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  1. The King's Outcome Scale for Childhood Head Injury and Injury Severity and Outcome Measures in Children with Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvert, Sophie; Miller, Helen E.; Curran, Andrew; Hameed, Biju; McCarter, Renee; Edwards, Richard J.; Hunt, Linda; Sharples, Peta Mary

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to relate discharge King's Outcome Scale for Childhood Head Injury (KOSCHI) category to injury severity and detailed outcome measures obtained in the first year post-traumatic brain injury (TBI). We used a prospective cohort study. Eighty-one children with TBI were studied: 29 had severe, 15 moderate, and 37 mild TBI. The…

  2. Traumatic Brain Injury: Imaging Spectrum from Mild to Severe Closed Head Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-11-01

    recent advances in TBI treatment. Decompressive Craniotomy has been a mainstay of severe penetrating head injury in current conflicts. It allows...immediate room for swelling while improving intracerebral bloodflow. An interesting surgical craniotomy technique was developed at the onset of the...for recovery and replacement later. This keeps the patient’s own bone viable. Stereolithography is now used to digitally reconstruct the patient’s

  3. Head Impact Severity Measures for Evaluating Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Risk Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Greenwald, Richard M.; Gwin, Joseph T.; Chu, Jeffrey J.; Crisco, Joseph J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To quantify sensitivity of various biomechanical measures of head impact (linear acceleration, rotational acceleration, impact duration, impact location) to clinical diagnosis of concussion in American football players and to develop a novel measure of head impact severity which combines these measures into a single score that better predicts the incidence of concussion. Methods On-field head impact data were collected from 449 football players at 13 organizations (n = 289,916) using in-helmet systems of six single axis accelerometers. 1,2,3,4,5 Concussions were diagnosed by medical staff and later associated with impact data. Principal Component Analysis 6, 7 and a weighting coefficient based on impact location were used to transform correlated head impact measures into a new composite variable (wPCS). The predictive power of linear acceleration, rotational acceleration, Head Injury Criteria, and wPCS was quantified using Receiver Operating Characteristic8,9,10 curves. The null hypothesis that a measure was no more predictive than guessing was tested (α=0.05). Additionally, ROC curves for wPCS and classical measures were directly compared to test the hypothesis that wPCS was more predictive of concussion than classic measures (α=0.05). Results When all impacts were considered, every biomechanical measure evaluated was statistically more predictive of concussion than guessing (p < 0.005). However, for the top 1% and 2% of impacts based on linear acceleration, a subset that consisted of 82% of all diagnosed concussions, only wPCS was significantly more predictive of concussion than guessing (p<0.03), and, when compared to each other, wPCS was more predictive of concussion than classical measures for the top 1% and 2% of all data (p < 0.04). Conclusions A weighted combination of several biomechanical inputs, including impact location, is more predictive of concussion than a single biomechanical measure. This study is the first to quantify improvements in

  4. Memory and head injury severity.

    PubMed

    Dikmen, S; Temkin, N; McLean, A; Wyler, A; Machamer, J

    1987-12-01

    One hundred and two consecutive head injured patients were studied at 1 and 12 months after injury. Their performances were compared with a group of uninjured friends. The results indicate that impairment in memory depends on the type of task used, time from injury to testing, and on the severity of head injury (that is, degree of impaired consciousness). Head injury severity indices are more closely related to behavioural outcome early as compared with later after injury. At 1 year, only those with deep or prolonged impaired consciousness (as represented by greater than 1 day of coma, Glasgow Coma Scale of 8 or less, and post traumatic amnesia of 2 weeks or greater) are performing significantly worse than comparison subjects.

  5. An Analysis of Beta-Blocker Administration Pre-and Post-Traumatic Brain Injury with Subanalyses for Head Injury Severity and Myocardial Injury.

    PubMed

    Edavettal, Mathew; Gross, Brian W; Rittenhouse, Katelyn; Alzate, James; Rogers, Amelia; Estrella, Lisa; Miller, Jo Ann; Rogers, Frederick B

    2016-12-01

    A growing body of literature indicates that beta-blocker administration after traumatic brain injury (TBI) is cerebroprotective, limiting secondary injury; however, the effects of preinjury beta blocker status remain poorly understood. We sought to characterize the effects of pre- and postinjury beta-blocker administration on mortality with subanalyses accounting for head injury severity and myocardial injury. In a Level II trauma center, all admissions of patients ≥18 years with a head Abbreviated Injury Scale Score ≥2, Glasgow Coma Scale ≤13 from May 2011 to May 2013 were queried. Demographic, injury-specific, and outcome variables were analyzed using univariate analyses. Subsequent multivariate analyses were conducted to determine adjusted odds of mortality for beta-blocker usage controlling for age, Injury Severity Score, head Abbreviated Injury Scale, arrival Glasgow Coma Scale, ventilator use, and intensive care unit stay. A total of 214 trauma admissions met inclusion criteria: 112 patients had neither pre- nor postinjury beta-blocker usage, 46 patients had preinjury beta-blocker usage, and 94 patients had postinjury beta-blocker usage. Both unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios of preinjury beta-blocker were insignificant with respect to mortality. However, postinjury in-hospital administration of beta blockers was found to significantly in the decrease of mortality in both univariate (P = 0.002) and multivariate analyses (P = 0.001). Our data indicate that beta-blocker administration post-TBI in hospital reduces odds of mortality; however, preinjury beta-blocker usage does not. Additionally, myocardial injury is a useful indicator for beta-blocker administration post-TBI. Further research into which beta blockers confer the best benefits as well as the optimal period of beta-blocker administration post-TBI is recommended.

  6. Effects of Neurosurgical Treatment and Severity of Head Injury on Cognitive Functioning, General Health and Incidence of Mental Disorders in Patients With Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rezaei, Sajjad; Asgari, Karim; Yousefzadeh, Shahrokh; Moosavi, Heshmat-Allah; Kazemnejad, Ehsan

    2012-01-01

    Background Neurosurgical treatment and the severity of head injury (HI) can have remarkable effect on patients’ neuropsychiatric outcomes. Objectives This research aimed to study the effect of these factors on cognitive functioning, general health and incidence of mental disorders in patients with a traumatic brain injury (TBI). Patients and Methods In this descriptive, longitudinal study, 206 TBI patients entered the study by consecutive sampling; they were then compared according to neurosurgery status and severity of their HI. Both groups underwent neurosurgical and psychological examinations. The mini mental state examination (MMSE) and general health questionnaire–28 items (GHQ-28) were administered to the study participants. At follow-up, four months later, the groups underwent a structured clinical interview by a psychiatrist based on the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, fourth edition (DSM-IV) diagnostic criteria regarding the presence of mental disorders. Results Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) and multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) were performed and adjusted for the effect of confounding variables (age, gender, Glasgow outcome scale (GOS) , and level of education). The severity of HI had the most significant effect for the following variables; cognitive functioning and physical symptoms (P < 0.05). The effect of the neurosurgical treatment factor was not significant; however, the interaction effect of the two variables on social dysfunction, and total score of the GHQ-28 questionnaire appeared to be significant (P < 0.05). Fisher's exact test indicated that after a four month follow-up period, no significant differences were seen between the two groups (with or without neurosurgery) in the incidence of mental disorders, while χ2 Test showed that having a more severe HI is significantly correlated with the incidence of mental disorders (P < 0.01). Conclusions The implications of this study should be discussed with an

  7. Repetitive Head Impacts and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    McKee, Ann C; Alosco, Michael L; Huber, Bertrand R

    2016-10-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a distinctive neurodegenerative disease that occurs as a result of repetitive head impacts. CTE can only be diagnosed by postmortem neuropathologic examination of brain tissue. CTE is a unique disorder with a pathognomonic lesion that can be reliably distinguished from other neurodegenerative diseases. CTE is associated with violent behaviors, explosivity, loss of control, depression, suicide, memory loss and cognitive changes. There is increasing evidence that CTE affects amateur athletes as well as professional athletes and military veterans. CTE has become a major public health concern.

  8. [A man with severe traumatic brain injury].

    PubMed

    Oudeman, Eline A; Martins Jarnalo, Carine O; van Ouwerkerk, Willem J R

    2013-01-01

    We present a 41-year-old man with severe traumatic brain injury. Cranial imaging studies revealed cerebral contusion and a longitudinal fracture of the temporal bone. Several days later brain herniated into the left external auditory canal. Imaging studies showed the known skull fracture with a direct connection between the external acoustic meatus and the intracranial structures.

  9. Neurologic impairment following closed head injury predicts post-traumatic neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Villasana, L.E.; Westbrook, G.L.; Schnell, E.

    2014-01-01

    In the mammalian hippocampus, neurogenesis persists into adulthood, and increased generation of newborn neurons could be of clinical benefit following concussive head injuries. Post-traumatic neurogenesis has been well documented using “open” traumatic brain injury (TBI) models in rodents; however, human TBI most commonly involves closed head injury. Here we used a closed head injury (CHI) model to examine post-traumatic hippocampal neurogenesis in mice. All mice were subjected to the same CHI protocol, and a gross-motor based injury severity score was used to characterize neurologic impairment one hour after the injury. When analyzed 2 weeks later, post-traumatic neurogenesis was significantly increased only in mice with a high degree of transient neurologic impairment immediately after injury. This increase was associated with an early increase in c-fos activity, and subsequent reactive astrocytosis and microglial activation in the dentate gyrus. Our results demonstrate that the initial degree of neurologic impairment after closed head injury predicts the induction of secondary physiologic and pathophysiologic processes, and that animals with severe neurologic impairment early after injury manifest an increase in post-traumatic neurogenesis in the absence of gross anatomic pathology. PMID:24861442

  10. Urban–rural differences in pediatric traumatic head injuries: A prospective nationwide study

    PubMed Central

    Halldorsson, Jonas G; Flekkoy, Kjell M; Gudmundsson, Kristinn R; Arnkelsson, Gudmundur B; Arnarson, Eirikur Orn

    2007-01-01

    Aims To estimate differences in the incidence of recorded traumatic head injuries by gender, age, severity, and geographical area. Methods The study was prospective and nationwide. Data were collected from all hospitals, emergency units and healthcare centers in Iceland regarding all Icelandic children and adolescents 0–19 years old consecutively diagnosed with traumatic head injuries (N = 550) during a one-year period. Results Annual incidence of minimal, mild, moderate/severe, and fatal head injuries (ICD-9 850–854) was 6.41 per 1000, with 95% confidence interval (CI) 5.9, 7.0. Annual incidence of minimal head injuries (ICD-9 850) treated at emergency units was 4.65 (CI 4.2, 5.1) per 1000, mild head injuries admitted to hospital (ICD-9 850) was 1.50 (CI 1.3, 1.8) per 1000, and moderate/severe nonfatal injuries (ICD-9 851–854) was 0.21 (CI 0.1, 0.3) per 1000. Death rate was 0.05 (CI 0.0, 0.1) per 1000. Young children were at greater risk of sustaining minimal head injuries than older ones. Boys were at greater risk than girls were. In rural areas, incidence of recorded minimal head injuries was low. Conclusions Use of nationwide estimate of the incidence of pediatric head injury shows important differences between urban and rural areas as well as between different age groups. PMID:19300630

  11. Regressive language in severe head injury.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, I V; Skinhoj, E

    1976-09-01

    In a follow-up study of 50 patients with severe head injuries three patients had echolalia. One patient with initially global aphasia had echolalia for some weeks when he started talking. Another patient with severe diffuse brain damage, dementia, and emotional regression had echolalia. The dysfunction was considered a detour performance. In the third patient echolalia and palilalia were details in a total pattern of regression lasting for months. The patient, who had extensive frontal atrophy secondary to a very severe head trauma, presented an extreme state of regression returning to a foetal-body pattern and behaving like a baby.

  12. The Effect of Hemoglobin Levels on Mortality in Pediatric Patients with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Yee, Kevin F; Walker, Andrew M; Gilfoyle, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    Objective. There is increasing evidence of adverse outcomes associated with blood transfusions for adult traumatic brain injury patients. However, current evidence suggests that pediatric traumatic brain injury patients may respond to blood transfusions differently on a vascular level. This study examined the influence of blood transfusions and anemia on the outcome of pediatric traumatic brain injury patients. Design. A retrospective cohort analysis of severe pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients was undertaken to investigate the association between blood transfusions and anemia on patient outcomes. Measurements and Main Results. One hundred and twenty patients with severe traumatic brain injury were identified and included in the analysis. The median Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) was 6 and the mean hemoglobin (Hgb) on admission was 115.8 g/L. Forty-three percent of patients (43%) received at least one blood transfusion and the mean hemoglobin before transfusion was 80.1 g/L. Multivariable regression analysis revealed that anemia and the administration of packed red blood cells were not associated with adverse outcomes. Factors that were significantly associated with mortality were presence of abusive head trauma, increasing PRISM score, and low GCS after admission. Conclusion. In this single centre retrospective cohort study, there was no association found between anemia, blood transfusions, and hospital mortality in a pediatric traumatic brain injury patient population.

  13. Variation in seizure prophylaxis in severe pediatric traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Ostahowski, Paige J; Kannan, Nithya; Wainwright, Mark S; Qiu, Qian; Mink, Richard B; Groner, Jonathan I; Bell, Michael J; Giza, Christopher C; Zatzick, Douglas F; Ellenbogen, Richard G; Boyle, Linda Ng; Mitchell, Pamela H; Vavilala, Monica S

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE Posttraumatic seizure is a major complication following traumatic brain injury (TBI). The aim of this study was to determine the variation in seizure prophylaxis in select pediatric trauma centers. The authors hypothesized that there would be wide variation in seizure prophylaxis selection and use, within and between pediatric trauma centers. METHODS In this retrospective multicenter cohort study including 5 regional pediatric trauma centers affiliated with academic medical centers, the authors examined data from 236 children (age < 18 years) with severe TBI (admission Glasgow Coma Scale score ≤ 8, ICD-9 diagnosis codes of 800.0-801.9, 803.0-804.9, 850.0-854.1, 959.01, 950.1-950.3, 995.55, maximum head Abbreviated Injury Scale score ≥ 3) who received tracheal intubation for ≥ 48 hours in the ICU between 2007 and 2011. RESULTS Of 236 patients, 187 (79%) received seizure prophylaxis. In 2 of the 5 centers, 100% of the patients received seizure prophylaxis medication. Use of seizure prophylaxis was associated with younger patient age (p < 0.001), inflicted TBI (p < 0.001), subdural hematoma (p = 0.02), cerebral infarction (p < 0.001), and use of electroencephalography (p = 0.023), but not higher Injury Severity Score. In 63% cases in which seizure prophylaxis was used, the patients were given the first medication within 24 hours of injury, and 50% of the patients received the first dose in the prehospital or emergency department setting. Initial seizure prophylaxis was most commonly with fosphenytoin (47%), followed by phenytoin (40%). CONCLUSIONS While fosphenytoin was the most commonly used medication for seizure prophylaxis, there was large variation within and between trauma centers with respect to timing and choice of seizure prophylaxis in severe pediatric TBI. The heterogeneity in seizure prophylaxis use may explain the previously observed lack of relationship between seizure prophylaxis and outcomes.

  14. Tauopathy PET and amyloid PET in the diagnosis of chronic traumatic encephalopathies: studies of a retired NFL player and of a man with FTD and a severe head injury.

    PubMed

    Mitsis, E M; Riggio, S; Kostakoglu, L; Dickstein, D L; Machac, J; Delman, B; Goldstein, M; Jennings, D; D'Antonio, E; Martin, J; Naidich, T P; Aloysi, A; Fernandez, C; Seibyl, J; DeKosky, S T; Elder, G A; Marek, K; Gordon, W; Hof, P R; Sano, M; Gandy, S

    2014-09-16

    Single, severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) which elevates CNS amyloid, increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD); while repetitive concussive and subconcussive events as observed in athletes and military personnel, may increase the risk of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). We describe two clinical cases, one with a history of multiple concussions during a career in the National Football League (NFL) and the second with frontotemporal dementia and a single, severe TBI. Both patients presented with cognitive decline and underwent [(18)F]-Florbetapir positron emission tomography (PET) imaging for amyloid plaques; the retired NFL player also underwent [(18)F]-T807 PET imaging, a new ligand binding to tau, the main constituent of neurofibrillary tangles (NFT). Case 1, the former NFL player, was 71 years old when he presented with memory impairment and a clinical profile highly similar to AD. [(18)F]-Florbetapir PET imaging was negative, essentially excluding AD as a diagnosis. CTE was suspected clinically, and [(18)F]-T807 PET imaging revealed striatal and nigral [(18)F]-T807 retention consistent with the presence of tauopathy. Case 2 was a 56-year-old man with personality changes and cognitive decline who had sustained a fall complicated by a subdural hematoma. At 1 year post injury, [(18)F]-Florbetapir PET imaging was negative for an AD pattern of amyloid accumulation in this subject. Focal [(18)F]-Florbetapir retention was noted at the site of impact. In case 1, amyloid imaging provided improved diagnostic accuracy where standard clinical and laboratory criteria were inadequate. In that same case, tau imaging with [(18)F]-T807 revealed a subcortical tauopathy that we interpret as a novel form of CTE with a distribution of tauopathy that mimics, to some extent, that of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), despite a clinical presentation of amnesia without any movement disorder complaints or signs. A key distinguishing feature is that our patient presented

  15. Tauopathy PET and amyloid PET in the diagnosis of chronic traumatic encephalopathies: studies of a retired NFL player and of a man with FTD and a severe head injury

    PubMed Central

    Mitsis, E M; Riggio, S; Kostakoglu, L; Dickstein, D L; Machac, J; Delman, B; Goldstein, M; Jennings, D; D'Antonio, E; Martin, J; Naidich, T P; Aloysi, A; Fernandez, C; Seibyl, J; DeKosky, S T; Elder, G A; Marek, K; Gordon, W; Hof, P R; Sano, M; Gandy, S

    2014-01-01

    Single, severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) which elevates CNS amyloid, increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD); while repetitive concussive and subconcussive events as observed in athletes and military personnel, may increase the risk of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). We describe two clinical cases, one with a history of multiple concussions during a career in the National Football League (NFL) and the second with frontotemporal dementia and a single, severe TBI. Both patients presented with cognitive decline and underwent [18F]-Florbetapir positron emission tomography (PET) imaging for amyloid plaques; the retired NFL player also underwent [18F]-T807 PET imaging, a new ligand binding to tau, the main constituent of neurofibrillary tangles (NFT). Case 1, the former NFL player, was 71 years old when he presented with memory impairment and a clinical profile highly similar to AD. [18F]-Florbetapir PET imaging was negative, essentially excluding AD as a diagnosis. CTE was suspected clinically, and [18F]-T807 PET imaging revealed striatal and nigral [18F]-T807 retention consistent with the presence of tauopathy. Case 2 was a 56-year-old man with personality changes and cognitive decline who had sustained a fall complicated by a subdural hematoma. At 1 year post injury, [18F]-Florbetapir PET imaging was negative for an AD pattern of amyloid accumulation in this subject. Focal [18F]-Florbetapir retention was noted at the site of impact. In case 1, amyloid imaging provided improved diagnostic accuracy where standard clinical and laboratory criteria were inadequate. In that same case, tau imaging with [18F]-T807 revealed a subcortical tauopathy that we interpret as a novel form of CTE with a distribution of tauopathy that mimics, to some extent, that of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), despite a clinical presentation of amnesia without any movement disorder complaints or signs. A key distinguishing feature is that our patient presented with

  16. Traumatic pneumorrachis after isolated closed head injuries: An up-to-date review.

    PubMed

    Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios F; Singh, Ranjodh; Stefanopoulos, Panagiotis; Petsanas, Adamantios; Hadjigeorgiou, Fivos G; Fountas, Kostas

    2016-12-01

    Pneumorrachis (PR) is characterized by the presence of air within the spinal canal. It can be classified descriptively into internal or intradural and external or epidural. The causes of PR can be divided as iatrogenic, nontraumatic and traumatic. In the present study, a comprehensive literature search was conducted to identify all previous cases of PR after an isolate head injury. Two additional cases were also reported. We concluded, that PR after isolated head injuries is a rare but likely an underdiagnosed entity. It is a marker of severe injury and the majority of such patients have a poor outcome. Although, PR is usually asymptomatic and reabsorbs spontaneously, prompt recognition and management of the underlying cause is essential. Therefore, clinicians should maintain a high level of suspicion for serious underlying injury in cases where initial radiological imaging reveals intraspinal air.

  17. A Drosophila model of closed head traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Katzenberger, Rebeccah J; Loewen, Carin A; Wassarman, Douglas R; Petersen, Andrew J; Ganetzky, Barry; Wassarman, David A

    2013-10-29

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a substantial health issue worldwide, yet the mechanisms responsible for its complex spectrum of pathologies remains largely unknown. To investigate the mechanisms underlying TBI pathologies, we developed a model of TBI in Drosophila melanogaster. The model allows us to take advantage of the wealth of experimental tools available in flies. Closed head TBI was inflicted with a mechanical device that subjects flies to rapid acceleration and deceleration. Similar to humans with TBI, flies with TBI exhibited temporary incapacitation, ataxia, activation of the innate immune response, neurodegeneration, and death. Our data indicate that TBI results in death shortly after a primary injury only if the injury exceeds a certain threshold and that age and genetic background, but not sex, substantially affect this threshold. Furthermore, this threshold also appears to be dependent on the same cellular and molecular mechanisms that control normal longevity. This study demonstrates the potential of flies for providing key insights into human TBI that may ultimately provide unique opportunities for therapeutic intervention.

  18. Abstract thinking following severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Scherzer, B P; Charbonneau, S; Solomon, C R; Lepore, F

    1993-01-01

    Abstract abilities were studied in a sample of 34 individuals with severe TBI and a control group. The results indicate that TBI interferes with performance on tests requiring individuals to process information into new categories. There appears to be a dissociation between verbal abstract abilities and visual-perceptual abstract abilities. There is evidence that Goldstein and Sheerer's [1] postulate of a general 'abstract attitude' was at least partially correct. This attitude does not appear to be related to a general verbal ideational process, as dysphasic subjects were only deficient on a purely verbal abstract task.

  19. A Study of the SIRS with severely traumatized patients.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Richard; Payne, Joshua W; Correa, Amor A; Gillard, Nathan D; Ross, Colin A

    2009-09-01

    Clinical research has revealed that traumatized patients often elevate feigning indicators on psychological measures, which raises the possibility that traumatization and concomitant dissociation may lead to misclassifications of malingering. Within the domain of feigned mental disorders, the Structured Interview of Reported Symptoms (SIRS; Rogers, Bagby, & Dickens, 1992) is a well established measure with excellent reliability and validity across clinical and forensic settings. Although recent studies have demonstrated its effectiveness with outpatient posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) samples, the SIRS usefulness with severely traumatized patients remains to be investigated. In this study, we recruited traumatized patients for a within-subjects simulation design in which we asked feigners to convincingly portray themselves as examinees claiming total disabilities. When compared to standard instructions, feigned presentations produced substantial effect sizes. Although the standard SIRS classifications produced moderately high sensitivities (M = .82), the false-positive rates were problematic. To minimize false-positives, we constructed a Trauma Index (TI) from 3 primary SIRS scales that appeared unaffected by severe trauma. Implementation of the TI substantially reduced false-positive rates (M = .09).

  20. Metacognitive monitoring in moderate and severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Kathy S; Carlson, Richard A; Arnett, Peter A; Cosentino, Stephanie A; Hillary, Frank G

    2011-07-01

    The ability to engage in self-reflective processes is a capacity that may be disrupted after neurological compromise; research to date has demonstrated that patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) show reduced awareness of their deficits and functional ability compared to caretaker or clinician reports. Assessment of awareness of deficit, however, has been limited by the use of subjective measures (without comparison to actual performance) that are susceptible to report bias. This study used concurrent measurements from cognitive testing and confidence judgments about performance to investigate in-the-moment metacognitive experiences after moderate and severe traumatic brain injury. Deficits in metacognitive accuracy were found in adults with TBI for some but not all indices, suggesting that metacognition may not be a unitary construct. Findings also revealed that not all indices of executive functioning reliably predict metacognitive ability.

  1. [Cerebral salt wasting syndrome and traumatic vasospasm after head trauma: report of two cases].

    PubMed

    Katsuno, Makoto; Kobayashi, Shiro; Yokota, Hiroyuki; Teramoto, Akira

    2009-08-01

    While patients with cerebral salt wasting syndrome and traumatic cerebral arterial spasms have been reported, the underlying pathogenesis of these events remains unclear. We encountered 2 patients with head trauma and cerebral infarction who presented with cerebral salt-wasting syndrome and cerebral arterial spasms. Our findings suggested hypothalamic dysfunction due to venous congestion around the hypothalamus caused cerebral salt wasting syndrome and traumatic cerebral arterial spasms.

  2. The Evolution of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder following Moderate-to-Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Alway, Yvette; Gould, Kate Rachel; McKay, Adam; Johnston, Lisa; Ponsford, Jennie

    2016-05-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may develop following traumatic brain injury (TBI), despite most patients having no conscious memory of their accident. This prospective study examined the frequency, timing of onset, symptom profile, and trajectory of PTSD and its psychiatric comorbidities during the first 4 years following moderate-to-severe TBI. Participants were 85 individuals (78.8% male) with moderate or severe TBI recruited following admission to acute rehabilitation between 2005 and 2010. Using the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Disorders (SCID-I), participants were evaluated for pre- and post-injury PTSD soon after injury and reassessed at 6 months, 12 months, 2 years, 3 years, and 4 years post-injury. Over the first 4 years post-injury, 17.6% developed injury-related PTSD, none of whom had PTSD prior to injury. PTSD onset peaked between 6 and 12 months post-injury. The majority of PTSD cases (66.7%) had a delayed-onset, which for a third was preceded by subsyndromal symptoms in the first 6 months post-injury. PTSD frequency increased over the first year post-injury, remained stable during the second year, and gradually declined thereafter. The majority of subjects with PTSD experienced a chronic symptom course and all developed one or more than one comorbid psychiatric disorder, with mood, other anxiety, and substance-use disorders being the most common. Despite event-related amnesia, post-traumatic stress symptoms, including vivid re-experiencing phenomena, may develop following moderate-to-severe TBI. Onset is typically delayed and symptoms may persist for several years post-injury.

  3. Traumatic Brain Injury Severity Affects Neurogenesis in Adult Mouse Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoting; Gao, Xiang; Michalski, Stephanie; Zhao, Shu; Chen, Jinhui

    2016-04-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been proven to enhance neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. However, various groups have reported contradictory results on whether TBI increases neurogenesis, partially due to a wide range in the severities of injuries seen with different TBI models. To address whether the severity of TBI affects neurogenesis in the injured brain, we assessed neurogenesis in mouse brains receiving different severities of controlled cortical impact (CCI) with the same injury device. The mice were subjected to mild, moderate, or severe TBI by a CCI device. The effects of TBI severity on neurogenesis were evaluated at three stages: NSC proliferation, immature neurons, and newly-generated mature neurons. The results showed that mild TBI did not affect neurogenesis at any of the three stages. Moderate TBI promoted NSC proliferation without increasing neurogenesis. Severe TBI increased neurogenesis at all three stages. Our data suggest that the severity of injury affects adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus, and thus it may partially explain the inconsistent results of different groups regarding neurogenesis following TBI. Further understanding the mechanism of TBI-induced neurogenesis may provide a potential approach for using endogenous NSCs to protect against neuronal loss after trauma.

  4. An Independent, Prospective, Head to Head Study of the Reliability and Validity of Neurocognitive Test Batteries for the Assessment of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    to Head Study of the Reliability and Validity of Neurocognitive Test Batteries for the Assessment of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury PRINCIPAL...CONTRACT NUMBER Validity of Neurocognitive Test Batteries for the Assessment of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1...tools (NCAT’s) for the acute neurocognitive assessment, tracking cognitive recovery, and informing clinical management after mild traumatic brain injury

  5. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... before. Often, the injury is minor because your skull is hard and it protects your brain. But ... injuries can be more severe, such as a skull fracture, concussion, or traumatic brain injury. Head injuries ...

  6. Discourse macrolevel processing after severe pediatric traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Sandra Bond; Sparks, Garen; Levin, Harvey S; Dennis, Maureen; Roncadin, Caroline; Zhang, Lifang; Song, James

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if discourse macrolevel processing abilities differed between children with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) at least 2 years postinjury and typically developing children. Twenty-three children had sustained a severe TBI either before the age of 8 (n = 10) or after the age of 8 (n = 13). The remaining 32 children composed a control group of typically developing peers. The groups' summaries and interpretive lesson statements were analyzed according to reduction and transformation of narrative text information. Compared to the control group, the TBI group condensed the original text information to a similar extent. However, the TBI group produced significantly less transformed information during their summaries, especially those children who sustained early injuries. The TBI and control groups did not significantly differ in their production of interpretive lesson statements. In terms of related skills, discourse macrolevel summarization ability was significantly related to problem solving but not to lexical or sentence level language skills or memory. Children who sustain a severe TBI early in childhood are at an increased risk for persisting deficits in higher level discourse abilities, results that have implications for academic success and therapeutic practices.

  7. Factors prognosticating the outcome of decompressive craniectomy in severe traumatic brain injury: A Malaysian experience

    PubMed Central

    Sharda, Priya; Haspani, Saffari; Idris, Zamzuri

    2014-01-01

    (P < 0.001). Multivariate logistic regression with stepwise likelihood ratio (LR) method concluded that hypoxia post operatively (P = 0.152), the unmaintained Cerebral Perfusion Pressure (CPP) (P = 0.007) and unstable blood pressure (BP) (P = <0.001). Poor outcome noted 10.2 times higher in post operative hypoxia [OR10.184; 95% CI: 0.424, 244.495]. Odds of having poor outcome if CPP unmaintained was 13.8 times higher [OR: 13.754; CI: 2.050, 92.301]. Highest predictor of poor outcome was the unstable BP, 32 times higher [OR 31.600; CI: 4.530, 220440]. Conclusion: Our series represent both urban and rural population, noted to be the largest series in severe TBI in this region. Severe head injury accounts for significant proportion of neurosurgical admissions, resources with its impact on socio-economic concerns to a growing population like Malaysia. This study concludes that the predictors of outcome in severe TBI post DC were postoperative hypoxia, unmaintained cerebral perfusion pressure and unstable blood pressure as independent predictors of poor outcome. Key words: Decompressive craniectomy, prognostication of decompressive craniectomy, prognostication of severe head injury, prognostication of traumatic brain injury, severe head injury, severe traumatic brain injury, traumatic brain injury. PMID:25685217

  8. Impaired emotional contagion following severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Rushby, Jacqueline Ann; McDonald, Skye; Randall, Rebekah; de Sousa, Arielle; Trimmer, Emily; Fisher, Alana

    2013-09-01

    Empathy deficits are widely-documented in individuals after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). This study examined the relationship between empathy deficits and psychophysiological responsivity in adults with TBI to determine if impaired responsivity is ameliorated through repeated emotional stimulus presentations. Nineteen TBI participants (13 males; 41 years) and 25 control participants (14 males; 31 years) viewed five repetitions of six 2-min film clip segments containing pleasant, unpleasant, and neutral content. Facial muscle responses (zygomaticus and corrugator), tonic heart rate (HR) and skin conductance level (SCL) were recorded. Mean responses for each viewing period were compared to a pre-experiment 2-min resting baseline period. Self-reported emotional empathy was also assessed. TBI participants demonstrated identical EMG response patterns to controls, i.e. an initial large facial response to both pleasant and unpleasant films, followed by habituation over repetitions for pleasant films, and sustained response to unpleasant films. Additionally, an increase in both arousal and HR deceleration to stimulus repetitions was found, which was larger for TBI participants. Compared to controls, TBI participants self-reported lower emotional empathy, and had lower resting arousal, and these measures were positively correlated. Results are consistent with TBI producing impairments in emotional empathy and responsivity. While some normalisation of physiological arousal appeared with repeated stimulus presentations, this came at the cost of greater attentional effort.

  9. Interleukin (IL)-8 immunoreactivity of injured axons and surrounding oligodendrocytes in traumatic head injury.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takahito; Ago, Kazutoshi; Nakamae, Takuma; Higo, Eri; Ogata, Mamoru

    2016-06-01

    Interleukin (IL)-8 has been suggested to be a positive regulator of myelination in the central nervous system, in addition to its principal role as a chemokine for neutrophils. Immunostaining for beta-amyloid precursor protein (AβPP) is an effective tool for detecting traumatic axonal injury, although AβPP immunoreactivity can also indicate axonal injury due to hypoxic causes. In this study, we examined IL-8 and AβPP immunoreactivity in sections of corpus callosum obtained from deceased patients with blunt head injury and from equivalent control tissue. AβPP immunoreactivity was detected in injured axons, such as axonal bulbs and varicose axons, in 24 of 44 head injury cases. These AβPP immunoreactive cases had survived for more than 3h. The AβPP immunostaining pattern can be classified into two types: traumatic (Pattern 1) and non-traumatic (Pattern 2) axonal injuries, which we described previously [Hayashi et al. Int. J. Legal Med. 129 (2015) 1085-1090]. Three of 44 control cases also showed AβPP immunoreactive injured axons as Pattern 2. In contrast, IL-8 immunoreactivity was detected in 7 AβPP immunoreactive and in 2 non-AβPP immunoreactive head injury cases, but was not detected in any of the 44 control cases, including the 3 AβPP immunoreactive control cases. The IL-8 immunoreactive cases had survived from 3 to 24 days, whereas those cases who survived less than 3 days (n=29) and who survived 90 days (n=1) were not IL-8 immunoreactive. Moreover, IL-8 was detected as Pattern 1 axons only. In addition, double immunofluorescence analysis showed that IL-8 is expressed by oligodendrocytes surrounding injured axons. In conclusion, our results suggest that immunohistochemical detection of IL-8 may be useful as a complementary diagnostic marker of traumatic axonal injury.

  10. Traumatic Brain Injury by a Closed Head Injury Device Induces Cerebral Blood Flow Changes and Microhemorrhages

    PubMed Central

    Kallakuri, Srinivasu; Bandaru, Sharath; Zakaria, Nisrine; Shen, Yimin; Kou, Zhifeng; Zhang, Liying; Haacke, Ewart Mark; Cavanaugh, John M

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Traumatic brain injury is a poly-pathology characterized by changes in the cerebral blood flow, inflammation, diffuse axonal, cellular, and vascular injuries. However, studies related to understanding the temporal changes in the cerebral blood flow following traumatic brain injury extending to sub-acute periods are limited. In addition, knowledge related to microhemorrhages, such as their detection, localization, and temporal progression, is important in the evaluation of traumatic brain injury. Materials and Methods: Cerebral blood flow changes and microhemorrhages in male Sprague Dawley rats at 4 h, 24 h, 3 days, and 7 days were assessed following a closed head injury induced by the Marmarou impact acceleration device (2 m height, 450 g brass weight). Cerebral blood flow was measured by arterial spin labeling. Microhemorrhages were assessed by susceptibility-weighted imaging and Prussian blue histology. Results: Traumatic brain injury rats showed reduced regional and global cerebral blood flow at 4 h and 7 days post-injury. Injured rats showed hemorrhagic lesions in the cortex, corpus callosum, hippocampus, and brainstem in susceptibility-weighted imaging. Injured rats also showed Prussian blue reaction products in both the white and gray matter regions up to 7 days after the injury. These lesions were observed in various areas of the cortex, corpus callosum, hippocampus, thalamus, and midbrain. Conclusions: These results suggest that changes in cerebral blood flow and hemorrhagic lesions can persist for sub-acute periods after the initial traumatic insult in an animal model. In addition, microhemorrhages otherwise not seen by susceptibility-weighted imaging are present in diverse regions of the brain. The combination of altered cerebral blood flow and microhemorrhages can potentially be a source of secondary injury changes following traumatic brain injury and may need to be taken into consideration in the long-term care of these cases. PMID:26605126

  11. Severe Traumatic Brain Injury In Children: An Evidence-Based Review Of Emergency Department Management.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, Kirsten; Fairbrother, Hilary

    2016-10-01

    More than 1.7 million traumatic brain injuries occur in adults and children each year in the United States, with approximately 30% occurring in children aged < 14 years. Traumatic brain injury is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in pediatric trauma patients. Early identification and management of severe traumatic brain injury is crucial in decreasing the risk of secondary brain injury and optimizing outcome. The main focus for early management of severe traumatic brain injury is to mitigate and prevent secondary injury, specifically by avoiding hypotension and hypoxia, which have been associated with poorer outcomes. This issue discusses methods to maintain adequate oxygenation, maximize management of intracranial hypertension, and optimize blood pressure in the emergency department to improve neurologic outcomes following pediatric severe traumatic brain injury.

  12. Injury severity measures for predicting return-to-work after a traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Chien, Ding-Kuo; Hwang, Hei-Fen; Lin, Mau-Roung

    2017-01-01

    This study compared the ability of five injury severity measures, namely the Abbreviated Injury Scale to the Head (AIS-H), Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS), Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOSE), and Injury Severity Score (ISS), to predict return-to-work after a traumatic brain injury (TBI). Furthermore, factors potentially associated with return-to-work were investigated. In total, 207 individuals aged ≤65 years newly diagnosed with a TBI and employed at the time of injury were recruited and followed-up for 1year by telephone every 3 months. A bivariate proportional hazards model analysis revealed that all five injury severity measures were significantly associated with return-to-work after a TBI. The AIS-H and non-head ISS explained 23.8% of the variation in the duration of returning to work from discharge after hospitalization for a TBI; similarly, the GCS, GOS, GOSE, and ISS respectively accounted for 4.7%, 21.4%, 12.9%, and 48.4% of the variation. A multivariable analysis revealed that individuals with higher injury severity as measured by the ISS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.94; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.92-0.97), a lack of autonomy in transportation (HR, 2.55; 95% CI, 1.23-5.32), cognitive impairment (HR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.28-0.79), and depression (HR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.95-0.99) were significantly less likely to be employed after a TBI. In conclusion, of the five injury severity measures, the ISS may be the most capable measure of predicting return-to-work after a TBI. In addition to injury severity, autonomy in transportation, cognitive function, and the depressive status may also influence the employment status during the first year after a TBI.

  13. Experimental study of blast-induced traumatic brain injury using a physical head model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiangyue; Pintar, Frank A; Yoganandan, Narayan; Gennarelli, Thomas A; Son, Steven F

    2009-11-01

    This study was conducted to quantify intracranial biomechanical responses and external blast overpressures using physical head model to understand the biomechanics of blast traumatic brain injury and to provide experimental data for computer simulation of blast-induced brain trauma. Ellipsoidal-shaped physical head models, made from 3-mm polycarbonate shell filled with Sylgard 527 silicon gel, were used. Six blast tests were conducted in frontal, side, and 45 degrees oblique orientations. External blast overpressures and internal pressures were quantified with ballistic pressure sensors. Blast overpressures, ranging from 129.5 kPa to 769.3 kPa, were generated using a rigid cannon and 1.3 to 3.0 grams of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) plastic sheet explosive (explosive yield of 13.24 kJ and TNT equivalent mass of 2.87 grams for 3 grams of material). The PETN plastic sheet explosive consisted of 63% PETN powder, 29% plasticizer, and 8% nitrocellulose with a density of 1.48 g/cm3 and detonation velocity of 6.8 km/s. Propagation and reflection of the shockwave was captured using a shadowgraph technique. Shockwave speeds ranging from 423.3 m/s to 680.3 m/s were recorded. The model demonstrated a two-stage response: a pressure dominant (overpressure) stage followed by kinematic dominant (blast wind) stage. Positive pressures in the brain simulant ranged from 75.1 kPa to 1095 kPa, and negative pressures ranged from -43.6 kPa to -646.0 kPa. High- and normal-speed videos did not reveal observable deformations in the brain simulant from the neutral density markers embedded in the midsagittal plane of the head model. Amplitudes of the internal positive and negative pressures were found to linearly correlate with external overpressure. Results from the current study suggested a pressure-dominant brain injury mechanism instead of strain injury mechanism under the blast severity of the current study. These quantitative results also served as the validation and calibration

  14. Coping strategies predict post-traumatic stress in patients with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Amy E; Morton, Randall P; Broadbent, Elizabeth

    2016-10-01

    Evidence suggests that patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) are susceptible to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, research is yet to examine predictors of PTSD symptoms in this patient group. The objective of this study was to investigate whether coping strategies at HNC diagnosis were related to outcomes of post-traumatic stress and health-related quality of life (HRQL) 6 months later. Sixty-five patients with HNC completed an assessment of coping, distress, and health-related quality of life at diagnosis and again 6 months later, and an assessment of post-traumatic stress at 6 months. Correlations and regression analyses were performed to examine relationships between coping and outcomes over time. Regression analyses showed that denial, behavioural disengagement and self-blame at diagnosis predicted post-traumatic stress symptoms. Self-blame at diagnosis also predicted poor HRQL. Results have implications for the development of psychological interventions that provide alternative coping strategies to potentially reduce PTSD symptoms and improve HRQL.

  15. Rehabilitation of Visual and Perceptual Dysfunction after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-2-0082 TITLE: Rehabilitation of Visual and Perceptual Dysfunction after Severe...From - To) 01 March 2011-28 February 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Rehabilitation of Visual and Perceptual Dysfunction after Severe Traumatic Brain...neglect (SN), disabling visual and cognitive perception conditions that commonly occur as a result of severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and stroke. Both

  16. Witnessing traumatic events causes severe behavioral impairments in rats

    PubMed Central

    Patki, Gaurav; Solanki, Naimesh; Salim, Samina

    2015-01-01

    Witnessing a traumatic event but not directly experiencing it can be psychologically quite damaging. In North America alone, ~30% of individuals who witness a traumatic event develop post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). While effects of direct trauma are evident, consequences of indirect or secondary trauma are often ignored. Also unclear is the role of social support in the consequences of these experiences. The social defeat paradigm, which involves aggressive encounters by a large Long–Evans male rat (resident) towards a smaller Sprague–Dawley male rat (intruder), is considered a rodent model of PTSD. We have modified this model to create a trauma witness model (TWM) and have used our TWM model to also evaluate social support effects. Basically, when an intruder rat is placed into the home cage of a resident rat, it encounters an agonistic behavior resulting in intruder subordination. The socially defeated intruder is designated the SD rat. A second rat, the cage mate of the SD, is positioned to witness the event and is the trauma witnessing (TW) rat. Experiments were performed in two different experimental conditions. In one, the SD and TW rats were cagemates and acclimatized together. Then, one SD rat was subjected to three sessions of social defeat for 7 d. TW rat witnessed these events. After each social defeat exposure, the TW and SD rats were housed together. In the second, the TW and SD rats were housed separately starting after the first defeat. At the end of each protocol, depression-anxiety-like behavior and memory tests were conducted on the SD and TW rats, blood withdrawn and specific organs collected. Witnessing traumatic events led to depression- and anxiety-like behavior and produced memory deficits in TW rats associated with elevated corticosterone levels. PMID:24887568

  17. Head Trauma with or without Mild Brain Injury Increases the Risk of Future Traumatic Death: A Controlled Prospective 15-Year Follow-Up Study.

    PubMed

    Vaaramo, Kalle; Puljula, Jussi; Tetri, Sami; Juvela, Seppo; Hillbom, Matti

    2015-10-15

    Patients who have recovered from traumatic brain injury (TBI) show an increased risk of premature death. To investigate long-term mortality rates in a population admitted to the hospital for head injury (HI), we conducted a population-based prospective case-control, record-linkage study, All subjects who were living in Northern Ostrobothnia, and who were admitted to Oulu University Hospital in 1999 because of HI (n=737), and 2196 controls matched by age, gender, and residence randomly drawn from the population of Northern Ostrobothnia were included. Death rate and causes of death in HI subjects during 15 years of follow-up was compared with the general population controls. The crude mortality rates were 56.9, 18.6, and 23.8% for subjects having moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), mild TBI, and head injury without TBI, respectively. The corresponding approximate annual mortality rates were 6.7%, 1.4%, and 1.9%. All types of index HI predicted a significant risk of traumatic death in the future. Subjects who had HI without TBI had an increased risk of both death from all causes (hazard ratio 2.00; 95% confidence interval 1.57-2.55) and intentional or unintentional traumatic death (4.01, 2.20-7.30), compared with controls. The main founding was that even HI without TBI carries an increased risk of future traumatic death. The reason for this remains unknown and further studies are needed. To prevent such premature deaths, post-traumatic therapy should include an interview focusing on lifestyle factors.

  18. [Traumatic cervical disc prolapse with severe neurological impact].

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Roland; Gundtoft, Per

    2014-12-15

    A 51-year-old male drove into a ditch on his scooter. Immediately after the trauma the patient complained of neck pain and decreased ability to feel and move his extremities. An initial trauma computed tomography (CT) of the columna showed normal conditions. Because the patient had neurological deficiencies, magnetic resonance imaging of the columna was performed 12 days later, and a disc prolapse at the C3/C4 level with spinal cord compression was visible. Despite decompression the patient did not recover. Traumatic cervical disc prolapse is a rare and positionally dangerous condition, which can be present despite a CT showing normal conditions.

  19. Investigation of traumatic brain injuries using the next generation of simulated injury monitor (SIMon) finite element head model.

    PubMed

    Takhounts, Erik G; Ridella, Stephen A; Hasija, Vikas; Tannous, Rabih E; Campbell, J Quinn; Malone, Dan; Danelson, Kerry; Stitzel, Joel; Rowson, Steve; Duma, Stefan

    2008-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate potential for traumatic brain injuries (TBI) using a newly developed, geometrically detailed, finite element head model (FEHM) within the concept of a simulated injury monitor (SIMon). The new FEHM is comprised of several parts: cerebrum, cerebellum, falx, tentorium, combined pia-arachnoid complex (PAC) with cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF), ventricles, brainstem, and parasagittal blood vessels. The model's topology was derived from human computer tomography (CT) scans and then uniformly scaled such that the mass of the brain represents the mass of a 50th percentile male's brain (1.5 kg) with the total head mass of 4.5 kg. The topology of the model was then compared to the preliminary data on the average topology derived from Procrustes shape analysis of 59 individuals. Material properties of the various parts were assigned based on the latest experimental data. After rigorous validation of the model using neutral density targets (NDT) and pressure data, the stability of FEHM was tested by loading it simultaneously with translational (up to 400 g) combined with rotational (up to 24,000 rad/s2) acceleration pulses in both sagittal and coronal planes. Injury criteria were established in the manner shown in Takhounts et al. (2003a). After thorough validation and injury criteria establishment (cumulative strain damage measure--CSDM for diffuse axonal injuries (DAI), relative motion damage measure--RMDM for acute subdural hematoma (ASDH), and dilatational damage measure--DDM for contusions and focal lesions), the model was used in investigation of mild TBI cases in living humans based on a set of head impact data taken from American football players at the collegiate level. It was found that CSDM and especially RMDM correlated well with angular acceleration and angular velocity. DDM was close to zero for most impacts due to their mild severity implying that cavitational pressure anywhere in the brain was not reached. Maximum

  20. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy: a potential late effect of sport-related concussive and subconcussive head trauma.

    PubMed

    Gavett, Brandon E; Stern, Robert A; McKee, Ann C

    2011-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a form of neurodegeneration believed to result from repeated head injuries. Originally termed dementia pugilistica because of its association with boxing, the neuropathology of CTE was first described by Corsellis in 1973 in a case series of 15 retired boxers. CTE has recently been found to occur after other causes of repeated head trauma, suggesting that any repeated blows to the head, such as those that occur in American football, hockey, soccer, professional wrestling, and physical abuse, can also lead to neurodegenerative changes. These changes often include cerebral atrophy, cavum septi pellucidi with fenestrations, shrinkage of the mammillary bodies, dense tau immunoreactive inclusions (neurofibrillary tangles, glial tangles, and neuropil neurites), and, in some cases, a TDP-43 proteinopathy. In association with these pathologic changes, disordered memory and executive functioning, behavioral and personality disturbances (eg, apathy, depression, irritability, impulsiveness, suicidality), parkinsonism, and, occasionally, motor neuron disease are seen in affected individuals. No formal clinical or pathologic diagnostic criteria for CTE currently exist, but the distinctive neuropathologic profile of the disorder lends promise for future research into its prevention, diagnosis, and treatment.

  1. Topical diagnostics of traumatic condylar injuries and alloplastic reconstruction of temporomandibular joint heads.

    PubMed

    Gvenetadze, Z; Danelia, T; Nemsadze, G; Gvenetadze, G

    2014-04-01

    Condylar fractures have an important place in facial traumatic injuries. Classification of condylar fractures according to clinical-anatomic picture is common in clinical practice. According to this classification there are: 1) fractures of mandibular joint head, aka intraarticular fractures, 2) condylar neck fractures or high extra articular fractures, 3) condylar base fractures. Radiographic imaging plays important role in diagnosing condylar fractures along with knowledge of clinical symptoms. We used computer tomography imaging in our clinical practice. Three-dimensional imaging of computer tomography gives exact information about location of condylar fractures, impact of fractured fragments, displacement of condylar head from articular fossa. This method is mostly important for the cases which are hard to diagnose (fractures of mandibular joint head, aka intraarticular fractures). For this group of patients surgical treatment is necessary with the method of arthroplasty. We have observed 5 patients with bilateral, fragmented, high condylar fractures. In all cases the surgery was performed on both sides with bone cement and titanium mini-plates. Long-term effects of the treatment included observation from 6 months to 2 years. In all cases anatomic and functional results were good. Shape of the mandible is restored, opening of mouth 3-3.5 cm, absence of malocclusion.

  2. Beneficial effect of cerebrolysin on moderate and severe head injury patients: result of a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Wong, G K C; Zhu, X L; Poon, W S

    2005-01-01

    Cerebrolysin is used as a neurotrophic agent for the treatment of ischemic stroke and Alzheimer's Disease. Exploratory studies in patients with post-acute traumatic brain injury have shown that this treatment might help improve recovery. Aim of this study was to investigate whether addition of Cerebrolysin to the initial treatment regimen of moderate and severe head injury patients would improve their outcome. At 6 months, 67% of the patients (Cerebrolysin group) attained good outcome (GOS 3-5). The study group was compared with the historical cohort of patients from the hospital trauma data bank, with age, sex and admitting GCS matching. More patients tended to a good outcome in the Cerebrolysin group (P = 0.065). No significant side-effect requiring cessation of Cerebrolysin was noted. It can be concluded that the use of Cerebrolysin as part of the initial management of moderate and severe head injury is safe and well tolerated. The results suggest that Cerebrolysin is beneficial in regard to the outcome in these patients, especially in elderly patients.

  3. Assessment of impulsivity after moderate to severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Rochat, Lucien; Beni, Catia; Billieux, Joël; Azouvi, Philippe; Annoni, Jean-Marie; Van der Linden, Martial

    2010-10-01

    The aim of the study was to develop and validate a short questionnaire assessing four dimensions of impulsivity (urgency, lack of premeditation, lack of perseverance, sensation seeking) in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). To this end, 82 patients with TBI and their caregivers completed a short questionnaire adapted from the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale designed to assess impulsivity changes after TBI. Confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs) performed on the version of the scale completed by the relatives revealed that a hierarchical model holding that lack of premeditation and lack of perseverance are facets of a higher order construct (lack of conscientiousness), with urgency and sensation seeking as separate correlated factors, fit the data best. Urgency, lack of premeditation, and lack of perseverance increased after the TBI, whereas sensation seeking decreased. CFA failed to reveal a satisfactory model in the version of the scale completed by the patients. The psychological processes related to these impulsivity changes and the discrepancy observed between self-report and informant-report are discussed. This short questionnaire opens up interesting prospects for better comprehension and assessment of behavioural symptoms of TBI.

  4. Maternal reporting of behaviour following very severe blunt head injury.

    PubMed Central

    Kinsella, G; Packer, S; Olver, J

    1991-01-01

    Mothers of 40 very severely head injured male subjects rated their son's behaviour on the Current Behaviour Scale and their ratings were compared with mothers' ratings of 40 control male subjects. The scale was able to discriminate the two groups, by utilising two factors--loss of emotional control and loss of motivation. The mothers' level of emotional distress was closely related to their reporting of loss of emotional control in their sons, but reporting of loss of motivation, or lowered arousal, was strongly predicted by the functional disability of the son. The utility of refining the measurement of post-trauma behaviour is discussed. PMID:1865205

  5. Human Serum Metabolites Associate With Severity and Patient Outcomes in Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Orešič, Matej; Posti, Jussi P; Kamstrup-Nielsen, Maja H; Takala, Riikka S K; Lingsma, Hester F; Mattila, Ismo; Jäntti, Sirkku; Katila, Ari J; Carpenter, Keri L H; Ala-Seppälä, Henna; Kyllönen, Anna; Maanpää, Henna-Riikka; Tallus, Jussi; Coles, Jonathan P; Heino, Iiro; Frantzén, Janek; Hutchinson, Peter J; Menon, David K; Tenovuo, Olli; Hyötyläinen, Tuulia

    2016-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability worldwide, especially in children and young adults. TBI is an example of a medical condition where there are still major lacks in diagnostics and outcome prediction. Here we apply comprehensive metabolic profiling of serum samples from TBI patients and controls in two independent cohorts. The discovery study included 144 TBI patients, with the samples taken at the time of hospitalization. The patients were diagnosed as severe (sTBI; n=22), moderate (moTBI; n=14) or mild TBI (mTBI; n=108) according to Glasgow Coma Scale. The control group (n=28) comprised of acute orthopedic non-brain injuries. The validation study included sTBI (n=23), moTBI (n=7), mTBI (n=37) patients and controls (n=27). We show that two medium-chain fatty acids (decanoic and octanoic acids) and sugar derivatives including 2,3-bisphosphoglyceric acid are strongly associated with severity of TBI, and most of them are also detected at high concentrations in brain microdialysates of TBI patients. Based on metabolite concentrations from TBI patients at the time of hospitalization, an algorithm was developed that accurately predicted the patient outcomes (AUC=0.84 in validation cohort). Addition of the metabolites to the established clinical model (CRASH), comprising clinical and computed tomography data, significantly improved prediction of patient outcomes. The identified 'TBI metabotype' in serum, that may be indicative of disrupted blood-brain barrier, of protective physiological response and altered metabolism due to head trauma, offers a new avenue for the development of diagnostic and prognostic markers of broad spectrum of TBIs.

  6. Long-term outcome after severe head injury.

    PubMed Central

    Lewin, W; Marshall, T F; Roberts, A H

    1979-01-01

    From a consecutive series of 7000 patients with head injuries admitted to the regional accident service, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford between 10 and 24 years earlier, every patient was taken who had been amnesic or unconscious for one week or longer. Of these 479 patients, all but ten were traced, and either the cause of death was established or the survivors examined. Ten years after injury 4% were totally disabled, and 14% severely disabled to a degree precluding normal occupational or social life. Of the remainder, 49% had recovered, and the rest were dead. Additionally, a selected series of 64 patients whose unconsciousness had been prolonged for a month or more were studied. Forty of these had survived between three and 25 years after injury and were re-examined. On the basis of age at injury, the worst state of neurological responsiveness, and the duration of posttraumatic amnesia, the outcome of head injury can be predicted reliably in most cases. Patients and relatives need more reassurance and simple psychotherapeutic support, especially in the first few months after injury. Extrapolation from our figures suggests that each year in England and Wales 210 patients survive totally disabled and another 1500 are severely disabled. PMID:119567

  7. Intraparenchymal hemorrhage segmentation from clinical head CT of patients with traumatic brain injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Snehashis; Wilkes, Sean; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Butman, John A.; Pham, Dzung L.

    2015-03-01

    Quantification of hemorrhages in head computed tomography (CT) images from patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) has potential applications in monitoring disease progression and better understanding of the patho-physiology of TBI. Although manual segmentations can provide accurate measures of hemorrhages, the processing time and inter-rater variability make it infeasible for large studies. In this paper, we propose a fully automatic novel pipeline for segmenting intraparenchymal hemorrhages (IPH) from clinical head CT images. Unlike previous methods of model based segmentation or active contour techniques, we rely on relevant and matching examples from already segmented images by trained raters. The CT images are first skull-stripped. Then example patches from an "atlas" CT and its manual segmentation are used to learn a two-class sparse dictionary for hemorrhage and normal tissue. Next, for a given "subject" CT, a subject patch is modeled as a sparse convex combination of a few atlas patches from the dictionary. The same convex combination is applied to the atlas segmentation patches to generate a membership for the hemorrhages at each voxel. Hemorrhages are segmented from 25 subjects with various degrees of TBI. Results are compared with segmentations obtained from an expert rater. A median Dice coefficient of 0.85 between automated and manual segmentations is achieved. A linear fit between automated and manual volumes show a slope of 1.0047, indicating a negligible bias in volume estimation.

  8. Rehabilitation of a person with severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Burke, D; Alexander, K; Baxter, M; Baker, F; Connell, K; Diggles, S; Feldman, K; Horny, A; Kokinos, M; Moloney, D; Withers, J

    2000-05-01

    A case study report of a long and intensive rehabilitation programme for a young woman after she sustained a severe diffuse axonal injury in a motor vehicle accident is described in detail. The purpose of this paper is to encourage specialist brain injury rehabilitation services to offer extended rehabilitation programmes to patients, even with very severe injuries. Significant functional improvements and enhanced quality of life frequently reward the high cost and hard work involved.

  9. Cerebrospinal Fluid Cortisol and Progesterone Profiles and Outcomes Prognostication after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Santarsieri, Martina; Niyonkuru, Christian; McCullough, Emily H.; Dobos, Julie A.; Dixon, C. Edward; Berga, Sarah L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Despite significant advances in the management of head trauma, there remains a lack of pharmacological treatment options for traumatic brain injury (TBI). While progesterone clinical trials have shown promise, corticosteroid trials have failed. The purpose of this study was to (1) characterize endogenous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) progesterone and cortisol levels after TBI, (2) determine relationships between CSF and serum profiles, and (3) assess the utility of these hormones as predictors of long-term outcomes. We evaluated 130 adults with severe TBI. Serum samples (n=538) and CSF samples (n=746) were collected for 6 days post-injury, analyzed for cortisol and progesterone, and compared with healthy controls (n=13). Hormone data were linked with clinical data, including Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) scores at 6 and 12 months. Group based trajectory (TRAJ) analysis was used to develop temporal hormone profiles delineating distinct subpopulations. Compared with controls, CSF cortisol levels were significantly and persistently elevated during the first week after TBI, and high CSF cortisol levels were associated with poor outcome. As a precursor to cortisol, progesterone mediated these effects. Serum and CSF levels for both cortisol and progesterone were strongly correlated after TBI relative to controls, possibly because of blood–brain barrier disruption. Also, differentially impaired hormone transport and metabolism mechanisms after TBI, potential de novo synthesis of steroids within the brain, and the complex interplay of cortisol and pro-inflammatory cytokines may explain these acute hormone profiles and, when taken together, may help shed light on why corticosteroid trials have previously failed and why progesterone treatment after TBI may be beneficial. PMID:24354775

  10. Consonant Accuracy after Severe Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury: A Prospective Cohort Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Thomas F.; Dollaghan, Christine; Janosky, Janine; Rusiewicz, Heather Leavy; Small, Steven L.; Dick, Frederic; Vick, Jennell; Adelson, P. David

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The authors sought to describe longitudinal changes in Percentage of Consonants Correct--Revised (PCC-R) after severe pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI), to compare the odds of normal-range PCC-R in children injured at older and younger ages, and to correlate predictor variables and PCC-R outcomes. Method: In 56 children injured…

  11. Impact of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Injury Severity on Recovery in Children with Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenardy, Justin; Le Brocque, Robyne; Hendrikz, Joan; Iselin, Greg; Anderson, Vicki; McKinlay, Lynne

    2012-01-01

    The adverse impact on recovery of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been demonstrated in returned veterans. The study assessed this effect in children's health outcomes following TBI and extended previous work by including a full range of TBI severity, and improved assessment of PTSD within a…

  12. Relation of Executive Functioning to Pragmatic Outcome following Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Jacinta M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to explore the behavioral nature of pragmatic impairment following severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and to evaluate the contribution of executive skills to the experience of pragmatic difficulties after TBI. Method: Participants were grouped into 43 TBI dyads (TBI adults and close relatives) and 43 control…

  13. [Acute traumatic myocardial infarction with cardiogenic shock in severe polytrauma--a case report].

    PubMed

    Rohe, G; Feyerherd, F; Möx, B; Hachenberg, T

    2000-04-01

    A 41-year-old man suffered severe polytrauma and developed a traumatic myocardial infarction with cardiogenic shock. Thrombolysis as well as coronary bypass grafting was contraindicated due to accompanying injuries. An attempted early coronary revascularization by percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) failed due to dissection of the left interventricular coronary artery. Treatment of cardiac insufficiency was complicated by intraabdominal haemorrhage enforcing emergency laparotomy. Intraaortic balloon counterpulsation proved to be efficient in supporting circulation in these circumstances. The case report documents the practicability and importance of treating both myocardial ischaemia and attending injuries in an equivalent and coordinated manner in traumatic myocardial infarction.

  14. Severe head injury in children: emergency access to neurosurgery in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Tasker, R C; Morris, K P; Forsyth, R J; Hawley, C A; Parslow, R C

    2006-01-01

    Objective To determine the scale of acute neurosurgery for severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) in childhood, and whether surgical evacuation for haematoma is achieved within four hours of presentation to an emergency department. Methods A 12 month audit of emergency access to all specialist neurosurgical and intensive care services in the UK. Severe TBI in a child was defined as that necessitating admission to intensive care. Results Of 448 children with severe head injuries, 91 (20.3%) underwent emergency neurosurgery, and 37% of these surgical patients had at least one non‐reactive and dilated pupil. An acute subdural or epidural haematoma was present in 143/448 (31.9%) children, of whom 66 (46.2%) underwent surgery. Children needing surgical evacuation of haematoma were at a median distance of 29 km (interquartile range (IQR) 11.8–45.7) from their neurosurgical centre. One in four children took longer than one hour to reach hospital after injury. Once in an accident and emergency department, 41% took longer than fours hours to arrive at the regional centre. The median interval between time of accident and arrival at the surgical centre was 4.5 hours (IQR 2.23–7.73), and 79% of inter‐hospital transfers were undertaken by the referring hospital rather than the regional centre. In cases where the regional centre undertook the transfer, none were completed within four hours of presentation—the median interval was 6.3 hours (IQR 5.1–8.12). Conclusions The system of care for severely head injured children in the UK does not achieve surgical evacuation of a significant haematoma within four hours. The recommendation to use specialist regional paediatric transfer teams delays rather than expedites the emergency service. PMID:16794092

  15. Repetitive head trauma, chronic traumatic encephalopathy and tau: Challenges in translating from mice to men.

    PubMed

    Ojo, Joseph O; Mouzon, Benoit C; Crawford, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurological and psychiatric condition marked by preferential perivascular foci of neurofibrillary and glial tangles (composed of hyperphosphorylated-tau proteins) in the depths of the sulci. Recent retrospective case series published over the last decade on athletes and military personnel have added considerably to our clinical and histopathological knowledge of CTE. This has marked a vital turning point in the traumatic brain injury (TBI) field, raising public awareness of the potential long-term effects of mild and moderate repetitive TBI, which has been recognized as one of the major risk factors associated with CTE. Although these human studies have been informative, their retrospective design carries certain inherent limitations that should be cautiously interpreted. In particular, the current overriding issue in the CTE literature remains confusing in regard to appropriate definitions of terminology, variability in individual pathologies and the potential case selection bias in autopsy based studies. There are currently no epidemiological or prospective studies on CTE. Controlled preclinical studies in animals therefore provide an alternative means for specifically interrogating aspects of CTE pathogenesis. In this article, we review the current literature and discuss difficulties and challenges of developing in-vivo TBI experimental paradigms to explore the link between repetitive head trauma and tau-dependent changes. We provide our current opinion list of recommended features to consider for successfully modeling CTE in animals to better understand the pathobiology and develop therapeutics and diagnostics, and critical factors, which might influence outcome. We finally discuss the possible directions of future experimental research in the repetitive TBI/CTE field.

  16. Cannabis Use Has Negligible Effects Following Severe Traumatic Injury.

    PubMed

    AbdelFattah, Kareem R; Edwards, Courtney R; Cripps, Michael W; Minshall, Christian T; Phelan, Herb A; Minei, Joseph P; Eastman, Alexander L

    Nearly half of all states have legalized medical marijuana or recreational-use marijuana. As more states move toward legalization, the effects on injured patients must be evaluated. This study sought to determine effects of cannabis positivity at the time of severe injury on hospital outcomes compared with individuals negative for illicit substances and those who were users of other illicit substances. A Level I trauma center performed a retrospective chart review covering subjects over a 2-year period with toxicology performed and an Injury Severity Score (ISS) of more than 16. These individuals were divided into the negative and positive toxicology groups, further divided into the marijuana-only, other drugs-only, and mixed-use groups. Differences in presenting characteristics, hospital length of stay, intensive care unit (ICU) stays, ventilator days, and death were compared. A total of 8,441 subjects presented during the study period; 2,134 (25%) of these had toxicology performed; 843 (40%) had an ISS of more than 16, with 347 having negative tests (NEG); 70 (8.3%) substance users tested positive only for marijuana (MO), 323 (38.3%) for other drugs-only, excluding marijuana (OD), and 103 (12.2%) subjects showed positivity for mixed-use (MU). The ISS was similar for all groups. No differences were identified in Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), ventilator days, blood administration, or ICU/hospital length of stay when comparing the MO group with the NEG group. Significant differences occurred between the OD group and the NEG/MO/MU groups for GCS, ICU length of stay, and hospital charges. Cannabis users suffering from severe injury demonstrated no detrimental outcomes in this study compared with nondrug users.

  17. Cerebral perfusion pressure and risk of brain hypoxia in severe head injury: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Marín-Caballos, Antonio J; Murillo-Cabezas, Francisco; Cayuela-Domínguez, Aurelio; Domínguez-Roldán, Jose M; Rincón-Ferrari, M Dolores; Valencia-Anguita, Julio; Flores-Cordero, Juan M; Muñoz-Sánchez, M Angeles

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Higher and lower cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) thresholds have been proposed to improve brain tissue oxygen pressure (PtiO2) and outcome. We study the distribution of hypoxic PtiO2 samples at different CPP thresholds, using prospective multimodality monitoring in patients with severe traumatic brain injury. Methods This is a prospective observational study of 22 severely head injured patients admitted to a neurosurgical critical care unit from whom multimodality data was collected during standard management directed at improving intracranial pressure, CPP and PtiO2. Local PtiO2 was continuously measured in uninjured areas and snapshot samples were collected hourly and analyzed in relation to simultaneous CPP. Other variables that influence tissue oxygen availability, mainly arterial oxygen saturation, end tidal carbon dioxide, body temperature and effective hemoglobin, were also monitored to keep them stable in order to avoid non-ischemic hypoxia. Results Our main results indicate that half of PtiO2 samples were at risk of hypoxia (defined by a PtiO2 equal to or less than 15 mmHg) when CPP was below 60 mmHg, and that this percentage decreased to 25% and 10% when CPP was between 60 and 70 mmHg and above 70 mmHg, respectively (p < 0.01). Conclusion Our study indicates that the risk of brain tissue hypoxia in severely head injured patients could be really high when CPP is below the normally recommended threshold of 60 mmHg, is still elevated when CPP is slightly over it, but decreases at CPP values above it. PMID:16356218

  18. Costo-osteochondral graft for post-traumatic osteonecrosis of the radial head in an adolescent boy.

    PubMed

    Iwai, S; Sato, K; Nakamura, T; Okazaki, M; Itoh, Y; Toyama, Y; Ikegami, H

    2011-01-01

    We present a case of post-traumatic osteonecrosis of the radial head in a 13-year-old boy which was treated with costo-osteochondral grafts. A satisfactory outcome was seen at a follow-up of two years and ten months. Although costo-osteochondral grafting has been used in the treatment of defects in articular cartilage, especially in the hand and the elbow, the extension of the technique to manage post-traumatic osteonecrosis of the radial head in a child has not previously been reported in the English language literature. Complete relief of pain was obtained and an improvement in the range of movement was observed. The long-term results remain uncertain.

  19. Non-surgical treatment of massive traumatic corpus callosum hematoma after blunt head injury: A case report.

    PubMed

    Elsayed, A; Elgamal, E; Elsayed, A A; Wasserberg, J; Kuncz, A

    2016-01-01

    Massive hematoma of the corpus callosum caused by blunt head trauma is an extremely rare lesion. Most frequent traumatic lesions involve the corpus callosum are diffuse axonal injuries. They might be associated with small hemorrhagic foci in the hemispheric and brain stem white matter, intraventricular hemorrhages, subarachnoid hemorrhages, traumatic lesions of the septum pellucidum and fornix. Many cases of corpus callosum injury present with permanent disconnection syndrome. We present a case of a 32-year-old female suffered blunt head trauma resulted in massive corpus callosum hematoma which was managed non-surgically. The patient initially had a reduced conscious level and symptoms of disconnection syndrome, and significant recovery was observed at 6 months follow up.

  20. Premorbid prevalence of poor academic performance in severe head injury.

    PubMed Central

    Haas, J F; Cope, D N; Hall, K

    1987-01-01

    A study of 80 head injured patients revealed poor premorbid academic performance in up to 50% of the sample. Poor academic performance, as defined by diagnosis of learning disability, multiple failed academic subjects, or school dropout during secondary education, is not a previously cited risk factor for head injury. These findings have important implications in the identification of a high risk population and in the subsequent ability to reduce the incidence of head injury. PMID:3819755

  1. Closed head experimental traumatic brain injury increases size and bone volume of callus in mice with concomitant tibial fracture

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Rhys D; Grills, Brian L; Church, Jarrod E; Walsh, Nicole C; McDonald, Aaron C; Agoston, Denes V; Sun, Mujun; O’Brien, Terence J; Shultz, Sandy R; McDonald, Stuart J

    2016-01-01

    Concomitant traumatic brain injury (TBI) and long bone fracture are commonly observed in multitrauma and polytrauma. Despite clinical observations of enhanced bone healing in patients with TBI, the relationship between TBI and fracture healing remains poorly understood, with clinical data limited by the presence of several confounding variables. Here we developed a novel trauma model featuring closed-skull weight-drop TBI and concomitant tibial fracture in order to investigate the effect of TBI on fracture healing. Male mice were assigned into Fracture + Sham TBI (FX) or Fracture + TBI (MULTI) groups and sacrificed at 21 and 35 days post-injury for analysis of healing fractures by micro computed tomography (μCT) and histomorphometry. μCT analysis revealed calluses from MULTI mice had a greater bone and total tissue volume, and displayed higher mean polar moment of inertia when compared to calluses from FX mice at 21 days post-injury. Histomorphometric results demonstrated an increased amount of trabecular bone in MULTI calluses at 21 days post-injury. These findings indicate that closed head TBI results in calluses that are larger in size and have an increased bone volume, which is consistent with the notion that TBI induces the formation of a more robust callus. PMID:27682431

  2. Bilateral non-traumatic aseptic osteonecrosis in the femoral head. An experimental study of incidence

    SciTech Connect

    Hauzeur, J.P.; Pasteels, J.L.; Orloff, S.

    1987-10-01

    Thirty-five patients who were seen with non-traumatic aseptic osteonecrosis of the femoral head were included in a study of the contralateral hip to evaluate the incidence of bilateral disease. We used not only conventional radiography and scintigraphy but also measurement of intramedullary pressure and core biopsy. Pain was caused by 14.3 per cent of the contralateral hips, a lesion was demonstrated on plain radiographs in 51.4 per cent, and increased isotopic uptake was seen in 31.4 per cent. Histological study of specimens obtained by osteomedullary biopsy (after special procedure) showed bilateral necrosis in 88.5 per cent of the patients. After a mean follow-up of thirty-four months, only one of nine hips that were painless and had negative radiographic and isotopic findings, but had positive findings on biopsy, became painful and radiographically positive. The intramedullary pressure in the intertrochanteric area was recorded in each hip, and no correlation was found with the radiographic stage or with pain.

  3. Vestibulo-ocular monitoring as a predictor of outcome after severe traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Based on the knowledge that traumatic brainstem damage often leads to alteration in brainstem functions, including the vestibulo-ocular reflex, the present study is designed to determine whether prediction of outcome in the early phase after severe traumatic brain injury is possible by means of vestibulo-ocular monitoring. Methods Vestibulo-ocular monitoring is based on video-oculographic recording of eye movements during galvanic labyrinth polarization. The integrity of vestibulo-ocular reflex is determined from the eye movement response during vestibular galvanic labyrinth polarization stimulation. Vestibulo-ocular monitoring is performed within three days after traumatic brain injury and the oculomotor response compared to outcome after six months (Glasgow Outcome Score). Results Twenty-seven patients underwent vestibulo-ocular monitoring within three days after severe traumatic brain injury. One patient was excluded from the study. In 16 patients oculomotor response was induced, in the remaining 11 patients no oculomotor response was observed. The patients' outcome was classified as Glasgow Outcome Score 1-2 or as Glasgow Outcome Score 3 to 5. Statistical testing supported the hypothesis that those patients with oculomotor response tended to recover (exact two-sided Fisher-Test (P < 10-3)). Conclusions The results indicate that vestibulo-ocular monitoring with galvanic labyrinth polarization performed during the first days after traumatic brain injury helps to predict favourable or unfavourable outcome. As an indicator of brainstem function, vestibulo-ocular monitoring provides a useful, complementary approach to the identification of brainstem lesions by imaging techniques. PMID:19948056

  4. External foam layers to football helmets reduce head impact severity.

    PubMed

    Nakatsuka, Austin S; Yamamoto, Loren G

    2014-08-01

    Current American football helmet design has a rigid exterior with a padded interior. Softening the hard external layer of the helmet may reduce the impact potential of the helmet, providing extra head protection and reducing its use as an offensive device. The objective of this study is to measure the impact reduction potential provided by external foam. We obtained a football helmet with built-in accelerometer-based sensors, placed it on a boxing mannequin and struck it with a weighted swinging pendulum helmet to mimic the forces sustained during a helmet-to-helmet strike. We then applied layers of 1.3 cm thick polyolefin foam to the exterior surface of the helmets and repeated the process. All impact severity measures were significantly reduced with the application of the external foam. These results support the hypothesis that adding a soft exterior layer reduces the force of impact which may be applicable to the football field. Redesigning football helmets could reduce the injury potential of the sport.

  5. Severe Traumatic Brain Injury, Frontal Lesions, and Social Aspects of Language Use: A Study of French-Speaking Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dardier, Virginie; Bernicot, Josie; Delanoe, Anaig; Vanberten, Melanie; Fayada, Catherine; Chevignard, Mathilde; Delaye, Corinne; Laurent-Vannier, Anne; Dubois, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the social (pragmatic) aspects of language use by French-speaking individuals with frontal lesions following a severe traumatic brain injury. Eleven participants with traumatic brain injury performed tasks in three areas of communication: production (interview situation), comprehension (direct…

  6. [Hemodynamic correction in children with severe traumatic injuries by the means of transpulmonary hemodilution].

    PubMed

    Lekmanov, A U; Azovskiĭ, D K; Piliutnik, S F; Gegueva, E N

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the research is t objectify the indications for use of catecholamines and/or change of the infusion therapy volume based on transpulmonary thermodilution in children with severe traumatic injuries. The examined group consisted of 22 children with thermal concomitant or isolated trauma and drowning. All the patents were transferred to the Intensive Care Unit from other hospitals. Hemodynamic parameter estimation was based upon transpulmonary thermodilution. Results indicate, that based upon dynamic assessment of cardiac output, preload (global end diastolic volume index) and postload (systemic vascular resistance index) it is possible to carry out an early targeted correction of the fluid therapy and chose the right type of inotorpic support. Transpulmonary thermodilution in children with severe traumatic injuries allows achieving optimal parameters of blood circulation just 24 hours after its adaption.

  7. Significance of Traumatic Macroamputation in Severely Injured Patients: An Analysis of the Traumaregister DGU®.

    PubMed

    Delhey, Patrick; Huber, Stephan; Hanschen, Marc; Häberle, Sandra; Trentzsch, Heiko; Deiler, Stephan; van Griensven, Martijn; Biberthaler, Peter; Lefering, Rolf; Huber-Wagner, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    Treatment of patients with traumatic macroamputations is challenging. The aim of this study is to analyze the significance of this type of injury in TraumaRegister DGU® (TR-DGU) and to depict the rate of formal surgical ablation of the traumatically induced amputation, epidemiologic data, as well as outcome in severely injured patients with amputations. We acquired data from the TR-DGU of the German Trauma Society (DGU). The inclusion criteria for our study were Injury Severity Score (ISS) greater than 9, macroamputation, and available data about the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) code. A total of 48,908 of 67,425 patients had an ISS greater than 9 and available data about the AIS code. In total, 926 (1.9%) of 48,908 patients had an immediate traumatic macroamputation on-scene. Thereof, 298 patients (32.2%) had a macroamputation of the arms, 605 patients (65.3%) had an amputation of the legs, and 23 patients (2.5%) had both. Among them, 457 patients (49.4%) with a macroamputation had monotrauma. In total, 126 patients (13.6%) underwent replantation and 800 patients (86.4%) underwent formal surgical ablation of the traumatically induced amputation. Seventy-six (23.7%) of 321 patients with upper-extremity amputations and 53 (8.4%) of 628 patients with lower-extremity amputations underwent replantation. Mortality in patients with replantation was lower (5.6% vs. 19.6%, P < 0.001). Standardized mortality rate was lower for patients with replantation (0.71, 95% confidence interval, 0.20-1.21 vs. 0.94, 95% confidence interval, 0.80-1.10; P = 0.26). Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) was significantly better for patients with replantation (34.0%; GOS score 5) as compared with patients without replantation (20.7%; GOS score 5; P < 0.001). In borderline patients (defined according to the orthopedic damage control principles), 91.5% received formal surgical ablation of the traumatically induced amputation and 8.5% underwent replantation. The rate of formal surgical ablation of the

  8. Timing of long bone fracture fixation in severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Jamjoom, Bakur A; Jamjoom, Abdulhakim B

    2012-04-01

    We present a review of the published evidence on the optimal timing for long bone fracture fixation in severe traumatic brain injury (TBI); a matter that remains under debate. Fifteen retrospective articles (level II-3 evidence) were considered suitable for the review. We conclude that the published evidence does not provide a definitive answer to the optimal timing of long bone fracture surgery in severe TBI, and a randomized controlled trial is required. We recommend a safe strategy that combines damage control surgery with a period of monitoring of intracranial pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure, and if available brain tissue oxygen until the patient is considered fit for the fracture fixation.

  9. 'Cool and quiet' therapy for malignant hyperthermia following severe traumatic brain injury: A preliminary clinical approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-He; Shang, Zhen-DE; Chen, Chao; Lu, Nan; Liu, Qi-Feng; Liu, Ming; Yan, Jing

    2015-02-01

    Malignant hyperthermia increases mortality and disability in patients with brain trauma. A clinical treatment for malignant hyperthermia following severe traumatic brain injury, termed 'cool and quiet' therapy by the authors of the current study, was investigated. Between June 2003 and June 2013, 110 consecutive patients with malignant hyperthermia following severe traumatic brain injury were treated using mild hypothermia (35-36°C) associated with small doses of sedative and muscle relaxant. Physiological parameters and intracranial pressure were monitored, and the patients slowly rewarmed following the maintenance of mild hypothermia for 3-12 days. Consecutive patients who had undergone normothermia therapy were retrospectively analyzed as the control. In the mild hypothermia group, the recovery rate was 54.5%, the mortality rate was 22.7%, and the severe and mild disability rates were 11.8 and 10.9%, respectively. The mortality rate of the patients, particularly that of patients with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of between 3 and 5 differed significantly between the hypothermia group and the normothermia group (P<0.05). The mortality of patients with a GCS score of between 6 and 8 was not significantly different between the two groups (P> 0.05). The therapy using mild hypothermia with a combination of sedative and muscle relaxant was beneficial in decreasing the mortality of patients with malignant hyperthermia following severe traumatic brain injury, particularly in patients with a GCS score within the range 3-5 on admission. The therapy was found to be safe, effective and convenient. However, rigorous clinical trials are required to provide evidence of the effectiveness of 'cool and quiet' therapy for hyperthermia.

  10. Decompressive craniectomy in severe traumatic brain injury: prognostic factors and complications

    PubMed Central

    Grille, Pedro; Tommasino, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the clinical characteristics, complications and factors associated with the prognosis of severe traumatic brain injury among patients who undergo a decompressive craniectomy. Methods Retrospective study of patients seen in an intensive care unit with severe traumatic brain injury in whom a decompressive craniectomy was performed between the years 2003 and 2012. Patients were followed until their discharge from the intensive care unit. Their clinical-tomographic characteristics, complications, and factors associated with prognosis (univariate and multivariate analysis) were analyzed. Results A total of 64 patients were studied. Primary and lateral decompressive craniectomies were performed for the majority of patients. A high incidence of complications was found (78% neurological and 52% nonneurological). A total of 42 patients (66%) presented poor outcomes, and 22 (34%) had good neurological outcomes. Of the patients who survived, 61% had good neurological outcomes. In the univariate analysis, the factors significantly associated with poor neurological outcome were postdecompressive craniectomy intracranial hypertension, greater severity and worse neurological state at admission. In the multivariate analysis, only postcraniectomy intracranial hypertension was significantly associated with a poor outcome. Conclusion This study involved a very severe and difficult to manage group of patients with high morbimortality. Intracranial hypertension was a main factor of poor outcome in this population. PMID:26340150

  11. Localized cortical chronic traumatic encephalopathy pathology after single, severe axonal injury in human brain.

    PubMed

    Shively, Sharon B; Edgerton, Sarah L; Iacono, Diego; Purohit, Dushyant P; Qu, Bao-Xi; Haroutunian, Vahram; Davis, Kenneth L; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Perl, Daniel P

    2017-03-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease associated with repetitive mild impact traumatic brain injury from contact sports. Recently, a consensus panel defined the pathognomonic lesion for CTE as accumulations of abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau (p-tau) in neurons (neurofibrillary tangles), astrocytes and cell processes distributed around small blood vessels at sulcal depths in irregular patterns within the cortex. The pathophysiological mechanism for this lesion is unknown. Moreover, a subset of CTE cases harbors cortical β-amyloid plaques. In this study, we analyzed postmortem brain tissues from five institutionalized patients with schizophrenia and history of surgical leucotomy with subsequent survival of at least another 40 years. Because leucotomy involves severing axons bilaterally in prefrontal cortex, this surgical procedure represents a human model of single traumatic brain injury with severe axonal damage and no external impact. We examined cortical tissues at the leucotomy site and at both prefrontal cortex rostral and frontal cortex caudal to the leucotomy site. For comparison, we analyzed brain tissues at equivalent neuroanatomical sites from non-leucotomized patients with schizophrenia, matched in age and gender. All five leucotomy cases revealed severe white matter damage with dense astrogliosis at the axotomy site and also neurofibrillary tangles and p-tau immunoreactive neurites in the overlying gray matter. Four cases displayed p-tau immunoreactivity in neurons, astrocytes and cell processes encompassing blood vessels at cortical sulcal depths in irregular patterns, similar to CTE. The three cases with apolipoprotein E ε4 haplotype showed scattered β-amyloid plaques in the overlying gray matter, but not the two cases with apolipoprotein E ε3/3 genotype. Brain tissue samples from prefrontal cortex rostral and frontal cortex caudal to the leucotomy site, and all cortical samples from the non-leucotomized patients

  12. Restoration of Function With Acupuncture Following Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Jacob; Sparks, Linda; Deng, Yong

    2015-01-01

    This case report illustrates the improvement of an acupuncture-treated patient who incurred a severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) from a snowboarding accident. Over 4 years, the patient progressed from initially not being able to walk, having difficulty with speech, and suffering from poor eyesight to where he has now regained significant motor function, speech, and vision and has returned to snowboarding. A core acupuncture protocol plus specific points added to address the patient's ongoing concerns was used. This case adds to the medical literature by demonstrating the potential role of acupuncture in TBI treatment. PMID:26665023

  13. Restoration of Function With Acupuncture Following Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Jacob; Sparks, Linda; Deng, Yong; Langland, Jeffrey

    2015-11-01

    This case report illustrates the improvement of an acupuncture-treated patient who incurred a severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) from a snowboarding accident. Over 4 years, the patient progressed from initially not being able to walk, having difficulty with speech, and suffering from poor eyesight to where he has now regained significant motor function, speech, and vision and has returned to snowboarding. A core acupuncture protocol plus specific points added to address the patient's ongoing concerns was used. This case adds to the medical literature by demonstrating the potential role of acupuncture in TBI treatment.

  14. Gabapentin in the management of dysautonomia following severe traumatic brain injury: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Baguley, Ian J; Heriseanu, Roxana E; Gurka, Joseph A; Nordenbo, Annette; Cameron, Ian D

    2007-01-01

    The pharmacological management of dysautonomia, otherwise known as autonomic storms, following acute neurological insults, is problematic and remains poorly researched. This paper presents six subjects with dysautonomia following extremely severe traumatic brain injury where gabapentin controlled paroxysmal autonomic changes and posturing in the early post‐acute phase following limited success with conventional medication regimens. In two subjects, other medications were reduced or ceased without a recurrence of symptoms. It is proposed that medications that can block or minimise abnormal afferent stimuli may represent a better option for dysautonomia management than drugs which increase inhibition of efferent pathways. Potential mechanisms for these effects are discussed. PMID:17435191

  15. Treatment of Severe Adult Traumatic Brain Injury Using Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells.

    PubMed

    Cox, Charles S; Hetz, Robert A; Liao, George P; Aertker, Benjamin M; Ewing-Cobbs, Linda; Juranek, Jenifer; Savitz, Sean I; Jackson, Margaret L; Romanowska-Pawliczek, Anna M; Triolo, Fabio; Dash, Pramod K; Pedroza, Claudia; Lee, Dean A; Worth, Laura; Aisiku, Imoigele P; Choi, Huimahn A; Holcomb, John B; Kitagawa, Ryan S

    2017-04-01

    Preclinical studies using bone marrow derived cells to treat traumatic brain injury have demonstrated efficacy in terms of blood-brain barrier preservation, neurogenesis, and functional outcomes. Phase 1 clinical trials using bone marrow mononuclear cells infused intravenously in children with severe traumatic brain injury demonstrated safety and potentially a central nervous system structural preservation treatment effect. This study sought to confirm the safety, logistic feasibility, and potential treatment effect size of structural preservation/inflammatory biomarker mitigation in adults to guide Phase 2 clinical trial design. Adults with severe traumatic brain injury (Glasgow Coma Scale 5-8) and without signs of irreversible brain injury were evaluated for entry into the trial. A dose escalation format was performed in 25 patients: 5 controls, followed 5 patients in each dosing cohort (6, 9, 12 ×10(6) cells/kg body weight), then 5 more controls. Bone marrow harvest, cell processing to isolate the mononuclear fraction, and re-infusion occurred within 48 hours after injury. Patients were monitored for harvest-related hemodynamic changes, infusional toxicity, and adverse events. Outcome measures included magnetic resonance imaging-based measurements of supratentorial and corpus callosal volumes as well as diffusion tensor imaging-based measurements of fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity of the corpus callosum and the corticospinal tract at the level of the brainstem at 1 month and 6 months postinjury. Functional and neurocognitive outcomes were measured and correlated with imaging data. Inflammatory cytokine arrays were measured in the plasma pretreatment, posttreatment, and at 1 and 6 month follow-up. There were no serious adverse events. There was a mild pulmonary toxicity of the highest dose that was not clinically significant. Despite the treatment group having greater injury severity, there was structural preservation of critical regions of interest

  16. A systematic review of the relationship between severe maternal morbidity and post-traumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The incidence of severe maternal morbidity is increasing in high-income countries as a consequence, in part, of increased obstetric intervention and increasingly complex medical needs of women who become pregnant. Access to emergency obstetric care means that for the majority of women in these countries, an experience of severe maternal morbidity is unlikely to result in loss of life. However, little is known about the subsequent impact on postnatal psychological health resulting in an evidence gap to support provision of appropriate care for these women. There has recently been increasing recognition that childbirth can be a cause of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The combination of experiencing a life-threatening complication and its management may culminate in psychological trauma. This systematic review examined the association between women’s experience of severe maternal morbidity during labour, at the time of giving birth or within the first week following birth, and PTSD and its symptoms. Methods Relevant literature was identified through multiple databases, including MEDLINE, PsycINFO, EMBASE, CINAHL, British Nursing Index, Web of Science, Cochrane library and the British Library, using predetermined search strategies. The search terms included "post-traumatic stress disorder", "PTSD", "stress disorders, post-traumatic", "maternal morbidity", “pregnancy complications” “puerperal disorders”, "obstetric labo(u)r complication", "postpartum h(a)emorrhage", "eclampsia”. Studies identified were categorised according to pre-defined inclusion and exclusion criteria. The quality of included studies was assessed using the relevant CASP appraisal tools. Results Eleven primary studies met review criteria. Evidence of a relationship between severe maternal morbidity and PTSD/PTSD symptoms was inconsistent and findings varied between studies. Nevertheless, there is some evidence that severe pre-eclampsia is a risk factor for PTSD and its

  17. Differential Activation of Infiltrating Monocyte-Derived Cells After Mild and Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Trahanas, Diane M; Cuda, Carla M; Perlman, Harris; Schwulst, Steven J

    2015-03-01

    Microglia are the resident innate immune cells of the brain. Although embryologically and functionally distinct, they are morphologically similar to peripheral monocyte-derived cells, resulting in a poor ability to discriminate between the two cell types. The purpose of this study was to develop a rapid and reliable method to simultaneously characterize, quantify, and discriminate between whole populations of myeloid cells from the brain in a murine model of traumatic brain injury. Male C57BL/6 mice underwent traumatic brain injury (n = 16) or sham injury (n = 14). Brains were harvested at 24 h after injury. Multiparameter flow cytometry and sequential gating analysis were performed, allowing for discrimination between microglia and infiltrating leukocytes as well as for the characterization and quantification of individual subtypes within the infiltrating population. The proportion of infiltrating leukocytes within the brain increased with the severity of injury, and the predominant cell types within the infiltrating population were monocyte derived (P = 0.01). In addition, the severity of injury altered the overall makeup of the infiltrating monocyte-derived cells. In conclusion, we describe a flow cytometry-based technique for gross discrimination between infiltrating leukocytes and microglia as well as the ability to simultaneously characterize and quantify individual myeloid subtypes and their maturation states within these populations.

  18. Changes in emotional empathy, affective responsivity, and behavior following severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Arielle; McDonald, Skye; Rushby, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the relationship between deficits in empathy, emotional responsivity, and social behavior in adults with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). A total of 21 patients with severe TBI and 25 control participants viewed six film clips containing pleasant, unpleasant, and neutral content whilst facial muscle responses, skin conductance, and valence and arousal ratings were measured. Emotional empathy (the Balanced Emotional Empathy Scale, BEES: self-report) and changes in drive and control in social situations (The Current Behaviour Scale, CBS: relative report) were also assessed. In comparison to control participants, those in the TBI group reported less ability to empathize emotionally and had reduced facial responding to both pleasant and unpleasant films. They also exhibited lowered autonomic arousal, as well as abnormal ratings of valence and arousal, particularly to unpleasant films. Relative reported loss of emotional control was significantly associated with heightened empathy, while there was a trend to suggest that impaired drive (or motivation) may be related to lower levels of emotional empathy. The results represent the first to suggest that level of emotional empathy post traumatic brain injury may be associated with behavioral manifestations of disorders of drive and control.

  19. Clinical application of event related potentials in patients with brain tumours and traumatic head injuries.

    PubMed

    Olbrich, H M; Nau, H E; Zerbin, D; Lanczos, L; Lodemann, E; Engelmeier, M P; Grote, W

    1986-01-01

    Event related potential recording and psychometric evaluation of cognitive impairment were carried out on 21 patients with brain tumours, 21 patients with severe head injuries and 24 controls. The tumour and trauma patients who met the psychometric inclusion criteria for dementia, but not the non-demented patients, had significantly longer N2 and P3 latencies than the controls. In assessing individual patients P3 latency correctly differentiated between demented and non-demented patients in 81% of cases (for N2 latency 77%). Particularly P3 latency may provide a practical and objective measure of mental impairment in neurosurgical disorders producing dementia. Marked asymmetry in N2 and P3 amplitudes between hemispheres was observed in a number of cases. No significant relationship was found between diminution of N2 and P3 components and side of lesion.

  20. Angular Impact Mitigation System for Bicycle Helmets to Reduce Head Acceleration and Risk of Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Kirk; Dau, Nathan; Feist, Florian; Deck, Caroline; Willinger, Rémy; Madey, Steven M.; Bottlang, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Angular acceleration of the head is a known cause of traumatic brain injury (TBI), but contemporary bicycle helmets lack dedicated mechanisms to mitigate angular acceleration. A novel Angular Impact Mitigation (AIM) system for bicycle helmets has been developed that employs an elastically suspended aluminum honeycomb liner to absorb linear acceleration in normal impacts as well as angular acceleration in oblique impacts. This study tested bicycle helmets with and without AIM technology to comparatively assess impact mitigation. Normal impact tests were performed to measure linear head acceleration. Oblique impact tests were performed to measure angular head acceleration and neck loading. Furthermore, acceleration histories of oblique impacts were analyzed in a computational head model to predict the resulting risk of TBI in the form of concussion and diffuse axonal injury (DAI). Compared to standard helmets, AIM helmets resulted in a 14% reduction in peak linear acceleration (p < 0.001), a 34% reduction in peak angular acceleration (p < 0.001), and a 22% to 32% reduction in neck loading (p < 0.001). Computational results predicted that AIM helmets reduced the risk of concussion and DAI by 27% and 44%, respectively. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that AIM technology could effectively improve impact mitigation compared to a contemporary expanded polystyrene-based bicycle helmet, and may enhance prevention of bicycle-related TBI. Further research is required. PMID:23770518

  1. Angular Impact Mitigation system for bicycle helmets to reduce head acceleration and risk of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Kirk; Dau, Nathan; Feist, Florian; Deck, Caroline; Willinger, Rémy; Madey, Steven M; Bottlang, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Angular acceleration of the head is a known cause of traumatic brain injury (TBI), but contemporary bicycle helmets lack dedicated mechanisms to mitigate angular acceleration. A novel Angular Impact Mitigation (AIM) system for bicycle helmets has been developed that employs an elastically suspended aluminum honeycomb liner to absorb linear acceleration in normal impacts as well as angular acceleration in oblique impacts. This study tested bicycle helmets with and without AIM technology to comparatively assess impact mitigation. Normal impact tests were performed to measure linear head acceleration. Oblique impact tests were performed to measure angular head acceleration and neck loading. Furthermore, acceleration histories of oblique impacts were analyzed in a computational head model to predict the resulting risk of TBI in the form of concussion and diffuse axonal injury (DAI). Compared to standard helmets, AIM helmets resulted in a 14% reduction in peak linear acceleration (p<0.001), a 34% reduction in peak angular acceleration (p<0.001), and a 22-32% reduction in neck loading (p<0.001). Computational results predicted that AIM helmets reduced the risk of concussion and DAI by 27% and 44%, respectively. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that AIM technology could effectively improve impact mitigation compared to a contemporary expanded polystyrene-based bicycle helmet, and may enhance prevention of bicycle-related TBI. Further research is required.

  2. The status of the fourth ventricle and ambient cisterns predict outcome in moderate and severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Bram; Beems, Tjemme; van der Vliet, Ton M; Borm, George F; Vos, Pieter E

    2010-02-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the head has become the diagnostic tool of choice, particularly for moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Various CT characteristics are associated with outcome, and may therefore be used as outcome predictors. One of the most prominent predictors appears to be the status of the basal cisterns. This study describes the prognostic value of the appearance of individual cisterns and ventricles in relation to that of the basal cisterns. Further, we determine the interrater and intrarater reliability in the evaluation of the cisterns and ventricles. All consecutive moderate and severe adult TBI patients admitted to our hospital were included in this study as part of the prospective Radboud University Brain Injury Cohort Study (RUBICS). Outcome was assessed at 6 months post-trauma using the Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended (GOS-E). The predictive value of cisterns and ventricles was determined using multivariate binary logistic regression analysis. We included 126 moderate and 574 severe TBI patients. Absence (complete obliteration), but also compression of the ambient cisterns and/or the fourth ventricle were strongly related to unfavorable outcome and death and emerged as the only significant outcome predictors after multivariate analysis. The assessment of the ambient cisterns and the fourth ventricle had a satisfactory inter- and intrarater reliability (kappa coefficients: 0.80-0.95). We conclude that, because obliteration of the ambient cisterns and the fourth ventricle both are better than the status of the basal cisterns as outcome predictors, they might be used in CT prediction models in cases of moderate and severe TBI.

  3. Mental Trauma Experienced by Caregivers of patients with Diffuse Axonal Injury or Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Syed Hassan, Syed Tajuddin; Jamaludin, Husna; Abd Raman, Rosna; Mohd Riji, Haliza; Wan Fei, Khaw

    2013-01-01

    Context As with care giving and rehabilitation in chronic illnesses, the concern with traumatic brain injury (TBI), particularly with diffuse axonal injury (DAI), is that the caregivers are so overwhelmingly involved in caring and rehabilitation of the victim that in the process they become traumatized themselves. This review intends to shed light on the hidden and silent trauma sustained by the caregivers of severe brain injury survivors. Motor vehicle accident (MVA) is the highest contributor of TBI or DAI. The essence of trauma is the infliction of pain and suffering and having to bear the pain (i.e. by the TBI survivor) and the burden of having to take care and manage and rehabilitate the TBI survivor (i.e. by the TBI caregiver). Moreover many caregivers are not trained for their care giving task, thus compounding the stress of care giving and rehabilitating patients. Most research on TBI including DAI, focus on the survivors and not on the caregivers. TBI injury and its effects and impacts remain the core question of most studies, which are largely based on the quantitative approach. Evidence Acquisition Qualitative research can better assess human sufferings such as in the case of DAI trauma. While quantitative research can measure many psychometric parameters to assess some aspects of trauma conditions, qualitative research is able to fully reveal the meaning, ramification and experience of TBI trauma. Both care giving and rehabilitation are overwhelmingly demanding; hence , they may complicate the caregivers’ stress. However, some positive outcomes also exist. Results Caregivers involved in caring and rehabilitation of TBI victims may become mentally traumatized. Posttraumatic recovery of the TBI survivor can enhance the entire family’s closeness and bonding as well as improve the mental status of the caregiver. Conclusions A long-term longitudinal study encompassing integrated research is needed to fully understand the traumatic experiences of

  4. Early asymmetric cardio-cerebral causality and outcome after severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lei; Smieleweski, Peter; Czosnyka, Marek; Ercole, Ari

    2017-03-23

    The brain and heart are two vital systems in health and disease, increasingly recognised as a complex, interdependent network with constant information flow in both directions. After severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), the causal, directed interactions between the brain, heart and autonomic nervous system have not been well established. Novel methods are needed to probe unmeasured, potentially prognostic information in complex biological networks that are not revealed via traditional means. In this study, we examined potential bi-directional causality between intracranial pressure (ICP), mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) and its relationship to mortality in a 24-hour period early after TBI. We applied Granger causality (GC) analysis to cardio-cerebral monitoring data from 171 severe traumatic brain injury patients admitted to a single neurocritical care center over a ten-year period. There was significant bi-directional causality between ICP and MAP, MAP and HR, ICP and HR in the majority of patients (p < 0.01). MAP influenced both ICP and HR to a greater extent (higher GC, p < 0. 00001), but there was no dominant unidirectional causality between ICP and HR (p = 0.85). Those who died had significantly lower GC for ICP causing MAP and HR causing ICP (p = 0.006 and p = 0.004 respectively) and were predictors of mortality independent of age, sex and traditional intracranial variables (ICP, cerebral perfusion pressure, GCS and PRx). Examining the brain and heart with GC-based features for the first time in severe TBI patients has confirmed strong interdependence, and reveals a significant relationship between select causality pairs and mortality. These results support the notion that impaired causal information flow between the cerebrovascular, autonomic and cardiovascular systems are of central importance in severe TBI.

  5. CO-OCCURRENCE OF CHRONIC HEAD, FACE AND NECK PAIN, AND DEPRESSION IN WAR VETERANS WITH POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER.

    PubMed

    Muhvić-Urek, Miranda; Vukšić, Željka; Simonić-Kocijan, Sunčana; Braut, Vedrana; Braut, Alen; Uhač, Ivone

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated the relationship between chronic head, face and neck pain, and the level of depression in Croatian war veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The presence of self-reported pain, pain on digital palpation, and pain severity in masticatory and neck muscles, temporomandibular joints and sinuses, as well as the level of depression were assessed in a group of war veterans with PTSD (n=52). Control groups consisted of war veterans without PTSD (n=50) and healthy men that were not engaged in war actions and were free from PTSD (n=50). The number of self-reported pain and number of painful sites were correlated with the level of depression. More self-reported pain and painful sites were recorded in the group of war veterans with PTSD as compared with either war veterans without PTSD or healthy men. Furthermore, PTSD patients mostly suffered from severe depression. There was a statistically significant positive correlation between all investigated pain parameters and level of depression. As the most important finding, the present study demonstrated chronic head, face and neck pain to be related to depression in PTSD patients.

  6. Recovery of Visual Search following Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen; Robertson, Kayela

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Deficits in attentional abilities can significantly impact rehabilitation and recovery from traumatic brain injury (TBI). This study investigated the nature and recovery of pre-attentive (parallel) and attentive (serial) visual search abilities after TBI. Methods Participants were 40 individuals with moderate to severe TBI who were tested following emergence from post-traumatic amnesia and approximately 8-months post-injury, as well as 40 age and education matched controls. Pre-attentive (automatic) and attentive (controlled) visual search situations were created by manipulating the saliency of the target item amongst distractor items in visual displays. The relationship between pre-attentive and attentive visual search rates and follow-up community integration were also explored. Results The results revealed intact parallel (automatic) processing skills in the TBI group both post-acutely and at follow-up. In contrast, when attentional demands on visual search were increased by reducing the saliency of the target, the TBI group demonstrated poorer performances compared to the control group both post-acutely and 8-months post-injury. Neither pre-attentive nor attentive visual search slope values correlated with follow-up community integration. Conclusions These results suggest that utilizing intact pre-attentive visual search skills during rehabilitation may help to reduce high mental workload situations, thereby improving the rehabilitation process. For example, making commonly used objects more salient in the environment should increase reliance or more automatic visual search processes and reduce visual search time for individuals with TBI. PMID:25671675

  7. Prediction of depression and anxiety 1 year after moderate-severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Demakis, George J; Hammond, Flora M; Knotts, Allison

    2010-07-01

    This study examined three scales of the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI; Anxiety, Anxiety-Related Disorders, and Depression) in 88 participants 1 year after they suffered a moderate-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Participants were all enrolled in the federally funded Traumatic Brain Injury Model System project at Carolinas Rehabilitation. The following variables were assessed at the time of injury: age, sex, employment and marital status, and length of loss of consciousness. Disability status, using the Disability Rating Scale (DRS), was assessed at the time of discharge from the rehabilitation hospital. A series of three linear regression analyses found that these variables significantly predicted scores on the Anxiety and Anxiety-Related Disorders scales, which accounted for 14% and 17.7% of the variance, respectively. The variables did not significantly predict scores on the Depression scale. Within each regression analysis, DRS was consistently and negatively related to each PAI scale, such that greater disability was associated with better psychological functioning. Such seemingly paradoxical findings are discussed in terms of anosognosia or poor awareness of psychological functioning among those with greater disability 1 year after TBI.

  8. The Brain Tourniquet: Physiological Isolation of Brain Regions Damaged by Traumatic Head Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-19

    brain slices were treated after injury with either a nootropic agent (aniracetam, cyclothiazide, IDRA 21, or 1-BCP) or the antiepileptic drug...pharmacological approach. 15. SUBJECT TERMS traumatic brain injury, cell necrosis, neuroprotection, nootropics , epilepsy, long-term potentiation...render their use problematic in an effective brain tourniquet system. We chose to focus our investigations on the nootropic (cognition enhancing) drugs

  9. Traumatic conditions of the coxofemoral joint: luxation, femoral head-neck fracture, acetabular fracture.

    PubMed

    Marchionatti, Emma; Fecteau, Gilles; Desrochers, André

    2014-03-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of traumatic conditions of the hip joint in cattle remain a challenge for the veterinarian. This article is intended to give an overview of the most common orthopedic problems of the bovine coxofemoral joint, diagnostic procedures, and treatment options.

  10. Hypothermia for severe traumatic brain injury in adults: Recent lessons from randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Shaefi, Shahzad; Mittel, Aaron M.; Hyam, Jonathan A.; Boone, M. Dustin; Chen, Clark C.; Kasper, Ekkehard M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a worldwide health concern associated with significant morbidity and mortality. In the United States, severe TBI is managed according to recommendations set forth in 2007 by the Brain Trauma Foundation (BTF), which were based on relatively low quality clinical trials. These guidelines prescribed the use of hypothermia for the management of TBI. Several randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of hypothermia for TBI have since been conducted. Despite this new literature, there is ongoing controversy surrounding the use of hypothermia for the management of severe TBI. Methods: We searched the PubMed database for all RCTs of hypothermia for TBI since 2007 with the intent to review the methodology outcomes of these trials. Furthermore, we aimed to develop evidence-based, expert opinions based on these recent studies. Results: We identified 8 RCTs of therapeutic hypothermia published since 2007 that focused on changes in neurologic outcomes or mortality in patients with severe TBI. The majority of these trials did not identify improvement with the use of hypothermia, though there were subgroups of patients that may have benefited from hypothermia. Differences in methodology prevented direct comparison between studies. Conclusions: A growing body of literature disfavors the use of hypothermia for the management of severe TBI. In general, empiric hypothermia for severe TBI should be avoided. However, based on the results of recent trials, there may be some patients, such as those in Asian centers or with focal neurologic injury, who may benefit from hypothermia. PMID:28168089

  11. Development, Implementation, and Validation of Supported Employment Model(s) for Traumatically Brain Injured Persons. Head Injury Re-entry Project (Project HIRe). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Dale F.; Menz, Fredrick E.

    The final report of the Head Injury Re-entry Project (Project HIRe) describes activities of this 3-year (1987 to 1990) project, which used a "best practices" model approach and a community-based employment strategy with persons having traumatic brain injury (TBI) in nonurban areas. Among 15 project accomplishments are the following: (1)…

  12. Severe traumatic brain injury management and clinical outcome using the Lund concept.

    PubMed

    Koskinen, L-O D; Olivecrona, M; Grände, P O

    2014-12-26

    This review covers the main principles of the Lund concept for treatment of severe traumatic brain injury. This is followed by a description of results of clinical studies in which this therapy or a modified version of the therapy has been used. Unlike other guidelines, which are based on meta-analytical approaches, important components of the Lund concept are based on physiological mechanisms for regulation of brain volume and brain perfusion and to reduce transcapillary plasma leakage and the need for plasma volume expanders. There have been nine non-randomized and two randomized outcome studies with the Lund concept or modified versions of the concept. The non-randomized studies indicated that the Lund concept is beneficial for outcome. The two randomized studies were small but showed better outcome in the groups of patients treated according to the modified principles of the Lund concept than in the groups given a more conventional treatment.

  13. Injury pattern, hospital triage, and mortality of 1250 patients with severe traumatic brain injury caused by road traffic accidents.

    PubMed

    Leijdesdorff, Henry A; van Dijck, Jeroen T J M; Krijnen, Pieta; Vleggeert-Lankamp, Carmen L A M; Schipper, Inger B

    2014-03-01

    This epidemiological study analyzed the incidence, risk factors, hospital triage, and outcome of patients with severe traumatic brain injuries (sTBIs) caused by road traffic accidents (RTAs) admitted to hospitals in the Trauma Center West-Netherlands (TCWN) region. Trauma registry data were used to identify TBI in all RTA victims admitted to hospitals in the mid-West region of the Netherlands from 2003 to 2011. Type of head injury and severity were classified using the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS). Head injuries with AIS severity scores ≥ 3 were considered sTBI. Ten percent of all 12,503 hospital-admitted RTA victims sustained sTBI, ranging from 5.4% in motorcyclists, 7.4% in motorists, 9.6% in cyclists, and 12.7% in moped riders to 15.1% in pedestrians (p<0.0001). Among RTA victims admitted to hospital, sTBI was most prevalent in pedestrians (odds ratio [OR], 2.25; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.78-2.86) and moped riders (OR, 1.86; 95% CI, 1.51-2.30). Injury patterns differed between road user groups. Incidence of contusion ranged from 46.6% in cyclists to 74.2% in motorcyclists, whereas basilar and open-skull fractures were least common in motorcyclists (22.6%) and most common in moped riders (51.5%). Hemorrhage incidence ranged from 44.9% (motorists) to 63.6% (pedestrians). Subdural and -arachnoid bleedings were most frequent. Age, Glasgow Coma Scale, and type of hemorrhage were independent prognostic factors for in-hospital mortality after sTBI. In-hospital mortality ranged from 4.2% in moped riders to 14.1% in motorists. Pedestrians have the highest risk to sustain sTBI and, more specifically, intracranial hemorrhage. Hemorrhage and contusion both occur in over 50% of patients with sTBI. Specific brain injury patterns can be distinguished for specific road user groups, and independent prognostic risk factors for sTBI were identified. This knowledge may be used to improve vigilance for particular injuries in specific patient groups and stimulate

  14. Laser head for simultaneous optical pumping of several dye lasers. [with single flash lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mumola, P. B.; Mcalexander, B. T. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    The invention is a laser head for simultaneous pumping several dye lasers with a single flash lamp. The laser head includes primarily a multi-elliptical cylinder cavity with a single flash lamp placed along the common focal axis of the cavity and with capillary tube dye cells placed along each of the other focal axes of the cavity. The inside surface of the cavity is polished. Hence, the single flash lamp supplies the energy to the several dye cells.

  15. Spillway-Induced Salmon Head Injury Triggers the Generation of Brain αII-Spectrin Breakdown Product Biomarkers Similar to Mammalian Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Miracle, Ann; Denslow, Nancy D.; Kroll, Kevin J.; Liu, Ming Cheng; Wang, Kevin K. W.

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in biomedical research have resulted in the development of specific biomarkers for diagnostic testing of disease condition or physiological risk. Of specific interest are αII-spectrin breakdown products (SBDPs), which are produced by proteolytic events in traumatic brain injury and have been used as biomarkers to predict the severity of injury in humans and other mammalian brain injury models. This study describes and demonstrates the successful use of antibody-based mammalian SBDP biomarkers to detect head injury in migrating juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) that have been injured during passage through high-energy hydraulic environments present in spillways under different operational configurations. Mortality and injury assessment techniques currently measure only near-term direct mortality and easily observable acute injury. Injury-based biomarkers may serve as a quantitative indicator of subacute physical injury and recovery, and aid hydropower operators in evaluation of safest passage configuration and operation actions for migrating juvenile salmonids. We describe a novel application of SBDP biomarkers for head injury for migrating salmon. To our knowledge, this is the first documented cross-over use of a human molecular biomarker in a wildlife and operational risk management scenario. PMID:19214235

  16. Spillway-induced salmon head injury triggers the generation of brain alphaII-spectrin breakdown product biomarkers similar to mammalian traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Miracle, Ann; Denslow, Nancy D; Kroll, Kevin J; Liu, Ming Cheng; Wang, Kevin K W

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in biomedical research have resulted in the development of specific biomarkers for diagnostic testing of disease condition or physiological risk. Of specific interest are alphaII-spectrin breakdown products (SBDPs), which are produced by proteolytic events in traumatic brain injury and have been used as biomarkers to predict the severity of injury in humans and other mammalian brain injury models. This study describes and demonstrates the successful use of antibody-based mammalian SBDP biomarkers to detect head injury in migrating juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) that have been injured during passage through high-energy hydraulic environments present in spillways under different operational configurations. Mortality and injury assessment techniques currently measure only near-term direct mortality and easily observable acute injury. Injury-based biomarkers may serve as a quantitative indicator of subacute physical injury and recovery, and aid hydropower operators in evaluation of safest passage configuration and operation actions for migrating juvenile salmonids. We describe a novel application of SBDP biomarkers for head injury for migrating salmon. To our knowledge, this is the first documented cross-over use of a human molecular biomarker in a wildlife and operational risk management scenario.

  17. [Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of severe traumatic brain injury. Part 2. Intensive care and neuromonitoring].

    PubMed

    Potapov, A A; Krylov, V V; Gavrilov, A G; Kravchuk, A D; Likhterman, L B; Petrikov, S S; Talypov, A E; Zakharova, N E; Oshorov, A V; Sychev, A A; Aleksandrova, E V; Solodov, A A

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the major causes of death and disability in young and middle-aged people. The most problematic group is comprised of patients with severe TBI who are in a coma. The adequate diagnosis of primary brain injuries and timely prevention and treatment of the secondary injury mechanisms largely define the possibility of reducing mortality and severe disabling consequences. When developing these guidelines, we used our experience in the development of international and national recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of mild traumatic brain injury, penetrating gunshot wounds to the skull and brain, severe traumatic brain injury, and severe consequences of brain injuries, including a vegetative state. In addition, we used international and national guidelines for the diagnosis, intensive care, and surgical treatment of severe traumatic brain injury, which had been published in recent years. The proposed guidelines concern intensive care of severe TBI in adults and are particularly intended for neurosurgeons, neurologists, neuroradiologists, anesthesiologists, and intensivists who are routinely involved in the treatment of these patients.

  18. Moderate-to-Severe Traumatic Brain Injury in Children: Complications and Rehabilitation Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Popernack, Myra L.; Gray, Nicola; Reuter-Rice, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death in children in the United States. Each year 37,200 children sustain a severe TBI, with up to 1.3 million life-years potentially adversely affected. Severe pediatric TBI is associated with significant mortality and morbidity. Of the children who survive their injury, more than 50% experience unfavorable outcomes 6 months after the injury. Although TBI-associated death rates decreased between 1997–2007, disabilities for TBI survivors continue to have both a direct and indirect impact on the economic and human integrity of our society. The degree of disability varies with the severity and mechanism of the injury, but a realm of physical and emotional deficits may be evident for years after the injury occurs. This article describes the pathophysiology of moderate to severe TBI, its associated complications, and opportunities to improve patient outcomes through use of acute management and rehabilitation strategies. To address the many challenges for TBI survivors and their families, including significant financial and emotional burdens, a collaborative effort is necessary to help affected children transition seamlessly from acute care through long-term rehabilitation. PMID:25449002

  19. Evaluation of cognitive restructuring for post-traumatic stress disorder in people with severe mental illness

    PubMed Central

    Mueser, Kim T.; Gottlieb, Jennifer D.; Xie, Haiyi; Lu, Weili; Yanos, Philip T.; Rosenberg, Stanley D.; Silverstein, Steven M.; Duva, Stephanie Marcello; Minsky, Shula; Wolfe, Rosemarie S.; McHugo, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    Background A cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT) programme designed for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in people with severe mental illness, including breathing retraining, education and cognitive restructuring, was shown to be more effective than usual services. Aims To evaluate the incremental benefit of adding cognitive restructuring to the breathing retraining and education components of the CBT programme (trial registration: clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00494650). Method In all, 201 people with severe mental illness and PTSD were randomised to 12- to 16-session CBT or a 3-session brief treatment programme (breathing retraining and education). The primary outcome was PTSD symptom severity. Secondary outcomes were PTSD diagnosis, other symptoms, functioning and quality of life. Results There was greater improvement in PTSD symptoms and functioning in the CBT group than in the brief treatment group, with both groups improving on other outcomes and effects maintained 1-year post-treatment. Conclusions Cognitive restructuring has a significant impact beyond breathing retraining and education in the CBT programme, reducing PTSD symptoms and improving functioning in people with severe mental illness. PMID:25858178

  20. Pituitary and/or hypothalamic dysfunction following moderate to severe traumatic brain injury: Current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Javed, Zeeshan; Qamar, Unaiza; Sathyapalan, Thozhukat

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing deliberation regarding hypopituitarism following traumatic brain injury (TBI) and recent data have suggested that pituitary dysfunction is very common among survivors of patients having moderate-severe TBI which may evolve or resolve over time. Due to high prevalence of pituitary dysfunction after moderate-severe TBI and its association with increased morbidity and poor recovery and the fact that it can be easily treated with hormone replacement, it has been suggested that early detection and treatment is necessary to prevent long-term neurological consequences. The cause of pituitary dysfunction after TBI is still not well understood, but evidence suggests few possible primary and secondary causes. Results of recent studies focusing on the incidence of hypopituitarism in the acute and chronic phases after TBI are varied in terms of severity and time of occurrence. Although the literature available does not show consistent values and there is difference in study parameters and diagnostic tests used, it is clear that pituitary dysfunction is very common after moderate to severe TBI and patients should be carefully monitored. The exact timing of development cannot be predicted but has suggested regular assessment of pituitary function up to 1 year after TBI. In this narrative review, we aim to explore the current evidence available regarding the incidence of pituitary dysfunction in acute and chronic phase post-TBI and recommendations for screening and follow-up in these patients. We will also focus light over areas in this field worthy of further investigation. PMID:26693424

  1. Brief Report: Parental Report of Sleep Behaviors Following Moderate or Severe Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury*

    PubMed Central

    Beebe, Dean W.; Krivitzky, Lauren; Wells, Carolyn T.; Wade, Shari L.; Taylor, H. Gerry; Yeates, Keith Owen

    2014-01-01

    Objective Determine the effect of moderate and severe traumatic brain injuries (TBI) on the sleep of school-aged children. Methods A concurrent cohort-prospective design compared children aged 6–12 years who sustained moderate TBI (baseline n=56), severe TBI (n= 53), or only orthopedic injuries (n= 80). Retrospective parental report of pre-injury sleep was collected about 3 weeks post-injury. Post-injury assessments occurred prospectively a mean of 6, 12, and 48 months later. Results Growth curve analyses compared the groups over time. The moderate TBI group had worse pre-injury sleep than the other groups. The moderate TBI and orthopedic injury groups displayed a small decline in sleep problems from pre- to post-injury. Children with severe TBI displayed increased post-injury sleep problems. Conclusions Children who sustain severe TBI are at elevated risk for post-injury sleep problems. Because sleep problems may result in daytime impairments and family distress, additional clinical and research attention is warranted. PMID:17442693

  2. Cisternostomy for Management of Intracranial Hypertension in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury; Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Masoudi, Mohammad Sadegh; Rezaee, Elahe; Hakiminejad, Hasanali; Tavakoli, Maryam; Sadeghpoor, Tayebe

    2016-01-01

    Main goal in the management of patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is control of intracranial pressure (ICP). Decompressive craniectomy is an accepted technique for control of refractory intracranial hypertension in patients with severe TBI. Because of high complication rate after decompressive craniectomy, new techniques such as basal cisternostomy have developed. We herein report a case of severe TBI in a 13-year-old boy treated by cisternostomy. The patient was admitted following a motor vehicle accident. Brain CT scan showed diffuse brain edema, left frontal contusion and posterior interhemispheric subdural hematoma. The patient underwent ICP monitoring. Subsequently, with 26 mmHg mean-value of ICP, he was treated surgically by cisternostomy technique. A progressive improvement of the neurological conditions in the following hours. After 5 days the boy was discharged and in the 3-months follow-up he was completely recovered. Cisternostomy could be an appropriate alternative to decompressive craniectomy for management of intracranial hypertension in patietns with sever TBI. PMID:27540551

  3. Neuroprotective effects of bloodletting at Jing points combined with mild induced hypothermia in acute severe traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Yue; Miao, Xiao-mei; Yi, Tai-long; Chen, Xu-yi; Sun, Hong-tao; Cheng, Shi-xiang; Zhang, Sai

    2016-01-01

    Bloodletting at Jing points has been used to treat coma in traditional Chinese medicine. Mild induced hypothermia has also been shown to have neuroprotective effects. However, the therapeutic effects of bloodletting at Jing points and mild induced hypothermia alone are limited. Therefore, we investigated whether combined treatment might have clinical effectiveness for the treatment of acute severe traumatic brain injury. Using a rat model of traumatic brain injury, combined treatment substantially alleviated cerebral edema and blood-brain barrier dysfunction. Furthermore, neurological function was ameliorated, and cellular necrosis and the inflammatory response were lessened. These findings suggest that the combined effects of bloodletting at Jing points (20 μL, twice a day, for 2 days) and mild induced hypothermia (6 hours) are better than their individual effects alone. Their combined application may have marked neuroprotective effects in the clinical treatment of acute severe traumatic brain injury. PMID:27482221

  4. Behavioural and psychosocial sequelae of severe closed head injury and regional cerebral blood flow: a SPECT study.

    PubMed Central

    Oder, W; Goldenberg, G; Spatt, J; Podreka, I; Binder, H; Deecke, L

    1992-01-01

    Thirty six patients (31 male, 5 female) who had suffered severe closed head injury were re-examined at an average of 39.3 (SD 12.8, range 7-66) months after the injury. Behavioural symptoms were measured using the Giessen test. The relatives' reports were used for data analysis to ensure that results were valid. The neurophysical impairment subscale of the Glasgow assessment schedule was completed by two neurologists, and the number connection test was completed by each patient. The adjective mood scale was completed by each relative. All patients were investigated by single photon emission computerised tomography (SPECT). Exploratory factor analysis using the principal components method was carried out separately for SPECT results and psychological measures and correlations were sought between the resulting factors. Factor analysis of the data from the Giessen test identified social isolation, disinhibition, and aggressive behaviour as major components of post-traumatic personality changes; it indicates that these behavioural features are independent of the level of neurological and neuropsychological impairment, which loaded on a single independent factor. Relatives' psychic health seemed to be relatively resistant to physical and cognitive disability and was mainly affected by disinhibitive behaviour. The highest correlation was between frontal flow indices and disinhibitive behaviour (p less than 0.01): the severity of disinhibition increased with lower frontal flow rates. There was a significant but somewhat weaker correlation (p less than 0.05) between flow indices of the left cerebral hemisphere and social isolation. Low flow values of the right brain regions were related to aggressive behaviour (p less than 0.05). Neurological and cognitive impairment correlated negatively with the thalamus; worse neurological and cognitive performance indicate by raised scores on the neurophysical scale and on the number connection test was associated with low thalamic

  5. Severe gingival recession caused by traumatic occlusion and mucogingival stress: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ustun, Kemal; Sari, Zafer; Orucoglu, Hasan; Duran, Ismet; Hakki, Sema S

    2008-04-01

    Gingival recession is displacement of the soft tissue margin apically leading to root surface exposure. Tooth malpositions, high muscle attachment, frenal pull have been associated with gingival tissue recession. Occlusal trauma is defined as injury resulting in tissue changes within the attachment apparatus as a result of occlusal forces. Trauma from occlusion may cause a shift in tooth position and the direction of the movement depends on the occlusal force. We present the clinical and radiological findings and the limitation of periodontal treatment of a severe gingival recession in a case with traumatic occlusion. A 16 years old male, systemically healthy and non-smoking patient presented to our clinic with severe gingival recession of mandibular canines and incisors. Clinical evaluation revealed extensive gingival recession on the vestibules of mandibular anterior segment. Patient has an Angle class III malocclusion and deep bite. To maintain the teeth until orthodontic therapy and maxillofacial surgery, mucogingival surgeries were performed to obtain attached gingiva to provide oral hygiene and reduce inflammation. After mucogingival surgeries, limited attached gingiva was gained in this case. Regular periodontal maintenance therapy was performed at 2 month intervals to preserve mandibular anterior teeth. Multidisciplinary approach should be performed in this kind of case for satisfactory results. Unless occlusal relationship was corrected, treatment of severe gingival recession will be problematic. For satisfactory periodontal treatment, early diagnosis of trauma from occlusion and its treatment is very important.

  6. Oxidation-Reduction Potential as a Biomarker for Severity and Acute Outcome in Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Stewart; Carrick, Matthew; Mains, Charles W.; Slone, Denetta S.

    2016-01-01

    There are few reliable markers for assessing traumatic brain injury (TBI). Elevated levels of oxidative stress have been observed in TBI patients. We hypothesized that oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) could be a potent biomarker in TBI. Two types of ORP were measured in patient plasma samples: the static state of oxidative stress (sORP) and capacity for induced oxidative stress (icORP). Differences in ORP values as a function of time after injury, severity, and hospital discharge were compared using ANOVAs with significance at p ≤ 0.05. Logit regression analyses were used to predict acute outcome comparing ORP, Injury Severity Score (ISS), Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS), and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). Antioxidant capacity (icORP) on day 4 was prognostic for acute outcomes (p < 0.05). An odds ratio of 4.08 was associated with poor acute outcome when icORP > 7.25 μC. IcORP was a better predictor than ISS, AIS, or GCS scores. sORP increased in those with the highest ISS values (p < 0.05). Based on these findings ORP is useful biomarker for severity and acute outcome in TBI patients. Changes in ORP values on day 4 after injury were the most prognostic, suggesting that patients' response to brain injury over time is a factor that determines outcome. PMID:27642494

  7. Severe Gingival Recession Caused by Traumatic Occlusion and Mucogingival Stress: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ustun, Kemal; Sari, Zafer; Orucoglu, Hasan; Duran, Ismet; Hakki, Sema S.

    2008-01-01

    Gingival recession is displacement of the soft tissue margin apically leading to root surface exposure. Tooth malpositions, high muscle attachment, frenal pull have been associated with gingival tissue recession. Occlusal trauma is defined as injury resulting in tissue changes within the attachment apparatus as a result of occlusal forces. Trauma from occlusion may cause a shift in tooth position and the direction of the movement depends on the occlusal force. We present the clinical and radiological findings and the limitation of periodontal treatment of a severe gingival recession in a case with traumatic occlusion. A 16 years old male, systemically healthy and non-smoking patient presented to our clinic with severe gingival recession of mandibular canines and incisors. Clinical evaluation revealed extensive gingival recession on the vestibules of mandibular anterior segment. Patient has an Angle class III malocclusion and deep bite. To maintain the teeth until orthodontic therapy and maxillofacial surgery, mucogingival surgeries were performed to obtain attached gingiva to provide oral hygiene and reduce inflammation. After mucogingival surgeries, limited attached gingiva was gained in this case. Regular periodontal maintenance therapy was performed at 2 month intervals to preserve mandibular anterior teeth. Multidisciplinary approach should be performed in this kind of case for satisfactory results. Unless occlusal relationship was corrected, treatment of severe gingival recession will be problematic. For satisfactory periodontal treatment, early diagnosis of trauma from occlusion and its treatment is very important. PMID:19212523

  8. Physical and rehabilitation medicine (PRM) care pathways: adults with severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Pradat-Diehl, P; Joseph, P-A; Beuret-Blanquart, F; Luauté, J; Tasseau, F; Remy-Neris, O; Azouvi, P; Sengler, J; Bayen, É; Yelnik, A; Mazaux, J-M

    2012-11-01

    This document is part of a series of guidelines documents designed by the French Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine Society (SOFMER) and the French Federation of PRM (FEDMER). These reference documents focus on a particular pathology (here patients with severe TBI). They describe for each given pathology patients' clinical and social needs, PRM care objectives and necessary human and material resources of the pathology-dedicated pathway. 'Care pathways in PRM' is therefore a short document designed to enable readers (physician, decision-maker, administrator, lawyer, finance manager) to have a global understanding of available therapeutic care structures, organization and economic needs for patients' optimal care and follow-up. After a severe traumatic brain injury, patients might be divided into three categories according to impairment's severity, to early outcomes in the intensive care unit and to functional prognosis. Each category is considered in line with six identical parameters used in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (World Health Organization), focusing thereafter on personal and environmental factors liable to affect the patients' needs.

  9. Better Glasgow outcome score, cerebral perfusion pressure and focal brain oxygenation in severely traumatized brain following direct regional brain hypothermia therapy: A prospective randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Idris, Zamzuri; Zenian, Mohd Sofan; Muzaimi, Mustapha; Hamid, Wan Zuraida Wan Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Background: Induced hypothermia for treatment of traumatic brain injury is controversial. Since many pathways involved in the pathophysiology of secondary brain injury are temperature dependent, regional brain hypothermia is thought capable to mitigate those processes. The objectives of this study are to assess the therapeutic effects and complications of regional brain cooling in severe head injury with Glasgow coma scale (GCS) 6-7. Materials and Methods: A prospective randomized controlled pilot study involving patients with severe traumatic brain injury with GCS 6 and 7 who required decompressive craniectomy. Patients were randomized into two groups: Cooling and no cooling. For the cooling group, analysis was made by dividing the group into mild and deep cooling. Brain was cooled by irrigating the brain continuously with cold Hartmann solution for 24-48 h. Main outcome assessments were a dichotomized Glasgow outcome score (GOS) at 6 months posttrauma. Results: A total of 32 patients were recruited. The cooling-treated patients did better than no cooling. There were 63.2% of patients in cooling group attained good GOS at 6 months compared to only 15.4% in noncooling group (P = 0.007). Interestingly, the analysis at 6 months post-trauma disclosed mild-cooling-treated patients did better than no cooling (70% vs. 15.4% attained good GOS, P = 0.013) and apparently, the deep-cooling-treated patients failed to be better than either no cooling (P = 0.074) or mild cooling group (P = 0.650). Conclusion: Data from this pilot study imply direct regional brain hypothermia appears safe, feasible and maybe beneficial in treating severely head-injured patients. PMID:25685201

  10. Text-to-Speech and Reading While Listening: Reading Support for Individuals with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Judy

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) often have reading challenges. They maintain or reestablish basic decoding and word recognition skills following injury, but problems with reading comprehension often persist. Practitioners have the potential to accommodate struggling readers by changing the presentational mode of text in a…

  11. Blunt cerebrovascular injuries in severe traumatic brain injury: incidence, risk factors, and evolution.

    PubMed

    Esnault, Pierre; Cardinale, Mickaël; Boret, Henry; D'Aranda, Erwan; Montcriol, Ambroise; Bordes, Julien; Prunet, Bertrand; Joubert, Christophe; Dagain, Arnaud; Goutorbe, Philippe; Kaiser, Eric; Meaudre, Eric

    2016-07-29

    OBJECTIVE Blunt cerebrovascular injuries (BCVIs) affect approximately 1% of patients with blunt trauma. An antithrombotic or anticoagulation therapy is recommended to prevent the occurrence or recurrence of neurovascular events. This treatment has to be carefully considered after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), due to the risk of intracranial hemorrhage expansion. Thus, the physician in charge of the patient is confronted with a hemorrhagic and ischemic risk. The main objective of this study was to determine the incidence of BCVI after severe TBI. METHODS The authors conducted a prospective, observational, single-center study including all patients with severe TBI admitted in the trauma center. Diagnosis of BCVI was performed using a 64-channel multidetector CT. Characteristics of the patients, CT scan results, and outcomes were collected. A multivariate logistic regression model was developed to determine the risk factors of BCVI. Patients in whom BCVI was diagnosed were treated with systemic anticoagulation. RESULTS In total, 228 patients with severe TBI who were treated over a period of 7 years were included. The incidence of BCVI was 9.2%. The main risk factors were as follows: motorcycle crash (OR 8.2, 95% CI 1.9-34.8), fracture involving the carotid canal (OR 11.7, 95% CI 1.7-80.9), cervical spine injury (OR 13.5, 95% CI 3.1-59.4), thoracic trauma (OR 7.3, 95% CI 1.1-51.2), and hepatic lesion (OR 13.3, 95% CI 2.1-84.5). Among survivors, 82% of patients with BCVI received systemic anticoagulation therapy, beginning at a median of Day 1.5. The overall stroke rate was 19%. One patient had an intracranial hemorrhagic complication. CONCLUSIONS Blunt cerebrovascular injuries are frequent after severe TBI (incidence 9.2%). The main risk factors are high-velocity lesions and injuries near cervical arteries.

  12. Use of Transcranial Doppler in Patients with Severe Traumatic Brain Injuries.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Daniel; Cravens, George; Poche, Gerard; Gandhi, Raj; Tellez, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Severe traumatic brain injuries (TBI) are associated with a high rate of mortality and disability. Transcranial Doppler (TCD) sonography permits a noninvasive measurement of cerebral blood flow. The purpose of this study is to determine the usefulness of TCD in patients with severe TBI. TCD was performed, from April 2008 to April 2013, on 255 patients with severe TBI, defined as a Glasgow Coma Scale score of ≤8 on admission. TCD was performed on hospital days 1, 2, 3, and 7. Hypoperfusion was defined by having two out of three of the following: 1) mean velocity (Vm) of the middle cerebral artery <35 cm/sec, 2) diastolic velocity (Vd) of the middle cerebral artery <20 cm/sec, or 3) pulsatility index (PI) of >1.4. Vasospasm was defined by the following: Vm of the middle cerebral artery >120 cm/sec and/or a Lindegaard index (LI) >3. One hundred fourteen (45%) had normal measurements. Of these, 92 (80.7%) had a good outcome, 6 (5.3%) had moderate disability, and 16 (14%) died, 4 from brain death. Seventy-two patients (28%) had hypoperfusion and 71 (98.6%) died, 65 from brain death, and 1 patient survived with moderate disability. Sixty-nine patients (27%) had vasospasm, 31 (44.9%) had a good outcome, 16 (23.2%) had severe disability, and 22 (31.9%) died, 13 from brain death. The vasospasm was detected on hospital day 1 in 8 patients, on day 2 in 23 patients, on day 3 in 22 patients, and on day 7 in 16 patients. Patients with normal measurements can be expected to survive. Patients with hypoperfusion have a poor prognosis. Patients with vasospasm have a high incidence of mortality and severe disability. TCD is useful in determining early prognosis.

  13. Abnormal functional MRI BOLD contrast in the vegetative state after severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Heelmann, Volker; Lippert-Grüner, Marcela; Rommel, Thomas; Wedekind, Christoph

    2010-06-01

    For the rehabilitation process, the treatment of patients surviving brain injury in a vegetative state is still a serious challenge. The aim of this study was to investigate patients exhibiting severely disturbed consciousness using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Five cases of posttraumatic vegetative state and one with minimal consciousness close to the vegetative state were studied clinically, electrophysiologically, and by means of functional magnetic resonance imaging. Visual, sensory, and acoustic paradigms were used for stimulation. In three patients examined less than 2 months after trauma, a consistent decrease in blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal ('negative activation') was observed for visual stimulation; one case even showed a decrease in BOLD activation for all three activation paradigms. In the remaining three cases examined more than 6 months after trauma, visual stimulation yielded positive BOLD contrast or no activation. In all cases, sensory stimulation was followed by a decrease in BOLD signal or no activation, whereas auditory stimulation failed to elicit any activation with the exception of one case. Functional magnetic resonance imaging in the vegetative state indicates retained yet abnormal brain function; this abnormality can be attributed to the impairment of cerebral vascular autoregulation or an increase in the energy consumption of activated neocortex in severe traumatic brain injury.

  14. Imaging of Cerebral Blood Flow in Patients with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury in the Neurointensive Care

    PubMed Central

    Rostami, Elham; Engquist, Henrik; Enblad, Per

    2014-01-01

    Ischemia is a common and deleterious secondary injury following traumatic brain injury (TBI). A great challenge for the treatment of TBI patients in the neurointensive care unit (NICU) is to detect early signs of ischemia in order to prevent further advancement and deterioration of the brain tissue. Today, several imaging techniques are available to monitor cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the injured brain such as positron emission tomography (PET), single-photon emission computed tomography, xenon computed tomography (Xenon-CT), perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and CT perfusion scan. An ideal imaging technique would enable continuous non-invasive measurement of blood flow and metabolism across the whole brain. Unfortunately, no current imaging method meets all these criteria. These techniques offer snapshots of the CBF. MRI may also provide some information about the metabolic state of the brain. PET provides images with high resolution and quantitative measurements of CBF and metabolism; however, it is a complex and costly method limited to few TBI centers. All of these methods except mobile Xenon-CT require transfer of TBI patients to the radiological department. Mobile Xenon-CT emerges as a feasible technique to monitor CBF in the NICU, with lower risk of adverse effects. Promising results have been demonstrated with Xenon-CT in predicting outcome in TBI patients. This review covers available imaging methods used to monitor CBF in patients with severe TBI. PMID:25071702

  15. What is wrong with the tenets underpinning current management of severe traumatic brain injury?

    PubMed

    Chesnut, Randall M

    2015-05-01

    The results of a recent randomized controlled trial comparing intracranial pressure (ICP) monitor-based treatment of severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI) to management without ICP monitoring prompt this skeptical reconsideration of the scientific foundation underlying current sTBI management. Much of current practice arises from research performed under conditions that are no longer relevant today. The definition of an episode of intracranial hypertension is incomplete, and the application of a fixed, universal ICP treatment threshold is poorly founded. Although intracranial hypertension is a valid indicator of disease severity, it remains to be demonstrated that lowering ICP improves outcome. Furthermore, sTBI has not been categorized on the basis of underlying pathophysiology despite the current capability to do so. Similar concerns also apply to manipulation of cerebral perfusion with respect to maintaining universal thresholds for contrived variables rather than tailoring treatment to monitored processes. As such, there is a failure to either optimize management approaches or minimize associated treatment risks for individual sTBI patients. The clinical and research TBI communities need to reassess many of the sTBI management concepts that are currently considered well established.

  16. Treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder in patients with severe mental illness: a review.

    PubMed

    Mabey, Linda; van Servellen, Gwen

    2014-02-01

    Although the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is high among those with severe mental illness, little is known about the use of interventions to lessen the burden of PTSD in this population. Currently, there are limited data about safe and effective interventions to treat these individuals. This systematic published work review presents the scientific published work reporting studies of psychological treatment approaches for individuals with comorbid PTSD and severe mental illness. A secondary aim of this study was to identify the specific models implemented and tested, and their impact upon patient outcomes. A review of the published work from January 2001 through January 2012 of English-language publications retrieved from the Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), MEDLINE, and the American Psychological Association generated abstracts (PsycINFO) databases was conducted. Six studies met the inclusion criteria for the review. The treatment programs described were cognitive-behavioural therapy, psychoeducation, exposure-based cognitive-behavioural therapy, and eye movement desensitization and reprocessing. Evidence of the effectiveness of these programs is examined. Data to support the use of these interventions are limited, indicating the need for further research and efficacy trials. Future areas of research and implications for nursing are discussed.

  17. The impact of acute hyponatraemia on severe traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Ke, C; Poon, W S; Ng, H K; Tang, N L; Chan, Y; Wang, J Y; Hsiang, J N

    2000-01-01

    The effect of experimental acute hyponatraemia on severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) was studied in a modified impact-acceleration model. The cortical contusional volume was quantified by image analysis on serial sections, injured axons were visualized and quantified by beta-Amyloid Precursor Protein (beta-APP) immunohistochemical staining. Regional brain water content was estimated by the wet-dry weight method. The experiment was conducted in Group I (injury only) and Group II (injury followed by acute hyponatraemia). Comparison between the two groups showed that acute hyponatraemia significantly increased contusional volume (3.24 +/- 0.70 mm3 vs. 1.80 +/- 0.65 mm3, P = 0.009) and the number of injured axons (128.7 +/- 44.3 vs. 41.7 +/- 50.1, P = 0.04) in the right thalamus & basal ganglia region. Water content of the brain stem region was also significantly increased by acute hyponatraemia (73.71 +/- 0.14% vs. 72.28 +/- 0.93%, P = 0.004). These results suggest that acute hyponatraemia potentiates secondary brain damage in severe TBI by augmentation of both focal contusion and diffuse axonal injury. The injured brain stem region is more susceptible to edema formation induced by experimental acute hyponatraemia.

  18. Cerebral extracellular lactate increase is predominantly nonischemic in patients with severe traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Sala, Nathalie; Suys, Tamarah; Zerlauth, Jean-Baptiste; Bouzat, Pierre; Messerer, Mahmoud; Bloch, Jocelyne; Levivier, Marc; Magistretti, Pierre J; Meuli, Reto; Oddo, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that endogenous lactate is an important substrate for neurons. This study aimed to examine cerebral lactate metabolism and its relationship with brain perfusion in patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). A prospective cohort of 24 patients with severe TBI monitored with cerebral microdialysis (CMD) and brain tissue oxygen tension (PbtO2) was studied. Brain lactate metabolism was assessed by quantification of elevated CMD lactate samples (>4 mmol/L); these were matched to CMD pyruvate and PbtO2 values and dichotomized as glycolytic (CMD pyruvate >119 μmol/L vs. low pyruvate) and hypoxic (PbtO2 <20 mm Hg vs. nonhypoxic). Using perfusion computed tomography (CT), brain perfusion was categorized as oligemic, normal, or hyperemic, and was compared with CMD and PbtO2 data. Samples with elevated CMD lactate were frequently observed (41±8%), and we found that brain lactate elevations were predominantly associated with glycolysis and normal PbtO2 (73±8%) rather than brain hypoxia (14±6%). Furthermore, glycolytic lactate was always associated with normal or hyperemic brain perfusion, whereas all episodes with hypoxic lactate were associated with diffuse oligemia. Our findings suggest predominant nonischemic cerebral extracellular lactate release after TBI and support the concept that lactate may be used as an energy substrate by the injured human brain. PMID:23963367

  19. Cognitive Deficits Underlying Error Behavior on a Naturalistic Task after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hendry, Kathryn; Ownsworth, Tamara; Beadle, Elizabeth; Chevignard, Mathilde P.; Fleming, Jennifer; Griffin, Janelle; Shum, David H. K.

    2016-01-01

    People with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) often make errors on everyday tasks that compromise their safety and independence. Such errors potentially arise from the breakdown or failure of multiple cognitive processes. This study aimed to investigate cognitive deficits underlying error behavior on a home-based version of the Cooking Task (HBCT) following TBI. Participants included 45 adults (9 females, 36 males) with severe TBI aged 18–64 years (M = 37.91, SD = 13.43). Participants were administered the HBCT in their home kitchens, with audiovisual recordings taken to enable scoring of total errors and error subtypes (Omissions, Additions, Estimations, Substitutions, Commentary/Questions, Dangerous Behavior, Goal Achievement). Participants also completed a battery of neuropsychological tests, including the Trail Making Test, Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised, Digit Span, Zoo Map test, Modified Stroop Test, and Hayling Sentence Completion Test. After controlling for cooking experience, greater Omissions and Estimation errors, lack of goal achievement, and longer completion time were significantly associated with poorer attention, memory, and executive functioning. These findings indicate that errors on naturalistic tasks arise from deficits in multiple cognitive domains. Assessment of error behavior in a real life setting provides insight into individuals' functional abilities which can guide rehabilitation planning and lifestyle support. PMID:27790099

  20. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy in athletes: progressive tauopathy after repetitive head injury.

    PubMed

    McKee, Ann C; Cantu, Robert C; Nowinski, Christopher J; Hedley-Whyte, E Tessa; Gavett, Brandon E; Budson, Andrew E; Santini, Veronica E; Lee, Hyo-Soon; Kubilus, Caroline A; Stern, Robert A

    2009-07-01

    Since the 1920s, it has been known that the repetitive brain trauma associated with boxing may produce a progressive neurological deterioration, originally termed dementia pugilistica, and more recently, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). We review 48 cases of neuropathologically verified CTE recorded in the literature and document the detailed findings of CTE in 3 profession althletes, 1 football player and 2 boxers. Clinically, CTE is associated with memory disturbances, behavioral and personality changes, parkinsonism, and speech and gait abnormalities. Neuropathologically, CTE is characterized by atrophy of the cerebral hemispheres, medial temporal lobe, thalamus, mammillary bodies, and brainstem, with ventricular dilatation and a fenestrated cavum septum pellucidum. Microscopically, there are extensive tau-immunoreactive neurofibrillary tangles, astrocytic tangles, and spindle-shaped and threadlike neurites throughout the brain. The neurofibrillary degeneration of CTE is distinguished from other tauopathies by preferential involvement of the superficial cortical layers, irregular patchy distribution in the frontal and temporal cortices, propensity for sulcal depths, prominent perivascular, periventricular, and subpial distribution, and marked accumulation of tau-immunoreactive astrocytes. Deposition of beta-amyloid, most commonly as diffuse plaques, occurs in fewer than half the cases. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy is a neuropathologically distinct slowly progressive tauopathy with a clear environmental etiology.

  1. Bone contusion progression from traumatic knee injury: association of rate of contusion resolution with injury severity

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Douglas R; El-Khoury, Georges Y; Thedens, Dan R; Saad-Eldine, Mothana; Phisitkul, Phinit; Amendola, Annunziato

    2017-01-01

    Background Bone contusions are frequently encountered in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of knee anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. Their role as indicators of injury severity remains unclear, primarily due to indeterminate levels of joint injury forces and to a lack of preinjury imaging. Purpose The purpose of this study was to 1) quantify bone contusion pathogenesis following traumatic joint injuries using fixed imaging follow-ups, and 2) assess the feasibility of using longitudinal bone contusion volumes as an indicator of knee injury severity. Study design Prospective sequential MRI follow-ups of a goat cohort exposed to controlled stifle trauma in vivo were compared to parallel clinical MRI follow-ups of a human ACL tear patient series. Methods Reproducible cartilage impact damage of various energy magnitudes was applied in a survival goat model, coupled with partial resection of anterior portions of medial menisci. Both emulate injury patterns to the knee osteochondral structures commonly encountered in human ACL injury imaging as well as instability from resultant ligament laxity. Longitudinal clinical MRI sequences portrayed stifle bone contusion evolution through 6 months after the inciting event. Results In the first 2 weeks, biological response variability dominated the whole-joint response with no apparent correlation to trauma severity. Control goats subjected to partial meniscectomy alone exhibited minimal bone response. Thereafter, 0.6 J impact bone contusions portrayed a faster rate of resolution than those induced by 1.2 J cartilage impacts. Conclusion Bone contusion sizes combined with time of persistence are likely better measures of joint injury severity than isolated bone contusion volume. PMID:28203112

  2. Absent or compressed basal cisterns on first CT scan: ominous predictors of outcome in severe head injury.

    PubMed

    Toutant, S M; Klauber, M R; Marshall, L F; Toole, B M; Bowers, S A; Seelig, J M; Varnell, J B

    1984-10-01

    The relationship of outcome to the appearance of the basal cisterns as seen on initial computerized tomography (CT) scanning was assessed in 218 consecutive severely head-injured patients entered into the second phase of the National Pilot Traumatic Coma Data Bank. Outcome could be directly related to the status of the basal cisterns on the initial CT scan. The mortality rates were 77%, 39%, and 22% among those with absent, compressed, and normal basal cisterns, respectively. This association between cisterns and outcome was shown to be strong after adjusting for Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score (p less than 0.001). The state of the cisterns was more important for those with higher GCS scores (scores 6 to 8) than for those with lower scores (scores 3 to 5). Patients with GCS scores of 6 to 8, with cisterns absent or not visualized, suffered nearly a fourfold additional risk of poor outcome, compared to those with normal cisterns. This indicates that the status of the cisterns can be used as an early noninvasive method of identifying patients at high risk of death or severe disability, in whom the initial neurological examination would potentially suggest otherwise.

  3. Chronic Post-Traumatic Headache after Head Injury in Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, Charlotte; Nagiub, George; Abu-Arafeh, Ishaq

    2008-01-01

    This was a prospective, observational study of children aged 3 to 15 years admitted to hospital with head injury (HI). Demographic data and information on the nature of the HI, and history of premorbid headache were collected. A structured telephone questionnaire was used to interview parents and children 2 months after injury and at 4-monthly…

  4. Association between the cerebral inflammatory and matrix metalloproteinase responses after severe traumatic brain injury in humans.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Derek J; Jenne, Craig N; Léger, Caroline; Kramer, Andreas H; Gallagher, Clare N; Todd, Stephanie; Parney, Ian F; Doig, Christopher J; Yong, V Wee; Kubes, Paul; Zygun, David A

    2013-10-15

    An increasing number of preclinical investigations have suggested that the degree of expression of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family of endopeptidases may explain some of the variability in neurological damage after traumatic brain injury (TBI). As cytokines are a prominent stimulus for MMP expression in animals, we conducted a prospective multimodal monitoring study and determined their association with temporal MMP expression after severe TBI in eight critically ill adults. High cutoff, cerebral microdialysis (n=8); external ventricular drainage (n=3); and arterial and jugular venous bulb catheters were used to measure the concentration of nine cytokines and eight MMPs in microdialysate, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and plasma over 6 days. Severe TBI was associated with a robust central inflammatory response, which was largely similar between microdialysate and CSF. At all time points after injury, this response was predominated by the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8. Use of univariate generalized estimating equations suggested that the concentration of several MMPs varied with cytokine levels in microdialysate. The largest of these changes included increases in microdialysate concentrations of MMP-8 and MMP-9 with increases in the levels of IL-1α and -2 and IL-1α and -2 and TNF-α, respectively. In contrast, the microdialysate level of MMP-7 decreased with increases in microdialysate concentrations of IL-1β, -2, and -6. These findings support the observations of animal studies that cross-talk exists between the neuroinflammatory and MMP responses after acute brain injury. Further study is needed to determine whether this link between cerebral inflammation and MMP expression may have clinical relevance to the care of patients with TBI.

  5. Outcome prediction within twelve hours after severe traumatic brain injury by quantitative cerebral blood flow.

    PubMed

    Kaloostian, Paul; Robertson, Claudia; Gopinath, Shankar P; Stippler, Martina; King, C Christopher; Qualls, Clifford; Yonas, Howard; Nemoto, Edwin M

    2012-03-20

    We measured quantitative cortical mantle cerebral blood flow (CBF) by stable xenon computed tomography (CT) within the first 12 h after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) to determine whether neurologic outcome can be predicted by CBF stratification early after injury. Stable xenon CT was used for quantitative measurement of CBF (mL/100 g/min) in 22 cortical mantle regions stratified as follows: low (0-8), intermediate (9-30), normal (31-70), and hyperemic (>70) in 120 patients suffering severe (Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS] score ≤8) TBI. For each of these CBF strata, percentages of total cortical mantle volume were calculated. Outcomes were assessed by Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score at discharge (DC), and 1, 3, and 6 months after discharge. Quantitative cortical mantle CBF differentiated GOS 1 and GOS 2 (dead or vegetative state) from GOS 3-5 (severely disabled to good recovery; p<0.001). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis for percent total normal plus hyperemic flow volume (TNHV) predicting GOS 3-5 outcome at 6 months for CBF measured <6 and <12 h after injury showed ROC area under the curve (AUC) cut-scores of 0.92 and 0.77, respectively. In multivariate analysis, percent TNHV is an independent predictor of GOS 3-5, with an odds ratio of 1.460 per 10 percentage point increase, as is initial GCS score (OR=1.090). The binary version of the Marshall CT score was an independent predictor of 6-month outcome, whereas age was not. These results suggest that quantitative cerebral cortical CBF measured within the first 6 and 12 h after TBI predicts 6-month outcome, which may be useful in guiding patient care and identifying patients for randomized clinical trials. A larger multicenter randomized clinical trial is indicated.

  6. Rehabilitation of divided attention after severe traumatic brain injury: a randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Couillet, Josette; Soury, Stephane; Lebornec, Gaelle; Asloun, Sybille; Joseph, Pierre-Alain; Mazaux, Jean-Michel; Azouvi, Philippe

    2010-06-01

    Patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) frequently suffer from a difficulty in dealing with two tasks simultaneously. However, there has been little research on the rehabilitation of divided attention. The objective of the present study was to assess the effectiveness of a rehabilitation programme for divided attention after severe TBI. Twelve patients at a subacute/chronic stage after a severe TBI were included. A randomised AB vs. BA cross-over design was used. Training lasted six weeks, with four one-hour sessions per week. It was compared to a non-specific (control) cognitive training. During experimental treatment, patients were trained to perform two concurrent tasks simultaneously. Each one of the two tasks was first trained as a single task, then both tasks were given simultaneously. A progressive hierarchical order of difficulty was used, by progressively increasing task difficulty following each patient's individual improvement. Patients were randomised in two groups: one starting with dual-task training, the other with control training. Outcome measures included target dual-task measures, executive and working memory tasks, non-target tasks, and the Rating Scale of Attentional Behaviour addressing attentional problems in everyday life. Assessment was not blind to treatment condition. A significant training-related effect was found on dual-task measures and on the divided attention item of the Rating Scale of Attentional Behaviour. There was only little effect on executive measures, and no significant effect on non-target measures. These results suggest that training had specific effects on divided attention and helped patients to deal more rapidly and more accurately with dual-task situations.

  7. Excitotoxicity and Metabolic Crisis Are Associated with Spreading Depolarizations in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury Patients.

    PubMed

    Hinzman, Jason M; Wilson, J Adam; Mazzeo, Anna Teresa; Bullock, M Ross; Hartings, Jed A

    2016-10-01

    Cerebral microdialysis has enabled the clinical characterization of excitotoxicity (glutamate >10 μM) and non-ischemic metabolic crisis (lactate/pyruvate ratio [LPR] >40) as important components of secondary damage in severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Spreading depolarizations (SD) are pathological waves that occur in many patients in the days following TBI and, in animal models, cause elevations in extracellular glutamate, increased anaerobic metabolism, and energy substrate depletion. Here, we examined the association of SD with changes in cerebral neurochemistry by placing a microdialysis probe alongside a subdural electrode strip in peri-lesional cortex of 16 TBI patients requiring neurosurgery. In 107 h (median; range: 76-117 h) of monitoring, 135 SDs were recorded in six patients. Glutamate (50 μmol/L) and lactate (3.7 mmol/L) were significantly elevated on day 0 in patients with SD compared with subsequent days and with patients without SD, whereas pyruvate was decreased in the latter group on days 0 and 1 (two-way analysis of variance [ANOVA], p values <0.05). In patients with SD, both glutamate and LPR increased in a dose-dependent manner with the number of SDs in the microdialysis sampling period (0, 1, ≥2 SD) [glutamate: 2.1→7.0→52.3 μmol/L; LPR: 27.8→29.9→45.0, p values <0.05]. In these patients, there was a 10% probability of SD occurring when glutamate and LPR were in normal ranges, but a 60% probability when both variables were abnormal (>10 μmol/L and >40 μmol/L, respectively). Taken together with previous studies, these preliminary clinical results suggest SDs are a key pathophysiological process of secondary brain injury associated with non-ischemic glutamate excitotoxicity and severe metabolic crisis in severe TBI patients.

  8. [The hardness of the traumatic object and the extent of injury (as exemplified by head injuries)].

    PubMed

    Shadymov, A B; Kazymov, M A

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to study the influence of the surface hardness of a traumatic agent on the extent and character of the injury to the soft and bone tissues of the cranial vault associated with various forms of injurious exposure. The authors evaluated forensic medical significance of the hardness as one of the most important properties of the major injurious agents involved in the formation of skull fractures and soft tissue ruptures under effect of an impact action or compression. The objects differing in the hardness of the contact element (striking pin) were studied in comparison with the hardness of the bone tissue. The extent and morphological features of the injuries to the bones and soft tissues in different parts of the skull were compared with reference to deformation and strength characteristics developing in response to a blow and compression.

  9. Is erythropoietin a worthy candidate for traumatic brain injury or are we heading the wrong way?

    PubMed Central

    Grasso, Giovanni; Alafaci, Concetta; Ghezzi, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and disability in the modern society. Although primary prevention is the only strategy that can counteract the primary brain damage, numerous preclinical studies have been accumulated in order to find therapeutic strategies against the secondary damage. In this scenario erythropoietin (EPO) has been shown to be a promising candidate as neuroprotective agent. A recent clinical trial, however, has shown that EPO has not an overall effect on outcomes following TBI thus renewing old concerns.  However, the results of a prespecified sensitivity analysis indicate that the effect of EPO on mortality remains still unclear. In the light of these observations, further investigations are needed to resolve doubts on EPO effectiveness in order to provide a more solid base for tailoring conclusive clinical trials. PMID:27239280

  10. A Qualitative Study Exploring Factors Associated with Provider Adherence to Severe Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Brolliar, Sarah M; Moore, Megan; Thompson, Hilaire J; Whiteside, Lauren K; Mink, Richard B; Wainwright, Mark S; Groner, Jonathan I; Bell, Michael J; Giza, Christopher C; Zatzick, Douglas F; Ellenbogen, Richard G; Ng Boyle, Linda; Mitchell, Pamela H; Rivara, Frederick P; Vavilala, Monica S

    2016-08-15

    Despite demonstrated improvement in patient outcomes with use of the Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Guidelines (Guidelines), there are differential rates of adherence. Provider perspectives on barriers and facilitators to adherence have not been elucidated. This study aimed to identify and explore in depth the provider perspective on factors associated with adherence to the Guidelines using 19 focus groups with nurses and physicians who provided acute management for pediatric patients with TBI at five university-affiliated Level 1 trauma centers. Data were examined using deductive and inductive content analysis. Results indicated that three inter-related domains were associated with clinical adherence: 1) perceived guideline credibility and applicability to individual patients, 2) implementation, dissemination, and enforcement strategies, and 3) provider culture, communication styles, and attitudes towards protocols. Specifically, Guideline usefulness was determined by the perceived relevance to the individual patient given age, injury etiology, and severity and the strength of the evidence. Institutional methods to formally endorse, codify, and implement the Guidelines into the local culture were important. Providers wanted local protocols developed using interdisciplinary consensus. Finally, a culture of collaboration, including consistent, respectful communication and interdisciplinary cooperation, facilitated adherence. Provider training and experience, as well as attitudes towards other standardized care protocols, mirror the use and attitudes towards the Guidelines. Adherence was determined by the interaction of each of these guideline, institutional, and provider factors acting in concert. Incorporating provider perspectives on barriers and facilitators to adherence into hospital and team protocols is an important step toward improving adherence and ultimately patient outcomes.

  11. Autobiographical memory and episodic future thinking after moderate to severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Katrine W; Berntsen, Dorthe

    2014-03-01

    Converging evidence suggests that autobiographical memory and episodic future thinking share a common neurocognitive basis. Although previous research has shown that traumatic brain injury (TBI) can impair the ability to remember the personal past, episodic future thinking has not previously been systematically examined within this population. In this study, we examined the ability to remember events in the personal past and the ability to imagine possible events in the personal future in a sample of moderate-to-severe TBI patients. We present data on nine patients and nine healthy controls, who were asked to report a series of events that had happened to them in the past and a series of events that might happen to them in the future. Transcriptions were scored according to a reliable system for categorizing internal (episodic) and external (semantic) information. For each event described, participants also completed two modified Autobiographical Memory Questionnaire items to assess self-reported phenomenal qualities associated with remembering and imagining. In addition, TBI patients underwent neuropsychological assessment. Results revealed that TBI patients recalled/imagined proportionally fewer episodic event-specific details for both past and future events compared to healthy controls (η²(p) = 0.78). In contrast, there were no group differences in ratings of phenomenal characteristics. These results are discussed in relation to theories suggesting that remembering and imagining the future are the expression of the same underlying neurocognitive system.

  12. Influence of APOE polymorphism on cognitive and behavioural outcome in moderate and severe traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Ariza, M; Pueyo, R; del M Matarín, M; Junqué, C; Mataró, M; Clemente, I; Moral, P; Poca, M A; Garnacho, Á; Sahuquillo, J

    2006-01-01

    Aim To analyse the influence of apolipoprotein (APOE) ε4 status on the cognitive and behavioural functions usually impaired after moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Methods In all, 77 patients with TBI selected from 140 consecutive admissions were genotyped for APOE. Each patient was subjected to neuropsychological and neurobehavioural assessment at least 6 months after injury. Results Performance of participants carrying the ε4 allele was notably worse on verbal memory (Auditory Verbal Learning Test), motor speed, fine motor coordination, visual scanning, attention and mental flexibility (Grooved Pegboard, Symbol Digit Modalities Test and part B of the Trail Making Test) and showed considerably more neurobehavioural disturbances (Neurobehavioral Rating Scale—Revised) than the group without the ε4 allele. Conclusions In particular, performance on neuropsychological tasks that are presumed to be related to temporal lobe, frontal lobe and white matter integrity is worse in patients with the APOE ε4 allele than in those without it. More neurobehavioural disturbances are observed in APOE ε4 carriers than in APOE ε2 and ε3 carriers. PMID:16614010

  13. A comparison of IQ and memory cluster solutions in moderate and severe pediatric traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Thaler, Nicholas S; Terranova, Jennifer; Turner, Alisa; Mayfield, Joan; Allen, Daniel N

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have examined heterogeneous neuropsychological outcomes in childhood traumatic brain injury (TBI) using cluster analysis. These studies have identified homogeneous subgroups based on tests of IQ, memory, and other cognitive abilities that show some degree of association with specific cognitive, emotional, and behavioral outcomes, and have demonstrated that the clusters derived for children with TBI are different from those observed in normal populations. However, the extent to which these subgroups are stable across abilities has not been examined, and this has significant implications for the generalizability and clinical utility of TBI clusters. The current study addressed this by comparing IQ and memory profiles of 137 children who sustained moderate-to-severe TBI. Cluster analysis of IQ and memory scores indicated that a four-cluster solution was optimal for the IQ scores and a five-cluster solution was optimal for the memory scores. Three clusters on each battery differed primarily by level of performance, while the others had pattern variations. Cross-plotting the clusters across respective IQ and memory test scores indicated that clusters defined by level were generally stable, while clusters defined by pattern differed. Notably, children with slower processing speed exhibited low-average to below-average performance on memory indexes. These results provide some support for the stability of previously identified memory and IQ clusters and provide information about the relationship between IQ and memory in children with TBI.

  14. Patient-Specific Thresholds and Doses of Intracranial Hypertension in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Lazaridis, Christos; Smielewski, Peter; Menon, David K; Hutchinson, Peter; Pickard, John D; Czosnyka, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Based on continuous monitoring of the pressure reactivity index (PRx), we defined individualized intracranial pressure (ICP) thresholds by graphing the relationship between ICP and PRx. We hypothesized that an "ICP dose" based on individually assessed ICP thresholds might correlate more closely with 6-month outcome compared with ICP doses derived from the recommended universal thresholds of 20 and 25 mmHg. Data from 327 patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) were analyzed. ICP doses were computed as the cumulative area under the curve above the defined thresholds in graphing ICP versus time. The term Dose 20 (D20) was used to refer to an ICP threshold of 20 mm Hg. The markers D25 and DPRx were calculated similarly. The discriminative ability of each dose with regard to mortality was assessed by receiver operating characteristics analysis using fivefold cross-validation (CV). DPRx was found to be the best discriminator of mortality, despite the fact that D20 was twice as large as DPRx. Individualized doses of intracranial hypertension were stronger predictors of mortality than doses derived from the universal thresholds of 20 and 25 mm Hg. The PRx could offer a method of individualizing the ICP threshold.

  15. Defining the biomechanical and biological threshold of murine mild traumatic brain injury using CHIMERA (Closed Head Impact Model of Engineered Rotational Acceleration).

    PubMed

    Namjoshi, Dhananjay R; Cheng, Wai Hang; Bashir, Asma; Wilkinson, Anna; Stukas, Sophie; Martens, Kris M; Whyte, Tom; Abebe, Zelalem A; McInnes, Kurt A; Cripton, Peter A; Wellington, Cheryl L

    2017-03-05

    CHIMERA (Closed Head Impact Model of Engineered Rotational Acceleration) is a recently described animal model of traumatic brain injury (TBI) that primarily produces diffuse axonal injury (DAI) characterized by white matter inflammation and axonal damage. CHIMERA was specifically designed to reliably generate a variety of TBI severities using precise and quantifiable biomechanical inputs in a nonsurgical user-friendly platform. The objective of this study was to define the lower limit of single impact mild TBI (mTBI) using CHIMERA by characterizing the dose-response relationship between biomechanical input and neurological, behavioral, neuropathological and biochemical outcomes. Wild-type male mice were subjected to a single CHIMERA TBI using six impact energies ranging from 0.1 to 0.7J, and post-TBI outcomes were assessed over an acute period of 14days. Here we report that single TBI using CHIMERA induces injury dose- and time-dependent changes in behavioral and neurological deficits, axonal damage, white matter tract microgliosis and astrogliosis. Impact energies of 0.4J or below produced no significant phenotype (subthreshold), 0.5J led to significant changes for one or more phenotypes (threshold), and 0.6 and 0.7J resulted in significant changes in all outcomes assessed (mTBI). We further show that linear head kinematics are the most robust predictors of duration of unconsciousness, severity of neurological deficits, white matter injury, and microgliosis following single TBI. Our data extend the validation of CHIMERA as a biofidelic animal model of DAI and establish working parameters to guide future investigations of the mechanisms underlying axonal pathology and inflammation induced by mechanical trauma.

  16. Improved outcomes from the administration of progesterone for patients with acute severe traumatic brain injury: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Guomin; Wei, Jing; Yan, Weiqi; Wang, Weimin; Lu, Zhenhui

    2008-01-01

    Background Severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been increasing with greater incidence of injuries from traffic or sporting accidents. Although there are a number of animal models of TBI using progesterone for head injury, the effects of progesterone on neurologic outcome of acute TBI patients remain unclear. The aim of the present clinical study was to assess the longer-term efficacy of progesterone on the improvement in neurologic outcome of patients with acute severe TBI. Methods A total of 159 patients who arrived within 8 hours of injury with a Glasgow Coma Score ≤ 8 were enrolled in the study. A prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of progesterone was conducted in the Neurotrauma Center of our teaching hospital. The patients were randomized to receive either progesterone or placebo. The primary endpoint was the Glasgow Outcome Scale score 3 months after brain injury. Secondary efficacy endpoints included the modified Functional Independence Measure score and mortality. In a follow-up protocol at 6 months, the Glasgow Outcome Scale and the modified Functional Independence Measure scores were again determined. Results Of the 159 patients randomized, 82 received progesterone and 77 received placebo. The demographic characteristics, the mechanism of injury, and the time of treatment were compared for the two groups. After 3 months and 6 months of treatment, the dichotomized Glasgow Outcome Scale score analysis exhibited more favorable outcomes among the patients who were given progesterone compared with the control individuals (P = 0.034 and P = 0.048, respectively). The modified Functional Independence Measure scores in the progesterone group were higher than those in the placebo group at both 3-month and 6-month follow-up (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01). The mortality rate of the progesterone group was significantly lower than that of the placebo group at 6-month follow-up (P < 0.05). The mean intracranial pressure values 72 hours and 7 days after

  17. Maximum Running Speed of Captive Bar-Headed Geese Is Unaffected by Severe Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Hawkes, Lucy A.; Butler, Patrick J.; Frappell, Peter B.; Meir, Jessica U.; Milsom, William K.; Scott, Graham R.; Bishop, Charles M.

    2014-01-01

    While bar-headed geese are renowned for migration at high altitude over the Himalayas, previous work on captive birds suggested that these geese are unable to maintain rates of oxygen consumption while running in severely hypoxic conditions. To investigate this paradox, we re-examined the running performance and heart rates of bar-headed geese and barnacle geese (a low altitude species) during exercise in hypoxia. Bar-headed geese (n = 7) were able to run at maximum speeds (determined in normoxia) for 15 minutes in severe hypoxia (7% O2; simulating the hypoxia at 8500 m) with mean heart rates of 466±8 beats min−1. Barnacle geese (n = 10), on the other hand, were unable to complete similar trials in severe hypoxia and their mean heart rate (316 beats.min−1) was significantly lower than bar-headed geese. In bar-headed geese, partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide in both arterial and mixed venous blood were significantly lower during hypoxia than normoxia, both at rest and while running. However, measurements of blood lactate in bar-headed geese suggested that anaerobic metabolism was not a major energy source during running in hypoxia. We combined these data with values taken from the literature to estimate (i) oxygen supply, using the Fick equation and (ii) oxygen demand using aerodynamic theory for bar-headed geese flying aerobically, and under their own power, at altitude. This analysis predicts that the maximum altitude at which geese can transport enough oxygen to fly without environmental assistance ranges from 6,800 m to 8,900 m altitude, depending on the parameters used in the model but that such flights should be rare. PMID:24710001

  18. Maximum running speed of captive bar-headed geese is unaffected by severe hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, Lucy A; Butler, Patrick J; Frappell, Peter B; Meir, Jessica U; Milsom, William K; Scott, Graham R; Bishop, Charles M

    2014-01-01

    While bar-headed geese are renowned for migration at high altitude over the Himalayas, previous work on captive birds suggested that these geese are unable to maintain rates of oxygen consumption while running in severely hypoxic conditions. To investigate this paradox, we re-examined the running performance and heart rates of bar-headed geese and barnacle geese (a low altitude species) during exercise in hypoxia. Bar-headed geese (n = 7) were able to run at maximum speeds (determined in normoxia) for 15 minutes in severe hypoxia (7% O2; simulating the hypoxia at 8500 m) with mean heart rates of 466±8 beats min-1. Barnacle geese (n = 10), on the other hand, were unable to complete similar trials in severe hypoxia and their mean heart rate (316 beats.min-1) was significantly lower than bar-headed geese. In bar-headed geese, partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide in both arterial and mixed venous blood were significantly lower during hypoxia than normoxia, both at rest and while running. However, measurements of blood lactate in bar-headed geese suggested that anaerobic metabolism was not a major energy source during running in hypoxia. We combined these data with values taken from the literature to estimate (i) oxygen supply, using the Fick equation and (ii) oxygen demand using aerodynamic theory for bar-headed geese flying aerobically, and under their own power, at altitude. This analysis predicts that the maximum altitude at which geese can transport enough oxygen to fly without environmental assistance ranges from 6,800 m to 8,900 m altitude, depending on the parameters used in the model but that such flights should be rare.

  19. Surgical reconstruction of severe forefoot derangement in a patient with traumatically acquired contralateral limb-length discrepancy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bonner, Alexander; Cranford, Carlton C; Patel, Rakesh; Chi, Andy; Bhikha, Shamir

    2012-01-01

    Limb-length discrepancy is a very common condition. A severe debilitating forefoot deformity resulting from a post-traumatic limb length discrepancy is quite rare. This case study discusses the surgical reconstruction of a forefoot deformity of a 64-year-old male following a post-traumatic limb-length discrepancy from a motor vehicle accident that caused compensatory biomechanical changes in the unaffected lower extremity. These changes resulted in a severe hallux abducto valgus deformity with subluxated metatarsophalangeal joints of the second and third digits, leaving the patient with a severe symptomatic forefoot deformity that closely mimics the radiographic appearance of a rheumatoid forefoot. The forefoot deformity was corrected using the Mckeever and Hoffman procedures with Kirschner-wire fixation. Seven months following the corrective procedures, the patient was able to obtain an asymptomatic plantigrade foot and can now wear regular footwear.

  20. Clinical review: Brain-body temperature differences in adults with severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Childs, Charmaine; Lunn, Kueh Wern

    2013-04-22

    Surrogate or 'proxy' measures of brain temperature are used in the routine management of patients with brain damage. The prevailing view is that the brain is 'hotter' than the body. The polarity and magnitude of temperature differences between brain and body, however, remains unclear after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). The focus of this systematic review is on the adult patient admitted to intensive/neurocritical care with a diagnosis of severe TBI (Glasgow Coma Scale score of less than 8). The review considered studies that measured brain temperature and core body temperature. Articles published in English from the years 1980 to 2012 were searched in databases, CINAHL, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, Science Direct, Ovid SP, Mednar and ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Database. For the review, publications of randomised controlled trials, non-randomised controlled trials, before and after studies, cohort studies, case-control studies and descriptive studies were considered for inclusion. Of 2,391 records identified via the search strategies, 37 were retrieved for detailed examination (including two via hand searching). Fifteen were reviewed and assessed for methodological quality. Eleven studies were included in the systematic review providing 15 brain-core body temperature comparisons. The direction of mean brain-body temperature differences was positive (brain higher than body temperature) and negative (brain lower than body temperature). Hypothermia is associated with large brain-body temperature differences. Brain temperature cannot be predicted reliably from core body temperature. Concurrent monitoring of brain and body temperature is recommended in patients where risk of temperature-related neuronal damage is a cause for clinical concern and when deliberate induction of below-normal body temperature is instituted.

  1. Influence of predispositions on post-traumatic stress disorder: does it vary by trauma severity?

    PubMed Central

    Breslau, N.; Troost, J. P.; Bohnert, K.; Luo, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Background Only a minority of trauma victims (<10%) develops post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), suggesting that victims vary in predispositions to the PTSD response to traumas. It is assumed that the influence of predispositions is inversely related to trauma severity: when trauma is extreme predispositions are assumed to play a secondary role. This assumption has not been tested. We estimate the influence of key predispositions on PTSD induced by an extreme trauma – associated with a high percentage of PTSD – (sexual assault), relative to events of lower magnitude (accidents, disaster, and unexpected death of someone close). Method The National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) is representative of the adult population of the USA. A total of 34 653 respondents completed the second wave in which lifetime PTSD was assessed. We conducted three series of multinomial logistic regressions, comparing the influence of six predispositions on the PTSD effect of sexual assault with each comparison event. Three pre-existing disorders and three parental history variables were examined. Results Predispositions predicted elevated PTSD risk among victims of sexual assault as they did among victims of comparison events. We detected no evidence that the influence of predispositions on PTSD risk was significantly lower when the event was sexual assault, relative to accidents, disasters and unexpected death of someone close. Conclusions Important predispositions increase the risk of PTSD following sexual assault as much as they do following accidents, disaster, and unexpected death of someone close. Research on other predispositions and alternative classifications of event severity would be illuminating. PMID:22703614

  2. Diet-Induced Obesity Significantly Increases the Severity of Post-Traumatic Arthritis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Louer, Craig R.; Furman, Bridgette D.; Huebner, Janet L.; Kraus, Virginia B.; Olson, Steven A.; Guilak, Farshid

    2012-01-01

    Objective Obesity and joint injury are both primary risk factors for osteoarthritis (OA) that involve potential alterations in the biomechanical and inflammatory environments of the joint. Post-traumatic arthritis (PTA) is a frequent long-term complication of intra-articular fractures. Obesity has been linked to primary OA and may potentially contribute to the development of PTA by a variety of mechanisms. The objectives of this study were to determine if diet-induced obesity influences the severity of PTA in mice and to examine interrelationships between joint degeneration and serum levels of inflammatory cytokines and adipokines in this response. Methods C57BL/6 mice were fed either normal chow (13% fat) or a high-fat diet (60% fat) starting at 4 weeks of age. At 16 weeks, half of each group received closed intra-articular fracture of the left knee. At 8 weeks post-fracture, knee osteoarthritis was assessed by cartilage and synovium histology in addition to bone morphology. Serum cytokine concentrations were determined with multiplex assay. Results Fractured knee joints of mice on a high-fat diet showed significantly increased osteoarthritic degeneration compared to non-fractured contralateral controls, while fractured knee joints of low-fat mice did not demonstrate significant differences from non-fractured contralateral controls. High-fat diet increased serum concentrations of interleukin-12p70, interleukin-6, and keratinocyte-derived chemokine, while decreasing adiponectin concentrations. Systemic levels of adiponectin were inversely correlated with synovial inflammation in control limbs. Conclusion Diet-induced obesity significantly increased the severity of osteoarthritis following intra-articular fracture. Obesity and joint injury together can alter systemic levels of inflammatory cytokines such as IL-12p70. PMID:22576842

  3. Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... Questions Glossary Contact Us Visitor Feedback mild Traumatic Brain Injury mild Traumatic Brain Injury VIDEO STORIES What is TBI Measuring Severity ... most common deployment injuries is a mild Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). A mild TBI is an injury ...

  4. Outcome Prediction after Traumatic Brain Injury: Comparison of the Performance of Routinely Used Severity Scores and Multivariable Prognostic Models

    PubMed Central

    Majdan, Marek; Brazinova, Alexandra; Rusnak, Martin; Leitgeb, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Prognosis of outcome after traumatic brain injury (TBI) is important in the assessment of quality of care and can help improve treatment and outcome. The aim of this study was to compare the prognostic value of relatively simple injury severity scores between each other and against a gold standard model – the IMPACT-extended (IMP-E) multivariable prognostic model. Materials and Methods: For this study, 866 patients with moderate/severe TBI from Austria were analyzed. The prognostic performances of the Glasgow coma scale (GCS), GCS motor (GCSM) score, abbreviated injury scale for the head region, Marshall computed tomographic (CT) classification, and Rotterdam CT score were compared side-by-side and against the IMP-E score. The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) and Nagelkerke's R2 were used to assess the prognostic performance. Outcomes at the Intensive Care Unit, at hospital discharge, and at 6 months (mortality and unfavorable outcome) were used as end-points. Results: Comparing AUCs and R2s of the same model across four outcomes, only little variation was apparent. A similar pattern is observed when comparing the models between each other: Variation of AUCs <±0.09 and R2s by up to ±0.17 points suggest that all scores perform similarly in predicting outcomes at various points (AUCs: 0.65–0.77; R2s: 0.09–0.27). All scores performed significantly worse than the IMP-E model (with AUC > 0.83 and R2 > 0.42 for all outcomes): AUCs were worse by 0.10–0.22 (P < 0.05) and R2s were worse by 0.22–0.39 points. Conclusions: All tested simple scores can provide reasonably valid prognosis. However, it is confirmed that well-developed multivariable prognostic models outperform these scores significantly and should be used for prognosis in patients after TBI wherever possible. PMID:28149077

  5. Could heart rate variability predict outcome in patients with severe head injury? A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rapenne, T; Moreau, D; Lenfant, F; Vernet, M; Boggio, V; Cottin, Y; Freysz, M

    2001-07-01

    Despite major improvements in the resuscitation of patients with head injury, the outcome of patients with head trauma often remains poor and difficult to establish. Heart rate variability (HRV) analysis is a noninvasive tool used to measure autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity. The aim of this prospective study was to investigate whether HRV analysis might be a useful adjunct for predicting outcome in patients with severe head injury. Twenty patients with severe head trauma (Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS] or= 10) to HRV in patients characterized by a worsened neurologic state (GCS < 10). Statistical analysis used the Kruskal-Wallis test, P < .05. To assess whether HRV could predict evolution to brain death, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated the day after trauma for Total Power, natural logarithm of high-frequency component of spectral analysis (LnHF), natural logarithm of low-frequency component of spectral analysis (LnLF), and root mean square for successive interval differences (rMSSD). Seven patients died between Day 1 and Day 5 after trauma. Six of those had progressed to brain death. In these six patients, at Day 1, Global HRV and parasympathetic tone were significantly higher. Referring to the area under the rMSSD ROC curve, HRV might provide useful information in predicting early evolution of patients with severe head trauma. During the awakening period, global HRV and the parasympathetic tone were significantly lower in the worsened neurologic state group. In conclusion, HRV could be helpful as a predictor of imminent brain death

  6. Detection of secondary insults by brain tissue pO2 and bedside microdialysis in severe head injury.

    PubMed

    Sarrafzadeh, A S; Sakowitz, O W; Callsen, T A; Lanksch, W R; Unterberg, A W

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated bedside cerebral on-line microdialysis for early detection of cerebral hypoxia in patients with traumatic brain injury. 24 severely head injured patients (Glasgow Coma Score < or = 8) were studied. Patients underwent continuous brain tissue PO2 (PtiO2) monitoring using the LICOX (GMS mbH, Germany) microcatheter device. The catheter was placed into the non-lesioned frontal white matter within 32.2 (7-48) hrs post injury. The microdialysis catheter (CMA 100, Sweden) was placed close to the PtiO2 probe via a 2- or 3-way skull screw, connected to a pump and perfused with Ringer solution (0.3 microliter/min). The microdialysis samples were collected hourly and analyzed at the bedside for glucose, lactate, lactate-pyruvate-ratio and glutamate (CMA 600, Sweden). We identified 252 episodes of impending hypoxia (PtiO2 < 15 mm Hg; 11,810 minutes) and 38 episodes of cerebral hypoxia (PtiO2 < 10 mm Hg; 1996 minutes). Before cerebral hypoxia, glucose decreased significantly. Glutamate was unchanged when no hypoxia or impending hypoxia occurred but increased 3-4 fold before a hypoxic episode appeared. We conclude that early metabolic detection of cerebral hypoxia before a critical decrease in brain tissue PtiO2 is seen and possibly allows earlier changes in treatment (e.g. reduction of hyperventilation therapy).

  7. Correction of severe post-traumatic deformities in the distal femur by distraction osteogenesis using Taylor Spatial Frame: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nakase, T; Ohzono, K; Shimizu, N; Yoshikawa, H

    2006-01-01

    A case of deformity and shortening after post-traumatic growth arrest treated using the Taylor Spatial Frame (Smith & Nephew, Tennessee, USA) is presented. This is the first report showing the application of the frame for post-traumatic deformity in the distal femur, and successful outcomes promise utilization of the frame even for correction of severe deformity in the distal femur.

  8. Domestic violence and post-traumatic stress disorder severity for participants of a domestic violence rehabilitation program.

    PubMed

    Gerlock, April A

    2004-06-01

    Domestic violence has been a long-standing problem for our nation's active duty and military veterans. The purpose of this article is to describe participants of a domestic violence program, the program design to help lessen attrition, and the completers and noncompleters of the program. There was a significant relationship between post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and domestic violence severity for the sample. PTSD severity was also related to reports of domestic violence in the family of origin. Completers and noncompleters were compared on demographic and violence variables and on nine research measures. Completers were more likely younger than 35 years old, employed, had higher self-ratings of relationship mutuality, lower levels of stress and post-traumatic stress, and were regularly court monitored. The results of a logistic regression significantly predicted completers and noncompleters based on age, relationship mutuality, PTSD, and court-monitored status (model chi2 statistic of 31.08, p = 0.0000).

  9. The Mental Health Sequelae of Traumatic Head Injury in South Vietnamese Ex-Political Detainees Who Survived Torture

    PubMed Central

    Mollica, Richard F.; Chernoff, Miriam C.; Berthold, S. Megan; Lavelle, James; Lyoo, In Kyoon; Renshaw, Perry

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the relationship between traumatic head injury (THI) and psychiatric morbidity in torture survivors. We examine the relationship between THI and depression, PTSD, post-concussive syndrome (PCS), disability and poor health status in Vietnamese ex-political detainees who survived incarceration in Vietnamese re-education camps. A community sample of ex-political detainees (n=337) and a non-THI, non-ex-detainee comparison group (n=82) were surveyed. 78% of the ex-political detainees had experienced THI. 90.6% of the ex-political detainees and 3.6% of the comparison group had experienced 7 or more trauma events. Depression and PTSD were greater in ex-detainees than the comparison group (40.9% vs 23.2% and 13.4% vs 0%). Dose-effect relationships for THI and trauma/torture in the ex-political detainee group were significant. Logistic regression in the pooled sample of ex-detainees and the comparison group confirmed the independent impact of THI from trauma/torture on psychiatric morbidity (OR for PTSD=22.4; 95% CI: 3.0-165.8). These results demonstrate important effects of THI on depression and PTSD in Vietnamese ex-detainees who have survived torture. PMID:24962448

  10. Righting Reflex Predicts Long-Term Histological and Behavioral Outcomes in a Closed Head Model of Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Grin’kina, Natalia M.; Li, Yang; Haber, Margalit; Sangobowale, Michael; Nikulina, Elena; Le’Pre, Charm; El Sehamy, Alexander M.; Dugue, Rachelle; Ho, Johnson S.

    2016-01-01

    Blunt impact produces a heterogeneous brain injury in people and in animal models of traumatic brain injury. We report that a single closed head impact to adult C57/BL6 mice produced two injury syndromes (CHI-1 and CHI-2). CHI-1 mice spontaneously reinitiated breathing after injury while CHI-2 mice had prolonged apnea and regained breathing only after cardiopulmonary resuscitation and supplementation of 100% O2. The CHI-1 group significantly regained righting reflex more rapidly than the CHI-2 group. At 7 days post-injury, CHI-1, but not CHI-2 mice, acquired but had no long-term retention of an active place avoidance task. The behavioral deficits of CHI-1 and CHI-2 mice were retained one-month after the injury. CHI-1 mice had loss of hippocampal neurons and localized white matter injury at one month after injury. CHI-2 had a larger loss of hippocampal neurons and more widespread loss of myelin and axons. High-speed videos made during the injury were followed by assessment of breathing and righting reflex. These videos show that CHI-2 mice experienced a larger vertical g-force than CHI-1 mice. Time to regain righting reflex in CHI-2 mice significantly correlated with vertical g-force. Thus, physiological responses occurring immediately after injury can be valuable surrogate markers of subsequent behavioral and histological deficits. PMID:27657499

  11. Age-related carbon dioxide reactivity in children after moderate and severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Maa, Tensing; Yeates, Keith Owen; Moore-Clingenpeel, Melissa; O'Brien, Nicole F

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE The objective of this study is to assess carbon dioxide reactivity (CO2R) in children following traumatic brain injury (TBI). METHODS This prospective observational study enrolled children younger than 18 years old following moderate and severe TBI. Thirty-eight mechanically ventilated children had daily CO2R testing performed by measuring changes in their bilateral middle cerebral artery flow velocities using transcranial Doppler ultrasonography (TCD) after a transient increase in minute ventilation. The cohort was divided into 3 age groups: younger than 2 years (n = 12); 2 to 5 years old (n = 9); and older than 5 years (n = 17). RESULTS Children younger than 2 years old had a lower mean CO2R over time. The 2-5-year-old age group had higher mean CO2R than younger patients (p = 0.01), and the highest CO2R values compared with either of the other age groups (vs > 5 years old, p = 0.046; vs < 2 years old, p = 0.002). Having a lower minimum CO2R had a statistically significant negative effect on outcome at discharge (p = 0.0413). Impaired CO2R beyond Postinjury Day 4 trended toward having an effect on outcome at discharge (p = 0.0855). CONCLUSIONS Abnormal CO2R is prevalent in children following TBI, and the degree of impairment varies by age. No clinical or laboratory parameters were identified as risk factors for impaired CO2R. Lower minimum CO2R values are associated with worse outcome at discharge.

  12. Hypernatremia in patients with severe traumatic brain injury: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hypernatremia is common following traumatic brain injury (TBI) and occurs from a variety of mechanisms, including hyperosmotic fluids, limitation of free water, or diabetes insipidus. The purpose of this systematic review was to assess the relationship between hypernatremia and mortality in patients with TBI. Methods We searched the following databases up to November 2012: MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CENTRAL. Using a combination of MeSH and text terms, we developed search filters for the concepts of hypernatremia and TBI and included studies that met the following criteria: (1) compared hypernatremia to normonatremia, (2) adult patients with TBI, (3) presented adjusted outcomes for mortality or complications. Results Bibliographic and conference search yielded 1,152 citations and 11 abstracts, respectively. Sixty-five articles were selected for full-text review with 5 being included in our study. All were retrospective cohort studies totaling 5,594 (range 100–4,296) patients. There was marked between-study heterogeneity. The incidence of hypernatremia ranged between 16% and 40%. Use of hyperosmolar therapy was presented in three studies (range 14-85% of patients). Hypernatremia was associated with increased mortality across all four studies that presented this outcome. Only one study considered diabetes insipidus (DI) in their analysis where hypernatremia was associated with increased mortality in patients who did not receive DDAVP. Conclusions Although hypernatremia was associated with increased mortality in the included studies, there was marked between-study heterogeneity. DI was a potential confounder in several studies. Considering these limitations, the clinical significance of hypernatremia in TBI is difficult to establish at this stage. PMID:24196399

  13. White matter disruption in moderate/severe pediatric traumatic brain injury: Advanced tract-based analyses

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Emily L.; Jin, Yan; Villalon-Reina, Julio E.; Zhan, Liang; Kernan, Claudia L.; Babikian, Talin; Mink, Richard B.; Babbitt, Christopher J.; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Giza, Christopher C.; Thompson, Paul M.; Asarnow, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability in children and can lead to a wide range of impairments. Brain imaging methods such as DTI (diffusion tensor imaging) are uniquely sensitive to the white matter (WM) damage that is common in TBI. However, higher-level analyses using tractography are complicated by the damage and decreased FA (fractional anisotropy) characteristic of TBI, which can result in premature tract endings. We used the newly developed autoMATE (automated multi-atlas tract extraction) method to identify differences in WM integrity. 63 pediatric patients aged 8–19 years with moderate/severe TBI were examined with cross sectional scanning at one or two time points after injury: a post-acute assessment 1–5 months post-injury and a chronic assessment 13–19 months post-injury. A battery of cognitive function tests was performed in the same time periods. 56 children were examined in the first phase, 28 TBI patients and 28 healthy controls. In the second phase 34 children were studied, 17 TBI patients and 17 controls (27 participants completed both post-acute and chronic phases). We did not find any significant group differences in the post-acute phase. Chronically, we found extensive group differences, mainly for mean and radial diffusivity (MD and RD). In the chronic phase, we found higher MD and RD across a wide range of WM. Additionally, we found correlations between these WM integrity measures and cognitive deficits. This suggests a distributed pattern of WM disruption that continues over the first year following a TBI in children. PMID:25737958

  14. Severity of experimental traumatic brain injury modulates changes in concentrations of cerebral free amino acids.

    PubMed

    Amorini, Angela Maria; Lazzarino, Giacomo; Di Pietro, Valentina; Signoretti, Stefano; Lazzarino, Giuseppe; Belli, Antonio; Tavazzi, Barbara

    2017-03-01

    In this study, concentrations of free amino acids (FAA) and amino group containing compounds (AGCC) following graded diffuse traumatic brain injury (mild TBI, mTBI; severe TBI, sTBI) were evaluated. After 6, 12, 24, 48 and 120 hr aspartate (Asp), glutamate (Glu), asparagine (Asn), serine (Ser), glutamine (Gln), histidine (His), glycine (Gly), threonine (Thr), citrulline (Cit), arginine (Arg), alanine (Ala), taurine (Tau), γ-aminobutyrate (GABA), tyrosine (Tyr), S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH), l-cystathionine (l-Cystat), valine (Val), methionine (Met), tryptophane (Trp), phenylalanine (Phe), isoleucine (Ile), leucine (Leu), ornithine (Orn), lysine (Lys), plus N-acetylaspartate (NAA) were determined in whole brain extracts (n = 6 rats at each time for both TBI levels). Sham-operated animals (n = 6) were used as controls. Results demonstrated that mTBI caused modest, transient changes in NAA, Asp, GABA, Gly, Arg. Following sTBI, animals showed profound, long-lasting modifications of Glu, Gln, NAA, Asp, GABA, Ser, Gly, Ala, Arg, Citr, Tau, Met, SAH, l-Cystat, Tyr and Phe. Increase in Glu and Gln, depletion of NAA and Asp increase, suggested a link between NAA hydrolysis and excitotoxicity after sTBI. Additionally, sTBI rats showed net imbalances of the Glu-Gln/GABA cycle between neurons and astrocytes, and of the methyl-cycle (demonstrated by decrease in Met, and increase in SAH and l-Cystat), throughout the post-injury period. Besides evidencing new potential targets for novel pharmacological treatments, these results suggest that the force acting on the brain tissue at the time of the impact is the main determinant of the reactions ignited and involving amino acid metabolism.

  15. Job stability in skilled work and communication ability after moderate-severe traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Meulenbroek, Peter; Turkstra, Lyn S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Communication deficits may play a critical role in maintaining employment after traumatic brain injury (TBI), but links between specific communication deficits and employment outcomes have not been determined. This study identified communication measures that distinguished stably employed versus unstably employed adults with TBI. Methods Participants were 31 adults with moderate-severe TBI who were employed full-time for at least 12 consecutive months before injury in skilled jobs and had attempted return to skilled jobs after injury. Sixteen had achieved stable employment (SE) post-injury, defined as full-time employment for ≥12 consecutive months; and 15 had unstable (UE) employment. Participants completed a battery of communication tests identified in a prior qualitative study of communication skills required for skilled work. Results Measures of spoken language comprehension, verbal reasoning, social inference, reading, and politeness in spoken discourse significantly discriminated between SE and UE groups. Two nested models were completed and compared. The first model excluded discourse data because of missing data for two UE and one SE participant. This model revealed that measures of verbal reasoning speed (β = −0.18, p = 0.05) and social inference (β = 0.19, p = 0.05) were predictive independent of the overall model. The second model included discourse data and was a better overall predictor of group membership (Likelihood ratio test, Model 1: 3.824, Model 2: 2.865). Conclusion Communication measures were positively associated with stable employment in skilled jobs after TBI. Clinicians should include assessment of communication for adults attempting return to work after TBI, paying specific attention to social inference and speed of verbal reasoning skills. PMID:25958999

  16. Activin a release into cerebrospinal fluid in a subset of patients with severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Phillips, David J; Nguyen, Phuong; Adamides, Alexios A; Bye, Nicole; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V; Kossmann, Thomas; Vallance, Shirley; Murray, Lynnette; Morganti-Kossmann, Maria C

    2006-09-01

    Activin A is a member of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily and has been demonstrated to be elevated during inflammation and to have neuroprotective properties following neural insults. In this study, we examined whether traumatic brain injury (TBI) induced a response in activin A or in the concentrations of its binding protein, follistatin. Thirty-nine patients with severe TBI had daily, matched cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum samples collected post-TBI and these were assayed for activin A and follistatin using specific immunoassays. Concentrations of both molecules were assessed relative to a variety of clinical parameters, such as the Glasgow Coma Score, computer tomography classification of TBI, measurement of injury markers, cell metabolism and membrane breakdown products. In about half of the patients, there was a notable increase in CSF activin A concentrations in the first few days post-TBI. There were only minor perturbations in either serum activin or in either CSF or serum follistatin concentrations. The CSF activin A response was not related to any of the common TBI indices, but was strongly correlated with two common markers of brain damage, neuronal specific enolase and S100-beta. Further, activin A levels were also associated with indices of metabolism, such as lactate and pyruvate, excitotoxicity (glutamate) and membrane lipid breakdown products such as glycerol. In one of the two patients who developed a CSF infection, activin A concentrations in CSF became markedly elevated. Thus, some TBI patients have an early release of activin A into the CSF that may result from activation of inflammatory and/or neuroprotective pathways.

  17. Tensor-Based Morphometry Reveals Volumetric Deficits in Moderate=Severe Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Xue; Villalon-Reina, Julio; Moran, Lisa M.; Kernan, Claudia; Babikian, Talin; Mink, Richard; Babbitt, Christopher; Johnson, Jeffrey; Giza, Christopher C.; Thompson, Paul M.; Asarnow, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can cause widespread and prolonged brain degeneration. TBI can affect cognitive function and brain integrity for many years after injury, often with lasting effects in children, whose brains are still immature. Although TBI varies in how it affects different individuals, image analysis methods such as tensor-based morphometry (TBM) can reveal common areas of brain atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), secondary effects of the initial injury, which will differ between subjects. Here we studied 36 pediatric moderate to severe TBI (msTBI) participants in the post-acute phase (1–6 months post-injury) and 18 msTBI participants who returned for their chronic assessment, along with well-matched controls at both time-points. Participants completed a battery of cognitive tests that we used to create a global cognitive performance score. Using TBM, we created three-dimensional (3D) maps of individual and group differences in regional brain volumes. At both the post-acute and chronic time-points, the greatest group differences were expansion of the lateral ventricles and reduction of the lingual gyrus in the TBI group. We found a number of smaller clusters of volume reduction in the cingulate gyrus, thalamus, and fusiform gyrus, and throughout the frontal, temporal, and parietal cortices. Additionally, we found extensive associations between our cognitive performance measure and regional brain volume. Our results indicate a pattern of atrophy still detectable 1-year post-injury, which may partially underlie the cognitive deficits frequently found in TBI. PMID:26393494

  18. Early Changes in Brain Oxygen Tension May Predict Outcome Following Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, J K; Chandrasekaran, S; Andrews, P J

    2016-01-01

    We report on the change in brain oxygen tension (PbtO2) over the first 24 h of monitoring in a series of 25 patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and relate this to outcome. The trend in PbtO2 for the whole group was to increase with time (mean PbtO2 17.4 [1.75] vs 24.7 [1.60] mmHg, first- vs last-hour data, respectively; p = 0.002). However, a significant increase in PbtO2 occurred in only 17 patients (68 %), all surviving to intensive care unit discharge (p = 0.006). Similarly, a consistent increase in PbtO2 with time occurred in only 13 patients, the correlation coefficient for PbtO2 versus time being ≥0.5 for all survivors. There were eight survivors and four non-survivors, with low correlation coefficients (<0.5). Significantly more patients with a correlation coefficient ≥0.5 for PbtO2 versus time survived in intensive care (p = 0.039). The cumulative length of time that PbtO2 was <20 mmHg was not significantly different among these three groups. In conclusion, although for the cohort as a whole PbtO2 increased over the first 24 h, the individual trends of PbtO2 were related to outcome. There was a significant association between improving PbtO2 and survival, despite these patients having cumulative durations of hypoxia similar to those of non-survivors.

  19. Lateral Ventricle Volume Asymmetry Predicts Midline Shift in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Arnold; Schmalfuss, Ilona; Heaton, Shelley C; Gabrielli, Andrea; Hannay, H Julia; Papa, Linda; Brophy, Gretchen M; Wang, Kevin K W; Büki, András; Schwarcz, Attila; Hayes, Ronald L; Robertson, Claudia S; Robicsek, Steven A

    2015-09-01

    Midline shift following severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI) detected on computed tomography (CT) scans is an established predictor of poor outcome. We hypothesized that lateral ventricular volume (LVV) asymmetry is an earlier sign of developing asymmetric intracranial pathology than midline shift. This retrospective analysis was performed on data from 84 adults with blunt sTBI requiring a ventriculostomy who presented to a Level I trauma center. Seventy-six patients underwent serial CTs within 3 h and an average of three scans within the first 10 d of sTBI. Left and right LVVs were quantified by computer-assisted manual volumetric measurements. LVV ratios (LVR) were determined on the admission CT to evaluate ventricular asymmetry. The relationship between the admission LVR value and subsequent midline shift development was tested using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, and odds ratio (OR) and relative risk tests. Sixty patients had no >5 mm midline shift on the initial admission scan. Of these, 15 patients developed it subsequently (16 patients already had >5 mm midline shift on admission scans). For >5 mm midline shift development, admission LVR of >1.67 was shown to have a sensitivity of 73.3% and a specificity of 73.3% (area under the curve=0.782; p<0.0001). LVR of >1.67 as exposure yielded an OR of 7.56 (p<0.01), and a risk ratio of 4.42 (p<0.01) for midline shift development as unfavorable outcome. We propose that LVR captures LVV asymmetry and is not only related to, but also predicts the development of midline shift already at admission CT examination. Lateral ventricles may have a higher "compliance" than midline structures to developing asymmetric brain pathology. LVR analysis is simple, rapidly accomplished and may allow earlier interventions to attenuate midline shift and potentially improve ultimate outcomes.

  20. Out-of-Hospital Hypertonic Resuscitation Following Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bulger, Eileen M.; May, Susanne; Brasel, Karen J.; Schreiber, Martin; Kerby, Jeffrey D.; Tisherman, Samuel A.; Newgard, Craig; Slutsky, Arthur; Coimbra, Raul; Emerson, Scott; Minei, Joseph P.; Bardarson, Berit; Kudenchuk, Peter; Baker, Andrew; Christenson, Jim; Idris, Ahamed; Davis, Daniel; Fabian, Timothy C.; Aufderheide, Tom P.; Callaway, Clifton; Williams, Carolyn; Banek, Jane; Vaillancourt, Christian; van Heest, Rardi; Sopko, George; Hata, J. Steven; Hoyt, David B.

    2010-01-01

    Context Hypertonic fluids restore cerebral perfusion with reduced cerebral edema and modulate inflammatory response to reduce subsequent neuronal injury and thus have potential benefit in resuscitation of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Objective To determine whether out-of-hospital administration of hypertonic fluids improves neurologic outcome following severe TBI. Design, Setting, and Participants Multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial involving 114 North American emergency medical services agencies within the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium, conducted between May 2006 and May 2009 among patients 15 years or older with blunt trauma and a prehospital Glasgow Coma Scale score of 8 or less who did not meet criteria for hypovolemic shock. Planned enrollment was 2122 patients. Intervention A single 250-mL bolus of 7.5% saline/6% dextran 70 (hypertonic saline/dextran), 7.5% saline (hypertonic saline), or 0.9% saline (normal saline) initiated in the out-of-hospital setting. Main Outcome Measure Six-month neurologic outcome based on the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOSE) (dichotomized as >4 or ≤4). Results The study was terminated by the data and safety monitoring board after randomization of 1331 patients, having met prespecified futility criteria. Among the 1282 patients enrolled, 6-month outcomes data were available for 1087 (85%). Baseline characteristics of the groups were equivalent. There was no difference in 6-month neurologic outcome among groups with regard to proportions of patients with severe TBI (GOSE ≤4) (hypertonic saline/dextran vs normal saline: 53.7% vs 51.5%; difference, 2.2% [95% CI, −4.5% to 9.0%]; hypertonic saline vs normal saline: 54.3% vs 51.5%; difference, 2.9% [95% CI, −4.0% to 9.7%]; P=.67). There were no statistically significant differences in distribution of GOSE category or Disability Rating Score by treatment group. Survival at 28 days was 74.3% with hypertonic saline

  1. Autologous Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells Reduce Therapeutic Intensity for Severe Traumatic Brain Injury in Children

    PubMed Central

    Liao, George P.; Harting, Matthew T.; Hetz, Robert A.; Walker, Peter A.; DO, Shinil K. Shah; Corkins, Christopher J.; Hughes, Travis G.; Jimenez, Fernando; Kosmach, Steven C.; Day, Mary-Clare; Tsao, KuoJen; Lee, Dean A.; Worth, Laura L.; Baumgartner, James E.; Cox, Charles S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The devastating effect of traumatic brain injury (TBI) is exacerbated by an acute secondary neuroinflammatory response, clinically manifest as elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) due to cerebral edema. The treatment effect of cell based therapies in the acute post-TBI period has not been clinically studied although preclinical data demonstrate that bone marrow derived mononuclear cell (BMMNC) infusion downregulates the inflammatory response. Our study evaluates whether pediatric TBI patients receiving intravenous, autologous BMMNCs within 48 hours of injury experienced a reduction in therapeutic intensity directed towards managing elevated ICP relative to matched controls. Design The study was a retrospective cohort design comparing pediatric patients in a Phase I clinical trial treated with intravenous autologous BMMNCs (n=10) to a control group of age and severity matched children (n=19). Setting The study setting was at Children's Memorial Hermann Hospital, an American College of Surgeons Level 1 Pediatric Trauma Center and teaching hospital for the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston from 2000-2008. Patients Study patients were 5-14 years with post resuscitation Glasgow Coma Scale scores of 5-8. Interventions The treatment group received 6 million autologous BMMNC/kg body weight intravenously within 48 hours of injury. The control group was treated in an identical fashion, per standard of care, guided by our TBI management protocol, derived from American Association of Neurological Surgeons guidelines. Measurements The primary measure was the Pediatric Intensity Level of Therapy (PILOT) scale, used to quantify treatment of elevated ICP. Secondary measures included the Pediatric Logistic Organ Dysfunction (PELOD) score and days of ICP monitoring as a surrogate for length of neurointensive care. Main Results A repeated measure mixed model with marginal linear predictions identified a significant reduction in the PILOT score beginning

  2. The relation between the incidence of hypernatremia and mortality in patients with severe traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The study was aimed at verifying whether the occurrence of hypernatremia during the intensive care unit (ICU) stay increases the risk of death in patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). We performed a retrospective study on a prospectively collected database including all patients consecutively admitted over a 3-year period with a diagnosis of TBI (post-resuscitation Glasgow Coma Score ≤ 8) to a general/neurotrauma ICU of a university hospital, providing critical care services in a catchment area of about 1,200,000 inhabitants. Methods Demographic, clinical, and ICU laboratory data were prospectively collected; serum sodium was assessed an average of three times per day. Hypernatremia was defined as two daily values of serum sodium above 145 mmol/l. The major outcome was death in the ICU after 14 days. Cox proportional-hazards regression models were used, with time-dependent variates designed to reflect exposure over time during the ICU stay: hypernatremia, desmopressin acetate (DDAVP) administration as a surrogate marker for the presence of central diabetes insipidus, and urinary output. The same models were adjusted for potential confounding factors. Results We included in the study 130 TBI patients (mean age 52 years (standard deviation 23); males 74%; median Glasgow Coma Score 3 (range 3 to 8); mean Simplified Acute Physiology Score II 50 (standard deviation 15)); all were mechanically ventilated; 35 (26.9%) died within 14 days after ICU admission. Hypernatremia was detected in 51.5% of the patients and in 15.9% of the 1,103 patient-day ICU follow-up. In most instances hypernatremia was mild (mean 150 mmol/l, interquartile range 148 to 152). The occurrence of hypernatremia was highest (P = 0.003) in patients with suspected central diabetes insipidus (25/130, 19.2%), a condition that was associated with increased severity of brain injury and ICU mortality. After adjustment for the baseline risk, the incidence of hypernatremia over the

  3. [Cranioencephalic traumatism. Audiovestibular sequelae].

    PubMed

    Llano, J A; Figuerola, E; Rosell, R; Liern, M

    1989-01-01

    A group of 80 patients with blunt head injury were examined. Long-term clinical neurologic and otologic sequelae of traumatic head injury are well recognized. The authors studied the vestibular disorders using ENG, EEG and high resolution CT.

  4. Traumatic breakage of the ceramic head of prosthesis in total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Moreschini, O; Braidotti, P

    1991-09-01

    The authors describe breakage of the 32 mm alumina AL2 O3 ceramic head in 3 cases of total hip replacement using two different models of prosthesis (Charnley-Müller and Mittelmeier). All three patients were of average height, weight, and activity (Brown et al., 1985; Callaghan et al., 1988), and the breakage had been caused by an accidental fall. The same mechanism of injury, in people the same age as our subjects, can cause femoral neck fractures. Reoperation was necessary in order to replace the component. The implants all appeared to be positioned correctly, and the patients had reported no symptoms. Before the trauma that caused breakage, there had been no other injuries worth noting. All patients were satisfied with their hip replacements.

  5. [Prognostic value of the trigemino-facial reflex in severe post-traumatic comas].

    PubMed

    Mabin, D; Mimassi, N; Besson, G; L'Azou, D; Chevalier, F; Tea, S

    1982-12-01

    The blink reflex (BR) study has been carried out on 40 severe head injury cases (average age 24.3 years). The recording was conducted several times between the 2nd and the 12th day and was repeated during the first month and beyond in prolonged comas. 23 patients did not respond even to high intensity stimuli. 17 patients displayed delayed and low amplitude latency responses: one of the components, early R1 or late R2 could be missing. The existence of a detectable focalized hemispheric lesion had no effect on the disappearance of the delayed lateral response. No BR was observed in mesencephalic, protubering comas and in 4 cases of subcortical and diencephalic comas. BR was observed in subcortical or diencephalic comas and in 5 cases of mesencephalic comas. The evolution of patients who did not display any electrical response during the first recording was unfavourable in 15 cases. Among the 5/8 remaining comatose cases, the BR was missing on the 2nd day and back on the 7th day. Among the 17 patients who displayed BR their evolution proved to be very favourable or favourable in 13 cases. In all the patients who survived beyond a month the response latencies proved normal, yet their amplitude was considerably lowered. The lack of BR is temporary but it is an element of unfavourable prognosis if it persists beyond a span of 8 days.

  6. Return to Work and Social Communication Ability Following Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Jacinta M.; Bracy, Christine A.; Snow, Pamela C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Return to competitive employment presents a major challenge to adults who survive traumatic brain injury (TBI). This study was undertaken to better understand factors that shape employment outcome by comparing the communication profiles and self-awareness of communication deficits of adults who return to and maintain employment with those…

  7. Time Perception in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury Patients: A Study Comparing Different Methodologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mioni, G.; Mattalia, G.; Stablum, F.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated time perception in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Fifteen TBI patients and 15 matched healthy controls participated in the study. Participants were tested with durations above and below 1s on three different temporal tasks that involved time reproduction, production, and discrimination tasks. Data…

  8. Clinical Phase IIB Trial of Oxycyte Perflurocarbon in Severe Human Traumatic Brain Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    thrombocytopenia . It is uncertain at this time whether this side effect will prove to be a limiting factor, which may jeopardize the use of these... thrombocytopenia , turn in intracranial hemorrhage into traumatic contusions could for obvious reasons be dangerous. The purpose of this grant therefore is...Aggregates of thrombocytes or megakaryocyte or infiltrating phagocytes (indicators of inflammation and thrombocytopenia ), were not observed in

  9. Symptom Complaints Following Combat-Related Traumatic Brain Injury: Relationship to Traumatic Brain Injury Severity and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    being less competent (Sawchyn, Mateer, & Suffi eld, 2005 ). Mild TBI has also been associated with greater emotional distress ( Leininger , Kreutzer...brain injury . Brain Injury , 23 , 83 – 91 . Leininger , B.E. , Kreutzer , J.S. , & Hill , M.R . ( 1991 ). Comparison of minor and severe

  10. Microdialysis Monitoring of CSF Parameters in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury Patients: A Novel Approach

    PubMed Central

    Thelin, Eric P.; Nelson, David W.; Ghatan, Per Hamid; Bellander, Bo-Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background: Neuro-intensive care following traumatic brain injury (TBI) is focused on preventing secondary insults that may lead to irreversible brain damage. Microdialysis (MD) is used to detect deranged cerebral metabolism. The clinical usefulness of the MD is dependent on the regional localization of the MD catheter. The aim of this study was to analyze a new method of continuous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) monitoring using the MD technique. The method was validated using conventional laboratory analysis of CSF samples. MD-CSF and regional MD-Brain samples were correlated to patient outcome. Materials and Methods: A total of 14 patients suffering from severe TBI were analyzed. They were monitored using (1) a MD catheter (CMA64-iView, n = 7448 MD samples) located in a CSF-pump connected to the ventricular drain and (2) an intraparenchymal MD catheter (CMA70, n = 8358 MD samples). CSF-lactate and CSF-glucose levels were monitored and were compared to MD-CSF samples. MD-CSF and MD-Brain parameters were correlated to favorable (Glasgow Outcome Score extended, GOSe 6–8) and unfavorable (GOSe 1–5) outcome. Results: Levels of glucose and lactate acquired with the CSF-MD technique could be correlated to conventional levels. The median MD recovery using the CMA64 catheter in CSF was 0.98 and 0.97 for glucose and lactate, respectively. Median MD-CSF (CMA 64) lactate (p = 0.0057) and pyruvate (p = 0.0011) levels were significantly lower in the favorable outcome group compared to the unfavorable group. No significant difference in outcome was found using the lactate:pyruvate ratio (LPR), or any of the regional MD-Brain monitoring in our analyzed cohort. Conclusion: This new technique of global MD-CSF monitoring correlates with conventional CSF levels of glucose and lactate, and the MD recovery is higher than previously described. Increase in lactate and pyruvate, without any effect on the LPR, correlates to unfavorable outcome, perhaps related to the

  11. Variable Neuroendocrine-Immune Dysfunction in Individuals with Unfavorable Outcome after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Santarsieri, Martina; Kumar, Raj G.; Kochanek, Patrick M.; Berga, Sarah L.; Wagner, Amy K.

    2014-01-01

    Bidirectional communication between the immune and neuroendocrine systems is not well understood in the context of traumatic brain injury (TBI). The purpose of this study was to characterize relationships between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cortisol and inflammation after TBI, and to determine how these relationships differ by outcome. CSF samples were collected from 91 subjects with severe TBI during days 0–6 post-injury, analyzed for cortisol and inflammatory markers, and compared to healthy controls (n=13 cortisol, n=11 inflammatory markers). Group-based trajectory analysis (TRAJ) delineated subpopulations with similar longitudinal CSF cortisol profiles (high vs. low cortisol). Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) scores at 6 months served as the primary outcome measure reflecting global outcome. Inflammatory markers that displayed significant bivariate associations with both GOS and cortisol TRAJ (interleukin [IL]-6, IL-10, soluble Fas [sFas], soluble intracellular adhesion molecule [sICAM]-1, and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF]-α) were used to generate a cumulative inflammatory load score (ILS). Subsequent analysis revealed that cortisol TRAJ group membership mediated ILS effects on outcome (indirect effect estimate= −0.253, 95% CI (−0.481, −0.025), p=0.03). Correlational analysis between mean cortisol levels and ILS were examined separately within each cortisol TRAJ group and by outcome. Within the low cortisol TRAJ group, subjects with unfavorable 6-month outcome displayed a negative correlation between ILS and mean cortisol (r=−0.562, p=0.045). Conversely, subjects with unfavorable outcome in the high cortisol TRAJ group displayed a positive correlation between ILS and mean cortisol (r=0.391, p=0.006). Our results suggest that unfavorable outcome after TBI may result from dysfunctional neuroendocrine-immune communication wherein an adequate immune response is not mounted or, alternatively, neuroinflammation is prolonged. Importantly, the nature of

  12. Pilot study of the effects of mixed light touch manual therapies on active duty soldiers with chronic post-traumatic stress disorder and injury to the head.

    PubMed

    Davis, Lauren; Hanson, Brenda; Gilliam, Sara

    2016-01-01

    This pilot study was designed to examine the effects of mixed Light Touch Manual Therapies (LTMT) on headache, anxiety and other symptoms suffered by active duty United States service members experiencing chronic Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Ten service members diagnosed with PTSD and having a self-reported injury to the head acquired at least two years prior, were provided with two hour-long sessions of mixed LTMT given a week apart. Data to assess the immediate and durable effects were gathered before and after the LTMT sessions. Results indicate that headache, anxiety, and pain interference were significantly reduced during the course of the pilot study. This suggests that mixed LTMT may be helpful in reducing some of the symptoms of PTSD and injury to the head. Further studies will be needed to determine if LTMT is an effective non-pharmacological treatment for headache, anxiety or other problems associated with PTSD or injury to the head.

  13. JSNT-Guidelines for the Management of Severe Head Injury (Abridged edition).

    PubMed

    Shima, Katsuji; Aruga, Tohru; Onuma, Takehide; Shigemori, Minoru

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is to introduce the principal part of the JSNT-guidelines for the management of severe head injury in adults. The JSNT-guidelines were developed in 2000 by the Guidelines Committee of the Japan Society of Neurotraumatology (JSNT) based on the results of literature review and the Committee consensus. The guidelines updated in 2006 consist of 7 topics pertaining not only to prehospital care, initial, ICU and surgical management, but also the management of pediatric and geriatric patients. The JSNT-guidelines are of practical nature accounting for the difference in the medical system and conditions in Japan, but in their essence they are similar to those of Western countries. Reports on the application of these guidelines indicate their positive affect on the results of management of severe head injury.

  14. Disability after severe head injury: observations on the use of the Glasgow Outcome Scale.

    PubMed Central

    Jennett, B; Snoek, J; Bond, M R; Brooks, N

    1981-01-01

    The nature of the neurological and mental disabilities resulting from severe head injuries are analysed in 150 patients. Mental handicap contributed more significantly to overall social disability than did neurological deficits. This social handicap is readily described by the Glasgow Outcome Scale, an extended version of which is described and compared with alternatives. Comments are made about the quality of life in disabled survivors. PMID:6453957

  15. Discrepancy between estimated and actual time elapsed after death of a severed head.

    PubMed

    Kojima, T; Miyazaki, T; Yashiki, M; Sakai, K; Yamasaki, Y

    1992-09-01

    A severed head which had been wrapped in seven plastic bags and set in concrete in an airtight insulated plastic box was found approximately 22 months after the occurrence of death. Ammonium magnesium phosphate had formed and on the basis of this and other observed postmortem changes, time elapsed after death was estimated to be from 2 weeks to 6 months. The absence of oxygen is thought to have contributed significantly to the great discrepancy between estimated and actual time elapsed after death.

  16. Head injury - first aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... happen from a gunshot to the head. Head injuries include: Concussion , in which the brain is shaken, is the most common type of traumatic brain injury. Scalp wounds. Skull fractures. Head injuries ...

  17. Identification of Serum MicroRNA Signatures for Diagnosis of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in a Closed Head Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Erin S.; Bhomia, Manish; Hutchison, Mary Anne; Balakathiresan, Nagaraja S.; Grunberg, Neil E.; Maheshwari, Radha K.

    2014-01-01

    Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have highlighted the problems of diagnosis and treatment of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). MTBI is a heterogeneous injury that may lead to the development of neurological and behavioral disorders. In the absence of specific diagnostic markers, mTBI is often unnoticed or misdiagnosed. In this study, mice were induced with increasing levels of mTBI and microRNA (miRNA) changes in the serum were determined. MTBI was induced by varying weight and fall height of the impactor rod resulting in four different severity grades of the mTBI. Injuries were characterized as mild by assessing with the neurobehavioral severity scale-revised (NSS-R) at day 1 post injury. Open field locomotion and acoustic startle response showed behavioral and sensory motor deficits in 3 of the 4 injury groups at day 1 post injury. All of the animals recovered after day 1 with no significant neurobehavioral alteration by day 30 post injury. Serum microRNA (miRNA) profiles clearly differentiated injured from uninjured animals. Overall, the number of miRNAs that were significantly modulated in injured animals over the sham controls increased with the severity of the injury. Thirteen miRNAs were found to identify mTBI regardless of its severity within the mild spectrum of injury. Bioinformatics analyses revealed that the more severe brain injuries were associated with a greater number of miRNAs involved in brain related functions. The evaluation of serum miRNA may help to identify the severity of brain injury and the risk of developing adverse effects after TBI. PMID:25379886

  18. Neuronal loss as evidenced by automated quantification of neuronal density following moderate and severe traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Balança, Baptiste; Bapteste, Lionel; Lieutaud, Thomas; Ressnikoff, Denis; Guy, Rainui; Bezin, Laurent; Marinesco, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury causes widespread neurological lesions that can be reproduced in animals with the lateral fluid percussion (LFP) model. The characterization of the pattern of neuronal death generated in this model remains unclear, involving both cortical and subcortical brain regions. Here, 7 days after moderate (3 atmospheres absolute [ATA]) or severe (3.8 ATA) LFP, we estimated neuronal loss by using immunohistochemistry together with a computer-assisted automated method for quantifying neuronal density in brain sections. Neuronal counts were performed ipsilateral to the impact, in the parietal cortex ventral to the site of percussion, in the temporal cortex, in the dorsal thalamus, and in the hippocampus. These results were compared with the counts observed at similar areas in sham animals. We found that neuronal density was severely decreased in the temporal cortex (-60%), in the dorsal thalamus (-63%), and in area CA3 of the hippocampus (-36%) of injured animals compared with controls but was not significantly modified in the cortices located immediately ventral to the impact. Total cellular density increased in brain structures displaying neuronal death, suggesting the presence of gliosis. The increase in the severity of LFP did not change the pattern of neuronal injury. This automated method simplified the study of neuronal loss following traumatic brain injury and allowed the identification of a pattern of neuronal loss that spreads from the dorsal thalamus to the temporal cortex, with the most severe lesions being in brain structures remote from the site of impact.

  19. Traumatic brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Blennow, Kaj; Brody, David L; Kochanek, Patrick M; Levin, Harvey; McKee, Ann; Ribbers, Gerard M; Yaffe, Kristine; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2016-11-17

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) are clinically grouped by severity: mild, moderate and severe. Mild TBI (the least severe form) is synonymous with concussion and is typically caused by blunt non-penetrating head trauma. The trauma causes stretching and tearing of axons, which leads to diffuse axonal injury - the best-studied pathogenetic mechanism of this disorder. However, mild TBI is defined on clinical grounds and no well-validated imaging or fluid biomarkers to determine the presence of neuronal damage in patients with mild TBI is available. Most patients with mild TBI will recover quickly, but others report persistent symptoms, called post-concussive syndrome, the underlying pathophysiology of which is largely unknown. Repeated concussive and subconcussive head injuries have been linked to the neurodegenerative condition chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), which has been reported post-mortem in contact sports athletes and soldiers exposed to blasts. Insights from severe injuries and CTE plausibly shed light on the underlying cellular and molecular processes involved in mild TBI. MRI techniques and blood tests for axonal proteins to identify and grade axonal injury, in addition to PET for tau pathology, show promise as tools to explore CTE pathophysiology in longitudinal clinical studies, and might be developed into diagnostic tools for CTE. Given that CTE is attributed to repeated head trauma, prevention might be possible through rule changes by sports organizations and legislators.

  20. [Multiplicity and prevention for patients with hydrocephalus secondary to severe traumatic brain injury after surgery].

    PubMed

    Cao, Ke; Meng, Guangran; Li, Zongzheng; Wang, Faxuan; Ma, Hui

    2015-09-01

    目的:探讨重型颅脑伤(severe traumatic brain injury,STBI)患者术后发生继发性脑积水的相关因素,为临床上如何早期防治继发性脑积水提供指导方案及理论依据。方法:对按同一标准纳入的107例于2010年6月至2013年6月入住宁夏医科大学附属总医院神经外科STBI患者进行前瞻性研究,对年龄、性别、手术前/后格拉斯哥昏迷评分(Glasgow coma scale,GCS)、术后是否继发脑室系统出血、手术前/后颅脑CT中脑导水管及环池结构情况、腰椎穿刺术与继发性脑积水形成之间的关系进行logistic多因素回归分析,探讨术后继发性脑积水的危险因素与保护因素,并着重对保护因素进行分析。结果:多因素回归分析显示:患者术前(OR=0.099,95% CI:0.028~0.350)/术后(OR=0.088,95% CI:0.012~0.649)GCS评分低、术后脑室系统出血(OR=0.168,95% CI:0.029~0.979)、术前(OR=0.134,95% CI:0.038~0.473)/术后(OR=0.221,95% CI:0.055~0.882)颅脑CT中脑导水管及环池结构不清均为STBI术后患者继发性脑积水的危险因素;腰椎穿刺术(OR=75.885,95% CI:9.612~599.122)为STBI术后患者继发性脑积水的保护性因素。且术后脑积水主要发生于术后2周内和2周~3个月,对照组脑积水发生率均明显高于腰椎穿刺组(P<0.05),术后3个月后2组之间继发性脑积水发生率差异无统计学意义(P>0.05)。 结论:对于STBI术后患者,在生命体征稳定的情况下,早期辅以行腰椎穿刺术可显著降低术后急性期、亚急性期继发性脑积水的发生率,改善患者预后。.

  1. Traumatic Brain Injury and Dystonia

    MedlinePlus

    Traumatic Brain Injury & Dystonia Traumatic brain injury (TBI) occurs when a sudden trauma damages to the brain. TBI can occur when the head suddenly and violently hits an object, or when an object pierces the skull and ...

  2. Correlation between catecholamine levels and outcome in patients with severe head trauma.

    PubMed

    Salehpoor, F; Bazzazi, A M; Estakhri, R; Zaheri, M; Asghari, B

    2010-08-01

    Some studies have shown that catecholamines and the changes in their levels during and after head trauma can be useful in predicting the outcome in head trauma patients. The goal of this study is to search for a probable relation between urine levels of catecholamines and prognosis in patients with severe head trauma. Fifty four patients with severe head trauma Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS < or = 8) on admission time were recruited in Imam Reza Hospital within one. These patients were included when having no major accompanying trauma in other organs. Twenty four hour urine was collected after admission and levels of metanephrine and nor-metanephrine were measured. The relation between urine levels of these metabolites with final outcome and also with GCS at admission, 24, 48 h and 1 week after admission and discharge time and Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) were studied. Fifty two patients, 48 males and 4 females with a mean age of 32.3 +/- 14.7 (3-72) years were included. The main underlying etiologies were motorcycle (46.2%) and car accidents (25%). Diffuse axonal injury, brain contusion and subdural hematoma were three main diagnoses (28.8, 17.3 and 15.4% of the cases, respectively). 19 (36.5%) of the patients expired within the study period. The mean level of metanephrine and normetanephrine in urine were 207.9 +/- 200.5 and 330.2 +/- 218.4 microg in 24 h, respectively. There was no meaningful relation between urine levels of these metabolites and any of GCS and GOS. There was also no meaningful relation between these parameters and final prognosis in patients.

  3. A Novel Closed-Head Model of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Using Focal Primary Overpressure Blast to the Cranium in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Guley, Natalie H.; Rogers, Joshua T.; Del Mar, Nobel A.; Deng, Yunping; Islam, Rafiqul M.; D'Surney, Lauren; Ferrell, Jessica; Deng, Bowei; Hines-Beard, Jessica; Bu, Wei; Ren, Huiling; Elberger, Andrea J.; Marchetta, Jeffrey G.; Rex, Tonia S.; Honig, Marcia G.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) from focal head impact is the most common form of TBI in humans. Animal models, however, typically use direct impact to the exposed dura or skull, or blast to the entire head. We present a detailed characterization of a novel overpressure blast system to create focal closed-head mild TBI in mice. A high-pressure air pulse limited to a 7.5 mm diameter area on the left side of the head overlying the forebrain is delivered to anesthetized mice. The mouse eyes and ears are shielded, and its head and body are cushioned to minimize movement. This approach creates mild TBI by a pressure wave that acts on the brain, with minimal accompanying head acceleration-deceleration. A single 20-psi blast yields no functional deficits or brain injury, while a single 25–40 psi blast yields only slight motor deficits and brain damage. By contrast, a single 50–60 psi blast produces significant visual, motor, and neuropsychiatric impairments and axonal damage and microglial activation in major fiber tracts, but no contusive brain injury. This model thus reproduces the widespread axonal injury and functional impairments characteristic of closed-head mild TBI, without the complications of systemic or ocular blast effects or head acceleration that typically occur in other blast or impact models of closed-skull mild TBI. Accordingly, our model provides a simple way to examine the biomechanics, pathophysiology, and functional deficits that result from TBI and can serve as a reliable platform for testing therapies that reduce brain pathology and deficits. PMID:26414413

  4. A Novel Closed-Head Model of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Using Focal Primary Overpressure Blast to the Cranium in Mice.

    PubMed

    Guley, Natalie H; Rogers, Joshua T; Del Mar, Nobel A; Deng, Yunping; Islam, Rafiqul M; D'Surney, Lauren; Ferrell, Jessica; Deng, Bowei; Hines-Beard, Jessica; Bu, Wei; Ren, Huiling; Elberger, Andrea J; Marchetta, Jeffrey G; Rex, Tonia S; Honig, Marcia G; Reiner, Anton

    2016-02-15

    Mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) from focal head impact is the most common form of TBI in humans. Animal models, however, typically use direct impact to the exposed dura or skull, or blast to the entire head. We present a detailed characterization of a novel overpressure blast system to create focal closed-head mild TBI in mice. A high-pressure air pulse limited to a 7.5 mm diameter area on the left side of the head overlying the forebrain is delivered to anesthetized mice. The mouse eyes and ears are shielded, and its head and body are cushioned to minimize movement. This approach creates mild TBI by a pressure wave that acts on the brain, with minimal accompanying head acceleration-deceleration. A single 20-psi blast yields no functional deficits or brain injury, while a single 25-40 psi blast yields only slight motor deficits and brain damage. By contrast, a single 50-60 psi blast produces significant visual, motor, and neuropsychiatric impairments and axonal damage and microglial activation in major fiber tracts, but no contusive brain injury. This model thus reproduces the widespread axonal injury and functional impairments characteristic of closed-head mild TBI, without the complications of systemic or ocular blast effects or head acceleration that typically occur in other blast or impact models of closed-skull mild TBI. Accordingly, our model provides a simple way to examine the biomechanics, pathophysiology, and functional deficits that result from TBI and can serve as a reliable platform for testing therapies that reduce brain pathology and deficits.

  5. Effects of Intracranial Pressure Monitoring on Mortality in Patients with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Sheng; Xu, Jie; Zhou, Yue; Yan, Ai; Yin, Rui; Lu, Bin; Nie, Xiaohu; Zhao, Shufa; Yan, Renfu

    2016-01-01

    Background The Brain Trauma Foundation (BTF) guidelines published in 2007 suggest some indications for intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring in severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, some studies had not shown clinical benefit in patients with severe TBI; several studies had even reported that ICP monitoring was associated with an increased mortality rate. The effect of ICP monitoring has remained controversial, regardless of the ICP monitoring guidelines. Here we performed a meta-analysis of published studies to assess the effects of ICP monitoring in patients with severe TBI. Methods We searched three comprehensive databases, the Cochrane Library, PUBMED, and EMBASE, for studies without limitations published up to September 2015. Mortality, ICU LOS, and hospital LOS were analyzed with Review Manager software according to data from the included studies. Results Eighteen eligible studies involving 25229 patients with severe TBI were included in our meta-analysis. The results indicated no significant reduction in the ICP monitored group in mortality (hospitalized before 2007), hospital mortality (hospitalized before 2007), mortality in randomized controlled trials. However, overall mortality, mortality (hospitalized after 2007), hospital mortality (hospitalized after 2007), mortality in observational studies (hospitalized after 2007), 2-week mortality, 6-month mortality, were reduced in ICP monitored group. Patients with an increased ICP were more likely to require ICP monitoring. Conclusion Superior survival was observed in severe TBI patients with ICP monitoring since the third edition of “Guidelines for the Management of Severe Traumatic Brain Injury,” which included “Indications for intracranial pressure monitoring,” was published in 2007. PMID:28030638

  6. Development and implementation of a standardized pathway in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit for children with severe traumatic brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Rakes, Lauren; King, Mary; Johnston, Brian; Chesnut, Randall; Grant, Rosemary; Vavilala, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children. In 2003 and 2012, the Brain Trauma Foundation established and refined evidence-based guidelines for management of severe TBI in children. A recent multicenter study demonstrated an association between TBI guideline adherence and improved discharge survival. However, this study also showed large variation in adherence to pediatric TBI management at our level 1 pediatric trauma center, where overall adherence to fourteen pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) TBI clinical indicators was 64%. The aim of this quality improvement project was to increase TBI guideline adherence by implementing a standard care pathway for PICU management of children with severe TBI. A multi-disciplinary approach was utilized to develop the Pediatric Guideline Adherence and Outcomes (PEGASUS) care pathway, and iterative PDCA cycles were performed. Over an 18 month period following pathway implementation, overall PICU clinical guideline adherence rate increased to 80%.

  7. Development and implementation of a standardized pathway in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit for children with severe traumatic brain injuries

    PubMed Central

    Rakes, Lauren; King, Mary; Johnston, Brian; Chesnut, Randall; Grant, Rosemary; Vavilala, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children. In 2003 and 2012, the Brain Trauma Foundation established and refined evidence-based guidelines for management of severe TBI in children. A recent multicenter study demonstrated an association between TBI guideline adherence and improved discharge survival. However, this study also showed large variation in adherence to pediatric TBI management at our level 1 pediatric trauma center, where overall adherence to fourteen pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) TBI clinical indicators was 64%. The aim of this quality improvement project was to increase TBI guideline adherence by implementing a standard care pathway for PICU management of children with severe TBI. A multi-disciplinary approach was utilized to develop the Pediatric Guideline Adherence and Outcomes (PEGASUS) care pathway, and iterative PDCA cycles were performed. Over an 18 month period following pathway implementation, overall PICU clinical guideline adherence rate increased to 80%. PMID:27933158

  8. Heightened false memory: a long-term sequela of severe closed head injury.

    PubMed

    Ries, Michele; Marks, William

    2006-01-01

    Declarative memory impairment is a common long-term sequela of severe closed head injury (CHI). Although veridical memory performance following severe CHI has received attention in the literature, little is known about false memory production in this population. Within the present study, both long-term survivors of severe CHI and matched control participants studied and were tested on six 12-items word lists from the Deese Roediger McDermott (DRM) paradigm. Word lists from the DRM are composed of words that are strongly semantically associated to a non-presented word (i.e., the critical lure). Prior studies have shown that healthy young adults show a high level of false recall and recognition memory for the critical lures, and it was hypothesized individuals with severe CHI would show heightened susceptibility to false memory compared to control participants due to difficulty with monitoring of memory. It was further hypothesized that severe CHI participants would show high confidence in their false memories. Consistent with hypotheses, results indicated that although severe CHI participants remembered fewer actual list items, they made more semantically related intrusion errors (recall) and false-positive responses (recognition) than the control participants. Severe CHI participants also showed greater confidence in their false memories than did control participants. The results are interpreted in the context of theoretical accounts of false memory, and possible structural and functional brain changes that might account for the Severe CHI group's memory performance are discussed.

  9. Optimizing cerebral perfusion pressure during fiberoptic bronchoscopy in severe head injury: effect of hyperventilation.

    PubMed

    Previgliano, I J; Ripoll, P I; Chiappero, G; Galíndez, F; Germani, L; González, D H; Ferrari, N; Hlavnicka, A; Purvis, C

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate if Hyperventilation (HV) could avoid the Intracranial Pressure (ICP) peak that occurs during Fiberoptic Bronchoscopy (FB) in severely head injured patients. A Cerebral Perfusion Pressure (CPP) > 75 mmHg was maintained in 34 patients, with a subgroup randomized to receive controlled HV during FB. Measurements were done before the procedure, during maximum ICP values and 30 minutes after FB. The HV group had minor ICP values after FB, without differences in CPP and ICP peak values.

  10. Report of a Consensus Meeting on Human Brain Temperature After Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: Its Measurement and Management During Pyrexia

    PubMed Central

    Childs, Charmaine; Wieloch, Tadeusz; Lecky, Fiona; Machin, Graham; Harris, Bridget; Stocchetti, Nino

    2010-01-01

    Temperature disturbances are common in patients with severe traumatic brain injury. The possibility of an adaptive, potentially beneficial role for fever in patients with severe brain trauma has been dismissed, but without good justification. Fever might, in some patients, confer benefit. A cadre of clinicians and scientists met to debate the clinically relevant, but often controversial issue about whether raised brain temperature after human traumatic brain injury (TBI) should be regarded as “good or bad” for outcome. The objective was to produce a consensus document of views about current temperature measurement and pyrexia treatment. Lectures were delivered by invited speakers with National and International publication track records in thermoregulation, neuroscience, epidemiology, measurement standards and neurocritical care. Summaries of the lectures and workshop discussions were produced from transcriptions of the lectures and workshop discussions. At the close of meeting, there was agreement on four key issues relevant to modern temperature measurement and management and for undergirding of an evidence-based practice, culminating in a consensus statement. There is no robust scientific data to support the use of hypothermia in patients whose intracranial pressure is controllable using standard therapy. A randomized clinical trial is justified to establish if body cooling for control of pyrexia (to normothermia) vs moderate pyrexia leads to a better patient outcome for TBI patients. PMID:21206519

  11. Report of a consensus meeting on human brain temperature after severe traumatic brain injury: its measurement and management during pyrexia.

    PubMed

    Childs, Charmaine; Wieloch, Tadeusz; Lecky, Fiona; Machin, Graham; Harris, Bridget; Stocchetti, Nino

    2010-01-01

    Temperature disturbances are common in patients with severe traumatic brain injury. The possibility of an adaptive, potentially beneficial role for fever in patients with severe brain trauma has been dismissed, but without good justification. Fever might, in some patients, confer benefit. A cadre of clinicians and scientists met to debate the clinically relevant, but often controversial issue about whether raised brain temperature after human traumatic brain injury (TBI) should be regarded as "good or bad" for outcome. The objective was to produce a consensus document of views about current temperature measurement and pyrexia treatment. Lectures were delivered by invited speakers with National and International publication track records in thermoregulation, neuroscience, epidemiology, measurement standards and neurocritical care. Summaries of the lectures and workshop discussions were produced from transcriptions of the lectures and workshop discussions. At the close of meeting, there was agreement on four key issues relevant to modern temperature measurement and management and for undergirding of an evidence-based practice, culminating in a consensus statement. There is no robust scientific data to support the use of hypothermia in patients whose intracranial pressure is controllable using standard therapy. A randomized clinical trial is justified to establish if body cooling for control of pyrexia (to normothermia) vs moderate pyrexia leads to a better patient outcome for TBI patients.

  12. Post-traumatic neurodegeneration and chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Daneshvar, Daniel H; Goldstein, Lee E; Kiernan, Patrick T; Stein, Thor D; McKee, Ann C

    2015-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity around the world. Concussive and subconcussive forms of closed-head injury due to impact or blast neurotrauma represent the most common types of TBI in civilian and military settings. It is becoming increasingly evident that TBI can lead to persistent, long-term debilitating effects, and in some cases, progressive neurodegeneration and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). The epidemiological literature suggests that a single moderate-to-severe TBI may be associated with accelerated neurodegeneration and increased risk of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, or motor neuron disease. However, the pathologic phenotype of these post-traumatic neurodegenerations is largely unknown and there may be pathobiological differences between post-traumatic disease and the corresponding sporadic disorder. By contrast, the pathology of CTE is increasingly well known and is characterized by a distinctive pattern of progressive brain atrophy and accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau neurofibrillary and glial tangles, dystrophic neurites, 43 kDa TAR DNA-binding protein (TDP-43) neuronal and glial aggregates, microvasculopathy, myelinated axonopathy, neuroinflammation, and white matter degeneration. Clinically, CTE is associated with behavioral changes, executive dysfunction, memory deficits, and cognitive impairments that begin insidiously and most often progress slowly over decades. Although research on the long-term effects of TBI is advancing quickly, the incidence and prevalence of post-traumatic neurodegeneration and CTE are unknown. Critical knowledge gaps include elucidation of pathogenic mechanisms, identification of genetic risk factors, and clarification of relevant variables-including age at exposure to trauma, history of prior and subsequent head trauma, substance use, gender, stress, and comorbidities-all of which may contribute to risk profiles and the development of post-traumatic

  13. Factors Influencing the Incidence of Severe Complications in Head and Neck Free Flap Reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    Broome, Martin; Juilland, Naline; Litzistorf, Yann; Monnier, Yan; Sandu, Kishore; Pasche, Philippe; Plinkert, Peter K.; Federspil, Philippe A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Complications after head and neck free-flap reconstructions are detrimental and prolong hospital stay. In an effort to identify related variables in a tertiary regional head and neck unit, the microvascular reconstruction activity over the last 5 years was captured in a database along with patient-, provider-, and volume-outcome–related parameters. Methods: Retrospective cohort study (level of evidence 3), a modified Clavien-Dindo classification, was used to assess severe complications. Results: A database of 217 patients was created with consecutively reconstructed patients from 2009 to 2014. In the univariate analysis of severe complications, we found significant associations (P < 0.05) between type of flap used, American Society of Anesthesiologists classification, T-stage, microscope use, surgeon, flap frequency, and surgeon volume. Within a binomial logistic regression model, less frequently versus frequently performed flap (odds ratio [OR] = 3.2; confidence interval [CI] = 2.9–3.5; P = 0.000), high-volume versus low-volume surgeon (OR = 0.52; CI = −0.22 to 0.82; P = 0.007), and ASA classification (OR = 2.9; CI = 2.4–3.4; P = 0.033) were retained as independent predictors of severe complications. In a Cox-regression model, surgeon (P = 0.011), site of reconstruction (P = 0.000), T-stage (P = 0.001), and presence of severe complications (P = 0.015) correlated with a prolonged hospitalization. Conclusions: In this study, we identified a correlation of patient-related factors with severe complications (ASA score) and prolonged hospital stay (T-stage, site). More importantly, we identified several provider- (surgeon) and volume-related (frequency with which a flap was performed and high-volume surgeon) factors as predictors of severe complications. Our data indicate that provider- and volume-related parameters play an important role in the outcome of microvascular free-flap procedures in the head and neck region. PMID:27826458

  14. Amantadine to Treat Cognitive Dysfunction in Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Stelmaschuk, Stephanie; Will, Mary Colleen; Meyers, Tamara

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of injury, disability, and death in the United States. Amantadine is an established dopamine agonist that supports neurological function. The purpose of this literature review was to determine whether amantadine improves cognitive function post-TBI. PubMed and CINAHL were used to search the literature for articles using amantadine to treat TBI from 1994 to 2004. Outcomes were summarized and the evidence was appraised. Although earlier studies from 1994 to 2003 were lower-level studies and recommended further research on treatment of cognitive dysfunction in TBI, the literature from 2004 to present generally concluded that amantadine improved cognitive function related to arousal, memory, and aggression. It can be started days to months postinjury and still produces benefits.

  15. Use of the adult attachment projective picture system in psychodynamic psychotherapy with a severely traumatized patient

    PubMed Central

    George, Carol; Buchheim, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The following case study is presented to facilitate an understanding of how the attachment information evident from Adult Attachment Projective Picture System (AAP) assessment can be integrated into a psychodynamic perspective in making therapeutic recommendations that integrate an attachment perspective. The Adult Attachment Projective Picture System (AAP) is a valid representational measure of internal representations of attachment based on the analysis of a set of free response picture stimuli designed to systematically activate the attachment system (George and West, 2012). The AAP provides a fruitful diagnostic tool for psychodynamic-oriented clinicians to identify attachment-based deficits and resources for an individual patient in therapy. This paper considers the use of the AAP with a traumatized patient in an inpatient setting and uses a case study to illustrate the components of the AAP that are particularly relevant to a psychodynamic conceptualization. The paper discusses also attachment-based recommendations for intervention. PMID:25140164

  16. Characteristics of auditory agnosia in a child with severe traumatic brain injury: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hattiangadi, Nina; Pillion, Joseph P; Slomine, Beth; Christensen, James; Trovato, Melissa K; Speedie, Lynn J

    2005-01-01

    We present a case that is unusual in many respects from other documented incidences of auditory agnosia, including the mechanism of injury, age of the individual, and location of neurological insult. The clinical presentation is one of disturbance in the perception of spoken language, music, pitch, emotional prosody, and temporal auditory processing in the absence of significant deficits in the comprehension of written language, expressive language production, or peripheral auditory function. Furthermore, the patient demonstrates relatively preserved function in other aspects of audition such as sound localization, voice recognition, and perception of animal noises and environmental sounds. This case study demonstrates that auditory agnosia is possible following traumatic brain injury in a child, and illustrates the necessity of assessment with a wide variety of auditory stimuli to fully characterize auditory agnosia in a single individual.

  17. Severe traumatic injury during long duration spaceflight: Light years beyond ATLS.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Andrew W; Ball, Chad G; Campbell, Mark; Williams, David R; Parazynski, Scott E; Mattox, Kenneth L; Broderick, Timothy J

    2009-03-25

    Traumatic injury strikes unexpectedly among the healthiest members of the human population, and has been an inevitable companion of exploration throughout history. In space flight beyond the Earth's orbit, NASA considers trauma to be the highest level of concern regarding the probable incidence versus impact on mission and health. Because of limited resources, medical care will have to focus on the conditions most likely to occur, as well as those with the most significant impact on the crew and mission. Although the relative risk of disabling injuries is significantly higher than traumatic deaths on earth, either issue would have catastrophic implications during space flight. As a result this review focuses on serious life-threatening injuries during space flight as determined by a NASA consensus conference attended by experts in all aspects of injury and space flight.In addition to discussing the impact of various mission profiles on the risk of injury, this manuscript outlines all issues relevant to trauma during space flight. These include the epidemiology of trauma, the pathophysiology of injury during weightlessness, pre-hospital issues, novel technologies, the concept of a space surgeon, appropriate training for a space physician, resuscitation of injured astronauts, hemorrhage control (cavitary and external), surgery in space (open and minimally invasive), postoperative care, vascular access, interventional radiology and pharmacology.Given the risks and isolation inherent in long duration space flight, a well trained surgeon and/or surgical capability will be required onboard any exploration vessel. More specifically, a broadly-trained surgically capable emergency/critical care specialist with innate capabilities to problem-solve and improvise would be desirable. It will be the ultimate remote setting, and hopefully one in which the most advanced of our societies' technologies can be pre-positioned to safeguard precious astronaut lives. Like so many

  18. Elucidating the Severity of Preclinical Traumatic Brain Injury Models: A Role for Functional Assessment?

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Ryan C.; VanGilder, Reyna L.; Naser, Zachary J.; Lucke-Wold, Brandon P.; Bailes, Julian E.; Matsumoto, Rae R.; Huber, Jason D.; Rosen, Charles L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Concussion remains a symptom-based diagnosis clinically, yet preclinical studies investigating traumatic brain injury, of which concussion is believed to represent a ‘mild’ form, emphasize histological endpoints with functional assessments often minimized or ignored all together. Recently, clinical studies have identified the importance of cognitive and neuropsychiatric symptoms, in addition to somatic complaints, following concussion. How these findings may translate to preclinical studies is unclear at present. Objective To address the contrasting endpoints utilized clinically compared to those in preclinical studies and the potential role of functional assessments in a commonly used model of diffuse axonal injury (DAI).. Methods Animals were subjected to DAI using the impact-acceleration model. Functional and behavioral assessments were conducted over 1 week following DAI prior to completion of histological assessment at 1-week post-DAI. Results We show, despite the suggestion that this model represents concussive injury, no functional impairments as determined using common measures of motor, sensorimotor, cognitive, and neuropsychiatric function following injury over the course of 1 week. The lack of functional deficits is in sharp contrast to neuropathologic findings indicating neural degeneration, astrocyte reactivity, and microglial activation. Conclusion Future studies are needed to identify functional assessments, neurophysiologic techniques, and imaging assessments more apt to distinguish differences following so-called ‘mild’ traumatic brain injury (TBI) in preclinical models and determine whether these models are truly studying concussive or subconcussive injury. These studies are needed to not only understand mechanism of injury and production of subsequent deficits, but also for rigorous evaluation of potential therapeutic agents. PMID:24448183

  19. Severe traumatic injury during long duration spaceflight: Light years beyond ATLS

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Andrew W; Ball, Chad G; Campbell, Mark; Williams, David R; Parazynski, Scott E; Mattox, Kenneth L; Broderick, Timothy J

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic injury strikes unexpectedly among the healthiest members of the human population, and has been an inevitable companion of exploration throughout history. In space flight beyond the Earth's orbit, NASA considers trauma to be the highest level of concern regarding the probable incidence versus impact on mission and health. Because of limited resources, medical care will have to focus on the conditions most likely to occur, as well as those with the most significant impact on the crew and mission. Although the relative risk of disabling injuries is significantly higher than traumatic deaths on earth, either issue would have catastrophic implications during space flight. As a result this review focuses on serious life-threatening injuries during space flight as determined by a NASA consensus conference attended by experts in all aspects of injury and space flight. In addition to discussing the impact of various mission profiles on the risk of injury, this manuscript outlines all issues relevant to trauma during space flight. These include the epidemiology of trauma, the pathophysiology of injury during weightlessness, pre-hospital issues, novel technologies, the concept of a space surgeon, appropriate training for a space physician, resuscitation of injured astronauts, hemorrhage control (cavitary and external), surgery in space (open and minimally invasive), postoperative care, vascular access, interventional radiology and pharmacology. Given the risks and isolation inherent in long duration space flight, a well trained surgeon and/or surgical capability will be required onboard any exploration vessel. More specifically, a broadly-trained surgically capable emergency/critical care specialist with innate capabilities to problem-solve and improvise would be desirable. It will be the ultimate remote setting, and hopefully one in which the most advanced of our societies' technologies can be pre-positioned to safeguard precious astronaut lives. Like so many

  20. Experimental Investigation of Cavitation as a Possible Damage Mechanism in Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury in Post-Mortem Human Subject Heads.

    PubMed

    Salzar, Robert S; Treichler, Derrick; Wardlaw, Andrew; Weiss, Greg; Goeller, Jacques

    2017-01-13

    The potential of blast-induced traumatic brain injury from the mechanism of localized cavitation of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is investigated. While the mechanism and criteria for non-impact blast-induced traumatic brain injury is still unknown, this study demonstrates that local cavitation in the CSF layer of the cranial volume could contribute to these injuries. The cranial contents of three post-mortem human subject (PMHS) heads were replaced with both a normal saline solution and a ballistic gel mixture with a simulated CSF layer. Each were instrumented with multiple pressure transducers and placed inside identical shock tubes at two different research facilities. Sensor data indicates that cavitation may have occurred in the PMHS models at pressure levels below those for a 50% risk of blast lung injury. This study points to skull flexion, the result of the shock wave on the front of the skull leading to a negative pressure in the contrecoup, as a possible mechanism that contributes to the onset of cavitation. Based on observation of intracranial pressure transducer data from the PMHS model, cavitation onset is thought to occur from approximately a 140 kPa head-on incident blast.

  1. Assessment of brainstem damage by the auditory brainstem response in acute severe head injury.

    PubMed Central

    Tsubokawa, T; Nishimoto, H; Yamamoto, T; Kitamura, M; Katayama, Y; Moriyasu, N

    1980-01-01

    In 64 cases suffering from severe head injury (Glasgow coma scale: less than seven- the auditory brainstem responses (FARs) recorded at the vertex, which are thought to be volumet conducted far-field potentials reflecting the sequential electrical activities of the auditory afferen) system in the brainstem, were recorded in the neurosurgical intensive care room immediately after admission. The alterations in the responses were compared with the types of primary injury, neurological signs., CT findings and outcome following treatment. Based on the results obtained, it is concluded that the FAR is a useful indicator for predicting the effects of treatment on brainstem damage in patients with severe head injury, and that it provides more reliable information about the function of the brainstem than the neurological signs or CT findings. Moreover, it also offers a diagnostic method for primary brainstem injury. Three cases or primary brainstem injury without lesions in the supratentorial region were diagnosed by means of combined CT and FAR recording. Images PMID:7441277

  2. Botulinum toxin in severe upper extremity spasticity among patients with traumatic brain injury: an open-labeled trial.

    PubMed

    Yablon, S A; Agana, B T; Ivanhoe, C B; Boake, C

    1996-10-01

    We studied the effect of botulinum toxin A (BTXA) among patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and severe spasticity unresponsive to conservative management. Twenty-one consecutive adult patients with severe spasticity involving the wrist and finger flexor musculature were treated with BTXA injection (20 to 40 units per muscle) under EMG guidance. After injection, patients received passive range of motion (ROM) exercise, with modalities and casting as clinically indicated. Outcome measures, including wrist ROM and the modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), were assessed 2 to 4 weeks after injection. Among the respective acute and chronic groups, mean ROM improved 42.9 (p = 0.001) and 36.2 degrees (p < 0.001). Mean MAS rating improved 1.5 (p = 0.01) and 1.47 (p = 0.002) points. There were no significant adverse effects. BTXA, in conjunction with conventional modalities, significantly improves spasticity and ROM in the distal upper extremity musculature of patients with TBI.

  3. Long non-coding RNA HOTAIR inhibits miR-17-5p to regulate osteogenic differentiation and proliferation in non-traumatic osteonecrosis of femoral head

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Baoxiang; Guo, Xiaxia; Liu, Song

    2017-01-01

    Background and aim The biological functions of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) have been widely identified in many human diseases. In the present study, the relationship between long non-coding RNA HOTAIR and microRNA-17-5p (miR-17-5p) and their roles in osteogenic differentiation and proliferation in non-traumatic osteonecrosis of femoral head (ONFH) were investigated. Methods The expression levels of HOTAIR and miR-17-5p in the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from patients with non-traumatic ONFH and osteoarthritis (OA) were examined by real-time PCR. BMP-2 induced human MSCs from bone marrow (hMSC-BM) were used for osteogenic differentiation. Results It was observed that the expression level of miR-17-5p was lower and the level of HOTAIR was higher in samples of non-traumatic ONFH compared with OA. HOTAIR downregulation induced by si-HOTAIR led to the increase of miR-17-5p expression and the decrease of miR-17-5p target gene SMAD7 expression. The values of osteogenic differentiation markers, including RUNX2 and COL1A1 mRNA expression and ALP activity, were also elevated by si-HOTAIR. However, the increase of these values was canceled by miR-17-5p inhibitor or SMAD7 upregulation. Conclusion HOTAIR played a role in regulating osteogenic differentiation and proliferation through modulating miR-17-5p and its target gene SMAD7 in non-traumatic ONFH. PMID:28207735

  4. Emergency Interventions After Severe Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats: Effect on Neuropathology and Functional Outcome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    to a conventional general anesthetic (isoflurane). Fentanyl or morphine are the most commonly used narcotics after human head injury while...neuronal death in CA3 hippocampus in a rat model of cerebral contusion. The further reduction of CBF with HV during the low cerebral blood flow state...either morphine or fentanyl anesthesia followed by either 1 or 4 h of hypothermia vs normothermia. (b3) Effect of the anti-excitotoxic NMDA-receptor

  5. Determination of Serum Lost Goodwill Target Proteome in Patients with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hongming; Hu, Changchen; Zhang, Gangli; Ren, Jinrui; Tan, Yihu; Sun, Wenxiao; Wang, Junwen; Li, Jun; Liu, Hongchao; Xie, Ruifan; Hao, Zhipeng; Guo, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the biokinetics of LGT proteome, a potential biomarker of severe TBI, in serum of severe TBI patients. The LGT proteome presents in the serum of severe TBI patients. The abundance diversity of LGT proteome is closely associated with pathologic condition of TBI patients. Serum LGT proteome may be used as a promising marker for evaluating severity of severe TBI.

  6. Management of severe head injury with brain exposure in three loggerhead sea turtles Caretta caretta.

    PubMed

    Franchini, D; Cavaliere, L; Valastro, C; Carnevali, F; van der Esch, A; Lai, O; Di Bello, A

    2016-05-03

    The loggerhead Caretta caretta is the most common sea turtle in the Mediterranean. Currently, sea turtles are considered endangered, mainly due to the impact of human activities. Among traumatic lesions, those involving the skull, if complicated by brain exposure, are often life-threatening. In these cases, death could be the outcome of direct trauma of the cerebral tissue or of secondary meningoencephalitis. This uncontrolled study aims to evaluate the use of a plant-derived dressing (1 Primary Wound Dressing®) in 3 sea turtles with severe lesions of the skull exposing the brain. Following surgical curettage, the treatment protocol involved exclusive use of the plant-derived dressing applied on the wound surface as the primary dressing, daily for the first month and then every other day until the end of treatment. The wound and peri-wound skin were covered with a simple secondary dressing without any active compound (non-woven gauze with petroleum jelly). Data presented herein show an excellent healing process in all 3 cases and no side effects due to contact of the medication with the cerebral tissue.

  7. Severe Dry Eye Syndrome After Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Bhandare, Niranjan; Moiseenko, Vitali; Song, William Y.; Morris, Christopher G.; Bhatti, M. Tariq; Mendenhall, William M.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the incidence of severe dry eye syndrome (DES) after external beam radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer and its dependence on the parameters relevant to external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The present retrospective study included 78 patients treated for primary extracranial head-and-neck tumors between 1965 and 2000, whose lacrimal apparatus/entire globe was exposed to fractionated external beam radiotherapy. The dose received by the major lacrimal gland was used for analysis. The end point of the present study was the ophthalmologic diagnosis of severe DES leading to vision compromise. Results: Of the 78 patients, 40 developed severe DES leading to visual compromise. The incidence of DES increased steadily from 6% at 35-39.99 Gy to 50% at 45-49.99 Gy and 90% at 60-64.99 Gy. With a mean of 0.9 years (range, 1 month to 3 years), the latency of DES was observed to be a function of the total dose and the dose per fraction. On univariate and multivariate analysis, the total dose (p < .0001 and p < .0001, respectively) and dose per fraction (p {<=} .0001 and p = .0044, respectively) were significant. However, age, gender, and the use of chemoradiotherapy were not. The actuarial analysis indicated a 5-year probability of freedom from DES of 93% for doses <45 Gy, 29% for 45-59.9 Gy, and 3% doses {>=}60 Gy. A logistic normal tissue complication probability model fit to our data obtained a dose of 34 and 38 Gy corresponding to a 5% and 10% incidence of DES. Conclusion: With a dose of 34 Gy corresponding to a 5% incidence of DES, the risk of severe DES increased, and the latency decreased with an increase in the total dose and dose per fraction to the lacrimal gland. The effect of chemoradiotherapy and hyperfractionation on the risk of DES needs additional investigation.

  8. Long Term Survivorship of a Severely Notched Femoral Stem after Replacing the Fractured Ceramic head with a Cobalt-Chromium Head

    PubMed Central

    Panagopoulos, Andreas; Tatani, Irini; Megas, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although ceramic head fracture occurs infrequently today, in the event of a fracture, the resulting revision surgery can prove very challenging, since the ceramic particles lodge into the surrounding soft tissue and can cause rapid implant failure Case Presentation: A case of long term survivorship of a severed notched femoral stem after replacing the fractured femoral head with a cobalt-chromium one is reported in a 40-year old woman with hip dysplasia who underwent an uncomplicated total hip arthroplasty. The incident of ceramic femoral head fracture occurred 14 months postoperatively without reporting any significant trauma. Intraoperative findings at revision were a multifragmented femoral head and a damaged polyethylene insert along with diffuse metallosis and excessive wear of the cone of the stem. Both the stem and the acetabular component were stable. After removal of ceramic fragments, metallotic tissue excision and careful lavage of the joint, the inlay was replaced by a similar one and a cobalt-chromium femoral head was placed to the existing notched taper of the firmly incorporated stem. At the 13th year follow up examination, the patient had no pain, used no walking aids, and had normal activity with no signs of wearing or loosening in the plain x-rays. Conclusion: Despite current recommendations of using ceramic femoral heads in cases of fracture or to revise the severely damaged stems we were able to provide a long term survivorship up to 13 years postoperatively of a cobalt-chromium femoral head applied to a severe damaged stem. PMID:28217203

  9. For veterans with mild traumatic brain injury, improved posttraumatic stress disorder severity and sleep correlated with symptomatic improvement.

    PubMed

    Ruff, Robert L; Riechers, Ronald G; Wang, Xiao-Feng; Piero, Traci; Ruff, Suzanne S

    2012-01-01

    This was an observational study of a cohort of 63 Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom veterans with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) associated with an explosion. They had headaches, residual neurological deficits (NDs) on neurological examination, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and were seen on average 2.5 years after their last mTBI. We treated them with sleep hygiene counseling and oral prazosin. We monitored headache severity, daytime sleepiness using the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, cognitive performance using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment test, and the presence of NDs. We quantitatively measured olfaction and assessed PTSD severity using the PTSD Checklist-Military Version. Nine weeks after starting sleep counseling and bedtime prazosin, the veterans' headache severity decreased, cognitive function as assayed with a brief screening tool improved, and daytime sleepiness diminished. Six months after completing treatment, the veterans demonstrated additional improvement in headache severity and daytime sleepiness and their improvements in cognitive function persisted. There were no changes in the prevalence of NDs or olfaction scores. Clinical improvements correlated with reduced PTSD severity and daytime sleepiness. The data suggested that reduced clinical manifestations following mTBI correlated with PTSD severity and improvement in sleep, but not the presence of NDs or olfaction impairment.

  10. Biochemical, cellular, and molecular mechanisms in the evolution of secondary damage after severe traumatic brain injury in infants and children: Lessons learned from the bedside.

    PubMed

    Kochanek, Patrick M.; Clark, Robert S.B.; Ruppel, Randall A.; Adelson, P. David; Bell, Michael J.; Whalen, Michael J.; Robertson, Courtney L.; Satchell, Margaret A.; Seidberg, Neal A.; Marion, Donald W.; Jenkins, Larry W.

    2000-07-01

    OBJECTIVE: To present a state-of-the-art review of mechanisms of secondary injury in the evolution of damage after severe traumatic brain injury in infants and children. DATA SOURCES: We reviewed 152 peer-reviewed publications, 15 abstracts and proceedings, and other material relevant to the study of biochemical, cellular, and molecular mechanisms of damage in traumatic brain injury. Clinical studies of severe traumatic brain injury in infants and children were the focus, but reports in experimental models in immature animals were also considered. Results from both clinical studies in adults and models of traumatic brain injury in adult animals were presented for comparison. DATA SYNTHESIS: Categories of mechanisms defined were those associated with ischemia, excitotoxicity, energy failure, and resultant cell death cascades; secondary cerebral swelling; axonal injury; and inflammation and regeneration. CONCLUSIONS: A constellation of mediators of secondary damage, endogenous neuroprotection, repair, and regeneration are set into motion in the brain after severe traumatic injury. The quantitative contribution of each mediator to outcome, the interplay between these mediators, and the integration of these mechanistic findings with novel imaging methods, bedside physiology, outcome assessment, and therapeutic intervention remain an important target for future research.

  11. Extracellular Brain pH and Outcome following Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Arun K; Zygun, David A; Johnston, Andrew J; Steiner, Luzius A; Al-Rawi, Pippa G; Chatfield, Dot; Shepherd, Edna; Kirkpatrick, Peter J; Hutchinson, Peter J; Menon, David K

    2004-06-01

    The ability to measure brain tissue chemistry has led to valuable information regarding pathophysiological changes in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Over the last few years, the focus has been on monitoring changes in brain tissue oxygen to determine thresholds of ischemia that affect outcome. However, the variability of this measurement suggests that it may not be a robust method. We have therefore investigated the relationship of brain tissue pH (pH(b)) and outcome in patients with TBI. We retrospectively analyzed prospectively collected data of 38 patients admitted to the Neurosciences Critical Care Unit with TBI between 1998 and 2003, and who had a multiparameter tissue gas sensor inserted into the brain. All patients were managed using an evidence-based protocol targeting CPP > 70 mm Hg. Physiological variables were averaged over 4 min and analyzed using a generalized least squares random effects model to determine the temporal profile of pH(b) and its association with outcome. Median (IQR) minimum pH(b) was 7.00 (6.89, 7.08), median (IQR) maximum pH(b) was 7.25 (7.18, 7.33), and median (IQR) patient averaged pH(b) was 7.13 (7.07, 7.17). pH(b) was significantly lower in those who did not survive their hospital stay compared to those that survived. In addition, those with unfavorable neurological outcome had lower pH(b) values than those with favorable neurological outcome. pH(b) differentiated between survivors and non-survivors. Measurement of pH(b) may be a useful indicator of outcome in patients with TBI.

  12. Glycyrrhizin Suppresses the Expressions of HMGB1 and Relieves the Severity of Traumatic Pancreatitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Zhulin; Ren, Jiandong; Tian, Fuzhou; Tang, Lijun; Chen, Tao; Dai, Ruiwu

    2014-01-01

    Background High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) plays important roles in a large variety of diseases; glycyrrhizin (GL) is recognized as an HMGB1 inhibitor. However, few studies have focused on whether glycyrrhizin can potentially improve the outcome of traumatic pancreatitis (TP) by inhibiting HMGB1. Methods A total of 60 male Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups (n = 20 in each): Control group, TP group and TP-GL group. Pancreatic trauma was established with a custom-made biological impact machine-III, and GL was administered at 15 minutes after the accomplishment of operation. To determine survival rates during the first 7 days after injury, another 60 rats (n = 20 in each) were grouped and treated as mentioned above. At 24 hours of induction of TP, the histopathological changes in pancreas were evaluated and serum amylase levels were tested. Serum tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and HMGB1 were measured using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. HMGB1 expressions in pancreas were measured using immunohistochemical staining, Western blot and Real-Time PCR analysis. Results Serum levels of HMGB1, TNF-α and IL-6 were increased dramatically in TP group at 24 hours after induction of TP. However, these indicators were reduced significantly by GL administration in TP-GL group comparing with TP group (P<0.05). Meanwhile, survival analysis showed that the seven-day survival rate in TP-GL group was significantly higher than that in TP group (85% versus 65%, P<0.05). GL treatment significantly decreased the pancreatic protein and mRNA expressions of HMGB1 and ameliorated the pancreatic injury in rats with TP. Conclusions Glycyrrhizin might play an important role in improving survival rates and ameliorating pancreatic injury of TP by suppression of the expressions of HMGB1 and other proinflammatory cytokine. PMID:25541713

  13. Nomogram for predicting symptom severity during radiation therapy for head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, Tommy; Fuller, Clifton David; Mendoza, Tito R.; Garden, Adam S.; Morrison, William H.; Beadle, Beth, M.; Phan, Jack; Frank, Steven J.; Hanna, Ehab Y.; Lu, Charles; Cleeland, Charles S.; Rosenthal, David I.; Gunn, G. Brandon

    2014-01-01

    Objective Radiation therapy (RT), with or without chemotherapy, can cause significant acute toxicity among patients treated for head & neck cancer (HNC), but predicting, before treatment, who will experience a particular toxicity or symptom is difficult. We created and evaluated two multivariate models and generated a nomogram to predict symptom severity during RT based on a patient-reported outcome (PRO) instrument, the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory–Head&Neck Module (MDASI-HN). Study Design This was a prospective, longitudinal, questionnaire-based study. Setting Tertiary cancer care center. Subjects and Methods Subjects were 264 patients with HNC (mostly oropharyngeal) who had completed the MDASI-HN before and during therapy. Pretreatment variables were correlated with MDASI-HN symptom scores during therapy with multivariate modeling and then correlated with composite MDASI-HN score during week 5 of therapy. Results A multivariate model incorporating pretreatment PROs better predicted MDASI-HN symptom scores during treatment than did a model based on clinical variables and physician-rated patient performance status alone (Aikake information criterion=1442.5 vs. 1459.9). In the most parsimonious model, pretreatment MDASI-HN symptom severity (P<0.001), concurrent chemotherapy (P=0.006), primary tumor site (P=0.016), and receipt of definitive (rather than adjuvant) RT (P=0.044) correlated with MDASI-HN symptom scores during week 5. That model was used to construct a nomogram. Conclusion Our model demonstrates the value of incorporating baseline PROs, in addition to disease and treatment characteristics, to predict patient symptom burden during therapy. Although additional investigation and validation are required, PRO-inclusive prediction tools can be useful for improving symptom interventions and expectations for patients being treated for HNC. PMID:25104816

  14. Depth of lesion model in children and adolescents with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury: use of SPGR MRI to predict severity and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Grados, M; Slomine, B; Gerring, J; Vasa, R; Bryan, N; Denckla, M

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—The utility of a depth of lesion classification using an SPGR MRI sequence in children with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) was examined. Clinical and depth of lesion classification measures of TBI severity were used to predict neurological and functional outcome after TBI.
METHODS—One hundred and six children, aged 4 to 19, with moderate to severe TBI admitted to a rehabilitation unit had an SPGR MRI sequence obtained 3 months afterTBI. Acquired images were analyzed for location, number, and size of lesions. The Glasgow coma scale (GCS) was the clinical indicator of severity. The deepest lesion present was used for depth of lesion classification. Speed of injury was inferred from the type of injury. The disability rating scale at the time of discharge from the rehabilitation unit (DRS1) and at 1 year follow up (DRS2) were functional outcome measures.
RESULTS—The depth of lesion classification was significantly correlated with GCS severity, number of lesions, and both functional measures, DRS1 and DRS2. This result was more robust for time 1, probably due to the greater number of psychosocial factors impacting on functioning at time 2. Lesion volume was not correlated with the depth of lesion model. In multivariate models, depth of lesion was most predictive of DRS1, whereas GCS was most predictive of DRS2.
CONCLUSIONS—A depth of lesion classification of TBI severity may have clinical utility in predicting functional outcome in children and adolescents with moderate to severe TBI.

 PMID:11181858

  15. Fluid markers of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj

    2015-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) occurs when an external force traumatically injures the brain. Whereas severe TBI can be diagnosed using a combination of clinical signs and standard neuroimaging techniques, mild TBI (also called concussion) is more difficult to detect. This is where fluid markers of injury to different cell types and subcellular compartments in the central nervous system come into play. These markers are often proteins, peptides or other molecules with selective or high expression in the brain, which can be measured in the cerebrospinal fluid or blood as they leak out or get secreted in response to the injury. Here, we review the literature on fluid markers of neuronal, axonal and astroglial injury to diagnose mild TBI and to predict clinical outcome in patients with head trauma. We also discuss chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a progressive neurodegenerative disease in individuals with a history of multiple mild TBIs in a biomarker context. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Traumatic Brain Injury'.

  16. Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) happens when a bump, blow, jolt, or other head injury causes damage to the brain. Every year, millions of people in the U.S. suffer brain injuries. More than half are bad enough that ...

  17. Head injury. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, P.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 22 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Radiographic Evaluation; Epidemiology of Head Injury; Emergency Care and Initial Evaluation; Skull Fracture and Traumatic Cerebrospinal Fluid Fistulas; Mild Head Injury; and Injuries of the Cranial Nerves.

  18. Expedited CT-Based Methods for Evaluating Fracture Severity to Assess Risk of Post-Traumatic Osteoarthritis After Articular Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Donald D.; Kilburg, Anthony T.; Thomas, Thaddeus P.; Marsh, J Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Background Post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) is common after intra-articular fractures of the tibial plafond. An objective CT-based measure of fracture severity was previously found to reliably predict whether PTOA developed following surgical treatment of such fractures. However, the extended time required obtaining the fracture energy metric and its reliance upon an intact contralateral limb CT limited its clinical applicability. The objective of this study was to establish an expedited fracture severity metric that provided comparable PTOA predictive ability without the prior limitations Methods An expedited fracture severity metric was computed from the CT scans of 30 tibial plafond fractures using textural analysis to quantify disorder in CT images. The expedited method utilized an intact surrogate model to enable severity assessment without requiring a contralateral limb CT. Agreement between the expedited fracture severity metric and the Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) radiographic OA score at two-year follow-up was assessed using concordance. The ability of the metric to differentiate between patients that did or did not develop PTOA was assessed using the Wilcoxon Ranked Sum test. Results The expedited severity metric agreed well (75.2% concordance) with the KL scores. The initial fracture severity of cases that developed PTOA differed significantly (p = 0.004) from those that did not. Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed that the expedited severity metric could accurately predict PTOA outcome in 80% of the cases. The time required to obtain the expedited severity metric averaged 14.9 minutes/ case, and the metric was obtained without using an intact contralateral CT Conclusion The expedited CT-based methods for fracture severity assessment present a solution to issues limiting the utility of prior methods. In a relatively short amount of time, the expedited methodology provided a severity score capable of predicting PTOA risk, without needing to

  19. Serum Total Cholinesterase Activity on Admission Is Associated with Disease Severity and Outcome in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qing-Hong; Li, An-Min; He, Sai-Lin; Yao, Xu-Dong; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Zhi-Wen; Sheng, Zhi-Yong; Yao, Yong-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the leading causes of neurological disability. In this retrospective study, serum total cholinesterase (ChE) activities were analyzed in 188 patients for diagnostic as well as predictive values for mortality. Methods and Findings Within 72 hours after injury, serum ChE activities including both acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase were measured. Disease severity was evaluated with Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, Glasgow Coma Score, length of coma, post-traumatic amnesia and injury feature. Neurocognitive and functional scores were assessed using clinical records. Of 188 patients, 146 (77.7%) survived and 42 (22.3%) died within 90 days. Lower ChE activities were noted in the non-survivors vs. survivors (5.94±2.19 vs. 7.04±2.16 kU/L, p=0.023), in septic vs. non-infected patients (5.93±1.89 vs. 7.31±2.45 kU/L, p=0.0005) and in patients with extremely severe injury vs. mild injury (6.3±1.98 vs. 7.57±2.48 kU/L, p=0.049). The trajectories of serum ChE levels were also different between non-survivors and survivors, septic and non-infected patients, mild and severely injured patients, respectively. Admission ChE activities were closely correlated with blood cell counts, neurocognitive and functional scores both on admission and at discharge. Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed that the area under the curve for ChE was inferior to that for either APACHE II or white blood cell (WBC) count. However, at the optimal cutoff value of 5 kU/L, the sensitivity of ChE for correct prediction of 90-day mortality was 65.5% and the specificity was 86.4%. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that lower ChE activity (<5 kU/L) was more closely correlated with poor survival than higher ChE activity (>5 kU/L) (p=0.04). After adjusting for other variables, ChE was identified as a borderline independent predictor for mortality as analyzed by Binary logistic regression (P=0.078). Conclusions

  20. The Role of Posttraumatic Hypothermia in Preventing Dendrite Degeneration and Spine Loss after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chuan-fang; Zhao, Cheng-cheng; Jiang, Gan; Gu, Xiao; Feng, Jun-feng; Jiang, Ji-yao

    2016-01-01

    Posttraumatic hypothermia prevents cell death and promotes functional outcomes after traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, little is known regarding the effect of hypothermia on dendrite degeneration and spine loss after severe TBI. In the present study, we used thy1-GFP transgenic mice to investigate the effect of hypothermia on the dendrites and spines in layer V/VI of the ipsilateral cortex after severe TBI. We found that hypothermia (33 °C) dramatically prevented dendrite degeneration and spine loss 1 and 7 days after CCI. The Morris water maze test revealed that hypothermia preserved the learning and memory functions of mice after CCI. Hypothermia significantly increased the expression of the synaptic proteins GluR1 and PSD-95 at 1 and 7 days after CCI in the ipsilateral cortex and hippocampus compared with that of the normothermia TBI group. Hypothermia also increased cortical and hippocampal BDNF levels. These results suggest that posttraumatic hypothermia is an effective method to prevent dendrite degeneration and spine loss and preserve learning and memory function after severe TBI. Increasing cortical and hippocampal BDNF levels might be the mechanism through which hypothermia prevents dendrite degeneration and spine loss and preserves learning and memory function. PMID:27833158

  1. Dimensional depression severity in women with major depression and post-traumatic stress disorder correlates with fronto-amygdalar hypoconnectivty

    PubMed Central

    Satterthwaite, TD; Cook, PA; Bruce, SE; Conway, C; Mikkelsen, E; Satchell, E; Vandekar, SN; Durbin, T; Shinohara, RT; Sheline, YI

    2016-01-01

    Depressive symptoms are common in multiple psychiatric disorders and are frequent sequelae of trauma. A dimensional conceptualization of depression suggests that symptoms should be associated with a continuum of deficits in specific neural circuits. However, most prior investigations of abnormalities in functional connectivity have typically focused on a single diagnostic category using hypothesis-driven seed-based analyses. Here, using a sample of 105 adult female participants from three diagnostic groups (healthy controls, n = 17; major depression, n = 38; and post-traumatic stress disorder, n = 50), we examine the dimensional relationship between resting-state functional dysconnectivity and severity of depressive symptoms across diagnostic categories using a data-driven analysis (multivariate distance-based matrix regression). This connectome-wide analysis identified foci of dysconnectivity associated with depression severity in the bilateral amygdala. Follow-up seed analyses using subject-specific amygdala segmentations revealed that depression severity was associated with amygdalo-frontal hypo-connectivity in a network of regions including bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate and anterior insula. In contrast, anxiety was associated with elevated connectivity between the amygdala and the ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Taken together, these results emphasize the centrality of the amygdala in the pathophysiology of depressive symptoms, and suggest that dissociable patterns of amygdalo-frontal dysconnectivity are a critical neurobiological feature across clinical diagnostic categories. PMID:26416545

  2. Dimensional depression severity in women with major depression and post-traumatic stress disorder correlates with fronto-amygdalar hypoconnectivty.

    PubMed

    Satterthwaite, T D; Cook, P A; Bruce, S E; Conway, C; Mikkelsen, E; Satchell, E; Vandekar, S N; Durbin, T; Shinohara, R T; Sheline, Y I

    2016-07-01

    Depressive symptoms are common in multiple psychiatric disorders and are frequent sequelae of trauma. A dimensional conceptualization of depression suggests that symptoms should be associated with a continuum of deficits in specific neural circuits. However, most prior investigations of abnormalities in functional connectivity have typically focused on a single diagnostic category using hypothesis-driven seed-based analyses. Here, using a sample of 105 adult female participants from three diagnostic groups (healthy controls, n=17; major depression, n=38; and post-traumatic stress disorder, n=50), we examine the dimensional relationship between resting-state functional dysconnectivity and severity of depressive symptoms across diagnostic categories using a data-driven analysis (multivariate distance-based matrix regression). This connectome-wide analysis identified foci of dysconnectivity associated with depression severity in the bilateral amygdala. Follow-up seed analyses using subject-specific amygdala segmentations revealed that depression severity was associated with amygdalo-frontal hypo-connectivity in a network of regions including bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate and anterior insula. In contrast, anxiety was associated with elevated connectivity between the amygdala and the ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Taken together, these results emphasize the centrality of the amygdala in the pathophysiology of depressive symptoms, and suggest that dissociable patterns of amygdalo-frontal dysconnectivity are a critical neurobiological feature across clinical diagnostic categories.

  3. Altered Cognitive Control Activations after Moderate-to-Severe Traumatic Brain Injury and Their Relationship to Injury Severity and Everyday-Life Function.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Alexander; Brunner, Jan Ferenc; Indredavik Evensen, Kari Anne; Finnanger, Torun Gangaune; Vik, Anne; Skandsen, Toril; Landrø, Nils Inge; Håberg, Asta Kristine

    2015-08-01

    This study investigated how the neuronal underpinnings of both adaptive and stable cognitive control processes are affected by traumatic brain injury (TBI). Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was undertaken in 62 survivors of moderate-to-severe TBI (>1 year after injury) and 68 healthy controls during performance of a continuous performance test adapted for use in a mixed block- and event-related design. Survivors of TBI demonstrated increased reliance on adaptive task control processes within an a priori core region for cognitive control in the medial frontal cortex. TBI survivors also had increased activations related to time-on-task effects during stable task-set maintenance in right inferior parietal and prefrontal cortices. Increased brain activations in TBI survivors had a dose-dependent linear positive relationship to injury severity and were negatively correlated with self-reported cognitive control problems in everyday-life situations. Results were adjusted for age, education, and fMRI task performance. In conclusion, evidence was provided that the neural underpinnings of adaptive and stable control processes are differently affected by TBI. Moreover, it was demonstrated that increased brain activations typically observed in survivors of TBI might represent injury-specific compensatory adaptations also utilized in everyday-life situations.

  4. Altered Cognitive Control Activations after Moderate-to-Severe Traumatic Brain Injury and Their Relationship to Injury Severity and Everyday-Life Function

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Alexander; Brunner, Jan Ferenc; Indredavik Evensen, Kari Anne; Finnanger, Torun Gangaune; Vik, Anne; Skandsen, Toril; Landrø, Nils Inge; Håberg, Asta Kristine

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated how the neuronal underpinnings of both adaptive and stable cognitive control processes are affected by traumatic brain injury (TBI). Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was undertaken in 62 survivors of moderate-to-severe TBI (>1 year after injury) and 68 healthy controls during performance of a continuous performance test adapted for use in a mixed block- and event-related design. Survivors of TBI demonstrated increased reliance on adaptive task control processes within an a priori core region for cognitive control in the medial frontal cortex. TBI survivors also had increased activations related to time-on-task effects during stable task-set maintenance in right inferior parietal and prefrontal cortices. Increased brain activations in TBI survivors had a dose-dependent linear positive relationship to injury severity and were negatively correlated with self-reported cognitive control problems in everyday-life situations. Results were adjusted for age, education, and fMRI task performance. In conclusion, evidence was provided that the neural underpinnings of adaptive and stable control processes are differently affected by TBI. Moreover, it was demonstrated that increased brain activations typically observed in survivors of TBI might represent injury-specific compensatory adaptations also utilized in everyday-life situations. PMID:24557637

  5. Abnormal Functional MRI BOLD Contrast in the Vegetative State after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heelmann, Volker

    2010-01-01

    For the rehabilitation process, the treatment of patients surviving brain injury in a vegetative state is still a serious challenge. The aim of this study was to investigate patients exhibiting severely disturbed consciousness using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Five cases of posttraumatic vegetative state and one with minimal…

  6. Victoria Symptom Validity Test performance in acute severe traumatic brain injury: implications for test interpretation.

    PubMed

    Macciocchi, Stephen N; Seel, Ronald T; Alderson, Amy; Godsall, Robert

    2006-08-01

    Effort testing has become commonplace in clinical practice. Recent research has shown that performance on effort tests is highly correlated with performance on neuropsychological measures. Clinical application of effort testing is highly dependent on research derived interpretive guidelines. The Victoria Symptom Validity Test (VSVT) is one of many measures currently used in clinical practice. The VSVT has recommended interpretive guidelines published in the test manual, but the samples used in developing interpretive guidelines are small and heterogeneous and concern has been expressed regarding high false negative rates. In this study, a homogeneous sample of acute, severely brain injured persons were used to assess the sensitivity of the VSVT. Results confirmed that acute, severely brain injured persons (N=71) perform very well on the VSVT. The severe brain injury population is 99% likely to have between 44.1 and 46.8 correct VSVT Combined Score responses. While the VSVT was insensitive to memory dysfunction, the presence of severe visual perceptual (Benton Visual Form Discrimination Score<21) and verbal fluency (Controlled Oral Word Association Score<15) deficits predicted poor performance on the VSVT. These results provide further evidence that performance expectations currently incorporated in the VSVT manual interpretative criteria are too conservative. Empirically based alternative criteria for interpreting VSVT Combined Scores in the TBI population are presented.

  7. The Differential Impact of Alcohol and Interpersonal Violence on the Severity of Violent Traumatic Brain Injuries among American Indians.

    PubMed

    Linton, Kristen F; Perrin, Paul B

    2017-04-03

    Research shows connections between substance use and traumatic brain injury (TBI), high rates of substance use and interpersonal violence (IPV) in American Indians with TBI, and connections between IPV and TBI. This study assessed the effects of substance use at the time of a violent TBI and possible mediators such as American Indian race on injury severity (injury severity score [ISS]). A secondary data analysis of 3,351 individuals who experienced a TBI due to violence was conducted. American Indians with TBI were more likely to experience IPV (χ(2) = 4.19; p = .04) and had significantly higher blood alcohol content level (BAC) scores (t = - 16.78; p = .000) than other racial groups. A regression model explained 27% of the variance in ISS. Significant interaction terms uncovered positive relationships between: (a) American Indian race and ISS when the injury aetiology was not IPV and BAC scores were lower than the legal limit, and (b) IPV and ISS when patients were not American Indian. Alcohol was negatively associated with ISS among American Indians, suggesting that BAC may impact individuals with TBI differentially as a function of race.

  8. Repeated upper limb salvage in a case of severe traumatic soft-tissue and brachial artery defect.

    PubMed

    Noaman, Hassan Hamdy; Shiha, Anis Elsayed

    2002-01-01

    We present the case of a 9-year-old male patient who suffered a gunshot injury to the right arm. The patient arrived in shock, his right arm severely traumatized, with soft-tissue loss involving the anterior surface and both sides of the right arm. The humerus was exposed. There was brachial artery defect and damage to the lateral fibers of the median nerve. The mangled extremity severity score (MESS) was 8 points. The patient was treated with general resuscitation, blood transfusion, and debridement. A venous graft, 12 cm in length, to bridge the brachial artery defect, and tendon transfer, triceps to the biceps, was performed in one step. Postoperatively, there was a normal radial pulse, normal skin color, normal temperature, and normal movement of the fingers without pain. Unfortunately, the patient then sustained a second trauma to the right arm 3 weeks later, rupturing the graft. This time he lost 1,500 cc of blood. After another blood transfusion, we performed a second reverse saphenous vein graft. The patient stayed at the hospital for 3 weeks. At follow-up 12 months later, the limb has good function and, except for the presence of a scar and skin graft, is equal in appearance to the left side.

  9. Recombinant human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist in severe traumatic brain injury: a phase II randomized control trial

    PubMed Central

    Helmy, Adel; Guilfoyle, Mathew R; Carpenter, Keri LH; Pickard, John D; Menon, David K; Hutchinson, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the commonest cause of death and disability in those aged under 40 years. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL1ra) is an endogenous competitive antagonist at the interleukin-1 type-1 receptor (IL-1R). Antagonism at the IL-1R confers neuroprotection in several rodent models of neuronal injury (i.e., trauma, stroke and excitotoxicity). We describe a single center, phase II, open label, randomized-control study of recombinant human IL1ra (rhIL1ra, anakinra) in severe TBI, at a dose of 100 mg subcutaneously once a day for 5 days in 20 patients randomized 1:1. We provide safety data (primary outcome) in this pathology, utilize cerebral microdialysis to directly determine brain extracellular concentrations of IL1ra and 41 cytokines and chemokines, and use principal component analysis (PCA) to explore the resultant cerebral cytokine profile. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist was safe, penetrated into plasma and the brain extracellular fluid. The PCA showed a separation in cytokine profiles after IL1ra administration. A candidate cytokine from this analysis, macrophage-derived chemoattractant, was significantly lower in the rhIL1ra-treated group. Our results provide promising data for rhIL1ra as a therapeutic candidate by showing safety, brain penetration and a modification of the neuroinflammatory response to TBI by a putative neuroprotective agent in humans for the first time. PMID:24569690

  10. Recombinant human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist in severe traumatic brain injury: a phase II randomized control trial.

    PubMed

    Helmy, Adel; Guilfoyle, Mathew R; Carpenter, Keri L H; Pickard, John D; Menon, David K; Hutchinson, Peter J

    2014-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the commonest cause of death and disability in those aged under 40 years. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL1ra) is an endogenous competitive antagonist at the interleukin-1 type-1 receptor (IL-1R). Antagonism at the IL-1R confers neuroprotection in several rodent models of neuronal injury (i.e., trauma, stroke and excitotoxicity). We describe a single center, phase II, open label, randomized-control study of recombinant human IL1ra (rhIL1ra, anakinra) in severe TBI, at a dose of 100 mg subcutaneously once a day for 5 days in 20 patients randomized 1:1. We provide safety data (primary outcome) in this pathology, utilize cerebral microdialysis to directly determine brain extracellular concentrations of IL1ra and 41 cytokines and chemokines, and use principal component analysis (PCA) to explore the resultant cerebral cytokine profile. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist was safe, penetrated into plasma and the brain extracellular fluid. The PCA showed a separation in cytokine profiles after IL1ra administration. A candidate cytokine from this analysis, macrophage-derived chemoattractant, was significantly lower in the rhIL1ra-treated group. Our results provide promising data for rhIL1ra as a therapeutic candidate by showing safety, brain penetration and a modification of the neuroinflammatory response to TBI by a putative neuroprotective agent in humans for the first time.

  11. MicroRNAs as Novel Biomarkers for the Diagnosis and Prognosis of Mild and Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Di Pietro, Valentina; Ragusa, Marco; Davies, David James; Su, Zhangjie; Hazeldine, Jon; Lazzarino, Giacomo; Hill, Lisa J; Crombie, Nicholas; Foster, Mark; Purrello, Michele; Logan, A; Belli, Antonio

    2017-03-09

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability under the age of 45 years in Western countries. Despite many studies, no reliable biomarkers have been found to assess TBI severity and predict recovery. MicroRNA (miRNA) profiling has become widely used to identify biomarkers and therapeutic targets. The expression of 754 miRNAs was analysed in serum of 5 mild TBI (mTBI) with extra-cranial injury (EC) patients, 5 severe TBI (sTBI) with EC patients and 5 healthy volunteers (HV) at 1 day and 15 days post injury, by using the TaqMan® Array Human MicroRNA A+B Cards. The aim was to find candidate biomarkers able to discriminate between mild and severe TBI. Following this, it was possible to select 10 miRNAs for further study in an enlarged validation cohort of 120 patients by using single TaqMan assays at the following time points: T0-1h, T4-12h, T48-72h and 15 days from the injury. Analysis revealed 2 miRNAs (miR-425-5p, miR-502) were significantly downregulated (p<0.05) in mTBI at early time points and are ideal candidates for diagnosis of mTBI; two miRNAs (miR-21 and miR-335) were significantly upregulated (p<0.01) and are valid biomarkers for the diagnosis of sTBI. In addition, miR-425-5p is a strong predictive of 6-month outcome at T0-1h and T4-12h, whilst miR-21 is predictive of the outcome at T4-12h. The panel of selected miRNAs shows promise as biomarkers to discriminate mild from severe TBI. In addition the selected miRNAs represent new potential therapeutic targets.

  12. Long-term retention of skilled visual search following severe traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    PAVAWALLA, SHITAL P.; SCHMITTER-EDGECOMBE, MAUREEN

    2007-01-01

    We examined the long-term retention of a learned automatic cognitive process in 17 severe TBI participants and 10 controls. Participants had initially received extensive consistent-mapping (CM) training (i.e., 3600 trials) in a semantic category visual search task (Schmitter-Edgecombe & Beglinger, 2001). Following CM training, TBI and control groups demonstrated dramatic performance improvements and the development of an automatic attention response (AAR), indicating task-specific and stimulus-specific skill learning. After a 5- or 10-month retention interval, participants in this study performed a New CM task and the originally trained CM task to assess for retention of task-specific and stimulus-specific visual search skills, respectively. No significant group differences were found in the level of retention for either skill type, indicating that individuals with severe TBI were able to retain the learned skills over a long-term retention interval at a level comparable to controls. Exploratory analyses revealed that TBI participants who returned at the 5-month retention interval showed nearly complete skill retention, and greater skill retention than TBI participants who returned at the 10-month interval, suggesting that “booster” or retraining sessions may be needed when a skill is not continuously in use. PMID:17064444

  13. Managing the severely proclined maxillary anteriors by extracting traumatized right maxillary central incisor

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Mahesh; Mogra, Subraya; Chalasani, Srikrishna; D’mello, Kuldeep; Dhakar, Nidhi

    2014-01-01

    A 14-year-old girl reported with severely proclined maxillary anterior teeth with fractured and discolored right maxillary central incisor with questionable prognosis. Autotransplantation of premolar to replace central incisor was considered a risky option as patient was 14-year-old with presence of advanced root development of premolar. The immediate placement of the prosthetic implant was also not possible because of patient's age. Therefore, it was decided to use the space obtained by extracting questionable maxillary right central incisor for orthodontic purpose and also sacrificing the healthy premolar is invariably an excessive biological cost for a modest functional and aesthetic gain. Hence, the treatment plan for this case includes extraction of right maxillary central incisor and left maxillary first premolar, movement of right maxillary lateral incisor mesially, achieving normal axial inclination of maxillary anteriors with normal overjet and overbite. Mandibular arch was treated nonextraction due to congenitally missing central incisors with presence of normally inclined lower anteriors thereby maintaining Angles class I occlusion. Tipping, usually, seen in Begg mechanotherapy was used for our advantage to correct severely proclined maxillary anteriors with simultaneous bite opening mechanics. Case was completed in 19 months and posttreatment records including photographs, radiographs and study models were made. Begg wrap around the retainer was placed in the maxillary arch allowing natural settling of occlusion. PMID:25395777

  14. Angry responses to emotional events: the role of impaired control and drive in people with severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Skye; Hunt, Christopher; Henry, Julie D; Dimoska, Aneta; Bornhofen, Cristina

    2010-10-01

    Emotional and behavioral changes (e.g., irritability and anger or alternatively passivity and inertia) are common after traumatic brain injury (TBI). These changes have been conceptualized as reflecting a loss of regulation, specifically control (loss of inhibition) and/or drive (self-initiation). However, no empirical studies have examined the relationship between neuropsychological measures of these constructs and emotional responsivity in situ. In this study, 29 individuals with severe, chronic TBI and 32 matched control participants were shown emotionally evocative films selected to elicit anger and were asked to rate their emotions before and after. They were also given measures of executive function to assess inhibition and flexibility as indices of control and drive, respectively. Both groups had heightened anxiety after the films. An increase in anger and confusion correlated with impaired control (Haylings Test score, Trails B errors) in the TBI group but not in controls. No association was found between reduced emotional responsivity and drive (Controlled Oral Word Association Test, Matrix Reasoning Scaled Score, Trails A/B time difference). This study provides support for the use of formal measures of disinhibition on neuropsychological tests as a corollary for emotion disinhibition. As with previous work, operationalization of loss of drive was more difficult to achieve.

  15. Preliminary guidelines for safe and effective use of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in moderate to severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Nielson, Dylan M; McKnight, Curtis A; Patel, Riddhi N; Kalnin, Andrew J; Mysiw, Walter J

    2015-04-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation has generated extensive interest within the traumatic brain injury (TBI) rehabilitation community, but little work has been done with repetitive protocols, which can produce prolonged changes in behavior. This is partly because of concerns about the safety of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in subjects with TBI, particularly the risk of seizures. These risks can be minimized by careful selection of the rTMS protocol and exclusion criteria. In this article, we identify guidelines for safe use of rTMS in subjects with TBI based on a review of the literature and illustrate their application with a case study. Our subject is a 48-year-old man who sustained a severe TBI 5 years prior to beginning rTMS for the treatment of post-TBI depression. After a 4-week baseline period, we administered daily sessions of low-frequency stimulation to the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex for 6 weeks. After stimulation, we performed monthly assessments for 3 months. The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) was our primary outcome measure. The stimulation was well tolerated and the patient reported no side effects. After 6 weeks of stimulation, the patient's depression was slightly improved, and these improvements continued through follow-up. At the end of follow-up, the patient's HAMD score was 49% of the average baseline score.

  16. Parent Management of the School Reintegration Needs of Children and Youth Following Moderate or Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Roscigno, Cecelia I.; Fleig, Denise K.; Knafl, Kathleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose School reintegration following children’s traumatic brain injury (TBI) is still poorly understood from families’ perspectives. We aimed to understand how both unique and common experiences during children’s school reintegration were explained by parents to influence the family. Methods Data came from an investigation using descriptive phenomenology (2005–2007) to understand parents’ experiences in the first 5 years following children’s moderate to severe TBI. Parents (N = 42 from 37 families in the United States) participated in two 90-minute interviews (first M = 15 months; second M = 27 months). Two investigators independently coded parents’ discussions of school reintegration using content analysis to understand the unique and common factors that parents perceived affected the family. Results Parents’ school negotiation themes included: 1) legal versus moral basis for helping the child; 2) inappropriate state and local services that did not consider needs specific to TBI; and, 3) involvement in planning, implementing, and evaluating the child’s education plan. Parents perceived that coordinated and collaboration leadership with school personnel lessened families’ workload. Families who home-schooled had unique challenges. Conclusions School reintegration can add to family workload by changing roles and relationships, and by adding to parents’ perceived stress in managing of the child’s condition. PMID:24969697

  17. Expression of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters B1 and C1 after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Willyerd, F. Anthony; Empey, Philip E.; Philbrick, Ashley; Ikonomovic, Milos D.; Puccio, Ava M.; Kochanek, Patrick M.; Okonkwo, David O.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) transport proteins ABCC1 and ABCB1 (also known as multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 and p-glycoprotein, respectively), are key membrane efflux transporters of drugs and endogenous substrates, including in the brain. The impact of traumatic brain injury (TBI) on ABCC1 and ABCB1 expression in humans is unknown. We hypothesized that ABCC1 and ABCB1 expression would be altered in brain tissue from patients acutely after severe TBI. Archived TBI samples (n=10) from our Brain Trauma Research Center and control samples (n=7) from our Alzheimer Disease Research Center were obtained under Institutional Review Board approval. Protein was extracted from fresh frozen cortical brain tissue for Western blot analysis and sections were obtained from fixed cortical tissue for immunohistochemistry. Relative abundance of ABCC1 was increased in samples from TBI versus controls (2.8±2.5 fold; p=0.005). ABCC1 immunohistochemistry was consistent with Western blot data, with increased immunoreactivity in cerebral blood vessel walls, as well as cells with the morphological appearance of neurons and glia in TBI versus controls. Relative abundance of ABCB1 was similar between TBI and controls (p=0.76), and ABCB1 immunoreactivity was primarily associated with cerebral blood vessels in both groups. These human data show that TBI increases ABCC1 expression in the brain, consistent with possible implications for both patients receiving pharmacological inhibitors and/or substrates of ABCC1 after TBI. PMID:25891836

  18. Brain tissue partial pressure of oxygen predicts the outcome of severe traumatic brain injury under mild hypothermia treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hongtao; Zheng, Maohua; Wang, Yanmin; Diao, Yunfeng; Zhao, Wanyong; Wei, Zhengjun

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical significance and changes of brain tissue partial pressure of oxygen (PbtO2) in the course of mild hypothermia treatment (MHT) for treating severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI). Methods There were 68 cases with sTBI undergoing MHT. PbtO2, intracranial pressure (ICP), jugular venous oxygen saturation (SjvO2), and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) were continuously monitored, and clinical outcomes were evaluated using the Glasgow Outcome Scale score. Results Of 68 patients with sTBI, PbtO2, SjvO2, and CPP were obviously increased, but decreased ICP level was observed throughout the MHT. PbtO2 and ICP were negatively linearly correlated, while there was a positive linear correlation between PbtO2 and SjvO2. Monitoring CPP and SjvO2 was performed under normal circumstances, and a large proportion of patients were detected with low PbtO2. Decreased PbtO2 was also found after MHT. Conclusion Continuous PbtO2 monitoring could be introduced to evaluate the condition of regional cerebral oxygen metabolism, thereby guiding the clinical treatment and predicting the outcome. PMID:27601907

  19. Monitoring intracranial pressure utilizing a novel pattern of brain multiparameters in the treatment of severe traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hong-tao; Zheng, Maohua; Wang, Yanmin; Diao, Yunfeng; Zhao, Wanyong; Wei, Zhengjun

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical value of multiple brain parameters on monitoring intracranial pressure (ICP) procedures in the therapy of severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI) utilizing mild hypothermia treatment (MHT) alone or a combination strategy with other therapeutic techniques. A total of 62 patients with sTBI (Glasgow Coma Scale score <8) were treated using mild hypothermia alone or mild hypothermia combined with conventional ICP procedures such as dehydration using mannitol, hyperventilation, and decompressive craniectomy. The multiple brain parameters, which included ICP, cerebral perfusion pressure, transcranial Doppler, brain tissue partial pressure of oxygen, and jugular venous oxygen saturation, were detected and analyzed. All of these measures can control the ICP of sTBI patients to a certain extent, but multiparameters associated with brain environment and functions have to be critically monitored simultaneously because some procedures of reducing ICP can cause side effects for long-term recovery in sTBI patients. The result suggested that multimodality monitoring must be performed during the process of mild hypothermia combined with conventional ICP procedures in order to safely target different clinical methods to specific patients who may benefit from an individual therapy. PMID:27382294

  20. Cerebrovascular Signal Complexity Six Hours after Intensive Care Unit Admission Correlates with Outcome after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lei; Smielewski, Peter; Czosnyka, Marek; Ercole, Ari

    2016-11-15

    Disease states are associated with a breakdown in healthy interactions and are often characterized by reduced signal complexity. We applied approximate entropy (ApEn) analysis to investigate the correlation between the complexity of heart rate (ApEn-HR), mean arterial pressure (ApEn-MAP), intracranial pressure (ApEn-ICP), and a combined ApEn-product (product of the three individual ApEns) and outcome after traumatic brain injury. In 174 severe traumatic brain injured patients, we found significant differences across groups classified by the Glasgow Outcome Score in ApEn-HR (p = 0.007), ApEn-MAP (p = 0.02), ApEn-ICP (p = 0.01), ApEn-product (p = 0.001), and pressure reactivity index (PRx) (p = 0.004) in the first 6 h. This relationship strengthened in a 24 h and 72 h analysis (ApEn-MAP continued to correlate with death but was not correlated with favorable outcome). Outcome was dichotomized as survival versus death, and favorable versus unfavorable; the ApEn-product achieved the strongest statistical significance at 6 h (F = 11.0; p = 0.001 and F = 10.5; p = 0.001, respectively) and was a significant independent predictor of mortality and favorable outcome (p < 0.001). Patients in the lowest quartile for ApEn-product were over four times more likely to die (39.5% vs. 9.3%, p < 0.001) than those in the highest quartile. ApEn-ICP was inversely correlated with PRx (r = -0.39, p < 0.000001) indicating unique information related to impaired cerebral autoregulation. Our results demonstrate that as early as 6 h into monitoring, complexity measures from easily attainable vital signs, such as HR and MAP, in addition to ICP, can help triage those who require more intensive neurological management at an early stage.

  1. Association of Serum Uric Acid Level with the Severity of Brain Injury and Patient’s Outcome in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hatefi, Masoud; Dastjerdi, Masoud Moghadas; Ghiasi, Bahareh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The prognostic value of serum Uric Acid (UA) levels in Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is unclear. Aim To investigate the relationship between serum UA levels and prognosis of patients with TBI when in hospital and at six months after discharge. Materials and Methods All patients attended our emergency department during July 2014 and December 2015 and were consecutively entered into the study and among 890 evaluated candidates based on inclusion criteria we finally investigated the serum UA levels of 725 TBI patients. Computed Tomography (CT) images of the brain were obtained within the first 24 hours of hospitalization. Outcome was assessed using the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score at discharge and at six months after discharge. Results Data of 725 patients (42.89% men; mean age: 54.69±12.37 years) were analyzed. Mean±Standard Deviation (SD) of Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores was 4.65±1.76. Serum levels of UA, when in hospital and at six months after discharge, among those who died were lower than those who survived (in hospital: 0.126±0.026 vs. 0.243±0.942 mmol/l, p = 0.000; 6 months post-discharge: 0.130±0.044 vs. 0.286±0.069 mmol/l, p<0.001). The mean UA plasma was significantly different between deceased and alive patients according to GOS scores (p<0.001 and p=0.030, respectively). The UA levels showed a significant relationship with GCS scores and severity of brain injury assessed using the Marshall Classification Score (p=0.005). Conclusion Our results showed a strong relationship between UA levels and patients’ outcomes either in hospital or at six months after discharge. Serum UA level could be considered as a valuable marker for evaluating the severity of brain injury and outcomes of TBI. PMID:28208906

  2. Non-traumatic rupture of the intracranial vertebral artery of a man found dead in a severe car accident - histopathological differentiation by step-serial sections.

    PubMed

    Ro, Ayako; Kageyama, Norimasa; Hayashi, Kino; Shigeta, Akio; Fukunaga, Tatsushige

    2008-03-01

    A 58-year-old male with untreated hypertension was found dead in his car after a traffic accident on his way to the office. Emergency head CT showed diffuse subarachnoid hemorrhage at cerebral base. On autopsy examination, traumatic injuries were seen on his face and lower extremities. The skull was not fractured and there were no brain contusions except subscalp bleeding at the frontal head. The brain weighed 1510g and showed diffuse subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a rupture of the left vertebral artery (VA). Histopathological examination using serial step sections of every 0.1mm of the whole VA revealed multiple arterial dissections (AD) with fresh and old states at bilateral VA. Previous dissections at the basilar artery and internal carotid artery were also observed. The symptoms that he reported a week before the accident, left sided headache and shoulder pains, could have come from previous dissections. We concluded that the AD occurred while driving and was the cause of death, with the car accident then being caused by the stroke. Other specific histopathological findings were medial degeneration and serrate changes of the internal elastic lamina which resembled lesion of the segmental arterial mediolysis. These would suggest a pathogenesis of intracranial AD. Differential diagnosis of subarachnoid hemorrhage from the ruptured VA, distinguishing between idiopathic AD and traumatic trilaminar rupture, is still a difficult matter in forensic autopsy. However, this serial step sections procedure could be useful for the morphological differentiation.

  3. Derivation of a Predictive Score for Hemorrhagic Progression of Cerebral Contusions in Moderate and Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Randall Z.; Nakagawa, Kazuma; Hayashi, Michael; Donovan, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds After traumatic brain injury (TBI), hemorrhagic progression of contusions (HPCs) occurs frequently. However, there is no established predictive score to identify high-risk patients for HPC. Methods Consecutive patients who were hospitalized (2008–2013) with non-penetrating moderate or severe TBI were studied. The primary outcome was HPC, defined by both a relative increase in contusion volume by ≥30 % and an absolute increase by ≥10 mL on serial imaging. Logistic regression models were created to identify independent risk factors for HPC. The HPC Score was then derived based on the final model. Results Among a total of 286 eligible patients, 61 (21 %) patients developed HPC. On univariate analyses, HPC was associated with older age, higher initial blood pressure, antiplatelet medications, anticoagulants, subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) subdural hematoma (SDH), skull fracture, frontal contusion, larger contusion volume, and shorter interval from injury to initial CT. In the final model, SAH (OR 6.33, 95 % CI, 1.80–22.23), SDH (OR 3.46, 95 % CI, 1.39–8.63), and skull fracture (OR 2.67, 95 % CI, 1.28–5.58) were associated with HPC. Based on these factors, the HPC Score was derived (SAH = 2 points, SDH = 1 point, and skull fracture = 1 point). This score had an area under the receiver operating curve of 0.77. Patients with a score of 0–2 had a 4.0 % incidence of HPC, while patients with a score of 3–4 had a 34.6 % incidence of HPC. Conclusions A simple HPC Score was developed for early risk stratification of HPC in patients with moderate or severe TBI. PMID:27473209

  4. Cognitive Deficits Post-Traumatic Brain Injury and Their Association with Injury Severity and Gray Matter Volumes.

    PubMed

    Livny, Abigail; Biegon, Anat; Kushnir, Tammar; Harnof, Sagi; Hoffmann, Chen; Fruchter, Eyal; Weiser, Mark

    2017-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is known to have a substantial though highly variable impact on cognitive abilities. Due to the wide range of cognitive abilities among healthy individuals, an objective assessment of TBI-related cognitive loss requires an accurate measurement of pre-morbid cognitive performance. To address this problem, we recruited 50 adults who sustained a TBI and had performed a cognitive baseline assessment in adolescence as part of the aptitude tests mandated by the Israeli Defense Forces. This group was matched with non-injured controls (n = 35). Pre- and post-injury cognitive assessments consisted of three domains-namely, verbal abstraction, mathematical reasoning, and non-verbal abstract reasoning (from the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition). The difference between post- and pre-injury scores was calculated as a measure of domain-specific cognitive decline. Voxel-based regression was used to correlate cognitive decline with modulated gray matter probability maps controlling for age, Glasgow Coma Scale, and total intracranial volume. Using objectively assessed cognitive scores, we found that abstract reasoning declined in both moderate-severe and mild TBI patients, whereas verbal abstraction declined only in the moderate-severe group. Mathematical reasoning was not affected by TBI. In the TBI patients, non-verbal abstract reasoning post-pre-injury change scores were negatively correlated with the volume of the insula. We conclude that access to pre-morbid neuropsychological data may have facilitated the discovery of the effects of mild TBI on abstract reasoning, as well as a significant correlation between TBI-related decline in this cognitive domain and the volume of the bilateral insula, both of which had not been appreciated in the past.

  5. Bench-to-bedside review: Oxygen debt and its metabolic correlates as quantifiers of the severity of hemorrhagic and post-traumatic shock

    PubMed Central

    Rixen, Dieter; Siegel, John H

    2005-01-01

    Evidence is increasing that oxygen debt and its metabolic correlates are important quantifiers of the severity of hemorrhagic and post-traumatic shock and and may serve as useful guides in the treatment of these conditions. The aim of this review is to demonstrate the similarity between experimental oxygen debt in animals and human hemorrhage/post-traumatic conditions, and to examine metabolic oxygen debt correlates, namely base deficit and lactate, as indices of shock severity and adequacy of volume resuscitation. Relevant studies in the medical literature were identified using Medline and Cochrane Library searches. Findings in both experimental animals (dog/pig) and humans suggest that oxygen debt or its metabolic correlates may be more useful quantifiers of hemorrhagic shock than estimates of blood loss, volume replacement, blood pressure, or heart rate. This is evidenced by the oxygen debt/probability of death curves for the animals, and by the consistency of lethal dose (LD)25,50 points for base deficit across all three species. Quantifying human post-traumatic shock based on base deficit and adjusting for Glasgow Coma Scale score, prothrombin time, Injury Severity Score and age is demonstrated to be superior to anatomic injury severity alone or in combination with Trauma and Injury Severity Score. The data examined in this review indicate that estimates of oxygen debt and its metabolic correlates should be included in studies of experimental shock and in the management of patients suffering from hemorrhagic shock. PMID:16277731

  6. Pre- and post-disaster negative life events in relation to the incidence and severity of post-traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Maes, M; Mylle, J; Delmeire, L; Janca, A

    2001-12-15

    There is evidence suggesting that stressful life events may precede major psychiatric illness, such as major depression, and that the severity of a traumatic event outside the range of usual human experience may provoke post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The present study was carried out to examine the effects of pre- and post-disaster stressful life events on the incidence rate of PTSD following two man-made traumatic events. An epidemiological study examining 127 victims of a flash fire in a ballroom and 55 motor vehicle accident (MVA) victims was undertaken. PTSD symptoms were assessed by means of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview and the pre- and post-disaster stressful life events by means of the Diagnostic Interview Schedule, Disaster Supplement. Binary logistic and multiple linear regression analyses were employed to examine the relationships between PTSD and pre- and post-disaster life events. There were no significant relationships between stressful life events the year prior to the traumatic event and the incidence or severity of PTSD. There were highly significant relationships between the cumulative number and event severity of post-disaster negative life events and the incidence rate and severity of PTSD. The post-disaster life events were significantly more related to the avoidance-depression dimension than to the anxiety-arousal dimension of PTSD. The most significant life events were: loss of job or income, broken relationships, serious illnesses or injuries in the victims and death or illness in close acquaintances. The results of this study show that the number and severity of additional stressful life events signal a higher risk to develop PTSD and a higher severity of the avoidance-depression dimension of PTSD symptomatology.

  7. [Intracranial pressure monitoring in severe traumatic brain injury: A different perspective of the BestTrip trial].

    PubMed

    Murillo-Cabezas, F; Godoy, D A

    2014-05-01

    The present study outlines a series of questions and reflections upon the recent publication of Chesnut et al., who compared 2 approaches to the treatment of intracranial hypertension (ICH) in severe head injuries: one with and the other without intracranial pressure monitoring (ICP). The authors concluded that no improved outcome was observed in the treatment group guided by ICP monitoring. The main concerns relate to the degree of training of the physicians involved in the monitoring and management of ICH in the ICP group, as well as to the possible inter-observer variability in interpreting the CT scans, the capacity of clinical signs to guide the treatment of ICH, and the suitability of randomization. The analysis of this trial should not be taken to suggest the futility of ICP monitoring but rather the need to correctly use the information afforded by ICP monitoring, with emphasis on the importance of the definition of alternative methods for non-invasive monitoring.

  8. The impact of severe traumatic brain injury on a novel base deficit- based classification of hypovolemic shock

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recently, our group has proposed a new classification of hypovolemic shock based on the physiological shock marker base deficit (BD). The classification consists of four groups of worsening BD and correlates with the extent of hypovolemic shock in severely injured patients. The aim of this study was to test the applicability of our recently proposed classification of hypovolemic shock in the context of severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Methods Between 2002 and 2011, patients ≥16 years in age with an AIShead ≥ 3 have been retrieved from the German TraumaRegister DGU® database. Patients were classified into four strata of worsening BD [(class I (BD ≤ 2 mmol/l), class II (BD > 2.0 to 6.0 mmol/l), class III (BD > 6.0 to 10 mmol/l) and class IV (BD > 10 mmol/l)] and assessed for demographic and injury characteristics as well as blood product transfusions and outcomes. The cohort of severely injured patients with TBI was compared to a population of all trauma patients to assess possible differences in the applicability of the BD based classification of hypovolemic shock. Results From a total of 23,496 patients, 10,201 multiply injured patients with TBI (AIShead ≥ 3) could be identified. With worsening of BD, a consecutive increase of mortality rate from 15.9% in class I to 61.4% in class IV patients was observed. Simultaneously, injury severity scores increased from 20.8 (±11.9) to 41.6 (±17). Increments in BD paralleled decreasing hemoglobin, platelet counts and Quick’s values. The number of blood units transfused correlated with worsening of BD. Massive transfusion rates increased from 5% in class I to 47% in class IV. Between multiply injured patients with TBI and all trauma patients, no clinically relevant differences in transfusion requirement or massive transfusion rates were observed. Conclusion The presence of TBI has no relevant impact on the applicability of the recently proposed BD-based classification of

  9. Frontal lobe changes after severe diffuse closed head injury in children: a volumetric study of magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Berryhill, P; Lilly, M A; Levin, H S; Hillman, G R; Mendelsohn, D; Brunder, D G; Fletcher, J M; Kufera, J; Kent, T A; Yeakley, J

    1995-09-01

    In view of the pathophysiology and biomechanics of severe closed head injury (CHI) in children, we postulated that the frontal lobes sustain diffuse injury, even in the absence of focal brain lesions detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This study quantitated the morphological effects of CHI on the frontal lobes in children who sustained head trauma of varying severity. The MRI findings of 14 children who had sustained severe CHIs (Glasgow Coma Scale score of < or = 8) were compared with the findings in a matched group of 14 children having sustained mild head injuries (Glasgow Coma Scale score of 13-15). The patients ranged in age from 5 to 15 years at the time of their MRIs, which were acquired at least 3 months postinjury. MRI findings revealed no focal areas of abnormal signal in the frontal lobes. Volumetric analysis disclosed that the total prefrontal cerebrospinal fluid increased and the gray matter volume decreased in the patients with severe CHI, relative to the mildly injured comparison group. Gray matter volume was also reduced in the orbitofrontal and dorsolateral regions of the brains of children with severe CHI, relative to the children who sustained mild head trauma. These volumetric findings indicate that prefrontal tissue loss occurs after severe CHI in children, even in the absence of focal brain lesions in this area. Nearly two-thirds of the children who sustained severe CHIs were moderately disabled after an average postinjury interval of 3 years or more, whereas 12 of the 14 patients with mild CHIs attained a good recovery (2 were moderately disabled) by the time of study.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Predictive Factors of Survival and 6-Month Favorable Outcome of Very Severe Head Trauma Patients; a Historical Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Vathanalaoha, Karin; Oearsakul, Thakul; Tunthanathip, Thara

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Very severe head trauma cases, defined as Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores of less than 6, have a higher mortality rate and poorer outcome. The purpose of this study was to recognize factors associated with survival and 6-month favorable outcome of very severe head trauma patients presenting to emergency department. Methods: In this historical cohort study, the authors retrospectively reviewed medical records of head trauma patients who were admitted to the emergency department with post-resuscitation GCS scores of less than 6. Both univariate and multivariate analyses were used to test the association between various parameters with survival and 6-month outcome. Results: 103 cases with the mean age of 39 ± 16.5 years were studied (80% male). The overall survival rate was 41.7% and the rate of 6-month favorable outcome was 28.2%. In multivariate analysis, brisk pupil light reaction on admission and patent basal cistern on brain computed tomography (CT) scan were significant factors associated with both survival (OR 5.20, 95% CI 1.57-17.246, p = 0.007 and OR 3.65, 95% CI 1.22-10.91, p=0.02 respectively) and favorable outcome (OR 4.07, 95% CI 1.35-12.24, p=0.01 and OR 3.54, 95% CI 1.22-10.26, p 0.02), respectively. Conclusion: Based on the results of present study, the survival rate of patients with very severe head trauma (GCS < 6) was 41.7%. The strong predictors of survival and 6-month favorable outcome of these patients were brisk pupillary reactivity and patent cistern on brain CT scan. It seems that very severe head trauma patients still have a reasonable chance to survive and aggressive management should be continued. PMID:28286831

  11. Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... Submit Button Connect with the CDC Injury Center File Formats Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, PPT, MPEG) on this site? Adobe PDF file Microsoft PowerPoint file Microsoft Word file Microsoft Excel ...

  12. Forensic investigation into a death: post-traumatic amnesia in a worker with a work-related head injury sustained in a coal-fired thermal power plant in India.

    PubMed

    Muralidhar, Venkiteswaran

    2017-03-15

    This is the first reported case of a work-related head injury in a coal-fired thermal power plant in India. This case highlights the trend of not reporting work injuries due to fears of reprisal from the management team that may include the termination of employment. Post-traumatic amnesia in a worker presenting with head trauma must be recognised by coworkers, so the cause of injury can be elicited early and the victim gets timely medical help. There are few published studies on work-related traumatic brain injury, and they provide no information on either anatomical localisation or signs and symptoms. It is imperative that this under-researched area is studied, so detailed epidemiology and accurate national and global statistics are made available to address this dangerous yet preventable condition.

  13. Association of a Guardian’s Report of a Child Acting Abnormally With Traumatic Brain Injury After Minor Blunt Head Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Nishijima, Daniel K.; Holmes, James F.; Dayan, Peter S.; Kuppermann, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Increased use of computed tomography (CT) in children is concerning owing to the cancer risk from ionizing radiation, particularly in children younger than 2 years. A guardian report that a child is acting abnormally is a risk factor for clinically important traumatic brain injury (ciTBI) and may be a driving factor for CT use in the emergency department. OBJECTIVE To determine the prevalence of ciTBIs and TBIs in children younger than 2 years with minor blunt head trauma and a guardian report of acting abnormally with (1) no other findings or (2) other concerning findings for TBI. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Secondary analysis of a large, prospective, multicenter cohort study that included 43 399 children younger than 18 years with minor blunt head trauma evaluated in 25 emergency departments. The study was conducted on data obtained between June 2004 and September 2006. Data analysis was performed between August 21, 2014, and March 9, 2015. EXPOSURES A guardian report that the child was acting abnormally after minor blunt head trauma. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The prevalence of ciTBI (defined as death, neurosurgery, intubation for >24 hours, or hospitalization for ≥2 nights in association with TBI on CT imaging) and TBI on CT imaging in children with a guardian report of acting abnormally with (1) no other findings and (2) other concerning findings for TBI. RESULTS Of 43 399 children in the cohort study, a total of 1297 children had reports of acting abnormally, of whom 411 (31.7%) had this report as their only finding. Reported as percentage (95% CI), 1 of 411 (0.2% [0–1.3%]) had a ciTBI, and 4 TBIs were noted on the CT scans in 185 children who underwent imaging (2.2% [0.6%–5.4%]). In children with reports of acting abnormally and other concerning findings for TBI, 29 of 886 (3.3% [2.2%–4.7%]) had ciTBIs and 66 of 674 (9.8% [7.7%–12.3%]) had TBIs on CT. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Clinically important TBIs are very uncommon, and TBIs

  14. Early Cerebral Circulation Disturbance in Patients Suffering from Severe Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI): A Xenon CT and Perfusion CT Study.

    PubMed

    Honda, Mitsuru; Ichibayashi, Ryo; Yokomuro, Hiroki; Yoshihara, Katsunori; Masuda, Hiroyuki; Haga, Daisuke; Seiki, Yoshikatsu; Kudoh, Chiaki; Kishi, Taichi

    2016-08-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is widely known to cause dynamic changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF). Ischemia is a common and deleterious secondary injury following TBI. Detecting early ischemia in TBI patients is important to prevent further advancement and deterioration of the brain tissue. The purpose of this study was to clarify the cerebral circulatory disturbance during the early phase and whether it can be used to predict patient outcome. A total of 90 patients with TBI underwent a xenon-computed tomography (Xe-CT) and subsequently perfusion CT to evaluate the cerebral circulation on days 1-3. We measured CBF using Xe-CT and mean transit time (MTT: the width between two inflection points [maximum upward slope and maximum downward slope from inflow to outflow of the contrast agent]) using perfusion CT and calculated the cerebral blood volume (CBV) using the AZ-7000W98 computer system. The relationships of the hemodynamic parameters CBF, MTT, and CBV to the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score and the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score were examined. There were no significant differences in CBF, MTT, and CBV among GCS3-4, GCS5-6, and GCS7-8 groups. The patients with a favorable outcome (GR and MD) had significantly higher CBF and lower MTT than those with an unfavorable one (SD, VS, or D). The discriminant analysis of these parameters could predict patient outcome with a probability of 70.6%. During the early phase, CBF reduction and MTT prolongation might influence the clinical outcome of TBI. These parameters are helpful for evaluating the severity of cerebral circulatory disturbance and predicting the outcome of TBI patients.

  15. Cost-effectiveness analysis of an early-initiated, continuous chain of rehabilitation after severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Andelic, Nada; Ye, Jiajia; Tornas, Sveinung; Roe, Cecilie; Lu, Juan; Bautz-Holter, Erik; Moger, Tron; Sigurdardottir, Solrun; Schanke, Anne-Kristine; Aas, Eline

    2014-07-15

    The aim of this study is to estimate the long-term cost-effectiveness of two different rehabilitation trajectories after severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI). A decision tree model compared hospitalization costs, health effects, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER) of a continuous chain versus a broken chain of rehabilitation. The expected costs were estimated by the reimbursement system using diagnosis-related group and based on point estimates of the Disability Rating Scale (DRS); the health effects were measured by means of area under the curve (AUC). The incremental health benefit was estimated as the difference in the AUCs between the chains. Lower values on the DRS scale indicate better health; thus, smaller AUCs were preferred. The modeled population was a cohort of 59 patients with sTBI (30 in continuous chain; 29 in broken chain) with 6-weeks, 1-year, and 5-year post-injury follow-ups. Regarding the DRS estimates, 5-year AUCs were 19.40 (continuous chain) and 23.46 (broken chain). Across 5 years, the continuous chain of rehabilitation had lower costs and better health effects. By replacing the broken chain with the continuous chain, NOK 37.000 could be saved and 4.06 DRS points gained. By means of probabilistic sensitivity analysis, the majority of ICER estimates (67% of the Monte Carlo simulations) indicated that a continuous chain of rehabilitation was less costly and more effective. These findings indicate that the trajectory of continuous rehabilitation represents a dominant strategy in that it reduces costs and improves outcomes after sTBI under reasonable assumptions.

  16. Early Cerebral Circulation Disturbance in Patients Suffering from Severe Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI): A Xenon CT and Perfusion CT Study

    PubMed Central

    HONDA, Mitsuru; ICHIBAYASHI, Ryo; YOKOMURO, Hiroki; YOSHIHARA, Katsunori; MASUDA, Hiroyuki; HAGA, Daisuke; SEIKI, Yoshikatsu; KUDOH, Chiaki; KISHI, Taichi

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is widely known to cause dynamic changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF). Ischemia is a common and deleterious secondary injury following TBI. Detecting early ischemia in TBI patients is important to prevent further advancement and deterioration of the brain tissue. The purpose of this study was to clarify the cerebral circulatory disturbance during the early phase and whether it can be used to predict patient outcome. A total of 90 patients with TBI underwent a xenon-computed tomography (Xe-CT) and subsequently perfusion CT to evaluate the cerebral circulation on days 1–3. We measured CBF using Xe-CT and mean transit time (MTT: the width between two inflection points [maximum upward slope and maximum downward slope from inflow to outflow of the contrast agent]) using perfusion CT and calculated the cerebral blood volume (CBV) using the AZ-7000W98 computer system. The relationships of the hemodynamic parameters CBF, MTT, and CBV to the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score and the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score were examined. There were no significant differences in CBF, MTT, and CBV among GCS3–4, GCS5–6, and GCS7–8 groups. The patients with a favorable outcome (GR and MD) had significantly higher CBF and lower MTT than those with an unfavorable one (SD, VS, or D). The discriminant analysis of these parameters could predict patient outcome with a probability of 70.6%. During the early phase, CBF reduction and MTT prolongation might influence the clinical outcome of TBI. These parameters are helpful for evaluating the severity of cerebral circulatory disturbance and predicting the outcome of TBI patients. PMID:27356957

  17. DELUSIONAL DISORDERS AFTER HEAD INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Sabhesan, S.; Natarajan, M.

    1988-01-01

    SUMMARY Delusional disorders have been fundamental to the behaviour problems seen in patients during the early recovery phase of head injury. One hundred and twenty three patients admitted in the Trauma Ward were followed up and the nature and types of the delusions were studied. Their emergence in relation to cognitive recovery and the significance of other factors, such as pre-traumatic personality, alcohol abuse, severity of injury etc., in the genesis of such delusions are presented. PMID:21927281

  18. [Prх-monitoring based decision-making about decompressive craniectomy in a patient with severe traumatic brain injury. A case report].

    PubMed

    Oshorov, A V; Popugaev, K A; Savin, I A; Gavrilov, A G; Kravchuk, A D; Potapov, A A

    2015-01-01

    The presented case illustrates a new approach to making a decision about decompressive craniectomy in the patient with sever traumatic brain injury and intracranial hypertension. The approach is based on continuous assessment of cerebral autoregulation using Prx-monitoring in addition to monitoring of intracranial pressure and cerebral perfusion pressure. Prx-monitoring enables timely detection of autoregulation failure and provides the opportunity to make a decision about decompressive craniectomy before starting such aggressive methods of intensive care as hypothermia or barbiturate coma.

  19. Simple Strategy to Prevent Severe Head Trauma in Judo —Biomechanical Analysis—

    PubMed Central

    Murayama, Haruo; Hitosugi, Masahito; Motozawa, Yasuki; Ogino, Masahiro; Koyama, Katsuhiro

    2013-01-01

    To determine whether the use of an under-mat has an effect on impact forces to the head in Judo, a Judo expert threw an anthropomorphic test device using the Osoto-gari and Ouchi-gari techniques onto a tatami (judo mat) with and without an under-mat. Head acceleration was measured and the head injury criterion (HIC) values with or without under-mat were compared. The use of an under-mat significantly decreased (p = 0.021) the HIC values from 1174.7 ± 246.7 (without under-mat) to 539.3 ± 43.5 in Ouchi-gari and from 330.0 ± 78.3 (without under-mat) to 156.1 ± 30.4 in Osoto-gari. The use of an under-mat simply reduces impact forces to the head in Judo. Rule changes are not necessary and the enjoyment and health benefits of Judo are maintained. PMID:24067767

  20. Psychosocial Issues Following Severe Head Injury in Adolescence: Individual and Family Perceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergland, Martha A.; Thomas, Kenneth R.

    1991-01-01

    Examined psychosocial functioning and transition to adult status following adolescent closed head injury. Used case study approach to describe changes in functioning following discharge and return to family and school from perspective of injured individual and primary caregiver. Found dependence in many areas of adult functioning, underscoring…

  1. Impact of Glasgow Coma Scale score and pupil parameters on mortality rate and outcome in pediatric and adult severe traumatic brain injury: a retrospective, multicenter cohort study.

    PubMed

    Emami, Pedram; Czorlich, Patrick; Fritzsche, Friederike S; Westphal, Manfred; Rueger, Johannes M; Lefering, Rolf; Hoffmann, Michael

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Prediction of death and functional outcome is essential for determining treatment strategies and allocation of resources for patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). The aim of this study was to evaluate, by using pupillary status and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, if patients with severe TBI who are ≤ 15 years old have a lower mortality rate and better outcome than adults with severe TBI. METHODS A retrospective cohort analysis of patients suffering from severe TBI registered in the Trauma Registry of the German Society for Trauma Surgery between 2002 and 2013 was undertaken. Severe TBI was defined as an Abbreviated Injury Scale of the head (AIShead) score of ≥ 3 and an AIS score for any other part of the body that does not exceed the AIShead score. Only patients with complete data (GCS score, age, and pupil parameters) were included. To assess the impact of GCS score and pupil parameters, the authors also used the recently introduced Eppendorf-Cologne Scale and divided the study population into 2 groups: children (0-15 years old) and adults (16-55 years old). Each patient's outcome was measured at discharge from the trauma center by using the Glasgow Outcome Scale. RESULTS A total of 9959 patients fulfilled the study inclusion criteria; 888 (8.9%) patients were ≤ 15 years old (median 10 years). The overall mortality rate and the mortality rate for patients with a GCS of 3 and bilaterally fixed and dilated pupils (19.9% and 16.3%, respectively) were higher for the adults than for the pediatric patients (85% vs 80.9%, respectively), although cardiopulmonary resuscitation rates were significantly higher in the pediatric patients (5.6% vs 8.8%, respectively). In the multivariate logistic regression analysis, no motor response (OR 3.490, 95% CI 2.240-5.435) and fixed pupils (OR 4.197, 95% CI 3.271-5.386) and bilateral dilated pupils (OR 2.848, 95% CI 2.282-3.556) were associated with a higher mortality rate. Patients ≤ 15 years old had a

  2. The impact-acceleration model of head injury: injury severity predicts motor and cognitive performance after trauma.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, A; Marmarou, A; Czigner, A; Yamamoto, M; Demetriadou, K; Shirotani, T; Marmarou, C; Dunbar, J

    1999-12-01

    This study examines neuropsychological dysfunction after varying severities of the Impact Acceleration Model of diffuse traumatic brain injury. Adult rats (340 g-400 g) were divided into five groups, and exposed to varying degrees of Impact Acceleration Injury (1 m, 2 m, 2.1 m/500 g and second insult). After injury, animals were allowed to recover; acute neurological reflexes, beam walk score, beam balance score, inclined plane score, and Morris Water Maze score were then assessed at multiple time points. Injury of all severities caused significant motor and cognitive deficits. With milder injuries these effects were transient; however, with more severe injuries no recovery in function was seen. The addition of hypoxia and hypotension made a moderate injury worse than a severe injury. The acute neurological reflexes, the beam balance test and the inclined plane test distinguished between the more severely injured groups, but were affected less by mild injury. The beam walk test was sensitive to mild injury, but appeared unable to distinguish between the severe groups. The Morris Water Maze was sensitive for all injury groups, but appeared to adopt a different response profile with secondary insult. This study has for the first time characterized the degree of motor and cognitive deficits in rodents exposed to differing severities of Impact Acceleration Injury. These data confirm that the tests considered, and the Injury Model used, provide a useful system for the consideration of potential therapies which might ameliorate neuropsychological deficits in diffuse brain injury.

  3. Segment characteristics and severity of head-on crashes on two-lane rural highways in Maine.

    PubMed

    Gårder, Per

    2006-07-01

    More than two out of three of all fatal crashes in Maine occur on rural, two-lane collector or arterial roads. Head-on crashes on these roads account for less than 5% of the crashes, but they are responsible for almost half of all fatalities. Data analyzed in this study was provided by Maine Department of Transportation and covers all head-on crashes for 2000-2002 during which period there were 3,136 head-on crashes reported. Out of these, 127 were fatal crashes and 235 produced incapacitating but not fatal injuries. These two categories made up over 75% of the crash cost. A clear majority of head-on crashes on two-lane, rural roads in Maine were caused by drivers making errors or misjudging situations. Illegal/unsafe speed was a factor in 32% of the crashes while driver inattention/distraction was a primary factor in 28%. Fatigue was responsible for around one in 40 crashes and one in 12 fatal crashes. Alcohol or drugs was a factor in one in 12 crashes and one in nine fatal head-on crashes. Less than 8% of fatalities involved someone overtaking another vehicle, and only around 14% involved a driver intentionally crossing the centerline. Two in three fatal head-on crashes occurred on straight segments and 67% of these happened on dry pavement. There is a clear trend towards higher speed limits leading to a higher percentage of crashes becoming fatal or having incapacitating injuries. There is also a clear trend - if one keeps speeds constant and AADT within a certain range - that wider shoulders give higher crash severities. Also, for higher-speed roads, more travel lanes (than two) increase crash severity. In summary, there seems to be two major reasons why people get across the centerline and have head-on collisions: (a) people are going too fast for the roadway conditions; or (b) people are inattentive and get across the centerline more or less without noticing it. The latter category of crashes could probably be reduced if centerline rumble-strips were

  4. Adipofascial radial artery perforator flap interposition to treat post-traumatic radioulnar synostosis in a patient with head injury

    PubMed Central

    Samson, Deepak; Power, Dominic; Tan, Simon

    2015-01-01

    We report this 47-year-old man who presented with polytrauma following a fall from a roof in March 2011. He sustained a head injury and a complex, comminuted forearm fracture. He underwent an open reduction and internal fixation of the fracture at the time of injury, but later developed a rigid type 2 diaphyseal radioulnar synostosis, with loss of forearm rotation. Synostosis excision and a radial artery perforator-based adipofascial interposition flap to prevent recurrence has resulted in a good functional outcome and no recurrence at 2.5 years follow-up. PMID:25725026

  5. Motor, visual and emotional deficits in mice after closed-head mild traumatic brain injury are alleviated by the novel CB2 inverse agonist SMM-189.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Anton; Heldt, Scott A; Presley, Chaela S; Guley, Natalie H; Elberger, Andrea J; Deng, Yunping; D'Surney, Lauren; Rogers, Joshua T; Ferrell, Jessica; Bu, Wei; Del Mar, Nobel; Honig, Marcia G; Gurley, Steven N; Moore, Bob M

    2014-12-31

    We have developed a focal blast model of closed-head mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) in mice. As true for individuals that have experienced mild TBI, mice subjected to 50-60 psi blast show motor, visual and emotional deficits, diffuse axonal injury and microglial activation, but no overt neuron loss. Because microglial activation can worsen brain damage after a concussive event and because microglia can be modulated by their cannabinoid type 2 receptors (CB2), we evaluated the effectiveness of the novel CB2 receptor inverse agonist SMM-189 in altering microglial activation and mitigating deficits after mild TBI. In vitro analysis indicated that SMM-189 converted human microglia from the pro-inflammatory M1 phenotype to the pro-healing M2 phenotype. Studies in mice showed that daily administration of SMM-189 for two weeks beginning shortly after blast greatly reduced the motor, visual, and emotional deficits otherwise evident after 50-60 psi blasts, and prevented brain injury that may contribute to these deficits. Our results suggest that treatment with the CB2 inverse agonist SMM-189 after a mild TBI event can reduce its adverse consequences by beneficially modulating microglial activation. These findings recommend further evaluation of CB2 inverse agonists as a novel therapeutic approach for treating mild TBI.

  6. Traumatic and non-traumatic adrenal emergencies.

    PubMed

    Chernyak, Victoria; Patlas, Michael N; Menias, Christine O; Soto, Jorge A; Kielar, Ania Z; Rozenblit, Alla M; Romano, Luigia; Katz, Douglas S

    2015-12-01

    Multiple traumatic and non-traumatic adrenal emergencies are occasionally encountered during the cross-sectional imaging of emergency department patients. Traumatic adrenal hematomas are markers of severe polytrauma, and can be easily overlooked due to multiple concomitant injuries. Patients with non-traumatic adrenal emergencies usually present to an emergency department with a non-specific clinical picture. The detection and management of adrenal emergencies is based on cross-sectional imaging. Adrenal hemorrhage, adrenal infection, or rupture of adrenal neoplasm require immediate detection to avoid dire consequences. More often however, adrenal emergencies are detected incidentally in patients being investigated for non-specific acute abdominal pain. A high index of suspicion is required for the establishment of timely diagnosis and to avert potentially life-threatening complications. We describe cross-sectional imaging findings in patients with traumatic and non-traumatic adrenal hemorrhage, adrenal infarctions, adrenal infections, and complications of adrenal masses.

  7. Peripheral Inflammatory Markers and Antioxidant Response during the Post-Acute and Chronic Phase after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Licastro, Federico; Hrelia, Silvana; Porcellini, Elisa; Malaguti, Marco; Di Stefano, Cristina; Angeloni, Cristina; Carbone, Ilaria; Simoncini, Laura; Piperno, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a mechanical insult to the brain caused by external forces and associated with inflammation and oxidative stress. The patients may show different profiles of neurological recovery and a combination of oxidative damage and inflammatory processes can affect their courses. It is known that an overexpression of cytokines can be seen in peripheral blood in the early hours/days after the injury, but little is known about the weeks and months encompassing the post-acute and chronic phases. In addition, no information is available about the antioxidant responses mediated by the major enzymes that regulate reactive oxygen species levels: superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidases, and GSH-related enzymes. This study investigates the 6-month trends of inflammatory markers and antioxidant responses in 22 severe TBI patients with prolonged disorders of consciousness, consecutively recruited in a dedicated neurorehabilitation facility. Patients with a high degree of neurological impairment often show an uncertain outcome. In addition, the profiles of plasma activities were related to the neurological recovery after 12 months. Venous peripheral blood samples were taken blindly as soon as clinical signs and laboratory markers confirmed the absence of infections, 3 and 6 months later. The clinical and neuropsychological assessment continued up to 12 months. Nineteen patients completed the follow-up. In the chronic phase, persistent high plasma levels of cytokines can interfere with cognitive functioning and higher post-acute levels of cytokines [interferon (IFN)-γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL1b, IL6] are associated with poorer cognitive recoveries 12 months later. Moreover, higher IFN-γ, higher TNF-α, and lower glutathione peroxidase activity are associated with greater disability. The results add evidence of persistent inflammatory response, provide information about long-term imbalance of antioxidant activity, and suggest that

  8. Peripheral Inflammatory Markers and Antioxidant Response during the Post-Acute and Chronic Phase after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Licastro, Federico; Hrelia, Silvana; Porcellini, Elisa; Malaguti, Marco; Di Stefano, Cristina; Angeloni, Cristina; Carbone, Ilaria; Simoncini, Laura; Piperno, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a mechanical insult to the brain caused by external forces and associated with inflammation and oxidative stress. The patients may show different profiles of neurological recovery and a combination of oxidative damage and inflammatory processes can affect their courses. It is known that an overexpression of cytokines can be seen in peripheral blood in the early hours/days after the injury, but little is known about the weeks and months encompassing the post-acute and chronic phases. In addition, no information is available about the antioxidant responses mediated by the major enzymes that regulate reactive oxygen species levels: superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidases, and GSH-related enzymes. This study investigates the 6-month trends of inflammatory markers and antioxidant responses in 22 severe TBI patients with prolonged disorders of consciousness, consecutively recruited in a dedicated neurorehabilitation facility. Patients with a high degree of neurological impairment often show an uncertain outcome. In addition, the profiles of plasma activities were related to the neurological recovery after 12 months. Venous peripheral blood samples were taken blindly as soon as clinical signs and laboratory markers confirmed the absence of infections, 3 and 6 months later. The clinical and neuropsychological assessment continued up to 12 months. Nineteen patients completed the follow-up. In the chronic phase, persistent high plasma levels of cytokines can interfere with cognitive functioning and higher post-acute levels of cytokines [interferon (IFN)-γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL1b, IL6] are associated with poorer cognitive recoveries 12 months later. Moreover, higher IFN-γ, higher TNF-α, and lower glutathione peroxidase activity are associated with greater disability. The results add evidence of persistent inflammatory response, provide information about long-term imbalance of antioxidant activity, and suggest that

  9. Guillain-Barré syndrome following severe head trauma and spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, F; Sevy, A; Moyse, E; Roche, P-H

    2013-02-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is an acute-onset inflammatory polyradiculoneuropathy usually triggered by an infectious disease. In some cases, GBS can occur without any preceding infectious episode, like after vaccination, epidural anaesthesia or surgery. A 73 years old woman had head and spine trauma. Body-TDM showed bilateral temporal and right frontal haematomas and fracture of the first lumbar vertebrae. Sextant and kyphoplasty were performed. She presented 14 days after surgery tetraparesis, swallowing difficulties and bilateral facial palsy. Electromyography was consistent with demyelinating neuropathy. Cerebrospinal fluid examination found albumino-cytological dissociation. Viral and bacterial serology and antiganglioside antibodies were negative. She was treated with intravenous immunoglobulins. Four months after discharge she had fully recovered except left peripheral facial palsy. GBS can rarely be triggered by head trauma or spine surgery. Physician must keep in mind this diagnosis whenever their patients present acute-onset neurological worsening in such context.

  10. Perception of active head rotation in patients with severe left unilateral spatial neglect.

    PubMed

    Kaibe, Shinobu; Okita, Manabu; Kaba, Hideto

    2017-02-09

    Unilateral spatial neglect is a common neurological syndrome following predominantly right hemisphere damage, and is characterized by a failure to perceive and report stimuli in the contralesional side of space. To test the reference shift hypothesis that contralesional spatial neglect in right-brain-damaged patients is attributed to a rightward deviation of the egocentric reference frame, we measured the final angular position to which controls and left-side neglect patients actively turned their head toward the left in response to a verbal instruction given from each of three locations-right, left, and front-in two conditions, with and without visual feedback. When neglect patients were asked to "look straight ahead", they deviated about 30° toward the right in the eyes-open condition. However, the rightward deviation was markedly reduced in the eyes-closed condition. Regardless of visual feedback, there was no significant difference between controls and neglect patients in the final angular position of active head rotation when the verbal instruction came from the subject's left or front side; however, the final angular position was significantly smaller in the neglect patients than in the controls when the verbal instruction was given from the right. These results support the contention that cervico-vestibular stimulation during active head rotation restores spatial remapping and sensori-motor correlations and so improves neglect without affecting the position of the egocentric reference; however, once left-side neglect patients respond to verbal instruction from the right side, they are unable to disengage attention from the hemispace, and the performance of head rotation is disturbed.

  11. Hypopituitarism after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Rodriguez, Eva; Bernabeu, Ignacio; Castro, Ana I; Casanueva, Felipe F

    2015-03-01

    The prevalence of hypopituitarism after traumatic brain (TBI) injury is widely variable in the literature; a meta-analysis determined a pooled prevalence of anterior hypopituitarism of 27.5%. Growth hormone deficiency is the most prevalent hormone insufficiency after TBI; however, the prevalence of each type of pituitary deficiency is influenced by the assays used for diagnosis, severity of head trauma, and time of evaluation. Recent studies have demonstrated improvement in cognitive function and cognitive quality of life with substitution therapy in GH-deficient patients after TBI.

  12. Head Injury Prevention Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fax: 847-378-0600 www.NeurosurgeryToday.org A traumatic brain injury (TBI) is defined as a blow or jolt to the head or a penetrating head injury that disrupts the normal function of the brain. TBI can result when the head suddenly and ...

  13. Preventing head injuries in children

    MedlinePlus

    Concussion - preventing in children; Traumatic brain injury - preventing in children; TBI - children; Safety - preventing head injury ... not ride on these vehicles. After having a concussion or mild head injury , your child may need ...

  14. Laboratory Validation of Two Wearable Sensor Systems for Measuring Head Impact Severity in Football Players.

    PubMed

    Siegmund, Gunter P; Guskiewicz, Kevin M; Marshall, Stephen W; DeMarco, Alyssa L; Bonin, Stephanie J

    2016-04-01

    Wearable sensors can measure head impact frequency and magnitude in football players. Our goal was to quantify the impact detection rate and validity of the direction and peak kinematics of two wearable sensors: a helmet system (HITS) and a mouthguard system (X2). Using a linear impactor, modified Hybrid-III headform and one helmet model, we conducted 16 impacts for each system at 12 helmet sites and 5 speeds (3.6-11.2 m/s) (N = 896 tests). Peak linear and angular accelerations (PLA, PAA), head injury criteria (HIC) and impact directions from each device were compared to reference sensors in the headform. Both sensors detected ~96% of impacts. Median angular errors for impact directions were 34° for HITS and 16° for X2. PLA, PAA and HIC were simultaneously valid at 2 sites for HITS (side, oblique) and one site for X2 (side). At least one kinematic parameter was valid at 2 and 7 other sites for HITS and X2 respectively. Median relative errors for PLA were 7% for HITS and -7% for X2. Although sensor validity may differ for other helmets and headforms, our analyses show that data generated by these two sensors need careful interpretation.

  15. A Novel Closed-Head Model of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Caused by Primary Overpressure Blast to the Cranium Produces Sustained Emotional Deficits in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Heldt, Scott A.; Elberger, Andrea J.; Deng, Yunping; Guley, Natalie H.; Del Mar, Nobel; Rogers, Joshua; Choi, Gy Won; Ferrell, Jessica; Rex, Tonia S.; Honig, Marcia G.; Reiner, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Emotional disorders are a common outcome from mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) in humans, but their pathophysiological basis is poorly understood. We have developed a mouse model of closed-head blast injury using an air pressure wave delivered to a small area on one side of the cranium, to create mild TBI. We found that 20-psi blasts in 3-month-old C57BL/6 male mice yielded no obvious behavioral or histological evidence of brain injury, while 25–40 psi blasts produced transient anxiety in an open field arena but little histological evidence of brain damage. By contrast, 50–60 psi blasts resulted in anxiety-like behavior in an open field arena that became more evident with time after blast. In additional behavioral tests conducted 2–8 weeks after blast, 50–60 psi mice also demonstrated increased acoustic startle, perseverance of learned fear, and enhanced contextual fear, as well as depression-like behavior and diminished prepulse inhibition. We found no evident cerebral pathology, but did observe scattered axonal degeneration in brain sections from 50 to 60 psi mice 3–8 weeks after blast. Thus, the TBI caused by single 50–60 psi blasts in mice exhibits the minimal neuronal loss coupled to “diffuse” axonal injury characteristic of human mild TBI. A reduction in the abundance of a subpopulation of excitatory projection neurons in basolateral amygdala enriched in Thy1 was, however, observed. The reported link of this neuronal population to fear suppression suggests their damage by mild TBI may contribute to the heightened anxiety and fearfulness observed after blast in our mice. Our overpressure air blast model of concussion in mice will enable further studies of the mechanisms underlying the diverse emotional deficits seen after mild TBI. PMID:24478749

  16. Investigation on interaction of DNA and several cationic surfactants with different head groups by spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis and viscosity technologies.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qing; Zhang, Zhaohong; Song, Youtao; Liu, Shuo; Gao, Wei; Qiao, Heng; Guo, Lili; Wang, Jun

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the interaction between DNA and several cationic surfactants with different head groups such as ethyl hexadecyl dimethyl ammonium bromide (EHDAB), hexadecyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride (HDBAC), and cetyl pyridinium bromide (CPB) were investigated by UV-vis absorption, fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis, and viscosity technologies. The results show that these cationic surfactants can interact with DNA and major binding modes are electrostatic and hydrophobic. Also, CPB and HDBAC molecules interact with DNA by partial intercalation, and CPB has slightly stronger intercalation than HDBAC, while EHDAB interacts with DNA by non-intercalation. The different head groups of the surfactant molecules can influence the interaction strength. CPB has the stronger interaction with DNA than the others. Moreover, surfactant concentration, the ratio of DNA and fluorescence probe, ionic strength can influence the interaction. The surfactants may interact with DNA by the competition reactions with BR for DNA-BR. The increase of ionic strength may favor the surface binding between DNA and surfactants to some extent. This work provides deep mechanistic insight on the toxicity of cationic surfactants with different head groups to DNA molecules.

  17. Biomechanical investigation of head impacts in football

    PubMed Central

    Withnall, C; Shewchenko, N; Gittens, R; Dvorak, J

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: This study sought to measure the head accelerations induced from upper extremity to head and head to head impact during the game of football and relate this to the risk of mild traumatic brain injury using the Head Impact Power (HIP) index. Furthermore, measurement of upper neck forces and torques will indicate the potential for serious neck injury. More stringent rules or punitive sanctions may be warranted for intentional impact by the upper extremity or head during game play. Methods: Game video of 62 cases of head impact (38% caused by the upper extremity and 30% by the head of the opposing player) was provided by F-MARC. Video analysis revealed the typical impact configurations and representative impact speeds. Upper extremity impacts of elbow strike and lateral hand strike were re-enacted in the laboratory by five volunteer football players striking an instrumented Hybrid III pedestrian model crash test manikin. Head to head impacts were re-enacted using two instrumented test manikins. Results: Elbow to head impacts (1.7–4.6 m/s) and lateral hand strikes (5.2–9.3 m/s) resulted in low risk of concussion (<5%) and severe neck injury (<5%). Head to head impacts (1.5–3.0 m/s) resulted in high concussion risk (up to 67%) but low risk of severe neck injury (<5%). Conclusion: The laboratory simulations suggest little risk of concussion based on head accelerations and maximum HIP. There is no biomechanical justification for harsher penalties in this regard. However, deliberate use of the head to impact another player's head poses a high risk of concussion, and justifies a harsher position by regulatory bodies. In either case the risk of serious neck injury is very low. PMID:16046356

  18. Dual-wavelength laser speckle imaging for monitoring brain metabolic and hemodynamic response to closed head traumatic brain injury in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kofman, Itamar; Abookasis, David

    2015-10-01

    The measurement of dynamic changes in brain hemodynamic and metabolism events following head trauma could be valuable for injury prognosis and for planning of optimal medical treatment. Specifically, variations in blood flow and oxygenation levels serve as important biomarkers of numerous pathophysiological processes. We employed the dual-wavelength laser speckle imaging (DW-LSI) technique for simultaneous monitoring of changes in brain hemodynamics and cerebral blood flow (CBF) at early stages of head trauma in a mouse model of intact head injury (n=10). For induction of head injury, we used a weight-drop device involving a metal mass (˜50 g) striking the mouse's head in a regulated manner from a height of ˜90 cm. In comparison to baseline measurements, noticeable dynamic variations were revealed immediately and up to 1 h postinjury, which indicate the severity of brain damage and highlight the ability of the DW-LSI arrangement to track brain pathophysiology induced by injury. To validate the monitoring of CBF by DW-LSI, measurements with laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) were also performed (n=5), which confirmed reduction in CBF following injury. A secondary focus of the study was to investigate the effectiveness of hypertonic saline as a neuroprotective agent, inhibiting the development of complications after brain injury in a subgroup of injured mice (n=5), further demonstrating the ability of DW-LSI to monitor the effects upon brain dynamics of drug treatment. Overall, our findings further support the use of DW-LSI as a noninvasive, cost-effective tool to assess changes in hemodynamics under a variety of pathological conditions, suggesting its potential contribution to the biomedical field. To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first to make use of the DW-LSI modality in a small animal model to (1) investigate brain function during the critical first hour of closed head injury trauma, (2) correlate between injury parameters of LDF measurements, and (3

  19. Life after Adolescent and Adult Moderate and Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: Self-Reported Executive, Emotional, and Behavioural Function 2–5 Years after Injury

    PubMed Central

    Finnanger, Torun Gangaune; Olsen, Alexander; Skandsen, Toril; Lydersen, Stian; Vik, Anne; Evensen, Kari Anne I.; Catroppa, Cathy; Håberg, Asta K.; Andersson, Stein; Indredavik, Marit S.

    2015-01-01

    Survivors of moderate-severe Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) are at risk for long-term cognitive, emotional, and behavioural problems. This prospective cohort study investigated self-reported executive, emotional, and behavioural problems in the late chronic phase of moderate and severe TBI, if demographic characteristics (i.e., age, years of education), injury characteristics (Glasgow Coma Scale score, MRI findings such as traumatic axonal injury (TAI), or duration of posttraumatic amnesia), symptoms of depression, or neuropsychological variables in the first year after injury predicted long-term self-reported function. Self-reported executive, emotional, and behavioural functioning were assessed among individuals with moderate and severe TBI (N = 67, age range 15–65 years at time of injury) 2–5 years after TBI, compared to a healthy matched control group (N = 72). Results revealed significantly more attentional, emotional regulation, and psychological difficulties in the TBI group than controls. Demographic and early clinical variables were associated with poorer cognitive and emotional outcome. Fewer years of education and depressive symptoms predicted greater executive dysfunction. Younger age at injury predicted more aggressive and rule-breaking behaviour. TAI and depressive symptoms predicted Internalizing problems and greater executive dysfunction. In conclusion, age, education, TAI, and depression appear to elevate risk for poor long-term outcome, emphasising the need for long-term follow-up of patients presenting with risk factors. PMID:26549936

  20. Automatic Prompting and Positive Attention to Reduce Tongue Protrusion and Head Tilting by Two Adults with Severe to Profound Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Didden, Robert; Pichierri, Sabrina

    2010-01-01

    This study assessed a simple behavioral strategy for reducing stereotypic tongue protrusion and forward head tilting displayed by a woman and a man with severe to profound intellectual disabilities. The strategy involved (a) auditory prompting (i.e., verbal encouragements to keep the tongue in the mouth or the head upright) delivered automatically…

  1. Tau elevations in the brain extracellular space correlate with reduced amyloid-β levels and predict adverse clinical outcomes after severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Magnoni, Sandra; Esparza, Thomas J; Conte, Valeria; Carbonara, Marco; Carrabba, Giorgio; Holtzman, David M; Zipfel, Greg J; Stocchetti, Nino; Brody, David L

    2012-04-01

    Axonal injury is believed to be a major determinant of adverse outcomes following traumatic brain injury. However, it has been difficult to assess acutely the severity of axonal injury in human traumatic brain injury patients. We hypothesized that microdialysis-based measurements of the brain extracellular fluid levels of tau and neurofilament light chain, two low molecular weight axonal proteins, could be helpful in this regard. To test this hypothesis, 100 kDa cut-off microdialysis catheters were placed in 16 patients with severe traumatic brain injury at two neurological/neurosurgical intensive care units. Tau levels in the microdialysis samples were highest early and fell over time in all patients. Initial tau levels were >3-fold higher in patients with microdialysis catheters placed in pericontusional regions than in patients in whom catheters were placed in normal-appearing right frontal lobe tissue (P = 0.005). Tau levels and neurofilament light-chain levels were positively correlated (r = 0.6, P = 0.013). Neurofilament light-chain levels were also higher in patients with pericontusional catheters (P = 0.04). Interestingly, initial tau levels were inversely correlated with initial amyloid-β levels measured in the same samples (r = -0.87, P = 0.000023). This could be due to reduced synaptic activity in areas with substantial axonal injury, as amyloid-β release is closely coupled with synaptic activity. Importantly, high initial tau levels correlated with worse clinical outcomes, as assessed using the Glasgow Outcome Scale 6 months after injury (r = -0.6, P = 0.018). Taken together, our data add support for the hypothesis that axonal injury may be related to long-term impairments following traumatic brain injury. Microdialysis-based measurement of tau levels in the brain extracellular space may be a useful way to assess the severity of axonal injury acutely in the intensive care unit. Further studies with larger numbers of

  2. Influence of pain severity on the quality of life in patients with head and neck cancer before antineoplastic therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the severity of pain and its impact on the quality of life (QoL) in untreated patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods A study group of 127 patients with HNSCC were interviewed before antineoplastic treatment. The severity of pain was measured using the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) questionnaire, and the QoL was assessed with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core-30 (EORTC QLQ-C30) and the head and neck module (QLQ-H&N35). Results The mean age of the patients was 57.9 years, and there was a predominance of men (87.4%). The most frequent site of the primary tumor was the oral cavity (70.6%), and the majority of the patients had advanced cancers (stages III and IV). QoL in early stage of cancer obtained better scores. Conversely, the patients with advanced stage cancer scored significantly higher on the symptom scales regarding fatigue, pain, appetite loss and financial difficulties, indicating greater difficulties. Regard to the severity of pain, patients with moderate-severe pain revealed a significantly worse score than patients without pain. Conclusions The severity of pain is statistically related to the advanced stages of cancer and directly affects the QoL. An assessment of the quality of life and symptoms before therapy can direct attention to the most important symptoms, and appropriate interventions can then be directed toward improving QoL outcomes and the response to treatment. PMID:24460780

  3. “8 Plate”: An Alternative Device to Fix Highly Recurrent Traumatic Anterior Gleno-Humeral Instability in Patients with Severe Impairment of the Anterior Capsule

    PubMed Central

    Tudisco, C; Bisicchia, S; Savarese, E; Ippolito, E

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is still debate about the best treatment option for highly recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation in patients with severe impairment of the anterior capsule and/or recurrence after either arthroscopic or open capsulorrhaphy. Materials and Methods: The clinical and radiological findings of 7 patients treated with an open capsulorrhaphy stabilized with an “8 plate” for a highly recurrent traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation with severe impairment of the anterior capsule and a large Bankart lesion were retrospectively reviewed. Follow-up evaluation included VAS for pain, Constant-Murley, Simple Shoulder Test, ASES, UCLA, Quick DASH, Rowe, Walsch-Duplay scores, as well as X-rays of the operated shoulder. Results: At follow-up none of the patients reported subsequent dislocations. Range of motion of the shoulder was complete in all cases, but one. Results of the functional scoring systems were satisfactory. X-rays showed no osteolysis and good position of the plate. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature about an open capsular tensioning and Bankart lesion repair performed with an “8 plate”. We believe that this is a reliable and effective procedure to address traumatic anterior re-dislocation of the gleno-humeral joint when the capsule is extensively torn and frayed or in revision cases. Moreover the “8 plate” is ideal to be applied in such a narrow space on the slant surface of the scapular neck close to the glenoid rim. PMID:25621080

  4. Evaluation of the Effect of Glibenclamide in Patients With Diffuse Axonal Injury Due to Moderate to Severe Head Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Zafardoost, Peyman; Ghasemi, Amir Abbas; Salehpour, Firooz; Piroti, Chia; Ziaeii, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    Background Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major health problem worldwide. Secondary injuries after TBI, including diffuse axonal injury (DAI) often occur, and proper treatments are needed in this regard. It has been shown that glibenclamide could reduce secondary brain damage after experimental TBI and improve outcomes. Objectives We aim to evaluate the role of glibenclamide on the short-term outcome of patients with DAI due to moderate to severe TBI. Patients and Methods In this controlled randomized clinical trial, 40 patients with moderate to severe TBI were assigned to glibenclamide (n = 20) and control (n = 20) groups. Six hours after admission the intervention group received 1.25 mg glibenclamide every 12 hours. The Glasgow coma scale (GCS) was administered at admission, in the first 24 and 48 hours, at one week post-trauma and at discharge. The Glasgow outcome scale (GOS) was also administered at discharge. All results were evaluated and compared between groups. Results Patients treated with glibenclamide compared to the control group had a significantly better GCS score one week post-trauma (P = 0.003) and at discharge (P = 0.004), as well as a better GOS score at discharge (P = 0.001). The glibenclamide group also had a shorter length of hospital stay compared to the control group (P = 0.03). In the control group, two patients (10%) died during the first week post-trauma, but there was no mortality in the glibenclamide group (P = 0.48). Conclusions Treatment with glibenclamide in patients with DAI due to moderate to severe TBI significantly improves short-term outcomes. PMID:28184360

  5. Plasma concentrations of arginine and related amino acids following traumatic brain injury: Proline as a promising biomarker of brain damage severity.

    PubMed

    Louin, G; Neveux, N; Cynober, L; Plotkine, M; Marchand-Leroux, C; Jafarian-Tehrani, M

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this study was to find a plasma biomarker, in relation with nitric oxide (NO), as a sign of brain damage severity following traumatic brain injury (TBI). We first investigated the post-traumatic evolution of the plasma concentrations of NO via the level of NO end-products metabolites (nitrite plus nitrate, NO(x)), that of l-arginine (Arg) and amino acids involved in its metabolism as well as the time course of neurological score in a rat model of lateral fluid percussion brain injury. First, the level of NO(x) was increased in plasma at 24 and 48 h post-TBI with a marked increase at 72 h. In contrast, this elevation was neither accompanied by a modification of plasma concentrations of Arg, nor of amino acids involved in NO and Arg metabolism, l-ornithine (Orn), l-glutamate (Glu), and l-glutamine (Gln). Second, TBI induced a fall of plasma l-proline (Pro) concentrations. The time course of post-TBI neurological deficit showed also a decrease of neurological score at 24, 48, and 72 h. Furthermore, there is a weak negative correlation between the neurological score and the plasma level of NO(x) (r=-0.305; P<0.05), while a marked positive correlation has been found between the neurological score and the plasma level of Pro (r=0.563; P<0.001). In conclusion, the plasma concentrations of Pro could be a promising marker of post-traumatic neurological deficit.

  6. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Yi, Juneyoung; Padalino, David J; Chin, Lawrence S; Montenegro, Philip; Cantu, Robert C

    2013-01-01

    Sports-related concussion has gained increased prominence, in part due to media coverage of several well-known athletes who have died from consequences of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). CTE was first described by Martland in 1928 as a syndrome seen in boxers who had experienced significant head trauma from repeated blows. The classic symptoms of impaired cognition, mood, behavior, and motor skills also have been reported in professional football players, and in 2005, the histopathological findings of CTE were first reported in a former National Football League (NFL) player. These finding were similar to Alzheimer's disease in some ways but differed in critical areas such as a predominance of tau protein deposition over amyloid. The pathophysiology is still unknown but involves a history of repeated concussive and subconcussive blows and then a lag period before CTE symptoms become evident. The involvement of excitotoxic amino acids and abnormal microglial activation remain speculative. Early identification and prevention of this disease by reducing repeated blows to the head has become a critical focus of current research.

  7. Hypopharyngeal Dose Is Associated With Severe Late Toxicity in Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: An RTOG Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Machtay, Mitchell; Moughan, Jennifer; Farach, Andrew; Galvin, James; Garden, Adam S.; Weber, Randal S.; Cooper, Jay S.; Forastiere, Arlene; Ang, K. Kian

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) increases local tumor control but at the expense of increased toxicity. We recently showed that several clinical/pretreatment factors were associated with the occurrence of severe late toxicity. This study evaluated the potential relationship between radiation dose delivered to the pharyngeal wall and toxicity. Methods and Materials: This was an analysis of long-term survivors from 3 previously reported Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials of CCRT for locally advanced SCCHN (RTOG trials 91-11, 97-03, and 99-14). Severe late toxicity was defined in this secondary analysis as chronic grade 3-4 pharyngeal/laryngeal toxicity and/or requirement for a feeding tube {>=}2 years after registration and/or potential treatment-related death (eg, pneumonia) within 3 years. Radiation dosimetry (2-dimensional) analysis was performed centrally at RTOG headquarters to estimate doses to 4 regions of interest along the pharyngeal wall (superior oropharynx, inferior oropharynx, superior hypopharynx, and inferior hypopharynx). Case-control analysis was performed with a multivariate logistic regression model that included pretreatment and treatment potential factors. Results: A total of 154 patients were evaluable for this analysis, 71 cases (patients with severe late toxicities) and 83 controls; thus, 46% of evaluable patients had a severe late toxicity. On multivariate analysis, significant variables correlated with the development of severe late toxicity, including older age (odds ratio, 1.062 per year; P=.0021) and radiation dose received by the inferior hypopharynx (odds ratio, 1.023 per Gy; P=.016). The subgroup of patients receiving {<=}60 Gy to the inferior hypopharynx had a 40% rate of severe late toxicity compared with 56% for patients receiving >60 Gy. Oropharyngeal dose was not associated with this outcome. Conclusions: Severe late toxicity following CCRT is

  8. [How to quantify the severity of brain injury during intensive care after adult head trauma].

    PubMed

    Stocchetti, N; Canavesi, K; Longhi, L; Magnoni, S; Protti, A; Pagan, F; Colombo, A

    2003-04-01

    Adequate early assessment of brain damage is essential. Location, extension and severity of structural damage affect brain function and ultimately determine the outcome. The extent of functional impairment, and the morphology of intracranial lesions, require specific treatment, often a combination of medical and surgical interventions. Brain damage usually evolves over time, and repeated assessments are necessary. Clinical evaluation is often biased by concomitant sedation and/or anesthesia, but remains necessary. A revision of the literature is presented. Brain damage is assessed combining clinical and instrumental data. Clinical examination is performed assessing the 3 components of the Glasgow Coma Scale. Spontaneous or stimulated (pain stimulus) eye opening, verbal and motor responses are observed after hemodynamic and respiratory stabilisation. Unfortunately a significant proportion of patients can not be properly examined for several reasons: eye opening can be altered by palpebral and facial injuries, verbal response can be impaired by maxillo-facial injuries or by endotracheal intubation, and motor response remains the most consistent parameter. Sedation, analgesia and myorelaxants, however, can profoundly diminish or abolish the motor response to maximal stimulation, so that examination should be performed after clearance of drugs. Often alcohol or other substances can further impair the neurological performances. Pupils diameter and reactivity to light should be observed, excluding pharmacologic effects (as dilation due to catecholamines) and direct ocular or orbital damage. The CT scan is necessary for disclosing surgical masses and for identifying the extent of diffuse damage and the location of focal lesions. These data should be combined with additional functional exploration, as provided by cerebral extraction of oxygen and electrophysiologic data. Early estimation of cerebral damage is complex and prone to mistakes. Accurate, repeated evaluations

  9. A five year prospective investigation of anterior pituitary function after traumatic brain injury: is hypopituitarism long-term after head trauma associated with autoimmunity?

    PubMed

    Tanriverdi, Fatih; De Bellis, Annamaria; Ulutabanca, Halil; Bizzarro, Antonio; Sinisi, Antonio A; Bellastella, Giuseppe; Amoresano Paglionico, Vanda; Dalla Mora, Liliana; Selcuklu, Ahmed; Unluhizarci, Kursad; Casanueva, Felipe F; Kelestimur, Fahrettin

    2013-08-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been recently recognized as a common cause of pituitary dysfunction. However, there are not sufficient numbers of prospective studies to understand the natural history of TBI induced hypopituitarism. The aim was to report the results of five years' prospective follow-up of anterior pituitary function in patients with mild, moderate and severe TBI. Moreover, we have prospectively investigated the associations between TBI induced hypopituitarism and presence of anti-hypothalamus antibodies (AHA) and anti-pituitary antibodies (APA). Twenty five patients (20 men, five women) were included who were prospectively evaluated 12 months and five years after TBI, and 17 of them also had a third-year evaluation. Growth hormone (GH) deficiency is the most common pituitary hormone deficit at one, three, and five years after TBI. Although most of the pituitary hormone deficiencies improve over time, there were substantial percentages of pituitary hormone deficiencies at the fifth year (28% GH, 4% adrenocorticotropic hormone [ACTH], and 4% gonadotropin deficiencies). Pituitary dysfunction was significantly higher in strongly AHA- and APA-positive (titers ≥1/16) patients at the fifth year. In patients with mild and moderate TBI, ACTH and GH deficiencies may improve over time in a considerable number of patients but, although rarely, may also worsen over the five-year period. However in severe TBI, ACTH and GH status of the patients at the first year evaluation persisted at the fifth year. Therefore, screening pituitary function after TBI for five years is important, especially in patients with mild TBI. Moreover, close strong associations between the presence of high titers of APA and/or AHA and hypopituitarism at the fifth year were shown for the first time.

  10. To determine the effect of metoclopramide on gastric emptying in severe head injuries: a prospective, randomized, controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Marino, L V; Kiratu, E M; French, S; Nathoo, N

    2003-02-01

    To determine the effect of 8-hourly administration of 10 mg intravenous metoclopramide, over a 48-h period on gastric emptying in severe head injury (SHI), 22 patients were prospectively randomized (Glasgow Coma Score of 3-8) to receive 2 ml of intravenous metoclopramide or 2 ml of 5% saline 8-hourly for 48 h. Baseline and serial blood paracetamol absorption assays were performed at time (t) = 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 min on day 0 and day 2. The area under the curve between the day 0 and day 2 was used to measure the degree of gastric emptying. In SHI, sequential doses of metoclopramide did not appear to improve gastric motility within subject comparisons (p = 0.65) and between subject comparisons (placebo p = 0.4 and drug p = 0.12). Metoclopramide has no significant prokinetic effect on gastric emptying in SHI patients when given in the early postinjury period.

  11. Traumatic-event headaches

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Background Chronic headaches from head trauma and whiplash injury are well-known and common, but chronic headaches from other sorts of physical traumas are not recognized. Methods Specific information was obtained from the medical records of 15 consecutive patients with chronic headaches related to physically injurious traumatic events that did not include either head trauma or whiplash injury. The events and the physical injuries produced by them were noted. The headaches' development, characteristics, duration, frequency, and accompaniments were recorded, as were the patients' use of pain-alleviative drugs. From this latter information, the headaches were classified by the diagnostic criteria of the International Headache Society as though they were naturally-occurring headaches. The presence of other post-traumatic symptoms and litigation were also recorded. Results The intervals between the events and the onset of the headaches resembled those between head traumas or whiplash injuries and their subsequent headaches. The headaches themselves were, as a group, similar to those after head trauma and whiplash injury. Thirteen of the patients had chronic tension-type headache, two had migraine. The sustained bodily injuries were trivial or unidentifiable in nine patients. Fabrication of symptoms for financial remuneration was not evident in these patients of whom seven were not even seeking payments of any kind. Conclusions This study suggests that these hitherto unrecognized post-traumatic headaches constitute a class of headaches characterized by a relation to traumatic events affecting the body but not including head or whiplash traumas. The bodily injuries per se can be discounted as the cause of the headaches. So can fabrication of symptoms for financial remuneration. Altered mental states, not systematically evaluated here, were a possible cause of the headaches. The overall resemblance of these headaches to the headaches after head or whiplash traumas implies

  12. Bench-to-Bedside and Bedside Back to the Bench; Seeking a Better Understanding of the Acute Pathophysiological Process in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Agoston, Denes V.

    2015-01-01

    Despite substantial investments, traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains one of the major disorders that lack specific pharmacotherapy. To a substantial degree, this situation is due to lack of understanding of the pathophysiological process of the disease. Experimental TBI research offers controlled, rapid, and cost-effective means to identify the pathophysiology but translating experimental findings into clinical practice can be further improved by using the same or similar outcome measures and clinically relevant time points. The pathophysiology during the acute phase of severe TBI is especially poorly understood. In this Mini review, I discuss some of the incongruences between current clinical practices and needs versus information provided by experimental TBI research as well as the benefits of designing animal experiments with translation into clinical practice in mind. PMID:25852631

  13. Cerebral Perfusion Pressure Targets Individualized to Pressure-Reactivity Index in Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Needham, Edward; McFadyen, Charles; Newcombe, Virginia; Synnot, Anneliese J; Czosnyka, Marek; Menon, David

    2017-03-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) frequently triggers a disruption of cerebral autoregulation. The cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) at which autoregulation is optimal ("CPPopt") varies between individuals, and can be calculated based on fluctuations between arterial blood pressure and intracranial pressure. This review assesses the effect of individualizing CPP targets to pressure reactivity index (a measure of autoregulation) in patients with TBI. Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE®, Embase, and Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature were searched in March 2015 for studies assessing the effect of targeting CPPopt in TBI. We included all studies that assessed the impact of targeting CPPopt on outcomes including mortality, neurological outcome, and physiological changes. Risk of bias was assessed using the RTI Item Bank and evidence quality was considered using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) criteria. Eight cohort studies (based on six distinct data sets) assessing the association between CPPopt and mortality, Glasgow Outcome Scale and physiological measures in TBI were included. The quality of evidence was deemed very low based on the GRADE criteria. Although the data suggest an association between variation from CPPopt and poor clinical outcome at 6 months, the quality of evidence prevents firm conclusions, particularly regarding causality, from being drawn. Available data suggest that targeting CPPopt might represent a technique to improve outcomes following TBI, but currently there is insufficient high-quality data to support a recommendation for use in clinical practice. Further prospective, randomized controlled studies should be undertaken to clarify its role in the acute management of TBI.

  14. The Head Injury Retrieval Trial (HIRT): a single-centre randomised controlled trial of physician prehospital management of severe blunt head injury compared with management by paramedics only

    PubMed Central

    Garner, Alan A; Mann, Kristy P; Fearnside, Michael; Poynter, Elwyn; Gebski, Val

    2015-01-01

    Background Advanced prehospital interventions for severe brain injury remains controversial. No previous randomised trial has been conducted to evaluate additional physician intervention compared with paramedic only care. Methods Participants in this prospective, randomised controlled trial were adult patients with blunt trauma with either a scene GCS score <9 (original definition), or GCS<13 and an Abbreviated Injury Scale score for the head region ≥3 (modified definition). Patients were randomised to either standard ground paramedic treatment or standard treatment plus a physician arriving by helicopter. Patients were evaluated by 30-day mortality and 6-month Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) scores. Due to high non-compliance rates, both intention-to-treat and as-treated analyses were preplanned. Results 375 patients met the original definition, of which 197 was allocated to physician care. Differences in the 6-month GOS scores were not significant on intention-to-treat analysis (OR 1.11, 95% CI 0.74 to 1.66, p=0.62) nor was the 30-day mortality (OR 0.91, 95% CI 0.60 to 1.38, p=0.66). As-treated analysis showed a 16% reduction in 30-day mortality in those receiving additional physician care; 60/195 (29%) versus 81/180 (45%), p<0.01, Number needed to treat =6. 338 patients met the modified definition, of which 182 were allocated to physician care. The 6-month GOS scores were not significantly different on intention-to-treat analysis (OR 1.14, 95% CI 0.73 to 1.75, p=0.56) nor was the 30-day mortality (OR 1.05, 95% CI 0.66 to 1.66, p=0.84). As-treated analyses were also not significantly different. Conclusions This trial suggests a potential mortality reduction in patients with blunt trauma with GCS<9 receiving additional physician care (original definition only). Confirmatory studies which also address non-compliance issues are needed. Trial registration number NCT00112398. PMID:25795741

  15. Administration of low dose methamphetamine 12 h after a severe traumatic brain injury prevents neurological dysfunction and cognitive impairment in rats.

    PubMed

    Rau, Thomas F; Kothiwal, Aakriti S; Rova, Annela R; Brooks, Diane M; Rhoderick, Joseph F; Poulsen, Austin J; Hutchinson, Jim; Poulsen, David J

    2014-03-01

    We recently published data that showed low dose of methamphetamine is neuroprotective when delivered 3 h after a severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). In the current study, we further characterized the neuroprotective potential of methamphetamine by determining the lowest effective dose, maximum therapeutic window, pharmacokinetic profile and gene expression changes associated with treatment. Graded doses of methamphetamine were administered to rats beginning 8 h after severe TBI. We assessed neuroprotection based on neurological severity scores, foot fault assessments, cognitive performance in the Morris water maze, and histopathology. We defined 0.250 mg/kg/h as the lowest effective dose and treatment at 12 h as the therapeutic window following severe TBI. We examined gene expression changes following TBI and methamphetamine treatment to further define the potential molecular mechanisms of neuroprotection and determined that methamphetamine significantly reduced the expression of key pro-inflammatory signals. Pharmacokinetic analysis revealed that a 24-hour intravenous infusion of methamphetamine at a dose of 0.500 mg/kg/h produced a plasma Cmax value of 25.9 ng/ml and a total exposure of 544 ng/ml over a 32 hour time frame. This represents almost half the 24-hour total exposure predicted for a daily oral dose of 25mg in a 70 kg adult human. Thus, we have demonstrated that methamphetamine is neuroprotective when delivered up to 12 h after injury at doses that are compatible with current FDA approved levels.

  16. Bilateral Traumatic Intracranial Hematomas and its Outcome: a Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Sharad; Sharma, Vivek; Singh, Kulwant; Pandey, Deepa; Sharma, Mukesh; Patil, Deepak Bhanudas; Shende, Neeraj; Chauhan, Richa Singh

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the age distribution, mode of injury, type of hematomas, and their surgical outcome in patients with bilateral traumatic head injuries. The present study included 669 cases of traumatic head injury who presented at the neurosurgery emergency out of which 94 cases had bilateral head injuries from the period of August 2009 to April 2014. The data from the hospital computerized database were retrospectively analysed. Cases of bilateral traumatic head injury included 94 patients out of which 88.29 % (n = 83) were males and 11.70 % (n = 11) were females. Commonest mode of injury was road traffic accident in 56.38 % (n = 53) followed by fall from height in 29.78 % (n = 28). In our study, 25.53 % patients had epidural hematoma (EDH) with intracerebral hematoma (ICH) or contusion (n = 24), followed by EDH with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in 18.08 % (n = 17). At the time of discharge, all those patients managed conservatively had good Glasgow outcome scale (GOS) while with surgical intervention 58 % patients had good GOS, 19 % had moderate disability, and 9 % remained with severe disability. In cases of bilateral hematomas, EDH is most common and should be managed in neurosurgical emergency. Other combinations of bilateral intracranial hematomas should be managed according to the surgical indication and serial CT imaging.

  17. Osteochondral Autograft Transplantation Surgery for Metacarpal Head Defects.

    PubMed

    Kitay, Alison; Waters, Peter M; Bae, Donald S

    2016-03-01

    Post-traumatic osteonecrosis of the metacarpal head is a challenging problem, particularly in younger patients in whom arthroplasty may not be a durable option. Although several osteochondral reconstructive options have been proposed, some are associated with considerable donor site morbidity and/or require the use of internal fixation. We present an application of osteochondral autograft transplantation surgery as a treatment option for focal metacarpal head lesions. An osteochondral plug from the non-weight-bearing articular surface of the knee is transferred and press-fit to resurface a focal metacarpal head defect. The technical pearls and pitfalls are reviewed, and an illustrative case is presented.

  18. Exploring the effects of roadway characteristics on the frequency and severity of head-on crashes: case studies from Malaysian federal roads.

    PubMed

    Hosseinpour, Mehdi; Yahaya, Ahmad Shukri; Sadullah, Ahmad Farhan

    2014-01-01

    Head-on crashes are among the most severe collision types and of great concern to road safety authorities. Therefore, it justifies more efforts to reduce both the frequency and severity of this collision type. To this end, it is necessary to first identify factors associating with the crash occurrence. This can be done by developing crash prediction models that relate crash outcomes to a set of contributing factors. This study intends to identify the factors affecting both the frequency and severity of head-on crashes that occurred on 448 segments of five federal roads in Malaysia. Data on road characteristics and crash history were collected on the study segments during a 4-year period between 2007 and 2010. The frequency of head-on crashes were fitted by developing and comparing seven count-data models including Poisson, standard negative binomial (NB), random-effect negative binomial, hurdle Poisson, hurdle negative binomial, zero-inflated Poisson, and zero-inflated negative binomial models. To model crash severity, a random-effect generalized ordered probit model (REGOPM) was used given a head-on crash had occurred. With respect to the crash frequency, the random-effect negative binomial (RENB) model was found to outperform the other models according to goodness of fit measures. Based on the results of the model, the variables horizontal curvature, terrain type, heavy-vehicle traffic, and access points were found to be positively related to the frequency of head-on crashes, while posted speed limit and shoulder width decreased the crash frequency. With regard to the crash severity, the results of REGOPM showed that horizontal curvature, paved shoulder width, terrain type, and side friction were associated with more severe crashes, whereas land use, access points, and presence of median reduced the probability of severe crashes. Based on the results of this study, some potential countermeasures were proposed to minimize the risk of head-on crashes.

  19. Automatic prompting and positive attention to reduce tongue protrusion and head tilting by two adults with severe to profound intellectual disabilities.

    PubMed

    Lancioni, Giulio E; Singh, Nirbhay N; O'Reilly, Mark F; Sigafoos, Jeff; Didden, Robert; Pichierri, Sabrina

    2010-07-01

    This study assessed a simple behavioral strategy for reducing stereotypic tongue protrusion and forward head tilting displayed by a woman and a man with severe to profound intellectual disabilities. The strategy involved (a) auditory prompting (i.e., verbal encouragement to keep the tongue in the mouth or the head upright) delivered automatically at fixed intervals via a portable device, and (b) social approval delivered by a research assistant at adjustable intervals for the absence of the inappropriate behavior. The intervals arranged for the delivery of approval were extended if the inappropriate behavior occurred in concomitance with the expected delivery. Data showed that the intervention strategy was effective in reducing the stereotypic tongue protrusion and forward head tilting. Their occurrences dropped from above 40% (tongue protrusion) and close to 80% (head tilting) of the observation instances during the initial baseline to around or slightly above 10% of those instances during the second intervention period and the 3-month postintervention check.

  20. How functional connectivity between emotion regulation structures can be disrupted: preliminary evidence from adolescents with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Newsome, Mary R; Scheibel, Randall S; Mayer, Andrew R; Chu, Zili D; Wilde, Elisabeth A; Hanten, Gerri; Steinberg, Joel L; Lin, Xiaodi; Li, Xiaoqi; Merkley, Tricia L; Hunter, Jill V; Vasquez, Ana C; Cook, Lori; Lu, Hanzhang; Vinton, Kami; Levin, Harvey S

    2013-09-01

    Outcome of moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) includes impaired emotion regulation. Emotion regulation has been associated with amygdala and rostral anterior cingulate (rACC). However, functional connectivity between the two structures after injury has not been reported. A preliminary examination of functional connectivity of rACC and right amygdala was conducted in adolescents 2 to 3 years after moderate to severe TBI and in typically developing (TD)control adolescents, with the hypothesis that the TBI adolescents would demonstrate altered functional connectivity in the two regions. Functional connectivity was determined by correlating fluctuations in the blood oxygen level dependent(BOLD) signal of the rACC and right amygdala with that of other brain regions. In the TBI adolescents, the rACC was found to be significantly less functionally connected to medial prefrontal cortices and to right temporal regions near the amygdala (height threshold T = 2.5, cluster level p < .05, FDR corrected), while the right amygdala showed a trend in reduced functional connectivity with the rACC (height threshold T = 2.5, cluster level p = .06, FDR corrected). Data suggest disrupted functional connectivity in emotion regulation regions. Limitations include small sample sizes. Studies with larger sample sizes are necessary to characterize the persistent neural damage resulting from moderate to severe TBI during development.

  1. Parent perceptions of early prognostic encounters following children’s severe traumatic brain injury: “Locked up in this cage of absolute horror”

    PubMed Central

    Roscigno, Cecelia I.; Grant, Gerald; Savage, Teresa A.; Philipsen, Gerry

    2013-01-01

    Objective Little guidance exists for discussing prognosis in early acute care with parents following children’s severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Providers’ beliefs about truth-telling can shape what is said, how it is said, and how providers respond to parents. Methods This study was part of a large qualitative study conducted in the USA (42 parents/37 families) following children’s moderate to severe TBI (2005 to 2007). Ethnography of speaking was used to analyse interviews describing early acute care following children’s severe TBI (29 parents/25 families). Results Parents perceived that: a) parents were disadvantaged by provider delivery; b) negative outcome values dominated some provider’s talk; c) truth-telling involves providers acknowledging all possibilities; d) framing the child’s prognosis with negative medical certainty when there is some uncertainty could damage parent-provider relationships; e) parents needed to remain optimistic; and, f) children’s outcomes could differ from providers’ early acute care prognostications. Conclusion Parents blatantly and tacitly revealed their beliefs that providers play an important role in shaping parent reception of and synthesis of prognostic information, which constructs the family’s ability to cope and participate in shared decision-making. Negative medical certainty created a fearful or threatening environment that kept parents from being fully informed. PMID:24087991

  2. Predictors of Severe Acute and Late Toxicities in Patients With Localized Head-and-Neck Cancer Treated With Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Francois; Fortin, Andre; Wang, Chang Shu; Liu, Geoffrey

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Radiation therapy (RT) causes acute and late toxicities that affect various organs and functions. In a large cohort of patients treated with RT for localized head and neck cancer (HNC), we prospectively assessed the occurrence of RT-induced acute and late toxicities and identified characteristics that predicted these toxicities. Methods and Materials: We conducted a randomized trial among 540 patients treated with RT for localized HNC to assess whether vitamin E supplementation could improve disease outcomes. Adverse effects of RT were assessed using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Acute Radiation Morbidity Criteria during RT and one month after RT, and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Scheme at six and 12 months after RT. The most severe adverse effect among the organs/tissues was selected as an overall measure of either acute or late toxicity. Grade 3 and 4 toxicities were considered as severe. Stepwise multivariate logistic regression models were used to identify all independent predictors (p < 0.05) of acute or late toxicity and to estimate odds ratios (OR) for severe toxicity with their 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: Grade 3 or 4 toxicity was observed in 23% and 4% of patients, respectively, for acute and late toxicity. Four independent predictors of severe acute toxicity were identified: sex (female vs. male: OR = 1.72, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.06-2.80), Karnofsky Performance Status (OR = 0.67 for a 10-point increment, 95% CI: 0.52-0.88), body mass index (above 25 vs. below: OR = 1.88, 95% CI: 1.22-2.90), TNM stage (Stage II vs. I: OR = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.25-2.92). Two independent predictors were found for severe late toxicity: female sex (OR = 3.96, 95% CI: 1.41-11.08) and weight loss during RT (OR = 1.26 for a 1 kg increment, 95% CI: 1.12-1.41). Conclusions: Knowledge of these predictors easily collected in a clinical setting could help

  3. Influence of inoculum and climatic factors on the severity of Fusarium head blight in German spring and winter barley.

    PubMed

    Linkmeyer, Andrea; Hofer, Katharina; Rychlik, Michael; Herz, Markus; Hausladen, Hans; Hückelhoven, Ralph; Hess, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) of small cereals is a disease of global importance with regard to economic losses and mycotoxin contamination harmful to human and animal health. In Germany, FHB is predominantly associated with wheat and F. graminearum is recognised as the major causal agent of the disease, but little is known about FHB of barley. Monitoring of the natural occurrence of FHB on Bavarian barley revealed differences for individual Fusarium spp. in incidence and severity of grain infection between years and between spring and winter barley. Parallel measurement of fungal DNA content in grain and mycotoxin content suggested the importance of F. graminearum in winter barley and of F. langsethiae in spring barley for FHB. The infection success of these two species was associated with certain weather conditions and barley flowering time. Inoculation experiments in the field revealed different effects of five Fusarium spp. on symptom formation, grain yield and mycotoxin production. A significant association between fungal infection of grain and mycotoxin content was observed following natural or artificial infection with the type B trichothecene producer F. culmorum, but not with the type A trichothecene-producing species F. langsethiae and F. sporotrichioides. Trichothecene type A toxin contamination also occurred in the absence of significant damage to grain and did not necessarily promote fungal colonisation.

  4. Memory for the perceptual and semantic attributes of information in pure amnesic and severe closed-head injured patients.

    PubMed

    Carlesimo, Giovanni A; Bonanni, Rita; Caltagirone, Carlo

    2003-05-01

    This study investigated the hypothesis that brain damaged patients with memory disorder are poorer at remembering the semantic than the perceptual attributes of information. Eight patients with memory impairment of different etiology and 24 patients with chronic consequences of severe closed-head injury were compared to similarly sized age- and literacy-matched normal control groups on recognition tests for the physical aspect and the semantic identity of words and pictures lists. In order to avoid interpretative problems deriving from different absolute levels of performance, study conditions were manipulated across subjects to obtain comparable accuracy on the perceptual recognition tests in the memory disordered and control groups. The results of the Picture Recognition test were consistent with the hypothesis. Indeed, having more time for the stimulus encoding, the two memory disordered groups performed at the same level as the normal subjects on the perceptual test but significantly lower on the semantic test. Instead, on the Word Recognition test, following study condition manipulation, patients and controls performed similarly on both the perceptual and the semantic tests. These data only partially support the hypothesis of the study; rather they suggest that in memory disordered patients there is a reduction of the advantage, exhibited by normal controls, of retrieving pictures over words (picture superiority effect).

  5. The preventive effect of dexmedetomidine on paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity in severe traumatic brain injury patients who have undergone surgery: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qilin; Wu, Xiang; Weng, Weiji; Li, Hongpeng; Feng, Junfeng; Mao, Qing; Jiang, Jiyao

    2017-01-01

    Background Paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity (PSH) results and aggravates in secondary brain injury, which seriously affects the prognosis of severe traumatic brain injury patients. Although several studies have focused on the treatment of PSH, few have concentrated on its prevention. Methods Ninety post-operation (post-op) severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI) patients admitted from October 2014 to April 2016 were chosen to participate in this study. Fifty of the post-op sTBI patients were sedated with dexmedetomidine and were referred as the “dexmedetomidine group” (admitted from May 2015 to April 2016). The other 40 patients (admitted from October 2014 to May 2015) received other sedations and were referred as the “control group.” The two groups were then compared based on their PSH scores and the scores and ratios of those patients who met the criteria of “probable,” “possible” and “unlikely” using the PSH assessment measure (PSH-AM) designed by Baguley et al. (2014). The durations of the neurosurgery intensive care unit (NICU) and hospital stays and the Glasgow outcome scale (GOS) values for the two groups were also compared to evaluate the therapeutic effects and the patients’ prognosis. Results The overall PSH score for the dexmedetomidine group was 5.26 ± 4.66, compared with 8.58 ± 8.09 for the control group. The difference between the two groups’ PSH scores was significant (P = 0.017). The score of the patients who met the criterion of “probable” was 18.33 ± 1.53 in the dexmedetomidine group and 22.63 ± 2.97 in the control group, and the difference was statistically significant (P = 0.045). The ratio of patients who were classified as “unlikely” between the two groups was statistically significant (P = 0.028); that is, 42 (84%) in the dexmedetomidine group and 25 (62.5%) in the control group. The differences in NICU, hospital stays and GOS values between the two groups were not significant. Conclusion

  6. Association between the Osteoporosis Self-Assessment Tool for Asians Score and Mortality in Patients with Isolated Moderate and Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Propensity Score-Matched Analysis.

    PubMed

    Rau, Cheng-Shyuan; Kuo, Pao-Jen; Wu, Shao-Chun; Chen, Yi-Chun; Hsieh, Hsiao-Yun; Hsieh, Ching-Hua

    2016-12-03

    Background: The purpose of this study was to use a propensity score-matched analysis to investigate the association between the Osteoporosis Self-Assessment Tool for Asians (OSTA) scores and clinical outcomes of patients with isolated moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Methods: The study population comprised 7855 patients aged ≥40 years who were hospitalized for treatment of isolated moderate and severe TBI (an Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) ≥3 points only in the head and not in other regions of the body) between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2014. Patients were categorized as high-risk (OSTA score < -4; n = 849), medium-risk (-4 ≤ OSTA score ≤ -1; n = 1647), or low-risk (OSTA score > -1; n = 5359). Two-sided Pearson's chi-squared, or Fisher's exact tests were used to compare categorical data. Unpaired Student's t-test and Mann-Whitney U test were performed to analyze normally and non-normally distributed continuous data, respectively. Propensity score-matching in a 1:1 ratio was performed using NCSS software, with adjustment for covariates. Results: Compared to low-risk patients, high- and medium-risk patients were significantly older and injured more severely. The high- and medium-risk patients had significantly higher mortality rates, longer hospital length of stay, and a higher proportion of admission to the intensive care unit than low-risk patients. Analysis of propensity score-matched patients with adjusted covariates, including gender, co-morbidity, blood alcohol concentration level, Glasgow Coma Scale score, and Injury Severity Score revealed that high- and medium-risk patients still had a 2.4-fold (odds ratio (OR), 2.4; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.39-4.15; p = 0.001) and 1.8-fold (OR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.19-2.86; p = 0.005) higher mortality, respectively, than low-risk patients. However, further addition of age as a covariate for the propensity score-matching demonstrated that there was no significant difference between high

  7. Association between the Osteoporosis Self-Assessment Tool for Asians Score and Mortality in Patients with Isolated Moderate and Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Propensity Score-Matched Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Cheng-Shyuan; Kuo, Pao-Jen; Wu, Shao-Chun; Chen, Yi-Chun; Hsieh, Hsiao-Yun; Hsieh, Ching-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to use a propensity score-matched analysis to investigate the association between the Osteoporosis Self-Assessment Tool for Asians (OSTA) scores and clinical outcomes of patients with isolated moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Methods: The study population comprised 7855 patients aged ≥40 years who were hospitalized for treatment of isolated moderate and severe TBI (an Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) ≥3 points only in the head and not in other regions of the body) between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2014. Patients were categorized as high-risk (OSTA score < −4; n = 849), medium-risk (−4 ≤ OSTA score ≤ −1; n = 1647), or low-risk (OSTA score > −1; n = 5359). Two-sided Pearson’s chi-squared, or Fisher’s exact tests were used to compare categorical data. Unpaired Student’s t-test and Mann-Whitney U test were performed to analyze normally and non-normally distributed continuous data, respectively. Propensity score-matching in a 1:1 ratio was performed using NCSS software, with adjustment for covariates. Results: Compared to low-risk patients, high- and medium-risk patients were significantly older and injured more severely. The high- and medium-risk patients had significantly higher mortality rates, longer hospital length of stay, and a higher proportion of admission to the intensive care unit than low-risk patients. Analysis of propensity score-matched patients with adjusted covariates, including gender, co-morbidity, blood alcohol concentration level, Glasgow Coma Scale score, and Injury Severity Score revealed that high- and medium-risk patients still had a 2.4-fold (odds ratio (OR), 2.4; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.39–4.15; p = 0.001) and 1.8-fold (OR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.19–2.86; p = 0.005) higher mortality, respectively, than low-risk patients. However, further addition of age as a covariate for the propensity score-matching demonstrated that there was no significant difference

  8. Demographic profile and extent of healthcare resource utilisation of patients with severe traumatic brain injury: still a major public health problem

    PubMed Central

    Wee, Jing Zhong; Yang, Yun Rui Jasmine; Lee, Qian Yi Ruth; Cao, Kelly; Chong, Chin Ted

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Trauma is the fifth principal cause of death in Singapore, with traumatic brain injury (TBI) being the leading specific subordinate cause. METHODS This study was an eight-year retrospective review of the demographic profiles of patients with severe TBI who were admitted to the neurointensive care unit (NICU) of the National Neuroscience Institute at Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore, between 2004 and 2011. RESULTS A total of 780 TBI patients were admitted during the study period; 365 (46.8%) patients sustained severe TBI (i.e. Glasgow Coma Scale score ≤ 8), with the majority (75.3%) being male. The ages of patients with severe TBI ranged from 14–93 years, with a bimodal preponderance in young adults (i.e. 21–40 years) and elderly persons (i.e. > 60 years). Motor vehicle accidents (48.8%) and falls (42.5%) were the main mechanisms of injury. Invasive line monitoring was frequently employed; invasive arterial blood pressure monitoring and central venous pressure monitoring were used in 81.6% and 60.0% of the patients, respectively, while intracranial pressure (ICP) measurement was required in 47.4% of the patients. The use of tiered therapy to control ICP (e.g. sedation, osmotherapy, cerebrospinal fluid drainage, moderate hyperventilation and barbiturate-induced coma) converged with international practices. CONCLUSION The high-risk groups for severe TBI were young adults and elderly persons involved in motor vehicle accidents and falls, respectively. In the NICU, the care of patients with severe TBI requires heavy utilisation of resources. The healthcare burden of these patients extends beyond the acute critical care phase. PMID:26768061

  9. Lifetime Traumatic Events and High-Risk Behaviors as Predictors of PTSD Symptoms in People with Severe Mental Illnesses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hare, Thomas; Sherrer, Margaret V.

    2009-01-01

    Research is limited regarding the role of high-risk behaviors, trauma, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in people with severe mental illnesses (SMI). The current survey of 276 community mental health clients diagnosed with either a schizophrenia spectrum disorder or a major mood disorder examined the mediating role of lifetime…

  10. Low self-awareness of individuals with severe traumatic brain injury can lead to reduced ability to take another person's perspective.

    PubMed

    Bivona, Umberto; Riccio, Angela; Ciurli, Paola; Carlesimo, Giovanni Augusto; Delle Donne, Valentina; Pizzonia, Elisa; Caltagirone, Carlo; Formisano, Rita; Costa, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Aims of this study were (i) to verify whether a deficit or a lack of self-awareness can lead to difficulties in assuming another person's perspective after a severe traumatic brain injury (TBI); (ii) to verify whether perspective-taking deficits emerge more from performance-based tasks than self-reports; and (iii) to evaluate the possible relationships between perspective-taking difficulties and some clinical, neuropsychological, neuropsychiatric, and neuroimaging variables. The Interpersonal Reactivity Index, Empathy Quotient, first-order false-belief, and faux pas written stories were administered to 28 patients with severe TBI and 28 healthy controls. The Awareness Questionnaire was also administered to TBI patients and their caregivers. Patients were split into 2 groups (impaired self-awareness vs adequate self-awareness) on the basis of the discrepancy Awareness Questionnaire score. Both TBI groups obtained lower scores than healthy controls on the Fantasy subscale of the Interpersonal Reactivity Index, the reality question of the false-belief stories, and the memory questions of the faux pas test. Only impaired self-awareness patients tended to obtain lower scores in first-order false-belief detection. Impaired self-awareness patients also performed significantly worse than both healthy controls and adequate self-awareness patients on the faux pas tasks. The analysis suggests a causal relationship between low self-awareness and perspective-taking difficulties in this population of patients.

  11. Reduced heart rate variability in chronic severe traumatic brain injury: Association with impaired emotional and social functioning, and potential for treatment using biofeedback.

    PubMed

    Francis, Heather M; Fisher, Alana; Rushby, Jacqueline A; McDonald, Skye

    2016-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) may provide an index of capacity for social functioning and may be remediated by HRV biofeedback. Given reductions in HRV are found following traumatic brain injury (TBI), the present study aimed to determine whether lower HRV in TBI is associated with social function, and whether HRV biofeedback might be a useful remediation technique in this population. Resting state HRV and measures of social and emotional processing were collected in 30 individuals with severe TBI (3-34 years post-injury) and 30 controls. This was followed by a single session of HRV biofeedback. HRV was positively associated with social cognition and empathy, and negatively associated with alexithymia for the TBI group. Both TBI and control groups showed significantly increased HRV on both time-domain (i.e., SDNN, rMSSD) and frequency-domain measures (LF, HF, LF:HF ratio) during biofeedback compared to baseline. These results suggest that decreased HRV is linked to social and emotional function following severe TBI, and may be a novel target for therapy using HRV biofeedback techniques.

  12. Delayed presentation of traumatic cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea: Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Guyer, Richard A; Turner, Justin H

    2015-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak is one of several complications that can occur after traumatic skull base injury. Although most patients present soon after the injury occurs, some can present years later, with resulting morbidity and the need for additional procedures. We present a case of a patient with a sphenoid sinus CSF leak who presented 12 years after a closed head injury that included a sphenoethmoid skull base fracture. We also reviewed the literature on this topic, with a discussion of previous reports of CSF leaks that occurred months, years, or decades after trauma. A late onset CSF leak appears to be a rare but important complication of traumatic skull base injury. This case highlights the need for clinicians to remain vigilant to the possibility of delayed CSF rhinorrhea, even years after traumatic head injury.

  13. A Panel of Serum MiRNA Biomarkers for the Diagnosis of Severe to Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Bhomia, Manish; Balakathiresan, Nagaraja S.; Wang, Kevin K.; Papa, Linda; Maheshwari, Radha K.

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (MiRNAs) are small endogenous RNA molecules and have emerged as novel serum diagnostic biomarkers for several diseases due to their stability and detection at minute quantities. In this study, we have identified a serum miRNA signature in human serum samples of mild to severe TBI, which can be used for diagnosis of mild and moderate TBI (MMTBI). Human serum samples of MMTBI, severe TBI (STBI), orthopedic injury and healthy controls were used and miRNA profiling was done using taqman real time PCR. The real time PCR data for the MMTBI, STBI and orthopedic injury was normalized to the control samples which showed upregulation of 39, 37 and 33 miRNAs in MMTBI, STBI and orthopedic injury groups respectively. TBI groups were compared to orthopedic injury group and an up-regulation of 18 and 20 miRNAs in MMTBI and STBI groups was observed. Among these, a signature of 10 miRNAs was found to be present in both MMTBI and STBI groups. These 10 miRNAs were validated in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from STBI and four miRNAs were found to be upregulated in CSF. In conclusion, we identified a subset of 10 unique miRNAs which can be used for diagnosis of MMTBI and STBI. PMID:27338832

  14. Parent Perceptions of How Nurse Encounters Can Provide Caring Support for the Family in Early Acute Care Following Children’s Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Roscigno, Cecelia I.

    2016-01-01

    Objective A child’s severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) creates a family crisis requiring extensive cultural, informational, psychological, and environmental support. Nurses need to understand parents’ expectations of caring in early acute care so they can tailor their attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors appropriately to accommodate the family’s needs. Methods In a previous qualitative study of 42 parents or caregivers from 37 families of children with moderate to severe TBI, parents of children with severe TBI (n = 25) described their appraisals of nurse caring and uncaring behaviors in early acute care. Swanson’s theory of caring was used to categorize parents’ descriptions in order to inform nursing early acute care practices and family-centered care. Results Caring nurse encounters included: (a) involving parents in the care of their child and reflecting on all socio-cultural factors shaping family resources and responses (knowing); (b) respecting that family grief can be co-mingled with resilience, and that parents are typically competent to be involved in decision-making (maintaining belief); (d) actively listening and engaging parents in order to fully understand family values and needs (being with); (e) decreasing parents’ workload to get information, emotional support, and providing a safe cultural, psychological, and physical environment for the family (doing for), and; (f) providing anticipatory guidance to navigate the early acute care system and giving assistance to learn and adjust to their situation (enabling). Conclusion Application of Swanson’s caring theory is prescriptive in helping individual nurses and early acute care systems to meet important family needs following children’s severe TBI. PMID:26871242

  15. White matter microstructure in chronic moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury: Impact of acute-phase injury-related variables and associations with outcome measures.

    PubMed

    Håberg, A K; Olsen, A; Moen, K G; Schirmer-Mikalsen, K; Visser, E; Finnanger, T G; Evensen, K A I; Skandsen, T; Vik, A; Eikenes, L

    2015-07-01

    This study examines how injury mechanisms and early neuroimaging and clinical measures impact white matter (WM) fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), and tract volumes in the chronic phase of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and how WM integrity in the chronic phase is associated with different outcome measures obtained at the same time. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) at 3 T was acquired more than 1 year after TBI in 49 moderate-to-severe-TBI survivors and 50 matched controls. DTI data were analyzed with tract-based spatial statistics and automated tractography. Moderate-to-severe TBI led to widespread FA decreases, MD increases, and tract volume reductions. In severe TBI and in acceleration/deceleration injuries, a specific FA loss was detected. A particular loss of FA was also present in the thalamus and the brainstem in all grades of diffuse axonal injury. Acute-phase Glasgow Coma Scale scores, number of microhemorrhages on T2*, lesion volume on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery, and duration of posttraumatic amnesia were associated with more widespread FA loss and MD increases in chronic TBI. Episodes of cerebral perfusion pressure <70 mmHg were specifically associated with reduced MD. Neither episodes of intracranial pressure >20 mmHg nor acute-phase Rotterdam CT scores were associated with WM changes. Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended scores and performance-based cognitive control functioning were associated with FA and MD changes, but self-reported cognitive control functioning was not. In conclusion, FA loss specifically reflects the primary injury severity and mechanism, whereas FA and MD changes are associated with objective measures of general and cognitive control functioning.

  16. Head impact in a snowboarding accident.

    PubMed

    Bailly, N; Llari, M; Donnadieu, T; Masson, C; Arnoux, P J

    2016-05-17

    To effectively prevent sport traumatic brain injury (TBI), means of protection need to be designed and tested in relation to the reality of head impact. This study quantifies head impacts during a typical snowboarding accident to evaluate helmet standards. A snowboarder numerical model was proposed, validated against experimental data, and used to quantify the influence of accident conditions (speed, snow stiffness, morphology, and position) on head impacts (locations, velocities, and accelerations) and injury risk during snowboarding backward falls. Three hundred twenty-four scenarios were simulated: 70% presented a high risk of mild TBI (head peak acceleration >80 g) and 15% presented a high risk of severe TBI (head injury criterion >1000). Snow stiffness, speed, and snowboarder morphology were the main factors influencing head impact metrics. Mean normal head impact speed (28 ± 6 km/h) was higher than equivalent impact speed used in American standard helmet test (ASTM F2040), and mean tangential impact speed, not included in standard tests, was 13.8 (±7 km/h). In 97% of simulated impacts, the peak head acceleration was below 300 g, which is the pass/fail criteria used in standard tests. Results suggest that initial speed, impacted surface, and pass/fail criteria used in helmet standard performance tests do not fully reflect magnitude and variability of snowboarding backward-fall impacts.

  17. Post-traumatic cluster headache: from the periphery to the central nervous system?

    PubMed

    Lambru, Giorgio; Castellini, Paola; Manzoni, Gian Camillo; Torelli, Paola

    2009-07-01

    A correlation between head trauma and cluster headache is believed to exist. We report a case of post-traumatic episodic cluster headache that fulfills the criteria of the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd edition. The distinctive features of this case are: a close temporal relation between head trauma and headache onset; pain ipsilateral to the side of trauma; mild severity of trauma; episodic course well-responsive to low doses of verapamil. Given the close temporal relation between the 2 events, multiple hypotheses can be advanced about a possible role of head trauma in the pathogenesis of cluster headache.

  18. A retrospective, multi-center cohort study evaluating the severity- related effects of cerebrolysin treatment on clinical outcomes in traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Muresanu, Dafin F; Ciurea, Alexandru V; Gorgan, Radu M; Gheorghita, Eva; Florian, Stefan I; Stan, Horatiu; Blaga, Alin; Ianovici, Nicolai; Iencean, Stefan M; Turliuc, Dana; Davidescu, Horia B; Mihalache, Cornel; Brehar, Felix M; Mihaescu, Anca S; Mardare, Dinu C; Anghelescu, Aurelian; Chiparus, Carmen; Lapadat, Magdalena; Pruna, Viorel; Mohan, Dumitru; Costea, Constantin; Costea, Daniel; Palade, Claudiu; Bucur, Narcisa; Figueroa, Jesus; Alvarez, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and disability for which there is currently no effective drug therapy available. Because drugs targeting a single TBI pathological pathway have failed to show clinical efficacy to date, pleiotropic agents with effects on multiple mechanisms of secondary brain damage could represent an effective option to improve brain recovery and clinical outcome in TBI patients. In this multicenter retrospective study, we investigated severity-related efficacy and safety of the add-on therapy with two concentrations (20 ml/day or 30 ml/day) of Cerebrolysin (EVER Neuro Pharma, Austria) in TBI patients. Adjunctive treatment with Cerrebrolysin started within 48 hours after TBI and clinical outcomes were ranked according to the Glasgow Outcome Scale and the Modified Rankin Disability Score at 10 and 30 days post-TBI. Analyses of efficacy were performed separately for subgroups of patients with mild, moderate or severe TBI according to Glasgow Coma Scale scores at admission. Compared to standard medical care alone (control group), both doses of Cerebrolysin were associated with improved clinical outcome scores at 10 days post-TBI in mild patients and at 10 and 30 days in moderate and severe cases. A dose-dependent effect of Cerebrolysin on TBI recovery was supported by the dose-related differences and the significant correlations with treatment duration observed for outcome measures. The safety and tolerability of Cerebrolysin in TBI patients was very good. In conclusion, the results of this large retrospective study revealed that early Cerebrolysin treatment is safe and is associated to improved TBI outcome.

  19. Tripartite Stratification of the Glasgow Coma Scale in Children with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury and Mortality: An Analysis from a Multi-Center Comparative Effectiveness Study.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Sarah; Thomas, Neal J; Gertz, Shira J; Beca, John; Luther, James F; Bell, Michael J; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Hartman, Adam L; Tasker, Robert C

    2017-02-27

    The Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score has not been validated in children younger than 5 years and the clinical circumstances at the time of assignment can limit its applicability. This study describes the distribution of GCS scores in the population, the relationship between injury characteristics with the GCS score, and the association between the tripartite stratification of the GCS on mortality in children with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). The first 200 children from a multi-center comparative effectiveness study in severe TBI (inclusion criteria: age 0-18 years, GCS ≤8 at the time of intracranial pressure [ICP] monitoring) were analyzed. After tripartite stratification of GCS scores (Group A, GCS 3; Group B, GCS 4 - 5; and Group C, GCS 6 - 8), analyses of variance and chi-square testing were performed. Mean age was 7.61 years ±5.33 and mortality was 19.1%. There was no difference in etiology or type/mechanism of injury between groups. However, groups demonstrated differences in neuromuscular blockade, endotracheal intubation, pre-hospital events (cardiac arrest and apnea), coagulopathy, and pupil response. Mortality between groups was different (42.2% Group A, 22.6% Group B, and 3.8% Group C; p < 0.001), and adding pupil response improved mortality associations. In children younger than 5 years of age, a similar relationship between GCS and mortality was observed. Overall, GCS score at the time of ICP monitor placement is strongly associated with mortality across the pediatric age range. Development of models with GCS and other factors may allow identification of subtypes of children after severe TBI for future studies.

  20. Early-Stage Hyperoxia Is Associated with Favorable Neurological Outcomes and Survival after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Post-Hoc Analysis of the Brain Hypothermia Study.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Motoki; Oda, Yasutaka; Yamashita, Susumu; Kaneda, Kotaro; Kaneko, Tadashi; Suehiro, Eiichi; Dohi, Kenji; Kuroda, Yasuhiro; Kobata, Hitoshi; Tsuruta, Ryosuke; Maekawa, Tsuyoshi

    2017-01-19

    The effects of hyperoxia on the neurological outcomes of patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) are still controversial. We examined whether the partial pressure of arterial oxygen (PaO2) and hyperoxia were associated with neurological outcomes and survival by conducting post-hoc analyses of the Brain Hypothermia (B-HYPO) study, a multi-center randomized controlled trial of mild therapeutic hypothermia for severe TBI. The differences in PaO2 and PaO2/fraction of inspiratory oxygen (P/F) ratio on the 1st day of admission were compared between patients with favorable (n = 64) and unfavorable (n = 65) neurological outcomes and between survivors (n = 90) and deceased patients (n = 39). PaO2 and the P/F ratio were significantly greater in patients with favorable outcomes than in patients with unfavorable neurological outcomes (PaO2: 252 ± 122 vs. 202 ± 87 mm Hg, respectively, p = 0.008; P/F ratio: 455 ± 171 vs. 389 ± 155, respectively, p = 0.022) and in survivors than in deceased patients (PaO2: 242 ± 117 vs. 193 ± 75 mm Hg, respectively, p = 0.005; P/F ratio: 445 ± 171 vs. 370 ± 141, respectively, p = 0.018). Similar tendencies were observed in subgroup analyses in patients with fever control and therapeutic hypothermia, and in patients with an evacuated mass or other lesions (unevacuated lesions). PaO2 was independently associated with survival (odds ratio 1.008, p = 0.037). These results suggested that early-stage hyperoxia might be associated with favorable neurological outcomes and survival following severe TBI.

  1. Cognitive control of conscious error awareness: error awareness and error positivity (Pe) amplitude in moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI).

    PubMed

    Logan, Dustin M; Hill, Kyle R; Larson, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Poor awareness has been linked to worse recovery and rehabilitation outcomes following moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury (M/S TBI). The error positivity (Pe) component of the event-related potential (ERP) is linked to error awareness and cognitive control. Participants included 37 neurologically healthy controls and 24 individuals with M/S TBI who completed a brief neuropsychological battery and the error awareness task (EAT), a modified Stroop go/no-go task that elicits aware and unaware errors. Analyses compared between-group no-go accuracy (including accuracy between the first and second halves of the task to measure attention and fatigue), error awareness performance, and Pe amplitude by level of awareness. The M/S TBI group decreased in accuracy and maintained error awareness over time; control participants improved both accuracy and error awareness during the course of the task. Pe amplitude was larger for aware than unaware errors for both groups; however, consistent with previous research on the Pe and TBI, there were no significant between-group differences for Pe amplitudes. Findings suggest possible attention difficulties and low improvement of performance over time may influence specific aspects of error awareness in M/S TBI.

  2. The impact of physical therapy in patients with severe traumatic brain injury during acute and post-acute rehabilitation according to coma duration

    PubMed Central

    Lendraitienė, Eglė; Petruševičienė, Daiva; Savickas, Raimondas; Žemaitienė, Ieva; Mingaila, Sigitas

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of study was to evaluate the impact of physical therapy on the recovery of motor and mental status in patients who sustained a severe traumatic brain injury, according to coma duration in acute and post-acute rehabilitation. [Subjects and Methods] The study population comprised patients with levels of consciousness ranging from 3 to 8 according to Glasgow Coma Scale score. The patients were divided into 2 groups based on coma duration as follows: group 1, those who were in a coma up to 1 week, and group 2, those who were in a coma for more than 2 weeks. The recovery of the patients’ motor function was evaluated according to the Motor Assessment Scale and the recovery of mental status according to the Mini-Mental State Examination. [Results] The evaluation of motor and mental status recovery revealed that the patients who were in a coma up to 1 week recovered significantly better after physical therapy during the acute rehabilitation than those who were in a coma for longer than 2 weeks. [Conclusion] The recovery of motor and mental status of the patients in acute rehabilitation was significantly better for those in a coma for a shorter period. PMID:27512262

  3. Cognitive control of conscious error awareness: error awareness and error positivity (Pe) amplitude in moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI)

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Dustin M.; Hill, Kyle R.; Larson, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Poor awareness has been linked to worse recovery and rehabilitation outcomes following moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury (M/S TBI). The error positivity (Pe) component of the event-related potential (ERP) is linked to error awareness and cognitive control. Participants included 37 neurologically healthy controls and 24 individuals with M/S TBI who completed a brief neuropsychological battery and the error awareness task (EAT), a modified Stroop go/no-go task that elicits aware and unaware errors. Analyses compared between-group no-go accuracy (including accuracy between the first and second halves of the task to measure attention and fatigue), error awareness performance, and Pe amplitude by level of awareness. The M/S TBI group decreased in accuracy and maintained error awareness over time; control participants improved both accuracy and error awareness during the course of the task. Pe amplitude was larger for aware than unaware errors for both groups; however, consistent with previous research on the Pe and TBI, there were no significant between-group differences for Pe amplitudes. Findings suggest possible attention difficulties and low improvement of performance over time may influence specific aspects of error awareness in M/S TBI. PMID:26217212

  4. Error-related processing following severe traumatic brain injury: an event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study.

    PubMed

    Sozda, Christopher N; Larson, Michael J; Kaufman, David A S; Schmalfuss, Ilona M; Perlstein, William M

    2011-10-01

    Continuous monitoring of one's performance is invaluable for guiding behavior towards successful goal attainment by identifying deficits and strategically adjusting responses when performance is inadequate. In the present study, we exploited the advantages of event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine brain activity associated with error-related processing after severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI). fMRI and behavioral data were acquired while 10 sTBI participants and 12 neurologically-healthy controls performed a task-switching cued-Stroop task. fMRI data were analyzed using a random-effects whole-brain voxel-wise general linear model and planned linear contrasts. Behaviorally, sTBI patients showed greater error-rate interference than neurologically-normal controls. fMRI data revealed that, compared to controls, sTBI patients showed greater magnitude error-related activation in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and an increase in the overall spatial extent of error-related activation across cortical and subcortical regions. Implications for future research and potential limitations in conducting fMRI research in neurologically-impaired populations are discussed, as well as some potential benefits of employing multimodal imaging (e.g., fMRI and event-related potentials) of cognitive control processes in TBI.

  5. Intracranial Pressure Monitoring in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury in Latin America: Process and Methods for a Multi-Center Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lujan, Silvia; Dikmen, Sureyya; Temkin, Nancy; Petroni, Gustavo; Pridgeon, Jim; Barber, Jason; Machamer, Joan; Cherner, Mariana; Chaddock, Kelley; Hendrix, Terence; Rondina, Carlos; Videtta, Walter; Celix, Juanita M.; Chesnut, Randall

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), the influence on important outcomes of the use of information from intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring to direct treatment has never been tested in a randomized controlled trial (RCT). We are conducting an RCT in six trauma centers in Latin America to test this question. We hypothesize that patients randomized to ICP monitoring will have lower mortality and better outcomes at 6-months post-trauma than patients treated without ICP monitoring. We selected three centers in Bolivia to participate in the trial, based on (1) the absence of ICP monitoring, (2) adequate patient accession and data collection during the pilot phase, (3) preliminary institutional review board approval, and (4) the presence of equipoise about the value of ICP monitoring. We conducted extensive training of site personnel, and initiated the trial on September 1, 2008. Subsequently, we included three additional centers. A total of 176 patients were entered into the trial as of August 31, 2010. Current enrollment is 81% of that expected. The trial is expected to reach its enrollment goal of 324 patients by September of 2011. We are conducting a high-quality RCT to answer a question that is important globally. In addition, we are establishing the capacity to conduct strong research in Latin America, where TBI is a serious epidemic. Finally, we are demonstrating the feasibility and utility of international collaborations that share resources and unique patient populations to conduct strong research about global public health concerns. PMID:22435793

  6. Intracranial pressure monitoring in severe traumatic brain injury in latin america: process and methods for a multi-center randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Carney, Nancy; Lujan, Silvia; Dikmen, Sureyya; Temkin, Nancy; Petroni, Gustavo; Pridgeon, Jim; Barber, Jason; Machamer, Joan; Cherner, Mariana; Chaddock, Kelley; Hendrix, Terence; Rondina, Carlos; Videtta, Walter; Celix, Juanita M; Chesnut, Randall

    2012-07-20

    In patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), the influence on important outcomes of the use of information from intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring to direct treatment has never been tested in a randomized controlled trial (RCT). We are conducting an RCT in six trauma centers in Latin America to test this question. We hypothesize that patients randomized to ICP monitoring will have lower mortality and better outcomes at 6-months post-trauma than patients treated without ICP monitoring. We selected three centers in Bolivia to participate in the trial, based on (1) the absence of ICP monitoring, (2) adequate patient accession and data collection during the pilot phase, (3) preliminary institutional review board approval, and (4) the presence of equipoise about the value of ICP monitoring. We conducted extensive training of site personnel, and initiated the trial on September 1, 2008. Subsequently, we included three additional centers. A total of 176 patients were entered into the trial as of August 31, 2010. Current enrollment is 81% of that expected. The trial is expected to reach its enrollment goal of 324 patients by September of 2011. We are conducting a high-quality RCT to answer a question that is important globally. In addition, we are establishing the capacity to conduct strong research in Latin America, where TBI is a serious epidemic. Finally, we are demonstrating the feasibility and utility of international collaborations that share resources and unique patient populations to conduct strong research about global public health concerns.

  7. Long-Term Caregiver Mental Health Outcomes Following a Predominately Online Intervention for Adolescents With Complicated Mild to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Shari L.; Taylor, H. Gerry; Cassedy, Amy; Stancin, Terry; Kirkwood, Michael W.; Maines Brown, Tanya

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the efficacy of counselor-assisted problem solving (CAPS) in improving long-term caregiver psychological functioning following traumatic brain injury (TBI) in adolescents. Methods This randomized clinical trial compared CAPS (n = 65), a predominantly online problem-solving intervention, with an Internet resource comparison (n = 67) program. Families of adolescents with TBI completed a baseline assessment and follow-up assessments 6, 12, and 18 months later. General linear mixed models were used to examine longitudinal changes in caregiver global psychological distress, depressive symptoms, and caregiving self-efficacy. Family income and injury severity were examined as moderators of treatment efficacy. Results Family income moderated long-term changes in caregiver psychological distress. For lower-income caregivers, the CAPS intervention was associated with lower levels of psychological distress at 6, 12, and 18 months post baseline. Conclusions These findings support the utility of Web-based interventions in improving long-term caregiver psychological distress, particularly for lower-income families. PMID:25682211

  8. Infra-red thermometry: the reliability of tympanic and temporal artery readings for predicting brain temperature after severe traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, Danielle; Rainey, Timothy; Vail, Andy; Childs, Charmaine

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Temperature measurement is important during routine neurocritical care especially as differences between brain and systemic temperatures have been observed. The purpose of the study was to determine if infra-red temporal artery thermometry provides a better estimate of brain temperature than tympanic membrane temperature for patients with severe traumatic brain injury. Methods Brain parenchyma, tympanic membrane and temporal artery temperatures were recorded every 15–30 min for five hours during the first seven days after admission. Results Twenty patients aged 17–76 years were recruited. Brain and tympanic membrane temperature differences ranged from -0.8 °C to 2.5 °C (mean 0.9 °C). Brain and temporal artery temperature differences ranged from -0.7 °C to 1.5 °C (mean 0.3 °C). Tympanic membrane temperature differed from brain temperature by an average of 0.58 °C more than temporal artery temperature measurements (95% CI 0.31 °C to 0.85 °C, P < 0.0001). Conclusions At temperatures within the normal to febrile range, temporal artery temperature is closer to brain temperature than is tympanic membrane temperature. PMID:19473522

  9. Daily oral intake of theanine prevents the decline of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation in hippocampal dentate gyrus with concomitant alleviation of behavioral abnormalities in adult mice with severe traumatic stress.

    PubMed

    Takarada, Takeshi; Nakamichi, Noritaka; Kakuda, Takami; Nakazato, Ryota; Kokubo, Hiroshi; Ikeno, Shinsuke; Nakamura, Saki; Hinoi, Eiichi; Yoneda, Yukio

    2015-03-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder is a long-lasting psychiatric disease with the consequence of hippocampal atrophy in humans exposed to severe fatal stress. We demonstrated a positive correlation between the transient decline of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) and long-lasting behavioral abnormalities in mice with traumatic stress. Here, we investigated pharmacological properties of theanine on the declined BrdU incorporation and abnormal behaviors in mice with traumatic stress. Prior daily oral administration of theanine at 50-500 mg/kg for 5 days significantly prevented the decline of BrdU incorporation, while theanine significantly prevented the decline in the DG even when administered for 5 days after stress. Consecutive daily administration of theanine significantly inhibited the prolonged immobility in mice with stress in forced swimming test seen 14 days later. Although traumatic stress significantly increased spontaneous locomotor activity over 30 min even when determined 14 days later, the increased total locomotion was significantly ameliorated following the administration of theanine at 50 mg/kg for 14 days after stress. These results suggest that theanine alleviates behavioral abnormalities together with prevention of the transient decline of BrdU incorporation in the hippocampal DG in adult mice with severe traumatic stress.

  10. Cognitive Impairment after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury, Clinical Course and Impact on Outcome: A Swedish-Icelandic Study

    PubMed Central

    Stenberg, Maud; Godbolt, Alison K.; Nygren De Boussard, Catharina; Levi, Richard; Stålnacke, Britt-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To assess the clinical course of cognitive and emotional impairments in patients with severe TBI (sTBI) from 3 weeks to 1 year after trauma and to study associations with outcomes at 1 year. Methods. Prospective, multicenter, observational study of sTBI in Sweden and Iceland. Patients aged 18–65 years with acute Glasgow Coma Scale 3–8 were assessed with the Barrow Neurological Institute Screen for Higher Cerebral Functions (BNIS) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Outcome measures were Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended (GOSE) and Rancho Los Amigos Cognitive Scale-Revised (RLAS-R). Results. Cognition was assessed with the BNIS assessed for 42 patients out of 100 at 3 weeks, 75 patients at 3 months, and 78 patients at 1 year. Cognition improved over time, especially from 3 weeks to 3 months. The BNIS subscales “orientation” and “visuospatial and visual problem solving” were associated with the GOSE and RLAS-R at 1 year. Conclusion. Cognition seemed to improve over time after sTBI and appeared to be rather stable from 3 months to 1 year. Since cognitive function was associated with outcomes, these results indicate that early screening of cognitive function could be of importance for rehabilitation planning in a clinical setting. PMID:26783381

  11. Traumatic Brain Injury as a Cause of Behavior Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordlund, Marcia R.

    There is increasing evidence that many children and adolescents who display behavior disorders have sustained a traumatic brain injury. Traumatic brain injury can take the following forms: closed head trauma in which the brain usually suffers diffuse damage; open head injury which usually results in specific focal damage; or internal trauma (e.g.,…

  12. A State-of-the-Science Overview of Randomized Controlled Trials Evaluating Acute Management of Moderate-to-Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Bragge, Peter; Synnot, Anneliese; Maas, Andrew I; Menon, David K; Cooper, D James; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V; Gruen, Russell L

    2016-08-15

    Moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains a major global challenge, with rising incidence, unchanging mortality and lifelong impairments. State-of-the-science reviews are important for research planning and clinical decision support. This review aimed to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating interventions for acute management of moderate/severe TBI, synthesize key RCT characteristics and findings, and determine their implications on clinical practice and future research. RCTs were identified through comprehensive database and other searches. Key characteristics, outcomes, risk of bias, and analysis approach were extracted. Data were narratively synthesized, with a focus on robust (multi-center, low risk of bias, n > 100) RCTs, and three-dimensional graphical figures also were used to explore relationships between RCT characteristics and findings. A total of 207 RCTs were identified. The 191 completed RCTs enrolled 35,340 participants (median, 66). Most (72%) were single center and enrolled less than 100 participants (69%). There were 26 robust RCTs across 18 different interventions. For 74% of 392 comparisons across all included RCTs, there was no significant difference between groups. Positive findings were broadly distributed with respect to RCT characteristics. Less than one-third of RCTs demonstrated low risk of bias for random sequence generation or allocation concealment, less than one-quarter used covariate adjustment, and only 7% employed an ordinal analysis approach. Considerable investment of resources in producing 191 completed RCTs for acute TBI management has resulted in very little translatable evidence. This may result from broad distribution of research effort, small samples, preponderance of single-center RCTs, and methodological shortcomings. More sophisticated RCT design, large multi-center RCTs in priority areas, increased focus on pre-clinical research, and alternatives to RCTs, such as comparative

  13. Psychosis following traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Arciniegas, David B; Harris, Susie N; Brousseau, Kristin M

    2003-11-01

    Psychosis is a relatively infrequent but potentially serious and debilitating consequence of traumatic brain injury (TBI), and one about which there is considerable scientific uncertainty and disagreement. There are several substantial clinical, epidemiological, and neurobiological differences between the post-traumatic psychoses and the primary psychotic disorders. The recognition of these differences may facilitate identification and treatment of patients whose psychosis is most appropriately regarded as post-traumatic. In the service of assisting psychiatrists and other mental health clinicians in the diagnosis and treatment of persons with post-traumatic psychoses, this article will review post-traumatic psychosis, including definitions relevant to describing the clinical syndrome, as well as epidemiologic, neurobiological, and neurogenetic factors attendant to it. An approach to evaluation and treatment will then be offered, emphasizing identification of the syndrome of post-traumatic psychosis, consideration of the differential diagnosis of this condition, and careful selection and administration of treatment interventions.

  14. Post-traumatic avascular necrosis of the femoral head predicted by preoperative technetium-99m antimony-colloid scan: an experimental and clinical study. [Rabbits; patients

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, J.H.

    1983-07-01

    Technetium-99m antimony colloid was used to visualize the bone marrow of the head of the femur within twenty-four hours after interruption of the blood supply by subcapital osteotomy and section of the ligamentum teres in thirteen rabbits and within twenty-four hours after a subcapital fracture in thirty patients. Of the rabbits, all showed loss of marrow radioactivity over the affected femoral head. Bone-imaging with technetium-99m methylene diphosphonate, in contrast, failed to demonstrate any abnormality in the avascular head of the femur for as long as forty-eight hours after osteotomy. This difference between the marrow scan and the bone scan was attributed to earlier loss of function in the marrow cells than in the osteocytes. The thirty patients who had a preoperative scan within twenty-four hours after sustaining a subcapital fracture were treated by internal fixation with a Richards screw and plate and were followed for as long as two years, or until the patient died or radiographs showed evidence of avascular necrosis. The preoperative technetium-99m antimony-colloid activity in the head of the fractured femur was normal in sixteen patients and absent in fourteen; two of the fourteen had no activity in either hip, which precluded assessment of the fractured hip in these patients. In fifteen of the sixteen hips, preservation of the uptake in the marrow of the head of the fractured femur preoperatively predicted normal healing. Late segmental collapse developed in the remaining hip. In eleven of the twelve patients who had loss of marrow activity in the femoral head preoperatively, avascular necrosis developed within two years.

  15. Indriven sphenoid wing as a cause of post-traumatic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Sumer, M M; Atasoy, H T; Unal, A; Kalayci, M; Mahmutyazicioglu, K; Erdem, O

    2003-11-01

    Post-traumatic epilepsy is more frequent after severe head injuries, however the severity of the trauma is not always correlated with the injured brain tissue. We report a patient whose seizures developed 4 years after a face trauma. Upward displacement of the sphenoid wing caused a contusion at the orbital surface of the frontal lobe. Computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalographic findings are presented. The patient responded well to commonly used antiepileptic drugs.

  16. Severe Cranioencephalic Trauma: Prehospital Care, Surgical Management and Multimodal Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael; M Rubiano, Andres; Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Calderon-Miranda, Willem; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; Blancas Rivera, Marco Antonio; Agrawal, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a leading cause of death in developed countries. It is estimated that only in the United States about 100,000 people die annually in parallel among the survivors there is a significant number of people with disabilities with significant costs for the health system. It has been determined that after moderate and severe traumatic injury, brain parenchyma is affected by more than 55% of cases. Head trauma management is critical is the emergency services worldwide. We present a review of the literature regarding the prehospital care, surgical management and intensive care monitoring of the patients with severe cranioecephalic trauma.

  17. Severe Cranioencephalic Trauma: Prehospital Care, Surgical Management and Multimodal Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael; M. Rubiano, Andres; Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Calderon-Miranda, Willem; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; Blancas Rivera, Marco Antonio; Agrawal, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a leading cause of death in developed countries. It is estimated that only in the United States about 100,000 people die annually in parallel among the survivors there is a significant number of people with disabilities with significant costs for the health system. It has been determined that after moderate and severe traumatic injury, brain parenchyma is affected by more than 55% of cases. Head trauma management is critical is the emergency services worldwide. We present a review of the literature regarding the prehospital care, surgical management and intensive care monitoring of the patients with severe cranioecephalic trauma.  PMID:27162922

  18. Ability of Serum Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein, Ubiquitin C-Terminal Hydrolase-L1, and S100B To Differentiate Normal and Abnormal Head Computed Tomography Findings in Patients with Suspected Mild or Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Welch, Robert D; Ayaz, Syed I; Lewis, Lawrence M; Unden, Johan; Chen, James Y; Mika, Valerie H; Saville, Ben; Tyndall, Joseph A; Nash, Marshall; Buki, Andras; Barzo, Pal; Hack, Dallas; Tortella, Frank C; Schmid, Kara; Hayes, Ronald L; Vossough, Arastoo; Sweriduk, Stephen T; Bazarian, Jeffrey J

    2016-01-15

    Head computed tomography (CT) imaging is still a commonly obtained diagnostic test for patients with minor head injury despite availability of clinical decision rules to guide imaging use and recommendations to reduce radiation exposure resulting from unnecessary imaging. This prospective multicenter observational study of 251 patients with suspected mild to moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI) evaluated three serum biomarkers' (glial fibrillary acidic protein [GFAP], ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L1 [UCH-L1] and S100B measured within 6 h of injury) ability to differentiate CT negative and CT positive findings. Of the 251 patients, 60.2% were male and 225 (89.6%) had a presenting Glasgow Coma Scale score of 15. A positive head CT (intracranial injury) was found in 36 (14.3%). UCH-L1 was 100% sensitive and 39% specific at a cutoff value >40 pg/mL. To retain 100% sensitivity, GFAP was 0% specific (cutoff value 0 pg/mL) and S100B had a specificity of only 2% (cutoff value 30 pg/mL). All three biomarkers had similar values for areas under the receiver operator characteristic curve: 0.79 (95% confidence interval; 0.70-0.88) for GFAP, 0.80 (0.71-0.89) for UCH-L1, and 0.75 (0.65-0.85) for S100B. Neither GFAP nor UCH-L1 curve values differed significantly from S100B (p = 0.21 and p = 0.77, respectively). In our patient cohort, UCH-L1 outperformed GFAP and S100B when the goal was to reduce CT use without sacrificing sensitivity. UCH-L1 values <40 pg/mL could potentially have aided in eliminating 83 of the 215 negative CT scans. These results require replication in other studies before the test is used in actual clinical practice.

  19. Diabetes Insipidus after Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Capatina, Cristina; Paluzzi, Alessandro; Mitchell, Rosalid; Karavitaki, Niki

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in many age groups. Neuroendocrine dysfunction has been recognized as a consequence of TBI and consists of both anterior and posterior pituitary insufficiency; water and electrolyte abnormalities (diabetes insipidus (DI) and the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH)) are amongst the most challenging sequelae. The acute head trauma can lead (directly or indirectly) to dysfunction of the hypothalamic neurons secreting antidiuretic hormone (ADH) or of the posterior pituitary gland causing post-traumatic DI (PTDI). PTDI is usually diagnosed in the first days after the trauma presenting with hypotonic polyuria. Frequently, the poor general status of most patients prevents adequate fluid intake to compensate the losses and severe dehydration and hypernatremia occur. Management consists of careful monitoring of fluid balance and hormonal replacement. PTDI is associated with high mortality, particularly when presenting very early following the injury. In many surviving patients, the PTDI is transient, lasting a few days to a few weeks and in a minority of cases, it is permanent requiring management similar to that offered to patients with non-traumatic central DI. PMID:26239685

  20. Evaluation after Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trudel, Tina M.; Halper, James; Pines, Hayley; Cancro, Lorraine

    2010-01-01

    It is important to determine if a traumatic brain injury (TBI) has occurred when an individual is assessed in a hospital emergency room after a car accident, fall, or other injury that affects the head. This determination influences decisions about treatment. It is essential to screen for the injury, because the sooner they begin appropriate…

  1. Early Enteral Combined with Parenteral Nutrition Treatment for Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: Effects on Immune Function, Nutritional Status and Outcomes(△).

    PubMed

    Ming-Chao, Fan; Qiao-Ling, Wang; Wei, Fang; Yun-Xia, Jiang; Lian-di, Li; Peng, Sun; Zhi-Hong, Wang

    2016-11-20

    Objective To compare the conjoint effect of enteral nutrition (EN) and parenteral nutrition (PN) with single EN or PN on immune function, nutritional status, complications and clinical outcomes of patients with severe traumatic brain injury (STBI). Methods A prospective randomized control trial was carried out from January 2009 to May 2012 in Neurological Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Patients of STBI who met the enrolment criteria (Glasgow Coma Scale score 6~8; Nutritional Risk Screening ≥3) were randomly divided into 3 groups and were admi- nistrated EN, PN or EN+PN treatments respectively. The indexes of nutritional status, immune function, complications and clinical outcomes were examined and compared statistically. Results There were 120 patients enrolled in the study, with 40 pationts in each group. In EN+PN group, T lymthocyte subsets CD3+%, CD4+%, ratio of CD3+/CD25+, ratio of CD4+/CD8+, the plasma levels of IgA, IgM, and IgG at 20 days after nutritional treatment were significantly increased compared to the baseline(t=4.32-30.00, P<0.01), and they were significantly higher than those of PN group (t=2.44-14.70; P<0.05,or P<0.01) with exception of CD4+/CD8+, higher than those of EN group (t=2.49-13.31, P<0.05, or P<0.01) with exceptions of CD3+/CD25+, CD4+/CD8+, IgG and IgM. For the nutritional status, the serum total protein, albumin, prealbumin and hemoglobin were significantly higher in the EN (t=5.87-11.91; P<0.01) and EN+PN groups (t=6.12-13.12; P<0.01) than those in PN group after nutrition treatment. The serum prealbumin was higher in EN+PN group than that in EN group (t=2.08; P<0.05). Compared to the PN group, the complication occurrence rates of EN+PN group were significantly lower in stress ulcer (22.5% vs. 47.5%; χ(2)= 8.24, P<0.01), intracranial infection (12.5% vs 32.5%;χ(2)= 6.88, P<0.01) and pyemia (25.0% vs. 47.5%; χ(2)= 6.57, P<0.05). Compared to the EN group, the complication occurrence rates of EN+PN group were significantly lower in

  2. Head stabilization measurements as a potential evaluation tool for comparison of persons with TBI and vestibular dysfunction with healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Sessoms, Pinata H; Gottshall, Kim R; Sturdy, Jordan; Viirre, Erik

    2015-03-01

    A large percentage of persons with traumatic brain injury incur some type of vestibular dysfunction requiring vestibular physical therapy. These injuries may affect the natural ability to stabilize the head while walking. A simple method of utilizing motion capture equipment to measure head movement while walking was used to assess improvements in head stabilization of persons undergoing computerized vestibular physical therapy and virtual reality training for treatment of their vestibular problems. Movement data from the head and sacrum during gait were obtained over several visits and then analyzed to determine improved oscillatory head movement relative to the sacrum. The data suggest that, over time with treatment, head stabilization improves and moves toward a pattern similar to that of a healthy control population. This simple analysis of measuring head stability could be transferred to smaller, portable systems that are easily utilized to measure head stability during gait for use in gait assessment and physical therapy training.

  3. Long-Term Behavioral Outcomes after a Randomized, Clinical Trial of Counselor-Assisted Problem Solving for Adolescents with Complicated Mild-to-Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Wade, Shari L; Taylor, H Gerry; Cassedy, Amy; Zhang, Nanhua; Kirkwood, Michael W; Brown, Tanya M; Stancin, Terry

    2015-07-01

    Family problem-solving therapy (FPST) has been shown to reduce behavior problems after pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI). It is unclear whether treatment gains are maintained. We sought to evaluate the maintenance of improvements in behavior problems after a Web-based counselor-assisted FPST (CAPS) intervention compared to an Internet resource comparison (IRC) intervention provided to adolescents within the initial year post-TBI. We hypothesized that family socioeconomic status, child educational status, and baseline levels of symptoms would moderate the efficacy of the treatment over time. Participants included 132 adolescents ages 12-17 years who sustained a complicated mild-to-severe TBI 1-6 months before study enrollment. Primary outcomes were the Child Behavior Checklist Internalizing and Externalizing Totals. Mixed-models analyses, using random intercepts and slopes, were conducted to examine group differences over time. There was a significant group×time×grade interaction (F(1,304)=4.42; p=0.03) for internalizing problems, with high school-age participants in CAPS reporting significantly lower symptoms at 18 months postbaseline than those in the IRC. Post-hoc analyses to elucidate the nature of effects on internalizing problems revealed significant group×time×grade interactions for the anxious/depressed (p=0.03) and somatic complaints subscales (p=0.04). Results also indicated significant improvement over time for CAPS participants who reported elevated externalizing behavior problems at baseline (F(1, 310)=7.17; p=0.008). Findings suggest that CAPS may lead to long-term improvements in behavior problems among older adolescents and those with pretreatment symptoms.

  4. An equiosmolar study on early intracranial physiology and long term outcome in severe traumatic brain injury comparing mannitol and hypertonic saline.

    PubMed

    Jagannatha, Aniruddha Tekkatte; Sriganesh, Kamath; Devi, Bhagavatula Indira; Rao, Ganne Sesha Umamaheswara

    2016-05-01

    The impact of hypertonic saline (HTS) on long term control of intracranial hypertension (ICH) is yet to be established. The current prospective randomized controlled study was carried out in 38 patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Over 450 episodes of refractory ICH were treated with equiosmolar boluses of 20% mannitol in 20 patients and 3.0% HTS in 18 subjects. Intracranial pressure (ICP) was monitored for 6days. ICP and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) were comparable between the groups. The mannitol group had a progressive increase in the ICP over the study period (p=0.01). A similar increase was not seen in the HTS group (p=0.1). The percentage time for which the ICP remained below a threshold of 20 mmHg on day6 was higher in the HTS group (63% versus 49%; p=0.3). The duration of inotrope requirement in the HTS group was less compared to the mannitol group (p=0.06). The slope of fall in ICP in response to a bolus dose at a given baseline value of ICP was higher with HTS compared to mannitol (p=0.0001). In-hospital mortality tended to be lower in the HTS group (3 versus 10; p=0.07) while mortality at 6 months was not different between the groups (6 versus 10; p=0.41). Dichotomized Glasgow Outcome Scale scores at 6months were comparable between the groups (p=0.21). To conclude, immediate physiological advantages seen with HTS over mannitol did not translate into long term benefit on ICP/CPP control or mortality of patients with TBI.

  5. Traumatic brain injury-induced sleep disorders

    PubMed Central

    Viola-Saltzman, Mari; Musleh, Camelia

    2016-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are frequently identified following traumatic brain injury, affecting 30%–70% of persons, and often occur after mild head injury. Insomnia, fatigue, and sleepiness are the most frequent sleep complaints after traumatic brain injury. Sleep apnea, narcolepsy, periodic limb movement disorder, and parasomnias may also occur after a head injury. In addition, depression, anxiety, and pain are common brain injury comorbidities with significant influence on sleep quality. Two types of traumatic brain injury that may negatively impact sleep are acceleration/deceleration injuries causing generalized brain damage and contact injuries causing focal brain damage. Polysomnography, multiple sleep latency testing, and/or actigraphy may be utilized to diagnose sleep disorders after a head injury. Depending on the disorder, treatment may include the use of medications, positive airway pressure, and/or behavioral modifications. Unfortunately, the treatment of sleep disorders associated with traumatic brain injury may not improve neuropsychological function or sleepiness. PMID:26929626

  6. Serum Levels of Caspase-Cleaved Cytokeratin-18 in Patients with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury Are Associated with Mortality: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Lorente, Leonardo; Martín, María M.; González-Rivero, Agustín F.; Argueso, Mónica; Ramos, Luis; Solé-Violán, Jordi; Cáceres, Juan J.; Jiménez, Alejandro; Borreguero-León, Juan M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective There have been found apoptotic changes in brain tissue samples from animals and humans after a traumatic brain injury (TBI). The protein cytokeratin 18 (CK-18), present in epithelial cells, is cleaved by the action of caspases during apoptosis, and the resulting fragments are released into the blood as caspase-cleaved CK (CCCK)-18. Circulating levels of CCCK-18, as biomarker of apoptosis, have been determined in patients with different processes; however, it has not been explored in TBI patients. Thus, the objective of this study was to determine whether there is an association between serum CCCK-18 levels and mortality and whether such levels could be used as a biomarker to predict outcomes in TBI patients. Methods A prospective, observational, multicenter study carried out in six Spanish Intensive Care Units. We included patients with severe TBI defined as Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) lower than 9; and were excluded those patients with Injury Severity Score (ISS) in non-cranial aspects higher than 9. We measured serum CCCK-18 levels at admission. The end-point of the study was 30-day mortality. Results Surviving patients (n = 73) showed lower serum CCCK-18 levels (P = 0.003) than non-survivors (n = 27). On ROC analysis, the area under the curve (AUC) for serum CCCK-18 levels as predictor of 30-day mortality was 0.69 (95% CI = 0.59–0.78; P = 0.006). We found in survival analysis that patients with serum CCCK-18 higher than 201 u/L had higher 30-day mortality than patients with lower levels (Hazard ratio = 3.9; 95% CI = 1.81–8.34; P<0.001). Regression analyses showed that serum CCCK-18 levels higher than 201 u/L were associated with 30-day mortality (OR = 8.476; 95% CI = 2.087–34.434; P = 0.003) after controlling for age and GCS. Conclusions The novel finding of our study was that serum CCCK-18 levels are associated with 30-day mortality and could be used as a prognostic biomarker in patients with severe TBI. PMID:25822281

  7. The M. D. Anderson Symptom Inventory-Head and Neck Module, a Patient-Reported Outcome Instrument, Accurately Predicts the Severity of Radiation-Induced Mucositis

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, David I. Mendoza, Tito R.; Chambers, Mark; Burkett, V. Shannon; Garden, Adam S.; Hessell, Amy C.; Lewin, Jan S.; Ang, K. Kian; Kies, Merrill S.

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To compare the M. D. Anderson Symptom Inventory-Head and Neck (MDASI-HN) module, a symptom burden instrument, with the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Head and Neck (FACT-HN) module, a quality-of-life instrument, for the assessment of mucositis in patients with head-and-neck cancer treated with radiotherapy and to identify the most distressing symptoms from the patient's perspective. Methods and Materials: Consecutive patients with head-and-neck cancer (n = 134) completed the MDASI-HN and FACT-HN before radiotherapy (time 1) and after 6 weeks of radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy (time 2). The mean global and subscale scores for each instrument were compared with the objective mucositis scores determined from the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. Results: The global and subscale scores for each instrument showed highly significant changes from time 1 to time 2 and a significant correlation with the objective mucositis scores at time 2. Only the MDASI scores, however, were significant predictors of objective Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events mucositis scores on multivariate regression analysis (standardized regression coefficient, 0.355 for the global score and 0.310 for the head-and-neck cancer-specific score). Most of the moderate and severe symptoms associated with mucositis as identified on the MDASI-HN are not present on the FACT-HN. Conclusion: Both the MDASI-HN and FACT-HN modules can predict the mucositis scores. However, the MDASI-HN, a symptom burden instrument, was more closely associated with the severity of radiation-induced mucositis than the FACT-HN on multivariate regression analysis. This greater association was most likely related to the inclusion of a greater number of face-valid mucositis-related items in the MDASI-HN compared with the FACT-HN.

  8. Post-traumatic Stress and Trauma-Related Subjective Distress: Comparisons Among Hispanics, African-Americans, and Whites with Severe Mental Illness.

    PubMed

    O'Hare, Thomas; Shen, Ce; Sherrer, Margaret V

    2017-02-06

    We tested the hypothesis with a sample of community mental health clients (N = 132) that Hispanic clients would report significantly greater post-traumatic stress symptoms than African-American or white clients when controlling for gender, psychiatric symptoms of SMI, and subjective distress from six of the most commonly reported trauma in the SMI literature. Results supported our main hypothesis: being self-identified as Hispanic was significantly associated with greater post-traumatic stress symptoms. Subjective distress from having been sexually abused along with being "Hispanic" were the only two significant variables left in the equation. Limitations of this study include its modest sample size.

  9. Traumatic extradural haematoma revealed after contralateral decompressive craniectomy.

    PubMed

    Nadig, Adarsh S; King, Andrew T

    2012-12-01

    Traumatic extradural haematoma following a severe head injury is well documented in neurosurgical literature. We report a case of traumatic extradural haematoma which initially was concealed by the high intracranial pressure (ICP) and revealed after the contralateral decompressive craniectomy. A 21-year-old roofer sustained severe head injury from a fall. The CT brain showed right sided fronto-temporal contusions with small acute subdural haematoma and left orbital roof fracture extending into the temporal bone. ICP was above 45 mmHg even after maximal medical therapy. Decompressive craniectomy was performed on the right side along with contusionectomy. Within an hour, ICP spiked and the CT brain showed left side extradural haematoma. The second surgery demonstrated a bleeding middle meningeal artery associated with the left temporal bone fracture. The clinical sequence of events, radiological and operative findings revealed this to be a traumatic extradural haematoma sustained at the initial trauma. This was revealed after the tamponade effect was released from the initial decompressive craniectomy on the contralateral side.

  10. Traumatic Asphyxia with Diaphragmatic Injury: 
A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lateef, Hussein

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic asphyxia, or Perthe’s syndrome, is a rare clinical syndrome characterized by cervicofacial cyanosis, petechiae, subconjunctival hemorrhage, neurological symptoms, and thoracic injury. It affects both adults and children after blunt chest traumas. The diagnosis of this condition is based mainly on the specific clinical signs, which should immediately bring to mind the severity of the trauma, the various probable types of pulmonary injuries, and the need for screening and careful assessment of other organs that might also be injured. In this report, we describe the case of a 39-year-old male who developed traumatic asphyxia after severe blunt chest trauma during his work at a construction site. The patient had multiple injuries to the chest, abdomen, head and neck, which were treated conservatively. An associated diaphragmatic injury was successfully treated by video-assisted thoracic surgery. This patient is one of five patients who were admitted to Saqr Hospital in the United Arab Emirates, diagnosed with traumatic asphyxia, and treated by mechanical ventilator, supportive measures, and fiberoptic bronchoscopy, for both diagnostic and therapeutic indications, in our unit in the period between July 2006 and June 2013. As traumatic asphyxia is a systemic injury, careful assessment of the patient and looking for other injuries is mandatory. Treatment usually involves supportive measures to the affected organs, but surgical intervention may sometimes prove to be an important part of the treatment. Bronchoscopy should be performed for diagnostic and therapeutic reasons because of the associated pulmonary and possible tracheobronchial injuries. PMID:25960842

  11. Disorder of Executive Function of the Brain after Head Injury and Mild Traumatic Brain Injury - Neuroimaging and Diagnostic Criteria for Implementation of Administrative Support in Japan.

    PubMed

    Shinoda, Jun; Asano, Yoshitaka

    2017-04-06

    The diagnotic criteria for disorder of the executive function of the brain (DEFB) as a syndrome of sequela were administratively established (ad-DEFB) in Japan in 2006 to support disabled patients whose impairment, limited to cognition (memory, attention, execution, and behavior), emerges after organic brain injuries regardless of physical deficits. However, some patients suffering from traumatic brain injury (TBI) have been excluded from receiving medico-social services. In particular, this tendency is more prominent in patients with mild TBI because no lesions are apparent on conventional computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the chronic phase. Recent development of new MRI neuroimaging modalities and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging makes it possible to detect regions of minute organic lesions and metabolic dysfunction in the brain where organic lesions may be absent or cannot be detected on conventional CT or MRI. In this review, we discuss diagnostic criteria for mild TBI and ad-DEFB, the relationship between the two disorders, characteristic neuroimaging [(MRI and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)] of diffuse brain injury including cerebral concussion, which is the principal cause of mild TBI, and suggested pathological mechanisms of ad-DEFB in DBI.

  12. Head Injury- A Maxillofacial Surgeon’s Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Choonthar, Muralee Mohan; Raghothaman, Ananthan; Prasad, Rajendra; Pandya, Kalpa

    2016-01-01

    Injuries and violence are one of the leading causes of mortality worldwide. A substantial portion of these injuries involve the maxillofacial region. Among the concomitant injuries, injuries to the head and cervical spine are amongst those that demand due consideration on account of their life threatening behaviour. Studies have shown that facial fractures have a strong association with traumatic brain injury. Knowledge of the types and mechanisms of traumatic brain injury is crucial for their treatment. Many a times, facial fractures tend to distract our attention from more severe and often life threatening injuries. Early diagnosis of these intracranial haemorrhage leads to prompt treatment which is essential to improve the outcome of these patients. An oral and maxillofacial surgeon should be able to suspect and diagnose head injury and also provide adequate initial management. PMID:26894193

  13. Epidemiology of mild traumatic brain injury and neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Raquel C; Yaffe, Kristine

    2015-05-01

    Every year an estimated 42 million people worldwide suffer a mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) or concussion. More severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a well-established risk factor for a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Recently, large epidemiological studies have additionally identified MTBI as a risk factor for dementia. The role of MTBI in risk of PD or ALS is less well established. Repetitive MTBI and repetitive sub-concussive head trauma have been linked to increased risk for a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). CTE is a unique neurodegenerative tauopathy first described in boxers but more recently described in a variety of contact sport athletes, military veterans, and civilians exposed to repetitive MTBI. Studies of repetitive MTBI and CTE have been limited by referral bias, lack of consensus clinical criteria for CTE, challenges of quantifying MTBI exposure, and potential for confounding. The prevalence of CTE is unknown and the amount of MTBI or sub-concussive trauma exposure necessary to produce CTE is unclear. This review will summarize the current literature regarding the epidemiology of MTBI, post-TBI dementia and Parkinson's disease, and CTE while highlighting methodological challenges and critical future directions of research in this field. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:Traumatic Brain Injury.

  14. Ability of Serum Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein, Ubiquitin C-Terminal Hydrolase-L1, and S100B To Differentiate Normal and Abnormal Head Computed Tomography Findings in Patients with Suspected Mild or Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ayaz, Syed I.; Lewis, Lawrence M.; Unden, Johan; Chen, James Y.; Mika, Valerie H.; Saville, Ben; Tyndall, Joseph A.; Nash, Marshall; Buki, Andras; Barzo, Pal; Hack, Dallas; Tortella, Frank C.; Schmid, Kara; Hayes, Ronald L.; Vossough, Arastoo; Sweriduk, Stephen T.; Bazarian, Jeffrey J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Head computed tomography (CT) imaging is still a commonly obtained diagnostic test for patients with minor head injury despite availability of clinical decision rules to guide imaging use and recommendations to reduce radiation exposure resulting from unnecessary imaging. This prospective multicenter observational study of 251 patients with suspected mild to moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI) evaluated three serum biomarkers' (glial fibrillary acidic protein [GFAP], ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L1 [UCH-L1] and S100B measured within 6 h of injury) ability to differentiate CT negative and CT positive findings. Of the 251 patients, 60.2% were male and 225 (89.6%) had a presenting Glasgow Coma Scale score of 15. A positive head CT (intracranial injury) was found in 36 (14.3%). UCH-L1 was 100% sensitive and 39% specific at a cutoff value >40 pg/mL. To retain 100% sensitivity, GFAP was 0% specific (cutoff value 0 pg/mL) and S100B had a specificity of only 2% (cutoff value 30 pg/mL). All three biomarkers had similar values for areas under the receiver operator characteristic curve: 0.79 (95% confidence interval; 0.70–0.88) for GFAP, 0.80 (0.71–0.89) for UCH-L1, and 0.75 (0.65–0.85) for S100B. Neither GFAP nor UCH-L1 curve values differed significantly from S100B (p = 0.21 and p = 0.77, respectively). In our patient cohort, UCH-L1 outperformed GFAP and S100B when the goal was to reduce CT use without sacrificing sensitivity. UCH-L1 values <40 pg/mL could potentially have aided in eliminating 83 of the 215 negative CT scans. These results require replication in other studies before the test is used in actual clinical practice. PMID:26467555

  15. Early-onset Infectious Complications among Penetrating and Severe Closed Traumatic Brain Injury in Active Duty Deployed during OIF and OEF, 2008-2013

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    Military traumatic brain injury and spinal column injury: 5-year study of the impact of blast and other military grade weaponry on the central...seizures, hydrocephalus, cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) leaks, infections inside the skull, vascular injuries, and cranial nerve injuries. 9-11 The...Infectious complications were a subset of medical complications grouped by type of infection (systemic, cerebral spinal fluid, pneumonia, fungal, and other

  16. [Mean ICP, ICP amplitude, mean AP and mean CPP dynamic in changing the position of the head of the bed in patients with severe TBI].

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    The study included 34 patient with severe TBI (GCS--5.6 +/- 1.2, age--35 +/- 8.2 years). ICP, AP and CPP monitored by Philips MP 4060 with ICM Plus software (UK). Autoregulation of blood flow was evaluated with Prx index. The backrest position was moving in the range 0-30-60-30-0 degrees. Minimal mean ICP was noted in 300 position. ICP in positions 0 degrees and 60 degrees did'nt differ significantly ICP in position 60 degrees was higher then ICP in position 30 degrees. ICP amplitude was raising during changing the position from 0 degrees to 60 degrees and was decreasing during reversing changing. Arterial pressure (AP) was decreasing during movement the head of the bed from 0 degrees to 60 degrees, the maximum of AP was noted in flat position. CPP was increasing during lowering the head of the bed. ICP amplitude and CPP had inverse correlation. ICP amplitude is a simple method of assessment of CPP adequacy during changing the position of the head of the bed in patients with intact autoregulation of cerebral blood flow.

  17. Acromegaly resolution after traumatic brain injury: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Anterior hypopituitarism is a common complication of head trauma, with a prevalence of 30% to 70% among long-term survivors. This is a much higher frequency than previously thought and suggests that most cases of post-traumatic hypopituitarism remain undiagnosed and untreated. Symptoms of hypopituitarism are very unspecific and very similar to those in traumatic brain injury patients in general, which makes hypopituitarism difficult to diagnose. The factors that predict the likelihood of developing hypopituitarism following traumatic brain injury remain poorly understood. The incidence of a specific hormone deficiency is variable, with growth hormone deficiency reported in 18% to 23% of cases. Case presentation A 23-year-old Hispanic man with a 2-year history of hypertension and diabetes presented with severe closed-head trauma producing diffuse axonal injury, subarachnoid hemorrhage and a brain concussion. A computed tomography scan showed a pituitary macroadenoma. The patient has clinical features of acromegaly and gigantism without other pituitary hyperfunctional manifestations or mass effect syndrome. A short-term post-traumatic laboratory test showed high levels of insulin like growth factor 1 and growth hormone, which are compatible with a growth hormone–producing pituitary tumor. At the third month post-trauma, the patient’s levels of insulin like growth factor 1 had decreased to low normal levels, with basal low levels of growth hormone. A glucose tolerance test completely suppressed the growth hormone, which confirmed resolution of acromegaly. An insulin tolerance test showed lack of stimulation of growth hormone and cortisol, demonstrating hypopituitarism of both axes. Conclusion Even though hypopituitarism is a frequent complication of traumatic brain injury, there are no reports in the literature, to the best of my knowledge, of patients with hyperfunctional pituitary adenomas, such as growth hormone–producing adenoma, that resolved

  18. Decreasing adrenergic or sympathetic hyperactivity after severe traumatic brain injury using propranolol and clonidine (DASH After TBI Study): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Severe TBI, defined as a Glasgow Coma Scale ≤ 8, increases intracranial pressure and activates the sympathetic nervous system. Sympathetic hyperactivity after TBI manifests as catecholamine excess, hypertension, abnormal heart rate variability, and agitation, and is associated with poor neuropsychological outcome. Propranolol and clonidine are centrally acting drugs that may decrease sympathetic outflow, brain edema, and agitation. However, there is no prospective randomized evidence available demonstrating the feasibility, outcome benefits, and safety for adrenergic blockade after TBI. Methods/Design The DASH after TBI study is an actively accruing, single-center, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, two-arm trial, where one group receives centrally acting sympatholytic drugs, propranolol (1 mg intravenously every 6 h for 7 days) and clonidine (0.1 mg per tube every 12 h for 7 days), and the other group, double placebo, within 48 h of severe TBI. The study uses a weighted adaptive minimization randomization with categories of age and Marshall head CT classification. Feasibility will be assessed by ability to provide a neuroradiology read for randomization, by treatment contamination, and by treatment compliance. The primary endpoint is reduction in plasma norepinephrine level as measured on day 8. Secondary endpoints include comprehensive plasma and urine catecholamine levels, heart rate variability, arrhythmia occurrence, infections, agitation measures using the Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale and Agitated Behavior scale, medication use (anti-hypertensive, sedative, analgesic, and antipsychotic), coma-free days, ventilator-free days, length of stay, and mortality. Neuropsychological outcomes will be measured at hospital discharge and at 3 and 12 months. The domains tested will include global executive function, memory, processing speed, visual-spatial, and behavior. Other assessments include the Extended Glasgow

  19. Early Recognition of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy through FDDNP PET Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    cumulative head trauma. All operational aspects of this study have been accomplished including local IRB approval, identification of potential... head injuries sustained in battle have been associated with the development of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Pathological series have...will examine whether FDDNP PET imaging correlates with, and/or can predict, decline in cognitive function in those exposed to cumulative head trauma

  20. Imaging in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy and Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Teena; Raince, Avtar; Manning, Erin; Tsiouris, Apostolos John

    2016-01-01

    Context: The diagnosis of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) can only be made pathologically, and there is no concordance of defined clinical criteria for premorbid diagnosis. The absence of established criteria and the insufficient imaging findings to detect this disease in a living athlete are of growing concern. Evidence Acquisition: The article is a review of the current literature on CTE. Databases searched include Medline, PubMed, JAMA evidence, and evidence-based medicine guidelines Cochrane Library, Hospital for Special Surgery, and Cornell Library databases. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: Chronic traumatic encephalopathy cannot be diagnosed on imaging. Examples of imaging findings in common types of head trauma are discussed. Conclusion: Further study is necessary to correlate the clinical and imaging findings of repetitive head injuries with the pathologic diagnosis of CTE. PMID:26733590

  1. Base deficit and serum lactate concentration in patients with post traumatic convulsion

    PubMed Central

    Afifi, Ibrahim; Parchani, Ashok; Al-Thani, Hassan; El-Menyar, Ayman; Alajaj, Raghad; Elazzazy, Shereen; Latifi, Rifat

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Traumatic brain injury is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and has been reported to be one of the risk factors for epileptic seizures. Abnormal blood lactate (LAC) and base deficit (BD) reflects hypoperfusion and could be used as metabolic markers to predict the outcome. The aim of this study is to assess the prognostic value of BD and LAC levels for post traumatic convulsion (PTC) in head injury patients. Materials and Methods: All head injury patients with PTC were studied for the demographics profile, mechanism of injury, initial vital signs, and injury severity score (ISS), respiratory rates, CT scan findings, and other laboratory investigations. The data were obtained from the trauma registry and medical records. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS software. Results: Amongst 3082 trauma patients, 1584 were admitted to the hospital. Of them, 401 patients had head injury. PTC was observed in 5.4% (22/401) patients. Out of the 22 head injury patients, 10 were presented with the head injury alone, whereas 12 patients had other associated injuries. The average age of the patients was 25 years, comprising predominantly of male patients (77%). Neither glasgow coma scale nor ISS had correlation with BD or LAC in the study groups. The mean level of BD and LAC was not statistically different in PTC group compared to controls. However, BD was significantly higher in patients with associated injuries than the isolated head injury group. Furthermore, there was no significant correlation amongst the two groups as far as LAC levels are concerned. Conclusion: Base deficit but not lactic acid concentration was significantly higher in head injury patients with associated injuries. Early resuscitation by pre-hospital personnel and in the trauma room might have impact in minimizing the effect of post traumatic convulsion on BD and LAC. PMID:27057221

  2. Traumatic grief and traumatic stress in survivors 12 years after the genocide in Rwanda.

    PubMed

    Mutabaruka, Jean; Séjourné, Nathalène; Bui, Eric; Birmes, Philippe; Chabrol, Henri

    2012-10-01

    The relationship between exposure to traumatic events and traumatic grief and the role of mediating and moderating variables [peritraumatic distress, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and symptoms of depression] were studied in survivors of the genocide of Batutsi in Rwanda in 1994. One hundred and two survivors (70 women, mean age 45 ± 7.53 years) participated in this retrospective study. All of them had lost a member of their family. The severity of traumatic exposure (Comprehensive Trauma Inventory), peritraumatic distress (Peritraumatic Distress Inventory), current PTSD symptoms (PTSD Checklist), depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory) and traumatic grief symptoms (Inventory of Traumatic Grief) was evaluated. A hierarchical multiple regression analysis was then conducted to examine the relative contribution of each variable to the symptoms of traumatic grief. The severity of traumatic exposure was related to traumatic grief symptoms (B=0.06, R=0.6, R(2) =0.36 and ß=0.6, t=7.54, p=0.00). The Baron and Kenny procedure (1986) (including three separate regressions), along with the Sobel test, was used to test mediation effects. Peritraumatic distress and PTSD symptoms may be mediating variables between traumatic exposure and traumatic grief. Traumatic grief is a complex but assessable entity, where previous distress and suffering result from both psychological trauma and the loss of a loved one.

  3. Motorcycle-Related Traumatic Brain Injuries: Helmet Use and Treatment Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Nnadi, Mathias Ogbonna Nnanna; Bankole, Olufemi Babatola; Fente, Beleudanyo Gbalipre

    2015-01-01

    Summary. With increasing use of motorcycle as means of transport in developing countries, traumatic brain injuries from motorcycle crashes have been increasing. The only single gadget that protects riders from traumatic brain injury is crash helmet. Objective. The objectives were to determine the treatment outcome among traumatic brain injury patients from motorcycle crashes and the rate of helmet use among them. Methods. It was a prospective, cross-sectional study of motorcycle-related traumatic brain injury patients managed in our center from 2010 to 2014. Patients were managed using our unit protocol for traumatic brain injuries. Data for the study were collected in accident and emergency, intensive care unit, wards, and outpatient clinic. The data were analyzed using Environmental Performance Index (EPI) info 7 software. Results. Ninety-six patients were studied. There were 87 males. Drivers were 65. Only one patient wore helmet. Majority of them were between 20 and 40 years. Fifty-three patients had mild head injuries. Favorable outcome among them was 84.35% while mortality was 12.5%. Severity of the injury affected the outcome significantly. Conclusion. Our study showed that the helmet use by motorcycle riders was close to zero despite the existing laws making its use compulsory in Nigeria. The outcome was related to severity of injuries. PMID:26317112

  4. An unusual recovery from traumatic brain injury in a young man

    PubMed Central

    Ratnasingam, Denesh; Lovick, Darren S.; Weber, Dennis M.; Buonocore, Richard V.; Williams, William V.

    2015-01-01

    Context Traumatic brain injury (TBI), a complex neurological traumatic incident where brain function is disrupted due to physical trauma, can be categorized in multiple ways and is commonly scored using the Glasgow Coma Scale. Severe closed head injury is a form of TBI with a Glasgow Coma Scale less than 8. The outcomes and prognosis are not uniform in the population but mortality is estimated at 30–50 percent. In this case of severe closed head injury, the patient was able to make a near full recovery after several neurosurgery and medical treatments and intercessory prayer to Saint Luigi Guanella. Findings A 21-year-old male patient received a severe closed head TBI and bilateral hemotympanum while rollerblading without a helmet. After imaging, a left frontal craniotomy and evacuation of epidural and subdural hematomas and resection of a left frontal contusion were performed. Intracranial pressure increased and the patient experienced a transtentorial herniation. He underwent a right frontotemporal and subtemporal craniectomy and evacuation of a frontotemporal subdural hematoma. The patient had intraventricular hemorrhage to which a ventriculostomy was performed and later converted to a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt for recurrent hydrocephalus. The patient was not expected to regain consciousness, but made a recovery after 24 days in the hospital and 10 days in rehabilitation. The patient followed up 6 months after injury for a cranioplasty and soon after returned to near baseline. Conclusions/clinical relevance In this extraordinary case, the severe closed head injury the patient sustained required intensive neurosurgical and medical treatment and the prognosis for recovery of consciousness was very poor; however, with treatment and rehabilitation and intercessory prayer to Saint Luigi Guanella, this patient was able to recover close to baseline from a Glasgow Coma Scale of 7. Lay Summary Head injuries vary in severity and traumatic brain injuries can be

  5. Bilateral traumatic facial paralysis. Case report.

    PubMed

    Undabeitia, Jose; Liu, Brian; Pendleton, Courtney; Nogues, Pere; Noboa, Roberto; Undabeitia, Jose Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    Although traumatic injury of the facial nerve is a relatively common condition in neurosurgical practice, bilateral lesions related to fracture of temporal bones are seldom seen. We report the case of a 38-year-old patient admitted to Intensive Care Unit after severe head trauma requiring ventilatory support (Glasgow Coma Scale of 7 on admission). A computed tomography (CT) scan confirmed a longitudinal fracture of the right temporal bone and a transversal fracture of the left. After successful weaning from respirator, bilateral facial paralysis was observed. The possible aetiologies for facial diplegia differ from those of unilateral injury. Due to the lack of facial asymmetry, it can be easily missed in critically ill patients, and both the high resolution CT scan and electromyographic studies can be helpful for correct diagnosis.

  6. Traumatic basilar impression: case report.

    PubMed

    Kuroiwa, T; Tanabe, H; Hasegawa, T; Ohta, T

    1995-07-01

    A very rare case of traumatic basilar impression is reported. The patient, a 57-year-old man, was hit on the head vertically in the parietal region. X ray of the cervical spine and computed tomography (CT) scans showed intracranial indentation of the atlas and the odontoid process with a depressed fracture around the foramen magnum. There are no previous reports about this type of fracture.

  7. Nucleus caudalis lesioning: Case report of chronic traumatic headache relief

    PubMed Central

    Sandwell, Stephen E.; El-Naggar, Amr O.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The nucleus caudalis dorsal root entry zone (DREZ) surgery is used to treat intractable central craniofacial pain. This is the first journal publication of DREZ lesioning used for the long-term relief of an intractable chronic traumatic headache. Case Description: A 40-year-old female experienced new-onset bi-temporal headaches following a traumatic head injury. Despite medical treatment, her pain was severe on over 20 days per month, 3 years after the injury. The patient underwent trigeminal nucleus caudalis DREZ lesioning. Bilateral single-row lesions were made at 1-mm interval between the level of the obex and the C2 dorsal nerve roots, using angled radiofrequency electrodes, brought to 80°C for 15 seconds each, along a path 1 to 1.2 mm posterior to the accessory nerve rootlets. The headache improved, but gradually returned. Five years later, her headaches were severe on over 24 days per month. The DREZ surgery was then repeated. Her headaches improved and the relief has continued for 5 additional years. She has remained functional, with no limitation in instrumental activities of daily living. Conclusions: The nucleus caudalis DREZ surgery brought long-term relief to a patient suffering from chronic traumatic headache. PMID:22059123

  8. The neuropathology of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Mckee, Ann C; Daneshvar, Daniel H

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury, a leading cause of mortality and morbidity, is divided into three grades of severity: mild, moderate, and severe, based on the Glasgow Coma Scale, the loss of consciousness, and the development of post-traumatic amnesia. Although mild traumatic brain injury, including concussion and subconcussion, is by far the most common, it is also the most difficult to diagnose and the least well understood. Proper recognition, management, and treatment of acute concussion and mild traumatic brain injury are the fundamentals of an emerging clinical discipline. It is also becoming increasingly clear that some mild traumatic brain injuries have persistent, and sometimes progressive, long-term debilitating effects. Evidence indicates that a single traumatic brain injury can precipitate or accelerate multiple age-related neurodegenerations, increase the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and motor neuron disease, and that repetitive mild traumatic brain injuries can provoke the development of a tauopathy, chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Clinically, chronic traumatic encephalopathy is associated with behavioral changes, executive dysfunction, memory loss, and cognitive impairments that begin insidiously and progress slowly over decades. Pathologically, chronic traumatic encephalopathy produces atrophy of the frontal and temporal lobes, thalamus, and hypothalamus, septal abnormalities, and abnormal deposits of hyperphosphorylated tau (τ) as neurofibrillary tangles and disordered neurites throughout the brain. The incidence and prevalence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy and the genetic risk factors critical to its development are currently unknown. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy frequently occurs as a sole diagnosis, but may be associated with other neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Lewy body disease, and motor neuron disease. Currently, chronic traumatic encephalopathy can be diagnosed only at

  9. Normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) modelling using spatial dose metrics and machine learning methods for severe acute oral mucositis resulting from head and neck radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Jamie A; Wong, Kee H; Welsh, Liam C; Jones, Ann-Britt; Schick, Ulrike; Newbold, Kate L; Bhide, Shreerang A; Harrington, Kevin J; Nutting, Christopher M; Gulliford, Sarah L

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Severe acute mucositis commonly results from head and neck (chemo)radiotherapy. A predictive model of mucositis could guide clinical decision-making and inform treatment planning. We aimed to generate such a model using spatial dose metrics and machine learning. Material and Methods Predictive models of severe acute mucositis were generated using radiotherapy dose (dose-volume and spatial dose metrics) and clinical data. Penalised logistic regression, support vector classification and random forest classification (RFC) models were generated and compared. Internal validation was performed (with 100-iteration cross-validation), using multiple metrics, including area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and calibration slope, to assess performance. Associations between covariates and severe mucositis were explored using the models. Results The dose-volume-based models (standard) performed equally to those incorporating spatial information. Discrimination was similar between models, but the RFCstandard had the best calibration. The mean AUC and calibration slope for this model were 0.71 (s.d.=0.09) and 3.9 (s.d.=2.2), respectively. The volumes of oral cavity receiving intermediate and high doses were associated with severe mucositis. Conclusions The RFCstandard model performance is modest-to-good, but should be improved, and requires external validation. Reducing the volumes of oral cavity receiving intermediate and high doses may reduce mucositis incidence. PMID:27240717

  10. Linear and angular head acceleration measurements in collegiate football.

    PubMed

    Rowson, Steven; Brolinson, Gunnar; Goforth, Mike; Dietter, Dave; Duma, Stefan

    2009-06-01

    Each year, between 1.6x10(6) and 3.8x10(6) concussions are sustained by athletes playing sports, with football having the highest incidence. The high number of concussions in football provides a unique opportunity to collect biomechanical data to characterize mild traumatic brain injury. Human head acceleration data for a range of impact severities were collected by instrumenting the helmets of collegiate football players with accelerometers. The helmets of ten Virginia Tech football players were instrumented with measurement devices for every game and practice for the 2007 football season. The measurement devices recorded linear and angular accelerations about each of the three axes of the head. Data for each impact were downloaded wirelessly to a sideline data collection system shortly after each impact occurred. Data were collected for 1712 impacts, creating a large and unbiased data set. While a majority of the impacts were of relatively low severity (<30 g and <2000 rad/s2), 172 impacts were greater than 40 g and 143 impacts were greater than 3000 rad/s2. No instrumented player sustained a clinically diagnosed concussion during the 2007 season. A large and unbiased data set was compiled by instrumenting the helmets of collegiate football players. Football provides a unique opportunity to collect head acceleration data of varying severity from human volunteers. The addition of concurrent concussive data may advance the understanding of the mechanics of mild traumatic brain injury. With an increased understanding of the biomechanics of head impacts in collegiate football and human tolerance to head acceleration, better equipment can be designed to prevent head injuries.

  11. [Continuous monitoring of oxygen saturation in the jugular vein bulb in severe head injuries. Management and case reviews].

    PubMed

    Larráyoz Iriarte, J M; Mariñelarena Huárriz, A C; Martínez de Losa Carvajal, S

    1999-01-01

    Since october 1996, the Intensive Care Unit of the Hospital of Navarra has carried out continuous monitoring of oxygen saturation in the bulb of the internal jugular vein (SjO2). This technique, used in patients with severe cranioencephalic trauma (SCET), is designed to facilitate care an ensure the use of adequate therapeutic measures in such patients. The present study has two parts: In the first part, SjO2 monitoring is defined and catheter insertion techniques, technical problems, and nursing care are described. In the second part, a retrospective review is made of patients admitted to the unit from october 1996 to october 1997 who underwent SjO2 monitoring. A total of 11 cases are included, the common features of which were: SCET, intracranial pressure over 20 mmHg, Glasgow score of 8 or less, and abnormal CAT study. This study provides a basis for developing a nursing protocol because familiarity with the technique allows problems to be prevented and/or resolved.

  12. What is the Relationship of Traumatic Brain Injury to Dementia?

    PubMed

    Mendez, Mario F

    2017-03-02

    There is a long history linking traumatic brain injury (TBI) with the development of dementia. Despite significant reservations, such as recall bias or concluding causality for TBI, a summary of recent research points to several conclusions on the TBI-dementia relationship. 1) Increasing severity of a single moderate-to-severe TBI increases the risk of subsequent Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common type of dementia. 2) Repetitive, often subconcussive, mild TBIs increases the risk for chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a degenerative neuropathology. 3) TBI may be a risk factor for other neurodegenerative disorders that can be associated with dementia. 4) TBI appears to lower the age of onset of TBI-related neurocognitive syndromes, potentially adding "TBI cognitive-behavioral features". The literature further indicates several specific risk factors for TBI-associated dementia: 5) any blast or blunt physical force to the head as long as there is violent head displacement; 6) decreased cognitive and/or neuronal reserve and the related variable of older age at TBI; and 7) the presence of apolipoprotein E ɛ4 alleles, a genetic risk factor for AD. Finally, there are neuropathological features relating TBI with neurocognitive syndromes: 8) acute TBI results in amyloid pathology and other neurodegenerative proteinopathies; 9) CTE shares features with neurodegenerative dementias; and 10) TBI results in white matter tract and neural network disruptions. Although further research is needed, these ten findings suggest that dose-dependent effects of violent head displacement in vulnerable brains predispose to dementia; among several potential mechanisms is the propagation of abnormal proteins along damaged white matter networks.

  13. Traumatic Neuroma at the Inferior Mesenteric Artery Stump after Rectal Cancer Surgery: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Sung Mi; Lee, Jae Young; Byeon, Sun Ju

    2016-11-25

    Traumatic neuroma results from regeneration attempts of the proximal end of an injured or severed nerve, resulting in a non-neoplastic nodular lesion. The lower extremity after amputation is the most common site, followed by the head and neck. Traumatic neuromas occurring in the abdomen, however, are rare. In the abdominal region, traumatic neuromas occur in the cystic duct stump and the common bile ducts as well as around the celiac trunk. This study reports a case of a 59-year-old man who presented with a traumatic neuroma arising at the stump of the inferior mesenteric artery after rectal cancer surgery. Traumatic neuromas at the stump of the inferior mesenteric artery have not been previously reported. The lesion exhibited atypical imaging features, including a well-enhanced nodule, a significant interval growth in size and a mild increase in 18F-fluo-rodeoxyglucose uptake, resembling lymph node metastasis. This case report will help physicians understand the sites of occurrence and imaging features of traumatic neuromas in the abdomen.

  14. Traumatic Fibromyositis

    PubMed Central

    Weinberger, Laurence M.

    1977-01-01

    Traumatic fibromyositis is not an inflammation; there is no fever, leukocytosis or increased sedimentation rate; electrical characteristics and serum enzyme levels are within normal limits, and there are no observable pathologic alterations, although they have been carefully searched for. Recent attempts to express the effects of muscular sprain or strain as a biochemical disturbance expressed in an unusual pattern of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes appear not only to be technically flawed but inconsistent with results of conventional enzyme studies on other muscle and interstitial inflammations. In the author's view, “traumatic” fibromyositis is no more than a verbal construct arrived at by adding an adjectival modifier to the old terms for idiopathic rheumatic disorders. An examination of the evolution of the concept of traumatic fibromyositis shows that it lacks validity as a clinical diagnosis and ought to be abandoned. PMID:268728

  15. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Omalu, Bennet

    2014-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative syndrome, which is caused by single, episodic, or repetitive blunt force impacts to the head and transfer of acceleration-deceleration forces to the brain. CTE presents clinically as a composite syndrome of mood disorders and behavioral and cognitive impairment, with or without sensorimotor impairment. Symptoms of CTE may begin with persistent symptoms of acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) following a documented episode of brain trauma or after a latent period that may range from days to weeks to months and years, up to 40 years following a documented episode of brain trauma or cessation of repetitive TBI. Posttraumatic encephalopathy is distinct from CTE, can be comorbid with CTE, and is a clinicopathologic syndrome induced by focal and/or diffuse, gross and/or microscopic destruction of brain tissue following brain trauma. The brain of a CTE sufferer may appear grossly unremarkable, but shows microscopic evidence of primary and secondary proteinopathies. The primary proteinopathy of CTE is tauopathy, while secondary proteinopathies may include, but are not limited to, amyloidopathy and TDP proteinopathy. Reported prevalence rates of CTE in cohorts exposed to TBI ranges from 3 to 80% across age groups.

  16. Development of self-awareness after severe traumatic brain injury through participation in occupation-based rehabilitation: mixed-methods analysis of a case series.

    PubMed

    Doig, Emmah; Kuipers, Pim; Prescott, Sarah; Cornwell, Petrea; Fleming, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. We examined participation in goal planning and development of self-awareness for people with impaired self-awareness after traumatic brain injury. METHOD. We performed a mixed-methods study of 8 participants recently discharged from inpatient rehabilitation. Self-awareness was measured using discrepancy between self and significant other ratings on the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Index (MPAI-4) at four time points. We calculated effect size to evaluate the change in MPAI-4 discrepancy over time. RESULTS. Seven participants identified their own goals. We found a large reduction in mean MPAI-4 discrepancy (M = 8.57, SD = 6.59, N = 7, d = 1.08) in the first 6 wk and a further small reduction (M = 5.33, SD = 9.09, N = 6, d = 0.45) in the second 6 wk of intervention. Case data indicated that 7 participants demonstrated some growth in self-awareness. CONCLUSION. Engagement in occupation-based, goal-directed rehabilitation appeared to foster awareness of injury-related changes to varying extents.

  17. [Neuroendocrine dysfunctions and their consequences following traumatic brain injury].

    PubMed

    Czirják, Sándor; Rácz, Károly; Góth, Miklós

    2012-06-17

    Posttraumatic hypopituitarism is of major public health importance because it is more prevalent than previously thought. The prevalence of hypopituitarism in children with traumatic brain injury is unknown. Most cases of posttraumatic hypopituitarism remain undiagnosed and untreated in the clinical practice, and it may contribute to the severe morbidity seen in patients with traumatic brain injury. In the acute phase of brain injury, the diagnosis of adrenal insufficiency should not be missed. Determination of morning serum cortisol concentration is mandatory, because adrenal insufficiency can be life threatening. Morning serum cortisol lower than 200 nmol/L strongly suggests adrenal insufficiency. A complete hormonal investigation should be performed after one year of the trauma. Isolated growth hormone deficiency is the most common deficiency after traumatic brain injury. Sports-related chronic repetitive head trauma (because of boxing, kickboxing, football and ice hockey) may also result in hypopituitarism. Close co-operation between neurosurgeons, endocrinologists, rehabilitation physicians and representatives of other disciplines is important to provide better care for these patients.

  18. Traumatic Brain Injury. Fact Sheet Number 18.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Information Center for Children and Youth with Disabilities, Washington, DC.

    This fact sheet describes traumatic brain injury (TBI), an injury of the brain caused by the head being hit by something or being shaken violently. It discusses the incidence of TBI, and describes its symptoms as changes in thinking and reasoning, understanding words, remembering things, paying attention, solving problems, thinking abstractly,…

  19. Traumatic Brain Injured Families: Therapeutic Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Teresa M.; Skaggs, Jobie L.; Kleist, David M.

    1997-01-01

    Defines traumatic brain injury (TBI) as an acquired injury to the head that results in long-term and often permanent physical and emotional disturbances that often has catastrophic impacts on families. Reviews six research articles regarding implications for both therapists and researchers working with TBI families. (Author/MKA)

  20. Understanding the Neuro-ophthalmology of Head Trauma: A Review of the Current Literature.

    PubMed

    Samra, Khawla Abu

    2014-01-01

    Head trauma is a major medical, social, economic, national, and public health priority issue in the United States. In severe head trauma, the overwhelming clinical manifestations are so compelling that damage to the visual system is most likely to be ignored. Both the afferent and efferent visual systems are susceptible to injury after head trauma, and physicians should be aware of the visual system and perform a thorough neuro-ophthalmic evaluation in patients presenting with head trauma.Most of the data available on neuro-ophthalmic complications of head trauma including cortical blindness, Horner's syndrome, traumatic internuclear ophthalmoplegia, and ocular motor palsy, comes from case reports highlighting the need for future studies to better understand these complications.This review summarizes some of the most important neuro-ophthalmic complications of head trauma including cortical blindness, Horner's syndrome, traumatic internuclear ophthalmoplegia, and ocular motor palsy. Search of the peer-reviewed literature was conducted using MEDLINE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Cochrane Library, Global Health, and MD Consult.

  1. [Long-latency components (N100, N200 and P300) of acoustic evoked potentials in prediction of mental recovery in severe traumatic brain injury].

    PubMed

    Oknina, L B; Sharova, E V; Zaĭtsev, O S; Zakharova, N E; Masherov, E L; Shekut'ev, G A; Kornienko, V N; Potapov, A A

    2011-01-01

    The authors analyzed correlations of amplitude and latency levels of N100, N200 and P300 components of acoustic evoked potentials (AEP) registered during sonic stimulation and counting of target-oriented stimuli in 22 patients in vegetative state and mutism as an outcome of traumatic brain injury. Results were analyzed with association of electrophysiological findings with data of diffusion-tensor MRI. 55 healthy volunteers were included into control group. It is described that patients in vegetative state with formal recovery to the level of clear consciousness develop all three components of AEP in response to target-oriented tone. The instruction "to counts" leads to their better development. Patients with restoration to minimal level of consciousness produce all components during audition of sounds and only N100 and N200 in response to standard tone after instruction "to count". It is discovered that levels of amplitude have bigger correlation according to Spearman's criterion with outcome in comparison to latency. There changes are more prominent in N100 and N200 components rather in P300. In addition, after instruction "to count sounds" the registered changes between stages of vegetative state and mutism are significant for leads of left hemisphere, and during audition of sounds--for sagittal leads. The study showed correspondence of acquired changes with MRI data. Chronic unconscious state is associated with changes in corpus callosum (degeneration fibers) and corticospinal tracts in the brainstem. The data are discussed in light of hypothesis of the role of morphofunctional disconnections (brainstem-thalamus and interhemispheric) in impairment of attention and in genesis of different forms of posttraumatic unconscious state.

  2. Traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Risdall, Jane E.; Menon, David K.

    2011-01-01

    There is an increasing incidence of military traumatic brain injury (TBI), and similar injuries are seen in civilians in war zones or terrorist incidents. Indeed, blast-induced mild TBI has been referred to as the signature injury of the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Assessment involves schemes that are common in civilcian practice but, in common with civilian TBI, takes little account of information available from modern imaging (particularly diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging) and emerging biomarkers. The efficient logistics of clinical care delivery in the field may have a role in optimizing outcome. Clinical care has much in common with civilian TBI, but intracranial pressure monitoring is not always available, and protocols need to be modified to take account of this. In addition, severe early oedema has led to increasing use of decompressive craniectomy, and blast TBI may be associated with a higher incidence of vasospasm and pseudoaneurysm formation. Visual and/or auditory deficits are common, and there is a significant risk of post-traumatic epilepsy. TBI is rarely an isolated finding in this setting, and persistent post-concussive symptoms are commonly associated with post-traumatic stress disorder and chronic pain, a constellation of findings that has been called the polytrauma clinical triad. PMID:21149359

  3. Magnetic Heads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoshima, Tokihiko

    Figure 6.1 shows how rapidly the areal density of hard disk drives (HDD) has been increasing over the past 20 years [1]. Several critical innovations were necessary to bring about such rapid progress in the field of magnetic recording [2]. One of the most significant innovations from the viewpoint of material improvement was the electrodeposition of permalloy (Ni80Fe20), which was introduced by IBM in 1979 as the core material of a thin-film inductive head to increase the magnetic recording density [3]. After the introduction of the magneto-resistive (MR) element as the read head and the electrodeposited permalloy as the write head by IBM in 1991 [4], the rate of increase in the recording density of HDDs jumped from 30% per year to 60% per year. Recently, a giant magneto-resistive (GMR) element has been used for the read element instead of the MR element. The rate of increase in the recording density jumped to over 100% per year in 1999, which is an incredible rate of increase. Since 2002, however, the rate of increase has decreased to 30%; thus, new innovations are required to maintain the rate of increase. In 2004, the practical use of perpendicular magnetic recording instead of longitudinal magnetic recording was announced [5]. This system is a critical innovation for developing high-performance HDD systems with high-recording density. The design of the magnetic recording head was changed because of the change of the recording system.

  4. Prevalence and monthly distribution of head lice using two diagnostic procedures in several age groups in Uberlândia, State of Minas Gerais, Southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Borges, Raquel; Silva, Juliana J; Rodrigues, Rosângela M; Mendes, Júlio

    2007-01-01

    Some epidemiological characteristics of head lice, Pediculus capitis, were studied using two procedures: cut hair analysis and head inspection. Higher prevalence rates were observed in the middle and at the end of the school terms. Both procedures indicated that children were the main reservoir for this type of pediculosis in Uberlândia.

  5. 45 CFR 1308.16 - Eligibility criteria: Traumatic brain injury.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Eligibility criteria: Traumatic brain injury. 1308.16 Section 1308.16 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, HEAD START PROGRAM HEAD...

  6. Fiberoptic intraparenchymal brain pressure monitoring with the Camino V420 monitor: reflections on our experience in 163 severely head-injured patients.

    PubMed

    Poca, Maria-Antonia; Sahuquillo, Juan; Arribas, Mercedes; Báguena, Marcelino; Amorós, Sonia; Rubio, Enrique

    2002-04-01

    To assess the safety and accuracy of the Camino intraparenchymal sensor, we prospectively evaluated hemorrhagic complications, zero-drift, infection, and system malfunction in 163 patients monitored after a severe head injury. Mean duration of intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring was 5 +/- 2.2 days (range: 12 h to 11 days). Of the 141 patients with a control CT scan, four showed a 1-2-cc collection of blood at the catheter's end. When removed, the sensors underread the true ICP value (negative zero-drift) in 80 of the 126 sensors evaluated (63.5%). Fourteen sensors showed no zero-drift, and 32 sensors overread the true ICP value (positive zero-drift) (median: -1 mm Hg; interquartile range: -4 to +1 mm Hg). No significant relationship was found between zero-drift, the surgeon who implanted the sensor, intracranial hypertension, or duration of ICP monitoring. No clinical infections could be attributed to the devices. Sixteen patients (9.8%) required more than one ICP sensor due to malfunctioning of the system. In conclusion, continuous ICP monitoring using the Camino intraparenchymal sensor has a low complication rate. However, this sensor may underread the real ICP values in a high number of patients. The lack of correlation between duration of ICP monitoring and zero-drift suggests that, contrary to the recommendations of other reports, the intraparenchymatous Camino sensor can provide reliable readings after the fifth day of use.

  7. Early and Severe Radiation Toxicity Associated with Concurrent Sirolimus in an Organ Transplant Recipient with Head and Neck Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Manyam, Bindu V; Nwizu, Tobenna I; Rahe, Melissa L; Harr, Bridgett A; Koyfman, Shlomo A

    2015-10-01

    We present a case of a 71-year-old man with a history of liver transplantation who was treated with adjuvant radiotherapy with concurrent cisplatin for recurrent cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. The patient was transitioned from tacrolimus to sirolimus for immunosuppression immediately prior to the start of radiation therapy, with the goal of reducing the risk for further skin cancer recurrence. The patient developed severe normal tissue toxicity, disproportionate to the dose delivered. He was diagnosed with Grade 4 esophagitis and mucositis after just 2,400 cGy in 12 fractions (planned 6,400 cGy in 32 fractions), requiring cessation of therapy. Six months later, the patient was diagnosed with local recurrence and distant metastases in the lung, and unfortunately passed away one month later. Randomized data have demonstrated the anti-neoplastic benefit of sirolimus. Pre-clinical studies and animal models have suggested that sirolimus may be a radiation sensitizer; however, the literature is limited regarding the clinical translation of these biologic findings. The case we presented reflects that concurrent radiation therapy with sirolimus may enhance the cytotoxic effects of radiation therapy and contribute to dose-limiting toxicity. Certainly, further study is necessary to explore this observation.

  8. Therapeutic Hypothermia Reduces Intracranial Pressure and Partial Brain Oxygen Tension in Patients with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: Preliminary Data from the Eurotherm3235 Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Jonathan; Andrews, Peter J.D.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant cause of disability and death and a huge economic burden throughout the world. Much of the morbidity associated with TBI is attributed to secondary brain injuries resulting in hypoxia and ischemia after the initial trauma. Intracranial hypertension and decreased partial brain oxygen tension (PbtO2) are targeted as potentially avoidable causes of morbidity. Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) may be an effective intervention to reduce intracranial pressure (ICP), but could also affect cerebral blood flow (CBF). This is a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from 17 patients admitted to the Western General Hospital, Edinburgh. Patients with an ICP >20 mmHg refractory to initial therapy were randomized to standard care or standard care and TH (intervention group) titrated between 32°C and 35°C to reduce ICP. ICP and PbtO2 were measured using the Licox system and core temperature was recorded through rectal thermometer. Data were analyzed at the hour before cooling, the first hour at target temperature, 2 consecutive hours at target temperature, and after 6 hours of hypothermia. There was a mean decrease in ICP of 4.3±1.6 mmHg (p<0.04) from 15.7 to 11.4 mmHg, from precooling to the first epoch of hypothermia in the intervention group (n=9) that was not seen in the control group (n=8). A decrease in ICP was maintained throughout all time periods. There was a mean decrease in PbtO2 of 7.8±3.1 mmHg (p<0.05) from 30.2 to 22.4 mmHg, from precooling to stable hypothermia, which was not seen in the control group. This research supports others in demonstrating a decrease in ICP with temperature, which could facilitate a reduction in the use of hyperosmolar agents or other stage II interventions. The decrease in PbtO2 is not below the suggested treatment threshold of 20 mmHg, but might indicate a decrease in CBF. PMID:26060880

  9. The traumatic potential of a projectile shot from a sling.

    PubMed

    Borovsky, Igor; Lankovsky, Zvi; Kalichman, Leonid; Belkin, Victor

    2017-03-01

    Herein, we analyze the energy parameters of stones of various weights and shapes shot from a sling and based on this data evaluate its traumatic potential. Four police officers proficient in the use of a sling participated in the trials. The following projectile types, shot using an overhead technique at a target 100m away were: round steel balls of different sizes and weights (24mm, 57g; 32mm, 135g; 38mm, 227g); different shaped stones weighing 100-150g and 150-200g and a golf ball (47g). Our data indicated that projectiles shot from unconventional weapons such as a sling, have serious traumatic potential for unprotected individuals and can cause blunt trauma of moderate to critical severity such as fractures of the trunk, limb, and facial skull bone, depending on the weight and shape of the projectile and the distance from the source of danger. Asymmetrically shaped projectiles weighing more than 100g were the most dangerous. Projectiles weighing more than 100g can cause bone fractures of the trunk and limbs at distances of up to 60m from the target and may cause serious head injuries to an unprotected person (Abbreviated Injury Scale 4-5) at distances up to 200m from the target. Due to the traumatic potential of projectiles shot from a sling, the police must wear full riot gear and keep at a distance of at least 60m from the source of danger in order to avoid serious injury. Furthermore, given the potential for serious head injuries, wearing a helmet with a visor is mandatory at distances up to 200m from the source of danger.

  10. An examination of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scales, Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) in individuals with complicated mild, moderate and Severe traumatic brain injury (TBI).

    PubMed

    Carlozzi, Noelle E; Kirsch, Ned L; Kisala, Pamela A; Tulsky, David S

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the clinical utility of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scales-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) in individuals with complicated mild, moderate or severe TBI. One hundred individuals with TBI (n = 35 complicated mild or moderate TBI; n = 65 severe TBI) and 100 control participants matched on key demographic variables from the WAIS-IV normative dataset completed the WAIS-IV. Univariate analyses indicated that participants with severe TBI had poorer performance than matched controls on all index scores and subtests (except Matrix Reasoning). Individuals with complicated mild/moderate TBI performed more poorly than controls on the Working Memory Index (WMI), Processing Speed Index (PSI), and Full Scale IQ (FSIQ), and on four subtests: the two processing speed subtests (SS, CD), two working memory subtests (AR, LN), and a perceptual reasoning subtest (BD). Participants with severe TBI had significantly lower scores than the complicated mild/moderate TBI on PSI, and on three subtests: the two processing speed subtests (SS and CD), and the new visual puzzles test. Effect sizes for index and subtest scores were generally small-to-moderate for the group with complicated mild/moderate and moderate-to-large for the group with severe TBI. PSI also showed good sensitivity and specificity for classifying individuals with severe TBI versus controls. Findings provide support for the clinical utility of the WAIS-IV in individuals with complicated mild, moderate, and severe TBI.

  11. Integrated Exposure-Based Therapy for Co-Occurring Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Substance Dependence: Predictors of Change in PTSD Symptom Severity

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Katherine L.; Barrett, Emma L.; Merz, Sabine; Rosenfeld, Julia; Ewer, Philippa L.; Sannibale, Claudia; Baker, Amanda L.; Hopwood, Sally; Back, Sudie E.; Brady, Kathleen T.; Teesson, Maree

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines factors associated with change in PTSD symptom severity among individuals randomised to receive an integrated exposure-based psychotherapy for PTSD and substance dependence–Concurrent Treatment of PTSD and Substance Use Disorders Using Prolonged Exposure (COPE). Outcomes examined include change in PTSD symptom severity as measured by the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS), and the reliability and clinical significance of change in PTSD symptom severity. Factors examined include patient baseline characteristics, treatment characteristics, and events over follow-up. The mean difference in CAPS score was 38.24 (SE 4.81). Approximately half (49.1%) demonstrated a reliable and clinically significant improvement in PTSD symptom severity. No one was classified as having demonstrated clinically significant worsening of symptoms. Three independent predictors of reductions in PTSD symptom severity were identified: baseline PTSD symptom severity (β 0.77, SE 0.23, p = 0.001), number of traumas experienced prior to baseline (β −0.30, SE 0.15, p = 0.049), and number of sessions attended (β 2.05, SE 0.87, p = 0.024). The present study provides further evidence regarding the safety of the COPE treatment and factors associated with improvement in PTSD symptom severity. The identification of only a small number of predictors of the outcome points to the broad applicability of the COPE treatment to PTSD and substance use disorder (SUD) patients. PMID:27854264

  12. Mild traumatic brain injury is associated with reduced cortical thickness in those at risk for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Jasmeet P; Logue, Mark W; Sadeh, Naomi; Spielberg, Jeffrey M; Verfaellie, Mieke; Hayes, Scott M; Reagan, Andrew; Salat, David H; Wolf, Erika J; McGlinchey, Regina E; Milberg, William P; Stone, Annjanette; Schichman, Steven A; Miller, Mark W

    2017-01-11

    Moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury is one of the strongest environmental risk factors for the development of neurodegenerative diseases such as late-onset Alzheimer's disease, although it is unclear whether mild traumatic brain injury, or concussion, also confers risk. This study examined mild traumatic brain injury and genetic risk as predictors of reduced cortical thickness in brain regions previously associated with early Alzheimer's disease, and their relationship with episodic memory. Participants were 160 Iraq and Afghanistan War veterans between the ages of 19 and 58, many of whom carried mild traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder diagnoses. Whole-genome polygenic risk scores for the development of Alzheimer's disease were calculated using summary statistics from the largest Alzheimer's disease genome-wide association study to date. Results showed that mild traumatic brain injury moderated the relationship between genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease and cortical thickness, such that individuals with mild traumatic brain injury and high genetic risk showed reduced cortical thickness in Alzheimer's disease-vulnerable regions. Among males with mild traumatic brain injury, high genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease was associated with cortical thinning as a function of time since injury. A moderated mediation analysis showed that mild traumatic brain injury and high genetic risk indirectly influenced episodic memory performance through cortical thickness, suggesting that cortical thinning in Alzheimer's disease-vulnerable brain regions is a mechanism for reduced memory performance. Finally, analyses that examined the apolipoprotein E4 allele, post-traumatic stress disorder, and genetic risk for schizophrenia and depression confirmed the specificity of the Alzheimer's disease polygenic risk finding. These results provide evidence that mild traumatic brain injury is associated with greater neurodegeneration and reduced memory performance

  13. Dizziness following head injury: a neuro-otological study.

    PubMed

    Davies, R A; Luxon, L M

    1995-03-01

    Dizziness is a frequent and debilitating complications of head injury and accounts for increasing numbers of medico-legal claims. A detailed neuro-otological study was carried out from the records of 100 patients with post-traumatic dizziness to explore the neuro-otological basis of their symptoms: 50 patients presenting for medico-legal purposes (group I) and 50 presenting for management of their vestibular symptoms (group II). The two groups showed a similar sex distribution, a similar range of causes of head injury and similar severity of head injury (72 minor, 24 moderate and 4 severe). Of the 100, 88 showed at least one audio-vestibular abnormality on testing. Vertigo of the benign positional paroxysmal type was the commonest vestibular diagnosis in both groups (61/100), and only 8 patients showed central vestibular abnormalities. Fifty-three patients had audiometric abnormalities attributable to the head injury, the commonest of which was a high-tone sensorineural hearing loss. There was no significant difference in the incidence of any of the abnormalities in the medico-legal group (group I) when compared with the symptom management group (group II). The results provide strong evidence for an organic basis to recurring dizziness after head injury, whether or not a claim for compensation is pending, and emphasize the need for specialist neuro-otological investigation if abnormalities are to be identified and managed correctly.

  14. Evaluation of a laboratory model of human head impact biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Fidel; Shull, Peter B.; Camarillo, David B.

    2015-01-01

    This work describes methodology for evaluating laboratory models of head impact biomechanics. Using this methodology, we investigated: how closely does twin-wire drop testing model head rotation in American football impacts? Head rotation is believed to cause mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) but helmet safety standards only model head translations believed to cause severe TBI. It is unknown whether laboratory head impact models in safety standards, like twin-wire drop testing, reproduce six degree-of-freedom (6DOF) head impact biomechanics that may cause mTBI. We compared 6DOF measurements of 421 American football head impacts to twin-wire drop tests at impact sites and velocities weighted to represent typical field exposure. The highest rotational velocities produced by drop testing were the 74th percentile of non-injury field impacts. For a given translational acceleration level, drop testing underestimated field rotational acceleration by 46% and rotational velocity by 72%. Primary rotational acceleration frequencies were much larger in drop tests (~100Hz) than field impacts (~10Hz). Drop testing was physically unable to produce acceleration directions common in field impacts. Initial conditions of a single field impact were highly resolved in stereo high-speed video and reconstructed in a drop test. Reconstruction results reflected aggregate trends of lower amplitude rotational velocity and higher frequency rotational acceleration in drop testing, apparently due to twin-wire constraints and the absence of a neck. These results suggest twin-wire drop testing is limited in modeling head rotation during impact, and motivate continued evaluation of head impact models to ensure helmets are tested under conditions that may cause mTBI. PMID:26117075

  15. Evaluation of a laboratory model of human head impact biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Fidel; Shull, Peter B; Camarillo, David B

    2015-09-18

    This work describes methodology for evaluating laboratory models of head impact biomechanics. Using this methodology, we investigated: how closely does twin-wire drop testing model head rotation in American football impacts? Head rotation is believed to cause mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) but helmet safety standards only model head translations believed to cause severe TBI. It is unknown whether laboratory head impact models in safety standards, like twin-wire drop testing, reproduce six degree-of-freedom (6DOF) head impact biomechanics that may cause mTBI. We compared 6DOF measurements of 421 American football head impacts to twin-wire drop tests at impact sites and velocities weighted to represent typical field exposure. The highest rotational velocities produced by drop testing were the 74th percentile of non-injury field impacts. For a given translational acceleration level, drop testing underestimated field rotational acceleration by 46% and rotational velocity by 72%. Primary rotational acceleration frequencies were much larger in drop tests (~100 Hz) than field impacts (~10 Hz). Drop testing was physically unable to produce acceleration directions common in field impacts. Initial conditions of a single field impact were highly resolved in stereo high-speed video and reconstructed in a drop test. Reconstruction results reflected aggregate trends of lower amplitude rotational velocity and higher frequency rotational acceleration in drop testing, apparently due to twin-wire constraints and the absence of a neck. These results suggest twin-wire drop testing is limited in modeling head rotation during impact, and motivate continued evaluation of head impact models to ensure helmets are tested under conditions that may cause mTBI.

  16. Influence of the severity and location of bodily injuries on post-concussive and combat stress symptom reporting after military-related concurrent mild traumatic brain injuries and polytrauma.

    PubMed

    French, Louis M; Lange, Rael T; Marshall, Kathryn; Prokhorenko, Olga; Brickell, Tracey A; Bailie, Jason M; Asmussen, Sarah B; Ivins, Brian; Cooper, Douglas B; Kennedy, Jan E

    2014-10-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) sustained in combat frequently co-occur with significant bodily injuries. Intuitively, more extensive bodily injuries might be associated with increased symptom reporting. In 2012, however, French et al. demonstrated an inverse relation between bodily injury severity and symptom reporting. This study expands on that work by examining the influence of location and severity of bodily injuries on symptom reporting after mild TBI. Participants were 579 US military service members who sustained an uncomplicated mild TBI with concurrent bodily injuries and who were evaluated at two military medical centers. Bodily injury severity was quantified using a modified Injury Severity Score (ISSmod). Participants completed the Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory (NSI) and the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist (PCL-C), on average, 2.5 months post-injury. There was a significant negative association between ISSmod scores and NSI (r=-0.267, p<0.001) and PCL-C (r=-0.273, p<0.001) total scores. Using linear regression to examine the relation between symptom reporting and injury severity across the six ISS body regions, three body regions were significant predictors of the NSI total score (face; p<0.001; abdomen; p=0.003; extremities; p<0.001) and accounted for 9.3% of the variance (p<0.001). For the PCL-C, two body regions were significant predictors of the PCL-C total score (face; p<0.001; extremities; p<0.001) and accounted for 10.5% of the variance. There was an inverse relation between bodily injury severity and symptom reporting in this sample. Hypothesized explanations include underreporting of symptoms, increased peer support, disruption of fear conditioning because of acute morphine use, or delayed expression of symptoms.

  17. A Review of Sport-Related Head Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Nagahiro, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    We review current topics in sport-related head injuries including acute subdural hematoma (ASDH), traumatic cerebrovascular disease, cerebral concussion, and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Sports-related ASDH is a leading cause of death and severe morbidity in popular contact sports like American football and Japanese judo. Rotational acceleration can cause either cerebral concussion or ASDH due to rupture of a parasagittal bridging vein. Although rare, approximately 80% of patients with cerebral infarction due to sport participation are diagnosed with ischemia or infarction due to arterial dissection. Computed tomography angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, and ultrasound are useful for diagnosing arterial dissection; ultrasound is particularly useful for detecting dissection of the common and internal carotid arteries. Repeated sports head injuries increase the risks of future concussion, cerebral swelling, ASDH, and CTE. To avoid fatal consequences of CTE, it is essential to understand the criteria for safe post-concussion sports participation. Once diagnosed with a concussion, an athlete should not be allowed to return to play on the same day and should not resume sports before the concussion symptoms have completely resolved. Information about the risks and management of head injuries in different sports should be widely disseminated in educational institutions and by sport organization public relations campaigns. PMID:27182494

  18. Head Lice

    MedlinePlus

    Head lice are parasitic wingless insects. They live on people's heads and feed on their blood. An adult louse ... Children ages 3-11 and their families get head lice most often. Personal hygiene has nothing to ...

  19. Head Lice

    MedlinePlus

    ... Schedules Nutrient Shortfall Questionnaire Home Diseases and Conditions Head Lice Head Lice Condition Family HealthKids and Teens Share Head Lice Table of Contents1. Overview2. Symptoms3. Causes4. Prevention5. ...

  20. Homogeneity of Severe Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptom Profiles in Children and Adolescents Across Gender, Age, and Traumatic Experiences Related to 9/11.

    PubMed

    Guffanti, Guia; Geronazzo-Alman, Lupo; Fan, Bin; Duarte, Cristiane S; Musa, George J; Hoven, Christina W

    2016-10-01

    Patients with a posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnosis according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 1994) will very likely not share all of the same symptoms, a consequence of the polythetic approach used in the DSM. We examined heterogeneity in the latent structure of PTSD symptoms using data from a previously published sample of 8,236 youth a subset of which had been exposed to the September 11, 2001 attacks (N = 6,670; Hoven et al., 2005). Latent class analysis was applied (a) to PTSD symptoms alone, (b) to symptoms in combination with impairment indicators, and (c) to PTSD symptoms when stratified by age and gender, as well as by empirically defined classes of exposure. We identified 4 symptom classes: no disturbance (49.4%), intermediate disturbance (2 classes; 21.5% and 18.6%, respectively), and severe disturbance (10.5%). These classes varied not only in the severity of symptoms, but also in the configuration of symptoms. We observed a high probability of endorsing both PTSD symptoms and indicators of impairment only in the severe disturbance class. A similar 4-class structure was found when the data were stratified by age, gender, and exposure classes. There were no significant differences as a function of age, gender, or exposure in the presence of severe PTSD. Heterogeneity was observed at intermediate levels of PTSD symptom severity. The specific PTSD symptoms that defined the severe PTSD profile could constitute the pathogenic aspects of a largely invariant and clinically meaningful PTSD syndrome.

  1. Hypoaminoacidemia Characterizes Chronic Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Durham, William J; Foreman, Jack P; Randolph, Kathleen M; Danesi, Christopher P; Spratt, Heidi; Masel, Brian D; Summons, Jennifer R; Singh, Charan K; Morrison, Melissa; Robles, Claudia; Wolfram, Cindy; Kreber, Lisa A; Urban, Randall J; Sheffield-Moore, Melinda; Masel, Brent E

    2017-01-15

    Individuals with a history of traumatic brain injury (TBI) are at increased risk for a number of disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and chronic traumatic encephalopathy. However, mediators of the long-term morbidity are uncertain. We conducted a multi-site, prospective trial in chronic TBI patients (∼18 years post-TBI) living in long-term 24-h care environments and local controls without a history of head injury. Inability to give informed consent was exclusionary for participation. A total of 41 individuals (17 moderate-severe TBI, 24 controls) were studied before and after consumption of a standardized breakfast to determine if concentrations of amino acids, cytokines, C-reactive protein, and insulin are potential mediators of long-term TBI morbidity. Analyte concentrations were measured in serum drawn before (fasting) and 1 h after meal consumption. Mean ages were 44 ± 15 and 49 ± 11 years for controls and chronic TBI patients, respectively. Chronic TBI patients had significantly lower circulating concentrations of numerous individual amino acids, as well as essential amino acids (p = 0.03) and large neutral amino acids (p = 0.003) considered as groups, and displayed fundamentally altered cytokine-amino acid relationships. Many years after injury, TBI patients exhibit abnormal metabolic responses and altered relationships between circulating amino acids, cytokines, and hormones. This pattern is consistent with TBI, inducing a chronic disease state in patients. Understanding the mechanisms causing the chronic disease state could lead to new treatments for its prevention.

  2. What do Youth Report as a Traumatic Event? Toward a Developmentally Informed Classification of Traumatic Stressors

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Leslie K.; Weems, Carl F.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore youth reports of traumatic events by 1) identifying the types of events that children and adolescents report as traumatic in their lives, 2) investigating the association between self reported traumatic events and self and parent reported emotional problems and 3) by examining developmental differences in the types and severity of the events reported as traumatic. Information regarding traumas and symptoms was collected from a sample of youth aged 6–17 using The Child PTSD Checklist. A coding system was developed for classifying the events reported. Findings suggest that youth reported a wide variety of experiences as traumatic that could be reliably coded and classified, and that youth reporting traumatic events and symptoms consistent with PTSD evidence higher levels of emotional, and behavioral problems (via parent and child report) than youth not reporting traumatic events. Youth aged 13–17 tended to report traumas that were rated by independent coders as more severe than youth aged 6–12. While the types of events reported did not differ in PTSD symptoms and other emotional, and behavioral problems there were differences in objective ratings of physical severity and psychological intensity. Implications of the findings are discussed in terms of the creation of developmentally informed classification of traumatic stressors. PMID:20414479

  3. Effects of a Sensory Stimulation by Nurses and Families on Level of Cognitive Function, and Basic Cognitive Sensory Recovery of Comatose Patients With Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Randomized Control Trial

    PubMed Central

    Moattari, Marzieh; Alizadeh Shirazi, Fatemeh; Sharifi, Nasrin; Zareh, Najaf

    2016-01-01

    Background Several lines of evidence suggest that early sensory stimulation and regular family visiting programs are potential nursing interventions to improve the outcomes of head injured comatose patients. However, little is known about the impacts of family involvement in providing sensory stimulation. Objectives To determine the effects of a sensory stimulation program conducted by nurses and families on the consciousness, level of cognitive function, and basic cognitive sensory recovery of head injury comatose patients. Patients and Methods This was a randomized clinical trial performed at the Shiraz level I trauma center including 60 head injured comatose patients with an initial Glasgow coma score (GCS) of less than 8. Patients were randomly assigned to receive sensory stimulation by a qualified nurse (nurse group; n = 20), by the family (family group; n = 20), or usual care (control group; n = 20). The sensory stimulation program involving the nurses and patients’ families was conducted, twice daily, in the morning and evening for 7 days. The level of consciousness, level of cognitive function, and basic cognitive sensory recovery of the patients were evaluated and monitored using the GCS, Rancho Los Amigos (RLA), and Western Neuro-Sensory stimulation profile (WNSSP). Data were analyzed by chi square, Kruskal-Wallis, and repeated-measures tests using SPSS. Results All the patients were comparable regarding their baseline characteristics, level of consciousness, level of cognitive function, and basic cognitive sensory recovery determined by GCS, RLA, and WNSSP. Although the two intervention groups of the study improved, those who received the sensory stimulation program from their families had significantly higher GCS (P = 0.001), RLA (P = 0.001), and WNSSP (P = 0.001) scores after 7 days when compared to the two other groups. Conclusions The application of sensory stimulation by families led to significant increases in the consciousness, level of

  4. Concussion in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Thor D.; Alvarez, Victor E.; McKee, Ann C.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that occurs in association with repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. It is associated with a variety of clinical symptoms in multiple domains, and there is a distinct pattern of pathological changes. The abnormal tau pathology in CTE occurs uniquely in those regions of the brain that are likely most susceptible to stress concentration during trauma. CTE has been associated with a variety of types of repetitive head trauma, most frequently contact sports. In cases published to date, the mean length of exposure to repetitive head trauma was 15.4 years. The clinical symptoms of the disease began after a mean latency of 14.5 years with a mean age of death of 59.3 years. Most subjects had a reported history of concussions with a mean of 20.3. However, 16 % of published CTE subjects did not have a history of concussion suggesting that subconcussive hits are sufficient to lead to the development of CTE. Overall, the number of years of exposure, not the number of concussions, was significantly associated with worse tau pathology in CTE. This suggests that it is the chronic and repetitive nature of head trauma, irrespective of concussive symptoms, that is the most important driver of disease. CTE and exposure to repetitive head trauma is also associated with a variety of other neurodegenerations, including Alzheimer disease. In fact, amyloid β peptide deposition is altered and accelerated in CTE and is associated with worse disease. Here, we review the current exposure, clinical, and pathological associations of CTE. PMID:26260277

  5. Concussion in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Stein, Thor D; Alvarez, Victor E; McKee, Ann C

    2015-10-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that occurs in association with repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. It is associated with a variety of clinical symptoms in multiple domains, and there is a distinct pattern of pathological changes. The abnormal tau pathology in CTE occurs uniquely in those regions of the brain that are likely most susceptible to stress concentration during trauma. CTE has been associated with a variety of types of repetitive head trauma, most frequently contact sports. In cases published to date, the mean length of exposure to repetitive head trauma was 15.4 years. The clinical symptoms of the disease began after a mean latency of 14.5 years with a mean age of death of 59.3 years. Most subjects had a reported history of concussions with a mean of 20.3. However, 16 % of published CTE subjects did not have a history of concussion suggesting that subconcussive hits are sufficient to lead to the development of CTE. Overall, the number of years of exposure, not the number of concussions, was significantly associated with worse tau pathology in CTE. This suggests that it is the chronic and repetitive nature of head trauma, irrespective of concussive symptoms, that is the most important driver of disease. CTE and exposure to repetitive head trauma is also associated with a variety of other neurodegenerations, including Alzheimer disease. In fact, amyloid β peptide deposition is altered and accelerated in CTE and is associated with worse disease. Here, we review the current exposure, clinical, and pathological associations of CTE.

  6. Anhedonia in combat veterans with penetrating head injury.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Jeffrey D; Krueger, Frank; Raymont, Vanessa; Solomon, Jeffrey; Knutson, Kristine M; Barbey, Aron K; Poore, Joshua C; Wassermann, Eric M; Grafman, Jordan

    2015-09-01

    Anhedonia is a common symptom following traumatic brain injury. The neural basis of anhedonia is poorly understood, but believed to involve disturbed reward processing, rather than the loss of sense of pleasure. This analysis was undertaken to determine if injury to specific regions of prefrontal cortex (PFC) result in anhedonia. A CT-based lesion analysis was undertaken in 192 participants of the Vietnam Head Injury Study, most with penetrating head injury. Participants were divided into left and right ventrolateral prefrontal, bilateral ventromedial prefrontal, and other injury locations. Anhedonia was measured by self-report in each group using the four-item anhedonia subscale score of the Beck Depression Inventory-II. Individuals with right ventrolateral injury reported greater severity of anhedonia compared to those with injury in the left ventrolateral region. These findings support an association between injury in the right ventrolateral PFC and anhedonia.

  7. The inflammatory reaction in human traumatic oedematous cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Castejón, O J; Castellano, A; Arismendi, G J; Medina, Z

    2005-04-01

    The inflammatory reaction surrounding hemorrhagic and perihematomal brain parenchyma has been studied by means of light and transmission electron microscopy in 12 patients with severe traumatic head injuries complicated with subdural or extradural hematoma or hygroma. Perivascular cells, ameboid phagocytic microglial cells, and infiltrated macrophage/monocyte system were observed surrounding perivascular and intraparenchymal hemorrhagic foci. They showed phagocytic activity of degenerated nerve cell processes, and organized proteinaceous edema fluid present in the enlarged extracellular space. Endocytosis by means of clathrin coated vesicles also was observed. Facultative and professional phagocytes exhibited a full repertoire of lysosomes, phagosomes containing nerve cell debris, lipid droplets, and lipofucsin granules. Phagocytic pericytes remaining within the capillary basement membrane were also observed around perivascular hemorrhages. The inflammatory reaction was examined in young and old patients with an evolution time of brain injury ranging from 1 day to 2 years. The inflammatory process developed according to the intensity of traumatic insult, patient age, associated hematoma or hygroma, severity of vasogenic and cytotoxic oedema, and anoxic-ischemic conditions of brain parenchyma.

  8. Sepsis in intensive care unit patients with traumatic brain injury: factors associated with higher mortality

    PubMed Central

    Cardozo, Luis Carlos Maia; da Silva, Redson Ruy

    2014-01-01

    Objective Patients with traumatic brain injury are particularly susceptible to sepsis, which may exacerbate the systemic inflammatory response and lead to organ dysfunction. The influence of clinical variables on the mortality of intensive care unit patients with traumatic brain injury and sepsis was investigated. Methods The present investigation was a retrospective study involving 175 patients with traumatic brain injury who were treated in a period of 1 year at a reference hospital for trauma and who had sepsis, severe sepsis, or septic shock. Demographic and clinical data were obtained, and the SOFA score was calculated at the time sepsis was found and after 72 hours. Results There was a predominance of young men with severe traumatic brain injury, multiple head injuries, sepsis with a pulmonary focus, prolonged hospital stay, and high mortality (37.7%). Circulatory and respiratory failure had a high incidence, but renal and coagulation failure were less frequent, and liver failure was not observed. After logistic regression, the presence of septic shock and respiratory failure 72 hours after the sepsis diagnosis was associated with higher mortality, with an odds ratio of 7.56 (95%CI=2.04-27.31, p=0.0024) and 6.62 (95%CI=1.93-22.78, p=0.0027), respectively. In addition, there was a higher mortality among patients who had no organ failure on D1 but who developed the condition after 72 hours of sepsis and in those patients who already had organ failure at the time sepsis was diagnosed and remained in this condition after 72 hours. Conclusion Septic shock and progressive organ (particularly respiratory) dysfunction increases the mortality of patients with traumatic brain injury and sepsis. PMID:25028949

  9. Effect of ski geometry on aggressive ski behaviour and visual aesthetics: equipment designed to reduce risk of severe traumatic knee injuries in alpine giant slalom ski racing

    PubMed Central

    Kröll, Josef; Spörri, Jörg; Gilgien, Matthias; Schwameder, Hermann; Müller, Erich

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim Aggressive ski-snow interaction is characterised by direct force transmission and difficulty of getting the ski off its edge once the ski is carving. This behaviour has been suggested to be a main contributor to severe knee injuries in giant slalom (GS). The aim of the current study was to provide a foundation for new equipment specifications in GS by considering two perspectives: Reducing the ski's aggressiveness for injury prevention and maintaining the external attractiveness of a ski racer's technique for spectators. Methods Three GS ski prototypes were defined based on theoretical considerations and were compared to a reference ski (Pref). Compared to Pref, all prototypes were constructed with reduced profile width and increased ski length. The construction radius (sidecut radius) of Pref was ≥27 m and was increased for the prototypes: 30 m (P30), 35 m (P35), and 40 m (P40). Seven World Cup level athletes performed GS runs on each of the three prototypes and Pref. Kinetic variables related to the ski-snow interaction were assessed to quantify the ski's aggressiveness. Additionally, 13 athletes evaluated their subjective perception of aggressiveness. 15 sports students rated several videotaped runs to assess external attractiveness. Results Kinetic variables quantifying the ski's aggressiveness showed decreased values for P35 and P40 compared to Pref and P30. Greater sidecut radius reduced subjectively perceived aggressiveness. External attractiveness was reduced for P40 only. Conclusions This investigation revealed the following evaluation of the prototypes concerning injury prevention and external attractiveness: P30: no preventative gain, no loss in attractiveness; P35: substantial preventative gain, no significant loss in attractiveness; P40: highest preventative gain, significant loss in attractiveness. PMID:26603647

  10. Gross morphology and morphometric sequelae in the hippocampus, fornix, and corpus callosum of patients with severe non-missile traumatic brain injury without macroscopically detectable lesions: a T1 weighted MRI study

    PubMed Central

    Tomaiuolo, F; Carlesimo, G; Di, P; Petrides, M; Fera, F; Bonanni, R; Formisano, R; Pasqualetti, P; Caltagirone, C

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The gross morphology and morphometry of the hippocampus, fornix, and corpus callosum in patients with severe non-missile traumatic brain injury (nmTBI) without obvious neuroradiological lesions was examined and the volumes of these structures were correlated with performance on memory tests. In addition, the predictability of the length of coma from the selected anatomical volumes was examined. Method: High spatial resolution T1 weighted MRI scans of the brain (1 mm3) and neuropsychological evaluations with standardised tests were performed at least 3 months after trauma in 19 patients. Results: In comparison with control subjects matched in terms of gender and age, volume reduction in the hippocampus, fornix, and corpus callosum of the nmTBI patients was quantitatively significant. The length of coma correlated with the volume reduction in the corpus callosum. Immediate free recall of word lists correlated with the volume of the fornix and the corpus callosum. Delayed recall of word lists and immediate recall of the Rey figure both correlated with the volume of the fornix. Delayed recall of the Rey figure correlated with the volume of the fornix and the right hippocampus. Conclusion: These findings demonstrate that in severe nmTBI without obvious neuroradiological lesions there is a clear hippocampal, fornix, and callosal volume reduction. The length of coma predicts the callosal volume reduction, which could be considered a marker of the severity of axonal loss. A few memory test scores correlated with the volumes of the selected anatomical structures. This relationship with memory performance may reflect the diffuse nature of the damage, leading to the disruption of neural circuits at multiple levels and the progressive neural degeneration occurring in TBI. PMID:15314123

  11. Diagnostic efficiency of demographically corrected Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III and Wechsler Memory Scale-III indices in moderate to severe traumatic brain injury and lower education levels.

    PubMed

    Walker, Alexandra J; Batchelor, Jennifer; Shores, E Arthur; Jones, Mike

    2009-11-01

    Despite the sensitivity of neuropsychological tests to educational level, improved diagnostic accuracy for demographically corrected scores has yet to be established. Diagnostic efficiency statistics of Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III (WAIS-III) and Wechsler Memory Scale-III (WMS-III) indices that were corrected for education, sex, and age (demographically corrected) were compared with age corrected indices in individuals aged 16 to 75 years with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and 12 years or less education. TBI participants (n = 100) were consecutive referrals to an outpatient rehabilitation service and met careful selection criteria. Controls (n = 100) were obtained from the WAIS-III/WMS-III standardization sample. Demographically corrected indices did not provide higher diagnostic efficiency than age corrected indices and this result was supported by reanalysis of the TBI group against a larger and unmatched control group. Processing Speed Index provided comparable diagnostic accuracy to that of combined indices. Demographically corrected indices were associated with higher cut-scores to maximize overall classification, reflecting the upward adjustment of those scores in a lower education sample. This suggests that, in clinical practice, the test results of individuals with limited education may be more accurately interpreted with the application of demographic corrections. Diagnostic efficiency statistics are presented, and future research directions are discussed.

  12. Sidecut radius and kinetic energy: equipment designed to reduce risk of severe traumatic knee injuries in alpine giant slalom ski racing

    PubMed Central

    Kröll, Josef; Spörri, Jörg; Gilgien, Matthias; Schwameder, Hermann; Müller, Erich

    2016-01-01

    Background Kinetic energy (Ekin) increases with speed by the power of 2 and is considered a major risk factor for injuries in alpine ski racing. There is no empirical knowledge about the effect of ski geometry on Ekin. Consequently, the aim of this study was to investigate the influence of sidecut radius on the progress of Ekin while skiing through a multigate section in giant slalom (GS). Methods 5 European-Cup level athletes skied on three different pairs of GS skis varying in sidecut radii (30, 35 and 40 m). Each athlete's position over time within a six gate section (including flat and steep terrain) was captured by the use of a differential Global Navigational Satellite System. Ekin, speed, time and path length were analysed for each pair of skis used. Results When using skis with greater sidecut radius, average Ekin was significantly lower over the entire six gate section, but not locally at every turn cycle. Particular decreases of Ekin were observed for both turns on the flat terrain, as well as for the turn at the terrain transition and the first turn on the steep terrain. The observed decreases in Ekin were found to be primarily explainable by increases in turn time. Conclusions With respect to typical sport mechanisms that cause severe knee injuries, using skis with greater sidecut radius potentially provides additional injury preventative gain, particularly in specific areas within a run. However, this injury preventative gain during falls in GS should not be overestimated. PMID:26702015

  13. Attenuated traumatic axonal injury and improved functional outcome after traumatic brain injury in mice lacking Sarm1.

    PubMed

    Henninger, Nils; Bouley, James; Sikoglu, Elif M; An, Jiyan; Moore, Constance M; King, Jean A; Bowser, Robert; Freeman, Marc R; Brown, Robert H

    2016-04-01

    Axonal degeneration is a critical, early event in many acute and chronic neurological disorders. It has been consistently observed after traumatic brain injury, but whether axon degeneration is a driver of traumatic brain injury remains unclear. Molecular pathways underlying the pathology of traumatic brain injury have not been defined, and there is no efficacious treatment for traumatic brain injury. Here we show that mice lacking the mouse Toll receptor adaptor Sarm1 (sterile α/Armadillo/Toll-Interleukin receptor homology domain protein) gene, a key mediator of Wallerian degeneration, demonstrate multiple improved traumatic brain injury-associated phenotypes after injury in a closed-head mild traumatic brain injury model. Sarm1(-/-) mice developed fewer β-amyloid precursor protein aggregates in axons of the corpus callosum after traumatic brain injury as compared to Sarm1(+/+) mice. Furthermore, mice lacking Sarm1 had reduced plasma concentrations of the phophorylated axonal neurofilament subunit H, indicating that axonal integrity is maintained after traumatic brain injury. Strikingly, whereas wild-type mice exibited a number of behavioural deficits after traumatic brain injury, we observed a strong, early preservation of neurological function in Sarm1(-/-) animals. Finally, using in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy we found tissue signatures consistent with substantially preserved neuronal energy metabolism in Sarm1(-/-) mice compared to controls immediately following traumatic brain injury. Our results indicate that the SARM1-mediated prodegenerative pathway promotes pathogenesis in traumatic brain injury and suggest that anti-SARM1 therapeutics are a viable approach for preserving neurological function after traumatic brain injury.

  14. [Social support after traumatism].

    PubMed

    Maercker, A; Heim, E; Hecker, T; Thoma, M V

    2017-01-01

    The classical concept of social support has recently become of relevance again, particularly in the context of traumatized patient groups, which include refugees and migrants. This article summarizes the evidence from social support research, e. g. different types of positive effects as well as context, gender and cultural aspects. These aspects are highlighted by means of studies stemming from applied healthcare research and thus describe a wide range of health effects, e.g. increased well-being and reduced depressive symptoms, improved functional abilities, better immune status and longevity. Two new trauma-specific differentiations of the social support concept are introduced: societal acknowledgement as a trauma survivor and disclosure of traumatic experiences. Against this background several implications for working with refugees arise: promotion of self-efficacy and posttraumatic maturation as well as the treatment of mental disorders show considerable benefits from focusing on social support. Finally, possibilities emerging from digital communication media are discussed, which are particularly relevant in this context.

  15. Anesthesia for Traumatic Diaphragmatic Hernia Associated with Corneal Laceration.

    PubMed

    Safaeian, Reza; Hassani, Valiollah; Faiz, Hamid Reza

    2016-09-06

    BACKGROUND Diaphragmatic rupture can be seen in up to 5% of car accidents, and 80%-100% of diaphragmatic hernias are associated with other vital organ injuries. Brain, pelvis, long bones, liver, spleen, and aorta are some other organs that can be severely damaged and need different anesthetic managements. CASE REPORT A 37-year-old male victim of a head-on collision who was suffering diaphragmatic rupture and corneal laceration was prepared for an emergency operation 11 hours after the car accident. Gastric decompression, pre-oxygenation, rapid sequence induction with succinylcholine, immediate use of non-depolarizing muscle relaxant, and mechanical ventilation with low tidal volume after intubation were used in anesthetic management of the patient. CONCLUSIONS Because of the high prevalence of coexisting pathologies with traumatic diaphragmatic hernia, anesthetic management must be tailored to the associated pathologies.

  16. Biomechanical Risk Estimates for Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Funk, J. R.; Duma, S. M.; Manoogian, S. J.; Rowson, S.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the risk of mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) in living humans based on a large set of head impact data taken from American football players at the collegiate level. Real-time head accelerations were recorded from helmet-mounted accelerometers designed to stay in contact with the player’s head. Over 27,000 head impacts were recorded, including four impacts resulting in MTBI. Parametric risk curves were developed by normalizing MTBI incidence data by head impact exposure data. An important finding of this research is that living humans, at least in the setting of collegiate football, sustain much more significant head impacts without apparent injury than previously thought. The following preliminary nominal injury assessment reference values associated with a 10% risk of MTBI are proposed: a peak linear head acceleration of 165 g, a HIC of 400, and a peak angular head acceleration of 9000 rad/s2. PMID:18184501

  17. Accuracy of non-invasive continuous total hemoglobin measurement by Pulse CO-Oximetry in severe traumatized and surgical bleeding patients.

    PubMed

    Baulig, Werner; Seifert, Burkhardt; Spahn, Donat R; Theusinger, Oliver M

    2017-02-01

    The Masimo Radical-7 Pulse CO-Oximeter (Masimo Corp., USA) non-invasively computes hemoglobin concentration (SpHb). SpHb was compared to Co-Oximeter readings (CoOxHb) of arterial samples in surgery patients of the emergency department. Forty-six patients were enrolled. The Masimo R1 25L (revision F and G) adult adhesive sensor was attached to the ring finger of the arterially cannulated hand. Before start, every 30 min during surgery and in the case of severe bleeding SpHb and CoOxHb values were documented. SpHb and post hoc adjusted SpHb (AdSpHb) values were analyzed. Linear regression analysis and Bland-Altman plot for agreement were performed. The detection failure rate of SpHb was 24.5 %. CoOxHb and SpHb showed a strong correlation (r = +0.81), but agreement was moderate [bias (LOA) of -0.6 (-3.0; +1.9)] g/dl. Positive and negative predicted value was 0.49 and 0.69. Exclusion of changes of CoOxHb values ≤1 g/dl resulted in a positive and negative predictive value of 0.66 and 1.00. Post hoc adjustment of the SpHb (AdSpHb) improved linear correlation of CoOxHb and AdSpHb [r = +0.90 (p < 0.001)] but less the agreement [bias (LOA) of CoOxHb and AdSpHb = -0.1 (-2.1/+1.9) g/dl]. SpHb agreed only moderately with CoOxHb values and predicted decreases of CoOxHb only if changes of SpHb ≤ 1.0 g/dl were excluded. The detection failure rate of SpHb was high. At present, additional refinements of the current technology are necessary to further improve performance of non-invasive hemoglobin measurement in the clinical setting.

  18. The effects of alcohol on head injury in the motor vehicle crash victim.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Rebecca M; Maio, Ronald F; Hill, Elizabeth M; Zink, Brian J

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if alcohol potentiates the severity of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in motor vehicle crash (MVC) victims, controlling for crash severity characteristics. Prior studies evaluating effects of alcohol on TBI have not accounted for severity of crash. We evaluated severity of head injury by Marshall score [a classification scale of intracranial pathology on head computed axial tomogram (CT)], and blood-alcohol concentration (BAC), while controlling for crash characteristics [traffic accident deformity score (TAD) and belt use]. Marshall scores were determined from initial CT or autopsy reports, by a neurosurgeon, and were categorized into less severe injury (<3) and more severe (> or =3). Logistic regression using this variable as the outcome parameter and crash characteristics, age and BAC as predictors was done, and the odds ratio (OR) and 0.95 confidence interval (0.95 CI) calculated. Fifty-eight patients were analysed: 41% were BAC positive, 30% had a modified Marshall score of > or =3. Patients with positive BAC were 2.1-fold more likely to have a more severe head injury as measured on CT scan by the Marshall scores. We suggest that alcohol potentiates severity of TBI as determined from head CT among MVC victims. Further research will be needed to substantiate this finding as well as to determine its long-term effect on clinical outcome.

  19. Assessment of visual space recognition in patients with visual field defects using head mounted display (HMD) system: case study with severe visual field defect.

    PubMed

    Sugihara, Shunichi; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Miyasaka, Tomoya; Izumi, Takashi; Shimizu, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    For the quantitative assessment of visual field defects of cerebrovascular patients, we developed a new measurement system that could present various kinds of visual information to the patient. In this system, we use a head mounted display as the display device. The quantitative assessment becomes possible by adding the capability to measure the eye movement and the head movement simultaneously by means of a video apparatus of motion analysis. In our study, we examined the effectiveness of this system by applying it to a patient with serious visual field defects. The visual image of the reduced test paper was presented to the patient, the effect on his/her spatial recognition and eye movement was investigated. The results indicated the increase in the ration of visual search in the reduced side. With the reduced image, the decrease of the angular velocity of eye movement was recognized in the visual search in the defected side. In the motion analysis, the head movement was not observed while the eye movements appeared corresponding to each different conditions. This fact led us to confirm that the patient coped with this kind of test by the eye movement. In this analysis, the effectiveness and the usefulness of the developed system were confirmed that enables us to evaluate the abnormal and compensation movement of the eyes.

  20. Head and neck injury risks in heavy metal: head bangers stuck between rock and a hard bass

    PubMed Central

    Patton, Declan

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the risks of mild traumatic brain injury and neck injury associated with head banging, a popular dance form accompanying heavy metal music. Design Observational studies, focus group, and biomechanical analysis. Participants Head bangers. Main outcome measures Head Injury Criterion and Neck Injury Criterion were derived for head banging styles and both popular heavy metal songs and easy listening music controls. Results An average head banging song has a tempo of about 146 beats per minute, which is predicted to cause mild head injury when the range of motion is greater than 75°. At higher tempos and greater ranges of motion there is a risk of neck injury. Conclusion To minimise the risk of head and neck injury, head bangers should decrease their range of head and neck motion, head bang to slower tempo songs by replacing heavy metal with adult oriented rock, only head bang to every second beat, or use personal protective equipment. PMID:19091761

  1. The Spectrum of Neurobehavioral Sequelae after Repetitive Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: A Novel Mouse Model of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Plog, Benjamin A.; Dayawansa, Samantha; Chen, Michael; Dashnaw, Matthew L.; Czerniecka, Katarzyna; Walker, Corey T.; Viterise, Tyler; Hyrien, Ollivier; Iliff, Jeffrey J.; Deane, Rashid; Nedergaard, Maiken; Huang, Jason H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract There has been an increased focus on the neurological sequelae of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (TBI), particularly neurodegenerative syndromes, such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE); however, no animal model exists that captures the behavioral spectrum of this phenomenon. We sought to develop an animal model of CTE. Our novel model is a modification and fusion of two of the most popular models of TBI and allows for controlled closed-head impacts to unanesthetized mice. Two-hundred and eighty 12-week-old mice were divided into control, single mild TBI (mTBI), and repetitive mTBI groups. Repetitive mTBI mice received six concussive impacts daily for 7 days. Behavior was assessed at various time points. Neurological Severity Score (NSS) was computed and vestibulomotor function tested with the wire grip test (WGT). Cognitive function was assessed with the Morris water maze (MWM), anxiety/risk-taking behavior with the elevated plus maze, and depression-like behavior with the forced swim/tail suspension tests. Sleep electroencephalogram/electromyography studies were performed at 1 month. NSS was elevated, compared to controls, in both TBI groups and improved over time. Repetitive mTBI mice demonstrated transient vestibulomotor deficits on WGT. Repetitive mTBI mice also demonstrated deficits in MWM testing. Both mTBI groups demonstrated increased anxiety at 2 weeks, but repetitive mTBI mice developed increased risk-taking behaviors at 1 month that persist at 6 months. Repetitive mTBI mice exhibit depression-like behavior at 1 month. Both groups demonstrate sleep disturbances. We describe the neurological sequelae of repetitive mTBI in a novel mouse model, which resemble several of the neuropsychiatric behaviors observed clinically in patients sustaining repetitive mild head injury. PMID:24766454

  2. Does isolated traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage merit a lower intensity level of observation than other traumatic brain injury?

    PubMed

    Phelan, Herb A; Richter, Adam A; Scott, William W; Pruitt, Jeffrey H; Madden, Christopher J; Rickert, Kim L; Wolf, Steven E

    2014-10-15

    Evidence is emerging that isolated traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (ITSAH) may be a milder form of traumatic brain injury (TBI). If true, ITSAH may not benefit from intensive care unit (ICU) admission, which would, in turn, decrease resource utilization. We conducted a retrospective review of all TBI admissions to our institution between February 2010 and November 2012 to compare the presentation and clinical course of subjects with ITSAH to all other TBI. We then performed descriptive statistics on the subset of ITSAH subjects presenting with a Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) of 13-15. Of 698 subjects, 102 had ITSAH and 596 had any other intracranial hemorrhage pattern. Compared to all other TBI, ITSAH had significantly lower injury severity scores (p<0.0001), lower head abbreviated injury scores (p<0.0001), higher emergency department GCS (p<0.0001), shorter ICU stays (p=0.007), higher discharge GCS (p=0.005), lower mortality (p=0.003), and significantly fewer head computed tomography scans (p<0.0001). Of those ITSAH subjects presenting with a GCS of 13-15 (n=77), none underwent placement of an intracranial monitor or craniotomy. One subject (1.3%) demonstrated a change in exam (worsened headache and dizziness) concomitant with a progression of his intracranial injury. His symptoms resolved with readmission to the ICU and continued observation. Our results suggest that ITSAH are less-severe brain injuries than other TBI. ITSAH patients with GCS scores of 13-15 demonstrate low rates of clinical progression, and when progression occurs, it resolves without further intervention. This subset of TBI patients does not appear to benefit from ICU admission.

  3. The spectrum of neurobehavioral sequelae after repetitive mild traumatic brain injury: a novel mouse model of chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Petraglia, Anthony L; Plog, Benjamin A; Dayawansa, Samantha; Chen, Michael; Dashnaw, Matthew L; Czerniecka, Katarzyna; Walker, Corey T; Viterise, Tyler; Hyrien, Ollivier; Iliff, Jeffrey J; Deane, Rashid; Nedergaard, Maiken; Huang, Jason H

    2014-07-01

    There has been an increased focus on the neurological sequelae of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (TBI), particularly neurodegenerative syndromes, such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE); however, no animal model exists that captures the behavioral spectrum of this phenomenon. We sought to develop an animal model of CTE. Our novel model is a modification and fusion of two of the most popular models of TBI and allows for controlled closed-head impacts to unanesthetized mice. Two-hundred and eighty 12-week-old mice were divided into control, single mild TBI (mTBI), and repetitive mTBI groups. Repetitive mTBI mice received six concussive impacts daily for 7 days. Behavior was assessed at various time points. Neurological Severity Score (NSS) was computed and vestibulomotor function tested with the wire grip test (WGT). Cognitive function was assessed with the Morris water maze (MWM), anxiety/risk-taking behavior with the elevated plus maze, and depression-like behavior with the forced swim/tail suspension tests. Sleep electroencephalogram/electromyography studies were performed at 1 month. NSS was elevated, compared to controls, in both TBI groups and improved over time. Repetitive mTBI mice demonstrated transient vestibulomotor deficits on WGT. Repetitive mTBI mice also demonstrated deficits in MWM testing. Both mTBI groups demonstrated increased anxiety at 2 weeks, but repetitive mTBI mice developed increased risk-taking behaviors at 1 month that persist at 6 months. Repetitive mTBI mice exhibit depression-like behavior at 1 month. Both groups demonstrate sleep disturbances. We describe the neurological sequelae of repetitive mTBI in a novel mouse model, which resemble several of the neuropsychiatric behaviors observed clinically in patients sustaining repetitive mild head injury.

  4. A novel head-neck cooling device for concussion injury in contact sports

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huan; Wang, Bonnie; Jackson, Kevin; Miller, Claire M.; Hasadsri, Linda; Llano, Daniel; Rubin, Rachael; Zimmerman, Jarred; Johnson, Curtis; Sutton, Brad

    2015-01-01

    Emerging research on the long-term impact of concussions on athletes has allowed public recognition of the potentially devastating effects of these and other mild head injuries. Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a multifaceted disease for which management remains a clinical challenge. Recent pre-clinical and clinical data strongly suggest a destructive synergism between brain temperature elevation and mTBI; conversely, brain hypothermia, with its broader, pleiotropic effects, represents the most potent neuro-protectant in laboratory studies to date. Although well-established in selected clinical conditions, a systemic approach to accomplish regional hypothermia has failed to yield an effective treatment strategy in traumatic brain injury (TBI). Furthermore, although systemic hypothermia remains a potentially valid treatment strategy for moderate to severe TBIs, it is neither practical nor safe for mTBIs. Therefore, selective head-neck cooling may represent an ideal strategy to provide therapeutic benefits to the brain. Optimizing brain temperature management using a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) spacesuit spinoff head-neck cooling technology before and/or after mTBI in contact sports may represent a sensible, practical, and effective method to potentially enhance recover and minimize post-injury deficits. In this paper, we discuss and summarize the anatomical, physiological, preclinical, and clinical data concerning NASA spinoff head-neck cooling technology as a potential treatment for mTBIs, particularly in the context of contact sports. PMID:28123788

  5. A novel head-neck cooling device for concussion injury in contact sports.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan; Wang, Bonnie; Jackson, Kevin; Miller, Claire M; Hasadsri, Linda; Llano, Daniel; Rubin, Rachael; Zimmerman, Jarred; Johnson, Curtis; Sutton, Brad

    2015-01-01

    Emerging research on the long-term impact of concussions on athletes has allowed public recognition of the potentially devastating effects of these and other mild head injuries. Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a multifaceted disease for which management remains a clinical challenge. Recent pre-clinical and clinical data strongly suggest a destructive synergism between brain temperature elevation and mTBI; conversely, brain hypothermia, with its broader, pleiotropic effects, represents the most potent neuro-protectant in laboratory studies to date. Although well-established in selected clinical conditions, a systemic approach to accomplish regional hypothermia has failed to yield an effective treatment strategy in traumatic brain injury (TBI). Furthermore, although systemic hypothermia remains a potentially valid treatment strategy for moderate to severe TBIs, it is neither practical nor safe for mTBIs. Therefore, selective head-neck cooling may represent an ideal strategy to provide therapeutic benefits to the brain. Optimizing brain temperature management using a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) spacesuit spinoff head-neck cooling technology before and/or after mTBI in contact sports may represent a sensible, practical, and effective method to potentially enhance recover and minimize post-injury deficits. In this paper, we discuss and summarize the anatomical, physiological, preclinical, and clinical data concerning NASA spinoff head-neck cooling technology as a potential treatment for mTBIs, particularly in the context of contact sports.

  6. Long-term psychiatric disorders after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Fleminger, S

    2008-01-01

    In the long term after traumatic brain injury, the most disabling problems are generally related to neuropsychiatric sequelae, including personality change and cognitive impairment, rather than neurophysical sequelae. Cognitive impairment after severe injury is likely to include impaired speed of information processing, poor memory and executive problems. Personality change may include poor motivation, and a tendency to be self-centred and less aware of the needs of others. Patients may be described as lazy and thoughtless. Some become disinhibited and rude. Agitation and aggression can be very difficult to manage. Anxiety and depression symptoms are quite frequent and play a role in the development of persistent post-concussion syndrome after milder injury. Depression may be associated with a deterioration in disability over time after injury. Psychosis is not unusual though it has been difficult to confirm that traumatic brain injury is a cause of schizophrenia. Head injury may, many years later, increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease. Good rehabilitation probably minimizes the risk of psychiatric sequelae, but specific psychological and pharmacological treatments may be needed.

  7. Decompressive craniectomy following traumatic brain injury: developing the evidence base

    PubMed Central

    Kolias, Angelos G.; Adams, Hadie; Timofeev, Ivan; Czosnyka, Marek; Corteen, Elizabeth A.; Pickard, John D.; Turner, Carole; Gregson, Barbara A.; Kirkpatrick, Peter J.; Murray, Gordon D.; Menon, David K.; Hutchinson, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In the context of traumatic brain injury (TBI), decompressive craniectomy (DC) is used as part of tiered therapeutic protocols for patients with intracranial hypertension (secondary or protocol-driven DC). In addition, the bone flap can be left out when evacuating a mass lesion, usually an acute subdural haematoma (ASDH), in the acute phase (primary DC). Even though, the principle of “opening the skull” in order to control brain oedema and raised intracranial pressure has been practised since the beginning of the 20th century, the last 20 years have been marked by efforts to develop the evidence base with the conduct of randomised trials. This article discusses the merits and challenges of this approach and provides an overview of randomised trials of DC following TBI. An update on the RESCUEicp study, a randomised trial of DC versus advanced medical management (including barbiturates) for severe and refractory post-traumatic intracranial hypertension is provided. In addition, the rationale for the RESCUE-ASDH study, the first randomised trial of primary DC versus craniotomy for adult head-injured patients with an ASDH, is presented. PMID:26972805

  8. Decompressive craniectomy following traumatic brain injury: developing the evidence base.

    PubMed

    Kolias, Angelos G; Adams, Hadie; Timofeev, Ivan; Czosnyka, Marek; Corteen, Elizabeth A; Pickard, John D; Turner, Carole; Gregson, Barbara A; Kirkpatrick, Peter J; Murray, Gordon D; Menon, David K; Hutchinson, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    In the context of traumatic brain injury (TBI), decompressive craniectomy (DC) is used as part of tiered therapeutic protocols for patients with intracranial hypertension (secondary or protocol-driven DC). In addition, the bone flap can be left out when evacuating a mass lesion, usually an acute subdural haematoma (ASDH), in the acute phase (primary DC). Even though, the principle of "opening the skull" in order to control brain oedema and raised intracranial pressure has been practised since the beginning of the 20th century, the last 20 years have been marked by efforts to develop the evidence base with the conduct of randomised trials. This article discusses the merits and challenges of this approach and provides an overview of randomised trials of DC following TBI. An update on the RESCUEicp study, a randomised trial of DC versus advanced medical management (including barbiturates) for severe and refractory post-traumatic intracranial hypertension is provided. In addition, the rationale for the RESCUE-ASDH study, the first randomised trial of primary DC versus craniotomy for adult head-injured patients with an ASDH, is presented.

  9. Head MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... the head; MRI - cranial; NMR - cranial; Cranial MRI; Brain MRI; MRI - brain; MRI - head ... the test, tell your provider if you have: Brain aneurysm clips An artificial heart valves Heart defibrillator ...

  10. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... scalp internal head injuries, which may involve the skull, the blood vessels within the skull, or the brain Fortunately, most childhood falls or ... knock the brain into the side of the skull or tear blood vessels. Some internal head injuries ...

  11. Heads Up

    MedlinePlus

    ... Us HEADS UP Apps Reshaping the Culture Around Concussion in Sports Get HEADS UP on Your Web Site Concussion ... fit, and maintain the right helmet for specific sports. Concussion Laws Learn about Return to Play and other ...

  12. Traumatic brain injury and the frontal lobes: what can we gain with diffusion tensor imaging?

    PubMed

    Zappalà, Giuseppe; Thiebaut de Schotten, Michel; Eslinger, Paul J

    2012-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death in the young population and long-term disability in relation to pervasive cognitive-behavioural disturbances that follow frontal lobe damage. To date, emphasis has been placed primarily on the clinical correlates of frontal cortex damage, whilst identification of the contribution of subjacent white matter lesion is less clear. Our poor understanding of white matter pathology in TBI is primarily due to the low sensitivity of conventional neuroimaging to identify pathological changes in less severe traumatic injury and the lack of methods to localise white matter pathology onto individual frontal lobe connections. In this paper we focus on the potential contribution of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to TBI. Our review of the current literature supports the conclusion that DTI is particularly sensitive to changes in the microstructure of frontal white matter, thus providing a valuable biomarker of the severity of traumatic injury and prognostic indicator of recovery of function. Furthermore we propose an atlas approach to TBI to map white matter lesions onto individual tracts. In the cases presented here we showed a direct correspondence between the clinical manifestations of the patients and the damage to specific white matter tracts. We are confident that in the near future the application of DTI to TBI will improve our understanding of the complex and heterogeneous clinical symptomatology which follows a TBI, especially mild and moderate head injury, which still represents 70-80% of all clinical population.

  13. Outcome of post-traumatic unawareness persisting for more than a month.

    PubMed Central

    Dubroja, I; Valent, S; Miklić, P; Kesak, D

    1995-01-01

    From 1986 to the end of 1991, 19 patients with persisting post-traumatic unawareness were admitted for rehabilitation. Criteria for admission were head trauma, Glasgow coma scale score < or = 8 points, and at least a one month duration of unawareness. Out of 19 patients, 12 patients (63%) regained consciousness, 11 patients (58%) within the first year and one patient (5%) within the second year. The mean duration of unawareness in the patients who recovered consciousness was 190 (range 62-440) days. In the recovery group, according to the Glasgow outcome scale, seven out of 12 patients (58%) were moderately disabled and five (42%) were severely disabled at the moment of discharge from rehabilitation. All the 12 patients who regained consciousness live with their families, and none had to be kept in an institution. The data confirm that awakening from post-traumatic unawareness is possible after a long period. Therefore, post-traumatic unawareness persisting for more than a month should not be considered an irreversible condition, because an outcome that might be regarded by some as being acceptable is possible even in patients with very severe brain damage. PMID:7738556

  14. Post-traumatic amnesia and confusional state: hazards of retrospective assessment.

    PubMed

    Friedland, Daniel; Swash, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Retrospective assessment of post-traumatic amnesia (PTA) must take into account factors other than traumatic brain injury (TBI) which may impact on memory both at the time of injury and subsequent to the injury. These include analgesics, anaesthesia required for surgery, and the development of acute or post-traumatic stress disorder. This is relevant in clinical and medicolegal settings. Repeated assessments of the post-injury state, involving tests for continuing amnesia, risk promoting recall of events suggested by the examiner, or generating confabulations. The PTA syndrome affects the categorical autobiographical memory, and is accompanied by confusion as an essential component; this should be suspected from the initial or early Glasgow Coma Scale score (13-14/15) if not directly recorded by clinical staff. PTA by itself is only one of several indices of severity of TBI. The nature of the head injury, including observers' accounts, clinical and neuroimaging data, the possible role of other external injuries, blood loss, acute stress disorder and the potential for hypoxic brain injury, must be taken into account as well as concomitant alcohol or substance abuse, and systemic shock. A plausible mechanism for a TBI must be demonstrable, and other causes of amnesia excluded.

  15. Computational modelling of traumatic brain injury predicts the location of chronic traumatic encephalopathy pathology.

    PubMed

    Ghajari, Mazdak; Hellyer, Peter J; Sharp, David J

    2017-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury can lead to the neurodegenerative disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy. This condition has a clear neuropathological definition but the relationship between the initial head impact and the pattern of progressive brain pathology is poorly understood. We test the hypothesis that mechanical strain and strain rate are greatest in sulci, where neuropathology is prominently seen in chronic traumatic encephalopathy, and whether human neuroimaging observations converge with computational predictions. Three distinct types of injury were simulated. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy can occur after sporting injuries, so we studied a helmet-to-helmet impact in an American football game. In addition, we investigated an occipital head impact due to a fall from ground level and a helmeted head impact in a road traffic accident involving a motorcycle and a car. A high fidelity 3D computational model of brain injury biomechanics was developed and the contours of strain and strain rate at the grey matter-white matter boundary were mapped. Diffusion tensor imaging abnormalities in a cohort of 97 traumatic brain injury patients were also mapped at the grey matter-white matter boundary. Fifty-one healthy subjects served as controls. The computational models predicted large strain most prominent at the depths of sulci. The volume fraction of sulcal regions exceeding brain injury thresholds were significantly larger than that of gyral regions. Strain and strain rates were highest for the road traffic accident and sporting injury. Strain was greater in the sulci for all injury types, but strain rate was greater only in the road traffic and sporting injuries. Diffusion tensor imaging showed converging imaging abnormalities within sulcal regions with a significant decrease in fractional anisotropy in the patient group compared to controls within the sulci. Our results show that brain tissue deformation induced by head impact loading is greatest in sulcal locations

  16. Head lice.

    PubMed

    Frankowski, Barbara L; Weiner, Leonard B

    2002-09-01

    Head lice infestation is associated with little morbidity but causes a high level of anxiety among parents of school-aged children. This statement attempts to clarify issues of diagnosis and treatment of head lice and makes recommendations for dealing with head lice in the school setting.

  17. On Impact: Students with Head Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canto, Angela I.; Chesire, David J.; Buckley, Valerie A.

    2011-01-01

    Students with head injuries may not be as "low incidence" as previously believed. Recent efforts from the American Academy of Pediatrics (2010), the National Football League, and other agencies are attempting to raise awareness of traumatic brain injury (TBI) among students. Along with awareness, there has been an increased publicity effort via…

  18. SURGICAL TREATMENT OF UPPER AND MIDDLE FACIAL ZONE TRAUMAS IN PROGRESS OF CONCOMITANT TRAUMATIC CRANIOFACIAL INJURIES.

    PubMed

    Lagvilava, G; Gvenetadze, Z; Toradze, G; Devidze, I; Gvenetadze, G

    2015-09-01

    In 2012-2015, 207 patients with concomitant craniofacial injuries, who underwent surgical treatment, were observed; among them 176 were men and 31- women. Age of the patients ranged from 16 to 60 years. According to localization and severity of trauma and a priority of surgical intervention, the patients conventionally were divided into 3 groups by the authors: I group (65 patients) - craniofacial injuries; the skull as well as upper and middle areas of face (subcranial and frontobasal fractures) were affected (fractured). II group (80 patients) - severe traumatic injuries of upper and especially middle zones of the face, accompanied with closed craniocerebral trauma, no need in neurosurgery. III group (62 patients) -on the background of serious head traumas, the injuries of face bones were less severe (injury of one or two anatomic areas with displacement of fractured fragments but without bone tissue defects) According to the obtained results a priority was always given to the neurosurgery (vital testimony).The reconstructive surgeries on face skeleton was conducted in combination involving neurosurgeons (I group patients). Reconstructive surgeries of facial bones were conducted in the patients of II group, immediately or at primary deferred period of time but in the patients of III group the surgical procedures for removal of early secondary or traumatic residual fractures have been performed. Reposition of the fractured facial bone fragments was performed in an open way and fixation was carried out by titanium plates and mesh cage (at bone tissue defect). For prevention and elimination of post-traumatic inflammatory processes, the final stage of surgical intervention was: sanation of nasal accessory sinuses and catheterization (5-7 days) of external carotid arteries for administration of antibiotics and other medical preparations. Early and differentiated approach to face injuries, worsening in the course of craniocephalic trauma was not revealed in any patient

  19. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy and athletes

    PubMed Central

    Mannix, Rebekah; Zafonte, Ross; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    Recent case reports have described athletes previously exposed to repetitive head trauma while participating in contact sports who later in life developed mood disorders, headaches, cognitive difficulties, suicidal ideation, difficulties with speech, and aggressive behavior. Postmortem discoveries show that some of these athletes have pathologic findings that are collectively termed chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Current hypotheses suggest that concussions or perhaps blows to the head that do not cause the signs and symptoms necessary for making the diagnosis of concussion, so-called subconcussive blows, cause both the clinical and pathologic findings. There are, however, some athletes who participate in contact sports who do not develop the findings ascribed to CTE. Furthermore, there are people who have headaches, mood disorders, cognitive difficulties, suicidal ideation, and other clinical problems who have neither been exposed to repeated head trauma nor possessed the pathologic postmortem findings of those currently diagnosed with CTE. The current lack of prospective data and properly designed case-control studies limits the current understanding of CTE, leading to debate about the causes of the neuropathologic findings and the clinical observations. Given the potential for referral and recall bias in available studies, it remains unclear whether or not the pathologic findings made postmortem cause the presumed neurobehavioral sequela and whether the presumed risk factors, such as sports activity, cerebral concussions, and subconcussive blows, are solely causative of the clinical signs and symptoms. This article discusses the current evidence and the associated limitations. PMID:26253448

  20. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy and athletes.

    PubMed

    Meehan, William; Mannix, Rebekah; Zafonte, Ross; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2015-10-27

    Recent case reports have described athletes previously exposed to repetitive head trauma while participating in contact sports who later in life developed mood disorders, headaches, cognitive difficulties, suicidal ideation, difficulties with speech, and aggressive behavior. Postmortem discoveries show that some of these athletes have pathologic findings that are collectively termed chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Current hypotheses suggest that concussions or perhaps blows to the head that do not cause the signs and symptoms necessary for making the diagnosis of concussion, so-called subconcussive blows, cause both the clinical and pathologic findings. There are, however, some athletes who participate in contact sports who do not develop the findings ascribed to CTE. Furthermore, there are people who have headaches, mood disorders, cognitive difficulties, suicidal ideation, and other clinical problems who have neither been exposed to repeated head trauma nor possessed the pathologic postmortem findings of those currently diagnosed with CTE. The current lack of prospective data and properly designed case-control studies limits the current understanding of CTE, leading to debate about the causes of the neuropathologic findings and the clinical observations. Given the potential for referral and recall bias in available studies, it remains unclear whether or not the pathologic findings made postmortem cause the presumed neurobehavioral sequela and whether the presumed risk factors, such as sports activity, cerebral concussions, and subconcussive blows, are solely causative of the clinical signs and symptoms. This article discusses the current evidence and the associated limitations.

  1. GFAP-BDP as an Acute Diagnostic Marker in Traumatic Brain Injury: Results from the Prospective Transforming Research and Clinical Knowledge in Traumatic Brain Injury Study

    PubMed Central

    Yue, John K.; Puccio, Ava M.; Panczykowski, David M.; Inoue, Tomoo; McMahon, Paul J.; Sorani, Marco D.; Yuh, Esther L.; Lingsma, Hester F.; Maas, Andrew I.R.; Valadka, Alex B.; Manley, Geoffrey T.; Casey, Scott S.; Cheong, Maxwell; Cooper, Shelly R.; Dams-O'Connor, Kristen; Gordon, Wayne A.; Hricik, Allison J.; Hochberger, Kerri; Menon, David K.; Mukherjee, Pratik; Sinha, Tuhin K.; Schnyer, David M.; Vassar, Mary J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Reliable diagnosis of traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major public health need. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is expressed in the central nervous system, and breakdown products (GFAP-BDP) are released following parenchymal brain injury. Here, we evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of elevated levels of plasma GFAP-BDP in TBI. Participants were identified as part of the prospective Transforming Research And Clinical Knowledge in Traumatic Brain Injury (TRACK-TBI) Study. Acute plasma samples (<24 h post-injury) were collected from patients presenting with brain injury who had CT imaging. The ability of GFAP-BDP level to discriminate patients with demonstrable traumatic lesions on CT, and with failure to return to pre-injury baseline at 6 months, was evaluated by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Of the 215 patients included for analysis, 83% had mild, 4% had moderate, and 13% had severe TBI; 54% had acute traumatic lesions on CT. The ability of GFAP-BDP level to discriminate patients with traumatic lesions on CT as evaluated by AUC was 0.88 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.84–0.93). The optimal cutoff of 0.68 ng/mL for plasma GFAP-BDP level was associated with a 21.61 odds ratio for traumatic findings on head CT. Discriminatory ability of unfavorable 6 month outcome was lower, AUC 0.65 (95% CI, 0.55–0.74), with a 2.07 odds ratio. GFAP-BDP levels reliably distinguish the presence and severity of CT scan findings in TBI patients. Although these findings confirm and extend prior studies, a larger prospective trial is still needed to validate the use of GFAP-BDP as a routine diagnostic biomarker for patient care and clinical research. The term “mild” continues to be a misnomer for this patient population, and underscores the need for evolving classification strategies for TBI targeted therapy. (ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT01565551; NIH Grant 1RC2 NS069409) PMID:23489259

  2. Radial Head and Neck Allograft for Comminute Irreparable Fracture-Dislocations of the Elbow.

    PubMed

    Bisicchia, Salvatore; Tudisco, Cosimo

    2016-11-01

    Fracture-dislocations of the elbow can be difficult to treat, with unsatisfactory results in some cases. In general, it is preferable to preserve the fractured radial head when possible, but some patients present a unique treatment challenge because of extremely comminuted fractures and bone loss. In these cases, the only options available are radial head prosthesis or allograft. The authors present a case of a 45-year-old man with a fracture-dislocation of the left elbow that was treated with an allograft of the radial head and neck because of extreme comminution of the fracture. There have been a few reports about osteochondral allograft transplantation of the radial head, and they all included traumatic or posttraumatic cases treated with a frozen allograft. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first report on the use of osteochondral allograft in the acute setting for the treatment of a comminuted fracture of the radius involving the whole head and neck. The clinical results were satisfactory at the final follow-up, although mild degenerative changes were present, the screws were coming loose, and the radial head had a slight valgus deformity. Radial head allograft can be an option in selected cases of acute fractures with severe comminution and bone loss that are not amenable to a stable internal fixation; for the young and active patient, who is not the best candidate for radial head resection; or in cases in which radial head arthroplasty is not feasible because of severe bone loss. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(6):e1205-e1208.].

  3. Anti-Malassezia-Specific IgE Antibodies Production in Japanese Patients with Head and Neck Atopic Dermatitis: Relationship between the Level of Specific IgE Antibody and the Colonization Frequency of Cutaneous Malassezia Species and Clinical Severity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Enshi; Tanaka, Takafumi; Tajima, Mami; Tsuboi, Ryoji; Kato, Hiroshi; Nishikawa, Akemi; Sugita, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis of the head and neck (HNAD) is recognized as a separate condition. Malassezia, the predominant skin microbiota fungus, is considered to exacerbate atopic dermatitis (AD), especially HNAD. In the present study, we investigated the relationships between the levels of specific IgE antibodies, colonization frequency of eight predominant Malassezia species, and clinical severity in 61 patients with HNAD (26 mild, 24 moderate, and 11 severe cases). As clinical severity increased, the levels of specific IgE antibodies against eight Malassezia species also increased. Species diversity of the Malassezia microbiota in scale samples from patients was analyzed by nested PCR using species-specific primers. The clinical severity of HNAD was correlated with the total level of specific IgE antibodies against Malassezia species and the number of Malassezia species detected. PMID:22253636

  4. Traumatic aneurysm of the supraclinoid internal carotid artery and an associated carotid-cavernous fistula: vascular reconstruction performed using intravascular implantation of stents and coils. Case report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Young; Yim, Man-Bin; Kim, Il-Man; Son, Eun-Ik; Kim, Dong-Won

    2004-01-01

    This report documents the treatment of a traumatic aneurysm of the supraclinoid internal carotid artery (ICA) that was associated with a carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF), which appeared following closed head trauma. This life-threatening lesion, which is very rare, required aggressive management achieved using intravascular stents and coils. A 19-year-old man presented with severe traumatic intracerebral and subarachnoid hematoma after he had suffered a severe closed head injury in a motor vehicle accident. Cerebral angiography performed 11 days after the injury demonstrated a traumatic aneurysm and severe narrowing of the right supraclinoid ICA, which was consistent with a dissection-induced stenosis associated with a direct CCF. Both lesions were successfully obliterated with preservation of the parent artery by using stents in conjunction with coils. Follow-up angiography obtained 7 months postoperatively revealed persistent obliteration of the aneurysm and CCF as well as patency of the parent artery. The patient remained asymptomatic during the clinical follow-up period of 14 months. Endovascular treatment involving the use of a stent combined with coils appears to be a feasible, minimally invasive option for treatment of this hard-to-treat lesion.

  5. Inflammation and Outcome in Traumatic Brain Injury: Does Gender Effect on Survival and Prognosis?

    PubMed Central

    Mohajeri, Mina; Dobakhti, Faramarz

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) accounts for the majority of trauma deaths and there has been increased interest in the understanding the role of prognostic factors. C-Reactive Protein (CRP) level increases rapidly in response to trauma. Aim Aim of the present study was to indicate the role of CRP as a predictor of outcome in TBI patients based on their gender category. Materials and Methods A prospective cohort study in a surgical Intensive Care Unit (ICU) in one of the Zanjan University of Medical Science hospital was designed. Fifty nine head trauma patients were divided into two groups based on their gender. Serum CRP was measured 48 hours after trauma. All data including the length of ICU stay, the duration of mechanical ventilation, the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) at discharge, and mortality were collected. The relationship between the clinical features and serum CRP level was also studied. Results In the male group, CRP level was not significantly correlated with the length of ICU stay, the duration of mechanical ventilation and GCS at discharge. In the female group, CRP level was positively correlated with the length of ICU stay and the duration of mechanical ventilation; however, CRP level was not significantly correlated with GCS at discharge. These results remain constant in female sub group with severe head injury contrast to female with mild injury. Conclusion The GCS level can predict the outcome of females with severe head injury better than females with mild head injury and males.

  6. Traumatic Brain Injury in Domestic Violence Victims: A Retrospective Study at the Barrow Neurological Institute.

    PubMed

    Zieman, Glynnis; Bridwell, Ashley; Cárdenas, Javier F

    2017-02-15

    Domestic violence is a national health crisis, which affects people of all ages, races, and socioeconomic classes. Traumatic brain injury is common in victims because of the high frequency of head and neck injuries inflicted through abuse. These recurrent injuries can lead to chronic symptoms with high morbidity. We conducted a retrospective chart review of 115 patients with a history of head trauma as a result of domestic violence. All patients were seen in a subspecialty traumatic brain injury clinic, at which time information regarding their histories and self-reported symptoms were recorded. In total, 109 females and 6 males were included in our study, with an age range of 4-68 years. Overall, 88% reported more than one injury and 81% reported a history of loss of consciousness associated with their injuries. Only 21% sought medical help at the time of injury. Whereas 85% had a history of abuse in adulthood, 22% had experienced abuse in both childhood and adulthood, and 60% of the patients abused as children went on to be abused as adults. Headache was the most common chief complaint, but on a self-reported symptom severity scale, behavioral symptoms were the most severe. Psychiatric disease was present in 84% of patients. Traumatic brain injury is a frequent sequela of domestic violence, from which many victims sustain multiple injuries without seeking medical care. Brain injuries are often sustained over many years and lead to lasting physical, behavioral, and cognitive consequences. Better understanding of these injuries will lead to improved care for this population.

  7. Epileptic spasms in paediatric post-traumatic epilepsy at a tertiary referral centre.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun T; Chugani, Harry T

    2017-03-17

    To recognize epileptic spasms (ES) as a seizure type after traumatic brain injury (TBI), accidental or non-accidental, in infants and children. In the process, we aim to gain some insight into the mechanisms of epileptogenesis in ES. A retrospective electronic chart review was performed at the Children's Hospital of Michigan from 2002 to 2012. Electronic charts of 321 patients were reviewed for evidence of post-traumatic epilepsy. Various clinical variables were collected including age at TBI, mechanism of trauma, severity of brain injury, electroencephalography/neuroimaging data, and seizure semiology. Six (12.8%) of the 47 patients diagnosed with post-traumatic epilepsy (PTE) had ES. Epileptic spasms occurred between two months to two years after TBI. All patients with ES had multiple irritative zones, manifesting as multifocal epileptiform discharges, unilateral or bilateral. Cognitive delay and epileptic encephalopathy were seen in all six patients, five of whom were free of spasms after treatment with vigabatrin or adrenocorticotropic hormone. The risk of PTE is 47/321(14.6%) and the specific risk of ES after TBI is 6/321 (1.8%). The risk of ES appears to be high if the age at which severe TBI occurred was during infancy. Non-accidental head trauma is a risk factor of epileptic spasms. While posttraumatic epilepsy (not ES) may start 10 years after the head injury, ES starts within two years, according to our small cohort. The pathophysiology of ES is unknown, however, our data support a combination of previously proposed models in which the primary dysfunction is a focal or diffuse cortical abnormality, coupled with its abnormal interaction with the subcortical structures and brainstem at a critical maturation stage.

  8. Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury. Special Topic Report #3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waaland, Pamela K.; Cockrell, Janice L.

    This brief report summarizes what is known about pediatric traumatic brain injury, including the following: risk factors (e.g., males especially those ages 5 to 25, youth with preexisting problems including previous head injury victims, and children receiving inadequate supervision); life after injury; physical and neurological consequences (e.g.,…

  9. Traumatic Brain Injury: A Guidebook for Idaho Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Susanne

    This guide is an introduction to head injury and to educational resources in the field. An introductory section describes traumatic brain injury (TBI) as a federally recognized disability category and provides its federal and Idaho definitions. The following section introduces the unique characteristics of students with brain injuries. A section…

  10. Experimental traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury, a leading cause of death and disability, is a result of an outside force causing mechanical disruption of brain tissue and delayed pathogenic events which collectively exacerbate the injury. These pathogenic injury processes are poorly understood and accordingly no effective neuroprotective treatment is available so far. Experimental models are essential for further clarification of the highly complex pathology of traumatic brain injury towards the development of novel treatments. Among the rodent models of traumatic brain injury the most commonly used are the weight-drop, the fluid percussion, and the cortical contusion injury models. As the entire spectrum of events that might occur in traumatic brain injury cannot be covered by one single rodent model, the design and choice of a specific model represents a major challenge for neuroscientists. This review summarizes and evaluates the strengths and weaknesses of the currently available rodent models for traumatic brain injury. PMID:20707892

  11. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... injury, cerebral contusion, cerebral laceration, coma, head trauma, hematoma, impaired consciousness, postconcussion syndrome, skull fracture, skull penetration, stupor, vegetative state Family Health, Infants ...

  12. Current topics in sports-related head injuries: a review.

    PubMed

    Nagahiro, Shinji; Mizobuchi, Yoshifumi

    2014-01-01

    We review the current topic in sports-related head injuries including acute subdural hematoma (ASDH), concussion, and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Sports-related ASDH is a leading cause of death and severe morbidity in popular contact sports like American football in the USA and judo in Japan. It is thought that rotational acceleration is most likely to produce not only cerebral concussion but also ASDH due to the rupture of a parasagittal bridging vein, depending on the severity of the rotational acceleration injury. Repeated sports head injuries increase the risk for future concussion, cerebral swelling, ASDH or CTE. To avoid fatal consequences or CTE resulting from repeated concussions, an understanding of the criteria for a safe post-concussion return to play (RTP) is essential. Once diagnosed with a concussion, the athlete must not be allowed to RTP the same day and should not resume play before the concussion symptoms have completely resolved. If brain damage has been confirmed or a subdural hematoma is present, the athlete should not be allowed to participate in any contact sports. As much remains unknown regarding the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of sports-related concussion, ASDH, and CTE, basic and clinical studies are necessary to elucidate the crucial issues in sports-related head injuries.

  13. Management of traumatic macular holes: case report.

    PubMed

    Brasil, Oswaldo Ferreira Moura; Brasil, Oswaldo Moura

    2008-01-01

    Traumatic macular hole is a disease whose pathogenesis is not fully understood and the best treatment guideline is controversial. We report 2 cases of traumatic macular hole with different treatment approaches. In the first case, a 9-year-old boy presented with a traumatic macular hole secondary to blunt ocular trauma with a stone, and initial vision of 20/300. He underwent surgical repair and his final vision was 20/70 with hole closure after a 1 year follow-up. In the second case, a 20-year-old woman suffered a penetrating bullet wound on the left side of her forehead. The injury caused optic nerve head avulsion in the left eye with loss of light perception. The right eye had a traumatic macular hole and signs suggestive of sclopetaria chorioretinitis, with 20/60 vision. This case was initially observed and vision improved to 20/30 with reduction of the hole diameter. Vision and hole diameter remained stable after 8 months.

  14. Traumatic Brain Injuries. Guidelines Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Education, Denver. Special Education Services Unit.

    This paper on traumatic brain injuries begins with statistics on the incidence of the disorder, especially as they relate to Colorado. Traumatic brain injury is then defined, and problems caused by traumatic brain injury are discussed. The components of effective programming for students with traumatic brain injuries are described, followed by the…

  15. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support in post-traumatic cardiopulmonary failure

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chun-Yu; Tsai, Feng-Chun; Lee, Hsiu-An; Tseng, Yuan-His

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Patients with multiple traumas associated with cardiopulmonary failure have a high mortality rate; however, such patients can be temporarily stabilized using extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), providing a bridge to rescue therapy. Using a retrospective study design, we aimed to clarify the prognostic factors of post-traumatic ECMO support. From March 2006 to July 2016, 43 adult patients (mean age, 37.3 ± 15.2 years; 7 females [16.3%]) underwent ECMO because of post-traumatic cardiopulmonary failure. Pre-ECMO demographics, peri-ECMO events, and post-ECMO recoveries were compared between survivors and nonsurvivors. The most common traumatic insult was traffic collision (n = 30, 69.8%), and involved injury areas included the chest (n = 33, 76.7%), head (n = 14, 32.6%), abdomen (n = 21, 48.8%), and fractures (n = 21, 48.8%). Fifteen patients (34.9%) underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation and 22 (51.2%) received rescue interventions before ECMO deployment. The mean time interval between trauma and ECMO was 90.6 ± 130.1 hours, and the mode of support was venovenous in 26 patients (60.5%). A total of 26 patients (60.5%) were weaned off of ECMO and 22 (51.6%) survived to discharge, with an overall mean support time of 162.9 ± 182.7 hours. A multivariate regression analysis identified 2 significant predictors for in-hospital mortality: an injury severity score (ISS) >30 (odds ratio [OR], 9.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04–18.47; P = 0.042), and the requirement of renal replacement therapy (RRT) during ECMO (OR, 8.64; 95% CI, 1.73–26.09; P = 0.020). These two factors were also significant for the 1-year survival (ISS >30: 12.5%; ISS ≤30, 48.1%, P = 0.001) (RRT required, 15.0%; RRT not required, 52.2%, P = 0.006). Using ECMO in selected traumatized patients with cardiopulmonary failure can be a salvage therapy. Prompt intervention before shock-impaired systemic organ perfusion and acute

  16. Biomarkers of Traumatic Brain Injury: Temporal Changes in Body Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Mårten, Kvist

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) are caused by a hit to the head or a sudden acceleration/deceleration movement of the head. Mild TBIs (mTBIs) and concussions are difficult to diagnose. Imaging techniques often fail to find alterations in the brain, and computed tomography exposes the patient to radiation. Brain-specific biomolecules that are released upon cellular damage serve as another means of diagnosing TBI and assessing the severity of injury. These biomarkers can be detected from samples of body fluids using laboratory tests. Dozens of TBI biomarkers have been studied, and research related to them is increasing. We reviewed the recent literature and selected 12 biomarkers relevant to rapid and accurate diagnostics of TBI for further evaluation. The objective was especially to get a view of the temporal profiles of the biomarkers’ rise and decline after a TBI event. Most biomarkers are rapidly elevated after injury, and they serve as diagnostics tools for some days. Some biomarkers are elevated for months after injury, although the literature on long-term biomarkers is scarce. Clinical utilization of TBI biomarkers is still at a very early phase despite years of active research. PMID:28032118

  17. Getting My Bearings, Returning to School: Issues Facing Adolescents with Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilling, Ethan J.; Getch, Yvette Q.

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is characterized by a blow to the head or other penetrating head injury resulting in impairment of the brain's functioning. Despite the high incidence of TBI in adolescents, many educators still consider TBI to be a low-incidence disability. In addition, school personnel often report receiving little to no pre-service…

  18. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Saulle, Michael; Greenwald, Brian D.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that is a long-term consequence of single or repetitive closed head injuries for which there is no treatment and no definitive pre-mortem diagnosis. It has been closely tied to athletes who participate in contact sports like boxing, American football, soccer, professional wrestling and hockey. Risk factors include head trauma, presence of ApoE3 or ApoE4 allele, military service, and old age. It is histologically identified by the presence of tau-immunoreactive NFTs and NTs with some cases having a TDP-43 proteinopathy or beta-amyloid plaques. It has an insidious clinical presentation that begins with cognitive and emotional disturbances and can progress to Parkinsonian symptoms. The exact mechanism for CTE has not been precisely defined however, research suggest it is due to an ongoing metabolic and immunologic cascade called immunoexcitiotoxicity. Prevention and education are currently the most compelling way to combat CTE and will be an emphasis of both physicians and athletes. Further research is needed to aid in pre-mortem diagnosis, therapies, and support for individuals and their families living with CTE. PMID:22567320

  19. Factors Associated with Incidence of "Inappropriate" Ambulance Transport in Rural Areas in Cases of Moderate to Severe Head Injury in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poltavski, Dmitri; Muus, Kyle

    2005-01-01

    Context: Ambulance transport of pediatric trauma patients to designated trauma centers in cases of moderate and severe injury is not always performed, which has been shown to result in poor treatment outcomes. Determination of factors involved in inappropriate patient transport, especially in rural areas, remains an important avenue of research.…

  20. Factors Associated With Incidence of "?Inappropriate"? Ambulance Transport in Rural Areas in Cases of Moderate to Severe Head Injury in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poltavski, Dmitri; Muus, Kyle