasible, safe and potentially effective to improve function of the paretic hand, in patients with mild to severe hemiparesis. These promising results will be valuable to design larger randomized clinical trials. PMID:22173953

  14. Effect of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation on Severely Affected Arm-Hand Motor Function in Patients After an Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Pilot Randomized Control Trial.

    PubMed

    Rabadi, Meheroz H; Aston, Christopher E

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this article was to determine whether cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (c-tDCS) to unaffected primary motor cortex (PMC) plus conventional occupational therapy (OT) improves functional motor recovery of the affected arm hand in patients after an acute ischemic stroke compared with sham transcranial direct current stimulation plus conventional OT. In this prospective, randomized, double-blinded, sham-controlled trial of 16 severe, acute ischemic stroke patients with severe arm-hand weakness were randomly assigned to either experimental (c-tDCS plus OT; n = 8) or control (sham transcranial direct current stimulation plus OT; n = 8) groups. All patients received a standard 3-hr in-patient rehabilitation therapy, plus an additional ten 30-min sessions of tDCS. During each session, 1 mA of cathodal stimulation to the unaffected PMC is performed followed by the patient's scheduled OT. The primary outcome measure was change in Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) total and subscores on discharge. Application of c-tDCS to unaffected PMC resulted in a clinically relevant 10-point improvement in the affected arm-hand function based on ARAT total score compared with a 2-point improvement in the control group. Application of 30-min of c-tDCS to the unaffected PMC showed a 10-point improvement in the ARAT score. This corresponds to a large effect size in improvement of affected arm-hand function in patients with severe, acute ischemic stroke. Although not statistically significant, this suggests that larger studies, enrolling at least 25 patients in each group, and with a longer follow-up are warranted.

  15. The Excess Heat Factor: A Metric for Heatwave Intensity and Its Use in Classifying Heatwave Severity

    PubMed Central

    Nairn, John R.; Fawcett, Robert J. B.

    2014-01-01

    Heatwaves represent a significant natural hazard in Australia, arguably more hazardous to human life than bushfires, tropical cyclones and floods. In the 2008/2009 summer, for example, many more lives were lost to heatwaves than to that summer’s bushfires which were among the worst in the history of the Australian nation. For many years, these other forms of natural disaster have received much greater public attention than heatwaves, although there are some signs of change. We propose a new index, called the excess heat factor (EHF) for use in Australian heatwave monitoring and forecasting. The index is based on a three-day-averaged daily mean temperature (DMT), and is intended to capture heatwave intensity as it applies to human health outcomes, although its usefulness is likely to be much broader and with potential for international applicability. The index is described and placed in a climatological context in order to derive heatwave severity. Heatwave severity, as characterised by the climatological distribution of heatwave intensity, has been used to normalise the climatological variation in heatwave intensity range across Australia. This methodology was used to introduce a pilot national heatwave forecasting service for Australia during the 2013/2014 summer. Some results on the performance of the service are presented. PMID:25546282

  16. Caloric Vestibular Stimulation Reduces Pain and Somatoparaphrenia in a Severe Chronic Central Post-Stroke Pain Patient: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Central post-stroke pain is a neuropathic syndrome characterized by intolerable contralesional pain and, in rare cases, somatic delusions. To date, there is limited evidence for the effective treatments of this disease. Here we used caloric vestibular stimulation to reduce pain and somatoparaphrenia in a 57-year-old woman suffering from central post-stroke pain. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess the neurological effects of this treatment. Following vestibular stimulation we observed impressive improvements in motor skills, pain, and somatic delusions. In the functional connectivity study before the vestibular stimulation, we observed differences in the patient’s left thalamus functional connectivity, with respect to the thalamus connectivity of a control group (N = 20), in the bilateral cingulate cortex and left insula. After the caloric stimulation, the left thalamus functional connectivity with these regions, which are known to be involved in the cortical response to pain, disappeared as in the control group. The beneficial use of vestibular stimulation in the reduction of pain and somatic delusion in a CPSP patient is now documented by behavioral and imaging data. This evidence can be applied to theoretical models of pain and body delusions. PMID:27028404

  17. Motor unit rate coding is severely impaired during forceful and fast muscular contractions in individuals post stroke.

    PubMed

    Chou, Li-Wei; Palmer, Jacqueline A; Binder-Macleod, Stuart; Knight, Christopher A

    2013-06-01

    Information regarding how motor units are controlled to produce forces in individuals with stroke and the mechanisms behind muscle weakness and movement slowness can potentially inform rehabilitation strategies. The purpose of this study was to describe the rate coding mechanism in individuals poststroke during both constant (n = 8) and rapid (n = 4) force production tasks. Isometric ankle dorsiflexion force, motor unit action potentials, and surface electromyography were recorded from the paretic and nonparetic tibialis anterior. In the paretic limb, strength was 38% less and the rate of force development was 63% slower. Linear regression was used to describe and compare the relationships between motor unit and electromyogram (EMG) measures and force. During constant force contractions up to 80% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), rate coding was compressed and discharge rates were lower in the paretic limb. During rapid muscle contractions up to 90% MVC, the first interspike interval was prolonged and the rate of EMG rise was less in the paretic limb. Future rehabilitation strategies for individuals with stroke could focus on regaining these specific aspects of motor unit rate coding and neuromuscular activation.

  18. Caloric Vestibular Stimulation Reduces Pain and Somatoparaphrenia in a Severe Chronic Central Post-Stroke Pain Patient: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Spitoni, Grazia Fernanda; Pireddu, Giorgio; Galati, Gaspare; Sulpizio, Valentina; Paolucci, Stefano; Pizzamiglio, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Central post-stroke pain is a neuropathic syndrome characterized by intolerable contralesional pain and, in rare cases, somatic delusions. To date, there is limited evidence for the effective treatments of this disease. Here we used caloric vestibular stimulation to reduce pain and somatoparaphrenia in a 57-year-old woman suffering from central post-stroke pain. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess the neurological effects of this treatment. Following vestibular stimulation we observed impressive improvements in motor skills, pain, and somatic delusions. In the functional connectivity study before the vestibular stimulation, we observed differences in the patient's left thalamus functional connectivity, with respect to the thalamus connectivity of a control group (N = 20), in the bilateral cingulate cortex and left insula. After the caloric stimulation, the left thalamus functional connectivity with these regions, which are known to be involved in the cortical response to pain, disappeared as in the control group. The beneficial use of vestibular stimulation in the reduction of pain and somatic delusion in a CPSP patient is now documented by behavioral and imaging data. This evidence can be applied to theoretical models of pain and body delusions.

  19. Cucumber Necrosis Virus Recruits Cellular Heat Shock Protein 70 Homologs at Several Stages of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Syed Benazir

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT RNA viruses often depend on host factors for multiplication inside cells due to the constraints of their small genome size and limited coding capacity. One such factor that has been exploited by several plant and animal viruses is heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) family homologs which have been shown to play roles for different viruses in viral RNA replication, viral assembly, disassembly, and cell-to-cell movement. Using next generation sequence analysis, we reveal that several isoforms of Hsp70 and Hsc70 transcripts are induced to very high levels during cucumber necrosis virus (CNV) infection of Nicotiana benthamiana and that HSP70 proteins are also induced by at least 10-fold. We show that HSP70 family protein homologs are co-opted by CNV at several stages of infection. We have found that overexpression of Hsp70 or Hsc70 leads to enhanced CNV genomic RNA, coat protein (CP), and virion accumulation, whereas downregulation leads to a corresponding decrease. Hsc70-2 was found to increase solubility of CNV CP in vitro and to increase accumulation of CNV CP independently of viral RNA replication during coagroinfiltration in N. benthamiana. In addition, virus particle assembly into virus-like particles in CP agroinfiltrated plants was increased in the presence of Hsc70-2. HSP70 was found to increase the targeting of CNV CP to chloroplasts during infection, reinforcing the role of HSP70 in chloroplast targeting of host proteins. Hence, our findings have led to the discovery of a highly induced host factor that has been co-opted to play multiple roles during several stages of the CNV infection cycle. IMPORTANCE Because of the small size of its RNA genome, CNV is dependent on interaction with host cellular components to successfully complete its multiplication cycle. We have found that CNV induces HSP70 family homologs to a high level during infection, possibly as a result of the host response to the high levels of CNV proteins that accumulate during infection

  20. Pediatric Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Patients & Families About Stroke Stroke Diagnosis ... UT Southwestern Medical Center. Copyright © 1997-2017 - The Internet Stroke Center. All rights reserved. The information contained ...

  1. Microstructural evolution during ultra-rapid annealing of severely deformed low-carbon steel: strain, temperature, and heating rate effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafaei, M. A.; Kazeminezhad, M.

    2016-07-01

    An interaction between ferrite recrystallization and austenite transformation in low-carbon steel occurs when recrystallization is delayed until the intercritical temperature range by employing high heating rate. The kinetics of recrystallization and transformation is affected by high heating rate and such an interaction. In this study, different levels of strain are applied to low-carbon steel using a severe plastic deformation method. Then, ultra-rapid annealing is performed at different heating rates of 200-1100°C/s and peak temperatures of near critical temperature. Five regimes are proposed to investigate the effects of heating rate, strain, and temperature on the interaction between recrystallization and transformation. The microstructural evolution of severely deformed low-carbon steel after ultra-rapid annealing is investigated based on the proposed regimes. Regarding the intensity and start temperature of the interaction, different microstructures consisting of ferrite and pearlite/martensite are formed. It is found that when the interaction is strong, the microstructure is refined because of the high kinetics of transformation and recrystallization. Moreover, strain shifts an interaction zone to a relatively higher heating rate. Therefore, severely deformed steel should be heated at relatively higher heating rates for it to undergo a strong interaction.

  2. Content of conventional therapy for the severely affected arm during subacute rehabilitation after stroke: An analysis of physiotherapy and occupational therapy practice.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Lex D; van Wijck, Frederike; Stewart, Roy E; Geurts, Alexander C H; Dijkstra, Pieter U

    2017-01-16

    Physiotherapy (PT) and occupational therapy (OT) are key professions providing treatment for the arm after stroke; however, knowledge about the content of these treatments is scant. Detailed data are needed to replicate interventions, evaluate their effective components, and evaluate PT and OT practice. This paper describes PT and OT treatment for the severely affected arm in terms of duration, content according to components and categories of the International Classification of Human Functioning, Disability and Health, and to analyze differences between professions. Design: This is a retrospective analysis of randomized trial data. 46 patients after stroke with poor arm motor control recruited from inpatient neurological units from three rehabilitation centers in the Netherlands. PTs and OTs recorded duration and content of arm treatment interventions for 8 weeks using a bespoke treatment schedule with 15 International Classification of Human Functioning, Disability and Health categories. PTs and OTs spent on average 4-7 min per treatment session (30 min) on arm treatment. OTs spent significantly more time providing arm treatment and treatment at the activities level than PTs. PTs spent 79% of their arm treatment time on body functions, OTs 41%. OTs spent significantly more time on "moving around using transportation," "self care," and "household tasks" categories. Patients after stroke with a severely affected arm and an unfavorable prognosis for arm motor recovery receive little arm-oriented PT and OT. Therapists spent most arm treatment time on body functions. There was a considerable overlap in the content of PT and OT in 12 of the 15 categories. Results can be generalized only to patients with poor arm motor control and may not represent practice in other countries. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Effect on arm function and cost of robot-assisted group therapy in subacute patients with stroke and a moderately to severely affected arm: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hesse, Stefan; Heß, Anke; Werner C, Cordula; Kabbert, Nadine; Buschfort, Rüdiger

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of robot-assisted arm group therapy (RAGT) versus individual arm therapy (IAT) to restore motor function in the moderately to severely affected patient after stroke. Single blind randomized controlled trial. Two in-patient neurological rehabilitation centers. Fifty first time subacute patients with stroke and a non-functional hand. The patients practiced either 30 minutes of RAGT + 30 minutes of IAT (group A) or 2x30 minutes of IAT (group B), per workday for four weeks. The RAGT consisted of six workstations enabling repetitive practice of finger, wrist, forearm and shoulder movements. Patients practiced according to their impairment level on at least two workstations per session. The IAT followed the Motor Relearning Programme, enriched by elements of the impairment-oriented training. Changes of the Fugl Meyer Score (FM, 0-66) between baseline and after 4 weeks, incremental cost effectiveness. Patients were homogeneous at study onset. All patients improved their upper limb motor function over time, but there were no between group differences. The initial (terminal) FM scores were 14.6±9.4 (25.7±16.5) in group A and 16.5±9.8 (31.1±19.1) in group B. The treatment of a single patient with RAGT cost 4.15 €, compared to 10.00 € for a patient to receive IAT. RAGT in combination with IAT was equally effective as a double session of IAT regarding the restoration of upper limb motor functions in moderate to severely affected subacute patients with stroke. The treatment costs for RAGT were less. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. The Effects of Heat Treatment on the Gene Expression of Several Heat Shock Protein Genes in Two Cultivars of Strawberry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Xanthomonas fragariae is a bacterium that causes angular leaf spot (ALS) in strawberry. ALS primarily affects the foliage, but can move systemically through the plant’s vascular tissue to infect additional tissues. Heat treatment has been shown to be an effective method for reducing systemic pathoge...

  5. Disruption of the HSF3 gene results in the severe reduction of heat shock gene expression and loss of thermotolerance.

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, M; Kawazoe, Y; Takeda, S; Morimoto, R I; Nagata, K; Nakai, A

    1998-01-01

    The vertebrate genome encodes a family of heat shock factors (HSFs 1-4) of which the DNA-binding and transcriptional activities of HSF1 and HSF3 are activated upon heat shock. HSF1 has the properties of a classical HSF and exhibits rapid activation of DNA-binding and transcriptional activity upon exposure to conditions of heat shock and other stresses, whereas HSF3 typically is activated at higher temperatures and with distinct delayed kinetics. To address the role of HSF3 in the heat shock response, null cells lacking the HSF3 gene were constructed by disruption of the resident gene by somatic recombination in an avian lymphoid cell line. Null cells lacking HSF3, yet expressing normal levels of HSF1, exhibited a severe reduction in the heat shock response, as measured by inducible expression of heat shock genes, and did not exhibit thermotolerance. At intermediate heat shock temperatures, where HSF1 oligomerizes to an active trimer in wild-type cells, HSF1 remained as an inert monomer in the HSF3 null cell line. HSF3 null cells were restored to a nearly normal heat shock-responsive state by reintroduction of an exogenous HSF3 gene. These results reveal that HSF3 has a dominant role in the regulation of the heat shock response and directly influences HSF1 activity. PMID:9501096

  6. Heating properties of the re-entrant type cavity applicator for brain tumor with several resonant frequencies.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, M; Kato, K; Hirashima, T; Shindo, Y; Uzuka, T; Takahashi, H; Fujii, Y

    2009-01-01

    We have proposed the re-entrant resonant cavity applicator system for non-invasive brain tumor hyperthermia treatment. In this method, a human head is placed in the gap of the inner electrodes. A brain tumor is heated with the electromagnetic field stimulated in the cavity without contact between the human head and the applicator. We have already presented the effectiveness of the heating properties of this system with cylinder-type agar phantoms and by computer simulations. This paper discusses the heating properties of the developed system with the human head-type agar phantom for brain tumor hyperthermia treatment. First, in order to heat deep brain tumors, we tried to heat the human head-type agar phantom by using several electromagnetic field patterns of the resonant frequency. We found that the temperature distributions can be controlled inside the agar phantom by changing the resonant frequencies. Second, to heat local and deep areas of the agar phantom, we tried to achieve heating using the two different resonant frequencies. We found distinct heating properties by changing the electromagnetic field patterns of resonant frequencies. From these results, it was found that our developed heating system can be applied to hyperthermia treatments of deep-seated brain tumors. Further, by changing resonant frequency, treatment can very correspond to the size and the position of a tumor.

  7. Psychoneuroimmunology of stroke.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Robert; Georgiou, Rachel; Thornton, Peter; Rothwell, Nancy

    2009-05-01

    Stroke is the major cause of disability in the Western world and is the third greatest cause of death, but there are no widely effective treatments to prevent the devastating effects of stroke. Extensive and growing evidence implicates inflammatory and immune processes in the occurrence of stroke and particularly in the subsequent injury. Several inflammatory mediators have been identified in the pathogenesis of stroke including specific cytokines, adhesion molecules, matrix metalloproteinases, and eicosanoids. An early clinical trial suggests that inhibiting interleukin-1 may be of benefit in the treatment of acute stroke.

  8. Pronounced enhancement of glucocorticoid-induced gene expression following severe heat shock of heat-conditioned cells hints to intricate cell survival tactics.

    PubMed

    Mitsiou, Dimitra J; Florentin, Ida; Baki, Lia; Georgakopoulos, Anastasios; Alexis, Michael N

    2005-02-01

    We have previously reported that severe heat shock of HeLa cells stably transfected with a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene, transcription of which is controlled by two glucocorticoid-responsive elements and a minimal promoter, pronouncedly enhanced glucocorticoid-induced CAT expression compared to that of non-heated cells, in spite of the glucocorticoid-receptor-mediated transcription of the gene being temporarily compromised by the shock. We now report that prolonged severe heat shock of properly heat-conditioned cells resulted in far more pronounced enhancement of glucocorticoid-induced CAT mRNA and protein expressions, in spite of a similar heat-induced loss of receptor-mediated CAT gene transcription. During recovery from the shock the hormonal activation of transcription exceeded that of non-heated cells. While CAT mRNA translation was restored appreciably later than CAT gene transcription, mRNA and protein expressions were thermally enhanced to a comparable extent, consistent with the integrity of CAT mRNA being preserved during recovery. CAT mRNA turnover was fully impaired during early recovery, suggesting that stabilisation of CAT mRNA as well as stimulation of the hormonal activation of CAT gene transcription account for the thermal enhancement of glucocorticoid-induced CAT expression. This data hint to cell survival tactics designed to safeguard high expression of genes of stress-enduring function.

  9. Embolic Stroke due to a Common Carotid Artery Thrombus in a Young Patient with Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia without Thrombocytosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This case report describes a 41-year-old previously healthy male who presented with stuttering transient ischemic symptoms and radiographic evidence of a left common carotid artery thrombus as well as acute and subacute ischemic infarcts in the left middle cerebral artery territory. An exhaustive stroke work-up did not provide a plausible etiology for his symptoms. His complete blood count and iron studies, however, revealed evidence of severe iron-deficiency anemia without reactive thrombocytosis. His stool guaiac test was positive. He was discharged home on oral antithrombotic agents and aggressive iron replacement therapy with a plan for repeat vascular imaging in 3 months and a colonoscopy. This case report suggests that severe iron-deficiency anemia with or without reactive thrombocytosis should be viewed as a possible hematologic condition associated with thrombotic tendencies and a risk factor for ischemic stroke, especially in young adults. Aggressive iron supplementation and short-term antithrombotic therapy with follow-up vascular imaging are a reasonable treatment for these patients. PMID:27752375

  10. Assessment of plant toxicity threshold of several heat transfer and storage fluids and eutectic salts

    SciTech Connect

    Nishita, H.

    1980-10-01

    Plant toxicity threshold levels of several heat transfer and storage fluids and eutectic salts were determined by using a modified Neubauer technique. Barley seed germination and seedling growth were used for the toxicity tests. The general order of toxicity of the fluids applied to three mineral soils was ethylene gloycol > Dow 200 much greater than Caloria HT43 > Therminol 66. The toxicity order of the fluids applied to an organic soil was ethylene glycol > Caloria HT43 > Dow 200 > Therminol 66. Thus, Therminol 66 was the least toxic among the fluids used. Among the eutectic salts tested Dupont HITEC was more toxic than 8.4 percent NaCl-86.3 percent NaNO/sub 3/-5.3 percent Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ mixture in three of the four soils used. In the fourth soil there was no apparent difference of toxicity between the two salt mixtures. Depending on the fluid and the salt mixture, the toxicity threshold levels for barley seedlings ranged from 4451 to 317,488 ppM in the soils used.

  11. Long-term variability of heat waves in Argentina and recurrence probability of the severe 2008 heat wave in Buenos Aires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusticucci, Matilde; Kyselý, Jan; Almeira, Gustavo; Lhotka, Ondřej

    2016-05-01

    Heat waves are one of the main concerns related to the impacts of climate change, because their frequency and severity are projected to increase in a future climate. The objectives of this work are to study the long-term variability of heat waves over Argentina and to estimate recurrence probability of the most severe 2008 heat wave in Buenos Aires. We used three definitions of heat waves that were based on (1) daily maximum temperature above the 90th percentile (MaxTHW), (2) daily minimum temperature above the 90th percentile (MinTHW) and (3) both maximum and minimum temperatures above the corresponding 90th percentiles (EHW). The minimum length of a heat wave was 3 days, and the analysis was performed over the October-March period. Decadal values in Buenos Aires experienced clear increases in heat waves according to MinTHW and EHW, with the highest frequency for both in the 2001-2010 decade, but at other stations, combinations of different trends and decadal variability resulted in some cases in a decrease of extreme heat waves. In the north-western part of the country, a strong positive change in the last decade was found, mainly due to the increment in the persistence of MinTHW but also accompanied by increases in MaxTHW. In general, other stations show a clear positive trend in MinTHW and decadal variability in MaxTHW, with the largest EHW cases in the last decade. We also estimated recurrence probability of the longest and most severe heat wave in Buenos Aires (over 1909-2010, according to intensity measured by the cumulative excess of maximum daily temperature above the 90th percentile) that occurred from 3 to 14 November 2008, by means of simulations with a stochastic first-order autoregressive model. The recurrence probability of such long and severe heat wave is small in the present climate but it is likely to increase substantially in the near future even under a moderate warming trend.

  12. Incidence and severity of shoulder pain does not increase with the use of circuit class therapy during inpatient stroke rehabilitation: a controlled trial.

    PubMed

    English, Coralie; Hillier, Susan; Stiller, Kathy

    2008-01-01

    Does circuit class therapy result in a greater incidence or severity of shoulder pain compared with individual therapy? Is the incidence influenced by the degree of active shoulder control? Controlled trial with intention-to-treat analysis. Sixty-eight people (6 drop-outs) undergoing inpatient rehabilitation after stroke. Participants received either individual therapy or group circuit class therapy. Incidence of shoulder pain over the previous 24 hours was measured as a yes/no response while severity of shoulder pain was measured using a visual analogue scale at admission, Week 4, and discharge. There was no greater chance of participants receiving circuit class therapy having shoulder pain at Week 4 (OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.32 to 2.80) or discharge (OR 0.38, 95% CI 0.11 to 1.45) than participants receiving individual therapy. Of those participants who reported pain, there was no difference between groups in the severity of pain at Week 4 (mean difference -0.2 cm, 95% CI -3.2 to 2.7) or discharge (mean difference -2.1 cm, 95% CI -4.8 to 0.6). There was a greater chance of participants who had no active shoulder control having shoulder pain at Week 4 (OR 5.8, 95% CI 1.6 to 20.4) and at discharge (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.0 to 13.9) than participants who had active shoulder control. The incidence and severity of shoulder pain was influenced by degree of active shoulder control but not by type of physiotherapy service delivery. Concerns regarding shoulder pain should not be a barrier to the implementation of circuit class therapy during inpatient stroke rehabilitation.

  13. Secondary stroke prevention.

    PubMed

    Hankey, Graeme J

    2014-02-01

    Survivors of stroke and transient ischaemic attacks are at risk of a recurrent stroke, which is often more severe and disabling than the index event. Optimum secondary prevention of recurrent stroke needs rapid diagnosis and treatment and prompt identification of the underlying cardiovascular cause. Effective treatments include organised acute assessment and intervention with antithrombotic therapy, carotid revascularisation, and control of causal risk factors, as appropriate. However, effective treatments are not implemented optimally in clinical practice. Recurrent strokes continue to account for 25-30% of all strokes and represent unsuccessful secondary prevention. Immediate and sustained implementation of effective and appropriate secondary prevention strategies in patients with first-ever stroke or transient ischaemic attack has the potential to reduce the burden of stroke by up to a quarter.

  14. Effects of several factors on the heat-shock-induced thermotolerance of Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Pagán, R; Condón, S; Sala, F J

    1997-01-01

    The influence of the temperature at which Listeria monocytogenes had been grown (4 or 37 degrees C) on the response to heat shocks of different durations at different temperatures was investigated. For cells grown at 4 degrees C, the effect of storage, prior to and after heat shock, on the induced thermotolerance was also studied. Death kinetics of heat-shocked cells is also discussed. For L. monocytogenes grown at 37 degrees C, the greatest response to heat shock was a fourfold increase in thermotolerance. For L. monocytogenes grown at 4 degrees C, the greatest response to heat shock was a sevenfold increase in thermotolerance. The only survival curves of cells to have shoulders were those for cells that had been heat shocked. A 3% concentration of sodium chloride added to the recovery medium made these shoulders disappear and decreased decimal reduction times. The percentage of cells for which thermotolerance increased after a heat shock was smaller the milder the heat shock and the longer the prior storage. PMID:9251209

  15. Comparison of joint space and end point space robotic training modalities for rehabilitation of interjoint coordination in individuals with moderate to severe impairment from chronic stroke.

    PubMed

    Brokaw, Elizabeth B; Holley, Rahsaan J; Lum, Peter S

    2013-09-01

    We have developed a novel robotic modality called Time Independent Functional Training (TIFT) that provides focused retraining of interjoint coordination after stroke. TIFT was implemented on the ARMin III exoskeleton and provides joint space walls that resist movement patterns that are inconsistent with the targeted interjoint coordination pattern. In a single test session, ten moderate to severely impaired individuals with chronic stroke practiced synchronous shoulder abduction and elbow extension in TIFT and also in a comparison mode commonly used in robotic therapy called end point tunnel training (EPTT). In EPTT, error is limited by forces applied to the hand that are normal to the targeted end point trajectory. The completion percentage of the movements was comparable between modes, but the coordination patterns used by subjects differed between modes. In TIFT, subjects performed the targeted pattern of synchronous shoulder abduction and elbow extension, while in EPTT, movements were completed with compensatory strategies that incorporated the flexor synergy (shoulder abduction with elbow flexion) or the extensor synergy (shoulder adduction with elbow extension). There were immediate effects on free movements, with TIFT resulting in larger improvements in interjoint coordination than EPTT. TIFT's ability to elicit normal coordination patterns merits further investigation into the effects of longer duration training.

  16. Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy Combined with Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation over Premotor Cortex Improves Motor Function in Severe Stroke: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Suellen M; Batista, Larissa M; Nogueira, Lídia L R F; de Oliveira, Eliane A; de Carvalho, Antonio G C; Lima, Soriano S; Santana, Jordânia R M; de Lima, Emerson C C; Fernández-Calvo, Bernardino

    2017-01-01

    Objective. We compared the effects of transcranial direct current stimulation at different cortical sites (premotor and motor primary cortex) combined with constraint-induced movement therapy for treatment of stroke patients. Design. Sixty patients were randomly distributed into 3 groups: Group A, anodal stimulation on premotor cortex and constraint-induced movement therapy; Group B, anodal stimulation on primary motor cortex and constraint-induced movement therapy; Group C, sham stimulation and constraint-induced movement therapy. Evaluations involved analysis of functional independence, motor recovery, spasticity, gross motor function, and muscle strength. Results. A significant improvement in primary outcome (functional independence) after treatment in the premotor group followed by primary motor group and sham group was observed. The same pattern of improvement was highlighted among all secondary outcome measures regarding the superior performance of the premotor group over primary motor and sham groups. Conclusions. Premotor cortex can contribute to motor function in patients with severe functional disabilities in early stages of stroke. This study was registered in ClinicalTrials.gov database (NCT 02628561).

  17. Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy Combined with Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation over Premotor Cortex Improves Motor Function in Severe Stroke: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Larissa M.; Nogueira, Lídia L. R. F.; de Oliveira, Eliane A.; de Carvalho, Antonio G. C.; Lima, Soriano S.; Santana, Jordânia R. M.; de Lima, Emerson C. C.; Fernández-Calvo, Bernardino

    2017-01-01

    Objective. We compared the effects of transcranial direct current stimulation at different cortical sites (premotor and motor primary cortex) combined with constraint-induced movement therapy for treatment of stroke patients. Design. Sixty patients were randomly distributed into 3 groups: Group A, anodal stimulation on premotor cortex and constraint-induced movement therapy; Group B, anodal stimulation on primary motor cortex and constraint-induced movement therapy; Group C, sham stimulation and constraint-induced movement therapy. Evaluations involved analysis of functional independence, motor recovery, spasticity, gross motor function, and muscle strength. Results. A significant improvement in primary outcome (functional independence) after treatment in the premotor group followed by primary motor group and sham group was observed. The same pattern of improvement was highlighted among all secondary outcome measures regarding the superior performance of the premotor group over primary motor and sham groups. Conclusions. Premotor cortex can contribute to motor function in patients with severe functional disabilities in early stages of stroke. This study was registered in ClinicalTrials.gov database (NCT 02628561). PMID:28250992

  18. American College of Sports Medicine Roundtable on Exertional Heat Stroke - Return to Duty/Return to Play: Conference Proceedings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    in physical activity and exposure to heat stress (35). Although current American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) recommendations suggest EHS...D, Punnett L, et al. The effects of continuous hot weather training on risk of exertional heat illness. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc. 2005; 37:84Y90. 66... Sports Med. 1986; 3:346Y56. 68. Wilkinson DA, Burholt DR, Shrivastava PN. Hypothermia following whole-body heating of mice: effect of heating time

  19. Measured performance of the heat exchanger in the NASA icing research tunnel under severe icing and dry-air conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, W.; Vanfossen, J.; Nussle, R.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements were made of the pressure drop and thermal perfomance of the unique refrigeration heat exchanger in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) under severe icing and frosting conditions and also with dry air. This data will be useful to those planning to use or extend the capability of the IRT and other icing facilities (e.g., the Altitude Wind Tunnel-AWT). The IRT heat exchanger and refrigeration system is able to cool air passing through the test section down to at least a total temperature of -30 C (well below icing requirements), and usually up to -2 C. The system maintains a uniform temperature across the test section at all airspeeds, which is more difficult and time consuming at low airspeeds, at high temperatures, and on hot, humid days when the cooling towers are less efficient. The very small surfaces of the heat exchanger prevent any icing cloud droplets from passing through it and going through the tests section again. The IRT heat exchanger was originally designed not to be adversely affected by severe icing. During a worst-case icing test the heat exchanger iced up enough so that the temperature uniformaity was no worse than about +/- 1 deg C. The conclusion is that the heat exchanger design performs well.

  20. Numerical study of forced convection in a turbulent heat sink made of several rows of blocks of square form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchenafa, Rachid; Saim, Rachid; Abboudi, Said

    2015-09-01

    Forced convection is a phenomenon associated with the heat transfer fluid flows. The presence of convection affects simultaneously the thermal and hydrodynamic fields, the problem is thus coupled. This form of heat transfer inside ducts occurs in many practical applications such as solar collectors, heat exchangers, cooling of electronic components as well as chemical and nuclear. In this work, we are interested primarily for a numerical study of thermo-hydraulic performances of an incompressible turbulent flow of air through a heat sink composed of several rows of bars of square section. Profiles and the axial velocity fields, as well as profiles and the distribution of the Nusselt number are plotted for all the geometry considered and chosen for different sections. The effects of geometrical parameters of the model and the operating parameters on the dynamic and thermal behavior of the air are analyzed.

  1. Burden of stroke in Estonia.

    PubMed

    Kõrv, Janika; Vibo, Riina

    2013-07-01

    Estonia is the smallest of the three Baltic countries. The decline in incidence of first-ever stroke during the 1990s has left Tartu, Estonia with a relatively low stroke incidence. However, the incidence rates for younger age groups, and the 28-day case fatality rate are higher compared with several other studies. Developments in the national health care system in recent years have been positive: the decline of mortality rate of stroke in Estonia is greater than the European Union average. However, the mortality of cardiovascular diseases is higher compared with several European countries. The prevalence of most stroke risk factors is comparable with European Union countries, while atrial fibrillation is somewhat more frequent (30%) among the patients having suffered from ischemic stroke. The management of stroke in Estonia has been in accordance with European and national stroke guidelines. Stroke units are organized in regional and central hospitals in bigger cities. A well-developed and free ambulance service, and a high priority of stroke code, enable a quick transportation of patients to the nearest hospital providing thrombolytic therapy. The number of thrombolyzed stroke cases has increased since 2003. The Estonian Stroke Initiative was founded in 2008 to improve stroke care, promote regional networks, and increase stroke knowledge among the general population and medical professionals. Since then, several activities regarding stroke awareness have been organized.

  2. Heat transfer and loss by whole-body hyperthermia during severe lower-body heating are impaired in healthy older men.

    PubMed

    Brazaitis, Marius; Paulauskas, Henrikas; Eimantas, Nerijus; Obelieniene, Diana; Baranauskiene, Neringa; Skurvydas, Albertas

    2017-10-01

    Most studies demonstrate that aging is associated with a weakened thermoregulation. However, it remains unclear whether heat transfer (for heat loss) from the lower (uncompensable) to the upper (compensable) body during passively-induced severe lower-body heating is delayed or attenuated with aging. Therefore, the main purpose of this study was to investigate heat transfer from uncompensable to compensable body areas in young men and healthy older men during passively-induced whole-body hyperthermia with a demonstrated post-heating change in core body (rectal; Tre) temperature. Nine healthy older men and eleven healthy young men (69±6 vs. 21±1 years old, mean±SD, P<0.05) participated in passively-induced severe lower-body heating in water at approximately 43°C. Despite a similar increment in Tre (approximately 2.5°C) in both groups, the heating rate was significantly lower in older men than in young men (1.69±0.12 vs. 2.47±0.29°C/h, respectively; P<0.05). The temperature increase in calf muscle and calf skin (uncompensable areas) was significantly higher in older men than in young men (5.10±0.18 vs. 3.99±0.14°C; P<0.05 and 9.92±0.22 vs. 7.65±0.33°C; P<0.05, respectively). However, the temperature increase in back skin and forearm skin (compensable areas) was significantly lower in older men than in young men (0.76±0.63 vs. 2.83±0.68°C; P<0.05 and 0.39±0.76 vs. 2.73±0.5°C; P<0.05, respectively). Furthermore, a post-warming increase in Tre of approximately 0.2°C was observed only in older men (P<0.05). In conclusion, older men whose lower extremities were immersed showed greater accumulation and storage of heat in the skin and deep muscles than young men, and this was associated with a greater heat-transfer delay and subsequent inertia in the increased core body (Tre) temperature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Effects of essential periodontal treatment on serum level of sCD40L and periodontal clinical parameters in patients with moderate to severe periodontitis at high risk of stroke].

    PubMed

    Gao, Lei; Sun, Xiao-Ju; Xie, Hong; Nan, Shun-Hua; Xie, Hui-Xin

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the effect of periodontal treatment on patients with moderate to severe periodontitis at high risk of stroke, by detecting the level of serum soluble cell differentiation antigen 40 ligand (sCD40L) before and after periodontal non-surgical treatment. Seventy-six patients with moderate to severe periodontitis at high risk of stroke were collected and randomly divided into 2 groups, 40 patients in group A received essential periodontal treatment + routine maintenance therapy, 36 cases in group B only received routine maintenance therapy. Another 36 patients with moderate and severe periodontitis were selected as group C, and received essential periodontal treatment. Bleeding on probing (BOP), periodontal probing depth (PD) and attachment loss (AL) in 6 loci were examined by the same dentists, and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to detect the level of serum sCD40L before treatment and 3 months after treatment. The data were analyzed by SPSS 17.0 software package. Compared with pre-treatment, serum level of sCD40L and periodontal clinical indexes of the three groups decreased. Compared with group B, serum SCD40L in group A significantly decreased(P<0.05). Periodontal treatment can reduce the serum level of sCD40L in patients with moderate to severe periodontitis at high risk of stroke, and improve the patient's inflammatory state. To a certain extent, periodontal treatment may reduce the risk of high-risk stroke population to develop stroke.

  4. Electrically Assisted Movement Therapy in Chronic Stroke Patients With Severe Upper Limb Paresis: A Pilot, Single-Blind, Randomized Crossover Study.

    PubMed

    Carda, Stefano; Biasiucci, Andrea; Maesani, Andrea; Ionta, Silvio; Moncharmont, Julien; Clarke, Stephanie; Murray, Micah M; Millán, José Del R

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the effects of electrically assisted movement therapy (EAMT) in which patients use functional electrical stimulation, modulated by a custom device controlled through the patient's unaffected hand, to produce or assist task-specific upper limb movements, which enables them to engage in intensive goal-oriented training. Randomized, crossover, assessor-blinded, 5-week trial with follow-up at 18 weeks. Rehabilitation university hospital. Patients with chronic, severe stroke (N=11; mean age, 47.9y) more than 6 months poststroke (mean time since event, 46.3mo). Both EAMT and the control intervention (dose-matched, goal-oriented standard care) consisted of 10 sessions of 90 minutes per day, 5 sessions per week, for 2 weeks. After the first 10 sessions, group allocation was crossed over, and patients received a 1-week therapy break before receiving the new treatment. Fugl-Meyer Motor Assessment for the Upper Extremity, Wolf Motor Function Test, spasticity, and 28-item Motor Activity Log. Forty-four individuals were recruited, of whom 11 were eligible and participated. Five patients received the experimental treatment before standard care, and 6 received standard care before the experimental treatment. EAMT produced higher improvements in the Fugl-Meyer scale than standard care (P<.05). Median improvements were 6.5 Fugl-Meyer points and 1 Fugl-Meyer point after the experimental treatment and standard care, respectively. The improvement was also significant in subjective reports of quality of movement and amount of use of the affected limb during activities of daily living (P<.05). EAMT produces a clinically important impairment reduction in stroke patients with chronic, severe upper limb paresis. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A survey of heating and turbulent boundary layer characteristics of several hypersonic research aircraft configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawing, P. L.

    1981-01-01

    Four of the configurations investigated during a proposed NASA-Langley hypersonic research aircraft program were selected for phase-change-paint heat-transfer testing and forebody boundary layer pitot surveys. In anticipation of future hypersonic aircraft, both published and unpublished data and results are reviewed and presented with the purpose of providing a synoptic heat-transfer data base from the research effort. Engineering heat-transfer predictions are compared with experimental data on both a global and a local basis. The global predictions are shown to be sufficient for purposes of configuration development, and even the local predictions can be adequate when interpreted in light of the proper flow field. In that regard, cross flow in the forebody boundary layers was examined for significant heating and aerodynamic effect on the scramjet engines. A design philosophy which evolved from the research airplane effort is used to design a forebody shape that produces thin, uniform, forebody boundary layers on a hypersonic airbreathing missile. Finally, heating/boundary layer phenomena which are not predictable with state-of-the-art knowledge and techniques are shown and discussed.

  6. Severely Heat Injured Survivors of E. coli O157:H7 ATCC 43888 Display Variable and Heterogeneous Stress Resistance Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Gayán, Elisa; Govers, Sander K.; Michiels, Chris W.; Aertsen, Abram

    2016-01-01

    Although minimal food processing strategies aim to eliminate foodborne pathogens and spoilage microorganisms through a combination of mild preservation techniques, little is actually known on the resistance behavior of the small fraction of microorganisms surviving an inimical treatment. In this study, the conduct of severely heat stressed survivors of E. coli O157:H7 ATCC 43888, as an indicator for the low infectious dose foodborne enterohemorrhagic strains, was examined throughout their resuscitation and outgrowth. Despite the fact that these survivors were initially sublethally injured, they were only marginally more sensitive to a subsequent heat treatment and actually much more resistant to a subsequent high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) shock in comparison with unstressed control cells. Throughout further resuscitation, however, their initial HHP resistance rapidly faded out, while their heat resistance increased and surpassed the initial heat resistance of unstressed control cells. Results also indicated that the population eventually emerging from the severely heat stressed survivors heterogeneously consisted of both growing and non-growing cells. Together, these observations provide deeper insights into the particular behavior and heterogeneity of stressed foodborne pathogens in the context of food preservation. PMID:27917163

  7. Ischemic Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spread the Word Advocate Share Spread the Word Contact Us Contact Us 1-800-STROKES (787-6537) 9707 E. ... Stroke En Espanol Stroke Facts Come Back Strong Contact Us 1-800-787-6537 9707 E. Easter ...

  8. Stroke Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    A stroke can cause lasting brain damage. People who survive a stroke need to relearn skills they lost because of ... them relearn those skills. The effects of a stroke depend on which area of the brain was ...

  9. Hemorrhagic Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    A stroke is a medical emergency. There are two types - ischemic and hemorrhagic. Hemorrhagic stroke is the less common type. It happens when ... an artery wall that breaks open. Symptoms of stroke are Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, ...

  10. Baroreceptor unloading does not limit forearm sweat rate during severe passive heat stress.

    PubMed

    Schlader, Zachary J; Gagnon, Daniel; Lucas, Rebekah A I; Pearson, James; Crandall, Craig G

    2015-02-15

    This study tested the hypothesis that sweat rate during passive heat stress is limited by baroreceptor unloading associated with heat stress. Two protocols were performed in which healthy subjects underwent passive heat stress that elicited an increase in intestinal temperature of ∼1.8°C. Upon attaining this level of hyperthermia, in protocol 1 (n = 10, 3 females) a bolus (19 ml/kg) of warm (∼38°C) isotonic saline was rapidly (5-10 min) infused intravenously to elevate central venous pressure (CVP), while in protocol 2 (n = 11, 5 females) phenylephrine was infused intravenously (60-120 μg/min) to return mean arterial pressure (MAP) to normothermic levels. In protocol 1, heat stress reduced CVP from 3.9 ± 1.9 mmHg (normothermia) to -0.6 ± 1.4 mmHg (P < 0.001), while saline infusion returned CVP to normothermic levels (5.1 ± 1.7 mmHg; P > 0.999). Sweat rate was elevated by heat stress (1.21 ± 0.44 mg·cm(-2)·min(-1)) but remained unchanged during rapid saline infusion (1.26 ± 0.47 mg·cm(-2)·min(-1), P = 0.5), whereas cutaneous vascular conductance increased from 77 ± 10 to 101 ± 20% of local heating max (P = 0.029). In protocol 2, MAP was reduced with heat stress from 85 ± 7 mmHg to 76 ± 8 mmHg (P = 0.048). Although phenylephrine infusion returned MAP to normothermic levels (88 ± 7 mmHg; P > 0.999), sweat rate remained unchanged during phenylephrine infusion (1.39 ± 0.22 vs. 1.41 ± 0.24 mg·cm(-2)·min(-1); P > 0.999). These data indicate that both cardiopulmonary and arterial baroreceptor unloading do not limit increases in sweat rate during passive heat stress.

  11. Baroreceptor unloading does not limit forearm sweat rate during severe passive heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Schlader, Zachary J.; Gagnon, Daniel; Lucas, Rebekah A. I.; Pearson, James

    2014-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that sweat rate during passive heat stress is limited by baroreceptor unloading associated with heat stress. Two protocols were performed in which healthy subjects underwent passive heat stress that elicited an increase in intestinal temperature of ∼1.8°C. Upon attaining this level of hyperthermia, in protocol 1 (n = 10, 3 females) a bolus (19 ml/kg) of warm (∼38°C) isotonic saline was rapidly (5–10 min) infused intravenously to elevate central venous pressure (CVP), while in protocol 2 (n = 11, 5 females) phenylephrine was infused intravenously (60–120 μg/min) to return mean arterial pressure (MAP) to normothermic levels. In protocol 1, heat stress reduced CVP from 3.9 ± 1.9 mmHg (normothermia) to −0.6 ± 1.4 mmHg (P < 0.001), while saline infusion returned CVP to normothermic levels (5.1 ± 1.7 mmHg; P > 0.999). Sweat rate was elevated by heat stress (1.21 ± 0.44 mg·cm−2·min−1) but remained unchanged during rapid saline infusion (1.26 ± 0.47 mg·cm−2·min−1, P = 0.5), whereas cutaneous vascular conductance increased from 77 ± 10 to 101 ± 20% of local heating max (P = 0.029). In protocol 2, MAP was reduced with heat stress from 85 ± 7 mmHg to 76 ± 8 mmHg (P = 0.048). Although phenylephrine infusion returned MAP to normothermic levels (88 ± 7 mmHg; P > 0.999), sweat rate remained unchanged during phenylephrine infusion (1.39 ± 0.22 vs. 1.41 ± 0.24 mg·cm−2·min−1; P > 0.999). These data indicate that both cardiopulmonary and arterial baroreceptor unloading do not limit increases in sweat rate during passive heat stress. PMID:25525210

  12. Improving public education about stroke.

    PubMed

    Alberts, Mark J

    2012-09-01

    Stroke is a common and serious disease. Most studies have shown that basic public knowledge about what a stroke is, symptoms of a stroke, and the proper reaction to a stroke is quite deficient. The fact that a stroke affects cognitive, communicative, and motor functions may partially explain the poor reaction to acute stroke symptoms. Several educational studies, using diverse formats and messaging paradigms, have been shown to positively affect public knowledge of stroke symptoms. Such efforts have often used mass media public education campaigns with an emphasis on recognizing symptoms of an acute stroke. Some have been able to demonstrate an increase in the chance of patients (or by-standers) calling 911 and seeking emergency care. However, many programs were of brief duration, and their long-term benefits are uncertain. Continual educational efforts will be needed to improve stroke knowledge and increase the percentage of patients who seek emergency care. © 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.

  13. Stroke rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Langhorne, Peter; Bernhardt, Julie; Kwakkel, Gert

    2011-05-14

    Stroke is a common, serious, and disabling global health-care problem, and rehabilitation is a major part of patient care. There is evidence to support rehabilitation in well coordinated multidisciplinary stroke units or through provision of early supported provision of discharge teams. Potentially beneficial treatment options for motor recovery of the arm include constraint-induced movement therapy and robotics. Promising interventions that could be beneficial to improve aspects of gait include fitness training, high-intensity therapy, and repetitive-task training. Repetitive-task training might also improve transfer functions. Occupational therapy can improve activities of daily living; however, information about the clinical effect of various strategies of cognitive rehabilitation and strategies for aphasia and dysarthria is scarce. Several large trials of rehabilitation practice and of novel therapies (eg, stem-cell therapy, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, virtual reality, robotic therapies, and drug augmentation) are underway to inform future practice. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Hypercoagulable states and strokes.

    PubMed

    Matijevic, Nena; Wu, Kenneth K

    2006-07-01

    Several hematologic disorders and hemostatic defects increase risk of ischemic stroke. A common feature of these disorders is the creation of a prothrombotic state, now commonly referred to as "hypercoagulable state." Hematologic diseases such as essential thrombocythemia, polycythemia vera, and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura clearly cause stroke. Effective treatment is now available for these disorders. Association of hemostatic defects with stroke risk is still at the investigational stage. Although a number of factors such as soluble thrombomodulin, fibrinogen, factor VIII, von Willebrand factor, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 are associated with stroke risk, their predictive values remain unknown. Furthermore, causal relationship has not been established.

  15. An Economic Evaluation Comparing Stroke Telemedicine to Conventional Stroke Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budhram, Stanley Chandra

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is not only a serious medical problem, but it also poses an enormous economic burden on society. Stroke ranks the third as the leading cause of death in the United States behind heart disease and cancer. The survivors of stroke suffer from various degrees of long-term disability which create a severe financial burden on society. University…

  16. An Economic Evaluation Comparing Stroke Telemedicine to Conventional Stroke Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budhram, Stanley Chandra

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is not only a serious medical problem, but it also poses an enormous economic burden on society. Stroke ranks the third as the leading cause of death in the United States behind heart disease and cancer. The survivors of stroke suffer from various degrees of long-term disability which create a severe financial burden on society. University…

  17. Initial evaluation of floor cooling on lactating sows under severe acute heat stress

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objectives were to evaluate an acute heat stress protocol for lactating sows and evaluate preliminary estimates of water flow rates required to cool sows. Twelve multiparous sows were provided with a cooling pad built with an aluminum plate surface, high-density polyethylene base and copper pipe...

  18. The influence of heat treatments on several types of base-metal removable partial denture alloys.

    PubMed

    Morris, H F; Asgar, K; Rowe, A P; Nasjleti, C E

    1979-04-01

    Four removable partial denture alloys, Vitallium (Co-Cr alloy), Dentillium P.D. (Fe-Cr alloy), Durallium L.G. (Co-Cr-Ni alloy), and Ticonium 100 (Ni-Cr alloy), were evaluated in the as-cast condition and after heat treatment for 15 minutes at 1,300 degrees, 1,600 degrees, 1,900 degrees, and 2,200 degrees F followed by quenching in water. The following properties were determined and compared for each alloy at each heat treatment condition: the yield strengths at 0.01%, 0.1%, and 0.2% offsets, the ultimate tensile strength, the percent elongation, the modulus of elasticity, and the Knoop microhardness. The results were statistically analyzed. Photomicrographs were examined for each alloy and test condition. The following conclusions were made: 1. The "highest values" were exhibited by the as-cast alloy. 2. Heat treatment of the partial denture alloys tested resulted in reductions in strength, while the elongations varied. This study demonstrates that, in practice, one should avoid (a) prolonged "heat-soaking" while soldering and (b) grinding or polishing of the casting until the alloy is "red hot". 3. Durallium L.G. was the least affected by the various heat treatment conditions. 4. Conventional reporting of the yield strength at 0.2% offset, the ultimate tensile strength, and percent elongation are not adequate to completely describe and compare the mechanical behavior of alloys. The reporting of the yield strength at 0.01% offset, in addition to the other reported properties, will provide a more complete description of the behavior of the dental alloys.

  19. Impairment-oriented training or Bobath therapy for severe arm paresis after stroke: a single-blind, multicentre randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Platz, T; Eickhof, C; van Kaick, S; Engel, U; Pinkowski, C; Kalok, S; Pause, M

    2005-10-01

    To study the effects of augmented exercise therapy time for arm rehabilitation as either Bobath therapy or the impairment-oriented training (Arm BASIS training) in stroke patients with arm severe paresis. Single blind, multicentre randomized control trial. Three inpatient neurorehabilitation centres. Sixty-two anterior circulation ischaemic stroke patients. Random assignment to three group: (A) no augmented exercise therapy time, (B) augmented exercise therapy time as Bobath therapy and (C) augmented exercise therapy time as Arm BASIS training. Fugl-Meyer arm motor score. Secondary measure: Action Research Arm Test (ARA). Ancillary measures: Fugl-Meyer arm sensation and joint motion/pain scores and the Ashworth Scale (elbow flexors). An overall effect of augmented exercise therapy time on Fugl-Meyer scores after four weeks was not corroborated (mean and 95% confidence interval (CI) of change scores: no augmented exercise therapy time (n=20) 8.8, 5.2-12.3; augmented exercise therapy time (n=40) 9.9, 6.8-13.9; p = 0.2657). The group who received the augmented exercise therapy time as Arm BASIS training (n=20) had, however, higher gains than the group receiving the augmented exercise therapy time as Bobath therapy (n=20) (mean and 95% CI of change scores: Bobath 7.2, 2.6-11.8; BASIS 12.6, 8.4-16.8; p = 0.0432). Passive joint motion/pain deteriorated less in the group who received BASIS training (mean and 95% CI of change scores: Bobath -3.2, -5.2 to -1.1; BASIS 0.1, -1.8-2.0; p = 0.0090). ARA, Fugl-Meyer arm sensation, and Ashworth Scale scores were not differentially affected. The augmented exercise therapy time as Arm BASIS training enhanced selective motor control. Type of training was more relevant for recovery of motor control than therapeutic time spent.

  20. Psychoneuroimmunology of stroke.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Robert; Georgiou, Rachel; Thornton, Peter; Rothwell, Nancy

    2006-08-01

    There is now considerable evidence from both experimental and clinical studies that immune and inflammatory processes can contribute to the onset of stroke and the neurologic and psychologic outcomes. Several specific therapeutic targets have been identified that may significantly improve the devastating impact of stroke.

  1. How does timing, duration and severity of heat stress influence pollen-pistil interactions in angiosperms?

    PubMed

    Snider, John L; Oosterhuis, Derrick M

    2011-07-01

    Reproductive development in sexual plants is substantially more sensitive to high temperature stress than vegetative development, resulting in negative implications for food and fiber production under the moderate temperature increases projected to result from global climate change. High temperature exposure either during early pollen development or during the progamic phase of pollen development will negatively impact pollen performance and reproductive output; both phases of pollen development are considered exceptionally sensitive to moderate heat stress. However, moderately elevated temperatures either before or during the progamic phase can limit fertilization by negatively impacting important pollen pistil interactions required for successful pollen tube growth toward the ovules. This minireview identifies the impacts of heat stress on pollen-pistil interactions and sexual reproduction in angiosperms. A special emphasis is placed on the biochemical response of the pistil to moderately high temperature and the resultant influence on in vivo pollen performance and fertilization.

  2. Study on several temperature control methods of non heated overflow container

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Haozhe

    2017-04-01

    For a simple water overflow container, we try to find the best solution through which we can keep the temperature as close as possible to the initial temperature without wasting too much water. We build models in time and space. Model in time: We mainly consider convective heat transfer of water and air, heat transfer of container and evaporation of water.we get curves of temperature versus time under different situations. Through calculating and comparing the total water consumption of each program,find out the best plan. Model in space:We build two sub models in the model in space. The difference is the position of added water.we can get some images about the temperature changes with distance in different layers, and find the best strategy.

  3. How does timing, duration and severity of heat stress influence pollen-pistil interactions in angiosperms?

    PubMed Central

    Oosterhuis, Derrick M

    2011-01-01

    Reproductive development in sexual plants is substantially more sensitive to high temperature stress than vegetative development, resulting in negative implications for food and fiber production under the moderate temperature increases projected to result from global climate change. High temperature exposure either during early pollen development or during the progamic phase of pollen development will negatively impact pollen performance and reproductive output; both phases of pollen development are considered exceptionally sensitive to moderate heat stress. However, moderately elevated temperatures either before or during the progamic phase can limit fertilization by negatively impacting important pollen pistil interactions required for successful pollen tube growth toward the ovules. This mini-review identifies the impacts of heat stress on pollen-pistil interactions and sexual reproduction in angiosperms. A special emphasis is placed on the biochemical response of the pistil to moderately high temperature and the resultant influence on in vivo pollen performance and fertilization. PMID:21628998

  4. Fabrication and development of several heat pipe honeycomb sandwich panel concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanzer, H. J.

    1982-06-01

    The feasibility of fabricating and processing liquid metal heat pipes in a low mass honeycomb sandwich panel configuration for application on the NASA Langley airframe-integrated Scramjet engine was investigated. A variety of honeycomb panel facesheet and core-ribbon wick concepts was evaluated within constraints dictated by existing manufacturing technology and equipment. The chosen design consists of an all-stainless steel structure, sintered screen facesheets, and two types of core-ribbon; a diffusion bonded wire mesh and a foil-screen composite. Cleaning, fluid charging, processing, and process port sealing techniques were established. The liquid metals potassium, sodium and cesium were used as working fluids. Eleven honeycomb panels 15.24 cm X 15.24 cm X 2.94 cm were delivered to NASA Langley for extensive performance testing and evaluation; nine panels were processed as heat pipes, and two panels were left unprocessed.

  5. Fabrication and development of several heat pipe honeycomb sandwich panel concepts. [airframe integrated scramjet engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanzer, H. J.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of fabricating and processing liquid metal heat pipes in a low mass honeycomb sandwich panel configuration for application on the NASA Langley airframe-integrated Scramjet engine was investigated. A variety of honeycomb panel facesheet and core-ribbon wick concepts was evaluated within constraints dictated by existing manufacturing technology and equipment. The chosen design consists of an all-stainless steel structure, sintered screen facesheets, and two types of core-ribbon; a diffusion bonded wire mesh and a foil-screen composite. Cleaning, fluid charging, processing, and process port sealing techniques were established. The liquid metals potassium, sodium and cesium were used as working fluids. Eleven honeycomb panels 15.24 cm X 15.24 cm X 2.94 cm were delivered to NASA Langley for extensive performance testing and evaluation; nine panels were processed as heat pipes, and two panels were left unprocessed.

  6. A pilot study of sensory feedback by transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation to improve manipulation deficit caused by severe sensory loss after stroke

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sensory disturbance is common following stroke and can exacerbate functional deficits, even in patients with relatively good motor function. In particular, loss of appropriate sensory feedback in severe sensory loss impairs manipulation capability. We hypothesized that task-oriented training with sensory feedback assistance would improve manipulation capability even without sensory pathway recovery. Methods We developed a system that provides sensory feedback by transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (SENS) for patients with sensory loss, and investigated the feasibility of the system in a stroke patient with severe sensory impairment and mild motor deficit. The electrical current was modulated by the force exerted by the fingertips so as to allow the patient to identify the intensity. The patient had severe sensory loss due to a right thalamic hemorrhage suffered 27 months prior to participation in the study. The patient first practiced a cylindrical grasp task with SENS for 1 hour daily over 29 days. Pressure information from the affected thumb was fed back to the unaffected shoulder. The same patient practiced a tip pinch task with SENS for 1 hour daily over 4 days. Pressure information from the affected thumb and index finger was fed back to the unaffected and affected shoulders, respectively. We assessed the feasibility of SENS and examined the improvement of manipulation capability after training with SENS. Results The fluctuation in fingertip force during the cylindrical grasp task gradually decreased as the training progressed. The patient was able to maintain a stable grip force after training, even without SENS. Pressure exerted by the tip pinch of the affected hand was unstable before intervention with SENS compared with that of the unaffected hand. However, they were similar to each other immediately after SENS was initiated, suggesting that the somatosensory information improved tip pinch performance. The patient’s manipulation

  7. Tropical Diabatic Heating and the Role of Convective Processes as Represented in Several Contemporary Climate Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Franklin R.; Roads, John; Oglesby, Robert; Marshall, Susan

    2004-01-01

    One of the most fundamental properties of the global heat balance is the net heat input into the tropical atmosphere that helps drive the planetary atmospheric circulation. Although broadly understood in terms of its gross structure and balance of source / sink terms, incorporation of the relevant processes in predictive models is still rather poor. The work reported here examines the tropical radiative and water cycle behavior as produced by four contemporary climate models. Among these are the NSIPP-2 (NASA Seasonal to Interannual Prediction Project) which uses the RAS convective parameterization; the FVCCM, a code using finite volume numerics and the CCM3.6 physics; FVCCM-MCRAS again having the finite volume numerics, but MCRAS convective parameterization and a different radiation treatment; and, finally, the NCEP GSM which uses the RAS. Using multi-decadal integrations with specified SSTs we examine the statistics of radiative / convective processes and associated energy transports, and then estimate model energy flux sensitivities to SST changes. In particular the behavior of the convective parameterizations is investigated. Additional model integrations are performed specifically to assess the importance representing convective inhibition in regulating convective cloud-top structure and moisture detrainment as well as controlling surface energy fluxes. To evaluate the results of these experiments, a number of satellite retrievals are used: TRMM retrievals of vertical reflectivity structure, rainfall rate, and inferred diabatic heating are analyzed to show both seasonal and interannual variations in vertical structure of latent heat release. Top-of-atmosphere radiative fluxes from ERBS and CERES are used to examine shortwave and longwave cloud forcing and to deduce required seasonal energy transports. Retrievals of cloud properties from ISCCP and water vapor variations from SSM/T-2 are also used to understand behavior of the humidity fields. These observations

  8. Tropical Diabatic Heating and the Role of Convective Processes as Represented in Several Contemporary Climate Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Franklin R.; Roads, John; Oglesby, Robert; Marshall, Susan

    2004-01-01

    One of the most fundamental properties of the global heat balance is the net heat input into the tropical atmosphere that helps drive the planetary atmospheric circulation. Although broadly understood in terms of its gross structure and balance of source / sink terms, incorporation of the relevant processes in predictive models is still rather poor. The work reported here examines the tropical radiative and water cycle behavior as produced by four contemporary climate models. Among these are the NSIPP-2 (NASA Seasonal to Interannual Prediction Project) which uses the RAS convective parameterization; the FVCCM, a code using finite volume numerics and the CCM3.6 physics; FVCCM-MCRAS again having the finite volume numerics, but MCRAS convective parameterization and a different radiation treatment; and, finally, the NCEP GSM which uses the RAS. Using multi-decadal integrations with specified SSTs we examine the statistics of radiative / convective processes and associated energy transports, and then estimate model energy flux sensitivities to SST changes. In particular the behavior of the convective parameterizations is investigated. Additional model integrations are performed specifically to assess the importance representing convective inhibition in regulating convective cloud-top structure and moisture detrainment as well as controlling surface energy fluxes. To evaluate the results of these experiments, a number of satellite retrievals are used: TRMM retrievals of vertical reflectivity structure, rainfall rate, and inferred diabatic heating are analyzed to show both seasonal and interannual variations in vertical structure of latent heat release. Top-of-atmosphere radiative fluxes from ERBS and CERES are used to examine shortwave and longwave cloud forcing and to deduce required seasonal energy transports. Retrievals of cloud properties from ISCCP and water vapor variations from SSM/T-2 are also used to understand behavior of the humidity fields. These observations

  9. Several allergens from Anisakis simplex are highly resistant to heat and pepsin treatments.

    PubMed

    Caballero, María Luisa; Moneo, Ignacio

    2004-06-01

    Ingestion of raw or undercooked fish can lead to infection with Anisakis simplex. Sensitized patients show specific IgE to proteins from this parasite. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of specific IgE recognition directed to heat and/or pepsin-resistant allergens from A. simplex among sensitized patients. Twenty-seven patients with positive specific IgE and immunoblotting with a crude parasite extract were included in the study. Specific IgE detection against allergens resistant to boiling for 30 min and/or a pepsin digestion of an A. simplex extract was performed by immunoblotting. A total of 81% of the patients showed specific IgE to pepsin-resistant allergens and 67% had specific IgE to heat-resistant allergens. Thirty percent of patients recognized allergens after both treatments, one being the allergen detected by 75% of the patients of this group. Heat- and/or pepsin-resistant allergens from A. simplex could explain reactions and symptoms after the ingestion of well-cooked or canned fish.

  10. Effects of floor heating and litter quality on the development and severity of foot pad dermatitis in young turkeys.

    PubMed

    Abd El-Wahab, A; Beineke, A; Beyerbach, M; Visscher, C F; Kamphues, J

    2011-09-01

    Actions concerning animal health in turkey production are coming more and more to the fore. Litter quality has a great impact on the bird's health and welfare. This study aimed at evaluating the effects of using floor heating, different litter materials, and exposure to litter with a "critical moisture content" of 35% for 16 or 24 hr/day on the severity of foot pad dermatitis (FPD), a widespread disease in fattening turkeys. Four groups of 2-wk-old female turkeys, with 20 birds in each, were reared during 3 wk. All turkeys were fed a commercial pellet diet ad libitum. The first two groups were kept on wood shavings (35% moisture) without and with floor heating. The other two groups were housed on lignocellulose (Soft Cell) of 35% moisture without and with floor heating. In each group, half of the birds were housed for 8 hr/day in adjacent separate boxes where the litter was kept clean and dry throughout the experimental period. Foot pads were assessed weekly for external and at day 35 for histopathologic scoring (scores: 0 = healthy; 7 = ulcer). At day 14 each bird had normal and healthy foot pads. The results indicate that using floor heating resulted in significantly lower FPD scores (0.8 +/- 0.2) compared to groups without floor heating (2.0 +/- 0.8). Using lignocellulose as a litter material resulted in significantly lower histopathologic FPD scores (1.4 +/- 0.7) compared with wood shavings (1.7 +/- 0.8). In all birds housed on dry litter for 8 hr/day, significantly lower FPD scores were found compared to birds housed on wet litter for 24 hr. In conclusion, using floor heating, even with wet litter (35% moisture), independent of the litter type, resulted in reduced severity of FPD compared to those birds housed in pens without using floor heating. Additionally, using lignocellulose as a litter material resulted in lower FPD compared with wood shavings. Keeping litter dry and "warm" could be achieved by using floor heating, which is considered a practical step

  11. Fracture response of several metals to fast heating of samples by intensive X-ray radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubev, Vladimir

    2015-06-01

    Results on studying the fracture response of metals samples in the form of thin disks to fast heating by the intensive pulse of X-ray radiation of a complete spectrum are presented in the paper. The samples of such metals as iron, copper, AMg6 aluminum, VT14 titanium, molybdenum, tungsten, cadmium, lead and zinc were tested. The samples were fixed in the special cartridges that were placed at such distances from the X-ray irradiator where the energy fluxes were 1.38, 0.90 and 0.29 kJ/cm2. The irradiating X-ray pulse was about 2 ns in duration. After testing, the depth of material ablation from a sample front surface and the degree and character of its spall damage were determined. The method of metallographic analysis was used for these purposes. The spectrum data were used for the calculations of samples heating. Numerical calculations of thermomechanical and shock wave loading conditions were made with the use of the equation of state taking into account the process of evaporation. The calculated value of maximum negative pressure in the sample at the coordinate corresponding to the depth of ablation and formation of spallation zones or spall cracks was conventionally accepted as the material resistance to spall fracture in such conditions. The comparison of obtained results with the data on the fracture of examined materials in the conditions of fast heating by the X-ray pulse with a hard spectrum and by the high-current electron beam of an electron pulse generator was conducted.

  12. Correlation of heat transfer for the zero pressure gradient hypersonic laminar boundary layer for several gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    A theoretical study of heat transfer for zero pressure gradient hypersonic laminar boundary layers for various gases with particular application to the flows produced in an expansion tube facility was conducted. A correlation based on results obtained from solutions to the governing equations for five gases was formulated. Particular attention was directed toward the laminar boundary layer shock tube splitter plates in carbon dioxide flows generated by high speed shock waves. Computer analysis of the splitter plate boundary layer flow provided information that is useful in interpreting experimental data obtained in shock tube gas radiation studies.

  13. The Calculated and Measured Performance Characteristics of a Heated-Wire Liquid-Water-Content Meter for Measuring Icing Severity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neel, Carr B.; Steinmetz, Charles P.

    1952-01-01

    Ground tests have been made of an instrument which, when assembled in a more compact form for flight installation, could be used to obtain statistical flight data on the liquid-water content of icing clouds and to provide an indication of icing severity. The sensing element of the instrument consists of an electrically heated wire which is mounted in the air stream. The degree of cooling of the wire resulting from evaporation of the impinging water droplets is a measure. of the liquid-water content of the cloud. Determination of the value of the liquid-water content from the wire temperature at any instant requires a knowledge of the airspeed, altitude, and air temperature. An analysis was made of the temperature response of a heated wire exposed to an air stream containing water drops. Comparisons were made of the liquid-water content as measured with several heated wires and absorbent cylinders in an artificially produced cloud. For one of the wires, comparative tests were made with a rotating-disk icing-rate meter in an icing wind tunnel. From the test results, it was shown that an instrument for measuring the concentration of liquid water in an air stream can be built using an electrically heated wire of known temperatureresistance characteristics, and that the performance of such a device can be predicted using appropriate theory. Although an instrument in a form suitable for gathering statistical data in flight was not built, the practicability of constructing such an instrument was illustrated. The ground-test results indicated that a flight heated-wire instrument would be simple and durable, would respond rapidly to variations in liquid-water content, and could be used for the measurement of water content in clouds which are above freezing temperature, as well as in icing clouds.

  14. Ischemic stroke and depression.

    PubMed

    Desmond, David W; Remien, Robert H; Moroney, Joan T; Stern, Yaakov; Sano, Mary; Williams, Janet B W

    2003-03-01

    Previous studies of depression after stroke have reported widely variable findings, possibly due to differences between studies in patient characteristics and methods for the assessment of depression, small sample sizes, and the failure to examine stroke-free reference groups to determine the base rate of depression in the general population. In an effort to address certain of those methodologic issues and further investigate the frequency and clinical determinants of depression after stroke, we administered the Structured Interview Guide for the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (SIGH-D) and neurological, neuropsychological, and functional assessments to 421 patients (age = 71.5 +/- 8.0 years) 3 months after ischemic stroke and 249 stroke-free control subjects (age = 70.8 +/- 6.7 years). We required a SIGH-D total score > 11 for the identification of depression. We found that depression was less frequent (47/421 patients, or 11.2%, and 13/249 control subjects, or 5.2%), less severe, and less persistent in our stroke cohort than previously reported, possibly due to the underrepresentation of patients with a premorbid history of affective illness. Depression was associated with more severe stroke, particularly in vascular territories that supply limbic structures; dementia; and female sex. SIGH-D item analyses suggested that a reliance on nonsomatic rather than somatic symptoms would result in the most accurate diagnoses of depression after ischemic stroke.

  15. Treatment of suspected heat illness.

    PubMed

    Eichner, E R

    1998-06-01

    1. Despite advances in the art and science of fluid balance, exertional heat illness -- even life-threatening heat stroke -- remains a threat for some athletes today. 2. Risk factors for heat illness include: being unacclimatized, unfit, or hypohydrated; certain illnesses or drugs; not drinking in long events; and a fast finishing pace. 3. Heat cramps typically occur in conditioned athletes who compete for hours in the sun. They can be prevented by increasing dietary salt and staying hydrated. 4. Early diagnosis of heat exhaustion can be vital. Early warning signs include: flushed face, hyperventilation, headache, dizziness, nausea, tingling arms, piloerection, chilliness, incoordination, and confusion. 5. Pitfalls in the diagnosis of heat illness include: confusion preventing self-diagnosis; the lack of trained spotters; rectal temperature not taken promptly; the problem of "seek not, find not;" and the mimicry of heat illness. 6. Heat stroke is a medical emergency. Mainstays of therapy include: emergency on-site cooling; intravenous fluids; treating hypoglycemia as needed; intravenous diazepam for seizures or severe cramping or shivering; and hospitalizing if response is slow or atypical. 7. The best treatment is prevention. Tips to avoiding heat illness include: rely not on thirst; drink on schedule; favor sports drinks; monitor weight; watch urine; shun caffeine and alcohol; key on meals for fluids and salt; stay cool when you can; and know the early warning signs of heat illness.

  16. Chronic Consumption of a Low Sodium Diet: Hormonal and Physiological Effects During Exercise in the Heat,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-26

    retrospective studies of more severe heat injuries in humans , circulating levels of sodium appear to be within the normal range upon admission (14...16) or slightly elevated (6, 19, 25) due to dehydration. The process of heat acclimatization in humans is partially manifested in the secretion of a...performance during exercise in the heat. We have used a rat model (15, 17) for human heat stroke to quantitate the effects of several factors which

  17. Anatomical and technical factors associated with stroke or death during carotid angioplasty and stenting: results from the endarterectomy versus angioplasty in patients with symptomatic severe carotid stenosis (EVA-3S) trial and systematic review.

    PubMed

    Naggara, Olivier; Touzé, Emmanuel; Beyssen, Bernard; Trinquart, Ludovic; Chatellier, Gilles; Meder, Jean-François; Mas, Jean-Louis

    2011-02-01

    The purposes of this study were to assess the relationships between anatomic and technical factors and the 30-day risk of stroke or death after carotid angioplasty and stenting in the Endarterectomy versus Stenting in Patients with Symptomatic Severe Carotid Stenosis (EVA-3S) trial and to perform a systematic review of the literature. We included patients from EVA-3S in whom carotid stenting was attempted irrespective of allocated treatment. Two radiologists blinded to clinical data independently assessed the aortic arch and carotid arteries on procedural angiograms. In addition, we performed a systematic review of studies that reported 30-day risk of stroke or death in relation with arterial anatomy and technique. Outcomes were stroke or death and stroke occurring within 30 days of the carotid angioplasty and stenting procedure. Two hundred sixty-two patients from EVA-3S fulfilled the inclusion criteria (including 1 initially allocated to surgery and 13 in whom stent insertion failed).Within 30 days after the procedure, 25 (9.5%) patients had a stroke or had died. The risk of stroke or death was higher in patients with internal carotid artery-common carotid artery angulation ≥60° (relative risk, 4.96; 2.29 to 10.74) and lower in those treated with cerebral protection devices (relative risk [RR], 0.38; 0.17 to 0.85). In the systematic review (56 studies; 34 398 patients), the risk of stroke or death was higher in patients with left-sided carotid angioplasty and stenting (RR, 1.29; 1.05 to 1.58), increased internal carotid artery-common carotid artery angulation (RR, 3.41; 1.52 to 7.63), and when the target internal carotid artery stenosis was >10 mm (RR, 2.36; 1.28 to 3.38). There was no significant increase in risk of stroke or death in patients with Type III aortic arch, aortic arch calcification, or with ostial involvement, calcification, ulceration or degree of stenosis of the target internal carotid artery stenosis. The use of a cerebral protection device

  18. Strokes in Thai children : etiology and outcome.

    PubMed

    Visudhiphan, P; Chiemchanya, S; Wattanasirichaigoon, D

    1996-12-01

    In Asian countries, specific etiology and outcome of stroke in children are rarely reported. During January 1979 to December 1997, 68 children with stroke, admitted to the Department of Pediatrics, Ramathibodi Hospital, Bangkok were reviewed for etiology and outcome; 38 patients (22 males) had ischemic stroke and 30 (20 males) had hemorrhagic stroke. Severe headache, vomiting, disturbance of consciousness and papilledema were prominent presentations of hemorrhagic stroke. Bleeding from vascular anomalies of the brain (AVM) was the most common etiology of hemorrhagic stroke while septic and non-septic emboli from congenital and acquired heart diseases were the most common cause of ischemic stroke. The mortality rate was 7% and 9% in hemorrhagic and ischemic strokes, respectively. Complete recovery was observed in 52% of cases of hemorrhagic stroke but in only 26% of ischemic stroke. Hemiparesis was the most common residual neurological deficit with higher occurrence in ischemic stroke.

  19. [Pathophysiology of heat illness].

    PubMed

    Aruga, Tohru; Miyake, Yasufumi

    2012-06-01

    Human core temperature is strictly controlled by mechanism of radiation, conduction, convection, and evaporation from skin surface. Serial hot and humid climate induces dehydration which interferes heat pump-out from the body. Heart dysfunction is the third factor to rise body temperature. Hyperthermia and hypo-perfusion caused by dehydration and heart failure deteriorate specific organ functions, i.e. central nervous system, liver and renal functions and coagulation system. Disseminated intravascular coagulopathy is one of the standard indicators of severity and mortality of heat stroke.

  20. Stroke in childhood.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2017-07-19

    Essential facts About 400 children a year have a stroke in the UK. Many are left with severe disability. While there have been improvements in diagnosis and treatment in recent years, the condition is still not as well recognised as stroke in adults. Experts believe that greater awareness among parents and healthcare professionals could lead to speedier diagnosis and minimise risk of severe long-term health problems.

  1. Stroke rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Bindawas, Saad M.; Vennu, Vishal S.

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is a major cause of death and other complications worldwide. In Saudi Arabia, stroke has become an emerging health issue leading to disability and death. However, stroke care including rehabilitation services, in Saudi Arabia lags behind developed countries. Stroke rehabilitation is an essential recovery option after stroke and should start as early as possible to avoid potential complications. The growing evidence on stroke rehabilitation effectiveness in different health care settings and outcome measures used widely are reviewed in this call to action paper. PMID:27744457

  2. Mixed sulfidation/carburization attack on several heat-resistant alloys at 900 C

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, M.A.; Cotner, J.P.

    2000-06-01

    A sulfidation/carburization study of seven commercial heat-resistant alloys was carried out at 900 C in a H{sub 2}-25 vol.%CH{sub 4}-14.8N{sub 2}-4CO-0.6CO{sub 2}-0.6H{sub 2}S atmosphere. The equilibrium partial pressures for oxygen (O{sub 2}) and sulfur (S{sub 2}) were 1.1 x 10{sup {minus}22} and 4.1 x 10{sup {minus}8} atm, respectively, and the carbon activity for this system was unity. The time of exposure was 500 hr. Relatively thick, mixed sulfide scales were formed on all of the alloys tested. In addition, internal carburization occurred in all of the alloys. Using metal loss (i.e., the reduction in sample thickness) plus internal attack (internal sulfidation plus internal carburization) as a performance criterion, an alloy with a nominal composition of Ni-29 wt.%Co-28Cr-2.75Si performed the best, showing 0.71 mm of attack. An alloy with a nominal composition of Fe-20 wt.%Ni-25Cr performed the worst, being totally consumed by the test (>3.18 mm of attack). Alloys containing relatively high amounts of silicon (> 2.5%) showed a dramatic increase in their sulfidation resistance compared to the other alloys containing lower silicon contents. The amount of iron present within a given material played a dominant role in the carburization attack that occurred, with as expected, high-iron alloys showing significant internal carburization because of a high solubility and diffusivity of carbon in the matrix. The importance of the various alloying elements with respect to sulfidation and carburization resistance is discussed.

  3. Sulfidation/carburization resistance of several heat-resistant alloys at 900 C

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, M.A.; Barnes, J.E.

    1998-12-31

    The results of high temperature sulfidation plus carburization testing on seven different commercial heat resistant alloys are reported in this paper. The test environment consisted of a H{sub 2}-25vol%CH{sub 4}-14.8N{sub 2}-4CO-0.6H{sub 2}S gas at 1650 F (9OO C) and the time of exposure was 500 hours. Relatively thick, mixed sulfide scales were formed on all of the alloys tested. Also, internal carburization occurred within all of the alloys. The use of x-ray diffraction allowed the phases constituting the scales to be identified, and these phases were in agreement with previous work published on the testing of various alloys in high temperature low oxygen activity, high sulfur and carbon activity atmospheres. Using metal loss (i.e. the reduction in sample thickness) plus internal attack (internal sulfidation plus internal carburization) as a performance criterion, an alloy with a nominal composition of Ni-29wt%Co-28Cr-2.75Si performed the best, showing 28 mils (0.71 mm) of attack, and an alloy with a nominal composition of Fe-20wt%Ni-25Cr performed the worst, being totally consumed by the test (>125 mils/3.18 mm of attack). The sulfidation plus carburization resistance of the Ni-Co-Cr-Si alloy is attributed to its high chromium plus silicon content, both of which are known to be beneficial in sulfidizing and carburizing environments, and its low iron/high nickel content, which results in a low solubility and diffusivity of carbon in the matrix.

  4. Highly efficient 6-stroke engine cycle with water injection

    SciTech Connect

    Szybist, James P; Conklin, James C

    2012-10-23

    A six-stroke engine cycle having improved efficiency. Heat is recovered from the engine combustion gases by using a 6-stroke engine cycle in which combustion gases are partially vented proximate the bottom-dead-center position of the fourth stroke cycle, and water is injected proximate the top-dead-center position of the fourth stroke cycle.

  5. The model homologue of the partially defective human 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, considered as a risk factor for stroke due to increased homocysteine level, can be protected and reactivated by heat shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, Michał; Banecki, Bogdan; Kadziński, Leszek; Jakóbkiewicz-Banecka, Joanna; Gabig-Cimińska, Magdalena; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz; Banecka-Majkutewicz, Zyta

    2016-10-01

    The A222 V substitution in the human MTHFR gene product (5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase) is responsible for a decreased activity of this enzyme. This may cause an increased homocysteine level, considered as a risk factor for arteriosclerosis and stroke. The bacterial homologue of the human enzyme, MetF, has been found to be a useful model in genetic and biochemical studies. The similarity of Escherichia coli MetF and human MTHFR proteins is so high that particular mutations in the corresponding human gene can be reflected by the bacterial mutants. For example, the A222 V substitution in MTHFR (caused by the C667T substitution in the MTHFR gene) can be ascribed to the A117 V substitution in MetF. Here, it is reported that a temperature-sensitive MetF117 (A117 V) protein can be partially protected from a thermal inactivation by the heat shock proteins from the Hsp70/100 systems. Moreover, activity of the thermally denatured enzyme can be partially restored by the same heat shock proteins. High temperature protein G (HtpG) had no effect on MetF117 activity in both experimental systems. The presented results indicate that functions of heat shock proteins may be required for maintenance of the MetF117 function. This may have implications for the mechanisms of arteriosclerosis and stroke, especially in the light of previous findings that the A222 V MTHFR polymorphism may be a risk factor for stroke, as well as recently published results which demonstrated the increased levels of antibodies against heat shock proteins in stroke patients.

  6. Plasma antibodies against heat shock protein 70 correlate with the incidence and severity of asthma in a Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Miao; Wu, Tangchun; Cheng, Longxian; Wang, Feng; Wei, Qingyi; Tanguay, Robert M

    2005-01-01

    Background The heat shock proteins (Hsps) are induced by stresses such as allergic factors and inflammatory responses in bronchi epithelial cells and therefore may be detectable in patients with asthma. However, the etiologic link between anti-Hsps and asthma (its severity and related inflammatory responses such as interleukin-4 and immunoglobulin E) has not been established. We determined whether antibodies against Hsp60 and Hsp70 were present in patients with asthma and evaluated their associations with risk and severity of asthma. Methods We determined the levels of anti-Hsp60 and anti-Hsp70 by immunoblot and their associations with risk and symptom severity of asthma in 95 patients with asthma and 99 matched non-symptomatic controls using multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results Compared to the controls, asthma patients were more likely to have detectable anti-Hsp60 (17.2% vs 5.1%) and anti-Hsp70 (33.7% vs 8.1%) (p ≤ 0.001). In particular, the presence of anti-Hsp70 was associated with a greater than 2 fold risk for asthma (adjusted OR = 2.21; 95% CI = 1.35~3.59). Furthermore, both anti-Hsp60 and anti-Hsp70 levels were positively correlated with symptom severity (p < 0.05) as well as interleukin-4 and immunoglobulin E (p < 0.05). Individuals with antibodies against anti-Hsp60 and anti-Hsp70 were more likely to have a family history of asthma (p < 0.001) and higher plasma concentrations of total immunoglobulin E (p = 0.001) and interleukin-4 (p < 0.05) than those without antibodies. Conclusions These data suggest that anti-Hsp60 and especially anti-Hsp70 correlate with the attacks and severity of asthma. The underlying molecular mechanisms linking antibodies to heat shock proteins and asthma remain to be investigated. PMID:15710045

  7. RyR1 S-Nitrosylation Underlies Environmental Heat Stroke and Sudden Death in Y522S RyR1 Knock-in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Durham, William J.; Aracena-Parks, Paula; Long, Cheng; Rossi, Ann E.; Goonasekera, Sanjeewa A.; Boncompagni, Simona; Galvan, Daniel L.; Gilman, Charles P.; Baker, Mariah; Shirokova, Natalia; Protasi, Feliciano; Dirksen, Robert; Hamilton, Susan L.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Mice with a malignant hyperthermia mutation (Y522S) in the ryanodine receptor (RyR1) display muscle contractures, rhabdomyolysis, and death in response to elevated environmental temperatures. We demonstrate that this mutation in RyR1 causes Ca2+ leak which drives increases generation of reactive nitrogen species (RNS). Subsequent S-nitrosylation of the mutant RyR1 increases its temperature sensitivity for activation, producing muscle contractures upon exposure to elevated temperatures. The Y522S mutation in humans is associated with central core disease. Many mitochondria in the muscle of heterozygous Y522S mice are swollen and misshapen. The mutant muscle displays decreased force production and increased mitochondrial lipid peroxidation with aging. Chronic treatment with N-acetylcysteine protects against mitochondrial oxidative damage and the decline in force generation. We propose a feed forward cyclic mechanism that increases the temperature sensitivity of RyR1 activation and underlies heat stroke and sudden death. The cycle eventually produces a myopathy with damaged mitochondria. PMID:18394989

  8. Preventing stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partially-hydrogenated or hydrogenated fats Medical problems may lead to stroke Control your cholesterol and diabetes with ... increase the chance of blood clots, which can lead to stroke. Clots are more likely in women ...

  9. Know Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Know Stroke Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table of Contents For ... D. Director, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Photo courtesy of NIH/NINDS Welcome to this ...

  10. Ischemic Strokes (Clots)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infographic Stroke Hero F.A.S.T. Quiz Ischemic Strokes (Clots) Updated:Apr 26,2017 Ischemic stroke accounts ... strokes. Read more about silent strokes . TIA and Stroke: Medical Emergencies When someone has shown symptoms of ...

  11. [Mobile stroke unit for prehospital stroke treatment].

    PubMed

    Walter, S; Grunwald, I Q; Fassbender, K

    2016-01-01

    The management of acute stroke patients suffers from several major problems in the daily clinical routine. In order to achieve optimal treatment a complex diagnostic work-up and rapid initiation of therapy are necessary; however, most patients arrive at hospital too late for any type of acute stroke treatment, although all forms of treatment are highly time-dependent according to the generally accepted "time is brain" concept. Recently, two randomized clinical trials demonstrated the feasibility of prehospital stroke diagnostic work-up and treatment. This was accomplished by use of a specialized ambulance, equipped with computed tomography for multimodal imaging and a point-of-care laboratory system. In both trials the results demonstrated a clear superiority of the prehospital treatment group with a significant reduction of treatment times, significantly increased number of patients treated within the first 60 min after symptom onset and an optimized triage to the correct target hospital. Currently, mobile stroke units are in operation in various countries and should lead to an improvement in stroke treatment; nevertheless, intensive research is still needed to analyze the best framework settings for prehospital stroke management.

  12. Low prevalence of collateral cerebral circulation in the circle of Willis in patients with severe carotid artery stenosis and recent ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Badacz, Rafał; Przewłocki, Tadeusz; Karch, Izabela; Pieniążek, Piotr; Rosławiecka, Agnieszka; Mleczko, Szymon; Brzychczy, Andrzej; Trystuła, Mariusz; Żmudka, Krzysztof; Kabłak-Ziembicka, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The circle of Willis is thought to play a key role in development of collateral flow in patients with internal carotid artery stenosis (ICAS). To assess flow in the circle of Willis in patients with recent ischemic stroke (IS). The study included 371 patients, 102 symptomatic with severe ICAS and recent IS (within the last 3 months) (group I) and 269 asymptomatic with severe ICAS (group II). Flow in the middle (MCA), anterior (ACA) and posterior (PCA) cerebral arteries and pattern of the cross-flow through anterior (ACoA) and posterior (PCoA) communicating arteries were assessed with transcranial color-coded Doppler ultrasonography (TCCD). The ACoA or PCoA was less prevalent in group I than in group II (54% vs. 78%, p < 0.001 and 20% vs. 42%, p < 0.001, respectively), resulting in lower peak-systolic velocity (PSV) in the MCA in group I vs. group II (p = 0.015). Any collateral pathway was present in 67% of patients in group I, compared to 86% in group II (p < 0.001). Both PSV and end-diastolic (EDV) flow velocity in the ACA were lower in patients with recent IS, compared to asymptomatic subjects (71 ±24 cm/s vs. 86 ±34 cm/s, p < 0.001 and 32 ±12 cm/s vs. 37 ±17 cm/s, p = 0.038, respectively). Presence of ACoA or PCoA and higher PSV in the MCA and ACA were associated with significant risk reduction of IS (RR = 0.28 (95% CI = 0.16-0.49, p < 0.001), RR = 0.28 (95% CI = 0.15-0.52, p < 0.001), RR = 0.97 (95% CI = 0.96-0.99, p < 0.001), RR = 0.99 (95% CI = 0.98-0.99, p < 0.032), respectively). However, ROC curves failed to show reliable MCA or ACA PSV cut-offs for IS risk assessment. The ACoA and PCoA seem to play a key role in the evaluation of IS risk in subjects with severe ICAS.

  13. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation in Post-stroke Chronic Aphasia: The Impact of Baseline Severity and Task Specificity in a Pilot Sample

    PubMed Central

    Norise, Catherine; Sacchetti, Daniela; Hamilton, Roy

    2017-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) can improve aspects of language production in persons with chronic non-fluent aphasia due to left hemisphere stroke. However, to date, studies exploring factors that predict response to tDCS in this or any patient population remain sparse, as are studies that investigate the specific aspects of language performance that are most responsive to stimulation. The current study explored factors that could predict recovery of language fluency and which aspects of language fluency could be expected to improve with the identified factor(s). We report nine patients who demonstrated deficits in fluency as assessed using the Cookie Theft picture description task of the Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination. In the treatment condition, subjects received a 2.0 mA current through 5 cm × 5 cm electrodes for 20 min at a site previously shown to elicit a patient-dependent optimal response to tDCS. They were then tested 2-weeks and 2-months after treatment. In the sham condition, a subset of these subjects were tested on the same protocol with sham instead of real tDCS. The current study assessed language fluency improvements in measures of production at the word-level and sentence level, grammatical accuracy, and lexical selection as a function of baseline aphasia severity. A more severe baseline language profile was associated with larger improvements in fluency at the word-level after real tDCS but not sham stimulation. These improvements were maintained at the 2-week follow-up. The results suggest that for at least some outcome measures, baseline severity may be an important factor in predicting the response to tDCS in patients with chronic non-fluent aphasia. Moving forward, the ability to identify patient factors that can predict response could help refine strategies for the administration of therapeutic tDCS, focusing attention on those patients most likely to benefit from stimulation. PMID

  14. Acute ischemic stroke update.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Kathleen; Orr, Sean; Briand, Mary; Piazza, Carolyn; Veydt, Annita; McCoy, Stacey

    2010-05-01

    Stroke is the third most common cause of death in the United States and is the number one cause of long-term disability. Legislative mandates, largely the result of the American Heart Association, American Stroke Association, and Brain Attack Coalition working cooperatively, have resulted in nationwide standardization of care for patients who experience a stroke. Transport to a skilled facility that can provide optimal care, including immediate treatment to halt or reverse the damage caused by stroke, must occur swiftly. Admission to a certified stroke center is recommended for improving outcomes. Most strokes are ischemic in nature. Acute ischemic stroke is a heterogeneous group of vascular diseases, which makes targeted treatment challenging. To provide a thorough review of the literature since the 2007 acute ischemic stroke guidelines were developed, we performed a search of the MEDLINE database (January 1, 2004-July 1, 2009) for relevant English-language studies. Results (through July 1, 2009) from clinical trials included in the Internet Stroke Center registry were also accessed. Results from several pivotal studies have contributed to our knowledge of stroke. Additional data support the efficacy and safety of intravenous alteplase, the standard of care for acute ischemic stroke since 1995. Due to these study results, the American Stroke Association changed its recommendation to extend the time window for administration of intravenous alteplase from within 3 hours to 4.5 hours of symptom onset; this recommendation enables many more patients to receive the drug. Other findings included clinically useful biomarkers, the role of inflammation and infection, an expanded role for placement of intracranial stents, a reduced role for urgent carotid endarterectomy, alternative treatments for large-vessel disease, identification of nontraditional risk factors, including risk factors for women, and newly published pediatric stroke guidelines. In addition, new devices for

  15. Relationship between visible branch arteries distal to the stenosis on magnetic resonance angiography and stroke recurrence in patients with severe middle cerebral artery trunk stenosis: a one-year follow up study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongbing; Li, Zhuhao; Hong, Hua; Xing, Shihui; Liu, Gang; Zhang, Aiwu; Tan, Shuangquan; Zhang, Jian; Zeng, Jinsheng

    2015-09-16

    To evaluate the relationship between the flow signal intensity of branch arteries distal to the stenosis on 3-dimensional (3D) time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and the risk of stroke recurrence in patients with severe middle cerebral artery (MCA) trunk stenosis. We prospectively recruited 153 patients (mean age 62.9 ± 13.0 years, 106 males) with a first ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack caused by a severe MCA trunk stenosis (70 % to 99 %) confirmed by 3D TOF MRA and followed them for one year to determine the stroke recurrence. The MCA branch signal intensity distal to the site of stenosis on 3D TOF MRA was classified as either good (grade A) or poor [mild reduction (grade B) or severe reduction (grade C)] according to the extent to which the MCA could be visualized. The patients were divided into groups A (35), B (58), or C (60) based on the MRA grading of the MCA branch signal intensity distal to the site of stenosis. Poor MCA branch signal intensity was associated with internal border-zone infarction (p < 0.05). The risk of stroke recurrence in the ipsilateral MCA in the first year was 18.3 %. The 1-year cumulative incidence of recurrence was higher in the patients in group C (30 %) than in groups B (12.1 %) or A (8.6 %) (Log rank, p = 0.007). Multivariate analyses via Cox proportional hazard regression demonstrated that only a grade C classification of the signal intensity of the MCA branches was an independent predictor of stroke recurrence in the ipsilateral MCA (hazard ratio = 3.0, 95 % confidence interval = 1.3-7.4, p = 0.014). This study demonstrated that MCA branch signal intensity as assessed via 3D TOF MRA may be a useful and simple tool to stratify the risk of stroke recurrence in patients with severe MCA trunk stenosis.

  16. Prehospital stroke care

    PubMed Central

    Saver, Jeffrey L.; Starkman, Sidney; Lees, Kennedy R.; Endres, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Brain cells die rapidly after stroke and any effective treatment must start as early as possible. In clinical routine, the tight time–outcome relationship continues to be the major limitation of therapeutic approaches: thrombolysis rates remain low across many countries, with most patients being treated at the late end of the therapeutic window. In addition, there is no neuroprotective therapy available, but some maintain that this concept may be valid if administered very early after stroke. Recent innovations have opened new perspectives for stroke diagnosis and treatment before the patient arrives at the hospital. These include stroke recognition by dispatchers and paramedics, mobile telemedicine for remote clinical examination and imaging, and integration of CT scanners and point-of-care laboratories in ambulances. Several clinical trials are now being performed in the prehospital setting testing prehospital delivery of neuroprotective, antihypertensive, and thrombolytic therapy. We hypothesize that these new approaches in prehospital stroke care will not only shorten time to treatment and improve outcome but will also facilitate hyperacute stroke research by increasing the number of study participants within an ultra-early time window. The potentials, pitfalls, and promises of advanced prehospital stroke care and research are discussed in this review. PMID:23897876

  17. Imaging acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    González, R Gilberto; Schwamm, Lee H

    2016-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is common and often treatable, but treatment requires reliable information on the state of the brain that may be provided by modern neuroimaging. Critical information includes: the presence of hemorrhage; the site of arterial occlusion; the size of the early infarct "core"; and the size of underperfused, potentially threatened brain parenchyma, commonly referred to as the "penumbra." In this chapter we review the major determinants of outcomes in ischemic stroke patients, and the clinical value of various advanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging methods that may provide key physiologic information in these patients. The focus is on major strokes due to occlusions of large arteries of the anterior circulation, the most common cause of a severe stroke syndrome. The current evidence-based approach to imaging the acute stroke patient at the Massachusetts General Hospital is presented, which is applicable for all stroke types. We conclude with new information on time and stroke evolution that imaging has revealed, and how it may open the possibilities of treating many more patients. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Post-stroke urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Mehdi, Z; Birns, J; Bhalla, A

    2013-11-01

    To provide a comprehensive review of the current evidence on post-stroke urinary incontinence. An electronic database search was performed to identify relevant studies and review articles related to Urinary Incontinence (UI) in the stroke population between the years 1966 and 2012. Urinary incontinence following stroke is a common problem affecting more than one-third of acute stroke patients and persisting in up to a quarter at 1 year. It is well established that this condition is a strong marker of stroke severity and is associated with poorer functional outcomes and increased institutionalisation and mortality rates compared with those who remain continent. Despite evidence linking better outcomes to those patients who regain continence, the results of national audits have demonstrated that the management of UI following stroke is suboptimal, with less than two-thirds of stroke units having a documented plan to promote continence. Current evidence supports a thorough assessment to categorise the type and severity of post-stroke urinary incontinence. An individually tailored, structured management strategy to promote continence should be employed. This has been associated with better stroke outcomes and should be the aim of all stroke health professionals. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Study of global heat transport and plume morphology in severely-confined Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Ke-Qing; Chong, Kai Leong

    2016-11-01

    We study systematically how severe geometrical confinement influences the global heat transport (expressed as Nusselt number Nu) and the plume morphology in Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RBC) by means of direct numerical simulations. Broad ranges of width-to-height aspect-ratio (1 / 128 <= Γ <= 1) and Rayleigh number (3 ×104 <= Ra <=1011) at fixed Prandtl number Pr = 4 . 38 are considered in present study. It is found that Nu exhibits the scaling Nu - 1 Ra 0 . 61 over three decades of Ra at Γ = 1 / 128 and the flow is dominated by finger-like, long-lived plume columns for such severely-confined situation. The Nu scaling and the flow structures contrast sharply to that found at Γ = 1 for which Nu exhibits the scaling Nu - 1 Ra 0 . 31 and the flow is dominated by mushroom-like, fragmented thermal plumes. Analogy is made between the severely-confined RBC and strongly rotating RBC. This work was supported by RGC of HKSAR (No. CUHK404513), CUHK Direct Grant (No. 3132740) and through a HKPhD Fellowship.

  20. Stroke: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Albertson, Megan; Sharma, Jitendra

    2014-11-01

    Cerebrovascular accidents (CVAs) are the leading cause of disability and the fourth leading cause of death in the U.S. The WHO defines stroke as "rapidly developing clinical signs of focal disturbance of cerebral function lasting more than 24 hours with no apparent cause other than of vascular origin." Strokes are subdivided into two major classifications: ischemic (80-87 percent) andhemorrhagic (13-20 percent). Ischemic strokes occur from thrombi, emboli, or global hypoperfusion. Hemorrhagic strokes are either parenchymal (10 percent of all strokes) or subarachnoid (3 percent of all strokes). There are a variety of recognized risk factors for stroke which include: age, race, family history, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis, cardiac arrhythmias, prosthetic valves, hyperlipidemia, cigarette smoking, and others (drugs or hormones). The initial assessment of a patient suspected of stroke should be done quickly enough to ensure maximal reperfusion of brain tissue. The steps to achieve this goal are: 1) exclude an intracranial hemorrhage, 2) assess for contraindications to thrombolytics, 3) characterize the infarct. The workup for a patient should first include a history (especially the time when neurologic symptoms began), a physical exam (including the NIHSS), and imaging studies (to rule out hemorrhagic components). In addition, several lab studies can also be obtained including: PT/INR, glucose, complete blood count, metabolic panel, creatine kinase, ECG, echocardiogram, lipid panel, carotid Doppler, MRA or CTA. Acute management of a stroke is primarily focused on stabilizing the patient and allowing as much reperfusion as possible for at-risk brain tissue. Stroke management in the acute setting includes: use of thrombolytics if indicated, and re-assessment to monitor progression. Several trials have been completed in pursuit of safety and effectiveness of intra-arterial stroke therapy for patients outside the recommended thrombolytic time window

  1. Evidence-based practice and the recognition and treatment of exertional heat stroke, part I: a perspective from the athletic training educator.

    PubMed

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M; Ruiz, Roberto C; Casa, Douglas J; Pagnotta, Kelly D; Pinkus, Danielle E; Armstrong, Lawrence E; Maresh, Carl M

    2011-01-01

    Athletic trainers (ATs) know to diagnose exertional heat stroke (EHS) via rectal thermometry (T(re)) and to treat EHS via cold-water immersion (CWI) but do not implement these recommendations in clinical practice. To gain an understanding of educational techniques used to deliver content regarding EHS. Qualitative study. In-person focus groups at the National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) Annual Meeting in June 2009 and 2 follow-up telephone interviews to confirm emergent themes. Thirteen AT educators (11 men, 2 women) from programs accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education, with an average of 22 ± 9 years of clinical experience and 16 ± 10 years of experience as educators. Five NATA districts were represented. Data were analyzed using inductive content analysis. Peer review and data source triangulation also were conducted to establish trustworthiness. Four themes emerged from the analysis: educational techniques, educational competencies, previous educational training, and privacy/public opinion. Educational techniques highlighted the lack of hands-on training for T(re) and CWI. Educational competencies referred to the omission of T(re) and CWI as psychomotor skills. Previous educational training addressed educators not having the skills or comfort with the skills necessary to properly educate students. Privacy/public opinion comprised external inputs from various groups (parents and coaches), legal considerations, and social bias. Educators supplied students with the appropriate didactic knowledge about EHS, but their lack of training and misgivings about T(re) prevented them from allowing students to gain competence with this skill. Until the NATA competencies state the need to teach T(re) and CWI and until educators are provided with their own learning opportunities, evidence-based practice regarding EHS will be lacking.

  2. Evidence-Based Medicine and the Recognition and Treatment of Exertional Heat Stroke, Part II: A Perspective From the Clinical Athletic Trainer

    PubMed Central

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Pinkus, Danielle E.; Casa, Douglas J.; McDermott, Brendon P.; Pagnotta, Kelly D.; Ruiz, Roberto C.; Armstrong, Lawrence E.; Maresh, Carl M.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Exertional heat stroke (EHS) is one of the leading causes of death in athletes. Certified athletic trainers (ATs) demonstrate strong knowledge of recommended practices with EHS but are apprehensive in implementing 2 basic procedures: rectal temperature assessment and cold water immersion. This apprehension might lead to deaths from EHS that could have been prevented. Objective: To investigate why collegiate and high school ATs do not implement best practices for the recognition and treatment of EHS. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: In-person focus groups consisting of 3 to 6 collegiate or high school ATs. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 19 ATs (9 men, 10 women; age = 36 ± 10 years, length of certification = 12 ± 9 years) employed at either the collegiate (n = 10) or high school (n = 9) level participated in the study. Data Collection and Analysis: Interviews were transcribed verbatim, and data were analyzed using deductive data analysis. Peer review and multiple-analyst data triangulation were conducted to establish trustworthiness of the data. Results: Five emergent themes explained the lack of evidence-based practice (EBP) regarding recognition and treatment of EHS. Three themes (lack of knowledge, comfort level, lack of initiative) were common in both the collegiate and high school settings, and 2 separate themes (liability concerns, lack of resources) were present in the high school setting. Conclusions: Our findings are consistent with those in the literature on EBP and EHS. Regardless of clinical setting, ATs have basic information on recognition and treatment of EHS, but 5 themes act as barriers to implementing proper management in the clinical setting. Workshops or hands-on training sessions need to be made available to improve students' comfort levels so ATs will implement EBP into everyday settings. PMID:22488141

  3. Evidence-Based Practice and the Recognition and Treatment of Exertional Heat Stroke, Part I: A Perspective From the Athletic Training Educator

    PubMed Central

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Ruiz, Roberto C.; Casa, Douglas J.; Pagnotta, Kelly D.; Pinkus, Danielle E.; Armstrong, Lawrence E.; Maresh, Carl M.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Athletic trainers (ATs) know to diagnose exertional heat stroke (EHS) via rectal thermometry (Tre) and to treat EHS via cold-water immersion (CWI) but do not implement these recommendations in clinical practice. Objective: To gain an understanding of educational techniques used to deliver content regarding EHS. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: In-person focus groups at the National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) Annual Meeting in June 2009 and 2 follow-up telephone interviews to confirm emergent themes. Patients or Other Participants: Thirteen AT educators (11 men, 2 women) from programs accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education, with an average of 22 ± 9 years of clinical experience and 16 ± 10 years of experience as educators. Five NATA districts were represented. Data Collection and Analysis: Data were analyzed using inductive content analysis. Peer review and data source triangulation also were conducted to establish trustworthiness. Results: Four themes emerged from the analysis: educational techniques, educational competencies, previous educational training, and privacy/public opinion. Educational techniques highlighted the lack of hands-on training for Tre and CWI. Educational competencies referred to the omission of Tre and CWI as psychomotor skills. Previous educational training addressed educators not having the skills or comfort with the skills necessary to properly educate students. Privacy/public opinion comprised external inputs from various groups (parents and coaches), legal considerations, and social bias. Conclusions: Educators supplied students with the appropriate didactic knowledge about EHS, but their lack of training and misgivings about Tre prevented them from allowing students to gain competence with this skill. Until the NATA competencies state the need to teach Tre and CWI and until educators are provided with their own learning opportunities, evidence-based practice regarding EHS

  4. Global specialized stroke care delivery models.

    PubMed

    Theofanidis, Dimitrios; Savopoulos, Christos; Hatzitolios, Apostolos

    2016-03-01

    Stroke services still vary enormously from country to country, with many countries providing no special services at all. The aim of this article is to provide a concise overview of the various types of acute stroke delivery systems at present available and critically describe merits and shortcomings. A systematic literature review was undertaken from 1990 to July 2014. Several models for stroke services have been developed mostly in the past 3 decades, mainly in the Western world. These include state-of-the-art stroke services ranging from highly specialized stroke centers to mobile stroke units for the community. In this light, the recommendations of the structure and organization of stroke units and stroke centers by the European Stroke Organization were recently published. What differentiates the various models of stroke care delivery across the globe is the diversity of services ranging from low key conventional care to highly sophisticated facilities with life saving interventional features via integrated stroke care infrastructure. Effective in-hospital care for stroke should start in the emergency department where a swift and appropriate diagnosis should be made. The role of all brain neuroimaging procedures should have a defined a priori and proper demarcation between actions according to updated stroke care pathways and clinical protocols, which should be followed closely. These essential actions initiated by well-trained staff in the emergency department, should then be carried on in dedicated stroke facilities that is, a stroke unit. Copyright © 2016 Society for Vascular Nursing, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Recovering after stroke

    MedlinePlus

    Stroke rehabilitation; Cerebrovascular accident - rehabilitation; Recovery from stroke; Stroke - recovery; CVA - recovery ... LIVE AFTER A STROKE Most people will need stroke rehabilitation (rehab) to help them recover after they leave ...

  6. Subacute management of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Bernheisel, Christopher R; Schlaudecker, Jeffrey D; Leopold, Katelyn

    2011-12-15

    Ischemic stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States and a common reason for hospitalization. The subacute period after a stroke refers to the time when the decision to not employ thrombolytics is made up until two weeks after the stroke occurred. Family physicians are often involved in the subacute management of ischemic stroke. All patients with an ischemic stroke should be admitted to the hospital in the subacute period for cardiac and neurologic monitoring. Imaging studies, including magnetic resonance angiography, carotid artery ultrasonography, and/or echocardiography, may be indicated to determine the cause of the stroke. Evaluation for aspiration risk, including a swallowing assessment, should be performed, and nutritional, physical, occupational, and speech therapy should be initiated. Significant causes of morbidity and mortality following ischemic stroke include venous thromboembolism, pressure sores, infection, and delirium, and measures should be taken to prevent these complications. For secondary prevention of future strokes, antiplatelet therapy with aspirin should be initiated within 24 hours of ischemic stroke in all patients without contraindications, and one of several antiplatelet regimens should be continued long-term. Statin therapy should also be given in most situations. Although permissive hypertension is initially warranted, antihypertensive therapy should begin within 24 hours. Diabetes mellitus should be controlled and patients counseled about lifestyle modifications to reduce stroke risk. Rehabilitative therapy following hospitalization improves outcomes and should be considered.

  7. TiO2-Nanowired Delivery of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Thwarts Diabetes- Induced Exacerbation of Brain Pathology in Heat Stroke: An Experimental Study in the Rat Using Morphological and Biochemical Approaches.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Hari S; Feng, Lianyuan; Lafuente, José V; Muresanu, Dafin F; Tian, Zhenrong R; Patnaik, Ranjana; Sharma, Aruna

    2015-01-01

    We have shown previously that heat stroke produced by whole body hyperthermia (WBH) for 4 h at 38°C in diabetic rats exacerbates blood-brain barrier breakdown, brain edema formation and neuronal cell injury as compared to healthy animals after identical heat exposure. In this combination of diabetes and WBH, normal therapeutic measures do not induce sufficient neuroprotection. Thus, we investigated whether nanowired mesenchymal cells (MSCs) when delivered systemically may have better therapeutic effects on brain damage in diabetic rats after WBH. Diabetes induced by streptozotocin administration (75 mg/kg, i.p, daily for 3 days) in rats resulted in clinical symptoms of the disease within 4 to 6 weeks (blood glucose level 20 to 30 mmoles/l as compared to saline control groups (4 to 6 mmoles/l). When subjected to WBH, these diabetic rats showed a 4-to 6-fold exacerbation of blood-brain barrier breakdown to Evans blue and radioiodine, along with brain edema formation and neuronal cell injury. Intravenous administration of rat MSCs (1x10(6)) to diabetic rats one week before WBH slightly reduced brain pathology, whereas TiO2 nanowired MSCs administered in an identical manner resulted in almost complete neuroprotection. On the other hand, MSCs alone significantly reduced brain pathology in saline-treated rats after WBH. These observations indicate that nanowired delivery of stem cells has superior therapeutic potential in heat stroke with diabetes, pointing to novel clinical perspectives in the future.

  8. Stroke Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Belagaje, Samir R

    2017-02-01

    Rehabilitation is an important aspect of the continuum of care in stroke. With advances in the acute treatment of stroke, more patients will survive stroke with varying degrees of disability. Research in the past decade has expanded our understanding of the mechanisms underlying stroke recovery and has led to the development of new treatment modalities. This article reviews and summarizes the key concepts related to poststroke recovery. Good data now exist by which one can predict recovery, especially motor recovery, very soon after stroke onset. Recent trials have not demonstrated a clear benefit associated with very early initiation of rehabilitative therapy after stroke in terms of improvement in poststroke outcomes. However, growing evidence suggests that shorter and more frequent sessions of therapy can be safely started in the first 24 to 48 hours after a stroke. The optimal amount or dose of therapy for stroke remains undetermined, as more intensive treatments have not been associated with better outcomes compared to standard intensities of therapy. Poststroke depression adversely affects recovery across a variety of measures and is an important target for therapy. Additionally, the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) appears to benefit motor recovery through pleiotropic mechanisms beyond their antidepressant effect. Other pharmacologic approaches also appear to have a benefit in stroke rehabilitation. A comprehensive rehabilitation program is essential to optimize poststroke outcomes. Rehabilitation is a process that uses three major principles of recovery: adaptation, restitution, and neuroplasticity. Based on these principles, multiple different approaches, both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic, exist to enhance rehabilitation. In addition to neurologists, a variety of health care professionals are involved in stroke rehabilitation. Successful rehabilitation involves understanding the natural history of stroke recovery and a

  9. Code stroke in Asturias.

    PubMed

    Benavente, L; Villanueva, M J; Vega, P; Casado, I; Vidal, J A; Castaño, B; Amorín, M; de la Vega, V; Santos, H; Trigo, A; Gómez, M B; Larrosa, D; Temprano, T; González, M; Murias, E; Calleja, S

    2016-04-01

    Intravenous thrombolysis with alteplase is an effective treatment for ischaemic stroke when applied during the first 4.5 hours, but less than 15% of patients have access to this technique. Mechanical thrombectomy is more frequently able to recanalise proximal occlusions in large vessels, but the infrastructure it requires makes it even less available. We describe the implementation of code stroke in Asturias, as well as the process of adapting various existing resources for urgent stroke care in the region. By considering these resources, and the demographic and geographic circumstances of our region, we examine ways of reorganising the code stroke protocol that would optimise treatment times and provide the most appropriate treatment for each patient. We distributed the 8 health districts in Asturias so as to permit referral of candidates for reperfusion therapies to either of the 2 hospitals with 24-hour stroke units and on-call neurologists and providing IV fibrinolysis. Hospitals were assigned according to proximity and stroke severity; the most severe cases were immediately referred to the hospital with on-call interventional neurology care. Patient triage was provided by pre-hospital emergency services according to the NIHSS score. Modifications to code stroke in Asturias have allowed us to apply reperfusion therapies with good results, while emphasising equitable care and managing the severity-time ratio to offer the best and safest treatment for each patient as soon as possible. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Autopsy approach to stroke.

    PubMed

    Love, Seth

    2011-02-01

    Stroke is a major cause of morbidity and mortality but the brain and other relevant tissues are often examined only cursorily when stroke patients come to autopsy. The pathological findings and clinical implications vary according to the type of stroke and its location and cause. Large ischaemic strokes are usually associated with atherosclerosis of extracranial or major intracranial arteries but can be caused by dissection. Most small cerebral infarcts are caused by arteriosclerosis or, in the elderly, cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). However, vasculitides and coagulopathies can cause a range of different patterns of ischaemic (and, occasionally, haemorrhagic) stroke. Global brain ischaemia, caused by severe hypotension or raised intracranial pressure, produces damage that is accentuated in certain regions and neuronal populations and may be confused with hypoglycaemic injury. The main cause of subarachnoid haemorrhage is a ruptured berry aneurysm but CAA, arteriovenous malformations and infective aneurysms are occasionally responsible. These can also cause parenchymal brain haemorrhage, although this most often complicates hypertensive small vessel disease. Sometimes the haemorrhage arises from a neoplasm. Performing an adequate autopsy in stroke requires proper preparation, awareness of the likely pathological processes, familiarity with intracranial vascular anatomy, careful gross examination and dissection, and appropriate use of histology.

  11. Fetal stroke.

    PubMed

    Ozduman, Koray; Pober, Barbara R; Barnes, Patrick; Copel, Joshua A; Ogle, Eileen A; Duncan, Charles C; Ment, Laura R

    2004-03-01

    Fetal stroke, or that which occurs between 14 weeks of gestation and the onset of labor resulting in delivery, has been associated with postnatal epilepsy, mental retardation, and cerebral palsy. The entity is caused by antenatal ischemic, thrombotic, or hemorrhagic injury. We present seven new cases of fetal stroke diagnosed in utero and review the 47 cases reported in the literature. Although risk factors could not be assigned to 50% of the fetuses with stroke, the most common maternal conditions associated with fetal stroke were alloimmune thrombocytopenia and trauma. Magnetic resonance imaging was optimal for identifying fetal stroke, and prenatal imaging revealed hemorrhagic lesions in over 90% of studies; porencephalies were identified in just 13%. Seventy-eight percent of cases with reported outcome resulted in either death or adverse neurodevelopmental outcome at ages 3 months to 6 years. Fetal stroke appears to have different risk factors, clinical characteristics, and outcomes than other perinatal or childhood stroke syndromes. A better understanding of those risk factors predisposing a fetus to cerebral infarction may provide a basis for future therapeutic intervention trials. Ozduman K, Pober BR, Barnes P, Copel JA, Ogle EA, Duncan CC, Ment LR. Fetal stroke.

  12. Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Teri; Murphy, Teresa

    2016-05-01

    Each year, more than 795,000 people in the United States suffer a stroke and by 2030, it is estimated that 4% of the U.S. population will have had a stroke. Home healthcare clinicians will be increasingly called upon to assist stroke survivors and their caregivers adjust to disability and assist the survivor during their reintegration into the community. Therapeutic modalities are changing with advanced technology. Great strides are being made in the treatment of acute stroke; particularly endovascular interventions. More patients are surviving the acute stroke event and therefore will need to learn how to live with various degrees of disability. It is important for home healthcare clinicians to understand the process from acute event to medical stabilization, and from rehabilitation to long-term adaptation.

  13. Impact of heat stress on the emissions of monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, phenolic BVOC and green leaf volatiles from several tree species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleist, E.; Mentel, T. F.; Andres, S.; Bohne, A.; Folkers, A.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Rudich, Y.; Springer, M.; Tillmann, R.; Wildt, J.

    2012-07-01

    Changes in the biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions from European beech, Palestine oak, Scots pine, and Norway spruce exposed to heat stress were measured in a laboratory setup. In general, heat stress decreased the de novo emissions of monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes and phenolic BVOC. Decreasing emission strength with heat stress was independent of the tree species and whether the de novo emissions being constitutive or induced by biotic stress. In contrast, heat stress induced emissions of green leaf volatiles. It also amplified the release of monoterpenes stored in resin ducts of conifers probably due to heat-induced damage of these resin ducts. The increased release of monoterpenes could be strong and long lasting. But, despite of such strong monoterpene emission pulses, the net effect of heat stress on BVOC emissions from conifers can be an overall decrease. In particular during insect attack on conifers the plants showed de novo emissions of sesquiterpenes and phenolic BVOC which exceeded constitutive monoterpene emissions from pools. The heat stress induced decrease of these de novo emissions was larger than the increased release caused by damage of resin ducts. We project that global change induced heat waves may cause increased BVOC emissions only in cases where the respective areas are predominantly covered with conifers that do not emit high amounts of sesquiterpenes and phenolic BVOC. Otherwise the overall effect of heat stress will be a decrease in BVOC emissions.

  14. Changes in chronotype after stroke: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kantermann, Thomas; Meisel, Andreas; Fitzthum, Katharina; Penzel, Thomas; Fietze, Ingo; Ulm, Lena

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to elucidate associations between stroke onset and severity as well as chronotype (phase of entrainment) and internal time of stroke. Fifty-six first-ever ischemic stroke patients participated in a cross-sectional study assessing chronotype (mid-sleep on work-free days corrected for sleep deficit on workdays; MSFsc) by applying the Munich ChronoType Questionnaire (MCTQ). The MCTQ was completed twice, on average 68 ± 24 (SD) days post stroke and retrospectively for the time before stroke. To assess the impact of stroke in relation to internal time, InTstroke was calculated as MSFsc minus local time of stroke. Stroke severity was assessed via the standard clinical National Institute Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and modified Ranking Scale (mRS), both at hospital admission and discharge. Overall, most strokes occurred between noon and midnight. There was no significant association between MSFsc and stroke onset. MSFsc changed significantly after stroke, especially in patients with more severe strokes. Changes in MSFsc varied with InTstroke - the earlier the internal time of a stroke relative to MSFsc-before-stroke, the more MSFsc advanced after stroke. In addition, we provide first evidence that MSFsc changes varied between stroke locations. Larger trials are needed to confirm these findings.

  15. Changes in Chronotype after Stroke: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kantermann, Thomas; Meisel, Andreas; Fitzthum, Katharina; Penzel, Thomas; Fietze, Ingo; Ulm, Lena

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to elucidate associations between stroke onset and severity as well as chronotype (phase of entrainment) and internal time of stroke. Fifty-six first-ever ischemic stroke patients participated in a cross-sectional study assessing chronotype (mid-sleep on work-free days corrected for sleep deficit on workdays; MSFsc) by applying the Munich ChronoType Questionnaire (MCTQ). The MCTQ was completed twice, on average 68 ± 24 (SD) days post stroke and retrospectively for the time before stroke. To assess the impact of stroke in relation to internal time, InTstroke was calculated as MSFsc minus local time of stroke. Stroke severity was assessed via the standard clinical National Institute Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and modified Ranking Scale (mRS), both at hospital admission and discharge. Overall, most strokes occurred between noon and midnight. There was no significant association between MSFsc and stroke onset. MSFsc changed significantly after stroke, especially in patients with more severe strokes. Changes in MSFsc varied with InTstroke – the earlier the internal time of a stroke relative to MSFsc-before-stroke, the more MSFsc advanced after stroke. In addition, we provide first evidence that MSFsc changes varied between stroke locations. Larger trials are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:25628597

  16. Sex Differences in Stroke Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Sohrabji, Farida; Park, Min Jung; Mahnke, Amanda H

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is the 5th leading cause of death and acquired disability in aged populations. Women are disproportionally affected by stroke, having a higher incidence and worse outcomes than men. Numerous preclinical studies have discovered novel therapies for the treatment of stroke, but almost all of these were found to be unsuccessful in clinical trials. Despite known sex differences in occurrence and severity of stroke, few therapeutics, both preclinically and clinically, take into account possible sex differences in treatment. Reanalysis of data from the only currently FDA-approved stroke therapy, tPA, has shown to not only improve stroke outcomes for both sexes, but to also show sexual dimorphism by more robust improvement in stroke outcome in females. Experimental evidence supports the inclusion of sex as a variable in the study of a number of novel stroke drugs and therapies, including preclinical studies of anti-inflammatory drugs (minocycline), stimulators of cell survival (IGF-1), and inhibitors of cell death pathways (pharmacological inhibition of PARP-1, NO production, and caspase activation), as well as in current clinical trials of stem cell therapy and cortical stimulation. Overall, study design and analyses in clinical trials, as well as in preclinical studies, must include both sexes equally, consider possible sex differences in the analyses, and report the differences/similarities in more systemized/structured way to translate promising therapies to both sexes and increase stroke recovery. PMID:27870437

  17. Stroke management

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Stroke is the third most common cause of death in most developed countries. It is a worldwide problem; about 4.5 million people die from stroke each year. Stroke can occur at any age, but half of all strokes occur in people aged over 70 years. About 80% of all acute strokes are ischaemic, usually resulting from thrombotic or embolic occlusion of a cerebral artery. The remainder are caused either by intracerebral or subarachnoid haemorrhage. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of specialised care in people with acute stroke? What are the effects of medical treatment in people with acute ischaemic stroke? What are the effects of decompressive hemicraniectomy in acute ischaemic stroke? What are the effects of surgical evacuation for intracerebral haematomas? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to August 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 41 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acute reduction in blood pressure, aspirin, evacuation (early surgical evacuation, or conservative treatment), decompressive hemicraniectomy, neuroprotective agents (calcium channel blockers, citicoline, gamma-aminobutyric acid agonists, glycine antagonists, lubeluzole, magnesium, N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonists), specialised stroke care, systemic anticoagulation (heparinoids, specific thrombin inhibitors

  18. Phase and structural transformations in U and U-Nb alloy upon severe deformation and heat treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuev, Yu. N.; Sagaradze, V. V.; Pecherkina, N. L.; Kabanova, I. I.; Svyatov, I. L.; Bondarchuk, S. V.; Belyaev, D. V.

    2013-12-01

    Transmission electron microscopy was used to analyze the twin and dislocation structure of samples of commercial uranium in the initial (undeformed) state and after severe deformation using explosive loading by plane and spherical waves of various intensity. It has been shown that an increase in the intensity of explosive loading by a plane wave leads, first, to an increase in the density of randomly distributed dislocations and twins and, then, to the development of polygonization processes with the formation of a subgrain structure of the α phase. Crystallographic analysis of the initial and deformation-induced twins in uranium has shown the presence of predominantly {130} twins of mixed type and, in singular cases, {172} and {176} twins of the second kind. It has been established that the retained spherical shells have a distinctly pronounced zonal structure, which contains information on the forward and reverse martensitic phase transformations of uranium (α ↔ β(γ) ↔ L, etc.) that occur under shock-wave loading by spherical waves. Conditions are determined for the manifestation of structural heredity in the U-6 wt % Nb alloy with recovery of the size and shape of grains of the initial high-temperature γ phase during the forward γ → α″ martensitic transformation upon cooling and during reverse α″ → γ transformation upon heating. Elimination of the structural heredity with significant grain refinement of the high-temperature γ phase occurs in the process of repeated quenching from 700°C after one type of preliminary treatments (cold deformation of α″ martensite, recrystallization of the deformed α″ phase, high-temperature aging of the initial α″ martensite, and eutectoid decomposition).

  19. Do stroke models model stroke?

    PubMed Central

    Mergenthaler, Philipp; Meisel, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of death worldwide and the biggest reason for long-term disability. Basic research has formed the modern understanding of stroke pathophysiology, and has revealed important molecular, cellular and systemic mechanisms. However, despite decades of research, most translational stroke trials that aim to introduce basic research findings into clinical treatment strategies – most notably in the field of neuroprotection – have failed. Among other obstacles, poor methodological and statistical standards, negative publication bias, and incomplete preclinical testing have been proposed as ‘translational roadblocks’. In this article, we introduce the models commonly used in preclinical stroke research, discuss some of the causes of failed translational success and review potential remedies. We further introduce the concept of modeling ‘care’ of stroke patients, because current preclinical research models the disorder but does not model care or state-of-the-art clinical testing. Stringent statistical methods and controlled preclinical trials have been suggested to counteract weaknesses in preclinical research. We conclude that preclinical stroke research requires (1) appropriate modeling of the disorder, (2) appropriate modeling of the care of stroke patients and (3) an approach to preclinical testing that is similar to clinical testing, including Phase 3 randomized controlled preclinical trials as necessary additional steps before new therapies enter clinical testing. PMID:23115201

  20. Stroke Telemedicine

    PubMed Central

    Demaerschalk, Bart M.; Miley, Madeline L.; Kiernan, Terri-Ellen J.; Bobrow, Bentley J.; Corday, Doren A.; Wellik, Kay E.; Aguilar, Maria I.; Ingall, Timothy J.; Dodick, David W.; Brazdys, Karina; Koch, Tiffany C.; Ward, Michael P.; Richemont, Phillip C.

    2009-01-01

    Stroke telemedicine is a consultative modality that facilitates care of patients with acute stroke at underserviced hospitals by specialists at stroke centers. The design and implementation of a hub-and-spoke telestroke network are complex. This review describes the technology that makes stroke telemedicine possible, the members that should be included in a telestroke team, the hub-and-spoke characteristics of a telestroke network, and the format of a typical consultation. Common obstacles to the practice of telestroke medicine are explored, such as medicolegal, economic, and market issues. An example of a state-based telestroke network is thoroughly described, and established international telestroke networks are presented and compared. The opportunities for future advances in telestroke practice, research, and education are considered. PMID:19121244

  1. Stroke telemedicine.

    PubMed

    Demaerschalk, Bart M; Miley, Madeline L; Kiernan, Terri-Ellen J; Bobrow, Bentley J; Corday, Doren A; Wellik, Kay E; Aguilar, Maria I; Ingall, Timothy J; Dodick, David W; Brazdys, Karina; Koch, Tiffany C; Ward, Michael P; Richemont, Phillip C

    2009-01-01

    Stroke telemedicine is a consultative modality that facilitates care of patients with acute stroke at underserviced hospitals by specialists at stroke centers. The design and implementation of a hub-and-spoke telestroke network are complex. This review describes the technology that makes stroke telemedicine possible, the members that should be included in a telestroke team, the hub-and-spoke characteristics of a telestroke network, and the format of a typical consultation. Common obstacles to the practice of telestroke medicine are explored, such as medicolegal, economic, and market issues. An example of a state-based telestroke network is thoroughly described, and established international telestroke networks are presented and compared. The opportunities for future advances in telestroke practice, research, and education are considered.

  2. Suicide in stroke survivors: epidemiology and prevention.

    PubMed

    Pompili, Maurizio; Venturini, Paola; Lamis, Dorian A; Giordano, Gloria; Serafini, Gianluca; Belvederi Murri, Martino; Amore, Mario; Girardi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is a dramatic event and is associated with potentially severe consequences, including disability, mortality, and social costs. Stroke may occur at any age; however, most strokes occur in individuals aged 65 years and older. Previous research has found that stroke increases suicide risk, especially among women and younger patients. The aim of the current review is to investigate the relationship between suicide and stroke in order to determine which stroke patients are at elevated risk for suicide. Moreover, we review the literature in order to provide pharmacological treatment strategies for stroke patients at high risk of suicide. We performed a careful search to identify articles and book chapters focused on this issue, selecting only English-language articles published from 1990 to 2014 that addressed the issue of suicide after stroke and its pharmacological management. We found 12 clinical trials that explored the relationship between stroke and suicidal ideation and/or suicidal plans and 11 investigating suicide as the cause of death after stroke. We identified stroke as a significant risk factor for both suicide and suicidal ideation, especially among younger adult depressed patients in all articles, providing further support for the association between post-stroke and suicidality. Suicide risk is particularly high in the first 5 years following stroke. Depression, previous mood disorder, prior history of stroke, and cognitive impairment were found to be the most important risk factors for suicide. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) represent the treatment of choice for stroke survivors with suicide risk, and studies in rats have suggested that carbolithium is a promising treatment in these patients. Early identification and treatment of post-stroke depression may significantly reduce suicide risk in stroke patients.

  3. Patient-Identified Factors That Influence Spasticity in People with Stroke and Multiple Sclerosis Receiving Botulinum Toxin Injection Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Janice; Rancourt, Amanda; Di Poce, Stephanie; Levine, Amy; Hoang, Jessica; Ismail, Farooq; Boulias, Chris

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To describe the nature, extent, and impact of spasticity; determine factors that are perceived to influence its severity; and examine the relationship between time since diagnosis and impact of spasticity on daily activities in people with stroke and multiple sclerosis (MS) who are receiving botulinum toxin injection treatments. Methods: After a cross-sectional telephone survey, descriptive statistics and correlations were analyzed separately for the stroke and MS groups. Results: A total of 29 people with stroke and 10 with MS were surveyed. Both groups perceived increased spasticity with outdoor cold (69% stroke, 60% MS), muscle fatigue (59% stroke, 80% MS), and mental stress (59% stroke, 90% MS). No statistically significant correlations were found between time since diagnosis and perceived impact of spasticity on function in the stroke (r=0.07, p=0.37) or MS (r=0.16, p=0.33) groups. The MS group experienced bilateral and more severe perception of spasticity in the legs than the stroke group and identified more factors as worsening their spasticity (p<0.05). Severity of leg (but not arm) spasticity was significantly correlated with severity of impact of the following factors in the MS group only: lying on the back (r=0.70, p<0.05), outdoor heat (r=0.61, p<0.05), and morning (r=0.59, p<0.05). Conclusion: Intrinsic and extrinsic triggers can influence the perception of spasticity differently depending on individual factors, severity, location (arm vs. leg), and distribution of spasticity (unilateral vs. bilateral). Clinicians can use the findings to better understand, educate, and treat people with stroke and MS. PMID:25931667

  4. Patient-identified factors that influence spasticity in people with stroke and multiple sclerosis receiving botulinum toxin injection treatments.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Janice; Rancourt, Amanda; Di Poce, Stephanie; Levine, Amy; Hoang, Jessica; Ismail, Farooq; Boulias, Chris; Phadke, Chetan P

    2015-01-01

    To describe the nature, extent, and impact of spasticity; determine factors that are perceived to influence its severity; and examine the relationship between time since diagnosis and impact of spasticity on daily activities in people with stroke and multiple sclerosis (MS) who are receiving botulinum toxin injection treatments. After a cross-sectional telephone survey, descriptive statistics and correlations were analyzed separately for the stroke and MS groups. A total of 29 people with stroke and 10 with MS were surveyed. Both groups perceived increased spasticity with outdoor cold (69% stroke, 60% MS), muscle fatigue (59% stroke, 80% MS), and mental stress (59% stroke, 90% MS). No statistically significant correlations were found between time since diagnosis and perceived impact of spasticity on function in the stroke (r=0.07, p=0.37) or MS (r=0.16, p=0.33) groups. The MS group experienced bilateral and more severe perception of spasticity in the legs than the stroke group and identified more factors as worsening their spasticity (p<0.05). Severity of leg (but not arm) spasticity was significantly correlated with severity of impact of the following factors in the MS group only: lying on the back (r=0.70, p<0.05), outdoor heat (r=0.61, p<0.05), and morning (r=0.59, p<0.05). Intrinsic and extrinsic triggers can influence the perception of spasticity differently depending on individual factors, severity, location (arm vs. leg), and distribution of spasticity (unilateral vs. bilateral). Clinicians can use the findings to better understand, educate, and treat people with stroke and MS.

  5. Exploring the impact of visual and movement based priming on a motor intervention in the acute phase post-stroke in persons with severe hemiparesis of the upper extremity.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jigna; Qiu, Qinyin; Yarossi, Mathew; Merians, Alma; Massood, Supriya; Tunik, Eugene; Adamovich, Sergei; Fluet, Gerard

    2017-07-01

    Explore the potential benefits of using priming methods prior to an active hand task in the acute phase post-stroke in persons with severe upper extremity hemiparesis. Five individuals were trained using priming techniques including virtual reality (VR) based visual mirror feedback and contralaterally controlled passive movement strategies prior to training with an active pinch force modulation task. Clinical, kinetic, and neurophysiological measurements were taken pre and post the training period. Clinical measures were taken at six months post training. The two priming simulations and active training were well tolerated early after stroke. Priming effects were suggested by increased maximal pinch force immediately after visual and movement based priming. Despite having no clinically observable movement distally, the subjects were able to volitionally coordinate isometric force and muscle activity (EMG) in a pinch tracing task. The Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) of force during the pinch trace task gradually decreased over the training period suggesting learning may have occurred. Changes in motor cortical neurophysiology were seen in the unaffected hemisphere using Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) mapping. Significant improvements in motor recovery as measured by the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) and the Upper Extremity Fugl Meyer Assessment (UEFMA) were demonstrated at six months post training by three of the five subjects. This study suggests that an early hand-based intervention using visual and movement based priming activities and a scaled motor task allows participation by persons without the motor control required for traditionally presented rehabilitation and testing. Implications for Rehabilitation Rehabilitation of individuals with severely paretic upper extremities after stroke is challenging due to limited movement capacity and few options for therapeutic training. Long-term functional recovery of the arm after stroke depends on early return

  6. Post-stroke dyskinesias

    PubMed Central

    Nakawah, Mohammad Obadah; Lai, Eugene C

    2016-01-01

    Strokes, whether ischemic or hemorrhagic, are among the most common causes of secondary movement disorders in elderly patients. Stroke-related (vascular) movement disorders, however, are uncommon complications of this relatively common disease. The spectrum of post-stroke movement disorders is broad and includes both hypo- and hyperkinetic syndromes. Post-stroke dyskinesias are involuntary hyperkinetic movements arising from cerebrovascular insults and often present with mixed phenotypes of hyperkinesia which can sometimes be difficult to classify. Nevertheless, identification of the most relevant motor phenotype, whenever possible, allows for a more specific phenomenological categorization of the dyskinesia and thus helps guide its treatment. Fortunately, post-stroke dyskinesias are usually self-limiting and resolve within 6 to 12 months of onset, but a short-term pharmacotherapy might sometimes be required for symptom control. Functional neurosurgical interventions targeting the motor thalamus or globus pallidus interna might be considered for patients with severe, disabling, and persistent dyskinesias (arbitrarily defined as duration longer than 12 months). PMID:27853372

  7. Heat shock factor 1 binds to and transcribes satellite II and III sequences at several pericentromeric regions in heat-shocked cells

    SciTech Connect

    Eymery, Angeline; Souchier, Catherine; Vourc'h, Claire; Jolly, Caroline

    2010-07-01

    Cells respond to stress by activating the synthesis of heat shock proteins (HSPs) which protect the cells against the deleterious effects of stress. This mechanism is controlled by the heat shock factor 1 (HSF1). In parallel to HSP gene transcription, in human cells, HSF1 also binds to and transcribes satellite III repeated sequences present in numerous copies in the 9q12 pericentromeric region of chromosome 9. These HSF1 accumulation sites are termed nuclear stress bodies (nSBs). In tumor cells, however, the number of nSBs is higher than the number of 9q12 copies, suggesting the existence of other HSF1 targets. In this paper, we were interested in characterizing these other HSF1 binding sites. We show that HSF1 indeed binds to the pericentromeric region of 14 chromosomes, thereby directing the formation of 'secondary nSBs'. The appearance of secondary nSBs depends on the number of satellite sequences present in the target locus, and on the cellular amount of HSF1 protein. Moreover, secondary nSBs also correspond to transcription sites, thus demonstrating that heat shock induces a genome-wide transcription of satellite sequences. Finally, by analyzing published transcriptomic data, we show that the derepression of these large heterochromatic blocks does not significantly affect the transcription of neighboring genes.

  8. Stroke (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Too Tall or Too Short All About Puberty Stroke KidsHealth > For Kids > Stroke Print A A A ... get help quickly. continue What Happens During a Stroke? A stroke usually happens suddenly, and a person ...

  9. Recovery After Stroke: Recurrent Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood pressure  Find out if you have atrial fibrillation (an irregular heartbeat which allows blood to pool ... your stroke risk. One form  known as atrial fibrillation or AF  causes blood to form clots that ...

  10. Heat-related illness in sports and exercise.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Andrew W

    2014-12-01

    Exertional heat-related illness (EHRI) is comprised of several states that afflict physically active persons when exercising during conditions of high environmental heat stress. Certain forms of EHRI may become life threatening if not treated. Exertional heat stroke (EHS), characterized by a core body temperature of >40 ° C and mental status changes, is the most severe form of EHRI. EHS must be treated immediately with rapid body cooling to reduce morbidity and mortality. Many EHRI cases are preventable by following heat acclimatization guidelines, modifying sports and exercise sessions during conditions of high environmental heat stress, maintaining adequate hydration, avoiding exertion in the heat when ill, and by educating sports medicine personnel, coaches, parents, and athletes on the early recognition and prevention of EHRI. Heat exhaustion, exercise-associated collapse, exercise-associated muscle cramps, exercise-associated hyponatremia, and exertional rhabdomyolysis are also described.

  11. Effects of high electrolyte contents in the diet and using floor heating on development and severity of foot pad dermatitis in young turkeys.

    PubMed

    Abd El-Wahab, A; Visscher, C F; Beineke, A; Beyerbach, M; Kamphues, J

    2013-02-01

    Foot pad dermatitis (FPD) is a very common disease affecting poultry and is mostly caused by bad litter condition. This study aimed to test the effects of poultry diets with normal levels of electrolytes compared with a surplus level of electrolytes with and without using floor heating. Eighty two-week-old ♀ turkey poults were reared over 3 weeks on wood shavings, divided randomly into four groups. Two groups were fed normal levels of electrolytes (1.60 g Na; 7.80 g K/kg diet), and the other two groups were fed surplus levels of electrolytes (3.10; 15.3 g/kg diet). In each dietary treatment, half of the birds were exposed to floor heating. Half of the birds in each group were exposed for 4 h/day to wet litter (35% water) in adjacent separate boxes. External assessment of foot pads was performed weekly. High dietary electrolytes increased the severity of FPD significantly (3.65 ± 1.03). Floor heating is likely to be highly effective in significantly reducing the severity of FPD (2.36 ± 0.588). Despite forced water intake, the litter became drier when floor heating was in use. Combining low Na and K levels with a floor heating system reduced the scores of FPD by approximately 60%, compared with high electrolyte levels without floor heating. Therefore, both dietary electrolyte levels and floor heating markedly affected FPD via litter moisture.

  12. Stroke and episodic memory disorders.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chun; Alexander, Michael P

    2009-12-01

    Memory impairments are common after stroke, and the anatomical basis for impairments may be quite variable. To determine the range of stroke-related memory impairment, we identified all case reports and group studies through the Medline database and the Science Citation Index. There is no hypothesis about memory that is unique to stroke, but there are several important facets of memory impairment after stroke: (1) Every node of the limbic system implicated in memory may be damaged by stroke but very rarely in isolation and the combination of amnesia with the associated deficits often illuminates additional aspects of memory functions. (2) Stroke produces amnesia by damage to critical convergence white matter connections of the limbic system, and stroke is the only etiology of amnesia that can delineate the entire pathway of memory and critical convergence points. (3) Stroke also impairs memory, without causing classical amnesia, by damaging brain regions responsible for cognitive processes, some modality specific and some more generally strategic, that are essential for normal learning and recall.

  13. Brain Edema After Ischaemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Dostovic, Zikrija; Dostovic, Ernestina; Smajlovic, Dzevdet; Ibrahimagic, Omer C.; Avdic, Leila

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the incidence of brain edema after ischaemic stroke and its impact on the outcome of patients in the acute phase of ischaemic stroke. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 114 patients. Ischaemic stroke and brain edema are verified by computed tomography. The severity of stroke was determined by National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale. Laboratory findings were made during the first four days of hospitalization, and complications were verified by clinical examination and additional tests. Results: In 9 (7.9%) patients developed brain edema. Pneumonia was the most common complication (12.3%). Brain edema had a higher incidence in women, patients with hypertension and elevated serum creatinine values, and patients who are suffering from diabetes. There was no significant correlation between brain edema and survival in patients after acute ischaemic stroke. Patients with brain edema had a significantly higher degree of neurological deficit as at admission, and at discharge (p = 0.04, p = 0.004). Conclusion: The cerebral edema is common after acute ischaemic stroke and no effect on survival in the acute phase. The existence of brain edema in acute ischaemic stroke significantly influence the degree of neurological deficit. PMID:27994292

  14. Comparison of estimated core body temperature measured with the BioHarness and rectal temperature under several heat stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yongsuk; DiLeo, Travis; Powell, Jeffrey B; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Roberge, Raymond J; Coca, Aitor

    2016-08-01

    Monitoring and measuring core body temperature is important to prevent or minimize physiological strain and cognitive dysfunction for workers such as first responders (e.g., firefighters) and military personnel. The purpose of this study is to compare estimated core body temperature (Tco-est), determined by heart rate (HR) data from a wearable chest strap physiology monitor, to standard rectal thermometry (Tre) under different conditions.  Tco-est and Tre measurements were obtained in thermoneutral and heat stress conditions (high temperature and relative humidity) during four different experiments including treadmill exercise, cycling exercise, passive heat stress, and treadmill exercise while wearing personal protective equipment (PPE).  Overall, the mean Tco-est did not differ significantly from Tre across the four conditions. During exercise at low-moderate work rates under heat stress conditions, Tco-est was consistently higher than Tre at all-time points. Tco-est underestimated temperature compared to Tre at rest in heat stress conditions and at a low work rate under heat stress while wearing PPE. The mean differences between the two measurements ranged from -0.1 ± 0.4 to 0.3 ± 0.4°C and Tco-est correlated well with HR (r = 0.795 - 0.849) and mean body temperature (r = 0.637 - 0.861).  These results indicate that, the comparison of Tco-est to Tre may result in over- or underestimation which could possibly lead to heat-related illness during monitoring in certain conditions. Modifications to the current algorithm should be considered to address such issues.

  15. Heat-related illness.

    PubMed

    Atha, Walter F

    2013-11-01

    Environmental exposure to high temperatures can result in abnormalities ranging from mild heat exhaustion to heat stroke with multiorgan system failure. An understanding of the mechanisms of thermoregulation and how those mechanisms fail with extreme heat stress is critical for management of the patient with elevated body temperature in the emergency department.

  16. Definition and Implications of the Preventable Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Mark; Moores, Lisa; Alsharif, Mohamad N.; Paganini-Hill, Annlia

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Although patients with acute stroke are routinely evaluated for potential treatment (ie, treatability of the stroke), preventability of the presenting stroke is generally not seriously considered. OBJECTIVE To systematically analyze stroke preventability. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We evaluated medical records of 274 consecutive patients discharged with a diagnosis of ischemic stroke between December 2, 2010, and June 11, 2012, at the University of California Irvine Medical Center. Mean (SE) patient age was 67.2 (0.8) years. Data analysis was conducted from July 3, 2014, to August 4, 2015. EXPOSURES Medical records were systematically examined for demographic information, stroke risk factors, stroke severity, and acute stroke treatment. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES We defined stroke preventability as the degree to which the patient’s presenting stroke was preventable. Using variables easily determined at onset of stroke, we developed a 10-point scale (0, not preventable; 10, most preventable) to classify the degree of stroke preventability. Our focus was effectiveness of treatment of hypertension (0–2 points), hyperlipidemia (0–2 points), and atrial fibrillation (0–4 points), as well as use of antithrombotic treatment for known prior cerebrovascular and cardiovascular disease (0–2 points). RESULTS Total risk scores ranged from 0 to 8 (mean [SE], 2.2 [0.1]), with 207 patients (75.5%) exhibiting some degree of preventability (score of 1 or higher). Seventy-one patients (25.9%) had scores of 4 or higher, indicating that the stroke was highly preventable. Severity of stroke as determined by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was not related to preventability of stroke. However, 21 of 71 patients (29.6%) whose stroke was highly preventable were treated with intravenous or intra-arterial acute stroke therapy while these treatments were provided for only 13 of 67 patients (19.4%) with scores of 0 (no preventability) and 19 of

  17. Effects of different classes of antihypertensive agents on the outcome of acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Tziomalos, Konstantinos; Giampatzis, Vasilios; Bouziana, Stella D; Spanou, Marianna; Papadopoulou, Maria; Kazantzidou, Pavlina; Kostaki, Stavroula; Kouparanis, Antonios; Savopoulos, Christos; Hatzitolios, Apostolos I

    2015-04-01

    It is unclear whether antihypertensive treatment before stroke affects acute ischemic stroke severity and outcome. To evaluate this association, the authors studied 482 consecutive patients (age 78.8±6.7 years) admitted with acute ischemic stroke. Stroke severity was assessed at admission with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). The outcome was assessed with rates of adverse outcome (modified Rankin scale at discharge ≥2). Independent predictors of severe stroke (NIHSS ≥16) were female sex and atrial fibrillation. Treatment with diuretics before stroke was associated with nonsevere stroke. At discharge, patients with adverse outcome were less likely to be treated before stroke with β-blockers or with diuretics. Independent predictors of adverse outcome were older age, higher NIHSS at admission, and history of ischemic stroke. Treatment with diuretics before stroke appears to be associated with less severe neurologic deficit in patients with acute ischemic stroke. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Antidiabetic drugs and stroke risk. Current evidence.

    PubMed

    Castilla-Guerra, Luis; Fernandez-Moreno, María Del Carmen; Leon-Jimenez, David; Carmona-Nimo, Eduardo

    2017-09-20

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the major cause of morbidity and mortality for individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D). In particular, the risk for stroke is twice that of patients without diabetes, and diabetes may be responsible for >8% of first ischemic strokes. Therefore, the way to prevent stroke in these patients has become an important issue. Traditionally, glucose-lowering drugs had not been shown to protect against stroke. Moreover, several antidiabetic drugs (i.e., sulfonylureas, rosiglitazone) have been reported to be associated with increased risks of CVD and stroke. On the contrary, data on the CV risks and benefits associated with new antidiabetic treatment in patients with T2D are emerging - and look promising. Therefore, it could be of great value to find out if any type of these new antidiabetic agents has protective effect against stroke. We review the available evidence regarding the risk of stroke in individuals taking non-insulin antidiabetic agents. To date, several antidiabetic agents have shown to have a positive effect on stroke prevention. The accumulated evidence suggests that metformin, pioglitazone and semaglutide reduce stroke risk. These agents do not represent only a way of controlling blood glucose and but also offer the opportunity to reduce stroke risk. Surely, new data from ongoing and future studies will provide additional information to select the best treatment for decreasing stroke risk in T2D patients. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Questions and Answers about Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stroke: Hope Through Research Questions and Answers About Stroke What is a stroke? A stroke occurs when blood flow to the ... need to function. What are the types of strokes? A stroke can occur in two ways. In ...

  20. Genetic susceptibility to ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Meschia, James F.; Worrall, Bradford B.; Rich, Stephen S.

    2014-01-01

    Clinicians who treat patients with stroke need to be aware of several single-gene disorders that have ischemic stroke as a major feature, including sickle cell disease, Fabry disease, cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, and retinal vasculopathy with cerebral leukodystrophy. The reported genome-wide association studies of ischemic stroke and several related phenotypes (for example, ischemic white matter disease) have shown that no single common genetic variant imparts major risk. Larger studies with samples numbering in the thousands are ongoing to identify common variants with smaller effects on risk. Pharmacogenomic studies have uncovered genetic determinants of response to warfarin, statins and clopidogrel. Despite increasing knowledge of stroke genetics, incorporating this new knowledge into clinical practice remains a challenge. The goals of this article are to review common single-gene disorders relevant to ischemic stroke, summarize the status of candidate gene and genome-wide studies aimed at discovering genetic stroke risk factors, and to briefly discuss pharmacogenomics related to stroke treatment. PMID:21629240

  1. Prevalence of electrocardiographic abnormalities based on hypertension severity and blood pressure levels: the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke study.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Hemal; Gamboa, Christopher M; Safford, Monika M; Soliman, Elsayed Z; Glasser, Stephen P

    2016-09-01

    We evaluated the prevalence of major and minor electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities based on blood pressure (BP) control and hypertension (HTN) treatment resistance. We analyzed data from the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke study of 20,932 participants who were divided into presence of major (n = 3782), only minor (n = 8944), or no (n = 8206) ECG abnormalities. The cohort was stratified into normotension (n = 3373), pre-HTN (n = 4142), controlled HTN (n = 8619), uncontrolled HTN (n = 3544), controlled apparent treatment-resistant HTN (aTRH, n = 400), and uncontrolled aTRH (n = 854) groups, and the prevalence ratios (PRs) of major and minor ECG abnormalities were assessed separately for each BP group. The full multivariable adjustment included demographics, risk factors, and HTN duration. Compared with normotension, the PRs of major ECG abnormalities for pre-HTN, controlled HTN, uncontrolled HTN, controlled aTRH, and uncontrolled aTRH groups were 1.01 (0.90-1.14), 1.30 (1.16-1.45), 1.37 (1.23-1.54), 1.42 (1.22-1.64), and 1.44 (1.26-1.65), respectively (P < .001), whereas the PRs of minor ECG abnormalities among each of the above BP groups were similar. Detection of major ECG abnormalities among hypertensive persons with poor control and treatment resistance may help improve their cardiovascular risk stratification and early intervention.

  2. Stroke at a younger age.

    PubMed

    Delilović-Vranić, Jasminka; Alajbegović, Azra; Tirić-Campara, Merita; Todorović, Ljubica

    2011-06-01

    Stroke is a suddenly developing disorder, caused by focal disturbance of cerebral circulation, followed by neurologic deficits of varying intensity with duration longer than 1 hour; it mostly occurs in old and middle age, and rarely at a younger age. The aim of the study was to analyze the occurrence of stroke at a younger age (18-49 years). We analyzed all stroke patients aged 18-49 treated at University Department of Neurology in Sarajevo during 2009, including analysis of their risk factors. During the one-year period, there were 820 stroke patients in total, 132 (18.5%) of them aged 18-49, male to female ratio 51.35%:48.65%. The majority of strokes were of ischemic type (94.59%), with only 5.41% of hemorrhagic stroke. The following risk factors were confirmed in study patients: hypertension (64.86%), smoking (57.76%), dyslipidemia (48.65%), ischemic heart disease (43.32%), psychological stress (29.73%), diabetes mellitus type 2 (24.43%), previous stroke including transient ischemic attack (21.62%), and others. During the one-month follow-up, 27.03% of patients achieved complete recovery, whereas mild neurologic signs were retained in 54.05%, signs of severe deficit requiring assistance in 13.51%, and 5.41% of patients died. In conclusion, stroke occurs even at a younger age in certain percentage. Along with smoking, diabetes, dyslipidemia and stress, hypertension is one of the leading risk factors for stroke also at a younger age. Timely and appropriate treatment contributes to faster recovery and shorter hospital stay, while reducing overall stroke sequels. The best prevention is primary, i.e. fighting risk factors and healthy lifestyle.

  3. Irreversible impacts of heat on the emissions of monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, phenolic BVOC and green leaf volatiles from several tree species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleist, E.; Mentel, T. F.; Andres, S.; Bohne, A.; Folkers, A.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Rudich, Y.; Springer, M.; Tillmann, R.; Wildt, J.

    2012-12-01

    Climate change will induce extended heat waves to parts of the vegetation more frequently. High temperatures may act as stress (thermal stress) on plants changing emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs). As BVOCs impact the atmospheric oxidation cycle and aerosol formation, it is important to explore possible alterations of BVOC emissions under high temperature conditions. Applying heat to European beech, Palestine oak, Scots pine, and Norway spruce in a laboratory setup either caused the well-known exponential increases of BVOC emissions or induced irreversible changes of BVOC emissions. Considering only irreversible changes of BVOC emissions as stress impacts, we found that high temperatures decreased the de novo emissions of monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes and phenolic BVOC. This behaviour was independent of the tree species and whether the de novo emissions were constitutive or induced by biotic stress. In contrast, application of thermal stress to conifers amplified the release of monoterpenes stored in resin ducts of conifers and induced emissions of green leaf volatiles. In particular during insect attack on conifers, the plants showed de novo emissions of sesquiterpenes and phenolic BVOCs, which exceeded constitutive monoterpene emissions from pools. The heat-induced decrease of de novo emissions was larger than the increased monoterpene release caused by damage of resin ducts. For insect-infested conifers the net effect of thermal stress on BVOC emissions could be an overall decrease. Global change-induced heat waves may put hard thermal stress on plants. If so, we project that BVOC emissions increase is more than predicted by models only in areas predominantly covered with conifers that do not emit high amounts of sesquiterpenes and phenolic BVOCs. Otherwise overall effects of high temperature stress will be lower increases of BVOC emissions than predicted by algorithms that do not consider stress impacts.

  4. Decadal Arctic surface atmosphere/ocean heat budgets and mass transport estimates from several atmospheric and oceanic reanalyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chepurin, gennaday; Carton, James

    2017-04-01

    The Arctic is undergoing dramatic changes associated with the loss of seasonal and permanent ice pack. By exposing the surface ocean to the atmosphere these changes dramatically increase surface exchange processes. In contrast, increases in freshwater and heat input decreases turbulent exchanges within the ocean. In this study we present results from an examination of changing ocean heat flux, storage, and transport during the 36 year period 1980-2015. To identify changes in the surface atmosphere we examine three atmospheric reanalyses: MERRA2, ERA-I, and JRA55. Significant differences in fluxes from these reanalyses arise due to the representation of clouds and water vapor. These differences provide an indication of the uncertainties in the historical record. Next we turn to the Simple Ocean Data Assimilation version 3 (SODA3) global ocean/sea ice reanalysis system to allow us to infer the full ocean circulation from the limited set of historical record of ocean observations. SODA3 has 10 km horizontal resolution in the Arctic and assimilates the full suite of historical marine temperature and salinity observations. To account for the uncertainties in atmospheric forcing, we repeat our analysis with each of the three atmospheric reanalyses. In the first part of the talk we review the climatological seasonal surface fluxes resulting from our reanalysis system, modified for consistency with the ocean observations, and the limits of what we can learn from the historical record. Next we compare the seasonal hydrography, heat, and mass transports with direct estimates from moorings. Finally we examine the impact on the Arctic climate of the changes in sea ice cover and variability and trends of ocean/sea ice heat storage and transport and their contributions to changes in the seasonal stratification of the Arctic Ocean.

  5. A heat wave during leaf expansion severely reduces productivity and modifies seasonal growth patterns in a northern hardwood forest.

    PubMed

    Stangler, Dominik Florian; Hamann, Andreas; Kahle, Hans-Peter; Spiecker, Heinrich; Mäkelä, Annikki

    2017-01-31

    A useful approach to monitor tree response to climate change and environmental extremes is the recording of long-term time series of stem radial variations obtained with precision dendrometers. Here, we study the impact of environmental stress on seasonal growth dynamics and productivity of yellow birch (Betula alleghaniensis Britton) and sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) in the Great Lakes, St Lawrence forest region of Ontario. Specifically, we research the effects of a spring heat wave in 2010, and a summer drought in 2012 that occurred during the 2005–14 study period. We evaluated both growth phenology (onset, cessation, duration of radial growth, time of maximum daily growth rate) and productivity (monthly and seasonal average growth rates, maximum daily growth rate, tree-ring width) and tested for differences and interactions among species and years. Productivity of sugar maple was drastically compromised by a 3-day spring heat wave in 2010 as indicated by low growth rates, very early growth cessation and a lagged growth onset in the following year. Sugar maple also responded more sensitively than yellow birch to a prolonged drought period in July 2012, but final tree-ring width was not significantly reduced due to positive responses to above-average temperatures in the preceding spring. We conclude that sugar maple, a species that currently dominates northern hardwood forests, is vulnerable to heat wave disturbances during leaf expansion, which might occur more frequently under anticipated climate change.

  6. Biotherapies in stroke.

    PubMed

    Detante, O; Jaillard, A; Moisan, A; Barbieux, M; Favre, I M; Garambois, K; Hommel, M; Remy, C

    2014-12-01

    Stroke is the second leading cause of death worldwide and the most common cause of severe disability. Neuroprotection and repair mechanisms supporting endogenous brain plasticity are often insufficient to allow complete recovery. While numerous neuroprotective drugs trials have failed to demonstrate benefits for patients, they have provided interesting translational research lessons related to neurorestorative therapy mechanisms in stroke. Stroke damage is not limited to neurons but involve all brain cell type including the extracellular matrix in a "glio-neurovascular niche". Targeting a range of host brain cells, biotherapies such as growth factors and therapeutic cells, currently hold great promise as a regenerative medical strategy for stroke. These techniques can promote both neuroprotection and delayed neural repair through neuro-synaptogenesis, angiogenesis, oligodendrogliogenesis, axonal sprouting and immunomodulatory effects. Their complex mechanisms of action are interdependent and vary according to the particular growth factor or grafted cell type. For example, while "peripheral" stem or stromal cells can provide paracrine trophic support, neural stem/progenitor cells (NSC) or mature neurons can act as more direct neural replacements. With a wide therapeutic time window after stroke, biotherapies could be used to treat many patients. However, guidelines for selecting the optimal time window, and the best delivery routes and doses are still debated and the answers may depend on the chosen product and its expected mechanism including early neuroprotection, delayed neural repair, trophic systemic transient effects or graft survival and integration. Currently, the great variety of growth factors, cell sources and cell therapy products form a therapeutic arsenal that is available for stroke treatment. Their effective clinical use will require prior careful considerations regarding safety (e.g. tumorgenicity, immunogenicity), potential efficacy, cell

  7. Blood Biomarkers for the Early Diagnosis of Stroke: The Stroke-Chip Study.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Alejandro; López-Cancio, Elena; Pich, Sara; Penalba, Anna; Giralt, Dolors; García-Berrocoso, Teresa; Ferrer-Costa, Carles; Gasull, Teresa; Hernández-Pérez, María; Millan, Mónica; Rubiera, Marta; Cardona, Pedro; Cano, Luis; Quesada, Helena; Terceño, Mikel; Silva, Yolanda; Castellanos, Mar; Garces, Moisés; Reverté, Silvia; Ustrell, Xavier; Marés, Rafael; Baiges, Joan Josep; Serena, Joaquín; Rubio, Francisco; Salas, Eduardo; Dávalos, Antoni; Montaner, Joan

    2017-09-01

    Stroke diagnosis could be challenging in the acute phase. We aimed to develop a blood-based diagnostic tool to differentiate between real strokes and stroke mimics and between ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes in the hyperacute phase. The Stroke-Chip was a prospective, observational, multicenter study, conducted at 6 Stroke Centers in Catalonia. Consecutive patients with suspected stroke were enrolled within the first 6 hours after symptom onset, and blood samples were drawn immediately after admission. A 21-biomarker panel selected among previous results and from the literature was measured by immunoassays. Outcomes were differentiation between real strokes and stroke mimics and between ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes. Predictive models were developed by combining biomarkers and clinical variables in logistic regression models. Accuracy was evaluated with receiver operating characteristic curves. From August 2012 to December 2013, 1308 patients were included (71.9% ischemic, 14.8% stroke mimics, and 13.3% hemorrhagic). For stroke versus stroke mimics comparison, no biomarker resulted included in the logistic regression model, but it was only integrated by clinical variables, with a predictive accuracy of 80.8%. For ischemic versus hemorrhagic strokes comparison, NT-proBNP (N-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide) >4.9 (odds ratio, 2.40; 95% confidence interval, 1.55-3.71; P<0.0001) and endostatin >4.7 (odds ratio, 2.02; 95% confidence interval, 1.19-3.45; P=0.010), together with age, sex, blood pressure, stroke severity, atrial fibrillation, and hypertension, were included in the model. Predictive accuracy was 80.6%. The studied biomarkers were not sufficient for an accurate differential diagnosis of stroke in the hyperacute setting. Additional discovery of new biomarkers and improvement on laboratory techniques seem necessary for achieving a molecular diagnosis of stroke. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Japanese physicians' practice of withholding and withdrawing mechanical ventilation and artificial nutrition and hydration from older adults with very severe stroke.

    PubMed

    Aita, Kaoruko; Miyata, Hiroaki; Takahashi, Miyako; Kai, Ichiro

    2008-01-01

    Amid the lack of legislation or guidelines regarding withholding and withdrawing care in Japan, some physicians who have withdrawn mechanical ventilation from dying patients have recently been subjected to police investigations on suspicion of murder. Under the circumstances, we examined Japanese physicians' attitudes towards mechanical ventilation and artificial nutrition and hydration (ANH) as life-sustaining treatments (LST) to find out if they withhold or withdraw the LST when treating older adults with stroke-caused profound impairment with no hope for recovery. Face-to-face, in-depth interviews were conducted with 27 physicians ranging in age from 26 to 70 in 2004 mainly in the Tokyo metropolitan area. The study findings show that the informants held different views towards the two LST because most doctors considered ANH to be indispensable, while they did not think so for mechanical ventilation. Regarding the reasons that lead physicians to consider ANH is indispensable while mechanical ventilation is not, the following factors were identified: ANH's special status as food and water, ordinary/extraordinary, the level of technology, and sense of unnaturalness. Because of its indispensability, ANH is automatically provided, while mechanical ventilation could be withheld in some patients that the physicians have diagnosed to have no hope for recovery. The current legal framework in Japan, which poses legal risks for physicians when withdrawing care, have led some of the physicians to withdraw care in a secret manner, thus causing an unnecessary psychological burden on the physicians. This study indicated that the legal framework has possibly caused troubles in two ways: routinely providing patients with possibly unwanted mechanical ventilation and ANH, and conversely, prompting some doctors to withhold mechanical ventilation in some cases, thereby potentially depriving some patients of a chance to recover. The introduction of the practice of a trial treatment

  9. Post-stroke depression therapy: where are we now?

    PubMed

    Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Turner, Alyna; Dean, Olivia; Sureda, Antoni; Mohammad, Seyed

    2014-01-01

    Post-stroke depression is an important psychological consequence of ischemic stroke, and affects around one third of stroke patients at any time post-stroke. It has a negative impact on patient morbidity and mortality, and as such development of effective post-stroke recognition and treatment strategies are very important. There are several therapeutic strategies for post-stroke depression, including both pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches. In this review, we present evidence regarding the underlying biology of post-stroke depression, commonalities between post-stroke depression and Major Depressive Disorder and explore several treatment approaches, including antidepressant therapy, psychotherapy, surgical therapy, electroconvulsive therapy, acupuncture, music therapy and natural products. Further experimental and clinical studies are required, particularly in emerging fields such as the role of nutraceuticals in the treatment of stroke.

  10. Genesis of return stroke current evolution at the wavefront

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Udaya; Raysaha, Rosy Balaram

    2013-07-01

    The channel dynamics at the wavefront is complex and is primarily responsible for the evolution of return stroke current. The enhancement of channel conductance at the wavefront is necessary for the evolution of current and hence, return stroke. In this regard several questions arise like: (i) what causes the enhancement of conductance, (ii) as the channel core temperature and electrical conductance are closely related, does one support the other and (iii) is the increase in core temperature on the nascent section of the channel the result of free burning arc of the wavefront just below. The present work investigates on these issues with appropriate transient thermal analysis and a macroscopic physical model for the lightning return stroke. Results clearly indicate that the contribution from the thermal field of the wavefront region to the adjacent nascent channel section is negligible as compared to the field enhancement brought in by the same. In other words, the whole process of return stroke evolution is dependent on the local heat generation at the nascent section caused by the enhancement of electric field due to the arrival of the wavefront.

  11. Calorie restriction and stroke

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Stroke, a major cause of disability and mortality in the elderly, occurs when a cerebral blood vessel is occluded or ruptured, resulting in ischemic damage and death of brain cells. The injury mechanism involves metabolic and oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, apoptosis and inflammatory processes, including activation of glial cells and infiltration of leukocytes. In animal models, dietary energy restriction, by daily calorie reduction (CR) or intermittent fasting (IF), extends lifespan and decreases the development of age-related diseases. Dietary energy restriction may also benefit neurons, as suggested by experimental evidence showing that CR and IF protect neurons against degeneration in animal models. Recent findings by our group and others suggest the possibility that dietary energy restriction may protect against stroke induced brain injury, in part by inducing the expression of neurotrophic factors, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF); protein chaperones, including heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) and glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78); antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutases (SOD) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), silent information regulator T1 (SIRT1), uncoupling proteins and anti-inflammatory cytokines. This article discusses the protective mechanisms activated by dietary energy restriction in ischemic stroke. PMID:21910904

  12. Left atrial enlargement and stroke recurrence: the Northern Manhattan Stroke Study.

    PubMed

    Yaghi, Shadi; Moon, Yeseon P; Mora-McLaughlin, Consuelo; Willey, Joshua Z; Cheung, Ken; Di Tullio, Marco R; Homma, Shunichi; Kamel, Hooman; Sacco, Ralph L; Elkind, Mitchell S V

    2015-06-01

    Although left atrial enlargement (LAE) increases incident stroke risk, the association with recurrent stroke is less clear. Our aim was to determine the association of LAE with recurrent stroke most likely related to embolism (cryptogenic and cardioembolic) and all ischemic stroke recurrences. We followed 655 first ischemic stroke patients in the Northern Manhattan Stroke Study for ≤5 years. LA size from 2D echocardiography was categorized as normal LAE (52.7%), mild LAE (31.6%), and moderate-severe LAE (15.7%). We used Cox proportional hazard models to calculate the hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the association of LA size and LAE with recurrent cryptogenic/cardioembolic and total recurrent ischemic stroke. LA size was available in 529 (81%) patients. Mean age at enrollment was 69±13 years; 45.8% were male, 54.0% Hispanic, and 18.5% had atrial fibrillation. Over a median of 4 years, there were 65 recurrent ischemic strokes (29 were cardioembolic or cryptogenic). In multivariable models adjusted for confounders, including atrial fibrillation and heart failure, moderate-severe LAE compared with normal LA size was associated with greater risk of recurrent cardioembolic/cryptogenic stroke (adjusted hazard ratio 2.83, 95% confidence interval 1.03-7.81), but not total ischemic stroke (adjusted hazard ratio 1.06, 95% confidence interval, 0.48-2.30). Mild LAE was not associated with recurrent stroke. Moderate to severe LAE was an independent marker of recurrent cardioembolic or cryptogenic stroke in a multiethnic cohort of ischemic stroke patients. Further research is needed to determine whether anticoagulant use may reduce risk of recurrence in ischemic stroke patients with moderate to severe LAE. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Sex differences in stroke therapies.

    PubMed

    Sohrabji, Farida; Park, Min Jung; Mahnke, Amanda H

    2017-01-02

    Stroke is the fifth leading cause of death and acquired disability in aged populations. Women are disproportionally affected by stroke, having a higher incidence and worse outcomes than men. Numerous preclinical studies have discovered novel therapies for the treatment of stroke, but almost all of these have been shown to be unsuccessful in clinical trials. Despite known sex differences in occurrence and severity of stroke, few preclinical or clinical therapeutics take into account possible sex differences in treatment. Reanalysis of data from studies of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), the only currently FDA-approved stroke therapy, has shown that tPA improves stroke outcomes for both sexes and also shows sexual dimorphism by more robust improvement in stroke outcome in females. Experimental evidence supports the inclusion of sex as a variable in the study of a number of novel stroke drugs and therapies, including preclinical studies of anti-inflammatory drugs (minocycline), stimulators of cell survival (insulin-like growth factor-1), and inhibitors of cell death pathways (pharmacological inhibition of poly[ADP-ribose] polymerase-1, nitric oxide production, and caspase activation) as well as in current clinical trials of stem cell therapy and cortical stimulation. Overall, study design and analysis in clinical trials as well as in preclinical studies must include both sexes equally, consider possible sex differences in the analyses, and report the differences/similarities in more systematic/structured ways to allow promising therapies for both sexes and increase stroke recovery. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Heat Illness - A Practical Primer.

    PubMed

    Raukar, Neha; Lemieux, Renee; Finn, George; Stearns, Rebecca; Casa, Douglas J

    2015-07-01

    Heat stroke is one of the top three causes of death for athletes. Vigilance is required to prevent these illnesses and when faced with an individual who is suffering an exertional heat stroke, the goal is to aggressively cool the patient to 102°F within 30 minutes to optimize survival. The elderly are also at risk for heat illness and physicians caring for these patients should discuss prevention and treatment plans.

  15. [Effect of monoamines, heat shock and other factors on the binding of several neuropharmacologic preparations by sea urchin embryos].

    PubMed

    Buznikov, G A; Manukhin, B N; Rakich, L; Kudriashova, N I; Khromov-Borisov, N V

    1977-01-01

    Early embryos of the sea urchins Arbacia lixula and Paracentrotus lividus being subjected to an osmotic or heat shock (10 min at 70 degrees C or higher) do not longer bind cytotoxic pharmaca and do not affect the sensitivity of normal indicator embryos to these drugs. After exposure for 10 min at 40 degrees C, the binding of neuropharmaca by embryos is not affected, although their ability to protect indicator embryos from the action of these neuropharmaca is inhibited 4--5 times. Serotonin and adrenaline inhibit the binding of neuropharmaca by 10--20%, while meterazine, noveryl and an amphetamine derivative--IEM-567--inhibit it by 50--60%. Antimycin A, rotenone and mercuric chloride do not affect the binding of neuropharmaca by sea urchin embryos.

  16. Arterial ischemic stroke in HIV

    PubMed Central

    Bryer, Alan; Lucas, Sebastian; Stanley, Alan; Allain, Theresa J.; Joekes, Elizabeth; Emsley, Hedley; Turnbull, Ian; Downey, Colin; Toh, Cheng-Hock; Brown, Kevin; Brown, David; Ison, Catherine; Smith, Colin; Corbett, Elizabeth L.; Nath, Avindra; Heyderman, Robert S.; Connor, Myles D.; Solomon, Tom

    2016-01-01

    HIV infection, and potentially its treatment, increases the risk of an arterial ischemic stroke. Multiple etiologies and lack of clear case definitions inhibit progress in this field. Several etiologies, many treatable, are relevant to HIV-related stroke. To fully understand the mechanisms and the terminology used, a robust classification algorithm to help ascribe the various etiologies is needed. This consensus paper considers the strengths and limitations of current case definitions in the context of HIV infection. The case definitions for the major etiologies in HIV-related strokes were refined (e.g., varicella zoster vasculopathy and antiphospholipid syndrome) and in some instances new case definitions were described (e.g., HIV-associated vasculopathy). These case definitions provided a framework for an algorithm to help assign a final diagnosis, and help classify the subtypes of HIV etiology in ischemic stroke. PMID:27386505

  17. Association between socioeconomic status and functional impairment 3 months after ischemic stroke: the Berlin Stroke Register.

    PubMed

    Grube, Maike Miriam; Koennecke, Hans-Christian; Walter, Georg; Thümmler, Jane; Meisel, Andreas; Wellwood, Ian; Heuschmann, Peter Ulrich

    2012-12-01

    We aimed to analyze the association between patient socioeconomic status and functional impairment 3 months after ischemic stroke and to identify factors that influence this association. Data were obtained from the Berlin Stroke Register, a network of 14 stroke units in Berlin. Ischemic stroke patients consecutively admitted to 1 of the hospitals in the Berlin Stroke Register between June 2010 and September 2011, were followed-up 3 months after the index event by postal or telephone interview. We used multivariable logistic regression to examine the association between highest education as marker of socioeconomic status and functional impairment after stroke defined by Barthel Index categories. We adjusted for age, sex, prestroke dependency, stroke severity, functional deficit after stroke onset, and comorbidities as possible confounding factors. A total of 1688 ischemic stroke patients who were alive at 3 months and completed the questionnaire were included in the analysis; 40% of the patients were female and 50% of the patients were 70 years or older. Age, prestroke dependency, stroke severity, and the absence of comorbidities were significantly associated with good functional outcome at 3 months. In multivariable analysis, a higher probability of good outcome was observed in patients with college or university degree (odds ratio, 2.18; 95% confidence interval, 1.39-3.42) compared with patients with no completed education. Patients with lower education have considerably lower rates of good functional outcome after stroke that cannot be fully explained by variations in the patients' clinical and demographic characteristics.

  18. Healthy Living after Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stories Stroke Heroes Among Us Healthy Living After Stroke Nutrition Good nutrition is one way to reduce ... reviewed on 04/30/2014. Register for the Stroke Rehab Webinar Join rehab experts as they discuss ...

  19. The "Know Stroke" Campaign

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Special Section The "Know Stroke" Campaign Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table of Contents ... campaign for the U.S. Hispanic community. 1 Know Stroke A stroke occurs when the blood supply to ...

  20. PREDICTORS FOR POST- STROKE DELIRIUM OUTCOME

    PubMed Central

    Dostovic, Zikrija; Dostovic, Ernestina; Smajlovic, Dzevdet; Ibrahimagic, Omer C.; Avdic, Leila; Becirovic, Elvir

    2016-01-01

    Background: There have been only a small number of studies that have evaluated the outcome of post-stroke delirium. Objectives: To evaluate the effects of gender, age, stroke localization, delirium severity, previous illnesses, associated medical complications on delirium outcome as well as, to determine effects of delirium on cognitive functioning one year after stroke. Patients and Methods: Comprehensive neuropsychological assessments were performed within the first week of stroke onset, at hospital discharge, and followed-up for 3, 6 and 12 months after stroke. We used diagnostic tools such as Glazgow Coma Scale, Delirium Rating Scale, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and Mini-Mental State. Results: Patients who developed post-stroke delirium had significantly more complications (p = 0.0005). Direct logistic regression was performed to assess the impact of several factors on the likelihood that patients will die. The strongest predictor of outcome was age, mean age ≥ 65 years with a odds ratio (OR) 4.9. Cox’s regression survival was conducted to assess the impact of multiple factors on survival. The accompanying medical complications were the strongest predictor of respondents poore outcome with Hazard-risk 3.3. Cognitive assessments including Mini Mental State score have showen that post-stroke delirium patients had significant cognitive impairment, three (p = 0.0005), six months (p = 0.0005) and one year (p = 0.0005) after stroke, compared to patients without delirium. Conclusion: Patient gender, age, localization of stroke, severity of delirium, chronic diseases and emerging complications significantly affect the outcome of post- stroke delirium. Delirium significantly reduced cognitive functioning of after stroke patients. PMID:27999490

  1. Stroke knowledge in Spanish-speaking populations.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, Maximiliano A; Ameriso, Sebastián F; Willey, Joshua Z

    2015-01-01

    Spanish is the second most-spoken language in the world. Spanish-speaking populations (SSP) have heterogeneous cultural backgrounds, racial and ethnical origins, economic status, and access to health care systems. There are no published reviews about stroke knowledge in SSP. We reviewed the existing literature addressing stroke knowledge among SSP and propose here some future directions for research. We identified 18 suitable studies by searching PubMed, Lilacs, Scopus, Embase, Cochrane and Scielo databases, and by looking at reference lists of eligible articles. We also included 2 conference abstracts. Data related to stroke knowledge from studies of Spanish-speakers were analyzed. Key Messages: Little is known about stroke knowledge in SSP, especially in Latin America. Information is lacking even among subjects at risk, stroke patients, stroke survivors, and health care providers. 'Ictus', the word used for stroke in Spanish, is largely unrecognized among subjects at risk. Furthermore, access to medical care and the availability of neurologists are suboptimal in many regions. There are several potential issues to solve regarding stroke knowledge and stroke care in SSP. Programs to educate the general population and non-neurologists medical providers in stroke and telemedicine may be better ways of improving the present situation. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Stroke Knowledge in Spanish-speaking populations

    PubMed Central

    Hawkes, Maximiliano A; Ameriso, Sebastián F; Willey, Joshua Z

    2015-01-01

    Background Spanish is the second most spoken language in the world. Spanish-speaking populations (SSP) have heterogeneous cultural backgrounds, racial and ethnical origins, economic status, and access to health care systems. There are no published reviews about stroke knowledge in SSP. We reviewed the existing literature addressing stroke knowledge among SSP and propose future directions for research. Summary We identified 18 suitable studies by searching PubMed, Lilacs, Scopus, Embase, Cochrane and Scielo databases, and looking at reference lists of eligible articles. We also included 2 conference abstracts. Data related to stroke knowledge from studies of Spanish-speakers was analyzed. Key messages Little is known about stroke knowledge in SSP, especially in Latin America. Information is poor even among subjects at risk, stroke patients, stroke survivors, and health care providers. “Ictus”, the word used for stroke in Spanish, is largely unrecognized among subjects at risk. Furthermore, access to medical care and presence of neurologists are suboptimal in many regions. There are several potential issues to solve regarding stroke knowledge and stroke care in SSP. Programs to educate the general population and non-neurologists medical providers in stroke and telemedicine may be suitable options to improve the present situation. PMID:25871697

  3. Handicap 5 years after stroke in the North East Melbourne Stroke Incidence Study.

    PubMed

    Gall, Seana L; Dewey, Helen M; Sturm, Jonathan W; Macdonell, Richard A L; Thrift, Amanda G

    2009-01-01

    Handicap is rarely comprehensively examined after stroke. We examined handicap among 5-year stroke survivors from an 'ideal' stroke incidence study. Survivors were assessed with the London Handicap Scale [LHS, score range: 0 (greatest handicap) to 100 (least handicap)]. Multivariable regression was used to examine demographic, risk and stroke-related factors associated with handicap. 351 of 441 (80%) survivors were assessed. Those assessed were more often Australian born than those not assessed (p < 0.05). The mean LHS score was 73 (SD = 21). The greatest handicap was present for physical independence and occupation/leisure items. Handicap was associated with older age, manual occupations, smoking, initial stroke severity, recurrent stroke and mood disorders. Reducing recurrent stroke, through better risk factor management, is likely to reduce handicap. The association between handicap and mood disorders, which are potentially modifiable, warrants further investigation. Copyright (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Stroke Laterality Bias in the Management of Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    McCluskey, Gavin; Wade, Carrie; McKee, Jacqueline; McCarron, Peter; McVerry, Ferghal; McCarron, Mark O

    2016-11-01

    Little is known of the impact of stroke laterality on the management process and outcome of patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Consecutive patients admitted to a general hospital over 1 year with supratentorial AIS were eligible for inclusion in the study. Baseline characteristics and risk factors, delays in hospital admission, imaging, intrahospital transfer to an acute stoke unit, stroke severity and classification, length of hospital admission, as well as 10-year mortality were measured and compared among right and left hemisphere AIS patients. There were 141 patients (77 men, 64 women; median age 73 [interquartile range 63-79] years), There were 71 patients with left hemisphere AIS and 70 with right hemisphere AIS. Delays to hospital admission from stroke onset to neuroimaging were similar among right and left hemisphere AIS patients. Delay in transfer to an acute stroke unit (ASU) following hospital admission was on average 14 hours more for right hemisphere compared to left hemisphere AIS patients (P = .01). Laterality was not associated with any difference in 10-year survival. Patients with mild and nondominant AIS merit particular attention to minimize their intrahospital transfer time to an ASU. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Anesthetic management of patients with acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Flexman, Alana M; Donovan, Anne L; Gelb, Adrian W

    2012-06-01

    Stroke is a major cause of death and disability. Anesthesiologists are likely to encounter patients with stroke and must be aware of the anesthetic considerations for these patients. Intravenous thrombolysis and intra-arterial thrombolysis are effective treatments for acuteischemic stroke as well as evolving endovascular techniques such as mechanical clot retrieval. Recent retrospective studies have found an association between general anesthesia and poor clinical outcome. The results of these studies have several limitations, and current evidence is inadequate to guide the choice of anesthesia in patients with acute stroke. The choice of anesthesia must be based on individual patient factors until further research is completed.

  6. Patent Foramen Ovale: Stroke and Device Closure.

    PubMed

    Suradi, Hussam S; Hijazi, Ziyad M

    2016-05-01

    Patent foramen ovale (PFO) is a common finding in healthy adults and has long been implicated in cryptogenic stroke. The pathogenesis is hypothesized to be caused by microemboli gaining access into the systemic circulation via a PFO. Proposed treatment options include medical therapy and/or PFO closure. Despite numerous studies and several randomized trials, much debate persists regarding the efficacy of this approach in reducing the risk of recurrent stroke in cryptogenic stroke patients. This article reviews the association between PFO and cryptogenic stroke, as well as current evidence for PFO device closure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The Epidemiology of Atrial Fibrillation and Stroke.

    PubMed

    Pistoia, Francesca; Sacco, Simona; Tiseo, Cindy; Degan, Diana; Ornello, Raffaele; Carolei, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    The burden of stroke is increasing due to aging population and unhealthy lifestyle habits. The considerable rise in atrial fibrillation (AF) is due to greater diffusion of risk factors and screening programs. The link between AF and ischemic stroke is strong. The subtype most commonly associated with AF is cardioembolic stroke, which is particularly severe and shows the highest rates of mortality and permanent disability. A trend toward a higher prevalence of cardioembolic stroke in high-income countries is probably due to the greater diffusion of AF and the control of atherosclerotic of risk factors.

  8. Stroke Code Improves Intravenous Thrombolysis Administration in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chih-Hao; Tang, Sung-Chun; Tsai, Li-Kai; Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Yeh, Shin-Joe; Huang, Kuang-Yu; Jeng, Jiann-Shing

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Timely intravenous (IV) thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke is associated with better clinical outcomes. Acute stroke care implemented with “Stroke Code” (SC) may increase IV tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) administration. The present study aimed to investigate the impact of SC on thrombolysis. Methods The study period was divided into the “pre-SC era” (January 2006 to July 2010) and “SC era” (August 2010 to July 2013). Demographics, critical times (stroke symptom onset, presentation to the emergency department, neuroimaging, thrombolysis), stroke severity, and clinical outcomes were recorded and compared between the two eras. Results During the study period, 5957 patients with acute ischemic stroke were admitted; of these, 1301 (21.8%) arrived at the emergency department within 3 h of stroke onset and 307 (5.2%) received IV-tPA. The number and frequency of IV-tPA treatments for patients with an onset-to-door time of <3 h increased from the pre-SC era (n = 91, 13.9%) to the SC era (n = 216, 33.3%) (P<0.001). SC also improved the efficiency of IV-tPA administration; the median door-to-needle time decreased (88 to 51 min, P<0.001) and the percentage of door-to-needle times ≤60 min increased (14.3% to 71.3%, P<0.001). The SC era group tended to have more patients with good outcome (modified Rankin Scale ≤2) at discharge (49.5 vs. 39.6%, P = 0.11), with no difference in symptomatic hemorrhage events or in-hospital mortality. Conclusion The SC protocol increases the percentage of acute ischemic stroke patients receiving IV-tPA and decreases door-to-needle time. PMID:25111200

  9. Stroke code improves intravenous thrombolysis administration in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Hao; Tang, Sung-Chun; Tsai, Li-Kai; Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Yeh, Shin-Joe; Huang, Kuang-Yu; Jeng, Jiann-Shing

    2014-01-01

    Timely intravenous (IV) thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke is associated with better clinical outcomes. Acute stroke care implemented with "Stroke Code" (SC) may increase IV tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) administration. The present study aimed to investigate the impact of SC on thrombolysis. The study period was divided into the "pre-SC era" (January 2006 to July 2010) and "SC era" (August 2010 to July 2013). Demographics, critical times (stroke symptom onset, presentation to the emergency department, neuroimaging, thrombolysis), stroke severity, and clinical outcomes were recorded and compared between the two eras. During the study period, 5957 patients with acute ischemic stroke were admitted; of these, 1301 (21.8%) arrived at the emergency department within 3 h of stroke onset and 307 (5.2%) received IV-tPA. The number and frequency of IV-tPA treatments for patients with an onset-to-door time of <3 h increased from the pre-SC era (n = 91, 13.9%) to the SC era (n = 216, 33.3%) (P<0.001). SC also improved the efficiency of IV-tPA administration; the median door-to-needle time decreased (88 to 51 min, P<0.001) and the percentage of door-to-needle times ≤60 min increased (14.3% to 71.3%, P<0.001). The SC era group tended to have more patients with good outcome (modified Rankin Scale ≤2) at discharge (49.5 vs. 39.6%, P = 0.11), with no difference in symptomatic hemorrhage events or in-hospital mortality. The SC protocol increases the percentage of acute ischemic stroke patients receiving IV-tPA and decreases door-to-needle time.

  10. Translational MR Neuroimaging of Stroke and Recovery.

    PubMed

    Mandeville, Emiri T; Ayata, Cenk; Zheng, Yi; Mandeville, Joseph B

    2017-02-01

    Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become a critical clinical tool for diagnosing focal ischemic stroke severity, staging treatment, and predicting outcome. Imaging during the acute phase focuses on tissue viability in the stroke vicinity, while imaging during recovery requires the evaluation of distributed structural and functional connectivity. Preclinical MRI of experimental stroke models provides validation of non-invasive biomarkers in terms of cellular and molecular mechanisms, while also providing a translational platform for evaluation of prospective therapies. This brief review of translational stroke imaging discusses the acute to chronic imaging transition, the principles underlying common MRI methods employed in stroke research, and the experimental results obtained by clinical and preclinical imaging to determine tissue viability, vascular remodeling, structural connectivity of major white matter tracts, and functional connectivity using task-based and resting-state fMRI during the stroke recovery process.

  11. Factors predicting post-stroke aphasia recovery.

    PubMed

    M M, Watila; S A, Balarabe

    2015-05-15

    Aphasia is an important stroke sequel that impacts negatively on the HQoL of stroke patients. Although a number of stroke patients with aphasia will have good functional recovery, many are left with language deficits. Papers were identified through PubMed and MEDLINE search, with keywords such as: 'stroke', 'aphasia', 'post-stroke aphasia', 'factors that predict aphasia recovery', 'aphasia outcomes' and 'aphasia prognosis'. The most important factors that determine recovery are the lesion location and size, aphasia type and severity and to some extent the nature of early haemodynamic response, and treatment received. Anagraphic factors like gender, age, handedness and education have not been found to be robust predictors of recovery. Predicting post-stroke aphasia recovery is difficult, because of the interplay between lesion, anagraphic, and treatment-related factors, in addition to the role of neuroplasticity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Quality of life after TIA and stroke

    PubMed Central

    Luengo-Fernandez, Ramon; Gray, Alastair M.; Bull, Linda; Welch, Sarah; Cuthbertson, Fiona

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the 5-year impact of stroke and TIA on utility and quality-adjusted survival. Methods: TIA and stroke patients from a UK population-based study (Oxford Vascular Study) were recruited from 2002 to 2007, and followed up until 2012. Quality of life was assessed over 5 years using the EQ-5D (EuroQol-5 Dimensions), with responses converted into utilities ranging from −0.59 (worse than death) to 1 (perfect health), using UK population valuations. Utilities for stroke and TIA patients were compared with those in matched controls obtained from the 2006 Health Survey for England. Five-year quality-adjusted life years were estimated by combining utility and survival information. Results: Four hundred forty TIA and 748 stroke patients were ascertained and included. Utility remained constant at approximately 0.78 over the 5 years after TIA. Utility improved from 0.64 one month after stroke to 0.70 at 6 months (p = 0.006), remaining at approximately 0.70 thereafter. Matched controls had considerably higher utility levels than stroke/TIA patients (0.85, p < 0.001). Event severity and recurrent stroke were significant predictors of decreased long-term utility. Five-year quality-adjusted life expectancy was 3.32 (95% confidence interval: 3.22–3.48) quality-adjusted life years after TIA and 2.21 (2.15–2.37) after stroke, varying considerably by severity (minor: 2.94; moderate: 1.65; and severe: 0.70). Conclusion: Quality-adjusted survival is low over the 5 years after stroke and TIA, with severity and recurrent stroke being major predictors. There remains considerable scope for improvements in acute treatment and secondary prevention to improve the quality of life after TIA and stroke. PMID:24107865

  13. Corrosion behavior of several metals in ethylene glycol-base heat-transfer fluids under conditions encountered in solar energy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zeman, G.J.

    1980-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of aluminum, copper, and iron in inhibited ethylene glycol-ASTM corrosive water solutions was evaluated in a laboratory loop under isothermal and heat-flux conditions for 1000 h at temperatures between 378 and 413/sup 0/K, in static autoclave tests at 450/sup 0/K for 500 h, and by potentiodynamic polarization measurements at temperatures between 298 and 348/sup 0/K. The effect of time, temperature, and ethylene glycol concentration of the heat-transfer fluid on the extent of inhibitor depletion was determined from analyses of the reserve alkalinity, pH, and inhibitor content of the solutions. The performance of an electrochemical sensor as a monitor of fluid quality was also evaluated. A heat flux of 0.4 to 1.0 kW/m/sup 2/ did not have a significant effect on the corrosion behavior of the various materials at temperatures between 378 and 413/sup 0/K. The corrosion rates of aluminum, copper, and iron in the 50 volume percent inhibited ethylene glycol-corrosive water solution decreased as a function of time during the 1000-h test. At 413/sup 0/K, the corrosion rate of copper was considerably higher than that of iron or aluminum at low flow velocity. Significant degradation of the fluid quality, as indicated by the measurement of the pH, reserve alkalinity, and inhibitor concentrations, occurred after several hundred hours at temperatures of approx. 450/sup 0/K.

  14. Role of prediabetes in stroke

    PubMed Central

    Mijajlović, Milija D; Aleksić, Vuk M; Šternić, Nadežda M; Mirković, Mihailo M; Bornstein, Natan M

    2017-01-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and probably the greatest cause of adult disability worldwide. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a state of accelerated aging of blood vessels. Patients with diabetes have increased risk of stroke. Hyperglycemia represents a risk factor for poor outcome following stroke, and probably is just a marker of poor outcome rather than a cause. Lowering of blood glucose levels has not been shown to improve prognosis. Also, prevention of stroke risk among patients with DM is not improved with therapy for reduction of glucose levels. On the other hand, prediabetes, a metabolic state between normal glucose metabolism and diabetes, is a risk factor for the development of DM type 2 and subsequently for stroke. Several methods are known to identify prediabetes patients, including fasting plasma glucose levels, 2-hour post load glucose levels, and glycosylated hemoglobin levels. In this text, we tried to summarize known data about diagnosis, epidemiology, risk factors, pathophysiology, and prevention of prediabetes in relation to DM and stroke. PMID:28203079

  15. Therapeutic interventions in acute stroke.

    PubMed Central

    Lees, K R

    1992-01-01

    1. Potential therapies for ischaemic stroke include agents to reduce oedema, to improve cerebral perfusion, to reduce excitotoxic damage, to minimise free-radical induced injury and to reduce complications such as deep venous thrombosis. 2. Of the anti-oedema drugs, steroids are ineffective and possibly dangerous; intravenous glycerol is unproven. 3. Haemodilution to reduce whole blood viscosity and improve perfusion is ineffective. Thrombolytic drugs have not been adequately tested but several randomised multicentre trials are now commencing. Early treatment and CT scanning are essential. 4. Anticoagulants and antiplatelet drugs may have wide applicability but have not been tested in the acute phase of stroke. A multi-centre trial will address this issue. 5. Neuronal cytoprotection offers exciting prospects for acute stroke treatment. Antagonists of glutamate at the NMDA receptor, calcium and sodium channel blocking agents and free radical scavenging drugs have potent effects experimentally. Several agents are now reaching clinical trials. The calcium antagonist nimodipine has been disappointing in large scale trials but some studies were flawed by late treatment. 6. Successful treatment of acute stroke is likely to combine several approaches. 7. Therapeutic trials in stroke must include CT scanning, early treatment and a multicentre approach to achieve large numbers of patients. PMID:1493080

  16. Air pollution and stroke - an overview of the evidence base.

    PubMed

    Maheswaran, Ravi

    2016-08-01

    Air pollution is being increasingly recognized as a significant risk factor for stroke. There are numerous sources of air pollution including industry, road transport and domestic use of biomass and solid fuels. Early reports of the association between air pollution and stroke come from studies investigating health effects of severe pollution episodes. Several daily time series and case-crossover studies have reported associations with stroke. There is also evidence linking chronic air pollution exposure with stroke and with reduced survival after stroke. A conceptual framework linking air pollution exposure and stroke is proposed. It links acute and chronic exposure to air pollution with pathways to acute and chronic effects on stroke risk. Current evidence regarding potential mechanisms mainly relate to particulate air pollution. Whilst further evidence would be useful, there is already sufficient evidence to support consideration of reduction in air pollution as a preventative measure to reduce the stroke burden globally.

  17. Hypertensive patients using thiazide diuretics as primary stroke prevention make better functional outcome after ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Shih, Hong-Mo; Lin, Wei Chun; Wang, Cheng-Hsien; Lin, Leng-Chieh

    2014-10-01

    Thiazides have been used for the control of blood pressure and primary prevention of ischemic stroke. No previous studies have assessed the influence of thiazides on functional prognosis after ischemic stroke. Demographics, prestroke conditions, poststroke National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, and clinical and laboratory parameters were prospectively registered in 216 Taiwanese patients. One hundred forty patients who completed follow-up 3 months after experiencing ischemic stroke were assessed with the modified Rankin scale as functional prognoses. Twenty-one patients used thiazide to control hypertension before experiencing ischemic stroke. No differences of stroke subtypes and comorbidities before stroke were observed between the 2 groups. The emergency department National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale was lesser among thiazide users (4 [2-7] versus 6 [4-16], P = .02). Among 140 patients who completed follow-up in 90 days, thiazide users had more favorable functional status (modified Rankin scale ≤2: 42.4% versus 26.9%, P = .02, odds ratio 3.34, 95%, confidence interval .130-.862). Hypertensive patients treated with thiazides long term had a lesser severity of stroke and better functional outcomes after ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Early Depressed mood after stroke predicts long-term disability: the Northern Manhattan Stroke Study (NOMASS)

    PubMed Central

    Willey, Joshua Z.; Disla, Norbelina; Moon, Yeseon Park; Paik, Myunghee C.; Sacco, Ralph L.; Boden-Albala, Bernadette; Elkind, Mitchell SV; Wright, Clinton

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Depression is highly prevalent after stroke, and may influence recovery. We aimed to determine whether depressed mood acutely after stroke predicts subsequent disability and mortality. Methods As part of the Northern Manhattan Stroke Study, a population-based inc