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Sample records for severe metabolic acidosis

  1. [Severe metabolic acidosis in an alcoholic].

    PubMed

    Sonne, Morten Egede; Rudolph, Søren Finnemann; Pott, Frank Christian

    2008-09-29

    Severe metabolic acidosis is associated with poor prognosis. We present a patient with profound alcohol and starvation-related combined lactic and keto acidosis (lactate = 29 mM; pH = 6.83) who made a good recovery following 18 hours of intensive care therapy. A brief summary of the proposed mechanism by which these metabolic derangements develop is presented.

  2. Metabolic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Salim

    2007-01-01

    Acute metabolic acidosis is frequently encountered in critically ill patients. Metabolic acidosis can occur as a result of either the accumulation of endogenous acids that consumes bicarbonate (high anion gap metabolic acidosis) or loss of bicarbonate from the gastrointestinal tract or the kidney (hyperchloremic or normal anion gap metabolic acidosis). The cause of high anion gap metabolic acidosis includes lactic acidosis, ketoacidosis, renal failure and intoxication with ethylene glycol, methanol, salicylate and less commonly with pyroglutamic acid (5-oxoproline), propylene glycole or djenkol bean (gjenkolism). The most common causes of hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis are gastrointestinal bicarbonate loss, renal tubular acidosis, drugs-induced hyperkalemia, early renal failure and administration of acids. The appropriate treatment of acute metabolic acidosis, in particular organic form of acidosis such as lactic acidosis, has been very controversial. The only effective treatment for organic acidosis is cessation of acid production via improvement of tissue oxygenation. Treatment of acute organic acidosis with sodium bicarbonate failed to reduce the morbidity and mortality despite improvement in acid-base parameters. Further studies are required to determine the optimal treatment strategies for acute metabolic acidosis.

  3. Metabolic acidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... diarrhea. Lactic acidosis results from a buildup of lactic acid. It can be caused by: Alcohol Cancer Exercising ... functions) Urine pH Urine ketones or blood ketones Lactic acid test Arterial blood gas analysis Other tests may ...

  4. Aluminum phosphide poisoning: effect of correction of severe metabolic acidosis on patient outcome.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, S; Verma, R K; Tewari, N

    2009-01-01

    Forty patients of aluminum phosphide poisoning who were admitted to the ICU of Sir Sunder Lal Hospital, Banaras Hindu University, were studied. Restlessness, excessive thirst, shock, arrhythmias, tachypnoea, and severe metabolic acidosis were the common clinical findings. Only repeated and full correction with intravenous sodium bicarbonate was able to cope up with the severity and rapidity of acidosis. There was no significant change in blood pressure, pulse rate, and respiratory rate after full correction but gradually pulse and systolic blood pressure settled after ionotropic support in the survivors. There was significant improvement from 30.36% in the case when only half correction was done, as has been the common practice, to 57.5%, when full correction of metabolic acidosis was done.

  5. Successful Treatment of Severe Metabolic Acidosis Due to Acute Aluminum Phosphide Poisoning With Peritoneal Dialysis: a Report of 2 Cases.

    PubMed

    Bashardoust, Bahman; Farzaneh, Esmaeil; Habibzadeh, Afshin; Seyyed Sadeghi, Mir Salim

    2017-03-01

    Aluminum phosphide poisoning is common in our region. It can cause severe metabolic acidosis and persistent hypotension, which lead to cardiogenic shock and subsequently mortality. Oliguric or anuric acute kidney injury is seen in almost all patients with aluminum phosphide poisoning. Renal replacement therapies are recommended in these patients to improve metabolic acidosis and increase the rate of survival. We report 2 cases of severe acute aluminum phosphide poisoning treated successfully with peritoneal dialysis.

  6. Drug-Induced Metabolic Acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Amy Quynh Trang; Xu, Li Hao Richie; Moe, Orson W.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis could emerge from diseases disrupting acid-base equilibrium or from drugs that induce similar derangements. Occurrences are usually accompanied by comorbid conditions of drug-induced metabolic acidosis, and clinical outcomes may range from mild to fatal. It is imperative that clinicians not only are fully aware of the list of drugs that may lead to metabolic acidosis but also understand the underlying pathogenic mechanisms. In this review, we categorized drug-induced metabolic acidosis in terms of pathophysiological mechanisms, as well as individual drugs’ characteristics. PMID:26918138

  7. Topiramate and metabolic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Wilner, A; Raymond, K; Pollard, R

    1999-06-01

    Topiramate (TPM) is a novel antiepileptic medication (AED) with at least three mechanisms of action. A possible fourth mechanism, that of a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, also may contribute to its antiepileptic properties. We report a patient with intractable epilepsy and normal renal function who developed a normal anion gap metabolic acidosis, which worsened during elective surgery for temporal lobectomy. We believe this side effect of TPM can become clinically significant during surgery, concomitant use of another carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, and potentially with the ketogenic diet.

  8. Diet-induced metabolic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Adeva, María M; Souto, Gema

    2011-08-01

    The modern Western-type diet is deficient in fruits and vegetables and contains excessive animal products, generating the accumulation of non-metabolizable anions and a lifespan state of overlooked metabolic acidosis, whose magnitude increases progressively with aging due to the physiological decline in kidney function. In response to this state of diet-derived metabolic acidosis, the kidney implements compensating mechanisms aimed to restore the acid-base balance, such as the removal of the non-metabolizable anions, the conservation of citrate, and the enhancement of kidney ammoniagenesis and urinary excretion of ammonium ions. These adaptive processes lower the urine pH and induce an extensive change in urine composition, including hypocitraturia, hypercalciuria, and nitrogen and phosphate wasting. Low urine pH predisposes to uric acid stone formation. Hypocitraturia and hypercalciuria are risk factors for calcium stone disease. Even a very mild degree of metabolic acidosis induces skeletal muscle resistance to the insulin action and dietary acid load may be an important variable in predicting the metabolic abnormalities and the cardiovascular risk of the general population, the overweight and obese persons, and other patient populations including diabetes and chronic kidney failure. High dietary acid load is more likely to result in diabetes and systemic hypertension and may increase the cardiovascular risk. Results of recent observational studies confirm an association between insulin resistance and metabolic acidosis markers, including low serum bicarbonate, high serum anion gap, hypocitraturia, and low urine pH.

  9. Acidosis induces reprogramming of cellular metabolism to mitigate oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A variety of oncogenic and environmental factors alter tumor metabolism to serve the distinct cellular biosynthetic and bioenergetic needs present during oncogenesis. Extracellular acidosis is a common microenvironmental stress in solid tumors, but little is known about its metabolic influence, particularly when present in the absence of hypoxia. In order to characterize the extent of tumor cell metabolic adaptations to acidosis, we employed stable isotope tracers to examine how acidosis impacts glucose, glutamine, and palmitate metabolism in breast cancer cells exposed to extracellular acidosis. Results Acidosis increased both glutaminolysis and fatty acid β-oxidation, which contribute metabolic intermediates to drive the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle) and ATP generation. Acidosis also led to a decoupling of glutaminolysis and novel glutathione (GSH) synthesis by repressing GCLC/GCLM expression. We further found that acidosis redirects glucose away from lactate production and towards the oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). These changes all serve to increase nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) production and counter the increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) present under acidosis. The reduced novel GSH synthesis under acidosis may explain the increased demand for NADPH to recycle existing pools of GSH. Interestingly, acidosis also disconnected novel ribose synthesis from the oxidative PPP, seemingly to reroute PPP metabolites to the TCA cycle. Finally, we found that acidosis activates p53, which contributes to both the enhanced PPP and increased glutaminolysis, at least in part, through the induction of G6PD and GLS2 genes. Conclusions Acidosis alters the cellular metabolism of several major metabolites, which induces a significant degree of metabolic inflexibility. Cells exposed to acidosis largely rely upon mitochondrial metabolism for energy generation to the extent that metabolic intermediates are

  10. Chronic metabolic acidosis destroys pancreas.

    PubMed

    Melamed, Peter; Melamed, Felix

    2014-11-28

    One primary reason for the current epidemic of digestive disorders might be chronic metabolic acidosis, which is extremely common in the modern population. Chronic metabolic acidosis primarily affects two alkaline digestive glands, the liver, and the pancreas, which produce alkaline bile and pancreatic juice with a large amount of bicarbonate. Even small acidic alterations in the bile and pancreatic juice pH can lead to serious biochemical/biomechanical changes. The pancreatic digestive enzymes require an alkaline milieu for proper function, and lowering the pH disables their activity. It can be the primary cause of indigestion. Acidification of the pancreatic juice decreases its antimicrobial activity, which can lead to intestinal dysbiosis. Lowering the pH of the pancreatic juice can cause premature activation of the proteases inside the pancreas with the potential development of pancreatitis. The acidification of bile causes precipitation of the bile acids, which irritate the entire biliary system and create bile stone formation. Aggressive mixture of the acidic bile and the pancreatic juice can cause erratic contractions of the duodenum's walls and subsequent bile reflux into the stomach and the esophagus. Normal exocrine pancreatic function is the core of proper digestion. Currently, there is no effective and safe treatment for enhancing the exocrine pancreatic function. Restoring normal acid-base homeostasis can be a useful tool for pathophysiological therapeutic approaches for various gastrointestinal disorders. There is strong research and practical evidence that restoring the HCO3(-) capacity in the blood can improve digestion.

  11. Sodium Bicarbonate Therapy in Patients with Metabolic Acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Adeva-Andany, María M.; Fernández-Fernández, Carlos; Mouriño-Bayolo, David; Castro-Quintela, Elvira; Domínguez-Montero, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis occurs when a relative accumulation of plasma anions in excess of cations reduces plasma pH. Replacement of sodium bicarbonate to patients with sodium bicarbonate loss due to diarrhea or renal proximal tubular acidosis is useful, but there is no definite evidence that sodium bicarbonate administration to patients with acute metabolic acidosis, including diabetic ketoacidosis, lactic acidosis, septic shock, intraoperative metabolic acidosis, or cardiac arrest, is beneficial regarding clinical outcomes or mortality rate. Patients with advanced chronic kidney disease usually show metabolic acidosis due to increased unmeasured anions and hyperchloremia. It has been suggested that metabolic acidosis might have a negative impact on progression of kidney dysfunction and that sodium bicarbonate administration might attenuate this effect, but further evaluation is required to validate such a renoprotective strategy. Sodium bicarbonate is the predominant buffer used in dialysis fluids and patients on maintenance dialysis are subjected to a load of sodium bicarbonate during the sessions, suffering a transient metabolic alkalosis of variable severity. Side effects associated with sodium bicarbonate therapy include hypercapnia, hypokalemia, ionized hypocalcemia, and QTc interval prolongation. The potential impact of regular sodium bicarbonate therapy on worsening vascular calcifications in patients with chronic kidney disease has been insufficiently investigated. PMID:25405229

  12. Bilateral putaminal necrosis in a comatose patient with metabolic acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sudhir; Reddy, Chenna Rajesh; Prabhakar, Subhashini

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of acute-onset coma in a young woman, associated with metabolic acidosis, respiratory distress, and hypotension. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain done on day 2 of admission showed features of bilateral putaminal necrosis. History of methanol ingestion, though not forthcoming at admission, was confirmed later after the patient regained consciousness. A final diagnosis of methyl alcohol toxicity resulting in severe metabolic acidosis, coma, and bilateral blindness was made. This case is reported to emphasize the point that the finding of bilateral putaminal necrosis in a patient with coma and metabolic acidosis is virtually diagnostic of methyl alcohol toxicity even in the absence of any positive history. PMID:28149036

  13. Molecular and pathophysiologic mechanisms of hyperkalemic metabolic acidosis.

    PubMed

    DuBose, T D

    2000-01-01

    In summary, hyperkalemia may have a dramatic impact on ammonium production and excretion. Chronic hyperkalemia decreases ammonium production in the proximal tubule and whole kidney, inhibits absorption of NH4+ in the mTALH, reduces medullary interstitial concentrations of NH4+ and NH3, and decreases entry of NH4+ and NH3 into the medullary collecting duct. The potential for development of a hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis is greatly augmented when renal insufficiency with associated reduction in functional renal mass coexists with the hyperkalemia, or in the presence of aldosterone deficiency or resistance. Such a cascade of events helps to explain, in part, the hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis and reduction in net acid excretion characteristic of several experimental models of hyperkalemic-hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis including: obstructive nephropathy, selective aldosterone deficiency, and chronic amiloride administration (7.9).

  14. Molecular and pathophysiologic mechanisms of hyperkalemic metabolic acidosis.

    PubMed Central

    DuBose, T. D.

    2000-01-01

    In summary, hyperkalemia may have a dramatic impact on ammonium production and excretion. Chronic hyperkalemia decreases ammonium production in the proximal tubule and whole kidney, inhibits absorption of NH4+ in the mTALH, reduces medullary interstitial concentrations of NH4+ and NH3, and decreases entry of NH4+ and NH3 into the medullary collecting duct. The potential for development of a hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis is greatly augmented when renal insufficiency with associated reduction in functional renal mass coexists with the hyperkalemia, or in the presence of aldosterone deficiency or resistance. Such a cascade of events helps to explain, in part, the hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis and reduction in net acid excretion characteristic of several experimental models of hyperkalemic-hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis including: obstructive nephropathy, selective aldosterone deficiency, and chronic amiloride administration (7.9). PMID:10881337

  15. Approach to the Treatment of Chronic Metabolic Acidosis in CKD.

    PubMed

    Raphael, Kalani L

    2016-04-01

    Chronic metabolic acidosis is not uncommon in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Clinical practice guidelines suggest that clinicians administer alkali to maintain serum bicarbonate level at a minimum of 22 mEq/L to prevent the effects of acidosis on bone demineralization and protein catabolism. Small interventional studies support the notion that correcting acidosis slows CKD progression as well. Furthermore, alkaline therapy in persons with CKD and normal bicarbonate levels may also preserve kidney function. Observational studies suggest that targeting a serum bicarbonate level near 28 mEq/L may improve clinical outcomes above and beyond targeting a value ≥ 22 mEq/L, yet values > 26 mEq/L have been reported to be associated with incident heart failure and mortality in the CRIC (Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort) Study. Furthermore, correcting acidosis may provoke vascular calcification. This teaching case discusses several uncertainties regarding the management of acidosis in CKD, such as when to initiate alkali treatment, potential side effects of alkali, and the optimum serum bicarbonate level based on current evidence in CKD. Suggestions regarding the maximum sodium bicarbonate dose to administer to patients with CKD to achieve the target serum bicarbonate concentration are offered.

  16. Metabolic acidosis during parenteral nutrition: Pathophysiological mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Dounousi, Evangelia; Zikou, Xanthi; Koulouras, Vasilis; Katopodis, Kostas

    2015-01-01

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is associated with metabolic complications including metabolic acidosis (MA), one of the main disorders of acid-base balance. The main causes involved in the appearance of MA during TPN administration are the metabolism of cationic amino acids and amino acids containing sulfuric acid (exogenous addition), the titratable acidity of the infused parenteral solution, the addition of acidificant agents (hydrochloric acid, acetic acid), thiamine deficiency, disruption of carbohydrate and lipid metabolic pathways and D-fructose administration. Moreover, hypophosphatemia that appears during TPN therapy contributes significantly to the maintenance of MA. This review describes in a comprehensive way the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the appearance of MA induced by intravenous administration of TPN products most commonly used in critically ill-patients. PMID:25983433

  17. Metabolic Acidosis in a Pediatric Patient Receiving Topiramate

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Razia; Iacoune, John

    2003-01-01

    Topiramate is an anticonvulsant that is labeled for the management of several seizure types in children >2 years of age. With the exception of cognitive dysfunction, nephrolithiasis, weight loss, and paresthesia, adverse effects in children are similar to other those noted with other anticonvulsants. We describe a 33-month-old child with complex partial seizures and secondary generalization who received topiramate 45 mg orally twice daily (6.2 mg/kg/d) for approximately 4 weeks before admission. He developed asymptomatic metabolic acidosis that was evidenced by a decrease in HCO3−, which was unresponsive to treatment with sodium bicarbonate. The child was weaned off topiramate and the metabolic acidosis resolved 48 hours after its discontinuation. PMID:23118685

  18. Thyroid hormones changes in infants and children with metabolic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Tahirović, H F

    1991-10-01

    The influence of the acidotic state on the thyroxine (T4) peripheral metabolism was studied in two different forms of metabolic acidosis, ie infantile diarrhea and diabetic ketoacidosis. The serum concentrations of T4, free T4 (FT4), triiodothyronine (T3), reverse T3 (rT3), thyrotropin (TSH) and thyroxine-binding globulin (TBG) were measured and compared to healthy control groups. Lower T4 and T3 and higher rT3 serum concentrations were found in both tested groups of patients in relation to the control groups. In infants with severe metabolic acidosis FT4 values were lower than those observed in the control group. In addition, serum TBG levels were lower in diabetic patients as compared to control subjects. Despite the reduced serum T3 and T4 concentrations in both groups of patients, TSH concentrations, were within the normal range. Therefore, we concluded that acidosis caused either by diarrhea (not so far described) or by diabetes mellitus (well documented up to now) affects the thyroid hormones metabolism in a similar way, at least as far as the thyroid hormones blood levels are concerned.

  19. Acidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Respiratory acidosis develops when there is too much carbon dioxide (an acid) in the body. This type ... when the body is unable to remove enough carbon dioxide through breathing. Other names for respiratory acidosis ...

  20. Severe lactic acidosis after an iatrogenic propylene glycol overdose.

    PubMed

    Zosel, Amy; Egelhoff, Elizabeth; Heard, Kennon

    2010-02-01

    Propylene glycol is a diluent found in many intravenous and oral drugs, including phenytoin, diazepam, and lorazepam. Propylene glycol is eliminated from the body by oxidation through alcohol dehydrogenase to form lactic acid. Under normal conditions, the body converts lactate to pyruvate and metabolizes pyruvate through the Krebs cycle. Lactic acidosis has occurred in patients, often those with renal dysfunction, who were receiving prolonged infusions of drugs that contain propylene glycol as a diluent. We describe a 50-year-old man who experienced severe lactic acidosis after receiving an accidental overdose of lorazepam, which contains propylene glycol. The patient was acutely intoxicated, with a serum ethanol concentration of 406 mg/dl. He had choked on a large piece of meat and subsequently experienced pulseless electrical activity with ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest. He was brought to the emergency department; within 2 hours, he was admitted to the intensive care unit for initiation of the hypothermia protocol. The patient began to experience generalized tonic-clonic seizures 12 hours later, which resolved after several boluses of lorazepam. A lorazepam infusion was started; however, it was inadvertently administered at a rate of 2 mg/minute instead of the standard rate of 2 mg/hour. Ten hours later, the administration error was recognized and the infusion stopped. The patient's peak propylene glycol level was 659 mg/dl, pH 6.9, serum bicarbonate level 5 mEq/L, and lactate level 18.6 mmol/L. Fomepizole was started the next day and was continued until hospital day 3. Continuous renal replacement therapy was started and then replaced with continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH) for the remainder of the hospital stay. The patient's acidosis resolved by day 3, when his propylene glycol level had decreased to 45 mg/dl. Fomepizole was discontinued, but the patient's prognosis was poor (anoxic brain injury); thus care was withdrawn and the patient died

  1. Intractable metabolic acidosis in a patient with colovesical fistula.

    PubMed

    Pillinger, Toby; Abdelrahman, Mohamed; Jones, Gregory; D'Souza, Francis

    2012-11-23

    A 58-year-old female presented with urosepsis and faecaluria secondary to a colovesical fistula of diverticular aetiology. A plan was made for surgical repair of the fistula. Preoperatively the patient developed a hyperchloraemic metabolic acidosis, with hyperkalaemia and hyponatraemia. Renal function was normal, and a short synachten test ruled out Addison's disease. Postoperatively her acid-base physiology normalised in the absence of medical management, demonstrating that surgical intervention was responsible for resolution of the patient's metabolic acidosis. The mechanisms by which colovesical pathophysiology causes hyperchloraemic metabolic acidosis are discussed. Although diverticular disease is the most common cause of colovesical fistulae, this is the first report of such fistulae causing metabolic acidosis.

  2. Characterisation of metabolic acidosis in Kenyan children admitted to hospital for acute non-surgical conditions.

    PubMed

    Sasi, P; English, M; Berkley, J; Lowe, B; Shebe, M; Mwakesi, R; Kokwaro, G

    2006-05-01

    Metabolic acidosis is associated with most severe malaria deaths in African children, and most deaths occur before maximum antimalarial action is achieved. Thus, specific acidosis treatment may reduce mortality. However, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood and no specific interventions have been developed. A detailed characterisation of this acidosis is critical in treatment development. We used the traditional and Stewart's approach to characterise acidosis in consecutive paediatric admissions for malaria and other acute non-surgical conditions to Kilifi District Hospital in Kenya. The overall acidosis prevalence was 21%. Gastroenteritis had the highest prevalence (61%). Both the mean albumin-corrected anion gap and the strong ion gap were high (>13 mmol/l and >0 mmol/l, respectively) in malaria, gastroenteritis, lower respiratory tract infection and malnutrition. Presence of salicylate in plasma was not associated with acidosis but was associated with signs of severe illness (odds ratio 2.11, 95% CI 1.1-4.2). In malaria, mean (95% CI) strong ion gap was 15 (14-7) mmol/l, and lactate, creatinine and inorganic phosphorous explained only approximately 40% of the variability in base excess (adjusted R2 = 0.397). Acidosis may be more common than previously recognised amongst paediatric admissions in Africa and is characterised by the presence of currently unidentified strong anions. In malaria, lactate and ketones, but not salicylate, are associated with acidosis. However, unidentified anions may be more important.

  3. Ethylene glycol induces hyperoxaluria without metabolic acidosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Green, Mike L; Hatch, Marguerite; Freel, Robert W

    2005-09-01

    Ethylene glycol (EG) consumption is commonly employed as an experimental regimen to induce hyperoxaluria in animal models of calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis. This approach has, however, been criticized because EG overdose induces metabolic acidosis in humans. We tested the hypothesis that EG consumption (0.75% in drinking water for 4 wk) induces metabolic acidosis by comparing arterial blood gases, serum electrolytes, and urinary chemistries in five groups of Sprague-Dawley rats: normal controls (CON), those made hyperoxaluric (HYP) with EG administration, unilaterally nephrectomized controls (UNI), unilaterally nephrectomized rats fed EG (HRF), and a metabolic acidosis (MA) reference group imbibing sweetened drinking water (5% sucrose) containing 0.28 M NH4Cl. Arterial pH, plasma bicarbonate concentrations, anion gap, urinary pH, and the excretion of titratable acid, ammonium, phosphate, citrate, and calcium in HYP rats were not significantly different from CON rats, indicating that metabolic acidosis did not develop in HYP rats with two kidneys. Unilateral nephrectomy alone (UNI group) did not significantly affect arterial pH, plasma bicarbonate, anion gap, or urinary pH compared with CON rats; however, HRF rats exhibited some signs of a nascent acidosis in having an elevated anion gap, higher phosphate excretion, lower urinary pH, and an increase in titratable acid. Frank metabolic acidosis was observed in the MA rats: decreased arterial pH and plasma HCO3(-) concentration with lower urinary pH and citrate excretion with elevated excretion of ammonium, phosphate and, hence, titratable acid. We conclude that metabolic acidosis does not develop in conventional EG treatments but may ensue with renal insufficiency resulting from an oxalate load.

  4. Unmeasured anions in metabolic acidosis: unravelling the mystery.

    PubMed

    Forni, Lui G; McKinnon, William; Hilton, Philip J

    2006-01-01

    In the critically ill, metabolic acidosis is a common observation and, in clinical practice, the cause of this derangement is often multi-factorial. Various measures are often employed to try and characterise the aetiology of metabolic acidosis, the most popular of which is the anion gap. The purpose of the anion gap can be perceived as a means by which the physician is alerted to the presence of unmeasured anions in plasma that contribute to the observed acidosis. In many cases, the causative ion may be easily identified, such as lactate, but often the causative ion(s) remain unidentified, even after exclusion of the 'classic' causes. We describe here the various attempts in the literature that have been made to address this observation and highlight recent studies that reveal potential sources of such hitherto unmeasured anions.

  5. Coagulopathy induced by acidosis, hypothermia and hypocalcaemia in severe bleeding.

    PubMed

    De Robertis, E; Kozek-Langenecker, S A; Tufano, R; Romano, G M; Piazza, O; Zito Marinosci, G

    2015-01-01

    Acidosis, hypothermia and hypocalcaemia are determinants for morbidity and mortality during massive hemorrhages. However, precise pathological mechanisms of these environmental factors and their potential additive or synergistic anticoagulant and/or antiplatelet effects are not fully elucidated and are at least in part controversial. Best available evidences from experimental trials indicate that acidosis and hypothermia progressively impair platelet aggregability and clot formation. Considering the cell-based model of coagulation physiology, hypothermia predominantly prolongs the initiation phase, while acidosis prolongs the propagation phase of thrombin generation. Acidosis increases fibrinogen breakdown while hypothermia impairs its synthesis. Acidosis and hypothermia have additive effects. The effect of hypocalcaemia on coagulopathy is less investigated but it appears that below the cut-off of 0.9 mmol/L, several enzymatic steps in the plasmatic coagulation system are blocked while above that cut-off effects remain without clinical sequalae. The impact of environmental factor on hemostasis is underestimated in clinical practice due to our current practice of using routine coagulation laboratory tests such as partial thromboplastin time or prothrombin time, which are performed at standardized test temperature, after pH correction, and upon recalcification. Temperature-adjustments are feasible in viscoelastic point-of-care tests such as thrombelastography and thromboelastometry which may permit quantification of hypothermia-induced coagulopathy. Rewarming hypothermic bleeding patients is highly recommended because it improves patient outcome. Despite the absence of high-quality evidence, calcium supplementation is clinical routine in bleeding management. Buffer administration may not reverse acidosis-induced coagulopathy but may be essential for the efficacy of coagulation factor concentrates such as recombinant activated factor VII.

  6. Propylene Glycol Poisoning From Excess Whiskey Ingestion: A Case of High Osmolal Gap Metabolic Acidosis.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Courtney A; Ku, Kevin; Sue, Gloria R

    2015-01-01

    In this report, we describe a case of high anion gap metabolic acidosis with a significant osmolal gap attributed to the ingestion of liquor containing propylene glycol. Recently, several reports have characterized severe lactic acidosis occurring in the setting of iatrogenic unintentional overdosing of medications that use propylene glycol as a diluent, including lorazepam and diazepam. To date, no studies have explored potential effects of excess propylene glycol in the setting of alcohol intoxication. Our patient endorsed drinking large volumes of cinnamon flavored whiskey, which was likely Fireball Cinnamon Whisky. To our knowledge, this is the first case of propylene glycol toxicity from an intentional ingestion of liquor containing propylene glycol.

  7. Autophagic Clearance of Mitochondria in the Kidney Copes with Metabolic Acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Namba, Tomoko; Takabatake, Yoshitsugu; Kimura, Tomonori; Takahashi, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Matsuda, Jun; Kitamura, Harumi; Niimura, Fumio; Matsusaka, Taiji; Iwatani, Hirotsugu; Matsui, Isao; Kaimori, Junya; Kioka, Hidetaka; Rakugi, Hiromi

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis, a common complication of CKD, causes mitochondrial stress by undefined mechanisms. Selective autophagy of impaired mitochondria, called mitophagy, contributes toward maintaining cellular homeostasis in various settings. We hypothesized that mitophagy is involved in proximal tubular cell adaptations to chronic metabolic acidosis. In transgenic mice expressing green fluorescent protein–tagged microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (GFP-LC3), NH4Cl loading increased the number of GFP puncta exclusively in the proximal tubule. In vitro, culture in acidic medium produced similar results in proximal tubular cell lines stably expressing GFP-LC3 and facilitated the degradation of SQSTM1/p62 in wild-type cells, indicating enhanced autophagic flux. Upon acid loading, proximal tubule–specific autophagy-deficient (Atg5-deficient) mice displayed significantly reduced ammonium production and severe metabolic acidosis compared with wild-type mice. In vitro and in vivo, acid loading caused Atg5-deficient proximal tubular cells to exhibit reduced mitochondrial respiratory chain activity, reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, and fragmented morphology with marked swelling in mitochondria. GFP-LC3–tagged autophagosomes colocalized with ubiquitinated mitochondria in proximal tubular cells cultured in acidic medium, suggesting that metabolic acidosis induces mitophagy. Furthermore, restoration of Atg5-intact nuclei in Atg5-deficient proximal tubular cells increased mitochondrial membrane potential and ammoniagenesis. In conclusion, metabolic acidosis induces autophagy in proximal tubular cells, which is indispensable for maintaining proper mitochondrial functions including ammoniagenesis, and thus for adapted urinary acid excretion. Our results provide a rationale for the beneficial effect of alkali supplementation in CKD, a condition in which autophagy may be reduced, and suggest a new therapeutic option for acidosis by modulating autophagy. PMID

  8. [The value of alkalizing treatments in severe diabetic keto-acidosis].

    PubMed

    Verdon, F; Bringolf, M; Enrico, J F; Perret, C

    1976-12-11

    In 37 diabetic patients with severe acidosis (pH less than 7.0; [HCO3-] less than 5.0 mMol/l), administration of insulin was preceded by a rapid infusion of molar sodium bicarbonate in order to obtain partial correction of acidosis (pH approximately 7.20). 31 patients survived (83,8%); 6 patients died in cardio-circulatory failure associated in two cases with acute pulmonary edema. Initial administration of bicarbonate appears to be beneficial in preventing the deleterious effects of prolonged severe acidosis, such as cardiac arrhythmias, shock or acute pulmonary edema. Furthermore, partial correction of acidosis decreases the total dose of insulin necessary to compensate hyperglycemia and thereby reduces the danger of late hypoglycemia. This treatment calls for frequent checks on acid-base status and serum potassium. In most cases hypokalemia develops, but can be easily corrected by administration of potassium chloride. Normalization of arterial pH by bicarbonate infusion is not recommended in view of the development of late hypernatremia and metabolic alkalosis.

  9. Proximal renal tubular acidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... References Krapf R, Seldin DW, Alpern RJ. Clinical syndromes of metabolic acidosis. In: Alpern RJ, Caplan M, Moe OW, ... 529. Read More Distal renal tubular acidosis Fanconi syndrome Low potassium level Metabolic acidosis Osteomalacia Respiratory acidosis Rickets Review Date 10/ ...

  10. Krebs cycle anions in metabolic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Bowling, Francis G; Morgan, Thomas J

    2005-10-05

    For many years it has been apparent from estimates of the anion gap and the strong ion gap that anions of unknown identity can be generated in sepsis and shock states. Evidence is emerging that at least some of these are intermediates of the citric acid cycle. The exact source of this disturbance remains unclear, because a great many metabolic blocks and bottlenecks can disturb the anaplerotic and cataplerotic pathways that enter and leave the cycle. These mechanisms require clarification with the use of tools such as gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

  11. Starvation Ketoacidosis as a Cause of Unexplained Metabolic Acidosis in the Perioperative Period

    PubMed Central

    Mostert, Monique; Bonavia, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 24 Final Diagnosis: Starvation ketoacidosis Symptoms: None Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Lumbar laminectomy Specialty: Orthopedics and Traumatology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Besides providing anesthesia for surgery, the anesthesiologist’s role is to optimize the patient for surgery and for post-surgical recovery. This involves timely identification and treatment of medical comorbidities and abnormal laboratory values that could complicate the patient’s perioperative course. There are several potential causes of anion and non-anion gap metabolic acidosis in surgical patients, most of which could profoundly affect a patient’s surgical outcome. Thus, the presence of an acute acid-base disturbance requires a thorough workup, the results of which will influence the patient’s anesthetic management. Case Report: An otherwise-healthy 24-year-old female presented for elective spine surgery and was found to have metabolic acidosis, hypotension, and polyuria intraoperatively. Common causes of acute metabolic acidosis were investigated and systematically ruled out, including lactic acidosis, diabetic ketoacidosis, drug-induced ketoacidosis, ingestion of toxic alcohols (e.g., methanol, ethylene glycol), uremia, and acute renal failure. Laboratory workup was remarkable only for elevated serum and urinary ketone levels, believed to be secondary to starvation ketoacidosis. Due to the patient’s unexplained acid-base disturbance, she was kept intubated postoperatively to allow for further workup and management. Conclusions: Starvation ketoacidosis is not widely recognized as a perioperative entity, and it is not well described in the medical literature. Lack of anesthesiologist awareness about this disorder may complicate the differential diagnosis for acute intraoperative metabolic acidosis and lead to a prolonged postoperative stay and an increase in hospital costs. The short- and long-term implications of perioperative

  12. Uncoventional Views on Certain Aspects of Toxin-Induced Metabolic Acidosis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    This discussion will highlight the following 9 specific points that related to metabolic acidosis caused by various toxins. The current recommendation suggests that alcohol dehydrogenase inhibitor fomepizole is preferred to ethanol in treatment of methanol and ethylene glycol poisoning, but analysis of the enzyme kinetics indicates that ethanol is a better alternative. In the presence of a modest increase in serum osmolal gap (<30 mOsm/L), the starting dose of ethanol should be far less than the usual recommended dose. One can take advantage of the high vapor pressure of methanol in the treatment of methanol poisoning when hemodialysis is not readily available. Profuse sweating with increased water ingestion can be highly effective in reducing methanol levels. Impaired production of ammonia by the proximal tubule of the kidney plays a major role in the development of metabolic acidosis in pyroglutamic acidosis. Glycine, not oxalate, is the main final end product of ethylene glycol metabolism. Metabolism of ethylene glycol to oxalate, albeit important clinically, represents less than 1% of ethylene glycol disposal. Urine osmolal gap would be useful in the diagnosis of ethylene glycol poisoning, but not in methanol poisoning. Hemodialysis is important in the treatment of methanol poisoning and ethylene glycol poisoning with renal impairment, with or without fomepizole or ethanol treatment. Severe leucocytosis is a highly sensitive indicator of ethylene glycol poisoning. Uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation by salicylate can explain most of the manifestations of salicylate poisoning. PMID:21468195

  13. Role of the endocrine pancreas in the kalemic response to acute metabolic acidosis in conscious dogs.

    PubMed

    Adrogué, H J; Chap, Z; Ishida, T; Field, J B

    1985-03-01

    Metabolic acidosis due to organic acids infusion fails to elicit hyperkalemia. Although plasma potassium levels may rise, the increase is smaller than in mineral acid acidosis. The mechanisms responsible for the different effects of organic acid acidosis and mineral acid acidosis remain undefined, although dissimilar hormonal responses by the pancreas may explain dissimilar hormonal responses by the pancreas may explain the phenomena. To test this hypothesis, beta-hydroxybutyric acid (7 meq/kg) or hydrochloric acid (3 meq/kg) was infused over 30 min into conscious dogs (n = 12) with chronically implanted catheters in the portal, hepatic, and systemic circulation, and flow probes were placed around the portal vein and hepatic artery. Acid infusion studies in two groups of anesthetized dogs were also done to assess the urinary excretion of potassium (n = 14), and to evaluate the effects of acute suppression of renal electrolyte excretion on plasma potassium and on the release/uptake of potassium in peripheral tissues of the hindleg (n = 17). Ketoacid infusion caused hypokalemia and a significant increase in portal vein plasma insulin, from the basal level of 27 +/- 4 microU/ml to a maximum of 84 +/- 22 microU/ml at 10 min, without changes in glucagon levels. By contrast, mineral acid acidosis of similar severity resulted in hyperkalemia and did not increase portal insulin levels but enhanced portal glucagon concentration from control values of 132 +/- 25 pg/ml to 251 +/- 39 pg/ml at 40 min. A significant decrease in plasma glucose levels due to suppression of hepatic release was observed during ketoacid infusion, while no changes were observed with mineral acid infusion. Plasma flows in the portal vein and hepatic artery remained unchanged from control values in both acid infusion studies. Differences in renal potassium excretion were ruled out as determinants of the disparate kalemic responses to organic acid infusion compared with HCl acidosis. Evaluation of the

  14. High Anion Gap Metabolic Acidosis after a Suicide Attempt with Cyanide: The Rebirth of Cyanide Poisoning.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Po-Jen; Chang, Che-Fu; Chiu, Chih-Chien; Chan, Jenq-Shyong; Chiang, Wen-Fang; Wu, Chia-Chao; Lin, Shih-Hua; Chen, Jin-Shuen

    2015-01-01

    A 33-year-old woman was admitted to our emergency department in a state of unconsciousness after attempting suicide with unknown substances. Severe metabolic acidosis (pH: 6.81), with a high anion gap (36.2) and high lactate level (20.2 mmol/L), was observed. After four hours of intensive medical treatment, the patient regained consciousness, with a return of the arterial pH to 7.42. Finally, cyanide intoxication was diagnosed based on the detection of a serum cyanide level of 3.5 mg/L. The presence of a high anion gap associated with severe lactic acidosis is a clue for making a rapid differential diagnosis of acute cyanide intoxication. Providing intensive and immediate supportive management is also crucial, even in cases without obtainable specific antidotes.

  15. Addisonian crisis and severe acidosis in a cat: a case of feline hypoadrenocorticism.

    PubMed

    Sicken, Julia; Neiger, Reto

    2013-10-01

    A 4-year-old female neutered British Shorthair cat was presented as an emergency owing to progressive apathy, anorexia, adipsia, weight loss and weakness. Clinical findings showed severe weakness, collapse, weak pulse, bradycardia, hypovolaemia and hypothermia. Blood examinations revealed marked metabolic acidosis, hyponatraemia, hyperkalaemia, hyperphosphataemia, hypercalcaemia, hypochloraemia and azotaemia. The diagnosis of feline hypoadrenocorticism was based on low cortisol and aldosterone plasma levels before and after synthetic adrenocorticotropic hormone administration. Initial treatment consisted of intravenous fluid therapy. After stabilisation a combination of fludrocortisone and prednisolone was given orally. One year after diagnosis the cat is free of clinical signs and in good condition.

  16. Lactate versus non-lactate metabolic acidosis: a retrospective outcome evaluation of critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Gunnerson, Kyle J; Saul, Melissa; He, Shui; Kellum, John A

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Acid–base abnormalities are common in the intensive care unit (ICU). Differences in outcome exist between respiratory and metabolic acidosis in similar pH ranges. Some forms of metabolic acidosis (for example, lactate) seem to have worse outcomes than others (for example, chloride). The relative incidence of each type of disorder is unknown. We therefore designed this study to determine the nature and clinical significance of metabolic acidosis in critically ill patients. Methods An observational, cohort study of critically ill patients was performed in a tertiary care hospital. Critically ill patients were selected on the clinical suspicion of the presence of lactic acidosis. The inpatient mortality of the entire group was 14%, with a length of stay in hospital of 12 days and a length of stay in the ICU of 5.8 days. Results We reviewed records of 9,799 patients admitted to the ICUs at our institution between 1 January 2001 and 30 June 2002. We selected a cohort in which clinicians caring for patients ordered a measurement of arterial lactate level. We excluded patients in which any necessary variable required to characterize an acid–base disorder was absent. A total of 851 patients (9% of ICU admissions) met our criteria. Of these, 548 patients (64%) had a metabolic acidosis (standard base excess < -2 mEq/l) and these patients had a 45% mortality, compared with 25% for those with no metabolic acidosis (p < 0.001). We then subclassified metabolic acidosis cases on the basis of the predominant anion present (lactate, chloride, or all other anions). The mortality rate was highest for lactic acidosis (56%); for strong ion gap (SIG) acidosis it was 39% and for hyperchloremic acidosis 29% (p < 0.001). A stepwise logistic regression model identified serum lactate, SIG, phosphate, and age as independent predictors of mortality. Conclusion In critically ill patients in which a measurement of lactate level was ordered, lactate and SIG were strong

  17. Metabolic acidosis stimulates protein degradation in rat muscle by a glucocorticoid-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    May, R C; Kelly, R A; Mitch, W E

    1986-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis is associated with enhanced renal ammonia-genesis which is regulated, in part, by glucocorticoids. The interaction between glucocorticoids and chronic metabolic acidosis on nitrogen utilization and muscle protein metabolism is unknown. In rats pair-fed by gavage, we found that chronic acidosis stunted growth and caused a 43% increase in urinary nitrogen and an 87% increase in urinary corticosterone. Net protein degradation in incubated epitrochlearis muscles from chronically acidotic rats was stimulated at all concentrations of insulin from 0 to 10(4) microU/ml. This effect of acidosis persisted despite supplementation of the media with amino acids with or without insulin, indomethacin, and inhibitors of lysosomal thiol cathepsins. Acidosis did not change protein synthesis; hence, the increase in net protein degradation was caused by stimulation of proteolysis. Acidosis did not increase glutamine production in muscle. The protein catabolic effect of acidosis required glucocorticoids; protein degradation was stimulated in muscle of acidotic, adrenalectomized rats only if they were treated with dexamethasone. Moreover, when nonacidotic animals were given 3 micrograms/100 g of body weight dexamethasone twice a day, muscle protein degradation was increased if the muscles were simply incubated in acidified media. We conclude that chronic metabolic acidosis depresses nitrogen utilization and increases glucocorticoid production. The combination of increased glucocorticoids and acidosis stimulates muscle proteolysis but does not affect protein synthesis. These changes in muscle protein metabolism may play a role in the defense against acidosis by providing amino acid nitrogen to support the glutamine production necessary for renal ammoniagenesis. PMID:3511100

  18. Metabolic acidosis mimicking diabetic ketoacidosis after use of calorie-free mineral water.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Gry T; Woldseth, Berit; Lindemann, Rolf

    2012-09-01

    A previously healthy boy was admitted with fever, tachycardia, dyspnea, and was vomiting. A blood test showed a severe metabolic acidosis with pH 7.08 and an anion gap of 36 mmol/L. His urine had an odor of acetone. The serum glucose was 5.6 mmol/L, and no glucosuria was found. Diabetic ketoacidosis could therefore be eliminated. Lactate level was normal. Tests for the most common metabolic diseases were negative. Because of herpes stomatitis, the boy had lost appetite and only been drinking Diet Coke and water the last days. Diet Coke or Coca-Cola Light is sweetened with a blend containing cyclamates, aspartame, and acesulfame potassium, all free of calories. The etiology of the metabolic acidosis appeared to be a catabolic situation exaggerated by fasting with no intake of calories. The elevated anion gap was due to a severe starvation ketoacidosis, mimicking a diabetic ketoacidosis. Pediatricians should recommend carbohydrate/calorie-containing fluids for rehydration of children with acute fever, diarrhea, or illness.

  19. Hyperchloremic Metabolic Acidosis Following Total Gut Irrigation with Normal Saline in Pediatric Patients: A Rare Occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Bala, Indu; Dwivedi, Deepak; Jain, Divya; Mahajan, Jai Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Use of 0.9% sodium chloride for total gut irrigation (TGI) through nasogastric route is an effective method of bowel preparation in children undergoing colorectal surgeries. TGI with normal saline (NS) can result in nausea, vomiting, abdominal distension, and mild electrolyte imbalance; however, hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis has not been documented. We report two cases of hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis in children posted for colorectal surgery following TGI with NS who were successfully managed. PMID:28197054

  20. Citrate metabolism in blood transfusions and its relationship due to metabolic alkalosis and respiratory acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kai; Xu, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic alkalosis commonly results from excessive hydrochloric acid (HCl), potassium (K+) and water (H2O) loss from the stomach or through the urine. The plasma anion gap increases in non-hypoproteinemic metabolic alkalosis due to an increased negative charge equivalent on albumin and the free ionized calcium (Ca++) content of plasma decreases. The mean citrate load in all patients was 8740±7027 mg from 6937±6603 mL of transfused blood products. The citrate load was significantly higher in patients with alkalosis (9164±4870 vs. 7809±3967, P < 0.05). The estimated mean total citrate administered via blood and blood products was calculated as 43.2±34.19 mg/kilogram/day. In non-massive and frequent blood transfusions, the elevated carbon dioxide output has been shown to occur. Due to citrate metabolism causes intracellular acidosis. As a result of intracellular acidosis compensation, decompensated metabolic alkalosis + respiratory acidosis and electrolyte imbalance may develop, blood transfusions may result in certain complications. PMID:26131288

  1. Metabolic acidosis status and mortality in patients on the end stage of renal disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background and Objectives Uncorrected metabolic acidosis leads to higher death risk in dialysis patients. We observed the relationship between metabolic acidosis status and mortality rate in patients on renal replacement therapy during a median follow up time of 60 months. Methods We studied 76 patients on an on-line hemodiafiltration. The dialysis adequacy was defined by Kt/V for urea. The Framingham risk score (FRS) points were used to determine the 10-year risk for coronary heart disease. We examined the impact of high or low serum bicarbonate concentrations on mortality rate and on 10-year risk for coronary heart disease via the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox’s model was used to evaluate a combination of prognostic variables, such as dialysis adequacy defined by Kt/V for urea, age and serum bicarbonate concentrations. Results We divided the enrolled patients in three groups according to serum bicarbonate concentrations (< 20 mmol/L, 20-22 mmol/L and > 22 mmol/L). Kaplan-Meier survival curve for the impact of serum bicarbonate concentrations on overall mortality was found significant (log-rank = 7.8, P = 0.02). The prevalence of serum bicarbonate less or more than 20 mmol/L on high FRS (> 20%) by Kaplan-Meier curve was also found significant (log-rank = 4.9, P = 0.02). Cox’s model revealed the significant predictive effect of serum bicarbonate on overall mortality (P = 0.006, OR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.12-1.98) in combination to Kt/V for urea and age. Conclusion Uncorrected severe metabolic acidosis, defined by serum bicarbonate concentrations less than 20 mmol/L, is associated with a 10-year risk for coronary heart disease more than 20% and high overall mortality in patients on renal replacement therapy. PMID:28191541

  2. The Dramatic Recovery of a Patient with Biguanide-associated Severe Lactic Acidosis Following Thiamine Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Godo, Shigeo; Yoshida, Yoshitaro; Fujita, Motoo; Kudo, Daisuke; Nomura, Ryosuke; Shimokawa, Hiroaki; Kushimoto, Shigeki

    2017-01-01

    Biguanides are a drug of choice for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Although they can cause lactic acidosis in susceptible patients with predisposing risk factors, the incidence of lactic acidosis is reported to be very low when they are used properly. We herein present a case of biguanide-associated severe lactic acidosis complicated with thiamine deficiency that was provoked without predisposing factors for thiamine deficiency. Diabetic patients taking biguanide may be predisposed to thiamine deficiency, even when there is no evidence of risk factors, and the high-dose administration of thiamine may be essential in the treatment of this otherwise under-recognized disorder. PMID:28202871

  3. Proteomic profiling and pathway analysis of the response of rat renal proximal convoluted tubules to metabolic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Schauer, Kevin L; Freund, Dana M; Prenni, Jessica E; Curthoys, Norman P

    2013-09-01

    Metabolic acidosis is a relatively common pathological condition that is defined as a decrease in blood pH and bicarbonate concentration. The renal proximal convoluted tubule responds to this condition by increasing the extraction of plasma glutamine and activating ammoniagenesis and gluconeogenesis. The combined processes increase the excretion of acid and produce bicarbonate ions that are added to the blood to partially restore acid-base homeostasis. Only a few cytosolic proteins, such as phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, have been determined to play a role in the renal response to metabolic acidosis. Therefore, further analysis was performed to better characterize the response of the cytosolic proteome. Proximal convoluted tubule cells were isolated from rat kidney cortex at various times after onset of acidosis and fractionated to separate the soluble cytosolic proteins from the remainder of the cellular components. The cytosolic proteins were analyzed using two-dimensional liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Spectral counting along with average MS/MS total ion current were used to quantify temporal changes in relative protein abundance. In all, 461 proteins were confidently identified, of which 24 exhibited statistically significant changes in abundance. To validate these techniques, several of the observed abundance changes were confirmed by Western blotting. Data from the cytosolic fractions were then combined with previous proteomic data, and pathway analyses were performed to identify the primary pathways that are activated or inhibited in the proximal convoluted tubule during the onset of metabolic acidosis.

  4. Effect of acidosis on skeletal muscle metabolism with and without propranolol.

    PubMed

    Barclay, J K; Graham, T E; Wolfe, B R; Van Dijk, J; Wilson, B A

    1990-07-01

    Does the stimulatory effect of circulating catecholamines counteract the inhibitory effect of acidosis on skeletal muscle metabolism? To investigate this possibility, we studied gastrocnemii in dogs breathing either air (n = 10) or 4% carbon dioxide in air (n = 10) at rest and during contractions. In five dogs from each group, we infused propranolol into the arterial supply of the right and left muscles for 40 min. After 30 min of infusion, the left muscle was stimulated at 3 Hz for 10 min. During the 10th min of contractions, we removed and froze both muscles in liquid nitrogen. Oxygen uptake and blood flow to the left muscle prior to or during stimulation was not affected by acidosis either with or without propranolol. Glycogen concentration in resting muscle was unaffected by acidosis with or without propranolol. There was an acidosis related decrease of approximately 50% in the glycolytic intermediates (glucose 6-phosphate, fructose 1,6-diphosphate, alpha-glycerol phosphate, and dihydroxyacetone phosphate) in unstimulated muscles without beta-blockade. At rest, acidosis decreased muscle lactate by 50% with and 64% without propranolol, but lactate release was decreased only with acidosis without propranolol (1.4-0.1 mumols/kg.s). Acidosis without propranolol had no effect on the changes in glycogen concentration or the change in the concentration of glycolytic intermediates resulting from contractions. In beta-blocked muscle, the difference between stimulated and unstimulated concentrations of glycogen and glycolytic intermediates including lactate was 20-50% smaller with acidosis. Thus, with beta-blockade, the acidotic effects at rest disappeared and an inhibition of the metabolic adjustment to contractions appeared, indicating that circulating catecholamines do modify some metabolic effects of acidosis.

  5. Hyperammonaemia with distal renal tubular acidosis.

    PubMed

    Miller, S G; Schwartz, G J

    1997-11-01

    The case is reported of an infant with hyperammonaemia secondary to severe distal renal tubular acidosis. A clinical association between increased concentrations of ammonia in serum and renal tubular acidosis has not previously been described. In response to acidosis the infant's kidneys presumably increased ammonia synthesis but did not excrete ammonia, resulting in hyperammonaemia. The patient showed poor feeding, frequent vomiting, and failure to thrive, but did not have an inborn error of metabolism. This case report should alert doctors to consider renal tubular acidosis in the differential diagnosis of severely ill infants with metabolic acidosis and hyperammonaemia.

  6. Hemodynamic consequences of severe lactic acidosis in shock states: from bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Kimmoun, Antoine; Novy, Emmanuel; Auchet, Thomas; Ducrocq, Nicolas; Levy, Bruno

    2015-04-09

    Lactic acidosis is a very common biological issue for shock patients. Experimental data clearly demonstrate that metabolic acidosis, including lactic acidosis, participates in the reduction of cardiac contractility and in the vascular hyporesponsiveness to vasopressors through various mechanisms. However, the contributions of each mechanism responsible for these deleterious effects have not been fully determined and their respective consequences on organ failure are still poorly defined, particularly in humans. Despite some convincing experimental data, no clinical trial has established the level at which pH becomes deleterious for hemodynamics. Consequently, the essential treatment for lactic acidosis in shock patients is to correct the cause. It is unknown, however, whether symptomatic pH correction is beneficial in shock patients. The latest Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines recommend against the use of buffer therapy with pH ≥7.15 and issue no recommendation for pH levels <7.15. Furthermore, based on strong experimental and clinical evidence, sodium bicarbonate infusion alone is not recommended for restoring pH. Indeed, bicarbonate induces carbon dioxide generation and hypocalcemia, both cardiovascular depressant factors. This review addresses the principal hemodynamic consequences of shock-associated lactic acidosis. Despite the lack of formal evidence, this review also highlights the various adapted supportive therapy options that could be putatively added to causal treatment in attempting to reverse the hemodynamic consequences of shock-associated lactic acidosis.

  7. Clinical significance of the fractional excretion of anions in metabolic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, H Y; Han, J S; Jeon, U S; Joo, K W; Earm, J H; Ahn, C; Kim, S; Lee, J S; Kim, G H

    2001-06-01

    The fractional excretion of anions has been proposed as a new index for the differential diagnosis of metabolic acidosis, identifying the properties of the conjugate base by examining the renal handling of the anion. Here, we investigated clinical significance of the fractional excretion of anions in pathophysiologic diagnosis of metabolic acidosis by measuring urine ammonium (NH4+) excretion, the ratio of A plasma anion gap/delta plasma HCO3- concentration (deltaAG/deltaHCO3-), and fractional excretion of anions in three different groups of metabolic acidosis: acid overproduction (8 patients with lactic acidosis, 8 with diabetic ketoacidosis, 3 with hippuric acidosis following glue sniffing), acid underexcretion (10 patients with chronic renal failure) and normal controls (10 normal volunteers who underwent 3-day NH4Cl loading). As expected, urine NH4+ excretion was higher in overproduction acidosis than in acid-loaded normal controls (88.1 +/- 12.3 vs. 54.0 +/- 3.7 mmol/day, p < 0.05), and it was lower in chronic renal failure than in acid-loaded normal controls (12.8 +/- 1.7 vs. 54.0 +/- 3.7 mmol/day, p < 0.05). The fractional excretion of anions had no difference between overproduction acidosis and chronic renal failure (41.2 +/- 42.8% vs. 41.0 +/- 8.1%). However, the fractional excretion of anions showed significant differences between the subgroups in acid overproduction (lactic acidosis, 4.7 +/- 0.3%; diabetic ketoacidosis, 45.8 +/- 3.1%; hippuric acidosis, 126.0 +/- 14.4%; p < 0.05). The ratio of plasma deltaAG/deltaHCO3- also exhibited significant differences between the subgroups in acid overproduction (lactic acidosis, 1.5 +/- 0.1; diabetic ketoacidosis, 1.0 +/- 0.1; hippuric acidosis, 0.3 +/- 0.1; p < 0.05). There was an inverse linear correlation between the fractional excretion of anions and the ratio of plasma deltaAG/deltaHCO3- (r2 =-0.89, p < 0.05). In conclusion, determination of the fractional excretion of anions may provide a useful clue to the

  8. Acute renal failure and metabolic acidosis due to oxalic acid intoxication: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Rie; Morita, Seiji; Aoki, Hiromichi; Nakagawa, Yoshihide; Yamamoto, Isotoshi; Inokuchi, Sadaki

    2011-12-20

    Most of the reports of oxalic acid intoxication are in cases of ethylene glycol intoxication. These symptoms are known to be central nerve system manifestations, cardiopulmonary manifestations and acute renal failure. There have been only a few reports of direct oxalic acid intoxication. However, there have been a few recent reports of oxalic acid intoxication due to the ingestion of star fruit and ascorbic acid. We herein report the case of a patient with acute renal failure and metabolic acidosis caused directly by consumption of oxalic acid. During the initial examination by the physician at our hospital, the patient presented with tachypnea, a precordinal burning sensation, nausea and metabolic acidosis. After admission, the patient developed renal failure and anion gap high metabolic acidosis, but did not develop any CNS or cardio-pulmonary manifestations in the clinical course. The patient benefitted symptomatically from hemodialysis.

  9. Ionized alkaline water: new strategy for management of metabolic acidosis in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Abol-Enein, Hassan; Gheith, Osama A; Barakat, Nashwa; Nour, Eman; Sharaf, Abd-Elhameed

    2009-06-01

    Metabolic acidosis can occur as a result of either the accumulation of endogenous acids or loss of bicarbonate from the gastrointestinal tract or the kidney, which represent common causes of metabolic acidosis. The appropriate treatment of acute metabolic acidosis has been very controversial. Ionized alkaline water was not evaluated in such groups of patients in spite of its safety and reported benefits. So, we aimed to assess its efficacy in the management of metabolic acidosis in animal models. Two models of metabolic acidosis were created in dogs and rats. The first model of renal failure was induced by ligation of both ureters; and the second model was induced by urinary diversion to gut (gastrointestinal bicarbonate loss model). Both models were subjected to ionized alkaline water (orally and by hemodialysis). Dogs with renal failure were assigned to two groups according to the type of dialysate utilized during hemodialysis sessions, the first was utilizing alkaline water and the second was utilizing conventional water. Another two groups of animals with urinary diversion were arranged to receive oral alkaline water and tap water. In renal failure animal models, acid-base parameters improved significantly after hemodialysis with ionized alkaline water compared with the conventional water treated with reverse osmosis (RO). Similar results were observed in urinary diversion models as there was significant improvement of both the partial pressure of carbon dioxide and serum bicarbonate (P = 0.007 and 0.001 respectively) after utilizing alkaline water orally. Alkaline ionized water can be considered as a major safe strategy in the management of metabolic acidosis secondary to renal failure or dialysis or urinary diversion. Human studies are indicated in the near future to confirm this issue in humans.

  10. Citric acid ingestion: a life-threatening cause of metabolic acidosis.

    PubMed

    DeMars, C S; Hollister, K; Tomassoni, A; Himmelfarb, J; Halperin, M L

    2001-11-01

    We present a case that illustrates the acute (<6 hours) metabolic and hemodynamic effects of the ingestion of a massive oral citric acid load. The principal findings included metabolic acidosis accompanied by an increase in the plasma anion gap that was not caused by L -lactic acidosis, hyperkalemia, and the abrupt onset of hypotension. A unique feature was a dramatic clinical improvement when ionized calcium was infused. The case illustrates the importance of considering the properties of the conjugate base (anion) of the added acid because, in this instance, the citrate anion had a unique and life-threatening consequence (lower ionized calcium level) that was rapidly reversible.

  11. Endocrine and metabolic emergencies in children: hypocalcemia, hypoglycemia, adrenal insufficiency, and metabolic acidosis including diabetic ketoacidosis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    It is important to fast diagnosis and management of the pediatric patients of the endocrine metabolic emergencies because the signs and symptoms of these disorders are nonspecific. Delayed diagnosis and treatment may lead to serious consequences of the pediatric patients, for example, cerebral dysfunction leading to coma or death of the patients with hypoglycemia, hypocalcemia, adrenal insufficiency, or diabetic ketoacidosis. The index of suspicion of the endocrine metabolic emergencies should be preceded prior to the starting nonspecific treatment. Importantly, proper diagnosis depends on the collection of blood and urine specimen before nonspecific therapy (intravenous hydration, electrolytes, glucose or calcium injection). At the same time, the taking of precise history and searching for pathognomonic physical findings should be performed. This review was described for fast diagnosis and proper management of hypoglycemic emergencies, hypocalcemia, adrenal insufficiency, and metabolic acidosis including diabetic ketoacidosis. PMID:26817004

  12. Equivalent metabolic acidosis with four colloids and saline on ex vivo haemodilution.

    PubMed

    Morgan, T J; Vellaichamy, M; Cowley, D M; Weier, S L; Venkatesh, B; Jones, M A

    2009-05-01

    Colloid infusions can cause metabolic acidosis. Mechanisms and relative severity with different colloids are incompletely understood. We compared haemodilution acid-base effects of 4% albumin, 3.5% polygeline, 4% succinylated gelatin (all weak acid colloids, strong ion difference 12 mEq/l, 17.6 mEq/l and 34 mEq/l respectively), 6% hetastarch (non-weak acid colloid, strong ion difference zero) and 0.9% saline (crystalloid, strong ion difference zero). Gelatin weak acid properties were tracked via the strong ion gap. Four-step ex vivo dilutions of pre-oxygenated human venous blood were performed to a final [Hb] near 50% baseline. With each fluid, base excess fell to approximately -13 mEq/l. Base excess/[Hb] relationships across dilution were linear and direct (R2 > or = 0.96), slopes and intercepts closely resembling saline. Baseline strong ion gap was -0.3 (2.1) mEq/l. Post-dilution increases occurred in three groups: small with saline, hetastarch and albumin (to 3.5 (02) mEq/l, 4.3 (0.3) mEq/l, 3.3 (1.4) mEq/l respectively), intermediate with polygeline (to 12.2 (0.9) mEq/l) and greatest with succinylated gelatin (to 20.8 (1.4) mEq/l). We conclude that, despite colloid weak acid activity ranging from zero (hydroxyethyl starch) to greater than that of albumin with both gelatin preparations, ex vivo dilution causes a metabolic acidosis of identical severity to saline in each case. This uniformity reflects modifications to the albumin and gelatin saline vehicles, in part aimed at pH correction. By proportionally increasing the strong ion difference, these modifications counter deviations from pure saline effects caused by colloid weak acid activity. Extrapolation in vivo requires further investigation.

  13. Grocery store baking soda. A source of sodium bicarbonate in the management of chronic metabolic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Booth, B E; Gates, J; Morris, R C

    1984-02-01

    Oral sodium bicarbonate is used to treat metabolic acidosis in patients with renal tubular acidosis. Since infants and young children are unable to swallow tablets, those affected must ingest sodium bicarbonate in a powder or liquid form. Pharmacy-weighed sodium bicarbonate is expensive and inconvenient to obtain; some pharmacists are reluctant to provide it. We determined that the sodium bicarbonate contained in 8-oz boxes of Arm and Hammer Baking Soda was sufficiently constant in weight that, dissolved in water to a given volume, it yielded a quantitatively acceptable therapeutic solution of sodium bicarbonate at a cost of approximately 3 percent of that of pharmacy-weighed sodium bicarbonate. Grocery store baking soda can be a safe, economical, and convenient source of sodium bicarbonate for the treatment of chronic metabolic acidosis in infants and young children.

  14. Mild metabolic acidosis impairs the β-adrenergic response in isolated human failing myocardium

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Pronounced extracellular acidosis reduces both cardiac contractility and the β-adrenergic response. In the past, this was shown in some studies using animal models. However, few data exist regarding how the human end-stage failing myocardium, in which compensatory mechanisms are exhausted, reacts to acute mild metabolic acidosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of mild metabolic acidosis on contractility and the β-adrenergic response of isolated trabeculae from human end-stage failing hearts. Methods Intact isometrically twitching trabeculae isolated from patients with end-stage heart failure were exposed to mild metabolic acidosis (pH 7.20). Trabeculae were stimulated at increasing frequencies and finally exposed to increasing concentrations of isoproterenol (0 to 1 × 10-6 M). Results A mild metabolic acidosis caused a depression in twitch-force amplitude of 26% (12.1 ± 1.9 to 9.0 ± 1.5 mN/mm2; n = 12; P < 0.01) as compared with pH 7.40. Force-frequency relation measurements yielded no further significant differences of twitch force. At the maximal isoproterenol concentration, the force amplitude was comparable in each of the two groups (pH 7.40 versus pH 7.20). However, the half-maximal effective concentration (EC50) was significantly increased in the acidosis group, with an EC50 of 5.834 × 10-8 M (confidence interval (CI), 3.48 × 10-8 to 9.779 × 10-8; n = 9), compared with the control group, which had an EC50 of 1.056 × 10-8 M (CI, 2.626 × 10-9 to 4.243 × 10-8; n = 10; P < 0.05), indicating an impaired β-adrenergic force response. Conclusions Our data show that mild metabolic acidosis reduces cardiac contractility and significantly impairs the β-adrenergic force response in human failing myocardium. Thus, our results could contribute to the still-controversial discussion about the therapy regimen of acidosis in patients with critical heart failure. PMID:22889236

  15. [Gastric emptying and metabolic acidosis. III. Study of gastric retention of a sodium citrate solution using an experimental model of metabolic acidosis in rats].

    PubMed

    Baracat, E C; Collares, E F

    1992-01-01

    The gastric emptying of sodium citrate solution 0.25 mEq/ml was studied in rats with metabolic acidosis induced by orogastric infusion of 0.5 M ammonium chloride solution. Two control groups were used: one infused with 0.5 M sodium chloride and the other with water. The 3 solutions content was 2 ml/100 g weight of the animal. Six hours after the infusion, there was a moderate metabolic acidosis in the group with ammonium citrate. This 6 hour interval marked the beginning of the gastric emptying study. The test meal (sodium citrate 0.25 mEq/ml) was utilized containing 6 mg% red fenol as a marker. The gastric emptying of sodium citrate was studied at 5, 10, 20 and 30 minutes after the infusion, and the results showed no differences between the 3 groups. The data suggest that the duodenal receptors to pH were more effective do determine the pattern of gastric response than the acidosis.

  16. Differential effects of acidosis, high potassium concentrations, and metabolic inhibition on noradrenaline release and its presynaptic muscarinic regulation.

    PubMed

    Haunstetter, Armin; Schulze Icking, Babette; Backs, Johannes; Krüger, Carsten; Haass, Markus

    2002-03-01

    It was the aim of the present study to characterize the effect of single components of ischaemia, such as inhibition of aerobic and anaerobic energy production by combined anoxic and glucose-free perfusion (metabolic inhibition), high extracellular potassium concentrations (hyperkalaemia), and acidosis, on (1). the stimulated release of noradrenaline from the in situ perfused guinea-pig heart and (2). its presynaptic modulation by the muscarinic agonist carbachol. The release of endogenous noradrenaline from efferent cardiac sympathetic nerve endings was induced by electrical stimulation of the left stellate ganglion (1 min, 5 V, 12 Hz) and quantified in the coronary venous effluent by high-performance liquid chromatography. Under control conditions, two consecutive electrical stimulations (S1, S2) elicited a similar noradrenaline overflow (S2/S1: 0.98 plus minus 0.05). After 10 min of global myocardial ischaemia overflow of endogenous noradrenaline was significantly reduced (S2/S1: 0.18 plus minus 0.03; P< 0.05). When studied separately, metabolic inhibition, hyperkalaemia (16 mM), and acidosis (pH 6.0) each markedly attenuated stimulated noradrenaline overflow (S2/S1: 0.65 plus minus 0.05, 0.43 plus minus 0.14, and 0.37 plus minus 0.09, respectively; P< 0.05). The muscarinic agonist carbachol (10 microM) inhibited stimulated noradrenaline release under normoxic conditions (S2/S1: 0.41 plus minus 0.07; P< 0.05). However, after 10 min of global myocardial ischaemia the inhibitory effect of carbachol on noradrenaline overflow was completely lost. Single components of ischaemia had a differential effect on presynaptic muscarinic modulation. Whereas hyperkalaemia (8-16 mM) did not affect muscarinic inhibition of noradrenaline release, carbachol lost its inhibitory effect during acidosis and metabolic inhibition. In conclusion, hyperkalaemia, metabolic inhibition, and severe acidosis each contribute to reduced overflow of noradrenaline after 10 min of myocardial

  17. Effect of collecting duct-specific deletion of both Rh B Glycoprotein (Rhbg) and Rh C Glycoprotein (Rhcg) on renal response to metabolic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Verlander, Jill W; Handlogten, Mary E; Han, Ki-Hwan; Weiner, I David

    2014-02-15

    The Rhesus (Rh) glycoproteins, Rh B and Rh C Glycoprotein (Rhbg and Rhcg, respectively), are ammonia-specific transporters expressed in renal distal nephron and collecting duct sites that are necessary for normal rates of ammonia excretion. The purpose of the current studies was to determine the effect of their combined deletion from the renal collecting duct (CD-Rhbg/Rhcg-KO) on basal and acidosis-stimulated acid-base homeostasis. Under basal conditions, urine pH and ammonia excretion and serum HCO3(-) were similar in control (C) and CD-Rhbg/Rhcg-KO mice. After acid-loading for 7 days, CD-Rhbg/Rhcg-KO mice developed significantly more severe metabolic acidosis than did C mice. Acid loading increased ammonia excretion, but ammonia excretion increased more slowly in CD-Rhbg/Rhcg-KO and it was significantly less than in C mice on days 1-5. Urine pH was significantly more acidic in CD-Rhbg/Rhcg-KO mice on days 1, 3, and 5 of acid loading. Metabolic acidosis increased phosphenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHE-3 and decreased glutamine synthetase (GS) expression in both genotypes, and these changes were significantly greater in CD-Rhbg/Rhcg-KO than in C mice. We conclude that 1) Rhbg and Rhcg are critically important in the renal response to metabolic acidosis; 2) the significantly greater changes in PEPCK, NHE-3, and GS expression in acid-loaded CD-Rhbg/Rhcg-KO compared with acid-loaded C mice cause the role of Rhbg and Rhcg to be underestimated quantitatively; and 3) in mice with intact Rhbg and Rhcg expression, metabolic acidosis does not induce maximal changes in PEPCK, NHE-3, and GS expression despite the presence of persistent metabolic acidosis.

  18. Proximal tubule-specific glutamine synthetase deletion alters basal and acidosis-stimulated ammonia metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Osis, Gunars; Handlogten, Mary E; Lamers, Wouter H; Chaudhry, Farrukh A; Verlander, Jill W; Weiner, I David

    2016-06-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the recycling of NH4 (+) with glutamate to form glutamine. GS is highly expressed in the renal proximal tubule (PT), suggesting ammonia recycling via GS could decrease net ammoniagenesis and thereby limit ammonia available for net acid excretion. The purpose of the present study was to determine the role of PT GS in ammonia metabolism under basal conditions and during metabolic acidosis. We generated mice with PT-specific GS deletion (PT-GS-KO) using Cre-loxP techniques. Under basal conditions, PT-GS-KO increased urinary ammonia excretion significantly. Increased ammonia excretion occurred despite decreased expression of key proteins involved in renal ammonia generation. After the induction of metabolic acidosis, the ability to increase ammonia excretion was impaired significantly by PT-GS-KO. The blunted increase in ammonia excretion occurred despite greater expression of multiple components of ammonia generation, including SN1 (Slc38a3), phosphate-dependent glutaminase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, and Na(+)-coupled electrogenic bicarbonate cotransporter. We conclude that 1) GS-mediated ammonia recycling in the PT contributes to both basal and acidosis-stimulated ammonia metabolism and 2) adaptive changes in other proteins involved in ammonia metabolism occur in response to PT-GS-KO and cause an underestimation of the role of PT GS expression.

  19. Branched-chain amino acid metabolism in rat muscle: abnormal regulation in acidosis

    SciTech Connect

    May, R.C.; Hara, Y.; Kelly, R.A.; Block, K.P.; Buse, M.G.; Mitch, W.E.

    1987-06-01

    Branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolism is frequently abnormal in pathological conditions accompanied by chronic metabolic acidosis. To study how metabolic acidosis affects BCAA metabolism in muscle, rats were gavage fed a 14% protein diet with or without 4 mmol NH/sub 4/Cl x 100 g body wt/sup -1/ x day/sup -1/. Epitrochlearis muscles were incubated with L-(1-/sup 14/C)-valine and L-(1-/sup 14/C)leucine, and rates of decarboxylation, net transamination, and incorporation into muscle protein were measured. Plasma and muscle BCAA levels were lower in acidotic rats. Rates of valine and leucine decarboxylation and net transamination were higher in muscles from acidotic rats; these differences were associated with a 79% increase in the total activity of branched-chain ..cap alpha..-keto acid dehydrogenase and a 146% increase in the activated form of the enzyme. They conclude that acidosis affects the regulation of BCAA metabolism by enhancing flux through the transaminase and by directly stimulating oxidative catabolism through activation of branched-chain ..cap alpha..-keto acid dehydrogenase.

  20. Hyperammonaemia in a child with distal renal tubular acidosis.

    PubMed

    Seracini, D; Poggi, G M; Pela, I

    2005-11-01

    A 5-month-old girl with distal renal tubular acidosis (RTA) and hyperammonaemia that had lasted for 12 days, despite metabolic acidosis correction, is presented in this report. The patient showed failure to thrive, poor feeding, hypotonia and vomiting crisis in absence of inborn errors of metabolism. Probably, hyperammonaemia was the result of an imbalance between the increased ammonia synthesis, in response to metabolic acidosis, and the impaired ammonia excretion, typical of distal RTA. Our case confirms that hyperammonaemia may be observed in distal RTA, mimicking an inborn error of metabolism, and it underlines that hyperammonaemia may persist several days after metabolic acidosis correction.

  1. Baking soda induced severe metabolic alkalosis in a haemodialysis patient.

    PubMed

    Solak, Yalcin; Turkmen, Kultigin; Atalay, Huseyin; Turk, Suleyman

    2009-08-01

    Metabolic alkalosis is a rare occurence in hemodialysis population compared to metabolic acidosis unless some precipitating factors such as nasogastric suction, vomiting and alkali ingestion or infusion are present. When metabolic alkalosis develops, it may cause serious clinical consequences among them are sleep apnea, resistent hypertension, dysrhythmia and seizures. Here, we present a 54-year-old female hemodialysis patient who developed a severe metabolic alkalosis due to baking soda ingestion to relieve dyspepsia. She had sleep apnea, volume overload and uncontrolled hypertension due to metabolic alkalosis. Metabolic alkalosis was corrected and the patient's clinical condition was relieved with negative-bicarbonate hemodialysis.

  2. Rh versus pH: the role of Rhesus glycoproteins in renal ammonia excretion during metabolic acidosis in a freshwater teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Wright, Patricia A; Wood, Chris M; Wilson, Jonathan M

    2014-08-15

    Increased renal ammonia excretion in response to metabolic acidosis is thought to be a conserved response in vertebrates. We tested the hypothesis that Rhesus (Rh) glycoproteins in the kidney of the freshwater common carp, Cyprinus carpio, play a crucial role in regulating renal ammonia excretion during chronic metabolic acidosis. Exposure to water pH 4.0 (72 h) resulted in a classic metabolic acidosis with reduced plasma arterial pH and [HCO3(-)], no change in PCO2 and large changes in renal function. Urine [NH4(+)] as well as [titratable acidity-HCO3(-)] rose significantly over the acid exposure, but the profound reduction (fivefold) in urine flow rates eliminated the expected elevations in renal ammonia excretion. Low urine flow rates may be a primary strategy to conserve ions, as urinary excretion rates of Na(+), Cl(-) and Ca(2+) were significantly lower during the acid exposure relative to the control period. Interestingly, renal Rhcg1 mRNA and protein levels were elevated in acid-exposed relative to control groups, along with mRNA levels of several ion transporters, including the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger, H(+)-ATPase and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed a strong apical Rhcg1 signal in distal tubules. Taken together, these data show that renal Rh glycoproteins and associated ion transporters are responsive to metabolic acidosis, but conservation of ions through reduced urine flow rates takes primacy over renal acid-base regulation in the freshwater C. carpio. We propose that an 'acid/base-ion balance' compromise explains the variable renal responses to metabolic acidosis in freshwater teleosts.

  3. Severe lactic acidosis and acute pancreatitis associated with cimetidine in a patient with type 2 diabetes mellitus taking metformin.

    PubMed

    Seo, Ji Ho; Lee, Da Young; Hong, Chang Woo; Lee, In Hee; Ahn, Ki Sung; Kang, Gun Woo

    2013-01-01

    An 82-year-old woman with type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and unstable angina presented with severe lactic acidosis and acute kidney injury (AKI) accompanied by acute pancreatitis. Her medical history revealed that she had taken cimetidine for two weeks while taking other medications, including metformin. Continuous veno-venous hemodiafiltration (CVVHDF) was initiated under diagnosis of lactic acidosis due to metformin and AKI caused by cimetidine-induced acute pancreatitis. In three days of CVVHDF, the levels of serum biochemical markers of lactic acidosis and AKI improved and the patient's urine output reached over 1 L/day. The pancreatitis improved over time.

  4. Severe hypophosphatemic osteomalacia with Fanconi syndrome, renal tubular acidosis, vitamin D deficiency and primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Bando, Hironori; Hashimoto, Naoko; Hirota, Yushi; Sakaguchi, Kazuhiko; Hisa, Itoko; Inoue, Yoshifumi; Imanishi, Yasuo; Seino, Susumu; Kaji, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    A 49-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for back pain with marked thoracic and extremity deformities leading to bed-rest for three years. She was diagnosed with hypophosphatemic osteomalacia based on her symptoms, X-ray and bone scintigram, high serum alkaline phosphatase level, and low serum levels of both phosphorus and 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D(3) with inhibition of phosphorus reabsorption. Fanconi syndrome with renal tubular acidosis, vitamin D deficiency and primary biliary cirrhosis were related to the pathogenesis of osteomalacia in this case. Several causal diseases may be concomitantly responsible for acceleration of the severity of osteomalacia in this patient.

  5. Liquid chromatographic-mass spectrometric method for simultaneous determination of small organic acids potentially contributing to acidosis in severe malaria.

    PubMed

    Sriboonvorakul, Natthida; Leepipatpiboon, Natchanun; Dondorp, Arjen M; Pouplin, Thomas; White, Nicholas J; Tarning, Joel; Lindegardh, Niklas

    2013-12-15

    Acidosis is an important cause of mortality in severe falciparum malaria. Lactic acid is a major contributor to metabolic acidosis, but accounts for only one-quarter of the strong anion gap. Other unidentified organic acids have an independent strong prognostic significance for a fatal outcome. In this study, a simultaneous bio-analytical method for qualitative and quantitative assessment in plasma and urine of eight small organic acids potentially contributing to acidosis in severe malaria was developed and validated. High-throughput strong anion exchange solid-phase extraction in a 96-well plate format was used for sample preparation. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) coupled to negative mass spectroscopy was utilized for separation and detection. Eight possible small organic acids; l-lactic acid (LA), α-hydroxybutyric acid (aHBA), β-hydroxybutyric acid (bHBA), p-hydroxyphenyllactic acid (pHPLA), malonic acid (MA), methylmalonic acid (MMA), ethylmalonic acid (EMA) and α-ketoglutaric acid (aKGA) were analyzed simultaneously using a ZIC-HILIC column with an isocratic elution containing acetonitrile and ammonium acetate buffer. This method was validated according to U.S. Food and Drug Administration guidelines with additional validation procedures for endogenous substances. Accuracy for all eight acids ranged from 93.1% to 104.0%, and the within-day and between-day precisions (i.e. relative standard deviations) were lower than 5.5% at all tested concentrations. The calibration ranges were: 2.5-2500μg/mL for LA, 0.125-125μg/mL for aHBA, 7.5-375μg/mL for bHBA, 0.1-100μg/mL for pHPLA, 1-1000μg/mL for MA, 0.25-250μg/mL for MMA, 0.25-100μg/mL for EMA, and 30-1500μg/mL for aKGA. Clinical applicability was demonstrated by analyzing plasma and urine samples from five patients with severe falciparum malaria; five acids had increased concentrations in plasma (range LA=177-1169μg/mL, aHBA=4.70-38.4μg/mL, bHBA=7.70-38.0μg/mL, pHPLA=0.900-4.30

  6. Coma, metabolic acidosis, and methemoglobinemia in a patient with acetaminophen toxicity.

    PubMed

    Kanji, Hussein D; Mithani, Shazma; Boucher, Paul; Dias, Valerian C; Yarema, Mark C

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of early coma, metabolic acidosis and methemoglobinemia after substantial acetaminophen toxicity in the absence of hepatic failure. A 77-year-old female presented to the emergency department with a decreased level of consciousness. She was found unresponsive by a family member in her bed, and was reported to be acting normally when she was last seen eight hours earlier. Laboratory results on arrival were: pH 7.19, sodium 139 mmol/L, chloride 106 mmol/L, potassium 3.3 mmol/L, CO2 8 mmol/L, and an anion gap of 25. Both venous lactate (10.2 mmol/L) and methemoglobin (9.4 %) were elevated. The patient's acetaminophen concentration was markedly elevated at 7138 µmol/L (1078 µg/ml). Hepatic enzymes and coagulation tests were normal [alanine transaminase (ALT) 8 U/L, international normalized ratio (INR) 1.0]. Intravenous N-acetylcysteine (NAC) was initiated at a dose of 150 mg/kg over 15 minutes, followed by 50 mg/kg over the next four hours, followed by 100 mg/kg over the next 16 hours. Twenty-four hours after admission, the anion gap metabolic acidosis had resolved, and the methemoglobin was 2.1%. Aminotransferases peaked at 44 U/L and INR peaked at 1.9. A urine 5-oxoproline assay performed five days after admission was negative, suggesting no evidence of a 5-oxoprolinase deficiency. We describe the pathophysiology and discuss the literature on acetaminophen-induced coma and metabolic acidosis in the absence of hepatic injury; and propose mechanisms for associated methemoglobinemia. 

  7. The deleterious effect of metabolic acidosis on nutritional status of hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Soleymanian, Tayebeh; Ghods, Ahad

    2011-11-01

    One of the main causes of protein-energy malnutrition in patients on maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) is metabolic acidosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of metabolic acidosis on nutritional status in a group of MHD patients with adequately delivered dialysis treatment. Of 165 eligible anuric MHD outpatients with Kt/V ≥ 1 and no underlying inflammatory diseases, 47 subjects were enrolled. In order to evaluate the effect of different parameters on serum albumin, we measured the pre-dialysis serum albumin, blood pH, serum bicarbonate (HCO 3‾ ), Kt/V, normalized protein catabolic rate (nPCR) and body mass index (BMI) in these patients. The mean age of the study patients was 55 ± 13.8 years; there were 22 females and six diabetics. The average Kt/V was 1.22 ± 0.16, pH was 7.40 ± 0.15, serum HCO 3‾ was 23.18 ± 2.38 mEq/L, serum albumin was 4.03 ± 0.56 g/dL, nPCR was 1.00 ± 0.16 g/kg/day, post-dialysis body weight was 58.50 ± 11.50 kg and BMI was 23.47 ± 2.70 kg/m 2 . There was a statistically significant direct correlation between serum albumin and BMI (r = 0.415, P = 0.004), and between serum albumin and serum HCO 3 (r = 0.341, P = 0.019). On multiple regression analysis, the predictors of serum albumin were serum HCO3‾ and BMI (direct effect) and nPCR (inverse effect). In 17 patients on MHD with serum HCO3‾ <22 mEq/L, there was a significant inverse correlation between HCO 3 and nPCR (r = 0.492, P = 0.045), and these patients had significantly lower serum albumin compared with patients with serum HCO3‾ >22 mEq/L (P = 0.046). These data demonstrate that patients on MHD with metabolic acidosis had a lower serum albumin concentration despite adequate dialysis treatment. The inverse effect of nPCR on serum albumin concentration in acidotic MHD patients may be due to hypercatabolism in the setting of metabolic acidosis, leading to deleterious effects on the nutritional status of patients on MHD.

  8. Lanthanum carbonate versus sevelamer hydrochloride: improvement of metabolic acidosis and hyperkalemia in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Filiopoulos, Vassilis; Koutis, Ioannis; Trompouki, Sofia; Hadjiyannakos, Dimitrios; Lazarou, Dimitrios; Vlassopoulos, Dimosthenis

    2011-02-01

    Sevelamer hydrochloride (SH) has been reported to aggravate metabolic acidosis and hyperkalemia. This study was performed to evaluate acid-base status and serum potassium changes after replacing SH with lanthanum carbonate (LC) in hemodialysis patients. SH was prescribed for 24 weeks in 14 stable hemodialysis patients and replaced by LC in a similar treatment schedule. Laboratory tests, including indices of acid-base status, nutrition, bone/mineral metabolism, and dialysis adequacy, were performed monthly during the study. Dialysate bicarbonate, potassium and calcium concentrations remained constant. Serum bicarbonate and pH rose, and serum potassium dropped significantly under LC. Alkaline phosphatase also decreased significantly under LC. No significant differences were observed in the other studied parameters between the two treatment periods. Control of serum phosphate was similar under both phosphate-binders and no differences were observed in calcium, Ca × P product, CRP, or lipid levels. Dialysis adequacy was constantly kept within K/DOQI target-range. Although full compliance to treatment was reported, three patients on LC complained of gastrointestinal upset and/or a metallic taste, and four had difficulty chewing the LC tablet. LC improves metabolic acidosis and hyperkalemia in hemodialysis patients previously under SH. Although both medications are well-tolerated, the gastrointestinal side-effects appear to occur more frequently with LC; a fact that, together with difficulties in chewing the tablet, may result in decreased compliance.

  9. A guide for predicting arterial CO2 tension in metabolic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Fulop, M

    1997-01-01

    This presentation examines the relation of arterial CO2 tension to the severity of acidemia in three large groups of cases of diabetic ketoacidosis, totalling 405 episodes. In particular, it evaluates the previously reported anecdotal observation that PaCO2 (in torr) in such patients is usually numerically close to the two-digit number to the right of the pH decimal point, down to a pH of 7.10-7.15. The relations between measured arterial CO2 tension levels and calculated plasma bicarbonate concentration in the three groups were very similar to those previously reported by others and us, the regression equations approximating PaCO2 = 1.5 x [HCO3-] + 8. Further, in the 262 episodes with blood pH 7.10-7.37, down to a pH of 7.10-7.15, the average PaCO2 in torr often did approximate the two-digit number to the right of the decimal point in the pH value. This relation provides a quick and easily remembered alternative guide for predicting the approximate expected PaCO2 in patients with metabolic acidosis. The basis for this apparently fortuitous relation between PaCO2 and blood pH may be the closely similar correlation between PaCO2 and 1/cH+ (i.e., 10PH), which in turn derives from the physiologically significant relation of alveolar ventilation to blood pH, and the inverse relation between PaCO2 and alveolar ventilation.

  10. Localization of members of MCT monocarboxylate transporter family Slc16 in the kidney and regulation during metabolic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Becker, Helen M; Mohebbi, Nilufar; Perna, Angelica; Ganapathy, Vadivel; Capasso, Giovambattista; Wagner, Carsten A

    2010-07-01

    The monocarboxylate transporter family (MCT) comprises 14 members with distinct transport properties and tissue distribution. The kidney expresses several members of the MCT family, but only little is known about their exact distribution and function. Here, we investigated selected members of the MCT family in the mouse kidney. MCT1, MCT2, MCT7, and MCT8 localized to basolateral membranes of the epithelial cells lining the nephron. MCT1 and MCT8 were detected in proximal tubule cells whereas MCT7 and MCT2 were located in the thick ascending limb and the distal tubule. CD147, a beta-subunit of MCT1 and MCT4, showed partially overlapping expression with MCT1 and MCT2. However, CD147 was also found in intercalated cells. We also detected SMCT1 and SMCT2, two Na(+)-dependent monocarboxylate cotransporters, on the luminal membrane of type A intercalated cells. Moreover, mice were given an acid load for 2 and 7 days. Acidotic animals showed a marked but transient increase in urinary lactate excretion. During acidosis, a downregulation of MCT1, MCT8, and SMCT2 was observed at the mRNA level, whereas MCT7 and SMCT1 showed increased mRNA abundance. Only MCT7 showed lower protein abundance whereas all other transporters remained unchanged. In summary, we describe for the first time the localization of various MCT transporters in mammalian kidney and demonstrate that metabolic acidosis induces a transient increase in urinary lactate excretion paralleled by lower MCT7 protein expression.

  11. Mechanism of potassium depletion during chronic metabolic acidosis in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Scandling, J.D.; Ornt, D.B.

    1987-01-01

    Pair-fed rats on a normal K diet were given either 1.5% NH/sub 4/Cl or water for 4 days. The acid-fed animals developed metabolic acidosis, negative K balance, and K depletion. Urinary Na excretion and urinary flow were not different between the groups beyond the first day. After the 4 days, isolated kidneys from animals in each of these groups were perfused at normal pH and bicarbonate concentrations. Urinary K excretion was similar between the groups despite the potassium depletion in the acid-fed animals. In contrast, isolated kidneys from animals with comparable K depletion induced by dietary K restriction readily conserved K. Sodium excretion and urinary flow were similar among the three groups of isolated kidneys. Plasma aldosterone concentrations were greater in the acid-fed rats after the 4 days of NH/sub 4/Cl ingestion than in the control animals. Adrenalectomized rats were treated with either normal (4 ..mu..g/day) or high (22 ..mu..g/day) aldosterone replacement while ingesting NH/sub 4/Cl for 4 days. Only in the presence of high aldosterone replacement did the acid-fed adrenalectomized animals develop K depletion. The authors conclude that chronic metabolic acidosis stimulates aldosterone secretion, and that aldosterone maintains the inappropriately high urinary potassium excretion and K depletion seen in this acid-base disorder.

  12. Treatment of metabolic acidosis in patients with stage 3 chronic kidney disease with fruits and vegetables or oral bicarbonate reduces urine angiotensinogen and preserves glomerular filtration rate.

    PubMed

    Goraya, Nimrit; Simoni, Jan; Jo, Chan-Hee; Wesson, Donald E

    2014-11-01

    Alkali therapy of metabolic acidosis in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) with plasma total CO2 (TCO2) below 22 mmol/l per KDOQI guidelines appears to preserve estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Since angiotensin II mediates GFR decline in partial nephrectomy models of CKD and even mild metabolic acidosis increases kidney angiotensin II in animals, alkali treatment of CKD-related metabolic acidosis in patients with plasma TCO2 over 22 mmol/l might preserve GFR through reduced kidney angiotensin II. To test this, we randomized 108 patients with stage 3 CKD and plasma TCO2 22-24 mmol/l to Usual Care or interventions designed to reduce dietary acid by 50% using sodium bicarbonate or base-producing fruits and vegetables. All were treated to achieve a systolic blood pressure below 130 mm Hg with regimens including angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition and followed for 3 years. Plasma TCO2 decreased in Usual Care but increased with bicarbonate or fruits and vegetables. By contrast, urine excretion of angiotensinogen, an index of kidney angiotensin II, increased in Usual Care but decreased with bicarbonate or fruits and vegetables. Creatinine-calculated and cystatin C-calculated eGFR decreased in all groups, but loss was less at 3 years with bicarbonate or fruits and vegetables than Usual Care. Thus, dietary alkali treatment of metabolic acidosis in CKD that is less severe than that for which KDOQI recommends therapy reduces kidney angiotensin II activity and preserves eGFR.

  13. Insulin sensitivity of muscle protein metabolism is altered in patients with chronic kidney disease and metabolic acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Garibotto, Giacomo; Sofia, Antonella; Russo, Rodolfo; Paoletti, Ernesto; Bonanni, Alice; Parodi, Emanuele L; Viazzi, Francesca; Verzola, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    An emergent hypothesis is that a resistance to the anabolic drive by insulin may contribute to loss of strength and muscle mass in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We tested whether insulin resistance extends to protein metabolism using the forearm perfusion method with arterial insulin infusion in 7 patients with CKD and metabolic acidosis (bicarbonate 19 mmol/l) and 7 control individuals. Forearm glucose balance and protein turnover (2H-phenylalanine kinetics) were measured basally and in response to insulin infused at different rates for 2 h to increase local forearm plasma insulin concentration by approximately 20 and 50 μU/ml. In response to insulin, forearm glucose uptake was significantly increased to a lesser extent (−40%) in patients with CKD than controls. In addition, whereas in the controls net muscle protein balance and protein degradation were decreased by both insulin infusion rates, in patients with CKD net protein balance and protein degradation were sensitive to the high (0.035 mU/kg per min) but not the low (0.01 mU/kg per min) insulin infusion. Besides blunting muscle glucose uptake, CKD and acidosis interfere with the normal suppression of protein degradation in response to a moderate rise in plasma insulin. Thus, alteration of protein metabolism by insulin may lead to changes in body tissue composition which may become clinically evident in conditions characterized by low insulinemia. PMID:26308671

  14. Dietary sodium chloride intake independently predicts the degree of hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis in healthy humans consuming a net acid-producing diet.

    PubMed

    Frassetto, Lynda A; Morris, R Curtis; Sebastian, Anthony

    2007-08-01

    We previously demonstrated that typical American net acid-producing diets predict a low-grade metabolic acidosis of severity proportional to the diet net acid load as indexed by the steady-state renal net acid excretion rate (NAE). We now investigate whether a sodium (Na) chloride (Cl) containing diet likewise associates with a low-grade metabolic acidosis of severity proportional to the sodium chloride content of the diet as indexed by the steady-state Na and Cl excretion rates. In the steady-state preintervention periods of our previously reported studies comprising 77 healthy subjects, we averaged in each subject three to six values of blood hydrogen ion concentration ([H]b), plasma bicarbonate concentration ([HCO(3)(-)]p), the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (Pco(2)), the urinary excretion rates of Na, Cl, NAE, and renal function as measured by creatinine clearance (CrCl), and performed multivariate analyses. Dietary Cl strongly correlated positively with dietary Na (P < 0.001) and was an independent negative predictor of [HCO(3)(-)]p after adjustment for diet net acid load, Pco(2) and CrCl, and positive and negative predictors, respectively, of [H]b and [HCO(3)(-)]p after adjustment for diet acid load and Pco(2). These data provide the first evidence that, in healthy humans, the diet loads of NaCl and net acid independently predict systemic acid-base status, with increasing degrees of low-grade hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis as the loads increase. Assuming a causal relationship, over their respective ranges of variation, NaCl has approximately 50-100% of the acidosis-producing effect of the diet net acid load.

  15. Sodium bicarbonate use and the risk of hypernatremia in thoracic aortic surgical patients with metabolic acidosis following deep hypothermic circulatory arrest

    PubMed Central

    Ghadimi, Kamrouz; Gutsche, Jacob T.; Ramakrishna, Harish; Setegne, Samuel L.; Jackson, Kirk R.; Augoustides, John G.; Ochroch, E. Andrew; Weiss, Stuart J.; Bavaria, Joseph E.; Cheung, Albert T.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Metabolic acidosis after deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) for thoracic aortic operations is commonly managed with sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3). The purpose of this study was to determine the relationships between total NaHCO3 dose and the severity of metabolic acidosis, duration of mechanical ventilation, duration of vasoactive infusions, and Intensive Care Unit (ICU) or hospital length of stay (LOS). Methods: In a single center, retrospective study, 87 consecutive elective thoracic aortic operations utilizing DHCA, were studied. Linear regression analysis was used to test for the relationships between the total NaHCO3 dose administered through postoperative day 2, clinical variables, arterial blood gas values, and short-term clinical outcomes. Results: Seventy-five patients (86%) received NaHCO3. Total NaHCO3 dose averaged 136 ± 112 mEq (range: 0.0–535 mEq) per patient. Total NaHCO3 dose correlated with minimum pH (r = 0.41, P < 0.0001), minimum serum bicarbonate (r = −0.40, P < 0.001), maximum serum lactate (r = 0.46, P = 0.007), duration of metabolic acidosis (r = 0.33, P = 0.002), and maximum serum sodium concentrations (r = 0.29, P = 0.007). Postoperative hypernatremia was present in 67% of patients and peaked at 12 h following DHCA. Eight percent of patients had a serum sodium ≥ 150 mEq/L. Total NaHCO3 dose did not correlate with anion gap, serum chloride, not the duration of mechanical ventilator support, vasoactive infusions, ICU or hospital LOS. Conclusion: Routine administration of NaHCO3 was common for the management of metabolic acidosis after DHCA. Total dose of NaHCO3 was a function of the severity and duration of metabolic acidosis. NaHCO3 administration contributed to postoperative hypernatremia that was often severe. The total NaHCO3 dose administered was unrelated to short-term clinical outcomes. PMID:27397449

  16. Survival from profound metabolic acidosis due to hypovolaemic shock. A world record?

    PubMed

    Di Rollo, Nicola; Caesar, David; Ferenbach, David A; Dunn, Mark J G

    2013-01-30

    This case describes the unexpected survival of an adult man who presented to the emergency department with hypovolaemic shock secondary to a splenic haemorrhage. Before surgery he had a pH 6.527, base excess (BE) -34.2 mmol/l and lactate 15.6 mmol/l. He underwent a splenectomy after which his condition stabilised. He was managed in the intensive care unit postoperatively where he required organ support including renal replacement therapy but was subsequently discharged home with no neurological or renal deficit. Although there are case reports of patients surviving such profound metabolic acidosis these have mainly been cases of near drowning or toxic alcohol ingestion. To the best of our knowledge this is the first reported case of survival after a pH of 6.5 secondary to hypovolaemic shock.

  17. The use of chloride-sodium ratio in the evaluation of metabolic acidosis in critically ill neonates.

    PubMed

    Kurt, Abdullah; Ecevit, Ayşe; Ozkiraz, Servet; Ince, Deniz Anuk; Akcan, Abdullah Baris; Tarcan, Aylin

    2012-06-01

    Acid-base disturbances have been usually evaluated with the traditional Henderson-Hasselbach method and Stewart's physiochemical approach by quantifying anions of tissue acids (TA). It is hypothesized that an increase in tissue acids during metabolic acidosis would cause a compensatory decrease in the plasma chloride (Cl) relative to sodium (Cl-Na ratio) in order to preserve electroneutral balance. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the use of Cl-Na ratio as a bedside tool to evaluate the identifying raised TA in neonates as an alternative to complex calculations of Stewart's physiochemical approach. This retrospective study was conducted between January 2008 and December 2009. Infants were included in the study when blood gas analysis reveals a metabolic acidosis; pH <7.25 and sHCO(3) concentration was <22 mEq/L. The Cl-Na ratio, sodium-chloride difference (Diff(NaCl)), anion gap (AG), albumin-corrected AG (AG(corr)), strong ion difference (SID), unmeasured anions (UMA), and TA were calculated at each episode of metabolic acidosis. A total of 105 metabolic acidosis episodes occurred in 59 infants during follow-up. Hypochloremic metabolic acidosis occurred in 17 (16%) of samples, and all had increased TA. The dominant component of TA was UMA rather than lactate. There was a negative correlation between the Cl-Na ratio and SID, AG(corr), UMA, and TA. Also, there was a positive correlation between Diff(NaCl) and SID, AG(corr), UMA, and TA. Base deficit and actual bicarbonate performed poorly in identifying the TA. In conclusion, our study suggested that Diff(NaCl) and Cl-Na ratio are simple and fast, and may be an alternative method to complex Stewart's physiochemical approach in identifying raised UMA and TA in critically ill neonates.

  18. Long-term management of sevelamer hydrochloride-induced metabolic acidosis aggravation and hyperkalemia in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Sonikian, Macroui; Metaxaki, Polyxeni; Iliopoulos, Anastasios; Marioli, Stamatia; Vlassopoulos, Dimosthenis

    2006-01-01

    Sevelamer hydrochloride use in hemodialysis patients is complicated by metabolic acidosis aggravation and hyperkalemia. Rare reports about a short-term correction of this complication have been published. The current authors investigated the long-term correction of metabolic acidosis and hyperkalemia in sevelamer hydrochloride-treated patients at doses adequate to achieve serum phosphate levels within K/DOQI recommendations. The authors followed 20 hemodialysis patients for 24 months in an open-label prospective study. The dialysate bicarbonate concentration was increased stepwise to a maximum 40 mEq/L and adjusted to reach patient serum bicarbonate levels of 22 mEq/L, according to K/DOQI recommendations. Laboratory results for serum bicarbonate, potassium, calcium, phosphate, albumin, alkaline phosphatase, iPTH, cholesterol (HDL-LDL), triglycerides, Kt/V, systolic-diastolic arterial pressure were recorded. Sevelamer hydrochloride-induced metabolic acidosis aggravation and hyperkalemia in hemodialysis patients were corrected, on the long-term, by an increase in dialysate bicarbonate concentration. Further improvement in bone biochemistry was noted with this adequate acidosis correction and parallel sevelamer hydrochloride administration, in sufficiently large doses to achieve K/DOQI phosphate recommendations.

  19. Metabolic acidosis aggravation and hyperkaliemia in hemodialysis patients treated by sevelamer hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Sonikian, Macroui A; Pani, Ioanna T; Iliopoulos, Anastasios N; Koutala, Kaliopi G; Marioli, Stamatia I; Vlassopoulos, Dimosthenis A

    2005-01-01

    Reports on acid-base side effects of sevelamer hydrochloride (SH), a new aluminum (Al)- and calcium (Ca)-free phosphate binder are rare and conflicting. In a retrospective analysis, we evaluated SH impact on metabolic acidosis and serum potassium (K) in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Two groups of stable HD patients were studied. Group A included 17 patients, M/F=15/2, 64 (42-80) years old, dialyzed since 130 (34-253) months, under SH for 24 months. Group B serving as controls was made of 7 patients, M/F=4/3, 67 (48-91) years old, dialyzed since 67 (27-174) months, under CaCO3 and/or Al(OH)3 as phosphate binders also for 24 months. Bicarbonate (BIC), K, Ca, phosphorus (P), Ca x P, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) were recorded before (MO) and at the end (M24) of 24-month SH or CaCO3-Al(OH)3 treatment in group A and B patients. In group A, BIC fell from 20.02 +/- 1.43 to 17.89 +/- 2.30 mEq/ L, P=.002; and K rose from 5.45 +/- 0.51 to 5.75 +/- 0.49 mEq/L, P=0.02. In group B, BIC (19.8 +/- 3.03 to 19.0 +/- 3.3 mEq/L) and K (5.01 +/- 0.8 to 4.9 +/- 1.1 mEq/L) had nonsignificant changes. In group A, iPTH rose from 132.82 +/- 124.08 to 326.89 +/- 283.91 pg/mL, P=.0008; P fell from 5.92 +/- 1.48 to 4.9 +/- 1.01, P=.02; and Ca x P decreased from 52.04 +/- 9.7 to 45.58 +/- 10.42 mg2/dL2, P=.04. In group B, changes in iPTH from 240.71 +/- 174.7 to 318.57 +/- 260.2 pg/mL, P from 4.9 +/- 0.5 to 4.8 +/- 1.3 mg/dL, and CaxP product from 44.3 +/- 6.6 to 44 +/- 11.2 mg2/dL2 were nonsignificant. The changes observed in Ca and ALP in both groups were nonsignificant. Correlations in group A between metabolic acidosis (BIC) and SH doses, or iPTH and BIC, Ca, or P changes, were also found to be nonsignificant. Long-term use of SH, effectively controlling serum P levels and Ca x P values, is associated with acidosis aggravation and hyperkaliemia. Worsening of secondary hyperparathyroidism, also noted, needs to be confirmed and could be related to Ca/Al salt

  20. Celiac Crisis in a 64-Year-Old Woman: An Unusual Cause of Severe Diarrhea, Acidosis, and Malabsorption

    PubMed Central

    Mrad, Rachel Abou; Ghaddara, Hussein Abou; Green, Peter H.; El-Majzoub, Nadim

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) rarely presents with life-threatening complications in older individuals. We report a 64-year-old woman who presented with profuse diarrhea, weight loss, hemodynamic instability, hypokalemia, hypoproteinemia, acidosis, and vitamin and iron deficiency. Pathologic and serologic studies confirmed CD presenting with celiac crisis with extensive and severe intestinal disease. Although celiac crisis occurs mostly in childhood and early adulthood, it should be considered in adults presenting with acute severe diarrheal illness, electrolyte abnormalities, and malabsorption. PMID:26157925

  1. Nitazoxanide induces in vitro metabolic acidosis in Taenia crassiceps cysticerci.

    PubMed

    Isac, Eliana; de A Picanço, Guaraciara; da Costa, Tatiane L; de Lima, Nayana F; de S M M Alves, Daniella; Fraga, Carolina M; de S Lino Junior, Ruy; Vinaud, Marina C

    2016-12-01

    Nitazoxanide (NTZ) is a broad-spectrum anti-parasitic drug used against a wide variety of protozoans and helminthes. Albendazole, its active metabolite albendazole sulfoxide (ABZSO), is one of the drugs of choice to treat both intestinal and tissue helminth and protozoan infections. However little is known regarding their impact on the metabolism of parasites. The aim of this study was to compare the in vitro effect of NTZ and ABZSO in the glycolysis of Taenia crassiceps cysticerci. The cysticerci were treated with 1.2; 0.6; 0.3 or 0.15 μg/mL of NTZ or ABZSO. Chromatographic and spectrophotometric analyses were performed in the culture medium and in the cysticerci extract. Regarding the glucose concentrations was possible to observe two responses: impair of the uptake and gluconeogenesis. The pyruvate concentrations were increased in the ABZSO treated group. Lactate concentrations were increased in the culture medium of NTZ treated groups. Therefore it was possible to infer that the metabolic acidosis was greater in the group treated with NTZ than in the ABZSO treated group indicating that this is one of the modes of action used by this drug to induce the parasite death.

  2. The effect of metabolic acidosis on the synthesis and turnover of rat renal phosphate-dependent glutaminase.

    PubMed Central

    Tong, J; Harrison, G; Curthoys, N P

    1986-01-01

    Regulation of the mitochondrial phosphate-dependent glutaminase activity is an essential component in the control of renal ammoniagenesis. Alterations in acid-base balance significantly affect the amount of the glutaminase that is present in rat kidney, but not in brain or small intestine. The relative rates of glutaminase synthesis were determined by comparing the amount of [35S]methionine incorporated into specific immunoprecipitates with that incorporated into total protein. In a normal animal, the rate of glutaminase synthesis constitutes 0.04% of the total protein synthesis. After 7 days of metabolic acidosis, the renal glutaminase activity is increased to a value that is 5-fold greater than normal. During onset of acidosis, the relative rate of synthesis increases more rapidly than the appearance of increased glutaminase activity. The increased rate of synthesis reaches a plateau within 5 days at a value that is 5.3-fold greater than normal. Recovery from chronic acidosis causes a rapid decrease in the relative rate of glutaminase synthesis, but a gradual decrease in glutaminase activity. The former returns to normal within 2 days, whereas the latter requires 11 days. The apparent half-time for glutaminase degradation was found to be 5.1 days and 4.7 days for normal and acidotic rats respectively. These results indicate that the increase in renal glutaminase activity associated with metabolic acidosis is due primarily to an increase in its rate of synthesis. From the decrease in activity that occurs upon recovery from acidosis, the true half-life for the glutaminase was estimated to be 3 days. Images Fig. 3. PMID:3954723

  3. Phosphate binders and metabolic acidosis in patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis—sevelamer hydrochloride, calcium carbonate, and bixalomer.

    PubMed

    Sanai, Toru; Tada, Hideo; Ono, Takashi; Fukumitsu, Toma

    2015-01-01

    The serum bicarbonate (HCO3(-)) levels are decreased in chronic hemodialysis (HD) patients treated with sevelamer hydrochloride (SH). We assessed the effects of bixalomer on the chronic metabolic acidosis in these patients. We examined 12 of the 122 consecutive Japanese patients with end-stage renal disease on HD, who orally ingested a dose of SH (≥2250 mg), and an arterial blood gas analysis and biochemical analysis were performed before HD. Patients whose serum HCO3(-) levels were under 18 mmol/L were changed from SH to the same dose of bixalomer. A total of 12 patients were treated with a large amount of SH. Metabolic acidosis (a serum HCO3(-) level under 18 mmol/L) was found in eight patients. These patients were also treated with or without small dose of calcium carbonate (1.2 ± 1.1 g). The dose of SH was changed to that of bixalomer. After 1 month, the serum HCO3(-) levels increased from 16.3 ± 1.4 to 19.6 ± 1.7 mmol/L (P < 0.05). Metabolic acidosis was not observed in four patients (serum HCO3(-) level: 20.3 ± 0.7 mmol/L) likely because they were taking 3 g of calcium carbonate with SH. In the present study, the development of chronic metabolic acidosis was induced by HCl containing phosphate binders, such as SH, and partially ameliorated by calcium carbonate, then subsequently improved after changing the treatment to bixalomer.

  4. Recent Advances in Targeting Tumor Energy Metabolism with Tumor Acidosis as a Biomarker of Drug Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Akhenblit, Paul J; Pagel, Mark D

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells employ a deregulated cellular metabolism to leverage survival and growth advantages. The unique tumor energy metabolism presents itself as a promising target for chemotherapy. A pool of tumor energy metabolism targeting agents has been developed after several decades of efforts. This review will cover glucose and fatty acid metabolism, PI3K/AKT/mTOR, HIF-1 and glutamine pathways in tumor energy metabolism, and how they are being exploited for treatments and therapies by promising pre-clinical or clinical drugs being developed or investigated. Additionally, acidification of the tumor extracellular microenvironment is hypothesized to be the result of active tumor metabolism. This implies that tumor extracellular pH (pHe) can be a biomarker for assessing the efficacy of therapies that target tumor metabolism. Several translational molecular imaging methods (PET, MRI) for interrogating tumor acidification and its suppression are discussed as well. PMID:26962408

  5. Plasmodium berghei: lactic acidosis and hypoglycaemia in a rodent model of severe malaria; effects of glucose, quinine, and dichloroacetate.

    PubMed

    Holloway, P A; Krishna, S; White, N J

    1991-02-01

    Fulminant malaria infections are characterised by hypoglycaemia and potentially lethal lactic acidosis. In young adult Wistar rats (n = 26) infected with Plasmodium berghei (ANKA strain), hyperparasitaemia (greater than 50%), anaemia (PCV 19.6 +/- 5.3%; mean +/- SD) hypoglycaemia (1.04 +/- 0.74 mmol/litre), hyperlactataemia (13.2 +/- 2.20 mmol/litre), hyperpyruvicaemia (0.51 +/- 0.12 mmol/litre) and metabolic acidosis (arterial pH 6.96 +/- 0.11) developed after approximately 14 days of infection. Hypoglycaemia was associated with appropriate suppression of plasma insulin concentrations. In a second series of experiments the metabolic effects of treatment with glucose (500 mg/kg/hr), quinine (5 mg/kg bolus followed by 10 mg/kg over 1 hr) and a potent activator of pyruvate dehydrogenase, dichloroacetate (300 mg/kg) were studied over a 1-hr period. In control animals quinine had no measurable effects, but dichloroacetate significantly reduced arterial blood lactate (74%) and pyruvate (80%). In infected animals, glucose infusion attenuated the rise in lactate (38% compared with 82%; P less than 0.01) but quinine had no additional metabolic effects. Dichloroacetate further attenuated the rise in lactate (14%; P less than 0.01).

  6. Effects of sodium hydroxide treatment of dried distillers' grains on digestibility, ruminal metabolism, and metabolic acidosis of feedlot steers.

    PubMed

    Freitas, T B; Relling, A E; Pedreira, M S; Santana Junior, H A; Felix, T L

    2016-02-01

    The objectives were to determine the optimum inclusion of NaOH necessary to buffer the acidity of dried distillers' grains with solubles (DDGS) and its effects on digestibility, ruminal metabolism, and metabolic acidosis in feedlot steers. Rumen cannulated Angus-crossed steers were blocked by BW (small: 555 ± 42 kg initial BW, = 4; large: 703 ± 85 kg initial BW, = 4) over four 21-d periods in a replicated 4 × 4 Latin square design. Steers were assigned to 1 of 4 dietary treatments: 1) 50% untreated DDGS, 2) 50% DDGS treated with 0.5% (DM basis) sodium hydroxide (NaOH), 3) 50% DDGS treated with 1.0% (DM basis) NaOH, and 4) 50% DDGS treated with 1.5% (DM basis) NaOH. The remainder of the diets, on a DM basis, was composed of 20% corn silage, 20% dry-rolled corn, and 10% supplement. Ruminal pH was not affected by treatments ( = 0.56) or by a treatment × time interaction ( = 0.15). In situ NDF and ruminal DM disappearance did not differ ( ≥ 0.49 and ≥ 0.47, respectively) among treatments. Similar to in situ results, apparent total tract DM and NDF digestibility were not affected ( ≥ 0.33 and ≥ 0.21, respectively) by increasing NaOH inclusion in the diets. Urinary pH increased (linear, < 0.01) with increasing NaOH concentration in the diet. Blood pH was not affected ( ≥ 0.20), and blood total CO and partial pressure of CO were similar ( ≥ 0.56 and ≥ 0.17, respectively) as NaOH increased in the diet. Increasing NaOH in the diet did not affect ( ≥ 0.21) ruminal concentrations of total VFA. There were no linear ( = 0.20) or quadratic ( = 0.20) effects of treatment on ruminal acetate concentrations, nor was there a treatment × time interaction ( = 0.22) for acetate. Furthermore, there were no effects ( ≥ 0.90) of NaOH inclusion on ruminal propionate concentration. However, there was a quadratic response ( = 0.01) of ruminal butyrate concentrations as NaOH inclusion increased in the diet; ruminal butyrate concentrations were greatest with the 0.5 and 1

  7. [Inherited tubular renal acidosis].

    PubMed

    Bouzidi, Hassan; Hayek, Donia; Nasr, Dhekra; Daudon, Michel; Fadhel Najjar, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    Renal tubular acidosis (RTA) is a tubulopathy characterized by metabolic acidosis with normal anion gap secondary to abnormalities of renal acidification. RTA can be classified into four main subtypes: distal RTA, proximal RTA, combined proximal and distal RTA, and hyperkalemic RTA. Distal RTA (type 1) is caused by the defect of H(+) secretion in the distal tubules and is characterized by the inability to acidify the urine below pH 5.5 during systemic acidemia. Proximal RTA (type 2) is caused by an impairment of bicarbonate reabsorption in the proximal tubules and characterized by a decreased renal bicarbonate threshold. Combined proximal and distal RTA (type 3) secondary to a reduction in tubular reclamation of bicarbonate and an inability to acidify the urine in the face of severe acidemia. Hyperkalemic RTA (type 4) may occur as a result of aldosterone deficiency or tubular insensitivity to aldosterone. Clinicians should be alert to the presence of RTA in patients with an unexplained normal anion gap acidosis, hypokalemia, recurrent nephrolithiasis and nephrocalcinosis. The mainstay of treatment of RTA remains alkali replacement.

  8. Differing Causes of Lactic Acidosis and Deep Breathing in Cerebral Malaria and Severe Malarial Anemia May Explain Differences in Acidosis-Related Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Nathan R.; Opoka, Robert O.; Hamre, Karen E. S.

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acidosis (LA) is a marker for mortality in severe malaria, but the mechanisms that lead to LA in the different types of severe malaria and the extent to which LA-associated mortality differs by type of severe malaria are not well described. We assessed the frequency of LA in children admitted to Mulago Hospital, Kampala, Uganda with cerebral malaria (CM, n = 193) or severe malarial anemia (SMA, n = 216). LA was compared to mortality and measures of parasite biomass and sequestration (P. falciparum histidine-rich protein-2 (PfHRP2) concentration, platelet count), and to a measure of systemic tissue oxygen delivery (hemoglobin level). LA was more frequent in children with SMA than CM (SMA, 47.7%, CM, 34.2%, P = 0.006), but mortality was higher in children with CM (13.0%) than SMA (0.5%, P<0.0001). In CM, LA was associated with increased PfHRP2 concentration and decreased platelet count but was not associated with hemoglobin level. In contrast, in SMA, LA was associated with a decreased hemoglobin level, but was not associated with PfHRP2 concentration or platelet count. LA was related to mortality only in CM. In multivariable regression analysis of the effect PfHRP2 and hemoglobin levels on LA and DB, only PfHRP2 level increased risk of LA and DB in CM, while in SMA, elevated hemoglobin strongly decreased risk of LA and DB, and PfHRP2 level modestly increased risk of LA. The study findings suggest that LA in CM is due primarily to parasite sequestration, which currently has no effective adjunctive therapy, while LA in SMA is due primarily to anemia, which is rapidly corrected with blood transfusion. Differing etiologies of LA in CM and SMA may explain why LA is associated with mortality in CM but not SMA. PMID:27684745

  9. The effect of sodium bicarbonate on cytokine secretion in CKD patients with metabolic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Ori, Yaacov; Zingerman, Boris; Bergman, Michael; Bessler, Hanna; Salman, Hertzel

    2015-04-01

    The incidence of acidosis increases with the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Correction of acidosis by sodium bicarbonate may slow CKD deterioration. Inflammation, which is common in CKD, may be related to acidosis. Whether the slower rate of GFR decline following the correction of acidosis is related to changes in inflammatory markers is unknown. The current study examined whether correcting CKD-acidosis affected inflammatory cytokines secretion. Thirteen patients with CKD 4-5 and acidosis were tested for cytokines secretion from peripheral-blood mononuclear cells at baseline and after one month of oral sodium bicarbonate. Following treatment with sodium bicarbonate there was no change in weight, blood pressure, serum creatinine, albumin, sodium, calcium, phosphate, PTH, hemoglobin and CRP. Serum urea decreased (134±10-116±8 mg/dl, P=0.002), potassium decreased (5.1±0.4-4.8±0.1 mequiv./l, P=0.064), pH increased (7.29±0.01-7.33±0.01, P=0.008), and serum bicarbonate increased (18.6±0.4 mequiv./l to 21.3±0.3 mequiv./l, P=0.001). The secretion of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 decreased (2.75±0.25 ng/ml to 2.29±0.21 ng/ml, P=0.041). There was no significant change in the secretion of the other pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, TNFα, IFNγ, IL-1ra. Thus, correcting acidosis in CKD with bicarbonate decreases IL-10 secretion. Its significance needs to be further investigated.

  10. Adaptation of rabbit cortical collecting duct HCO3- transport to metabolic acidosis in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Tsuruoka, S; Schwartz, G J

    1996-01-01

    Net HCO3- transport in the rabbit kidney cortical collecting duct (CCD) is mediated by simultaneous H+ secretion and HCO3- secretion, most likely occurring in a alpha- and beta-intercalated cells (ICs), respectively. The polarity of net HCO3- transport is shifted from secretion to absorption after metabolic acidosis or acid incubation of the CCD. We investigated this adaptation by measuring net HCO3- flux before and after incubating CCDs 1 h at pH 6.8 followed by 2 h at pH 7.4. Acid incubation always reversed HCO3- flux from net secretion to absorption, whereas incubation for 3 h at pH 7.4 did not. Inhibition of alpha-IC function (bath CL- removal or DIDS, luminal bafilomycin) stimulated net HCO3- secretion by approximately 2 pmol/min per mm before acid incubation, whereas after incubation these agents inhibited net HCO3- absorption by approximately 5 pmol/min per mm. Inhibition of beta-IC function (luminal Cl- removal) inhibited HCO3- secretion by approximately 9 pmol/min per mm before incubation, whereas after incubation HCO3- absorption by only 3 pmol/min per mm. After acid incubation, luminal SCH28080 inhibited HCO3- absorption by only 5-15% vs the circa 90% inhibitory effect of bafilomycin. In outer CCDs, which contain fewer alpha-ICs than midcortical segments, the reversal in polarity of HCO3- flux was blunted after acid incubation. We conclude that the CCD adapts to low pH in vitro by downregulation HCO3- secretion in beta-ICs via decreased apical CL-/base exchang activity and upregulating HCO3- absorption in alpha-ICs via increased apical H+ -ATPase and basolateral CL-/base exchange activities. Whether or not there is a reversal of IC polarity or recruitment of gamma-ICs in this adaptation remains to be established. PMID:8613531

  11. Incidence, prevalence, severity, and risk factors for ruminal acidosis in feedlot steers during backgrounding, diet transition, and finishing.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Lopez, E; Wiese, B I; Hendrick, S; McKinnon, J J; McAllister, T A; Beauchemin, K A; Penner, G B

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the incidence, prevalence, severity, and risk factors for ruminal acidosis in feedlot steers during backgrounding, diet transition, and finishing. Steers were purchased from a local auction market (n = 250; mean ± SD; 330 ± 20.0 kg initial BW) and were grouped together with 28 steers fitted with a ruminal cannula (248 ± 25.5 kg initial BW). Steers were randomly allocated to 1 of 8 pens (3 to 4 cannulated steers per pen with a total of 35 steers/pen). The feeding period (143 d) was divided into 4 phases: backgrounding (BKGD; d 1 to 20), diet transition (TRAN; d 21 to 40), and the first (FIN1; d 41 to 91) and second half (FIN2; d 92 to 143) of finishing. The BKGD diet contained (% DM) barley silage (45.7%), barley grain (41.6%), canola meal (4.2%), and a pelleted mineral and vitamin supplement (8.5%). Steers were transitioned to a finishing diet containing (% DM) barley silage (5%), barley grain (80.9%), canola meal (4.9%), and a pelleted mineral and vitamin supplement (9.2%) using 4 transition diets. Feed was offered to achieve 5% refusals (as-is basis). Ruminal pH was recorded in cannulated steers every 10 min throughout the study, and feed refusals and BW were recorded at 2 wk intervals. Mean ruminal pH (P < 0.01) was 6.4, 6.3, 6.2, and 6.0 ± 0.01 during the BKGD, TRAN, FIN1, and FIN2, respectively. The duration (P < 0.01) pH < 5.5 was 4.1, 12.1, 78.7, and 194 ± 9.4 min/d during BKGD, TRAN, FIN1, and FIN2, respectively. Using a threshold of ruminal pH < 5.5 for at least 180 min to diagnose ruminal acidosis, incidence was defined as the number of times steers experienced ruminal acidosis during each period and prevalence was defined as the percentage of steers that experienced acidosis during each period. On average, the incidence rate (P < 0.01) of ruminal acidosis was 0.1, 0.3, 6.7, and 14.8 ± 0.97 episodes during BKGD, TRAN, FIN1, and FIN2, respectively. In the same order, the prevalence (P < 0.01) was 0.7, 1

  12. Contribution of individual superficial nephron segments to ammonium handling in chronic metabolic acidosis in the rat. Evidence for ammonia disequilibrium in the renal cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, E; Martin, D; Buerkert, J

    1985-01-01

    Ammonia entry along surface nephron segments of rats was studied with micropuncture techniques under control and chronic metabolic acidosis conditions. Tubule fluid was collected successively from sites at the end and beginning of the distal tubule and at the end of the proximal tubule of the same nephron. During chronic metabolic acidosis, ammonium excretion doubled. As anticipated, the ammonium concentration (TFNH+4) was significantly higher in proximal tubule fluid during acidosis, and ammonium delivery to end proximal sites increased from 19.4 +/- 2.3 to 34.0 +/- 3.2 pmol/min (P less than 0.001). Although chronic acidosis did not affect TFNH+4 at the beginning of the distal tubule, ammonium delivery to the end of the distal tubule increased from 5.72 +/- 0.97 to 9.88 +/- 0.97 pmol/min. In both control and acidotic groups ammonium delivery was lower (P less than 0.001) to end distal sites than to end proximal sites, indicating net loss in the intervening segment. This loss was greater during chronic metabolic acidosis (23.9 +/- 3.3 vs. 13.6 +/- 2.0 pmol/min in controls, P less than 0.025). In both groups net entry of ammonia, in similar amounts, occurred along the distal tubule (P less than 0.05). In situ pH averaged 6.80 +/- 0.05 at end proximal tubule sites and fell to 6.54 +/- 0.08 at the beginning of the distal tubule (P less than 0.005). Chronic metabolic acidosis did not affect these measurements. The calculated free ammonia at the end of the proximal tubule rose from 9.3 +/- 2.2 to 21 +/- 9 microM (P less than 0.005) during chronic metabolic acidosis, and was also higher at beginning distal sites during acidosis (8.8 +/- 2.4 vs. 2.7 +/- 0.7 microM in controls, P less than 0.05). In both groups ammonia values for the beginning distal tubule fluid were lower than for end proximal tubule fluid. Thus, loss of ammonium in the loop segment is enhanced by chronic metabolic acidosis. Distal entry of ammonia is markedly less than along the proximal tubule and does

  13. Sympathetic activation in exercise is not dependent on muscle acidosis. Direct evidence from studies in metabolic myopathies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vissing, J.; Vissing, S. F.; MacLean, D. A.; Saltin, B.; Quistorff, B.; Haller, R. G.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Muscle acidosis has been implicated as a major determinant of reflex sympathetic activation during exercise. To test this hypothesis we studied sympathetic exercise responses in metabolic myopathies in which muscle acidosis is impaired or augmented during exercise. As an index of reflex sympathetic activation to muscle, microneurographic measurements of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) were obtained from the peroneal nerve. MSNA was measured during static handgrip exercise at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction force to exhaustion in patients in whom exercise-induced muscle acidosis is absent (seven myophosphorylase deficient patients; MD [McArdle's disease], and one patient with muscle phosphofructokinase deficiency [PFKD]), augmented (one patient with mitochondrial myopathy [MM]), or normal (five healthy controls). Muscle pH was monitored by 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy during handgrip exercise in the five control subjects, four MD patients, and the MM and PFKD patients. With handgrip to exhaustion, the increase in MSNA over baseline (bursts per minute [bpm] and total activity [%]) was not impaired in patients with MD (17+/-2 bpm, 124+/-42%) or PFKD (65 bpm, 307%), and was not enhanced in the MM patient (24 bpm, 131%) compared with controls (17+/-4 bpm, 115+/-17%). Post-handgrip ischemia studied in one McArdle patient, caused sustained elevation of MSNA above basal suggesting a chemoreflex activation of MSNA. Handgrip exercise elicited an enhanced drop in muscle pH of 0.51 U in the MM patient compared with the decrease in controls of 0.13+/-0.02 U. In contrast, muscle pH increased with exercise in MD by 0.12+/-0.05 U and in PFKD by 0.01 U. In conclusion, patients with glycogenolytic, glycolytic, and oxidative phosphorylation defects show normal muscle sympathetic nerve responses to static exercise. These findings indicate that muscle acidosis is not a prerequisite for sympathetic activation in exercise.

  14. [Metformin- related lactic acidosis].

    PubMed

    Manes, Massimo; Pellu, Valentina; Caputo, Donatella; Molino, Andrea; Paternoster, Giuseppe; Gabrielli, Danila; Nebiolo, Pier Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acidosis metformin-related is a potentially fatal complication. Reviews show a stable prevalence of this phenomenon, but nephrological experience is required since it is frequently involved in therapeutic management. Here we report the cases of two old patients with severe lactic acidosis and acute renal failure treated with hemodiafiltration.

  15. Acute but not chronic metabolic acidosis potentiates the acetylcholine-induced reduction in blood pressure: an endothelium-dependent effect.

    PubMed

    Celotto, A C; Ferreira, L G; Capellini, V K; Albuquerque, A A S; Rodrigues, A J; Evora, P R B

    2016-02-01

    Metabolic acidosis has profound effects on vascular tone. This study investigated the in vivo effects of acute metabolic acidosis (AMA) and chronic metabolic acidosis (CMA) on hemodynamic parameters and endothelial function. CMA was induced by ad libitum intake of 1% NH4Cl for 7 days, and AMA was induced by a 3-h infusion of 6 M NH4Cl (1 mL/kg, diluted 1:10). Phenylephrine (Phe) and acetylcholine (Ach) dose-response curves were performed by venous infusion with simultaneous venous and arterial blood pressure monitoring. Plasma nitrite/nitrate (NOx) was measured by chemiluminescence. The CMA group had a blood pH of 7.15±0.03, which was associated with reduced bicarbonate (13.8±0.98 mmol/L) and no change in the partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2). The AMA group had a pH of 7.20±0.01, which was associated with decreases in bicarbonate (10.8±0.54 mmol/L) and PaCO2 (47.8±2.54 to 23.2±0.74 mmHg) and accompanied by hyperventilation. Phe or ACh infusion did not affect arterial or venous blood pressure in the CMA group. However, the ACh infusion decreased the arterial blood pressure (ΔBP: -28.0±2.35 mm Hg [AMA] to -4.5±2.89 mmHg [control]) in the AMA group. Plasma NOx was normal after CMA but increased after AMA (25.3±0.88 to 31.3±0.54 μM). These results indicate that AMA, but not CMA, potentiated the Ach-induced decrease in blood pressure and led to an increase in plasma NOx, reinforcing the effect of pH imbalance on vascular tone and blood pressure control.

  16. [Topiramate in monotherapy or in combination as a cause of metabolic acidosis in adults with epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Granados, Velvet J; Márquez-Romero, Juan M

    2015-02-16

    Objetivo. Determinar la frecuencia de acidosis metabolica y sus factores relacionados en pacientes tratados con topiramato solo o como adyuvante para el tratamiento de epilepsia. Pacientes y metodos. Analisis transversal de la gasometria arterial de pacientes epilepticos que recibieron topiramato durante 2010 en la clinica de epilepsia del Centro Medico Nacional 20 de Noviembre en Mexico. Se registraron datos clinicos concernientes a la epilepsia y su tratamiento, asi como de los sintomas comunes de acidosis metabolica. Resultados. Se estudiaron 32 adultos con epilepsia, quienes recibieron topiramato en monoterapia o en combinacion por lo menos durante un mes. Se encontro acidosis metabolica en todos los pacientes (HCO3 < 22 Eq/L); nueve tomaron solo topiramato y 23 tomaron por lo menos dos farmacos antiepilepticos (FAE). Todos los pacientes fueron asintomaticos. No se encontro correlacion entre los niveles de bicarbonato y la dosis del medicamento o la duracion del tratamiento. La dosis fue significativamente mayor en el grupo de monoterapia y el nivel de bicarbonato fue mas bajo en los pacientes que tomaban mas de un FAE. Conclusiones. El uso concomitante de FAE incrementa los efectos conocidos del topiramato sobre los niveles sericos de bicarbonato y la presencia de acidosis metabolica; estos efectos parecen ser independientes del numero de FAE utilizados.

  17. Old and new approaches to the interpretation of acid-base metabolism, starting from historical data applied to diabetic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Mioni, Roberto; Marega, Alessandra; Lo Cicero, Marco; Montanaro, Domenico

    2016-11-01

    The approach to acid-base chemistry in medicine includes several methods. Currently, the two most popular procedures are derived from Stewart's studies and from the bicarbonate/BE-based classical formulation. Another method, unfortunately little known, follows the Kildeberg theory applied to acid-base titration. By using the data produced by Dana Atchley in 1933, regarding electrolytes and blood gas analysis applied to diabetes, we compared the three aforementioned methods, in order to highlight their strengths and their weaknesses. The results obtained, by reprocessing the data of Atchley, have shown that Kildeberg's approach, unlike the other two methods, is consistent, rational and complete for describing the organ-physiological behavior of the hydrogen ion turnover in human organism. In contrast, the data obtained using the Stewart approach and the bicarbonate-based classical formulation are misleading and fail to specify which organs or systems are involved in causing or maintaining the diabetic acidosis. Stewart's approach, despite being considered 'quantitative', does not propose in any way the concept of 'an amount of acid' and becomes even more confusing, because it is not clear how to distinguish between 'strong' and 'weak' ions. As for Stewart's approach, the classical method makes no distinction between hydrogen ions managed by the intermediate metabolism and hydroxyl ions handled by the kidney, but, at least, it is based on the concept of titration (base-excess) and indirectly defines the concept of 'an amount of acid'. In conclusion, only Kildeberg's approach offers a complete understanding of the causes and remedies against any type of acid-base disturbance.

  18. Hypokalemic quadriparesis and rhabdomyolysis as a rare presentation of distal renal tubular acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad Bhat, Manzoor; Ahmad Laway, Bashir; Mustafa, Farhat; Shafi Kuchay, Mohammad; Mubarik, Idrees; Ahmad Palla, Nazir

    2014-01-01

    Distal renal tubular acidosis is a syndrome of abnormal urine acidification and is characterized by hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis, hypokalemia, hypercalciurea, nephrocalcinosis and nephrolithiasis. Despite the presence of persistent hypokalemia, acute muscular paralysis is rarely encountered in males. Here, we will report an eighteen year old male patient who presented with flaccid quadriparesis and was subsequently found to have rhabdomyolysis, severe short stature, skeletal deformities and primary distal renal tubular acidosis. PMID:25250276

  19. TASK channels are not required to mount an aldosterone secretory response to metabolic acidosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Guagliardo, Nick A.; Yao, Junlan; Bayliss, Douglas A.; Barrett, Paula Q.

    2010-01-01

    The stimulation of aldosterone production by acidosis enhances proton excretion and serves to limit disturbances in systemic acid-base equilibrium. Yet, the mechanisms by which protons stimulate aldosterone production from cells of the adrenal cortex remain largely unknown. TWIK-related acid sensitive K channels (TASK) are inhibited by extracellular protons within the physiological range and have emerged as important regulators of aldosterone production in the adrenal cortex. Here we show that congenic C57BL/6J mice with genetic deletion of TASK-1 (K2P3.1) and TASK-3 (K2P9.1) channel subunits overproduce aldosterone and display an enhanced sensitivity to steroidogenic stimuli, including a more pronounced steroidogenic response to chronic NH4Cl loading. Thus, we conclude that TASK channels are not required for the stimulation of aldosterone production by protons but their inhibition by physiological acidosis may contribute to full expression of the steroidogenic response. PMID:21111026

  20. Physiological and molecular responses of the goldfish (Carassius auratus) kidney to metabolic acidosis, and potential mechanisms of renal ammonia transport.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Michael J; Wright, Patricia A; Wood, Chris M

    2015-07-01

    Relative to the gills, the mechanisms by which the kidney contributes to ammonia and acid-base homeostasis in fish are poorly understood. Goldfish were exposed to a low pH environment (pH 4.0, 48 h), which induced a characteristic metabolic acidosis and an increase in total plasma [ammonia] but reduced plasma ammonia partial pressure (PNH3). In the kidney tissue, total ammonia, lactate and intracellular pH remained unchanged. The urinary excretion rate of net base under control conditions changed to net acid excretion under low pH, with contributions from both the NH4 (+) (∼30%) and titratable acidity minus bicarbonate (∼70%; TA-HCO3 (-)) components. Inorganic phosphate (Pi), urea and Na(+) excretion rates were also elevated while Cl(-) excretion rates were unchanged. Renal alanine aminotransferase activity increased under acidosis. The increase in renal ammonia excretion was due to significant increases in both the glomerular filtration and the tubular secretion rates of ammonia, with the latter accounting for ∼75% of the increase. There was also a 3.5-fold increase in the mRNA expression of renal Rhcg-b (Rhcg1) mRNA. There was no relationship between ammonia secretion and Na(+) reabsorption. These data indicate that increased renal ammonia secretion during acidosis is probably mediated through Rhesus (Rh) glycoproteins and occurs independently of Na(+) transport, in contrast to branchial and epidermal models of Na(+)-dependent ammonia transport in freshwater fish. Rather, we propose a model of parallel H(+)/NH3 transport as the primary mechanism of renal tubular ammonia secretion that is dependent on renal amino acid catabolism.

  1. Type IV renal tubular acidosis and spironolactone therapy in the elderly.

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, J. E.; Colledge, N. R.

    1993-01-01

    Spironolactone therapy is a well-known cause of hyperkalaemia, but in susceptible patient, it may also be associated with metabolic acidosis. We report a case of severe renal tubular acidosis (Type IV) with life-threatening hyperkalaemia caused by spironolactone, and discuss the mechanisms by which this may occur. PMID:8290440

  2. [Tubular renal acidosis].

    PubMed

    Seidowsky, A; Moulonguet-Doleris, L; Hanslik, T; Yattara, H; Ayari, H; Rouveix, E; Massy, Z A; Prinseau, J

    2014-01-01

    Renal tubular acidosis (RTAs) are a group of metabolic disorders characterized by metabolic acidosis with normal plasma anion gap. There are three main forms of RTA: a proximal RTA called type II and a distal RTA (type I and IV). The RTA type II is a consequence of the inability of the proximal tubule to reabsorb bicarbonate. The distal RTA is associated with the inability to excrete the daily acid load and may be associated with hyperkalaemia (type IV) or hypokalemia (type I). The most common etiology of RTA type IV is the hypoaldosteronism. The RTAs can be complicated by nephrocalcinosis and obstructive nephrolithiasis. Alkalinization is the cornerstone of treatment.

  3. Glucocorticoid activity and metabolism with NaCl-induced low-grade metabolic acidosis and oral alkalization: results of two randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Buehlmeier, Judith; Remer, Thomas; Frings-Meuthen, Petra; Maser-Gluth, Christiane; Heer, Martina

    2016-04-01

    Low-grade metabolic acidosis (LGMA), as induced by high dietary acid load or sodium chloride (NaCl) intake, has been shown to increase bone and protein catabolism. Underlying mechanisms are not fully understood, but from clinical metabolic acidosis interactions of acid-base balance with glucocorticoid (GC) metabolism are known. We aimed to investigate GC activity/metabolism under alkaline supplementation and NaCl-induced LGMA. Eight young, healthy, normal-weight men participated in two crossover designed interventional studies. In Study A, two 10-day high NaCl diet (32 g/d) periods were conducted, one supplemented with 90 mmol KHCO3/day. In Study B, participants received a high and a low NaCl diet (31 vs. 3 g/day), each for 14 days. During low NaCl, the diet was moderately acidified by replacement of a bicarbonate-rich mineral water (consumed during high NaCl) with a non-alkalizing drinking water. In repeatedly collected 24-h urine samples, potentially bioactive-free GCs (urinary-free cortisol + free cortisone) were analyzed, as well as tetrahydrocortisol (THF), 5α-THF, and tetrahydrocortisone (THE). With supplementation of 90 mmol KHCO3, the marker of total adrenal GC secretion (THF + 5α-THF + THE) dropped (p = 0.047) and potentially bioactive-free GCs were reduced (p = 0.003). In Study B, however, GC secretion and potentially bioactive-free GCs did not exhibit the expected fall with NaCl-reduction as net acid excretion was raised by 30 mEq/d. Diet-induced acidification/alkalization affects GC activity and metabolism, which in case of long-term ingestion of habitually acidifying western diets may constitute an independent risk factor for bone degradation and cardiometabolic diseases.

  4. Acidosis-Induced Dysfunction of Cortical GABAergic Neurons through Astrocyte-Related Excitotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Sudong; Zhu, Yan; Wang, Jin-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Background Acidosis impairs cognitions and behaviors presumably by acidification-induced changes in neuronal metabolism. Cortical GABAergic neurons are vulnerable to pathological factors and their injury leads to brain dysfunction. How acidosis induces GABAergic neuron injury remains elusive. As the glia cells and neurons interact each other, we intend to examine the role of the astrocytes in acidosis-induced GABAergic neuron injury. Results Experiments were done at GABAergic cells and astrocytes in mouse cortical slices. To identify astrocytic involvement in acidosis-induced impairment, we induced the acidification in single GABAergic neuron by infusing proton intracellularly or in both neurons and astrocytes by using proton extracellularly. Compared the effects of intracellular acidification and extracellular acidification on GABAergic neurons, we found that their active intrinsic properties and synaptic outputs appeared more severely impaired in extracellular acidosis than intracellular acidosis. Meanwhile, extracellular acidosis deteriorated glutamate transporter currents on the astrocytes and upregulated excitatory synaptic transmission on the GABAergic neurons. Moreover, the antagonists of glutamate NMDA-/AMPA-receptors partially reverse extracellular acidosis-induced injury in the GABAergic neurons. Conclusion Our studies suggest that acidosis leads to the dysfunction of cortical GABAergic neurons by astrocyte-mediated excitotoxicity, in addition to their metabolic changes as indicated previously. PMID:26474076

  5. Proteomic profiling of the effect of metabolic acidosis on the apical membrane of the proximal convoluted tubule

    PubMed Central

    Walmsley, Scott J.; Freund, Dana M.

    2012-01-01

    The physiological response to the onset of metabolic acidosis requires pronounced changes in renal gene expression. Adaptations within the proximal convoluted tubule support the increased extraction of plasma glutamine and the increased synthesis and transport of glucose and of NH4+ and HCO3− ions. Many of these adaptations involve proteins associated with the apical membrane. To quantify the temporal changes in these proteins, proteomic profiling was performed using brush-border membrane vesicles isolated from proximal convoluted tubules (BBMVPCT) that were purified from normal and acidotic rats. This preparation is essentially free of contaminating apical membranes from other renal cortical cells. The analysis identified 298 proteins, 26% of which contained one or more transmembrane domains. Spectral counts were used to assess changes in protein abundance. The onset of acidosis produced a twofold, but transient, increase in the Na+-dependent glucose transporter and a more gradual, but sustained, increase (3-fold) in the Na+-dependent lactate transporter. These changes were associated with the loss of glycolytic and gluconeogenic enzymes that are contained in the BBMVPCT isolated from normal rats. In addition, the levels of γ-glutamyltranspeptidase increased twofold, while transporters that participate in the uptake of neutral amino acids, including glutamine, were decreased. These changes could facilitate the deamidation of glutamine within the tubular lumen. Finally, pronounced increases were also observed in the levels of DAB2 (3-fold) and myosin 9 (7-fold), proteins that may participate in endocytosis of apical membrane proteins. Western blot analysis and accurate mass and time analyses were used to validate the spectral counting. PMID:22357915

  6. Rumen microbial abundance and fermentation profile during severe subacute ruminal acidosis and its modulation by plant derived alkaloids in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mickdam, Elsayed; Khiaosa-Ard, Ratchaneewan; Metzler-Zebeli, Barbara U; Klevenhusen, Fenja; Chizzola, Remigius; Zebeli, Qendrim

    2016-06-01

    Rumen microbiota have important metabolic functions for the host animal. This study aimed at characterizing changes in rumen microbial abundances and fermentation profiles using a severe subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) in vitro model, and to evaluate a potential modulatory role of plant derived alkaloids (PDA), containing quaternary benzophenanthridine and protopine alkaloids, of which sanguinarine and chelerythrine were the major bioactive compounds. Induction of severe SARA strongly affected the rumen microbial composition and fermentation variables without suppressing the abundance of total bacteria. Protozoa and fungi were more sensitive to the low ruminal pH condition than bacteria. Induction of severe SARA clearly depressed degradation of fiber (P < 0.001), which came along with a decreased relative abundance of fibrolytic Ruminococcus albus and Fibrobacter succinogenes (P < 0.001). Under severe SARA conditions, the genus Prevotella, Lactobacillus group, Megasphaera elsdenii, and Entodinium spp. (P < 0.001) were more abundant, whereas Ruminobacter amylophilus was less abundant. SARA largely suppressed methane formation (-70%, P < 0.001), although total methanogenic 16S rRNA gene abundance was not affected. According to principal component analysis, Methanobrevibacter spp. correlated to methane concentration. Addition of PDA modulated ruminal fermentation under normal conditions such as enhanced (P < 0.05) concentration of total SCFA, propionate and valerate, and increased (P < 0.05) degradation of crude protein compared with the unsupplemented control diet. Our results indicate strong shifts in the microbial community during severe SARA compared to normal conditions. Supplementation of PDA positively modulates ruminal fermentation under normal ruminal pH conditions.

  7. Life threatening hyperkalemia and acidosis secondary to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole treatment.

    PubMed

    Margassery, S; Bastani, B

    2001-01-01

    We present a 77-year-old male with moderate chronic renal insufficiency from diabetic nephropathy who developed severe metabolic acidosis and life threatening hyperkalemia on treatment with regular dose of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMZ) for urinary tract infection. The metabolic acidosis and hyperkalemia resolved upon appropriate medical intervention and discontinuation of TMP-SMZ. While hyperkalemia has commonly been reported with high dose of TMP-SMZ, severe metabolic acidosis is quite uncommon with regular dose TMP-SMZ. We emphasize that patients with renal tubular acidosis (RTA), renal insufficiency, aldosterone deficiency, old age with reduced renal mass and function, and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitor therapy are at high risk of developing these severe and potentially life threatening complications.

  8. Metformin-associated lactic acidosis precipitated by diarrhea.

    PubMed

    El-Hennawy, Adel S; Jacob, Sunitha; Mahmood, Aza K

    2007-01-01

    Metformin-associated lactic acidosis (MALA) is a serious metabolic complication that occurs because of metformin accumulation in patients who become dehydrated or developed acute renal failure. Bicarbonate hemodialysis treatment should take place early in the course of management, especially in patients with severe metabolic acidosis who fail to respond to intravenous bicarbonate therapy or in whom renal failure is present. We report a case of MALA in which acute renal failure resulting from dehydration secondary to diarrhea and poor oral intake likely caused MALA. Early recognition of this condition and initiation of effective treatment can improve outcome.

  9. Lactic acidosis in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Held-Warmkessel, Jeanne; Dell, Deena Damsky

    2014-10-01

    Lactic acidosis is the most common metabolic acidosis in hospitalized patients-the result from an underlying pathogenic process. To successfully manage lactic acid production, its cause needs to be eliminated. Patients with cancer have many risk factors for developing lactic acidosis, including the cancer diagnosis itself. Patients with lactic acidosis are critically ill, requiring an intense level of nursing care with accompanying frequent cardiopulmonary and renal assessments. The mortality rate from lactic acidosis is high. Therefore, appropriate nursing interventions may include end-of-life and palliative care.

  10. Chronic Metabolic Acidosis Activates Renal Tubular Sodium Chloride Cotransporter through Angiotension II-dependent WNK4-SPAK Phosphorylation Pathway.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yu-Wei; Yang, Sung-Sen; Cheng, Chih-Jen; Tseng, Min-Hua; Hsu, Hui-Min; Lin, Shih-Hua

    2016-01-05

    The mechanism by which chronic metabolic acidosis (CMA) regulates sodium (Na(+))-chloride (Cl(-)) cotransporter (NCC) in the renal distal convoluted tubules remains unexplored. We examined the role of STE20/SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) and with-no-lysine kinase 4 (WNK4) on expression of NCC in mouse models of CMA. CMA was induced by NH4Cl in wild type mice (WTA mice), SPAK, and WNK4 knockout mice. The quantities of Ncc mRNA, expression of total NCC, phosphorylated (p)-NCC, SPAK and WNK4 in the kidneys as well as NCC inhibition with hydrochlorothiazide and Na(+) balance were evaluated. Relative to WT mice, WTA mice had similar levels of Ncc mRNA, but increased expression of total and p-NCC, SPAK, and WNK4 and an exaggerated response to hydrochlorothiazide which could not be observed in SPAK or WNK4 knockout mice with CMA. In WTA mice, increased plasma renin activity, aldosterone and angiotensin II concentrations accompanied by a significantly negative Na(+) balance. High Na(+) diet abolished the enhanced NCC expression in WTA mice. Furthermore, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker rather than a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist exerted a marked inhibition on Na(+) reabsorption and NCC phosphorylation in WTA mice. CMA increases WNK4-SPAK-dependent NCC phosphorylation and appears to be secondary to previous natriuresis with volume-dependent angiotensin II activation.

  11. Chronic metabolic acidosis may be the cause of cachexia: body fluid pH correction may be an effective therapy.

    PubMed

    Drochioiu, Gabi

    2008-01-01

    Cachexia is a pathological state characterized by weight loss and protein mobilization during various diseases. Nutritional supplementation or appetite stimulants are unable to restore the loss of lean body mass. Agents interfering with TNF-alpha have not been very successful to date. Only eicosapentaenoic acid was able to interfere with the action of proteolysis-inducing factors. An acceleration of proteolysis and branched-chain amino acid oxidation was correlated with chronic metabolic acidosis. Therefore, we suggest here that the main cause of cachexia is the increased acidity of the body fluids, which results in a higher and non-specific proteolysis of muscle proteins. Moderate hypoxia might be close related to lactic acid production within the whole body, not only in the cancer cells. Anorexia seems to be a consequence, but a cause of cachexia: the cachectic patients are in fact well fed, unfortunately they use fatty acids from their fat and glucose via muscle proteins, amino acids, alanine, and lactic acid. Our hypothesis is consistent with the most findings reported in literature and opens new ways for cachexia prevention and therapy, such as pH correction or higher oxygenation.

  12. Respiratory acidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names Ventilatory failure; Respiratory failure; Acidosis - respiratory Images Respiratory system References Effros RM, Swenson ER. Acid-base balance. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016: ...

  13. Hyperkalemic distal renal tubular acidosis caused by immunosuppressant treatment with tacrolimus in a liver transplant patient: case report.

    PubMed

    Riveiro-Barciela, M; Campos-Varela, I; Tovar, J L; Vargas, V; Simón-Talero, M; Ventura-Cots, M; Crespo, M; Bilbao, I; Castells, L

    2011-12-01

    Nephrotoxicity is one of the most common side effects of long-term immunosuppressive therapy with calcineurin inhibitors. We describe a case of distal renal tubular acidosis secondary to tacrolimus administration. A 43-year-old man with end-stage liver disease due to hepatitis C and B virus infections and alcoholic cirrhosis received a liver transplantation under immunosuppressive treatment with tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil. In the postoperative period, the patient developed hyperkalemic hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis, with a normal serum anion gap and a positive urinary anion gap, suggesting distal renal tubular acidosis. We excluded other causes of hyperkalemia. Administration of intravenous bicarbonate, loop diuretics, and oral resin exchanger corrected the acidosis and potassium levels. Distal renal tubular acidosis is one of several types of nephrotoxicity induced by tacrolimus treatment, resulting from inhibition of potassium secretion in the collecting duct. Treatment to correct the acidosis and hyperkalemia should be promptly initiated, and the tacrolimus dose adjusted when possible.

  14. Use of Lactated Ringer’s solution does not eliminate the risk of strong ion difference-related metabolic acidosis following on-pump cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Jovaisa, T; Vicka, V; Linkaitė, G; Guseinovaitė, J; Ringaitienė, D; Norkienė, I

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the effects of plasma sodium levels on postoperative outcomes. A trend of using balanced crystalloid solutions is based on the extensive data on chloride and the strong ion difference-related acidosis. However, effects of sodium are often overlooked in this context. The aim of the study was to establish the effects of the routine use of Lactated Ringer’s Solution (RL) on postoperative changes in sodium concentrations and whether these changes result in metabolic acidosis. We performed database analysis of 358 consecutive elective on-pump cardiac surgery cases in a tertiary referral university hospital. Approval from the institutional ethics committee was obtained for this study. Intraoperative fluid balance was 2726±1073 ml and the total volume of intravenous infusions in the first 24 hours was 5865 (±1073) ml, 95% of which was RL; 58% of the patients had metabolic acidosis with a base excess below (–)2 mmol L–1 on arrival at the intensive care unit. There was a significant correlation between a strong ion difference and base excess (p less than 0.01). A significant improvement in metabolic acidosis was noted within the first 24 hours, from a base excess of (–)2.49±2.8 to 0.32±2.6 mmol L–1 (p less than 0.001). All of the improvement in the base excess is explained by a change in the strong ion difference from the mean value of 31±4.3 to 34.2±3.6 mmol L–1 (p less than 0.001). Changes in the strong ion difference were primarily driven by changes in the serum sodium concentration, which were three-fold higher compared to those of chloride [–2.36 (±2.6) mmol L–1 (p less than 0.001) and 0.84 (±3.2) mmol L–1, respectively (p = 0.01)]. In conclusion, our data confirm that there is a direct correlation between a strong ion difference and base excess following on-pump cardiac surgery. The use of RL prevented significant hyperchloraemia, but did not eliminate the risk of strong ion difference-related metabolic acidosis. The

  15. Hyperlipidaemia alone and in combination with acidosis can increase the incidence and severity of statin-induced myotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Taha, Dhiaa A; Zgair, Atheer; Lee, Jong Bong; de Moor, Cornelia H; Barrett, David A; Bruce, Kimberley D; Sungelo, Mitchell; Eckel, Robert H; Gershkovich, Pavel

    2017-03-30

    The association of lipophilic statins with plasma lipoproteins in the presence of disturbed acid-base balance can modify the pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of these drugs, resulting in alteration in their efficacy and toxicity profiles. The purpose of this study is to elucidate the role of hyperlipidaemia alone or in combination with acidosis/alkalosis in the development and potentiation of statin-induced myotoxicity. Statins association with plasma lipoproteins was examined under conditions of physiological and altered pH levels. The effect of this association on cellular uptake and myotoxicity of statins was also assessed at different pH levels using C2C12 cells that overexpress lipoprotein lipase. Lipophilic simvastatin displayed considerable association with the non-polar lipoprotein fractions (triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and low-density lipoprotein). This association contributed to increased cellular uptake of simvastatin by C2C12 cells through lipoprotein lipase-mediated process, resulting in enhanced muscle toxicity in hyperlipidaemic conditions. Furthermore, a combination of low pH environment (representing acidosis) and hyperlipidaemia increased the association of simvastatin with plasma lipoproteins causing potentiation of cellular uptake and myotoxicity of this drug. Comorbidities such as hyperlipidaemia, especially when coincident with acidosis, can enhance statin-associated muscle toxicity, and therefore require extra caution by prescribing clinicians. Hydrophilic rather than lipophilic statins could be a preferable choice in this patient population.

  16. Metformin-associated lactic acidosis treated with continuous renal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Akihide; Suzuki, Kei; Imai, Hiroshi; Katayama, Naoyuki

    2017-02-10

    Metformin-associated lactic acidosis (MALA) is a rare but life-threatening complication. We report a case of MALA in a man aged 71 years who was treated with continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). The patient was brought to the hospital for prolonged and gradual worsening gastrointestinal symptoms. Although he received intravenous treatment, he developed catecholamine-resistant shock, and blood gas analysis revealed lactic acidosis. Bicarbonate and antibiotics for possible sepsis were initiated, but with no clear benefit. Owing to haemodynamic instability with metabolic acidosis, urgent CRRT was given: it was immediately effective in reducing lactate levels; pH values completely normalised within 18 hours, and he was stabilised. MALA sometimes presents with non-specific symptoms, and is important to consider when treating unexplainable metabolic acidosis. In severe cases, CRRT has potential merit, particularly in haemodynamically unstable patients. It is important to be familiar with MALA as a medical emergency, even for emergency physicians.

  17. Localization and hormonal control of serine dehydratase during metabolic acidosis differ markedly from those of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Tohru; Ogawa, Hirofumi; Matsushima, Takako; Kawamata, Seiichi; Sasahara, Masakiyo; Kuroda, Kazunari; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Takata, Yoshimi; Yamazaki, Mitsuaki; Takusagawa, Fusao; Pitot, Henry C

    2003-08-01

    Serine dehydratase (SDH) is abundant in the rat liver but scarce in the kidney. When administrated with dexamethasone, the renal SDH activity was augmented 20-fold, whereas the hepatic SDH activity was affected little. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry revealed that SDH was localized to the proximal straight tubule of the nephron. To address the role of this hormone, rats were made acidotic by gavage of NH(4)Cl. Twenty-two hours later, the SDH activity was increased three-fold along with a six-fold increment in the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) activity, a rate-limiting enzyme of gluconeogenesis. PEPCK, which is localized to the proximal tubules under the normal condition, spreads throughout the entire cortex to the outer medullary rays by acidosis, whereas SDH does not change regardless of treatment with dexamethasone or NH(4)Cl. When NH(4)Cl was given to adrenalectomized rats, in contrast to the SDH activity no longer increasing, the PEPCK activity responded to acidosis to the same extent as in the intact rats. A simultaneous administration of dexamethasone and NH(4)Cl into the adrenalectomized rats fully restored the SDH activity, demonstrating that the rise in the SDH activity during acidosis is primarily controlled by glucocorticoids. The present findings clearly indicate that the localization of SDH and its hormonal regulation during acidosis are strikingly different from those of PEPCK.

  18. (Uncommon) Mechanisms of Branchial Ammonia Excretion in the Common Carp (Cyprinus carpio) in Response to Environmentally Induced Metabolic Acidosis.

    PubMed

    Wright, Patricia A; Wood, Chris M; Hiroi, Junya; Wilson, Jonathan M

    2016-01-01

    Freshwater fishes generally increase ammonia excretion in acidic waters. The new model of ammonia transport in freshwater fish involves an association between the Rhesus (Rh) protein Rhcg-b, the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE), and a suite of other membrane transporters. We tested the hypothesis that Rhcg-b and NHE3 together play a critical role in branchial ammonia excretion in common carp (Cyprinus carpio) chronically exposed to a low-pH environment. Carp were exposed to three sequential environmental treatments-control pH 7.6 water (24 h), pH 4.0 water (72 h), and recovery pH 7.6 water (24 h)-or in a separate series were simply exposed to either control (72 h) or pH 4.0 (72 h) water. Branchial ammonia excretion was increased by ∼2.5-fold in the acid compared with the control period, despite the absence of an increase in the plasma-to-water partial pressure NH3 gradient. Alanine aminotransferase activity was higher in the gills of fish exposed to pH 4 versus control water, suggesting that ammonia may be generated in gill tissue. Gill Rhcg-b and NHE3b messenger RNA levels were significantly elevated in acid-treated relative to control fish, but at the protein level Rhcg-b decreased (30%) and NHE3b increased (2-fold) in response to water of pH 4.0. Using immunofluorescence microscopy, NHE3b and Rhcg-b were found to be colocalized to ionocytes along the interlamellar space of the filament of control fish. After 72 h of acid exposure, Rhcg-b staining almost disappeared from this region, and NHE3b was more prominent along the lamellae. We propose that ammoniagenesis within the gill tissue itself is responsible for the higher rates of branchial ammonia excretion during chronic metabolic acidosis. Unexpectedly, gill Rhcg-b does not appear to be important in gill ammonia transport in low-pH water, but the strong induction of NHE3b suggests that some NH4(+) may be eliminated directly in exchange for Na(+). These findings contrast with previous studies in larval zebrafish

  19. Endolymphatic sac enlargement in a girl with a novel mutation for distal renal tubular acidosis and severe deafness.

    PubMed

    Nikki, Rink; Martin, Bitzan; Gus, O'Gorman; Mato, Nagel; Elena, Torban; Paul, Goodyer

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA) is caused by mutations of genes encoding subunits of the H(+)-ATPase (ATP6V0A4 and ATP6V1B1) expressed in α-intercalated cells of the distal renal tubule and in the cochlea. We report on a 2-year-old girl with distal RTA and profound speech delay which was initially misdiagnosed as autism. Genetic analysis showed compound heterozygous mutations with one known and one novel mutation of the ATP6V1B1 gene; cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed bilateral enlargement of the endolymphatic sacs of the inner ear. With improved cooperation, audiometric testing showed that hearing loss was most profound on the right, where endolymphatic sac enlargement was greatest, demonstrating a clear link between the degree of deafness and the degree of inner ear abnormality. This case indicates the value of MRI for diagnosis of inner ear involvement in very young children with distal RTA. Although citrate therapy quickly corrects the acidosis and restores growth, early diagnosis of deafness is crucial so that hearing aids can be used to assist acquisition of speech and to provide enough auditory nerve stimulation to assure the affected infants remain candidates for cochlear implantation.

  20. [Gastric emptying and metabolic acidosis. II. Study, in an experimental model in rats, of gastric retention of a sodium bicarbonate solution].

    PubMed

    Belangero, V M; Collares, E F

    1992-01-01

    The gastric emptying of a 0.25 M sodium bicarbonate solution was studied in rats with metabolic acidosis induced by a previous (6 hours) orogastric infusion of a 0.5 M ammonium chloride solution. Two control groups were used: one previously infused with 0.5 M sodium chloride and the other with water, in the same volume that further solutions. Every animal was fed with 2 ml/100 g of its weight of these solutions. The test meal (bicarbonate solution) was utilized containing 6 mg% red fenol as a marker. The gastric retentions were determined 6 hours after those first meals at 5, 10, 20 and 30 minutes. The results demonstrated that the gastric retentions of the bicarbonate solution were significantly lower in the acidotic group than that one of water group (at 20 minutes) and that one of the sodium chloride (at 10, 20 and 30 minutes). The data here presented suggest that metabolic acidosis accelerates the gastric emptying of a sodium bicarbonate solution.

  1. [D-Lactic acidosis secondary to short bowel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Tapia Guerrero, M J; Olveira, G; Bravo Utrera, M; Colomo Rodríguez, N; Fernández García, J C

    2010-01-01

    The short bowel syndrome appears for the reduction of intestinal absorptive surface due to functional or anatomical loss of part of the small bowel. We present the case of a 35-year-old woman with severe short bowel syndrome secondary to acute intestinal ischemia in adults, who presented at 5 years of evolution episodes of dizziness with gait instability and loss of strength in hands. The diagnosis was D-lactic acidosis. D-lactic acidosis is a rare complication, but important for their symptoms, of this syndrome. It is due to a change in intestinal flora secondary to an overgrowth of lactic acid bacteria that produce D-lactate. D-lactic acidosis should be looked for in cases of metabolic acidosis in which the identity of acidosis is not apparent, neurological manifestations without focality and the patient has short bowel syndrome or patients who have had jejunoileal bypass surgery. Appropriate treatment usually results in resolution of neurologic symptoms and prevents or reduces further recurrences.

  2. Acidosis Activates Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Pathways through GPR4 in Human Vascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Lixue; Krewson, Elizabeth A.; Yang, Li V.

    2017-01-01

    Acidosis commonly exists in the tissue microenvironment of various pathophysiological conditions such as tumors, inflammation, ischemia, metabolic disease, and respiratory disease. For instance, the tumor microenvironment is characterized by acidosis and hypoxia due to tumor heterogeneity, aerobic glycolysis (the “Warburg effect”), and the defective vasculature that cannot efficiently deliver oxygen and nutrients or remove metabolic acid byproduct. How the acidic microenvironment affects the function of blood vessels, however, is not well defined. GPR4 (G protein-coupled receptor 4) is a member of the proton-sensing G protein-coupled receptors and it has high expression in endothelial cells (ECs). We have previously reported that acidosis induces a broad inflammatory response in ECs. Acidosis also increases the expression of several endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response genes such as CHOP (C/EBP homologous protein) and ATF3 (activating transcription factor 3). In the current study, we have examined acidosis/GPR4-induced ER stress pathways in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and other types of ECs. All three arms of the ER stress/unfolded protein response (UPR) pathways were activated by acidosis in ECs as an increased expression of phosphorylated eIF2α (eukaryotic initiation factor 2α), phosphorylated IRE1α (inositol-requiring enzyme 1α), and cleaved ATF6 upon acidic pH treatment was observed. The expression of other downstream mediators of the UPR, such as ATF4, ATF3, and spliced XBP-1 (X box-binding protein 1), was also induced by acidosis. Through genetic and pharmacological approaches to modulate the expression level or activity of GPR4 in HUVEC, we found that GPR4 plays an important role in mediating the ER stress response induced by acidosis. As ER stress/UPR can cause inflammation and cell apoptosis, acidosis/GPR4-induced ER stress pathways in ECs may regulate vascular growth and inflammatory response in the acidic microenvironment

  3. Interaction between bunk management and monensin concentration on finishing performance, feeding behavior, and ruminal metabolism during an acidosis challenge with feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Erickson, G E; Milton, C T; Fanning, K C; Cooper, R J; Swingle, R S; Parrott, J C; Vogel, G; Klopfenstein, T J

    2003-11-01

    Two commercial feedlot experiments and a metabolism study were conducted to evaluate the effects of monensin concentrations and bunk management strategies on performance, feed intake, and ruminal metabolism. In the feedlot experiments, 1,793 and 1,615 steers were used in Exp. 1 and 2, respectively, in 18 pens for each experiment (six pens/treatment). Three treatments were evaluated: 1) ad libitum bunk management with 28.6 mg/kg monensin and clean bunk management strategies with either 2) 28.6 or 3) 36.3 mg/kg monensin. In both experiments, 54 to 59% of the clean bunk pens were clean at targeted clean time, or 2200, compared with 24 to 28% of the ad libitum pens. However, only 13% of the pens were clean by 2000 in Exp. 1 (summer), whereas 44% of the pens in Exp. 2 (winter) were clean by 2000. In Exp. 1, bunk management and monensin concentration did not affect carcass-adjusted performance. In Exp. 2, steers fed ad libitum had greater DMI (P < 0.01) and carcass-adjusted ADG (P < 0.01) but feed efficiency (P > 0.13) similar to that of clean bunk-fed steers. Monensin concentration had no effect on carcass-adjusted performance (P > 0.20) in either experiment. A metabolism experiment was conducted with eight fistulated steers in a replicated 4 x 4 Latin square acidosis challenge experiment. An acidosis challenge was imposed by feeding 125% of the previous day's DMI, 4 h later than normal. Treatments consisted of monensin concentrations (mg/kg) of 0, 36.7, 48.9, or 36.7 until challenged and switched to 48.9 on the challenge day and 4 d following. Each replicate of the Latin square was managed with separate bunk management strategies (clean bunk or ad libitum). Feeding any concentration of monensin increased number of meals and decreased DMI rate (%/h) (P < 0.12) for the 4 d following the acidosis challenge. Meal size, pH change, and pH variance were lower (P < 0.10) for steers fed monensin with clean bunk management. However, no monensin effect was observed for steers fed

  4. Enterolobium contortisiliquum is a cause of acute ruminal acidosis in sheep.

    PubMed

    Pupin, Rayane C; Leal, Paula V; Lima, Stephanie C; Melo, Gleice Kelli A; Pott, Arnildo; Araújo, Marcelo A; Barros, Claudio S L; Lemos, Ricardo A A

    2017-02-01

    The ingestion of pods of Enterolobium contortisiliquum is associated with digestive disturbances, photosensitivity and abortion in domestic ruminants. This experiment was designed to test the hypothesis that digestive disturbances in this toxicosis are really caused by acute ruminal acidosis. Three sheep fed large doses (10-15 g/kg/body weight [bw]) of E. contortisiliquum pods developed ruminal acidosis and were treated with sodium bicarbonate to try to control this metabolic disturbance, thus providing additional evidence of the involvement of ruminal acidosis in the pathogenesis of toxicosis. Two of the sheep died, and one recovered after treatment. In the two sheep that developed severe signs of ruminal acidosis, the values of blood lactate were 18 mg/dL and 196.88 mg/dL, indicating metabolic acidosis as the cause of death. Additionally, four sheep developed elevated serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase and gamma glutamyl transferase, indicating that the pods had hepatotoxic effects. Necropsy findings included the accentuation of the hepatic lobular pattern and multiple focally extensive red areas in the rumen mucosa and on the surface of the liver. Repeated ingestion of small doses induced tolerance but did not induce cumulative effects. Histopathologically, the epithelial mucosa of the rumen and reticulum exhibited swollen and vacuolated epithelia with intraepithelial pustules. Focal ulceration of the mucosa was also observed. Multifocal vacuolar degeneration of hepatocytes and scattered individual hepatocellular necrosis were evident in the liver. We concluded that the main clinical manifestation of intoxication by E. contortisiliquum pods in sheep was acute ruminal lactic acidosis and metabolic acidosis. Ingestion of repeated sublethal doses could stimulate proliferation of the ruminal fauna that degrades the sugar present in the pods, and thereby prevent the occurrence of ruminal acidosis. The plant is also hepatotoxic, and no abortions were

  5. Rumen microbial and fermentation characteristics are affected differently by acarbose addition during two nutritional types of simulated severe subacute ruminal acidosis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Liu, Junhua; Yin, Yuyang; Zhu, Weiyun; Mao, Shengyong

    2017-04-06

    Little information is available on whether or not the effect of an alpha-glucosidase inhibitor on the prevention of ruminal acidosis is influenced by the type of diet during ruminant feeding. This study was conducted to explore the effect of acarbose addition on the prevention of severe subacute ruminal acidosis induced by either cracked wheat or beet pulp in vitro. Cracked wheat and beet pulp were fermented in vitro by rumen microorganisms obtained from three dairy cows. When cracked wheat was used as the substrate and fermented for 24 h, compared with the control, acarbose addition decreased the concentrations of acetate, propionate, butyrate, total volatile fatty acids, and lactate (P < 0.05), while linearly increasing the ratio of acetate to propionate, pH value and, the ammonia-nitrogen level (P < 0.05). Applying Illumina MiSeq sequencing of a fragment of the 16S rRNA gene revealed that the relative abundance of Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes as well as the ACE (abundance-based coverage estimator) value, Chao 1 value, and Shannon index increased significantly (P < 0.05), while there was a significant reduction (P < 0.05) in the relative abundance of Tenericutes as well as Proteobacteria after adding acarbose compared to the control. On the other hand, when beet pulp was used as the substrate, acarbose addition had no significant effects (P > 0.05) on the fermentation parameters and the Chao 1 value, the Shannon index, and the proportion of Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes. In general, these findings indicate that acarbose had more effects on ruminal fermentation when wheat was used as the substrate, whereas it exhibited little effect on ruminal fermentation when beet pulp was used as the substrate.

  6. Renal Tubular Acidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Renal Tubular Acidosis KidsHealth > For Parents > Renal Tubular Acidosis Print A A A What's in ... Causes Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment en español Acidosis tubular renal Each time our internal organs do something, such ...

  7. Fuel metabolism during severe rowing exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyt, R.W.; Lubowitz, J.; Asakura, T.; Stein, T.P.

    1986-03-01

    Eight elite oarsmen were studied during and after six min of severe ergometer exercise. Power output averaged 380 +/- 28 watts. Serial venous blood samples and gas exchange measurements were obtained during exercise. In 4 of the 8 subjects, a primed periodic oral dose of the tracer (6,6-/sup 2/H/sub 2/)glucose was used to determine the effects of severe exercise on glucose metabolism. During exercise, the levels of lactate progressively increased to 12.2 +/- 1.3 mM (SE). There was little change in isotopic glucose enrichment during exercise (from 2.95 +/- 0.30 to 2.55 +/- 0.23 atom percent excess, APE). During recovery, isotopic glucose enrichment decreased significantly to 1.40 +/- 0.14 APE, indicating a substantial post-exercise plasma glucose flux. There were significant post-exercise increases in plasma glucose accumulation (from 84 +/- 5 to 131 +/- 3 mg/dl) and insulin concentration (0.57 +/- 0.08 to 1.34 +/- 0.15 ng/ml). These results suggest that muscle glycogen is the primary source of fuel during six minutes of maximal rowing exercise.

  8. Phenylbutyrate Therapy for Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex Deficiency and Lactic Acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Ferriero, Rosa; Manco, Giuseppe; Lamantea, Eleonora; Nusco, Edoardo; Ferrante, Mariella I.; Sordino, Paolo; Stacpoole, Peter W.; Lee, Brendan; Zeviani, Massimo; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acidosis is a build-up of lactic acid in the blood and tissues, which can be due to several inborn errors of metabolism as well as nongenetic conditions. Deficiency of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) is the most common genetic disorder leading to lactic acidosis. Phosphorylation of specific serine residues of the E1α subunit of PDHC by pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) inactivates the enzyme, whereas dephosphorylation restores PDHC activity. We found that phenylbutyrate enhances PDHC enzymatic activity in vitro and in vivo by increasing the proportion of unphosphorylated enzyme through inhibition of PDK. Phenylbutyrate given to C57B6/L wild-type mice results in a significant increase in PDHC enzyme activity and a reduction of phosphorylated E1α in brain, muscle, and liver compared to saline-treated mice. By means of recombinant enzymes, we showed that phenylbutyrate prevents phosphorylation of E1α through binding and inhibition of PDK, providing a molecular explanation for the effect of phenylbutyrate on PDHC activity. Phenylbutyrate increases PDHC activity in fibroblasts from PDHC-deficient patients harboring various molecular defects and corrects the morphological, locomotor, and biochemical abnormalities in the noam631 zebrafish model of PDHC deficiency. In mice, phenylbutyrate prevents systemic lactic acidosis induced by partial hepatectomy. Because phenylbutyrate is already approved for human use in other diseases, the findings of this study have the potential to be rapidly translated for treatment of patients with PDHC deficiency and other forms of primary and secondary lactic acidosis. PMID:23467562

  9. Increased feeding frequency increased milk fat yield and may reduce the severity of subacute ruminal acidosis in higher-risk cows.

    PubMed

    Macmillan, K; Gao, X; Oba, M

    2017-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine whether feeding behavior is different between cows at higher or lower risk for subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) and whether increasing feeding frequency could be used to reduce the severity of SARA in higher-risk cows. In preliminary studies, 16 ruminally cannulated lactating cows were fed high-grain diets once per day to increase the risk of SARA. After a 17-d diet adaptation, ruminal pH was measured every 30 s over 24 h. Cows were classified as higher-risk (n = 7) or lower-risk (n = 9) for SARA based on an acidosis index (area of pH <5.8/dry matter intake). Feeding behavior was recorded every 5 min over the same 24 h. The 24-h observation period was analyzed in 3 periods of 8 h after feeding. Although there was no significant difference in overall dry matter intake, higher-risk cows spent more time eating in the first 8-h period after feeding than lower-risk cows (186 vs. 153 min) and less time eating in the third 8-h period (19 vs. 43 min). In the primary experiment, 8 ruminally cannulated lactating cows were fed a high-grain diet once per day (1×; 0800 h) or 3 times per day (3×; 0800, 1500, and 2000 h) in a crossover design with 21-d periods (16 d of treatment adaptation and 5 d of data collection). Rumen pH and feeding behavior were measured over 72 h. Behavior data were summarized separately for the 3 periods (0800 to 1500, 1500 to 2200, and 2200 to 0800 h). Four cows were categorized as higher-risk and 4 as lower-risk, based on their acidosis index. The 3× feeding reduced eating time between 0800 and 1500 h (99 vs. 145 min) and increased eating time between 2200 and 0800 h (76 vs. 43 min) for all cows, regardless of category, compared with 1× feeding. For higher-risk cows, 3× feeding reduced the area below pH 5.8 (51 vs. 98 pH × min/d), but it did not affect rumen pH for the lower-risk cows. Milk yield was not different between groups, but 3× feeding increased milk fat yield (1.22 vs. 1.08 kg/d) for all

  10. Pathogenesis of acidosis in hereditary fructose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Richardson, R M; Little, J A; Patten, R L; Goldstein, M B; Halperin, M L

    1979-11-01

    An 18-yr-old man with a classical history of hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) developed typical biochemical changes following an oral fructose load: fructosemia, hypoglycemia, hypophosphatemia, hyperuricemia, and metabolic acidosis. Hypokalemia (3.1 meq/liter) was also noted. Three aspects of this case expand the published literature on this syndrome: (1) Metabolic acidosis was found to be due to both lactic acidosis and proximal renal tubular acidosis (RTA). We could quantitate the relative contribution of each, and found that urinary bicarbonate loss due to proximal RTA accounted for less than 10% of the fall in serum bicarbonate. The major cause of the metabolic acidosis was lactic acidosis. (2) Hypokalemia was found to be due to movement of potassium out of the extracellular space rather than to urinary loss. Potassium may have entered cells with phosphate or may have been sequestered in the gastrointestinal tract. (3) The coexistence of proximal RTA and acidemia made it possible to study the effect of acidemia on the urine-blood partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2) gradient in alkaline urine (U-B PCO2). The U-B PCO2 measured during acidemia was much higher at the same urine bicarbonate concentration than in normal controls during alkalemia, providing evidence in humans that acidemia stimulates distal nephron hydrogen-ion secretion.

  11. [Case of distal renal tubular acidosis complicated with renal diabetes insipidus, showing aggravation of symptoms with occurrence of diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hexing; Tomoda, Fumihiro; Koike, Tsutomu; Ohara, Maiko; Nakagawa, Taizo; Kagitani, Satoshi; Inoue, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    We report herein a 27-year-old male case of inherited distal renal tubular acidosis complicated with renal diabetes insipidus, the symptoms of which were aggravated by the occurrence of diabetes mellitus. At 2 months after birth, he was diagnosed as having inherited distal renal tubular acidosis and thereafter supplementation of both potassium and alkali was started to treat his hypokalemia and metabolic acidosis. At the age of 4 years, calcification of the bilateral renal medulla was detected by computed tomography. Subsequently his urinary volume gradually increased and polyuria of approximately 4 L/day persisted. At the age of 27 years, he became fond of sugar-sweetened drinks and also often forgot to take the medicine. He was admitted to our hospital due to polyuria of more than 10 L day, muscle weakness and gait disturbance. Laboratory tests disclosed worsening of both hypokalemia and metabolic acidosis in addition to severe hyperglycemia. It seemed likely that occurrence of diabetes mellitus and cessation of medications can induce osmotic diuresis and aggravate hypokalemia and metabolic acidosis. Consequently, severe dehydration, hypokalemia-induced damage of his urinary concentration ability and enhancement of the renin angiotensin system occurred and thereby possibly worsened his hypokalemia and metabolic acidosis. As normalization of hyperglycemia and metabolic acidosis might have exacerbated hypokalemia further, dehydration and hypokalemia were treated first. Following intensive treatment, these abnormalities were improved, but polyuria persisted. Elevated plasma antidiuretic hormone (12.0 pg/mL) and deficit of renal responses to antidiuretic hormone suggested that the polyuria was attributable to the preexisting renal diabetes insipidus possibly caused by bilateral renal medulla calcification. Thiazide diuretic or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were not effective for the treatment of diabetes insipidus in the present case.

  12. Very Low-Protein Diet (VLPD) Reduces Metabolic Acidosis in Subjects with Chronic Kidney Disease: The “Nutritional Light Signal” of the Renal Acid Load

    PubMed Central

    Di Iorio, Biagio Raffaele; Di Micco, Lucia; Marzocco, Stefania; De Simone, Emanuele; De Blasio, Antonietta; Sirico, Maria Luisa; Nardone, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Background: Metabolic acidosis is a common complication of chronic kidney disease; current guidelines recommend treatment with alkali if bicarbonate levels are lower than 22 mMol/L. In fact, recent studies have shown that an early administration of alkali reduces progression of CKD. The aim of the study is to evaluate the effect of fruit and vegetables to reduce the acid load in CKD. Methods: We conducted a case-control study in 146 patients who received sodium bicarbonate. Of these, 54 patients assumed very low-protein diet (VLPD) and 92 were controls (ratio 1:2). We calculated every three months the potential renal acid load (PRAL) and the net endogenous acid production (NEAP), inversely correlated with serum bicarbonate levels and representing the non-volatile acid load derived from nutrition. Un-paired T-test and Chi-square test were used to assess differences between study groups at baseline and study completion. Two-tailed probability values ≤0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: At baseline, there were no statistical differences between the two groups regarding systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), protein and phosphate intake, urinary sodium, potassium, phosphate and urea nitrogen, NEAP, and PRAL. VLPD patients showed at 6 and 12 months a significant reduction of SBP (p < 0.0001), DBP (p < 0.001), plasma urea (p < 0.0001) protein intake (p < 0.0001), calcemia (p < 0.0001), phosphatemia (p < 0.0001), phosphate intake (p < 0.0001), urinary sodium (p < 0.0001), urinary potassium (p < 0.002), and urinary phosphate (p < 0.0001). NEAP and PRAL were significantly reduced in VLPD during follow-up. Conclusion: VLPD reduces intake of acids; nutritional therapy of CKD, that has always taken into consideration a lower protein, salt, and phosphate intake, should be adopted to correct metabolic acidosis, an important target in the treatment of CKD patients. We provide useful indications regarding acid load of food and drinks

  13. Primary sclerosing cholangitis: a new cause of distal renal tubular acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Goutaudier, Valentin; Szwarc, Ilan; Serre, Jean-Emmanuel; Pageaux, Georges-Philippe; Argilés, Àngel

    2016-01-01

    We describe the first case of distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA) associated with primary sclerosing cholangitis. A 26-year-old Lao-Thai male patient presented with severe jaundice, metabolic acidosis and hypokalaemia. He was diagnosed of dRTA. Liver transplantation resulted in correction of electrolyte disturbances and hyperbilirubinaemia. A fludrocortisone-furosemide test revealed normal urinary acidification, demonstrating no residual dRTA. This observation suggests that dRTA may be an early manifestation of bilirubin-associated nephropathy or the consequence of an immune mechanism. PMID:27994859

  14. Blood glucose threshold and the metabolic responses to incremental exercise tests with and without prior lactic acidosis induction.

    PubMed

    Simões, Herbert Gustavo; Campbell, Carmen S G; Kushnick, Michael R; Nakamura, Akiko; Katsanos, Christos S; Baldissera, Vilmar; Moffatt, Robert J

    2003-08-01

    This study compared the metabolic-ventilatory responses and the glycemic threshold identified during lactate minimum (LM) and individual anaerobic threshold (IAT) tests. In addition, the ability to determine the anaerobic power, aerobic-anaerobic transition (Trans) (e.g. ventilatory threshold; VT) and the maximal oxygen consumption (VO(2max)) all within a single incremental treadmill test (IT) was investigated. Fifteen physically fit men [25.9 (5.5) years; 77.4 (6.5) kg] performed the following: test 1, IT for IAT; and test 2, LM: 30-s Wingate test followed by 8 min rest and then an IT that was the same as test 1. Blood lactate concentration [lac], glucose concentration [gluc], pH, PO(2), PCO(2), base excess (BE) and ventilatory variables were measured. At the beginning of the IT for LM, the ventilation, PO(2) and VO(2) were higher and the pH, BE and PCO(2) were lower in relation to IAT ( P<0.05), while no differences were observed after reaching LM intensity during IT. Moreover, the Trans could be identified by [lac] (IAT, LM), minute ventilation [V(E;) VT identified during IAT protocol (VT-IAT) and VT identified during LM protocol (VT-LM)], and [gluc] (IGT, GM) during the IT for IAT and LM. The velocities (kilometers per hour) corresponding to IAT (12.6+/-1.6), VT-IAT (12.5+/-1.7), IGT (12.6+/-1.6), LM (12.5+/-1.5), VT-LM (12.3+/-1.5), and GM (12.6+/-1.9) were not different from each other and the LM and IAT protocols resulted in the similar VO(2max). We concluded that: (1) after reaching the LM the metabolic responses during IT are similar to IAT; (2) performing a Wingate test prior to an IT does not interfere with the Trans and VO(2max) attainment; (3) and the IGT and GM can predict the Trans.

  15. Protein metabolism in severe childhood malnutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The major clinical syndromes of severe childhood malnutrition (SCM) are marasmus (non-oedematous SCM), kwashiorkor and marasmic-kwashiorkor (oedematous SCM). Whereas treatment of marasmus is straightforward and the associated mortality is low, kwashiorkor and marasmic-kwashiorkor are difficult to tr...

  16. Distal renal tubular acidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... get better with treatment. When to Contact a Medical Professional Call your health care provider if you have symptoms of distal renal tubular acidosis. Get medical help right away if you develop emergency symptoms ...

  17. Metabolic syndrome in patients with severe mental illness in Gorgan

    PubMed Central

    Kamkar, Mohammad Zaman; Sanagoo, Akram; Zargarani, Fatemeh; Jouybari, Leila; Marjani, Abdoljalal

    2016-01-01

    Background: Metabolic syndrome is commonly associated with cardiovascular diseases and psychiatric mental illness. Hence, we aimed to assess the metabolic syndrome among severe mental illness (SMI). Materials and Methods: The study included 267 patients who were referred to the psychiatric unit at 5th Azar Education Hospital of Golestan University of Medical Sciences in Gorgan, Iran. Results: The mean waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, triglyceride and fasting blood glucose levels were significantly higher in the SMI with metabolic syndrome, but the high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol was significantly lower. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in SMI patients was 20.60%. There were significant differences in the mean of waist circumference, systolic (except for women) and diastolic blood pressure, triglyceride, HDL-cholesterol and fasting blood glucose in men and women with metabolic syndrome when compared with subjects without metabolic syndrome. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in SMI women was higher than men. The most age distribution was in range of 30-39 years old. The most prevalence of metabolic syndrome was in age groups 50-59 years old. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was increased from 30 to 59 years old. Conclusion: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in patients with SMI in Gorgan is almost similar to those observed in Asian countries. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was lower than western countries. These observations may be due to cultural differences in the region. It should be mention that the families of mental illness subjects in our country believe that their patients must be cared better than people without mental illness. These findings of this study suggest that mental illness patients are at risk of metabolic syndrome. According to our results, risk factors such as age and gender differences may play an important role in the presence of metabolic syndrome. In our country, women do less

  18. A Review of metabolic staging in severely injured patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    An interpretation of the metabolic response to injury in patients with severe accidental or surgical trauma is made. In the last century, various authors attributed a meaning to the post-traumatic inflammatory response by using teleological arguments. Their interpretations of this response, not only facilitates integrating the knowledge, but also the flow from the bench to the bedside, which is the main objective of modern translational research. The goal of the current review is to correlate the metabolic changes with the three phenotypes -ischemia-reperfusion, leukocytic and angiogenic- that the patients express during the evolution of the systemic inflammatory response. The sequence in the expression of multiple metabolic systems that becomes progressively more elaborate and complex in severe injured patients urges for more detailed knowledge in order to establish the most adequate metabolic support according to the evolutive phase. Thus, clinicians must employ different treatment strategies based on the different metabolic phases when caring for this challenging patient population. Perhaps, the best therapeutic option would be to favor early hypometabolism during the ischemia-reperfusion phase, to boost the antienzymatic metabolism and to reduce hypermetabolism during the leukocytic phase through the early administration of enteral nutrition and the modulation of the acute phase response. Lastly, the early epithelial regeneration of the injured organs and tissues by means of an oxidative metabolism would reduce the fibrotic sequelae in these severely injured patients. PMID:20478066

  19. Transient hyperkalemic distal renal tubular acidosis with bicarbonate wasting in a young child.

    PubMed

    Khositseth, Sookkasem

    2011-12-01

    Distal renal tubular acidosis is a clinical syndrome characterized by inability to acidify urine in the presence of metabolic acidosis. Classic dRTA patients exhibit failure to thrive, polyuria, metabolic acidosis and hypokalemia. Hyperkalemic dRTA without underlying disease is very rare. Transient bicarbonate wasting accompanied with hypokalemic dRTA was reported in infants. Herein, a transient hyperkalemic dRTA with bicarbonate wasting was reported in a young child.

  20. Plasmodium berghei infection: dichloroacetate improves survival in rats with lactic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Holloway, P A; Knox, K; Bajaj, N; Chapman, D; White, N J; O'Brien, R; Stacpoole, P W; Krishna, S

    1995-06-01

    The kinetics of Plasmodium berghei infection and the development of lactic acidosis, hypoglycemia, and anemia were defined in young Wistar rats. This model of metabolic dysfunction, which is similar to that of severe human malaria, was used to test the hypothesis that dichloroacetate, a treatment for lactic acidosis, prolonged survival in rats receiving a single antimalarial dose of quinine (20 mg/kg). Rats with hyperlactatemia (lactate > 5 mmol/liter, N = 183) were randomized to receive either dichloroacetate (100 mg/kg, N = 99) or saline (N = 84) and were monitored for outcome (survival or death) for 50 hr. Logistic regression modeling adjusting for baseline venous lactate concentration demonstrated that dichloroacetate increases survival rates in rats with venous lactate concentrations between 5 and 8.9 mmol/liter (odds ratio > 2.2, P < 0.021). This is the first demonstration that specific intervention to treat lactic acidosis can prolong survival and suggests that dichloroacetate may be useful as adjunctive therapy in the management of lactic acidosis complicating severe falciparum malaria.

  1. Persistent lactic acidosis after chronic topical application of silver sulfadiazine in a pediatric burn patient: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Willis, Monte S; Cairns, Bruce A; Purdy, Ashley; Bortsov, Andrey V; Jones, Samuel W; Ortiz-Pujols, Shiara M; Willis, Tina M Schade; Joyner, Benny L

    2013-01-01

    A 3-year old male who sustained 2(nd) and 3(rd) degree burns that covered approximately 60% TBSA presented to a large adult and pediatric verified burn center. On hospital day (HD) 26 of his stay, Candida fungemia was identified by blood culture, delaying operative management until HD 47. On HD 47, after his first operative intervention, the patient developed a persistent metabolic and lactic acidosis. On HD 66, a search for a cause of his osmol gap of 56 mOsm/kg revealed a potential source-propylene glycol. Previous studies have implicated the propylene glycol emulsifier in the silver sulfadiazine that was being applied to his skin as a rare cause of lactic acidosis in severely burned patients. Within 24 hours of stopping the silver sulfadiazine therapy, his lactic acidosis and osmol gap resolved; within 72 hours his metabolic acidosis resolved. Silver sulfadiazine is commonly used adjunct therapy in the treatment of 2(nd) and 3(rd) degree burns and generally has few adverse reactions. The absorption of propylene glycol systemically can rarely occur when applied to extensive burns, presumably due to the disruption of the skin barrier; the half-life of PG is 10 hours and can be prolonged with renal disease because ~50% of the sulfadiazine is excreted in the urine unchanged. When propylene glycol is present systemically, it is metabolized to lactic acid in the liver, which can cause a lactic acidosis. Several commonly used drugs also use propylene glycol as an emulsifier, including IV preparations of lorazepam, pentobarbital, phenobarbital, and phenytoin. In all of these clinical scenarios, including severe burn patients that are being treated with silver sulfadiazine, both lactic acid and propylene glycol levels should be measured to monitor for this rare, potentially serious co-morbidity.

  2. Renal tubular acidosis type IV as a complication of lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Marcos, C; Hoffman, V; Prieto-González, S; Hernández-Rodríguez, J; Espinosa, G

    2016-03-01

    Renal tubular acidosis (RTA) is a rare complication of renal involvement of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We describe a 24-year-old male with type IV lupus nephropathy as a presenting manifestation of SLE. He presented with improvement of renal function following induction therapy with three pulses of methylprednisolone and 500 mg biweekly pulses of cyclophosphamide. However, a week after the first pulse of cyclophosphamide, the patient presented with a significant increase in legs edema and severe hyperkalemia. Type IV RTA associated with hyporeninemic hypoaldosteronism was suspected in the presence of metabolic acidosis with a normal anion gap, severe hyperkalemia without worsening renal function, and urinary pH of 5. RTA was confirmed with a transtubular potassium concentration gradient of 2 and low levels of plasma aldosterone, renin, angiotensin II, and cortisol. Intravenous bicarbonate, high-dose furosemide, and fludrocortisone were administered with normalization of potassium levels and renal function.

  3. Treatment of Metformin Intoxication Complicated by Lactic Acidosis and Acute Kidney Injury: The Role of Prolonged Intermittent Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Regolisti, Giuseppe; Antoniotti, Riccardo; Fani, Filippo; Greco, Paolo; Fiaccadori, Enrico

    2017-02-17

    Metformin intoxication with lactic acidosis, a potentially lethal condition, may develop in diabetic patients when the drug dose is inappropriate and/or its clearance is reduced. Diagnosis and therapy may be delayed due to nonspecific symptoms at presentation, with severe anion gap metabolic acidosis and elevated serum creatinine values being the most prominent laboratory findings. Confirmation requires measurement of serum metformin by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, but this technique is available only at specialized institutions and cannot be relied on as a guide to immediate treatment. Thus, based on strong clinical suspicion, renal replacement therapy must be started promptly to achieve efficient drug clearance and correct the metabolic acidosis. However, because metformin accumulates in the intracellular compartment with prolonged treatment, a rebound in serum concentrations due to redistribution is expected at the end of dialysis. We report a case of metformin intoxication, severe lactic acidosis, and acute kidney injury in a diabetic patient with pre-existing chronic kidney disease stage 3, treated effectively with sustained low-efficiency dialysis. We discuss the pathophysiology, differential diagnosis, and treatment options and highlight specific pharmacokinetic issues that should be considered in selecting the appropriate modality of renal replacement therapy.

  4. Klinefelter's syndrome with renal tubular acidosis: impact on height.

    PubMed

    Jebasingh, F; Paul, T V; Spurgeon, R; Abraham, S; Jacob, J J

    2010-02-01

    A 19-year-old Indian man presented with a history of proximal muscle weakness, knock knees and gynaecomastia. On examination he had features of rickets and bilateral small testes. Karyotyping revealed a chromosomal pattern of 47,XXX, confirming the diagnosis of Klinefelter's syndrome. He was also found to have hyperchloraemic metabolic acidosis with hypokalaemia, hypophosphataemia, phosphaturia and glycosuria, which favoured a diagnosis of proximal renal tubular acidosis. Patients with Klinefelter's syndrome typically have a tall stature due to androgen deficiency, resulting in unfused epiphyses and an additional X chromosome. However, this patient had a short stature due to associated proximal renal tubular acidosis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second case of Klinefelter's syndrome with short stature due to associated renal tubular acidosis reported in the literature. This report highlights the need to consider other causes when patients with Klinefelter's syndrome present with a short stature.

  5. Reversible lactic acidosis associated with repeated intravenous infusions of sorbitol and ethanol.

    PubMed Central

    Batstone, G. F.; Alberti, K. G.; Dewar, A. K.

    1977-01-01

    Infusions of fructose or sorbitol are used commonly in parenteral nutrition and may cause lactic acidosis. A case is reported in whom blood lactate concentration was monitored frequently over a 5-day period during intravenous feeding with a sorbitol-ethanol-amino acid mixture. During the first five infusions blood lactate rose only moderately, but with the final infusion lactate rose to 11-1 mmol/l and the patient had a severe metabolic acidosis. In retrospect the patient had shown deterioration in renal and hepatic function tests during the preceding 24 hr. On terminating the infusions the blood lactate concentration fell rapidly. It is suggested that great care should be exercised when using such infusions in ill patients and acid base status and renal and hepatic function should be monitored frequently. PMID:22069

  6. [Metabolic emergencies in critically ill cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Namendys-Silva, Silvio A; Hernández-Garay, Marisol; García-Guillén, Francisco J; Correa-García, Paulina; Herrera Gómez, Angel; Meneses-García, Abelardo

    2013-11-01

    Severe metabolic alterations frequently occur in critically ill cancer patients; hypercalcemia, hypocalcemia, hyponatremia, tumor lysis syndrome, metabolic complications of renal failure and lactic acidosis. Cancer patients with metabolic emergencies should be treated in a medical oncology department or an intensive care unit. Most metabolic emergencies can be treated properly when they are identified early. The clinician should consider that the prognosis of critically ill cancer patients depends on their primary disease, comorbidities and organ failure.

  7. Hemodynamic and Metabolic Correlates of Perinatal White Matter Injury Severity

    PubMed Central

    Riddle, Art; Maire, Jennifer; Cai, Victor; Nguyen, Thuan; Gong, Xi; Hansen, Kelly; Grafe, Marjorie R.; Hohimer, A. Roger; Back, Stephen A.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Although the spectrum of perinatal white matter injury (WMI) in preterm infants is shifting from cystic encephalomalacia to milder forms of WMI, the factors that contribute to this changing spectrum are unclear. We hypothesized that the variability in WMI quantified by immunohistochemical markers of inflammation could be correlated with the severity of impaired blood oxygen, glucose and lactate. Methods We employed a preterm fetal sheep model of in utero moderate hypoxemia and global severe but not complete cerebral ischemia that reproduces the spectrum of human WMI. Since there is small but measurable residual brain blood flow during occlusion, we sought to determine if the metabolic state of the residual arterial blood was associated with severity of WMI. Near the conclusion of hypoxia-ischemia, we recorded cephalic arterial blood pressure, blood oxygen, glucose and lactate levels. To define the spectrum of WMI, an ordinal WMI rating scale was compared against an unbiased quantitative image analysis protocol that provided continuous histo-pathological outcome measures for astrogliosis and microgliosis derived from the entire white matter. Results A spectrum of WMI was observed that ranged from diffuse non-necrotic lesions to more severe injury that comprised discrete foci of microscopic or macroscopic necrosis. Residual arterial pressure, oxygen content and blood glucose displayed a significant inverse association with WMI and lactate concentrations were directly related. Elevated glucose levels were the most significantly associated with less severe WMI. Conclusions Our results suggest that under conditions of hypoxemia and severe cephalic hypotension, WMI severity measured using unbiased immunohistochemical measurements correlated with several physiologic parameters, including glucose, which may be a useful marker of fetal response to hypoxia or provide protection against energy failure and more severe WMI. PMID:24416093

  8. A metabolic syndrome severity score: A tool to quantify cardio-metabolic risk factors.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Joshua F; Carrington, Melinda J

    2016-07-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of cardio-metabolic risk factors and is associated with increased mortality. There is no standard, validated way to assess the severity of aggregated metabolic syndrome risk factors. Cardiovascular and diabetes risk factor data came from two studies conducted in Australia from 2006 to 2010 in adults aged 18 or above. In medication free adults, sex-specific clinical thresholds and Principal Component Analysis were used to develop a formula to calculate a metabolic syndrome severity score (MetSSS). These scores were compared to scores derived using the same process in subgroups by sex, age, medication status, and time. We also examined the MetSSS in relation to other known risk factors. In 2125 adults (57.6±14.7years of age), the MetSSS ranged from 0 to 8.7 with a mean of 2.6. There were strong correlations (.95-.99) between the MetSSS in medication free adults and the MetSSS calculated from subgroups. MetSSS predicted medication initiation for hypertension, hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia over six months (OR=1.31, 95% CI [1.00-1.70], per MetSSS unit, p=.043). Lower education, medication prescription, history of smoking and age were associated with higher MetSSS (all p<.05). Higher physical but not mental health quality of life was associated with lower MetSSS (p<.001). A standardized formula to measure cardio-metabolic risk factor severity was constructed and demonstrated expected relations with known risk factors. The use of the MetSSS is recommended as a measure of change within individuals in cardio-metabolic risk factors and to guide treatment and management.

  9. Trends in Metabolic Syndrome Severity and Lifestyle Factors Among Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Arthur M.; Gurka, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Childhood metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a risk factor for adverse outcomes later in life. Our goal was to identify temporal trends among US adolescents in the severity of MetS, its individual components, and factors related to diet and physical activity. METHODS: We analyzed 5117 participants aged 12 to 19 from NHANES. We used regression analysis of individual waves of data, 1999 to 2012. MetS severity was calculated using a gender- and race/ethnicity-specific MetS severity z score. RESULTS: There was a linear trend of decreasing MetS severity in US adolescents from 1999 to 2012 (P = .030). This occurred despite a trend of increasing BMI z score (P = .005); instead, the decrease in MetS severity appeared to be due to trends in increasing high-density lipoprotein (HDL; P < .0001) and decreasing triglyceride (P = .0001) levels. In considering lifestyle factors, there was no change in physical activity over the time period. Regarding dietary patterns, total calorie consumption and carbohydrate consumption were positively associated with triglyceride levels and negatively associated with HDL levels, whereas unsaturated fat consumption exhibited the opposite associations. Consistent with these associations, there was a trend of decreasing total calorie consumption (P < .0001), decreasing carbohydrate consumption (P < .0001), and increasing unsaturated fat consumption (P = .002). CONCLUSIONS: The healthier trend of declining MetS severity in adolescents appeared to be due to favorable increases in HDL and decreases in fasting triglyceride measurements. These were in turn associated with favorable changes in dietary patterns among US adolescents. Future studies should investigate the causality of dietary differences on changes in MetS severity in adolescents. PMID:26908664

  10. Hyperkalemia in neonatal diarrheic calves depends on the degree of dehydration and the cause of the metabolic acidosis but does not require the presence of acidemia.

    PubMed

    Trefz, F M; Constable, P D; Sauter-Louis, C; Lorch, A; Knubben-Schweizer, G; Lorenz, I

    2013-01-01

    Hyperkalemia is a clinically important electrolyte imbalance in neonatal diarrheic calves that has previously been associated with skeletal muscle weakness and life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias. The aim of the present retrospective analysis was to identify risk factors for hyperkalemia in a convenience sample of 832 calves (≤ 21 d of age) with a clinical diagnosis of diarrhea admitted to a veterinary teaching hospital. Plasma potassium concentrations were most closely associated with parameters of dehydration and renal function such as serum creatinine [Spearman correlation (rs) = 0.61], urea (rs = 0.51), and inorganic phosphorus concentrations (rs = 0.64). Plasma potassium concentrations were weakly associated with venous blood pH (rs = -0.21). Although venous blood pH was not predictive in a multivariate linear regression analysis, the odds of having hyperkalemia (>5.8 mmol/L) in acidemic calves was found to be 8.6 times as high as in nonacidemic calves [95% confidence interval (CI): 4.8-15.4]. However, the presence of hyperkalemia depended on the nature of an existing acidosis, and the odds for the presence of hyperkalemia in acidemic calves with hyper-D-lactatemia (>3.96 mmol/L) were only 0.15 times as high as in acidemic calves with normal D-lactate concentrations (95% CI, 0.11-0.22). Acidemia in hyperkalemic diarrheic calves was associated with hyponatremia and increased concentrations of inorganic phosphorus, L-lactate, and unidentified strong anions that presumably included uremic anions such as sulfate. We conclude that hyper-D-lactatemia in neonatal diarrheic calves is not usually associated with elevated plasma potassium concentrations. Application of the simplified strong ion acid-base model indicated that dehydration is an important contributor to the pathogenesis of hyperkalemia and acidemia in neonatal calves with diarrhea.

  11. Severe hypomagnesemia and low-grade inflammation in metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Romero, Fernando; Bermudez-Peña, Carmen; Rodríguez-Morán, Martha

    2011-06-01

    To evaluate the association between severe hypomagnesemia and the low-grade inflammatory response in subjects with metabolic syndrome (MetS), ninety-eight individuals with new diagnosis of MetS were enrolled in a cross-sectional study. Pregnancy, smoking, alcohol intake, renal damage, hepatic disorders, infectious or chronic inflammatory diseases, malignancy, use of diuretics, statins, calcium antagonist, antioxidants, vitamins, anti-inflammatory drugs, or previous oral magnesium supplementation were exclusion criteria. According serum magnesium levels, participants were assigned to the following groups: 1) severe hypomagnesemia (≤1.2 mg/dL); 2) hypomagnesemia (>1.2≤1.8 mg/dL); 3) Normal serum magnesium levels (>1.8 mg/dL). The low-grade inflammatory response was defined by elevation of serum levels of (hsCRP >1.0 ≤10.0 mg/L) or TNF-alpha (TNF-α ≥3.5 pg/mL). Severe hypomagnesemia, hypomagnesemia, and normomagnesemia were identified in 21 (21.4%), 38 (38.8%), and 39 (39.8%) individuals. The ORs, adjusted by WC, showed that severe hypomagnesemia (OR: 8.1; CI 95%: 3.6-19.4 and OR: 3.7; CI 95%: 1.1-12.1), but not hypomagnesemia (OR: 1.8; CI 95%: 0.9-15.5 and OR: 1.6; CI 95%: 0.7-3.6), was strongly associated with elevated hsCRP and TNF-α levels, and that normomagnesemia exhibited a protective role (OR: 0.32; CI 95%: 0.1-0.7 and OR: 0.28; CI 95%: 0.1-0.6) for elevation of CRP and TNF-α. Results of this study show that, in subjects with MetS, severe hypomagnesemia, but not hypomagnesemia, is associated with elevated concentrations of CRP and TNF-α.

  12. Understanding lactic acidosis in paracetamol (acetaminophen) poisoning.

    PubMed

    Shah, Anoop D; Wood, David M; Dargan, Paul I

    2011-01-01

    Paracetamol (acetaminophen) is one of the most commonly taken drugs in overdose in many areas of the world, and the most common cause of acute liver failure in both the UK and USA. Paracetamol poisoning can result in lactic acidosis in two different scenarios. First, early in the course of poisoning and before the onset of hepatotoxicity in patients with massive ingestion; a lactic acidosis is usually associated with coma. Experimental evidence from studies in whole animals, perfused liver slices and cell cultures has shown that the toxic metabolite of paracetamol, N-acetyl-p-benzo-quinone imine, inhibits electron transfer in the mitochondrial respiratory chain and thus inhibits aerobic respiration. This occurs only at very high concentrations of paracetamol, and precedes cellular injury by several hours. The second scenario in which lactic acidosis can occur is later in the course of paracetamol poisoning as a consequence of established liver failure. In these patients lactate is elevated primarily because of reduced hepatic clearance, but in shocked patients there may also be a contribution of peripheral anaerobic respiration because of tissue hypoperfusion. In patients admitted to a liver unit with paracetamol hepatotoxicity, the post-resuscitation arterial lactate concentration has been shown to be a strong predictor of mortality, and is included in the modified King's College criteria for consideration of liver transplantation. We would therefore recommend that post-resuscitation lactate is measured in all patients with a severe paracetamol overdose resulting in either reduced conscious level or hepatic failure.

  13. Type 4 renal tubular acidosis in a kidney transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Manjunath

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of a 66-year-old diabetic patient who presented with muscle weakness 2 weeks after kidney transplantation. Her immunosuppressive regimen included tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and steroids. She was found to have hyperkalemia and normal anion gap metabolic acidosis. Tacrolimus levels were in therapeutic range. All other drugs such as beta blockers and trimethoprim - sulfamethoxazole were stopped. She did not respond to routine antikalemic measures. Further evaluation revealed type 4 renal tubular acidosis. Serum potassium levels returned to normal after starting sodium bicarbonate and fludrocortisone therapy. Though hyperkalemia is common in kidney transplant recipients, determining exact cause can guide specific treatment.

  14. Clinical utility of metabolic syndrome severity scores: considerations for practitioners

    PubMed Central

    DeBoer, Mark D; Gurka, Matthew J

    2017-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is marked by abnormalities in central obesity, high blood pressure, high triglycerides, low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and high fasting glucose and appears to be produced by underlying processes of inflammation, oxidative stress, and adipocyte dysfunction. MetS has traditionally been classified based on dichotomous criteria that deny that MetS-related risk likely exists as a spectrum. Continuous MetS scores provide a way to track MetS-related risk over time. We generated MetS severity scores that are sex- and race/ethnicity-specific, acknowledging that the way MetS is manifested may be different by sex and racial/ethnic subgroup. These scores are correlated with long-term risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. Clinical use of scores like these provide a potential opportunity to identify patients at highest risk, motivate patients toward lifestyle change, and follow treatment progress over time. PMID:28255250

  15. Water, acidosis, and experimental pyelonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Andriole, Vincent T.

    1970-01-01

    The effect of water restriction and ammonium chloride acidosis on the course of Escherichia coli pyelonephritis was determined in the nonobstructed kidney of the rat. To alter the chemical composition of the renal medulla, water intake was reduced in rats to one-half the normal daily intake. Water restriction increased the incidence of coliform pyelonephritis. Systemic acidosis, produced by giving a 300 mM solution of ammonium chloride, increased urinary osmolality to values comparable to water restriction and also predisposed to pyelonephritis. However, when rats were fed the same solution of ammonium chloride but were allowed access to tap water ad lib., urinary osmolality values were comparable to those observed in normal animals, and susceptibility to pyelonephritis was reduced or eliminated despite a degree of systemic acidosis similar to that observed in rats fed ammonium chloride solution without access to tap water. These results suggest that water diuresis may overcome the inactivation of complement produced by ammonium chloride acidosis and that renal medullary hypertonicity, produced by either water restriction or ammonium chloride acidosis, is a major determinant of this tissue's unique susceptibility to infection. PMID:4902827

  16. Renal tubular acidosis type 4 in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Jakes, Adam Daniel; Baynes, Kevin; Nelson-Piercy, Catherine

    2016-03-17

    We describe the clinical course of renal tubular acidosis (RTA) type 4 in pregnancy, which has not been previously published. Renal tubular acidosis type 4 is a condition associated with increased urinary ammonia secondary to hypoaldosteronism or pseudohypoaldosteronism. Pregnancy may worsen the hyperkalaemia and acidosis of renal tubular acidosis type 4, possibly through an antialdosterone effect. We advise regular monitoring of potassium and pH throughout pregnancy to ensure safe levels are maintained.

  17. A patient with foot ulcer and severe metabolic alkalosis.

    PubMed

    John, Ruby Samuel; Simoes, Sonia; Reddi, Alluru S

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of triple acid-base disorder with metabolic alkalosis as the primary disorder in a 65-year-old man due to ingestion and application to leg ulcers of baking soda (calcium bicarbonate). The blood pH was 7.65 with hypochloremia, hypokalemia, and prerenal azotemia. He was treated with isotonic saline with K replacement, and the patient improved without any adverse clinical consequences. We discuss the causes, mechanisms, and management of Cl-responsive (depletion) metabolic alkalosis.

  18. Anesthetic Management of a Surgical Patient with Chronic Renal Tubular Acidosis Complicated by Subclinical Hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Haruyuki; Yasumura, Rie; Wada, Kosuke

    2016-01-01

    A 53-year-old man with chronic renal tubular acidosis and subclinical hypothyroidism underwent lower leg amputation surgery under general anesthesia. Perioperative acid-base management in such patients poses many difficulties because both pathophysiologies have the potential to complicate the interpretation of capnometry and arterial blood gas analysis data; inappropriate correction of chronic metabolic acidosis may lead to postoperative respiratory deterioration. We discuss the management of perioperative acidosis in order to achieve successful weaning from mechanical ventilation and promise a complete recovery from anesthesia. PMID:27648310

  19. Effect of a metabolically created systemic acidosis on calcium homeostasis and the diurnal variation in urine pH in the non-lactating pregnant dairy cow.

    PubMed

    Roche, John R; Dalley, Dawn E; O'Mara, Frank P

    2007-02-01

    Reducing the dietary cation-anion difference (DCAD) has been shown to be an effective means of preventing parturient paresis in confinement systems where cows are offered a total mixed ration containing DCAD-reducing mineral compounds (anionic salts). Such a supplementation strategy is not possible in cows being group fed forages precalving, and little is known about the effect of supplementing these cows with large amounts of anionic salts twice daily. Eight non-lactating, pregnant Holstein-Friesian cows were allocated to two levels of DCAD (-20 and +18 meq/100 g DM) for 24 d, with an intensive Ca balance undertaken in metabolism stalls following a 2-week acclimatization to diet. The basal diet was 3 kg DM of crushed barley and 7 kg DM of pasture-hay. Urine and faeces were collected separately, weighed daily for 5 d and analysed for Ca content. Urinary Ca, creatinine and hydroxyproline concentration and plasma Ca concentration were determined during the period of the balance study. The diurnal pattern in urine and rumen pH was determined over 2 d. Decreasing DCAD reduced (P<0.001) the pH of urine, and increased (P<0.05) Ca absorption. Plasma Ca concentration was not affected by DCAD, and DCAD did not affect the output of urinary hydroxyproline, a marker of bone resorption. Twice-daily supplementation of anionic salts was sufficient to reduce the pH of blood and increase gastrointestinal Ca absorption. There was no diurnal variation in the pH of urine, suggesting that time of sampling to determine efficacy of DCAD in reducing systemic pH was not important.

  20. Severe malnutrition and metabolic complications of HIV-infected children in the antiretroviral era: clinical care and management in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Musoke, Philippa M; Fergusson, Pamela

    2011-12-01

    More than 2 million children globally are living with HIV infection and >90% of these reside in sub-Saharan Africa. Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) remains a major problem for HIV-infected children who live in resource-limited settings (RLS), and SAM is an important risk factor for mortality. SAM in HIV-infected children is associated with complications including electrolyte disorders, micronutrient deficiencies, and severe infections, which contribute to the high mortality. Access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) has significantly improved the survival of HIV-infected children, although the response to ART of children with SAM remains undocumented in the literature. Immune and virologic responses to ART in RLS are similar to those of infected children in resource-rich settings, but delays in initiation of therapy have led to a high early mortality. Antiretroviral drug toxicities have been described in children who receive therapy and may affect their quality of life and long-term survival. Metabolic complications of ART include lipodystrophy, dyslipidemia, lactic acidosis, insulin resistance, and osteopenia. These complications have been well described in adults and children from developed countries, but data from RLS are limited, and these complications may be compounded by SAM. In this article we review the epidemiology, clinical presentation, and complications of SAM in HIV-infected children and the metabolic complications of HIV-infected children in the era of ART, and discuss future research priorities for RLS.

  1. Anoxia and Acidosis Tolerance of the Heart in an Air-Breathing Fish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus).

    PubMed

    Joyce, William; Gesser, Hans; Bayley, Mark; Wang, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Air breathing has evolved repeatedly in fishes and may protect the heart during stress. We investigated myocardial performance in the air-breathing catfish Pangasianodon hypophthalmus, a species that can withstand prolonged exposure to severe hypoxia and acidosis. Isometric ventricular preparations were exposed to anoxia, lactic acidosis, hypercapnic acidosis, and combinations of these treatments. Ventricular preparations were remarkably tolerant to anoxia, exhibiting an inotropic reduction of only 40%, which fully recovered during reoxygenation. Myocardial anoxia tolerance was unaffected by physiologically relevant elevations of bicarbonate concentration, in contrast to previous results in other fishes. Both lactic acidosis (5 mM; pH 7.10) and hypercapnic acidosis (10% CO2; pH 6.70) elicited a biphasic response, with an initial and transient decrease in force followed by overcompensation above control values. Spongy myocardial preparations were significantly more tolerant to hypercapnic acidosis than compact myocardial preparations. While ventricular preparations were tolerant to the isolated effects of anoxia and acidosis, their combination severely impaired myocardial performance and contraction kinetics. This suggests that air breathing may be a particularly important myocardial oxygen source during combined anoxia and acidosis, which may occur during exercise or environmental stress.

  2. Clinical approach to renal tubular acidosis in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Reddy, P

    2011-03-01

    Renal tubular acidosis (RTA) is a group of disorders observed in patients with normal anion gap metabolic acidosis. There are three major forms of RTA: A proximal (type II) RTA and two types of distal RTAs (type I and type IV). Proximal (type II) RTA originates from the inability to reabsorb bicarbonate normally in the proximal tubule. Type I RTA is associated with inability to excrete the daily acid load and may present with hyperkalaemia or hypokalaemia. The most prominent abnormality in type IV RTA is hyperkalaemia caused by hypoaldosteronism. This article extensively reviews the mechanism of hydrogen ion generation from metabolism of normal diet and various forms of RTA leading to disruptions of normal acid-base handling by the kidneys.

  3. Severe malaria: lessons learned from the management of critical illness in children.

    PubMed

    Maitland, Kathryn

    2006-10-01

    Two hypotheses have recently been raised to explain the metabolic acidosis (increased blood acidity) of severe malaria, and both are relevant to treatment. The first suggests that a decreased blood volume (hypovolaemia) has an important role in severe malaria; following this, treatment should be based on the current standard paediatric management of acidosis in children with features of cardiovascular compromise. The second hypothesis contends that acidosis in malaria has a metabolic cause and proposes treatment with dichloroacetate. Both hypotheses are plausible and are not mutually exclusive. In truth, the risks and benefits of either treatment are uncertain, and will remain so until large multicentre, randomised controlled trials provide appropriate supportive evidence. As both views involve complex physiological rationales, beyond the usual scope of this journal, I attempt here to present the largely academic aspects of these hypotheses within the practical and contextual aspects of childhood severe malaria.

  4. A case of severe corrosive esophagitis, gastritis, and liver necrosis caused by ingestion of methyl ethyl ketone peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jung Oh; Choi, Jeong Woo; Hwang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The plastic hardener methyl ethyl ketone peroxide is unstable peroxide that releases free oxygen radicals. Ingestion of this compound induces widespread liver necrosis, severe metabolic acidosis, corrosive esophagitis and gastritis, that is often fatal. A 49-year-old man unintentionally ingested approximately 100 mL (55%) of this compound in solution, which was purchased as plastic hardener. Despite resuscitation, he died about 11 hours after admission. We report a patient with poisoning due to methyl ethyl ketone peroxide who presented with corrosive esophagitis and gastritis, gastrointestinal bleeding, and developed ischemia of the bowel and necrosis of the liver and died of severe metabolic acidosis and multiorgan failure. PMID:28168233

  5. Lipoprotein metabolism and lipoprotein lipase in severe cystic acne.

    PubMed

    Pigatto, P; Altomare, G F; Negri, M; Finzi, A F; Vigotti, G; Vergani, C

    1985-01-01

    In severe cystic acne we found low levels of high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) and apolipoprotein A (Apo-A) in the presence of normal total lipids. In a larger number of patients, we always observed significantly lower levels of HDL-C and Apo-A than in either age-matched controls or subjects with acne vulgaris. Since lipoprotein lipase is one major determinant of HDL concentration, we assayed the lipase activity in liver and extra-hepatic tissues by the method of Krauss et al. There was highly significant less total and hepatic lipase activity than in age-matched controls. HDL distribution was examined by zonal ultracentrifugation and a decrease in the HDL2 subclass was discovered. Since HDL are inversely correlated to atherosclerosis, cystic acne is one risk factor for atherosclerosis. The linkage between low HDL levels and severe cystic acne should be further investigated.

  6. Low-flow CO2 removal integrated into a renal-replacement circuit can reduce acidosis and decrease vasopressor requirements

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Lung-protective ventilation in patients with ARDS and multiorgan failure, including renal failure, is often paralleled with a combined respiratory and metabolic acidosis. We assessed the effectiveness of a hollow-fiber gas exchanger integrated into a conventional renal-replacement circuit on CO2 removal, acidosis, and hemodynamics. Methods In ten ventilated critically ill patients with ARDS and AKI undergoing renal- and respiratory-replacement therapy, effects of low-flow CO2 removal on respiratory acidosis compensation were tested by using a hollow-fiber gas exchanger added to the renal-replacement circuit. This was an observational study on safety, CO2-removal capacity, effects on pH, ventilator settings, and hemodynamics. Results CO2 elimination in the low-flow circuit was safe and was well tolerated by all patients. After 4 hours of treatment, a mean reduction of 17.3 mm Hg (−28.1%) pCO2 was observed, in line with an increase in pH. In hemodynamically instable patients, low-flow CO2 elimination was paralleled by hemodynamic improvement, with an average reduction of vasopressors of 65% in five of six catecholamine-dependent patients during the first 24 hours. Conclusions Because no further catheters are needed, besides those for renal replacement, the implementation of a hollow-fiber gas exchanger in a renal circuit could be an attractive therapeutic tool with only a little additional trauma for patients with mild to moderate ARDS undergoing invasive ventilation with concomitant respiratory acidosis, as long as no severe oxygenation defects indicate ECMO therapy. PMID:23883472

  7. Metformin associated lactic acidosis in Auckland City Hospital 2005 to 2009

    PubMed Central

    Haloob, Imad; de Zoysa, Janak R

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the incidence, clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients with metformin associated lactic acidosis (MALA). METHODS: Auckland City Hospital drains a population of just over 400000 people. All cases presenting with metabolic acidosis between July 2005 and July 2009 were identified using clinical coding. A retrospective case notes review identified patients with MALA. Prescribing data for metformin was obtained from the national pharmaceutical prescribing scheme. RESULTS: There were 42 cases of metabolic lactic acidosis over 1718000 patient years. There were 51000 patient years of metformin prescribed to patients over the study period. There were thirty two cases of lactic acidosis due to sepsis, seven in patients treated with metformin. Ten cases of MALA were identified. The incidence of MALA was estimated at 19.46 per 100000 patient year exposure to metformin. The relative risk of lactic acidosis in patients on metformin was 13.53 (95%CI: 7.88-21.66) compared to the general population. The mean age of patients with MALA was 63 years, range 40-83 years. A baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate was obtained in all patients and ranged from 23-130 mL/min per 1.73 m2. Only two patients had chronic kidney disease G4. Three patients required treatment with haemodialysis. Two patients died. CONCLUSION: Lactic acidosis is an uncommon but significant complication of use of metformin which carries a high risk of morbidity. PMID:27458565

  8. Acidosis-induced downregulation of hepatocyte mitochondrial aquaporin-8 and ureagenesis from ammonia.

    PubMed

    Molinas, Sara M; Soria, Leandro R; Marrone, Julieta; Danielli, Mauro; Trumper, Laura; Marinelli, Raúl A

    2015-08-01

    It has been proposed that, during metabolic acidosis, the liver downregulates mitochondrial ammonia detoxification via ureagenesis, a bicarbonate-consuming process. Since we previously demonstrated that hepatocyte mitochondrial aquaporin-8 channels (mtAQP8) facilitate the uptake of ammonia and its metabolism into urea, we studied whether mtAQP8 is involved in the liver adaptive response to acidosis. Primary cultured rat hepatocytes were adapted to acidosis by exposing them to culture medium at pH 7.0 for 40 h. Control cells were exposed to pH 7.4. Hepatocytes exposed to acid medium showed a decrease in mtAQP8 protein expression (-30%, p < 0.05). Ureagenesis from ammonia was assessed by incubating the cells with (15)N-labeled ammonia and measuring (15)N-labeled urea synthesis by nuclear magnetic resonance. Reduced ureagenesis was found in acidified hepatocytes (-31%, p < 0.05). In vivo studies in rats subjected to 7 days acidosis also showed decreased protein expression of hepatic mtAQP8 (-50%, p < 0.05) and reduced liver urea content (-35%; p < 0.05). In conclusion, our in vitro and in vivo data suggest that hepatic mtAQP8 expression is downregulated in acidosis, a mechanism that may contribute to decreased ureagenesis from ammonia in response to acidosis.

  9. The use of dilute hydrochloric acid and cimetidine to reverse severe metabolic alkalosis.

    PubMed

    Rowlands, B J; Tindall, S F; Elliott, D J

    1978-02-01

    Two cases of severe metabolic alkalosis associated with gastric hypersecretion were successfully treated with dilute hydrochloric acid and a histamine H2-receptor antagonist given by intravenous infusion. This combined therapy with electrolyte replacement and suppression of gastric secretion is valuable in the control of this serious metabolic abnormality when conventional treatment is unsuccessful or contraindicated.

  10. Lipoyltransferase 1 Gene Defect Resulting in Fatal Lactic Acidosis in Two Siblings

    PubMed Central

    Taché, Véronique; Bivina, Liga; White, Sophie; Gregg, Jeffrey; Deignan, Joshua; Boyadjievd, Simeon A.; Poulain, Francis R.

    2016-01-01

    A term male neonate developed severe intractable lactic acidosis on day of life 1 and died the same day at our institution. The family previously lost another term, female newborn on day of life 1 from suspected sepsis at an outside hospital. After performing an autopsy on the neonate who died at our institution, extensive and lengthy neonatal and parental genetic testing, as well as biochemical analyses, and whole exome sequencing analysis identified compound heterozygous mutations in the lipoyltransferase 1 (LIPT1) gene responsible for the lipoylation of the 2-keto dehydrogenase complexes in the proband. These mutations were also identified in the deceased sibling. The clinical manifestations of these two siblings are consistent with those recently described in two unrelated families with lactic acidosis due to LIPT1 mutations, an underrecognized and underreported cause of neonatal death. Conclusions. Our observations contribute to the delineation of a new autosomal recessive metabolic disorder, leading to neonatal death. Our case report also highlights the importance of an interdisciplinary team in solving challenging cases. PMID:27247813

  11. Osteomalacia complicating renal tubular acidosis in association with Sjogren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    El Ati, Zohra; Fatma, Lilia Ben; Boulahya, Ghada; Rais, Lamia; Krid, Madiha; Smaoui, Wided; Maiz, Hedi Ben; Beji, Soumaya; Zouaghi, Karim; Moussa, Fatma Ben

    2014-09-01

    Renal involvement in Sjogren's syndrome (SS) is not uncommon and may precede other complaints. Tubulointerstitial nephritis is the most common renal disease in SS and may lead to renal tubular acidosis (RTA), which in turn may cause osteomalacia. Nevertheless, osteomalacia rarely occurs as the first manifestation of a renal tubule disorder due to SS. We herewith describe a 43-year-old woman who was admitted to our hospital for weakness, lumbago and inability to walk. X-ray of the long bones showed extensive demineralization of the bones. Laboratory investigations revealed chronic kidney disease with serum creatinine of 2.3 mg/dL and creatinine clearance of 40 mL/min, hypokalemia (3.2 mmol/L), hypophosphatemia (0.4 mmol/L), hypocalcemia (2.14 mmol/L) and hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis (chlorine: 114 mmol/L; alkaline reserve: 14 mmol/L). The serum alkaline phosphatase levels were elevated. The serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D were low and borderline low, respectively, and the parathyroid hormone level was 70 pg/L. Urinalysis showed inappropriate alkaline urine (urinary PH: 7), glycosuria with normal blood glucose, phosphaturia and uricosuria. These values indicated the presence of both distal and proximal RTA. Our patient reported dryness of the mouth and eyes and Schirmer's test showed xerophthalmia. An accessory salivary gland biopsy showed changes corresponding to stage IV of Chisholm and Masson score. Kidney biopsy showed diffuse and severe tubulo-interstitial nephritis with dense lymphoplasmocyte infiltrates. Sicca syndrome and renal interstitial infiltrates indicated SS as the underlying cause of the RTA and osteomalacia. The patient received alkalinization, vitamin D (Sterogyl ®), calcium supplements and steroids in an initial dose of 1 mg/kg/day, tapered to 10 mg daily. The prognosis was favorable and the serum creatinine level was 1.7 mg/dL, calcium was 2.2 mmol/L and serum phosphate was 0.9 mmol/L.

  12. The effect of treatment of acidosis on calcium balance in patients with chronic azotemic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Litzow, J R; Lemann, J; Lennon, E J

    1967-02-01

    Small but statistically significant negative calcium balances were found in each of eight studies in seven patients with chronic azotemic renal disease when stable metabolic acidosis was present. Only small quantities of calcium were excreted in the urine, but fecal calcium excretion equaled or exceeded dietary intake. Complete and continuous correction of acidosis by NaHCO(3) therapy reduced both urinary and fecal calcium excretion and produced a daily calcium balance indistinguishable from zero. Apparent acid retention was found throughout the studies during acidosis, despite no further reduction of the serum bicarbonate concentration. The negative calcium balances that accompanied acid retention support the suggestion that slow titration of alkaline bone salts provides an additional buffer reservoir in chronic metabolic acidosis. The treatment of metabolic acidosis prevented further calcium losses but did not induce net calcium retention. It is suggested that the normal homeostatic responses of the body to the alterations in ionized calcium and calcium distribution produced by raising the serum bicarbonate might paradoxically retard the repair of skeletal calcium deficits.

  13. Disorders of pyruvate metabolism.

    PubMed

    De Meirleir, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase and pyruvate carboxylase deficiency are the most common disorders in pyruvate metabolism. Diagnosis is made by enzymatic and DNA analysis after basic biochemical tests in plasma, urine, and CSF. Pyruvate dehydrogenase has three main subunits, an additional E3-binding protein and two complex regulatory enzymes. Most frequent are deficiencies in PDH-E1α. There is a spectrum of clinical presentations in E1α deficiency, ranging in boys from severe neonatal lactic acidosis, Leigh encephalopathy, to later onset of neurological disease such as intermittent ataxia or dystonia. Females tend to have a more uniform presentation resembling nonprogressive cerebral palsy. Neuroradiological abnormalities such as corpus callosum agenesis are seen more frequently in girls, basal ganglia and midbrain disturbances in boys. Deficiencies in the other subunits have also been described, but in a smaller number of patients. Pyruvate carboxylase deficiency has three clinical phenotypes. The infantile type is characterized mainly by severe developmental delay, failure to thrive, and seizures. The second type is characterized by neonatal onset of severe lactic acidosis with rigidity and hypokinesia. A third form is rarer with intermittent episodes of lactic acidosis and ketoacidosis. Neuroradiological findings such as cystic periventricular leukomalacia have been described.

  14. Emerging Drugs and Indications for Cardio-Metabolic Disorders in People with Severe Mental Illness.

    PubMed

    Kouidrat, Youssef; Amad, Ali; De Hert, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Patients with severe mental illnesses, such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, are at increased risk of developing metabolic disorders including obesity, diabetes, and dyslipidemia. All of these comorbidities increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. Different approaches, including diet and lifestyle modifications, behavioral therapy and switching antipsychotic agents, have been proposed to manage these metabolic abnormalities. However, these interventions may be insufficient, impractical or fail to counteract the metabolic dysregulation. Consequently, a variety of pharmacological agents such as antidiabetic drugs, have been studied in an attempt to reverse the weight gain and metabolic abnormalities evident in these patients. Despite a significant effect, many of these treatments are used off-label. This qualitative review focuses on pharmacological agents that could offer significant benefits in the management of cardio-metabolic disorders associated with serious mental illness.

  15. Citric acid as the last therapeutic approach in an acute life-threatening metabolic decompensation of propionic acidaemia.

    PubMed

    Siekmeyer, Manuela; Petzold-Quinque, Stefanie; Terpe, Friederike; Beblo, Skadi; Gebhardt, Rolf; Schlensog-Schuster, Franziska; Kiess, Wieland; Siekmeyer, Werner

    2013-01-01

    The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle represents the key enzymatic steps in cellular energy metabolism. Once the TCA cycle is impaired in case of inherited metabolic disorders, life-threatening episodes of metabolic decompensation and severe organ failure can arise. We present the case of a 6 ½-year-old girl with propionic acidaemia during an episode of acute life-threatening metabolic decompensation and severe lactic acidosis. Citric acid given as an oral formulation showed the potential to sustain the TCA cycle flux. This therapeutic approach may become a treatment option in a situation of acute metabolic crisis, possibly preventing severe disturbance of energy metabolism.

  16. MT2013-31: Allo HCT for Metabolic Disorders and Severe Osteopetrosis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-22

    Mucopolysaccharidosis Disorders; Hurler Syndrome; Hunter Syndrome; Maroteaux Lamy Syndrome; Sly Syndrome; Alpha-Mannosidosis; Fucosidosis; Aspartylglucosaminuria; Glycoprotein Metabolic Disorders; Sphingolipidoses; Recessive Leukodystrophies; Globoid Cell Leukodystrophy; Metachromatic Leukodystrophy; Niemann-Pick B; Niemann-Pick C Subtype 2; Sphingomyelin Deficiency; Peroxisomal Disorders; Adrenoleukodystrophy With Cerebral Involvement; Zellweger Syndrome; Neonatal Adrenoleukodystrophy; Infantile Refsum Disease; Acyl-CoA Oxidase Deficiency; D-Bifunctional Enzyme Deficiency; Multifunctional Enzyme Deficiency; Alpha-methylacyl-CoA Racmase Deficiency; Mitochondrial Neurogastrointestingal Encephalopathy; Severe Osteopetrosis; Hereditary Leukoencephalopathy; Inherited Metabolic Disorders

  17. Long-term follow-up in distal renal tubular acidosis with sensorineural deafness.

    PubMed

    Peces, R

    2000-11-01

    A 20-year-old man presented with failure to thrive and bilateral genu valgum. On the basis of growth failure, skeletal deformity, hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis with alkaline urine and hypokalemia, nephrocalcinosis, and hearing loss, a diagnosis of distal renal tubular acidosis (DRTA) with sensorineural deafness was made. The genu valgum was treated by corrective osteotomy. Skeletal deformity was corrected and impaired growth improved after sustained therapy of metabolic acidosis with alkali supplementation. During an 8-year follow-up period the patient's glomerular filtration rate remained stable, the nephrocalcinosis did not progress, and his height increased 10 cm. Although nephrolithiasis led to atrophy of the right kidney, at last follow-up, when the patient was 44 years old, his creatinine clearance was 50 ml/min per 1.73 m2 body surface.

  18. Acidosis and correction of acidosis does not affect rFVIIa function in swine

    PubMed Central

    Darlington, Daniel N; Kheirabadi, Bijan S; Scherer, Michael R; Martini, Wenjun Z; Cap, Andrew P; Dubick, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    Background: Hemorrhagic shock and trauma are associated with acidosis and altered coagulation. A fall in pH has been reported to attenuate the activity of recombinant activated Factor VII (rFVIIa) in vitro. However, it is not known if acidosis induced by hemorrhagic shock or infusion of HCl attenuates FVIIa activity in vivo. The purpose of this study was to determine if acidosis, induced by two methods, affects recombinant FVIIa (rFVIIa) activity in swine, and if correction of the pH restores rFVIIa activity to normal. Methods: Acidosis was induce in anesthetized swine in two separate models: 1) HCl infusion (n=10) and 2) hemorrhage/hypoventilation (n=8). Three groups per model were used: Control (pH7.4), Acidosis (arterial pH7.1) and Acidosis-Corrected (bicarbonate infusion to return pH from 7.1 to 7.4). Pigs were then injected with rFVIIa (90 μg/kg) or vehicle (saline) at target pH and arterial blood samples were taken for measurement of coagulation function, including Thromboelastography -TEG, Thrombin Generation, Activated Clotting Time, Prothrombin Time, activated Partial Thromboplastin Time, Fibrinogen Concentration and Platelet count before and 5min after injection of rFVIIa. Results: Acidosis led to a hypocoagulation as measured by almost all coagulation parameters in both models. Furthermore, the change in coagulation function produced after infusion of rFVIIa was not different between control, acidosis and acidosis-corrected groups for all coagulation parameters measured. Conclusion: Acidosis associated with hemorrhagic shock or HCl infusion led to a hypocoagulation that was not corrected with bicarbonate infusion. Furthermore, acidosis did not affect rFVIIa function, and correction of the acidosis with bicarbonate had no effect on rFVIIa function in these models. This suggests that in vivo acidosis did not diminish rFVIIa function. PMID:23272296

  19. Management of Moderate to Severe Psoriasis in Patients with Metabolic Comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    Gisondi, Paolo; Galvan, Arturo; Idolazzi, Luca; Girolomoni, Giampiero

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease affecting 2–3% of worldwide population. The extent of skin involvement is variable, ranging from a few localized plaques to generalized involvement. Moderate to severe psoriasis (>10% of body surface area) is frequently associated with psoriatic arthritis and metabolic diseases, like abdominal obesity, diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, dyslipidemia, metabolic syndrome, and chronic kidney disease. A common genetic background as well as several acquired risk factors links psoriasis to comorbidities. From a clinical prespective, the understanding of the patients in the context of these comorbidities is very important to ensure that treatment is tailored to meet the individual patient needs. Indeed, some pharmacological treatments may negatively affect cardio-metabolic comorbidities, and have important interactions with drugs that are commonly used to treat them. Non-pharmacological intervention such as diet, smoking cessation, and physical exercise could both improve the response to treatments for psoriasis and reduce the cardiovascular risk. PMID:25654080

  20. Acute isoniazid intoxication: an uncommon cause of convulsion, coma and acidosis.

    PubMed

    Uzman, Sinan; Uludağ Yanaral, Tümay; Toptaş, Mehmet; Koç, Alparslan; Taş, Aytül; Bican, Gülşen

    2013-01-01

    Despite the widespread use, suicidal ingestion of isoniazid is a rare condition in Turkey. We reported a case of acute isoniazid intoxication associated with alcohol intake presenting with convulsion, coma and metabolic acidosis. The patient was treated successfully with intravenous pyridoxine administration. Early recognation and appropriate treatment in the intensive care unit is very important to prevent mortality in patients with acute isoniazid toxicity.

  1. Mechanisms in hyperkalemic renal tubular acidosis.

    PubMed

    Karet, Fiona E

    2009-02-01

    The form of renal tubular acidosis associated with hyperkalemia is usually attributable to real or apparent hypoaldosteronism. It is therefore a common feature in diabetes and a number of other conditions associated with underproduction of renin or aldosterone. In addition, the close relationship between potassium levels and ammonia production dictates that hyperkalemia per se can lead to acidosis. Here I describe the modern relationship between molecular function of the distal portion of the nephron, pathways of ammoniagenesis, and hyperkalemia.

  2. Founder p.Arg 446* mutation in the PDHX gene explains over half of cases with congenital lactic acidosis in Roma children.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Ivan S; Azmanov, Dimitar N; Ivanova, Mariya B; Chamova, Teodora; Pacheva, Ilyana H; Panova, Margarita V; Song, Sharon; Morar, Bharti; Yordanova, Ralitsa V; Galabova, Fani K; Sotkova, Iglika G; Linev, Alexandar J; Bitchev, Stoyan; Shearwood, Anne-Marie J; Kancheva, Dalia; Gabrikova, Dana; Karcagi, Veronika; Guergueltcheva, Velina; Geneva, Ina E; Bozhinova, Veneta; Stoyanova, Vili K; Kremensky, Ivo; Jordanova, Albena; Savov, Aleksey; Horvath, Rita; Brown, Matthew A; Tournev, Ivailo; Filipovska, Aleksandra; Kalaydjieva, Luba

    2014-01-01

    Investigation of 31 of Roma patients with congenital lactic acidosis (CLA) from Bulgaria identified homozygosity for the R446* mutation in the PDHX gene as the most common cause of the disorder in this ethnic group. It accounted for around 60% of patients in the study and over 25% of all CLA cases referred to the National Genetic Laboratory in Bulgaria. The detection of a homozygous patient from Hungary and carriers among population controls from Romania and Slovakia suggests a wide spread of the mutation in the European Roma population. The clinical phenotype of the twenty R446* homozygotes was relatively homogeneous, with lactic acidosis crisis in the first days or months of life as the most common initial presentation (15/20 patients) and delayed psychomotor development and/or seizures in infancy as the leading manifestations in a smaller group (5/20 patients). The subsequent clinical picture was dominated by impaired physical growth and a very consistent pattern of static cerebral palsy-like encephalopathy with spasticity and severe to profound mental retardation seen in over 80% of cases. Most patients had a positive family history. We propose testing for the R446* mutation in PDHX as a rapid first screening in Roma infants with metabolic acidosis. It will facilitate and accelerate diagnosis in a large proportion of cases, allow early rehabilitation to alleviate the chronic clinical course, and prevent further affected births in high-risk families.

  3. Evaluation of in vitro models for predicting acidosis risk of barley grain in finishing beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Anele, U Y; Swift, M-L; McAllister, T A; Galyean, M L; Yang, W Z

    2015-10-01

    Our objective was to develop a model to predict the acidosis potential of barley based on the in vitro batch culture incubation of 50 samples varying in bulk density, starch content, processing method, growing location, and agronomic practices. The model was an adaptation of the acidosis index (calculated from a combination of in situ and in vitro analyses and from several components of grain chemical composition) developed in Australia for use in the feed industry to estimate the potential for grains to increase the risk of ruminal acidosis. Of the independent variables considered, DM disappearance at 6 h of incubation (DMD6) using reduced-strength (20%) buffer in the batch culture accounted for 90.5% of the variation in the acidosis index with a root mean square error (RMSE) of 4.46%. To evaluate our model using independent datasets (derived from previous batch culture studies using full-strength [100%] buffer), we performed another batch culture study using full-strength buffer. The full-strength buffer model using in vitro DMD6 (DMD6-FS) accounted for 66.5% of the variation in the acidosis index with an RMSE of 8.30%. When the new full-strength buffer model was applied to 3 independent datasets to predict acidosis, it accounted for 20.1, 28.5, and 30.2% of the variation in the calculated acidosis index. Significant ( < 0.001) mean bias was evident in 2 of the datasets, for which the DMD6 model underpredicted the acidosis index by 46.9 and 5.73%. Ranking of samples from the most diverse independent dataset using the DMD6-FS model and the Black (2008) model (calculated using in situ starch degradation) indicated the relationship between the rankings using Spearman's rank correlation was negative (ρ = -0.30; = 0.059). When the reduced-strength buffer model was used, however, there were similarities in the acidosis index ranking of barley samples by the models as shown by the result of a correlation analysis between calculated (using the Australian model) and

  4. Low Cerebral Glucose Metabolism: A Potential Predictor for the Severity of Vascular Parkinsonism and Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yunqi; Wei, Xiaobo; Liu, Xu; Liao, Jinchi; Lin, Jiaping; Zhu, Cansheng; Meng, Xiaochun; Xie, Dongsi; Chao, Dongman; Fenoy, Albert J; Cheng, Muhua; Tang, Beisha; Zhang, Zhuohua; Xia, Ying; Wang, Qing

    2015-11-01

    This study explored the association between cerebral metabolic rates of glucose (CMRGlc) and the severity of Vascular Parkinsonism (VP) and Parkinson's disease (PD). A cross-sectional study was performed to compare CMRGlc in normal subjects vs. VP and PD patients. Twelve normal subjects, 22 VP, and 11 PD patients were evaluated with the H&Y and MMSE, and underwent 18F-FDG measurements. Pearson's correlations were used to identify potential associations between the severity of VP/PD and CMRGlc. A pronounced reduction of CMRGlc in the frontal lobe and caudate putamen was detected in patients with VP and PD when compared with normal subjects. The VP patients displayed a slight CMRGlc decrease in the caudate putamen and frontal lobe in comparison with PD patients. These decreases in CMRGlc in the frontal lobe and caudate putamen were significantly correlated with the VP patients' H&Y, UPDRS II, UPDRS III, MMSE, cardiovascular, and attention/memory scores. Similarly, significant correlations were observed in patients with PD. This is the first clinical study finding strong evidence for an association between low cerebral glucose metabolism and the severity of VP and PD. Our findings suggest that these changes in glucose metabolism in the frontal lobe and caudate putamen may underlie the pathophysiological mechanisms of VP and PD. As the scramble to find imaging biomarkers or predictors of the disease intensifies, a better understanding of the roles of cerebral glucose metabolism may give us insight into the pathogenesis of VP and PD.

  5. Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... and intestines. Several of the hormones of the endocrine system are involved in controlling the rate and direction ... For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Endocrine System What Can I Do About My High Metabolism? ...

  6. [A clinical case of development of lactic acid acidosis in a diabetic patient taking metformin].

    PubMed

    Cesur, Mustafa; Cekmen, Nedum; Cetinbas, Riza R; Badalov, Pavel; Erdemli, Ozcan

    2006-01-01

    Metformin is a biguanide. Due to its effects in suppressing the hepatic production of endogenous glucose and in increasing insulin sensitivity in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle, the agent is used particularly in type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome, in which insulin resistance is especially pronounced. Lactic acidosis is one of the most important side effects of metformin. A male patient, born in 1923, was admitted to the emergency unit of our hospital for sudden vertigo, weakness, dyspnea, cyanosis, and lethargy. His history data showed that the patient had been suffering from type 2 diabetes mellitus for 10 years and taking Glargin (insulin), 12 U/kg, once daily and Glucophage (metformin), 850 mg thrice daily. The patient's general condition was fair; stupor, time and spatial orientation were absent. Analysis of arterial blood gases showed the presence of metabolic acidosis, hypokalemia, hypoxemia, and hypercapnia. Thereafter the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit of the hospital; intubated and connected to a T-bird ventilation apparatus. On the following day, an analysis of arterial blood gases indicated the proximity of the results to their physiological parameters. Ventilation was stopped; and monitoring of the patient continued by following the T-shape type of ventilation discontinuation. There were no X-ray signs of pneumonia or pulmonary edema. On the same day, the patient was extubated and oxygen inhalation in a dose of L/min was continued through a mask. On day 4 since therapy was initiated, the patient's vital signs, serum sugar and lactate levels became normal. By determining a new treatment regimen, the patient was discharged from the intensive care unit. Dyspnea, acidosis, and hypoxia developed in the patient resulted from lactic acidosis caused by the use of metformin. It should be remembered that dyspnea, acidosis, and hypoxia, which suddenly developed in metformin-treated patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, may be

  7. The Effect of Osmotherapy and Tight Control of Acidosis on Early Graft Function among Deceased-Donor Kidney Transplant Recipients: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Etezadi, F.; Najafi Abrandabadi, A. H.; Motaharinia, J.; Mojtahedzadeh, M.; Pourfakhr, P.; Khajavi, M. R.; Gooran, S.; Shariat Moharari, R.; Dehghani, S.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Reperfusion injury and the acid-base status of the transplant are important factors affecting post-transplantation graft function. Objective: We hypothesized that infusing hypertonic saline (HS) or tight control of acid-base status of the blood rushing through renal graft using sodium bicarbonate may have beneficial effects on early graft function. Methods: Candidates for deceased-donor kidney transplant were randomized into three groups. HS group (n=33) received 50 mL/kg normal saline (NS) titrated during operation plus 4 mL/kg of 5% HS just within graft reperfusion phase; bicarbonate group (n=37) was administered 60 mL/kg NS while their metabolic acidosis (base excess ≤5 mEq/L) was tightly corrected every 30 min with sodium bicarbonate; and a control group (n=36) that received 60 mL/kg normal saline while they were administered sodium bicarbonate only, if they encountered severe metabolic acidosis (base excess ≤15 mEq/L). The primary outcome was defined as early post-operative renal function evaluated based on serial serum creatinine levels. The study was registered in Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials (IRCT2013122815841N19). Results: Post-operative early graft function improved significantly during the first 3 days in the intervention groups (p<0.05). However, that beneficial effect no longer remained at the same level after the day four. Conclusion: Timely administration of HS or tight control of metabolic acidosis with sodium bicarbonate infusion improve early renal function during renal transplant surgery. PMID:28299023

  8. Severe metabolic alkalosis due to baking soda ingestion: case reports of two patients with unsuspected antacid overdose.

    PubMed

    Fitzgibbons, L J; Snoey, E R

    1999-01-01

    Oral ingestion of baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) has been used for decades as a home remedy for acid indigestion. Excessive bicarbonate ingestion places patients at risk for a variety of metabolic derangements including metabolic alkalosis, hypokalemia, hypernatremia, and even hypoxia. The clinical presentation is highly variable but can include seizures, dysrhythmias, and cardiopulmonary arrest. We present two cases of severe metabolic alkalosis in patients with unsuspected antacid overdose. The presentation and pathophysiology of antacid-related metabolic alkalosis is reviewed.

  9. Severe normotensive metabolic alkalosis in a 2-month-old boy with hyperekplexia.

    PubMed

    Schlapbach, L J; Sozzo, A; Ramelli, G; Bianchetti, M G

    2006-02-01

    A 2-month-old infant with hereditary hyperekplexia, umbilical and bilateral inguinal hernias and history of poor feeding was noted to have severe normotensive metabolic alkalosis: sodium 132 mmol/L, potassium 3.4 mmol/L, chloride 77 mmol/L, pH 7.55, carbon dioxide tension 56.3 mmHg and bicarbonate 48.0 mmol/L. After parenteral rehydration and treatment with clonazepam, laboratory parameters normalized.

  10. Reciprocal Transcriptional Regulation of Metabolic and Signaling Pathways Correlates with Disease Severity in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Andreas S; Kumordzie, Ami; Frangakis, Constantine; Margulies, Kenneth B; Cappola, Thomas P; Tomaselli, Gordon F

    2012-01-01

    Background Systolic heart failure (HF) is a complex systemic syndrome that can result from a wide variety of clinical conditions and gene mutations. Despite phenotypic similarities, characterized by ventricular dilatation and reduced contractility, the extent of common and divergent gene expression between different forms of HF remains a matter of intense debate. Methods and Results Using a meta-analysis of 28 experimental (mouse, rat, dog) and human HF microarray studies, we demonstrate that gene expression changes are characterized by a coordinated and reciprocal regulation of major metabolic and signaling pathways. In response to a wide variety of stressors in animal models of HF, including ischemia, pressure overload, tachypacing, chronic isoproterenol infusion, Chagas disease, and transgenic mouse models, major metabolic pathways are invariably downregulated, while cell signaling pathways are upregulated. In contrast to this uniform transcriptional pattern observed in experimental animal models which recapitulates a fetal gene expression program, human HF microarray studies displayed a greater heterogeneity, with some studies even showing upregulation of metabolic and downregulation of signaling pathways in end-stage human hearts. These discrepant results between animal and human studies are due to a number of factors, prominently cardiac disease and variable exposure to cold cardioplegic solution in non-failing human samples which can downregulate transcripts involved in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) within the first 6h, thus mimicking gene expression patterns observed in failing samples. Additionally, beta-blockers and ACE-inhibitor use in end-stage human HF was associated with higher levels of myocardial OXPHOS transcripts, thus partially reversing the fetal gene expression pattern. In human failing samples, downregulation of metabolism was associated with hemodynamic markers of disease severity. Conclusions Irrespective of the etiology, gene

  11. Metabolite mapping reveals severe widespread perturbation of multiple metabolic processes in Huntington's disease human brain.

    PubMed

    Patassini, Stefano; Begley, Paul; Xu, Jingshu; Church, Stephanie J; Reid, Suzanne J; Kim, Eric H; Curtis, Maurice A; Dragunow, Mike; Waldvogel, Henry J; Snell, Russell G; Unwin, Richard D; Faull, Richard L M; Cooper, Garth J S

    2016-09-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a genetically-mediated neurodegenerative disorder wherein the aetiological defect is a mutation in the Huntington's gene (HTT), which alters the structure of the huntingtin protein (Htt) through lengthening of its polyglutamine tract, thus initiating a cascade that ultimately leads to premature death. However, neurodegeneration typically manifests in HD only in middle age, and mechanisms linking the causative mutation to brain disease are poorly understood. Brain metabolism is severely perturbed in HD, and some studies have indicated a potential role for mutant Htt as a driver of these metabolic aberrations. Here, our objective was to determine the effects of HD on brain metabolism by measuring levels of polar metabolites in regions known to undergo varying degrees of damage. We performed gas-chromatography/mass spectrometry-based metabolomic analyses in a case-control study of eleven brain regions in short post-mortem-delay human tissue from nine well-characterized HD patients and nine matched controls. In each patient, we measured metabolite content in representative tissue-samples from eleven brain regions that display varying degrees of damage in HD, thus identifying the presence and abundance of 63 different metabolites from several molecular classes, including carbohydrates, amino acids, nucleosides, and neurotransmitters. Robust alterations in regional brain-metabolite abundances were observed in HD patients: these included changes in levels of small molecules that play important roles as intermediates in the tricarboxylic-acid and urea cycles, and amino-acid metabolism. Our findings point to widespread disruption of brain metabolism and indicate a complex phenotype beyond the gradient of neuropathologic damage observed in HD brain.

  12. Metabolomic profiling reveals severe skeletal muscle group-specific perturbations of metabolism in aged FBN rats.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Sean M; Dugle, Janis E; Kennedy, Adam D; McDunn, Jonathan E; Kline, William; Guo, Lining; Guttridge, Denis C; Pereira, Suzette L; Edens, Neile K

    2014-06-01

    Mammalian skeletal muscles exhibit age-related adaptive and pathological remodeling. Several muscles in particular undergo progressive atrophy and degeneration beyond median lifespan. To better understand myocellular responses to aging, we used semi-quantitative global metabolomic profiling to characterize trends in metabolic changes between 15-month-old adult and 32-month-old aged Fischer 344 × Brown Norway (FBN) male rats. The FBN rat gastrocnemius muscle exhibits age-dependent atrophy, whereas the soleus muscle, up until 32 months, exhibits markedly fewer signs of atrophy. Both gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were analyzed, as well as plasma and urine. Compared to adult gastrocnemius, aged gastrocnemius showed evidence of reduced glycolytic metabolism, including accumulation of glycolytic, glycogenolytic, and pentose phosphate pathway intermediates. Pyruvate was elevated with age, yet levels of citrate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide were reduced, consistent with mitochondrial abnormalities. Indicative of muscle atrophy, 3-methylhistidine and free amino acids were elevated in aged gastrocnemius. The monounsaturated fatty acids oleate, cis-vaccenate, and palmitoleate also increased in aged gastrocnemius, suggesting altered lipid metabolism. Compared to gastrocnemius, aged soleus exhibited far fewer changes in carbohydrate metabolism, but did show reductions in several glycolytic intermediates, fumarate, malate, and flavin adenine dinucleotide. Plasma biochemicals showing the largest age-related increases included glycocholate, heme, 1,5-anhydroglucitol, 1-palmitoleoyl-glycerophosphocholine, palmitoleate, and creatine. These changes suggest reduced insulin sensitivity in aged FBN rats. Altogether, these data highlight skeletal muscle group-specific perturbations of glucose and lipid metabolism consistent with mitochondrial dysfunction in aged FBN rats.

  13. [Self-treatment with baking soda can lead to severe metabolic alkalosis].

    PubMed

    Jensen, Sara; Skriver, Signe

    2014-12-15

    This case report describes a 66-year-old man, previously healthy besides mild hypertension. He ingested a self-made folk remedy consisting of baking soda and water against acid reflux in dosages that resulted in severe metabolic alkalosis (pH 7.8). Diagnosing and treating MA is easy and cheap, but if the condition is not treated, consequences can be severe. The challenge is to uncover patients' use of non prescription medications and folk remedies in the diagnostic process. Having this information it is possible to prevent MA in both high- and low-risk patients.

  14. β-Cell Dysfunction Is Associated with Metabolic Syndrome Severity in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Malin, Steven K.; Finnegan, Stephen; Fealy, Ciaran E.; Filion, Julianne; Rocco, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Metabolic syndrome is prevalent in adults characterized by increased visceral adiposity and insulin resistance (IR). However, the link between pancreatic β-cell function and metabolic syndrome severity in adults across the glucose spectrum is unknown. We hypothesized that poor β-cell function would independently predict a higher metabolic syndrome Z-score (i.e., severity). Methods: Seventy (12 normal glucose tolerant, 37 prediabetic, 21 type 2 diabetic) obese adults [62.4±1.1 year; 34.6±0.6 kg/m2; data are mean±standard error of the mean (SEM)] participated in this cross-sectional study. A 2-hr 75-gram oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was administered, and insulin and glucose area under the curve was determined for calculations of insulin action. Fasting and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was calculated using homeostasis model assessment of insulin secretion (HOMA-B) and the insulinogenic index (i.e., I0–30/Glc0–30 or I60–120/Glc60–120), respectively. Fasting and postprandial insulin sensitivity was assessed by HOMA-IR and the Matsuda Index, respectively. β-cell function was estimated using the disposition index via HOMA-B/HOMA-IR, I0–30/Glc0–30 or I60–120/Glc60–120×Matsuda Index, which represents basal, first-, and second-phase insulin release, respectively. Body composition (via computerized tomography and dual X-ray absorptiometry) and sex-specific metabolic syndrome Z-scores were calculated from waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting glucose, triglycerides, and high-density lipoproteins. Results: Compared to those with normal glucose tolerance, visceral fat and IR were higher and β-cell function was lower in adults with glucose intolerance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Elevated visceral fat and IR (HOMA-IR and Matsuda Index) correlated with elevated Z-scores (r=0.51, r=0.54, r=−0.49; all P<0.002, respectively). Basal, first-, and second-phase β-cell function correlated with low Z-scores (r=−0

  15. Maple Bark Biochar Affects Rhizoctonia solani Metabolism and Increases Damping-Off Severity.

    PubMed

    Copley, Tanya R; Aliferis, Konstantinos A; Jabaji, Suha

    2015-10-01

    Many studies have investigated the effect of biochar on plant yield, nutrient uptake, and soil microbial populations; however, little work has been done on its effect on soilborne plant diseases. To determine the effect of maple bark biochar on Rhizoctonia damping-off, 11 plant species were grown in a soilless potting substrate amended with different concentrations of biochar and inoculated or not with Rhizoctonia solani anastomosis group 4. Additionally, the effect of biochar amendment on R. solani growth and metabolism in vitro was evaluated. Increasing concentrations of maple bark biochar increased Rhizoctonia damping-off of all 11 plant species. Using multivariate analyses, we observed positive correlations between biochar amendments, disease severity and incidence, abundance of culturable bacterial communities, and physicochemical parameters. Additionally, biochar amendment significantly increased R. solani growth and hyphal extension in vitro, and altered its primary metabolism, notably the mannitol and tricarboxylic acid cycles and the glycolysis pathway. One or several organic compounds present in the biochar, as identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis, may be metabolized by R. solani. Taken together, these results indicate that future studies on biochar should focus on the effect of its use as an amendment on soilborne plant pathogens before applying it to soils.

  16. Metformin-Associated Lactic Acidosis in a Patient with Normal Renal Function.

    PubMed

    Omar, Ahmed; Ellen, Ruth; Sorisky, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    We report a case of metformin-associated lactic acidosis (MALA) in the setting of normal renal function and review the relevant medical literature. A 77-year-old female diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus previously treated with insulin and gliclazide MR was started on metformin. A few weeks later, she was found to have lactic acidosis. Renal function was normal, and no severe underlying illness was identified. Metformin was discontinued, and lactate levels normalized within 4 days, suggesting metformin was a reversible precipitant of the lactic acidosis. MALA can occur in the absence of renal impairment, systemic hypoperfusion or severe liver disease. A possible mechanism is a genetically determined alteration in metformin pharmacokinetics. Metformin is beneficial and safe in patients with normal renal function, but the development of MALA, although rare, should be kept in mind to prevent potentially life-threatening toxicity.

  17. Comparison of metabolic substrates in alligators and several birds of prey.

    PubMed

    Sweazea, Karen L; McMurtry, John P; Elsey, Ruth M; Redig, Patrick; Braun, Eldon J

    2014-08-01

    On average, avian blood glucose concentrations are 1.5-2 times those of mammals of similar mass and high concentrations of insulin are required to lower blood glucose. Whereas considerable data exist for granivorous species, few data are available for plasma metabolic substrate and glucoregulatory hormone concentrations for carnivorous birds and alligators. Birds and mammals with carnivorous diets have higher metabolic rates than animals consuming diets with less protein whereas alligators have low metabolic rates. Therefore, the present study was designed to compare substrate and glucoregulatory hormone concentrations in several birds of prey and a phylogenetically close relative of birds, the alligator. The hypothesis was that the combination of carnivorous diets and high metabolic rates favored the evolution of greater protein and fatty acid utilization leading to insulin resistance and high plasma glucose concentrations in carnivorous birds. In contrast, it was hypothesized that alligators would have low substrate utilization attributable to a low metabolic rate. Fasting plasma substrate and glucoregulatory hormone concentrations were compared for bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), great horned owls (Bubo virginianus), red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), and American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis). Avian species had high circulating β-hydroxybutyrate (10-21 mg/dl) compared to alligators (2.81 ± 0.16 mg/dl). In mammals high concentrations of this byproduct of fatty acid utilization are correlated with insulin resistance. Fasting glucose and insulin concentrations were positively correlated in eagles whereas no relationship was found between these variables for owls, hawks or alligators. Additionally, β-hydroxybutyrate concentrations were low in alligators. Similar to carnivorous mammals, ingestion of a high protein diet may have favored the utilization of fatty acids and protein for energy thereby promoting the development of insulin

  18. Ruminal Acidosis in Feedlot: From Aetiology to Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Joaquín; Benedito, José Luis; Abuelo, Angel; Castillo, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Acute ruminal acidosis is a metabolic status defined by decreased blood pH and bicarbonate, caused by overproduction of ruminal D-lactate. It will appear when animals ingest excessive amount of nonstructural carbohydrates with low neutral detergent fiber. Animals will show ruminal hypotony/atony with hydrorumen and a typical parakeratosis-rumenitis liver abscess complex, associated with a plethora of systemic manifestations such as diarrhea and dehydration, liver abscesses, infections of the lung, the heart, and/or the kidney, and laminitis, as well as neurologic symptoms due to both cerebrocortical necrosis and the direct effect of D-lactate on neurons. In feedlots, warning signs include decrease in chewing activity, weight, and dry matter intake and increase in laminitis and diarrhea prevalence. The prognosis is quite variable. Treatment will be based on the control of systemic acidosis and dehydration. Prevention is the most important tool and will require normalization of ruminal pH and microbiota. Appropriate feeding strategies are essential and involve changing the dietary composition to increase neutral detergent fiber content and greater particle size and length. Appropriate grain processing can control the fermentation rate while additives such as prebiotics or probiotics can help to stabilize the ruminal environment. Immunization against producers of D-lactate is being explored. PMID:25489604

  19. Excitotoxicity and Metabolic Crisis Are Associated with Spreading Depolarizations in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury Patients.

    PubMed

    Hinzman, Jason M; Wilson, J Adam; Mazzeo, Anna Teresa; Bullock, M Ross; Hartings, Jed A

    2016-10-01

    Cerebral microdialysis has enabled the clinical characterization of excitotoxicity (glutamate >10 μM) and non-ischemic metabolic crisis (lactate/pyruvate ratio [LPR] >40) as important components of secondary damage in severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Spreading depolarizations (SD) are pathological waves that occur in many patients in the days following TBI and, in animal models, cause elevations in extracellular glutamate, increased anaerobic metabolism, and energy substrate depletion. Here, we examined the association of SD with changes in cerebral neurochemistry by placing a microdialysis probe alongside a subdural electrode strip in peri-lesional cortex of 16 TBI patients requiring neurosurgery. In 107 h (median; range: 76-117 h) of monitoring, 135 SDs were recorded in six patients. Glutamate (50 μmol/L) and lactate (3.7 mmol/L) were significantly elevated on day 0 in patients with SD compared with subsequent days and with patients without SD, whereas pyruvate was decreased in the latter group on days 0 and 1 (two-way analysis of variance [ANOVA], p values <0.05). In patients with SD, both glutamate and LPR increased in a dose-dependent manner with the number of SDs in the microdialysis sampling period (0, 1, ≥2 SD) [glutamate: 2.1→7.0→52.3 μmol/L; LPR: 27.8→29.9→45.0, p values <0.05]. In these patients, there was a 10% probability of SD occurring when glutamate and LPR were in normal ranges, but a 60% probability when both variables were abnormal (>10 μmol/L and >40 μmol/L, respectively). Taken together with previous studies, these preliminary clinical results suggest SDs are a key pathophysiological process of secondary brain injury associated with non-ischemic glutamate excitotoxicity and severe metabolic crisis in severe TBI patients.

  20. Enkephalins and hormonal-metabolic reactions in experimental stress depending on its severity

    SciTech Connect

    Lishmanov, Y.B.; Alekminskaya, L.A.; Lasukova, T.V.

    1985-08-01

    The aim of this investigation was to study the action of enkephalins on changes in hormonal-metabolic constants in stress of varied severity. Catecholamine excretion with the urine was determined fluorometrically, serum cortisol and insulin concentrations were measured radioimmunologically and glucose was determined by the standard orthotoluidine method. The results of the investigation indicate that enkephalins have a modulating effect on various hormonal mechanisms of adaptation stress. The results confirm that the physiological action of the peptide regulator depends on the functional state of the biological systems and it may differ sharply, even to the extent of diametrically opposite effects.

  1. [The correction of metabolic disorders in severely burned patients by enteral hyperalimentation].

    PubMed

    Zaets, T L; Tarasov, A V

    1992-01-01

    An investigation was carried out of the metabolic processes, and some procedures for standardizing them, for patients with severe burns receiving uniformly distributed dosified high-calorie catheter alimentation, i.e. enteral hyperalimentation, in addition to the hospital's daily diet. Fifteen types of mixtures of Combustal were used, made and preserved ad hoc, and two commercial probe alimentation liquid products--Biosorbin-MCT (Pfrimmer-Kabi) and Fresubin (Fresenius AG). The average period taken to normalize the nitrogen balance was sixteen days counted from commencement of hyperalimentation. While it shifted the nitrogen balance figures from negative to positive, it was also seen to reduce A and C phospholipase activities in serum, while the level of excretion of nitrogenated amino acids and creatine remained high. During this time, pseudocholinesterase activity dropped, with the concentration of fibronectine in serum, which indicates low levels of biosynthetic processes and insufficiency in the reticuloendothelial system. The average value for the determination of lipids in general remained normal throughout the catheter feeding period. To ensure complete normalization of the metabolic process in patients suffering severe burns, enteral hyperalimentation must be extended for at least one month.

  2. Treatment of Severe Metabolic Alkalosis with Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy: Bicarbonate Kinetic Equations of Clinical Value.

    PubMed

    Yessayan, Lenar; Yee, Jerry; Frinak, Stan; Kwon, David; Szamosfalvi, Balazs

    2015-01-01

    Concomitant severe metabolic alkalosis, hypernatremia, and kidney failure pose a therapeutic challenge. Hemodialysis to correct azotemia and abnormal electrolytes results in rapid correction of serum sodium, bicarbonate, and urea but presents a risk for dialysis disequilibrium and brain edema. We describe a patient with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome with persistent encephalopathy, severe metabolic alkalosis (highest bicarbonate 81 mEq/L), hypernatremia (sodium 157 mEq/L), and kidney failure despite 30 hours of intravenous crystalloids and proton pump inhibitor. We used continuous renal replacement therapy (RRT) with delivered hourly urea clearance of ~3 L/hour (24 hour sustained low efficiency dialysis with regional citrate anticoagulation protocol at blood flow rate 60 ml/min and dialysate flow rate 400 ml/min). To mitigate a pronounced decrease in plasma osmolality while removing urea from this hypernatremic patient, dialysate sodium was set to start at 155 mEq/L then at 150 mEq/L after 6 hours. Serum bicarbonate, urea, and sodium were slowly corrected over 26 hours. This case demonstrates how to regulate and predict the systemic bicarbonate level using single pool kinetic modeling during convective or diffusive RRT. Kinetic modeling provides a valuable tool for systemic blood pH control in future combined use of extracorporeal CO2 removal and continuous RRT systems.

  3. Epinephrine-induced lactic acidosis in orthognathic surgery: a report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Submucosal infiltration and the topical application of epinephrine as a vasoconstrictor produce excellent hemostasis during surgery. The hemodynamic effects of epinephrine have been documented in numerous studies. However, its metabolic effects (especially during surgery) have been seldom recognized clinically. We report two cases of significant metabolic effects (including lactic acidosis and hyperglycemia) as well as hemodynamic effects in healthy patients undergoing orthognathic surgery with general anesthesia. Epinephrine can induce glycolysis and pyruvate generation, which result in lactic acidosis, via β2-adrenergic receptors. Therefore, careful perioperative observation for changes in plasma lactate and glucose levels along with intensive monitoring of vital signs should be carried out when epinephrine is excessively used as a vasoconstrictor during surgery. PMID:27847739

  4. Glycolysis in energy metabolism during seizures☆

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Heng; Wu, Jiongxing; Guo, Ren; Peng, Yufen; Zheng, Wen; Liu, Ding; Song, Zhi

    2013-01-01

    Studies have shown that glycolysis increases during seizures, and that the glycolytic metabolite lactic acid can be used as an energy source. However, how lactic acid provides energy for seizures and how it can participate in the termination of seizures remains unclear. We reviewed possible mechanisms of glycolysis involved in seizure onset. Results showed that lactic acid was involved in seizure onset and provided energy at early stages. As seizures progress, lactic acid reduces the pH of tissue and induces metabolic acidosis, which terminates the seizure. The specific mechanism of lactic acid-induced acidosis involves several aspects, which include lactic acid-induced inhibition of the glycolytic enzyme 6-diphosphate kinase-1, inhibition of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, activation of the acid-sensitive 1A ion channel, strengthening of the receptive mechanism of the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-minobutyric acid, and changes in the intra- and extracellular environment. PMID:25206426

  5. Metabolic recovery in goldfish: A comparison of recovery from severe hypoxia exposure and exhaustive exercise.

    PubMed

    Mandic, Milica; Lau, Gigi Y; Nijjar, Manu M S; Richards, Jeffrey G

    2008-11-01

    Severe hypoxia exposure and exhaustive exercise in goldfish both elicit a strong activation of substrate-level phosphorylation with the majority of the metabolic perturbations occurring in the white muscle. Approximately half of the muscle glycogen breakdown observed during severe hypoxia exposure was accounted for by ethanol production and loss to the environment, which limited the extent of muscle glycogen recovery when animals were returned to normoxic conditions. Ethanol production in goldfish is not solely a response to anoxia/hypoxia exposure however, as a transient increase in ethanol production was observed during the early stages of recovery from exhaustive exercise. These data suggest that ethanol production is a ubiquitous "anaerobic" end product, which accumulates whenever metabolic demands exceed mitochondrial oxidative potential. Exhaustive exercise and hypoxia exposure both caused a 7 to 8 micromol g(-1) wet mass increase in muscle [lactate] and the rates of recovery following these perturbations were similar. The rates of muscle PCr and pHi recovery after hypoxia exposure and exhaustive exercise were similar with levels returning to controls values within 0.5 h. Surprisingly, liver [glycogen] was not depleted during exposure to severe hypoxia, however, during recovery from both hypoxia and exercise dramatically different responses in liver [glycogen] were noted. During the early stages of recovery, liver [glycogen] transiently increased to high levels after exhaustive exercise, while during recovery from hypoxia there was a transient decrease in liver glycogen over the same time frame. Overall, this points to the liver playing a dramatically different role in facilitating recovery from exercise compared with hypoxia exposure.

  6. ASAS Centennial Paper: contributions in the Journal of Animal Science to understanding cattle metabolic and digestive disorders.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, J T; Galyean, M L

    2008-07-01

    Acute and subacute ruminal acidosis, bloat, liver abscesses, and polioencephalomalacia (PEM) were reviewed with respect to contributions published in the Journal of Animal Science (JAS) regarding these metabolic and digestive disorders in beef cattle. Increased grain feeding and expansion of the feedlot industry in the 1960s led to considerable research on acidosis, and early publications defined ruminal changes with acute acidosis. The concept of subacute acidosis was developed in the 1970s. Significant research was published during the 1980s and 1990s on adaptation to high-grain diets, effects of ionophores, and the development of model systems to study ruminal and metabolic changes in acidosis. Since 2000, JAS publications on acidosis have largely focused on individual animal variability in response to acid loads and the role of management strategies in controlling acidosis. Increased grain feeding also was associated with an increase in the incidence of liver abscesses, which were quickly linked to insults to the ruminal epithelium associated with acidosis. The role of antibiotics, particularly tylosin, in decreasing the incidence and severity of liver abscesses was a significant contribution of JAS publications during the 1970s and 1980s. Papers on bloat were among the earliest published in JAS related to metabolic and digestive disorders in cattle. Noteworthy accomplishments in bloat research chronicled in JAS include the nature of ruminal contents in legume and feedlot bloat, the role of plant fractions and microbial populations in the development of bloat, and the efficacy of poloxalene, ionophores, and, more recently, condensed tannins in decreasing the incidence and severity of bloat. Although less research has been published on PEM in JAS, early publications highlighting the association between PEM and ruminal acidity and the role of thiaminase in certain forms of the disorder, as well as more recent publications related to the role of sulfur in the

  7. A Heterozygous ZMPSTE24 Mutation Associated with Severe Metabolic Syndrome, Ectopic Fat Accumulation, and Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Galant, Damien; Gaborit, Bénédicte; Desgrouas, Camille; Abdesselam, Ines; Bernard, Monique; Levy, Nicolas; Merono, Françoise; Coirault, Catherine; Roll, Patrice; Lagarde, Arnaud; Bonello-Palot, Nathalie; Bourgeois, Patrice; Dutour, Anne; Badens, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    ZMPSTE24 encodes the only metalloprotease, which transforms prelamin into mature lamin A. Up to now, mutations in ZMPSTE24 have been linked to Restrictive Dermopathy (RD), Progeria or Mandibulo-Acral Dysplasia (MAD). We report here the phenotype of a patient referred for severe metabolic syndrome and cardiomyopathy, carrying a mutation in ZMPSTE24. The patient presented with a partial lipodystrophic syndrome associating hypertriglyceridemia, early onset type 2 diabetes, and android obesity with truncal and abdominal fat accumulation but without subcutaneous lipoatrophy. Other clinical features included acanthosis nigricans, liver steatosis, dilated cardiomyopathy, and high myocardial and hepatic triglycerides content. Mutated fibroblasts from the patient showed increased nuclear shape abnormalities and premature senescence as demonstrated by a decreased Population Doubling Level, an increased beta-galactosidase activity and a decreased BrdU incorporation rate. Reduced prelamin A expression by siRNA targeted toward LMNA transcripts resulted in decreased nuclear anomalies. We show here that a central obesity without subcutaneous lipoatrophy is associated with a laminopathy due to a heterozygous missense mutation in ZMPSTE24. Given the high prevalence of metabolic syndrome and android obesity in the general population, and in the absence of familial study, the causative link between mutation and phenotype cannot be formally established. Nevertheless, altered lamina architecture observed in mutated fibroblasts are responsible for premature cellular senescence and could contribute to the phenotype observed in this patient. PMID:27120622

  8. Severe hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis and hypertension in a 54 year old male with ectopic ACTH syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Valles, Miguel Angel; Palafox-Cazarez, Asael; Paredes-Avina, Jose Antonio

    2009-07-31

    Ectopic ACTH syndrome is a rare cause of Cushing's syndrome accounting for about 15% of all cases. Small cell lung cancer and bronchial carcinoids account for about half of the cases. Malignant neoplasm has rapid and more aggressive metabolic effects. We report a 54-year-old male patient with phenotypic features of Cushing's syndrome with severe hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis, hypertension and altered mental status as manifestations of an ACTH-secreting small cell carcinoma from the lung. Ectopic ACTH syndrome should be highly considered in patients with hypertension and severe hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis, especially when a lung mass is discovered.

  9. New insights into the metabolic and nutritional determinants of severe combined immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Field, Martha S; Kamynina, Elena; Watkins, David; Rosenblatt, David S; Stover, Patrick J

    2015-01-01

    Human mutations in MTHFD1 have recently been identified in patients with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). SCID results from inborn errors of metabolism that cause impaired T- and B-cell proliferation and function. One of the most common causes of SCID is adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency, which ultimately inhibits DNA synthesis and cell division. MTHFD1 has been shown to translocate to the nucleus during S-phase of the cell cycle; this localization is critical for synthesis of thymidyate (dTMP or the “T” base in DNA) and subsequent progression through the cell cycle and cell proliferation. Identification of MTHFD1 mutations that are associated with SCID highlights the potential importance of adequate dTMP synthesis in the etiology of SCID. PMID:27123375

  10. Desmoglein 1 deficiency results in severe dermatitis, multiple allergies and metabolic wasting.

    PubMed

    Samuelov, Liat; Sarig, Ofer; Harmon, Robert M; Rapaport, Debora; Ishida-Yamamoto, Akemi; Isakov, Ofer; Koetsier, Jennifer L; Gat, Andrea; Goldberg, Ilan; Bergman, Reuven; Spiegel, Ronen; Eytan, Ori; Geller, Shamir; Peleg, Sarit; Shomron, Noam; Goh, Christabelle S M; Wilson, Neil J; Smith, Frances J D; Pohler, Elizabeth; Simpson, Michael A; McLean, W H Irwin; Irvine, Alan D; Horowitz, Mia; McGrath, John A; Green, Kathleen J; Sprecher, Eli

    2013-10-01

    The relative contribution of immunological dysregulation and impaired epithelial barrier function to allergic diseases is still a matter of debate. Here we describe a new syndrome featuring severe dermatitis, multiple allergies and metabolic wasting (SAM syndrome) caused by homozygous mutations in DSG1. DSG1 encodes desmoglein 1, a major constituent of desmosomes, which connect the cell surface to the keratin cytoskeleton and have a crucial role in maintaining epidermal integrity and barrier function. Mutations causing SAM syndrome resulted in lack of membrane expression of DSG1, leading to loss of cell-cell adhesion. In addition, DSG1 deficiency was associated with increased expression of a number of genes encoding allergy-related cytokines. Our deciphering of the pathogenesis of SAM syndrome substantiates the notion that allergy may result from a primary structural epidermal defect.

  11. [Metformin-associated lactic acidosis and acute kidney injury].

    PubMed

    Greco, Paolo; Regolisti, Giuseppe; Antoniotti, Riccardo; Maccari, Caterina; Parenti, Elisabetta; Corrado, Silvia; Fiaccadori, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Metformin is recommended as the treatment of choice in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus because of its efficacy, general tolerability and low cost. Recent guidelines have extended the use of metformin to patients with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) up to stage III. However, in the recent literature, cases of MALA (metformin-associated lactic acidosis) are increasingly reported. MALA is the most dangerous side effect of the drug, with an incidence rate of 2-9 cases per 100000 person-years of exposure. We report on two patients with accidental metformin overdose, severe lactic acidosis and acute kidney injury. In both cases, the usual dose of metformin was inappropriate with respect to the level of kidney dysfunction (CKD stage III). As both patients met the criteria for renal replacement therapy in metformin poisoning, they were treated effectively with sustained low-efficiency dialysis until normalization of serum lactate and bicarbonate values. Clinical status and kidney function improved and both patients could be discharged from the hospital.

  12. [Cardiac and metabolic risk factors in severe mental disorders. Task of a prevention manager].

    PubMed

    Lederbogen, F; Schwarz, P; Häfner, S; Schweiger, U; Bohus, M; Deuschle, M

    2015-07-01

    People with severe mental disorders have a reduction in life expectancy of 13-30 % compared with the general population. This severe disadvantage is primarily due to an increased prevalence of cardiac and metabolic disorders, especially coronary heart disease (CHD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus and are the result of untoward health behavior characterized by smoking, low levels of physical activity and unhealthy dietary habits. Obesity, arterial hypertension and lipid disorders are also associated with this behavior and further increase the risk of CHD and type 2 diabetes. Thus, people with mental disorders constitute a population with a high risk of cardiovascular events. Appropriate measures for prevention and therapy are urgently indicated but rarely applied. This article presents new organizational structures to overcome this deficit with a prevention manager playing a central role in organizing and applying preventive and therapeutic care. Results from cardiology and diabetic medicine have shown the effectiveness of pooling this responsibility. The measure has the potential to reduce the increased mortality of people with severe mental disorders.

  13. Distal renal tubular acidosis with hereditary spherocytosis.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rajiv; Agarwal, Indira; Bawazir, Waleed M; Bruce, Lesley J

    2013-07-01

    Hereditary spherocytosis (HS) and distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA), although distinct entities, share the same protein i.e. the anion exchanger1 (AE1) protein. Despite this, their coexistence has been rarely reported. We hereby describe the largest family to date with co-existence of dRTA and HS and discuss the molecular basis for the co-inheritance of these conditions.

  14. Medullary sponge kidney presenting in a neonate with distal renal tubular acidosis and failure to thrive: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Medullary sponge kidney is a congenital anomaly characterized by diffuse ectasy of the collecting tubules of one or both kidneys. It is usually diagnosed in the second or third decade of life. Case presentation Distal renal tubular acidosis is commonly observed in patients with medullary sponge kidney. We describe here a 50-day-old Egyptian Caucasian girl with medullary sponge kidney who had features of distal renal tubular acidosis, (persistent alkaline urine, hypercalciuria, hypocitraturia) and failure to thrive. Renal ultrasound revealed left renal increased medullary echogenicity and bilateral nephrocalcinosis. Conclusion Early gene(s) expression of medullary sponge kidney disease might be responsible for persistent metabolic acidosis during the neonatal period. PMID:19830120

  15. Successful Management of Refractory Type 1 Renal Tubular Acidosis with Amiloride

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Robert; Yim, Kenneth; Jaar, Bernard G.

    2017-01-01

    A 28-year-old female with history of hypothyroidism, Sjögren's Syndrome, and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) presented with complaints of severe generalized weakness, muscle pain, nausea, vomiting, and anorexia. Physical examination was unremarkable. Laboratory test showed hypokalemia at 1.6 mmol/l, nonanion metabolic acidosis with HCO3 of 11 mmol/l, random urine pH of 7.0, and urine anion gap of 8 mmol/l. CT scan of the abdomen revealed bilateral nephrocalcinosis. A diagnosis of type 1 RTA likely secondary to Sjögren's Syndrome was made. She was started on citric acid potassium citrate with escalating dosages to a maximum dose of 60 mEq daily and potassium chloride over 5 years without significant improvement in serum K+ and HCO3 levels. She had multiple emergency room visits for persistent muscle pain, generalized weakness, and cardiac arrhythmias. Citric acid potassium citrate was then replaced with sodium bicarbonate at 15.5 mEq every 6 hours which was continued for 2 years without significant improvement in her symptoms and electrolytes. Amiloride 5 mg daily was added to her regimen as a potassium sparing treatment with dramatic improvement in her symptoms and electrolyte levels (as shown in the figures). Amiloride was increased to 10 mg daily and potassium supplementation was discontinued without affecting her electrolytes. Her sodium bicarbonate was weaned to 7.7 mEq daily. PMID:28127482

  16. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome and diabetic keto-acidosis.

    PubMed

    de Boer, C; Gaete, H P

    1992-12-01

    A patient suffering from schizophrenia developed diabetic keto-acidosis and NMS after treatment with neuroleptics. The combination of two uncommon complications of treatment with neuroleptics proved fatal.

  17. [A clinical case of lactic acidosis development in a diabetic patient taking metformin].

    PubMed

    Cezur, Mustafa; Celmen, Nedim; Cetinbas, Riza; Badalov, Pavel; Erdemli, Ozcan

    2009-01-01

    Metformin is a biguanide. Due to its effects in decreasing the hepatic production of glucose and in increasing insulin sensitivity in peripheral tissues, such as adipose tissue and skeletal muscle, the agent is used in metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus and, in which insulin resistance is especially pronounced. Eighty-one-year old male patient was admitted to the emergency unit with sudden vertigo, tiredness, dyspnea, cyanosis, and lethargy. He had had type 2 diabetes mellitus for 10 years and was taking glargin 12 U/kg once daily and metformin (glucophage) 850 mg thrice daily. The patient showed no cooperation and orientation. Metabolic acidosis, hypoxemia, and hypercapnea were detected in arterial blood gases (ABG). The patient was transferred to an intensive care unit of the hospital; endotracheal intubation was applied and mechanic ventilation was started. On the following day, his ABG got better; he was disconnected and weaning was applied. Lung X-ray study revealed no signs of pneumonia or pulmonary edema. On the same day, extubation was ended and O2 was given by mask at a rate of 4 L/min. After the patient's vital signs, blood sugar, and lactate levels were stabilized; his treatment regimen was arranged again and the patient was discharged on day 4 of his admission. Dyspnea, acidosis, and hypoxia seen in the patient were thought to be due to lactic acidosis which may rarely occur when metformin is used.

  18. Interrelation between compensation of carbohydrate metabolism and severity of manifestations of oxidative stress in type II diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Nedosugova, L V; Lankin, V Z; Balabolkin, M I; Konovalova, G G; Lisina, M O; Antonova, K V; Tikhaze, A K; Belenkov, Yu N

    2003-08-01

    Glycosylation end-products formed during diabetes mellitus promoted atherogenic oxidative modification of low-density lipoproteins. We evaluated the effects of compensation of carbohydrate metabolism and therapy with antioxidant probucol on parameters of free radical oxidation in patients with type II diabetes mellitus. Compensation of carbohydrate metabolism reduced manifestations of oxidative stress, which was manifested in accelerated enzymatic utilization of reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxides and decreased content of free radical oxidation products in low-density lipoproteins. In patients with type II diabetes mellitus combination therapy with antioxidant probucol decreased the severity of oxidative stress and stabilized carbohydrate metabolism without increasing the dose of hypoglycemic preparations.

  19. Carbicarb: an effective substitute for NaHCO3 for the treatment of acidosis.

    PubMed

    Sun, J H; Filley, G F; Hord, K; Kindig, N B; Bartle, E J

    1987-11-01

    Carbicarb (Na2CO3 0.33 molar NaHCO3 0.33 molar), a mixture formulated to avoid the objections to sodium bicarbonate therapy, has been compared with 1 mol/L NaHCO3 and 1 mol/L NaCl in the treatment of mixed respiratory and metabolic acidosis (pH 7.17) produced by asphyxia in rats. In clinically appropriate doses, intravenous NaHCO3 raised arterial pH only 0.03 unit, elevated arterial carbon dioxide pressure, and doubled lactate concentration. With Carbicarb, the pH rise was three times as great and the blood lactate level was unchanged. The new drug should be effective in treating the acidosis of cardiopulmonary failure without raising blood carbon dioxide pressure or lactate levels and at lower sodium doses than required for NaHCO3.

  20. [Several features of the metabolism of the fast and slow muscles of Emys orbicularis tortoises].

    PubMed

    Lebedinskaia, I I; Ogorodnikova, L G

    1978-01-01

    In skeletal muscles of the tortoise E. orbicularis, studies have been made on the content of glycogen, lactic acid, on the activity of glucose-6-phosphatase and phosphorylase. Histochemical studies were made on the lipid content. Experiments were performed on fast and slow bundles from mm. iliofibularis, testo cervicalis and retractor capitis. For comparison, the same indices of carbohydrate metabolism were investigated in fast m. plantaris and slow m. soleus of rats. In rats, slow muscles exhibit aerobic metabolism, in fast muscles--anaerobic one. In tortoises, slow muscles exhibit intermediate type of metabolism. Fast muscles show an anaerobic type or metabolism which is less intensive than anaerobic metabolism in slow muscles. Significant differences in some of the indices of carbohydrate metabolism were found in muscles which perform different functions in the organism.

  1. TRPA1 and TRPV1 Antagonists Do Not Inhibit Human Acidosis-Induced Pain.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Matthias G; Namer, Barbara; Reeh, Peter W; Fischer, Michael J M

    2017-01-03

    Acidosis occurs in a variety of pathophysiological and painful conditions where it is thought to excite or contribute to excitation of nociceptive neurons. Despite potential clinical relevance the principal receptor for sensing acidosis is unclear, but several receptors have been proposed. We investigated the contribution of the acid-sensing ion channels, transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) and transient receptor potential ankyrin type 1 (TRPA1) to peripheral pain signaling. We first established a human pain model using intraepidermal injection of the TRPA1 agonist carvacrol. This resulted in concentration-dependent pain sensations, which were reduced by experimental TRPA1 antagonist A-967079. Capsaicin-induced pain was reduced by the TRPV1 inhibitor BCTC. Amiloride was used to block acid-sensing ion channels. Testing these antagonists in a double-blind and randomized experiment, we probed the contribution of the respective channels to experimental acidosis-induced pain in 15 healthy human subjects. A continuous intraepidermal injection of pH 4.3 was used to counter the buffering capacity of tissue and generate a prolonged painful stimulation. In this model, addition of A-967079, BCTC or amiloride did not reduce the reported pain. In conclusion, target-validated antagonists, applied locally in human skin, have excluded the main hypothesized targets and the mechanism of the human acidosis-induced pain remains unclear.

  2. Renal tubular acidosis in chronic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Golding, Peter L.

    1975-01-01

    Renal tubular acidosis of the gradient or classic type, thought to be due to a disorder of the distal tubule, has been found to occur in 32% of 117 patients with chronic liver disease. Whilst the cause of this disorder is probably multifactorial, immunological mechanisms are considered to play a major role. The presence of this disorder might well be a cause, rather than the result of, the various electrolyte abnormalities seen in patients with chronic liver disease. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 6 PMID:1234340

  3. Distal Renal Tubular Acidosis and Calcium Nephrolithiasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moe, Orson W.; Fuster, Daniel G.; Xie, Xiao-Song

    2008-09-01

    Calcium stones are commonly encountered in patients with congenital distal renal tubular acidosis, a disease of renal acidification caused by mutations in either the vacuolar H+-ATPase (B1 or a4 subunit), anion exchanger-1, or carbonic anhydrase II. Based on the existing database, we present two hypotheses. First, heterozygotes with mutations in B1 subunit of H+-ATPase are not normal but may harbor biochemical abnormalities such as renal acidification defects, hypercalciuria, and hypocitraturia which can predispose them to kidney stone formation. Second, we propose at least two mechanisms by which mutant B1 subunit can impair H+-ATPase: defective pump assembly and defective pump activity.

  4. Severe pulmonary hypertension is associated with altered right ventricle metabolic substrate uptake

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rahul; Mickael, Claudia; Sanders, Linda; Gebreab, Liya; Huber, Kendra M.; Perez, Mario; Smith-Jones, Peter; Serkova, Natalie J.; Tuder, Rubin M.

    2015-01-01

    In severe pulmonary hypertension (SPH), prior studies have shown an increase in right ventricle (RV) uptake of glucose, but it is unclear whether there is a change in the relative utilization of fatty acids. We hypothesized that in the RV in SPH, as in left ventricular (LV) failure, there is altered substrate utilization, with increased glucose uptake and decreased fatty acid uptake. SPH was induced in rats by treatment with the VEGF receptor inhibitor SU5416 and 3 wk of hypoxia (10% FiO2), followed by an additional 4 wk of normoxia (SU-Hx group). Control rats were treated with carboxymethylcellulose vehicle and 7 wk of normoxia (CMC-Nx group). The rodents then underwent positron emission tomography with sequential administration of two radiotracers, 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoroglucose (18F-FDG) and 14-(R,S)-[18F]fluoro-6-thia-heptadecanoic acid (18F-FTHA), analogs of glucose and fatty acid, respectively. Five CMC-Nx and 3 SU-Hx rats completed the entire experimental protocol. In the RV, there was a mild increase in 18F-FDG uptake (1.35-fold, P = 0.085) and a significant decrease in 18F-FTHA uptake (−2.1-fold, P < 0.05) in the SU-Hx rats relative to the CMC-Nx rats. In the LV, SU-Hx rats had less uptake of both radiotracers compared with CMC-Nx rats. Less RV fatty acid uptake in SPH was corroborated by decreased fatty acid transporters and enzymes in the RV tissue, and specifically a decrease in lipoprotein lipase. In the RV in rats with SPH, there is a major shift in metabolic substrate preference, largely due to decreased fatty acid uptake. PMID:26115672

  5. Anesthetic Management of a Patient with Sustained Severe Metabolic Alkalosis and Electrolyte Abnormalities Caused by Ingestion of Baking Soda

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    The use of alternative medicine is prevalent worldwide. However, its effect on intraoperative anesthetic care is underreported. We report the anesthetic management of a patient who underwent an extensive head and neck cancer surgery and presented with a severe intraoperative metabolic alkalosis from the long term ingestion of baking soda and other herbal remedies. PMID:25180100

  6. Anesthetic management of a patient with sustained severe metabolic alkalosis and electrolyte abnormalities caused by ingestion of baking soda.

    PubMed

    Soliz, Jose; Lim, Jeffrey; Zheng, Gang

    2014-01-01

    The use of alternative medicine is prevalent worldwide. However, its effect on intraoperative anesthetic care is underreported. We report the anesthetic management of a patient who underwent an extensive head and neck cancer surgery and presented with a severe intraoperative metabolic alkalosis from the long term ingestion of baking soda and other herbal remedies.

  7. Evidence for a Detrimental Effect of Bicarbonate Therapy in Hypoxic Lactic Acidosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Helmut; Leach, William; Arieff, Allen I.

    1985-02-01

    Lactic acidosis, a clinical syndrome caused by the accumulation of lactic acid, is characterized by lactate concentration in blood greater than 5 mM. Therapy usually consists of intravenous sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3), but resultant mortality is greater than 60 percent. The metabolic and systemic effects of NaHCO3 therapy of hypoxic lactic acidosis in dogs were studied and compared to the effects of sodium chloride or no therapy. Sodium bicarbonate elevated blood lactate concentrations to a greater extent than did either sodium chloride or no treatment. Despite the infusion of NaHCO3, both arterial pH and bicarbonate concentration decreased by a similar amount in all three groups of dogs. Additional detrimental effects of NaHCO3 were observed on the cardiovascular system, including decreases in cardiac output and blood pressure that were not observed with either sodium chloride or no treatment. Thus there is evidence for a harmful effect of NaHCO3 in the treatment of hypoxic lactic acidosis.

  8. Functional Metabolomics Uncovers Metabolic Alterations Associated to Severe Oxidative Stress in MCF7 Breast Cancer Cells Exposed to Ascididemin

    PubMed Central

    Morvan, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Marine natural products are a source of promising agents for cancer treatment. However, there is a need to improve the evaluation of their mechanism of action in tumors. Metabolomics of the response to anti-tumor agents is a tool to reveal candidate biomarkers and metabolic targets. We used two-dimensional high-resolution magic angle spinning proton-NMR spectroscopy-based metabolomics to investigate the response of MCF7 breast cancer cells to ascididemin, a marine alkaloid and lead molecule for anti-cancer treatment. Ascididemin induced severe oxidative stress and apoptosis within 48 h of exposure. Thirty-three metabolites were quantified. Metabolic response involved downregulation of glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and phospholipid metabolism alterations. Candidate metabolic biomarkers of the response of breast cancer cells to ascididemin were proposed including citrate, gluconate, polyunsaturated fatty acids, glycerophospho-choline and -ethanolamine. In addition, candidate metabolic targets were identified. Overall, the response to Asc could be related to severe oxidative stress and anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:24152560

  9. Severe Ketoacidosis Associated with Canagliflozin (Invokana): A Safety Concern

    PubMed Central

    Gelaye, Alehegn; Haidar, Abdallah; Kassab, Christina; Kazmi, Syed; Sinha, Prabhat

    2016-01-01

    Canagliflozin (Invokana) is a selective sodium glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitor that was first introduced in 2013 for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). Though not FDA approved yet, its use in type 1 DM has been justified by the fact that its mechanism of action is independent of insulin secretion or action. However, some serious side effects, including severe anion gap metabolic acidosis and euglycemic diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), have been reported. Prompt identification of the causal association and initiation of appropriate therapy should be instituted for this life threatening condition. PMID:27088018

  10. Severe Ketoacidosis Associated with Canagliflozin (Invokana): A Safety Concern.

    PubMed

    Gelaye, Alehegn; Haidar, Abdallah; Kassab, Christina; Kazmi, Syed; Sinha, Prabhat

    2016-01-01

    Canagliflozin (Invokana) is a selective sodium glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitor that was first introduced in 2013 for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). Though not FDA approved yet, its use in type 1 DM has been justified by the fact that its mechanism of action is independent of insulin secretion or action. However, some serious side effects, including severe anion gap metabolic acidosis and euglycemic diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), have been reported. Prompt identification of the causal association and initiation of appropriate therapy should be instituted for this life threatening condition.

  11. [Fatal lactic acidosis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy. Report of a case].

    PubMed

    Lasso, M; Pérez, J; Noriega, L M; Northland, R

    2000-10-01

    Type B lactic acidosis occurs without any evidence of cellular hypoxia and is associated with the use of drugs or toxins. We report a 36 years old woman with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome that was admitted to the hospital with a severe lactic acidosis. She had been treated with didanosine, stavudine and efavirenz for four months prior to admission. Despite the use of high bicarbonate doses and vasoactive drugs, the patient had a catastrophic evolution and died in shock and multiple organ failure, 68 hours after admission. (Rev Méd Chile 2000; 128: 1139-43).

  12. [Chronic kidney diseases, metformin and lactic acidosis].

    PubMed

    Borbély, Zoltán

    2016-04-01

    Chronic kidney disease and diabetes mellitus represent a worldwide public health problem. The incidence of these diseases is gradually growing into epidemic proportions. In many cases they occur simultaneously, what leads to increased morbidity and mortality among the affected patients. The majority of the patients treated for diabetes mellitus are unaware of the presence of renal insufficiency. Vascular hypertrophy and diabetic kidney disease in patients with type 2 diabetes are the most common causes of kidney failure in countries with advanced healthcare systems. Metformin is a basic drug used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. It is excreted in an unchanged form by the kidneys. When administered to patients with renal insufficiency, sepsis, dehydration or after the parenteral administration of iodinated contrast agents, metformin can cause lactic acidosis, which is also associated with an increased mortality rate.

  13. Subacute ruminal acidosis in Dutch dairy herds.

    PubMed

    Kleen, J L; Hooijer, G A; Rehage, J; Noordhuizen, J P T M

    2009-05-30

    The prevalence of subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) was determined in 197 dairy cows in 18 herds in the Dutch province of Friesland. Samples of rumen fluid were taken by rumenocentesis from between five and 19 animals on each farm and the pH of each sample was determined. The body condition of 139 of the cows was scored approximately three weeks before they calved and three weeks after they calved. The overall prevalence of SARA was 13.8 per cent, and the prevalence on individual farms ranged between 0 per cent (on seven of the farms) and 38 per cent (on one farm). The stage of lactation did not influence the prevalence of SARA but the cows with the condition lost more body condition over the calving period.

  14. Metformin-induced lactic acidosis: no one left behind

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Metformin is a safe drug when correctly used in properly selected patients. In real life, however, associated lactic acidosis has been repeatedly, although rarely, reported. The term metformin-induced lactic acidosis refers to cases that cannot be explained by any major risk factor other than drug accumulation, usually due to renal failure. Treatment consists of vital function support and drug removal, mainly achieved by renal replacement therapy. Despite dramatic clinical presentation, the prognosis of metformin-induced lactic acidosis is usually surprisingly good. PMID:21349142

  15. Respiration of Chemodenervated Goats in Acute Metabolic Acidosis,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-02

    changed after CBx. Cerebral vasodilation in response to hypercapnia and hypoxia was found to be reduced in anesthetized animals after CBx (Ponte and Purves ...M.J. Purves (1974). The role of the carotid body chemo- receptors and carotid sinus baroreceptors in the control of cerebral blood vessels. J

  16. Drug-induced haemolysis, renal failure, thrombocytopenia and lactic acidosis in patients with HIV and cryptococcal meningitis: a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Camara-Lemarroy, Carlos R; Flores-Cantu, Hazael; Calderon-Hernandez, Hector J; Diaz-Torres, Marco A; Villareal-Velazquez, Hector J

    2015-12-01

    Patients with HIV are at risk of both primary and secondary haematological disorders. We report two cases of patients with HIV and cryptococcal meningitis who developed severe haemolytic anaemia, thrombocytopenia, renal failure and lactic acidosis while on treatment with amphotericin B and co-trimoxazole.

  17. Complex III deficiency due to an in-frame MT-CYB deletion presenting as ketotic hypoglycemia and lactic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Mori, Mari; Goldstein, Jennifer; Young, Sarah P; Bossen, Edward H; Shoffner, John; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2015-09-01

    Complex III deficiency due to a MT-CYB mutation has been reported in patients with myopathy. Here, we describe a 15-year-old boy who presented with metabolic acidosis, ketotic hypoglycemia and carnitine deficiency. Electron transport chain analysis and mitochondrial DNA sequencing on muscle tissue lead to the eventual diagnosis of complex III deficiency. This case demonstrates the critical role of muscle biopsies in a myopathy work-up, and the clinical efficacy of supplement therapy.

  18. Distal Renal Tubular Acidosis in Infancy: A Bicarbonate Wasting State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez-Soriano, J.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Studied were three unrelated infants with distal renal tubular acidosis (a condition characterized by an inability to acidify the urine to minimal pH levels resulting in the loss of bicarbonates). (DB)

  19. Novel ATP6V1B1 and ATP6V0A4 mutations in autosomal recessive distal renal tubular acidosis with new evidence for hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Stover, E H; Borthwick, K J; Bavalia, C; Eady, N; Fritz, D M; Rungroj, N; Giersch, A B S; Morton, C C; Axon, P R; Akil, I; Al-Sabban, E A; Baguley, D M; Bianca, S; Bakkaloglu, A; Bircan, Z; Chauveau, D; Clermont, M-J; Guala, A; Hulton, S A; Kroes, H; Li Volti, G; Mir, S; Mocan, H; Nayir, A; Ozen, S; Rodriguez Soriano, J; Sanjad, S A; Tasic, V; Taylor, C M; Topaloglu, R; Smith, A N; Karet, F E

    2002-11-01

    Autosomal recessive distal renal tubular acidosis (rdRTA) is characterised by severe hyperchloraemic metabolic acidosis in childhood, hypokalaemia, decreased urinary calcium solubility, and impaired bone physiology and growth. Two types of rdRTA have been differentiated by the presence or absence of sensorineural hearing loss, but appear otherwise clinically similar. Recently, we identified mutations in genes encoding two different subunits of the renal alpha-intercalated cell's apical H(+)-ATPase that cause rdRTA. Defects in the B1 subunit gene ATP6V1B1, and the a4 subunit gene ATP6V0A4, cause rdRTA with deafness and with preserved hearing, respectively. We have investigated 26 new rdRTA kindreds, of which 23 are consanguineous. Linkage analysis of seven novel SNPs and five polymorphic markers in, and tightly linked to, ATP6V1B1 and ATP6V0A4 suggested that four families do not link to either locus, providing strong evidence for additional genetic heterogeneity. In ATP6V1B1, one novel and five previously reported mutations were found in 10 kindreds. In 12 ATP6V0A4 kindreds, seven of 10 mutations were novel. A further nine novel ATP6V0A4 mutations were found in "sporadic" cases. The previously reported association between ATP6V1B1 defects and severe hearing loss in childhood was maintained. However, several patients with ATP6V0A4 mutations have developed hearing loss, usually in young adulthood. We show here that ATP6V0A4 is expressed within the human inner ear. These findings provide further evidence for genetic heterogeneity in rdRTA, extend the spectrum of disease causing mutations in ATP6V1B1 and ATP6V0A4, and show ATP6V0A4 expression within the cochlea for the first time.

  20. Novel ATP6V1B1 and ATP6V0A4 mutations in autosomal recessive distal renal tubular acidosis with new evidence for hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Stover, E; Borthwick, K; Bavalia, C; Eady, N; Fritz, D; Rungroj, N; Giersch, A; Morton, C; Axon, P; Akil, I; Al-Sabban, E; Baguley, D; Bianca, S; Bakkaloglu, A; Bircan, Z; Chauveau, D; Clermont, M; Guala, A; Hulton, S; Kroes, H; Li, V; Mir, S; Mocan, H; Nayir, A; Ozen, S; Rodriguez, S; Sanjad, S; Tasic, V; Taylor, C; Topaloglu, R; Smith, A; Karet, F

    2002-01-01

    Autosomal recessive distal renal tubular acidosis (rdRTA) is characterised by severe hyperchloraemic metabolic acidosis in childhood, hypokalaemia, decreased urinary calcium solubility, and impaired bone physiology and growth. Two types of rdRTA have been differentiated by the presence or absence of sensorineural hearing loss, but appear otherwise clinically similar. Recently, we identified mutations in genes encoding two different subunits of the renal α-intercalated cell's apical H+-ATPase that cause rdRTA. Defects in the B1 subunit gene ATP6V1B1, and the a4 subunit gene ATP6V0A4, cause rdRTA with deafness and with preserved hearing, respectively. We have investigated 26 new rdRTA kindreds, of which 23 are consanguineous. Linkage analysis of seven novel SNPs and five polymorphic markers in, and tightly linked to, ATP6V1B1 and ATP6V0A4 suggested that four families do not link to either locus, providing strong evidence for additional genetic heterogeneity. In ATP6V1B1, one novel and five previously reported mutations were found in 10 kindreds. In 12 ATP6V0A4 kindreds, seven of 10 mutations were novel. A further nine novel ATP6V0A4 mutations were found in "sporadic" cases. The previously reported association between ATP6V1B1 defects and severe hearing loss in childhood was maintained. However, several patients with ATP6V0A4 mutations have developed hearing loss, usually in young adulthood. We show here that ATP6V0A4 is expressed within the human inner ear. These findings provide further evidence for genetic heterogeneity in rdRTA, extend the spectrum of disease causing mutations in ATP6V1B1 and ATP6V0A4, and show ATP6V0A4 expression within the cochlea for the first time. PMID:12414817

  1. Renal tubular acidosis: an immunopathological study on four patients

    PubMed Central

    Pasternack, A.; Linder, E.

    1970-01-01

    Renal biopsies and sera of four patients with distal renal tubular acidosis were examined. The findings consisted of immunoglobulin containing mononuclear cellular infiltrates around the distal tubules, bound immunoglobulin and complement in tubules. The sera of the patients contained antibodies reacting with various tissue antigens, among them renal tubular antigens. The results suggest that autoimmunity was involved in the pathogenesis of the renal tubular acidosis in these patients. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:5202740

  2. Transient Distal Renal Tubular Acidosis in Organophosphate Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Ram; Abdulla, Mansoor C.; Alungal, Jemshad

    2017-01-01

    Renal complications due to organophosphate poisoning are very rare. We are presenting a unique case of transient distal renal tubular acidosis due to organophosphate poisoning, which to the best of our knowledge is the first of its kind. An elderly female after deliberate self-harm with ingestion of chlorpyrifos had multiple ventricular arrhythmias due to hypokalemia secondary to distal renal tubular acidosis which improved completely after treatment.

  3. Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolism refers to all the physical and chemical processes in the body that convert or use energy, ... Tortora GJ, Derrickson BH. Metabolism. In: Tortora GJ, Derrickson ... Physiology . 14th ed. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons; 2014:chap ...

  4. Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... El metabolismo Metabolism Basics Our bodies get the energy they need from food through metabolism, the chemical ... that convert the fuel from food into the energy needed to do everything from moving to thinking ...

  5. The severity of NAFLD is associated with gut dysbiosis and shift in the metabolic function of the gut microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Boursier, Jérôme; Mueller, Olaf; Barret, Matthieu; Machado, Mariana; Fizanne, Lionel; Araujo-Perez, Felix; Guy, Cynthia D.; Seed, Patrick C.; Rawls, John F.; David, Lawrence A.; Hunault, Gilles; Oberti, Frédéric; Calès, Paul; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2016-01-01

    Background & aims Several animal studies have emphasized the role of gut microbiota in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, data about gut dysbiosis in human NAFLD remains scarce in the literature, especially studies including the whole spectrum of NAFLD lesions. We aimed to evaluate the association between gut dysbiosis and severe NAFLD lesions, i.e. non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and fibrosis, in a well-characterized population of adult NAFLD. Methods 57 patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD were enrolled. The taxonomic composition of gut microbiota was determined using 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing of stool samples. Results 30 patients had F0/1 fibrosis stage at liver biopsy (10 with NASH), and 27 patients had significant F≥2 fibrosis (25 with NASH). Bacteroides abundance was significantly increased in NASH and F≥2 patients, whereas Prevotella abundance was decreased. Ruminococcus abundance was significantly higher in F≥2 patients. By multivariate analysis, Bacteroides abundance was independently associated with NASH and Ruminococcus with F≥2 fibrosis. Stratification according to the abundance of these 2 bacteria generated 3 patient subgroups with increasing severity of NAFLD lesions. Based on imputed metagenomic profiles, KEGG pathways significantly related to NASH and fibrosis F≥2 were mostly related to carbohydrate, lipid, and amino acid metabolism. Conclusion NAFLD severity associates with gut dysbiosis and a shift in metabolic function of the gut microbiota. We identified Bacteroides as independently associated with NASH and Ruminococcus with significant fibrosis. Thus, gut microbiota analysis adds information to classical predictors of NAFLD severity and suggests novel metabolic targets for pre/probiotics therapies. PMID:26600078

  6. Nutritional and metabolic status of children with autism vs. neurotypical children, and the association with autism severity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The relationship between relative metabolic disturbances and developmental disorders is an emerging research focus. This study compares the nutritional and metabolic status of children with autism with that of neurotypical children and investigates the possible association of autism severity with biomarkers. Method Participants were children ages 5-16 years in Arizona with Autistic Spectrum Disorder (n = 55) compared with non-sibling, neurotypical controls (n = 44) of similar age, gender and geographical distribution. Neither group had taken any vitamin/mineral supplements in the two months prior to sample collection. Autism severity was assessed using the Pervasive Development Disorder Behavior Inventory (PDD-BI), Autism Treatment Evaluation Checklist (ATEC), and Severity of Autism Scale (SAS). Study measurements included: vitamins, biomarkers of vitamin status, minerals, plasma amino acids, plasma glutathione, and biomarkers of oxidative stress, methylation, sulfation and energy production. Results Biomarkers of children with autism compared to those of controls using a t-test or Wilcoxon test found the following statistically significant differences (p < 0.001): Low levels of biotin, plasma glutathione, RBC SAM, plasma uridine, plasma ATP, RBC NADH, RBC NADPH, plasma sulfate (free and total), and plasma tryptophan; also high levels of oxidative stress markers and plasma glutamate. Levels of biomarkers for the neurotypical controls were in good agreement with accessed published reference ranges. In the Autism group, mean levels of vitamins, minerals, and most amino acids commonly measured in clinical care were within published reference ranges. A stepwise, multiple linear regression analysis demonstrated significant associations between several groups of biomarkers with all three autism severity scales, including vitamins (adjusted R2 of 0.25-0.57), minerals (adj. R2 of 0.22-0.38), and plasma amino acids (adj. R2 of 0.22-0.39). Conclusion The autism

  7. Acidosis-mediated regulation of the NHE1 isoform of the Na⁺/H⁺ exchanger in renal cells.

    PubMed

    Odunewu, Ayodeji; Fliegel, Larry

    2013-08-01

    The mammalian Na⁺/H⁺ exchanger isoform 1 (NHE1) is a ubiquitous plasma membrane protein that regulates intracellular pH by removing a proton in exchange for extracellular sodium. Renal tissues are subject to metabolic and respiratory acidosis, and acidosis has been shown to acutely activate NHE1 activity in other cell types. We examined if NHE1 is activated by acute acidosis in HEK293 and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Acute sustained intracellular acidosis (SIA) activated NHE1 in both cell types. We expressed wild-type and mutant NHE1 cDNAs in MDCK cells. All the cDNAs had a L163F/G174S mutation, which conferred a 100-fold resistance to EMD87580, an NHE1-specific inhibitor. We assayed exogenous NHE1 activity while inhibiting endogenous activity with EMD87580 and while inhibiting the NHE3 isoform of the Na⁺/H⁺ exchanger using the isoform-specific inhibitor S3226. We examined the activation and phosphorylation of the wild-type and mutant NHE1 proteins in response to SIA. In MDCK cells we demonstrated that the amino acids Ser⁷⁷¹, Ser⁷⁷⁶, Thr⁷⁷⁹, and Ser⁷⁸⁵ are important for NHE1 phosphorylation and activation after acute SIA. SIA activated ERK-dependent pathways in MDCK cells, and this was blocked by treatment with the MEK inhibitor U0126. Treatment with U0126 also blocked activation of NHE1 by SIA. These results suggest that acute acidosis activates NHE1 in mammalian kidney cells and that in MDCK cells this activation occurs through an ERK-dependent pathway affecting phosphorylation of a distinct set of amino acids in the cytosolic regulatory tail of NHE1.

  8. Pancreas volume reduction and metabolic effects in Japanese patients with severe obesity following laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Umemura, Akira; Sasaki, Akira; Nitta, Hiroyuki; Baba, Shigeaki; Ando, Taro; Kajiwara, Takashi; Ishigaki, Yasushi

    2017-03-17

    This study aimed to assess the relationship between the metabolic effect after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) in morbidly obese Japanese patients, with or without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and improved pancreatic steatosis (PS). The study enrolled 27 morbidly obese Japanese patients who were undergoing LSG. Their clinical and metabolic effects were evaluated at baseline and six months after LSG. Pancreas volume (PV), pancreatic attenuation (PA), and splenic attenuation (SA) were measured using a 64-row computed tomography (CT). Changes in PV, PA-SA, and PA/SA were evaluated. The mean body-weight loss, body mass index loss, and percentage of excess weight loss (%EWL) were -34.4 kg (p < 0.001), -11.0 kg/m(2) (p < 0.001), and 43.7%, respectively. The mean PV was 96.7 mL at baseline, and it decreased six months after LSG (-16.3mL, p < 0.001). The mean PA significantly increased six months after LSG (9.5 HU, p < 0.001). PA-SA (-23.2 HU vs. -13.3 HU, p = 0.003), and PA/SA (0.54 vs. 0.73, p < 0.001) also significantly increased six months after LSG. In T2DM patients, decreased PV correlated with decreased fasting blood sugar, decreased insulin, and reduced liver volume. In conclusion, PV significantly decreased after LSG in morbidly obese Japanese patients, and that decrease correlated with improvements in PS. In addition, PS plays an important role of development and progression of insulin resistance and T2DM.

  9. Tumor acidosis enhances cytotoxic effects and autophagy inhibition by salinomycin on cancer cell lines and cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrini, Paola; Dyczynski, Matheus; Sbrana, Francesca Vittoria; Karlgren, Maria; Buoncervello, Maria; Hägg-Olofsson, Maria; Ma, Ran; Hartman, Johan; Bajalica-Lagercrantz, Svetlana; Grander, Dan; Kharaziha, Pedram; De Milito, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Sustained autophagy contributes to the metabolic adaptation of cancer cells to hypoxic and acidic microenvironments. Since cells in such environments are resistant to conventional cytotoxic drugs, inhibition of autophagy represents a promising therapeutic strategy in clinical oncology. We previously reported that the efficacy of hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), an autophagy inhibitor under clinical investigation is strongly impaired in acidic tumor environments, due to poor uptake of the drug, a phenomenon widely associated with drug resistance towards many weak bases. In this study we identified salinomycin (SAL) as a potent inhibitor of autophagy and cytotoxic agent effective on several cancer cell lines under conditions of transient and chronic acidosis. Since SAL has been reported to specifically target cancer-stem cells (CSC), we used an established model of breast CSC and CSC derived from breast cancer patients to examine whether this specificity may be associated with autophagy inhibition. We indeed found that CSC-like cells are more sensitive to autophagy inhibition compared to cells not expressing CSC markers. We also report that the ability of SAL to inhibit mammosphere formation from CSC-like cells was dramatically enhanced in acidic conditions. We propose that the development and use of clinically suitable SAL derivatives may result in improved autophagy inhibition in cancer cells and CSC in the acidic tumor microenvironment and lead to clinical benefits. PMID:27248168

  10. Acidosis and Correction of Acidosis Does Not Affect rFVIIa Function in Swine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-15

    normaliza- tion of respiration returned arterial pH to 7.4 and restored PaCO2, PaO2 and BE to baseline (Table 3). Ionized calcium was maintained near...model Control Acidosis Acidosis corrected n=10 pH 7.38±0.01 7.14±0.01 7.43±0.01 PaCO2 (mmHg) 47.3±1.8 43.0±1.8 55.0±3.1 PaO2 (mmHg) 433.6±26.4 400.9±33.1...mmHg) 49.5±1.3 48.2±1.8 94.0±5.2 *# PaO2 (mmHg) 142.8±3.3 133.5±8.6 99.6±9.6 *# HCO3 - (mM) 31.2±0.7 24.3±1.1* 29.5±1.2# BE (mM) 5.8±0.6 -1.5±1.0* -2.1

  11. Acute pancreatitis and severe hypertriglyceridaemia masking unsuspected underlying diabetic ketoacidosis

    PubMed Central

    Aboulhosn, Kewan; Arnason, Terra

    2013-01-01

    A healthy 18-year-old girl presented to a local emergency room with 48 h of abdominal pain and vomiting. A radiological and biochemical diagnosis of moderate acute pancreatitis was made. Bloodwork demonstrated prominent hypertriglyceridaemia (HTG) of 19.5 mmol/L (severe HTG: 11.2–22.4), detectable urine ketones and a random blood glucose of 13 mmol/L dropping to 10.5 mmol/L on repeat (normal random <11). Ketone levels were deemed consistent with fasting ketosis after 48 h of vomiting. There was no known history of diabetes in the patient. Management included aggressive rehydration and pain control, yet the patient rapidly decompensated into shock requiring intensive care unit support. Blood gases revealed severe metabolic acidosis (pH 6.99) and unsuspected underlying diabetic ketoacidosis was diagnosed. The HTG gradually resolved following intravenous fluids and insulin infusion with slower correction of the metabolic acidosis. Importantly, her glycated haemoglobin was 12%, indicating the silent presence of chronic glucose elevations. PMID:24005972

  12. Acute pancreatitis and severe hypertriglyceridaemia masking unsuspected underlying diabetic ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Aboulhosn, Kewan; Arnason, Terra

    2013-09-04

    A healthy 18-year-old girl presented to a local emergency room with 48 h of abdominal pain and vomiting. A radiological and biochemical diagnosis of moderate acute pancreatitis was made. Bloodwork demonstrated prominent hypertriglyceridaemia (HTG) of 19.5 mmol/L (severe HTG: 11.2-22.4), detectable urine ketones and a random blood glucose of 13 mmol/L dropping to 10.5 mmol/L on repeat (normal random <11). Ketone levels were deemed consistent with fasting ketosis after 48 h of vomiting. There was no known history of diabetes in the patient. Management included aggressive rehydration and pain control, yet the patient rapidly decompensated into shock requiring intensive care unit support. Blood gases revealed severe metabolic acidosis (pH 6.99) and unsuspected underlying diabetic ketoacidosis was diagnosed. The HTG gradually resolved following intravenous fluids and insulin infusion with slower correction of the metabolic acidosis. Importantly, her glycated haemoglobin was 12%, indicating the silent presence of chronic glucose elevations.

  13. Nutritional and Pharmacological Modulation of the Metabolic Response of Severely Burned Patients: Review of the Literature (Part II)*.

    PubMed

    Atiyeh, B S; Gunn, S W A; Dibo, S A

    2008-09-30

    Severe burn patients are some of the most challenging critically ill patients, with an extreme state of physiological stress and an overwhelming systemic metabolic response. Increased energy expenditure to cope with this insult necessitates mobilization of large amounts of substrate from fat stores and active muscle for repair and fuel, leading to catabolism. The hypermetabolic response can last for as long as nine months to one year after injury and is associated with impaired wound healing, increased infection risks, erosion of lean body mass, hampered rehabilitation, and delayed reintegration of burn survivors into society. Reversal of the hypermetabolic response by manipulating the patient's physiological and biochemical environment through the administration of specific nutrients, growth factors, or other agents, often in pharmacological doses, is emerging as an essential component of the state of the art in severe burn management. Early enteral nutritional support, control of hyperglycaemia, blockade of catecholamine response, and use of anabolic steroids have all been proposed to attenuate hypermetabolism or to blunt catabolism associated with severe burn injury. The present study is a literature review of the proposed nutritional and metabolic therapeutic measures in order to determine evidence-based best practice. Unfortunately, the present state of our knowledge does not allow the formulation of clear-cut guidelines. Only general trends can be outlined which will certainly have some practical applications but above all will dictate future research in the field.

  14. Nutritional and pharmacological modulation of the metabolic response of severely burned patients: review of the literature (part 1).

    PubMed

    Atiyeh, B S; Gunn, S W A; Dibo, S A

    2008-06-30

    Severe burn patients are some of the most challenging critically ill patients, with an extreme state of physiological stress and an overwhelming systemic metabolic response. Increased energy expenditure to cope with this insult necessitates mobilization of large amounts of substrate from fat stores and active muscle for repair and fuel, leading to catabolism. The hypermetabolic response can last for as long as nine months to one year after injury and is associated with impaired wound healing, increased infection risks, erosion of lean body mass, hampered rehabilitation, and delayed reintegration of burn survivors into society. Reversal of the hypermetabolic response by manipulating the patient's physiological and biochemical environment through the administration of specific nutrients, growth factors, or other agents, often in pharmacological doses, is emerging as an essential component of the state of the art in severe burn management. Early enteral nutritional support, control of hyperglycaemia, blockade of catecholamine response, and use of anabolic steroids have all been proposed to attenuate hypermetabolism or to blunt catabolism associated with severe burn injury. The present study is a literature review of the proposed nutritional and metabolic therapeutic measures in order to determine evidence-based best practice. Unfortunately, the present state of our knowledge does not allow the formulation of clear-cut guidelines. Only general trends can be outlined which will certainly have some practical applications but above all will dictate future research in the field.

  15. Nutritional and Pharmacological Modulation of the Metabolic Response of Severely Burned Patients: Review of the Literature (Part III)*.

    PubMed

    Atiyeh, B S; Gunn, S W A; Dibo, S A

    2008-12-31

    Severe burn patients are some of the most challenging critically ill patients, with an extreme state of physiological stress and an overwhelming systemic metabolic response. Increased energy expenditure to cope with this insult necessitates mobilization of large amounts of substrate from fat stores and active muscle for repair and fuel, leading to catabolism. The hypermetabolic response can last for as long as nine months to one year after injury and is associated with impaired wound healing, increased infection risks, erosion of lean body mass, hampered rehabilitation, and delayed reintegration of burn survivors into society.Reversal of the hypermetabolic response by manipulating the patient's physiological and biochemical environment through the administration of specific nutrients, growth factors, or other agents, often in pharmacological doses, is emerging as an essential component of the state of the art in severe burn management. Early enteral nutritional support, control of hyperglycaemia, blockade of catecholamine response, and use of anabolic steroids have all been proposed to attenuate hypermetabolism or to blunt catabolism associated with severe burn injury. The present study is a literature review of the proposed nutritional and metabolic therapeutic measures in order to determine evidence-based best practice. Unfortunately, the present state of our knowledge does not allow the formulation of clear-cut guidelines. Only general trends can be outlined which will certainly have some practical applications but above all will dictate future research in the field.

  16. Ten-week lifestyle changing program reduces several indicators for metabolic syndrome in overweight adults.

    PubMed

    Mecca, Marita S; Moreto, Fernando; Burini, Franz Hp; Dalanesi, Reinaldo C; McLellan, Kátia Cp; Burini, Roberto C

    2012-01-19

    We aim to investigate the effectiveness of a 10-week lifestyle intervention focusing on physical activity and high fiber intake for reducing indicators for metabolic syndrome in overweight-obese individuals. A prospective study of 50 overweight (OW) adults (22 in the general educational group - G1; 28 in the high fiber nutrition group - G2) was performed. Both groups were offered dietary counseling and supervised exercise. Clinical, anthropometric, dietary and plasma biochemical tests were performed at baseline - time 0 (T0) and after 10 weeks - time 1 (T1). Both groups improved their dietary quality, but only G2 presented higher intake of fruit and vegetables (servings/day), higher plasma β-carotene levels and a 24% reduction of MetS incidence. Additionally G2 showed greater reductions in body fat (4%), and waist circumference (7%), obesity class III (2%) and obesity class II (14%) rate. Lifestyle intervention, including a high dietary fiber intake, improved healthy eating index and decreased body fat composition and plasma lipid concentrations leading to MetS incidence reduction.

  17. Cobalamin deficiency results in severe metabolic disorder of serine and threonine in rats.

    PubMed

    Ebara, S; Toyoshima, S; Matsumura, T; Adachi, S; Takenaka, S; Yamaji, R; Watanabe, F; Miyatake, K; Inui, H; Nakano, Y

    2001-12-05

    Dietary cobalamin (vitamin B12; Cbl) deficiency caused significant increases in plasma serine, threonine, glycine, alanine, tyrosine, lysine and histidine levels in rats. In particular, the serine and threonine levels were over five and eight times, respectively, higher in the Cbl-deficient rats than those in the sufficient controls. In addition, some amino acids, including serine and threonine, were excreted into urine at significantly higher levels in the deficient rats. When Cbl was supplemented into the deficient rats for 2 weeks, in coincidence with the disappearance of the urinary excretion of methylmalonic acid (an index of Cbl deficiency), the plasma serine and threonine levels were normalized. These results indicate that Cbl deficiency results in metabolic disorder of certain amino acids, including serine and threonine. The expression level of hepatic serine dehydratase (SDH), which catalyzes the conversion of serine and threonine to pyruvate and 2-oxobutyrate, respectively, was significantly lowered by Cbl deficiency, even though Cbl does not participate directly in the enzyme reaction. The SDH activity in the deficient rats was less than 20% of that in the sufficient controls, and was normalized 2 weeks after the Cbl supplementation. It is thus suggested that the decrease of the SDH expression relates closely with the abnormalities in the plasma and urinary levels of serine and threonine in the Cbl-deficient rats.

  18. Effect of ginkgolide B on brain metabolism and tissue oxygenation in severe haemorrhagic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Chun-Ling; Shen, Dong-Fang; Wang, Peng-Jun; Li, Hu-Lun; Zhang, Li

    2015-01-01

    Ginkgolide B, a diterpene, is an herbal constituent isolated from the leaves of Ginkgo biloba tree. The present study demonstrates the effect of ginkgolide B in osmotherapy on brain metabolism and tissue oxygenation. Multimodality monitoring including intracranial pressure (ICP), cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), partial pressure of brain tissue oxygen (PbtO2), lactate/pyruvate ratio (LPR) and microdialysis were employed to study the effect of ginkgolide B osmotherapy. The results demonstrated that administration of 15% solution of ginkgolide B to the comatose patients with raised ICP (> 20 mm Hg) and resistant to standard therapy led to a significant decrease in ICP. The cerebral microdialysis was used to compare mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), ICP, CPP, PbtO2, brain lactate, pyruvate and glucose level after hourly intervals starting 3 h before and up to 4 h after hyperosmolar therapy. There was a decrease in ICP in 45 min from 23 ± 14 mm Hg (P < 0.001) to 18 ± 24 mm Hg and increase in CPP after 1 h of gingkolide B infusion from 74 ± 18 to 85 ± 22 mm Hg (P < 0.002). However there was no significant effect on MAP but PbtO2 was maintained in the range of 22-26. The peak lactate/pyruvate ratio was recorded at the time of initiation of osmotherapy (44 ± 20) with an 18% decrease over 2 h following gingkolide B therapy. Also the brain glucose remained unaffected. PMID:26064244

  19. Putrescine catabolism is a metabolic response to several stresses in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Barbara L; Hernandez, V James; Reitzer, Larry

    2013-05-01

    Genes whose products degrade arginine and ornithine, precursors of putrescine synthesis, are activated by either regulators of the nitrogen-regulated (Ntr) response or σ(S) -RNA polymerase. To determine if dual control regulates a complete putrescine catabolic pathway, we examined expression of patA and patD, which specify the first two enzymes of one putrescine catabolic pathway. Assays of PatA (putrescine transaminase) activity and β-galactosidase from cells with patA-lacZ transcriptional and translational fusions indicate dual control of patA transcription and putrescine-stimulated patA translation. Similar assays for PatD indicate that patD transcription required σ(S) -RNA polymerase, and Nac, an Ntr regulator, enhanced the σ(S) -dependent transcription. Since Nac activation via σ(S) -RNA polymerase is without precedent, transcription with purified components was examined and the results confirmed this conclusion. This result indicates that the Ntr regulon can intrude into the σ(S) regulon. Strains lacking both polyamine catabolic pathways have defective responses to oxidative stress, high temperature and a sublethal concentration of an antibiotic. These defects and the σ(S) -dependent expression indicate that polyamine catabolism is a core metabolic response to stress.

  20. Hemodynamic and metabolic basis of impaired exercise tolerance in patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Roubin, G.S.; Anderson, S.D.; Shen, W.F.; Choong, C.Y.; Alwyn, M.; Hillery, S.; Harris, P.J.; Kelly, D.T. )

    1990-04-01

    Hemodynamic and metabolic changes were measured at rest and during exercise in 23 patients with chronic heart failure and in 6 control subjects. Exercise was limited by leg fatigue in both groups and capacity was 40% lower in the patients with failure. At rest, comparing patients with control subjects, heart rate and right atrial and pulmonary wedge pressure were higher; cardiac output, stroke volume and work indexes and ejection fraction were lower; mean arterial and right atrial pressure and systemic resistance were similar. During all phases of exercise in patients with heart failure, pulmonary wedge pressure and systemic vascular resistance were higher and pulmonary vascular resistance remained markedly elevated compared with values in control subjects. Cardiac output was lower in the patients with failure, but appeared to have the same physiologic distribution in both groups during exercise. Although arterial-femoral venous oxygen content difference was higher in patients with heart failure, this increase did not compensate for the reduced blood flow. Even though the maximal oxygen consumption was significantly reduced, femoral venous lactate and pH values were higher than values in control subjects, but femoral venous pH was similar in both groups at their respective levels of maximal exercise. Ejection fraction was lower in those with heart failure at rest and did not increase with exercise. Ventilation in relation to oxygen consumption was higher in patients with failure than in control subjects.

  1. Unique metabolic characteristics of the major syndromes of severe childhood malnutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The major clinical syndromes of severe childhood malnutrition (SCM) are marasmus, kwashiorkor and marasmic-kwashiorkor. Whereas treatment of marasmus is straightforward and the associated mortality is low, kwashiorkor and marasmic-kwashiorkor are difficult to treat and have high morbidity and mortal...

  2. Cerebrospinal fluid lactic acidosis in bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Eross, J; Silink, M; Dorman, D

    1981-01-01

    A rapid, microenzymatic method was used to measure cerebrospinal fluid lactate levels in 205 children with suspected bacterial meningitis. Fifty children with normal CSF containing fewer than 0.005 X 10(9)/l WBC, no segmented neutrophils, glucose 3.4 +/- 0.8 mmol/l (61.2 +/- 14.4 mg/100 ml), and a protein of less than 0.30 g/l had CSF lactate levels below 2.0 mmol/l (18 mg/100 ml) (mean and standard deviation 1.3 +/- 0.3 mmol/l (11.8 +/- 2.7 mg/100 ml)). In 31 cases of proved viral meningitis as with 58 cases of clinically diagnosed viral meningitis, levels were below 3.8 mmol/l (34.5 mg/100 ml), being 2.3 +/- 0.6 mmol/l (20.9 +/- 5.4 mg/100 ml), and 2.1 +/- 0.7 mmol/l (19.1 +/- 6.4 mg/100 ml) respectively. Sixty-six cases of bacterial meningitis had CSF lactate levels ranging from 3.9 mmol/l (35.4 mg/100 ml) to greater than 10.0 mmol/l (90.0 mg/100 ml). Longitudinal studies in 7 children with bacterial meningitis showed that cerebrospinal fluid lactate levels differentiated bacterial from viral meningitis up to 4 days after starting treatment with antibiotics. Use of CSF lactate measurement for monitoring the efficacy of treatment is illustrated in a case of bacterial meningitis due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The origin of the cerebrospinal fluid lactate acidosis and the role of lactate in the pathophysiological cycle leading to intensification of brain tissue hypoxia and cellular damage is discussed with respect to the short-term prognosis and the long-term neurological sequelae. PMID:7294872

  3. Subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA): a review.

    PubMed

    Kleen, J L; Hooijer, G A; Rehage, J; Noordhuizen, J P T M

    2003-10-01

    Subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) is likely to arise when an easily palatable, high-energy diet meets a ruminal environment not adapted to this type of substrate. Increase of short-chained fatty acids (SCFA) will occur. Eventually, this may result in a transient nadir of ruminal pH below 5.5. Two situations are likely to represent the risk of SARA. First, fresh lactating cows are confronted with a diet considerably differing from that in the dry-period. A diet change carried out too rapidly or without proper transition management will put the animals at risk. Secondly, further in lactation, inaccurate calculation of dry-matter-intake (DMI) leading to wrong roughage/concentrate ratio, an inadequate content of structure within the diet or mistakes in preparing of total mixed rations may produce SARA. The consequences of SARA are diverse and complex. Laminitis is regularly connected to SARA and the negative impact of organic acids on the ruminal wall may lead to parakeratosis enabling translocation of pathogens into the bloodstream provoking inflammation and abscessation throughout the ruminant body. Moreover, milk-fat depression (MFD) can be related to SARA. In order to achieve a proper diagnosis, SARA has to be understood as a herd-management problem. A screening of the herd for SARA by means of a rumenocentesis, performed on a sample-group, preferably 12 individuals, may reveal the presence of SARA. The herd screening should include the risk group suspected, preferably. The prevention of SARA applies to the principles of ruminant feeding. Careful transition management from the dry to the lactation period and control of fibre-content and ration quality should be more yielding than the use of buffers or antibiotic drugs.

  4. Characterization of the interaction between local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose and acid-base index in ischemic rat brain employing a double-isotope methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Peek, K.E.H.

    1988-01-01

    The association between increases in cerebral glucose metabolism and the development of acidosis is largely inferential, based on reports linking hyperglycemia with poor neurological outcome, lactate accumulation, and the severity of acidosis. We measured local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (lCMRglc) and an index of brain pH-the acid-base index (ABI)-concurrently and characterized their interaction in a model of focal cerebral ischemia in rats in a double-label autoradiographic study, using ({sup 14}C)2-deoxyglucose and ({sup 14}C)dimethyloxazolidinedione. Computer-assisted digitization and analysis permitted the simultaneous quantification of the two variables on a pixel-by-pixel basis in the same brain slices.

  5. Prevalence of biopsy-proven non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in severely obese subjects without metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, K; Abrams, G A

    2016-04-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD encompasses simple fatty liver (FL) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in its spectrum. NASH can progress to liver cirrhosis and is associated with liver cancer. Not all obese subjects have insulin resistance (IR) or develop metabolic syndrome (MS). This study evaluates the prevalence of NAFLD in severely obese subjects without MS. We retrospectively reviewed 445 charts from our database of severely obese subjects with clinical suspicion of NAFLD and who were selected for laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery. One hundred five subjects who did not have MS, as defined by the International Diabetes Foundation, based on comprehensive pre-operative metabolic evaluation were included. Liver biopsy specimens were evaluated for NAFLD. 24% of morbidly obese (mean body mass index [BMI] 48 kg m(-2) ) adult subjects (mean age 38 years) who underwent bariatric surgery did not have MS. NAFLD was identified in 77 (73%) on liver biopsy, out of which 59 (56%) were labelled as FL and 18 (17%) had histological diagnosis of NASH. Age, gender, race and BMI were the same among all groups. Among NAFLD subjects, 22% did not have any additional metabolic component of MS, while 36% had low high-density lipoprotein, 27% had hypertension, 8% had high triglycerides and 6% had hyperglycaemia. IR calculated by HOMA-IR (Homeostatic Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance) and diagnosis of hyperglycaemia was statistically higher in NASH group compared to those who did not have NASH. NAFLD is highly prevalent in morbidly obese individuals who undergo bariatric surgery despite the absence of MS. Diagnosis of hyperglycaemia in such subjects suggests the presence of IR and may have underlying NASH, which is a progressive form of NAFLD.

  6. Retinoic acid regulates several genes in bile acid and lipid metabolism via upregulation of small heterodimer partner in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Mamoon, Abulkhair; Subauste, Angela; Subauste, Maria C; Subauste, Jose

    2014-10-25

    Retinoic acid (RA) affects multiple aspects of development, embryogenesis and cell differentiation processes. The liver is a major organ that stores RA suggesting that retinoids play an important role in the function of hepatocytes. In our previous studies, we have demonstrated the involvement of small heterodimer partner (SHP) in RA-induced signaling in a non-transformed hepatic cell line AML 12. In the present study, we have identified several critical genes in lipid homeostasis (Apoa1, Apoa2 and ApoF) that are repressed by RA-treatment in a SHP dependent manner, in vitro and also in vivo with the use of the SHP null mice. In a similar manner, RA also represses several critical genes involved in bile acid metabolism (Cyp7a1, Cyp8b1, Mdr2, Bsep, Baat and Ntcp) via upregulation of SHP. Collectively our data suggest that SHP plays a major role in RA-induced potential changes in pathophysiology of metabolic disorders in the liver.

  7. Mechanistic Modeling of the Effects of Acidosis on Thrombin Generation

    PubMed Central

    Mitrophanov, Alexander Y.; Rosendaal, Frits R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acidosis, a frequent complication of trauma and complex surgery, results from tissue hypoperfusion and IV resuscitation with acidic fluids. While acidosis is known to inhibit the function of distinct enzymatic reactions, its cumulative effect on the blood coagulation system is not fully understood. Here, we use computational modeling to test the hypothesis that acidosis delays and reduces the amount of thrombin generation in human blood plasma. Moreover, we investigate the sensitivity of different thrombin generation parameters to acidosis, both at the individual and population level. METHODS: We used a kinetic model to simulate and analyze the generation of thrombin and thrombin–antithrombin complexes (TAT), which were the end points of this study. Large groups of temporal thrombin and TAT trajectories were simulated and used to calculate quantitative parameters, such as clotting time (CT), thrombin peak time, maximum slope of the thrombin curve, thrombin peak height, area under the thrombin trajectory (AUC), and prothrombin time. The resulting samples of parameter values at different pH levels were compared to assess the acidosis-induced effects. To investigate intersubject variability, we parameterized the computational model using the data on clotting factor composition for 472 subjects from the Leiden Thrombophilia Study. To compare acidosis-induced relative parameter changes in individual (“virtual”) subjects, we estimated the probabilities of relative change patterns by counting the pattern occurrences in our virtual subjects. Distribution overlaps for thrombin generation parameters at distinct pH levels were quantified using the Bhattacharyya coefficient. RESULTS: Acidosis in the range of pH 6.9 to 7.3 progressively increased CT, thrombin peak time, AUC, and prothrombin time, while decreasing maximum slope of the thrombin curve and thrombin peak height (P < 10–5). Acidosis delayed the onset and decreased the amount of TAT generation (P

  8. Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms. Metabolic diseases and conditions include: Hyperthyroidism (pronounced: hi-per-THIGH-roy-dih-zum). Hyperthyroidism is caused ... or through surgery or radiation treatments. Hypothyroidism (pronounced: hi-po-THIGH-roy-dih-zum). Hypothyroidism is caused ...

  9. Intracellular acidosis enhances the excitability of working muscle.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Thomas H; Nielsen, Ole B; Lamb, Graham D; Stephenson, D George

    2004-08-20

    Intracellular acidification of skeletal muscles is commonly thought to contribute to muscle fatigue. However, intracellular acidosis also acts to preserve muscle excitability when muscles become depolarized, which occurs with working muscles. Here, we show that this process may be mediated by decreased chloride permeability, which enables action potentials to still be propagated along the internal network of tubules in a muscle fiber (the T system) despite muscle depolarization. These results implicate chloride ion channels in muscle function and emphasize that intracellular acidosis of muscle has protective effects during muscle fatigue.

  10. Mitochondrial uncoupling reduces exercise capacity despite several skeletal muscle metabolic adaptations.

    PubMed

    Schlagowski, A I; Singh, F; Charles, A L; Gali Ramamoorthy, T; Favret, F; Piquard, F; Geny, B; Zoll, J

    2014-02-15

    The effects of mitochondrial uncoupling on skeletal muscle mitochondrial adaptation and maximal exercise capacity are unknown. In this study, rats were divided into a control group (CTL, n = 8) and a group treated with 2,4-dinitrophenol, a mitochondrial uncoupler, for 28 days (DNP, 30 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) in drinking water, n = 8). The DNP group had a significantly lower body mass (P < 0.05) and a higher resting oxygen uptake (Vo2, P < 0.005). The incremental treadmill test showed that maximal running speed and running economy (P < 0.01) were impaired but that maximal Vo2 (Vo2max) was higher in the DNP-treated rats (P < 0.05). In skinned gastrocnemius fibers, basal respiration (V0) was higher (P < 0.01) in the DNP-treated animals, whereas the acceptor control ratio (ACR, Vmax/V0) was significantly lower (P < 0.05), indicating a reduction in OXPHOS efficiency. In skeletal muscle, DNP activated the mitochondrial biogenesis pathway, as indicated by changes in the mRNA expression of PGC1-α and -β, NRF-1 and -2, and TFAM, and increased the mRNA expression of cytochrome oxidase 1 (P < 0.01). The expression of two mitochondrial proteins (prohibitin and Ndufs 3) was higher after DNP treatment. Mitochondrial fission 1 protein (Fis-1) was increased in the DNP group (P < 0.01), but mitofusin-1 and -2 were unchanged. Histochemical staining for NADH dehydrogenase and succinate dehydrogenase activity in the gastrocnemius muscle revealed an increase in the proportion of oxidative fibers after DNP treatment. Our study shows that mitochondrial uncoupling induces several skeletal muscle adaptations, highlighting the role of mitochondrial coupling as a critical factor for maximal exercise capacities. These results emphasize the importance of investigating the qualitative aspects of mitochondrial function in addition to the amount of mitochondria.

  11. Severe hyperkalemia as a complication of timolol, a topically applied beta-adrenergic antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, E.R.

    1986-06-01

    Severe hyperkalemia occurred in a patient with radiation pneumonitis and glaucoma shortly after beginning prednisone therapy. There was no evidence of renal failure, diabetes, acidosis, increased potassium intake, or significant tissue trauma. Medications having adverse effects on potassium metabolism were considered, and the patient's use of timolol maleate eyedrops was discontinued. His serum potassium level normalized despite continuation of the prednisone therapy. He became hyperkalemic on rechallenge with timolol and normokalemic following its withdrawal. This case indicates that the potential for beta-blocker-induced hyperkalemia exists even with topical appreciation.

  12. [Distal renal tubular acidosis with rhabdomyolysis as the presenting form in 4 pregnant women].

    PubMed

    Carminati, G; Chena, A; Orlando, J M; Russo, S; Salomón, S; Carena, J A

    2001-01-01

    We describe four pregnant patients with distal renal tubular acidosis (type I) (DRTA) whose initial presentation was rhabdomyolysis (RML) secondary to severe hypokalemia. We draw attention to the unusual presentation of DRTA during pregnancy, the low frequency of DRTA in adult patients and RML as initial manifestation. In one case the DRTA was secondary to Sjögren Syndrome and the etiology was unknown in the rest of the cases. We discuss the potential pathogenic mechanisms to explain hypokalemic RML and the various causes of DRTA in adult patients.

  13. Metabolic Syndrome in South African Patients with Severe Mental Illness: Prevalence and Associated Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Saloojee, Shamima; Burns, Jonathan K; Motala, Ayesha A

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a surge of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in Africa. CVD is the leading cause of mortality among patients with severe mental illness (SMI) in developed countries, with little evidence from the African context. Objective To determine the prevalence and risk factors for MetS among South African patients with SMI. Method In a cross sectional study, individuals with SMI treated with antipsychotics and a control group without a mental illness, matched for age, gender and ethnicity were evaluated for MetS using the 2009 Joint Interim statement (JIS) criteria. Results Of the 276 study group subjects, 65.9% were male, 84.1% black African, 9.1% white, 5.4% of Indian descent and 1.5% coloured (mixed race) with a mean age of 34.7 years (±12.5). Schizophrenia was the most common diagnosis (73.2%) and 40% were taking first generation antipsychotics. The prevalence of MetS was 23.2% (M: 15.4%, F: 38.3%) in the study group and 19.9% (M: 11.9%, F: 36.3%) in the control group (p = 0.4). MetS prevalence was significantly higher in study subjects over 55 years compared to controls (p = 0.03). Increased waist circumference (p< 0.001) and low high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (p = 0.003) were significantly more prevalent in study subjects compared to controls. In study subjects, risk factors associated with MetS included age (OR: 1.09, 95% CI 1.06–1.12, p < 0.001), female gender (OR: 2.19, 95% CI 1.06–4.55, p = 0.035) and Indian descent (OR: 5.84, 95% CI 1.66–20.52, p = 0.006) but not class of antipsychotic (p = 0.26). Conclusion The overall MetS prevalence was not increased in patients with SMI compared to controls; however, the higher prevalence of the individual components (HDL cholesterol and waist circumference) suggests an increased risk for CVD, especially in patients over 55 years. PMID:26882230

  14. The effect of cyclical and severe heat stress on growth performance and metabolism in Afshari lambs.

    PubMed

    Mahjoubi, E; Yazdi, M Hossein; Aghaziarati, N; Noori, G R; Afsarian, O; Baumgard, L H

    2015-04-01

    lambs' ADG was more than 2-fold greater than the PFTN controls. These results indicate that HS markedly alters the energetics of weight gain during growth and that the effects of HS are dependent on the severity of the heat load.

  15. The relation of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin-D levels with severity of obstructive sleep apnea and glucose metabolism abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, N Colak; Cakal, E; Sahin, M; Ozkaya, E Cakir; Firat, H; Delibasi, T

    2012-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and 25-hydroxyvitamin-D₃ (25-OH-D) deficiency are two separate disorders associating with obesity, inflammation, and impaired glucose metabolism. We aimed to investigate the vitamin D status of OSA patients regarding to potential links between lower vitamin D levels and abnormal glucose metabolism, which is one of the main adverse outcomes of OSA. Study group is composed of 190 non-diabetic subjects who were suspected of having OSA. Subjects undergone polysomnography and were grouped due to apnea-hypopnea indices (AHI) as controls (AHI < 5, n = 47), mild OSA (5 ≤ AHI < 15, n = 46), moderate OSA (15 ≤ AHI < 30, n = 47), and severe OSA (AHI ≥ 30, n = 50). Serum 25-OH-D, HbA₁c, insulin levels were measured and 75-g oral glucose tolerance test was performed. Serum 25-OH-D level (ng/ml) of OSA patients were lower than control subjects (17.4 ± 6.9 vs. 19.9 ± 7.8), and decrement was parallel to severity of OSA; as 18.2 ± 6.4 (5 ≤ AHI < 15), 17.5 ± 7.4 (15 ≤ AHI < 30), and 16.3 ± 6.9 (AHI > 30), respectively (P = 0.097, r = -0.13). However, severe female OSA patients had significantly lower 25-OH-D levels (11.55 ng/ml), while control males had the highest mean value (21.7 ng/ml) (P < 0.001). Frequency of insulin resistance (IR) was 48%, prediabetes 41%, diabetes 16% in OSA patients. Mean 25-OH-D level of insulin resistant subjects (HOMA-IR ≥ 2.7, n = 77, AHI = 35.5) was lower than non-insulin resistant subjects (HOMA-IR < 2.7, n = 113, AHI = 19.8) as 16.18 ± 7.81 versus 19.2 ± 6.6, respectively (P = 0.004). 25-OH-D level of 91 non-diabetic subjects (n = 91, AHI = 19.7) was 19.5 ± 7.4, prediabetics (n = 75, AHI = 28.7) was 17.45 ± 6.9, and diabetics (n = 24, AHI = 46.3) was 13.8 ± 5.3 (P = 0.02). We showed that subjects with more severe OSA indices (AHI ≥ 15) tended to present lower vitamin D levels correlated to increased prevalence of IR, prediabetes, and diabetes. Vitamin D deficiency may play a role and/or worsen

  16. Metformin-associated lactic acidosis: Current perspectives on causes and risk.

    PubMed

    DeFronzo, Ralph; Fleming, G Alexander; Chen, Kim; Bicsak, Thomas A

    2016-02-01

    Although metformin has become a drug of choice for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, some patients may not receive it owing to the risk of lactic acidosis. Metformin, along with other drugs in the biguanide class, increases plasma lactate levels in a plasma concentration-dependent manner by inhibiting mitochondrial respiration predominantly in the liver. Elevated plasma metformin concentrations (as occur in individuals with renal impairment) and a secondary event or condition that further disrupts lactate production or clearance (e.g., cirrhosis, sepsis, or hypoperfusion), are typically necessary to cause metformin-associated lactic acidosis (MALA). As these secondary events may be unpredictable and the mortality rate for MALA approaches 50%, metformin has been contraindicated in moderate and severe renal impairment since its FDA approval in patients with normal renal function or mild renal insufficiency to minimize the potential for toxic metformin levels and MALA. However, the reported incidence of lactic acidosis in clinical practice has proved to be very low (<10 cases per 100,000 patient-years). Several groups have suggested that current renal function cutoffs for metformin are too conservative, thus depriving a substantial number of type 2 diabetes patients from the potential benefit of metformin therapy. On the other hand, the success of metformin as the first-line diabetes therapy may be a direct consequence of conservative labeling, the absence of which could have led to excess patient risk and eventual withdrawal from the market, as happened with earlier biguanide therapies. An investigational delayed-release metformin currently under development could potentially provide a treatment option for patients with renal impairment pending the results of future studies. This literature-based review provides an update on the impact of renal function and other conditions on metformin plasma levels and the risk of MALA in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  17. An experimental renal acidification defect in patients with hereditary fructose intolerance. I. Its resemblance to renal tubular acidosis.

    PubMed

    Morris, R C

    1968-06-01

    In three unrelated patients with hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI), but in none of five normal subjects, the experimental administration of fructose invariably induced a reversible dysfunction of the renal tubule with biochemical and physiological characteristics of renal tubular acidosis. During a state of ammonium chloride-induced acidosis, (a) urinary pH was greater than six and the rate of excretion of net acid (titratable acid plus ammonium minus bicarbonate) was inappropriately low, (b) the glomerular filtration rate remained unchanged or decreased modestly, and (c) urinary excretion of titratable acid increased briskly with diuresis of infused phosphate, although urinary pH changed little. The tubular dysfunction, which also includes impaired tubular reabsorption of alpha amino nitrogen and phosphate, persisted throughout administration of fructose and disappeared afterward. The tubular dysfunction was not causally dependent on hypoglucosemia, ammonium chloride-induced acidosis or osmotic diuresis. Rather, it appeared causally related to the fructose-induced metabolic abnormality of patients with HFI. The causal enzymatic defect, the virtual absence of fructose-1-phosphate aldolase, occurs in the kidney as well as in the liver of patients with HFI.

  18. Heart diseases in mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fayssoil, Abdallah

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke (MELAS) syndrome is a mitochondrial genetic disorder caused by a point mutation, resulting in the substitution of guanine for adenine at nucleotide 3243 (A3243G) of mitochondrial DNA. This disease is characterized by a multisystem disorder with variable manifestations. The authors review heart involvement in this disease.

  19. Acidosis, magnesium and acetylsalicylic acid: Effects on thrombin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisevich, Nikolaj; Loznikova, Svetlana; Sukhodola, Aleksandr; Halets, Inessa; Bryszewska, Maria; Shcharbin, Dzmitry

    2013-03-01

    Thrombin, an enzyme from the hydrolase family, is the main component of the blood coagulation system. In ischemic stroke it acts as a serine protease that converts soluble fibrinogen into insoluble strands of fibrin forming blood clots in the brain. It has been found to phosphoresce at room temperature in the millisecond and microsecond ranges. The phosphorescence of thrombin was studied under physiological conditions, in acidosis (decrease of pH from 8.0 to 5.0) and on the addition of salts (magnesium sulfate and sodium chloride) and of acetylsalicylic acid, and its connection with thrombin function is discussed. Acidosis significantly increased the internal dynamics of thrombin. We propose that lactate-acidosis plays a protective role in stroke, preventing the formation of clots. The addition of NaCl and MgSO4 in different concentrations increased the internal dynamics of thrombin. Also, the addition of MgSO4 decreased thrombin-induced platelet aggregation. However, magnesium sulfate and acetylsalicylic acid in the therapeutic concentrations used for treatment of ischemic stroke had no effect on thrombin internal dynamics. The data obtained will help to elucidate the conformational stability of thrombin under conditions modulating lactate-acidosis and in the presence of magnesium sulfate.

  20. Analysis of metabolic flux phenotypes for two Arabidopsis mutants with severe impairment in seed storage lipid synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lonien, J.; Schwender, J.

    2009-11-01

    Major storage reserves of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seeds are triacylglycerols (seed oils) and proteins. Seed oil content is severely reduced for the regulatory mutant wrinkled1 (wri1-1; At3g54320) and for a double mutant in two isoforms of plastidic pyruvate kinase (pkp{beta}{sub 1}pkp{alpha}; At5g52920 and At3g22960). Both already biochemically well-characterized mutants were now studied by {sup 13}C metabolic flux analysis of cultured developing embryos based on comparison with their respective genetic wild-type backgrounds. For both mutations, in seeds as well as in cultured embryos, the oil fraction was strongly reduced while the fractions of proteins and free metabolites increased. Flux analysis in cultured embryos revealed changes in nutrient uptakes and fluxes into biomass as well as an increase in tricarboxylic acid cycle activity for both mutations. While in both wild types plastidic pyruvate kinase (PK{sub p}) provides most of the pyruvate for plastidic fatty acid synthesis, the flux through PK{sub p} is reduced in pkp{beta}{sub 1}pkp{alpha} by 43% of the wild-type value. In wri1-1, PK{sub p} flux is even more reduced (by 82%), although the genes PKp{beta}{sub 1} and PKp{alpha} are still expressed. Along a common paradigm of metabolic control theory, it is hypothesized that a large reduction in PK{sub p} enzyme activity in pkp{beta}{sub 1}pkp{alpha} has less effect on PK{sub p} flux than multiple smaller reductions in glycolytic enzymes in wri1-1. In addition, only in the wri1-1 mutant is the large reduction in PK{sub p} flux compensated in part by an increased import of cytosolic pyruvate and by plastidic malic enzyme. No such limited compensatory bypass could be observed in pkp{beta}{sub 1}pkp{alpha}.

  1. Effect of Metabolic Syndrome Score, Metabolic Syndrome, and Its Individual Components on the Prevalence and Severity of Angiographic Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Ming-Hui; Ling, Yan; Liu, Lin; Jiang, Jing-Jing; Li, Xiao-Ying; Gao, Xin

    2017-01-01

    Background: The clinical significance of metabolic syndrome (MS) score, MS, and its individual components with respect to risk prediction of coronary artery disease (CAD) remains unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate whether and to what extent MS score, MS, and its individual components were related to the risk of CAD. Methods: Among 1191 participants who underwent coronary angiography for the confirmation of suspected myocardial ischemia, 858 were included in this study according to the inclusion criteria from September 2010 to June 2013. MS was diagnosed with the 2005 National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. The severity of coronary atherosclerosis was assessed by Gensini score. Results: The results showed that the age- and sex-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for CAD were as follows: MS score, 1.327; MS, 2.013; elevated waist circumference, 1.447; reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, 1.654; and elevated fasting glucose, 1.782; all P < 0.05; whereas for elevated triglycerides, 1.324, and elevated blood pressure, 1.342, both P > 0.05. After multivariate adjustment, results showed that only MS and elevated fasting glucose were significantly associated with CAD (OR, 1.628, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.151–2.305, P = 0.006 for elevated fasting glucose, and OR, 1.631, 95% CI, 1.208–2.203, P = 0.001 for MS). The study showed that only MS score and elevated fasting glucose were significantly associated with Gensini score (standardized coefficient, 0.101, P = 0.031 for elevated fasting glucose and standardized coefficient, 0.103, P = 0.009 for MS score). Conclusions: The present study demonstrated that MS score, MS, and its individual components might have different contributions to CAD prevalence and severity. MS and elevated fasting glucose were independent risk factors for the prevalence of angiographic CAD whereas MS score and elevated fasting glucose were significantly associated with the severity of CAD

  2. The Prevalence of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Related Metabolic Comorbidities Was Associated with Age at Onset of Moderate to Severe Plaque Psoriasis: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yunlu; Ding, Yangfeng

    2017-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has been found to be highly prevalent in psoriatic patients. Adult onset psoriasis could be divided into either early or late onset psoriasis. The associations between NAFLD and related metabolic comorbidities and age at onset of psoriasis have not yet been investigated. Our study was to evaluate the associations between prevalence of NAFLD and related metabolic conditions and early, late, and childhood onset psoriasis. A cross-sectional observational study was conducted on patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. Data on clinical characteristics of NAFLD and related metabolic diseases (diabetes, hypertriglyceridemia, hyperuricemia, and metabolic syndrome) were collected. The prevalence of NAFLD in 439 patients (mean: 51±14 years, range: 18–85 years) was 55.8%. NAFLD was frequently identified in early onset patients (74.2%), and this diagnosis was particularly common in patients currently younger than 40 (85.3%). Diabetes was the least prevalent component of metabolic syndrome in early onset patients with metabolic syndrome but the most often found component in late onset ones. Patients with childhood onset psoriasis had the lowest frequencies of all metabolic comorbidities except hyperuricemia among the three groups. In the multivariate analyses, early onset was independently and positively associated with NAFLD, hypertriglyceridemia and hyperuricemia and independently and negatively associated with diabetes among early and late onset patients. The results suggested prevalence of NAFLD and related metabolic comorbidities was associated with age at onset of moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. Early onset of psoriasis was independently associated with greater odds of NAFLD, hypertriglyceridemia, hyperuricemia and smaller odds of diabetes compared to late onset. Early onset patients have metabolic syndrome mainly related to lipid disorders and abnormal glucose metabolism was not often involved. PMID:28099469

  3. Monitoring of metformin-induced lactic acidosis in a diabetic patient with acute kidney failure and effect of hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Laforest, Claire; Saint-Marcoux, Franck; Amiel, Jean-Bernard; Pichon, Nicolas; Merle, Louis

    2013-02-01

    Metformin associated lactic acidosis (MALA) is a serious complication occurring especially in elderly patients given high doses of the drug. We report a non-fatal case of MALA with pronounced acidosis (pH 6.76, lactate 30.81 mmol/l) and high metformin concentrations (127 mg/l) in a patient who had developed acute renal failure after undergoing an operation. Multiple measurements of biological parameters and metformin blood concentrations showed the effectiveness of repeated hemodialysis sessions on metformin elimination. Cases previously reported with such a severe MALA were associated with a high mortality rate. We show that close monitoring in an intensive care unit together with prompt and repeated dialysis sessions can lead to a favorable outcome.

  4. Metabolic decompensation in methylmalonic aciduria: which biochemical parameters are discriminative?

    PubMed

    Zwickler, Tamaris; Haege, Gisela; Riderer, Alina; Hörster, Friederike; Hoffmann, Georg F; Burgard, Peter; Kölker, Stefan

    2012-09-01

    Recurrent, life-threatening metabolic decompensations often occur in patients with methylmalonic aciduria (MMAuria). Our study evaluated (impending) metabolic decompensations in these patients aiming to identify the most frequent and reliable clinical and biochemical abnormalities that could be helpful for decision-making on when to start an emergency treatment. Seventy-six unscheduled and 179 regular visits of 10 patients with confirmed MMAuria continuously followed by our metabolic centre between 1975 and 2009 were analysed. The most frequent symptom of an impending acute metabolic decompensation was vomiting (90% of episodes), whereas symptoms of intercurrent infectious disease (29%) or other symptoms (such as food refusal and impaired consciousness) were found less often. Thirty-five biochemical parameters were included in the analysis. Among them, pathological changes of acid-base balance reflecting metabolic acidosis with partial respiratory compensation (decreased pH, pCO(2), standard bicarbonate, and base excess) and elevated ammonia were the most reliable biochemical parameters for the identification of a metabolic decompensation and the estimation of its severity. In contrast, analyses of organic acids, acylcarnitines and carnitine status were less discriminative. In conclusion, careful history taking and identification of suspicious symptoms in combination with a small number of rapidly available biochemical parameters are helpful to differentiate compensated metabolic condition and (impending) metabolic crisis and to decide when to start an emergency treatment.

  5. Can phenformin-induced lactic acidosis be prevented?

    PubMed Central

    Gale, E A; Tattersall, R B

    1976-01-01

    Although patients taking phenformin are more likely to develop lactic acidosis in the presence of renal, cardiovascular, or hepatic disease, criteria for safe use of the drug are not well established. Eight diabetics died of lactic acidosis in Nottingham in 1972-5 and all were taking phenformin in therapeutic doses. Six had attended the diabetic clinic within a month of their terminal illness. Two patients had appreciable renal impairment and should not have been given phenformin. Four had hypertension and minimal evidence of renal disease, while in two no predisposing factor was identified. There are so many contraindications to the use of phenformin that it is doubtful whether patients on the drug can be monitored adequately. We suggest that phenformin should be withdrawn from general use. PMID:974710

  6. Ruminal acidosis in a 21-month-old Holstein heifer

    PubMed Central

    Golder, Helen M.; Celi, Pietro; Lean, Ian J.

    2014-01-01

    Rumen and blood biochemical profiles were monitored in 8 Holstein heifers exposed to a carbohydrate feeding challenge. One of the heifers had clinical signs consistent with acute ruminal acidosis on the day of, and subsequent to, the challenge. Within 24 h of challenge, 6 of 7 rumen volatile fatty acids measured were not detectable in this heifer and her rumen total lactate concentration was > 70 mM. PMID:24891639

  7. Complement and contact activation in term neonates after fetal acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Sonntag, J.; Wagner, M.; Strauss, E.; Obladen, M.

    1998-01-01

    AIMS—To evaluate complement and contact activation after fetal acidosis.
METHODS—Fifteen term neonates with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy after umbilical arterial pH < 7.10 were compared with 15 healthy neonates with umbilical arterial pH > 7.20. Determinations of the complement function and C1-inhibitor activity were performed as kinetic tests 22-28 hours after birth. C1q, C1-inhibitor, and factor B concentrations were determined by radial immunodiffusion and those of C3a, C5a, and factor XIIa by enzyme immunoabsorbent assay.
RESULTS—Median complement function (46 vs 73 %), C1q (4.3 vs 9.1 mg/dl), and factor B (5.2 vs 7.7 mg/dl) decreased after fetal acidosis. The activated split products C3a (260 vs 185 µg/l), C5a (5.0 vs 0.6 µg/l), and factor XIIa (3.2 vs 1.3 µg/l) increased in the neonates after fetal acidosis. No differences were found in the concentration and activity of C1-inhibitor.
CONCLUSIONS—Complement and contact activation occurred in the newborns with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. Activation of these systems generates mediators which can trigger inflammation and tissue injury.

 PMID:9577283

  8. Bench-to-bedside review: Oxygen debt and its metabolic correlates as quantifiers of the severity of hemorrhagic and post-traumatic shock

    PubMed Central

    Rixen, Dieter; Siegel, John H

    2005-01-01

    Evidence is increasing that oxygen debt and its metabolic correlates are important quantifiers of the severity of hemorrhagic and post-traumatic shock and and may serve as useful guides in the treatment of these conditions. The aim of this review is to demonstrate the similarity between experimental oxygen debt in animals and human hemorrhage/post-traumatic conditions, and to examine metabolic oxygen debt correlates, namely base deficit and lactate, as indices of shock severity and adequacy of volume resuscitation. Relevant studies in the medical literature were identified using Medline and Cochrane Library searches. Findings in both experimental animals (dog/pig) and humans suggest that oxygen debt or its metabolic correlates may be more useful quantifiers of hemorrhagic shock than estimates of blood loss, volume replacement, blood pressure, or heart rate. This is evidenced by the oxygen debt/probability of death curves for the animals, and by the consistency of lethal dose (LD)25,50 points for base deficit across all three species. Quantifying human post-traumatic shock based on base deficit and adjusting for Glasgow Coma Scale score, prothrombin time, Injury Severity Score and age is demonstrated to be superior to anatomic injury severity alone or in combination with Trauma and Injury Severity Score. The data examined in this review indicate that estimates of oxygen debt and its metabolic correlates should be included in studies of experimental shock and in the management of patients suffering from hemorrhagic shock. PMID:16277731

  9. Nitrite Reduces Cytoplasmic Acidosis under Anoxia1

    PubMed Central

    Libourel, I.G.L.; van Bodegom, P.M.; Fricker, M.D.; Ratcliffe, R.G.

    2006-01-01

    The ameliorating effect of nitrate on the acidification of the cytoplasm during short-term anoxia was investigated in maize (Zea mays) root segments. Seedlings were grown in the presence or absence of nitrate, and changes in the cytoplasmic and vacuolar pH in response to the imposition of anoxia were measured by in vivo 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Soluble ions and metabolites released to the suspending medium by the anoxic root segments were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and volatile metabolites were measured by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The beneficial effect of nitrate on cytoplasmic pH regulation under anoxia occurred despite limited metabolism of nitrate under anoxia, and modest effects on the ions and metabolites, including fermentation end products, released from the anoxic root segments. Interestingly, exposing roots grown and treated in the absence of nitrate to micromolar levels of nitrite during anoxia had a beneficial effect on the cytoplasmic pH that was comparable to the effect observed for roots grown and treated in the presence of nitrate. It is argued that nitrate itself is not directly responsible for improved pH regulation under anoxia, contrary to the usual assumption, and that nitrite rather than nitrate should be the focus for further work on the beneficial effect of nitrate on flooding tolerance. PMID:17071644

  10. Near-future pH conditions severely impact calcification, metabolism and the nervous system in the pteropod Heliconoides inflatus.

    PubMed

    Moya, Aurelie; Howes, Ella L; Lacoue-Labarthe, Thomas; Forêt, Sylvain; Hanna, Bishoy; Medina, Mónica; Munday, Philip L; Ong, Jue-Sheng; Teyssié, Jean-Louis; Torda, Gergely; Watson, Sue-Ann; Miller, David J; Bijma, Jelle; Gattuso, Jean-Pierre

    2016-12-01

    Shelled pteropods play key roles in the global carbon cycle and food webs of various ecosystems. Their thin external shell is sensitive to small changes in pH, and shell dissolution has already been observed in areas where aragonite saturation state is ~1. A decline in pteropod abundance has the potential to disrupt trophic networks and directly impact commercial fisheries. Therefore, it is crucial to understand how pteropods will be affected by global environmental change, particularly ocean acidification. In this study, physiological and molecular approaches were used to investigate the response of the Mediterranean pteropod, Heliconoides inflatus, to pH values projected for 2100 under a moderate emissions trajectory (RCP6.0). Pteropods were subjected to pHT 7.9 for 3 days, and gene expression levels, calcification and respiration rates were measured relative to pHT 8.1 controls. Gross calcification decreased markedly under low pH conditions, while genes potentially involved in calcification were up-regulated, reflecting the inability of pteropods to maintain calcification rates. Gene expression data imply that under low pH conditions, both metabolic processes and protein synthesis may be compromised, while genes involved in acid-base regulation were up-regulated. A large number of genes related to nervous system structure and function were also up-regulated in the low pH treatment, including a GABAA receptor subunit. This observation is particularly interesting because GABAA receptor disturbances, leading to altered behavior, have been documented in several other marine animals after exposure to elevated CO2 . The up-regulation of many genes involved in nervous system function suggests that exposure to low pH could have major effects on pteropod behavior. This study illustrates the power of combining physiological and molecular approaches. It also reveals the importance of behavioral analyses in studies aimed at understanding the impacts of low pH on marine

  11. Devastating metabolic brain disorders of newborns and young infants.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hyun Jung; Kim, Ji Hye; Jeon, Tae Yeon; Yoo, So-Young; Eo, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic disorders of the brain that manifest in the neonatal or early infantile period are usually associated with acute and severe illness and are thus referred to as devastating metabolic disorders. Most of these disorders may be classified as organic acid disorders, amino acid metabolism disorders, primary lactic acidosis, or fatty acid oxidation disorders. Each disorder has distinctive clinical, biochemical, and radiologic features. Early diagnosis is important both for prompt treatment to prevent death or serious sequelae and for genetic counseling. However, diagnosis is often challenging because many findings overlap and may mimic those of more common neonatal conditions, such as hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and infection. Ultrasonography (US) may be an initial screening method for the neonatal brain, and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is the modality of choice for evaluating metabolic brain disorders. Although nonspecific imaging findings are common in early-onset metabolic disorders, characteristic patterns of brain involvement have been described for several disorders. In addition, diffusion-weighted images may be used to characterize edema during an acute episode of encephalopathy, and MR spectroscopy depicts changes in metabolites that may help diagnose metabolic disorders and assess response to treatment. Imaging findings, including those of advanced MR imaging techniques, must be closely reviewed. If one of these rare disorders is suspected, the appropriate biochemical test or analysis of the specific gene should be performed to confirm the diagnosis.

  12. Metabolic syndrome and psoriasis severity in South-East Asian patients: An investigation of potential association using current and chronological assessments.

    PubMed

    Chularojanamontri, Leena; Wongpraparut, Chanisada; Silpa-Archa, Narumol; Chaweekulrat, Pichanee

    2016-12-01

    Although studies regarding prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) in Asian psoriatic patients are limited and show varying results, a previous report describes a significant increase in prevalence of MS in Thai psoriatic patients, as compared with rates in the general population. However, no significant association between MS and psoriasis severity using the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) was found, which differs from the findings of Korean and Japanese studies. This study aimed at re-evaluating the association between MS and psoriasis severity in Thai patients using current assessment (PASI) and chronological assessment (historical course and interventions). A total of 273 psoriatic patients were recruited. After controlling for age and sex, 96 patients were assigned to the MS group and 96 patients to the non-MS group. Similar to the previous study, no significant differences were identified between metabolic and non-metabolic patients regarding PASI, age of onset, disease duration and family history of psoriasis. However, the numbers of hospitalizations (P = 0.018) and interventions (P = 0.028) were significantly higher in metabolic patients than in non-metabolic patients. Further, a greater number of metabolic components was significantly associated with a higher number of hospitalizations (P = 0.012), pustular or erythrodermic psoriasis episodes (P = 0.049), and interventions (P = 0.005). Body mass index of 23 kg/m(2) or more, abdominal obesity and high blood pressure were associated with an increased risk of treatment failure. Using chronological assessment, our study supported that MS negatively affects psoriasis severity and treatment outcomes. Screening for MS is highly recommended for psoriatic patients.

  13. An enzymatic bridge between carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism: regulation of glutamate dehydrogenase by reversible phosphorylation in a severe hypoxia-tolerant crayfish.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Neal J; Storey, Kenneth B

    2012-04-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) (EC 1.4.1.3) is a crucial enzyme involved in bridging two metabolic pathways, gating the use of glutamate for either amino acid metabolism, or carbohydrate metabolism. The present study investigated GDH from tail muscle of the freshwater crayfish Orconectes virilis exploring changes to kinetic properties, phosphorylation levels and structural stability between two forms of the enzyme (aerobic control and 20-h severe hypoxic). Evidence indicated that GDH was converted to a high phosphate form under oxygen limitation. ProQ Diamond phosphoprotein staining showed a 42% higher bound phosphate content on GDH from muscle of severely hypoxic crayfish compared with the aerobic form, and treatment of this GDH with commercial phosphatase (alkaline phosphatase), and treatments that stimulated the activities of different endogenous protein phosphatases (stimulating PP1 + PP2A, PP2B, and PP2C) yielded significant increases in the fold activation by ADP of GDH from both control and severe hypoxic conditions. By contrast, stimulation of the activities of endogenous protein kinases (AMPK, PKA or CaMK) significantly reduced the ADP fold activation from control animals. The physiological consequence of severe hypoxia-induced GDH phosphorylation may be to suppress GDH activity under low oxygen, shutting off this critical bridge point between two metabolic pathways.

  14. Tumor cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Garcia, Susana; Lopez-Gonzalez, Jose Sullivan; B´ez-Viveros, José Luis; Aguilar-Cazares, Dolores

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is a genetic disease that is caused by mutations in oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and stability genes. The fact that the metabolism of tumor cells is altered has been known for many years. However, the mechanisms and consequences of metabolic reprogramming have just begun to be understood. In this review, an integral view of tumor cell metabolism is presented, showing how metabolic pathways are reprogrammed to satisfy tumor cell proliferation and survival requirements. In tumor cells, glycolysis is strongly enhanced to fulfill the high ATP demands of these cells; glucose carbons are the main building blocks in fatty acid and nucleotide biosynthesis. Glutaminolysis is also increased to satisfy NADPH regeneration, whereas glutamine carbons replenish the Krebs cycle, which produces metabolites that are constantly used for macromolecular biosynthesis. A characteristic feature of the tumor microenvironment is acidosis, which results from the local increase in lactic acid production by tumor cells. This phenomenon is attributed to the carbons from glutamine and glucose, which are also used for lactic acid production. Lactic acidosis also directs the metabolic reprogramming of tumor cells and serves as an additional selective pressure. Finally, we also discuss the role of mitochondria in supporting tumor cell metabolism. PMID:22057267

  15. Electrolyte Imbalances and Nephrocalcinosis in Acute Phosphate Poisoning on Chronic Type 1 Renal Tubular Acidosis due to Sjögren's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung-Gun; Han, Sang-Woong; Kim, Ho-Jung

    2013-01-01

    Although renal calcium crystal deposits (nephrocalcinosis) may occur in acute phosphate poisoning as well as type 1 renal tubular acidosis (RTA), hyperphosphatemic hypocalcemia is common in the former while normocalcemic hypokalemia is typical in the latter. Here, as a unique coexistence of these two seperated clinical entities, we report a 30-yr-old woman presenting with carpal spasm related to hypocalcemia (ionized calcium of 1.90 mM/L) due to acute phosphate poisoning after oral sodium phosphate bowel preparation, which resolved rapidly after calcium gluconate intravenously. Subsequently, type 1 RTA due to Sjögren's syndrome was unveiled by sustained hypokalemia (3.3 to 3.4 mEq/L), persistent alkaline urine pH (> 6.0) despite metabolic acidosis, and medullary nephrocalcinosis. Through this case report, the differential points of nephrocalcinosis and electrolyte imbalances between them are discussed, and focused more on diagnostic tests and managements of type 1 RTA. PMID:23400265

  16. Functional, metabolic and ultrastructure evidence for improved myocardial protection during severe ischaemic stress with MBS, a new crystalloid cardioplegic solution.

    PubMed

    Choong, Y S; Gavin, J B

    1996-06-01

    The duration of aortic clamping and the temperature of the arrested heart are two important factors in the overall strategy of myocardial protection with cardioplegic solutions. The isolated working rat heart was used to compare the cardioprotection effects (function, metabolism and ultrastructure) of the new "extracellular" crystalloid solution, MBS (containing glucose, aspartate and lactobionate) and St. Thomas' Hospital No. 2 (STH) during prolonged moderate hypothermic ischaemia (30 degrees C, 2 hours and 4 hours) with multidose reinfusion (2 min every 30 min interval). All MBS treated hearts (n = 9 per group) rapidly resumed spontaneous regular sinus rhythm (0.8 +/- 0.2 min) and had similar high degree of functional recovery (cardiac output: 90.2 +/- 4.5% & 80.9 +/- 3.5%, stroke volume: 89.1 +/- 4.7% & 81.9 +/- 3.4% and aortic pressure: 102.0 +/- 4.0% & 100.0 +/- 7.3% of pre-arrest values for 2 hours and 4 hours groups, respectively) during 30 min post-ischaemic reperfusion. In contrast, hearts protected with STH showed significantly (p<0.01) less recovery of left ventricular function (cardiac output: 64.3 +/- 2.9% & 5.5 +/- 3.9%, respectively) with two of the nine hearts failing to regain any cardiac pump function after 4 hours. MBS increased lactate efflux (glycolysis) and completely abolished the progressive increase in the coronary vascular resistance during 4 hours ischaemic arrest. These improvements were directly related to the significantly (p<0.01) reduced depletion of the myocardial adenosine triphosphate (13.32 +/- 1.65 vs 2.42 +/- 0.09 micromol/g dry wt) and guanosine triphosphate (1.56 +/- 0.08 vs 0.74 +/- 0.04 micromol/g dry wt) during arrest; to their enhanced repletion after reperfusion (ATP: 96% vs 36%, TAN: 90% vs 40% and GTP: 69% vs 48%); and to the absence of ultrastructural injury to cardiac myocytes and the microvasculature. We conclude that the new crystalloid cardioplegic solution MBS provides markedly improved myocardial protection

  17. Metabolic studies of transient tyrosinemia in premature infants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernbach, S. A.; Summons, R. E.; Pereira, W. E.; Duffield, A. M.

    1975-01-01

    The recently developed technique of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry supported by computer has considerably improved the analysis of physiologic fluids. This study attempted to demonstrate the value of this system in the investigation of metabolite patterns in urine in two metabolic problems of prematurity, transient tyrosinemia and late metabolic acidosis. Serial 24-hr urine specimens were analyzed in 9 infants. Transient tyrosinemia, characterized by 5- 10-fold increases over basal excretion of tyrosine, p-hydroxyphenyllactate, and p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate in urine, was noted in five of the infants. Late metabolic acidosis was seen in four infants, but bore no relation to transient tyrosinemia.

  18. Acidosis slows electrical conduction through the atrio-ventricular node

    PubMed Central

    Nisbet, Ashley M.; Burton, Francis L.; Walker, Nicola L.; Craig, Margaret A.; Cheng, Hongwei; Hancox, Jules C.; Orchard, Clive H.; Smith, Godfrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Acidosis affects the mechanical and electrical activity of mammalian hearts but comparatively little is known about its effects on the function of the atrio-ventricular node (AVN). In this study, the electrical activity of the epicardial surface of the left ventricle of isolated Langendorff-perfused rabbit hearts was examined using optical methods. Perfusion with hypercapnic Tyrode's solution (20% CO2, pH 6.7) increased the time of earliest activation (Tact) from 100.5 ± 7.9 to 166.1 ± 7.2 ms (n = 8) at a pacing cycle length (PCL) of 300 ms (37°C). Tact increased at shorter PCL, and the hypercapnic solution prolonged Tact further: at 150 ms PCL, Tact was prolonged from 131.0 ± 5.2 to 174.9 ± 16.3 ms. 2:1 AVN block was common at shorter cycle lengths. Atrial and ventricular conduction times were not significantly affected by the hypercapnic solution suggesting that the increased delay originated in the AVN. Isolated right atrial preparations were superfused with Tyrode's solutions at pH 7.4 (control), 6.8 and 6.3. Low pH prolonged the atrial-Hisian (AH) interval, the AVN effective and functional refractory periods and Wenckebach cycle length significantly. Complete AVN block occurred in 6 out of 9 preparations. Optical imaging of conduction at the AV junction revealed increased conduction delay in the region of the AVN, with less marked effects in atrial and ventricular tissue. Thus acidosis can dramatically prolong the AVN delay, and in combination with short cycle lengths, this can cause partial or complete AVN block and is therefore implicated in the development of brady-arrhythmias in conditions of local or systemic acidosis. PMID:25009505

  19. Acidosis slows electrical conduction through the atrio-ventricular node.

    PubMed

    Nisbet, Ashley M; Burton, Francis L; Walker, Nicola L; Craig, Margaret A; Cheng, Hongwei; Hancox, Jules C; Orchard, Clive H; Smith, Godfrey L

    2014-01-01

    Acidosis affects the mechanical and electrical activity of mammalian hearts but comparatively little is known about its effects on the function of the atrio-ventricular node (AVN). In this study, the electrical activity of the epicardial surface of the left ventricle of isolated Langendorff-perfused rabbit hearts was examined using optical methods. Perfusion with hypercapnic Tyrode's solution (20% CO2, pH 6.7) increased the time of earliest activation (Tact) from 100.5 ± 7.9 to 166.1 ± 7.2 ms (n = 8) at a pacing cycle length (PCL) of 300 ms (37°C). Tact increased at shorter PCL, and the hypercapnic solution prolonged Tact further: at 150 ms PCL, Tact was prolonged from 131.0 ± 5.2 to 174.9 ± 16.3 ms. 2:1 AVN block was common at shorter cycle lengths. Atrial and ventricular conduction times were not significantly affected by the hypercapnic solution suggesting that the increased delay originated in the AVN. Isolated right atrial preparations were superfused with Tyrode's solutions at pH 7.4 (control), 6.8 and 6.3. Low pH prolonged the atrial-Hisian (AH) interval, the AVN effective and functional refractory periods and Wenckebach cycle length significantly. Complete AVN block occurred in 6 out of 9 preparations. Optical imaging of conduction at the AV junction revealed increased conduction delay in the region of the AVN, with less marked effects in atrial and ventricular tissue. Thus acidosis can dramatically prolong the AVN delay, and in combination with short cycle lengths, this can cause partial or complete AVN block and is therefore implicated in the development of brady-arrhythmias in conditions of local or systemic acidosis.

  20. Does Bicarbonate Correct Coagulation Function Impaired by Acidosis in Swine?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    L bicarbonate to a pH of 7.4 (A-Bi, n 6). Blood samples were taken at base - line, 15 minutes after acidosis induction, and 15 minutes after...Behring, Deerfield, IL). Plasma fibrinogen concentra- tion was determined by BCS Coagulation System based on fibrinogen functional activities in the...0.05). Hct decreased from 31 1% to 28 1% in A-LR and from 29 1% to 25 1% in A-Bi (p 0.05). Arterial base excess (BE) dropped from 7.1 0.7

  1. A fatal outcome of complicated severe diabetic ketoacidosis in a 11-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    Severinski, Srećko; Butorac Ahel, Ivona; Ovuka, Aleksandar; Verbić, Arijan

    2016-08-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a complex metabolic state characterized by hyperglycemia, metabolic acidosis and ketonuria. Cerebral edema is the most common rare complication of DKA in children. The objective of the study was to emphasize the importance of careful evaluation and monitoring for signs and symptoms of cerebral edema in all children undergoing treatment for DKA. We present a case of 11-year-old girl with a history of diabetes mellitus type I (T1DM) who presented with severe DKA complicated by hypovolemic shock, cerebral edema and hematemesis. Considering the fact that complications of DKA are rare and require a high index of clinical suspicion, early recognition and treatment are crucial for avoiding permanent damage.

  2. Metformin-associated lactic acidosis in a patient with normal kidney function.

    PubMed

    van Sloten, T T; Pijpers, E; Stehouwer, C D A; Brouwers, M C G J

    2012-06-01

    The existence of metformin-induced lactic acidosis has been questioned, in particular in the absence of specific risk factors such as impaired renal function. This report describes the presence of lactic acidosis in a patient with normal kidney function and normal doses of metformin. Subsequent positive rechallenge with metformin confirms causality.

  3. Effect of several doses of zeolite A on feed intake, energy metabolism and on mineral metabolism in dairy cows around calving.

    PubMed

    Grabherr, H; Spolders, M; Fürll, M; Flachowsky, G

    2009-04-01

    The object of the present study was to determine the influence of different zeolite A doses on dry matter intake (DMI) and mineral metabolism, and to evaluate an optimum dosage for preventing hypocalcaemia. Eighty pregnant dry cows were assigned to four groups (I-IV). They were fed a total mixed ration (TMR) ad libitum. Groups II, III and IV received an average daily dose of 12, 23 and 43 g zeolite A/kg DM for the last 2 weeks prepartum. Individually DMI was recorded daily. Blood and urine samples were taken before, during and after zeolite A supplementation. Serum was analysed for Ca, Mg, P(i), K, non-esterified fatty acids and beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB). Urine was analysed for Ca, Mg, P(i), K and net acid-base excretion (NABE). After calving, milk yield (fat corrected milk) and milk composition were determined. During zeolite A supplementation, mean DMI of Group IV (7.3 +/- 1.3 kg/cow/day) was significantly lower compared to Groups I-III (10.1, 10.9, 9.5 kg/cow/day). The reduced feed intake of Group IV resulted in significantly increased BHB as well as decreased NABE after calving. Zeolite A supplementation in higher doses (III and IV) had a stabilizing effect on Ca metabolism around calving for older cows, whereas cows in Groups I and II showed a subclinical hypocalcaemia. The mean serum Mg concentration decreased significantly in older cows in Group IV at calving. The mean P(i) concentration in cows of Group IV decreased into ranges of hypophosphataemia already 1 week after beginning of zeolite A feeding. The mean DMI postpartum as well as the milk yield was not affected by zeolite A supplementation. Feeding of 23 g zeolite A/kg DM TMR prepartum proved to be an adequate dosage for reducing subclinical hypocalcaemia frequency without significant effects on feed intake and P(i) concentration in serum.

  4. Diet-induced ketosis does not cause cerebral acidosis.

    PubMed

    Al-Mudallal, A S; LaManna, J C; Lust, W D; Harik, S I

    1996-03-01

    Ketosis is beneficial for seizure control, possibly through induction of cerebral acidosis. However, cerebral intracellular pH has not previously been measured in ketotic humans and the animal data are sparse. We describe a high-fat diet, avidly consumed by rats, that induced consistent and moderate ketosis. Adult male rats were fed either the high-fat ketogenic diet, a high-carbohydrate diet with the same protein content as the ketogenic diet, or regular laboratory chow. Five to 6 weeks later, the rats were anesthetized, paralyzed, and injected with neutral red; their brains were frozen in situ. Intracellular pH of the cerebral cortex and cerebral glucose, lactate, ATP, phosphocreatine, and gama-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels were measured. Rats fed the ketogenic diet had > 10-fold increase in their plasma ketones, but we noted no significant differences in cerebral pH or in cerebral metabolites and GABA levels among the three groups. Therefore, the antiepileptic effect of the ketogenic diet probably is not mediated by cerebral acidosis or changes in total cerebral GABA levels.

  5. Different patterns of testicular in vitro metabolism of (/sup 14/C)testosterone in several Betta (Anabantoidei, Belontiidae) species

    SciTech Connect

    Leitz, T.

    1987-07-01

    Testicular tissues of Betta picta, Betta smaragdina, and the short-finned variety of Betta splendens were incubated with (/sup 14/C)testosterone at 27 degrees for 120 min and the metabolites were isolated and characterized by paper and thin-layer chromatography and eventually by crystallization to constant specific activity. The metabolic profiles of the species were totally different. The short-finned B. splendens formed mainly 11-ketotestosterone (51.4%) as does the veiltail variety. B. smaragdina was the only species which formed considerable amounts of conjugates (24.3%), whereas in B. picta almost exclusively reduced (5 beta-) compounds (66.2%) were metabolites of testosterone. The results are discussed to be attributable to differences in testicular steroid metabolism. The significance of this observation remains unclear.

  6. Measurement of urinary free and acylcarnitines: quantitative acylcarnitine profiling in normal humans and in several patients with metabolic errors

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, J.A.; Mamer, O.A.

    1989-01-01

    A method for determining urinary concentrations of carnitine and acylcarnitine esters is described that employs fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry, stable isotope dilution techniques, and a novel deutero-methyl esterification that permits unambiguous identification and quantitation of free carnitine and acylcarnitines. It is rapid, does not require chromatographic or other isolation procedures, and is immune to analyte losses in sample preparation. Urinary concentrations are reported for adult control subjects and for others with various metabolic disorders.

  7. Diisopropylamine dichloroacetate, a novel pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 inhibitor, as a potential therapeutic agent for metabolic disorders and multiorgan failure in severe influenza.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Kazuhiko; Indalao, Irene L; Chida, Junji; Yamamoto, Yoshikazu; Hanawa, Masaaki; Kido, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Severe influenza is characterized by cytokine storm and multiorgan failure with metabolic energy disorders and vascular hyperpermeability. In the regulation of energy homeostasis, the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex plays an important role by catalyzing oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate, linking glycolysis to the tricarboxylic acid cycle and fatty acid synthesis, and thus its activity is linked to energy homeostasis. The present study tested the effects of diisopropylamine dichloroacetate (DADA), a new PDH kinase 4 (PDK4) inhibitor, in mice with severe influenza. Infection of mice with influenza A PR/8/34(H1N1) virus resulted in marked down-regulation of PDH activity and ATP level, with selective up-regulation of PDK4 in the skeletal muscles, heart, liver and lungs. Oral administration of DADA at 12-h intervals for 14 days starting immediately after infection significantly restored PDH activity and ATP level in various organs, and ameliorated disorders of glucose and lipid metabolism in the blood, together with marked improvement of survival and suppression of cytokine storm, trypsin up-regulation and viral replication. These results indicate that through PDK4 inhibition, DADA effectively suppresses the host metabolic disorder-cytokine cycle, which is closely linked to the influenza virus-cytokine-trypsin cycle, resulting in prevention of multiorgan failure in severe influenza.

  8. Effects of induced subacute ruminal acidosis on milk fat content and milk fatty acid profile.

    PubMed

    Enjalbert, F; Videau, Y; Nicot, M C; Troegeler-Meynadier, A

    2008-06-01

    Two lactating dairy cows fitted with a rumen cannula received successively diets containing 0%, 20%, 34% and again 0% of wheat on a dry matter basis. After 5, 10 and 11 days, ruminal pH was measured between 8:00 and 16:00 hours, and milk was analysed for fat content and fatty acid profile. Diets with 20% and 34% wheat induced a marginal and a severe subacute ruminal acidosis respectively. After 11 days, diets with wheat strongly reduced the milk yield and milk fat content, increased the proportions of C8:0 to C13:0 even- or odd-chain fatty acids, C18:2 n-6 and C18:3 n-3 fatty acids but decreased the proportions of C18:0 and cis-9 C18:1 fatty acids. Wheat also increased the proportions of trans-5 to trans-10 C18:1, the latter exhibiting a 10-fold increase with 34% of wheat compared with value during the initial 0% wheat period. There was also an increase of trans-10, cis-12 C18:2 fatty acid and a decrease of trans-11 to trans-16 C18:1 fatty acids. The evolution during adaptation or after return to a 0% wheat diet was rapid for pH but much slower for the fatty acid profile. The mean ruminal pH was closely related to milk fat content, the proportion of odd-chain fatty acids (linear relationship) and the ratio of trans-10 C18:1/trans-11 C18:1 (nonlinear relationship). Such changes in fatty acid profile suggested a possible use for non-invasive diagnosis of subacute ruminal acidosis.

  9. Liquid extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal: use of THAM (tris-hydroxymethyl aminomethane) coupled to hemofiltration to control hypercapnic acidosis in a porcine model of protective mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Tapia, Pablo; Lillo, Felipe; Soto, Dagoberto; Escobar, Leslie; Simon, Felipe; Hernández, Karina; Alegría, Leyla; Bruhn, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    A promising approach to facilitate protective mechanical ventilation is the use of extracorporeal CO2 removal techniques. Several strategies based on membrane gas exchangers have been developed. However, these techniques are still poorly available. The goal of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of THAM infusion coupled to hemofiltration for the management of hypercapnic acidosis. A severe respiratory acidosis was induced in seven anesthetized pigs. Five of them were treated with THAM 8-mmol·kg(-1)·h(-1) coupled to hemofiltration (THAM+HF group) at 100 mL·kg(-1)·h(-1). After 18-hours of treatment the THAM infusion was stopped but hemofiltration was kept on until 24-hours. The 2 other animals were treated with THAM but without hemofiltration. After 1-hour of treatment in THAM+HF, PaCO2 rapidly decreased from a median of 89.0 (IQR) (80.0, 98.0) to 71.3 (65.8, 82.0) mmHg (P<0.05), while pH increased from 7.12 (7.01, 7.15) to 7.29 (7.27, 7.30) (P<0.05). Thereafter PaCO2 remained stable between 60-70 mmHg, while pH increased above 7.4. After stopping THAM at 18 hours of treatment a profound rebound effect was observed with severe hypercapnic acidosis. The most important side effect we observed was hyperosmolality, which reached a maximum of 330 (328, 332) mOsm·kg H2O(-1) at T18. The animals treated only with THAM developed severe hypercapnia, despite the fact that pH returned to normal values, and died after 12 hours. Control-group had an uneven evolution until the end of the experiment. A combined treatment with THAM coupled to hemofiltration may be an effective treatment to control severe hypercapnic acidosis.

  10. The acetaminophen metabolite N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI) inhibits glutathione synthetase in vitro; a clue to the mechanism of 5-oxoprolinuric acidosis?

    PubMed

    Walker, Valerie; Mills, Graham A; Anderson, Mary E; Ingle, Brandall L; Jackson, John M; Moss, Charlotte L; Sharrod-Cole, Hayley; Skipp, Paul J

    2017-02-01

    1. Metabolic acidosis due to accumulation of l-5-oxoproline is a rare, poorly understood, disorder associated with acetaminophen treatment in malnourished patients with chronic morbidity. l-5-Oxoprolinuria signals abnormal functioning of the γ-glutamyl cycle, which recycles and synthesises glutathione. Inhibition of glutathione synthetase (GS) by N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI) could contribute to 5-oxoprolinuric acidosis in such patients. We investigated the interaction of NAPQI with GS in vitro. 2. Peptide mapping of co-incubated NAPQI and GS using mass spectrometry demonstrated binding of NAPQI with cysteine-422 of GS, which is known to be essential for GS activity. Computational docking shows that NAPQI is properly positioned for covalent bonding with cysteine-422 via Michael addition and hence supports adduct formation. 3. Co-incubation of 0.77 μM of GS with NAPQI (25-400 μM) decreased enzyme activity by 16-89%. Inhibition correlated strongly with the concentration of NAPQI and was irreversible. 4. NAPQI binds covalently to GS causing irreversible enzyme inhibition in vitro. This is an important novel biochemical observation. It is the first indication that NAPQI may inhibit glutathione synthesis, which is pivotal in NAPQI detoxification. Further studies are required to investigate its biological significance and its role in 5-oxoprolinuric acidosis.

  11. Identification of elevated urea as a severe, ubiquitous metabolic defect in the brain of patients with Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Patassini, Stefano; Begley, Paul; Reid, Suzanne J; Xu, Jingshu; Church, Stephanie J; Curtis, Maurice; Dragunow, Mike; Waldvogel, Henry J; Unwin, Richard D; Snell, Russell G; Faull, Richard L M; Cooper, Garth J S

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder wherein the aetiological defect is a mutation in the Huntington's gene (HTT), which alters the structure of the huntingtin protein through the lengthening of a polyglutamine tract and initiates a cascade that ultimately leads to dementia and premature death. However, neurodegeneration typically manifests in HD only in middle age, and processes linking the causative mutation to brain disease are poorly understood. Here, our objective was to elucidate further the processes that cause neurodegeneration in HD, by measuring levels of metabolites in brain regions known to undergo varying degrees of damage. We applied gas-chromatography/mass spectrometry-based metabolomics in a case-control study of eleven brain regions in short post-mortem-delay human tissue from nine well-characterized HD patients and nine controls. Unexpectedly, a single major abnormality was evident in all eleven brain regions studied across the forebrain, midbrain and hindbrain, namely marked elevation of urea, a metabolite formed in the urea cycle by arginase-mediated cleavage of arginine. Urea cycle activity localizes primarily in the liver, where it functions to incorporate protein-derived amine-nitrogen into urea for recycling or urinary excretion. It also occurs in other cell-types, but systemic over-production of urea is not known in HD. These findings are consistent with impaired local urea regulation in brain, by up-regulation of synthesis and/or defective clearance. We hypothesize that defective brain urea metabolism could play a substantive role in the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration, perhaps via defects in osmoregulation or nitrogen metabolism. Brain urea metabolism is therefore a target for generating novel monitoring/imaging strategies and/or therapeutic interventions aimed at ameliorating the impact of HD in patients.

  12. A comparison of zinc metabolism, inflammation, and disease severity in critically ill infected and noninfected adults early after intensive care unit admission123

    PubMed Central

    Besecker, Beth Y; Exline, Matthew C; Hollyfield, Jennifer; Phillips, Gary; DiSilvestro, Robert A; Wewers, Mark D; Knoell, Daren L

    2011-01-01

    Background: Zinc deficiency is a cause of immune dysfunction and infection. Previous human studies have shown that the activation of the acute phase response alters zinc metabolism. Whether the alteration in zinc metabolism is predictive of disease severity in the setting of critical illness is unclear. Objective: We sought to determine whether differences occur in zinc metabolism at the onset of critical illness between infected (septic) and noninfected subjects. Design: We conducted this prospective study in an adult medical intensive care unit (MICU) at a tertiary care hospital. Subjects were enrolled within 24 h of intensive care unit admission. Subjects who did not meet sepsis criteria were considered for the critically ill control (CIC) arm. After patient consent, blood was immediately collected to measure plasma zinc and cytokine concentrations and zinc transporter gene expression in peripheral blood monocytes. Clinical data during the MICU stay were also recorded. Results: A total of 56 patients were evaluated (22 septic, 22 CIC, and 12 healthy subjects). Plasma zinc concentrations were below normal in CIC patients and further reduced in the septic cohort (57.2 ± 18.2 compared with 45.5 ± 18.1 μg/dL). Cytokine concentrations increased with decreasing plasma zinc concentrations (P = 0.05). SLC39A8 gene expression was highest in patients with the lowest plasma zinc concentrations and the highest severity of illness. Conclusions: The alteration of zinc metabolism was more pronounced in septic patients than in noninfected critically ill patients. Specifically, sepsis was associated with lower plasma zinc concentrations and higher SLC39A8 mRNA expression, which correlated with an increased severity of illness, including cardiovascular dysfunction. PMID:21525204

  13. Genealogy profiling through strain improvement by using metabolic network analysis: metabolic flux genealogy of several generations of lysine-producing corynebacteria.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, Christoph; Heinzle, Elmar

    2002-12-01

    A comprehensive approach of metabolite balancing, (13)C tracer studies, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry, and isotopomer modeling was applied for comparative metabolic network analysis of a genealogy of five successive generations of lysine-producing Corynebacterium glutamicum. The five strains examined (C. glutamicum ATCC 13032, 13287, 21253, 21526, and 21543) were previously obtained by random mutagenesis and selection. Throughout the genealogy, the lysine yield in batch cultures increased markedly from 1.2 to 24.9% relative to the glucose uptake flux. Strain optimization was accompanied by significant changes in intracellular flux distributions. The relative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) flux successively increased, clearly corresponding to the product yield. Moreover, the anaplerotic net flux increased almost twofold as a consequence of concerted regulation of C(3) carboxylation and C(4) decarboxylation fluxes to cover the increased demand for lysine formation; thus, the overall increase was a consequence of concerted regulation of C(3) carboxylation and C(4) decarboxylation fluxes. The relative flux through isocitrate dehydrogenase dropped from 82.7% in the wild type to 59.9% in the lysine-producing mutants. In contrast to the NADPH demand, which increased from 109 to 172% due to the increasing lysine yield, the overall NADPH supply remained constant between 185 and 196%, resulting in a decrease in the apparent NADPH excess through strain optimization. Extrapolated to industrial lysine producers, the NADPH supply might become a limiting factor. The relative contributions of PPP and the tricarboxylic acid cycle to NADPH generation changed markedly, indicating that C. glutamicum is able to maintain a constant supply of NADPH under completely different flux conditions. Statistical analysis by a Monte Carlo approach revealed high precision for the estimated fluxes, underlining the

  14. A combined high CYP2D6-CYP2C19 metabolic capacity is associated with the severity of suicide attempt as measured by objective circumstances.

    PubMed

    Peñas-Lledó, E; Guillaume, S; Naranjo, M E G; Delgado, A; Jaussent, I; Blasco-Fontecilla, H; Courtet, P; LLerena, A

    2015-04-01

    This study examined, for the first time, whether a high CYP2D6-CYP2C19 metabolic capacity combination increases the likelihood of suicidal intent severity in a large study cohort. Survivors of a suicide attempt (n=587; 86.8% women) were genotyped for CYP2C19 (*2, *17) and CYP2D6 (*3, *4, *4xN, *5, *6, *10, wtxN) genetic variation and evaluated with the Beck Suicide Intent Scale (SIS). Patients with a high CYP2D6-CYP2C19 metabolic capacity showed an increased risk for a severe suicide attempt (P<0.01) as measured by the SIS-objective circumstance subscale (odds ratio (OR)=1.37; 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.05-1.78; P=0.02) after adjusting for confounders (gender, age, level of studies, marital status, mental disorders, tobacco use, family history of suicide, personal history of attempts and violence of the attempt). Importantly, the risk was greater in those without a family history of suicide (OR=1.82; CI=1.19-2.77; P=0.002). Further research is warranted to evaluate whether the observed relationship is mediated by the role of CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 involvement in the endogenous physiology or drug metabolism or both.

  15. Blood Pressure and Metabolic Changes After 3-Month CPAP Therapy in a Very Elderly Obese with Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Spannella, Francesco; Giulietti, Federico; Di Pentima, Chiara; Lombardi, Francesca Elena; Borioni, Elisabetta; Sarzani, Riccardo

    2017-03-21

    Age is one of the main risk factor for the presence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). This syndrome is associated with hypertension, cardiovascular disease, cognitive impairment and metabolic abnormalities, such as type 2 diabetes. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) represents the gold standard therapy, but its benefit is still to be determined in very elderly. We report the blood pressure and metabolic changes in a very elderly obese with severe OSA after 3-month CPAP therapy. We have evaluated a very elderly obese male affected by severe symptomatic OSA, poor controlled nocturnal hypertension and insulin resistance. After 3-month CPAP therapy, without any changes in drug therapy, we observed a normalization of circadian blood pressure (BP) pattern, an improved insulin sensitivity, together with a reduced resting energy expenditure, despite no significant change in weight. This case report shows the benefits of OSA treatment with CPAP, not only on BP profile, but also on metabolic parameters in a very elderly, a particular type of patient in which scientific evidence is still scant. Further studies are needed to better investigate the relationship between OSA, CPAP therapy and energy expenditure not only in adults but also in elderly patients.

  16. Severe Sepsis in Severely Malnourished Young Bangladeshi Children with Pneumonia: A Retrospective Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Faruque, Abu S. G.; Shahid, Abu S. M. S. B.; Shahunja, K. M.; Das, Sumon Kumar; Hossain, Md Iqbal; Ahmed, Tahmeed

    2015-01-01

    Background In developing countries, there is no published report on predicting factors of severe sepsis in severely acute malnourished (SAM) children having pneumonia and impact of fluid resuscitation in such children. Thus, we aimed to identify predicting factors for severe sepsis and assess the outcome of fluid resuscitation of such children. Methods In this retrospective case-control study SAM children aged 0–59 months, admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of the Dhaka Hospital of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh from April 2011 through July 2012 with history of cough or difficult breathing and radiologic pneumonia, who were assessed for severe sepsis at admission constituted the study population. We compared the pneumonic SAM children with severe sepsis (cases = 50) with those without severe sepsis (controls = 354). Severe sepsis was defined with objective clinical criteria and managed with fluid resuscitation, in addition to antibiotic and other supportive therapy, following the standard hospital guideline, which is very similar to the WHO guideline. Results The case-fatality-rate was significantly higher among the cases than the controls (40% vs. 4%; p<0.001). In logistic regression analysis after adjusting for potential confounders, lack of BCG vaccination, drowsiness, abdominal distension, acute kidney injury, and metabolic acidosis at admission remained as independent predicting factors for severe sepsis in pneumonic SAM children (p<0.05 for all comparisons). Conclusion and Significance We noted a much higher case fatality among under-five SAM children with pneumonia and severe sepsis who required fluid resuscitation in addition to standard antibiotic and other supportive therapy compared to those without severe sepsis. Independent risk factors and outcome of the management of severe sepsis in our study children highlight the importance for defining optimal fluid resuscitation therapy aiming at reducing the case

  17. Beyond Warburg effect – dual metabolic nature of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jiansheng; Wu, Hao; Dai, Chunyan; Pan, Qiangrong; Ding, Zonghui; Hu, Danqing; Ji, Bingyan; Luo, Yan; Hu, Xun

    2014-01-01

    Warburg effect is a dominant phenotype of most cancer cells. Here we show that this phenotype depends on its environment. When cancer cells are under regular culture condition, they show Warburg effect; whereas under lactic acidosis, they show a nonglycolytic phenotype, characterized by a high ratio of oxygen consumption rate over glycolytic rate, negligible lactate production and efficient incorporation of glucose carbon(s) into cellular mass. These two metabolic modes are intimately interrelated, for Warburg effect generates lactic acidosis that promotes a transition to a nonglycolytic mode. This dual metabolic nature confers growth advantage to cancer cells adapting to ever changing microenvironment. PMID:24820099

  18. Neural Correlates of the Severity of Cocaine, Heroin, Alcohol, MDMA and Cannabis Use in Polysubstance Abusers: A Resting-PET Brain Metabolism Study

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-López, Laura; Stamatakis, Emmanuel A.; Fernández-Serrano, Maria José; Gómez-Río, Manuel; Rodríguez-Fernández, Antonio; Pérez-García, Miguel; Verdejo-García, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Functional imaging studies of addiction following protracted abstinence have not been systematically conducted to look at the associations between severity of use of different drugs and brain dysfunction. Findings from such studies may be relevant to implement specific interventions for treatment. The aim of this study was to examine the association between resting-state regional brain metabolism (measured with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography (FDG-PET) and the severity of use of cocaine, heroin, alcohol, MDMA and cannabis in a sample of polysubstance users with prolonged abstinence from all drugs used. Methods Our sample consisted of 49 polysubstance users enrolled in residential treatment. We conducted correlation analyses between estimates of use of cocaine, heroin, alcohol, MDMA and cannabis and brain metabolism (BM) (using Statistical Parametric Mapping voxel-based (VB) whole-brain analyses). In all correlation analyses conducted for each of the drugs we controlled for the co-abuse of the other drugs used. Results The analysis showed significant negative correlations between severity of heroin, alcohol, MDMA and cannabis use and BM in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and temporal cortex. Alcohol use was further associated with lower metabolism in frontal premotor cortex and putamen, and stimulants use with parietal cortex. Conclusions Duration of use of different drugs negatively correlated with overlapping regions in the DLPFC, whereas severity of cocaine, heroin and alcohol use selectively impact parietal, temporal, and frontal-premotor/basal ganglia regions respectively. The knowledge of these associations could be useful in the clinical practice since different brain alterations have been associated with different patterns of execution that may affect the rehabilitation of these patients. PMID:22768136

  19. Acidosis inhibits spontaneous activity and membrane currents in myocytes isolated from the rabbit atrioventricular node.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hongwei; Smith, Godfrey L; Orchard, Clive H; Hancox, Jules C

    2009-01-01

    Recent evidence from intact hearts suggests that the function of cardiac nodal tissue may be particularly susceptible to acidosis. Little is currently known, however, about the effects of acidosis on the cellular electrophysiology of the atrioventricular node (AVN). This study was conducted, therefore, to determine the effect of acidosis on the spontaneous activity and membrane currents of myocytes isolated from the rabbit AVN, recorded at 35-37 degrees C using whole-cell patch-clamp. Reduction of extracellular pH (pH(e); from 7.4 to 6.8 or 6.3) produced pH-dependent slowing of spontaneous action potential rate and upstroke velocity, and reductions in maximum diastolic potential and action potential amplitude. Ionic current recordings under voltage-clamp indicated that acidosis (pH(e) 6.3) decreased L-type Ca current (I(Ca,L)), without significant changes in voltage-dependent activation or inactivation. Acidosis reduced the E-4031-sensitive, rapid delayed rectifier current (I(Kr)) tail amplitude at -40 mV following command pulses to between -30 and +50 mV, and accelerated tail-current deactivation. In contrast, the time-dependent hyperpolarisation-activated current, I(f), was unaffected by acidosis. Background current insensitive to E-4031 and nifedipine was reduced by acidosis. Measurement of intracellular pH (pH(i)) from undialysed cells using BCECF showed a reduction in mean pH(i) from 7.24 to 6.45 (n=17) when pH(e) was lowered from 7.4 to 6.3. We conclude that I(f) is unlikely to be involved in the response of the AVN to acidosis, whilst inhibition of I(Ca,L) and I(Kr) by acidosis are likely to play a significant role in effects on AVN cellular electrophysiology.

  20. Energy metabolic disorder is a major risk factor in severe influenza virus infection: Proposals for new therapeutic options based on animal model experiments.

    PubMed

    Kido, Hiroshi; Indalao, Irene L; Kim, Hyejin; Kimoto, Takashi; Sakai, Satoko; Takahashi, Etsuhisa

    2016-09-01

    Severe influenza is characterized by cytokine storm and multiorgan failure. Influenza patients with underlying diseases show a rapid progression in disease severity. The major mechanism that underlies multiorgan failure during the progressive stage of infection, particularly in patients with underlying risk factors, is mitochondrial energy crisis. The relationship between the factors that determine infection severity, such as influenza virus, cytokines, cellular trypsin as a hemagglutinin processing protease for viral multiplication, accumulation of metabolic intermediates and ATP crisis in mitochondria, is termed the "influenza virus-cytokine-trypsin" cycle. This occurs during the initial stages of infection, and is interconnected with the "metabolic disorders-cytokine" cycle in the middle to late phase of infection. Experiments using animal models have highlighted the complex relationship between these two cycles. New treatment options have been proposed that target the ATP crisis and multiorgan failure during the late phase of infection, rather than antiviral treatments with neuraminidase inhibitors that work during the initial phase. These options are (i) restoration of glucose oxidation in mitochondria by diisopropylamine dichloroacetate, which inhibits infection-induced pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 activity, and (ii) restoration of long-chain fatty acid oxidation in mitochondria by l-carnitine and bezafibrate, an agonist of peroxisome proliferation-activated receptors-β/δ, which transcriptionally upregulates carnitine palmitoyltransferase II. The latter is particularly effective in patients with influenza-associated encephalopathy who have thermolabile and short half-life compound variants of carnitine palmitoyltransferase II.

  1. Sequence and genetic organization of a Zymomonas mobilis gene cluster that encodes several enzymes of glucose metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Barnell, W.O.; Kyung Cheol Yi; Conway, T. )

    1990-12-01

    The Zymomonas mobilis genes that encode glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (zwf), 6-phosphogluconate dehydratase (edd), and glucokinase (glk) were cloned independently by genetic complementation of specific defects in Escherichia coli metabolism. The identify of these cloned genes was confirmed by various biochemical means. Nucleotide sequence analysis established that these three genes are clustered on the genome and revealed an additional open reading frame in this region that has significant amino acid identity to the E.coli xylose-proton symporter and the human glucose transporter. On the basis of this evidence and structural analysis of the deduced primary amino acid sequence, this gene is believed to encode the Z. mobilis glucose-facilitated diffusion protein, glf. The four genes in the 6-kb cluster are organized in the order glf, zwf, edd, glk. The glf and zwf genes are separated by 146 bp. The zwf and edd genes overlap by 8 bp, and their expression may be translationally coupled. The edd and glk genes are separated by 203 bp. The glk gene is followed by tandem transcriptional terminators. The four genes appear to be organized in an operon. Such an arrangement of the genes that govern glucose uptake and the first three steps of the Entner-Doudoroff glycolytic pathway provides the organism with a mechanism for carefully regulating the levels of the enzymes that control carbon flux into the pathway.

  2. [Brachial artery endothelial function in teenagers with obesity depending on severity of clinical, trophological and metabolic disorders].

    PubMed

    Maskova, G S; Chernaia, N L; Nagornova, E Iu; Fomina, O V; Byteva, T A

    2014-01-01

    We carried out complex examination of 68 adolescents aged 11-17 years with primary obesity which in addition to assessment of clinical-anamnestic, laboratory data and functional parameters of cardiovascular system included registration of reaction of brachial artery endothelium to reactive hyperemia. Vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) was found in 66% of obese teenagers. Obesity in adolescents with VED was characterized by aggravated course with higher fat mass index (36.8 +/- 4.39%) and prevalence of hypothalamic (42%) and metabolic (8.8%) syndromes. Stable arterial hypertension (AH) found in 37% of examined adolescents was 1.5 times more often registered in those with VED. We distinguished 4 groups of adolescents with various degree of risk of development of cardiovascular disorders: with stable AH and VED (group I), with stable AH and normal function of vascular endothelium (group II), with normal or labile arterial pressure with VED (group III), with normal or labile arterial pressure with normal function of vascular endothelium. It is expedient to supplement examination of obese adolescents with assessment of the state of vascular endothelium aiming at determination of degree of risk of development of atherosclerosis and/or stable AH.

  3. Hemodialysis-refractory metformin-associated lactate acidosis with hypoglycemia, hypothermia, and bradycardia in a diabetic patient with belated diagnosis and chronic kidney disease
.

    PubMed

    Zibar, Lada; Zibar, Karin

    2017-01-30

    Metformin is a first-line oral antidiabetic therapy for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Metformin-associated lactate acidosis (MALA) is a well-known, life-threatening, but rare side effect of metformin therapy. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients have a much greater risk of MALA. We report the case of a severe refractory MALA despite hemodialysis (HD) treatment, associated with hypoglycemia, hypothermia, and bradycardia in a neglected and thus untimely-recognized CKD patient with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Despite the recent rehabilitation of metformin as a treatment of choice for type 2 diabetes mellitus, the drug should be prescribed with caution as it can be associated with life-threatening refractory acidosis, particularly in CKD patients. Moreover, HD treatment could occasionally be ineffective, resulting in a fatal outcome.
.

  4. Prevalence and risk factors of metabolic syndrome in obese children and adolescents: the role of the severity of obesity.

    PubMed

    Sen, Yasar; Kandemir, Nurgun; Alikasifoglu, Ayfer; Gonc, Nazli; Ozon, Alev

    2008-10-01

    The present study was performed to determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) and its risk factors in obese children and adolescents. The study included 352 obese children and adolescents (body mass index [BMI] > or = 95th percentile) aged between 2 and 19 years. The diagnosis of MS was made according to the criteria adapted from the World Health Organization (WHO) and the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III) guidelines. BMI z-scores were calculated to assess the degree of obesity. The prevalence of MS and risk factors were determined. Determinants of MS were examined using regression analysis. The prevalence of MS was 41.8%. The age at onset of obesity, sedentary life-span, fasting blood levels of glucose, insulin, triglyceride, very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) cholesterol, and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were higher, while levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and the number of actively spent hours were lower in cases with MS (p < 0.05). The most important determinant of MS was BMI z-score (r = 0.31, p < 0.0001). A one-point increase in BMI z-score yielded a 2-fold increase in the prevalence of MS. The prevalence of MS increased from 27.6% to 60.7% when the BMI z-score increased from 2.3 to 3.3. The risk of developing MS was 2.6-fold higher in cases with BMI z-score > 3 when compared to those with z-scores between 2 and 3. The results from this study indicate that, although the correlation between MS and the BMI z-score was weak, the BMI z-score may be an effective parameter in identifying obese children and adolescents at risk for MS. Screening the cases with BMI z-scores > or = 2 for MS is important for establishing an early diagnosis.

  5. A comparison of the metabolic complications and hospital course of severe anorexia nervosa by binge-purge and restricting subtypes.

    PubMed

    Rylander, Melanie; Brinton, John T; Sabel, Allison L; Mehler, Philip S; Gaudiani, Jennifer L

    2017-01-06

    This study examines adult patients with severe, life-threatening anorexia nervosa who were admitted to an inpatient, medical stabilization unit between October 1, 2008 and December 31, 2014. Specifically, the study compares anorexia nervosa, binge purge subtype (AN-BP) and anorexia nervosa, restricting subtype (AN-R) on admission measures, hospital course, and outcomes. Of the 232 patients, 46% (N = 108) had AN-BP. Patients with AN-R manifested a higher frequency of underweight-mediated medical complications, including bone marrow dysfunction, hepatic dysfunction, and hypoglycemia. Understanding the pathophysiologic differences between severe AN-R and AN-BP is essential to understanding the abnormalities seen on clinical presentation, guiding appropriate clinical treatment, and predicting medical complications during refeeding.

  6. Localization of a Gene for Autosomal Recessive Distal Renal Tubular Acidosis with Normal Hearing (rdRTA2) to 7q33-34

    PubMed Central

    Karet, Fiona E.; Finberg, Karin E.; Nayir, Ahmet; Bakkaloglu, Aysin; Ozen, Seza; Hulton, Sally A.; Sanjad, Sami A.; Al-Sabban, Essam A.; Medina, Juan F.; Lifton, Richard P.

    1999-01-01

    Summary Failure of distal nephrons to excrete excess acid results in the “distal renal tubular acidoses” (dRTA). Early childhood features of autosomal recessive dRTA include severe metabolic acidosis with inappropriately alkaline urine, poor growth, rickets, and renal calcification. Progressive bilateral sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is evident in approximately one-third of patients. We have recently identified mutations in ATP6B1, encoding the B-subunit of the collecting-duct apical proton pump, as a cause of recessive dRTA with SNHL. We now report the results of genetic analysis of 13 kindreds with recessive dRTA and normal hearing. Analysis of linkage and molecular examination of ATP6B1 indicated that mutation in ATP6B1 rarely, if ever, accounts for this phenotype, prompting a genomewide linkage search for loci underlying this trait. The results strongly supported linkage with locus heterogeneity to a segment of 7q33-34, yielding a maximum multipoint LOD score of 8.84 with 68% of kindreds linked. The LOD-3 support interval defines a 14-cM region flanked by D7S500 and D7S688. That 4 of these 13 kindreds do not support linkage to rdRTA2 and ATP6B1 implies the existence of at least one additional dRTA locus. These findings establish that genes causing recessive dRTA with normal and impaired hearing are different, and they identify, at 7q33-34, a new locus, rdRTA2, for recessive dRTA with normal hearing. PMID:10577919

  7. Increased extracellular heat shock protein 90α in severe sepsis and SIRS associated with multiple organ failure and related to acute inflammatory-metabolic stress response in children.

    PubMed

    Fitrolaki, Michaela-Diana; Dimitriou, Helen; Venihaki, Maria; Katrinaki, Marianna; Ilia, Stavroula; Briassoulis, George

    2016-08-01

    Mammalian heat-shock-protein (HSP) 90α rapidly responses to environmental insults. We examined the hypothesis that not only serum HSP72 but also HSP90α is increased in the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), severe-sepsis (SS), and/or sepsis (S) compared to healthy children (H); we assessed HSP90α relation to (a) multiple organ system failure (MOSF) and (b) inflammatory-metabolic response and severity of illness.A total of 65 children with S, SS, or SIRS and 25 H were included. ELISA was used to evaluate extracellular HSP90α and HSP72, chemiluminescence interleukins (ILs), flow-cytometry neutrophil-CD64 (nCD64)-expression.HSP90α, along with HSP72, were dramatically increased among MOSF patients. Patients in septic groups and SIRS had elevated HSP90α compared to H (P < 0.01). HSP90α was independently related to predicted death rate and severity of illness; positively to HSP72, nCD64, ILs, length of stay, days on ventilator, and fever; negatively to HDL and LDL (P < 0.05). The HSP72 was increased in SS/S and related negatively to HDL and LDL (P < 0.05).Serum HSP90α is markedly elevated in children with severe sepsis and is associated with MOSF. Better than the HSP72, also increased in SS, SIRS, and MOSF, HSP90α is related to the inflammatory stress, fever, outcome endpoints, and predicted mortality and inversely related to the low-LDL/low-HDL stress metabolic pattern.

  8. Increased extracellular heat shock protein 90α in severe sepsis and SIRS associated with multiple organ failure and related to acute inflammatory-metabolic stress response in children

    PubMed Central

    Fitrolaki, Michaela-Diana; Dimitriou, Helen; Venihaki, Maria; Katrinaki, Marianna; Ilia, Stavroula; Briassoulis, George

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Mammalian heat-shock-protein (HSP) 90α rapidly responses to environmental insults. We examined the hypothesis that not only serum HSP72 but also HSP90α is increased in the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), severe-sepsis (SS), and/or sepsis (S) compared to healthy children (H); we assessed HSP90α relation to (a) multiple organ system failure (MOSF) and (b) inflammatory-metabolic response and severity of illness. A total of 65 children with S, SS, or SIRS and 25 H were included. ELISA was used to evaluate extracellular HSP90α and HSP72, chemiluminescence interleukins (ILs), flow-cytometry neutrophil-CD64 (nCD64)-expression. HSP90α, along with HSP72, were dramatically increased among MOSF patients. Patients in septic groups and SIRS had elevated HSP90α compared to H (P < 0.01). HSP90α was independently related to predicted death rate and severity of illness; positively to HSP72, nCD64, ILs, length of stay, days on ventilator, and fever; negatively to HDL and LDL (P < 0.05). The HSP72 was increased in SS/S and related negatively to HDL and LDL (P < 0.05). Serum HSP90α is markedly elevated in children with severe sepsis and is associated with MOSF. Better than the HSP72, also increased in SS, SIRS, and MOSF, HSP90α is related to the inflammatory stress, fever, outcome endpoints, and predicted mortality and inversely related to the low-LDL/low-HDL stress metabolic pattern. PMID:27583886

  9. Mechanisms of adaptation to chronic respiratory acidosis in the rabbit proximal tubule.

    PubMed Central

    Krapf, R

    1989-01-01

    The hyperbicarbonatemia of chronic respiratory acidosis is maintained by enhanced bicarbonate reabsorption in the proximal tubule. To investigate the cellular mechanisms involved in this adaptation, cell and luminal pH were measured microfluorometrically using (2",7')-bis(carboxyethyl)-(5,6)-carboxyfluorescein in isolated, microperfused S2 proximal convoluted tubules from control and acidotic rabbits. Chronic respiratory acidosis was induced by exposure to 10% CO2 for 52-56 h. Tubules from acidotic rabbits had a significantly lower luminal pH after 1-mm perfused length (7.03 +/- 0.09 vs. 7.26 +/- 0.06 in controls, perfusion rate = 10 nl/min). Chronic respiratory acidosis increased the initial rate of cell acidification (dpHi/dt) in response to luminal sodium removal by 63% and in response to lowering luminal pH (7.4-6.8) by 69%. Chronic respiratory acidosis also increased dpHi/dt in response to peritubular sodium removal by 63% and in response to lowering peritubular pH by 73%. In conclusion, chronic respiratory acidosis induces a parallel increase in the rates of the luminal Na/H antiporter and the basolateral Na/(HCO3)3 cotransporter. Therefore, the enhanced proximal tubule reabsorption of bicarbonate in chronic respiratory acidosis may be, at least in part, mediated by a parallel adaptation of these transporters. PMID:2537851

  10. [Non-fatal hyperkalemia in lactic acidosis due to metformin overdose. Report of one case].

    PubMed

    Díaz, Rienzi; Vega, Jorge; Goecke, Helmuth

    2015-03-01

    We report a 74-year-old man with diabetes mellitus type 2 and hypertension, who recently underwent coronary bypass surgery due to severe triple vessel disease receiving cardiological and combined antidiabetic therapy, including metformin 4 g/day. He was admitted with abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and loss of consciousness. At admission, he was disoriented and agitated with signs of poor perfusion. His blood pressure was 80/70 mmHg, pulse rate 40 beats/min, respiratory rate 20-breaths/min, and axillary temperature 35 °C. Biochemical profile revealed an extreme hyperkalemia of 15.4 mEq/L (double checked), elevated creatinine, uremia and brain natriuretic peptide; hypoglycemia (blood glucose 68 mg/dl) and normal C Reactive Protein. Arterial blood gases revealed severe lactic acidemia. The electrocardiogram showed sinus bradycardia, simple AV block, widened QRS with prominent T wave and prolonged QT. He was admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) with the suspicion of lactic acidosis associated with metformin, receiving fluid management, intravenous hypertonic glucose plus insulin and sodium bicarbonate, mechanical ventilation, vasopressor therapy, a temporary pacemaker lead, in addition to continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration. Two days later, the patient experienced a significant clinical improvement with normalization of the acid-base status, plasma lactate and potassium levels. On day 9, diuresis was recovered, creatinine and uremia returned to normal levels and the patient was discharged from the ICU.

  11. Management of severe malaria: results from recent trials.

    PubMed

    Olupot-Olupot, Peter; Maitland, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    Globally, malaria remains a substantial public health burden with an estimated 349-552 million clinical cases of P. falciparum malaria each year--leading to 780,000 deaths directly attributable to the disease. Whilst the outcome from severe malaria in Africa children remains poor, recent developments in the management of malaria have come from two key sources--the introduction of new, safe and rapidly-effective anti-malarials and high quality evidence from two of the largest clinical trials ever conducted in African children with severe malaria. As a result, the time-honoured anti-malarial treatment for severe malaria, quinine, will now be replaced by artesunate, a water-soluble artemisinin derivative. Supportive care, specifically the management of shock, has been informed by a large late phase clinical trial which concluded that bolus resuscitation is harmful and therefore should be avoided in children with severe malaria, including the high risk group with severe metabolic acidosis and advanced shock.

  12. G418-mediated ribosomal read-through of a nonsense mutation causing autosomal recessive proximal renal tubular acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Azimov, Rustam; Abuladze, Natalia; Sassani, Pakan; Newman, Debra; Kao, Liyo; Liu, Weixin; Orozco, Nicholas; Ruchala, Piotr; Pushkin, Alexander; Kurtz, Ira

    2008-01-01

    Autosomal recessive proximal renal tubular acidosis is caused by mutations in the SLC4A4 gene encoding the electrogenic sodium bicarbonate cotransporter NBCe1-A. The mutations that have been characterized thus far result in premature truncation, mistargeting, or decreased function of the cotransporter. Despite bicarbonate treatment to correct the metabolic acidosis, extrarenal manifestations persist, including glaucoma, cataracts, corneal opacification, and mental retardation. Currently, there are no known therapeutic approaches that can specifically target mutant NBCe1-A proteins. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the NBCe1-A-Q29X mutation can be rescued in vitro by treatment with aminoglycoside antibiotics, which are known for their ability to suppress premature stop codons. As a model system, we cloned the NBCe1-A-Q29X mutant into a vector lacking an aminoglycoside resistance gene and transfected the mutant cotransporter in HEK293-H cells. Cells transfected with the NBCe1-A-Q29X mutant failed to express the cotransporter because of the premature stop codon. Treatment of the cells with G418 significantly increased the expression of the full-length cotransporter, as assessed by immunoblot analysis. Furthermore, immunocytochemical studies demonstrated that G418 treatment induced cotransporter expression on the plasma membrane whereas in the absence of G418, NBCe1-A-Q29X was not expressed. In HEK293-H cells transfected with the NBCe1-A-Q29X mutant not treated with G418, NBCe1-A-mediated flux was not detectable. In contrast, in cells transfected with the NBCe1-A-Q29X mutant, G418 treatment induced Na+- and HCO3−-dependent transport that did not differ from wild-type NBCe1-A function. G418 treatment in mock-transfected cells was without effect. In conclusion, G418 induces ribosomal read-through of the NBCe1-A-Q29X mutation in HEK293-H cells. These findings represent the first evidence that in the presence of the NBCe1-A-Q29X mutation that causes

  13. G418-mediated ribosomal read-through of a nonsense mutation causing autosomal recessive proximal renal tubular acidosis.

    PubMed

    Azimov, Rustam; Abuladze, Natalia; Sassani, Pakan; Newman, Debra; Kao, Liyo; Liu, Weixin; Orozco, Nicholas; Ruchala, Piotr; Pushkin, Alexander; Kurtz, Ira

    2008-09-01

    Autosomal recessive proximal renal tubular acidosis is caused by mutations in the SLC4A4 gene encoding the electrogenic sodium bicarbonate cotransporter NBCe1-A. The mutations that have been characterized thus far result in premature truncation, mistargeting, or decreased function of the cotransporter. Despite bicarbonate treatment to correct the metabolic acidosis, extrarenal manifestations persist, including glaucoma, cataracts, corneal opacification, and mental retardation. Currently, there are no known therapeutic approaches that can specifically target mutant NBCe1-A proteins. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the NBCe1-A-Q29X mutation can be rescued in vitro by treatment with aminoglycoside antibiotics, which are known for their ability to suppress premature stop codons. As a model system, we cloned the NBCe1-A-Q29X mutant into a vector lacking an aminoglycoside resistance gene and transfected the mutant cotransporter in HEK293-H cells. Cells transfected with the NBCe1-A-Q29X mutant failed to express the cotransporter because of the premature stop codon. Treatment of the cells with G418 significantly increased the expression of the full-length cotransporter, as assessed by immunoblot analysis. Furthermore, immunocytochemical studies demonstrated that G418 treatment induced cotransporter expression on the plasma membrane whereas in the absence of G418, NBCe1-A-Q29X was not expressed. In HEK293-H cells transfected with the NBCe1-A-Q29X mutant not treated with G418, NBCe1-A-mediated flux was not detectable. In contrast, in cells transfected with the NBCe1-A-Q29X mutant, G418 treatment induced Na(+)- and HCO(3)(-)-dependent transport that did not differ from wild-type NBCe1-A function. G418 treatment in mock-transfected cells was without effect. In conclusion, G418 induces ribosomal read-through of the NBCe1-A-Q29X mutation in HEK293-H cells. These findings represent the first evidence that in the presence of the NBCe1-A-Q29X mutation that

  14. Carbonic anhydrase II deficiency in 12 families with the autosomal recessive syndrome of osteopetrosis with renal tubular acidosis and cerebral calcification.

    PubMed

    Sly, W S; Whyte, M P; Sundaram, V; Tashian, R E; Hewett-Emmett, D; Guibaud, P; Vainsel, M; Baluarte, H J; Gruskin, A; Al-Mosawi, M

    1985-07-18

    Osteopetrosis with renal tubular acidosis and cerebral calcification was identified as a recessively inherited syndrome in 1972. In 1983, we reported a deficiency of carbonic anhydrase II, one of the isozymes of carbonic anhydrase, in three sisters with this disorder. We now describe our study of 18 similarly affected patients with this syndrome in 11 unrelated families of different geographic and ethnic origins. Virtual absence of the carbonic anhydrase II peak on high-performance liquid chromatography, of the esterase and carbon dioxide hydratase activities of carbonic anhydrase II, and of immunoprecipitable isozyme II was demonstrated on extracts of erythrocyte hemolysates from all patients studied. Reduced levels of isozyme II were found in obligate heterozygotes. These observations demonstrate the generality of the findings that we reported earlier in one family and provide further evidence that a deficiency of carbonic anhydrase II is the enzymatic basis for the autosomal recessive syndrome of osteopetrosis with renal tubular acidosis and cerebral calcification. We also summarize the clinical findings in these families, propose mechanisms by which a deficiency of carbonic anhydrase II could produce this metabolic disorder of bone, kidney, and brain, and discuss the clinical evidence for genetic heterogeneity in patients from different kindreds with this inborn error of metabolism.

  15. Hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy for adenosine deaminase-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency leads to long-term immunological recovery and metabolic correction.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, H Bobby; Cooray, Samantha; Gilmour, Kimberly C; Parsley, Kathryn L; Zhang, Fang; Adams, Stuart; Bjorkegren, Emma; Bayford, Jinhua; Brown, Lucinda; Davies, E Graham; Veys, Paul; Fairbanks, Lynette; Bordon, Victoria; Petropoulou, Theoni; Petropolou, Theoni; Kinnon, Christine; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2011-08-24

    Genetic defects in the purine salvage enzyme adenosine deaminase (ADA) lead to severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) with profound depletion of T, B, and natural killer cell lineages. Human leukocyte antigen-matched allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) offers a successful treatment option. However, individuals who lack a matched donor must receive mismatched transplants, which are associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for ADA-SCID is available, but the associated suboptimal correction of immunological defects leaves patients susceptible to infection. Here, six children were treated with autologous CD34-positive hematopoietic bone marrow stem and progenitor cells transduced with a conventional gammaretroviral vector encoding the human ADA gene. All patients stopped ERT and received mild chemotherapy before infusion of gene-modified cells. All patients survived, with a median follow-up of 43 months (range, 24 to 84 months). Four of the six patients recovered immune function as a result of engraftment of gene-corrected cells. In two patients, treatment failed because of disease-specific and technical reasons: Both restarted ERT and remain well. Of the four reconstituted patients, three remained off enzyme replacement. Moreover, three of these four patients discontinued immunoglobulin replacement, and all showed effective metabolic detoxification. All patients remained free of infection, and two cleared problematic persistent cytomegalovirus infection. There were no adverse leukemic side effects. Thus, gene therapy for ADA-SCID is safe, with effective immunological and metabolic correction, and may offer a viable alternative to conventional unrelated donor HSCT.

  16. Utility of the modified ATP III defined metabolic syndrome and severe obesity as predictors of insulin resistance in overweight children and adolescents: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Dhuper, Sarita; Cohen, Hillel W; Daniel, Josephine; Gumidyala, Padmasree; Agarwalla, Vipin; St Victor, Rosemarie; Dhuper, Sunil

    2007-01-01

    Background The rising prevalence of obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS) has received increased attention since both place individuals at risk for Type II diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Insulin resistance (IR) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of obesity and MetS in both children and adults and is a known independent cardiovascular risk factor. However measures of IR are not routinely performed in children while MetS or severe obesity when present, are considered as clinical markers for IR. Objective The study was undertaken to assess the utility of ATPIII defined metabolic syndrome (MetS) and severe obesity as predictors of insulin resistance (IR) in a group of 576 overweight children and adolescents attending a pediatric obesity clinic in Brooklyn. Methods Inclusion criteria were children ages 3–19, and body mass index > 95th percentile for age. MetS was defined using ATP III criteria, modified for age. IR was defined as upper tertile of homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) within 3 age groups (3–8, n = 122; 9–11, n = 164; 12–19, n = 290). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values and odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated within age groups for predicting IR using MetS and severe obesity respectively. Results MetS was present in 45%, 48% and 42% of the respective age groups and significantly predicted IR only in the oldest group (OR = 2.0, 95% CI 1.2, 3.4; p = .006). Sensitivities were <55%; specificities <63% and positive predictive values ≤ 42% in all groups. Severe obesity was significantly associated with IR in both the 9–11 (p = .002) and 12–18 (p = .01) groups but positive predictive values were nonetheless ≤ 51% for all groups. Conclusion The expression of IR in overweight children and adolescents is heterogeneous and MetS or severe obesity may not be sufficiently sensitive and specific indicators of insulin resistance. In addition to screening for MetS in overweight children markers for

  17. Exogenous oestrogen affects calcium metabolism differently from exogenous testosterone in ovariectomized or orchiectomized rats fed a high fructose diet severely deficient in magnesium.

    PubMed

    Koh, E T; Owen, W L; Om, A S

    1996-03-01

    To investigate interactions between sex hormones, dietary fructose, and a severe magnesium deficiency on calcium metabolism, 10 week old ovariectomized (OVX) female, and orchiectomized (ORX) males rats were studied. The OVX and ORX animals were divided into two groups: one half of the animals in each group was injected with beta-oestradiol-3-benzoate dissolved in sesame oil twice a week; the other half was injected with testosterone cypionate in sesame oil twice a week. All animals were pari-fed a severely magnesium-deficient fructose diet. After a 4 week experimental period, a 24 h urine sample was collected for measurements of cAMP, calcium, magnesium, and phosphorus. Blood was collected for determination of calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, 25-hydroxy- and 1.25-dihydroxycholecalciferol [25(OH)D, 1.25(OH)2D], and parathyroid hormone (PTH). Femurs were used for measurements of bone mineral content (BMC) and density (BMD). Oestrogen treatment produced hypercalcaemia and hypercalciuria, and, further, this was higher in female than in male rats. In contrast, testosterone treatment produced hypocalcaemia and hypocalciuria. Hypocalcaemia in testosterone-treated animals may stimulate secretion of PTH. Testosterone-treated animals had significantly lower BMD than oestrogen-treated animals. High circulating PTH seemed to cause bone loss in the testosterone group. High PTH may stimulate hydroxylation of 25(OH) D to 1.25(OH)2D in the kidneys, and high circulating 1.25(OH)2D would antagonize bone formation. Either endogenous or exogenous oestrogen increased kidney calcification. The study indicates that oestrogen-fructose-magnesium interaction on calcium metabolism was significantly different from that of testosterone.

  18. Beetroot juice supplementation speeds O2 uptake kinetics and improves exercise tolerance during severe-intensity exercise initiated from an elevated metabolic rate.

    PubMed

    Breese, Brynmor C; McNarry, Melitta A; Marwood, Simon; Blackwell, Jamie R; Bailey, Stephen J; Jones, Andrew M

    2013-12-15

    Recent research has suggested that dietary nitrate (NO3(-)) supplementation might alter the physiological responses to exercise via specific effects on type II muscle. Severe-intensity exercise initiated from an elevated metabolic rate would be expected to enhance the proportional activation of higher-order (type II) muscle fibers. The purpose of this study was, therefore, to test the hypothesis that, compared with placebo (PL), NO3(-)-rich beetroot juice (BR) supplementation would speed the phase II VO2 kinetics (τ(p)) and enhance exercise tolerance during severe-intensity exercise initiated from a baseline of moderate-intensity exercise. Nine healthy, physically active subjects were assigned in a randomized, double-blind, crossover design to receive BR (140 ml/day, containing ~8 mmol of NO3(-)) and PL (140 ml/day, containing ~0.003 mmol of NO3(-)) for 6 days. On days 4, 5, and 6 of the supplementation periods, subjects completed a double-step exercise protocol that included transitions from unloaded to moderate-intensity exercise (U→M) followed immediately by moderate to severe-intensity exercise (M→S). Compared with PL, BR elevated resting plasma nitrite concentration (PL: 65 ± 32 vs. BR: 348 ± 170 nM, P < 0.01) and reduced the VO2 τ(p) in M→S (PL: 46 ± 13 vs. BR: 36 ± 10 s, P < 0.05) but not U→M (PL: 25 ± 4 vs. BR: 27 ± 6 s, P > 0.05). During M→S exercise, the faster VO2 kinetics coincided with faster near-infrared spectroscopy-derived muscle [deoxyhemoglobin] kinetics (τ; PL: 20 ± 9 vs. BR: 10 ± 3 s, P < 0.05) and a 22% greater time-to-task failure (PL: 521 ± 158 vs. BR: 635 ± 258 s, P < 0.05). Dietary supplementation with NO3(-)-rich BR juice speeds VO2 kinetics and enhances exercise tolerance during severe-intensity exercise when initiated from an elevated metabolic rate.

  19. Lactic acidosis and the relationship with metformin usage

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weiyi; Castelino, Ronald L.; Peterson, Gregory M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The principal objective of this study was to retrospectively review a series of cases of lactic acidosis (LA) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and examine the relationship with the use of metformin. More generally, the study enabled an investigation of the profiles of patients diagnosed with LA and clinical variables associated with in-hospital mortality. Methods: All patients admitted to the Royal Hobart Hospital in Tasmania with LA (lactate >5.0 mmol/L and pH <7.35) over a 4-year period were included. Data extracted included patient demographics, medical history, medications, acute and chronic conditions associated with LA, and relevant pathology results. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify predictors for in-hospital mortality in patients with LA. Results: A total of 139 patients with LA were included in this study. Of these, 23 patients had T2DM and 11 patients were taking metformin. All metformin-treated patients had at least 1 additional medical condition (either chronic or acute) associated with an increased risk for LA. More than half (n = 72, 51.8%) of the patients with LA died during hospitalization. Multivariate logistic regression revealed older age and lower pH as the significant independent predictors (P < 0.05) for in-hospital mortality. Conclusion: LA was associated with high in-hospital mortality, with older age and lower pH as the significant risk factors for mortality. In patients with LA, approximately half of the patients with T2DM were receiving metformin. All the patients treated with metformin had other medical conditions that were risk factors for developing LA. The role of LA in patients treated with metformin is seemingly overemphasized. PMID:27861334

  20. A novel heterozygous mutation in the ATP6V0A4 gene encoding the V-ATPase a4 subunit in an adult patient with incomplete distal renal tubular acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Imai, Eri; Kaneko, Shuzo; Mori, Takayasu; Okado, Tomokazu; Uchida, Shinichi; Tsukamoto, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    A 40-year-old Japanese man who had a medical history of hypokalemic periodic paralysis 4 months prior was hospitalized to undergo a cholecystectomy. Hypokalemia, nephrocalcinosis and alkaluria suggesting distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA) were detected, but metabolic acidosis was not evident. An ammonium chloride/furosemide–fludrocortisone/bicarbonate loading test demonstrated a remarkable disability in urinary H+ excretion. A novel heterozygous mutation in the ATP6V0A4 gene encoding the vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) a4 subunit p.S544L was detected. Among cases of V-ATPase a4 mutations, this is the first case in which a heterozygous mutation developed to an incomplete or latent form of dRTA. PMID:27274828

  1. Survival after cardiopulmonary arrest with extreme hyperkalaemia and hypothermia in a patient with metformin-associated lactic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Tay, Stan; Lee, I-Lynn

    2012-12-20

    Potassium levels are regularly used as a prognostic factor to cease resuscitation in significant hypothermia. In this case report, we highlight how survival is still possible with extreme hyperkalaemia in severe hypothermia. We present a case of a 65-year-old Caucasian man who presented with metformin associated lactic acidosis. On presentation he had potassium of 9.1 mmol/l and a temperature of 31.5 °C. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was commenced when he went into asystolic arrest. This presentation would commonly make attempts at resuscitation futile with a 100% death rate. However, with appropriate management this patient's condition improved and survival was possible. We provide evidence that survival is possible in profound hyperkalaemia and hypothermia. Effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation with early haemofiltration can be successful.

  2. Metabolic Consequences after Urinary Diversion

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Raimund; Rubenwolf, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic disturbances are well-known, but sometimes neglected immediate consequences or late sequelae following urinary diversion (UD) using bowel segments. Whereas subclinical disturbances appear to be quite common, clinically relevant metabolic complications, however, are rare. Exclusion of bowel segments for UD results in loss of absorptive surface for its physiological function. Previous studies demonstrated that at least some of the absorptive and secreting properties of the bowel are preserved when exposed to urine. For each bowel segment typical consequences and complications have been reported. The use of ileal and/or colonic segments may result in hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis, which can be prevented if prophylactic treatment with alkali supplementation is started early. The resection of ileal segments may be responsible for malabsorption of vitamin B12 and bile acids with subsequent neurological and hematological late sequelae as well as potential worsening of the patient’s bowel habits. Hence, careful patient and procedure selection, meticulous long-term follow-up, and prophylactic treatment of subclinical acidosis is of paramount importance in the prevention of true metabolic complications. PMID:24653981

  3. Liquid extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal: use of THAM (tris-hydroxymethyl aminomethane) coupled to hemofiltration to control hypercapnic acidosis in a porcine model of protective mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Tapia, Pablo; Lillo, Felipe; Soto, Dagoberto; Escobar, Leslie; Simon, Felipe; Hernández, Karina; Alegría, Leyla; Bruhn, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    A promising approach to facilitate protective mechanical ventilation is the use of extracorporeal CO2 removal techniques. Several strategies based on membrane gas exchangers have been developed. However, these techniques are still poorly available. The goal of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of THAM infusion coupled to hemofiltration for the management of hypercapnic acidosis. A severe respiratory acidosis was induced in seven anesthetized pigs. Five of them were treated with THAM 8-mmol·kg-1·h-1 coupled to hemofiltration (THAM+HF group) at 100 mL·kg-1·h-1. After 18-hours of treatment the THAM infusion was stopped but hemofiltration was kept on until 24-hours. The 2 other animals were treated with THAM but without hemofiltration. After 1-hour of treatment in THAM+HF, PaCO2 rapidly decreased from a median of 89.0 (IQR) (80.0, 98.0) to 71.3 (65.8, 82.0) mmHg (P<0.05), while pH increased from 7.12 (7.01, 7.15) to 7.29 (7.27, 7.30) (P<0.05). Thereafter PaCO2 remained stable between 60-70 mmHg, while pH increased above 7.4. After stopping THAM at 18 hours of treatment a profound rebound effect was observed with severe hypercapnic acidosis. The most important side effect we observed was hyperosmolality, which reached a maximum of 330 (328, 332) mOsm·kg H2O-1 at T18. The animals treated only with THAM developed severe hypercapnia, despite the fact that pH returned to normal values, and died after 12 hours. Control-group had an uneven evolution until the end of the experiment. A combined treatment with THAM coupled to hemofiltration may be an effective treatment to control severe hypercapnic acidosis. PMID:27648139

  4. Proximal renal tubular acidosis: a not so rare disorder of multiple etiologies

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Syed K.; Ariceta, Gema; Batlle, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Proximal renal tubular acidosis (RTA) (Type II RTA) is characterized by a defect in the ability to reabsorb HCO3 in the proximal tubule. This is usually manifested as bicarbonate wastage in the urine reflecting that the defect in proximal tubular transport is severe enough that the capacity for bicarbonate reabsorption in the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop and more distal nephron segments is overwhelmed. More subtle defects in proximal bicarbonate transport likely go clinically unrecognized owing to compensatory reabsorption of bicarbonate distally. Inherited proximal RTA is more commonly autosomal recessive and has been associated with mutations in the basolateral sodium-bicarbonate cotransporter (NBCe1). Mutations in this transporter lead to reduced activity and/or trafficking, thus disrupting the normal bicarbonate reabsorption process of the proximal tubules. As an isolated defect for bicarbonate transport, proximal RTA is rare and is more often associated with the Fanconi syndrome characterized by urinary wastage of solutes like phosphate, uric acid, glucose, amino acids, low-molecular-weight proteins as well as bicarbonate. A vast array of rare tubular disorders may cause proximal RTA but most commonly it is induced by drugs. With the exception of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors which cause isolated proximal RTA, drug-induced proximal RTA is associated with Fanconi syndrome. Drugs that have been recently recognized to cause severe proximal RTA with Fanconi syndrome include ifosfamide, valproic acid and various antiretrovirals such as Tenofovir particularly when given to human immunodeficiency virus patients receiving concomitantly protease inhibitors such as ritonavir or reverse transcriptase inhibitors such as didanosine. PMID:23235953

  5. Influence of acidosis and hypoxia on liver ischemia and reperfusion injury in an in vivo rat model.

    PubMed

    Heijnen, Bob H M; Elkhaloufi, Yasser; Straatsburg, Irene H; Van Gulik, Thomas M

    2002-07-01

    The contribution of acidosis to the development of reperfusion injury is controversial. In this study, we examined the effects of respiratory acidosis and hypoxia in a frequently used in vivo liver ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury rat model. Rats were anesthetized with intraperitoneal anesthetics and subjected to partial liver ischemia (70%) for 60 min and subsequent reperfusion for 90 min under the following conditions: 1) no acidosis and normoxia, maintained by controlled ventilation; 2) acidosis and normoxia, maintained by passive supply with oxygen; 3) no acidosis and hypoxia, maintained by bicarbonate administration without respiratory support; and 4) acidosis and hypoxia, i.e., without respiratory support or pH correction. Changes in plasma aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels were measured as parameters of hepatocellular injury, and bile secretion was monitored. AST and ALT levels were lowest in the ventilated rats and highest in the bicarbonate-treated rats. No differences in bile secretion were found between groups. Our results suggest that respiratory acidosis significantly enhanced liver I/R injury under normoxic conditions, whereas respiratory acidosis significantly reduced liver I/R injury under hypoxic conditions.

  6. Seasonal influence over serum and urine metabolic markers in submariners during prolonged patrols

    PubMed Central

    Holy, Xavier; Bégot, Laurent; Renault, Sylvie; Butigieg, Xavier; André, Catherine; Bonneau, Dominique; Savourey, Gustave; Collombet, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Within the framework of earlier publications, we have consistently dedicated our investigations to eliciting the effects of both seasonal vitamin D deficiency and submarine-induced hypercapnia on serum parameters for acid–base balance and bone metabolism in submariners over a 2-month winter (WP) or summer (SP) patrols. The latest findings reported herein, contribute further evidence with regard to overall physiological regulations in the same submariner populations that underwent past scrutiny. Hence, urine and blood samples were collected in WP and SP submariners at control prepatrol time as well as on submarine patrol days 20, 41, and 58. Several urine and serum metabolic markers were quantified, namely, deoxypyridinoline (DPD), lactate, albumin, creatinine, nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA), and ionized sodium (Na+) or potassium (K+), with a view to assessing bone, muscle, liver, or kidney metabolisms. We evidenced bone metabolism alteration (urine DPD, calcium, and phosphorus) previously recorded in submarine crewmembers under prolonged patrols. We also highlighted transitory modifications in liver metabolism (serum albumin) occurring within the first 20 days of submersion. We further evidenced changes in submariners’ renal physiology (serum creatinine) throughout the entire patrol time span. Measurements of ionic homeostasis (serum Na+ and K+) displayed potential seasonal impact over active ionic pumps in submariners. Finally, there is some evidence that submersion provides beneficial conditions prone to fend off seasonal lactic acidosis (serum lactate) detected in WP submariners. PMID:26265754

  7. Blueberries and Metabolic Syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metabolic Syndrome is a cluster of metabolic disorders that increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Type 2 diabetes, elevated blood pressure, and atherogenic dyslipidemia are among the metabolic alterations that predispose the individual to several adverse cardiovascular complications. The hea...

  8. A Rare Case of Persistent Lactic Acidosis in the ICU: Glycogenic Hepatopathy and Mauriac Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, George F.

    2016-01-01

    Mauriac syndrome is a rare disorder that can present with the single feature of glycogenic hepatopathy in children and adults with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus. An often underrecognized finding of glycogenic hepatopathy is lactic acidosis and hyperlactatemia. Primary treatment of glycogenic hepatopathy is improved long-term blood glucose control. Resolution of symptoms and hepatomegaly will occur with improvement in hemoglobin A1C. We present here a case of a young adult female presenting to the intensive care unit with Mauriac syndrome. This case demonstrates exacerbation of lactic acidosis in a patient with glycogenic hepatopathy treated for diabetic ketoacidosis with high dose insulin and dextrose. PMID:27699071

  9. Early Cerebral Hemodynamic, Metabolic, and Histological Changes in Hypoxic–Ischemic Fetal Lambs during Postnatal Life

    PubMed Central

    Rey-Santano, Carmen; Mielgo, Victoria E.; Gastiasoro, Elena; Murgia, Xabier; Lafuente, Hector; Ruiz-del-Yerro, Estibaliz; Valls-i-Soler, Adolf; Hilario, Enrique; Alvarez, Francisco J.

    2011-01-01

    The hemodynamic, metabolic, and biochemical changes produced during the transition from fetal to neonatal life may be aggravated if an episode of asphyxia occurs during fetal life. The aim of the study was to examine regional cerebral blood flow (RCBF), histological changes, and cerebral brain metabolism in preterm lambs, and to analyze the role of oxidative stress in the first hours of postnatal life following severe fetal asphyxia. Eighteen chronically instrumented newborn lambs were randomly assigned to either a control group or the hypoxic–ischemic (HI) group, in which case fetal asphyxia was induced just before delivery. All the animals were maintained on intermittent positive pressure ventilation for 3 h after delivery. During the HI insult, the injured group developed acidosis, hypoxia, hypercapnia, lactic acidosis, and tachycardia (relative to the control group), without hypotension. The intermittent positive pressure ventilation transiently improved gas exchange and cardiovascular parameters. After HI injury and during ventilatory support, there continued to be an increased RCBF in inner regions among the HI group, but no significant differences were detected in cortical flow compared to the control group. Also, the magnitude of the increase in TUNEL positive cells (apoptosis) and antioxidant enzymes, and decrease of ATP reserves was significantly greater in the brain regions where the RCBF was not higher. In conclusion, our findings identify early metabolic, histological, and hemodynamic changes involved in brain damage in premature asphyxiated lambs. Such changes have been described in human neonates, so our model could be useful to test the safety and the effectiveness of different neuroprotective or ventilation strategies applied in the first hours after fetal HI injury. PMID:21960958

  10. Acidosis Acts through HSP90 in a PHD/VHL-Independent Manner to Promote HIF Function and Stem Cell Maintenance in Glioma.

    PubMed

    Filatova, Alina; Seidel, Sascha; Böğürcü, Nuray; Gräf, Sabine; Garvalov, Boyan K; Acker, Till

    2016-10-01

    Hypoxia is a common feature of solid tumors, which controls multiple aspects of cancer progression. One important function of hypoxia and the hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF) is the maintenance of cancer stem-like cells (CSC), a population of tumor cells that possess stem cell-like properties and drives tumor growth. Among the changes promoted by hypoxia is a metabolic shift resulting in acidification of the tumor microenvironment. Here, we show that glioma hypoxia and acidosis functionally cooperate in inducing HIF transcription factors and CSC maintenance. We found that these effects did not involve the classical PHD/VHL pathway for HIF upregulation, but instead involved the stress-induced chaperone protein HSP90. Genetic or pharmacologic inactivation of HSP90 inhibited the increase in HIF levels and abolished the self-renewal and tumorigenic properties of CSCs induced by acidosis. In clinical specimens of glioma, HSP90 was upregulated in the hypoxic niche and was correlated with a CSC phenotype. Our findings highlight the role of tumor acidification within the hypoxic niche in the regulation of HIF and CSC function through HSP90, with implications for therapeutic strategies to target CSC in gliomas and other hypoxic tumors. Cancer Res; 76(19); 5845-56. ©2016 AACR.

  11. The plasticizer benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP) alters the ecdysone hormone pathway, the cellular response to stress, the energy metabolism, and several detoxication mechanisms in Chironomus riparius larvae.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Óscar; Planelló, Rosario; Morcillo, Gloria

    2015-06-01

    Butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP) has been extensively used worldwide as a plasticizer in the polyvinyl chloride (PVC) industry and the manufacturing of many other products, and its presence in the aquatic environment is expected for decades. In the present study, the toxicity of BBP was investigated in Chironomus riparius aquatic larvae. The effects of acute 24-h and 48-h exposures to a wide range of BBP doses were evaluated at the molecular level by analysing changes in genes related to the stress response, the endocrine system, the energy metabolism, and detoxication pathways, as well as in the enzyme activity of glutathione S-transferase. BBP caused a dose and time-dependent toxicity in most of the selected biomarkers. 24-h exposures to high doses affected larval survival and lead to a significant response of several heat-shock genes (hsp70, hsp40, and hsp27), and to a clear endocrine disrupting effect by upregulating the ecdysone receptor gene (EcR). Longer treatments with low doses triggered a general repression of transcription and GST activity. Furthermore, delayed toxicity studies were specially relevant, since they allowed us to detect unpredictable toxic effects, not immediately manifested after contact with the phthalate. This study provides novel and interesting results on the toxic effects of BBP in C. riparius and highlights the suitability of this organism for ecotoxicological risk assessment, especially in aquatic ecosystems.

  12. Timing of onset of CKD-related metabolic complications.

    PubMed

    Moranne, Olivier; Froissart, Marc; Rossert, Jerome; Gauci, Cedric; Boffa, Jean-Jacques; Haymann, Jean Philippe; M'rad, Mona Ben; Jacquot, Christian; Houillier, Pascal; Stengel, Benedicte; Fouqueray, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) guidelines recommend evaluating patients with GFR <60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) for complications, but little evidence supports the use of a single GFR threshold for all metabolic disorders. We used data from the NephroTest cohort, including 1038 adult patients who had stages 2 through 5 CKD and were not on dialysis, to study the occurrence of metabolic complications. GFR was measured using renal clearance of (51)Cr-EDTA (mGFR) and estimated using two equations derived from the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease study. As mGFR decreased from 60 to 90 to <20 ml/min per 1.73 m(2), the prevalence of hyperparathyroidism increased from 17 to 85%, anemia from 8 to 41%, hyperphosphatemia from 1 to 30%, metabolic acidosis from 2 to 39%, and hyperkalemia from 2 to 42%. Factors most strongly associated with metabolic complications, independent of mGFR, were younger age for acidosis and hyperphosphatemia, presence of diabetes for acidosis, diabetic kidney disease for anemia, and both male gender and the use of inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin system for hyperkalemia. mGFR thresholds for detecting complications with 90% sensitivity were 50, 44, 40, 39, and 37 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) for hyperparathyroidism, anemia, acidosis, hyperkalemia, and hyperphosphatemia, respectively. Analysis using estimated GFR produced similar results. In summary, this study describes the onset of CKD-related complications at different levels of GFR; anemia and hyperparathyroidism occur earlier than acidosis, hyperkalemia, and hyperphosphatemia.

  13. A 44-year-old woman with metabolic acidosis, high anion gap, and delayed neurologic deterioration.

    PubMed

    Vakil, Abhay; Upadhyay, Hinesh; Sherani, Khalid; Cervellione, Kelly; Trepeta, Scott; Patel, Mahendra C

    2015-01-01

    A 44-year-old woman was brought to the ED from John F. Kennedy International Airport. The patient was returning with her son from a 3-month visit to Bangladesh. Her journey started with a 4-h flight from Dhaka, Bangladesh to Dubai, United Arab Emirates. She consumed 240 mL of whiskey during the flight. This was followed by a 14-h flight from Dubai to New York. According to the patient's son, she did not consume any alcohol during the second flight. The patient was in her usual state of health with normal mentation throughout her journey. Upon landing, she started complaining of shortness of breath. After disembarking, she was witnessed to have seizure-like activity with involuntary passage of urine, following which she collapsed. The patient was intubated by emergency medical services in the field.

  14. Respiratory Adaptation to Acute Metabolic Acidosis in Goats with Ablated Carotid Bodies,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-03

    values. DISCUSSION We have shown in a previous communication (26) that the goats used in the present study were deprived of peripheral chemoreception ...was manifest in the chemodenervated awake goats. This is in agreement with findings in anesthetized cats (14) and in anesthetized (12) and awake dogs...anesthetized cats by Katsaros (14). It appears that a respiratory adaptation to AMA, mani- fest in lowering the resting PaCO 2 and in shifting CO2

  15. Metabolic Factors Influencing Myocardial Recovery from Acidosis (CiC3).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-10

    projects have been presented at research meetings. The data in the Suleymanlar et al paper was presented at the American Heart Association Symposium...soon as it is ready for submission. We plan to submit these data also as an abstract for presentation to the 1993 American Heart Association meeting. 17

  16. Severe systemic intoxication following triclopyr-TEA ingestion.

    PubMed

    Kyong, Yeon Y; Lee, Kyoung U; Choi, Kyoung H

    2010-11-01

    We report a case of triclopyr ingestion, a herbicide that acts via the auxin system in plants. It is classified as low-toxicity herbicide. The patient ingested this product and developed metabolic acidosis and coma with cardiovascular impairment. Echocardiography and elevated Troponin T and CK MB with prolongation of QTc suggested direct myocardial toxicity. The patient was extubated 57 h after ingestion, and he recovered completely. This case illustrates the potential acute toxicity of this agent in humans.

  17. Epimural Indicator Phylotypes of Transiently-Induced Subacute Ruminal Acidosis in Dairy Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Wetzels, Stefanie U.; Mann, Evelyne; Metzler-Zebeli, Barbara U.; Pourazad, Poulad; Qumar, Muhammad; Klevenhusen, Fenja; Pinior, Beate; Wagner, Martin; Zebeli, Qendrim; Schmitz-Esser, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    The impact of a long-term subacute rumen acidosis (SARA) on the bovine epimural bacterial microbiome (BEBM) and its consequences for rumen health is poorly understood. This study aimed to investigate shifts in the BEBM during a long-term transient SARA model consisting of two concentrate-diet-induced SARA challenges separated by a 1-week challenge break. Eight cows were fed forage and varying concentrate amounts throughout the experiment. In total, 32 rumen papilla biopsies were taken for DNA isolation (4 sampling time points per cow: at the baseline before concentrate was fed, after the first SARA challenge, after the challenge break, and after the second SARA challenge). Ruminal pH was continuously monitored. The microbiome was determined using Illumina MiSeq sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene (V345 region). In total 1,215,618 sequences were obtained and clustered into 6833 operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Campylobacter and Kingella were the most abundant OTUs (16.5 and 7.1%). According to ruminal pH dynamics, the second challenge was more severe than the first challenge. Species diversity estimates and evenness increased during the challenge break compared to all other sampling time points (P < 0.05). During both SARA challenges, Kingella- and Azoarcus-OTUs decreased (0.5 and 0.4 fold-change) and a dominant Ruminobacter-OTU increased during the challenge break (18.9 fold-change; P < 0.05). qPCR confirmed SARA-related shifts. During the challenge break noticeably more OTUs increased compared to other sampling time points. Our results show that the BEBM re-establishes the baseline conditions slower after a SARA challenge than ruminal pH. Key phylotypes that were reduced during both challenges may help to establish a bacterial fingerprint to facilitate understanding effects of SARA conditions on the BEBM and their consequences for the ruminant host. PMID:26973642

  18. Trimethoprim related Hyperkalaemia in a patient with Renal Tubular Acidosis Type 4.

    PubMed

    Patel, M C

    2009-01-01

    Hyperkalaemia is a common, treatable, medical emergency, often with an iatrogenic cause. This case illustrates the vulnerability of patients with pre-existing renal tubular acidosis type 4 to medications that further inhibit renin-aldosterone action. The case also illustrates the danger of keeping entirely separate case notes between different hospital disciplines.

  19. Metabolic neuropathies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Severe infection throughout the body ( sepsis ) Thyroid disease Vitamin deficiencies (including vitamins B12 , B6 , E , and B1 ) Some ... best treatment is to correct the metabolic problem. Vitamin deficiencies are treated with diet or with vitamins by ...

  20. Matriptase activation and shedding through PDGF-D-mediated extracellular acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Najy, Abdo J.; Dyson, Gregory; Jena, Bhanu P.; Lin, Chen-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Activation of β-platelet-derived growth factor receptor (β-PDGFR) is associated with prostate cancer (PCa) progression and recurrence after prostatectomy. Analysis of the β-PDGFR ligands in PCa revealed association between PDGF-D expression and Gleason score as well as tumor stage. During the course of studying the functional consequences of PDGF ligand-specific β-PDGFR signaling in PCa, we discovered a novel function of PDGF-D for activation/shedding of the serine protease matriptase leading to cell invasion, migration, and tumorigenesis. The present study showed that PDGF-D, not PDGF-B, induces extracellular acidification, which correlates with increased matriptase activation. A cDNA microarray analysis revealed that PDGF-D/β-PDGFR signaling upregulates expression of the acidosis regulator carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX), a classic target of the transcriptional factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α). Cellular fractionation displayed a strong HIF-1α nuclear localization in PDGF-D-expressing cells. Treatment of vector control or PDGF-B-expressing cells with the HIF-1α activator CoCl2 led to increased CAIX expression accompanied by extracellular acidosis and matriptase activation. Furthermore, the analysis of the CAFTD cell lines, variants of the BPH-1 transformation model, showed that increased PDGF-D expression is associated with enhanced HIF-1α activity, CAIX induction, cellular acidosis, and matriptase shedding. Importantly, shRNA-mediated knockdown of CAIX expression effectively reversed extracellular acidosis and matriptase activation in PDGF-D-transfected BPH-1 cells and in CAFTD variants that express endogenous PDGF-D at a high level. Taken together, these novel findings reveal a new paradigm in matriptase activation involving PDGF-D-specific signal transduction leading to extracellular acidosis. PMID:26157007

  1. Matriptase activation and shedding through PDGF-D-mediated extracellular acidosis.

    PubMed

    Najy, Abdo J; Dyson, Gregory; Jena, Bhanu P; Lin, Chen-Yong; Kim, Hyeong-Reh C

    2016-02-15

    Activation of β-platelet-derived growth factor receptor (β-PDGFR) is associated with prostate cancer (PCa) progression and recurrence after prostatectomy. Analysis of the β-PDGFR ligands in PCa revealed association between PDGF-D expression and Gleason score as well as tumor stage. During the course of studying the functional consequences of PDGF ligand-specific β-PDGFR signaling in PCa, we discovered a novel function of PDGF-D for activation/shedding of the serine protease matriptase leading to cell invasion, migration, and tumorigenesis. The present study showed that PDGF-D, not PDGF-B, induces extracellular acidification, which correlates with increased matriptase activation. A cDNA microarray analysis revealed that PDGF-D/β-PDGFR signaling upregulates expression of the acidosis regulator carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX), a classic target of the transcriptional factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α). Cellular fractionation displayed a strong HIF-1α nuclear localization in PDGF-D-expressing cells. Treatment of vector control or PDGF-B-expressing cells with the HIF-1α activator CoCl2 led to increased CAIX expression accompanied by extracellular acidosis and matriptase activation. Furthermore, the analysis of the CAFTD cell lines, variants of the BPH-1 transformation model, showed that increased PDGF-D expression is associated with enhanced HIF-1α activity, CAIX induction, cellular acidosis, and matriptase shedding. Importantly, shRNA-mediated knockdown of CAIX expression effectively reversed extracellular acidosis and matriptase activation in PDGF-D-transfected BPH-1 cells and in CAFTD variants that express endogenous PDGF-D at a high level. Taken together, these novel findings reveal a new paradigm in matriptase activation involving PDGF-D-specific signal transduction leading to extracellular acidosis.

  2. Tumor cell metabolism: an integral view.

    PubMed

    Romero-Garcia, Susana; Lopez-Gonzalez, Jose Sullivan; Báez-Viveros, José Luis; Aguilar-Cazares, Dolores; Prado-Garcia, Heriberto

    2011-12-01

    Cancer is a genetic disease that is caused by mutations in oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and stability genes. The fact that the metabolism of tumor cells is altered has been known for many years. However, the mechanisms and consequences of metabolic reprogramming have just begun to be understood. In this review, an integral view of tumor cell metabolism is presented, showing how metabolic pathways are reprogrammed to satisfy tumor cell proliferation and survival requirements. In tumor cells, glycolysis is strongly enhanced to fulfill the high ATP demands of these cells; glucose carbons are the main building blocks in fatty acid and nucleotide biosynthesis. Glutaminolysis is also increased to satisfy NADPH regeneration, whereas glutamine carbons replenish the Krebs cycle, which produces metabolites that are constantly used for macromolecular biosynthesis. A characteristic feature of the tumor microenvironment is acidosis, which results from the local increase in lactic acid production by tumor cells. This phenomenon is attributed to the carbons from glutamine and glucose, which are also used for lactic acid production. Lactic acidosis also directs the metabolic reprogramming of tumor cells and serves as an additional selective pressure. Finally, we also discuss the role of mitochondria in supporting tumor cell metabolism.

  3. Carotid body, insulin, and metabolic diseases: unraveling the links

    PubMed Central

    Conde, Sílvia V.; Sacramento, Joana F.; Guarino, Maria P.; Gonzalez, Constancio; Obeso, Ana; Diogo, Lucilia N.; Monteiro, Emilia C.; Ribeiro, Maria J.

    2014-01-01

    The carotid bodies (CB) are peripheral chemoreceptors that sense changes in arterial blood O2, CO2, and pH levels. Hypoxia, hypercapnia, and acidosis activate the CB, which respond by increasing the action potential frequency in their sensory nerve, the carotid sinus nerve (CSN). CSN activity is integrated in the brain stem to induce a panoply of cardiorespiratory reflexes aimed, primarily, to normalize the altered blood gases, via hyperventilation, and to regulate blood pressure and cardiac performance, via sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activation. Besides its role in the cardiorespiratory control the CB has been proposed as a metabolic sensor implicated in the control of energy homeostasis and, more recently, in the regulation of whole body insulin sensitivity. Hypercaloric diets cause CB overactivation in rats, which seems to be at the origin of the development of insulin resistance and hypertension, core features of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Consistent with this notion, CB sensory denervation prevents metabolic and hemodynamic alterations in hypercaloric feed animal. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is another chronic disorder characterized by increased CB activity and intimately related with several metabolic and cardiovascular abnormalities. In this manuscript we review in a concise manner the putative pathways linking CB chemoreceptors deregulation with the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and arterial hypertension. Also, the link between chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) and insulin resistance is discussed. Then, a final section is devoted to debate strategies to reduce CB activity and its use for prevention and therapeutics of metabolic diseases with an emphasis on new exciting research in the modulation of bioelectronic signals, likely to be central in the future. PMID:25400585

  4. Association between Metformin Use and Risk of Lactic Acidosis or Elevated Lactate Concentration in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Young; Hwang, Sena; Lee, Yong-ho; Lee, Seo Hee; Lee, Young Mi; Kang, Hua Pyong; Han, Eugene; Lee, Woonhyoung; Lee, Byung-Wan; Kang, Eun Seok; Cha, Bong Soo

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Metformin can reduce diabetes-related complications and mortality. However, its use is limited because of potential lactic acidosis-associated adverse effects, particularly in renal impairment patients. We aimed to investigate the association of metformin use with lactic acidosis and hyperlactatemia in patients with type 2 diabetes. Materials and Methods This was a cross-sectional study from a tertiary university-affiliated medical center. A total of 1954 type 2 diabetes patients were recruited in 2007–2011, and stratified according to the estimated glomerular filtration rate of 60 mL/min/1.73 m2. Lactic acidosis was defined as plasma lactate levels >5 mmol/L and arterial pH <7.35. Results Metformin was used in 61.4% of the patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Plasma lactate levels were not different in the patients with and without metformin use. There was no difference in prevalence of hyperlactatemia and lactic acidosis between the patients with and without metformin use (18.9% vs. 18.7%, p=0.905 for hyperlactatemia and 2.8% vs. 3.3%, p=0.544 for lactic acidosis). Similar results were observed in the patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min/1.73 m2. Most patients with lactic acidosis had at least one condition related to hypoxia or poor tissue perfusion. Multiple regression analysis indicated no association between metformin use and lactic acidosis, whereas tissue hypoxia was an independent risk factor for lactic acidosis [odds ratio 4.603 (95% confidence interval, 1.327–15.965)]. Conclusion Metformin use was not associated with hyperlactatemia or lactic acidosis in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:28120561

  5. Prevalence and severity of disordered mineral metabolism in patients with chronic kidney disease: A study from a tertiary care hospital in India

    PubMed Central

    Vikrant, Sanjay; Parashar, Anupam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Disordered mineral metabolism is common complications of chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, there are limited data on the pattern of these disturbances in Indian CKD population. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective observational study of CKD-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) over a period of 3 years. The biochemical markers of CKD-MBD, namely, calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), and 25-hydoxyvitamin Vitamin D3 (25OHD), were measured in newly diagnosed CKD Stage 3–5 and prevalent CKD Stage 5D adult patients. Results: A total of 462 patients of CKD Stage 3–5D were studied. The frequency of various biochemical abnormalities was hypocalcemia (23.8%), hypercalcemia (5.4%), hypophosphatemia (2.8%), hyperphosphatemia (55.4%), raised alkaline phosphatase (56.9%), secondary hyperparathyroidism (82.7%), and hypoparathyroidism (1.5%). 25OHD was done in 335 (72.5%) patients and 90.4% were found to have Vitamin D deficiency. About 70.6% of the patients had iPTH levels were above kidney disease outcomes quality initiative (KDOQI) target range. Nondiabetic CKD as compared to diabetic CKD had a higher alkaline phosphatase (P = 0.016), a higher iPTH (P = 0.001) a higher proportion of patients with iPTH above KDOQI target range (P = 0.09), and an elevated alkaline phosphatase (P = 0.004). The 25OHD levels were suggestive of severe Vitamin D deficiency in 33.7%, Vitamin D deficiency in 45.4%, and Vitamin D insufficiency in 11.3% patients. There was a significant positive correlation between iPTH with alkaline phosphatase (r = 0.572, P = 0.001), creatinine (r = 0.424, P = 0.001), and phosphorus (r = 0.241, P = 0.001) and a significant negative correlation with hemoglobin (r = −0.325, 0.001), age (r = −0.169, P = 0.002), and 25OHD (r = −0.126, P = 0.021). On multivariate logistic regression analysis, an elevated alkaline phosphatase was a significant predictor of hyperparathyroidism (odds ratio 9.7, 95

  6. Comparison of continuation or cessation of growth hormone (GH) therapy on body composition and metabolic status in adolescents with severe GH deficiency at completion of linear growth.

    PubMed

    Carroll, P V; Drake, W M; Maher, K T; Metcalfe, K; Shaw, N J; Dunger, D B; Cheetham, T D; Camacho-Hübner, C; Savage, M O; Monson, J P

    2004-08-01

    muscle mass remained static after GH cessation in these adolescents with GHD. This divergence of gain in LBM is of potential importance because increases in LBM occur as a feature of healthy late adolescent development. GH is a major mediator of insulin sensitivity, independent of body composition in adolescents. Further studies are required to determine whether discontinuation of GH in the adolescent with severe GHD once linear growth is complete results in long-term irreversible adverse physical and metabolic consequences and to determine conclusively the benefits of continuing GH therapy.

  7. Metabolic resuscitation in sepsis: a necessary step beyond the hemodynamic?

    PubMed Central

    de Lima, Lúcio Flávio Peixoto

    2016-01-01

    Despite the advances made in monitoring and treatment of sepsis and septic shock, many septic patients ultimately develop multiple organ dysfunction (MODS) and die, suggesting that other players are involved in the pathophysiology of this syndrome. Mitochondrial dysfunction occurs early in sepsis and has a central role in MODS development. MODS severity and recovery of mitochondrial function have been associated with survival. In recent clinical and experimental investigations, mitochondrion-target therapy for sepsis and septic shock has been suggested to reduce MODS severity and mortality. This intervention, which might be named “metabolic resuscitation”, would lead to improved mitochondrial activity afforded by pharmacological and nutritional agents. Of particular interest in this therapeutic strategy is thiamine, a water-soluble vitamin that plays an essential role in cellular energy metabolism. Critical illness associated with hypermetabolic states may predispose susceptible individuals to the development of thiamine deficiency, which is not usually identified by clinicians as a source of lactic acidosis. The protective effects of thiamine on mitochondrial function may justify supplementation in septic patients at risk of deficiency. Perspectives of supplementation with other micronutrients (ascorbic acid, tocopherol, selenium and zinc) and potential metabolic resuscitators [coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), cytochrome oxidase (CytOx), L-carnitine, melatonin] to target sepsis-induced mitochondrial dysfunction are also emerging. Metabolic resuscitation may probably be a safe and effective strategy in the treatment of septic shock in the future. However, until then, preliminary investigations should be replicated in further researches for confirmation. Better identification of groups of patients presumed to benefit clinically by a certain intervention directed to “mitochondrial resuscitation” are expected to increase driven by genomics and metabolomics. PMID:27501325

  8. High protein pre-term infant formula: effect on nutrient balance, metabolic status and growth.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Richard; Embleton, Nick; Rigo, Jacques; Carrie, Annelise; Haschke, Ferdinand; Ziegler, Ekhard

    2006-02-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that formula with protein content of 3.0 g/100 kcal does not fully meet the protein needs of very-low-birth weight infants. Our purpose was to compare nitrogen balance, metabolic status and growth in infants fed a standard (3.0 g/100 kcal; RegPro) and high (3.6 g/100 kcal; HiPro) protein infant formula. Infants were fed both formulas, each formula for one week in balanced cross-over design. Metabolic status was monitored throughout. Nutrient balance and plasma amino acids were determined at the end of each week. Data were analysed using a linear mixed model. Eighteen infants were studied. Nine infants received the RegPro and nine received HiPro formula first. Nitrogen intake, absorption and retention were greater with the HiPro formula. None of the infants developed uremia or metabolic acidosis but retinol-binding-protein and weight gain were greater with the HiPro formula. Increased protein accretion paralleled by better weight gain without evidence of metabolic stress indicates that a formula with a protein content of 3.6 g/100 kcal better meets protein needs in these rapidly-growing infants. Further studies are needed to determine whether these short-term outcomes will be translated into long-term benefits.

  9. Neonatal cardiomyopathies and metabolic crises due to oxidative phosphorylation defects.

    PubMed

    Schiff, Manuel; Ogier de Baulny, Hélène; Lombès, Anne

    2011-08-01

    Neonatal cardiomyopathies due to mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) defects are extremely severe conditions which can be either isolated or included in a multi-organ disease, with or without metabolic crises, of which profound lactic acidosis is the prominent feature. Cardiomyopathy is more often hypertrophic than dilated. Antenatal manifestations such as fetal cardiomyopathy, arrhythmia and/or hydrops have been reported. Pathophysiological mechanisms are complex, going beyond ATP deficiency of the high-energy-consuming neonatal myocardium. Birth is a key metabolic period when the myocardium switches ATP production from anaerobic glycolysis to mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and OXPHOS. Heart-specificity of the defect may be related to the specific localization of the defect, to the high myocardium dependency on OXPHOS, and/or to interaction between the primary genetic alteration and other factors such as modifier genes. Therapeutic options are limited but standardized diagnostic procedures are mandatory to confirm the OXPHOS defect and to identify its causal mutation, allowing genetic counseling and potential prenatal diagnosis.

  10. Viekira Pak Induced Fatal Lactic Acidosis: A Case Report of an Unusual Side Effect

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Viekira Pak is a new direct-acting antiviral agent that has an excellent efficacy in treating patients with chronic HCV. FDA released a safety warning that Viekira Pak can cause serious liver injury mostly in patients with underlying advanced liver disease. We report the first case of fatal lactic acidosis presenting 3 days after initiating therapy with Viekira Pak. Although it is very hard to precisely determine the cause of lactic acidosis, our case highlights an unusual side effect that ensued after starting the medication. Given the complexity of drug-drug interactions that can happen with the new direct-acting antiviral agents and the paucity of data regarding coadministration and methods of monitoring, a thorough review should be pursued prior to initiating these medications. PMID:28044114

  11. Role of Ca2+ in protecting the heart from hyperkalemia and acidosis in the rabbit: implications for exercise.

    PubMed

    Leitch, S P; Paterson, D J

    1994-11-01

    Catecholamines can offset the negative effect of acidosis and raised extracellular K+ concentration in the isolated rabbit heart when these factors are changed with similar kinetics and concentrations as those observed in exercise. This effect appears to be mediated by changes in Ca2+ handling in the heart. To test the role of Ca2+ in vivo, we studied the interactive effects of infusions of KCl, lactic acid, norepinephrine (NE), and CaCl2 on cardiovascular performance in the anesthetized rabbit. After propranolol, CaCl2 was given during acidosis and hyperkalemia. Acidosis (arterial pH 7.17 +/- 0.3) markedly reduced cardiac performance, and its effects were exacerbated by hyperkalemia (7.3 +/- 0.4 mM). NE reversed the cardiac response to combined acidosis and hyperkalemia. After propranolol, arterial pH and arterial K+ concentration changed more rapidly with acidosis and hyperkalemia, combined with a faster fall in cardiac performance, but CaCl2 offset these negative hemodynamic effects. The rises in plasma Ca2+, NE, and sympathetic activity during exercise may therefore interact to ameliorate the harmful effects of acidosis and hyperkalemia.

  12. A mouse model for distal renal tubular acidosis reveals a previously unrecognized role of the V-ATPase a4 subunit in the proximal tubule

    PubMed Central

    Hennings, J Christopher; Picard, Nicolas; Huebner, Antje K; Stauber, Tobias; Maier, Hannes; Brown, Dennis; Jentsch, Thomas J; Vargas-Poussou, Rosa; Eladari, Dominique; Hübner, Christian A

    2012-01-01

    The V-ATPase is a multisubunit complex that transports protons across membranes. Mutations of its B1 or a4 subunit are associated with distal renal tubular acidosis and deafness. In the kidney, the a4 subunit is expressed in intercalated cells of the distal nephron, where the V-ATPase controls acid/base secretion, and in proximal tubule cells, where its role is less clear. Here, we report that a4 KO mice suffer not only from severe acidosis but also from proximal tubule dysfunction with defective endocytic trafficking, proteinuria, phosphaturia and accumulation of lysosomal material and we provide evidence that these findings may be also relevant in patients. In the inner ear, the a4 subunit co-localized with pendrin at the apical side of epithelial cells lining the endolymphatic sac. As a4 KO mice were profoundly deaf and displayed enlarged endolymphatic fluid compartments mirroring the alterations in pendrin KO mice, we propose that pendrin and the proton pump co-operate in endolymph homeostasis. Thus, our mouse model gives new insights into the divergent functions of the V-ATPase and the pathophysiology of a4-related symptoms. PMID:22933323

  13. ERK-mediated NF-κB activation through ASIC1 in response to acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, B; Liu, J; Ho, T-T; Ding, X; Mo, Y-Y

    2016-01-01

    Acidic microenvironment is a common feature of solid tumors. We have previously shown that neuron specific acid-sensing ion channel 1 (ASIC1) is expressed in breast cancer, and it is responsible for acidosis-induced cellular signaling through AKT, leading to nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation, and cell invasion and metastasis. However, AKT is frequently activated in cancer. Thus, a key question is whether ASIC1-mediated cell signaling still takes place in the cancer cells carrying constitutively active AKT. In the present study, we show that among four prostate cancer cell lines tested, 22Rv1 cells express the highest level of phosphorylated AKT that is not impacted by acidosis. However, acidosis can still induce NF-κB activation during which extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) serves as an alternative pathway for ASIC-mediated cell signaling. Inhibition of ERK by chemical inhibitors or small interfering RNAs suppresses the acidosis-induced NF-κB activity through regulation of the inhibitory subunit IκBα phosphorylation. Furthermore, suppression of ASIC1-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by ROS scavengers, such as glutathione or N-acetyl-cysteine causes a decrease in ERK phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα. Finally, ASIC1 is upregulated in a subset of prostate cancer cases and ASIC1 knockout by CRISPR/Cas9 significantly suppresses cell invasion, and castration resistance both in vitro and in vivo. Together, these results support the significance of ASIC1-ROS-ERK-IκBα-NF-κB axis in prostate tumorigenesis, especially in the constitutively active AKT background. PMID:27941930

  14. Hypercapnic respiratory acidosis: a protective or harmful strategy for critically ill newborn foals?

    PubMed

    Vengust, Modest

    2012-10-01

    This paper reviews both the beneficial and adverse effects of permissive hypercapnic respiratory acidosis in critically ill newborn foals. It has been shown that partial carbon dioxide pressure (PCO2) above the traditional safe range (hypercapnia), has beneficial effects on the physiology of the respiratory, cardiovascular, and nervous system in neonates. In human neonatal critical care medicine permissive hypercapnic acidosis is generally well-tolerated by patients and is more beneficial to their wellbeing than normal carbon dioxide (CO2) pressure or normocapnia. Even though adverse effects of hypercapnia have been reported, especially in patients with central nervous system pathology and/or chronic infection, critical care clinicians often artificially increase PCO2 to take advantage of its positive effects on compromised neonate tissues. This is referred to as therapeutic hypercapnia. Hypercapnic respiratory acidosis is common in critically ill newborn foals and has traditionally been considered as not beneficial. A search of online scientific databases was conducted to survey the literature on the effects of hypercapnia in neonates, with emphasis on newborn foals. The dynamic status of safety levels of PCO2 and data on the effectiveness of different carbon dioxide levels are not available for newborn foals and should be scientifically determined. Presently, permissive hypercapnia should be implemented or tolerated cautiously in compromised newborn foals and its use should be based on relevant data from adult horses and other species.

  15. Effects of the ionophores monensin and tetronasin on simulated development of ruminal lactic acidosis in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Newbold, C J; Wallace, R J

    1988-01-01

    A continuous coculture of four ruminal bacteria, Megasphaera elsdenii, Selenomonas ruminantium, Streptococcus bovis, and Lactobacillus sp. strain LB17, was used to study the effects of the ionophores monensin and tetronasin on the changes in ruminal microbial ecology that occur during the onset of lactic acidosis. In control incubations, the system simulated the development of lactic acidosis in vivo, with an initial overgrowth of S. bovis when an excess of glucose was added to the fermentor. Lactobacillus sp. strain LB17 subsequently became dominant as pH fell and lactate concentration rose. Both ionophores were able to prevent the accumulation of lactic acid and maintain a healthy non-lactate-producing bacterial population when added at the same time as an excess of glucose. Tetronasin was more potent in this respect than monensin. When tetronasin was added to the culture 24 h after glucose, the proliferation of lactobacilli was reversed and a non-lactate-producing bacterial population developed, with an associated drop in lactate concentration in the fermentor. Rises in culture pH and volatile fatty acid concentrations accompanied these changes. Monensin was unable to suppress the growth of lactobacilli; therefore, in contrast to tetronasin, monensin added 24 h after the addition of glucose failed to reverse the acidosis. Numbers of lactobacilli and lactate concentrations remained high, whereas pH and volatile fatty acid concentrations were low. PMID:3223764

  16. Early Administration of Glutamine Protects Cardiomyocytes from Post-Cardiac Arrest Acidosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yan-Ren; Li, Chao-Jui; Syu, Shih-Han; Wen, Cheng-Hao; Buddhakosai, Waradee; Wu, Han-Ping; Hsu Chen, Cheng; Lu, Huai-En; Chen, Wen-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Postcardiac arrest acidosis can decrease survival. Effective medications without adverse side effects are still not well characterized. We aimed to analyze whether early administration of glutamine could improve survival and protect cardiomyocytes from postcardiac arrest acidosis using animal and cell models. Forty Wistar rats with postcardiac arrest acidosis (blood pH < 7.2) were included. They were divided into study (500 mg/kg L-alanyl-L-glutamine, n = 20) and control (normal saline, n = 20) groups. Each of the rats received resuscitation. The outcomes were compared between the two groups. In addition, cardiomyocytes derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells were exposed to HBSS with different pH levels (7.3 or 6.5) or to culture medium (control). Apoptosis-related markers and beating function were analyzed. We found that the duration of survival was significantly longer in the study group (p < 0.05). In addition, in pH 6.5 or pH 7.3 HBSS buffer, the expression levels of cell stress (p53) and apoptosis (caspase-3, Bcl-xL) markers were significantly lower in cardiomyocytes treated with 50 mM L-glutamine than those without L-glutamine (RT-PCR). L-glutamine also increased the beating function of cardiomyocytes, especially at the lower pH level (6.5). More importantly, glutamine decreased cardiomyocyte apoptosis and increased these cells' beating function at a low pH level.

  17. Prognosis of alcohol-associated lactic acidosis in critically ill patients: an 8-year study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun-Chieh; Chan, Khee-Siang; Tseng, Kuei-Ling; Weng, Shih-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acidosis is common in critical care; by contrast, a subtype called alcohol-associated lactic acidosis (AALA) is rarely encountered. The primary purpose of this study was to determine the prognosis of AALA in critically ill patients and the second aim was to determine whether the survival was associated to the peak blood lactate concentration. An 8-year retrospective analysis of adult patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) with AALA between January 2007 and December 2014 was considered in a tertiary care hospital. In total, 23 patients were analyzed and the median peak blood lactate level was 15.9 mmol/L. Only 2 patients (8.7%) presented peak blood lactate levels <10 mmol/L. In this study, 21 patients survived from ICU and hospital, the mortality rate was 8.7%. The result indicted the survival of AALA was not associated with peak blood lactate concentration although survivors still had a better lactate clearance rate per hour than non-survivors. Moreover, AALA patients with coexisting sepsis presenting higher lactate clearance rate and shorter lactate clearance time than those of AALA patients with solely sepsis-related lactic acidosis. PMID:27748410

  18. The effect of extracellular acidosis on the behaviour of mesenchymal stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Massa, A; Perut, F; Chano, T; Woloszyk, A; Mitsiadis, T A; Avnet, S; Baldini, N

    2017-04-03

    The stem cell fraction of a cell population is finely tuned by stimuli from the external microenvironment. Among these stimuli, a decrease of extracellular pH (pHe) may occur in a variety of physiological and pathological conditions, including hypoxia and inflammation. In this study, by using bone marrow stem cells and dental pulp stem cells, we provided evidence that extracellular acidosis endows the maintenance of stemness in mesenchymal cells. Indeed, continuous exposure for 21 d to low pHe (6.5-6.8) conditions impaired the osteogenic differentiation of both cell types. Moreover, the exposure to low pHe, for 1 and up to 7 d, induced the expression of stemness-related genes and proteins, drove cells to reside in the quiescent G0 alert state and enhanced their ability to form floating spheres. The pre-conditioning with extracellular acidosis for 7 d did not affect the differentiation potential of dental pulp stem cells since, when the cells were cultured again at physiological pHe, their multilineage potential was almost unmodified. Our data provided evidence of the role of extracellular acidosis as a modulator of the stemness of mesenchymal cells. This condition is commonly found both in systemic and local bone conditions, hence underlining the relevance of this phenomenon for a better comprehension of bone healing and regeneration.

  19. Early Administration of Glutamine Protects Cardiomyocytes from Post-Cardiac Arrest Acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Syu, Shih-Han; Wen, Cheng-Hao; Buddhakosai, Waradee; Hsu Chen, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Postcardiac arrest acidosis can decrease survival. Effective medications without adverse side effects are still not well characterized. We aimed to analyze whether early administration of glutamine could improve survival and protect cardiomyocytes from postcardiac arrest acidosis using animal and cell models. Forty Wistar rats with postcardiac arrest acidosis (blood pH < 7.2) were included. They were divided into study (500 mg/kg L-alanyl-L-glutamine, n = 20) and control (normal saline, n = 20) groups. Each of the rats received resuscitation. The outcomes were compared between the two groups. In addition, cardiomyocytes derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells were exposed to HBSS with different pH levels (7.3 or 6.5) or to culture medium (control). Apoptosis-related markers and beating function were analyzed. We found that the duration of survival was significantly longer in the study group (p < 0.05). In addition, in pH 6.5 or pH 7.3 HBSS buffer, the expression levels of cell stress (p53) and apoptosis (caspase-3, Bcl-xL) markers were significantly lower in cardiomyocytes treated with 50 mM L-glutamine than those without L-glutamine (RT-PCR). L-glutamine also increased the beating function of cardiomyocytes, especially at the lower pH level (6.5). More importantly, glutamine decreased cardiomyocyte apoptosis and increased these cells' beating function at a low pH level. PMID:28058255

  20. Severe malaria in children: A descriptive report from Kinshasa, the Democratic Republic of Congo.

    PubMed

    Kunuanunua, Thomas S; Nsibu, Célestin N; Bodi, Joseph M; Tshibola, Thérèse K; Makusi Bura, Mimy; Magoga, Kumbundu; Ekila, Mathilde B; Situakibanza, Hypolite T; Aloni, Michel N

    2015-08-01

    The decline of susceptibility of Plasmodium falciparum to chloroquine and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine resulted in the change of drug policy. This policy has probably changed the facies of the severe form of malaria. A prospective study was conducted in Kinshasa, the Democratic Republic of Congo. Data on children aged ≤13 years, diagnosed with severe malaria were analyzed. In total, 378 children were included with an overall median age of 8 years (age range: 1-13 years). Dark urine was seen in 25.1% of cases. Metabolic acidosis (85.2%), hypoglycemia (62.2%) and hemoglobin ≤5 g/dl (39.1%) were the common laboratories features. Severe malaria anemia, cerebral malaria and Blackwater fever (BWF) were found in 39.1, 30.1 and 25.4%, respectively. Mortality rate was 4%. BWF emerges as a frequent form of severe malaria in our midst. Availing artemisin-based combination treatments in the health care system is a priority to reduce the incidence of BWF in our environment.

  1. Thiamine Deficiency in Tropical Pediatrics: New Insights into a Neglected but Vital Metabolic Challenge.

    PubMed

    Hiffler, Laurent; Rakotoambinina, Benjamin; Lafferty, Nadia; Martinez Garcia, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    In humans, thiamine is a micronutrient prone to depletion that may result in severe clinical abnormalities. This narrative review summarizes current knowledge on thiamine deficiency (TD) and bridges the gap between pathophysiology and clinical presentation by integrating thiamine metabolism at subcellular level with its function to vital organs. The broad clinical spectrum of TD is outlined, with emphasis on conditions encountered in tropical pediatric practice. In particular, TD is associated with type B lactic acidosis and classic forms of beriberi in children, but it is often unrecognized. Other severe acute conditions are associated with hypermetabolism, inducing a functional TD. The crucial role of thiamine in infant cognitive development is also highlighted in this review, along with analysis of the potential impact of TD in refeeding syndrome during severe acute malnutrition (SAM). This review aims to increase clinical awareness of TD in tropical settings where access to diagnostic tests is poor, and advocates for an early therapeutic thiamine challenge in resource-limited settings. Moreover, it provides evidence for thiamine as treatment in critical conditions requiring metabolic resuscitation, and gives rationale to the consideration of increased thiamine supplementation in therapeutic foods for malnourished children.

  2. Thiamine Deficiency in Tropical Pediatrics: New Insights into a Neglected but Vital Metabolic Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Hiffler, Laurent; Rakotoambinina, Benjamin; Lafferty, Nadia; Martinez Garcia, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    In humans, thiamine is a micronutrient prone to depletion that may result in severe clinical abnormalities. This narrative review summarizes current knowledge on thiamine deficiency (TD) and bridges the gap between pathophysiology and clinical presentation by integrating thiamine metabolism at subcellular level with its function to vital organs. The broad clinical spectrum of TD is outlined, with emphasis on conditions encountered in tropical pediatric practice. In particular, TD is associated with type B lactic acidosis and classic forms of beriberi in children, but it is often unrecognized. Other severe acute conditions are associated with hypermetabolism, inducing a functional TD. The crucial role of thiamine in infant cognitive development is also highlighted in this review, along with analysis of the potential impact of TD in refeeding syndrome during severe acute malnutrition (SAM). This review aims to increase clinical awareness of TD in tropical settings where access to diagnostic tests is poor, and advocates for an early therapeutic thiamine challenge in resource-limited settings. Moreover, it provides evidence for thiamine as treatment in critical conditions requiring metabolic resuscitation, and gives rationale to the consideration of increased thiamine supplementation in therapeutic foods for malnourished children. PMID:27379239

  3. Experimental feed induction of ruminal lactic, propionic, or butyric acidosis in sheep.

    PubMed

    Lettat, A; Nozière, P; Silberberg, M; Morgavi, D P; Berger, C; Martin, C

    2010-09-01

    A study was conducted to determine the feasibility to induce rumen acidosis with propionate, butyrate, or lactate as the major fermentation end products. Three rumen-cannulated Texel wethers were used in a 3 x 3 Latin square design. Each period consisted of 11 d of adaptation where wethers were daily fed at 90% of ad libitum intake a hay and wheat-based concentrate diet (4:1 ratio on a DM basis) in 2 equal portions followed by 3 d of acidosis induction. During the challenge, the morning feeding was replaced by an intraruminal supply of wheat (readily fermentable starch), corn (slowly fermentable starch), or beet pulp (easily digestible fiber), dosed at 1.2% of BW. Ruminal liquid samples were taken daily 1 h before (-1) and 1, 3, 5, and 6 h after intraruminal feed supply to measure pH, VFA, and lactic acid concentration. The differences between treatments accentuated throughout the 3-d challenge, being maximal and significant on d 3. Indeed, 6 h after the third day of the challenge, mean ruminal pH was less for wheat (4.85) than for corn (5.61; P = 0.008) and beet pulp (6.09; P = 0.001), and total VFA tended to be less for wheat (48.7 mM) than for corn and beet pulp (84.7 mM on average; P = 0.08). At the same time, the proportion of acetate was greater for wheat than for corn (75.5 and 62.2%, respectively; P = 0.005) but did not differ from beet pulp challenge (69.0%). The proportion of propionate was greatest for beet pulp compared with corn and wheat (21.0, 17.3, and 12.1%, respectively; P = 0.03), whereas the butyrate proportion was greatest for corn, intermediate for wheat, and least for beet pulp (16.3, 10.8, and 8.3%, respectively; P = 0.05). Lactate concentration was greatest for wheat (45.5 mM) compared with corn and beet pulp (8.3 mM on average; P = 0.01). Under our experimental conditions, ruminal lactic acidosis was successfully induced by wheat, whereas butyric and propionic subacute ruminal acidosis were respectively provoked by corn and beet pulp. We

  4. The progression from a lower to a higher invasive stage of bladder cancer is associated with severe alterations in glucose and pyruvate metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Conde, Vanessa R.; Oliveira, Pedro F.; Ramalhosa, Elsa; Pereira, José A.; Alves, Marco G.; Silva, Branca M.

    2015-07-01

    Cancer cells present a particular metabolic behavior. We hypothesized that the progression of bladder cancer could be accompanied by changes in cells glycolytic profile. We studied two human bladder cancer cells, RT4 and TCCSUP, in which the latter represents a more invasive stage. The levels of glucose, pyruvate, alanine and lactate in the extracellular media were measured by Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. The protein expression levels of glucose transporters 1 (GLUT1) and 3 (GLUT3), monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4), phosphofructokinase-1 (PFK1), glutamic-pyruvate transaminase (GPT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were determined. Our data showed that glucose consumption and GLUT3 levels were similar in both cell lines, but TCCSUP cells displayed lower levels of GLUT1 and PFK expression. An increase in pyruvate consumption, concordant with the higher levels of lactate and alanine production, was also detected in TCCSUP cells. Moreover, TCCSUP cells presented lower protein expression levels of GPT and LDH. These results illustrate that bladder cancer progression is associated with alterations in cells glycolytic profile, namely the switch from glucose to pyruvate consumption in the more aggressive stage. This may be useful to develop new therapies and to identify biomarkers for cancer progression. - Highlights: • Metabolic phenotype of less and high invasive bladder cancer cells was studied. • Bladder cancer progression involves alterations in cells glycolytic profile. • More invasive bladder cancer cells switch from glucose to pyruvate consumption. • Our results may help to identify metabolic biomarkers of bladder cancer progression.

  5. Misexpression of a Chloroplast Aspartyl Protease Leads to Severe Growth Defects and Alters Carbohydrate Metabolism in Arabidopsis1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Paparelli, Eleonora; Gonzali, Silvia; Parlanti, Sandro; Novi, Giacomo; Giorgi, Federico M.; Licausi, Francesco; Kosmacz, Monika; Feil, Regina; Lunn, John E.; Brust, Henrike; van Dongen, Joost T.; Steup, Martin; Perata, Pierdomenico

    2012-01-01

    The crucial role of carbohydrate in plant growth and morphogenesis is widely recognized. In this study, we describe the characterization of nana, a dwarf Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutant impaired in carbohydrate metabolism. We show that the nana dwarf phenotype was accompanied by altered leaf morphology and a delayed flowering time. Our genetic and molecular data indicate that the mutation in nana is due to a transfer DNA insertion in the promoter region of a gene encoding a chloroplast-located aspartyl protease that alters its pattern of expression. Overexpression of the gene (oxNANA) phenocopies the mutation. Both nana and oxNANA display alterations in carbohydrate content, and the extent of these changes varies depending on growth light intensity. In particular, in low light, soluble sugar levels are lower and do not show the daily fluctuations observed in wild-type plants. Moreover, nana and oxNANA are defective in the expression of some genes implicated in sugar metabolism and photosynthetic light harvesting. Interestingly, some chloroplast-encoded genes as well as genes whose products seem to be involved in retrograde signaling appear to be down-regulated. These findings suggest that the NANA aspartic protease has an important regulatory function in chloroplasts that not only influences photosynthetic carbon metabolism but also plastid and nuclear gene expression. PMID:22987884

  6. Accidental hypothermia in severe trauma.

    PubMed

    Vardon, Fanny; Mrozek, Ségolène; Geeraerts, Thomas; Fourcade, Olivier

    2016-10-01

    Hypothermia, along with acidosis and coagulopathy, is part of the lethal triad that worsen the prognosis of severe trauma patients. While accidental hypothermia is easy to identify by a simple measurement, it is no less pernicious if it is not detected or treated in the initial phase of patient care. It is a multifactorial process and is a factor of mortality in severe trauma cases. The consequences of hypothermia are many: it modifies myocardial contractions and may induce arrhythmias; it contributes to trauma-induced coagulopathy; from an immunological point of view, it diminishes inflammatory response and increases the chance of pneumonia in the patient; it inhibits the elimination of anaesthetic drugs and can complicate the calculation of dosing requirements; and it leads to an over-estimation of coagulation factor activities. This review will detail the pathophysiological consequences of hypothermia, as well as the most recent principle recommendations in dealing with it.

  7. Protective effects of high dietary potassium: nutritional and metabolic aspects.

    PubMed

    Demigné, Christian; Sabboh, Houda; Rémésy, Christian; Meneton, Pierre

    2004-11-01

    Potassium (K+) requirements have been largely overlooked because severe deficiencies are uncommon due to the ubiquity of this element in foods. However, a transition toward modern ("Westernized") diets has led to a substantial decline of K+ intake compared with traditional food habits, and a large fraction of the population might now have suboptimal K+ intake. A high K+ intake was demonstrated to have protective effects against several pathologic states affecting the cardiovascular system, kidneys, and bones. Additionally, fruits and vegetables contain K/organic anion salts (malate, citrate), which exert alkalinizing effects, through KHCO(3)(-) generation, which serves to neutralize fixed acidity in urine. Low-grade metabolic acidosis, when not properly controlled, may exacerbate various catabolic processes (bone Ca++ mobilization, proteolysis), especially in the elderly. Fruits and vegetables are therefore receiving great attention in a strategy to increase the nutritional value of meals while reducing energy density and intake. The need to ensure a 2.5- to 3.5-g daily K+ supply from fruits and vegetables represents a strong rationale for the "5-10 servings per day" recommendations.

  8. Dynamic scenario of metabolic pathway adaptation in tumors and therapeutic approach

    PubMed Central

    Peppicelli, Silvia; Bianchini, Francesca; Calorini, Lido

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells need to regulate their metabolic program to fuel several activities, including unlimited proliferation, resistance to cell death, invasion and metastasis. The aim of this work is to revise this complex scenario. Starting from proliferating cancer cells located in well-oxygenated regions, they may express the so-called “Warburg effect” or aerobic glycolysis, meaning that although a plenty of oxygen is available, cancer cells choose glycolysis, the sole pathway that allows a biomass formation and DNA duplication, needed for cell division. Although oxygen does not represent the primary font of energy, diffusion rate reduces oxygen tension and the emerging hypoxia promotes “anaerobic glycolysis” through the hypoxia inducible factor-1α-dependent up-regulation. The acquired hypoxic phenotype is endowed with high resistance to cell death and high migration capacities, although these cells are less proliferating. Cells using aerobic or anaerobic glycolysis survive only in case they extrude acidic metabolites acidifying the extracellular space. Acidosis drives cancer cells from glycolysis to OxPhos, and OxPhos transforms the available alternative substrates into energy used to fuel migration and distant organ colonization. Thus, metabolic adaptations sustain different energy-requiring ability of cancer cells, but render them responsive to perturbations by anti-metabolic agents, such as inhibitors of glycolysis and/or OxPhos. PMID:25897425

  9. An experimental renal acidification defect in patients with hereditary fructose intolerance. II. Its distinction from classic renal tubular acidosis; its resemblance to the renal acidification defect associated with the Fanconi syndrome of children with cystinosis.

    PubMed

    Morris, R C

    1968-07-01

    In adult patients with hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) fructose induces a renal acidification defect characterized by (a) a 20-30% reduction in tubular reabsorption of bicarbonate (T HCO(3) (-)) at plasma bicarbonate concentrations ranging from 21-31 mEq/liter, (b) a maximal tubular reabsorption of bicarbonate (Tm HCO(3) (-)) of approximately 1.9 mEq/100 ml of glomerular filtrate, (c) disappearance of bicarbonaturia at plasma bicarbonate concentrations less than 15 mEq/liter, and (d) during moderately severe degrees of acidosis, a sustained capacity to maintain urinary pH at normal minima and to excrete acid at normal rates. In physiologic distinction from this defect, the renal acidification defect of patients with classic renal tubular acidosis is characterized by (a) just less than complete tubular reabsorption of bicarbonate at plasma bicarbonate concentrations of 26 mEq/liter or less, (b) a normal Tm HCO(3) (-) of approximately 2.8 mEq/100 ml of glomerular filtrate, and (c) during acidosis of an even severe degree, a quantitatively trivial bicarbonaturia, as well as (d) a urinary pH of greater than 6. That the fructose-induced renal acidification defect involves a reduced H(+) secretory capacity of the proximal nephron is supported by the magnitude of the reduction in T HCO(3) (-) (20-30%) and the simultaneous occurrence and the persistence throughout administration of fructose of impaired tubular reabsorption of phosphate, alpha amino nitrogen and uric acid.A reduced H(+) secretory capacity of the proximal nephron also appears operative in two unrelated children with hyperchloremic acidosis, Fanconi's syndrome, and cystinosis. In both, T HCO(3) (-) was reduced 20-30% at plasma bicarbonate concentrations ranging from 20-30 mEq/liter. The bicarbonaturia disappeared at plasma bicarbonate concentrations ranging from 15-18 mEq/liter, and during moderate degrees of acidosis, urinary pH decreased to less than 6, and the excretion rate of acid was normal.

  10. Insulin regulates the expression of several metabolism-related genes in the liver and primary hepatocytes of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Plagnes-Juan, Elisabeth; Lansard, Marine; Seiliez, Iban; Médale, Françoise; Corraze, Geneviève; Kaushik, Sadasivam; Panserat, Stéphane; Skiba-Cassy, Sandrine

    2008-08-01

    Rainbow trout have a limited ability to use dietary carbohydrates efficiently and are considered to be glucose intolerant. Administration of carbohydrates results in persistent hyperglycemia and impairs post-prandial down regulation of gluconeogenesis despite normal insulin secretion. Since gluconeogenic genes are mainly under insulin control, we put forward the hypothesis that the transcriptional function of insulin as a whole may be impaired in the trout liver. In order to test this hypothesis, we performed intraperitoneal administration of bovine insulin to fasted rainbow trout and also subjected rainbow trout primary hepatocytes to insulin and/or glucose stimulation. We demonstrate that insulin was able to activate Akt, a key element in the insulin signaling pathway, and to regulate hepatic metabolism-related target genes both in vivo and in vitro. In the same way as in mammals, insulin decreased mRNA expression of gluconeogenic genes, including glucose 6-phosphatase (G6Pase), fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK). Insulin also limited the expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1), a limiting enzyme of fatty acid beta-oxidation. In vitro studies revealed that, as in mammals, glucose is an important regulator of some insulin target genes such as the glycolytic enzyme pyruvate kinase (PK) and the lipogenic enzyme fatty acid synthase (FAS). Interestingly, glucose also stimulates expression of glucokinase (GK), which has no equivalent in mammals. This study demonstrates that insulin possesses the intrinsic ability to regulate hepatic gene expression in rainbow trout, suggesting that other hormonal or metabolic factors may counteract some of the post-prandial actions of insulin.

  11. QTL for several metabolic traits map to loci controlling growth and body composition in an F2 intercross between high- and low-growth chicken lines.

    PubMed

    Nadaf, Javad; Pitel, Frédérique; Gilbert, Hélène; Duclos, Michel J; Vignoles, Florence; Beaumont, Catherine; Vignal, Alain; Porter, Tom E; Cogburn, Larry A; Aggrey, Samuel E; Simon, Jean; Le Bihan-Duval, Elisabeth

    2009-08-07

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) for metabolic and body composition traits were mapped at 7 and 9 wk, respectively, in an F(2) intercross between high-growth and low-growth chicken lines. These lines also diverged for abdominal fat percentage (AFP) and plasma insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), insulin, and glucose levels. Genotypings were performed with 129 microsatellite markers covering 21 chromosomes. A total of 21 QTL with genomewide level of significance were detected by single-trait analyses for body weight (BW), breast muscle weight (BMW) and percentage (BMP), AF weight (AFW) and percentage (AFP), shank length (ShL) and diameter (ShD), fasting plasma glucose level (Gluc), and body temperature (T(b)). Other suggestive QTL were identified for these parameters and for plasma IGF-I and nonesterified fatty acid levels. QTL controlling adiposity and Gluc were colocalized on GGA3 and GGA5 and QTL for BW, ShL and ShD, adiposity, and T(b) on GGA4. Multitrait analyses revealed two QTL controlling Gluc and AFP on GGA5 and Gluc and T(b) on GGA26. Significant effects of the reciprocal cross were observed on BW, ShD, BMW, and Gluc, which may result from mtDNA and/or maternal effects. Most QTL regions for Gluc and adiposity harbor genes for which alleles have been associated with increased susceptibility to diabetes and/or obesity in humans. Identification of genes responsible for these metabolic QTL will increase our understanding of the constitutive "hyperglycemia" found in chickens. Furthermore, a comparative approach could provide new information on the genetic causes of diabetes and obesity in humans.

  12. Effects of acute hypoxia/acidosis on intracellular pH in differentiating neural progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Nordström, Tommy; Jansson, Linda C; Louhivuori, Lauri M; Akerman, Karl E O

    2012-06-21

    The response of differentiating mouse neural progenitor cells, migrating out from neurospheres, to conditions simulating ischemia (hypoxia and extracellular or intracellular acidosis) was studied. We show here, by using BCECF and single cell imaging to monitor intracellular pH (pH(i)), that two main populations can be distinguished by exposing migrating neural progenitor cells to low extracellular pH or by performing an acidifying ammonium prepulse. The cells dominating at the periphery of the neurosphere culture, which were positive for neuron specific markers MAP-2, calbindin and NeuN had lower initial resting pH(i) and could also easily be further acidified by lowering the extracellular pH. Moreover, in this population, a more profound acidification was seen when the cells were acidified using the ammonium prepulse technique. However, when the cell population was exposed to depolarizing potassium concentrations no alterations in pH(i) took place in this population. In contrast, depolarization caused an increase in pH(i) (by 0.5 pH units) in the cell population closer to the neurosphere body, which region was positive for the radial cell marker (GLAST). This cell population, having higher resting pH(i) (pH 6.9-7.1) also responded to acute hypoxia. During hypoxic treatment the resting pH(i) decreased by 0.1 pH units and recovered rapidly after reoxygenation. Our results show that migrating neural progenitor cells are highly sensitive to extracellular acidosis and that irreversible damage becomes evident at pH 6.2. Moreover, our results show that a response to acidosis clearly distinguishes two individual cell populations probably representing neuronal and radial cells.

  13. Planned reoperation for severe trauma.

    PubMed Central

    Hirshberg, A; Mattox, K L

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors review the physiologic basis, indications, techniques, and results of the planned reoperation approach to severe trauma. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Multivisceral trauma and exsanguinating hemorrhage lead to hypothermia, coagulopathy, and acidosis. Formal resections and reconstructions in these unstable patients often result in irreversible physiologic insult. A new surgical strategy addresses these physiologic concerns by staged control and repair of the injuries. METHOD: The authors review the literature. RESULTS: Indications for planned reoperation include avoidance of irreversible physiologic insult and inability to obtain direct hemostasis or formal abdominal closure. The three phases of the strategy include initial control, stabilization, and delayed reconstruction. Various techniques are used to obtain rapid temporary control of bleeding and hollow visceral spillage. Hypothermia, coagulopathy, and the abdominal compartment syndrome are major postoperative concerns. Definitive repair of the injuries is undertaken after stabilization. CONCLUSION: Planned reoperation offers a simple and effective alternative to the traditional surgical management of complex or multiple injuries in critically wounded patients. PMID:7618965

  14. [Sjögren syndrome associated with renal tubular acidosis type I].

    PubMed

    Górriz, L; Molino, R; Arjona, D; Estripeaut, D

    2000-01-01

    Primary Sjögren's Syndrome complicated with a renal tubular acidosis type 1 and hypocalcemic paralysis, as the principal clinical manifestation, is uncommon. Although the initial manifestations of the nephropathy are not well understood, it is believed that the invasion of mononuclear cells and the high level of circulating antibodies, play an important role in the pathogenesis of the disease. We present a patient with hypocalcemic paralysis as an initial manifestation of a latent Sjögren's disease. The glandular biopsy was normal, suggesting a mayor participation of an immunological humoral factor in the renal lesion.

  15. Human immunodeficiency virus infection with human granulocytic ehrlichiosis complicated by symptomatic lactic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Springer, Sandra A; Altice, Frederick L

    2003-06-15

    Lactic acidosis has been reported as a complication associated with antiretroviral therapy; in particular, usually with use of nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors. We describe a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patient with a history of lipodystrophy who presented with hepatic insult associated with documented human granulocytic ehrlichiosis (HGE). Despite a normal serum lactate level before the onset of acute coinfection, the patient developed symptomatic hyperlactatemia while receiving appropriate treatment for HGE. To date, this is the first presentation of symptomatic hyperlactatemia in a patient with HIV infection and HGE.

  16. Pathogenesis of renal calculi in distal renal tubular acidosis. Possible role of parathyroid hormone.

    PubMed

    Lee, D B; Drinkard, J P; Gonick, H C; Coulson, W F; Cracchiolo, A

    1976-01-01

    Elevated circulating levels of immunoreactive parathyroid hormone (PTH), hypercalciuria and renal calculi were found in 3 patients with distal renal tubular acidosis (RTA). Treatment with alkali resulted in a fall of PTH toward normal and a reduction in urinary calcium, but the frequency of urolithiasis was unchanged. In one patient in whom prolonged follow-up was possible, a subtotal parathyroidectomy was performed. This was followed by virtual cessation of stone formation despite persistence of the acidification defect. This study suggests that RTA may be associated with secondary hyperparathyroidism and that the consequent elevation in PTH may play a contributory role in the pathogenesis of renal calculi.

  17. The need for genetic study to diagnose some cases of distal renal tubular acidosis.

    PubMed

    Heras Benito, Manuel; Garcia-Gonzalez, Miguel A; Valdenebro Recio, María; Molina Ordás, Álvaro; Callejas Martínez, Ramiro; Rodríguez Gómez, María Astrid; Calle García, Leonardo; Sousa Silva, Lisbeth; Fernández-Reyes Luis, María José

    We describe the case of a young woman who was diagnosed with advanced kidney disease, with an incidental finding of nephrocalcinosis of unknown aetiology, having been found asymptomatic throughout her life. The genetic study by panels of known genes associated with tubulointerstitial disease allowed us to discover autosomal dominant distal renal tubular acidosis associated with a de novo mutation in exon 14 of the SLC4A1 gene, which would have been impossible to diagnose clinically due to the advanced nature of the kidney disease when it was discovered.

  18. Modulation of ventricular transient outward K+ current by acidosis and its effects on excitation-contraction coupling

    PubMed Central

    Saegusa, Noriko; Garg, Vivek

    2013-01-01

    The contribution of transient outward current (Ito) to changes in ventricular action potential (AP) repolarization induced by acidosis is unresolved, as is the indirect effect of these changes on calcium handling. To address this issue we measured intracellular pH (pHi), Ito, L-type calcium current (ICa,L), and calcium transients (CaTs) in rabbit ventricular myocytes. Intracellular acidosis [pHi 6.75 with extracellular pH (pHo) 7.4] reduced Ito by ∼50% in myocytes with both high (epicardial) and low (papillary muscle) Ito densities, with little effect on steady-state inactivation and activation. Of the two candidate α-subunits underlying Ito, human (h)Kv4.3 and hKv1.4, only hKv4.3 current was reduced by intracellular acidosis. Extracellular acidosis (pHo 6.5) shifted Ito inactivation toward less negative potentials but had negligible effect on peak current at +60 mV when initiated from −80 mV. The effects of low pHi-induced inhibition of Ito on AP repolarization were much greater in epicardial than papillary muscle myocytes and included slowing of phase 1, attenuation of the notch, and elevation of the plateau. Low pHi increased AP duration in both cell types, with the greatest lengthening occurring in epicardial myocytes. The changes in epicardial AP repolarization induced by intracellular acidosis reduced peak ICa,L, increased net calcium influx via ICa,L, and increased CaT amplitude. In summary, in contrast to low pHo, intracellular acidosis has a marked inhibitory effect on ventricular Ito, perhaps mediated by Kv4.3. By altering the trajectory of the AP repolarization, low pHi has a significant indirect effect on calcium handling, especially evident in epicardial cells. PMID:23585132

  19. The Role of Plasma and Urine Metabolomics in Identifying New Biomarkers in Severe Newborn Asphyxia: A Study of Asphyxiated Newborn Pigs following Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Sachse, Daniel; Solevåg, Anne Lee; Berg, Jens Petter; Nakstad, Britt

    2016-01-01

    Background Optimizing resuscitation is important to prevent morbidity and mortality from perinatal asphyxia. The metabolism of cells and tissues is severely disturbed during asphyxia and resuscitation, and metabolomic analyses provide a snapshot of many small molecular weight metabolites in body fluids or tissues. In this study metabolomics profiles were studied in newborn pigs that were asphyxiated and resuscitated using different protocols to identify biomarkers for subject characterization, intervention effects and possibly prognosis. Methods A total of 125 newborn Noroc pigs were anesthetized, mechanically ventilated and inflicted progressive asphyxia until asystole. Pigs were randomized to resuscitation with a FiO2 0.21 or 1.0, different duration of ventilation before initiation of chest compressions (CC), and different CC to ventilation ratios. Plasma and urine samples were obtained at baseline, and 2 h and 4 h after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC, heart rate > = 100 bpm). Metabolomics profiles of the samples were analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Results Plasma and urine showed severe metabolic alterations consistent with hypoxia and acidosis 2 h and 4 h after ROSC. Baseline plasma hypoxanthine and lipoprotein concentrations were inversely correlated to the duration of hypoxia sustained before asystole occurred, but there was no evidence for a differential metabolic response to the different resuscitation protocols or in terms of survival. Conclusions Metabolic profiles of asphyxiated newborn pigs showed severe metabolic alterations. Consistent with previously published reports, we found no evidence of differences between established and alternative resuscitation protocols. Lactate and pyruvate may have a prognostic value, but have to be independently confirmed. PMID:27529347

  20. The progression from a lower to a higher invasive stage of bladder cancer is associated with severe alterations in glucose and pyruvate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Conde, Vanessa R; Oliveira, Pedro F; Nunes, Ana R; Rocha, Cátia S; Ramalhosa, Elsa; Pereira, José A; Alves, Marco G; Silva, Branca M

    2015-07-01

    Cancer cells present a particular metabolic behavior. We hypothesized that the progression of bladder cancer could be accompanied by changes in cells glycolytic profile. We studied two human bladder cancer cells, RT4 and TCCSUP, in which the latter represents a more invasive stage. The levels of glucose, pyruvate, alanine and lactate in the extracellular media were measured by Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. The protein expression levels of glucose transporters 1 (GLUT1) and 3 (GLUT3), monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4), phosphofructokinase-1 (PFK1), glutamic-pyruvate transaminase (GPT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were determined. Our data showed that glucose consumption and GLUT3 levels were similar in both cell lines, but TCCSUP cells displayed lower levels of GLUT1 and PFK expression. An increase in pyruvate consumption, concordant with the higher levels of lactate and alanine production, was also detected in TCCSUP cells. Moreover, TCCSUP cells presented lower protein expression levels of GPT and LDH. These results illustrate that bladder cancer progression is associated with alterations in cells glycolytic profile, namely the switch from glucose to pyruvate consumption in the more aggressive stage. This may be useful to develop new therapies and to identify biomarkers for cancer progression.

  1. SHOCK WAVE LITHOTRIPSY TARGETING OF THE KIDNEY AND PANCREAS DOES NOT INCREASE THE SEVERITY OF METABOLIC SYNDROME IN A PORCINE MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Handa, Rajash K.; Evan, Andrew P.; Connors, Bret A.; Johnson, Cynthia D.; Liu, Ziyue; Alloosh, Mouhamad; Sturek, Michael; Evans-Molina, Carmella; Mandeville, Jessica A.; Gnessin, Ehud; Lingeman, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) treatment of the kidney of metabolic syndrome (MetS) pigs worsens glucose tolerance or increases the risk of developing diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods Nine-month-old female Ossabaw miniature pigs were fed a hypercaloric atherogenic diet to induce MetS. At 15 months of age, pigs were treated with 2000 SWs or 4000 SWs (24 kV at 120 SWs/min) using the unmodified Dornier HM3 lithotripter. SWs were targeted to the upper pole calyx of the left kidney so as to model treatment that would also expose the tail of the pancreas to SWs. Intravenous glucose tolerance tests (IVGTTs) were performed on conscious, fasting pigs before SWL and at 1 month and 2 months post-SWL with blood samples taken for glucose and insulin measurement. Results Pigs fed the hypercaloric atherogenic diet were obese, dyslipidemic, insulin resistant and glucose intolerant—consistent with the development of MetS. Assessment of insulin resistance, glucose tolerance and pancreatic beta cell function from fasting plasma glucose and insulin levels, and the glucose and insulin response profile to IVGTTs, were similar before and after SWL. Conclusions The MetS status of SWL treated pigs was unchanged 2 months following treatment of the kidney with 2000 high-amplitude SWs or overtreatment with 4000 high-amplitude SWs. These findings do not support a single SWL treatment of the kidney as a risk factor for the onset of diabetes mellitus. PMID:24657667

  2. [Higher Brain Dysfunction in Mitochondrial Myopathy, Encephalopathy, Lactic Acidosis and Stroke-Like Episodes (MELAS)].

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Hiroo

    2016-02-01

    Stroke-like episodes are one of the cardinal features of mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), and occur in 84-99% of the patients. The affected areas detected on neuroimaging do not have classical vascular distribution, and involve predominantly the temporal, parietal and occipital lobes. Thus, the neurological symptoms including higher brain dysfunction correlate with this topographical distribution. In association with the occipital lobe involvement, the most frequent symptom is cortical blindness. Other symptoms have been occasionally reported in case reports: visual agnosia, prosopagnosia, cortical deafness, auditory agnosia, topographical disorientation, various types of aphasia, hemispatial neglect, and so on. On the other hand, cognitive decline associated with more diffuse brain impairment rather than with focal stroke-like lesions has been postulated. This condition is also known as mitochondrial dementia. Domains of cognitive dysfunction include abstract reasoning, verbal memory, visual memory, language (naming and fluency), executive or constructive functions, attention, and visuospatial function. Cognitive functions and intellectual abilities may decline from initially minimal cognitive impairment to dementia. To date, the neuropsychological and neurologic impairment has been reported to be associated with cerebral lactic acidosis as estimated by ventricular spectroscopic lactate levels.

  3. The effects of cinacalcet treatment on bone mineral metabolism, anemia parameters, left ventricular mass index and parathyroid gland volume in hemodialysis patients with severe secondary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Torun, Dilek; Yildiz, Ismail; Micozkadioglu, Hasan; Nursal, Gul Nihal; Yigit, Fatma; Ozelsancak, Ruya

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of cinacalcet therapy on anemia parameters, bone mineral metabolism, left ventricular mass index (LVMI) and parathyroid gland volume in hemodialysis (HD) patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism. Twenty-five HD patients (M/F: 11/14, mean age: 45.2±17.9 years, mean HD duration: 96.4±32.7 months) were included in this prospective pilot study. The indication to start calcimimetic therapy was persistent serum levels of parathyroid hormone (PTH)>1000 pg/mL, refractory to intravenous (i.v.) vitamin D and phosphate-binding therapy. The initial and one-year results of adjusted serum calcium (Ca+2), phosphate (P), Ca×P product, PTH, hemoglobin (Hb) and ferritin levels, transferrin saturation index (TSAT), median weekly erythropoietin (EPO) dose, LVMI, and parathyroid volume by parathyroid ultrasonography were determined. There were no differences between pre- and post-treatment levels of serum Ca+2 (P=0.853), P (P=0.447), Ca×P product (P=0.587), PTH (P=0.273), ferritin (P=0.153) and TSAT (P=0.104). After 1 year of calcimimetic therapy, the Hb levels were significantly higher than the initial levels (P=0.048). The weekly dose of EPO decreased with no statistical significance. The dose of cinacalcet was increased from 32.4±12.0 to 60.0±24.4 mg/day (P=0.01). There were no differences between the pre- and post-treatment results regarding weekly vitamin D dose, parenteral iron dose, LVMI and parathyroid volume. The results of our study suggest that cinacalcet therapy might have an additional benefit in the control anemia in HD patients.

  4. [Treatment of severe Rhesus erythroblastosis].

    PubMed

    Bichler, A; Frisch, H

    1977-01-01

    Report about the management of cases of severe Rhesus erythroblastosis. One case is specially discussed because of it's actuality. This was a patient with severe Rh-sensitization (OOD at 450 mm from the beginning of the 30th week of gestation in zone III according to Liley). Because of the haemolytic disease and the chronic fetal distress the Caesarean section was already performed in the 32nd week of gestation after Betamethason treatment of the mother. The Lecithin-Sphingomyelin (L/S) ratio in the amniotic fluid as a criterium of fetal lung maturity raised almost twicefold (from 0.9 to 1.6) after Cortison treatment. The intensive care (assisted ventilation with PEEP, correction of the acidosis and transfusion of packed red cells) of the severely anaemic (Hb 3.5 g%, Hk 15 vol.%) and hydropic newborn was already started in the delivery room. The newborn developed no RDS and was discharged healthy. With reference to this and other cases the management of severe Rh-sensitization before the 34th week of gestation is discussed. Premature infants are mainly susceptable to the development of a Respiratory Distress syndrome (RDS). After antepartum Cortison treatment for prevention of an RDS the date of confinement should be arranged earlier. The value of an early Caesarian section after antepartum Glucocorticoid treatment as compared to the application of intrauterine transfusions in cases of severe erythroblastosis is discussed. It is also reported about recent methods of treatment of severe conditions of hydrops fetalis.

  5. Lactic acidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... problem that causes the condition. References Seifter JL. Acid-base disorders. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's ... Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap120. Strayer RJ. Acid-base disorders. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, ...

  6. Genetic Variation in Iron Metabolism Is Associated with Neuropathic Pain and Pain Severity in HIV-Infected Patients on Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kallianpur, Asha R.; Jia, Peilin; Ellis, Ronald J.; Zhao, Zhongming; Bloss, Cinnamon; Wen, Wanqing; Marra, Christina M.; Hulgan, Todd; Simpson, David M.; Morgello, Susan; McArthur, Justin C.; Clifford, David B.; Collier, Ann C.; Gelman, Benjamin B.; McCutchan, J. Allen; Franklin, Donald; Samuels, David C.; Rosario, Debralee; Holzinger, Emily; Murdock, Deborah G.; Letendre, Scott; Grant, Igor

    2014-01-01

    HIV sensory neuropathy and distal neuropathic pain (DNP) are common, disabling complications associated with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). We previously associated iron-regulatory genetic polymorphisms with a reduced risk of HIV sensory neuropathy during more neurotoxic types of cART. We here evaluated the impact of polymorphisms in 19 iron-regulatory genes on DNP in 560 HIV-infected subjects from a prospective, observational study, who underwent neurological examinations to ascertain peripheral neuropathy and structured interviews to ascertain DNP. Genotype-DNP associations were explored by logistic regression and permutation-based analytical methods. Among 559 evaluable subjects, 331 (59%) developed HIV-SN, and 168 (30%) reported DNP. Fifteen polymorphisms in 8 genes (p<0.05) and 5 variants in 4 genes (p<0.01) were nominally associated with DNP: polymorphisms in TF, TFRC, BMP6, ACO1, SLC11A2, and FXN conferred reduced risk (adjusted odds ratios [ORs] ranging from 0.2 to 0.7, all p<0.05); other variants in TF, CP, ACO1, BMP6, and B2M conferred increased risk (ORs ranging from 1.3 to 3.1, all p<0.05). Risks associated with some variants were statistically significant either in black or white subgroups but were consistent in direction. ACO1 rs2026739 remained significantly associated with DNP in whites (permutation p<0.0001) after correction for multiple tests. Several of the same iron-regulatory-gene polymorphisms, including ACO1 rs2026739, were also associated with severity of DNP (all p<0.05). Common polymorphisms in iron-management genes are associated with DNP and with DNP severity in HIV-infected persons receiving cART. Consistent risk estimates across population subgroups and persistence of the ACO1 rs2026739 association after adjustment for multiple testing suggest that genetic variation in iron-regulation and transport modulates susceptibility to DNP. PMID:25144566

  7. Glycogen storage disease type Ia: linkage of glucose, glycogen, lactic acid, triglyceride, and uric acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sever, Sakine; Weinstein, David A; Wolfsdorf, Joseph I; Gedik, Reyhan; Schaefer, Ernst J

    2012-01-01

    A female presented in infancy with hypotonia, undetectable serum glucose, lactic acidosis, and triglycerides >5000 mg/dL. The diagnosis of type 1A glycogen storage disease was made via the result of a liver biopsy, which showed increased glycogen and absent glucose-6-phosphatase enzyme activity. The patient was treated with dextrose administered orally, which was replaced by frequent feedings of cornstarch, which resulted in an improvement of her metabolic parameters. At age 18 years of age, she had marked hypertriglyceridemia (3860 mg/dL) and eruptive xanthomas and was treated with fenofibrate, atorvastatin, and fish oil. At age 29 years she was noted to have multiple liver adenomas, severe anemia, and hyperuricemia. Aggressive cornstarch therapy was commenced with a goal of maintaining her blood glucose levels >75 mg/dL and lactate levels <2 mmol/L. After 15 months on this regimen, her lipids levels (measured in mg/dL) off all medications were as follows: total cholesterol 222, triglycerides 179, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol 32, and calculated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol 154. Her weight was stable with a body mass index of 24.8 kg/m(2). Her liver adenomas had decreased in size, and her anemia and hyperuricemia had improved. She was homozygous for the R83C missense mutation in G6PC. Our data indicate that optimized metabolic control to maintain blood glucose levels >75 mg/dL is critical in the management of this disease.

  8. Topological location and structural importance of the NBCe1-A residues mutated in proximal renal tubular acidosis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Quansheng; Kao, Liyo; Azimov, Rustam; Newman, Debra; Liu, Weixin; Pushkin, Alexander; Abuladze, Natalia; Kurtz, Ira

    2010-04-30

    NBCe1-A electrogenically cotransports Na(+) and HCO(3)(-) across the basolateral membrane of renal proximal tubule cells. Eight missense mutations and 3 nonsense mutations in NBCe1-A cause severe proximal renal tubular acidosis (pRTA). In this study, the topologic properties and structural importance of the 8 endogenous residues mutated in pRTA and the in situ topology of NBCe1-A were examined by the substituted cysteine accessibility method. Of the 55 analyzed individually introduced cysteines, 8 were labeled with both membrane permeant (biotin maleimide (BM)) and impermeant (2-((5(6)-tetramethylrhodamine)carboxylamino)ethyl methanethiosulfonate (MTS-TAMRA)) sulfhydryl reagents, 4 with only BM, and 3 with only MTS-TAMRA. The location of the labeled and unlabeled introduced cysteines clearly indicates that the transmembrane region of NBCe1-A contains 14 transmembrane segments (TMs). In this in situ based NBCe1-A topology, residues mutated in pRTA (pRTA residues) are assigned as: Ser(427), TM1; Thr(485) and Gly(486), TM3; Arg(510) and Leu(522), TM4; Ala(799), TM10; and Arg(881), TM12. Substitution of pRTA residues with cysteines impaired the membrane trafficking of R510C and R881C, the remaining membrane-processed constructs had various impaired transport function. Surprisingly, none of the membrane-processed constructs was accessible to labeling with BM and MTS-TAMRA, nor were they functionally sensitive to the inhibition by (2-aminoethyl)methanethiosulfonate. Functional analysis of Thr(485) with different amino acid substitutions indicated it resides in a unique region important for NBCe1-A function. Our findings demonstrate that the pRTA residues in NBCe1-A are buried in the protein complex/lipid bilayer where they perform important structural roles.

  9. Topological Location and Structural Importance of the NBCe1-A Residues Mutated in Proximal Renal Tubular Acidosis*

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Quansheng; Kao, Liyo; Azimov, Rustam; Newman, Debra; Liu, Weixin; Pushkin, Alexander; Abuladze, Natalia; Kurtz, Ira

    2010-01-01

    NBCe1-A electrogenically cotransports Na+ and HCO3− across the basolateral membrane of renal proximal tubule cells. Eight missense mutations and 3 nonsense mutations in NBCe1-A cause severe proximal renal tubular acidosis (pRTA). In this study, the topologic properties and structural importance of the 8 endogenous residues mutated in pRTA and the in situ topology of NBCe1-A were examined by the substituted cysteine accessibility method. Of the 55 analyzed individually introduced cysteines, 8 were labeled with both membrane permeant (biotin maleimide (BM)) and impermeant (2-((5(6)-tetramethylrhodamine)carboxylamino)ethyl methanethiosulfonate (MTS-TAMRA)) sulfhydryl reagents, 4 with only BM, and 3 with only MTS-TAMRA. The location of the labeled and unlabeled introduced cysteines clearly indicates that the transmembrane region of NBCe1-A contains 14 transmembrane segments (TMs). In this in situ based NBCe1-A topology, residues mutated in pRTA (pRTA residues) are assigned as: Ser427, TM1; Thr485 and Gly486, TM3; Arg510 and Leu522, TM4; Ala799, TM10; and Arg881, TM12. Substitution of pRTA residues with cysteines impaired the membrane trafficking of R510C and R881C, the remaining membrane-processed constructs had various impaired transport function. Surprisingly, none of the membrane-processed constructs was accessible to labeling with BM and MTS-TAMRA, nor were they functionally sensitive to the inhibition by (2-aminoethyl)methanethiosulfonate. Functional analysis of Thr485 with different amino acid substitutions indicated it resides in a unique region important for NBCe1-A function. Our findings demonstrate that the pRTA residues in NBCe1-A are buried in the protein complex/lipid bilayer where they perform important structural roles. PMID:20197274

  10. Individual animal variability in ruminal bacterial communities and ruminal acidosis in primiparous Holstein cows during the periparturient period

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate variability among individual cows for their susceptibility to ruminal acidosis (RA) pre- and postpartum, and determine whether this variability was related to differences in their ruminal bacterial community composition (BCC). Variability in susceptibilit...

  11. Linezolid-induced lactic acidosis in two liver transplant patients with the mitochondrial DNA A2706G polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Del Pozo, J L; Fernández-Ros, N; Sáez, E; Herrero, J I; Yuste, J R; Banales, J M

    2014-07-01

    Mitochondrial toxicity has been recently suggested to be the underlying mechanism of long-term linezolid-associated toxicity in patients with 16S rRNA genetic polymorphisms. Here, we report for the first time two cases of lactic acidosis due to long-term linezolid exposure in liver transplant recipients who presented an A2706G mitochondrial DNA polymorphism.

  12. Impact of hard vs. soft wheat and monensin level on rumen acidosis in feedlot heifers.

    PubMed

    Yang, W Z; Xu, L; Zhao, Y L; Chen, L Y; McAllister, T A

    2014-11-01

    Many feedlot finishing diets include wheat when the relative wheat prices are low. This study was conducted to examine the responses in ruminal pH and fermentation as well as site and extent of digestion from substituting soft or hard wheat for barley grain and to determine whether an elevated monensin concentration might decrease indicators of ruminal acidosis in feedlot heifers. Five ruminally cannulated beef heifers were used in a 5 × 5 Latin square with 2 × 2 + 1 factorial arrangement. Treatments included barley (10% barley silage, 86% barley, 4% supplement, with 28 mg monensin/kg DM) and diets where barley was substituted by either soft or hard wheat with either 28 or 44 mg monensin/kg diet DM. Intake of DM was not affected by grain source, whereas increasing monensin with wheat diets reduced (P < 0.02) DMI. Mean ruminal pH was lower (P < 0.04) and durations of pH < 5.8 and pH < 5.5 greater (P < 0.03) for wheat than for barley diets. However, ruminal pH was not affected by wheat type or monensin level. Total VFA concentrations were greater (P < 0.03) for wheat than barley diets with no effect of wheat type. The molar proportion of propionate was greater (P < 0.04), whereas butyrate (P < 0.01) and ratio of acetate to propionate tended to be lower (P < 0.09), with the high as compared to low level of monensin. Replacing barley with wheat in finishing diets did not affect the duodenal flow or the digestibility of OM, likely as a result of greater (P < 0.01) NDF digestion from barley offsetting the increased (P < 0.03) supply of digested starch from wheat. Feeding soft vs. hard wheat delivered a greater (P < 0.03) duodenal supply of OM and nonammonia N with no differences in total tract nutrient digestion. The increased monensin concentration decreased the flow of OM (P < 0.01), total N (P < 0.05), and microbial protein (P < 0.05) to the small intestine due to decreased DMI. These results indicated that hard and soft wheat exhibited digestive characteristics

  13. Effect of induction of subacute ruminal acidosis on milk fat profile and rumen parameters.

    PubMed

    Colman, E; Fokkink, W B; Craninx, M; Newbold, J R; De Baets, B; Fievez, V

    2010-10-01

    High-concentrate diets can lead to subacute ruminal acidosis and are known to result in changes of the ruminal fermentation pattern and mammary secretion of fatty acids. The objective of this paper is to describe modifications in milk fatty acid proportions, particularly odd- and branched-chain fatty acids and rumen biohydrogenation intermediates, associated with rumen parameters during a 6-wk subacute ruminal acidosis induction protocol with 12 ruminally fistulated multiparous cows. The protocol involved a weekly gradual replacement of a standard dairy concentrate with a wheat-based concentrate (610 g of wheat/kg of concentrate) during the first 5 wk and an increase in the total amount of concentrate in wk 6. Before the end of induction wk 6, cows were switched to a control diet because 7 cows showed signs of sickness. The pH was measured continuously by an indwelling pH probe. Milk and rumen samples were taken on d 2 and 7 of each week. Data were analyzed using a linear mixed model and by principal component analysis. A pH decrease occurred after the first concentrate switch but rumen parameters returned to the original values and remained stable until wk 5. In wk 5 and 6, rumen pH values were indicative of increasing acidotic conditions. After switching to the control diet in wk 6, rumen pH values rapidly achieved normal values. Odd- and branched-chain fatty acids and C18:1 trans-10 increased with increasing amount of concentrate in the diet, whereas C18:1 trans-11 decreased. Four fatty acids [C18:1 trans-10, C15:0 and C17:0+C17:1 cis-9 (negative loadings), and iso C14:0 (positive loading)] largely correlated with the first principal component (PC1), with cows spread along the PC1 axis. The first 4 wk of the induction experiment showed variation across the second principal component (PC2) only, with high loadings of anteiso C13:0 (negative loading) and C18:2 cis-9,trans-11 and C18:1 trans-11 (positive loadings). Weeks 5 and 6 deviated from PC2 and tended toward

  14. The central role of chloride in the metabolic acid-base changes in canine parvoviral enteritis.

    PubMed

    Burchell, Richard K; Schoeman, Johan P; Leisewitz, Andrew L

    2014-04-01

    The acid-base disturbances in canine parvoviral (CPV) enteritis are not well described. In addition, the mechanisms causing these perturbations have not been fully elucidated. The purpose of the present study was to assess acid-base changes in puppies suffering from CPV enteritis, using a modified strong ion model (SIM). The hypothesis of the study was that severe acid-base disturbances would be present and that the SIM would provide insights into pathological mechanisms, which have not been fully appreciated by the Henderson-Hasselbalch model. The study analysed retrospective data, obtained from 42 puppies with confirmed CPV enteritis and 10 healthy control dogs. The CPV-enteritis group had been allocated a clinical score, to allow classification of the data according to clinical severity. The effects of changes in free water, chloride, l-lactate, albumin and phosphate were calculated, using a modification of the base excess algorithm. When the data were summated for each patient, and correlated to each individual component, the most important contributor to the metabolic acid-base changes, according to the SIM, was chloride (P<0.001). Severely-affected animals tended to demonstrate hypochloraemic alkalosis, whereas mildly-affected puppies had a hyperchloraemic acidosis (P=0.007). In conclusion, the acid-base disturbances in CPV enteritis are multifactorial and complex, with the SIM providing information in terms of the origin of these changes.

  15. Metabolic alkalosis transition in renal proximal tubule cells facilitates an increase in CYP27B1, while blunting responsiveness to PTH

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is the central activator of renal proximal 1-alpha-hydroxylase (CYP27B1), the enzyme responsible for synthesis of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3). Past studies have documented a disruption of CYP27B1 activity in chronic metabolic acidosis in vivo, while simulated ac...

  16. Re-engineering Cytochrome P450 2B11dH for Enhanced Metabolism of Several Substrates Including the Anti-cancer Prodrugs Cyclophosphamide and Ifosfamide

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ling; Chen, Chong S.; Waxman, David J.; Liu, Hong; Halpert, James R.; Kumar, Santosh

    2007-01-01

    Based on recent directed evolution of P450 2B1, six P450 2B11 mutants at three positions were created in an N-terminal modified construct termed P450 2B11dH and characterized for enzyme catalysis using five substrates. Mutant I209A demonstrated a 3.2-fold enhanced kcat/Km for 7-ethoxy-4-trifluoromethylcourmarin O-deethylation, largely due to a dramatic decrease in Km (0.72 vs. 18 μM). I209A also demonstrated enhanced selectivity for testosterone 16β-hydroxylation over 16α-hydroxylation. In contrast, V183L showed a 4-fold increased kcat for 7-benzyloxyresorufin debenzylation and a 4.7-fold increased kcat/Km for testosterone 16α-hydroxylation. V183L also displayed a 1.7-fold higher kcat/Km than P450 2B11dH with the anti-cancer prodrugs cyclophosphamide and ifosfamide, resulting from a ~4-fold decrease in Km. Introduction of the V183L mutation into full-length P450 2B11 did not enhance the kcat/Km. Overall, the re-engineered P450 2B11dH enzymes exhibited enhanced catalytic efficiency with several substrates including the anti-cancer prodrugs. PMID:17254539

  17. Effects of several dioxin-like compounds on estrogen metabolism in the malignant MCF-7 and nontumorigenic MCF-10A human mammary epithelial cell lines.

    PubMed

    van Duursen, Majorie B M; Sanderson, J Thomas; van der Bruggen, Marieke; van der Linden, Jeroen; van den Berg, Martin

    2003-08-01

    In human breast tissue, estrone (E(1)) and estradiol (E(2)) are mainly hydroxylated by cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and 1B1 (CYP1B1) to 2-hydroxyestrogens (2-OHE(1/2)) and 4-hydroxyestrogens (4-OHE(1/2)), respectively. Several studies show that 4-OHE(1/2), but not 2-OHE(1/2), may act as a carcinogen and a high estrogen 4-/2-hydroxylation ratio appears to be a marker for the presence of neoplasms. In this study, we investigated the effects of several dioxin-like compounds on estrogen 2- and 4-hydroxylation in a malignant (MCF-7) and a nontumorigenic (MCF-10A) human mammary epithelial cell line. 2- and 4-methoxyestrogen (MeOE(1/2)) formations were used as measures of the 2- and 4-hydroxylation pathways, respectively. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), 2,3,4,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran (PCDF), 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126), and 3,3'4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 169) concentration dependently induced 2-MeOE(1/2) formation and ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylation (EROD) activity through induced CYP1A1 expression in MCF-7 and MCF-10A cells. 2,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 118) had no such effect. Effects on CYP1B1 expression and 4-MeOE(1/2) formation were less pronounced; only TCDD caused an induction, whereas PCB 169 was a potent and selective inhibitor of 4-MeOE(1/2) formation (IC(50) 0.7 and 2.2 nM PCB 169 in MCF-7 and MCF-10A cells, respectively). MCF-10A cells were less responsive toward dioxin-like compounds and the apparent EC(50) values for CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 induction in this study were 10-100 fold higher than in MCF-7 cells. The constitutive 4-/2-MeOE(1/2) ratios were 2.99 +/- 0.78 and 0.93 +/- 0.40 in MCF-7 and MCF-10A, respectively. Incubation with dioxin-like compounds resulted in a concentration-dependent decrease in the 4-/2-MeOE(1/2) ratio, but an increase in potentially carcinogenic estrogen metabolites in both MCF-7 and MCF-10A cells. This indicates that even though the 4-/2-OHE(1/2) ratio may be used as indicator for the presence

  18. A comparison of the effects of glucose ingestion and NH4Cl acidosis on urinary calcium and magnesium excretion in man

    PubMed Central

    Lennon, Edward J.; Piering, Walter F.

    1970-01-01

    Both glucose ingestion and NH4Cl acidosis have been reported to augment urinary calcium (UCa V) and magnesium (UMg V) excretion. Both also cause acidification of the urine and an increase in renal acid excretion. To examine whether a common mechanism of action was involved, the effects of glucose ingestion and NH4Cl acidosis on UCa V and UMg V were tested in the same subjects. Glucose ingestion caused significant increases in both UCa V and UMg V. During stable NH4Cl acidosis, UCa V increased significantly, while UMg V was unaffected. When a glucose load was given during acidosis, the separate effects of acidosis and glucose on UCa V were additive, whereas UMg V increased less than observed during normal acid-base balance. Although renal acid excretion increased and the urine was acidified after glucose in the normal steady state, when glucose was administered during NH4Cl acidosis urine pH rose and there was no change in renal acid excretion. We concluded that NH4Cl acidosis and glucose ingestion reduce the renal tubular reabsorption of magnesium and (or) calcium, but they act through separate mechanisms. PMID:5432375

  19. Comprehensive review on lactate metabolism in human health.

    PubMed

    Adeva-Andany, M; López-Ojén, M; Funcasta-Calderón, R; Ameneiros-Rodríguez, E; Donapetry-García, C; Vila-Altesor, M; Rodríguez-Seijas, J

    2014-07-01

    Metabolic pathways involved in lactate metabolism are important to understand the physiological response to exercise and the pathogenesis of prevalent diseases such as diabetes and cancer. Monocarboxylate transporters are being investigated as potential targets for diagnosis and therapy of these and other disorders. Glucose and alanine produce pyruvate which is reduced to lactate by lactate dehydrogenase in the cytoplasm without oxygen consumption. Lactate removal takes place via its oxidation to pyruvate by lactate dehydrogenase. Pyruvate may be either oxidized to carbon dioxide producing energy or transformed into glucose. Pyruvate oxidation requires oxygen supply and the cooperation of pyruvate dehydrogenase, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Enzymes of the gluconeogenesis pathway sequentially convert pyruvate into glucose. Congenital or acquired deficiency on gluconeogenesis or pyruvate oxidation, including tissue hypoxia, may induce lactate accumulation. Both obese individuals and patients with diabetes show elevated plasma lactate concentration compared to healthy subjects, but there is no conclusive evidence of hyperlactatemia causing insulin resistance. Available evidence suggests an association between defective mitochondrial oxidative capacity in the pancreatic β-cells and diminished insulin secretion that may trigger the development of diabetes in patients already affected with insulin resistance. Several mutations in the mitochondrial DNA are associated with diabetes mellitus, although the pathogenesis remains unsettled. Mitochondrial DNA mutations have been detected in a number of human cancers. d-lactate is a lactate enantiomer normally formed during glycolysis. Excess d-lactate is generated in diabetes, particularly during diabetic ketoacidosis. d-lactic acidosis is typically associated with small bowel resection.

  20. Dermal bone in early tetrapods: a palaeophysiological hypothesis of adaptation for terrestrial acidosis.

    PubMed

    Janis, Christine M; Devlin, Kelly; Warren, Daniel E; Witzmann, Florian

    2012-08-07

    The dermal bone sculpture of early, basal tetrapods of the Permo-Carboniferous is unlike the bone surface of any living vertebrate, and its function has long been obscure. Drawing from physiological studies of extant tetrapods, where dermal bone or other calcified tissues aid in regulating acid-base balance relating to hypercapnia (excess blood carbon dioxide) and/or lactate acidosis, we propose a similar function for these sculptured dermal bones in early tetrapods. Unlike the condition in modern reptiles, which experience hypercapnia when submerged in water, these animals would have experienced hypercapnia on land, owing to likely inefficient means of eliminating carbon dioxide. The different patterns of dermal bone sculpture in these tetrapods largely correlates with levels of terrestriality: sculpture is reduced or lost in stem amniotes that likely had the more efficient lung ventilation mode of costal aspiration, and in small-sized stem amphibians that would have been able to use the skin for gas exchange.

  1. The definition of acidosis in dairy herds predominantly fed on pasture and concentrates.

    PubMed

    Bramley, E; Lean, I J; Fulkerson, W J; Stevenson, M A; Rabiee, A R; Costa, N D

    2008-01-01

    This cross-sectional survey examined the prevalence of ruminal acidosis and the effects of acidosis on the production of dairy cattle. Eight fresh cows, 3 primiparous and 5 multiparous (< 100 d in milk), were selected randomly from each of 100 dairy herds in 5 regions of Australia. Rumen fluid was obtained from each cow by rumenocentesis and a stomach tube, and samples were tested for pH. Stomach tube rumen fluid samples were analyzed for volatile fatty acid, ammonia, and D-lactate concentrations. On the basis of the results of all assays, cows were categorized into 3 distinct categories (categories 1, 2, and 3) by cluster analysis. The percentages of cattle in categories 1, 2, and 3 were 10.2, 29.9, and 59.9%, respectively. Mean rumen pH for categories 1, 2, and 3 were 5.74 +/- 0.47, 6.18 +/- 0.44, and 6.33 +/- 0.43, respectively. Biochemically, categories 1, 2, and 3 were characterized, respectively, as follows: mean total VFA concentration (mM), 100.74 +/- 23.22, 94.79 +/- 18.13, and 62.81 +/- 15.65; mean ammonia concentration (mM), 2.46 +/- 2.02, 7.79 +/- 3.75, and 3.64 +/- 2.03; and mean D-lactate concentration (mM), 0.34 +/- 0.86, 0.28 +/- 0.97, and 0.12 +/- 0.51. Category 1 cows had higher propionate, valerate, isovalerate, and caproate concentrations and were of lower parity than cows in other categories. Cows in category 1 had higher milk production but lower milk fat content than category 2 cows. Herds were assigned to 1 of 3 groups according to the numbers of cows assigned to each category. Herds with > or = 3 of the 8 cows in category 1 were classified as acidotic. Herds with > or = 3 of the 8 cows in category 2 were classified as having suboptimal rumen function, and herds with > or = 3 of the 8 cows in category 3 were classified as normal. Herds that had 3 or more of the 8 cows in category 1 (acidotic herds) had diets with higher energy and nonfiber carbohydrate contents and a lower neutral detergent fiber content than herds with a high prevalence of

  2. Successful treatment of proximal renal tubular acidosis and Fanconi syndrome with vitamin D replacement.

    PubMed

    Ali, Syed Ahsan; Tariq, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Proximal renal tubular acidosis (RTA), also known as Type II RTA, is characterized by a defect in the ability to reabsorb bicarbonate (HCO 3 ) in the proximal tubule. It is usually associated with generalized dysfunction of the proximal tubule as part of Fanconi syndrome. Very few case reports in the literature support Vitamin D deficiency as a cause of proximal RTA. We present a case of a young female who presented with proximal RTA and Fanconi syndrome and excellently responded to Vitamin D replacement. Thus, work-up for the etiology of proximal RTA should include Vitamin D levels since replacement of this vitamin in those who are deficient can lead to cure of such patients.

  3. Acidosis and nutritional status in hemodialyzed patients. French Study Group for Nutrition in Dialysis.

    PubMed

    Chauveau, P; Fouque, D; Combe, C; Laville, M; Canaud, B; Azar, R; Cano, N; Aparicio, M; Leverve, X

    2000-01-01

    In a cross-sectional study of more than 30% of French dialysis patients (N = 7,123), we evaluated the relationships between predialysis plasma bicarbonate concentration and nutritional markers. Data including age, gender, cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), time on dialysis, body mass index (BMI), blood levels of midweek predialysis albumin, prealbumin, and bicarbonate were collected. Normalized protein catabolic rate (nPCR), dialysis adequacy parameters, and estimation of lean body mass (LBM) were computed from pre- and postbicarbonate-dialysis urea and creatinine levels according to the classical formulas of Garred. Average values (+/- 1 SD) were age 61 +/- 16 years, BMI 23.3 +/- 4.6 kg/m2, dialysis time 12.4 +/- 2.7 h/week, HCO3 22.8 +/- 3.5 mmol/L, albumin 38.7 +/- 5.3 g/L, prealbumin 340 +/- 90 mg/L, Kt/V 1.36 +/- 0.36, nPCR 1.13 +/- 0.32 g/kg BW/day, and LBM 0.86 +/- 0.21% of ideal LBM. A highly significant negative correlation was observed between predialysis bicarbonate levels (within a range of 16-30 mmol/L, 95% of this population) and nPCR confirmed by analysis of variance using bicarbonate classes (p < 0.0001). Bicarbonate was also negatively correlated with albumin, prealbumin, BMI, and LBM. No relationship was noted between bicarbonate and Kt/V despite a positive correlation between Kt/V and nPCR. It is likely that a persistent acidosis observed despite standard bicarbonate dialysis was caused by a high dietary protein intake which results in an increased acid load, but also overcomes the usual catabolic effects of acidosis.

  4. Regulation of intracellular pH in cnidarians: response to acidosis in Anemonia viridis.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Julien; Venn, Alexander; Tambutté, Éric; Ganot, Philippe; Allemand, Denis; Tambutté, Sylvie

    2014-02-01

    The regulation of intracellular pH (pHi) is a fundamental aspect of cell physiology that has received little attention in studies of the phylum Cnidaria, which includes ecologically important sea anemones and reef-building corals. Like all organisms, cnidarians must maintain pH homeostasis to counterbalance reductions in pHi, which can arise because of changes in either intrinsic or extrinsic parameters. Corals and sea anemones face natural daily changes in internal fluids, where the extracellular pH can range from 8.9 during the day to 7.4 at night. Furthermore, cnidarians are likely to experience future CO₂-driven declines in seawater pH, a process known as ocean acidification. Here, we carried out the first mechanistic investigation to determine how cnidarian pHi regulation responds to decreases in extracellular and intracellular pH. Using the anemone Anemonia viridis, we employed confocal live cell imaging and a pH-sensitive dye to track the dynamics of pHi after intracellular acidosis induced by acute exposure to decreases in seawater pH and NH₄Cl prepulses. The investigation was conducted on cells that contained intracellular symbiotic algae (Symbiodinium sp.) and on symbiont-free endoderm cells. Experiments using inhibitors and Na⁺-free seawater indicate a potential role of Na⁺/H⁺ plasma membrane exchangers (NHEs) in mediating pHi recovery following intracellular acidosis in both cell types. We also measured the buffering capacity of cells, and obtained values between 20.8 and 43.8 mM per pH unit, which are comparable to those in other invertebrates. Our findings provide the first steps towards a better understanding of acid-base regulation in these basal metazoans, for which information on cell physiology is extremely limited.

  5. Inhibition of energy metabolism by 2-methylacetoacetate and 2-methyl-3-hydroxybutyrate in cerebral cortex of developing rats.

    PubMed

    Rosa, R B; Schuck, P F; de Assis, D R; Latini, A; Dalcin, K B; Ribeiro, C A J; da C Ferreira, G; Maria, R C; Leipnitz, G; Perry, M L S; Filho, C S Dutra; Wyse, A T S; Wannmacher, C M D; Wajner, M

    2005-01-01

    Mitochondrial beta-ketothiolase and 2-methyl-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase (MHBD) deficiencies are inherited neurometabolic disorders affecting isoleucine catabolism. Biochemically, beta-ketothiolase deficiency is characterized by intermittent ketoacidosis and urinary excretion of 2-methyl-acetoacetate (MAA), 2-methyl-3-hydroxybutyrate (MHB) and tiglylglycine (TG), whereas in MHBD deficiency only MHB and tiglylglycine accumulate. Lactic acid accumulation and excretion are also observed in these patients, being more pronounced in MHBD-deficient individuals, particularly during acute episodes of decompensation. Patients affected by MHBD deficiency usually manifest severe mental retardation and convulsions, whereas beta-ketothiolase-deficient patients present encephalopathic crises characterized by metabolic acidosis, vomiting and coma. Considering that the pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for the neurological alterations of these disorders are unknown and that lactic acidosis suggests an impairment of energy production, the objective of the present work was to investigate the in vitro effect of MAA and MHB, at concentrations varying from 0.01 to 1.0 mmol/L, on several parameters of energy metabolism in cerebral cortex from young rats. We observed that MAA markedly inhibited CO2 production from glucose, acetate and citrate at concentrations as low as 0.01 mmol/L. In addition, the activities of the respiratory chain complex II and succinate dehydrogenase were mildly inhibited by MAA. MHB, at 0.01 mmol/L and higher concentrations, strongly inhibited CO2 production from all tested substrates, as well as the respiratory chain complex IV activity. The other activities of the respiratory chain were not affected by these metabolites. The data indicate a marked blockage in the Krebs cycle and a mild inhibition of the respiratory chain caused by MAA and MHB. Furthermore, MHB inhibited total and mitochondrial creatine kinase activities, which was prevented by the

  6. Protective effects of polyethylene oxide on the vascular and organ function of rats with severe hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Huang, Tao; Dong, Zhen

    2015-08-01

    This study examined the effects of polyethylene oxide (PEO) on the survival rate, hemodynamics, blood gas indexes, lactic acid levels, microcirculation, and inflammatory cytokine levels in rats subjected to severe hemorrhagic shock. The shocked rats were resuscitated with either Ringer's lactate solution or 20 ppm of PEO in Ringer's lactate solution for 1 h. It was found that infusion of PEO effectively improved the survival, metabolic acidosis, oxygen delivery, hyperlactacidemia, tissue perfusion, and inflammatory responses of rats subjected to hemorrhagic shock. In addition, we found, for the first time, that PEO showed protective effects on hepatic and renal injury, as evidenced by the significant decreases in the elevated levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, blood urea nitrogen, and creatinine caused by shock induction after infusion of PEO (p < 0.05, 60 min post-resuscitation by comparison with pre-resuscitation). All of these findings indicate that PEO exhibits strong therapeutic effects under conditions of severe hemorrhagic shock,which also provides theoretical and experimental bases for the clinical use of PEO.

  7. Molecular Connections between Cancer Cell Metabolism and the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Justus, Calvin R.; Sanderlin, Edward J.; Yang, Li V.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells preferentially utilize glycolysis, instead of oxidative phosphorylation, for metabolism even in the presence of oxygen. This phenomenon of aerobic glycolysis, referred to as the “Warburg effect”, commonly exists in a variety of tumors. Recent studies further demonstrate that both genetic factors such as oncogenes and tumor suppressors and microenvironmental factors such as spatial hypoxia and acidosis can regulate the glycolytic metabolism of cancer cells. Reciprocally, altered cancer cell metabolism can modulate the tumor microenvironment which plays important roles in cancer cell somatic evolution, metastasis, and therapeutic response. In this article, we review the progression of current understandings on the molecular interaction between cancer cell metabolism and the tumor microenvironment. In addition, we discuss the implications of these interactions in cancer therapy and chemoprevention. PMID:25988385

  8. [Orthotopic ileal neobladder: urodynamic and metabolic aspects. Our experience].

    PubMed

    Mangiarotti, B; Ceresoli, A; Del Nero, A; Parravicini, M; Prati, G; Currò, A; Zanetti, G P; Trinchieri, A; Pisani, E

    1996-12-01

    We subjected to a functional and metabolic evaluation (urodynamic examination + cystography) 10 patients underwent to radical cystectomy with a ileal orthotopic reservoir (VIP) for bladder cancer. At the moment patients have a minimum 3-years follow-up and they are out of disease. The medium capacity of the reservoir is about 447 ml, with a low pressure flow, a medium pressure of ureteral closing of 62.5 cm of H2O. At the cystography neither ureteral reflux nor post miction residuum have been proved. All the patients are continent, with the exception of one patient suffering from episodes of nocturnal enuresis. The metabolic evaluation hasn't proved substantial changes except the presence of hypocitraturia in the only patient in metabolic acidosis. In conclusion the ileal orthotopic reservoir showed a good long-term functionality without considerable complication of metabolism.

  9. Midkine, a multifunctional cytokine, in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Krzystek-Korpacka, Malgorzata; Mierzchala, Magdalena; Neubauer, Katarzyna; Durek, Grazyna; Gamian, Andrzej

    2011-05-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate whether severe sepsis and septic shock are related to alterations in midkine concentrations, to identify disease-related factors associated with these alterations, and to initially appraise whether midkine might serve as a biomarker in sepsis. Prospective observational cross-sectional study with 5-day follow-up. Circulating midkine was measured (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) in 38 septic (13 with severe sepsis, 25 with septic shock), 82 active inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) (26 with systemic inflammatory response syndrome [SIRS]) patients, and 87 healthy subjects. Midkine significantly increased along with a sequence: health-inflammation (IBD)-systemic inflammation (IBD-SIRS)-severe sepsis/septic shock. High midkine levels (>1,000 ng/L) were found in 63% of septic and in 19% of IBD-SIRS patients, whereas extremely high concentrations (>5,000 ng/L) were found in 16% vs. 4%. Although not different at admission, midkine gradually decreased in severe sepsis and remained high in shock. Similarly, persistently high midkine was observed in patients with cardiovascular insufficiency (CVI) and in mechanically ventilated as compared with normalizing levels in patients without CVI and not requiring ventilation. The differences in devised simple rates (Δ5th-1st) were significant in all these cases. Accordingly, admission midkine was higher in patients with metabolic acidosis. Concerning pathogen, gram-positive infections were associated with the highest midkine levels. In conclusion, sepsis and septic shock are associated with midkine elevation, substantially more pronounced than in inflammation, even systemic, revealing a new potential mediator of deregulation of neutrophil migration. Sepsis-related global hypoxia seems to contribute to midkine elevation. Our results substantiate further research on possible midkine application as a sepsis biomarker: in differentiating SIRS from sepsis and identifying gram-positive sepsis and

  10. Cellular metabolism and disease: what do metabolic outliers teach us?

    PubMed Central

    DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Thompson, Craig B.

    2012-01-01

    An understanding of metabolic pathways based solely on biochemistry textbooks would underestimate the pervasive role of metabolism in essentially every aspect of biology. It is evident from recent work that many human diseases involve abnormal metabolic states – often genetically programmed – that perturb normal physiology and lead to severe tissue dysfunction. Understanding these metabolic outliers is now a crucial frontier in disease-oriented research. This review discusses the broad impact of metabolism in cellular function, how modern concepts of metabolism can inform our understanding of common diseases like cancer, and considers the prospects of developing new metabolic approaches to disease treatment. PMID:22424225

  11. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in adults for severe acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Rozé, H; Repusseau, B; Ouattara, A

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to examine the indications of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) for severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). This technique of oxygenation has significantly increased worldwide with the H1N1 flu pandemic. The goal of ECMO is to maintain a safe level of oxygenation and controlled respiratory acidosis under protective ventilation. The enthusiasm for ECMO should not obscure the consideration for potential associated complications. Before widespread diffusion of ECMO, new trials should test the efficacy of early initiation or CO2 removal in addition to, or even as an alternative to mechanical ventilation for severe ARDS.

  12. DREAMS of metabolism.

    PubMed

    Soh, Keng Cher; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily

    2010-10-01

    Metabolic networks have been studied for several decades, and sophisticated computational frameworks are needed to augment experimental approaches to harness these complex networks. BNICE (Biochemical Network Integrated Computational Explorer), a computational approach for the discovery of novel biochemical pathways that is based on biochemical transformations, overcomes many of the current limitations. BNICE and similar frameworks can be used in several different areas: (i) 'Design' of novel pathways for metabolic engineering; (ii) 'Retrosynthesis' of metabolic compounds; (iii) 'Evolution' analysis between metabolic pathways of different organisms; (iv) 'Analysis' of metabolic pathways; (v) 'Mining' of omics data; and (vi) 'Selection' of targets for enzyme engineering. Here, we discuss the issues and challenges in building such frameworks as well as the gamut of applications in biotechnology, metabolic engineering and synthetic biology.

  13. Rare mutation in the SLC26A3 transporter causes life-long diarrhoea with metabolic alkalosis.

    PubMed

    Abou Ziki, Maen D; Verjee, Mohamud A

    2015-01-07

    SLC26A3, a chloride/bicarbonate transporter mainly expressed in the intestines, plays a pivotal role in chloride absorption. We present a 23-year-old woman with a history of congenital chloride diarrhoea (CCD) and renal transplant who was admitted for rehydration and treatment of acute kidney injury after she presented with an acute diarrhoeal episode. Laboratory investigations confirmed metabolic alkalosis and severe hypochloraemia, consistent with her underlying CCD. This contrasts with most other forms of diarrhoea, which are normally associated with metabolic acidosis. Genetic testing was offered and revealed a homozygous non-sense mutation in SLC26A3 (Gly-187-Stop). This loss-of-function mutation results in bicarbonate retention in the blood and chloride loss into the intestinal lumen. Symptomatic management with daily NaCl and KCl oral syrups was supplemented with omeprazole therapy. The loss of her own kidneys is most likely due to crystal-induced nephropathy secondary to chronic volume contraction and chloride depletion. This case summarises the pathophysiology and management of CCD.

  14. Sigmoid volvulus in a patient with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS): a rare occurrence.

    PubMed

    Hallac, Alexander; Keshava, Hari B; Morris-Stiff, Gareth; Ibrahim, Samuel

    2016-03-02

    Mitochondrial diseases are rare and devastating, with a wide spectrum of clinical presentations and systemic symptoms. The majority of the published literature focuses on the neuromuscular manifestations and genetic components of this mitochondrial cytopathy, however, cardiac, renal, endocrine and gastrointestinal manifestations may also be present. The authors report a case detailing a 56-year-old woman's final hospitalisation from the gastrointestinal sequelae of mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) (Co Q10 deficiency variant). She presented with abdominal pain and distension associated with lactic acidosis, and was shown on imaging to have a colon perforation. This resulted in emergent surgery at which a necrotic colon secondary to a sigmoid colon was identified. Following four subsequent operations, and the development of multiorgan failure, care was eventually withdrawn. Practitioners of patients with MELAS should be cognisant of the rare but devastating gastrointestinal consequences of mitochondrial diseases.

  15. UPLC/ESI-MS/MS-based determination of metabolism of several new illicit drugs, ADB-FUBINACA, AB-FUBINACA, AB-PINACA, QUPIC, 5F-QUPIC and α-PVT, by human liver microsome.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Takahiro; Suzuki, Mayu; Todoroki, Kenichiro; Inoue, Koichi; Min, Jun Zhe; Kikura-Hanajiri, Ruri; Goda, Yukihiro; Toyo'oka, Toshimasa

    2014-06-01

    The metabolism by human liver microsomes of several new illicit drugs, that is, N-(1-amino-3,3-dimethyl-1-oxobutan-2-yl)-1-(4-fluorobenzyl)-1H-indazole-3- carboxamide (ADB-FUBINACA), N-(1-amino-3-methyl-1-oxobutan-2-yl)-1- (4-fluorobenzyl)-1H-indazole-3-carboxamide (AB-FUBINACA), N-(1-amino-3-methyl-1-oxobutan-2-yl)-1-pentyl-1H-indazole-3-carboxamide (AB-PINACA), quinolin-8-yl 1-pentyl-(1H-indole)-3-carboxylate (QUPIC), quinolin-8-yl 1-(5-fluoropentyl)-(1H-indole)-3-carboxylate (5 F-QUPIC) and α-pyrrolidinovalerothiophenone (α-PVT), which have indole, indazole, quinolinol ester and thiophene structures, was investigated using reversed-phase chromatography and mass spectrometry. The present method is based upon the oxidation by cytochrome p450 superfamily enzymes in the microsomes. The oxidation of ADB-FUBINACA and AB-FUBINACA mainly occurred on the N-(1-amino-alkyl-1-oxobutan) moiety. However, the oxidation of AB-PINACA seemed to occur on the 1-pentyl moiety. On the other hand, QUPIC and 5 F-QUPIC, which have a quinolinol ester structure, predominantly underwent a cleavage reaction to produce indoleacetic acid type metabolites. In contrast, the metabolism reaction of α-PVT was different from that of the other tested drugs, and various oxidation products were observed on the chromatograms. The obtained metabolites are not in conflict with the results predicted by MetaboLynx software. However, the exact structures of the metabolites, except for 1-pentyl-1H-indole-3-carboxylic acid (QUPIC metabolite) and 1-(5-fluoropentyl)-1H-indole-3-carboxylic acid (5 F-QUPIC metabolite), are currently not proven, because we have no authentic compounds for comparison. The proposed approach using human liver microsome seems to provide a new technology for the prediction of possible metabolites occuring in humans.

  16. Local anesthetic failure associated with inflammation: verification of the acidosis mechanism and the hypothetic participation of inflammatory peroxynitrite

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Takahiro; Tsuchiya, Hironori; Mizogami, Maki; Takakura, Ko

    2008-01-01

    The presence of inflammation decreases local anesthetic efficacy, especially in dental anesthesia. Although inflammatory acidosis is most frequently cited as the cause of such clinical phenomena, this has not been experimentally proved. We verified the acidosis mechanism by studying the drug and membrane lipid interaction under acidic conditions together with proposing an alternative hypothesis. Liposomes and nerve cell model membranes consisting of phospholipids and cholesterol were treated at different pH with lidocaine, prilocaine and bupivacaine (0.05%–0.2%, w/v). Their membrane-interactive potencies were compared by the induced-changes in membrane fluidity. Local anesthetics fluidized phosphatidylcholine membranes with the potency being significantly lower at pH 6.4 than at pH 7.4 (p < 0.01), supporting the acidosis theory. However, they greatly fluidized nerve cell model membranes even at pH 6.4 corresponding to inflamed tissues, challenging the conventional mechanism. Local anesthetics acted on phosphatidylserine liposomes, as well as nerve cell model membranes, at pH 6.4 with almost the same potency as that at pH 7.4, but not on phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and sphingomyelin liposomes. Since the positively charged anesthetic molecules are able to interact with nerve cell membranes by ion-paring with anionic components like phosphatidylserine, tissue acidosis is not essentially responsible for the local anesthetic failure associated with inflammation. The effects of local anesthetics on nerve cell model membranes were inhibited by treating with peroxynitrite (50 μM), suggesting that inflammatory cells producing peroxynitrite may affect local anesthesia. PMID:22096346

  17. Acidosis is a key regulator of osteoblast ecto-nucleotidase pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase 1 (NPP1) expression and activity.

    PubMed

    Orriss, Isabel R; Key, Michelle L; Hajjawi, Mark O R; Millán, José L; Arnett, Timothy R

    2015-12-01

    Previous work has shown that acidosis prevents bone nodule formation by osteoblasts in vitro by inhibiting mineralisation of the collagenous matrix. The ratio of phosphate (Pi ) to pyrophosphate (PPi ) in the bone microenvironment is a fundamental regulator of bone mineralisation. Both Pi and PPi , a potent inhibitor of mineralisation, are generated from extracellular nucleotides by the actions of ecto-nucleotidases. This study investigated the expression and activity of ecto-nucleotidases by osteoblasts under normal and acid conditions. We found that osteoblasts express mRNA for a number of ecto-nucleotidases including NTPdase 1-6 (ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase) and NPP1-3 (ecto-nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase). The rank order of mRNA expression in differentiating rat osteoblasts (day 7) was Enpp1 > NTPdase 4 > NTPdase 6 > NTPdase 5 >  alkaline phosphatase > ecto-5-nucleotidase > Enpp3 > NTPdase 1 > NTPdase 3 > Enpp2 > NTPdase 2. Acidosis (pH 6.9) upregulated NPP1 mRNA (2.8-fold) and protein expression at all stages of osteoblast differentiation compared to physiological pH (pH 7.4); expression of other ecto-nucleotidases was unaffected. Furthermore, total NPP activity was increased up to 53% in osteoblasts cultured in acid conditions (P < 0.001). Release of ATP, one of the key substrates for NPP1, from osteoblasts, was unaffected by acidosis. Further studies showed that mineralised bone formation by osteoblasts cultured from NPP1 knockout mice was increased compared with wildtypes (2.5-fold, P < 0.001) and was partially resistant to the inhibitory effect of acidosis. These results indicate that increased NPP1 expression and activity might contribute to the decreased mineralisation observed when osteoblasts are exposed to acid conditions.

  18. Inhibition of the oxygen sensor PHD2 in the liver improves survival in lactic acidosis by activating the Cori cycle.

    PubMed

    Suhara, Tomohiro; Hishiki, Takako; Kasahara, Masataka; Hayakawa, Noriyo; Oyaizu, Tomoko; Nakanishi, Tsuyoshi; Kubo, Akiko; Morisaki, Hiroshi; Kaelin, William G; Suematsu, Makoto; Minamishima, Yoji Andrew

    2015-09-15

    Loss of prolyl hydroxylase 2 (PHD2) activates the hypoxia-inducible factor-dependent hypoxic response, including anaerobic glycolysis, which causes large amounts of lactate to be released from cells into the circulation. We found that Phd2-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) produced more lactate than wild-type MEFs, as expected, whereas systemic inactivation of PHD2 in mice did not cause hyperlacticacidemia. This unexpected observation led us to hypothesize that the hypoxic response activated in the liver enhances the Cori cycle, a lactate-glucose carbon recycling system between muscle and liver, and thereby decreases circulating lactate. Consistent with this hypothesis, blood lactate levels measured after a treadmill or lactate tolerance test were significantly lower in Phd2-liver-specific knockout (Phd2-LKO) mice than in control mice. An in vivo (13)C-labeled lactate incorporation assay revealed that the livers of Phd2-LKO mice produce significantly more glucose derived from (13)C-labeled lactate than control mice, suggesting that blockade of PHD2 in the liver ameliorates lactic acidosis by activating gluconeogenesis from lactate. Phd2-LKO mice were resistant to lactic acidosis induced by injection of a lethal dose of lactate, displaying a significant elongation of survival. Moreover, oral administration of a PHD inhibitor improved survival in an endotoxin shock mice model. These data suggest that PHD2 is a potentially novel drug target for the treatment of lactic acidosis, which is a serious and often fatal complication observed in some critically ill patients.

  19. Oxidative response of neutrophils to platelet-activating factor is altered during acute ruminal acidosis induced by oligofructose in heifers

    PubMed Central

    Concha, Claudia; Carretta, María Daniella; Alarcón, Pablo; Conejeros, Ivan; Gallardo, Diego; Hidalgo, Alejandra Isabel; Tadich, Nestor; Cáceres, Dante Daniel; Hidalgo, María Angélica

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is one of the main mechanisms used to kill microbes during innate immune response. D-lactic acid, which is augmented during acute ruminal acidosis, reduces platelet activating factor (PAF)-induced ROS production and L-selectin shedding in bovine neutrophils in vitro. This study was conducted to investigate whether acute ruminal acidosis induced by acute oligofructose overload in heifers interferes with ROS production and L-selectin shedding in blood neutrophils. Blood neutrophils and plasma were obtained by jugular venipuncture, while ruminal samples were collected using rumenocentesis. Lactic acid from plasma and ruminal samples was measured by HPLC. PAF-induced ROS production and L-selectin shedding were measured in vitro in bovine neutrophils by a luminol chemiluminescence assay and flow cytometry, respectively. A significant increase in ruminal and plasma lactic acid was recorded in these animals. Specifically, a decrease in PAF-induced ROS production was observed 8 h after oligofructose overload, and this was sustained until 48 h post oligofructose overload. A reduction in PAF-induced L-selectin shedding was observed at 16 h and 32 h post oligofructose overload. Overall, the results indicated that neutrophil PAF responses were altered in heifers with ruminal acidosis, suggesting a potential dysfunction of the innate immune response. PMID:25013355

  20. A stand-alone synbiotic treatment for the prevention of D-lactic acidosis in short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Terashima, Hideo; Kohno, Keisuke; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Synbiotics are combinations of probiotics and prebiotics that have recently been used in the context of various gastrointestinal diseases, including infectious enteritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and bowel obstruction. We encountered a patient with recurrent D-lactic acidosis who was treated successfully for long periods using synbiotics. The patient was diagnosed as having short bowel syndrome and had recurrent episodes of neurologic dysfunction due to D-lactic acidosis. In addition to fasting, the patient had been treated with antibiotics to eliminate D-lactate-producing bacteria. After the failure of antibiotic treatment, a stand-alone synbiotic treatment was started, specifically Bifidobacterium breve Yakult and Lactobacillus casei Shirota as probiotics, and galacto-oligosaccharide as a prebiotic. Serum D-lactate levels declined, and the patient has been recurrence-free for 3 years without dietary restriction. Synbiotics allowed the reduction in colonic absorption of D-lactate by both prevention of D-lactate-producing bacterial overgrowth and stimulation of intestinal motility, leading to remission of D-lactate acidosis.

  1. Oxidative response of neutrophils to platelet-activating factor is altered during acute ruminal acidosis induced by oligofructose in heifers.

    PubMed

    Concha, Claudia; Carretta, María Daniella; Alarcón, Pablo; Conejeros, Ivan; Gallardo, Diego; Hidalgo, Alejandra Isabel; Tadich, Nestor; Cáceres, Dante Daniel; Hidalgo, María Angélica; Burgos, Rafael Agustín

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is one of the main mechanisms used to kill microbes during innate immune response. D-lactic acid, which is augmented during acute ruminal acidosis, reduces platelet activating factor (PAF)-induced ROS production and L-selectin shedding in bovine neutrophils in vitro. This study was conducted to investigate whether acute ruminal acidosis induced by acute oligofructose overload in heifers interferes with ROS production and L-selectin shedding in blood neutrophils. Blood neutrophils and plasma were obtained by jugular venipuncture, while ruminal samples were collected using rumenocentesis. Lactic acid from plasma and ruminal samples was measured by HPLC. PAF-induced ROS production and L-selectin shedding were measured in vitro in bovine neutrophils by a luminol chemiluminescence assay and flow cytometry, respectively. A significant increase in ruminal and plasma lactic acid was recorded in these animals. Specifically, a decrease in PAF-induced ROS production was observed 8 h after oligofructose overload, and this was sustained until 48 h post oligofructose overload. A reduction in PAF-induced L-selectin shedding was observed at 16 h and 32 h post oligofructose overload. Overall, the results indicated that neutrophil PAF responses were altered in heifers with ruminal acidosis, suggesting a potential dysfunction of the innate immune response.

  2. Targeting the Metabolic Microenvironment of Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Kate M.; Wojtkowiak, Jonathan W.; Hashim, Arig Ibrahim; Gillies, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    The observation of aerobic glycolysis by tumor cells in 1924 by Otto Warburg, and subsequent innovation of imaging glucose uptake by tumors in patients with PET-CT has incited a renewed interest in the altered metabolism of tumors. As tumors grow in situ, a fraction of it is further away from their blood supply, leading to decreased oxygen concentrations (hypoxia), which induces the hypoxia response pathways of HIF1α, mTOR and UPR. In normal tissues, these responses mitigate hypoxic stress and induce neo-angiogenesis. In tumors, these pathways are dysregulated and lead to decreased perfusion and exacerbation of hypoxia as a result of immature and chaotic blood vessels. Hypoxia selects for a glycolytic phenotype and resultant acidification of the tumor microenvironment, facilitated by upregulation of proton transporters. Acidification selects for enhanced metastatic potential and reduced drug efficacy through ion trapping. In this review, we provide a comprehensive summary of pre-clinical and clinical drugs under development for targeting aerobic glycolysis, acidosis, hypoxia and hypoxia-response pathways. Hypoxia and acidosis can be manipulated, providing further therapeutic benefit for cancers that feature these common phenotypes. PMID:22959024

  3. Zonation of gluconeogenesis, ketogenesis and intracellular pH in livers from normal and diabetic ketoacidotic rats: evidence for intralobular redistribution of metabolic events in ketoacidosis.

    PubMed Central

    Burns, S P; Cohen, R D; Iles, R A; Bailey, R A; Desai, M; Germain, J P; Going, T C

    1999-01-01

    The intralobular distribution of metabolism was examined in the livers from rats with severe diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), perfused at pH 6.8, and compared with that in livers from normal starved animals perfused at either pH 7.4 or 6.8. With lactate and palmitate as substrates, the perivenous uptake of periportally synthesized glucose seen in normal livers at pH 7.4 was abolished during DKA; indeed, gluconeogenesis was most active in the perivenous region. Whereas in normal livers perfused at pH 7.4 the periportal region showed a markedly elevated intracellular pH (pH(i)) compared with the perivenous zone, this distribution of pH(i) was reversed in DKA, with an intermediate distribution in normal livers perfused at pH 6. 8. 3-Hydroxybutyrate was generated throughout the lobule. Some acetoacetate generated periportally was converted to 3-hydroxybutyrate more perivenously. A steep gradient of oxygen uptake along the radius of the lobule was apparent in all three groups; oxygen uptake was greatly decreased perivenously despite adequate oxygen supply. These findings are consistent with our previous observations of the lobular co-location of high pH(i) and gluconeogenesis, and might offer an explanation of how high gluconeogenic rates can continue in spite of severe systemic acidosis in DKA. The findings provide direct evidence for a marked redistribution of intralobular metabolism in DKA. PMID:10493939

  4. Sustained metabolic scope.

    PubMed

    Peterson, C C; Nagy, K A; Diamond, J

    1990-03-01

    Sustained metabolic rates (SusMR) are time-averaged metabolic rates that are measured in free-ranging animals maintaining constant body mass over periods long enough that metabolism is fueled by food intake rather than by transient depletion of energy reserves. Many authors have suggested that SusMR of various wild animal species are only a few times resting (basal or standard) metabolic rates (RMR). We test this conclusion by analyzing all 37 species (humans, 31 other endothermic vertebrates, and 5 ectothermic vertebrates) for which SusMR and RMR had both been measured. For all species, the ratio of SusMR to RMR, which we term sustained metabolic scope, is less than 7; most values fall between 1.5 and 5. Some of these values, such as those for Tour de France cyclists and breeding birds, are surely close to sustainable metabolic ceilings for the species studied. That is, metabolic rates higher than 7 times RMR apparently cannot be sustained indefinitely. These observations pose several questions: whether the proximate physiological causes of metabolic ceilings reside in the digestive tract's ability to process food or in each tissue's metabolic capacity; whether ceiling values are independent of the mode of energy expenditure; whether ceilings are set by single limiting physiological capacities or by coadjusted clusters of capacities (symmorphosis); what the ultimate evolutionary causes of metabolic ceilings are; and how metabolic ceilings may limit animals' reproductive effort, foraging behavior, and geographic distribution.

  5. Pathophysiological evaluation of subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) by continuous ruminal pH monitoring

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Evaluation of the radio‐transmission pH‐measurement system for monitoring the ruminal pH and subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) in cattle is described. This is done in order to reveal the possible application of this system for detection and pathophysiological research of SARA by continuous ruminal pH measurement. The possibility of using this system for assessment of the ruminal pH in SARA cattle, and the presence of negative correlation between the ruminal pH and ruminal temperature in heathy and SARA cattle were determined. In addition, the 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing analysis showed that the ruminal microbial community was simpler in SARA cattle, and the bacterial numbers in SARA cattle were lower than those in healthy hay‐fed cattle. Concentrate feeding might have reduced the diversity of the ruminal microbial community. Changes in the ruminal microbial community of SARA cattle might be related to the changes in ruminal pH followed by the decrease in the number of some bacteria. Continuous monitoring of the ruminal pH using the radio‐transmission pH‐measurement system would be applied for detection and prevention of SARA in the field and pathophysiological research of SARA, including ruminal zymology and bacteriology, which have been determined previously by sampling of the ruminal fluid and measuring of ruminal pH. PMID:26279060

  6. Lactic acidosis, potassium, and the heart rate deflection point in professional road cyclists

    PubMed Central

    Lucia, A; Hoyos, J; Santalla, A; Perez, M; Carvajal, A; Chicharro, J

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To determine the influence of lactic acidosis, the Bohr effect, and exercise induced hyperkalaemia on the occurrence of the heart rate deflection point (HRDP) in elite (professional) cyclists. Methods: Sixteen professional male road cyclists (mean (SD) age 26 (1) years) performed a ramp test on a cycle ergometer (workload increases of 5 W/12 s, averaging 25 W/min). Heart rate (HR), gas exchange parameters, and blood variables (lactate, pH, P50 of the oxyhaemoglobin dissociation curve, and K+) were measured during the tests. Results: A HRDP was shown in 56% of subjects at about 88% of their maximal HR (HRDP group; n = 9) but was linear in the rest (No-HRDP group; n = 7). In the HRDP group, the slope of the HR-workload regression line above the HRDP correlated inversely with levels of K+ at the maximal power output (r = -0.67; p<0.05). Conclusions: The HRDP phenomenon is associated, at least partly, with exercise induced hyperkalaemia. PMID:11916893

  7. Ruminal temperature may aid in the detection of subacute ruminal acidosis.

    PubMed

    AlZahal, O; Kebreab, E; France, J; Froetschel, M; McBride, B W

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between ruminal pH and ruminal temperature and to develop a predictive equation that can aid in the diagnosis of subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA). Six rumen-fistulated lactating Holstein dairy cows (639 +/- 51 kg body weight) were used in the study. Cows were randomly allocated to 1 of 2 dietary treatments: control (% of dry matter, 40% corn silage, 27% mixed haylage, 7% alfalfa hay, 18% protein supplement, 4% ground corn, and 4% wheat bran) or SARA total mixed ration (% of dry matter, 31% corn silage, 20% mixed haylage, 5% alfalfa hay, 15% protein supplement, 19% ground wheat, and 10% ground barley) and were fed daily at 0700 and 1300 h. The experiment consisted of 1 wk of adaptation followed by 1 wk of treatment. Ruminal pH and ruminal temperature were simultaneously and continuously recorded every minute for 4 d per week using the same indwelling electrode. Subacute-acidotic cows spent more time (min/d) below ruminal pH 5.6 and a greater time above 39.2 degrees C than control cows. Ruminal pH nadir had a negative relationship with its corresponding ruminal temperature (R2 = 0.77). Therefore, ruminal temperature may have potential to predict ruminal pH and thus aid in the diagnosis of SARA.

  8. Treatment options for mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Santa, Kristin M

    2010-11-01

    Mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome is a rare neurodegenerative disease caused by the decreased ability of cells to produce sufficient energy in the form of adenosine 5'-triphosphate. Although it is one of the most common maternally inherited mitochondrial disorders, its exact incidence is unknown. Caused most frequently by an A-to-G point mutation at the 3243 position in the mitochondrial DNA, MELAS syndrome has a broad range of clinical manifestations and a highly variable course. The classic neurologic characteristics include encephalopathy, seizures, and stroke-like episodes. In addition to its neurologic manifestations, MELAS syndrome exhibits multisystem effects including cardiac conduction defects, diabetes mellitus, short stature, myopathy, and gastrointestinal disturbances. Unfortunately, no consensus guidelines outlining standard drug regimens exist for this syndrome. Many of the accepted therapies used in treating MELAS syndrome have been identified through a small number of clinical trials or isolated case reports. Currently, the drugs most often used include antioxidants and various vitamins aimed at minimizing the demands on the mitochondria and supporting and maximizing their function. Some of the most frequently prescribed agents include coenzyme Q(10), l-arginine, B vitamins, and levocarnitine. Although articles describing MELAS syndrome are available, few specifically target education for clinical pharmacists. This article will provide pharmacists with a practical resource to enhance their understanding of MELAS syndrome in order to provide safe and effective pharmaceutical care.

  9. Effect of keto-acidosis on seizure occurrence in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Gao, X; Wee, A S; Nick, T G

    2005-05-01

    It has been observed anecdotally that diabetics are usually non-ketotic at the time of their seizure presentation. In order to establish some validity on this observation, we reviewed the medical records of patients with diagnoses of diabetes and seizure. Study subjects were diabetics presenting with seizures. Control subjects were random sampling of all diabetics. In 51 diabetics presenting with seizures, 38 were nonketotic and 13 were ketotic. In the control group of 119 diabetics, 63 were non-ketotic and 56 were ketotic. There were no significant differences in the serum levels of glucose, sodium, potassium, chloride, and calcium between the seizure and control groups. Multiple regression analysis showed that non-ketotic patients were at risk for developing seizures with an odds ratio of 4.03 (p=0.001). Male sex and type 1 diabetes were also risk factors while age was not a risk factor. Keto-acidosis may play a role in preventing epileptic seizures from occurring in diabetic patients.

  10. Pathophysiological evaluation of subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) by continuous ruminal pH monitoring.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shigeru

    2016-02-01

    Evaluation of the radio-transmission pH-measurement system for monitoring the ruminal pH and subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) in cattle is described. This is done in order to reveal the possible application of this system for detection and pathophysiological research of SARA by continuous ruminal pH measurement. The possibility of using this system for assessment of the ruminal pH in SARA cattle, and the presence of negative correlation between the ruminal pH and ruminal temperature in heathy and SARA cattle were determined. In addition, the 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing analysis showed that the ruminal microbial community was simpler in SARA cattle, and the bacterial numbers in SARA cattle were lower than those in healthy hay-fed cattle. Concentrate feeding might have reduced the diversity of the ruminal microbial community. Changes in the ruminal microbial community of SARA cattle might be related to the changes in ruminal pH followed by the decrease in the number of some bacteria. Continuous monitoring of the ruminal pH using the radio-transmission pH-measurement system would be applied for detection and prevention of SARA in the field and pathophysiological research of SARA, including ruminal zymology and bacteriology, which have been determined previously by sampling of the ruminal fluid and measuring of ruminal pH.

  11. The effects of active dried and killed dried yeast on subacute ruminal acidosis, ruminal fermentation, and nutrient digestibility in beef heifers.

    PubMed

    Vyas, D; Uwizeye, A; Mohammed, R; Yang, W Z; Walker, N D; Beauchemin, K A

    2014-02-01

    , irrespective of its viability, in reducing the severity of SARA. However, further studies are required to evaluate the importance of yeast viability for other dietary conditions, particularly when the risk of acidosis is high.

  12. Troglitazone acts by PPARgamma and PPARgamma-independent pathways on LLC-PK1-F+ acid-base metabolism.

    PubMed

    Welbourne, Tomas; Friday, Ellen; Fowler, Rocky; Turturro, Francesco; Nissim, Itzhak

    2004-01-01

    Troglitazone was studied in pH-sensitive LLC-PK1-F+ cells to determine the effect on pHi and glutamine metabolism as well as the role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARgamma)-dependent and PPARgamma-independent signaling pathways. Troglitazone induces a dose-dependent cellular acidosis that occurs within 4 min and persists over 18 h as a result of inhibiting Na+/H+ exchanger-mediated acid extrusion. Cellular acidosis was associated with glutamine-dependent augmented [15N]ammonium production and decreased [15N]alanine formation from 15N-labeled glutamine. The shift in glutamine metabolism from alanine to ammoniagenesis appears within 3 h and is associated after 18 h with both a reduction in assayable alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity as well as cellular acidosis. The relative contribution of troglitazone-induced cellular acidosis vs. the decrease in assayable ALT activity to alanine production could be demonstrated. The PPARgamma antagonist bisphenol A diglycide ether (BADGE) reversed both the troglitazone-induced cellular acidosis and ammoniagenesis but enhanced the troglitazone reduction of assayable ALT activity; BADGE also blocked troglitazone induction of peroxisome proliferator response element-driven firefly luciferase activity. The protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor chelerythrine mimics troglitazone effects, whereas phorbol ester reverses the effects on ammoniagenesis consistent with troglitazone negatively regulating the DAG/PKC/ERK pathway. Although functional PPARgamma signaling occurs in this cell line, the major troglitazone-induced acid-base responses appear to be mediated by pathway(s) involving PKC/ERK.

  13. Severe Weather

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forde, Evan B.

    2004-01-01

    Educating the public about safety issues related to severe weather is part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) mission. This month's insert, Severe Weather, has been created by NOAA to help educate the public about hazardous weather conditions. The four types of severe weather highlighted in this poster are hurricanes,…

  14. Severe Weather

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forde, Evan B.

    2004-01-01

    Educating the public about safety issues related to severe weather is part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) mission. This article deals with a poster entitled, "Severe Weather," that has been created by NOAA to help educate the public about hazardous weather conditions. The four types of severe weather highlighted in…

  15. Energy substrate metabolism in pyruvate dehydrogenase complex deficiency.

    PubMed

    Stenlid, Maria Halldin; Ahlsson, Fredrik; Forslund, Anders; von Döbeln, Ulrika; Gustafsson, Jan

    2014-11-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) deficiency is an inherited disorder of carbohydrate metabolism, resulting in lactic acidosis and neurological dysfunction. In order to provide energy for the brain, a ketogenic diet has been tried. Both the disorder and the ketogenic therapy may influence energy production. The aim of the study was to assess hepatic glucose production, lipolysis and resting energy expenditure (REE) in an infant, given a ketogenic diet due to neonatal onset of the disease. Lipolysis and glucose production were determined for two consecutive time periods by constant-rate infusions of [1,1,2,3,3-²H₅]-glycerol and [6,6-²H²]-glucose. The boy had been fasting for 2.5 h at the start of the sampling periods. REE was estimated by indirect calorimetry. Rates of glucose production and lipolysis were increased compared with those of term neonates. REE corresponded to 60% of normal values. Respiratory quotient (RQ) was increased, indicating a predominance of glucose oxidation. Blood lactate was within the normal range. Several mechanisms may underlie the increased rates of glucose production and lipolysis. A ketogenic diet will result in a low insulin secretion and reduced peripheral and hepatic insulin sensitivity, leading to increased production of glucose and decreased peripheral glucose uptake. Surprisingly, RQ was high, indicating active glucose oxidation, which may reflect a residual enzyme activity, sufficient during rest. Considering this, a strict ketogenic diet might not be the optimal choice for patients with PDH deficiency. We propose an individualised diet for this group of patients aiming at the highest glucose intake that each patient will tolerate without elevated lactate levels.

  16. Standardized treatment of severe methanol poisoning with ethanol and hemodialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ekins, B.R.; Rollins, D.E.; Duffy, D.P.; Gregory, M.C.

    1985-03-01

    Seven patients with methanol poisoning were treated with ethanol, hemodialysis and supportive measures. The interval between ingestion and initiation of ethanol therapy varied from 3 to 67 hours and from ingestion to dialysis from 9 to 93 hours. All patients survived, but one had permanent visual impairment. A 10% ethanol solution administered intravenously is a safe and effective antidote for severe methanol poisoning. Ethanol therapy is recommended when plasma methanol concentrations are higher than 20 mg per dl, when ingested doses are greater than 30 ml and when there is evidence of acidosis or visual abnormalities in cases of suspected methanol poisoning. 13 references, 1 figure, 2 table.

  17. Metabolic disturbances and renal stone promotion on treatment with topiramate: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Dell'Orto, Valentina G; Belotti, Eva A; Goeggel-Simonetti, Barbara; Simonetti, Giacomo D; Ramelli, Gian Paolo; Bianchetti, Mario G; Lava, Sebastiano A G

    2014-01-01

    Aims The use of topiramate, which is prescribed for the management of epilepsy, for migraine headache prophylaxis and as a weight-loss agent, has been associated with the development of metabolic acidosis, hypokalaemia and renal stone disease. We systematically reviewed all the literature. Methods The systematic review of the literature was realized using the principles underlying the UK Economic and Social Research Council guidance on the conduct of narrative synthesis and the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. Results Fourty-seven reports published between 1996 and 2013 were retained for the final analysis. Five case–control studies and six longitudinal studies addressed the effect of topiramate on acid–base and potassium balance. A significant tendency towards mild-to-moderate hyperchloraemic metabolic acidosis (with bicarbonate ≤21.0 mmol l−1 in approximately every third case) and mild hypokalaemia (with potassium ≤3.5 mmol l−1 in 10% of the cases) was noted on treatment with topiramate, which was similar in children and adults. A single study observed that topiramate causes mild hyperuricaemia in male adults. A tendency towards hypocitraturia, a recognized promoter of renal stone formation, was noted in all patients on topiramate. Conclusions Increasing evidence supports the use of topiramate. Topiramate is generally well tolerated, and serious adverse events are rare. Nonetheless, the present systematic review of the literature indicates that its use is linked with the development of acidosis, hypokalaemia, hyperuricaemia and hypocitraturia. PMID:24219102

  18. Metabolically induced heteroplasmy shifting and L-arginine treatment reduce the energetic defect in a neuronal-like model of MELAS

    PubMed Central

    Desquiret-Dumas, Valerie; Gueguen, Naig; Barth, Magalie; Chevrollier, Arnaud; Hancock, Saege; Wallace, Douglas C; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Henrion, Daniel; Bonneau, Dominique; Reynier, Pascal; Procaccio, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    The m.3243A>G variant in the mitochondrial tRNALeu (UUR) gene is a common mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation. Phenotypic manifestations depend mainly on the heteroplasmy, i.e. the ratio of mutant to normal mtDNA copies. A high percentage of mutant mtDNA is associated with a severe, life-threatening neurological syndrome known as MELAS (mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes). MELAS is described as a neurovascular disorder primarily affecting the brain and blood vessels, but the pathophysiology of the disease is poorly understood. We developed a series of cybrid cell lines at two different mutant loads: 70% and 100% in the nuclear background of a neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y). We investigated the impact of the mutation on the metabolism and mitochondrial respiratory chain activity of the cybrids. The m.3243A>G mitochondrial mutation induced a metabolic switch towards glycolysis in the neuronal cells and produced severe defects in respiratory chain assembly and activity. We used two strategies to compensate for the biochemical defects in the mutant cells: one consisted of lowering the glucose content in the culture medium, and the other involved the addition of L-arginine. The reduction of glucose significantly shifted the 100% mutant cells towards the wild-type, reaching a 90% mutant level and restoring respiratory chain complex assembly. The addition of L-arginine, a nitric oxide (NO) donor, improved complex I activity in the mutant cells in which the defective NO metabolism had led to a relative shortage of NO. Thus, metabolically induced heteroplasmy shifting and L-arginine therapy may constitute promising therapeutic strategies against MELAS. PMID:22306605

  19. Metabolism at Evolutionary Optimal States

    PubMed Central

    Rabbers, Iraes; van Heerden, Johan H.; Nordholt, Niclas; Bachmann, Herwig; Teusink, Bas; Bruggeman, Frank J.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolism is generally required for cellular maintenance and for the generation of offspring under conditions that support growth. The rates, yields (efficiencies), adaptation time and robustness of metabolism are therefore key determinants of cellular fitness. For biotechnological applications and our understanding of the evolution of metabolism, it is necessary to figure out how the functional system properties of metabolism can be optimized, via adjustments of the kinetics and expression of enzymes, and by rewiring metabolism. The trade-offs that can occur during such optimizations then indicate fundamental limits to evolutionary innovations and bioengineering. In this paper, we review several theoretical and experimental findings about mechanisms for metabolic optimization. PMID:26042723

  20. Sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase isoforms: diverse responses to acidosis.

    PubMed Central

    Wolosker, H; Rocha, J B; Engelender, S; Panizzutti, R; De Miranda, J; de Meis, L

    1997-01-01

    The effects of acidic pH on the kinetics of Ca2+-ATPase isoforms from intracellular membranes of skeletal muscle, cardiac muscle, cerebellum and blood platelets were studied. At neutral pH, all four Ca2+-ATPase isoforms exhibited similar Ca2+-concentration requirements for half-maximal rates of Ca2+ uptake and ATP hydrolysis. A decrease in the pH from 7.0 to 6.0 promoted a decrease in both the apparent affinity for Ca2+ [increasing half-maximal activation (K0.5)] and the maximal velocity (Vmax) of Ca2+ uptake. With skeletal muscle vesicles these effect were 5 to 10 times smaller than those observed with all the other isoforms. Acidification of the medium from pH 7.0 to 6.5 caused the release of Ca2+ from loaded vesicles and a decrease in the amount of Ca2+ retained by the vesicles at the steady state. With the vesicles derived from skeletal muscle these effects were smaller than for vesicles derived from other tissues. The rate of passive Ca2+ efflux from skeletal and cardiac muscle vesicles, loaded with Ca2+ and diluted in a medium containing none of the ligands of Ca2+-ATPase, was the same at pH 7.0 and 6.0. In contrast, the rate of Ca2+ efflux from cerebellar and platelet vesicles increased 2-fold after acidification of the medium. The effects of DMSO, Mg2+ with Pi and arsenate on the rate of Ca2+ efflux varied among the different preparations tested. The differences became more pronounced when the pH of the medium was decreased from 7.0 to 6.0. It is proposed that the kinetic differences among the Ca2+-ATPase isoforms may reflect different adaptations to cellular acidosis, such as that which occurs during ischaemia. PMID:9020893

  1. Phosphate Binding with Sevelamer Preserves Mechanical Competence of Bone Despite Acidosis in Advanced Experimental Renal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Jokihaara, Jarkko; Pörsti, Ilkka H.; Sievänen, Harri; Kööbi, Peeter; Kannus, Pekka; Niemelä, Onni; Turner, Russell T.; Iwaniec, Urszula T.; Järvinen, Teppo L. N.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Phosphate binding with sevelamer can ameliorate detrimental histomorphometric changes of bone in chronic renal insufficiency (CRI). Here we explored the effects of sevelamer-HCl treatment on bone strength and structure in experimental CRI. Methods Forty-eight 8-week-old rats were assigned to surgical 5/6 nephrectomy (CRI) or renal decapsulation (Sham). After 14 weeks of disease progression, the rats were allocated to untreated and sevelamer-treated (3% in chow) groups for 9 weeks. Then the animals were sacrificed, plasma samples collected, and femora excised for structural analysis (biomechanical testing, quantitative computed tomography). Results Sevelamer-HCl significantly reduced blood pH, and final creatinine clearance in the CRI groups ranged 30%-50% of that in the Sham group. Final plasma phosphate increased 2.4- to 2.9-fold, and parathyroid hormone 13- to 21-fold in CRI rats, with no difference between sevelamer-treated and untreated animals. In the femoral midshaft, CRI reduced cortical bone mineral density (-3%) and breaking load (-15%) (p<0.05 for all versus Sham), while sevelamer increased bone mineral density (+2%) and prevented the deleterious changes in bone. In the femoral neck, CRI reduced bone mineral density (-11%) and breaking load (-10%), while sevelamer prevented the decrease in bone mineral density (+6%) so that breaking load did not differ from controls. Conclusions In this model of stage 3–4 CRI, sevelamer-HCl treatment ameliorated the decreases in femoral midshaft and neck mineral density, and restored bone strength despite prevailing acidosis. Therefore, treatment with sevelamer can efficiently preserve mechanical competence of bone in CRI. PMID:27658028

  2. Risk factors for mortality in children with diabetic keto acidosis from developing countries.

    PubMed

    Poovazhagi, Varadarajan

    2014-12-15

    Diabetic keto acidosis (DKA) is the major cause for mortality in children with Diabetes mellitus (DM). With increasing incidence of type 1 DM worldwide, there is an absolute increase of DM among children between 0-14 year age group and overall incidence among less than 30 years remain the same. This shift towards younger age group is more of concern especially in developing countries where mortality in DKA is alarmingly high. Prior to the era of insulin, DKA was associated with 100% mortality and subsequently mortality rates have come down and is now, 0.15%-0.31% in developed countries. However the scenario in developing countries like India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh are very different and mortality is still high in children with DKA. Prospective studies on DKA in children are lacking in developing countries. Literature on DKA related mortality are based on retrospective studies and are very recent from countries like India, Pakistan and Bangladesh. There exists an urgent need to understand the differences between developed and developing countries with respect to mortality rates and factors associated with increased mortality in children with DKA. Higher mortality rates, increased incidence of cerebral edema, sepsis, shock and renal failure have been identified among DKA in children from developing countries. Root cause for all these complications and increased mortality in DKA could be delayed diagnosis in children from developing countries. This necessitates creating awareness among parents, public and physicians by health education to identify symptoms of DM/DKA in children, in order to decrease mortality in DKA. Based on past experience in Parma, Italy it is possible to prevent occurrence of DKA both in new onset DM and in children with established DM, by simple interventions to increase awareness among public and physicians.

  3. Autosomal dominant osteopetrosis associated with renal tubular acidosis is due to a CLCN7 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Piret, Sian E.; Gorvin, Caroline M.; Trinh, Anne; Taylor, John; Lise, Stefano; Taylor, Jenny C.; Ebeling, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the causative mutation in a family with an unusual presentation of autosomal dominant osteopetrosis (OPT), proximal renal tubular acidosis (RTA), renal stones, epilepsy, and blindness, a combination of features not previously reported. We undertook exome sequencing of one affected and one unaffected family member, followed by targeted analysis of known candidate genes to identify the causative mutation. This identified a missense mutation (c.643G>A; p.Gly215Arg) in the gene encoding the chloride/proton antiporter 7 (gene CLCN7, protein CLC‐7), which was confirmed by amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS)‐PCR, and to be present in the three available patients. CLC‐7 mutations are known to cause autosomal dominant OPT type 2, also called Albers–Schonberg disease, which is characterized by osteosclerosis, predominantly of the spine, pelvis and skull base, resulting in bone fragility and fractures. Albers–Schonberg disease is not reported to be associated with RTA, but autosomal recessive OPT type 3 (OPTB3) with RTA is associated with carbonic anhydrase type 2 (CA2) mutations. No mutations were detected in CA2 or any other genes known to cause proximal RTA. Neither CLCN7 nor CA2 mutations have previously been reported to be associated with renal stones or epilepsy. Thus, we identified a CLCN7 mutation in a family with autosomal dominant osteopetrosis, RTA, renal stones, epilepsy, and blindness. © 2016 The Authors. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27540713

  4. Non-Specific Inhibition of Ischemia- and Acidosis-Induced Intracellular Calcium Elevations and Membrane Currents by α-Phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone, Butylated Hydroxytoluene and Trolox

    PubMed Central

    Katnik, Christopher; Cuevas, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Ischemia, and subsequent acidosis, induces neuronal death following brain injury. Oxidative stress is believed to be a key component of this neuronal degeneration. Acute chemical ischemia (azide in the absence of external glucose) and acidosis (external media buffered to pH 6.0) produce increases in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) and inward membrane currents in cultured rat cortical neurons. Two α-tocopherol analogues, trolox and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), and the spin trapping molecule α-Phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone (PBN) were used to determine the role of free radicals in these responses. PBN and BHT inhibited the initial transient increases in [Ca2+]i, produced by ischemia, acidosis and acidic ischemia and increased steady state levels in response to acidosis and the acidic ischemia. BHT and PBN also potentiated the rate at which [Ca2+]i increased after the initial transients during acidic ischemia. Trolox inhibited peak and sustained increases in [Ca2+]i during ischemia. BHT inhibited ischemia induced initial inward currents and trolox inhibited initial inward currents activated by acidosis and acidic ischemia. Given the inconsistent results obtained using these antioxidants, it is unlikely their effects were due to elimination of free radicals. Instead, it appears these compounds have non-specific effects on the ion channels and exchangers responsible for these responses. PMID:24583849

  5. Disorders of Carbohydrate Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Metabolic Disorders Disorders of Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders of Lipid Metabolism Carbohydrates are sugars. ... Metabolic Disorders Disorders of Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders of Lipid Metabolism NOTE: This is ...

  6. Synthetic metabolism: metabolic engineering meets enzyme design.

    PubMed

    Erb, Tobias J; Jones, Patrik R; Bar-Even, Arren

    2017-01-30

    Metabolic engineering aims at modifying the endogenous metabolic network of an organism to harness it for a useful biotechnological task, for example, production of a value-added compound. Several levels of metabolic engineering can be defined and are the topic of this review. Basic 'copy, paste and fine-tuning' approaches are limited to the structure of naturally existing pathways. 'Mix and match' approaches freely recombine the repertoire of existing enzymes to create synthetic metabolic networks that are able to outcompete naturally evolved pathways or redirect flux toward non-natural products. The space of possible metabolic solution can be further increased through approaches including 'new enzyme reactions', which are engineered on the basis of known enzyme mechanisms. Finally, by considering completely 'novel enzyme chemistries' with de novo enzyme design, the limits of nature can be breached to derive the most advanced form of synthetic pathways. We discuss the challenges and promises associated with these different metabolic engineering approaches and illuminate how enzyme engineering is expected to take a prime role in synthetic metabolic engineering for biotechnology, chemical industry and agriculture of the future.

  7. Metabolic concerns associated with antiepileptic medications.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Raj D

    2004-11-23

    Because treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is often for years or lifelong, physicians should be aware of the metabolic changes that can be associated with AED use and the potential effects of these changes during long-term therapy. Alterations of bone metabolism leading to decreased bone mineral density, associated particularly but not exclusively with the hepatic enzyme-inducing AEDs, can worsen the risk for fractures, which is already increased in patients with epilepsy by factors such as seizure-related falls and trauma. Some AEDs are associated with weight gain, an effect that is not only distressing to many patients but may be sufficient to increase the risk for cardiovascular disease and other disorders associated with excessive body weight. The carbonic anhydrase-inhibiting properties of some AEDs can lead to metabolic acidosis. The AEDs that inhibit carbonic anhydrase are also associated with an increase in risk for renal stones, as is the ketogenic diet. Awareness of the potential metabolic disturbances associated with AED use is particularly important because many of them are subtle and may take years to become clinically apparent.

  8. Lactic acidosis in vivo: testing the link between lactate generation and H+ accumulation in ischemic mouse muscle.

    PubMed

    Marcinek, David J; Kushmerick, Martin J; Conley, Kevin E

    2010-06-01

    The link between lactate generation and cellular acidosis has been questioned based on the possibility of H+ generation, independent of lactate production during glycolysis under physiological conditions. Here we test whether glycolytic H+ generation matches lactate production over a physiological pH and lactate range using ischemia applied to the hindlimb of a mouse. We measured the H+ generation and ATP level in vivo using 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy and chemically determined intracellular lactate level in the hindlimb muscles. No significant change was found in ATP content by chemical analysis (P>0.1), in agreement with the stoichiometric decline in phosphocreatine (20.2+/-1.2 mM) vs. rise in Pi (18.7+/-2.0 mM), as measured by 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A substantial drop in pH from 7.0 to 6.7 and lactate accumulation to 25 mM were found during 25 min of ischemia. The rise in H+ generation closely agreed with the accumulation of lactate, as shown by a close correlation with a slope near identity (0.98; r2=0.86). This agreement between glycolytic H+ production and elevation of lactate is confirmed by an analysis of the underlying reactions involved in glycolysis in vivo and supports the concept of lactic acidosis under conditions that substantially elevate lactate and drop pH. However, this link is expected to fail with conditions that deplete phosphocreatine, leading to net ATP hydrolysis and nonglycolytic H+ generation. Thus both direct measurements and an analysis of the stoichiometry of glycolysis in vivo support lactate acidosis as a robust concept for physiological conditions of the muscle cell.

  9. Inhibition of the oxygen sensor PHD2 in the liver improves survival in lactic acidosis by activating the Cori cycle

    PubMed Central

    Suhara, Tomohiro; Hishiki, Takako; Kasahara, Masataka; Hayakawa, Noriyo; Oyaizu, Tomoko; Nakanishi, Tsuyoshi; Kubo, Akiko; Morisaki, Hiroshi; Kaelin, William G.; Suematsu, Makoto; Minamishima, Yoji Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Loss of prolyl hydroxylase 2 (PHD2) activates the hypoxia-inducible factor-dependent hypoxic response, including anaerobic glycolysis, which causes large amounts of lactate to be released from cells into the circulation. We found that Phd2-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) produced more lactate than wild-type MEFs, as expected, whereas systemic inactivation of PHD2 in mice did not cause hyperlacticacidemia. This unexpected observation led us to hypothesize that the hypoxic response activated in the liver enhances the Cori cycle, a lactate–glucose carbon recycling system between muscle and liver, and thereby decreases circulating lactate. Consistent with this hypothesis, blood lactate levels measured after a treadmill or lactate tolerance test were significantly lower in Phd2-liver-specific knockout (Phd2-LKO) mice than in control mice. An in vivo 13C-labeled lactate incorporation assay revealed that the livers of Phd2-LKO mice produce significantly more glucose derived from 13C-labeled lactate than control mice, suggesting that blockade of PHD2 in the liver ameliorates lactic acidosis by activating gluconeogenesis from lactate. Phd2-LKO mice were resistant to lactic acidosis induced by injection of a lethal dose of lactate, displaying a significant elongation of survival. Moreover, oral administration of a PHD inhibitor improved survival in an endotoxin shock mice model. These data suggest that PHD2 is a potentially novel drug target for the treatment of lactic acidosis, which is a serious and often fatal complication observed in some critically ill patients. PMID:26324945

  10. Imaging acute ischemic tissue acidosis with pH-sensitive endogenous amide proton transfer (APT) MRI - Correction of tissue relaxation and concomitant RF irradiation effects toward mapping quantitative cerebral tissue pH

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Phillip Zhe; Wang, Enfeng; Cheung, Jerry S

    2011-01-01

    Amide proton transfer (APT) MRI is sensitive to ischemic tissue acidosis and has been increasingly used as a research tool to investigate disrupted tissue metabolism during acute stroke. However, magnetization transfer asymmetry (MTRasym) analysis is often used for calculating APT contrast, which only provides pH-weighted images. In addition to pH- dependent APT contrast, in vivo MTRasym is subject to a baseline shift (ΔMTR′asym) attributable to the slightly asymmetric magnetization transfer (MT) effect. Additionally, APT contrast approximately scales with T1 relaxation time. Tissue relaxation time may also affect the experimentally obtainable APT contrast via saturation efficiency and RF spillover effects. In this study, we acquired perfusion, diffusion, relaxation and pH-weighted APT MRI data, and spectroscopy (MRS) in an animal model of acute ischemic stroke. We modeled in vivo MTRasym as a superposition of pH-dependent APT contrast and a baseline shift ΔMTR′asym (i.e., MTRasym=APTR(pH) + ΔMTR′asym), and quantified tissue pH. We found pH of the contralateral normal tissue to be 7.03 ± 0.05 and the ipsilateral ischemic tissue pH was 6.44 ± 0.24, which correlated with tissue perfusion and diffusion rates. In summary, our study established an endogenous and quantitative pH imaging technique for improved characterization of ischemic tissue acidification and metabolism disruption. PMID:22178815

  11. Role of CaMKII in post acidosis arrhythmias: a simulation study using a human myocyte model.

    PubMed

    Lascano, Elena C; Said, Matilde; Vittone, Leticia; Mattiazzi, Alicia; Mundiña-Weilenmann, Cecilia; Negroni, Jorge A

    2013-07-01

    Postacidotic arrhythmias have been associated to increased sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) load and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) activation. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these arrhythmias are still unclear. To better understand this process, acidosis produced by CO2 increase from 5% to 30%, resulting in intracellular pH (pHi) change from 7.15 to 6.7, was incorporated into a myocyte model of excitation-contraction coupling and contractility, including acidotic inhibition of L-type Ca(2+) channel (I(CaL)), Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger, Ca(2+) release through the SR ryanodine receptor (RyR2) (I(rel)), Ca(2+) reuptake by the SR Ca(2+) ATPase2a (I(up)), Na(+)-K(+) pump, K(+) efflux through the inward rectifier K(+) channel and the transient outward K(+) flow (I(to)) together with increased activity of the Na(+)-H(+) exchanger (I(NHE)). Simulated CaMKII regulation affecting I(rel), I(up), I(CaL), I(NHE) and I(to) was introduced in the model to partially compensate the acidosis outcome. Late Na(+) current increase by CaMKII was also incorporated. Using this scheme and assuming that diastolic Ca(2+) leak through the RyR2 was modulated by the resting state of this channel and the difference between SR and dyadic cleft [Ca(2+)], postacidotic delayed after depolarizations (DADs) were triggered upon returning to normal pHi after 6 min acidosis. The model showed that DADs depend on SR Ca(2+) load and on increased Ca(2+) leak through RyR2. This postacidotic arrhythmogenic pattern relies mainly on CaMKII effect on I(CaL) and I(up), since its individual elimination produced the highest DAD reduction. The model further revealed that during the return to normal pHi, DADs are fully determined by SR Ca(2+) load at the end of acidosis. Thereafter, DADs are maintained by SR Ca(2+) reloading by Ca(2+) influx through the reverse NCX mode during the time period in which [Na(+)]i is elevated.

  12. Intoxication with over-the-counter antitussive medication containing dihydrocodeine and chlorpheniramine causes generalized convulsion and mixed acidosis.

    PubMed

    Murao, Satoshi; Manabe, Hiroaki; Yamashita, Tetsuji; Sekikawa, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    We report a 35-year-old man who was referred to our hospital with generalized convulsion and mixed acidosis presumably caused by abuse of SS-BRON tablets, an over-the-counter (OTC) antitussive medication sold in Japan. These tablets contain dihydrocodeine phosphate, methylephedrine, chlorpheniramine, and caffeine. Although it is difficult to discern which component caused these symptoms, it seems that dihydrocodeine phosphate or methylephedrine was involved in the addiction to SS-BRON and chlorpheniramine may have caused the generalized convulsion. It should be recognized that an OTC antitussive, which is quite easy to obtain, can be abused and subsequently induce serious intoxication.

  13. Sever's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... good flexibility while your child is growing. The stretching exercises pictured in the treatment section can lower ... your child has already recovered from Sever's disease, stretching and putting ice on the heel after activity ...

  14. Cytochrome P450-mediated warfarin metabolic ability is not a critical determinant of warfarin sensitivity in avian species: In vitro assays in several birds and in vivo assays in chicken.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kensuke P; Kawata, Minami; Ikenaka, Yoshinori; Nakayama, Shouta M M; Ishii, Chihiro; Darwish, Wageh Sobhi; Saengtienchai, Aksorn; Mizukawa, Hazuki; Ishizuka, Mayumi

    2015-10-01

    Coumarin-derivative anticoagulant rodenticides used for rodent control are posing a serious risk to wild bird populations. For warfarin, a classic coumarin derivative, chickens have a high median lethal dose (LD50), whereas mammalian species generally have much lower LD50. Large interspecies differences in sensitivity to warfarin are to be expected. The authors previously reported substantial differences in warfarin metabolism among avian species; however, the actual in vivo pharmacokinetics have yet to be elucidated, even in the chicken. In the present study, the authors sought to provide an in-depth characterization of warfarin metabolism in birds using in vivo and in vitro approaches. A kinetic analysis of warfarin metabolism was performed using liver microsomes of 4 avian species, and the metabolic abilities of the chicken and crow were much higher in comparison with those of the mallard and ostrich. Analysis of in vivo metabolites from chickens showed that excretions predominantly consisted of 4'-hydroxywarfarin, which was consistent with the in vitro results. Pharmacokinetic analysis suggested that chickens have an unexpectedly long half-life despite showing high metabolic ability in vitro. The results suggest that the half-life of warfarin in other bird species could be longer than that in the chicken and that warfarin metabolism may not be a critical determinant of species differences with respect to warfarin sensitivity.

  15. Quiescence in Artemia franciscana embryos: reversible arrest of metabolism and gene expression at low oxygen levels.

    PubMed

    Hand, S C

    1998-04-01

    Depression of the production and consumption of cellular energy appears to be a prerequisite for the survival of prolonged bouts of anoxia. A correlation exists between the degree of metabolic depression under anoxia and the duration of anoxia tolerance. In the case of brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) embryos, oxygen deprivation induces a reversible quiescent state that can be tolerated for several years with substantial survivorship. A global arrest of cytoplasmic translation accompanies the transition into anoxia, and rates of protein synthesis in mitochondria from these embryos appears to be markedly reduced in response to anoxia. Previous evidence suggests that the acute acidification of intracellular pH (pHi) by over 1.0 unit during the transition into anoxia contributes to the depression of biosynthesis, but message limitation does not appear to play a role in the down-regulation in either cellular compartment. The ontogenetic increase in mRNA levels for a mitochondrial-encoded subunit of cytochrome c oxidase (COX I) and for nuclear-encoded actin is blocked by anoxia and aerobic acidosis (artificial quiescence imposed by intracellular acidification under aerobic conditions). Further, the levels of COX I and actin mRNA do not decline appreciably during 6 h bouts of quiescence, even though protein synthesis is acutely arrested across this same period. Thus, the constancy of mRNA levels during quiescence indicates that reduced protein synthesis is not caused by message limitation but, instead, is probably controlled at the translational level. This apparent stabilization of mRNA under anoxia is mirrored in an extension of protein half-life. The ubiquitin-dependent pathway for protein degradation is depressed under anoxia and aerobic acidosis, as judged by the acute drop in levels of ubiquitin-conjugated proteins. Mitochondrial protein synthesis is responsive to both acidification of pHi and removal of oxygen per se. Matrix pH declines in parallel with pHi, and

  16. Induction of Subacute Ruminal Acidosis Affects the Ruminal Microbiome and Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    McCann, Joshua C.; Luan, Shaoyu; Cardoso, Felipe C.; Derakhshani, Hooman; Khafipour, Ehsan; Loor, Juan J.

    2016-01-01

    Subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) negatively impacts the dairy industry by decreasing dry matter intake, milk production, profitability, and increasing culling rate and death loss. Six ruminally cannulated, lactating Holstein cows were used in a replicated incomplete Latin square design to determine the effects of SARA induction on the ruminal microbiome and epithelium. Experimental periods were 10 days with days 1–3 for ad libitum intake of control diet, followed by 50% feed restriction on day 4, and ad libitum access on day 5 to the basal diet or the basal diet with an additional 10% of a 50:50 wheat/barley pellet. Based on subsequent ruminal pH, cows were grouped (SARA grouping; SG) as Non-SARA or SARA based on time <5.6 pH (0 and 3.4 h, respectively). Ruminal samples were collected on days 1 and 6 of each period prior to feeding and separated into liquid and solid fractions. Microbial DNA was extracted for bacterial analysis using 16S rRNA gene paired-end sequencing on the MiSeq Illumina platform and quantitative PCR (qPCR). Ruminal epithelium biopsies were taken on days 1 and 6 before feeding. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to determine gene expression in rumen epithelium. Bray–Curtis similarity indicated samples within the liquid fraction separated by day and coincided with an increased relative abundance of genera Prevotella, Ruminococcus, Streptococcus, and Lactobacillus on day 6 (P < 0.06). Although Firmicutes was the predominant phyla in the solid fraction, a SG × day interaction (P < 0.01) indicated a decrease on day 6 for SARA cows. In contrast, phylum Bacteroidetes increased on day 6 (P < 0.01) for SARA cows driven by greater genera Prevotella and YRC22 (P < 0.01). Streptococcus bovis and Succinivibrio dextrinosolvens populations tended to increase on day 6 but were not affected by SG. In ruminal epithelium, CLDN1 and CLDN4 expression increased on day 6 (P < 0.03) 24 h after SARA induction and a tendency for a SG × day interaction (P < 0.10) was

  17. Altered glutamatergic metabolism associated with punctate white matter lesions in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Wisnowski, Jessica L; Blüml, Stefan; Paquette, Lisa; Zelinski, Elizabeth; Nelson, Marvin D; Painter, Michael J; Damasio, Hanna; Gilles, Floyd; Panigrahy, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    Preterm infants (∼10% of all births) are at high-risk for long-term neurodevelopmental disabilities, most often resulting from white matter injury sustained during the neonatal period. Glutamate excitotoxicity is hypothesized to be a key mechanism in the pathogenesis of white matter injury; however, there has been no in vivo demonstration of glutamate excitotoxicity in preterm infants. Using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), we tested the hypothesis that glutamate and glutamine, i.e., markers of glutamatergic metabolism, are altered in association with punctate white matter lesions and "diffuse excessive high signal intensity" (DEHSI), the