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Sample records for severe heat stroke

  1. Point-of-care cardiac troponin test accurately predicts heat stroke severity in rats.

    PubMed

    Audet, Gerald N; Quinn, Carrie M; Leon, Lisa R

    2015-11-15

    Heat stroke (HS) remains a significant public health concern. Despite the substantial threat posed by HS, there is still no field or clinical test of HS severity. We suggested previously that circulating cardiac troponin (cTnI) could serve as a robust biomarker of HS severity after heating. In the present study, we hypothesized that (cTnI) point-of-care test (ctPOC) could be used to predict severity and organ damage at the onset of HS. Conscious male Fischer 344 rats (n = 16) continuously monitored for heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), and core temperature (Tc) (radiotelemetry) were heated to maximum Tc (Tc,Max) of 41.9 ± 0.1°C and recovered undisturbed for 24 h at an ambient temperature of 20°C. Blood samples were taken at Tc,Max and 24 h after heat via submandibular bleed and analyzed on ctPOC test. POC cTnI band intensity was ranked using a simple four-point scale via two blinded observers and compared with cTnI levels measured by a clinical blood analyzer. Blood was also analyzed for biomarkers of systemic organ damage. HS severity, as previously defined using HR, BP, and recovery Tc profile during heat exposure, correlated strongly with cTnI (R(2) = 0.69) at Tc,Max. POC cTnI band intensity ranking accurately predicted cTnI levels (R(2) = 0.64) and HS severity (R(2) = 0.83). Five markers of systemic organ damage also correlated with ctPOC score (albumin, alanine aminotransferase, blood urea nitrogen, cholesterol, and total bilirubin; R(2) > 0.4). This suggests that cTnI POC tests can accurately determine HS severity and could serve as simple, portable, cost-effective HS field tests.

  2. Severe stroke: which medicine for which results?

    PubMed

    Woimant, F; Biteye, Y; Chaine, P; Crozier, S

    2014-02-01

    In face of any severe stroke, the questions for health professionals in charge of the patient are: will the handicap be acceptable for the patient? But can we predict an acceptable handicap for the patient? For his family? When we know that the cognitive disorders, consequences of severe stroke often modify, in a major way, the behaviour of these patients? Given these difficulties for estimate vital and functional prognosis and even more the quality of life of patients with severe stroke, collective reflexions between physicians and nurses are essential, reflexions taking into account preferences and values of patients. Use of resuscitation resources for severe stroke patients implies to offer them the best rehabilitation. So, questions about health pathways for severe stroke are essential: which structures for these patients, which technologies, which medical, medico-social and social supports, which human accompaniment the society can propose to the patients and to their family, so that they have an acceptable quality of life.

  3. IV thrombolysis in very severe and severe ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lees, Kennedy R.; Collas, David; Rand, Viiu-Marika; Mikulik, Robert; Toni, Danilo; Wahlgren, Nils; Ahmed, Niaz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the safety of off-label IV thrombolysis in patients with very severe stroke (NIH Stroke Scale [NIHSS] scores >25) compared with severe stroke (NIHSS scores 15–25), where treatment is within European regulations. Methods: Data were analyzed from 57,247 patients with acute ischemic stroke receiving IV tissue plasminogen activator in 793 hospitals participating in the Safe Implementation of Thrombolysis in Stroke (SITS) International Stroke Thrombolysis Registry (2002–2013). Eight hundred sixty-eight patients (1.5%) had NIHSS scores >25 and 19,995 (34.9%) had NIHSS scores 15–25. Outcome measures were parenchymal hemorrhage, symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage, mortality, and functional outcome. Results: Parenchymal hemorrhage occurred in 10.7% vs 11.0% (p = 0.79), symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage per SITS-MOST (SITS–Monitoring Study) in 1.4% vs 2.5% (p = 0.052), death at 3 months in 50.4% vs 26.9% (p < 0.001), and functional independence at 3 months in 14.0% vs 29.0% (p < 0.001) of patients with NIHSS scores >25 and NIHSS scores 15–25, respectively. Multivariate adjustment did not change findings from univariate comparisons. Posterior circulation stroke was more common in patients with NIHSS scores >25 (36.2% vs 7.4%, p < 0.001), who were also more often obtunded or comatose on presentation (58.4% vs 7.1%, p < 0.001). Of patients with NIHSS scores >25, 26.2% were treated >3 hours from symptom onset vs 14.5% with NIHSS scores of 15–25. Conclusions: Our data show no excess risk of cerebral hemorrhage in patients with NIHSS score >25 compared to score 15–25, suggesting that the European contraindication to IV tissue plasminogen activator treatment at NIHSS levels >25 may be unwarranted. Increased mortality and lower rates of functional independence in patients with NIHSS score >25 are explained by higher stroke severity, impaired consciousness on presentation due to posterior circulation ischemia, and longer treatment delays. PMID

  4. Aspirin resistance is more common in lacunar strokes than embolic strokes and is related to stroke severity.

    PubMed

    Englyst, Nicola A; Horsfield, Gill; Kwan, Joseph; Byrne, Christopher D

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between aspirin resistance, ischaemic stroke subtype, stroke severity, and inflammatory cytokines. Aspirin resistance was assessed by thrombelastography in 45 people with ischaemic stroke and 25 controls. Plasma interleukin (IL)-6 was measured. Stroke severity was assessed using the modified Rankin scale and National Institute of Health Stroke Score within 72 h of stroke. Aspirin resistance was more common in the stroke than the control group (67% versus 40%, P=0.028), and within the stroke group the aspirin-resistant group had a higher Rankin score (4.0 versus 2.0, P=0.013). Aspirin resistance was greater in lacunar than embolic strokes (platelet activation 79% versus 59%, P=0.020). The stroke aspirin-resistant group had higher levels of IL-6 than the stroke aspirin-sensitive group (2.4+/-1 versus 1.8+/-0.9 ng/mL, P=0.037). Using multivariate analysis, we examined the interrelationships between aspirin resistance, IL-6, and stroke severity. These analyses showed that IL-6 was independently associated with stroke severity as the outcome (B=3.738, P=0.036), and aspirin resistance was independently associated with IL-6 (B=0.765, P=0.005) as the outcome. In conclusion, aspirin resistance is related to stroke severity and aspirin resistance is more common in lacunar strokes than embolic strokes.

  5. Dual-stroke heat pump field performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veyo, S. E.

    1984-11-01

    Two nearly identical proprototype systems, each employing a unique dual-stroke compressor, were built and tested. One was installed in an occupied residence in Jeannette, Pa. It has provided the heating and cooling required from that time to the present. The system has functioned without failure of any prototypical advanced components, although early field experience did suffer from deficiencies in the software for the breadboard micro processor control system. Analysis of field performance data indicates a heating performance factor (HSPF) of 8.13 Stu/Wa, and a cooling energy efficiency (SEER) of 8.35 Scu/Wh. Data indicate that the beat pump is oversized for the test house since the observed lower balance point is 3 F whereas 17 F La optimum. Oversizing coupled with the use of resistance heat ot maintain delivered air temperature warmer than 90 F results in the consumption of more resistance heat than expected, more unit cycling, and therefore lower than expected energy efficiency. Our analysis indicates that with optimal mixing the dual stroke heat pump will yield as HSFF 30% better than a single capacity heat pump representative of high efficiency units in the market place today for the observed weather profile.

  6. Exertional heat stroke: the runner's nemesis.

    PubMed Central

    Hart, L. E.; Egier, B. P.; Shimizu, A. G.; Tandan, P. J.; Sutton, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    Heat stroke in distance runners is increasing in frequency. A case is reported of a 41-year-old man who collapsed during a 10-km "fun run" held when the temperature was 31.6 degrees C and the humidity 80%. Acute renal failure (serum creatinine level 1530 mumol/l [17.3 mg/dl]), rhabdomyolysis, disseminated intravascular coagulation and hepatic damage complicated the clinical picture. Repeated peritoneal dialysis and one cycle of hemodialysis because of a very high serum level of uric acid (1.23 mmol/l [20.7 mg/dl]) were required. Although the illness was prolonged, recovery was almost complete, and 4 months after the man's collapse the serum creatinine level had fallen to 133 mumol/l (1.5 mg/dl). PMID:7388706

  7. A Systems Biology Approach to Heat Stress, Heat Injury and Heat Stroke

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    A systems biology approach to heat stress, heat injury and heat stroke Jonathan D. Stallings and Danielle L. Ippolito US Army Center for...paramount importance to the military. Here, we review our recent systems biology approaches to heat stress in order to develop a 3-dimensional (3D...Transcriptomics, Proteomics, Systems biology, Protein aggregation, Metabolomics, Energetics, Computational modeling 1. HEAT ILLNESS IN THE U.S. ARMED FORCES

  8. Heat stroke and multi-organ failure with liver involvement in an asylum-seeking refugee.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Melanie; Koskinas, John; Emmanuel, Theodoros; Kountouras, Dimitris; Hadziyannis, Stephanos

    2006-10-01

    Heat stroke is the result of exposure to high environmental temperature and strenuous exercise representing a medical emergency characterized by an elevated core body temperature and central nervous system disorders. Slightly elevated liver enzymes, lacking clinical significance, seem to be frequent in heat stroke, whereas severe, clinically relevant, hepatocellular injury has been observed in only a minority of cases. In the present report we describe the case of an otherwise healthy young asylum-seeking refugee from East Timor, who developed severe heat stroke during his transportation to Greece in a closed container on a ship under unusually high temperatures. He was admitted to the hospital with severe multi-organ failure. After a short period of initial improvement, he developed severe hepatocellular injury and hepatic encephalopathy. Other causes of liver damage were excluded. The patient completely recovered.

  9. [Heat stroke related to the use of topiramate. The importance of prevention].

    PubMed

    Rosich Del Cacho, M; Pareja Grande, J; Martínez Jiménez, M D; Latorre Latorre, J F; Bejarano Ramírez, N; López-Menchero Oliva, C

    2014-09-01

    Heat stroke is the most severe pathology related to heat. It is defined as an increase in core body temperature accompanied by signs of neurological dysfunction. In the absence of an early treatment, it has a very high mortality rate. Topiramate is a well known drug widely used in epilepsy treatment and migraine prevention. Oligohydrosis has been described amongst topiramate side effects, favouring the risk of hyperthermia and heatstroke. We present the case of a patient who developed heat stroke due to physical exercise while under topiramate treatment.

  10. Neuroanatomical correlates of severe cardiac arrhythmias in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Frank; Kallmünzer, Bernd; Gutjahr, Isabell; Breuer, Lorenz; Winder, Klemens; Kaschka, Iris; Kloska, Stephan; Doerfler, Arnd; Hilz, Max-Josef; Schwab, Stefan; Köhrmann, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Neurocardiological interactions can cause severe cardiac arrhythmias in patients with acute ischemic stroke. The relationship between the lesion location in the brain and the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias is still discussed controversially. The aim of the present study was to correlate the lesion location with the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Cardiac arrhythmias were systematically assessed in patients with acute ischemic stroke during the first 72 h after admission to a monitored stroke unit. Voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping (VLSM) was used to correlate the lesion location with the occurrence of clinically relevant severe arrhythmias. Overall 150 patients, 56 with right-hemispheric and 94 patients with a left-hemispheric lesion, were eligible to be included in the VLSM study. Severe cardiac arrhythmias were present in 49 of these 150 patients (32.7%). We found a significant association (FDR correction, q < 0.05) between lesions in the right insular, right frontal and right parietal cortex as well as the right amygdala, basal ganglia and thalamus and the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias. Because left- and right-hemispheric lesions were analyzed separately, the significant findings rely on the 56 patients with right-hemispheric lesions. The data indicate that these areas are involved in central autonomic processing and that right-hemispheric lesions located to these areas are associated with an elevated risk for severe cardiac arrhythmias.

  11. Cortex Integrity Relevance in Muscle Synergies in Severe Chronic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    García-Cossio, Eliana; Broetz, Doris; Birbaumer, Niels; Ramos-Murguialday, Ander

    2014-01-01

    Background: Recent experimental evidence has indicated that the motor system coordinates muscle activations through a linear combination of muscle synergies that are specified at the spinal or brainstem networks level. After stroke upper limb impairment is characterized by abnormal patterns of muscle activations or synergies. Objective: This study aimed at characterizing the muscle synergies in severely affected chronic stroke patients. Furthermore, the influence of integrity of the sensorimotor cortex on synergy modularity and its relation with motor impairment was evaluated. Methods: Surface electromyography from 33 severely impaired chronic stroke patients was recorded during 6 bilateral movements. Muscle synergies were extracted and synergy patterns were correlated with motor impairment scales. Results: Muscle synergies extracted revealed different physiological patterns dependent on the preservation of the sensorimotor cortex. Patients without intact sensorimotor cortex showed a high preservation of muscle synergies. On the contrary, patients with intact sensorimotor cortex showed poorer muscle synergies preservation and an increase in new generated synergies. Furthermore, the preservation of muscle synergies correlated positively with hand functionality in patients with intact sensorimotor cortex and subcortical lesions only. Conclusion: Our results indicate that severely paralyzed chronic stroke patient with intact sensorimotor cortex might sculpt new synergy patterns as a response to maladaptive compensatory strategies. PMID:25294998

  12. Small heat-shock proteins protect from heat-stroke-associated neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Kourtis, Nikos; Nikoletopoulou, Vassiliki; Tavernarakis, Nektarios

    2012-10-11

    Heat stroke is a life-threatening condition, characterized by catastrophic collapse of thermoregulation and extreme hyperthermia. In recent years, intensification of heat waves has caused a surge of heat-stroke fatalities. The mechanisms underlying heat-related pathology are poorly understood. Here we show that heat stroke triggers pervasive necrotic cell death and neurodegeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans. Preconditioning of animals at a mildly elevated temperature strongly protects from heat-induced necrosis. The heat-shock transcription factor HSF-1 and the small heat-shock protein HSP-16.1 mediate cytoprotection by preconditioning. HSP-16.1 localizes to the Golgi, where it functions with the Ca(2+)- and Mn(2+)-transporting ATPase PMR-1 to maintain Ca(2+) homeostasis under heat stroke. Preconditioning also suppresses cell death inflicted by diverse insults, and protects mammalian neurons from heat cytotoxicity. These findings reveal an evolutionarily conserved mechanism that defends against diverse necrotic stimuli, and may be relevant to heat stroke and other pathological conditions involving necrosis in humans.

  13. Dehydration, Heat Stroke, or Hyponatremia? The Recognition, Treatment, and Prevention of Hyponatremia Caused by High Exercise Outdoor Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Brent

    Hyponatremia (severe sodium depletion) has symptoms similar to heat exhaustion and heat stroke and can easily be misdiagnosed. The number of wilderness users and extreme adventure activities has increased in recent years, and more cases are being diagnosed. Given that a 1993 study found that 1 in 10 cases of heat-related illnesses were…

  14. Exertional heat stroke in navy and marine personnel: a hot topic.

    PubMed

    Goforth, Carl W; Kazman, Josh B

    2015-02-01

    Although exertional heat stroke is considered a preventable condition, this life-threatening emergency affects hundreds of military personnel annually. Because heat stroke is preventable, it is important that Navy critical care nurses rapidly recognize and treat heat stroke casualties. Combined intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors can quickly lead to heat stroke if not recognized by deployed critical care nurses and other first responders. In addition to initial critical care nursing interventions, such as establishing intravenous access, determining body core temperature, and assessing hemodynamic status, aggressive cooling measures should be initiated immediately. The most important determinant in heat stroke outcome is the amount of time that patients sustain hyperthermia. Heat stroke survival approaches 100% when evidence-based cooling guidelines are followed, but mortality from heat stroke is a significant risk when care is delayed. Navy critical care and other military nurses should be aware of targeted assessments and cooling interventions when heat stroke is suspected during military operations.

  15. The Role of Arginase 1 in Post-Stroke Immunosuppression and Ischemic Stroke Severity.

    PubMed

    Petrone, Ashley B; O'Connell, Grant C; Regier, Michael D; Chantler, Paul D; Simpkins, James W; Barr, Taura L

    2016-04-01

    A balanced immune system response plays an important role in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) recovery. Our laboratory has previously identified several immune-related genes, including arginase 1 (ARG1), with altered expression in human AIS patients. The neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) may be a marker of the degree of immune dysregulation following AIS; however, the molecular mechanisms that may mediate the NLR are unknown. The purpose of this study was to (1) examine the relationship between ARG1, NLR, and AIS severity and (2) to utilize principal component analysis (PCA) to statistically model multiple gene expression changes following AIS. AIS patients and stroke-free control subjects were recruited, and blood samples were collected from AIS patients within 24 h of stroke symptom onset. White blood cell differentials were obtained at this time to calculate the NLR. Gene expression was measured using real-time PCR. PCA with varimax rotation was used to develop composite variables consisting of a five-gene profile. ARG1 was positively correlated with NLR (r = 0.57, p = 0.003), neutrophil count (r = 0.526, p = 0.007), NIHSS (r = 0.607, p = 0.001), and infarct volume (r = 0.27, p = 0.051). PCA identified three principal components that explain 84.4 % of variation in the original patient gene dataset comprised of ARG1, LY96, MMP9, s100a12, and PC1 was a significant explanatory variable for NIHSS (p < 0.001) and NLR (p = 0.005). Our study suggests a novel relationship between ARG1, NLR, and stroke severity, and the NLR is an underutilized clinically available biomarker to monitor the post-stroke immune response.

  16. Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Stroke About Stroke Stroke -- A Serious Event A stroke is serious, just ... lifestyle can help you prevent stroke. What Is Stroke? A stroke is sometimes called a "brain attack." ...

  17. Dissociation of severity of stroke and aphasia recovery early after intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Christine; Kappelin, Johan; Perren, Fabienne

    2014-10-01

    Clinical observation suggested to us that aphasia recovers relatively better than other deficits early after intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (IV-rtPA) treatment in stroke patients with minor deficits, while the reverse seemed the case in those with severe deficits. Retrospective analysis of acute ischemic stroke patients with aphasia admitted within 3 hours from symptom onset and treated with IV-rtPA was carried out. Stroke severity, aphasia and global neurological impairment were assessed at admission and 24 hours after thrombolysis. Improvement of aphasia (gain of ⩾ 1 point on the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale [NIHSS] aphasia score) and global neurological improvement (gain of ⩾ 4 points on the NIHSS) were compared in minor strokes (NIHSS ⩽ 7), moderate strokes (NIHSS 8-15), and major strokes (NIH ⩾ 16). Sixty-nine of 243 stroke patients suffered from aphasia. Improvement of aphasia occurred in 7/16 minor strokes, 11/25 moderate strokes, and 7/28 severe strokes. Improvement of ⩾ 4 points on the NIHSS occurred in 3/16 minor strokes, 17/25 moderate strokes and 15/28 severe strokes. There is a significant (X(2)=4.073, p<0.05) dissociation of recovery of aphasia and that of other neurological deficits between minor versus severe strokes. This confirms the clinically suspected dissociation between a good early recovery from aphasia in minor strokes relative to recovery of other neurological deficits, as opposed to a better recovery from other neurological deficits than from aphasia in patients with severe strokes.

  18. Heat Stroke: Role of the Systemic Inflammatory Response

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    developing of novel strategies to reduce the morbid- ity and mortality associated with heat stroke. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS We thank M . Blaha, D. Morehouse, N...Y, Mizutani T, Kato M , Ito T, Morishita E, Yamazaki M , Miyamoto K, Nakao S. Pathophysiology of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) progresses...Sedairy S, Siddiqui S, Shail E, Rezeig M . Elevated pyrogenic cytokines in heatstroke. Chest 104: 1498–1502, 1993. 8. Bouchama A, Hammami MM, Haq A

  19. Exploratory Environmental Tests of Several Heat Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, George P.; Betts, John, Jr.

    1961-01-01

    Exploratory tests have been conducted with several conceptual radiative heat shields of composite construction. Measured transient temperature distributions were obtained for a graphite heat shield without insulation and with three types of insulating materials, and for a metal multipost heat shield, at surface temperatures of approximately 2,000 F and 1,450 F, respectively, by use of a radiant-heat facility. The graphite configurations suffered loss of surface material under repeated irradiation. Temperature distribution calculated for the metal heat shield by a numerical procedure was in good agreement with measured data. Environmental survival tests of the graphite heat shield without insulation, an insulated multipost heat shield, and a stainless-steel-tile heat shield were made at temperatures of 2,000 F and dynamic pressures of approximately 6,000 lb/sq ft, provided by an ethylene-heated jet operating at a Mach number of 2.0 and sea-level conditions. The graphite heat shield survived the simulated aerodynamic heating and pressure loading. A problem area exists in the design and materials for heat-resistant fasteners between the graphite shield and the base structure. The insulated multipost heat shield was found to be superior to the stainless-steel-tile heat shield in retarding heat flow. Over-lapped face-plate joints and surface smoothness of the insulated multi- post heat shield were not adversely affected by the test environment. The graphite heat shield without insulation survived tests made in the acoustic environment of a large air jet. This acoustic environment is random in frequency and has an overall noise level of 160 decibels.

  20. An autopsy case of infant death due to heat stroke.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, T; Maeda, H; Takayasu, T; Fujioka, Y; Nakaya, T

    1992-09-01

    We report an autopsy case of infant death due to heat stroke. On a winter day, a 52-day-old female baby was placed under a Japanese electric foot warmer with a coverlet (kotatsu) on an electric carpet warmer in a heated room at home. After about 5 h, the mother noticed that the baby was unconscious and took her to a hospital. Spontaneous respiration, however, was already absent, and the pupils were dilated. The trunk was hot; body temperature was 41.3 degrees C. The skin of the whole body was dry. Autopsy revealed second-degree burn injuries on the left side of the face and the dorsum of the left hand. Numerous marked petechiae and ecchymoses were found in the thymus (capsule and parenchyma), pleurae (visceral and parietal), pericardial cavity (internal and external surfaces), epicardium, and beneath the serosa at the origin of the aorta. In addition, there was congestion in various organs, edema in the brain and lungs, and hemorrhage in the lungs. Histopathologically, macrophages without hemosiderin granules were present in the alveoli. When the heating conditions at the accident were reproduced experimentally, the temperature in the electric kotatsu warmer rose to 50-60 degrees C. Thus, we concluded that misuse of the electric kotatsu caused heat stroke in this infant.

  1. Uncooled two-stroke gas engine for heat pump drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badgley, Patrick; McNulty, Dave; Woods, Melvin

    This paper describes the design and analysis of a family of natural gas fueled, uncooled, two-stroke, lean burn, thermal-ignition engines. The engines were designed specifically to meet the requirements dictated by the commercial heat pump application. The engines have a power output ranging from 15 to 100 kW; a thermal efficiency of 36 percent; a mean time between failure greater than 3 years; and a life expectancy of 45,000 hours. To meet these specifications a family of very simple, uncooled, two-stroke cycle engines were designed which have no belts, gears or pumps. The engines utilize crankcase scavenging, lubrication, stratified fuel introduction to prevent raw fuel from escaping with the exhaust gas, and use of ceramic rolling contact bearings. The Thermal Ignition Combustion System (TICS) is used for ignition to enable the engines to operate with a lean mixture and eliminate spark plug erosion.

  2. Cortisol levels and the severity and outcomes of acute stroke: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Barugh, Amanda Jayne; Gray, Paul; Shenkin, Susan Deborah; MacLullich, Alasdair Maurice Joseph; Mead, Gillian Elizabeth

    2014-03-01

    Studies in non-stroke patients have shown an association between dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and morbidity and mortality. We conducted a systematic review to evaluate cortisol levels in acute stroke and their associations with outcome. We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE for articles up to April 2013 and PsychINFO for articles up to July 2013, using the keywords "cortisol" and "stroke" and associated terms or synonyms. We included studies published in peer-reviewed journals that recruited 10 or more participants and measured cortisol at least once in the first year following stroke. Data were extracted regarding cortisol levels, including changes over time and their relationship to stroke severity, and outcome. Of 11,240 abstracts, 101 full texts were obtained and 48 fulfilled our inclusion criteria. Cortisol levels were high in the first week after stroke in the majority of studies (26 studies, n = 1,340). Higher cortisol was associated with dependency (8/11 studies, n = 822), delirium (5/6 studies, n = 269) depression (3/5 studies n = 117) and mortality (8/10 studies, n = 856). Five studies adjusted for stroke severity; one found an association between higher cortisol and dependency, and three found an association between higher cortisol and mortality. Cortisol levels are high for at least 7 days after stroke. Elevated cortisol after stroke is associated with dependency, morbidity, and mortality; however, there is insufficient evidence to conclude that these relationships are independent of stroke severity.

  3. Heat stroke internet searches can be a new heatwave health warning surveillance indicator

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tiantian; Ding, Fan; Sun, Qinghua; Zhang, Yi; Kinney, Patrick L.

    2016-01-01

    The impact of major heatwave shocks on population morbidity and mortality has become an urgent public health concern. However, Current heatwave warning systems suffer from a lack of validation and an inability to provide accurate health risk warnings in a timely way. Here we conducted a correlation and linear regression analysis to test the relationship between heat stroke internet searches and heat stroke health outcomes in Shanghai, China, during the summer of 2013. We show that the resulting heatstroke index captures much of the variation in heat stroke cases and deaths. The correlation between heat stroke deaths, the search index and the incidence of heat stroke is higher than the correlation with maximum temperature. This study highlights a fast and effective heatwave health warning indicator with potential to be used throughout the world. PMID:27869135

  4. Heat stroke internet searches can be a new heatwave health warning surveillance indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tiantian; Ding, Fan; Sun, Qinghua; Zhang, Yi; Kinney, Patrick L.

    2016-11-01

    The impact of major heatwave shocks on population morbidity and mortality has become an urgent public health concern. However, Current heatwave warning systems suffer from a lack of validation and an inability to provide accurate health risk warnings in a timely way. Here we conducted a correlation and linear regression analysis to test the relationship between heat stroke internet searches and heat stroke health outcomes in Shanghai, China, during the summer of 2013. We show that the resulting heatstroke index captures much of the variation in heat stroke cases and deaths. The correlation between heat stroke deaths, the search index and the incidence of heat stroke is higher than the correlation with maximum temperature. This study highlights a fast and effective heatwave health warning indicator with potential to be used throughout the world.

  5. Cortisol levels and the severity and outcomes of acute stroke: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Paul; Shenkin, Susan Deborah; MacLullich, Alasdair Maurice Joseph; Mead, Gillian Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Studies in non-stroke patients have shown an association between dysregulation of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis and morbidity and mortality. We conducted a systematic review to evaluate cortisol levels in acute stroke and their associations with outcome. We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE for articles up to April 2013 and PsychINFO for articles up to July 2013, using the keywords “cortisol” and “stroke” and associated terms or synonyms. We included studies published in peer-reviewed journals that recruited 10 or more participants and measured cortisol at least once in the first year following stroke. Data were extracted regarding cortisol levels, including changes over time and their relationship to stroke severity, and outcome. Of 11,240 abstracts, 101 full texts were obtained and 48 fulfilled our inclusion criteria. Cortisol levels were high in the first week after stroke in the majority of studies (26 studies, n = 1,340). Higher cortisol was associated with dependency (8/11 studies, n = 822), delirium (5/6 studies, n = 269) depression (3/5 studies n = 117) and mortality (8/10 studies, n = 856). Five studies adjusted for stroke severity; one found an association between higher cortisol and dependency, and three found an association between higher cortisol and mortality. Cortisol levels are high for at least 7 days after stroke. Elevated cortisol after stroke is associated with dependency, morbidity, and mortality; however, there is insufficient evidence to conclude that these relationships are independent of stroke severity. PMID:24477489

  6. Exertional rhabdomyolysis and heat stroke: Beware of volatile anesthetic sedation

    PubMed Central

    Heytens, Karel; De Bleecker, Jan; Verbrugghe, Walter; Baets, Jonathan; Heytens, Luc

    2017-01-01

    In view of the enormous popularity of mass sporting events such as half-marathons, the number of patients with exertional rhabdomyolysis or exercise-induced heat stroke admitted to intensive care units (ICUs) has increased over the last decade. Because these patients have been reported to be at risk for malignant hyperthermia during general anesthesia, the intensive care community should bear in mind that the same risk of life-threatening rhabdomyolysis is present when these patients are admitted to an ICU, and volatile anesthetic sedation is chosen as the sedative technique. As illustrated by the three case studies we elaborate upon, a thorough diagnostic work-up is needed to clarify the subsequent risk of strenuous exercise, and the anesthetic exposure to volatile agents in these patients and their families. Other contraindications for the use of volatile intensive care sedation consist of known malignant hyperthermia susceptibility, congenital myopathies, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and intracranial hypertension. PMID:28224104

  7. [Psychiatric drugs as risk factor in fatal heat stroke].

    PubMed

    Fijnheer, R; van de Ven, P J; Erkelens, D W

    1995-07-08

    Two men aged 33 and 31 years suffered a fatal heat stroke on a warm summer day. One of them used pimozide and clomipramine, the other zuclopenthixol, dexetimide, droperidol, promethazine and propranolol as psychiatric medication. Both of them had a body temperature > 42.3 degrees C, without perspiring. At first only a comatose situation with practically normal laboratory values existed; this was rapidly followed by massive liver damage, disseminated intravascular coagulation, anaemia, thrombopenia and acute renal failure. In spite of adequate and rapid treatment these complications were fatal. Both patients used medication with an antidopaminergic and anticholinergic (side) effect. The set point of the temperature regulation centre can be elevated by the antidopaminergic activity of antipsychotics. Use of anticholinergic medication can disturb the thermoregulation via inhibition of the parasympathicomimetically mediated sweat secretion. It is recommended to point out the danger of unusually high outdoor temperatures to patients using this medication.

  8. Mitochondrial Impairment in Cerebrovascular Endothelial Cells is Involved in the Correlation between Body Temperature and Stroke Severity

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Heng; Doll, Danielle N.; Sun, Jiahong; Lewis, Sara E.; Wimsatt, Jeffrey H.; Kessler, Matthew J.; Simpkins, James W.; Ren, Xuefang

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is the second leading cause of death worldwide. The prognostic influence of body temperature on acute stroke in patients has been recently reported; however, hypothermia has confounded experimental results in animal stroke models. This work aimed to investigate how body temperature could prognose stroke severity as well as reveal a possible mitochondrial mechanism in the association of body temperature and stroke severity. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) compromises mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in cerebrovascular endothelial cells (CVECs) and worsens murine experimental stroke. In this study, we report that LPS (0.1 mg/kg) exacerbates stroke infarction and neurological deficits, in the mean time LPS causes temporary hypothermia in the hyperacute stage during 6 hours post-stroke. Lower body temperature is associated with worse infarction and higher neurological deficit score in the LPS-stroke study. However, warming of the LPS-stroke mice compromises animal survival. Furthermore, a high dose of LPS (2 mg/kg) worsens neurological deficits, but causes persistent severe hypothermia that conceals the LPS exacerbation of stroke infarction. Mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I inhibitor, rotenone, replicates the data profile of the LPS-stroke study. Moreover, we have confirmed that rotenone compromises mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in CVECs. Lastly, the pooled data analyses of a large sample size (n=353) demonstrate that stroke mice have lower body temperature compared to sham mice within 6 hours post-surgery; the body temperature is significantly correlated with stroke outcomes; linear regression shows that lower body temperature is significantly associated with higher neurological scores and larger infarct volume. We conclude that post-stroke body temperature predicts stroke severity and mitochondrial impairment in CVECs plays a pivotal role in this hypothermic response. These novel findings suggest that body temperature is prognostic for

  9. Mitochondrial Impairment in Cerebrovascular Endothelial Cells is Involved in the Correlation between Body Temperature and Stroke Severity.

    PubMed

    Hu, Heng; Doll, Danielle N; Sun, Jiahong; Lewis, Sara E; Wimsatt, Jeffrey H; Kessler, Matthew J; Simpkins, James W; Ren, Xuefang

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is the second leading cause of death worldwide. The prognostic influence of body temperature on acute stroke in patients has been recently reported; however, hypothermia has confounded experimental results in animal stroke models. This work aimed to investigate how body temperature could prognose stroke severity as well as reveal a possible mitochondrial mechanism in the association of body temperature and stroke severity. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) compromises mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in cerebrovascular endothelial cells (CVECs) and worsens murine experimental stroke. In this study, we report that LPS (0.1 mg/kg) exacerbates stroke infarction and neurological deficits, in the mean time LPS causes temporary hypothermia in the hyperacute stage during 6 hours post-stroke. Lower body temperature is associated with worse infarction and higher neurological deficit score in the LPS-stroke study. However, warming of the LPS-stroke mice compromises animal survival. Furthermore, a high dose of LPS (2 mg/kg) worsens neurological deficits, but causes persistent severe hypothermia that conceals the LPS exacerbation of stroke infarction. Mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I inhibitor, rotenone, replicates the data profile of the LPS-stroke study. Moreover, we have confirmed that rotenone compromises mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in CVECs. Lastly, the pooled data analyses of a large sample size (n=353) demonstrate that stroke mice have lower body temperature compared to sham mice within 6 hours post-surgery; the body temperature is significantly correlated with stroke outcomes; linear regression shows that lower body temperature is significantly associated with higher neurological scores and larger infarct volume. We conclude that post-stroke body temperature predicts stroke severity and mitochondrial impairment in CVECs plays a pivotal role in this hypothermic response. These novel findings suggest that body temperature is prognostic for

  10. Quercetin protects against heat stroke-induced myocardial injury in male rats: Antioxidative and antiinflammatory mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaojing; Lin, Cheng-Hsien; Zhao, Tingbao; Zuo, Dan; Ye, Zhujun; Liu, Lin; Lin, Mao-Tsun

    2017-03-01

    Heat stroke is characterized by hyperthermia, systemic inflammation, and multiple organ failure including arterial hypotension. This definition can be fulfilled by a rat model of heat stroke used in the present study. Anesthetized animals were exposed to heat exposure (43 °C for 70 min) and then returned to room temperature (26 °C) for recovery. One hour before heat exposure, an intraperitoneal dose of quercetin (30 mg/kg) or vehicle (normal saline 1 ml/kg) was administered to the experimental groups of rats. Additional injection was administered immediately after the onset of heat stroke. Immediately after the onset of heat stroke. Vehicle-treated rats displayed (i) hyperthermia; (ii) suppressed left ventricular function; (iii) decreased contents of cardiac total antioxiant capacity (e.g., superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, catalase); (iv) increased contents of cardiac oxidative capacity malondialdehyde and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances; (v) increased cardiac levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6; and (vi) decreased cardiac levels of an anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 10. Histopathologic and survival observation provided supportive evidence for biochemical analyses. These heat stroke reactions all can be significantly attenuated by quercetin therapy. Our data suggest that quercetin therapy might improve outcomes of heat stroke in rats by attenuating excessive hyperthermia as well as myocardial injury. The protective effects of quercetin could be attributed to anti-lipid peroxidative, anti-oxidant, and anti-inflammatory properties.

  11. Severe edentulism is a major risk factor influencing stroke incidence in rural Ecuador (The Atahualpa Project).

    PubMed

    Del Brutto, Oscar H; Mera, Robertino M; Zambrano, Mauricio; Del Brutto, Victor J

    2017-02-01

    Background There is no information on stroke incidence in rural areas of Latin America, where living conditions and cardiovascular risk factors are different from urban centers. Aim Using a population-based prospective cohort study design, we aimed to assess risk factors influencing stroke incidence in community-dwelling adults living in rural Ecuador. Methods First-ever strokes occurring from 1 June 2012 to 31 May 2016, in Atahualpa residents aged ≥40 years, were identified from yearly door-to-door surveys and other overlapping sources. Poisson regression models adjusted for demographics, cardiovascular risk factors, edentulism and the length of observation time per subject were used to estimate stroke incidence rate ratio as well as factors influencing such incidence. Results Of 807 stroke-free individuals prospectively enrolled in the Atahualpa Project, follow-up was achieved in 718 (89%), contributing 2,499 years of follow-up (average 3.48 ± 0.95 years). Overall stroke incidence rate was 2.97 per 100 person-years of follow-up (95% CI: 1.73-4.2), which increased to 4.77 (95% CI: 1.61-14.1) when only persons aged ≥57 years were considered. Poisson regression models, adjusted for relevant confounders, showed that high blood pressure (IRR: 5.24; 95% CI: 2.55-7.93) and severe edentulism (IRR: 5.06; 95% CI: 2.28-7.85) were the factors independently increasing stroke incidence. Conclusions Stroke incidence in this rural setting is comparable to that reported from the developed world. Besides age and high blood pressure, severe edentulism is a major factor independently predicting incident strokes. Public awareness of the consequences of poor dental care might reduce stroke incidence in rural settings.

  12. Validation of a novel claims-based stroke severity index in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Ling-Chien; Sung, Sheng-Feng; Hsieh, Cheng-Yang; Hu, Ya-Han; Lin, Huey-Juan; Chen, Yu-Wei; Yang, Yea-Huei Kao; Lin, Sue-Jane

    2016-01-01

    Background Stroke severity is an important outcome predictor for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) but is typically unavailable in administrative claims data. We validated a claims-based stroke severity index (SSI) in patients with ICH in Taiwan. Methods Consecutive ICH patients from hospital-based stroke registries were linked with a nationwide claims database. Stroke severity, assessed using the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), and functional outcomes, assessed using the modified Rankin Scale (mRS), were obtained from the registries. The SSI was calculated based on billing codes in each patient's claims. We assessed two types of criterion-related validity (concurrent validity and predictive validity) by correlating the SSI with the NIHSS and the mRS. Logistic regression models with or without stroke severity as a continuous covariate were fitted to predict mortality at 3, 6, and 12 months. Results The concurrent validity of the SSI was established by its significant correlation with the admission NIHSS (r = 0.731; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.705–0.755), and the predictive validity was verified by its significant correlations with the 3-month (r = 0.696; 95% CI, 0.665–0.724), 6-month (r = 0.685; 95% CI, 0.653–0.715) and 1-year (r = 0.664; 95% CI, 0.622–0.702) mRS. Mortality models with NIHSS had the highest area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, followed by models with SSI and models without any marker of stroke severity. Conclusions The SSI appears to be a valid proxy for the NIHSS and an effective adjustment for stroke severity in studies of ICH outcome with administrative claims data. PMID:28135194

  13. Effect of prior medical treatments on ischemic stroke severity and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Sacco, Simona; Toni, Danilo; Bignamini, Angelo A.; Zaninelli, Augusto; Gensini, Gian Franco; Carolei, Antonio

    Summary Antiplatelets, antihypertensives, and statins might reduce the severity of the event or improve outcome in patients who, despite prior medical treatment, have a stroke. We evaluated, in patients who had an ischemic stroke, the effect, on stroke severity and outcome, of prior treatment with antiplatelets, antihypertensives, and statins, used either alone or in a three-drug combination. Stroke in Italy and Related Impact on Outcome (SIRIO) was a prospective, nationwide, multicenter, hospital-based, observational study that included patients aged ≥18 years with acute ischemic stroke. We studied 2,529 acute ischemic stroke patients from the SIRIO population: 887 were antiplatelet users, 1,497 antihypertensive users, 231 statin users, and 138 three-drug combination users prior to the index event. The adjusted logistic regression analysis showed an association between prior treatment with statins and good functional outcome at discharge, while prior treatment with antiplatelets, antihypertensives or the three-drug combination did not influence severity or outcome. The absolute probability of a good functional outcome was 46.3% (95% CI: 40.3%–53.2%) in statin users and 36.7% (95% CI: 34.7%–38.7%) in non-users of statins; the absolute risk difference was 9.6% (95% CI: 2.9%–16.4%; p=0.004). Prior treatment with antiplatelets, antihypertensives, or the three-drug combination did not influence stroke severity or outcome, while prior treatment with statins did not influence stroke severity but was associated with a better functional outcome. PMID:22152434

  14. The Effects of Exercise, Heat, and Microclimate Cooling on Terminal Stroke Volume in Men and Women

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    NAVAL HEALTH RESEARCH CENTER THE EFFECTS OF EXERCISE, HEAT AND MICROCLIMATE COOLING ON TERMINAL STROKE VOLUME IN MEN AND WOMEN...20372-5300 THE EFFECTS OF EXERCISE, HEAT AND MICROCLIMATE COOLING ON TERMINAL STROKE VOLUME IN MEN AND WOMEN Naval Health Research Center...We have previously reported that in lieu of the more common end-of-test criteria such as core temperature < 39°C, and heart rate (HR) < 180 bpm

  15. Modeling the Intra- and Extracellular Cytokine Signaling Pathway under Heat Stroke in the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Fernandez, Maria; Grosman, Benyamin; Yuraszeck, Theresa M.; Helwig, Bryan G.; Leon, Lisa R.; Doyle III, Francis J.

    2013-01-01

    Heat stroke (HS) is a life-threatening illness induced by prolonged exposure to a hot environment that causes central nervous system abnormalities and severe hyperthermia. Current data suggest that the pathophysiological responses to heat stroke may not only be due to the immediate effects of heat exposure per se but also the result of a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). The observation that pro- (e.g., IL-1) and anti-inflammatory (e.g., IL-10) cytokines are elevated concomitantly during recovery suggests a complex network of interactions involved in the manifestation of heat-induced SIRS. In this study, we measured a set of circulating cytokine/soluble cytokine receptor proteins and liver cytokine and receptor mRNA accumulation in wild-type and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor knockout mice to assess the effect of neutralization of TNF signaling on the SIRS following HS. Using a systems approach, we developed a computational model describing dynamic changes (intra- and extracellular events) in the cytokine signaling pathways in response to HS that was fitted to novel genomic (liver mRNA accumulation) and proteomic (circulating cytokines and receptors) data using global optimization. The model allows integration of relevant biological knowledge and formulation of new hypotheses regarding the molecular mechanisms behind the complex etiology of HS that may serve as future therapeutic targets. Moreover, using our unique modeling framework, we explored cytokine signaling pathways with three in silico experiments (e.g. by simulating different heat insult scenarios and responses in cytokine knockout strains in silico). PMID:24039931

  16. Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... emergency. Strokes happen when blood flow to your brain stops. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die. There are two kinds ... blocks or plugs a blood vessel in the brain. The other kind, called hemorrhagic stroke, is caused ...

  17. Antiretroviral Treatment with Efavirenz Disrupts the Blood-Brain Barrier Integrity and Increases Stroke Severity

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Luc; Dygert, Levi; Toborek, Michal

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of antiretroviral drugs (ARVd) changed the prognosis of HIV infection from a deadly disease to a chronic disease. However, even with undetectable viral loads, patients still develop a wide range of pathologies, including cerebrovascular complications and stroke. It is hypothesized that toxic side effects of ARVd may contribute to these effects. To address this notion, we evaluated the impact of several non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI; Efavirenz, Etravirine, Rilpivirine and Nevirapine) on the integrity of the blood-brain barrier, and their impact on severity of stroke. Among studied drugs, Efavirenz, but not other NNRTIs, altered claudin-5 expression, increased endothelial permeability, and disrupted the blood-brain barrier integrity. Importantly, Efavirenz exposure increased the severity of stroke in a model of middle cerebral artery occlusion in mice. Taken together, these results indicate that selected ARVd can exacerbate HIV-associated cerebrovascular pathology. Therefore, careful consideration should be taken when choosing an anti-retroviral therapy regimen. PMID:28008980

  18. Effects of aspirin on risk and severity of early recurrent stroke after transient ischaemic attack and ischaemic stroke: time-course analysis of randomised trials

    PubMed Central

    Rothwell, Peter M; Algra, Ale; Chen, Zhengming; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Norrving, Bo; Mehta, Ziyah

    2017-01-01

    Background Aspirin is recommended for secondary prevention after transient ischaemic attack (TIA) and ischaemic stroke based on trials showing about a 13% reduction in long-term risk of recurrent stroke. However, the risk of major stroke is very high for only the first few days after TIA and minor ischaemic stroke and observational studies show substantially greater benefits of early medical treatment in the acute phase. We hypothesised that the short-term benefits of early aspirin have been underestimated. Methods Using individual patient data from all randomised trials of aspirin vs placebo in secondary prevention after TIA or ischaemic stroke, we studied the time-course of effects on risk and severity (modified Rankin score - mRS) of recurrent stroke and myocardial infarction. To more reliably determine the very early time-course of effect of aspirin on risk of recurrent ischaemic stroke, we also studied trials in treatment of acute stroke stratified by severity of baseline neurological deficit. To understand possible mechanisms of action, we also studied the time-course of the interaction between effects of aspirin and dipyridamole in secondary prevention of stroke. Results Among 15,778 patients in 12 trials of aspirin vs. control in secondary prevention, aspirin reduced the 6-week risk of major ischaemic vascular events by 70-80% (disabling or fatal ischaemic stroke - HR=0.29,0.20-0.43, p<0.0001; acute myocardial infarction - HR=0.22, 0.09-0.53, p=0.0008), with greatest benefit in patients with TIA or minor stroke (disabling or fatal ischaemic stroke: 0-2 weeks-HR=0.07,0.02-0.31,p=0.0004; 0-6 weeks-HR=0.19,0.11-0.34,p<0.0001). The effect of aspirin on early recurrent ischaemic stroke was due partly to a substantial reduction in severity (mRS shift analysis: OR=0.43,0.26-0.72,p=0.001). These effects were independent of dose, patient characteristics or aetiology of TIA or stroke. Some further reduction in risk of ischaemic stroke on aspirin only vs control

  19. ["Heat stroke" and/or "Malin's syndrome" in a patient treated with fluphenazine decanoate].

    PubMed

    Ginestet, D; Plumecoq, C; Farine, K; Brion, S

    1977-01-01

    The role of the "heat stroke" is discussed on account of an observation of hyperthermia (42 degrees C or 107.6 Farenheit) that occured with a patient under fluphenazine decanoate, during the summer 1976 heat wave. Contrary to the American descriptions of heat strokes, the patient kept his perspiring ability. Moreover, there was no hypertonic extrapyramidal syndrome, but hypotonia instead. It is to be noted that the preliminary treatment by the corresponding standard neuroleptic (fluphenazine chlorhydrate) did not prevent that hyperthermia whose evolution was rapidly favorable.

  20. Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Is a Stroke? A stroke occurs if the flow of oxygen-rich blood to a portion of the brain ... pressure from the leaked blood damages brain cells. High blood pressure and ... A TIA occurs if blood flow to a portion of the brain is blocked ...

  1. American football and fatal exertional heat stroke: a case study of Korey Stringer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundstein, Andrew; Knox, John A.; Vanos, Jennifer; Cooper, Earl R.; Casa, Douglas J.

    2017-03-01

    On August 1, 2001, Korey Stringer, a Pro Bowl offensive tackle for the Minnesota Vikings, became the first and to date the only professional American football player to die from exertional heat stroke (EHS). The death helped raise awareness of the dangers of exertional heat illnesses in athletes and prompted the development of heat safety policies at the professional, collegiate, and interscholastic levels. Despite the public awareness of this death, no published study has examined in detail the circumstances surrounding Stringer's fatal EHS. Using the well-documented details of the case, our study shows that Stringer's fatal EHS was the result of a combination of physiological limitations, organizational and treatment failings, and extreme environmental conditions. The COMfort FormulA (COMFA) energy budget model was used to assess the relative importance of several extrinsic factors on Stringer's EHS, including weather conditions, clothing insulation, and activity levels. We found that Stringer's high-intensity training in relation to the oppressive environmental conditions was the most prominent factor in producing dangerous, uncompensable heat stress conditions and that the full football uniform played a smaller role in influencing Stringer's energy budget. The extreme energy budget levels that led to the fatal EHS would have been avoided according to our modeling through a combination of reduced intensity and lower clothing insulation. Finally, a long delay in providing medical treatment made the EHS fatal. These results highlight the importance of modern heat safety guidelines that provide controls on extrinsic factors, such as the adjustment of duration and intensity of training along with protective equipment modifications based on environmental conditions and the presence of an emergency action plan focused on rapid recognition and immediate on-site aggressive cooling of EHS cases.

  2. Outdoor air pollution, subtypes and severity of ischemic stroke – a small-area level ecological study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Evidence linking outdoor air pollution and incidence of ischemic stroke subtypes and severity is limited. We examined associations between outdoor PM10 and NO2 concentrations modeled at a fine spatial resolution and etiological and clinical ischemic stroke subtypes and severity of ischemic stroke. Methods We used a small-area level ecological study design and a stroke register set up to capture all incident cases of first ever stroke (1995–2007) occurring in a defined geographical area in South London (948 census output areas; population of 267839). Modeled PM10 and NO2 concentrations were available at a very fine spatial scale (20 meter by 20 meter grid point resolution) and were aggregated to output area level using postcode population weighted averages. Ischemic stroke was classified using the Oxford clinical classification, the Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST) etiological classification, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score and a pragmatic clinical severity classification based on Glasgow coma score, ability to swallow, urinary continence and death <2 days of stroke onset. Results Mean (SD) concentrations were 25.1 (1.2) ug/m3 (range 23.3-36.4) for PM10 and 41.4 (3.0) ug/m3 (range 35.4-68.0) for NO2. There were 2492 incident cases of ischemic stroke. We found no evidence of association between these pollutants and the incidence of ischemic stroke subtypes classified using the Oxford and TOAST classifications. We found no significant association with stroke severity using NIHSS severity categories. However, we found that outdoor concentrations of both PM10 and NO2 appeared to be associated with increased incidence of mild but not severe ischemic stroke, classified using the pragmatic clinical severity classification. For mild ischemic stroke, the rate ratio in the highest PM10 category by tertile was 1.20 (1.05-1.38) relative to the lowest category. The rate ratio in the highest NO2 category was 1.22 (1

  3. Use of a Portable Assistive Glove to Facilitate Rehabilitation in Stroke Survivors With Severe Hand Impairment.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Heidi C; Triandafilou, Kristen M; Thielbar, Kelly O; Ochoa, José M; Lazzaro, Emily D C; Pacholski, Kathleen A; Kamper, Derek G

    2016-03-01

    Treatment options for stroke survivors with severe hand impairment are limited. Active task practice can be restricted by difficulty in voluntarily activating finger muscles and interference from involuntary muscle excitation. We developed a portable, actuated glove-orthosis, which could be employed to address both issues. We hypothesized that combining passive cyclical stretching (reducing motoneuronal hyperexcitability) imposed by the device with active-assisted, task-oriented training (rehabilitating muscle activation) would improve upper extremity motor control and task performance post-stroke. Thirteen participants who experienced a stroke 2-6 months prior to enrollment completed 15 treatment sessions over five weeks. Each session involved cyclically stretching the long finger flexors (30 min) followed by active-assisted task-oriented movement practice (60 min). Outcome measures were completed at six intervals: three before and three after treatment initiation. Overall improvement in post-training scores was observed across all outcome measures, including the Graded Wolf Motor Function Test, Action Research Arm Test, and grip and pinch strength (p ≤ 0.02), except finger extension force. No significant change in spasticity was observed. Improvement in upper extremity capabilities is achievable for stroke survivors even with severe hand impairment through a novel intervention combining passive cyclical stretching and active-assisted task practice, a paradigm which could be readily incorporated into the clinic.

  4. Movement related slow cortical potentials in severely paralyzed chronic stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Ozge; Birbaumer, Niels; Ramos-Murguialday, Ander

    2015-01-01

    Movement-related slow cortical potentials (SCPs) are proposed as reliable and immediate indicators of cortical reorganization in motor learning. SCP amplitude and latency have been reported as markers for the brain's computational effort, attention and movement planning. SCPs have been used as an EEG signature of motor control and as a main feature in Brain-Machine-Interfaces (BMIs). Some reports suggest SCPs are modified following stroke. In this study, we investigated movement-related SCPs in severe chronic stroke patients with no residual paretic hand movements preceding and during paretic (when they try to move) and healthy hand movements. The aim was to identify SCP signatures related to cortex integrity and complete paralysis due to stroke in the chronic stage. Twenty severely impaired (no residual finger extension) chronic stoke patients, of whom ten presented subcortical and ten cortical and subcortical lesions, underwent EEG and EMG recordings during a cue triggered hand movement (open/close) paradigm. SCP onset appeared and peaked significantly earlier during paretic hand movements than during healthy hand movements. Amplitudes were significantly larger over the midline (Cz, Fz) for paretic hand movements while contralateral (C4, F4) and midline (Cz, Fz) amplitudes were significantly larger than ipsilateral activity for healthy hand movements. Dividing the participants into subcortical only and mixed lesioned patient groups, no significant differences observed in SCP amplitude and latency between groups. This suggests lesions in the thalamocortical loop as the main factor in SCP changes after stroke. Furthermore, we demonstrated how, after long-term complete paralysis, post-stroke intention to move a paralyzed hand resulted in longer and larger SCPs originating in the frontal areas. These results suggest SCP are a valuable feature that should be incorporated in the design of new neurofeedback strategies for motor neurorehabilitation. PMID:25642177

  5. Promoting Best Practices regarding Exertional Heat Stroke: A Perspective from the Team Physician

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Pagnotta, Kelly D.; McDowell, Lindsey; Casa, Douglas J.; Armstrong, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    Context: Knowing the team physician's perspective regarding the use of evidence-based practice (EBP) for treatment of exertional heat stroke (EHS) may help increase the number of athletic trainers (ATs) implementing best practices and avoiding the use of improper assessment tools and treatment methods. Objective: To ascertain team physicians'…

  6. Professional Preparation regarding the Recognition and Treatment of Exertional Heat Stroke: The Student Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Pagnotta, Kelly D.; Casa, Douglas J.; Armstrong, Lawrence; Maresh, Carl

    2011-01-01

    Context: Current evidence suggests rectal temperature(T[subscript re] and cold-water immersion (CWI) are the most effective means to diagnose and treat exertional heat stroke (EHS), respectively. Educators, clinicians, and students should be apprised of this evidence to guide their practice. Objective: Investigate what athletic training students…

  7. Increased levels of antibodies against heat shock proteins in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Banecka-Majkutewicz, Zyta; Grabowski, Michał; Kadziński, Leszek; Papkov, Aliaksei; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Banecki, Bogdan

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is the second leading cause of death worldwide. One of the main risk factors of the ischemic stroke is atherosclerosis which is a chronic inflammatory and immune-mediated disease. Bacterial infections generate specific human antibodies against various antigens, including Hsps. It has been demonstrated that Hsps are selectively overexpressed in the atherosclerotic lesions. The amino acid sequence homology between human and bacterial Hsps may lead to an autoimmune response by immunological cross-reaction. Such immune response against Hsps overexpressed in the blood vessels under stressful conditions may contribute to inflammatory processes and subsequent development of atherosclerosis. In this study we determined the antibody levels against bacterial and human Hsp by ELISA in blood plasma obtained from stroke patients. Using ANOVA we analyzed levels of Hsp-antibodies in control and patient groups and correlate them with several stroke risk factors. The group of stroke patients had elevated levels of anti-Hsp antibodies compared to the control group. We also discovered an antibody level increase in patients that previously underwent another stroke. Our data provide evidence that autoimmunity could underlie formation of atherosclerosis plaque leading to stroke.

  8. Heat stroke with multiple organ failure treated with cold hemodialysis and cold continuous hemodiafiltration: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wakino, Shu; Hori, Shingo; Mimura, Takuya; Fujishima, Seitaroh; Hayashi, Koichi; Inamoto, Hajime; Saruta, Takao; Aikawa, Naoki

    2005-10-01

    A 23-year-old comatose man was presented in the emergency room. He had been working inside a building under construction on a hot summer's day. His core body temperature was 42.1 degrees C and he was diagnosed with heat stroke. Urgent cooling procedures, including applying cold vapor to the patient's skin, a gastric lavage with cold water and an intravenous cold saline infusion, were not completely successful and his body temperature remained above 40 degrees C. Because his high temperature was refractory to conventional cooling procedures and we suspected that acute renal failure (ARF) by rhabdomyolysis would develop, we applied hemodialysis (HD) using cold dialysate (initially 30 degrees C and later 35 degrees C), followed by continuous hemodiafiltration (CHDF) with cold dialysate (35 degrees C) at a high flow rate of 18,000 mL per hour. The patient's body temperature fell below 38.0 degrees C within 3 h and was kept below 38.0 degrees C. Continuous hemodiafiltration was continued for one week. During the first week, the patient suffered from multiple organ failure (MOF) involving renal failure, as well as the failure of heart, liver, lung, and central nervous systems. Disseminated intravascular coagulation also developed. However, by virtue of cold CHDF, he almost recovered 3 weeks after the onset, except for remaining mild liver and renal dysfunction. In severe heat stroke, cold HD and high flow, cold CHDF should be a therapeutic choice for cooling and treatment of MOF. Considering mild liver and renal dysfunction still remained, this case suggested these procedures should be initiated at the very beginning of the treatment of severe heat stroke.

  9. Deaths from heat-stroke in Japan: 1968-1994

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, S.; Itoh, T.; Morimoto, T.

    Global warming is increasingly recognized as a threat to the survival of human beings, because it could cause a serious increase in the occurrence of diseases due to environmental heat during intermittent hot weather. To assess the direct impact of extremely hot weather on human health, we investigated heat-related deaths in Japan from 1968 through 1994, analyzing the data to determine the distribution of the deaths by age and their correlation to the incidence of hot days in summer. Vital Statistics of Japan, published by the Ministry of Health and Welfare of Japan, was the source of the heat-related mortality data employed in this study. Meteorological data were obtained from the District Meteorological Observatories in Tokyo and Osaka, the two largest cities in Japan. Heat-related deaths were most prone to occur on days with a peak daily temperature above 38°C, and the incidence of these deaths showed an exponential dependence on the number of hot days. Thus, even a small rise in atmospheric temperature may lead to a considerable increase in heat-related mortality, indicating the importance of combating global warming. Furthermore, half (50.1%) of the above-noted deaths occurred in children (4 years and under) and the elderly (70 years and over) irrespective of gender, indicating the vulnerability of these specific age groups to heat. Since a warmer climate is predicted in the future, the incidence of heat waves will increase, and more comprehensive measures, both medical and social, should be adopted for children of 4 years and younger the elderly to prevent heat-related deaths in these age groups.

  10. Deaths from heat-stroke in Japan: 1968-1994.

    PubMed

    Nakai, S; Itoh, T; Morimoto, T

    1999-11-01

    Global warming is increasingly recognized as a threat to the survival of human beings, because it could cause a serious increase in the occurrence of diseases due to environmental heat during intermittent hot weather. To assess the direct impact of extremely hot weather on human health, we investigated heat-related deaths in Japan from 1968 through 1994, analyzing the data to determine the distribution of the deaths by age and their correlation to the incidence of hot days in summer. Vital Statistics of Japan, published by the Ministry of Health and Welfare of Japan, was the source of the heat-related mortality data employed in this study. Meteorological data were obtained from the District Meteorological Observatories in Tokyo and Osaka, the two largest cities in Japan. Heat-related deaths were most prone to occur on days with a peak daily temperature above 38 degrees C, and the incidence of these deaths showed an exponential dependence on the number of hot days. Thus, even a small rise in atmospheric temperature may lead to a considerable increase in heat-related mortality, indicating the importance of combating global warming. Furthermore, half (50.1%) of the above-noted deaths occurred in children (4 years and under) and the elderly (70 years and over) irrespective of gender, indicating the vulnerability of these specific age groups to heat. Since a warmer climate is predicted in the future, the incidence of heat waves will increase, and more comprehensive measures, both medical and social, should be adopted for children of 4 years and younger the elderly to prevent heat-related deaths in these age groups.

  11. Classic heat stroke in a case of simple hypohydrosis with "bad prognostic indicators" but a remarkable recovery.

    PubMed

    Sinha, A K; Ghacha, R; Youmbissi, J T; Khursany, I A

    2001-09-01

    Heat stroke occurs in the desert area of Saudi Arabia quite frequently and manifest in different patterns including coagulopathy. Frequently encountered complications include renal or hepatic failure, rhabdomyolysis, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), and seizure. Not all of these complications usually occur in the same patient, in case it occurs the mortality reported is significantly high. We describe a case of heat stroke that had nearly all the known complications of heat stroke but recovered from all, except minor neurological deficit in the form of dysarthria and exaggerated deep reflexes.

  12. Risk Factors for Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome in Severe Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shuna; Li, Yue; Yuan, Junliang; Yang, Lei; Li, Shujuan; Hu, Wenli

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe stroke patients have poor clinical outcome which may be associated with development of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). Therefore, the aim of our study was to investigate independent risk factors for development of MODS in severe stroke patients. Methods Ninety seven severe stroke patients were prospective recruited from Jan 2011 to Jun 2015. The development of MODS was identified by Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score (score ≥ 3, at least two organs), which was assessed on day 1, 4, 7, 10 and 14 after admission. Baseline characteristics, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, Glasgow coma score (GCS) and cerebral imaging parameters were collected at admission. Cox regression was performed to determine predictors for the development of MODS. Medical complications after admission and in-hospital mortality were also investigated. Results 33 (34%) patients were in MODS group and 64 (66%) were in non-MODS group within 14 days after admission. Patients in MODS group had more smoker (51.5% vs 28.1%, p = 0.023), higher NIHSS score (23.48 ± 6.12 vs 19.81 ± 4.83, p = 0.004), higher APACHE II score (18.70 ± 5.18 vs 15.64 ± 4.36, p = 0.003) and lower GCS score (6.33 ± 2.48 vs 8.14 ± 2.73, p = 0.002). They also had higher rate of infarction in multi vascular territories (36.4% vs 10.9%, p = 0.003). The most common complication in all patients was pulmonary infection, while complication scores were comparable between two groups. Patients with MODS had higher in-hospital mortality (69.7% vs 9.4%, p = 0.000). In Cox regression, NIHSS score (RR = 1.084, 95% CI 1.019–1.153) and infarction in multi vascular territories (RR = 2.345 95% CI 1.105–4.978) were independent risk factors for development of MODS. Conclusions In acute phase of stroke, NIHSS score and infarction in multi vascular territories predicted MODS in severe stroke patients. Moreover, patients with MODS had higher in-hospital mortality

  13. Optimal control of the power adiabatic stroke of an optomechanical heat engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bathaee, M.; Bahrampour, A. R.

    2016-08-01

    We consider the power adiabatic stroke of the Otto optomechanical heat engine introduced in Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 150602 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.150602. We derive the maximum extractable work of both optomechanical normal modes in the minimum time while the system experiences quantum friction effects. We show that the total work done by the system in the power adiabatic stroke is optimized by a bang-bang control. The time duration of the power adiabatic stroke is of the order of the inverse of the effective optomechanical-coupling coefficient. The optimal phase-space trajectory of the Otto cycle for both optomechanical normal modes is also obtained.

  14. Use of Antihypertensive Drugs and Ischemic Stroke Severity – Is There a Role for Angiotensin-II?

    PubMed Central

    Bots, Michiel L.; Selvarajah, Sharmini; Abdul Aziz, Zariah; Sidek, Norsima Nazifah; Spiering, Wilko; Kappelle, L. Jaap; Vaartjes, Ilonca

    2016-01-01

    Background The increase in angiotensin II (Ang II) formation by selected antihypertensive drugs is said to exhibit neuroprotective properties, but this translation into improvement in clinical outcomes has been inconclusive. We undertook a study to investigate the relationship between types of antihypertensive drugs used prior to a stroke event and ischemic stroke severity. We hypothesized that use of antihypertensive drugs that increase Ang II formation (Ang II increasers) would reduce ischemic stroke severity when compared to antihypertensive drugs that suppress Ang II formation (Ang II suppressors). Methods From the Malaysian National Neurology Registry, we included hypertensive patients with first ischemic stroke who presented within 48 hours from ictus. Antihypertensive drugs were divided into Ang II increasers (angiotensin-I receptor blockers (ARBs), calcium channel blockers (CCBs) and diuretics) and Ang II suppressors (angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and beta blockers). We evaluated stroke severity during admission with the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). We performed a multivariable logistic regression with the score being dichotomized at 15. Scores of less than 15 were categorized as less severe stroke. Results A total of 710 patients were included. ACEIs was the most commonly prescribed antihypertensive drug in patients using Ang II suppressors (74%) and CCBs, in patients prescribed with Ang II increasers at 77%. There was no significant difference in the severity of ischemic stroke between patients who were using Ang II increasers in comparison to patients with Ang II suppressors (OR: 1.32, 95%CI: 0.83–2.10, p = 0.24). Conclusion In our study, we found that use of antihypertensive drugs that increase Ang II formation was not associated with less severe ischemic stroke as compared to use of antihypertensive drugs that suppress Ang II formation. PMID:27846309

  15. Decoding of motor intentions from epidural ECoG recordings in severely paralyzed chronic stroke patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spüler, M.; Walter, A.; Ramos-Murguialday, A.; Naros, G.; Birbaumer, N.; Gharabaghi, A.; Rosenstiel, W.; Bogdan, M.

    2014-12-01

    Objective. Recently, there have been several approaches to utilize a brain-computer interface (BCI) for rehabilitation with stroke patients or as an assistive device for the paralyzed. In this study we investigated whether up to seven different hand movement intentions can be decoded from epidural electrocorticography (ECoG) in chronic stroke patients. Approach. In a screening session we recorded epidural ECoG data over the ipsilesional motor cortex from four chronic stroke patients who had no residual hand movement. Data was analyzed offline using a support vector machine (SVM) to decode different movement intentions. Main results. We showed that up to seven hand movement intentions can be decoded with an average accuracy of 61% (chance level 15.6%). When reducing the number of classes, average accuracies up to 88% can be achieved for decoding three different movement intentions. Significance. The findings suggest that ipsilesional epidural ECoG can be used as a viable control signal for BCI-driven neuroprosthesis. Although patients showed no sign of residual hand movement, brain activity at the ipsilesional motor cortex still shows enough intention-related activity to decode different movement intentions with sufficient accuracy.

  16. Tissue and Circulating Expression of IL-1 Family Members Following Heat Stroke

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    understanding the pathophysiology and SIRS -like responses associated with HS. In addition, future studies de- signed to measure tissue protein levels...for public release; distribution unlimited. Interleukin-1 (IL-1) is thought to have a significant role in the pathophysiology of heat stroke (HS...published August 9, 2011; doi:10.1152/physiolgenomics.00076.2011.—Interleukin-1 (IL-1) is thought to have a significant role in the pathophysiology of

  17. The Thermoregulatory Consequences of Heat Stroke: Are Cytokines Involved

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    Acknowledgements I thank A.M. Bastille, M . Blaha, J. Castor, and L.D. Walker for their technical assistance with the gene knock- out studies. D.A. Dubose and M.N...151, 564–575. Aoki, K., Kondo, N., Shibasaki, M ., Takano, S., Katsuura, T., 1998. Circadian variation in skin blood flow responses to passive heat...sepsis study group. Crit. Care Med. 27, 699–707. Attia, M ., Khogali, M ., El-Khatib, G., Mustafa, M.K.E., Mahmoud, M.A., Eldin, A.N., Gumaa, K., 1983

  18. Serum Levels of Substance P and Mortality in Patients with a Severe Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lorente, Leonardo; Martín, María M.; Almeida, Teresa; Pérez-Cejas, Antonia; Ramos, Luis; Argueso, Mónica; Riaño-Ruiz, Marta; Solé-Violán, Jordi; Hernández, Mariano

    2016-01-01

    Substance P (SP), a member of tachykinin family, is involved in the inflammation of the central nervous system and in the appearance of cerebral edema. Higher serum levels of SP have been found in 18 patients with cerebral ischemia compared with healthy controls. The aim of our multi-center study was to analyze the possible association between serum levels of SP and mortality in ischemic stroke patients. We included patients with malignant middle cerebral artery infarction (MMCAI) and a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) lower than 9. Non-surviving patients at 30 days (n = 31) had higher serum concentrations of SP levels at diagnosis of severe MMCAI than survivors (n = 30) (p < 0.001). We found in multiple regression an association between serum concentrations of SP higher than 362 pg/mL and mortality at 30 days (Odds Ratio = 5.33; 95% confidence interval = 1.541–18.470; p = 0.008) after controlling for age and GCS. Thus, the major novel finding of our study was the association between serum levels of SP and mortality in patients suffering from severe acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27338372

  19. Low Temperature Heat Capacity of a Severely Deformed Metallic Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bünz, Jonas; Brink, Tobias; Tsuchiya, Koichi; Meng, Fanqiang; Wilde, Gerhard; Albe, Karsten

    2014-04-01

    The low temperature heat capacity of amorphous materials reveals a low-frequency enhancement (boson peak) of the vibrational density of states, as compared with the Debye law. By measuring the low-temperature heat capacity of a Zr-based bulk metallic glass relative to a crystalline reference state, we show that the heat capacity of the glass is strongly enhanced after severe plastic deformation by high-pressure torsion, while subsequent thermal annealing at elevated temperatures leads to a significant reduction. The detailed analysis of corresponding molecular dynamics simulations of an amorphous Zr-Cu glass shows that the change in heat capacity is primarily due to enhanced low-frequency modes within the shear band region.

  20. Improved status following behavioural intervention in a case of severe dysarthria with stroke aetiology.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Catherine; Lowit, Anja

    2012-08-01

    There is little published intervention outcome literature concerning dysarthria acquired from stroke. Single case studies have potential for more detailed specification and interpretation than is generally possible in larger studies so are informative for clinicians dealing with similar cases. Such research also contributes to planning of larger scale investigations. Behavioural intervention is described which was carried out between 7-9 months after stroke with a 69-year-old man with severe dysarthria. Pre-intervention stability between 5-7 months contrasted with post-intervention gains. Significant improvement was demonstrated using randomized, blinded assessment by 10 judges on measures of word and reading intelligibility and communication effectiveness in conversation. A range of speech analyses were undertaken (rate, pause, and intonation characteristics in connected speech and single word phonetic transcription), with the aim of identifying speech components which might explain the listeners' perceptions of improvement. Changes were detected mainly in parameters related to utterance segmentation and intonation. The basis of post-intervention improvement in dysarthria is complex, both in terms of the active therapeutic dimensions and also the specific speech alterations which account for changes to intelligibility and effectiveness.

  1. Effects of heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) on evolution of astrocyte activation following stroke in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Barreto, George E; White, Robin E; Xu, Lijun; Palm, Curtis J; Giffard, Rona G

    2012-12-01

    Astrocyte activation is a hallmark of the response to brain ischemia consisting of changes in gene expression and morphology. Heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) protects from cerebral ischemia, and although several protective mechanisms have been investigated, effects on astrocyte activation have not been studied. To identify potential mechanisms of protection, microarray analysis was used to assess gene expression in the ischemic hemispheres of wild-type (WT) and Hsp72-overexpressing (Hsp72Tg) mice 24 h after middle cerebral artery occlusion or sham surgery. After stroke both genotypes exhibited changes in genes related to apoptosis, inflammation, and stress, with more downregulated genes in Hsp72Tg and more inflammation-related genes increased in WT mice. Genes indicative of astrocyte activation were also upregulated in both genotypes. To measure the extent and time course of astrocyte activation after stroke, detailed histological and morphological analyses were performed in the cortical penumbra. We observed a marked and persistent increase in glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and a transient increase in vimentin. No change in overall astrocyte number was observed based on glutamine synthetase immunoreactivity. Hsp72Tg and WT mice were compared for density of astrocytes expressing activation markers and astrocytic morphology. In animals with comparable infarct size, overexpression of Hsp72 reduced the density of GFAP- and vimentin-expressing cells, and decreased astrocyte morphological complexity 72 h following stroke. However, by 30 days astrocyte activation was similar between genotypes. These data indicate that early modulation of astrocyte activation provides an additional novel mechanism associated with Hsp72 overexpression in the setting of ischemia.

  2. Percutaneous Recanalization of Acute Internal Carotid Artery Occlusions in Patients with Severe Stroke

    SciTech Connect

    Dabitz, Rainer; Triebe, Stefan; Leppmeier, Ullrich; Ochs, Guenther; Vorwerk, Dierk

    2007-02-15

    Background. Sudden symptomatic occlusions of the proximal internal carotid artery (ICA) resulting in severe middle cerebral artery (MCA) ischemia and stroke are usually not accessible by rt-PA thrombolysis and the prognosis is usually very poor. Mechanical recanalization of the proximal ICA combined with intravenous and intra-arterial thrombolysis was therefore used as a rescue procedure. Methods. Ten patients (9 men, 1 woman; mean age 56.1 years) were treated with emergency recanalization of the proximal carotid artery by using stents and/or balloon angioplasty as a rescue procedure. Three patients showed dissection, and 7 had atherothrombotic occlusions. Nine of 10 presented with an initial modified Rankin Scale (mRS) of 5, the remaining patient with mRS 4 (average NIHSS 21.4). After sonographic confirmation of ICA with associated MCA/distal ICA occlusion and bridging with rt-PA (without abciximab) an emergency angiography was performed with subsequent mechanical recanalization by percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) (n = 1) or primary stenting (n = 9) using self-expanding stents. Distal protection was used in 1 of 10 patients. Results. Recanalization of the proximal ICA was achieved in all. At least partial recanalization of the intracerebral arteries was achieved in all, and complete recanalization in 5. In 4 of 10 patients limited hemorrhage was detected during CT controls. Major complications included 2 patients who had to undergo hemicraniectomy. One patient died from malignant infarction. At the time of discharge from the stroke unit 9 of 10 patients had improved markedly, 5 patients having an mRS of {<=}2, and 3 patients a mRS of 3. At control after a mean of 20 weeks, 7 of 8 (88%) patients had a mRS {<=}2, and 1 a mRS of 3. Conclusions. Primary mechanical recanalization of ICA occlusions by stent and PTA combined with fibrinolysis and/or GPIIb/IIIa-receptor antagonists seems to be feasible to improve patient outcome significantly.

  3. Cortical activation during robotic therapy for a severely affected arm in a chronic stroke patient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Saeki, Satoru; Matsushima, Yasuyuki; Hachisuka, Kenji

    2008-06-01

    The use of robotic-aided therapy in a patient with residual damage from a previous stroke was an attempt to improve function in a moderate to severe hemiparetic arm. Cortical activities associated with motor recovery are not well documented and require investigation. A chronic stroke patient with a severely affected arm underwent a robotic-training program for 12 weeks. The robotic-aided therapy improved motor control and spasticity in the proximal upper-limb. An increased oxygenated hemoglobin level was observed at the motor-related area in the affected hemisphere. A 12-week robotic-aided training program used in a chronic stroke patient demonstrated elements of motor recovery, and was also associated with direct activation of the affected hemisphere.

  4. Plasticity of premotor cortico-muscular coherence in severely impaired stroke patients with hand paralysis.

    PubMed

    Belardinelli, Paolo; Laer, Leonard; Ortiz, Erick; Braun, Christoph; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2017-01-01

    Motor recovery in severely impaired stroke patients is often very limited. To refine therapeutic interventions for regaining motor control in this patient group, the functionally relevant mechanisms of neuronal plasticity need to be detected. Cortico-muscular coherence (CMC) may provide physiological and topographic insights to achieve this goal. Synchronizing limb movements to motor-related brain activation is hypothesized to reestablish cortico-motor control indexed by CMC. In the present study, right-handed, chronic stroke patients with right-hemispheric lesions and left hand paralysis participated in a four-week training for their left upper extremity. A brain-robot interface turned event-related beta-band desynchronization of the lesioned sensorimotor cortex during kinesthetic motor-imagery into the opening of the paralyzed hand by a robotic orthosis. Simultaneous MEG/EMG recordings and individual models from MRIs were used for CMC detection and source reconstruction of cortico-muscular connectivity to the affected finger extensors before and after the training program. The upper extremity-FMA of the patients improved significantly from 16.23 ± 6.79 to 19.52 ± 7.91 (p = 0.0015). All patients showed significantly increased CMC in the beta frequency-band, with a distributed, bi-hemispheric pattern and considerable inter-individual variability. The location of CMC changes was not correlated to the severity of the motor impairment, the motor improvement or the lesion volume. Group analysis of the cortical overlap revealed a common feature in all patients following the intervention: a significantly increased level of ipsilesional premotor CMC that extended from the superior to the middle and inferior frontal gyrus, along with a confined area of increased CMC in the contralesional premotor cortex. In conclusion, functionally relevant modulations of CMC can be detected in patients with long-term, severe motor deficits after a brain-robot assisted

  5. Bowel Ischemia from Heat Stroke: A Rare Presentation of an Uncommon Complication

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Anuj; Syed, Wajihuddin; Manocha, Divey

    2016-01-01

    A healthy 27-year-old female presented to the hospital after she collapsed an hour into her first marathon run on a hot humid day. On presentation, she was hyperthermic, encephalopathic, tachycardic, and hypotensive. On admission, she was found to have lactic acidosis, rhabdomyolysis, and acute kidney injury and was treated with cold normal saline and cooling blankets. She subsequently started having abdominal pain and bloody bowel movements. Computed tomography of the abdomen revealed ascending colon thickening. Furthermore, her lab findings showed transaminitis and elevated coagulation parameters. Due to the acute hypotensive state from the heat stroke, patient had developed bowel ischemia, ischemic hepatitis, and disseminated intravascular coagulation, all of which are uncommon complications of heat stroke. She was managed aggressively with intravenous fluid hydration with resolution of her symptoms over the course of 4 days. In addition to the uncommon complications, early presentation of this bowel ischemia despite adequate hydration in such a healthy individual is another unique aspect of the case. PMID:27840645

  6. Quantum four-stroke heat engine: thermodynamic observables in a model with intrinsic friction.

    PubMed

    Feldmann, Tova; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2003-07-01

    The fundamentals of a quantum heat engine are derived from first principles. The study is based on the equation of motion of a minimum set of operators, which is then used to define the state of the system. The relation between the quantum framework and the thermodynamical observables is examined. A four-stroke heat engine model with a coupled two-level system as a working fluid is used to explore the fundamental relations. In the model used, the internal Hamiltonian does not commute with the external control field, which defines the two adiabatic branches. Heat is transferred to the working fluid by coupling to hot and cold reservoirs under constant field values. Explicit quantum equations of motion for the relevant observables are derived on all branches. The dynamics on the heat transfer constant field branches is solved in closed form. On the adiabats, a general numerical solution is used and compared with a particular analytic solution. These solutions are combined to construct the cycle of operation. The engine is then analyzed in terms of the frequency-entropy and entropy-temperature graphs. The irreversible nature of the engine is the result of finite heat transfer rates and frictionlike behavior due to noncommutability of the internal and external Hamiltonians.

  7. Severe Cerebral Vasospasm and Childhood Arterial Ischemic Stroke After Intrathecal Cytarabine.

    PubMed

    Tibussek, Daniel; Natesirinilkul, Rungrote; Sun, Lisa R; Wasserman, Bruce A; Brandão, Leonardo R; deVeber, Gabrielle

    2016-02-01

    We report on 2 patients who developed widespread cerebral vasospasm and arterial ischemic strokes (AIS) after application of intrathecal (IT) cytarabine. In a 3-year-old child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), left leg weakness, hyperreflexia, and clonus were noted 4 days after her first dose of IT cytarabine during the induction phase of her chemotherapy. Cerebral MRI revealed multiple acute cerebral ischemic infarcts and widespread cerebral vasospasm. A 5-year-old girl complained of right arm and leg pain and began limping 11 days after IT cytarabine. Symptoms progressed to right dense hemiplegia, left gaze deviation, headache, and speech arrest. MRI revealed 2 large cortical areas of diffusion restriction in the right frontal and left parietal lobes. Cerebral magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) showed irregular narrowing affecting much of the intracranial arterial circulation. Although the first child fully recovered from her neurologic symptoms, the second patient had persistent hemiplegia on follow-up. Including this report, there are now 4 pediatric ALL cases of severe cerebral vasospasm and AIS in the context of IT cytarabine administration, strongly suggesting a true association. Differential diagnosis and management issues are discussed. Along with the more widespread use of MRI and MRA, the true frequency of this severe adverse effect will become clearer in future. For any child with neurologic symptoms within hours or days of receiving IT cytarabine, a low threshold for cerebral imaging with MRI and MRA is recommended.

  8. [Withdrawal of artificial nutrition and hydration in severe stroke: medical, legal and ethical considerations].

    PubMed

    Tannier, C; Crozier, S; Zuber, M; Constantinides, Y; Delezie, E; Gisquet, E; Grignoli, N; Lamy, C; Louvet, F; Pinel, J-F

    2015-02-01

    In the majority of cases, severe stroke is accompanied by difficulty in swallowing and an altered state of consciousness requiring artificial nutrition and hydration. Because of their artificial nature, nutrition and hydration are considered by law as treatment rather basic care. Withdrawal of these treatments is dictated by the refusal of unreasonable obstinacy enshrined in law and is justified by the risk of severe disability and very poor quality of life. It is usually the last among other withholding and withdrawal decisions which have already been made during the long course of the disease. Reaching a collegial consensus on a controversial decision such as artificial nutrition and hydration withdrawal is a difficult and complex process. The reluctance for such decisions is mainly due to the symbolic value of food and hydration, to the fear of "dying badly" while suffering from hunger and thirst, and to the difficult distinction between this medical act and euthanasia. The only way to overcome such reluctance is to ensure flawless accompaniment, associating sedation and appropriate comfort care with a clear explanation (with relatives but also caregivers) of the rationale and implications of this type of decision. All teams dealing with this type of situation must have thoroughly thought through the medical, legal and ethical considerations involved in making this difficult decision.

  9. Machine-based, self-guided home therapy for individuals with severe arm impairment after stroke: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Zondervan, DK; Augsburger, R; Bodenhoefer, B; Friedman, N; Reinkensmeyer, DJ; Cramer, SC

    2015-01-01

    Background Few therapeutic options exist for the millions of persons living with severe arm impairment after stroke to increase their dose of arm rehabilitation. This study compared self-guided, high-repetition home therapy with a mechanical device (the Resonating Arm Exerciser - RAE) to conventional therapy in patients with chronic stroke, and explored RAE use for patients with subacute stroke. Methods Sixteen participants with severe upper extremity impairment (mean Fugl-Meyer (FM) score = 21.4 ± 8.8 out of 66) > 6 months post stroke were randomized to three-weeks of exercise with RAE or conventional exercises. Primary outcome measure was FM score one month post-therapy. Secondary outcome measures included MAL, Visual Analog Pain scale, and Ashworth spasticity scale. After a one-month break, individuals in the conventional group also received a three-week course of RAE therapy. Results The change in FM score was significant in both the RAE and conventional groups after training (2.6 ± 1.4 and 3.4 ± 2.4, p = 0.008 and 0.016, respectively). These improvements were not significant at one-month. Exercise with RAE led to significantly greater improvements in distal FM score than conventional therapy at the one-month follow-up (p = 0.02). In a separate cohort of patients with subacute stroke, RAE was found feasible for exercise. Discussion In subjects with severe arm impairment after chronic stroke, home-based training with RAE was feasible and significantly reduced impairment without increasing pain or spasticity. Gains with RAE were comparable to those found with conventional training, and also included distal arm improvement. PMID:25273359

  10. A Highly Efficient Six-Stroke Internal Combustion Engine Cycle with Water Injection for In-Cylinder Exhaust Heat Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Conklin, Jim; Szybist, James P

    2010-01-01

    A concept is presented here that adds two additional strokes to the four-stroke Otto or Diesel cycle that has the potential to increase fuel efficiency of the basic cycle. The engine cycle can be thought of as a 4 stroke Otto or Diesel cycle followed by a 2-stroke heat recovery steam cycle. Early exhaust valve closing during the exhaust stroke coupled with water injection are employed to add an additional power stroke at the end of the conventional four-stroke Otto or Diesel cycle. An ideal thermodynamics model of the exhaust gas compression, water injection at top center, and expansion was used to investigate this modification that effectively recovers waste heat from both the engine coolant and combustion exhaust gas. Thus, this concept recovers energy from two waste heat sources of current engine designs and converts heat normally discarded to useable power and work. This concept has the potential of a substantial increase in fuel efficiency over existing conventional internal combustion engines, and under appropriate injected water conditions, increase the fuel efficiency without incurring a decrease in power density. By changing the exhaust valve closing angle during the exhaust stroke, the ideal amount of exhaust can be recompressed for the amount of water injected, thereby minimizing the work input and maximizing the mean effective pressure of the steam expansion stroke (MEPsteam). The value of this exhaust valve closing for maximum MEPsteam depends on the limiting conditions of either one bar or the dew point temperature of the expansion gas/moisture mixture when the exhaust valve opens to discard the spent gas mixture in the sixth stroke. The range of MEPsteam calculated for the geometry of a conventional gasoline spark-ignited internal combustion engine and for plausible water injection parameters is from 0.75 to 2.5 bars. Typical combustion mean effective pressures (MEPcombustion) of naturally aspirated gasoline engines are up to 10 bar, thus this

  11. Heat stroke induces autophagy as a protection mechanism against neurodegeneration in the brain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tsung-Ta; Hu, Chou-Hui; Tsai, Chu-Dang; Li, Chuan-Wang; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Wang, Jia-Yi

    2010-12-01

    Heat stroke (HS) is defined clinically as a condition when core body temperature rises above 40°C and is accompanied by central nervous system abnormalities. In this study, we established a rat model of HS by exposing anesthetized rats to elevated ambient temperature (40°C) until core temperature reaching 40.5°C (HS onset). The rat was immediately removed from heating chamber, allowed recovery for various time periods, and killed for histological and biochemical studies. Our results indicated neuronal shrinkage and pyknosis of the nucleus and sustained up to 12 h recovery time in cerebral cortex. Elevated expression of autophagy-related proteins, including microtubule associated protein light chain 3 and beclin 1 in cortical tissue at various times (3, 6, 12 h) of recovery was observed. In addition, the number of autophagosomes stained by monodansylcadaverine, a specific autophagosome marker, increased after heat exposure but was reduced by pretreatment with 3-methyladenine, an autophagy inhibitor. Furthermore, heat exposure increased neuronal degeneration in cortical tissue, as evidenced by staining with the fluorescent dye Fluoro-Jade B for degenerating neuron. Pretreatment with 3-methyladenine in HS rats aggravated neurodegeneration. Taken together, these results suggest that HS induces autophagy as a protection mechanism against neurodegeneration. Modulation of autophagy may provide a potential therapeutic approach for HS and await further research.

  12. Role of contralesional hemisphere in paretic arm reaching in patients with severe arm paresis due to stroke: A preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, Sambit; Harrington, Rachael; Chan, Evan; Dromerick, Alexander W; Breceda, Erika Y; Harris-Love, Michelle

    2016-03-23

    Stroke is highly prevalent and a leading cause of serious, long-term disability among American adults. Impaired movement (i.e. paresis) of the stroke-affected arm is a major contributor to post-stroke disability, yet the mechanisms of upper extremity motor recovery are poorly understood, particularly in severely impaired patients who lack hand function. To address this problem, we examined the functional relevance of the contralesional hemisphere in paretic arm motor performance in individuals with severe arm paresis. Twelve individuals with severe stroke-induced arm paresis (Upper Extremity Fugl-Meyer Assessment=17.1 ± 8.5; maximum score=66) participated in the study. Participants performed a reaching response time task with their paretic arm. At varying time intervals following a 'Go' cue, a pair of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) pulses were delivered to contralesional hemisphere primary motor (M1) or dorsal pre-motor cortex (PMd) to momentarily disrupt the pattern of neural firing. Response time components and hand-path characteristics were compared across the 2 sites for trials with and without TMS disruption. There was no significant effect of TMS disruption on overall Response time or Reaction time, but Movement time was significantly longer (i.e. slower) with disruption of the contralesional hemisphere (p=0.015), regardless of which area was stimulated. Peak hand-path velocity and hand-path smoothness were also significantly lower (p=0.005 and p<0.0001, respectively) with TMS disruption of the contralesional hemisphere. The data from this study provide evidence supporting a functionally relevant role of contralesional hemisphere motor areas in paretic arm reaching movements in individuals with severe post-stroke arm impairment.

  13. Role of corpus callosum integrity in arm function differs based on motor severity after stroke.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Jill Campbell; Dewanjee, Pritha; Tran, George; Quinlan, Erin Burke; Dodakian, Lucy; McKenzie, Alison; See, Jill; Cramer, Steven C

    2017-01-01

    While the corpus callosum (CC) is important to normal sensorimotor function, its role in motor function after stroke is less well understood. This study examined the relationship between structural integrity of the motor and sensory sections of the CC, as reflected by fractional anisotropy (FA), and motor function in individuals with a range of motor impairment level due to stroke. Fifty-five individuals with chronic stroke (Fugl-Meyer motor score range 14 to 61) and 18 healthy controls underwent diffusion tensor imaging and a set of motor behavior tests. Mean FA from the motor and sensory regions of the CC and from corticospinal tract (CST) were extracted and relationships with behavioral measures evaluated. Across all participants, FA in both CC regions was significantly decreased after stroke (p < 0.001) and showed a significant, positive correlation with level of motor function. However, these relationships varied based on degree of motor impairment: in individuals with relatively less motor impairment (Fugl-Meyer motor score > 39), motor status correlated with FA in the CC but not the CST, while in individuals with relatively greater motor impairment (Fugl-Meyer motor score ≤ 39), motor status correlated with FA in the CST but not the CC. The role interhemispheric motor connections play in motor function after stroke may differ based on level of motor impairment. These findings emphasize the heterogeneity of stroke, and suggest that biomarkers and treatment approaches targeting separate subgroups may be warranted.

  14. Predictive factors of brain death in severe stroke patients identified by organ procurement and transplant coordination in Lorrain, France.

    PubMed

    Humbertjean, Lisa; Mione, Gioia; Fay, Renaud; Durin, Laurent; Planel, Sophie; Lacour, Jean-Christophe; Enea, Ana-Maria; Richard, Sébastien

    2016-03-01

    There are no established predictive factors to identify patients at the acute phase of severe stroke with a high probability of presenting brain death (BD). We retrospectively collected clinical and paraclinical data of consecutive patients at the acute phase of severe stroke with a potential progression to BD through the hospital organ procurement and transplant coordination system in five centres in Lorrain (France) between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2013. Final endpoint was adjudicated BD. Of 400 included patients, 91 (23%) presented adjudicated BD. Initial Glasgow Coma Scale score ≤6 (P = 0.008), herniation (P = 0.009), hydrocephalus (P = 0.019), initial systolic blood pressure >150 mmHg (P = 0.002), past history of alcohol abuse (P = 0.019) and stroke volume >65 ml (P = 0.040) were significantly associated with BD progression. Two prognostic scores for stroke with unquantifiable or quantifiable volume were built according to the number of risk factors presented. Following internal validation, the respective bias-corrected predictive performance (c-index) of the two scores was 72% (95% confidence interval: 67-78%) and 77% (95% confidence interval: 72-82%). These scores could form the basis of a simple tool of six criteria to help physicians make the difficult decision of intensive care unit management to preserve organs in potential donors.

  15. Differences in initial stroke severity between Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic whites vary by age: the Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi (BASIC) project

    PubMed Central

    Wing, Jeffrey J.; Baek, Jonggyu; Sánchez, Brisa N.; Lisabeth, Lynda D.; Smith, Melinda A.; Morgenstern, Lewis B.; Zahuranec, Darin B.

    2014-01-01

    Background A wide variety of racial and ethnic disparities in stroke epidemiology and treatment have been reported. Race-ethnic differences in initial stroke severity may be one important determinant of differences in outcome after stroke. The overall goal of this study was to move beyond ethnic comparisons in the mean or median severity, and instead investigate ethnic differences in the entire distribution of initial stroke severity. Additionally, we investigated whether age modifies the relationship between ethnicity and initial stroke severity as this may be an important determinant of racial differences in outcome after stroke. Methods Ischemic stroke cases were identified from the population-based Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi (BASIC) project. National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) was determined from the medical record or abstracted from the chart. Ethnicity was reported as Mexican American (MA) or non-Hispanic white (NHW). Quantile regression was used to model the distribution of NIHSS score by age category (45–59, 60–74, 75+) to test whether ethnic differences exist over different quantiles of NIHSS (5 percentile increments). Crude models examined the interaction between age category and ethnicity; models were then adjusted for history of stroke/transient ischemic attack, hypertension, atrial fibrillation, coronary artery disease, and diabetes. Results were adjusted for multiple comparisons. Results There were 4,366 ischemic strokes, with median age 72 years (IQR: 61–81), 55% MA and median NIHSS of 4 (IQR: 2–8). MAs were younger, more likely to have a history of hypertension and diabetes, but less likely to have atrial fibrillation compared to NHWs. In the crude model, the ethnicity-age interaction was not statistically significant. After adjustment, the ethnicity-age interaction became significant at the 85th and 95th percentiles of NIHSS distribution. MAs in the younger age category (45–59) were significantly less

  16. Differential effects of sympathetic nervous system and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis on systemic immune cells after severe experimental stroke.

    PubMed

    Mracsko, Eva; Liesz, Arthur; Karcher, Simone; Zorn, Markus; Bari, Ferenc; Veltkamp, Roland

    2014-10-01

    Infectious complications are the leading cause of death in the post-acute phase of stroke. Post-stroke immunodeficiency is believed to result from neurohormonal dysregulation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. However, the differential effects of these neuroendocrine systems on the peripheral immune cells are only partially understood. Here, we determined the impact of the hormones of the SNS and HPA on distinct immune cell populations and characterized their interactions after stroke. At various time points after cortical or extensive hemispheric cerebral ischemia, plasma cortisone, corticosterone, metanephrine and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels were measured in mice. Leukocyte subpopulations were flow cytometrically analyzed in spleen and blood. To investigate their differential sensitivity to stress hormones, splenocytes were incubated in vitro with prednisolone, epinephrine and their respective receptor blockers. Glucocorticoid receptor (GCR) and beta2-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) on leukocyte subpopulations were quantified by flow cytometry. In vivo effects of GCR and selective β2-AR blockade, respectively, were defined on serum hormone concentrations, lymphopenia and interferon-γ production after severe ischemia. We found elevated cortisone, corticosterone and metanephrine levels and associated lymphocytopenia only after extensive brain infarction. Prednisolone resulted in a 5 times higher cell death rate of splenocytes than epinephrine in vitro. Prednisolone and epinephrine-induced leukocyte cell death was prevented by GCR and β2-AR blockade, respectively. In vivo, only GCR blockade prevented post ischemic lymphopenia whereas β2-AR preserved interferon-γ secretion by lymphocytes. GCR blockade increased metanephrine levels in vivo and prednisolone, in turn, decreased β2-AR expression on lymphocytes. In conclusion, mediators of the SNS and the HPA axis differentially affect the systemic

  17. Homocysteine, heat shock proteins, genistein and vitamins in ischemic stroke--pathogenic and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Banecka-Majkutewicz, Zyta; Sawuła, Wojciech; Kadziński, Leszek; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Banecki, Bogdan

    2012-01-01

    Stroke is one of the most devastating neurological conditions, with an approximate worldwide mortality of 5.5 million annually and loss of 44 million disability-adjusted life-years. The etiology of stroke is often unknown; it has been estimated that the etiology and pathophysiology remains unexplained in more than 40% of stroke cases. The conventional stroke risk factors, including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, and cardiac diseases, do not fully account for the risk of stroke, and stroke victims, especially young subjects, often do not have any of these factors. It is very likely that inflammation, specific genetic predispositions and traditional risk factors interact with each other and may together increase the risk of stroke. Inflammatory and immune responses play important roles in the course of ischemic stroke. Hyperhomocysteinemia (hcy) is considered a modifiable risk factor for stroke, possibly through an atherogenic and prothrombotic mechanism. Both genetic and environmental factors (e.g., dietary intake of folic acid and B vitamins) affect homocysteine level. Identification of the role of hcy as a modifiable risk factor for stroke and of HSPs as regulators of the immune response may lead to more effective prevention and treatment of stroke through dietary and pharmacological intervention. Dietary modification may also include supplementation with novel preventive compounds, such as the antioxidative isoflavones--genistein or daidzein.

  18. A discussion of the several types of two-stroke-cycle engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venediger, Herbert J

    1935-01-01

    This report discusses different types of two-stroke engines as well as the three most important design factors: volume of scavenge and charge delivery, scavenging process (scavenging result), and result of charge. Some of the types of engines discussed include: single cylinder with crank-chamber scavenge pump and auxiliary suction piston linked to working connecting rod; and two cylinder engines with a rotary scavenge pump arrangement. Three and four cylinder engines are also discussed in various designs.

  19. Environmental Conditions and the Occurrence of Exertional Heat Illnesses and Exertional Heat Stroke at the Falmouth Road Race

    PubMed Central

    DeMartini, Julie K.; Casa, Douglas J.; Belval, Luke N.; Crago, Arthur; Davis, Rob J.; Jardine, John J.; Stearns, Rebecca L.

    2014-01-01

    Context: The Falmouth Road Race is unique because of the environmental conditions and relatively short distance, which allow runners to maintain a high intensity for the duration of the event. Therefore, the occurrence of exertional heat illnesses (EHIs), especially exertional heat stroke (EHS), is 10 times higher than in other races. Objective: To summarize the occurrence and relationship of EHI and environmental conditions at the Falmouth Road Race. Design: Descriptive epidemiologic study. Setting: An 11.3-km (7-mile) road race in Falmouth, Massachusetts. Patients or Other Participants: Runners who sustained an EHI while participating in the Falmouth Road Race. Main Outcome Measure(s): We obtained 18 years of medical records and environmental conditions from the Falmouth Road Race and documented the incidence of EHI, specifically EHS, as related to ambient temperature (Tamb), relative humidity, and heat index (HI). Results: Average Tamb, relative humidity, and HI were 23.3 ± 2.5°C, 70 ± 16%, and 24 ± 3.5°C, respectively. Of the 393 total EHI cases observed, EHS accounted for 274 (70%). An average of 15.2 ± 13.0 EHS cases occurred each year; the incidence was 2.13 ± 1.62 cases per 1000 runners. Regression analysis revealed a relationship between the occurrence of both EHI and EHS and Tamb (R2 = 0.71, P = .001, and R2 = 0.65, P = .001, respectively) and HI (R2 = 0.76, P < .001, and R2 = 0.74, P < .001, respectively). Occurrences of EHS (24.2 ± 15.5 cases versus 9.3 ± 4.3 cases) and EHI (32.3 ± 16.3 versus 13.0 ± 4.9 cases) were higher when Tamb and HI were high compared with when Tamb and HI were low. Conclusions: Because of the environmental conditions and race duration, the Falmouth Road Race provides a unique setting for a high incidence of EHS. A clear relationship exists between environmental stress, especially as measured by Tamb and HI, and the occurrence of EHS or other EHI. Proper prevention and treatment strategies should be used during periods

  20. Frequency of early remodeling of left ventricle and its comparison between patients with stroke volume ≥97 Ml versus patients with stroke volume <97 Ml after aortic valve replacement for severe aortic regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Ali Rizvi, Hafiz Muhammad Farhan; Khalid, Zaigham Rasool; Baksh, Allah; Raza Baig, Mirza Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the frequency of early remodeling in patients of severe aortic regurgitation after aortic valve replacement and to see the incidence of early remodeling in patients with stroke volume >97 ml versus < 97 ml before aortic valve replacement. Method: This was a prospective comparative study conducted from August 2013 to December 2014 in a tertiary care hospital. Fifty seven (57) patients of isolated chronic aortic regurgitation were included in this study. SPSS v23 was used for data analysis. Independent sample t-test was used for analysis of continuous variables and chi-square test for qualitative variables. Results: Out of fifty seven patients, early remodeling occurred in 34 (59.64%) patients after surgery. The mean pre-operative stroke volume of patient in whom remodeling occurred was 110.3+9.66 ml while mean pre-operative stroke volume of patients who did not undergo remodeling was 86.65+7.63 ml. There were 28 (82.4%) patients with stroke volume >97 ml in whom Remodeling occurred where as in patients with stroke volume <97 ml remodeling occurred only in 6 (17.6%) patients (p value 0.004). There was no in-hospital mortality. Conclusion: There is an association between stroke volume and early LV remodeling after Aortic valve replacement. Stroke volume >97 ml is a good predictor of early LV remodeling. PMID:28083026

  1. The Secondary School Football Coach's Relationship With the Athletic Trainer and Perspectives on Exertional Heat Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Adams, William M.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Casa, Douglas J.; Huggins, Robert A.; Burton, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Context: Prior researchers have examined the first-aid knowledge and decision making among high school coaches, but little is known about their perceived knowledge of exertional heat stroke (EHS) or their relationships with an athletic trainer (AT). Objective: To examine secondary school football coaches' perceived knowledge of EHS and their professional relationship with an AT. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: Web-based management system. Patients or Other Participants: Thirty-eight secondary school head football coaches (37 men, 1 woman) participated in this study. Their average age was 47 ± 10 years old, and they had 12 ± 9 years' experience as a head football coach. Data Collection and Analysis: Participants responded to a series of online questions that were focused on their perceived knowledge of EHS and professional relationships with ATs. Data credibility was established through multiple-analyst triangulation and peer review. We analyzed the data by borrowing from the principles of a general inductive approach. Results: Two dominant themes emerged from the data: perceived self-confidence of the secondary school coach and the influence of the AT. The first theme highlighted the perceived confidence, due to basic emergency care training, of the coach regarding management of an emergency situation, despite a lack of knowledge. The second theme illustrated the secondary school coach's positive professional relationships with ATs regarding patient care and emergency procedures. Of the coaches who participated, 89% (34 out of 38) indicated positive interactions with their ATs. Conclusions: These secondary school coaches were unaware of the potential causes of EHS or the symptoms associated with EHS, and they had higher perceived levels of self-confidence in management abilities than indicated by their perceived knowledge level. The secondary school football coaches valued and understood the role of the AT regarding patient and emergency care. PMID:24933433

  2. Heat transfer model of hyporthermic intracarotid infusion of cold saline for stroke therapy.

    PubMed

    Neimark, Matthew A; Konstas, Angelos-Aristeidis; Laine, Andrew F; Pile-Spellman, John

    2006-01-01

    A 3-dimensional hemispheric computational brain model is developed to simulate infusion of cold saline in the carotid arteries in terms of brain cooling for stroke therapy. The model is based on the Pennes bioheat equation, with four tissue layers: white matter, gray matter, skull, and scalp. The stroke lesion is simulated by reducing blood flow to a selected volume of the brain by a factor of one-third, and brain metabolism by 50%. A stroke penumbra was also generated surrounding the core lesion (blood volume reduction 25%, metabolism reduction 20%). The finite difference method was employed to solve the system of partial differential equations. This model demonstrated a reduction in brain temperature, at the stroke lesion, to 32 degrees C in less than 10 minutes.

  3. A Characterization Study of Several Heat Resistant Explosives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-10-04

    explosives appear to be performing as expected. The velocities are of the same magnitude as other heat-resistant explosives such as HNS . They are lower than...the same shock sensitivity as HNS . UNCLASSIFIED 11 NOLTR 74-177 10- 10- 6 o CI1- w 0 10- 7 AH s (MOLAR) = 43.9 kCal/mole AH s (SPECIFIC) 61.5Cal/gm 10...BURNING, AND/OR EXPLOSION. [2 25 NOLTR 74 -177 TABLE I11 ELECTROSTATIC SPARK SENSITIVITY TEST RESULTS HNS -TEFLON 7C Y (ID11)TT(D182 N (D103 CAP. 90/10

  4. Neural Substrates of Motor Recovery in Severely Impaired Stroke Patients With Hand Paralysis.

    PubMed

    Harris-Love, Michelle L; Chan, Evan; Dromerick, Alexander W; Cohen, Leonardo G

    2016-05-01

    In well-recovered stroke patients with preserved hand movement, motor dysfunction relates to interhemispheric and intracortical inhibition in affected hand muscles. In less fully recovered patients unable to move their hand, the neural substrates of recovered arm movements, crucial for performance of daily living tasks, are not well understood. Here, we evaluated interhemispheric and intracortical inhibition in paretic arm muscles of patients with no recovery of hand movement (n = 16, upper extremity Fugl-Meyer Assessment = 27.0 ± 8.6). We recorded silent periods (contralateral and ipsilateral) induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation during voluntary isometric contraction of the paretic biceps and triceps brachii muscles (correlates of intracortical and interhemispheric inhibition, respectively) and investigated links between the silent periods and motor recovery, an issue that has not been previously explored. We report that interhemispheric inhibition, stronger in the paretic triceps than biceps brachii muscles, significantly correlated with the magnitude of residual impairment (lower Fugl-Meyer scores). In contrast, intracortical inhibition in the paretic biceps brachii, but not in the triceps, correlated positively with motor recovery (Fugl-Meyer scores) and negatively with spasticity (lower Modified Ashworth scores). Our results suggest that interhemispheric inhibition and intracortical inhibition of paretic upper arm muscles relate to motor recovery in different ways. While interhemispheric inhibition may contribute to poorer recovery, muscle-specific intracortical inhibition may relate to successful motor recovery and lesser spasticity.

  5. Are we armed with the right data? Pooled individual data review of biomarkers in people with severe upper limb impairment after stroke.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Kathryn S; Schmidt, Julia; Lohse, Keith R; Peters, Sue; Bernhardt, Julie; Lannin, Natasha A; Boyd, Lara A

    2017-01-01

    To build an understanding of the neurobiology underpinning arm recovery in people with severe arm impairment due to stroke, we conducted a pooled individual data systematic review to: 1) characterize brain biomarkers; 2) determine relationship(s) between biomarkers and motor outcome; and 3) establish relationship(s) between biomarkers and motor recovery. Three electronic databases were searched up to October 2, 2015. Eligible studies included adults with severe arm impairment after stroke. Descriptive statistics were calculated to characterize brain biomarkers, and pooling of individual patient data was performed using mixed-effects linear regression to examine relationships between brain biomarkers and motor outcome and recovery. Thirty-eight articles including individual data from 372 people with severe arm impairment were analysed. The majority of individuals were in the chronic (> 6 months) phase post stroke (51%) and had a subcortical stroke (49%). The presence of a motor evoked potential (indexed by transcranial magnetic stimulation) was the only biomarker related to better motor outcome (p = 0.02). There was no relationship between motor outcome and stroke volume (cm(3)), location (cortical, subcortical, mixed) or side (left vs. right), and corticospinal tract asymmetry index (extracted from diffusion weighted imaging). Only one study had longitudinal data, thus no data pooling was possible to address change over time (preventing our third objective). Based on the available evidence, motor evoked potentials at rest were the only biomarker that predicted motor outcome in individuals with severe arm impairment following stroke. Given that few biomarkers emerged, this review highlights the need to move beyond currently known biomarkers and identify new indices with sufficient variability and sensitivity to guide recovery models in individuals with severe motor impairments following stroke.

  6. Comparison of Several Methods of Cyclic De-Icing of a Gas-Heated Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Vernon H.; Bowden, Dean T.

    1953-01-01

    Several methods of cyclic de-icing of a gas-heated airfoil were investigated to determine ice-removal characteristics and heating requirements. The cyclic de-icing system with a spanwise ice-free parting strip in the stagnation region and a constant-temperature gas-supply duct gave the quickest and most reliable ice removal. Heating requirements for the several methods of cyclic de-icing are compared, and the savings over continuous ice prevention are shown. Data are presented to show the relation of surface temperature, rate of surface heating, and heating time to the removal of ice.

  7. [Japan stroke scales and its application for stroke].

    PubMed

    Amano, Takahiro

    2002-11-01

    There are many stroke scales currently available for estimating the severity and outcome of stroke. However, none of the stroke scales have been able to objectively quantify the severity of stroke. The Japan Stroke Society formed a subcommittee to task force the development of an innovative, quantifiable stroke scale. Conjoint analysis was utilized to compile this data. Finally, they developed a novel, and quantifiable Japan Stroke for the acute phase of stroke (JSS) (Stroke 32: 1800-1807, 2001). In addition to standard JSS, the Japan Stroke Scale Motor Function and Japan Stroke scale--Higher Cortical Function were finalized. These stroke scales are all parametric stroke scales. We utilize the stroke scales to monitor stroke patients, to start clinical pathway on patients with lacunas infarction after deciding whether severity of stroke is suitable for the clinical pathway by JSS. We use the JSS for the clinical studies of stroke patients. Furthermore, the JSS was utilized in the phase 2 trial of a new treatment in stroke patients which had significant statistical power. The scales were also introduced to the stroke databank. Therefore, these scales are useful to monitoring the neurological damage of stroke patients in the acute and chronic phase and to estimating the severity of stroke symptoms and predicting stroke outcome in clinical studies. They also have a potential to prove the efficacy of treatments through parametric analysis.

  8. Radiant heating tests of several liquid metal heat-pipe sandwich panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarda, C. J.; Basiulis, A.

    1983-01-01

    Integral heat-pipe sandwich panels, which synergistically combine the thermal efficiency of heat pipes and the structural efficiency of honeycomb sandwich construction, were conceived as a means of alleviating thermal stress problems in the Langley Scramjet Engine. Test panels which utilized two different wickable honeycomb cores, facesheets with screen mesh sintered to the internal surfaces, and a liquid metal working fluid (either sodium or potassium) were tested by radiant heating at various heat-load levels. The heat-pipe panels reduced maximum temperature differences by 31 percent with sodium working fluid and 45 percent with potassium working fluid. Results indicate that a heat-pipe sandwich panel is a potential, simple solution to the engine thermal stress problem. Other interesting applications of the concept include: cold plates for electronic component and circuit card cooling, radiators for large space platforms, low-distortion large area structures (e.g., space antennas) and laser mirrors.

  9. Radiant heating tests of several liquid metal heat-pipe sandwich panels

    SciTech Connect

    Camarda, C.J.; Basiulis, A.

    1983-08-01

    Integral heat pipe sandwich panels, which synergistically combine the thermal efficiency of heat pipes and the structural efficiency of honeycomb sandwich construction, were conceived as a means of alleviating thermal stress problems in the Langley Scramjet Engine. Test panels which utilized two different wickable honeycomb cores, facesheets with screen mesh sintered to the internal surfaces, and a liquid metal working fluid (either sodium or potassium) were tested by radiant heating at various heat load levels. The heat pipe panels reduced maximum temperature differences by 31 percent with sodium working fluid and 45 percent with potassium working fluid. Results indicate that a heat pipe sandwich panel is a potential, simple solution to the engine thermal stress problem. Other interesting applications of the concept include: cold plates for electronic component and circuit card cooling, radiators for large space platforms, low distortion large area structures (e.g., space antennas) and laser mirrors.

  10. Radiant heating tests of several liquid metal heat-pipe sandwich panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarda, C. J.; Basiulis, A.

    1983-01-01

    Integral heat pipe sandwich panels, which synergistically combine the thermal efficiency of heat pipes and the structural efficiency of honeycomb sandwich construction, were conceived as a means of alleviating thermal stress problems in the Langley Scramjet Engine. Test panels which utilized two different wickable honeycomb cores, facesheets with screen mesh sintered to the internal surfaces, and a liquid metal working fluid (either sodium or potassium) were tested by radiant heating at various heat load levels. The heat pipe panels reduced maximum temperature differences by 31 percent with sodium working fluid and 45 percent with potassium working fluid. Results indicate that a heat pipe sandwich panel is a potential, simple solution to the engine thermal stress problem. Other interesting applications of the concept include: cold plates for electronic component and circuit card cooling, radiators for large space platforms, low distortion large area structures (e.g., space antennas) and laser mirrors.

  11. High-Intensity, Unilateral Resistance Training of a Non-Paretic Muscle Group Increases Active Range of Motion in a Severely Paretic Upper Extremity Muscle Group after Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Urbin, M. A.; Harris-Love, Michelle L.; Carter, Alex R.; Lang, Catherine E.

    2015-01-01

    Limited rehabilitation strategies are available for movement restoration when paresis is too severe following stroke. Previous research has shown that high-intensity resistance training of one muscle group enhances strength of the homologous, contralateral muscle group in neurologically intact adults. How this “cross education” phenomenon might be exploited to moderate severe weakness in an upper extremity muscle group after stroke is not well understood. The primary aim of this study was to examine adaptations in force-generating capacity of severely paretic wrist extensors resulting from high intensity, dynamic contractions of the non-paretic wrist extensors. A secondary, exploratory aim was to probe neural adaptations in a subset of participants from each sample using a single-pulse, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) protocol. Separate samples of neurologically intact controls (n = 7) and individuals ≥4 months post stroke (n = 6) underwent 16 sessions of training. Following training, one-repetition maximum of the untrained wrist extensors in the control group and active range of motion of the untrained, paretic wrist extensors in the stroke group were significantly increased. No changes in corticospinal excitability, intracortical inhibition, or interhemispheric inhibition were observed in control participants. Both stroke participants who underwent TMS testing, however, exhibited increased voluntary muscle activation following the intervention. In addition, motor-evoked potentials that were unobtainable prior to the intervention were readily elicited afterwards in a stroke participant. Results of this study demonstrate that high-intensity resistance training of a non-paretic upper extremity muscle group can enhance voluntary muscle activation and force-generating capacity of a severely paretic muscle group after stroke. There is also preliminary evidence that corticospinal adaptations may accompany these gains. PMID:26074871

  12. Cerebral Hemodynamics and Vascular Reactivity in Mild and Severe Ischemic Rodent Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion Stroke Models

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Jeongeun; Jo, Areum; Kang, Bok-Man; Lee, Sohee; Bang, Oh Young; Heo, Chaejeong; Jhon, Gil-Ja; Lee, Youngmi

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia can cause decreased cerebral neurovascular coupling, leading to a failure in the autoregulation of cerebral blood flow. This study aims to investigate the effect of varying degrees of ischemia on cerebral hemodynamic reactivity using in vivo real-time optical imaging. We utilized direct cortical stimulation to elicit hyper-excitable neuronal activation, which leads to induced hemodynamic changes in both the normal and middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) ischemic stroke groups. Hemodynamic measurements from optical imaging accurately predict the severity of occlusion in mild and severe MCAO animals. There is neither an increase in cerebral blood volume nor in vessel reactivity in the ipsilateral hemisphere (I.H) of animals with severe MCAO. The pial artery in the contralateral hemisphere (C.H) of the severe MCAO group reacted more slowly than both hemispheres in the normal and mild MCAO groups. In addition, the arterial reactivity of the I.H in the mild MCAO animals was faster than the normal animals. Furthermore, artery reactivity is tightly correlated with histological and behavioral results in the MCAO ischemic group. Thus, in vivo optical imaging may offer a simple and useful tool to assess the degree of ischemia and to understand how cerebral hemodynamics and vascular reactivity are affected by ischemia. PMID:27358581

  13. Stroke: First Aid

    MedlinePlus

    First aid Stroke: First aid Stroke: First aid By Mayo Clinic Staff A stroke occurs when there's bleeding into your brain or when normal blood flow to ... next several hours. Seek immediate medical assistance. A stroke is a true emergency. The sooner treatment is ...

  14. C-Terminus of Heat Shock Cognate 70 Interacting Protein Increases Following Stroke and Impairs Survival Against Acute Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Stankowski, Jeannette N.; Zeiger, Stephanie L.H.; Cohen, Evan L.; DeFranco, Donald B.; Cai, Jiyang

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The decision to remove or refold oxidized, denatured, or misfolded proteins by heat shock protein 70 and its binding partners is critical to determine cell fate under pathophysiological conditions. Overexpression of the ubiquitin ligase C-terminus of HSC70 interacting protein (CHIP) can compensate for failure of other ubiquitin ligases and enhance protein turnover and survival under chronic neurological stress. The ability of CHIP to alter cell fate after acute neurological injury has not been assessed. Using postmortem human tissue samples, we provide the first evidence that cortical CHIP expression is increased after ischemic stroke. Oxygen glucose deprivation in vitro led to rapid protein oxidation, antioxidant depletion, proteasome dysfunction, and a significant increase in CHIP expression. To determine if CHIP upregulation enhances neural survival, we overexpressed CHIP in vitro and evaluated cell fate 24 h after acute oxidative stress. Surprisingly, CHIP overexpressing cells fared worse against oxidative injury, accumulated more ubiquitinated and oxidized proteins, and experienced decreased proteasome activity. Conversely, using small interfering RNA to decrease CHIP expression in primary neuronal cultures improved survival after oxidative stress, suggesting that increases in CHIP observed after stroke like injuries are likely correlated with diminished survival and may negatively impact the neuroprotective potential of heat shock protein 70. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 14, 1787–1801. PMID:20677910

  15. Severe summer heat waves over Georgia: trends, patterns and driving forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keggenhoff, I.; Elizbarashvili, M.; King, L.

    2015-11-01

    During the last 50 years Georgia experienced a rising number of severe summer heat waves causing increasing heat-health impacts. In this study, the 10 most severe heat waves between 1961 and 2010 and recent changes in heat wave characteristics have been detected from 22 homogenized temperature minimum and maximum series using the Excess Heat Factor (EHF). A composite and Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) have been performed to study summer heat wave patterns and their relationships to the selected predictors: mean Sea Level Pressure (SLP), Geopotential Height at 500 mb (Z500), Sea Surface Temperature (SST), Zonal (u-wind500) and Meridional Wind at 500 mb (v-wind500), Vertical Velocity at 500 mb (O500), Outgoing Longwave Radiation (OLR), Relative Humidity (RH500), Precipitation (RR) and Soil Moisture (SM). Most severe heat events during the last 50 years are identified in 2007, 2006 and 1998. Largest significant trend magnitudes for the number, intensity and duration of low and high-impact heat waves have been found during the last 30 years. Significant changes in the heat wave predictors reveal that all relevant surface and atmospheric patterns contributing to heat waves have been intensified between 1961 and 2010. Composite anomalies and CCA patterns provide evidence of a large anticyclonic blocking pattern over the southern Ural Mountains, which attracts warm air masses from the Southwest, enhances subsidence and surface heating, shifts the African Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) northwards, and causes a northward shift of the subtropical jet. Moreover, pronounced precipitation and soil moisture deficiency throughout Georgia contribute to the heat wave formation and persistence over Georgia. Due to different large- to mesoscale circulation patterns and the local terrain, heat wave effects over Eastern Georgia are dominated by subsidence and surface heating, while convective rainfall and cooling are observed in the West.

  16. Recent severe heat waves: how to view them in a 'global warming' perspective?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kysely, J.

    2010-03-01

    The area of western and central Europe has recently been affected by several long-lasting and severe heat waves, particularly in July-August 2003, June-July 2006, and July 2007. The heat waves influenced various sectors of human activities, with enormous socio-economic impacts. With an estimated death toll exceeding 50000 over Europe, the August 2003 heat wave was the worst natural disaster in Europe during the last 50 years, yielding an example of how seriously may also high-income countries be affected by climate change. The aims of the study are to assess whether recent occurrences of severe heat waves in central Europe were exceptional in the context of past fluctuations, and to estimate their recurrence probabilities under future climate change scenarios. We focus on analogs of the 2006 heat wave which lasted 33 consecutive days in Prague and was the longest and most severe heat wave since the beginning of air temperature measurements in 1775. Probabilities of long and severe heat waves are estimated from daily temperature series generated by a first-order autoregressive model with a deterministic component, incorporating the seasonal cycle and the long-term trend. The model is validated with respect to the simulation of heat waves in present climate (1961-2006) and subsequently run under several assumptions reflecting various rates of summer warming over the 21st century, based on climate model projections. The return period of a heat wave reaching or exceeding the length of the 2006 heat wave is estimated to be around 120 years in 2006. Due to an increase in mean summer temperatures, probabilities of very long heat waves have already risen by an order of magnitude over the recent 25 years, and they are likely to increase by another order of magnitude by around 2040 under the summer warming rate assumed by the mid-scenario. Even the lower-bound scenario yields a considerable decline of return periods associated with intense heat waves. Although positive socio

  17. EEG-Triggered Functional Electrical Stimulation Therapy for Restoring Upper Limb Function in Chronic Stroke with Severe Hemiplegia

    PubMed Central

    Marquis, Aaron; Popovic, Milos R.

    2016-01-01

    We report the therapeutic effects of integrating brain-computer interfacing technology and functional electrical stimulation therapy to restore upper limb reaching movements in a 64-year-old man with severe left hemiplegia following a hemorrhagic stroke he sustained six years prior to this study. He completed 40 90-minute sessions of functional electrical stimulation therapy using a custom-made neuroprosthesis that facilitated 5 different reaching movements. During each session, the participant attempted to reach with his paralyzed arm repeatedly. Stimulation for each of the movement phases (e.g., extending and retrieving the arm) was triggered when the power in the 18 Hz–28 Hz range (beta frequency range) of the participant's EEG activity, recorded with a single electrode, decreased below a predefined threshold. The function of the participant's arm showed a clinically significant improvement in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment Upper Extremity (FMA-UE) subscore (6 points) as well as moderate improvement in Functional Independence Measure Self-Care subscore (7 points). The changes in arm's function suggest that the combination of BCI technology and functional electrical stimulation therapy may restore voluntary motor function in individuals with chronic hemiplegia which results in severe upper limb deficit (FMA-UE ≤ 15), a population that does not benefit from current best-practice rehabilitation interventions. PMID:27882256

  18. Pediatric Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Patients & Families About Stroke Stroke Diagnosis Stroke ... communicate with your child’s doctor. Symptoms of a Stroke Stroke is an injury to part of the ...

  19. Accessing Inpatient Rehabilitation after Acute Severe Stroke: Age, Mobility, Prestroke Function and Hospital Unit Are Associated with Discharge to Inpatient Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hakkennes, Sharon; Hill, Keith D.; Brock, Kim; Bernhardt, Julie; Churilov, Leonid

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the variables associated with discharge to inpatient rehabilitation following acute severe stroke and to determine whether hospital unit contributed to access. Five acute hospitals in Victoria, Australia participated in this study. Patients were eligible for inclusion if they had suffered an acute severe…

  20. [Clinical severity and functionality of acute stroke patients attended at the physiotherapy public services of Natal, Rio Grande do Norte State, Brazil].

    PubMed

    da Costa, Fabrícia Azevêdo; da Silva, Diana Lídice Araújo; da Rocha, Vera Maria

    2011-01-01

    This article investigates the severity and functional independence of hemiplegics patients' post-acute stroke by means of a multidisciplinary clinical staff. It is a descriptive study composed by 40 hemiplegics attended at the four largest physiotherapy public services in Natal, Rio Grande do Norte State. The methods used were an evaluation form, Functional Independence Measure and NIHSS. The results showed a sample predominantly female (55%), stroke ischemic (90%), right brain hemisphere (52.5%) and Hypertension Risk Factor (90%). The mean of clinical severity and functional independence was 13.32±4.7 and 54.6±17.15 respectively. There was no significant difference between the mean of functionality about stroke side (pvalue = 0.66). There is a significant relation between clinical severity and functional independence (r = -0.45 pvalue=0.003). It can be concluded that the level of clinical severity and functional dependence of stroke patients that make use of public physiotherapy services is significant and show the necessity, beyond the classic treatment, to be encouraged preventive educational actions to improve knowledge of this population.

  1. Survey Instrument Validity Part II: Validation of a Survey Instrument Examining Athletic Trainers' Knowledge and Practice Beliefs Regarding Exertional Heat Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Laura J.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this article is to discuss the process of developing and validating an instrument to investigate an athletic trainer's attitudes and behaviors regarding the recognition and treatment of exertional heat stroke. Background: Following up from our initial paper, which discussed the process of survey instrument design and…

  2. The Impact of Heat Waves on Occurrence and Severity of Construction Accidents.

    PubMed

    Rameezdeen, Rameez; Elmualim, Abbas

    2017-01-11

    The impact of heat stress on human health has been extensively studied. Similarly, researchers have investigated the impact of heat stress on workers' health and safety. However, very little work has been done on the impact of heat stress on occupational accidents and their severity, particularly in South Australian construction. Construction workers are at high risk of injury due to heat stress as they often work outdoors, undertake hard manual work, and are often project based and sub-contracted. Little is known on how heat waves could impact on construction accidents and their severity. In order to provide more evidence for the currently limited number of empirical investigations on the impact of heat stress on accidents, this study analysed 29,438 compensation claims reported during 2002-2013 within the construction industry of South Australia. Claims reported during 29 heat waves in Adelaide were compared with control periods to elicit differences in the number of accidents reported and their severity. The results revealed that worker characteristics, type of work, work environment, and agency of accident mainly govern the severity. It is recommended that the implementation of adequate preventative measures in small-sized companies and civil engineering sites, targeting mainly old age workers could be a priority for Work, Health and Safety (WHS) policies.

  3. The Impact of Heat Waves on Occurrence and Severity of Construction Accidents

    PubMed Central

    Rameezdeen, Rameez; Elmualim, Abbas

    2017-01-01

    The impact of heat stress on human health has been extensively studied. Similarly, researchers have investigated the impact of heat stress on workers’ health and safety. However, very little work has been done on the impact of heat stress on occupational accidents and their severity, particularly in South Australian construction. Construction workers are at high risk of injury due to heat stress as they often work outdoors, undertake hard manual work, and are often project based and sub-contracted. Little is known on how heat waves could impact on construction accidents and their severity. In order to provide more evidence for the currently limited number of empirical investigations on the impact of heat stress on accidents, this study analysed 29,438 compensation claims reported during 2002–2013 within the construction industry of South Australia. Claims reported during 29 heat waves in Adelaide were compared with control periods to elicit differences in the number of accidents reported and their severity. The results revealed that worker characteristics, type of work, work environment, and agency of accident mainly govern the severity. It is recommended that the implementation of adequate preventative measures in small-sized companies and civil engineering sites, targeting mainly old age workers could be a priority for Work, Health and Safety (WHS) policies. PMID:28085067

  4. Modeling the inflammatory response in the hypothalamus ensuing heat stroke: iterative cycle of model calibration, identifiability analysis, experimental design and data collection.

    PubMed

    Klett, Hagen; Rodriguez-Fernandez, Maria; Dineen, Shauna; Leon, Lisa R; Timmer, Jens; Doyle, Francis J

    2015-02-01

    Heat Stroke (HS) is a life-threatening illness caused by prolonged exposure to heat that causes severe hyperthermia and nervous system abnormalities. The long term consequences of HS are poorly understood and deeper insight is required to find possible treatment strategies. Elevated pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines during HS recovery suggest to play a major role in the immune response. In this study, we developed a mathematical model to understand the interactions and dynamics of cytokines in the hypothalamus, the main thermoregulatory center in the brain. Uncertainty and identifiability analysis of the calibrated model parameters revealed non-identifiable parameters due to the limited amount of data. To overcome the lack of identifiability of the parameters, an iterative cycle of optimal experimental design, data collection, re-calibration and model reduction was applied and further informative experiments were suggested. Additionally, a new method of approximating the prior distribution of the parameters for Bayesian optimal experimental design based on the profile likelihood is presented.

  5. Heat transfer and pressure drop of supercritical carbon dioxide flowing in several printed circuit heat exchanger channel patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, M.; Kruizenga, A.; Anderson, M.; Corradini, M.

    2012-07-01

    Closed-loop Brayton cycles using supercritical carbon dioxide (SCO{sub 2}) show potential for use in high-temperature power generation applications including High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGR) and Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors (SFR). Compared to Rankine cycles SCO{sub 2} Brayton cycles offer similar or improved efficiency and the potential for decreased capital costs due to a reduction in equipment size and complexity. Compact printed-circuit heat exchangers (PCHE) are being considered as part of several SCO{sub 2} Brayton designs to further reduce equipment size with increased energy density. Several designs plan to use a gas cooler operating near the pseudo-critical point of carbon dioxide to benefit from large variations in thermophysical properties, but further work is needed to validate correlations for heat transfer and pressure-drop characteristics of SCO{sub 2} flows in candidate PCHE channel designs for a variety of operating conditions. This paper presents work on experimental measurements of the heat transfer and pressure drop behavior of miniature channels using carbon dioxide at supercritical pressure. Results from several plate geometries tested in horizontal cooling-mode flow are presented, including a straight semi-circular channel, zigzag channel with a bend angle of 80 degrees, and a channel with a staggered array of extruded airfoil pillars modeled after a NACA 0020 airfoil with an 8.1 mm chord length facing into the flow. Heat transfer coefficients and bulk temperatures are calculated from measured local wall temperatures and local heat fluxes. The experimental results are compared to several methods for estimating the friction factor and Nusselt number of cooling-mode flows at supercritical pressures in millimeter-scale channels. (authors)

  6. Stroke vision, aphasia, neglect (VAN) assessment—a novel emergent large vessel occlusion screening tool: pilot study and comparison with current clinical severity indices

    PubMed Central

    Teleb, Mohamed S; Ver Hage, Anna; Carter, Jaqueline; Jayaraman, Mahesh V; McTaggart, Ryan A

    2017-01-01

    Background Identification of emergent large vessel occlusion (ELVO) stroke has become increasingly important with the recent publications of favorable acute stroke thrombectomy trials. Multiple screening tools exist but the length of the examination and the false positive rate range from good to adequate. A screening tool was designed and tested in the emergency department using nurse responders without a scoring system. Methods The vision, aphasia, and neglect (VAN) screening tool was designed to quickly assess functional neurovascular anatomy. While objective, there is no need to calculate or score with VAN. After training participating nurses to use it, VAN was used as an ELVO screen for all stroke patients on arrival to our emergency room before physician evaluation and CT scan. Results There were 62 consecutive code stroke activations during the pilot study. 19 (31%) of the patients were VAN positive and 24 (39%) had a National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score of ≥6. All 14 patients with ELVO were either VAN positive or assigned a NIHSS score ≥6. While both clinical severity thresholds had 100% sensitivity, VAN was more specific (90% vs 74% for NIHSS ≥6). Similarly, while VAN and NIHSS ≥6 had 100% negative predictive value, VAN had a 74% positive predictive value while NIHSS ≥6 had only a 58% positive predictive value. Conclusions The VAN screening tool accurately identified ELVO patients and outperformed a NIHSS ≥6 severity threshold and may best allow clinical teams to expedite care and mobilize resources for ELVO patients. A larger study to both validate this screening tool and compare with others is warranted. PMID:26891627

  7. Effect of treatment delay, age, and stroke severity on the effects of intravenous thrombolysis with alteplase for acute ischaemic stroke: a meta-analysis of individual patient data from randomised trials

    PubMed Central

    Emberson, Jonathan; Lees, Kennedy R; Lyden, Patrick; Blackwell, Lisa; Albers, Gregory; Bluhmki, Erich; Brott, Thomas; Cohen, Geoff; Davis, Stephen; Donnan, Geoffrey; Grotta, James; Howard, George; Kaste, Markku; Koga, Masatoshi; von Kummer, Ruediger; Lansberg, Maarten; Lindley, Richard I; Murray, Gordon; Olivot, Jean Marc; Parsons, Mark; Tilley, Barbara; Toni, Danilo; Toyoda, Kazunori; Wahlgren, Nils; Wardlaw, Joanna; Whiteley, William; del Zoppo, Gregory J; Baigent, Colin; Sandercock, Peter; Hacke, Werner

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Alteplase is effective for treatment of acute ischaemic stroke but debate continues about its use after longer times since stroke onset, in older patients, and among patients who have had the least or most severe strokes. We assessed the role of these factors in affecting good stroke outcome in patients given alteplase. Methods We did a pre-specified meta-analysis of individual patient data from 6756 patients in nine randomised trials comparing alteplase with placebo or open control. We included all completed randomised phase 3 trials of intravenous alteplase for treatment of acute ischaemic stroke for which data were available. Retrospective checks confirmed that no eligible trials had been omitted. We defined a good stroke outcome as no significant disability at 3–6 months, defined by a modified Rankin Score of 0 or 1. Additional outcomes included symptomatic intracranial haemorrhage (defined by type 2 parenchymal haemorrhage within 7 days and, separately, by the SITS-MOST definition of parenchymal type 2 haemorrhage within 36 h), fatal intracranial haemorrhage within 7 days, and 90-day mortality. Findings Alteplase increased the odds of a good stroke outcome, with earlier treatment associated with bigger proportional benefit. Treatment within 3·0 h resulted in a good outcome for 259 (32·9%) of 787 patients who received alteplase versus 176 (23·1%) of 762 who received control (OR 1·75, 95% CI 1·35–2·27); delay of greater than 3·0 h, up to 4·5 h, resulted in good outcome for 485 (35·3%) of 1375 versus 432 (30·1%) of 1437 (OR 1·26, 95% CI 1·05–1·51); and delay of more than 4·5 h resulted in good outcome for 401 (32·6%) of 1229 versus 357 (30·6%) of 1166 (OR 1·15, 95% CI 0·95–1·40). Proportional treatment benefits were similar irrespective of age or stroke severity. Alteplase significantly increased the odds of symptomatic intracranial haemorrhage (type 2 parenchymal haemorrhage definition 231 [6·8%] of 3391 vs 44 [1·3

  8. Nitric Oxide does not Contribute to the Hypotension of Heat Stroke

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-03-01

    instrumented for the measurement of arterial blood pressure , electrocardiogram, and temperature at four sites. Rats were exposed to EH (ambient...temperature, 40 6 1°C) until mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) decreased to 75 mmHg, which was arbitrarily defined as the induction of heatstroke. In...environmental heating; hyperthermia; heat stress; blood pressure HEATSTROKE IS A MEDICAL EMERGENCY characterized by profound hypotension, delirium

  9. Stroke in Minorities

    PubMed Central

    Trimble, Brian; Morgenstern, Lewis B.

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Minorities in the United States have higher stroke risks, stroke occurrence at an earlier age, and for some groups, more severe strokes than non-Hispanic whites. Factors contributing to this disparity are explored. Characteristics of African American, Hispanic, and Native American stroke risk and incidence are reviewed. We mention recent interventions to raise the awareness of stroke risk factors and symptoms in minorities. The importance of the problem is discussed, and we suggest ways stroke in minorities may be reduced. PMID:19026907

  10. Airplane stroke syndrome.

    PubMed

    Humaidan, Hani; Yassi, Nawaf; Weir, Louise; Davis, Stephen M; Meretoja, Atte

    2016-07-01

    Only 37 cases of stroke during or soon after long-haul flights have been published to our knowledge. In this retrospective observational study, we searched the Royal Melbourne Hospital prospective stroke database and all discharge summaries from 1 September 2003 to 30 September 2014 for flight-related strokes, defined as patients presenting with stroke within 14days of air travel. We hypothesised that a patent foramen ovale (PFO) is an important, but not the only mechanism, of flight-related stroke. We describe the patient, stroke, and flight characteristics. Over the study period, 131 million passengers arrived at Melbourne airport. Our centre admitted 5727 stroke patients, of whom 42 (0.73%) had flight-related strokes. Flight-related stroke patients were younger (median age 65 versus 73, p<0.001), had similar stroke severity, and received intravenous thrombolysis more often than non-flight-related stroke patients. Seven patients had flight-related intracerebral haemorrhage. The aetiology of the ischaemic strokes was cardioembolic in 14/35 (40%), including seven patients with confirmed PFO, one with atrial septal defect, four with atrial fibrillation, one with endocarditis, and one with aortic arch atheroma. Paradoxical embolism was confirmed in six patients. Stroke related to air travel is a rare occurrence, less than one in a million. Although 20% of patients had a PFO, distribution of stroke aetiologies was diverse and was not limited to PFO and paradoxical embolism.

  11. Superior neuroprotective effects of cerebrolysin in heat stroke following chronic intoxication of Cu or Ag engineered nanoparticles. A comparative study with other neuroprotective agents using biochemical and morphological approaches in the rat.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Hari Shanker; Muresanu, Dafin Fior; Patnaik, Ranjana; Stan, Adina Dora; Vacaras, Vitalie; Perju-Dumbrav, Laura; Alexandru, Badisor; Buzoianu, Anca; Opincariu, Iulian; Menon, Preeti Kumaran; Sharma, Aruna

    2011-09-01

    The possibility that cerebrolysin, a mixture of several active fragments of neurotrophic factors and peptides induces neuroprotection following nanoparticles induced exacerbation of brain damage in heat stroke was examined in a rat model. For this purpose, the therapeutic efficacy of Cerebrolysin (2.5 or 5 ml/kg) recommended for stroke treatment was used in comparison with other drugs in standard doses recommended for such therapy in clinical situations e.g., levetiracetam (44 mg/kg), pregabalin (200 mg/kg), topiramate (40 mg/kg,i.p.) and valproate (400 mg/kg). Rats subjected to 4 h heat stress in a biological oxygen demand (BOD) incubator at 38 degrees C (Rel Humid 45-47%; Wind vel 22.4 to 25.6 cm/sec) developed profound behavioral symptoms of heat stroke e.g., hyperthermia, profuse salivation, prostration and gastric ulcerations in the stomach. These rats also exhibited marked brain pathology at this time. Thus, breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to proteins associated with brain edema formation could be seen in these heat stressed rats as compared to control groups. The edematous brain areas showed profound neuronal damage and/or distortion in large areas of the neuropil. These pathological symptoms were further exacerbated in Cu or Ag nanoparticles treated group (50-60 nm particle size, 50 mg/kg, i.p./day for 7 days) after identical heat stress on the 8th day. Pretreatment with cerebrolysin (2.5 ml/kg, i.v.) daily for 3 days in normal rats before heat stress significantly reduced the behavioral stress symptoms and the breakdown of the BBB function, edema formation and neuronal injuries. However, the magnitude and intensity of these neuroprotective effects were much less intense in all other drug treated rats after similar heat stress. On the other hand, almost double dose of cerebrolysin (5 ml/kg) was needed to achieve comparable neuroprotection in nanoparticles treated animals after heat stress. Whereas, double dose of all other compounds was much less

  12. Hippocampal stroke.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    The first to link disturbance of memory and lesions of the medial temporal lobe was the Russian neurologist von Bechterew, who in 1989 presented the brain of a 60-year-old man who had suffered from severe amnesia. Autopsy showed bilateral damage of the medial temporal lobe. Several following postmortem case studies confirmed the association between permanent amnesia and bitemporal stroke. Reports of transient memory deficits in unilateral stroke in combination with other neurological and neuropsychological deficits followed. With the advent of brain imaging, persistent or transient amnesia as the sole or primary manifestation of acute - mostly left-sided - hippocampal stroke was described. With the use of modern MRI techniques the identification of typical ischemic stroke lesion patterns affecting the hippocampus has become possible. Although overt cognitive deficits in unilateral hippocampal stroke seem to be rare, a careful neuropsychological examination might be necessary to detect resulting neuropsychological deficits including disturbances of verbal and nonverbal episodic long-term memory and spatial orientation.

  13. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting for severe stenosis of the intracranial extradural internal carotid artery causing transient ischemic attack or minor stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Jun Kyeung; Choi, Chang Hwa; Cha, Seung Heon; Choi, Byung Kwan; Cho, Won Ho; Kang, Tae Ho; Sung, Sang Min; Cho, Han Jin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the technical feasibility and clinical efficacy of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting (PTAS) for symptomatic stenosis of the intracranial extradural (petrous and cavernous) internal carotid artery (ICA). Review of medical records identified 26 consecutive patients who underwent PTAS using a balloon-expandable coronary stent (n = 15, 57.7%) or a Wingspan self-expandable stent (n = 11, 42.3%) for treatment of severe stenosis (>70%) involving the intracranial extradural ICA. The inclusion criteria were transient ischemic attack with an ABCD2 score of ≥3 (n = 12, 46.2%) or minor stroke with an NIHSS score of ≤4 (n = 14, 53.8%). Technical success rates, complications, and angiographic and clinical outcomes were analyzed retrospectively. PTAS was technically successful in all patients. The mean stenosis ratio decreased from 77.1% to 10.0% immediately after PTAS. The overall incidence of procedural complications was 23.1%, and the postoperative permanent morbidity/mortality rate was 7.7%. A total of 22 patients were tracked over an average period of 29.9 months. During the observation period, 20 patients (90.9%) had no further cerebrovascular events and stroke recurrence occurred in two patients (9.1%), resulting in an annual stroke risk of 3.7%. Two cases (11.1%) of significant in-stent restenosis (>50%) were found on follow-up angiography (n = 18). PTAS for severe stenosis (>70%) involving the intracranial extradural ICA showed a good technical feasibility and favorable clinical outcome in patients with transient ischemic attack or minor stroke. PMID:26063697

  14. Therapeutic treatment with ascorbate rescues mice from heat stroke-induced death by attenuating systemic inflammatory response and hypothalamic neuronal damage.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Yu; Chen, Jen-Yin; Chen, Sheng-Hsien; Cheng, Tain-Junn; Lin, Mao-Tsun; Hu, Miao-Lin

    2016-04-01

    The impact of ascorbate on oxidative stress-related diseases is moderate because of its limited oral bioavailability and rapid clearance. However, recent evidence of the clinical benefit of parenteral vitamin C administration has emerged, especially in critical care. Heatstroke is defined as a form of excessive hyperthermia associated with a systemic inflammatory response that results in multiple organ dysfunctions in which central nervous system disorders such as delirium, convulsions, and coma are predominant. The thermoregulatory, immune, coagulation and tissue injury responses of heatstroke closely resemble those observed during sepsis and are likely mediated by similar cellular mechanisms. This study was performed by using the characteristic high lethality rate and sepsis-mimic systemic inflammatory response of a murine model of heat stroke to test our hypothesis that supra-physiological doses of ascorbate may have therapeutic use in critical care. We demonstrated that parenteral administration of ascorbate abrogated the lethality and thermoregulatory dysfunction in murine model of heat stroke by attenuating heat stroke-induced accelerated systemic inflammatory, coagulation responses and the resultant multiple organ injury, especially in hypothalamus. Overall, our findings support the hypothesis and notion that supra-physiological doses of ascorbate may have therapeutic use in critical care.

  15. Use of a robotic device for the rehabilitation of severe upper limb paresis in subacute stroke: exploration of patient/robot interactions and the motor recovery process.

    PubMed

    Duret, Christophe; Courtial, Ophélie; Grosmaire, Anne-Gaëlle; Hutin, Emilie

    2015-01-01

    This pioneering observational study explored the interaction between subacute stroke inpatients and a rehabilitation robot during upper limb training. 25 stroke survivors (age 55 ± 17 years; time since stroke, 52 ± 21 days) with severe upper limb paresis carried out 16 sessions of robot-assisted shoulder/elbow training (InMotion 2.0, IMT, Inc., MA, USA) combined with standard therapy. The values of 3 patient/robot interaction parameters (a guidance parameter: Stiffness, a velocity-related parameter: Slottime, and Robotic Power) were compared between sessions 1 (S1), 4 (S4), 8 (S8), 12 (S12), and 16 (S16). Pre/post Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) scores were compared in 18 patients. Correlations between interaction parameters and clinical and kinematic outcome measures were evaluated. Slottime decreased at S8 (P = 0.003), while Guidance decreased at S12 (P = 0.008). Robotic Power tended to decrease until S16. FMA scores improved from S1 to S16 (+49%, P = 0.002). Changes in FMA score were correlated with the Stiffness parameter (R = 0.4, P = 0.003). Slottime was correlated with movement velocity. This novel approach demonstrated that a robotic device is a useful and reliable tool for the quantification of interaction parameters. Moreover, changes in these parameters were correlated with clinical and kinematic changes. These results suggested that robot-based recordings can provide new insights into the motor recovery process.

  16. Use of a Robotic Device for the Rehabilitation of Severe Upper Limb Paresis in Subacute Stroke: Exploration of Patient/Robot Interactions and the Motor Recovery Process

    PubMed Central

    Courtial, Ophélie; Grosmaire, Anne-Gaëlle; Hutin, Emilie

    2015-01-01

    This pioneering observational study explored the interaction between subacute stroke inpatients and a rehabilitation robot during upper limb training. 25 stroke survivors (age 55 ± 17 years; time since stroke, 52 ± 21 days) with severe upper limb paresis carried out 16 sessions of robot-assisted shoulder/elbow training (InMotion 2.0, IMT, Inc., MA, USA) combined with standard therapy. The values of 3 patient/robot interaction parameters (a guidance parameter: Stiffness, a velocity-related parameter: Slottime, and Robotic Power) were compared between sessions 1 (S1), 4 (S4), 8 (S8), 12 (S12), and 16 (S16). Pre/post Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) scores were compared in 18 patients. Correlations between interaction parameters and clinical and kinematic outcome measures were evaluated. Slottime decreased at S8 (P = 0.003), while Guidance decreased at S12 (P = 0.008). Robotic Power tended to decrease until S16. FMA scores improved from S1 to S16 (+49%, P = 0.002). Changes in FMA score were correlated with the Stiffness parameter (R = 0.4, P = 0.003). Slottime was correlated with movement velocity. This novel approach demonstrated that a robotic device is a useful and reliable tool for the quantification of interaction parameters. Moreover, changes in these parameters were correlated with clinical and kinematic changes. These results suggested that robot-based recordings can provide new insights into the motor recovery process. PMID:25821804

  17. Recovery of post stroke proximal arm function, driven by complex neuroplastic bilateral brain activation patterns and predicted by baseline motor dysfunction severity

    PubMed Central

    Pundik, Svetlana; McCabe, Jessica P.; Hrovat, Ken; Fredrickson, Alice Erica; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Feng, I Jung; Daly, Janis J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Neuroplastic changes that drive recovery of shoulder/elbow function after stroke have been poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between neuroplastic brain changes related to shoulder/elbow movement control in response to treatment and recovery of arm motor function in chronic stroke survivors.Methods: Twenty-three chronic stroke survivors were treated with 12 weeks of arm rehabilitation. Outcome measures included functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) for the shoulder/elbow components of reach and a skilled motor function test (Arm Motor Abilities Test, AMAT), collected before and after treatment.Results: We observed two patterns of neuroplastic changes that were associated with gains in motor function: decreased or increased task-related brain activation. Those with significantly better motor function at baseline exhibited a decrease in brain activation in response to treatment, evident in the ipsilesional primary motor and contralesional supplementary motor regions; in contrast, those with greater baseline motor impairment, exhibited increased brain activation in response to treatment. There was a linear relationship between greater functional gain (AMAT) and increased activation in bilateral primary motor, contralesional primary and secondary sensory regions, and contralesional lateral premotor area, after adjusting for baseline AMAT, age, and time since stroke.Conclusions: Recovery of functional reach involves recruitment of several contralesional and bilateral primary motor regions. In response to intensive therapy, the direction of functional brain change (i.e., increase or decrease in task-related brain recruitment) for shoulder/elbow reach components depends on baseline level of motor function and may represent either different phases of recovery or different patterns of neuroplasticity that drive functional recovery. PMID:26257623

  18. Ischemic Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    A stroke is a medical emergency. There are two types - ischemic and hemorrhagic. Ischemic stroke is the most common type. It is usually ... are at risk for having a more serious stroke. Symptoms of stroke are Sudden numbness or weakness ...

  19. Psychoneuroimmunology of stroke.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Robert; Georgiou, Rachel; Thornton, Peter; Rothwell, Nancy

    2009-05-01

    Stroke is the major cause of disability in the Western world and is the third greatest cause of death, but there are no widely effective treatments to prevent the devastating effects of stroke. Extensive and growing evidence implicates inflammatory and immune processes in the occurrence of stroke and particularly in the subsequent injury. Several inflammatory mediators have been identified in the pathogenesis of stroke including specific cytokines, adhesion molecules, matrix metalloproteinases, and eicosanoids. An early clinical trial suggests that inhibiting interleukin-1 may be of benefit in the treatment of acute stroke.

  20. Caloric Vestibular Stimulation Reduces Pain and Somatoparaphrenia in a Severe Chronic Central Post-Stroke Pain Patient: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Central post-stroke pain is a neuropathic syndrome characterized by intolerable contralesional pain and, in rare cases, somatic delusions. To date, there is limited evidence for the effective treatments of this disease. Here we used caloric vestibular stimulation to reduce pain and somatoparaphrenia in a 57-year-old woman suffering from central post-stroke pain. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess the neurological effects of this treatment. Following vestibular stimulation we observed impressive improvements in motor skills, pain, and somatic delusions. In the functional connectivity study before the vestibular stimulation, we observed differences in the patient’s left thalamus functional connectivity, with respect to the thalamus connectivity of a control group (N = 20), in the bilateral cingulate cortex and left insula. After the caloric stimulation, the left thalamus functional connectivity with these regions, which are known to be involved in the cortical response to pain, disappeared as in the control group. The beneficial use of vestibular stimulation in the reduction of pain and somatic delusion in a CPSP patient is now documented by behavioral and imaging data. This evidence can be applied to theoretical models of pain and body delusions. PMID:27028404

  1. Caloric Vestibular Stimulation Reduces Pain and Somatoparaphrenia in a Severe Chronic Central Post-Stroke Pain Patient: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Spitoni, Grazia Fernanda; Pireddu, Giorgio; Galati, Gaspare; Sulpizio, Valentina; Paolucci, Stefano; Pizzamiglio, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Central post-stroke pain is a neuropathic syndrome characterized by intolerable contralesional pain and, in rare cases, somatic delusions. To date, there is limited evidence for the effective treatments of this disease. Here we used caloric vestibular stimulation to reduce pain and somatoparaphrenia in a 57-year-old woman suffering from central post-stroke pain. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess the neurological effects of this treatment. Following vestibular stimulation we observed impressive improvements in motor skills, pain, and somatic delusions. In the functional connectivity study before the vestibular stimulation, we observed differences in the patient's left thalamus functional connectivity, with respect to the thalamus connectivity of a control group (N = 20), in the bilateral cingulate cortex and left insula. After the caloric stimulation, the left thalamus functional connectivity with these regions, which are known to be involved in the cortical response to pain, disappeared as in the control group. The beneficial use of vestibular stimulation in the reduction of pain and somatic delusion in a CPSP patient is now documented by behavioral and imaging data. This evidence can be applied to theoretical models of pain and body delusions.

  2. Motor unit rate coding is severely impaired during forceful and fast muscular contractions in individuals post stroke.

    PubMed

    Chou, Li-Wei; Palmer, Jacqueline A; Binder-Macleod, Stuart; Knight, Christopher A

    2013-06-01

    Information regarding how motor units are controlled to produce forces in individuals with stroke and the mechanisms behind muscle weakness and movement slowness can potentially inform rehabilitation strategies. The purpose of this study was to describe the rate coding mechanism in individuals poststroke during both constant (n = 8) and rapid (n = 4) force production tasks. Isometric ankle dorsiflexion force, motor unit action potentials, and surface electromyography were recorded from the paretic and nonparetic tibialis anterior. In the paretic limb, strength was 38% less and the rate of force development was 63% slower. Linear regression was used to describe and compare the relationships between motor unit and electromyogram (EMG) measures and force. During constant force contractions up to 80% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), rate coding was compressed and discharge rates were lower in the paretic limb. During rapid muscle contractions up to 90% MVC, the first interspike interval was prolonged and the rate of EMG rise was less in the paretic limb. Future rehabilitation strategies for individuals with stroke could focus on regaining these specific aspects of motor unit rate coding and neuromuscular activation.

  3. Heat up and potential failure of BWR upper internals during a severe accident

    SciTech Connect

    Robb, Kevin R

    2015-01-01

    In boiling water reactors, the steam dome, steam separators, and dryers above the core are comprised of approximately 100 tons of stainless steel. During a severe accident in which the coolant boils away and exothermic oxidation of zirconium occurs, gases (steam and hydrogen) are superheated in the core region and pass through the upper internals. Historically, the upper internals have been modeled using severe accident codes with relatively simple approximations. The upper internals are typically modeled in MELCOR as two lumped volumes with simplified heat transfer characteristics, with no structural integrity considerations, and with limited ability to oxidize, melt, and relocate. The potential for and the subsequent impact of the upper internals to heat up, oxidize, fail, and relocate during a severe accident was investigated. A higher fidelity representation of the shroud dome, steam separators, and steam driers was developed in MELCOR v1.8.6 by extending the core region upwards. This modeling effort entailed adding 45 additional core cells and control volumes, 98 flow paths, and numerous control functions. The model accounts for the mechanical loading and structural integrity, oxidation, melting, flow area blockage, and relocation of the various components. The results indicate that the upper internals can reach high temperatures during a severe accident; they are predicted to reach a high enough temperature such that they lose their structural integrity and relocate. The additional 100 tons of stainless steel debris influences the subsequent in-vessel and ex-vessel accident progression.

  4. Numerical simulation of supercritical heat transfer under severe axial density gradient in a narrow vertical tube

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Y. Y.; Hong, S. D.; Kim, Y. W.

    2012-07-01

    A number of computational works have been performed so far for the simulation of heat transfer in a supercritical fluid. The simulations, however, faced a lot of difficulties when heat transfer deteriorates due either to buoyancy or by acceleration. When the bulk temperature approaches the pseudo-critical temperature the fluid experiences a severe axial density gradient on top of a severe radial one. Earlier numerical calculations showed, without exception, unrealistic over-predictions, as soon as the bulk temperature exceeded the pseudo-critical temperature. The over-predictions might have been resulted from an inapplicability of widely-used turbulence models. One of the major causes for the difficulties may probably be an assumption of a constant turbulent Prandtl number. Recent research, both numerical and experimental, indicates that the turbulent Prandtl number is never a constant when the gradient of physical properties is significant. This paper describes the applicability of a variable turbulent Prandtl number to the numerical simulation of heat transfer in supercritical fluids flowing in narrow vertical tubes. (authors)

  5. Heat up and failure of BWR upper internals during a severe accident

    DOE PAGES

    Robb, Kevin R.

    2017-02-21

    In boiling water reactors, the shroud dome, separators, and dryers above the core are made of approximately 100,000 kg of stainless steel. During a severe accident in which the coolant boils away and exothermic oxidation of zirconium occurs, gases (steam and hydrogen) are superheated in the core region and pass through the upper internals. In this scenario, the upper internals can also be heated by thermal radiation from the hot degrading core. Historically, models of the upper internals have been relatively simple in severe accident codes. The upper internals are typically modeled in MELCOR as two lumped volumes with simplifiedmore » heat transfer characteristics and no structural integrity considerations, and with limited ability to oxidize, melt, and relocate. The potential for and the subsequent impact of the upper internals to heat up, oxidize, fail, and relocate during a severe accident was investigated. A higher fidelity representation of the shroud dome, steam separators, and steam driers was developed in MELCOR v1.8.6 by extending the core region upwards. The MELCOR modeling effort entailed adding 45 additional core cells and control volumes, 98 flow paths, and numerous control functions. The model accounts for the mechanical loading and structural integrity, oxidation, melting, flow area blockage, and relocation of the various components. Consistent with a previous study, the results indicate that the upper internals can reach high temperatures during a severe accident sufficient to lose their structural integrity and relocate. Finally, the additional 100 metric tons of stainless steel debris influences the subsequent in-vessel and ex-vessel accident progression.« less

  6. Secondary stroke prevention.

    PubMed

    Hankey, Graeme J

    2014-02-01

    Survivors of stroke and transient ischaemic attacks are at risk of a recurrent stroke, which is often more severe and disabling than the index event. Optimum secondary prevention of recurrent stroke needs rapid diagnosis and treatment and prompt identification of the underlying cardiovascular cause. Effective treatments include organised acute assessment and intervention with antithrombotic therapy, carotid revascularisation, and control of causal risk factors, as appropriate. However, effective treatments are not implemented optimally in clinical practice. Recurrent strokes continue to account for 25-30% of all strokes and represent unsuccessful secondary prevention. Immediate and sustained implementation of effective and appropriate secondary prevention strategies in patients with first-ever stroke or transient ischaemic attack has the potential to reduce the burden of stroke by up to a quarter.

  7. Embolic Stroke due to a Common Carotid Artery Thrombus in a Young Patient with Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia without Thrombocytosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This case report describes a 41-year-old previously healthy male who presented with stuttering transient ischemic symptoms and radiographic evidence of a left common carotid artery thrombus as well as acute and subacute ischemic infarcts in the left middle cerebral artery territory. An exhaustive stroke work-up did not provide a plausible etiology for his symptoms. His complete blood count and iron studies, however, revealed evidence of severe iron-deficiency anemia without reactive thrombocytosis. His stool guaiac test was positive. He was discharged home on oral antithrombotic agents and aggressive iron replacement therapy with a plan for repeat vascular imaging in 3 months and a colonoscopy. This case report suggests that severe iron-deficiency anemia with or without reactive thrombocytosis should be viewed as a possible hematologic condition associated with thrombotic tendencies and a risk factor for ischemic stroke, especially in young adults. Aggressive iron supplementation and short-term antithrombotic therapy with follow-up vascular imaging are a reasonable treatment for these patients. PMID:27752375

  8. Heat and mass transfer in turbulent flows with several recirculated flow eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baake, E.; Nacke, B.; Jakovics, A.; Umbrashko, A.

    2001-06-01

    Numerical modeling of the concentration and temperature distribution in axial symmetrical systems with several recirculated flow eddies, which is based on various 2D stationary k-ɛ models and commercial codes, e.g. ANSYS and FLUENT, leads to results, which are significantly different from experimental data. Therefore additional user-defined subroutines were included in the commercial program code to improve the turbulent heat and mass transfer in the zone between the recirculated flow eddies. In addition transient 3D calculations were performed to investigate scientifically the flow dynamics. Figs 9, Refs 8.

  9. Passive decay heat removal by natural air convection after severe accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Erbacher, F.J.; Neitzel, H.J.; Cheng, X.

    1995-09-01

    The composite containment proposed by the Research Center Karlsruhe and the Technical University Karlsruhe is to cope with severe accidents. It pursues the goal to restrict the consequences of core meltdown accidents to the reactor plant. One essential of this new containment concept is its potential to remove the decay heat by natural air convection and thermal radiation in a passive way. To investigate the coolability of such a passive cooling system and the physical phenomena involved, experimental investigations are carried out at the PASCO test facility. Additionally, numerical calculations are performed by using different codes. A satisfying agreement between experimental data and numerical results is obtained.

  10. Burden of stroke in Estonia.

    PubMed

    Kõrv, Janika; Vibo, Riina

    2013-07-01

    Estonia is the smallest of the three Baltic countries. The decline in incidence of first-ever stroke during the 1990s has left Tartu, Estonia with a relatively low stroke incidence. However, the incidence rates for younger age groups, and the 28-day case fatality rate are higher compared with several other studies. Developments in the national health care system in recent years have been positive: the decline of mortality rate of stroke in Estonia is greater than the European Union average. However, the mortality of cardiovascular diseases is higher compared with several European countries. The prevalence of most stroke risk factors is comparable with European Union countries, while atrial fibrillation is somewhat more frequent (30%) among the patients having suffered from ischemic stroke. The management of stroke in Estonia has been in accordance with European and national stroke guidelines. Stroke units are organized in regional and central hospitals in bigger cities. A well-developed and free ambulance service, and a high priority of stroke code, enable a quick transportation of patients to the nearest hospital providing thrombolytic therapy. The number of thrombolyzed stroke cases has increased since 2003. The Estonian Stroke Initiative was founded in 2008 to improve stroke care, promote regional networks, and increase stroke knowledge among the general population and medical professionals. Since then, several activities regarding stroke awareness have been organized.

  11. Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy Combined with Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation over Premotor Cortex Improves Motor Function in Severe Stroke: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Larissa M.; Nogueira, Lídia L. R. F.; de Oliveira, Eliane A.; de Carvalho, Antonio G. C.; Lima, Soriano S.; Santana, Jordânia R. M.; de Lima, Emerson C. C.; Fernández-Calvo, Bernardino

    2017-01-01

    Objective. We compared the effects of transcranial direct current stimulation at different cortical sites (premotor and motor primary cortex) combined with constraint-induced movement therapy for treatment of stroke patients. Design. Sixty patients were randomly distributed into 3 groups: Group A, anodal stimulation on premotor cortex and constraint-induced movement therapy; Group B, anodal stimulation on primary motor cortex and constraint-induced movement therapy; Group C, sham stimulation and constraint-induced movement therapy. Evaluations involved analysis of functional independence, motor recovery, spasticity, gross motor function, and muscle strength. Results. A significant improvement in primary outcome (functional independence) after treatment in the premotor group followed by primary motor group and sham group was observed. The same pattern of improvement was highlighted among all secondary outcome measures regarding the superior performance of the premotor group over primary motor and sham groups. Conclusions. Premotor cortex can contribute to motor function in patients with severe functional disabilities in early stages of stroke. This study was registered in ClinicalTrials.gov database (NCT 02628561). PMID:28250992

  12. Comparison of joint space and end point space robotic training modalities for rehabilitation of interjoint coordination in individuals with moderate to severe impairment from chronic stroke.

    PubMed

    Brokaw, Elizabeth B; Holley, Rahsaan J; Lum, Peter S

    2013-09-01

    We have developed a novel robotic modality called Time Independent Functional Training (TIFT) that provides focused retraining of interjoint coordination after stroke. TIFT was implemented on the ARMin III exoskeleton and provides joint space walls that resist movement patterns that are inconsistent with the targeted interjoint coordination pattern. In a single test session, ten moderate to severely impaired individuals with chronic stroke practiced synchronous shoulder abduction and elbow extension in TIFT and also in a comparison mode commonly used in robotic therapy called end point tunnel training (EPTT). In EPTT, error is limited by forces applied to the hand that are normal to the targeted end point trajectory. The completion percentage of the movements was comparable between modes, but the coordination patterns used by subjects differed between modes. In TIFT, subjects performed the targeted pattern of synchronous shoulder abduction and elbow extension, while in EPTT, movements were completed with compensatory strategies that incorporated the flexor synergy (shoulder abduction with elbow flexion) or the extensor synergy (shoulder adduction with elbow extension). There were immediate effects on free movements, with TIFT resulting in larger improvements in interjoint coordination than EPTT. TIFT's ability to elicit normal coordination patterns merits further investigation into the effects of longer duration training.

  13. Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy Combined with Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation over Premotor Cortex Improves Motor Function in Severe Stroke: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Suellen M; Batista, Larissa M; Nogueira, Lídia L R F; de Oliveira, Eliane A; de Carvalho, Antonio G C; Lima, Soriano S; Santana, Jordânia R M; de Lima, Emerson C C; Fernández-Calvo, Bernardino

    2017-01-01

    Objective. We compared the effects of transcranial direct current stimulation at different cortical sites (premotor and motor primary cortex) combined with constraint-induced movement therapy for treatment of stroke patients. Design. Sixty patients were randomly distributed into 3 groups: Group A, anodal stimulation on premotor cortex and constraint-induced movement therapy; Group B, anodal stimulation on primary motor cortex and constraint-induced movement therapy; Group C, sham stimulation and constraint-induced movement therapy. Evaluations involved analysis of functional independence, motor recovery, spasticity, gross motor function, and muscle strength. Results. A significant improvement in primary outcome (functional independence) after treatment in the premotor group followed by primary motor group and sham group was observed. The same pattern of improvement was highlighted among all secondary outcome measures regarding the superior performance of the premotor group over primary motor and sham groups. Conclusions. Premotor cortex can contribute to motor function in patients with severe functional disabilities in early stages of stroke. This study was registered in ClinicalTrials.gov database (NCT 02628561).

  14. Ischemic Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spread the Word Advocate Share Spread the Word Contact Us Contact Us 1-800-STROKES (787-6537) 9707 E. ... Stroke En Espanol Stroke Facts Come Back Strong Contact Us 1-800-787-6537 9707 E. Easter ...

  15. Stroke Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    A stroke can cause lasting brain damage. People who survive a stroke need to relearn skills they lost because of ... them relearn those skills. The effects of a stroke depend on which area of the brain was ...

  16. Hemorrhagic Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    A stroke is a medical emergency. There are two types - ischemic and hemorrhagic. Hemorrhagic stroke is the less common type. It happens when ... an artery wall that breaks open. Symptoms of stroke are Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, ...

  17. Improving public education about stroke.

    PubMed

    Alberts, Mark J

    2012-09-01

    Stroke is a common and serious disease. Most studies have shown that basic public knowledge about what a stroke is, symptoms of a stroke, and the proper reaction to a stroke is quite deficient. The fact that a stroke affects cognitive, communicative, and motor functions may partially explain the poor reaction to acute stroke symptoms. Several educational studies, using diverse formats and messaging paradigms, have been shown to positively affect public knowledge of stroke symptoms. Such efforts have often used mass media public education campaigns with an emphasis on recognizing symptoms of an acute stroke. Some have been able to demonstrate an increase in the chance of patients (or by-standers) calling 911 and seeking emergency care. However, many programs were of brief duration, and their long-term benefits are uncertain. Continual educational efforts will be needed to improve stroke knowledge and increase the percentage of patients who seek emergency care.

  18. Hypercoagulable states and strokes.

    PubMed

    Matijevic, Nena; Wu, Kenneth K

    2006-07-01

    Several hematologic disorders and hemostatic defects increase risk of ischemic stroke. A common feature of these disorders is the creation of a prothrombotic state, now commonly referred to as "hypercoagulable state." Hematologic diseases such as essential thrombocythemia, polycythemia vera, and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura clearly cause stroke. Effective treatment is now available for these disorders. Association of hemostatic defects with stroke risk is still at the investigational stage. Although a number of factors such as soluble thrombomodulin, fibrinogen, factor VIII, von Willebrand factor, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 are associated with stroke risk, their predictive values remain unknown. Furthermore, causal relationship has not been established.

  19. Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy for Severe Upper-Extremity Impairment after Stroke in an Outpatient Rehabilitation Setting: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Shears, Jennifer; Hutchings, Lisa; Osmond, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Laboratory studies confirm that constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) improves upper-extremity (UE) function after stroke. Due to strict patient criteria and the intensive resources required, CIMT has been slow to become part of rehabilitation practice. Our purpose was to determine the feasibility and effectiveness of an adapted experimental protocol within an outpatient clinical setting for a patient with moderate to severe UE impairment who did not meet traditional CIMT criteria. Patient Description: AJ, a 16-year-old male, experienced a left middle cerebral artery ischemic stroke due to carotid artery dissection one year before beginning CIMT. He demonstrated some proximal movement but no wrist or finger extension. He had received intensive rehabilitation for 12 months prior to beginning CIMT. Intervention: Two occupational therapists and two physiotherapists collaborated to provide CIMT task training for 6 hours daily for 2 weeks. A knitted mitten extending to the elbow restrained the less-involved UE during 90% of waking hours. Tasks were tailored to AJ's interests, with the goal of integrating his affected UE into his behavioural repertoire. Measures and Outcomes: After 2 weeks of CIMT, AJ improved in all measures (grip and lateral pinch strength, Action Research Arm Test [ARAT], and Box and Block Test) except the Chedoke McMaster Impairment Inventory. Greatest gains were seen at 6 months in the ARAT and Box and Block Test, which coincided with patient and family reports of AJ's using his arm in everyday functional tasks. Implications: Shared workload, emphasis on relevant functional tasks, and complete family participation likely influenced the success of CIMT. Our findings suggest that the strict CIMT criteria used in previous studies may exclude patients who might benefit from the treatment. Controlled trials should be undertaken to examine the effects of CIMT in patients with moderate to severe UE impairment. PMID:20145779

  20. An Economic Evaluation Comparing Stroke Telemedicine to Conventional Stroke Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budhram, Stanley Chandra

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is not only a serious medical problem, but it also poses an enormous economic burden on society. Stroke ranks the third as the leading cause of death in the United States behind heart disease and cancer. The survivors of stroke suffer from various degrees of long-term disability which create a severe financial burden on society. University…

  1. The role of several heat transfer mechanisms on the enhancement of thermal conductivity in nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machrafi, H.; Lebon, G.

    2016-09-01

    A modelling of the thermal conductivity of nanofluids based on extended irreversible thermodynamics is proposed with emphasis on the role of several coupled heat transfer mechanisms: liquid interfacial layering between nanoparticles and base fluid, particles agglomeration and Brownian motion. The relative importance of each specific mechanism on the enhancement of the effective thermal conductivity is examined. It is shown that the size of the nanoparticles and the liquid boundary layer around the particles play a determining role. For nanoparticles close to molecular range, the Brownian effect is important. At nanoparticles of the order of 1-100 nm, both agglomeration and liquid layering are influent. Agglomeration becomes the most important mechanism at nanoparticle sizes of the order of 100 nm and higher. The theoretical considerations are illustrated by three case studies: suspensions of alumina rigid spherical nanoparticles in water, ethylene glycol and a 50/50w% water/ethylene glycol mixture, respectively, good agreement with experimental data is observed.

  2. Psychoneuroimmunology of stroke.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Robert; Georgiou, Rachel; Thornton, Peter; Rothwell, Nancy

    2006-08-01

    There is now considerable evidence from both experimental and clinical studies that immune and inflammatory processes can contribute to the onset of stroke and the neurologic and psychologic outcomes. Several specific therapeutic targets have been identified that may significantly improve the devastating impact of stroke.

  3. The effect of cyclical and severe heat stress on growth performance and metabolism in Afshari lambs.

    PubMed

    Mahjoubi, E; Yazdi, M Hossein; Aghaziarati, N; Noori, G R; Afsarian, O; Baumgard, L H

    2015-04-01

    lambs' ADG was more than 2-fold greater than the PFTN controls. These results indicate that HS markedly alters the energetics of weight gain during growth and that the effects of HS are dependent on the severity of the heat load.

  4. The Excess Heat Factor: A Metric for Heatwave Intensity and Its Use in Classifying Heatwave Severity

    PubMed Central

    Nairn, John R.; Fawcett, Robert J. B.

    2014-01-01

    Heatwaves represent a significant natural hazard in Australia, arguably more hazardous to human life than bushfires, tropical cyclones and floods. In the 2008/2009 summer, for example, many more lives were lost to heatwaves than to that summer’s bushfires which were among the worst in the history of the Australian nation. For many years, these other forms of natural disaster have received much greater public attention than heatwaves, although there are some signs of change. We propose a new index, called the excess heat factor (EHF) for use in Australian heatwave monitoring and forecasting. The index is based on a three-day-averaged daily mean temperature (DMT), and is intended to capture heatwave intensity as it applies to human health outcomes, although its usefulness is likely to be much broader and with potential for international applicability. The index is described and placed in a climatological context in order to derive heatwave severity. Heatwave severity, as characterised by the climatological distribution of heatwave intensity, has been used to normalise the climatological variation in heatwave intensity range across Australia. This methodology was used to introduce a pilot national heatwave forecasting service for Australia during the 2013/2014 summer. Some results on the performance of the service are presented. PMID:25546282

  5. Cucumber Necrosis Virus Recruits Cellular Heat Shock Protein 70 Homologs at Several Stages of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Syed Benazir

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT RNA viruses often depend on host factors for multiplication inside cells due to the constraints of their small genome size and limited coding capacity. One such factor that has been exploited by several plant and animal viruses is heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) family homologs which have been shown to play roles for different viruses in viral RNA replication, viral assembly, disassembly, and cell-to-cell movement. Using next generation sequence analysis, we reveal that several isoforms of Hsp70 and Hsc70 transcripts are induced to very high levels during cucumber necrosis virus (CNV) infection of Nicotiana benthamiana and that HSP70 proteins are also induced by at least 10-fold. We show that HSP70 family protein homologs are co-opted by CNV at several stages of infection. We have found that overexpression of Hsp70 or Hsc70 leads to enhanced CNV genomic RNA, coat protein (CP), and virion accumulation, whereas downregulation leads to a corresponding decrease. Hsc70-2 was found to increase solubility of CNV CP in vitro and to increase accumulation of CNV CP independently of viral RNA replication during coagroinfiltration in N. benthamiana. In addition, virus particle assembly into virus-like particles in CP agroinfiltrated plants was increased in the presence of Hsc70-2. HSP70 was found to increase the targeting of CNV CP to chloroplasts during infection, reinforcing the role of HSP70 in chloroplast targeting of host proteins. Hence, our findings have led to the discovery of a highly induced host factor that has been co-opted to play multiple roles during several stages of the CNV infection cycle. IMPORTANCE Because of the small size of its RNA genome, CNV is dependent on interaction with host cellular components to successfully complete its multiplication cycle. We have found that CNV induces HSP70 family homologs to a high level during infection, possibly as a result of the host response to the high levels of CNV proteins that accumulate during infection

  6. Microstructural evolution during ultra-rapid annealing of severely deformed low-carbon steel: strain, temperature, and heating rate effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafaei, M. A.; Kazeminezhad, M.

    2016-07-01

    An interaction between ferrite recrystallization and austenite transformation in low-carbon steel occurs when recrystallization is delayed until the intercritical temperature range by employing high heating rate. The kinetics of recrystallization and transformation is affected by high heating rate and such an interaction. In this study, different levels of strain are applied to low-carbon steel using a severe plastic deformation method. Then, ultra-rapid annealing is performed at different heating rates of 200-1100°C/s and peak temperatures of near critical temperature. Five regimes are proposed to investigate the effects of heating rate, strain, and temperature on the interaction between recrystallization and transformation. The microstructural evolution of severely deformed low-carbon steel after ultra-rapid annealing is investigated based on the proposed regimes. Regarding the intensity and start temperature of the interaction, different microstructures consisting of ferrite and pearlite/martensite are formed. It is found that when the interaction is strong, the microstructure is refined because of the high kinetics of transformation and recrystallization. Moreover, strain shifts an interaction zone to a relatively higher heating rate. Therefore, severely deformed steel should be heated at relatively higher heating rates for it to undergo a strong interaction.

  7. Disruption of the HSF3 gene results in the severe reduction of heat shock gene expression and loss of thermotolerance.

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, M; Kawazoe, Y; Takeda, S; Morimoto, R I; Nagata, K; Nakai, A

    1998-01-01

    The vertebrate genome encodes a family of heat shock factors (HSFs 1-4) of which the DNA-binding and transcriptional activities of HSF1 and HSF3 are activated upon heat shock. HSF1 has the properties of a classical HSF and exhibits rapid activation of DNA-binding and transcriptional activity upon exposure to conditions of heat shock and other stresses, whereas HSF3 typically is activated at higher temperatures and with distinct delayed kinetics. To address the role of HSF3 in the heat shock response, null cells lacking the HSF3 gene were constructed by disruption of the resident gene by somatic recombination in an avian lymphoid cell line. Null cells lacking HSF3, yet expressing normal levels of HSF1, exhibited a severe reduction in the heat shock response, as measured by inducible expression of heat shock genes, and did not exhibit thermotolerance. At intermediate heat shock temperatures, where HSF1 oligomerizes to an active trimer in wild-type cells, HSF1 remained as an inert monomer in the HSF3 null cell line. HSF3 null cells were restored to a nearly normal heat shock-responsive state by reintroduction of an exogenous HSF3 gene. These results reveal that HSF3 has a dominant role in the regulation of the heat shock response and directly influences HSF1 activity. PMID:9501096

  8. Pronounced enhancement of glucocorticoid-induced gene expression following severe heat shock of heat-conditioned cells hints to intricate cell survival tactics.

    PubMed

    Mitsiou, Dimitra J; Florentin, Ida; Baki, Lia; Georgakopoulos, Anastasios; Alexis, Michael N

    2005-02-01

    We have previously reported that severe heat shock of HeLa cells stably transfected with a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene, transcription of which is controlled by two glucocorticoid-responsive elements and a minimal promoter, pronouncedly enhanced glucocorticoid-induced CAT expression compared to that of non-heated cells, in spite of the glucocorticoid-receptor-mediated transcription of the gene being temporarily compromised by the shock. We now report that prolonged severe heat shock of properly heat-conditioned cells resulted in far more pronounced enhancement of glucocorticoid-induced CAT mRNA and protein expressions, in spite of a similar heat-induced loss of receptor-mediated CAT gene transcription. During recovery from the shock the hormonal activation of transcription exceeded that of non-heated cells. While CAT mRNA translation was restored appreciably later than CAT gene transcription, mRNA and protein expressions were thermally enhanced to a comparable extent, consistent with the integrity of CAT mRNA being preserved during recovery. CAT mRNA turnover was fully impaired during early recovery, suggesting that stabilisation of CAT mRNA as well as stimulation of the hormonal activation of CAT gene transcription account for the thermal enhancement of glucocorticoid-induced CAT expression. This data hint to cell survival tactics designed to safeguard high expression of genes of stress-enduring function.

  9. Strokes in Thai children : etiology and outcome.

    PubMed

    Visudhiphan, P; Chiemchanya, S; Wattanasirichaigoon, D

    1996-12-01

    In Asian countries, specific etiology and outcome of stroke in children are rarely reported. During January 1979 to December 1997, 68 children with stroke, admitted to the Department of Pediatrics, Ramathibodi Hospital, Bangkok were reviewed for etiology and outcome; 38 patients (22 males) had ischemic stroke and 30 (20 males) had hemorrhagic stroke. Severe headache, vomiting, disturbance of consciousness and papilledema were prominent presentations of hemorrhagic stroke. Bleeding from vascular anomalies of the brain (AVM) was the most common etiology of hemorrhagic stroke while septic and non-septic emboli from congenital and acquired heart diseases were the most common cause of ischemic stroke. The mortality rate was 7% and 9% in hemorrhagic and ischemic strokes, respectively. Complete recovery was observed in 52% of cases of hemorrhagic stroke but in only 26% of ischemic stroke. Hemiparesis was the most common residual neurological deficit with higher occurrence in ischemic stroke.

  10. Stroke rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Bindawas, Saad M.; Vennu, Vishal S.

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is a major cause of death and other complications worldwide. In Saudi Arabia, stroke has become an emerging health issue leading to disability and death. However, stroke care including rehabilitation services, in Saudi Arabia lags behind developed countries. Stroke rehabilitation is an essential recovery option after stroke and should start as early as possible to avoid potential complications. The growing evidence on stroke rehabilitation effectiveness in different health care settings and outcome measures used widely are reviewed in this call to action paper. PMID:27744457

  11. Long-term variability of heat waves in Argentina and recurrence probability of the severe 2008 heat wave in Buenos Aires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusticucci, Matilde; Kyselý, Jan; Almeira, Gustavo; Lhotka, Ondřej

    2016-05-01

    Heat waves are one of the main concerns related to the impacts of climate change, because their frequency and severity are projected to increase in a future climate. The objectives of this work are to study the long-term variability of heat waves over Argentina and to estimate recurrence probability of the most severe 2008 heat wave in Buenos Aires. We used three definitions of heat waves that were based on (1) daily maximum temperature above the 90th percentile (MaxTHW), (2) daily minimum temperature above the 90th percentile (MinTHW) and (3) both maximum and minimum temperatures above the corresponding 90th percentiles (EHW). The minimum length of a heat wave was 3 days, and the analysis was performed over the October-March period. Decadal values in Buenos Aires experienced clear increases in heat waves according to MinTHW and EHW, with the highest frequency for both in the 2001-2010 decade, but at other stations, combinations of different trends and decadal variability resulted in some cases in a decrease of extreme heat waves. In the north-western part of the country, a strong positive change in the last decade was found, mainly due to the increment in the persistence of MinTHW but also accompanied by increases in MaxTHW. In general, other stations show a clear positive trend in MinTHW and decadal variability in MaxTHW, with the largest EHW cases in the last decade. We also estimated recurrence probability of the longest and most severe heat wave in Buenos Aires (over 1909-2010, according to intensity measured by the cumulative excess of maximum daily temperature above the 90th percentile) that occurred from 3 to 14 November 2008, by means of simulations with a stochastic first-order autoregressive model. The recurrence probability of such long and severe heat wave is small in the present climate but it is likely to increase substantially in the near future even under a moderate warming trend.

  12. Know Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Know Stroke Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table of Contents For ... D. Director, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Photo courtesy of NIH/NINDS Welcome to this ...

  13. Measured performance of the heat exchanger in the NASA icing research tunnel under severe icing and dry-air conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, W.; Vanfossen, J.; Nussle, R.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements were made of the pressure drop and thermal perfomance of the unique refrigeration heat exchanger in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) under severe icing and frosting conditions and also with dry air. This data will be useful to those planning to use or extend the capability of the IRT and other icing facilities (e.g., the Altitude Wind Tunnel-AWT). The IRT heat exchanger and refrigeration system is able to cool air passing through the test section down to at least a total temperature of -30 C (well below icing requirements), and usually up to -2 C. The system maintains a uniform temperature across the test section at all airspeeds, which is more difficult and time consuming at low airspeeds, at high temperatures, and on hot, humid days when the cooling towers are less efficient. The very small surfaces of the heat exchanger prevent any icing cloud droplets from passing through it and going through the tests section again. The IRT heat exchanger was originally designed not to be adversely affected by severe icing. During a worst-case icing test the heat exchanger iced up enough so that the temperature uniformaity was no worse than about +/- 1 deg C. The conclusion is that the heat exchanger design performs well.

  14. Ischemic Strokes (Clots)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Quiz 5 Things to Know About Stroke Ischemic Strokes (Clots) Updated:Nov 9,2016 Ischemic stroke accounts ... strokes. Read more about silent strokes . TIA and Stroke: Medical Emergencies When someone has shown symptoms of ...

  15. Recovering after stroke

    MedlinePlus

    Stroke rehabilitation; Cerebrovascular accident - rehabilitation; Recovery from stroke; Stroke - recovery; CVA - recovery ... WHERE TO LIVE AFTER A STROKE Most people will need stroke ... after they leave the hospital. Stroke rehab will help you ...

  16. Numerical study of forced convection in a turbulent heat sink made of several rows of blocks of square form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchenafa, Rachid; Saim, Rachid; Abboudi, Said

    2015-09-01

    Forced convection is a phenomenon associated with the heat transfer fluid flows. The presence of convection affects simultaneously the thermal and hydrodynamic fields, the problem is thus coupled. This form of heat transfer inside ducts occurs in many practical applications such as solar collectors, heat exchangers, cooling of electronic components as well as chemical and nuclear. In this work, we are interested primarily for a numerical study of thermo-hydraulic performances of an incompressible turbulent flow of air through a heat sink composed of several rows of bars of square section. Profiles and the axial velocity fields, as well as profiles and the distribution of the Nusselt number are plotted for all the geometry considered and chosen for different sections. The effects of geometrical parameters of the model and the operating parameters on the dynamic and thermal behavior of the air are analyzed.

  17. Acute ischemic stroke update.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Kathleen; Orr, Sean; Briand, Mary; Piazza, Carolyn; Veydt, Annita; McCoy, Stacey

    2010-05-01

    Stroke is the third most common cause of death in the United States and is the number one cause of long-term disability. Legislative mandates, largely the result of the American Heart Association, American Stroke Association, and Brain Attack Coalition working cooperatively, have resulted in nationwide standardization of care for patients who experience a stroke. Transport to a skilled facility that can provide optimal care, including immediate treatment to halt or reverse the damage caused by stroke, must occur swiftly. Admission to a certified stroke center is recommended for improving outcomes. Most strokes are ischemic in nature. Acute ischemic stroke is a heterogeneous group of vascular diseases, which makes targeted treatment challenging. To provide a thorough review of the literature since the 2007 acute ischemic stroke guidelines were developed, we performed a search of the MEDLINE database (January 1, 2004-July 1, 2009) for relevant English-language studies. Results (through July 1, 2009) from clinical trials included in the Internet Stroke Center registry were also accessed. Results from several pivotal studies have contributed to our knowledge of stroke. Additional data support the efficacy and safety of intravenous alteplase, the standard of care for acute ischemic stroke since 1995. Due to these study results, the American Stroke Association changed its recommendation to extend the time window for administration of intravenous alteplase from within 3 hours to 4.5 hours of symptom onset; this recommendation enables many more patients to receive the drug. Other findings included clinically useful biomarkers, the role of inflammation and infection, an expanded role for placement of intracranial stents, a reduced role for urgent carotid endarterectomy, alternative treatments for large-vessel disease, identification of nontraditional risk factors, including risk factors for women, and newly published pediatric stroke guidelines. In addition, new devices for

  18. Highly efficient 6-stroke engine cycle with water injection

    SciTech Connect

    Szybist, James P; Conklin, James C

    2012-10-23

    A six-stroke engine cycle having improved efficiency. Heat is recovered from the engine combustion gases by using a 6-stroke engine cycle in which combustion gases are partially vented proximate the bottom-dead-center position of the fourth stroke cycle, and water is injected proximate the top-dead-center position of the fourth stroke cycle.

  19. Severely Heat Injured Survivors of E. coli O157:H7 ATCC 43888 Display Variable and Heterogeneous Stress Resistance Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Gayán, Elisa; Govers, Sander K.; Michiels, Chris W.; Aertsen, Abram

    2016-01-01

    Although minimal food processing strategies aim to eliminate foodborne pathogens and spoilage microorganisms through a combination of mild preservation techniques, little is actually known on the resistance behavior of the small fraction of microorganisms surviving an inimical treatment. In this study, the conduct of severely heat stressed survivors of E. coli O157:H7 ATCC 43888, as an indicator for the low infectious dose foodborne enterohemorrhagic strains, was examined throughout their resuscitation and outgrowth. Despite the fact that these survivors were initially sublethally injured, they were only marginally more sensitive to a subsequent heat treatment and actually much more resistant to a subsequent high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) shock in comparison with unstressed control cells. Throughout further resuscitation, however, their initial HHP resistance rapidly faded out, while their heat resistance increased and surpassed the initial heat resistance of unstressed control cells. Results also indicated that the population eventually emerging from the severely heat stressed survivors heterogeneously consisted of both growing and non-growing cells. Together, these observations provide deeper insights into the particular behavior and heterogeneity of stressed foodborne pathogens in the context of food preservation. PMID:27917163

  20. Baroreceptor unloading does not limit forearm sweat rate during severe passive heat stress.

    PubMed

    Schlader, Zachary J; Gagnon, Daniel; Lucas, Rebekah A I; Pearson, James; Crandall, Craig G

    2015-02-15

    This study tested the hypothesis that sweat rate during passive heat stress is limited by baroreceptor unloading associated with heat stress. Two protocols were performed in which healthy subjects underwent passive heat stress that elicited an increase in intestinal temperature of ∼1.8°C. Upon attaining this level of hyperthermia, in protocol 1 (n = 10, 3 females) a bolus (19 ml/kg) of warm (∼38°C) isotonic saline was rapidly (5-10 min) infused intravenously to elevate central venous pressure (CVP), while in protocol 2 (n = 11, 5 females) phenylephrine was infused intravenously (60-120 μg/min) to return mean arterial pressure (MAP) to normothermic levels. In protocol 1, heat stress reduced CVP from 3.9 ± 1.9 mmHg (normothermia) to -0.6 ± 1.4 mmHg (P < 0.001), while saline infusion returned CVP to normothermic levels (5.1 ± 1.7 mmHg; P > 0.999). Sweat rate was elevated by heat stress (1.21 ± 0.44 mg·cm(-2)·min(-1)) but remained unchanged during rapid saline infusion (1.26 ± 0.47 mg·cm(-2)·min(-1), P = 0.5), whereas cutaneous vascular conductance increased from 77 ± 10 to 101 ± 20% of local heating max (P = 0.029). In protocol 2, MAP was reduced with heat stress from 85 ± 7 mmHg to 76 ± 8 mmHg (P = 0.048). Although phenylephrine infusion returned MAP to normothermic levels (88 ± 7 mmHg; P > 0.999), sweat rate remained unchanged during phenylephrine infusion (1.39 ± 0.22 vs. 1.41 ± 0.24 mg·cm(-2)·min(-1); P > 0.999). These data indicate that both cardiopulmonary and arterial baroreceptor unloading do not limit increases in sweat rate during passive heat stress.

  1. Baroreceptor unloading does not limit forearm sweat rate during severe passive heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Schlader, Zachary J.; Gagnon, Daniel; Lucas, Rebekah A. I.; Pearson, James

    2014-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that sweat rate during passive heat stress is limited by baroreceptor unloading associated with heat stress. Two protocols were performed in which healthy subjects underwent passive heat stress that elicited an increase in intestinal temperature of ∼1.8°C. Upon attaining this level of hyperthermia, in protocol 1 (n = 10, 3 females) a bolus (19 ml/kg) of warm (∼38°C) isotonic saline was rapidly (5–10 min) infused intravenously to elevate central venous pressure (CVP), while in protocol 2 (n = 11, 5 females) phenylephrine was infused intravenously (60–120 μg/min) to return mean arterial pressure (MAP) to normothermic levels. In protocol 1, heat stress reduced CVP from 3.9 ± 1.9 mmHg (normothermia) to −0.6 ± 1.4 mmHg (P < 0.001), while saline infusion returned CVP to normothermic levels (5.1 ± 1.7 mmHg; P > 0.999). Sweat rate was elevated by heat stress (1.21 ± 0.44 mg·cm−2·min−1) but remained unchanged during rapid saline infusion (1.26 ± 0.47 mg·cm−2·min−1, P = 0.5), whereas cutaneous vascular conductance increased from 77 ± 10 to 101 ± 20% of local heating max (P = 0.029). In protocol 2, MAP was reduced with heat stress from 85 ± 7 mmHg to 76 ± 8 mmHg (P = 0.048). Although phenylephrine infusion returned MAP to normothermic levels (88 ± 7 mmHg; P > 0.999), sweat rate remained unchanged during phenylephrine infusion (1.39 ± 0.22 vs. 1.41 ± 0.24 mg·cm−2·min−1; P > 0.999). These data indicate that both cardiopulmonary and arterial baroreceptor unloading do not limit increases in sweat rate during passive heat stress. PMID:25525210

  2. Prehospital stroke care

    PubMed Central

    Saver, Jeffrey L.; Starkman, Sidney; Lees, Kennedy R.; Endres, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Brain cells die rapidly after stroke and any effective treatment must start as early as possible. In clinical routine, the tight time–outcome relationship continues to be the major limitation of therapeutic approaches: thrombolysis rates remain low across many countries, with most patients being treated at the late end of the therapeutic window. In addition, there is no neuroprotective therapy available, but some maintain that this concept may be valid if administered very early after stroke. Recent innovations have opened new perspectives for stroke diagnosis and treatment before the patient arrives at the hospital. These include stroke recognition by dispatchers and paramedics, mobile telemedicine for remote clinical examination and imaging, and integration of CT scanners and point-of-care laboratories in ambulances. Several clinical trials are now being performed in the prehospital setting testing prehospital delivery of neuroprotective, antihypertensive, and thrombolytic therapy. We hypothesize that these new approaches in prehospital stroke care will not only shorten time to treatment and improve outcome but will also facilitate hyperacute stroke research by increasing the number of study participants within an ultra-early time window. The potentials, pitfalls, and promises of advanced prehospital stroke care and research are discussed in this review. PMID:23897876

  3. Initial evaluation of floor cooling on lactating sows under severe acute heat stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives were to evaluate an acute heat stress protocol for lactating sows and evaluate preliminary estimates of water flow rates required to cool sows. Twelve multiparous sows were provided with a cooling pad built with an aluminum plate surface, high-density polyethylene base and copper pipe...

  4. The influence of heat treatments on several types of base-metal removable partial denture alloys.

    PubMed

    Morris, H F; Asgar, K; Rowe, A P; Nasjleti, C E

    1979-04-01

    Four removable partial denture alloys, Vitallium (Co-Cr alloy), Dentillium P.D. (Fe-Cr alloy), Durallium L.G. (Co-Cr-Ni alloy), and Ticonium 100 (Ni-Cr alloy), were evaluated in the as-cast condition and after heat treatment for 15 minutes at 1,300 degrees, 1,600 degrees, 1,900 degrees, and 2,200 degrees F followed by quenching in water. The following properties were determined and compared for each alloy at each heat treatment condition: the yield strengths at 0.01%, 0.1%, and 0.2% offsets, the ultimate tensile strength, the percent elongation, the modulus of elasticity, and the Knoop microhardness. The results were statistically analyzed. Photomicrographs were examined for each alloy and test condition. The following conclusions were made: 1. The "highest values" were exhibited by the as-cast alloy. 2. Heat treatment of the partial denture alloys tested resulted in reductions in strength, while the elongations varied. This study demonstrates that, in practice, one should avoid (a) prolonged "heat-soaking" while soldering and (b) grinding or polishing of the casting until the alloy is "red hot". 3. Durallium L.G. was the least affected by the various heat treatment conditions. 4. Conventional reporting of the yield strength at 0.2% offset, the ultimate tensile strength, and percent elongation are not adequate to completely describe and compare the mechanical behavior of alloys. The reporting of the yield strength at 0.01% offset, in addition to the other reported properties, will provide a more complete description of the behavior of the dental alloys.

  5. Stroke: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Albertson, Megan; Sharma, Jitendra

    2014-11-01

    Cerebrovascular accidents (CVAs) are the leading cause of disability and the fourth leading cause of death in the U.S. The WHO defines stroke as "rapidly developing clinical signs of focal disturbance of cerebral function lasting more than 24 hours with no apparent cause other than of vascular origin." Strokes are subdivided into two major classifications: ischemic (80-87 percent) andhemorrhagic (13-20 percent). Ischemic strokes occur from thrombi, emboli, or global hypoperfusion. Hemorrhagic strokes are either parenchymal (10 percent of all strokes) or subarachnoid (3 percent of all strokes). There are a variety of recognized risk factors for stroke which include: age, race, family history, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis, cardiac arrhythmias, prosthetic valves, hyperlipidemia, cigarette smoking, and others (drugs or hormones). The initial assessment of a patient suspected of stroke should be done quickly enough to ensure maximal reperfusion of brain tissue. The steps to achieve this goal are: 1) exclude an intracranial hemorrhage, 2) assess for contraindications to thrombolytics, 3) characterize the infarct. The workup for a patient should first include a history (especially the time when neurologic symptoms began), a physical exam (including the NIHSS), and imaging studies (to rule out hemorrhagic components). In addition, several lab studies can also be obtained including: PT/INR, glucose, complete blood count, metabolic panel, creatine kinase, ECG, echocardiogram, lipid panel, carotid Doppler, MRA or CTA. Acute management of a stroke is primarily focused on stabilizing the patient and allowing as much reperfusion as possible for at-risk brain tissue. Stroke management in the acute setting includes: use of thrombolytics if indicated, and re-assessment to monitor progression. Several trials have been completed in pursuit of safety and effectiveness of intra-arterial stroke therapy for patients outside the recommended thrombolytic time window

  6. Fabrication and development of several heat pipe honeycomb sandwich panel concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanzer, H. J.

    1982-06-01

    The feasibility of fabricating and processing liquid metal heat pipes in a low mass honeycomb sandwich panel configuration for application on the NASA Langley airframe-integrated Scramjet engine was investigated. A variety of honeycomb panel facesheet and core-ribbon wick concepts was evaluated within constraints dictated by existing manufacturing technology and equipment. The chosen design consists of an all-stainless steel structure, sintered screen facesheets, and two types of core-ribbon; a diffusion bonded wire mesh and a foil-screen composite. Cleaning, fluid charging, processing, and process port sealing techniques were established. The liquid metals potassium, sodium and cesium were used as working fluids. Eleven honeycomb panels 15.24 cm X 15.24 cm X 2.94 cm were delivered to NASA Langley for extensive performance testing and evaluation; nine panels were processed as heat pipes, and two panels were left unprocessed.

  7. How does timing, duration and severity of heat stress influence pollen-pistil interactions in angiosperms?

    PubMed Central

    Oosterhuis, Derrick M

    2011-01-01

    Reproductive development in sexual plants is substantially more sensitive to high temperature stress than vegetative development, resulting in negative implications for food and fiber production under the moderate temperature increases projected to result from global climate change. High temperature exposure either during early pollen development or during the progamic phase of pollen development will negatively impact pollen performance and reproductive output; both phases of pollen development are considered exceptionally sensitive to moderate heat stress. However, moderately elevated temperatures either before or during the progamic phase can limit fertilization by negatively impacting important pollen pistil interactions required for successful pollen tube growth toward the ovules. This mini-review identifies the impacts of heat stress on pollen-pistil interactions and sexual reproduction in angiosperms. A special emphasis is placed on the biochemical response of the pistil to moderately high temperature and the resultant influence on in vivo pollen performance and fertilization. PMID:21628998

  8. Fabrication and development of several heat pipe honeycomb sandwich panel concepts. [airframe integrated scramjet engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanzer, H. J.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of fabricating and processing liquid metal heat pipes in a low mass honeycomb sandwich panel configuration for application on the NASA Langley airframe-integrated Scramjet engine was investigated. A variety of honeycomb panel facesheet and core-ribbon wick concepts was evaluated within constraints dictated by existing manufacturing technology and equipment. The chosen design consists of an all-stainless steel structure, sintered screen facesheets, and two types of core-ribbon; a diffusion bonded wire mesh and a foil-screen composite. Cleaning, fluid charging, processing, and process port sealing techniques were established. The liquid metals potassium, sodium and cesium were used as working fluids. Eleven honeycomb panels 15.24 cm X 15.24 cm X 2.94 cm were delivered to NASA Langley for extensive performance testing and evaluation; nine panels were processed as heat pipes, and two panels were left unprocessed.

  9. Tropical Diabatic Heating and the Role of Convective Processes as Represented in Several Contemporary Climate Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Franklin R.; Roads, John; Oglesby, Robert; Marshall, Susan

    2004-01-01

    One of the most fundamental properties of the global heat balance is the net heat input into the tropical atmosphere that helps drive the planetary atmospheric circulation. Although broadly understood in terms of its gross structure and balance of source / sink terms, incorporation of the relevant processes in predictive models is still rather poor. The work reported here examines the tropical radiative and water cycle behavior as produced by four contemporary climate models. Among these are the NSIPP-2 (NASA Seasonal to Interannual Prediction Project) which uses the RAS convective parameterization; the FVCCM, a code using finite volume numerics and the CCM3.6 physics; FVCCM-MCRAS again having the finite volume numerics, but MCRAS convective parameterization and a different radiation treatment; and, finally, the NCEP GSM which uses the RAS. Using multi-decadal integrations with specified SSTs we examine the statistics of radiative / convective processes and associated energy transports, and then estimate model energy flux sensitivities to SST changes. In particular the behavior of the convective parameterizations is investigated. Additional model integrations are performed specifically to assess the importance representing convective inhibition in regulating convective cloud-top structure and moisture detrainment as well as controlling surface energy fluxes. To evaluate the results of these experiments, a number of satellite retrievals are used: TRMM retrievals of vertical reflectivity structure, rainfall rate, and inferred diabatic heating are analyzed to show both seasonal and interannual variations in vertical structure of latent heat release. Top-of-atmosphere radiative fluxes from ERBS and CERES are used to examine shortwave and longwave cloud forcing and to deduce required seasonal energy transports. Retrievals of cloud properties from ISCCP and water vapor variations from SSM/T-2 are also used to understand behavior of the humidity fields. These observations

  10. Several allergens from Anisakis simplex are highly resistant to heat and pepsin treatments.

    PubMed

    Caballero, María Luisa; Moneo, Ignacio

    2004-06-01

    Ingestion of raw or undercooked fish can lead to infection with Anisakis simplex. Sensitized patients show specific IgE to proteins from this parasite. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of specific IgE recognition directed to heat and/or pepsin-resistant allergens from A. simplex among sensitized patients. Twenty-seven patients with positive specific IgE and immunoblotting with a crude parasite extract were included in the study. Specific IgE detection against allergens resistant to boiling for 30 min and/or a pepsin digestion of an A. simplex extract was performed by immunoblotting. A total of 81% of the patients showed specific IgE to pepsin-resistant allergens and 67% had specific IgE to heat-resistant allergens. Thirty percent of patients recognized allergens after both treatments, one being the allergen detected by 75% of the patients of this group. Heat- and/or pepsin-resistant allergens from A. simplex could explain reactions and symptoms after the ingestion of well-cooked or canned fish.

  11. The model homologue of the partially defective human 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, considered as a risk factor for stroke due to increased homocysteine level, can be protected and reactivated by heat shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, Michał; Banecki, Bogdan; Kadziński, Leszek; Jakóbkiewicz-Banecka, Joanna; Gabig-Cimińska, Magdalena; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz; Banecka-Majkutewicz, Zyta

    2016-10-01

    The A222 V substitution in the human MTHFR gene product (5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase) is responsible for a decreased activity of this enzyme. This may cause an increased homocysteine level, considered as a risk factor for arteriosclerosis and stroke. The bacterial homologue of the human enzyme, MetF, has been found to be a useful model in genetic and biochemical studies. The similarity of Escherichia coli MetF and human MTHFR proteins is so high that particular mutations in the corresponding human gene can be reflected by the bacterial mutants. For example, the A222 V substitution in MTHFR (caused by the C667T substitution in the MTHFR gene) can be ascribed to the A117 V substitution in MetF. Here, it is reported that a temperature-sensitive MetF117 (A117 V) protein can be partially protected from a thermal inactivation by the heat shock proteins from the Hsp70/100 systems. Moreover, activity of the thermally denatured enzyme can be partially restored by the same heat shock proteins. High temperature protein G (HtpG) had no effect on MetF117 activity in both experimental systems. The presented results indicate that functions of heat shock proteins may be required for maintenance of the MetF117 function. This may have implications for the mechanisms of arteriosclerosis and stroke, especially in the light of previous findings that the A222 V MTHFR polymorphism may be a risk factor for stroke, as well as recently published results which demonstrated the increased levels of antibodies against heat shock proteins in stroke patients.

  12. Stroke Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... how to subscribe to the Stroke Connection Magazine. Community Resources Home health services, available from the Visiting Nurses Association, public health departments, hospital home care departments ...

  13. Effects of floor heating and litter quality on the development and severity of foot pad dermatitis in young turkeys.

    PubMed

    Abd El-Wahab, A; Beineke, A; Beyerbach, M; Visscher, C F; Kamphues, J

    2011-09-01

    Actions concerning animal health in turkey production are coming more and more to the fore. Litter quality has a great impact on the bird's health and welfare. This study aimed at evaluating the effects of using floor heating, different litter materials, and exposure to litter with a "critical moisture content" of 35% for 16 or 24 hr/day on the severity of foot pad dermatitis (FPD), a widespread disease in fattening turkeys. Four groups of 2-wk-old female turkeys, with 20 birds in each, were reared during 3 wk. All turkeys were fed a commercial pellet diet ad libitum. The first two groups were kept on wood shavings (35% moisture) without and with floor heating. The other two groups were housed on lignocellulose (Soft Cell) of 35% moisture without and with floor heating. In each group, half of the birds were housed for 8 hr/day in adjacent separate boxes where the litter was kept clean and dry throughout the experimental period. Foot pads were assessed weekly for external and at day 35 for histopathologic scoring (scores: 0 = healthy; 7 = ulcer). At day 14 each bird had normal and healthy foot pads. The results indicate that using floor heating resulted in significantly lower FPD scores (0.8 +/- 0.2) compared to groups without floor heating (2.0 +/- 0.8). Using lignocellulose as a litter material resulted in significantly lower histopathologic FPD scores (1.4 +/- 0.7) compared with wood shavings (1.7 +/- 0.8). In all birds housed on dry litter for 8 hr/day, significantly lower FPD scores were found compared to birds housed on wet litter for 24 hr. In conclusion, using floor heating, even with wet litter (35% moisture), independent of the litter type, resulted in reduced severity of FPD compared to those birds housed in pens without using floor heating. Additionally, using lignocellulose as a litter material resulted in lower FPD compared with wood shavings. Keeping litter dry and "warm" could be achieved by using floor heating, which is considered a practical step

  14. RyR1 S-Nitrosylation Underlies Environmental Heat Stroke and Sudden Death in Y522S RyR1 Knock-in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Durham, William J.; Aracena-Parks, Paula; Long, Cheng; Rossi, Ann E.; Goonasekera, Sanjeewa A.; Boncompagni, Simona; Galvan, Daniel L.; Gilman, Charles P.; Baker, Mariah; Shirokova, Natalia; Protasi, Feliciano; Dirksen, Robert; Hamilton, Susan L.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Mice with a malignant hyperthermia mutation (Y522S) in the ryanodine receptor (RyR1) display muscle contractures, rhabdomyolysis, and death in response to elevated environmental temperatures. We demonstrate that this mutation in RyR1 causes Ca2+ leak which drives increases generation of reactive nitrogen species (RNS). Subsequent S-nitrosylation of the mutant RyR1 increases its temperature sensitivity for activation, producing muscle contractures upon exposure to elevated temperatures. The Y522S mutation in humans is associated with central core disease. Many mitochondria in the muscle of heterozygous Y522S mice are swollen and misshapen. The mutant muscle displays decreased force production and increased mitochondrial lipid peroxidation with aging. Chronic treatment with N-acetylcysteine protects against mitochondrial oxidative damage and the decline in force generation. We propose a feed forward cyclic mechanism that increases the temperature sensitivity of RyR1 activation and underlies heat stroke and sudden death. The cycle eventually produces a myopathy with damaged mitochondria. PMID:18394989

  15. Atherosclerosis and Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... After Stroke Inspirational Stories Stroke Heroes Among Us Atherosclerosis and Stroke Updated:Oct 24,2016 Excerpted and ... cause difficulty walking and eventually gangrene. Stroke and atherosclerosis There are two types of ischemic stroke caused ...

  16. Fracture response of several metals to fast heating of samples by intensive X-ray radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubev, Vladimir

    2015-06-01

    Results on studying the fracture response of metals samples in the form of thin disks to fast heating by the intensive pulse of X-ray radiation of a complete spectrum are presented in the paper. The samples of such metals as iron, copper, AMg6 aluminum, VT14 titanium, molybdenum, tungsten, cadmium, lead and zinc were tested. The samples were fixed in the special cartridges that were placed at such distances from the X-ray irradiator where the energy fluxes were 1.38, 0.90 and 0.29 kJ/cm2. The irradiating X-ray pulse was about 2 ns in duration. After testing, the depth of material ablation from a sample front surface and the degree and character of its spall damage were determined. The method of metallographic analysis was used for these purposes. The spectrum data were used for the calculations of samples heating. Numerical calculations of thermomechanical and shock wave loading conditions were made with the use of the equation of state taking into account the process of evaporation. The calculated value of maximum negative pressure in the sample at the coordinate corresponding to the depth of ablation and formation of spallation zones or spall cracks was conventionally accepted as the material resistance to spall fracture in such conditions. The comparison of obtained results with the data on the fracture of examined materials in the conditions of fast heating by the X-ray pulse with a hard spectrum and by the high-current electron beam of an electron pulse generator was conducted.

  17. The Calculated and Measured Performance Characteristics of a Heated-Wire Liquid-Water-Content Meter for Measuring Icing Severity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neel, Carr B.; Steinmetz, Charles P.

    1952-01-01

    Ground tests have been made of an instrument which, when assembled in a more compact form for flight installation, could be used to obtain statistical flight data on the liquid-water content of icing clouds and to provide an indication of icing severity. The sensing element of the instrument consists of an electrically heated wire which is mounted in the air stream. The degree of cooling of the wire resulting from evaporation of the impinging water droplets is a measure. of the liquid-water content of the cloud. Determination of the value of the liquid-water content from the wire temperature at any instant requires a knowledge of the airspeed, altitude, and air temperature. An analysis was made of the temperature response of a heated wire exposed to an air stream containing water drops. Comparisons were made of the liquid-water content as measured with several heated wires and absorbent cylinders in an artificially produced cloud. For one of the wires, comparative tests were made with a rotating-disk icing-rate meter in an icing wind tunnel. From the test results, it was shown that an instrument for measuring the concentration of liquid water in an air stream can be built using an electrically heated wire of known temperatureresistance characteristics, and that the performance of such a device can be predicted using appropriate theory. Although an instrument in a form suitable for gathering statistical data in flight was not built, the practicability of constructing such an instrument was illustrated. The ground-test results indicated that a flight heated-wire instrument would be simple and durable, would respond rapidly to variations in liquid-water content, and could be used for the measurement of water content in clouds which are above freezing temperature, as well as in icing clouds.

  18. Fetal stroke.

    PubMed

    Ozduman, Koray; Pober, Barbara R; Barnes, Patrick; Copel, Joshua A; Ogle, Eileen A; Duncan, Charles C; Ment, Laura R

    2004-03-01

    Fetal stroke, or that which occurs between 14 weeks of gestation and the onset of labor resulting in delivery, has been associated with postnatal epilepsy, mental retardation, and cerebral palsy. The entity is caused by antenatal ischemic, thrombotic, or hemorrhagic injury. We present seven new cases of fetal stroke diagnosed in utero and review the 47 cases reported in the literature. Although risk factors could not be assigned to 50% of the fetuses with stroke, the most common maternal conditions associated with fetal stroke were alloimmune thrombocytopenia and trauma. Magnetic resonance imaging was optimal for identifying fetal stroke, and prenatal imaging revealed hemorrhagic lesions in over 90% of studies; porencephalies were identified in just 13%. Seventy-eight percent of cases with reported outcome resulted in either death or adverse neurodevelopmental outcome at ages 3 months to 6 years. Fetal stroke appears to have different risk factors, clinical characteristics, and outcomes than other perinatal or childhood stroke syndromes. A better understanding of those risk factors predisposing a fetus to cerebral infarction may provide a basis for future therapeutic intervention trials. Ozduman K, Pober BR, Barnes P, Copel JA, Ogle EA, Duncan CC, Ment LR. Fetal stroke.

  19. Autopsy approach to stroke.

    PubMed

    Love, Seth

    2011-02-01

    Stroke is a major cause of morbidity and mortality but the brain and other relevant tissues are often examined only cursorily when stroke patients come to autopsy. The pathological findings and clinical implications vary according to the type of stroke and its location and cause. Large ischaemic strokes are usually associated with atherosclerosis of extracranial or major intracranial arteries but can be caused by dissection. Most small cerebral infarcts are caused by arteriosclerosis or, in the elderly, cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). However, vasculitides and coagulopathies can cause a range of different patterns of ischaemic (and, occasionally, haemorrhagic) stroke. Global brain ischaemia, caused by severe hypotension or raised intracranial pressure, produces damage that is accentuated in certain regions and neuronal populations and may be confused with hypoglycaemic injury. The main cause of subarachnoid haemorrhage is a ruptured berry aneurysm but CAA, arteriovenous malformations and infective aneurysms are occasionally responsible. These can also cause parenchymal brain haemorrhage, although this most often complicates hypertensive small vessel disease. Sometimes the haemorrhage arises from a neoplasm. Performing an adequate autopsy in stroke requires proper preparation, awareness of the likely pathological processes, familiarity with intracranial vascular anatomy, careful gross examination and dissection, and appropriate use of histology.

  20. Chronic Consumption of a Low Sodium Diet: Hormonal and Physiological Effects During Exercise in the Heat,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-26

    retrospective studies of more severe heat injuries in humans , circulating levels of sodium appear to be within the normal range upon admission (14...16) or slightly elevated (6, 19, 25) due to dehydration. The process of heat acclimatization in humans is partially manifested in the secretion of a...performance during exercise in the heat. We have used a rat model (15, 17) for human heat stroke to quantitate the effects of several factors which

  1. Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Teri; Murphy, Teresa

    2016-05-01

    Each year, more than 795,000 people in the United States suffer a stroke and by 2030, it is estimated that 4% of the U.S. population will have had a stroke. Home healthcare clinicians will be increasingly called upon to assist stroke survivors and their caregivers adjust to disability and assist the survivor during their reintegration into the community. Therapeutic modalities are changing with advanced technology. Great strides are being made in the treatment of acute stroke; particularly endovascular interventions. More patients are surviving the acute stroke event and therefore will need to learn how to live with various degrees of disability. It is important for home healthcare clinicians to understand the process from acute event to medical stabilization, and from rehabilitation to long-term adaptation.

  2. [Pathophysiology of heat illness].

    PubMed

    Aruga, Tohru; Miyake, Yasufumi

    2012-06-01

    Human core temperature is strictly controlled by mechanism of radiation, conduction, convection, and evaporation from skin surface. Serial hot and humid climate induces dehydration which interferes heat pump-out from the body. Heart dysfunction is the third factor to rise body temperature. Hyperthermia and hypo-perfusion caused by dehydration and heart failure deteriorate specific organ functions, i.e. central nervous system, liver and renal functions and coagulation system. Disseminated intravascular coagulopathy is one of the standard indicators of severity and mortality of heat stroke.

  3. How a Stroke Is Diagnosed

    MedlinePlus

    ... News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Patients & Families About Stroke Stroke Diagnosis Stroke ... Diagnosis » How a Stroke is Diagnosed How a Stroke is Diagnosed How a Stroke is Diagnosed Lab ...

  4. Stroke management

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Stroke is the third most common cause of death in most developed countries. It is a worldwide problem; about 4.5 million people die from stroke each year. Stroke can occur at any age, but half of all strokes occur in people aged over 70 years. About 80% of all acute strokes are ischaemic, usually resulting from thrombotic or embolic occlusion of a cerebral artery. The remainder are caused either by intracerebral or subarachnoid haemorrhage. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of specialised care in people with acute stroke? What are the effects of medical treatment in people with acute ischaemic stroke? What are the effects of decompressive hemicraniectomy in acute ischaemic stroke? What are the effects of surgical evacuation for intracerebral haematomas? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to August 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 41 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acute reduction in blood pressure, aspirin, evacuation (early surgical evacuation, or conservative treatment), decompressive hemicraniectomy, neuroprotective agents (calcium channel blockers, citicoline, gamma-aminobutyric acid agonists, glycine antagonists, lubeluzole, magnesium, N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonists), specialised stroke care, systemic anticoagulation (heparinoids, specific thrombin inhibitors

  5. Evidence-Based Practice and the Recognition and Treatment of Exertional Heat Stroke, Part I: A Perspective From the Athletic Training Educator

    PubMed Central

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Ruiz, Roberto C.; Casa, Douglas J.; Pagnotta, Kelly D.; Pinkus, Danielle E.; Armstrong, Lawrence E.; Maresh, Carl M.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Athletic trainers (ATs) know to diagnose exertional heat stroke (EHS) via rectal thermometry (Tre) and to treat EHS via cold-water immersion (CWI) but do not implement these recommendations in clinical practice. Objective: To gain an understanding of educational techniques used to deliver content regarding EHS. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: In-person focus groups at the National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) Annual Meeting in June 2009 and 2 follow-up telephone interviews to confirm emergent themes. Patients or Other Participants: Thirteen AT educators (11 men, 2 women) from programs accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education, with an average of 22 ± 9 years of clinical experience and 16 ± 10 years of experience as educators. Five NATA districts were represented. Data Collection and Analysis: Data were analyzed using inductive content analysis. Peer review and data source triangulation also were conducted to establish trustworthiness. Results: Four themes emerged from the analysis: educational techniques, educational competencies, previous educational training, and privacy/public opinion. Educational techniques highlighted the lack of hands-on training for Tre and CWI. Educational competencies referred to the omission of Tre and CWI as psychomotor skills. Previous educational training addressed educators not having the skills or comfort with the skills necessary to properly educate students. Privacy/public opinion comprised external inputs from various groups (parents and coaches), legal considerations, and social bias. Conclusions: Educators supplied students with the appropriate didactic knowledge about EHS, but their lack of training and misgivings about Tre prevented them from allowing students to gain competence with this skill. Until the NATA competencies state the need to teach Tre and CWI and until educators are provided with their own learning opportunities, evidence-based practice regarding EHS

  6. Evidence-Based Medicine and the Recognition and Treatment of Exertional Heat Stroke, Part II: A Perspective From the Clinical Athletic Trainer

    PubMed Central

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Pinkus, Danielle E.; Casa, Douglas J.; McDermott, Brendon P.; Pagnotta, Kelly D.; Ruiz, Roberto C.; Armstrong, Lawrence E.; Maresh, Carl M.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Exertional heat stroke (EHS) is one of the leading causes of death in athletes. Certified athletic trainers (ATs) demonstrate strong knowledge of recommended practices with EHS but are apprehensive in implementing 2 basic procedures: rectal temperature assessment and cold water immersion. This apprehension might lead to deaths from EHS that could have been prevented. Objective: To investigate why collegiate and high school ATs do not implement best practices for the recognition and treatment of EHS. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: In-person focus groups consisting of 3 to 6 collegiate or high school ATs. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 19 ATs (9 men, 10 women; age = 36 ± 10 years, length of certification = 12 ± 9 years) employed at either the collegiate (n = 10) or high school (n = 9) level participated in the study. Data Collection and Analysis: Interviews were transcribed verbatim, and data were analyzed using deductive data analysis. Peer review and multiple-analyst data triangulation were conducted to establish trustworthiness of the data. Results: Five emergent themes explained the lack of evidence-based practice (EBP) regarding recognition and treatment of EHS. Three themes (lack of knowledge, comfort level, lack of initiative) were common in both the collegiate and high school settings, and 2 separate themes (liability concerns, lack of resources) were present in the high school setting. Conclusions: Our findings are consistent with those in the literature on EBP and EHS. Regardless of clinical setting, ATs have basic information on recognition and treatment of EHS, but 5 themes act as barriers to implementing proper management in the clinical setting. Workshops or hands-on training sessions need to be made available to improve students' comfort levels so ATs will implement EBP into everyday settings. PMID:22488141

  7. Plasma antibodies against heat shock protein 70 correlate with the incidence and severity of asthma in a Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Miao; Wu, Tangchun; Cheng, Longxian; Wang, Feng; Wei, Qingyi; Tanguay, Robert M

    2005-01-01

    Background The heat shock proteins (Hsps) are induced by stresses such as allergic factors and inflammatory responses in bronchi epithelial cells and therefore may be detectable in patients with asthma. However, the etiologic link between anti-Hsps and asthma (its severity and related inflammatory responses such as interleukin-4 and immunoglobulin E) has not been established. We determined whether antibodies against Hsp60 and Hsp70 were present in patients with asthma and evaluated their associations with risk and severity of asthma. Methods We determined the levels of anti-Hsp60 and anti-Hsp70 by immunoblot and their associations with risk and symptom severity of asthma in 95 patients with asthma and 99 matched non-symptomatic controls using multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results Compared to the controls, asthma patients were more likely to have detectable anti-Hsp60 (17.2% vs 5.1%) and anti-Hsp70 (33.7% vs 8.1%) (p ≤ 0.001). In particular, the presence of anti-Hsp70 was associated with a greater than 2 fold risk for asthma (adjusted OR = 2.21; 95% CI = 1.35~3.59). Furthermore, both anti-Hsp60 and anti-Hsp70 levels were positively correlated with symptom severity (p < 0.05) as well as interleukin-4 and immunoglobulin E (p < 0.05). Individuals with antibodies against anti-Hsp60 and anti-Hsp70 were more likely to have a family history of asthma (p < 0.001) and higher plasma concentrations of total immunoglobulin E (p = 0.001) and interleukin-4 (p < 0.05) than those without antibodies. Conclusions These data suggest that anti-Hsp60 and especially anti-Hsp70 correlate with the attacks and severity of asthma. The underlying molecular mechanisms linking antibodies to heat shock proteins and asthma remain to be investigated. PMID:15710045

  8. Protecting Yourself from Heat Stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... as heat stroke, heat exhaustion, or heat cramps. Heat Stroke A condition that occurs when the body becomes unable to control its temperature, and can cause death or permanent disability. Symptoms ■■ High body temperature ■■ Confusion ■■ ...

  9. Preventing stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... risk of stroke. Diseases such as cancer, chronic kidney disease , and some autoimmune diseases . Weak areas in an artery wall or abnormal arteries and veins . Pregnancy, both during and in the weeks right after ...

  10. Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Association Cardiology Patient Page Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation Christian T. Ruff Download PDF https://doi.org/ ... an irregular and fast heartbeat. What Causes Atrial Fibrillation? Several factors and medical conditions make it more ...

  11. Suicide in stroke survivors: epidemiology and prevention.

    PubMed

    Pompili, Maurizio; Venturini, Paola; Lamis, Dorian A; Giordano, Gloria; Serafini, Gianluca; Belvederi Murri, Martino; Amore, Mario; Girardi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is a dramatic event and is associated with potentially severe consequences, including disability, mortality, and social costs. Stroke may occur at any age; however, most strokes occur in individuals aged 65 years and older. Previous research has found that stroke increases suicide risk, especially among women and younger patients. The aim of the current review is to investigate the relationship between suicide and stroke in order to determine which stroke patients are at elevated risk for suicide. Moreover, we review the literature in order to provide pharmacological treatment strategies for stroke patients at high risk of suicide. We performed a careful search to identify articles and book chapters focused on this issue, selecting only English-language articles published from 1990 to 2014 that addressed the issue of suicide after stroke and its pharmacological management. We found 12 clinical trials that explored the relationship between stroke and suicidal ideation and/or suicidal plans and 11 investigating suicide as the cause of death after stroke. We identified stroke as a significant risk factor for both suicide and suicidal ideation, especially among younger adult depressed patients in all articles, providing further support for the association between post-stroke and suicidality. Suicide risk is particularly high in the first 5 years following stroke. Depression, previous mood disorder, prior history of stroke, and cognitive impairment were found to be the most important risk factors for suicide. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) represent the treatment of choice for stroke survivors with suicide risk, and studies in rats have suggested that carbolithium is a promising treatment in these patients. Early identification and treatment of post-stroke depression may significantly reduce suicide risk in stroke patients.

  12. Post-stroke dyskinesias

    PubMed Central

    Nakawah, Mohammad Obadah; Lai, Eugene C

    2016-01-01

    Strokes, whether ischemic or hemorrhagic, are among the most common causes of secondary movement disorders in elderly patients. Stroke-related (vascular) movement disorders, however, are uncommon complications of this relatively common disease. The spectrum of post-stroke movement disorders is broad and includes both hypo- and hyperkinetic syndromes. Post-stroke dyskinesias are involuntary hyperkinetic movements arising from cerebrovascular insults and often present with mixed phenotypes of hyperkinesia which can sometimes be difficult to classify. Nevertheless, identification of the most relevant motor phenotype, whenever possible, allows for a more specific phenomenological categorization of the dyskinesia and thus helps guide its treatment. Fortunately, post-stroke dyskinesias are usually self-limiting and resolve within 6 to 12 months of onset, but a short-term pharmacotherapy might sometimes be required for symptom control. Functional neurosurgical interventions targeting the motor thalamus or globus pallidus interna might be considered for patients with severe, disabling, and persistent dyskinesias (arbitrarily defined as duration longer than 12 months). PMID:27853372

  13. Recovery After Stroke: Recurrent Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood pressure  Find out if you have atrial fibrillation (an irregular heartbeat which allows blood to pool ... your stroke risk. One form  known as atrial fibrillation or AF  causes blood to form clots that ...

  14. Stroke (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... de los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Stroke KidsHealth > For Kids > Stroke Print A A A ... get help quickly. continue What Happens During a Stroke? A stroke usually happens suddenly, and a person ...

  15. TiO2-Nanowired Delivery of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Thwarts Diabetes- Induced Exacerbation of Brain Pathology in Heat Stroke: An Experimental Study in the Rat Using Morphological and Biochemical Approaches.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Hari S; Feng, Lianyuan; Lafuente, José V; Muresanu, Dafin F; Tian, Zhenrong R; Patnaik, Ranjana; Sharma, Aruna

    2015-01-01

    We have shown previously that heat stroke produced by whole body hyperthermia (WBH) for 4 h at 38°C in diabetic rats exacerbates blood-brain barrier breakdown, brain edema formation and neuronal cell injury as compared to healthy animals after identical heat exposure. In this combination of diabetes and WBH, normal therapeutic measures do not induce sufficient neuroprotection. Thus, we investigated whether nanowired mesenchymal cells (MSCs) when delivered systemically may have better therapeutic effects on brain damage in diabetic rats after WBH. Diabetes induced by streptozotocin administration (75 mg/kg, i.p, daily for 3 days) in rats resulted in clinical symptoms of the disease within 4 to 6 weeks (blood glucose level 20 to 30 mmoles/l as compared to saline control groups (4 to 6 mmoles/l). When subjected to WBH, these diabetic rats showed a 4-to 6-fold exacerbation of blood-brain barrier breakdown to Evans blue and radioiodine, along with brain edema formation and neuronal cell injury. Intravenous administration of rat MSCs (1x10(6)) to diabetic rats one week before WBH slightly reduced brain pathology, whereas TiO2 nanowired MSCs administered in an identical manner resulted in almost complete neuroprotection. On the other hand, MSCs alone significantly reduced brain pathology in saline-treated rats after WBH. These observations indicate that nanowired delivery of stem cells has superior therapeutic potential in heat stroke with diabetes, pointing to novel clinical perspectives in the future.

  16. Brain Edema After Ischaemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Dostovic, Zikrija; Dostovic, Ernestina; Smajlovic, Dzevdet; Ibrahimagic, Omer C.; Avdic, Leila

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the incidence of brain edema after ischaemic stroke and its impact on the outcome of patients in the acute phase of ischaemic stroke. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 114 patients. Ischaemic stroke and brain edema are verified by computed tomography. The severity of stroke was determined by National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale. Laboratory findings were made during the first four days of hospitalization, and complications were verified by clinical examination and additional tests. Results: In 9 (7.9%) patients developed brain edema. Pneumonia was the most common complication (12.3%). Brain edema had a higher incidence in women, patients with hypertension and elevated serum creatinine values, and patients who are suffering from diabetes. There was no significant correlation between brain edema and survival in patients after acute ischaemic stroke. Patients with brain edema had a significantly higher degree of neurological deficit as at admission, and at discharge (p = 0.04, p = 0.004). Conclusion: The cerebral edema is common after acute ischaemic stroke and no effect on survival in the acute phase. The existence of brain edema in acute ischaemic stroke significantly influence the degree of neurological deficit. PMID:27994292

  17. Stroke and episodic memory disorders.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chun; Alexander, Michael P

    2009-12-01

    Memory impairments are common after stroke, and the anatomical basis for impairments may be quite variable. To determine the range of stroke-related memory impairment, we identified all case reports and group studies through the Medline database and the Science Citation Index. There is no hypothesis about memory that is unique to stroke, but there are several important facets of memory impairment after stroke: (1) Every node of the limbic system implicated in memory may be damaged by stroke but very rarely in isolation and the combination of amnesia with the associated deficits often illuminates additional aspects of memory functions. (2) Stroke produces amnesia by damage to critical convergence white matter connections of the limbic system, and stroke is the only etiology of amnesia that can delineate the entire pathway of memory and critical convergence points. (3) Stroke also impairs memory, without causing classical amnesia, by damaging brain regions responsible for cognitive processes, some modality specific and some more generally strategic, that are essential for normal learning and recall.

  18. Study of global heat transport and plume morphology in severely-confined Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Ke-Qing; Chong, Kai Leong

    2016-11-01

    We study systematically how severe geometrical confinement influences the global heat transport (expressed as Nusselt number Nu) and the plume morphology in Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RBC) by means of direct numerical simulations. Broad ranges of width-to-height aspect-ratio (1 / 128 <= Γ <= 1) and Rayleigh number (3 ×104 <= Ra <=1011) at fixed Prandtl number Pr = 4 . 38 are considered in present study. It is found that Nu exhibits the scaling Nu - 1 Ra 0 . 61 over three decades of Ra at Γ = 1 / 128 and the flow is dominated by finger-like, long-lived plume columns for such severely-confined situation. The Nu scaling and the flow structures contrast sharply to that found at Γ = 1 for which Nu exhibits the scaling Nu - 1 Ra 0 . 31 and the flow is dominated by mushroom-like, fragmented thermal plumes. Analogy is made between the severely-confined RBC and strongly rotating RBC. This work was supported by RGC of HKSAR (No. CUHK404513), CUHK Direct Grant (No. 3132740) and through a HKPhD Fellowship.

  19. Patient-Identified Factors That Influence Spasticity in People with Stroke and Multiple Sclerosis Receiving Botulinum Toxin Injection Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Janice; Rancourt, Amanda; Di Poce, Stephanie; Levine, Amy; Hoang, Jessica; Ismail, Farooq; Boulias, Chris

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To describe the nature, extent, and impact of spasticity; determine factors that are perceived to influence its severity; and examine the relationship between time since diagnosis and impact of spasticity on daily activities in people with stroke and multiple sclerosis (MS) who are receiving botulinum toxin injection treatments. Methods: After a cross-sectional telephone survey, descriptive statistics and correlations were analyzed separately for the stroke and MS groups. Results: A total of 29 people with stroke and 10 with MS were surveyed. Both groups perceived increased spasticity with outdoor cold (69% stroke, 60% MS), muscle fatigue (59% stroke, 80% MS), and mental stress (59% stroke, 90% MS). No statistically significant correlations were found between time since diagnosis and perceived impact of spasticity on function in the stroke (r=0.07, p=0.37) or MS (r=0.16, p=0.33) groups. The MS group experienced bilateral and more severe perception of spasticity in the legs than the stroke group and identified more factors as worsening their spasticity (p<0.05). Severity of leg (but not arm) spasticity was significantly correlated with severity of impact of the following factors in the MS group only: lying on the back (r=0.70, p<0.05), outdoor heat (r=0.61, p<0.05), and morning (r=0.59, p<0.05). Conclusion: Intrinsic and extrinsic triggers can influence the perception of spasticity differently depending on individual factors, severity, location (arm vs. leg), and distribution of spasticity (unilateral vs. bilateral). Clinicians can use the findings to better understand, educate, and treat people with stroke and MS. PMID:25931667

  20. Definition and Implications of the Preventable Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Mark; Moores, Lisa; Alsharif, Mohamad N.; Paganini-Hill, Annlia

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Although patients with acute stroke are routinely evaluated for potential treatment (ie, treatability of the stroke), preventability of the presenting stroke is generally not seriously considered. OBJECTIVE To systematically analyze stroke preventability. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We evaluated medical records of 274 consecutive patients discharged with a diagnosis of ischemic stroke between December 2, 2010, and June 11, 2012, at the University of California Irvine Medical Center. Mean (SE) patient age was 67.2 (0.8) years. Data analysis was conducted from July 3, 2014, to August 4, 2015. EXPOSURES Medical records were systematically examined for demographic information, stroke risk factors, stroke severity, and acute stroke treatment. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES We defined stroke preventability as the degree to which the patient’s presenting stroke was preventable. Using variables easily determined at onset of stroke, we developed a 10-point scale (0, not preventable; 10, most preventable) to classify the degree of stroke preventability. Our focus was effectiveness of treatment of hypertension (0–2 points), hyperlipidemia (0–2 points), and atrial fibrillation (0–4 points), as well as use of antithrombotic treatment for known prior cerebrovascular and cardiovascular disease (0–2 points). RESULTS Total risk scores ranged from 0 to 8 (mean [SE], 2.2 [0.1]), with 207 patients (75.5%) exhibiting some degree of preventability (score of 1 or higher). Seventy-one patients (25.9%) had scores of 4 or higher, indicating that the stroke was highly preventable. Severity of stroke as determined by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was not related to preventability of stroke. However, 21 of 71 patients (29.6%) whose stroke was highly preventable were treated with intravenous or intra-arterial acute stroke therapy while these treatments were provided for only 13 of 67 patients (19.4%) with scores of 0 (no preventability) and 19 of

  1. Stroke at a younger age.

    PubMed

    Delilović-Vranić, Jasminka; Alajbegović, Azra; Tirić-Campara, Merita; Todorović, Ljubica

    2011-06-01

    Stroke is a suddenly developing disorder, caused by focal disturbance of cerebral circulation, followed by neurologic deficits of varying intensity with duration longer than 1 hour; it mostly occurs in old and middle age, and rarely at a younger age. The aim of the study was to analyze the occurrence of stroke at a younger age (18-49 years). We analyzed all stroke patients aged 18-49 treated at University Department of Neurology in Sarajevo during 2009, including analysis of their risk factors. During the one-year period, there were 820 stroke patients in total, 132 (18.5%) of them aged 18-49, male to female ratio 51.35%:48.65%. The majority of strokes were of ischemic type (94.59%), with only 5.41% of hemorrhagic stroke. The following risk factors were confirmed in study patients: hypertension (64.86%), smoking (57.76%), dyslipidemia (48.65%), ischemic heart disease (43.32%), psychological stress (29.73%), diabetes mellitus type 2 (24.43%), previous stroke including transient ischemic attack (21.62%), and others. During the one-month follow-up, 27.03% of patients achieved complete recovery, whereas mild neurologic signs were retained in 54.05%, signs of severe deficit requiring assistance in 13.51%, and 5.41% of patients died. In conclusion, stroke occurs even at a younger age in certain percentage. Along with smoking, diabetes, dyslipidemia and stress, hypertension is one of the leading risk factors for stroke also at a younger age. Timely and appropriate treatment contributes to faster recovery and shorter hospital stay, while reducing overall stroke sequels. The best prevention is primary, i.e. fighting risk factors and healthy lifestyle.

  2. Biotherapies in stroke.

    PubMed

    Detante, O; Jaillard, A; Moisan, A; Barbieux, M; Favre, I M; Garambois, K; Hommel, M; Remy, C

    2014-12-01

    Stroke is the second leading cause of death worldwide and the most common cause of severe disability. Neuroprotection and repair mechanisms supporting endogenous brain plasticity are often insufficient to allow complete recovery. While numerous neuroprotective drugs trials have failed to demonstrate benefits for patients, they have provided interesting translational research lessons related to neurorestorative therapy mechanisms in stroke. Stroke damage is not limited to neurons but involve all brain cell type including the extracellular matrix in a "glio-neurovascular niche". Targeting a range of host brain cells, biotherapies such as growth factors and therapeutic cells, currently hold great promise as a regenerative medical strategy for stroke. These techniques can promote both neuroprotection and delayed neural repair through neuro-synaptogenesis, angiogenesis, oligodendrogliogenesis, axonal sprouting and immunomodulatory effects. Their complex mechanisms of action are interdependent and vary according to the particular growth factor or grafted cell type. For example, while "peripheral" stem or stromal cells can provide paracrine trophic support, neural stem/progenitor cells (NSC) or mature neurons can act as more direct neural replacements. With a wide therapeutic time window after stroke, biotherapies could be used to treat many patients. However, guidelines for selecting the optimal time window, and the best delivery routes and doses are still debated and the answers may depend on the chosen product and its expected mechanism including early neuroprotection, delayed neural repair, trophic systemic transient effects or graft survival and integration. Currently, the great variety of growth factors, cell sources and cell therapy products form a therapeutic arsenal that is available for stroke treatment. Their effective clinical use will require prior careful considerations regarding safety (e.g. tumorgenicity, immunogenicity), potential efficacy, cell

  3. Prevalence of electrocardiographic abnormalities based on hypertension severity and blood pressure levels: the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke study.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Hemal; Gamboa, Christopher M; Safford, Monika M; Soliman, Elsayed Z; Glasser, Stephen P

    2016-09-01

    We evaluated the prevalence of major and minor electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities based on blood pressure (BP) control and hypertension (HTN) treatment resistance. We analyzed data from the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke study of 20,932 participants who were divided into presence of major (n = 3782), only minor (n = 8944), or no (n = 8206) ECG abnormalities. The cohort was stratified into normotension (n = 3373), pre-HTN (n = 4142), controlled HTN (n = 8619), uncontrolled HTN (n = 3544), controlled apparent treatment-resistant HTN (aTRH, n = 400), and uncontrolled aTRH (n = 854) groups, and the prevalence ratios (PRs) of major and minor ECG abnormalities were assessed separately for each BP group. The full multivariable adjustment included demographics, risk factors, and HTN duration. Compared with normotension, the PRs of major ECG abnormalities for pre-HTN, controlled HTN, uncontrolled HTN, controlled aTRH, and uncontrolled aTRH groups were 1.01 (0.90-1.14), 1.30 (1.16-1.45), 1.37 (1.23-1.54), 1.42 (1.22-1.64), and 1.44 (1.26-1.65), respectively (P < .001), whereas the PRs of minor ECG abnormalities among each of the above BP groups were similar. Detection of major ECG abnormalities among hypertensive persons with poor control and treatment resistance may help improve their cardiovascular risk stratification and early intervention.

  4. Post-stroke depression therapy: where are we now?

    PubMed

    Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Turner, Alyna; Dean, Olivia; Sureda, Antoni; Mohammad, Seyed

    2014-01-01

    Post-stroke depression is an important psychological consequence of ischemic stroke, and affects around one third of stroke patients at any time post-stroke. It has a negative impact on patient morbidity and mortality, and as such development of effective post-stroke recognition and treatment strategies are very important. There are several therapeutic strategies for post-stroke depression, including both pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches. In this review, we present evidence regarding the underlying biology of post-stroke depression, commonalities between post-stroke depression and Major Depressive Disorder and explore several treatment approaches, including antidepressant therapy, psychotherapy, surgical therapy, electroconvulsive therapy, acupuncture, music therapy and natural products. Further experimental and clinical studies are required, particularly in emerging fields such as the role of nutraceuticals in the treatment of stroke.

  5. Calorie restriction and stroke

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Stroke, a major cause of disability and mortality in the elderly, occurs when a cerebral blood vessel is occluded or ruptured, resulting in ischemic damage and death of brain cells. The injury mechanism involves metabolic and oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, apoptosis and inflammatory processes, including activation of glial cells and infiltration of leukocytes. In animal models, dietary energy restriction, by daily calorie reduction (CR) or intermittent fasting (IF), extends lifespan and decreases the development of age-related diseases. Dietary energy restriction may also benefit neurons, as suggested by experimental evidence showing that CR and IF protect neurons against degeneration in animal models. Recent findings by our group and others suggest the possibility that dietary energy restriction may protect against stroke induced brain injury, in part by inducing the expression of neurotrophic factors, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF); protein chaperones, including heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) and glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78); antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutases (SOD) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), silent information regulator T1 (SIRT1), uncoupling proteins and anti-inflammatory cytokines. This article discusses the protective mechanisms activated by dietary energy restriction in ischemic stroke. PMID:21910904

  6. Arterial ischemic stroke in HIV

    PubMed Central

    Bryer, Alan; Lucas, Sebastian; Stanley, Alan; Allain, Theresa J.; Joekes, Elizabeth; Emsley, Hedley; Turnbull, Ian; Downey, Colin; Toh, Cheng-Hock; Brown, Kevin; Brown, David; Ison, Catherine; Smith, Colin; Corbett, Elizabeth L.; Nath, Avindra; Heyderman, Robert S.; Connor, Myles D.; Solomon, Tom

    2016-01-01

    HIV infection, and potentially its treatment, increases the risk of an arterial ischemic stroke. Multiple etiologies and lack of clear case definitions inhibit progress in this field. Several etiologies, many treatable, are relevant to HIV-related stroke. To fully understand the mechanisms and the terminology used, a robust classification algorithm to help ascribe the various etiologies is needed. This consensus paper considers the strengths and limitations of current case definitions in the context of HIV infection. The case definitions for the major etiologies in HIV-related strokes were refined (e.g., varicella zoster vasculopathy and antiphospholipid syndrome) and in some instances new case definitions were described (e.g., HIV-associated vasculopathy). These case definitions provided a framework for an algorithm to help assign a final diagnosis, and help classify the subtypes of HIV etiology in ischemic stroke. PMID:27386505

  7. The "Know Stroke" Campaign

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Special Section The "Know Stroke" Campaign Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table of Contents ... campaign for the U.S. Hispanic community. 1 Know Stroke A stroke occurs when the blood supply to ...

  8. Healthy Living after Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stories Stroke Heroes Among Us Healthy Living After Stroke Nutrition Good nutrition is one way to reduce ... look to maintain health and wellness. Subscribe to Stroke Connection Get quarterly digital issues plus our monthly ...

  9. Phase and structural transformations in U and U-Nb alloy upon severe deformation and heat treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuev, Yu. N.; Sagaradze, V. V.; Pecherkina, N. L.; Kabanova, I. I.; Svyatov, I. L.; Bondarchuk, S. V.; Belyaev, D. V.

    2013-12-01

    Transmission electron microscopy was used to analyze the twin and dislocation structure of samples of commercial uranium in the initial (undeformed) state and after severe deformation using explosive loading by plane and spherical waves of various intensity. It has been shown that an increase in the intensity of explosive loading by a plane wave leads, first, to an increase in the density of randomly distributed dislocations and twins and, then, to the development of polygonization processes with the formation of a subgrain structure of the α phase. Crystallographic analysis of the initial and deformation-induced twins in uranium has shown the presence of predominantly {130} twins of mixed type and, in singular cases, {172} and {176} twins of the second kind. It has been established that the retained spherical shells have a distinctly pronounced zonal structure, which contains information on the forward and reverse martensitic phase transformations of uranium (α ↔ β(γ) ↔ L, etc.) that occur under shock-wave loading by spherical waves. Conditions are determined for the manifestation of structural heredity in the U-6 wt % Nb alloy with recovery of the size and shape of grains of the initial high-temperature γ phase during the forward γ → α″ martensitic transformation upon cooling and during reverse α″ → γ transformation upon heating. Elimination of the structural heredity with significant grain refinement of the high-temperature γ phase occurs in the process of repeated quenching from 700°C after one type of preliminary treatments (cold deformation of α″ martensite, recrystallization of the deformed α″ phase, high-temperature aging of the initial α″ martensite, and eutectoid decomposition).

  10. PREDICTORS FOR POST- STROKE DELIRIUM OUTCOME

    PubMed Central

    Dostovic, Zikrija; Dostovic, Ernestina; Smajlovic, Dzevdet; Ibrahimagic, Omer C.; Avdic, Leila; Becirovic, Elvir

    2016-01-01

    Background: There have been only a small number of studies that have evaluated the outcome of post-stroke delirium. Objectives: To evaluate the effects of gender, age, stroke localization, delirium severity, previous illnesses, associated medical complications on delirium outcome as well as, to determine effects of delirium on cognitive functioning one year after stroke. Patients and Methods: Comprehensive neuropsychological assessments were performed within the first week of stroke onset, at hospital discharge, and followed-up for 3, 6 and 12 months after stroke. We used diagnostic tools such as Glazgow Coma Scale, Delirium Rating Scale, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and Mini-Mental State. Results: Patients who developed post-stroke delirium had significantly more complications (p = 0.0005). Direct logistic regression was performed to assess the impact of several factors on the likelihood that patients will die. The strongest predictor of outcome was age, mean age ≥ 65 years with a odds ratio (OR) 4.9. Cox’s regression survival was conducted to assess the impact of multiple factors on survival. The accompanying medical complications were the strongest predictor of respondents poore outcome with Hazard-risk 3.3. Cognitive assessments including Mini Mental State score have showen that post-stroke delirium patients had significant cognitive impairment, three (p = 0.0005), six months (p = 0.0005) and one year (p = 0.0005) after stroke, compared to patients without delirium. Conclusion: Patient gender, age, localization of stroke, severity of delirium, chronic diseases and emerging complications significantly affect the outcome of post- stroke delirium. Delirium significantly reduced cognitive functioning of after stroke patients. PMID:27999490

  11. Stroke Knowledge in Spanish-speaking populations

    PubMed Central

    Hawkes, Maximiliano A; Ameriso, Sebastián F; Willey, Joshua Z

    2015-01-01

    Background Spanish is the second most spoken language in the world. Spanish-speaking populations (SSP) have heterogeneous cultural backgrounds, racial and ethnical origins, economic status, and access to health care systems. There are no published reviews about stroke knowledge in SSP. We reviewed the existing literature addressing stroke knowledge among SSP and propose future directions for research. Summary We identified 18 suitable studies by searching PubMed, Lilacs, Scopus, Embase, Cochrane and Scielo databases, and looking at reference lists of eligible articles. We also included 2 conference abstracts. Data related to stroke knowledge from studies of Spanish-speakers was analyzed. Key messages Little is known about stroke knowledge in SSP, especially in Latin America. Information is poor even among subjects at risk, stroke patients, stroke survivors, and health care providers. “Ictus”, the word used for stroke in Spanish, is largely unrecognized among subjects at risk. Furthermore, access to medical care and presence of neurologists are suboptimal in many regions. There are several potential issues to solve regarding stroke knowledge and stroke care in SSP. Programs to educate the general population and non-neurologists medical providers in stroke and telemedicine may be suitable options to improve the present situation. PMID:25871697

  12. Stroke Code Improves Intravenous Thrombolysis Administration in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chih-Hao; Tang, Sung-Chun; Tsai, Li-Kai; Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Yeh, Shin-Joe; Huang, Kuang-Yu; Jeng, Jiann-Shing

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Timely intravenous (IV) thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke is associated with better clinical outcomes. Acute stroke care implemented with “Stroke Code” (SC) may increase IV tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) administration. The present study aimed to investigate the impact of SC on thrombolysis. Methods The study period was divided into the “pre-SC era” (January 2006 to July 2010) and “SC era” (August 2010 to July 2013). Demographics, critical times (stroke symptom onset, presentation to the emergency department, neuroimaging, thrombolysis), stroke severity, and clinical outcomes were recorded and compared between the two eras. Results During the study period, 5957 patients with acute ischemic stroke were admitted; of these, 1301 (21.8%) arrived at the emergency department within 3 h of stroke onset and 307 (5.2%) received IV-tPA. The number and frequency of IV-tPA treatments for patients with an onset-to-door time of <3 h increased from the pre-SC era (n = 91, 13.9%) to the SC era (n = 216, 33.3%) (P<0.001). SC also improved the efficiency of IV-tPA administration; the median door-to-needle time decreased (88 to 51 min, P<0.001) and the percentage of door-to-needle times ≤60 min increased (14.3% to 71.3%, P<0.001). The SC era group tended to have more patients with good outcome (modified Rankin Scale ≤2) at discharge (49.5 vs. 39.6%, P = 0.11), with no difference in symptomatic hemorrhage events or in-hospital mortality. Conclusion The SC protocol increases the percentage of acute ischemic stroke patients receiving IV-tPA and decreases door-to-needle time. PMID:25111200

  13. The Epidemiology of Atrial Fibrillation and Stroke.

    PubMed

    Pistoia, Francesca; Sacco, Simona; Tiseo, Cindy; Degan, Diana; Ornello, Raffaele; Carolei, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    The burden of stroke is increasing due to aging population and unhealthy lifestyle habits. The considerable rise in atrial fibrillation (AF) is due to greater diffusion of risk factors and screening programs. The link between AF and ischemic stroke is strong. The subtype most commonly associated with AF is cardioembolic stroke, which is particularly severe and shows the highest rates of mortality and permanent disability. A trend toward a higher prevalence of cardioembolic stroke in high-income countries is probably due to the greater diffusion of AF and the control of atherosclerotic of risk factors.

  14. Anesthetic management of patients with acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Flexman, Alana M; Donovan, Anne L; Gelb, Adrian W

    2012-06-01

    Stroke is a major cause of death and disability. Anesthesiologists are likely to encounter patients with stroke and must be aware of the anesthetic considerations for these patients. Intravenous thrombolysis and intra-arterial thrombolysis are effective treatments for acuteischemic stroke as well as evolving endovascular techniques such as mechanical clot retrieval. Recent retrospective studies have found an association between general anesthesia and poor clinical outcome. The results of these studies have several limitations, and current evidence is inadequate to guide the choice of anesthesia in patients with acute stroke. The choice of anesthesia must be based on individual patient factors until further research is completed.

  15. Translational MR Neuroimaging of Stroke and Recovery.

    PubMed

    Mandeville, Emiri T; Ayata, Cenk; Zheng, Yi; Mandeville, Joseph B

    2017-02-01

    Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become a critical clinical tool for diagnosing focal ischemic stroke severity, staging treatment, and predicting outcome. Imaging during the acute phase focuses on tissue viability in the stroke vicinity, while imaging during recovery requires the evaluation of distributed structural and functional connectivity. Preclinical MRI of experimental stroke models provides validation of non-invasive biomarkers in terms of cellular and molecular mechanisms, while also providing a translational platform for evaluation of prospective therapies. This brief review of translational stroke imaging discusses the acute to chronic imaging transition, the principles underlying common MRI methods employed in stroke research, and the experimental results obtained by clinical and preclinical imaging to determine tissue viability, vascular remodeling, structural connectivity of major white matter tracts, and functional connectivity using task-based and resting-state fMRI during the stroke recovery process.

  16. The Christchurch earthquake stroke incidence study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Teddy Y; Cheung, Jeanette; Cole, David; Fink, John N

    2014-03-01

    We examined the impact of major earthquakes on acute stroke admissions by a retrospective review of stroke admissions in the 6 weeks following the 4 September 2010 and 22 February 2011 earthquakes. The control period was the corresponding 6 weeks in the previous year. In the 6 weeks following the September 2010 earthquake there were 97 acute stroke admissions, with 79 (81.4%) ischaemic infarctions. This was similar to the 2009 control period which had 104 acute stroke admissions, of whom 80 (76.9%) had ischaemic infarction. In the 6 weeks following the February 2011 earthquake, there were 71 stroke admissions, and 61 (79.2%) were ischaemic infarction. This was less than the 96 strokes (72 [75%] ischaemic infarction) in the corresponding control period. None of the comparisons were statistically significant. There was also no difference in the rate of cardioembolic infarction from atrial fibrillation between the study periods. Patients admitted during the February 2011 earthquake period were less likely to be discharged directly home when compared to the control period (31.2% versus 46.9%, p=0.036). There was no observable trend in the number of weekly stroke admissions between the 2 weeks leading to and 6 weeks following the earthquakes. Our results suggest that severe psychological stress from earthquakes did not influence the subsequent short term risk of acute stroke, but the severity of the earthquake in February 2011 and associated civil structural damages may have influenced the pattern of discharge for stroke patients.

  17. Role of prediabetes in stroke

    PubMed Central

    Mijajlović, Milija D; Aleksić, Vuk M; Šternić, Nadežda M; Mirković, Mihailo M; Bornstein, Natan M

    2017-01-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and probably the greatest cause of adult disability worldwide. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a state of accelerated aging of blood vessels. Patients with diabetes have increased risk of stroke. Hyperglycemia represents a risk factor for poor outcome following stroke, and probably is just a marker of poor outcome rather than a cause. Lowering of blood glucose levels has not been shown to improve prognosis. Also, prevention of stroke risk among patients with DM is not improved with therapy for reduction of glucose levels. On the other hand, prediabetes, a metabolic state between normal glucose metabolism and diabetes, is a risk factor for the development of DM type 2 and subsequently for stroke. Several methods are known to identify prediabetes patients, including fasting plasma glucose levels, 2-hour post load glucose levels, and glycosylated hemoglobin levels. In this text, we tried to summarize known data about diagnosis, epidemiology, risk factors, pathophysiology, and prevention of prediabetes in relation to DM and stroke. PMID:28203079

  18. Therapeutic interventions in acute stroke.

    PubMed Central

    Lees, K R

    1992-01-01

    1. Potential therapies for ischaemic stroke include agents to reduce oedema, to improve cerebral perfusion, to reduce excitotoxic damage, to minimise free-radical induced injury and to reduce complications such as deep venous thrombosis. 2. Of the anti-oedema drugs, steroids are ineffective and possibly dangerous; intravenous glycerol is unproven. 3. Haemodilution to reduce whole blood viscosity and improve perfusion is ineffective. Thrombolytic drugs have not been adequately tested but several randomised multicentre trials are now commencing. Early treatment and CT scanning are essential. 4. Anticoagulants and antiplatelet drugs may have wide applicability but have not been tested in the acute phase of stroke. A multi-centre trial will address this issue. 5. Neuronal cytoprotection offers exciting prospects for acute stroke treatment. Antagonists of glutamate at the NMDA receptor, calcium and sodium channel blocking agents and free radical scavenging drugs have potent effects experimentally. Several agents are now reaching clinical trials. The calcium antagonist nimodipine has been disappointing in large scale trials but some studies were flawed by late treatment. 6. Successful treatment of acute stroke is likely to combine several approaches. 7. Therapeutic trials in stroke must include CT scanning, early treatment and a multicentre approach to achieve large numbers of patients. PMID:1493080

  19. Air pollution and stroke - an overview of the evidence base.

    PubMed

    Maheswaran, Ravi

    2016-08-01

    Air pollution is being increasingly recognized as a significant risk factor for stroke. There are numerous sources of air pollution including industry, road transport and domestic use of biomass and solid fuels. Early reports of the association between air pollution and stroke come from studies investigating health effects of severe pollution episodes. Several daily time series and case-crossover studies have reported associations with stroke. There is also evidence linking chronic air pollution exposure with stroke and with reduced survival after stroke. A conceptual framework linking air pollution exposure and stroke is proposed. It links acute and chronic exposure to air pollution with pathways to acute and chronic effects on stroke risk. Current evidence regarding potential mechanisms mainly relate to particulate air pollution. Whilst further evidence would be useful, there is already sufficient evidence to support consideration of reduction in air pollution as a preventative measure to reduce the stroke burden globally.

  20. Heat shock factor 1 binds to and transcribes satellite II and III sequences at several pericentromeric regions in heat-shocked cells

    SciTech Connect

    Eymery, Angeline; Souchier, Catherine; Vourc'h, Claire; Jolly, Caroline

    2010-07-01

    Cells respond to stress by activating the synthesis of heat shock proteins (HSPs) which protect the cells against the deleterious effects of stress. This mechanism is controlled by the heat shock factor 1 (HSF1). In parallel to HSP gene transcription, in human cells, HSF1 also binds to and transcribes satellite III repeated sequences present in numerous copies in the 9q12 pericentromeric region of chromosome 9. These HSF1 accumulation sites are termed nuclear stress bodies (nSBs). In tumor cells, however, the number of nSBs is higher than the number of 9q12 copies, suggesting the existence of other HSF1 targets. In this paper, we were interested in characterizing these other HSF1 binding sites. We show that HSF1 indeed binds to the pericentromeric region of 14 chromosomes, thereby directing the formation of 'secondary nSBs'. The appearance of secondary nSBs depends on the number of satellite sequences present in the target locus, and on the cellular amount of HSF1 protein. Moreover, secondary nSBs also correspond to transcription sites, thus demonstrating that heat shock induces a genome-wide transcription of satellite sequences. Finally, by analyzing published transcriptomic data, we show that the derepression of these large heterochromatic blocks does not significantly affect the transcription of neighboring genes.

  1. Comparison of estimated core body temperature measured with the BioHarness and rectal temperature under several heat stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yongsuk; DiLeo, Travis; Powell, Jeffrey B; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Roberge, Raymond J; Coca, Aitor

    2016-08-01

    Monitoring and measuring core body temperature is important to prevent or minimize physiological strain and cognitive dysfunction for workers such as first responders (e.g., firefighters) and military personnel. The purpose of this study is to compare estimated core body temperature (Tco-est), determined by heart rate (HR) data from a wearable chest strap physiology monitor, to standard rectal thermometry (Tre) under different conditions.  Tco-est and Tre measurements were obtained in thermoneutral and heat stress conditions (high temperature and relative humidity) during four different experiments including treadmill exercise, cycling exercise, passive heat stress, and treadmill exercise while wearing personal protective equipment (PPE).  Overall, the mean Tco-est did not differ significantly from Tre across the four conditions. During exercise at low-moderate work rates under heat stress conditions, Tco-est was consistently higher than Tre at all-time points. Tco-est underestimated temperature compared to Tre at rest in heat stress conditions and at a low work rate under heat stress while wearing PPE. The mean differences between the two measurements ranged from -0.1 ± 0.4 to 0.3 ± 0.4°C and Tco-est correlated well with HR (r = 0.795 - 0.849) and mean body temperature (r = 0.637 - 0.861).  These results indicate that, the comparison of Tco-est to Tre may result in over- or underestimation which could possibly lead to heat-related illness during monitoring in certain conditions. Modifications to the current algorithm should be considered to address such issues.

  2. Effects of high electrolyte contents in the diet and using floor heating on development and severity of foot pad dermatitis in young turkeys.

    PubMed

    Abd El-Wahab, A; Visscher, C F; Beineke, A; Beyerbach, M; Kamphues, J

    2013-02-01

    Foot pad dermatitis (FPD) is a very common disease affecting poultry and is mostly caused by bad litter condition. This study aimed to test the effects of poultry diets with normal levels of electrolytes compared with a surplus level of electrolytes with and without using floor heating. Eighty two-week-old ♀ turkey poults were reared over 3 weeks on wood shavings, divided randomly into four groups. Two groups were fed normal levels of electrolytes (1.60 g Na; 7.80 g K/kg diet), and the other two groups were fed surplus levels of electrolytes (3.10; 15.3 g/kg diet). In each dietary treatment, half of the birds were exposed to floor heating. Half of the birds in each group were exposed for 4 h/day to wet litter (35% water) in adjacent separate boxes. External assessment of foot pads was performed weekly. High dietary electrolytes increased the severity of FPD significantly (3.65 ± 1.03). Floor heating is likely to be highly effective in significantly reducing the severity of FPD (2.36 ± 0.588). Despite forced water intake, the litter became drier when floor heating was in use. Combining low Na and K levels with a floor heating system reduced the scores of FPD by approximately 60%, compared with high electrolyte levels without floor heating. Therefore, both dietary electrolyte levels and floor heating markedly affected FPD via litter moisture.

  3. Primary and Comprehensive Stroke Centers: History, Value and Certification Criteria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In the United States (US) stroke care has undergone a remarkable transformation in the past decades at several levels. At the clinical level, randomized trials have paved the way for many new stroke preventives, and recently, several new mechanical clot retrieval devices for acute stroke treatment have been cleared for use in practice by the US Federal Drug Administration. Furthermore, in the mid 1990s we witnessed regulatory approval of intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator for administration in acute ischemic stroke. In the domain of organization of medical care and delivery of health services, stroke has transitioned from a disease dominated by neurologic consultation services only to one managed by vascular neurologists in geographical stroke units, stroke teams and care pathways, primary stroke center certification according to The Joint Commission, and most recently comprehensive stroke center designation under the aegis of The Joint Commission. Many organizations in the US have been involved to enhance stroke care. To name a few, the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association, Brain Attack Coalition, and National Stroke Association have been on the forefront of this movement. Additionally, governmental initiatives by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and legislative initiatives such as the Paul Coverdell National Acute Stroke Registry program have paved the way to focus on stroke prevention, acute treatment and quality improvement. In this invited review, we discuss a brief history of organized stroke care in the United States, evidence to support the value of primary and comprehensive stroke centers, and the certification criteria and process to become a primary or comprehensive stroke center. PMID:24324943

  4. Galanin's implications for post-stroke improvement

    PubMed Central

    Song, Juhyun

    2016-01-01

    Stroke leads to a variety of pathophysiological conditions such as ischemic infarct, cerebral inflammation, neuronal damage, cognitive decline, and depression. Many endeavors have been tried to find the therapeutic solutions to attenuate severe neuropathogenesis after stroke. Several studies have reported that a decrease in the neuropeptide regulator ‘galanin’ is associated with neuronal loss, learning and memory dysfunctions, and depression following a stroke. The present review summarized recent evidences on the function and the therapeutic potential of galanin in post-ischemic stroke to provide a further understanding of galanin's role. Hence, we suggest that galanin needs to be considered as a therapeutic factor in the alleviation of post-stroke pathologies. PMID:28127496

  5. [Stroke - lifestyle and environment].

    PubMed

    Gerischer, L M; Flöel, A; Endres, M

    2015-08-01

    Lifestyle modifications and environmental factors are important for stroke prevention and rehabilitation after stroke. The individual stroke risk may be modified by factors like physical activity, body weight and nutrition, special dietary supplements such as vitamins, smoking, consumption of tea, coffee and alcohol, psychological factors and by keeping a pet. The focus of this article lies on measures for stroke prevention. For certain topics, it also comments on factors that are important during rehabilitation after stroke.

  6. Heat-related illness.

    PubMed

    Atha, Walter F

    2013-11-01

    Environmental exposure to high temperatures can result in abnormalities ranging from mild heat exhaustion to heat stroke with multiorgan system failure. An understanding of the mechanisms of thermoregulation and how those mechanisms fail with extreme heat stress is critical for management of the patient with elevated body temperature in the emergency department.

  7. Stroke rehabilitation in Canada: a work in progress.

    PubMed

    Teasell, Robert; Meyer, Matthew J; Foley, Norine; Salter, Katherine; Willems, Deb

    2009-01-01

    Stroke rehabilitation in Canada continues to function under models and practices that have changed little in the last four decades and struggles to implement new evidence-based or best practices. Ontario, Canada's largest province, has had a coordinated stroke strategy since 2000. The Ontario Stroke System has developed an extensive infrastructure of research syntheses, consensus panel recommendations, practice guidelines, standards of care, and centralized data collection across the continuum of stroke care. This has produced a solid foundation upon which an evidence-based stroke rehabilitation system can be developed. However, failure to invest in stroke rehabilitation or provide incentives to implement change has resulted in the stroke rehabilitation system and critical outcomes remaining largely unchanged. Improvements in time to admission have been countered by rising admission FIM scores such that severe stroke patients often cannot access the stroke rehabilitation system. Many stroke patients are still rehabilitated on general rehabilitation units, therapy intensities remain unacceptably low, and many outpatient programs are being reduced or even closed. Although there are pockets of innovation, the stroke rehabilitation system continues to function more according to traditional ways of practicing. The hope is that with appropriate investments and incentives, Canadians and Ontarians can build upon the existing infrastructure to ensure stroke patients receive optimal rehabilitative care based on best evidence. In the meantime, stroke rehabilitation in Canada remains a work in progress.

  8. Clinical study of 222 patients with pure motor stroke

    PubMed Central

    Arboix, A; Padilla, I; Massons, J; Garcia-Eroles, L; Comes, E; Targa, C

    2001-01-01

    The objective was to assess the frequency of pure motor stroke caused by different stroke subtypes and to compare demographic, clinical, neuroimaging, and outcome data of pure motor stroke with those of patients with other lacunar stroke as well as with those of patients with non-lacunar stroke.
Data from 2000 patients with acute stroke (n=1761) or transient ischaemic attack (n=239) admitted consecutively to the department of neurology of an acute care 350 bed teaching hospital were prospectively collected in the Sagrat Cor Hospital of Barcelona stroke registry over a 10 year period. For the purpose of the study 222 (12.7%) patients with pure motor stroke were selected. The other study groups included 218 (12.3%) patients with other lacunar strokes and 1321 (75%) patients with non-lacunar stroke.
In relation to stroke subtype, lacunar infarcts were found in 189 (85%) patients, whereas ischaemic lacunar syndromes not due to lacunar infarcts occurred in 23 (10.4%) patients (atherothrombotic stroke in 12, cardioembolic stroke in seven, infarction of undetermined origin in three, and infarction of unusual aetiology in one) and haemorrhagic lacunar syndromes in 10 (4.5%). Patients with pure motor stroke showed a better outcome than patients with non-lacunar stroke with a significantly lower number of complications and in hospital mortality rate, shorter duration of hospital stay, and a higher number of symptom free patients at hospital discharge. After multivariate analysis, hypertension, diabetes, obesity, hyperlipidaemia, non-sudden stroke onset, internal capsule involvement, and pons topography seemed to be independent factors of pure motor stroke in patients with acute stroke.
In conclusion, about one of every 10 patients with acute stroke had a pure motor stroke. Pure motor stroke was caused by a lacunar infarct in 85% of patients and by other stroke subtypes in 15%. Several clinical features are more frequent in patients with pure motor stroke than in

  9. Role of sleep-disordered breathing and sleep-wake disturbances for stroke and stroke recovery

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) and sleep-wake disturbances (SWD) are highly prevalent in stroke patients. Recent studies suggest that they represent both a risk factor and a consequence of stroke and affect stroke recovery, outcome, and recurrence. Methods: Review of literature. Results: Several studies have proven SDB to represent an independent risk factor for stroke. Sleep studies in TIA and stroke patients are recommended in view of the very high prevalence (>50%) of SDB (Class IIb, level of evidence B). Treatment of obstructive SDB with continuous positive airway pressure is recommended given the strength of the increasing evidence in support of a positive effect on outcome (Class IIb, level of evidence B). Oxygen, biphasic positive airway pressure, and adaptive servoventilation may be considered in patients with central SDB. Recently, both reduced and increased sleep duration, as well as hypersomnia, insomnia, and restless legs syndrome (RLS), were also suggested to increase stroke risk. Mainly experimental studies found that SWD may in addition impair neuroplasticity processes and functional stroke recovery. Treatment of SWD with hypnotics and sedative antidepressants (insomnia), activating antidepressants or stimulants (hypersomnia), dopaminergic drugs (RLS), and clonazepam (parasomnias) are based on single case observations and should be used with caution. Conclusions: SDB and SWD increase the risk of stroke in the general population and affect short- and long-term stroke recovery and outcome. Current knowledge supports the systematic implementation of clinical procedures for the diagnosis and treatment of poststroke SDB and SWD on stroke units. PMID:27488603

  10. A heat wave during leaf expansion severely reduces productivity and modifies seasonal growth patterns in a northern hardwood forest.

    PubMed

    Stangler, Dominik Florian; Hamann, Andreas; Kahle, Hans-Peter; Spiecker, Heinrich

    2016-10-13

    A useful approach to monitor tree response to climate change and environmental extremes is the recording of long-term time series of stem radial variations obtained with precision dendrometers. Here, we study the impact of environmental stress on seasonal growth dynamics and productivity of yellow birch (Betula alleghaniensis Britton) and sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) in the Great Lakes, St Lawrence forest region of Ontario. Specifically, we research the effects of a spring heat wave in 2010, and a summer drought in 2012 that occurred during the 2005-14 study period. We evaluated both growth phenology (onset, cessation, duration of radial growth, time of maximum daily growth rate) and productivity (monthly and seasonal average growth rates, maximum daily growth rate, tree-ring width) and tested for differences and interactions among species and years. Productivity of sugar maple was drastically compromised by a 3-day spring heat wave in 2010 as indicated by low growth rates, very early growth cessation and a lagged growth onset in the following year. Sugar maple also responded more sensitively than yellow birch to a prolonged drought period in July 2012, but final tree-ring width was not significantly reduced due to positive responses to above-average temperatures in the preceding spring. We conclude that sugar maple, a species that currently dominates northern hardwood forests, is vulnerable to heat wave disturbances during leaf expansion, which might occur more frequently under anticipated climate change.

  11. Global Burden of Stroke.

    PubMed

    Feigin, Valery L; Norrving, Bo; Mensah, George A

    2017-02-03

    On the basis of the GBD (Global Burden of Disease) 2013 Study, this article provides an overview of the global, regional, and country-specific burden of stroke by sex and age groups, including trends in stroke burden from 1990 to 2013, and outlines recommended measures to reduce stroke burden. It shows that although stroke incidence, prevalence, mortality, and disability-adjusted life-years rates tend to decline from 1990 to 2013, the overall stroke burden in terms of absolute number of people affected by, or who remained disabled from, stroke has increased across the globe in both men and women of all ages. This provides a strong argument that "business as usual" for primary stroke prevention is not sufficiently effective. Although prevention of stroke is a complex medical and political issue, there is strong evidence that substantial prevention of stroke is feasible in practice. The need to scale-up the primary prevention actions is urgent.

  12. Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart disease and stroke prevention Heart Health and Stroke Heart disease and stroke prevention Related information Learn more about healthy eating ... to top More information on Heart disease and stroke prevention Read more from womenshealth.gov A Lifetime ...

  13. Difficulty Swallowing After Stroke (Dysphagia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stories Stroke Heroes Among Us Difficulty Swallowing After Stroke (Dysphagia) Updated:Nov 15,2016 Excerpted and adapted ... stiffness (spasticity), fatigue and more. Let's Talk About Stroke Fact Sheets Our stroke fact sheets cover treatments, ...

  14. Stroke biomarkers: Can they help us to guide stroke thrombolysis?

    PubMed

    Montaner, Joan

    2006-11-01

    The use of blood biomarkers is getting increasingly popular in the field of cerebrovascular diseases, since biomarkers might aid physicians in several steps of stroke evaluation. We will discuss whether stroke diagnosis might be possible using some specific brain biomarkers and if this approach will permit rapid referral of stroke patients to hospitals with acute treatments such as tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) available. Although thrombolytic therapy in acute stroke is effective since it accelerates clot lyses and earlier restoration of blood flow, up to 40-50% of treated patients do not recanalize or do it too late, and between 6 and 15% suffer hemorrhagic transformations with high death rates. In the context of the neurovascular unit, t-PA may degrade extracellular matrix integrity and increase risks of neurovascular cell death, blood-brain barrier leakage, edema and hemorrhage. In humans, biomarkers such as matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) or fibronectin, which might be used to select patients at higher risk of hemorrhagic transformation, and high plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) interfering with tPA-induced recanalization, thus predicting clot-lyses resistance and poor outcome, have been recently identified. Moreover, high levels of MMP-9 and MMP-13 are involved in DWI lesion growth in spite of thrombolytic therapy suggesting its ultra-early role in brain injury. Other biomarkers such as C-reactive protein may accurately predict stroke mortality following reperfusion therapies. Finally, we will also show that genetic background of stroke patients may condition plasma levels of some of these biomarkers and influence therapeutic response in t-PA-treated patients.

  15. Stroke Warning Signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms, call 9-1-1 or emergency medical services immediately. After Calling 911: Receiving timely stroke treatment is important and an important step to recovery. Why Getting Quick Stroke Treatment is Important "Let's ...

  16. Two Kinds of Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Two Kinds of Stroke Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table ... minutes, brain cells begin to die. There are two kinds of stroke. The more common kind, called ...

  17. Stroke Connection Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... edition or on the Stroke Connection website. The Poetry of Survival Poetry uses words to process emotions, and stroke appears to bring up plenty of emotions. Read the poetry of five survivors as well as guidance from ...

  18. Stroke Trials Registry

    MedlinePlus

    ... News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Trials Registry Clinical Trials Interventions Conditions Sponsors ... a clinical trial near you Welcome to the Stroke Trials Registry Our registry of clinical trials in ...

  19. Heart and Stroke Encyclopedia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More The Heart and Stroke Encyclopedia Click a letter below to get a ... dozens of cardiovascular terms from our Heart and Stroke Encyclopedia and get links to in-depth information. ...

  20. [Effect of monoamines, heat shock and other factors on the binding of several neuropharmacologic preparations by sea urchin embryos].

    PubMed

    Buznikov, G A; Manukhin, B N; Rakich, L; Kudriashova, N I; Khromov-Borisov, N V

    1977-01-01

    Early embryos of the sea urchins Arbacia lixula and Paracentrotus lividus being subjected to an osmotic or heat shock (10 min at 70 degrees C or higher) do not longer bind cytotoxic pharmaca and do not affect the sensitivity of normal indicator embryos to these drugs. After exposure for 10 min at 40 degrees C, the binding of neuropharmaca by embryos is not affected, although their ability to protect indicator embryos from the action of these neuropharmaca is inhibited 4--5 times. Serotonin and adrenaline inhibit the binding of neuropharmaca by 10--20%, while meterazine, noveryl and an amphetamine derivative--IEM-567--inhibit it by 50--60%. Antimycin A, rotenone and mercuric chloride do not affect the binding of neuropharmaca by sea urchin embryos.

  1. Stroke care quality in China: Substantial improvement, and a huge challenge and opportunity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yilong; Li, Zixiao; Zhao, Xingquan; Wang, David; Li, Hao; Xian, Ying; Liu, Liping; Wang, Yongjun

    2017-04-01

    Stroke is The first two authors contributed equally. the leading cause of death and adult disability in China. Although evidence-based clinical interventions have been identified to improve care and outcomes in stroke, significant gaps still exist between guideline recommendations and clinical practice in China. Regional and national stroke registries have been used to assess the benchmark of stroke care quality, provide feedback on compliance with evidence-based performance measures to health care providers, and continuously improve stroke care quality without increasing additional medical costs in the past several decades worldwide. In China, stroke care has become a national priority. A series of stroke care quality assessment and improvement actions was initiated by the Ministry of Health to increase the detection of high-risk populations with stroke, rate of adherence to evidence-based process performance measures of stroke care, and stroke care organization development, aiming to decrease the burden of stroke. China National Stroke Registries have been started in 2007, and they are conducted every 3 to 5 years. A carotid disease screen and intervention project for communities was initiated in 2009. The Chinese Stroke Association, founded in 2015, launched the Chinese Stroke Center Alliance to increase the stroke center design in the near future. In this article, we described these stroke care actions and progression, summarized the benchmark and improvement of stroke care quality, and outlined the future plans in China.

  2. Stroke Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Problems judging distances — The stroke survivor may misjudge distances and fall or be unable to guide her hands to pick something up. Impaired judgment and behavior — The stroke survivor may try to do things that she should not do, such as driving a car. Short-term memory loss — The stroke survivor may ...

  3. Lightning return stroke models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Y. T.; Uman, M. A.; Standler, R. B.

    1980-01-01

    We test the two most commonly used lightning return stroke models, Bruce-Golde and transmission line, against subsequent stroke electric and magnetic field wave forms measured simultaneously at near and distant stations and show that these models are inadequate to describe the experimental data. We then propose a new return stroke model that is physically plausible and that yields good approximations to the measured two-station fields. Using the new model, we derive return stroke charge and current statistics for about 100 subsequent strokes.

  4. Epigenetics in Stroke Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Kassis, Haifa; Shehadah, Amjad; Chopp, Michael; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: While the death rate from stroke has continually decreased due to interventions in the hyperacute stage of the disease, long-term disability and institutionalization have become common sequelae in the aftermath of stroke. Therefore, identification of new molecular pathways that could be targeted to improve neurological recovery among survivors of stroke is crucial. Epigenetic mechanisms such as post-translational modifications of histone proteins and microRNAs have recently emerged as key regulators of the enhanced plasticity observed during repair processes after stroke. In this review, we highlight the recent advancements in the evolving field of epigenetics in stroke recovery. PMID:28264471

  5. Disturbance of circadian rhythm in heart rate, blood pressure and locomotive activity at the stroke-onset in malignant stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Tabuchi, M; Umegaki, K; Ito, T; Suzuki, M; Ikeda, M; Tomita, T

    2001-02-01

    Malignant stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (M-SHRSP), separated from SHRSP, develop severe hypertension and spontaneously develop stroke at early ages. Using this model of cerebrovascular stroke, influence of stroke-onset on the autonomic nervous system was investigated. Heart rate (HR), systolic and diastolic blood pressures (SBP and DBP) and locomotive activity were monitored during development of stroke using a telemetry system. Stroke-onset was assessed by neurologic symptoms, changes in body weight, fluid intake and serum NOx level. The rat displayed a nocturnal pattern of circadian rhythms. At stroke-onset, mean HR over 24 h increased by 20 to 30 bpm and rapidly increased at post stroke, approximately 100 bpm higher than that at pre stroke. Circadian variation in HR, which was normally 50 bpm higher during night than during day, attenuated at stroke-onset, and it was blunted or reversed at post stroke. BP variation, which was approximately 7 mmHg higher at night than at day, decreased one or two days before stroke-onset and reversed at post stroke, especially in DBP. Insufficient falls in HR and BP during the day mainly accounted for the disturbed circadian variations. Variation of locomotive activity also decreased. These changes serve as reliable and accurate markers for stroke-onset in evaluation of drugs for the prevention and outcome predictions of stroke.

  6. Aspiration Pneumonia After Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, John R.; Mosher, Benjamin D.

    2011-01-01

    Fifteen million strokes occur worldwide each year with 5 million associated deaths and an additional 5 million people left permanently disabled. In the United States, about 780 000 people suffer a new or recurrent stroke each year. There were an estimated total 5.8 million stroke survivors as of 2008. Mortality from stroke is the third leading cause of death in America following heart disease and cancer. Chest infection may affect up to as many as one-third of stroke patients. This increases the morbidity and mortality of this patient population. Pneumonia causes the highest attributable mortality of all medical complications following stroke. A comprehensive multidisciplinary team approach is required at the hospital level. This requires active administrative commitment and participation. Implementation of evidence-based management strategies can improve outcomes and reduce costs. We sought to review the problem of post-stroke pneumonia and discuss strategies for prevention and intervention. PMID:23983842

  7. The European Stroke Organisation Guidelines: a standard operating procedure.

    PubMed

    Ntaios, George; Bornstein, Natan M; Caso, Valeria; Christensen, Hanne; De Keyser, Jacques; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Diez-Tejedor, Exuperio; Ferro, Jose M; Ford, Gary A; Grau, Armin; Keller, Emanuella; Leys, Didier; Russell, David; Toni, Danilo; Turc, Guillaume; Van der Worp, Bart; Wahlgren, Nils; Steiner, Thorsten

    2015-10-01

    In 2008, the recently founded European Stroke Organisation published its guidelines for the management of ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack. This highly cited document was translated in several languages and was updated in 2009. Since then, the European Stroke Organisation has published guidelines for the management of intracranial aneurysms and subarachnoidal hemorrhage, for the establishment of stroke units and stroke centers, and recently for the management of intracerebral hemorrhage. In recent years, the methodology for the development of guidelines has evolved significantly. To keep pace with this progress and driven by the strong determination of the European Stroke Organisation to further promote stroke management, education, and research, the European Stroke Organisation decided to delineate a detailed standard operating procedure for its guidelines. There are two important cornerstones in this standard operating procedure: The first is the implementation of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation methodology for the development of its Guideline Documents. The second one is the decision of the European Stroke Organisation to move from the classical model of a single Guideline Document about a major topic (e.g. management of ischemic stroke) to focused modules (i.e. subdivisions of a major topic). This will enable the European Stroke Organisation to react faster when new developments in a specific stroke field occur and update its recommendations on the related module rather swiftly; with the previous approach of a single large Guideline Document, its entire revision had to be completed before an updated publication, delaying the production of up-to-date guidelines. After discussion within the European Stroke Organisation Guidelines Committee and significant input from European Stroke Organisation members as well as methodologists and analysts, this document presents the official standard operating procedure for

  8. Downregulation of miR-181b in mouse brain following ischemic stroke induces neuroprotection against ischemic injury through targeting heat shock protein A5 and ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase isozyme L1.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhifeng; Li, Jiefei; Li, Yun; Yang, Xuan; Feng, Sujuan; Han, Song; Li, Junfa

    2013-10-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanism of cerebral hypoxic preconditioning (HPC)-induced endogenous neuroprotection may provide potential therapeutic targets for ischemic stroke. By using bioinformatics analysis, we found that miR-181b, one of 19 differentially expressed miRNAs, may target aconitate hydratase (ACO2), heat shock protein A5 (HSPA5), and ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase isozyme L1 (UCHL1) among 26 changed protein kinase C isoform-specific interacting proteins in HPC mouse brain. In this study, the role of miR-181b in oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced N2A cell ischemic injury in vitro and mouse middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO)-induced cerebral ischemic injury in vivo, and its regulation of ACO2, HSPA5, and UCHL1 were further determined. We found that miR-181b expression levels significantly decreased in mouse brain following MCAO and in OGD-treated N2A cells. Up- and downregulation of miR-181b by transfection of pre- or anti-miR-181b could negatively regulate HSPA5 and UCHL1 (but not ACO2) protein levels as well as N2A cell death and programmed cell death in OGD-treated N2A cells. By using a T7 promoter-driven control dual luciferase assay, we confirmed that miR-181b could bind to the 3'-untranslated rergions of HSPA5 and UCHL1 mRNAs and repress their translations. miR-181b antagomir reduced caspase-3 cleavage and neural cell loss in cerebral ischemic cortex and improved neurological deficit of mice after MCAO. In addition, HSPA5 and UCHL1 short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) blocked anti-miR-181b-mediated neuroprotection against OGD-induced N2A cell injury in vitro. These results suggest that the downregulated miR-181b induces neuroprotection against ischemic injury through negatively regulating HSPA5 and UCHL1 protein levels, providing a potential therapeutic target for ischemic stroke.

  9. Corrosion behavior of several metals in ethylene glycol-base heat-transfer fluids under conditions encountered in solar energy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zeman, G.J.

    1980-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of aluminum, copper, and iron in inhibited ethylene glycol-ASTM corrosive water solutions was evaluated in a laboratory loop under isothermal and heat-flux conditions for 1000 h at temperatures between 378 and 413/sup 0/K, in static autoclave tests at 450/sup 0/K for 500 h, and by potentiodynamic polarization measurements at temperatures between 298 and 348/sup 0/K. The effect of time, temperature, and ethylene glycol concentration of the heat-transfer fluid on the extent of inhibitor depletion was determined from analyses of the reserve alkalinity, pH, and inhibitor content of the solutions. The performance of an electrochemical sensor as a monitor of fluid quality was also evaluated. A heat flux of 0.4 to 1.0 kW/m/sup 2/ did not have a significant effect on the corrosion behavior of the various materials at temperatures between 378 and 413/sup 0/K. The corrosion rates of aluminum, copper, and iron in the 50 volume percent inhibited ethylene glycol-corrosive water solution decreased as a function of time during the 1000-h test. At 413/sup 0/K, the corrosion rate of copper was considerably higher than that of iron or aluminum at low flow velocity. Significant degradation of the fluid quality, as indicated by the measurement of the pH, reserve alkalinity, and inhibitor concentrations, occurred after several hundred hours at temperatures of approx. 450/sup 0/K.

  10. The Predicted Heat of Formation of Several Si-Cl-O-H and Ti-Cl-O-H Species

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-25

    MP4 ) to predict the thermochemistry of several silicon-containing systems (Si- C-O-H, Si-O-H, Si-Cl-H, Si-H-O-CI). 15,16’ 21-23 The BAC- MP4 method is...are listed in Table 3 along with the experi-f mentally measured valueS25-28 where available and the previous calculated BAC- MP4 . 16,21,23 Table 4...measured experimental value where available and previous calculated values using BAC- MP4 method. AHf° (298 K) kj AHfI(298K) kJ mol- AHf°(298K) kl mol

  11. Evidence for stroke family caregiver and dyad interventions: a statement for healthcare professionals from the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association.

    PubMed

    Bakas, Tamilyn; Clark, Patricia C; Kelly-Hayes, Margaret; King, Rosemarie B; Lutz, Barbara J; Miller, Elaine L

    2014-09-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of severe, long-term disability. Most stroke survivors are cared for in the home by a family caregiver. Caregiver stress is a leading cause of stroke survivor institutionalization, which results in significant costs to the healthcare system. Stroke family caregiver and dyad intervention studies have reported a variety of outcomes. A critical analysis of 17 caregiver intervention studies and 15 caregiver/stroke survivor dyad intervention studies was conducted to provide evidence-based recommendations for the implementation and future design of stroke family caregiver and dyad interventions.

  12. White matter injury in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Liu, Gang; Hong, Dandan; Chen, Fenghua; Ji, Xunming; Cao, Guodong

    2016-06-01

    Stroke is one of the major causes of disability and mortality worldwide. It is well known that ischemic stroke can cause gray matter injury. However, stroke also elicits profound white matter injury, a risk factor for higher stroke incidence and poor neurological outcomes. The majority of damage caused by stroke is located in subcortical regions and, remarkably, white matter occupies nearly half of the average infarct volume. Indeed, white matter is exquisitely vulnerable to ischemia and is often injured more severely than gray matter. Clinical symptoms related to white matter injury include cognitive dysfunction, emotional disorders, sensorimotor impairments, as well as urinary incontinence and pain, all of which are closely associated with destruction and remodeling of white matter connectivity. White matter injury can be noninvasively detected by MRI, which provides a three-dimensional assessment of its morphology, metabolism, and function. There is an urgent need for novel white matter therapies, as currently available strategies are limited to preclinical animal studies. Optimal protection against ischemic stroke will need to encompass the fortification of both gray and white matter. In this review, we discuss white matter injury after ischemic stroke, focusing on clinical features and tools, such as imaging, manifestation, and potential treatments. We also briefly discuss the pathophysiology of WMI and future research directions.

  13. Therapeutic benefits of nanoparticles in stroke

    PubMed Central

    Panagiotou, Stavros; Saha, Sikha

    2015-01-01

    Stroke represents one of the major causes of death and disability worldwide, for which no effective treatments are available. The thrombolytic drug alteplase (tissue plasminogen activator or tPA) is the only treatment for acute ischemic stroke but its use is limited by several factors including short therapeutic window, selective efficacy, and subsequent haemorrhagic complications. Numerous preclinical studies have reported very promising results using neuroprotective agents but they have failed at clinical trials because of either safety issues or lack of efficacy. The delivery of many potentially therapeutic neuroprotectants and diagnostic compounds to the brain is restricted by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Nanoparticles (NPs), which can readily cross the BBB without compromising its integrity, have immense applications in the treatment of ischemic stroke. In this review, potential uses of NPs will be summarized for the treatment of ischemic stroke. Additionally, an overview of targeted NPs will be provided, which could be used in the diagnosis of stroke. Finally, the potential limitations of using NPs in medical applications will be mentioned. Since the use of NPs in stroke therapy is now emerging and is still in development, this review is far from comprehensive or conclusive. Instead, examples of NPs and their current use will be provided, as well as the potentials of NPs in an effort to meet the high demand of new therapies in stroke. PMID:26041986

  14. Novel Stroke Therapeutics: Unraveling Stroke Pathophysiology and Its Impact on Clinical Treatments

    PubMed Central

    George, Paul M.; Steinberg, Gary K.

    2016-01-01

    Stroke remains a leading cause of death and disability in the world. Over the past few decades our understanding of the pathophysiology of stroke has increased, but greater insight is required to advance the field of stroke recovery. Clinical treatments have improved in the acute time window, but long-term therapeutics remain limited. Complex neural circuits damaged by ischemia make restoration of function after stroke difficult. New therapeutic approaches, including cell transplantation or stimulation, focus on reestablishing these circuits through multiple mechanisms to improve circuit plasticity and remodeling. Other research targets intact networks to compensate for damaged regions. This review highlights several important mechanisms of stroke injury and describes emerging therapies aimed at improving clinical outcomes. PMID:26182415

  15. Co-overexpression of two Heat Shock Factors results in enhanced seed longevity and in synergistic effects on seedling tolerance to severe dehydration and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We have previously reported that the seed-specific overexpression of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) Heat Shock Factor A9 (HaHSFA9) enhanced seed longevity in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.). In addition, the overexpression of HaHSFA9 in vegetative organs conferred tolerance to drastic levels of dehydration and oxidative stress. Results Here we found that the combined overexpression of sunflower Heat Shock Factor A4a (HaHSFA4a) and HaHSFA9 enhanced all the previously reported phenotypes described for the overexpression of HaHSFA9 alone. The improved phenotypes occurred in coincidence with only subtle changes in the accumulation of small Heat Shock Proteins (sHSP) that are encoded by genes activated by HaHSFA9. The single overexpression of HaHSFA4a in vegetative organs (which lack endogenous HSFA9 proteins) did not induce sHSP accumulation under control growth conditions; neither it conferred thermotolerance. The overexpression of HaHSFA4a alone also failed to induce tolerance to severe abiotic stress. Thus, a synergistic functional effect of both factors was evident in seedlings. Conclusions Our study revealed that HaHSFA4a requires HaHSFA9 for in planta function. Our results strongly support the involvement of HaHSFA4a and HaHSFA9 in transcriptional co-activation of a genetic program of longevity and desiccation tolerance in sunflower seeds. These results would also have potential application for improving seed longevity and tolerance to severe stress in vegetative organs. PMID:24593798

  16. Literature and art therapy in post-stroke psychological disorders.

    PubMed

    Eum, Yeongcheol; Yim, Jongeun

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of morbidity and long-term disability worldwide, and post-stroke depression (PSD) is a common and serious psychiatric complication of stroke. PSD makes patients have more severe deficits in activities of daily living, a worse functional outcome, more severe cognitive deficits and increased mortality as compared to stroke patients without depression. Therefore, to reduce or prevent mental problems of stroke patients, psychological treatment should be recommended. Literature and art therapy are highly effective psychological treatment for stroke patients. Literature therapy divided into poetry and story therapy is an assistive tool that treats neurosis as well as emotional or behavioral disorders. Poetry can add impression to the lethargic life of a patient with PSD, thereby acting as a natural treatment. Story therapy can change the gloomy psychological state of patients into a bright and healthy story, and therefore can help stroke patients to overcome their emotional disabilities. Art therapy is one form of psychological therapy that can treat depression and anxiety in stroke patients. Stroke patients can express their internal conflicts, emotions, and psychological status through art works or processes and it would be a healing process of mental problems. Music therapy can relieve the suppressed emotions of patients and add vitality to the body, while giving them the energy to share their feelings with others. In conclusion, literature and art therapy can identify the emotional status of patients and serve as a useful auxiliary tool to help stroke patients in their rehabilitation process.

  17. Dilemma in the emergency setting: hypomagnesemia mimicking acute stroke

    PubMed Central

    Rico, María; Martinez-Rodriguez, Laura; Larrosa-Campo, Davinia; Calleja, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Background Stroke mimics may account for up to 30% of all acute stroke consultations. However, in the emergency setting, accurate diagnosis is not always possible. Methods Case report and review of the literature. Results A 73-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency department with acute aphasia and right hemiparesis. The National Institute of Health Stroke Score was 21, compatible with severe stroke, so she received thrombolysis. Laboratory testing demonstrated severe hypomagnesemia. She had been taking proton pump inhibitors for years and neuroimaging did not demonstrate signs of acute ischemic disease. After correcting the metabolic alterations with intravenous and oral supplemental magnesium, the patient was discharged asymptomatic. No further episodes have been registered to date. Conclusion Hypomagnesemia might cause acute neurological symptoms that could be confused with stroke. A careful history is essential for diagnosis but suspicion of stroke mimic should not prevent tPA administration. PMID:27354832

  18. Stroke risk stratification in acute dizziness presentations

    PubMed Central

    Meurer, William J.; Brown, Devin L.; Burke, James F.; Hofer, Timothy P.; Tsodikov, Alexander; Hoeffner, Ellen G.; Fendrick, A.M.; Adelman, Eric E.; Morgenstern, Lewis B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the ability of bedside information to risk stratify stroke in acute dizziness presentations. Methods: Surveillance methods were used to identify patients with acute dizziness and nystagmus or imbalance, excluding those with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, medical causes, or moderate to severe neurologic deficits. Stroke was defined as acute infarction or intracerebral hemorrhage on a clinical or research MRI performed within 14 days of dizziness onset. Bedside information comprised history of stroke, the ABCD2 score (age, blood pressure, clinical features, duration, and diabetes), an ocular motor (OM)-based assessment (head impulse test, nystagmus pattern [central vs other], test of skew), and a general neurologic examination for other CNS features. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine the association of the bedside information with stroke. Model calibration was assessed using low (<5%), intermediate (5% to <10%), and high (≥10%) predicted probability risk categories. Results: Acute stroke was identified in 29 of 272 patients (10.7%). Associations with stroke were as follows: ABCD2 score (continuous) (odds ratio [OR] 1.74; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.20–2.51), any other CNS features (OR 2.54; 95% CI 1.06–6.08), OM assessment (OR 2.82; 95% CI 0.96–8.30), and prior stroke (OR 0.48; 95% CI 0.05–4.57). No stroke cases were in the model's low-risk probability category (0/86, 0%), whereas 9 were in the moderate-risk category (9/94, 9.6%) and 20 were in the high-risk category (20/92, 21.7%). Conclusion: In acute dizziness presentations, the combination of ABCD2 score, general neurologic examination, and a specialized OM examination has the capacity to risk-stratify acute stroke on MRI. PMID:26511453

  19. Management of depression in elderly stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Lökk, Johan; Delbari, Ahmad

    2010-01-01

    Poststroke depression (PSD) in elderly patients has been considered the most common neuropsychiatric consequence of stroke up to 6–24 months after stroke onset. When depression appears within days after stroke onset, it is likely to remit, whereas depression at 3 months is likely to be sustained for 1 year. One of the major problems posed by elderly stroke patients is how to identify and optimally manage PSD. This review provides insight to identification and management of depression in elderly stroke patients. Depression following stroke is less likely to include dysphoria and more likely characterized by vegetative signs and symptoms compared with other forms of late-life depression, and clinicians should rely more on nonsomatic symptoms rather than somatic symptoms. Evaluation and diagnosis of depression among elderly stroke patients are more complex due to vague symptoms of depression, overlapping signs and symptoms of stroke and depression, lack of properly trained health care personnel, and insufficient assessment tools for proper diagnosis. Major goals of treatment are to reduce depressive symptoms, improve mood and quality of life, and reduce the risk of medical complications including relapse. Antidepressants (ADs) are generally not indicated in mild forms because the balance of benefit and risk is not satisfactory in elderly stroke patients. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are the first choice of PSD treatment in elderly patients due to their lower potential for drug interaction and side effects, which are more common with tricyclic ADs. Recently, stimulant medications have emerged as promising new therapeutic interventions for PSD and are now the subject of rigorous clinical trials. Cognitive behavioral therapy can also be useful, and electroconvulsive therapy is available for patients with severe refractory PSD. PMID:20856917

  20. Projecting the number of patients with first ever strokes and patients newly handicapped by stroke in England and Wales.

    PubMed Central

    Malmgren, R.; Bamford, J.; Warlow, C.; Sandercock, P.; Slattery, J.

    1989-01-01

    The common assumption that future increases in the number of elderly people will result in a parallel increase in the burden of care of long term disabled survivors of stroke was examined. The number of patients with first ever strokes and the net number of people handicapped after these strokes in England and Wales every five years until 2023 have been projected. Between the base year 1983 and the year 2023 an increase in population of about 5% will occur; first ever strokes are projected to increase by about 30% and deaths within six months of first ever strokes by about 40%. The net number of severely handicapped people six months after a first ever stroke is projected to increase by only about 8%, however, and the net number of people who are moderately or severely handicapped by only 4%. This paradox occurs because first ever stroke often kills people who have been handicapped by other causes, particularly if they are elderly. It is concluded that despite the limitations of these data they strongly suggest that the increased burden of health care of patients with first ever strokes in the next 40 years will be primarily that of caring for those in the acute stages of stroke and not with the management of chronic handicap after a stroke. PMID:2523745

  1. [Nutritional support in stroke patients].

    PubMed

    Burgos Peláez, Rosa; Segurola Gurrutxaga, Hegoi; Bretón Lesmes, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a public health problem of the first order. In developed countries is one of the leading causes of death, along with cardiovascular disease and cancer. In addition, stroke is the leading cause of permanent disability in adulthood. Many of the patients who survive do so with significant sequelae that limit them in their activities of daily living. Most strokes (80-85%) are due to ischemia, while the rest are hemorrhagic. We have identified many modifiable risk factors, some with an important relationship with dietary factors or comorbidities in wich the diet has a significant impact. The incidence of malnutrition in stroke patients is not well known, but most likely impacts on patient prognosis. Furthermore, the nutritional status of patients admitted for stroke often deteriorates during hospitalization. It is necessary to perform a nutritional assessment of the patient in the early hours of admission, to determine both the nutritional status and the presence of dysphagia. Dysphagia, through alteration of the safety and efficacy of swallowing, is a complication that has an implication for nutritional support, and must be treated to prevent aspiration pneumonia, which is the leading cause of mortality in the stroke patient. Nutritional support should begin in the early hours. In patients with no or mild dysphagia that can be controlled by modifying the texture of the diet, they will start oral diet and oral nutritional supplementation will be used if the patient does not meet their nutritional requirements. There is no evidence to support the use of nutritional supplements routinely. Patients with severe dysphagia, or decreased level of consciousness will require enteral nutrition. Current evidence indicates that early nutrition should be initiated through a nasogastric tube, with any advantages of early feeding gastrostomy. Gastrostomy will be planned when the enteral nutrition support will be expected for long-term (4 weeks). Much evidence points to the

  2. Drug abuse and stroke.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Ana Catarina; Ferro, José M

    2013-02-01

    Cerebrovascular disorders contribute to the morbidity and disability associated with illicit drug use. Drug abusers have an increased risk of both hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke. In geographic areas with a high prevalence of illicit drug use, drug abuse is a frequent cause of stroke in the young adult. The illicit drugs more commonly associated with stroke are psychomotor stimulants, such as amphetamine and cocaine. Less commonly implicated are opioids and psychotomimetic drugs, including cannabis. Toxicology screening for illicit drugs should be done in young patients with stroke with no obvious cause, or if suggested by history or examination. Although in some patients the mechanism of stroke is identified using neuroimaging and other modern diagnostic tools, in a sizeable fraction of cases the mechanism of stroke remains unclear. Further studies are needed to elucidate the role of hemodynamic and immunologic mechanisms in these cases.

  3. Mild Heating of Amphotericin B-Desoxycholate: Effects on Ultrastructure, In Vitro Activity and Toxicity, and Therapeutic Efficacy in Severe Candidiasis in Leukopenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    van Etten, Els W. M.; van Vianen, Wim; Roovers, Patty; Frederik, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Heated (20 min at 70°C) amphotericin B-desoxycholate (hAMB-DOC) was further characterized, as was another formulation obtained after centrifugation (60 min, 3000 × g), hcAMB-DOC. Conventional AMB-DOC consisted of individual micelles (approximately 4 nm in diameter) and threadlike aggregated micelles, as revealed by cryo-transmission electron microscopy. For both hAMB-DOC and hcAMB-DOC, pleiomorphic cobweb structures were observed with a mean particle size of approximately 300 nm as determined by laser diffraction. The potent antifungal activity of AMB-DOC against Candida albicans is not reduced by heating. Effective killing of C. albicans (>99.9% within 6 h) was obtained at 0.1 mg/liter with each of the AMB formulations. For AMB-DOC, hAMB-DOC, and hcAMB-DOC, cation release (86Rb+) from C. albicans of ≥50% was observed at 0.8, 0.4, and 0.4 mg/liter, respectively. After heating of AMB-DOC, toxicity was reduced 16-fold as determined by red blood cell (RBC) lysis. For AMB-DOC, hAMB-DOC, and hcAMB-DOC, hemolysis of ≥50% was observed at 6.4, 102.4, and 102.4 mg/liter, respectively. In contrast, AMB-DOC and its derivates showed similar toxicities in terms of cation release from RBC. For AMB-DOC, hAMB-DOC, and hcAMB-DOC, cation release (86Rb+) of ≥50% was observed at 1.6, 0.8, and 0.8 mg/liter, respectively. In persistently leukopenic mice with severe invasive candidiasis, higher dosages of both hAMB-DOC and hcAMB-DOC were tolerated than those of conventional AMB-DOC (3 versus 0.8 mg/kg of body weight, respectively), resulting in significantly improved therapeutic efficacy. In conclusion, this new approach of heating AMB-DOC may be of great value for further optimizing the treatment of severe fungal infections. PMID:10817715

  4. Electromagnetic induction holography imaging for stroke detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lulu

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents the application of the electromagnetic induction holography (EMIH) approach to imaging the electromagnetic activity of the brain, with a particular focus on stroke detection. An integral equation formulation is presented to describe the scattered magnetic field from the distribution of optically small dielectric and magnetic objects of arbitrary shapes adsorbed onto a planar electromagnetic substrate. A numerical computer model was developed in a MATLAB environment to validate the theory. Several realistic human head models were developed to investigate the detectability of strokes with the multi-channel EMIH system. Small strokes can be clearly identified with the correct location and size in the reconstructed head images. The simulation results demonstrated the feasibility of detecting and imaging small strokes using the approach.

  5. Aspirin resistant patients with recent ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Castilla-Guerra, L; Navas-Alcántara, M S; Fernández-Moreno, M C

    2014-04-01

    Some patients with a recent ischemic stroke who are being treated with aspirin as an antiaggregant suffer a new ischemic stroke. These patients (15-25%) have been called unresponsive to aspirin or aspirin resistant. The aspirin-resistant patients have a four-time greater risk of suffering a stroke. Furthermore, these strokes are generally more severe, with increased infarct volume and greater risk of recurrence. There is currently no ideal laboratory test to detect the resistance to the antiaggregant effect of aspirin. The study of resistance to aspirin would only be indicated in selected cases. In these patients, one should first rule out any "pseudo-resistance" to aspirin (lack of compliance, concomitant treatments that interfere with the action of the aspirin).

  6. Emerging Treatments for Motor Rehabilitation After Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Chandramouli; Khot, Sandeep P.

    2015-01-01

    Although numerous treatments are available to improve cerebral perfusion after acute stroke and prevent recurrent stroke, few rehabilitation treatments have been conclusively shown to improve neurologic recovery. The majority of stroke survivors with motor impairment do not recover to their functional baseline, and there remains a need for novel neurorehabilitation treatments to minimize long-term disability, maximize quality of life, and optimize psychosocial outcomes. In recent years, several novel therapies have emerged to restore motor function after stroke, and additional investigational treatments have also shown promise. Here, we familiarize the neurohospitalist with emerging treatments for poststroke motor rehabilitation. The rehabilitation treatments covered in this review will include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor medications, constraint-induced movement therapy, noninvasive brain stimulation, mirror therapy, and motor imagery or mental practice. PMID:25829989

  7. Heat-transfer thermal switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedell, M. V.; Anderson, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    Thermal switch maintains temperature of planetary lander, within definite range, by transferring heat. Switch produces relatively large stroke and force, uses minimum electrical power, is lightweight, is vapor pressure actuated, and withstands sterilization temperatures without damage.

  8. Posterior Circulation Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Go, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 20-25% of all acute strokes occur in the posterior circulation. These strokes can be rather difficult to diagnose because they present in such diverse ways, and can easily be mistaken for more benign entities. A fastidious history, physical exam, high clinical suspicion, and appropriate use of imaging are essential for the emergency physician to properly diagnose and treat these patients. Expert stroke neurologist consultation should be utilized liberally.

  9. Recovery After Stroke: Healthy Eating

    MedlinePlus

    Recovery After Stroke: Healthy Eating Eating well after stroke is key to your recovery. Choosing healthy foods can help you keep up ... get the nutrition you need for your stroke recovery.  Eat your biggest meal early in the day ...

  10. Stroke Drills for Swimming Instructors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahill, Peter J.

    1982-01-01

    Stroke drills to be used by swimming instructors to teach four competitive swim strokes are described. The drills include: one arm swims; (2) alternative kicks; (3) fist swims; and (4) catch-up strokes. (JN)

  11. Strokes are possible complications of cannabinoids use.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Valérie; Jouanjus, Emilie

    2017-02-23

    cannabinoids, the low frequency of neurovascular complications after their use may be due to a genetic predisposition to their neurovascular toxicity in some individuals. Further studies should focus on this point. More importantly however, this low frequency may be underestimated because the drug consumption may not be systematically researched, neither by questioning nor by laboratory screening. Besides this vascular role of cannabinoids in the occurrence of stroke, a cellular effect of cannabis on brain mitochondria was recently suggested in an experimental study. One of the mechanisms involved in young cannabis users with stroke may be the generation of reactive oxygen species leading to an oxidative stress, which is a known mechanism in stroke in humans. It is useful to inform the young population about the real potential risk of using cannabinoids. We suggest to systematically ask all young adults with stroke about their drug consumption including cannabinoids, to screen urine for cannabis or to include a specific diagnostic test to detect synthetic cannabinoids, and to obtain non-invasive intracranial arterial investigations (i.e. CT-angiography or cerebral MRA) in order to search for cerebral vasoconstriction. However, several questions remained unresolved and further research is still needed to assess the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in young cannabinoids users with stroke. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Cannabinoids and Epilepsy".

  12. Current status of endovascular stroke treatment.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Philip M; Schumacher, H Christian; Connolly, E Sander; Heyer, Eric J; Gray, William A; Higashida, Randall T

    2011-06-07

    The management of acute ischemic stroke is rapidly developing.Although acute ischemic stroke is a major cause of adult disability and death, the number of patients requiring emergency endovascular intervention remains unknown, but is a fraction of the overall stroke population. Public health initiatives endeavor to raise public awareness about acute stroke to improve triage for emergency treatment, and the medical community is working to develop stroke services at community and academic medical centers throughout the United States. There is an Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education–approved pathway for training in endovascular surgical neuroradiology, the specialty designed to train physicians specifically to treat cerebrovascular diseases. Primary and comprehensive stroke center designations have been defined, yet questions remain about the best delivery model. Telemedicine is available to help community medical centers cope with the complexity of stroke triage and treatment. Should comprehensive care be provided at every community center, or should patients with complex medical needs be triaged to major stroke centers with high-level surgical,intensive care, and endovascular capabilities? Although the answers to these and other questions about stroke care delivery remain unanswered owing to the paucity of empirical data, we are convinced that stroke care regionalization is crucial for delivery of high-quality comprehensive ischemic stroke treatment. A stroke team available 24 hours per day, 7 days per week requires specialty skills in stroke neurology, endovascular surgical neuroradiology, neurosurgery, neurointensive care, anesthesiology, nursing, and technical support for optimal success. Several physician groups with divergent training backgrounds (i.e., interventional neuroradiology, neurosurgery,neurology, peripheral interventional radiology, and cardiology) lay claim to the treatment of stroke patients,particularly the endovascular or

  13. Neurorestoration after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Tej D.; Veeravagu, Anand; Steinberg, Gary K.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advancements in stem cell biology and neuromodulation have ushered in a battery of new neurorestorative therapies for ischemic stroke. While the understanding of stroke pathophysiology has matured, the ability to restore patients’ quality of life remains inadequate. New therapeutic approaches, including cell transplantation and neurostimulation, focus on reestablishing the circuits disrupted by ischemia through multidimensional mechanisms to improve neuroplasticity and remodeling. The authors provide a broad overview of stroke pathophysiology and existing therapies to highlight the scientifc and clinical implications of neurorestorative therapies for stroke. PMID:27132523

  14. Recovery After Stroke: Dealing with Pain

    MedlinePlus

    Recovery After Stroke: Dealing with Pain Some survivors have to deal with pain caused by their strokes. ... good quality of life.  Get information on stroke recovery from National Stroke Association. Visit www. stroke. org ...

  15. What to Know - and Do! - about Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Stroke Rehabilitation What to Know – and Do! – About Stroke Past ... chances of having a stroke. Read More "Stroke Rehabilitation" Articles What to Know – and Do! – About Stroke / " ...

  16. Knowledge and awareness of heat-related morbidity among adult recreational endurance athletes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shendell, Derek G.; Alexander, Melannie S.; Lorentzson, Lauren; McCarty, Frances A.

    2010-07-01

    Adults have been increasingly motivated to compete in recreational endurance sports events. Amateurs may lack a complete understanding of recommended strategies for handling heat and humidity, making heat-related illnesses increasingly possible. This is compounded by global climate change and increasing average surface and air temperatures, especially in urban areas of industrialized nations in Europe and North America that have hosted most events to date. We conducted an on-line, secure survey at the 2nd Annual ING Georgia Marathon and Half-Marathon in Atlanta, Georgia, in 2008. We included previously validated questions on participant socio-demographics, training locations, and knowledge and awareness of heat-related illnesses. Participants were aware of heat illnesses, and of heat stroke as a serious form of heat stress. However, the majority, across age and gender, did not understand the potential severity of heat stroke. Furthermore, 1-in-5 participants did not understand the concept of heat stress as a form of heat-related illness, and how heat stress may result from buildup of muscle-generated heat in the body. Adult recreational endurance athletes are another susceptible, vulnerable population sub-group for applied research and public health educational interventions, especially in urban areas of industrialized nations in Europe and North America.

  17. Picturing the Size and Site of Stroke With an Expanded National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale

    PubMed Central

    Agis, Daniel; Goggins, Maria B.; Oishi, Kumiko; Oishi, Kenichi; Davis, Cameron; Wright, Amy; Kim, Eun Hye; Sebastian, Rajani; Tippett, Donna C.; Faria, Andreia

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose— The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) includes minimal assessment of cognitive function, particularly in right hemisphere (RH) stroke. Descriptions of the Cookie Theft picture from the NIHSS allow analyses that (1) correlate with aphasia severity and (2) identify communication deficits in RH stroke. We hypothesized that analysis of the picture description contributes valuable information about volume and location of acute stroke. Methods— We evaluated 67 patients with acute ischemic stroke (34 left hemisphere [LH]; 33 RH) with the NIHSS, analysis of the Cookie Theft picture, and magnetic resonance imaging, compared with 35 sex- and age-matched controls. We evaluated descriptions for total content units (CU), syllables, ratio of left:right CU, CU/minute, and percent interpretive CU, based on previous studies. Lesion volume and percent damage to regions of interest were measured on diffusion-weighted imaging. Multivariable linear regression identified variables associated with infarct volume, independently of NIHSS score, age and sex. Results— Patients with RH and LH stroke differed from controls, but not from each other, on CU, syllables/CU, and CU/minute. Left:right CU was lower in RH compared with LH stroke. CU, syllables/CU, and NIHSS each correlated with lesion volume in LH and RH stroke. Lesion volume was best accounted by a model that included CU, syllables/CU, NIHSS, left:right CU, percent interpretive CU, and age, in LH and RH stroke. Each discourse variable and NIHSS score were associated with percent damage to different regions of interest, independently of lesion volume and age. Conclusions— Brief picture description analysis complements NIHSS scores in predicting stroke volume and location. PMID:27217502

  18. Cooling Characteristics of the V-1650-7 Engine. II - Effect of Coolant Conditions on Cylinder Temperatures and Heat Rejection at Several Engine Powers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povolny, John H.; Bogdan, Louis J.; Chelko, Louis J.

    1947-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted on a V-1650-7 engine to determine the cylinder temperatures and the coolant and oil heat rejections over a range of coolant flows (50 to 200 gal/min) and oil inlet temperatures (160 to 2150 F) for two values of coolant outlet temperature (250 deg and 275 F) at each of four power conditions ranging from approximately 1100 to 2000 brake horsepower. Data were obtained for several values of block-outlet pressure at each of the two coolant outlet temperatures. A mixture of 30 percent by volume of ethylene glycol and 70-percent water was used as the coolant. The effect of varying coolant flow, coolant outlet temperature, and coolant outlet pressure over the ranges investigated on cylinder-head temperatures was small (0 deg to 25 F) whereas the effect of increasing the engine power condition from ll00 to 2000 brake horsepower was large (maximum head-temperature increase, 110 F).

  19. Chromium supplementation improved post-stroke brain infarction and hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Ying; Mao, Frank Chiahung; Liu, Chia-Hsin; Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Lai, Nai-Wei; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2016-04-01

    Hyperglycemia is common after acute stroke and is associated with a worse outcome of stroke. Thus, a better understanding of stress hyperglycemia is helpful to the prevention and therapeutic treatment of stroke. Chromium is an essential nutrient required for optimal insulin activity and normal carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Beyond its nutritional effects, dietary supplement of chromium causes beneficial outcomes against several diseases, in particular diabetes-associated complications. In this study, we investigated whether post-stroke hyperglycemia involved chromium dynamic mobilization in a rat model of permanent focal cerebral ischemia and whether dietary supplement of chromium improved post-stroke injury and alterations. Stroke rats developed brain infarction, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance. Post-stroke hyperglycemia was accompanied by elevated secretion of counter-regulatory hormones including glucagon, corticosterone, and norepinephrine, decreased insulin signaling in skeletal muscles, and increased hepatic gluconeogenesis. Correlation studies revealed that counter-regulatory hormone secretion showed a positive correlation with chromium loss and blood glucose increased together with chromium loss. Daily chromium supplementation increased tissue chromium levels, attenuated brain infarction, improved hyperglycemia, and decreased plasma levels of glucagon and corticosterone in stroke rats. Our findings suggest that stroke rats show disturbance of tissue chromium homeostasis with a net loss through urinary excretion and chromium mobilization and loss might be an alternative mechanism responsible for post-stroke hyperglycemia.

  20. Positive effects of intermittent fasting in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Fann, David Yang-Wei; Ng, Gavin Yong Quan; Poh, Luting; Arumugam, Thiruma V

    2017-03-01

    Intermittent fasting (IF) is a dietary protocol where energy restriction is induced by alternate periods of ad libitum feeding and fasting. Prophylactic intermittent fasting has been shown to extend lifespan and attenuate the progress and severity of age-related diseases such as cardiovascular (e.g. stroke and myocardial infarction), neurodegenerative (e.g. Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease) and cancerous diseases in animal models. Stroke is the second leading cause of death, and lifestyle risk factors such as obesity and physical inactivity have been associated with elevated risks of stroke in humans. Recent studies have shown that prophylactic IF may mitigate tissue damage and neurological deficit following ischemic stroke by a mechanism(s) involving suppression of excitotoxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation and cell death pathways in animal stroke models. This review summarizes data supporting the potential hormesis mechanisms of prophylactic IF in animal models, and with a focus on findings from animal studies of prophylactic IF in stroke in our laboratory.

  1. The Role of Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Jiyuan; Dou, Yang; Tian, Xiaodi; Wang, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is the third commonest cause of death following cardiovascular diseases and cancer. In particular, in recent years, the morbidity and mortality of stroke keep remarkable growing. However, stroke still captures people attention far less than cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Past studies have shown that oxidative stress and inflammation play crucial roles in the progress of cerebral injury induced by stroke. Evidence is accumulating that the dietary supplementation of fish oil exhibits beneficial effects on several diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases, metabolic diseases, and cancer. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs), the major component of fish oil, have been found against oxidative stress and inflammation in cardiovascular diseases. And the potential of n-3 PUFAs in stroke treatment is attracting more and more attention. In this review, we will review the effects of n-3 PUFAs on stroke and mainly focus on the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of n-3 PUFAs. PMID:27433289

  2. Blood pressure control versus atrial fibrillation management in stroke prevention.

    PubMed

    Savoia, Carmine; Sada, Lidia; Volpe, Massimo

    2015-06-01

    Hypertension is one of the major risk factors for atrial fibrillation which in turn is the most prevalent concomitant condition in hypertensive patients. While both these pathological conditions are independent risk factors for stroke, the association of hypertension and atrial fibrillation increases the incidence of disabling strokes. Moreover, documented or silent atrial fibrillation doubles the rate of cardiovascular death. Lowering blood pressure is strongly recommended, particularly for primary stroke prevention. However, a relatively small percentage of hypertensive patients still achieve the recommended blood pressure goals. The management of atrial fibrillation with respect to stroke prevention is changing. New oral anticoagulants represent a major advancement in long-term anticoagulation therapy in non valvular atrial fibrillation. They have several benefits over warfarin, including improved adherence to the anticoagulation therapy. This is an important issue since non-adherence to stroke prevention medications is a risk factor for first and recurrent strokes.

  3. Trypanosomiasis, cardiomyopathy and the risk of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Carod-Artal, Francisco Javier

    2010-05-01

    American (Chagas disease) and African (sleeping sickness) trypanosomiasis are neglected tropical diseases and are a heavy burden in Latin America and Africa, respectively. Chagas disease is an independent risk factor for stroke. Apical aneurysm, heart failure and cardiac arrhythmias are associated with ischemic stroke in chagasic cardiomyopathy. Not all chagasic patients who suffer an ischemic stroke have a severe cardiomyopathy, and stroke may be the first manifestation of Chagas disease. Cardioembolism affecting the middle cerebral artery is the most common stroke subtype. Risk of recurrence is high and careful evaluation of recurrence risk should be addressed. Repolarization changes, low voltage and prolonged QT interval are common electrocardiography alterations in human African trypanosomiasis, and can be found in more than 70% of patients. Epidemiological studies are needed to asses the risk of stroke in African trypanosomiasis perimyocarditis.

  4. National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale in Plain English Is Reliable for Novice Nurse Users with Minimal Training.

    PubMed

    Dancer, Sandy; Brown, Allen J; Yanase, Lisa Rietz

    2017-03-28

    The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) is commonly used in Comprehensive Stroke Centers, but it has not been easily implemented in smaller centers. The aim of this study was to assess whether nurse providers who were naive to stroke assessment scales could obtain accurate stroke severity scores using our previously validated NIH Stroke Scale in Plain English (NIHSS-PE) with minimal or no training.

  5. Thrombolysis for acute ischaemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Wardlaw, Joanna M; Murray, Veronica; Berge, Eivind; del Zoppo, Gregory J

    2014-01-01

    Background Most strokes are due to blockage of an artery in the brain by a blood clot. Prompt treatment with thrombolytic drugs can restore blood flow before major brain damage has occurred and improve recovery after stroke in some people. Thrombolytic drugs, however, can also cause serious bleeding in the brain, which can be fatal. One drug, recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA), is licensed for use in selected patients within 4.5 hours of stroke in Europe and within three hours in the USA. There is an upper age limit of 80 years in some countries, and a limitation to mainly non-severe stroke in others. Forty per cent more data are available since this review was last updated in 2009. Objectives To determine whether, and in what circumstances, thrombolytic therapy might be an effective and safe treatment for acute ischaemic stroke. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (last searched November 2013), MEDLINE (1966 to November 2013) and EMBASE (1980 to November 2013).We also handsearched conference proceedings and journals, searched reference lists and contacted pharmaceutical companies and trialists. Selection criteria Randomised trials of any thrombolytic agent compared with control in people with definite ischaemic stroke. Data collection and analysis Two review authors applied the inclusion criteria, extracted data and assessed trial quality. We verified the extracted data with investigators of all major trials, obtaining additional unpublished data if available. Main results We included 27 trials, involving 10,187 participants, testing urokinase, streptokinase, rt-PA, recombinant pro-urokinase or desmoteplase. Four trials used intra-arterial administration, while the rest used the intravenous route. Most data come from trials that started treatment up to six hours after stroke. About 44% of the trials (about 70% of the participants) were testing intravenous rt-PA. In earlier studies very few of the participants (0

  6. Stroke (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... stroke, doctors usually get an MRI or a CAT scan , which take pictures of the brain and how blood is flowing through the brain. This test can show the doctor what part of the brain has been affected and how big the stroke is. How Does a Person Get ...

  7. Immune interventions in stroke

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Ying; Liu, Qiang; Anrather, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory and immune responses in the brain can shape the clinical presentation and outcome of stroke. Approaches for effective management of acute stroke are sparse and many measures for brain protection fail, but our ability to modulate the immune system and modify the disease progression of multiple sclerosis is increasing. As a result, immune interventions are currently being explored as therapeutic interventions in acute stroke. In this Review, we compare the immunological features of acute stroke with those of multiple sclerosis, identify unique immunological features of stroke, and consider the evidence for immune interventions. In acute stroke, microglia activation and cell death products trigger an inflammatory cascade that damages vessels and the parenchyma within minutes to hours of the ischaemia or haemorrhage. Immune interventions that restrict brain inflammation, vascular permeability and tissue oedema must be administered rapidly to reduce acute immune-mediated destruction and to avoid subsequent immunosuppression. Preliminary results suggest that the use of drugs that modify disease in multiple sclerosis might accomplish these goals in ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke. Further elucidation of the immune mechanisms involved in stroke is likely to lead to successful immune interventions. PMID:26303850

  8. The Danish Stroke Registry

    PubMed Central

    Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Ingeman, Annette; Hundborg, Heidi Holmager; Schaarup, Susanne Zielke; Gyllenborg, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database The aim of the Danish Stroke Registry is to monitor and improve the quality of care among all patients with acute stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) treated at Danish hospitals. Study population All patients with acute stroke (from 2003) or TIA (from 2013) treated at Danish hospitals. Reporting is mandatory by law for all hospital departments treating these patients. The registry included >130,000 events by the end of 2014, including 10,822 strokes and 4,227 TIAs registered in 2014. Main variables The registry holds prospectively collected data on key processes of care, mainly covering the early phase after stroke, including data on time of delivery of the processes and the eligibility of the individual patients for each process. The data are used for assessing 18 process indicators reflecting recommendations in the national clinical guidelines for patients with acute stroke and TIA. Patient outcomes are currently monitored using 30-day mortality, unplanned readmission, and for patients receiving revascularization therapy, also functional level at 3 months poststroke. Descriptive data Sociodemographic, clinical, and lifestyle factors with potential prognostic impact are registered. Conclusion The Danish Stroke Registry is a well-established clinical registry which plays a key role for monitoring and improving stroke and TIA care in Denmark. In addition, the registry is increasingly used for research. PMID:27843349

  9. Relational Processing Following Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Glenda; Halford, Graeme S.; Shum, David; Maujean, Annick; Chappell, Mark; Birney, Damian

    2013-01-01

    The research examined relational processing following stroke. Stroke patients (14 with frontal, 30 with non-frontal lesions) and 41 matched controls completed four relational processing tasks: sentence comprehension, Latin square matrix completion, modified Dimensional Change Card Sorting, and n-back. Each task included items at two or three…

  10. Increased extracellular heat shock protein 90α in severe sepsis and SIRS associated with multiple organ failure and related to acute inflammatory-metabolic stress response in children.

    PubMed

    Fitrolaki, Michaela-Diana; Dimitriou, Helen; Venihaki, Maria; Katrinaki, Marianna; Ilia, Stavroula; Briassoulis, George

    2016-08-01

    Mammalian heat-shock-protein (HSP) 90α rapidly responses to environmental insults. We examined the hypothesis that not only serum HSP72 but also HSP90α is increased in the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), severe-sepsis (SS), and/or sepsis (S) compared to healthy children (H); we assessed HSP90α relation to (a) multiple organ system failure (MOSF) and (b) inflammatory-metabolic response and severity of illness.A total of 65 children with S, SS, or SIRS and 25 H were included. ELISA was used to evaluate extracellular HSP90α and HSP72, chemiluminescence interleukins (ILs), flow-cytometry neutrophil-CD64 (nCD64)-expression.HSP90α, along with HSP72, were dramatically increased among MOSF patients. Patients in septic groups and SIRS had elevated HSP90α compared to H (P < 0.01). HSP90α was independently related to predicted death rate and severity of illness; positively to HSP72, nCD64, ILs, length of stay, days on ventilator, and fever; negatively to HDL and LDL (P < 0.05). The HSP72 was increased in SS/S and related negatively to HDL and LDL (P < 0.05).Serum HSP90α is markedly elevated in children with severe sepsis and is associated with MOSF. Better than the HSP72, also increased in SS, SIRS, and MOSF, HSP90α is related to the inflammatory stress, fever, outcome endpoints, and predicted mortality and inversely related to the low-LDL/low-HDL stress metabolic pattern.

  11. Increased extracellular heat shock protein 90α in severe sepsis and SIRS associated with multiple organ failure and related to acute inflammatory-metabolic stress response in children

    PubMed Central

    Fitrolaki, Michaela-Diana; Dimitriou, Helen; Venihaki, Maria; Katrinaki, Marianna; Ilia, Stavroula; Briassoulis, George

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Mammalian heat-shock-protein (HSP) 90α rapidly responses to environmental insults. We examined the hypothesis that not only serum HSP72 but also HSP90α is increased in the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), severe-sepsis (SS), and/or sepsis (S) compared to healthy children (H); we assessed HSP90α relation to (a) multiple organ system failure (MOSF) and (b) inflammatory-metabolic response and severity of illness. A total of 65 children with S, SS, or SIRS and 25 H were included. ELISA was used to evaluate extracellular HSP90α and HSP72, chemiluminescence interleukins (ILs), flow-cytometry neutrophil-CD64 (nCD64)-expression. HSP90α, along with HSP72, were dramatically increased among MOSF patients. Patients in septic groups and SIRS had elevated HSP90α compared to H (P < 0.01). HSP90α was independently related to predicted death rate and severity of illness; positively to HSP72, nCD64, ILs, length of stay, days on ventilator, and fever; negatively to HDL and LDL (P < 0.05). The HSP72 was increased in SS/S and related negatively to HDL and LDL (P < 0.05). Serum HSP90α is markedly elevated in children with severe sepsis and is associated with MOSF. Better than the HSP72, also increased in SS, SIRS, and MOSF, HSP90α is related to the inflammatory stress, fever, outcome endpoints, and predicted mortality and inversely related to the low-LDL/low-HDL stress metabolic pattern. PMID:27583886

  12. Genetics of ischaemic stroke in young adults

    PubMed Central

    Terni, Eva; Giannini, Nicola; Brondi, Marco; Montano, Vincenzo; Bonuccelli, Ubaldo; Mancuso, Michelangelo

    2014-01-01

    Background Stroke may be a clinical expression of several inherited disorders in humans. Recognition of the underlined genetic disorders causing stroke is important for a correct diagnosis, for genetic counselling and, even if rarely, for a correct therapeutic management. Moreover, the genetics of complex diseases such the stroke, in which multiple genes interact with environmental risk factors to increase risk, has been revolutionized by the Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) approach. Scope of review Here we review the single-gene causes of ischemic stroke, bringing the reader from the candidate gene method toward the exciting new horizons of genetic technology. Major conclusions The aetiological diagnosis of ischemic stroke in young adults is more complex than in the elderly. The identification of a genetic cause is important to provide appropriate counseling and to start a correct therapy, when available. The advent of GWAS technology, such as for other complex pathological conditions, has contributed enormously to the understanding of many of these genetic bases. For success large, well phenotyped case cohorts are required, and international collaborations are essential. General significance This review focuses on the main causes of genetically-based ischemic stroke in young adults, often classified as indeterminate, investigating also the recent findings of the GWAS, in order to improve diagnostic and therapeutic management. PMID:26672892

  13. Current status of acute stroke management in Korea: a report on a multicenter, comprehensive acute stroke registry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Beom Joon; Han, Moon-Ku; Park, Tai Hwan; Park, Sang-Soon; Lee, Kyung Bok; Lee, Byung-Chul; Yu, Kyung-Ho; Cha, Jae Kwan; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Lee, Jun; Lee, Soo Joo; Ko, Youngchai; Park, Jong-Moo; Kang, Kyusik; Cho, Yong-Jin; Hong, Keun-Sik; Cho, Ki-Hyun; Kim, Joon-Tae; Kim, Dong-Eog; Lee, Juneyoung; Lee, Ji Sung; Jang, Myung Suk; Broderick, Joseph P; Yoon, Byung-Woo; Bae, Hee-Joon

    2014-06-01

    There are limited data on the utilization of diagnostics and the variation of treatments at the national level in acute stroke care. Clinical Research Center for Stroke--5th division stroke registry aimed to describe stroke statistics and quality of care in Korea and to implement quality indicators. Clinical Research Center for Stroke--5th division registry was established in April 2008 and covers pretreatment demographics, medical and stroke severity measures, diagnostic evaluation, hyperacute revascularization, in-hospital management, discharge disposition, quality indicators, and long-term functional outcomes. Consecutive stroke cases from 12 participating centers are registered to a web-based database. Meticulous data management and auditing policy were applied. A total of 14,792 ischemic stroke cases were enrolled from April 2008 to January 2012. The median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was 4 at admission, with median delay of onset to arrival of 14 h. Rate of risk factor management before stroke exceeds more than 80% for hypertension and diabetes. Revascularization procedures were performed in 1736 subjects (12%), and 34% were endovascular (n = 598). Substantial variability was noted in the preferred modality of hyperacute revascularization (range of endovascular recanalization = 6-60%), use of computed tomography (30-93%), and perfusion imaging (2-96%). The Clinical Research Center for Stroke--5th division registry documented that the current practice of acute stroke care in South Korea largely met the standard of guidelines, but variability of practice still remains. The registry would provide an opportunity to evaluate the quality of stroke care across South Korea and compare it with that of other countries.

  14. Trends in the treatment of risk factors for stroke in a Czech stroke unit

    PubMed Central

    Simunek, Libor; Krajickova, Dagmar; Vysata, Oldrich; Valis, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study is to evaluate therapeutic trends for several diseases that represent risk factors for stroke. The relative frequency of therapy with compounds that influence the risk factors for stroke was monitored in a group of 3,290 patients who were hospitalised in the Stroke Unit at the University Hospital in Hradec Kralove between 2005 and 2012. For most drugs monitored, the reasons for the significant decrease or increase in use were causes other than the reduction of stroke risk. Despite this finding, the majority of statistically significant changes had, according to review of comparative studies, a positive effect on prevention of stroke. Motivation to change treatment of stroke risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus and hypercholesterolemia, was mainly aimed at sufficient disease management with a minimum of adverse effects. On the other hand, optimization of stroke recurrence and economic factors were motivations to treatment changes in prevention with antiplatelets. Antidiabetics were associated with an increase in metformin use and reduction in insulin use. For antihypertensives, the most significant reduction was associated with the use of diuretics, although calcium channel blockers and beta-blockers are also less used. Additionally, the use of the ACE inhibitor ramipril increased PMID:28352720

  15. Human Cardiovascular Responses to Passive Heat Stress

    PubMed Central

    Crandall, Craig G.; Wilson, Thad E.

    2016-01-01

    Heat stress increases human morbidity and mortality compared to normothermic conditions. Many occupations, disease states, as well as stages of life are especially vulnerable to the stress imposed on the cardiovascular system during exposure to hot ambient conditions. This review focuses on the cardiovascular responses to heat stress that are necessary for heat dissipation. To accomplish this regulatory feat requires complex autonomic nervous system control of the heart and various vascular beds. For example, during heat stress cardiac output increases up to twofold, by increases in heart rate and an active maintenance of stroke volume via increases in inotropy in the presence of decreases in cardiac preload. Baroreflexes retain the ability to regulate blood pressure in many, but not all, heat stress conditions. Central hypovolemia is another cardiovascular challenge brought about by heat stress, which if added to a subsequent central volumetric stress, such as hemorrhage, can be problematic and potentially dangerous, as syncope and cardiovascular collapse may ensue. These combined stresses can compromise blood flow and oxygenation to important tissues such as the brain. It is notable that this compromised condition can occur at cardiac outputs that are adequate during normothermic conditions but are inadequate in heat because of the increased systemic vascular conductance associated with cutaneous vasodilation. Understanding the mechanisms within this complex regulatory system will allow for the development of treatment recommendations and countermeasures to reduce risks during the ever-increasing frequency of severe heat events that are predicted to occur. PMID:25589263

  16. Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Heart Disease & Stroke Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke About 1.5 million heart attacks and strokes happen every year in the United States. You ... some of your risks for heart disease and stroke, but you can manage many of your risks ...

  17. Heart Failure in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Cuadrado-Godia, Elisa; Ois, Angel; Roquer, Jaume

    2010-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex clinical syndrome that can result from any structural or functional cardiac disorder that impairs the ability of the ventricle to fill with or eject blood. Due to the aging of the population it has become a growing public health problem in recent decades. Diagnosis of HF is clinical and there is no diagnostic test, although some basic complementary testing should be performed in all patients. Depending on the ejection fraction (EF), the syndrome is classified as HF with low EF or HF with normal EF (HFNEF). Although prognosis in HF is poor, HFNEF seems to be more benign. HF and ischemic stroke (IS) share vascular risk factors such as age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease and atrial fibrillation. Persons with HF have higher incidence of IS, varying from 1.7% to 10.4% per year across various cohort studies. The stroke rate increases with length of follow-up. Reduced EF, independent of severity, is associated with higher risk of stroke. Left ventricular mass and geometry are also related with stroke incidence, with concentric hypertrophy carrying the greatest risk. In HF with low EF, the stroke mechanism may be embolism, cerebral hypoperfusion or both, whereas in HFNEF the mechanism is more typically associated with chronic endothelial damage of the small vessels. Stroke in patients with HF is more severe and is associated with a higher rate of recurrence, dependency, and short term and long term mortality. Cardiac morbidity and mortality is also high in these patients. Acute stroke treatment in HF includes all the current therapeutic options to more carefully control blood pressure. For secondary prevention, optimal control of all vascular risk factors is essential. Antithrombotic therapy is mandatory, although the choice of a platelet inhibitor or anticoagulant drug depends on the cardiac disease. Trials are ongoing to evaluate anticoagulant therapy for prevention of embolism in patients with low EF who are at

  18. The Migraine–Stroke Connection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi Ji; Lee, Chungbin; Chung, Chin-Sang

    2016-01-01

    Migraine and stroke are common neurovascular disorders which share underlying physiological processes. Increased risks of ischemic stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, and subclinical ischemic lesions have been consistently found in migraineurs. Three possible associations are suggested. One is that underlying pathophysiology of migraine can lead to ischemic stroke. Second, common comorbidities between migraine and stroke can be present. Lastly, some syndromes can manifest with both migraine-like headache and cerebrovascular disease. Future studies should be targeted on bidirectional influence of migraine on different stroke mechanisms and optimal prevention of stroke in migraine patients. PMID:27283278

  19. Sexual function after strokes.

    PubMed

    Boller, François; Agrawal, Kunal; Romano, Alissa

    2015-01-01

    Strokes are the second leading cause of death and the third leading cause of disability worldwide. Thanks in part to better and more available diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation, the vast majority of stroke patients tend to survive strokes, particularly in the industrialized world. Motor disability and cognitive changes such as aphasia and visuospatial disorders are most often considered among the major contributors to stroke burden. This chapter discusses disorders of sexual functions as another frequent sequel of strokes. Strokes generally induce hyposexuality, but in some instances they may be followed by hypersexuality. There is some evidence suggesting that lesions of either hemisphere affect sexual activities, but for different reasons: aphasia and depression after left-hemisphere lesions, a deficit in arousal and perhaps visuospatial disorders after right-hemisphere lesions. Psychologic, psychosocial, and physical factors, as well as medications, play an important role. A better understanding of the psychosocial and physiologic mechanisms underlying sexual functioning can provide insight into improving sexual activity and therefore quality of life in patients affected by strokes and other brain lesions.

  20. Interleukin-1β Accelerates the Onset of Stroke in Stroke-Prone Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chiba, Tsuyoshi; Itoh, Tatsuki; Tabuchi, Masaki; Nakazawa, Toru; Satou, Takao

    2012-01-01

    High blood levels of inflammatory biomarkers and immune cells in stroke lesions have been recognized as results of stroke. However, recent studies have suggested that inflammation occurs prior to stroke onset. In this study, we aimed to clarify the role of inflammation in stroke onset among stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP). At 4 weeks of age (before stroke onset), the plasma level of IL-1β was significantly higher in SHRSP (153.0 ± 49.7 pg/ml) than in Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY) (7.7 ± 3.4 pg/ml, P < 0.001 versus SHRSP) or spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) (28.0 ± 9.1 pg/ml, P < 0.001 versus SHRSP) (n = 6 per strain). Stimulated IL-1β signal was also observed in cerebrovascular endothelial cells of SHRSP. Gene expressions of IL-1β, IL-1 receptors, caspase-1, and downstream genes (MCP-1 and ICAM-1), which associated with immune cell recruitment, were significantly greater in SHRSP than in WKY or SHR, coincident with greater NFκB protein levels in SHRSP compared to WKY or SHR. In addition, continuous administration of IL-1β (2 μg/day) using an osmotic pump slightly increased the incidence of stroke in SHR (P = 0.046) and significantly accelerated the onset of stroke in SHRSP (P = 0.006) compared to each control (n = 10 per group). These results suggest that a stimulated IL-1β signal might be a cause of stroke onset when concomitant with severe hypertension. PMID:23326018

  1. Assimilation of Web-Based Urgent Stroke Evaluation: A Qualitative Study of Two Networks

    PubMed Central

    Mathiassen, Lars; Switzer, Jeffrey A; Adams, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    Background Stroke is a leading cause of death and serious, long-term disability across the world. Urgent stroke care treatment is time-sensitive and requires a stroke-trained neurologist for clinical diagnosis. Rural areas, where neurologists and stroke specialists are lacking, have a high incidence of stroke-related death and disability. By virtually connecting emergency department physicians in rural hospitals to regional medical centers for consultations, specialized Web-based stroke evaluation systems (telestroke) have helped address the challenge of urgent stroke care in underserved communities. However, many rural hospitals that have deployed telestroke have not fully assimilated this technology. Objective The objective of this study was to explore potential sources of variations in the utilization of a Web-based telestroke system for urgent stroke evaluation and propose a telestroke assimilation model to improve stroke care performance. Methods An exploratory, qualitative case study of two telestroke networks, each comprising an academic stroke center (hub) and connected rural hospitals (spokes), was conducted. Data were collected from 50 semistructured interviews with 40 stakeholders, telestroke usage logs from 32 spokes, site visits, published papers, and reports. Results The two networks used identical technology (called Remote Evaluation of Acute isCHemic stroke, REACH) and were of similar size and complexity, but showed large variations in telestroke assimilation across spokes. Several observed hub- and spoke-related characteristics can explain these variations. The hub-related characteristics included telestroke institutionalization into stroke care, resources for the telestroke program, ongoing support for stroke readiness of spokes, telestroke performance monitoring, and continuous telestroke process improvement. The spoke-related characteristics included managerial telestroke championship, stroke center certification, dedicated telestroke

  2. Newer Oral Anticoagulants: Stroke Prevention and Pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Anand; Goddeau Jr, Richard P.; Henninger, Nils

    2016-01-01

    Warfarin is very effective in preventing stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. However, its use is limited due to fear of hemorrhagic complications, unpredictable anticoagulant effects related to multiple drug interactions and dietary restrictions, a narrow therapeutic window, frequent difficulty maintaining the anticoagulant effect within a narrow therapeutic window, and the need for inconvenient monitoring. Several newer oral anticoagulants have been approved for primary and secondary prevention of stroke in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. These agents have several advantages relative to warfarin therapy. As a group, these direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC), which include the direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran, and the factor Xa inhibitors (rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban), are more effective than dose adjusted warfarin for prevention of all-cause stroke (including both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke), and have an overall more favorable safety profile. Nevertheless, an increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding (with the exception of apixaban), increased risk for thrombotic complication with sudden discontinuation, and inability to accurately assess and reverse anticoagulant effect require consideration prior to therapy initiation, and pose a challenge for decision making in acute stroke therapy. PMID:27347226

  3. Sleep and Stroke.

    PubMed

    Mims, Kimberly Nicole; Kirsch, Douglas

    2016-03-01

    Evidence increasingly suggests sleep disorders are associated with higher risk of cardiovascular events, including stroke. Strong data correlate untreated sleep apnea with poorer stroke outcomes and more recent evidence implicates sleep disruption as a possible etiology for increased cerebrovascular events. Also, sleep duration may affect incidence of cardiovascular events. In addition, sleep-disordered breathing, insomnia, restless legs syndrome, and parasomnias can occur as a result of cerebrovascular events. Treatment of sleep disorders improve sleep-related symptoms and may also improve stroke recovery and risk of future events.

  4. Evaluation of stroke disability.

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, J.; Keltz, E.; Stein, M. C.; White, M. M.

    1976-01-01

    The disabilities resulting from a stroke are not well understood from the epidemiologic or functional point of view. The stroke may impair mental status, perception, sensation, communication and motor ability; the total resulting disability is related to the extent of impairment in each of these areas. A complete evaluation in all these areas has to be done to determine the degree of disability before any rehabilitation program is planned. A comprehensive approach to evaluating stroke disability is presented that includes correlating the degree of impairment in each of the above-mentioned areas with the overall functional ability of the patient. PMID:1260603

  5. GPs have pivotal role in care of stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Best, Catherine; Mead, Gillian

    2010-02-01

    Stroke is a major cause of mortality in the community and the most common cause of disability. At one year, a third of patients who have had a stroke have died, and 37% of survivors are dependent. In the acute phase of ischaemic stroke, patients should receive thrombolysis (within 4.5 hours of stroke onset), aspirin (within 48 hours of onset), and early access to a stroke unit. Care in a stroke unit significantly reduces the risk of death or dependency irrespective of stroke severity. A multidisciplinary team to manage the range of problems after stroke (e.g. swallowing difficulties, communication problems, mobility) is central to rehabilitation. Much rehabilitation is orientated toward physical function whereas returning to their social roles is more important to patients. While the emphasis of rehabilitation is on targeted therapy interventions to improve function and finding compensatory strategies to increase independence--the goal of community exercise is to improve general physical fitness and activity levels. The marked loss of physical fitness evident in stroke survivors can be at least partly reversed by physical fitness training, and leads to improvements in physical function. Group exercise also improves self-confidence and social integration. Pharmacological therapies play a key role in secondary prevention, and must be started as soon as possible to reduce the risk of early recurrence.

  6. Epidemiology and Registry Studies of Stroke in Japan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Stroke is the most prevalent cardiovascular disease in Japan. This review introduces two epidemiologic studies and four registry studies of stroke in Japan. The Hisayama Study was begun as a population-based prospective cohort study of cerebrovascular and cardiovascular diseases in 1961 in the town of Hisayama. Most of the deceased subjects of the study underwent autopsy examinations from the beginning of the study. Changes in stroke trends in the last 50 years were clarified by comparison of data from different study cohorts registered every 13 to 14 years. The Suita Study was based on a random sampling of Japanese urban residents. Several reports from this study showed the significance of pre-hypertension, as well as hypertension, as a risk factor for stroke by itself and in combination with other underlying characteristics. In addition, the Japan Multicenter Stroke Investigators' Collaboration (J-MUSIC), the Japan Standard Stroke Registry Study, the Fukuoka Stroke Registry, and the Stroke Acute Management with Urgent Risk-factor Assessment and Improvement (SAMURAI) rt-PA Registry are explained as registry studies involving Japanese stroke patients. PMID:24324936

  7. Epidemiology and registry studies of stroke in Japan.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Kazunori

    2013-01-01

    Stroke is the most prevalent cardiovascular disease in Japan. This review introduces two epidemiologic studies and four registry studies of stroke in Japan. The Hisayama Study was begun as a population-based prospective cohort study of cerebrovascular and cardiovascular diseases in 1961 in the town of Hisayama. Most of the deceased subjects of the study underwent autopsy examinations from the beginning of the study. Changes in stroke trends in the last 50 years were clarified by comparison of data from different study cohorts registered every 13 to 14 years. The Suita Study was based on a random sampling of Japanese urban residents. Several reports from this study showed the significance of pre-hypertension, as well as hypertension, as a risk factor for stroke by itself and in combination with other underlying characteristics. In addition, the Japan Multicenter Stroke Investigators' Collaboration (J-MUSIC), the Japan Standard Stroke Registry Study, the Fukuoka Stroke Registry, and the Stroke Acute Management with Urgent Risk-factor Assessment and Improvement (SAMURAI) rt-PA Registry are explained as registry studies involving Japanese stroke patients.

  8. Post-stroke language disorders.

    PubMed

    Sinanović, Osman; Mrkonjić, Zamir; Zukić, Sanela; Vidović, Mirjana; Imamović, Kata

    2011-03-01

    Post-stroke language disorders are frequent and include aphasia, alexia, agraphia and acalculia. There are different definitions of aphasias, but the most widely accepted neurologic and/or neuropsychological definition is that aphasia is a loss or impairment of verbal communication, which occurs as a consequence of brain dysfunction. It manifests as impairment of almost all verbal abilities, e.g., abnormal verbal expression, difficulties in understanding spoken or written language, repetition, naming, reading and writing. During the history, many classifications of aphasia syndromes were established. For practical use, classification of aphasias according to fluency, comprehension and abilities of naming it seems to be most suitable (nonfluent aphasias: Broca's, transcortical motor, global and mixed transcortical aphasia; fluent aphasias: anomic, conduction, Wernicke's, transcortical sensory, subcortical aphasia). Aphasia is a common consequence of left hemispheric lesion and most common neuropsychological consequence of stroke, with a prevalence of one-third of all stroke patients in acute phase, although there are reports on even higher figures. Many speech impairments have a tendency of spontaneous recovery. Spontaneous recovery is most remarkable in the first three months after stroke onset. Recovery of aphasias caused by ischemic stroke occurs earlier and it is most intensive in the first two weeks. In aphasias caused by hemorrhagic stroke, spontaneous recovery is slower and occurs from the fourth to the eighth week after stroke. The course and outcome of aphasia depend greatly on the type of aphasia. Regardless of the fact that a significant number of aphasias spontaneously improve, it is necessary to start treatment as soon as possible. The writing and reading disorders in stroke patients (alexias and agraphias) are more frequent than verified on routine examination, not only in less developed but also in large neurologic departments. Alexia is an acquired

  9. Mathematical Formulation of the Remote Electric and Magnetic Emissions of the Lightning Dart Leader and Return Stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiemann, Edward M. B.

    Lightning detection and geolocation networks have found widespread use by the utility, air traffic control and forestry industries as a means of locating strikes and predicting imminent recurrence. Accurate lightning geolocation requires detecting VLF radio emissions at multiple sites using a distributed sensor network with typical baselines exceeding 150 km, along with precision time of arrival estimation to triangulate the origin of a strike. The trend has been towards increasing network accuracy without increasing sensor density by incorporating precision GPS synchronized clocks and faster front-end signal processing. Because lightning radio waveforms evolve as they propagate over a finitely conducting earth, and that measurements for a given strike may have disparate propagation path lengths, accurate models are required to determine waveform fiducials for precise strike location. The transition between the leader phase and return stroke phase may offer such a fiducial and warrants quantitative modeling to improve strike location accuracy. The VLF spectrum of the ubiquitous downward negative lightning strike is able to be modeled by the transfer of several Coulombs of negative charge from cloud to ground in a two-step process. The lightning stepped leader ionizes a plasma channel downward from the cloud at a velocity of approximately 0.05c, leaving a column of charge in its path. Upon connection with a streamer, the subsequent return stroke initiates at or near ground level and travels upward at an average but variable velocity of 0.3c. The return stroke neutralizes any negative charge along its path. Subsequent dart leader and return strokes often travel smoothly down the heated channel left by a preceding stroke, lacking the halting motion of the preceding initial stepped leader and initial return stroke. Existing lightning models often neglect the leader current and rely on approximations when solving for the return stroke. In this thesis, I present an

  10. Proteomic analysis of a model unicellular green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, during short-term exposure to irradiance stress reveals significant down regulation of several heat-shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Mahong, Bancha; Roytrakul, Suttiruk; Phaonaklop, Narumon; Wongratana, Janewit; Yokthongwattana, Kittisak

    2012-03-01

    Oxygenic photosynthetic organisms often suffer from excessive irradiance, which cause harmful effects to the chloroplast proteins and lipids. Photoprotection and the photosystem II repair processes are the mechanisms that plants deploy to counteract the drastic effects from irradiance stress. Although the protective and repair mechanisms seemed to be similar in most plants, many species do confer different level of tolerance toward high light. Such diversity may originate from differences at the molecular level, i.e., perception of the light stress, signal transduction and expression of stress responsive genes. Comprehensive analysis of overall changes in the total pool of proteins in an organism can be performed using a proteomic approach. In this study, we employed 2-DE/LC-MS/MS-based comparative proteomic approach to analyze total proteins of the light sensitive model unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in response to excessive irradiance. Results showed that among all the differentially expressed proteins, several heat-shock proteins and molecular chaperones were surprisingly down-regulated after 3-6 h of high light exposure. Discussions were made on the possible involvement of such down regulation and the light sensitive nature of this model alga.

  11. Heat-related illness.

    PubMed

    Becker, Jonathan A; Stewart, Lynsey K

    2011-06-01

    Heat-related illness is a set of preventable conditions ranging from mild forms (e.g., heat exhaustion, heat cramps) to potentially fatal heat stroke. Hot and humid conditions challenge cardiovascular compensatory mechanisms. Once core temperature reaches 104°F (40°C), cellular damage occurs, initiating a cascade of events that may lead to organ failure and death. Early recognition of symptoms and accurate measurement of core temperature are crucial to rapid diagnosis. Milder forms of heat-related illness are manifested by symptoms such as headache, weakness, dizziness, and an inability to continue activity. These are managed by supportive measures including hydration and moving the patient to a cool place. Hyperthermia and central nervous system symptoms should prompt an evaluation for heat stroke. Initial treatments should focus on lowering core temperature through cold water immersion. Applying ice packs to the head, neck, axilla, and groin is an alternative. Additional measures include transporting the patient to a cool environment, removing excess clothing, and intravenous hydration. Delayed access to cooling is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in persons with heat stroke. Identification of at-risk groups can help physicians and community health agencies provide preventive measures.

  12. ALTERED PHALANX FORCE DIRECTION DURING POWER GRIP FOLLOWING STROKE

    PubMed Central

    Enders, Leah R.

    2015-01-01

    Many stroke survivors with severe impairment can grasp only with a power grip. Yet, little knowledge is available on altered power grip after stroke, other than reduced power grip strength. This study characterized stroke survivors’ static power grip during 100% and 50% maximum grip. Each phalanx force’s angular deviation from the normal direction and its contribution to total normal force was compared for 11 stroke survivors and 11 age-matched controls. Muscle activities and skin coefficient of friction (COF) were additionally compared for another 20 stroke and 13 age-matched control subjects. The main finding was that stroke survivors gripped with a 34% greater phalanx force angular deviation of 19±2° compared to controls of 14±1° (p<.05). Stroke survivors’ phalanx force angular deviation was closer to the 23° threshold of slippage between the phalanx and grip surface, which may explain increased likelihood of object dropping in stroke survivors. In addition, this altered phalanx force direction decreases normal grip force by tilting the force vector, indicating a partial role of phalanx force angular deviation in reduced grip strength post stroke. Greater phalanx force angular deviation may biomechanically result from more severe underactivation of stroke survivors’ first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and extensor digitorum communis (EDC) muscles compared to their flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) or somatosensory deficit. While stroke survivors’ maximum power grip strength was approximately half of the controls’, the distribution of their remaining strength over the fingers and phalanges did not differ, indicating evenly distributed grip force reduction over the entire hand. PMID:25795079

  13. Prognosis of stroke in the south of Greece: 1 year mortality, functional outcome and its determinants: the Arcadia Stroke Registry

    PubMed Central

    Vemmos, K; Bots, M; Tsibouris, P; Zis, V; Takis, C; Grobbee, D; Stamatelopoulos, S

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—For Greece, data on incidence of stroke, type of stroke, and prognosis of stroke is limited. Recently, results on incidence of stroke were published. Here 1 year mortality, functional outcome after a first ever stroke, and determinants of the prognosis are described.
METHODS—A population based registry was established in the Arcadia area, located in eastern central Peloponessos in southern Greece. Between 1 November 1993 and 31 October 1995, 555 patients with a first ever stroke were identified using information from death certificates, hospital records, public health centres and general practitioners. Extensive information on cardiovascular risk factors and stroke characteristics was obtained. After 1 year a modified Rankin score was determined in all surviving patients.
RESULTS—After 1 year of follow up, 204 (36.8%) patients died. The probability of survival 1 year after stroke was higher for cerebral infarction than for intracerebral haemorrhage; 67.8% (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 64-72) and 46.4% (35-57), respectively. Of the survivors, 68.9% had either no symptoms or symptoms that would not interfere with their capacity to look after themselves (Rankin score 0 to 2). Increasing age and low Glasgow coma scale score were the most powerful predictors of death within 1 year (p<0.01), whereas increasing age, atrial fibrillation, and low Glasgow coma scale score were the most important predictors of functional outcome 1 year after a stroke (p<0.01).
CONCLUSIONS—One year mortality from stroke in Greece is similar to that of other industrialised countries. The most important factors that affect the prognosis of a patient with a first ever stroke are increasing age, stroke severity, and atrial fibrillation.

 PMID:11032610

  14. [Antioxidant therapy in ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Suslina, Z A; Federova, T N; Maksimova, M Iu; Riasina, T V; Stvolinskiĭ, S L; Khrapova, E V; Boldyrev, A A

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents the results of investigation of emoxipin, an antioxidant synthetic drug, for treatment of patients with ischemic disorders of cerebral circulation. The drug produced a beneficial clinical effect in patients with lacunar and cardioembolic strokes of moderate severity. Therapy with emoxipin increased endogenic antioxidant activity and improved a clinical status of the patients. The protective effect of carnosine was demonstrated in experimental acute hypobaric hypoxia and cerebral ischemia in rats. The results obtained permit to recommend an inclusion of both emoxipin and carnosine in a combined treatment of ischemic disorders of cerebral circulation.

  15. Heat waves, aging, and human cardiovascular health.

    PubMed

    Kenney, W Larry; Craighead, Daniel H; Alexander, Lacy M

    2014-10-01

    This brief review is based on a President's Lecture presented at the Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine in 2013. The purpose of this review was to assess the effects of climate change and consequent increases in environmental heat stress on the aging cardiovascular system. The earth's average global temperature is slowly but consistently increasing, and along with mean temperature changes come increases in heat wave frequency and severity. Extreme passive thermal stress resulting from prolonged elevations in ambient temperature and prolonged physical activity in hot environments creates a high demand on the left ventricle to pump blood to the skin to dissipate heat. Even healthy aging is accompanied by altered cardiovascular function, which limits the extent to which older individuals can maintain stroke volume, increase cardiac output, and increase skin blood flow when exposed to environmental extremes. In the elderly, the increased cardiovascular demand during heat waves is often fatal because of increased strain on an already compromised left ventricle. Not surprisingly, excess deaths during heat waves 1) occur predominantly in older individuals and 2) are overwhelmingly cardiovascular in origin. Increasing frequency and severity of heat waves coupled with a rapidly growing at-risk population dramatically increase the extent of future untoward health outcomes.

  16. Pediatric Stroke: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Tsze, Daniel S.; Valente, Jonathan H.

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is relatively rare in children, but can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Understanding that children with strokes present differently than adults and often present with unique risk factors will optimize outcomes in children. Despite an increased incidence of pediatric stroke, there is often a delay in diagnosis, and cases may still remain under- or misdiagnosed. Clinical presentation will vary based on the child's age, and children will have risk factors for stroke that are less common than in adults. Management strategies in children are extrapolated primarily from adult studies, but with different considerations regarding short-term anticoagulation and guarded recommendations regarding thrombolytics. Although most recommendations for management are extrapolated from adult populations, they still remain useful, in conjunction with pediatric-specific considerations. PMID:22254140

  17. Strokes (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... that could affect a child throughout life, including: cerebral palsy mental retardation paralysis or weakness on one side ... ON THIS TOPIC Meningitis First Aid: Seizures Seizures Cerebral Palsy Brain and Nervous System Stroke Your Brain & Nervous ...

  18. Strokes (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... in adults, which can include sudden weakness, slurred speech, or blurred vision. These effects vary widely depending ... changes in the child's behavior, concentration, memory, or speech. Common signs of stroke in kids and teens : ...

  19. A Stroke of Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaisdell, Bob

    2011-01-01

    The author reflects on foreign-language learning by his EFL students as well as his own foreign-language learning. He concludes by musing on the possible and fantastical devastation on language-ability wrought by strokes.

  20. Stroke: Hope through Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... United States: estimated at about $43 billion / year direct costs for medical care and therapy: estimated at ... days after a stroke: $35,000* percentage of direct cost of care for the first 90 days*: ...

  1. Mitochondrial DNA haplogroups and short-term neurological outcomes of ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Biyang; Zhang, Zhizhong; Liu, Keting; Fan, Wenping; Zhang, Yumeng; Xie, Xia; Dai, Minhui; Cao, Liping; Bai, Wen; Du, Juan; Dai, Qiliang; Zhou, Shuyu; Zhang, Hao; Zhu, Wusheng; Ma, Minmin; Liu, Wenhua; Liu, Xinfeng; Xu, Gelin

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and long-term disability worldwide. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a potential contributor for the sex differences of ischemic stroke heritability. Although mtDNA haplogroups were associated with stroke onset, their impacts on stroke outcomes remain unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the impacts of mtDNA haplogroups on short-term outcomes of neurological functions in patients with ischemic stroke. A total of 303 patients were included, and their clinical data and mtDNA sequences were analyzed. Based on the changes between baseline and 14-day follow-up stroke severity, our results showed that haplogroup N9 was an independent protective factor against neurological worsening in acute ischemic stroke patients. These findings supported that mtDNA variants play a role in post-stroke neurological recovery, thus providing evidences for future pharmacological intervention in mitochondrial function. PMID:25993529

  2. Coupling of Neurogenesis and Angiogenesis After Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Linhui; Wang, Brian; ZhuGe, Qichuan; Jin, Kunlin

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of mortality and severe long-term disability worldwide. Development of effective treatment or new therapeutic strategies for ischemic stroke patients is therefore crucial. Ischemic stroke promotes neurogenesis by several growth factors including FGF-2, IGF-1, BDNF, VEGF and chemokines including SDF-1, MCP-1. Stroke-induced angiogenesis is similarly regulated by many factors most notably, eNOS and CSE, VEGF/VEGFR2, and Ang-1/Tie2. Important findings in the last decade have revealed that neurogenesis is not the stand-alone consideration in the fight for full functional recovery from stroke. Angiogenesis has been also shown to be critical in improving post-stroke neurological functional recovery. More than that, recent evidence has shown a highly possible interplay or dependence between stroke-induced neurogenesis and angiogenesis. Moving forward, elucidating the underlying mechanisms of this coupling between stroke-induced neurogenesis and angiogenesis will be of great importance, which will provide the basis for neurorestorative therapy. PMID:25736182

  3. Orthostatic haemodynamic responses in acute stroke

    PubMed Central

    Panayiotou, B; Reid, J; Fotherby, M; Crome, P

    1999-01-01

    Little is known about orthostatic blood pressure regulation in acute stroke. We determined postural haemodynamic responses in 40 patients with acute stroke (mild or moderate severity) and 40 non-stroke control in-patients, at two days (`Day 1') and one week (`Week 1') post-admission. Following a 10-minute supine rest and baseline readings, subjects sat up and blood pressure and heart rate were taken for 5 minutes. The procedure was repeated with subjects moving from supine to the standing posture. Haemodynamic changes from supine data were analysed. On standing up, the control group had a transient significant fall in mean arterial blood pressure on Day 1 but not Week 1. No significant changes were seen on either day when sitting up. In contrast to controls, the stroke group showed increases in mean arterial blood pressure on moving from supine to the sitting and standing positions on both days. Persistent postural hypotension defined as ⩾20 mmHg systolic fall occurred in <10% of either of the study groups on both days. Sitting and standing heart rates in both groups were significantly faster than supine heart rate on both days. The orthostatic blood pressure elevation is consistent with sympathetic nervous system overactivity which has been reported in acute stroke. Upright positioning as part of early rehabilitation and mobilisation following mild-to-moderate stroke would, therefore, not predispose to detrimental postural reductions in blood pressure.


Keywords: stroke; orthostatic hypotension; hypotension PMID:10715760

  4. Telestroke in stroke survivors.

    PubMed

    Joubert, Jacques; Joubert, Lynette B; de Bustos, Elizabeth Medeiros; Ware, Dallas; Jackson, David; Harrison, Terrence; Cadilhac, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    Stroke is a high-frequency disorder placing a significant burden on the health care systems, being the foremost cause of complex chronic disability in adults. Devising systems that can enhance the prevention of stroke recurrence is an important priority and challenge in both the developed and the developing world. The potential for recurrent stroke can be substantially reduced by effective management of vascular risk factors. Telestroke is a tool with potential application to improve risk management of stroke survivors. Lack of acknowledgment of existing practices as well as lack of awareness of potential financial barriers to diffusion of telestroke can lead to limited implementation. Telestroke offers service providers the opportunity to access large numbers of stroke survivors targeting secondary prevention. The ideal 'telestroke model' provides service support, education for the patient and caregiver, as well as integration of specialist and primary care services. Effective use of technological advances, with adequate recognition of the importance of human interaction in the long-term management of a largely elderly population of stroke survivors is challenging but possible. Telestroke should be systems- and not technology-driven. Barriers in the implementation of telestroke have been identified as insufficient planning of IT infrastructure, lack of long-term vision for sustainability, a lack of contextual perspective as well as poor communication across domains. Future telestroke models should provide effective action in an integrated model of care recognizing and involving all existing players and practices.

  5. Miniature High-Force, Long-Stroke SMA Linear Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cummin, Mark A.; Donakowski, William; Cohen, Howard

    2008-01-01

    Improved long-stroke shape-memory-alloy (SMA) linear actuators are being developed to exert significantly higher forces and operate at higher activation temperatures than do prior SMA actuators. In these actuators, long linear strokes are achieved through the principle of displacement multiplication, according to which there are multiple stages, each intermediate stage being connected by straight SMA wire segments to the next stage so that relative motions of stages are additive toward the final stage, which is the output stage. Prior SMA actuators typically include polymer housings or shells, steel or aluminum stages, and polymer pads between successive stages of displacement-multiplication assemblies. Typical output forces of prior SMA actuators range from 10 to 20 N, and typical strokes range from 0.5 to 1.5 cm. An important disadvantage of prior SMA wire actuators is relatively low cycle speed, which is related to actuation temperature as follows: The SMA wires in prior SMA actuators are typically made of a durable nickel/titanium alloy that has a shape-memory activation temperature of 80 C. An SMA wire can be heated quickly from below to above its activation temperature to obtain a stroke in one direction, but must then be allowed to cool to somewhat below its activation temperature (typically, less than or equal to 60 C in the case of an activation temperature of 80 C) to obtain a stroke in the opposite direction (return stroke). At typical ambient temperatures, cooling times are of the order of several seconds. Cooling times thus limit cycle speeds. Wires made of SMA alloys having significantly higher activation temperatures [denoted ultra-high-temperature (UHT) SMA alloys] cool to the required lower return-stroke temperatures more rapidly, making it possible to increase cycle speeds. The present development is motivated by a need, in some applications (especially aeronautical and space-flight applications) for SMA actuators that exert higher forces, operate

  6. The Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Anthony F.

    1987-01-01

    The Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario is a non-profit volunteer-driven organization that is active in supporting research and education programs with the ultimate goal of reducing death and disability from heart disease and stroke. The Foundation has over 65 chapters across the province, a full-time staff of 130, and over 70,000 volunteers involved in various programs and fund-raising activities. Several of the Foundation's programs offer direct assistance to family physicians and their patients. This review summarizes the major programs of the Foundation and specifies how they relate to the physicians of Ontario. PMID:21263913

  7. Clinical presentation and imaging characteristics of occult lung cancer associated ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Mai, Hui; Xia, Jun; Wu, Yongjun; Ke, Junlong; Li, Junliang; Pan, Jiangang; Chen, Wubiao; Shao, Yiming; Yang, Zhi; Luo, Saihua; Sun, Yonghua; Zhao, Bin; Li, Longxuan

    2015-02-01

    We investigated the clinical and imaging characteristics of initial and recurrent strokes in patients with occult lung cancer associated ischemic stroke (OLCA-stroke). A retrospective review of all ischemic stroke patients with occult lung cancer in the absence of conventional stroke etiologies between 2005 and 2013 was conducted. We compared the initial and recurrent lesion patterns on diffusion-weighted MRI in patients with OLCA-stroke, with respect to vascular territory involved, number and size of lesions, clinical presentation, cancer subtypes, recurrences and fatalities, and outcome of survivors. Thirteen patients with confirmed OLCA-stroke were identified. All had elevated D-dimer levels, six had central lung cancer and seven had peripheral lung cancer. Eight (62%) had adenocarcinoma, and nine (69%) had metastasis. Ten (77%) patients had multiple lesions in multiple vascular territories. Twelve (92%) patients suffered recurrent strokes. Multiple small and large disseminated lesions in multiple vascular territories were more frequent in recurrent strokes in comparison with initial strokes. The middle cerebral artery was most frequently involved in recurrent strokes, followed by the posterior circulation territory and anterior cerebral artery, which were of similar frequency as initial strokes. Overall, 58% of patients had their first recurrent stroke within the first month, and 69% had a poor outcome, especially for those with multiple recurrent strokes and metastases. Occult cancer should be considered in the setting of multiple and recurrent embolic strokes within the short term in the absence of conventional stroke etiologies. The severity of malignancy and cancer treatments and stroke influenced the recurrences and outcome.

  8. Compensatory Versus Noncompensatory Shoulder Movements Used for Reaching in Stroke.

    PubMed

    Levin, Mindy F; Liebermann, Dario G; Parmet, Yisrael; Berman, Sigal

    2016-08-01

    Background The extent to which the upper-limb flexor synergy constrains or compensates for arm motor impairment during reaching is controversial. This synergy can be quantified with a minimal marker set describing movements of the arm-plane. Objectives To determine whether and how (a) upper-limb flexor synergy in patients with chronic stroke contributes to reaching movements to different arm workspace locations and (b) reaching deficits can be characterized by arm-plane motion. Methods Sixteen post-stroke and 8 healthy control subjects made unrestrained reaching movements to targets located in ipsilateral, central, and contralateral arm workspaces. Arm-plane, arm, and trunk motion, and their temporal and spatial linkages were analyzed. Results Individuals with moderate/severe stroke used greater arm-plane movement and compensatory trunk movement compared to those with mild stroke and control subjects. Arm-plane and trunk movements were more temporally coupled in stroke compared with controls. Reaching accuracy was related to different segment and joint combinations for each target and group: arm-plane movement in controls and mild stroke subjects, and trunk and elbow movements in moderate/severe stroke subjects. Arm-plane movement increased with time since stroke and when combined with trunk rotation, discriminated between different subject groups for reaching the central and contralateral targets. Trunk movement and arm-plane angle during target reaches predicted the subject group. Conclusions The upper-limb flexor synergy was used adaptively for reaching accuracy by patients with mild, but not moderate/severe stroke. The flexor synergy, as parameterized by the amount of arm-plane motion, can be used by clinicians to identify levels of motor recovery in patients with stroke.

  9. Human Data Supporting Glyburide in Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Sheth, Kevin N.; Simard, J. Marc; Elm, Jordan; Kronenberg, Golo; Kunte, Hagen; Kimberly, W. Taylor

    2016-01-01

    The SUR1-TRPM4 channel is a critical determinant of edema and hemorrhagic transformation after focal ischemia. Blockade of this channel by the small molecule glyburide results in improved survival and neurological outcome in multiple preclinical models of ischemic stroke. A robust, compelling body of evidence suggests that an intravenous (IV) formulation of glyburide, RP-1127, can prevent swelling and improve outcome in patients with stroke. Retrospective studies of diabetic stroke patients show improved outcomes in patients who are continued on sulfonylureas after stroke onset. Early phase II study of MRI and plasma biomarkers support the conclusion that RP-1127 may decrease swelling and hemorrhagic transformation. Finally, the ongoing phase II RP-1127 development program has demonstrated continued safety as well as feasibility of enrollment and tolerability of the intervention. Continued efforts to complete the ongoing phase IIb study and definitive efficacy studies are urgently needed to bring a candidate pharmacotherapy to a population of severe stroke patients that currently have no alternative. PMID:26463916

  10. Potential markers of oxidative stress in stroke.

    PubMed

    Cherubini, Antonio; Ruggiero, Carmelinda; Polidori, M Cristina; Mecocci, Patrizia

    2005-10-01

    Free radical production is increased in ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, leading to oxidative stress that contributes to brain damage. The measurement of oxidative stress in stroke would be extremely important for a better understanding of its pathophysiology and for identifying subgroups of patients that might receive targeted therapeutic intervention. Since direct measurement of free radicals and oxidized molecules in the brain is difficult in humans, several biological substances have been investigated as potential peripheral markers. Among lipid peroxidation products, malondialdehyde, despite its relevant methodological limitations, is correlated with the size of ischemic stroke and clinical outcome, while F2-isoprostanes appear to be promising, but they have not been adequately evaluated. 8-Hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine has been extensively investigated as markers of oxidative DNA damage but no study has been done in stroke patients. Also enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidants have been proposed as indirect markers. Among them ascorbic acid, alpha-tocopherol, uric acid, and superoxide dismutase are related to brain damage and clinical outcome. After a critical evaluation of the literature, we conclude that, while an ideal biomarker is not yet available, the balance between antioxidants and by-products of oxidative stress in the organism might be the best approach for the evaluation of oxidative stress in stroke patients.

  11. Real-time optoacoustic monitoring of stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneipp, Moritz; Turner, Jake; Hambauer, Sebastian; Krieg, Sandro M.; Lehmberg, Jens; Lindauer, Ute; Razansky, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    Characterizing disease progression and identifying possible therapeutic interventions in stroke is greatly aided by the use of longitudinal function imaging studies. In this study, we investigate the applicability of real-time multispectral optoacoustic tomography (MSOT) as a tool for non-invasive monitoring of the progression of stroke in the whole brain. The middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) method was used to induce stroke. Mice were imaged under isoflurane anesthesia preoperatively and at several time points during and after the 60-minute occlusion. The animals were sacrificed after 24 hours and their excised brains frozen at -80°C for sectioning. The cryosection were stained using H&E staining to identify the ischemic lesion. Major vessels are readily identifiable in the whole mouse head in the in vivo optoacoustic scans. During ischemia, a reduction in cerebral blood volume is detectable in the cortex. Post ischemia, spectral unmixing of the optoacoustic signals shows an asymmetry of the deoxygenated hemoglobin in the hemisphere affected by MCAO. This hypoxic area was mainly located around the boundary of the ischemic lesion and was therefore identified as the ischemic penumbra. Non-invasive functional MSOT imaging is able to visualize the hypoxic penumbra in brains affected by stroke. Stopping the spread of the infarct area and revitalizing the penumbra is central in stroke research, this new imaging technique may therefore prove to be a valuable tool in the monitoring and developing new treatments.

  12. World Stroke Organization global stroke services guidelines and action plan.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Patrice; Furie, Karen L; Davis, Stephen M; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Norrving, Bo

    2014-10-01

    Every two seconds, someone across the globe suffers a symptomatic stroke. 'Silent' cerebrovascular disease insidiously contributes to worldwide disability by causing cognitive impairment in the elderly. The risk of cerebrovascular disease is disproportionately higher in low to middle income countries where there may be barriers to stroke care. The last two decades have seen a major transformation in the stroke field with the emergence of evidence-based approaches to stroke prevention, acute stroke management, and stroke recovery. The current challenge lies in implementing these interventions, particularly in regions with high incidences of stroke and limited healthcare resources. The Global Stroke Services Action Plan was conceived as a tool to identifying key elements in stroke care across a continuum of health models. At the minimal level of resource availability, stroke care delivery is based at a local clinic staffed predominantly by non-physicians. In this environment, laboratory tests and diagnostic studies are scarce, and much of the emphasis is placed on bedside clinical skills, teaching, and prevention. The essential services level offers access to a CT scan, physicians, and the potential for acute thrombolytic therapy, however stroke expertise may still be difficult to access. At the advanced stroke services level, multidisciplinary stroke expertise, multimodal imaging, and comprehensive therapies are available. A national plan for stroke care should incorporate local and regional strengths and build upon them. This clinical practice guideline is a synopsis of the core recommendations and quality indicators adapted from ten high quality multinational stroke guidelines. It can be used to establish the current level of stroke services, target goals for expanding stroke resources, and ensuring that all stages of stroke care are being adequately addressed, even at the advanced stroke services level. This document is a start, but there is more to be done

  13. Recovery After Stroke: Bladder and Bowel Function

    MedlinePlus

    Recovery After Stroke: Bladder & Bowel Function Problems with bladder and bowel function are common but distressing for ... embarrassed by – these issues.  Get information on stroke recovery from National Stroke Association.  Visit www. stroke. org ...

  14. Ovine HSP90AA1 Expression Rate Is Affected by Several SNPs at the Promoter under Both Basal and Heat Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Salces-Ortiz, Judit; González, Carmen; Moreno-Sánchez, Natalia; Calvo, Jorge H.; Pérez-Guzmán, M. Dolores; Serrano, Magdalena M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the association between polymorphisms located at the HSP90AA1 ovine gene promoter and gene expression rate under different environmental conditions, using a mixed model approach. Blood samples from 120 unrelated rams of the Manchega sheep breed were collected at three time points differing in environmental conditions. Rams were selected on the basis of their genotype for the transversion G/C located 660 base pairs upstream the gene transcription initiation site. Animals were also genotyped for another set of 6 SNPs located at the gene promoter. Two SNPs, G/C−660 and A/G−444, were associated with gene overexpression resulting from heat stress. The composed genotype CC−660-AG−444 was the genotype having the highest expression rates with fold changes ranging from 2.2 to 3.0. The genotype AG−522 showed the highest expression levels under control conditions with a fold change of 1.4. Under these conditions, the composed genotype CC−601-TT−524-AG−522-TT−468 is expected to be correlated with higher basal expression of the gene according to genotype frequencies and linkage disequilibrium values. Some putative transcription factors were predicted for binding sites where the SNPs considered are located. Since the expression rate of the gene under alternative environmental conditions seems to depend on the composed genotype of several SNPs located at its promoter, a cooperative regulation of the transcription of the HSP90AA1 gene could be hypothesized. Nevertheless epigenetic regulation mechanisms cannot be discarded. PMID:23826107

  15. Mini-Stroke vs. Regular Stroke: What's the Difference?

    MedlinePlus

    ... How is a ministroke different from a regular stroke? Answers from Jerry W. Swanson, M.D. When ... brain, spinal cord or retina, which may cause stroke-like symptoms but does not damage brain cells ...

  16. Association of Gallbladder Polyp and Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien-Hua; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Gallbladder polyp (GP) and stroke share several metabolic disorders as risk factors. We assessed the association between GP and subsequent stroke risk. From 2000 to 2011, patients with GP aged >20 years were identified from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000. Of the 15,975 examined patients, 12,780 and 3195 were categorized into the non-GP and GP cohorts, respectively. The relative risks of stroke were estimated using the Cox proportional hazard model after adjusting for age, sex, and comorbidities. The overall incidence of stroke was higher in the GP cohort than in the non-GP cohort (6.66 vs 5.20/1000 person-yr), with an incidence rate ratio (IRR) of 1.28 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.15–1.42). The risk of stroke was 1.32-fold (95% CI = 1.06–1.63) in patients with GP compared with patients without GP after adjusting for age, sex, income level, urbanization level, occupation and comorbidities of gallstone, alcohol-related illness, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, obesity, COPD, coronary heart disease, and asthma. Furthermore, the stroke risk was higher among elderly patients (with 1-yr intervals; adjusted HR [aHR] = 1.06, 95% CI = 1.05–1.07), the male sex (aHR = 1.62, 95% CI = 1.35–1.96), lower income level (aHR = 1.37, 95% CI = 1.02–1.85 for level I; aHR = 1.62, 95% CI = 1.25–2.10 for level II), living in second urbanized areas (aHR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.00–1.63), alcohol-related illness (aHR = 1.56, 95% CI = 1.07–2.28), diabetes (aHR = 1.78, 95% CI = 1.41–2.24), and hypertension (aHR = 2.74, 95% CI = 2.19–3.42). GP is associated with stroke; however, GP may be less influential than other risk factors are, such as male sex, lower income level, alcohol-related illness, diabetes, and hypertension, on stroke development. Additional studies are required to clarify whether GP is a risk factor for or an epiphenomenon of stroke development. PMID

  17. Hereditary Connective Tissue Diseases in Young Adult Stroke: A Comprehensive Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Vanakker, Olivier M.; Hemelsoet, Dimitri; De Paepe, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Though the genetic background of ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke is often polygenetic or multifactorial, it can in some cases result from a monogenic disease, particularly in young adults. Besides arteriopathies and metabolic disorders, several connective tissue diseases can present with stroke. While some of these diseases have been recognized for decades as causes of stroke, such as the vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, others only recently came to attention as being involved in stroke pathogenesis, such as those related to Type IV collagen. This paper discusses each of these connective tissue disorders and their relation with stroke briefly, emphasizing the main clinical features which can lead to their diagnosis. PMID:21331163

  18. Oxidative stress in the chronic phase after stroke.

    PubMed

    Alexandrova, Margarita L; Bochev, Petyo G; Markova, Vanya I; Bechev, Blagovest G; Popova, Marina A; Danovska, Maya P; Simeonova, Virginia K

    2003-01-01

    The spontaneous and the stimulated extracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by peripheral phagocytes, the blood antioxidant capacity and the degree of oxidative damage were evaluated in patients with severe ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in the chronic phase of disease. It was found in patients compared to the control group that: (i) the spontaneous phagocyte oxidative activity was enhanced independently of the type of stroke and the time elapsed after stroke onset; (ii) there was no difference in the extracellular ROS generation stimulated by opsonin-dependent and independent receptor mechanisms; (iii) there was no change in the indices of blood antioxidant capacity; (iv) the concentration of plasma lipid peroxides was enhanced regardless of the type of stroke, but it significantly increased over time; and (v) the concentration of blood thiobarbituric acid-reactive material was also enhanced. It was independent of the type of stroke and remained elevated during the whole period studied. We have demonstrated an enhanced spontaneous phagocyte oxidative activity and oxidative damage to lipids in patients in the chronic phase after stroke. The elimination of generated ROS and products of lipid peroxidation from the circulation could prevent the aggravation of chronic vascular injury in patients and could reduce the possibility of a subsequent stroke. This suggests the need for complex therapy, including antioxidant treatment directed to exclude the effects of free radicals, after the oxidative stress of stroke.

  19. Genetic predictors for stroke in children with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Jonathan M; Frohlich, Denise M; Howard, Thad A; Schultz, William H; Driscoll, Catherine; Nagasubramanian, Ramamoorthy; Mortier, Nicole A; Kimble, Amy C; Aygun, Banu; Adams, Robert J; Helms, Ronald W; Ware, Russell E

    2011-06-16

    Stroke is a devastating complication of sickle cell anemia (SCA), affecting 5% to 10% of patients before adulthood. Several candidate genetic polymorphisms have been proposed to affect stroke risk, but few have been validated, mainly because previous studies were hampered by relatively small sample sizes and the absence of additional patient cohorts for validation testing. To verify the accuracy of proposed genetic modifiers influencing stroke risk in SCA, we performed genotyping for 38 published single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), as well as α-thalassemia, G6PD A(-) variant deficiency, and β-globin haplotype in 2 cohorts of children with well-defined stroke phenotypes (130 stroke, 103 nonstroke). Five polymorphisms had significant influence (P < .05): SNPs in the ANXA2, TGFBR3, and TEK genes were associated with increased stroke risk, whereas α-thalassemia and a SNP in the ADCY9 gene were linked with decreased stroke risk. Further investigation at these genetic regions may help define mutations that confer stroke risk or protection in children with SCA.

  20. Impact of stroke on health-related quality of life in diverse cultures: the Berlin-Ibadan multicenter international study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Various studies have reported discordant profiles of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) after stroke. The aims of this study, the first of its kind, were to determine the real impact of stroke on HRQOL across diverse cultures; and to compare HRQOL between stroke patients and healthy adults, and across stroke severity strata. Methods 100 stroke patients and 100 apparently healthy adults (AHAs) in Nigeria; as well as 103 stroke and 50 AHAs in Germany participated. Stroke severity was measured using the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale, Stroke Levity Scale and modified Rankin scale. HRQOL was evaluated using the HRQOL In Stroke Patients (HRQOLISP) measure, a holistic multiculturally-validated measure with seven therapeutically-relevant domains distributed into two spheres. Results Domains within the spiritual sphere were considered more important by stroke patients. In both countries, stroke patients significantly (0.00001 < p < 0.004) had worse HRQOL than AHAs in all domains within the physical sphere. This was not so for the spiritual sphere. Consistently, stroke severity correlated significantly with all domains in the physical sphere unlike the spiritual sphere. In diverse cultures, the correlation coefficients between HRQOL and all indices of stroke severity revealed a decremental trend from the physical domain (rho = 0.77, p < 0.00001) to the spiritual domain (rho = 0.01, p = 0.893). Conclusions Consistently, stroke elicited a decremental response across domains, with domains in the spiritual sphere being relatively stroke-resilient. The potential utility of the relatively preserved spiritual sphere in facilitating stroke rehabilitation requires evaluation in diverse cultures. PMID:21951379

  1. Education in stroke: strategies to improve stroke patient care.

    PubMed

    Gompertz, Patrick; Slack, Andrew; Vogel, Mira; Burrows, Sharon; Clark, Philippa

    2002-07-01

    'Stroke units save lives', but organized care requires expert staff and regular training to be effective. However, the quality of inpatient care for stroke remains poor, and stroke education is often fragmented between the health-care professions. This review describes some national and local strategies aimed at ensuring that all patients are cared for by expert staff.

  2. Controversies in Cardioembolic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Wessler, Benjamin S.; Kent, David M

    2015-01-01

    Opinion statement Cardioembolic (CE) stroke mechanisms account for a significant number of ischemic strokes however the true burden is likely underestimated. It is critically important to identify patients with CE strokes since these individuals have high recurrence rates and represent a subgroup of patients who may benefit from targeted therapy in the form of anticoagulation or device based treatments. Current guidelines offer recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of these patients however important questions remain. Appropriate cardiac testing in the setting of CE must be individualized and the optimal duration of electrocardiographic monitoring to rule out atrial fibrillation (AF) is unclear. So too, risk stratification tools for AF remain understudied and there is controversy about which anticoagulant agents are most appropriate. Lastly, important potential CE sources of stroke such as PFO have garnered significant attention recently and debate regarding how to treat these patients remains. In this review we discuss some of the important controversies in diagnosing and treating patients with possible CE stroke, pointing to areas where future research might be particularly valuable. PMID:25398426

  3. Leisure after stroke.

    PubMed

    Sjögren, K

    1982-01-01

    Leisure activities and satisfaction derived from leisure activities were investigated together with feelings of stigma and of depression in 51 first-stroke married/cohabitating hemiplegics (males (n: 39) mean age 54 +/- 9; females (n: 12) mean age 50 +/- 12). Leisure goals appeared to mirror traditional gender roles; males having more outdoor and straining leisure activities. For the majority, number and frequency of active leisure participation decreased after stroke and they became passively discontented. This was the case for outdoor and indoor activities as well as for activities characterized by social interaction and entertainment. Mutual and non-mutual partnership of leisure activities occurred for those investigated within a year after stroke. Dissatisfaction also followed increased, passive, time together with spouse. Stigmatism was common (about 50 per cent) during the first year post-stroke, while depression was most common (65 per cent) between 7 and 12 months after stroke. The findings are discussed in terms of physical (disease-related) resources, geographical circumstances and psychological adaptation in its temporal context.

  4. Fatalism, optimism, spirituality, depressive symptoms and stroke outcome: A population-based analysis

    PubMed Central

    Morgenstern, Lewis B.; Sánchez, Brisa N.; Skolarus, Lesli E.; Garcia, Nelda; Risser, Jan M.H.; Wing, Jeffrey J.; Smith, Melinda A.; Zahuranec, Darin B.; Lisabeth, Lynda D.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose We sought to describe the association of spirituality, optimism, fatalism and depressive symptoms with initial stroke severity, stroke recurrence and post-stroke mortality. Methods Stroke cases June 2004–December 2008 were ascertained in Nueces County, Texas. Patients without aphasia were queried on their recall of depressive symptoms, fatalism, optimism, and non-organizational spirituality before stroke using validated scales. The association between scales and stroke outcomes was studied using multiple linear regression with log-transformed NIHSS and Cox proportional hazards regression for recurrence and mortality. Results 669 patients participated, 48.7% were women. In fully adjusted models, an increase in fatalism from the first to third quartile was associated with all-cause mortality (HR=1.41, 95%CI: 1.06, 1.88), marginally associated with risk of recurrence (HR=1.35, 95%CI: 0.97, 1.88), but not stroke severity. Similarly, an increase in depressive symptoms was associated with increased mortality (HR=1.32, 95%CI: 1.02, 1.72), marginally associated with stroke recurrence (HR=1.22, CI: 0.93, 1.62), and with a 9.0% increase in stroke severity (95%CI: 0.01, 18.0). Depressive symptoms altered the fatalism-mortality association such that the association of fatalism and mortality was more pronounced for patients reporting no depressive symptoms. Neither spirituality nor optimism conferred a significant effect on stroke severity, recurrence or mortality. Conclusions Among patients who have already had a stroke, self-described pre-stroke depressive symptoms and fatalism, but not optimism or spirituality, are associated with increased risk of stroke recurrence and mortality. Unconventional risk factors may explain some of the variability in stroke outcomes observed in populations, and may be novel targets for intervention. PMID:21940963

  5. Hispanics and Heart Disease, Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Hispanics and Heart Disease, Stroke Updated:Aug 30,2016 Heart disease is the No. 1 killer for all Americans and stroke is the fifth leading cause of death. Hispanics ...

  6. Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease, & Other Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke Having diabetes means that ... help to stop. What is the link between diabetes, heart disease, and stroke? Over time, high blood ...

  7. When does stroke rehabilitation end?

    PubMed

    Korner-Bitensky, Nicol

    2013-01-01

    This article examines key evidence on intervention effectiveness late poststroke; provides discussion on how this evidence impacts stroke rehabilitation at a clinical and national level; and explores strategies that should improve the way in which chronic stroke is addressed internationally.

  8. Stroke rehabilitation and discharge planning.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Peter

    Nurses play a pivotal role in the rehabilitation and discharge planning process of patients who have had a stroke. The nurse's role in the wider stroke multidisciplinary team is complex and diverse and, as such, stroke nurses may find it hard to describe their role and how it fits into the rehabilitation and discharge planning process. A definition of the stroke nurse role in prominent publications such as those of the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network and the Royal College of Physicians is lacking. This article emphasises the role of the stroke nurse in the rehabilitation and discharge planning process in the stroke unit, while highlighting the complexity, diversity and importance of this role in providing holistic care and support for patients who have survived a stroke. The author draws on his clinical experience of stroke nursing practice in primary, secondary and tertiary care in west central Scotland.

  9. Resistant starch content among several sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) genotypes and the effect of heat treatment on resistant starch retention in two genotypes.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Natália de Carvalho; Queiroz, Valéria Aparecida Vieira; Rocha, Maria Clara; Amorim, Aline Cristina Pinheiro; Soares, Thayana Oliveira; Monteiro, Marlene Azevedo Magalhães; de Menezes, Cícero Beserra; Schaffert, Robert Eugene; Garcia, Maria Aparecida Vieira Teixeira; Junqueira, Roberto Gonçalves

    2016-04-15

    The resistant starch (RS) contents in 49 sorghum genotypes and the effects of heat treatment using dry and wet heat on the grain and flour from two sorghum genotypes were investigated. The results showed a wide variation in the RS contents of the genotypes analyzed. The RS mean values were grouped into six distinct groups and ranged from 0.31±0.33 g/100 g to 65.66±5.46 g/100 g sorghum flour on dry basis. Dry heat causes minor losses in the RS content with retentions of up to 97.19±1.92% of this compound, whereas wet heat retained at most 6.98±0.43% of the RS. The SC 59 and (SSN76)FC6608 RED KAFIR BAZINE (ASA N23) cultivars, which have an average RS content of 65.51 g/100 g, were appropriate for human consumption, and the use of dry heat is presented as a better alternative for the preservation of RS in heat-treated grains.

  10. Educational approach on stroke training in Europe.

    PubMed

    Corea, F; Gunther, A; Kwan, J; Petzold, A; Debette, S; Sessa, M; Silvestrelli, G; Parnetti, L; Tambasco, N

    2006-01-01

    According to the European Stroke Initiative (EUSI), stroke care is best delivered within a stroke unit by a specialized multidisciplinary stroke team led by stroke specialists. At present, there is no guideline or consensus regarding training requirements or clinical standards that stroke specialists should achieve. It is envisaged that stroke specialists in training would need to acquire adequate knowledge and competency across three major areas of stroke care: acute stroke, stroke rehabilitation, and stroke prevention. With an EUSI document, the European Association of Young Neurologists and Trainees Stroke Subspeciality Group aims to promote discussion on the many aspects of stroke training and the requirements to be a stroke specialist in the European community. The ultimate purpose is to agree on common standards to promote good clinical care and effective stroke prevention across Europe. In the future, this may be translated into better patient outcome and a reduction in the global burden of this condition.

  11. Recent Epidemiological Trends of Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun-Seok; Kang, Myong-Jin

    2008-01-01

    Objective Rapid increase in aged population and westernization of lifestyle have modified epidemiological status of stroke. The purpose of this study is to analyze changing trends of stroke epidemiology in South Korea. Methods We reviewed retrospectively medical records of 1,124 cases diagnosed as stroke among 54,534 patients who visited the Emergency Medical Center at our hospital from January 1994 to December 1996 (Group A). Also, we evaluated 1,705 cases diagnosed as stroke among 55,381 patients who visited to the same hospital from January 2003 to December 2005 (Group B). The variable features of stroke, such as age, sex, seasonal variation and distribution of stroke subtypes were studied by comparing group A with B. Results In group A, hemorrhagic stroke (67.9%) was more prevalent than ischemic stroke (32.1%). However, group B showed that the ratio of hemorrhagic stroke (40.3%) to ischemic stroke (59.6%) has been reversed. The highest incidence of stroke was noted in their sixties and seventies of age in group B, which was older than that of group A. In group A, male ischemic stroke (IS) patients outnumbered female patients (1.26:1). Moreover, this gender disproportion became higher in group B (1.53:1). In group A, the number of male intracerebral hermorrhage (ICH) patients were similar to that of female patients (0.97:1). However, male ICH patients outnumbered female patients in group B (1.23:1). As for subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), female patients outnumbered male patients more than two-fold in both groups. Both groups showed that the occurrence of ischemic stroke was highest in summer, but that of hemorrhagic stroke was the highest in winter. Conclusion This study showed the changing trends of stroke in its distribution of subtypes. Multicenter prospective study using stroke registry would be required for the determination of national epidemiologic trends. PMID:19096539

  12. Plotting Lightning-Stroke Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatom, F. B.; Garst, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Data on lightning-stroke locations become easier to correlate with cloudcover maps with aid of new graphical treatment. Geographic region divided by grid into array of cells. Number of lightning strokes in each cell tabulated, and value representing density of lightning strokes assigned to each cell. With contour-plotting routine, computer draws contours of lightning-stroke density for region. Shapes of contours compared directly with shapes of storm cells.

  13. Microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector

    DOEpatents

    Haddad, Waleed S.; Trebes, James E.

    2002-01-01

    The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector includes a low power pulsed microwave transmitter with a broad-band antenna for producing a directional beam of microwaves, an index of refraction matching cap placed over the patients head, and an array of broad-band microwave receivers with collection antennae. The system of microwave transmitter and receivers are scanned around, and can also be positioned up and down the axis of the patients head. The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector is a completely non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots or to measure blood flow within the head or body. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with specialized antennas and tomographic methods. The system can be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of blood pooling such as occurs with hemorrhagic stroke in human or animal patients as well as for the detection of hemorrhage within a patient's body.

  14. [Circadian rhythm and stroke].

    PubMed

    Terayama, Yasuo

    2013-12-01

    Studies on the relationship between stroke incidence and alterations of circadian rhythm are scarce, while pathologically reduced or abolished circadian variation has been described to cause stroke since a long time ago. Although ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes are different entities and are characterized by different pathophysiological mechanisms, they share an identical pattern. A constellation of endogenous circadian rhythms and exogenous cyclic factors are involved. The staging of the circadian rhythms in vascular tone, coagulation balance including platelet function, and blood pressure plus temporal patterns in posture, physical activity, emotional stress, autonomic function, and medication effects play central and/or triggering roles. Features of the circadian rhythm of blood pressure, in terms of their chronic and acute effects on cerebral vessels, and of coagulation are especially important.

  15. Stroke and Episodic Memory Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Chun; Alexander, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    Memory impairments are common after stroke, and the anatomical basis for impairments may be quite variable. To determine the range of stroke-related memory impairment, we identified all case reports and group studies through the Medline database and the Science Citation Index. There is no hypothesis about memory that is unique to stroke, but there…

  16. Impact of nutritional status and dietary quality on stroke: do we need specific recommendations?

    PubMed

    Lim, H; Choue, R

    2013-05-01

    Stroke, one of the most prevalent geriatric diseases, is a leading cause of death worldwide that often results in permanent physical disability and decreased quality of life, and can have a negative impact on families both financially and emotionally. Although many previous studies have shown relationships between the risk of stroke and nutritional factors, clear dietary recommendations for the prevention and reduction of stroke recurrence have not been established. Several factors should be considered to control and manage stroke. For example, a considerable number of patients with stroke are poorly nourished, have several comorbidities and undesirable health-related behaviors may be present. Stroke patients are less likely to consume beneficial foods, have poorer eating habits and have impoverished dietary quality. In addition, psychological factors such as depression must also be considered in stroke management. Given these factors, dietary recommendations for stroke patients should be established. In this article, we summarized the nutritional status and dietary quality of stroke patients. We also suggested some nutritional guidelines for stroke patients and for those who are at risk for stroke.

  17. Three Variations in Rabbit Angiographic Stroke Models

    PubMed Central

    Culp, William C.; Woods, Sean D.; Brown, Aliza T.; Lowery, John D.; Hennings, Leah J.; Skinner, Robert D.; Borrelli, Michael J.; Roberson, Paula K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To develop angiographic models of embolic stroke in the rabbit using pre-formed clot or microspheres to model clinical situations ranging from transient ischemic events to severe ischemic stroke. Materials and Methods New Zealand White rabbits (N=151) received angiographic access to the internal carotid artery (ICA) from a femoral approach. Variations of emboli type and quantity of emboli were tested by injection into the ICA. These included fresh clots (1.0-mm length, 3–6 h), larger aged clots (4.0-mm length, 3 days), and 2 or 3 insoluble microspheres (700–900 μm). Neurological assessment scores (NAS) were based on motor, sensory, balance, and reflex measures. Rabbits were euthanized at 4, 7, or 24 hours after embolization, and infarct volume was measured as a percent of total brain volume using 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC). Results Infarct volume percent at 24 hours after stroke was lower for rabbits embolized with fresh clot (0.45% ± 0.14%), compared with aged clot (3.52% ± 1.31%) and insoluble microspheres (3.39% ± 1.04%). Overall NAS (including posterior vessel occlusions) were positively correlated to infarct volume percent measurements in the fresh clot (r=0.50), aged clot (r=0.65) and microsphere (r=0.62) models (p<0.001). Conclusion The three basic angiographic stroke models may be similar to human transient ischemic attacks (TIA) (fresh clot), major strokes that can be thrombolysed (aged clot), or major strokes with insoluble emboli such as atheromata (microspheres). Model selection can be tailored to specific research needs. PMID:23142182

  18. Endocarditis and Stroke

    PubMed Central

    GRECU, Nicolae; TIU, Cristina; TERECOASA, Elena; BAJENARU, Ovidiu

    2014-01-01

    Endocarditis is an important, although less common, cause of cerebral embolism. All forms of endocarditis share an initial common pathophysiologic pathway, best illustrated by the non-bacterial thrombotic form, but also a final potential for embolization. Stroke associated with endocarditis has signifficant mortality and morbidity rates, especially due to the frequent concomitant multiple sites of brain embolization. In this article we aim to briefly review endocarditis with a focus on stroke as a complication, while also presenting case correlates from our department. PMID:25705308

  19. Managing severe peripartum hyponatraemia: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jerry; Laing, Christopher M; MacCallum, Niall S; Brealey, David A

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of severe peripartum hyponatraemia that occurred following a major obstetric haemorrhage causing both an ischaemic stroke and Sheehan's syndrome and outline the investigations and management strategy required. PMID:27512448

  20. The effects of citicoline on acute ischemic stroke: a review.

    PubMed

    Overgaard, Karsten

    2014-08-01

    Early reopening of the occluded artery is, thus, important in ischemic stroke, and it has been calculated that 2 million neurons die every minute in an ischemic stroke if no effective therapy is given; therefore, "Time is Brain." In massive hemispheric infarction and edema, surgical decompression lowers the risk of death or severe disability defined as a modified Rankin Scale score greater than 4 in selected patients. The majority, around 80%-85% of all ischemic stroke victims, does not fulfill the criteria for revascularization therapy, and also for these patients, there is no effective acute therapy. Also there is no established effective acute treatment of spontaneous intracerebral bleeding. Therefore, an effective therapy applicable to all stroke victims is needed. The neuroprotective drug citicoline has been extensively studied in clinical trials with volunteers and more than 11,000 patients with various neurologic disorders, including acute ischemic stroke (AIS). The conclusion is that citicoline is safe to use and may have a beneficial effect in AIS patients and most beneficial in less severe stroke in older patients not treated with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. No other neuroprotective agent had any beneficial effect in confirmative clinical trials or had any positive effect in the subgroup analysis. Citicoline is the only drug that in a number of different clinical stroke trials continuously had some neuroprotective benefit.

  1. Why are patients with acute stroke admitted to hospital?

    PubMed Central

    Bamford, J; Sandercock, P; Warlow, C; Gray, M

    1986-01-01

    Data on 515 consecutive patients registered with the Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project were used to compare the characteristics of those patients who were admitted to hospital within one month after their first stroke with those who remained in the community during that time. Twenty eight patients had their stroke while in hospital for other conditions, and of the remaining 487, 266 were admitted. Though patients with a severe neurological deficit were significantly more likely to be admitted, 47 out of 202 such patients were managed in the community. In a substudy of 162 consecutive patients the general practitioners' reasons for either arranging admission to hospital or continuing with community care in the first week after the stroke were ascertained. Sixty patients were admitted. The only reason for admission was diagnostic uncertainty in five cases (though this was a contributing factor in 25) and to provide nursing or general, non-medical care in 25. Patients who lived alone were more likely to be admitted. All 12 patients who presented directly to the casualty department were admitted, though only five had had a severe stroke. A stroke service that provides a facility for rapid outpatient and domiciliary diagnosis as well as a rapidly acting domiciliary nursing team might reduce the number of patients with stroke admitted to hospital without adversely affecting the quality of patient care: this should be properly evaluated. PMID:3085852

  2. Global stroke statistics.

    PubMed

    Thrift, Amanda G; Thayabaranathan, Tharshanah; Howard, George; Howard, Virginia J; Rothwell, Peter M; Feigin, Valery L; Norrving, Bo; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Cadilhac, Dominique A

    2017-01-01

    Background Up to date data on incidence, mortality, and case-fatality for stroke are important for setting the agenda for prevention and healthcare. Aims and/or hypothesis We aim to update the most current incidence and mortality data on stroke available by country, and to expand the scope to case-fatality and explore how registry data might be complementary. Methods Data were compiled using two approaches: (1) an updated literature review building from our previous review and (2) direct acquisition and analysis of stroke events in the World Health Organization (WHO) mortality database for each country providing these data. To assess new and/or updated data on incidence, we searched multiple databases to identify new original papers and review articles that met ideal criteria for stroke incidence studies and were published between 15 May 2013 and 31 May 2016. For data on case-fatality, we searched between 1980 and 31 May 2016. We further screened reference lists and citation history of papers to identify other studies not obtained from these sources. Mortality codes for ICD-8, ICD-9, and ICD-10 were extracted. Using population denominators provided for each country, we calculated both the crude mortality from stroke and mortality adjusted to the WHO world population. We used only the most recent year reported to the WHO for which both population and mortality data were available. Results Fifty-one countries had data on stroke incidence, some with data over many time periods, and some with data in more than one region. Since our last review, there were new incidence studies from 12 countries, with four meeting pre-determined quality criteria. In these four studies, the incidence of stroke, adjusted to the WHO World standard population, ranged from 76 per 100,000 population per year in Australia (2009-10) up to 119 per 100,000 population per year in New Zealand (2011-12), with the latter being in those aged at least 15 years. Only in Martinique (2011-12) was the

  3. Mechanisms of action of hyperbaric oxygenation in stroke: a review.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Ernesto Cuauhtémoc

    2013-01-01

    This article outlines the therapeutic mechanisms of hyperbaric oxygenation in acute stroke, based on information obtained from peer-reviewed medical literature. Hyperbaric oxygen is an approved treatment modality for ischemia-reperfusion injury in several conditions. It maintains the viability of the marginal tissue, reduces the mitochondrial dysfunction, metabolic penumbra, and blocks inflammatory cascades observed in acute stroke. Basic and clinical data suggest that hyperbaric oxygen could be a safe and effective treatment option in the management of acute stroke. Further work is needed to clarify its clinical utility when applied within the treatment window of "gold standard" treatments (<3-5 hours).

  4. Hypernatremia secondary to post-stroke hypodipsia: just add water!

    PubMed

    Ramthun, Maikel; Mocelin, Altair Jacob; Alvares Delfino, Vinicius Daher

    2011-08-01

    Disorders in water metabolism may occur in stroke patients. When hypernatremia arises in this setting, it is usually secondary to the development of central diabetes insipidus or it is the result of neurologic lesions that prevent patients from having free access to water. Much rarer are the cases of post-stroke hypernatremia caused by hypodipsia secondary to lesions of the thirst center. We report the case of a patient with severe hypernatremia, probably secondary to post-hemorrhagic stroke hypodipsia. The hypernatremia seen in this case was corrected by scheduling the patient's water intake.

  5. Accuracy of diagnostic heat and moisture budgets using SESAME-79 field data as revealed by observing system simulation experiments. [Severe Environmental Storm and Mesoscale Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, Y.-H.; Anthes, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    Observing system simulation experiments are used to investigate the accuracy of diagnostic heat and moisture budgets which employ the AVE-SESAME 1979 data. The time-including, four-dimensional data set of a mesoscale model is used to simulate rawinsonde observations from AVE-SESAME 1979. The 5 C/day (heat budget) and 2 g/kg per day (moisture budget) magnitudes of error obtained indicate difficulties in the diagnosis of the heating rate in weak convective systems. The influences exerted by observational frequency, objective analysis, observational density, vertical interpolation, and observational errors on the budget are also studied, and it is found that the temporal and spatial resolution of the SESAME regional network is marginal for diagnosing convective effects on a horizontal time scale of 550 x 550 km.

  6. Diabetes augments in vivo microvascular blood flow dynamics after stroke.

    PubMed

    Tennant, Kelly A; Brown, Craig E

    2013-12-04

    Stroke usually affects people with underlying medical conditions. In particular, diabetics are significantly more likely to have a stroke and the prognosis for recovery is poor. Because diabetes is associated with degenerative changes in the vasculature of many organs, we sought to determine how hyperglycemia affects blood flow dynamics after an ischemic stroke. Longitudinal in vivo two-photon imaging was used to track microvessels before and after photothrombotic stroke in a diabetic mouse model. Chronic hyperglycemia exacerbated acute (3-7 d) ischemia-induced increases in blood flow velocity, vessel lumen diameter, and red blood cell flux in peri-infarct regions. These changes in blood flow dynamics were most evident in superficial blood vessels within 500 μm from the infarct, rather than deeper or more distant cortical regions. Long-term imaging of diabetic mice not subjected to stroke indicated that these acute stroke-related changes in vascular function could not be attributed to complications from hyperglycemia alone. Treating diabetic mice with insulin immediately after stroke resulted in less severe alterations in blood flow within the first 7 d of recovery, but had more variable results at later time points. Analysis of microvessel branching patterns revealed that stroke led to a pruning of microvessels in peri-infarct cortex, with very few instances of sprouting. These results indicate that chronic hyperglycemia significantly affects the vascular response to ischemic stroke and that insulin only partially mitigates these changes. The combination of these acute and chronic alterations in blood flow dynamics could underlie diabetes-related deficits in cortical plasticity and stroke recovery.

  7. Correlates of depressive symptoms in individuals attending outpatient stroke clinics.

    PubMed

    Vermeer, Julianne; Rice, Danielle; McIntyre, Amanda; Viana, Ricardo; Macaluso, Steven; Teasell, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose Depressive symptoms are common post-stroke. We examined stroke deficits and lifestyle factors that are independent predictors for depressive symptomology. Methods A retrospective chart review was performed for patients' post-stroke who attended outpatient clinics at a hospital in Southwestern Ontario between 1 January 2014 and 30 September 2014. Demographic variables, stroke deficits, secondary stroke risk factors and disability study measures [Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA)] were analyzed. Results Of the 221 outpatients who attended the stroke clinics (53% male; mean age = 65.2 ± 14.9 years; mean time post-stroke 14.6 ± 20.1 months), 202 patients were used in the final analysis. About 36% of patients (mean = 5.17 ± 5.96) reported mild to severe depressive symptoms (PHQ-9 ≥ 5). Cognitive impairment (CI), smoking, pain and therapy enrollment (p < 0.01) were significantly associated with depressive symptoms. Patients reporting CI were 4 times more likely to score highly on the PHQ-9 than those who did not report CI (OR = 4.72). While controlling for age, MoCA scores negatively related to depressive symptoms with higher PHQ-9 scores associated with lower MoCA scores (r= -0.39, p < 0.005). Conclusions High levels of depressive symptoms are common in the chronic phase post-stroke and were partially related to cognition, pain, therapy enrollment and lifestyle factors. Implications for Rehabilitation Stroke patients who report cognitive deficits, pain, tobacco use or being enrolled in therapy may experience increased depressive symptoms. A holistic perspective of disease and lifestyle factors should be considered while assessing risk of depressive symptoms in stroke patients. Patients at risk for depressive symptoms should be monitored at subsequent outpatient visits.

  8. The Importance of Patient Involvement in Stroke Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the perceived needs for health services by persons with stroke within the first year after rehabilitation, and associations between perceived impact of stroke, involvement in decisions regarding care/treatment, and having health services needs met. Method Data was collected, through a mail survey, from patients with stroke who were admitted to a university hospital in 2012 and had received rehabilitation after discharge from the stroke unit. The rehabilitation lasted an average of 2 to 4.6 months. The Stroke Survivor Needs Survey Questionnaire was used to assess the participants' perceptions of involvement in decisions on care or treatment and needs for health services in 11 problem areas: mobility, falls, incontinence, pain, fatigue, emotion, concentration, memory, speaking, reading, and sight. The perceived impact of stroke in eight areas was assessed using the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) 3.0. Eleven logistic regression models were created to explore associations between having health services needs met in each problem area respectively (dependent variable) and the independent variables. In all models the independent variables were: age, sex, SIS domain corresponding to the dependent variable, or stroke severity in cases when no corresponding SIS domain was identified, and involvement in decisions on care and treatment. Results The 63 participants who returned the questionnaires had a mean age of 72 years, 33 were male and 30 were female. Eighty percent had suffered a mild stroke. The number of participants who reported problems varied between 51 (80%, mobility) and 24 (38%, sight). Involvement in decisions on care and treatment was found to be associated with having health services needs met in six problem areas: falls, fatigue, emotion, memory, speaking, and reading. Conclusions The results highlight the importance of involving patients in making decisions on stroke rehabilitation, as it appears to be associated with meeting their health

  9. Stroke: roles of B vitamins, homocysteine and antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Moreno, Concepción; Jiménez-Escrig, Antonio; Martín, Antonio

    2009-06-01

    In the present review concerning stroke, we evaluate the roles of B vitamins, homocysteine and antioxidant vitamins. Stroke is a leading cause of death in developed countries. However, current therapeutic strategies for stroke have been largely unsuccessful. Several studies have reported important benefits on reducing the risk of stroke and improving the post-stroke-associated functional declines in patients who ate foods rich in micronutrients, including B vitamins and antioxidant vitamins E and C. Folic acid, vitamin B6 and vitamin B12 are all cofactors in homocysteine metabolism. Growing interest has been paid to hyperhomocysteinaemia as a risk factor for CVD. Hyperhomocysteinaemia has been linked to inadequate intake of vitamins, particularly to B-group vitamins and therefore may be amenable to nutritional intervention. Hence, poor dietary intake of folate, vitamin B6 and vitamin B12 are associated with increased risk of stroke. Elevated consumption of fruits and vegetables appears to protect against stroke. Antioxidant nutrients have important roles in cell function and have been implicated in processes associated with ageing, including vascular, inflammatory and neurological damage. Plasma vitamin E and C concentrations may serve as a biological marker of lifestyle or other factors associated with reduced stroke risk and may be useful in identifying those at high risk of stroke. After reviewing the observational and intervention studies, there is an incomplete understanding of mechanisms and some conflicting findings; therefore the available evidence is insufficient to recommend the routine use of B vitamins, vitamin E and vitamin C for the prevention of stroke. A better understanding of mechanisms, along with well-designed controlled clinical trials will allow further progress in this area.

  10. Antiplatelet resistance in stroke

    PubMed Central

    Topçuoglu, Mehmet Akif; Arsava, Ethem Murat; Ay, Hakan

    2011-01-01

    Although the exact prevalence of antiplatelet resistance in ischemic stroke is not known, estimates about the two most widely used antiplatelet agents – aspirin and clopidogrel – suggest that the resistance rate is high, irrespective of the definition used and parameters measured. Inadequate antiplatelet responsiveness correlates with an increased risk of recurrent ischemic vascular events in patients with stroke and acute coronary syndrome. It is not currently known whether tailoring antiplatelet therapy based on platelet function test results translates into a more effective strategy to prevent secondary vascular events after stroke. Large-scale clinical trials using a universally accepted definition and standardized measurement techniques for antiplatelet resistance are needed to demonstrate whether a ‘platelet-function test-guided antiplatelet treatment’ strategy translates into improved stroke care. This article gives an overview of the clinical importance of laboratory antiplatelet resistance, describes the challenges for platelet-function test-guided antiplatelet treatment and discusses practical issues about the management of patients with aspirin and/or clopidogrel resistance. PMID:21306212

  11. Reorganization of brain function during force production after stroke: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kokotilo, Kristen J; Eng, Janice J; Boyd, Lara A

    2011-01-01

    Damage to motor areas of the brain, caused by stroke, can produce devastating motor deficits, including aberrant control of force. Reorganization of brain function has been identified as one of the fundamental mechanisms involved in recovery of motor control after stroke, and recent advances in neuroimaging have enabled study of this brain reorganization. This review focuses on neuroimaging studies that have examined reorganization of brain function during force production and force modulation after stroke. Type and extent of reorganization after stroke was characterized via three factors: severity of injury, time after stroke and the impact of therapeutic interventions on brain activation during force production. Twenty-six studies meeting the inclusion criteria could be identified in MEDLINE (1980 to 2007). Relevant characteristics of studies (lesion location, chronicity of stroke, motor task) and mapping techniques varied widely. During force production, increased activation in secondary motor areas occurred in persons with more severe strokes. Also, reduced recruitment of secondary motor areas during force production was found as a function of increased time since stroke. During force modulation, increased activation in motor areas occurred with greater force generation. In addition, persons with more severe stroke showed relatively greater activation with rising force as compared to persons with less severe stroke. Lastly, alteration of brain activation during and after rehabilitative interventions in persons with stroke occurred in some studies. This systematic review establishes that reorganization of brain function during force production and force modulation can occur after stroke. These findings imply that therapeutic strategies that may be able to target brain reorganization to improve force control and functional recovery after stroke. PMID:19265770

  12. A prospective study of brain natriuretic peptide levels in three subgroups: Stroke with hypertension, stroke without hypertension, and hypertension alone

    PubMed Central

    Cakir, Zeynep; Saritas, Ayhan; Emet, Mucahit; Aslan, Sahin; Akoz, Ayhan; Gundogdu, Fuat

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To study brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels in three subgroups: patients having stroke with hypertension (HT), those having stroke without HT, and those with HT alone. We also tried to identify whether BNP levels predict the length of stay in hospital and mortality. Materials and Methods: The groups were formed by patients who had been admitted to the emergency department in the first 4–12 h after the onset of symptoms. There were 30 stroke patients with a history of HT (group I), 30 stroke patients without a history of HT (group II), and 20 HT patients without stroke (group III). Patients with congestive heart failure, chronic cor pulmonale, severe valvular heart disease, chronic renal failure, liver insufficiency, diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation, and those with a history of stroke were excluded from the study since these diseases can affect the plasma BNP levels. Results: The demographic characteristics, except the age distribution, were similar among the groups. The mean BNP levels in the three groups were 168.8 ± 223.9 pg/ml, 85.0 ± 75.1 pg/ml, and 84.8 ± 178.3 pg/ml, respectively. The differences between the groups were statistically significant. Conclusion: The mean BNP levels were affected by HT and/or stroke. The simultaneous presence of HT and stroke results in a more significant increase BNP than the presence of either stroke or HT alone. When diseases that can affect the plasma BNP levels are excluded, the BNP levels in stroke patients without a history of HT are similar to the levels seen in patients with only HT. PMID:20436747

  13. Ethnic Differences in Post-Stroke Quality of Life in the Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi (BASIC) Project

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Sarah L; Brown, Devin L; Baek, Jonggyu; Wing, Jeffrey J; Morgenstern, Lewis B; Lisabeth, Lynda D

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Mexican Americans (MAs) have an increased risk of stroke and experience worse post-stroke disability than non-Hispanic whites (NHWs), which may translate into worse post-stroke quality of life (QOL). We assessed ethnic differences in post-stroke QOL, as well as potential modification of associations by age, sex, and initial stroke severity. Methods Ischemic stroke survivors were identified through the biethnic, population-based Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi (BASIC) Project. Data were collected from medical records, baseline interviews, and 90-day post-stroke interviews. Post-stroke QOL was measured at approximately 90 days by the validated short-form stroke-specific QOL in 3 domains: overall, physical, and psychosocial (range 0–5; higher scores represent better QOL). Tobit regression was used to model associations between ethnicity and post-stroke QOL scores, adjusted for demographics, clinical characteristics, and pre-stroke cognition and function. Results Among 290 eligible stroke survivors (66% MA, 34% NHW, median age=69 years), median scores for overall, physical, and psychosocial post-stroke QOL were 3.3, 3.8 and 2.7, respectively. Overall post-stroke QOL was lower for MAs than NHWs (mean difference = −0.30, 95%CI:−0.59,−0.01) and in the physical domain (mean difference = −0.47, 95%CI:−0.81,−0.14) after multivariable adjustment. No ethnic difference was found in the psychosocial domain. Age modified the associations between ethnicity and post-stroke QOL such that differences were present in older but not younger ages. Conclusions Disparities exist in post-stroke QOL for MAs and appear to be driven by differences in older stroke patients. Targeted interventions to improve outcomes among MA stroke survivors are urgently needed. PMID:26286542

  14. Lightning energetics: Estimates of energy dissipation in channels, channel radii, and channel-heating risetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Borovsky, J.E.

    1998-05-01

    In this report, several lightning-channel parameters are calculated with the aid of an electrodynamic model of lightning. The electrodynamic model describes dart leaders and return strokes as electromagnetic waves that are guided along conducting lightning channels. According to the model, electrostatic energy is delivered to the channel by a leader, where it is stored around the outside of the channel; subsequently, the return stroke dissipates this locally stored energy. In this report this lightning-energy-flow scenario is developed further. Then the energy dissipated per unit length in lightning channels is calculated, where this quantity is now related to the linear charge density on the channel, not to the cloud-to-ground electrostatic potential difference. Energy conservation is then used to calculate the radii of lightning channels: their initial radii at the onset of return strokes and their final radii after the channels have pressure expanded. Finally, the risetimes for channel heating during return strokes are calculated by defining an energy-storage radius around the channel and by estimating the radial velocity of energy flow toward the channel during a return stroke. In three appendices, values for the linear charge densities on lightning channels are calculated, estimates of the total length of branch channels are obtained, and values for the cloud-to-ground electrostatic potential difference are estimated. {copyright} 1998 American Geophysical Union

  15. Females exposed to 24 h of sleep deprivation do not experience greater physiological strain, but do perceive heat illness symptoms more severely, during exercise-heat stress.

    PubMed

    Relf, Rebecca; Willmott, Ashley; Mee, Jessica; Gibson, Oliver; Saunders, Arron; Hayes, Mark; Maxwell, Neil

    2017-03-24

    There is limited and inconclusive evidence surrounding the physiological and perceptual responses to heat stress while sleep deprived, especially for females. This study aimed to quantify the effect of 24 h sleep deprivation on physiological strain and perceptual markers of heat-related illness in females. Nine females completed two 30-min heat stress tests (HST) separated by 48 h in 39°C, 41% relative humidity at a metabolic heat production of 10 W · kg(-1). The non-sleep deprived HST was followed by the sleep deprivation (SDHST) trial for all participants during the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. Physiological and perceptual measures were recorded at 5 min intervals during the HSTs. On the cessation of the HSTs, heat illness symptom index (HISI) was completed. HISI scores increased after sleep deprivation by 28 ± 16 versus 20 ± 16 (P = 0.01). Peak (39.40 ± 0.35°C vs. 39.35 ± 0.33°C) and change in rectal temperature (1.91 ± 0.21 vs. 1.93 ± 0.34°C), and whole body sweat rate (1.08 ± 0.31 vs. 1.15 ± 0.36 L · h(-1)) did not differ (P > 0.05) between tests. No difference was observed in peak, nor rise in: heart rate, mean skin temperature, perceived exertion or thermal sensation during the HSTs. Twenty-four hours sleep deprivation increased perceptual symptoms associated with heat-related illness; however, no thermoregulatory alterations were observed.

  16. Knowledge of Stroke Risk Factors among Stroke Survivors in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Moses, Taritei

    2016-01-01

    Background. Knowledge of stroke risk factors is expected to reduce the incidence of stroke—whether first-ever or recurrent. This study examined knowledge of stroke risk factors and its determinants among stroke survivors. Methods. A cross-sectional survey of consenting stroke survivors at two physiotherapy facilities in Nigeria was carried out. Sociodemographic and clinical data were obtained and knowledge of stroke risk factors (defined as the ability to mention at least one correct risk factor) was assessed using open-ended questionnaire. Data were treated with descriptive statistics and logistic regression analysis. Results. Sixty-nine stroke survivors (male = 72.5%; mean ± SD age = 49.7 ± 10.6 years) participated in the study. Thirty-four (49.4%) participants had knowledge of stroke risk factors. Only educational level was significantly associated with knowledge and participants with tertiary educational qualification were about 48 times (odds ratio = 48.5; CI = 7.6–309.8; P < 0.0001) more likely to be knowledgeable than those with no education. Conclusion. Less than half of the participants had knowledge of stroke risk factors. Participants with tertiary education were significantly more knowledgeable than those with lower educational qualifications. Effective means of educating stroke survivors on stroke risk factors should be identified and adopted. PMID:27882262

  17. Etiologic Ischemic Stroke Phenotypes in the NINDS Stroke Genetics Network

    PubMed Central

    Ay, Hakan; Arsava, Ethem Murat; Andsberg, Gunnar; Benner, Thomas; Brown, Robert D.; Chapman, Sherita N.; Cole, John W.; Delavaran, Hossein; Dichgans, Martin; Engström, Gunnar; Giralt-Steinhauer, Eva; Grewal, Raji P.; Gwinn, Katrina; Jern, Christina; Jimenez-Conde, Jordi; Jood, Katarina; Katsnelson, Michael; Kissela, Brett; Kittner, Steven J.; Kleindorfer, Dawn O.; Labovitz, Daniel L.; Lanfranconi, Silvia; Lee, Jin-Moo; Lehm, Manuel; Lemmens, Robin; Levi, Chris; Li, Linxin; Lindgren, Arne; Markus, Hugh S.; McArdle, Patrick F.; Melander, Olle; Norrving, Bo; Peddareddygari, Leema Reddy; Pedersén, Annie; Pera, Joanna; Rannikmäe, Kristiina; Rexrode, Kathryn M.; Rhodes, David; Rich, Stephen S.; Roquer, Jaume; Rosand, Jonathan; Rothwell, Peter M.; Rundek, Tatjana; Sacco, Ralph L.; Schmidt, Reinhold; Schürks, Markus; Seiler, Stephan; Sharma, Pankaj; Slowik, Agnieszka; Sudlow, Cathie; Thijs, Vincent; Woodfield, Rebecca; Worrall, Bradford B.; Meschia, James F.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose NINDS Stroke Genetics Network (SiGN) is an international consortium of ischemic stroke studies that aims to generate high quality phenotype data to identify the genetic basis of etiologic stroke subtypes. This analysis characterizes the etiopathogenetic basis of ischemic stroke and reliability of stroke classification in the consortium. Methods Fifty-two trained and certified adjudicators determined both phenotypic (abnormal test findings categorized in major etiologic groups without weighting towards the most likely cause) and causative ischemic stroke subtypes in 16,954 subjects with imaging-confirmed ischemic stroke from 12 US studies and 11 studies from 8 European countries using the web-based Causative Classification of Stroke System. Classification reliability was assessed with blinded re-adjudication of 1509 randomly selected cases. Results The distribution of etiologic categories varied by study, age, sex, and race (p<0.001 for each). Overall, only 40% to 54% of cases with a given major ischemic stroke etiology (phenotypic subtype) were classified into the same final causative category with high confidence. There was good agreement for both causative (kappa 0.72, 95%CI:0.69-0.75) and phenotypic classifications (kappa 0.73, 95%CI:0.70-0.75). Conclusions This study demonstrates that etiologic subtypes can be determined with good reliability in studies that include investigators with different expertise and background, institutions with different stroke evaluation protocols and geographic location, and patient populations with different epidemiological characteristics. The discordance between phenotypic and causative stroke subtypes highlights the fact that the presence of an abnormality in a stroke patient does not necessarily mean that it is the cause of stroke. PMID:25378430

  18. Tissue microenvironments within functional cortical subdivisions adjacent to focal stroke.

    PubMed

    Katsman, Diana; Zheng, Jian; Spinelli, Kateri; Carmichael, S Thomas

    2003-09-01

    Stroke produces a region of complete cell death and areas of partial damage, injury, and gliosis. The spatial relationship of these regions of damage to the infarct core and within spared neuronal circuits has not been identified. A model of cortical stroke was developed within functional subsets of the somatosensory cortex. Infarct size, regions of apoptosis, oxidative DNA damage, heat shock protein induction, and subtypes of reactive gliosis were precisely mapped with the somatosensory body map, quantified, and interrelated. Three tissue microenvironments were recognized: zones of partial ischemic damage, heat shock protein induction, and distributed gliosis. These three zones involved progressively more distant cortical regions, each larger than the infarct core. The zone of partial ischemic damage represents an overlap region of apoptotic cell death, oxidative DNA damage, loss of synaptic connections, and local reactive gliosis. The zone of distributed gliosis occupies distinct functional areas of the somatosensory cortex. The tissue reorganization induced by stroke is much larger than the stroke site itself. Adjacent tissue microenvironments are sites of distinct reactive cellular signaling and may serve as a link between the processes of acute cell death and delayed neuronal plasticity after focal stroke.

  19. Long stroke, double acting pump having tension guide member

    SciTech Connect

    Walling, J. B.

    1985-09-17

    A downhole, electro-hydraulic pump assembly, having a hydraulic power piston connected to a double-acting production piston is disclosed. Hydraulic power for operating the power piston is developed downhole by a mechanical pump which is driven by an electrical motor carried within the pump housing. The electrical motor is energized by high-cycle electrical power conducted from a surface facility for increased pumping capability in very deep wells. Long stroke capability is provided by an annular piston and a tubular connecting ram which ride on a tensioned guide tube. The effective production piston area is maximized for efficient production in both up-stroke and down-stroke by conducting the flow of formation fluid produced in the down-stroke through the bore of the tensioned guide tube. The electric drive motor and hydraulic drive pump are operated safely at high power levels because of the improved heat dissipation arrangement in which the electrical motor and pump are cooled by circulation of the power fluid within the pump housing, with the power fluid being continuously circulated to the surface through a filter and heat exchanger. In a preferred embodiment, the downhole electrical drive motor is energized from the surface by a cyclo-converter having a continuously variable frequency output, whereby the stroke speed is also continuously variable over a wide range to accomodate changes in the producing formation.

  20. What Is the Future of Stroke Prevention?

    PubMed Central

    Kernan, Walter N.; Launer, Lenore J.; Goldstein, Larry B.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose The control of stroke risk factors remains challenging. The “polypill” concept represents a novel approach for reducing stroke and cardiovascular risk factors in the entire population. The polypill would include several components and be provided without prescription to all adults of a certain age. Results A polypill aimed at lowering blood pressure and cholesterol levels is estimated to potentially reduce the risk of a first ischemic stroke by 53%; this would translate to about 400 000 fewer strokes each year in the United States alone. Recommending a polypill for the entire older adult population would, however, include many individuals without the multiple risk factors targeted by its components, putting them at risk for drug-related side effects and responsible for the costs of a medication from which they would not derive benefit. Additional arguments for and against the polypill approach are discussed. Conclusions Only clinical trials can provide the evidence needed to determine the usefulness of the polypill approach. Issues related to defining the components of the polypill, evaluating the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of a multiple-component formulation, and establishing safety and cost-effectiveness when given to large populations, however, are not trivial. PMID:20876501

  1. Understanding Stroke - Know Stroke • Know the Signs • Act in Time

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Understanding Stroke Know Stroke • Know the Signs • Act in Time Past Issues / ... Julie Harris, and motivational speaker David Layton. Preventing Stroke "Until I had my stroke, I didn't ...

  2. Physical activity in the prevention of ischemic stroke and improvement of outcomes: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Laura E; Corbett, Dale; Brooks, Dina; Sage, Michael D; Macintosh, Bradley J; McIlroy, William E; Black, Sandra E

    2013-02-01

    Physical activity is an integral component of stroke prevention. Although approximately 80% of strokes are due to cerebral ischemia, the mechanisms linking physical activity to the incidence of and recovery from ischemic stroke are not completely understood. This review summarizes evidence from human and animal studies regarding physical activity in the prevention of overt and covert ischemic stroke and associated injury. In cohort studies, people who are physically active have reduced rates of overt ischemic stroke and ischemic stroke mortality. However, few human studies have examined physical activity and the incidence of covert stroke. Evidence from animal models of ischemic stroke indicates that physical activity reduces injury after ischemic stroke by reducing infarct size and apoptotic cell death. Accordingly, physical activity may reduce the magnitude of injury from ischemic stroke so that there are fewer or less severe symptoms. Future research should investigate physical activity and incidence of covert stroke prospectively, ascertain the optimal dose and type of exercise to prevent ischemic injury, and identify the underlying neuroprotective mechanisms.

  3. More outcomes than trials: a call for consistent data collection across stroke rehabilitation trials.

    PubMed

    Ali, M; English, C; Bernhardt, J; Sunnerhagen, K S; Brady, M

    2013-01-01

    Stroke survivors experience complex combinations of impairments, activity limitations, and participation restrictions. The essential components of stroke rehabilitation remain elusive. Determining efficacy in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) is challenging; there is no commonly agreed primary outcome measure for rehabilitation trials. Clinical guidelines depend on proof of efficacy in RCTs and meta-analyses. However, diverse trial aims, differing methods, inconsistent data collection, and use of multiple assessment tools hinder comparability across trials. Consistent data collection in acute stroke trials has facilitated meta-analyses to inform trial design and clinical practice. With few exceptions, inconsistent data collection has hindered similar progress in stroke rehabilitation research. There is an urgent need for the routine collection of a core dataset of common variables in rehabilitation trials. The European Stroke Organisation Outcomes Working Group, the National Institutes of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Common Data Elements project, and the Collaborative Stroke Audit and Research project have called for consistency in data collection in stroke trials. Standardizing data collection can decrease study start up times, facilitate data sharing, and inform clinical guidelines. Although achieving consensus on which outcome measures to use in stroke rehabilitation trials is a considerable task, perhaps a feasible starting point is to achieve consistency in the collection of data on demography, stroke severity, and stroke onset to inclusion times. Longer term goals could include the development of a consensus process to establish the core dataset. This should be endorsed by researchers, funders, and journal editors in order to facilitate sustainable change.

  4. Assessing Walking Strategies Using Insole Pressure Sensors for Stroke Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Munoz-Organero, Mario; Parker, Jack; Powell, Lauren; Mawson, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Insole pressure sensors capture the different forces exercised over the different parts of the sole when performing tasks standing up such as walking. Using data analysis and machine learning techniques, common patterns and strategies from different users to achieve different tasks can be automatically extracted. In this paper, we present the results obtained for the automatic detection of different strategies used by stroke survivors when walking as integrated into an Information Communication Technology (ICT) enhanced Personalised Self-Management Rehabilitation System (PSMrS) for stroke rehabilitation. Fourteen stroke survivors and 10 healthy controls have participated in the experiment by walking six times a distance from chair to chair of approximately 10 m long. The Rivermead Mobility Index was used to assess the functional ability of each individual in the stroke survivor group. Several walking strategies are studied based on data gathered from insole pressure sensors and patterns found in stroke survivor patients are compared with average patterns found in healthy control users. A mechanism to automatically estimate a mobility index based on the similarity of the pressure patterns to a stereotyped stride is also used. Both data gathered from stroke survivors and healthy controls are used to evaluate the proposed mechanisms. The output of trained algorithms is applied to the PSMrS system to provide feedback on gait quality enabling stroke survivors to self-manage their rehabilitation. PMID:27706077

  5. Secondhand Smoke Exposure and Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Malek, Angela M.; Cushman, Mary; Lackland, Daniel T.; Howard, George; McClure, Leslie A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Stroke is a major public health concern worldwide given the associated morbidity and mortality. Smoking is a risk factor for stroke, but the relationship between secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure and stroke has been inconsistent to date. The aim of the current study was to examine the association of SHS exposure and risk of stroke and its subtypes (ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke) among nonsmokers. Methods Demographic and clinical characteristics were compared by SHS exposure status for black and white nonsmokers aged ≥45 years in the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study in 2014. Hazard ratios (HRs) and corresponding 95% CIs were calculated by Cox proportional hazards models to assess the relationship between SHS exposure and stroke risk. Results Of the 21,743 participants (38% African American, 45% male), SHS exposure in the past year was reported by 23%. Compared with those without SHS exposure, exposed participants were more likely to be female, white, younger, and reside with a smoker (all p<0.001). A total of 428 incident strokes were observed from April 2003 to March 2012 during a mean follow-up of 5.6 years. The risk of overall stroke was increased 30% among those with SHS exposure after adjustment for other stroke risk factors (95% CI=2%, 67%). This relationship appeared to be driven by ischemic strokes. Conclusions SHS exposure is independently associated with an increased risk of stroke. Future studies are needed to confirm these findings and examine the role of long-term effects of SHS exposure on stroke outcomes. PMID:26117341

  6. The Influence of Acute Hyperglycemia in an Animal Model of Lacunar Stroke That Is Induced by Artificial Particle Embolization.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Jun; Lin, Ming-Wei; Huang, Yaw-Bin; Kuo, Yu-Min; Tsai, Yi-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Animal and clinical studies have revealed that hyperglycemia during ischemic stroke increases the stroke's severity and the infarct size in clinical and animal studies. However, no conclusive evidence demonstrates that acute hyperglycemia worsens post-stroke outcomes and increases infarct size in lacunar stroke. In this study, we developed a rat model of lacunar stroke that was induced via the injection of artificial embolic particles during full consciousness. We then used this model to compare the acute influence of hyperglycemia in lacunar stroke and diffuse infarction, by evaluating neurologic behavior and the rate, size, and location of the infarction. The time course of the neurologic deficits was clearly recorded from immediately after induction to 24 h post-stroke in both types of stroke. We found that acute hyperglycemia aggravated the neurologic deficit in diffuse infarction at 24 h after stroke, and also aggravated the cerebral infarct. Furthermore, the infarct volumes of the basal ganglion, thalamus, hippocampus, and cerebellum but not the cortex were positively correlated with serum glucose levels. In contrast, acute hyperglycemia reduced the infarct volume and neurologic symptoms in lacunar stroke within 4 min after stroke induction, and this effect persisted for up to 24 h post-stroke. In conclusion, acute hyperglycemia aggravated the neurologic outcomes in diffuse infarction, although it significantly reduced the size of the cerebral infarct and improved the neurologic deficits in lacunar stroke.

  7. Subclinical Hypothyroidism and the Risk of Stroke Events and Fatal Stroke: An Individual Participant Data Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chaker, Layal; Baumgartner, Christine; den Elzen, Wendy P. J.; Ikram, M. Arfan; Blum, Manuel R.; Collet, Tinh-Hai; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Dehghan, Abbas; Drechsler, Christiane; Luben, Robert N.; Hofman, Albert; Portegies, Marileen L. P.; Medici, Marco; Iervasi, Giorgio; Stott, David J.; Ford, Ian; Bremner, Alexandra; Wanner, Christoph; Ferrucci, Luigi; Newman, Anne B.; Dullaart, Robin P.; Sgarbi, José A.; Ceresini, Graziano; Maciel, Rui M. B.; Westendorp, Rudi G.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Imaizumi, Misa; Franklyn, Jayne A.; Bauer, Douglas C.; Walsh, John P.; Razvi, Salman; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Cappola, Anne R.; Völzke, Henry; Franco, Oscar H.; Gussekloo, Jacobijn; Rodondi, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to determine the risk of stroke associated with subclinical hypothyroidism. Data Sources and Study Selection: Published prospective cohort studies were identified through a systematic search through November 2013 without restrictions in several databases. Unpublished studies were identified through the Thyroid Studies Collaboration. We collected individual participant data on thyroid function and stroke outcome. Euthyroidism was defined as TSH levels of 0.45–4.49 mIU/L, and subclinical hypothyroidism was defined as TSH levels of 4.5–19.9 mIU/L with normal T4 levels. Data Extraction and Synthesis: We collected individual participant data on 47 573 adults (3451 subclinical hypothyroidism) from 17 cohorts and followed up from 1972–2014 (489 192 person-years). Age- and sex-adjusted pooled hazard ratios (HRs) for participants with subclinical hypothyroidism compared to euthyroidism were 1.05 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.91–1.21) for stroke events (combined fatal and nonfatal stroke) and 1.07 (95% CI, 0.80–1.42) for fatal stroke. Stratified by age, the HR for stroke events was 3.32 (95% CI, 1.25–8.80) for individuals aged 18–49 years. There was an increased risk of fatal stroke in the age groups 18–49 and 50–64 years, with a HR of 4.22 (95% CI, 1.08–16.55) and 2.86 (95% CI, 1.31–6.26), respectively (p trend 0.04). We found no increased risk for those 65–79 years old (HR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.86–1.18) or ≥80 years old (HR, 1.31; 95% CI, 0.79–2.18). There was a pattern of increased risk of fatal stroke with higher TSH concentrations. Conclusions: Although no overall effect of subclinical hypothyroidism on stroke could be demonstrated, an increased risk in subjects younger than 65 years and those with higher TSH concentrations was observed. PMID:25856213

  8. The Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes (SPS3) study

    PubMed Central

    Benavente, Oscar R.; White, Carole L.; Pearce, Lesly; Pergola, Pablo; Roldan, Ana; Benavente, Marie-France; Coffey, Christopher; McClure, Leslie A.; Szychowski, Jeff M.; Conwit, Robin; Heberling, Patricia A.; Howard, George; Bazan, Carlos; Vidal-Pergola, Gabriela; Talbert, Robert; Hart, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Small subcortical strokes, also known as lacunar strokes, comprise more than 25% of brain infarcts, and the underlying vasculopathy is the most common cause of vascular cognitive impairment. How to optimally prevent stroke recurrence and cognitive decline in S3 patients is unclear. The aim of the Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes study (Trial registration: NCT00059306) is to define strategies for reducing stroke recurrence, cognitive decline, and major vascular events. Methods Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes is a randomised, multicentre clinical trial (n = 3000) being conducted in seven countries, and sponsored by the US NINDS/NIH. Patients with symptomatic small subcortical strokes in the six-months before and an eligible lesion on magnetic resonance imaging are simultaneously randomised, in a 2 × 2 factorial design, to antiplatelet therapy – 325 mg aspirin daily plus 75 mg clopidogrel daily, vs. 325 mg aspirin daily plus placebo, double-blind – and to one of two levels of systolic blood pressure targets –‘intensive’ (<130 mmHg) vs. ‘usual’ (130–149 mmHg). Participants are followed for an average of four-years. Time to recurrent stroke (ischaemic or haemorrhagic) is the primary outcome and will be analysed separately for each intervention. The secondary outcomes are the rate of cognitive decline and major vascular events. The primary and most secondary outcomes are adjudicated centrally by those unaware of treatment assignment. Conclusions Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes will address several important clinical and scientific questions by testing two interventions in patients with recent magnetic resonance imaging-defined lacunar infarcts, which are likely due to small vessel disease. The results will inform the management of millions of patients with this common vascular disorder. PMID:21371282

  9. Post-stroke Fractures in a Bi-ethnic Community

    PubMed Central

    Lisabeth, Lynda D; Morgenstern, Lewis B; Wing, Jeffrey J; Sanchez, Brisa N; Zahuranec, Darin B; Skolarus, Lesli E; Burke, James F; Kleerekoper, Michael; Smith, Melinda A; Brown, Devin L

    2010-01-01

    Background Mexican Americans have increased stroke risk and lower fracture risk compared with non-Hispanic whites, but little is known about post-stroke fracture risk in Mexican Americans. The objective was to describe post-stroke fracture risk in a bi-ethnic population and to compare risk by ethnicity. Methods In the Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi Project, strokes were identified through hospital surveillance (2000–2004) and validated by neurologists (n=2,389). Inpatient claims for fractures were ascertained (2000–2004) and cross-referenced with strokes. Survival free from fracture (any and hip) post-stroke was estimated and compared by ethnicity. Cox regression was used to test the association of ethnicity and fracture risk adjusted for confounders. Interaction terms for ethnicity and age were considered. Results Mean age was 71 years (sd=13); 54% were Mexican American; 52% were women. Mean follow-up was 4 years. There were 105 fractures (hip 33%). Survival free of any fracture and of hip fracture did not differ by ethnicity in unadjusted analyses. Increasing age, female gender, intracerebral hemorrhage and greater stroke severity were associated with risk of any fracture, but ethnicity was not. Ethnicity was associated with risk of hip fracture but this association was modified by age (p=0.02), where Mexican Americans were protected from hip fractures at younger but not older ages. Conclusion Stroke patients were at high fracture risk, with a 10% risk at 5 years. Mexican Americans were protected from hip fractures at younger but not older ages. Both elderly Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic whites should be targeted for fracture prevention post-stroke. PMID:21334222

  10. Lack of hemispheric dominance for consciousness in acute ischaemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Cucchiara, B; Kasner, S; Wolk, D; Lyden, P; Knappertz, V; Ashwood, T; Odergren, T; Nordlund, A

    2003-01-01

    Background: Previous reports have suggested left hemispheric dominance for maintaining consciousness, although there is controversy over this claim. Objective: To compare early impairment of level of consciousness between patients with right and left hemispheric stroke. Methods: Data from 564 patients with ischaemic stroke enrolled in the placebo arm of a trial of a putative neuroprotectant were analysed. All patients had major hemispheric stroke with cortical dysfunction, visual field deficit, and limb weakness, with symptom onset within 12 hours of enrolment. Patients were prospectively evaluated on a predefined scale (1–6; 1 = fully awake, higher scores representing greater impairment) to measure level of consciousness at multiple time points over the initial 24 hours after presentation. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) stroke scale score at presentation and infarct volume at 30 days were determined. Results: Some degree of impairment in level of consciousness was observed in 409 of the 564 patients (73%). Median maximum sedation score was 2 for both right and left hemispheric stroke (p = 0.91). Mean sedation score over 24 hours was 1.5 for both right and left stroke (p = 0.75). There was no difference between level of consciousness scores in right and left stroke at any individual time point during the 24 hour monitoring period. No association between side and impairment in level of consciousness was seen after adjustment for stroke severity and infarct volume. Conclusions: In contrast to previous reports, there was no evidence for hemispheric dominance for consciousness in the setting of a major hemispheric stroke. PMID:12810773

  11. Epidemiology of Hospitalizations and Deaths from Heat Illness in Soldiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    compared with Caucasians (incidence density ratio, 0.76 [95% confidence interval , 0.71-0.82]; greater rates of hospitalizations and heat strokes among...recruits from northern than southern states (incidence density ratio, 1.69 [95% confidence interval , 1.42-1 .90]; and greater rates of hospitalizations...and heat strokes among women than men (incidence density ratio, 1.18 [95% confidence interval , 1.09-1.27]). Exertional heat illness continues to be a

  12. Is hyperglycaemia an independent predictor of poor outcome after acute stroke? Results of a long-term follow up study.

    PubMed Central

    Weir, C. J.; Murray, G. D.; Dyker, A. G.; Lees, K. R.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether raised plasma glucose concentration independently influences outcome after acute stroke or is a stress response reflecting increased stroke severity. DESIGN: Long-term follow up study of patients admitted to an acute stroke unit. SETTING: Western Infirmary, Glasgow. SUBJECTS: 811 patients with acute stroke confirmed by computed tomography. Analysis was restricted to the 750 non-diabetic patients. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Survival time and placement three months after stroke. RESULTS: 645 patients (86%) had ischaemic stroke and 105 patients (14%) haemorrhagic stroke. Cox's proportional hazards modelling with stratification according to Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project categories identified increased age (relative hazard 1.36 per decade; 95% confidence interval 1.21 to 1.53), haemorrhagic stroke (relative hazard 1.67; 1.22 to 2.28), time to resolution of symptoms > 72 hours (relative hazard 2.15; 1.15 to 4.05), and hyperglycaemia (relative hazard 1.87; 1.43 to 2.45) as predictors of mortality. The effect of glucose concentration on survival was greatest in the first month. CONCLUSIONS: Plasma glucose concentration above 8 mmol/l after acute stroke predicts a poor prognosis after correcting for age, stroke severity, and stroke subtype. Raised plasma glucose concentration is therefore unlikely to be solely a stress response and should arguably be treated actively. A randomised trial is warranted. PMID:9158464

  13. Microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector

    DOEpatents

    Haddad, Waleed S.; Trebes, James E.

    2007-06-05

    The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector includes a low power pulsed microwave transmitter with a broad-band antenna for producing a directional beam of microwaves, an index of refraction matching cap placed over the patients head, and an array of broad-band microwave receivers with collection antennae. The system of microwave transmitter and receivers are scanned around, and can also be positioned up and down the axis of the patients head. The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector is a completely non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots or to measure blood flow within the head or body. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with specialized antennas and tomographic methods. The system can be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of blood pooling such as occurs with hemorrhagic stoke in human or animal patients as well as for the detection of hemorrhage within a patient's body.

  14. DRESS and Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Cahyanur, Rahmat; Oktavia, Dina; Koesno, Sukamto

    2012-07-01

    DRESS (drug rash eosinophilia and systemic symptoms) is a life threatening condition characterized by skin rash, fever, leucocytosis with eosinophilia or atypical lymphocytosis, lymphadenopathy, and internal organ involvement. This case report would like to describe an interesting case of DRESS coincidence with ischemic stroke. A 38 year old woman had been admitted with skin rash and fever since four days before. Four weeks before admission she received antibiotic and multivitamin for one week. The patient looked ill, with body temperature 38.0°C. Marked physical findings were cervical lymphadenopathy and hepatomegaly. Dermatological examination finding was generalized exanthema. Laboratory evaluation showed leucocytosis, eosinophilia, and increased level of ALT and AST. During hospitalization the patient also suffered from ischemic stroke. Treatments administered in this patient were oxygen, adequate intravenous fluid, parenteral nutrition, methyl prednisolone, cethirizin bid, ranitidin bid, and antibiotic. The antibiotic treatment in this case was performed with graded challenge or test dosing.

  15. Communication in conversation in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Rousseaux, Marc; Daveluy, Walter; Kozlowski, Odile

    2010-07-01

    In stroke patients, it has been suggested that communication disorders could result from lexical and syntactic disorders in left hemisphere lesions and from pragmatics problems in right lesions. However, we have little information on patient behaviour in dyadic communication, especially in conversation. Here, we analyzed the various processes participating in communication difficulties at the rehabilitation phase (1-6 months) post-stroke, in order to define the main mechanisms of verbal and non-verbal communication (VC, NVC) disorders and their relationship with aphasic disorders. Sixty-three patients were recruited, who belonged to six groups, with left or right cortico-sub-cortical (L-CSC, R-CSC) or sub-cortical (L-SC, R-SC), frontal (Fro) or posterior fossa (PF) lesions. They were compared with an equivalent control group (gender, age, education level). We used the Lille Communication Test, which comprises three parts: participation to communication (greeting, attention, engagement), verbal communication (verbal comprehension, speech outflow, intelligibility, word production, syntax, verbal pragmatics and verbal feedback) and non-verbal communication (understanding gestures, affective expressivity, producing gestures, pragmatics and feedback). We also used the Functional Communication Profile and the Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination (BDAE). Decrease in participation was found in L-CSC, R-CSC and Fro patients. Verbal communication was essentially disrupted in L-SCS and L-SC groups, including by verbal pragmatic disorders, and to a lesser degree in frontal patients. Nonverbal communication was mainly affected in R-CSC patients, especially by pragmatic difficulties. L-CSC patients showed an increase in gesture production, compensating for aphasia. In conclusion, communication disorders were relatively complex and could not be summarised by syntactical and lexical difficulties in left stroke and pragmatic problems in right stroke. The former also showed severe

  16. Bayonet heat exchangers in heat-assisted Stirling heat pump

    SciTech Connect

    Yagyu, S.; Fukuyama, Y.; Morikawa, T.; Isshiki, N.; Satoh, I.; Corey, J.; Fellows, C.

    1998-07-01

    The Multi-Temperature Heat Supply System is a research project creating a city energy system with lower environmental load. This system consists of a gas-fueled internal combustion engine and a heat-assisted Stirling heat pump utilizing shaft power and thermal power in a combination of several cylinders. The heat pump is mainly driven by engine shaft power and is partially assisted by thermal power from engine exhaust heat source. Since this heat pump is operated by proportioning the two energy sources to match the characteristics of the driving engine, the system is expected to produce cooling and heating water at high COP. This paper describes heat exchanger development in the project to develop a heat-assisted Stirling heat pump. The heat pump employs the Bayonet type heat exchangers (BHX Type I) for supplying cold and hot water and (BHX Type II) for absorbing exhaust heat from the driving engine. The heat exchanger design concepts are presented and their heat transfer and flow loss characteristics in oscillating gas flow are investigated. The main concern in the BHX Type I is an improvement of gas side heat transfer and the spirally finned tubes were applied to gas side of the heat exchanger. For the BHX Type II, internal heat transfer characteristics are the main concern. Shell-and-tube type heat exchangers are widely used in Stirling machines. However, since brazing is applied to the many tubes for their manufacturing processes, it is very difficult to change flow passages to optimize heat transfer and loss characteristics once they have been made. The challenge was to enhance heat transfer on the gas side to make a highly efficient heat exchanger with fewer parts. It is shown that the Bayonet type heat exchanger can have good performance comparable to conventional heat exchangers.

  17. Long stroke pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, Gerald S. (Inventor); Moore, Nicholas R. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A very high pressure pump apparatus which minimizes wear on the seals thereof and on valves connected thereto, by utilizing a very long stroke piston rod whose opposite ends are received in long cylinders. An electric motor which drives the rod, includes a rotor with a threaded aperture that receives a long threaded middle portion of the rod, so that as the rotor turns it advances the rod.

  18. Danger signals in stroke.

    PubMed

    Gelderblom, Mathias; Sobey, Christopher G; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Magnus, Tim

    2015-11-01

    Danger molecules are the first signals released from dying tissue after stroke. These danger signals bind to receptors on immune cells that will result in their activation and the release of inflammatory and neurotoxic mediators, resulting in amplification of the immune response and subsequent enlargement of the damaged brain volume. The release of danger signals is a central event that leads to a multitude of signals and cascades in the affected and neighbouring tissue, therefore providing a potential target for therapy.

  19. Predicting Discharge Mortality after Acute Ischemic Stroke Using Balanced Data

    PubMed Central

    Ho, King Chung; Speier, William; El-Saden, Suzie; Liebeskind, David S.; Saver, Jeffery L.; Bui, Alex A. T.; Arnold, Corey W.

    2014-01-01

    Several models have been developed to predict stroke outcomes (e.g., stroke mortality, patient dependence, etc.) in recent decades. However, there is little discussion regarding the problem of between-class imbalance in stroke datasets, which leads to prediction bias and decreased performance. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of the Synthetic Minority Over-sampling Technique to overcome such problems. We also compare state of the art machine learning methods and construct a six-variable support vector machine (SVM) model to predict stroke mortality at discharge. Finally, we discuss how the identification of a reduced feature set allowed us to identify additional cases in our research database for validation testing. Our classifier achieved a c-statistic of 0.865 on the cross-validated dataset, demonstrating good classification performance using a reduced set of variables. PMID:25954451

  20. Homocysteine-lowering therapy: a role in stroke prevention?

    PubMed

    Spence, J David

    2007-09-01

    On the basis of the results of several recent clinical trials, many researchers have concluded that vitamin therapy designed to lower total homocysteine concentrations is not effective in reducing the risk of cardiovascular events. However, whereas almost all myocardial infarctions are due to plaque rupture, stroke has many more pathophysiological mechanisms, and thrombosis-which is increased by raised total homocysteine concentrations-has an important role in many of these processes. Thus, stroke and myocardial infarction could respond differently to vitamin therapy. A detailed assessment of the results of the recent HOPE-2 trial and a reanalysis of the VISP trial restricted to patients capable of responding to vitamin therapy suggest that higher doses of vitamin B12 and perhaps new approaches to lowering total homocysteine besides routine vitamin therapy with folate, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12 could reduce the risk of stroke. Thus, therapy to lower homocysteine could still help to prevent stroke, if not other vascular outcomes.

  1. Nrf2 Weaves an Elaborate Network of Neuroprotection Against Stroke.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shuai; Deng, Chao; Lv, Jianjun; Fan, Chongxi; Hu, Wei; Di, Shouyin; Yan, Xiaolong; Ma, Zhiqiang; Liang, Zhenxing; Yang, Yang

    2017-03-01

    Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a neuroprotective transcription factor that has recently attracted increased attention. Stroke, a common and serious neurological disease, is currently a leading cause of death in the USA so far. It is therefore of vital importance to explore how Nrf2 behaves in stroke. In this review, we first introduce the structural features of Nrf2 and Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) and briefly depict the activation, inactivation, and regulation processes of the Nrf2 pathway. Next, we discuss the physiopathological mechanisms, upstream modulators, and downstream targets of the Nrf2 pathway. Following this background, we expand our discussion to the roles of Nrf2 in ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke and provide several potential future directions. The information presented here may be useful in the design of future experimental research and increase the likelihood of using Nrf2 as a therapeutic target for stroke in the future.

  2. Delayed reperfusion deficits after experimental stroke account for increased pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Burrows, Fiona E; Bray, Natasha; Denes, Adam; Allan, Stuart M; Schiessl, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow and oxygenation in the first few hours after reperfusion following ischemic stroke are critical for therapeutic interventions but are not well understood. We investigate changes in oxyhemoglobin (HbO2) concentration in the cortex during and after ischemic stroke, using multispectral optical imaging in anesthetized mice, a remote filament to induce either 30 minute middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo), sham surgery or anesthesia alone. Immunohistochemistry establishes cortical injury and correlates the severity of damage with the change of oxygen perfusion. All groups were imaged for 6 hours after MCAo or sham surgery. Oxygenation maps were calculated using a pathlength scaling algorithm. The MCAo group shows a significant drop in HbO2 during occlusion and an initial increase after reperfusion. Over the subsequent 6 hours HbO2 concentrations decline to levels below those observed during stroke. Platelets, activated microglia, interleukin-1α, evidence of BBB breakdown and neuronal stress increase within the stroked hemisphere and correlate with the severity of the delayed reperfusion deficit but not with the ΔHbO2 during stroke. Despite initial restoration of HbO2 after 30 min MCAo there is a delayed compromise that coincides with inflammation and could be a target for improved stroke outcome after thrombolysis. PMID:25407273

  3. Brain-machine interfaces in neurorehabilitation of stroke.

    PubMed

    Soekadar, Surjo R; Birbaumer, Niels; Slutzky, Marc W; Cohen, Leonardo G

    2015-11-01

    Stroke is among the leading causes of long-term disabilities leaving an increasing number of people with cognitive, affective and motor impairments depending on assistance in their daily life. While function after stroke can significantly improve in the first weeks and months, further recovery is often slow or non-existent in the more severe cases encompassing 30-50% of all stroke victims. The neurobiological mechanisms underlying recovery in those patients are incompletely understood. However, recent studies demonstrated the brain's remarkable capacity for functional and structural plasticity and recovery even in severe chronic stroke. As all established rehabilitation strategies require some remaining motor function, there is currently no standardized and accepted treatment for patients with complete chronic muscle paralysis. The development of brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) that translate brain activity into control signals of computers or external devices provides two new strategies to overcome stroke-related motor paralysis. First, BMIs can establish continuous high-dimensional brain-control of robotic devices or functional electric stimulation (FES) to assist in daily life activities (assistive BMI). Second, BMIs could facilitate neuroplasticity, thus enhancing motor learning and motor recovery (rehabilitative BMI). Advances in sensor technology, development of non-invasive and implantable wireless BMI-systems and their combination with brain stimulation, along with evidence for BMI systems' clinical efficacy suggest that BMI-related strategies will play an increasing role in neurorehabilitation of stroke.

  4. Delayed reperfusion deficits after experimental stroke account for increased pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Fiona E; Bray, Natasha; Denes, Adam; Allan, Stuart M; Schiessl, Ingo

    2015-02-01

    Cerebral blood flow and oxygenation in the first few hours after reperfusion following ischemic stroke are critical for therapeutic interventions but are not well understood. We investigate changes in oxyhemoglobin (HbO2) concentration in the cortex during and after ischemic stroke, using multispectral optical imaging in anesthetized mice, a remote filament to induce either 30 minute middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo), sham surgery or anesthesia alone. Immunohistochemistry establishes cortical injury and correlates the severity of damage with the change of oxygen perfusion. All groups were imaged for 6 hours after MCAo or sham surgery. Oxygenation maps were calculated using a pathlength scaling algorithm. The MCAo group shows a significant drop in HbO2 during occlusion and an initial increase after reperfusion. Over the subsequent 6 hours HbO2 concentrations decline to levels below those observed during stroke. Platelets, activated microglia, interleukin-1α, evidence of BBB breakdown and neuronal stress increase within the stroked hemisphere and correlate with the severity of the delayed reperfusion deficit but not with the ΔHbO2 during stroke. Despite initial restoration of HbO2 after 30 min MCAo there is a delayed compromise that coincides with inflammation and could be a target for improved stroke outcome after thrombolysis.

  5. Predicting outcome in a postacute stroke rehabilitation programme.

    PubMed

    van Bragt, Peter J; van Ginneken, Berbke T; Westendorp, Tessa; Heijenbrok-Kal, Majanka H; Wijffels, Markus P; Ribbers, Gerard M

    2014-06-01

    This study aims to evaluate and predict outcome as part of routine quality assessment of an inpatient stroke rehabilitation programme. By relating functional outcome to patient characteristics, including variables from the quality of life domain, we aim to find a set of variables that can be useful for prognosis, stratification and programme improvement. Data were collected, before and after rehabilitation, from a prospective quality registration database. Included were 250 patients in inpatient stroke rehabilitation after sustaining a first or recurrent ischemic or haemorrhagic stroke. Functional status was measured with the Barthel Index and the Academic Medical Centre Linear Disability Score. Health-related quality of life (HrQoL) was measured with the COOP/WONCA and the Nottingham Health Profile. Significant improvements were found on all outcome measures. A lower functional admission score, older age, more severe stroke, more pain and more negative emotional reactions on admission were found to be independent predictors of a lower outcome score, explaining 39.5% of its variance. Subjective (HrQoL) factors such as negative emotion and pain have an adverse effect on outcome of stroke rehabilitation, in addition to stroke severity, age and functional status at admission. These factors need to be taken into account in screening, clinical decision making and treatment design.

  6. Connector Mechanism Has Smaller Stroke

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milam, M. Bruce

    1992-01-01

    System for connecting electrical and/or fluid lines includes mechanism reducing length of stroke necessary to make or break connections. Feature enables connection and disconnection in confined space, and compensates for misalignment between connectors. Connector in active member moves upward at twice the speed of downward stroke of passive member. Stroke amplified within connector system. Applications include connections between modular electronic units, coupled vehicles, and hydraulic systems.

  7. Recovery After Stroke: Coping with Emotions

    MedlinePlus

    Recovery After Stroke: Coping with Emotions Dealing with a flood of emotions can be hard for stroke ... not be considered a normal part of stroke recovery. If you suffer from depression, anxiety or emotions ...

  8. Cost and Outcome in Pediatric Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, William; Huang, Haijuan; Seiber, Eric; Lo, Warren

    2015-10-01

    The cost of childhood stroke receives little notice. The authors examined potential drivers of cost and outcome to test whether (1) neonatal strokes cost less than childhood strokes, (2) associated diseases influence cost, (3) arterial ischemic stroke is more costly than sinovenous thrombosis, and (4) cost correlates with outcome. The authors reviewed records of 111 children who sustained arterial ischemic stroke or sinovenous thrombosis between 2005 and 2010 to identify costs for the following year. They assessed outcomes in 46 with the Recovery and Recurrence Questionnaire and the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory. Neonatal strokes cost less than childhood stroke. Strokes associated with congenital heart disease or vasculopathy cost the most, while perinatal or idiopathic strokes cost the least. Higher costs are correlated with worse impairment and poorer quality of life. Stroke etiology significantly influences the cost of pediatric stroke. Future cost-benefit studies must consider etiology when estimating the incremental costs associated with stroke.

  9. Stroke and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Population Profiles > Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander > Stroke Stroke and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders Native Hawaiians/Pacific ... non-Hispanic white adults to die from a stroke in 2010. In general, Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander ...

  10. What Are the Warning Signs of Stroke?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cardiovascular Conditions What Are the Warning Signs of Stroke? Brain tissue affected by blockage Stroke is the fifth leading cause of death in ... over 55 years old have more chance of stroke, and the risk gets greater as you get ...

  11. Promoting recovery from ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Antje; Minnerup, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Over recent decades, experimental and clinical stroke studies have identified a number of neurorestorative treatments that stimulate neural plasticity and promote functional recovery. In contrast to the acute stroke treatments thrombolysis and endovascular thrombectomy, neurorestorative treatments are still effective when initiated days after stroke onset, which makes them applicable to virtually all stroke patients. In this article, selected physical, pharmacological and cell-based neurorestorative therapies are discussed, with special emphasis on interventions that have already been transferred from the laboratory to the clinical setting. We explain molecular and structural processes that promote neural plasticity, discuss potential limitations of neurorestorative treatments, and offer a speculative viewpoint on how neurorestorative treatments will evolve.

  12. Electronic Stroke CarePath: Integrated Approach to Stroke Care.

    PubMed

    Katzan, Irene L; Fan, Youran; Speck, Micheal; Morton, Johanna; Fromwiller, Lauren; Urchek, John; Uchino, Ken; Griffith, Sandra D; Modic, Michael

    2015-10-01

    We describe the development, implementation, and outcomes of the first 2 years of the Electronic Stroke CarePath, an initiative developed for management of ischemic stroke patients in an effort to improve efficiency and quality of care for patients. The CarePath consists of care pathways for ischemic stroke that are integrated within the electronic health record. Patient-reported outcomes are collected using an external software platform. Documentation tools, order sets, and clinical decision support were designed to improve efficiency, optimize process measure adherence, and produce clinical data as a byproduct of care that are available for future analyses. Inpatient mortality and length of stay were compared before and after CarePath implementation in ischemic stroke patients after adjustment for case-mix. Postdischarge functional outcomes of patients with ischemic stroke were compared between the first 3 months of rollout and remainder of the study period. From January 2011 to December 2012, there were 1106 patients with ischemic stroke on the CarePath. There was a decline in inpatient mortality in patients with ischemic stroke, but not in control patients with intracerebral or subarachnoid hemorrhage. Completion rate of patient-reported questionnaires at postdischarge stroke follow-up was 72.9%. There was a trend toward improved functional outcomes at follow-up with CarePath implementation. Implementation of the Electronic Stroke CarePath is feasible and may be associated with a benefit in multiple different outcomes after ischemic stroke. This approach may be an important strategy for optimizing stroke care in the future.

  13. Atrial fibrillation is a predictor of in-hospital mortality in ischemic stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Cheung-Ter; Wong, Yi-Sin; Wu, Chi-Shun; Su, Yu-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    Background/purpose In-hospital mortality rate of acute ischemic stroke patients remains between 3% and 18%. For improving the quality of stroke care, we investigated the factors that contribute to the risk of in-hospital mortality in acute ischemic stroke patients. Materials and methods Between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2011, 2,556 acute ischemic stroke patients admitted to a stroke unit were included in this study. Factors such as demographic characteristics, clinical characteristics, comorbidities, and complications related to in-hospital mortality were assessed. Results Of the 2,556 ischemic stroke patients, 157 received thrombolytic therapy. Eighty of the 2,556 patients (3.1%) died during hospitalization. Of the 157 patients who received thrombolytic therapy, 14 (8.9%) died during hospitalization. History of atrial fibrillation (AF, P<0.01) and stroke severity (P<0.01) were independent risk factors of in-hospital mortality. AF, stroke severity, cardioembolism stroke, and diabetes mellitus were independent risk factors of hemorrhagic transformation. Herniation and sepsis were the most common complications of stroke that were attributed to in-hospital mortality. Approximately 70% of in-hospital mortality was related to stroke severity (total middle cerebral artery occlusion with herniation, basilar artery occlusion, and hemorrhagic transformation). The other 30% of in-hospital mortality was related to sepsis, heart disease, and other complications. Conclusion AF is associated with higher in-hospital mortality rate than in patients without AF. For improving outcome of stroke patients, we also need to focus to reduce serious neurological or medical complications. PMID:27418830

  14. The multilevel four-stroke swap engine and its environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzdin, Raam; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2014-09-01

    A multilevel four-stroke engine where the thermalization strokes are generated by unitary collisions with thermal bath particles is analyzed. Our model is solvable even when the engine operates far from thermal equilibrium and in the strong system-bath coupling. Necessary operation conditions for the heat machine to perform as an engine or a refrigerator are derived. We relate the work and efficiency of the device to local and non-local statistical properties of the baths (purity, index of coincidence, etc) and put upper bounds on these quantities. Finally, in the ultra-hot regime, we analytically optimize the work and find a striking similarity to results obtained for efficiency at maximal power of classical engines. The complete swap limit of our results holds for any four-stroke quantum Otto engine that is coupled to the baths for periods that are significantly longer than the thermal relaxation time.

  15. Decomposition of some polynitro arenes initiated by heat and shock Part II: Several N-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)-substituted amino derivatives.

    PubMed

    Varga, Róbert; Zeman, Svatopluk; Kouba, Martin

    2006-10-11

    Samples of 2,4,6-trinitroaniline (PAM), 2,4,6-trinitro-N-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)aniline (DPA), N,N'-bis(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)-3,5-dinitropyridine-2,6-diamine (PYX) and N,N',N''-tris(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)-1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6-triamine (TPM) were exposed to heat or to shock and then analysed chromatographically (LC-UV and LC/MS). It was found that the main identified decomposition products of these two incomplete initiations are identical for each of the compounds studied. It has been stated that the chemical micro-mechanism of the primary fragmentations of their low-temperature decomposition should be the same as in the case of their initiation by shock, including fragmentation during their detonation transformation.

  16. Stroke: advances in medical therapy and acute stroke intervention.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Kevin M; Lal, Brajesh K; Meschia, James F

    2015-10-01

    Evidence-based therapeutic options for stroke continue to emerge based on results from well-designed clinical studies. Ischemic stroke far exceeds hemorrhagic stroke in terms of prevalence and incidence, both in the USA and worldwide. The public health effect of reducing death and disability related to ischemic stroke justifies the resources that have been invested in identifying safe and effective treatments. The emergence of novel oral anticoagulants for ischemic stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation has introduced complexity to clinical decision making for patients with this common cardiac arrhythmia. Some accepted ischemic stroke preventative strategies, such as carotid revascularization for asymptomatic carotid stenosis, require reassessment, given advances in risk factor management, antithrombotic therapy, and surgical techniques. Intra-arterial therapy, particularly with stent retrievers after intravenous tissue plasminogen activator, has recently been demonstrated to improve functional outcomes and will require investment in system-based care models to ensure that effective treatments are received by patients in a timely fashion. The purpose of this review is to describe recent advances in medical and surgical approaches to ischemic stroke prevention and acute treatment. Results from recently published clinical trials will be highlighted along with ongoing clinical trials addressing key questions in ischemic stroke management and prevention where equipoise remains.

  17. Diverse accumulation of several dehydrin-like proteins in cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis), Arabidopsis thaliana and yellow lupin (Lupinus luteus) mitochondria under cold and heat stress

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Dehydrins represent hydrophilic proteins acting mainly during cell dehydration and stress response. Dehydrins are generally thermostable; however, the so-called dehydrin-like (dehydrin-related) proteins show variable thermolability. Both groups immunoreact with antibodies directed against the K-segment of dehydrins. Plant mitochondrial dehydrin-like proteins are poorly characterized. The purpose of this study was to extend previous reports on plant dehydrins by comparing the level of immunoprecipitated dehydrin-like proteins in cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis), Arabidopsis thaliana and yellow lupin (Lupinus luteus) mitochondria under cold and heat stress. Results All the analyzed plant species showed constitutive accumulation of thermostable mitochondrial putative dehydrins ranging from 50 to 70 kDa. The mitochondrial dehydrin-like proteins observed in cauliflower and Arabidopsis ranged from 10 to 100 kDa and in lupin imbibed seeds and hypocotyls - from 20 to 90 kDa. Cold treatment increased mainly the accumulation of 10-100 kDa cauliflower and Arabidopsis dehydrin-like proteins, in the patterns different in cauliflower leaf and inflorescence mitochondria. However, in lupin mitochondria, cold affected mainly 25-50 kDa proteins and seemed to induce the appearance of some novel dehydrin-like proteins. The influence of frost stress on cauliflower leaf mitochondrial dehydrin- like proteins was less significant. The impact of heat stress was less significant in lupin and Arabidopsis than in cauliflower inflorescence mitochondria. Cauliflower mitochondrial dehydrin-like proteins are localized mostly in the mitochondrial matrix; it seems that some of them may interact with mitochondrial membranes. Conclusions All the results reveal an unexpectedly broad spectrum of dehydrin-like proteins accumulated during some abiotic stress in the mitochondria of the plant species analyzed. They display only limited similarity in size to those reported previously

  18. Specific expression of antimicrobial peptide and HSP70 genes in response to heat-shock and several bacterial challenges in mussels.

    PubMed

    Cellura, Cinzia; Toubiana, Mylène; Parrinello, Nicolò; Roch, Philippe

    2007-04-01

    Defensin, mytilin and myticin are antimicrobial peptides (AMP) involved in mussel innate immunity. Their in vitro antibacterial activity is different according to the targeted bacterial species. To determine if this specificity is correlated to different regulations of gene expressions, adult mussels were challenged in vivo with either Vibrio splendidus LGP32, Vibrio anguillarum, Micrococcus lysodeikticus or by heat shock. RNAs were isolated from circulating hemocytes and AMP mRNAs were quantified by Q-PCR using 28S rRNA as housekeeping gene. In addition, HSP70 gene expression was also quantified as representing non-specific response to stress. In naïve mussels, the three AMP mRNAs were present in dramatically different quantities. Compared to defensin, myticin was expressed 300-fold more and mytilin 30-fold more. HSP70 was found expressed 80-fold more than defensin. AMP genes were differentially regulated according to the challenging bacteria, M. lysodeikticus being the only one inducing down-regulation. Such variations in mRNA quantities were observed immediately after challenging, lasting less than 24h. Only V. anguillarum effect was observed later, between 12h and 3 days post-challenge. Compared to their background expression in naïve mussels, the major effect of V. splendidus was the decrease of mytilin and myticin mRNAs, V. anguillarum mainly increased both mytilin and HSP70 mRNAs, whereas M. lysodeikticus almost suppressed defensin mRNA. As expected, heat shock increased HSP70 mRNA, but also myticin mRNA. Consequently, AMP genes responded specifically to the challenges, confirming that at least some of the innate immune mechanisms are specifically orientated.

  19. Apolipoprotein E polymorphisms increase the risk of post-stroke depression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue-bin; Wang, Jie; Xu, An-ding; Huang, Jian-min; Meng, Lan-qing; Huang, Rui-ya; Wang, Jun-li

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports have shown that apolipoprotein E (APOE) polymorphisms are involved in neurodegenerative disease. However, it is unclear whether APOE affects post-stroke depression. Accordingly, we hypothesized that APOE polymorphisms modify the risk of post-stroke depression. Here, we performed a hospital-based case-control study (including 76 cerebral infarction cases with post-stroke depression, 88 cerebral infarction cases without post-stroke depression, and 109 controls without any evidence of post-stroke depression or cerebral infarction) to determine possible association between APOE rs429358 and rs7412 polymorphisms and risk of post-stroke depression. Our findings show no difference among the groups with regards genotype distribution of the rs7412 polymorphism. In contrast, APOE genotypes with rs429358-C alleles increased the risk of post-stroke depression. Further, the rs429358 polymorphism was associated with significantly decreased regional cerebral blood flow values in the left temporal lobe of post-stroke depression cases. Additionally, the rs429358 polymorphism was not only associated with depression severity, but with increasing serum levels of total cholesterol. These results suggest that the APOE rs429358 polymorphism is associated with increased risk of developing post-stroke depression, and that APOE rs429358-C allele genotypes may be detrimental to recovery of nerve function after stoke. Indeed, these findings provide clinical data for future post-stroke depression gene interventions. PMID:28123423

  20. [Stroke and Cancer: Are Cryptogenic Strokes a Paraneoplastic Syndrome?].

    PubMed

    Eschle, Daniel

    2015-07-22

    Cancer is an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke, and stroke can precede tumour diagnosis by many months. A paraneoplastic hypercoagulability has been implicated. Overall, cancer is a rare cause, but should be suspected in cases of cryptogenic stroke. In patients with cryptogenic stroke, two criteria – ischemic lesions in multiple vascular territories and D-dimer values >2,15 µg/ml – predict cancer with 100% specificity according to one relevant study. An adenocarcinoma at an advanced stage is identified in many cases, the risk of stroke-recurrence is high. There is a lack of evidence-based recommendations regarding secondary prevention in these cases. In analogy to the guidelines for venous thromboembolism in cancer patients, low molecular weight heparins might be more efficient compared to other anti-clotting agents.

  1. Characteristics of Hemorrhagic Stroke following Spine and Joint Surgeries.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fei; Zhao, Jianning; Xu, Haidong

    2017-01-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke can occur after spine and joint surgeries such as laminectomy, lumbar spinal fusion, tumor resection, and total joint arthroplasty. Although this kind of stroke rarely happens, it may cause severe consequences and high mortality rates. Typical clinical symptoms of hemorrhagic stroke after spine and joint surgeries include headache, vomiting, consciousness disturbance, and mental disorders. It can happen several hours after surgeries. Most bleeding sites are located in cerebellar hemisphere and temporal lobe. A cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage caused by surgeries may be the key to intracranial hemorrhages happening. Early diagnosis and treatments are very important for patients to prevent the further progression of intracranial hemorrhages. Several patients need a hematoma evacuation and their prognosis is not optimistic.

  2. Characteristics of Hemorrhagic Stroke following Spine and Joint Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke can occur after spine and joint surgeries such as laminectomy, lumbar spinal fusion, tumor resection, and total joint arthroplasty. Although this kind of stroke rarely happens, it may cause severe consequences and high mortality rates. Typical clinical symptoms of hemorrhagic stroke after spine and joint surgeries include headache, vomiting, consciousness disturbance, and mental disorders. It can happen several hours after surgeries. Most bleeding sites are located in cerebellar hemisphere and temporal lobe. A cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage caused by surgeries may be the key to intracranial hemorrhages happening. Early diagnosis and treatments are very important for patients to prevent the further progression of intracranial hemorrhages. Several patients need a hematoma evacuation and their prognosis is not optimistic. PMID:28164124

  3. Variants in the inflammatory IL6 and MPO genes modulate stroke susceptibility through main effects and gene–gene interactions

    PubMed Central

    Manso, Helena; Krug, Tiago; Sobral, João; Albergaria, Isabel; Gaspar, Gisela; Ferro, José M; Oliveira, Sofia A; Vicente, Astrid M

    2011-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that inflammation within the central nervous system contributes to stroke risk and recovery. Inflammatory conditions increase stroke risk, and the inflammatory response is of major importance in recovery and healing processes after stroke. We investigated the role of inflammatory genes IL1B, IL6, MPO, and TNF in stroke susceptibility and recovery in a population sample of 672 patients and 530 controls, adjusting for demographic, clinical and lifestyle risk factors, and stroke severity parameters. We also considered the likely complexity of inflammatory mechanisms in stroke, by assessing the combined effects of multiple genes. Two interleukin 6 (IL6) and one myeloperoxidase (MPO) single-nucleotide polymorphisms were significantly associated with stroke risk (0.022stroke risk. An epistatic interaction between the IL6 and MPO genes was also identified in association with stroke susceptibility (P=0.031 after 1,000 permutations). In a subset of 546 patients, one IL6 haplotype was associated with stroke outcome at 3 months (correctedP=0.024), an intriguing finding warranting further validation. Our findings support the association of the IL6 gene and present novel evidence for the involvement of MPO in stroke susceptibility, suggesting a modulation of stroke risk by main gene effects, clinical and lifestyle factors, and gene–gene interactions. PMID:21407237

  4. Oral anticoagulation to reduce risk of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation: current and future therapies.

    PubMed

    Amin, Alpesh

    2013-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with an increased incidence and severity of strokes. The burden of AF-related stroke is expected to increase in parallel with the aging of the population. Oral anticoagulation with warfarin has been the pharmacologic standard for stroke risk reduction in patients with AF. When used with close attention to dosing and monitoring, warfarin is effective prophylactic therapy against thromboembolic stroke. However, it is underused by physicians, in part because of the known risks of adverse events with warfarin. Consequently, many patients with AF live with an avoidably elevated risk of stroke. New options, ie, oral anticoagulants with novel mechanisms of action, have recently been approved to reduce the risk of stroke in AF, and others are in development. These newer agents may address some of the complexities of warfarin use while providing similar or better efficacy and safety.

  5. [Professionalizing the management of strokes].

    PubMed

    Jonniaux, Sandrine; Simon, Josette; Haouisée, Jocelyne

    2016-01-01

    A stroke is a life threatening emergency requiring fast access to medical care and to a technical support centre. Health professionals are trained in the complexity of this care. Preventive care and educational activities are developed in emergency departments, notably in neurovascular units, thereby contributing to the prevention of complications and the risk of repeat strokes.

  6. Burden of stroke in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Kusuma, Y; Venketasubramanian, N; Kiemas, L S; Misbach, J

    2009-10-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of death among Indonesians above five years of age, comprising 15.4% of all deaths, age-gender-standardised death rate 99/100 000, and age-gender-standardised disability-adjusted life years lost 685/100 000. Stroke prevalence is 0.0017% in rural Indonesia, 0.022% in urban Indonesia, 0.5% among urban Jakarta adults, and 0.8% overall. Frequent risk factors include hypertension, smoking and hypercholesterolaemia. The mean age of stroke patients is 58.8 years. Subarachnoid haemorrhage is found in 1.4% of patients, intracerebral haemorrhage in 18.5%, and ischaemic stroke in 42.9%. Only city hospitals have neurology, neurosurgery and neuroimaging services. Indonesia has 40 stroke units. Commonly used medications for stroke are easily available. Hospital-based rehabilitative services are available in large hospitals. Traditional medicine is widely practiced. Efforts to combat stroke include education, more stroke units and rehabilitative services especially in the rural areas.

  7. One Stroke at a Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollibaugh, Molly

    2012-01-01

    At first glance, a Zentangle creation can seem intricate and complicated. But, when you learn how it is done, you realize how simple it is. Zentangles are patterns, or "tangles," that have been reduced to a simple sequence of elemental strokes. When you learn to focus on each stroke you find yourself capable of things that you may have once…

  8. Stroke-Related Translational Research

    PubMed Central

    Caplan, Louis R.; Arenillas, Juan; Cramer, Steven C.; Joutel, Anne; Lo, Eng H.; Meschia, James; Savitz, Sean; Tournier-Lasserve, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Stroke-related translational research is multifaceted. Herein, we highlight genome-wide association studies and genetic studies of cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, COL4A1 mutations, and cerebral cavernous malformations; advances in molecular biology and biomarkers; newer brain imaging research; and recovery from stroke emphasizing cell-based and other rehabilitative modalities. PMID:21555605

  9. Acute reperfusion therapy and stroke care in Asia after successful endovascular trials.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Kazunori; Koga, Masatoshi; Hayakawa, Mikito; Yamagami, Hiroshi

    2015-06-01

    The current status of and prospects for acute stroke care in Asia in the situation where both intravenous thrombolysis and endovascular therapies have been recognized as established strategies for acute stroke are reviewed. Of 15 million people annually having stroke worldwide, ≈9 million are Asians. The burdens of both ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes are severe in Asia. The unique features of stroke in Asia include susceptibility to intracranial atherosclerosis, high prevalence of intracerebral hemorrhage, effects of dietary and lifestyle habits, and several disorders with genetic causes. These features affect acute stroke care, such as the dosage of alteplase for thrombolysis and consideration of bleeding complications during antithrombotic therapy. Acute endovascular thrombectomy, as well as intravenous thrombolysis, is relatively prevalent in East Asia, but most of the other Asian countries need to develop their human resources and fundamental medical infrastructure for stroke care. A limitation of endovascular therapy in East Asia is the high prevalence of intracranial atherosclerosis that can cause recanalization failure and require additional angioplasty or permanent stent insertion although intracranial stenting is not an established strategy. Multinational collaboration on stroke research among Asian countries is infrequent. Asians should collaborate to perform their own thrombolytic and endovascular trials and seek the optimal strategy for stroke care specific to Asia.

  10. Emotional outcomes after stroke: factors associated with poor outcome

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, M.; O'Rourke, S.; Lewis, S.; Sharpe, M.; Warlow, C.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—The impact of stroke on the emotional outcome of patients is large. The aim was to describe the emotional outcomes among a cohort of patients which was of sufficient size to provide a precise estimate of their frequency and help identify those factors which are associated with poor outcomes after an acute stroke.
METHODS—372 surviving patients, who had been referred to a hospital and entered into a randomised trial to evaluate a stroke family care worker, were asked to complete questionnaires at a 6 month follow up. These included measures of emotional distress (general health questionnaire 30 item, hospital anxiety and depression scale) and physical functioning (modified Rankin, Barthel index). A regression analysis was used to identify factors which were independently associated with poor outcomes.
RESULTS—184 (60%) surviving patients scored more than 4 on the GHQ-30, 55 (22%) more than 8 on the HAD anxiety subscale, and 49 (20%) more than 8 on the HAD depression subscale. Patients with severe strokes resulting in physical disability were more likely to be depressed whereas there was a less strong relation between disability and anxiety. Patients with posterior circulation strokes had consistently better emotional outcomes than those with anterior circulation strokes.
CONCLUSIONS—These data may help identify those patients at greatest risk of poor emotional outcomes and thus help in planning trials and delivering appropriate interventions. 

 PMID:10601401

  11. Geometrical Effects on the Electromagnetic Radiation from Lightning Return Strokes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willett, John C.; Smith, David A.; LeVine, David M.; Zukor, Dorothy J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Sferic Array has recorded electric-field-change waveforms simultaneously at several stations surrounding the ground-strike points of numerous return strokes in cloud-to-ground lightning flashes. Such data are available from the five-station sub-networks in both Florida and New Mexico. With these data it has been possible for the first time to compare the waveforms radiated in different directions by a given stroke. Such comparisons are of interest to assess both the effects of channel geometry on the fine structure of subsequent-stroke radiation fields and the role of branches in the more jagged appearance of first-stroke waveforms. This paper presents multiple-station, time-domain waveforms with a 200 Hz to 500 kHz pass-band from both first and subsequent return strokes at ranges generally between 100 and 200 km. The differences among waveforms of the same stroke received at stations in different directions from the lightning channel are often obvious. These differences are illustrated and interpreted in the context of channel tortuosity and branches.

  12. Assessing cognitive function following medial prefrontal stroke in the rat.

    PubMed

    Livingston-Thomas, Jessica M; Jeffers, Matthew S; Nguemeni, Carine; Shoichet, Molly S; Morshead, Cindi M; Corbett, Dale

    2015-11-01

    Cognitive impairments are prevalent following clinical stroke; however, preclinical research has focused almost exclusively on motor deficits. In order to conduct systematic evaluations into the nature of post-stroke cognitive dysfunction and recovery, it is crucial to develop focal stroke models that predominantly affect cognition while leaving motor function intact. Herein, we evaluated a range of cognitive functions 1-4 months following focal medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) stroke using a battery of tests. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent focal ischemia induced in the mPFC using bilateral intracerebral injections of endothelin-1, or sham surgery. Cognitive function was assessed using an open field, several object recognition tests, attentional set-shifting, light-dark box, spontaneous alternation, Barnes maze, and win-shift/win-stay tests. Prefrontal cortex damage resulted in significant changes in object recognition function, behavioural flexibility, and anxiety-like behaviour, while spontaneous alternation and locomotor function remained intact. These deficits are similar to the cognitive deficits following stroke in humans. Our results suggest that this model may be useful for identifying and developing potential therapies for improving post-stroke cognitive dysfunction.

  13. Infection after Acute Ischemic Stroke: Risk Factors, Biomarkers, and Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Wartenberg, Katja E.; Stoll, Anett; Funk, Andreas; Meyer, Andreas; Schmidt, J. Michael; Berrouschot, Joerg

    2011-01-01

    Background. The activation of inflammatory cascades triggered by ischemic stroke may play a key role in the development of infections. Methods. Patients admitted with ischemic stroke within 24 hours were prospectively enrolled. Biomarkers of infection were measured on days 1, 3, and 5. The patients were continuously monitored for predefined infections. Results. Patients with infection were older (OR 1.06 per year, 95% CI 1.01–1.11) and had a higher National Institute of Health Stroke Scale Score (NIHSS, OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.10–1.34), localization in the insula, and higher stroke volumes on diffusion-weighted imaging. The maximum temperature on days 1 and 3, leukocytes, interleukin-6, lipopolysaccharide-binding protein on days 1, 3, and 5, C-reactive protein on days 3 and 5, and procalcitonin on day 5 were higher and HLA-DR-expression on monocytes on days 1, 3, and 5 lower in patients with infection. Age and NIHSS predicted the development of infections. Infection was an independent predictor of poor functional outcome. Conclusions. Severe stroke and increasing age were shown to be early predictors for infections after stroke. PMID:21789273

  14. Impact of Extreme Heat Events on Emergency Department Visits in North Carolina (2007-2011).

    PubMed

    Fuhrmann, Christopher M; Sugg, Margaret M; Konrad, Charles E; Waller, Anna

    2016-02-01

    Extreme heat is the leading cause of weather-related mortality in the U.S. Extreme heat also affects human health through heat stress and can exacerbate underlying medical conditions that lead to increased morbidity and mortality. In this study, data on emergency department (ED) visits for heat-related illness (HRI) and other selected diseases were analyzed during three heat events across North Carolina from 2007 to 2011. These heat events were identified based on the issuance and verification of heat products from local National Weather Service forecast offices (i.e. Heat Advisory, Heat Watch, and Excessive Heat Warning). The observed number of ED visits during these events were compared to the expected number of ED visits during several control periods to determine excess morbidity resulting from extreme heat. All recorded diagnoses were analyzed for each ED visit, thereby providing insight into the specific pathophysiological mechanisms and underlying health conditions associated with exposure to extreme heat. The most common form of HRI was heat exhaustion, while the percentage of visits with heat stroke was relatively low (<10%). The elderly (>65 years of age) were at greatest risk for HRI during the early summer heat event (8.9 visits per 100,000), while young and middle age adults (18-44 years of age) were at greatest risk during the mid-summer event (6.3 visits per 100,000). Many of these visits were likely due to work-related exposure. The most vulnerable demographic during the late summer heat event was adolescents (15-17 years of age), which may relate to the timing of organized sports. This demographic also exhibited the highest visit rate for HRI among all three heat events (10.5 visits per 100,000). Significant increases (p < 0.05) in visits with cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases were noted during the three heat events (3-8%). The greatest increases were found in visits with hypotension during the late summer event (23%) and sequelae during

  15. Stroke education in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Jose C; Baroque, Alejandro C; Lokin, Johnny K

    2013-10-01

    Education is paramount in effectively reducing the significant burden of stroke in the Philippines. Dedicated academic institutions and dynamic professional organizations in the Philippines have collaborated to involve themselves in the plight against stroke through systematic curriculum development for undergraduates, continuous regulation of quality residency and fellowship training program, hosting up-to-date Continuing Medical Education (CME) activities for local and international audience, and active participation in clinical stroke trials. Most recently, the University of Santo Tomas Faculty of Medicine & Surgery and the Department of Neurology & Psychiatry offered a 72-hour Certification Course in Stroke Medicine that commenced in 2011 in anticipation of the Master on Health Sciences in Stroke Medicine course being prepared for 2013.

  16. Acute Stroke Imaging Research Roadmap

    PubMed Central

    Wintermark, Max; Albers, Gregory W.; Alexandrov, Andrei V.; Alger, Jeffry R.; Bammer, Roland; Baron, Jean-Claude; Davis, Stephen; Demaerschalk, Bart M.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Eastwood, James D.; Fiebach, Jochen B.; Fisher, Marc; Furie, Karen L.; Goldmakher, Gregory V.; Hacke, Werner; Kidwell, Chelsea S.; Kloska, Stephan P.; Köhrmann, Martin; Koroshetz, Walter; Lee, Ting-Yim; Lees, Kennedy R.; Lev, Michael H.; Liebeskind, David S.; Ostergaard, Leif; Powers, William J.; Provenzale, James; Schellinger, Peter; Silbergleit, Robert; Sorensen, Alma Gregory; Wardlaw, Joanna; Wu, Ona; Warach, Steven

    2009-01-01

    The recent “Advanced Neuroimaging for Acute Stroke Treatment” meeting on September 7 and 8, 2007 in Washington DC, brought together stroke neurologists, neuroradiologists, emergency physicians, neuroimaging research scientists, members of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), industry representatives, and members of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to discuss the role of advanced neuroimaging in acute stroke treatment. The goals of the meeting were to assess state-of-the-art practice in terms of acute stroke imaging research and to propose specific recommendations regarding: (1) the standardization of perfusion and penumbral imaging techniques, (2) the validation of the accuracy and clinical utility of imaging markers of the ischemic penumbra, (3) the validation of imaging biomarkers relevant to clinical outcomes, and (4) the creation of a central repository to achieve these goals. The present article summarizes these recommendations and examines practical steps to achieve them. PMID:18477656

  17. Multimodal MRI of experimental stroke

    PubMed Central

    Duong, Timothy Q

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is the fourth leading cause of death and the leading cause of long-term disability in the United States. Brain imaging data from experimental stroke models and stroke patients have shown that there is often a gradual progression of potentially reversible ischemic injury toward infarction. Reestablishing tissue perfusion and/or treating with neuroprotective drugs in a timely fashion are expected to salvage some ischemic tissues. Diffusion-weighted imaging based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in which contrast is based on water motion can detect ischemic injury within minutes after onsets, whereas computed tomography and other imaging modalities fail to detect stroke injury for at least a few hours. Along with quantitative perfusion imaging, the perfusion-diffusion mismatch which approximates the ischemic penumbra could be imaged non-invasively. This review describes recent progresses in the development and application of multimodal MRI and image analysis techniques to study ischemic tissue at risk in experimental stroke in rats. PMID:24323751

  18. Assessing cognitive impairment following stroke.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, Michelle N; Bryan, Janet; Smith, Ashleigh E; Esterman, Adrian J

    2011-11-01

    The assessment of cognitive function is often neglected following stroke, with no consensus on the optimal method to assess poststroke cognition. We evaluated the ability of a brief protocol to detect cognitive impairment in community-dwelling people with chronic stroke compared to healthy controls and its ability to detect changes in cognition in stroke participants undergoing an exercise intervention. Four tests of cognition were able to detect differences between the groups in the domains of executive function, memory, and information-processing speed. Stroke survivors undergoing exercise over a 5-month period showed significantly improved memory and speed of information processing. Results suggest that exercise may have the potential to improve cognition in long-term stroke survivors and that these tests are sensitive measures of poststroke cognition.

  19. Efficacy of citicoline as an acute stroke treatment.

    PubMed

    Clark, Wayne M

    2009-04-01

    Citicoline (cytidine-5'-diphosphocholine or CDP-choline) is a precursor essential for the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine, one of the cell membrane components that is degraded during cerebral ischemia to free fatty acids and free radicals. Animal studies suggest that citicoline may protect cell membranes by accelerating resynthesis of phospholipids and suppressing the release of free fatty acids, stabilizing cell membranes, and reducing free radical generation. Numerous experimental stroke studies with citicoline have shown improved outcome and reduced infarct size in both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke models. Citicoline has been studied worldwide in both ischemic and hemorrhagic clinical stroke with excellent safety and possibly efficacy found in several trials. A meta-analysis of four randomized US clinical citicoline trials concluded that treatment with oral citicoline within the first 24 h after a moderate to severe stroke is safe and increases the probability of complete recovery at 3 months. Citicoline clinical efficacy trials are now continuing outside of the US in both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. A citicoline supplement is now available from several sources on the internet.

  20. Preventive Antibacterial Therapy in Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Klehmet, Juliane; Rogge, Witold; Drenckhahn, Christoph; Göhler, Jos; Bereswill, Stefan; Göbel, Ulf; Wernecke, Klaus Dieter; Wolf, Tilo; Arnold, Guy; Halle, Elke; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Meisel, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Background Pneumonia is a major risk factor of death after acute stroke. In a mouse model, preventive antibacterial therapy with moxifloxacin not only prevents the development of post-stroke infections, it also reduces mortality, and improves neurological outcome significantly. In this study we investigate whether this approach is effective in stroke patients. Methods Preventive ANtibacterial THERapy in acute Ischemic Stroke (PANTHERIS) is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in 80 patients with severe, non-lacunar, ischemic stroke (NIHSS>11) in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory. Patients received either intravenous moxifloxacin (400 mg daily) or placebo for 5 days starting within 36 hours after stroke onset. Primary endpoint was infection within 11 days. Secondary endpoints included neurological outcome, survival, development of stroke-induced immunodepression, and induction of bacterial resistance. Findings On intention-to treat analysis (79 patients), the infection rate at day 11 in the moxifloxacin treated group was 15.4% compared to 32.5% in the placebo treated group (p = 0.114). On per protocol analysis (n = 66), moxifloxacin significantly reduced infection rate from 41.9% to 17.1% (p = 0.032). Stroke associated infections were associated with a lower survival rate. In this study, neurological outcome and survival were not significantly influenced by treatment with moxifloxacin. Frequency of fluoroquinolone resistance in both treatment groups did not differ. On logistic regression analysis, treatment arm as well as the interaction between treatment arm and monocytic HLA-DR expression (a marker for immunodepression) at day 1 after stroke onset was independently and highly predictive for post-stroke infections. Interpretation PANTHERIS suggests that preventive administration of moxifloxacin is superior in reducing infections after severe non-lacunar ischemic stroke compared to placebo. In addition, the results emphasize the

  1. Ischemic stroke incidence in Santa Coloma de Gramenet (ISISCOG), Spain. A community-based study

    PubMed Central

    Alzamora, María Teresa; Sorribes, Marta; Heras, Antonio; Vila, Nicolás; Vicheto, Marisa; Forés, Rosa; Sánchez-Ojanguren, José; Sancho, Amparo; Pera, Guillem

    2008-01-01

    Background In Spain, stroke is one of the major causes of death and the main cause of severe disability in people over 65 years. We analyzed the incidence of ischemic stroke, stroke subtypes, case fatality and disability at 90 days after the event in a Spanish population. Methods A prospective community-based register of ischemic strokes was established in Santa Coloma de Gramenet (Barcelona) [116,220 inhabitants of all ages, according to the municipal census of December 31,2001], from January 1 to December 31, 2003. Standard definitions and case finding methods were used to identify all cases in all age groups. Every patient underwent a complete clinical evaluation and systematic tests including neuroimaging (CT/MRI) and vascular studies (carotid duplex ultrasound intra and extracranial and MR angiography). Results Over a one year period, 196 ischemic strokes were registered [107 men; median age = 76 years (range 39–98)], being the first event in 159 patients (81.1%) and a recurrent stroke in 37 (18.9%). After age-adjustment to the European population, the incidence of ischemic stroke per 100,000 inhabitants was 172 (95% CI, 148–196); 219 (176–261) in men and 133 (105–160) in women, with an annual incidence for first ischemic stroke of 139 (118–161); 165 (128–201) in men and 115 (89–140) in women. The incidence of stroke increased with age. Stroke subtypes (TOAST classification criteria) were lacunar in 28.8%, atherothrombotic in 18.6%, cardioembolic in 26.6% and undetermined in 26.0% of patients. At 90 days, the case-fatality was 12%, and among survivors, moderate-to-severe disability was present in 45 % at 3 months. Conclusion This prospective community-based study shows one of the lowest incidences of stroke in Europe, as well as one of the lowest case fatality and disability rates at 90 days after stroke. PMID:18371212

  2. Positron emission tomography in ischaemic stroke: cerebral perfusion and metabolism after stroke onset.

    PubMed

    Yasaka, M; Read, S J; O'Keefe, G J; Egan, G F; Pointon, O; McKay, W J; Donnan, G A

    1998-10-01

    PET studies were performed in 37 patients up to 1 month after ischaemic stroke to observe the relationships between cerebral blood flow (CBF), rate of cerebral oxygen metabolism (CMRO(2)) and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) with time. PET findings were classified as misery perfusion (two patients), luxury perfusion (15 patients), matched hypoperfusion-hypometabolism (17 patients) or normal (nine patients). Misery perfusion was seen up to 3 days post-stroke, suggesting an extended time window during which at least some tissue may be salvageable. Luxury perfusion, an indication of non-nutritional flow, was seen as early as 30 h and as late as 23 days, but more commonly between 3 and 7 days. A matched reduction of CBF and CMRO(2) was seen during all time periods, but as early as 27 hours. Since this was associated with severely impaired CBF, presumably from the onset of stroke, it can be assumed that the duration of cerebral tissue survival is less than 27 h under these conditions. We inferred that, for maximal tissue recovery, therapy will need to be introduced within 27 h after stroke, but that at least some potential for recovery exists up to 3 days.

  3. Post-stroke dementia - a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Mijajlović, Milija D; Pavlović, Aleksandra; Brainin, Michael; Heiss, Wolf-Dieter; Quinn, Terence J; Ihle-Hansen, Hege B; Hermann, Dirk M; Assayag, Einor Ben; Richard, Edo; Thiel, Alexander; Kliper, Efrat; Shin, Yong-Il; Kim, Yun-Hee; Choi, SeongHye; Jung, San; Lee, Yeong-Bae; Sinanović, Osman; Levine, Deborah A; Schlesinger, Ilana; Mead, Gillian; Milošević, Vuk; Leys, Didier; Hagberg, Guri; Ursin, Marie Helene; Teuschl, Yvonne; Prokopenko, Semyon; Mozheyko, Elena; Bezdenezhnykh, Anna; Matz, Karl; Aleksić, Vuk; Muresanu, DafinFior; Korczyn, Amos D; Bornstein, Natan M

    2017-01-18

    Post-stroke dementia (PSD) or post-stroke cognitive impairment (PSCI) may affect up to one third of stroke survivors. Various definitions of PSCI and PSD have been described. We propose PSD as a label for any dementia following stroke in temporal relation. Various tools are available to screen and assess cognition, with few PSD-specific instruments. Choice will depend on purpose of assessment, with differing instruments needed for brief screening (e.g., Montreal Cognitive Assessment) or diagnostic formulation (e.g., NINDS VCI battery). A comprehensive evaluation should include assessment of pre-stroke cognition (e.g., using Informant Questionnaire for Cognitive Decline in the Elderly), mood (e.g., using Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), and functional consequences of cognitive impairments (e.g., using modified Rankin Scale). A large number of biomarkers for PSD, including indicators for genetic polymorphisms, biomarkers in the cerebrospinal fluid and in the serum, inflammatory mediators, and peripheral microRNA profiles have been proposed. Currently, no specific biomarkers have been proven to robustly discriminate vulnerable patients ('at risk brains') from those with better prognosis or to discriminate Alzheimer's disease dementia from PSD. Further, neuroimaging is an important diagnostic tool in PSD. The role of computerized tomography is limited to demonstrating type and location of the underlying primary lesion and indicating atrophy and severe white matter changes. Magnetic resonance imaging is the key neuroimaging modality and has high sensitivity and specificity for detecting pathological changes, including small vessel disease. Advanced multi-modal imaging includes diffusion tensor imaging for fiber tracking, by which changes in networks can be detected. Quantitative imaging of cerebral blood flow and metabolism by positron emission tomography can differentiate between vascular dementia and degenerative dementia and show the interaction between

  4. Stroke bricks - spatial brain regions to assess ischemic stroke localization.

    PubMed

    Ciszek, Bogdan; Jóźwiak, Rafał; Sobieszczuk, Ewa; Przelaskowski, Artur; Skadorwa, Tymon

    2017-03-29

    Computer-aided analysis of non-contrast CT (NCCT) images for rapid diagnosis of ischemic stroke is based on the augmented visualization of evolving ischemic lesions. Computerized support of NCCT often leads to overinterpretation of ischemic areas, thus it is of great interest to provide neurologically verified regions in order to improve accuracy of subsequent radiological assessment. We propose Stroke Bricks (StBr) as an arbitrary spatial division of brain tissue into the regions associated with specific clinical symptoms of ischemic stroke. Neurological stroke deficit is formally translated into respective areas of possible ischemic lesions. StBr were designed according to formalized mapping of neurological symptoms and were attributed to the uniquely defined areas of impaired blood supply. StBr concept may be useful for an integrated radiological CT-based assessment of suspected stroke cases or can be included into computer-aided tools to optimize the evaluation of stroke site and its extent. These data in turn are appropriable for further diagnosis, predicting the therapeutic outcome as well as for patients' qualification for an appropriate form of reperfusion therapy. The usefulness of Stroke Bricks was illustrated in the case studies.

  5. Strategies for stroke rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Dobkin, Bruce H

    2014-01-01

    Rehabilitation after hemiplegic stroke has typically relied on the training of patients in compensatory strategies. The translation of neuroscientific research into care has led to new approaches and renewed promise for better outcomes. Improved motor control can progress with task-specific training incorporating increased use of proximal and distal movements during intensive practice of real-world activities. Functional gains are incorrectly said to plateau by 3–6 months. Many patients retain latent sensorimotor function that can be realised any time after stroke with a pulse of goal-directed therapy. The amount of practice probably best determines gains for a given level of residual movement ability. Clinicians should encourage patients to build greater strength, speed, endurance, and precision of multijoint movements on tasks that increase independence and enrich daily activity. Imaging tools may help clinicians determine the capacity of residual networks to respond to a therapeutic approach and help establish optimal dose-response curves for training. Promising adjunct approaches include practice with robotic devices or in a virtual environment, electrical stimulation to increase cortical excitability during training, and drugs to optimise molecular mechanisms for learning. Biological strategies for neural repair may augment rehabilitation in the next decade. PMID:15324721

  6. [Neurorehabilitation after stroke].

    PubMed

    Freimüller, Manfred; Fheodoroff, Klemens

    2003-01-01

    After stroke most patients need to undergo extensive neurological and neuropsychological rehabilitation (neurorehabilitation). It is important to have an individual treatment programme that takes into account that the stroke patient is impaired in terms of his receptive skills, his capacity to act and his personal integrity. Based on the "phase model" of the Austrian Society for Neurological Rehabilitation (OGNR) individual goals have to be agreed and measures have to be taken. After maintaining the vital functions and a stable vegetative state, the remaining abilities have to be stimulated, functions have to be regained and deficits have to be compensated. An interdisciplinary neurological rehabilitation team has, for example, the following responsibilities: treatment of impaired motor skills and balance, treatment of swallowing and breathing impairments, training of activities of daily living, and special concepts for the treatment of cognitive deficits and impaired behaviour. A decisive factor for rehabilitation success is the relationship between therapists and patients and their relatives/carers. Preparation for independent or care-managed life after inpatient rehabilitation is of paramount importance, this means organization of continuing out-patient treatment, out-patient care management, as well as measurement and documentation of rehabilitation success. Regaining quality of life is an active process of analysing and working on the remaining activity limitations and participation restrictions in society. The work of the interdisciplinary neurological rehabilitation team contributes decisively to this process.

  7. Influence of bright light exposure for several hours during the daytime on cutaneous vasodilatation and local sweating induced by an exercise heat load.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, S; Tokura, H

    1998-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of exposure to differing light intensities for several hours during the daytime on the cutaneous vasodilatation and local forearm sweat rate induced by exercise. Seven healthy female subjects were exposed to bright light of 6000 lux (bright) or dim light of 100 lux (dim) during the daytime between 0900 hours to 1330 hours, followed by exposure to 150 lux until the test was over at 1600 hours. They spent their time in neutral conditions (29 degrees C, 40% relative humidity) from 0900 hours to 1500 hours, and then exercised on a cycle ergometer for 30 min at 50% maximal physical work capacity. Average tympanic temperatures were significantly lower in bright than in dim from 1133 hours to 1430 hours. The onset of cutaneous vasodilatation and local forearm sweating occurred at significantly lower tympanic temperature (Tty) during exercise after bright than after dim. After exercise, the cessation of forearm sweating and the rapid change of skin blood flow occurred at significantly lower Tty after bright than after dim. It was concluded that exposure to bright light over several hours during the daytime could reduce Tty and shift the threshold Tty for cutaneous vasodilatation and forearm sweating to a lower level.

  8. Hereditary cerebral small vessel disease and stroke.

    PubMed

    Søndergaard, Christian Baastrup; Nielsen, Jørgen Erik; Hansen, Christine Krarup; Christensen, Hanne

    2017-04-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease is considered hereditary in about 5% of patients and is characterized by lacunar infarcts and white matter hyperintensities on MRI. Several monogenic hereditary diseases causing cerebral small vessel disease and stroke have been identified. The purpose of this systematic review is to provide a guide for determining when to consider molecular genetic testing in patients presenting with small vessel disease and stroke. CADASIL, CARASIL, collagen type IV mutations (including PADMAL), retinal vasculopathy with cerebral leukodystrophy, Fabry disease, hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis, and forkhead box C1 mutations are described in terms of genetics, pathology, clinical manifestation, imaging, and diagnosis. These monogenic disorders are often characterized by early-age stroke, but also by migraine, mood disturbances, vascular dementia and often gait disturbances. Some also present with extra-cerebral manifestations such as microangiopathy of the eyes and kidneys. Many present with clinically recognizable syndromes. Investigations include a thorough family medical history, medical history, neurological examination, neuroimaging, often supplemented by specific examinations e.g of the of vision, retinal changes, as well as kidney and heart function. However molecular genetic analysis is the final gold standard of diagnosis. There are increasing numbers of reports on new monogenic syndromes causing cerebral small vessel disease. Genetic counseling is important. Enzyme replacement therapy is possible in Fabry disease, but treatment options remain overall very limited.

  9. Mexican Americans with Atrial Fibrillation have More Recurrent Strokes than Non-Hispanic Whites

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, J.R.; Zahuranec, D.B.; Lisabeth, L.D.; Sánchez, B.N.; Skolarus, L.E.; Mendizabal, J.E.; Smith, M.A.; Garcia, N.M.; Morgenstern, L.B.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose Atrial fibrillation is a common cause of stroke with a known preventative treatment. We compared post-stroke recurrence and survival in Mexican Americans (MAs) and non-Hispanic whites (NHWs) with atrial fibrillation in a population-based study. Methods Using surveillance methods from the Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi (BASIC) Project, cases of ischemic stroke/TIA with atrial fibrillation were prospectively identified January 2000-June 2008. Recurrent stroke and all-cause mortality were compared by ethnicity with survival analysis methods. Results A total of 236 patients were available (88 MA, 148 NHW). MAs were younger than NHWs, with no ethnic differences in severity of the first stroke or proportion discharged on warfarin. MAs had a higher risk of stroke recurrence than NHWs (Kaplan Meier estimates of survival free of stroke recurrence risk at 28-days and 1-year were 0.99 and 0.85 in MAs and 0.98 and 0.96 in NHWs; p=0.01, log-rank test), which persisted despite adjustment for age and gender (hazard ratio 2.46, 95% CI: 1.19, 5.11). Severity of the recurrent stroke was higher in MAs than in NHWs (p=0.02). There was no ethnic difference in survival after stroke in unadjusted analysis or after adjusting for demographics and clinical factors (hazard ratio 1.03, 95% CI: 0.63–1.67). Conclusions MAs with atrial fibrillation have a higher stroke recurrence risk and more severe recurrences than NHWs, but no difference in all-cause mortality. Aggressive stroke prevention measures focused on MAs are warranted. PMID:20829515

  10. Basic Land Drills for Swimming Stroke Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Teaching swimming strokes can be a challenging task in physical education. The purpose of the article is to introduce 12 on land drills that can be utilized to facilitate the learning of swimming strokes, including elementary back stroke, sidestroke, front crawl, back stroke, breaststroke, and butterfly. Each drill consists of four components…

  11. Migraine and Stroke: “Vascular” Comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Guidetti, Donata; Rota, Eugenia; Morelli, Nicola; Immovilli, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Several comorbidities are associated to migraine. Recent meta-analyses have consistently demonstrated a relationship between migraine and stroke, which is well-defined for ischemic stroke and migraine with aura (MA), even stronger in females on oral contraceptives or smokers. However, there seems to be no clear-cut association between stroke in migraineurs and the common vascular risk factors, at least in the young adult population. Migraineurs also run an increased risk of hemorrhagic stroke, while the association between migraine and cardiovascular disease remains poorly defined. Another aspect is the relationship between migraine and the presence of silent brain lesions. It has been demonstrated that there is an increased frequency of ischemic lesions in the white matter of migraineurs, especially silent infarcts in the posterior circulation territory in patients with at least 10 attacks per month. Although there is a higher prevalence of patent foramen ovale (PFO) in migraineurs, the relationship between migraine and PFO remains controversial and PFO closure is not a recommended procedure to prevent migraine. As an increased frequency of cervical artery dissections has been observed in migrainous patients, it has been hypothesized that migraine may represent a predisposing factor for cervical artery dissection. There still remains the question as to whether migraine should be considered a true “vascular disease” or if the comorbidity between migraine and cerebrovascular disease may have underlying shared risk factors or pathophysiological mechanisms. Although further studies are required to clarify this issue, current evidence supports a clinical management where MA patients should be screened for other concomitant vascular risk factors and treated accordingly. PMID:25339937

  12. Direct oral anticoagulants: key considerations for use to prevent stroke in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Ment, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia worldwide. Strokes that occur as a complication of AF are usually more severe and associated with a higher disability or morbidity and mortality rate compared with non-AF-related strokes. The risk of stroke in AF is dependent on several risk factors; AF itself acts as an independent risk factor for stroke. The combination of effective anticoagulation therapy, risk stratification (based on stroke risk scores, such as CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc), and recommendations provided by guidelines is essential for decreasing the risk of stroke in patients with AF. Although effective in preventing the occurrence of stroke, vitamin K antagonists (VKAs; eg, warfarin) are associated with several limitations. Therefore, direct oral anticoagulants, such as apixaban, dabigatran etexilate, edoxaban, and rivaroxaban, have emerged as an alternative to the VKAs for stroke prevention in patients with nonvalvular AF. Compared with the VKAs, these agents have more favorable pharmacological characteristics and, unlike the VKAs, they are given at fixed doses without the need for routine coagulation monitoring. It remains important that physicians use these direct oral anticoagulants responsibly to ensure optimal safety and effectiveness. This article provides an overview of the existing data on the direct oral anticoagulants, focusing on management protocols for aiding physicians to optimize anticoagulant therapy in patients with nonvalvular AF, particularly in special patient populations (eg, those with renal impairment) and other specific clinical situations. PMID:26089678

  13. Direct oral anticoagulants: key considerations for use to prevent stroke in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Ment, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia worldwide. Strokes that occur as a complication of AF are usually more severe and associated with a higher disability or morbidity and mortality rate compared with non-AF-related strokes. The risk of stroke in AF is dependent on several risk factors; AF itself acts as an independent risk factor for stroke. The combination of effective anticoagulation therapy, risk stratification (based on stroke risk scores, such as CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc), and recommendations provided by guidelines is essential for decreasing the risk of stroke in patients with AF. Although effective in preventing the occurrence of stroke, vitamin K antagonists (VKAs; e.g., warfarin) are associated with several limitations. Therefore, direct oral anticoagulants, such as apixaban, dabigatran etexilate, edoxaban, and rivaroxaban, have emerged as an alternative to the VKAs for stroke prevention in patients with nonvalvular AF. Compared with the VKAs, these agents have more favorable pharmacological characteristics and, unlike the VKAs, they are given at fixed doses without the need for routine coagulation monitoring. It remains important that physicians use these direct oral anticoagulants responsibly to ensure optimal safety and effectiveness. This article provides an overview of the existing data on the direct oral anticoagulants, focusing on management protocols for aiding physicians to optimize anticoagulant therapy in patients with nonvalvular AF, particularly in special patient populations (e.g., those with renal impairment) and other specific clinical situations.

  14. Assessing executive abilities following acute stroke with the trail making test and digit span.

    PubMed

    Tamez, Elaine; Myerson, Joel; Morris, Lucy; White, Desirée A; Baum, Carolyn; Connor, Lisa Tabor

    2011-01-01

    The Trail Making Test and Digit Span are neuropsychological tests widely used to assess executive abilities following stroke. The Trails B and Digits Backward conditions of these tests are thought to be more sensitive to executive impairment related to frontal lobe dysfunction than the Trails A and Digits Forward conditions. Trails B and Digits Backward are also thought to be more sensitive to brain damage in general. Data from the Stroke and Lesion Registry maintained by the Washington University Cognitive Rehabilitation Research Group were analyzed to compare the effects of frontal versus nonfrontal strokes and to assess the effects of stroke severity. Results showed that the performance of patients with frontal and nonfrontal strokes was comparable in each condition of both the Trail Making Test and Digit Span, providing no support for the widely held belief that Trails B and Digits Backward are more sensitive to frontal lobe damage. Further, Trails A was as strongly correlated with stroke severity as Trails B, whereas Digits Backward was more strongly correlated with stroke severity than Digits Forward. Overall, the Trail Making Test and Digit Span are sensitive to brain damage but do not differentiate between patients with frontal versus nonfrontal stroke.

  15. Stroke rehabilitation: an international perspective.

    PubMed

    Teasell, Robert; Meyer, Matthew J; McClure, Andrew; Pan, Cheng; Murie-Fernandez, Manuel; Foley, Norine; Salter, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    There is a revolution underway in stroke rehabilitation. International comparative studies coupled with an impressive evidence base have provided a platform from which an ideal system for stroke rehabilitation can be envisioned. Using the concepts of structure and process of care, different systems of stroke rehabilitation can be compared and evaluated against best evidence. Two structures of care are examined: specialized interdisciplinary stroke rehabilitation units and outpatient programs. Although specialized interdisciplinary stroke rehabilitation units remain the "gold standard" of care, access to them is often limited. Outpatient programs are essential to stroke rehabilitation systems of care; however, while some countries are investing in outpatient programs, others are scaling back. Even though structures of care have been shown to affect processes of care, it is the processes of care that have proven to be more influential in altering patient outcomes. Four key processes of care are examined: time to admission, intensity of therapy, task-specific therapy, and discharge planning. Within international stroke rehabilitation systems, differences in these processes have resulted in significant differences in outcomes. This allows for "real-world" comparisons of how differing processes affect patient outcomes. Those systems whose structures and processes of care best reflect current best evidence appear to achieve better outcomes.

  16. Editorial for the Third Pangu Stroke Conference.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Chen, Jun; Ji, Xunming; Xi, Guohua; Zhang, John

    2015-10-01

    The Pangu Stroke Conference has been held annually in China since 2012 and is based on the successful templates of the Princeton Stroke Conference in the United States and the Marburg Conference on Cerebral Ischemia in Germany. All participants in the Pangu Stroke Conference are expert stroke clinicians or stroke basic science researchers of Chinese origin. This conference promotes collaboration between clinicians and basic science researchers and between stroke researchers in mainland China and other parts of the world. The Pangu Stroke Conference fosters translational stroke research, discussions of stroke research milestones, and proposals for future directions. Some of the keynote presentations in the third Pangu Stroke Conference are included in this special issue.

  17. Peripheral Frequency of CD4+ CD28− Cells in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Tuttolomondo, Antonino; Pecoraro, Rosaria; Casuccio, Alessandra; Di Raimondo, Domenico; Buttà, Carmelo; Clemente, Giuseppe; Corte, Vittoriano della; Guggino, Giuliana; Arnao, Valentina; Maida, Carlo; Simonetta, Irene; Maugeri, Rosario; Squatrito, Rosario; Pinto, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract CD4+ CD28− T cells also called CD28 null cells have been reported as increased in the clinical setting of acute coronary syndrome. Only 2 studies previously analyzed peripheral frequency of CD28 null cells in subjects with acute ischemic stroke but, to our knowledge, peripheral frequency of CD28 null cells in each TOAST subtype of ischemic stroke has never been evaluated. We hypothesized that CD4+ cells and, in particular, the CD28 null cell subset could show a different degree of peripheral percentage in subjects with acute ischemic stroke in relation to clinical subtype and severity of ischemic stroke. The aim of our study was to analyze peripheral frequency of CD28 null cells in subjects with acute ischemic stroke in relation to TOAST diagnostic subtype, and to evaluate their relationship with scores of clinical severity of acute ischemic stroke, and their predictive role in the diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke and diagnostic subtype We enrolled 98 consecutive subjects admitted to our recruitment wards with a diagnosis of ischemic stroke. As controls we enrolled 66 hospitalized patients without a diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke. Peripheral frequency of CD4+ and CD28 null cells has been evaluated with a FACS Calibur flow cytometer. Subjects with acute ischemic stroke had a significantly higher peripheral frequency of CD4+ cells and CD28 null cells compared to control subjects without acute ischemic stroke. Subjects with cardioembolic stroke had a significantly higher peripheral frequency of CD4+ cells and CD28 null cells compared to subjects with other TOAST subtypes. We observed a significant relationship between CD28 null cells peripheral percentage and Scandinavian Stroke Scale and NIHSS scores. ROC curve analysis showed that CD28 null cell percentage may be useful to differentiate between stroke subtypes. These findings seem suggest a possible role for a T-cell component also in acute ischemic stroke clinical setting showing a different

  18. Warning Signs and Symptoms of Heat-Related Illness

    MedlinePlus

    ... continues, seek medical attention immediately. Heat Stroke High body temperature (above 103°F)* Hot, red, dry or moist ... person to a cooler environment. Reduce the person's body temperature with cool cloths or even a bath. Do ...

  19. Atrial fibrillation and silent stroke: links, risks, and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Hahne, Kathrin; Mönnig, Gerold; Samol, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia, with a projected number of 1 million affected subjects in Germany. Changes in age structure of the Western population allow for the assumption that the number of concerned people is going to be doubled, maybe tripled, by the year 2050. Large epidemiological investigations showed that AF leads to a significant increase in mortality and morbidity. Approximately one-third of all strokes are caused by AF and, due to thromboembolic cause, these strokes are often more severe than those caused by other etiologies. Silent brain infarction is defined as the presence of cerebral infarction in the absence of corresponding clinical symptomatology. Progress in imaging technology simplifies diagnostic procedures of these lesions and leads to a large amount of diagnosed lesions, but there is still no final conclusion about frequency, risk factors, and clinical relevance of these infarctions. The prevalence of silent strokes in patients with AF is higher compared to patients without AF, and several studies reported high incidence rates of silent strokes after AF ablation procedures. While treatment strategies to prevent clinically apparent strokes in patients with AF are well investigated, the role of anticoagulatory treatment for prevention of silent infarctions is unclear. This paper summarizes developments in diagnosis of silent brain infarction and its context to AF. PMID:27022272

  20. Physical fitness training in Subacute Stroke (PHYS-STROKE) - study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Given the rising number of strokes worldwide, and the large number of individuals left with disabilities after stroke, novel strategies to reduce disability, increase functions in the motor and the cognitive domains, and improve quality of life are of major importance. Physical activity is a promising intervention to address these challenges but, as yet, there is no study demonstrating definite outcomes. Our objective is to assess whether additional treatment in the form of physical fitness-based training for patients early after stroke will provide benefits in terms of functional outcomes, in particular gait speed and the Barthel Index (co-primary outcome measures) reflecting activities of daily living (ADL). We will gather secondary functional outcomes as well as mechanistic parameters in an exploratory approach. Methods/Design Our phase III randomised controlled trial will recruit 215 adults with moderate to severe limitations of walking and ADL 5 to 45 days after stroke onset. Participants will be stratified for the prognostic variables of “centre”, “age”, and “stroke severity”, and randomly assigned to one of two groups. The interventional group receives physical fitness training delivered as supported or unsupported treadmill training (cardiovascular active aerobic training; five times per week, over 4 weeks; each session 50 minutes; total of 20 additional physical fitness training sessions) in addition to standard rehabilitation treatment. The control intervention consists of relaxation sessions (non-cardiovascular active; five times per week week, over 4 weeks; each session 50 minutes) in addition to standard rehabilitation treatment. Co-primary efficacy endpoints will be gait speed (in m/s, 10 m walk) and the Barthel Index (100 points total) at 3 months post-stroke, compared to baseline measurements. Secondary outcomes include standard measures of quality of life, sleep and mood, cognition, arm function, maximal oxygen uptake

  1. Ethical dilemmas around the dying patient with stroke: a qualitative interview study with team members on stroke units in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Helene; Andersson, Gisela; Olsson, Louise; Milberg, Anna; Friedrichsen, Maria

    2014-06-01

    In Sweden, individuals affected by severe stroke are treated in specialized stroke units. In these units, patients are attended by a multiprofessional team with a focus on care in the acute phase of stroke, rehabilitation phase, and palliative phase. Caring for patients with such a large variety in condition and symptoms might be an extra challenge for the team. Today, there is a lack of knowledge in team experiences of the dilemmas that appear and the consequences that emerge. Therefore, the purpose of this article was to study ethical dilemmas, different approaches, and what consequences they had among healthcare professionals working with the dying patients with stroke in acute stroke units. Forty-one healthcare professionals working in a stroke team were interviewed either in focus groups or individually. The data were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using content analysis. The ethical dilemmas that appeared were depending on "nondecisions" about palliative care or discontinuation of treatments. The lack of decision made the team members act based on their own individual skills, because of the absence of common communication tools. When a decision was made, the healthcare professionals had "problems holding to the decision." The devised and applied plans could be revalued, which was described as a setback to nondecisions again. The underlying problem and theme was "communication barriers," a consequence related to the absence of common skills and consensus among the value system. This study highlights the importance of palliative care knowledge and skills, even for patients experiencing severe stroke. To make a decision and to hold on to that is a presupposition in creating a credible care plan. However, implementing a common set of values based on palliative care with symptom control and quality of life might minimize the risk of the communication barrier that may arise and increases the ability to create a healthcare that is meaningful and dignified.

  2. Imaging of prehospital stroke therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Michelle P; Sanossian, Nerses; Liebeskind, David S

    2016-01-01

    Despite significant quality improvement efforts to streamline in-hospital acute stroke care in the conventional model, there remain inherent layers of treatment delays, which could be eliminated with prehospital diagnostics and therapeutics administered in a mobile stroke unit. Early diagnosis using Telestroke and neuroimaging while in the ambulance may enable targeted routing to hospitals with specialized care, which will likely improve patient outcomes. Key clinical trials in Telestroke, mobile stroke units with prehospital neuroimaging capability, prehospital ultrasound and co-administration of various classes of neuroprotectives, antiplatelets and antithrombin agents with intravenous thrombolysis are discussed in this article. PMID:26308602

  3. [Cerebrolysin for acute ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    iganshina, L E; Abakumova, T R

    2013-01-01

    The review discusses existing evidence of benefits and risks of cerebrolysin--a mixture of low-molecular-weight peptides and amino acids derived from pigs' brain tissue with proposed neuroprotective and neurotrophic properties, for acute ischemic stroke. The review presents results of systematic search and analysis of randomised clinical trials comparing cerebrolysin with placebo in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Only one trial was selected as meeting quality criteria. No difference in death and adverse events between cerebrolysin and placebo was established. The authors conclude about insufficiency of evidence to evaluate the effect of cerebrolysin on survival and dependency in people with acute ischemic stroke.

  4. Stroke Rehabilitation using Virtual Environments

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Michael J.; Knutson, Jayme; Chae, John

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis This review covers the rationale, mechanisms, and availability of commercially available virtual environment-based interventions for stroke rehabilitation. It describes interventions for motor, speech, cognitive, and sensory dysfunction. Also discussed are the important features and mechanisms that allow virtual environments to facilitate motor relearning. A common challenge facing the field is inability to translate success in small trials to efficacy in larger populations. The heterogeneity of stroke pathophysiology has been blamed and experts advocate for the study of multimodal approaches. Therefore, this article also introduces a framework to help define new therapy combinations that may be necessary to address stroke heterogeneity. PMID:26522910

  5. Strokes in young adults: epidemiology and prevention.

    PubMed

    Smajlović, Dževdet

    2015-01-01

    Strokes in young adults are reported as being uncommon, comprising 10%-15% of all stroke patients. However, compared with stroke in older adults, stroke in the young has a disproportionately large economic impact by leaving victims disabled before their most productive years. Recent publications report an increased incidence of stroke in young adults. This is important given the fact that younger stroke patients have a clearly increased risk of death compared with the general population. The prevalence of standard modifiable vascular risk factors in young stroke patients is different from that in older patients. Modifiable risk factors for stroke, such as dyslipidemia, smoking, and hypertension, are highly prevalent in the young stroke population, with no significant difference in geographic, climatic, nutritional, lifestyle, or genetic diversity. The list of potential stroke etiologies among young adults is extensive. Strokes of undetermined and of other determined etiology are the most common types among young patients according to TOAST (Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment) criteria. Prevention is the primary treatment strategy aimed at reducing morbidity and mortality related to stroke. Therefore, primary prevention is very important with regard to stroke in young adults, and aggressive treatment of risk factors for stroke, such as hypertension, smoking, and dyslipidemia, is essential. The best form of secondary stroke prevention is directed toward stroke etiology as well as treatment of additional risk factors. However, there is a lack of specific recommendations and guidelines for stroke management in young adults. In conclusion, strokes in young adults are a major public health problem and further research, with standardized methodology, is needed in order to give us more precise epidemiologic data. Given the increasing incidence of stroke in the young, there is an objective need for more research in order to reduce this burden.

  6. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as a risk factor for stroke-related seizures.

    PubMed

    De Reuck, J; Proot, P; Van Maele, G

    2007-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a risk factor for cardiovascular disorders and different types of stroke. The present retrospective study investigates whether COPD is also a risk factor for the development of seizures in stroke patients. The study population consisted of 237 patients with stroke-related seizures. The control population was composed of 939 patients, admitted for a stroke between 2002 and 2004 and who did not develop epileptic spells on a follow up of 2 years. The stroke type and aetiology, and the vascular risk factors, including COPD, were compared. The seizure patients were older (P = 0.009) and had more arterial hypertension (P = 0.046) and cardiac-embolic strokes (P = 0.045) than the control group. On logistic regression only partial anterior circulation syndrome/infarct (PACS/I) and COPD (P < 0.001) emerged as independent risk factors for the development of seizures in stroke patients. The occurrence of seizures was not related to the severity of the COPD or to its type of treatment. The present study confirms that seizures occur most frequently in patients with a PACS/I. Although we were unable to demonstrate why COPD is a risk factor for seizures in stroke patients, its frequent associated nocturnal oxygen desaturation seems to be the most plausible explanation. Further prospective are needed to assess the role of COPD as a possible independent risk factor for stroke-related seizures.

  7. Obesity paradox in stroke – Myth or reality? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Oesch, Lisa; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Arnold, Marcel; Sarikaya, Hakan

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose Both stroke and obesity show an increasing incidence worldwide. While obesity is an established risk factor for stroke, its influence on outcome in ischemic stroke is less clear. Many studies suggest a better prognosis in obese patients after stroke (“obesity paradox”). This review aims at assessing the clinical outcomes of obese patients after stroke by performing a systematic literature search. Methods The reviewers searched MEDLINE from inception to December 2015. Studies were eligible if they included outcome comparisons in stroke patients with allocation to body weight. Results Twenty-five studies (299’750 patients) were included and none was randomised. Ten of 12 studies (162’921 patients) reported significantly less mortality rates in stroke patients with higher BMI values. Seven of 9 studies (92’718 patients) ascertained a favorable effect of excess body weight on non-fatal outcomes (good clinical outcome, recurrence of vascular events). Six studies (85’042 patients) indicated contradictory results after intravenous thrombolysis (IVT), however. Several methodological limitations were observed in major part of studies (observational study design, inaccuracy of BMI in reflecting obesity, lacking body weight measurement, selection bias, survival bias). Conclusion Most observational data indicate a survival benefit of obese patients after stroke, but a number of methodological concerns exist. No obesity paradox was observed in patients after IVT. There is a need for well-designed randomized controlled trials assessing the effects of weight reduction on stroke risk in obese patients. PMID:28291782

  8. The role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and its single nucleotide polymorphisms in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Kotlęga, Dariusz; Peda, Barbara; Zembroń-Łacny, Agnieszka; Gołąb-Janowska, Monika; Nowacki, Przemysław

    2017-03-06

    Stroke is the main cause of motoric and neuropsychological disability in adults. Recent advances in research into the role of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor in neuroplasticity, neuroprotection and neurogenesis might provide important information for the development of new poststroke-rehabilitation strategies. It plays a role as a mediator in motor learning and rehabilitation after stroke. Concentrations of BDNF are lower in acute ischemic-stroke patients compared to controls. Lower levels of BDNF are correlated with an increased risk of stroke, worse functional outcomes and higher mortality. BDNF signalling is dependent on the genetic variation which could affect an individual's response to recovery after stroke. Several single nucleotide polymorphisms of the BDNF gene have been studied with regard to stroke patients, but most papers analyse the rs6265 which results in a change from valine to methionine in the precursor protein. Subsequently a reduction in BDNF activity is observed. There are studies indicating the role of this polymorphism in brain plasticity, functional and morphological changes in the brain. It may affect the risk of ischemic stroke, post-stroke outcomes and the efficacy of the rehabilitation process within physical exercise and transcranial magnetic stimulation. There is a consistent trend of Met alleles' being connected with worse outcomes and prognoses after stroke. However, there is no satisfactory data confirming the importance of Met allele in stroke epidemiology and the post-stroke rehabilitation process. We present the current data on the role of BDNF and polymorphisms of the BDNF gene in stroke patients, concentrating on human studies.

  9. Cerebral infarction in diabetes: Clinical pattern, stroke subtypes, and predictors of in-hospital mortality

    PubMed Central

    Arboix, Adrià; Rivas, Antoni; García-Eroles, Luis; de Marcos, Lourdes; Massons, Joan; Oliveres, Montserrat

    2005-01-01

    Background To compare the characteristics and prognostic features of ischemic stroke in patients with diabetes and without diabetes, and to determine the independent predictors of in-hospital mortality in people with diabetes and ischemic stroke. Methods Diabetes was diagnosed in 393 (21.3%) of 1,840 consecutive patients with cerebral infarction included in a prospective stroke registry over a 12-year period. Demographic characteristics, cardiovascular risk factors, clinical events, stroke subtypes, neuroimaging data, and outcome in ischemic stroke patients with and without diabetes were compared. Predictors of in-hospital mortality in diabetic patients with ischemic stroke were assessed by multivariate analysis. Results People with diabetes compared to people without diabetes presented more frequently atherothrombotic stroke (41.2% vs 27%) and lacunar infarction (35.1% vs 23.9%) (P < 0.01). The in-hospital mortality in ischemic stroke patients with diabetes was 12.5% and 14.6% in those without (P = NS). Ischemic heart disease, hyperlipidemia, subacute onset, 85 years old or more, atherothrombotic and lacunar infarcts, and thalamic topography were independently associated with ischemic stroke in patients with diabetes, whereas predictors of in-hospital mortality included the patient's age, decreased consciousness, chronic nephropathy, congestive heart failure and atrial fibrillation Conclusion Ischemic stroke in people with diabetes showed a different clinical pattern from those without diabetes, with atherothrombotic stroke and lacunar infarcts being more frequent. Clinical factors indicative of the severity of ischemic stroke available at onset have a predominant influence upon in-hospital mortality and may help clinicians to assess prognosis more accurately. PMID:15833108

  10. Associations between DSM-IV mental disorders and subsequent non-fatal, self-reported stroke

    PubMed Central

    Swain, Nicola R.; Lim, Carmen C.W.; Levinson, Daphna; Fiestas, Fabian; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Moskalewicz, Jacek; Lepine, Jean-Pierre; Posada-Villa, Jose; Haro, Josep Maria; Medina-Mora, María Elena; Xavier, Miguel; Iwata, Noboru; de Jonge, Peter; Bruffaerts, Ronny; O’Neill, Siobhan; Kessler, Ron C.; Scott, Kate M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine the associations between a wide range of mental disorders and subsequent onset of stroke. Lifecourse timing of stroke was examined using retrospectively reconstructed data from cross-sectional surveys. Methods Data from the World Mental Health Surveys were accessed. This data was collected from general population surveys over 17 countries of 87,250 adults. The Composite International Diagnostic Interview retrospectively assessed lifetime prevalence and age at onset of DSM-IV mental disorders. A weighted subsample (n = 45,288), was used for analysis in the present study. Survival analyses estimated associations between first onset of mental disorders and subsequent stroke onset. Results Bivariate models showed that 12/16 mental disorders were associated with subsequent stroke onset (ORs ranging from 1.6 to 3.8). However, after adjustment for mental disorder comorbidity and smoking, only significant relationships between depression and stroke (OR 1.3) and alcohol abuse and stroke (OR 1.5) remained. Among females, having a bipolar disorder was also associated with increased stroke incidence (OR 2.1). Increasing number of mental disorders was associated with stroke onset in a dose–response fashion (OR 3.3 for 5+ disorders). Conclusions Depression and alcohol abuse may have specific associations with incidence of non-fatal stroke. General severity of psychopathology may be a more important predictor of non-fatal stroke onset. Mental health treatment should be considered as part of stroke risk prevention. Limitations of retrospectively gathered cross sectional surveys design mean further research on the links between mental health and stroke incidence is warranted. PMID:26094010

  11. Early and intermediate prognosis of intravenous thrombolytic therapy in acute ischemic stroke subtypes according to the causative classification of stroke system

    PubMed Central

    Pashapour, Ali; Atalu, Abolfazl; Farhoudi, Mehdi; Taheraghdam, Ali-Akbar; Sadeghi Hokmabadi, Elyar; Sharifipour, Ehsan; NajafiNeshli, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Intravenous thrombolytic therapy has established acceptable results in treating ischemic stroke. However, there is little information on treatment outcome especially in different subtypes. The aim of current study was to evaluate early and intermediate prognosis in intravenous thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke subtypes. Methodology: Forty eligible patients (57.5% male with mean age of 63.18±13.49 years) with definite ischemic stroke who were admitted to emergency department of Imam Reza University Hospital, in the first 180 minutes after occurrence received recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. All investigation findings were recorded and stroke subtypes were determined according to the Causative Classification of Stroke System. Stroke severity forms including modified Rankin Scale (mRS) and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores were recorded for all patients in first, seven and 90 days after stroke and disease outcome was evaluated. Results: The etiology of stroke was large artery atherosclerosis in 20%, cardio-aortic embolism in 45%, small artery occlusion in 17.5% and undetermined causes in 17.5%. NIHSS and mRS scores were significantly improved during time (P < 0.001 in both cases). Three months mortality rate was 25%. Among the etiologies, patients with small artery occlusion and then cardio-aortic embolism had lower NIHSS score at arrival (P = 0.04). Caplan-meier analysis showed that age, sex and symptom to needle time could predict disease outcome. Conclusion: Intravenous thrombolytic therapy is accompanied by good early and intermediate outcome in most patients with ischemic stroke. Small artery occlusion subtype had less disease severity and higher improvement. PMID:24353536

  12. [Post-stroke apathy].

    PubMed

    López-Dóriga Bonnardeaux, Pedro; Andrino Díaz, Nuria

    2016-01-01

    Apathy is a motivational disturbance that can be defined as a quantitative reduction of goal-directed behaviour. Patients present with loss of motivation, concern, interest, and emotional response, resulting in a loss of initiative, decreased interaction with their environment, and a reduced interest in social life. Apathy not only appears to be common in stroke patients, but it has also been related to a wide range of negative consequences for the patients and their caregivers, including poor functional recovery, loss of social independence, and caregiver distress. Clear definition and consensus diagnostic criteria for apathy are needed to accomplish an accurate assessment and an individualised treatment plan. Although there have been reports of successful behavioural therapy treatment of apathetic states, there is a paucity of controlled clinical trials on the efficacy of apathetic behaviours using pharmacotherapy.

  13. Stroke and High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More How High Blood Pressure Can Lead to Stroke Updated:Dec 2,2016 ... content was last reviewed October 2016. High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP • Know Your ...

  14. Effect of a Caregiver's Education Program on Stroke Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate effects of caregiver's education program on their satisfaction, as well as patient functional recovery, performed in addition to daily conventional rehabilitation treatment. Methods Three hundred eleven subjects diagnosed with first-onset stroke and transferred to the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation of Inha University Hospital were surveyed. In 2015, caregivers attended an education program for acute and subacute stroke patients. Patients who received an additional rehabilitation therapy were assigned to the experimental group (n=81), whereas the control group (n=100) consisted of transfer cases in 2014 with only conventional treatment. The experimental group was classified by severity using the Korean version of the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (K-NIHSS), which was administered to all 181 subjects, in addition to, the Korean version of the Mini Mental Status Examination (K-MMSE), a Modified Barthel Index (K-MBI), and the Berg Balance Scale (K-BBS). Caregiver satisfaction and burden before and after education programs were assessed using the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM), as well as family burden and caregiver burnout scales. Results No significant intergroup difference was observed between initial K-NIHSS, K-MMSE, K-BBS, K-MBI scores, and times from admission to transfer. Those with moderate or severe strokes under the experimental condition showed a more significant improvement than the control group as determined by the K-NIHSS and K-BBS, as well as tendential K-MMSE and K-MBI score increases. Satisfaction was significantly greater for family members and formal caregivers of patients with strokes of moderate severity in the experimental group. Conclusion The caregiver's education program for stroke subjects had a positive outcome on patients' functional improvement and caregiver satisfaction. The authors believe that the additional rehabilitation therapy with the education program aids

  15. A Rare Case of Stroke Secondary to Iron Deficiency Anemia in a Young Female Patient

    PubMed Central

    Gopalratnam, Kavitha; Sena, Kanaga; Gupta, Manisha

    2017-01-01

    Ischemic strokes occur when there is a sudden obstruction of an artery supplying blood flow to an area of the brain, leading to a focal neurological deficit. Strokes can be thrombotic or embolic in etiology and are associated with underlying conditions such as hypertension and atherosclerosis. Possible etiologies of strokes include cardioembolic disease, hematologic disorders, connective tissue disorders, and substance abuse or can be cryptogenic. Most stroke cases are seen in patients over 65 years of age. However, about one-fourth of strokes occur in young adults. Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) has been described as a known cause for strokes in children, but very few case reports describe this association in adults. We describe a 20-year-old female who presented with sudden onset left side weakness. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of the brain demonstrated ischemic infarctions. Patient was also found to be severely anemic. Patient had a thorough work-up including Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) of the brain, echocardiogram, and an extensive screen for thrombophilia disorders. This, however, did not demonstrate a clear etiology. As it has been suggested that IDA is a potential cause for stroke, it is possible the stroke in this young patient was attributable to severe IDA. PMID:28348599

  16. Antigen-specific immune reactions to ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Urra, Xabier; Miró, Francesc; Chamorro, Angel; Planas, Anna M.

    2014-01-01

    Brain proteins are detected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood of stroke patients and their concentration is related to the extent of brain damage. Antibodies against brain antigens develop after stroke, suggesting a humoral immune response to the brain injury. Furthermore, induced immune tolerance is beneficial in animal models of cerebral ischemia. The presence of circulating T cells sensitized against brain antigens, and antigen presenting cells (APCs) carrying brain antigens in draining lymphoid tissue of stroke patients support the notion that stroke might induce antigen-specific immune responses. After stroke, brain proteins that are normally hidden from the periphery, inflammatory mediators, and danger signals can exit the brain through several efflux routes. They can reach the blood after leaking out of the damaged blood-brain barrier (BBB) or following the drainage of interstitial fluid to the dural venous sinus, or reach the cervical lymph nodes through the nasal lymphatics following CSF drainage along the arachnoid sheaths of nerves across the nasal submucosa. The route and mode of access of brain antigens to lymphoid tissue could influence the type of response. Central and peripheral tolerance prevents autoimmunity, but the actual mechanisms of tolerance to brain antigens released into the periphery in the presence of inflammation, danger signals, and APCs, are not fully characterized. Stroke does not systematically trigger autoimmunity, but under certain circumstances, such as pronounced systemic inflammation or infection, autoreactive T cells could escape the tolerance controls. Further investigation is needed to elucidate whether antigen-specific immune events could underlie neurological complications impairing recovery from stroke. PMID:25309322

  17. Role of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in stroke rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Pinter, Michaela M; Brainin, Michael

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, efforts have focused on investigating the neurophysiological changes that occur in the brain after stroke, and on developing novel strategies such as additional brain stimulation to enhance sensorimotor and cognitive recovery. In the 1990s, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) was introduced as a therapeutic tool for improving the efficacy of rehabilitation for recovery after stroke. It is evident that disturbances of interhemispheric processes after stroke result in a pathological hyperactivity of the intact hemisphere. The rationale of using rTMS as a complementary therapy is mainly to decrease the cortical excitability in regions that are presumed to hinder optimal recovery by low-frequency rTMS delivered to the unaffected hemisphere, while high-frequency rTMS delivered to the affected hemisphere facilitates cortical excitability. However, the exact mechanisms of how rTMS works are still under investigation. There is a growing body of research in stroke patients investigating the effect of rTMS on facilitating recovery by modifying cortical and subcortical networks. Clinical trials applying rTMS already yielded promising results in improving recovery of sensorimotor and cognitive functions. Altogether, in combination with conventional therapeutic approaches, rTMS has a potential to become a complementary strategy to enhance stroke recovery by modulating the excitability of targeted brain areas. In future studies, emphasis should be placed on selecting patient populations to determine whether treatment response depends on age, lesion acuteness, or stroke severity. Furthermore, it is important to identify parameters optimizing the beneficial effects of rTMS on stroke recovery, and to monitor their long-term effects.

  18. Cardioembolic Stroke: Clinical Features, Specific Cardiac Disorders and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Arboix, Adrià; Alió, Josefina

    2010-01-01

    This article provides the reader with an overview and up-date of clinical features, specific cardiac disorders and prognosis of cardioembolic stroke. Cardioembolic stroke accounts for 14-30% of ischemic strokes and, in general, is a severe condition; patients with cardioembolic infarction are prone to early and long-term stroke recurrence, although recurrences may be preventable by appropriate treatment during the acute phase and strict control at follow-up. Certain clinical features are suggestive of cardioembolic infarction, including sudden onset to maximal deficit, decreased level of consciousness at onset, Wernicke’s aphasia or global aphasia without hemiparesis, a Valsalva manoeuvre at the time of stroke onset, and co-occurrence of cerebral and systemic emboli. Lacunar clinical presentations, a lacunar infarct and especially multiple lacunar infarcts, make cardioembolic origin unlikely. The more common high risk cardioembolic conditions are atrial fibrillation, recent myocardial infarction, mechanical prosthetic valve, dilated myocardiopathy, and mitral rheumatic stenosis. Transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiogram can disclose structural heart diseases. Paroxysmal atrial dysrhyhtmia can be detected by Holter monitoring. In-hospital mortality in cardioembolic stroke (27.3%, in our series) is the highest as compared with other subtypes of cerebral infarction. In our experience, in-hospital mortality in patients with early embolic recurrence (within the first 7 days) was 77%. Patients with alcohol abuse, hypertension, valvular heart disease, nausea and vomiting, and previous cerebral infarction are at increased risk of early recurrent systemic embolization. Secondary prevention with anticoagulants should be started immediately if possible in patients at high risk for recurrent cardioembolic stroke in which contraindications, such as falls, poor compliance, uncontrolled epilepsy or gastrointestinal bleeding are absent. PMID:21804774

  19. Heat pipe array heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, Robert C.

    1987-08-25

    A heat pipe arrangement for exchanging heat between two different temperature fluids. The heat pipe arrangement is in a ounterflow relationship to increase the efficiency of the coupling of the heat from a heat source to a heat sink.

  20. Increased risk of posterior circulation infarcts among ischemic stroke patients with cervical spondylosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chih-Chi; Chung, Chia-Ying; Lee, Tsong-Hai; Chang, Wei-Han; Tang, Simon FT; Pei, Yu-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Background Cervical spondylosis is one of the extrinsic factors causing vertebral artery stenosis. Several case studies have reported compression of the vertebral artery induced by cervical osteophytes that has resulted in posterior circulation infarcts (POCI). However, to the best of our knowledge, no studies have yet analyzed differences in the risk factors and stroke subtypes between ischemic stroke patients with cervical spondylosis and those without. Purpose In the case-controlled study reported here, we analyzed the risk factors and stroke subtypes in ischemic stroke patients with and without cervical spondylosis. Characteristics in all the recruited patients with POCI and non-POCI were further compared to extract other risk factors that could predict the occurrence of POCI. Methods and patients We filtered out ischemic stroke patients with cervical spondylosis (“Stroke+C” group) by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes. We analyzed the data of 38 subjects in the Stroke+C group and 152 sex- and age-comparable ischemic stroke patients without cervical spondylosis (“Stroke−C” group). We recorded the demographic characteristics including sex and age, and stroke risk factors, including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, heart disease, hyperlipidemia, and smoking habits. The stroke classifications were defined by the Oxford Community Stroke Project classification. All subjects were further categorized into POCI or non-POCI groups. The ultrasound findings of the vertebral arteries (