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Sample records for sexual partnership distributions

  1. Defining life partnerships: does sexual orientation matter?

    PubMed

    Kline, Todd M; Martz, Gary; Lesperance, C Jason; Waldo, Merilyne C

    2008-01-01

    This study compared the responses of gay men, lesbians, heterosexual men, and heterosexual women to a number of questions investigating the needs and tensions in life partnerships between two individuals. Overall, the groups had similar attitudes toward life partnerships. Nearly all respondents found great meaning in the idea of life partnership, the pursuits of psychological and physical intimacy and the importance of family and social support, and all three of these categories were actually considered more important than the ability to marry legally. Respondents recognized that having children may encourage commitment to life partnerships, though this was less influential for gay men. A significant percentage of respondents, regarding HIV status, either had no opinion or felt that HIV was not particularly or not at all threatening to life partnerships. Men and women, regardless of sexual orientation, appear to experience similar needs and aspirations regarding life partnerships.

  2. Incarceration and Risky Sexual Partnerships in a Southern US City

    PubMed Central

    Wohl, David A.; Weir, Sharon S.; Adimora, Adaora A.; Moseley, Caroline; Norcott, Kathy; Duncan, Jesse; Kaufman, Jay S.; Miller, William C.

    2007-01-01

    Incarceration is strongly associated with HIV infection and may contribute to viral transmission by disrupting stable partnerships and promoting high-risk partnerships. We investigated incarceration and STI/HIV-related partnerships among a community-based sample recruited for a sexual behavior interview while frequenting venues where people meet sexual partners in a North Carolina city (N = 373). Men reporting incarceration in the past 12 months were more likely than men without recent incarceration to experience multiple new sexual partnerships (unadjusted prevalence ratio [PR] 1.8, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.1–3.1) and transactional sex defined as trading sex for money, goods, or services (unadjusted PR: 4.0, 95% CI: 2.3–7.1) in the past 4 weeks. Likewise, women who were ever incarcerated were more likely than never-incarcerated women to experience recent multiple new partnerships (unadjusted PR: 3.1, 95% CI: 1.8–5.4) and transactional sex (unadjusted PR: 5.3, 95% CI: 2.6–10.9). Sexual partnership in the past 12 months with someone who had ever been incarcerated versus with partners with no known incarceration history was associated with recent multiple new partnerships (men: unadjusted PR 2.0, 95% CI 1.4–2.9, women: unadjusted PR 4.8, 95% CI 2.3–10.1) and transactional sex (men: unadjusted PR 3.3, 95% CI 1.7–6.6, women: unadjusted PR 6.1, 95% CI 2.4–15.4). Adjustment for demographic and socioeconomic variables had minimal effect on estimates. However, the strong overlap between incarceration, partner incarceration, and substance abuse had substantial effects in multivariable models. Correctional-facility and community-based HIV prevention, with substance abuse treatment, should reach currently and formerly incarcerated individuals and their sexual partners. PMID:18027088

  3. Migration, Multiple Sexual Partnerships, and Sexual Concurrency in the Garífuna Population of Honduras.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Anisha D; Pettifor, Audrey; Barrington, Clare; Marshall, Stephen W; Behets, Frieda; Guardado, Maria Elena; Farach, Nasim; Ardón, Elvia; Paz-Bailey, Gabriela

    2015-09-01

    The Garífuna, an ethnic minority group in Honduras, have been disproportionately affected by HIV. Previous research suggests that migration and high rates of multiple sexual partnerships are major drivers of the epidemic. Using data from a 2012 population-based survey, we assessed whether temporary migration was associated with (1) multiple sexual partnerships and (2) sexual concurrency among Garífuna men and women in Honduras. Among both men and women, temporary migration in the last year was associated with an increased likelihood of multiple sexual partnerships and with concurrency, though only the association between migration and multiple sexual partnerships among men was statistically significant (Adjusted Prevalence Ratio 1.7, 95 % CI 1.2-2.4). Migration may contribute to HIV/STI vulnerability among Garífuna men and women via increases in these sexual risk behaviors. Research conducted among men and women at elevated risk of HIV should continue to incorporate measures of mobility, including history of internal migration.

  4. Migration, multiple sexual partnerships, and sexual concurrency in the Garífuna population of Honduras

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Anisha D.; Pettifor, Audrey; Barrington, Clare; Marshall, Stephen W.; Behets, Frieda; Guardado, Maria Elena; Farach, Nasim; Ardón, Elvia; Paz-Bailey, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    The Garífuna, an ethnic minority group in Honduras, have been disproportionately affected by HIV. Previous research suggests that migration and high rates of multiple sexual partnerships are major drivers of the epidemic. Using data from a 2012 population-based survey, we assessed whether temporary migration was associated with 1) multiple sexual partnerships and 2) sexual concurrency among Garífuna men and women in Honduras. Among both men and women, temporary migration in the last year was associated with an increased likelihood of multiple sexual partnerships and with concurrency, though only the association between migration and multiple sexual partnerships among men was statistically significant (Adjusted Prevalence Ratio 1.7, 95% CI 1.2-2.4). Migration may contribute to HIV/STI vulnerability among Garífuna men and women via increases in these sexual risk behaviors. Research conducted among men and women at elevated risk of HIV should continue to incorporate measures of mobility, including history of internal migration. PMID:26242612

  5. Monitoring knowledge among family, sexually transmitted infections, and sexual partnership characteristics of African American adolescent females.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Riley J; Swartzendruber, Andrea L; Rose, Eve; DiClemente, Ralph J

    2014-10-01

    Among 284 African American girls aged 14 to 17 years, frequent family monitoring knowledge was associated with a reduced likelihood of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and having a casual sex partner but was not associated with other partnership characteristics. Family monitoring may offer an additional STI prevention opportunity for this vulnerable population.

  6. Partnership-Level Analysis of African American Women's Risky Sexual Behavior in Main and Non-Main Partnerships.

    PubMed

    Broaddus, Michelle; Owczarzak, Jill; Pacella, Maria; Pinkerton, Steven; Wright, Cassandra

    2016-12-01

    The majority of research on risky sexual behavior in African American women has examined global associations between individual-level predictors and behavior. However, this method obscures the potentially significant impact of the specific relationship or relationship partner on risky sexual behavior. To address this gap, we conducted partnership-level analysis of risky sexual behavior among 718 African American women recruited from HIV counseling, testing, and referral sites in four states. Using mixed model regressions, we tested relationships between condomless vaginal intercourse with men and variables drawn from the Theory of Planned Behavior, Theory of Gender and Power, and previous research specifically on sexual risks among African American women. Significant associations with risky sexual behavior indicate the need for continued emphasis on condom attitudes, condom negotiation behaviors, and overcoming partner resistance to condoms within both main and non-main partnerships when implementing interventions designed to address HIV and sexually transmitted infection risks among African American women.

  7. Concurrent sexual partnerships among married Zimbabweans – implications for HIV prevention

    PubMed Central

    Mugweni, Esther; Pearson, Stephen; Omar, Mayeh

    2015-01-01

    Background Concurrent sexual partnerships play a key role in sustaining the HIV epidemic in Zimbabwe. Married couples are at an increased risk of contracting HIV from sexual networks produced by concurrent sexual partnerships. Addressing these partnerships is an international HIV prevention priority. Methods Our qualitative study presents the socioeconomic factors that contribute to the occurrence of concurrent sexual partnerships among married people in Zimbabwe. We conducted 36 in-depth interviews and four focus group discussions with married men and women in Zimbabwe in 2008 to understand the organizations of concurrent sexual partnerships. Data were analyzed using framework analysis. Results Our study indicates that relationship dissatisfaction played a key role in the engagement of concurrent sexual partnerships. Depending on the source of the dissatisfaction, there were four possible types of concurrent sexual relationships that were formed: sex worker, casual partner, regular girlfriend or informal polygyny which was referred to as “small house”. These relationships had different levels of intimacy, which had a bearing on practicing safer sex. Participants described three characteristics of hegemonic masculinity that contributed to the sources of dissatisfaction leading to concurrent sexual activity. Similarly, various aspects of emphasized femininity were described as creating opportunities for the occurrence of concurrent sexual relationships. Economic status was also listed as a factor that contributed to the occurrence of concurrent sexual partnerships. Conclusion Marital dissatisfaction was indicated as a contributing factor to the occurrence of concurrent sexual relationships. There were several reports of satisfying marital relationships in which affairs did not occur. Lessons from these marriages can be made part of future HIV prevention interventions targeted at preventing concurrent sexual partnerships by married couples. PMID:26491372

  8. Love, lust and the emotional context of multiple and concurrent sexual partnerships among young Swazi adults.

    PubMed

    Ruark, Allison; Dlamini, Lunga; Mazibuko, Nonhlanhla; Green, Edward C; Kennedy, Caitlin; Nunn, Amy; Flanigan, Timothy; Surkan, Pamela J

    2014-01-01

    Men and women in Swaziland who are engaged in multiple or concurrent sexual partnerships, or who have sexual partners with concurrent partners, face a very high risk of HIV infection. Ninety-four in-depth interviews were conducted with 28 Swazi men and women (14 of each sex) between the ages of 20 and 39 to explore participants' sexual partnership histories, including motivations for sexual relationships which carried high HIV risk. Concurrency was normative, with most men and women having had at least one concurrent sexual partnership, and all women reporting having had at least one partner who had a concurrent partner. Men distinguished sexual partnerships that were just for sex from those that were considered to be 'real relationships', while women represented most of their relationships, even those which included significant financial support, as being based on love. Besides being motivated by love, concurrent sexual partnerships were described as motivated by a lack of sexual satisfaction, a desire for emotional support and/or as a means to exact revenge against a cheating partner. Social and structural factors were also found to play a role in creating an enabling environment for high-risk sexual partnerships. These factors included social pressure and norms; a lack of social trust; poverty and a desire for material goods; and geographical separation of partners.

  9. Influence of HLA on human partnership and sexual satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Kromer, J.; Hummel, T.; Pietrowski, D.; Giani, A. S.; Sauter, J.; Ehninger, G.; Schmidt, A. H.; Croy, I.

    2016-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC, called HLA in humans) is an important genetic component of the immune system. Fish, birds and mammals prefer mates with different genetic MHC code compared to their own, which they determine using olfactory cues. This preference increases the chances of high MHC variety in the offspring, leading to enhanced resilience against a variety of pathogens. Humans are also able to discriminate HLA related olfactory stimuli, however, it is debated whether this mechanism is of behavioural relevance. We show on a large sample (N = 508), with high-resolution typing of HLA class I/II, that HLA dissimilarity correlates with partnership, sexuality and enhances the desire to procreate. We conclude that HLA mediates mate behaviour in humans. PMID:27578547

  10. Satisfaction guaranteed? How individual, partner, and relationship factors impact sexual satisfaction within partnerships

    PubMed Central

    Margraf, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    Within committed relationships, a wide range of factors may challenge or facilitate sexual satisfaction. The aim of this study was to clarify which individual, partner-, and partnership-related aspects of a sexual relationship are crucial for the prediction of sexual satisfaction. The study included data of a representative sample of 964 couples from the general population. The actor-partner interdependence model was used to estimate actor and partner effects. Overall, predictors explained 57% of outcome variance. Actor effects were found for sexual function, sexual distress, frequency of sexual activity, desire discrepancy, sexual initiative, sexual communication, sociosexual orientation, masturbation, and life satisfaction. Gender-specific partner effects were found for sexual function and sexual distress. Neither age, nor relationship duration were significant predictors. To deepen our understanding of sexual satisfaction, it is necessary to take quantitative and qualitative aspects of sexual relationships into account and to consider actor-, partner-, and relationship-related predictors. PMID:28231314

  11. Correlates of Concurrent Sexual Partnerships Among Young, Rural African American Men

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Junhan; Barnum, Stacey C.; Brown, Geoffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We investigated the social, behavioral, and psychological factors associated with concurrent (i.e., overlapping in time) sexual partnerships among rural African American young men with a primary female partner. Methods We recruited 505 men in rural areas of southern Georgia from January 2012 to August 2013 using respondent-driven sampling; 361 reported having a primary female partner and participating only in heterosexual sexual activity. Men provided data on their demographic characteristics and HIV-related risk behaviors, as well as social, behavioral, and psychological risk factors. Results Of the 361 men with a primary female partner, 164 (45.4%) reported concurrent sexual partners during the past three months. Among the 164 men with a concurrent sexual partner, 144 (92.9%) reported inconsistent condom use with their primary partners, and 68 (41.5%) reported using condoms inconsistently with their concurrent partners. Having concurrent sexual partnerships was associated with inconsistent condom use, substance use before sex, and self-reported sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Bivariate correlates of concurrent sexual partnerships included incarceration, substance use, early onset of sexual activity, impulsive decision-making, and masculinity attitudes (i.e., men's adherence to culturally defined standards for male behavior). In a multivariate model, both masculinity ideology and impulsive decision-making independently predicted concurrent sexual partnerships independent of other risk factors. Conclusion Masculinity attitudes and impulsive decision-making are independent predictors of concurrent sexual partnerships among rural African American men and, consequently, the spread of HIV and other STIs. Developing programs that target masculinity attitudes and self-regulatory skills may help to reduce concurrent sexual partnerships. PMID:26345725

  12. A framework of sexual partnerships: risks and implications for HIV prevention in Africa.

    PubMed

    Green, Edward C; Mah, Timothy L; Ruark, Allison; Hearst, Norman

    2009-03-01

    The global diversity of HIV epidemics can be explained in part by types and patterns of sexual partnerships. We offer a typology of sexual partnerships that corresponds to varying levels of HIV-transmission risk to help guide thinking about appropriate behavioral interventions, particularly in the epidemics of sub-Saharan Africa. Declines in HIV prevalence have been associated with reductions in numbers of sex partners, whereas many other prevention strategies have not been demonstrated to reduce HIV transmission at a population level. We suggest a reorientation of current prevention efforts, based on the epidemiology of sexually transmitted HIV epidemics and trends in sexual behavior change. Concurrent sexual partnerships are likely to play a large role in transmission dynamics in the generalized epidemics of East and Southern Africa, and should be addressed through improved behavior-change interventions.

  13. The missing mass of morality: a new fitpack design for hepatitis C prevention in sexual partnerships.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Suzanne

    2013-05-01

    In the West, most hepatitis C transmission occurs through the sharing of equipment used for injecting drugs, and most sharing occurs between sexual partners. Despite this, little is known about how injecting practice, including equipment use, is managed in these partnerships. This article draws on science studies theorist Bruno Latour's work on technology and ethics (2002), and preliminary data collected for a research project on sexual partners who inject together, to illuminate these issues. Responsibility for avoiding transmission has long been conceived individually, as have measures intended to aid individuals in fulfilling this responsibility, such as the distribution of sterile injecting equipment. This individualising tendency has been criticised for inequitably responsibilising disadvantaged people. This article aims to exceed this individualising approach by proposing a different understanding of agency and a new mode of prevention. Rather than treating hepatitis C in conventional terms, as a bounded, ontologically stable object that pre-exists its encounter with individuals and the material objects they use in injecting, it formulates it as made in its enfolding with other phenomena, including social relationships and technological objects. In turn it sees transmission in new terms; as a question of social relationships and of object design. The article goes on to discuss a new Australian research project that takes this approach as its starting point, aiming to develop two key prevention innovations: (1) new messages aimed at partnerships rather than individuals, and (2) a new injecting pack or 'fitpack' that treats the partnership as a primary unit of resourcing. The article concludes by considering the politics of this shift to an ethics of technology, social relationships and objects.

  14. Attitudes towards Power in Relationships and Sexual Concurrency within Heterosexual Youth Partnerships in Baltimore, MD

    PubMed Central

    Lilleston, Pamela S.; Hebert, Luciana E.; Jennings, Jacky M.; Holtgrave, David R.; Ellen, Jonathan M.; Sherman, Susan G.

    2016-01-01

    Sexual concurrency may increase risk for HIV/STIs among youth. Attitudes about gender roles, including power balances within sexual partnerships, could be a driver. We examined this association among Baltimore youth (N=352), aged 15–24. Data were collected from February, 2011 to May, 2013. We examined whether index concurrency in male-reported partnerships (N=221) and sex partner concurrency in female-reported partnerships (N=241) were associated with youth’s attitudes towards relationship power. Males with more equitable beliefs about power were less likely to report index concurrency. Females with more equitable beliefs were more likely to report partner’s concurrency. The relationship was significant in main and casual partnerships among females and main partnerships among males. The strongest associations were detected among middle-SES males and low-SES and African American females. Implementing interventions that recognize the complex relationship between socioeconomic context, partner dynamics, gender, and sexual behavior is an important step towards reducing HIV/STI risk among youth. PMID:26054391

  15. Father Involvement and Young, Rural African American Men's Engagement in Substance Misuse and Multiple Sexual Partnerships.

    PubMed

    Barton, Allen W; Kogan, Steven M; Cho, Junhan; Brown, Geoffrey L

    2015-12-01

    This study was designed to examine the associations of biological father and social father involvement during childhood with African American young men's development and engagement in risk behaviors. With a sample of 505 young men living in the rural South of the United States, a dual mediation model was tested in which retrospective reports of involvement from biological fathers and social fathers were linked to young men's substance misuse and multiple sexual partnerships through men's relational schemas and future expectations. Results from structural equation modeling indicated that levels of involvement from biological fathers and social fathers predicted young men's relational schemas; only biological fathers' involvement predicted future expectations. In turn, future expectations predicted levels of substance misuse, and negative relational schemas predicted multiple sexual partnerships. Biological fathers' involvement evinced significant indirect associations with young men's substance misuse and multiple sexual partnerships through both schemas and expectations; social fathers' involvement exhibited an indirect association with multiple sexual partnerships through relational schemas. Findings highlight the unique influences of biological fathers and social fathers on multiple domains of African American young men's psychosocial development that subsequently render young men more or less likely to engage in risk behaviors.

  16. Father Involvement and Young, Rural African American Men's Engagement in Substance Misuse and Multiple Sexual Partnerships

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Allen W.; Kogan, Steven M.; Cho, Junhan; Brown, Geoffrey L.

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the associations of biological father and social father involvement during childhood with African American young men's development and engagement in risk behaviors. With a sample of 505 young men living in the rural South, a dual mediation model was tested in which retrospective reports of involvement from biological fathers and social fathers were linked to young men's substance misuse and multiple sexual partnerships through men's relational schemas and future expectations. Results from structural equation modeling indicated that levels of involvement from biological fathers and social fathers predicted young men's relational schemas; only biological fathers' involvement predicted future expectations. In turn, future expectations predicted levels of substance misuse, and negative relational schemas predicted multiple sexual partnerships. Biological fathers' involvement evinced significant indirect associations with young men's substance misuse and multiple sexual partnerships through both schemas and expectations; social fathers' involvement exhibited an indirect association with multiple sexual partnerships through relational schemas. Findings highlight the unique influences of biological fathers and social fathers on multiple domains of African American young men's psychosocial development that subsequently render young men more or less likely to engage in risk behaviors. PMID:26362297

  17. 26 CFR 1.732-2 - Special partnership basis of distributed property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... property to a partner, the partnership bases of the distributed properties shall reflect any increases or.... Partner D acquired his interest in partnership ABD from a previous partner. Since the partnership had made... property X is distributed to partner A, a nontransferee partner, its adjusted basis to the partnership...

  18. Descriptive and injunctive norms related to concurrent sexual partnerships in Malawi: implications for HIV prevention research and programming.

    PubMed

    Limaye, Rupali J; Babalola, Stella; Kennedy, Caitlin E; Kerrigan, Deanna L

    2013-08-01

    Concurrent sexual partnerships are hypothesized to be a contributing factor to Malawi's HIV epidemic. As social norms influence health behavior and have been found to influence sexual behavior, the purpose of this study was to explore two types of norms, descriptive and injunctive norms, toward concurrent sexual partnerships in Malawi. Data from 40 focus group discussions and 20 in-depth interviews conducted in five districts in Malawi, which included 318 participants aged 18-55 years, were analyzed. Participants perceived that concurrent sexual partnerships were extremely common, and believed that very few individuals in their communities were not in concurrent sexual partnerships. However, participants perceived that others in their communities heavily disapproved of concurrent sexual partnerships outside of polygamy, as polygamy was viewed as an acceptable type of partnership because it was conducted in the open. Participants asserted that there were no traditional practices that promoted concurrent sexual partnerships, and perceived that those that engaged in the behavior were for the most part stigmatized by community members. Further research is needed to obtain a thorough understanding of the way in which the perceived actions and beliefs of peers influence the beliefs, feelings and actions of individuals to strengthen HIV programming efforts in the region.

  19. 26 CFR 1.732-2 - Special partnership basis of distributed property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Special partnership basis of distributed... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Distributions by A Partnership § 1.732-2 Special partnership basis of distributed property. (a) Adjustments under section 734(b). In the case of a...

  20. 26 CFR 1.732-2 - Special partnership basis of distributed property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Special partnership basis of distributed... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Distributions by A Partnership § 1.732-2 Special partnership basis of distributed property. (a) Adjustments under section 734(b). In the case of a...

  1. 26 CFR 1.732-2 - Special partnership basis of distributed property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Special partnership basis of distributed... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Distributions by A Partnership § 1.732-2 Special partnership basis of distributed property. (a) Adjustments under section 734(b). In the case of a...

  2. Extra-marital sexual partnerships and male friendships in rural Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Shelley

    2010-01-01

    Extra-marital sexual partnerships (EMSPs) are a major route of HIV/AIDS transmission in sub-Saharan Africa. In this paper, we investigate the roles of two types of male friendships – best friends and friends with whom they talk about AIDS – in determining whether men have EMSPs. Using data from men in rural Malawi, we find that men's current extra-marital sexual behavior is most closely correlated with their best friends', but that the behaviors of both types of friends are associated with men's subsequent EMSPs. These findings suggest that men's friendships could be used to help combat the AIDS epidemic. PMID:20531977

  3. Sexuality: Measures of Partnerships, Practices, Attitudes, and Problems in the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Study

    PubMed Central

    Laumann, Edward O.; Das, Aniruddha; Schumm, L. Philip

    2009-01-01

    Objectives The National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (NSHAP) was designed to examine the relationship between sexual behavior, sexual problems, and health among older women and men. We describe measures of sexual partnerships, sexual practices, sexual problems, attitudes toward sex, and nonsexual intimacy in the first wave of NSHAP. Methods We compare measures of sexuality for those 57–85 years old, by age, separately for men and women. We construct scales of sexual mores, sexual interest, and relationship satisfaction and discuss properties of each scale. Results Sexuality among older adults tends to vary with age and gender. At all ages in this study, men are more likely than women to have a partner, more likely to be sexually active with that partner, and tend to have more positive and permissive attitudes toward sex. The proportions in a sexual partnership, behavior, problems, and attitudes all differ substantially by age. And these age patterns often differ for men and women. Discussion Data obtained in the NSHAP can be used to construct key measures of sexuality among older adults; to examine sexuality itself; and to explore the link between sexuality, health, well-being, and other dimensions of the lives of older adults. PMID:19497930

  4. Race/ethnicity, sexual partnerships with men involved with drugs, and sexually transmitted infections among a sample of urban young adult women.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Leah F; Brown, Qiana; Cavanaugh, Courtenay; Lawson, April

    2015-10-01

    In many urban neighbourhoods in the United States, drug markets borne from disadvantage have produced risk for sexually transmitted infections through altered sexual norms and partnerships. Presently, we examined the association of race, sexual partnerships with men involved with drugs, and self-reported sexually transmitted infections among 240 African American and white women aged 18-30 years. Thirty seven per cent reported ever having a sexually transmitted infection. Almost 30% of Whites reported sex with a drug user, compared to 5% of African Americans. Fifty eight per cent of African Americans compared to 31% of Whites reported sex with a drug dealer. On Step 1 of a sequential logistic regression model, race was associated with lifetime sexually transmitted infections (OR = 4.7, 95% CI = 2.61-8.34). Results from the full sequential logistic regression model indicated a significant, but smaller association of race and lifetime sexually transmitted infections (Adjusted OR = 3.5, 95% CI = 1.78-7.02) and an association of sex with a drug dealer and lifetime sexually transmitted infections (Adjusted OR = 2.9, 95% CI = 1.55-5.20). Forming sexual partnerships with drug dealers may place women at increased risk for sexually transmitted infections and explain racial disparities. More research focused on drug dealers as core transmitters is needed.

  5. Multiple and concurrent sexual partnerships among men who have sex with men in Viet Nam: results from a National Internet-based Cross-sectional Survey.

    PubMed

    García, M C; Duong, Q L; Meyer, S B; Ward, P R

    2016-03-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) are one of the largest HIV risk groups in Viet Nam and have been understudied. Sexual concurrency and multiple sex partnerships may contribute to high HIV incidence among MSM in Viet Nam. Limited information is available on concurrency and multiple sexual partnerships among MSM in Viet Nam or on the extent to which this population engages in concurrent and multiple unprotected anal intercourse. Data are from a self-administered Internet-based survey of Vietnamese MSM aged 18 years or older, having sex with male partner(s) in the last 12 months and recruited from social networking MSM-specific websites in Viet Nam. Multiple partnerships and concurrency were measured using the UNAIDS-recommended sexual partner matrix, a key component in the questionnaire. Concurrent and multiple sexual partnerships were analyzed at the individual level. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to assess the demographic characteristics and behaviors associated with multiple sexual partnerships. A total of 1695 MSM reported on multiple sexual partnerships; 69.5% indicated multiple sexual partnerships in the last 6 months. A total of 257 MSM reported on concurrent sexual partnerships, with 51.0% reporting penetrative sex with concurrent partners in the last 6 months. Respondents were more likely to engage in multiple sexual partnerships if they were no longer a student, consumed alcohol before and/or during sex, used the Internet to meet casual sex partners and had never participated in a behavioral HIV intervention. Multiple sexual partnerships in the previous 6 months were common among MSM surveyed, as was sexual concurrency. High levels of multiple and concurrent sexual partnerships may be catalyzing the transmission of HIV among MSM in Viet Nam. Given the high prevalence of this high-risk sexual behavior, our findings underscore the urgent need for targeted prevention efforts, focusing on the reduction of multiple and concurrent sexual partners

  6. Partnerships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Anne

    The strength of partnerships within and without the educational enterprise provides the ability to alter or modify existing practices as social and economic realities emerge. A number of interdependent factors raise questions related to partnerships. Demography is a major factor; while a substantial portion of the aging population will have less…

  7. Prevalence and predictors of concurrent sexual partnerships in a predominantly African American population in Jackson, Mississippi

    PubMed Central

    Nunn, Amy; MacCarthy, Sarah; Barnett, Nancy; Rose, Jennifer; Chan, Philip; Yolken, Annajane; Cornwall, Alexandra; Chamberlain, Nicholas; Barnes, Arti; Riggins, Reginald; Moore, Elya; Simmons, Dantrell; Parker, Sharon; Mena, Leandro

    2014-01-01

    Concurrent sexual partnerships, or sexual partnerships that overlap in time, have been associated with HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STI) infection. How best to measure concurrency and the personal characteristics and predictors of concurrency are not yet well understood. We compared two frequently used concurrency definitions, including a self-reported measure based on participant response regarding overlapping sex with partners, and the UNAIDS measure based on overlapping dates of last sex and intention to have sex again. We performed multivariable logistic regression analyses to identify socio-demographic, behavioral, and structural predictors of concurrency among 1,542 patients at an urban STI clinic in Jackson, Mississippi. Nearly half (44%) reported concurrency based on self-reported sex with other partners, and 26% reported concurrency according to the UNAIDS concurrency measure. Using the self-reported concurrency measure, the strongest predictors of concurrency were perceived partner concurrency, drug use at last sex, having more than 10 lifetime partners, and being recently incarcerated. Strongest predictors of concurrency using the UNAIDS measure were lifetime number of partners and perceived partner concurrency. Concurrency is highly prevalent in this population in the Deep South and social, structural and behavioral factors were important predictors of concurrency for both measures. Future research should use time anchored data collection methods and biomarkers to assess whether both definitions of concurrency are associated with HIV outcomes. PMID:24803130

  8. Place and sexual partnership transition among young American Indian and Alaska Native Women

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Cynthia R.; Cassels, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Multiple challenges expose American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) women to high-risk sexual partnerships and increased risk for HIV/STI. Using a unique sample of sexually-active young AIAN women (n=129), we examined characteristics of last three partners and whether transitional partnerships were associated with different risk profiles, including where partners met, lived, and had sex. Respondents were more likely to have met their previous or current secondary partner (P2) at a friend’s or family setting (versus work or social setting) (AOR=3.92; 95%CI: 1.31, 11.70). Condom use was less likely when meeting a partner at friend’s or family settings (AOR=0.17; 95%CI: 0.05, 0.59). Sexual intercourse with P2 (compared to P1) usually took place in “riskier” settings such as a car, bar, or outside (AOR=4.15; 95%CI: 1.59, 10.68). Perceived “safe” places, e.g., friend’s or family’s house, were identified with risky behaviors; thus, homogeneous messaging campaigns may promote a false sense of safety. PMID:24276791

  9. 26 CFR 1.732-2 - Special partnership basis of distributed property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of property to a partner, the partnership bases of the distributed properties shall reflect any... following example: Example. Partner D acquired his interest in partnership ABD from a previous partner... partner is a transferee of a partnership interest and has a special basis adjustment for...

  10. 13 CFR 107.1400 - Dividends or partnership distributions on 4 percent Preferred Securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Dividends or partnership... (Leverage) Preferred Securities Leverage-Section 301(d) Licensees § 107.1400 Dividends or partnership... 21, 1989, you must pay SBA a dividend or partnership distribution of 4 percent per year, from...

  11. Assortative sexual mixing patterns in male?female and male?male partnerships in Melbourne, Australia: implications for HIV and sexually transmissible infection transmission.

    PubMed

    Chow, Eric P F; Read, Tim R H; Law, Matthew G; Chen, Marcus Y; Bradshaw, Catriona S; Fairley, Christopher K

    2016-07-29

    Background: Assortative mixing patterns have become a new and important focus in HIV/sexually transmissible infection (STI) research in recent years. There are very limited data on sexual mixing patterns, particularly in an Australian population. Methods: Male-female and male-male partnerships attending the Melbourne Sexual Health Centre (MSHC) between 2011 and 2014 were included. Correlation of age between two individuals within a partnership was examined by using Spearman's rank correlation. The Newman's assortativity coefficient was used as an aggregate quantitative measurement of sexual mixing for number of partners and condom use. Results: 1165 male-female and 610 male-male partnerships were included in the analysis. There was a strong positive correlation of age in both male-female (rho=0.709; P<0.001) and male-male partnerships (rho=0.553; P<0.001). The assortative mixing pattern for number of partners was similar in male-female (r=0.255; 95% CI: 0.221-0.289) and male-male partnerships (r=0.264; 95% CI: 0.218-0.309). There was a stronger assortative mixing pattern for condom use in male-male (r=0.517, 95% CI: 0.465-0.569) compared with male-female (r=0.382; 95% CI: 0.353-0.412) partnerships. Conclusion: Male-female and male-male partnerships have a high assortativity mixing pattern for age, number of partners and condom use. The sexual mixing pattern is not purely assortative, and hence it may lead to increased HIV and STI transmission in certain risk groups.

  12. Female-Driven Multiple Concurrent Sexual Partnership Systems in a Rural Part of a Southern Tanzanian Province

    PubMed Central

    Agnarson, Abela Mpobela; Strömdahl, Susanne; Levira, Francis; Masanja, Honorati; Thorson, Anna Ekéus

    2015-01-01

    Background Multiple concurrent sexual relationships are one of the major challenges to HIV prevention in Tanzania. This study aims to explore sexual behaviour patterns including the practice of multiple concurrent sexual partnerships in a rural Tanzanian setting. Methods This qualitative study used focus group discussions and in-depth interviews with men and women from the community as well as ethnographic participant observations. The data was collected during 16 months of fieldwork in 2007, 2008, and 2009. The focus group discussions and in-depth interviews were transcribed verbatim and translated into English. The data was analysed through the process of latent content analysis. An open coding coding process was applied to create categories and assign themes. Findings Mafiga matatu was an expression used in this society to describe women’s multiple concurrent sexual partners, usually three partners, which was described as a way to ensure social and financial security for their families as well as to achieve sexual pleasure. Adolescent initiation ceremonies initiated and conducted by grand mothers taught young women why and how to engage successfully in multiple concurrent sexual relationships. Some men expressed support for their female partners to behave according to mafiga matatu, while other men were hesitant around this behaviour. Our findings indicate that having multiple concurrent sexual partners is common and a normative behaviour in this setting. Economical factors and sexual pleasure were identified as drivers and viewed as legitimate reason for women to have multiple concurrent sexual partnerships. Conclusions Structural changes improving women’s financial opportunities and increasing gender equality will be important to enable women to not depend on multiple concurrent sexual partnerships for financial security. Future research should explore how normative sexual behaviour changes as these structural changes take place. PMID:26683189

  13. Sexual Transmission Behaviors and Serodiscordant Partnerships among HIV-positive Men Who Have Sex with Men in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Chongyi; Guadamuz, Thomas E.; Lim, Sin How; Koe, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    We described sexual transmission behaviors and serodiscordant partnerships among an online sample of HIV-positive MSM (N = 416) in Asia. High rates of UAI (74.8%), serodiscordant partnerships (68.5%), and unprotected sex within serodiscordant partnerships (~60.0%) were reported. Increased number of partners, meeting partners on the Internet, drug use before sex, and not knowing one’s viral load were associated with UAI. Efforts to develop and scale up biomedical and behavioral interventions for HIV-positive MSM in Asia are needed. PMID:22421700

  14. Characteristics of sex partners and sexual partnership correlates of inconsistent condom use among male injection drug users in India.

    PubMed

    Tun, Waimar; Bhattacharya, Aruna; Apicella, Louis; Shasikumar Singh, Yumnam; Lewis, Dean

    2014-07-01

    Previous studies have established the risky behaviors of IDUs in India, and that IDUs are sexually active; however, there is a need to better understand the nature of sexual partnerships of IDUs. A total of 783 (Delhi) and 766 (Imphal) male IDUs were recruited into the study through respondent-driven sampling. We examined characteristics of sex partners of male IDUs and individual and sexual partnership characteristics associated with unprotected sex in Delhi and Imphal. While 16.8% of sexual partnerships in Delhi were male-to-male, there were almost no male-to-male partnerships in Imphal. The majority of partners of male IDUs in Delhi (82.5%) and Imphal (92.3%) do not inject drugs, with the exception of male partners of male IDUs in Delhi. Commercial partners (females: 58.3%; males: 71.3%) were the most common type of sex partners of male IDUs in Delhi, while regular partners (65.2%) were the most common type of sex partners in Imphal. In Delhi, characteristics of sex partners significantly associated with unprotected sex were being male/transgender (AOR 2.2; 95% CI: 1.2-4.0), being a regular (AOR 5.1; 95% CI: 2.8-9.4) or non-regular partner (AOR 2.7; 95% CI: 1.7- 4.5), and sharing needles/syringes with the index IDU (AOR 2.8; 95% CI: 1.4-5.3). In Imphal, partner characteristics associated with unprotected sex were being a regular (AOR 10.1; 95% CI: 41-25.1) or non-regular partner (AOR 3.4; 95% CI: 1.5-7.6), and living outside of town or state (AOR 3.3; 95% CI: 1.2-9.6). Enhanced understanding of disassortative sexual mixing and context of unprotected sex within sexual partnerships may enhance sexual risk reduction interventions for IDUs.

  15. Sexual Behaviour of Men and Women within Age-Disparate Partnerships in South Africa: Implications for Young Women's HIV Risk

    PubMed Central

    Maughan-Brown, Brendan; Evans, Meredith; George, Gavin

    2016-01-01

    Background Age-disparate partnerships are hypothesized to increase HIV-risk for young women. However, the evidence base remains mixed. Most studies have focused only on unprotected sex among women in the partnership. Consequently, little is known about other risky behaviours, such as transactional sex, alcohol use, and concurrency, as well as the behaviours of the men who partner with young women. We therefore examined differences in various sexual behaviours of both young women and their male partners by partnership age difference. Methods We used nationally representative data from South Africa (2012) on partnerships reported by 16–24 year old black African women (n = 818) and by black African men in partnerships with 16–24 year old women (n = 985). We compared sexual behaviours in age-disparate partnerships and age-similar partnerships, using multiple logistic regression to control for potential confounders and to assess rural/urban differences. Results Young women in age-disparate partnerships were more likely to report unprotected sex than young women in similar-aged partnerships (aOR:1.51; p = 0.014; 95%CI:1.09–2.11). Men in partnerships with young women were more likely to report unprotected sex (aOR:1.92; p<0.01; 95%CI:1.31–2.81), transactional sex (aOR:2.73; p<0.01; 95%CI:1.64–4.56), drinking alcohol before sex (aOR:1.60; p = 0.062; 95%CI:0.98–2.61), and concurrency (aOR:1.39; p = 0.097; 95%CI:0.94–2.07) when their partners were five or more years younger. The association between age-disparate partnerships and transactional sex (aOR:4.14; p<0.01; 95%CI: 2.03–8.46) and alcohol use (aOR:2.24; p<0.013; 95%CI:1.20–4.19) was only found in urban areas. Conclusions Results provide evidence that young women’s age-disparate partnerships involve greater sexual risk, particularly through the risky behaviours of their male partners, with the risk amplified for young women in urban areas. PMID:27526116

  16. Changes and Correlates in Multiple Sexual Partnerships among Chinese Adult Women——Population Based Surveys in 2000 and 2006

    PubMed Central

    Yingying, Huang; Smith, Kumi; Suiming, Pan

    2011-01-01

    The sexual transmission of HIV and STI is becoming a major public health concern in China. However, studies on sexuality in China remain scant, particularly those that analyze female sexuality. This study is to investigate the prevalence of multiple sexual partnerships among adult women, and to examine trends and correlates for having more than one lifetime sexual partner. Multiple sexual partnership (MSP), coded as having one or none vs. two or more lifetime sexual partners, was the key binary outcome measure. The data were from two national probability surveys on sexual behaviors in China carried out in 2000 and 2006. The sample size of adult women was 1899 in 2000 (total sample n= 3812), and 2626 in 2006 (n=5404). Overall prevalence of MSP increased from 8.1% in 2000 to 29.6% in 2006 (Chi-square test, sig.=0.000). The most rapid changes took place among women with less education, those who worked in blue collar jobs and lower social status positions, and those living in rural areas or small towns. Women who were better educated, lived in big cities, and held management level occupations exhibited less change but had a higher baselines prevalence of MSP, suggesting that changes in MSP behavior may occur initially among women of higher socioeconomic status. Based on the 2006 dataset, significant positive correlates of MSP included more years of education, being in a long-term relationship, being middle aged, having a lower status job, going out dancing at entertainments venues, and being a state of overall health in the past 12 months. The significant recent increase in MSP among women reinforces the need to examine China’s sexual revolution in the context of a rapidly transitioning society. Findings regarding female sexuality also raise new questions to be explored in further sexuality studies, in order to better understand population sexual behaviors and to inform future HIV prevention efforts. PMID:21660755

  17. Sexuality, Self-Esteem and Partnership Quality in Infertile Women and Men

    PubMed Central

    Wischmann, T.; Schilling, K.; Toth, B.; Rösner, S.; Strowitzki, T.; Wohlfarth, K.; Kentenich, H.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Infertile couples often report quality-of-life impairments, especially in terms of sexuality, self-esteem and partnership quality. So far, there have been no systematic studies of the sex lives and behaviour of infertile women and men before and after the emergence of their mutual desire for a child. Materials and Methods: From February 2010 to August 2010 all couples starting treatment either at Heidelberg Universityʼs Womenʼs Hospital or at the Fertility Center Berlin were asked to fill out the Self-Esteem and Relationship Questionnaire (SEAR). A total of n = 158 women and n = 153 men participated in the study. Results: Decreasing tendencies were observable for both partners in the domains Sexual Relationship Satisfaction and Confidence and in the subscales Self-Esteem and Overall Relationship Satisfaction. There were especially clear indications of a loss of spontaneous sexuality during the experience of infertility. We were also able to establish that infertility has a negative impact on womenʼs self-esteem. Discussion: The results of this study indicate that SEAR can be used as a feasible instrument for identifying infertile women and men whose infertility has a negative effect on their relationship quality and/or sex lives. PMID:25221344

  18. Young Men’s Social Network Characteristics and Associations with Sexual Partnership Concurrency in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Jacob C.; Moody, James W.; Kajula, Lusajo J.

    2015-01-01

    Social network influence on young people’s sexual behavior is understudied in sub-Saharan Africa. Previous research identified networks of mostly young men in Dar es Salaam who socialize in “camps”. This study describes network characteristics within camps and their relationship to young men’s concurrent sexual partnerships. We conducted surveys with a nearly complete census of ten camp networks (490 men and 160 women). Surveys included name generators to identify camp-based networks. Fifty seven percent of sexually active men (n = 471) reported past year concurrency, measured using the UNAIDS method. In a multivariable model, men’s individual concurrency was associated with being a member of a closer knit camp in which concurrency was the normative behavior. Younger men who had older members in their networks were more likely to engage in concurrency. Respondent concurrency was also associated with inequitable personal gender norms. Our findings suggest strategies for leveraging social networks for HIV prevention among young men. PMID:26271813

  19. Modeling the community-level effects of male incarceration on the sexual partnerships of men and women.

    PubMed

    Knittel, Andrea K; Snow, Rachel C; Riolo, Rick L; Griffith, Derek M; Morenoff, Jeffrey

    2015-12-01

    Men who have been incarcerated experience substantial changes in their sexual behavior after release from jail and prison, and high rates of incarceration may change sexual relationship patterns at a community level. Few studies, however, address how rates of incarceration affect community patterns of sexual behavior, and the implications of those patterns for HIV and STD risk. We describe a "proof of principle" computational model that tests whether rates of male incarceration could, in part, explain observed population-level differences in patterns of sexual behavior between communities with high rates of incarceration and those without. This validated agent-based model of sexual partnership among 20-25 year old heterosexual urban residents in the United States uses an algorithm that incarcerates male agents and then releases them back into the agent community. The results from these model experiments suggest that at rates of incarceration similar to those observed for urban African American men, incarceration can cause an increase in the number of partners at the community level. The results suggest that reducing incarceration and creating a more open criminal justice system that supports the maintenance of inmates' relationships to reduce instability of partnerships for men who are incarcerated may have important sexual health and public health implications. Incarceration is one of many social forces that affect sexual decision-making, and incarceration rates may have substantial effects on community-level HIV and STD risks.

  20. Modeling the community-level effects of male incarceration on the sexual partnerships of men and women

    PubMed Central

    Knittel, Andrea K.; Snow, Rachel C.; Riolo, Rick L.; Griffith, Derek M.; Morenoff, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Men who have been incarcerated experience substantial changes in their sexual behavior after release from jail and prison, and high rates of incarceration may change sexual relationship patterns at a community level. Few studies, however, address how rates of incarceration affect community patterns of sexual behavior, and the implications of those patterns for HIV and STD risk. We describe a “proof of principle” computational model that tests whether rates of male incarceration could, in part, explain observed population-level differences in patterns of sexual behavior between communities with high rates of incarceration and those without. This validated agent-based model of sexual partnership among 20-25 year old heterosexual urban residents in the United States uses an algorithm that incarcerates male agents and then releases them back into the agent community. The results from these model experiments suggest that at rates of incarceration similar to those observed for urban African American men, incarceration can cause an increase in the number of partners at the community level. The results suggest that reducing incarceration and creating a more open criminal justice system that supports the maintenance of inmates’ relationships to reduce instability of partnerships for men who are incarcerated may have important sexual health and public health implications. Incarceration is one of many social forces that affect sexual decision-making, and incarceration rates may have substantial effects on community-level HIV and STD risks. PMID:26610077

  1. Reducing Concurrent Sexual Partnerships Among Blacks in the Rural Southeastern United States: Development of Narrative Messages for a Radio Campaign.

    PubMed

    Cates, Joan R; Francis, Diane B; Ramirez, Catalina; Brown, Jane D; Schoenbach, Victor J; Fortune, Thierry; Powell Hammond, Wizdom; Adimora, Adaora A

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, heterosexual transmission of HIV infection is dramatically higher among Blacks than among Whites. Overlapping (concurrent) sexual partnerships promote HIV transmission. The authors describe their process for developing a radio campaign (Escape the Web) to raise awareness among 18-34-year-old Black adults of the effect of concurrency on HIV transmission in the rural South. Radio is a powerful channel for the delivery of narrative-style health messages. Through six focus groups (n = 51) and 42 intercept interviews, the authors explored attitudes toward concurrency and solicited feedback on sample messages. Men were advised to (a) end concurrent partnerships and not to begin new ones; (b) use condoms consistently with all partners; and (c) tell others about the risks of concurrency and benefits of ending concurrent partnerships. The narrative portrayed risky behaviors that trigger initiation of casual partnerships. Women were advised to (a) end partnerships in which they are not their partner's only partner; (b) use condoms consistently with all partners; and (c) tell others about the risks of concurrency and benefits of ending concurrent partnerships. Messages for all advised better modeling for children.

  2. Reducing Concurrent Sexual Partnerships Among Blacks in the Rural Southeastern United States: Development of Narrative Messages for a Radio Campaign

    PubMed Central

    CATES, JOAN R.; FRANCIS, DIANE B.; RAMIREZ, CATALINA; BROWN, JANE D.; SCHOENBACH, VICTOR J.; FORTUNE, THIERRY; HAMMOND, WIZDOM POWELL; ADIMORA, ADAORA A.

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, heterosexual transmission of HIV infection is dramatically higher among Blacks than among Whites. Overlapping (concurrent) sexual partnerships promote HIV transmission. The authors describe their process for developing a radio campaign (Escape the Web) to raise awareness among 18–34-year-old Black adults of the effect of concurrency on HIV transmission in the rural South. Radio is a powerful channel for the delivery of narrative-style health messages. Through six focus groups (n = 51) and 42 intercept interviews, the authors explored attitudes toward concurrency and solicited feedback on sample messages. Men were advised to (a) end concurrent partnerships and not to begin new ones; (b) use condoms consistently with all partners; and (c) tell others about the risks of concurrency and benefits of ending concurrent partnerships. The narrative portrayed risky behaviors that trigger initiation of casual partnerships. Women were advised to (a) end partnerships in which they are not their partner’s only partner; (b) use condoms consistently with all partners; and (c) tell others about the risks of concurrency and benefits of ending concurrent partnerships. Messages for all advised better modeling for children. PMID:26134387

  3. Partnership, sex, and marginalization: Moving the Global Fund sexual orientation and gender identities agenda.

    PubMed

    Seale, Andy; Bains, Anurita; Avrett, Sam

    2010-06-15

    After almost three decades of work to address HIV and AIDS, resources are still failing to adequately address the needs of the most affected and marginalized groups in many societies. In recognition of this ongoing failure, the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (the Global Fund) has approved a sexual orientation and gender identities (SOGI) Strategy. The Strategy is designed to help its investments more effectively reach men who have sex with men; transgender populations; male, female, and transgender sex workers; and women who have sex with women. The Global Fund financing model is unique and based on ideas of broad partnership. It emphasizes the importance of country-ownership while ensuring that work is appropriately targeted, evidence-based, and rooted in principles of human rights. The classic international development tension of pursuing a rights-based agenda, while also supporting strong country ownership, has moved the Global Fund into a more substantive technical, advocacy, and policy arena, resulting in the creation of the SOGI Strategy, which emphasizes the needs of marginalized groups. A strong commitment to participation and consultation was crucial during the development stages of the Strategy. Now, as the Strategy goes live, it is clear that progress will only be achieved through continued and strengthened partnership. The diverse partners - in particular the governments and other stakeholders in recipient countries that helped develop the Strategy - must now commit to stronger collaboration on this agenda and must demonstrate bold leadership in overcoming the considerable technical and political challenges of implementation that lie ahead.

  4. HIV/sexual and reproductive health program for HIV prevention: the youth-adult partnership with schools approach.

    PubMed

    Fongkaew, Warunee; Fongkaew, Kangwan; Muecke, Marjorie

    2006-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the development and evaluation of a program designed to prevent HIV/AIDS. A participatory action research (PAR) approach was used in collaboration with ten schools in Chiang Mai Province, Thailand, to develop a youth- adult partnership with schools (YAPS) model. The YAPS model included curricula using participatory learning experiences, edutainment approaches, and skills building strategies for enhancing youth leaders'capacities. Results showed that the YAPS model was effective in leadership role preparation and in empowering youth leaders to undertake activities on their own, initiate creativity and share knowledge on sexuality education and HIV prevention messages with students in schools. The use of partnerships and the participatory process mobilized parents, teachers, and school administrators to play a proactive role in sexuality education and HIV prevention for early adolescents in schools, resulting in the integration of the program into the school system.

  5. The Distribution of Sex Acts and Condom Use within Partnerships in a Rural Sub-Saharan African Population

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jennifer; Nyamukapa, Constance; Gregson, Simon; Lewis, James; Magutshwa, Sitholubuhle; Schumacher, Christina; Mushati, Phyllis; Hallett, Tim; Garnett, Geoff

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In an HIV/AIDS epidemic driven primarily by heterosexual transmission, it is important to have an understanding of the human sexual behaviour patterns that influence transmission. We analysed the distribution and predictors of within-partnership sexual behaviour and condom use in rural Zimbabwe and generated parameters for use in future modelling analyses. Methods A population-based cohort was recruited from a household census in 12 communities. A baseline survey was carried out in 1998–2000 with follow-up surveys after 3 and 5 years. Statistical distributions were fitted to reported within-partnership numbers of total, unprotected and protected sex acts in the past two weeks. Multilevel linear and logistic regression models were constructed to assess predictors of the frequency of unprotected sex and consistent condom use. Results A normal distribution of ln(sex acts+1) provided the best fit for total and unprotected sex acts for men and women. A negative binomial distribution applied to the untransformed data provided the best fit for protected sex acts. Condom use within partnerships was predominantly bimodal with at least 88% reporting zero or 100% use. Both men and women reported fewer unprotected sex acts with non-regular compared to regular partners (men: 0.26 fewer every two weeks (95% confidence interval 0.18–0.34); women: 0.16 (0.07–0.23)). Never and previously married individuals reported fewer unprotected sex acts than currently married individuals (never married men: 0.64 (0.60–0.67); previously married men: 0.59 (0.50–0.67); never married women: 0.51 (0.45–0.57); previously married women: 0.42 (0.37–0.47)). These variables were also associated with more consistent condom use. Discussion We generated parameters that will be useful for defining transmission models of HIV and other STIs, which rely on a valid representation of the underlying sexual network that determines spread of an infection. This will enable a better

  6. Forming new sex partnerships while overseas: findings from the third British National Survey of Sexual Attitudes & Lifestyles (Natsal-3)

    PubMed Central

    Tanton, Clare; Johnson, Anne M; Macdowall, Wendy; Datta, Jessica; Clifton, Soazig; Field, Nigel; Mitchell, Kirstin R; Wellings, Kaye; Sonnenberg, Pam; Mercer, Catherine H

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Travelling away from home presents opportunities for new sexual partnerships, which may be associated with sexually transmitted infection (STI) risk. We examined the prevalence of, and factors associated with, reporting new sexual partner(s) while overseas, and whether this differed by partners’ region of residence. Methods We analysed data from 12 530 men and women aged 16–74 years reporting ≥1 sexual partner(s) in the past 5 years in Britain's third National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal-3), a probability survey undertaken 2010–2012. Results 9.2% (95% CI 8.3% to 10.1%) of men and 5.3% (4.8% to 5.8%) of women reported new sexual partner(s) while overseas in the past 5 years. This was strongly associated with higher partner numbers and other sexual and health risk behaviours. Among those with new partners while overseas, 72% of men and 58% of women reported partner(s) who were not UK residents. Compared with those having only UK partners while abroad, these people were more likely to identify as ‘White Other’ or ‘Non-White’ (vs White British ethnicity), report higher partner numbers, new partners from outside the UK while in the UK and paying for sex (men only) all in the past 5 years. There was no difference in reporting STI diagnosis/es during this time period. Conclusions Reporting new partners while overseas was associated with a range of sexual risk behaviours. Advice on sexual health should be included as part of holistic health advice for all travellers, regardless of age, destination or reason for travel. PMID:27272533

  7. Sexual dimorphisms in genetic loci linked to body fat distribution.

    PubMed

    Pulit, Sara L; Karaderi, Tugce; Lindgren, Cecilia M

    2017-02-28

    Obesity is a chronic condition associated with increased morbidity and mortality and is a risk factor for a number of other diseases including type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Obesity confers an enormous, costly burden on both individuals and public health more broadly. Body fat distribution is a heritable trait and a well-established predictor of adverse metabolic outcomes. Body fat distribution is distinct from overall obesity in measurement, but studies of body fat distribution can yield insights into the risk factors for and causes of overall obesity. Sexual dimorphism in body fat distribution is present throughout life. Though sexual dimorphism is subtle in early stages of life, it is attenuated in puberty and during menopause. This phenomenon could be, at least in part, due to the influence of sex hormones on the trait. Findings from recent large genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for various measures of body fat distribution (including waist-to-hip ratio, hip or waist circumference, trunk fat percentage and the ratio of android and gynoid fat percentage) emphasize the strong sexual dimorphism in the genetic regulation of fat distribution traits. Importantly, sexual dimorphism is not observed for overall obesity (as assessed by body mass index or total fat percentage). Notably, the genetic loci associated with body fat distribution, which show sexual dimorphism, are located near genes that are expressed in adipose tissues and/or adipose cells. Considering the epidemiological and genetic evidence, sexual dimorphism is a prominent feature of body fat distribution. Research that specifically focuses on sexual dimorphism in fat distribution can provide novel insights into human physiology and into the development of obesity and its comorbidities, as well as yield biological clues that will aid in the improvement of disease prevention and treatment.

  8. Sexual dimorphisms in genetic loci linked to body fat distribution

    PubMed Central

    Pulit, Sara L.; Karaderi, Tugce

    2017-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic condition associated with increased morbidity and mortality and is a risk factor for a number of other diseases including type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Obesity confers an enormous, costly burden on both individuals and public health more broadly. Body fat distribution is a heritable trait and a well-established predictor of adverse metabolic outcomes. Body fat distribution is distinct from overall obesity in measurement, but studies of body fat distribution can yield insights into the risk factors for and causes of overall obesity. Sexual dimorphism in body fat distribution is present throughout life. Though sexual dimorphism is subtle in early stages of life, it is attenuated in puberty and during menopause. This phenomenon could be, at least in part, due to the influence of sex hormones on the trait. Findings from recent large genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for various measures of body fat distribution (including waist-to-hip ratio, hip or waist circumference, trunk fat percentage and the ratio of android and gynoid fat percentage) emphasize the strong sexual dimorphism in the genetic regulation of fat distribution traits. Importantly, sexual dimorphism is not observed for overall obesity (as assessed by body mass index or total fat percentage). Notably, the genetic loci associated with body fat distribution, which show sexual dimorphism, are located near genes that are expressed in adipose tissues and/or adipose cells. Considering the epidemiological and genetic evidence, sexual dimorphism is a prominent feature of body fat distribution. Research that specifically focuses on sexual dimorphism in fat distribution can provide novel insights into human physiology and into the development of obesity and its comorbidities, as well as yield biological clues that will aid in the improvement of disease prevention and treatment. PMID:28073971

  9. Pattern of HIV testing and multiple sexual partnerships among men who have sex with men in China

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Men who have sex with men (MSM) are a hidden but emerging population susceptible to HIV infection against a background of rapidly increasing HIV prevalence in China. Low HIV testing levels and multiple partnerships among MSM are two major contributing factors to HIV transmission. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey among 447 Chinese MSM in Changsha and Tianjin cities from November to December 2011 using an anonymous questionnaire. We aim to investigate (1) the trend of HIV testing rates among Chinese MSM during 2009 to 2011; and (2) the patterns of multiple sexual relationships with male, female and commercial partners. Results The self-reported past-12-months HIV testing level among Chinese MSM increased from 16.6% in 2009 to 46.3% in 2010 and 58.6% in 2011 (χ2 = 173.49, p < 0.001). Compared with men who have tested for HIV, the never-tested MSM were generally younger, never married, students, and more likely to have unprotected anal intercourse with non-commercial male partners. Furthermore, 21.3% (56/263) MSM reported having multiple regular male and female sexual partnerships and 6.2% (16/257) reported having commercial male partners in the past six months. However, individuals who were never-tested for HIV are consistently less likely to engage in multiple sexual relationships. Conclusions HIV testing rates have increased substantially among Chinese MSM in the period 2009–2011, although significant barriers to testing remain. Multiple sexual partnerships, and especially bisexual behaviours, are common among Chinese MSM. PMID:24238403

  10. 26 CFR 1.731-2 - Partnership distributions of marketable securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... of gain. (i) A and B form partnership AB as equal partners. A contributes property with a fair market value of $1,000 and an adjusted tax basis of $250. B contributes $1,000 cash. AB subsequently purchases... immediately before the distribution, there would have been no gain recognized by AB and A's distributive...

  11. 26 CFR 1.731-2 - Partnership distributions of marketable securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... of gain. (i) A and B form partnership AB as equal partners. A contributes property with a fair market value of $1,000 and an adjusted tax basis of $250. B contributes $1,000 cash. AB subsequently purchases... immediately before the distribution, there would have been no gain recognized by AB and A's distributive...

  12. 26 CFR 1.731-2 - Partnership distributions of marketable securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of gain. (i) A and B form partnership AB as equal partners. A contributes property with a fair market value of $1,000 and an adjusted tax basis of $250. B contributes $1,000 cash. AB subsequently purchases... immediately before the distribution, there would have been no gain recognized by AB and A's distributive...

  13. 26 CFR 1.731-2 - Partnership distributions of marketable securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... of gain. (i) A and B form partnership AB as equal partners. A contributes property with a fair market value of $1,000 and an adjusted tax basis of $250. B contributes $1,000 cash. AB subsequently purchases... immediately before the distribution, there would have been no gain recognized by AB and A's distributive...

  14. Multiple sexual partnerships and their correlates among Facebook users in Swaziland: an online cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Lukhele, Bhekumusa Wellington; Techasrivichien, Teeranee; Musumari, Patou Masika; El-Saaidi, Christina; Suguimoto, S Pilar; Ono-Kihara, Masako; Kihara, Masahiro

    2016-09-01

    Social networking sites (SNSs) have been suggested to facilitate risky sexual activities. However, it is unknown and of concern how SNSs such as Facebook shape risky sexual activities in developing settings such as Swaziland, the country hardest hit by HIV and AIDS. We conducted an online cross-sectional study in 2012 to explore the prevalence of multiple sexual partnerships (MSPs) and their correlates among Facebook users in Swaziland. The response rate was 44.1% (N = 882); relatively, an equal proportion of men 82.7% (341/414) and 82.9% (388/468) women had ever had sex. Of those sexually active, 44.9% of men and 30.7% of women reported having sex with someone they met on Facebook. Approximately half of the participants (61.6% men, 41.0% women and 50.6% total) reported MSPs over the past 12 months. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that time spent on Facebook, "finding it easier to initiate a romantic conversation on Facebook" and having had sex with someone met on Facebook were significantly associated with having MSPs (adjusted odds ratio = 1.6-3.8). The potential impact of risky sexual behaviour among Facebook users should be appropriately addressed particularly in high HIV-prevalent settings like Swaziland.

  15. What happened to multiple sexual partnerships in Swaziland? Analysis of five linked national surveys between 2002 and 2008.

    PubMed

    Cockcroft, Anne; Andersson, Neil; Ho-Foster, Ari; Marokoane, Nobantu; Mziyako, Bheka

    2010-08-01

    Multiple sexual partnerships are a driver of the HIV epidemic in southern Africa. Five linked cluster surveys in 2002, 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2008 allowed us to measure changes in rates of multiple partnerships in these clusters in Swaziland. We selected a stratified random sample of census enumeration areas in 2002 and survey teams subsequently revisited this same sample (a random sub-sample in 2005 and 2006). For this study, analysis includes only people aged 18-29 years interviewed in communities included in all five surveys (1862 men and 2701 women). Among men, there was a significant fall in the proportion having multiple partners in the last 12 months (MP12), among those that had any, between 2002 (61%) and 2007 (46%), followed by a slight rise in 2008 (49%). For multiple partnerships in the last six months (MP6 - measured in 2005 and 2006), there was a decrease between 2005 (43%) and 2006 (25%). There was a significant decrease in multiple partnerships in the last month (MP1) between 2005 (35%) and 2006 (16%), followed by an increase in 2007 (24%) and 2008 (25%). Among women, there was a significant decrease in MP12 between 2002 (22%) and 2007 (9%), then a significant increase in 2008 (15%). There was little difference in women's MP6 between 2005 (7%) and 2006 (6%). There was also little change in women's MP1 between 2005 (5%) and 2006 (3%), with an increase from 2007 (3%) to 2008 (6%); the 2006-2008 difference was significant. A 2006 campaign to reduce multiple partnerships may have changed behaviour among men or it may have made them less likely to admit to multiple partners. The recent increase in MP12 and MP1, especially among women, may reflect behaviour or it could reflect increased willingness to report.

  16. Evaluation of a partnership between primary and secondary care providing an accessible Level 1 sexual health service in the community.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Carmel; Johnston, Jillian; Carey, Fiona

    2014-09-01

    Summary Comprehensive testing for asymptomatic sexually transmitted infections in Northern Ireland has traditionally been provided by genitourinary medicine clinics. As patient demand for services has increased while budgets have remained limited, there has been increasing difficulty in accommodating this demand. In May 2013, the newly commissioned specialist Sexual Health service in the South Eastern Trust sought to pilot a new model of care working alongside a GP partnership of 12 practices. A training programme to enable GPs and practice nurses to deliver Level 1 sexual health care to heterosexual patients aged >16 years, in accordance with the standards of BASHH, was developed. A comprehensive care pathway and dedicated community health advisor supported this new model with close liaison between primary and secondary care. Testing for Chlamydia, gonorrhoea, HIV and syphilis was offered. The aims of the pilot were achieved, namely to provide accessible, cost-effective sexual health care within a framework of robust clinical governance. Furthermore, it uncovered a high positivity rate for Chlamydia, especially in young men attending their general practice, and demonstrated a high level of patient satisfaction. Moreover the capacity of secondary care to deliver Levels 2 and 3 services was increased.

  17. 26 CFR 1.731-2 - Partnership distributions of marketable securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Partnership distributions of marketable securities. 1.731-2 Section 1.731-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... traded. For purposes of section 731(c) and this section, a financial instrument is actively traded...

  18. Dominican and Puerto Rican Women in Partnerships and Their Sexual Risk Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreno, Claudia L.; El-Bassel, Nabila

    2007-01-01

    This study compares demographic characteristics, sexual risk factors for HIV/STI, and cultural predictors of sexual risk among 254 Dominican and 1,012 Puerto Rican women using outpatient health care in New York City. More Dominicans were born outside continental United States and were employed, whereas more Puerto Ricans were single and less…

  19. Early male partnership patterns, social support, and sexual risk behavior among young men who have sex with men

    PubMed Central

    Glick, Sara Nelson; Golden, Matthew R.

    2014-01-01

    Few data exist on the early sexual behavior patterns of contemporary young men who have sex with men (YMSM), the social context of these patterns, and which of these factors influence risk for HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STI). We enrolled 94 YMSM (age 16–30) into a one-year cohort study with serial online retrospective surveys and HIV/STI testing. The first 3 partnerships of YMSM were characterized by relatively high rates of unprotected anal sex and a rapidly expanding sexual repertoire, but also increasing rates of HIV status disclosure. During follow-up, 17% of YMSM reported any nonconcordant unprotected anal intercourse (NCUAI) and 15% were newly diagnosed with HIV/STI. Sex education in high school and current maternal support were protective against HIV/STI, while isolation from family and friends was associated with recent NCUAI. Social support – including from parents, peers, and school-based sex education – may help mitigate HIV/STI risk in this population. PMID:24356869

  20. Early male partnership patterns, social support, and sexual risk behavior among young men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Glick, Sara Nelson; Golden, Matthew R

    2014-08-01

    Few data exist on the early sexual behavior patterns of contemporary young men who have sex with men (YMSM), the social context of these patterns, and which of these factors influence risk for HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STI). We enrolled 94 YMSM (age 16-30) into a 1-year cohort study with serial online retrospective surveys and HIV/STI testing. The first three partnerships of YMSM were characterized by relatively high rates of unprotected anal sex and a rapidly expanding sexual repertoire, but also increasing rates of HIV status disclosure. During follow-up, 17 % of YMSM reported any nonconcordant unprotected anal intercourse (NCUAI) and 15 % were newly diagnosed with HIV/STI. Sex education in high school and current maternal support were protective against HIV/STI, while isolation from family and friends was associated with recent NCUAI. Social support-including from parents, peers, and school-based sex education-may help mitigate HIV/STI risk in this population.

  1. Lessons Learned and Global Partnerships: Stories of Sexual and Reproductive Health from Namibia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maurer, Lis; Kelly, Maureen

    2005-01-01

    Through a Global Partnership Project, Planned Parenthood of the Southern Finger Lakes in Ithaca, New York and the Namibian Planned Parenthood Association (NAPPA) in Windhoek, Namibia have joined together to share best practices, technical assistance, support, and resources. The Global Partners share the common goal of increasing awareness,…

  2. Sexual Risk and Transmission Behaviors, Partnerships and Settings Among Young Adult Nonmedical Opioid Users in New York City.

    PubMed

    Friedman, S R; Mateu-Gelabert, P; Ruggles, K V; Goodbody, E; Syckes, C; Jessell, L; Teubl, Jennifer; Guarino, H

    2017-04-01

    Nonmedical prescription opioid use has become widespread. It can lead to heroin use, drug injection and HIV infection. We describe young adult opioid users' sexual risk behavior, partnerships and settings. 464 youth aged 18-29 who reported opioid use in the past 30 days were recruited using Respondent-Driven Sampling. Eligible participants completed a computer-assisted, interviewer-administered risk questionnaire and were tested for STIs and HIV. Participants (33% female; 66% white non-Hispanic) almost all had sex in the prior 90 days; 42% reported more than one partner. Same-sex sex was reported by 3% of men and 10% of women. Consistent condom use was rare. Seven percent reported group sex participation in the last 90 days but lifetime group sex was common among men and women. Young opioid users' unprotected sex, multiple partners and group sex puts them and others at high HIV and STI risk.

  3. Male migrants' non-spousal sexual partnerships in the place of origin: an in-depth investigation in two rural settings of India

    PubMed Central

    Ganju, Deepika; Mahapatra, Bidhubhusan; Saggurti, Niranjan

    2013-01-01

    Male migrants in India are at disproportionately high risk for HIV, not only because of their sexual behaviours in destination areas but also due to their risk behaviours in their place of origin. While studies have documented male migrants’ risky behaviours in the home setting, few have attempted to understand the underlying socio-cultural context in which they engage in such behaviours. This paper examines the patterns and context of male migrants’ non-spousal sexual partnerships in two high-out-migration districts of India. Data, drawn from a cross-sectional behavioural mixed-methods study conducted in 2008, included a structured survey with 1272 migrants, followed by in-depth interviews with 33 male migrants. Results suggest that sexual activity was common in the place of origin: around 50% of migrants had sex with a non-spousal female partner and two-fifths had initiated sex in this setting. Migrants’ non-spousal sexual behaviours in the home village were influenced by the prevailing socio-cultural context, including migrants’ enhanced socio-economic status, attitudes to non-spousal sex and accessibility of sexual partners. Male migrants’ non-spousal sexual partnerships in source areas are influenced by socio-cultural factors, which must be considered when designing HIV programmes in India and elsewhere. PMID:23323963

  4. “Dying a hero”: parents’ and young people’s discourses on concurrent sexual partnerships in rural Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Concurrent sexual partnerships (CSPs) have been speculated to drive the HIV pandemic in many sub-Saharan African countries. We have limited understanding of how people think and talk about CSPs, how beliefs are transmitted across generations, and how this might affect the practice. This paper explores these issues to understand how CSPs are perpetuated and help identify opportunities for interventions to modify them. Methods The study employed an ethnographic research design involving: participant observation in 10 households, 60 in-depth interviews (IDIs), and nine participatory focus group discussions (FGDs). Participants were young people aged 14-24 and parents/carers of young people within this age group. The 60 IDIs were conducted with: 17 fathers, 13 mothers, 13 young men and 17 young women (six of whom had had unplanned pregnancies and 11 had no children). The nine FGDs were conducted with groups of: fathers (2), mothers (2), young women (2), and young men (3). A discourse analysis was carried out with all the transcripts. Data were analysed with the aid of NVIVO 8 software. Results Six distinct discourses were identified from the way participants talked about CSPs and the norms driving the practice: 1) predatory masculine sexuality; 2) masculine respectability; 3) feminine respectability; 4) empowered modern women; 5) traditional health beliefs; 6) public health. Discourses legitimating CSPs were drawn on and reproduced primarily by young people and the media and only indirectly by parents. Discourses discouraging CSPs were used primarily by parents, religious leaders and learning institutions and only indirectly by young people themselves. Conclusion Better knowledge of the discourses through which young people CSPs, and how these discourses are transmitted across generations, might help develop “culturally compelling” interventions that modify these discourses to enhance sexual health. PMID:25048413

  5. The NatCarb geoportal: Linking distributed data from the Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnerships

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, T.R.; Rich, P.M.; Bartley, J.D.

    2007-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnerships are generating the data for a "carbon atlas" of key geospatial data (carbon sources, potential sinks, etc.) required for rapid implementation of carbon sequestration on a broad scale. The NATional CARBon Sequestration Database and Geographic Information System (NatCarb) provides Web-based, nation-wide data access. Distributed computing solutions link partnerships and other publicly accessible repositories of geological, geophysical, natural resource, infrastructure, and environmental data. Data are maintained and enhanced locally, but assembled and accessed through a single geoportal. NatCarb, as a first attempt at a national carbon cyberinfrastructure (NCCI), assembles the data required to address technical and policy challenges of carbon capture and storage. We present a path forward to design and implement a comprehensive and successful NCCI. ?? 2007 The Haworth Press, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Spatial Distribution of Flower Color Induced by Interspecific Sexual Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Yuma; Takakura, Koh-ichi; Kawata, Masakado

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms shaping the spatiotemporal distribution of species has long been a central concern of ecology and evolutionary biology. Contemporary patterns of plant assemblies suggest that sexual interactions among species, i.e., reproductive interference, lead to the exclusive distributions of closely related species that share pollinators. However, the fitness consequences and the initial ecological/evolutionary responses to reproductive interference remain unclear in nature, since reproductive isolation or allopatric distribution has already been achieved in the natural community. In Japan, three species of blue-eyed grasses (Sisyrinchium) with incomplete reproductive isolation have recently colonized and occur sympatrically. Two of them are monomorphic with white flowers, whereas the other exhibits heritable color polymorphism (white and purple morphs). Here we investigated the effects of the presence of two monomorphic species on the distribution and reproductive success of color morphs. The frequency and reproductive success of white morphs decreased in area where monomorphic species were abundant, while those of purple morphs did not. The rate of hybridization between species was higher in white morphs than in the purple ones. Resource competition and habitat preference seemed not to contribute to the spatial distribution and reproductive success of two morphs. Our results supported that color-dependent reproductive interference determines the distribution of flower color polymorphism in a habitat, implying ecological sorting promoted by pollinator-mediated reproductive interference. Our study helps us to understand the evolution and spatial structure of flower color in a community. PMID:27723785

  7. Applications in bridging the gap: a community-campus partnership to address sexual health disparities among African-American youth in the south.

    PubMed

    Akintobi, Tabia Henry; Trotter, Jennie C; Evans, Donoria; Johnson, Tarita; Laster, Nastassia; Jacobs, Debran; King, Tandeca

    2011-06-01

    Risky sexual behavior among African-American youth increases risks for sexually transmitted diseases and unintended pregnancy. This article describes a community-academic partnership to assess The 2 HYPE Abstinence Club, a program combining abstinence education with stress management and creative arts promotion for African-American youth ages 12-18. Bi-directional learning and communication systems were established to facilitate culturally relevant evaluation approaches, quality assurance in data collection, and action-based protocols for on-going improvement. Assessment tools included self-administered surveys and focus groups to gauge intervention effectiveness and perceptions regarding abstinence, sexual peer norms and intervention characteristics. Statistically significant increases in the understanding of abstinence benefits and sexual activity risks were observed and youth identified goal-setting and refusal skills as most important program components. Youth-instructor relationships and the integration of hip-hop were reasons cited for sustained participation. This assessment partnership represents a rapport with minority youth and a participatory evaluation approach adding programmatic and evidence-based value to intervention efforts.

  8. Exploration of Male Attitudes on Partnerships and Sexuality with Female BRCA1/2 Mutation Carriers.

    PubMed

    Mauer, Caitlin; Spencer, Sara; Dungan, Jeffery; Hurley, Karen

    2016-04-01

    Women with BRCA mutations are inundated with decisions about managing cancer risks and childbearing considerations. Decisions become more complicated when women face disclosing their mutation and risk-reduction options to a romantic partner. This study identifies the concerns and perspectives of male romantic partners regarding these unique decisions. Twenty-five male participants completed an online survey posted to cancer support group message boards. Participants reported relationship changes regarding intimacy levels (n = 9), attraction (n = 2), and communication (n = 22) after mutation disclosure. Participants whose partners had not undergone prophylactic mastectomy (n = 14) reported concerns regarding sexual relations (n = 5), post-surgical appearance (n = 2), post-surgical attraction (n = 5), and health/lifespan (n = 9). Participants did not express attitude changes toward childbearing. While mutation disclosure conversations and surgical options are concerns for many BRCA mutation carriers in relationships, male partners share these concerns. Aspects of the relationship may change, but male study participants continued to support their partners. This information can benefit female BRCA mutation carriers, their current or future partners, and genetic counselors working with this particular population.

  9. STI/HIV Sexual Risk Behavior and Prevalent STI among Incarcerated African American Men in Committed Intimate Partnerships: The Significance of Poverty, Mood Disorders, and Substance Use

    PubMed Central

    Khan, MR; Golin, CE; Friedman, SR; Scheidell, JD; Adimora, AA; Judon-Monk, S; Hobbs, MM; Dockery, G; Griffin, S; Oza, KK; Myers, D; Hu, H; Medina, KP; Wohl, DA

    2015-01-01

    African Americans face disproportionate sexually transmitted infection including HIV (STI/HIV), with those passing through a correctional facility at heightened risk. There is a need to identify modifiable STI/HIV risk factors among incarcerated African Americans. Project DISRUPT is a cohort study of incarcerated African American men recruited from September 2011 through January 2014 from prisons in North Carolina who were in committed partnerships with women at prison entry (N=207). During the baseline (in-prison) study visit, participants responded to a risk behavior survey and provided a urine specimen, which was tested for STIs. Substantial proportions reported multiple partnerships (42%), concurrent partnerships (33%), and buying sex (11%) in the six months before incarceration, and 9% tested positive for an STI at baseline (chlamydia: 5.3%, gonorrhea: 0.5%, trichomoniasis: 4.9%). Poverty and depression appeared to be strongly associated with sexual risk behaviors. Substance use was linked to prevalent STI, with binge drinking the strongest independent risk factor (adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 3.79, 95% CI: 1.19–12.04). There is a continued need for improved prison-based STI testing, treatment, and prevention education as well as mental health and substance use diagnosis. PMID:25863467

  10. STI/HIV Sexual Risk Behavior and Prevalent STI Among Incarcerated African American Men in Committed Partnerships: The Significance of Poverty, Mood Disorders, and Substance Use.

    PubMed

    Khan, M R; Golin, C E; Friedman, S R; Scheidell, J D; Adimora, A A; Judon-Monk, S; Hobbs, M M; Dockery, G; Griffin, S; Oza, K K; Myers, D; Hu, H; Medina, K P; Wohl, D A

    2015-08-01

    African Americans face disproportionate sexually transmitted infection including HIV (STI/HIV), with those passing through a correctional facility at heightened risk. There is a need to identify modifiable STI/HIV risk factors among incarcerated African Americans. Project DISRUPT is a cohort study of incarcerated African American men recruited from September 2011 through January 2014 from prisons in North Carolina who were in committed partnerships with women at prison entry (N = 207). During the baseline (in-prison) study visit, participants responded to a risk behavior survey and provided a urine specimen, which was tested for STIs. Substantial proportions reported multiple partnerships (42 %), concurrent partnerships (33 %), and buying sex (11 %) in the 6 months before incarceration, and 9 % tested positive for an STI at baseline (chlamydia: 5.3 %, gonorrhea: 0.5 %, trichomoniasis: 4.9 %). Poverty and depression appeared to be strongly associated with sexual risk behaviors. Substance use was linked to prevalent STI, with binge drinking the strongest independent risk factor (adjusted odds ratio: 3.79, 95 % CI 1.19-12.04). There is a continued need for improved prison-based STI testing, treatment, and prevention education as well as mental health and substance use diagnosis.

  11. The Committed Intimate Partnerships of Incarcerated African-American Men: Implications for Sexual HIV Transmission Risk and Prevention Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Khan, Maria R; El-Bassel, Nabila; Golin, Carol E; Scheidell, Joy D; Adimora, Adaora A; Coatsworth, Ashley M; Hu, Hui; Judon-Monk, Selena; Medina, Katie P; Wohl, David A

    2017-03-22

    Incarceration is thought to influence HIV transmission by disrupting partnerships that provide support and protect against sex risk-taking. Current correctional facility-based family-strengthening programs focus on marital partnerships, a minority of inmates' partnerships. Research on the sex partnerships of incarcerated African-American men and the types of partnerships most likely to protect against HIV-related sex risk is limited. Improved understanding can inform expansion of correctional facility-based family-strengthening programs to a greater proportion of protective partnerships and HIV risk reduction programs to partnerships vulnerable to sex risk. Project DISRUPT is a cohort study of African-American men being released from prison in North Carolina who were in committed heterosexual partnerships at prison entry. Using baseline survey data (N = 189), we conducted latent class analysis (LCA) to identify subgroups of participants with distinct relationship profiles and measured associations between relationship characteristics and multiple partnerships of inmates and their partners in the six months before incarceration. LCA indicated a two-class solution, with relationships distinguished by satisfaction/stability (satisfied/stable class: 58.0%; dissatisfied/unstable class: 42.0%); each class had comparable relationship length and levels of marriage and cohabitation. Dissatisfied/unstable relationships were associated with multiple partnerships among participants (AOR 2.93, 95% CI 1.50, 5.72) and partners (AOR 4.95, 95% CI 1.68, 14.58). Satisfaction indicators-versus length, marriage, or cohabitation-were the strongest independent correlates of inmates' and partners' multiple partnerships. Pre-incarceration economic deprivation, mental disorder symptoms, substance use, and violence in relationships were associated with dissatisfaction/instability. Prison-based programs designed to maintain healthy partnerships, strengthen relationship skills, and reduce

  12. Macular Degeneration Partnership

    MedlinePlus

    ... Age Related Macular Degeneration) Partnership Listen AMD Month Public Service Announcement To raise awareness of AMD, the Macular Degeneration Partnership (MDP) is distributing a public service announcement (PSA) nationwide. Seen through the eyes of a ...

  13. 26 CFR 1.1445-5 - Special rules concerning distributions and other transactions by corporations, partnerships...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... any particular language required, so long as the document meets the requirements of this paragraph... after the date of the transfer a partnership or fiduciary learns that a partner's or beneficiary's... on which the partnership or fiduciary learns that the certification is false. For rules...

  14. Targeting pre-exposure prophylaxis among men who have sex with men in the United States and Peru: partnership types, contact rates, and sexual role

    PubMed Central

    Carnegie, Nicole Bohme; Goodreau, Steven M.; Liu, Albert; Vittinghoff, Eric; Sanchez, Jorge; Lama, Javier R.; Buchbinder, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Background We aim to identify optimal strategies for deploying pre-exposure prophylaxis among men who have sex with men in the US and Peru to maximize population-level effectiveness in an efficient manner. We use epidemic models to simulate the impact of targeting strategies. Most studies have focused on targeting either the general population or high-risk MSM. Alternative strategies, including serodiscordant couples, may better balance effectiveness and efficiency. Methods We use dynamic, stochastic sexual network models based in exponential-family random graph modeling, parameterized from behavioral surveys of MSM in the US and Peru. These models represent main partnerships and casual contacts separately, permitting modeling of interventions targeting men whose risk derives from combinations of relational types. We also model varying rates of uptake and adherence to PrEP. We assess sensitivity of results to risk compensation via increases in condomless casual contacts and condomless sex in main partnerships. Results Targeting all men who are not exclusively insertive has the largest impact on HIV incidence, but targeting only those with high levels of casual activity yields comparable results using fewer person-years on PrEP. The effect is robust to risk compensation in the US, but less so in Peru. Targeting serodiscordant main partnerships does not significantly impact incidence, but requires fewer person-years on PrEP per infection averted than other strategies. Conclusions PrEP could be effective in reducing new infections at the population level in both settings. Serodiscordant partnerships are an attractive component of a targeting program, but targeting should include other high-risk men. PMID:25942463

  15. Racial/Ethnic Differences in Sexual Network Mixing: A Log-Linear Analysis of HIV Status by Partnership and Sexual Behavior Among Most at-Risk MSM.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Kayo; Williams, Mark L

    2015-06-01

    Mixing patterns within sexual networks have been shown to have an effect on HIV transmission, both within and across groups. This study examined sexual mixing patterns involving HIV-unknown status and risky sexual behavior conditioned on assortative/dissortative mixing by race/ethnicity. The sample used for this study consisted of drug-using male sex workers and their male sex partners. A log-linear analysis of 257 most at-risk MSM and 3,072 sex partners was conducted. The analysis found two significant patterns. HIV-positive most at-risk Black MSM had a strong tendency to have HIV-unknown Black partners (relative risk, RR = 2.91, p < 0.001) and to engage in risky sexual behavior (RR = 2.22, p < 0.001). White most at-risk MSM with unknown HIV status also had a tendency to engage in risky sexual behavior with Whites (RR = 1.72, p < 0.001). The results suggest that interventions that target the most at-risk MSM and their sex partners should account for specific sexual network mixing patterns by HIV status.

  16. Time for sex: nycthemeral distribution of human sexual behavior

    PubMed Central

    Refinetti, Roberto

    2005-01-01

    Background Nycthemeral (daily) oscillation has been documented in a variety of physiological and behavioral processes. The present study was carried out to evaluate the existence of a nycthemeral rhythm of human sexual behavior and to identify environmental factors responsible for the rhythmic pattern. Methods Non-traditional university students (ages 18 to 51 years) recorded the times of day when they went to sleep, when they woke up, and when they had sex for 3 consecutive weeks. They also answered a questionnaire designed to identify the causes of their selection of time for sex. Results The majority of sexual encounters took place at bedtime (11 pm to 1 am). The most common explanations for this temporal pattern were the rigidity of the professional work schedule and family obligations and the availability of the partner, which reduced the opportunity for sexual encounters at other times of the day. Conclusion Most sexual encounters take place around bedtime. Although the presence of an endogenous component responsible for this temporal pattern cannot be excluded, the evidence indicates strong environmental forcing, particularly from the work/family schedule of the individuals and from partner availability. PMID:15790406

  17. Frequency, patterns, and preferences of lubricant use during anal intercourse within male sexual partnerships in Lima, Peru: implications for a rectal microbicide HIV prevention intervention.

    PubMed

    Clark, Jesse L; Salvatierra, Hector J; Segura, Eddy R; Salazar, Ximena; Konda, Kelika; Galea, Jerome; Klausner, Jeffrey D; Coates, Thomas J; Caceres, Carlos F

    2013-01-01

    Understanding current practices of lubricant use during anal intercourse can help to assess the contexts for the introduction of topical rectal microbicides as an HIV prevention tool for men who have sex with men (MSM). We used quantitative and qualitative methods to assess: current patterns of lubricant use; preferred characteristics of commercial lubricant formulations; and social and behavioral contexts of lubricant use within male sexual partnerships in Lima, Peru. Between 2007 and 2008, we conducted a quantitative behavioral survey with 547 MSM followed by qualitative individual and group interviews with 36 MSM from Lima, Peru. Approximately half of all participants in the quantitative survey (50.3%) reported using commercial lubricant during intercourse occasionally or consistently during the preceding two months, with lack of availability at the time of intercourse the most commonly reported reason for non-use. No clear preferences regarding the color, smell, taste, or viscosity of commercial lubricants were identified, and all participants who reported using a commercial lubricant used the same product ("Love-Lub"). In the qualitative analysis, participants characterized lubricant use as a sexual practice consistently controlled by the receptive partner, who typically obtained and applied lubricant independently, with or without the consent of the insertive partner. Quantitative findings supported this differential pattern of lubricant use, with men who reported sexual identities or roles consistent with receptive anal intercourse, including unprotected receptive intercourse, more likely to report lubricant use than MSM who claimed an exclusively insertive sexual role. Given the social, behavioral, and biological factors contributing to increased vulnerability for HIV and STI acquisition by the receptive partner in anal intercourse, delivery of a topical rectal microbicide as a lubricant formulation could provide an important HIV prevention resource for at

  18. Frequency, Patterns and Preferences of Lubricant Use During Anal Intercourse Within Male Sexual Partnerships in Lima, Peru: Implications for a Rectal Microbicide HIV Prevention Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Clark, J; Salvatierra, Hector Javier; Segura, Eddy Roberto; Salazar, Ximena; Konda, Kelika; Galea, Jerome; Klausner, Jeffrey D; Coates, Thomas; Caceres, Carlos Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Understanding current practices of lubricant use during anal intercourse can help to assess the contexts for the introduction of topical rectal microbicides as an HIV prevention tool for men who have sex with men (MSM). We used quantitative and qualitative methods to assess: current patterns of lubricant use; preferred characteristics of commercial lubricant formulations; and social and behavioral contexts of lubricant use within male sexual partnerships in Lima, Peru. Between 2007 and 2008, we conducted a quantitative behavioral survey with 547 MSM followed by qualitative individual and group interviews with 36 MSM from Lima, Peru. Approximately half of all participants in the quantitative survey (50.3%) reported using commercial lubricant during intercourse occasionally or consistently during the preceding two months, with lack of availability at the time of intercourse the most commonly reported reason for non-use. No clear preferences regarding the color, smell, taste, or viscosity of commercial lubricants were identified, and all participants who reported using a commercial lubricant used the same product (“Love-Lub”). In the qualitative analysis, participants characterized lubricant use as a sexual practice consistently controlled by the receptive partner, who typically obtained and applied lubricant independently, with or without the consent of the insertive partner. Quantitative findings supported this differential pattern of lubricant use, with men who reported sexual identities or roles consistent with receptive anal intercourse, including unprotected receptive intercourse, more likely to report lubricant use than MSM who claimed an exclusively insertive sexual role. Given the social, behavioral, and biological factors contributing to increased vulnerability for HIV and STI acquisition by the receptive partner in anal intercourse, delivery of a topical rectal microbicide as a lubricant formulation could provide an important HIV prevention resource for

  19. Housing, medical, and food deprivation in poor urban contexts: implications for multiple sexual partnerships and transactional sex in Nairobi's slums.

    PubMed

    Greif, Meredith J

    2012-03-01

    Identifying the factors that lead to sexual risk behavior is crucial in addressing the HIV epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa. Scholars have primarily relied on traditional measures of SES (income, wealth, and education) to predict risk, overlooking measures of deprivation in important social arenas such as housing, medical care, and food expenses. Findings demonstrated that all three deprivation measures, particularly housing and health care, were robust influences of sexual risk even while controlling for traditional SES measures. A multifaceted deprivation framework appears crucial to the development of effective policy interventions to diminish HIV infection.

  20. Treatment with Youth Who Have Committed Sexual Offences: Extending the Reach of Systemic Interventions through Collaborative Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smallbone, Stephen; Rayment-McHugh, Susan; Crissman, Belinda; Shumack, Danielle

    2008-01-01

    Delivery of high-quality mental health services to clients in regional and remote areas in Australia presents significant challenges. Griffith Youth Forensic Service (GYFS) provides specialised, state-wide assessment and systemic treatment services for young people in Queensland who have committed sexual offences. In an effort to provide…

  1. The Role of Facial and Body Hair Distribution in Women's Judgments of Men's Sexual Attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Dixson, Barnaby J W; Rantala, Markus J

    2016-05-01

    Facial and body hair are some of the most visually conspicuous and sexually dimorphic of all men's secondary sexual traits. Both are androgen dependent, requiring the conversion of testosterone into dihydrotestosterone via the enzyme 5α reductase 2 for their expression. While previous studies on the attractiveness of facial and body hair are equivocal, none have accounted as to how natural variation in their distribution may influence male sexual attractiveness. In the present study, we quantified men's facial and body hair distribution as either very light, light, medium, or heavy using natural photographs. We also tested whether women's fertility influenced their preferences for beards and body hair by comparing preferences among heterosexual women grouped according their fertility (high fertility, low fertility, and contraceptive use). Results showed that men with more evenly and continuously distributed facial hair from the lower jaw connecting to the mustache and covering the cheeks were judged as more sexually attractive than individuals with more patchy facial hair. Men with body hair were less attractive than when clean shaven, with the exception of images depicting some hair around the areolae, pectoral region, and the sternum that were significantly more attractive than clean-shaven bodies. However, there was no effect of fertility on women's preferences for men's beard or body hair distribution. These results suggest that the distribution of facial and body hair influences male attractiveness to women, possibly as an indication of masculine development and the synthesis of testosterone into dihydrotestosterone via 5α reductase.

  2. Concurrent sexual partnerships among female sex workers and their non-commercial male partners in Tijuana and Ciudad Juárez, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Angela M.; Syvertsen, Jennifer L.; Rangel, M. Gudelia; Staines, Hugo S.; Morris, Martina; Patterson, Thomas L.; Ulibarri, Monica D.; Strathdee, Steffanie A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the prevalence and correlates of concurrent (overlapping) sexual partnerships among female sex workers (FSWs) and their non-commercial male partners in two Mexico-U.S. border cities. Methods A cross-sectional survey of FSWs and their non-commercial male partners was conducted in Tijuana and Ciudad Juárez, Mexico (2010–2011). Eligible FSWs and verified non-commercial partners were aged ≥18 years; FSWs had ever used hard drugs (lifetime) and recently exchanged sex for money, drugs, or other goods (past month). Participants underwent baseline questionnaires obtaining dates of sex and condom use with ≤5 other recurring partners, including FSWs’ regular clients. These dates were compared to dates of sex with enrolled study partners to determine overlap (i.e., “recurring” concurrency). Bivariate probit regression identified recurring concurrency correlates. Results Among 428 individuals (214 couples), past-year recurring concurrency prevalence was 16% and was higher among women than their non-commercial male partners (26% vs. 6%). In 10 couples (5%), both partners reported recurring concurrency. The majority of couples (64%) always had unprotected sex, and most of the individuals (70%) with recurring concurrency “sometimes” or “never” used condoms with their concurrent partners. Recurring concurrency was positively associated with FSWs’ income, men’s caballerismo (a form of traditional masculinity), and men’s belief that their FSW-partners had STIs. Conclusions Recurring concurrency, representing sustained periods of overlapping partnerships in which unprotected sex was common, should be addressed by couple-based STI prevention interventions. PMID:23172036

  3. Community perspectives on parental influence on engagement in multiple concurrent sexual partnerships among youth in Tanzania: implications for HIV prevention programming.

    PubMed

    Fehringer, Jessica A; Babalola, Stella; Kennedy, Caitlin E; Kajula, Lusajo J; Mbwambo, Jessie K; Kerrigan, Deanna

    2013-01-01

    Although concurrent sexual partnerships (CPs) have been hypothesized to be an important risk factor for HIV in sub-Saharan Africa, the social and cultural factors that encourage CPs are not well understood. This study explored the community's perspectives on the role that parents can play in influencing their children's decision to engage in CPs. We conducted 16 in-depth interviews, 32 focus group discussions, and 16 key informant interviews with 280 adult participants in Tanzania. Data were coded; findings and conclusions were developed based on themes that emerged from coding. Three parental influences on CPs emerged: parent-child communication about sex, both silent and explicit encouragement of CPs, and parental behavior modeling. Parents are typically either too busy or too "embarrassed" to talk with their children about sex and CPs. The information parents do give is often confusing, fear-based, inadequate, and/or only focused on daughters. Parents themselves also encourage CPs through complicity of silence when their daughters come home with extra cash or consumer goods. In some cases, parents overtly encourage their children, particularly daughters, to practice CPs due to the promise of money from wealthy partners. Finally, when parents engage in CPs, the children themselves learn to behave similarly. These results suggest that parents can influence their children's decision to engage in CPs. HIV prevention interventions should address this by promoting parent-child communication about sexuality; associated disease risks and gender-equitable relationships; promoting positive parental role modeling; and educating parents on the implications of encouragement of CPs in their children.

  4. Sex-specific winter distribution in a sexually dimorphic shorebird is explained by resource partitioning

    PubMed Central

    Duijns, Sjoerd; van Gils, Jan A; Spaans, Bernard; ten Horn, Job; Brugge, Maarten; Piersma, Theunis

    2014-01-01

    Sexual size dimorphism (SSD) implies correlated differences in energetic requirements and feeding opportunities, such that sexes will face different trade-offs in habitat selection. In seasonal migrants, this could result in a differential spatial distribution across the wintering range. To identify the ecological causes of sexual spatial segregation, we studied a sexually dimorphic shorebird, the bar-tailed godwit Limosa lapponica, in which females have a larger body and a longer bill than males. With respect to the trade-offs that these migratory shorebirds experience in their choice of wintering area, northern and colder wintering sites have the benefit of being closer to the Arctic breeding grounds. According to Bergmann's rule, the larger females should incur lower energetic costs per unit of body mass over males, helping them to winter in the cold. However, as the sexes have rather different bill lengths, differences in sex-specific wintering sites could also be due to the vertical distribution of their buried prey, that is, resource partitioning. Here, in a comparison between six main intertidal wintering areas across the entire winter range of the lapponica subspecies in northwest Europe, we show that the percentage of females between sites was not correlated with the cost of wintering, but was positively correlated with the biomass in the bottom layer and negatively with the biomass in the top layer. We conclude that resource partitioning, rather than relative expenditure advantages, best explains the differential spatial distribution of male and female bar-tailed godwits across northwest Europe. PMID:25505527

  5. Sexual partnerships and considerations for HIV antiretroviral pre-exposure prophylaxis utilization among high-risk substance using men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Mimiaga, Matthew J; Closson, Elizabeth F; Kothary, Vishesh; Mitty, Jennifer A

    2014-01-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) remain at great risk of HIV in the United States, representing 65 % of incident HIV infections. One factor contributing to the high rate of HIV infection among MSM is use of "recreational" drugs that are highly associated with unprotected anal sex. Pre-exposure chemoprophylaxis (PrEP) is a novel biomedical HIV prevention strategy that has the potential to reduce HIV transmission in MSM. Main and casual sex partners play a role in HIV prevention efforts for MSM. The study aimed to qualitatively explore the perceived influences of sexual relationships on promoting and inhibiting PrEP use among high-risk MSM who report regular drug use. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with 40 participants recruited in Boston, Massachusetts. Data were analyzed using descriptive qualitative analysis. Casual partners presented a distinct set of concerns from primary partnerships. MSM generally viewed main partners as a potential source of support for taking PrEP. Given their informal and often temporary nature, PrEP disclosure to casual partners was considered unnecessary. HIV-related stigma and substance use were also perceived as barriers to discussing PrEP use with casual partners. MSM articulated a high degree of personal agency regarding their ability to take PrEP. Findings suggest that behavioral interventions to improve PrEP utilization and adherence for high-risk MSM should be tailored to sex partner type and the parameters established between sex partners. Approaches to PrEP disclosure and partner engagement should be informed by the relative benefits and limitations characterized by these different types of relationships.

  6. 13 CFR 107.1400 - Dividends or partnership distributions on 4 percent Preferred Securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... distributions on 4 percent Preferred Securities. 107.1400 Section 107.1400 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES SBA Financial Assistance for Licensees... distributions on 4 percent Preferred Securities. If you issued Preferred Securities to SBA on or after...

  7. 26 CFR 1.1445-5 - Special rules concerning distributions and other transactions by corporations, partnerships...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 1 140,000 140,000 3/05/94 5,000 10,000 3,500 125,000 3/15/94 10,000 5,000 1,750 110,000 5/01/94... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Special rules concerning distributions and... December 31, 2000 (see § 1.1441-3(c)(4) and (h)). (iv) Taxable distributions by domestic or...

  8. Sexual variability in Histoplasma capsulatum and its possible distribution: what is going on?

    PubMed

    Muniz, Mauro Medeiros; Sousa, Carolina Nascimento; Evangelista Oliveira, Manoel Marques; Pizzini, Claudia Vera; Almeida, Marcos Abreu; Rodríguez-Arellanes, Gabriela; Taylor, Maria Lucia; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria

    2014-01-01

    Histoplasma capsulatum is a dimorphic fungal pathogen naturally found in the soil. Inhalation of conidia can result in pulmonary histoplasmosis and, in some cases, causes severe disseminated disease and death. This fungus is an ascomycete that has an anamorphic or asexual stage and a teleomorphic or sexual stage, known as Ajellomyces capsulatus, which results from (+) and (-) mating types. Sexual reproduction is regulated by a specialized genomic region known as the mating-type (MAT1) locus. The mating process in this heterothallic species is represented by isolates that contain only one of the two different MAT1 locus idiomorphs (MAT1-1 or MAT1-2) that have unrelated sequences encoding different transcription factors. In medically important dimorphic pathogens and in most ascomycete molds, one MAT locus idiomorph encodes a high-mobility-group (HMG) box-domain transcription factor, and the other idiomorph encodes an alpha-box domain transcription factor. There is scarce molecular information about H. capsulatum mating type although recombinant population structures have been reported that could occur in nature and this process has been documented in distinct models such as parasites and other fungi. In this review, we shall focus on published studies on H. capsulatum sexuality, and outline the distribution of the two H. capsulatum mating types in Latin America. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012).

  9. First description of the sexuals of Camponotus opaciventris Mayr, 1879 (Hymenoptera, Formicidae), with notes on distribution in Western Himalaya

    PubMed Central

    Wachkoo, Aijaz Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background The taxonomy of Camponotus ants in India is mostly based on the worker caste, described in about 96% of the known species (AntWeb 2016). However, nearly 48% of these ant species are only known from workers, with no record of sexual forms. To improve knowledge of Indian Camponotus, we here describe sexuals of Camponotus opaciventris Mayr 1879. New information The hitherto unknown sexuals of Camponotus opaciventris Mayr 1879 are described for the first time. Workers are redescribed and distribution of this ant species in Indian Western Himalaya is herewith detailed. PMID:28174505

  10. Measuring concurrency using a joint multistate and point process model for retrospective sexual history data.

    PubMed

    Aralis, Hilary J; Gorbach, Pamina M; Brookmeyer, Ron

    2016-10-30

    Understanding the impact of concurrency, defined as overlapping sexual partnerships, on the spread of HIV within various communities has been complicated by difficulties in measuring concurrency. Retrospective sexual history data consisting of first and last dates of sexual intercourse for each previous and ongoing partnership is often obtained through use of cross-sectional surveys. Previous attempts to empirically estimate the magnitude and extent of concurrency among these surveyed populations have inadequately accounted for the dependence between partnerships and used only a snapshot of the available data. We introduce a joint multistate and point process model in which states are defined as the number of ongoing partnerships an individual is engaged in at a given time. Sexual partnerships starting and ending on the same date are referred to as one-offs and modeled as discrete events. The proposed method treats each individual's continuation in and transition through various numbers of ongoing partnerships as a separate stochastic process and allows the occurrence of one-offs to impact subsequent rates of partnership formation and dissolution. Estimators for the concurrent partnership distribution and mean sojourn times during which a person has k ongoing partnerships are presented. We demonstrate this modeling approach using epidemiological data collected from a sample of men having sex with men and seeking HIV testing at a Los Angeles clinic. Among this sample, the estimated point prevalence of concurrency was higher among men later diagnosed HIV positive. One-offs were associated with increased rates of subsequent partnership dissolution. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Schooling & Sexualities: Teaching for a Positive Sexuality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laskey, Louise, Ed.; Beavis, Catherine, Ed.

    This collection of papers contains a Foreword by Jane Kenway, an Introduction by Louise Laskey and Catherine Beavis, and four sections. Section 1, Schools and the Social Construction of Sexuality, contains 3 chapters: (1) Power and Partnership? Challenging the Sexual Construction of Schooling (D. Denborough); (2) Where Do You Draw the Line?…

  12. An evaluation of the distribution of sexual references among "Top 8" MySpace friends.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Megan A; Brockman, Libby; Rogers, Cara B; Christakis, Dimitri A

    2010-10-01

    To evaluate whether online friends of adolescents who display sexual references on a social networking site also display references. The method used was content analysis. The result of this study was that adolescents who displayed explicit sexual references were more likely to have online friends who displayed references. Thus, social networking sites present new opportunities to investigate adolescent sexual behavior.

  13. Partnership Successes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Through partnerships with industry and academia, NASA s space-age technology improves all aspects of society. While not every technology transfer activity results in commercialization, these partnerships offer far-reaching benefits to U.S. citizens. The following examples are just a few of the ways NASA is applying its technology and resources to improve the quality of life on Earth.

  14. Mitigating risky sexual behaviors among Russian narcology hospital patients: the PREVENT (Partnership to Reduce the Epidemic Via Engagement in Narcology Treatment) randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Krupitsky, Evgeny M.; Cheng, Debbie M.; Raj, Anita; Egorova, Valentina Y.; Levenson, Suzette; Meli, Seville; Bridden, Carly; Verbitskaya, Elena V.; Kamb, Mary L.; Zvartau, Edwin E.

    2008-01-01

    Aim To assess the effectiveness of a sexual risk reduction intervention in the Russian narcology hospital setting. Design, setting and participants This was a randomized controlled trial from October 2004 to December 2005 among patients with alcohol and/or heroin dependence from two narcology hospitals in St Petersburg, Russia. Intervention Intervention subjects received two personalized sexual behavior counseling sessions plus three telephone booster sessions. Control subjects received usual addiction treatment, which did not include sexual behavior counseling. All received a research assessment and condoms at baseline. Measurements Primary outcomes were percentage of safe sex episodes (number of times condoms were used ÷ by number of sexual episodes) and no unprotected sex (100% condom use or abstinence) during the previous 3 months, assessed at 6 months. Findings Intervention subjects reported higher median percentage of safe sex episodes (unadjusted median difference 12.7%; P = 0.01; adjusted median difference 23%, P = 0.07); a significant difference was not detected for the outcome no unprotected sex in the past 3 months [unadjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.8-3.1; adjusted OR 1.5, 95% CI 0.7-3.3]. Conclusions Among Russian substance-dependent individuals, sexual behavior counseling during addiction treatment should be considered as one potential component of efforts to decrease risky sexual behaviors in this HIV at-risk population. PMID:18636998

  15. Poor sexual reproduction on the distribution limit of the rare tree Sorbus torminalis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Kristine Kjørup; Kollmann, Johannes

    2004-05-01

    Plants growing in small fragmented populations under stressful environmental conditions may have reduced sexual reproduction. This can cause low gene flow between populations and eventually extinction. Here we report on a pollination experiment with Sorbus torminalis, a rare fleshy-fruited tree with a submediterranean distribution in Europe. At the northern limit of its range in SE-Denmark two relatively small and isolated populations were studied for effects of seven pollination treatments on fruit production and on the timing of fruit abortion. There was evidence that lack of pollination and spontaneous self-pollination caused particularly high fruit abortion, which indicates that apomixis is unlikely and spontaneous self-pollination not efficient. Fruit abortion was delayed after hand pollination, which suggests limitation by pollen quantity. Self-pollination caused earlier abortion than experimental cross-pollination within or between populations indicating inbreeding depression. There was no evidence for outbreeding depression as measured by fruit abortion. We conclude that generative reproduction of S. torminalis is reduced on its northern distribution limit and that it might be negatively affected by pollen limitation and inbreeding effects, which have not been compensated for by increased self-compatibility or apomixis.

  16. Outsourcing through Partnerships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeRose, Garry J.; McLaughlin, Janet

    1995-01-01

    Outsourcing, a major corporate trend formerly used primarily for information services, is now used for marketing, distribution, maintenance, human resource management, and training. Corning outsourced its training by developing a partnership with CCFL, a nonprofit education and training organization that is a consortium of colleges. (JOW)

  17. Effect of Early Antiretroviral Therapy on Sexual Behaviors and HIV-1 Transmission Risk Among Adults With Diverse Heterosexual Partnership Statuses in Côte d'Ivoire

    PubMed Central

    Jean, Kévin; Gabillard, Delphine; Moh, Raoul; Danel, Christine; Fassassi, Raïmi; Desgrées-du-Loû, Annabel; Eholié, Serge; Lert, France; Anglaret, Xavier; Dray-Spira, Rosemary

    2014-01-01

    Background. The effect of early initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART; ie, at CD4+ T-cell counts >350 cells/mm3) on sexual behaviors and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV) transmission risk has not been documented in populations other than HIV-serodiscordant couples in stable relationships. Methods. On the basis of data from a behavioral study nested in a randomized, controlled trial (Temprano-ANRS12136) of early ART, we compared proportions of risky sex (ie, unprotected sex with a partner of negative/unknown HIV status) reported 12 months after inclusion between participants randomly assigned to initiate ART immediately (hereafter, “early ART”) or according to ongoing World Health Organization criteria. Group-specific HIV transmission rates were estimated on the basis of sexual behaviors and viral load–specific per-act HIV transmission probabilities. The ratio of transmission rates was computed to estimate the protective effect of early ART. Results. Among 957 participants (baseline median CD4+ T-cell count, 478 cells/mm3), 46.0% reported sexual activity in the past month; of these 46.0%, sexual activity for 41.5% involved noncohabiting partners. The proportion of subjects who engaged in risky sex was 10.0% in the early ART group, compared with 12.8% in the standard ART group (P = .17). After accounting for sexual behaviors and viral load, we estimated that the protective effect of early ART was 90% (95% confidence interval, 81%–95%). Conclusion. Twelve months after inclusion, patients in the early and standard ART groups reported similar sexual behaviors. Early ART decreased the estimated risk of HIV transmission by 90%, suggesting a major prevention benefit among seronegative sex partners in stable or casual relationships with seropositive individuals. PMID:23990567

  18. F-actin distribution and function during sexual development in Eimeria maxima.

    PubMed

    Frölich, Sonja; Wallach, Michael

    2015-06-01

    To determine the involvement of the actin cytoskeleton in macrogametocyte growth and oocyst wall formation, freshly purified macrogametocytes and oocysts were stained with Oregon Green 514 conjugated phalloidin to visualize F-actin microfilaments, while Evans blue staining was used to detect type 1 wall forming bodies (WFB1s) and the outer oocyst wall. The double-labelled parasites were then analysed at various stages of sexual development using three-dimensional confocal microscopy. The results showed F-actin filaments were distributed throughout the entire cytoplasm of mature Eimeria maxima macrogametocytes forming a web-like meshwork of actin filaments linking the type 1 WFBs together into structures resembling 'beads on a string'. At the early stages of oocyst wall formation, F-actin localization changed in alignment with the egg-shaped morphology of the forming oocysts with F-actin microfilaments making direct contact with the WFB1s. In tissue oocysts, the labelled actin cytoskeleton was situated underneath the forming outer layer of the oocyst wall. Treatment of macrogametocytes in vitro with the actin depolymerizing agents, Cytochalasin D and Latrunculin, led to a reduction in the numbers of mature WFB1s in the cytoplasm of the developing macrogametocytes, indicating that the actin plays an important role in WFB1 transport and oocyst wall formation in E. maxima.

  19. Sexual partner selectiveness effects on homosexual HIV transmission dynamics.

    PubMed

    Koopman, J; Simon, C; Jacquez, J; Joseph, J; Sattenspiel, L; Park, T

    1988-01-01

    Deterministic simulation models are used to show that HIV transmission dynamics in homosexual populations can be strongly affected by sexual partner selectiveness. The type of selectiveness or biased mixing examined is where individuals with similar new partnership formation rates are more likely to form a pair than would be expected by chance. The effect of such selectiveness could be strong even when the total number and distribution of new sexual partnerships and sex acts remains constant. This means that in order to predict the future course of HIV transmission and identify the populations at highest risk, we must have information not only on the frequency of new sexual partnerships and types of sex acts, but also on who has sex with whom. Given high sexual partner selectiveness, some groups of homosexuals with low rates of sex and new sex partners would take many decades before a single introduction would generate an epidemic. Epidemics in these groups can be markedly accelerated by only modest contact with higher risk groups. Even in very low activity groups, which if isolated would have no epidemic, an important proportion of their members can be infected when they are not selective. The relative risks of AIDS in groups making high numbers of new sexual partnerships compared to groups making low numbers are markedly affected by sexual partner selectiveness. The models developed were examined using information collected in 1984 from the Coping and Change Study in collaboration with the Chicago Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study. This population was divided into activity groups by the rate at which individuals established new sexual partnerships and then a structure of new sexual partnerships between these activity groups was defined consistent with available data. Even without introducing any behavior change in the models, the proportion of the homosexual population infected was seen to level off temporarily at around 50% after several years as a consequence of

  20. 48 CFR 1401.370 - Acquisition Managers' Partnership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...' Partnership. 1401.370 Section 1401.370 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Acquisition Managers' Partnership. (a) The Acquisition Managers' Partnership (AMP) is a forum for DOI's senior... the partnership will meet and develops meeting agendas. The Chairperson will distribute the...

  1. 48 CFR 1401.370 - Acquisition Managers' Partnership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...' Partnership. 1401.370 Section 1401.370 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Acquisition Managers' Partnership. (a) The Acquisition Managers' Partnership (AMP) is a forum for DOI's senior... the partnership will meet and develops meeting agendas. The Chairperson will distribute the...

  2. 48 CFR 1401.370 - Acquisition Managers' Partnership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...' Partnership. 1401.370 Section 1401.370 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Acquisition Managers' Partnership. (a) The Acquisition Managers' Partnership (AMP) is a forum for DOI's senior... the partnership will meet and develops meeting agendas. The Chairperson will distribute the...

  3. 48 CFR 1401.370 - Acquisition Managers' Partnership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...' Partnership. 1401.370 Section 1401.370 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Acquisition Managers' Partnership. (a) The Acquisition Managers' Partnership (AMP) is a forum for DOI's senior... the partnership will meet and develops meeting agendas. The Chairperson will distribute the...

  4. 26 CFR 1.1446-4 - Publicly traded partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Corporations and Tax-Free Covenant Bonds § 1.1446-4 Publicly traded partnerships. (a) In general. This section... publicly traded partnership distributes property other than money, the partnership shall not release the property until it has funds sufficient to enable the partnership to pay over in money the required 1446...

  5. Cryptic sexual populations account for genetic diversity and ecological success in a widely distributed, asexual fungus-growing ant

    PubMed Central

    Rabeling, Christian; Gonzales, Omar; Schultz, Ted R.; Bacci, Maurício; Garcia, Marcos V. B.; Verhaagh, Manfred; Ishak, Heather D.; Mueller, Ulrich G.

    2011-01-01

    Sex and recombination are central processes in life generating genetic diversity. Organisms that rely on asexual propagation risk extinction due to the loss of genetic diversity and the inability to adapt to changing environmental conditions. The fungus-growing ant species Mycocepurus smithii was thought to be obligately asexual because only parthenogenetic populations have been collected from widely separated geographic localities. Nonetheless, M. smithii is ecologically successful, with the most extensive distribution and the highest population densities of any fungus-growing ant. Here we report that M. smithii actually consists of a mosaic of asexual and sexual populations that are nonrandomly distributed geographically. The sexual populations cluster along the Rio Amazonas and the Rio Negro and appear to be the source of independently evolved and widely distributed asexual lineages, or clones. Either apomixis or automixis with central fusion and low recombination rates is inferred to be the cytogenetic mechanism underlying parthenogenesis in M. smithii. Males appear to be entirely absent from asexual populations, but their existence in sexual populations is indicated by the presence of sperm in the reproductive tracts of queens. A phylogenetic analysis of the genus suggests that M. smithii is monophyletic, rendering a hybrid origin of asexuality unlikely. Instead, a mitochondrial phylogeny of sexual and asexual populations suggests multiple independent origins of asexual reproduction, and a divergence-dating analysis indicates that M. smithii evolved 0.5–1.65 million years ago. Understanding the evolutionary origin and maintenance of asexual reproduction in this species contributes to a general understanding of the adaptive significance of sex. PMID:21768368

  6. Cryptic sexual populations account for genetic diversity and ecological success in a widely distributed, asexual fungus-growing ant.

    PubMed

    Rabeling, Christian; Gonzales, Omar; Schultz, Ted R; Bacci, Maurício; Garcia, Marcos V B; Verhaagh, Manfred; Ishak, Heather D; Mueller, Ulrich G

    2011-07-26

    Sex and recombination are central processes in life generating genetic diversity. Organisms that rely on asexual propagation risk extinction due to the loss of genetic diversity and the inability to adapt to changing environmental conditions. The fungus-growing ant species Mycocepurus smithii was thought to be obligately asexual because only parthenogenetic populations have been collected from widely separated geographic localities. Nonetheless, M. smithii is ecologically successful, with the most extensive distribution and the highest population densities of any fungus-growing ant. Here we report that M. smithii actually consists of a mosaic of asexual and sexual populations that are nonrandomly distributed geographically. The sexual populations cluster along the Rio Amazonas and the Rio Negro and appear to be the source of independently evolved and widely distributed asexual lineages, or clones. Either apomixis or automixis with central fusion and low recombination rates is inferred to be the cytogenetic mechanism underlying parthenogenesis in M. smithii. Males appear to be entirely absent from asexual populations, but their existence in sexual populations is indicated by the presence of sperm in the reproductive tracts of queens. A phylogenetic analysis of the genus suggests that M. smithii is monophyletic, rendering a hybrid origin of asexuality unlikely. Instead, a mitochondrial phylogeny of sexual and asexual populations suggests multiple independent origins of asexual reproduction, and a divergence-dating analysis indicates that M. smithii evolved 0.5-1.65 million years ago. Understanding the evolutionary origin and maintenance of asexual reproduction in this species contributes to a general understanding of the adaptive significance of sex.

  7. Writing Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Cathy

    2009-01-01

    In the writer's workshop, teachers are highly challenged after the minilesson during the independent writing time. In that segment, teachers are confronted by the demands of conferencing with numerous students and responding to writing in a limited amount of time. Writing partnerships link students in long-term pairs, resulting in two valuable…

  8. The potential role of sexual conflict and sexual selection in shaping the genomic distribution of Mito-nuclear genes.

    PubMed

    Dean, Rebecca; Zimmer, Fabian; Mank, Judith E

    2014-05-01

    Mitochondrial interactions with the nuclear genome represent one of life's most important co-evolved mutualisms. In many organisms, mitochondria are maternally inherited, and in these cases, co-transmission between the mitochondrial and nuclear genes differs across different parts of the nuclear genome, with genes on the X chromosome having two-third probability of co-transmission, compared with one-half for genes on autosomes. These asymmetrical inheritance patterns of mitochondria and different parts of the nuclear genome have the potential to put certain gene combinations in inter-genomic co-adaptation or conflict. Previous work in mammals found strong evidence that the X chromosome has a dearth of genes that interact with the mitochondria (mito-nuclear genes), suggesting that inter-genomic conflict might drive genes off the X onto the autosomes for their male-beneficial effects. Here, we developed this idea to test coadaptation and conflict between mito-nuclear gene combinations across phylogenetically independent sex chromosomes on a far broader scale. We found that, in addition to therian mammals, only Caenorhabditis elegans showed an under-representation of mito-nuclear genes on the sex chromosomes. The remaining species studied showed no overall bias in their distribution of mito-nuclear genes. We discuss possible factors other than inter-genomic conflict that might drive the genomic distribution of mito-nuclear genes.

  9. Men without a sense of smell exhibit a strongly reduced number of sexual relationships, women exhibit reduced partnership security - a reanalysis of previously published data.

    PubMed

    Croy, Ilona; Bojanowski, Viola; Hummel, Thomas

    2013-02-01

    Olfactory function influences social behavior. For instance, olfaction seems to play a key role in mate choice and helps detecting emotions in other people. In a previous study, we showed that people who were born without a sense of smell exhibit enhanced social insecurity. Based on the comments to this article we decided to have a closer look to whether the absence of the sense of smell affects men and women differently. Under this focus questionnaire data of 32 patients, diagnosed with isolated congenital anosmia (10 men, 22 women) and 36 age-matched healthy controls (15 men, 21 women) was reanalyzed. In result, men and women without a sense of smell reported enhanced social insecurity, but with different consequences: Men who were born without a sense of smell exhibit a strongly reduced number of sexual relationships and women are affected such that they feel less secure about their partner. This emphasizes the importance of the sense of smell for intimate relationships.

  10. EPA Distribution System (DS) Research as It Relates to the TCRDS and the DS Research Partnership ..and more

    EPA Science Inventory

    An overview of Water Supply and Water Research Division (WSWRD) distribution system water quality research was provided. Specifically, the research topics of corrosion, nitrification, biofilms and contaminant accumulation were discussed.

  11. Sexual selection has minimal impact on effective population sizes in species with high rates of random offspring mortality: an empirical demonstration using fitness distributions

    PubMed Central

    Pischedda, Alison; Friberg, Urban; Stewart, Andrew D.; Miller, Paige M.; Rice, William R.

    2015-01-01

    The effective population size (Ne) is a fundamental parameter in population genetics that influences the rate of loss of genetic diversity. Sexual selection has the potential to reduce Ne by causing the sex-specific distributions of individuals that successfully reproduce to diverge. To empirically estimate the effect of sexual selection on Ne, we obtained fitness distributions for males and females from an outbred, laboratory-adapted population of Drosophila melanogaster. We observed strong sexual selection in this population (the variance in male reproductive success was ∼14 times higher than that for females), but found that sexual selection had only a modest effect on Ne, which was 75% of the census size. This occurs because the substantial random offspring mortality in this population diminishes the effects of sexual selection on Ne, a result that necessarily applies to other high fecundity species. The inclusion of this random offspring mortality creates a scaling effect that reduces the variance/mean ratios for male and female reproductive success and causes them to converge. Our results demonstrate that measuring reproductive success without considering offspring mortality can underestimate Ne and overestimate the genetic consequences of sexual selection. Similarly, comparing genetic diversity among different genomic components may fail to detect strong sexual selection. PMID:26374275

  12. Astroglial distribution and sexual differences in neural metabolism in mammillary bodies.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Eduardo; Picón, Isabel M; Miranda, Ruben; Begega, Azucena; Conejo, Nélida M; Arias, Jorge L

    2006-02-27

    The sexual differences in cerebral nuclei are produced by the organizational and the activational function of gonadal hormones. The different performances by male and female rats in memory tasks requiring use of the mammillary bodies (MBs), could be due to structural and functional sexual dimorphic differences. Our work quantifies the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactive (GFAP-IR) astrocytes, and neuronal metabolic activity measured by the cytochrome oxidase (CO) histochemistry in the MBs in rats of both sexes. We find that there is no difference in astroglial number in the medial mammillary nucleus (MMN) and in the lateral mammillary nucleus (LMN) of males, females in estrus and diestrus adult rats. However, we do find statistically significant differences between the sexes in the neuronal oxidative metabolism influenced by the estrous cycle. We, therefore, conclude that there are functional and not structural sex differences in the MBs.

  13. Analysis and simulation of a stochastic, discrete-individual model of STD transmission with partnership concurrency.

    PubMed

    Chick, S E; Adams, A L; Koopman, J S

    2000-07-01

    Deterministic differential equation models indicate that partnership concurrency and non-homogeneous mixing patterns play an important role in the spread of sexually transmitted infections. Stochastic discrete-individual simulation studies arrive at similar conclusions, but from a very different modeling perspective. This paper presents a stochastic discrete-individual infection model that helps to unify these two approaches to infection modeling. The model allows for both partnership concurrency, as well as the infection, recovery, and reinfection of an individual from repeated contact with a partner, as occurs with many mucosal infections. The simplest form of the model is a network-valued Markov chain, where the network's nodes are individuals and arcs represent partnerships. Connections between the differential equation and discrete-individual approaches are constructed with large-population limits that approximate endemic levels and equilibrium probability distributions that describe partnership concurrency. A more general form of the discrete-individual model that allows for semi-Markovian dynamics and heterogeneous contact patterns is implemented in simulation software. Analytical and simulation results indicate that the basic reproduction number R(0) increases when reinfection is possible, and the epidemic rate of rise and endemic levels are not related by 1-1/R(0), when partnerships are not point-time processes.

  14. Mismatch in the distribution of floral ecotypes and pollinators: insights into the evolution of sexually deceptive orchids.

    PubMed

    Phillips, R D; Bohman, B; Anthony, J M; Krauss, S L; Dixon, K W; Peakall, R

    2015-03-01

    Plants are predicted to show floral adaptation to geographic variation in the most effective pollinator, potentially leading to reproductive isolation and genetic divergence. Many sexually deceptive orchids attract just a single pollinator species, limiting opportunities to experimentally investigate pollinator switching. Here, we investigate Drakaea concolor, which attracts two pollinator species. Using pollinator choice tests, we detected two morphologically similar ecotypes within D. concolor. The common ecotype only attracted Zaspilothynnus gilesi, whereas the rare ecotype also attracted an undescribed species of Pogonothynnus. The rare ecotype occurred at populations nested within the distribution of the common ecotype, with no evidence of ecotypes occurring sympatrically. Surveying for pollinators at over 100 sites revealed that ecotype identity was not correlated with wasp availability, with most orchid populations only attracting the rare Z. gilesi. Using microsatellite markers, genetic differentiation among populations was very low (GST = 0.011) regardless of ecotype, suggestive of frequent gene flow. Taken together, these results may indicate that the ability to attract Pogonothynnus has evolved recently, but this ecotype is yet to spread. The nested distribution of ecotypes, rather than the more typical formation of ecotypes in allopatry, illustrates that in sexually deceptive orchids, pollinator switching could occur throughout a species' range, resulting from multiple potentially suitable but unexploited pollinators occurring in sympatry. This unusual case of sympatric pollinators highlights D. concolor as a promising study system for further understanding the process of pollinator switching from ecological, chemical and genetic perspectives.

  15. Green Power Partnership Videos

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Green Power Partnership develops videos on a regular basis that explore a variety of topics including, Green Power partnership, green power purchasing, Renewable energy certificates, among others.

  16. The nature and development of sex attractant specificity in cockroaches of the genus Periplaneta. I. Sexual dimorphism in the distribution of antennal sense organs in five species.

    PubMed

    Schafer, R; Sanchez, T V

    1976-06-01

    Sexual dimorphism in the distribution of antennal sense organs is common among adults of the genus Periplaneta. In three out of the four strains of Periplaneta americana examined, adult males had more contact chemoreceptros than females. In the fourth strain of P. americana and in P. australasiae, P. brunnea, P. fuliginosa, and P. japonica, no statistically supportable sexual dimorphism of contact chemoreceptors was found. However, in all strains and species of Periplaneta examined, sexual dimorphism was found in the total number and/or density of olfactory sensilla. Male adults had nearly twice as many olfactory sensilla as female adults. These observations are consistent with the behavioral observation that males within the genus Periplaneta rely on the reception of an airborne pheromone for the initiation of courtship behavior. In P. americana, where sexual dimorphism was found in the contact chemoreceptors, contact stimuli release the full wing raising display and presentation in males during courtship.

  17. Community Sexual Bridging Among Heterosexuals at High-Risk of HIV in New York City

    PubMed Central

    Jenness, Samuel M.; Reilly, Kathleen H.; Youm, Yoosik; Hagan, Holly; Wendel, Travis; Gelpi-Acosta, Camila

    2016-01-01

    Community sexual bridging may influence the socio-geographic distribution of heterosexually transmitted HIV. In a cross-sectional study, heterosexual adults at high-risk of HIV were recruited in New York City (NYC) in 2010 for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-sponsored National HIV Behavioral Surveillance system. Eligible participants were interviewed about their HIV risk behaviors and sexual partnerships and tested for HIV. Social network analysis of the geographic location of participants’ recent sexual partnerships was used to calculate three sexual bridging measures (non-redundant ties, flow-betweenness and walk-betweenness) for NYC communities (defined as United Hospital Fund neighborhoods), which were plotted against HIV prevalence in each community. The analysis sample comprised 494 participants and 1534 sexual partnerships. Participants were 60.1 % male, 79.6 % non-Hispanic black and 19.6 % Hispanic race/ethnicity; the median age was 40 years (IQR 24–50); 37.7 % had ever been homeless (past 12 months); 16.6 % had ever injected drugs; in the past 12 months 76.7 % used non-injection drugs and 90.1 % engaged in condomless vaginal or anal sex; 9.6 % tested HIV positive (of 481 with positive/negative results). Sexual partnerships were located in 33 (78.6 %) of 42 NYC communities, including 13 “high HIV-spread communities”, 7 “hidden bridging communities”, 0 “contained high HIV prevalence communities”, and 13 “latent HIV bridging communities”. Compared with latent HIV bridging communities, the population racial/ethnic composition was more likely (p < 0.0001) to be black or Hispanic in high HIV-spread communities and to be black in hidden bridging communities. High HIV-spread and hidden bridging communities may facilitate the maintenance and spread of heterosexually transmitted HIV in black and Hispanic populations in NYC. PMID:26558628

  18. 26 CFR 1.1045-1 - Application to partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... partner (as defined in paragraph (g)(3) of this section) of a partnership that sells QSB stock, may elect... partnerships and partners that elect to apply section 1045. Paragraph (i) of this section provides examples..., each eligible partner shall not recognize its distributive share of any partnership section 1045...

  19. Sexual differentiation in the distribution potential of northern jaguars (Panthera onca)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boydston, Erin E.; Lopez Gonzalez, Carlos A.

    2005-01-01

    We estimated the potential geographic distribution of jaguars in the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico by modeling the jaguar ecological niche from occurrence records. We modeled separately the distribution of males and females, assuming records of females probably represented established home ranges while male records likely included dispersal movements. The predicted distribution for males was larger than that for females. Eastern Sonora appeared capable for supporting male and female jaguars with potential range expansion into southeastern Arizona. New Mexico and Chihuahua contained environmental characteristics primarily limited to the male niche and thus may be areas into which males occasionally disperse.

  20. Sexual Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Statistics Resources on infectious diseases, reproductive health and sexual violence prevention. Sexually Transmitted Diseases Up-to-date Sexually ... Health Answers to women's and men's reproductive concerns Sexual Violence Prevention Sexual violence affects all people, particularly women ...

  1. Building Academic Partnerships in Psychology: The Psychology Partnerships Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathie, Virginia Andreoli

    2002-01-01

    Outlines how academic partnerships across educational levels can help psychology teachers address educational challenges, examining factors that facilitate the formation and maintenance of these partnerships and presenting the American Psychological Association's successful Psychology Partnerships Project: Academic Partnerships to Meet the…

  2. Evolution and human sexuality.

    PubMed

    Gray, Peter B

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this review is to put core features of human sexuality in an evolutionary light. Toward that end, I address five topics concerning the evolution of human sexuality. First, I address theoretical foundations, including recent critiques and developments. While much traces back to Darwin and his view of sexual selection, more recent work helps refine the theoretical bases to sex differences and life history allocations to mating effort. Second, I consider central models attempting to specify the phylogenetic details regarding how hominin sexuality might have changed, with most of those models honing in on transitions from a possible chimpanzee-like ancestor to the slightly polygynous and long-term bonded sociosexual partnerships observed among most recently studied hunter-gatherers. Third, I address recent genetic and physiological data contributing to a refined understanding of human sexuality. As examples, the availability of rapidly increasing genomic information aids comparative approaches to discern signals of selection in sexuality-related phenotypes, and neuroendocrine studies of human responses to sexual stimuli provide insight into homologous and derived mechanisms. Fourth, I consider some of the most recent, large, and rigorous studies of human sexuality. These provide insights into sexual behavior across other national samples and on the Internet. Fifth, I discuss the relevance of a life course perspective to understanding the evolution of human sexuality. Most research on the evolution of human sexuality focuses on young adults. Yet humans are sexual beings from gestation to death, albeit in different ways across the life course, and in ways that can be theoretically couched within life history theory.

  3. Asymmetric calmodulin distribution in the hypothalamus: role of sexual differentiation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Medina, Marco A; Reyes, Alejandro; Chavarría, María Eugenia; Vergara-Onofre, Marcela; Canchola, Enrique; Rosado, Adolfo

    2002-05-01

    The Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM) system plays important roles both in hypothalamic sexual differentiation and in the progesterone-induced facilitation of lordosis behavior in the adult rat. We recently showed sex-dependent differences in rat hypothalamic CaM levels, both in newborn and in adult animals. Here, we evaluated the presence of left-right hypothalamic asymmetries in CaM concentration in male and female rats, as well as the changes induced on these parameters by neonatal (1 h after birth) subcutaneous administration of tamoxifen (200 microg/rat) or testosterone (30 microg/rat). CaM was measured by RIA in each half of the hypothalamus (at 2, 6, 12, and 24 h and at 90 days after birth) in both control and treated animals. In untreated young rats (2-24 h after birth), CaM concentration was significantly higher in the right half of the hypothalamus of males, whereas in females, it was higher in the hypothalamic left half. Treatment of females with testosterone or tamoxifen to males, consistently reversed these results. In the hypothalamus of treated animals, we found higher CaM levels in the left half of males, as well as in the right half of females. In control adult females, CaM concentration was also higher in the left half of the hypothalamus, as it was in the right half of adult males. However, this asymmetry was lost after neonatal hormone manipulation. These results reinforce the role of CaM in the development of sex-related hypothalamic functions.

  4. Green Power Partnership Scope

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The U.S. EPA's Green Power Partnership is a voluntary partnership program designed to reduce the environmental impact of electricity generation by promoting renewable energy. Organizations can elect to join organization-wide or at the facility level.

  5. Green Power Partnership Requirements

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The U.S. EPA's Green Power Partnership is a voluntary partnership program designed to reduce the environmental impact of electricity generation by promoting renewable energy. To join, organizations must meet EPA's program requirements.

  6. Trends in the Distribution of Teacher Effectiveness in the Intensive Partnerships for Effective Teaching: Progress Report. Working Paper WR-1036-BMGF

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Jennifer L.; Baird, Matthew; Engberg, John; Hunter, Gerald Paul

    2014-01-01

    As part of its effective teaching initiative, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation partnered with three urban school districts across the U.S. and a group of four charter management organizations to undertake a strategic set of human capital reforms. A key objective of the "Intensive Partnerships for Effective Teaching" program was to…

  7. Using the Partnership Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilks, Bob

    This paper provides a case study of the use of the Partnership Model in the development of a film about female menopause. Not only are the film maker and the client involved in the trust based partnership relationship, but the film subjects and audience are also included in the information sharing process. Advantages of the Partnership Model…

  8. Partnerships That Work!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Don, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    This theme issue of the monthly Partnerships in Education (PIE) journal focuses on new collaborations, new educational challenges, and some examples of exemplary partnership programs at work in school districts across the country. Each of the 22 chapters was written by those who either direct or coordinate a partnership program. Partnership…

  9. Partnerships in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Perspectives, 1990

    1990-01-01

    This theme issue includes eight articles that discuss partnerships between schools, colleges, and businesses. The partnerships are members of the National Network for Educational Renewal (NNER). "School-University Partnerships: Fundamental Concepts" (J. I. Goodlad) outlines the concepts, agenda, and structure essential to…

  10. Incarceration and sexual risk: examining the relationship between men's involvement in the criminal justice system and risky sexual behavior.

    PubMed

    Knittel, Andrea K; Snow, Rachel C; Griffith, Derek M; Morenoff, Jeffrey

    2013-10-01

    In this study, we used data from Add Health Waves II and III to compare men who had been incarcerated to those who had not, and examined whether incarceration was associated with increased numbers of sexual partners and increased odds of concurrent partnerships. We used multivariate regression and propensity-score matching to compare sexual behavior of Wave III male respondents who had been incarcerated with those who had not, and compared sexual behavior at Wave II to identify differences in sexual behavior prior to incarceration. Incarceration was associated with an increased rate of lifetime sexual partnership, but this was attenuated by substance use. Criminal justice involvement was associated with increased odds of having partners who report concurrent partnerships, but no further increase was seen with incarceration. There were no significant sexual behavior differences prior to incarceration. These results suggest that the criminal justice system and substance use may interact to shape sexual behavior.

  11. 20 CFR 638.512 - Sexual behavior and harassment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sexual behavior and harassment. 638.512... establish rules concerning sexual behavior and harassment. See also §§ 638.539(g) and 638.813(a) of this... PROGRAM UNDER TITLE IV-B OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Center Operations § 638.512 Sexual...

  12. Choline incorporation by Schistosoma mansoni: distribution of choline metabolites during development and after sexual differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ancelin, M.L.; Torpier, G.; Vial, H.J.; Capron, A.

    1987-06-01

    Choline metabolism was investigated in Schistosoma mansoni during the main phases of its development, namely, schistosomula, 11- and 15-day-old worms, and adults. At the physiological choline concentration used in the assay (20 microM), betaine was, along with phosphatidylcholine, one of the most abundant choline metabolites, revealing considerable choline oxidation activity. Very little radioactivity was associated with CDP-choline, whereas a sustained incorporation into phosphocholine occurred. These results provide good evidence that CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase plays a regulatory role in the de novo pathway of phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis. During development, the incorporation of choline into its various metabolites was maximal in 11-day-old worms. At this stage, the oxidative pathway predominated over the Kennedy pathway, whereas at all other stages the de novo phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis was predominant. Furthermore, choline incorporation into betaine was much more important in the adult female worm than in the male, indicating a major difference in choline incorporation and distribution between the 2 sexes of the adult worms.

  13. Temporal changes and sexual differences in spatial distribution of Burbot in Lake Erie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stapanian, Martin A.; Witzel, Larry D.; Cook, Andy

    2013-01-01

    We used GIS mapping techniques to examine capture data for Burbot Lota lota from annual gill-net surveys in Canadian waters of Lake Erie during late August and September 1994–2011. Adult males were captured over a larger area (3–17% for ≥20% maximum yearly catch [MYC]) than adult females. More males than females were caught in the gill nets in 14 of the 15 study years. Collectively, these results support a hypothesis of greater activity by adult males during summer, when Burbot are actively feeding. The area of capture contracted by more than 60% (for ≥20% MYC) for both sexes during the time period, which is consistent with the documented decrease of the Burbot population in the lake. The sex ratio (females: males) varied over the time series but declined steadily from 0.97 in 2001 to 0.59 in 2011. The overlap in the capture areas of adult males and females was scale dependent. The depth distribution at which adult Burbot were caught did not change over the time series, and there was no difference in the median depths (about 30 m) at which adult male and female Burbot were caught. The last results are consistent with the Burbot's reliance on coldwater habitats. Additional research is recommended, including telemetry to describe daily and seasonal movements and assessment of gender bias in active and passive capture gear.

  14. Sexual Difficulties

    MedlinePlus

    ... and conditions Caregiving Wellness Staying active Mental health Sexual health Sexual difficulties Protecting yourself Safety and abuse Falls ... updates. Enter email address Submit Home > Healthy Aging > Sexual health Healthy Aging Sexual difficulties Learn more about men's ...

  15. Western Hemisphere Knowledge Partnerships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, T. F.

    2001-05-01

    Society in general, and geophysicists in particular, are challenged by problems and opportunities in the prospects for an additional three billion people on finite planet Earth by 2050 in a global economy four to six times larger than it is at present. A problem was identified by the Pilot Assessment of Global Ecosystems (PAGE): "If we choose to continue our current patterns of use, we face almost certain decline in the ability of ecosystems to yield their broad spectrum of benefits - from clean water to stable climate, fuel wood to food crops, timber to wildlife habitat." This is the issue of environmental sustainability. Another problem is the widening gap in wealth and health between affluent nations and impoverished countries. Every day each of the more than a billion people in the industrial nations produces goods and services worth nearly 60 dollars to meet their basic needs and "wants." This figure increases by about 85 cents annually. Every day each of the 600 million people in the least developed countries produces goods and services worth about 75 cents to meet their basic needs and limited wants. That number grows by less that a penny a day annually. This is the issue of economic prosperity and equity. By harnessing revolutionary technologies in communications to distribute expanding knowledge in the physical, chemical, and geophysical sciences and exploding knowledge in the biological and health sciences, a new vision for world society is brought within reach in The Knowledge Age. It is a society in which all of the basic human needs and an equitable share of human wants can be met while maintaining healthy, attractive, and biologically productive ecosystems. This society is environmentally sustainable, economically prosperous and equitable, and therefore likely to be politically stable. The time has arrived to fashion a strategy to pursue that vision. A knowledge-based and human-centered strategy will involve the discovery, integration, dissemination

  16. Sexuality and Physical Contact in National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project Wave 2

    PubMed Central

    McClintock, Martha K.; Waite, Linda J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Wave 2 of the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (NSHAP) includes new measures of sexual interest and behavior, as well as new measures of the context of sexual experience and the frequency and appeal of physical contact. This is the first time many of these constructs have been measured in a nationally representative sample. Method. We describe the new measures and compare the distributions of each across gender and age groups, in some cases by partnership status. Results. Two components of sexuality decrease with age among both men and women: frequency of finding an unknown person sexually attractive and receptivity to a partner’s sexual overtures. In contrast, the inclination to make one’s self sexually attractive to others was a more complicated function of partner status, gender, and age: partnered women and unpartnered men made the most effort, with the more effortful gender’s effort decreasing with age. Both men and women find nonsexual physical contact appealing but sexual physical contact is more appealing to men than women. Finally, two fifths of men and women report dissatisfaction with their partner’s frequency of caring behaviors that make later sexual interactions pleasurable, and a fifth of women and a quarter of men who had vaginal sex in the past year report dissatisfaction with amount of foreplay. Discussion. These data offer the opportunity to characterize sexual motivation in older adulthood more precisely and richly and to examine how the context of sexual experience and the nonsexual aspects of physical intimacy correlate with sexual behavior, enjoyment, and problems. PMID:25360027

  17. 26 CFR 1.734-1 - Optional adjustment to basis of undistributed partnership property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the basis of partnership property as the result of a distribution of property to a partner, unless the... and a distribution of partnership property is made, whether or not in liquidation of the partner's... partner. See § 1.460-4(k)(2)(iv)(D) for a rule determining the partnership's basis in a long-term...

  18. Partnerships with Academic Departments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Anthony M.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter describes how professional and continuing higher education units can develop and sustain successful partnerships with academic departments in order to deliver educational programs effectively to students.

  19. Ukraine Steam Partnership

    SciTech Connect

    Gurvinder Singh

    2000-02-15

    The Ukraine Steam Partnership program is designed to implement energy efficiency improvements in industrial steam systems. These improvements are to be made by the private plants and local government departments responsible for generation and delivery of energy to end-users. One of the activities planned under this program was to provide a two-day training workshop on industrial steam systems focusing on energy efficiency issues related to the generation, distribution, and consumption of steam. The workshop was geared towards plant managers, who are not only technically oriented, but are also key decision makers in their respective companies. The Agency for Rational Energy Use and Ecology (ARENA-ECO), a non-governmental, not-for-profit organization founded to promote energy efficiency and environmental protection in Ukraine, in conjunction with the Alliance staff in Kiev sent out invitations to potential participants in all the regions of Ukraine. The purpose of this report is the describe the proceedings from the workshop and provide recommendations from the workshop's roundtable discussion. The workshop was broken down into two main areas: (1) Energy efficient boiler house steam generation; and Energy efficient steam distribution and consumption. The workshop also covered the following topics: (1) Ukrainian boilers; (2) Water treatment systems; (3) A profile of UKRESCO (Ukrainian Energy Services Company); (4) Turbine expanders and electricity generation; (5) Enterprise energy audit basics; and (6) Experience of steam use in Donetsk oblast.

  20. Partnership Green Power Use Requirements

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The U.S. EPA's Green Power Partnership is a voluntary partnership program designed to reduce the environmental impact of electricity generation by promoting renewable energy. This pages details green power use requirements for Partnership.

  1. The Risk of Stable Partnerships: Associations between Partnership Characteristics and Unprotected Anal Intercourse among Men Who Have Sex with Men and Transgender Women Recently Diagnosed with HIV and/or STI in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Cambou, Mary C.; Perez-Brumer, Amaya G.; Segura, Eddy R.; Salvatierra, H. Javier; Lama, Javier R.; Sanchez, Jorge; Clark, Jesse L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Partnership type is an important factor associated with unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) and subsequent risk for HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STI). We examined the association of partnership type with UAI among men who have sex with men (MSM) and male-to-female transgender women (TGW) in Lima, Peru, recently diagnosed with HIV and/or STI. Methods We report data from a cross-sectional analysis of MSM and TGW recently diagnosed with HIV and/or STI in Lima, Peru between 2011 and 2012. We surveyed participants regarding UAI with up to their three most recent sexual partners according to partner type. Multivariable Generalized Estimate Equating (GEE) models with Poisson distribution were used to estimate prevalence ratios (PR) for UAI according to partner type. Results Among 339 MSM and TGW recently diagnosed with HIV and/or STI (mean age: 30.6 years, SD 9.0), 65.5% self-identified as homosexual/gay, 16.0% as bisexual, 15.2% as male-to-female transgender, and 3.3% as heterosexual. Participants provided information on 893 recent male or TGW partners with whom they had engaged in insertive or receptive anal intercourse: 28.9% stable partners, 56.4% non-stable/non-transactional partners (i.e. casual or anonymous), and 14.7% transactional partners (i.e. transactional sex client or sex worker). Unprotected anal intercourse was reported with 41.3% of all partners. In multivariable analysis, factors associated with UAI included partnership type (non-stable/non-transactional partner APR 0.73, [95% CI 0.59–0.91], transactional partner APR 0.53 [0.36–0.78], p<0.05) and the number of previous sexual encounters with the partner (>10 encounters APR 1.43 [1.06–1.92], p<0.05). Conclusion UAI was more commonly reported for stable partners and in partnerships with >10 sexual encounters, suggesting UAI is more prevalent in partnerships with a greater degree of interpersonal commitment. Further research assessing partner-level factors and behavior is

  2. Community College Partnership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Marjorie

    Community colleges must assume a proactive leadership role to develop strategies that establish and maintain partnerships with business and other community organizations. San Juan College (SJC) has forged partnerships with a variety of local organizations, including governmental, civic, business, educational, medical, and cultural groups.…

  3. Strategic Education Research Partnership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donovan, M. S., Ed.; Wigdor, A. K., Ed.; Snow, C. E., Ed.

    This book is a proposal for the Strategic Education Research Partnership (SERP), a large-scale coherent program of research and development carried out through a partnership between researchers and practitioners. The program would put the problems of educational practice at its center and focus on carrying research and development through all the…

  4. The Santa Ana Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cournoyer, David, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    One of the priority interests of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation is to connect the knowledge and resources of institutions with communities in order to improve the quality of life in community. Partnerships achieve uncommon results. In Santa Ana, California, an unusual partnership of public schools, community college, universities, community…

  5. Sexual Assault

    MedlinePlus

    Sexual assault is any sexual activity to which you haven't freely given your consent. This includes completed ... trust, a friend, an acquaintance, or a stranger. Sexual assault can affect your health in many ways. It ...

  6. Sexual Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Reproductive System Gynecomastia Help! Is This My Body? Male Reproductive System When Will I Start Developing? Why Are My ... Erection When Waking Up? Is My Penis Normal? Male Reproductive System Sexual Attraction and Orientation Sexual Harassment and Sexual ...

  7. Sexual Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Irregular. What's Going On? Pap Smears Pelvic Exams Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Sexual Attraction and Orientation Sexual Harassment and Sexual ... My Monthly Cycle Go Back to Normal With PCOS Treatment? For Guys Can I Stop Myself From ...

  8. Sexual Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... for a healthy life Mental health for men Sexual health for men Male infertility Prostate health Sexual problems ... updates. Enter email address Submit Home > Men's Health > Sexual health for men Men's Health This information in Spanish ( ...

  9. Sexual Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... healthy and enjoyable sex life at any age. Sex and aging Can older adults remain sexually active? ... from sexually transmitted infections. Talking to kids about sex Kids and sexuality — those words strike fear into ...

  10. Sexual Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... health include Fear of unplanned pregnancy Concerns about infertility Sexually transmitted diseases Chronic diseases such as cancer or heart disease Medicines that affect sexual desire or performance

  11. Mating-type distribution and genetic diversity of Cercospora sojina populations on soybean from Arkansas: evidence for potential sexual reproduction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hun; Newell, Annakay D; Cota-Sieckmeyer, Robyn G; Rupe, John C; Fakhoury, Ahmad M; Bluhm, Burton H

    2013-10-01

    Cercospora sojina causes frogeye leaf spot of soybean, which can cause serious economic losses in the United States. In this study, 132 C. sojina isolates were collected from six fields (from two counties, Cross and Crawford) in Arkansas. To determine mating type, a multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay was developed with primers specific for C. sojina. Of the 132 isolates, 68 isolates had the MAT1-1-1 idiomorph and 64 isolates had the MAT1-2 idiomorph; no isolates possessed both idiomorphs. Both mating types were present in a variety of spatial scales, including separate lesions on individual leaves. Clone-corrected data from eight microsatellites indicated that mating-type loci were present in approximately equal proportions in all populations analyzed, which suggests that Arkansas populations of C. sojina are undergoing cryptic sexual reproduction. All six populations evaluated had high genotypic diversity of 26 to 79%. In addition, among strains isolated from a single leaf, multiple and distinct haplotypes were associated with both mating types, supporting the hypothesis that sexual reproduction occurs within the populations. Most populations showed significant gametic disequilibrium but levels of disequilibrium were relatively low, particularly in populations from Crawford County. A low differentiation index (GST) was observed for all simple-sequence repeat markers across all populations. Furthermore, the value of G statistics between populations suggests that significant genetic exchange exists among the populations. Taken together, these results demonstrate that C. sojina populations from Arkansas are genetically diverse and most likely undergoing sexual reproduction.

  12. 26 CFR 1.707-3 - Disguised sales of property to partnership; general rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... be earned from those assets); (viii) That partnership distributions, allocation or control of... more than two years apart. (i) On February 1, 1992, I, J, and K form partnership IJK. On formation of... formation of the partnership over J's and K's share of the appreciation in the government securities...

  13. 76 FR 71255 - Application of Section 108(e)(8) to Indebtedness Satisfied by a Partnership Interest

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-17

    ...) of the Internal Revenue Code (Code) to partnerships and their partners. These regulations provide... be included in the distributive shares of the partners in the partnership immediately before such... regulations regarding the application of section 108(e)(8) to partnerships and their partners, including...

  14. 26 CFR 1.734-1 - Optional adjustment to basis of undistributed partnership property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... partnership property. 1.734-1 Section 1.734-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Distributions by A Partnership § 1.734-1 Optional adjustment to basis of undistributed partnership property. (a) General rule....

  15. 26 CFR 1.734-1 - Optional adjustment to basis of undistributed partnership property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... partnership property. 1.734-1 Section 1.734-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Distributions by A Partnership § 1.734-1 Optional adjustment to basis of undistributed partnership property. (a) General rule....

  16. 26 CFR 1.706-1 - Taxable years of partner and partnership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Taxable years of partner and partnership. 1.706...) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Partners and Partnerships § 1.706-1 Taxable years of partner and... year, a partner is required to include the partner's distributive share of partnership items set...

  17. Building Arts Partnerships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soper, Stephanie

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the activities of the Education Department at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, including the local education outreach program and the Partners in Education program promoting school-community partnerships. (SR)

  18. Creating Innovative Partnerships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polo, James E.; Rotchford, Louise M.; Setteducati, Paula M.

    1999-01-01

    Bell Atlantic Corporation offers an associate degree in applied science (telecommunications) to its employees through a consortium of community colleges. The NEXT STEP program has become a creative partnership of education, labor, and industry. (SK)

  19. Using the Partnership Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilks, Bob

    1977-01-01

    Demonstrates how the Partnership Model can be utilized in the real world by showing how it served as a guide during the production of a film on female menopause for the College of Human Medicine. (MH)

  20. CHP Partnership Partners

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Partners of EPA's Combined Heat and Power Partnership include federal, state, and local government agencies and private organizations such as energy users, energy service companies, CHP project developers and consultants, and equipment manufacturers.

  1. Engineering Capabilities and Partnerships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poulos, Steve

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the engineering capabilities at Johnson Space Center, The presentation also reviews the partnerships that have resulted in successfully designed and developed projects that involved commercial and educational institutions.

  2. DOE climate partnerships

    SciTech Connect

    Stoss, F.

    1995-12-31

    This article briefly describes US DOE partnerships, with electrical utilities and with US EPA and industry, which focus on reduction in greenhouse gasses. They are called `Climate Challenge` and `Climate Wise.`

  3. Sexual Harassment and Sexual Bulllying (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Sexual Harassment and Sexual Bullying KidsHealth > For Teens > Sexual Harassment and Sexual Bullying ... being sexually harassed or bullied. What Are Sexual Bullying and Harassment? Just like other kinds of bullying, ...

  4. Partnership with the customer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trachta, Gregory S.

    1992-01-01

    This discussion will recount some historical observations about establishing partnerships with the customer. It suggests that such partnerships are established as the natural evolutionary product of a continuous improvement culture. Those are warm, ethereal terms about a topic that some people think already suffers from an excess of hot air. We will focus on some real-world activities and workplace artifacts to show there are substantive concepts behind the TQM buzzwords.

  5. Perception of risk of HIV and sexual risk behaviors among University students: implication for planning interventions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The university environment offers great opportunity for HIV high-risk behaviors, including unsafe sex and multiple partnerships. Despite recently gained decline of the overall incidence of HIV infection, still significant proportion of youth population are at high risk of HIV infection. The aims of this study were to assess the perception of HIV risk and factors associated with risk perception among students at University of Gondar, Northwest Ethiopia. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted between February and April, 2012 among health science students. A total of 384 students were involved in the study using stratified sampling technique. Chi-square test and logistic regression analysis were employed. P-value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant for all cases. Results Of the total 384 participated students, 200(52.1%) were females. Out of the total study respondents, 202(52.6%) were sexually experienced. One hundred and nine (59.2%) out of 184 males and 93(46.5%) out of 200 females had had sexual experience. About 23(57.5%) of those age below 20 years, 70(52.2%) of 20-24 years old, and 13(61.9%) of those ages of 25 years or older were perceived themselves as if they have no chance of acquiring HIV infection. Students initiated sexual intercourse at early age (≤8 years) were significantly associated with having multiple partnerships (crude OR =3.6, p = 0.002 for male and crude OR = 1.7, p = 0.04 for female). Statistically significant difference was observed in the distribution of condom use during sexual intercourse among various age groups (p-value = 0.001). Sexual initiation at younger age, having multiple partnerships, inconsistent condom use and alcohol and/or drug abuse were significantly perceived as predictor for an increased risks for HIV infection. Conclusion Students were engaged in various HIV risk behaviors. Early sexual initiation and alcohol and/or drug abuse were important factors for having

  6. Distribution of sexual and asexual Ostracoda (Crustacea) from different altitudinal ranges in the Ordu region of Turkey: testing the Rapoport Rule.

    PubMed

    Külköylüoğlu, Okan; Sari, Necmettin; Akdemir, Derya; Yavuzatmaca, Mehmet; Altinbağ, Ceren

    2012-06-01

    We evaluated Rapoport's rule which states a negative correlation between species richness and altitude. To understand the relationship between altitude and reproductive modes (a/sexual) of non-marine ostracods, 166 aquatic bodies in Ordu region, Turkey were randomly sampled from July 11 to July 16, 2010. A total of 26 species of ostracods were found from 133 out of 166 sites. Except for one species (Heterocypris incongruens), the other 25 species were new reports for the region. Candona improvisa was also a new report for Turkish ostracod fauna. Three species (Psychrodromus olivaceus, H. incongruens, and C. neglecta) occurred most frequently as 43, 46, and 76 times, respectively. Canonical correspondence analyses exhibited two variables [Habitat type (p=0.014; F=2.171) and water temperature (p=0.018; F=2.248)] as having the most effect on species. Correlation of species' reproductive modes to those of environmental variables measured was not significant. UPGMA dendrogram displayed 15 most frequently occurring species into four clusters where most species (11) were asexual. Although a small group (asexual species without swimming setae) showed a tendency to habitat type and electrical conductivity, such variables are believed to play secondary role on species distribution. Highest species diversity (13 species) was observed at the range of 1200 and 1400 m (a.s.l.), where numbers of stations sampled was not the highest (22). Numbers of asexual species (19) were higher than the sexual (11) but there were no significant differences (p>0.05) between the frequencies of their occurrences at different altitudinal ranges. Accordingly, our findings do not support the Rapoport Rule. Results yield that reproductive modes of species (sexual and asexual) was not directly correlated to altitude or any environmental variables measured during this study. A better explanation of ostracod diversity appears to be suitability of habitats.

  7. Modelling the Impact of Condom Distribution on the Incidence and Prevalence of Sexually Transmitted Infections in an Adult Male Prison System

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Nick; McBryde, Emma; Kirwan, Amy; Stoové, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Aims To determine the effects of 1) a condom distribution program and 2) a condom distribution program combined with opt-out sexually transmitted infection (STI) screening on the transmission and prevalence of STIs in a prison system. Methods Using data from an implementation evaluation of a state-wide prison condom program and parameter estimates from available literature, a deterministic model was developed to quantify the incidence and prevalence of sexually transmitted HIV, hepatitis B, chlamydia, syphilis and gonorrhoea across 14 Victorian prisons. The model included individual prison populations (by longer (>2 years) or shorter sentence lengths) and monthly prisoner transfers. For each STI, simulations were compared: without any intervention; with a condom distribution program; and with a combined condom and opt-out STI screening at prison reception intervention program. Results Condoms reduced the annual incidence of syphilis by 99% (N = 66 averted cases); gonorrhoea by 98% (N = 113 cases); hepatitis B by 71% (N = 5 cases); chlamydia by 27% (N = 196 cases); and HIV by 50% (N = 2 cases every 10 years). Condom availability changed the in-prison epidemiology of gonorrhoea and syphilis from self-sustaining to levels unlikely to result in infection outbreaks; however, condoms did not reduce chlamydia prevalence below a self-sustaining level due to its high infectiousness, high prevalence and low detection rate. When combined with a screening intervention program, condoms reduced chlamydia prevalence further, but not below a self-sustaining level. The low prevalence of HIV and hepatitis B in Australian prisons meant the effects of condoms were predicted to be small. Conclusion Condoms are predicted to effectively reduce the incidence of STIs in prison and are predicted to control syphilis and gonorrhoea transmission, however even combined with a screening on arrival program may be insufficient to reduce chlamydia prevalence below self-sustaining levels. To control

  8. [Molecular epidemiology of Neisseria gonorrhoeae: effect of sex and sexual orientation on the distribution of gonococcal types].

    PubMed

    Kohl, P K; Henze, I; Kamionek, I; Krahl, D; Petzoldt, D

    1994-05-01

    Auxotype/serovar (A/S) classification enables precise characterisation of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. In the present study we evaluated whether sex and sexual preference of the patient influence the auxotype/serovar class of the infecting gonococcal strain. In male patients prototrophic/IB-3 was the most frequently isolated A/S class. By contrast, in female patients the A/S class (P)AH(U)/IA-1/2 was significantly (p < 0.005) more frequently isolated than in male patients. Analysis of our data according to sexual preference of the patients showed that in heterosexual patients the two mentioned A/S classes were leading, whereas in homo- and bisexual patients A/S classes prototrophic/IB-2 (p < 0.0001) and Pro/IB-2/16 (p < 0.0001) were isolated significantly more often. Our data are a strong indication that the host environment is also responsible for the selection of N. gonorrhoeae strains with certain typing characteristics.

  9. Energy Systems Integration Partnerships: NREL + CSIRO

    SciTech Connect

    2016-12-01

    This fact sheet highlights work done at the ESIF in partnership with CSIRO. The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Australia's science agency, has teamed up with NREL to evaluate advanced control solutions for integrating solar energy in hybrid distributed generation applications. NREL and CSIRO demonstrated a plug-and play microgrid controller at the ESIF and also tested other control techniques for integrating solar power with Australian and U.S. electrical distribution systems.

  10. 31 CFR 306.87 - Partnerships (including nominee partnerships).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... partnership must be executed by a general partner. Upon dissolution of a partnership, assignment by all living... dissolution. Upon voluntary dissolution, for any jurisdiction where a general partner may not act in...

  11. 31 CFR 306.87 - Partnerships (including nominee partnerships).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... partnership must be executed by a general partner. Upon dissolution of a partnership, assignment by all living... dissolution. Upon voluntary dissolution, for any jurisdiction where a general partner may not act in...

  12. 31 CFR 306.87 - Partnerships (including nominee partnerships).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... partnership must be executed by a general partner. Upon dissolution of a partnership, assignment by all living... dissolution. Upon voluntary dissolution, for any jurisdiction where a general partner may not act in...

  13. Religiosity and sexual involvement within adolescent romantic couples.

    PubMed

    LeJeune, Brenna C; Zimet, Gregory D; Azzouz, Faouzi; Fortenberry, J Dennis; Aalsma, Matthew C

    2013-09-01

    The impact of religiosity in adolescent romantic partnerships on sexual behavior was assessed. Data were obtained from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health reciprocated couples database using religious- and relationship-oriented variables to predict sexual involvement in 374 couples (748 participants). We found that individual- and couple-based religiosity impacted sexual behavior. These findings provide evidence for dyad religiosity as a component involved in the expression of sexual behavior in romantic relationships. The current results highlight the importance of incorporating a broad social perspective in order to understand the expression of adolescent sexual behavior.

  14. Gay and Lesbian Partnership: Evidence from California

    PubMed Central

    CARPENTER, CHRISTOPHER; GATES, GARY J.

    2008-01-01

    Much recent research on sexual minorities has used couples-based samples, which—by construction—provide no information on nonpartnered individuals. We present the first systematic empirical analysis of partnership and cohabitation among self-identified gay men and lesbians using two independent, large, population-wwbased data sources from California. These data indicate that 37%–46% of gay men and 51%–62% of lesbians aged 18–59 are in cohabiting partnerships (compared with 62% of heterosexual individuals in coresidential unions at comparable ages). Unlike previous research, we find that white and highly educated gay men and lesbians are more likely to be partnered, and we confirm that same-sex cohabiting partners in our data have demographic characteristics that are similar to California same-sex couples from Census 2000. We also present the first detailed analysis of officially registered domestic partnerships in California. We find that almost half of partnered lesbians are officially registered with the local or state government, while less than a quarter of partnered gay men are officially registered. We conclude with implications of our findings for couples-based research on gay men and lesbians, as well as recommendations for survey data collection. PMID:18939662

  15. An examination of the characteristics, concentration, and distribution of androgen receptor in rat testis during sexual maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Buzek, S.W.

    1989-01-01

    In these studies a nuclear exchange assay was established in rat testis in which exchange after 86 hours at 4{degree}C was greater than 85% complete and receptor was stable. Receptor concentration per DNA measured by exchange declined between 15 and 25 days of age in the rat testis, then increased 4-fold during sexual maturation. Proliferation of germ cells which had low receptor concentration appeared to account for the early decline in testicular receptor concentration, whereas increase in receptor number per Sertoli cell between 25 and 35 days of age contributed to the later increase. Detailed studies showed that other possible explanations for changes in receptor number were not likely. Androgen receptor dynamics in testicular cells showed rapid, specific uptake of ({sup 3}H)-testosterone that was easily blocked by unlabeled testosterone, and medroxyprogesterone acetate, but not as well as by the anti-androgens cyproterone acetate and hydroxyflutamide.

  16. The Evolution of a Female Genital Trait Widely Distributed in the Lepidoptera: Comparative Evidence for an Effect of Sexual Coevolution

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Víctor; Hernández-Baños, Blanca Estela; Cordero, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Background Sexual coevolution is considered responsible for the evolution of many male genital traits, but its effect on female genital morphology is poorly understood. In many lepidopterans, females become temporarily unreceptive after mating and the length of this refractory period is inversely related to the amount of spermatophore remaining in their genital tracts. Sperm competition can select for males that delay female remating by transferring spermatophores with thick spermatophore envelopes that take more time to be broken. These envelopes could select for signa, sclerotized sharp structures located within the female genital tract, that are used for breaking spermatophores. Thus, this hypothesis predicts that thick spermatophore envelopes and signa evolve in polyandrous species, and that these adaptations are lost when monandry evolves subsequently. Here we test the expected associations between female mating pattern and presence/absence of signa, and review the scant information available on the thickness of spermatophore envelopes. Methodology/Principal Findings We made a literature review and found information on female mating pattern (monandry/polyandry), presence/absence of signa and phylogenetic position for 37 taxa. We built a phylogenetic supertree for these taxa, mapped both traits on it, and tested for the predicted association by using Pagel's test for correlated evolution. We found that, as predicted by our hypothesis, monandry evolved eight times and in five of them signa were lost; preliminary evidence suggests that at least in two of the three exceptions males imposed monandry on females by means of specially thick spermatophore envelopes. Previously published data on six genera of Papilionidae is in agreement with the predicted associations between mating pattern and the characteristics of spermatophore envelopes and signa. Conclusions/Significance Our results support the hypothesis that signa are a product of sexually antagonistic

  17. 31 CFR 306.87 - Partnerships (including nominee partnerships).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... GOVERNING U.S. SECURITIES Assignments in Behalf of Private or Public Organizations § 306.87 Partnerships... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Partnerships (including nominee partnerships). 306.87 Section 306.87 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and...

  18. 31 CFR 306.87 - Partnerships (including nominee partnerships).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... GOVERNING U.S. SECURITIES Assignments in Behalf of Private or Public Organizations § 306.87 Partnerships... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Partnerships (including nominee partnerships). 306.87 Section 306.87 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and...

  19. Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LP DAAC) 25th Anniversary Recognition "A Model for Government Partnerships". LP DAAC "History and a Look Forward"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behnke, Jeanne; Doescher, Chris

    2015-01-01

    This presentation discusses 25 years of interactions between NASA and the USGS to manage a Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LPDAAC) for the purpose of providing users access to NASA's rich collection of Earth Science data. The presentation addresses challenges, efforts and metrics on the performance.

  20. Canadian ADL Partnership Lab

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-19

    WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Canadian Defense Academy,PO Box 17000 Station Forces ,Kingston ON CANADA K7K 7B4...CMP Canadian ADL Partnership Lab Presentation by CDA Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the... Canadian ADL Partnership Lab 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f

  1. Benefits of Green Power Partnership

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The U.S. EPA's Green Power Partnership is a voluntary partnership program designed to reduce the environmental impact of electricity generation by promoting renewable energy. Learn about the benefits of becoming a Green Power Partner.

  2. Green Power Partnership Eligible Organizations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The U.S. EPA's Green Power Partnership is a voluntary partnership program designed to reduce the environmental impact of electricity generation by promoting renewable energy. Many different types of organizations are eligible to become Partners.

  3. Green Power Partnership Resource Eligibility

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The U.S. EPA's Green Power Partnership is a voluntary partnership program designed to reduce the environmental impact of electricity generation by promoting renewable energy. This page details the resources EPA considers eligible green power.

  4. Healthy Sexuality

    MedlinePlus

    ... a sexual experience is safe, healthy, and enjoyable. Sexual health is a vital part of a person’s total well-being. Of course, sex is essential for reproduction, but it can also build intimacy in relationships ...

  5. Strategic Partnerships in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortega, Janet L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impacts of strategic partnerships between community colleges and key stakeholders; to specifically examine strategic partnerships; leadership decision-making; criteria to evaluate strategic partnerships that added value to the institution, value to the students, faculty, staff, and the local…

  6. The Promise of Transformative Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yendol-Hoppey, Diane

    2010-01-01

    The promise, potential, and problems associated with school-university partnerships interested in better preparing teachers for the challenges they face teaching in today's schools rest in educators' ability to actualize transformative practices within partnership contexts. To date, most partnerships have focused on less complex forms of…

  7. Towards a sexual ethics of rights and responsibilities.

    PubMed

    Dixon-Mueller, Ruth; Germain, Adrienne; Fredrick, Beth; Bourne, Kate

    2009-05-01

    Sexual rights as human rights encompass individual freedoms and social entitlements. Both depend for their realisation on equally important social responsibilities on the part of individuals, couples, families, other social institutions, and the State. The principle that all persons must understand their own sexual rights and responsibilities and respect the equal rights of others - particularly those of their sexual partners - informs our interpretation of the ethical basis of sexual behaviours. We propose a conceptual framework for defining a sexual ethics of equal rights and responsibilities pertaining to five dimensions of sexual behaviour: 1) sexual relationships and the right to choose one's partner; 2) sexual expression and the right to seek pleasure; 3) sexual consequences and the right to cooperation from one's partner; 4) sexual harm and the right to protection; and 5) sexual health and the right to information, education and health services. We suggest that the ethical principles presented here pertaining to sexual partnerships should be incorporated into sexuality education, sexual and reproductive health services, and social policies aimed at promoting the health and rights of all persons regardless of gender, marital status, sexual orientation, religion, ethnicity and other personal or group identities.

  8. Managing Movement as Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimbrell, Sinead

    2011-01-01

    The associate director of education at Hubbard Street Dance Chicago recounts her learning and teaching through managing the Movement as Partnership program. Included are detailed descriptions of encounters with teachers and students as they create choreography reflective of their inquiry into integrating dance and literacy arts curriculum in the…

  9. A Rewarding Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbott, Cheryl; Swanson, Marc

    2006-01-01

    A collaborating scientist--a rewarding addition to any high school science program--can help students collect and analyze data that either replicates or parallels the work of the partnering scientist. This type of partnership is beneficial for both students and scientists, and perhaps there has never been a better time to consider such a…

  10. Parks In Partnership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Sally-Jo

    1998-01-01

    More than 50 National Park Service (NPS) sites interpret Native cultures or early Native contact with Europeans. In about 30 of those, American Indians, Alaska Natives, or Native Hawaiians, in partnership with the NPS, present their own heritage and issues. Describes Native-run aspects of Sitka National Historical Park, Glacier National Park, and…

  11. Contracting with Teacher Partnerships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaten, Jessica; Kolderie, Ted

    This monograph describes the concept of school district contracts with teacher partnerships for educational services; taking the view of education as an industry, the document analyzes advantages, obstacles, and strategies of such a change. Section 1, "The Challenge," suggests that societal changes make an education industry outside the…

  12. The California Partnership Academies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raby, Marilyn

    The California Partnership Academies Program is a highly successful school/business collaboration that allows students who are at risk of not graduating from high school to see clearly the connection between school and the workplace. The following key components are discussed: (1) an at-risk student population made up largely of the educationally…

  13. Partnerships, Technology, and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Roy R.; Schlumpf, Jacob F., Jr.

    A major goal of the Shoreline School District is to develop partnerships with the community, other community agencies, and businesses. The development of a "Long Range Facilities Utilization Plan" led to a 10-year districtwide modernization program to enhance technology and instruction. Now at its midpoint, the design and development of…

  14. Partnership and Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Gene; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Fifteen short articles on partnerships describe job center networks in Wisconsin, cooperative education, Chrysler's dislocated worker program, behavior problems, dropout programs, computer literacy, a summer inservice institute, hazardous materials handling, small business incubators, parenting classes in prisons, at-risk youth, superintendent…

  15. Partnerships in Economic Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luterbach, Edward J.; Dary, Donald K.

    1988-01-01

    Many colleges in North America are taking a proactive role in community economic development to respond to changing economic conditions. This article explores the myriad of activities engaged in by Red Deer College, Alberta, Canada, by describing the partnerships themselves, their benefits, and the principles under which they operate. (Author)

  16. Partnership: Recycling $/$ Outdoor Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weir, Phil

    1996-01-01

    The Ottawa Board of Education (Ontario, Canada) has committed revenues generated by a districtwide recycling program to help fund the MacSkimming Outdoor Education Centre. A partnership between recycling and outdoor education is valuable in developing an environmental ethic among students and in finding new ways to fund outdoor education. (LP)

  17. A Transforming Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Susan

    2006-01-01

    Just a few years ago Jefferson Elementary School in San Diego County, California suffered from low test scores and a lackluster "science from workbooks approach" that was not motivating many in the 75% Hispanic and 50% learning-to-speak-English student body. A partnership program with the San Diego Natural History Museum called…

  18. Job Training Partnership Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tindall, Lloyd W.; Hedberg, Sally B.

    1987-01-01

    The Job Training Partnership Act, which provides money to programs preparing disadvantaged (including disabled) individuals for entry into the labor force, has helped special education students in such programs as the Special Education Local Plan Areas Job Project and the Day Training Activity Center at the Las Trampas School, Inc. in Lafayette,…

  19. Partnerships for Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathanson, Jeanne H., Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This journal issue focuses on cooperative partnership programs for the improvement of educational services to students with disabilities. The eight articles are: (1) "Partner-Based Prelinguistic Intervention: A Preliminary Report" by M. Jeanne Wilcox (which found the intervention procedures had a strong effect on mother-child dyads); (2)…

  20. Partnership School Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edison Project, New York, NY.

    This handbook describes the Edison Project, a private company that was formed in 1991 to establish partnerships with school districts across the United States. The Edison Project tailors Edison's school design to the local community's needs; upgrades school facilities and brings in sophisticated technology; takes responsibility for daily operation…

  1. An Academic Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horwedel, Dina M.

    2005-01-01

    Black and Hispanic studies are separate fields at most universities. However, at Baruch College, part of the City University of New York system, the Black and Hispanic studies minors are housed under the same roof. The somewhat unique partnership seems to be working, as the minors are among the most popular on the business-oriented campus. Dr.…

  2. Training Partnerships Keiretsu Style.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eidgahy, S. Y.; Shearman, John P.

    1995-01-01

    The fundamental principles of Keiretsu, a Japanese style of business alliance, were used to create a training partnership model that outlines a plan for implementation and a structure for monitoring. Discussion includes training program needs, purposes of learning in professional development programs, reasons for cooperative training, and the…

  3. Sexuality, Sexual Practices, and HIV Risk among Incarcerated African-American Women in North Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Farel, Claire E.; Parker, Sharon D.; Muessig, Kathryn E.; Grodensky, Catherine A.; Jones, Chaunetta; Golin, Carol E.; Fogel, Catherine I.; Wohl, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Women who have been in prison carry a greater lifetime risk of HIV for reasons that are not well understood. This effect is amplified in the Southeastern United States, where HIV incidence and prevalence is especially high among African American (AA) women. The role of consensual sexual partnerships in the context of HIV risk, especially same-sex partnerships, merits further exploration. Methods We conducted digitally recorded qualitative interviews with 29 AA women (15 HIV-positive, 14 HIV-negative) within three months after entry into the state prison system. We explored potential pre-incarceration HIV risk factors, including personal sexual practices. Two researchers thematically coded interview transcripts and a consensus committee reviewed coding. Results Women reported complex sexual risk profiles during the six months prior to incarceration, including sex with women as well as prior sexual partnerships with both men and women. Condom use with primary male partners was low and a history of transactional sex work was prevalent. These behaviors were linked to substance use, particularly among HIV-positive women. Conclusions Although women may not formally identify as bisexual or lesbian, sex with women was an important component of this cohort’s sexuality. Addressing condom use, heterogeneity of sexual practices, and partner concurrency among at-risk women should be considered for reducing HIV acquisition and preventing forward transmission in women with a history of incarceration. PMID:24183410

  4. Allatotropin-like neuropeptide in the cockroach abdominal nervous system: myotropic actions, sexually dimorphic distribution and colocalization with serotonin.

    PubMed

    Rudwall, A J; Sliwowska, J; Nässel, D R

    2000-12-04

    Allatotropin (AT) was isolated from the moth Manduca sexta as a peptide stimulating biosynthesis of juvenile hormone in the corpora allata, but has also been shown to be cardioactive in the same species. Here, we have investigated the presence and biological activity of AT-like peptide in the cockroaches Leucophaea maderae and Periplaneta americana with focus on abdominal ganglia and their target tissues. An antiserum to M. sexta AT was used for immunocytochemical mapping of neurons in the abdominal ganglia. A small number of interneurons and efferent neurons were found AT-like immunoreactive (AT-LI) in each of the abdominal ganglia. A prominent sexual dimorphism was detected in the terminal abdominal ganglion: in L. maderae the male ganglion there are approximately 18 AT-LI neurons with cell bodies posteriorly and efferent axons in the genital nerves; in the female ganglion 4-5 AT-LI cell bodies (with efferent axons) were found in the same region. Correlated with the extra efferents in males, the male accessory glands are richly supplied by AT-LI fibers and in females a less prominent innervation was seen in oviduct muscle. A similar dimorphism was seen in abdominal ganglia of P. americana. A sexual dimorphism was also detected in the abdominal ganglia A4-A6 of L. maderae. In each of these ganglia, approximately 8-10 large AT-LI neuronal cell bodies were found along the midline; in females these neurons have significantly larger cell bodies than in males. In both sexes, and both cockroach species, two large dorsal midline neurons were detected in A-5 and 6, which seem to send axons to the hindgut: the rectal pads of the hindgut are supplied by arborizing AT-LI axons. In males and females of both species, efferent AT-LI axons from midline neurons in A3-A6 supply the lateral heart nerves and other neurohemal release sites with arborizations. The efferent midline neurons of females contain colocalized serotonin-immunoreactivity. We tested the in vitro actions of M

  5. Meta-analysis identifies 13 new loci associated with waist-hip ratio and reveals sexual dimorphism in the genetic basis of fat distribution

    PubMed Central

    Heid, Iris M; Jackson, Anne U; Randall, Joshua C; Winkler, Thomas W; Qi, Lu; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Zillikens, M Carola; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Mägi, Reedik; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; White, Charles C; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Harris, Tamara B; Berndt, Sonja I; Ingelsson, Erik; Willer, Cristen J; Weedon, Michael N; Luan, Jian’An; Vedantam, Sailaja; Esko, Tõnu; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Kutalik, Zoltán; Li, Shengxu; Monda, Keri L; Dixon, Anna L; Holmes, Christopher C; Kaplan, Lee M; Liang, Liming; Min, Josine L; Moffatt, Miriam F; Molony, Cliona; Nicholson, George; Schadt, Eric E; Zondervan, Krina T; Feitosa, Mary F; Ferreira, Teresa; Allen, Hana Lango; Weyant, Robert J; Wheeler, Eleanor; Wood, Andrew R; Estrada, Karol; Goddard, Michael E; Lettre, Guillaume; Mangino, Massimo; Nyholt, Dale R; Purcell, Shaun; Smith, Albert Vernon; Visscher, Peter M; Yang, Jian; McCarroll, Steven A; Nemesh, James; Voight, Benjamin F; Absher, Devin; Amin, Najaf; Aspelund, Thor; Coin, Lachlan; Glazer, Nicole L; Hayward, Caroline; Heard-costa, Nancy L; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Johansson, Åsa; Johnson, Toby; Kaakinen, Marika; Kapur, Karen; Ketkar, Shamika; Knowles, Joshua W; Kraft, Peter; Kraja, Aldi T; Lamina, Claudia; Leitzmann, Michael F; McKnight, Barbara; Morris, Andrew P; Ong, Ken K; Perry, John R B; Peters, Marjolein J; Polasek, Ozren; Prokopenko, Inga; Rayner, Nigel W; Ripatti, Samuli; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Robertson, Neil R; Sanna, Serena; Sovio, Ulla; Surakka, Ida; Teumer, Alexander; van Wingerden, Sophie; Vitart, Veronique; Zhao, Jing Hua; Cavalcanti-Proença, Christine; Chines, Peter S; Fisher, Eva; Kulzer, Jennifer R; Lecoeur, Cecile; Narisu, Narisu; Sandholt, Camilla; Scott, Laura J; Silander, Kaisa; Stark, Klaus; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Teslovich, Tanya M; Timpson, Nicholas John; Watanabe, Richard M; Welch, Ryan; Chasman, Daniel I; Cooper, Matthew N; Jansson, John-Olov; Kettunen, Johannes; Lawrence, Robert W; Pellikka, Niina; Perola, Markus; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Alavere, Helene; Almgren, Peter; Atwood, Larry D; Bennett, Amanda J; Biffar, Reiner; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Bornstein, Stefan R; Buchanan, Thomas A; Campbell, Harry; Day, Ian N M; Dei, Mariano; Dörr, Marcus; Elliott, Paul; Erdos, Michael R; Eriksson, Johan G; Freimer, Nelson B; Fu, Mao; Gaget, Stefan; Geus, Eco J C; Gjesing, Anette P; Grallert, Harald; Gräßler, Jürgen; Groves, Christopher J; Guiducci, Candace; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hassanali, Neelam; Havulinna, Aki S; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Hicks, Andrew A; Hui, Jennie; Igl, Wilmar; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti; Kajantie, Eero; Kinnunen, Leena; Kolcic, Ivana; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Kroemer, Heyo K; Krzelj, Vjekoslav; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kvaloy, Kirsti; Laitinen, Jaana; Lantieri, Olivier; Lathrop, G Mark; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Luben, Robert N; Ludwig, Barbara; McArdle, Wendy L; McCarthy, Anne; Morken, Mario A; Nelis, Mari; Neville, Matt J; Paré, Guillaume; Parker, Alex N; Peden, John F; Pichler, Irene; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H; Platou, Carl G P; Pouta, Anneli; Ridderstråle, Martin; Samani, Nilesh J; Saramies, Jouko; Sinisalo, Juha; Smit, Jan H; Strawbridge, Rona J; Stringham, Heather M; Swift, Amy J; Teder-Laving, Maris; Thomson, Brian; Usala, Gianluca; van Meurs, Joyce B J; van Ommen, Gert-Jan; Vatin, Vincent; Volpato, Claudia B; Wallaschofski, Henri; Walters, G Bragi; Widen, Elisabeth; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Witte, Daniel R; Zgaga, Lina; Zitting, Paavo; Beilby, John P; James, Alan L; Kähönen, Mika; Lehtimäki, Terho; Nieminen, Markku S; Ohlsson, Claes; Palmer, Lyle J; Raitakari, Olli; Ridker, Paul M; Stumvoll, Michael; Tönjes, Anke; Viikari, Jorma; Balkau, Beverley; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Bergman, Richard N; Boeing, Heiner; Smith, George Davey; Ebrahim, Shah; Froguel, Philippe; Hansen, Torben; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hveem, Kristian; Isomaa, Bo; Jørgensen, Torben; Karpe, Fredrik; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Laakso, Markku; Lawlor, Debbie A; Marre, Michel; Meitinger, Thomas; Metspalu, Andres; Midthjell, Kristian; Pedersen, Oluf; Salomaa, Veikko; Schwarz, Peter E H; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Valle, Timo T; Wareham, Nicholas J; Arnold, Alice M; Beckmann, Jacques S; Bergmann, Sven; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boomsma, Dorret I; Caulfield, Mark J; Collins, Francis S; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Hattersley, Andrew T; Hofman, Albert; Hu, Frank B; Illig, Thomas; Iribarren, Carlos; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kao, W H Linda; Kaprio, Jaakko; Launer, Lenore J; Munroe, Patricia B; Oostra, Ben; Penninx, Brenda W; Pramstaller, Peter P; Psaty, Bruce M; Quertermous, Thomas; Rissanen, Aila; Rudan, Igor; Shuldiner, Alan R; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Timothy D; Syvanen, Ann-Christine; Uda, Manuela; Uitterlinden, André; Völzke, Henry; Vollenweider, Peter; Wilson, James F; Witteman, Jacqueline C; Wright, Alan F; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B; Deloukas, Panos; Frayling, Timothy M; Groop, Leif C; Haritunians, Talin; Hunter, David J; Kaplan, Robert C; North, Kari E; O’connell, Jeffrey R; Peltonen, Leena; Schlessinger, David; Strachan, David P; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Assimes, Themistocles L; Wichmann, H-Erich; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Stefansson, Kari; Cupples, L Adrienne; Loos, Ruth J F; Barroso, Inês; McCarthy, Mark I; Fox, Caroline S; Mohlke, Karen L; Lindgren, Cecilia M

    2011-01-01

    Waist-hip ratio (WHR) is a measure of body fat distribution and a predictor of metabolic consequences independent of overall adiposity. WHR is heritable, but few genetic variants influencing this trait have been identified. We conducted a meta-analysis of 32 genome-wide association studies for WHR adjusted for body mass index (comprising up to 77,167 participants), following up 16 loci in an additional 29 studies (comprising up to 113,636 subjects). We identified 13 new loci in or near RSPO3, VEGFA, TBX15-WARS2, NFE2L3, GRB14, DNM3-PIGC, ITPR2-SSPN, LY86, HOXC13, ADAMTS9, ZNRF3-KREMEN1, NISCH-STAB1 and CPEB4 (P = 1.9 × 10−9 to P = 1.8 × 10−40) and the known signal at LYPLAL1. Seven of these loci exhibited marked sexual dimorphism, all with a stronger effect on WHR in women than men (P for sex difference = 1.9 × 10−3 to P = 1.2 × 10−13). These findings provide evidence for multiple loci that modulate body fat distribution independent of overall adiposity and reveal strong gene-by-sex interactions. PMID:20935629

  6. Female sexuality.

    PubMed

    Rao, T S Sathyanarana; Nagaraj, Anil Kumar M

    2015-07-01

    Sex is a motive force bringing a man and a woman into intimate contact. Sexuality is a central aspect of being human throughout life and encompasses sex, gender identities and roles, sexual orientation, eroticism, pleasure, intimacy, and reproduction. Sexuality is experienced and expressed in thoughts, fantasies, desires, beliefs, attitudes, values, behaviors, practices, roles and relationships. Though generally, women are sexually active during adolescence, they reach their peak orgasmic frequency in their 30 s, and have a constant level of sexual capacity up to the age of 55 with little evidence that aging affects it in later life. Desire, arousal, and orgasm are the three principle stages of the sexual response cycle. Each stage is associated with unique physiological changes. Females are commonly affected by various disorders in relation to this sexual response cycle. The prevalence is generally as high as 35-40%. There are a wide range of etiological factors like age, relationship with a partner, psychiatric and medical disorders, psychotropic and other medication. Counseling to overcome stigma and enhance awareness on sexuality is an essential step in management. There are several effective psychological and pharmacological therapeutic approaches to treat female sexual disorders. This article is a review of female sexuality.

  7. Female sexuality

    PubMed Central

    Rao, T.S. Sathyanarana; Nagaraj, Anil Kumar M.

    2015-01-01

    Sex is a motive force bringing a man and a woman into intimate contact. Sexuality is a central aspect of being human throughout life and encompasses sex, gender identities and roles, sexual orientation, eroticism, pleasure, intimacy, and reproduction. Sexuality is experienced and expressed in thoughts, fantasies, desires, beliefs, attitudes, values, behaviors, practices, roles and relationships. Though generally, women are sexually active during adolescence, they reach their peak orgasmic frequency in their 30 s, and have a constant level of sexual capacity up to the age of 55 with little evidence that aging affects it in later life. Desire, arousal, and orgasm are the three principle stages of the sexual response cycle. Each stage is associated with unique physiological changes. Females are commonly affected by various disorders in relation to this sexual response cycle. The prevalence is generally as high as 35–40%. There are a wide range of etiological factors like age, relationship with a partner, psychiatric and medical disorders, psychotropic and other medication. Counseling to overcome stigma and enhance awareness on sexuality is an essential step in management. There are several effective psychological and pharmacological therapeutic approaches to treat female sexual disorders. This article is a review of female sexuality. PMID:26330647

  8. Partnership in Computational Science

    SciTech Connect

    Huray, Paul G.

    1999-02-24

    This is the final report for the "Partnership in Computational Science" (PICS) award in an amount of $500,000 for the period January 1, 1993 through December 31, 1993. A copy of the proposal with its budget is attached as Appendix A. This report first describes the consequent significance of the DOE award in building infrastructure of high performance computing in the Southeast and then describes the work accomplished under this grant and a list of publications resulting from it.

  9. The Global Soil Partnership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanarella, Luca

    2015-07-01

    The Global Soil Partnership (GSP) has been established, following an intensive preparatory work of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) in collaboration with the European Commission (EC), as a voluntary partnership coordinated by the FAO in September 2011 [1]. The GSP is open to all interested stakeholders: Governments (FAO Member States), Universities, Research Organizations, Civil Society Organizations, Industry and private companies. It is a voluntary partnership aiming towards providing a platform for active engagement in sustainable soil management and soil protection at all scales: local, national, regional and global. As a “coalition of the willing” towards soil protection, it attempts to make progress in reversing soil degradation with those partners that have a genuine will of protecting soils for our future generations. It openly aims towards creating an enabling environment, despite the resistance of a minority of national governments, for effective soil protection in the large majority of the countries that are genuinely concerned about the rapid depletion of their limited soil resources.

  10. Compulsory sexuality.

    PubMed

    Emens, Elizabeth F

    2014-02-01

    Asexuality is an emerging identity category that challenges the common assumption that everyone is defined by some type of sexual attraction. Asexuals--those who report feeling no sexual attraction to others--constitute one percent of the population, according to one prominent study. In recent years, some individuals have begun to identify as asexual and to connect around their experiences interacting with a sexual society. Asexuality has also become a protected classification under the antidiscrimination law of one state and several localities, but legal scholarship has thus far neglected the subject. This Article introduces asexuality to the legal literature as a category of analysis, an object of empirical study, and a phenomenon of medical science. It then offers a close examination of the growing community of self-identified asexuals. Asexual identity has revealing intersections with the more familiar categories of gender, sexual orientation, and disability, and inspires new models for understanding sexuality. Thinking about asexuality also sheds light on our legal system. Ours is arguably a sexual law, predicated on the assumption that sex is important. This Article uses asexuality to develop a framework for identifying the ways that law privileges sexuality. Across various fields, these interactions include legal requirements of sexual activity, special carve-outs to shield sexuality from law, legal protections from others' sexuality, and legal protections for sexual identity. Applying this framework, the Article traces several ways that our sexual law burdens, and occasionally benefits, asexuals. This Article concludes by closely examining asexuality's prospects for broader inclusion into federal, state, and local antidiscrimination laws.

  11. Sexual pain.

    PubMed

    Boardman, Lori A; Stockdale, Colleen K

    2009-12-01

    Sexual pain is an underrecognized and poorly treated constellation of disorders that significantly impact affected women and their partners. Recognized as a form of chronic pain, sexual pain disorders are heterogeneous and include dyspareunia (superficial and deep), vaginismus, vulvodynia, vestibulitis, and noncoital sexual pain disorder. Women too often tolerate pain in the belief that this will meet their partners' needs. This article provides a review of the terminology and definition of the condition, theories on the pathophysiology, diagnostic considerations, and recommendations on the management of female sexual pain.

  12. Internet Sexualities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döring, Nicola

    The term “internet sexuality” (or OSA, online sexual activities) refers to sexual-related content and activities observable on the internet (cf. Adams, Oye, & Parker, 2003; Cooper, McLoughlin, & Campbell, 2000; Leiblum & Döring, 2002). It designates a variety of sexual phenomena (e.g., pornography, sex education, sexual contacts) related to a wide spectrum of online services and applications (e.g., websites, online chat rooms, peer-to-peer networks). If an even broader range of computer networks - such as the Usenet or bulletin board systems - is included in this extensional definition, one speaks of “online sexuality” or “cybersexuality.”

  13. Sexual assault.

    PubMed

    Dunn, S F; Gilchrist, V J

    1993-06-01

    Estimates are that one in four women will be sexually assaulted at some time during her life. For the victim, it is a life-changing, traumatic event. This paper reviews both the immediate and long-term care of the sexual assault victim. For the victim seen immediately after the assault, physicians must provide empathic, nonjudgmental care that puts the victim back in control of her life. It is essential that the physician provide continued support for the victim and her family through the recovery process. The medical presentations that should prompt the physician to inquire about undisclosed sexual assault and the social and cultural myths that promote sexual assault are reviewed.

  14. Adolescent sexuality.

    PubMed

    Grant, L M; Demetriou, E

    1988-12-01

    The consequences of adolescent sexual behavior are an enormous burden both for the adolescent and society. The problem is not that teens are sexually active but rather that they have little preparation and guidance in developing responsible sexual behavior. Developmentally, adolescents reach physical maturity before they are cognitively able to appreciate the consequences of their behavior. A teenager's primary source of information regarding sexuality is his or her peer group, all of whom are experiencing and reinforcing the same behaviors. The family, the major socializer of other behaviors, is not as powerful a force in shaping responsible sexual behavior because of parental discomfort with sex education and sexual discussions. This is the result of a social milieu in which sex is frequently portrayed but rarely linked with responsible behavior or accurate, nonjudgmental information. The pediatric practitioner is in an ideal position to intervene in these dynamics. In the office, the practitioner can provide accurate sexual information to both parents and adolescents, support parental-child communication on sexual issues, and provide appropriate services or referral. In the community, the practitioner can advocate for school-based sex education as well as act as an information resource. Finally, the practitioner can advocate for the health care needs for adolescents on a national level, supporting legislation that provides adolescents with information and access to services necessary to make responsible sexual decisions.

  15. NOAA Big Data Partnership RFI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Beaujardiere, J.

    2014-12-01

    In February 2014, the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) issued a Big Data Request for Information (RFI) from industry and other organizations (e.g., non-profits, research laboratories, and universities) to assess capability and interest in establishing partnerships to position a copy of NOAA's vast data holdings in the Cloud, co-located with easy and affordable access to analytical capabilities. This RFI was motivated by a number of concerns. First, NOAA's data facilities do not necessarily have sufficient network infrastructure to transmit all available observations and numerical model outputs to all potential users, or sufficient infrastructure to support simultaneous computation by many users. Second, the available data are distributed across multiple services and data facilities, making it difficult to find and integrate data for cross-domain analysis and decision-making. Third, large datasets require users to have substantial network, storage, and computing capabilities of their own in order to fully interact with and exploit the latent value of the data. Finally, there may be commercial opportunities for value-added products and services derived from our data. Putting a working copy of data in the Cloud outside of NOAA's internal networks and infrastructures should reduce demands and risks on our systems, and should enable users to interact with multiple datasets and create new lines of business (much like the industries built on government-furnished weather or GPS data). The NOAA Big Data RFI therefore solicited information on technical and business approaches regarding possible partnership(s) that -- at no net cost to the government and minimum impact on existing data facilities -- would unleash the commercial potential of its environmental observations and model outputs. NOAA would retain the master archival copy of its data. Commercial partners would not be permitted to charge fees for access to the NOAA data they receive, but

  16. Civil partnerships five years on.

    PubMed

    Ross, Helen; Gask, Karen; Berrington, Ann

    2011-01-01

    The Civil Partnership Act 2004, which came into force in December 2005 allowing same-sex couples in the UK to register their relationship for the first time, celebrated its fifth anniversary in December 2010. This article examines civil partnership in England and Wales, five years on from its introduction. The characteristics of those forming civil partnerships between 2005 and 2010 including age, sex and previous marital/civil partnership status are examined. These are then compared with the characteristics of those marrying over the same period. Further comparisons are also made between civil partnership dissolutions and divorce. The article presents estimates of the number of people currently in civil partnerships and children of civil partners. Finally the article examines attitudes towards same-sex and civil partner couples both in the UK and in other countries across Europe.

  17. 26 CFR 1.47-6 - Partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Partnerships. 1.47-6 Section 1.47-6 Internal... Credit for Investment in Certain Depreciable Property § 1.47-6 Partnerships. (a) In general—(1) Disposition or cessation in hands of partnership. If a partnership disposes of any partnership section...

  18. 26 CFR 1.47-6 - Partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Partnerships. 1.47-6 Section 1.47-6 Internal... Credit for Investment in Certain Depreciable Property § 1.47-6 Partnerships. (a) In general—(1) Disposition or cessation in hands of partnership. If a partnership disposes of any partnership section...

  19. 26 CFR 1.47-6 - Partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Partnerships. 1.47-6 Section 1.47-6 Internal... Credit for Investment in Certain Depreciable Property § 1.47-6 Partnerships. (a) In general—(1) Disposition or cessation in hands of partnership. If a partnership disposes of any partnership section...

  20. On the relationship among social anxiety, intimacy, sexual communication, and sexual satisfaction in young couples.

    PubMed

    Montesi, Jennifer L; Conner, Bradley T; Gordon, Elizabeth A; Fauber, Robert L; Kim, Kevin H; Heimberg, Richard G

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to better understand why socially anxious individuals experience less sexual satisfaction in their intimate partnerships than nonanxious individuals, a relationship that has been well documented in previous research. Effective communication between partners is an important predictor of relationship satisfaction. Sexual communication, an important aspect of communication between romantic partners, is especially sensitive for couples given the vulnerability inherent in being open about sexual issues. Because socially anxious individuals characteristically report fear of evaluation or scrutiny by others, we hypothesized that the process of building intimacy by sharing personal information about oneself with one's partner, including when this information relates to one's sexuality and/or the sexual domain of the relationship, would be particularly difficult for socially anxious individuals. The present study examined fear of intimacy and sexual communication as potential mediators of the relationship between higher social anxiety and lower sexual satisfaction. Self-report data were collected from 115 undergraduate students and their partners in monogamous, heterosexual, committed relationships of at least 3 months duration. Multilevel path modeling revealed that higher social anxiety predicted higher fear of intimacy, which predicted lower satisfaction with open sexual communication, which, in turn, predicted lower sexual satisfaction. Additionally, there was evidence of mediation as there were significant indirect effects of the antecedent variables on sexual satisfaction. The path model had excellent fit. Implications for social anxiety, intimate relationships, and couples therapy are discussed.

  1. Alternatives to Certain Phthalates Partnership

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The alternatives assessment partnership project on alternatives to certain phthalates seeks to eplore the human health and environmental profiles of eight action plan phthalates and functional alternatives

  2. Sexuality (and Lack Thereof) in Adolescence and Early Adulthood: A Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Boislard, Marie-Aude; van de Bongardt, Daphne; Blais, Martin

    2016-03-17

    Youth sexuality has been primarily studied with a focus on its potential public health issues, such as sexually transmitted infections and unwanted pregnancies, and its comorbidity with other risky behaviors. More recently, it has been studied as a normative step in romantic partnerships, either pre- or post-marital, as well as outside the context of romantic involvement. In this paper, we review the extensive literature on sexuality in adolescence and early adulthood both within and outside romantic relationships (i.e., casual sexual relationships and experiences; CSREs). Furthermore, the recent recognition of youth sexuality as a developmental task has led to a renewed interest from scholars in youth who abstain from sexual encounters, whether deliberately or not. A brief overview of the literature on cultural differences in sexuality, and sexual-minority youth sexual development is also provided. This paper concludes by suggesting future directions to bring the field of youth sexuality and romantic relationships forward.

  3. Sexuality (and Lack Thereof) in Adolescence and Early Adulthood: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Boislard, Marie-Aude; van de Bongardt, Daphne; Blais, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Youth sexuality has been primarily studied with a focus on its potential public health issues, such as sexually transmitted infections and unwanted pregnancies, and its comorbidity with other risky behaviors. More recently, it has been studied as a normative step in romantic partnerships, either pre- or post-marital, as well as outside the context of romantic involvement. In this paper, we review the extensive literature on sexuality in adolescence and early adulthood both within and outside romantic relationships (i.e., casual sexual relationships and experiences; CSREs). Furthermore, the recent recognition of youth sexuality as a developmental task has led to a renewed interest from scholars in youth who abstain from sexual encounters, whether deliberately or not. A brief overview of the literature on cultural differences in sexuality, and sexual-minority youth sexual development is also provided. This paper concludes by suggesting future directions to bring the field of youth sexuality and romantic relationships forward. PMID:26999225

  4. Sexual Preference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Commission on the Observance of International Women's Year, Washington, DC.

    This document considers sexual preference as it specifically relates to women. Divided into two parts, the document presents a fact sheet about lesbianism and contains a workshop resource guide on sexual preference. The fact sheet, arranged in a question-answer format, focuses on the following concerns: (1) lesbianism as a woman's issue; (2) legal…

  5. Sexual prejudice.

    PubMed

    Herek, Gregory M; McLemore, Kevin A

    2013-01-01

    Despite shifts toward greater acceptance in U.S. public opinion and policy, lesbian, gay, and bisexual people remain widely stigmatized. This article reviews empirical research on sexual prejudice, that is, heterosexuals' internalization of cultural stigma, manifested in the form of negative attitudes toward sexual minorities and same-sex desires and behaviors. After briefly reviewing measurement issues, we discuss linkages between sexual prejudice and religion, gender, sexuality, and related variables, and consider how the cultural institutions encompassing these domains create a social context within which individual expressions of prejudice can meet important psychological needs. These include needs for securing social acceptance, affirming values that are central to one's self-concept, and avoiding anxiety and other negative emotions associated with threats to self-esteem. We conclude by discussing factors that may motivate heterosexuals to reduce their own sexual prejudice, including intergroup contact, as well as avenues for future empirical inquiry.

  6. Partnership implementation research

    PubMed Central

    Solberg, Leif I.; Glasgow, Russell E.; Unützer, Jürgen; Jaeckels, Nancy; Oftedahl, Gary; Beck, Arne; Maciosek, Michael V.; Crain, A. Lauren

    2014-01-01

    Background Translational research is increasingly important as academic health centers transform themselves to meet new requirements of NIH funding. Most attention has focused on T1 translation studies (bench to bedside) with considerable uncertainty about how to enhance T2 (effectiveness trials) and especially T3 (implementation studies). Objective To describe an innovative example of a T3 study, conducted as partnership research with the leaders of a major natural experiment in Minnesota to improve the primary care of depression. Methods All health plans in the state have agreed on a new payment model to support clinics that implement the well-evidenced collaborative care model for depression in the DIAMOND Initiative (Depression Improvement Across Minnesota: Offering a New Direction). The DIAMOND Study was developed in an ongoing partnership with Initiative leaders from seven health plans, 85 clinics, and a regional quality improvement collaborative to evaluate the implementation and its impacts on patients and other stakeholders. We agreed upon a staggered implementation, multiple baseline research design, utilizing the concepts of practical clinical trials and engaged scholarship and have collaborated on all aspects of conducting the study, including joint identification of patient and clinic survey recipients. Results Complex study methods have worked well through 20 months because of the commitment of all stakeholders to both the Initiative and study. Over 1,500 patient subjects have been recruited from health plan information delivered weekly and 99.7% of 316 physicians and administrators from all participating clinical organizations have completed Study surveys. Conclusions Partnership research can greatly facilitate translational research studies. PMID:20508531

  7. Partnership Teaching: Our Own Growth; Partnership School Council.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirtle, Sarah

    2002-01-01

    Strategies to implement partnership teaching in the classroom include considering unsuccessful attempts at negotiating social situations as mistakes rather than misbehavior, introducing Gandhi's concept of truthful love, and using nonviolent communication in conflict resolution. A partnership school council involves all students in school…

  8. Steps to Join Green Power Partnership

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The U.S. EPA's Green Power Partnership is a voluntary partnership program designed to reduce the environmental impact of electricity generation by promoting renewable energy. This page details steps organizations should take to join the Partnership.

  9. NASA International Environmental Partnerships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Pattie; Valek, Susan

    2010-01-01

    For nearly five decades, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been preeminent in space exploration. NASA has landed Americans on the moon, robotic rovers on Mars, and led cooperative scientific endeavors among nations aboard the International Space Station. But as Earth's population increases, the environment is subject to increasing challenges and requires more efficient use of resources. International partnerships give NASA the opportunity to share its scientific and engineering expertise. They also enable NASA to stay aware of continually changing international environmental regulations and global markets for materials that NASA uses to accomplish its mission. Through international partnerships, NASA and this nation have taken the opportunity to look globally for solutions to challenges we face here on Earth. Working with other nations provides NASA with collaborative opportunities with the global science/engineering community to explore ways in which to protect our natural resources, conserve energy, reduce the use of hazardous materials in space and earthly applications, and reduce greenhouse gases that potentially affect all of Earth's inhabitants. NASA is working with an ever-expanding list of international partners including the European Union, the European Space Agency and, especially, the nation of Portugal. Our common goal is to foster a sustainable future in which partners continue to explore the universe while protecting our home planet's resources for future generations. This brochure highlights past, current, and future initiatives in several important areas of international collaboration that can bring environmental, economic, and other benefits to NASA and the wider international space community.

  10. Successful VET Partnerships in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guenther, John; Kilpatrick, Sue

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports findings of the first phase of a study conducted to investigate the factors that contribute to the success of partnerships between vocational education and training (VET) providers and community/industry, and the processes partnerships employ to produce quality learning outcomes for individuals and other stakeholders, including…

  11. Interdependence through Partnerships: Transforming Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simone, Beverly S.

    At Wisconsin's Madison Area Technical College (MATC), both external and internal partnerships are a fundamental part of instructional programming. As the need for technological and mathematical competence in the workforce has increased, partnerships between the college and business and industry have become more important and represent an…

  12. Concluding Observations on Successful Partnerships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spangler, Mary S.

    2002-01-01

    States that most successful partnerships between community colleges and business and industry have several common elements, and that they also face certain consistent challenges that must be overcome if they are to persist and flourish. Discusses the types of challenges experienced and elements necessary for establishing a successful partnership.…

  13. A Partnership Raises Healthier Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maloney, Rick; Banks, Patti; Eyres, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    A school district in western Washington commits to developing physically fit and healthy students, not only as a means of enhancing learning but as a whole child goal in its own right. This is a report on how it does so in partnership with its community, believing that it is only through such a partnership that it can reach its goals. The central…

  14. Strategic Partnerships in International Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treat, Tod; Hartenstine, Mary Beth

    2013-01-01

    This chapter provides a framework and recommendations for development of strategic partnerships in a variety of cultural contexts. Additionally, this study elucidates barriers and possibilities in interagency collaborations. Without careful consideration regarding strategic partnerships' approaches, functions, and goals, the ability to…

  15. 26 CFR 1.704-4 - Distribution of contributed property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Partners and Partnerships § 1.704-4 Distribution of contributed property... distribution of such property to another partner within five years of its contribution to the partnership in an...) and § 1.704-3 if the distributed property had been sold by the partnership to the distributee...

  16. Molecular Phylogeny of the Leafy Liverwort Lejeunea (Porellales): Evidence for a Neotropical Origin, Uneven Distribution of Sexual Systems and Insufficient Taxonomy

    PubMed Central

    Heinrichs, Jochen; Dong, Shanshan; Schäfer-Verwimp, Alfons; Pócs, Tamás; Feldberg, Kathrin; Czumaj, Aleksandra; Schmidt, Alexander R.; Reitner, Joachim; Renner, Matt A. M.; Hentschel, Joern; Stech, Michael; Schneider, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Background Lejeunea is a largely epiphytic, subcosmopolitan liverwort genus with a complex taxonomic history. Species circumscriptions and their relationships are subject to controversy; biogeographic history and diversification through time are largely unknown. Methodology and Results We employed sequences of two chloroplast regions (trnL-trnF, rbcL) and the nuclear ribosomal ITS region of 332 accessions to explore the phylogeny of the Harpalejeunea-Lejeunea-Microlejeunea complex. Lejeunea forms a well-supported clade that splits into two main lineages corresponding to L. subg. Lejeunea and L. subg. Crossotolejeunea. Neotropical accessions dominate early diverging lineages of both main clades of Lejeunea. This pattern suggests an origin in the Neotropics followed by several colonizations from the Neotropics into the Paleotropics and vice versa. Most Afro-Madagascan clades are related to Asian clades. Several temperate Lejeunea radiations were detected. Eighty two of the 91 investigated Lejeunea species could be identified to species level. Of these 82 species, 54 were represented by multiple accessions (25 para- or polyphyletic, 29 monophyletic). Twenty nine of the 36 investigated species of L. subg. Lejeunea were monoicous and 7 dioicous. Within L. subg. Crossotolejeunea, 15 of the 46 investigated species were monoicous and 31 dioicous. Some dioicous as well as some monoicous species have disjunct ranges. Conclusions/Significance We present the first global phylogeny of Lejeunea and the first example of a Neotropical origin of a Pantropical liverwort genus. Furthermore, we provide evidence for the Neotropics as a cradle of Lejeunea lineages and detect post-colonization radiations in Asia, Australasia, Afro-Madagascar and Europe. Dioicy/monoicy shifts are likely non-randomly distributed. The presented phylogeny points to the need of integrative taxonomical studies to clarify many Lejeunea binomials. Most importantly, it provides a framework for future studies on

  17. The Impact of Condom Use Negotiation Self-Efficacy and Partnership Patterns on Consistent Condom Use among College-Educated Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nesoff, Elizabeth D.; Dunkle, Kristin; Lang, Delia

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to explore the impact of condom negotiation self-efficacy, interpersonal factors, and sensational factors on condom use behavior among a population of college-educated women with different patterns and types of sexual partner. We administered an online questionnaire capturing sexual behavior, partnership patterns, perceived…

  18. Teenage Sexuality

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pediatrician Ages & Stages Prenatal Baby Toddler Preschool Gradeschool Teen Dating & Sex Fitness Nutrition Driving Safety School Substance Abuse Young Adult Healthy Children > Ages & Stages > Teen > Dating & Sex > Teenage Sexuality Ages & Stages Listen Español Text Size ...

  19. An innovative partnership for national environmental assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shaw, D.M.; Field, D.W.; Holm, T.M.; Jennings, M.D.; Sturdevant, J.A.; Thelin, G.P.; Worthy, L.D.

    1993-01-01

    Four federal environmental programs: EMAP (USEPA), GAP (USFWS), C-CAP (NOAA), NAWQA (USGS) have formed a partnership with EROS Data Center (USGS) to facilitate the development of baseline land characteristics information for the conterminous U.S. Each of the respective programs brings to the group unique experience and expertise. Despite emphasis on different environmental issues, together we have identified common requirements for source satellite data, preprocessing, spectral clustering, ancillary data, data management and distribution. We are also developing a research agenda to support this initiative and future efforts of this partnership. The short-term goal of out effort is the joint acquisition and preprocessing of recent Landsat TM images for the conterminous U.S. To date, images have been identified for acquisition, and preliminary plans have been made for preprocessing. The long-term goal for this group is collaborative research and development of a flexible and functional land characteristics database for use by our programs and others. This partnership demonstrates that national environmental programs within multiple government agencies can work effectively together to achieve common goals and reduce overall cost.

  20. Scientific developments within the Global Flood Partnership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Groeve, Tom; Alfieri, Lorenzo; Thielen, Jutta

    2015-04-01

    More than 90 scientists, end users, and decision makers in the field of flood forecasting, remote sensing, hazard and risk assessment and emergency management collaborate in the Global Flood Partnership (GFP). The Partnership, launched in 2014, aims at the development of flood observational and modelling infrastructure, leveraging on existing initiatives for better predicting and managing flood disaster impacts and flood risk globally. Scientists collaborate in the GFP in different pillars, respectively focused on (1) development of tools and systems for global flood monitoring (Flood Toolbox), (2) applying the tools for publishing near real-time impact-based flood awareness information (Flood Observatory), and (3) collecting flood maps and impact information in a distributed database (Flood Record). The talk will focus on concrete collaboration results in 2014 and 2015, showing the added value of collaborating under a partnership. These include an overview of 10 services, 5 tools (algorithms or software) and 4 datasets related to global flood forecasting and observation. Through the various results (on interoperability, standards, visualization, integration and system design of integrated systems), it will be shown that a user-centric approach can lead to effective uptake of research results, rapid prototype development and experimental services that fill a gap in global flood response.

  1. Values and sexual behaviour in central and eastern europe.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Robin; Realo, Anu; Kwiatkowska, Anna; Kozlova, Alexandra; Luu, Lan Anh Nguyen; Nizharadze, George

    2002-01-01

    Despite the profusion of social cognitive models for the prediction of sexual behaviour, we have only limited knowledge as to the role of individual values in predicting risky sexual activity. This study assessed the relationship between a recently developed value structure and sexual behaviour in the context of rising HIV infection in central and eastern Europe. Five hundred and three respondents (business people, doctors and nurses) from Estonia, Georgia, Hungary, Poland and Russia completed Schwartz's Portrait Values Questionnaire and reported their condom use, partnership history and record of sexual disease. Results indicated that values had a moderate but consistent relationship with sexual behaviour, with riskier sexual activity reported by those high on Openness to Change, Hedonism and Self-Enhancement. These findings are discussed in the context of the need for culturally sensitive interventions in order to tackle the growing HIV epidemic in this region.

  2. The AMTEX Partnership

    SciTech Connect

    Lemon, D.K.

    1993-03-01

    The American Textile Partnership, as its name implies, is a collaborative effort between the DOE national labs and industry-related R&D/educational institutions. The purpose of AMTEX is to promote R&D that enhance the competitiveness of the integrated textile industry (i.e., fibers, textiles, sewn/fabricated products). The industry-related organizations bring a vital perspective of industry needs in addition to their own R&D capabilities. The DOE labs bring broad R&D capabilities and perspectives from other areas of research application. The strong synergy between industry and DOE will enable this collaboration to significantly impact industry competitiveness while focusing and strengthening, the labs` capabilities consistent with DOE`s mission. There are three main components in AMTEX: DOE/ER oversight; the Operating Committee, which is composed a Laboratory Board and an Industry Board; and five Technology Area Coordination Teams (TACTs).

  3. The AMTEX Partnership

    SciTech Connect

    Lemon, D.K.

    1993-01-01

    The American Textile Partnership, as its name implies, is a collaborative effort between the DOE national labs and industry-related R D/educational institutions. The purpose of AMTEX is to promote R D that enhance the competitiveness of the integrated textile industry (i.e., fibers, textiles, sewn/fabricated products). The industry-related organizations bring a vital perspective of industry needs in addition to their own R D capabilities. The DOE labs bring broad R D capabilities and perspectives from other areas of research application. The strong synergy between industry and DOE will enable this collaboration to significantly impact industry competitiveness while focusing and strengthening, the labs' capabilities consistent with DOE's mission. There are three main components in AMTEX: DOE/ER oversight; the Operating Committee, which is composed a Laboratory Board and an Industry Board; and five Technology Area Coordination Teams (TACTs).

  4. Rape, sex partnership, and substance use consequences in women veterans.

    PubMed

    Booth, Brenda M; Mengeling, Michelle; Torner, James; Sadler, Anne G

    2011-06-01

    The association of rape history and sexual partnership with alcohol and drug use consequences in women veterans is unknown. Midwestern women veterans (N = 1,004) completed a retrospective telephone interview assessing demographics, rape history, substance abuse and dependence, depression, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). One third met lifetime criteria for substance use disorder (SUD), half reported lifetime completed rape, a third childhood rape, one quarter in-military rape, 11% sex with women. Lifetime SUD was higher for women with rape history (64% vs. 44%). Women with women as sex partners had significantly higher rates of all measures of rape, and also lifetime substance use disorder. Postmilitary rape, sex partnership, and current depression were significantly associated with lifetime SUD in multivariate models (odds ratio = 2.3, 3.6, 2.1, respectively). Many women veterans have a high need for comprehensive mental health services.

  5. Sexual sadism in sexual offenders and sexually motivated homicide.

    PubMed

    Briken, Peer; Bourget, Dominique; Dufour, Mathieu

    2014-06-01

    This article gives a clinically oriented overview of forensically relevant forms of sexual sadism disorder and its specific relationship to sexual homicide. In sexual homicide perpetrators, peculiar patterns of sexual sadism may be a motivational pathway to kill. Sexual sadism increases the risk for reoffending in sexual offenders. Through psychotherapy and pharmacological interventions, treatment of sadistic sex offenders has to consider special characteristics that may be different from those of nonsadistic sex offenders. Many of these offenders share a combination of sexual sadistic motives and an intact self-regulation, sometimes combined with a high level of sexual preoccupation.

  6. Characteristics of Age-discordant Partnerships Associated with HIV Risk Among Young South African Women (HPTN 068)

    PubMed Central

    Ritchwood, Tiarney D.; Hughes, James P.; Jennings, Larissa; MacPhail, Catherine; Williamson, Brian; Selin, Amanda; Kathleen, Kahn; Gómez-Olivé, F. Xavier; Pettifor, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    Objective Sexual liaisons between older men and younger women have been linked to greater risk of HIV acquisition. This study aims to: 1) identify psychosocial and behavioral factors associated with age-discordant (partner ≥ 5 years older) versus age-concordant partnerships (−1sexual behavior. Methods We used generalized estimating equations to analyze responses from 656 sexually-experienced females (aged 13-20 years) from rural Mpumalanga province. Results Partner age discordance was associated with greater odds of reporting both more frequent sex (adjusted odd ratio [aOR] = 1.77, 95% CI 1.20-2.60) and having a partner with concurrent partnerships (aOR = 1.77, 95% CI 1.22-2.57). Age-discordant partnerships were associated with greater odds of: casual partnerships (aOR 1.50, 95% CI 1.06-2.13), having a partner with concurrent partnerships (aOR 1.71, 95% CI 1.19-2.46) and more frequent intercourse (i.e., having sex at least 2 or 3 times per month) (aOR 2.04, 95% CI 1.39-3.00). They were associated with lower odds of reporting condom use at last sex (aOR 0.70, 95% CI 0.50-0.98) and always using condoms (aOR 0.53, 95% CI 0.32-0.88) in age-discordant partnerships. Conclusion Our findings suggest that a history of age-discordant partnerships, and to a lesser extent having an age-discordant partner, is linked to HIV risk among young South African women; however, the link between partner age discordance and HIV risk may be more strongly related to the characteristics of age-discordant partnerships than to characteristics of young women who form such partnerships. PMID:26977748

  7. More than just someone to inject drugs with: injecting within primary injection partnerships

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Meghan D.; Bates, Anna; Andrew, Erin; Hahn, Judith; Page, Kimberly; Maher, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies have shown intimate injection partners engage in higher rates of syringe and injecting equipment sharing. We examined the drug use context and development of injection drug use behaviors within intimate injection partnerships. Methods In-depth interviews (n=18) were conducted with both members of nine injecting partnerships in Sydney, Australia. Content analysis identified key domains related to the reasons for injecting with a primary injection partner and development of drug injection patterns. Main Findings Most partnerships (n=5) were also sexual; three were blood-relatives and one a friend dyad. The main drug injected was heroin (66%) with high rates of recent sharing behaviors (88%) reported within dyads. Injecting within a primary injection partnership provided perceived protection against overdose events, helped reduce stress, increased control over when, where, and how drugs were used, and promoted the development of an injecting pattern where responsibilities could be shared. Unique to injecting within primary injection partnerships was the social connection and companionship resulted in a feeling of fulfillment while also blinding one from recognizing risky behavior. Conclusions Findings illuminated the tension between protection and risks within primary injection partnerships. Primary injection partnerships provide a potential platform to expand risk reduction strategies. PMID:26460140

  8. 46 CFR 67.35 - Partnership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Partnership. 67.35 Section 67.35 Shipping COAST GUARD... Citizenship Requirements for Vessel Documentation § 67.35 Partnership. A partnership meets citizenship... recreational endorsement, at least 50 percent of the equity interest in the partnership is owned by...

  9. 19 CFR 141.39 - Partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Partnerships. 141.39 Section 141.39 Customs Duties... (CONTINUED) ENTRY OF MERCHANDISE Powers of Attorney § 141.39 Partnerships. (a)(1) General. A power of attorney granted by a partnership shall state the names of all members of the partnership. One member...

  10. 46 CFR 67.35 - Partnership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Partnership. 67.35 Section 67.35 Shipping COAST GUARD... Citizenship Requirements for Vessel Documentation § 67.35 Partnership. A partnership meets citizenship... recreational endorsement, at least 50 percent of the equity interest in the partnership is owned by...

  11. 46 CFR 67.35 - Partnership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Partnership. 67.35 Section 67.35 Shipping COAST GUARD... Citizenship Requirements for Vessel Documentation § 67.35 Partnership. A partnership meets citizenship... recreational endorsement, at least 50 percent of the equity interest in the partnership is owned by...

  12. 19 CFR 141.39 - Partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Partnerships. 141.39 Section 141.39 Customs Duties... (CONTINUED) ENTRY OF MERCHANDISE Powers of Attorney § 141.39 Partnerships. (a)(1) General. A power of attorney granted by a partnership shall state the names of all members of the partnership. One member...

  13. 46 CFR 67.35 - Partnership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Partnership. 67.35 Section 67.35 Shipping COAST GUARD... Citizenship Requirements for Vessel Documentation § 67.35 Partnership. A partnership meets citizenship... recreational endorsement, at least 50 percent of the equity interest in the partnership is owned by...

  14. 19 CFR 141.39 - Partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Partnerships. 141.39 Section 141.39 Customs Duties... (CONTINUED) ENTRY OF MERCHANDISE Powers of Attorney § 141.39 Partnerships. (a)(1) General. A power of attorney granted by a partnership shall state the names of all members of the partnership. One member...

  15. 46 CFR 67.35 - Partnership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Partnership. 67.35 Section 67.35 Shipping COAST GUARD... Citizenship Requirements for Vessel Documentation § 67.35 Partnership. A partnership meets citizenship... recreational endorsement, at least 50 percent of the equity interest in the partnership is owned by...

  16. 19 CFR 141.39 - Partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... all its Customs business. (2) Limited partnership. A power of attorney granted by a limited partnership need only state the names of the general partners who have authority to bind the firm unless the... attorney. For this purpose, a partnership or limited partnership means any business association...

  17. 19 CFR 141.39 - Partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... all its Customs business. (2) Limited partnership. A power of attorney granted by a limited partnership need only state the names of the general partners who have authority to bind the firm unless the... attorney. For this purpose, a partnership or limited partnership means any business association...

  18. The Rhetoric and Reality of Partnership Working

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dhillon, Jaswinder K.

    2005-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of the policy rhetoric of partnership and the reality of the process of partnership working using data from a qualitative case study of a sub-regional partnership. The purpose of the partnership is to widen participation in post-16 learning in the Black Country, a part of the Midlands in England. Data collected…

  19. Sexual behaviors among women living with HIV in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Samantha; Gardner, Sandra; Loutfy, Mona; Light, Lucia; Tharao, Wangari; Rourke, Sean B; Burchell, Ann N

    2017-05-01

    Understanding the sexual activities and partnerships of women living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) remains important to promote healthy sexuality and to reduce the transmission of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. We described sexual behaviors of women living with HIV enrolled in an ongoing study in Ontario, Canada. Data were available from 582 women who self-completed a sexual behavior questionnaire between 2010 and 2012. Nearly half (46.1%) of women reported a sexual partner in the preceding three months; women less likely to be sexually active were older, Black/African, separated, divorced, widowed, single, and unemployed. Most sexually active women had one partner (76.4%), a regular partner (75.9%), male (96.2%) partner(s), and partners who were HIV-negative or unknown HIV status (75.2%). Women were more likely to use a condom with HIV-negative/status unknown partners (81.3%) than with HIV-positive partners (58.6%; p   =   .008). Only 8.0% of sexually active women reported condomless sex with a discordant HIV-negative/status unknown partner when their viral load was detectable. Overall, most women living with HIV were sexually inactive or engaged in sexual activities that were low risk for HIV transmission.

  20. 26 CFR 301.6501(o)-2 - Special rules for partnership items of federally registered partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., address, and taxpayer identification number of both the partner and the partnership. The statement shall... partner. In the case of a partnership having a “pass through” entity (i.e., partnership, electing small... partnership, has two partners, Partnerships W and X. The partners of W are A and B, who are individuals, and...

  1. Child Sexual Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enter ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here Child Sexual Abuse Public This section is for Veterans, General Public, Family, & Friends Child Sexual Abuse What is child sexual abuse? Child sexual abuse ...

  2. Healthy Aging -- Sexual Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthy Aging This information in Spanish ( en español ) Sexual health More information on sexual health Many older women ... Protecting yourself Return to top More information on Sexual health Read more from womenshealth.gov Sexually Transmitted Infections ...

  3. HIV Serodisclosure and Sexual Behavior During International Travel.

    PubMed

    Truong, Hong-Ha M; Chen, Yea-Hung; Grasso, Michael; Robertson, Tyler; Tao, Luke; Fatch, Robin; Curotto, Alberto; McFarland, Willi; Grant, Robert M; Reznick, Olga; Raymond, H Fisher; Steward, Wayne T

    2016-07-01

    When traveling internationally, HIV serodisclosure and knowledge of partners' serostatus were hampered by the lack of a common language. Condomless anal intercourse was less likely to occur in partnerships where HIV serostatus was not disclosed or known. Taken together, these observations suggest that language barriers may affect sexual decision making.

  4. Green Power Partnership Program Overview

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The U.S. EPA's Green Power Partnership is a voluntary program designed to reduce the environmental impact of electricity generation by promoting renewable energy. This page provides a brief program overview, including vision and accomplishments.

  5. Green Power Partnership Program Initiatives

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's Green Power Partnership has a number of initiatives that focus on the collective green power efforts within specific sectors and renewable energy procurement strategies, which provide recognition opportunities for Partners and increase awareness.

  6. F-Gas Partnership Programs

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Provides basic information and resources for the Fluorinated Gas Partnership Programs, which were launched as a joint effort by EPA and industry groups to reduce the amount of fluorinated gases emitted through a variety of industrial processes.

  7. Networking the Global Maritime Partnership

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-13

    NETWORKING THE GLOBAL MARITIME PARTNERSHIP ix years after Admiral Michael Mullen, then Chief of Naval Operations, pro- posed his “thousand-ship navy...concept at the Seventeenth International Seapower Symposium at the U.S. Naval War College in 2005, his notion of a Global Maritime Partnership is... global commons.2 Real-world operations, especially in the Pacific Rim, have demonstrated that networking maritime forces is crucial to the effectiveness

  8. Adolescent sexual activity.

    PubMed

    Braverman, P K; Strasburger, V C

    1993-11-01

    Adolescents are becoming sexually active at younger ages. One half of the adolescents in the United States are sexually active. This article reviews adolescent sexual activity, including rates of sexual activity, sexual practices, gay and lesbian youth, and factors affecting the initiation of sexual activity. In addition, adolescent pregnancy, with possible outcomes and effects on teen parents and their offspring, is discussed.

  9. Partnerships with the Deans: Delivery of the "Whole Product."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Laurie L.; Munn-Fremon, Cheryl

    1995-01-01

    The origins and expansion of the University of Michigan Information Technology Division (ITD) partnership with academic units is described. The program, which began with the university's largest academic unit, features distributed computing and support services. Lessons have been learned concerning deans' attitudes about computing technology and…

  10. The Healthy Homes Partnership: A Cooperative Extension Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Laura B.; Peek, Gina G.

    2013-01-01

    This article highlights the accomplishments of the Healthy Homes Partnership, which recently celebrated its 10th anniversary. Since the program began in 1999, funds totaling $2.7 million have been distributed to 34 states and Virgin Islands Extension programs through a competitive process. Extension professionals have used the funds as seed grants…

  11. Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Brian McPherson

    2006-03-31

    The Southwest Partnership on Carbon Sequestration completed its Phase I program in December 2005. The main objective of the Southwest Partnership Phase I project was to evaluate and demonstrate the means for achieving an 18% reduction in carbon intensity by 2012. Many other goals were accomplished on the way to this objective, including (1) analysis of CO{sub 2} storage options in the region, including characterization of storage capacities and transportation options, (2) analysis and summary of CO{sub 2} sources, (3) analysis and summary of CO{sub 2} separation and capture technologies employed in the region, (4) evaluation and ranking of the most appropriate sequestration technologies for capture and storage of CO{sub 2} in the Southwest Region, (5) dissemination of existing regulatory/permitting requirements, and (6) assessing and initiating public knowledge and acceptance of possible sequestration approaches. Results of the Southwest Partnership's Phase I evaluation suggested that the most convenient and practical ''first opportunities'' for sequestration would lie along existing CO{sub 2} pipelines in the region. Action plans for six Phase II validation tests in the region were developed, with a portfolio that includes four geologic pilot tests distributed among Utah, New Mexico, and Texas. The Partnership will also conduct a regional terrestrial sequestration pilot program focusing on improved terrestrial MMV methods and reporting approaches specific for the Southwest region. The sixth and final validation test consists of a local-scale terrestrial pilot involving restoration of riparian lands for sequestration purposes. The validation test will use desalinated waters produced from one of the geologic pilot tests. The Southwest Regional Partnership comprises a large, diverse group of expert organizations and individuals specializing in carbon sequestration science and engineering, as well as public policy and outreach. These partners include 21 state

  12. Sexual Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... grow older. By Mayo Clinic Staff As you age, sex isn't the same as it was in ... work for you and your partner. At any age, emotional issues can affect your sexuality. Many older couples report greater satisfaction with their sex life because they have fewer distractions, more time ...

  13. Sexual Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... lack of interest loss of orgasm worry or anxiety that interferes with sex reduced frequency of sex physical obstacles arising from a disease or health condition. The Most Common Types of Sexual Problems in Older Adults For women, age-related changes due to menopause include: lack ...

  14. Sexual dimorphism in flowering plants.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Spencer C H; Hough, Josh

    2013-01-01

    Among dioecious flowering plants, females and males often differ in a range of morphological, physiological, and life-history traits. This is referred to as sexual dimorphism, and understanding why it occurs is a central question in evolutionary biology. Our review documents a range of sexually dimorphic traits in angiosperm species, discusses their ecological consequences, and details the genetic and evolutionary processes that drive divergence between female and male phenotypes. We consider why sexual dimorphism in plants is generally less well developed than in many animal groups, and also the importance of sexual and natural selection in contributing to differences between the sexes. Many sexually dimorphic characters, including both vegetative and flowering traits, are associated with differences in the costs of reproduction, which are usually greater in females, particularly in longer-lived species. These differences can influence the frequency and distribution of females and males across resource gradients and within heterogeneous environments, causing niche differences and the spatial segregation of the sexes. The interplay between sex-specific adaptation and the breakdown of between-sex genetic correlations allows for the independent evolution of female and male traits, and this is influenced in some species by the presence of sex chromosomes. We conclude by providing suggestions for future work on sexual dimorphism in plants, including investigations of the ecological and genetic basis of intraspecific variation, and genetic mapping and expression studies aimed at understanding the genetic architecture of sexually dimorphic trait variation.

  15. Romance and sex: pre-marital partnership formation among young women and men, Pune district, India.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Mallika; Garda, Laila; Kanade, Savita; Jejeebhoy, Shireen; Ganatra, Bela

    2006-11-01

    Using qualitative and survey data in a rural and an urban slum setting in Pune district, India, this paper describes patterns of pre-marital romantic partnerships among young people aged 15-24, in spite of norms that discourage opposite-sex interaction before marriage. 25-40% of young men and 14-17% of young women reported opposite-sex friends. Most young people devised strategies to interact with others, largely from the same neighbourhood. There were wide gender differences with regard to making or receiving romantic proposals, having a romantic partner and experiencing hand-holding, kissing and sexual relations. For those who engaged in sexual relations, the time from the onset of the partnership to having sexual relations was short. Sex most often took place without protection or communication, and for a disturbing minority of young women only after persuasion or without consent. Among those who were unmarried, a large percentage had expected to marry their romantic partner, but for a third of young women and half of young men the relationship had been discontinued. Partnership formation often leads to physical intimacy, but intimacy should be wanted, informed and safe. Findings call for programmes that inform youth in non-threatening, non-judgmental and confidential ways, respect their sexual rights and equip them to make safe choices and negotiate wanted outcomes.

  16. Distributions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowers, Wayne A.

    This monograph was written for the Conference of the New Instructional Materials in Physics, held at the University of Washington in summer, 1965. It is intended for students who have had an introductory college physics course. It seeks to provide an introduction to the idea of distributions in general, and to some aspects of the subject in…

  17. Prescribing and partnership with patients

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Christine; Blenkinsopp, Alison; Raynor, David K

    2012-01-01

    There have been widespread changes in society and the roles of professionals. This change is also reflected in health care, where there is now acceptance of the need to involve patients in decision making. In prescribing specifically, the concordance agenda was developed alongside these initiatives to encourage improved medication taking and reduce wastage. However the extent to which these partnerships are delivered in practice remains unclear. This paper explores some of the issues to be considered when preparing patients and professionals for partnership and summarizes the limited evidence of barriers to, and benefits of, this approach. Firstly patients must be given the confidence, skills and knowledge to be partners. They need information about medicines, provided in ways known to be acceptable to them. Likewise professionals may need new skills to be partners. They need to understand the patient agenda and may need training and support to change the ways in which they consult with patients. There are also practical issues such as the perceived increase in time taken when consulting in partnership mode, room layout, computer interfaces and record keeping. Health care professionals other than doctors are also expected to behave in partnership mode, whether this is as prescribers in their own right or in supporting the prescribing of others. Whilst much has been claimed for the benefit of partnership approaches, hard evidence is limited. However whilst there is still much more to understand there will be no going back to the paternalistic model of the mid 20th century. PMID:22621201

  18. Puberty and adolescent sexuality.

    PubMed

    Fortenberry, J Dennis

    2013-07-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Puberty and Adolescence". Sexuality emerges as a major developmental element of puberty and the adolescent years that follow. However, connecting the sexuality that emerges with puberty and elements of adult sexuality is difficult because much adolescent sexuality research addresses the transition to partnered sexual behaviors (primarily coitus) and consequences such as unplanned pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections. This review proposes a framework of an expanded understanding of puberty and adolescent sexuality from the perspective of four hallmarks of adult sexuality: sexual desire; sexual arousal; sexual behaviors; and, sexual function. This approach thus addresses important gaps in understanding of the ontogeny of sex and the continuum of sexuality development from adolescence through the adult lifespan.

  19. Pathological buying and partnership status.

    PubMed

    Müller, Astrid; de Zwaan, Martina; Mitchell, James E; Zimmermann, Tanja

    2016-05-30

    This pilot study investigated the partnership status and the level of pathological buying (PB) in 157 female patients with PB and 1153 women from a German population-based sample. Slightly more than half of both samples were currently living with a partner. The results suggest a protective effect of being in a couple relationship in the representative sample. In contrast, having a partner was not related to the severity of PB among patients. Future studies should address the question of whether the characteristics and quality of partnership have an impact on the severity and course of PB, and vice versa.

  20. The Value of Strategic Partnerships

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, Josh; Narayan, Amit; McNutt, Ty

    2015-02-10

    Strong strategic partnerships can be the difference between those technologies that only achieve success in the lab and those that actually break into the marketplace. Two ARPA-E awardees—AutoGrid and APEI—have forged strategic partnerships that have positioned their technologies to achieve major success in the market. This video features remarks from ARPA-E Technology-to-Market Advisor Josh Gould and interviews with technologists at AutoGrid and APEI, who each tell the story of how their company leveraged relationships with strategic partners to broaden their customer base and bring their technology to life.

  1. The Value of Strategic Partnerships

    ScienceCinema

    Gould, Josh; Narayan, Amit; McNutt, Ty

    2016-07-12

    Strong strategic partnerships can be the difference between those technologies that only achieve success in the lab and those that actually break into the marketplace. Two ARPA-E awardees—AutoGrid and APEI—have forged strategic partnerships that have positioned their technologies to achieve major success in the market. This video features remarks from ARPA-E Technology-to-Market Advisor Josh Gould and interviews with technologists at AutoGrid and APEI, who each tell the story of how their company leveraged relationships with strategic partners to broaden their customer base and bring their technology to life.

  2. Green Power Partnership Events and Webinars

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's Green Power Partnership hosts variety of events, such as webinars and presentations at conferences, on a regular basis. Topics include the Green Power Partnership, green power technologies and products, and information on procuring green power.

  3. EPA Leadership in the Global Mercury Partnership

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Global Mercury Partnership is a voluntary multi-stakeholder partnership initiated in 2005 to take immediate actions to protect human health and the environment from the releases of mercury and its compounds to the environment.

  4. 77 FR 74121 - Limited Liability Partnerships (LLPs)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ...; ] FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION 11 CFR Part 110 Limited Liability Partnerships (LLPs) AGENCY: Federal Election... the treatment of limited liability partnerships (``LLPs'') for purposes of the Federal Election... Federal Election Commission, Attn.: Robert M. Knop, Assistant General Counsel, 999 E Street...

  5. NASA and Public-Private Partnerships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Gary L.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews ways to build public-private partnerships with NASA, and the many efforts that Ames Research Center is engaged in in building partnerships with private businesses, not profit organizations and universities.

  6. Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Partnership

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The CHP Partnership seeks to reduce air pollution and water usage associated with electric power generation by promoting the use of CHP. The Partnership works to remove policy barriers and to facilitate the development of new projects.

  7. Green Power Partnership Program Success Metrics

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The U.S. EPA's Green Power Partnership is a voluntary program designed to reduce the environmental impact of electricity generation by promoting renewable energy. EPA evaluates partnership metrics annually to determine progress toward programmatic goals.

  8. Green Power Partnership Renewable Generation Vintage Requirements

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The U.S. EPA's Green Power Partnership is a voluntary partnership program designed to reduce the environmental impact of electricity generation by promoting renewable energy. EPA requires that Partners meet GPP's vintage requirement.

  9. Green Power Partnership New Renewable Requirements

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The U.S. EPA's Green Power Partnership is a voluntary partnership program designed to reduce the environmental impact of electricity generation by promoting renewable energy. All Partners must meet GPP's new renewables requirement to join.

  10. Green Power Partnership Annual Reporting Requirements

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The U.S. EPA's Green Power Partnership is a voluntary partnership program designed to reduce the environmental impact of electricity generation by promoting renewable energy. Partners commit to submitting a report on their green power use annually.

  11. Green Power Partnership National Top 100

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The U.S. EPA's Green Power Partnership is a voluntary program designed to reduce the environmental impact of electricity generation by promoting renewable energy. The National Top 100 lists the largest green power users within the Green Power Partnership.

  12. Sexuality and Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice Sterling

    2000-01-01

    Describes normal aspects of sexuality during the early years, including masturbation and children's fanciful sexual ideas. Presents inappropriately mature sexual knowledge as a danger sign of abuse. Discusses whether and what teachers/caregivers should tell children about sexuality, and notes the importance of teaching staff about sexual identity…

  13. The Partnership Pact: Fulfilling School Districts' Research Needs with University-District Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ralston, Nicole; Weitzel, Bruce; Waggoner, Jacqueline; Naegele, Zulema; Smith, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    There has been a recent shift in university-district partnership models from traditional transactional partnerships, which lack a shared purpose, to transformational partnerships that are mutually beneficial to both universities and school districts. These transformational research-practice partnerships have gained popularity in the United States…

  14. 7 CFR 1400.204 - Limited partnerships, limited liability partnerships, limited liability companies, corporations...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Limited partnerships, limited liability partnerships... AND SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.204 Limited partnerships, limited liability partnerships, limited liability companies, corporations, and other similar...

  15. 7 CFR 1400.204 - Limited partnerships, limited liability partnerships, limited liability companies, corporations...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Limited partnerships, limited liability partnerships... AND SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.204 Limited partnerships, limited liability partnerships, limited liability companies, corporations, and other similar...

  16. 7 CFR 1400.204 - Limited partnerships, limited liability partnerships, limited liability companies, corporations...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Limited partnerships, limited liability partnerships... AND SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.204 Limited partnerships, limited liability partnerships, limited liability companies, corporations, and other similar...

  17. 7 CFR 1400.204 - Limited partnerships, limited liability partnerships, limited liability companies, corporations...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Limited partnerships, limited liability partnerships... AND SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.204 Limited partnerships, limited liability partnerships, limited liability companies, corporations, and other similar...

  18. Working in partnership with patients and carers.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Lesley

    2016-12-07

    Health policy and healthcare professional guidelines promote patient and carer involvement, which includes working in partnership with service users in all aspects of healthcare provision, research and education. This article explores the expectations for nurses to work in partnership with patients and carers, examines the definitions and theories of working in partnership and related concepts, as well as considering examples of partnership working in nursing practice.

  19. Appreciative leadership: building customer-driven partnerships.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Gwen

    2006-12-01

    Partnerships are relationships and are only as effective as the communication between participants. Partnerships imply building something new by bringing together varying elements to achieve mutual goals. Appreciative inquiry initiates change through questions derived from valuing. Leaders who use inquiry to initiate business planning to create academic and practice partnerships move away from traditional industrial models in healthcare to focus on the symbiotic, interdependent, and complex need for partnerships between education and practice as evidenced in exemplars.

  20. A Corporate Partnership to Enhance Teacher Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fine, Bethann

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses a corporate partnership with SMART Technologies that changed what teacher candidates learned and how they learned. The experience of the partnership has revealed five best practices for implementing white board technology. Teacher training benefits of the partnership are evident in descriptions of three instructional…

  1. 11 CFR 115.4 - Partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Partnerships. 115.4 Section 115.4 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION GENERAL FEDERAL CONTRACTORS § 115.4 Partnerships. (a) The assets of a partnership which is a Federal contractor may not be used to make contributions or expenditures in...

  2. 24 CFR 401.301 - Partnership arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Partnership arrangements. 401.301...) § 401.301 Partnership arrangements. If the PAE is in a partnership, the PRA must specify the following: (a) The responsibilities of each partner regarding the Restructuring Plan; (b) The resources...

  3. It Might Just Take a Partnership...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amrein-Beardsley, Audrey; Barnett, Joshua H.

    2012-01-01

    Most school-university partnerships have consisted of pre-service teacher education partnerships, by which colleges of teacher education team up with schools to train future teachers. Proponents of these partnerships claim that they have the ability to transform education through networks of teachers and faculty who are passionate about…

  4. Collaborative Research Partnerships for Knowledge Mobilisation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edelstein, Hilary

    2016-01-01

    This study examines elements of collaborative research partnerships (CRPs) between university researchers and organisations who engage in knowledge mobilisation activities in education. The study uses key informant interviews and document analysis from one type of partnership, and a survey of university-community partnerships across Canada to…

  5. Mapping the Field of VET Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Alison

    2009-01-01

    This paper looks critically at partnerships in education and training by presenting a case study of a community-level partnership aimed at promoting high school apprenticeships in Ontario Canada. The analysis maps the field of social relations within this partnership in order to reveal institutionally-based struggles and their implications for…

  6. 15 CFR 806.12 - Partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ECONOMIC ANALYSIS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE DIRECT INVESTMENT SURVEYS § 806.12 Partnerships. Limited partners do not have voting rights in a partnership and therefore cannot have a direct investment in a... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Partnerships. 806.12 Section...

  7. 78 FR 35559 - Noncompensatory Partnership Options; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-13

    ... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BA53 Noncompensatory Partnership Options; Correction AGENCY... issued by a partnership. The final regulations generally provide that the exercise of a noncompensatory option does not cause the recognition of immediate income or loss by either the issuing partnership...

  8. 78 FR 17868 - Noncompensatory Partnership Options; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-25

    ... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BA53 Noncompensatory Partnership Options; Correction AGENCY... issued by a partnership. The final regulations generally provide that the exercise of a noncompensatory option does not cause the recognition of immediate income or loss by either the issuing partnership...

  9. 15 CFR 806.12 - Partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ECONOMIC ANALYSIS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE DIRECT INVESTMENT SURVEYS § 806.12 Partnerships. Limited partners do not have voting rights in a partnership and therefore cannot have a direct investment in a... direct investment in a partnership shall be based on the country of residence of, and the...

  10. Wyoming Community Colleges Annual Partnership Report, 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyoming Community College Commission, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The "Annual Partnership Report" catalogs partnerships that Wyoming community colleges established and maintained for each fiscal year. Each community college maintains numerous partnerships for the development and provision of academic, occupational-technical, workforce development, and enrichment educational programs. These partnerships…

  11. Wyoming Community Colleges Annual Partnership Report, 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyoming Community College Commission, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The "Annual Partnership Report" catalogs partnerships that Wyoming community colleges established and maintained for each fiscal year. Each community college maintains numerous partnerships for the development and provision of academic, occupational-technical, workforce development, and enrichment educational programs. These partnerships…

  12. Wyoming Community Colleges Annual Partnership Report, 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyoming Community College Commission, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The "Annual Partnership Report" catalogs partnerships that Wyoming community colleges established and maintained for each fiscal year. Each community college maintains numerous partnerships for the development and provision of academic, occupational-technical, workforce development, and enrichment educational programs. These partnerships…

  13. 26 CFR 1.875-1 - Partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Partnerships. 1.875-1 Section 1.875-1 Internal... TAXES (CONTINUED) Nonresident Aliens and Foreign Corporations § 1.875-1 Partnerships. Whether a nonresident alien individual who is a member of a partnership is taxable in accordance with subsection (a),...

  14. 26 CFR 1.875-1 - Partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Partnerships. 1.875-1 Section 1.875-1 Internal... TAXES (CONTINUED) Nonresident Aliens and Foreign Corporations § 1.875-1 Partnerships. Whether a nonresident alien individual who is a member of a partnership is taxable in accordance with subsection (a),...

  15. 11 CFR 115.4 - Partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Partnerships. 115.4 Section 115.4 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION GENERAL FEDERAL CONTRACTORS § 115.4 Partnerships. (a) The assets of a partnership which is a Federal contractor may not be used to make contributions or expenditures in...

  16. 15 CFR 806.12 - Partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Partnerships. 806.12 Section 806.12... ECONOMIC ANALYSIS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE DIRECT INVESTMENT SURVEYS § 806.12 Partnerships. Limited partners do not have voting rights in a partnership and therefore cannot have a direct investment in...

  17. 24 CFR 401.301 - Partnership arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Partnership arrangements. 401.301 Section 401.301 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development...) § 401.301 Partnership arrangements. If the PAE is in a partnership, the PRA must specify the...

  18. 11 CFR 115.4 - Partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Partnerships. 115.4 Section 115.4 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION GENERAL FEDERAL CONTRACTORS § 115.4 Partnerships. (a) The assets of a partnership which is a Federal contractor may not be used to make contributions or expenditures in...

  19. 24 CFR 401.301 - Partnership arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Partnership arrangements. 401.301 Section 401.301 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development...) § 401.301 Partnership arrangements. If the PAE is in a partnership, the PRA must specify the...

  20. 11 CFR 115.4 - Partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Partnerships. 115.4 Section 115.4 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION GENERAL FEDERAL CONTRACTORS § 115.4 Partnerships. (a) The assets of a partnership which is a Federal contractor may not be used to make contributions or expenditures in...

  1. 11 CFR 115.4 - Partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Partnerships. 115.4 Section 115.4 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION GENERAL FEDERAL CONTRACTORS § 115.4 Partnerships. (a) The assets of a partnership which is a Federal contractor may not be used to make contributions or expenditures in...

  2. 26 CFR 1.875-1 - Partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Partnerships. 1.875-1 Section 1.875-1 Internal... TAXES Nonresident Aliens and Foreign Corporations § 1.875-1 Partnerships. Whether a nonresident alien individual who is a member of a partnership is taxable in accordance with subsection (a), (b), or (c)...

  3. 24 CFR 401.301 - Partnership arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Partnership arrangements. 401.301 Section 401.301 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development...) § 401.301 Partnership arrangements. If the PAE is in a partnership, the PRA must specify the...

  4. 24 CFR 401.301 - Partnership arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Partnership arrangements. 401.301 Section 401.301 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development...) § 401.301 Partnership arrangements. If the PAE is in a partnership, the PRA must specify the...

  5. 26 CFR 1.875-1 - Partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Partnerships. 1.875-1 Section 1.875-1 Internal... TAXES (CONTINUED) Nonresident Aliens and Foreign Corporations § 1.875-1 Partnerships. Whether a nonresident alien individual who is a member of a partnership is taxable in accordance with subsection (a),...

  6. 26 CFR 1.875-1 - Partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Partnerships. 1.875-1 Section 1.875-1 Internal... TAXES (CONTINUED) Nonresident Aliens and Foreign Corporations § 1.875-1 Partnerships. Whether a nonresident alien individual who is a member of a partnership is taxable in accordance with subsection (a),...

  7. Public-private partnerships. Going into labour.

    PubMed

    Lissauer, R

    2001-06-28

    Public-private partnerships are one of the government's key policy tools. There is little conclusive evidence of the ability of partnerships to manage hospitals. The government should launch small pilot projects. Managers and the public need to be convinced of the viability and equity of public-private partnerships.

  8. Social Partnership in Accrediting Lithuanian VET Qualifications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tutlys, Vidmantas; Kaminskiene, Lina

    2008-01-01

    This article examines social partnership in accrediting qualifications in Lithuania. It defines the factors influencing social partnership and surveys future development perspectives, referring to the creation and implementation of the national qualifications system in Lithuania. Social partnership in qualifications accreditation is regarded as a…

  9. Making the most of collaboration: exploring the relationship between partnership synergy and partnership functioning.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Elisa S; Anderson, Rebecca Miller; Lasker, Roz D

    2002-12-01

    Considering the challenges inherent to collaboration and the time it takes to achieve measurable outcomes, partnerships need a way to determine, at an early stage, whether they are making the most of collaboration. The authors have developed a new measure, partnership synergy, which assesses the degree to which a partnership's collaborative process successfully combines its participants' perspectives, knowledge, and skills. This article reports the results of a national study designed to examine the relationship between partnership synergy and six dimensions of partnership functioning: leadership, administration and management, partnership efficiency, nonfinancial resources, partner involvement challenges, and community-related challenges. Data were collected from 815 informants in 63 partnerships. Results of regression analysis conducted with partnership-level data indicated that partnership synergy was most closely related to leadership effectiveness and partnership efficiency. Implications of these findings for research and practice are discussed.

  10. Wyoming Community Colleges Annual Partnership Report, 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyoming Community College Commission, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The "Annual Partnership Report" catalogs all partnerships that Wyoming community colleges established and maintained for each fiscal year. Each community college maintains numerous partnerships for the development and provision of academic, occupational-technical, workforce development, and enrichment educational programs. These…

  11. Teacher Perceptions of a PDS Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everett, Diane; Tichenor, Mercedes

    2004-01-01

    Professional development schools (PDSs) are collaborative partnerships between teacher education programs and K-12 schools that provide educational opportunities for teachers and students alike. Such school-university partnerships are an important part of current educational reform. The body of empirical research examining PDS partnerships is…

  12. Retrospective Accounts of Injection Initiation in Intimate Partnerships

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Janie; Rajan, Sonali; McMahon, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Background The influence of family members, peers and sexual partners on initiation to injection drug use is well established. Furthermore, research on gender differences in injection initiation has recognized the increased vulnerability of women, in particular, to injection-related health risks, and the gendered nature of the injection initiation experience. Yet more research is needed on the interpersonal and structural dynamics that shape injection initiation within intimate partnerships. Methods This paper draws on narrative data from semi-structured ethnographic interviews with 25, relatively stable, drug-using couples from two New York City neighborhoods. The study was conducted between 2007–2009. Our analyses focus on retrospective accounts of injection initiation from IDUs who were initiated to injection (or initiated their partners) in current or former intimate partnerships. In particular we analyze narratives of injection initiation events where both partners participated as initiates or initiators. Results Transition to injection within intimate partnerships was common, especially for women, and occurred in specific contexts. Structural and interpersonal dynamics, including the ubiquity of drugs in poor communities and the gendered nature of drug acquisition and use strategies, as well as the problem of increased drug tolerance, situational impediments to drug access, and the perceived cost-benefit of injecting, all influenced the process of initiation to injection drug use within couples. The data also suggest that, even when risks associated with injection initiation were understood, both pragmatic and emotional considerations within relationships tended to offset concerns about potential dangers. Conclusion The findings suggest the need for a broad range of interventions (including couples-focused interventions) to minimize rates of injection initiation within intimate partnerships. PMID:22398215

  13. Partnership Council MGUE Test Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-29

    representative operational threat environments • Utilization of Live Sky M NAV signals - MGUE Test Operations • Racks: Static Tests • RQ-11 B Raven...Integration, Static /Dynamic Tests First Successful Flight Data Collection of Integrated M-Code Receiver 2015 04 29 _Partnership Council MGU E Test

  14. Learning through Partnership: Four Narratives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan-Fleming, Barbara; Simpson, Douglas J.; Curtis, Kristi; Hull, William

    2010-01-01

    The partnership between Best Elementary School and Texas Tech University's College of Education has been in place over 15 years. During this time field based methods classes have been taught at Best, graduate and undergraduate students have been involved in tutoring programs, and activities such as field trips have been conducted in partnership…

  15. Creating School-Business Partnerships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts State Dept. of Education, Quincy. Bureau of Student, Community and Adult Services.

    The six chapters in this publication describe the scope of school/business partnership activity in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Following the first chapter's introductory remarks, chapter 2 outlines methodology for the research project. Surveys were sent to superintendents of schools and to various businesses thought likely to be involved in…

  16. Focus on P-16 Partnerships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    L'Orange, Hans P., Ed.

    2003-01-01

    This issue of "Network News" takes a look at emerging P-16/K-16 partnerships and data systems. The first article, "P-16 Data and Accountability Systems," by Hans L'Orange and Rick Voorhees (an adaptation of a policy brief) looks at data being used for accountability within P-16 systems and provides some general characteristics…

  17. The Mysteries of Creative Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Shelby A.

    2008-01-01

    Since 2002, Creative Partnerships, based at the Arts Council of England, has been investing time, energy, and resources to bring artists and schools together. Their goal is to "animate the national curriculum and to enrich school life by making the best use of the United Kingdom's creative wealth." This article concentrates on the…

  18. Children's Services: Partnerships for Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamant-Cohen, Betsy, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    Co-author of the popular titles "Booktalking Bonanza" and "The Early Literacy Kit", Betsy Diamant-Cohen brings together 18 examples of successful outreach partnerships that children's librarians and administrators can adapt to their own situations. Contributors from the U.S and Canada explain how they partnered with schools,…

  19. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas A. Erickson

    2004-01-01

    The PCOR Partnership is off to a very exciting and ambitious start. Task 1 activities have included the planning and execution of an internal kickoff meeting, participation in the DOE's national kickoff meeting, and the planning and execution of the first meeting of the PCOR Partnership at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). Task 2 activities have focused on developing effective and critical partnerships. A plan has been developed to utilize Dakota Gasification Company's (DGC) experience and data with respect to their participation in the enhanced oil recovery project at Weyburn, Saskatchewan. A solid line of communication has been developed with the Interstate Oil & Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) for the mutual benefit of the PCOR Partnership and IOGCC's compensatory efforts. Task 3 activities have been focused on developing a foundation of background materials in order to avoid a duplication of efforts and provide the best outreach and educational materials possible. Progress in Task 4, Characterization and Evaluation, has included the development of a database format, the preliminary collection of data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks, and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, and treatment to prepare the fluid for pipeline transportation. Task 5 activities have resulted in a conceptual model for screening and qualitatively assessing sequestration options. Task 5 activities have also been useful in structuring data collection and other activities in Tasks 2, 3, and 5.

  20. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect

    Edward N. Steadman; John A. Harju; Erin M. O'Leary; James A. Sorensen; Daniel J. Daly; Melanie D. Jensen; Thea E. Reikoff

    2005-04-01

    The Plains CO{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership continues to make great progress. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) focused on developing information regarding deployment issues to support Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) and provided information to be used to assess CO{sub 2} sequestration opportunities in the PCOR Partnership region. Task 2 efforts also included preparation of a draft topical report entitled ''Deployment Issues Related to Geologic CO{sub 2} Sequestration in the PCOR Partnership Region'', which is nearing completion. Task 3 (Public Outreach) focused on developing an informational video about CO{sub 2} sequestration. The video will be completed and aired on Prairie Public Television in the next quarter. Progress in Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) included the continued collection of data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation. The addition of the Canadian province of Alberta to the PCOR Partnership region expanded the decision support system (DSS) geographic information system database. Task 5 screened and qualitatively assessed sequestration options. Task 5 activities also continue to be useful in structuring data collection and other activities in Tasks 2, 3, and 5.

  1. Public/Private Partnership Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    District of Columbia Public Schools, Washington, DC.

    This document presents the Public/Private Partnership Programs, a school-community project developed in 1981 by the District of Columbia public schools and the private sector community to provide career-focused high school programs. The project was designed to motivate and support young people to stay in school, graduate from high school, and…

  2. Two Partnerships: The Industry View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Earl E.; Saxton, Robert H.

    1983-01-01

    Often community colleges have upgraded personnel and equipment and added courses in response to the training needs of local companies. Businesses have contributed funding and materials, creating partnerships that benefit the college, the community, and the industry. This article describes successful programs in Niagara Falls, NY and Pensacola, FL.…

  3. University--Science Fair Partnership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tallman, Erika; Taylor, Karen

    1997-01-01

    Describes a partnership between a fifth-grade teacher and a university methods professor that involved developing an elementary science fair project mentored by university students. Provides opportunities for elementary students to conduct scientific investigations to learn about science, and opportunities for education majors to have firsthand…

  4. Business School Partnerships for Globalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Rob; Slanickova, Daniela; Warwick, Philip

    2013-01-01

    International partnerships are an essential tool to enable business schools to internationalize their activities. They can lead to improved research, better more internationally relevant teaching, provide staff with an international perspective, and help prepare students for careers in global business. Using case studies of four of Durham…

  5. Partnership in Sector Wide Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolley, Hilary

    2011-01-01

    Within the context of bilateral support to the education sector in Tonga and the Solomon Islands, this paper will explore how the discourse of "partnership" has been interpreted and activated within the Sector wide approach (SWAp). In concentrating particularly on the relationship between the respective Ministries of Education and New…

  6. Your Quality Partnerships Begin Today.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, MaryLou Wendel

    This collection of materials offers information on Portland Community College's Institute for Management and Professional Development. The first information sheet, "Your Quality Partnerships Begin Today," focuses on the Total Quality Management (TQM) programs of the Institute, indicating that 8,000 to 10,000 individuals per year,…

  7. Wiring a Tech School Partnership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kafka, Kery; Frank, Liz

    1999-01-01

    In Spring 1997, ITT Technical Institute, a private technical college, initiated a partnership with a Wisconsin high school based on offering ITT electronics courses to junior and senior high-school students. The program has benefited both students and teachers. Implementation steps are outlined. (MLH)

  8. Investigating University-School Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nath, Janice, Ed.; Guadarrama, Irma N., Ed.; Ramsey, John, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Investigating University-School Partnerships: A Volume in Professional Development School Research, the fourth book in the PDS Research Series developed by the same editors, includes a collection of organized papers that represent the best and latest examples of practitioner thinking, research, and program design and evaluation in the field at the…

  9. Coaching Leadership Learning through Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Jan

    2009-01-01

    This article is focused on the concept of partnership within the learning relationship. It develops the argument that leaders' personal experiences of reciprocal learning relationships will influence their leadership practice, and thus ultimately the school culture. The examination of values and beliefs is central to this process. The co-creation…

  10. Sexual Dysfunction in Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... pressure), excessive alcohol use or vaginal infections can cause sexual problems. Depression, relationship problems or abuse (current or past abuse) can also cause sexual dysfunction.You may have less sexual desire ...

  11. Condom use at last sexual relationship among adolescents of Santiago Island, Cape Verde, - West Africa

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objective To estimate factors associated with condom use at last sexual intercourse among adolescents. Methods Cross-sectional study of a representative sample of 368 sexually active adolescents aged 13–17 years from eight public high schools on Santiago Island, Cape Verde, 2007. The level of significance was 5.0% obtained from logistic regression, considering the association between condom use and socio-demographic, sexual and reproductive variables. Results The prevalence of condom use at last sexual intercourse was 94.9%. Factors associated with condom use at last sexual relationship were: non-Catholic religion (OR=0.68, 95%CI: 0.52; 0.88) and affective-sexual partnership before the interview (OR=5.15, 95%CI: 1.79; 14.80). Conclusions There was a high prevalence of condom use at last sexual intercourse of adolescents. PMID:23153259

  12. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2005-01-31

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. Efforts are underway to showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is

  13. The distribution of neuropeptide Y and dynorphin immunoreactivity in the brain and pituitary gland of the platyfish, Xiphophorus maculatus, from birth to sexual maturity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cepriano, L. M.; Schreibman, M. P.

    1993-01-01

    Immunoreactive neuropeptide Y and dynorphin have been localized in the brain and pituitary gland of the platyfish, Xiphophorus maculatus, at different ages and stages of development from birth to sexual maturity. Immunoreactive neuropeptide Y was found in perikarya and tracts of the nucleus olfactoretinalis, telencephalon, ventral tegmentum and in the neurohypophysis and in the three regions of the adenohypophysis. Immunoreactive dynorphin was found in nerve tracts in the olfactory bulb and in cells of the pars intermedia and the rostral pars distalis of the pituitary gland.

  14. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-06-30

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. During the third quarter, planning efforts are underway for the next Partnership meeting which will showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks, discuss the methods and analysis underway for assessing geological and terrestrial sequestration potentials. The meeting will conclude with an ASME workshop (see attached agenda). The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement

  15. Sexual assault.

    PubMed

    DeVore, Heather K; Sachs, Carolyn J

    2011-08-01

    Sexual assault is a problem that permeates all socioeconomic classes and impacts hundreds of thousands in the United States and millions worldwide. Most victims do not report the assault; those that do often present to an emergency department. Care must encompass the patients' physical and emotional needs. Providers must be cognizant regarding handling of evidence and possible legal ramifications. This article discusses the emergency medicine approach to history taking, physical examination, evidence collection, chain of custody, psychological and medical treatment, and appropriate follow-up. Special circumstances discussed include intimate partner violence, male examinations, pediatric examinations, suspect examinations, and drug-facilitated assaults.

  16. Sexual dichromatism in frogs: natural selection, sexual selection and unexpected diversity

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Rayna C.; Zamudio, Kelly R.

    2012-01-01

    Sexual dichromatism, a form of sexual dimorphism in which males and females differ in colour, is widespread in animals but has been predominantly studied in birds, fishes and butterflies. Moreover, although there are several proposed evolutionary mechanisms for sexual dichromatism in vertebrates, few studies have examined this phenomenon outside the context of sexual selection. Here, we describe unexpectedly high diversity of sexual dichromatism in frogs and create a comparative framework to guide future analyses of the evolution of these sexual colour differences. We review what is known about evolution of colour dimorphism in frogs, highlight alternative mechanisms that may contribute to the evolution of sexual colour differences, and compare them to mechanisms active in other major groups of vertebrates. In frogs, sexual dichromatism can be dynamic (temporary colour change in males) or ontogenetic (permanent colour change in males or females). The degree and the duration of sexual colour differences vary greatly across lineages, and we do not detect phylogenetic signal in the distribution of this trait, therefore frogs provide an opportunity to investigate the roles of natural and sexual selection across multiple independent derivations of sexual dichromatism. PMID:22993253

  17. Sexual dichromatism in frogs: natural selection, sexual selection and unexpected diversity.

    PubMed

    Bell, Rayna C; Zamudio, Kelly R

    2012-12-07

    Sexual dichromatism, a form of sexual dimorphism in which males and females differ in colour, is widespread in animals but has been predominantly studied in birds, fishes and butterflies. Moreover, although there are several proposed evolutionary mechanisms for sexual dichromatism in vertebrates, few studies have examined this phenomenon outside the context of sexual selection. Here, we describe unexpectedly high diversity of sexual dichromatism in frogs and create a comparative framework to guide future analyses of the evolution of these sexual colour differences. We review what is known about evolution of colour dimorphism in frogs, highlight alternative mechanisms that may contribute to the evolution of sexual colour differences, and compare them to mechanisms active in other major groups of vertebrates. In frogs, sexual dichromatism can be dynamic (temporary colour change in males) or ontogenetic (permanent colour change in males or females). The degree and the duration of sexual colour differences vary greatly across lineages, and we do not detect phylogenetic signal in the distribution of this trait, therefore frogs provide an opportunity to investigate the roles of natural and sexual selection across multiple independent derivations of sexual dichromatism.

  18. Sexually antagonistic coevolution for sexual harassment can act as a barrier to further invasions by parthenogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kawatsu, Kazutaka

    2013-02-01

    The assumption of a twofold cost of sex not only complicates the maintenance of sex but also sets conditions for sexual conflict: in organisms with the twofold cost, males often sexually harass females. Sexual harassment is detrimental to female fitness and thus might help maintain sexual populations if male harassment inflicts a harsher cost on parthenogens than on sexual females (asymmetric harassment cost). However, the generality of this concept is now considered doubtful because selective harassment of parthenogens results in loss of mating opportunities for males. Using three mathematical models, I show here that sexual harassment still can impose the asymmetric cost on parthenogens. First, I apply the Lotka-Volterra model to show the degree of asymmetric harassment cost that permits sex to be maintained stably in the population. Second, using adaptive dynamics, I examine whether sexually antagonistic coevolution for sexual harassment, which occurs only in sexual populations, can promote the asymmetric harassment cost. Finally, an individual-based model, which assumes a spatial structure unlike that in the other two, demonstrates that the asymmetric evolution of harassment cost prevents further invasions of parthenogens from different patches into sexual lineages; these mechanisms may account for allopatric distributions of sexual and parthenogenetic lineages as well as the maintenance of sex.

  19. An exploratory study of the categorical versus spectrum nature of sexual orientation.

    PubMed

    Savin-Williams, Ritch C

    2014-01-01

    This exploratory study investigated the nature of sexual orientation (categorical or spectrum) by assessing the relative ability of sexual and romantic indicators to be predicted by sexual orientation labels. Young adults from a variety of community and college venues (N =292) reported their sexual orientation label on a 9-point scale; from a 10-item list, their sexual identity; and the percentage of their sexual attraction, fantasy, genital contact, infatuation, and romantic relationship directed to males and females. Although the five indicators were significantly intercorrelated and sexual orientation labels predicted each indicator, discrepancies existed across indicators in relationship to sexual orientation (highest for attraction, lowest for romantic relationship). Sexual identity and sexual orientation label were strongly related at the ends of the sexual spectrum, less so in the middle. Men were nearly as nonexclusive as women. Study results supported the perspective that sexual orientation is a continuously distributed individual characteristic.

  20. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-01-04

    The Big Sky Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts during the first performance period fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first Partnership meeting the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Complementary to the efforts on evaluation of sources and sinks is the development of the Big Sky Partnership Carbon Cyberinfrastructure (BSP-CC) and a GIS Road Map for the Partnership. These efforts will put in place a map-based integrated information management system for our Partnership, with transferability to the national carbon sequestration effort. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but other policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best

  1. Sexual excitement.

    PubMed

    Stoller, R J

    1976-08-01

    Sexual excitement depends on a scenario the person to be aroused has been writing since childhood. The story is an adventure, an autobiography disguised as fiction, in which the hero/heroine hides crucial intrapsychic conflicts, mysteries, screen memories of actual traumatic events and the resolution of these elements into a happy ending, best celebrated by orgasm. The function of the fantasy is to take these painful experiences and convert them to pleasure-triumph. In order to sharpen excitement-the vibration between the fear of original traumas repeating and the hope of a pleasurable conclusion this time-one introduces into the story elements of risk (approximations of the trauma) meant to prevent boredom and safety factors (sub-limnal signals to the storyteller that the risk are not truly dangerous). Sexual fantasy can be studied by means of a person's daydreams (including those chosen in magazines, books, plays, television, movies, and outright pornography), masturbatory behavior, object choice, foreplay, techniques of intercourse, or postcoital behavior.

  2. Multidimensional sexual perfectionism.

    PubMed

    Stoeber, Joachim; Harvey, Laura N; Almeida, Isabel; Lyons, Emma

    2013-11-01

    Perfectionism is a multidimensional personality characteristic that can affect all areas of life. This article presents the first systematic investigation of multidimensional perfectionism in the domain of sexuality exploring the unique relationships that different forms of sexual perfectionism show with positive and negative aspects of sexuality. A sample of 272 university students (52 male, 220 female) completed measures of four forms of sexual perfectionism: self-oriented, partner-oriented, partner-prescribed, and socially prescribed. In addition, they completed measures of sexual esteem, sexual self-efficacy, sexual optimism, sex life satisfaction (capturing positive aspects of sexuality) and sexual problem self-blame, sexual anxiety, sexual depression, and negative sexual perfectionism cognitions during sex (capturing negative aspects). Results showed unique patterns of relationships for the four forms of sexual perfectionism, suggesting that partner-prescribed and socially prescribed sexual perfectionism are maladaptive forms of sexual perfectionism associated with negative aspects of sexuality whereas self-oriented and partner-oriented sexual perfectionism emerged as ambivalent forms associated with positive and negative aspects.

  3. [Female sexual function and chronic disease].

    PubMed

    Bronner, Gila

    2006-02-01

    Female sexual dysfunction (FSD) is a multifactorial set of conditions associated with multiple anatomical, physiological, biological, medical and psychological factors that can have major impact on self-esteem, quality of life, mood and relationships. Studies indicate that FSD is commonly seen in women who report a low level of satisfaction with partner relationship and in women with male partners who have erectile dysfunction. This complexity of FSD is augmented by the presence of chronic disease. Negative sexual effects are widely reported in studies of women with chronic diseases (such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, cancer, spinal cord injury, lupus, rheumatic diseases, Parkinson's disease, fibromyalgia and chronic pain) as compared to a general healthy female population. Physical problems, emotional problems and partnership difficulties arising from disease-related stress contribute to less active and less enjoyable sex life. Chronic pain, fatigue, low self-esteem as well as use of medications might reduce sexual function. These effects of chronic diseases on female sexual function still remain largely unstudied. The study by Manor and Zohar published in this issue of Harefuah draws our attention to the sexual dysfunction of women with breast cancer and examines their needs for information regarding their sexual function. In the absence of definite treatment evidence, psychological counseling, improved vaginal lubrication, low dose of hormonal therapy can be used to relieve FSD. Physicians must consider integrating diagnosis of their female patients' sexual needs and dysfunction, especially women with chronic diseases. Patients' education and counseling may contribute to a better quality of life in spite of their chronic disease.

  4. Sexual Health and Well-being Among Older Men and Women in England: Findings from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing.

    PubMed

    Lee, David M; Nazroo, James; O'Connor, Daryl B; Blake, Margaret; Pendleton, Neil

    2016-01-01

    We describe levels of sexual activity, problems with sexual functioning, and concerns about sexual health among older adults in the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA), and associations with age, health, and partnership factors. Specifically, a total of 6,201 core ELSA participants (56 % women) aged 50 to >90 completed a comprehensive Sexual Relationships and Activities questionnaire (SRA-Q) included in ELSA Wave 6 (2012/13). The prevalence of reporting any sexual activity in the last year declined with age, with women less likely than men at all ages to report being sexually active. Poorer health was associated with lower levels of sexual activity and a higher prevalence of problems with sexual functioning, particularly among men. Difficulties most frequently reported by sexually active women related to becoming sexually aroused (32 %) and achieving orgasm (27 %), while for men it was erectile function (39 %). Sexual health concerns most commonly reported by women related to their level of sexual desire (11 %) and frequency of sexual activities (8 %). Among men it was level of sexual desire (15 %) and erectile difficulties (14 %). While the likelihood of reporting sexual health concerns tended to decrease with age in women, the opposite was seen in men. Poor sexual functioning and disagreements with a partner about initiating and/or feeling obligated to have sex were associated with greater concerns about and dissatisfaction with overall sex life. Levels of sexual activity decline with increasing age, although a sizable minority of men and women remain sexually active until the eighth and ninth decades of life. Problems with sexual functioning were relatively common, but overall levels of sexual health concerns were much lower. Sexually active men reported higher levels of concern with their sexual health and sexual dissatisfaction than women at all ages. Older peoples' sexual health should be managed, not just in the context of their age, gender

  5. Sexuality in Older Couples: Individual and Dyadic Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Waite, Linda J; Iveniuk, James; Laumann, Edward O; McClintock, Martha K

    2017-02-01

    Sexuality is a key component of health and functioning that changes with age. Although most sexual activity takes place with a partner, the majority of research on sexuality has focused on individuals. In this paper, we focused on the sexual dyad. We proposed and tested a conceptual model of the predictors of partnered sexual activity in older adulthood. This model began with the personality of each of the partners, which affects individuals' views of sex and characteristics of the partnership, which in turn affected sexual expression in the couple. We measured a key feature of personality, Positivity, which reflected the individual's tendency to present his or herself positively in social situations. This trait, we posited, increased frequency of sex through increased desire for sex, and the subjective importance of sex to each member of the couple. In this model, Positivity also impacted characteristics of the relationship that promoted dyadic sexual behavior. These processes differed for men and women in the model. We tested this model with data from the National Social Life, Health and Aging Project, which conducted personal interviews with both partners in 940 American dyads (average male age 72; average female age 69). We found that couples in which the husbands' (but not wives') were high in Positivity show higher levels of sexual activity, and that this association was partially mediated by dimensions of relationship quality, but more so by individual factors such as thinking about sex and believing sex is important.

  6. Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    SciTech Connect

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2005-11-01

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO2 utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other DOE regional partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the

  7. Partnerships for development: municipal solid waste management in Kasese, Uganda.

    PubMed

    Christensen, David; Drysdale, David; Hansen, Kenneth; Vanhille, Josefine; Wolf, Andreas

    2014-11-01

    Municipal solid waste management systems of many developing countries are commonly constrained by factors such as limited financial resources and poor governance, making it a difficult proposition to break with complex, entrenched and unsustainable technologies and systems. This article highlights strategic partnerships as a way to affect a distributed agency among several sets of stakeholders to break so-called path dependencies, which occur when such unsustainable pathways arise, stabilize and become self-reinforcing over time. Experiences from a North-South collaborative effort provide some lessons in such partnership building: In Uganda and Denmark, respectively, the World Wildlife Fund and the network organization access2innovation have mobilized stakeholders around improving the municipal solid waste management system in Kasese District. Through a municipal solid waste management system characterization and mapping exercise, some emergent lessons and guiding principles in partnership building point to both pitfalls and opportunities for designing sustainable pathways. First, socio-technical lock-in effects in the municipal solid waste management system can stand in the way of partnerships based on introducing biogas or incineration technologies. However, opportunities in the municipal solid waste management system can exist within other areas, and synergies can be sought with interlinking systems, such as those represented with sanitation.

  8. Does physical abuse, sexual abuse, or neglect in childhood increase the likelihood of same-sex sexual relationships and cohabitation? A prospective 30-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Helen W; Widom, Cathy Spatz

    2010-02-01

    Existing cross-sectional research suggests associations between physical and sexual abuse in childhood and same-sex sexual orientation in adulthood. This study prospectively examined whether abuse and/or neglect in childhood were associated with increased likelihood of same-sex partnerships in adulthood. The sample included physically abused (N = 85), sexually abused (N = 72), and neglected (N = 429) children (ages 0-11) with documented cases during 1967-1971 who were matched with non-maltreated children (N = 415) and followed into adulthood. At approximately age 40, participants (483 women and 461 men) were asked about romantic cohabitation and sexual partners, in the context of in-person interviews covering a range of topics. Group (abuse/neglect versus control) differences were assessed with cross-tabulations and logistic regression. A total of 8% of the overall sample reported any same-sex relationship (cohabitation or sexual partners). Childhood physical abuse and neglect were not significantly associated with same-sex cohabitation or sexual partners. Individuals with documented histories of childhood sexual abuse were significantly more likely than controls to report ever having had same-sex sexual partners (OR = 2.81, 95% CI = 1.16-6.80, p < or = .05); however, only men with histories of childhood sexual abuse were significantly more likely than controls to report same-sex sexual partners (OR = 6.75, 95% CI = 1.53-29.86, p < or = .01). These prospective findings provide tentative evidence of a link between childhood sexual abuse and same-sex sexual partnerships among men, although further research is needed to explore this relationship and to examine potential underlying mechanisms.

  9. Energy Systems Integration Partnerships, NREL + Wyle (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2015-03-01

    This fact sheet describes the partnership between NREL and Wyle Labs at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. Under a research agreement with Wyle Labs, NREL is working with the U.S. Army to complete development and testing of the Consolidated Utility Base Energy (CUBE) System - a power distribution device that delivers power from solar, battery, and diesel generators to loads on forward operating bases.

  10. Youth Sexual Health: Sexual Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behavior Among Students at a University in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    SARAÇOĞLU, Gamze Varol; ERDEM, İlknur; DOĞAN, Sultan; TOKUÇ, Burcu

    2014-01-01

    Introduction To determine sexual attitudes, behavior, and knowledge of Namik Kemal University (NKU) students about sexual health and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Method A sample representing 10% of the undergraduate population of NKU in 2009–2010, was studied. Of 1,500 questionnaires distributed, 1,314 (87.6%) were filled out. Results The mean age of the respondents (52.9% male) was 20.07±1.75 years. The rate of students who had received sexual health education was 32.0%, and 15.3% had previously used a sexual health service. Eleven percent of the female students and 50.3% of the male students had had sexual intercourse. The average age of initial sexual intercourse was 16.83±2.07 years. Of the students who had had sexual intercourse, 46.6% reported that they did not use any contraception method. The most preferred method was condoms (37.6%). The rate of contraceptive use was 58.7% in sexually educated students and 43.9% in those not educated (p=.004). The most well-known STI was AIDS (96.5%), with sexually educated students giving higher rates of correct answers about STIs (p<.05) Conclusion The students who had received sexual health education were more knowledgeable about vital consequences of STI’s, even though it is not sufficient, than sexually active students. Awareness of safe sexual practices and changes in behavior, in particular, promoting condom use should be established in higher risk youths. Deficiencies in knowledge could be addressed by adding a sexual healthtraining component to the university curriculum, and unmet requirements could be met by reorganizing medico-social centers in universities.

  11. Partnership to build research capacity.

    PubMed

    Boland, Mary G; Kamikawa, Cindy; Inouye, Jillian; Latimer, Renee W; Marshall, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    Today's nursing leaders are setting the stage for the next evolution--bringing together skilled clinicians and administrators with peers in education to create new approaches to leading the profession forward. Partnerships share goals, common purpose, mutual respect, willingness to negotiate and compromise, informed participation, information giving, and shared decision making. The shared practice academia effort between a public university and a private health care system situated in the island state of Hawai'i is described. The medical center and school of nursing pursued individual strategic efforts to build research capacity and used the opportunity to fund academic practice research projects. The mutual need and recognition of the high stakes involved, in concert with stable, committed leaders at all levels, were key to the early success of their efforts. Through the formal research partnership mechanism, a discrete focus was created for efforts and used to move to tactical, operational, and interpersonal integration in this relationship.

  12. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect

    Edward N. Steadman

    2004-07-01

    The Plains Co{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership continues to make great progress. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) activities have focused on developing information on deployment issues to support Task 5 activities by providing information to be used to assess CO{sub 2} sequestration opportunities in the PCOR Partnership region. Task 3 (Public Outreach) activities have focused on developing an informational video about CO{sub 2} sequestration. Progress in Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) has included the continued collection of data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation. Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) activities have focused on screening and qualitatively assessing sequestration options. Task 5 activities also continue to be useful in structuring data collection and other activities in Tasks 2, 3, and 5.

  13. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect

    Edward N. Steadman; John A. Harju; Erin M. O'Leary; James A. Sorensen; Daniel J. Daly; Melanie D. Jensen; Thea E. Reikoff

    2004-10-01

    The Plains CO{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership continues to make great progress. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) focused on developing information regarding deployment issues to support Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) by providing information to be used to assess CO{sub 2} sequestration opportunities in the PCOR Partnership region. Task 3 (Public Outreach) focused on developing an informational video about CO{sub 2} sequestration. Progress in Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) included the continued collection of data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation. Task 5 focused on screening and qualitatively assessing sequestration options. Task 5 activities also continue to be useful in structuring data collection and other activities in Tasks 2, 3, and 5.

  14. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect

    Edward N. Steadman; John A. Harju; Erin M. O'Leary; James A. Sorensen; Daniel J. Daly; Melanie D. Jensen; Thea E. Reikoff

    2005-01-01

    The Plains CO{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership continues to make great progress. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) focused on developing information regarding deployment issues to support Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) by providing information to be used to assess CO{sub 2} sequestration opportunities in the PCOR Partnership region. Task 3 (Public Outreach) focused on developing an informational video about CO{sub 2} sequestration. Progress in Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) included the continued collection of data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation. Task 5 focused on screening and qualitatively assessing sequestration options. Task 5 activities also continue to be useful in structuring data collection and other activities in Tasks 2, 3, and 5.

  15. Dyadic Configurations of Sexual Problems Among Older U.S. Adults: A National Study.

    PubMed

    Das, Aniruddha

    2016-07-06

    Using data from the 2010-2011 National Social Life Health and Aging Project (NSHAP)-a nationally representative probability sample of older U.S. adults as well as their partners-this study provides the first comprehensive, population-based analysis of dyadic configurations of sexual problems and their correlates among those aged 60 to 90 years. Results suggest the majority of late-life partnerships (N = 854) may not have a heavy burden of sexual difficulties. However, almost a fifth (18.21%) of partnered older women do not abstain from sex despite low sexual motivation and capacity. This relational "type" seems unlinked to demographic or health attributes, and may be driven more by partnership strains. In addition, an "at risk" group with consistent sexual problems, arguably due to age-related decline, comprises 27.16% of all late-life couples.

  16. Willingness to distribute free rapid home HIV test kits and to test with social or sexual network associates among men who have sex with men in the United States.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Akshay; Chavez, Pollyanna R; MacGowan, Robin J; McNaghten, A D; Mustanski, Brian; Gravens, Laura; Freeman, Arin E; Sullivan, Patrick S

    2017-04-09

    Peer-driven HIV prevention strategies can be effective in identifying high-risk persons with undiagnosed infections. Besides individual self-testing, other potential uses of rapid home HIV test kits include distributing them, and testing with others within one's social or sexual networks. We sought to identify factors associated with the willingness to engage in these alternative activities among men who have sex with men (MSM) in the United States. From May to October 2014, we surveyed 828 HIV-negative or unknown status MSM about multiple aspects of rapid home HIV testing. A greater proportion indicated being likely to distribute free oral fluid (OF) tests compared to free finger-stick blood (FSB) tests (91% versus 79%), and almost three-fourths (72%) reported being likely to test with their friends or sex partners in the future. MSM not identifying as homosexual/gay were less willing to distribute OF tests, and those with lower educational attainment were more willing to distribute FSB tests. MSM unaware of their HIV status were less likely to report potentially testing with others using free rapid home HIV tests compared to those who were HIV-negative. Finally, MSM willing to self-test were more likely to report future test kit distribution, and those willing to distribute kits were more likely to report potentially testing with others. Engaging individuals with positive attitudes towards these strategies in prevention efforts could help increase HIV testing levels among MSM. A greater understanding of the potential public health impact of rapid home HIV test kits is necessary.

  17. Sexual Problems of Counselees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heritage, Jeannette G.; West, W. Beryl

    Approximately 50% of American marriages have some sexual dysfunction. Because sexuality is an important part of a person's life, counselors should be sensitive to sexual concerns of their clients. Taking an adequate sex history and highlighting problem areas may increase counseling efficiency. When counselors teach courses on human sexuality, they…

  18. Sexuality and Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanctuary, Gerald

    The author examines specific manifestations of violence in relation to sexuality: (1) forcible rape rate; (2) war atrocities; (3) sexual violence in prisons; and (4) pornography. Drawing much from Hannah Arendt's book on violence, he views sexual violence as symptomatic of a lack of sexual power, not a sign of its possession. The causes are seen…

  19. Sexuality and the law.

    PubMed

    Portelli, C J

    1998-01-01

    Federal, state, and local laws in the US now govern almost every aspect of sexuality. This includes sexuality at the workplace, sexuality education, adolescent sexuality, access to sexuality information and sexually explicit materials, sexual orientation, and sexually transmitted disease(STD)/HIV transmission. Almost 33% of the US Supreme Court's docket this past term concerned sexuality issues. In contrast to 50 years ago, when sexuality law was confined to the criminal arena, contemporary "sex crimes" primarily relate to nonconsensual and exploitative behaviors. It is time for lawmakers, judges, lawyers, policy analysts, lobbyists, and advocates to realize they cannot legislate or litigate how, when, or why people fall in love. Rather, the role of the law should be to create and preserve models of justice and equality that seek to preserve one's individual rights to privacy and freedom to choose in matters related to one's sexuality. This includes free access to age-appropriate sexuality information, the right to marriage and children regardless of sexual orientation, comprehensive sexuality education that encompasses information about avoiding unwanted pregnancies and HIV/STDs, access to contraception and abortion, protection from sexually abusive or exploitative relationships, and access to sexual health care.

  20. Military Sexual Trauma

    MedlinePlus

    Military Sexual Trauma What is military sexual trauma (MST)? Military sexual trauma, or MST, is the term used by VA to refer to experiences of sexual assault ... that a Veteran experienced during his or her military service. The definition used by the VA comes ...

  1. Addressing Sexual Harassment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Ellie L.; Ashbaker, Betty Y.

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses ways on how to address the problem of sexual harassment in schools. Sexual harassment--simply defined as any unwanted and unwelcome sexual behavior--is a sensitive topic. Merely providing students, parents, and staff members with information about the school's sexual harassment policy is insufficient; schools must take…

  2. Assessing global partnerships in graduate nursing.

    PubMed

    Birch, Amelia P; Tuck, Jodi; Malata, Address; Gagnon, Anita J

    2013-11-01

    North-South partnerships in graduate nursing education can prepare students to address global healthcare issues, increase cultural competence, and build research capacity. However, the current literature does not include a critical and systematic assessment of partnerships using established guidelines. This paper has two objectives: 1) Find and refine a suitable measure to assess a North-South inter-institutional research and clinical partnership in nursing; 2) Pilot test an assessment measure and describe the results of a systematic institutional self-evaluation of a developing North-South research and clinical partnership within a graduate nursing program. The first objective was addressed by searching for, examining and selecting an assessment measure. The second objective was obtained by applying the assessment measure to a developing graduate-level research and clinical partnership between a Canadian School of Nursing and a Malawian College of Nursing; qualitative data collected included information from a document review and subjective experiences of partners. Results showed that when appropriate revisions are made to an existing guideline, it is applicable to use as an assessment measure for North-South inter-institutional research and clinical partnerships. Recommendations for improvement were made, allowing the guideline to be more specific for research and clinical partnerships. Results demonstrated that the existing Canadian-Malawian partnership was strongest in the guideline category of "shaping the purpose and scope of the partnership," and weakest in "partnership implementation and context." This paper implies that: 1) evaluation can strengthen partnerships and enhance educational experience for nursing students; 2) research comparing and contrasting different genres of partnerships could help determine which type is the most appropriate for an institutions' particular outcome goals; and 3) effective establishment and maintenance of North

  3. Heteronormativity and sexual partnering among bisexual Latino men.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Laboy, Miguel; Garcia, Jonathan; Wilson, Patrick A; Parker, Richard G; Severson, Nicolette

    2015-05-01

    Our analyses address the question of how bisexual Latino men organize their sexual partnerships. Heteronormativity can be understood as the set of social norms and normative structures that guide sexual partnering among men and women. We provide descriptive statistics to describe bisexual Latino men's sexual partnerships. Logistic and linear regression modeling were used to explore bivariate and multivariate relationships. Of our total sample (N = 142), 41.6 % had unprotected vaginal intercourse 2 months prior to the interview; 21.8 % had unprotected anal intercourse with female partners; 37.5 % had unprotected insertive anal intercourse with male partners; and 22.5 % had unprotected receptive anal intercourse with male partners. In our multivariate model, machismo was directly associated with meeting female partners through formal spaces (workplace, school, and/or church), but inversely associated with meeting male partners in formal spaces. Machismo was positively associated with meeting male sex partners through social networks (i.e., friendship and kinship networks). The more comfortable men were with homosexuality the less likely they were to meet men online and the more likely they were to meet men through social networks of friends and kinship. Interventions to reduce sexually transmitted diseases that target bisexual behavior as an epidemiological "bridge" of transmission from homosexual to heterosexual networks might very well benefit from a more complex understanding of how Latino bisexuality is patterned. Thus, this exploratory analysis might lead to a rethinking of how to address risk and vulnerability among Latino bisexual men and their sexual networks.

  4. Adolescent sexual orientation.

    PubMed

    Spigarelli, Michael G

    2007-12-01

    Sexual orientation has been defined as the patterns of sexual thoughts, fantasies, and attractions that an individual has toward other persons of the same or opposite gender. Throughout childhood and approaching adolescence, children try to understand their own sexuality and sexual orientation in the context of the society in which they live. Typically, this attempt to understand first occurs in thoughts of a sexual nature and later through actions, usually before sexual orientation is clearly defined. How these experiences are handled, by the individual and close friends and relatives, helps to define how an individual views and accepts their sexual orientation ultimately as an adult.

  5. [Sexuality and infertility].

    PubMed

    Salama, S; Boitrelle, F; Gauquelin, A; Jaoul, M; Albert, M; Bailly, M; Wainer, R; Veluire, M

    2012-12-01

    Following the recent medical innovations, it is now possible to disassociate sexuality and reproduction. With contraception, people can have free sexuality without the fear of an unexpected pregnancy. Frequently, Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ART), with in vitro fertilization, can obtain a pregnancy without intercourse. There are three major problems concerning infertility and sexuality. Firstly, infertility because of a sexual disorder; secondly, sexual disorder induced by infertility diagnosis; thirdly, sexual disorder induced by ART. Praticians should be aware of possible existence of sexual problems to allow the couple to express them. Once diagnosed, these troubles can be treated by the pratician himself or the couple has to be referred to a psychologist or a sexologist.

  6. Sexual Function Across Aging.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Anita H; Harsh, Veronica

    2016-03-01

    Women experience multiple changes in social and reproductive statuses across the life span which can affect sexual functioning. Various phases of the sexual response cycle may be impacted and can lead to sexual dysfunction. Screening for sexual problems and consideration of contributing factors such as neurobiology, reproductive life events, medical problems, medication use, and depression can help guide appropriate treatment and thereby improve the sexual functioning and quality of life of affected women. Treatment options include psychotropic medications, hormone therapy, and psychotherapy.

  7. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-10-31

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. During the third quarter, planning efforts are underway for the next Partnership meeting which will showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks, discuss the methods and analysis underway for assessing geological and terrestrial sequestration potentials. The meeting will conclude with an ASME workshop. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification

  8. Sexuality and Islam.

    PubMed

    Dialmy, Abdessamad

    2010-06-01

    This paper deals with three major questions: (1) What are the sexual norms defined by the sacred texts (Koran and Sunna)? (2) What are the sexual practices currently observed among Moslems? (3) To which extent are current sexual practices of Moslems dissociated from Islamic sexual norms? Sexual standards in Islam are paradoxical: on the one hand, they allow and actually are an enticement to the exercise of sexuality but, on the other hand, they discriminate between male and female sexuality, between marital and pre- or extramarital sexuality, and between heterosexuality and homosexuality. Men are given more rights with regard to the expression of their sexuality; women are forbidden to have extramarital sex (with their slaves) and both genders to have homosexual relationships. The combination of these paradoxical standards with modernisation leads to the current back and forth swing of sexual practices between repression and openness. Partial modernisation leads to greater sexual tolerance. But restrictive sexual standards have gathered strength and have become idealised as a result of the current radicalisation of Islam. This swing of the pendulum between repression and openness is illustrated by phenomena such as public harassment, premarital sexuality, female pleasure, prostitution, and homosexuality. Currently, Islam is not any more the only reference which provides guidance concerning sexual practices but secularisation of sexual laws is still politically unthinkable today. So the only solution is to achieve reform in the name of Islam, through the reinterpretation of repressive holy texts.

  9. Academic practice partnerships: a national dialogue.

    PubMed

    Beal, Judy A; Alt-White, Anna; Erickson, Judith; Everett, Linda Q; Fleshner, Irene; Karshmer, Judith; Swider, Susan; Gale, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    Academic-practice partnerships are an important mechanism to strengthen nursing practice and help nurses become well positioned to lead change and advance health. Through implementing such partnerships, both academic institutions and practice settings will formally address the recommendations of the Institute of Medicine Future of Nursing Committee. Effective partnerships will create systems for nurses to achieve educational and career advancement, prepare nurses of the future to practice and lead, provide mechanisms for lifelong learning, and provide a structure for nurse residency programs. This paper details the work of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing-American Organization of Nurse Executives Task Force on Academic-Practice Partnerships that has identified hallmarks of successful partnership and produced tools and shared exemplars to assist nursing leaders in developing and sustaining partnerships for the future.

  10. Partnerships 2000: A Decade of Growth and Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Maria Voles, Ed.

    This report presents data from a survey of school partnerships that described the current national status of partnerships in schools, measured growth in partnerships through the 1990s, provided data on trends in partnership objectives and activities over 10 years, and related changes in partnerships to major education reform issues. Surveys were…

  11. 26 CFR 1.708-1 - Continuation of partnership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Partners and Partnerships § 1.708-1 Continuation of partnership. (a) General rule... of the partnership continues to be carried on by any of its partners in a partnership. For example, on November 20, 1956, A and B, each of whom is a 20-percent partner in partnership ABC, sell...

  12. 26 CFR 1.7704-1 - Publicly traded partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Publicly traded partnerships. 1.7704-1 Section... partnerships. (a) In general—(1) Publicly traded partnership. A domestic or foreign partnership is a publicly traded partnership for purposes of section 7704(b) and this section if— (i) Interests in the...

  13. 26 CFR 1.7704-1 - Publicly traded partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Publicly traded partnerships. 1.7704-1 Section... partnerships. (a) In general—(1) Publicly traded partnership. A domestic or foreign partnership is a publicly traded partnership for purposes of section 7704(b) and this section if— (i) Interests in the...

  14. 26 CFR 1.7704-1 - Publicly traded partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Publicly traded partnerships. 1.7704-1 Section... partnerships. (a) In general—(1) Publicly traded partnership. A domestic or foreign partnership is a publicly traded partnership for purposes of section 7704(b) and this section if— (i) Interests in the...

  15. 26 CFR 1.7704-1 - Publicly traded partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Publicly traded partnerships. 1.7704-1 Section... partnerships. (a) In general—(1) Publicly traded partnership. A domestic or foreign partnership is a publicly traded partnership for purposes of section 7704(b) and this section if— (i) Interests in the...

  16. 26 CFR 1.7704-1 - Publicly traded partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... or profits transferred during the taxable year of the partnership (other than in private transfers... partnership capital or profits transferred during the taxable year of the partnership (other than in private... partnership in which a transfer of a partnership interest occurs (other than a private transfer as...

  17. Successful partnerships with third sector organisations to enhance the healthcare student experience: a partnership evaluation.

    PubMed

    Bell, Katie; Tanner, Judith; Rutty, Jane; Astley-Pepper, Maxine; Hall, Richard

    2015-03-01

    There is limited research surrounding academic partnerships and more research is needed to educate universities, and the private, public and third sectors about the benefits and limitations of such partnerships. The aim of this study was to outline the unique partnership between Macmillan Cancer Support and De Montfort University and to evaluate the progress of this partnership. A qualitative approach was employed which involved interviews with nine members of the partnership's steering group. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using thematic analysis. The results showed that a partnership between a university and a third sector charity can have mutual benefits for all those involved, particularly for students and those affected by cancer. Furthermore, the module to develop volunteering among families affected cancer, created through this partnership is now being considered by other universities as a way of providing holistic and non-traditional lecture based learning experiences. Recommendations are made for future partnerships between third sector charities and universities.

  18. Developing Effective Partnerships for Special Populations: The Challenge of Partnerships and Alliances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, L. Allen; Maddy-Bernstein, Carolyn

    1992-01-01

    Effective business-education partnerships can have the following benefits for special populations: additional resources in resource-poor areas, employment opportunities, increased personal attention, improved facilities, and better teacher morale. Partnerships should complement, not replace, existing educational programs. (SK)

  19. Public Private Partnerships Applicability to Defence Procurement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-01

    Public Private Partnerships Applicability to Defence Procurement Jonathan Barnes KPMG Corporate Finance Report Documentation Page Report Date...25SEP2001 Report Type N/A Dates Covered (from... to) 25SEP2001 - 27SEP2001 Title and Subtitle Public Private Partnerships Applicability to Defence...unclassified Classification of Abstract unclassified Limitation of Abstract UU Number of Pages 6 kpmg Aim Provide an appreciation of: n Public Private Partnerships

  20. Urban-rural differences in the socioeconomic deprivation--sexual behavior link in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Dodoo, F Nii-Amoo; Zulu, Eliya M; Ezeh, Alex C

    2007-03-01

    We compare the impact of socioeconomic deprivation on risky sexual outcomes in rural and urban Kenya. Quantitative data are drawn from the Demographic & Health Surveys (DHS) and qualitative data from the Sexual Networking and Associated Reproductive and Social Health Concerns study. Using two separate indicators of deprivation we show that, although poverty is significantly associated with the examined sexual outcomes in all settings, the urban poor are significantly more likely than their rural counterparts to have an early sexual debut and a greater incidence of multiple sexual partnerships. The disadvantage of the urban poor is accentuated for married women; those in Nairobi's slums are at least three times as likely to have multiple sexual partners as their rural counterparts. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  1. Sexual size dimorphism predicts the frequency of sexual cannibalism within and among species of spiders.

    PubMed

    Wilder, Shawn M; Rypstra, Ann L

    2008-09-01

    Sexual cannibalism varies widely among spiders, but no general evolutionary hypothesis has emerged to explain its distribution across taxa. Sexual size dimorphism (SSD) also varies widely among spiders and could affect the vulnerability of males to cannibalistic attacks by females. We tested for a relationship between SSD and sexual cannibalism within and among species of spiders, using a broad taxonomic data set. For most species, cannibalism was more likely when males were much smaller than females. In addition, using phylogenetically controlled and uncontrolled analyses, there was a strong positive relationship between average SSD of a species and the frequency of sexual cannibalism. This is the first evidence that the degree of size difference between males and females is related to the phylogenetic distribution of sexual cannibalism among a broad range of spiders.

  2. Strategies for sustaining effective conservation partnerships

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alden, H.R.; Schroeder, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    Resource management partnerships among a wide variety of agencies and private groups are increasing in number across the country. The Colorado Rockies Regional Cooperative represents an early example of a grassroots effort of 14 partners to cooperate in the areas of research, education, and resource management. The cooperative conducted a survey of existing resource management partners and partnerships to determine what is necessary to establish and sustain effective partnerships. Survey findings, recent literature, and the experience of the Colorado Rockies Regional Cooperative suggest specific strategies for sustaining effective resource management partnerships.

  3. Developing partnership promotes peace: group psychotherapy experiences.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Robi

    2002-04-01

    Partnerships are often optimal processes for interpersonal growth. The ability to have and keep a partner in mind should, therefore, be thought about and learnt. Although reciprocity, some symmetry, and mutual give and take are important aspects of partnerships, this article emphasizes a partners ability to process difficulties for the other as an aid to growth. The containment and elaboration of distress in partnerships is discussed using three examples of such potential relationships. The emotional beginning of a partnership, whether starting from love, working relationship or from hate, is the focus of the article. Individual, dyadic, and group aspects as separation-individuation and containment processes are described as contributing to partnership-building. The ability of a therapy group to process splitting and projecting phenomena are discussed. Co-therapists seem to have to work through painful conflicts between themselves to develop the therapists' containment abilities inside a functional partnership. Supervision may help process these emotional hardships. Within families, mothers could contribute to a better processing of their sons violence shared through infant dreams, which represent an effort to cope with inner and outer aggression. Growth-promoting aspects of dream telling as potential partnerships in families and groups are discussed. Finally, partnership building between hating foes is exemplified by the efforts made by participants in Israeli and Palestinian peace dialogues. In groups, interpersonal development may be furthered by helping participants mutually contain and be contained, enabling partnership opportunities to grow after love and sympathy are over.

  4. Short-term Mobility and Increased Partnership Concurrency among Men in Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Cassels, Susan; Manhart, Lisa; Jenness, Samuel M.; Morris, Martina

    2013-01-01

    Background Migration has long been understood as an underlying factor for HIV transmission, and sexual partner concurrency has been increasingly studied as an important component of HIV transmission dynamics. However, less work has examined the role of short-term mobility in sexual partner concurrency using a network approach. Short-term mobility may be a risk for HIV for the migrant’s partner as well either through the partner’s risk behaviors while the migrant is away, such as the partner having additional partners, or via exposure to the return migrant. Methods Using data from the 2010–11 Zimbabwe Demographic and Health Survey, weighted generalized linear regression models were used to investigate the associations between short-term mobility and partnership concurrency at the individual and partnership levels. Results At the individual level, we find strong evidence of an association between short-term mobility and concurrency. Men who traveled were more likely to have concurrent partnerships compared to men who did not travel and the relationship was non-linear: each trip was associated with a 2% higher probability of concurrency, with a diminishing risk at 60 trips (p<0.001). At the partnership level, short-term mobility by the male only or both partners was associated with male concurrency. Couples in which the female only traveled exhibited less male concurrency. Conclusions Short-term mobility has the ability to impact population-level transmission dynamics by facilitating partnership concurrency and thus onward HIV transmission. Short-term migrants may be an important population to target for HIV testing, treatment, or social and behavioral interventions to prevent the spread of HIV. PMID:23824635

  5. Partnerships with Cultural Organisations: A Case for Partnerships Developed by Teacher Educators for Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemon, Narelle; Weller, Jacolyn

    2015-01-01

    New ways of working in teacher education are currently being highlighted, especially in relation to partnerships. One type of partnership that is under utilised is that with cultural organisations. This paper reports on two projects where the authors work with preservice teachers in partnership with a wildlife sanctuary and a national gallery.…

  6. Profiles of Public-Private Partnerships for Child Care. The Child Care Partnership Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finance Project, Washington, DC.

    The profiles of programs collected in this report were developed as part of the Child Care Partnership Project, a multi-year technical assistance effort. The Partnership Project provides a series of technical assistance resources and materials to support the development and strengthening of public-private partnerships to improve the quality and…

  7. 26 CFR 301.6511(g)-1 - Special rule for partnership items of federally registered partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Special rule for partnership items of federally registered partnerships. 301.6511(g)-1 Section 301.6511(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Limitations on Assessment and Collection § 301.6511(g)-1 Special rule for partnership items of...

  8. 26 CFR 301.6501(o)-2 - Special rules for partnership items of federally registered partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Special rules for partnership items of federally registered partnerships. 301.6501(o)-2 Section 301.6501(o)-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... Limitations Limitations on Assessment and Collection § 301.6501(o)-2 Special rules for partnership items...

  9. 26 CFR 301.6511(g)-1 - Special rule for partnership items of federally registered partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Special rule for partnership items of federally registered partnerships. 301.6511(g)-1 Section 301.6511(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Limitations on Assessment and Collection § 301.6511(g)-1 Special rule for partnership items of...

  10. 26 CFR 301.6511(g)-1 - Special rule for partnership items of federally registered partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Special rule for partnership items of federally registered partnerships. 301.6511(g)-1 Section 301.6511(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Limitations on Assessment and Collection § 301.6511(g)-1 Special rule for partnership items of...

  11. 26 CFR 301.6501(o)-2 - Special rules for partnership items of federally registered partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Special rules for partnership items of federally registered partnerships. 301.6501(o)-2 Section 301.6501(o)-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... Limitations Limitations on Assessment and Collection § 301.6501(o)-2 Special rules for partnership items...

  12. Partnership-based practice with young people: relational dimensions of partnership in a therapeutic setting.

    PubMed

    Timor-Shlevin, Shachar; Krumer-Nevo, Michal

    2016-09-01

    The recent literature concerning partnership between professionals and young people reveals important developments regarding the nature of partnership: from short-term partnerships with young people's parents intended to improve decision-making in the context of critical life decisions, to a growing interest in direct partnership between professionals and young people as a core principle of long-term relationships. Although it is widely acknowledged among health and social service professionals that partnerships can have positive outcomes for young people, the concept and implementation of partnership remain vague. This article examines the meanings of partnership for people involved in a community youth centre for marginalised youth. Data were collected during the year 2011 using multiple-methods including focus groups (with eight youth workers), participant observations (in assembly meetings and 'partnership meetings') and semi-structured interviews (with 10 principal stakeholders, including youth, youth workers and the Center's founders). Data were analysed using principles of grounded theory to articulate partnership as an ongoing experience, combining both structural-technical and content-experiential components. Our findings present partnership as existing simultaneously in the practice of decision-making and in the realm of self-experience and interpersonal relationships, and explore the relationship between both spheres. The findings also shed light on the importance of the specific characteristics of shared decision-making (atmosphere, content and duration) in the creation of partnership. We discuss our findings in the light of possibilities for partnership-based practice with marginalised youth.

  13. 26 CFR 301.6511(g)-1 - Special rule for partnership items of federally registered partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Special rule for partnership items of federally registered partnerships. 301.6511(g)-1 Section 301.6511(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Limitations on Assessment and Collection § 301.6511(g)-1 Special rule for partnership items of...

  14. 26 CFR 301.6501(o)-2 - Special rules for partnership items of federally registered partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Special rules for partnership items of federally registered partnerships. 301.6501(o)-2 Section 301.6501(o)-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... Limitations Limitations on Assessment and Collection § 301.6501(o)-2 Special rules for partnership items...

  15. 26 CFR 301.6501(o)-2 - Special rules for partnership items of federally registered partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... partner. In the case of a partnership having a “pass through” entity (i.e., partnership, electing small business corporation (as defined in section 1371(b)), trust, estate, or nominee) as a partner, the 1 year..., address, and taxpayer identification number of both the partner and the partnership. The statement...

  16. Fact Sheets of Public-Private Partnerships for Child Care. The Child Care Partnership Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finance Project, Washington, DC.

    These fact sheets were developed as part of the Child Care Partnership Project, a multi-year technical assistance effort. The Partnership Project provides a series of technical assistance resources and materials to support the development and strengthening of public-private partnerships to improve the quality and supply of child care. The fact…

  17. Partnerships for Reform: Changing Teacher Preparation through the Title II HEA Partnership Program. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    In 1998, Congress reauthorized and amended the "Higher Education Act of 1965 (HEA)", creating, under Title II, the Teacher Quality Enhancement Grants Program for States and Partnerships. One initiative under this amendment, the partnership grants program, funded partnerships among colleges of education, schools of arts and sciences, and…

  18. Comparability of Results from Pair and Classical Model Formulations for Different Sexually Transmitted Infections

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Jimmy Boon Som; Fu, Xiuju; Lee, Gary Kee Khoon; Chen, Mark I-Cheng

    2012-01-01

    The “classical model” for sexually transmitted infections treats partnerships as instantaneous events summarized by partner change rates, while individual-based and pair models explicitly account for time within partnerships and gaps between partnerships. We compared predictions from the classical and pair models over a range of partnership and gap combinations. While the former predicted similar or marginally higher prevalence at the shortest partnership lengths, the latter predicted self-sustaining transmission for gonorrhoea (GC) and Chlamydia (CT) over much broader partnership and gap combinations. Predictions on the critical level of condom use (Cc) required to prevent transmission also differed substantially when using the same parameters. When calibrated to give the same disease prevalence as the pair model by adjusting the infectious duration for GC and CT, and by adjusting transmission probabilities for HIV, the classical model then predicted much higher Cc values for GC and CT, while Cc predictions for HIV were fairly close. In conclusion, the two approaches give different predictions over potentially important combinations of partnership and gap lengths. Assuming that it is more correct to explicitly model partnerships and gaps, then pair or individual-based models may be needed for GC and CT since model calibration does not resolve the differences. PMID:22761828

  19. 26 CFR 1.704-1 - Partner's distributive share.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Partner's distributive share. 1.704-1 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Partners and Partnerships § 1.704-1 Partner's distributive share. (a) Effect of partnership agreement. A partner's distributive share of any item or class of items of...

  20. Sexual narcissism and the perpetration of sexual aggression.

    PubMed

    Widman, Laura; McNulty, James K

    2010-08-01

    Despite indirect evidence linking narcissism to sexual aggression, studies directly examining this relationship have yielded inconsistent results. Likely contributing to such inconsistencies, prior research has used global measures of narcissism not sensitive to whether the components of narcissism are activated in sexual versus non-sexual domains. The current research avoided such problems by using a measure of sexual narcissism to predict sexual aggression. In a sample of 299 men and women, Study 1 validated the Sexual Narcissism Scale, a new sexuality research instrument with four subscales-Sexual Exploitation, Sexual Entitlement, Low Sexual Empathy, and Sexual Skill. Then, in a sample of 378 men, Study 2 demonstrated that sexual narcissism was associated with reports of the frequency of sexual aggression, three specific types of sexual aggression (unwanted sexual contact, sexual coercion, and attempted/completed rape), and the likelihood of future sexual aggression. Notably, global narcissism was unrelated to all indices of sexual aggression when sexual narcissism was controlled. That sexual narcissism outperformed global assessments of narcissism to account for variance in sexual aggression suggests that future research may benefit by examining whether sexual narcissism and other sexual-situation-specific measurements of personality can similarly provide a more valid test of the association between personality and other sexual behaviors and outcomes (e.g., contraceptive use, infidelity, sexual satisfaction).

  1. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-06-01

    The Big Sky Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts during the second performance period fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for

  2. Industrial partnerships yield EPIC results

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, T.

    1996-08-01

    With a new era of competition approaching in the electricity supply industry, utilities are getting closer than ever to their industrial customers, in many cases making direct alliances as partners to help customers become more efficient, productive, and competitive. The EPRI Partnership for Industrial Competitiveness (EPIC) program aims to help industrial customers address critical priorities in environmental impact, efficiency, and productivity with the ultimate goals of long-term profitability and job retention. By offering in-plant consultant evaluations of systems and processes, EPIC helps industrial customers develop strategic insights into their operations and leverage technology and productivity solutions for competitive business advantage.

  3. Portable classroom leads to partnership.

    PubMed

    Le Ber, Jeanne Marie; Lombardo, Nancy T; Weber, Alice; Bramble, John

    2004-01-01

    Library faculty participation on the School of Medicine Curriculum Steering Committee led to a unique opportunity to partner technology and teaching utilizing the library's portable wireless classroom. The pathology lab course master expressed a desire to revise the curriculum using patient cases and direct access to the Web and library resources. Since the pathology lab lacked computers, the library's portable wireless classroom provided a solution. Originally developed to provide maximum portability and flexibility, the wireless classroom consists of ten laptop computers configured with wireless cards and an access point. While the portable wireless classroom led to a partnership with the School of Medicine, there were additional benefits and positive consequences for the library.

  4. Building strong partnerships with CMOs.

    PubMed

    Dye, Carson F

    2014-07-01

    CFOs and chief medical officers (CMOs) can build on common traits to form productive partnerships in guiding healthcare organizations through the changes affecting the industry. CFOs can strengthen bonds with CMOs by taking steps to engage physicians on their own turf--by visiting clinical locations and attending medical-executive committee meetings, for example. Steps CFOs can take to help CMOs become more acquainted with the financial operations of health systems include demonstrating the impact of clinical decisions on costs and inviting CMOs to attend finance-related meetings.

  5. Indian concepts on sexuality

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Kaustav; Thakurata, Rajarshi Guha

    2013-01-01

    India is a vast country depicting wide social, cultural and sexual variations. Indian concept of sexuality has evolved over time and has been immensely influenced by various rulers and religions. Indian sexuality is manifested in our attire, behavior, recreation, literature, sculptures, scriptures, religion and sports. It has influenced the way we perceive our health, disease and device remedies for the same. In modern era, with rapid globalization the unique Indian sexuality is getting diffused. The time has come to rediscover ourselves in terms of sexuality to attain individual freedom and to reinvest our energy to social issues related to sexuality. PMID:23858263

  6. Multidimensional Sexual Perfectionism and Female Sexual Function: A Longitudinal Investigation.

    PubMed

    Stoeber, Joachim; Harvey, Laura N

    2016-11-01

    Research on multidimensional sexual perfectionism differentiates four forms: self-oriented, partner-oriented, partner-prescribed, and socially prescribed. Self-oriented sexual perfectionism reflects perfectionistic standards people apply to themselves as sexual partners; partner-oriented sexual perfectionism reflects perfectionistic standards people apply to their sexual partner; partner-prescribed sexual perfectionism reflects people's beliefs that their sexual partner imposes perfectionistic standards on them; and socially prescribed sexual perfectionism reflects people's beliefs that society imposes such standards on them. Previous studies found partner-prescribed and socially prescribed sexual perfectionism to be maladaptive forms of sexual perfectionism associated with a negative sexual self-concept and problematic sexual behaviors, but only examined cross-sectional relationships. The present article presents the first longitudinal study examining whether multidimensional sexual perfectionism predicts changes in sexual self-concept and sexual function over time. A total of 366 women aged 17-69 years completed measures of multidimensional sexual perfectionism, sexual esteem, sexual anxiety, sexual problem self-blame, and sexual function (cross-sectional data). Three to six months later, 164 of the women completed the same measures again (longitudinal data). Across analyses, partner-prescribed sexual perfectionism emerged as the most maladaptive form of sexual perfectionism. In the cross-sectional data, partner-prescribed sexual perfectionism showed positive relationships with sexual anxiety, sexual problem self-blame, and intercourse pain, and negative relationships with sexual esteem, desire, arousal, lubrication, and orgasmic function. In the longitudinal data, partner-prescribed sexual perfectionism predicted increases in sexual anxiety and decreases in sexual esteem, arousal, and lubrication over time. The findings suggest that partner-prescribed sexual

  7. 76 FR 29775 - The Critical Infrastructure Partnership Advisory Council (CIPAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-23

    ... SECURITY The Critical Infrastructure Partnership Advisory Council (CIPAC) AGENCY: National Protection and... Security (DHS) announced the establishment of the Critical Infrastructure Partnership Advisory Council... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Nancy J. Wong, Director, Partnership Programs and Information Sharing...

  8. 76 FR 20995 - Critical Infrastructure Partnership Advisory Council (CIPAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-14

    ... SECURITY Critical Infrastructure Partnership Advisory Council (CIPAC) AGENCY: National Protection and... Security (DHS) announced the establishment of the Critical Infrastructure Partnership Advisory Council... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Nancy J. Wong, Director, Partnership Programs and Information Sharing...

  9. 75 FR 19941 - Manufacturing Extension Partnership Advisory Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-16

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Manufacturing Extension Partnership Advisory Board AGENCY... announces that the Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MEP) Advisory Board, National Institute of Standards..., 2010. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Karen Lellock, Manufacturing Extension Partnership,...

  10. 75 FR 50749 - Manufacturing Extension Partnership Advisory Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-17

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Manufacturing Extension Partnership Advisory Board AGENCY... announces that the Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MEP) Advisory Board, National Institute of Standards... INFORMATION CONTACT: Karen Lellock, Manufacturing Extension Partnership, National Institute of Standards...

  11. [Medicine and the sexual distribution of work: an analysis of the scientific discourse on the role of the "human factor" in improving performance at work (Spain, 1922-1936)].

    PubMed

    Pérez, José Martínez

    2008-01-01

    During the first third of the twentieth century, and especially after the 1920s, a discourse on occupational hygiene and safety began to develop in Spain. This discourse, without rejecting the value of the work carried out in the factory environment, particularly stressed the need to take into account what was called the "human factor." Promoted mainly by the budding occupational doctors and psychologists, this discourse became part of both the lines of biological thinking of constitutional pathology as well as the economic ideas of the so-called OCT, and it expounded the need to take the somatic and psychic characteristics of people into account in order to carry out "rational" distribution of the same in the workplace. The article aims to highlight the way in which this discourse contained elements that would help to attribute specific roles within the workplace based on the biological and psychological characteristics of men and women, so facilitating the legitimisation of a sexual distribution of work which helped to reinforce the social organization of gender at that time.

  12. Female adolescent sexuality. Promoting healthy sexual development.

    PubMed

    Blythe, M J; Rosenthal, S L

    2000-03-01

    Health care providers must recognize the specific challenges and rewards of providing services for adolescents. Quality care begins with the establishment of trust, respect, and confidentiality between the health care provider and the adolescent. Data suggest that the normal age for beginning puberty is decreasing, which has important clinical, educational, and social implications. The health care provider should be aware of the broad range of potential sexual behaviors involving adolescents, as well as the teen's acceptance of such behaviors, often dictated by age, gender, culture, and education. When providing gynecologic care to adolescent girls, the physician should not only provide contraception and screen for sexually transmitted diseases but should contribute to the development of the patient's sexual health. Especially when providing care for the younger teen, the health care provider must focus on involving a member of the family or another significant adult to provide needed support and guidance. Anticipatory guidance for parents should focus on assessing their parenting styles and promoting supervision. Although parents should strive to maintain open communication with their adolescents, they may not accurately estimate the sexual activity of and the sexual risk for their teenage children. Parents need to be encouraged to consider the implications of their own sexual behaviors. The provider should attempt to foster a comfortable environment in which youth may seek help and support for appropriate medical care while reserving the right to disclose their sexual identity when ready. Health care professionals cannot exclude heterosexual behavior on the basis that a young woman self-identifies as homosexual. Her reported sexual behaviors may not indicate her sexual orientation. Self-definition of sexual orientation is a dynamic process including factors such as fantasies, desires, and behaviors. Self-definition of sexual identity is affected by individual

  13. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas A. Erickson

    2004-04-01

    The PCOR Partnership continues to make great progress. Task 2 (Deployment Issues) activities have focused on utilizing Dakota Gasification Company (DGC) experience and data with respect to DGC participation in the enhanced oil recovery project at Weyburn, Saskatchewan. A solid line of communication has been developed with the Interstate Oil & Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) for the mutual benefit of the PCOR Partnership and IOGCC's complementary efforts. Task 3 (Public Education and Outreach) activities have focused on developing a foundation of background materials in order to avoid a duplication of efforts and provide the best outreach and educational materials possible. Progress in Task 4 (Characterization and Evaluation) has included the development of a database format, the preliminary collection of data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks, and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation. Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) activities have resulted in a conceptual model for screening and qualitatively assessing sequestration options. Task 5 activities have also been useful in structuring data collection and other activities in Tasks 2, 3, and 5.

  14. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect

    Edward N. Steadman; John A. Harju; Erin M. O'Leary; James A. Sorensen; Daniel J. Daly; Melanie D. Jensen; Lisa S. Botnen

    2005-07-01

    The Plains CO{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership characterization work is nearing completion, and most remaining efforts are related to finalizing work products. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) has developed a Topical Report entitled ''Deployment Issues Related to Geologic CO{sub 2} Sequestration in the PCOR Partnership Region''. Task 3 (Public Outreach) has developed an informational Public Television program entitled ''Nature in the Balance'', about CO{sub 2} sequestration. The program was completed and aired on Prairie Public Television in this quarter. Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) efforts are nearing completion, and data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation are being incorporated into a series of topical reports. The expansion of the Decision Support System Geographic Information System database has continued with the development of a ''save bookmark'' feature that allows users to save a map from the system easily. A feature that allows users to develop a report that summarizes CO{sub 2} sequestration parameters was also developed. Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) focused on screening and qualitatively assessing sequestration options and developing economic estimates for important regional CO{sub 2} sequestration strategies.

  15. MACT Partnership: A good idea

    SciTech Connect

    Bergeson, L.L.

    1995-11-01

    In light of strict deadlines imposed under the Clean Air Act (CAA) that the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) knows it cannot meet, the Agency is thinking of creative ways of developing maximum achievable control technology (MACT) standards. EPA`s March 1995, announcement that it is developing streamlined MACT standards, and its more recent issuance of guidance on its MACT Partnership Program, provides much needed relief for EPA and industry alike in addressing the challenges posed by CAA Section 112. Since the CAA Amendments were enacted in 1990, EPA has been under extraordinary pressure to develop MACT standards for 174 individual categories of major and selected area sources by the year 2000. On March 29, 1995, EPA rolled-out its MACT Partnership Program and requested comment. The notice announced EPA`s plan to use a streamlined approach to promulgating MACT standards. In short, the program involves two phases for each MACT standard. The first phase involves development of a presumptive MACT. The second phase is the formal standard development process which ultimately will result in the issuance of a MACT standard for a particular source category.

  16. A Partnership Experience in Private Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacino, Maria A.; Watkins, Alice; Warren, Susan R.; Yee-Sakamoto, Ivy; Lawson, Dan

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to document the planning, process, and outcomes resulting from a partnership between two private, faith-based institutions a kindergarten through fifth grade (K-5) school and a university. A team of five university professors formed a partnership with the K-5 school in February 2003. The university faculty continues to…

  17. Managing Academic and Research Libraries Partnerships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rader, Hannelore B.

    This paper describes initiatives at the University of Louisville (Kentucky) as an example of a successful scenario where, through a variety of partnerships, the libraries have become more central in the campus teaching and learning community. The first section describes faculty-librarianship partnerships, including initiatives related to…

  18. Arts-Focused School Partnerships. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Ella M.

    2007-01-01

    Joyce Epstein at Johns Hopkins University is the nation's pre-eminent expert on School, Family and Community Partnerships. Dr. Epstein is the Director of the Center on School, Family and Community Partnerships. A membership organization associated with the center is available and provides significant help in the development of…

  19. Successful Community College Campus-Based Partnerships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sink, David W. Jr.; Jackson, Karen Luke

    2002-01-01

    Examines partnerships at Blue Ridge Community College (North Carolina) from the perspective of 12 nonprofit organizations and government agencies located on or adjacent to campus. Discusses factors contributing to the success of partnerships in addressing societal needs and advancing the college's mission, including accessibility, common goals,…

  20. Building Business & Community Partnerships for Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Partnership for Family Involvement in Education (ED), Washington, DC.

    This brochure is directed at individuals interested in building business and community partnerships with education. It details how and why to establish partnerships in classrooms, school districts, communities, and the policy arena. It begins with brief discussions of the following: reasons for encouraging higher standards in education; the need…

  1. Why Community Colleges Need Organizational Partnerships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kussrow, Paul G.

    Community problems are often so immense that community colleges can only respond effectively by forming organizational partnerships. The key to successful partnerships is communication among agencies; once an appreciation of each organization's capabilities is reached, community needs can be identified and responsive strategies can be designed. As…

  2. Creating Partnerships. A Handbook for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa State Council on Vocational Education, Des Moines.

    This handbook details a step-by-step process to establishing educational relationships or partnerships with business, labor, government, and community organizations. Worksheets are provided to help with this relationship-building process. Chapter 1 focuses on these areas: the why of a partnership, resources to support the effort, benefits for each…

  3. Distance Learning Partnerships for Underserved Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chavkin, Nancy Feyl; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes a partnership that was formed to develop a fiber optic interactive network and its interface with the development of algebra curriculum and social services in the PATH (Partnership for Access to Higher) Mathematics project in Texas. Equipment connections, costs, and classroom layout are described; and social work components are…

  4. Managing Partnerships with University Support Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rockman, Ilene

    This paper describes the following examples of partnerships in which academic libraries have been able to promote their institutional mission: (1) a partnership between the California Polytechnic State University library and the campus bookstore to honor campus authors; (2) a reception held by the Southern Methodist University (Texas) library in…

  5. The New Wave of Community College Partnerships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturgeon, Julie

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the new emerging partnerships community colleges are using to enhance the services they can offer to their students and the surrounding community without destroying their budgets. Two examples are presented of community college partnerships with several corporations to provide space for workplace development. (GR)

  6. Partnership Instability and Child Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborne, Cynthia; McLanahan, Sara

    2007-01-01

    We use data from three waves of the Fragile Families Study (N= 2,111) to examine the prevalence and effects of mothers' partnership changes between birth and age 3 on children's behavior. We find that children born to unmarried and minority parents experience significantly more partnership changes than children born to parents who are married or…

  7. Partnerships and Pricing Services. Research Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Debra J.

    1998-01-01

    Research shows that partnerships have become crucial to long-term organizational success. Benefits and constraints of partnerships are outlined. A second research article on pricing shows that establishing and advertising an anchor price helps consumers understand increases and discounts. Implications for camp management are discussed. (SAS)

  8. Partnership Attitude Tracking Study, Teens 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    The Partnership Attitude Tracking Study (PATS) is Partnership for a Drug Free America's (PDFA) unique contribution to the field of substance abuse prevention. An annual study that tracks the attitudes consumers have about illegal drugs, this research examines what PDFA's target audiences think and feel about various drugs. After a decade of rising…

  9. Youth-Adult Partnerships: Unity in Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warkentin, Robert, Ed.; Rea, Dan, Ed.

    This book offers practical principles and programs for establishing "youth-adult partnerships" to bridge the generation gap and prepare youth for a future free of unnecessary risk. Following an introduction titled "Diversity as Strength in Partnerships: Collective Responses to Complex Problems" by Robert Warkentin and Dan Rea, the papers are: (1)…

  10. A Holistic Model of Partnership in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Islahuddin; Tolla, Ismail; Mansyur

    2016-01-01

    This research aims at describing the functions of education played by the family, school, community, and government in education partnerships in Makassar. It is also explaining the holistic model of education partnerships in Makassar. This study used a qualitative approach with a case study. The data were collected through interviews, observation,…

  11. Professional Development Schools and Transformative Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polly, Drew, Ed.; Heafner, Tina, Ed.; Chapman, Marvin, Ed.; Spooner, Melba, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    School-university partnerships have the potential to greatly benefit teaching and learning in PK-12 environments, as well as educator preparation programs. This collaboration is advantageous to teachers, counselors, and administrators. "Professional Development Schools and Transformative Partnerships" provides a comprehensive look at the…

  12. 48 CFR 970.2673 - Regional partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Regional partnerships. 970.2673 Section 970.2673 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS DOE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Other Socioeconomic Programs 970.2673 Regional partnerships....

  13. 48 CFR 970.2673 - Regional partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Regional partnerships. 970.2673 Section 970.2673 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS DOE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Other Socioeconomic Programs 970.2673 Regional partnerships....

  14. 48 CFR 970.2673 - Regional partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Regional partnerships. 970.2673 Section 970.2673 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS DOE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Other Socioeconomic Programs 970.2673 Regional partnerships....

  15. Inclusive Partnership: Enhancing Student Engagement in Geography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore-Cherry, Niamh; Healey, Ruth; Nicholson, Dawn T.; Andrews, Will

    2016-01-01

    Partnership is currently the focus of much work within higher education and advocated as an important process to address a range of higher education goals. In this paper, we propose the term "inclusive partnership" to conceptualise a non-selective staff-student relationship. While recognising the challenges of inclusive partnership…

  16. 48 CFR 970.2673 - Regional partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Regional partnerships. 970.2673 Section 970.2673 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS DOE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Other Socioeconomic Programs 970.2673 Regional partnerships....

  17. 48 CFR 970.2673 - Regional partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Regional partnerships. 970.2673 Section 970.2673 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS DOE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Other Socioeconomic Programs 970.2673 Regional partnerships....

  18. The Latest in Corporate-College Partnerships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meister, Jeanne C.

    2003-01-01

    Success factors in establishing corporate-college partnerships include communicating a shared vision for success, defining the degree of customization and flexibility from a university, and mutually devising a marketing and recruitment program. The metrics for success must be defined early and managed throughout the partnership. (JOW)

  19. New Partnerships for EFA: Building on Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draxler, Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    In 2007, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization-International Institute for Educational Planning (UNESCO-IIEP) and the World Economic Forum's Global Education Initiative launched a new program, "Partnerships for Education" (PfE), to create a global coalition for multi-stakeholder partnerships for education, including…

  20. Industry-Education Partnerships: Massachusetts Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts State Dept. of Education, Quincy. Office of Community Education.

    This document consists largely of descriptions of 15 industry-education partnerships in Massachusetts, selected on the basis of their creativity; the range of partnership organizations and activity they represent; the diversity of students, teachers, businesses, and communities they affect; and their innovative and efficient coordination and…

  1. Promoting Success in Educational Partnerships Involving Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Linda M.

    The goals of educational partnerships between schools and businesses or associations often include the purchase of educational technology and its integration into the daily life of schools. A study was conducted to determine the common features of successful technology partnerships and factors that contribute to success. After preliminary analysis…

  2. 27 CFR 19.133 - Partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... partner or partners acquire the business upon settlement of the partnership, the surviving partner or... Amending An Operating Permit § 19.133 Partnerships. (a) If there is a death or insolvency of a partner in a company that holds an operating permit under this part, the surviving partner or partners may continue...

  3. 27 CFR 19.117 - Partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Amending A Registration § 19.117 Partnerships. (a) If there is a death or insolvency of a partner in the business registered under this part, the surviving partner or partners may continue to operate under the... partner or partners acquire the business upon settlement of the partnership, the surviving partner...

  4. Service-Learning Partnerships: Paths of Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorado, Silvia; Giles, Dwight E., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    This article furthers research and theory on the initiation and development of service-learning partnerships. It identifies three paths of engagement between university and community agencies: tentative engagement, aligned engagement, and committed engagement. This conceptualization helps to understand how service-learning partnerships evolve over…

  5. 27 CFR 18.34 - Continuing partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Continuing partnerships. 18.34 Section 18.34 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU..., the partnership is not immediately terminated on death or insolvency of a partner, but continues...

  6. 27 CFR 19.689 - Continuing partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Continuing partnerships. 19.689 Section 19.689 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU... Information § 19.689 Continuing partnerships. (a) If there is a death or insolvency of a partner in...

  7. 27 CFR 19.117 - Partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Partnerships. 19.117 Section 19.117 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Amending A Registration § 19.117 Partnerships. (a) If there is a death or insolvency of a partner in...

  8. 27 CFR 19.133 - Partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Partnerships. 19.133 Section 19.133 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Amending An Operating Permit § 19.133 Partnerships. (a) If there is a death or insolvency of a partner in...

  9. 27 CFR 555.58 - Continuing partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Continuing partnerships. 555.58 Section 555.58 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS... death or insolvency of a partner, but continues until the winding up of the partnership affairs...

  10. 27 CFR 18.34 - Continuing partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Continuing partnerships. 18.34 Section 18.34 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU..., the partnership is not immediately terminated on death or insolvency of a partner, but continues...

  11. 27 CFR 18.34 - Continuing partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Continuing partnerships. 18.34 Section 18.34 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU..., the partnership is not immediately terminated on death or insolvency of a partner, but continues...

  12. 27 CFR 555.58 - Continuing partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Continuing partnerships. 555.58 Section 555.58 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS... death or insolvency of a partner, but continues until the winding up of the partnership affairs...

  13. 27 CFR 19.925 - Continuing partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Continuing partnerships. 19.925 Section 19.925 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU... partnership is not immediately terminated on death or insolvency of a partner, but continues until the...

  14. 27 CFR 20.59 - Continuing partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Continuing partnerships. 20.59 Section 20.59 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU... the laws of a particular State, a partnership is not teminated on death or insolvency of a...

  15. 27 CFR 22.60 - Continuing partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Continuing partnerships. 22.60 Section 22.60 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU... a particular State, a partnership is not terminated on death or insolvency of a partner,...

  16. 27 CFR 18.34 - Continuing partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Continuing partnerships. 18.34 Section 18.34 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU..., the partnership is not immediately terminated on death or insolvency of a partner, but continues...

  17. 27 CFR 22.60 - Continuing partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Continuing partnerships. 22.60 Section 22.60 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU... a particular State, a partnership is not terminated on death or insolvency of a partner,...

  18. 27 CFR 19.689 - Continuing partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Continuing partnerships. 19.689 Section 19.689 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU... Information § 19.689 Continuing partnerships. (a) If there is a death or insolvency of a partner in...

  19. 27 CFR 19.689 - Continuing partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Continuing partnerships. 19.689 Section 19.689 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU... Information § 19.689 Continuing partnerships. (a) If there is a death or insolvency of a partner in...

  20. 27 CFR 22.60 - Continuing partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Continuing partnerships. 22.60 Section 22.60 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU... a particular State, a partnership is not terminated on death or insolvency of a partner,...

  1. 27 CFR 18.34 - Continuing partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Continuing partnerships. 18.34 Section 18.34 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU..., the partnership is not immediately terminated on death or insolvency of a partner, but continues...

  2. 27 CFR 555.58 - Continuing partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Continuing partnerships. 555.58 Section 555.58 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS... death or insolvency of a partner, but continues until the winding up of the partnership affairs...

  3. 27 CFR 20.59 - Continuing partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Continuing partnerships. 20.59 Section 20.59 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU... the laws of a particular State, a partnership is not teminated on death or insolvency of a...

  4. 27 CFR 19.133 - Partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Partnerships. 19.133 Section 19.133 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Amending An Operating Permit § 19.133 Partnerships. (a) If there is a death or insolvency of a partner in...

  5. 27 CFR 20.59 - Continuing partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Continuing partnerships. 20.59 Section 20.59 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU... the laws of a particular State, a partnership is not teminated on death or insolvency of a...

  6. 27 CFR 19.117 - Partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Partnerships. 19.117 Section 19.117 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Amending A Registration § 19.117 Partnerships. (a) If there is a death or insolvency of a partner in...

  7. 27 CFR 22.60 - Continuing partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Continuing partnerships. 22.60 Section 22.60 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU... a particular State, a partnership is not terminated on death or insolvency of a partner,...

  8. 27 CFR 22.60 - Continuing partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Continuing partnerships. 22.60 Section 22.60 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU... a particular State, a partnership is not terminated on death or insolvency of a partner,...

  9. 27 CFR 555.58 - Continuing partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Continuing partnerships. 555.58 Section 555.58 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS... death or insolvency of a partner, but continues until the winding up of the partnership affairs...

  10. 27 CFR 555.58 - Continuing partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2012-04-01 2010-04-01 true Continuing partnerships. 555.58 Section 555.58 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS... death or insolvency of a partner, but continues until the winding up of the partnership affairs...

  11. 27 CFR 19.133 - Partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Partnerships. 19.133 Section 19.133 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Amending An Operating Permit § 19.133 Partnerships. (a) If there is a death or insolvency of a partner in...

  12. 27 CFR 20.59 - Continuing partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Continuing partnerships. 20.59 Section 20.59 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU... the laws of a particular State, a partnership is not teminated on death or insolvency of a...

  13. 27 CFR 19.117 - Partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Partnerships. 19.117 Section 19.117 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Amending A Registration § 19.117 Partnerships. (a) If there is a death or insolvency of a partner in...

  14. 27 CFR 19.188 - Partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Partnerships. 19.188 Section 19.188 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... partnership is not terminated on death or insolvency of a partner, but continues until the winding up of...

  15. 27 CFR 20.59 - Continuing partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Continuing partnerships. 20.59 Section 20.59 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU... the laws of a particular State, a partnership is not teminated on death or insolvency of a...

  16. Public-Private Partnerships in Flanders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leemans, Geert

    2006-01-01

    Belgium's Flemish government recently approved a EUR 1 billion investment in school infrastructure through public-private partnerships, its first major initiative of this kind. The Flemish Community's variant of public-private partnerships in school building allows the government to meet urgent needs in the short run, but also to spread the costs…

  17. Exploring Competencies for Manufacturing Education Partnership Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Diane D.; Guerdat, Kate G.

    2012-01-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology's Hollings Manufacturing Extension Partnership works with U.S. manufacturers to help them create and retain jobs, increase profits, and save time and money. Members of the Manufacturing Extension Partnership recognized the need to expand capacity and capabilities of their network to address the…

  18. Training for Trade: A Partnership Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wismer, Jack N.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the role of community colleges in providing international trade education and training, highlighting the importance of building partnerships. Describes methods for building partnerships, eight current community college training-for-trade (TFT) programs, and training services and resources. Suggests that TFT programs must become a…

  19. Simultaneous Renewal through Professional Development School Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shroyer, Gail; Yahnke, Sally; Bennett, Andrew; Dunn, Cindi

    2007-01-01

    The authors describe the premises, processes used, and outcomes of a K-16 simultaneous renewal model, as implemented through the Kansas State University Professional Development School Partnership Project. The goal of this partnership is to improve K-12 teaching and learning while improving a university teacher-preparation program through…

  20. Student Voice and Engagement: Connecting through Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Claire; Swain, Julie; Rodway-Dyer, Sue

    2014-01-01

    This paper draws on research conducted across an English higher education partnership to investigate the ways in which student voice was engaged in further education colleges offering university awards through partnership arrangements. Such collaborations are characterised by the marginal presence of higher education students in an environment…