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Sample records for severe hemodynamic alteration

  1. Altered Hemodynamics in the Embryonic Heart Affects Outflow Valve Development

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Vinal; Eberth, John F.; Goodwin, Richard L.; Potts, Jay D.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac valve structure and function are primarily determined during early development. Consequently, abnormally-formed heart valves are the most common type of congenital heart defects. Several adult valve diseases can be backtracked to abnormal valve development, making it imperative to completely understand the process and regulation of heart valve development. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays an important role in the development of heart valves. Though hemodynamics is vital to valve development, its role in regulating EMT is still unknown. In this study, intracardiac hemodynamics were altered by constricting the outflow tract (OFT)/ventricle junction (OVJ) of HH16–17 (Hamilton and Hamburger (HH) Stage 16–17) chicken embryos, ex ovo for 24 h. The constriction created an increase in peak and time-averaged centerline velocity along the OFT without changes to volumetric flow or heart rate. Computational fluid dynamics was used to estimate the level of increased spatially-averaged wall shear stresses on the OFT cushion from AMIRA reconstructions. OFT constriction led to a significant decrease in OFT cushion volume and the number of invaded mesenchyme in the OFT cushion. qPCR analysis revealed altered mRNA expression of a representative panel of genes, vital to valve development, in the OFT cushions from banded hearts. This study indicates the importance of hemodynamics in valve development. PMID:26878022

  2. Hemodynamic alterations in chronically conscious unrestrained diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Carbonell, L F; Salom, M G; Garcia-Estañ, J; Salazar, F J; Ubeda, M; Quesada, T

    1987-05-01

    Important cardiovascular dysfunctions have been described in streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic rats. To determine the influence of these changes on the hemodynamic state and whether insulin treatment can avoid them, different hemodynamic parameters, obtained by the thermodilution method, were studied in STZ-induced (65 mg/kg) diabetic male Wistar rats, as well as in age-control, weight-control, and insulin-treated diabetic ones. All rats were examined in the conscious, unrestrained state 12 wk after induction of diabetes or acidified saline (pH 4.5) injection. At 12 wk of diabetic state most important findings were normotension, high blood volume, bradycardia, increase in stroke volume, cardiac output, and cardiosomatic ratio, and decrease in total peripheral resistance and cardiac contractility and relaxation (dP/dtmax and dP/dtmin of left ventricular pressure curves). The insulin-treated diabetic rats did not show any hemodynamic differences when compared with the control animals. These results suggest that important hemodynamic alterations are present in the chronic diabetic state, possibly conditioning congestive heart failure. These alterations can be prevented by insulin treatment.

  3. Effects of altered cerebral hemodynamics on cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Randolph S

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral hemodynamic impairment has come under examination over the years as an independent cause for cognitive dysfunction, but only recently has the advance of imaging and ultrasound technology permitted a fuller investigation of physiopathology. Beyond the impact of fixed structural lesions such as infarction and white matter hyperintensities, hemodynamic dysfunction, which includes hypoperfusion and altered cerebral autoregulation, may be independently associated with cognitive decline. More importantly, whereas vascular-related structural pathology may produce so-called vascular dementia, disorders of blood flow and blood flow regulation may also present clinically as mild cognitive impairment or even frank dementia, but may in fact be reversible. Hemodynamic effects may occur at the level of the cerebral hemisphere due to restricted flow through a large vessel of the neck or head, at a global level in the setting of cardiac failure, or intrinsically due to dysfunction of the endothelium in the microvasculature. This review surveys clinical, imaging, and physiological evidence for the association between hemodynamic abnormalities at these different levels and cognitive impairment.

  4. Ambient fine particulate matter alters cerebral hemodynamics in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Wellenius, Gregory A; Boyle, Luke D; Wilker, Elissa H; Sorond, Farzaneh A; Coull, Brent A; Koutrakis, Petros; Mittleman, Murray A; Lipsitz, Lewis A

    2013-06-01

    Short-term elevations in fine particulate matter air pollution (PM2.5) are associated with increased risk of acute cerebrovascular events. Evidence from the peripheral circulation suggests that vascular dysfunction may be a central mechanism. However, the effects of PM2.5 on cerebrovascular function and hemodynamics are unknown. We used transcranial Doppler ultrasound to measure beat-to-beat blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery at rest and in response to changes in end-tidal CO2 (cerebral vasoreactivity) and arterial blood pressure (cerebral autoregulation) in 482 participants from the Maintenance of Balance, Independent Living, Intellect, and Zest in the Elderly (MOBILIZE) of Boston study. We used linear mixed effects models with random subject intercepts to evaluate the association between cerebrovascular hemodynamic parameters and mean PM2.5 levels 1 to 28 days earlier adjusting for age, race, medical history, meteorologic covariates, day of week, temporal trends, and season. An interquartile range increase (3.0 µg/m(3)) in mean PM2.5 levels during the previous 28 days was associated with an 8.6% (95% confidence interval, 3.7%-13.8%; P<0.001) higher cerebral vascular resistance and a 7.5% (95% confidence interval, 4.2%-10.6%; P<0.001) lower blood flow velocity at rest. Measures of cerebral vasoreactivity and autoregulation were not associated with PM2.5 levels. In this cohort of community-dwelling seniors, exposure to PM2.5 was associated with higher resting cerebrovascular resistance and lower cerebral blood flow velocity. If replicated, these findings suggest that alterations in cerebrovascular hemodynamics may underlie the increased risk of particle-related acute cerebrovascular events.

  5. Computational Hemodynamic Simulation of Human Circulatory System under Altered Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim. Chang Sung; Kiris, Cetin; Kwak, Dochan

    2003-01-01

    A computational hemodynamics approach is presented to simulate the blood flow through the human circulatory system under altered gravity conditions. Numerical techniques relevant to hemodynamics issues are introduced to non-Newtonian modeling for flow characteristics governed by red blood cells, distensible wall motion due to the heart pulse, and capillary bed modeling for outflow boundary conditions. Gravitational body force terms are added to the Navier-Stokes equations to study the effects of gravity on internal flows. Six-type gravity benchmark problems are originally presented to provide the fundamental understanding of gravitational effects on the human circulatory system. For code validation, computed results are compared with steady and unsteady experimental data for non-Newtonian flows in a carotid bifurcation model and a curved circular tube, respectively. This computational approach is then applied to the blood circulation in the human brain as a target problem. A three-dimensional, idealized Circle of Willis configuration is developed with minor arteries truncated based on anatomical data. Demonstrated is not only the mechanism of the collateral circulation but also the effects of gravity on the distensible wall motion and resultant flow patterns.

  6. Dietary melatonin alters uterine artery hemodynamics in pregnant Holstein heifers.

    PubMed

    Brockus, K E; Hart, C G; Gilfeather, C L; Fleming, B O; Lemley, C O

    2016-04-01

    The objective was to examine uterine artery hemodynamics and maternal serum profiles in pregnant heifers supplemented with dietary melatonin (MEL) or no supplementation (CON). In addition, melatonin receptor-mediated responses in steroid metabolism were examined using a bovine endometrial epithelial culture system. Twenty singleton pregnant Holstein heifers were supplemented with 20 mg of melatonin (n = 10) or no melatonin supplementation (control; n = 10) from days 190 to 262 of gestation. Maternal measurements were recorded on days 180 (baseline), 210, 240, and 262 of gestation. Total uterine blood flow was increased by 25% in the MEL-treated heifers compared with the CON. Concentrations of progesterone were decreased in MEL vs CON heifers. Total serum antioxidant capacity was increased by 43% in MEL-treated heifers when compared with CON. Activity of cytochrome P450 1A, 2C, and superoxide dismutase was increased in bovine endometrial epithelial cells treated with melatonin, whereas the melatonin receptor antagonist, luzindole, negated the increase in cytochrome P450 2C activity. Moreover, estradiol or progesterone treatment altered bovine uterine melatonin receptor expression, which could potentiate the melatonin-mediated responses during late gestation. The observed increase in total uterine blood flow during melatonin supplementation could be related to its antioxidant properties. Compromised pregnancies are typically accompanied by increased oxidative stress; therefore, melatonin could serve as a therapeutic supplementation strategy. This could lead to further fetal programming implications in conjunction with offspring growth and development postnatally.

  7. Clinically significant hemodynamic alterations after propacetamol injection in the emergency department: prevalence and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Bae, June-Il; Ahn, Shin; Lee, Yoon-Seon; Kim, Won Young; Lee, Jae Ho; Oh, Bum Jin; Lim, Kyung Soo

    2017-04-01

    Propacetamol, a water-soluble prodrug form of paracetamol, is hydrolyzed by esterase to generate paracetamol in the blood. Each gram of propacetamol is equal to 0.5 g of paracetamol. It has been reported to cause hypotension in critically ill patients with a fever. We aimed to investigate the hemodynamic effects of propacetamol for the control of fever in patients with diverse severities of illness who were managed in the emergency department (ED). We also aimed to identify clinical factors related to significant hemodynamic alterations in ED patients. This was a retrospective study of 1507 ED patients who received propacetamol. Significant hemodynamic alterations were defined as systolic blood pressure (SBP) <90 mmHg or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) <60 mmHg, or a drop in SBP >30 mmHg, which required treatments with a bolus of fluid or vasopressor administration. Postinfusion SBP and DBP were significantly lower than the preinfusion SBP and DBP. A clinically significant drop in BP occurred in 162 (10.7 %) patients, and interventions were necessary. Among the predictors assessed, congestive heart failure (OR 6.21, 95 % CI 2.67-14.45) and chills (OR 3.10, 95 % CI 2.04-4.70) were independent factors for a significant hemodynamic change. Administration of propacetamol can provoke a reduction in BP in ED patients. This reduction was clinically significant for 10 % of infusions. Clinicians should be aware of this potential deleterious effect, especially in patients with congestive heart failure or who experience chills prior to the administration of propacetamol.

  8. Dietary melatonin alters uterine artery hemodynamics in pregnant holstein heifers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective was to examine uterine artery hemodynamics and maternal serum profiles in pregnant heifers supplemented with dietary melatonin (MEL) or no supplementation (CON). In addition, melatonin receptor–mediated responses in steroid metabolism were examined using a bovine endometrial epithelial...

  9. Altering hemodynamics leads to congenital heart defects (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Stephanie M.; McPheeters, Matthew T.; Wang, Yves T.; Gu, Shi; Doughman, Yong Qiu; Strainic, James P.; Rollins, Andrew M.; Watanabe, Michiko; Jenkins, Michael W.

    2016-03-01

    The role of hemodynamics in early heart development is poorly understood. In order to successfully assess the impact of hemodynamics on development, we need to monitor and perturb blood flow, and quantify the resultant effects on morphology. Here, we have utilized cardiac optical pacing to create regurgitant flow in embryonic hearts and OCT to quantify regurgitation percentage and resultant morphology. Embryonic quail in a shell-less culture were optically paced at 3 Hz (well above the intrinsic rate or 1.33-1.67 Hz) on day 2 of development (3-4 weeks human) for 5 minutes. The pacing fatigued the heart and led to a prolonged period (> 1 hour) of increased regurgitant flow. Embryos were kept alive until day 3 (cardiac looping - 4-5 weeks human) or day 8 (4 chambered heart - 8 weeks human) to quantify resultant morphologic changes with OCT. All paced embryos imaged at day 3 displayed cardiac defects. The extent of regurgitant flow immediately after pacing was correlated with cardiac cushion size 24-hours post pacing (p-value < 0.01) with higher regurgitation leading to smaller cushions. Almost all embryos (16/18) surviving to day 8 exhibited congenital heart defects (CHDs) including 11/18 with valve defects, 5/18 with ventricular septal defects and 5/18 with hypoplastic right ventricles. Our data suggests that regurgitant flow leads to smaller cushions, which develop into abnormal valves and septa. Our model produces similar phenotypes as found in our fetal alcohol syndrome and velo-cardio-facial/DiGeorge syndrome models suggesting that hemodynamics plays a role in these syndromes as well. Utilizing OCT and optical pacing to understand hemodynamics in development is an important step towards determining CHD mechanisms and ultimately developing earlier treatments.

  10. Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Secomb, Timothy W.

    2016-01-01

    A review is presented of the physical principles governing the distribution of blood flow and blood pressure in the vascular system. The main factors involved are the pulsatile driving pressure generated by the heart, the flow characteristics of blood, and the geometric structure and mechanical properties of the vessels. The relationship between driving pressure and flow in a given vessel can be understood by considering the viscous and inertial forces acting on the blood. Depending on the vessel diameter and other physical parameters, a wide variety of flow phenomena can occur. In large arteries, the propagation of the pressure pulse depends on the elastic properties of the artery walls. In the microcirculation, the fact that blood is a suspension of cells strongly influences its flow properties and leads to a non-uniform distribution of hematocrit among microvessels. The forces acting on vessel walls include shear stress resulting from blood flow and circumferential stress resulting from blood pressure. Biological responses to these forces are important in the control of blood flow and the structural remodeling of vessels, and also play a role in major disease processes including hypertension and atherosclerosis. Consideration of hemodynamics is essential for a comprehensive understanding of the functioning of the circulatory system. PMID:27065172

  11. Vascular tracers alter hemodynamics and airway pressure in anesthetized sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Albertine, K.H.; Staub, N.C.

    1986-11-01

    The technique of vascular labeling was developed to mark sites of increased microvascular permeability. We used the vascular labeling technique in anesthetized sheep and found that hemodynamics and airway pressure were adversely affected by intraarterial infusions of two vascular tracers. Monastral blue (nine sheep) immediately caused systemic arterial hypotension, pulmonary arterial hypertension, and bronchoconstriction. All three physiological responses were partially blocked by a cyclooxygenase inhibitor (indomethacin) but not by an H1-antihistamine (chlorpheniramine). Colloidal gold (nine sheep) caused immediate, but less dramatic, pulmonary arterial hypertension which was not attenuated by the blocking agents. We conclude that these two vascular tracers caused detrimental physiological side effects in sheep at the usual doses used to label injured microvessels in other species.

  12. Persistent vascular collagen accumulation alters hemodynamic recovery from chronic hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Tabima, Diana M; Roldan-Alzate, Alejandro; Wang, Zhijie; Hacker, Timothy A; Molthen, Robert C; Chesler, Naomi C

    2012-03-15

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is caused by narrowing and stiffening of the pulmonary arteries that increase pulmonary vascular impedance (PVZ). In particular, small arteries narrow and large arteries stiffen. Large pulmonary artery (PA) stiffness is the best current predictor of mortality from PAH. We have previously shown that collagen accumulation leads to extralobar PA stiffening at high strain (Ooi et al. 2010). We hypothesized that collagen accumulation would increase PVZ, including total pulmonary vascular resistance (Z(0)), characteristic impedance (Z(C)), pulse wave velocity (PWV) and index of global wave reflections (P(b)/P(f)), which contribute to increased right ventricular afterload. We tested this hypothesis by exposing mice unable to degrade type I collagen (Col1a1(R/R)) to 21 days of hypoxia (hypoxia), some of which were allowed to recover for 42 days (recovery). Littermate wild-type mice (Col1a1(+/+)) were used as controls. In response to hypoxia, mean PA pressure (mPAP) increased in both mouse genotypes with no changes in cardiac output (CO) or PA inner diameter (ID); as a consequence, Z(0) (mPAP/CO) increased by ~100% in both genotypes (p<0.05). Contrary to our expectations, Z(C), PWV and P(b)/P(f) did not change. However, with recovery, Z(C) and PWV decreased in the Col1a1(+/+) mice and remained unchanged in the Col1a1(R/R) mice. Z(0) decreased with recovery in both genotypes. Microcomputed tomography measurements of large PAs did not show evidence of stiffness changes as a function of hypoxia exposure or genotype. We conclude that hypoxia-induced PA collagen accumulation does not affect the pulsatile components of pulmonary hemodynamics but that excessive collagen accumulation does prevent normal hemodynamic recovery, which may have important consequences for right ventricular function. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Transcranial Doppler investigation of hemodynamic alterations associated with blunt cervical vascular injuries in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Purvis, Dianna L; Crutchfield, Kevin; Trickey, Amber W; Aldaghlas, Tayseer; Rizzo, Anne; Sikdar, Siddhartha

    2013-10-01

    Blunt cervical vascular injuries, often missed with current screening methods, have substantial morbidity and mortality, and there is a need for improved screening. Elucidation of cerebral hemodynamic alterations may facilitate serial bedside monitoring and improved management. Thus, the objective of this study was to define cerebral flow alterations associated with single blunt cervical vascular injuries using transcranial Doppler sonography and subsequent Doppler waveform analyses in a trauma population. In this prospective pilot study, patients with suspected blunt cervical vascular injuries had diagnoses by computed tomographic angiography and were examined using transcranial Doppler sonography to define cerebral hemodynamics. Multiple vessel injuries were excluded for this analysis, as the focus was to identify hemodynamic alterations from isolated injuries. The inverse damping factor characterized altered extracranial flow patterns; middle cerebral artery flow velocities, the pulsatility index, and their asymmetries characterized altered intracranial flow patterns. Twenty-three trauma patients were evaluated: 4 with single internal carotid artery injuries, 5 with single vertebral artery injuries, and 14 without blunt cervical vascular injuries. All internal carotid artery injuries showed a reduced inverse damping factor in the internal carotid artery and dampened ipsilateral mean flow and peak systolic velocities in the middle cerebral artery. Vertebral artery injuries produced asymmetry of a similar magnitude in the middle cerebral artery mean flow velocity with end-diastolic velocity alterations. These data indicate that extracranial and intracranial hemodynamic alterations occur with internal carotid artery and vertebral artery blunt cervical vascular injuries and can be quantified in the acute injury phase by transcranial Doppler indices. Further study is required to elucidate cerebral flow changes resulting from a single blunt cervical vascular injury

  14. A Novel Ex Ovo Banding Technique to Alter Intracardiac Hemodynamics in an Embryonic Chicken System.

    PubMed

    Menon, Vinal; Junor, Lorain; Balhaj, Marwa; Eberth, John F; Potts, Jay D

    2016-05-13

    The new model presented here can be used to understand the influence of hemodynamics on specific cardiac developmental processes, at the cellular and molecular level. To alter intracardiac hemodynamics, fertilized chicken eggs are incubated in a humidified chamber to obtain embryos of the desired stage (HH17). Once this developmental stage is achieved, the embryo is maintained ex ovo and hemodynamics in the embryonic heart are altered by partially constricting the outflow tract (OFT) with a surgical suture at the junction of the OFT and ventricle (OVJ). Control embryos are also cultured ex ovo but are not subjected to the surgical intervention. Banded and control embryos are then incubated in a humidified incubator for the desired period of time, after which 2D ultrasound is employed to analyze the change in blood flow velocity at the OVJ as a result of OFT banding. Once embryos are maintained ex ovo, it is important to ensure adequate hydration in the incubation chamber so as to prevent drying and eventually embryo death. Using this new banded model, it is now possible to perform analyses of changes in the expression of key players involved in valve development and to understand the role of hemodynamics on cellular responses in vivo, which could not be achieved previously.

  15. Increased Hemodynamic Load in Early Embryonic Stages Alters Endocardial to Mesenchymal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Midgett, Madeline; López, Claudia S.; David, Larry; Maloyan, Alina; Rugonyi, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    Normal blood flow is essential for proper heart formation during embryonic development, as abnormal hemodynamic load (blood pressure and shear stress) results in cardiac defects seen in congenital heart disease. However, the progressive detrimental remodeling processes that relate altered blood flow to cardiac defects remain unclear. Endothelial–mesenchymal cell transition is one of the many complex developmental events involved in transforming the early embryonic outflow tract into the aorta, pulmonary trunk, interventricular septum, and semilunar valves. This study elucidated the effects of increased hemodynamic load on endothelial–mesenchymal transition remodeling of the outflow tract cushions in vivo. Outflow tract banding was used to increase hemodynamic load in the chicken embryo heart between Hamburger and Hamilton stages 18 and 24. Increased hemodynamic load induced increased cell density in outflow tract cushions, fewer cells along the endocardial lining, endocardium junction disruption, and altered periostin expression as measured by confocal microscopy analysis. In addition, 3D focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy analysis determined that a portion of endocardial cells adopted a migratory shape after outflow tract banding that is more irregular, elongated, and with extensive cellular projections compared to normal cells. Proteomic mass-spectrometry analysis quantified altered protein composition after banding that is consistent with a more active stage of endothelial–mesenchymal transition. Outflow tract banding enhances the endothelial–mesenchymal transition phenotype during formation of the outflow tract cushions, suggesting that endothelial–mesenchymal transition is a critical developmental process that when disturbed by altered blood flow gives rise to cardiac malformation and defects. PMID:28228731

  16. Hemodynamic and Metabolic Correlates of Perinatal White Matter Injury Severity

    PubMed Central

    Riddle, Art; Maire, Jennifer; Cai, Victor; Nguyen, Thuan; Gong, Xi; Hansen, Kelly; Grafe, Marjorie R.; Hohimer, A. Roger; Back, Stephen A.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Although the spectrum of perinatal white matter injury (WMI) in preterm infants is shifting from cystic encephalomalacia to milder forms of WMI, the factors that contribute to this changing spectrum are unclear. We hypothesized that the variability in WMI quantified by immunohistochemical markers of inflammation could be correlated with the severity of impaired blood oxygen, glucose and lactate. Methods We employed a preterm fetal sheep model of in utero moderate hypoxemia and global severe but not complete cerebral ischemia that reproduces the spectrum of human WMI. Since there is small but measurable residual brain blood flow during occlusion, we sought to determine if the metabolic state of the residual arterial blood was associated with severity of WMI. Near the conclusion of hypoxia-ischemia, we recorded cephalic arterial blood pressure, blood oxygen, glucose and lactate levels. To define the spectrum of WMI, an ordinal WMI rating scale was compared against an unbiased quantitative image analysis protocol that provided continuous histo-pathological outcome measures for astrogliosis and microgliosis derived from the entire white matter. Results A spectrum of WMI was observed that ranged from diffuse non-necrotic lesions to more severe injury that comprised discrete foci of microscopic or macroscopic necrosis. Residual arterial pressure, oxygen content and blood glucose displayed a significant inverse association with WMI and lactate concentrations were directly related. Elevated glucose levels were the most significantly associated with less severe WMI. Conclusions Our results suggest that under conditions of hypoxemia and severe cephalic hypotension, WMI severity measured using unbiased immunohistochemical measurements correlated with several physiologic parameters, including glucose, which may be a useful marker of fetal response to hypoxia or provide protection against energy failure and more severe WMI. PMID:24416093

  17. Hemodynamic comparison of mild and severe preeclampsia: concept of stroke systemic vascular resistance index.

    PubMed

    Scardo, J; Kiser, R; Dillon, A; Brost, B; Newman, R

    1996-01-01

    Our purpose was to compare baseline hemodynamic parameters of mild and severe preeclampsia. Patients admitted to the Medical University Labor and Delivery Unit with the diagnosis of preeclampsia who had not received prior antihypertensive or magnesium sulfate therapy were recruited for noninvasive hemodynamic monitoring with thoracic electrical bioimpedance. After stabilization in the lateral recumbent position, hemodynamic monitoring was begun. Baseline hemodynamic parameters, mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI), cardiac index (CI), and stroke index (SI) were recorded. Stroke systemic vascular resistance index (SSVRI), the resistance imposed by vasculature on each beat of the heart, was calculated for each patient by multiplying SVRI by HR. For statistical analysis, unpaired Student's t-tests (two-tailed) were utilized (P < 0.01). Forty-one preeclamptic patients (20 mild, 21 severe) were enrolled. Mean gestational age of severe patients was 32.2 +/- 4.0 and of mild patients was 37.0 +/- 3.5. MAP, SBP, diastolic blood pressure, HR, and SSVRI were higher in the severe group. SVRI, CI, cardiac output, and SI did not differ significantly between groups. Severe preclampsia appears to be a more intensely vasoconstricted state than mild preeclampsia. Although CI is inversely proportional to SVRI, increased HR in severe preeclampsia prevents this expected decrease in cardiac output.

  18. [Hemodynamic effects of bathing in severe burnt patients].

    PubMed

    Moutet, J; Pinaud, M; Zaouter, M; Le Floch, R; Fourret, P; Meignier, M; Pannier, M

    1992-01-01

    Repeated water immersion is currently used in France in the treatment of severe burn injury. A prospective study was carried out to assess the haemodynamic effects of immersing such patients in a half sitting position in water, the temperature of which was kept at 35 degrees C. The burn exceeded 50% of body surface area (BSA), with at least 30% being third degree burns. The study was carried out during the first bath, three days after the injury. The patients were immersed up to the clavicles. They were sedated with 2 mg.h-1 of both flunitrazepam and phenoperidine, and were mechanically ventilated. The following haemodynamic parameters were monitored: heart rate, arterial blood pressure (the transducer being level with the arterial catheter), right atrial and pulmonary arterial pressures (the transducer being level with the right atrium, level which had been marked on the chest before immersion and placed two intercostal spaces higher after immersion because of the change in position of the heart). The cardiac output was measured using the thermodilution method. The patient's temperature was monitored with the thermistance of the Swan-Ganz catheter. Values were obtained before immersion, after 15 and 30 minutes of immersion, and 5 minutes after the end of the bath. Nine patients were included, 2 women and 7 men, aged between 24 and 45 years, weighing 73.7 kg on average. Burn size was 78% of BSA (range 64 to 95%). Water immersion was maintained for 34 +/- 3 min. The right atrial, mean pulmonary arterial, and wedge pressures, and the cardiac and systolic indices increased.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Hemodynamic characteristics of vasopressin in dogs with severe hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Min-Su; Park, Hee-Myung

    2006-09-01

    The effect of vasopressin was compared with that of the established vasopressor epinephrine in experimentally induced hemorrhagic shock. After rapid crystalloid resuscitation in a ratio of three volumes of 0.9% saline to one volume of blood (3:1 crystalloid resuscitation), six dogs were given 0.4 IU/kg vasopressin and another six dogs were given 0.1 mg/kg epinephrine. Five dogs in the control group were given fluid resuscitation in the same manner as above without administration of any drugs. Administration of vasopressin increased diastolic arterial pressure (DAP) from 45.0 +/- 4.9 to 91.2 +/- 9.6 mmHg within 5 min, compared with epinephrine from 46 +/- 4.0 to 51.8 +/- 7.7, and control from 47.3 +/- 7.5 to 46.3 +/- 7.3. Systolic arterial pressure (SAP) did not increase significantly following vasopressin compared with epinephrine and control group. Results of DAP and systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI) suggested that vasopressin administration was vasoconstrictive after fluid resuscitation in decompensatory hemorrhagic shock in dogs, whereas epinephrine did not compared with control. In addition, epinephrine did not affect the cardiac index (CI) and SVRI, while a significant decrease in CI and increase in SVRI were observed in vasopressin group. The pressor effect of epinephrine in the vascular system was abrupt and only lasted a short period of time (within 5 min), while that of vasopressin was steady and lasted for more than 1 hr, especially regard to in DAP. When compared with epinephrine, vasopressin can be a more effective and safer choice in patients with severe hemorrhagic shock.

  20. Altered cerebral hemodynamics in early Alzheimer disease: a pilot study using transcranial Doppler.

    PubMed

    Claassen, Jurgen A H R; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Martin-Cook, Kristin; Levine, Benjamin D; Zhang, Rong

    2009-01-01

    Cerebrovascular disease may contribute to the development and progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study investigated whether impairments in cerebral hemodynamics can be detected in early-stage AD. Nine patients with mild AD and eight cognitively normal controls matched for age underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging and neuropsychological evaluation, followed by assessment of steady-state cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV, transcranial Doppler), blood pressure (BP, Finapres), and cerebrovascular resistance index (BP/CBFV). Cerebral hemodynamics were quantified using spectral and transfer function analysis of BP and CBFV in rest, during standing up after squat, and during repeated squat-stand maneuvers. Compared to controls, AD patients had lower CBFV and higher cerebrovascular resistance index, unexplained by brain atrophy. Low-frequency variability of BP was enhanced, suggesting impaired arterial baroreflex function. However, CBFV variability was reduced despite enhanced BP variability, and dynamic cerebral autoregulation was not impaired. In conclusion, despite a distinct pattern of altered cerebral hemodynamics, AD patients may have normal autoregulation. However, the challenges for autoregulation in AD are higher, as our data show enhanced BP fluctuations. Increased cerebral vasoconstriction or reduced vasomotion also may attenuate CBFV variability.

  1. Hemodynamic effects of a counterpulsation device implanted on the ascending aorta in severe cardiogenic shock.

    PubMed

    Nanas, J N; Nanas, S N; Charitos, C E; Kontoyiannis, D; Poyiadjis, A D; Stamatopoulos, G; Melkaoui, A; Kokollis, G; Moulopoulos, S D

    1988-01-01

    A valveless, single orifice counterpulsation device (CD) with maximum stroke volume of 100 ml was implanted on the ascending aorta of nine dogs. Its pneumatic driver was gaited by the ECG to provide aortic diastolic augmentation, with a stroke volume of 60-70 ml. In the same animals a 20 ml intraaortic balloon (IAB) was placed into the descending aorta. An attempt was made to evaluate the effectiveness of the CD on severe cardiogenic shock and to compare its hemodynamic effects with those of the IABP. Severe cardiogenic shock was induced by coronary artery ligation, propranolol administration, and fluid infusion and was characterized by a LVEDP of 22.2 +/- 6.4 mmHg, ASP less than 70 mmHg and greater than or equal to 30 mmHg, and a reduction of CI by 71.7%. The CD had a significant beneficial effect in all measured parameters. The LVEDP decreased by a mean of 44.3% (P less than 0.001) below control value, and the AEDP by 60.2% (P less than 0.001). The PADA increased by 108.5% (P less than 0.001), and the CI by 155.8% (P less than 0.004). The IABP did not significantly change any of the hemodynamic variables. In conclusion, the CD has significant salutary hemodynamic effects in severe cardiogenic shock where IABP is ineffective.

  2. Multiple sclerosis-related white matter microstructural change alters the BOLD hemodynamic response.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Nicholas A; Turner, Monroe; Hutchison, Joanna L; Ouyang, Austin; Strain, Jeremy; Oasay, Larry; Sundaram, Saranya; Davis, Scott; Remington, Gina; Brigante, Ryan; Huang, Hao; Hart, John; Frohman, Teresa; Frohman, Elliot; Biswal, Bharat B; Rypma, Bart

    2016-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) results in inflammatory damage to white matter microstructure. Prior research using blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) imaging indicates MS-related alterations to brain function. What is currently unknown is the extent to which white matter microstructural damage influences BOLD signal in MS. Here we assessed changes in parameters of the BOLD hemodynamic response function (HRF) in patients with relapsing-remitting MS compared to healthy controls. We also used diffusion tensor imaging to assess whether MS-related changes to the BOLD-HRF were affected by changes in white matter microstructural integrity. Our results showed MS-related reductions in BOLD-HRF peak amplitude. These MS-related amplitude decreases were influenced by individual differences in white matter microstructural integrity. Other MS-related factors including altered reaction time, limited spatial extent of BOLD activity, elevated lesion burden, or lesion proximity to regions of interest were not mediators of group differences in BOLD-HRF amplitude. Results are discussed in terms of functional hyperemic mechanisms and implications for analysis of BOLD signal differences. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Early evaluation of renal hemodynamic alterations in type I diabetes mellitus with duplex ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Saif, Aasem; Soliman, Neveen A; Abdel-Hameed, Alaa

    2010-03-01

    To evaluate the role of renal duplex ultrasonography in the detection of early alteration of renal blood flow in type I diabetic patients, we studied with duplex ultrasound 32 patients with type I diabetes mellitus (19 males, 13 females, age range 8-19 years) and 35 age and sex-matched controls. The resistivity indices (RIs) and pulsatility indices (PIs) of the main renal as well as intra-renal arteries were calculated. Compared with the healthy control subjects, diabetic patients had significantly higher resistivity indices (RIs) in the intrarenal (segmental, arcuate and interlobar) arteries (P= 0.001). The study, also revealed a significantly positive correlation between the RIs in the intrarenal arteries in diabetics and the albumin/creatinine ratio (r= 0.54, 0.52 and 0.51 respectively), glycated hemoglobin (r= 0.61, 0.59 and 0.63 respectively), as well as the estimated GFR (e-GFR) (r= 0.53, 0.51 and 0.57 respectively). We conclude that the current study documented early intra-renal hemodynamic alterations in the form of pathologically elevated intrarenal RIs. This denotes the potential usefulness of duplex evaluation of the intrarenal arteries, as a noninvasive procedure, for monitoring type 1 diabetic patients to predict those at risk of diabetic nephropathy.

  4. Hemodynamics in Transplant Renal Artery Stenosis and its Alteration after Stent Implantation Based on a Patient-specific Computational Fluid Dynamics Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong-Yang; Liu, Long-Shan; Cao, Hai-Ming; Li, Jun; Deng, Rong-Hai; Fu, Qian; Zhang, Huan-Xi; Fei, Ji-Guang; Wang, Chang-Xi

    2017-01-01

    Background: Accumulating studies on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) support the involvement of hemodynamic factors in artery stenosis. Based on a patient-specific CFD model, the present study aimed to investigate the hemodynamic characteristics of transplant renal artery stenosis (TRAS) and its alteration after stent treatment. Methods: Computed tomography angiography (CTA) data of kidney transplant recipients in a single transplant center from April 2013 to November 2014 were reviewed. The three-dimensional geometry of transplant renal artery (TRA) was reconstructed from the qualified CTA images and categorized into three groups: the normal, stenotic, and stented groups. Hemodynamic parameters including pressure distribution, velocity, wall shear stress (WSS), and mass flow rate (MFR) were extracted. The data of hemodynamic parameters were expressed as median (interquartile range), and Mann–Whitney U-test was used for analysis. Results: Totally, 6 normal, 12 stenotic, and 6 stented TRAs were included in the analysis. TRAS presented nonuniform pressure distribution, adverse pressure gradient across stenosis throat, flow vortex, and a separation zone at downstream stenosis. Stenotic arteries had higher maximal velocity and maximal WSS (2.94 [2.14, 3.30] vs. 1.06 [0.89, 1.15] m/s, 256.5 [149.8, 349.4] vs. 41.7 [37.8, 45.3] Pa at end diastole, P = 0.001; 3.25 [2.67, 3.56] vs. 1.65 [1.18, 1.72] m/s, 281.3 [184.3, 364.7] vs. 65.8 [61.2, 71.9] Pa at peak systole, P = 0.001) and lower minimal WSS and MFRs (0.07 [0.03, 0.13] vs. 0.52 [0.45, 0.67] Pa, 1.5 [1.0, 3.0] vs. 11.0 [8.0, 11.3] g/s at end diastole, P = 0.001; 0.08 [0.03, 0.19] vs. 0.70 [0.60, 0.81] Pa, 2.0 [1.3, 3.3] vs. 16.5 [13.0, 20.3] g/s at peak systole, P = 0.001) as compared to normal arteries. Stent implantation ameliorated all the alterations of the above hemodynamic factors except low WSS. Conclusions: Hemodynamic factors were significantly changed in severe TRAS. Stent implantation can restore or

  5. Hemodynamics in Transplant Renal Artery Stenosis and its Alteration after Stent Implantation Based on a Patient-specific Computational Fluid Dynamics Model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Yang; Liu, Long-Shan; Cao, Hai-Ming; Li, Jun; Deng, Rong-Hai; Fu, Qian; Zhang, Huan-Xi; Fei, Ji-Guang; Wang, Chang-Xi

    Accumulating studies on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) support the involvement of hemodynamic factors in artery stenosis. Based on a patient-specific CFD model, the present study aimed to investigate the hemodynamic characteristics of transplant renal artery stenosis (TRAS) and its alteration after stent treatment. Computed tomography angiography (CTA) data of kidney transplant recipients in a single transplant center from April 2013 to November 2014 were reviewed. The three-dimensional geometry of transplant renal artery (TRA) was reconstructed from the qualified CTA images and categorized into three groups: the normal, stenotic, and stented groups. Hemodynamic parameters including pressure distribution, velocity, wall shear stress (WSS), and mass flow rate (MFR) were extracted. The data of hemodynamic parameters were expressed as median (interquartile range), and Mann-Whitney U-test was used for analysis. Totally, 6 normal, 12 stenotic, and 6 stented TRAs were included in the analysis. TRAS presented nonuniform pressure distribution, adverse pressure gradient across stenosis throat, flow vortex, and a separation zone at downstream stenosis. Stenotic arteries had higher maximal velocity and maximal WSS (2.94 [2.14, 3.30] vs. 1.06 [0.89, 1.15] m/s, 256.5 [149.8, 349.4] vs. 41.7 [37.8, 45.3] Pa at end diastole, P= 0.001; 3.25 [2.67, 3.56] vs. 1.65 [1.18, 1.72] m/s, 281.3 [184.3, 364.7] vs. 65.8 [61.2, 71.9] Pa at peak systole, P= 0.001) and lower minimal WSS and MFRs (0.07 [0.03, 0.13] vs. 0.52 [0.45, 0.67] Pa, 1.5 [1.0, 3.0] vs. 11.0 [8.0, 11.3] g/s at end diastole, P= 0.001; 0.08 [0.03, 0.19] vs. 0.70 [0.60, 0.81] Pa, 2.0 [1.3, 3.3] vs. 16.5 [13.0, 20.3] g/s at peak systole, P= 0.001) as compared to normal arteries. Stent implantation ameliorated all the alterations of the above hemodynamic factors except low WSS. Hemodynamic factors were significantly changed in severe TRAS. Stent implantation can restore or ameliorate deleterious change of hemodynamic

  6. A theoretical analysis of hemodynamic and biomechanical alterations in intracranial AVMs after radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, E.H. )

    1993-09-20

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is being increasingly used to treat intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). However, successful radiosurgery may involve latent periods of 1-2 years prior to AVM obliteration. This latent period include states of altered flow patterns that may not influence hemorrhage probabilities. The probability of hemorrhage is likely to be related to the degree of biomechanical stress across the AVM shunt walls. This paper describes a theoretical analysis of the altered hemodynamics and biomechanical stresses within AVM shunts post-radiosurgery. The mathematical model is comprised of linked flow compartments that represent the AVM and adjacent normal vasculature. As obliteration of the irradiated shunts occurs, changes in flow rates and pressure gradients are calculated based on first order fluid dynamics. Stress on the AVM shunt walls is calculated based on tangential forces due to intramural pressure. Two basic models are presented: a distribution of shunts with fixed thin walls subject to step-function obliteration, and a distribution of shunts subject to luminal obliteration from slowly thickening walls. Variations on these models are analyzed, including sequential, selective and random shunt obliteration, and uniform or Poisson distributions of shunt radii. Model I reveals that the range of pressure alterations in the radiosurgically-treated AVM include the possibility of transient increases in the total biomechanical stress within the shunt walls prior to obliteration. Model II demonstrates that uniform luminal narrowing via thickened walls should lead to reduced transmural stresses. The precise temporal pattern of AVM flow decrease and biomechanical stress reduction depends on the selection of shunts that are obliterated. 34 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Portalsystemic hemodynamic changes in chronic severe hepatitis B: An ultrasonographic study

    PubMed Central

    Su, Zhong-Zhen; Shan, Hong; Ke, Wei-Min; He, Bing-Jun; Zheng, Rong-Qin

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate portalsystemic hemodynamic changes in chronic severe hepatitis B. METHODS: Hemodynamic parameters included portal vein diameter (PVD), portal vein peak velocity (PVPV), portal vein volume (PVV), spleen length (SPL), spleen vein diameter (SPVD), spleen vein volume (SPVV) and umbilical vein recanalization. They were measured by Color Doppler ultrasonography in 36 patients with chronic severe hepatitis B, compared with 51 normal controls, 61 patients with chronic hepatitis B, 46 patients with compensable cirrhosis, and 36 patients with decompensable cirrhosis. RESULTS: In the group of chronic severe hepatitis B, PVD (12.38 ± 1.23 mm) was significantly different from the normal control, compensable cirrhosis and decompensable cirrhosis groups (P = 0.000-0.026), but not significantly different from the chronic hepatitis group. PVPV (16.15 ± 3.82 cm/s) dropped more significantly in the chronic severe hepatitis B group than the normal control, chronic hepatitis B and compensable cirrhosis groups (P = 0.000-0.011). PVV (667.53 ± 192.83 mL/min) dropped significantly as compared with the four comparison groups (P = 0.000-0.004). SPL (120.42 ± 18.36 mm) and SPVD (7.52 ± 1.52 mm) were longer in the normal control and chronic hepatitis B groups (P = 0.000-0.009), yet they were significantly shorter than those in the decompensable cirrhosis group (P = 0.000). SPVV (242.51 ± 137.70 mL/min) was also lower than the decompensable cirrhosis group (P = 0.000). The umbilical vein recanalization rate (75%) was higher than the chronic hepatitis B and compensable cirrhosis groups. In the course of progression from chronic hepatitis to decompensable cirrhosis, PVD, SPL and SPVD gradually increased and showed significant differences between every two groups (P = 0.000-0.002). CONCLUSION: Patients with chronic severe hepatitis B have a tendency to develop acute portal hypertension, resulting in significantly reduced portal vein perfusion. Observation of the

  8. [Hemodynamic correction in children with severe traumatic injuries by the means of transpulmonary hemodilution].

    PubMed

    Lekmanov, A U; Azovskiĭ, D K; Piliutnik, S F; Gegueva, E N

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the research is t objectify the indications for use of catecholamines and/or change of the infusion therapy volume based on transpulmonary thermodilution in children with severe traumatic injuries. The examined group consisted of 22 children with thermal concomitant or isolated trauma and drowning. All the patents were transferred to the Intensive Care Unit from other hospitals. Hemodynamic parameter estimation was based upon transpulmonary thermodilution. Results indicate, that based upon dynamic assessment of cardiac output, preload (global end diastolic volume index) and postload (systemic vascular resistance index) it is possible to carry out an early targeted correction of the fluid therapy and chose the right type of inotorpic support. Transpulmonary thermodilution in children with severe traumatic injuries allows achieving optimal parameters of blood circulation just 24 hours after its adaption.

  9. Coagulation defects and altered hemodynamic responses in mice lacking receptors for thromboxane A2.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, D W; Mannon, R B; Mannon, P J; Latour, A; Oliver, J A; Hoffman, M; Smithies, O; Koller, B H; Coffman, T M

    1998-01-01

    Thromboxane A2 (TXA2) is a labile metabolite of arachidonic acid that has potent biological effects. Its actions are mediated by G protein-coupled thromboxane-prostanoid (TP) receptors. TP receptors have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. To investigate the physiological functions of TP receptors, we generated TP receptor-deficient mice by gene targeting. Tp-/- animals reproduce and survive in expected numbers, and their major organ systems are normal. Thromboxane agonist binding cannot be detected in tissues from Tp-/- mice. Bleeding times are prolonged in Tp-/- mice and their platelets do not aggregate after exposure to TXA2 agonists. Aggregation responses after collagen stimulation are also delayed, although ADP-stimulated aggregation is normal. Infusion of the TP receptor agonist U-46619 causes transient increases in blood pressure followed by cardiovascular collapse in wild-type mice, but U-46619 caused no hemodynamic effect in Tp-/- mice. Tp-/- mice are also resistant to arachidonic acid-induced shock, although arachidonic acid signifi-cantly reduced blood pressure in Tp-/- mice. In summary, Tp-/- mice have a mild bleeding disorder and altered vascular responses to TXA2 and arachidonic acid. Our studies suggest that most of the recognized functions of TXA2 are mediated by the single known Tp gene locus. PMID:9835625

  10. Attributable harm of severe bleeding after cardiac surgery in hemodynamically stable patients.

    PubMed

    Magruder, J Trent; Belmustakov, Stephen; Ohkuma, Rika; Collica, Sarah; Grimm, Joshua C; Crawford, Todd; Conte, John V; Baumgartner, William A; Shah, Ashish S; Whitman, Glenn R

    2017-02-01

    We sought to quantify the effect of severe postoperative bleeding in hemodynamically stable patients following cardiac surgery. We reviewed the charts of all cardiac surgery patients operated on at our institution between 2010 and 2014. After excluding patients with tamponade or MAP <60, we propensity matched patients having chest tube output >300 mL in the first postoperative hour, >200 mL in the second, and >100 mL in the third ("bleeding" group) with patients having <50 mL/h of chest tube output ("dry" group). The primary outcome was a composite of morbidity or mortality (excluding reexploration). 5016 patients were operated on between 2010 and 2014; of these, we included the records of 84 bleeding and 498 dry patients. Propensity matching resulted in 68 pairs of patients well-matched on baseline and operative variables. As compared to matched dry patients, bleeding patients were more likely to experience the primary outcome of any morbidity/mortality (36.8 vs. 13.2 %, p = 0.002), as well as ventilation >24 h (33.8 vs. 7.4 %, p < 0.001) and 30-day mortality (11.8 vs. 1.5 %, p = 0.02). Of the 84 bleeding patients, 46 underwent reexploration for bleeding within 24 h of surgery. A subgroup analysis propensity matching bleeding patients who were or were not reexplored <24 h demonstrated similarly poor outcomes in each group (primary outcome, 44.7 % reexplored vs. 50.0 % non-reexplored, p = 0.65), though reexplored patients were far less likely to require hematoma evacuation/washout >24 h after surgery (0 vs. 18.4 %, p = 0.005). Even among hemodynamically stable patients, severe bleeding is associated with markedly worse outcomes following cardiac surgery.

  11. Investigating Non-Invasive Hemodynamic Monitoring Devices Using Severe Dengue as a Surrogate for Trauma-Induced Shock

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    Devices Using Severe Dengue as a Surrogate for Trauma-Induced Shock” PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Stephen Thomas CONTRACTING...Hemodynamic Monitoring Devices Using Severe Dengue as a Surrogate for Trauma-Induced Shock” 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-2-0079 5c. PROGRAM

  12. Hemodynamic Alterations after Stent Implantation in 15 Cases of Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Tian, Zhongbin; Liu, Jian; Jing, Linkai; Paliwal, Nikhil; Wang, Shengzhang; Zhang, Ying; Xiang, Jianping; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Meng, Hui; Yang, Xinjian

    2016-01-01

    Background Stent-assisted coiling technology has been widely used in the treatment of intracranial aneurysms. In current study, we investigated the intra-aneurysmal hemodynamic alterations after stent implantation and its association with aneurysm location. Methods We first retrospectively studied 15 aneurysm cases (8 internal carotid artery-ophthalmic artery (ICA-OphA) aneurysms and 7 posterior communicating artery (PcoA) aneurysms) treated with Enterprise stents and coils. Then based on patient-specific geometries before and after stenting, we built virtual stenting computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation models. Results Before and after stent deployment, the average Wall Shear Stress (WSS) on the aneurysmal sac at systolic peak changed from 7.04 Pa (4.14 Pa, 15.77 Pa) to 6.04 Pa (3.86 Pa, 11.13 Pa), P = 0.001; and the spatially averaged value of flow velocity in the perpendicular plane of aneurysm dropped from 0.5 m/s (0.28 m/s, 0.7 m/s) to 0.33 m/s (0.25 m/s, 0.49 m/s), P = 0.001, respectively. Post-stent implantation, WSS in ICA-OphA aneurysms and PcoA aneurysms decreased by 14.4% (P = 0.012) and 16.6% (P = 0.018) respectively, and flow velocity also reduced by 10.3% (P = 0.029) and 10.5% (P = 0.013), respectively. Changes in WSS, flow velocity, and pressure were not significantly different between ICA-OphA aneurysms and PcoA aneurysms (P > 0.05). Stent implantation did not significantly change the peak systolic pressure in both aneurysm types. Conclusion After stent implantation, intra-aneurysmal flow velocity and WSS decreased independent of aneurysm type (ICA-OphA and PcoA). Little change was observed on peak systolic pressure. PMID:26746828

  13. Altered thyroid function in severely injured patients

    PubMed Central

    Grill, Elena; Strong, Michelle; Sonnad, Seema S.; Sarani, Babak; Pascual, Jose; Collins, Heather; Sims, Carrie A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Hemorrhagic shock profoundly affects the neuroendocrine profile of trauma patients, and we hypothesized that massive resuscitation would negatively impact thyroid function. Methods A prospective, observational study investigating thyroid function in hypotensive trauma patients (systolic blood pressure <90 mm Hg × 2) who survived >48 h was conducted at a Level I center over a 6-mo period. Blood samples for thyroid function were collected at time of presentation to the trauma bay and serially for 48 h. Collected data included demographics, injury data, vital signs, transfusion needs, crystalloid use, and vasopressor requirements. Patients receiving >5 units packed red blood cells (PRBC) within 12 h were compared with those receiving ≥ 5 units. Results Patients who required >5 units of PRBC/12 h had significantly lower total and free T4 levels on initial presentation, and levels remained significantly depressed over the next 48 h when compared with patients who required a less aggressive resuscitative effort. T3 values were markedly suppressed during the initial 48 h post trauma in all patients, but were significantly lower in patients requiring >5 units PRBC. TSH levels remained within the normal range for all time points. Lower trauma admission T4 levels were associated with the need for greater crystalloid resuscitation within the first 24 h. Conclusion Measurements of thyroid function are significantly altered in severely injured patients on initial presentation, and low T4 levels predict the need for large resuscitation. Further research investigating the profile and impact of thyroid function in trauma patients during resuscitation and recovery is warranted. PMID:23043865

  14. Cerebral Hemodynamics and Vascular Reactivity in Mild and Severe Ischemic Rodent Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion Stroke Models

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Jeongeun; Jo, Areum; Kang, Bok-Man; Lee, Sohee; Bang, Oh Young; Heo, Chaejeong; Jhon, Gil-Ja; Lee, Youngmi

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia can cause decreased cerebral neurovascular coupling, leading to a failure in the autoregulation of cerebral blood flow. This study aims to investigate the effect of varying degrees of ischemia on cerebral hemodynamic reactivity using in vivo real-time optical imaging. We utilized direct cortical stimulation to elicit hyper-excitable neuronal activation, which leads to induced hemodynamic changes in both the normal and middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) ischemic stroke groups. Hemodynamic measurements from optical imaging accurately predict the severity of occlusion in mild and severe MCAO animals. There is neither an increase in cerebral blood volume nor in vessel reactivity in the ipsilateral hemisphere (I.H) of animals with severe MCAO. The pial artery in the contralateral hemisphere (C.H) of the severe MCAO group reacted more slowly than both hemispheres in the normal and mild MCAO groups. In addition, the arterial reactivity of the I.H in the mild MCAO animals was faster than the normal animals. Furthermore, artery reactivity is tightly correlated with histological and behavioral results in the MCAO ischemic group. Thus, in vivo optical imaging may offer a simple and useful tool to assess the degree of ischemia and to understand how cerebral hemodynamics and vascular reactivity are affected by ischemia. PMID:27358581

  15. Serial hemodynamic monitoring to guide treatment of maternal hypertension leads to reduction in severe hypertension.

    PubMed

    Stott, D; Papastefanou, I; Paraschiv, D; Clark, K; Kametas, N A

    2017-01-01

    To examine whether treatment for hypertension in pregnancy that is guided by serial monitoring of maternal central hemodynamics leads to a reduction in the rate of severe hypertension, defined as blood pressure ≥ 160/110 mmHg; and to assess the distinct longitudinal hemodynamic profiles associated with beta-blocker monotherapy, vasodilator monotherapy and dual agent therapy, and their relationships with outcomes, including fetal growth restriction. This was a prospective observational study at a dedicated antenatal hypertension clinic in a tertiary UK hospital. Fifty-two untreated women presenting with hypertension were recruited consecutively and started on treatment, either with a beta-blocker or a vasodilator. The choice of initial antihypertensive agent was determined according to a model constructed previously to predict the response to the beta-blocker labetalol in pregnant women needing antihypertensive treatment. At presentation, the demographic and maternal hemodynamic variables associated with a therapeutic response to labetalol, defined as blood pressure control < 140/90 mmHg with labetalol monotherapy throughout pregnancy, were ascertained and analyzed with logistic regression to create a model to predict sustained blood pressure control as described above. The women were reviewed regularly until delivery and underwent serial hemodynamic monitoring throughout pregnancy. If their blood pressure was elevated, the prediction model was referred to again to determine if alternative antihypertensive therapy, either with additional beta-blocker or a vasodilator, should be added. Treatment by referring to results of serial hemodynamic monitoring reduced the rate of severe antenatal hypertension from 18% to 3.8%. Seventy-seven percent of women were initially prescribed a beta-blocker and 23% a vasodilator. The group that maintained good blood pressure control with beta-blocker monotherapy had the best fetal and maternal outcomes. They had lower blood pressures

  16. Delay in Renal Hemodynamic Response to a Meat Meal in Severe Obesity.

    PubMed

    Anastasio, Pietro; Viggiano, Davide; Zacchia, Miriam; Altobelli, Claudia; Capasso, Giovambattista; Gaspare De Santo, Natale

    2017-01-01

    Little information is available about the tubular functions and the renal adjustments that take place in obese subjects after a protein meal. How the excess fat may affect renal response to dietary proteins is currently only partially understood. This paper aims to address (i) whether severe obesity, in the absence of other comorbidities, is responsible of kidney dysfunction at either the glomerular or the tubular level and (ii) whether it compromises renal adaptations to a large protein meal. Twenty-eight obese subjects without albuminuria, along with 20 control subjects, age and gender matched, have been studied. The glomerular filtration rate (GFR; inulin clearance), renal plasma flow (p-aminohippurate clearance), the proximal tubular function (lithium clearance), the fractional excretion of sodium (FPRNa) have been measured at the basal level (steady state) and after a protein meal (perturbation). Under steady state conditions, filtration fraction, proximal tubular sodium handling and the FPRNa were not significantly different in non proteinuric obese subjects compared with controls. However, a protein meal led to a delayed glomerular hyperfiltration in obese patients compared with controls. This study shows that obese patients, in the absence of significant comorbidities, have a normal proximal tubule Na+ absorption at basal; conversely, these subjects showed a different response to a protein meal compared with normal subjects in terms of changes of GFR. Overall, these results suggest that the modified hemodynamic response to a protein meal might be the earliest hallmark of future kidney dysfunction in obese subjects. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Iliac arteriovenous fistula due to spinal disk surgery. Causes severe hemodynamic repercussion with pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Machado-Atías, I; Fornés, O; González-Bello, R; Machado-Hernández, I

    1993-01-01

    We present a case of a 46-year-old man with a pulsatile mass in the left inferior abdominal quadrant that irradiated a continuous murmur extending to the left lumbar region. Despite an 8-year history of cardiomegaly, he appeared to be asymptomatic except for the mass and could recollect no traumatic injury or surgery that might have caused it. Near the vertebral column, we found a small scar, the result of spinal disk surgery 11 years before. Following chest radiography and electrocardiography, we located the suspected arteriovenous fistula by selective angiography of the aorta and its branches: a communication of the left iliac artery with the left iliac vein had resulted in a very large left-to-right shunt and a severely dilated inferior vena cava. We then divided and isolated the arterial segment containing the fistula, but left this segment in continuity with the left iliac vein by over-sewing both ends. To avoid injury to surrounding structures, dissection was limited to the area of maximal thrill. Hemodynamic improvement was immediate, and the postoperative course was uneventful. At the present time, almost 3 years postoperatively, the patient is asymptomatic. Images PMID:8508067

  18. Laser speckle flowmetry method for measuring spatial and temporal hemodynamic alterations throughout large microvascular networks.

    PubMed

    Meisner, Joshua K; Sumer, Suna; Murrell, Kelsey P; Higgins, Timothy J; Price, Richard J

    2012-10-01

    1) To develop and validate laser speckle flowmetry (LSF) as a quantitative tool for individual microvessel hemodynamics in large networks. 2) To use LSF to determine if structural differences in the dorsal skinfold microcirculation (DSFWC) of C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice impart differential network hemodynamic responses to occlusion. We compared LSF velocity measurements with known/measured velocities in vitro using capillary tube tissue phantoms and in vivo using mouse DSFWCs and cremaster muscles. Hemodynamic changes induced by feed arteriole occlusion were measured using LSF in DSFWCs implanted on C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice. In vitro, we found that the normalized speckle intensity (NSI) versus velocity linear relationship (R(2) ≥ 0.97) did not vary with diameter or hematocrit and can be shifted to meet an expected operating range. In vivo, DSFWC and cremaster muscle preparations (R(2) = 0.92 and 0.95, respectively) demonstrated similar linear relationships between NSI and centerline velocity. Stratification of arterioles into predicted collateral pathways revealed significant differences between C57BL/6 and BALB/c strains in response to feed arteriole occlusion. These data demonstrate the applicability of LSF to intravital microscopy microcirculation preparations for determining both relative and absolute hemodynamics on a network-wide scale while maintaining the resolution of individual microvessels. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. A NO way to BOLD? Dietary nitrate alters the hemodynamic response to visual stimulation.

    PubMed

    Aamand, Rasmus; Dalsgaard, Thomas; Ho, Yi-Ching Lynn; Møller, Arne; Roepstorff, Andreas; Lund, Torben E

    2013-12-01

    Neurovascular coupling links neuronal activity to vasodilation. Nitric oxide (NO) is a potent vasodilator, and in neurovascular coupling NO production from NO synthases plays an important role. However, another pathway for NO production also exists, namely the nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway. On this basis, we hypothesized that dietary nitrate (NO3-) could influence the brain's hemodynamic response to neuronal stimulation. In the present study, 20 healthy male participants were given either sodium nitrate (NaNO3) or sodium chloride (NaCl) (saline placebo) in a crossover study and were shown visual stimuli based on the retinotopic characteristics of the visual cortex. Our primary measure of the hemodynamic response was the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response measured with high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging (0.64×0.64×1.8 mm) in the visual cortex. From this response, we made a direct estimate of key parameters characterizing the shape of the BOLD response (i.e. lag and amplitude). During elevated nitrate intake, corresponding to the nitrate content of a large plate of salad, both the hemodynamic lag and the BOLD amplitude decreased significantly (7.0±2% and 7.9±4%, respectively), and the variation across activated voxels of both measures decreased (12.3±4% and 15.3±7%, respectively). The baseline cerebral blood flow was not affected by nitrate. Our experiments demonstrate, for the first time, that dietary nitrate may modulate the local cerebral hemodynamic response to stimuli. A faster and smaller BOLD response, with less variation across local cortex, is consistent with an enhanced hemodynamic coupling during elevated nitrate intake. These findings suggest that dietary patterns, via the nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway, may be a potential way to affect key properties of neurovascular coupling. This could have major clinical implications, which remain to be explored. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Assessment of renal hemodynamic toxicity of fluid challenge with 0.9% NaCl compared to balanced crystalloid (PlasmaLyte(®)) in a rat model with severe sepsis.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Pierre-Yves; Beloncle, François; Seegers, Valérie; Tabka, Maher; Renou de La Bourdonnaye, Mathilde; Mercat, Alain; Cales, Paul; Henrion, Daniel; Radermacher, Peter; Piquilloud, Lise; Lerolle, Nicolas; Asfar, Pierre

    2017-12-01

    According to international guidelines, volume expansion with crystalloids is the first-line treatment for hemodynamic management in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. Compared to balanced crystalloids, 0.9% sodium chloride (0.9% NaCl) induces hyperchloremia and metabolic acidosis and may alter renal hemodynamics and function. We compared the effects of 0.9% NaCl to a less chloride-concentrated fluid, PlasmaLyte(®) (PL) in targeted fluid resuscitation in a randomized, double-blind controlled study in an experimental model of severe sepsis in rats. A sepsis with hypotension was induced by cecal ligature and puncture (CLP) in 40 male Wistar rats (20 for each crystalloid). Rats received fluid resuscitation over a period of 200 min for a targeted mean arterial pressure of 90 mm Hg. Animals received similar volumes of 0.9% NaCl or PL. Unlike PL-resuscitated rats, 0.9% NaCl-resuscitated rats experienced hyperchloremia and metabolic acidosis, whereas systemic hemodynamics, renal hemodynamics and renal function were not significantly different between both groups. In our model of rats with severe sepsis resuscitated with large amounts of crystalloids, 0.9% NaCl-induced hyperchloremic acidosis, but balanced crystalloid did not improve systemic and renal hemodynamics or renal function.

  1. Study of severe scorpion envenoming following subcutaneous venom injection into dogs: Hemodynamic and concentration/effect analysis.

    PubMed

    Elatrous, Souheil; Ouanes-Besbes, Lamia; Ben Sik-Ali, Habiba; Hamouda, Zineb; BenAbdallah, Saoussen; Tilouche, Nejla; Jalloul, Faten; Fkih-Hassen, Mohamed; Dachraoui, Fahmi; Ouanes, Islem; Abroug, Fekri

    2015-09-15

    To evaluate the dose-effects of Androctonus australis hector (Aah) venom injected subcutaneously on hemodynamics and neurohormonal secretions, 10 anesthetized and ventilated mongrel dogs, were split in two groups (n = 5/group). Subcutaneous injection was done with either 0.2 mg/kg or 0.125 mg/kg of the purified G50 scorpion toxic fraction. Hemodynamic parameters using right heart catheter were recorded and plasma concentrations of catecholamine, troponin, and serum toxic fraction were measured sequentially from baseline to 120 min. We identified the dose of toxic fraction evoking characteristic hemodynamic perturbation of severe envenomation, the time-lapse to envenomation, and the associated plasma level. The injection of 0.125 mg/kg toxic fraction was not associated with significant variations in hemodynamic parameters, whereas the 0.2 mg/kg dose caused envenomation characterized by significant increase in plasma catecholamines, increased pulmonary artery occluded pressure, mean arterial pressure, and systemic vascular resistance (p < 0.05), in association with sustained decline in cardiac output (p < 0.001). Envenomation occurred by the 30th minute, and the corresponding concentration of toxic fraction was 1.14 ng/ml. The current experiment allowed the identification of the sub-lethal dose (0.2 mg/kg) of the toxic fraction of Aah administered by the subcutaneous route. Two parameters with potential clinical relevance were also uncovered: the time-lapse to envenomation and the corresponding concentration of toxic fraction.

  2. Altered hemodynamics, endothelial function, and protein expression occur with aortic coarctation and persist after repair

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Arjun; Eddinger, Thomas J.; Wang, Hongfeng; Wendell, David C.; Toth, Jeffrey M.

    2012-01-01

    Coarctation of the aorta (CoA) is associated with substantial morbidity despite treatment. Mechanically induced structural and functional vascular changes are implicated; however, their relationship with smooth muscle (SM) phenotypic expression is not fully understood. Using a clinically representative rabbit model of CoA and correction, we quantified mechanical alterations from a 20-mmHg blood pressure (BP) gradient in the thoracic aorta and related the expression of key SM contractile and focal adhesion proteins with remodeling, relaxation, and stiffness. Systolic and mean BP were elevated for CoA rabbits compared with controls leading to remodeling, stiffening, an altered force response, and endothelial dysfunction both proximally and distally. The proximal changes persisted for corrected rabbits despite >12 wk of normal BP (∼4 human years). Computational fluid dynamic simulations revealed reduced wall shear stress (WSS) proximally in CoA compared with control and corrected rabbits. Distally, WSS was markedly increased in CoA rabbits due to a stenotic velocity jet, which has persistent effects as WSS was significantly reduced in corrected rabbits. Immunohistochemistry revealed significantly increased nonmuscle myosin and reduced SM myosin heavy chain expression in the proximal arteries of CoA and corrected rabbits but no differences in SM α-actin, talin, or fibronectin. These findings indicate that CoA can cause alterations in the SM phenotype contributing to structural and functional changes in the proximal arteries that accompany the mechanical stimuli of elevated BP and altered WSS. Importantly, these changes are not reversed upon BP correction and may serve as markers of disease severity, which explains the persistent morbidity observed in CoA patients. PMID:23023871

  3. Effects of normoxic and hypoxic exercise regimens on cardiac, muscular, and cerebral hemodynamics suppressed by severe hypoxia in humans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jong-Shyan; Wu, Min-Huan; Mao, Tso-Yen; Fu, Tieh-cheng; Hsu, Chih-Chin

    2010-07-01

    Hypoxic preconditioning prevents cerebrovascular/cardiovascular disorders by increasing resistance to acute ischemic stress, but severe hypoxic exposure disturbs vascular hemodynamics. This study compared how various exercise regimens with/without hypoxia affect hemodynamics and oxygenation in cardiac, muscle, and cerebral tissues during severe hypoxic exposure. Sixty sedentary males were randomly divided into five groups. Each group (n = 12) received one of five interventions: 1) normoxic (21% O(2)) resting control, 2) hypoxic (15% O(2)) resting control, 3) normoxic exercise (50% maximum work rate under 21% O(2); N-E group), 4) hypoxic-relative exercise (50% maximal heart rate reserve under 15% O(2); H-RE group), or 5) hypoxic-absolute exercise (50% maximum work rate under 15% O(2); H-AE group) for 30 min/day, 5 days/wk, for 4 wk. A recently developed noninvasive bioreactance device was used to measure cardiac hemodynamics, and near-infrared spectroscopy was used to assess perfusion and oxygenation in the vastus lateralis (VL)/gastrocnemius (GN) muscles and frontal cerebral lobe (FC). Our results demonstrated that the H-AE group had a larger improvement in aerobic capacity compared with the N-E group. Both H-RE and H-AE ameliorated the suppression of cardiac stroke volume and the GN hyperemic response (Delta total Hb/min) and reoxygenation rate by acute 12% O(2) exposure. Simultaneously, the two hypoxic interventions enhanced perfusion (Delta total Hb) and O(2) extraction [Delta deoxyHb] of the VL muscle during the 12% O(2) exercise. Although acute 12% O(2) exercise decreased oxygenation (Delta O(2)Hb) of the FC, none of the 4-wk interventions influenced the cerebral perfusion and oxygenation during normoxic/hypoxic exercise tests. Therefore, we conclude that moderate hypoxic exercise training improves cardiopulmonary fitness and increases resistance to disturbance of cardiac hemodynamics by severe hypoxia, concurrence with enhancing O(2) delivery/utilization in

  4. Alteration of Intra-Aneurysmal Hemodynamics for Flow Diversion Using Enterprise and Vision Stents

    PubMed Central

    Tremmel, Markus; Xiang, Jianping; Natarajan, Sabareesh K.; Hopkins, L. Nelson; Siddiqui, Adnan H.; Levy, Elad I.; Meng, Hui

    2010-01-01

    Objective Flow diversion is a novel concept for intracranial aneurysm treatment. The recently developed Enterprise Vascular Reconstruction Device (Codman Neurovascular, Raynham MA) provides easy delivery and repositioning. Although designed specifically for restraining coils within an aneurysm, this stent has theoretical effects on modifying flow dynamics, which have not been studied. The goal of this study was to quantify the effect of single and multiple self-expanding Enterprise stents alone or in combination with balloon-mounted stents on aneurysm hemodynamics using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Methods The geometry of a wide-necked, saccular, basilar trunk aneurysm was reconstructed from computed tomographic angiography images. Various combinations of 1–3 stents were “virtually” conformed to fit into the vessel lumen and placed across the aneurysm orifice. CFD analysis was performed to calculate hemodynamic parameters considered important in aneurysm pathogenesis and thrombosis for each model. Results The complex aneurysmal flow pattern was suppressed by stenting. Stent placement lowered average flow velocity in the aneurysm; further reduction was achieved by additional stent deployment. Aneurysmal flow turnover time, an indicator of stasis, was increased to 114-117% for single-stent, 127-128% for double-stent, and 141% for triple-stent deployment. Furthermore, aneurysmal wall shear stress (WSS) decreased with increasing number of deployed stents. Conclusion This is the first study analyzing flow modifications associated with placement of Enterprise stents for aneurysm occlusion. Placement of 2-3 stents significantly reduced intra-aneurysmal hemodynamic activities, thereby increasing the likelihood of inducing aneurysm thrombotic occlusion. PMID:21197155

  5. Hemodynamic consequences of severe lactic acidosis in shock states: from bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Kimmoun, Antoine; Novy, Emmanuel; Auchet, Thomas; Ducrocq, Nicolas; Levy, Bruno

    2015-04-09

    Lactic acidosis is a very common biological issue for shock patients. Experimental data clearly demonstrate that metabolic acidosis, including lactic acidosis, participates in the reduction of cardiac contractility and in the vascular hyporesponsiveness to vasopressors through various mechanisms. However, the contributions of each mechanism responsible for these deleterious effects have not been fully determined and their respective consequences on organ failure are still poorly defined, particularly in humans. Despite some convincing experimental data, no clinical trial has established the level at which pH becomes deleterious for hemodynamics. Consequently, the essential treatment for lactic acidosis in shock patients is to correct the cause. It is unknown, however, whether symptomatic pH correction is beneficial in shock patients. The latest Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines recommend against the use of buffer therapy with pH ≥7.15 and issue no recommendation for pH levels <7.15. Furthermore, based on strong experimental and clinical evidence, sodium bicarbonate infusion alone is not recommended for restoring pH. Indeed, bicarbonate induces carbon dioxide generation and hypocalcemia, both cardiovascular depressant factors. This review addresses the principal hemodynamic consequences of shock-associated lactic acidosis. Despite the lack of formal evidence, this review also highlights the various adapted supportive therapy options that could be putatively added to causal treatment in attempting to reverse the hemodynamic consequences of shock-associated lactic acidosis.

  6. Impact of associated significant aortic regurgitation on left ventricular remodeling and hemodynamic impairment in severe aortic valve stenosis.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Andreea Catarina; Antonini-Canterin, Francesco; Enache, Roxana; Nicolosi, Gian Luigi; Piazza, Rita; Faggiano, Pompilio; Cassin, Matteo; Dimulescu, Doina; Ginghină, Carmen; Popescu, Bogdan Alexandru

    2013-01-01

    The left ventricular (LV) response to combined pressure and volume overload [aortic stenosis (AS) and aortic regurgitation (AR)] versus pressure overload (isolated AS)has not been systematically studied. We aimed to assess LV remodeling, functional and hemodynamic consequences inpatients with mixed aortic valve disease versus patients with isolated AS. We enrolled 181 patients (67 ± 9 years,109 men) with severe AS (aortic valve area indexed to body surface area <0.6 cm 2 /m 2 ) who underwent preoperative cardiac catheterization and a complete echocardiogram. Pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP), LV end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP) and pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) were measured. One hundred and ten patients (group A)had isolated severe AS (AR 0–1) and 71 patients (group B)had mixed aortic valve disease (severe AS plus AR 2–3). Patients in group B were younger and in a higher New York Heart Association class (p < 0.01). Severity of AS was similar in both groups. Patients in group B had a higher indexed LV mass, a lower LV ejection fraction, and higher PCWP, LVED Pand PAP (all p ≤ 0.01). Patients with severe AS and significant AR are more symptomatic than patients with isolated severe AS. The increased burden due to the combined lesion induces pronounced LV remodeling and more severe hemodynamic consequences.

  7. Changes in peripheral vascular and cardiac sympathetic activity before and after coronary artery bypass surgery: interrelationships with hemodynamic alterations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y D; Jones, M; Hanowell, S T; Koch, J P; Lees, D E; Weise, V; Kopin, I J

    1981-12-01

    The plasma catecholamine levels obtained simultaneously from radial artery (A), pulmonary artery (MV), brachial vein (PV), and coronary sinus (CS) were measured concurrent with hemodynamic determinations during coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) operations. Arterial catecholamine levels decreased after induction of anesthesia and increased after sternotomy; changes in veno-arterial norepinephrine (NE) differences ([PV-A]ne, [MV-A]ne, and [CS-A]ne) were of the same magnitude and direction, suggesting that NE release from various organs was of the same extent. After operation, arterial NE increased further, but the veno-arterial NE differences were in striking contrast; [PV-A]ne became markedly positive, whereas [CS-A]ne became markedly negative, indicating that NE release from extremity peripheral vasculature increased markedly while cardiac NE release decreased. These differential changes in regional sympathetic activity appear to be related to postoperative hypertension (HT) and low cardiac output (CO). There were close relationships of changes in [MV-A]ne to mean arterial pressure (r = 0.78, p less than 0.001) and systemic vascular resistance (r = 0.62, p less than 0.010, suggesting that the sympathetic nervous system plays an important role in CABG perioperative hemodynamic alterations.

  8. Lower body positive and negative pressure alter thermal and hemodynamic responses after exercise.

    PubMed

    Journeay, W Shane; Reardon, Francis D; Jean-Gilles, Sartre; Martin, C Ryan; Kenny, Glen P

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of upright lower body positive and negative pressure (LBPP/LBNP) application on the post-exercise thermal response. It was hypothesized that the application of LBPP would decrease core temperature secondary to increases in skin blood flow (SkBF) and sweating, whereas the application of LBNP would maintain core temperature secondary to attenuated SkBF and sweating responses. There were six subjects who randomly underwent each of the following treatments in the upright posture, separated by a minimum of 48 h: 1) +45 mmHg LBPP; 2) -20 mmHg LBNP; or 3) no pressure for 45 min after performing 15 min of cycle ergometry exercise at 70% of their VO2peak. Measurements included mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), cardiac output (Q), stroke volume (SV), total peripheral resistance (TPR), mean skin temperature (Tsk), mean heat flux, esophageal temperature (Tes), SkBF, and sweat rate. After the application of LBPP, we observed a significantly greater decrease in core temperature relative to the LBNP and control conditions (p < 0.001). This was accompanied by increases in SkBF, sweating, and heat flux (p < 0.05), all of which were higher than the LBNP and control conditions. Core temperature, SkBF, sweating, and heat flux in the LBNP and control conditions were not different from each other. LBPP promoted the restoration of hemodynamics while LBNP and control prolonged the post-exercise hemodynamic state. We conclude that during recovery from exercise in the upright seated posture, core temperature recovery is affected by compromised SkBF and sweating secondary to nonthermal cardiovascular influences.

  9. Acute hemodynamic responses to adenosine and iloprost in patients with congenital heart defects and severe pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Duan-zhen; Zhu, Xian-yang; Meng, Jing; Xue, Hong-mei; Sheng, Xiao-tang; Han, Xiu-min; Cui, Chun-sheng; Wang, Qi-guang; Zhang, Po

    2011-03-17

    Detection of pulmonary vasoreactivity is important for the evaluation of patient with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). The present study aimed to investigate the acute hemodynamic responses to adenosine and iloprost in patients with congenital heart defects (CHDs) and severe PAH. From Mar 2007 to Nov 2009, 75 patients with severe PAH secondary to left-to-right shunt CHDs underwent acute vasodilator test using aerosolized iloprost (n = 50) or intravenous adenosine (n = 25). The hemodynamics were detected and analyzed. Decreased mean pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) were observed in 39 and 43 patients in the iloprost group, and in 16 and 19 patients in the adenosine group, respectively. However, the mean PAP was higher than 40 mm Hg in both groups. No significant difference was observed in the age and baseline hemodynamics between the patients with the decrease of PVR and mean pulmonary-to-aortic pressure (Pp/Ps) ratio greater than 10% and the remaining patients. Adenosine decreased both PAP and systemic arterial pressure significantly, while iloprost inhalation selectively reduced the PAP and increased the oxygen saturation of femoral arterial blood and the pulmonary-to-systemic flow (Qp/Qs) ratio. Compared with adenosine, iloprost caused a more profound decline in the Pp/Ps ratio, PVR and pulmonary-to-systemic vascular resistance ratio, and increase in the Qp/Qs ratio. The acute haemodynamic responses to adenosine and iloprost varied among the patients with CHDs and severe PAH. Different to adenosine, inhaled iloprost exerted selective pulmonary vasodilative effects and was beneficial for pulmonary gas exchange. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Sino-aortic denervation alters the hemodynamic response to exercise in hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Collins, H L; Kim, J K; DiCarlo, S E

    2001-11-01

    The effect of sino-aortic denervation (SAD) on the heart rate (HR), arterial pressure (AP) and regional blood flow responses during dynamic exercise was examined in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Intact (n= 14) and SAD (n= 17) rats were instrumented with arterial catheters and mesenteric and iliac Doppler ultrasonic flow probes. After recovery, all rats underwent a graded exercise test. Heart rate increased significantly during exercise in intact and SAD rats. There was no significant difference in the steady state heart rate response to exercise in the intact and SAD rats. Arterial pressure increased during exercise in the intact rats. In sharp contrast, arterial pressure decreased during exercise in the SAD rats. Iliac vascular conductance increased during exercise in the intact and SAD rats. The increase in iliac vascular conductance during exercise was significantly greater in the SAD rats. Mesenteric vascular conductance decreased during exercise in the intact and SAD rats. The decrease in mesenteric vascular conductance during exercise was significantly attenuated in the SAD rats. Results suggest that functioning arterial baroreceptors are required for the typical hemodynamic responses during dynamic treadmill running in hypertensive rats.

  11. Sensitivity of neural-hemodynamic coupling to alterations in cerebral blood flow during hypercapnia

    PubMed Central

    Huppert, Theodore J.; Jones, Phill B.; Devor, Anna; Dunn, Andrew K.; Teng, Ivan C.; Dale, Anders M.; Boas, David A.

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between measurements of cerebral blood oxygenation and neuronal activity is highly complex and depends on both neurovascular and neurometabolic biological coupling. While measurements of blood oxygenation changes via optical and MRI techniques have been developed to map functional brain activity, there is evidence that the specific characteristics of these signals are sensitive to the underlying vascular physiology and structure of the brain. Since baseline blood flow and oxygen saturation may vary between sessions and across subjects, functional blood oxygenation changes may be a less reliable indicator of brain activity in comparison to blood flow and metabolic changes. In this work, we use a biomechanical model to examine the relationships between neural, vascular, metabolic, and hemodynamic responses to parametric whisker stimulation under both normal and hypercapnic conditions in a rat model. We find that the relationship between neural activity and oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin changes is sensitive to hypercapnia-induced changes in baseline cerebral blood flow. In contrast, the underlying relationships between evoked neural activity, blood flow, and model-estimated oxygen metabolism changes are unchanged by the hypercapnic challenge. We conclude that evoked changes in blood flow and cerebral oxygen metabolism are more closely associated with underlying evoked neuronal responses. PMID:19725749

  12. Sensitivity of neural-hemodynamic coupling to alterations in cerebral blood flow during hypercapnia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huppert, Theodore J.; Jones, Phill B.; Devor, Anna; Dunn, Andrew K.; Teng, Ivan C.; Dale, Anders M.; Boas, David A.

    2009-07-01

    The relationship between measurements of cerebral blood oxygenation and neuronal activity is highly complex and depends on both neurovascular and neurometabolic biological coupling. While measurements of blood oxygenation changes via optical and MRI techniques have been developed to map functional brain activity, there is evidence that the specific characteristics of these signals are sensitive to the underlying vascular physiology and structure of the brain. Since baseline blood flow and oxygen saturation may vary between sessions and across subjects, functional blood oxygenation changes may be a less reliable indicator of brain activity in comparison to blood flow and metabolic changes. In this work, we use a biomechanical model to examine the relationships between neural, vascular, metabolic, and hemodynamic responses to parametric whisker stimulation under both normal and hypercapnic conditions in a rat model. We find that the relationship between neural activity and oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin changes is sensitive to hypercapnia-induced changes in baseline cerebral blood flow. In contrast, the underlying relationships between evoked neural activity, blood flow, and model-estimated oxygen metabolism changes are unchanged by the hypercapnic challenge. We conclude that evoked changes in blood flow and cerebral oxygen metabolism are more closely associated with underlying evoked neuronal responses.

  13. Prior Infarcts, Reactivity, and Angiography in Moyamoya Disease (PIRAMD): a scoring system for moyamoya severity based on multimodal hemodynamic imaging.

    PubMed

    Ladner, Travis R; Donahue, Manus J; Arteaga, Daniel F; Faraco, Carlos C; Roach, Brent A; Davis, L Taylor; Jordan, Lori C; Froehler, Michael T; Strother, Megan K

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE Quantification of the severity of vasculopathy and its impact on parenchymal hemodynamics is a necessary prerequisite for informing management decisions and evaluating intervention response in patients with moyamoya. The authors performed digital subtraction angiography and noninvasive structural and hemodynamic MRI, and they outline a new classification system for patients with moyamoya that they have named Prior Infarcts, Reactivity, and Angiography in Moyamoya Disease (PIRAMD). METHODS Healthy control volunteers (n = 11; age 46 ± 12 years [mean ± SD]) and patients (n = 25; 42 ± 13.5 years) with angiographically confirmed moyamoya provided informed consent and underwent structural (T1-weighted, T2-weighted, FLAIR, MR angiography) and hemodynamic (T2*- and cerebral blood flow-weighted) 3-T MRI. Cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) in the internal carotid artery territory was assessed using susceptibility-weighted MRI during a hypercapnic stimulus. Only hemispheres without prior revascularization were assessed. Each hemisphere was considered symptomatic if localizing signs were present on neurological examination and/or there was a history of transient ischemic attack with symptoms referable to that hemisphere. The PIRAMD factor weighting versus symptomatology was optimized using binary logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic curve analysis with bootstrapping. The PIRAMD finding was scored from 0 to 10. For each hemisphere, 1 point was assigned for prior infarct, 3 points for reduced CVR, 3 points for a modified Suzuki Score ≥ Grade II, and 3 points for flow impairment in ≥ 2 of 7 predefined vascular territories. Hemispheres were divided into 3 severity grades based on total PIRAMD score, as follows: Grade 1, 0-5 points; Grade 2, 6-9 points; and Grade 3, 10 points. RESULTS In 28 of 46 (60.9%) hemispheres the findings met clinical symptomatic criteria. With decreased CVR, the odds ratio of having a symptomatic hemisphere was 13 (95% CI

  14. Glomerular hemodynamic alterations during acute hyperinsulinemia in normal and diabetic rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, B. J.; Anderson, C. M.; Thies, R. S.; Collins, R. C.; Blantz, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    Treatment of insulin dependent diabetes invariably requires exogenous insulin to control blood glucose. Insulin treatment, independent of other factors associated with insulin dependent diabetes, may induce changes that affect glomerular function. Due to exogenous delivery of insulin in insulin dependent diabetes entering systemic circulation prior to the portal vein, plasma levels of insulin are often in excess of that observed in non-diabetics. The specific effects of hyperinsulinemia on glomerular hemodynamics have not been previously examined. Micropuncture studies were performed in control (non-diabetic), untreated diabetic and insulin-treated diabetic rats 7 to 10 days after administration of 65 mg/kg body weight streptozotocin. After the first period micropuncture measurements were obtained, 5 U of regular insulin (Humulin-R) was infused i.v., and glucose clamped at euglycemic values (80 to 120 mg/dl). Blood glucose concentration in non-diabetic controls was 99 +/- 6 mg/dl. In control rats, insulin infusion and glucose clamp increased nephron filtration rate due to decreases in both afferent and efferent arteriolar resistance (afferent greater than efferent) resulting in increased plasma flow and increased glomerular hydrostatic pressure gradient. However, insulin infusion and glucose clamp produced the opposite effect in both untreated and insulin-treated diabetic rats with afferent arteriolar vasoconstriction resulting in decreases in plasma flow, glomerular hydrostatic pressure gradient and nephron filtration rate. Thromboxane A2 (TX) synthetase inhibition partially decreased the vasoconstrictive response due to acute insulin infusion in diabetic rats preventing the decrease in nephron filtration rate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  15. Alterations in uterine hemodynamics caused by uterine fibroids and their impact on in vitro fertilization outcomes.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jei-Won; Kim, Chung-Hoon; Kim, Jun-Bum; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Chae, Hee-Dong; Kang, Byung-Moon

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the impact of fibroids on the blood flow of the uterine and subendometrial arteries and in vitro fertilization (IVF) outcomes. In this study, we analyzed 86 IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycles in which a gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist protocol was used for controlled ovarian stimulation between January 2008 and March 2009. The subjects comprised 86 infertile women with (fibroid group, n=43) or without (control group, n=43) uterine fibroids. Patient characteristics were similar between the fibroid and control groups. The IVF/ICSI outcomes in patients with fibroids were similar to those of patients in the control group. The resistance index (RI) and pulsatile index (PI) of the uterine and subendometrial arteries on the day of embryo transfer were also comparable between the two groups. IVF outcomes and uterine hemodynamics in patients with multiple (≥2) fibroids were similar to those of patients with a single fibroid. However, clinical pregnancy and implantation rates were significantly lower in patients with fibroids who experienced uterine cavity distortion than in patients with fibroids who had a normal uterine cavity (both p<0.05). The RI and PI of the subendometrial artery were significantly higher on the day of embryo transfer in patients with fibroids who experienced uterine cavity distortion than in patients with fibroids who had a normal uterine cavity (both p<0.05). Fibroids which distorting the uterine cavity might impair the subendometrial artery blood flow clinical pregnancy rate and embryo implantation rate in infertile patients undergoing IVF. Otherwise, IVF outcomes were not influenced by the presence of uterine fibroids.

  16. Alterations in uterine hemodynamics caused by uterine fibroids and their impact on in vitro fertilization outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Jei-Won; Kim, Jun-Bum; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Chae, Hee-Dong; Kang, Byung-Moon

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the impact of fibroids on the blood flow of the uterine and subendometrial arteries and in vitro fertilization (IVF) outcomes. Methods In this study, we analyzed 86 IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycles in which a gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist protocol was used for controlled ovarian stimulation between January 2008 and March 2009. The subjects comprised 86 infertile women with (fibroid group, n=43) or without (control group, n=43) uterine fibroids. Results Patient characteristics were similar between the fibroid and control groups. The IVF/ICSI outcomes in patients with fibroids were similar to those of patients in the control group. The resistance index (RI) and pulsatile index (PI) of the uterine and subendometrial arteries on the day of embryo transfer were also comparable between the two groups. IVF outcomes and uterine hemodynamics in patients with multiple (≥2) fibroids were similar to those of patients with a single fibroid. However, clinical pregnancy and implantation rates were significantly lower in patients with fibroids who experienced uterine cavity distortion than in patients with fibroids who had a normal uterine cavity (both p<0.05). The RI and PI of the subendometrial artery were significantly higher on the day of embryo transfer in patients with fibroids who experienced uterine cavity distortion than in patients with fibroids who had a normal uterine cavity (both p<0.05). Conclusion Fibroids which distorting the uterine cavity might impair the subendometrial artery blood flow clinical pregnancy rate and embryo implantation rate in infertile patients undergoing IVF. Otherwise, IVF outcomes were not influenced by the presence of uterine fibroids. PMID:26816875

  17. Glomerular hemodynamic alterations during acute hyperinsulinemia in normal and diabetic rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, B. J.; Anderson, C. M.; Thies, R. S.; Collins, R. C.; Blantz, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    Treatment of insulin dependent diabetes invariably requires exogenous insulin to control blood glucose. Insulin treatment, independent of other factors associated with insulin dependent diabetes, may induce changes that affect glomerular function. Due to exogenous delivery of insulin in insulin dependent diabetes entering systemic circulation prior to the portal vein, plasma levels of insulin are often in excess of that observed in non-diabetics. The specific effects of hyperinsulinemia on glomerular hemodynamics have not been previously examined. Micropuncture studies were performed in control (non-diabetic), untreated diabetic and insulin-treated diabetic rats 7 to 10 days after administration of 65 mg/kg body weight streptozotocin. After the first period micropuncture measurements were obtained, 5 U of regular insulin (Humulin-R) was infused i.v., and glucose clamped at euglycemic values (80 to 120 mg/dl). Blood glucose concentration in non-diabetic controls was 99 +/- 6 mg/dl. In control rats, insulin infusion and glucose clamp increased nephron filtration rate due to decreases in both afferent and efferent arteriolar resistance (afferent greater than efferent) resulting in increased plasma flow and increased glomerular hydrostatic pressure gradient. However, insulin infusion and glucose clamp produced the opposite effect in both untreated and insulin-treated diabetic rats with afferent arteriolar vasoconstriction resulting in decreases in plasma flow, glomerular hydrostatic pressure gradient and nephron filtration rate. Thromboxane A2 (TX) synthetase inhibition partially decreased the vasoconstrictive response due to acute insulin infusion in diabetic rats preventing the decrease in nephron filtration rate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  18. Multigate quality Doppler profiles and morphological/hemodynamic alterations in multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Ciccone, Marco Matteo; Galeandro, Aldo Innocente; Scicchitano, Pietro; Zito, Annapaola; Gesualdo, Michele; Sassara, Marco; Cortese, Francesca; Dachille, Annamaria; Carbonara, Rosa; Federico, Francesco; Livrea, Paolo; Trojano, Maria

    2012-05-01

    Venous echo-color-Doppler (ECD) showed that chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) syndrome is related to multiple sclerosis (MS). Study aims were to assess interobserver variability in ultrasound evaluation of MS patients and to relate echo-markers to MS clinical symptoms and the disability degree. 277 MS patients (117 men, mean age 43.05+10.04 years) admitted to the Neurology Department of Bari University General Hospital, underwent clinical, Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) evaluation, and a cerebro-venous system ECD evaluation. Two operators reevaluated 32 patients to calculate interobserver variability. McNemar test confirmed the procedure reproducibility between two operators (p=ns). Septa/membranes correlated with deep cerebral veins reflux [right: 16% absence vs. 58% presence, p < 0.0001; left: 26% vs. 50%, p < 0.0001]; their absence in Primary Progressive (PP) MS form [right: 11% vs. 2%, p < 0.001; left: 12% vs. 2%, p < 0.001]. Internal jugular veins (IJVs) reflux absence was in Relapsing-remitting (RR) form [right: 60% vs. 74%, p=0.036; left: 56% vs. 85%, p < 0.0001] like hemodynamically significant stenosis [right: 57% vs. 69%, p=0.033; left: 49% vs. 73%, p < 0.001] not present in PP [right: 11% vs. 2%, p < 0.001; left: 10% vs. 3%, p=0.009]. A supine IJVs blocked flow was related to the EDSS class [right: 4.8±1.5 vs. 5.4±1.4, p=0.006; left: 4.7±1.6 vs. 5.5±1.2, p < 0.0001]; its absence was linked to RR [right: 60% vs. 76%, p=0.016; left: 58% vs. 79%, p < 0.001]. ECD has an important value in MS patients with IJV anomalies detection and a good interobserver procedure reproducibility. MS is associated with CCSVI, although further studies are needed.

  19. Cardiac hypertrophy and altered hemodynamic adaptation in growth-restricted preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Leipälä, Jaana A; Boldt, Talvikki; Turpeinen, Ursula; Vuolteenaho, Olli; Fellman, Vineta

    2003-06-01

    The objective was to elucidate hemodynamic adaptation in very low birth weight (<1500 g) infants after intrauterine growth retardation. 31 growth-retarded (SGA, birth weight <-2 SD) and 32 appropriate for gestational age (AGA, birth weight within +/- 1 SD range) infants were enrolled. In SGA infants, the diastolic diameters of the interventricular septum and the left ventricle were increased, and serum brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) was elevated. Left ventricular output (LVO) of the AGA infants increased from 150 +/- 28 to 283 +/- 82 mL/kg/min during the study (p < 0.01). The SGA infants had a higher initial LVO than the AGA infants (243 +/- 47 versus 150 +/- 28 mL/kg/min, p < 0.05), but did not show further LVO increase during the study period. Red cell (RCV) and blood (BV) volume were assessed by Hb subtype analysis, when packed donor red cells were transfused. RCV and BV did not differ between the groups initially, but RCV increased by 18% and BV by 29% in the AGA group during the first 3 d. On day 3, AGA infants had larger BV than the SGA infants (88 +/- 5 versus 73 +/- 12 mL/kg, p < 0.05). In conclusion, cardiac hypertrophy, elevated initial LVO and BNP of the SGA infants suggest increased cardiac workload after intrauterine growth retardation. Based on the BV and RCV data, blood volume regulation may also be impaired. The data suggest that SGA preterm infants may be exposed to an increased risk of circulatory failure during early adaptation.

  20. A coupled experimental and computational approach to quantify deleterious hemodynamics, vascular alterations, and mechanisms of long-term morbidity in response to aortic coarctation

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Arjun; Wendell, David C.; Wang, Hongfeng; Eddinger, Thomas J.; Toth, Jeffrey M.; Dholakia, Ronak J.; Larsen, Paul M.; Jensen, Eric S.; LaDisa, John F.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Coarctation of the aorta (CoA) is associated with morbidity despite treatment. Although mechanisms remain elusive, abnormal hemodynamics and vascular biomechanics are implicated. We present a novel approach that facilitates quantification of coarctation-induced mechanical alterations and their impact on vascular structure and function, without genetic or confounding factors. Methods Rabbits underwent thoracic CoA at 10 weeks of age ( ~9 human years) to induce a 20 mmHg blood pressure (BP) gradient using permanent or dissolvable suture thereby replicating untreated and corrected CoA. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was performed using imaging and BP data at 32 weeks to quantify velocity, strain and wall shear stress (WSS) for comparison to vascular structure and function as revealed by histology and myograph results. Results Systolic and mean BP was elevated in CoA compared to corrected and control rabbits leading to vascular thickening, disorganization and endothelial dysfunction proximally and distally. Corrected rabbits had less severe medial thickening, endothelial dysfunction, and stiffening limited to the proximal region despite 12 weeks of normal BP (~4 human years) after the suture dissolved. WSS was elevated distally for CoA rabbits, but reduced for corrected rabbits. Discussion These findings are consistent with alterations in humans. We are now poised to investigate mechanical contributions to mechanisms of morbidity in CoA using these methods. PMID:22079597

  1. Altered Systemic Hemodynamic & Baroreflex Response to Angiotensin II in Postural Tachycardia Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Hossam I.; Raj, Satish R.; Diedrich, André; Black, Bonnie K.; Paranjape, Sachin Y.; Dupont, William D.; Williams, Gordon H.; Biaggioni, Italo; Robertson, David

    2013-01-01

    Background Postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is characterized by excessive orthostatic tachycardia and significant functional disability. We have previously found that POTS patients had increases in plasma angiotensin II (Ang II) twice as high as normal subjects despite normal blood pressures. In this study we assess systemic and renal hemodynamic and functional responses to Ang II infusion in patients with POTS compared with healthy controls. Methods and Results Following a 3 day sodium controlled diet, we infused Ang II (3 ng/kg/min) for 1 hour in POTS patients (n=15) and healthy controls (n=13) in the supine position. All study subjects were females with normal blood pressure (BP). Ages were similar for POTS and control subjects (30±2 [mean±SEM] vs. 26±1 years; P=0.11). We measured the changes from baseline mean arterial pressure (MAP), renal plasma flow (RPF), plasma renin activity (PRA), aldosterone, urine sodium and baroreflex sensitivity in both groups. In response to Ang II infusion, POTS patients had a blunted increase compared with control subjects in MAP (10±1 mmHg vs. 14±1 mmHg; P=0.01), and diastolic BP (9±1 mmHg vs. 13±1 mmHg; P=0.01), but not systolic BP (13±2 mmHg vs. 15±2 mmHg; P=0.40). Renal plasma flow (RPF) decreased similarly with Ang II infusion in POTS patients and controls (−166±20 vs. −181±17 mL/min/1.73 kg/m2; P=0.58). Post-infusion, the decrease in PRA (−0.9±0.2 vs. −0.6±0.2 ng/mL/h; P=0.43) and the increase in aldosterone (17±1 vs. 15±2 pg/ml; P=0.34) were similar in POTS and controls. The decrease in urine sodium excretion was similar in both POTS and controls (−49±12 vs. −60±16 mEq/g Cr; P=0.55). The spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity at baseline was significantly lower in POTS compared to healthy controls (10.1±1.2 vs. 16.8±1.5 ms/mmHg, P=0.003) and it was further reduced with Ang II infusion. Conclusions Patients with POTS have blunted vasopressor response to Ang II and impaired baroreflex function

  2. Mechanisms of portal hypertension-induced alterations in renal hemodynamics, renal water excretion, and renin secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, R J; Cronin, R E; McDonald, K M; Schrier, R W

    1976-01-01

    Clinical states with portal venous hypertension are frequently associated with impairment in renal hemodynamics and water excretion, as well as increased renin secretion. In the present investigation, portal venous pressure (PVP) was increased in anesthetized dogs undergoing a water diuresis. Renal arterial pressure was maintained constant in all studies. As PVP was increased from 6 to 20 mm Hg, decreases in cardiac output (2.5-2.0 liter/min, P less than 0.05) and mean arterial pressure (140-131 mm Hg, P less than 0.05) were observed. Increases in PVP were also associated with decreases in glomerular filtration rate (GFR, 40-31 ml/min, P less than 0.001), renal blood flow (RBF, 276-193 ml/min, P less than 0.001), and increases in renin secretion (232-939 U/min, P less than 0.025) in innervated kidneys. No significant change in either GFR or RBF and a decrease in renin secretion occurred with increases in PVP in denervated kidneys. To dissociate the changes in cardiac output and mean arterial pressure induced by increase PVP from the observed decreases in GFR and RBF, studies were performed on animals undergoing constriction of the thoracic inferior vena cava. In these studies, similar decreases in cardiac output and mean arterial pressure were not associated with significant changes in GFR or RBF. Increases in PVP also were associated with an antidiuresis as urine osmolality increased from 101 to 446 mosmol/kg H2O (P less than 0.001). This antidiuresis was significantly blunted but not abolished by acute hypophysectomy. In hypophysectomized animals, changes in free water clearance and urine flow were linearly correlated as PVP was increased. These studies indicate that increases in PVP result in decreases in GFR and RBF and increases in renin secretion mediated by increased renal adrenergic tone. Increased PVP is also associated with antidiuresis; this antidiuresis is mediated both by vasopressin release and by diminished tubular fluid delivery to the distal

  3. Cerebral hemodynamics in patients with carotid artery occlusion and contralateral moderate or severe internal carotid artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Vernieri, F; Pasqualetti, P; Diomedi, M; Giacomini, P; Rossini, P M; Caltagirone, C; Silvestrini, M

    2001-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate cerebral hemodynamics in patients suffering from occlusion of the carotid artery (CA) and contralateral CA stenosis. Using transcranial Doppler ultrasonography, the cerebrovascular reactivity to hypercapnia in the middle cerebral arteries was evaluated by calculating the breath-holding index (BHI) of 69 symptomatic patients suffering from internal CA (ICA) occlusion and moderate or severe contralateral ICA stenosis. To evaluate which variables influenced BHIs ipsilateral to the site of ICA occlusion, a multiple stepwise linear regression analysis was performed that included the following factors: patient age, percentage of contralateral ICA stenosis, contralateral BHI, number of collateral pathways, and presence of hypertension, diabetes, smoking, and hyperlipidemia. An analysis of variance was conducted to evaluate the impact of the type of collateral vessels on the BHI. A regression analysis showed that the BHI ipsilateral to the site of ICA occlusion could be accounted for by the contralateral BHI (which was entered at the first step of the analysis, p < 0.001) and by the number of collateral pathways (which was entered at the second step, p = 0.033). Neither the degree of contralateral ICA stenosis nor the other variables could be added to improve the model. The analysis demonstrated that the absence of collateral pathways and the presence of the anterior communicating artery (ACoA) alone were associated with lower BHI values than those found in the presence of two or three collateral vessels, regardless of the presence of an anterior collateral pathway. On the basis of these data one can infer that the cerebral hemodynamic status of patients with occlusive disease of the CA is influenced by individual anatomical and functional characteristics. Because improvement in contralateral hemodynamics after surgical correction of an ICA stenosis can only be expected in the presence of an ACoA, the planning of strategies for

  4. Hemodynamic and metabolic basis of impaired exercise tolerance in patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Roubin, G.S.; Anderson, S.D.; Shen, W.F.; Choong, C.Y.; Alwyn, M.; Hillery, S.; Harris, P.J.; Kelly, D.T. )

    1990-04-01

    Hemodynamic and metabolic changes were measured at rest and during exercise in 23 patients with chronic heart failure and in 6 control subjects. Exercise was limited by leg fatigue in both groups and capacity was 40% lower in the patients with failure. At rest, comparing patients with control subjects, heart rate and right atrial and pulmonary wedge pressure were higher; cardiac output, stroke volume and work indexes and ejection fraction were lower; mean arterial and right atrial pressure and systemic resistance were similar. During all phases of exercise in patients with heart failure, pulmonary wedge pressure and systemic vascular resistance were higher and pulmonary vascular resistance remained markedly elevated compared with values in control subjects. Cardiac output was lower in the patients with failure, but appeared to have the same physiologic distribution in both groups during exercise. Although arterial-femoral venous oxygen content difference was higher in patients with heart failure, this increase did not compensate for the reduced blood flow. Even though the maximal oxygen consumption was significantly reduced, femoral venous lactate and pH values were higher than values in control subjects, but femoral venous pH was similar in both groups at their respective levels of maximal exercise. Ejection fraction was lower in those with heart failure at rest and did not increase with exercise. Ventilation in relation to oxygen consumption was higher in patients with failure than in control subjects.

  5. Effect of alterations in femoral artery flow on abdominal vessel hemodynamics in swine.

    PubMed

    Henderson, J M; Aukerman, J A; Clingan, P A; Friedman, M H

    1999-01-01

    In support of an in vivo investigation in swine of the influence of changes in fluid dynamic wall shear on arterial macromolecular permeability, a procedure has been developed to alter the flows in the porcine posterior arterial vasculature by opening and closing a reversible arteriovenous shunt placed on one of the femoral arteries. Laparoscopic techniques were used to place appropriately modified Transonic Systems ultrasonic flow probes on both external and circumflex iliac arteries, and on the terminal aorta. Flow measurements were made prior to shunt placement, and with the shunt open and closed, to measure the influence of altered external iliac artery flow on the distribution to the infrarenal abdominal vessels. Similar experiments were carried out to relate the flow rates in the external iliac arteries to those in the femoral arteries, which are more accessible. Based on the relationships among the measured flow rates, rules have been developed to estimate the major infrarenal flows in the pig, at baseline and with the shunt opened and closed, from only the flow rates measured at the two femoral arteries.

  6. INSD-Hemodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cetin, Kiris

    2004-01-01

    Hemodynamics (potentially will support Digital Astronaut program): Hemodynamics (potentially will support Digital Astronaut program): During long-duration space missions, astronauts have to adapt themselves to.altered circumstance of microgravity. Blood circulation undergoes significant adaptation during and after space flight. The blood flow through an anatomical Circle of Willis configuration is simulated to provide means for studying gravitational effects on the brain circulation.

  7. Emergency mitral valve replacement for acute severe mitral regurgitation following balloon mitral valvotomy: pathophysiology of hemodynamic collapse and peri-operative management issues.

    PubMed

    Bayya, Praveen Reddy; Varma, Praveen Kerala; Raman, Suneel Puthuvassery; Neema, Praveen Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Severe mitral regurgitation (MR) following balloon mitral valvotomy (BMV) needing emergent mitral valve replacement is a rare complication. The unrelieved mitral stenosis is compounded by severe MR leading to acute rise in pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular afterload, decreased coronary perfusion, ischemia and right ventricular failure. Associated septal shift and falling left ventricular preload leads to a vicious cycle of myocardial ischemia and hemodynamic collapse and needs to be addressed emergently before the onset of end organ damage. In this report, we describe the pathophysiology of hemodynamic collapse and peri-operative management issues in a case of mitral valve replacement for acute severe MR following BMV.

  8. L-arginine reduces heart rate and improves hemodynamics in severe congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Bocchi, E A; Vilella de Moraes, A V; Esteves-Filho, A; Bacal, F; Auler, J O; Carmona, M J; Bellotti, G; Ramires, A F

    2000-03-01

    Stimulated endothelium-derived relaxing factor-mediated vasodilation and conduit artery distensibility are impaired in congestive heart failure (CHF). L-arginine could have a potentially beneficial role in CHF, acting through the nitric oxide (NO)-L-arginine pathway or by growth hormone increment. This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of L-arginine on heart rate, hemodynamics, and left ventricular (LV) function in CHF. In seven patients (aged 39 +/- 8 years) with CHF, we obtained the following parameters using echocardiography and an LV Millar Mikro-Tip catheter simultaneously under four conditions: basal, during NO inhalation (40 ppm), in basal condition before L-arginine infusion, and after L-arginine intravenous infusion (mean dose 30.4 +/- 1.9 g). Nitric oxide inhalation increased pulmonary capillary wedge pressure from 25 +/- 9 to 31 +/- 7 mmHg (p < 0.05), but did not change echocardiographic variables or LV contractility by elastance determination. L-arginine decreased heart rate (from 88 +/- 15 to 80 +/- 16 beats/min, p<0.005), mean systemic arterial pressure (from 84 +/- 17 to 70 +/- 18 mmHg, p < 0.007), and systemic vascular resistance (from 24 +/- 8 to 15 +/- 6 Wood units, p<0.003). L-arginine increased right atrial pressure (from 7 +/- 2 to 10 +/- 3 mmHg, p<0.04), cardiac output (from 3.4 +/- 0.7 to 4.1 +/- 0.8 l/min, p < 0.009), and stroke volume (from 40 +/- 9 to 54 +/- 14 ml, p < 0.008). The ratios of pulmonary vascular resistance to systemic vascular resistance at baseline and during NO inhalation were 0.09 and 0.075, respectively, and with L-arginine this increased from 0.09 to 0.12. L-arginine exerted no effect on contractility; however, by acting on systemic vascular resistance it improved cardiac performance. L-arginine showed a negative chronotropic effect. The possible beneficial effect of L-arginine on reversing endothelial dysfunction in CHF without changing LV contractility should be the subject of further investigations.

  9. Intravenous lipid emulsion alters the hemodynamic response to epinephrine in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Carreiro, Stephanie; Blum, Jared; Jay, Gregory; Hack, Jason B

    2013-09-01

    Intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE) is an adjunctive antidote used in selected critically ill poisoned patients. These patients may also require administration of advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) drugs. Limited data is available to describe interactions of ILE with standard ACLS drugs, specifically epinephrine. Twenty rats with intra-arterial and intravenous access were sedated with isoflurane and split into ILE or normal saline (NS) pretreatment groups. All received epinephrine 15 μm/kg intravenously (IV). Continuous mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) were monitored until both indices returned to baseline. Standardized t tests were used to compare peak MAP, time to peak MAP, maximum change in HR, time to maximum change in HR, and time to return to baseline MAP/HR. There was a significant difference (p = 0.023) in time to peak MAP in the ILE group (54 s, 95 % CI 44-64) versus the NS group (40 s, 95 % CI 32-48) and a significant difference (p = 0.004) in time to return to baseline MAP in ILE group (171 s, 95 % CI 148-194) versus NS group (130 s, 95 % CI 113-147). There were no significant differences in the peak change in MAP, peak change in HR, time to minimum HR, or time to return to baseline HR between groups. ILE-pretreated rats had a significant difference in MAP response to epinephrine; ILE delayed the peak effect and prolonged the duration of effect of epinephrine on MAP, but did not alter the peak increase in MAP or the HR response.

  10. [Hemodynamic effects of intracardiac diatritoic acid and their dependance on left ventricular function and severity of coronary sclerosis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Kober, G; Schröder, W; Kaltenbach, M

    1978-07-01

    In 16 patients with coronary heart disease (n = 13) and cardiomyopathy (n = 3) heart rate, left ventricular pressure and contractility (max dp/dt, min dp/dt and Vpm) were measured prior during and after three consecutive left ventricular angiograms. Heart rate decreased during angiography and increased slightly but significantly after angiography. Systolic and diastolic left ventricular pressure, max dp/dt and min dp/dt increased after angiography, whereas Vpm remained unchanged. Any hemodynamic changes occuring were moderate and only of short duration. No significant differences were found a) between patients with angiographically proven normal and reduced left ventricular function, b) between patients with normal or increased left ventricular filling pressure or c) between those with slight or severe coronary heart disease. The investigations point to a good tolerance for the sodium methyl glucamine salt of diatrizoic acid (Urografin 76) even in patients with progressed coronary heart disease. Severe side-effects described in animal experiments indicate a poor comparibility between animal models and human studies. Moreover animal experiments are mostly done with high doses not used clinically.

  11. Effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition on altered renal hemodynamics induced by low protein diet in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Repollet, E; Tapia, E; Martínez-Maldonado, M

    1987-01-01

    We assessed the role of angiotensin II in mediating the alterations in renal hemodynamics known to result from low protein feeding to normal rats by examining the effect of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor captopril. 2 wk of low protein (6% casein) diet resulted in decreased glomerular filtration rate (normal protein [NP], 1.82 +/- 0.17 vs. low protein [LP], 0.76 +/- 0.01 ml/min; P less than 0.05) and renal plasma flow (NP, 6.7 +/- 0.2 vs. LP, 3.3 +/- 0.3 ml/min; P less than 0.05); renal vascular resistance rose (NP, 8.7 +/- 0.4 vs. LP, 19.8 +/- 1.4 dyn . s per cm5; P less than 0.05). These changes were accompanied by a significant decrease in plasma renin activity (NP, 7.0 +/- 0.7 vs. LP, 4.4 +/- 0.8 ng A I/ml per h; P less than 0.05), plasma aldosterone concentration (NP, 7.0 +/- 0.6 vs. LP, 4.1 +/- 0.7 ng/dl; P less than 0.05), and urinary PGE2 excretion (NP, 3,120 +/- 511 vs. LP, 648 +/- 95 pg/mgCr; P less than 0.05); by contrast renal renin content was significantly increased (NP, 2,587 +/- 273 vs. LP, 7,032 +/- 654 ng A I/mg protein; P less than 0.05). Treatment with captopril (30 mg/kg per d) raised glomerular filtration rate (GFR; LP + capt, 1.6 +/- 0.2 ml/min) and renal plasma flow (RPF; LP + capt, 6.7 +/- 0.7 ml/min), and reduced renal vascular resistance (LP + capt, 9.2 +/- 0.5 dyn/s per cm5) in low protein-fed animals. These values were not different from those measured in untreated and captopril-treated rats fed a normal (23%) protein diet. There were no changes in systemic mean arterial pressure in any group of rats. These data provide evidence that intrarenal angiotensin II mediates the changes in intrarenal hemodynamics induced by protein deprivation. The effects of low protein feeding may be partly potentiated by the reduction in PGE2 synthesis. However, the normalization of GFR and RPF in view of only modest increases in PGE2 excretion after captopril (LP, 648 +/- 95 vs. LP + capt, 1,131 +/- 82 pg/mgCr; P less than 0.05) suggests

  12. Intravenous nanosomes of quercetin improve brain function and hemodynamic instability after severe hypoxia in newborn piglets.

    PubMed

    Blasina, Fernanda; Vaamonde, Lucía; Silvera, Fernando; Tedesco, Antonio Claudio; Dajas, Federico

    2015-10-01

    Perinatal asphyxia is a major cause of death and neurological morbidity in newborns and oxidative stress is one of the critical mechanisms leading to permanent brain lesions in this pathology. In this context we have chosen quercetin, a natural antioxidant, known also by its brain protective effects to study its potential as a therapy for brain pathology provoked by severe hypoxia in the brain. To overcame the difficulties of quercetin to access the brain, we have developed lecithin/cholesterol/cyclodextrin nanosomes as a safe and protective vehicle. We have applied the nanosomal preparation intravenously to newborn piglets submitted to a severe hypoxic or ischemic/hypoxic episode and followed them for 8 or 72 h, respectively. Either towards the end of 8 h after hypoxia or up to 72 h after, electroencephalographic amplitude records in animals that received the nanosomes improved significantly. Animals receiving quercetin also stabilized blood pressure and recovered spontaneous breathing. In this experimental group mechanical ventilation assistance was withdrawn in the first 24 h while the hypoxic and vehicle groups required more than 24 h of mechanical ventilation. Three days after the hypoxia the suckling and walking capacity in the group that received quercetin recovered significantly compared with the hypoxic groups. Pathological studies did not show significant differences in the brain of newborn piglets treated with nanosomes compared with hypoxic groups. The beneficial effects of quercetin nanosomal preparation after experimental perinatal asphyxia show it as a promising putative treatment for the damaged brain in development.

  13. Altered Epithelial Gene Expression in Peripheral Airways of Severe Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Singhania, Akul; Rupani, Hitasha; Jayasekera, Nivenka; Lumb, Simon; Hales, Paul; Gozzard, Neil; Davies, Donna E.

    2017-01-01

    Management of severe asthma remains a challenge despite treatment with glucocorticosteroid therapy. The majority of studies investigating disease mechanisms in treatment-resistant severe asthma have previously focused on the large central airways, with very few utilizing transcriptomic approaches. The small peripheral airways, which comprise the majority of the airway surface area, remain an unexplored area in severe asthma and were targeted for global epithelial gene expression profiling in this study. Differences between central and peripheral airways were evaluated using transcriptomic analysis (Affymetrix HG U133 plus 2.0 GeneChips) of epithelial brushings obtained from severe asthma patients (N = 17) and healthy volunteers (N = 23). Results were validated in an independent cohort (N = 10) by real-time quantitative PCR. The IL-13 disease signature that is associated with an asthmatic phenotype was upregulated in severe asthmatics compared to healthy controls but was predominantly evident within the peripheral airways, as were genes related to mast cell presence. The gene expression response associated with glucocorticosteroid therapy (i.e. FKBP5) was also upregulated in severe asthmatics compared to healthy controls but, in contrast, was more pronounced in central airways. Moreover, an altered epithelial repair response (e.g. FGFBP1) was evident across both airway sites reflecting a significant aspect of disease in severe asthma unadressed by current therapies. A transcriptomic approach to understand epithelial activation in severe asthma has thus highlighted the need for better-targeted therapy to the peripheral airways in severe asthma, where the IL-13 disease signature persists despite treatment with currently available therapy. PMID:28045928

  14. Altered Epithelial Gene Expression in Peripheral Airways of Severe Asthma.

    PubMed

    Singhania, Akul; Rupani, Hitasha; Jayasekera, Nivenka; Lumb, Simon; Hales, Paul; Gozzard, Neil; Davies, Donna E; Woelk, Christopher H; Howarth, Peter H

    2017-01-01

    Management of severe asthma remains a challenge despite treatment with glucocorticosteroid therapy. The majority of studies investigating disease mechanisms in treatment-resistant severe asthma have previously focused on the large central airways, with very few utilizing transcriptomic approaches. The small peripheral airways, which comprise the majority of the airway surface area, remain an unexplored area in severe asthma and were targeted for global epithelial gene expression profiling in this study. Differences between central and peripheral airways were evaluated using transcriptomic analysis (Affymetrix HG U133 plus 2.0 GeneChips) of epithelial brushings obtained from severe asthma patients (N = 17) and healthy volunteers (N = 23). Results were validated in an independent cohort (N = 10) by real-time quantitative PCR. The IL-13 disease signature that is associated with an asthmatic phenotype was upregulated in severe asthmatics compared to healthy controls but was predominantly evident within the peripheral airways, as were genes related to mast cell presence. The gene expression response associated with glucocorticosteroid therapy (i.e. FKBP5) was also upregulated in severe asthmatics compared to healthy controls but, in contrast, was more pronounced in central airways. Moreover, an altered epithelial repair response (e.g. FGFBP1) was evident across both airway sites reflecting a significant aspect of disease in severe asthma unadressed by current therapies. A transcriptomic approach to understand epithelial activation in severe asthma has thus highlighted the need for better-targeted therapy to the peripheral airways in severe asthma, where the IL-13 disease signature persists despite treatment with currently available therapy.

  15. Sex-Related Discordance Between Aortic Valve Calcification and Hemodynamic Severity of Aortic Stenosis: Is Valvular Fibrosis the Explanation?

    PubMed

    Simard, Louis; Côté, Nancy; Dagenais, François; Mathieu, Patrick; Couture, Christian; Trahan, Sylvain; Bossé, Yohan; Mohammadi, Siamak; Pagé, Sylvain; Joubert, Philippe; Clavel, Marie-Annick

    2017-02-17

    Calcific aortic stenosis (AS) is characterized by calcium deposition in valve leaflets. However, women present lower aortic valve calcification loads than men for the same AS hemodynamic severity. We, thus, aimed to assess sex differences in aortic valve fibrocalcific remodeling. One hundred and twenty-five patients underwent Doppler echocardiography and multidetector computed tomography within 3 months before aortic valve replacement. Explanted stenotic tricuspid aortic valves were weighed, and fibrosis degree was determined. Sixty-four men and 39 women were frequency matched for age, body mass index, hypertension, renal disease, diabetes mellitus, and AS severity. Mean age (75±9 years), mean gradient (41±18 mm Hg), and indexed aortic valve area (0.41±0.12 cm(2)/m(2)) were similar between men and women (all P≥0.18). Median aortic valve calcification (1973 [1124-3490] Agatston units) and mean valve weight (2.36±0.99 g) were lower in women compared with men (both P<0.0001). Aortic valve calcification density correlated better with valve weight in men (r(2)=0.57; P<0.0001) than in women (r(2)=0.26; P=0.0008). After adjustment for age, body mass index, aortic valve calcification density, and aortic annulus diameter, female sex was an independent risk factor for higher fibrosis score in AS valves (P=0.003). Picrosirius red staining of explanted valves showed greater amount of collagen fibers (P=0.01), and Masson trichrome staining revealed a greater proportion of dense connective tissue (P=0.02) in women compared with men. In this series of patients with tricuspid aortic valve and similar AS severity, women have less valvular calcification but more fibrosis compared with men. These findings suggest that the pathophysiology of AS and thus potential targets for drug development may be different according to sex. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Causal connectivity alterations of cortical-subcortical circuit anchored on reduced hemodynamic response brain regions in first-episode drug-naïve major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qing; Zou, Ke; He, Zongling; Sun, Xueli; Chen, Huafu

    2016-01-01

    Some efforts were done to investigate the disruption of brain causal connectivity networks involved in major depressive disorder (MDD) using Granger causality (GC) analysis. However, the homogenous hemodynamic response function (HRF) assumption over the brain may disturb the inference of temporal precedence. Here we applied a blind deconvolution approach to examine the altered HRF shape in first-episode, drug-naïve MDD patients. The regions with abnormal HRF shape in patients were chosen as seeds to detect the GC alterations in MDD. The results demonstrated significantly decreased magnitude of spontaneous hemodynamic response of the orbital frontal cortex (OFC) and the caudate nucleus (CAU) in MDD comparing to healthy controls, suggesting MDD patients likely had alterations in neurovascular coupling and cerebrovascular physiology in these two regions. GC mapping showed increased/decreased GC in OFC-/CAU centered networks in MDD. The outgoing GC values from OFC to anterior cingulate cortex and occipital regions were positively correlated with Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD) scores, while the incoming GC from insula, middle and superior temporal gyrus to CAU were negatively correlated with HAMD scores of MDD. The abnormalities of directional connections in the cortico-subcortico-cerebellar network may lead to unbalanced integrating the emotional-related information for MDD, and further exacerbating depressive symptoms. PMID:26911651

  17. Pilot study to determine the hemodynamic safety and feasibility of magnesium sulfate infusion in children with severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Natale, JoAnne E; Guerguerian, Anne-Marie; Joseph, Jill G; McCarter, Robert; Shao, Cheng; Slomine, Beth; Christensen, James; Johnston, Michael V; Shaffner, Donald H

    2007-01-01

    Magnesium sulfate is neuroprotective in preclinical models, but there are limited safety data regarding its clinical use for pediatric traumatic brain injury. We conducted a pilot study in children with severe traumatic brain injury to a) examine if magnesium sulfate decreases mean arterial pressure, decreases cerebral perfusion pressure, increases intracranial pressure, or adversely effects cardiac conduction; and b) determine the feasibility of a multiple-center trial of magnesium sulfate. Double-blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized pilot trial with repeated measurement of hemodynamic variables. Two pediatric trauma centers. Six children (3 months to 18 yrs) with severe traumatic brain injury. : Magnesium sulfate (50 mg/kg) bolus followed by (8.3 mg/kg/hr) infusion for 24 hr vs. equivolume placebo. We screened 96 patients with severe traumatic brain injury during 24 months; 20 were eligible for enrollment, six provided informed consent, four received magnesium sulfate, and two received placebo. Before and after study drug infusion, we repeatedly measured blood ionized magnesium concentration, mean arterial pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure, intracranial pressure, heart rate, and corrected QT interval. Mean age (7.9 yrs), mean highest Glasgow Coma Scale score (6), gender (33% boys), inflicted injury rate (17%), and case mortality rate (17%) did not differ between those enrolled and those not enrolled. Compared with baseline, magnesium sulfate did not change cerebral perfusion pressure, intracranial pressure, heart rate, or corrected QT interval. Mean arterial pressure was unchanged until the late phase of magnesium sulfate infusion, when mean arterial pressure rose (82 +/- 5 vs. 93 +/- 6 mm Hg, p < .05). Sixty-four percent of corrected QT interval determinations obtained in the first 6 days after injury exceeded 440 msecs; 12% were >600 msecs. In children with severe traumatic brain injury, magnesium sulfate administration did not decrease mean arterial

  18. A Novel Index Using Ankle Hemodynamic Parameters to Assess the Severity of Peripheral Arterial Disease: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Tanno, Jun; Gatate, Yodo; Kasai, Takatoshi; Nakano, Shintaro; Senbonmatsu, Takaaki; Sato, Osamu; Ichioka, Shigeru; Kuro-O, Makoto; Nishimura, Shigeyuki

    2016-01-01

    In peripheral arterial disease (PAD) of the lower extremities, the presence of flow-limiting stenoses can be objectively detected by the ankle-brachial index (ABI). However, the severity of ischemic symptoms is not necessarily associated with the ABI value. Atherosclerotic plaque in lower extremity PAD induces ankle arterial stiffness and reduces ankle vascular resistance, which may decrease ankle blood flow and cause ischemic symptoms. We hypothesized that the ankle hemodynamic index (AHI), defined as the ratio of ankle arterial stiffness to ankle vascular resistance, could be used to assess the blood supply deficiency in a diseased lower limb in patients with PAD. The 85 consecutive patients with PAD who were retrospectively analyzed in this study had Rutherford grade 1 to grade 6 ischemia diagnosed as PAD and significant stenotic lesions (>50% diameter stenosis) of the lower extremity on contrast angiography. The AHI was calculated as the product of the ankle pulse pressure and the ratio of heart rate to ankle mean arterial pressure (ankle pulse pressure × heart rate/ankle mean arterial pressure). The Rutherford grade was significantly correlated with the AHI (r = 0.50, P < 0.001), but not with the ABI (r = 0.07, P = 0.52). Multiple ordinal regression analysis showed that anemia (odds ratio 0.66, P = 0.002) and AHI (odds ratio 1.04, P = 0.02) were independently associated with Rutherford grade. Our study shows that AHI, a novel parameter based on the ABI measurement, is well correlated with ischemic symptoms, and may be a useful means to assess the arterial blood supply of the lower extremities of patients with PAD.

  19. Hemodynamic, Autonomic, Ventilatory, and Metabolic Alterations After Resistance Training in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Flavia R; Bonjorno, Jose C; Arena, Ross; Phillips, Shane A; Cabiddu, Ramona; Mendes, Renata G; Arakelian, Vivian M; Bassi, Daniela; Borghi-Silva, Audrey

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the hemodynamic, autonomic, and metabolic responses during resistance and dynamic exercise before and after an 8-week resistance training program using a low-intensity (30% of 1 repetitium maximum), high-repetition (3 sets of 20 repetitions) model, added to an aerobic training program, in a coronary artery disease cohort. Twenty male subjects with coronary artery disease (61.1 ± 4.7 years) were randomly assigned to a combined training group (resistance + aerobic) or aerobic training group (AG). Heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac output, minute ventilation, blood lactate, and parasympathetic modulation indices of heart rate (square root of the mean squared differences of successive RR intervals [RMSSD] and dispersion of points perpendicular to the line of identity that provides information about the instantaneous beat-to-beat variability [SD1]) were obtained before and after an 8-week RT program while performing exercise on a cycle ergometer and a 45-degree leg press. Resistance training resulted in an increase in maximal and submaximal load tolerance (P < 0.01), a decreased hemodynamic response (P < 0.01), and a reduction in blood lactate in the combined training group compared to the aerobic training group during the 45-degree leg press. During exercise on a cycle ergometer, there was a decreased hemodynamic response and increased minute ventilation (P < 0.01). The 8-week RT program resulted in greater parasympathetic tone (RMSSD and SD1) and an increase in the SDNN index during exercise on a cycle ergometer and 45-degree leg press (P < 0.05). An 8-week resistance training program associated with aerobic training may attenuate hemodynamic stress, and modify metabolic and autonomic responses during resistance exercise. The training program also appeared to elicit beneficial cardiovascular and autonomic effects during exercise.

  20. Principals of hemodynamic monitoring.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Patricio M; Pinsky, Michael R

    2007-01-01

    Hemodynamic monitoring is the cornerstone of patient management in the intensive care unit. However, to be used effectively its applications and limitations need to be defined and its values applied within the context of proven therapeutic approaches. Review of the physiological basis for monitoring and a review of the literature on its utility in altering patient outcomes. Most forms of monitoring are used to prevent cardiovascular deterioration or restore cardiovascular wellness. However, little data support the generalized use of aggressive resuscitation protocols in all but the most acutely ill prior to the onset of organ injury. Outcomes improve with aggressive resuscitation in some patients presenting with early severe sepsis and in postoperative high-risk surgical patients. Monitoring should be targeted to meet the specific needs of the patient and should not be applied in a broad fashion and whenever possible it should be used as part of a treatment protocol of proven efficacy.

  1. Effects of severe smoke inhalation injury and septic shock on global hemodynamics and microvascular blood flow in sheep.

    PubMed

    Maybauer, Dirk M; Maybauer, Marc O; Traber, Lillian D; Westphal, Martin; Nakano, Yoshimitsu Y; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei; Morita, Naoki; Herndon, David N; Traber, Daniel L

    2006-11-01

    This prospective, randomized, controlled experimental study looks at the effects on global and regional microvascular blood flow (RMBF) in an ovine model of septic shock after severe smoke inhalation injury. Sixteen sheep were randomized into two groups, a control group (no injury, n = 8) and a smoke/sepsis (SS) group (n = 8), which received an insufflation of 4 sets of 12 breaths of cotton smoke (<40 degrees C) followed by instillation of live Pseudomonas aeruginosa into both lung lobes, according to an established protocol. All sheep were mechanically ventilated with 100% oxygen, and fluid resuscitated with lactated Ringer's solution for the entire duration of the 24-h experimental period to maintain hematocrit at baseline (BL) levels. Healthy control animals were not subjected to the injury and received only 4 x 12 breaths of room air and instillation of the vehicle (normal saline). Blood flow was analyzed using colored microspheres. Control animals remained hemodynamically stable and had no statistical changes from BL in visceral or cerebral blood flow during the entire experimental period. All SS animals developed a hypotensive, hyperdynamic circulation, characterized by a significant increase in heart rate and cardiac output with a simultaneous significant fall in mean arterial pressure, which, in combination, led to a fall in systemic vascular resistance index versus BL (P < 0.001, each). In visceral organs, the trachea showed a significant increase in RMBF (P < 0.001). In addition, skeletal muscle significantly increased versus BL and versus controls over time (P < 0.01). Whereas the pancreas displayed a significant drop in RMBF versus BL and controls (P < 0.05), no statistical differences occurred in the renal cortex, spleen, and ileum. All investigated cerebral structures, such as the cortex cerebri, basal ganglia, thalamus, hippocampus, pons, medulla oblongata, and cerebellum showed a significant increase in RMBF versus BL and versus control animals (P

  2. Canopy soil bacterial communities altered by severing host tree limbs

    PubMed Central

    Dangerfield, Cody R.; Nadkarni, Nalini M.

    2017-01-01

    Trees of temperate rainforests host a large biomass of epiphytic plants, which are associated with soils formed in the forest canopy. Falling of epiphytic material results in the transfer of carbon and nutrients from the canopy to the forest floor. This study provides the first characterization of bacterial communities in canopy soils enabled by high-depth environmental sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Canopy soil included many of the same major taxonomic groups of Bacteria that are also found in ground soil, but canopy bacterial communities were lower in diversity and contained different operational taxonomic units. A field experiment was conducted with epiphytic material from six Acer macrophyllum trees in Olympic National Park, Washington, USA to document changes in the bacterial communities of soils associated with epiphytic material that falls to the forest floor. Bacterial diversity and composition of canopy soil was highly similar, but not identical, to adjacent ground soil two years after transfer to the forest floor, indicating that canopy bacteria are almost, but not completely, replaced by ground soil bacteria. Furthermore, soil associated with epiphytic material on branches that were severed from the host tree and suspended in the canopy contained altered bacterial communities that were distinct from those in canopy material moved to the forest floor. Therefore, the unique nature of canopy soil bacteria is determined in part by the host tree and not only by the physical environmental conditions associated with the canopy. Connection to the living tree appears to be a key feature of the canopy habitat. These results represent an initial survey of bacterial diversity of the canopy and provide a foundation upon which future studies can more fully investigate the ecological and evolutionary dynamics of these communities. PMID:28894646

  3. No reflow leading to catastrophic hemodynamic collapse in a patient with severe aortic stenosis and its management.

    PubMed

    Singh Rao, Ravinder; Shapiro, Robert L; Lasala, John M

    2016-04-01

    We report a case of an 87-year-old female who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for non-ST elevation myocardial infarction while she was being worked up for transcatheter aortic valve procedure. Hemodynamic compromise occurred during the PCI, which could only be mitigated by doing a balloon aortic valvuloplasty and Impella™ insertion. This case report will help in preparedness for any untoward events in patients with aortic stenosis and undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Magnetic Signatures of Several Synthetic Iron Oxides Alteration Pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyodo, Y.; Ona-Nguema, G.; Bonville, P.; Lagroix, F.

    2009-05-01

    The alteration of naturally occurring iron oxides and oxyhydroxides, under the influence of varying environmental conditions, including micro-environments and biological activity, is an important research topic because their connection to past climate variations remains to be elucidated. One approach to this subject matter is to perform laboratory experiments using synthetic iron oxides (sensus lato) subjected to specific physical and bio-chemical conditions. In our presentation, we will report on alteration experiments performed on synthetic lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) and maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) particles. A first approach consists in using the starting materials as electron acceptors in bio-reduction experiments involving the iron- reducing bacteria Shewanella putrefaciens and leading to the formation of magnetite (Fe3O4) particles. In a parallel approach, the starting materials are converted to magnetite by slow heating in CO/CO2 atmosphere. Further alteration can be done by slow heating in air, this time inducing aging and oxidation of the material. At various stages of our experiments, the samples are characterized using both magnetic (low-temperature, low-field and high-field magnetic measurements, Mossbaüer spectroscopy, etc.) and non-magnetic techniques (XRD, HRTEM, etc.). The various experiments conducted on these samples will allow us to study different pathways of magnetite formation and alteration in the environment, including solid-state conversion, partial or total dissolution/precipitation, and particles aggregation.

  5. How good are experienced cardiologists at predicting the hemodynamic severity of coronary stenoses when taking fractional flow reserve as the gold standard.

    PubMed

    Brueren, B R G; ten Berg, J M; Suttorp, M J; Bal, E T; Ernst, J M P G; Mast, E G; Plokker, H W M

    2002-04-01

    Coronary angioplasty should be based on documented ischemia. However, in daily clinical practice the indication for angioplasty is often based on eyeball assessment of the severity of the stenosis. This study was performed to assess the accuracy of eyeball estimation of coronary stenosis when taking functional flow reserve (FFR) as gold standard. Study lesions were where no mutual agreement on the severity of the stenosis was obtained. The procedure consisted of a repeat control angiogram, FFR measurement and in case of FFR<75% percutaneous coronary intervention. The eyeball assessment of the stenosis was written down before further execution of the procedure. FFR was measured with a pressure monitoring guide. Maximal myocardial hyperemia was induced by intravenous adenosine infusion. Fifty-two patients were studied. Agreement between eyeball assessment and FFR existed in a total of 36 cases (69.2%). Over estimation of hemodynamic severity occurred in six cases (11.5%) and under estimation in 10 cases (19.2%). Consequently, the positive predictive value of eyeball assessment for pressure-derived FFR was 63% and the negative predictive value 76%. The assessment of the hemodynamic severity of intermediate coronary stenosis should not be based on eyeball assessment even by experienced interventional cardiologists.

  6. Effects of Phosphodiesterase Type 5 Inhibition on Systemic and Pulmonary Hemodynamics and Ventricular Function in Patients with Severe Symptomatic Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Lindman, Brian R.; Zajarias, Alan; Madrazo, José A.; Shah, Jay; Gage, Brian F.; Novak, Eric; Johnson, Stephanie N.; Chakinala, Murali M.; Hohn, Tara A.; Saghir, Mohammed; Mann, Douglas L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Pressure overload due to aortic stenosis (AS) causes maladaptive ventricular and vascular remodeling that can lead to pulmonary hypertension, heart failure symptoms, and adverse outcomes. Retarding or reversing this maladaptive remodeling and its unfavorable hemodynamic consequences has potential to improve morbidity and mortality. Preclinical models of pressure overload have shown that phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibition is beneficial, however the use of PDE5 inhibitors in patients with AS is controversial because of concerns about vasodilation and hypotension. Methods and Results We evaluated the safety and hemodynamic response of 20 subjects with severe symptomatic AS (mean aortic valve area 0.7±0.2 cm2, ejection fraction 60±14%) who received a single oral dose of sildenafil (40mg or 80mg). Compared to baseline, after 60 minutes sildenafil reduced systemic (−12%, p<0.001) and pulmonary (−29%, p=0.002) vascular resistance, mean pulmonary artery (−25%, p<0.001) and wedge (−17%, p<0.001) pressure, and increased systemic (+13%, p<0.001) and pulmonary (+45%, p<0.001) vascular compliance and stroke volume index (+8%, p=0.01). These changes were not dose dependent. Sildenafil caused a modest decrease in mean systemic arterial pressure (−11%, p<0.001), but was well-tolerated with no episodes of symptomatic hypotension. Conclusions This study shows for the first time that a single dose of a PDE5 inhibitor is safe and well-tolerated in patients with severe AS and is associated with acute improvements in pulmonary and systemic hemodynamics resulting in biventricular unloading. These findings support the need for longer-term studies to evaluate the role of PDE5 inhibition as adjunctive medical therapy in patients with AS. PMID:22447809

  7. 4D cardiovascular magnetic resonance velocity mapping of alterations of right heart flow patterns and main pulmonary artery hemodynamics in tetralogy of Fallot

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To assess changes in right heart flow and pulmonary artery hemodynamics in patients with repaired Tetralogy of Fallot (rTOF) we used whole heart, four dimensional (4D) velocity mapping (VM) cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). Methods CMR studies were performed in 11 subjects with rTOF (5M/6F; 20.1 ± 12.4 years) and 10 normal volunteers (6M/4F; 34.2 ± 13.4 years) on clinical 1.5T and 3.0T MR scanners. 4D VM-CMR was performed using PC VIPR (Phase Contrast Vastly undersampled Isotropic Projection Reconstruction). Interactive streamline and particle trace visualizations of the superior and inferior vena cava (IVC and SVC, respectively), right atrium (RA), right ventricle (RV), and pulmonary artery (PA) were generated and reviewed by three experienced readers. Main PA net flow, retrograde flow, peak flow, time-to-peak flow, peak acceleration, resistance index and mean wall shear stress were quantified. Differences in flow patterns between the two groups were tested using Fisher's exact test. Differences in quantitative parameters were analyzed with the Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test. Results 4D VM-CMR was successfully performed in all volunteers and subjects with TOF. Right heart flow patterns in rTOF subjects were characterized by (a) greater SVC/IVC flow during diastole than systole, (b) increased vortical flow patterns in the RA and in the RV during diastole, and (c) increased helical or vortical flow features in the PA's. Differences in main PA retrograde flow, resistance index, peak flow, time-to-peak flow, peak acceleration and mean wall shear stress were statistically significant. Conclusions Whole heart 4D VM-CMR with PC VIPR enables detection of both normal and abnormal right heart flow patterns, which may allow for comprehensive studies to evaluate interdependencies of post-surgically altered geometries and hemodynamics. PMID:22313680

  8. Altered Insular Function during Aberrant Salience Processing in Relation to the Severity of Psychotic Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Anna; Suenderhauf, Claudia; Smieskova, Renata; Lenz, Claudia; Harrisberger, Fabienne; Schmidt, André; Vogel, Tobias; Lang, Undine E.; Riecher-Rössler, Anita; Eckert, Anne; Borgwardt, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    There is strong evidence for abnormal salience processing in patients with psychotic experiences. In particular, there are indications that the degree of aberrant salience processing increases with the severity of positive symptoms. The aim of the present study was to elucidate this relationship by means of brain imaging. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was acquired to assess hemodynamic responses during the Salience Attribution Test, a paradigm for reaction time that measures aberrant salience to irrelevant stimulus features. We included 42 patients who were diagnosed as having a psychotic disorder and divided them into two groups according to the severity of their positive symptoms. Whole brain analysis was performed using Statistical Parametric Mapping. We found no significant behavioral differences with respect to task performance. Patients with more positive symptoms showed increased hemodynamic responses in the left insula corresponding to aberrant salience than in patients with less positive symptoms. In addition, left insula activation correlated negatively with cumulative antipsychotic medication. Aberrant salience processing in the insula may be increased in psychosis, depending on the severity of positive symptoms. This study indicates that clinically similar psychosis manifestations share the same functional characteristics. In addition, our results suggest that antipsychotic medication can modulate insular function. PMID:27933003

  9. Hemodynamic and serum biochemical alterations associated with intravenous administration of three types of contrast media in anesthetized dogs.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Rachel E; Puchalski, Sarah M; Pascoe, Peter J

    2008-10-01

    To determine the incidence and type of alterations in heart rate (HR), peak systolic blood pressure (PSBP), and serum biochemical variables (total bilirubin, BUN, and creatinine concentrations) associated with IV administration of ionic-iodinated contrast (IIC), nonionic-iodinated contrast (NIC), and gadolinium dimeglumine (GD) contrast media in anesthetized dogs. 280 anesthetized dogs undergoing cross-sectional imaging. HR and PSBP were recorded at 5-minute intervals for 20 minutes for untreated control dogs and dogs that received IIC, NIC, or GD contrast medium. The development of an HR of < 60 beats/min or > 130 beats/min that included a > or = 20% change from baseline was considered a response. The development of PSBP of < 90 mm Hg or > 160 mm Hg that included a > or = 20% change from baseline was considered a response. Pre- and postcontrast serum biochemical values were recorded. Results-Of dogs receiving IIC medium, 3% (3/91) had a response in HR and 4% (4/91) had a response in PSBP at > or = 1 time points. None of the dogs receiving NIC medium had a response in HR; 1 of 16 had a response in PSBP. Of dogs receiving GD contrast medium, 1% (1/92) had a response in HR and 4% (4/92) had a response in PSBP. Of control dogs, 2% (2/81) had a response in HR and 4% (3/81) had a response in PSBP. No serum biochemical alterations were observed. IV administration of contrast media in anesthetized dogs caused moderate bradycardia, tachycardia, hypotension, or hypertension.

  10. Cognition and Hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Novak, Vera

    2012-10-01

    The relationship between cerebral hemodynamics and cognitive performance has increasingly become recognized as a major challenge in clinical practice for older adults. Both diabetes and hypertension worsen brain perfusion and are major risk factors for cerebrovascular disease, stroke and dementia. Cerebrovascular reserve has emerged as a potential biomarker for monitoring pressure-perfusion-cognition relationships. Endothelial dysfunction and inflammation, microvascular disease, and mascrovascular disease affect cerebral hemodynamics and play an important role in pathohysiology and severity of multiple medical conditions, presenting as cognitive decline in the old age. Therefore, the identification of cerebrovascular vascular reactivity as a new therapeutic target is needed for prevention of cognitive decline late in life.

  11. Cognition and Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Vera

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between cerebral hemodynamics and cognitive performance has increasingly become recognized as a major challenge in clinical practice for older adults. Both diabetes and hypertension worsen brain perfusion and are major risk factors for cerebrovascular disease, stroke and dementia. Cerebrovascular reserve has emerged as a potential biomarker for monitoring pressure–perfusion–cognition relationships. Endothelial dysfunction and inflammation, microvascular disease, and mascrovascular disease affect cerebral hemodynamics and play an important role in pathohysiology and severity of multiple medical conditions, presenting as cognitive decline in the old age. Therefore, the identification of cerebrovascular vascular reactivity as a new therapeutic target is needed for prevention of cognitive decline late in life. PMID:23050027

  12. Beneficial effects of fluid resuscitation via the rectum on hemodynamic disorders and multiple organ injuries in an experimental severe acute pancreatitis model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Ma, Li; Song, Xiaoqin; Fei, Jian; Chen, Erzhen; Mao, Enqiang

    2015-01-01

    Exaggerated hydration is harmful for patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), and it can increase mortality rate. In this study, we investigated the role of fluid resuscitation via the rectum (FRVR) on the hemodynamic state and compared FRVR with intravenous fluid resuscitation (IVFR) on resuscitation effect and organ function in an early stage of SAP. We studied whether FRVR corrects hemodynamic disorders at an early stage of SAP in Spraque-Dawley (SD) rats and whether it mitigates organ dysfunction and whether FRVR is superior to IVFR. In both IVFR and FRVR groups, we observed a rebound in the mean arterial pressure (MAP) after 5 h and 6 h of administration (p < 0.05), respectively. MAP of the FRVR group reached the same level as the SHAM group at the end of the treatment, with hematocrit declining compared with the non-fluid resuscitation (NFR) group (p < 0.05). A concomitant increase in abdominal ascites and the lung wet/dry ratio by IVFR was depressed in the FRVR group (p < 0.05). Liver function was ameliorated in both fluid resuscitation groups (p < 0.05), consistent with histopathological improvement. TNF-α in serum and MPO in the lungs and jejunum of the FRVR group were lower than the IVFR group (p < 0.05). Pancreas histopathological injuries were ameliorated by both IVFR and FRVR (p < 0.05). Our findings suggested FRVR is a potential supplementary method for fluid management in an early stage of SAP and FRVR should be studied further. Copyright © 2015 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier India Pvt Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Changes in B-type Natriuretic Peptide and Related Hemodynamic Parameters Following a Fluid Challenge in Critically Ill Patients with Severe Sepsis or Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Shahed; Ali, Ahmad; Atiya, Yahya; Mathivha, Rudo Lufuno; Dulhunty, Joel M.

    2017-01-01

    Context: Severe sepsis or septic shock. Aims: The aim of this study is to examine the effect of a fluid challenge on the B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and the hemodynamic state. Settings and Design: This observational study was conducted in an intensivist-led academic, mixed medical-surgical Intensive Care Unit. Subjects and Methods: Focused transthoracic echocardiogram, plasma BNP, and hemodynamic measurements were recorded at baseline and following a 500 ml fluid challenge in thirty patients. Independent predictors of the percentage (%) change in stroke volume (SV) were sought. Next, these independent predictors were assessed for a relationship with the percentage change in BNP. Statistical Analysis Used: Multiple linear regressions, Wilcoxon rank-sum test, t-test, and Pearson's correlation were used. Data analysis was carried out using SAS. The 5% significance level was used. Results: Using a multiple regression models, the percentage increase in SV was independently predicted by the percentage increase in mean arterial pressure, left ventricular end-diastolic volume/dimension (LVEDV/LVEDd), ejection fraction, and a decrease in Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score (P < 0.0001). Preload, measured using LVEDV1 (before the fluid challenge) was significantly larger in the fluid nonresponders (%SV increase <15%) vs. the responders (%SV increase ≥15%). Finally, the percentage change in BNP was positively correlated with left ventricular size at end diastole LVEDd, r = 0.4, P < 0.035). Conclusions: An increase in BNP soon after a fluid challenge may have some predictive utility of a large LVEDd, which in turn can be used to independently predict the SV response to a fluid challenge.

  14. Dose-Dependent Hemodynamic, Biochemical, and Tissue Oxygen Effects of OC99 following Severe Oxygen Debt Produced by Hemorrhagic Shock in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Muir, William W.; del Rio, Carlos L.; Ueyama, Yukie; Youngblood, Bradley L.; George, Robert S.; Rausch, Carl W.; Lau, Billy S. H.; Hamlin, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    We determined the dose-dependent effects of OC99, a novel, stabilized hemoglobin-based oxygen-carrier, on hemodynamics, systemic and pulmonary artery pressures, surrogates of tissue oxygen debt (arterial lactate 7.2 ± 0.1 mM/L and arterial base excess −17.9 ± 0.5 mM/L), and tissue oxygen tension (tPO2) in a dog model of controlled severe oxygen-debt from hemorrhagic shock. The dose/rate for OC99 was established from a pilot study conducted in six bled dogs. Subsequently twenty-four dogs were randomly assigned to one of four groups (n = 6 per group) and administered: 0.0, 0.065, 0.325, or 0.65 g/kg of OC99 combined with 10 mL/kg lactated Ringers solution administered in conjunction with 20 mL/kg Hextend IV over 60 minutes. The administration of 0.325 g/kg and 0.65 g/kg OC99 produced plasma hemoglobin concentrations of 0.63 ± 0.01 and 1.11 ± 0.02 g/dL, respectively, improved systemic hemodynamics, enhanced tPO2, and restored lactate and base excess values compared to 0.0 and 0.065 g/kg OC99. The administration of 0.65 g/kg OC99 significantly elevated pulmonary artery pressure. Plasma hemoglobin concentrations of OC99 ranging from 0.3 to 1.1 g/dL, in conjunction with colloid based fluid resuscitation, normalized clinical surrogates of tissue oxygen debt, improved tPO2, and avoided clinically relevant increases in pulmonary artery pressure. PMID:25405028

  15. Comparison of acute hemodynamic effects of aerosolized iloprost and inhaled nitric oxide in adult congenital heart disease with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Caojin, Zhang; Yigao, Huang; Tao, Huang; Wenhui, Huang; Chunli, Xia; Xinsheng, Huang

    2012-01-01

    To compare the acute hemodynamic effects of aerosolized iloprost and inhaled nitric oxide (NO) in adult congenital heart disease (CHD) patients with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). One hundred and eighty five adult CHDs with severe PAH were nonrandomized into two groups (iloprost, n=127; NO, n=58). Various hemodynamic parameters were measured before and after iloprost or NO inhalation. Iloprost and NO inhalation resulted in significant reductions in pulmonary arterial pressure (from 110.6±21.8 mmHg to 105.5±22.3 mmHg, p<0.05; from 113.1±18.7 mmHg to 107.2±19.9 mmHg, p<0.05, respectively) and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) (from 13.4±8.3 Wood units to 9.6±6.4 Wood units, p<0.01; from 13.7±7.1 Wood units to 9.3±4.9 Wood units, p<0.01, respectively) and increases in pulmonary blood flow (from 6.7±3.3 L/min to 9.4±5.8 L/min, p<0.05; from 6.6±3.1 L/min to 9.6±5.9 L/min, p<0.01, respectively) and the Qp/Qs ratio (from 1.5±0.8 to 2.1±1.4, p<0.01; from 1.5±0.8 to 2.0±1.3, p<0.01, respectively). When the effects of inhaled iloprost and NO were compared, similar reductions in pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance were observed. Aerosolized iloprost and inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) were generally well tolerated and no patient experienced any side effects during inhalation. Aerosolized iloprost can be effectively and safely used and might be an alternative to NO for testing pulmonary vascular reactivity and treating severe PAH in adult CHD patients.

  16. The hemodynamic effects of intravenous digoxin-binding fab immunoglobulin in severe preeclampsia: a double-blind, randomized, clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Adair, C D; Luper, A; Rose, J C; Russell, G; Veille, J-C; Buckalew, V M

    2009-04-01

    An endogenous digitalis-like factor (EDLF) has been implicated in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia (PE). This hypothesis is supported by two cases of preeclampsia in which administration of digoxin immune Fab (DIF) reduced mean arterial pressure (MAP). To study this observation further, we performed a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial to examine the effects on MAP of intravenous DIF given after delivery in 26 subjects with severe preeclampsia. Treating obstetricians were blinded to subject assignment and were allowed to use standard antihypertensive drugs during the trial. The primary outcome, a significant difference in blood pressure between the two groups over the 24-h period of observation after the intervention, was not supported. However, mean MAP was significantly lower in the DIF-treated subjects for the first 4 h after therapy as compared with controls (P=0.05). Six subjects (46.2%) in the placebo arm were given conventional antihypertensive medications by their obstetrician for blood pressure >160 mm Hg systolic or >110 mm Hg diastolic, compared with zero subjects in the treatment arm (P=0.01). A trend towards increased creatinine clearance was observed in DIF-treated subjects (137.6+/-42.6 versus 104.1+/-43.4, P=0.07). These results support the hypothesis that EDLF contributes to the elevated blood pressure in preeclampsia and suggests a possible role for DIF as a treatment for this condition.

  17. Direct hemoperfusion with polymyxin B-immobilized cartridge in severe sepsis due to intestinal perforation: hemodynamic findings and clinical considerations in anticoagulation therapy.

    PubMed

    Maynar, Javier; Martínez-Sagasti, Fernando; Herrera-Gutiérrez, Manuel; Martí, Francisco; Candel, Francisco Javier; Belda, Javier; Castaño, Sergio; Sanchez-Izquierdo, José Ángel

    2013-06-01

    High levels of endotoxin have been reported as a risk factor for mortality in critical patients. Toraymyxin® is a column designed to remove circulating blood endotoxin by direct hemoperfusion widely used in Japan. To evaluate the effect of direct hemoperfusion with Toraymyxin® (DHP-PMX) as an adjuvant treatment in patients with severe sepsis due to intestinal perforation in terms of hemodynamic function and coagulation abnormalities. Prospective cohort study with a historical control group. Cohort 1: prospective cohort undergoing two sessions of DHP-PMX (n=14). Cohort 2: retrospective historical cohort (n=7). The anticoagulation regime was used according to the protocol of each centre and to the special conditions of each patient. Mean norepinephrine dose was significantly reduced (0.9 ± 0.5 μg/kg/min pre-first DHP-PMX vs 0.3 ± 0.4 μg/kg/min post-second DHP-PMX treatment, p<0.05). Central venous pressure (CVP) and stroke volume variation (SVV) remained without significant changes during the study, as well as cardiac index (CI) in patients with initial CI ≥ 2.5 L/min/m2. CI significantly increased in patients with initial CI<2.5 L/min/m2 (2.1 ± 0.4 pre-first DHP-PMX vs 3.4 ± 0.4 pre-second DHP-PMX session, p=0.01). Mean platelet count pre-first and post-second DHP-PMX decreased significantly (213.9 x 10(3) ± 138.5 x 10(3) platelets/mm3 vs 91.0 x 10(3) ± 53.5 x 10(3) platelets/mm3, p=0.03), without significant changes during each DHP-PMX treatment. Patients did not experience bleeding nor complications derived from DHP-PMX treatments. Survival rates at 28 and 56 days did not differ significantly between cohort 1 and 2 (21.4% vs 42.9%; 42.9% vs 57.1%; respectively). Performing two sessions of DHP-PMX treatment in a cohort of patients with abdominal sepsis is a feasible adjuvant therapeutic approach, safe in terms of coagulation abnormalities, can be done with different anticoagulation protocols, improves hemodynamic status and may impact on survival.

  18. 2D.08: COMPARISON OF CENTRAL HEMODYNAMIC INDICES FOR PREDICTING THE PRESENCE AND SEVERITY OF CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE USING A BRACHIAL CUFF-BASED OSCILLOMETRIC DEVICE.

    PubMed

    Nakagomi, A; Okada, S; Shoji, T; Kobayashi, Y

    2015-06-01

    Various indices of central hemodynamics, such as aortic pulsatility, pulse pressure amplification (PPA) and augmentation index, have been proposed as novel predictors for coronary artery disease (CAD). However, it remains unknown which parameter is most appropriate for risk estimation. The aim of this study was to compare the predictive value of these indices using an easy-to-use, brachial cuff-based oscillometric device. Consecutive 139 patients undergoing elective coronary angiography were enrolled in this study. Augmentation index adjusted to 75 beats/min (Aix@75), brachial and aortic BP indices were measured with Mobil-O-Graph®. We defined fractional pulse pressure (FPP) as pulse pressure (PP) per mean BP and PPA as brachial PP minus aortic PP. Significant CAD was defined as having more than 50% stenosis in major coronary arteries, and the severity was evaluated with Gensini score. Compared with no CAD patients, CAD patients showed significantly higher PPs and FPPs (brachial PP 48.4 ± 15.5 vs 55.0 ± 16.2mmHg, aortic PP 51.7 ± 19.4 vs 62.2 ± 19.9mmHg, brachial FPP 0.42 ± 0.09 vs 0.49 ± 0.11, aortic FPP 0.46 ± 0.13 vs 0.57 ± 0.14; all p < 0.05) and lower PPA (-3.3 ± 8.7 vs -7.2 ± 7.8; p < 0.05). Other indices including Aix@75 did not differ significantly. Logistic regression analysis revealed aortic PP, brachial FPP, aortic FPP and PPA each correlated with the presence of CAD after adjustment for potential confounders (odds ratio (OR) [95% confidence interval]: aortic PP per 10 mmHg OR = 1.50 [1.08-2.08], brachial FPP per 0.1 OR = 2.26 [1.30-3.94], aortic FPP per 0.1 OR = 2.15 [1.35-3.42], PPA per 1 mmHg OR = 0.93 [0.87-0.99], respectively). However, when aortic FPP plus either aortic PP, brachial FPP, or PPA were included in the model, only aortic FPP remained significant. These indices were all associated with the severity of CAD expressed as Gensini score (correlation coefficient

  19. Statins and cerebral hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Giannopoulos, Sotirios; Katsanos, Aristeidis H; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Marshall, Randolph S

    2012-01-01

    HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are associated with improved stroke outcome. This observation has been attributed in part to the palliative effect of statins on cerebral hemodynamics and cerebral autoregulation (CA), which are mediated mainly through the upregulation of endothelium nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Several animal studies indicate that statin pretreatment enhances cerebral blood flow after ischemic stroke, although this finding is not further supported in clinical settings. Cerebral vasomotor reactivity, however, is significantly improved after long-term statin administration in most patients with severe small vessel disease, aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, or impaired baseline CA. PMID:22929438

  20. Hemodynamic changes associated with spinal and general anesthesia for hip fracture surgery in severe ASA III elderly population: a pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Messina, A; Frassanito, L; Colombo, D; Vergari, A; Draisci, G; Della Corte, F; Antonelli, M

    2013-09-01

    Patients affected by hip fracture (HF) have high risk of perioperative complications. Despite regional anesthesia is widely used, hypotension is common and increases the risk of myocardial ischemia. The aim of this work was to study hemodynamic changes following spinal (SA) and general (GA) anesthesia in this selected population of patients. Twenty patients over 70 years, ASA III, scheduled for HF repair were randomized to receive SA or general anesthesia GA. Hemodynamic responses to SA and GA were analyzed trough LiDCO™plus monitor (LiDCO Ltd., Cambridge, UK). SA provided a more stable hemodynamic profile. SA group received less interventions to keep mean arterial pressure (MAP) within limits. GA group had intraoperative cardiac index (CI), stroke volume index (SVI) and MAP significantly lower than baseline. Despite both groups experienced hypotension after the induction, MAP reduction in SA group was primarily due to systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI) decline, whereas hypotension in GA group was primarily due to a reduction in SVI and CI. The coefficient of variation (CV) was significantly higher in GA group for CI, SVI, MAP and heart rate (HR) within one hour analysis comparing to SA group. SA group had an higher CV for SVRI. SA in the elderly population with hip fracture provides a more stable hemodynamic profile requiring less intervention to keep MAP close to baseline value. Hypotension was common in SA and GA after induction and within intraoperative period. A larger randomized clinical study should be performed to confirm these preliminary data.

  1. Correlations of Flow Structure and Particle Deposition with Structural Alterations in Severe Asthmatic Lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sanghun; Miyawaki, Shinjiro; Choi, Jiwoong; Hoffman, Eric A.; Wenzel, Sally; Lin, Ching-Long

    2014-11-01

    Severe asthmatics are characterized by alterations of bifurcation angle, hydraulic diameter, circularity of the airways, and local shift of air-volume functional change. The characteristics altered against healthy human subjects can affect flow structure and particle deposition. A large-eddy-simulation (LES) model for transitional and turbulent flows is utilized to study flow characteristics and particle deposition with representative healthy and severe asthmatic lungs. For the subject-specific boundary condition, local air-volume changes are derived with two computed tomography images at inspiration and expiration. Particle transport simulations are performed on LES-predicted flow fields. In severe asthmatics, the elevated air-volume changes of apical lung regions affect the increased particle distribution toward upper lobes, especially for small particles. The constricted airways are significantly correlated with high wall shear stress, leading to the increased pressure drop and particle deposition. The structural alterations of bifurcation angle, circularity and hydraulic diameter in severe asthmatics are associated with the increase of particle deposition, wall shear stress and wall thickness. NIH Grants: U01-HL114494, R01-HL094315 and S10-RR022421. Computer time: XSEDE.

  2. Asiatic acid alleviates hemodynamic and metabolic alterations via restoring eNOS/iNOS expression, oxidative stress, and inflammation in diet-induced metabolic syndrome rats.

    PubMed

    Pakdeechote, Poungrat; Bunbupha, Sarawoot; Kukongviriyapan, Upa; Prachaney, Parichat; Khrisanapant, Wilaiwan; Kukongviriyapan, Veerapol

    2014-01-16

    Asiatic acid is a triterpenoid isolated from Centella asiatica. The present study aimed to investigate whether asiatic acid could lessen the metabolic, cardiovascular complications in rats with metabolic syndrome (MS) induced by a high-carbohydrate, high-fat (HCHF) diet. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed with HCHF diet with 15% fructose in drinking water for 12 weeks to induce MS. MS rats were treated with asiatic acid (10 or 20 mg/kg/day) or vehicle for a further three weeks. MS rats had an impairment of oral glucose tolerance, increases in fasting blood glucose, serum insulin, total cholesterol, triglycerides, mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate, and hindlimb vascular resistance; these were related to the augmentation of vascular superoxide anion production, plasma malondialdehyde and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) levels (p<0.05). Plasma nitrate and nitrite (NOx) were markedly high with upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, but dowregulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression (p<0.05). Asiatic acid significantly improved insulin sensitivity, lipid profiles, hemodynamic parameters, oxidative stress markers, plasma TNF-α, NOx, and recovered abnormality of eNOS/iNOS expressions in MS rats (p<0.05). In conclusion, asiatic acid improved metabolic, hemodynamic abnormalities in MS rats that could be associated with its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory effects and recovering regulation of eNOS/iNOS expression.

  3. Prevalence and severity of foot pad alterations in German turkey poults during the early rearing phase.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, S; Ziegler, N; Bartels, T; Hübel, J; Schumacher, C; Rauch, E; Brandl, S; Bender, A; Casalicchio, G; Krautwald-Junghanns, M-E; Erhard, M H

    2013-05-01

    In the previously performed field study from 2007 to 2009, it became evident that foot pad alterations were already commonly found in turkeys at the age of 6 wk. At this early age, 45% of the clinically examined birds were diagnosed with epithelial necrosis. Therefore, it became important to specifically analyze the situation during the early rearing phase. The present study reflects the prevalence and severity of foot pad alterations of turkey poults up to the age of 35 d (5 wk), starting as early as the age of 3 d. From 24 turkey farms throughout Germany, in general 5,531 turkeys [3,131 male and 2,400 female] of the British United Turkeys 6 strain from 46 flocks, were examined to that effect. Prevalence and severity increased within the duration of stay in the stable, and the prevalence was higher (P < 0.001) during the second visit between d 22 to 35 (factor: 0.94). Therefore, 27.3% (d 3 to 5; male/female: 39.1/25.0%) and 63.3% (d 22 to 35: 61.3/65.7%) of the examined poults had alterations of the foot pads, such as hyperkeratosis (d 3 to 5: 20.4/14.2%; d 22 to 35: 17.6/17.1%), high-grade hyperkeratosis with adhesive dirt (d 3 to 5: 8.7/10.7%; d 22 to 35: 29.2/39.3%), and epithelial necrosis (d 3 to 5: 0.1/0.1%; d 22 to 35: 14.6/9.3%). Female poults showed a higher risk (P < 0.001) of developing food pad alterations (factor: 0.76) than male poults. Male poults developed a higher percentage of epithelial necrosis than hens shortly before relocation. A higher stocking density during the very early rearing phase (d 3 to 5) led to a worse foot pad health status (P < 0.001). Because even mild alterations in the foot pad condition can be indicators for suboptimal design of the rearing environment and are to be seen as a pre-state for severe cases of foot pad dermatitis, it is important to set the main focus on the early rearing phase.

  4. Airway glutathione homeostasis is altered in children with severe asthma: evidence for oxidant stress.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Anne M; Teague, W Gerald; Holguin, Fernando; Yeh, Mary; Brown, Lou Ann S

    2009-01-01

    Severe asthma is characterized by persistent airway inflammation and increased formation of reactive oxygen species. Glutathione (GSH) is an important antioxidant in the epithelial lining fluid (ELF). We hypothesized that airway GSH homeostasis was altered in children with severe asthma and was characterized by decreased GSH and increased glutathione disulfide (GSSG) concentrations. Bronchoalveolar lavage was obtained from 65 children with severe asthma, including 35 children with baseline airway obstruction evidenced by FEV(1) <80%. Control data were obtained from 6 children with psychogenic (habit) cough or vocal cord dysfunction undergoing diagnostic bronchoscopy and 35 healthy adult controls. GSH, GSSG, and other determinants of airway oxidative stress including glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), malondialdehyde, 8-isoprostane, and H(2)O(2) were measured in the ELF. The ELF redox potential was calculated from GSH and GSSG by using the Nernst equation. Compared with controls, subjects with severe asthma had lower airway GSH with increased GSSG despite no differences in GST, GR, and GPx activities between groups. This was accompanied by increased malondialdehyde, 8-isoprostane, and H(2)O(2) concentrations in the ELF. GSH oxidation was most apparent in subjects with severe asthma with airway obstruction and was supported by an upward shift in the ELF GSH redox potential. Children with severe asthma have increased biomarkers of oxidant stress in the ELF that are associated with increased formation of GSSG and a shift in the GSH redox potential toward the more oxidized state.

  5. Severe dyspnoea with alteration of the diffusion capacity of the lung associated with fingolimod treatment.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Assunta; Patanella, Agata Katia; Nociti, Viviana; De Fino, Chiara; Lucchini, Matteo; Savio, Francesco Lo; Rossini, Paolo Maria; Mirabella, Massimiliano

    2016-09-01

    In phase II clinical trial, fingolimod at a dose of 5.0mg (ten times higher than the currently approved dose) induced dyspnoea and decreased forced expiratory flow in some patients, probably trought an airways constriction S1P4-mediated. In phase III trials, respiratory adverse events associated with fingolimod treatment as dyspnoea, cough, oropharingeal pain and nasal congestion are reported with the same incidence of placebo. Here we report two cases of severe dyspnoea with alteration of the diffusion capacity of the lung associated with fingolimod treatment, which led to permanent treatment withdrawal.

  6. [CLINICAL-HEMODYNAMIC PECULIARITIES OF THE COURSE OF HEMODYNAMIC ISCHEMIC STROKE IN ACUTE PERIOD].

    PubMed

    Shkrobot, S; Sokhor, N; Milevska-Vovchuk, L; Yasniy, O; Shkrobot, L

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the research is to study the peculiarities of cardiac morphometric parameters, the parameters of central hemodynamics and their impact on the course of hemodynamic ischemic stroke in acute period. 116 patients were performed Echo-Doppler-cardiography in acute period of hemodynamic ischemic stroke in order to evaluate cardiac morphometric parameters. These patients were also performed transcranial duplex scanning. The results established that among significant clinical factors that influence the course of the acute period of hemodynamic ischemic stroke the most important are: the size of the focus, the level of consciousness on the 1st day, primary systolic arterial pressure, age of the patient. Hemodynamic ischemic stroke occurs on the background of changes of cardiac morphometric parameters and the disorders of the central hemodynamics. There is a close connection between the severity of hemodynamic ischemic stroke on the 7th and 14th day with the ejection fraction, the size of left atrium, the thickness of posterior wall of left ventricle, final diastolic size of left ventricle. The interrelation between the parameters of cerebral hemodynamics and cardiac morphometric parameters was established. cardiac morphometric parameters and parameters of central hemodynamics can be predictors of the course of hemodynamic ischemic stroke in acute period.

  7. Effect of altered precipitation on osmotic potentials of several species in a forest ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Gebre, G.M.; Shirshac, T.L.; Gunderson, C.A.

    1995-06-01

    The effect of altered precipitation on osmotic potential of several species in an upland oak forest was investigated. Leaf samples were collected from a treatment whose precipitation was either unaltered (ambient) or altered by intercepting 33% of throughfall (dry) and diverting it to another treatment (wet). Treatment as well as species differences in osmotic potential at saturation were evident with the oaks generally exhibiting lower osmotic potentials than sugar maple, red maple, dogwood, and black gum. Leaves of chestnut oak had lower osmotic potentials than other species, throughout the growing season. Osmotic potential at saturation of chestnut oak leaves collected in August increased in response to an increase in soil moisture content. The osmotic potential of dogwood leaves declined in the dry treatment, with the largest osmotic adjustment occurring in June, coinciding with the period of greatest drought. Among the species sampled from May to September; only chestnut oak, white oak, and sugar maple continued to lower their osmotic potentials in the dry treatment. These first year data indicate that a 33% reduction of the throughfall precipitation was sufficient to alter water relations of some species and identify those species capable of osmotic adjustment to drought. Chestnut oak trees lowered their osmotic potentials sooner than other species and maintained lower baseline osmotic potentials at saturation, indicative of their drought tolerance capability.

  8. Effects of Obesity on Cardiovascular Hemodynamics, Cardiac Morphology, and Ventricular Function.

    PubMed

    Alpert, Martin A; Omran, Jad; Bostick, Brian P

    2016-12-01

    Obesity produces a variety of hemodynamic alterations that may cause changes in cardiac morphology which predispose to left and right ventricular dysfunction. Various neurohormonal and metabolic alterations commonly associated with obesity may contribute to these abnormalities of cardiac structure and function. These changes in cardiovascular hemodynamics, cardiac morphology, and ventricular function may, in severely obese patients, predispose to heart failure, even in the absence of other forms of heart disease (obesity cardiomyopathy). In normotensive obese patients, cardiac involvement is commonly characterized by elevated cardiac output, low peripheral vascular resistance, and increased left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic pressure. Sleep-disordered breathing may lead to pulmonary arterial hypertension and, in association with left heart failure, may contribute to elevation of right heart pressures. These alterations, in association with various neurohormonal and metabolic abnormalities, may produce LV hypertrophy; impaired LV diastolic function; and less commonly, LV systolic dysfunction. Many of these alterations are reversible with substantial voluntary weight loss.

  9. Hemodynamic effects of short-term noise exposure--comparison of steady state and intermittent noise at several sound pressure levels.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Y

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the extent of blood pressure elevation during noise exposure, to elucidate the underlying hemodynamic mechanisms and to assess baroreceptor cardiac reflex sensitivity in connection with blood pressure elevation. Twenty-two young normotensive males participated in the experiment and underwent six noise exposure conditions of 20 min each: steady state and intermittent pink noises of 80 dB (sound pressure level (SPL)), 90 dB (SPL) and 100 dB (SPL). The results indicate that elevations in mean arterial pressure, as well as diastolic and systolic blood pressure, were significant or almost significant in the intermittent 100 dB (SPL) and 90 dB (SPL) conditions. Habituation occurred particularly with the steady state noises. In at least the intermittent 100 dB (SPL) condition, an increase in peripheral vascular resistance was the underlying hemodynamic mechanism of blood pressure elevation. Decreases in cardiac output and stroke volume were also associated with the peripheral vasoconstriction. Baroreceptor reflex sensitivity was maintained near the baseline level for all of the noise exposure conditions. Therefore, reflex sensitivity may not have been suppressed even in the intermittent 100 dB (SPL) condition during which blood pressure elevations occurred.

  10. Moderate and severe malnutrition alters proliferation of spleen cells in rats.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Barberena, E; Ceballos-Olvera, I; González-Márquez, H; Ortiz-Muñiz, R

    2013-04-01

    Previous studies have shown alterations in bone marrow cell proliferation in malnourished rats, during lactation. The objective of this study was to determine in vivo effects of moderate and severe malnutrition on spleen cell proliferation in 21-day-old rat pups. Spleen cell proliferation was determined following administration of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) over a time course of 2, 4, 6 and 8 h. Incorporation of BrdUrd was detected using FITC-conjugated anti-BrdUrd monoclonal antibodies and total DNA content was detected and evaluated using propidium iodide using flow cytometry. Proportions of cells in S and G2 /M were reduced in the rats with moderate (MN2(nd) ) and severe (MN3(rd) ) malnutrition. BrdUrd incorporation was lower in both groups of malnourished rat. In cells of MN2nd individuals, length of G1 became shorter, while length of S-phase increased. In contrast, fraction of cells in proliferation was significantly lower in both groups of malnourished rat, with MN3rd group having lowest percentage of cell population growth. In this study, severe malnutrition did not significantly affect duration of phases of the cell cycle, although fractions of proliferating cells were dramatically reduced. Moderate malnutrition increased time of cells in DNA synthesis and time of total cell cycle and severe malnutrition reduced growth fraction of spleen cells in malnourished rats during lactation. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Symptom-Hemodynamic Mismatch and Heart Failure Event Risk

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Christopher S.; Hiatt, Shirin O.; Denfeld, Quin E.; Mudd, James O.; Chien, Christopher; Gelow, Jill M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Heart failure (HF) is a heterogeneous condition of both symptoms and hemodynamics. Objective The goal of this study was to identify distinct profiles among integrated data on physical and psychological symptoms and hemodynamics, and quantify differences in 180-day event-risk among observed profiles. Methods A secondary analysis of data collected during two prospective cohort studies by a single group of investigators was performed. Latent class mixture modeling was used to identify distinct symptom-hemodynamic profiles. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to quantify difference in event-risk (HF emergency visit, hospitalization or death) among profiles. Results The mean age (n=291) was 57±13 years, 38% were female, and 61% had class III/IV HF. Three distinct symptom-hemodynamic profiles were identified. 17.9% of patients had concordant symptoms and hemodynamics (i.e. moderate physical and psychological symptoms matched the comparatively hemodynamic profile), 17.9% had severe symptoms and average hemodynamics, and 64.2% had poor hemodynamics and mild symptoms. Compared to those in the concordant profile, both profiles of symptom-hemodynamic mismatch were associated with a markedly increased event-risk (severe symptoms hazards ratio = 3.38, p=0.033; poor hemodynamics hazards ratio = 3.48, p=0.016). Conclusions A minority of adults with HF have concordant symptoms and hemodynamics. Either profile of symptom-hemodynamic mismatch in HF is associated with a greater risk of healthcare utilization for HF or death. PMID:24988323

  12. Altered protein networks and cellular pathways in severe west nile disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Fraisier, Christophe; Camoin, Luc; Lim, Stephanie M; Lim, Stéphanie; Bakli, Mahfoud; Belghazi, Maya; Fourquet, Patrick; Granjeaud, Samuel; Osterhaus, Ab D M E; Koraka, Penelope; Martina, Byron; Almeras, Lionel

    2013-01-01

    The recent West Nile virus (WNV) outbreaks in developed countries, including Europe and the United States, have been associated with significantly higher neuropathology incidence and mortality rate than previously documented. The changing epidemiology, the constant risk of (re-)emergence of more virulent WNV strains, and the lack of effective human antiviral therapy or vaccines makes understanding the pathogenesis of severe disease a priority. Thus, to gain insight into the pathophysiological processes in severe WNV infection, a kinetic analysis of protein expression profiles in the brain of WNV-infected mice was conducted using samples prior to and after the onset of clinical symptoms. To this end, 2D-DIGE and gel-free iTRAQ labeling approaches were combined, followed by protein identification by mass spectrometry. Using these quantitative proteomic approaches, a set of 148 proteins with modified abundance was identified. The bioinformatics analysis (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis) of each protein dataset originating from the different time-point comparisons revealed that four major functions were altered during the course of WNV-infection in mouse brain tissue: i) modification of cytoskeleton maintenance associated with virus circulation; ii) deregulation of the protein ubiquitination pathway; iii) modulation of the inflammatory response; and iv) alteration of neurological development and neuronal cell death. The differential regulation of selected host protein candidates as being representative of these biological processes were validated by western blotting using an original fluorescence-based method. This study provides novel insights into the in vivo kinetic host reactions against WNV infection and the pathophysiologic processes involved, according to clinical symptoms. This work offers useful clues for anti-viral research and further evaluation of early biomarkers for the diagnosis and prevention of severe neurological disease caused by WNV.

  13. Altered Protein Networks and Cellular Pathways in Severe West Nile Disease in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fraisier, Christophe; Camoin, Luc; Lim, Stéphanie; Bakli, Mahfoud; Belghazi, Maya; Fourquet, Patrick; Granjeaud, Samuel; Osterhaus, Ab D. M. E.; Koraka, Penelope; Martina, Byron; Almeras, Lionel

    2013-01-01

    Background The recent West Nile virus (WNV) outbreaks in developed countries, including Europe and the United States, have been associated with significantly higher neuropathology incidence and mortality rate than previously documented. The changing epidemiology, the constant risk of (re-)emergence of more virulent WNV strains, and the lack of effective human antiviral therapy or vaccines makes understanding the pathogenesis of severe disease a priority. Thus, to gain insight into the pathophysiological processes in severe WNV infection, a kinetic analysis of protein expression profiles in the brain of WNV-infected mice was conducted using samples prior to and after the onset of clinical symptoms. Methodology/Principal Findings To this end, 2D-DIGE and gel-free iTRAQ labeling approaches were combined, followed by protein identification by mass spectrometry. Using these quantitative proteomic approaches, a set of 148 proteins with modified abundance was identified. The bioinformatics analysis (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis) of each protein dataset originating from the different time-point comparisons revealed that four major functions were altered during the course of WNV-infection in mouse brain tissue: i) modification of cytoskeleton maintenance associated with virus circulation; ii) deregulation of the protein ubiquitination pathway; iii) modulation of the inflammatory response; and iv) alteration of neurological development and neuronal cell death. The differential regulation of selected host protein candidates as being representative of these biological processes were validated by western blotting using an original fluorescence-based method. Conclusion/Significance This study provides novel insights into the in vivo kinetic host reactions against WNV infection and the pathophysiologic processes involved, according to clinical symptoms. This work offers useful clues for anti-viral research and further evaluation of early biomarkers for the diagnosis and prevention

  14. Maternal effects alter the severity of inbreeding depression in the offspring.

    PubMed

    Pilakouta, Natalie; Smiseth, Per T

    2016-09-14

    A maternal effect is a causal influence of the maternal phenotype on the offspring phenotype over and above any direct effects of genes. There is abundant evidence that maternal effects can have a major impact on offspring fitness. Yet, no previous study has investigated the potential role of maternal effects in influencing the severity of inbreeding depression in the offspring. Inbreeding depression is a reduction in the fitness of inbred offspring relative to outbred offspring. Here, we tested whether maternal effects due to body size alter the magnitude of inbreeding depression in the burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides We found that inbreeding depression in larval survival was more severe for offspring of large females than offspring of small females. This might be due to differences in how small and large females invest in an inbred brood because of their different prospects for future breeding opportunities. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence for a causal effect of the maternal phenotype on the severity of inbreeding depression in the offspring. In natural populations that are subject to inbreeding, maternal effects may drive variation in inbreeding depression and therefore contribute to variation in the strength and direction of selection for inbreeding avoidance.

  15. Hemodynamic Intervention of Cerebral Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Hui

    2005-11-01

    Cerebral aneurysm is a pathological vascular response to hemodynamic stimuli. Endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms essentially alters the blood flow to stop them from continued growth and eventual rupture. Compared to surgical clipping, endovascular methods are minimally invasive and hence rapidly gaining popularity. However, they are not always effective with risks of aneurysm regrowth and various complications. We aim at developing a Virtual Intervention (VI) platform that allows: patient-specific flow calculation and risk prediction as well as recommendation of tailored intervention based on quantitative analysis. This is a lofty goal requiring advancement in three areas of research: (1). Advancement of image-based CFD; (2) Understanding the biological/pathological responses of tissue to hemodynamic factors in the context of cerebral aneurysms; and (3) Capability of designing and testing patient-specific endovascular devices. We have established CFD methodologies based on anatomical geometry obtained from 3D angiographic or CT images. To study the effect of hemodynamics on aneurysm development, we have created a canine model of a vascular bifurcation anastomosis to provide the hemodynamic environment similar to those in CA. Vascular remodeling was studied using histology and compared against the flow fields obtained from CFD. It was found that an intimal pad, similar to those frequently seen clinically, developed at the flow impingement site, bordering with an area of `groove' characteristic of an early stage of aneurysm, where the micro environment exhibits an elevated wall shear stresses. To further address the molecular mechanisms of the flow-mediated aneurysm pathology, we are also developing in vitro cell culture systems to complement the in vivo study. Our current effort in endovascular device development focuses on novel stents that alters the aneurysmal flow to promote thrombotic occlusion as well as favorable remodeling. Realization of an

  16. Recovery from renal ischemia-reperfusion injury is associated with altered renal hemodynamics, blunted pressure natriuresis, and sodium-sensitive hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pechman, Kimberly R; De Miguel, Carmen; Lund, Hayley; Leonard, Ellen C; Basile, David P; Mattson, David L

    2009-11-01

    The present studies evaluated intrarenal hemodynamics, pressure natriuresis, and arterial blood pressure in rats following recovery from renal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. Acute I/R injury, induced by 40 min of bilateral renal arterial occlusion, resulted in an increase in plasma creatinine that resolved within a week. Following 5 wk of recovery on a 0.4% NaCl diet, the pressure-natriuresis response was assessed in anesthetized rats in which the kidney was denervated and extrarenal hormones were administered intravenously. Increasing renal perfusion pressure (RPP) from 107 to 141 mmHg resulted in a fourfold increase in urine flow and sodium excretion in sham control rats. In comparison, pressure diuresis and natriuresis were significantly attenuated in post-I/R rats. In sham rats, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) averaged 1.6 +/- 0.2 mlxmin(-1)xg kidney weight(-1) and renal blood flow (RBF) averaged 7.8 +/- 0.7 mlxmin(-1)xg kidney weight(-1) at RPP of 129 mmHg. Renal cortical blood flow, measured by laser-Doppler flowmetry, was well autoregulated whereas medullary blood flow and renal interstitial hydrostatic pressure increased directly with elevated RPP in sham rats. In contrast, GFR and RBF were significantly reduced whereas medullary perfusion and interstitial pressure demonstrated an attenuated response to RPP in post-I/R rats. Further experiments demonstrated that conscious I/R rats develop hypertension when sodium intake is increased. The present data indicate that the pressure-natriuretic-diuretic response in I/R rats is blunted because of a decrease in GFR and RBF and the depressed pressure-dependent increase in medullary blood flow and interstitial pressure.

  17. Hemodynamic monitoring in the critically ill: an overview of current cardiac output monitoring methods

    PubMed Central

    Huygh, Johan; Peeters, Yannick; Bernards, Jelle; Malbrain, Manu L. N. G.

    2016-01-01

    Critically ill patients are often hemodynamically unstable (or at risk of becoming unstable) owing to hypovolemia, cardiac dysfunction, or alterations of vasomotor function, leading to organ dysfunction, deterioration into multi-organ failure, and eventually death. With hemodynamic monitoring, we aim to guide our medical management so as to prevent or treat organ failure and improve the outcomes of our patients. Therapeutic measures may include fluid resuscitation, vasopressors, or inotropic agents. Both resuscitation and de-resuscitation phases can be guided using hemodynamic monitoring. This monitoring itself includes several different techniques, each with its own advantages and disadvantages, and may range from invasive to less- and even non-invasive techniques, calibrated or non-calibrated. This article will discuss the indications and basics of monitoring, further elaborating on the different techniques of monitoring. PMID:28003877

  18. Age and Vascular Burden Determinants of Cortical Hemodynamics Underlying Verbal Fluency

    PubMed Central

    Heinzel, Sebastian; Metzger, Florian G.; Ehlis, Ann-Christine; Korell, Robert; Alboji, Ahmed; Haeussinger, Florian B.; Wurster, Isabel; Brockmann, Kathrin; Suenkel, Ulrike; Eschweiler, Gerhard W.; Maetzler, Walter; Berg, Daniela; Fallgatter, Andreas J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Aging processes and several vascular burden factors have been shown to increase the risk of dementia including Alzheimer's disease. While pathological alterations in dementia precede diagnosis by many years, reorganization of brain processing might temporarily delay cognitive decline. We hypothesized that in healthy elderly individuals both age-related neural and vascular factors known to be related to the development of dementia impact functional cortical hemodynamics during increased cognitive demands. Methods Vascular burden factors and cortical functional hemodynamics during verbal fluency were assessed in 1052 non-demented elderly individuals (51 to 83 years; cross-sectional data of the longitudinal TREND study) using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). The prediction of functional hemodynamic responses by age in multiple regressions and the impact of single and cumulative vascular burden factors including hypertension, diabetes, obesity, smoking and atherosclerosis were investigated. Results Replicating and extending previous findings we could show that increasing age predicted functional hemodynamics to be increased in right prefrontal and bilateral parietal cortex, and decreased in bilateral inferior frontal junction during phonological fluency. Cumulative vascular burden factors, with hypertension in particular, decreased left inferior frontal junction hemodynamic responses during phonological fluency. However, age and vascular burden factors showed no statistical interaction on functional hemodynamics. Conclusion Based on these findings, one might hypothesize that increased fronto-parietal processing may represent age-related compensatory reorganization during increased cognitive demands. Vascular burden factors, such as hypertension, may contribute to regional cerebral hypoperfusion. These neural and vascular hemodynamic determinants should be investigated longitudinally and combined with other markers to advance the prediction of

  19. Age and Vascular Burden Determinants of Cortical Hemodynamics Underlying Verbal Fluency.

    PubMed

    Heinzel, Sebastian; Metzger, Florian G; Ehlis, Ann-Christine; Korell, Robert; Alboji, Ahmed; Haeussinger, Florian B; Wurster, Isabel; Brockmann, Kathrin; Suenkel, Ulrike; Eschweiler, Gerhard W; Maetzler, Walter; Berg, Daniela; Fallgatter, Andreas J

    2015-01-01

    Aging processes and several vascular burden factors have been shown to increase the risk of dementia including Alzheimer's disease. While pathological alterations in dementia precede diagnosis by many years, reorganization of brain processing might temporarily delay cognitive decline. We hypothesized that in healthy elderly individuals both age-related neural and vascular factors known to be related to the development of dementia impact functional cortical hemodynamics during increased cognitive demands. Vascular burden factors and cortical functional hemodynamics during verbal fluency were assessed in 1052 non-demented elderly individuals (51 to 83 years; cross-sectional data of the longitudinal TREND study) using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). The prediction of functional hemodynamic responses by age in multiple regressions and the impact of single and cumulative vascular burden factors including hypertension, diabetes, obesity, smoking and atherosclerosis were investigated. Replicating and extending previous findings we could show that increasing age predicted functional hemodynamics to be increased in right prefrontal and bilateral parietal cortex, and decreased in bilateral inferior frontal junction during phonological fluency. Cumulative vascular burden factors, with hypertension in particular, decreased left inferior frontal junction hemodynamic responses during phonological fluency. However, age and vascular burden factors showed no statistical interaction on functional hemodynamics. Based on these findings, one might hypothesize that increased fronto-parietal processing may represent age-related compensatory reorganization during increased cognitive demands. Vascular burden factors, such as hypertension, may contribute to regional cerebral hypoperfusion. These neural and vascular hemodynamic determinants should be investigated longitudinally and combined with other markers to advance the prediction of future cognitive decline and dementia.

  20. Chronic ethanol feeding increases the severity of Staphylococcus aureus skin infections by altering local host defenses

    PubMed Central

    Parlet, Corey P.; Kavanaugh, Jeffrey S.; Horswill, Alexander R.; Schlueter, Annette J.

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholics are at increased risk of Staphylococcus aureus skin infection and serious sequelae, such as bacteremia and death. Despite the association between alcoholism and severe S. aureus skin infection, the impact of EtOH on anti-S. aureus cutaneous immunity has not been investigated in a model of chronic EtOH exposure. To test the hypothesis that EtOH enhances the severity of S. aureus skin infection, mice were fed EtOH for ≥12 weeks via the Meadows-Cook model of alcoholism and inoculated with S. aureus following epidermal abrasion. Evidence of exacerbated staphylococcal disease in EtOH-fed mice included: skin lesions that were larger and contained more organisms, greater weight loss, and increased bacterial dissemination. Infected EtOH-fed mice demonstrated poor maintenance and induction of PMN responses in skin and draining LNs, respectively. Additionally, altered PMN dynamics in the skin of these mice corresponded with reduced production of IL-23 and IL-1β by CD11b+ myeloid cells and IL-17 production by γδ T cells, with the latter defect occurring in the draining LNs as well. In addition, IL-17 restoration attenuated S. aureus-induced dermatopathology and improved bacterial clearance defects in EtOH-fed mice. Taken together, the findings show, in a novel model system, that the EtOH-induced increase in S. aureus-related injury/illness corresponds with defects in the IL-23/IL-17 inflammatory axis and poor PMN accumulation at the site of infection and draining LNs. These findings offer new information about the impact of EtOH on cutaneous host-defense pathways and provide a potential mechanism explaining why alcoholics are predisposed to S. aureus skin infection. PMID:25605871

  1. Chronic ethanol feeding increases the severity of Staphylococcus aureus skin infections by altering local host defenses.

    PubMed

    Parlet, Corey P; Kavanaugh, Jeffrey S; Horswill, Alexander R; Schlueter, Annette J

    2015-04-01

    Alcoholics are at increased risk of Staphylococcus aureus skin infection and serious sequelae, such as bacteremia and death. Despite the association between alcoholism and severe S. aureus skin infection, the impact of EtOH on anti-S. aureus cutaneous immunity has not been investigated in a model of chronic EtOH exposure. To test the hypothesis that EtOH enhances the severity of S. aureus skin infection, mice were fed EtOH for ≥12 weeks via the Meadows-Cook model of alcoholism and inoculated with S. aureus following epidermal abrasion. Evidence of exacerbated staphylococcal disease in EtOH-fed mice included: skin lesions that were larger and contained more organisms, greater weight loss, and increased bacterial dissemination. Infected EtOH-fed mice demonstrated poor maintenance and induction of PMN responses in skin and draining LNs, respectively. Additionally, altered PMN dynamics in the skin of these mice corresponded with reduced production of IL-23 and IL-1β by CD11b(+) myeloid cells and IL-17 production by γδ T cells, with the latter defect occurring in the draining LNs as well. In addition, IL-17 restoration attenuated S. aureus-induced dermatopathology and improved bacterial clearance defects in EtOH-fed mice. Taken together, the findings show, in a novel model system, that the EtOH-induced increase in S. aureus-related injury/illness corresponds with defects in the IL-23/IL-17 inflammatory axis and poor PMN accumulation at the site of infection and draining LNs. These findings offer new information about the impact of EtOH on cutaneous host-defense pathways and provide a potential mechanism explaining why alcoholics are predisposed to S. aureus skin infection.

  2. States of severely altered consciousness: clinical characteristics, medical complications and functional outcome after rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Ng, Yee Sien; Chua, Karen S G

    2005-01-01

    To identify and characterize demographics, injury variables, complications, and functional outcomes in Asian patients presenting in States of Severely Altered Consciousness (SSAC). Descriptive case series review. Acute rehabilitation unit with intensive, comprehensive neurological rehabilitation program. Thirty consecutive patients diagnosed to be in persistent vegetative state (PVS) or minimally conscious (MCS) state over a 4-year period were included. Disability Rating Scale (DRS), Ranchos Los Amigos Scale (RLAS), Modified Barthel Index (MBI). Seventeen (57%) were male, with a mean age of 31.8 years (median 25y, range 15-74, SD 16.3y). Twenty-one (70%) had traumatic brain injury, and median GCS on acute admission was 5. The mean length of stays (LOS) in acute and rehabilitation facilities was 90.1 days and 106.3 days respectively. Tracheostomized patients had longer acute LOS. (p = 0.03). All patients had improvement in their DRS scores upon rehabilitation discharge. The MBI was insensitive in identifying low-level changes; though paired analyses were significant for improvement. Seventeen (57%) patients were in PVS and the rest in MCS on admission to rehabilitation. Twelve patients progressed to a state of awareness, with eye responses as the most frequent first sign. There was a greater spread of higher RLAS categories on rehabilitation discharge. Urinary tract infection (16 patients, 53%) was the most common medical complication. Nineteen (63%) had central fever and this group was more functionally disabled (p = 0.045). The mean number of medications on discharge was 6. The majority of patients (22 patients, 73%) were discharged home, and patients continued to make functional progress post-discharge. Despite SSAC states, the majority improve, however profound disability persists. Possible predictors of a worse outcome include tracheostomy, severity of initial disability, initial RLAS II level and presence of central fever.

  3. TFIIH subunit alterations causing xeroderma pigmentosum and trichothiodystrophy specifically disturb several steps during transcription.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amita; Compe, Emanuel; Le May, Nicolas; Egly, Jean-Marc

    2015-02-05

    Mutations in genes encoding the ERCC3 (XPB), ERCC2 (XPD), and GTF2H5 (p8 or TTD-A) subunits of the transcription and DNA-repair factor TFIIH lead to three autosomal-recessive disorders: xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), XP associated with Cockayne syndrome (XP/CS), and trichothiodystrophy (TTD). Although these diseases were originally associated with defects in DNA repair, transcription deficiencies might be also implicated. By using retinoic acid receptor beta isoform 2 (RARB2) as a model in several cells bearing mutations in genes encoding TFIIH subunits, we observed that (1) the recruitment of the TFIIH complex was altered at the activated RARB2 promoter, (2) TFIIH participated in the recruitment of nucleotide excision repair (NER) factors during transcription in a manner different from that observed during NER, and (3) the different TFIIH variants disturbed transcription by having distinct consequences on post-translational modifications of histones, DNA-break induction, DNA demethylation, and gene-loop formation. The transition from heterochromatin to euchromatin was disrupted depending on the variant, illustrating the fact that TFIIH, by contributing to NER factor recruitment, orchestrates chromatin remodeling. The subtle transcriptional differences found between various TFIIH variants thus participate in the phenotypic variability observed among XP, XP/CS, and TTD individuals.

  4. Altered invertase activities of symptomatic tissues on Beet severe curly top virus (BSCTV) infected Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Park, Jungan; Kim, Soyeon; Choi, Eunseok; Auh, Chung-Kyun; Park, Jong-Bum; Kim, Dong-Giun; Chung, Young-Jae; Lee, Taek-Kyun; Lee, Sukchan

    2013-09-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana infected with Beet severe curly top virus (BSCTV) exhibits systemic symptoms such as stunting of plant growth, callus induction on shoot tips, and curling of leaves and shoot tips. The regulation of sucrose metabolism is essential for obtaining the energy required for viral replication and the development of symptoms in BSCTV-infected A. thaliana. We evaluated the changed transcript level and enzyme activity of invertases in the inflorescence stems of BSCTV-infected A. thaliana. These results were consistent with the increased pattern of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase activity and photosynthetic pigment concentration in virus-infected plants to supply more energy for BSCTV multiplication. The altered gene expression of invertases during symptom development was functionally correlated with the differential expression patterns of D-type cyclins, E2F isoforms, and invertase-related genes. Taken together, our results indicate that sucrose sensing by BSCTV infection may regulate the expression of sucrose metabolism and result in the subsequent development of viral symptoms in relation with activation of cell cycle regulation.

  5. Altered plasma pharmacokinetics of ceftiofur hydrochloride in cows affected with severe clinical mastitis.

    PubMed

    Gorden, P J; Kleinhenz, M D; Wulf, L W; KuKanich, B; Lee, C J; Wang, C; Coetzee, J F

    2016-01-01

    Mastitis is a frequent problem among dairy cows, reducing milk yield and increasing cull rates. Systemic therapy with the cephalosporin antimicrobial ceftiofur hydrochloride (CEF) may improve therapeutic outcomes, but the incidence of CEF violative residues has increased annually since 2011. One potential explanation is that disease status may alter the pharmacokinetics (PK) of CEF. To test this hypothesis, we compared the plasma PK of CEF in healthy cows with those with severe endotoxic mastitis. Eight cows with naturally occurring mastitis and 8 clinically healthy cows were treated with 2.2 mg of CEF per kilogram of body weight once daily for 5d via the intramuscular route. Blood was collected at 0, 0.33, 0.67, 1, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 8, 16, and 24h after the first CEF administration and every 8h thereafter until 120 h after the final dose. Plasma samples were analyzed for CEF concentrations using liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. With the exception of time 0, CEF was detected at all time points. The disease group had a significantly higher plasma CEF concentration at t=3h after the first injection and a significantly lower plasma concentration from 40 to 152 h following the first injection, with the exception of the t=64 h time point. Data following the first injection (time 0-24 h) were fit to a single-dose, noncompartmental PK model. This model indicated that the disease group had a shorter plasma half-life. A multidose, noncompartmental model was used to determine steady-state PK. Compared with control cows, the disease group had an initially higher peak concentration and a higher volume of distribution and drug clearance rates. The disease group also had a lower area under the curve per dosing interval, steady-state concentration maximum, and dose-adjusted peak steady-state concentration. All other PK parameters were not different between the 2 groups. Altered PK, as suggested by this trial, may contribute to an increased risk for the

  6. QUANTIFICATION OF LOCAL HEMODYNAMIC ALTERATIONS CAUSED BY VIRTUAL IMPLANTATION OF THREE COMMERCIALLY-AVAILABLE STENTS FOR THE TREATMENT OF AORTIC COARCTATION

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Sung; Feinstein, Jeffrey A.; Dholakia, Ronak J.; LaDisa, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with coarctation of the aorta (CoA) are prone to morbidity including atherosclerotic plaque that has been shown to correlate with altered wall shear stress (WSS) in the descending thoracic aorta (dAo). We created the first patient-specific computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of a CoA patient treated by Palmaz stenting to date, and compared resulting WSS distributions to those from virtual implantation of GenesisXD and modified NumedCP stents also commonly used for CoA. CFD models were created from magnetic resonance imaging, fluoroscopy and blood pressure (BP) data. Simulations incorporated vessel deformation, downstream vascular resistance and compliance to match measured data and generate blood flow velocity and time-averaged WSS (TAWSS) results. TAWSS was quantified longitudinally and circumferentially in the stented region and dAo. While modest differences were seen in the distal portion of the stented region, marked differences were observed downstream along the posterior dAo and depended on stent type. The GenesisXD model had the least area of TAWSS values exceeding the threshold for platelet aggregation in vitro, followed by the Palmaz and NumedCP stents. Alterations in local blood flow patterns and WSS imparted on the dAo appear to depend on the type of stent implanted for CoA. Following confirmation in larger studies, these findings may aid pediatric interventional cardiologists in selecting the most appropriate stent for each patient, and ultimately reduce long-term morbidity following treatment for CoA by stenting. PMID:24259013

  7. Loss of Bace1 in Mice Does Not Alter the Severity of Caerulein Induced Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Heindl, Mario; Tuennemann, Jan; Sommerer, Ines; Mössner, Joachim; Hoffmeister, Albrecht

    2015-01-01

    Context Beta-site alpha-amyloid protein cleaving enzyme1 (BACE1) plays a key role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. Additional to its moderate expression in the brain, high levels of BACE1 mRNA were found in the pancreas. Murine Bace1 has been immunohistochemicaly detected at the apical pole of acinar cells within the exocrine pancreas of mice and Bace1 activity was observed in pancreatic juice. In vitro experiments revealed enteropeptidase as a putative substrate for Bace1 suggesting a role in acute pancreatitis. Objective The aim of this study was to address a protective mechanism of Bace1 in acute experimental pancreatitis in mice. Methods Acute experimental pancreatitis was induced by intraperitoneal injection of caerulein in homozygote Bace1-/- mice and wild type mice. Serum and tissue analyses were carried out after 4 h, 8 h and 24 h. Measurement of plasma amylase and lipase was performed to confirm pancreatitis induction. In order to assess the severity of pancreatitis H&E stained pancreatic sections were examined regarding edema, inflammation and apoptosis. Immunohistochemical detection of myeloperoxidase (MPO) positive cells was carried out to further quantify the extent of inflammation. Expression of Bace2 within the pancreas was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and RT-qPCR. Results We demonstrate that total loss of Bace1 in mice leads to no alterations in the course of acute experimental caerulein-pancreatitis. Bace1-/- mice develop a moderate pancreatitis that is comparable in histomorphological and serological features with those seen in wild type mice. Discussion We discuss the results in the context of the applied caerulein induced edematous pancreatitis model and possible compensatory mechanisms via Bace2 that might be responsible for the observed results. PMID:25961820

  8. Severe pulmonary hypertension is associated with altered right ventricle metabolic substrate uptake

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rahul; Mickael, Claudia; Sanders, Linda; Gebreab, Liya; Huber, Kendra M.; Perez, Mario; Smith-Jones, Peter; Serkova, Natalie J.; Tuder, Rubin M.

    2015-01-01

    In severe pulmonary hypertension (SPH), prior studies have shown an increase in right ventricle (RV) uptake of glucose, but it is unclear whether there is a change in the relative utilization of fatty acids. We hypothesized that in the RV in SPH, as in left ventricular (LV) failure, there is altered substrate utilization, with increased glucose uptake and decreased fatty acid uptake. SPH was induced in rats by treatment with the VEGF receptor inhibitor SU5416 and 3 wk of hypoxia (10% FiO2), followed by an additional 4 wk of normoxia (SU-Hx group). Control rats were treated with carboxymethylcellulose vehicle and 7 wk of normoxia (CMC-Nx group). The rodents then underwent positron emission tomography with sequential administration of two radiotracers, 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoroglucose (18F-FDG) and 14-(R,S)-[18F]fluoro-6-thia-heptadecanoic acid (18F-FTHA), analogs of glucose and fatty acid, respectively. Five CMC-Nx and 3 SU-Hx rats completed the entire experimental protocol. In the RV, there was a mild increase in 18F-FDG uptake (1.35-fold, P = 0.085) and a significant decrease in 18F-FTHA uptake (−2.1-fold, P < 0.05) in the SU-Hx rats relative to the CMC-Nx rats. In the LV, SU-Hx rats had less uptake of both radiotracers compared with CMC-Nx rats. Less RV fatty acid uptake in SPH was corroborated by decreased fatty acid transporters and enzymes in the RV tissue, and specifically a decrease in lipoprotein lipase. In the RV in rats with SPH, there is a major shift in metabolic substrate preference, largely due to decreased fatty acid uptake. PMID:26115672

  9. Functional hemodynamic monitoring.

    PubMed

    Pinsky, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Functional hemodynamic monitoring is the assessment of the dynamic interactions of hemodynamic variables in response to a defined perturbation. Recent interest in functional hemodynamic monitoring for the bedside assessment of cardiovascular insufficiency has heightened with the documentation of its accuracy in predicting volume responsiveness using a wide variety of monitoring devices, both invasive and noninvasive, and across multiple patient groups and clinical conditions. However, volume responsiveness, though important, reflects only part of the overall spectrum of functional physiologic variables that can be measured to define the physiologic state and monitor response to therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Altered Trafficking and Processing of GALC Mutants Correlates with Globoid Cell Leukodystrophy Severity

    PubMed Central

    Feltri, M. Laura; Wrabetz, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Globoid cell leukodystrophy (GLD, Krabbe disease) is due to autosomal recessive mutations in the lysosomal enzyme galactosylceramidase (GALC). Many GLD patients develop infantile-onset of progressive neurologic deterioration and death by 2 years of age, whereas others have a later-onset, milder disease. Cord blood transplant slows disease progression much more effectively when performed presymptomatically, highlighting the importance of early diagnosis. Current diagnosis is based on reduced GALC activity, DNA sequence, and clinical examination. However, presymptomatic diagnosis is hampered by imperfect genotype-GALC activity-phenotype correlations. In addition, three polymorphisms in the GALC gene are variably associated with disease mutations and have unknown effects on GALC activity and disease outcome. Here, we study mutations that cause infantile or later-onset GLD, and show that GALC activity is significantly lower in infantile versus later-onset mutants when measured in the lysosomal fraction, but not in whole-cell lysates. In parallel, infantile-onset mutant GALCs showed reduced trafficking to lysosomes and processing than later-onset mutant GALCs. Finally, the cis-polymorphisms also affected trafficking to the lysosome and processing of GALC. These differences potentially explain why the activity of different mutations appears similar in whole-cell extracts from lymphocytes, and suggest that measure of GALC activity in lysosomes may better predict the onset and severity of disease for a given GLD genotype. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Globoid cell leukodystrophy (GLD, Krabbe disease) is diagnosed by measuring galactosylceramidase (GALC) activity and DNA analysis. However, genotype and phenotype often do not correlate due to considerable clinical variability, even for the same mutation, for unknown reasons. We find that altered trafficking to the lysosome and processing of GALC correlates with GLD severity and is modulated by cis-polymorphisms. Current diagnosis

  11. Altered Trafficking and Processing of GALC Mutants Correlates with Globoid Cell Leukodystrophy Severity.

    PubMed

    Shin, Daesung; Feltri, M Laura; Wrabetz, Lawrence

    2016-02-10

    Globoid cell leukodystrophy (GLD, Krabbe disease) is due to autosomal recessive mutations in the lysosomal enzyme galactosylceramidase (GALC). Many GLD patients develop infantile-onset of progressive neurologic deterioration and death by 2 years of age, whereas others have a later-onset, milder disease. Cord blood transplant slows disease progression much more effectively when performed presymptomatically, highlighting the importance of early diagnosis. Current diagnosis is based on reduced GALC activity, DNA sequence, and clinical examination. However, presymptomatic diagnosis is hampered by imperfect genotype-GALC activity-phenotype correlations. In addition, three polymorphisms in the GALC gene are variably associated with disease mutations and have unknown effects on GALC activity and disease outcome. Here, we study mutations that cause infantile or later-onset GLD, and show that GALC activity is significantly lower in infantile versus later-onset mutants when measured in the lysosomal fraction, but not in whole-cell lysates. In parallel, infantile-onset mutant GALCs showed reduced trafficking to lysosomes and processing than later-onset mutant GALCs. Finally, the cis-polymorphisms also affected trafficking to the lysosome and processing of GALC. These differences potentially explain why the activity of different mutations appears similar in whole-cell extracts from lymphocytes, and suggest that measure of GALC activity in lysosomes may better predict the onset and severity of disease for a given GLD genotype. Globoid cell leukodystrophy (GLD, Krabbe disease) is diagnosed by measuring galactosylceramidase (GALC) activity and DNA analysis. However, genotype and phenotype often do not correlate due to considerable clinical variability, even for the same mutation, for unknown reasons. We find that altered trafficking to the lysosome and processing of GALC correlates with GLD severity and is modulated by cis-polymorphisms. Current diagnosis of GLD is based on GALC

  12. Invasive hemodynamics of constrictive pericarditis.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Shrenik; Ramakrishnan, Sivasubramanian; Gupta, Saurabh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac catheterization and hemodynamic study is the gold standard for the diagnosis of pericardial constriction. Careful interpretation of the hemodynamic data is essential to differentiate it from other diseases with restrictive physiology. In this hemodynamic review we shall briefly discuss the physiologic basis of various hemodynamic changes seen in a patient with constrictive pericarditis.

  13. Curcumin prevents maleate-induced nephrotoxicity: relation to hemodynamic alterations, oxidative stress, mitochondrial oxygen consumption and activity of respiratory complex I.

    PubMed

    Tapia, E; Sánchez-Lozada, L G; García-Niño, W R; García, E; Cerecedo, A; García-Arroyo, F E; Osorio, H; Arellano, A; Cristóbal-García, M; Loredo, M L; Molina-Jijón, E; Hernández-Damián, J; Negrette-Guzmán, M; Zazueta, C; Huerta-Yepez, S; Reyes, J L; Madero, M; Pedraza-Chaverrí, J

    2014-11-01

    The potential protective effect of the dietary antioxidant curcumin (120 mg/Kg/day for 6 days) against the renal injury induced by maleate was evaluated. Tubular proteinuria and oxidative stress were induced by a single injection of maleate (400 mg/kg) in rats. Maleate-induced renal injury included increase in renal vascular resistance and in the urinary excretion of total protein, glucose, sodium, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) and N-acetyl β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG), upregulation of kidney injury molecule (KIM)-1, decrease in renal blood flow and claudin-2 expression besides of necrosis and apoptosis of tubular cells on 24 h. Oxidative stress was determined by measuring the oxidation of lipids and proteins and diminution in renal Nrf2 levels. Studies were also conducted in renal epithelial LLC-PK1 cells and in mitochondria isolated from kidneys of all the experimental groups. Maleate induced cell damage and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in LLC-PK1 cells in culture. In addition, maleate treatment reduced oxygen consumption in ADP-stimulated mitochondria and diminished respiratory control index when using malate/glutamate as substrate. The activities of both complex I and aconitase were also diminished. All the above-described alterations were prevented by curcumin. It is concluded that curcumin is able to attenuate in vivo maleate-induced nephropathy and in vitro cell damage. The in vivo protection was associated to the prevention of oxidative stress and preservation of mitochondrial oxygen consumption and activity of respiratory complex I, and the in vitro protection was associated to the prevention of ROS production.

  14. Functional hemodynamic monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Pinsky, Michael R; Payen, Didier

    2005-01-01

    Hemodynamic monitoring is a central component of intensive care. Patterns of hemodynamic variables often suggest cardiogenic, hypovolemic, obstructive, or distributive (septic) etiologies to cardiovascular insufficiency, thus defining the specific treatments required. Monitoring increases in invasiveness, as required, as the risk for cardiovascular instability-induced morbidity increases because of the need to define more accurately the diagnosis and monitor the response to therapy. Monitoring is also context specific: requirements during cardiac surgery will be different from those in the intensive care unit or emergency department. Solitary hemodynamic values are useful as threshold monitors (e.g. hypotension is always pathological, central venous pressure is only elevated in disease). Some hemodynamic values can only be interpreted relative to metabolic demand, whereas others have multiple meanings. Functional hemodynamic monitoring implies a therapeutic application, independent of diagnosis such as a therapeutic trial of fluid challenge to assess preload responsiveness. Newer methods for assessing preload responsiveness include monitoring changes in central venous pressure during spontaneous inspiration, and variations in arterial pulse pressure, systolic pressure, and aortic flow variation in response to vena caval collapse during positive pressure ventilation or passive leg raising. Defining preload responsiveness using these functional measures, coupled to treatment protocols, can improve outcome from critical illness. Potentially, as these and newer, less invasive hemodynamic measures are validated, they could be incorporated into such protocolized care in a cost-effective manner. PMID:16356240

  15. Effect of ultra-fast mild hypothermia using total liquid ventilation on hemodynamics and respiratory mechanics.

    PubMed

    Sage, Michaël; Nadeau, Mathieu; Kohlhauer, Matthias; Praud, Jean-Paul; Tissier, Renaud; Robert, Raymond; Walti, Hervé; Micheau, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    Ultra-fast cooling for mild therapeutic hypothermia (MTH) has several potential applications, including prevention of post-cardiac arrest syndrome. Ultra-fast MTH by total liquid ventilation (TLV) entails the sudden filling of the lungs with a cold perfluorocarbon liquid and its subsequent use to perform TLV. The present physiological study was aimed at assessing whether pulmonary and systemic hemodynamics as well as lung mechanics are significantly altered during this procedure. Pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures, cardiac output as well as airway resistance and respiratory system compliance were measured during ultra-fast MTH by TLV followed by rewarming and normothermia in six healthy juvenile lambs. Results show that none of the studied variables were altered upon varying the perfluorocarbon temperature from 12 to 41 °C. It is concluded that ultra-fast MTH by TLV does not have any deleterious effect on hemodynamics or lung mechanics in healthy juvenile lambs.

  16. Improvement in cerebral hemodynamic parameters and outcomes after superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery bypass in patients with severe stenoocclusive disease of the intracranial internal carotid or middle cerebral arteries.

    PubMed

    Low, Shiong Wen; Teo, Kejia; Lwin, Sein; Yeo, Leonard L L; Paliwal, Prakash R; Ahmad, Aftab; Sinha, Arvind K; Teoh, Hock Luen; Wong, Lily Y H; Chong, Vincent F; Seet, Raymond C S; Chan, Bernard P L; Yeo, Tseng Tsai; Chou, Ning; Sharma, Vijay K

    2015-09-01

    Both the older and the recent extracranial-intracranial (EC-IC) bypass trials for symptomatic carotid occlusion failed to demonstrate a reduction in stroke recurrence. However, the role of superficial temporal artery (STA)-middle cerebral artery (MCA) bypass in patients with symptomatic intracranial stenoocclusive disease has been rarely evaluated. The authors evaluated serial changes in various cerebral hemodynamic parameters in patients with severe stenoocclusive disease of the intracranial internal carotid artery (ICA) or middle cerebral artery (MCA) and impaired cerebral vasodilatory reserve (CVR), treated by STA-MCA bypass surgery or medical treatment. Patients with severe stenoocclusive disease of the intracranial ICA or MCA underwent transcranial Doppler (TCD) ultrasonography and CVR assessment using the breath-holding index (BHI). Patients with impaired BHI (< 0.69) were further evaluated with acetazolamide-challenge technitium-99m hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime ((99m)Tc HMPAO) SPECT. STA-MCA bypass surgery was offered to patients with impaired CVR on SPECT. All patients underwent TCD and SPECT at 4 ± 1 months and were followed up for cerebral ischemic events. A total of 112 patients were included. This total included 73 men, and the mean age of the entire study population was 56 years (range 23-78 years). (99m)Tc HMPAO SPECT demonstrated impaired CVR in 77 patients (69%). Of these 77 patients, 46 underwent STA-MCA bypass while 31 received best medical treatment. TCD and acetazolamide-challenge (99m)Tc HMPAO SPECT repeated at 4 ± 1 months showed significant improvement in the STA-MCA bypass group. During a mean follow-up of 34 months (range 18-39 months), only 6 (13%) of 46 patients in the bypass group developed cerebral ischemic events, as compared with 14 (45%) of 31 patients receiving medical therapy (absolute risk reduction 32%, p = 0.008). STA-MCA bypass surgery in carefully selected patients with symptomatic severe intracranial stenoocclusive

  17. Altered hemodynamics and hyperuricemia accompany an elevated sFlt-1/PlGF ratio before the onset of early severe preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Anne; Carvalho, Jose C A; Drewlo, Sascha; El-Khuffash, Afif; Downey, Kristi; Dodds, Madelaine; Kingdom, John

    2014-08-01

    Objectifs : L’identification précoce des femmes exposées à des risques d’en venir à présenter une prééclampsie grave d’apparition précoce (PEg) constitue un objectif clé en obstétrique. La constatation d’un rapport sFlt-1 (tyrosine kinase 1 de type fms soluble) - PlGF (facteur de croissance placentaire) (rapport sFlt-1/PlGF) élevé précède celle d’une hypertension patente. La relation longitudinale entre ce marqueur biologique, l’hémodynamique maternelle et le taux sérique maternel d’acide urique au cours de la phase préclinique est inconnue. Devis de l’étude : Nous avons suivi, de 20 semaines jusqu’à l’accouchement ou 34 semaines de gestation, 20 femmes normotendues exposées à un risque élevé d’en venir à présenter une PEg. Un monitorage hémodynamique non effractif (faisant appel à la technologie de la bioréactance) à été mené à 20-22, à 24-26, à 28-30 et à 32-34 semaines de gestation. Les taux sériques d’acide urique, de sFlt-1 et de PlGF ont été mesurés simultanément. Résultats : Six des 20 femmes (30 %) ont accouché avant 33 semaines et présentaient une PEg; elles présentaient une résistance vasculaire périphérique totale (RVPT) moyenne considérablement plus élevée, un taux sérique d’acide urique accru et des rapports sFlt-1/PlGF plus élevés à 24 semaines de gestation que les femmes non affectées. La surface sous la courbe, les valeurs seuils et la sensibilité / spécificité pour ce qui est de la prévision de la PEg à 24 semaines étaient les suivantes : RVPT = 0,84, 1 250 dyne.s.cm-5, 80 %, 93 %; rapport sFlt-1/PlGF = 0,94, 55, 100 %, 93 %; et taux sérique d’acide urique = 0,99, 255 μmol/l, 100 %, 93 %. La RVPT et la sFlt-1 présentaient une corrélation positive au sein du groupe PEg avant la mise en œuvre d’un traitement antihypertenseur (r = 0,65, P = 0,01). Le taux sérique d’acide urique présentait une corrélation tant avec la sFlt-1 (r = 0,65, P = 0,003) qu’avec le rapport sFlt-1/PlGF (r = 0,54, P = 0,02). Conclusion : La combinaison « détermination non effractive de la RVPT-mesure du taux sérique d’acide urique » pourrait permettre l’identification d’un sous-ensemble de femmes qui sont exposées à un risque élevé sur le plan clinique et qui présentent une PEg évolutive, sans devoir avoir recours à la détermination du rapport sFlt-1/PlGF. La valeur prédictive de cette approche intégrée doit être évaluée auprès d’une cohorte de femmes de plus grande envergure afin d’en confirmer davantage l’utilité.

  18. Early endocrine alterations reflect prolonged stress and relate to 1-year functional outcome in patients with severe brain injury.

    PubMed

    Marina, Djordje; Klose, Marianne; Nordenbo, Annette; Liebach, Annette; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    2015-06-01

    Severe brain injury may increase the risk of developing acute and chronic hypopituitarism. Pituitary hormone alterations developed in the early recovery phase after brain injury may have implications for long-term functional recovery. The objective of the present study was to assess the pattern and prevalence of pituitary hormone alterations 3 months after a severe brain injury with relation to functional outcome at a 1-year follow-up. Prospective study at a tertiary university referral centre. A total of 163 patients admitted to neurorehabilitation after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI, n=111) or non-TBI (n=52) were included. The main outcome measures were endocrine alterations 3.3 months (median) after the brain injury and their relationship to the functioning and ability of the patients at a 1-year follow-up, as measured by the Functional Independence Measure and the Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended. Three months after the injury, elevated stress hormones (i.e. 30 min stimulated cortisol, prolactin and/or IGF1) and/or suppressed gonadal or thyroid hormones were recorded in 68 and 32% of the patients respectively. At 1 year after the injury, lower functioning level (Functional Independence Measure) and lower capability of performing normal life activities (Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended) were related to both the elevated stress hormones (P≤0.01) and the reduced gonadal and/or thyroid hormones (P≤0.01) measured at 3 months. The present study suggests that brain injury-related endocrine alterations that mimic secondary hypogonadism and hypothyroidism and that occur with elevated stress hormones most probably reflect a prolonged stress response 2-5 months after severe brain injury, rather than pituitary insufficiency per se. These endocrine alterations thus seem to reflect a more severe disease state and relate to 1-year functional outcome. © 2015 European Society of Endocrinology.

  19. Alterations in CDH15 and KIRREL3 in Patients with Mild to Severe Intellectual Disability

    PubMed Central

    Bhalla, Kavita; Luo, Yue; Buchan, Tim; Beachem, Michael A.; Guzauskas, Gregory F.; Ladd, Sydney; Bratcher, Shelly J.; Schroer, Richard J.; Balsamo, Janne; DuPont, Barbara R.; Lilien, Jack; Srivastava, Anand K.

    2008-01-01

    Cell-adhesion molecules play critical roles in brain development, as well as maintaining synaptic structure, function, and plasticity. Here we have found the disruption of two genes encoding putative cell-adhesion molecules, CDH15 (cadherin superfamily) and KIRREL3 (immunoglobulin superfamily), by a chromosomal translocation t(11;16) in a female patient with intellectual disability (ID). We screened coding regions of these two genes in a cohort of patients with ID and controls and identified four nonsynonymous CDH15 variants and three nonsynonymous KIRREL3 variants that appear rare and unique to ID. These variations altered highly conserved residues and were absent in more than 600 unrelated patients with ID and 800 control individuals. Furthermore, in vivo expression studies showed that three of the CDH15 variations adversely altered its ability to mediate cell-cell adhesion. We also show that in neuronal cells, human KIRREL3 colocalizes and interacts with the synaptic scaffolding protein, CASK, recently implicated in X-linked brain malformation and ID. Taken together, our data suggest that alterations in CDH15 and KIRREL3, either alone or in combination with other factors, could play a role in phenotypic expression of ID in some patients. PMID:19012874

  20. Changes in tissue perfusion parameters in dogs with severe sepsis/septic shock in response to goal-directed hemodynamic optimization at admission to ICU and the relation to outcome.

    PubMed

    Conti-Patara, Andreza; de Araújo Caldeira, Juliana; de Mattos-Junior, Ewaldo; de Carvalho, Haley da Silva; Reinoldes, Adriane; Pedron, Bruno Gregnanin; Patara, Marcelo; Francisco Talib, Mariana Semião; Faustino, Marcelo; de Oliveira, Clair Motos; Cortopassi, Silvia Renata Gaido

    2012-08-01

    To evaluate the changes in tissue perfusion parameters in dogs with severe sepsis/septic shock in response to goal-directed hemodynamic optimization in the ICU and their relation to outcome. Prospective observational study. ICU of a veterinary university medical center. Thirty dogs with severe sepsis or septic shock caused by pyometra who underwent surgery and were admitted to the ICU. Severe sepsis was defined as the presence of sepsis and sepsis-induced dysfunction of one or more organs. Septic shock was defined as the presence of severe sepsis plus hypotension not reversed with fluid resuscitation. After the presumptive diagnosis of sepsis secondary to pyometra, blood samples were collected and clinical findings were recorded. Volume resuscitation with 0.9% saline solution and antimicrobial therapy were initiated. Following abdominal ultrasonography and confirmation of increased uterine volume, dogs underwent corrective surgery. After surgery, the animals were admitted to the ICU, where resuscitation was guided by the clinical parameters, central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO(2)), lactate, and base deficit. Between survivors and nonsurvivors it was observed that the ScvO(2), lactate, and base deficit on ICU admission were each related independently to death (P = 0.001, P = 0.030, and P < 0.001, respectively). ScvO(2) and base deficit were found to be the best discriminators between survivors and nonsurvivors as assessed via receiver operator characteristic curve analysis. Our study suggests that ScvO(2) and base deficit are useful in predicting the prognosis of dogs with severe sepsis and septic shock; animals with a higher ScvO(2) and lower base deficit at admission to the ICU have a lower probability of death. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2012.

  1. Hemodynamic characterization of geometric cerebral aneurysm templates.

    PubMed

    Nair, Priya; Chong, Brian W; Indahlastari, Aprinda; Lindsay, James; DeJeu, David; Parthasarathy, Varsha; Ryan, Justin; Babiker, Haithem; Workman, Christopher; Gonzalez, L Fernando; Frakes, David

    2016-07-26

    Hemodynamics are currently considered to a lesser degree than geometry in clinical practices for evaluating cerebral aneurysm (CA) risk and planning CA treatment. This study establishes fundamental relationships between three clinically recognized CA geometric factors and four clinically relevant hemodynamic responses. The goal of the study is to develop a more combined geometric/hemodynamic basis for informing clinical decisions. Flows within eight idealized template geometries were simulated using computational fluid dynamics and measured using particle image velocimetry under both steady and pulsatile flow conditions. The geometric factor main effects were then analyzed to quantify contributions made by the geometric factors (aneurysmal dome size (DS), dome-to-neck ratio (DNR), and parent-vessel contact angle (PV-CA)) to effects on the hemodynamic responses (aneurysmal and neck-plane root-mean-square velocity magnitude (Vrms), aneurysmal wall shear stress (WSS), and cross-neck flow (CNF)). Two anatomical aneurysm models were also examined to investigate how well the idealized findings would translate to more realistic CA geometries. DNR made the greatest contributions to effects on hemodynamics including a 75.05% contribution to aneurysmal Vrms and greater than 35% contributions to all responses. DS made the next greatest contributions, including a 43.94% contribution to CNF and greater than 20% contributions to all responses. PV-CA and several factor interactions also made contributions of greater than 10%. The anatomical aneurysm models and the most similar idealized templates demonstrated consistent hemodynamic response patterns. This study demonstrates how individual geometric factors, and combinations thereof, influence CA hemodynamics. Bridging the gap between geometry and flow in this quantitative yet practical way may have potential to improve CA evaluation and treatment criteria. Agreement among results from idealized and anatomical models further

  2. Severe COPD Alters Muscle Fiber Conduction Velocity During Knee Extensors Fatiguing Contraction.

    PubMed

    Boccia, Gennaro; Coratella, Giuseppe; Dardanello, Davide; Rinaldo, Nicoletta; Lanza, Massimo; Schena, Federico; Rainoldi, Alberto

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the changes in muscle fiber conduction velocity (CV), as a sign of fatigue during knee extensor contraction in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as compared with healthy controls. Eleven male patients (5 with severe and 6 with moderate COPD; age 67 ± 5 years) and 11 age-matched healthy male controls (age 65 ± 4 years) volunteered for the study. CV was obtained by multichannel surface electromyography (EMG) from the vastus lateralis (VL) and medialis (VM) of the quadriceps muscle during isometric, 30-second duration knee extension at 70% of maximal voluntary contraction. The decline in CV in both the VL and VM was steeper in the severe COPD patients than in healthy controls (for VL: severe COPD vs. controls -0.45 ± 0.07%/s; p < 0.001, and for VM: severe COPD vs. controls -0.54 ± 0.09%/s, p < 0.001). No difference in CV decline was found between the moderate COPD patients and the healthy controls. These findings suggest that severe COPD may impair muscle functions, leading to greater muscular fatigue, as expressed by CV changes. The results may be due to a greater involvement of anaerobic metabolism and a shift towards fatigable type II fibers in the muscle composition of the severe COPD patients.

  3. Hemodynamic assessment in heart failure: role of physical examination and noninvasive methods.

    PubMed

    Almeida Junior, Gustavo Luiz; Xavier, Sérgio Salles; Garcia, Marcelo Iorio; Clausell, Nadine

    2012-01-01

    Among the cardiovascular diseases, heart failure (HF) has a high rate of hospitalization, morbidity and mortality, consuming vast resources of the public health system in Brazil and other countries. The correct determination of the filling pressures of the left ventricle by noninvasive or invasive assessment is critical to the proper treatment of patients with decompensated chronic HF, considering that congestion is the main determinant of symptoms and hospitalization. Physical examination has shown to be inadequate to predict the hemodynamic pattern. Several studies have suggested that agreement on physical findings by different physicians is small and that, ultimately, adaptive physiological alterations in chronic HF mask important aspects of the physical examination. As the clinical assessment fails to predict hemodynamic aspects and because the use of Swan-Ganz catheter is not routinely recommended for this purpose in patients with HF, noninvasive hemodynamic assessment methods, such as BNP, echocardiography and cardiographic bioimpedance, are being increasingly used. The present study intends to carry out, for the clinician, a review of the role of each of these tools when defining the hemodynamic status of patients with decompensated heart failure, aiming at a more rational and individualized treatment.

  4. The Acute Impact of Smoking One Cigarette on Cardiac Hemodynamic Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Farha, Khalid Abou; AbouFarha, Ramy; Bolt, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Background The acute impact of tobacco smoking on the cardiac hemodynamic parameters and its pathological implication in the process of arterial atherosclerosis need further exploration. This investigation was purposed to assess the acute impact of tobacco smoke on blood pressure and cardiac hemodynamic parameters. Methods Using an Ultrasonic Cardiac Output Monitor, and DINAMAP Pro 400 Series V2 blood pressure monitor, several cardiac hemodynamic parameters and the blood pressure were assessed in 14 smokers, 11 females and 3 males, at 2 time points, before and after smoking of one cigarette. Data, in terms of ratio of the means and 95% confidence interval were analyzed using ANOVA. Results Single-subject design in which the subject has served as his/her own control has been used. Tobacco smoking led to statistically significant acute increase in the means of all hemodynamic parameters, except for heart rate in female subjects, as compared to the means obtained before smoking. Conclusions Cigarette smoking induces acute non-physiologic alteration in cardiac outflow forces, exposing the aortic valve and arch to mechanical injury that might be implicated in initiating and promoting the process of aortic arch atherosclerosis and associated pathological lesions.

  5. Insular Dysfunction Reflects Altered Between-Network Connectivity and Severity of Negative Symptoms in Schizophrenia during Psychotic Remission

    PubMed Central

    Manoliu, Andrei; Riedl, Valentin; Doll, Anselm; Bäuml, Josef Georg; Mühlau, Mark; Schwerthöffer, Dirk; Scherr, Martin; Zimmer, Claus; Förstl, Hans; Bäuml, Josef; Wohlschläger, Afra M.; Koch, Kathrin; Sorg, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia is characterized by aberrant intrinsic functional connectivity (iFC) within and between intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs), including the Default Mode- (DMN), Salience- (SN), and Central Executive Network (CEN). The anterior insula (AI) of the SN has been demonstrated to modulate DMN/CEN interactions. Recently, we found that the dependence of DMN/CEN interactions on SN’s right AI activity is altered in patients with schizophrenia in acute psychosis and related to psychotic symptoms, indicating a link between aberrant AI, DMN, CEN, and psychosis. However, since structural alterations of the insula are also present during psychotic remission and associated with negative symptoms, impaired AI interaction might be relevant even for psychotic remission and corresponding symptoms. Twelve patients with schizophrenia during psychotic remission (SR) and 12 healthy controls were assessed using resting-state fMRI and psychometric examination. High-model-order independent component analysis of fMRI data revealed ICNs including DMN, SN, and CEN. Scores of iFC within (intra-iFC) and between (inter-iFC) distinct subsystems of the DMN, SN, and CEN were calculated, compared between groups and correlated with the severity of symptoms. Intra-iFC was altered in patients’ SN, DMN, and CEN, including decreased intra-iFC in the left AI within the SN. Patients’ inter-iFC between SN and CEN was increased and correlated with the severity of negative symptoms. Furthermore, decreased intra-iFC of the left AI correlated with both severity of negative symptoms and increased inter-iFC between SN and CEN. Our result provides first evidence for a relationship between AI dysfunction and altered between-network interactions in schizophrenia during psychotic remission, which is related to the severity of negative symptoms. Together with our previous results, data suggest specific SN/DMN/CEN reorganization in schizophrenia with distinct insular pathways for distinct symptom

  6. The revised Atlanta criteria 2012 altered the classification, severity assessment and management of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jie; Qu, Hong-Ping; Zheng, Yun-Feng; Song, Xu-Wei; Li, Lei; Xu, Zhi-Wei; Mao, En-Qiang; Chen, Er-Zhen

    2016-06-01

    The Atlanta criteria for acute pancreatitis (AP) has been revised recently. This study was to evaluate its practical value in classification of AP, the severity assessment and management. The clinical features, severity classification, outcome and risk factors for mortality of 3212 AP patients who had been admitted in Ruijin Hospital from 2004 to 2011 were analyzed based on the revised Atlanta criteria (RAC) and the original Atlanta criteria (OAC). Compared to the OAC group, the incidence of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) was decreased by approximately one half (13.9% vs 28.2%) in the RAC group. The RAC presented a lower sensitivity but higher specificity, and its predictive value for severity and poor outcome was higher than those of the OAC. The proportion of SAP diagnosis and ICU admission in the early phase in the RAC group was significantly lower than that in the OAC group (P<0.05). Based on the RAC, the risk factors for death among SAP patients were older age, high CT severity index (CTSI), renal failure, cardiovascular failure, acute necrotic collection and walled-off necrosis. Compared to the OAC, the acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II) score, Ranson score, idiopathic etiology, respiratory failure and laparotomy debridement were not risk factors of death in contrast to walled-off necrosis. Interestingly, hypertriglyceridemia-related SAP had good outcomes in both groups. The RAC showed a higher predictive value for severity and poorer outcome than the OAC. However, the RAC resulted in fewer ICU admissions in the early phase due to its lower sensitivity for diagnosis of SAP. Among SAP cases, older age, high CTSI, renal and cardiovascular failure, complications of acute necrotic collection and walled-off necrosis were independent risk factors for mortality.

  7. Hemodynamic effects of red blood cell aggregation.

    PubMed

    Baskurt, Oguz K; Meiselman, Herbert J

    2007-01-01

    The influence of red blood cell (RBC) aggregation on blood flow in vivo has been under debate since early 1900's, yet a full understanding has still has not been reached. Enhanced RBC aggregation is well known to increase blood viscosity measured in rotational viscometers. However, it has been demonstrated that RBC aggregation may decrease flow resistance in cylindrical tubes, due to the formation of a cell-poor zone near the tube wall which results from the enhanced central accumulation of RBC. There is also extensive discussion regarding the effects of RBC aggregation on in vivo blood flow resistance. Several groups have reported increased microcirculatory flow resistance with enhanced RBC aggregation in experiments that utilized intravital microscopy. Alternatively, whole organ studies revealed that flow resistance may be significantly decreased if RBC aggregation is enhanced. Recently, new techniques have been developed to achieve well-controlled, graded alterations in RBC aggregation without influencing suspending phase properties. Studies using this technique revealed that the effects of RBC aggregation are determined by the degree of aggregation changes, and that this relationship can be explained by different hemodynamic mechanisms.

  8. Collateralization and ischemia in hemodynamic cerebrovascular insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Czabanka, Marcus; Acker, Gueliz; Jussen, Daniel; Finger, Tobias; Pena-Tapia, Pablo; Schubert, Gerrit A; Scharf, Johann; Martus, Peter; Schmiedek, Peter; Vajkoczy, Peter

    2014-11-01

    Moyamoya disease and atherosclerotic cerebrovascular occlusive disease lead to hemodynamic impairment of cerebral blood flow. One major differentiation between both disease entities lies in the collateralization pathways. The clinical implications of the collateralization pathways for the development of hemodynamic ischemia remain unknown. The aim was to characterize collateralization and ischemia patterns in patients with chronic hemodynamic compromise. Hemodynamic compromise was verified using acetazolamide-stimulated xenon-CT or SPECT in 54 patients [30 moyamoya and 24 atherosclerotic cerebrovascular disease (ACVD)]. All patients received MRI to differentiate hemodynamic ischemia into anterior/posterior cortical border zone infarction (CBI), inferior border zone infarction (IBI) or territorial infarction (TI). Digital subtraction angiography was applied to evaluate collateralization. Collateralization was compared and correlated with the localization of ischemia and number of vascular territories with impaired cerebrovascular reserve capacity (CVRC). MM patients showed collateralization significantly more often via pericallosal anastomosis and the posterior communicating artery (flow in the anterior-posterior direction; MM: 95%/95% vs. ACVD: 23%/12%, p < 0.05). ACVD patients demonstrated collateralization via the anterior and posterior communicating arteries (flow in the posterior-anterior direction, MM: 6%/5% vs. ACVD: 62%/88%, p < 0.05). Patterns of infarction were comparable (aCBI: MM: 36% vs. ACVD: 35%; pCBI: MM: 10% vs. ACVD: 20%; IBI: MM: 35% vs. ACVD: 41%; TI: MM: 13% vs. ACVD: 18%). The number and localization of vascular territories with impaired CVRC were comparable. Despite significant differences in collateralization, the infarct patterns and severity of CVRC impairment do not differ between MMV and ACVD patients. Cerebral collateralization does not allow reaching conclusions about the localization of cerebral ischemia or severity of impaired

  9. Inflammatory Serum Proteins Are Severely Altered in Metastatic Gastric Adenocarcinoma Patients from the Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ashok; He, Mingfang; Xue, Jing; Wu, Jianzhong; Dun, Boying; Li, Gang; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Ji, Minghua; She, Jin-Xiong; Tang, Jinhai

    2015-01-01

    Background Inflammation is one of the major hallmarks of cancer. This study was designed to profile a panel of inflammatory mediators in gastric adenocarcinoma (GA) and to identify their potential differences separately in metastatic and non-metastatic patient subgroups. Methods Serum samples from 216 GA patients and 333 healthy controls from China were analyzed for six proteins using the Luminex multiplex assay. Results The serum levels for all the six proteins were significantly elevated in metastatic GA compared to non-metastatic GA. Two acute phase proteins (SAA and CRP) and a CXC chemokine (GRO) were significantly elevated in metastatic GA (p <0.01) but smaller changes were observed in non-metastatic GA compared to healthy controls. OPN is moderately increased in non-metastatic GA (2.05-fold) and more severely elevated in metastatic GA (3.34-fold). Surprisingly, soluble VCAM1 and AGP were significantly lower in both non-metastatic and metastatic GA patients compared to controls. Several individual proteins were shown to possess moderate diagnostic value for non-metastatic GA (AUC = 0.786, 0.833, 0.823 for OPN, sVCAM1 and AGP, respectively) and metastatic GA (AUC = 0.931, 0.720, 0.834 and 0.737 for OPN, sVCAM1, SAA and CRP, respectively). However, protein combinations further improve the diagnostic potential for both non-metastatic GA (best AUC = 0.946) and metastatic GA (best AUC = 0.963). The protein combination with best AUC value for both comparisons is OPN+sVCAM1+AGP+SAA. Conclusions These results suggest that several serum proteins are directly related to the severity of gastric cancer. Overall, stronger associations are observed with metastatic than non-metastatic GA as the protein changes are greater with the metastatic status. A combination of these serum proteins may serve as non-invasive markers to assess the severity status and stage of gastric cancer. PMID:25884401

  10. Increased ambient air temperature alters the severity of soil water repellency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Keulen, Geertje; Sinclair, Kat; Hallin, Ingrid; Doerr, Stefan; Urbanek, Emilia; Quinn, Gerry; Matthews, Peter; Dudley, Ed; Francis, Lewis; Gazze, S. Andrea; Whalley, Richard

    2017-04-01

    Soil repellency, the inability of soils to wet readily, has detrimental environmental impacts such as increased runoff, erosion and flooding, reduced biomass production, inefficient use of irrigation water and preferential leaching of pollutants. Its impacts may exacerbate (summer) flood risks associated with more extreme drought and precipitation events. In this study we have tested the hypothesis that transitions between hydrophobic and hydrophilic soil particle surface characteristics, in conjunction with soil structural properties, strongly influence the hydrological behaviour of UK soils under current and predicted UK climatic conditions. We have addressed the hypothesis by applying different ambient air temperatures under controlled conditions to simulate the effect of predicted UK climatic conditions on the wettability of soils prone to develop repellency at different severities. Three UK silt-loam soils under permanent vegetation were selected for controlled soil perturbation studies. The soils were chosen based on the severity of hydrophobicity that can be achieved in the field: severe to extreme (Cefn Bryn, Gower, Wales), intermediate to severe (National Botanical Garden, Wales), and subcritical (Park Grass, Rothamsted Research near London). The latter is already highly characterised so was also used as a control. Soils were fully saturated with water and then allowed to dry out gradually upon exposure to controlled laboratory conditions. Soils were allowed to adapt for a few hours to a new temperature prior to initiation of the controlled experiments. Soil wettability was determined at highly regular intervals by measuring water droplet penetration times. Samples were collected at four time points: fully wettable, just prior to and after the critical soil moisture concentrations (CSC), and upon reaching air dryness (to constant weight), for further (ultra)metaproteomic and nanomechanical studies to allow integration of bulk soil characterisations with

  11. Diets enriched with cranberry beans alter the microbiota and mitigate colitis severity and associated inflammation.

    PubMed

    Monk, Jennifer M; Lepp, Dion; Zhang, Claire P; Wu, Wenqing; Zarepoor, Leila; Lu, Jenifer T; Pauls, K Peter; Tsao, Rong; Wood, Geoffrey A; Robinson, Lindsay E; Power, Krista A

    2016-02-01

    Common beans are rich in phenolic compounds and nondigestible fermentable components, which may help alleviate intestinal diseases. We assessed the gut health priming effect of a 20% cranberry bean flour diet from two bean varieties with differing profiles of phenolic compounds [darkening (DC) and nondarkening (NDC) cranberry beans vs. basal diet control (BD)] on critical aspects of gut health in unchallenged mice, and during dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis (2% DSS wt/vol, 7 days). In unchallenged mice, NDC and DC increased (i) cecal short-chain fatty acids, (ii) colon crypt height, (iii) crypt goblet cell number and mucus content and (iv) Muc1, Klf4, Relmβ and Reg3γ gene expression vs. BD, indicative of enhanced microbial activity and gut barrier function. Fecal 16S rRNA sequencing determined that beans reduced abundance of the Lactobacillaceae (Ruminococcus gnavus), Clostridiaceae (Clostridium perfringens), Peptococcaceae, Peptostreptococcaceae, Rikenellaceae and Pophyromonadaceae families, and increased abundance of S24-7 and Prevotellaceae. During colitis, beans reduced (i) disease severity and colonic histological damage, (ii) increased gene expression of barrier function promoting genes (Muc1-3, Relmβ, and Reg3γ) and (iii) reduced colonic and circulating inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IFNγ and TNFα). Therefore, prior to disease induction, bean supplementation enhanced multiple concurrent gut health promoting parameters that translated into reduced colitis severity. Moreover, both bean diets exerted similar effects, indicating that differing phenolic content did not influence the endpoints assessed. These data demonstrate a proof-of-concept regarding the gut-priming potential of beans in colitis, which could be extended to mitigate the severity of other gut barrier-associated pathologies. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Sperm of patients with severe asthenozoospermia show biochemical, molecular and genomic alterations.

    PubMed

    Bonanno, Oriana; Romeo, Giulietta; Asero, Paola; Pezzino, Franca Maria; Castiglione, Roberto; Burrello, Nunziatina; Sidoti, Giuseppe; Frajese, Giovanni Vanni; Vicari, Enzo; D'Agata, Rosario

    2016-12-01

    The multifactorial pathological condition, that is, severe low sperm motility is a frequent cause of infertility. However, mechanisms underlying the development of this condition are not completely understood. Single abnormalities have been reported in sperm of patients with asthenozoospermia. In this study, we characterized, in 22 normozoospermic men and in 37 patients with asthenozoospermia, biochemical, molecular and genomic abnormalities that frequently occur in sperm of patients with asthenozoospermia. We evaluated a panel of sperm biomarkers that may affect the motility and fertilizing ability of sperm of patients with severe asthenozoospermia. Since reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is involved in the pathogenesis of such sperm abnormalities, we determined the association between ROS production and sperm abnormalities. High percentage of patients with severe asthenozoospermia showed increased basal and stimulated ROS production. Moreover, these patients showed increased mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number but decreased mtDNA integrity and they were associated with elevated ROS levels. Furthermore, mitochondrial membrane potential was also significantly decreased and again associated with high ROS production in these patients. However, the rate of nuclear DNA fragmentation was increased only in less than one-fifth of these patients. An important cohort of these patients showed multiple identical biochemical, molecular and genomic abnormalities, which are typical manifestations of oxidative stress. The most frequent association was found in patients with high ROS levels, increased mtDNA copy number and decreased integrity, and low MMP. A smaller cohort of the aforementioned patients also showed nDNA fragmentation. Therefore, patients with asthezoospermia likely present reduced fertilizing potential because of such composed abnormalities.

  13. Alterations in the gut microbiome of children with severe ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Michail, Sonia; Durbin, Matthew; Turner, Dan; Griffiths, Anne M; Mack, David R.; Hyams, Jeffrey; Leleiko, Neal; Kenche, Harshavardhan; Stolfi, Adrienne; Wine, Eytan

    2011-01-01

    Background Although the role of microbes in disease pathogenesis is well established, data describing the variability of the vast microbiome in children diagnosed with ulcerative colitis (UC) are lacking. This study characterizes the gut microbiome in hospitalized children with severe UC and determines the relationship between microbiota and response to steroid therapy. Methods Fecal samples were collected from 26 healthy controls and 27 children hospitalized with severe UC as part of a prospective multi-center study. DNA extraction, PCR amplification of bacterial 16S rRNA, and microarray hybridization were performed. Results were analyzed in Genespring GX 11.0 comparing healthy controls to children with UC, and steroid responsive (n=17) to non-responsive patients (n=10). Results Bacterial signal strength and distribution showed differences between UC and healthy controls (adjusted p<0.05) for Phylum, Class, Order, Family, Genus, and Phylospecies levels with reduction in Clostridia and an increase in Gamma-proteobacteria. The number of microbial phylospecies was reduced in UC (266±69) vs. controls (758±3, p<0.001), as was the Shannon diversity index (6.1±0.23 vs. 6.49±0.04, respectively; p<0.0001). Steroids non-responders harbored less phylospecies than responders (142±49 vs. 338±62, p=0.013). Conclusions Richness, evenness, and biodiversity of the gut microbiome were remarkably reduced in children with UC, compared to healthy controls. Children who did not respond to steroids harbored a microbiome that was even less rich than steroid responders. This study is the first to characterize the gut microbiome in a large cohort of pediatric patients with severe ulcerative colitis and describes changes in the gut microbiome as a potential prognostic feature. PMID:22170749

  14. Severe protein deficiency and repletion alter body and brain composition and organ weights in infant pigs.

    PubMed

    Pond, W G; Ellis, K J; Mersmann, H J; Heath, J P; Krook, L P; Burrin, D G; Dudley, M A; Sheng, H P

    1996-01-01

    Three-wk-old genetically lean or obese pigs were used in two experiments to determine the changes in body composition, visceral organs and brain in response to severe protein deficiency. In Experiment 1, 16 obese pigs were fed an adequate (A, 21% protein, 3% fat) or a protein-deficient (D, 5% protein, 23% fat) diet for 7 wk. One-half of each group was killed at 7 wk, and the remainder of each group was fed the A diet for an additional 8 wk. At 7 wk, pigs fed D contained a higher percentage of fat than those fed A (P < 0.01); after 8-wk of repletion, body composition of the two groups was similar. Duodenum, jejunum, and ileum of the protein-deficient pigs had severely atrophic villi, submucosal edema, and atrophic muscle layers; after 8 wk of repletion, however, microscopic architecture of the gastrointestinal tract was restored to normal. Absolute cerebrum weight at 7 wk, but not after 8 wk repletion, in the pigs fed D were significantly less than in pigs fed A, indicating reduced brain cellularity after 7 wk of protein restriction, but not after 8 wk repletion. In Experiment 2, genetically obese (O, n = 8) and lean (L, n = 8) pigs consumed the A or D diet ad libitum for 10 wk. L and O pigs responded similarly to protein deficiency; D pigs were fatter than A pigs and plasma constituents, bone mineral content, bone mineral density and most organ weights revealed no interactions between diet and genotype. The pig model system used in these experiments enabled the isolation of protein deficiency from infectious disease, parasites and social environmental stimulation that may confound interpretation of human infant malnutrition experiments. The data suggest that genetically controlled body fatness is not a major determinant in the response of the infant pig to severe protein deficiency.

  15. Altered Mucosal Microbiome Diversity and Disease Severity in Sjögren Syndrome.

    PubMed

    de Paiva, Cintia S; Jones, Dan B; Stern, Michael E; Bian, Fang; Moore, Quianta L; Corbiere, Shani; Streckfus, Charles F; Hutchinson, Diane S; Ajami, Nadim J; Petrosino, Joseph F; Pflugfelder, Stephen C

    2016-04-18

    There is mounting evidence that the microbiome has potent immunoregulatory functions. We assessed the effects of intestinal dysbiosis in a model of Sjögren syndrome (SS) by subjecting mice to desiccating stress (DS) and antibiotics (ABX). We characterized the conjunctival, tongue and fecal microbiome profiles of patients with SS. Severity of ocular surface and systemic disease was graded. 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing characterized the microbiota. ABX + DS mice had a significantly worse dry eye phenotype compared to controls, a decrease in Clostridium and an increase in Enterobacter, Escherichia/Shigella, and Pseudomonas in stool after ABX + DS for 10 days. Goblet cell density was significantly lower in ABX treated groups compared to controls. Stool from SS subjects had greater relative abundances of Pseudobutyrivibrio, Escherichia/Shigella, Blautia, and Streptococcus, while relative abundance of Bacteroides, Parabacteroides, Faecalibacterium, and Prevotella was reduced compared to controls. The severity of SS ocular and systemic disease was inversely correlated with microbial diversity. These findings suggest that SS is marked by a dysbiotic intestinal microbiome driven by low relative abundance of commensal bacteria and high relative abundance of potentially pathogenic genera that is associated with worse ocular mucosal disease in a mouse model of SS and in SS patients.

  16. Altered Mucosal Microbiome Diversity and Disease Severity in Sjögren Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    de Paiva, Cintia S.; Jones, Dan B.; Stern, Michael E.; Bian, Fang; Moore, Quianta L.; Corbiere, Shani; Streckfus, Charles F.; Hutchinson, Diane S.; Ajami, Nadim J.; Petrosino, Joseph F.; Pflugfelder, Stephen C.

    2016-01-01

    There is mounting evidence that the microbiome has potent immunoregulatory functions. We assessed the effects of intestinal dysbiosis in a model of Sjögren syndrome (SS) by subjecting mice to desiccating stress (DS) and antibiotics (ABX). We characterized the conjunctival, tongue and fecal microbiome profiles of patients with SS. Severity of ocular surface and systemic disease was graded. 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing characterized the microbiota. ABX + DS mice had a significantly worse dry eye phenotype compared to controls, a decrease in Clostridium and an increase in Enterobacter, Escherichia/Shigella, and Pseudomonas in stool after ABX + DS for 10 days. Goblet cell density was significantly lower in ABX treated groups compared to controls. Stool from SS subjects had greater relative abundances of Pseudobutyrivibrio, Escherichia/Shigella, Blautia, and Streptococcus, while relative abundance of Bacteroides, Parabacteroides, Faecalibacterium, and Prevotella was reduced compared to controls. The severity of SS ocular and systemic disease was inversely correlated with microbial diversity. These findings suggest that SS is marked by a dysbiotic intestinal microbiome driven by low relative abundance of commensal bacteria and high relative abundance of potentially pathogenic genera that is associated with worse ocular mucosal disease in a mouse model of SS and in SS patients. PMID:27087247

  17. Disease severity in patients with visceral leishmaniasis is not altered by co-infection with intestinal parasites.

    PubMed

    Tajebe, Fitsumbrhan; Getahun, Mulusew; Adem, Emebet; Hailu, Asrat; Lemma, Mulualem; Fikre, Helina; Raynes, John; Tamiru, Aschalew; Mulugeta, Zemenay; Diro, Ermias; Toulza, Frederic; Shkedy, Ziv; Ayele, Tadesse; Modolell, Manuel; Munder, Markus; Müller, Ingrid; Takele, Yegnasew; Kropf, Pascale

    2017-07-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a neglected tropical disease that affects the poorest communities and can cause substantial morbidity and mortality. Visceral leishmaniasis is characterized by the presence of Leishmania parasites in the spleen, liver and bone marrow, hepatosplenomegaly, pancytopenia, prolonged fever, systemic inflammation and low body mass index (BMI). The factors impacting on the severity of VL are poorly characterized. Here we performed a cross-sectional study to assess whether co-infection of VL patients with intestinal parasites influences disease severity, assessed with clinical and haematological data, inflammation, cytokine profiles and BMI. Data from VL patients was similar to VL patients co-infected with intestinal parasites, suggesting that co-infection of VL patients with intestinal parasites does not alter disease severity.

  18. Optical imaging of neural and hemodynamic brain activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schei, Jennifer Lynn

    Optical imaging technologies can be used to record neural and hemodynamic activity. Neural activity elicits physiological changes that alter the optical tissue properties. Specifically, changes in polarized light are concomitant with neural depolarization. We measured polarization changes from an isolated lobster nerve during action potential propagation using both reflected and transmitted light. In transmission mode, polarization changes were largest throughout the center of the nerve, suggesting that most of the optical signal arose from the inner nerve bundle. In reflection mode, polarization changes were largest near the edges, suggesting that most of the optical signal arose from the outer sheath. To overcome irregular cell orientation found in the brain, we measured polarization changes from a nerve tied in a knot. Our results show that neural activation produces polarization changes that can be imaged even without regular cell orientations. Neural activation expends energy resources and elicits metabolic delivery through blood vessel dilation, increasing blood flow and volume. We used spectroscopic imaging techniques combined with electrophysiological measurements to record evoked neural and hemodynamic responses from the auditory cortex of the rat. By using implantable optics, we measured responses across natural wake and sleep states, as well as responses following different amounts of sleep deprivation. During quiet sleep, evoked metabolic responses were larger compared to wake, perhaps because blood vessels were more compliant. When animals were sleep deprived, evoked hemodynamic responses were smaller following longer periods of deprivation. These results suggest that prolonged neural activity through sleep deprivation may diminish vascular compliance as indicated by the blunted vascular response. Subsequent sleep may allow vessels to relax, restoring their ability to deliver blood. These results also suggest that severe sleep deprivation or chronic

  19. Severe and moderate hemophilia A: identification of 38 new genetic alterations.

    PubMed

    Casaña, Pilar; Cabrera, Noelia; Cid, Ana Rosa; Haya, Saturnino; Beneyto, Magdalena; Espinós, Carmen; Cortina, Vicente; Dasí, Maria Angeles; Aznar, Josè Antonio

    2008-07-01

    Hemophilia A is an X-linked recessive disorder caused by a lack or decrease of factor VIII activity. Its socio-economic impact is high given its high bleeding expression and treatment cost. Our aim was to establish the mutation of each patient to improve family management. A total of 116 unrelated families with severe and moderate hemophilia A were involved. Non-carriers of intron 22 and intron 1 rearrangements were included in F8 gene screening. Intron 1 and 22 inversion frequencies were 3% and 52.5% respectively. Putative mutations were identified in all the families; 38 were new. The cumulative inhibitor incidence was 22%. Approximately half the families carry non-recurrent mutations, which were unique in around one third. Harmful effects for mutations predicting null alleles are expected. Missense mutation consequences are not easily predictable, despite the help of some bio-informatics tools.

  20. Severe pre-eclampsia is associated with alterations in cytotrophoblasts of the smooth chorion

    PubMed Central

    Garrido-Gomez, Tamara; Ona, Katherine; Kapidzic, Mirhan; Gormley, Matthew; Simón, Carlos; Genbacev, Olga

    2017-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia (PE), which affects ∼8% of first pregnancies, is associated with faulty placentation. Extravillous cytotrophoblasts (CTBs) fail to differentiate properly, contributing to shallow uterine invasion and deficient spiral artery remodeling. We studied the effects of severe PE (sPE) on the smooth chorion portion of the fetal membranes. The results showed a significant expansion of the CTB layer. The cells displayed enhanced expression of stage-specific antigens that extravillous CTBs normally upregulate as they exit the placenta. Transcriptomics revealed the dysregulated expression of many genes (e.g. placental proteins, markers of oxidative stress). We confirmed an sPE-related increase in production of PAPPA1, which releases IGF1 from its binding protein. IGF1 enhanced proliferation of smooth chorion CTBs, a possible explanation for expansion of this layer, which may partially compensate for the placental deficits. PMID:28232601

  1. Severe pre-eclampsia is associated with alterations in cytotrophoblasts of the smooth chorion.

    PubMed

    Garrido-Gomez, Tamara; Ona, Katherine; Kapidzic, Mirhan; Gormley, Matthew; Simón, Carlos; Genbacev, Olga; Fisher, Susan J

    2017-03-01

    Pre-eclampsia (PE), which affects ∼8% of first pregnancies, is associated with faulty placentation. Extravillous cytotrophoblasts (CTBs) fail to differentiate properly, contributing to shallow uterine invasion and deficient spiral artery remodeling. We studied the effects of severe PE (sPE) on the smooth chorion portion of the fetal membranes. The results showed a significant expansion of the CTB layer. The cells displayed enhanced expression of stage-specific antigens that extravillous CTBs normally upregulate as they exit the placenta. Transcriptomics revealed the dysregulated expression of many genes (e.g. placental proteins, markers of oxidative stress). We confirmed an sPE-related increase in production of PAPPA1, which releases IGF1 from its binding protein. IGF1 enhanced proliferation of smooth chorion CTBs, a possible explanation for expansion of this layer, which may partially compensate for the placental deficits. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. The effects of hemodynamic force on embryonic development

    PubMed Central

    CULVER, JAMES C.; DICKINSON, MARY E.

    2010-01-01

    Blood vessels have long been known to respond to hemodynamic force, and several mechanotransduction pathways have been identified. However, only recently have we begun to understand the effects of hemodynamic force on embryonic development. In this review, we will discuss specific examples illustrating the role of hemodynamic force during the development of the embryo, with particular focus on the development of the vascular system and the morphogenesis of the heart. We will also discuss the important functions served by mechanotransduction and hemodynamic force during placentation, as well as in regulating the maintenance and division of embryonic, hematopoietic, neural, and mesenchymal stem cells. Pathological misregulation of mechanosensitive pathways during pregnancy and embryonic development may contribute to the occurrence of cardiovascular birth defects, as well as to a variety of other diseases, including preeclampsia. Thus, there is a need for future studies focusing on better understanding the physiological effects of hemodynamic force during embryonic development and their role in the pathogenesis of disease. PMID:20374481

  3. Age-Related Alteration of Arginase Activity Impacts on Severity of Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Ingrid; Hailu, Asrat; Choi, Beak-San; Abebe, Tamrat; Fuentes, Jose M.; Munder, Markus; Modolell, Manuel; Kropf, Pascale

    2008-01-01

    Background The leishmaniases are a group of vector-borne parasitic diseases that represent a major international public health problem; they belong to the most neglected tropical diseases and have one of the highest rates of morbidity and mortality. The clinical outcome of infection with Leishmania parasites depends on a variety of factors such as parasite species, vector-derived products, genetics, behaviour, and nutrition. The age of the infected individuals also appears to be critical, as a significant proportion of clinical cases occur in children; this age-related higher prevalence of disease is most remarkable in visceral leishmaniasis. The mechanisms resulting in this higher incidence of clinical disease in children are poorly understood. We have recently revealed that sustained arginase activity promotes uncontrolled parasite growth and pathology in vivo. Here, we tested the hypothesis that arginase-mediated L-arginine metabolism differs with age. Methodology The age distribution of patients with visceral or cutaneous leishmaniasis was determined in cohorts of patients in our clinics in endemic areas in Ethiopia. To exclude factors that are difficult to control in patients, we assessed the impact of ageing on the manifestations of experimental leishmaniasis. We determined parasite burden, T cell responses, and macrophage effector functions in young and aged mice during the course of infection. Results Our results show that younger mice develop exacerbated lesion pathology and higher parasite burdens than aged mice. This aggravated disease development in younger individuals does not correlate with a change in T helper cytokine profile. To address the underlying mechanisms responsible for the more severe infections in younger mice, we investigated macrophage effector functions. Our results show that macrophages from younger mice do not have an impaired capacity to kill parasites; however, they express significantly higher levels of arginase 1 than aged mice

  4. Altered brain activity in severely obese women may recover after Roux-en Y gastric bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Frank, S; Wilms, B; Veit, R; Ernst, B; Thurnheer, M; Kullmann, S; Fritsche, A; Birbaumer, N; Preissl, H; Schultes, B

    2014-03-01

    Neuroimaging studies have demonstrated alterations in brain activity in obese (OB) subjects that might be causally linked to their disorder. Roux-en Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery induces a marked and sustained weight loss and may affect brain activity. The aim of this study was to compare brain activity pattern between severely OB women (n=11), normal-weight women (NW, n=11) and previously severely OB women who had undergone RYGB surgery (RYGB, n=9) on average 3.4±0.8 years (all >1 year) before the experiment. Brain activity was assessed by functional magnetic resonance imaging during a one-back task containing food- and non-food-related pictures and during resting state. Hunger and satiety were repeatedly rated on a visual analog scale during the experiment. As compared with NW and also with RYGB women, OB women showed (1) a higher cerebellar and a lower fusiform gyrus activity during the visual stimulation independently of the picture category, (2) a higher hypothalamic activation during the presentation of low- vs high-caloric food pictures, (3) a higher hippocampal and cerebellar activity during the working memory task and (4) a stronger functional connectivity in frontal regions of the default mode network during resting state. There were no differences in brain activity between the NW and RYGB women, both during picture presentation and during resting state. RYGB women generally rated lower on hunger and higher on satiety, whereas there were no differences in these ratings between the OB and NW women. Data provide evidence for an altered brain activity pattern in severely OB women and suggest that RYGB surgery and/or the surgically induced weight loss reverses the obesity-associated alterations.

  5. Severely impaired learning and altered neuronal morphology in mice lacking NMDA receptors in medium spiny neurons.

    PubMed

    Beutler, Lisa R; Eldred, Kiara C; Quintana, Albert; Keene, C Dirk; Rose, Shannon E; Postupna, Nadia; Montine, Thomas J; Palmiter, Richard D

    2011-01-01

    The striatum is composed predominantly of medium spiny neurons (MSNs) that integrate excitatory, glutamatergic inputs from the cortex and thalamus, and modulatory dopaminergic inputs from the ventral midbrain to influence behavior. Glutamatergic activation of AMPA, NMDA, and metabotropic receptors on MSNs is important for striatal development and function, but the roles of each of these receptor classes remain incompletely understood. Signaling through NMDA-type glutamate receptors (NMDARs) in the striatum has been implicated in various motor and appetitive learning paradigms. In addition, signaling through NMDARs influences neuronal morphology, which could underlie their role in mediating learned behaviors. To study the role of NMDARs on MSNs in learning and in morphological development, we generated mice lacking the essential NR1 subunit, encoded by the Grin1 gene, selectively in MSNs. Although these knockout mice appear normal and display normal 24-hour locomotion, they have severe deficits in motor learning, operant conditioning and active avoidance. In addition, the MSNs from these knockout mice have smaller cell bodies and decreased dendritic length compared to littermate controls. We conclude that NMDAR signaling in MSNs is critical for normal MSN morphology and many forms of learning.

  6. Altered empathic responding in major depressive disorder: relation to symptom severity, illness burden, and psychosocial outcome.

    PubMed

    Cusi, Andrée M; Macqueen, Glenda M; Spreng, R Nathan; McKinnon, Margaret C

    2011-07-30

    Individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD) demonstrate deficits in multiple social cognitive domains; however, systematic investigations of empathic responding have not been performed. Twenty patients with MDD completed two measures of empathy, the Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI: Davis, 1980, 1983) and the Toronto Empathy Questionnaire (TEQ: Spreng et al., 2009). Relative to matched controls, patients with MDD reported significantly reduced levels of empathy measured broadly on the TEQ and specifically in cognitive ('Perspective Taking') and affective ('Empathic Concern') domains captured by the IRI. A higher illness burden (i.e., greater number of past depressive episodes) was associated with greater reductions in perspective taking ability. This study provides early evidence of impaired empathic abilities in patients with MDD that may worsen with illness progression. Alternatively, reductions in perspective taking ability may contribute to a more severe course of illness in this population. Further longitudinal work is needed to characterize the relation between social cognitive performance and social functioning in this population. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  7. Altered intrinsic functional connectivity of the cingulate cortex in children with severe temper outbursts.

    PubMed

    Roy, Amy Krain; Bennett, Randi; Posner, Jonathan; Hulvershorn, Leslie; Castellanos, F Xavier; Klein, Rachel G

    2017-08-14

    Severe temper outbursts (STO) in children are associated with impaired school and family functioning and may contribute to negative outcomes. These outbursts can be conceptualized as excessive frustration responses reflecting reduced emotion regulation capacity. The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) has been implicated in negative affect as well as emotional control, and exhibits disrupted function in children with elevated irritability and outbursts. This study examined the intrinsic functional connectivity (iFC) of a region of the ACC, the anterior midcingulate cortex (aMCC), in 5- to 9-year-old children with STO (n = 20), comparing them to children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) without outbursts (ADHD; n = 18). Additional analyses compared results to a sample of healthy children (HC; n = 18) and examined specific associations with behavioral and emotional dysregulation. Compared to the ADHD group, STO children exhibited reduced iFC between the aMCC and surrounding regions of the ACC, and increased iFC between the aMCC and precuneus. These differences were also seen between the STO and HC groups; ADHD and HC groups did not differ. Specificity analyses found associations between aMCC-ACC connectivity and hyperactivity, and between aMCC-precuneus iFC and emotion dysregulation. Disruption in aMCC networks may underlie the behavioral and emotional dysregulation characteristic of children with STO.

  8. Ocular hemodynamics during isometric exercise.

    PubMed

    Kiss, B; Dallinger, S; Polak, K; Findl, O; Eichler, H G; Schmetterer, L

    2001-01-01

    The autoregulatory capacity of the human retina is well documented, but the pressure-flow relationship of the human choroid is still a matter of controversy. Recent data, using laser Doppler flowmetry to measure choroidal blood flow, indicate that the choroid has some autoregulatory potential, whereas most data using other techniques for the assessment of choroidal hemodynamics indicate that the choroidal pressure-flow curve is linear. We used a new laser interferometric technique to characterize choroidal blood flow during isometric exercise. Twenty healthy subjects performed squatting for 6 min during normocapnia and during inhalation of 5% CO2 and 95% air. Ocular fundus pulsation amplitude, flow velocities in the ophthalmic artery, intraocular pressure, and systemic hemodynamics were measured in 2-min intervals. To gain information on choroidal blood flow fundus pulsation amplitude was corrected for changes in flow pulsatility using data from the ophthalmic artery and for changes in pulse rate. Ocular perfusion pressure was calculated from mean arterial pressure and intraocular pressure. The ocular pressure-flow relationship was calculated by sorting data according to ascending ocular perfusion pressure values. In a pilot study in 6 healthy subjects comparable ocular pressure flow relationships were obtained when choroidal blood flow was assessed with the method described above and with laser Doppler flowmetry. In the main study isometric exercise caused a significant increase in mean arterial pressure (56%, P < 0.001), pulse rate (84%, P < 0.001), and intraocular pressure (37%, P 0.004), but decreased fundus pulsation amplitude (-36%, P < 0.001). Significant deviations from baseline choroidal blood flow were observed only at ocular perfusion pressures >69% during normocapnia and 70% during hypercapnia. Our data indicate that during isometric exercise the choroid has a high capacity to keep blood flow constant despite changes in perfusion pressure and that this

  9. B-type natriuretic peptide in low-flow, low-gradient aortic stenosis: relationship to hemodynamics and clinical outcome: results from the Multicenter Truly or Pseudo-Severe Aortic Stenosis (TOPAS) study.

    PubMed

    Bergler-Klein, Jutta; Mundigler, Gerald; Pibarot, Philippe; Burwash, Ian G; Dumesnil, Jean G; Blais, Claudia; Fuchs, Christina; Mohty, Dania; Beanlands, Rob S; Hachicha, Zeineb; Walter-Publig, Nicole; Rader, Florian; Baumgartner, Helmut

    2007-06-05

    The prognostic value of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is unknown in low-flow, low-gradient aortic stenosis (AS). We sought to evaluate the relationship between AS and rest, stress hemodynamics, and clinical outcome. BNP was measured in 69 patients with low-flow AS (indexed effective orifice area < 0.6 cm2/m2, mean gradient < or = 40 mm Hg, left ventricular ejection fraction < or = 40%). All patients underwent dobutamine stress echocardiography and were classified as truly severe or pseudosevere AS by their projected effective orifice area at normal flow rate of 250 mL/s (effective orifice area < or = 1.0 cm2 or > 1.0 cm2). BNP was inversely related to ejection fraction at rest (Spearman correlation coefficient r(s)=-0.59, P<0.0001) and at peak stress (r(s)=-0.51, P<0.0001), effective orifice area at rest (r(s)=-0.50, P<0.0001) and at peak stress (r(s)=-0.46, P=0.0002), and mean transvalvular flow (r(s)=-0.31, P=0.01). BNP was directly related to valvular resistance (r(s)=0.42, P=0.0006) and wall motion score index (r(s)=0.36, P=0.004). BNP was higher in 29 patients with truly severe AS versus 40 with pseudosevere AS (median, 743 pg/mL [Q1, 471; Q3, 1356] versus 394 pg/mL [Q1, 191 to Q3, 906], P=0.012). BNP was a strong predictor of outcome. In the total cohort, cumulative 1-year survival of patients with BNP > or = 550 pg/mL was only 47+/-9% versus 97+/-3% with BNP < 550 (P<0.0001). In 29 patients who underwent valve replacement, postoperative 1-year survival was also markedly lower in patients with BNP > or = 550 pg/mL (53+/-13% versus 92+/-7%). BNP is significantly higher in truly severe than pseudosevere low-gradient AS and predicts survival of the whole cohort and in patients undergoing valve replacement.

  10. Trait Mindfulness, Problem-Gambling Severity, Altered State of Awareness and Urge to Gamble in Poker-Machine Gamblers.

    PubMed

    McKeith, Charles F A; Rock, Adam J; Clark, Gavin I

    2016-09-12

    In Australia, poker-machine gamblers represent a disproportionate number of problem gamblers. To cultivate a greater understanding of the psychological mechanisms involved in poker-machine gambling, a repeated measures cue-reactivity protocol was administered. A community sample of 38 poker-machine gamblers was assessed for problem-gambling severity and trait mindfulness. Participants were also assessed regarding altered state of awareness (ASA) and urge to gamble at baseline, following a neutral cue, and following a gambling cue. Results indicated that: (a) urge to gamble significantly increased from neutral cue to gambling cue, while controlling for baseline urge; (b) cue-reactive ASA did not significantly mediate the relationship between problem-gambling severity and cue-reactive urge (from neutral cue to gambling cue); (c) trait mindfulness was significantly negatively associated with both problem-gambling severity and cue-reactive urge (i.e., from neutral cue to gambling cue, while controlling for baseline urge); and (d) trait mindfulness did not significantly moderate the effect of problem-gambling severity on cue-reactive urge (from neutral cue to gambling cue). This is the first study to demonstrate a negative association between trait mindfulness and cue-reactive urge to gamble in a population of poker-machine gamblers. Thus, this association merits further evaluation both in relation to poker-machine gambling and other gambling modalities.

  11. Hemodynamic Consequences of Changes in Microvascular Structure.

    PubMed

    Rizzoni, Damiano; Agabiti-Rosei, Claudia; Agabiti-Rosei, Enrico

    2017-10-01

    In hypertension, an increased media-to-lumen ratio of small resistance arteries might play an important role in the increase of vascular resistance, and may also be an adaptive response to the increased hemodynamic load. The presence of morphological alteration in the microvasculature may be associated to an impaired tissue perfusion and/or to the development of target organ damage. Structural alterations in the microcirculation might represent a predictor of the onset of cardio-cerebrovascular events and hypertension complications. A cross-talk between the small and large artery may exaggerate arterial damage, following a vicious circle. Therefore, in the present review, possible hemodynamic consequences of the presence of microvascular structural alterations will be considered, in terms of their time of onset, role in the development and/or maintenance of high blood pressure values, and interrelationships with structural/mechanical alterations of large conductance arteries. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2017. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Hemodynamic coherence and the rationale for monitoring the microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Ince, Can

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a personal viewpoint of the shortcoming of conventional hemodynamic resuscitation procedures in achieving organ perfusion and tissue oxygenation following conditions of shock and cardiovascular compromise, and why it is important to monitor the microcirculation in such conditions. The article emphasizes that if resuscitation procedures are based on the correction of systemic variables, there must be coherence between the macrocirculation and microcirculation if systemic hemodynamic-driven resuscitation procedures are to be effective in correcting organ perfusion and oxygenation. However, in conditions of inflammation and infection, which often accompany states of shock, vascular regulation and compensatory mechanisms needed to sustain hemodynamic coherence are lost, and the regional circulation and microcirculation remain in shock. We identify four types of microcirculatory alterations underlying the loss of hemodynamic coherence: type 1, heterogeneous microcirculatory flow; type 2, reduced capillary density induced by hemodilution and anemia; type 3, microcirculatory flow reduction caused by vasoconstriction or tamponade; and type 4, tissue edema. These microcirculatory alterations can be observed at the bedside using direct visualization of the sublingual microcirculation with hand-held vital microscopes. Each of these alterations results in oxygen delivery limitation to the tissue cells despite the presence of normalized systemic hemodynamic variables. Based on these concepts, we propose how to optimize the volume of fluid to maximize the oxygen-carrying capacity of the microcirculation to transport oxygen to the tissues.

  13. Hemodynamic coherence and the rationale for monitoring the microcirculation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a personal viewpoint of the shortcoming of conventional hemodynamic resuscitation procedures in achieving organ perfusion and tissue oxygenation following conditions of shock and cardiovascular compromise, and why it is important to monitor the microcirculation in such conditions. The article emphasizes that if resuscitation procedures are based on the correction of systemic variables, there must be coherence between the macrocirculation and microcirculation if systemic hemodynamic-driven resuscitation procedures are to be effective in correcting organ perfusion and oxygenation. However, in conditions of inflammation and infection, which often accompany states of shock, vascular regulation and compensatory mechanisms needed to sustain hemodynamic coherence are lost, and the regional circulation and microcirculation remain in shock. We identify four types of microcirculatory alterations underlying the loss of hemodynamic coherence: type 1, heterogeneous microcirculatory flow; type 2, reduced capillary density induced by hemodilution and anemia; type 3, microcirculatory flow reduction caused by vasoconstriction or tamponade; and type 4, tissue edema. These microcirculatory alterations can be observed at the bedside using direct visualization of the sublingual microcirculation with hand-held vital microscopes. Each of these alterations results in oxygen delivery limitation to the tissue cells despite the presence of normalized systemic hemodynamic variables. Based on these concepts, we propose how to optimize the volume of fluid to maximize the oxygen-carrying capacity of the microcirculation to transport oxygen to the tissues. PMID:26729241

  14. Supporting hemodynamics: what should we target? What treatments should we use?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Assessment and monitoring of hemodynamics is a cornerstone in critically ill patients as hemodynamic alteration may become life-threatening in a few minutes. Defining normal values in critically ill patients is not easy, because 'normality' is usually referred to healthy subjects at rest. Defining 'adequate' hemodynamics is easier, which embeds whatever pressure and flow set is sufficient to maintain the aerobic metabolism. We will refer to the unifying hypothesis proposed by Schrier several years ago. Accordingly, the alteration of three independent variables - heart (contractility and rate), vascular tone and intravascular volume - may lead to underfilling of the arterial tree, associated with reduced (as during myocardial infarction or hemorrhage) or expanded (sepsis or cirrhosis) plasma volume. The underfilling is sensed by the arterial baroreceptors, which activate primarily the sympathetic nervous system and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, as well as vasopressin, to restore the arterial filling by increasing the vascular tone and retaining sodium and water. Under 'normal' conditions, therefore, the homeostatic system is not activated and water/sodium excretion, heart rate and oxygen extraction are in the range found in normal subjects. When arterial underfilling occurs, the mechanisms are activated (sodium and water retention) - associated with low central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) if underfilling is caused by low flow/hypovolemia, or with normal/high ScvO2 if associated with high flow/hypervolemia. Although the correction of hemodynamics should be towards the correction of the independent determinants, the usual therapy performed is volume infusion. An accepted target is ScvO2 >70%, although this ignores the arterial underfilling associated with volume expansion/high flow. For large-volume resuscitation the worst solution is normal saline solution (chloride load, strong ion difference = 0, acidosis). To avoid changes in acid-base equilibrium the

  15. Differing Complex Microbiota Alter Disease Severity of the IL-10−/− Mouse Model of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Marcia L.; Ericsson, Aaron C.; Franklin, Craig L.

    2017-01-01

    It is estimated that 1.4 million people in the United States suffer from Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), with an overall annual health care cost of more than $1.7 billion. Although the exact etiology of this disease remains unknown, research suggests that it is a multifactorial disease associated with aberrant gastrointestinal microbial populations (dysbiosis). The C57BL/6 and C3H/HeJBir mouse strains with targeted mutations in the IL-10 gene are commonly used models to study IBD. However, anecdotally, disease phenotype can vary in severity from lab to lab. Moreover, studies using germfree and monocolonized mice have suggested that gut microbiota (GM) are critical to disease induction in these models. With recent studies suggesting variation in naturally occurring GM composition and complexity among mouse producers, we hypothesized that differences in these naturally occurring complex GM profiles may modulate disease severity in the IL-10−/− mouse model. To test this hypothesis, we use a technique referred to as complex microbiota targeted rederivation (CMTR) to transfer genetically identical C57BL/6 IL-10−/− and C3H/HeJBir IL-10−/− embryos into surrogate CD-1 or C57BL/6 dams from different commercial producers with varying microbiota complexity and composition. We found that disease severity significantly and reproducibly differed among mice in both IL-10−/− strains, dependent on differing maternally inherited GM. Furthermore, disease severity was associated with alterations in relative abundance of several physiologically relevant bacterial species. These findings suggest that the composition of the resident GM is a primary determinant of disease severity in IBD and provide proof-of-concept that CMTR can be used to investigate the contribution of contemporary complex GM on disease phenotype and reproducibility. PMID:28553262

  16. The Impact of the Geometric Characteristics on the Hemodynamics in the Stenotic Coronary Artery

    PubMed Central

    Xian, Zhanchao; Liu, Xin; Huang, Wenhua; Xu, Pengcheng; Wang, Jinyang

    2016-01-01

    The alterations of the hemodynamics in the coronary arteries, which result from patient-specific geometric significances are complex. The effect of the stenosis on the blood flow alteration had been wildly reported, but the combinational contribution from geometric factors required a comprehensive investigation to provide patient-specific information for diagnosis and assisting in the decision on the further treatment strategies. In the present study, we investigated the correlation between hemodynamic parameters and individual geometric factors in the patient-specific coronary arteries. Computational fluid dynamic simulations were performed on 22 patient-specific 3-dimensional coronary artery models that were reconstructed based on computed tomography angiography images. Our results showed that the increasing severity of the stenosis is associated with the increased maximum wall shear stress at the stenosis region (r = 0.752, P < 0.001). In contrast, the length of the recirculation zone has a moderate association with the curvature of the lesion segment (r = 0.505, P = 0.019) and the length of the lesions (r = 0.527, P = 0.064). Moreover, bifurcation in the coronary arteries is significantly correlated with the occurrence of recirculation, whereas the severity of distal stenosis demonstrated an effect on the alteration of the flow in the upstream bifurcation. These findings could serve as an indication for treatment planning and assist in prognosis evaluation. PMID:27310014

  17. Alteration of Oriented Deposition of Cellulose Microfibrils by Mutation of a Katanin-Like Microtubule-Severing Protein

    PubMed Central

    Burk, David H.; Ye, Zheng-Hua

    2002-01-01

    It has long been hypothesized that cortical microtubules (MTs) control the orientation of cellulose microfibril deposition, but no mutants with alterations of MT orientation have been shown to affect this process. We have shown previously that in Arabidopsis, the fra2 mutation causes aberrant cortical MT orientation and reduced cell elongation, and the gene responsible for the fra2 mutation encodes a katanin-like protein. In this study, using field emission scanning electron microscopy, we found that the fra2 mutation altered the normal orientation of cellulose microfibrils in walls of expanding cells. Although cellulose microfibrils in walls of wild-type cells were oriented transversely along the elongation axis, cellulose microfibrils in walls of fra2 cells often formed bands and ran in different directions. The fra2 mutation also caused aberrant deposition of cellulose microfibrils in secondary walls of fiber cells. The aberrant orientation of cellulose microfibrils was shown to be correlated with disorganized cortical MTs in several cell types examined. In addition, the thickness of both primary and secondary cell walls was reduced significantly in the fra2 mutant. These results indicate that the katanin-like protein is essential for oriented cellulose microfibril deposition and normal cell wall biosynthesis. We further demonstrated that the Arabidopsis katanin-like protein possessed MT-severing activity in vitro; thus, it is an ortholog of animal katanin. We propose that the aberrant MT orientation caused by the mutation of katanin results in the distorted deposition of cellulose microfibrils, which in turn leads to a defect in cell elongation. These findings strongly support the hypothesis that cortical MTs regulate the oriented deposition of cellulose microfibrils that determines the direction of cell elongation. PMID:12215512

  18. Growth and hemodynamics after early embryonic aortic arch occlusion*

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Stephanie E.; Menon, Prahlad G.; Kowalski, William J.; Shekhar, Akshay; Yalcin, Huseyin C.; Nishimura, Nozomi; Schaffer, Chris B.; Butcher, Jonathan T.; Pekkan, Kerem

    2015-01-01

    The majority of severe clinically significant forms of congenital heart disease (CHD) is associated with great artery lesions, including hypoplastic, double, right or interrupted aortic arch morphologies. While fetal and neonatal interventions are advancing, their potential ability to restore cardiac function, optimal timing, location, and intensity required for intervention remain largely unknown. We here combine computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations with in vivo experiments to test how individual pharyngeal arch artery hemodynamics alters as a result of local interventions to obstruct individual arch artery flow. Simulated isolated occlusions within each pharyngeal arch artery were created with image derived three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of normal chick pharyngeal arch anatomy at Hamburger-Hamilton (HH) developmental stages HH18 and HH24. Acute flow redistributions were then computed using in vivo measured subject-specific aortic sinus inflow velocity profiles. A kinematic vascular growth-rendering algorithm was then developed and implemented to test the role of changing local wall shear stress patterns in downstream 3D morphogenesis of arch arteries. CFD simulations predicted that altered pressure gradients and flow redistributions were most sensitive to occlusion of the IVth arches. To evaluate these simulations experimentally, a novel in vivo experimental model of pharyngeal arch occlusion was developed and implemented using two-photon microscopy guided femtosecond laser based photodisruption surgery. The right IVth arch was occluded at HH18, and resulting diameter changes were followed for up to 24 hours. Pharyngeal arch diameter responses to acute hemodynamic changes were predicted qualitatively but poorly quantitatively. Chronic growth and adaptation to hemodynamic changes however were predicted in a subset of arches. Our findings suggest that this complex biodynamic process is governed through more complex forms of mechanobiological

  19. Growth and hemodynamics after early embryonic aortic arch occlusion.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Stephanie E; Menon, Prahlad G; Kowalski, William J; Shekhar, Akshay; Yalcin, Huseyin C; Nishimura, Nozomi; Schaffer, Chris B; Butcher, Jonathan T; Pekkan, Kerem

    2015-08-01

    The majority of severe clinically significant forms of congenital heart disease (CHD) are associated with great artery lesions, including hypoplastic, double, right or interrupted aortic arch morphologies. While fetal and neonatal interventions are advancing, their potential ability to restore cardiac function, optimal timing, location, and intensity required for intervention remain largely unknown. Here, we combine computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations with in vivo experiments to test how individual pharyngeal arch artery hemodynamics alter as a result of local interventions obstructing individual arch artery flow. Simulated isolated occlusions within each pharyngeal arch artery were created with image-derived three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of normal chick pharyngeal arch anatomy at Hamburger-Hamilton (HH) developmental stages HH18 and HH24. Acute flow redistributions were then computed using in vivo measured subject-specific aortic sinus inflow velocity profiles. A kinematic vascular growth-rendering algorithm was then developed and implemented to test the role of changing local wall shear stress patterns in downstream 3D morphogenesis of arch arteries. CFD simulations predicted that altered pressure gradients and flow redistributions were most sensitive to occlusion of the IVth arches. To evaluate these simulations experimentally, a novel in vivo experimental model of pharyngeal arch occlusion was developed and implemented using two-photon microscopy-guided femtosecond laser-based photodisruption surgery. The right IVth arch was occluded at HH18, and resulting diameter changes were followed for up to 24 h. Pharyngeal arch diameter responses to acute hemodynamic changes were predicted qualitatively but poorly quantitatively. Chronic growth and adaptation to hemodynamic changes, however, were predicted in a subset of arches. Our findings suggest that this complex biodynamic process is governed through more complex forms of mechanobiological

  20. Functional Metabolomics Uncovers Metabolic Alterations Associated to Severe Oxidative Stress in MCF7 Breast Cancer Cells Exposed to Ascididemin

    PubMed Central

    Morvan, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Marine natural products are a source of promising agents for cancer treatment. However, there is a need to improve the evaluation of their mechanism of action in tumors. Metabolomics of the response to anti-tumor agents is a tool to reveal candidate biomarkers and metabolic targets. We used two-dimensional high-resolution magic angle spinning proton-NMR spectroscopy-based metabolomics to investigate the response of MCF7 breast cancer cells to ascididemin, a marine alkaloid and lead molecule for anti-cancer treatment. Ascididemin induced severe oxidative stress and apoptosis within 48 h of exposure. Thirty-three metabolites were quantified. Metabolic response involved downregulation of glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and phospholipid metabolism alterations. Candidate metabolic biomarkers of the response of breast cancer cells to ascididemin were proposed including citrate, gluconate, polyunsaturated fatty acids, glycerophospho-choline and -ethanolamine. In addition, candidate metabolic targets were identified. Overall, the response to Asc could be related to severe oxidative stress and anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:24152560

  1. Hemodynamics in aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kumar, B V; Naidu, K B

    1996-04-01

    A numerical simulation of hemodynamics in blood vessels with 0-75% dilation is made. A transient UVP finite element method (FEM) and a stable time integration scheme, based on a predictor-corrector strategy, with constant error monitoring are employed in the flow analysis. The pulsatile flow is analyzed without any assumptions in nonlinear terms and is characterized by thoroughly analyzing the flow, pressure, and stress fields. The central axis velocity, central axis and wall pressures, pressure gradient history, and wall shear stress are influenced by the presence of aneurysm. Time-dependent recirculation regions which are sensitive to the degree of dilation of the vessel are seen in the concavity of the dilation. The transverse velocities and their variations with time are found to be too significant to be neglected. The effects of nonlinear convective terms and the nonlinear geometry of the vessel are clearly depicted through the transverse velocity and pressure profiles.

  2. Blood Brothers: Hemodynamics and Cell–Matrix Interactions in Endothelial Function

    PubMed Central

    Yurdagul, Arif

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Alterations in endothelial function contribute to a variety of vascular diseases. In pathological conditions, the endothelium shows a reduced ability to regulate vasodilation (endothelial dysfunction) and a conversion toward a proinflammatory and leaky phenotype (endothelial activation). At the interface between the vessel wall and blood, the endothelium exists in a complex microenvironment and must translate changes in these environmental signals to alterations in vessel function. Mechanical stimulation and endothelial cell interactions with the vascular matrix, as well as a host of soluble factors, coordinately contribute to this dynamic regulation. Recent Advances: Blood hemodynamics play an established role in the regulation of endothelial function. However, a growing body of work suggests that subendothelial matrix composition similarly and coordinately regulates endothelial cell phenotype such that blood flow affects matrix remodeling, which affects the endothelial response to flow. Critical Issues: Hemodynamics and soluble factors likely affect endothelial matrix remodeling through multiple mechanisms, including transforming growth factor β signaling and alterations in cell–matrix receptors, such as the integrins. Likewise, differential integrin signaling following matrix remodeling appears to regulate several key flow-induced responses, including nitric oxide production, regulation of oxidant stress, and activation of proinflammatory signaling and gene expression. Microvascular remodeling responses, such as angiogenesis and arteriogenesis, may also show coordinated regulation by flow and matrix. Future Directions: Identifying the mechanisms regulating the dynamic interplay between hemodynamics and matrix remodeling and their contribution to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease remains an important research area with therapeutic implications across a variety of conditions. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 415–434. PMID:26715135

  3. Review of diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography using several endoscopic methods in patients with surgically altered gastrointestinal anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Shimatani, Masaaki; Takaoka, Makoto; Tokuhara, Mitsuo; Miyoshi, Hideaki; Ikeura, Tsukasa; Okazaki, Kazuichi

    2015-01-01

    The endoscopic approach for biliary diseases in patients with surgically altered gastrointestinal anatomy (SAGA) had been generally deemed impractical. However, it was radically made feasible by the introduction of double balloon endoscopy (DBE) that was originally developed for diagnosis and treatments for small-bowel diseases. Followed by the subsequent development of single-balloon endoscopy (SBE) and spiral endoscopy (SE), interventions using several endoscopes for biliary disease in patients with SAGA widely gained an acceptance as a new modality. Many studies have been made on this new technique. Yet, some problems are to be solved. For instance, the mutual unavailability among devices due to different working lengths and channels, and unestablished standardization of procedural techniques can be raised. Additionally, in an attempt to standardize endoscopic procedures, it is important to evaluate biliary cannulating methods by case with existence of papilla or not. A full comprehension of the features of respective scope types is also required. However there are not many papers written as a review. In our manuscript, we would like to evaluate and make a review of the present status of diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography applying DBE, SBE and SE for biliary diseases in patients with SAGA for establishment of these modalities as a new technology and further improvement of the scopes and devices. PMID:26078830

  4. Nocturnal cerebral hemodynamics in snorers and in patients with obstructive sleep apnea: a near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Pizza, Fabio; Biallas, Martin; Wolf, Martin; Werth, Esther; Bassetti, Claudio L

    2010-02-01

    Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) of the obstructive type causes hemodynamic consequences, leading to an increased cerebrovascular risk. The severity of SDB at which detrimental circulatory consequences appear is matter of controversy. Aim of the present study is the investigation of cerebral hemodynamics in patients with SDB of variable severity using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). N/A. Sleep laboratory. Nineteen patients with SDB. N/A. Patients underwent nocturnal videopolysomnography (VPSG) coupled with cerebral NIRS. NIRS data were averaged for each patient, and a new method (integral) was applied to quantify cerebral hemodynamic alterations. Nocturnal VPSG disclosed various severities of SDB: snoring (7 patients, apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] = 2 +/- 2/h, range: 0.5-4.5); mild SDB (7 patients, AHI = 14 +/- 8/h, range: 6.3-28.6); and severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (5 patients, AHI = 79 +/- 20/h, range: 39.6-92.9). Relative changes of NIRS parameters were significantly larger during obstructive apneas (compared with hypopneas; mean deoxygenated hemoglobin [HHb] change of 0.72 +/- 0.23 and 0.13 +/- 0.08 micromol/L per sec, p value = 0.048) and in patients with severe SDB (as compared with patients with mild SDB and simple snorers; mean HHb change of 0.84 +/- 0.24, 0.02 +/- 0.09, and 0.2 +/- 0.08 micromol/L per sec, respectively, p value = 0.020). In this group, NIRS and concomitant changes in peripheral oxygen saturation correlated. The results of this study suggest that acute cerebral hemodynamic consequences of SDB lead to a failure of autoregulatory mechanisms with brain hypoxia only in the presence of frequent apneas (AHI > 30) and obstructive events.

  5. Transcranial magnetic stimulation elicits coupled neural and hemodynamic consequences.

    PubMed

    Allen, Elena A; Pasley, Brian N; Duong, Thang; Freeman, Ralph D

    2007-09-28

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is an increasingly common technique used to selectively modify neural processing. However, application of TMS is limited by uncertainty concerning its physiological effects. We applied TMS to the cat visual cortex and evaluated the neural and hemodynamic consequences. Short TMS pulse trains elicited initial activation (approximately 1 minute) and prolonged suppression (5 to 10 minutes) of neural responses. Furthermore, TMS disrupted the temporal structure of activity by altering phase relationships between neural signals. Despite the complexity of this response, neural changes were faithfully reflected in hemodynamic signals; quantitative coupling was present over a range of stimulation parameters. These results demonstrate long-lasting neural responses to TMS and support the use of hemodynamic-based neuroimaging to effectively monitor these changes over time.

  6. Truncated Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-γ Coactivator 1α Splice Variant Is Severely Altered in Huntington's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Johri, Ashu; Starkov, Anatoly A.; Chandra, Abhishek; Hennessey, Thomas; Sharma, Abhijeet; Orobello, Sara; Squitieri, Ferdinando; Yang, Lichuan; Beal, M. Flint

    2011-01-01

    Background Reduced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1α (PGC1α) gene expression has been observed in striatal cell lines, transgenic mouse models of Huntington's disease (HD), and brain tissue from HD patients. As this protein is a key transcription regulator of the expression of many mitochondrial proteins, these observations strongly support the role of aberrant mitochondrial function in the pathogenesis of HD. The PGC1α protein undergoes posttranslational modifications that affect its transcriptional activity. The N-truncated splice variant of PGC1α (NT-PGC1α) is produced in tissues, but the role of truncated splice variants of PGC1α in HD and in the regulation of mitochondrial gene expression has not been elucidated. Objective To examine the expression and modulation of expression of NT-PGC1α levels in HD. Methods and Results We found that the NT-PGC1α protein, a splice variant of ∼38 kDa, but not full-length PGC1α is severely and consistently altered in human HD brain, human HD myoblasts, mouse HD models, and HD striatal cells. NT-PGC1α levels were significantly upregulated in HD cells and mouse brown fat by physiologically relevant stimuli that are known to upregulate PGC1α gene expression. This resulted in an increase in mitochondrial gene expression and cytochrome c content. Conclusion Our data suggest that NT-PGC1α is an important component of the PGC1α transcriptional network, which plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of HD. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel PMID:21757867

  7. Does CPAP therapy alter urinary albumin level in adult patients with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome?

    PubMed

    Yaşar, Zehra Aşuk; Ucar, Zeynep Zeren; Demir, Ahmet Ugur; Kirakli, Cenk; Kalenci, Dilek; Tibet, Gültekin

    2014-09-01

    Urinary albumin is a marker of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and also it has been viewed as a marker for vascular endothelial dysfunction in both the kidneys and systemic vasculature. Lowering urinary albumin is associated with fewer cardiovascular and renal diseases. We investigated the change in urinary albumin after 1 month of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Eighteen patients (four females) in the middle-age group with moderate to severe OSAS were enrolled, who received and were compliant to CPAP therapy. Patients did not have a systemic disease or use a medication that could influence urinary albumin. Blood and urine samples were obtained in the morning after polysomnography and after 1 month of CPAP therapy to measure urinary albumin excretion and urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio. Urinary albumin excretion (UAE) and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (UACR) decreased significantly after 1 month of CPAP therapy: UAE at baseline and 1 month, 50 (1.1-174.8) and 22.7 (4.1-55.9); UACR, 27 (18.5-51.6) and 10.6 (4.3-43.1). UAE alteration was significantly associated with proportion of sleep time spent below an SaO2 of 90%. Serum creatinine, serum total cholesterol, and creatinine clearance also decreased after 1 month of CPAP therapy. Albuminuria is not rare in patients with OSAS and can be corrected after CPAP therapy. Determination of urinary albumin level is a simple, inexpensive, and noninvasive method that could be a promising biomarker to identify a high-risk population in patients with OSAS who may benefit from closer medical follow-up and preventive therapy.

  8. Truncated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1α splice variant is severely altered in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Johri, Ashu; Starkov, Anatoly A; Chandra, Abhishek; Hennessey, Thomas; Sharma, Abhijeet; Orobello, Sara; Squitieri, Ferdinando; Yang, Lichuan; Beal, M Flint

    2011-01-01

    Reduced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1α (PGC1α) gene expression has been observed in striatal cell lines, transgenic mouse models of Huntington's disease (HD), and brain tissue from HD patients. As this protein is a key transcription regulator of the expression of many mitochondrial proteins, these observations strongly support the role of aberrant mitochondrial function in the pathogenesis of HD. The PGC1α protein undergoes posttranslational modifications that affect its transcriptional activity. The N-truncated splice variant of PGC1α (NT-PGC1α) is produced in tissues, but the role of truncated splice variants of PGC1α in HD and in the regulation of mitochondrial gene expression has not been elucidated. To examine the expression and modulation of expression of NT-PGC1α levels in HD. We found that the NT-PGC1α protein, a splice variant of ∼38 kDa, but not full-length PGC1α is severely and consistently altered in human HD brain, human HD myoblasts, mouse HD models, and HD striatal cells. NT-PGC1α levels were significantly upregulated in HD cells and mouse brown fat by physiologically relevant stimuli that are known to upregulate PGC1α gene expression. This resulted in an increase in mitochondrial gene expression and cytochrome c content. Our data suggest that NT-PGC1α is an important component of the PGC1α transcriptional network, which plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of HD. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Prediabetes in obese youth: a syndrome of impaired glucose tolerance, severe insulin resistance, and altered myocellular and abdominal fat partitioning

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Ram; Dufour, Sylvie; Taksali, Sara E; Tambortlane, William V; Petersen, Kitt F; Bonadonna, Riccardo C; Boselli, Linda; Barbetta, Gina; Alle, Karin; Rife, Francis; Savoye, Mary; Dziura, James; Sherwin, Robert; Shulman, Gerald I; Caprio, Sonia

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background Impaired glucose tolerance is common among obese adolescents, but the changes in insulin sensitivity and secretion that lead to this prediabetic state are unknown. We investigated whether altered partitioning of myocellular and abdominal fat relates to abnormalities in glucose homoeostasis in obese adolescents with prediabetes. Methods We studied 14 obese children with impaired glucose tolerance and 14 with normal glucose tolerance, of similar ages, sex distribution, and degree of obesity. Insulin sensitivity and secretion were assessed by the euglycaemichyperinsulinaemic clamp and the hyperglycaemic clamp. Intramyocellular lipid was assessed by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and abdominal fat distribution by magnetic resonance imaging. Findings Peripheral glucose disposal was significantly lower in individuals with impaired than in those with normal glucose tolerance (mean 35·4 [SE 4·0] vs 60·6 [7·2] μmoles per kg lean body mass per min; p=0·023) owing to a reduction in non-oxidative glucose disposal metabolism (storage). Individuals with impaired glucose tolerance had higher intramyocellular lipid content (3·04 [0·43] vs 1·99 [0·19]%, p=0·03), lower abdominal subcutaneous fat (460 [47] vs 626 [39] cm2, p=0·04), and slightly higher visceral fat than the controls (70 [11] vs 47 [6] cm2, p=0·065), resulting in a higher ratio of visceral to subcutaneous fat (0·15 [0·02] vs 0·07 [0·01], p=0·002). Intramyocellular and visceral lipid contents were inversely related to the glucose disposal and non-oxidative glucose metabolism and positively related to the 2 h plasma glucose concentration. Interpretation In obese children and adolescents with prediabetes, intramyocellular and intra-abdominal lipid accumulation is closely linked to the development of severe peripheral insulin resistance. PMID:14511928

  10. Prediabetes in obese youth: a syndrome of impaired glucose tolerance, severe insulin resistance, and altered myocellular and abdominal fat partitioning.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Ram; Dufour, Sylvie; Taksali, Sara E; Tamborlane, William V; Petersen, Kitt F; Bonadonna, Riccardo C; Boselli, Linda; Barbetta, Gina; Allen, Karin; Rife, Francis; Savoye, Mary; Dziura, James; Sherwin, Robert; Shulman, Gerald I; Caprio, Sonia

    2003-09-20

    Impaired glucose tolerance is common among obese adolescents, but the changes in insulin sensitivity and secretion that lead to this prediabetic state are unknown. We investigated whether altered partitioning of myocellular and abdominal fat relates to abnormalities in glucose homoeostasis in obese adolescents with prediabetes. We studied 14 obese children with impaired glucose tolerance and 14 with normal glucose tolerance, of similar ages, sex distribution, and degree of obesity. Insulin sensitivity and secretion were assessed by the euglycaemic-hyperinsulinaemic clamp and the hyperglycaemic clamp. Intramyocellular lipid was assessed by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and abdominal fat distribution by magnetic resonance imaging. Peripheral glucose disposal was significantly lower in individuals with impaired than in those with normal glucose tolerance (mean 35.4 [SE 4.0] vs 60.6 [7.2] micromoles per kg lean body mass per min; p=0.023) owing to a reduction in non-oxidative glucose disposal metabolism (storage). Individuals with impaired glucose tolerance had higher intramyocellular lipid content (3.04 [0.43] vs 1.99 [0.19]%, p=0.03), lower abdominal subcutaneous fat (460 [47] vs 626 [39] cm2, p=0.04), and slightly higher visceral fat than the controls (70 [11] vs 47 [6] cm2, p=0.065), resulting in a higher ratio of visceral to subcutaneous fat (0.15 [0.02] vs 0.07 [0.01], p=0.002). Intramyocellular and visceral lipid contents were inversely related to the glucose disposal and non-oxidative glucose metabolism and positively related to the 2 h plasma glucose concentration. In obese children and adolescents with prediabetes, intramyocellular and intra-abdominal lipid accumulation is closely linked to the development of severe peripheral insulin resistance.

  11. Hemodynamic Parameters during Laryngoscopic Procedures in the Office and in the Operating Room.

    PubMed

    Tierney, William S; Chota, Rebecca L; Benninger, Michael S; Nowacki, Amy S; Bryson, Paul C

    2016-09-01

    Previous research has shown that office-based laryngoscopic procedures can induce hemodynamic changes, including tachycardia and severe hypertension, calling into question the safety of these procedures. However, comparison between office and operating room (OR) procedures has not been carried out. Therefore, we prospectively measured hemodynamic variables in both settings to compare hemodynamic changes between office and OR procedures. Prospective cohort study. Single academic center. Subjects undergoing office and OR laryngoscopic procedures were prospectively identified, and 92 OR and 70 office subjects were included. Heart rate and blood pressure were measured at established time points before, during, and after the procedures. Descriptive and comparative statistical analyses were conducted. Severe hemodynamic events, either tachycardia or severe hypertension (blood pressure >180 mm Hg systolic or >110 mm Hg diastolic), occurred significantly more frequently in OR than office procedures (41% vs 20%; P = .006). OR severe hemodynamic events occurred more commonly than previously reported rates in the office (41% vs 28%; P = .012). Regression analyses showed that the odds of having a severe hemodynamic event were 3.66 times higher in OR versus office procedures. Severe hemodynamic events are more likely to occur in the OR than in the office during laryngologic procedures. While larger studies will be required to establish rates of dangerous cardiovascular events in laryngoscopic procedures, hemodynamic parameters indicate that office-based procedures have a safety benefit for procedures that can be conducted in either setting. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  12. Periodic leg movements during sleep and cerebral hemodynamic changes detected by NIRS.

    PubMed

    Pizza, Fabio; Biallas, Martin; Wolf, Martin; Valko, Philipp O; Bassetti, Claudio L

    2009-07-01

    Periodic leg movements during sleep (PLMS) have been shown to be associated with changes in autonomic and hemispheric activities. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) assesses hemodynamic changes linked to hemispheric/cortical activity. We applied NIRS to test whether cerebral hemodynamic alterations accompany PLMS. Three PLMS patients underwent nocturnal polysomnography coupled with cerebral NIRS. EEG correlates of PLMS were scored and NIRS data were analysed for the identification of correspondent hemodynamic changes. PLMS were constantly associated with cerebral hemodynamic fluctuations that showed greater amplitude when associated to changes in EEG and were present also in absence of any visually detectable arousal or A phase in the EEG. This is the first study documenting cerebral hemodynamic changes linked to PLMS. The clinical relevance of these observations remains to be determined.

  13. Cue-Reactive Altered State of Consciousness Mediates the Relationship Between Problem-Gambling Severity and Cue-Reactive Urge in Poker-Machine Gamblers.

    PubMed

    Tricker, Christopher; Rock, Adam J; Clark, Gavin I

    2016-06-01

    In order to enhance our understanding of the nature of poker-machine problem-gambling, a community sample of 37 poker-machine gamblers (M age = 32 years, M PGSI = 5; PGSI = Problem Gambling Severity Index) were assessed for urge to gamble (responses on a visual analogue scale) and altered state of consciousness (assessed by the Altered State of Awareness dimension of the Phenomenology of Consciousness Inventory) at baseline, after a neutral cue, and after a gambling cue. It was found that (a) problem-gambling severity (PGSI score) predicted increase in urge (from neutral cue to gambling cue, controlling for baseline; sr (2) = .19, p = .006) and increase in altered state of consciousness (from neutral cue to gambling cue, controlling for baseline; sr (2) = .57, p < .001), and (b) increase in altered state of consciousness (from neutral cue to gambling cue) mediated the relationship between problem-gambling severity and increase in urge (from neutral cue to gambling cue; κ(2) = .40, 99 % CI [.08, .71]). These findings suggest that cue-reactive altered state of consciousness is an important component of cue-reactive urge in poker-machine problem-gamblers.

  14. Hemodynamic Consequences of Malignant Ascites in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Surgery∗

    PubMed Central

    Hunsicker, Oliver; Fotopoulou, Christina; Pietzner, Klaus; Koch, Mandy; Krannich, Alexander; Sehouli, Jalid; Spies, Claudia; Feldheiser, Aarne

    2015-01-01

    vasopressor and fluid demands, whereas the administration of artificial infusion solutions was related to opposite effects. Malignant ascites >500 mL implies increased fluid demands and substantial alterations in circulatory blood flow during cancer surgery. Fresh frozen plasma transfusion promotes recovering hemodynamic stability in patients with malignant ascites >500 mL, in whom artificial infusion solutions could not prevent from hemodynamic deterioration. PMID:26656336

  15. Rapid Cerebral Hemodynamic Modulation during Set Shifting: Evidence of Time-Locked Associations with Cognitive Control in Females

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuepbach, Daniel; Huizinga, Mariette; Duschek, Stefan; Grimm, Simone; Boeker, Heinz; Hell, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Set shifting provokes specific alterations of cerebral hemodynamics in basal cerebral arteries. However, no gender differences have been reported. In the following functional transcranial Doppler study, we introduced cerebral hemodynamic modulation to the aspects of set shifting during Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). Twenty-one subjects…

  16. Rapid Cerebral Hemodynamic Modulation during Set Shifting: Evidence of Time-Locked Associations with Cognitive Control in Females

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuepbach, Daniel; Huizinga, Mariette; Duschek, Stefan; Grimm, Simone; Boeker, Heinz; Hell, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Set shifting provokes specific alterations of cerebral hemodynamics in basal cerebral arteries. However, no gender differences have been reported. In the following functional transcranial Doppler study, we introduced cerebral hemodynamic modulation to the aspects of set shifting during Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). Twenty-one subjects…

  17. [Hemodynamic study of the elderly subject. Indications, risks and value].

    PubMed

    Ohayon, J; Colle, J P; Besse, P

    1985-04-30

    The authors record all the hemodynamic evaluations realised on aged population above severity years during two years (549 patients) representing ten per cent of the whole investigations in an hemodynamic department. The greater part of the indications were severe coronaritis resistant to medical treatment (54 percent) with unstable angina or steady state angina, and valvulopathy (37 percent) with prevalence of symptomatic aortic stenosis. The catheterization incidents and accidents do not appear more owing to the high risk pathology and to the taken precautions. The lethal accident frequency is three point five per thousand little above the frequency in a general catheterized population (two per thousand). Seldinger difficulties are easily got over by using axillary passage in case of need. The surgical interest is underlined by the fact that sixty six percent of the investigated patients will be operated. The hemodynamic evaluation in aged population between 70 and 80 years is realizable in good conditions with little risk increase when it's necessary.

  18. Hemodynamic forces in a model left ventricle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domenichini, Federico; Pedrizzetti, Gianni

    2016-12-01

    Intraventricular pressure gradients were clinically demonstrated to represent one useful indicator of the left ventricle (LV) function during the development of heart failure. We analyze the fluid dynamics inside a model LV to improve the understanding of the development of hemodynamic forces (i.e., mean pressure gradient) in normal conditions and their modification in the presence of alterations of LV tissue motion. To this aim, the problem is solved numerically and the global force exchanged between blood flow and LV boundaries is computed by volume integration. We also introduce a simplified analytical model, based on global conservation laws, to estimate hemodynamic forces from the knowledge of LV tissue information commonly available in cardiac imaging. Numerical results show that the normal intraventricular gradients feature a deep brief suction at early diastolic filling and a persistent thrust during systolic ejection. In presence of abnormalities of the wall motion, the loss of time synchrony is more relevant than the loss of spatial uniformity in modifying the normal pressure gradient spatiotemporal pattern. The main findings are reproduced in the integral model, which represents a possible easy approach for integrating fluid dynamics evaluations in the clinical examination.

  19. Lagrangian postprocessing of computational hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Shadden, Shawn C.; Arzani, Amirhossein

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in imaging, modeling and computing have rapidly expanded our capabilities to model hemodynamics in the large vessels (heart, arteries and veins). This data encodes a wealth of information that is often under-utilized. Modeling (and measuring) blood flow in the large vessels typically amounts to solving for the time-varying velocity field in a region of interest. Flow in the heart and larger arteries is often complex, and velocity field data provides a starting point for investigating the hemodynamics. This data can be used to perform Lagrangian particle tracking, and other Lagrangian-based postprocessing. As described herein, Lagrangian methods are necessary to understand inherently transient hemodynamic conditions from the fluid mechanics perspective, and to properly understand the biomechanical factors that lead to acute and gradual changes of vascular function and health. The goal of the present paper is to review Lagrangian methods that have been used in post-processing velocity data of cardiovascular flows. PMID:25059889

  20. Proteomic analysis of Plasmodium falciparum induced alterations in humans from different endemic regions of India to decipher malaria pathogenesis and identify surrogate markers of severity.

    PubMed

    Ray, Sandipan; Kumar, Vipin; Bhave, Amruta; Singh, Vaidhvi; Gogtay, Nithya J; Thatte, Urmila M; Talukdar, Arunansu; Kochar, Sanjay K; Patankar, Swati; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2015-09-08

    India significantly contributes to the global malaria burden and has the largest population in the world at risk of malaria. This study aims to analyze alterations in the human serum proteome as a consequence of non-severe and severe infections by the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum to identify markers related to disease severity and to obtain mechanistic insights about disease pathogenesis and host immune responses. In discovery phase of the study, a comprehensive quantitative proteomic analysis was performed using gel-based (2D-DIGE) and gel-free (iTRAQ) techniques on two independent mass spectrometry platforms (ESI-Q-TOF and Q-Exactive mass spectrometry), and selected targets were validated by ELISA. Proteins showing altered serum abundance in falciparum malaria patients revealed the modulation of different physiological pathways including chemokine and cytokine signaling, IL-12 signaling and production in macrophages, complement cascades, blood coagulation, and protein ubiquitination pathways. Some muscle related and cytoskeletal proteins such as titin and galectin-3-binding protein were found to be up-regulated in severe malaria patients. Hemoglobin levels and platelet counts were also found to be drastically lower in severe malaria patients. Identified proteins including serum amyloid A, C-reactive protein, apolipoprotein E and haptoglobin, which exhibited sequential alterations in their serum abundance in different severity levels of malaria, could serve as potential predictive markers for disease severity. To the best of our information, we report here the first comprehensive analysis describing the serum proteomic alterations observed in severe P. falciparum infected patients from different malaria endemic regions of India. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteomics in India.

  1. Hemodynamic response to the upright posture.

    PubMed

    Smith, J J; Porth, C M; Erickson, M

    1994-05-01

    The authors' objective was to review previous studies of immediate (first 30 seconds) and stabilized (30 seconds to 20 minutes) hemodynamic responses of healthy adults to the head-up posture, with particular reference to alteration of such responses in the elderly and the usefulness of such data in the diagnosis of orthostatic hypotension. The immediate response in healthy young adults is characterized by a prompt rise in heart rate, which peaks at about 8 to 15 seconds and then tapers; the arterial pressure and total vascular resistance decrease sharply at 5 to 10 seconds, followed by a rapid rebound and overshoot. Over the first 30 seconds there is a steady parallel decline of thoracic blood volume and stroke volume; there is also an initial surge of cardiac output followed by a steady decrease. During the stabilized response (30 seconds to 20 minutes), the hemodynamic variables are relatively steady, showing average increases in heart rate of about 15 to 30%, in diastolic pressure of 10 to 15%, and in total vascular resistance of 30 to 40%; during the 5th to 20th minutes there are also decreases in thoracic blood volume averaging about 25 to 30%, in cardiac output 15 to 30%, and in pulse pressure about 5 to 10%. It is evident that in normal human subjects, assumption of the upright posture results in profound hemodynamic changes, most of them occurring during the first 30 seconds. In elderly subjects (aged 60-69 years), there are, in the upright posture, lesser increments of heart rate and diastolic pressure, but no significant differences from younger age groups in the response of thoracic blood volume, cardiac output or total vascular resistance. However, beginning at about age 75, there is an increasing incidence of orthostatic hypotension, which averages about 14 to 20% at age 75 and older. The tendency toward orthostatic hypotension in the elderly is due (1) to the structural and functional changes in the circulation itself, (2) to a decline in autonomic

  2. Expression, topography, and function of integrin receptors are severely altered in keratinocytes from involved and uninvolved psoriatic skin.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, G; De Luca, M; Orecchia, G; Balzac, F; Cremona, O; Savoia, P; Cancedda, R; Marchisio, P C

    1992-06-01

    Psoriasis is a hyperproliferative cutaneous disease of unknown etiology and etiopathogenesis. Alteration of keratinocyte adhesiveness to basal lamina has been proposed as the initial disturbance leading to poorly controlled proliferation. Keratinocyte adhesion to basal lamina and lateral interactions among basal epidermal cells are mediated, besides other molecules, by integrin receptors that are segregated to discrete membrane domains. In this paper, the expression and function of integrins in psoriatic keratinocytes were examined, both in vivo and in vitro. We found that: (a) in psoriatic keratinocytes the integrin heterodimers alpha 2 beta 1, alpha 3 beta 1, and alpha 6 beta 4 have lost their polarized distribution on the plasma membrane; (b) the role of these integrins in mediating keratinocyte adhesion in vitro is altered; (c) psoriatic keratinocytes form focal contacts containing both beta 1 and beta 4 integrins. In normal adult keratinocytes the alpha 5 beta 1 fibronectin receptor is poorly expressed and diffusely distributed on the basal keratinocyte plasma membrane and is not organized in defined adhesive structures. In contrast, psoriatic keratinocytes show a clear fibronectin receptor staining in vivo, and organize alpha 5 beta 1 in typical focal contacts in vitro without any obvious increase of its expression and synthesis. These multiple alterations of integrins are also present in uninvolved keratinocytes from psoriatic patients, suggesting a key role for altered integrin-mediated adhesion in the pathogenesis of this disease.

  3. Expression, topography, and function of integrin receptors are severely altered in keratinocytes from involved and uninvolved psoriatic skin.

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrini, G; De Luca, M; Orecchia, G; Balzac, F; Cremona, O; Savoia, P; Cancedda, R; Marchisio, P C

    1992-01-01

    Psoriasis is a hyperproliferative cutaneous disease of unknown etiology and etiopathogenesis. Alteration of keratinocyte adhesiveness to basal lamina has been proposed as the initial disturbance leading to poorly controlled proliferation. Keratinocyte adhesion to basal lamina and lateral interactions among basal epidermal cells are mediated, besides other molecules, by integrin receptors that are segregated to discrete membrane domains. In this paper, the expression and function of integrins in psoriatic keratinocytes were examined, both in vivo and in vitro. We found that: (a) in psoriatic keratinocytes the integrin heterodimers alpha 2 beta 1, alpha 3 beta 1, and alpha 6 beta 4 have lost their polarized distribution on the plasma membrane; (b) the role of these integrins in mediating keratinocyte adhesion in vitro is altered; (c) psoriatic keratinocytes form focal contacts containing both beta 1 and beta 4 integrins. In normal adult keratinocytes the alpha 5 beta 1 fibronectin receptor is poorly expressed and diffusely distributed on the basal keratinocyte plasma membrane and is not organized in defined adhesive structures. In contrast, psoriatic keratinocytes show a clear fibronectin receptor staining in vivo, and organize alpha 5 beta 1 in typical focal contacts in vitro without any obvious increase of its expression and synthesis. These multiple alterations of integrins are also present in uninvolved keratinocytes from psoriatic patients, suggesting a key role for altered integrin-mediated adhesion in the pathogenesis of this disease. Images PMID:1534817

  4. Hemodynamic Influences on Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Disease: Application of Biomechanics to Aneurysm Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Dua, Monica M.; Dalman, Ronald L.

    2010-01-01

    “Atherosclerotic” abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) occur with the greatest frequency in the distal aorta. The unique hemodynamic environment of this area predisposes it to site-specific degenerative changes. In this review, we summarize the differential hemodynamic influences present along the length of the abdominal aorta, and demonstrate how alterations in aortic flow and wall shear stress modify AAA progression in experimental models. Improved understanding of aortic hemodynamic risk profiles provides an opportunity to modify patient activity patterns to minimize risk of aneurysmal degeneration. PMID:20347049

  5. Hemodynamic studies of the legs under weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, W. E.; Hoffler, G. W.

    1974-01-01

    Following exposure to weightlessness, alterations in the return of blood from the legs play a crucial role in orthostatic tolerance and may be an important factor in work tolerance. To investigate some of the hemodynamic mechansism involved, an experiment was performed on the Skylab 3 and Skylab 4 missions to study arterial blood flow, venous compliance, and muscle pumping of blood. Skylab 4 results indicated that the most likely cause of increased blood flow was an increase in cardiac output secondary to increased central venous pressure caused by blood redistribution. Changes in venous compliance are thought to be primarily changes in somatic musculature which is postulated to primarily determine venous compliance of the legs. This was also thought to be demonstrated by the changes in muscle pumping. It is thought that these compliance changes, when taken with the decreased blood volume; provide a basis for the changes seen in orthostatic tolerance, work capacity and lower body negative pressure response.

  6. Hemodynamic aspects of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Ken; Sato, Mika; Satoh, Yuichi; Watahiki, Yasuhito; Kondoh, Yasushi; Sugawara, Maki; Box, Georgia; Wright, David; Leung, Sumie; Yuya, Hiromichi; Shimosegawa, Eku

    2002-11-01

    Neuroradiological functional imaging techniques demonstrate the patterns of hypoperfusion and hypometabolism that are thought to be useful in the differential diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) from other dementing disorders. Besides the distribution patterns of perfusion or energy metabolism, vascular transit time (VTT), vascular reactivity (VR), and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF), which can be measured with positron emission tomography (PET), provide hemodynamic aspects of brain pathophysiology. In order to evaluate the hemodynamic features of AD, PET studies were carried out in 20 patients with probable AD and 20 patients with vascular dementia (VaD). The PET findings were not included in their diagnostic process of AD. Using oxygen-15-labeled compounds, cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO(2)), OEF, cerebral blood volume, and VTT were measured quantitatively during resting state. To evaluate VR, CBF was also measured during CO(2) inhalation. There was a significant increase in OEF in and around the parietotemporal cortices, but both VTT and VR were well preserved in patients with AD. By contrast, VR was markedly depressed and VTT was mildly prolonged in patients with VaD. Thus, from the hemodynamic point of view, the preservation of vascular reserve may be a distinct difference between AD and VaD. Furthermore, this indicates a hemodynamic integrity of the vasculature in the level of arterioles in AD.

  7. Altered Cognitive Control Activations after Moderate-to-Severe Traumatic Brain Injury and Their Relationship to Injury Severity and Everyday-Life Function

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Alexander; Brunner, Jan Ferenc; Indredavik Evensen, Kari Anne; Finnanger, Torun Gangaune; Vik, Anne; Skandsen, Toril; Landrø, Nils Inge; Håberg, Asta Kristine

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated how the neuronal underpinnings of both adaptive and stable cognitive control processes are affected by traumatic brain injury (TBI). Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was undertaken in 62 survivors of moderate-to-severe TBI (>1 year after injury) and 68 healthy controls during performance of a continuous performance test adapted for use in a mixed block- and event-related design. Survivors of TBI demonstrated increased reliance on adaptive task control processes within an a priori core region for cognitive control in the medial frontal cortex. TBI survivors also had increased activations related to time-on-task effects during stable task-set maintenance in right inferior parietal and prefrontal cortices. Increased brain activations in TBI survivors had a dose-dependent linear positive relationship to injury severity and were negatively correlated with self-reported cognitive control problems in everyday-life situations. Results were adjusted for age, education, and fMRI task performance. In conclusion, evidence was provided that the neural underpinnings of adaptive and stable control processes are differently affected by TBI. Moreover, it was demonstrated that increased brain activations typically observed in survivors of TBI might represent injury-specific compensatory adaptations also utilized in everyday-life situations. PMID:24557637

  8. Altered Cognitive Control Activations after Moderate-to-Severe Traumatic Brain Injury and Their Relationship to Injury Severity and Everyday-Life Function.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Alexander; Brunner, Jan Ferenc; Indredavik Evensen, Kari Anne; Finnanger, Torun Gangaune; Vik, Anne; Skandsen, Toril; Landrø, Nils Inge; Håberg, Asta Kristine

    2015-08-01

    This study investigated how the neuronal underpinnings of both adaptive and stable cognitive control processes are affected by traumatic brain injury (TBI). Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was undertaken in 62 survivors of moderate-to-severe TBI (>1 year after injury) and 68 healthy controls during performance of a continuous performance test adapted for use in a mixed block- and event-related design. Survivors of TBI demonstrated increased reliance on adaptive task control processes within an a priori core region for cognitive control in the medial frontal cortex. TBI survivors also had increased activations related to time-on-task effects during stable task-set maintenance in right inferior parietal and prefrontal cortices. Increased brain activations in TBI survivors had a dose-dependent linear positive relationship to injury severity and were negatively correlated with self-reported cognitive control problems in everyday-life situations. Results were adjusted for age, education, and fMRI task performance. In conclusion, evidence was provided that the neural underpinnings of adaptive and stable control processes are differently affected by TBI. Moreover, it was demonstrated that increased brain activations typically observed in survivors of TBI might represent injury-specific compensatory adaptations also utilized in everyday-life situations.

  9. Review: hemodynamic response to carbon monoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Penney, D.G.

    1988-04-01

    Historically, and at present, carbon monoxide is a major gaseous poison responsible for widespread morbidity and mortality. From threshold to maximal nonlethal levels, a variety of cardiovascular changes occur, both immediately and in the long term, whose homeostatic function it is to renormalize tissue oxygen delivery. However, notwithstanding numerous studies over the past century, the literature remains equivocal regarding the hemodynamic responses in animals and humans, although CO hypoxia is clearly different in several respects from hypoxic hypoxia. Factors complicating interpretation of experimental findings include species, CO dose level and rate, route of CO delivery, duration, level of exertion, state of consciousness, and anesthetic agent used. Augmented cardiac output usually observed with moderate COHb may be compromised in more sever poisoning for the same reasons, such that regional or global ischemia result. The hypotension usually seen in most animal studies is thought to be a primary cause of CNS damage resulting from acute CO poisoning, yet the exact mechanism(s) remains unproven in both animals and humans, as does the way in which CO produces hypotension. This review briefly summarizes the literature relevant to the short- and long-term hemodynamic responses reported in animals and humans. It concludes by presenting an overview using data from a single species in which the most complete work has been done to date.

  10. Nocturnal Cerebral Hemodynamics in Snorers and in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Pizza, Fabio; Biallas, Martin; Wolf, Martin; Werth, Esther; Bassetti, Claudio L.

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) of the obstructive type causes hemodynamic consequences, leading to an increased cerebrovascular risk. The severity of SDB at which detrimental circulatory consequences appear is matter of controversy. Aim of the present study is the investigation of cerebral hemodynamics in patients with SDB of variable severity using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Design: N/A. Setting: Sleep laboratory. Patients or Participants: Nineteen patients with SDB. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Patients underwent nocturnal videopolysomnography (VPSG) coupled with cerebral NIRS. NIRS data were averaged for each patient, and a new method (integral) was applied to quantify cerebral hemodynamic alterations. Nocturnal VPSG disclosed various severities of SDB: snoring (7 patients, apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] = 2 ± 2/h, range: 0.5–4.5); mild SDB (7 patients, AHI = 14 ± 8/h, range: 6.3–28.6); and severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (5 patients, AHI = 79 ± 20/h, range: 39.6–92.9). Relative changes of NIRS parameters were significantly larger during obstructive apneas (compared with hypopneas; mean deoxygenated hemoglobin [HHb] change of 0.72 ± 0.23 and 0.13 ± 0.08 μmol/L per sec, p value = 0.048) and in patients with severe SDB (as compared with patients with mild SDB and simple snorers; mean HHb change of 0.84 ± 0.24, 0.02 ± 0.09, and 0.2 ± 0.08 μmol/L per sec, respectively, p value = 0.020). In this group, NIRS and concomitant changes in peripheral oxygen saturation correlated. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that acute cerebral hemodynamic consequences of SDB lead to a failure of autoregulatory mechanisms with brain hypoxia only in the presence of frequent apneas (AHI > 30) and obstructive events. Citation: Pizza F; Biallas M; Wolf M; Werth E; Bassetti CL. Nocturnal cerebral hemodynamics in snorers and in patients with obstructive sleep apnea: a near-infrared spectroscopy study. SLEEP 2010

  11. The Correlation of Hepatic and Systemic Hemodynamics During Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Feng, An-Chieh; Chen, Teng-Wei; Fan, Hsiu-Lung; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hsieh, Chung-Bao

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The correlation between portal vein pressure (PVP) and flow (PVF) has not been established, and there is still lack of consensus about the optimal hemodynamics during liver transplantation (LT). We aimed to establish the correlation between systemic and hepatic hemodynamics during LT by applying the hepatokinetic power hypothesis, based on the law of energy conservation and hydrodynamics. A total of 103 adult liver transplant recipients were enrolled in this study from September 2012 to December 2014. Systemic and hepatic hemodynamics were assessed intraoperatively to calculate the hepatokinetic power status. Severe surgical complications (Clavien–Dindo grade ≥III) were recorded as the main outcome measure, and potential covariates were evaluated including recipient, donor, donor–recipient match, surgery-related factors, conventional hemodynamics, and the intraoperative hepatokinetic power profile. In multivariate analysis, hepatokinetic power gradient >4260 mL mmHg min−1100 g graft weight−1 (P = 0.001), 2.2 < ratio of hepatokinetic power from the portal vein to the hepatic artery ≤8.7 (P = 0.012), and hepatic resistance of partial grafts ≤0.006 or >0.015 min mmHg mL−1 (P = 0.012) were associated with a higher risk. None of the conventional hemodynamic parameters, such as PVP, PVF, and hepatic venous pressure gradient, entered into this regression model (c-statistic = 0.916) when competing with hepatokinetic power indexes. The hepatokinetic power hypothesis clarifies the correlation of systemic and hepatic hemodynamics in a simple, rational manner. The hepatic resistance, derived from the hepatokinetic power equation, can be quantified and has an effect on the incidence of severe surgical complications. This finding offers a new objective clinical approach to evaluate graft quality during transplantation. PMID:26512581

  12. Assessment of Conjunctival Microvascular Hemodynamics in Stages of Diabetic Microvasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Khansari, Maziyar M.; Wanek, Justin; Tan, Michael; Joslin, Charlotte E.; Kresovich, Jacob K.; Camardo, Nicole; Blair, Norman P.; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes impairs the microcirculation and function of various vital tissues throughout the body. The conjunctival microcirculation can be non-invasively imaged and thus enables assessment of microvascular hemodynamics. In this study, alterations in conjunctival microvascular hemodynamics were quantitatively assessed at stages of increasing diabetic microvasculopathy based on diabetic retinopathy (DR). Subjects were categorized into non-diabetic control (C, N = 34), no clinically visible DR (NDR, N = 47), non-proliferative DR (NPDR, N = 45), and proliferative DR (PDR, N = 35). Conjunctival hemodynamic descriptors, namely vessel diameter (D), blood velocity (V), blood flow (Q), wall shear rate (WSR), and wall shear stress (WSS) were measured in arterioles and venules, and compared between DR and C subjects using generalized linear mixed models. In arterioles, V, WSR, and WSS were lower in NDR (P ≤ 0.01). V was lower in NDR than NPDR and PDR subjects (P ≤ 0.02). In venules, D was higher in NDR and NPDR (P ≤ 0.03), while V was lower in PDR (P = 0.04). Venular V and Q were higher in NPDR than PDR subjects (P ≤ 0.04). WSR and WSS were lower in all stages of DR (P ≤ 0.05), suggestive of the potential of WSS as a marker of diabetic microvasculopathy. Quantitative assessment of conjunctival hemodynamics can potentially be useful for evaluation of diabetic microvasculopathy. PMID:28387229

  13. Central hemodynamics and target organ damage in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Junichiro

    2014-05-01

    Recent advances in technology have enabled the noninvasive evaluation of pulsatile hemodynamics in the central aorta; namely, central pressure and flow measurements. The central blood pressure represents the true load imposed on the heart, kidney and brain, and the central blood flow influences the local flow into these vital organs. An elevation of the central blood pressure has a direct, adverse impact on the target organ and, thus, the cardiovascular prognosis in patients with hypertension. A decrease in the central blood flow can cause organ dysfunction and failure. The central pressure and flow dynamics were conventionally regarded as unidirectional from the heart to the periphery. However, current evidence suggests that it should be recognized as a bidirectional interplay between the central and peripheral arteries. Specifically, the pressure pulse wave is not only transmitted forward to the periphery but also reflected backward to the central aorta. The flow pulse wave is also composed of the forward and reverse components. Aortic stiffening and arteriolar remodeling due to hypertension not only augment the central pressure by increasing the wave reflection but also may alter the central bidirectional flow, inducing hemodynamic damage/dysfunction in susceptible organs. Therefore, central hemodynamic monitoring has the potential to provide a diagnostic and therapeutic basis for preventing systemic target organ damage and for offering personalized therapy suitable for the arterial properties in each patient with hypertension. This brief review will summarize hypothetical mechanisms for the association between the central hemodynamics and hypertensive organ damage in the heart, kidney and brain.

  14. Aortic hemodynamics and white matter hyperintensities in normotensive postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Jill N; Harvey, Ronée E; Zuk, Samantha M; Lundt, Emily S; Lesnick, Timothy G; Gunter, Jeffrey L; Senjem, Matthew L; Shuster, Lynne T; Miller, Virginia M; Jack, Clifford R; Joyner, Michael J; Kantarci, Kejal

    2017-04-07

    Hypertension is associated with development of white matter hyperintensities (WMH) in the brain, which are risk factors for mild cognitive impairment. Hormonal shifts at menopause alter vascular function putting women at risk for both hypertension and WMH. Elevations in aortic hemodynamics precede the appearance of clinically defined hypertension but the relationship of aortic hemodynamics to development of WMH in women is not known. Therefore, this study aimed to characterize aortic hemodynamics in relationship to WMH in postmenopausal women. Aortic systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP), aortic augmentation index (Alx) and aortic round trip travel time (Aortic T R) by tonometry were examined in 53 postmenopausal women (age 60 ± 2 years). WMH was calculated from fluid-attenuated inversion recovery MRI using a semi-automated segmentation algorithm. WMH as a fraction of total white matter volume positively associated with aortic systolic BP (regression coefficient = 0.018; p = 0.04) after adjusting for age. In addition, WMH fraction was positively associated with AIx (0.025; p = 0.04), and inversely associated with Aortic T R (-0.015; p = 0.04) after adjusting for age. Our results suggest that assessing aortic hemodynamics may identify individuals at risk for accelerated development of WMH and guide early treatment to reduce WMH burden and cognitive impairment in the future.

  15. Altering embryonic cardiac dynamics with optical pacing.

    PubMed

    Peterson, L M; McPheeters, M; Barwick, L; Gu, S; Rollins, A M; Jenkins, M W

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have shown that altering blood flow early in development leads to congenital heart defects. In these studies the perturbations to hemodynamics were very gross manipulations (vessel ligation, conotruncal banding, etc.) that would be inappropriate for probing the delicate mechanisms responsible for mechanically-transduced signaling. Also, these perturbations lacked feedback from a monitoring system to determine the exact degree of alteration and the location of its effect. Here, we employed optical pacing (OP) to alter the heart rate in quail embryos and optical coherence tomography (OCT) to measure the resultant shear forces on the endocardium. OP is a new technique utilizing pulsed 1.851 µm infrared laser light to noninvasively capture the heart rate to the pulse frequency of the laser without the use of exogenous agents. To measure shear stress on the endocardium, we extended our previous OCT algorithms to enable the production of 4-D shear maps. 4-D shear maps allowed observation of the spatial and temporal distribution of shear stress. Employing both OCT and OP, we were able to develop perturbation protocols that increase regurgitant flow and greatly modify the oscillatory shear index (OSI) in a region of the heart tube where future valves will develop. Regurgitant flow has been linked with valve development and precise perturbations may allow one to determine the role of hemodynamics in valvulogenesis.

  16. Spatial distribution and properties of ash and thermally altered soils after high-severity forest fire, southern California

    Treesearch

    Brett R. Goforth; Robert C. Graham; Kenneth R. Hubbert; C. William Zanner; Richard A. Minnich

    2005-01-01

    After a century of fire suppression, dense forests in California have fueled high-severity fires. We surveyed mixed conifer forest with 995–1178 trees ha-1 (stems > 10 cm diameter at breast height), and nearby pine–oak woodland having 175–230 trees ha-1, 51 days after a severe burn, to contrast the spatial extent and...

  17. Alterations of T helper lymphocyte subpopulations in sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock: a prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Li, Ming; Su, Longxiang; Wang, Huijuan; Xiao, Kun; Deng, Jie; Jia, Yanhong; Han, Gencheng; Xie, Lixin

    2015-01-01

    Circulating lymphocyte number was significantly decreased in patients with sepsis. However, it remains unknown which severity phase (sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock) does it develop and what happen on each subpopulation. Eight patients with differing severities of sepsis (31 sepses, 33 severe sepses, and 16 septic shocks) were enrolled. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of Th1, Th2, and Th17; regulatory T (Treg) cell-specific transcription factor T-bet; GATA-3; RORgammat (RORγt); forkhead box P3 (FOXP3); and IL-17 mRNA were performed, and the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to detect serum interferon (IFN)-γ, IL-4, and IL-10. In this study, the Th1, Th2, Treg transcription factors, and related cytokines IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-10 levels of sepsis and severe sepsis patients in peripheral blood were significantly higher than those of the normal controls. Except for IL-17, the T-bet, GATA-3, and IFN-γ levels of septic shock patients were lower than those of sepsis patients. We also observed that the proportions of Th17/Treg in the sepsis and septic shock groups were inversed. From the above, the inflammatory response especially the adaptive immune response is still activated in sepsis and severe sepsis, but significant immunosuppression was developed in septic shock. In addition, the proportion of Th17/Treg inversed may be associated with the illness aggravation of patients with sepsis.

  18. Hemodynamics of Mechanical Circulatory Support.

    PubMed

    Burkhoff, Daniel; Sayer, Gabriel; Doshi, Darshan; Uriel, Nir

    2015-12-15

    An increasing number of devices can provide mechanical circulatory support (MCS) to patients with acute hemodynamic compromise and chronic end-stage heart failure. These devices work by different pumping mechanisms, have various flow capacities, are inserted by different techniques, and have different sites from which blood is withdrawn and returned to the body. These factors result in different primary hemodynamic effects and secondary responses of the body. However, these are not generally taken into account when choosing a device for a particular patient or while managing a patient undergoing MCS. In this review, we discuss fundamental principles of cardiac, vascular, and pump mechanics and illustrate how they provide a broad foundation for understanding the complex interactions between the heart, vasculature, and device, and how they may help guide future research to improve patient outcomes.

  19. Cerebral Hemodynamic Changes During Intensive Care of Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Limperopoulos, Catherine; Gauvreau, Kimberlee K.; O'Leary, Heather; Moore, Marianne; Bassan, Haim; Eichenwald, Eric C.; Soul, Janet S.; Ringer, Steven A.; Di Salvo, Donald N.; du Plessis, Adré J.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The objectives of this study were to examine the circulatory changes experienced by the immature systemic and cerebral circulations during routine events in the critical care of preterm infants and to identify clinical factors that are associated with greater hemodynamic-oxygenation changes during these events. METHODS We studied 82 infants who weighed <1500 g at birth and required intensive care management and continuous blood pressure monitoring from an umbilical arterial catheter. Continuous recording of cerebral and systemic hemodynamic and oxygenation changes was performed. We studied 6 distinct types of caregiving events during 10-minute epochs: (1) quiet baseline periods; (2) minor manipulation; (3) diaper changes; (4) endotracheal tube suctioning; (5) endotracheal tube repositioning; and (6) complex events. Each event was matched with a preceding baseline. We examined the effect of specific clinical factors and cranial ultrasound abnormalities on the systemic and cerebral hemodynamic oxygenation changes that were associated with the various event types. RESULTS There were highly significant differences in hemodynamics and oxygenation between events overall and baseline epochs. The magnitude of these circulatory changes was greatest during endotracheal tube repositioning and complex caregiving events. Lower gestational age, higher illness severity, chorioamnionitis, low Apgar scores, and need for pressor-inotropes all were associated with circulatory changes of significantly lower magnitude. Cerebral hemodynamic changes were associated with early parenchymal ultrasound abnormalities. CONCLUSIONS Routine caregiving procedures in critically ill preterm infants are associated with major circulatory fluctuations that are clinically underappreciated and underdetected by current bedside monitoring. Our data underscore the importance of continuous cerebral hemodynamic monitoring in critically ill preterm infants. PMID:18931348

  20. Calibrated imaging reveals altered grey matter metabolism related to white matter microstructure and symptom severity in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Nicholas A; Turner, Monroe P; Ouyang, Minhui; Himes, Lyndahl; Thomas, Binu P; Hutchison, Joanna L; Faghihahmadabadi, Shawheen; Davis, Scott L; Strain, Jeremy F; Spence, Jeffrey; Krawczyk, Daniel C; Huang, Hao; Lu, Hanzhang; Hart, John; Frohman, Teresa C; Frohman, Elliot M; Okuda, Darin T; Rypma, Bart

    2017-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) involves damage to white matter microstructures. This damage has been related to grey matter function as measured by standard, physiologically-nonspecific neuroimaging indices (i.e., blood-oxygen-level dependent signal [BOLD]). Here, we used calibrated functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging to examine the extent to which specific, evoked grey matter physiological processes were associated with white matter diffusion in MS. Evoked changes in BOLD, cerebral blood flow (CBF), and oxygen metabolism (CMRO2 ) were measured in visual cortex. Individual differences in the diffusion tensor measure, radial diffusivity, within occipital tracts were strongly associated with MS patients' BOLD and CMRO2 . However, these relationships were in opposite directions, complicating the interpretation of the relationship between BOLD and white matter microstructural damage in MS. CMRO2 was strongly associated with individual differences in patients' fatigue and neurological disability, suggesting that alterations to evoked oxygen metabolic processes may be taken as a marker for primary symptoms of MS. This work demonstrates the first application of calibrated and diffusion imaging together and details the first application of calibrated functional MRI in a neurological population. Results lend support for neuroenergetic hypotheses of MS pathophysiology and provide an initial demonstration of the utility of evoked oxygen metabolism signals for neurology research. Hum Brain Mapp 38:5375-5390, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Alterations in gills of Lepomis gibbosus, after acute exposure to several xenobiotics (pesticide, detergent and pharmaceuticals): morphometric and biochemical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Sara; Correia, Alberto T; Antunes, Sara C; Nunes, Bruno

    2015-04-01

    In recent decades, scientific research about the effects of anthropogenic xenobiotics on non-target organisms has increased. Among the likely effects, some studies reported the evaluation of biochemical and morphological changes in specific tissues or organs of fishes, such as gills, which are key organs for the direct action of pollutants in the aquatic environment. This work intended to assess biochemical [oxidative stress/phase II conjugation isoenzymes glutathione S-transferase (GSTs)] and morphological [secondary lamellar length (SLL), secondary lamellar width (SLW), interlamellar distance (ID), basal epithelial thickness (BET) and proportion of the secondary lamellae available for gas exchange (PAGE)] changes in gills, after acute exposure to the pesticide chlorfenvinphos, the detergent sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) and to the anticholinesterasic pharmaceuticals (neostigmine and pyridostigmine). Our results point to a significant, eventually hormetic, effect in the activity of GSTs following exposure to chlorfenvinphos that significantly increased the activity of GSTs at concentration of 0.2 mg/L. The activity of GSTs increased significantly after exposure to 100 mg/L of neostigmine. Considering the morphometric analysis of the gills, the data obtained showed that chlorfenvinphos exerted mainly minor architectural alterations in gills, with the exception of the highest tested concentration of chlorfenvinphos that produced also a slight decrease of the PAGE. The overall conclusions point to a null or negligible toxicity of the selected toxicants towards L. gibbosus, which may be reverted if exposure is withdrawn.

  2. Tacrolimus does not alter the production of several cytokines and antimicrobial peptide in Malassezia furfur-infected-keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Balato, Anna; Paoletti, Iole; De Gregorio, Vincenza; Cantelli, Mariateresa; Ayala, Fabio; Donnarumma, Giovanna

    2014-03-01

    Topical immunosuppressant therapy is widely used in the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases, such as atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. Besides its beneficial therapeutic effects, application of topical anti-inflammatory drugs may render the epidermis more vulnerable to invading pathogens by suppressing innate immune responses in keratinocytes (KCs). Cytokines, chemokines and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) produced by epithelial cells enable them to participate in innate and acquired immune responses. The aim of the present work was to study the influence of tacrolimus (FK506) on KCs infected with Malassezia furfur (M. furfur), evaluating the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1α and IL-6, chemokine IL-8, anti-inflammatory cytokines transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-β1) and IL-10 and AMP β-defensin-2. Human KCs were obtained from surgical specimens of normal adult skin. The expression of mRNAs in KCs: FK506-treated, FK506-treated and M. furfur-infected as well as only M. furfur-infected was quantified by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Next, the production of the AMP β-defensin-2 and of the above-mentioned pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines was evaluated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In this study, FK506 did not alter cytokine and AMP production by KCs; this led us to hypothesise that it may not enhance the risk of mycotic skin infections.

  3. Remodeling of blood vessels: responses of diameter and wall thickness to hemodynamic and metabolic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Pries, Axel R; Reglin, Bettina; Secomb, Timothy W

    2005-10-01

    Vascular functions, including tissue perfusion and peripheral resistance, reflect continuous structural adaptation (remodeling) of blood vessels in response to several stimuli. Here, a theoretical model is presented that relates the structural and functional properties of microvascular networks to the adaptive responses of individual segments to hemodynamic and metabolic stimuli. All vessels are assumed to respond, according to a common set of adaptation rules, to changes in wall shear stress, circumferential wall stress, and tissue metabolic status (indicated by partial pressure of oxygen). An increase in vessel diameter with increasing wall shear stress and an increase in wall mass with increased circumferential stress are needed to ensure stable vascular adaptation. The model allows quantitative predictions of the effects of changes in systemic hemodynamic conditions or local adaptation characteristics on vessel structure and on peripheral resistance. Predicted effects of driving pressure on the ratio of wall thickness to vessel diameter are consistent with experimental observations. In addition, peripheral resistance increases by approximately 65% for an increase in driving pressure from 50 to 150 mm Hg. Peripheral resistance is predicted to be markedly increased in response to a decrease in vascular sensitivity to wall shear stress, and to be decreased in response to increased tissue metabolic demand. This theoretical approach provides a framework for integrating available information on structural remodeling in the vascular system and predicting responses to changing conditions or altered vascular reactivity, as may occur in hypertension.

  4. [Hemorheology, hemodynamics and microcirculation. 1].

    PubMed

    Larcan, A; Stoltz, J F

    1989-01-01

    The microcirculation constitutes an ubiquitous vascular network presenting a mesh pattern, and comprising different types of vessels, arterioles, small veins, capillaries, arteriovenous shunts or similar structures, and lymphatics. Many dimensions have to be recognized, or simply mentioned, if one is to understand the hemodynamic and hemorheological particulars of this territory, which differ, in many aspects, from those specific to the macrocirculation (number and length of the vessels, diameter and cross section, intercapillary distance, geometric characteristics, intravascular pressure, pressure gradient, pressure-volume relationship, flow rate, mean velocity of plasma and RBC, velocity profile, local hematocrit, in situ viscosity, kinematic viscosity, wall shearing conditions, local oxygen transport, aggregation and deformability of RBC, leukocyte properties, etc.). The flow rate in capillary tubes and capillary vessels of the living organism varies with many factors, such as proximal hemodynamics, hemorheological characteristics of blood (fibrinogen, macro- and micro-hematocrit), some known effects (Farheus, Farheus Lindqvist), local diameter, the plasma layer which plays the role of the limiting layer, the endothelial film, the wall effect, and so forth. Models of the circulation have been propounded, none of which takes into account the whole of these phenomena due to their great complexity. Hemodynamic and hemorheological interactions provide for a better understanding of certain concepts, such as vascular resistance, hindrance, capacitance, local flow rates, real capillary opening and closing, development of two-directional functional shunts, autoregulation, pressure-volume relationship, critical closing pressure, circulatory current slowing effect, sequelae of intravascular aggregation of formed blood elements.

  5. Neurodegeneration severity can be predicted from early microglia alterations monitored in vivo in a mouse model of chronic glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Bosco, Alejandra; Romero, Cesar O.; Breen, Kevin T.; Chagovetz, Alexis A.; Steele, Michael R.; Ambati, Balamurali K.; Vetter, Monica L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Microglia serve key homeostatic roles, and respond to neuronal perturbation and decline with a high spatiotemporal resolution. The course of all chronic CNS pathologies is thus paralleled by local microgliosis and microglia activation, which begin at early stages of the disease. However, the possibility of using live monitoring of microglia during early disease progression to predict the severity of neurodegeneration has not been explored. Because the retina allows live tracking of fluorescent microglia in their intact niche, here we investigated their early changes in relation to later optic nerve neurodegeneration. To achieve this, we used the DBA/2J mouse model of inherited glaucoma, which develops progressive retinal ganglion cell degeneration of variable severity during aging, and represents a useful model to study pathogenic mechanisms of retinal ganglion cell decline that are similar to those in human glaucoma. We imaged CX3CR1+/GFP microglial cells in vivo at ages ranging from 1 to 5 months by confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (cSLO) and quantified cell density and morphological activation. We detected early microgliosis at the optic nerve head (ONH), where axonopathy first manifests, and could track attenuation of this microgliosis induced by minocycline. We also observed heterogeneous and dynamic patterns of early microglia activation in the retina. When the same animals were aged and analyzed for the severity of optic nerve pathology at 10 months of age, we found a strong correlation with the levels of ONH microgliosis at 3 to 4 months. Our findings indicate that live imaging and monitoring the time course and levels of early retinal microgliosis and microglia activation in glaucoma could serve as indicators of future neurodegeneration severity. PMID:25755083

  6. Hemodynamic and tubular changes induced by contrast media.

    PubMed

    Caiazza, Antonella; Russo, Luigi; Sabbatini, Massimo; Russo, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of acute kidney injury induced by contrast media (CI-AKI) is the third cause of AKI in hospitalized patients. Contrast media cause relevant alterations both in renal hemodynamics and in renal tubular cell function that lead to CI-AKI. The vasoconstriction of intrarenal vasculature is the main hemodynamic change induced by contrast media; the vasoconstriction is accompanied by a cascade of events leading to ischemia and reduction of glomerular filtration rate. Cytotoxicity of contrast media causes apoptosis of tubular cells with consequent formation of casts and worsening of ischemia. There is an interplay between the negative effects of contrast media on renal hemodynamics and on tubular cell function that leads to activation of renin-angiotensin system and increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) within the kidney. Production of ROS intensifies cellular hypoxia through endothelial dysfunction and alteration of mechanisms regulating tubular cells transport. The physiochemical characteristics of contrast media play a critical role in the incidence of CI-AKI. Guidelines suggest the use of either isoosmolar or low-osmolar contrast media rather than high-osmolar contrast media particularly in patients at increased risk of CI-AKI. Older age, presence of atherosclerosis, congestive heart failure, chronic renal disease, nephrotoxic drugs, and diuretics may multiply the risk of CI-AKI.

  7. Cerebral hemodynamics and endothelial function in patients with Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Segura, Tomás; Ayo-Martín, Oscar; Gómez-Fernandez, Isabel; Andrés, Carolina; Barba, Miguel A; Vivancos, José

    2013-11-11

    Cerebral vasculopathy have been described in Fabry disease, in which altered cerebral blood flow, vascular remodelling or impairment of endothelial function could be involved. Our study aims to evaluate these three possibilities in a group of Fabry patients, and compare it to healthy controls. Cerebral hemodynamics, vascular remodelling and systemic endothelial function were investigated in 10 Fabry patients and compared to data from 17 healthy controls. Transcranial Doppler was used to study blood flow velocity of intracranial arteries and cerebral vasomotor reactivity. For the study of vascular remodelling and endothelial function, intima-media thickness of common carotid arteries, flow-mediated dilation in brachial artery and serum levels of soluble VCAM-1, TNF-α, high-sensitive CRP and IL-6 were measured. Differences between groups were evaluated using appropriate tests. No relevant differences were observed in cerebral hemodynamic parameters, intima-media thickness or flow-mediated dilation. There was a trend for low serum levels of IL-6 and high serum levels of TNF-α and high-sensitive CRP in Fabry patients; plasma concentrations of soluble VCAM-1 were significantly higher in Fabry disease patients than in healthy volunteers (p = 0.02). In our sample, we did not find relevant alterations of cerebral hemodynamics in Fabry disease patients. Increased levels of plasmatic endothelial biomarkers seem to be the most important feature indicative of possible vascular dysfunction in Fabry disease patients.

  8. Cerebral hemodynamics and endothelial function in patients with Fabry disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cerebral vasculopathy have been described in Fabry disease, in which altered cerebral blood flow, vascular remodelling or impairment of endothelial function could be involved. Our study aims to evaluate these three possibilities in a group of Fabry patients, and compare it to healthy controls. Methods Cerebral hemodynamics, vascular remodelling and systemic endothelial function were investigated in 10 Fabry patients and compared to data from 17 healthy controls. Transcranial Doppler was used to study blood flow velocity of intracranial arteries and cerebral vasomotor reactivity. For the study of vascular remodelling and endothelial function, intima-media thickness of common carotid arteries, flow-mediated dilation in brachial artery and serum levels of soluble VCAM-1, TNF-α, high-sensitive CRP and IL-6 were measured. Differences between groups were evaluated using appropriate tests. Results No relevant differences were observed in cerebral hemodynamic parameters, intima-media thickness or flow-mediated dilation. There was a trend for low serum levels of IL-6 and high serum levels of TNF-α and high-sensitive CRP in Fabry patients; plasma concentrations of soluble VCAM-1 were significantly higher in Fabry disease patients than in healthy volunteers (p = 0.02). Conclusions In our sample, we did not find relevant alterations of cerebral hemodynamics in Fabry disease patients. Increased levels of plasmatic endothelial biomarkers seem to be the most important feature indicative of possible vascular dysfunction in Fabry disease patients. PMID:24207059

  9. Systemic hemodynamics in advanced cirrhosis: Concerns during perioperative period of liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Tomohide; Ogura, Yasuhiro; Onishi, Yasuharu; Kamei, Hideya; Kurata, Nobuhiko; Kainuma, Motoshi; Takahashi, Hideo; Suzuki, Shogo; Ichikawa, Takashi; Mizuno, Shoko; Aoyama, Tadashi; Ishida, Yuki; Hirai, Takahiro; Hayashi, Tomoko; Hasegawa, Kazuko; Takeichi, Hiromu; Ota, Atsunobu; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Iida, Taku; Yagi, Shintaro; Taniguchi, Kentaro; Uemoto, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Advanced liver cirrhosis is usually accompanied by portal hypertension. Long-term portal hypertension results in various vascular alterations. The systemic hemodynamic state in patients with cirrhosis is termed a hyperdynamic state. This peculiar hemodynamic state is characterized by an expanded blood volume, high cardiac output, and low total peripheral resistance. Vascular alterations do not disappear even long after liver transplantation (LT), and recipients with cirrhosis exhibit a persistent systemic hyperdynamic state even after LT. Stability of optimal systemic hemodynamics is indispensable for adequate portal venous flow (PVF) and successful LT, and reliable parameters for optimal systemic hemodynamics and adequate PVF are required. Even a subtle disorder in systemic hemodynamics is precisely indicated by the balance between cardiac output and blood volume. The indocyanine green (ICG) kinetics reflect the patient’s functional hepatocytes and effective PVF, and PVF is a major determinant of the ICG elimination constant (kICG) in the well-preserved allograft. The kICG value is useful to set the optimal PVF during living-donor LT and to evaluate adequate PVF after LT. Perioperative management has a large influence on the postoperative course and outcome; therefore, key points and unexpected pitfalls for intensive management are herein summarized. Transplant physicians should fully understand the peculiar systemic hemodynamic behavior in LT recipients with cirrhosis and recognize the critical importance of PVF after LT. PMID:27660671

  10. Childhood maltreatment, altered limbic neurobiology, and substance use relapse severity via trauma-specific reductions in limbic gray matter volume.

    PubMed

    Van Dam, Nicholas T; Rando, Kenneth; Potenza, Marc N; Tuit, Keri; Sinha, Rajita

    2014-08-01

    Substance use disorders (SUDs) are among the most common sequelae of childhood maltreatment, yet the independent contributions of SUDs and childhood maltreatment to neurobiological changes and the effect of the latter on relapse risk (a critical variable in addiction treatment) are relatively unknown. To identify structural neural characteristics independently associated with childhood maltreatment (CM; a common type of childhood adversity), comparing a sample with SUD with a demographically comparable control sample, and to examine the relationship between CM-related structural brain changes and subsequent relapse. Structural magnetic resonance imaging study comparing 79 treatment-engaged participants with SUD in acute remission in inpatient treatment at a community mental health center vs 98 healthy control participants at an outpatient research center at an academic medical center. Both groups included individuals with a range of CM experiences. Participants with SUD were followed up prospectively for 90 days to assess relapse and relapse severity. Standard 12-step, recovery-based, inpatient addiction treatment for all participants with SUD. Gray matter volume (GMV), subsequent substance use relapse, days to relapse, and severity of relapse. Controlling for SUD and psychiatric comorbidity, CM (dichotomously classified) was uniquely associated with lower GMV across all participants in the left hippocampus (cornu ammonis 1-3, dentate gyrus), parahippocampus (presubiculum, parasubiculum, prosubiculum, subiculum, and entorhinal cortex), and anterior fusiform gyrus (corrected P < .05; uncorrected P = .001). Among the sample with SUD, CM prospectively predicted a shorter relapse to use of any drug (P = .048), while CM-related GMV reductions predicted severity of substance use relapse (P = .04). Findings indicate that CM was related to decreased GMV in limbic regions, which in turn predicted increased risk of relapse in SUD. These results suggest that

  11. Childhood Maltreatment, Altered Limbic Neurobiology, and Substance Use Relapse Severity via Trauma-Specific Reductions in Limbic Gray Matter Volume

    PubMed Central

    Van Dam, Nicholas T.; Rando, Kenneth; Potenza, Marc N.; Tuit, Keri; Sinha, Rajita

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Substance use disorders (SUDs) are among the most common sequelae of childhood maltreatment, yet the independent contributions of SUDs and childhood maltreatment to neurobiological changes and the effect of the latter on relapse risk (a critical variable in addiction treatment) are relatively unknown. OBJECTIVES To identify structural neural characteristics independently associated with childhood maltreatment (CM; a common type of childhood adversity), comparing a sample with SUD with a demographically comparable control sample, and to examine the relationship between CM-related structural brain changes and subsequent relapse. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Structural magnetic resonance imaging study comparing 79 treatment-engaged participants with SUD in acute remission in inpatient treatment at a community mental health center vs 98 healthy control participants at an outpatient research center at an academic medical center. Both groups included individuals with a range of CM experiences. Participants with SUD were followed up prospectively for 90 days to assess relapse and relapse severity. INTERVENTION Standard 12-step, recovery-based, inpatient addiction treatment for all participants with SUD. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Gray matter volume (GMV), subsequent substance use relapse, days to relapse, and severity of relapse. RESULTS Controlling for SUD and psychiatric comorbidity, CM (dichotomously classified) was uniquely associated with lower GMV across all participants in the left hippocampus (cornu ammonis 1-3, dentate gyrus), parahippocampus (presubiculum, parasubiculum, prosubiculum, subiculum, and entorhinal cortex), and anterior fusiform gyrus (corrected P < .05; uncorrected P = .001). Among the sample with SUD, CM prospectively predicted a shorter relapse to use of any drug (P = .048), while CM-related GMV reductions predicted severity of substance use relapse (P = .04). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Findings indicate that CM was related to

  12. Hemodynamics of Cerebral Aneurysms: Computational Analyses of Aneurysm Progress and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Woowon; Rhee, Kyehan

    2012-01-01

    The progression of a cerebral aneurysm involves degenerative arterial wall remodeling. Various hemodynamic parameters are suspected to be major mechanical factors related to the genesis and progression of vascular diseases. Flow alterations caused by the insertion of coils and stents for interventional aneurysm treatment may affect the aneurysm embolization process. Therefore, knowledge of hemodynamic parameters may provide physicians with an advanced understanding of aneurysm progression and rupture, as well as the effectiveness of endovascular treatments. Progress in medical imaging and information technology has enabled the prediction of flow fields in the patient-specific blood vessels using computational analysis. In this paper, recent computational hemodynamic studies on cerebral aneurysm initiation, progress, and rupture are reviewed. State-of-the-art computational aneurysmal flow analyses after coiling and stenting are also summarized. We expect the computational analysis of hemodynamics in cerebral aneurysms to provide valuable information for planning and follow-up decisions for treatment. PMID:22454695

  13. Forest fuel reduction alters fire severity and long-term carbon storage in three Pacific Northwest ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Stephen R; Harmon, Mark E; O'Connell, Kari E B

    2009-04-01

    Two forest management objectives being debated in the context of federally managed landscapes in the U.S. Pacific Northwest involve a perceived trade-off between fire restoration and carbon sequestration. The former strategy would reduce fuel (and therefore C) that has accumulated through a century of fire suppression and exclusion which has led to extreme fire risk in some areas. The latter strategy would manage forests for enhanced C sequestration as a method of reducing atmospheric CO2 and associated threats from global climate change. We explored the trade-off between these two strategies by employing a forest ecosystem simulation model, STANDCARB, to examine the effects of fuel reduction on fire severity and the resulting long-term C dynamics among three Pacific Northwest ecosystems: the east Cascades ponderosa pine forests, the west Cascades western hemlock-Douglas-fir forests, and the Coast Range western hemlock-Sitka spruce forests. Our simulations indicate that fuel reduction treatments in these ecosystems consistently reduced fire severity. However, reducing the fraction by which C is lost in a wildfire requires the removal of a much greater amount of C, since most of the C stored in forest biomass (stem wood, branches, coarse woody debris) remains unconsumed even by high-severity wildfires. For this reason, all of the fuel reduction treatments simulated for the west Cascades and Coast Range ecosystems as well as most of the treatments simulated for the east Cascades resulted in a reduced mean stand C storage. One suggested method of compensating for such losses in C storage is to utilize C harvested in fuel reduction treatments as biofuels. Our analysis indicates that this will not be an effective strategy in the west Cascades and Coast Range over the next 100 years. We suggest that forest management plans aimed solely at ameliorating increases in atmospheric CO2 should forgo fuel reduction treatments in these ecosystems, with the possible exception of

  14. Elevated Nucleated Red Blood Cells at Birth Predict Hemodynamically Significant Patent Ductus Arteriosus.

    PubMed

    Bin-Nun, Alona; Mimouni, Francis B; Fink, Daniel; Sela, Hen; Hammerman, Cathy

    2016-10-01

    We hypothesized that postnatal absolute nucleated red blood cell (aNRBC) counts would be elevated in premature infants with hemodynamically significant patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), reflecting intrauterine hypoxia. PDA severity was assessed and categorized echocardiographically. aNRBC counts were significantly correlated with ductal severity (Pearson correlation: P = .007). At the extremes, aNRBC levels were 3770 (728, 6015) hemodynamically significant PDA vs 865 (483, 2528) closed ductus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The hippocampi of children with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome have localized anterior alterations that predict severity of anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Julia A.; Goodrich-Hunsaker, Naomi; Kalish, Kristopher; Lee, Aaron; Hunsaker, Michael R.; Schumann, Cynthia M.; Carmichael, Owen T.; Simon, Tony J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) have an elevated risk for schizophrenia, which increases with history of childhood anxiety. Altered hippocampal morphology is a common neuroanatomical feature of 22q11.2DS and idiopathic schizophrenia. Relating hippocampal structure in children with 22q11.2DS to anxiety and impaired cognitive ability could lead to hippocampus-based characterization of psychosis-proneness in this at-risk population. Methods We measured hippocampal volume using a semiautomated approach on MRIs collected from typically developing children and children with 22q11.2DS. We then analyzed hippocampal morphology with Localized Components Analysis. We tested the modulating roles of diagnostic group, hippocampal volume, sex and age on local hippocampal shape components. Lastly, volume and shape components were tested as covariates of IQ and anxiety. Results We included 48 typically developing children and 69 children with 22q11.2DS in our study. Hippocampal volume was reduced bilaterally in children with 22q11.2DS, and these children showed greater variation in the shape of the anterior hippocampus than typically developing children. Children with 22q11.2DS had greater inward deformation of the anterior hippocampus than typically developing children. Greater inward deformation of the anterior hippocampus was associated with greater severity of anxiety, specifically fear of physical injury, within the 22q11.2DS group. Limitations Shape alterations are not specific to hippocampal subfields. Conclusion Alterations in the structure of the anterior hippocampus likely affect function and may impact limbic circuitry. We suggest these alterations potentially contribute to anxiety symptoms in individuals with 22q11.2DS through modulatory pathways. Altered hippocampal morphology may be uniquely linked to anxiety risk factors for schizophrenia, which could be a powerful neuroanatomical marker of schizophrenia risk and hence protection

  16. [Pulmonary hemodynamics and hemostasis in rabbits exposed to high altitude].

    PubMed

    Almerekova, A A; Tartakovskiĭ, V N; Isakova, Zh T

    1993-01-01

    Pulmonary hemodynamics, homeostasis and red blood parameters were studied in 77 rabbits in the mountains of the Tien Shan (3200 m above sea-level). Exposure of animals in alpine environment gave rise to pulmonary hypertension, polycythemia, alterations of homeostasis by the pattern of hyper- and hypocoagulation syndrome. On certain stages of adaptation products of paracoagulation were observed in blood as well as intravascular aggregation of formed elements, increased sensitivity of blood plates to platelet activation, increased fibrinolysis. Given existing hypothesis about involvement of changes in homeostasis and red blood in the pathogenesis of altitude pulmonary hypertension, the coefficients of paired linear correlation between indices of pulmonary hemodynamics and blood have been calculated. These coefficients are valid only for low values of the ratio.

  17. Clinical relevance of fetal hemodynamic monitoring: Perinatal implications.

    PubMed

    Pruetz, Jay D; Votava-Smith, Jodie; Miller, David A

    2015-08-01

    Comprehensive assessment of fetal wellbeing involves monitoring of fetal growth, placental function, central venous pressure, and cardiac function. Ultrasound evaluation of the fetus using 2D, color Doppler, and pulse-wave Doppler techniques form the foundation of antenatal diagnosis of structural anomalies, rhythm abnormalities and altered fetal circulation. Accurate and timely prenatal identification of the fetus at risk is critical for appropriate parental counseling, antenatal diagnostic testing, consideration for fetal intervention, perinatal planning, and coordination of postnatal care delivery. Fetal hemodynamic monitoring and serial assessment are vital to ensuring fetal wellbeing, particularly in the setting of complex congenital anomalies. A complete hemodynamic evaluation of the fetus gives important information on the likelihood of a smooth postnatal transition and contributes to ensuring the best possible outcome for the neonate.

  18. Skeletal muscle myotubes of the severely obese exhibit altered ubiquitin-proteasome and autophagic/lysosomal proteolytic flux

    PubMed Central

    Bollinger, Lance M.; Powell, Jonathan J. S.; Houmard, Joseph A.; Witczak, Carol A.; Brault, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Whole-body protein metabolism is dysregulated with obesity. Our goal was to determine if activity and expression of major protein degradation pathways are compromised specifically in human skeletal muscle with obesity. Methods We utilized primary Human Skeletal Muscle cell (HSkM) cultures since cellular mechanisms can be studied absent of hormones and contractile activity that could independently influence metabolism. HSkM from 10 lean (BMI ≤ 26.0 kg/m2) and 8 severely obese (BMI ≥ 39.0) women were examined basally and when stimulated to atrophy (serum and amino acid starvation). Results HSkM from obese donors had a lower proportion of type I myosin heavy chain and slower flux through the autophagic/lysosomal pathway. During starvation, flux through the ubiquitin-proteasome system diverged according to obesity status, with a decrease in the lean and an increase in HSkM from obese subjects. HSkMC from the obese also displayed elevated proteasome activity despite no difference in proteasome content. Atrophy-related gene expression and myotube area were similar in myotubes derived from lean and obese individuals under basal and starved conditions. Conclusions Our data indicate that muscle cells of the lean and severely obese have innate differences in management of protein degradation, which may explain their metabolic differences. PMID:26010327

  19. Experimental periodontitis induced by Porphyromonas gingivalis does not alter the onset or severity of diabetes in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Yang, H; Ding, Y; Aprecio, R; Zhang, W; Wang, Q; Li, Y

    2013-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus is believed to increase the risk and severity of periodontitis. However, less evidence is available on the converse effects of periodontitis on diabetes. The objective of the study was to investigate to what degree experimental periodontitis induced by Porphyromonas gingivalis might influence the onset and severity of diabetes in different mouse models. Twenty-eight male Tallyho/JngJ mice (type 2 diabetes), 20 male streptozotocin-induced diabetes C57BL/6J mice (type 1 diabetes) and 20 male C57BL/6J mice at 4 wks of age were evenly divided into two groups: periodontal infection and sham infection. Periodontitis was induced by Porphyromonas gingivalis W50 (P. gingivalis) oral inoculation before the development of diabetes. Sham-infected mice received vehicle as control. P. gingivalis in the oral cavity were identified by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Fasting glucose, body weight and food intake levels were monitored and glucose tolerance tests were performed to assess glucose homeostasis for the onset and progression of diabetes. The level of alveolar bone loss and tumor necrosis factor-alpha were determined in week 20 when mice were killed. Mice in the infection groups developed more alveolar bone loss than those in sham-infection groups (Tallyho p = 0.021; C57-STZ p = 0.014; C57 p = 0.035). Hyperglycemic mice exhibited significantly more bone loss compared to those normal glucose mice (Tallyho vs. C57 p = 0.029; C57-STZ vs. C57 p = 0.024). The level of tumor necrosis factor-alpha was consistent with that of periodontal bone loss and hyperglycemia. There was no significant effect of mouse species on the amount of bone loss at the same level of blood glucose. No statistically significant difference or trend in glucose metabolism was found between the infection and sham-infection group. Diabetes enhanced the risk for periodontal disease induced by P. gingivalis. However, no converse impact was found between this periodontal

  20. Hemodynamic Correlates of Cognition in Human Infants

    PubMed Central

    Aslin, Richard N.; Shukla, Mohinish; Emberson, Lauren L.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, the field of cognitive neuroscience has relied heavily on hemodynamic measures of blood oxygenation in local regions of the brain to make inferences about underlying cognitive processes. These same functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) techniques have recently been adapted for use with human infants. We review the advantages and disadvantages of these two neuroimaging methods for studies of infant cognition, with a particular emphasis on their technical limitations and the linking hypotheses that are used to draw conclusions from correlational data. In addition to summarizing key findings in several domains of infant cognition, we highlight the prospects of improving the quality of fNIRS data from infants to address in a more sophisticated way how cognitive development is mediated by changes in underlying neural mechanisms. PMID:25251480

  1. Cerebral Hemodynamics and Cognitive Function in Cirrhotic Patients with Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yuqing; Dong, Qian; Zhang, Rong; Zhou, Shunfeng; Li, Linqiang; Cheng, Keran; Kong, Rui; Yu, Qiang; Xu, Shizan; Li, Jingjing; Li, Sainan; Feng, Jiao; Wu, Liwei; Liu, Tong; Lu, Xiya; Xia, Yujing

    2016-01-01

    Aims. To investigate cerebral hemodynamics in cirrhotic patients with HE and to observe effects of treatment in cerebral hemodynamics and correlations among ammonia, cerebral hemodynamics, and cognitive function. Methods. There were four groups: healthy controls (group 1), cirrhosis without HE (group 2), cirrhosis with MHE (group 3), and cirrhosis with OHE (group 4). Ammonia and cerebral hemodynamics (by TCD) were assessed. Patients in group 3 were subsequently randomized to two subgroups: the control (group A) and the treated (group B, treated with lactulose for two months), and they were retested for ammonia and TCD after treatment. Results. Ammonia, Vm, Vd, PI, and RI were statistically different before treatment, and ammonia, PI, and RI levels paralleled the severity of HE (P < 0.05). In group B, Vd increased and ammonia, PI, and RI declined following treatment (P < 0.05), while there were no differences in group A (P > 0.05). Correlations were found between ammonia and Vd, PI, RI, NCT-A, and DST and also found between Vd, PI, RI, and NCT-A and DST (P < 0.05). Conclusions. This study revealed that cerebral hemodynamics were related to the severity of HE and cerebral autoregulation was impaired. There were tight correlations among ammonia, cerebral hemodynamics, and cognitive function, and, following treatment, cerebral hemodynamics improved. PMID:28096811

  2. Ketamine spares morphine consumption after transthoracic lung and heart surgery without adverse hemodynamic effects.

    PubMed

    Nesher, Nahum; Serovian, Irena; Marouani, Nissim; Chazan, Shoshana; Weinbroum, Avi A

    2008-07-01

    Thoracotomy is associated with severe pain. Large doses of morphine can depress respiratory drive and compromise hemodynamic stability. Ketamine reduces hyperalgesia, prevents opioid tolerance and resistance and lowers morphine consumption. At sub-anesthetic (< or = 500 microg/kg) doses, ketamine rarely produces undesirable hemodynamic alterations. We hypothesized that by combining a sub-anesthetic dose of ketamine with morphine, we could effectively control pain with less morphine and minimize drowsiness, while maintaining safe hemodynamic and respiratory parameters. Sequential patients undergoing anterolateral thoracotomy for MIDCAB, lung tumor resection, or median sternotomy for OPCAB were randomized to one of the two intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) protocols. MO-only patients received 1.5 mg MO bolus, and MK patients received 1.0 mg MO+5 mg ketamine/bolus, both with a 7 min lockout time. IV-PCA was initiated when the patient was sufficiently awake (> or = 5/10 VAS) and rated pain > or = 5/10 on a 0-10 VAS. Rescue intramuscular diclofenac 75 mg was available. Follow-up of respiratory, hemodynamic and pain statuses lasted 72 h. Fifty-eight patients completed the 6-month study. Heart rate and blood pressures were identically stable in both groups. Respiratory rate and pulse oximetry were higher (P < 0.05) in the MK than in the MO group. MO patients (n = 28) used twice (2.0 +/-2.3 mg/patient/h) the amount of morphine compared to MK patients (n = 30, 1.0 +/- 1.4 mg/patient/h, P < 0.05). Thirty-six hours after starting PCA, 10 MO patients still required IV-PCA compared to 5 MK patients (P < 0.05). Diclofenac was used 70% more in MO than in MK patients. MO patients suffered more postoperative nausea and vomiting. No patients had hallucinations. The concomitant use of sub-anesthetic ketamine plus two-thirds the standard MO dose following thoracotomy, MIDCAB or OPCAB resulted in lower pain scores, reduced MO consumption and shorter postoperative IV

  3. Hemodynamic Characterization of Peripheral Arterio-venous Malformations.

    PubMed

    Frey, Sabrina; Haine, A; Kammer, R; von Tengg-Kobligk, H; Obrist, D; Baumgartner, I

    2017-03-21

    Peripheral arterio-venous malformations (pAVMs) are congenital vascular anomalies that require treatment, due to their severe clinical consequences. The complexity of lesions often leads to misdiagnosis and ill-planned treatments. To improve disease management, we developed a computational model to quantify the hemodynamic effects of key angioarchitectural features of pAVMs. Hemodynamic results were used to predict the transport of contrast agent (CA), which allowed us to compare our findings to digital subtraction angiography (DSA) recordings of patients. The model is based on typical pAVM morphologies and a generic vessel network that represents realistic vascular feeding and draining components related to lesions. A lumped-parameter description of the vessel network was employed to compute blood pressure and flow rates. CA-transport was determined by coupling the model to a 1D advection-diffusion equation. Results show that the extent of hemodynamic effects of pAVMs, such as arterial steal and venous hypertension, strongly depends on the lesion type and its vascular architecture. Dimensions of shunting vessels strongly influence hemodynamic parameters. Our results underline the importance of the dynamics of CA-transport in diagnostic DSA images. In this context, we identified a set of temporal CA-transport parameters, which are indicative of the presence and specific morphology of pAVMs.

  4. Antisense Suppression of the Small Chloroplast Protein CP12 in Tobacco Alters Carbon Partitioning and Severely Restricts Growth1[W

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Thomas P.; Fryer, Michael J.; Singh, Prashant; Metodiev, Metodi; Lytovchenko, Anna; Obata, Toshihiro; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Kruger, Nicholas J.; Quick, W. Paul; Lloyd, Julie C.; Raines, Christine A.

    2011-01-01

    The thioredoxin-regulated chloroplast protein CP12 forms a multienzyme complex with the Calvin-Benson cycle enzymes phosphoribulokinase (PRK) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). PRK and GAPDH are inactivated when present in this complex, a process shown in vitro to be dependent upon oxidized CP12. The importance of CP12 in vivo in higher plants, however, has not been investigated. Here, antisense suppression of CP12 in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) was observed to impact on NAD-induced PRK and GAPDH complex formation but had little effect on enzyme activity. Additionally, only minor changes in photosynthetic carbon fixation were observed. Despite this, antisense plants displayed changes in growth rates and morphology, including dwarfism and reduced apical dominance. The hypothesis that CP12 is essential to separate oxidative pentose phosphate pathway activity from Calvin-Benson cycle activity, as proposed in cyanobacteria, was tested. No evidence was found to support this role in tobacco. Evidence was seen, however, for a restriction to malate valve capacity, with decreases in NADP-malate dehydrogenase activity (but not protein levels) and pyridine nucleotide content. Antisense repression of CP12 also led to significant changes in carbon partitioning, with increased carbon allocation to the cell wall and the organic acids malate and fumarate and decreased allocation to starch and soluble carbohydrates. Severe decreases were also seen in 2-oxoglutarate content, a key indicator of cellular carbon sufficiency. The data presented here indicate that in tobacco, CP12 has a role in redox-mediated regulation of carbon partitioning from the chloroplast and provides strong in vivo evidence that CP12 is required for normal growth and development in plants. PMID:21865489

  5. Altered Modulation of Silent Period in Tongue Motor Cortex of Persistent Developmental Stuttering in Relation to Stuttering Severity.

    PubMed

    Busan, Pierpaolo; Del Ben, Giovanni; Bernardini, Simona; Natarelli, Giulia; Bencich, Marco; Monti, Fabrizio; Manganotti, Paolo; Battaglini, Piero Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Motor balance in developmental stuttering (DS) was investigated with Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS), with the aim to define novel neural markers of persistent DS in adulthood. Eleven DS adult males were evaluated with TMS on tongue primary motor cortex, compared to 15 matched fluent speakers, in a "state" condition (i.e. stutterers vs. fluent speakers, no overt stuttering). Motor and silent period thresholds (SPT), recruitment curves, and silent period durations were acquired by recording tongue motor evoked potentials. Tongue silent period duration was increased in DS, especially in the left hemisphere (P<0.05; Hedge's g or Cohen's dunbiased = 1.054, i.e. large effect size), suggesting a "state" condition of higher intracortical inhibition in left motor cortex networks. Differences in motor thresholds (different excitatory/inhibitory ratios in DS) were evident, as well as significant differences in SPT. In fluent speakers, the left hemisphere may be marginally more excitable than the right one in motor thresholds at lower muscular activation, while active motor thresholds and SPT were higher in the left hemisphere of DS with respect to the right one, resulting also in a positive correlation with stuttering severity. Pre-TMS electromyography data gave overlapping evidence. Findings suggest the existence of a complex intracortical balance in DS tongue primary motor cortex, with a particular interplay between excitatory and inhibitory mechanisms, also in neural substrates related to silent periods. Findings are discussed with respect to functional and structural impairments in stuttering, and are also proposed as novel neural markers of a stuttering "state" in persistent DS, helping to define more focused treatments (e.g. neuro-modulation).

  6. Altered Modulation of Silent Period in Tongue Motor Cortex of Persistent Developmental Stuttering in Relation to Stuttering Severity

    PubMed Central

    Busan, Pierpaolo; Del Ben, Giovanni; Bernardini, Simona; Natarelli, Giulia; Bencich, Marco; Monti, Fabrizio; Manganotti, Paolo; Battaglini, Piero Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Motor balance in developmental stuttering (DS) was investigated with Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS), with the aim to define novel neural markers of persistent DS in adulthood. Eleven DS adult males were evaluated with TMS on tongue primary motor cortex, compared to 15 matched fluent speakers, in a “state” condition (i.e. stutterers vs. fluent speakers, no overt stuttering). Motor and silent period thresholds (SPT), recruitment curves, and silent period durations were acquired by recording tongue motor evoked potentials. Tongue silent period duration was increased in DS, especially in the left hemisphere (P<0.05; Hedge’s g or Cohen’s dunbiased = 1.054, i.e. large effect size), suggesting a “state” condition of higher intracortical inhibition in left motor cortex networks. Differences in motor thresholds (different excitatory/inhibitory ratios in DS) were evident, as well as significant differences in SPT. In fluent speakers, the left hemisphere may be marginally more excitable than the right one in motor thresholds at lower muscular activation, while active motor thresholds and SPT were higher in the left hemisphere of DS with respect to the right one, resulting also in a positive correlation with stuttering severity. Pre-TMS electromyography data gave overlapping evidence. Findings suggest the existence of a complex intracortical balance in DS tongue primary motor cortex, with a particular interplay between excitatory and inhibitory mechanisms, also in neural substrates related to silent periods. Findings are discussed with respect to functional and structural impairments in stuttering, and are also proposed as novel neural markers of a stuttering “state” in persistent DS, helping to define more focused treatments (e.g. neuro-modulation). PMID:27711148

  7. Antisense suppression of the small chloroplast protein CP12 in tobacco alters carbon partitioning and severely restricts growth.

    PubMed

    Howard, Thomas P; Fryer, Michael J; Singh, Prashant; Metodiev, Metodi; Lytovchenko, Anna; Obata, Toshihiro; Fernie, Alisdair R; Kruger, Nicholas J; Quick, W Paul; Lloyd, Julie C; Raines, Christine A

    2011-10-01

    The thioredoxin-regulated chloroplast protein CP12 forms a multienzyme complex with the Calvin-Benson cycle enzymes phosphoribulokinase (PRK) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). PRK and GAPDH are inactivated when present in this complex, a process shown in vitro to be dependent upon oxidized CP12. The importance of CP12 in vivo in higher plants, however, has not been investigated. Here, antisense suppression of CP12 in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) was observed to impact on NAD-induced PRK and GAPDH complex formation but had little effect on enzyme activity. Additionally, only minor changes in photosynthetic carbon fixation were observed. Despite this, antisense plants displayed changes in growth rates and morphology, including dwarfism and reduced apical dominance. The hypothesis that CP12 is essential to separate oxidative pentose phosphate pathway activity from Calvin-Benson cycle activity, as proposed in cyanobacteria, was tested. No evidence was found to support this role in tobacco. Evidence was seen, however, for a restriction to malate valve capacity, with decreases in NADP-malate dehydrogenase activity (but not protein levels) and pyridine nucleotide content. Antisense repression of CP12 also led to significant changes in carbon partitioning, with increased carbon allocation to the cell wall and the organic acids malate and fumarate and decreased allocation to starch and soluble carbohydrates. Severe decreases were also seen in 2-oxoglutarate content, a key indicator of cellular carbon sufficiency. The data presented here indicate that in tobacco, CP12 has a role in redox-mediated regulation of carbon partitioning from the chloroplast and provides strong in vivo evidence that CP12 is required for normal growth and development in plants.

  8. Amphotericin B severely affects expression and activity of the endothelial constitutive nitric oxide synthase involving altered mRNA stability

    PubMed Central

    Suschek, Christoph Viktor; Bonmann, Eckhard; Kleinert, Hartmut; Wenzel, Michael; Mahotka, Csaba; Kolb, Hubert; Förstermann, Ulrich; Gerharz, Claus-Dieter; Kolb-Bachofen, Victoria

    2000-01-01

    The therapeutic use of the antifungal drug amphotericin B (AmB) is limited due to severe side effects like glomerular vasoconstriction and risk of renal failure during AmB administration. As nitric oxide (NO) has substantial functions in renal autoregulation, we have determined the effects of AmB on endothelial constitutive NO synthase (ecNOS) expression and activity in human and rat endothelial cell cultures.AmB used at concentrations of 0.6 to 1.25 μg ml−1 led to increases in ecNOS mRNA and protein expression as well as NO production. This was the result of an increased ecNOS mRNA half-life. In contrast, incubation of cells with higher albeit subtoxic concentrations of AmB (2.5–5.0 μg ml−1) resulted in a decrease or respectively in completely abolished ecNOS mRNA and protein expression with a strongly reduced or inhibited ecNOS activity, due to a decrease of ecNOS mRNA half-life. None of the AmB concentrations affected promoter activity as found with a reporter gene construct stably transfected into ECV304 cells.Thus, our experiments show a concentration-dependent biphasic effect of AmB on expression and activity of ecNOS, an effect best explained by AmB influencing ecNOS mRNA stability. In view of the known renal accumulation of this drug the results reported here could help to elucidate its renal toxicity. PMID:11015297

  9. Microstructural alterations in trigeminal neuralgia determined by diffusion tensor imaging are independent of symptom duration, severity, and type of neurovascular conflict.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Juergen; Thon, Niklas; Stahl, Robert; Lummel, Nina; Tonn, Joerg-Christian; Linn, Jennifer; Mehrkens, Jan-Hinnerk

    2016-03-01

    In this prospective study diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was used to evaluate the influence of clinical and anatomical parameters on structural alterations within the fifth cranial nerve in patients with trigeminal neuralgia (TN) due to neurovascular compression. Overall, 81 patients (40 men and 41 women; mean age 60 ± 5 years) with typical TN were included who underwent microsurgical decompression. Preoperative 3.0-T high-resolution MRI and DTI were analyzed in a blinded fashion. The respective fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient values were compared with the clinical, imaging, and intraoperative data. This study was approved by the institutional review board, and written informed consent was obtained from all patients. DTI analyses revealed significantly lower FA values within the vulnerable zone of the affected trigeminal nerve compared with the contralateral side (p = 0.05). The DTI analyses also included 3 patients without clear evidence of neurovascular conflict on preoperative MRI. No differences were seen between arterial and venous compression. Lower FA values were found 5 months after symptom onset; however, no correlation was found with the duration of symptoms or severity of compression. DTI analysis allows the quantification of structural alterations, even in those patients without any discernible neurovascular contact on MRI. Moreover, our findings support the hypothesis that both the arteries and veins can cause structural alterations that lead to TN. These aspects can be useful for making treatment decisions.

  10. Alterations of thyroid volume and nodular size during and after pregnancy in a severe iodine-deficient area.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Serap B; Ogullar, Sabri; Ural, Ulku Mete; Ilkkilic, Kadir; Metin, Yavuz; Ayaz, Teslime

    2014-11-01

    The effects of pregnancy on thyroid nodules were investigated in a few number of studies. We aimed to evaluate the prevalence of thyroid nodules, the changes in size, volume and number of nodules during pregnancy and after delivery in pregnant women. This prospective study was performed in a severe iodine-deficient area and included 83 pregnant women (mean age 30·4 ± 5·5 years). We evaluated thyroid hormone levels, ultrasound examination of thyroid and urine iodine concentration (UIE) at each trimester and at 3-month post-partum period (PP). All patients with thyroid nodules >1 cm underwent fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) after the last visit at the PP. Twenty-six women had thyroid nodules on thyroid ultrasonography at the first trimester. The volume of single/dominant nodule showed enlargement during pregnancy and remained at the PP; however, it was not significant (first trimester: 0·83 ± 0·8 ml; second trimester: 0·92 ± 1 ml; third trimester: 0·99 ± 1·2 ml; PP: 0·92 ± 1·2 ml). The maximum diameter of single/dominant nodule in the third trimester of pregnancy (12·6 ± 5·4 mm) was greater than the first trimester (11·9 ± 4·8 mm) (P = 0·002). The number of nodules did not change during pregnancy. The mean TV increased during pregnancy and remained 3 months after delivery (P < 0·001), and the maximum value of TV was reached in the third trimester (14·2 ± 7·9 ml). FNAB results revealed a 6·6% prevalence of malignancy among the nodules. Thyroid nodules were present in 30·1% of pregnant women. While size of the single/dominant thyroid nodule increased significantly during pregnancy, the number of nodules did not change. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Hemodynamics Should Be the Primary Approach to Diagnosing, Following, and Managing Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Maron, Bradley A.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a highly morbid cardiopulmonary disease characterized by plexogenic pulmonary arteriole remodeling. Importantly, PAH severity correlates inversely with cardiac output and directly with pulmonary vascular resistance and right atrial pressure, illustrating the importance of accurately measured hemodynamics to defining the clinical profile of patients. Currently available non-invasive technology offers only hemodynamic estimates. By contrast, right heart catheterization is the principle diagnostic procedure in PAH and is required to i) definitively exclude alternative pulmonary vascular diseases, and ii) quantify hemodynamics at baseline, following vasoreactivity testing, or in response to therapy in order to prognosticate outcome and guide therapeutic escalation. PMID:25742869

  12. Intraoperative medications associated with hemodynamically significant anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Freundlich, Robert E; Duggal, Neal M; Housey, Michelle; Tremper, Tyler T; Engoren, Milo C; Kheterpal, Sachin

    2016-12-01

    To facilitate the identification of drugs and patient factors associated with hemodynamically significant anaphylaxis. Using an existing database containing complete perioperative records, instances of hemodynamically significant anaphylaxis were identified using a physiologic and treatment-based screening algorithm. All cases were manually reviewed by 2 clinicians, with a third adjudicating disagreements, and confirmed cases were matched 3:1 with control cases. Intraoperative medications given in instances of hemodynamically significant anaphylaxis and patient risk factors were compared with control cases. University of Michigan Hospital, a large, tertiary care hospital. All adult patients undergoing surgery between January 1, 2004, and January 5, 2015. None. Incidence of hemodynamically significant anaphylaxis during anesthesia. Patient risk factors and intraoperative medications associated with hemodynamically significant anaphylaxis. Hemodynamically significant anaphylaxis occurred in 55 of 461 986 cases (1 in 8400). Hemodynamically significant anaphylaxis occurred in 52 patients, with 1 patient experiencing 3 instances and another patient 2 instances. Only 1 drug was associated with an increased risk of hemodynamically significant anaphylaxis: protamine (odds ratio, 11.78; 95% confidence interval, 1.40-99.26; P=.0233). No category of drugs was associated with increased risk. Of patient risk factors, only personal history of anaphylaxis was associated with an increased risk (odds ratio, 77.1; 95% confidence interval, 10.46-567.69; P=<.0001). Postoperative follow-up and evaluation of patients were low at our institution. A serum tryptase level was sent in only 49% of cases, and 41% of levels were positive, an overall positive rate of 20% of cases. Following instances of hemodynamically significant anaphylaxis, only 29% of patients were seen and evaluated by an allergist at our institution. Hemodynamically significant anaphylaxis is a rare complication of

  13. MAOA Alters the Effects of Heavy Drinking and Childhood Physical Abuse on Risk for Severe Impulsive Acts of Violence Among Alcoholic Violent Offenders

    PubMed Central

    Tikkanen, Roope; Ducci, Francesca; Goldman, David; Holi, Matti; Lindberg, Nina; Tiihonen, Jari; Virkkunen, Matti

    2011-01-01

    Background A polymorphism in the promoter region of the monoamine oxidase A gene (MAOA) has been shown to alter the effect of persistent drinking and childhood maltreatment on the risk for violent and antisocial behaviors. These findings indicate that MAOA could contribute to inter-individual differences in stress resiliency. Methods Recidivism in severe violent crimes was assessed after 8 years of nonincarcerated follow-up in a male sample of 174 impulsive Finnish alcoholic violent offenders, the majority of whom exhibited antisocial (ASPD) or borderline personality disorder (BPD) or both. We examined whether MAOA genotype alters the effects of heavy drinking and childhood physical abuse (CPA) on the risk for committing impulsive recidivistic violent crimes. Results Logistic regression analyses showed that both heavy drinking and CPA were significant independent predictors of recidivism in violent behavior (OR 5.2, p = 0.004 and OR 5.3, p = 0.003) among offenders having the high MAOA activity genotype (MAOA-H), but these predictors showed no effect among offenders carrying the low MAOA activity genotype (MAOA-L). Conclusion Carriers of the MAOA-H allele have a high risk to commit severe recidivistic impulsive violent crimes after exposure to heavy drinking and CPA. PMID:20201935

  14. MAOA alters the effects of heavy drinking and childhood physical abuse on risk for severe impulsive acts of violence among alcoholic violent offenders.

    PubMed

    Tikkanen, Roope; Ducci, Francesca; Goldman, David; Holi, Matti; Lindberg, Nina; Tiihonen, Jari; Virkkunen, Matti

    2010-05-01

    A polymorphism in the promoter region of the monoamine oxidase A gene (MAOA) has been shown to alter the effect of persistent drinking and childhood maltreatment on the risk for violent and antisocial behaviors. These findings indicate that MAOA could contribute to inter-individual differences in stress resiliency. Recidivism in severe violent crimes was assessed after 8 years of nonincarcerated follow-up in a male sample of 174 impulsive Finnish alcoholic violent offenders, the majority of whom exhibited antisocial (ASPD) or borderline personality disorder (BPD) or both. We examined whether MAOA genotype alters the effects of heavy drinking and childhood physical abuse (CPA) on the risk for committing impulsive recidivistic violent crimes. Logistic regression analyses showed that both heavy drinking and CPA were significant independent predictors of recidivism in violent behavior (OR 5.2, p = 0.004 and OR 5.3, p = 0.003) among offenders having the high MAOA activity genotype (MAOA-H), but these predictors showed no effect among offenders carrying the low MAOA activity genotype (MAOA-L). Carriers of the MAOA-H allele have a high risk to commit severe recidivistic impulsive violent crimes after exposure to heavy drinking and CPA.

  15. Particle Image Velocimetry studies of bicuspid aortic valve hemodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Yap, Choon-Hwai; Yoganathan, Ajit P.

    2010-11-01

    Bicuspid aortic valves (BAVs) are a congenital anomaly of the aortic valve with two fused leaflets, affecting about 1-2% of the population. BAV patients have much higher incidence of valve calcification & aortic dilatation, which may be related to altered mechanical forces from BAV hemodynamics. This study aims to characterize BAV hemodynamics using Particle Image Velocimetry(PIV). BAV models are constructed from normal explanted porcine aortic valves by suturing two leaflets together. The valves are mounted in an acrylic chamber with two sinuses & tested in a pulsatile flow loop at physiological conditions. 2D PIV is performed to obtain flow fields in three planes downstream of the valve. The stenosed BAV causes an eccentric jet, resulting in a very strong vortex in the normal sinus. The bicuspid sinus vortex appears much weaker, but more unstable. Unsteady oscillatory shear stresses are also observed, which have been associated with adverse biological response; characterization of the hemodynamics of BAVs will provide the first step to understanding these processes better. Results from multiple BAV models of varying levels of stenosis will be presented & higher stenosis corresponded to stronger jets & increased aortic wall shear stresses.

  16. Etiology of bicuspid aortic valve disease: Focus on hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Atkins, Samantha K; Sucosky, Philippe

    2014-12-26

    The bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is the most common form of inheritable cardiac defect. Although this abnormality may still achieve normal valvular function, it is often associated with secondary valvular and aortic complications such as calcific aortic valve disease and aortic dilation. The clinical significance and economic burden of BAV disease justify the need for improved clinical guidelines and more robust therapeutic modalities, which address the root-cause of those pathologies. Unfortunately, the etiology of BAV valvulopathy and aortopathy is still a debated issue. While the BAV anatomy and its secondary complications have been linked historically to a common genetic root, recent advances in medical imaging have demonstrated the existence of altered hemodynamics near BAV leaflets prone to calcification and BAV aortic regions vulnerable to dilation. The abnormal mechanical stresses imposed by the BAV on its leaflets and on the aortic wall could be transduced into cell-mediated processes, leading ultimately to valvular calcification and aortic medial degeneration. Despite increasing evidence for this hemodynamic etiology, the demonstration of the involvement of mechanical abnormalities in the pathogenesis of BAV disease requires the investigation of causality between the blood flow environment imposed on the leaflets and the aortic wall and the local biology, which has been lacking to date. This editorial discusses the different hypothetical etiologies of BAV disease with a particular focus on the most recent advances in cardiovascular imaging, flow characterization techniques and tissue culture methodologies that have provided new evidence in support of the hemodynamic theory.

  17. Hemodynamics in Coronary Arterial Tree of Serial Stenoses

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Bin; Jia, Xinwei; Zhong, Liang; Kassab, Ghassan S.; Tan, Wenchang

    2016-01-01

    Serial segmental narrowing frequently occurs in humans, which alters coronary hemodynamics and further affects atherosclerotic progression and plaque formation. The objective of this study was to understand the distribution of hemodynamic parameters in the epicardial left main coronary arterial (LMCA) tree with serial stenoses reconstructed from patient computer tomography angiography (CTA) images. A finite volume method was used in conjunction with the inlet pressure wave and outlet flow resistance. The time-averaged wall shear stress (TAWSS) and oscillatory shear index (OSI) were determined from the flow field. A stenosis at a mother vessel mainly deteriorated the hemodynamics near the bifurcation while a stenosis at a daughter vessel affected the remote downstream bifurcation. In comparison with a single stenosis, serial stenoses increased the peak pressure gradient along the main trunk of the epicardial left anterior descending arterial tree by > 50%. An increased distance between serial stenoses further increased the peak pressure gradient. These findings have important implications on the diagnosis and treatment of serial coronary stenoses. PMID:27685989

  18. Evaluation of hemodynamic effects of xenon in dogs undergoing hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Franceschi, Ruben C; Malbouisson, Luiz; Yoshinaga, Eduardo; Auler, Jose Otavio Costa; Figueiredo, Luiz Francisco Poli de; Carmona, Maria Jose C

    2013-01-01

    The anesthetic gas xenon is reported to preserve hemodynamic stability during general anesthesia. However, the effects of the gas during shock are unclear. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of Xe on hemodynamic stability and tissue perfusion in a canine model of hemorrhagic shock. Twenty-six dogs, mechanically ventilated with a fraction of inspired oxygen of 21% and anesthetized with etomidate and vecuronium, were randomized into Xenon (Xe; n = 13) or Control (C; n = 13) groups. Following hemodynamic monitoring, a pressure-driven shock was induced to reach an arterial pressure of 40 mmHg. Hemodynamic data and blood samples were collected prior to bleeding, immediately after bleeding and 5, 20 and 40 minutes following shock. The Xe group was treated with 79% Xe diluted in ambient air, inhaled for 20 minutes after shock. The mean bleeding volume was 44 mL.kg-1 in the C group and 40 mL.kg-1 in the Xe group. Hemorrhage promoted a decrease in both the cardiac index (p<0.001) and mean arterial pressure (p<0.001). These changes were associated with an increase in lactate levels and worsening of oxygen transport variables in both groups (p<0.05). Inhalation of xenon did not cause further worsening of hemodynamics or tissue perfusion markers. Xenon did not alter hemodynamic stability or tissue perfusion in an experimentally controlled hemorrhagic shock model. However, further studies are necessary to validate this drug in other contexts.

  19. The effects of hemodynamic lag on functional connectivity and behavior after stroke.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Joshua S; Snyder, Abraham Z; Ramsey, Lenny; Shulman, Gordon L; Corbetta, Maurizio

    2016-12-01

    Stroke disrupts the brain's vascular supply, not only within but also outside areas of infarction. We investigated temporal delays (lag) in resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging signals in 130 stroke patients scanned two weeks, three months and 12 months post stroke onset. Thirty controls were scanned twice at an interval of three months. Hemodynamic lag was determined using cross-correlation with the global gray matter signal. Behavioral performance in multiple domains was assessed in all patients. Regional cerebral blood flow and carotid patency were assessed in subsets of the cohort using arterial spin labeling and carotid Doppler ultrasonography. Significant hemodynamic lag was observed in 30% of stroke patients sub-acutely. Approximately 10% of patients showed lag at one-year post-stroke. Hemodynamic lag corresponded to gross aberrancy in functional connectivity measures, performance deficits in multiple domains and local and global perfusion deficits. Correcting for lag partially normalized abnormalities in measured functional connectivity. Yet post-stroke FC-behavior relationships in the motor and attention systems persisted even after hemodynamic delays were corrected. Resting state fMRI can reliably identify areas of hemodynamic delay following stroke. Our data reveal that hemodynamic delay is common sub-acutely, alters functional connectivity, and may be of clinical importance. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. The effect of trabeculectomy on ocular hemodynamics.

    PubMed Central

    Cantor, L B

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the effects of chronic reduction of intraocular pressure (IOP) on ocular hemodynamics. METHODS: Multisite, prospective evaluation of patients requiring trabeculectomy for treatment of glaucoma. Patients were recruited from the glaucoma service of 2 university hospitals. Patients were evaluated prior to surgery and at 3, 6, and 12 months after trabeculectomy. Color Doppler imaging was used to measure blood flow in the ophthalmic artery, central retinal artery, and short posterior ciliary arteries. Heidelberg retinal flowmetry was used to evaluate perfusion in the peripapillary and optic disc capillary beds. IOP was measured at baseline and at each study visit. RESULTS: There were highly significant reductions in IOP from presurgical baseline measures. At 3 months, mean IOP reduction was 17.1 mm Hg (62.3%; P < .001). At the 6- and 12-month evaluations, the mean IOP reductions were 15.7 mm Hg (57.3%) and 15.5 mm Hg (56.5%), respectively, P < .001. Despite the significant reduction in IOP, there were no significant differences in any ocular blood flow parameters before and after trabeculectomy. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study suggest that chronic reduction of IOP does not alter ocular blood flow and that IOP may be an independent risk factor for progression of glaucoma. These findings also suggest that the eye has the ability to autoregulate to chronically increased IOP over time and that additional studies evaluating the long-term effects of IOP changes are needed to further define this relationship. PMID:11797313

  1. Vestibular stimulation leads to distinct hemodynamic patterning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerman, I. A.; Emanuel, B. A.; Yates, B. J.

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that responses of a particular sympathetic nerve to vestibular stimulation depend on the type of tissue the nerve innervates as well as its anatomic location. In the present study, we sought to determine whether such precise patterning of vestibulosympathetic reflexes could lead to specific hemodynamic alterations in response to vestibular afferent activation. We simultaneously measured changes in systemic blood pressure and blood flow (with the use of Doppler flowmetry) to the hindlimb (femoral artery), forelimb (brachial artery), and kidney (renal artery) in chloralose-urethane-anesthetized, baroreceptor-denervated cats. Electrical vestibular stimulation led to depressor responses, 8 +/- 2 mmHg (mean +/- SE) in magnitude, that were accompanied by decreases in femoral vasoconstriction (23 +/- 4% decrease in vascular resistance or 36 +/- 7% increase in vascular conductance) and increases in brachial vascular tone (resistance increase of 10 +/- 6% and conductance decrease of 11 +/- 4%). Relatively small changes (<5%) in renal vascular tone were observed. In contrast, electrical stimulation of muscle and cutaneous afferents produced pressor responses (20 +/- 6 mmHg) that were accompanied by vasoconstriction in all three beds. These data suggest that vestibular inputs lead to a complex pattern of cardiovascular changes that is distinct from that which occurs in response to activation of other types of somatic afferents.

  2. Comparing a non-invasive hemodynamic monitor with minimally invasive monitoring during major open abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Lawrence; Liu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Abstract As part of the enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) protocol, the goal-directed fluid management with hemodynamic monitoring can effectively guide perioperative fluid use and significantly improve the outcomes in high-risk patients undergoing major surgeries. Several minimally invasive and non-invasive monitoring devices are commercially available for clinical use. As part of an internal evaluation, we reported the results from three different hemodynamic monitoring devices used in a patient undergoing a major abdominal surgery. PMID:25050116

  3. Cerebral hemodynamics and cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Festa, J.R.; Cheung, Y.K.; Chen, R.; Pavol, M.A.; Derdeyn, C.P.; Clarke, W.R.; Videen, T.O.; Grubb, R.L.; Adams, H.P.; Powers, W.J.; Lazar, R.M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether unihemispheral hemodynamic failure is independently associated with cognitive impairment among participants in the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke–sponsored, multicenter, randomized clinical trial, Randomized Evaluation of Carotid Occlusion and Neurocognition (RECON). Methods: Forty-three patients were randomized into RECON after recent symptomatic carotid artery occlusion and asymmetrically increased oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) by PET (OEF ratio >1.13), indicating stage II hemodynamic failure on the side of occlusion. The PET-positive patients were compared with 28 RECON-enrolled patients who met all clinical and radiographic inclusion/exclusion criteria but had no OEF asymmetry. A multivariable regression compared patients with PET OEF >1.13 or ≤1.13, stratifying by TIA vs stroke as the qualifying event. The dependent variable was a composite neurocognitive score derived from averaging age-normalized z scores on a test battery that included global and internal carotid artery (ICA) side-relevant hemisphere-specific tests. Results: There were no differences in demographic, clinical, or radiologic characteristics between the PET-positive and PET-negative patients except for PET OEF asymmetry. The unadjusted average neurocognitive z score was −1.45 for the PET-positive and −1.25 for the PET-negative patients, indicating cognitive impairment in both groups but no difference between them (p = 0.641). After adjustment for age, education, side of occlusion, depression, and previous stroke, there was a significant difference between PET-positive and PET-negative patients among those with TIA as a qualifying event (average z score = −1.41 vs −0.76, p = 0.040). Older age and right ICA side were also significant in this model. Conclusion: Hemodynamic failure is independently associated with cognitive impairment in patients with carotid occlusion. This finding establishes the physiologic parameter upon

  4. Combined Effects of Flow Diverting Strategies and Parent Artery Curvature on Aneurysmal Hemodynamics: A CFD Study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinyu; Wu, Zhichen; Yu, Ying; Lv, Nan; Wang, Shengzhang; Karmonik, Christof; Liu, Jian-Min; Huang, Qinghai

    2015-01-01

    Flow diverters (FD) are increasingly being considered for treating large or giant wide-neck aneurysms. Clinical outcome is highly variable and depends on the type of aneurysm, the flow diverting device and treatment strategies. The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of different flow diverting strategies together with parent artery curvature variations on altering intra-aneurysmal hemodynamics. Four ideal intracranial aneurysm models with different parent artery curvature were constructed. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of the hemodynamics before and after applying five types of flow diverting strategies (single FD, single FD with 5% and 10% packing density of coils, two FDs with 25% and 50% overlapping rate) were performed. Changes in pressure, wall shear stress (WSS), relative residence time (RRT), inflow velocity and inflow volume rate were calculated and compared. Each flow diverting strategy resulted in enhancement of RRT and reduction of normalized mean WSS, inflow volume rate and inflow velocity in various levels. Among them, 50% overlapped FD induced most effective hemodynamic changes in RRT and inflow volume rate. The mean pressure only slightly decreased after treatment. Regardless of the kind of implantation of FD, the mean pressure, inflow volume rate and inflow velocity increased and the RRT decreased as the curvature of the parent artery increased. Of all flow diverting strategies, overlapping FDs induced most favorable hemodynamic changes. Hemodynamics alterations post treatment were substantially influenced by parent artery curvature. Our results indicate the need of an individualized flow diverting strategy that is tailored for a specific aneurysm.

  5. Several Hfq-dependent alterations in physiology of Yersinia enterocolitica O:3 are mediated by derepression of the transcriptional regulator RovM.

    PubMed

    Leskinen, Katarzyna; Pajunen, Maria I; Varjosalo, Markku; Fernández-Carrasco, Helena; Bengoechea, José A; Skurnik, Mikael

    2017-03-01

    In bacteria, the RNA chaperone Hfq enables pairing of small regulatory RNAs with their target mRNAs and therefore is a key player of post-transcriptional regulation network. As a global regulator, Hfq is engaged in the adaptation to external environment, regulation of metabolism and bacterial virulence. In this study we used RNA-sequencing and quantitative proteomics (LC-MS/MS) to elucidate the role of this chaperone in the physiology and virulence of Yersinia enterocolitica serotype O:3. This global approach revealed the profound impact of Hfq on gene and protein expression. Furthermore, the role of Hfq in the cell morphology, metabolism, cell wall integrity, resistance to external stresses and pathogenicity was evaluated. Importantly, our results revealed that several alterations typical for the hfq-negative phenotype were due to derepression of the transcriptional factor RovM. The overexpression of RovM caused by the loss of Hfq chaperone resulted in extended growth defect, alterations in the lipid A structure, motility and biofilm formation defects, as well as changes in mannitol utilization. Furthermore, in Y. enterocolitica RovM only in the presence of Hfq affected the abundance of RpoS. Finally, the impact of hfq and rovM mutations on the virulence was assessed in the mouse infection model. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Severe contusion of the femoral vessels in rats alters tissue oxygenation and microvascular blood flow regulation in the skeletal muscles of the limb.

    PubMed

    Karlander, L E; Gustavsson, U; Lidman, D; Sjöberg, F

    2000-02-01

    Severe contusion of an artery often presents clinical problems in that it affects flow distal to the injury. However, the effect of a contusion on the microvascular flow regulation in the distal part of the limb is still largely unknown. A multipoint microelectrode technique was used to assess both tissue oxygenation (PtO2) and microflow (hydrogen clearance) on the skeletal muscle surface in a standard contusion injury to the femoral vessels in rats. A significant increase in and an altered distribution of (PtO2) as well as a reduction in and altered distribution of microflow on the muscle surface distal to the injury was found in all animals (n = 27) compared with the uninjured control leg. These findings could not be reproduced experimentally by sympathectomy or when the adjacent skeletal muscle alone was injured. The results suggest that the changes observed distal to the injury are of vascular origin, possibly as a result of endothelial damage at the site of the contusion.

  7. Simulation of hemodynamic responses to the valsalva maneuver: an integrative computational model of the cardiovascular system and the autonomic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Liang, Fuyou; Liu, Hao

    2006-02-01

    The Valsalva maneuver is a frequently used physiological test in evaluating the cardiovascular autonomic functions in human. Although a large pool of experimental data has provided substantial insights into different aspects of the mechanisms underlying the cardiovascular regulations during the Valsalva maneuver, so far a complete comprehension of these mechanisms and the interactions among them is unavailable. In the present study, a computational model of the cardiovascular system (CVS) and its interaction with the autonomic nervous system (ANS) was developed for the purpose of quantifying the individual roles of the CVS and the ANS in the hemodynamic regulations during the Valsalva maneuver. A detailed computational compartmental parameter model of the global CVS, a system of mathematical equations representing the autonomic nervous reflex regulatory functions, and an empirical cerebral autoregulation (CA) model formed the main body of the present model. Based on simulations of the Valsalva maneuvers at several typical postures, it was demonstrated that hemodynamic responses to the maneuver were not only determined by the ANS-mediated cardiovascular regulations, but also significantly affected by the postural-change-induced hemodynamic alterations preceding the maneuver. Moreover, the large-magnitude overshoot in cerebral perfusion immediately after the Valsalva maneuver was found to result from a combined effect of the circulatory autonomic functions, the CA, and the cerebral venous blood pressure.

  8. Hemodynamic effects of nifedipine tocolysis.

    PubMed

    Yamasato, Kelly; Burlingame, Janet; Kaneshiro, Bliss

    2015-01-01

    To describe the effects of nifedipine tocolysis on blood pressure and heart rate in non-hypertensive women. This was a retrospective study from 2001 to 2011 to compare blood pressures and heart rates among non-hypertensive women on nifedipine tocolysis up to 8 h after nifedipine initiation. Measurements at 20-60 and 61-120 min were compared to assess the differential effects of dosing on hemodynamics and reflected the effects of the initial and complete loading doses, respectively. Charts were reviewed for hypotension-related emergent delivery. One hundred and thirty-eight patients were included. Over the 8-h study interval, mean systolic blood pressure (P < 0.001) and mean diastolic blood pressure (P < 0.001) decreased by 5 mmHg and heart rate increased by 4 b.p.m. (P < 0.001). Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were unchanged from baseline up to 120 min at all doses. Heart rate increased at both 20-60 and 61-120 min when all doses were considered (P < 0.001), but differential dosing effects were not observed. Rates of tachycardia increased (P < 0.001), but rates of hypotension were unchanged. No hypotension-related emergent deliveries occurred. Nifedipine tocolysis was associated with hemodynamic changes in non-hypertensive women. Tachycardia was increased but hypotension was unaffected, supporting the general safety of nifedipine in this setting. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2014 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  9. Cerebrovascular hemodynamics during pranayama techniques

    PubMed Central

    Nivethitha, L.; Mooventhan, A.; Manjunath, N. K.; Bathala, Lokesh; Sharma, Vijay K.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Pranayama techniques are known to produce variable physiological effects on the body. We evaluated the effect of the two commonly practiced Pranayama techniques on cerebral hemodynamics. Materials and Methods: Fifteen healthy male volunteers, trained in Yoga and Pranayama, were included in the study. Mean age was 24 years (range 22–32 years). Study participants performed 2 Pranayamas in 2 different orders. Order 1 (n = 7) performed Bhastrika (bellows breaths) followed by Kumbhaka (breath retention) while order 2 (n = 8) performed Kumbhaka followed by Bhastrika. Both breathing techniques were performed for 1 min each. Continuous transcranial Doppler (TCD) monitoring was performed during the breathing techniques. TCD parameters that were recorded included peak systolic velocity (PSV), end-diastolic velocity (EDV), mean flow velocity (MFV), and pulsatility index (PI) of the right middle cerebral artery at baseline, 15, 30, 45, and 60 s. Results: Significant reductions in EDV (3.67 ± 6.48; P < 0.001) and MFV (22.00 ± 7.30; P < 0.001) with a significant increase in PI (2.43 ± 0.76; P < 0.001) were observed during Bhastrika. On the contrary, a significant increase in PSV (65.27 ± 13.75; P < 0.001), EDV (28.67 ± 12.03; P < 0.001), and MFV (43.67 ± 12.85; P < 0.001) with a significant reduction in PI (0.89 ± 0.28; P < 0.01) was observed only during Kumbhaka. Conclusion: Bhastrika and Kumbhaka practices of Pranayama produce considerable and opposing effects on cerebral hemodynamic parameters. Our findings may play a potential role in designing the Pranayama techniques according to patients’ requirements. PMID:28149083

  10. Hemodynamic Thresholds for Precapillary Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gerges, Christian; Gerges, Mario; Skoro-Sajer, Nika; Zhou, Yi; Zhang, Lixia; Sadushi-Kolici, Roela; Jakowitsch, Johannes; Lang, Marie B; Lang, Irene M

    2016-04-01

    Hemodynamic differentiation between pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and postcapillary pulmonary hypertension (PH) is important because treatment options are strikingly different for the two disease subsets. Whereas patients with PAH can be treated effectively with targeted therapies, their use in postcapillary PH is currently not recommended. Our aim was to establish an algorithm to identify patients who are likely to experience a significant hemodynamic treatment response. We determined hemodynamic cutoffs to discriminate between idiopathic PAH and postcapillary PH in a large database of 4,363 stable patients undergoing first diagnostic right and left heart catheterizations. In a second step, we performed a patient-level pooled analysis of four randomized, placebo-controlled trials including 541 patients with PAH who received treprostinil or placebo, to validate hemodynamic cutoffs with regard to treatment response. Receiver operating characteristic analysis identified mean pulmonary arterial wedge pressure (mPAWP) < 12 mm Hg and diastolic pulmonary vascular pressure gradient (DPG) ≥ 7 mm Hg as the best hemodynamic discriminators between idiopathic PAH and postcapillary PH. In our treatment study, only patients with mPAWP < 12 mm Hg, DPG > 20 mm Hg or a combination of both had a significant placebo-corrected improvement in hemodynamics. mPAWP < 12 mm Hg and DPG > 20 mm Hg identify patients with PAH who are likely to have significant hemodynamic improvement with prostacyclin treatment. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Current Developments and Future Applications of Intracoronary Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Coverstone, Edward; Shapiro, Robert; Singh, Jasvindar

    2015-01-01

    Intracoronary hemodynamic assessment of the physiologic significance of coronary lesions improves clinical outcomes in patients with coronary artery disease. Coronary flow velocity reserve (CFVR), fractional flow reserve (FFR), instantaneous wave-free ratio (iFR), and index of microcirculatory resistance (IMR) utilize sensor-mounted guidewires to approximate coronary flow. CFVR and FFR rely on pharmacologic administration of adenosine to achieve hyperemia and diagnose epicardial lesion severity. As an adenosine-free index, iFR utilizes a wave-free period in mid-late diastole during which resistance is constant and low to assess lesion significance. IMR combines hyperemic pressure measurements with thermodilution to quantify microvascular resistance. We review the physiology, clinical trials, and clinical applications of these invasive hemodynamic assessments. PMID:25946656

  12. A simulation model to study the role of the extracranial venous drainage pathways in intracranial hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Gadda, G; Taibi, A; Sisini, F; Gambaccini, M; Sethi, S K; Utriainen, D; Haacke, E M; Zamboni, P; Ursino, M

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in the extracranial venous circulation due to posture changes, and/or extracranial venous obstructions in patients with vascular diseases, can have important implications on cerebral hemodynamics. A hemodynamic model for the study of cerebral venous outflow was developed to investigate the correlations between extracranial blood redistributions and changes in the intracranial environment. Flow data obtained with both magnetic resonance (MR) and Echo-Color Doppler (ECD) technique are used to validate the model. The very good agreement between simulated supine and upright flows and experimental results means that the model can correctly reproduce the main factors affecting the extracranial venous circulation.

  13. Evaluation of the hemodynamic impact of continuous renal replacement therapy in healthy dogs.

    PubMed

    Shimokawa Miyama, Takako; Itamoto, Kazuhito; Yoshioka, Chihiro; Minami, Koji; Okawa, Takumi; Fujisaki, Yuka; Hiraoka, Hiroko; Mizuno, Takuya; Okuda, Masaru

    2010-04-01

    We performed continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) on clinically healthy dogs to evaluate the effects of CRRT on hemodynamics. Heart rate, arterial blood pressure, and central venous pressure of the dogs (n=6) were recorded during the procedure, which was performed under general anesthesia. Throughout the CRRT, heart rate and arterial blood pressure were stable. Central venous pressure increased after CRRT termination but returned to the basal level within 30 min. In this study, hemodynamic alterations, including hypotension, hypertension, and arrhythmias, were not observed during CRRT. These observations suggest that the CRRT protocol used in the present study can be safely applied to clinical cases with acute renal failure.

  14. Caval flow reflects Fontan hemodynamics: quantification by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Ovroutski, S; Nordmeyer, S; Miera, O; Ewert, P; Klimes, K; Kühne, T; Berger, F

    2012-02-01

    Failing Fontan circulation is a multifactorial problem without clear predictors and with uncertain onset. We sought to investigate the correlations between systemic venous flow return and the clinical condition of Fontan patients. Flow measurements using phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed in the superior and inferior vena cava (SVC, IVC) in 61 Fontan patients. Median postoperative follow-up time was 6.7 (0.6-14.1) years; median age at MRI was 11.6 (4.0-44.6) years. Eight patients were identified clinically as a subgroup with suboptimal hemodynamics. The effective forward flow of combined SVC and IVC flow volume was defined as the venous cardiac index (vCI, l/min/m(2)). SVC flow ratio was defined as SVC flow in relation to vCI. The vCI and flow distribution between the SVC and IVC were investigated in relation to the hemodynamics and patients' age at MRI. Venous flow return through the SVC was 1.1 (0.6-3.4) l/min/m(2) and through the IVC 1.8 (0.6-3.2) l/min/m(2); total vCI was 3 l/min/m(2) (1.2-5.1). Patients with suboptimal Fontan hemodynamics showed significantly lower IVC flow return (median of 1.5 vs. 1.9 l/min/m(2), p = 0.027) and increased SVC flow ratio (0.56 vs. 0.35, p = 0.005) in comparison to those with good clinical condition. The total vCI decrease was correlated with older patient age (r = 0.575, p < 0.001). Altered systemic venous flow return is associated with suboptimal Fontan hemodynamics and seems to progress with patients' age and long-term follow-up after Fontan operation. Thus, MRI flow volume measurements might help in monitoring Fontan patients before the onset of clinical signs of suboptimal hemodynamics.

  15. Alterations in echocardiographic left ventricular function after percutaneous coronary stenting in diabetic patients with isolated severe proximal left anterior descending artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Nabati, Maryam; Taghavi, Morteza; Saffar, Naser; Yazdani, Jamshid; Bagheri, Babak

    There are conflicting theories regarding the use of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) of isolated severe proximal left anterior descending (LAD) artery stenosis in place of left internal mammary artery grafting in diabetic patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of PCI on left ventricular function and determine difference between diabetics and non-diabetics. A prospective study was conducted on 50 patients with isolated severe proximal LAD stenosis: 23 diabetic and 27 non-diabetic patients. Successful PCI with everolimus-eluting stents was performed for all of the patients. These patients underwent transthoracic echocardiography within 24h before and 1 month after PCI, and alterations in the left ventricular parameters were compared between the two groups. There was a significant 12% increment in the mitral annular peak systolic velocity (s') (p=0.02), 21% decrement in the trans mitral early filling deceleration time (DT) (p<0.001), 10% decrement in the systolic left ventricular internal dimension (LVIDs) (p=0.002), significant increment in the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) (p=0.004), and significant decrement in the left atrial diameter (p=0.006) in the diabetic patients after performing PCI. Conversely, the non-diabetic patients showed a statistically significant 14% increase in the DT, 6.3% decrease in the s' velocity, 8% increase in the LVIDs, significant increment in the left atrial diameter and no change in LVEF after PCI. Our study demonstrated that everolimus-eluting stents favorably improved the markers of left ventricular systolic and diastolic function in diabetic patients with isolated severe proximal LAD stenosis compared with those of non-diabetic patients with the same condition. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Artifact reduction in long-term monitoring of cerebral hemodynamics using near-infrared spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vinette, Sarah A.; Dunn, Jeff F.; Slone, Edward; Federico, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a noninvasive neuroimaging technique used to assess cerebral hemodynamics. Its portability, ease of use, and relatively low operational cost lend itself well to the long-term monitoring of hemodynamic changes, such as those in epilepsy, where events are unpredictable. Long-term monitoring is associated with challenges including alterations in behaviors and motion that can result in artifacts. Five patients with epilepsy were assessed for interictal hemodynamic changes and alterations in behavior or motion. Based on this work, visual inspection was used to identify NIRS artifacts during a period of interest, specifically prior to seizures, in four patients. A motion artifact reduction algorithm (MARA, also known as the spline interpolation method) was tested on these data. Alterations in the NIRS measurements often occurred simultaneously with changes in motion and behavior. Occasionally, sharp shift artifacts were observed in the data. When artifacts appeared as sustained baseline shifts in the data, MARA reduced the standard deviation of the data and the appearance improved. We discussed motion and artifacts as challenges associated with long-term monitoring of cerebral hemodynamics in patients with epilepsy and our group’s approach to circumvent these challenges and improve the quality of the data collected. PMID:26158008

  17. Hemodynamic Support for Ventricular Tachycardia Ablation.

    PubMed

    Palaniswamy, Chandrasekar; Miller, Marc A; Reddy, Vivek Y; Dukkipati, Srinivas R

    2017-03-01

    This review discusses the role of hemodynamic support for catheter ablation of unstable ventricular tachycardia, using commercially available mechanical circulatory support devices (intra-aortic balloon pump, Impella, TandemHeart, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation) and analyzes the published clinical experience of the safety and efficacy of these devices during ventricular tachycardia ablation. Appropriate selection of patients, device-specific characteristics, and hemodynamic monitoring is also discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Determining the resilience of carbon dynamics in semi-arid biomes of the Southwestern US to severe drought and altered rainfall patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvak, M. E.; Krofcheck, D. J.; Hilton, T. W.; Fox, A. M.; Osuna, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    Water is critically important for biotic processes in semi-arid ecosystems and 2011 is developing as one of the most severe drought years on record for many parts of the Southwestern US. To quantify the impact of this severe drought on regional carbon and energy balance, we need a more detailed understanding of how water limitation alters ecosystem processes across a range of semi-arid biomes. We quantified the impact of severe drought and changes in both the quantity and distribution of precipitation on ecosystem biotic structure and function across the range of biomes represented in the NM elevation gradient network (desert grassland, creosote shrubland, juniper savanna, piñon-juniper woodland, ponderosa pine forest and subalpine mixed conifer forest). We compared how daily, seasonal and annual carbon and energy balance and their components in each of these biomes respond to changes in rainfall patterns using continuous measurements of carbon, water and energy exchange and associated measurements in each of these biomes during a 5 year period (2006-2011) that included a severe drought, and large variability in both winter precipitation and the timing and intensity of the monsoon. To understand the underlying mechanisms, we used time series of radiation absorbed by vegetation, surface albedo, soil moisture storage, phenology, gross primary productivity (GPP), ecosystem respiration (Re), and WorldView-2 images acquired pre- and post-monsoon in each of these biomes. In all of the biomes except the desert grassland site, the strength and timing of both winter and monsoon precipitation are important controls over carbon and energy dynamics in this region, though we see site-specific sensitivities across the elevation gradient. Over the past 5 years, carbon dynamics in the desert grassland site appears to be decoupled from winter precipitation. In addition, carbon dynamics in disturbed grassland and pinon-juniper ecosystems were more sensitive to severe drought than

  19. Conjunctival Microvascular Hemodynamics in Sickle Cell Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Valeshabad, Ali Kord; Wanek, Justin; Zelkha, Ruth; Lim, Jennifer I.; Camardo, Nicole; Gaynes, Bruce; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine alterations in bulbar conjunctival microvascular hemodynamics in sickle cell retinopathy (SCR) subjects with focal macular thinning (FMT). Methods Conjunctival microcirculation imaging and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) were performed in 22 subjects (eyes) diagnosed with SCR. Based on evaluation of SD-OCT retinal thickness maps, eyes were assigned to one of two groups: with or without FMT. Conjunctival venule diameter and axial blood velocity were measured in multiple venules in each eye by customized image analysis algorithms. Measurements were then categorized into two vessel size groups (vessel size 1 and 2) and compared between FMT groups. A Pearson correlation coefficient was computed to assess the relationship between retinal thickness and axial blood velocity. Results Mean age, hematocrit, sickle cell hemoglobin type, and median retinopathy score were not significantly different between the two groups (p ≥ 0.1). Retinal thickness in parafoveal and perifoveal temporal subfields was significantly lower in eyes with FMT as compared to eyes without FMT (p ≤ 0.04). There was a significant effect of FMT on axial blood velocity (P = 0.04), while the effect of vessel size was not significant (P = 0.4). In vessel size 1, axial blood velocity was lower in eyes with FMT than in eyes without FMT (P = 0.03), while in vessel size 2, there was no statistically significant difference between FMT groups (P = 0.1). In vessel size 1, there was a significant positive correlation between axial blood velocity and retinal thickness in the perifoveal (r = 0.48, P = 0.02) and parafoveal (r = 0.43, P = 0.04) temporal subfields. Conclusion Conjunctival axial blood velocity in small venules is reduced in SCR subjects with focal macular thinning. PMID:25429907

  20. Effects of Different Crystalloid Solutions on Hemodynamics, Peripheral Perfusion, and the Microcirculation in Experimental Abdominal Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Orbegozo, Diego; Su, Fuhong; Santacruz, Carlos; He, Xinrong; Hosokawa, Koji; Creteur, Jacques; De Backer, Daniel; Vincent, Jean-Louis

    2016-10-01

    Crystalloid solutions are used to restore intravascular volume in septic patients, but each solution has limitations. The authors compared the effects of three crystalloid solutions on hemodynamics, organ function, microcirculation, and survival in a sepsis model. Peritonitis was induced by injection of autologous feces in 21 anesthetized, mechanically ventilated adult sheep. After baseline measurements, animals were randomized to lactated Ringer's (LR), normal saline (NS), or PlasmaLyte as resuscitation fluid. The sublingual microcirculation was assessed using sidestream dark field videomicroscopy and muscle tissue oxygen saturation with near-infrared spectroscopy. NS administration was associated with hyperchloremic acidosis. NS-treated animals had lower cardiac index and left ventricular stroke work index than LR-treated animals from 8 h and lower mean arterial pressure than LR-treated animals from 12 h. NS-treated animals had a lower proportion of perfused vessels than LR-treated animals after 12 h (median, 82 [71 to 83] vs. 85 [82 to 89], P = 0.04) and greater heterogeneity of proportion of perfused vessels than PlasmaLyte or LR groups at 18 h. Muscle tissue oxygen saturation was lower at 16 h in the NS group than in the other groups. The survival time of NS-treated animals was shorter than that of the LR group (17 [14 to 20] vs. 26 [23 to 29] h, P < 0.01) but similar to that of the PlasmaLyte group (20 [12 to 28] h, P = 0.74). In this abdominal sepsis model, resuscitation with NS was associated with hyperchloremic acidosis, greater hemodynamic instability, a more altered microcirculation, and more severe organ dysfunction than with balanced fluids. Survival time was shorter than in the LR group.

  1. Microtubule Actin Cross-Linking Factor 1 Regulates Cardiomyocyte Microtubule Distribution and Adaptation to Hemodynamic Overload

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Dongmin; Wang, Huan; Liu, Xiaoyu; Hu, Xinli; Bache, Robert J.; Chen, Yingjie

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant cardiomyocyte microtubule growth is a feature of pressure overload induced cardiac hypertrophy believed to contribute to left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. Microtubule Actin Cross-linking Factor 1 (MACF1/Acf7) is a 600 kd spectraplakin that stabilizes and guides microtubule growth along actin filaments. MACF1 is expressed in the heart, but its impact on cardiac microtubules, and how this influences cardiac structure, function, and adaptation to hemodynamic overload is unknown. Here we used inducible cardiac-specific MACF1 knockout mice (MACF1 KO) to determine the impact of MACF1 on cardiac microtubules and adaptation to pressure overload (transverse aortic constriction (TAC).In adult mouse hearts, MACF1 expression was low under basal conditions, but increased significantly in response to TAC. While MACF1 KO had no observable effect on heart size or function under basal conditions, MACF1 KO exacerbated TAC induced LV hypertrophy, LV dilation and contractile dysfunction. Interestingly, subcellular fractionation of ventricular lysates revealed that MACF1 KO altered microtubule distribution in response to TAC, so that more tubulin was associated with the cell membrane fraction. Moreover, TAC induced microtubule redistribution into this cell membrane fraction in both WT and MACF1 KO mice correlated strikingly with the level of contractile dysfunction (r2 = 0.786, p<.001). MACF1 disruption also resulted in reduction of membrane caveolin 3 levels, and increased levels of membrane PKCα and β1 integrin after TAC, suggesting MACF1 function is important for spatial regulation of several physiologically relevant signaling proteins during hypertrophy. Together, these data identify for the first time, a role for MACF1 in cardiomyocyte microtubule distribution and in adaptation to hemodynamic overload. PMID:24086300

  2. Non-Newtonian effects of blood flow on hemodynamics in distal vascular graft anastomoses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Lu, Xi-Yun; Wang, Wen

    2006-01-01

    Non-Newtonian fluid flow in a stenosed coronary bypass is investigated numerically using the Carreau-Yasuda model for the shear thinning behavior of the blood. End-to-side coronary bypass anastomosis is considered in a simplified model geometry where the host coronary artery has a 75% severity stenosis. Different locations of the bypass graft to the stenosis and different flow rates in the graft and in the host artery are studied. Particular attention is given to the non-Newtonian effect of the blood on the primary and secondary flow patterns in the host coronary artery and the wall shear stress (WSS) distribution there. Interaction between the jet flow from the stenosed artery and the flow from the graft is simulated by solving the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equation coupled with the non-Newtonian constitutive model. Results for the non-Newtonian flow, the Newtonian flow and the rescaled Newtonian flow are presented. Significant differences in axial velocity profiles, secondary flow streamlines and WSS between the non-Newtonian and Newtonian fluid flows are revealed. However, reasonable agreement between the non-Newtonian and the rescaled Newtonian flows is found. Results from this study support the view that the residual flow in a partially occluded coronary artery interacts with flow in the bypass graft and may have significant hemodynamic effects in the host vessel downstream of the graft. Non-Newtonian property of the blood alters the flow pattern and WSS distribution and is an important factor to be considered in simulating hemodynamic effects of blood flow in arterial bypass grafts.

  3. Microtubule Actin Cross-linking Factor 1 regulates cardiomyocyte microtubule distribution and adaptation to hemodynamic overload.

    PubMed

    Fassett, John T; Xu, Xin; Kwak, Dongmin; Wang, Huan; Liu, Xiaoyu; Hu, Xinli; Bache, Robert J; Chen, Yingjie

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant cardiomyocyte microtubule growth is a feature of pressure overload induced cardiac hypertrophy believed to contribute to left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. Microtubule Actin Cross-linking Factor 1 (MACF1/Acf7) is a 600 kd spectraplakin that stabilizes and guides microtubule growth along actin filaments. MACF1 is expressed in the heart, but its impact on cardiac microtubules, and how this influences cardiac structure, function, and adaptation to hemodynamic overload is unknown. Here we used inducible cardiac-specific MACF1 knockout mice (MACF1 KO) to determine the impact of MACF1 on cardiac microtubules and adaptation to pressure overload (transverse aortic constriction (TAC).In adult mouse hearts, MACF1 expression was low under basal conditions, but increased significantly in response to TAC. While MACF1 KO had no observable effect on heart size or function under basal conditions, MACF1 KO exacerbated TAC induced LV hypertrophy, LV dilation and contractile dysfunction. Interestingly, subcellular fractionation of ventricular lysates revealed that MACF1 KO altered microtubule distribution in response to TAC, so that more tubulin was associated with the cell membrane fraction. Moreover, TAC induced microtubule redistribution into this cell membrane fraction in both WT and MACF1 KO mice correlated strikingly with the level of contractile dysfunction (r(2) = 0.786, p<.001). MACF1 disruption also resulted in reduction of membrane caveolin 3 levels, and increased levels of membrane PKCα and β1 integrin after TAC, suggesting MACF1 function is important for spatial regulation of several physiologically relevant signaling proteins during hypertrophy. Together, these data identify for the first time, a role for MACF1 in cardiomyocyte microtubule distribution and in adaptation to hemodynamic overload.

  4. Computational fluid dynamics assisted characterization of parafoveal hemodynamics in normal and diabetic eyes using adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yang; Bernabeu, Miguel O.; Lammer, Jan; Cai, Charles C.; Jones, Martin L.; Franco, Claudio A.; Aiello, Lloyd Paul; Sun, Jennifer K.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of visual loss in working-age adults worldwide. Previous studies have found hemodynamic changes in the diabetic eyes, which precede clinically evident pathological alterations of the retinal microvasculature. There is a pressing need for new methods to allow greater understanding of these early hemodynamic changes that occur in DR. In this study, we propose a noninvasive method for the assessment of hemodynamics around the fovea (a region of the eye of paramount importance for vision). The proposed methodology combines adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and computational fluid dynamics modeling. We compare results obtained with this technique with in vivo measurements of blood flow based on blood cell aggregation tracking. Our results suggest that parafoveal hemodynamics, such as capillary velocity, wall shear stress, and capillary perfusion pressure can be noninvasively and reliably characterized with this method in both healthy and diabetic retinopathy patients. PMID:28078170

  5. Computational fluid dynamics assisted characterization of parafoveal hemodynamics in normal and diabetic eyes using adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yang; Bernabeu, Miguel O; Lammer, Jan; Cai, Charles C; Jones, Martin L; Franco, Claudio A; Aiello, Lloyd Paul; Sun, Jennifer K

    2016-12-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of visual loss in working-age adults worldwide. Previous studies have found hemodynamic changes in the diabetic eyes, which precede clinically evident pathological alterations of the retinal microvasculature. There is a pressing need for new methods to allow greater understanding of these early hemodynamic changes that occur in DR. In this study, we propose a noninvasive method for the assessment of hemodynamics around the fovea (a region of the eye of paramount importance for vision). The proposed methodology combines adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and computational fluid dynamics modeling. We compare results obtained with this technique with in vivo measurements of blood flow based on blood cell aggregation tracking. Our results suggest that parafoveal hemodynamics, such as capillary velocity, wall shear stress, and capillary perfusion pressure can be noninvasively and reliably characterized with this method in both healthy and diabetic retinopathy patients.

  6. Saturation thresholds of evoked neural and hemodynamic responses in awake and asleep rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schei, Jennifer L.; Van Nortwick, Amy S.; Meighan, Peter C.; Rector, David M.

    2011-03-01

    Neural activation generates a hemodynamic response to the localized region replenishing nutrients to the area. Changes in vigilance state have been shown to alter the vascular response where the vascular response is muted during wake compared to quiet sleep. We tested the saturation thresholds of the neurovascular response in the auditory cortex during wake and sleep by chronically implanting rats with an EEG electrode, a light emitting diode (LED, 600 nm), and photodiode to simultaneously measure evoked response potentials (ERPs) and evoked hemodynamic responses. We stimulated the cortex with a single speaker click delivered at random intervals 2-13 s at varied stimulus intensities ranging from 45-80 dB. To further test the potential for activity related saturation, we sleep deprived animals for 2, 4, or 6 hours and recorded evoked responses during the first hour recovery period. With increasing stimulus intensity, integrated ERPs and evoked hemodynamic responses increased; however the hemodynamic response approached saturation limits at a lower stimulus intensity than the ERP. With longer periods of sleep deprivation, the integrated ERPs did not change but evoked hemodynamic responses decreased. There may be physical limits in cortical blood delivery and vascular compliance, and with extended periods of neural activity during wake, vessels may approach these limits.

  7. Left ventricular geometric patterns and adaptations to hemodynamics are similar in elderly men and women.

    PubMed

    Masiha, Said; Sundström, Johan; Lind, Lars

    2011-05-27

    Common conditions such as obesity and hypertension result in hemodynamic alterations that will induce remodeling of the left ventricle (LV). However, differences between the genders in the relationship of hemodynamics to LV geometry are not well known.The present study aims to investigate differences between the genders in this respect, in a sample of elderly persons. Echocardiography and Doppler was performed in a population-based sample aged 70 - The Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) study (n = 922).Hemodynamic patterns obtained by echocardiography and Doppler were evaluated in relation to four LV geometric groups (normal, concentric remodeling, eccentric hypertrophy and concentric hypertrophy). No significant difference between the genders was observed regarding the prevalence of the LV geometric groups.Mean values of most evaluated echocardiography and Doppler variables differed between men and women, such as LA, IVS, LVEDD and IVRT, but the relationship of hemodynamic variables to LV geometric groups did not differ between the genders. Although mean values of many echocardiographic variables differed between men and women, the LV geometric adaptations to a given hemodynamic load appear similar in both genders.

  8. Perioperative cerebral hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism in neonates with single-ventricle physiology

    PubMed Central

    Dehaes, Mathieu; Cheng, Henry H.; Buckley, Erin M.; Lin, Pei-Yi; Ferradal, Silvina; Williams, Kathryn; Vyas, Rutvi; Hagan, Katherine; Wigmore, Daniel; McDavitt, Erica; Soul, Janet S.; Franceschini, Maria Angela; Newburger, Jane W.; Ellen Grant, P.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) patients are at risk for neurodevelopmental delay. The etiology of these delays is unclear, but abnormal prenatal cerebral maturation and postoperative hemodynamic instability likely play a role. A better understanding of these factors is needed to improve neurodevelopmental outcome. In this study, we used bedside frequency-domain near infrared spectroscopy (FDNIRS) and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) to assess cerebral hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism in neonates with single-ventricle (SV) CHD undergoing surgery and compared them to controls. Our goals were 1) to compare cerebral hemodynamics between unanesthetized SV and healthy neonates, and 2) to determine if FDNIRS-DCS could detect alterations in cerebral hemodynamics beyond cerebral hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO2). Eleven SV neonates were recruited and compared to 13 controls. Preoperatively, SV patients showed decreased cerebral blood flow (CBFi), cerebral oxygen metabolism (CMRO2i) and SO2; and increased oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) compared to controls. Compared to preoperative values, unstable postoperative SV patients had decreased CMRO2i and CBFi, which returned to baseline when stable. However, SO2 showed no difference between unstable and stable states. Preoperative SV neonates are flow-limited and show signs of impaired cerebral development compared to controls. FDNIRS-DCS shows potential to improve assessment of cerebral development and postoperative hemodynamics compared to SO2 alone. PMID:26713191

  9. Alterations in Low-Level Perceptual Networks Related to Clinical Severity in PTSD after an Earthquake: A Resting-State fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Jing; Meng, Yajing; Zhu, Hongru; Qiu, Changjian; Gong, Qiyong; Liao, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Background Several task-based functional MRI (fMRI) studies have highlighted abnormal activation in specific regions involving the low-level perceptual (auditory, visual, and somato-motor) network in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) patients. However, little is known about whether the functional connectivity of the low-level perceptual and higher-order cognitive (attention, central-execution, and default-mode) networks change in medication-naïve PTSD patients during the resting state. Methods We investigated the resting state networks (RSNs) using independent component analysis (ICA) in 18 chronic Wenchuan earthquake-related PTSD patients versus 20 healthy survivors (HSs). Results Compared to the HSs, PTSD patients displayed both increased and decreased functional connectivity within the salience network (SN), central executive network (CEN), default mode network (DMN), somato-motor network (SMN), auditory network (AN), and visual network (VN). Furthermore, strengthened connectivity involving the inferior temporal gyrus (ITG) and supplementary motor area (SMA) was negatively correlated with clinical severity in PTSD patients. Limitations Given the absence of a healthy control group that never experienced the earthquake, our results cannot be used to compare alterations between the PTSD patients, physically healthy trauma survivors, and healthy controls. In addition, the breathing and heart rates were not monitored in our small sample size of subjects. In future studies, specific task paradigms should be used to reveal perceptual impairments. Conclusions These findings suggest that PTSD patients have widespread deficits in both the low-level perceptual and higher-order cognitive networks. Decreased connectivity within the low-level perceptual networks was related to clinical symptoms, which may be associated with traumatic reminders causing attentional bias to negative emotion in response to threatening stimuli and resulting in emotional dysregulation. PMID

  10. Venous hemodynamic changes in lower limb venous disease: the UIP consensus according to scientific evidence.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung B; Nicolaides, Andrew N; Myers, Kenneth; Meissner, Mark; Kalodiki, Evi; Allegra, Claudio; Antignani, Pier L; Bækgaard, Niels; Beach, Kirk; Belcaro, Giovanni; Black, Stephen; Blomgren, Lena; Bouskela, Eliete; Cappelli, Massimo; Caprini, Joseph; Carpentier, Patrick; Cavezzi, Attilio; Chastanet, Sylvain; Christenson, Jan T; Christopoulos, Demetris; Clarke, Heather; Davies, Alun; Demaeseneer, Marianne; Eklöf, Bo; Ermini, Stefano; Fernández, Fidel; Franceschi, Claude; Gasparis, Antonios; Geroulakos, George; Gianesini, Sergio; Giannoukas, Athanasios; Gloviczki, Peter; Huang, Ying; Ibegbuna, Veronica; Kakkos, Stavros K; Kistner, Robert; Kölbel, Tilo; Kurstjens, Ralph L; Labropoulos, Nicos; Laredo, James; Lattimer, Christopher R; Lugli, Marzia; Lurie, Fedor; Maleti, Oscar; Markovic, Jovan; Mendoza, Erika; Monedero, Javier L; Moneta, Gregory; Moore, Hayley; Morrison, Nick; Mosti, Giovanni; Nelzén, Olle; Obermayer, Alfred; Ogawa, Tomohiro; Parsi, Kurosh; Partsch, Hugo; Passariello, Fausto; Perrin, Michel L; Pittaluga, Paul; Raju, Seshadri; Ricci, Stefano; Rosales, Antonio; Scuderi, Angelo; Slagsvold, Carl E; Thurin, Anders; Urbanek, Tomasz; M VAN Rij, Andre; Vasquez, Michael; Wittens, Cees H; Zamboni, Paolo; Zimmet, Steven; Ezpeleta, Santiago Z

    2016-06-01

    thrombosis indicating their pathophysiological and clinical significance. Chapter 3 describes the hemodynamic changes that occur in different classes of chronic venous disease and their relation to the anatomic extent of disease in the macrocirculation and microcirculation. The next four chapters (Chapters 4-7) describe the hemodynamic changes resulting from treatmen by compression using different materials, intermittent compression devices, pharmacological agents and finally surgical or endovenous ablation. Chapter 8 discusses the unique hemodynamic features associated with alternative treatment techniques used by the CHIVA and ASVAL. Chapter 9 describes the hemodynamic effects following treatment to relieve pelvic reflux and obstruction. Finally, Chapter 10 demonstrates that contrary to general belief there is a moderate to good correlation between certain hemodynamic measurements and clinical severity of chronic venous disease. The authors believe that this document will be a timely asset to both clinicians and researchers alike. It is directed towards surgeons and physicians who are anxious to incorporate the conclusions of research into their daily practice. It is also directed to postgraduate trainees, vascular technologists and bioengineers, particularly to help them understand the hemodynamic background to pathophysiology, investigations and treatment of patients with venous disorders. Hopefully it will be a platform for those who would like to embark on new research in the field of venous disease.

  11. Local Inflammation Alters MMP-2 and MMP-9 Gelatinase Expression Associated with the Severity of Nifedipine-Induced Gingival Overgrowth: a Rat Model Study.

    PubMed

    Li, Wu-Li; Wu, Cheng-Hai; Yang, Jun; Tang, Min; Chen, Long-Jie; Zhao, Shou-Liang

    2015-08-01

    Nifedipine-induced gingival overgrowth (NIGO) is characterized by cell proliferation and extracellular matrix (ECM) component accumulation in gingival connective tissues, with varying degrees of inflammation and fibrosis. Impaired collagen and ECM homeostasis may be among the underlying molecular mechanisms that lead to the fibrotic changes that occur in drug-induced gingival overgrowth (DIGO). Because matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play vital roles in regulating collagen and ECM metabolism, many studies have been performed to reveal the relationship between MMPs and DIGO. It is thought that the gelatinases MMP-2 and MMP-9, both type IV collagenases, are involved in the development of tissue inflammation and organ fibrosis. However, the few studies regarding gelatinase expression in DIGO are controversial. Recent studies have demonstrated the inhibitory effect of cyclosporine A (CsA) on gelatinase expression and/or activity; however, similar changes have yet to be detected in Nif-treated gingival tissues. In this study, we verified that Nif treatment could lead to gingival overgrowth in rats and that gingival inflammation played a pro-proliferative role in NIGO development. Additionally, we examined the temporal expression of gelatinases on days 0, 7, 14, 21, 30, and 40 during NIGO development. The aim was to investigate whether MMP-2 and MMP-9 played significant roles in regulating NIGO development and progression. MMP-2 gene expression was not altered by Nif treatment alone but was significantly inhibited by Nif treatment for 30 days in the presence of local inflammation. However, no significant alterations in MMP-2 protein expression were detected in the Nif-treated gingival tissue, regardless of the presence or absence of local inflammation. Moreover, Nif treatment could lead to transient and significant increases in MMP-9 gene and protein expression levels in the presence of local inflammation. In particular, active MMP-9 expression increased significantly

  12. Neutralization of MMP-2 and TNFR1 Regulates the Severity of S. aureus-Induced Septic Arthritis by Differential Alteration of Local and Systemic Proinflammatory Cytokines in Mice.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Sahin; Adhikary, Rana; Bishayi, Biswadev

    2017-03-22

    Despite advancement in the field of antibiotics septic arthritis remains a serious concern till date. Staphylococcus aureus is the most common bacterium that causes septic arthritis. Severity of this disease is directly correlated with chronic inflammation induced by proinflammatory cytokines like TNF-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and induction of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) including MMP-2. The objective of our study was to evaluate the role of MMP-2 and tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1) in the pathogenesis of S. aureus infection-induced septic arthritis. Mice were infected with live S. aureus (5 × 10(6) cells/ml) followed by administration of MMP-2 inhibitor and TNFR1 antibody. Arthritis index showed highest reduction in severity of arthritis in mice treated with both MMP-2 inhibitor and TNFR1 antibody after infection. Combined neutralization of MMP-2 and TNFR1 led to marked diminution in bacterial count in the combined group. Lowest levels of pro inflammatory cytokines like TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IFN-γ were observed in both serum and synovial tissues indicating maximum protection in S. aureus arthritis during combination treatment. Increment in the level of IL-10 in the combination group could be positively correlated with the recovery of arthritis. Similarly, expressions of COX-2 and iNOS, markers of acute inflammation were also significantly reduced in the combination group due to resolution of inflammation. Levels of O2(.-) and NO also showed a significant fall in case of the group treated with MMP-2 inhibitor and TNFR1 antibody both. Neutralization of both MMP-2 and TNFR1 caused rapid decline in recruitment of neutrophil and macrophages in the synovial tissues as evident from reduced MPO and MCP-1 levels, respectively, compared to other groups. Overall, it can be suggested that administration of MMP-2 inhibitor and TNFR1 antibody in combination is protective against the severity of inflammation and cartilage destruction associated with S

  13. Post-stenotic Recirculating Flow May Cause Hemodynamic Perforator Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bum Joon; Ha, Hojin; Huh, Hyung Kyu; Kim, Guk Bae; Kim, Jong S.; Kim, Namkug; Lee, Sang-Joon; Kang, Dong-Wha; Kwon, Sun U.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose The primary mechanism underlying paramedian pontine infarction (PPI) is atheroma obliterating the perforators. Here, we encountered a patient with PPI in the post-stenotic area of basilar artery (BA) without a plaque, shown by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (HR-MRI). We performed an experiment using a 3D-printed BA model and a particle image velocimetry (PIV) to explore the hemodynamic property of the post-stenotic area and the mechanism of PPI. Methods 3D-model of a BA stenosis was reconstructed with silicone compound using a 3D-printer based on the source image of HR-MRI. Working fluid seeded with fluorescence particles was used and the velocity of those particles was measured horizontally and vertically. Furthermore, microtubules were inserted into the posterior aspect of the model to measure the flow rates of perforators (pre-and post-stenotic areas). The flow rates were compared between the microtubules. Results A recirculating flow was observed from the post-stenotic area in both directions forming a spiral shape. The velocity of the flow in these regions of recirculation was about one-tenth that of the flow in other regions. The location of recirculating flow well corresponded with the area with low-signal intensity at the time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography and the location of PPI. Finally, the flow rate through the microtubule inserted into the post-stenotic area was significantly decreased comparing to others (P<0.001). Conclusions Perforator infarction may be caused by a hemodynamic mechanism altered by stenosis that induces a recirculation flow. 3D-printed modeling and PIV are helpful understanding the hemodynamics of intracranial stenosis. PMID:26687122

  14. Hemodynamic Features of Symptomatic Vertebrobasilar Disease

    PubMed Central

    Amin-Hanjani, Sepideh; Du, Xinjian; Rose-Finnell, Linda; Pandey, Dilip K.; Richardson, DeJuran; Thulborn, Keith R.; Elkind, Mitchell S.V.; Zipfel, Gregory J.; Liebeskind, David S.; Silver, Frank L.; Kasner, Scott E.; Aletich, Victor A.; Caplan, Louis R.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; Gorelick, Philip B; Charbel, Fady T.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Atherosclerotic vertebrobasilar (VB) disease is an important etiology of posterior circulation stroke. To examine the role of hemodynamic compromise, a prospective multi-center study, Vertebrobasilar Flow Evaluation and Risk of Transient Ischemic Attack and Stroke (VERiTAS), was conducted. Here we report clinical features and vessel flow measurements from the study cohort. Methods Patients with recent VB TIA or stroke and ≥50% atherosclerotic stenosis or occlusion in vertebral (VA) and/or basilar (BA) arteries were enrolled. Large vessel flow in the VB territory was assessed using quantitative MRA. Results The cohort (n=72, 44% female) had a mean age of 65.6 years; 72% presented with ischemic stroke. Hypertension (93%) and hyperlipidemia (81%) were the most prevalent vascular risk factors. BA flows correlated negatively with percentage stenosis in the affected vessel, and positively to the minimal diameter at the stenosis site (p<0.01). A relative threshold effect was evident, with flows dropping most significantly with ≥80% stenosis/occlusion (p<0.05). Tandem disease involving the BA and either/both VAs had the greatest negative impact on immediate downstream flow in the BA (43 ml/min vs. 71 ml/min, p=0.01). Distal flow status assessment, based on an algorithm incorporating collateral flow by examining distal vessels (BA and posterior cerebral arteries), correlated neither with multifocality of disease nor severity of the maximal stenosis. Conclusions Flow in stenotic posterior circulation vessels correlates with residual diameter, and drops significantly with tandem disease. However, distal flow status, incorporating collateral capacity, is not well predicted by the severity or location of the disease. PMID:25977279

  15. Optical monitoring of spinal cord hemodynamics, a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadgan, Babak; Kwon, Brian K.; Streijger, Femke; Manouchehri, Neda; So, Kitty; Shortt, Katelyn; Cripton, Peter A.; Macnab, Andrew

    2017-02-01

    Background: After an acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), the spinal cord is subjected to ischemia, hypoxia, and increased hydrostatic pressure which exacerbate further secondary damage and neuronal deficit. The purpose of this pilot study was to explore the use of near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) for non-invasive and real-time monitoring of these changes within the injured spinal cord in an animal model. NIRS is a non-invasive optical technique that utilizes light in the near infrared spectrum to monitor changes in the concentration of tissue chromophores from which alterations in tissues oxygenation and perfusion can be inferred in real time. Methods: A custom-made miniaturized NIRS sensor was developed to monitor spinal cord hemodynamics and oxygenation noninvasively and in real time simultaneously with invasive, intraparenchymal monitoring in a pig model of SCI. The spinal cord around the T10 injury site was instrumented with intraparenchymal probes inserted directly into the spinal cord to measure oxygen pressure, blood flow, and hydrostatic pressure, and the same region of the spinal cord was monitored with the custom-designed extradural NIRS probe. We investigated how well the extradural NIRS probe detected intraparenchymal changes adjacent to the injury site after alterations in systemic blood pressure, global hypoxia, and traumatic injury generated by a weight-drop contusion. Results: The NIRS sensor successfully identified periods of systemic hypoxia, re-ventilation and changes in spinal cord perfusion and oxygenation during alterations of mean arterial pressure and following spinal cord injury. Conclusion: This pilot study indicates that extradural NIRS monitoring of the spinal cord is feasible as a non-invasive optical method to identify changes in spinal cord hemodynamics and oxygenation in real time. Further development of this technique would allow clinicians to monitor real-time physiologic changes within the injured spinal cord during the

  16. Acute changes in systemic hemodynamics and serum vasopressin after complete cervical spinal cord injury in piglets.

    PubMed

    Zahra, Michael; Samdani, Amer; Piggott, Kurt; Gonzalez-Brito, Manuel; Solano, Juan; De Los Santo, Roosevelt; Buitrago, Juan C; Alam, Farid; He, Dansha; Gaughan, John P; Betz, Randal; Dietrich, Dalton; Kuluz, John

    2010-08-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) produces acute hemodynamic alterations through disruption of sympathetic output of the autonomic nervous system and places individuals with SCI at high risk of secondary ischemic insult to the spinal cord as well as to other organs. The purpose of this study was to examine hemodynamics and serum vasopressin concentration in the acute period following complete cervical SCI in piglets. We developed a new model of traumatic complete cervical SCI in piglets and measured acute hemodynamic variables and serum arginine vasopressin (AVP) concentrations at baseline and for 4 h after SCI under fentanyl anesthesia. Complete cervical SCI caused an immediate tachycardia which lasted for approximately 1 h, immediate hypotension which was sustained for the 4-h duration of the study, decreases in both systemic and pulmonary vascular resistance, and a compensatory increase in cardiac output, which resulted initially from an increase in heart rate (HR) but was later sustained after resolution of tachycardia by an increase in cardiac stroke volume. Serum AVP concentration increased significantly after SCI and did not change in the control group. Neurogenic shock did not occur due to the robust increase in cardiac output and cardiac stroke volume. Complete cervical SCI produces hemodynamic alterations consistent with the withdrawal of sympathetic tone. Although mean arterial pressure (MAP) decreased significantly after SCI, the increase in serum vasopressin may have played a role in maintaining blood pressure and preventing circulatory collapse, a complication which is encountered frequently in patients with cervical and upper thoracic SCI.

  17. Hemodynamic Changes following Aortic Valve Bypass: A Mathematical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Benevento, Emilia; Djebbari, Abdelghani; Keshavarz-Motamed, Zahra; Cecere, Renzo; Kadem, Lyes

    2015-01-01

    Aortic valve bypass (AVB) has been shown to be a viable solution for patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS). Under this circumstance, the left ventricle (LV) has a double outlet. The objective was to develop a mathematical model capable of evaluating the hemodynamic performance following the AVB surgery. A mathematical model that captures the interaction between LV, AS, arterial system, and AVB was developed. This model uses a limited number of parameters that all can be non-invasively measured using patient data. The model was validated using in vivo data from the literature. The model was used to determine the effect of different AVB and AS configurations on flow proportion and pressure of the aortic valve and the AVB. Results showed that the AVB leads to a significant reduction in transvalvular pressure gradient. The percentage of flow through the AVB can range from 55.47% to 69.43% following AVB with a severe AS. LV stroke work was also significantly reduced following the AVB surgery and reached a value of around 1.2 J for several AS severities. Findings of this study suggest: 1) the AVB leads to a significant reduction in transvalvular pressure gradients; 2) flow distribution between the AS and the AVB is significantly affected by the conduit valve size; 3) the AVB leads to a significant reduction in LV stroke work; and 4) hemodynamic performance variations can be estimated using the model. PMID:25881082

  18. Practical issues of hemodynamic monitoring at the bedside.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Patricio M; Pinsky, Michael R

    2006-12-01

    The hemodynamic monitoring of a surgical patient acquires a major relevance in high-risk patients and those suffering from surgical diseases associated with hemodynamic instability, such as hemorrhagic or septic shock. This article reviews the fundamental physiologic principles needed to understand hemodynamic monitoring at the bedside. Monitoring defines stability, instability, and response to therapy. The major hemodynamic parameters measured and derived from invasive hemodynamic monitoring, such as arterial, central venous, and pulmonary catheterization, are discussed, as are its clinical indications, benefits, and complications. The current clinical data relevant to hemodynamic monitoring are reviewed and discussed.

  19. The craniosacral progression of muscle development influences the emergence of neuromuscular junction alterations in a severe murine model for spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Tilman; Neve, Anuja; Schümperli, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    As 4-day-old mice of the severe spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) model (dying at 5-8 days) display pronounced neuromuscular changes in the diaphragm but not the soleus muscle, we wanted to gain more insight into the relationship between muscle development and the emergence of pathological changes and additionally to analyse intercostal muscles which are affected in human SMA. Structures of muscle fibres and neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) of the diaphragm, intercostal and calf muscles of prenatal (E21) and postnatal (P0 and P4) healthy and SMA mice were analysed by light and transmission electron microscopy. NMJ innervation was studied by whole mount immunofluorescence in diaphragms of P4 mice. During this period, the investigated muscles still show a significant neck-to-tail developmental gradient. The diaphragm and calf muscles are most and least advanced, respectively, with respect to muscle fibre fusion and differentiation. The number and depth of subsynaptic folds increases, and perisynaptic Schwann cells (PSCs) acquire a basal lamina on their outer surface. Subsynaptic folds are connected to an extensive network of tubules and beaded caveolae, reminiscent of the T system in adult muscle. Interestingly, intercostal muscles from P4 SMA mice show weaker pathological involvement (that is, vacuolization of PSCs and perineurial cells) than those previously described by us for the diaphragm, whereas calf muscles show no pathological changes. SMA-related alterations appear to occur only when the muscles have reached a certain developmental maturity. Moreover, glial cells, in particular PSCs, play an important role in SMA pathogenesis. © 2013 British Neuropathological Society.

  20. Neonatal aortic arch hemodynamics and perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Pekkan, Kerem; Dur, Onur; Sundareswaran, Kartik; Kanter, Kirk; Fogel, Mark; Yoganathan, Ajit; Undar, Akif

    2008-12-01

    The objective of this study is to quantify the detailed three-dimensional (3D) pulsatile hemodynamics, mechanical loading, and perfusion characteristics of a patient-specific neonatal aortic arch during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). The 3D cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) reconstruction of a pediatric patient with a normal aortic arch is modified based on clinical literature to represent the neonatal morphology and flow conditions. The anatomical dimensions are verified from several literature sources. The CPB is created virtually in the computer by clamping the ascending aorta and inserting the computer-aided design model of the 10 Fr tapered generic cannula. Pulsatile (130 bpm) 3D blood flow velocities and pressures are computed using the commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. Second order accurate CFD settings are validated against particle image velocimetry experiments in an earlier study with a complex cardiovascular unsteady benchmark. CFD results in this manuscript are further compared with the in vivo physiological CPB pressure waveforms and demonstrated excellent agreement. Cannula inlet flow waveforms are measured from in vivo PC-MRI and 3 kg piglet neonatal animal model physiological experiments, distributed equally between the head-neck vessels and the descending aorta. Neonatal 3D aortic hemodynamics is also compared with that of the pediatric and fetal aortic stages. Detailed 3D flow fields, blood damage, wall shear stress (WSS), pressure drop, perfusion, and hemodynamic parameters describing the pulsatile energetics are calculated for both the physiological neonatal aorta and for the CPB aorta assembly. The primary flow structure is the high-speed canulla jet flow (approximately 3.0 m/s at peak flow), which eventually stagnates at the anterior aortic arch wall and low velocity flow in the cross-clamp pouch. These structures contributed to the reduced flow pulsatility (85%), increased WSS (50%), power loss (28%), and blood

  1. [Comparison of clinical assessment and invasive evaluation of hemodynamic parameters in septic shock].

    PubMed

    Vucić, N; Pilas, V

    1995-06-01

    The authors compare, in this prospective study, the accuracy of their own clinical assessment of hemodynamic parameters and severity of disease with the findings obtained by right heart catheterization in 50 patients with septic shock. The purpose of the study was to determine whether Swan-Ganz catheter insertion was necessary in all patients with septic shock. As soon as the diagnosis was established, the value of pulmonary capillary wedge pressure was estimated, as well as presence or absence of pathological uptake/supply dependency in all patients. The latter is an excellent indicator of severity of disease. The accurate assessment was noted in 27 (54%) patients (1. investigator), and in 30 (60%) patients (2. investigator). The sensitivity of detection of pathological uptake/supply dependency amounted to 53% and 65%; specificity was 73% and 79%, respectively. The therapy was altered in 21 patients (42%) after catheter insertion. The results were tested with chi2-test (p < 0.01). The findings of this study warrant catheter insertion in patients with septic shock.

  2. The role of venous capacitance, circulating catecholamines, and heart rate in the hemodynamic response to increased temperature and hypoxia in the dogfish.

    PubMed

    Sandblom, Erik; Cox, Georgina K; Perry, Steve F; Farrell, Anthony P

    2009-05-01

    Hypoxia and increased temperature alter venous blood pressures in teleosts through active changes in venous tone. Elasmobranchs possess a capacious venous system but have limited adrenergic vascular innervation and subambient central venous pressure (P(cv)). In this study, we explored venous hemodynamic responses to acute temperature increase and moderate (6.9 kPa) and severe (2.5 kPa) hypoxia in the dogfish (Squalus acanthias). Normoxic dogfish at 10 degrees C had a P(cv) between -0.08 and -0.04 kPa and a mean circulatory filling pressure (P(mcf)) of approximately 0.12 kPa. At 16 degrees C, heart rate (f(H)), cardiac output (Q), and P(mcf) increased but P(cv) and plasma epinephrine and norepinephrine levels were unchanged. In contrast, moderate and severe hypoxia increased P(cv) and decreased Q and stroke volume (V(S)). f(H) decreased in severe hypoxia, whereas P(mcf) was unaffected despite elevated catecholamine levels. Atropine abolished hypoxic reductions in Q, V(S), and f(H), but P(cv) still increased. In contrast to the response in teleosts, this study on dogfish suggests that venous capacitance changes associated with warming and hypoxia are minimal and likely not mediated by circulating catecholamines. Thus hemodynamic status of the capacious elasmobranch venous circulation is potentially regulated by blood volume shifts from passive flow-mediated events and possibly through myogenic mechanisms.

  3. Group-Level Progressive Alterations in Brain Connectivity Patterns Revealed by Diffusion-Tensor Brain Networks across Severity Stages in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rasero, Javier; Alonso-Montes, Carmen; Diez, Ibai; Olabarrieta-Landa, Laiene; Remaki, Lakhdar; Escudero, Iñaki; Mateos, Beatriz; Bonifazi, Paolo; Fernandez, Manuel; Arango-Lasprilla, Juan Carlos; Stramaglia, Sebastiano; Cortes, Jesus M.

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a chronically progressive neurodegenerative disease highly correlated to aging. Whether AD originates by targeting a localized brain area and propagates to the rest of the brain across disease-severity progression is a question with an unknown answer. Here, we aim to provide an answer to this question at the group-level by looking at differences in diffusion-tensor brain networks. In particular, making use of data from Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), four different groups were defined (all of them matched by age, sex and education level): G1 (N1 = 36, healthy control subjects, Control), G2 (N2 = 36, early mild cognitive impairment, EMCI), G3 (N3 = 36, late mild cognitive impairment, LMCI) and G4 (N4 = 36, AD). Diffusion-tensor brain networks were compared across three disease stages: stage I (Control vs. EMCI), stage II (Control vs. LMCI) and stage III (Control vs. AD). The group comparison was performed using the multivariate distance matrix regression analysis, a technique that was born in genomics and was recently proposed to handle brain functional networks, but here applied to diffusion-tensor data. The results were threefold: First, no significant differences were found in stage I. Second, significant differences were found in stage II in the connectivity pattern of a subnetwork strongly associated to memory function (including part of the hippocampus, amygdala, entorhinal cortex, fusiform gyrus, inferior and middle temporal gyrus, parahippocampal gyrus and temporal pole). Third, a widespread disconnection across the entire AD brain was found in stage III, affecting more strongly the same memory subnetwork appearing in stage II, plus the other new subnetworks, including the default mode network, medial visual network, frontoparietal regions and striatum. Our results are consistent with a scenario where progressive alterations of connectivity arise as the disease severity increases and provide the brain areas

  4. Hemodynamic effects of mebutamate in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, J M; Pfeffer, M A; Frohlich, E D

    1975-05-01

    The acute hemodynamic effects of the antihypertensive agent mebutamate were evaluated in spontaneously hypertensive and normotensive Wistar rats. Arterial and venous pressures and cardiac output (electromagnetic flowmeter) were recorded in artificially ventilated, open-chest, ether-anesthetized animals before and after varying doses of mebutamate were injected intravenously. In both normotensive and hypertensive rats mebutamate produced a moderate decrease in arterial pressure which was associated with a reduction in both heart rate and cardiac output; total peripheral resistance remained unchanged. These data suggest that mebutamate may have therapuetic value in reducing arterial pressure in mild to moderately severe hypertensive patients.

  5. Enteral nutrition in the hemodynamically unstable critically ill patient.

    PubMed

    Flordelís Lasierra, J L; Pérez-Vela, J L; Montejo González, J C

    2015-01-01

    The benefit of enteral nutrition in critically ill patients has been demonstrated by several studies, especially when it is started early, in the first 24-48h of stay in the Intensive Care Unit, and this practice is currently advised by the main clinical guidelines. The start of enteral nutrition is controversial in patients with hemodynamic failure, since it may trigger intestinal ischemia. However, there are data from experimental studies in animals, as well as from observational studies in humans that allow for hypotheses regarding its beneficial effect and safety. Interventional clinical trials are needed to confirm these findings.

  6. Boundary conditions for hemodynamics: The structured tree revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousins, W.; Gremaud, P. A.

    2012-07-01

    The structured tree boundary condition is a physiologically-based outflow boundary condition used in hemodynamics. We propose an alternative derivation that is considerably simpler than the original one and yields similar, but not identical, results. We analyze the sensitivity of this boundary condition to its parameters and discuss its domain of validity. Several implementation issues are discussed and tested in the case of arterial flow in the Circle of Willis. Additionally, we compare results obtained from the structured tree boundary condition to the Windkessel boundary condition and measured data.

  7. Role of Hemodynamic Forces in Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms: An Overview of a Complex Scenario.

    PubMed

    Longo, Marcello; Granata, Francesca; Racchiusa, Sergio; Mormina, Enricomaria; Grasso, Giovanni; Longo, Giuseppe Maria; Garufi, Giada; Salpietro, Francesco M; Alafaci, Concetta

    2017-09-01

    An understanding of the natural history of unruptured intracranial aneurysms (IAs) has always played a critical role in presurgical or endovascular planning, to avoid possibly fatal events. Size, shape, morphology, and location are known risk factors for rupture of an aneurysm, but morphologic parameters alone may not be sufficient to perform proper rupture risk stratification. We performed a systematic PubMed search and focused on hemodynamics forces that may influence aneurysmal initiation, growth, and rupture. We included 223 studies describing several hemodynamic parameters related to aneurysm natural history. In these studies, different modalities of aneurysm model creation have been used to evaluate flow and to comprehensively analyze the evolution of IAs. Controversy exists about the correlation between these parameters and initiation, growth, rupture risk, or stabilization of the aneurysmal sac. Recent findings have also shown the importance of flow patterns in this process and the relationship between unruptured IA geometry and hemodynamic parameters. The role of hemodynamic forces in evaluation of the natural history of unruptured IAs presents is inherently complex and is still not completely understood. In this complex scenario, although several attempts have been described in the literature, a proper risk rupture stratification and treatment strategy selection based on hemodynamic forces has not yet been created. Further efforts should be made to accomplish this important goal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Post-operative consequences of hemodynamic optimization.

    PubMed

    Lazkani, A; Lebuffe, G

    2016-12-01

    Hemodynamic optimization begins with a medical assessment to identify the high-risk patients. This stratification is needed to customize the choice of hemodynamic support that is best adapted to the patient's level of risk, integrating the use of the least invasive procedures. The macro-circulatory hemodynamic approach aims to maintain a balance between oxygen supply (DO2) and oxygen demand (VO2). Volume replacement plays a crucial role based on the titration of fluid boluses according to their effect on measured stroke volume or indices of preload dependency. Good function of the microcirculatory system is the best guarantee to achieve this goal. An assessment of the DO2/VO2 ratio is needed for guidance in critical situations where tissue hypoxia may occur. Overall, all of these strategies are based on objective criteria to guide vascular replacement and/or tissue oxygenation in order to improve the patient's post-operative course by decreasing morbidity and hospital stay.

  9. Severe hypertension in children and adolescents: pathophysiology and treatment.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Joseph T; Tullus, Kjell

    2009-06-01

    Severe, symptomatic hypertension occurs uncommonly in children, usually only in those with underlying congenital or acquired renal disease. If such hypertension has been long-standing, then rapid blood pressure reduction may be risky due to altered cerebral hemodynamics. While many drugs are available for the treatment of severe hypertension in adults, few have been studied in children. Despite the lack of scientific studies, some agents, particularly continuous intravenous infusions of nicardipine and labetalol, are preferred in many centers. These agents generally provide the ability to control the magnitude and rapidity of blood pressure reduction and should--in conjunction with careful patient monitoring--allow the safe reduction of blood pressure and the avoidance of complications. This review provides a summary of the underlying causes and pathophysiology of acute severe hypertension in childhood as well as a detailed discussion of drug treatment and the optimal clinical approach to managing children and adolescents with acute severe hypertension.

  10. Flow-volume loops derived from three-dimensional echocardiography: a novel approach to the assessment of left ventricular hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Shahgaldi, Kambiz; Söderqvist, Emil; Gudmundsson, Petri; Winter, Reidar; Nowak, Jacek; Brodin, Lars-Åke

    2008-01-01

    Background This study explores the feasibility of non-invasive evaluation of left ventricular (LV) flow-volume dynamics using 3-dimensional (3D) echocardiography, and the capacity of such an approach to identify altered LV hemodynamic states caused by valvular abnormalities. Methods Thirty-one patients with moderate-severe aortic (AS) and mitral (MS) stenoses (21 and 10 patients, respectively) and 10 healthy volunteers underwent 3D echocardiography with full volume acquisition using Philips Sonos 7500 equipment. The digital 3D data were post- processed using TomTec software. LV flow-volume loops were subsequently constructed for each subject by plotting instantaneous LV volume data sampled throughout the cardiac cycle vs. their first derivative representing LV flow. After correction for body surface area, an average flow-volume loop was calculated for each subject group. Results Flow-volume loops were obtainable in all subjects, except 3 patients with AS. The flow-volume diagrams displayed clear differences in the form and position of the loops between normal individuals and the respective patient groups. In patients with AS, an "obstructive" pattern was observed, with lower flow values during early systole and larger end-systolic volume. On the other hand, patients with MS displayed a "restrictive" flow-volume pattern, with reduced diastolic filling and smaller end-diastolic volume. Conclusion Non-invasive evaluation of LV flow-volume dynamics using 3D-echocardiographic data is technically possible and the approach has a capacity to identify certain specific types of alteration of LV flow-volume pattern caused by valvular abnormalities, thus reflecting underlying hemodynamic states specific for these abnormalities. PMID:18394157

  11. Hemodynamics in growing and stable cerebral aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Sforza, Daniel M; Kono, Kenichi; Tateshima, Satoshi; Viñuela, Fernando; Putman, Christopher; Cebral, Juan R

    2016-04-01

    The detailed mechanisms of cerebral aneurysm evolution are poorly understood but are important for objective aneurysm evaluation and improved patient management. The purpose of this study was to identify hemodynamic conditions that may predispose aneurysms to growth. A total of 33 intracranial unruptured aneurysms longitudinally followed with three-dimensional imaging were studied. Patient-specific computational fluid dynamics models were constructed and used to quantitatively characterize the hemodynamic environments of these aneurysms. Hemodynamic characteristics of growing (n=16) and stable (n=17) aneurysms were compared. Logistic regression statistical models were constructed to test the predictability of aneurysm growth by hemodynamic features. Growing aneurysms had significantly smaller shear rate ratios (p=0.01), higher concentration of wall shear stress (p=0.03), smaller vorticity ratios (p=0.01), and smaller viscous dissipation ratios (p=0.01) than stable aneurysms. They also tended to have larger areas under low wall shear stress (p=0.06) and larger aspect ratios (p=0.18), but these trends were not significant. Mean wall shear stress was not significantly different between growing and stable aneurysms. Logistic regression models based on hemodynamic variables were able to discriminate between growing and stable aneurysms with a high degree of accuracy (94-100%). Growing aneurysms tend to have complex intrasaccular flow patterns that induce non-uniform wall shear stress distributions with areas of concentrated high wall shear stress and large areas of low wall shear stress. Statistical models based on hemodynamic features seem capable of discriminating between growing and stable aneurysms. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  12. [Hemodynamic evaluation of the patient with microvarices].

    PubMed

    Alvarez Sánchez, J A; Vega Gómez, M E; Rodríguez Lacaba, B; Martínez Griñán, M A

    1992-01-01

    The present study included 21 lower limbs with micro varicosities, 56 lower limbs with retrograde flow-varicosities (positive Rivlin) and 35 health lower limbs. Technics used for diagnosis were: Doppler ultrasonography and strain gauge plethysmography. We found a higher incidence of valvular failure on the varicose patients with retrograde flow (showing changes on their viscoelastic features of their venous walls). On the contrary, patient with microvaricosities showed an hemodynamics similar to the healty patient: we did not found any difference on the variables analyzed between the two groups. We conclude that the presence of microvaricosities has no influence on the analyzed hemodynamic parametres.

  13. Asymptomatic Pulmonary Vein Stenosis: Hemodynamic Adaptation and Successful Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary vein stenosis is a well-established possible complication following an atrial fibrillation ablation of pulmonary veins. Symptoms of pulmonary vein stenosis range from asymptomatic to severe exertional dyspnea. The number of asymptomatic patients with pulmonary vein stenosis is greater than originally estimated; moreover, only about 22% of severe pulmonary vein stenosis requires intervention. We present a patient with severe postatrial fibrillation (AF) ablation pulmonary vein (PV) stenosis, which was seen on multiple imaging modalities including cardiac computed tomography (CT) angiogram, lung perfusion scan, and pulmonary angiogram. This patient did not have any pulmonary symptoms. Hemodynamic changes within a stenosed pulmonary vein might not reflect the clinical severity of the obstruction if redistribution of pulmonary artery flow occurs. Our patient had an abnormal lung perfusion and ventilation (V/Q) scan, suggesting pulmonary artery blood flow redistribution. The patient ultimately underwent safe repeat atrial fibrillation ablation with successful elimination of arrhythmia. PMID:28105376

  14. Prone Versus Sitting Position in Neurosurgery-Differences in Patients' Hemodynamic Management.

    PubMed

    Luostarinen, Teemu; Lindroos, Ann-Christine; Niiya, Tomohisa; Silvasti-Lundell, Marja; Schramko, Alexey; Hernesniemi, Juha; Randell, Tarja; Niemi, Tomi

    2017-01-01

    Neurosurgery in general anesthesia exposes patients to hemodynamic alterations in both the prone and the sitting position. We aimed to evaluate the hemodynamic profile during stroke volume-directed fluid administration in patients undergoing neurosurgery either in the sitting or the prone position. In 2 separate prospective trials, 30 patients in prone and 28 patients in sitting position were randomly assigned to receive either Ringer acetate (RAC) or hydroxyethyl starch (HES; 130 kDa/0.4) for optimization of stroke volume. After combining data from these 2 trials, 2-way analysis of variance was performed to compare patients' hemodynamic profile between the 2 positions and to evaluate differences between RAC and HES consumption. To achieve comparable hemodynamics during surgery, a higher mean cumulative dose of RAC than HES was needed (679 mL ± 390 vs. 455 mL ± 253; P < 0.05). When fluid consumption was adjusted with weight, statistical difference was lost. Fluid administration did not differ between the prone and sitting position. Mean arterial pressure was lower and cardiac index and stroke volume index were higher over time in patients in the sitting position. The sitting position does not require excess fluid treatment compared with the prone position. HES is slightly more effective than RAC in achieving comparable hemodynamics, but the difference might be explained by patient weight. With goal-directed fluid administration and moderate use of vasoactive drugs, it is possible to achieve stable hemodynamics in both positions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of hemodynamic effects of xenon in dogs undergoing hemorrhagic shock

    PubMed Central

    Franceschi, Ruben C.; Malbouisson, Luiz; Yoshinaga, Eduardo; Auler, José Otavio Costa; de Figueiredo (in memoriam), Luiz Francisco Poli; Carmona, Maria José C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The anesthetic gas xenon is reported to preserve hemodynamic stability during general anesthesia. However, the effects of the gas during shock are unclear. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of Xe on hemodynamic stability and tissue perfusion in a canine model of hemorrhagic shock. METHOD: Twenty-six dogs, mechanically ventilated with a fraction of inspired oxygen of 21% and anesthetized with etomidate and vecuronium, were randomized into Xenon (Xe; n = 13) or Control (C; n = 13) groups. Following hemodynamic monitoring, a pressure-driven shock was induced to reach an arterial pressure of 40 mmHg. Hemodynamic data and blood samples were collected prior to bleeding, immediately after bleeding and 5, 20 and 40 minutes following shock. The Xe group was treated with 79% Xe diluted in ambient air, inhaled for 20 minutes after shock. RESULT: The mean bleeding volume was 44 mL.kg−1 in the C group and 40 mL.kg−1 in the Xe group. Hemorrhage promoted a decrease in both the cardiac index (p<0.001) and mean arterial pressure (p<0.001). These changes were associated with an increase in lactate levels and worsening of oxygen transport variables in both groups (p<0.05). Inhalation of xenon did not cause further worsening of hemodynamics or tissue perfusion markers. CONCLUSIONS: Xenon did not alter hemodynamic stability or tissue perfusion in an experimentally controlled hemorrhagic shock model. However, further studies are necessary to validate this drug in other contexts. PMID:23525321

  16. Combined Effects of Flow Diverting Strategies and Parent Artery Curvature on Aneurysmal Hemodynamics: A CFD Study

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ying; Lv, Nan; Wang, Shengzhang; Karmonik, Christof; Liu, Jian-Min; Huang, Qinghai

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Flow diverters (FD) are increasingly being considered for treating large or giant wide-neck aneurysms. Clinical outcome is highly variable and depends on the type of aneurysm, the flow diverting device and treatment strategies. The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of different flow diverting strategies together with parent artery curvature variations on altering intra-aneurysmal hemodynamics. Methods Four ideal intracranial aneurysm models with different parent artery curvature were constructed. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of the hemodynamics before and after applying five types of flow diverting strategies (single FD, single FD with 5% and 10% packing density of coils, two FDs with 25% and 50% overlapping rate) were performed. Changes in pressure, wall shear stress (WSS), relative residence time (RRT), inflow velocity and inflow volume rate were calculated and compared. Results Each flow diverting strategy resulted in enhancement of RRT and reduction of normalized mean WSS, inflow volume rate and inflow velocity in various levels. Among them, 50% overlapped FD induced most effective hemodynamic changes in RRT and inflow volume rate. The mean pressure only slightly decreased after treatment. Regardless of the kind of implantation of FD, the mean pressure, inflow volume rate and inflow velocity increased and the RRT decreased as the curvature of the parent artery increased. Conclusions Of all flow diverting strategies, overlapping FDs induced most favorable hemodynamic changes. Hemodynamics alterations post treatment were substantially influenced by parent artery curvature. Our results indicate the need of an individualized flow diverting strategy that is tailored for a specific aneurysm. PMID:26398847

  17. Avoiding hemodynamic collapse during high-risk percutaneous coronary intervention: Advanced hemodynamics of impella support.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sanjay; Burkhoff, Daniel; O'Neill, William W

    2017-03-01

    The rate of performing primary percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with complex coronary artery disease is increasing. The use of percutaneous mechanical circulatory support devices provides critical periprocedural hemodynamic support. Mechanical support has increased the safety and efficacy of interventional procedures in this high-risk patient population. Predicting patient response to the selected intervention can be clinically challenging. Here we demonstrate a case where complete hemodynamic collapse during PCI was avoided by mechanical support provided by the Impella device. Further, we employ a comprehensive cardiovascular model to predict ventricular function and patient hemodynamics in response to the procedure. New computational tools may help interventionists visualize, understand, and predict the multifaceted hemodynamic aspects of these high risk procedures in individual patients. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Measuring hemodynamics in the developing heart tube with four-dimensional gated Doppler optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Michael W.; Peterson, Lindsy; Gu, Shi; Gargesha, Madhusudhana; Wilson, David L.; Watanabe, Michiko; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2010-11-01

    Hemodynamics is thought to play a major role in heart development, yet tools to quantitatively assess hemodynamics in the embryo are sorely lacking. The especially challenging analysis of hemodynamics in the early embryo requires new technology. Small changes in blood flow could indicate when anomalies are initiated even before structural changes can be detected. Furthermore, small changes in the early embryo that affect blood flow could lead to profound abnormalities at later stages. We present a demonstration of 4-D Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging of structure and flow, and present several new hemodynamic measurements on embryonic avian hearts at early stages prior to the formation of the four chambers. Using 4-D data, pulsed Doppler measurements could accurately be attained in the inflow and outflow of the heart tube. Also, by employing an en-face slice from the 4-D Doppler image set, measurements of stroke volume and cardiac output are obtained without the need to determine absolute velocity. Finally, an image plane orthogonal to the blood flow is used to determine shear stress by calculating the velocity gradient normal to the endocardium. Hemodynamic measurements will be crucial to identifying genetic and environmental factors that lead to congenital heart defects.

  19. Stress Echocardiography in Aortic Stenosis: Insights into Valve Mechanics and Hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Bermejo, Javier; García-Fernández, Miguel A.; Antoranz, J. Carlos; Moreno, M. Mar; Delcán, Juan Luis

    1999-10-01

    Stress interventions have been classically combined with cardiac catheterization recordings to understand the hemodynamic principles of valvular stenosis. Indices of aortic stenosis such as pressure gradient and valve area were based on simple hydraulic principles and have proved to be clinically useful for patient management during a number of decades. With the advent of Doppler echocardiography, these hemodynamic indices can be readily obtained noninvasively. Abundant evidence obtained using exercise and pharmacological stress echocardiography has demonstrated that the assumptions of classic hemodynamic models of aortic stenosis were wrong. Consequently, it is recognized that conventional indices may be misleading indicators of aortic stenosis significance in particular clinical situations. To improve diagnostic accuracy, several alternative hemodynamic models have been developed in the past few years, including valve resistance and left ventricular stroke work loss, among others. Nevertheless, these more-accurate indices should be obtainable noninvasively and need to demonstrate greater diagnostic and prognostic power than conventional indices; preliminary data suggest such superiority. Stress echocardiography is well established as the tool of choice for testing hypothesis and physical models of cardiac valve function. Although the final role of alternative indices is not yet well established, the new insights into valvular hemodynamics provided by this technique may change the clinical assessment of aortic stenosis.

  20. Renal hemodynamic effects of relaxin in humans.

    PubMed

    Smith, Marie; Davison, John; Conrad, Kirk; Danielson, Lee

    2005-05-01

    Rat studies have convincingly demonstrated the essential role of the ovarian hormone relaxin in mediating gestational renal hemodynamic and osmoregulatory changes in that species. We describe a model in nonpregnant volunteers using exogenous hCG to stimulate the production and release of ovarian relaxin in order to assess renal hemodynamic responses. Women (n = 10) were serially studied +/- hCG stimulation during menstrual cycles with measurement of inulin, PAH, and neutral dextran clearances (to determine glomerular filtration rate [GFR], renal plasma flow [RPF], and glomerular porosity, respectively). Controls were women without ovarian function (n = 6) and men (n = 10). GFR and RPF were increased in the luteal phase compared to the follicular phase (15.3% increase in GFR, P < 0.005; 17.8% increase in RPF, P < 0.05). In controls, GFR and RPF were not significantly different between study occasions. Although exogenous hCG did not stimulate relaxin secretion in women without ovarian function or in men, it did so in normal women, but not into the pregnancy range. In no group were renal hemodynamics augmented by administered hCG. In naturally occurring cycles, increased serum relaxin is associated with augmented renal hemodynamics. As luteal stimulation with hCG failed to yield pregnancy relaxin levels, the use of exogenous relaxin for human administration is needed to further elucidate the renal vasodilatory properties of relaxin.

  1. Central Hemodynamics for Management of Arteriosclerotic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Junichiro

    2017-08-01

    Arteriosclerosis, particularly aortosclerosis, is the most critical risk factor associated with cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and renal diseases. The pulsatile hemodynamics in the central aorta consists of blood pressure, flow, and stiffness and substantially differs from the peripheral hemodynamics in muscular arteries. Arteriosclerotic changes with age appear earlier in the elastic aorta, and age-dependent increases in central pulse pressure are more marked than those apparent from brachial pressure measurement. Central pressure can be affected by lifestyle habits, metabolic disorders, and endocrine and inflammatory diseases in a manner different from brachial pressure. Central pulse pressure widening due to aortic stiffening increases left ventricular afterload in systole and reduces coronary artery flow in diastole, predisposing aortosclerotic patients to myocardial hypertrophy and ischemia. The widened pulse pressure is also transmitted deep into low-impedance organs such as the brain and kidney, causing microvascular damage responsible for lacunar stroke and albuminuria. In addition, aortic stiffening increases aortic blood flow reversal, which can lead to retrograde embolic stroke and renal function deterioration. Central pressure has been shown to predict cardiovascular events in most previous studies and potentially serves as a surrogate marker for intervention. Quantitative and comprehensive evaluation of central hemodynamics is now available through various noninvasive pressure/flow measurement modalities. This review will focus on the clinical usefulness and mechanistic rationale of central hemodynamic measurements for cardiovascular risk management.

  2. Central Hemodynamics for Management of Arteriosclerotic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Arteriosclerosis, particularly aortosclerosis, is the most critical risk factor associated with cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and renal diseases. The pulsatile hemodynamics in the central aorta consists of blood pressure, flow, and stiffness and substantially differs from the peripheral hemodynamics in muscular arteries. Arteriosclerotic changes with age appear earlier in the elastic aorta, and age-dependent increases in central pulse pressure are more marked than those apparent from brachial pressure measurement. Central pressure can be affected by lifestyle habits, metabolic disorders, and endocrine and inflammatory diseases in a manner different from brachial pressure. Central pulse pressure widening due to aortic stiffening increases left ventricular afterload in systole and reduces coronary artery flow in diastole, predisposing aortosclerotic patients to myocardial hypertrophy and ischemia. The widened pulse pressure is also transmitted deep into low-impedance organs such as the brain and kidney, causing microvascular damage responsible for lacunar stroke and albuminuria. In addition, aortic stiffening increases aortic blood flow reversal, which can lead to retrograde embolic stroke and renal function deterioration. Central pressure has been shown to predict cardiovascular events in most previous studies and potentially serves as a surrogate marker for intervention. Quantitative and comprehensive evaluation of central hemodynamics is now available through various noninvasive pressure/flow measurement modalities. This review will focus on the clinical usefulness and mechanistic rationale of central hemodynamic measurements for cardiovascular risk management. PMID:28603219

  3. Transitional Hemodynamics in Preterm Neonates: Clinical Relevance.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tai-Wei; Azhibekov, Timur; Seri, Istvan

    2016-02-01

    Each newborn enters this world facing tremendous respiratory, hemodynamic and neuroendocrine challenges while going through drastic physiological changes during the process of adaption from fetal to postnatal life. Even though the vast majority of term infants transition smoothly without apparent consequences, this task becomes increasingly arduous for the extremely preterm infant. This article reviews the physiology and pathophysiology of cardiovascular adaptation of the very preterm neonate. In particular it describes the physiology of fetal circulation, summarizes the hemodynamic changes occurring during preterm births and discusses the impact of the most frequently seen clinical scenarios that place additional burden on the premature infant during immediate transition. Finally an emphasis is placed on discussing common clinical dilemmas and practical aspects of developmental hemodynamics such as neonatal hypotension and patent ductus arteriosus; clinical presentations the neonatologist encounters on a daily basis. The review provides a physiology-based view on the hemodynamics of the immediate postnatal transitional period. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Basic Perforator Flap Hemodynamic Mathematical Model.

    PubMed

    Tao, Youlun; Ding, Maochao; Wang, Aiguo; Zhuang, Yuehong; Chang, Shi-Min; Mei, Jin; Tang, Maolin; Hallock, Geoffrey G

    2016-05-01

    A mathematical model to help explain the hemodynamic characteristics of perforator flaps based on blood flow resistance systems within the flap will serve as a theoretical guide for the future study and clinical applications of these flaps. There are 3 major blood flow resistance network systems of a perforator flap. These were defined as the blood flow resistance of an anastomosis between artery and artery of adjacent perforasomes, between artery and vein within a perforasome, and then between vein and vein corresponding to the outflow of that perforasome. From this, a calculation could be made of the number of such blood flow resistance network systems that must be crossed for all perforasomes within a perforator flap to predict whether that arrangement would be viable. The summation of blood flow resistance networks from each perforasome in a given perforator flap could predict which portions would likely survive. This mathematical model shows how this is directly dependent on the location of the vascular pedicle to the flap and whether supercharging or superdrainage maneuvers have been added. These configurations will give an estimate of the hemodynamic characteristics for the given flap design. This basic mathematical model can (1) conveniently determine the degree of difficulty for each perforasome within a perforator flap to survive; (2) semiquantitatively allow the calculation of basic hemodynamic parameters; and (3) allow the assessment of the pros and cons expected for each pattern of perforasomes encountered clinically based on predictable hemodynamic observations.

  5. Resuscitation of traumatic shock: a hemodynamic review.

    PubMed

    Cottingham, Christine A

    2006-01-01

    Shock, or tissue hypoperfusion, is a frequent complication from traumatic injury. Despite the etiology of the shock state, there is always some component of hypovolemia. The body's innate ability to compensate for impaired perfusion may mask clinical signs, leading to delays in treatment. This article presents an overview of these compensatory mechanisms and resuscitation strategies from the vantage point of routine hemodynamic monitoring.

  6. Exploration of the Rapid Effects of Personal Fine Particulate Matter Exposure on Hemodynamics and Vascular Function during the Same Day

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Levels of fine particulate matter [≤ 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5)] are associated with alterations in arterial hemodynamics and vascular function. However, the characteristics of the same-day exposure–response relationships remain unclear. Object...

  7. Exploration of the Rapid Effects of Personal Fine Particulate Matter Exposure on Hemodynamics and Vascular Function during the Same Day

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Levels of fine particulate matter [≤ 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5)] are associated with alterations in arterial hemodynamics and vascular function. However, the characteristics of the same-day exposure–response relationships remain unclear. Object...

  8. Hemodynamic sensor in cardiac implantable electric devices: the endocardial accelaration technology.

    PubMed

    Sacchi, Stefania; Contardi, Danilo; Pieragnoli, Paolo; Ricciardi, Giuseppe; Giomi, Andrea; Padeletti, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    There have been substantial progresses in the technology of cardiac implantable electric devices (CIEDs) during the past decades. One of the progresses is represented by the development of a hemodynamic sensor embedded at the tip of a pacing lead that measures myocardial contractility by the analysis of myocardial mechanical vibrations occurring during the cardiac cycle. This sensor, providing continuous hemodynamic monitoring, could play an important role in clinical practice because of several clinical applications in CIEDs recipients. The objectives of this work are to report how this sensor operates and to review the main findings about its clinical applications.

  9. The influence of stenosis degrees and graft suture position on local hemodynamics of coronary bypass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totorean, A. F.; Bernad, S. I.; Susan-Resiga, R. F.

    2016-06-01

    Bypass graft failure is mainly caused by intimal hyperplasia (IH) that occurs at the graft anastomosis after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery. It has been shown that local hemodynamics influences the process of IH initiation and progression. A main concern at this type of surgery is to increase the graft patency, respectively to improve the local hemodynamics. This paper analyzes the influence of different degree of stenosis severity and graft suture position on graft patency, taking into consideration the local hemodynamics. Bypass configurations with anastomosis angle of 45° were numerically investigated, with respect to wall shear stress and pressure variation. We can assume that in the conditions of our study, different stenosis degrees and position of the graft suture influence the local blood flow conditions, and, nevertheless, the graft patency.

  10. Hemodynamics of physiological blood flow in the aorta with nonlinear anisotropic heart valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Gilmanov, Anvar; Stolarski, Henryk

    2016-11-01

    The hemodynamic blood flow in cardiovascular system is one of the most important factor, which causing several vascular diseases. We developed a new Curvilinear Immersed Boundary - Finite Element - Fluid Structure Interaction (CURVIB-FE-FSI) method to analyze hemodynamic of pulsatile blood flow in a real aorta with nonlinear anisotropic aortic valve at physiological conditions. Hyperelastic material model, which is more realistic for describing heart valve have been incorporated in the CURVIB-FE-FSI code to simulate interaction of aortic heart valve with pulsatile blood flow. Comparative studies of hemodynamics for linear and nonlinear models of heart valve show drastic differences in blood flow patterns and hence differences of stresses causing impact at leaflets and aortic wall. This work is supported by the Lillehei Heart Institute at the University of Minnesota.

  11. The impact of deformation of an aneurysm model under pulsatile flow on hemodynamic analysis.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, T; Takao, H; Ichikawa, C; Kamiya, K; Murayama, Y; Motosuke, M

    2016-08-01

    Hemodynamic analysis of cerebral aneurysms has been widely carried out to clarify the mechanisms of their growth and rupture. In several cases, patient-specific aneurysm models made of transparent polymers have been used. Even though periodic changes in aneurysms due to the pulsation of blood flow could be important, the deformation of the model geometry and its effect on hemodynamic evaluation has not been fully investigated. In addition, the fabrication accuracy of aneurysm models has not been evaluated even though it may affect the hemodynamic parameters to be analyzed. In this study, the fabrication accuracy of a silicone aneurysm model was investigated. Additionally, the deformation of the model under pulsatile flow as well as its correlation with flow behavior was evaluated. Consequently, a fabrication method for an aneurysm model with high accuracy was established and the importance of the wall thickness of the model was also specified.

  12. Functional Imaging of the Hemodynamic Sensory Gating Response in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Andrew R.; Ruhl, David; Merideth, Flannery; Ling, Josef; Hanlon, Faith; Bustillo, Juan; Cañive, Jose

    2013-01-01

    The cortical (auditory and prefrontal) and/or subcortical (thalamic and hippocampal) generators of abnormal electrophysiological responses during sensory gating remain actively debated in the schizophrenia literature. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has the spatial resolution for disambiguating deep or simultaneous sources but has been relatively under-utilized to investigate generators of the gating response. Thirty patients with chronic schizophrenia (SP) and 30 matched controls participated in the current experiment. Hemodynamic response functions (HRF) for single (S1) and pairs (S1 + S2) of identical (IT; “gating-out” redundant information) or non-identical (NT; “gating-in” novel information) tones were generated through deconvolution. Increased or prolonged activation for patients in conjunction with deactivation for controls was observed within auditory cortex, prefrontal cortex and thalamus in response to single tones during the late hemodynamic response, and these group differences were not associated with clinical or cognitive symptomatology. Although patient hyper-activation to paired-tones conditions was present in several ROI, the effects were not statistically significant for either the gating-out or gating-in conditions. Finally, abnormalities in the post-undershoot of the auditory HRF were also observed for both single and paired tones conditions in patients. In conclusion, the amalgamation of the entire electrophysiological response to both S1 and S2 stimuli may limit hemodynamic sensitivity to paired tones during sensory gating, which may be more readily overcome by paradigms that utilize multiple stimuli rather than pairs. Patient hyperactivation following single tones is suggestive of deficits in basic inhibition, neurovascular abnormalities or a combination of both factors. PMID:22461278

  13. Echocardiographic and Hemodynamic Predictors of Mortality in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Lebron, Belinda N.; Forfia, Paul R.; Kreider, Maryl; Lee, James C.; Holmes, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) can lead to the development of pulmonary hypertension, which is associated with an increased risk of death. In pulmonary arterial hypertension, survival is directly related to the capacity of the right ventricle to adapt to elevated pulmonary vascular load. The relative importance of right ventricular function in IPF is not well understood. Our objective was to evaluate right ventricular echocardiographic and hemodynamic predictors of mortality in a cohort of patients with IPF referred for lung transplant evaluation. Methods: We performed a retrospective cohort study of 135 patients who met 2011 American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society criteria for IPF and who were evaluated for lung transplantation at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Results: Right ventricle:left ventricle diameter ratio (hazard ratio [HR], 4.5; 95% CI, 1.7-11.9), moderate to severe right atrial and right ventricular dilation (HR, 2.9; 95% CI, 1.4-5.9; and HR, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.4-5.4, respectively) and right ventricular dysfunction (HR, 5.5; 95% CI, 2.6-11.5) were associated with an increased risk of death. Higher pulmonary vascular resistance was also associated with increased mortality (HR per 1 Wood unit, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.1-1.5). These risk factors were independent of age, sex, race, height, weight, FVC, and lung transplantation status. Other hemodynamic indices, such as mean pulmonary artery pressure and cardiac index, were not associated with outcome. Conclusions: Right-sided heart size and right ventricular dysfunction measured by echocardiography and higher pulmonary vascular resistance by invasive hemodynamic assessment predict mortality in patients with IPF evaluated for lung transplantation. PMID:23450321

  14. Post-Treatment Hemodynamics of a Basilar Aneurysm and Bifurcation

    SciTech Connect

    Ortega, J; Hartman, J; Rodriguez, J; Maitland, D

    2008-01-16

    Aneurysm re-growth and rupture can sometimes unexpectedly occur following treatment procedures that were initially considered to be successful at the time of treatment and post-operative angiography. In some cases, this can be attributed to surgical clip slippage or endovascular coil compaction. However, there are other cases in which the treatment devices function properly. In these instances, the subsequent complications are due to other factors, perhaps one of which is the post-treatment hemodynamic stress. To investigate whether or not a treatment procedure can subject the parent artery to harmful hemodynamic stresses, computational fluid dynamics simulations are performed on a patient-specific basilar aneurysm and bifurcation before and after a virtual endovascular treatment. The simulations demonstrate that the treatment procedure produces a substantial increase in the wall shear stress. Analysis of the post-treatment flow field indicates that the increase in wall shear stress is due to the impingement of the basilar artery flow upon the aneurysm filling material and to the close proximity of a vortex tube to the artery wall. Calculation of the time-averaged wall shear stress shows that there is a region of the artery exposed to a level of wall shear stress that can cause severe damage to endothelial cells. The results of this study demonstrate that it is possible for a treatment procedure, which successfully excludes the aneurysm from the vascular system and leaves no aneurysm neck remnant, to elevate the hemodynamic stresses to levels that are injurious to the immediately adjacent vessel wall.

  15. Phonocardiographic Assessment of Hemodynamic Response to Balloon Aortic Valvuloplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Howard S.; Ferguson, James J.

    1990-01-01

    The time to systolic murmur peak is a clinical index that is useful in assessing the severity of valvular aortic stenosis. To determine whether phonocardiography could be used to detect a change in the timing of the murmur and thus to measure hemodynamic improvements in elderly balloon aortic valvuloplasty patients, we retrospectively reviewed phonocardiographic tracings of 18 patients taken before and after the procedure. Ten men and 8 women were included in the study; the mean age was 80.7 ± 11.2 years (range, 64 to 90). Phonocardiographic signals were digitized, and the R-wave to murmur peak interval (R-MP) was measured. In 11 patients, the R-MP decreased (mean decrease, 16% ± 11%): of these, 10 had a significant (> 25%) decrease in mean gradient; 10 had a significant (> 25%) decrease in peak-to-peak gradient; and the average increase in aortic valve area was 38%. Seven patients had an increase in R-MP (mean increase, 10% ± 9%): of these, 6 had a decrease in mean gradient of less than 25%; 6 had a decrease in peak-to-peak gradient of less than 25%; and the average increase in aortic valve area was 21%. Pre- and post-balloon aortic valvuloplasty heart rates were not significantly different (71 ± 8 beats/min versus 73 ± 5 beats/min). In this study, hemodynamic improvements after valvuloplasty were manifested by a reduction in the R-MP interval. We conclude that phonocardiography may be a practical, noninvasive method of assessing the hemodynamic response to balloon aortic valvuloplasty. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1990;17:42-7) PMID:15227188

  16. Effect of the serotonin antagonist ketanserin on the hemodynamic and morphological consequences of thrombotic infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, W.D.; Busto, R.; Ginsberg, M.D. )

    1989-12-01

    The effect of the serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) antagonist ketanserin on the remote hemodynamic consequences of thrombotic brain infarction was studied in rats. Treated rats received an injection of 1 mg/kg ketanserin 30 min before and 1 h following photochemically induced cortical infarction. Local CBF (LCBF) was assessed autoradiographically with ({sup 14}C)iodoantipyrine 4 h following infarction, and chronic infarct size was documented at 5 days. Thrombotic infarction led to significant decreases in LCBF within noninfarcted cortical regions. For example, mean LCBF was decreased to 63, 55, and 65% of control (nontreated normal rats) in ipsilateral frontal, lateral, and auditory cortices, respectively. In rats treated with ketanserin, significant decreases in LCBF were not documented within remote cortical areas compared with controls. In contrast to these hemodynamic effects, morphological analysis of chronic infarct size demonstrated no differences in infarct volume between treated (27 +/- 3 mm3) and nontreated (27 +/- 6 mm3) rats. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that 5-HT is involved in the widespread hemodynamic consequences of experimentally induced thrombotic infarction. Remote hemodynamic consequences of acute infarction can be inhibited without altering final infarct size.

  17. Acute effects of ferumoxytol on regulation of renal hemodynamics and oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Cantow, Kathleen; Pohlmann, Andreas; Flemming, Bert; Ferrara, Fabienne; Waiczies, Sonia; Grosenick, Dirk; Niendorf, Thoralf; Seeliger, Erdmann

    2016-01-01

    The superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle ferumoxytol is increasingly used as intravascular contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This study details the impact of ferumoxytol on regulation of renal hemodynamics and oxygenation. In 10 anesthetized rats, a single intravenous injection of isotonic saline (used as volume control) was followed by three consecutive injections of ferumoxytol to achieve cumulative doses of 6, 10, and 41 mg Fe/kg body mass. Arterial blood pressure, renal blood flow, renal cortical and medullary perfusion and oxygen tension were continuously measured. Regulation of renal hemodynamics and oxygenation was characterized by dedicated interventions: brief periods of suprarenal aortic occlusion, hypoxia, and hyperoxia. None of the three doses of ferumoxytol resulted in significant changes in any of the measured parameters as compared to saline. Ferumoxytol did not significantly alter regulation of renal hemodynamics and oxygenation as studied by aortic occlusion and hypoxia. The only significant effect of ferumoxytol at the highest dose was a blunting of the hyperoxia-induced increase in arterial pressure. Taken together, ferumoxytol has only marginal effects on the regulation of renal hemodynamics and oxygenation. This makes ferumoxytol a prime candidate as contrast agent for renal MRI including the assessment of renal blood volume fraction. PMID:27436132

  18. Noninvasive high-speed photoacoustic tomography of cerebral hemodynamics in awake-moving rats.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jianbo; Xi, Lei; Zhou, Junli; Huang, Hua; Zhang, Tao; Carney, Paul R; Jiang, Huabei

    2015-08-01

    We present a noninvasive method of photoacoustic tomography (PAT) for imaging cerebral hemodynamics in awake-moving rats. The wearable PAT (wPAT) system has a size of 15 mm in height and 33 mm in diameter, and a weight of ~8 g (excluding cabling). The wPAT achieved an imaging rate of 3.33 frames/s with a lateral resolution of 243 μm. Animal experiments were designed to show wPAT feasibility for imaging cerebral hemodynamics on awake-moving animals. Results showed that the cerebral oxy-hemoglobin and deoxy-hemoglobin changed significantly in response to hyperoxia; and, after the injection of pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), cerebral blood volume changed faster over time and larger in amplitude for rats in awake-moving state compared with rats under anesthesia. By providing a light-weight, high-resolution technology for in vivo monitoring of cerebral hemodynamics in awake-behaving animals, it will be possible to develop a comprehensive understanding on how activity alters hemodynamics in normal and diseased states.

  19. Noninvasive high-speed photoacoustic tomography of cerebral hemodynamics in awake-moving rats

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jianbo; Xi, Lei; Zhou, Junli; Huang, Hua; Zhang, Tao; Carney, Paul R; Jiang, Huabei

    2015-01-01

    We present a noninvasive method of photoacoustic tomography (PAT) for imaging cerebral hemodynamics in awake-moving rats. The wearable PAT (wPAT) system has a size of 15 mm in height and 33 mm in diameter, and a weight of ~8 g (excluding cabling). The wPAT achieved an imaging rate of 3.33 frames/s with a lateral resolution of 243 μm. Animal experiments were designed to show wPAT feasibility for imaging cerebral hemodynamics on awake-moving animals. Results showed that the cerebral oxy-hemoglobin and deoxy-hemoglobin changed significantly in response to hyperoxia; and, after the injection of pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), cerebral blood volume changed faster over time and larger in amplitude for rats in awake-moving state compared with rats under anesthesia. By providing a light-weight, high-resolution technology for in vivo monitoring of cerebral hemodynamics in awake-behaving animals, it will be possible to develop a comprehensive understanding on how activity alters hemodynamics in normal and diseased states. PMID:26082016

  20. Uncontrolled Hemorrhagic Shock Modeled via Liver Laceration in Mice with Real Time Hemodynamic Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Mitchell; Haldeman, Shannon; Gutierrez, Andres; Kohut, Lauryn; Sen Gupta, Anirban; Neal, Matthew D

    2017-05-21

    Uncontrolled hemorrhage is an important cause of preventable deaths among trauma patients. We have developed a murine model of uncontrolled hemorrhage via a liver laceration that results in consistent blood loss, hemodynamic alterations, and survival. Mice undergo a standardized resection of the left-middle lobe of the liver. They are allowed to bleed without mechanical intervention. Hemostatic agents can be administered as pre-treatment or rescue therapy depending on the interest of the investigator. During the time of hemorrhage, real-time hemodynamic monitoring via a left femoral arterial line is performed. Mice are then sacrificed, blood loss is quantified, blood is collected for further analysis, and organs are harvested for analysis of injury. Experimental design is described to allow for simultaneous testing of multiple animals. Liver hemorrhage as a model of uncontrolled hemorrhage exists in the literature, primarily in rat and porcine models. Some of these models utilize hemodynamic monitoring or quantify blood loss but lack consistency. The present model incorporates quantification of blood loss, real-time hemodynamic monitoring in a murine model that offers the advantage of using transgenic lines and a high-throughput mechanism to further investigate the pathophysiologic mechanisms in uncontrolled hemorrhage.

  1. Experimental Comparison of the Hemodynamic Effects of Bifurcating Coronary Stent Implantation Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brindise, Melissa; Vlachos, Pavlos; AETheR Lab Team

    2015-11-01

    Stent implantation in coronary bifurcations imposes unique effects to the blood flow patterns and currently there is no universally accepted stent deployment approach. Despite the fact that stent-induced changes can greatly alter clinical outcomes, no concrete understanding exists regarding the hemodynamic effects of each implantation method. This work presents an experimental evaluation of the hemodynamic differences between implantation techniques. We used four common stent implantation methods including the currently preferred one-stent provisional side branch (PSB) technique and the crush (CRU), Culotte (CUL), and T-stenting (T-PR) two-stent techniques, all deployed by a cardiologist in coronary models. Particle image velocimetry was used to obtain velocity and pressure fields. Wall shear stress (WSS), oscillatory shear index, residence times, and drag and compliance metrics were evaluated and compared against an un-stented case. The results of this study demonstrate that while PSB is preferred, both it and T-PR yielded detrimental hemodynamic effects such as low WSS values. CRU provided polarizing and unbalanced results. CUL demonstrated a symmetric flow field, balanced WSS distribution, and ultimately the most favorable hemodynamic environment.

  2. Invasive hemodynamic characterization of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Mads J; Borlaug, Barry A

    2014-07-01

    Recent hemodynamic studies have advanced our understanding of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Despite improved pathophysiologic insight, clinical trials have failed to identify an effective treatment for HFpEF. Invasive hemodynamic assessment can diagnose or exclude HFpEF, making it invaluable in understanding the basis of the disease. This article reviews the hemodynamic mechanisms underlying HFpEF and how they manifest clinically, discusses invasive hemodynamic assessment as a diagnostic tool, and explores how invasive hemodynamic profiling may allow understanding of pathophysiological differences and inform the design and entry criteria for future trials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Misexpression of a Chloroplast Aspartyl Protease Leads to Severe Growth Defects and Alters Carbohydrate Metabolism in Arabidopsis1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Paparelli, Eleonora; Gonzali, Silvia; Parlanti, Sandro; Novi, Giacomo; Giorgi, Federico M.; Licausi, Francesco; Kosmacz, Monika; Feil, Regina; Lunn, John E.; Brust, Henrike; van Dongen, Joost T.; Steup, Martin; Perata, Pierdomenico

    2012-01-01

    The crucial role of carbohydrate in plant growth and morphogenesis is widely recognized. In this study, we describe the characterization of nana, a dwarf Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutant impaired in carbohydrate metabolism. We show that the nana dwarf phenotype was accompanied by altered leaf morphology and a delayed flowering time. Our genetic and molecular data indicate that the mutation in nana is due to a transfer DNA insertion in the promoter region of a gene encoding a chloroplast-located aspartyl protease that alters its pattern of expression. Overexpression of the gene (oxNANA) phenocopies the mutation. Both nana and oxNANA display alterations in carbohydrate content, and the extent of these changes varies depending on growth light intensity. In particular, in low light, soluble sugar levels are lower and do not show the daily fluctuations observed in wild-type plants. Moreover, nana and oxNANA are defective in the expression of some genes implicated in sugar metabolism and photosynthetic light harvesting. Interestingly, some chloroplast-encoded genes as well as genes whose products seem to be involved in retrograde signaling appear to be down-regulated. These findings suggest that the NANA aspartic protease has an important regulatory function in chloroplasts that not only influences photosynthetic carbon metabolism but also plastid and nuclear gene expression. PMID:22987884

  4. Kinematic alterations of the lower limbs and pelvis during an ascending stairs task are associated with the degree of knee osteoarthritis severity.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Glaucia Helena; Selistre, Luiz Fernando Approbato; Petrella, Marina; Mattiello, Stela Márcia

    2017-03-01

    Individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA) generally demonstrate great difficulty in ascending stairs. The strategies and compensations used by these individuals in stair activities have not been fully established. The purpose of this study was to investigate the joint kinematics of the pelvis, hip, knee and ankle throughout the gait cycle, in the sagittal and frontal planes, in individuals with mild and moderate knee OA, during an ascending stairs task. Thirty-one individuals with knee OA and 19 controls were subjected to clinical and radiographic analysis, divided into three groups: control, mild knee OA, and moderate knee OA. Participants answered a self-reported questionnaire, carried out performance-based tests, and their kinematic data were recorded during an ascending stairs task using an eight-camera Qualisys 3D-Motion analysis system. The individuals with moderate degrees of knee OA demonstrated kinematic alterations in the pelvis, hip, knee, and ankle in the sagittal plane. The individuals with mild degrees of knee OA demonstrated kinematic alterations of the hip in the frontal plane, and kinematic alterations of the ankle in the sagittal plane. The ascending stairs task allowed verification of meaningful information regarding gait strategies used by individuals with mild and moderate knee OA. The strategies of these two groups of individuals are different for this task, although more pronounced in individuals with moderate knee OA. The findings should be taken into account in the development of rehabilitation programs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Optimal design for nonlinear estimation of the hemodynamic response function.

    PubMed

    Maus, Bärbel; van Breukelen, Gerard J P; Goebel, Rainer; Berger, Martijn P F

    2012-06-01

    Subject-specific hemodynamic response functions (HRFs) have been recommended to capture variation in the form of the hemodynamic response between subjects (Aguirre et al., [ 1998]: Neuroimage 8:360-369). The purpose of this article is to find optimal designs for estimation of subject-specific parameters for the double gamma HRF. As the double gamma function is a nonlinear function of its parameters, optimal design theory for nonlinear models is employed in this article. The double gamma function is linearized by a Taylor approximation and the maximin criterion is used to handle dependency of the D-optimal design on the expansion point of the Taylor approximation. A realistic range of double gamma HRF parameters is used for the expansion point of the Taylor approximation. Furthermore, a genetic algorithm (GA) (Kao et al., [ 2009]: Neuroimage 44:849-856) is applied to find locally optimal designs for the different expansion points and the maximin design chosen from the locally optimal designs is compared to maximin designs obtained by m-sequences, blocked designs, designs with constant interstimulus interval (ISI) and random event-related designs. The maximin design obtained by the GA is most efficient. Random event-related designs chosen from several generated designs and m-sequences have a high efficiency, while blocked designs and designs with a constant ISI have a low efficiency compared to the maximin GA design.

  6. [Invasive and minimally invasive hemodynamic monitoring].

    PubMed

    Hansen, Matthias

    2016-10-01

    Advanced hemodynamic monitoring is necessary for adequate management of high-risk patients or patients with derangement of circulation. Studies demonstrate a benefit of early goal directed therapy in unstable cardiopulmonary situations. In these days we have different possibilities of minimally invasive or invasive hemodynamic monitoring. Minimally invasive measurements like pulse conture analysis or pulse wave analysis being less accurate under some circumstances, however only an artery catheter is needed for cardiac output monitoring. Pulmonary artery, transpulmonary thermodilution and lithium dilution technology have acceptable accuracy in cardiac output measurement. For therapy of unstable circulation there are additionally parameters to obtain. The pulmonary artery catheter is the device with the largest rate of complications, used by a trained crew and with a correct indication, his use is unchained justified.

  7. Non-invasive measurements of tissue hemodynamics with hybrid diffuse optical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durduran, Turgut

    Diffuse optical techniques were used to measure hemodynamics of tissues non-invasively. Spectroscopy and tomography of the brain, muscle and implanted tumors were carried out in animal models and humans. Two qualitatively different methods, diffuse optical tomography and diffuse correlation tomography, were hybridized permitting simultaneous measurement of total hemoglobin concentration, blood oxygen saturation and blood flow. This combination of information was processed further to derive estimates of oxygen metabolism (e.g. CMRO 2) in tissue. The diffuse correlation measurements of blood flow were demonstrated in human tissues, for the first time, demonstrating continous, non-invasive imaging of oxygen metabolism in large tissue volumes several centimeters below the tissue surface. The bulk of these investigations focussed on cerebral hemodynamics. Extensive validation of this methodology was carried out in in vivo rat brain models. Three dimensional images of deep tissue hemodynamics in middle cerebral artery occlusion and cortical spreading depression (CSD) were obtained. CSD hemodynamics were found to depend strongly on partial pressure of carbon dioxide. The technique was then adapted for measurement of human brain. All optical spectroscopic measurements of CMRO2 during functional activation were obtained through intact human skull non-invasively. Finally, a high spatio-temporal resolution measurement of cerebral blood flow due to somatosensory cortex activation following electrical forepaw stimulation in rats was carried out with laser speckle flowmetry. New analysis methods were introduced for laser speckle flowmetry. In other organs, deep tissue hemodynamics were measured on human calf muscle during exercise and cuff-ischemia and were shown to have some clinical utility for peripheral vascular disease. In mice tumor models, the measured hemodynamics were shown to be predictive of photodynamic therapy efficacy, again suggesting promise of clinical utility

  8. Automatic coronary lumen segmentation with partial volume modeling improves lesions' hemodynamic significance assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freiman, M.; Lamash, Y.; Gilboa, G.; Nickisch, H.; Prevrhal, S.; Schmitt, H.; Vembar, M.; Goshen, L.

    2016-03-01

    The determination of hemodynamic significance of coronary artery lesions from cardiac computed tomography angiography (CCTA) based on blood flow simulations has the potential to improve CCTA's specificity, thus resulting in improved clinical decision making. Accurate coronary lumen segmentation required for flow simulation is challenging due to several factors. Specifically, the partial-volume effect (PVE) in small-diameter lumina may result in overestimation of the lumen diameter that can lead to an erroneous hemodynamic significance assessment. In this work, we present a coronary artery segmentation algorithm tailored specifically for flow simulations by accounting for the PVE. Our algorithm detects lumen regions that may be subject to the PVE by analyzing the intensity values along the coronary centerline and integrates this information into a machine-learning based graph min-cut segmentation framework to obtain accurate coronary lumen segmentations. We demonstrate the improvement in hemodynamic significance assessment achieved by accounting for the PVE in the automatic segmentation of 91 coronary artery lesions from 85 patients. We compare hemodynamic significance assessments by means of fractional flow reserve (FFR) resulting from simulations on 3D models generated by our segmentation algorithm with and without accounting for the PVE. By accounting for the PVE we improved the area under the ROC curve for detecting hemodynamically significant CAD by 29% (N=91, 0.85 vs. 0.66, p<0.05, Delong's test) with invasive FFR threshold of 0.8 as the reference standard. Our algorithm has the potential to facilitate non-invasive hemodynamic significance assessment of coronary lesions.

  9. Altered miRNA Signature of Developing Germ-cells in Infertile Patients Relates to the Severity of Spermatogenic Failure and Persists in Spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Xavier; Mata, Ana; Bassas, Lluís; Larriba, Sara

    2015-12-09

    The aim of this study was to assess the cellular miRNA expression behaviour in testes with spermatogenic failure (SpF). We performed a high-throughput screen of 623 mature miRNAs by a quantitative RT-qPCR-based approach in histologically well-defined testicular samples with spermatogenic disruption at different germ-cell stages, which revealed altered patterns of miRNA expression. We focussed on the differentially expressed miRNAs whose expression correlated with the number of testicular mature germ-cells and described the combined expression values of a panel of three miRNAs (miR-449a, miR-34c-5p and miR-122) as a predictive test for the presence of mature germ-cells in testicular biopsy. Additionally, we determined decreased cellular miRNA content in developing germ-cells of SpF testis; this was more noticeable the earlier the stage of germ-cell differentiation was affected by maturation failure. Furthermore, we showed that the miRNA expression profile in mature sperm from mild SpF patients was widely altered. Our results suggest that the cellular miRNA content of developed germ-cells depends heavily on the efficacy of the spermatogenic process. What is more, spermatozoa that have fulfilled the differentiation process still retain the dysregulated miRNA pattern observed in the developing SpF germ-cells. This altered miRNA molecular signature may have functional implications for the male gamete.

  10. The Effect of Intravenous Magnesium Sulfate and Lidocaine in Hemodynamic Responses to Endotracheal Intubation in Elective Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mesbah Kiaee, Mehrdad; Safari, Saeid; Movaseghi, Gholam Reza; Mohaghegh Dolatabadi, Mahmoud Reza; Ghorbanlo, Masoud; Etemadi, Mehrnoosh; Amiri, Seyed Arash; Zamani, Mohammad Mahdi

    2014-01-01

    Background: There have been many concerns about alteration in hemodynamic parameters within and shortly after endotracheal intubation (ETI) in patients scheduled for elective coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Objectives: We compared the attenuation effect of magnesium sulfate and lidocaine on hemodynamic responses after ETI, in patients undergoing CABG. Patients and Methods: In this randomized controlled trial 150 patients undergoing elective CABG were enrolled. Included patients were randomly allocated to three groups and received lidocaine (1.5 mg/kg), magnesium sulfate (50 mg/kg within five minute), or normal saline, 90 seconds before ETI. Baseline hemodynamic parameters including heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were recorded immediately before anesthesia induction, before intubation, immediately after intubation, and at second and fifth minutes after intubation. Results: The baseline hemodynamic variables had no deference among the three groups. HR between intubation and five minute after intubation was significantly lower in two groups received lidocaine or magnesium sulfate in comparison with placebo group. Lidocaine induced more than 20% decrease in HR and MAP immediately after intubation; hence, lidocaine group showed significant MAP reduction in comparison with the two other groups. Conclusions: Lidocaine induced hemodynamic instability but premedication of magnesium sulfate maintained hemodynamic stability after intubation. Therefore, in patients undergoing CABG who received high-dose intravenous analgesic for general anesthesia, the administration of magnesium sulfate might result in maintaining hemodynamic stability after ETI in comparison with lidocaine. PMID:25237632

  11. Comparison of hemodynamic, biochemical and hematological parameters of healthy pregnant women in the third trimester of pregnancy and the active labor phase

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pregnancy is accompanied by several hemodynamic, biochemical and hematological changes which revert to normal values after labor. The mean values of these parameters have been reported for developed countries, but not for Mexican women. Furthermore, labor constitutes a stress situation, in which these factors may be altered. It is known that serologic increase of heat shock protein (Hsp) 70 is associated with abnormal pregnancies, presenting very low level in normal pregnant women. Nevertheless, there are no studies where these measurements are compared in healthy pregnant women at their third trimester of pregnancy (3TP) and the active labor phase (ActLP). Methods Seventy five healthy Mexican pregnant women were included. Hemodynamic, biochemical and hematological parameters were obtained in all cases, and serum Hsp70 levels were measured in a sample of 15 women at 3TP and at ActLP. Results Significant differences were found in most analysis performed and in Hsp70 concentration at 3TP as compared to ActLP, however all were within normal range in both conditions, supporting that only in pathological pregnancies Hsp70 is drastically increased. Conclusion Results obtained indicate that 3TP and ActLP have clinical similarities in normal pregnancies, therefore if abnormalities are found during 3TP, precautions should be taken before ActLP. PMID:21548965

  12. Comparison of hemodynamic, biochemical and hematological parameters of healthy pregnant women in the third trimester of pregnancy and the active labor phase.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Dennen, Fernando; Martínez-Ocaña, Joel; Kawa-Karasik, Simón; Villanueva-Egan, Luis; Reyes-Paredes, Norberto; Flisser, Ana; Olivo-Díaz, Angélica

    2011-05-06

    Pregnancy is accompanied by several hemodynamic, biochemical and hematological changes which revert to normal values after labor. The mean values of these parameters have been reported for developed countries, but not for Mexican women. Furthermore, labor constitutes a stress situation, in which these factors may be altered. It is known that serologic increase of heat shock protein (Hsp) 70 is associated with abnormal pregnancies, presenting very low level in normal pregnant women. Nevertheless, there are no studies where these measurements are compared in healthy pregnant women at their third trimester of pregnancy (3TP) and the active labor phase (ActLP). Seventy five healthy Mexican pregnant women were included. Hemodynamic, biochemical and hematological parameters were obtained in all cases, and serum Hsp70 levels were measured in a sample of 15 women at 3TP and at ActLP. Significant differences were found in most analysis performed and in Hsp70 concentration at 3TP as compared to ActLP, however all were within normal range in both conditions, supporting that only in pathological pregnancies Hsp70 is drastically increased. Results obtained indicate that 3TP and ActLP have clinical similarities in normal pregnancies, therefore if abnormalities are found during 3TP, precautions should be taken before ActLP.

  13. Hemodynamic effects of naloxone in anaphylactic shock.

    PubMed

    Barsan, W G; Hedges, J R; Syverud, S A

    1986-07-01

    Recent reports suggest that endorphins may contribute to hemodynamic depression in septic and hemorrhagic shock. There is also evidence that reversal of endorphin effects with high dose naloxone may improve hemodynamic function and improve survival in shock states. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of naloxone on hemodynamic parameters in anaphylactic shock. Anaphylactic shock was induced in sensitized rabbits with horse serum. Three minutes after serum challenge, rabbits were treated with a 3 mg/kg bolus of naloxone followed by a 3 mg/kg per h infusion (group I, n = 8), or by injection with an equal volume of saline (group II, n = 8). Cardiac output, blood pressure, heart rate and body temperature were monitored continuously for 60 min and the experiment was terminated. There was a significant increase in cardiac index in group I animals at 10 min (P less than 0.01) and 15 min (P less than 0.01). Stroke volume index was also higher in naloxone treated animals at 10 min and 15 min (P less than 0.05). Although mean blood pressure was higher in group I animals at all time intervals after naloxone was begun, the difference was statistically significant only at 60 min (P less than 0.05). Peripheral vascular resistance index was not significantly different for the two groups.

  14. Basic Principles of Hemodynamics and Cerebral Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Munarriz, Pablo M; Gómez, Pedro A; Paredes, Igor; Castaño-Leon, Ana M; Cepeda, Santiago; Lagares, Alfonso

    2016-04-01

    Rupture is the most serious consequence of cerebral aneurysms, and its likelihood depends on nonmodifiable and modifiable risk factors. Recent efforts have focused on analyzing the effects of hemodynamic forces on the initiation, growth, and rupture of cerebral aneurysms. Studies of the role of hemodynamics in the physiopathology of intracranial aneurysms fall between mechanical engineering and molecular biology. This review summarizes the basic principles of the effect of hemodynamic forces on the cerebral vascular wall. The size of the aneurysm dome is the most common parameter used in clinical practice to estimate the risk of rupture. However, relying only on aneurysm size means excessively simplifying a more complicated reality. Aneurysms emerge in areas of the vascular wall exposed to high wall shear stress. The direction in which blood flows once an aneurysm forms depends on aspects such as neck diameter, its angle with respect to the parent artery, the parent vessel caliber, the caliber or the angle of efferent vessels, and aneurysm shape. The progression and rupture of aneurysms have been associated with zones of the aneurysm wall exposed to both high and low wall shear stresses. Advances in this challenging and growing field are intended to predict more precisely the risk of rupture of aneurysms and to better understand the mechanisms of origin and growth of aneurysms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. In-vivo optical imaging and spectroscopy of cerebral hemodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chao

    Functional optical imaging techniques, such as diffuse optical imaging and spectroscopy and laser speckle imaging (LSI), were used in research and clinical settings to measure cerebral hemodynamics. In this thesis, theoretical and experimental developments of the techniques and their in-vivo applications ranging from small animals to adult humans are demonstrated. Near infrared diffuse optical techniques non-invasively measure hemoglobin concentrations, blood oxygen saturation (diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, DRS) and blood flow (diffuse correlation spectroscopy, DCS) in deep tissues, e.g. brain. A noise model was derived for DCS measurements. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) measured with DCS was validated with arterial-spin-labeling MRI. Three-dimensional CBF tomography was obtained during cortical spreading depression from a rat using the optimized diffuse correlation tomographic method. Cerebral hemodynamics in newborn piglets after traumatic brain injury were continuously monitored optically for six hours to demonstrate the feasibility of using diffuse optical techniques as bedside patient monitors. Cerebral autoregulation in piglets and human stroke patients was demonstrated to be non-invasively assessable via the continuous DCS measurement. Significant differences of CBF responses to head-of-bead maneuvers were observed between the peri- and contra-infarct hemispheres in human stroke patients. A significant portion of patient population showed paradoxical CBF responses, indicating the importance of individualized stroke management. The development of a speckle noise model revealed the source of noise for LSI. LSI was then applied to study the acute functional recovery of the rat brain following transient brain ischemia. The spatial and temporal cerebral blood flow responses to functional stimulation were statistically quantified. The area of activation, and the temporal response to stimulation were found significantly altered by the ischemic insult, while the

  16. Virtual stenting of intracranial aneurysms: application of hemodynamic modification analysis.

    PubMed

    Song, Yunsun; Choe, Jooae; Liu, Hairi; Park, Kye Jin; Yu, HyungBin; Lim, Ok Kyun; Kim, Hyoweon; Park, Darlene; Ge, Jiajia; Suh, Dae Chul

    2016-08-01

    Practical application of hemodynamic modification analysis based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in intracranial aneurysms is still under study. To determine the clinical applicability of virtual stenting of aneurysms by comparing the simulated results with clinical outcome of real stenting. Three-dimensional (3D) digital subtraction angiography (DSA) images were imported to a dedicated integrated prototypic CFD platform (Siemens Healthcare GmbH) which allows all necessary steps of 3D models for CFD analysis. The results of CFD simulation with virtual implantation of a stent can be visualized in the same platform for qualitative comparisons on a color-coded volume visualization window. Five small intracranial aneurysms with and without virtual stenting were analyzed and assessed on a qualitative level. Expert rating were performed for evaluating the simulated results, and comparing those to the long-term follow-up outcomes of real stenting. CFD simulation after virtual stenting was feasible in five differently located aneurysms and corresponded to the long-term changes of stented aneurysms by showing alteration in flow pattern. There was no significant difference (P = 0.5) between the simulated hemodynamic changes after virtual stenting and the angiographic changes after stenting in four aneurysms except one. There was good agreement regarding the assessment of the changes by two raters (kappa = 0.657). CFD analysis using patient-specific virtual stenting of the CFD platform may be used as a simple and less time-consuming test tool predicting the involution of aneurysms after stent placement by analyzing the vector visualization of the flow changes. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2015.

  17. Tempol improves renal hemodynamics and pressure natriuresis in hyperthyroid rats.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Juan Manuel; Rodríguez Gómez, Isabel; Wangensteen, Rosemary; Alvarez-Guerra, Miriam; de Dios Luna, Juan; García-Estañ, Joaquín; Vargas, Félix

    2008-03-01

    Hyperthyroidism in rats is associated with increased oxidative stress. These animals also show abnormal renal hemodynamics and an attenuated pressure-diuresis-natriuresis (PDN) response. We analyzed the role of oxidative stress as a mediator of these alterations by examining acute effects of tempol, a superoxide dismutase mimetic. The effects of increasing bolus doses of tempol (25-150 micromol/kg) on mean arterial pressure (MAP), renal vascular resistance (RVR), and cortical (CBF) and medullary (MBF) blood flow were studied in control and thyroxine (T4)-treated rats. In another experiment, tempol was infused at 150 micromol.kg(-1).h(-1) to analyze its effects on the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and on PDN response in these animals. Tempol dose dependently decreased MAP and RVR and increased CBF and MBF in control and T4-treated rats, but the T4 group showed a greater responsiveness to tempol in all of these variables. The highest dose of tempol decreased RVR by 13.5 +/- 2.1 and 5.5 +/- 1.2 mmHg.ml(-1).min(-1) in hyperthyroid (P < 0.01) and control rats, respectively. GFR was not changed by tempol in controls but was significantly increased in the hyperthyroid group. Tempol did not change the absolute or fractional PDN responses of controls but significantly improved those of hyperthyroid rats, although without attaining normal values. Tempol increased the slopes of the relationship between renal perfusion pressure and natriuresis (T4+tempol: 0.17 +/- 0.05; T4: 0.09 +/- 0.03 microeq.min(-1).g(-1).mmHg(-1); P < 0.05) and reduced 8-isoprostane excretion in hyperthyroid rats. These results show that antioxidant treatment with tempol improves renal hemodynamic variables and PDN response in hyperthyroid rats, indicating the participation of an increased oxidative stress in these mechanisms.

  18. Hemodynamic management of septic shock: is it time for "individualized goal-directed hemodynamic therapy" and for specifically targeting the microcirculation?

    PubMed

    Saugel, Bernd; Trepte, Constantin J; Heckel, Kai; Wagner, Julia Y; Reuter, Daniel A

    2015-06-01

    Septic shock is a life-threatening condition in both critically ill medical patients and surgical patients during the perioperative phase. In septic shock, specific alterations in global cardiovascular dynamics (i.e., the macrocirculation) and in the microcirculatory blood flow (i.e., the microcirculation) have been described. However, the presence and degree of microcirculatory failure are in part independent from systemic macrohemodynamic variables. Macrocirculatory and microcirculatory failure can independently induce organ dysfunction. We review current diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for the assessment and optimization of both the macrocirculation and the microcirculation in septic shock. There are various technologies for the determination of macrocirculatory hemodynamic variables. We discuss the data on early goal-directed therapy for the resuscitation of the macrocirculation. In addition, we describe the concept of "individualized goal-directed hemodynamic therapy." Technologies to assess the local microcirculation are also available. However, adequate resuscitation goals for the optimization of the microcirculation still need to be defined. At present, we are not ready to specifically monitor and target the microcirculation in clinical routine outside studies. In the future, concepts for an integrative approach for individualized hemodynamic management of the macrocirculation and in parallel the microcirculation might constitute a huge opportunity to define additional resuscitation end points in septic shock.

  19. Oral contraceptive use, muscle sympathetic nerve activity, and systemic hemodynamics in young women

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Ronee E.; Hart, Emma C.; Charkoudian, Nisha; Curry, Timothy B.; Carter, Jason R.; Fu, Qi; Minson, Christopher T.; Joyner, Michael J.; Barnes, Jill N.

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous female sex hormones influence muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), a regulator of arterial blood pressure and important factor in hypertension development. While nearly 80% of American women report using hormonal contraceptives sometime during their life, the influence of combined oral contraceptives (OCs) on MSNA and systemic hemodynamics remains equivocal. The goal of this study was to determine if women taking OCs have altered MSNA and hemodynamics (cardiac output and total peripheral resistance) at rest during the placebo phase of OC use compared to women with natural menstrual cycles during the early follicular phase. We retrospectively analyzed data from studies in which healthy, premenopausal women (ages 18–35 years old) participated. We collected MSNA values at rest and hemodynamic measurements in women taking OCs (n=53, 25±4 yr) and women with natural menstrual cycles (n=74, 25±4 yr). Blood pressure was higher in women taking OCs versus those with natural menstrual cycles (mean arterial pressure: 89±1 vs. 85±1 mmHg, respectively; p=0.01), although MSNA was similar in both groups (MSNA burst incidence: 16±1 vs. 18±1 bursts/100 heartbeats, respectively, p=0.19). In a subset of women in which detailed hemodynamic data were available, those taking OCs (n=33) had similar cardiac output (4.9±0.2 vs. 4.7±0.2 L/min, respectively; p=0.47) and total peripheral resistance (19.2±0.8 vs. 20.0±0.9 units, respectively; p=0.51) as women with natural menstrual cycles (n=22). In conclusion, women taking OCs have higher resting blood pressure and similar MSNA and hemodynamics during the placebo phase of OC use compared to naturally menstruating women in the early follicular phase. PMID:26101348

  20. Image-based modeling of hemodynamics in coronary artery aneurysms caused by Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Dibyendu; Kahn, Andrew M; Burns, Jane C; Sankaran, Sethuraman; Shadden, Shawn C; Marsden, Alison L

    2012-07-01

    Kawasaki Disease (KD) is the leading cause of acquired pediatric heart disease. A subset of KD patients develops aneurysms in the coronary arteries, leading to increased risk of thrombosis and myocardial infarction. Currently, there are limited clinical data to guide the management of these patients, and the hemodynamic effects of these aneurysms are unknown. We applied patient-specific modeling to systematically quantify hemodynamics and wall shear stress in coronary arteries with aneurysms caused by KD. We modeled the hemodynamics in the aneurysms using anatomic data obtained by multi-detector computed tomography (CT) in a 10-year-old male subject who suffered KD at age 3 years. The altered hemodynamics were compared to that of a reconstructed normal coronary anatomy using our subject as the model. Computer simulations using a robust finite element framework were used to quantify time-varying shear stresses and particle trajectories in the coronary arteries. We accounted for the cardiac contractility and the microcirculation using physiologic downstream boundary conditions. The presence of aneurysms in the proximal coronary artery leads to flow recirculation, reduced wall shear stress within the aneurysm, and high wall shear stress gradients at the neck of the aneurysm. The wall shear stress in the KD subject (2.95-3.81 dynes/sq cm) was an order of magnitude lower than the normal control model (17.10-27.15 dynes/sq cm). Particle residence times were significantly higher, taking 5 cardiac cycles to fully clear from the aneurysmal regions in the KD subject compared to only 1.3 cardiac cycles from the corresponding regions of the normal model. In this novel quantitative study of hemodynamics in coronary aneurysms caused by KD, we documented markedly abnormal flow patterns that are associated with increased risk of thrombosis. This methodology has the potential to provide further insights into the effects of aneurysms in KD and to help risk stratify patients for

  1. The progression from a lower to a higher invasive stage of bladder cancer is associated with severe alterations in glucose and pyruvate metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Conde, Vanessa R.; Oliveira, Pedro F.; Ramalhosa, Elsa; Pereira, José A.; Alves, Marco G.; Silva, Branca M.

    2015-07-01

    Cancer cells present a particular metabolic behavior. We hypothesized that the progression of bladder cancer could be accompanied by changes in cells glycolytic profile. We studied two human bladder cancer cells, RT4 and TCCSUP, in which the latter represents a more invasive stage. The levels of glucose, pyruvate, alanine and lactate in the extracellular media were measured by Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. The protein expression levels of glucose transporters 1 (GLUT1) and 3 (GLUT3), monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4), phosphofructokinase-1 (PFK1), glutamic-pyruvate transaminase (GPT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were determined. Our data showed that glucose consumption and GLUT3 levels were similar in both cell lines, but TCCSUP cells displayed lower levels of GLUT1 and PFK expression. An increase in pyruvate consumption, concordant with the higher levels of lactate and alanine production, was also detected in TCCSUP cells. Moreover, TCCSUP cells presented lower protein expression levels of GPT and LDH. These results illustrate that bladder cancer progression is associated with alterations in cells glycolytic profile, namely the switch from glucose to pyruvate consumption in the more aggressive stage. This may be useful to develop new therapies and to identify biomarkers for cancer progression. - Highlights: • Metabolic phenotype of less and high invasive bladder cancer cells was studied. • Bladder cancer progression involves alterations in cells glycolytic profile. • More invasive bladder cancer cells switch from glucose to pyruvate consumption. • Our results may help to identify metabolic biomarkers of bladder cancer progression.

  2. Obesity and major depression: Body-mass index (BMI) is associated with a severe course of disease and specific neurostructural alterations.

    PubMed

    Opel, Nils; Redlich, Ronny; Grotegerd, Dominik; Dohm, Katharina; Heindel, Walter; Kugel, Harald; Arolt, Volker; Dannlowski, Udo

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is one of the most prevalent somatic comorbidities of major depressive disorder (MDD). Both disorders rank among the leading challenges in public health and have been independently characterized by gray matter alterations in partly overlapping brain structures. Hence, it appears crucial to investigate the possibility of a shared neurostructural correlate of this frequent comorbidity as well as its clinical implications. One hundred and fourty-four patients suffering from acute MDD and 141 healthy control subjects underwent structural MRI. Imaging data were analyzed using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Body-mass-index (BMI) as well as state and course of disease were assessed. Higher BMI was associated with a highly comparable pattern of gray matter reductions in the medial prefrontal cortex, the orbitofrontal cortex, the caudate nucleus and the thalamus in MDD patients and healthy controls alike. In MDD-patients, BMI was associated with a more chronic course of disease and both BMI and chronicity of disorder were related to similar morphometric anomalies in medial prefrontal areas. In MDD, obese subjects might be characterized by a more chronic course of disease. Moreover, obesity and chronicity of disorder seem to share overlapping neurostructural anomalies in prefrontal areas involved in emotion regulation and impulse control. Hence, our data provide evidence for specific morphological alterations underlying this prevalent comorbidity. It further underlines the clinical importance of preventive measures against obesity accompanying MDD treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Technical note: Improvement of cadaveric skin samples (with severe morphological alteration connected to putrefaction or injury) by an extended histological processing.

    PubMed

    Boracchi, M; Andreola, S; Gentile, G; Maghin, F; Marchesi, M; Muccino, M; Zoja, R

    2016-04-01

    The microscopic study and the interpretation of skin samples with advanced post-mortal phenomena or with particular destructive injuries is problematic for the forensic pathologist. In an attempt of restoring the histological architecture of cadaveric skin and overcoming these types of problem, the Authors performed a histological processing that was longer than the standard: it was extended until 62 days to evaluate the improvement of the microscopic morphological aspect. Cutaneous samples were taken from 25 cadavers (5 typologies of skin: charred, putrified, corifed, mummified and partially skeletonized), fixed with a 10%-buffered formalin and then processed in two different ways: one half of the samples was routinely addressed to the standard-time automatic technique, while the other half was manually processed with prolonged times. All the slides were then stained in Hematoxylin-Eosin. The standard-processed slides demonstrated marked morphological alterations and artefacts at the microscopic observation; conversely, those processed with the prolonged manual technique showed an improvement in the morphological structure, sometimes permitting the identification of the anatomical components. Though it is characterized by the inconvenience of protracted times, the application of a long-term manual histological processing to cadaveric skin samples with advanced post-mortal alteration permits to better observe the anatomical architecture of skin and it could be useful and helpful in the evaluation of such cases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Altered expression of neprilysin family members in the pituitary gland of sleep-disturbed rats, an animal model of severe fatigue.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Tokiko; Kiryu-Seo, Sumiko; Tanaka, Masaaki; Konishi, Hiroyuki; Iwata, Nobuhisa; Saido, Takaomi; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Kiyama, Hiroshi

    2005-11-01

    Alterations of the expression of some peptidases in the pituitary gland of a fatigued rat model were identified. Rats were kept in a cage filled with water to a height of 1.5 cm to disturb deep sleep. After 24-h sleep disturbance, expression of neutral endopeptidase 24.11 (neprilysin) mRNA was increased in the intermediate lobe of the pituitary gland, whereas the mRNA expression of another family member, damage-induced neuronal endopeptidase, which is normally expressed in a subgroup of anterior pituitary cells, was significantly suppressed. These alterations were demonstrated by RT-PCR, northern blotting and in situ hybridization. Other family members, such as neprilysin 2 and endothelin converting enzyme-1, did not show any change in mRNA expression. An increase of neprilysin mRNA expression was not seen in any other tissues of the sleep-disturbed rats. The enzymatic activity of neprilysin was also increased in the pituitary. The augmentation of neprilysin expression and activity was prolonged as long as the sleep disturbance continued (up to 5 days), and returned to the basal level when rats were allowed to sleep freely. These results suggest that peptide processing and degradation in the pituitary may be an influential factor in fatigued states such as sleep disturbance.

  5. Numerical simulation of aneurysm hemodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacVicar, Stephen; Huynh, Sophia; Rossmann, Jenn

    2003-11-01

    Rupture of intracranial aneurysms is the leading cause of spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage, with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Numerical simulations of flow in a variety of two-dimensional and three-dimensional saccular aneurysm geometries were performed to evaluate possible sites and mechanisms for aneurysm growth and rupture. The governing equations were solved in their finite volume formulation for both steady and pulsatile flows. Recirculation zones and secondary flows were observed in aneurysms and arteries. Regions of elevated and oscillating shear stress were observed, often at the aneurysm's distal shoulder. The influence of several geometric factors, including vessel curvature, branching angle, and aneurysm shape, on flow patterns and fluid mechanical forces was studied, with the goal of assessing the risks posed by given aneurysm geometry.

  6. Effects of antiaggregant and antiinflammatory doses of aspirin on coronary hemodynamics and myocardial reactive hyperemia in conscious dogs.

    PubMed

    Andrieu, S; Lebret, M; Maclouf, J; Bévérelli, F; Giudicelli, J F; Berdeaux, A

    1999-02-01

    Clinical studies have shown that low doses of aspirin (<300 mg/day) inhibit thromboxane A2 production and platelet aggregation but preserve prostacyclin synthesis. In contrast, high doses of aspirin (>1,000 mg/day) suppress the synthesis of both eicosanoids. Because the consequences of aspirin administration have never been investigated on coronary vasomotor tone in vivo, we investigated the effects of low and high doses of aspirin on systemic and coronary hemodynamics under basal conditions and after myocardial reactive hyperemia in conscious dogs. Dogs were instrumented with a Doppler flow probe and a hydraulic occluder. Coronary blood flow was measured in the conscious state at baseline and during myocardial reactive hyperemia after 10, 20, and 30 s of coronary occlusion. Thromboxane B2 serum concentrations, an index of platelet aggregation, decreased by >90% after long-term i.v. administration of aspirin, 100 mg/day for 7 days (low dose). Neither systemic and coronary hemodynamics nor reactive hyperemia were affected by the drug. After combined administration of this low dose of aspirin and of the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA, 30 mg/kg/day/7 days), reactive hyperemia decreased to the same extent as when L-NNA was administered alone. After administration of a unique high-dose aspirin (1,000 mg, i.v.), myocardial reactive hyperemia was markedly reduced, and this effect was still observed after previous blockade of NOS and cyclooxygenase by L-NNA and diclofenac, respectively. Thus long-term treatment with a low antiaggregant dose of aspirin does not alter the ability of coronary vessels to dilate during myocardial reactive hyperemia in conscious dogs. In contrast, short-term administration of a high antiinflammatory dose of aspirin severely blunts myocardial reactive hyperemia through a mechanism that is independent of both cyclooxygenase and nitric oxide metabolic pathways.

  7. Regurgitation Hemodynamics Alone Cause Mitral Valve Remodeling Characteristic of Clinical Disease States In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Connell, Patrick S; Azimuddin, Anam F; Kim, Seulgi E; Ramirez, Fernando; Jackson, Matthew S; Little, Stephen H; Grande-Allen, K Jane

    2016-04-01

    Mitral valve regurgitation is a challenging clinical condition that is frequent, highly varied, and poorly understood. While the causes of mitral regurgitation are multifactorial, how the hemodynamics of regurgitation impact valve tissue remodeling is an understudied phenomenon. We employed a pseudo-physiological flow loop capable of long-term organ culture to investigate the early progression of remodeling in living mitral valves placed in conditions resembling mitral valve prolapse (MVP) and functional mitral regurgitation (FMR). Valve geometry was altered to mimic the hemodynamics of controls (no changes from native geometry), MVP (5 mm displacement of papillary muscles towards the annulus), and FMR (5 mm apical, 5 mm lateral papillary muscle displacement, 65% larger annular area). Flow measurements ensured moderate regurgitant fraction for regurgitation groups. After 1-week culture, valve tissues underwent mechanical and compositional analysis. MVP conditioned tissues were less stiff, weaker, and had elevated collagen III and glycosaminoglycans. FMR conditioned tissues were stiffer, more brittle, less extensible, and had more collagen synthesis, remodeling, and crosslinking related enzymes and proteoglycans, including decorin, matrix metalloproteinase-1, and lysyl oxidase. These models replicate clinical findings of MVP (myxomatous remodeling) and FMR (fibrotic remodeling), indicating that valve cells remodel extracellular matrix in response to altered mechanical homeostasis resulting from disease hemodynamics.

  8. 4D Subject-Specific Inverse Modeling of the Chick Embryonic Heart Outflow Tract Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Goenezen, Sevan; Chivukula, Venkat Keshav; Midgett, Madeline; Phan, Ly; Rugonyi, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Blood flow plays a critical role in regulating embryonic cardiac growth and development, with altered flow leading to congenital heart disease. Progress in the field, however, is hindered by a lack of quantification of hemodynamic conditions in the developing heart. In this study, we present a methodology to quantify blood flow dynamics in the embryonic heart using subject-specific computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models. While the methodology is general, we focused on a model of the chick embryonic heart outflow tract (OFT), which distally connects the heart to the arterial system, and is the region of origin of many congenital cardiac defects. Using structural and Doppler velocity data collected from optical coherence tomography (OCT), we generated 4D (3D + time) embryo-specific CFD models of the heart OFT. To replicate the blood flow dynamics over time during the cardiac cycle, we developed an iterative inverse-method optimization algorithm, which determines the CFD model boundary conditions such that differences between computed velocities and measured velocities at one point within the OFT lumen are minimized. Results from our developed CFD model agree with previously measured hemodynamics in the OFT. Further, computed velocities and measured velocities differ by less than 15% at locations that were not used in the optimization, validating the model. The presented methodology can be used in quantifications of embryonic cardiac hemodynamics under normal and altered blood flow conditions, enabling an in depth quantitative study of how blood flow influences cardiac development. PMID:26361767

  9. Angiotensin receptors modulate the renal hemodynamic effects of nitric oxide in conscious newborn lambs

    PubMed Central

    Vinturache, Angela E.; Smith, Francine G.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to elucidate the roles of both angiotensin II (ANG II) receptors – type 1 (AT1Rs) and type 2 (AT2Rs) – separately and together in influencing hemodynamic effects of endogenously produced nitric oxide (NO) during postnatal development. In conscious, chronically instrumented lambs aged ~1 week (8 ± 1 days, N = 8) and ~6 weeks (41 ± 2 days, N = 8), systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressure (SAP, DAP, MAP) and venous pressure (MVP), renal blood flow (RBF), and renal vascular resistance (RVR) were measured in response to the l‐arginine analog, l‐NAME after pretreatment with either the AT1R antagonist, ZD 7155, the AT2R antagonist, PD 123319, or both antagonists. The increase in SAP, DAP, and MAP by l‐NAME was not altered by either ATR antagonist in either age group. The increase in RBF after l‐NAME was, however, altered by both ATR antagonists in an age‐dependent manner, which was mediated predominantly through AT2Rs in newborn lambs. These findings reveal that there is an age‐dependent interaction between the renin–angiotensin (RAS) and the NO pathway in regulating renal but not systemic hemodynamics through both ATRs, whereas AT2Rs appear to be important in the renal hemodynamic effects of NO early in life. PMID:24872358

  10. Cerebral hemodynamics in the different phases of migraine and cluster headache.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jakob M; Schankin, Christoph J

    2017-01-01

    Headache is one of the most common ailments; migraine is one of the most prevalent and disabling neurological disorders and cluster headache presents as one of the most excruciating pain disorders. Both are complex disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of headache. A key feature is that various triggers can set off an attack providing the opportunity to explore disease mechanisms by experimentally inducing attacks. This review summarizes neuroimaging and hemodynamic studies in human in provoked and spontaneous attacks of migraine and cluster headache. Cerebral hemodynamics during different phases of the migraine attack demonstrate alterations in cerebral blood flow and perfusion, vessel caliber, cortical and sub-cortical function, underscoring that migraine pathophysiology is highly complex. Migraine attacks might begin in diencephalic and brainstem areas, whereas migraine aura is a cortical phenomenon. In cluster headache pathophysiology, the hypothalamus might also play a pivotal role, whereas the pattern of cerebral blood flood differs from migraine. For both disorders, alterations of arterial blood vessel diameter might be more an epiphenomenon of the attack than a causative trigger. Studying cerebral hemodynamics in provocation models are important in the search for specific biomarkers in the hope to discover future targets for more specific and effective mechanism-based anti-headache treatment.

  11. Hemodynamics and transient flow reversal in real deployed stents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, Ralph; Ionescu, Mircea

    2011-11-01

    Restenosis rates caused by neointimal hyperplasia are relatively high (~ 30 %) after stent implantation in stenosed arteries. The flow around stent struts under steady and unsteady conditions using computational hemodynamics (CHD) was studied to identify contributing factors to the formation of low and oscillating wall shear stress regions that have been shown to promote endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerotic plaque formation in arteries. Datasets of the Neuroform, BxVelocity, and Taxus stents deployed in straight polymer tubes were obtained from high resolution micro computed tomography. Finite volume CHD simulations of steady and unsteady flow with and without flow reversal were performed. Stagnation zones were noticed adjacent to the strut junctions as the flow enters and exits the stent cells. The stagnation zones were larger in the case of the stents with larger strut diameter (BxVelocity, Taxus), wider strut junctions and larger angles between the struts. Unsteady flow simulations showed enhanced flow reversal with thicker struts and large regions of recirculation flow developing inside the stent at Reynolds numbers higher than 200. It was shown that alterations in blood flow due to real stent deployment (strut prolapse, junction misalignment) cannot be captured with computer generated stent models, that stent specific geometry, and time dependent flow effects can locally alter the wall shear stress and stagnation zones.

  12. Previous physical exercise alters the hepatic profile of oxidative-inflammatory status and limits the secondary brain damage induced by severe traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Mauro Robson Torres; Ferreira, Ana Paula de Oliveira; Busanello, Guilherme Lago; da Silva, Luís Roberto Hart; da Silveira Junior, Mauro Eduardo Porto; Fiorin, Fernando da Silva; Arrifano, Gabriela; Crespo-López, Maria Elena; Barcelos, Rômulo Pillon; Cuevas, María J; Bresciani, Guilherme; González-Gallego, Javier; Fighera, Michele Rechia; Royes, Luiz Fernando Freire

    2017-09-01

    An early inflammatory response and oxidative stress are implicated in the signal transduction that alters both hepatic redox status and mitochondrial function after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Peripheral oxidative/inflammatory responses contribute to neuronal dysfunction after TBI Exercise training alters the profile of oxidative-inflammatory status in liver and protects against acute hyperglycaemia and a cerebral inflammatory response after TBI. Approaches such as exercise training, which attenuates neuronal damage after TBI, may have therapeutic potential through modulation of responses by metabolic organs. The vulnerability of the body to oxidative/inflammatory in TBI is significantly enhanced in sedentary compared to physically active counterparts. Although systemic responses have been described after traumatic brain injury (TBI), little is known regarding potential interactions between brain and peripheral organs after neuronal injury. Accordingly, we aimed to investigate whether a peripheral oxidative/inflammatory response contributes to neuronal dysfunction after TBI, as well as the prophylactic role of exercise training. Animals were submitted to fluid percussion injury after 6 weeks of swimming training. Previous exercise training increased mRNA expression of X receptor alpha and ATP-binding cassette transporter, and decreased inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6 expression per se in liver. Interestingly, exercise training protected against hepatic inflammation (COX-2, iNOS, TNF-α and IL-6), oxidative stress (decreases in non-protein sulfhydryl and glutathione, as well as increases in 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate oxidation and protein carbonyl), which altered hepatic redox status (increases in myeloperoxidase and superoxide dismutase activity, as well as inhibition of catalase activity) mitochondrial function (decreases in methyl-tetrazolium and Δψ, as well as

  13. Severe White Pine Blister Rust Infection in Whitebark Pine Alters Mountain Pine Beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Attack Density, Emergence Rate, and Body Size.

    PubMed

    Dooley, Edith M; Six, Diana L

    2015-10-01

    Exotic tree pathogens can cause devastating ecological effects on forests that can be exacerbated when infections increase the likelihood of attack by insects. Current high rates of mortality of whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis Engelm.) are due to white pine blister rust caused by the exotic fungus, Cronartium ribicola J.C. Fisch, and the native mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins). These two mortality agents interact in whitebark pine; mountain pine beetle preferentially selects white pine blister rust-infected whitebark pine over healthy trees, and likelihood of attack has been observed to increase with infection severity. We examined attack and emergence rates, and size and sex ratio of mountain pine beetle in whitebark pines exhibiting varying white pine blister rust infection severities. Mountain pine beetle attack density was lowest on the most severely infected trees, but emergence rates and size of beetles from these trees were greater than those from uninfected and less severely infected trees. Low attack rates on severely infected whitebark pine may indicate these trees have lower defenses and that fewer beetle attacks are needed to kill them. Higher beetle emergence rates from severely infected trees may be due to low intraspecific competition resulting from low attack rates or differences in nutrient quality. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Computational Hemodynamics Involving Artificial Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Dochan; Kiris, Cetin; Feiereisen, William (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports the progress being made towards developing complete blood flow simulation capability in human, especially, in the presence of artificial devices such as valves and ventricular assist devices. Devices modeling poses unique challenges different from computing the blood flow in natural hearts and arteries. There are many elements needed such as flow solvers, geometry modeling including flexible walls, moving boundary procedures and physiological characterization of blood. As a first step, computational technology developed for aerospace applications was extended in the recent past to the analysis and development of mechanical devices. The blood flow in these devices is practically incompressible and Newtonian, and thus various incompressible Navier-Stokes solution procedures can be selected depending on the choice of formulations, variables and numerical schemes. Two primitive variable formulations used are discussed as well as the overset grid approach to handle complex moving geometry. This procedure has been applied to several artificial devices. Among these, recent progress made in developing DeBakey axial flow blood pump will be presented from computational point of view. Computational and clinical issues will be discussed in detail as well as additional work needed.

  15. Competitive flow and anastomosis angle influence on bypass hemodynamics in unsteady flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totorean, A. F.; Bernad, S. I.; Hudrea, I. C.; Susan-Resiga, R. F.

    2017-07-01

    Bypass graft patency is strongly influenced by geometric parameters such as anastomosis angle or the presence of competitive flow. Low values of Wall Shear Stress are associated to regions with flow disturbance, a main cause for intimal hyperplasia development and therefore graft failure. This paper analyzes the influence of anastomosis angle and competitive flow on bypass hemodynamics in unsteady conditions. Straight bypass configurations with anastomosis angles of 15°, 30°, 45° and 60°, respectively with 80% partial and 100% full stenosis were considered. Numerical simulations were performed under pulsatile physiological conditions with main period of T=0,8s. Hemodynamic parameters vary during the cardiac cycle, having the maximum values both for WSS and pressure drop associated to diastolic peak. Results show that these parameters alter as the anastomosis angle increases, whereas the presence of partial non-significant competitive flow positively influence the pressure drop along graft and host artery.

  16. Using ventilator and cardiovascular graphics in the patient who is hemodynamically unstable.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Bryant A; Durbin, Charles G

    2005-02-01

    The interaction of a mechanical ventilator and the human cardiovascular system is complex. One of the most important effects of positive-pressure ventilation (PPV) is that it can decrease venous return. PPV also alters right- and left-ventricular ejection. Increased lung volume increases right-ventricular size by increasing pulmonary vascular resistance, causing intraventricular cardiac-septum shift, and decreasing left-ventricular filling. Increased intrathoracic pressure reduces afterload on the LV and increases ejection of blood from the LV. Understanding and managing these complex and often opposing interactions in critically ill patients is facilitated by analysis of hemodynamic and ventilator waveforms at the bedside. The relationship of PPV to changes in the arterial pressure waveform gives important information regarding appropriate fluid and vasopressor treatment. This article focuses on effects of respiratory pressures on hemodynamics and considers how cardiac pressures can be transmitted to the airway and cause ventilator malfunction.

  17. Coupling hemodynamics with vascular wall mechanics and mechanobiology to understand intracranial aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    Arteries exhibit a remarkable ability to adapt in response to sustained alterations in hemodynamic loading, to heal in response to injuries, and to compensate in response to diverse disease conditions. Nevertheless, such compensatory adaptations are limited and many vascular disorders, if untreated, lead to significant morbidity or mortality. Parallel advances in vascular biology, medical imaging, biomechanics, and computational methods promise to provide increased insight into many arterial diseases, including intracranial aneurysms. In particular, although it may be possible to identify useful clinical correlations between either the blood flow patterns within or the shape of aneurysms and their rupture-potential, our ultimate goal should be to couple studies of hemodynamics with those of wall mechanics and the underlying mechanobiology so that we can understand better the mechanisms by which aneurysms arise, enlarge, and rupture and thereby identify better methods of treatment. This paper presents one such approach to fluid-solid-growth (FSG) modeling of intracranial aneurysms. PMID:20526461

  18. Noninvasive sensors in critical care medicine: near-infrared spectroscopy for the detection of altered microvascular blood flow in severe sepsis and septic shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walz, J. Matthias; Soller, Babs; Soyemi, Olusola; Yang, Ye; Landry, Michelle; Heard, Stephen O.

    2006-10-01

    It is estimated that 750,000 cases of severe sepsis occur in the United States annually, at least 225,000 of which are fatal, resulting in significant utilization of healthcare resources and expenses. Significant progress in the understanding of pathophysiology and treatment of this condition has been made lately. Among the newer treatment strategies for critically ill patients are the administration of early goal directed therapy, and Recombinant Human Activated Protein C (Drotrecogrin alfa (activated) [DTAA]) for severe sepsis. However, mortality remains unacceptably high.

  19. Hemodynamically Driven Vein Graft Remodeling: A Systems Biology Approach

    PubMed Central

    Berceli, Scott A.; Tran-Son-Tay, Roger; Garbey, Marc; Jiang, Zhihua

    2011-01-01

    Despite intense investigation over several decades to understand the mechanisms of vein graft failure, few therapeutic modalities have emerged. Emphasis using standard reductionist approaches has been focused on cataloging the components involved in the early events following vein graft implantation, but limited insight has been gained in understanding the dynamic interaction of these components. We propose that the application of systems theory offers the opportunity for significant advances in this area. Focused on modeling the dynamic relationships that define living organisms, systems biology provides the necessary tools to further our understanding of the complex series of overlapping biologic events on surgical implantation of the vein graft. Through the use of ordinary differential equation and agent-based modeling techniques, we present our ongoing efforts to define the nonlinear interactions between hemodynamics and vascular adaptation. PMID:19426605

  20. Cerebral hemodynamic changes in stroke during sleep-disordered breathing.

    PubMed

    Pizza, Fabio; Biallas, Martin; Kallweit, Ulf; Wolf, Martin; Bassetti, Claudio L

    2012-07-01

    Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) negatively impacts stroke outcome. Near-infrared spectroscopy showed the acute cerebral hemodynamic effects of SDB. Eleven patients (7 men, age 61±13 years) with acute/subacute middle cerebral artery stroke (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score 10±7) and SDB (apnea-hypopnea index 32±28/hour) were assessed with nocturnal polysomnography and bilateral near-infrared spectroscopy recording. Cerebral oxygenation and hemoglobin concentration changes during obstructive and central apneas were analyzed. During SDB, near-infrared spectroscopy showed asymmetrical patterns of cerebral oxygenation and hemoglobin concentrations with changes significantly larger on the unaffected compared with the affected hemisphere. Brain tissue hypoxia was more severe during obstructive compared with central apneas. Profound cerebral deoxygenation effects of SDB occurred in acute/subacute stroke. These changes may contribute to poor outcome, arising in the possibility of a potential benefit of SDB treatment in stroke management.

  1. Effect of periodic alterations in shear on vascular macromolecular uptake.

    PubMed

    Friedman, M H; Henderson, J M; Aukerman, J A; Clingan, P A

    2000-01-01

    Experiments were carried out in swine to test the hypothesis that changes in the fluid dynamic environment of the arterial wall, with time constants of several minutes to perhaps a few hours, prompt adaptive responses that transiently increase endothelial permeability. After parenteral Evans Blue Dye (EBD) administration, the hemodynamics of the external iliac arteries of the experimental animals were altered using a reversible arteriovenous femoral shunt. For 3 h, the shunt was opened and closed with a period (tau) between 1-180 min. Subsequently, the animal was euthanized and the iliac vessels were photographed en face to obtain the distribution of EBD-bound albumin uptake by the tissue during its exposure to the dye. Albumin uptake increases with tau in a fashion that can be explained by an a priori model of the adaptive permeability response, with a time constant of about an hour.

  2. A Point Mutation in the FRNK Motif of the Potyvirus Helper Component-Protease Gene Alters Symptom Expression in Cucurbits and Elicits Protection Against the Severe Homologous Virus.

    PubMed

    Gal-On, A

    2000-05-01

    Sequence comparison had previously shown three amino acid changes in conserved motifs in the 455-amino acid sequence of the helper component-protease (HC-Pro) between a severe field strain of Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV-NAT) and a mild field strain of ZYMV (ZYMV-WK). In this study, exchange of fragments and site-directed mutagenesis within the HC-Pro gene in an infectious clone of ZYMV enabled the effects of the mutations on symptom expression to be mapped. The substitution of Ile for Arg at position 180 in the conserved motif Phe-Arg-Asn-Lys (FRNK) of potyviruses was found to affect symptom expression. Infection of cucurbits with the engineered ZYMV (ZYMV-AG) that contained this mutation caused a dramatic symptom change from severe to mild in squash and to a symptom-free appearance in cucumber, melon, and watermelon. The Ile to Arg mutation was found to be stable, and no revertant virus was found after several passages through plants after long incubation periods. The AG strain was detected 4 days postinoculation and accumulated in cucurbits to a level and with kinetics similar to that of the wild-type ZYMV-AT strain. Cucurbit plants infected with the AG strain were protected against infection by the severe strain.

  3. The progression from a lower to a higher invasive stage of bladder cancer is associated with severe alterations in glucose and pyruvate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Conde, Vanessa R; Oliveira, Pedro F; Nunes, Ana R; Rocha, Cátia S; Ramalhosa, Elsa; Pereira, José A; Alves, Marco G; Silva, Branca M

    2015-07-01

    Cancer cells present a particular metabolic behavior. We hypothesized that the progression of bladder cancer could be accompanied by changes in cells glycolytic profile. We studied two human bladder cancer cells, RT4 and TCCSUP, in which the latter represents a more invasive stage. The levels of glucose, pyruvate, alanine and lactate in the extracellular media were measured by Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. The protein expression levels of glucose transporters 1 (GLUT1) and 3 (GLUT3), monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4), phosphofructokinase-1 (PFK1), glutamic-pyruvate transaminase (GPT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were determined. Our data showed that glucose consumption and GLUT3 levels were similar in both cell lines, but TCCSUP cells displayed lower levels of GLUT1 and PFK expression. An increase in pyruvate consumption, concordant with the higher levels of lactate and alanine production, was also detected in TCCSUP cells. Moreover, TCCSUP cells presented lower protein expression levels of GPT and LDH. These results illustrate that bladder cancer progression is associated with alterations in cells glycolytic profile, namely the switch from glucose to pyruvate consumption in the more aggressive stage. This may be useful to develop new therapies and to identify biomarkers for cancer progression.

  4. Genetic background alters the severity and onset of neuromuscular disease caused by the loss of ubiquitin-specific protease 14 (usp14).

    PubMed

    Marshall, Andrea G; Watson, Jennifer A; Hallengren, Jada J; Walters, Brandon J; Dobrunz, Lynn E; Francillon, Ludwig; Wilson, Julie A; Phillips, Scott E; Wilson, Scott M

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we identified and characterized an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) induced mutation in Usp14 (nmf375) that leads to adult-onset neurological disease. The nmf375 mutation causes aberrant splicing of Usp14 mRNA, resulting in a 95% reduction in USP14. We previously showed that loss of USP14 in ataxia (ax (J)) mice results in reduced ubiquitin levels, motor endplate disease, Purkinje cell axonal dystrophy and decreased hippocampal paired pulse facilitation (PPF) during the first 4-6 weeks of life, and early postnatal lethality by two months of age. Although the loss of USP14 is comparable between the nmf375 and ax (J) mice, the nmf375 mice did not exhibit these ax (J) developmental abnormalities. However, by 12 weeks of age the nmf375 mutants present with ubiquitin depletion and motor endplate disease, indicating a continual role for USP14-mediated regulation of ubiquitin pools and neuromuscular junction (NMJ) structure in adult mice. The observation that motor endplate disease was only seen after ubiquitin depletion suggests that the preservation of NMJ structure requires the stable maintenance of synaptic ubiquitin pools. Differences in genetic background were shown to affect ubiquitin expression and dramatically alter the phenotypes caused by USP14 deficiency.

  5. Comparison of tricuspid and bicuspid aortic valve hemodynamics under steady flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaman, Clara; Ward, James; Sucosky, Philippe

    2011-11-01

    The bicuspid aortic valve (BAV), a congenital valvular defect consisting of two leaflets instead of three, is associated with a high prevalence of calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD). CAVD also develops in the normal tricuspid aortic valve (TAV) but its progression in the BAV is more severe and rapid. Although hemodynamic abnormalities are increasingly considered potential pathogenic contributor, the native BAV hemodynamics remain largely unknown. Therefore, this study aims at comparing experimentally the hemodynamic environments in TAV and BAV anatomies. Particle-image velocimetry was used to characterize the flow downstream of a native TAV and a model BAV mounted in a left-heart simulator and subjected to three steady flow rates characterizing different phases of the cardiac cycle. While the TAV developed a jet aligned along the valve axis, the BAV was shown to develop a skewed systolic jet with skewness decreasing with increasing flow rate. Measurement of the transvalvular pressure revealed a valvular resistance up to 50% larger in the BAV than in the TAV. The increase in velocity between the TAV and BAV leads to an increase in shear stress downstream of the valve. This study reveals strong hemodynamic abnormalities in the BAV, which may contribute to CAVD pathogenesis.

  6. Perspective on CFD studies of coronary artery disease lesions and hemodynamics: a review.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun-Mei; Zhong, Liang; Su, Boyang; Wan, Min; Yap, Jinq Shya; Tham, Jasmine P L; Chua, Leok Poh; Ghista, Dhanjoo N; Tan, Ru San

    2014-06-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common cardiovascular disease. Early diagnosis of CAD's physiological significance is of utmost importance for guiding individualized risk-tailored treatment strategies. In this paper, we first review the state-of-the-art clinical diagnostic indices to quantify the severity of CAD and the associated invasive and noninvasive imaging technologies in order to quantify the anatomical parameters of diameter stenosis, area stenosis, and hemodynamic indices of coronary flow reserve and fractional flow reserve. With the development of computational technologies and CFD methods, tremendous progress has been made in applying image-based CFD simulation techniques to elucidate the effects of hemodynamics in vascular pathophysiology toward the initialization and progression of CAD. So then, we review the advancements of CFD technologies in patient-specific modeling, involving the development of geometry reconstruction, boundary conditions, and fluid-structure interaction. Next, we review the applications of CFD to stenotic sites, in order to compute their hemodynamic parameters and study the relationship between the hemodynamic conditions and the clinical indices, to thereby assess the amount of viable myocardium and candidacy for percutaneous coronary intervention. Finally, we review the strengths and limitations of current researches of applying CFD to CAD studies. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Hemodynamic effects of intraoperative anesthetics administration in photothrombotic stroke model: a study using laser speckle imaging.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hongyang; Li, Yao; Bo, Bin; Yuan, Lu; Lu, Xiaodan; Li, Hangdao; Tong, Shanbao

    2017-01-05

    Previous neuroimaging studies have shown the hemodynamic effect of either preconditioning or postconditioning anesthesia in ischemic stroke model. However, the anesthetic effect in hemodynamics during and immediately after the stroke modeling surgery remains unknown due to the lack of appropriate anesthesia-free stroke model and intraoperative imaging technology. In the present study, we utilized our recently developed photothrombotic model of focal cerebral ischemia in conscious and freely moving rats, and investigated transient hemodynamic changes with or without isoflurane administration. Laser speckle imaging was applied to acquire real-time two-dimensional full-field cerebral blood flow (CBF) information throughout the surgical operations and early after. Significantly larger CBF reduction area was observed in conscious rats from 8 min immediately after the onset of stroke modeling, compared with anesthetized rats. Stroke rats without isoflurane administration also showed larger lesion volume identified by magnetic resonance imaging 3 h post occlusion (58.9%), higher neurological severity score 24 h post occlusion (28.3%), and larger infarct volume from 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining 24 h post occlusion (46.9%). Our results demonstrated that the hemodynamic features were affected by anesthetics at as early as during the stroke induction. Also, our findings about the neuroprotection of intraoperative anesthetics administration bring additional insights into understanding the translational difficulty in stroke research.

  8. [Prediction of human orthostatic tolerance by changes in arterial and venous hemodynamics in the microgravity environment].

    PubMed

    Kotovskaia, A R; Fomin, G A

    2013-01-01

    The authors intentionally present exclusively the results of their recent studies of arterial and venous hemodynamics as predictors of human orthostatic tolerance (OT) during space flight and on return to Earth. There is a sufficient demonstration of the in-flight OT predictability by arterial hemodynamic reactions to LBNP and venous hemodynamic changes in response to the lower extremities occlusion. Three levels of cerebral blood flow deficits in the course of the lower body negative pressure test (LBNP) performed in microgravity were first defined. The authors offer quantitative arguments for the dependence of cerebral flow deficit on the degree of LBNP tolerance degradation. Patterns of arterial hemodynamics during LBNP were used successfully to diagnose the actual orthostatic tolerance and also to follow its trend as flight extended, which attests to the predictability of OT change in an individual cosmonaut on space flight. Occlusion plethysmography of legs revealed three levels of response of the most informative venous parameters (capacity, distensibility and rate of filling) correlating with severity of OT degradation.

  9. Hemodynamic and thrombogenic analysis of a trileaflet polymeric valve using a fluid-structure interaction approach

    PubMed Central

    Piatti, Filippo; Sturla, Francesco; Marom, Gil; Sheriff, Jawaad; Claiborne, Thomas E.; Slepian, Marvin J.; Redaelli, Alberto; Bluestein, Danny

    2015-01-01

    Surgical valve replacement in patients with severe calcific aortic valve disease using either bioprosthetic or mechanical heart valves is still limited by structural valve deterioration for the former and thrombosis risk mandating anticoagulant therapy for the latter. Prosthetic polymeric heart valves have the potential to overcome the inherent material and design limitations of these valves, but their development is still ongoing. The aim of this study was to characterize the hemodynamics and thrombogenic potential of the Polynova polymeric trileaflet valve prototype using a fluid-structure interaction (FSI) approach. The FSI model replicated experimental conditions of the valve as tested in a left heart simulator. Hemodynamic parameters (transvalvular pressure gradient, flow rate, maximum velocity, and effective orifice area) were compared to assess the validity of the FSI model. The thrombogenic footprint of the polymeric valve was evaluated using a Lagrangian approach to calculate the stress accumulation (SA) values along multiple platelet trajectories and their statistical distribution. In the commissural regions, platelets were exposed to the highest SA values because of highest stress levels combined with local reverse flow patterns and vortices. Stress-loading waveforms from representative trajectories in regions of interest were emulated in our Hemodynamic Shearing Device (HSD). Platelet activity was measured using our platelet activation state (PAS) assay and the results confirmed the higher thrombogenic potential of the commissural hotspots. In conclusion, the proposed method provides an in depth analysis of the hemodynamic and thrombogenic performance of the polymer valve prototype and identifies locations for further design optimization. PMID:26329461

  10. [Second Clinical Consensus of the Ibero-American Society of Neonatology: hemodynamic management of newborns].

    PubMed

    Golombek, Sergio G; Fariña, Diana; Sola, Augusto; Baquero, Hernando; Cabañas, Fernando; Dominguez, Fernando; Fajardo, Carlos; Goldsmit, Gustavo S; Flores, Gabriel Lara; Lee, Mario; Varela, Lourdes Lemus; Mariani, Gonzalo; Miura, Ernani; Pérez, Jose Maria; Zambosco, Guillermo; Pellicer, Adelina; Bancalari, Eduardo

    2011-04-01

    This study reports on the process and results of the Second Clinical Consensus of the Ibero-American Society of Neonatology. Eighty neonatologists from 23 countries were invited to collaborate and participate in the event. Several questions of clinical-physiological importance in the hemodynamic management of newborns were addressed. Participants were divided into groups to facilitate interaction and teamwork, with instructions to respond to three to five questions by analyzing the literature and local factors. Meeting in Mar del Plata, Argentina, the Consensus Group served as a form for various presentations and discussions. In all, 54 neonatologists from 21 countries attended, with the objective of reaching a consensus on such matters as concepts and definitions of hemodynamic instability, the physiopathology of hemodynamic compromise, recommended therapy strategies, and hemodynamic monitoring. It is hoped that this international experience will serve as a useful initiative for future consensus building and reduction of the existing disparities among the countries of the Region in terms of treatment and outcomes.

  11. Pathologic findings in adenosine deaminase deficient-severe combined immunodeficiency. II. Thymus, spleen, lymph node, and gastrointestinal tract lymphoid tissue alterations.

    PubMed Central

    Ratech, H.; Hirschhorn, R.; Greco, M. A.

    1989-01-01

    Eight autopsies of patients with adenosine deaminase deficient-severe combined immunodeficiency disease (ADA-SCID) were reviewed with special emphasis on the lymphoid tissues. The thymus histology in five cases was remarkably uniform, whether or not prior ADA enzyme replacement or immunologic reconstitution therapy had been administered. Lymph nodes and spleens in all cases examined showed a residual nonlymphoid architectural framework corresponding to usual T and B cell zones found in normals. The development of an extranodal, monoclonal IgA lambda B cell immunoblastic lymphoma as a terminal event in one patient after several years of successful ADA enzyme replacement therapy through multiple red blood cell transfusions is described. In another patient with long-term ADA enzyme replacement, a terminal autoimmune hemolytic anemia developed. Autopsy revealed severe deposits of iron in the B cell zones of the lymph nodes, which is an unusual location. In addition, iron deposits outlined the splenic trabeculae, as well as the ring fibers and bridging fibers of the splenic sinuses. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:2596574

  12. Impact of Therapeutic Plasma Exchange on Hemodynamic Parameters in Medical Intensive Care Unit Patients: An Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Lahmer, Tobias; Messer, Marlena; Schnappauf, Christopher; Rasch, Sebastian; Fekecs, Lisa; Beitz, Analena; Eser, Stefan; Schmid, Roland M; Huber, Wolfgang

    2017-02-01

    Therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) is an extracorporeal treatment with reported beneficial as well as detrimental effects on circulation. However, there is a lack of data using advanced hemodynamic monitoring during TPE. Therefore, we investigated the effects of TPE on hemodynamic parameters derived from transpulmonary thermodilution (TPTD) as well as the risk for transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI). We compared hemodynamic parameters obtained before and after a total of 30 sessions of TPE treatment in 10 intensive care unit patients. Among standard hemodynamic parameters, heart rate (P < 0.012) and systolic blood pressure (P < 0.008) significantly increase, whereas neither mean arterial pressure nor diastolic blood pressure was altered after TPE. The TPTD-derived cardiac function parameters, cardiac index (CI; P = 0.035), cardiac power index (CPI; P = 0.008), global ejection fraction (GEF; P = 0.002), and stroke volume index (SVI; P = 0.014), were significantly higher after TPE. Furthermore, systemic vascular index significantly increased (P < 0.042). Among the cardiac preload parameters, central venous pressure was significantly lower after TPE (P < 0.001), while the global end-diastolic volume index (GEDVI) did not change. Contractility marker dPmax did not change. Finally, TPE application did not significantly alter the pulmonary hydration and permeability parameters, extravascular lung water index (EVLWI) and pulmonary vascular permeability index. Vasopressor dose was not statistically significantly altered. Considering increases in SVI, CI, GEF, and CPI and stable values for GEDVI, EVLWI, and dPmax, our data do not give any hint for hemodynamic impairment or TRALI.

  13. Cerebral Blood Flow Alterations as Assessed by 3D ASL in Cognitive Impairment in Patients with Subcortical Vascular Cognitive Impairment: A Marker for Disease Severity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yawen; Cao, Wenwei; Ding, Weina; Wang, Yao; Han, Xu; Zhou, Yan; Xu, Qun; Zhang, Yong; Xu, Jianrong

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal reductions in cortical cerebral blood flow (CBF) have been identified in subcortical vascular cognitive impairment (SVCI). However, little is known about the pattern of CBF reduction in relation with the degree of cognitive impairment. CBF measured with three-dimensional (3D) Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) helps detect functional changes in subjects with SVCI. We aimed to compare CBF maps in subcortical ischemic vascular disease (SIVD) subjects with and without cognitive impairment and to detect the relationship of the regions of CBF reduction in the brain with the degree of cognitive impairment according to the z-score. A total of 53 subjects with SVCI and 23 matched SIVD subjects without cognitive impairment (controls), underwent a whole-brain 3D ASL MRI in the resting state. Regional CBF (rCBF) was compared voxel wise by using an analysis of variance design in a statistical parametric mapping program, with patient age and sex as covariates. Correlations were calculated between the rCBF value in the whole brain and the z-score in the 53 subjects with SVCI. Compared with the control subjects, SVCI group demonstrated diffuse decreased CBF in the brain. Significant positive correlations were determined in the rCBF values in the left hippocampus, left superior temporal pole gyrus, right superior frontal orbital lobe, right medial frontal orbital lobe, right middle temporal lobe, left thalamus and right insula with the z-scores in SVCI group. The noninvasively quantified resting CBF demonstrated altered CBF distributions in the SVCI brain. The deficit brain perfusions in the temporal and frontal lobe, hippocampus, thalamus and insula was related to the degree of cognitive impairment. Its relationship to cognition indicates the clinical relevance of this functional marker. Thus, our results provide further evidence for the mechanisms underlying the cognitive deficit in patients with SVCI. PMID:27630562

  14. Depletion of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells increases severity of mechanical allodynia and significantly alters systemic cytokine levels following peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Lees, Justin G; Duffy, Samuel S; Perera, Chamini J; Moalem-Taylor, Gila

    2015-02-01

    Neuropathic pain is a debilitating condition caused by damage to the somatosensory nervous system, such as peripheral nerve injury. The immune system, and in particular the adaptive T cell response, plays a key role in mediating such pain. Regulatory T (Treg) cells are a small subpopulation of inhibitory T cells that prevent autoimmunity, limit immunopathology and maintain immune homeostasis. Here, we investigated the effects of conditional depletion of Treg cells on mechanical allodynia and serum cytokines in mice with chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve, an animal model of neuropathic pain. We demonstrate that CCI induced the infiltration of small numbers of Treg cells within effected neuronal tissue. Utilising the transgenic DEREG (DEpletion of REGulatory T cells) mice, we confirmed effective depletion of Foxp3+ Treg cells by diphtheria toxin injections. Following CCI we observed a transient, though significant, increase in pain hypersensitivity for Treg-depleted DEREG mice compared to non-Treg-depleted mice. Analysis of systemic cytokine levels demonstrated significant changes in serum cytokine expression profiles. In particular, we observed significant increases in systemic concentration of RANTES, IL-2 and IL-5, and significant decreases in IL-12 and IFN-γ in nerve-injured Treg-depleted DEREG mice. Further analysis indicated a substantial increase in the serum concentration of IL-12p40 as a direct result of Treg cell depletion. These results suggest that depletion of Foxp3+ Treg cells promote nerve injury-induced pain hypersensitivity, partially by inducing altered systemic concentrations of cytokines, which may act to regulate neuropathic pain.

  15. Earthing defect: a cause for unstable hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Selvan, R Barani; Rao, Parnandi Bhaskar; Ramachandran, T R; Veliath, David George

    2012-01-01

    Interference of monitored electrocardiogram (ECG) is a common event in intensive care units and operation theaters. Artifacts in the ECG tracing can resemble serious arrhythmia, thus leading to unnecessary usage of antiarrhythmics or electrical defibrillation. In addition, ECG artifacts may lead to serious hemodynamic consequences secondary to intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) trigger failure. We report a rare event of IABP failure due to ECG artifact, which appeared on placement of the transthoracic echocardiography probe over the chest. Subsequent evaluation revealed potential current leakage from echocardiography machine secondary to earthing defect in the machine.

  16. Hemodynamic Consequences of Malignant Ascites in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Surgery*: A Prospective Substudy of a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Hunsicker, Oliver; Fotopoulou, Christina; Pietzner, Klaus; Koch, Mandy; Krannich, Alexander; Sehouli, Jalid; Spies, Claudia; Feldheiser, Aarne

    2015-12-01

    vasopressor and fluid demands, whereas the administration of artificial infusion solutions was related to opposite effects.Malignant ascites >500 mL implies increased fluid demands and substantial alterations in circulatory blood flow during cancer surgery. Fresh frozen plasma transfusion promotes recovering hemodynamic stability in patients with malignant ascites >500 mL, in whom artificial infusion solutions could not prevent from hemodynamic deterioration.

  17. Very early posttraumatic serum alterations are significantly associated to initial massive RBC substitution, injury severity, multiple organ failure and adverse clinical outcome in multiple injured patients

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Multiple severe trauma frequently leads to massive dysbalances of the human immune system. This phenomenon is known as "Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS)". SIRS is connected to multiple organ failure and thereby entails higher morbidity and mortality in trauma patients. Pro-and anti-inflammatory cytokines such as Il-6, Il-8 and Il-10 seem to play a superior role in the development of SIRS. Several studies support the hypothesis that the very early cytokine release pattern determines the patients' subsequent clinical course. Most data about interleukins in trauma patients however refer to serum concentrations assessed sometime in the first 24 h, but there is only little information about release dynamics in a small-meshed time frame in the very initial post-trauma period. Patients and methods 58 multiple injured patients (Injury Severity Score > 16 points) were included. Blood samples were drawn on patient admission (not later then 90 minutes after trauma) and at 6 h, 12 h, 24 h, 48 h and 72 h. Il-6, Il-8 and Il-10 were measured using an automated chemiluminescence assay (IMMULITE, Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics GmbH). Interleukin levels were correlated to distinct epidemiological and clinical parameters. Results Interleukin serum concentrations are thoroughly elevated after trauma. Patients with haemorrhagic shock and consecutive massive RBC substitution (n = 27) exhibit higher Il-6, Il-8 and Il-10 levels as compared to patients with minor RBC transfusion extent (n = 31). Interleukin levels also differentiate patients with MOF (n = 43) from such without MOF (n = 15) already at the earliest post trauma time (90 minutes). Il-6, Il-8 and Il-10 concentrations also significantly distinguish patients with adverse outcome (n = 11) from such with favourable outcome (n = 47). Exclusively Il-10 has significant correlation to injury severity (ISS > 35). Conclusion The current study presents an image of the serum Il-6, 8 and 10 releases in multiple

  18. Hemodynamic response to ketamine in children with pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Friesen, Robert H; Twite, Mark D; Nichols, Christopher S; Cardwell, Kathryn A; Pan, Zhaoxing; Darst, Jeffrey R; Wilson, Neil; Fagan, Thomas E; Miyamoto, Shelley D; Ivy, D Dunbar

    2016-01-01

    The safety of ketamine in children with pulmonary hypertension has been debated because of conflicting results of prior studies in which changes in mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) have been widely variable. The goal of this prospective study was to quantitate the effects of ketamine on pulmonary hemodynamics in a cohort of children with pulmonary hypertension under conditions in which variables such as airway/ventilatory management, FiO(2), and use of vasodilating anesthetics were controlled. The IRB approved this study of 34 children undergoing cardiac catheterization for pulmonary hypertension studies. Following anesthetic induction with sevoflurane and tracheal intubation facilitated by the administration of rocuronium 0.7-1 mg·kg(-1) iv, sevoflurane was discontinued and anesthesia was maintained with midazolam 0.1 mg·kg(-1) iv (or 0.5 mg·kg(-1) po preoperatively) and remifentanil iv infusion 0.5-0.7 mcg·kg(-1) ·min(-1). Ventilation was mechanically controlled to maintain PaCO(2) 35-40 mmHg. When endtidal sevoflurane was 0% and FiO(2) was 0.21, baseline heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), mPAP, right atrial pressure (RAP), pulmonary artery occlusion pressure (PAOP), right ventricular end-diastolic pressure (RVEDP), cardiac output, and arterial blood gases were measured, and indexed systemic vascular resistance (SVRI), indexed pulmonary vascular resistance (PVRI), and cardiac index (CI) were calculated. Each child then received a bolus of ketamine 2 mg·kg(-1) infused over 2 min. Measurements and calculations were repeated 2 min after the conclusion of the infusion. The mean (95% CI) increase in mPAP following ketamine was 2 mmHg (0.2, 3.7), which was statistically significant but clinically insignificant. PVRI and PVRI/SVRI did not change significantly. Hemodynamic changes did not differ among subjects with differing severity of pulmonary hypertension or between subjects chronically treated with

  19. BRCA1 deficiency in ovarian cancer is associated with alteration in expression of several key regulators of cell motility – A proteomics study

    PubMed Central

    Gau, David M; Lesnock, Jamie L; Hood, Brian L; Bhargava, Rohit; Sun, Mai; Darcy, Kathleen; Luthra, Soumya; Chandran, Uma; Conrads, Thomas P; Edwards, Robert P; Kelley, Joseph L; Krivak, Thomas C; Roy, Partha

    2015-01-01

    Functional loss of expression of breast cancer susceptibility gene 1(BRCA1) has been implicated in genomic instability and cancer progression. There is emerging evidence that BRCA1 gene product (BRCA1) also plays a role in cancer cell migration. We performed a quantitative proteomics study of EOC patient tumor tissues and identified changes in expression of several key regulators of actin cytoskeleton/cell adhesion and cell migration (CAPN1, 14-3-3, CAPG, PFN1, SPTBN1, CFN1) associated with loss of BRCA1 function. Gene expression analyses demonstrate that several of these proteomic hits are differentially expressed between early and advanced stage EOC thus suggesting clinical relevance of these proteins to disease progression. By immunohistochemistry of ovarian tumors with BRCA1+/+ and BRCA1null status, we further verified our proteomic-based finding of elevated PFN1 expression associated with BRCA1 deficiency. Finally, we established a causal link between PFN1 and BRCA1-induced changes in cell migration thus uncovering a novel mechanistic basis for BRCA1-dependent regulation of ovarian cancer cell migration. Overall, findings of this study open up multiple avenues by which BRCA1 can potentially regulate migration and metastatic phenotype of EOC cells. PMID:25927284

  20. Altered Brain Functional Activity in Infants with Congenital Bilateral Severe Sensorineural Hearing Loss: A Resting-State Functional MRI Study under Sedation

    PubMed Central

    Che, Jing; Li, Qiang; Chai, Chao; Zheng, Meizhu; Shen, Wen

    2017-01-01

    Early hearing deprivation could affect the development of auditory, language, and vision ability. Insufficient or no stimulation of the auditory cortex during the sensitive periods of plasticity could affect the function of hearing, language, and vision development. Twenty-three infants with congenital severe sensorineural hearing loss (CSSHL) and 17 age and sex matched normal hearing subjects were recruited. The amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (ALFF) and regional homogeneity (ReHo) of the auditory, language, and vision related brain areas were compared between deaf infants and normal subjects. Compared with normal hearing subjects, decreased ALFF and ReHo were observed in auditory and language-related cortex. Increased ALFF and ReHo were observed in vision related cortex, which suggest that hearing and language function were impaired and vision function was enhanced due to the loss of hearing. ALFF of left Brodmann area 45 (BA45) was negatively correlated with deaf duration in infants with CSSHL. ALFF of right BA39 was positively correlated with deaf duration in infants with CSSHL. In conclusion, ALFF and ReHo can reflect the abnormal brain function in language, auditory, and visual information processing in infants with CSSHL. This demonstrates that the development of auditory, language, and vision processing function has been affected by congenital severe sensorineural hearing loss before 4 years of age. PMID:28255465

  1. Correlations between microstructural alterations and severity of cognitive deficiency in Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment: a diffusional kurtosis imaging study.

    PubMed

    Gong, Nan-Jie; Wong, Chun-Sing; Chan, Chun-Chung; Leung, Lam-Ming; Chu, Yiu-Ching

    2013-06-01

    Diffusional kurtosis imaging (DKI), a natural extension of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), can characterize non-Gaussian diffusion in the brain. We investigated the capability of DKI parameters for detecting microstructural changes in both gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) and sought to determine whether these DKI parameters could serve as imaging biomarkers to indicate the severity of cognitive deficiency. DKI was performed on 18AD patients and 12 MCI patients. Fractional anisotropy, kurtosis and diffusivity parameters in the temporal, parietal, frontal and occipital lobes were compared between the two groups using Mann-Whitney U test. The correlations between regional DKI parameters and mini-mental state examination (MMSE) score were tested using Pearson's correlation. In ADs, significantly increased diffusivity and decreased kurtosis parameters were observed in both the GM and WM of the parietal and occipital lobes as compared to MCIs. Significantly decreased fractional anisotropy was also observed in the WM of these lobes in ADs. With the exception of fractional anisotropy and radial kurtosis, all the five other DKI parameters exhibited significant correlations with MMSE score in both GM and WM. Bearing additional information, the DKI model can provide sensitive imaging biomarkers for assessing the severity of cognitive deficiency in reference to MMSE score and potentially improve early detection and progression monitoring of AD based on characterizing microstructures in both the WM and especially the GM. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Ectopic expression of Xylella fastidiosa rpfF conferring production of diffusible signal factor in transgenic tobacco and citrus alters pathogen behavior and reduces disease severity.

    PubMed

    Caserta, Raquel; Souza-Neto, Reinaldo Rodrigues; Takita, Marco Aurelio; Lindow, Steven; Souza, Alessandra De

    2017-08-04

    The pathogenicity of Xylella fastidiosa is associated with its ability to colonize the xylem of host plants. Expression of genes contributing to xylem colonization are suppressed, while those necessary for insect vector acquisition are increased, with increasing concentrations of diffusible signal factor (DSF) whose production is dependent on RpfF. We previously demonstrated that transgenic citrus plants ectopically expressing rpfF from a citrus strain of X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca exhibited less susceptibility to Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri, another pathogen whose virulence is modulated by DSF accumulation. Here we demonstrate that ectopic expression of rpfF in both transgenic tobacco and sweet orange also confers a reduction in disease severity incited by X. fastidiosa and reduces its colonization of those plants. Decreased disease severity in the transgenic plants was generally associated with increased expression of genes conferring adhesiveness to the pathogen, and decreased expression of genes necessary for active motility, accounting for the reduced population sizes achieved in the plants, apparently by limiting pathogen dispersal through the plant. Plant-derived DSF signal molecules in a host plant therefore can be exploited to interfere with more than one pathogen whose virulence is controlled by DSF signaling.

  3. BRCA1 deficiency in ovarian cancer is associated with alteration in expression of several key regulators of cell motility - A proteomics study.

    PubMed

    Gau, David M; Lesnock, Jamie L; Hood, Brian L; Bhargava, Rohit; Sun, Mai; Darcy, Kathleen; Luthra, Soumya; Chandran, Uma; Conrads, Thomas P; Edwards, Robert P; Kelley, Joseph L; Krivak, Thomas C; Roy, Partha

    2015-01-01

    Functional loss of expression of breast cancer susceptibility gene 1(BRCA1) has been implicated in genomic instability and cancer progression. There is emerging evidence that BRCA1 gene product (BRCA1) also plays a role in cancer cell migration. We performed a quantitative proteomics study of EOC patient tumor tissues and identified changes in expression of several key regulators of actin cytoskeleton/cell adhesion and cell migration (CAPN1, 14-3-3, CAPG, PFN1, SPTBN1, CFN1) associated with loss of BRCA1 function. Gene expression analyses demonstrate that several of these proteomic hits are differentially expressed between early and advanced stage EOC thus suggesting clinical relevance of these proteins to disease progression. By immunohistochemistry of ovarian tumors with BRCA1(+/+) and BRCA1(null) status, we further verified our proteomic-based finding of elevated PFN1 expression associated with BRCA1 deficiency. Finally, we established a causal link between PFN1 and BRCA1-induced changes in cell migration thus uncovering a novel mechanistic basis for BRCA1-dependent regulation of ovarian cancer cell migration. Overall, findings of this study open up multiple avenues by which BRCA1 can potentially regulate migration and metastatic phenotype of EOC cells.

  4. Short-term oral administration of several manganese compounds in mice: Physiological and behavioral alterations caused by different forms of manganese

    SciTech Connect

    Komura, Junko; Sakamoto, Michiko )

    1991-06-01

    In Kanazawa, Japan, air pollution from a Mn treatment factory was found to affect local junior high school students, who showed reduced respiratory function relative to their exposure to Mn. The use of Mn as an antiknock ingredient in automobile fuels has recently been introduced, placing the general population at risk of chronic low-level exposure. There are few animal studies on the effects of compounds other than manganese chloride (MnCl{sub 2}). In the case of environmental pollution by Mn, the differing physiological effects of the various chemical forms of Mn must be considered. The present study therefore examined the differences in the effects of several Mn compounds on the physiology and behavior of mice by short-term oral administration.

  5. Calpain Protects the Heart from Hemodynamic Stress*

    PubMed Central

    Taneike, Manabu; Mizote, Isamu; Morita, Takashi; Watanabe, Tetsuya; Hikoso, Shungo; Yamaguchi, Osamu; Takeda, Toshihiro; Oka, Takafumi; Tamai, Takahito; Oyabu, Jota; Murakawa, Tomokazu; Nakayama, Hiroyuki; Nishida, Kazuhiko; Takeda, Junji; Mochizuki, Naoki; Komuro, Issei; Otsu, Kinya

    2011-01-01

    Calpains make up a family of Ca2+-dependent intracellular cysteine proteases that include ubiquitously expressed μ- and m-calpains. Both are heterodimers consisting of a distinct large catalytic subunit (calpain 1 for μ-calpain and calpain 2 for m-calpain) and a common regulatory subunit (calpain 4). The physiological roles of calpain remain unclear in the organs, including the heart, but it has been suggested that calpain is activated by Ca2+ overload in diseased hearts, resulting in cardiac dysfunction. In this study, cardiac-specific calpain 4-deficient mice were generated to elucidate the role of calpain in the heart in response to hemodynamic stress. Cardiac-specific deletion of calpain 4 resulted in decreased protein levels of calpains 1 and 2 and showed no cardiac phenotypes under base-line conditions but caused left ventricle dilatation, contractile dysfunction, and heart failure with interstitial fibrosis 1 week after pressure overload. Pressure-overloaded calpain 4-deficient hearts took up a membrane-impermeant dye, Evans blue, indicating plasma membrane disruption. Membrane repair assays using a two-photon laser-scanning microscope revealed that calpain 4-deficient cardiomyocytes failed to reseal a plasma membrane that had been disrupted by laser irradiation. Thus, the data indicate that calpain protects the heart from hemodynamic stresses, such as pressure overload. PMID:21795695

  6. Hemodynamic Simulations in Dialysis Access Fistulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGah, Patrick; Leotta, Daniel; Beach, Kirk; Riley, James; Aliseda, Alberto

    2010-11-01

    Arteriovenous fistulae are created surgically to provide adequate access for dialysis in patients with End-Stage Renal Disease. It has long been hypothesized that the hemodynamic and mechanical forces (such as wall shear stress, wall stretch, or flow- induced wall vibrations) constitute the primary external influence on the remodeling process. Given that nearly 50% of fistulae fail after one year, understanding fistulae hemodynamics is an important step toward improving patency in the clinic. We perform numerical simulations of the flow in patient-specific models of AV fistulae reconstructed from 3D ultrasound scans with physiologically-realistic boundary conditions also obtained from Doppler ultrasound. Comparison of the flow features in different geometries and configurations e.g. end-to-side vs. side-to-side, with the in vivo longitudinal outcomes will allow us to hypothesize which flow conditions are conducive to fistulae success or failure. The flow inertia and pulsatility in the simulations (mean Re 700, max Re 2000, Wo 4) give rise to complex secondary flows and coherent vortices, further complicating the spatio- temporal variability of the wall pressure and shear stresses. Even in mature fistulae, the anastomotic regions are subjected to non-physiological shear stresses (>10.12pcPa) which may potentially lead to complications.

  7. Hemodynamic parameters to guide fluid therapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The clinical determination of the intravascular volume can be extremely difficult in critically ill and injured patients as well as those undergoing major surgery. This is problematic because fluid loading is considered the first step in the resuscitation of hemodynamically unstable patients. Yet, multiple studies have demonstrated that only approximately 50% of hemodynamically unstable patients in the intensive care unit and operating room respond to a fluid challenge. Whereas under-resuscitation results in inadequate organ perfusion, accumulating data suggest that over-resuscitation increases the morbidity and mortality of critically ill patients. Cardiac filling pressures, including the central venous pressure and pulmonary artery occlusion pressure, have been traditionally used to guide fluid management. However, studies performed during the past 30 years have demonstrated that cardiac filling pressures are unable to predict fluid responsiveness. During the past decade, a number of dynamic tests of volume responsiveness have been reported. These tests dynamically monitor the change in stroke volume after a maneuver that increases or decreases venous return (preload) and challenges the patients' Frank-Starling curve. These dynamic tests use the change in stroke volume during mechanical ventilation or after a passive leg raising maneuver to assess fluid responsiveness. The stroke volume is measured continuously and in real-time by minimally invasive or noninvasive technologies, including Doppler methods, pulse contour analysis, and bioreactance. PMID:21906322

  8. Post-Treatment Hemodynamics of a Basilar Aneurysm and Bifurcation

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, J.; Hartman, J.; Rodriguez, J.; Maitland, D.

    2009-01-01

    To investigate whether or not a successful aneurysm treatment procedure can subject a parent artery to harmful hemodynamic stresses, computational fluid dynamics simulations are performed on a patient-specific basilar aneurysm and bifurcation before and after a virtual endovascular treatment. Prior to treatment, the aneurysm at systole is filled with a periodic train of vortex tubes, which form at the aneurysm neck and advect upwards into the dome. Following the treatment procedure however, the motion of the vortex train is inhibited by the aneurysm filling material, which confines the vortex tubes to the region beneath the aneurysm neck. Analysis of the post-treatment flow field indicates that the impingement of the basilar artery flow upon the treated aneurysm neck and the close proximity of a vortex tube to the parent artery wall increase the maximum wall shear stresses to values approximately equal to 50 Pa at systole. Calculation of the time-averaged wall shear stresses indicates that there is a 1.4 × 9 10−7 m2 area on the parent artery exposed to wall shear stresses greater than 37.9 Pa, a value shown by Fry [Circ. Res. 22(2):165–197, 1968] to cause severe damage to the endothelial cells that line the artery wall. The results of this study demonstrate that it is possible for a treatment procedure, which successfully isolates the aneurysm from the circulation and leaves no aneurysm neck remnant, to elevate the hemodynamic stresses to levels that are injurious to the artery wall. PMID:18629647

  9. Arterial stiffness, central hemodynamics, and cardiovascular risk in hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Palatini, Paolo; Casiglia, Edoardo; Gąsowski, Jerzy; Głuszek, Jerzy; Jankowski, Piotr; Narkiewicz, Krzysztof; Saladini, Francesca; Stolarz-Skrzypek, Katarzyna; Tikhonoff, Valérie; Van Bortel, Luc; Wojciechowska, Wiktoria; Kawecka-Jaszcz, Kalina

    2011-01-01

    This review summarizes several scientific contributions at the recent Satellite Symposium of the European Society of Hypertension, held in Milan, Italy. Arterial stiffening and its hemodynamic consequences can be easily and reliably measured using a range of noninvasive techniques. However, like blood pressure (BP) measurements, arterial stiffness should be measured carefully under standardized patient conditions. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity has been proposed as the gold standard for arterial stiffness measurement and is a well recognized predictor of adverse cardiovascular outcome. Systolic BP and pulse pressure in the ascending aorta may be lower than pressures measured in the upper limb, especially in young individuals. A number of studies suggest closer correlation of end-organ damage with central BP than with peripheral BP, and central BP may provide additional prognostic information regarding cardiovascular risk. Moreover, BP-lowering drugs can have differential effects on central aortic pressures and hemodynamics compared with brachial BP. This may explain the greater beneficial effect provided by newer antihypertensive drugs beyond peripheral BP reduction. Although many methodological problems still hinder the wide clinical application of parameters of arterial stiffness, these will likely contribute to cardiovascular assessment and management in future clinical practice. Each of the abovementioned parameters reflects a different characteristic of the atherosclerotic process, involving functional and/or morphological changes in the vessel wall. Therefore, acquiring simultaneous measurements of different parameters of vascular function and structure could theoretically enhance the power to improve risk stratification. Continuous technological effort is necessary to refine our methods of investigation in order to detect early arterial abnormalities. Arterial stiffness and its consequences represent the great challenge of the twenty-first century for

  10. Hemodynamic changes by drug interaction of adrenaline with chlorpromazine.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Hitoshi; Yabuki, Akiko; Ishii-Maruhama, Minako; Tomoyasu, Yumiko; Maeda, Shigeru; Miyawaki, Takuya

    2014-01-01

    Adrenaline (epinephrine) is included in dental local anesthesia for the purpose of vasoconstriction. In Japan, adrenaline is contraindicated for use in patients receiving antipsychotic therapy, because the combination of adrenaline and an antipsychotic is considered to cause severe hypotension; however, there is insufficient evidence supporting this claim. The purpose of the present study was to clarify the changes in hemodynamics caused by drug interaction between adrenaline and an antipsychotic and to evaluate the safety of the combined use of adrenaline and an antipsychotic in an animal study. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized with sodium pentobarbital. A catheter was inserted into the femoral artery to measure blood pressure and pulse rate. Rats were pretreated by intraperitoneal injection of chlorpromazine or chlorpromazine and propranolol, and after 20 minutes, saline or 1 of 3 different doses of adrenaline was administered by intraperitoneal injection. Changes in the ratio of mean arterial blood pressure and pulse rate were measured after the injection of adrenaline. Significant hypotension and tachycardia were observed after the injection of adrenaline in the chlorpromazine-pretreated rats. These effects were in a dose-dependent manner, and 100 μg/kg adrenaline induced significant hemodynamic changes. Furthermore, in the chlorpromazine and propranolol-pretreated rats, modest hypertension was induced by adrenaline, but hypotension and tachycardia were not significantly shown. Hypotension was caused by a drug interaction between adrenaline and chlorpromazine through the activation of the β-adrenergic receptor and showed a dose-dependent effect. Low-dose adrenaline similar to what might be used in human dental treatment did not result in a significant homodynamic change.

  11. Hemodynamic Changes by Drug Interaction of Adrenaline With Chlorpromazine

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Hitoshi; Yabuki, Akiko; Ishii-Maruhama, Minako; Tomoyasu, Yumiko; Maeda, Shigeru; Miyawaki, Takuya

    2014-01-01

    Adrenaline (epinephrine) is included in dental local anesthesia for the purpose of vasoconstriction. In Japan, adrenaline is contraindicated for use in patients receiving antipsychotic therapy, because the combination of adrenaline and an antipsychotic is considered to cause severe hypotension; however, there is insufficient evidence supporting this claim. The purpose of the present study was to clarify the changes in hemodynamics caused by drug interaction between adrenaline and an antipsychotic and to evaluate the safety of the combined use of adrenaline and an antipsychotic in an animal study. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized with sodium pentobarbital. A catheter was inserted into the femoral artery to measure blood pressure and pulse rate. Rats were pretreated by intraperitoneal injection of chlorpromazine or chlorpromazine and propranolol, and after 20 minutes, saline or 1 of 3 different doses of adrenaline was administered by intraperitoneal injection. Changes in the ratio of mean arterial blood pressure and pulse rate were measured after the injection of adrenaline. Significant hypotension and tachycardia were observed after the injection of adrenaline in the chlorpromazine-pretreated rats. These effects were in a dose-dependent manner, and 100 μg/kg adrenaline induced significant hemodynamic changes. Furthermore, in the chlorpromazine and propranolol–pretreated rats, modest hypertension was induced by adrenaline, but hypotension and tachycardia were not significantly shown. Hypotension was caused by a drug interaction between adrenaline and chlorpromazine through the activation of the β-adrenergic receptor and showed a dose-dependent effect. Low-dose adrenaline similar to what might be used in human dental treatment did not result in a significant homodynamic change. PMID:25517550

  12. Early predictors of mortality in hemodynamically unstable pelvis fractures.

    PubMed

    Smith, Wade; Williams, Allison; Agudelo, Juan; Shannon, Michael; Morgan, Steven; Stahel, Phillip; Moore, Ernest

    2007-01-01

    To determine reliable, early indicators of mortality and causes of death in hemodynamically unstable patients with pelvic ring injuries. This was a retrospective review of a prospective pelvic database. In all, 187 hemodynamically unstable patients with pelvic fractures (persistent systolic blood pressure <90 mm Hg after receiving 2 L of intravenous crystalloid) admitted from April 1998 to November 2004 were included. Intervention was Level 1 Trauma Center-Pelvis Fracture standardized protocol. Main outcome measurements were: Injury Severity Score (ISS), Revised Trauma Score (RTS), age, blood transfusion, mortality, and multisystem organ failure (MOF). Group 1 (39 patients) did not survive their injury. Group 2 (148 patients) survived their injury. Fracture pattern (chi(2) = 9.1, P = 0.33), and treatment with angiography/embolization (chi(2) = 0.054, P = 0.84) were not predictive of death. Patients requiring more blood had a statistically significant higher mortality rate. The ISS (t = -5.62, P < 0.001), RTS (t = 6.10, P < 0.001), age >60 years old (chi(2) = 5.4, P = 0.03), and transfusion (t = -2.70, P = 0.010) were statistically significant independent predictors of mortality. A logistic regression analysis and receiver operating characteristic curves indicated that of these variables, RTS was the most predictive independent variable. However, a model including all four variables was superior at predicting mortality. Most deaths were attributed to exsanguination (74.4%) or MOF (17.9%). Predictors of mortality in pelvis fracture patients should be available early in the course of treatment in order to be useful. Death within 24 hours was most often a result of acute blood loss while death after 24 hours was most often caused by MOF. Improved survival will depend upon the evolution of early hemorrhage control and resuscitative strategies in patients at high mortality risk.

  13. Hemodynamic Effect of Laser Therapy in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tomimura, Suely; Silva, Bianca Passos Assumpção; Sanches, Iris Callado; Canal, Marina; Consolim-Colombo, Fernanda; Conti, Felipe Fernandes; Angelis, Katia De; Chavantes, Maria Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Systemic arterial hypertension (SAH) is considered to be the greatest risk factor for the development of neuro-cardiovascular pathologies, thus constituting a severe Public Health issue in the world. The Low-Level Laser Therapy (LLLT), or laser therapy, activates components of the cellular structure, therefore converting luminous energy into photochemical energy and leading to biophysical and biochemical reactions in the mitochondrial respiratory chain. The LLLT promotes cellular and tissue photobiomodulation by means of changes in metabolism, leading to molecular, cellular and systemic changes. The objective of this study was to analyze the action of low-level laser in the hemodynamic modulation of spontaneously hypertensive rats, in the long term. Animals (n = 16) were randomly divided into the Laser Group (n = 8), which received three weekly LLLT irradiations for seven weeks, and into the Sham Group (n = 8), which received three weekly simulations of laser for seven weeks, accounting for 21 applications in each group. After seven weeks, animals were cannulated by the implantation of a catheter in the left carotid artery. On the following day, the systemic arterial pressure was recorded. The Laser Group showed reduced levels of mean blood pressure, with statistically significant reduction (169 ± 4 mmHg* vs. 182 ± 4 mmHg from the Sham Group) and reduced levels of diastolic pressure (143 ± 4 mmHg* vs. 157 ± 3 mmHg from the Sham Group), revealing a 13 and 14 mmHg decrease, respectively. Besides, there was a concomitant important decline in heart rate (312 ± 14 bpm vs. 361 ± 13 bpm from the Sham Group). Therefore, laser therapy was able to produce hemodynamic changes, thus reducing pressure levels in spontaneously hypertensive rats. PMID:25211315

  14. Sustained low-efficiency dialysis in septic shock: Hemodynamic tolerability and efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Shakti Bedanta; Singh, Ratender Kumar; Baronia, Arvind Kumar; Poddar, Banani; Azim, Afzal; Gurjar, Mohan

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the Study: Acute kidney injury (AKI) in septic shock has poor outcomes. Sustained low-efficiency dialysis (SLED) is increasingly replacing continuous renal replacement therapy as the preferred modality in Intensive Care Units (ICUs). However, the essential aspects of hemodynamic tolerability and efficacy of SLED in septic shock AKI has been minimally studied. Patients and Methods: We describe hemodynamic tolerability using modified vasopressor index (VI) and vasopressor dependency (VD) and efficacy using a combination of Kt/v, correction of acidosis, electrolyte, and fluid overload. Adult ICU patients of septic shock in AKI requiring SLED were included in this study. Results: One hundred and twenty-four patients of septic shock AKI requiring SLED were enrolled in the study. There were 74 nonsurvivors (NSs). Approximately, 56% (278/498) of the sessions in which vasopressors were required were studied. Metabolic acidosis (49%) was the predominant indication for the initiation of SLED in these patients. Baseline characteristics between survivors and NSs were comparable, except for age, severity scores, AKI stage, and coexisting illness. VI and VD prior to the initiation of SLED and delta VI and VD during SLED were significantly higher in NSs. Hemodynamic tolerability and efficacy of SLED was achievable only at lower vasopressor doses. Conclusion: VI, VD, and combination of Kt/v together with correction of acidosis, electrolyte, and fluid overload can be used to describe hemodynamic tolerability and efficacy of SLED in septic shock AKI. However, at higher vasopressor doses in septic shock, hemodynamic tolerability and efficacy of SLED requires further evidence. PMID:28149027

  15. Comparison of Dexmedetomidine and Remifentanil on Airway Reflex and Hemodynamic Changes during Recovery after Craniotomy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunzu; Min, Kyeong Tae; Lee, Jeong Rim; Ha, Sang Hee; Lee, Woo Kyung; Seo, Jae Hee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose During emergence from anesthesia for a craniotomy, maintenance of hemodynamic stability and prompt evaluation of neurological status is mandatory. The aim of this prospective, randomized, double-blind study was to compare the effects of dexmedetomidine and remifentanil on airway reflex and hemodynamic change in patients undergoing craniotomy. Materials and Methods Seventy-four patients undergoing clipping of unruptured cerebral aneurysm were recruited. In the dexmedetomidine group, patients were administered dexmedetomidine (0.5 µg/kg) for 5 minutes, while the patients of the remifentanil group were administered remifentanil with an effect site concentration of 1.5 ng/mL until endotracheal extubation. The incidence and severity of cough and hemodynamic variables were measured during the recovery period. Hemodynamic variables, respiration rate, and sedation scale were measured after extubation and in the post-anesthetic care unit (PACU). Results The incidence of grade 2 and 3 cough at the point of extubation was 62.5% in the dexmedetomidine group and 53.1% in the remifentanil group (p=0.39). Mean arterial pressure (p=0.01) at admission to the PACU and heart rate (p=0.04 and 0.01, respectively) at admission and at 10 minutes in the PACU were significantly lower in the dexmedetomidine group. Respiration rate was significantly lower in the remifentanil group at 2 minutes (p<0.01) and 5 minutes (p<0.01) after extubation. Conclusion We concluded that a single bolus of dexmedetomidine (0.5 µg/kg) and remifentanil infusion have equal effectiveness in attenuating coughing and hemodynamic changes in patients undergoing cerebral aneurysm clipping; however, dexmedetomidine leads to better preservation of respiration. PMID:27189295

  16. Lack of Association Between Limb Hemodynamics and Response to Infrapopliteal Endovascular Therapy in Patients With Critical Limb Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Mustapha, J A; Diaz-Sandoval, Larry J; Adams, George; Jaff, Michael R; Beasley, Robert; McGoff, Theresa; Finton, Sara; Miller, Larry E; Ansari, Mohammad; Saab, Fadi

    2017-05-01

    Non-invasive limb hemodynamics may aid in diagnosis of critical limb ischemia (CLI), although the relationship with disease severity and response to endovascular therapy is unclear. This prospective, single-center study enrolled 100 CLI patients (Rutherford class 4-6) who underwent infrapopliteal endovascular revascularization (175 lesions) in the Peripheral RegIstry of Endovascular Clinical OutcoMEs (PRIME) registry. Hemodynamic measures included ankle-brachial index (ABI), toe-brachial index (TBI), and toe pressure (TP). Procedure success following revascularization was defined as stenosis ≤30%. Hemodynamic success was defined as an increase >0.15 in ABI or TBI relative to baseline. Freedom from amputation was defined as no major or minor amputation during follow-up. Clinical success was defined as a decrease of at least one Rutherford class during follow-up. Treatment success was defined as procedure success, freedom from amputation, and clinical improvement. Median baseline hemodynamic values were 0.90 for ABI, 0.39 for TBI, and 54 mm Hg for TP. Twenty-nine patients (29%) did not meet the common hemodynamic diagnostic criterion for eligibility in CLI trials (ABI ≤0.5, TBI ≤0.5, or TP <50 mm Hg). Main outcomes included 96% procedure success, 95% freedom from amputation, 64% clinical success, and 62% treatment success. There was no relationship between baseline (or with the pretreatment to posttreatment change) limb hemodynamic values and the response to infrapopliteal endovascular therapy. Non-invasive hemodynamic studies may have limited clinical usefulness in patients with CLI. The usefulness of these parameters to confirm eligibility and to assess response to therapy in interventional CLI clinical trials should be re-evaluated.

  17. Advanced Hemodynamic Management in Patients with Septic Shock.

    PubMed

    Saugel, Bernd; Huber, Wolfgang; Nierhaus, Axel; Kluge, Stefan; Reuter, Daniel A; Wagner, Julia Y

    2016-01-01

    In patients with sepsis and septic shock, the hemodynamic management in both early and later phases of these "organ dysfunction syndromes" is a key therapeutic component. It needs, however, to be differentiated between "early goal-directed therapy" (EGDT) as proposed for the first 6 hours of emergency department treatment by Rivers et al. in 2001 and "hemodynamic management" using advanced hemodynamic monitoring in the intensive care unit (ICU). Recent large trials demonstrated that nowadays protocolized EGDT does not seem to be superior to "usual care" in terms of a reduction in mortality in emergency department patients with early identified septic shock who promptly receive antibiotic therapy and fluid resuscitation. "Hemodynamic management" comprises (a) making the diagnosis of septic shock as one differential diagnosis of circulatory shock, (b) assessing the hemodynamic status including the identification of therapeutic conflicts, and (c) guiding therapeutic interventions. We propose two algorithms for hemodynamic management using transpulmonary thermodilution-derived variables aiming to optimize the cardiocirculatory and pulmonary status in adult ICU patients with septic shock. The complexity and heterogeneity of patients with septic shock implies that individualized approaches for hemodynamic management are mandatory. Defining individual hemodynamic target values for patients with septic shock in different phases of the disease must be the focus of future studies.

  18. Advanced Hemodynamic Management in Patients with Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Wolfgang; Nierhaus, Axel; Kluge, Stefan; Reuter, Daniel A.; Wagner, Julia Y.

    2016-01-01

    In patients with sepsis and septic shock, the hemodynamic management in both early and later phases of these “organ dysfunction syndromes” is a key therapeutic component. It needs, however, to be differentiated between “early goal-directed therapy” (EGDT) as proposed for the first 6 hours of emergency department treatment by Rivers et al. in 2001 and “hemodynamic management” using advanced hemodynamic monitoring in the intensive care unit (ICU). Recent large trials demonstrated that nowadays protocolized EGDT does not seem to be superior to “usual care” in terms of a reduction in mortality in emergency department patients with early identified septic shock who promptly receive antibiotic therapy and fluid resuscitation. “Hemodynamic management” comprises (a) making the diagnosis of septic shock as one differential diagnosis of circulatory shock, (b) assessing the hemodynamic status including the identification of therapeutic conflicts, and (c) guiding therapeutic interventions. We propose two algorithms for hemodynamic management using transpulmonary thermodilution-derived variables aiming to optimize the cardiocirculatory and pulmonary status in adult ICU patients with septic shock. The complexity and heterogeneity of patients with septic shock implies that individualized approaches for hemodynamic management are mandatory. Defining individual hemodynamic target values for patients with septic shock in different phases of the disease must be the focus of future studies. PMID:27703980

  19. Altered expression of several genes in IIIManL-defective mutants of Streptococcus salivarius demonstrated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of cytoplasmic proteins.

    PubMed

    Lapointe, R; Frenette, M; Vadeboncoeur, C

    1993-05-01

    Mannose, glucose and fructose are transported in Streptococcus salivarius by a phosphoenolpyruvate:mannose phosphotransferase system (PTS) which consists of a membrane-bound Enzyme II (EII) and two forms of IIIMan having molecular weights of 38,900 (IIIManH) and 35,200 (IIIManL), respectively. We have previously reported the isolation of spontaneous mutants lacking IIIManL and showed that they exhibit higher beta-galactosidase activity than the parental strain after growth on glucose, and that some of them constitutively express a fructose PTS which is induced by fructose in the parental strain. In an attempt to determine whether the expression of other genes is affected by the mutation and what the physiological link is between them, we examined three S. salivarius IIIManL-defective mutants (strains A37, B31 and G29) and the parental strain using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis after growth of the cells on a variety of sugars. After growth on glucose, five new proteins were detected in the cytoplasm of the three mutants. Two of these proteins were induced in the parental strain by galactose or oligosaccharides containing galactose, and one was specifically induced by melibiose. The other two proteins were not detected in the parental strain under any of the growth conditions tested. Two other proteins were only detected in glucose-grown cells of mutant A37, and a protein associated with the metabolism of fructose was constitutively expressed in mutants B31 and G29. Moreover, we have found that under identical growth conditions the amounts of several other proteins which were detected in the parental strain were either increased or decreased in the mutants. Globally, our results have indicated that (1) the expression of several genes was affected in the spontaneous IIIManL-defective mutants; (2) some of the proteins abnormally produced in the mutants were specifically induced in the parental strain by sugars; (3) the phenotypic modifications observed in the

  20. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin treatment alters eicosanoid levels in several organs of the mouse in an aryl hydrocarbon receptor-dependent fashion

    SciTech Connect

    Bui, Peter; Solaimani, Parrisa; Wu, Xiaomeng; Hankinson, Oliver

    2012-03-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) adversely affects many mammalian organs and tissues. These effects are mediated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 are upregulated by the liganded AHR. These (and other) cytochromes P450 can metabolize arachidonic acid into a variety of bioactive eicosanoids. Towards investigating a potential role of eicosanoids in TCDD toxicity, arachidonic acid, two other unsaturated long-chain fatty acids, and up to twenty-five eicosanoids were measured in five organs/tissues of male and female wild-type and Ahr null mice treated or untreated with TCDD. TCDD generally increased the levels of the four dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs) and (where measured) 5,6-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid and 18-, 19- and 20-hydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (HETEs) in the serum, liver, spleen and lungs, but not the heart, of both sexes, and increased the levels in the serum, liver and spleen of several metabolites that are usually considered products of lipoxygenase activity, but which may also be generated by cytochromes P450. TCDD also increased the levels of the esterified forms of these eicosanoids in the liver in parallel with the corresponding free forms. The levels of prostanoids were generally not affected by TCDD. The above changes did not occur in Ahr null mice, and are therefore mediated by the AHR. TCDD increased the mRNA levels of Cyp1a1, Cyp1a2, Cyp1b1 and the Pla2g12a form of phospholipase A{sub 2} to varying degrees in the different organs, and these increases correlated with some but not all the changes in eicosanoids levels in the organs, suggesting that other enzymes may also be involved. -- Highlights: ► TCDD treatment increases the levels of many eicosanoids in several mouse organs. ► Products of both the cytochrome P450 and classical lipoxygenase pathways are increased. ► These increases are dependent on the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. ► Cyp1a1, Cyp1a2 and Cyp1b1 appear to be responsible for much but

  1. Conjunctival microvascular hemodynamics following vaso-occlusive crisis in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Kord Valeshabad, Ali; Wanek, Justin; Gaynes, Bruce; Saraf, Santosh L; Molokie, Robert; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2015-09-25

    Painful vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC) is the clinical hallmark of sickle cell disease (SCD). Microcirculatory hemodynamic changes following painful VOC may be indicative of future development of VOC events in subjects with SCD. The purpose of the present study was to determine alterations in conjunctival microvascular hemodynamics during non-crisis state in SCD subjects with a history of VOC. Conjunctival microcirculation imaging was performed to measure conjunctival diameter (D) and axial blood velocity (V) in 10 control and 30 SCD subjects. SCD subjects were categorized into two groups based on their history of VOC within a 2-year period before imaging (with or without VOC-H) and also based on whether there was progression in the rate of VOCs during a 2-year period following imaging as compared to before imaging (with or without VOC-P). Conjunctival V was significantly higher in SCD subjects with VOC-H than in both control subjects and SCD subjects without VOC-H (P≤0.03). Conjunctival V was also significantly higher in SCD subjects with VOC-P compared with control subjects and SCD subjects without VOC-P (P≤0.03). Assessment of the conjunctival microcirculation may be useful for understanding hemodynamic changes that lead to VOC events in SCD subjects.

  2. Assessment of Hemodynamic Conditions in the Aorta Following Root Replacement with Composite Valve-Conduit Graft.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhuo; Kidher, Emaddin; Jarral, Omar A; O'Regan, Declan P; Wood, Nigel B; Athanasiou, Thanos; Xu, Xiao Yun

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the analysis of detailed hemodynamics in the aortas of four patients following replacement with a composite bio-prosthetic valve-conduit. Magnetic resonance image-based computational models were set up for each patient with boundary conditions comprising subject-specific three-dimensional inflow velocity profiles at the aortic root and central pressure waveform at the model outlet. Two normal subjects were also included for comparison. The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of the valve-conduit on flow in the proximal and distal aorta. The results suggested that following the composite valve-conduit implantation, the vortical flow structure and hemodynamic parameters in the aorta were altered, with slightly reduced helical flow index, elevated wall shear stress and higher non-uniformity in wall shear compared to normal aortas. Inter-individual analysis revealed different hemodynamic conditions among the patients depending on the conduit configuration in the ascending aorta, which is a key factor in determining post-operative aortic flow. Introducing a natural curvature in the conduit to create a smooth transition between the conduit and native aorta may help prevent the occurrence of retrograde and recirculating flow in the aortic arch, which is particularly important when a large portion or the entire ascending aorta needs to be replaced.

  3. Effect of Hemodynamics on Outcome of Subtotally Occluded Paraclinoid Aneurysms after Stent-Assisted Coil Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian; Jing, Linkai; Wang, Chao; Paliwal, Nikhil; Wang, Shengzhang; Zhang, Ying; Xiang, Jianping; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Meng, Hui; Yang, Xinjian

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND and OBJECTIVE Endovascular treatment of paraclinoid aneurysms is preferred in clinical practice. Flow alterations caused by stents and coils may affect treatment outcome. Our aim was to assess hemodynamic changes following stent-assisted coil embolization in subtotally embolized paraclinoid aneurysms with residual necks that were predisposed to recanalization. METHODS We studied 27 paraclinoid aneurysms (seven recanalized and 20 stable) treated with coils and Enterprise™ stents. Computational fluid dynamics simulations were performed on patient-specific aneurysm geometries using virtual stenting and porous media technology. RESULTS After stent placement in 27 cases, aneurysm flow velocity decreased significantly, gradually increasing from the neck plane (11.9%), to the residual neck (12.3%), to the aneurysm dome (16.3%). Subsequent coil embolization was performed after stent placement and the hemodynamic factors decreased further and significantly at all aneurysm regions except the neck plane. Compared between recanalized and stable cases, univariate analysis showed no significant differences in any parameter before treatment. After stent-assisted coiling, only the reduction in area-averaged velocity at the neck plane differed significantly between recanalized (8.1%) and stable cases (20.5%) (p=0.016). CONCLUSION Aneurysm flow velocity can be significantly decreased by stent placement and coil embolization. However, hemodynamics at the aneurysm neck plane was less sensitive to coils. Significant reduction in flow velocity at the neck plane may be an important factor in preventing recanalization of paraclinoid aneurysms after subtotal stent-assisted coil embolization. PMID:26610731

  4. Throwing out the "grade" book: management of isolated spleen and liver injury based on hemodynamic status.

    PubMed

    McVay, Marcene R; Kokoska, Evan R; Jackson, Richard J; Smith, Samuel D

    2008-06-01

    Current organizational guidelines for the management of isolated spleen and liver injuries are based on injury grade. We propose that management based on hemodynamic status is safe in children and results in decreased length of stay (LOS) and resource use compared to current grade-based guidelines. Patients with spleen or liver injuries for a 5-year period were identified using our institutional trauma registry. All patients were managed using a pathway based on hemodynamic status. Charts were reviewed for demographics, mechanism, hematrocrit values, transfusion requirement, imaging, injury grade, LOS, and outcome. Exclusion criteria included penetrating mechanism, associated injuries altering LOS or ambulation status, combined spleen/liver injury, initial operative management or death. Statistical comparison was performed using Student's t test; P < .05 is significant. One hundred one patients (50 spleen, 51 liver) meeting inclusion criteria were identified. Average actual LOS for all patients was 1.9 days vs 3.2 projected days based on American Pediatric Surgical Association guidelines (P < .0001). Actual vs projected LOS for grades III to V was 2.5 vs 4.3 days (P < .0001). All patients returned to full activity without complication. Isolated blunt spleen and liver injuries, regardless of grade, can be safely managed using a pathway based on hemodynamic status, resulting in decreased LOS and resource use compared to current guidelines.

  5. Loss of Maged1 results in obesity, deficits of social interactions, impaired sexual behavior and severe alteration of mature oxytocin production in the hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Dombret, Carlos; Nguyen, Tuan; Schakman, Olivier; Michaud, Jacques L; Hardin-Pouzet, Hélène; Bertrand, Mathieu J M; De Backer, Olivier

    2012-11-01

    MAGED1, NECDIN and MAGEL2 are members of the MAGE gene family. The latter two of these genes have been involved in Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), which includes hyperphagia, repetitive and compulsive behaviors, and cognitive impairment. Here, we show that Maged1-deficient mice develop progressive obesity associated with hyperphagia and reduced motor activity. Loss of Maged1 also results in a complex behavioral syndrome that includes reduced social interactions and memory, deficient sexual behavior, as well as increased anxiety and self-grooming. Oxytocin (OT), which is produced in the hypothalamus, can act as a neurotransmitter that reduces anxiety, promotes social behaviors and regulates food intake. Growing evidences indicate that OT is involved in autism. We found that Maged1 mutants showed a severe reduction in the levels of mature OT, but not of its precursors, in the hypothalamus. Moreover, the administration of OT rescued the deficit in social memory of these mice. We conclude that Maged1 is required for OT processing or stability. A decrease in mature OT levels in Maged1 mutants affects social interactions and possibly other behavioral processes. Our observations suggest that, in human, MAGED1 could play a role in autism or cause a neurodevelopmental condition that is reminiscent of the PWS.

  6. The plasticizer benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP) alters the ecdysone hormone pathway, the cellular response to stress, the energy metabolism, and several detoxication mechanisms in Chironomus riparius larvae.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Óscar; Planelló, Rosario; Morcillo, Gloria

    2015-06-01

    Butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP) has been extensively used worldwide as a plasticizer in the polyvinyl chloride (PVC) industry and the manufacturing of many other products, and its presence in the aquatic environment is expected for decades. In the present study, the toxicity of BBP was investigated in Chironomus riparius aquatic larvae. The effects of acute 24-h and 48-h exposures to a wide range of BBP doses were evaluated at the molecular level by analysing changes in genes related to the stress response, the endocrine system, the energy metabolism, and detoxication pathways, as well as in the enzyme activity of glutathione S-transferase. BBP caused a dose and time-dependent toxicity in most of the selected biomarkers. 24-h exposures to high doses affected larval survival and lead to a significant response of several heat-shock genes (hsp70, hsp40, and hsp27), and to a clear endocrine disrupting effect by upregulating the ecdysone receptor gene (EcR). Longer treatments with low doses triggered a general repression of transcription and GST activity. Furthermore, delayed toxicity studies were specially relevant, since they allowed us to detect unpredictable toxic effects, not immediately manifested after contact with the phthalate. This study provides novel and interesting results on the toxic effects of BBP in C. riparius and highlights the suitability of this organism for ecotoxicological risk assessment, especially in aquatic ecosystems.

  7. Alteration of laboratory findings after radiofrequency ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma: relationship to severity of the underlying liver disease and the ablation volume

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sang-Wook; Lim, Sanghyeok; Kim, Yongsoo; Kim, Jinoo

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims To investigate sequential changes in laboratory markers after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and the relationship of these changes to the severity of the underlying liver disease. Methods This retrospective analysis included 65 patients (44 males, 21 females) who underwent RFA of HCC. Hematologic and biochemical markers were assessed at the pre-RFA period and 1 day, 2-3 days, and 1-2 weeks after RFA. We classified the subjects into two groups: Child-Pugh A (n=41) and Child-Pugh B (n=24). The ablative margin volume (AMV) of each patient was measured. We analyzed the changes in laboratory profiles from the baseline, and investigated whether these laboratory changes were correlated with the AMV and the Child-Pugh classification. Results Most of the laboratory values peaked at 2-3 days after RFA. AMV was significantly correlated with changes in WBC count, hemoglobin level, and serum total bilirubin level (Pearson's correlation coefficient, 0.324-0.453; P<0.05). The alanine aminotransferase (ALT) level varied significantly over time (P=0.023). Conclusions Most of the measured laboratory markers changed from baseline, peaking at 2-3 days. The ALT level was the only parameter for which there was a significant difference after RFA between Child-Pugh A and B patients: it increased significantly more in the Child-Pugh A patients. PMID:25834804

  8. Proteomic and Real-Time PCR analyses of Saccharomyces cerevisiae VL3 exposed to microcystin-LR reveals a set of protein alterations transversal to several eukaryotic models.

    PubMed

    Valério, Elisabete; Campos, Alexandre; Osório, Hugo; Vasconcelos, Vitor

    2016-03-15

    Some of the most common toxins present in freshwater, in particular microcystins (MCs), are produced by cyanobacteria. These toxins have a negative impact on human health, being associated with episodes of acute hepatotoxicity and being considered potentially carcinogenic to humans. To date the exact mechanisms of MC-induced toxicity and tumor promotion were not completely elucidated. To get new insights underlying microcystin-LR (MCLR) molecular mechanisms of toxicity we have performed the proteomic profiling using two-dimensional electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/TOF of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells exposed for 4 h-1 nM and 1 μM of MCLR, and compared them to the control (cells not exposed to MCLR). We identified 14 differentially expressed proteins. The identified proteins are involved in metabolism, genotoxicity, cytotoxicity and stress response. Furthermore, we evaluated the relative expression of yeast's PP1 and PP2A genes and also of genes from the Base Excision Repair (BER) DNA-repair system, and observed that three out of the five genes analyzed displayed dose-dependent responses. Overall, the different proteins and genes affected are related to oxidative stress and apoptosis, thus reinforcing that it is probably the main mechanism of MCLR toxicity transversal to several organisms, especially at lower doses. Notwithstanding these MCLR responsive proteins could be object of further studies to evaluate their suitability as biomarkers of exposure to the toxin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of 12 days exposure to simulated microgravity on central circulatory hemodynamics in the rhesus monkey

    NASA Astr