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Sample records for shallow marine carbonates

  1. Shallow marine carbon and oxygen isotope and elemental records indicate icehouse-greenhouse cycles during the Early Jurassic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korte, Christoph; Hesselbo, Stephen P.

    2011-12-01

    For much of the Mesozoic record there has been an inconclusive debate on the possible global significance of isotopic proxies for environmental change and of sequence stratigraphic depositional sequences. We present a carbon and oxygen isotope and elemental record for part of the Early Jurassic based on marine benthic and nektobenthic molluscs and brachiopods from the shallow marine succession of the Cleveland Basin, UK. The invertebrate isotope record is supplemented with carbon isotope data from fossil wood, which samples atmospheric carbon. New data elucidate two major global carbon isotope events, a negative excursion of ˜2‰ at the Sinemurian-Pliensbachian boundary, and a positive excursion of ˜2‰ in the Late Pliensbachian. The Sinemurian-Pliensbachian boundary event is similar to the slightly younger Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event and is characterized by deposition of relatively deepwater organic-rich shale. The Late Pliensbachian strata by contrast are characterized by shallow marine deposition. Oxygen isotope data imply cooling locally for both events. However, because deeper water conditions characterize the Sinemurian-Pliensbachian boundary in the Cleveland Basin the temperature drop is likely of local significance; in contrast a cool Late Pliensbachian shallow seafloor agrees with previous inference of partial icehouse conditions. Both the large-scale, long-term and small-scale, short-duration isotopic cycles occurred in concert with relative sea level changes documented previously from sequence stratigraphy. Isotope events and the sea level cycles are concluded to reflect processes of global significance, supporting the idea of an Early Jurassic in which cyclic swings from icehouse to greenhouse and super greenhouse conditions occurred at timescales from 1 to 10 Ma.

  2. Changes in Eocene-Miocene shallow marine carbonate factories along the tropical SE Circum-Caribbean responded to major regional and global environmental and tectonic events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva-Tamayo, Juan Carlos

    2015-04-01

    Changes in the factory of Cenozoic tropical marine carbonates have been for long attributed to major variations on climatic and environmental conditions. Although important changes on the factories of Cenozoic Caribbean carbonates seem to have followed global climatic and environmental changes, the regional impact of such changes on the factories of shallow marine carbonate along the Caribbean is not well established. Moreover, the influence of transpressional tectonics on the occurrence, distribution and stratigraphy of shallow marine carbonate factories along this area is far from being well understood. Here we report detailed stratigraphic, petrographic and Sr-isotope chemostratigraphic information of several Eocene-Miocene carbonate successions deposited along the equatorial/tropical SE Circum-Caribbean (Colombia and Panama) from which we further assess the influence of changing environmental conditions, transtentional tectonics and sea level change on the development of the shallow marine carbonate factories. Our results suggest that during the Eocene-early Oligocene interval, a period of predominant high atmospheric pCO2, coralline algae constitute the principal carbonate builders of shallow marine carbonate successions along the SE Circum-Caribbean. Detailed stratigraphic and paragenetic analyses suggest the developed of laterally continuous red algae calcareous build-ups along outer-rimmed carbonate platforms. The predominance of coralline red algae over corals on the shallow marine carbonate factories was likely related to high sea surface temperatures and high turbidity. The occurrence of such build-ups was likely controlled by pronounce changes in the basin paleotopography, i.e. the occurrence of basement highs and lows, resulting from local transpressional tectonics. The occurrence of these calcareous red algae dominated factories was also controlled by diachronic opening of different sedimentary basins along the SE Circum Caribbean resulting from

  3. In situ trace metal analysis of Neoarchaean--Ordovician shallow-marine microbial-carbonate-hosted pyrites.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, M; Turner, E C; Kamber, B S

    2015-07-01

    Pre-Cambrian atmospheric and oceanic redox evolutions are expressed in the inventory of redox-sensitive trace metals in marine sedimentary rocks. Most of the currently available information was derived from deep-water sedimentary rocks (black shale/banded iron formation). Many of the studied trace metals (e.g. Mo, U, Ni and Co) are sensitive to the composition of the exposed land surface and prevailing weathering style, and their oceanic inventory ultimately depends on the terrestrial flux. The validity of claims for increased/decreased terrestrial fluxes has remained untested as far as the shallow-marine environment is concerned. Here, the first systematic study of trace metal inventories of the shallow-marine environment by analysis of microbial carbonate-hosted pyrite, from ca. 2.65-0.52 Ga, is presented. A petrographic survey revealed a first-order difference in preservation of early diagenetic pyrite. Microbial carbonates formed before the 2.4 Ga great oxygenation event (GOE) are much richer in pyrite and contain pyrite grains of greater morphological variability but lesser chemical substitution than samples deposited after the GOE. This disparity in pyrite abundance and morphology is mirrored by the qualitative degree of preservation of organic matter (largely as kerogen). Thus, it seems that in microbial carbonates, pyrite formation and preservation were related to presence and preservation of organic C. Several redox-sensitive trace metals show interpretable temporal trends supporting earlier proposals derived from deep-water sedimentary rocks. Most notably, the shallow-water pyrite confirms a rise in the oceanic Mo inventory across the pre-Cambrian-Cambrian boundary, implying the establishment of efficient deep-ocean ventilation. The carbonate-hosted pyrite also confirms the Neoarchaean and early Palaeoproterozoic ocean had higher Ni concentration, which can now more firmly be attributed to a greater proportion of magnesian volcanic rock on land rather

  4. In situ trace metal analysis of Neoarchaean--Ordovician shallow-marine microbial-carbonate-hosted pyrites.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, M; Turner, E C; Kamber, B S

    2015-07-01

    Pre-Cambrian atmospheric and oceanic redox evolutions are expressed in the inventory of redox-sensitive trace metals in marine sedimentary rocks. Most of the currently available information was derived from deep-water sedimentary rocks (black shale/banded iron formation). Many of the studied trace metals (e.g. Mo, U, Ni and Co) are sensitive to the composition of the exposed land surface and prevailing weathering style, and their oceanic inventory ultimately depends on the terrestrial flux. The validity of claims for increased/decreased terrestrial fluxes has remained untested as far as the shallow-marine environment is concerned. Here, the first systematic study of trace metal inventories of the shallow-marine environment by analysis of microbial carbonate-hosted pyrite, from ca. 2.65-0.52 Ga, is presented. A petrographic survey revealed a first-order difference in preservation of early diagenetic pyrite. Microbial carbonates formed before the 2.4 Ga great oxygenation event (GOE) are much richer in pyrite and contain pyrite grains of greater morphological variability but lesser chemical substitution than samples deposited after the GOE. This disparity in pyrite abundance and morphology is mirrored by the qualitative degree of preservation of organic matter (largely as kerogen). Thus, it seems that in microbial carbonates, pyrite formation and preservation were related to presence and preservation of organic C. Several redox-sensitive trace metals show interpretable temporal trends supporting earlier proposals derived from deep-water sedimentary rocks. Most notably, the shallow-water pyrite confirms a rise in the oceanic Mo inventory across the pre-Cambrian-Cambrian boundary, implying the establishment of efficient deep-ocean ventilation. The carbonate-hosted pyrite also confirms the Neoarchaean and early Palaeoproterozoic ocean had higher Ni concentration, which can now more firmly be attributed to a greater proportion of magnesian volcanic rock on land rather

  5. Strontium and carbon isotope stratigraphy of the Late Jurassic shallow marine limestone in western Palaeo-Pacific, northwest Borneo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakizaki, Yoshihiro; Weissert, Helmut; Hasegawa, Takashi; Ishikawa, Tsuyoshi; Matsuoka, Jun; Kano, Akihiro

    2013-09-01

    Strontium and carbon isotope stratigraphy was applied to a 202 m-thick shallow marine carbonate section within the Late Jurassic Bau Limestone at the SSF quarry in northwest Borneo, Malaysia, which was deposited in the western Palaeo-Pacific. Strontium isotopic ratios of rudist specimens suggest that the SSF section was formed between the latest Oxfordian (155.95 Ma) and the Late Kimmeridgian (152.70 Ma), which is consistent with previous biostratigraphy. The δ13Ccarb values of bulk carbonate range from -0.10 to +2.28‰ and generally show an increasing upward trend in the lower part of the section and a decreasing upward trend in the upper part of the section. A comparable pattern is preserved in the δ13Corg isotope record. Limestone samples of the SSF section mainly preserve the initial δ13Ccarb values, except for the interval 84-92 m, where an apparent negative anomaly likely developed as a result of meteoric diagenesis. Comparing with the Tethyan δ13Ccarb profile, a negative anomaly in the lower SSF section can be correlated with the lowered δ13C values around the Oxfordian/Kimmeridgian boundary. In addition, δ13Ccarb values of the Bau Limestone are generally ∼1‰ lower than the Tethyan values, but comparable with the values reported from Scotland and Russia, located in Boreal realm during the Late Jurassic. This suggests that either the Tethyan record or the other records have been affected by the δ13C values of regionally variable dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). The Late Jurassic δ13CDIC values are thought to have been regionally variable as a result of their palaeoceanographic settings. This study shows that δ13C chemostratigraphy of the Palaeo-Pacific region contributes to an improved understanding of global carbon cycling and oceanography during this time period.

  6. Orbitally paced phosphogenesis in Mediterranean shallow marine carbonates during the middle Miocene Monterey event

    PubMed Central

    Hauzenberger, Christoph A.; Reuter, Markus; Piller, Werner E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract During the Oligo‐Miocene, major phases of phosphogenesis occurred in the Earth's oceans. However, most phosphate deposits represent condensed or allochthonous hemipelagic deposits, formed by complex physical and chemical enrichment processes, limiting their applicability for the study regarding the temporal pacing of Miocene phosphogenesis. The Oligo‐Miocene Decontra section located on the Maiella Platform (central Apennines, Italy) is a widely continuous carbonate succession deposited in a mostly middle to outer neritic setting. Of particular interest are the well‐winnowed grain to packstones of the middle Miocene Bryozoan Limestone, where occurrences of authigenic phosphate grains coincide with the prominent carbon isotope excursion of the Monterey event. This unique setting allows the analysis of orbital forcing on phosphogenesis, within a bio, chemo, and cyclostratigraphically constrained age‐model. LA‐ICP‐MS analyses revealed a significant enrichment of uranium in the studied authigenic phosphates compared to the surrounding carbonates, allowing natural gamma‐radiation (GR) to be used as a qualitative proxy for autochthonous phosphate content. Time series analyses indicate a strong 405 kyr eccentricity forcing of GR in the Bryozoan Limestone. These results link maxima in the GR record and thus phosphate content to orbitally paced increases in the burial of organic carbon, particularly during the carbon isotope maxima of the Monterey event. Thus, phosphogenesis during the middle Miocene in the Mediterranean was controlled by the 405 kyr eccentricity and its influence on large‐scale paleoproductivity patterns. Rare earth element data were used as a tool to reconstruct the formation conditions of the investigated phosphates, indicating generally oxic formation conditions, which are consistent with microbially mediated phosphogenesis. PMID:27570497

  7. The Eocene storm-dominated foralgal ramp of the western Pyrenees (Urbasa-Andia Formation): An analogue of future shallow-marine carbonate systems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payros, Aitor; Pujalte, Victoriano; Tosquella, Josep; Orue-Etxebarria, Xabier

    2010-07-01

    If the ongoing phenomenon of global warming prevails, three main consequences are expected in tropical seas: a higher sea level, a reduction in coral reefs and more intense cyclones. What will shallow-marine carbonate systems be like? Insights can be gained from the Pyrenean Urbasa-Andia Formation, a transgressive heterozoan-like foralgal (larger foraminiferal and red algal) ramp that formed in Middle Eocene times, a greenhouse interval characterized by high atmospheric CO 2 content. Firstly, the evolution of future tropical shallow-marine systems subject to a sea-level rise is very likely to be similar to that seen in the backstepping architecture of the Urbasa-Andia Formation. Secondly, Eocene larger foraminifers rose when the Paleocene-Eocene hyperthermal event caused a decline in corals in tropical seas. Coral reefs are again among the ecosystems that are likely to be particularly affected by current global warming. It is therefore probable that future shallow-marine tropical ecosystems will be devoid of platform margin coral reefs, heterozoan ramps being far more common. Thirdly, strong storm influence was common on the Urbasa-Andia carbonate ramp, the most distinctive feature being a distal dune field that was formed below storm wave base by high-energy return currents. Similar features also characterize other Eocene carbonate ramps. Furthermore, numerical simulations highlighted the effect of strong tropical cyclones during the equable climate of the Eocene. Together this information supports the hypothesis that tropical cyclone activity may increase under future greenhouse conditions. Taking everything into account, the transgressive storm-dominated foralgal ramp represented by the Urbasa-Andia Formation can be used as a virtual analogue of future shallow-marine carbonate sedimentary environments developed under greenhouse conditions.

  8. Size fraction analysis of fish-derived carbonates in shallow sub-tropical marine environments and a potentially unrecognised origin for peloidal carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salter, Michael A.; Perry, Chris T.; Wilson, Rod W.

    2014-12-01

    Marine bony fish are now known as primary producers of calcium carbonate. Furthermore, within the shallow sub-tropical platform settings of the Bahamas, this production process has been shown to occur at rates relevant to carbonate sediment production budgets. Fish excrete these carbonates as loosely aggregated pellets which, post-excretion, exhibit a range of distinctive crystal morphologies and have mineralogies ranging from low (0-4 mol% MgCO3) to high (4-40 mol% MgCO3) Mg-calcites, aragonite and amorphous carbonate phases. Here we provide the first quantitative assessment of the size fractions of the carbonates produced by a range of tropical fish species, and document the extent of post-excretion carbonate pellet break down under a range of physical agitation conditions. Specifically, we document the morphologies and size fractions of: i) intact pellets at the point of excretion; ii) intact pellets after agitation in seawater; and iii) the particles released from pellets post-disaggregation. Results indicate that fish-derived pellets initially fall within the very fine to very coarse sand fractions. Exposure to conditions of moderate seawater agitation for 30 days results in significant pellet diminution; 66% of initial pellet mass being released as individual particles, whilst 34% is retained as partially intact pellets that are smaller (fine sand-grade) and more rounded than initial pellets. In contrast, pellets exposed to very gently agitated conditions for up to 200 days show little change. Where pellet disaggregation does occur, particles are commonly released as individual clay- and silt-grade crystals. However, some morphotypes (e.g., polycrystalline spheres) can be intergrown and are released as strongly cohesive particle clusters falling within the coarse silt to fine sand fractions. Only very vigorous agitation may disaggregate such particles, resulting in the release of their component clay-grade crystals. We conclude that fish-derived carbonates

  9. Correlating carbon and oxygen isotope events in early to middle Miocene shallow marine carbonates in the Mediterranean region using orbitally tuned chemostratigraphy and lithostratigraphy

    PubMed Central

    Piller, Werner E.; Reuter, Markus; Harzhauser, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Abstract During the Miocene prominent oxygen isotope events (Mi‐events) reflect major changes in glaciation, while carbonate isotope maxima (CM‐events) reflect changes in organic carbon burial, particularly during the Monterey carbon isotope excursion. However, despite their importance to the global climate history they have never been recorded in shallow marine carbonate successions. The Decontra section on the Maiella Platform (central Apennines, Italy), however, allows to resolve them for the first time in such a setting during the early to middle Miocene. The present study improves the stratigraphic resolution of parts of the Decontra section via orbital tuning of high‐resolution gamma ray (GR) and magnetic susceptibility data to the 405 kyr eccentricity metronome. The tuning allows, within the established biostratigraphic, sequence stratigraphic, and isotope stratigraphic frameworks, a precise correlation of the Decontra section with pelagic records of the Mediterranean region, as well as the global paleoclimatic record and the global sea level curve. Spectral series analyses of GR data further indicate that the 405 kyr orbital cycle is particularly well preserved during the Monterey Event. Since GR is a direct proxy for authigenic uranium precipitation during increased burial of organic carbon in the Decontra section, it follows the same long‐term orbital pacing as observed in the carbon isotope records. The 405 kyr GR beat is thus correlated with the carbon isotope maxima observed during the Monterey Event. Finally, the Mi‐events can now be recognized in the δ18O record and coincide with plankton‐rich, siliceous, or phosphatic horizons in the lithology of the section. PMID:27546980

  10. Methane-derived carbonates form at the sediment-bedrock interface in a shallow marine gas seep.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimball, J.; Ding, H.; Valentine, D. L.

    2006-12-01

    Hydrocarbon seeps occur world-wide, and release large quantities of oil and natural gas to the ocean and atmosphere. One of the world's most prolific hydrocarbon seep fields is located just offshore from Goleta, CA, and serves as the study site for this investigation. In the course of investigating gas fluxes from a 10 m deep coastal seep, samples of seafloor bedrock were collected by scuba diving during a time of low sediment burden. These samples were found to be concretions composed primarily of carbonate-cemented sand. The delta13C values of the carbonate range from -25 to -32 per mille, and indicate a role for methane oxidation in the formation of the carbonates. Long chain fatty acids were extracted from the concretions and were quantified, identified, and analyzed for their 13C composition. Fatty acids typical of sulfate reducing bacteria were observed, and interpreted as a signature of anoxia. Further mineralogical and isotopic studies are planned. From these observations we interpret a shallow water origin for these concretions, whereby the seasonal migration of sand to the seep environment drives anoxia and anaerobic methane oxidation at the sediment-bedrock interface. The alkalinity generated from sulfate reduction causes the precipitation of methane-derived carbonate- which forms a concretion with sand.

  11. Late Aptian palaeoclimatic turnovers and volcanism: Insights from a shallow-marine and continental succession of the Apennine carbonate platform, southern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graziano, Roberto; Raspini, Arturo; Bartiromo, Antonello

    2016-06-01

    This study reports an integrated facies analysis carried out on a new section from the Upper Aptian of the SE Matese Mts. (Civitella Licinio, northern Campania, S. Italy), which includes several decimeter-to-meter scale lacustrine intervals straddling a meter-scale plant-rich Plattenkalk. These intervals are assigned to the late Gargasian-early Clansayesian by their stratigraphic relationship with the upper Salpingoporella dinarica acme as well as lithologic and biostratigraphic supra-regional key-markers found in the Apennine Carbonate Platform (ApCP), including the Orbitolina Level. We infer that the monogeneric parautochthonous plant remains (Frenelopsis sp.) were deposited in a supratidal-to-paralic coastal mudflat close to a restricted, shallow-marine lagoon, at the verge of an arid-semiarid climatic phase. The Plattenkalk was rapidly replaced by persistent lacustrine lithofacies at the onset of a major climatic turnover (Glacial Trigger). The overlying shallow-marine deposits are capped by a deeply incised palaeokarstic surface and, in turn, by unconformable middle Clansayesian transgressive shallow-marine deposits. Interlayering of reliable lithologic indicators of palaeoclimate and High-Resolution Event Stratigraphic (HIRES) correlation of the Civitella Licinio succession with the astrochronologically tuned Mt. Faito reference section of the ApCP bring evidence of rapidly fluctuating hydroclimatic conditions (wet and arid phases) in the short (100 ky) and long (400 ky) eccentricity time band. HIRES and astrochronological age assignment to crucial key markers and humid/arid phases at Civitella Licinio permit to further refine the detailed stratigraphy of the Mt. Faito reference section and to assign the upper S. dinarica acme of the ApCP to a numerical age of 118.55-118.50 My. SEM and EDS analyses document common to abundant windblown volcanic particles (glass shards and sanidine crystals) throughout the Frenelopsis-rich Plattenkalk (~ 118.3 to ~ 118.2 My

  12. A multi-proxy approach for correlating shallow marine carbonate successions in the Oligocene-Miocene Mediterranean region with global chronostratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auer, Gerald; Piller, Werner E.; Reuter, Markus; Harzhauser, Mathias; Brandano, Marco

    2014-05-01

    In most neritic carbonates time resolution does not allow exact correlation with chronostratigraphic standards since these are, especially for the Cenozoic, defined in deep marine successions. A critical time interval in the Cenozoic is the Oligocene-Miocene transition for which most GSSPs are defined in deep marine sections in the Mediterranean region. However, a sound correlation with shallow water carbonate systems is still missing. A possible candidate for such a correlation is the Decontra section on the Maiella Platform (central Apennines, Italy). The widely continuous carbonate succession is composed of larger benthic foraminiferan, bryozoan and corallinacean limestones interbedded with planktic foraminiferal carbonates representing a mostly outer neritic setting. Integrated multi-proxy and facies analyses indicate that CaCO3 and TOC contents display only local to regional processes on the carbonate platform and are not suited for stratigraphic correlation on a wider scale. In contrast, new biostratigraphic data (planktic and larger benthic foraminifers) allow correlating the Decontra stable C isotope record to the global deep sea C isotope record. This links relative sea level fluctuations, which are reflected by facies and magnetic susceptibility (MS), to third-order eustatic cycles. In addition, observed low frequency cycles in the MS record were used to orbitally tune parts of the Decontra section with the 400ky-eccentricity-cycles which correlate well with the ages defined by both bio- and sequence stratigraphy. Time series analyses of gamma-ray (GR) data indicate that the 400ky-cycle is well preserved in this proxy during the interval between ~17 and 13.5 Ma. Since GR is a direct proxy for raised precipitation of autogenic Uranium caused by increased burial of organic carbon it follows the same long-term orbital pacing as observed in deep-sea carbon and oxygen isotope records. The observed 400ky GR beat is thus assumed to correlate with the carbon

  13. Shallow Carbon Sequestration Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Pendergrass, Gary; Fraley, David; Alter, William; Bodenhamer, Steven

    2013-09-30

    The potential for carbon sequestration at relatively shallow depths was investigated at four power plant sites in Missouri. Exploratory boreholes were cored through the Davis Shale confining layer into the St. Francois aquifer (Lamotte Sandstone and Bonneterre Formation). Precambrian basement contact ranged from 654.4 meters at the John Twitty Energy Center in Southwest Missouri to over 1100 meters near the Sioux Power Plant in St. Charles County. Investigations at the John Twitty Energy Center included 3D seismic reflection surveys, downhole geophysical logging and pressure testing, and laboratory analysis of rock core and water samples. Plans to perform injectivity tests at the John Twitty Energy Center, using food grade CO{sub 2}, had to be abandoned when the isolated aquifer was found to have very low dissolved solids content. Investigations at the Sioux Plant and Thomas Hill Energy Center in Randolph County found suitably saline conditions in the St. Francois. A fourth borehole in Platte County was discontinued before reaching the aquifer. Laboratory analyses of rock core and water samples indicate that the St. Charles and Randolph County sites could have storage potentials worthy of further study. The report suggests additional Missouri areas for further investigation as well.

  14. Shallow marine ecosystem feedback to the Permian/Triassic mass extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongbiao; Meng, Zheng; Liao, Wei; Weng, Zeting; Yang, Hao

    2011-03-01

    Late Permian reefs developed widely on shallow marine carbonate platforms in South China but disappeared far below the main mass extinction level of the latest Permian. The collapse of reef ecosystem may be related to the enhanced volcanism at the end of Late Permian. Notably, some colony corals and reef-building sponges were found to occur near the mass extinction boundary, inferring the eclipse of reef ecosystem is ahead of the disappearance of reef-building organisms, and the triggers would be present long before the main mass extinction. As the primary producers, the calcareous algae are rich in platform limestones of Late Permian and played a very important role in maintaining the shallow benthic ecosystems. The calcareous algae were found to disappear synchronously with the great reduction of foraminifers, which were ecologically associated with these algae. The extinction of Late Permian calcareous algae greatly reduced the biodiversity of primary producers in the shallow marine environment and destroyed in part the structure and the base of the shallow marine ecosystems, which in turn cause the extinction of ecologically associated metazoan. Microbialites developed on carbonate platforms immediately after the end-Permian mass extinction, representing a simple and unique microbial ecosystem. Widespread occurrence of microbialites symbolized the deterioration of marine environmental conditions and the dramatic revolution of marine ecosystems. As the new primary producers instead of the extinguished calcareous algae, cyanobacteria in the microbialites were an important base of this peculiar ecosystem and contributed greatly to the survival of the remnant faunas after the mass extinction. Widespread occurrence of microbialites in shallow marine environment is suggested to be related to the elevated level of volcanism-induced greenhouse gases and enhanced evaporation and hypersaline condition in addition to the decrease of metazoan grazing pressure. The change

  15. Deep Water, Shallow Water: Marine Animal Homes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soltow, Willow

    1984-01-01

    Examines the diversity of life in the oceans and ways in which teachers can explore ocean habitats with their students without leaving the classroom. Topic areas considered include: restricted habitats, people and marine habitats, pollution, incidental kills, and the commercial and recreational uses of marine waters. (JN)

  16. Marine mammal audibility of selected shallow-water survey sources.

    PubMed

    MacGillivray, Alexander O; Racca, Roberto; Li, Zizheng

    2014-01-01

    Most attention about the acoustic effects of marine survey sound sources on marine mammals has focused on airgun arrays, with other common sources receiving less scrutiny. Sound levels above hearing threshold (sensation levels) were modeled for six marine mammal species and seven different survey sources in shallow water. The model indicated that odontocetes were most likely to hear sounds from mid-frequency sources (fishery, communication, and hydrographic systems), mysticetes from low-frequency sources (sub-bottom profiler and airguns), and pinnipeds from both mid- and low-frequency sources. High-frequency sources (side-scan and multibeam) generated the lowest estimated sensation levels for all marine mammal species groups.

  17. δ44/40Ca variability in shallow water carbonates and the impact of submarine groundwater discharge on Ca-cycling in marine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmden, C.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Blanchon, P.; Evans, S.

    2012-04-01

    Shallow water carbonates from Florida Bay, the Florida Reef Tract, and a Mexican Caribbean fringing reef at Punta Maroma were studied to determine the range of Ca-isotope variation among a cohort of modern carbonate producers and to look for local-scale Ca-cycling effects. The total range of Ca-isotope fractionation is 0.4‰ at Punta Maroma, yielding an allochem-weighted average δ44/40Ca value of -1.12‰ consistent with bulk sediment from the lagoon with a value of -1.09‰. These values are virtually identical to bulk carbonate sediments from the Florida Reef Tract (-1.11‰) and from one location in Florida Bay (-1.09‰) near a tidal inlet in the Florida Keys. No evidence was found for the ∼0.6‰ fractionation between calcite and aragonite which has been observed in laboratory precipitation experiments. Combining these results with carbonate production modes and δ44/40Ca values for pelagic carbonates taken from the literature, we calculate a weighted average value of -1.12 ± 0.11‰ (2σ) for the global-scale Ca-output flux into carbonate sediments. The δ44/40Ca value of the input Ca-flux from rivers and hydrothermal fluids is -1.01 ± 0.04‰ (2σmean), calculated from literature data that have been corrected for inter-laboratory bias. Assuming that the ocean Ca cycle is in steady state, we calculate a δ44/40Ca value of -1.23 ± 0.23‰ (2σ) for submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) on a global scale. The SGD Ca-flux rivals river flows and mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal vent inputs as a source of Ca to the oceans. It has the potential to differ significantly in its isotopic value from these traditional Ca-inputs in the geological past, and to cause small changes in the δ44/40Ca value of oceans through time. In the innermost water circulation restricted region of northeastern Florida Bay, sediments and waters exhibit a 0.7‰ gradient in δ44/40Ca values decreasing towards the Florida Everglades. This lowering of δ44/40Ca is predominantly caused by

  18. Marine fish communities in shallow volcanic habitats.

    PubMed

    Pinault, M; Loiseau, N; Chabanet, P; Durville, P; Magalon, H; Quod, J P; Galzin, R

    2013-06-01

    This survey of the marine ichthyofauna of the Piton de La Fournaise volcano at Reunion Island is the first explanatory study of fish community structures in this area. It describes and analyses the main qualitative descriptors of the fish communities (i.e. species richness, diet, life history and geographical distribution) and their spatio-temporal organization. This investigation in 2011 examined lava flows of different ages, including the most recent flows that entered the ocean between 1977 and 2007. In all, 263 species belonging to 45 families were observed. Overall, the fish community was notable for an absence of top predators and a predominance of opportunistic small-bodied species, with dietary flexibility and high reproductive rates, characteristic of the early stages of ecological succession. Between-site analysis indicated that the fish assemblages differed essentially according to the intensity of the last volcanic disturbances. Fish communities in the most disturbed sites showed the highest numbers of Serranidae and the highest proportions of omnivores and small-bodied opportunistic carnivores, including a high proportion of endemic south-western Indian Ocean species. The spatial pattern of this last category of species could be the result of convergent biological traits, and their adaptation to unstable environments at the expense of their competitiveness in more biodiverse, mature communities. Conversely, fish communities in the less disturbed sites showed the highest number of Holocentridae and the highest proportion of browsers of sessile invertebrates. This last characteristic could be a consequence of higher ecological maturity, illustrated by a more specialized trophic network, for assemblages in areas with less intense disturbances. Otherwise, high structural complexity, either in unconsolidated lava boulders, rocks and rubble or high coral-covered sites, could favour the increase of the total number of species independent of disturbance

  19. Carbonate Production by Benthic Communities on Shallow Coralgal Reefs of Abrolhos Bank, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Reis, Vanessa Moura Dos; Karez, Cláudia Santiago; Mariath, Rodrigo; de Moraes, Fernando Coreixas; de Carvalho, Rodrigo Tomazetto; Brasileiro, Poliana Silva; Bahia, Ricardo da Gama; Lotufo, Tito Monteiro da Cruz; Ramalho, Laís Vieira; de Moura, Rodrigo Leão; Francini-Filho, Ronaldo Bastos; Pereira-Filho, Guilherme Henrique; Thompson, Fabiano Lopes; Bastos, Alex Cardoso; Salgado, Leonardo Tavares; Amado-Filho, Gilberto Menezes

    2016-01-01

    The abundance of reef builders, non-builders and the calcium carbonate produced by communities established in Calcification Accretion Units (CAUs) were determined in three Abrolhos Bank shallow reefs during the period from 2012 to 2014. In addition, the seawater temperature, the irradiance, and the amount and composition of the sediments were determined. The inner and outer reef arcs were compared. CAUs located on the inner reef shelf were under the influence of terrigenous sediments. On the outer reefs, the sediments were composed primarily of marine biogenic carbonates. The mean carbonate production in shallow reefs of Abrolhos was 579 ± 98 g m-2 y-1. The builder community was dominated by crustose coralline algae, while the non-builder community was dominated by turf. A marine heat wave was detected during the summer of 2013-2014, and the number of consecutive days with a temperature above or below the summer mean was positively correlated with the turf cover increase. The mean carbonate production of the shallow reefs of Abrolhos Bank was greater than the estimated carbonate production measured for artificial structures on several other shallow reefs of the world. The calcimass was higher than the non-calcareous mass, suggesting that the Abrolhos reefs are still in a positive carbonate production balance. Given that marine heat waves produce an increase of turf cover on the shallow reefs of the Abrolhos, a decrease in the cover represented by reef builders and shifting carbonate production are expected in the near future. PMID:27119151

  20. Carbonate Production by Benthic Communities on Shallow Coralgal Reefs of Abrolhos Bank, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Reis, Vanessa Moura Dos; Karez, Cláudia Santiago; Mariath, Rodrigo; de Moraes, Fernando Coreixas; de Carvalho, Rodrigo Tomazetto; Brasileiro, Poliana Silva; Bahia, Ricardo da Gama; Lotufo, Tito Monteiro da Cruz; Ramalho, Laís Vieira; de Moura, Rodrigo Leão; Francini-Filho, Ronaldo Bastos; Pereira-Filho, Guilherme Henrique; Thompson, Fabiano Lopes; Bastos, Alex Cardoso; Salgado, Leonardo Tavares; Amado-Filho, Gilberto Menezes

    2016-01-01

    The abundance of reef builders, non-builders and the calcium carbonate produced by communities established in Calcification Accretion Units (CAUs) were determined in three Abrolhos Bank shallow reefs during the period from 2012 to 2014. In addition, the seawater temperature, the irradiance, and the amount and composition of the sediments were determined. The inner and outer reef arcs were compared. CAUs located on the inner reef shelf were under the influence of terrigenous sediments. On the outer reefs, the sediments were composed primarily of marine biogenic carbonates. The mean carbonate production in shallow reefs of Abrolhos was 579 ± 98 g m-2 y-1. The builder community was dominated by crustose coralline algae, while the non-builder community was dominated by turf. A marine heat wave was detected during the summer of 2013-2014, and the number of consecutive days with a temperature above or below the summer mean was positively correlated with the turf cover increase. The mean carbonate production of the shallow reefs of Abrolhos Bank was greater than the estimated carbonate production measured for artificial structures on several other shallow reefs of the world. The calcimass was higher than the non-calcareous mass, suggesting that the Abrolhos reefs are still in a positive carbonate production balance. Given that marine heat waves produce an increase of turf cover on the shallow reefs of the Abrolhos, a decrease in the cover represented by reef builders and shifting carbonate production are expected in the near future.

  1. Carbonate Production by Benthic Communities on Shallow Coralgal Reefs of Abrolhos Bank, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    dos Reis, Vanessa Moura; Karez, Cláudia Santiago; Mariath, Rodrigo; de Moraes, Fernando Coreixas; de Carvalho, Rodrigo Tomazetto; Brasileiro, Poliana Silva; Bahia, Ricardo da Gama; Lotufo, Tito Monteiro da Cruz; Ramalho, Laís Vieira; de Moura, Rodrigo Leão; Francini-Filho, Ronaldo Bastos; Pereira-Filho, Guilherme Henrique; Thompson, Fabiano Lopes; Bastos, Alex Cardoso; Salgado, Leonardo Tavares; Amado-Filho, Gilberto Menezes

    2016-01-01

    The abundance of reef builders, non-builders and the calcium carbonate produced by communities established in Calcification Accretion Units (CAUs) were determined in three Abrolhos Bank shallow reefs during the period from 2012 to 2014. In addition, the seawater temperature, the irradiance, and the amount and composition of the sediments were determined. The inner and outer reef arcs were compared. CAUs located on the inner reef shelf were under the influence of terrigenous sediments. On the outer reefs, the sediments were composed primarily of marine biogenic carbonates. The mean carbonate production in shallow reefs of Abrolhos was 579 ± 98 g m-2 y-1. The builder community was dominated by crustose coralline algae, while the non-builder community was dominated by turf. A marine heat wave was detected during the summer of 2013–2014, and the number of consecutive days with a temperature above or below the summer mean was positively correlated with the turf cover increase. The mean carbonate production of the shallow reefs of Abrolhos Bank was greater than the estimated carbonate production measured for artificial structures on several other shallow reefs of the world. The calcimass was higher than the non-calcareous mass, suggesting that the Abrolhos reefs are still in a positive carbonate production balance. Given that marine heat waves produce an increase of turf cover on the shallow reefs of the Abrolhos, a decrease in the cover represented by reef builders and shifting carbonate production are expected in the near future. PMID:27119151

  2. Late Paleocene Arctic Ocean shallow-marine temperatures from mollusc stable isotopes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bice, Karen L.; Arthur, Michael A.; Marincovich, Louie, Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Late Paleocene high-latitude (80°N) Arctic Ocean shallow-marine temperatures are estimated from molluscan δ18O time series. Sampling of individual growth increments of two specimens of the bivalve Camptochlamys alaskensis provides a high-resolution record of shell stable isotope composition. The heavy carbon isotopic values of the specimens support a late Paleocene age for the youngest marine beds of the Prince Creek Formation exposed near Ocean Point, Alaska. The oxygen isotopic composition of regional freshwater runoff is estimated from the mean δ18O value of two freshwater bivalves collected from approximately coeval fluviatile beds. Over a 30 – 34‰ range of salinity, values assumed to represent the tolerance of C. alaskensis, the mean annual shallow-marine temperature recorded by these individuals is between 11° and 22°C. These values could represent maximum estimates of the mean annual temperature because of a possible warm-month bias imposed on the average δ18O value by slowing or cessation of growth in winter months. The amplitude of the molluscan δ18O time series probably records most of the seasonality in shallow-marine temperature. The annual temperature range indicated is approximately 6°C, suggesting very moderate high-latitude marine temperature seasonality during the late Paleocene. On the basis of analogy with modern Chlamys species, C. alaskensis probably inhabited water depths of 30–50 m. The seasonal temperature range derived from δ18O is therefore likely to be damped relative to the full range of annual sea surface temperatures. High-resolution sampling of molluscan shell material across inferred growth bands represents an important proxy record of seasonality of marine and freshwater conditions applicable at any latitude. If applied to other regions and time periods, the approach used here would contribute substantially to the paleoclimate record of seasonality.

  3. Seismic peak amplitude as a predictor of TOC content in shallow marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neto, Arthur Ayres; Mota, Bruno Bourguignon; Belem, André Luiz; Albuquerque, Ana Luiza; Capilla, Ramsés

    2016-10-01

    Acoustic remote sensing is a highly effective tool for exploring the seafloor of both deep and shallow marine settings. Indeed, the acoustic response depends on several physicochemical factors such as sediment grain size, bulk density, water content, and mineralogy. The objective of the present study is to assess the suitability of seismic peak amplitude as a predictor of total organic carbon (TOC) content in shallow marine sediments, based on data collected in the Cabo Frio mud belt in an upwelling zone off southeastern Brazil. These comprise records of P-wave velocity ( V P) along 680 km of high-resolution single-channel seismic surveys, combined with analyses of grain size, wet bulk density, absolute water content and TOC content for four piston-cores. TOC contents of sediments from 13 box-cores served to validate the methodology. The results show well-defined positive correlations between TOC content and mean grain size (phi scale) as well as absolute water content, and negative correlations with V P, wet bulk density, and acoustic impedance. These relationships yield a regression equation by which TOC content can be satisfactorily predicted on the basis of acoustic impedance for this region: y = - 4.84 ln( x) + 40.04. Indeed, the derived TOC contents differ by only 5% from those determined by geochemical analysis. After appropriate calibration, acoustic impedance can thus be conveniently used as a predictor of large-scale spatial distributions of organic carbon enrichment in marine sediments. This not only contributes to optimizing scientific project objectives, but also enhances the cost-effectiveness of marine surveys by greatly reducing the ship time commonly required for grid sampling.

  4. Seismic peak amplitude as a predictor of TOC content in shallow marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neto, Arthur Ayres; Mota, Bruno Bourguignon; Belem, André Luiz; Albuquerque, Ana Luiza; Capilla, Ramsés

    2016-04-01

    Acoustic remote sensing is a highly effective tool for exploring the seafloor of both deep and shallow marine settings. Indeed, the acoustic response depends on several physicochemical factors such as sediment grain size, bulk density, water content, and mineralogy. The objective of the present study is to assess the suitability of seismic peak amplitude as a predictor of total organic carbon (TOC) content in shallow marine sediments, based on data collected in the Cabo Frio mud belt in an upwelling zone off southeastern Brazil. These comprise records of P-wave velocity (V P) along 680 km of high-resolution single-channel seismic surveys, combined with analyses of grain size, wet bulk density, absolute water content and TOC content for four piston-cores. TOC contents of sediments from 13 box-cores served to validate the methodology. The results show well-defined positive correlations between TOC content and mean grain size (phi scale) as well as absolute water content, and negative correlations with V P, wet bulk density, and acoustic impedance. These relationships yield a regression equation by which TOC content can be satisfactorily predicted on the basis of acoustic impedance for this region: y = - 4.84 ln(x) + 40.04. Indeed, the derived TOC contents differ by only 5% from those determined by geochemical analysis. After appropriate calibration, acoustic impedance can thus be conveniently used as a predictor of large-scale spatial distributions of organic carbon enrichment in marine sediments. This not only contributes to optimizing scientific project objectives, but also enhances the cost-effectiveness of marine surveys by greatly reducing the ship time commonly required for grid sampling.

  5. Marine Diagenesis of Shallow Marine Lime-Mud Sediments: Insights from dgrO18 and dgrC13 Data.

    PubMed

    Choquette, P W

    1968-09-13

    Shallow marine lime-mud sediments of the Ste. Genevieve Formation (Mississippian), in part of the Illinois Basin, underwent at least three diagenetic changes: (i) local dolomitization in seawater or a brine, producing dolostone having average deltaC(13) of +2.5 per mille and deltaO(18) of +1.9 per mille (versus PDB-1); (ii) more usually cementation of unreplaced CaCO(3), in intrasediment seawater, yielding isotopically marine lime mudstone mainly composed of calcite, 4-micron or finer, with deltaO(18) of from -1 to +1 per mille; (iii) later partial alteration of CaCO(3), in permeable dolomitic rocks, by isotopically "lighter" waters, to calcite with an estimated deltaO(18) of -10 per mille or less. Isotope data appraised by petrographic analysis thus suggest "submarine" cementation of these carbonates in shallow marine conditions. PMID:17812283

  6. Marine Diagenesis of Shallow Marine Lime-Mud Sediments: Insights from dgrO18 and dgrC13 Data.

    PubMed

    Choquette, P W

    1968-09-13

    Shallow marine lime-mud sediments of the Ste. Genevieve Formation (Mississippian), in part of the Illinois Basin, underwent at least three diagenetic changes: (i) local dolomitization in seawater or a brine, producing dolostone having average deltaC(13) of +2.5 per mille and deltaO(18) of +1.9 per mille (versus PDB-1); (ii) more usually cementation of unreplaced CaCO(3), in intrasediment seawater, yielding isotopically marine lime mudstone mainly composed of calcite, 4-micron or finer, with deltaO(18) of from -1 to +1 per mille; (iii) later partial alteration of CaCO(3), in permeable dolomitic rocks, by isotopically "lighter" waters, to calcite with an estimated deltaO(18) of -10 per mille or less. Isotope data appraised by petrographic analysis thus suggest "submarine" cementation of these carbonates in shallow marine conditions.

  7. Extremely heat tolerant photosymbiosis in a shallow marine benthic foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Christiane; Danna, Titelboim; Janett, Brandt; Raphael, Morard; Barak, Herut; Sigal, Abramovich; Ahuva, Almogi-Labin; Michal, Kucera

    2016-04-01

    Thermal stress leads to the loss of algal symbionts (bleaching) in many shallow marine calcifiers including foraminifera. The bleaching threshold often occurs at water temperatures, which are likely to be exceeded in the near future due to global warming. Preadaptation represents one mechanism allowing photosymbiotic organisms to persist under warmer conditions, providing the tolerance can be carried to new habitats. Here we provide evidence for the existence of such adaptation in the benthic foraminifera Pararotalia calcariformata recently discovered in the eastern Mediterranean. We identify its symbionts as a consortium of diatom species dominated by Minutocellus polymorphus. We show that in the field, the foraminifera retains its pigments at a thermally polluted site, where peak water temperatures reach 36°C. To test whether this tolerance represents a widespread adaptation, we conducted manipulative experiments exposing populations from an unpolluted site to elevated temperatures for up to three weeks. The populations were kept in co-culture with the more thermally sensitive diatom-bearing foraminifera Amphistegina lobifera. Reduced photosynthetic activity in A. lobifera occurred at 32°C whereas photochemical stress in P. calcariformata was first observed during exposure to 36°C and chronic photoinhibition (but not mortality) first occurred at 42°C. Survivorship was high in all treatments, and growth was observed under thermal conditions similar to summer maxima at the thermally polluted site (35-36°C). The photosymbiosis in P. calcariformata is unusually thermally tolerant for a photosymbiont-bearing eukaryote. The thermal tolerance of this photosymbiosis is present in a natural environment where its thermal threshold is never realized. These observations imply that photosymbiosis in marine protists can respond to elevated temperatures by drawing on a pool of naturally occurring pre-adaptations. It also provides a perspective on the massive occurrence of

  8. Ningaloo Reef: Shallow Marine Habitats Mapped Using a Hyperspectral Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Kobryn, Halina T.; Wouters, Kristin; Beckley, Lynnath E.; Heege, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Research, monitoring and management of large marine protected areas require detailed and up-to-date habitat maps. Ningaloo Marine Park (including the Muiron Islands) in north-western Australia (stretching across three degrees of latitude) was mapped to 20 m depth using HyMap airborne hyperspectral imagery (125 bands) at 3.5 m resolution across the 762 km2 of reef environment between the shoreline and reef slope. The imagery was corrected for atmospheric, air-water interface and water column influences to retrieve bottom reflectance and bathymetry using the physics-based Modular Inversion and Processing System. Using field-validated, image-derived spectra from a representative range of cover types, the classification combined a semi-automated, pixel-based approach with fuzzy logic and derivative techniques. Five thematic classification levels for benthic cover (with probability maps) were generated with varying degrees of detail, ranging from a basic one with three classes (biotic, abiotic and mixed) to the most detailed with 46 classes. The latter consisted of all abiotic and biotic seabed components and hard coral growth forms in dominant or mixed states. The overall accuracy of mapping for the most detailed maps was 70% for the highest classification level. Macro-algal communities formed most of the benthic cover, while hard and soft corals represented only about 7% of the mapped area (58.6 km2). Dense tabulate coral was the largest coral mosaic type (37% of all corals) and the rest of the corals were a mix of tabulate, digitate, massive and soft corals. Our results show that for this shallow, fringing reef environment situated in the arid tropics, hyperspectral remote sensing techniques can offer an efficient and cost-effective approach to mapping and monitoring reef habitats over large, remote and inaccessible areas. PMID:23922921

  9. High Resolution Marine Magnetic Survey of Shallow Water Littoral Area

    PubMed Central

    Ginzburg, Boris; Cohen, Tsuriel Ram; Zafrir, Hovav; Alimi, Roger; Salomonski, Nizan; Sharvit, Jacob

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a system developed for detection and accurate mapping of ferro-metallic objects buried below the seabed in shallow waters. The system comprises a precise magnetic gradiometer and navigation subsystem, both installed on a non-magnetic catamaran towed by a low-magnetic interfering boat. In addition we present the results of a marine survey of a near-shore area in the vicinity of Atlit, a town situated on the Mediterranean coast of Israel, about 15 km south of Haifa. The primary purpose of the survey was to search for a Harvard airplane that crashed into the sea in 1960. A magnetic map of the survey area (3.5 km2 on a 0.5 m grid) was created revealing the anomalies at sub-meter accuracy. For each investigated target location a corresponding ferro-metallic item was dug out, one of which turned to be very similar to a part of the crashed airplane. The accuracy of location was confirmed by matching the position of the actual dug artifacts with the magnetic map within a range of ± 1 m, in a water depth of 9 m.

  10. Brucite microbialites in living coral skeletons: Indicators of extreme microenvironments in shallow-marine settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nothdurft, Luke D.; Webb, Gregory E.; Buster, Noreen A.; Holmes, Charles W.; Sorauf, James E.; Kloprogge, J. T.

    2005-03-01

    Brucite [Mg(OH)2] microbialites occur in vacated interseptal spaces of living scleractinian coral colonies (Acropora, Pocillopora, Porites) from subtidal and intertidal settings in the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, and subtidal Montastraea from the Florida Keys, United States. Brucite encrusts microbial filaments of endobionts (i.e., fungi, green algae, cyanobacteria) growing under organic biofilms; the brucite distribution is patchy both within interseptal spaces and within coralla. Although brucite is undersaturated in seawater, its precipitation was apparently induced in the corals by lowered pCO2 and increased pH within microenvironments protected by microbial biofilms. The occurrence of brucite in shallow-marine settings highlights the importance of microenvironments in the formation and early diagenesis of marine carbonates. Significantly, the brucite precipitates discovered in microenvironments in these corals show that early diagenetic products do not necessarily reflect ambient seawater chemistry. Errors in environmental interpretation may arise where unidentified precipitates occur in microenvironments in skeletal carbonates that are subsequently utilized as geochemical seawater proxies.

  11. Brucite microbialites in living coral skeletons: Indicators of extreme microenvironments in shallow-marine settings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nothdurft, L.D.; Webb, G.E.; Buster, N.A.; Holmes, C.W.; Sorauf, J.E.; Kloprogge, J.T.

    2005-01-01

    Brucite [Mg(OH)2] microbialites occur in vacated interseptal spaces of living scleractinian coral colonies (Acropora, Pocillopora, Porites) from subtidal and intertidal settings in the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, and subtidal Montastraea from the Florida Keys, United States. Brucite encrusts microbial filaments of endobionts (i.e., fungi, green algae, cyanobacteria) growing under organic biofilms; the brucite distribution is patchy both within interseptal spaces and within coralla. Although brucite is undersaturated in seawater, its precipitation was apparently induced in the corals by lowered pCO 2 and increased pH within microenvironments protected by microbial biofilms. The occurrence of brucite in shallow-marine settings highlights the importance of microenvironments in the formation and early diagenesis of marine carbonates. Significantly, the brucite precipitates discovered in microenvironments in these corals show that early diagenetic products do not necessarily reflect ambient seawater chemistry. Errors in environmental interpretation may arise where unidentified precipitates occur in microenvironments in skeletal carbonates that are subsequently utilized as geochemical seawater proxies. ?? 2005 Geological Society of America.

  12. Determining Effects of Diagenesis on Geochemical Dating of Plio-Pleistocene Shallow Marine Fauna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandstrom, R. M.; Cai, Y.; Raymo, M. E.; Goldstein, S. L.; Inglis, J. D.; Mata, R.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate dating of fossil shorelines is essential for establishing chronology related to paleo sea level changes, providing insight into past climates, paleo ice volumes and local dynamic topography. Biogenic carbonate is a particularly useful tool for dating marine terraces, as they record chemical signatures of seawater at the time of formation. However, the primary geochemical methods (marine Sr isotopes, U-series disequilibrium, and U-Pb dating) used to date shallow water fauna older than the late Pleistocene are often subject to open system effects, such as diagenesis (recrystallization and meteoric weathering). This is especially problematic for Sr isotope dating during the Mid-Pliocene, when the 87Sr/86Sr seawater calibration curve shows small changes over time, and small variations in 87Sr/86Sr ratios correspond to large uncertainties in ages. To identify pristine carbonate material that generates reliable seawater Sr isotope ratios, we examined different species of Plio-Pleistocene bivalves and corals from various geographic locations and environments by combining optical images, scanning electron microscope (SEM), cathodoluminescence and x-ray diffraction (XRD) with elemental and Sr isotope analyses of micro-drilled calcite and aragonite layers within individual organisms. The results from this study will help to evaluate the effect of secondary diagenesis and recrystallization on trace element abundances and Sr isotope ratios. Using these methods, we show that reliable ages can be achieved using the Sr isotope seawater curve.

  13. Microbial arsenic oxidation in a shallow marine hydrothermal vent system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amend, J. P.; Meyer-Dombard, D. R.; Pichler, T.; Price, R.; Herndon, E.; Hsia, N.

    2005-12-01

    The toxic effects of arsenic are well documented, but this Group V element can also serve as an energy source to a diverse group of microorganisms. Most of the attention has been on arsenate (AsV) reduction, but the focus is shifting to include arsenite (AsIII) oxidation and subsequent immobilization through coprecipitation with iron (oxy)hydroxides. The shallow marine hydrothermal fluids near Ambitle Island, Papua New Guinea are characterized by arsenite concentrations of up to 1,000 μg/L. Directly proximal to the vent orifices, arsenate coprecipitates with 2-line ferrihydrite, coating rocks and corals in red and green biofilms up to 1 cm thick. DNA extracted from these coatings was amplified with archaeal- and bacterial-specific primers, and the 16S rRNA gene was sequenced. Both biofilm samples revealed archaeal communities exclusively composed of uncultured Crenarchaea. The bacterial members are primarily gamma Proteobacteria and Planctomycetes in the red biofilm, but 60% of the community in the green biofilm affiliate with the alpha Proteobacteria and candidate group OP11; there is minimal overlap in bacterial phylotypes between the two coatings. Slurries from these coatings were also used to inoculate geochemically designed growth media supplemented with various redox couples, including aerobic and anaerobic As(III) oxidation. On a medium targeting anaerobic, chemolithoautotrophic arsenic oxidation coupled to ferric iron reduction at 50 °C, predominantly rod-shaped organisms (~5×105 cells/ml) were enriched. In contrast, on an aerobic arsenic oxidation medium, coccoid-shaped organisms (~3×106 cells/ml) were enriched. The respective thermophilic microbial communities may be taking advantage of overall metabolisms represented by H3AsO3(aq) + 2FeOOH(s) + 3H+ = H2AsO4- + 2Fe2+ + 3H2O (1) and H3AsO3(aq) + 1/2O2(aq) = H2AsO4- + H+. (2) To date, no arsenite oxidizers are known to use ferric iron as a terminal electron acceptor (reaction 1). However, this

  14. Improving shallow-water carbonate chemostratigraphy by means of rudist bivalve sclerochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, S.; Heimhofer, U.

    2015-09-01

    Deep-time shallow-marine carbonate platforms record distinct biotic responses to climatic and environmental stressors. Unfortunately, precise temporal assignment of these biotic responses is often problematical due to poor biostratigraphic control and/or a significant diagenetic overprint of the neritic bulk carbonate chemostratigraphic inventory. An accurate stratigraphic framework is essential to better understand the causal relation between biotic events recorded by carbonate platforms and environmental changes that, for instance, culminated in mass extinction events or prolonged episodes of oceanic anoxia. Here we provide an integrated carbon and strontium-isotope stratigraphy of the Early Cretaceous subtropical Provence carbonate platform in SE France that is based solely on pristine low-Mg calcite from rudist bivalves. Carbon-isotope data of geochemically screened rudist fragments enabled reconstruction of a characteristic Barremian pattern including the Mid-Barremian Event (MBE) that allowed for a precise correlation with stratigraphically well-constrained Tethyan shallow-water and hemipelagic reference sections. In order to evaluate ontogenetic carbon-isotope changes and the overall variability of the shell-derived carbon-isotope data, numerous sclerochronological carbon-isotope profiles of individual large rudist shells are presented. Strontium-isotope stratigraphy supports the carbon-isotope-based age of the studied sections, but also provides unequivocal evidence for a major hiatus in the depositional record covering large parts of the Late Barremian. In contrast to biostratigraphic and bulk carbonate chemostratigraphic archives, the here established chronostratigraphy of carbonate platform evolution in the southern Provence region demonstrates a twofold resurgence of rudist-rich carbonate platform production during the Early Aptian and arguably the latest Early Aptian.

  15. Conglomerate facies and processes in shallow to deep-marine Cretaceous forearc basins of Baja California, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, W.; Smith, D.P.; Busby-Spera, C.J.

    1989-04-01

    Detailed studies of slope apron, fan-delta, submarine canyon, and submarine fan deposits from noncontemporaneous Cretaceous forearc subbasins in Baja California provide key criteria for recognizing ancient shallow-marine to deep-marine conglomerate depositional environments.

  16. Methane hydrate - A major reservoir of carbon in the shallow geosphere?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1988-01-01

    Methane hydrates are solids composed of rigid cages of water molecules that enclose methane. Sediment containing methane hydrates is found within specific pressure-temperature conditions that occur in regions of permafrost and beneath the sea in outer continental margins. Because methane hydrates are globally widespread and concentrate methane within the gas-hydrate structure, the potential amount of methane present in the shallow geosphere at subsurface depths of < ???2000 m is very large. However, estimates of the amount are speculative and range over about three orders of magnitude, from 2 ?? 103 to 4 ?? 106 Gt (gigatons = 1015 g) of carbon, depending on the assumptions made. The estimate I favor is ??? 1 ?? 104 Gt of carbon. The estimated amount of organic carbon in the methane-hydrate reservoir greatly exceeds that in many other reservoirs of the global carbon cycle - for example, the atmosphere (3.6 Gt); terrestrial biota (830 Gt); terrestrial soil, detritus and peat (1960 Gt); marine biota (3 Gt); and marine dissolved materials (980 Gt). In fact, the amount of carbon may exceed that in all fossil fuel deposits (5 ?? 103 Gt). Because methane hydrates contain so much methane and occur in the shallow geosphere, they are of interest as a potential resource of natural gas and as a possible source of atmospheric methane released by global warming. As a potential resource, methane hydrates pose both engineering and production problems. As a contributor to a changing global climate, destabilized methane hydrates, particularly those in shallow, nearshore regions of the Arctic Ocean, may have some effect, but this effect will probably be minimal, at least during the next 100 years. ?? 1988.

  17. Biochemical and microbial features of shallow marine sediments along the Terra Nova Bay (Ross Sea, Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldi, Franco; Marchetto, Davide; Pini, Francesco; Fani, Renato; Michaud, Luigi; Lo Giudice, Angelina; Berto, Daniela; Giani, Michele

    2010-09-01

    Shallow marine sediments were collected from seven stations (three of which located at Gerlache Inlet, two at Tethys Bay, one at Adelie Cove and one just beneath the Italian Research Base) along the Terra Nova Bay coast (Ross Sea, Antarctica). Their chemical, biochemical and microbiological properties were studied in order to provide further insights in the knowledge of this Antarctic benthic ecosystem. Overall, the organic carbon (OC) represented the major fraction of total carbon (TC) and displayed concentrations similar to or slightly lower than those previously measured in Antarctic bottom sediments. The biopolymeric carbon within OC ranged from 4.1% to 19.9% and showed a wide trophic range (65-834 μg g -1 d.w.). Proteins (PRT) represented on average the main biochemical class contributing to labile organic carbon, followed by lipids (LIP) and carbohydrates (CHO). The activity of aminopeptidase, β- D-glucosidase, alkaline phosphatase and esterase was checked, giving the highest values at Tethys Bay and at the deepest water sediments. The principal component analysis, which was computed considering physical, chemical (elemental and biochemical sedimentary composition) and microbiological parameters (including bacterial abundance, ectoenzymatic activities, T-RFs richness and diversity indices), allowed to obtain two main clusters ("Tethys Bay" and "other stations"). Based on data obtained, two representative 16S rRNA clone libraries using samples from Tethys Bay and Gerlache Inlet were constructed. The sequences of 171 clones were compared to those available in public databases to determine their approximate phylogenetic affiliations. Both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria were disclosed, with the majority of them affiliated with the Gamma- and Deltaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Acidobacteria. The occurrence of strictly anaerobic bacteria suggests that sediments might also undergo anoxic conditions that, in turn, could favor the accumulation of PRT in respect

  18. Multiparticle Exciton Ionization in Shallow Doped Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Sau, Jay D; Crochet, Jared J; Doorn, Stephen K; Cohen, Marvin L

    2013-03-21

    Shallow hole doping in small-diameter semiconducting carbon nanotubes with a valley degeneracy is predicted to result in the resonant ionization of excitons into free electron-hole pairs. This mechanism, which relies on the chirality of the electronic states, causes excitons to decay with high efficiencies where the rate scales as the square of the dopant density. Moreover, multiparticle exciton ionization can account for delocalized fluorescence quenching when a few holes per micrometer of tube length are present.

  19. Differences between nonprecipitating tropical and trade wind marine shallow cumuli

    DOE PAGES

    Ghate, Virendra P.; Miller, Mark A.; Zhu, Ping

    2015-11-13

    In this study, marine nonprecipitating cumulus topped boundary layers (CTBLs) observed in a tropical and in a trade wind region are contrasted based on their cloud macrophysical, dynamical, and radiative structures. Data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) observational site previously operating at Manus Island, Papua New Guinea, and data collected during the deployment of ARM Mobile Facility at the island of Graciosa, in the Azores, were used in this study. The tropical marine CTBLs were deeper, had higher surface fluxes and boundary layer radiative cooling, but lower wind speeds compared to their trade wind counterparts. The radiative velocity scalemore » was 50%-70% of the surface convective velocity scale at both locations, highlighting the prominent role played by radiation in maintaining turbulence in marine CTBLs. Despite greater thicknesses, the chord lengths of tropical cumuli were on average lower than those of trade wind cumuli, and as a result of lower cloud cover, the hourly averaged (cloudy and clear) liquid water paths of tropical cumuli were lower than the trade wind cumuli. At both locations ~70% of the cloudy profiles were updrafts, while the average amount of updrafts near cloud base stronger than 1 m s–1 was ~22% in tropical cumuli and ~12% in the trade wind cumuli. The mean in-cloud radar reflectivity within updrafts and mean updraft velocity was higher in tropical cumuli than the trade wind cumuli. Despite stronger vertical velocities and a higher number of strong updrafts, due to lower cloud fraction, the updraft mass flux was lower in the tropical cumuli compared to the trade wind cumuli. The observations suggest that the tropical and trade wind marine cumulus clouds differ significantly in their macrophysical and dynamical structures« less

  20. Differences between nonprecipitating tropical and trade wind marine shallow cumuli

    SciTech Connect

    Ghate, Virendra P.; Miller, Mark A.; Zhu, Ping

    2015-11-13

    In this study, marine nonprecipitating cumulus topped boundary layers (CTBLs) observed in a tropical and in a trade wind region are contrasted based on their cloud macrophysical, dynamical, and radiative structures. Data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) observational site previously operating at Manus Island, Papua New Guinea, and data collected during the deployment of ARM Mobile Facility at the island of Graciosa, in the Azores, were used in this study. The tropical marine CTBLs were deeper, had higher surface fluxes and boundary layer radiative cooling, but lower wind speeds compared to their trade wind counterparts. The radiative velocity scale was 50%-70% of the surface convective velocity scale at both locations, highlighting the prominent role played by radiation in maintaining turbulence in marine CTBLs. Despite greater thicknesses, the chord lengths of tropical cumuli were on average lower than those of trade wind cumuli, and as a result of lower cloud cover, the hourly averaged (cloudy and clear) liquid water paths of tropical cumuli were lower than the trade wind cumuli. At both locations ~70% of the cloudy profiles were updrafts, while the average amount of updrafts near cloud base stronger than 1 m s–1 was ~22% in tropical cumuli and ~12% in the trade wind cumuli. The mean in-cloud radar reflectivity within updrafts and mean updraft velocity was higher in tropical cumuli than the trade wind cumuli. Despite stronger vertical velocities and a higher number of strong updrafts, due to lower cloud fraction, the updraft mass flux was lower in the tropical cumuli compared to the trade wind cumuli. The observations suggest that the tropical and trade wind marine cumulus clouds differ significantly in their macrophysical and dynamical structures

  1. Global change and modern coral reefs: New opportunities to understand shallow-water carbonate depositional processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallock, Pamela

    2005-04-01

    Human activities are impacting coral reefs physically, biologically, and chemically. Nutrification, sedimentation, chemical pollution, and overfishing are significant local threats that are occurring worldwide. Ozone depletion and global warming are triggering mass coral-bleaching events; corals under temperature stress lose the ability to synthesize protective sunscreens and become more sensitive to sunlight. Photo-oxidative stress also reduces fitness, rendering reef-building organisms more susceptible to emerging diseases. Increasing concentration of atmospheric CO 2 has already reduced CaCO 3 saturation in surface waters by more than 10%. Doubling of atmospheric CO 2 concentration over pre-industrial concentration in the 21st century may reduce carbonate production in tropical shallow marine environments by as much as 80%. As shallow-water reefs decline worldwide, opportunities abound for researchers to expand understanding of carbonate depositional systems. Coordinated studies of carbonate geochemistry with photozoan physiology and calcification, particularly in cool subtropical-transition zones between photozoan-reef and heterotrophic carbonate-ramp communities, will contribute to understanding of carbonate sedimentation under environmental change, both in the future and in the geologic record. Cyanobacteria are becoming increasingly prominent on declining reefs, as these microbes can tolerate strong solar radiation, higher temperatures, and abundant nutrients. The responses of reef-dwelling cyanobacteria to environmental parameters associated with global change are prime topics for further research, with both ecological and geological implications.

  2. Molecular evidence for abiotic sulfurization of dissolved organic matter in marine shallow hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Saez, Gonzalo V.; Niggemann, Jutta; Dittmar, Thorsten; Pohlabeln, Anika M.; Lang, Susan Q.; Noowong, Ann; Pichler, Thomas; Wörmer, Lars; Bühring, Solveig I.

    2016-10-01

    Shallow submarine hydrothermal systems are extreme environments with strong redox gradients at the interface of hot, reduced fluids and cold, oxygenated seawater. Hydrothermal fluids are often depleted in sulfate when compared to surrounding seawater and can contain high concentrations of hydrogen sulfide (H2S). It is well known that sulfur in its various oxidation states plays an important role in processing and transformation of organic matter. However, the formation and the reactivity of dissolved organic sulfur (DOS) in the water column at hydrothermal systems are so far not well understood. We investigated DOS dynamics and its relation to the physicochemical environment by studying the molecular composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in three contrasting shallow hydrothermal systems off Milos (Eastern Mediterranean), Dominica (Caribbean Sea) and Iceland (North Atlantic). We used ultra-high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) to characterize the DOM on a molecular level. The molecular information was complemented with general geochemical data, quantitative dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and DOS analyses as well as isotopic measurements (δ2H, δ18O and F14C). In contrast to the predominantly meteoric fluids from Dominica and Iceland, hydrothermal fluids from Milos were mainly fed by recirculating seawater. The hydrothermal fluids from Milos were enriched in H2S and DOS, as indicated by high DOS/DOC ratios and by the fact that >90% of all assigned DOM formulas that were exclusively present in the fluids contained sulfur. In all three systems, DOS from hydrothermal fluids had on average lower O/C ratios (0.26-0.34) than surrounding surface seawater DOS (0.45-0.52), suggesting shallow hydrothermal systems as a source of reduced DOS, which will likely get oxidized upon contact with oxygenated seawater. Evaluation of hypothetical sulfurization reactions suggests DOM reduction and sulfurization during seawater

  3. Carbon-Isotope Stratigraphy Of A Paleogene Pacific Ocean Guyot And The Response Of The Shallow-Water Carbonate Factory To The PETM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, S. A.

    2009-12-01

    The shallow-water carbonate platforms found on many Pacific guyots potentially provide ‘dipsticks’ for shallow-water environmental and climatic conditions unhindered by the influence of clastic input. They thus represent ideal sites at which to assess the extent to which past changes in surface-ocean physical and chemical conditions (e.g. temperature, nutrification, pH) affected the sustainability of shallow-water carbonate producers. The PETM and other Paleogene hyperthermal events are associated with major carbon-cycle perturbations and deep-sea carbonate dissolution, yet the effect in shallow-water carbonate environments is more poorly constrained. This is in part due to complications arising from variations in sea level causing major facies changes in many coastal shelf settings and also difficulties in providing robust age controls for some carbonate platforms. The basaltic edifice of Limalok Guyot (ODP Site 871) in the southwest Pacific Ocean was flooded in the late Paleocene and accumulated shallow-water carbonate sediments until the middle Eocene, when the platform drowned and was buried under a pelagic cap. A new carbon-isotope stratigraphy for the platform carbonates will be presented which reveals stratigraphic variations that are consistent with the long-term late Paleocene-Eocene pattern known from deep-sea carbonates. Through a consideration of the larger benthic foraminiferal record, and other micropalaeontological datums, it will be argued that the carbon-isotope stratigraphy captures the negative carbon isotope excursion associated with the PETM thereby allowing discussion of the effects of this event on shallow-water guyot environments. Although core recovery is extremely poor, it will be suggested that Site 871 provides an opportunity to examine the response of the shallow ocean carbonate factory to changes in carbon-cycle dynamics during the Early Cenozoic and assess any associated shallow water biotic and environmental changes. Identifying

  4. Organic geochemical characterisation of shallow marine Cretaceous formations from Yola Sub-basin, Northern Benue Trough, NE Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarki Yandoka, Babangida M.; Abdullah, Wan Hasiah; Abubakar, M. B.; Hakimi, Mohammed Hail; Jauro, Aliyu; Adegoke, Adebanji Kayode

    2016-05-01

    The shallow marine shales of the Cretaceous formations namely Yolde, Dukul, Jessu, Sekuliye and Numanha ranging in age from Cenomanian to Coniacian within the Yola Sub-basin in the Northern Benue Trough, northeastern Nigeria were analysed to provide an overview on their hydrocarbon generation potential. This study is based on pyrolysis analysis, total organic carbon content (TOC), extractable organic matter (EOM), biomarker distributions and measured vitrinite reflectance. The present-day TOC contents range between 0.24 and 0.71 wt. % and Hydrogen Index (HI) values between 8.7 and 113 mg HC/g TOC with Type III/IV kerogens. Based on the present-day kerogen typing, the shale sediments are expected to generate mainly gas. Biomarker compositions indicates deposition in a marine environment under suboxic conditions with prevalent contribution of aquatic organic matter and a significant amount of terrigenous organic matter input. Organic matter that is dominated by marine components contains kerogens of Type II and Type II-III. This study shows that the organic matter has been affected by volcanic intrusion and consequently, have reached post-mature stage of oil generation. These higher thermal maturities levels are consistent with the vitrinite reflectance ranging from 0.85 to 2.35 Ro % and high Tmax (440-508 °C) values as supported by biomarker maturity ratios. Based on this study, a high prospect for major gas and minor oil generation potential is anticipated from the shallow marine Cretaceous formations from Yola Sub-basin.

  5. Rhodotorula portillonensis sp. nov., a basidiomycetous yeast isolated from Antarctic shallow-water marine sediment.

    PubMed

    Laich, Federico; Vaca, Inmaculada; Chávez, Renato

    2013-10-01

    During the characterization of the mycobiota associated with shallow-water marine environments from Antarctic sea, a novel pink yeast species was isolated. Sequence analysis of the D1/D2 domain of the LSU rDNA gene and 5.8S-ITS regions revealed that the isolated yeast was closely related to Rhodotorula pallida CBS 320(T) and Rhodotorula benthica CBS 9124(T). On the basis of morphological, biochemical and physiological characterization and phylogenetic analyses, a novel basidiomycetous yeast species, Rhodotorula portillonensis sp. nov., is proposed. The type strain is Pi2(T) ( = CBS 12733(T)  = CECT 13081(T)) which was isolated from shallow-water marine sediment in Fildes Bay, King George Island, Antarctica. PMID:23934251

  6. Differential severity of Permian Triassic environmental changes on Tethyan shallow-water carbonate platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidlich, Oliver; Bernecker, Michaela

    2007-01-01

    impoverished bioclastic packstone capped by an unconformity, marks the onset of platform drowning which resulted from the end-Guadalupian mass extinction. Above, a polymict breccia witnessed rift pulses of the Neo-Tethys. The overlying pelagic mud- and packstone contains radiolarians and rare foraminifera of Lopingian age, and overlying microbialites. In the Carnian, tropical shallow-water carbonate production restarted with a low-relief platform and culminated in a Norian-Rhaetian reef-rimmed platform. Stacked Lofer cycles dominated the inner platform of Jebel Kawr (Misfah Formation). We here propose a differential onset and severity of the Late Permian mass extinctions for carbonate platforms. On the Arabian Plate, tropical carbonate production collapsed after the end-Lopingian mass extinction and was replaced by microbialites and sea-floor cements during the earliest Triassic. After approximately six million years, tropical shallow-water carbonate production resumed in the Middle Triassic. Neo-Tethyan isolated platforms drowned shortly after the end-Guadalupian mass extinction and did not recover before the Late Triassic. Absence of shallow-water limestone suggests that carbonate production of isolated platforms ceased for about 30 million years, a period exceeding the recovery of most marine ecosystems.

  7. Eustatic, volcanic, and tectonic controls on redeposition of shallow-water carbonate: A reanalysis of Pacific DSDP examples

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, J.F. )

    1990-05-01

    On the basis of comparisons between eustatic sea level curves and occurrences of displaced shallow marine carbonate sediment in deep water Pacific DSDP (Deep Sea Drilling Project) cores, several previous workers have proposed that most displaced neritic carbonate is redeposited in the deep sea during eustatic sea level lowstands in a manner similar to siliciclastic sediment. However, reanalysis of these same DSDP data indicates a much more complex set of controls on redeposition including eustatic, volcanic, and tectonic effects. Of the 43 occurrences identified in 20 DSDP sites, eight (including all occurrences of true allodapic calcarenites) were deposited either during eustatic highstands or immediately after cessation of island-building volcanism; establishment of a shallow-water source area probably represents the dominant control on this type of deposition. Twenty-three other occurrences contain volcanic detritus mixed with minor amounts of reworked carbonate. Of these occurrences eight contain volcaniclastic sediment and exhibit no clear correlation with sea level, indicating probable redeposition of shelf carbonate during volcanic events as a result of either gravitational or seismic instability of the shelf. In contrast, the 15 other mixed volcanic/carbonate occurrences represent lowstand deposit and contain epiclastic volcanic detritus, suggesting lowstand erosion of mixed volcanic/carbonate shelf sediments. Five other lowstand occurrences contain only reworked carbonate sediment and probably record either continued outer shelf/slope lowstand carbonate deposition or minor mechanical erosion of shelf carbonate. Six occurrences contain only reworked Inoceramus fragments, which are not necessarily indicative of a shelf source area.

  8. Exploration model for shallow Silurian (Kankakee) carbonate reservoirs in western Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Crockett, J.E.; Seyler, B.J.; Whitaker, S.

    1987-09-01

    Reservoirs in shallow (600-650 ft deep) basal Silurian Kankakee carbonates at Buckhorn consolidated, Siloam, and Kellerville oil fields in western Illinois have produced nearly 2 million bbl of oil, but were developed essentially by random drilling. A new exploration model that combines lithologic studies and isopach mapping has been developed at the Illinois State Geological Survey. Isopach mapping of Silurian and Devonian rocks between an organic facies in the Mississippian-Devonian New Albany Shale and the top of the Ordovician Maquoketa Shale reveals thickened sequences that coincide with most of the oil fields. These thickened intervals apparently reflect subtle paleovalleys eroded into the Maquoketa shale during the Ordovician-Silurian hiatus. During the initial Silurian marine transgression, these paleovalleys at the base of the Kankakee were filled with carbonates to form the thickened sequences. Differential erosion at the top of the Kankakee does not satisfactorily explain the locally thickened sequences in the Kankakee. Lithologic studies suggest that subsurface fluid flows concentrated along these paleovalleys contributed to subsequent diagenesis of valleyfill carbonates. Diagenetic alteration of these carbonates resulted in development of basal Kankakee reservoirs within the paleovalleys. This concept of Kankakee reservoirs occurring within paleovalleys at the Ordovician-Silurian unconformity is a new exploration model that can aid in the search for similar traps in western Illinois.

  9. Gamma-emitting radionuclides in the shallow marine sediments off the Sindh coast, Arabian Sea.

    PubMed

    Akram, M; Qureshi, Riffat M; Ahmad, Nasir; Solaija, Tariq Jamal

    2006-01-01

    Determination of gamma emitting radionuclides in shallow marine sediments off the Sindh coast has been carried out using a gamma spectrometry technique. The activity concentration measured in various sediment samples off the Sindh coast has been found to vary from 15.93 +/- 5.22 to 30.53 +/- 4.70 Bq kg(-1) for 226Ra, from 11.72 +/- 1.22 to 33.94 +/- 1.86 Bq kg(-1) for 228Ra and from 295.22 +/- 32.83 to 748.47 +/- 28.75 Bq kg(-1) for 40K. The calculated mean values of radium equivalent activity, absorbed dose rate and effective dose are 98 Bq kg(-1), 49 nGy h(-1) and 0.06 mSv y(-1), respectively. No artificial radionuclide was detected in the samples measured from the study area. As no data on radioactivity of the coastal environment of Pakistan are available, the data presented here will serve as baseline information on radionuclide concentration in shallow sea sediments off the Sindh coast. The data will also be useful for tracking pollution inventories from unusual radiological events (if any) in the territorial waters of the study area. Further, the information presented will contribute to modelling of a regional radioactivity database from the perspectives of the International Atomic Energy Agency's Asia-Pacific Marine Radioactivity Database and Global Marine Radioactivity Database.

  10. Characterization of shallow marine convection in subtropical regions by airborne and spaceborne lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Silke; Gutleben, Manuel; Schäfler, Andreas; Kiemle, Christoph; Wirth, Martin; Hirsch, Lutz; Ament, Felix

    2016-04-01

    One of the biggest challenges in present day climate research is still the quantification of cloud feedbacks in climate models. Especially the feedback from marine cumulus clouds in the boundary layer with maximum cloud top heights of 4 km introduces large uncertainties in climate sensitivity. Therefore a better understanding of these shallow marine clouds, as well as of their interaction with aerosols and the Earth's energy budget is demanded. To improve our knowledge of shallow marine cumulus convection, measurements onboard the German research aircraft HALO were performed during the NARVAL (Next-generation Aircraft Remote-sensing for Validation studies) mission in December 2013. During NARVAL an EarthCARE equivalent remote sensing payload, with the DLR airborne high spectral resolution and differential absorption lidar system WALES and the cloud radar of the HAMP (HALO Microwave Package) as its core instrumentation, was deployed. To investigate the capability of spaceborne lidar measurements for this kind of study several CALIOP underflights were performed. We will present a comparison of airborne and spaceborne lidar measurements, and we will present the vertical and horizontal distribution of the clouds during NARVAL based on lidar measurements. In particular we investigate the cloud top distribution and the horizontal cloud and cloud gap length. Furthermore we study the representativeness of the NARVAL data by comparing them to and analysing a longer time series and measurements at different years and seasons.

  11. Marine sequestration of carbon in bacterial metabolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechtenfeld, Oliver J.; Hertkorn, Norbert; Shen, Yuan; Witt, Matthias; Benner, Ronald

    2015-03-01

    Linking microbial metabolomics and carbon sequestration in the ocean via refractory organic molecules has been hampered by the chemical complexity of dissolved organic matter (DOM). Here, using bioassay experiments and ultra-high resolution metabolic profiling, we demonstrate that marine bacteria rapidly utilize simple organic molecules and produce exometabolites of remarkable molecular and structural diversity. Bacterial DOM is similar in chemical composition and structural complexity to naturally occurring DOM in sea water. An appreciable fraction of bacterial DOM has molecular and structural properties that are consistent with those of refractory molecules in the ocean, indicating a dominant role for bacteria in shaping the refractory nature of marine DOM. The rapid production of chemically complex and persistent molecules from simple biochemicals demonstrates a positive feedback between primary production and refractory DOM formation. It appears that carbon sequestration in diverse and structurally complex dissolved molecules that persist in the environment is largely driven by bacteria.

  12. Oceanic acidification affects marine carbon pump and triggers extended marine oxygen holes.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Matthias; Schellnhuber, Hans-Joachim

    2009-03-01

    Rising atmospheric CO(2) levels will not only drive future global mean temperatures toward values unprecedented during the whole Quaternary but will also lead to massive acidification of sea water. This constitutes by itself an anthropogenic planetary-scale perturbation that could significantly modify oceanic biogeochemical fluxes and severely damage marine biota. As a step toward the quantification of such potential impacts, we present here a simulation-model-based assessment of the respective consequences of a business-as-usual fossil-fuel-burning scenario where a total of 4,075 Petagrams of carbon is released into the atmosphere during the current millennium. In our scenario, the atmospheric pCO(2) level peaks at approximately 1,750 microatm in the year 2200 while the sea-surface pH value drops by >0.7 units on global average, inhibiting the growth of marine calcifying organisms. The study focuses on quantifying 3 major concomitant effects. The first one is a significant (climate-stabilizing) negative feedback on rising pCO(2) levels as caused by the attenuation of biogenic calcification. The second one is related to the biological carbon pump. Because mineral ballast, notably CaCO(3), is found to play a dominant role in carrying organic matter through the water column, a reduction of its export fluxes weakens the strength of the biological carbon pump. There is, however, a third effect with severe consequences: Because organic matter is oxidized in shallow waters when mineral-ballast fluxes weaken, oxygen holes (hypoxic zones) start to expand considerably in the oceans in our model world--with potentially harmful impacts on a variety of marine ecosystems.

  13. Precipitation susceptibility in marine stratocumulus and shallow cumulus from airborne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Eunsil; Albrecht, Bruce A.; Sorooshian, Armin; Zuidema, Paquita; Jonsson, Haflidi H.

    2016-09-01

    Precipitation tends to decrease as aerosol concentration increases in warm marine boundary layer clouds at fixed liquid water path (LWP). The quantitative nature of this relationship is captured using the precipitation susceptibility (So) metric. Previously published works disagree on the qualitative behavior of So in marine low clouds: So decreases monotonically with increasing LWP or cloud depth (H) in stratocumulus clouds (Sc), while it increases and then decreases in shallow cumulus clouds (Cu). This study uses airborne measurements from four field campaigns on Cu and Sc with similar instrument packages and flight maneuvers to examine if and why So behavior varies as a function of cloud type. The findings show that So increases with H and then decreases in both Sc and Cu. Possible reasons for why these results differ from those in previous studies of Sc are discussed.

  14. A Low-Cost Sensor Buoy System for Monitoring Shallow Marine Environments

    PubMed Central

    Albaladejo, Cristina; Soto, Fulgencio; Torres, Roque; Sánchez, Pedro; López, Juan A.

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring of marine ecosystems is essential to identify the parameters that determine their condition. The data derived from the sensors used to monitor them are a fundamental source for the development of mathematical models with which to predict the behaviour of conditions of the water, the sea bed and the living creatures inhabiting it. This paper is intended to explain and illustrate a design and implementation for a new multisensor monitoring buoy system. The system design is based on a number of fundamental requirements that set it apart from other recent proposals: low cost of implementation, the possibility of application in coastal shallow-water marine environments, suitable dimensions for deployment and stability of the sensor system in a shifting environment like the sea bed, and total autonomy of power supply and data recording. The buoy system has successfully performed remote monitoring of temperature and marine pressure (SBE 39 sensor), temperature (MCP9700 sensor) and atmospheric pressure (YOUNG 61302L sensor). The above requirements have been satisfactorily validated by operational trials in a marine environment. The proposed buoy sensor system thus seems to offer a broad range of applications. PMID:23012562

  15. Eramosa Lagerstätte—Exceptionally preserved soft-bodied biotas with shallow-marine shelly and bioturbating organisms (Silurian, Ontario, Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Bitter, Peter H.; Purnell, Mark A.; Tetreault, Denis K.; Stott, Christopher A.

    2007-10-01

    The middle Silurian Eramosa Lagerstätte of Ontario, Canada, preserves taxonomically and taphonomically diverse biotas including articulated conodont skeletons and heterostracan fish, annelids and arthropods with soft body parts, and a diverse marine flora. Soft tissues are preserved as calcium phosphate and carbon films, the latter possibly stabilized by early diagenetic sulfurization. It is significant that the biotas also include a decalcified, autochthonous shelly marine fauna, and trace fossils. This association of exceptionally preserved and more typical fossils distinguishes the Eramosa from other Silurian shallow-marine Lagerstätten, such as the Waukesha Lagerstätte, and suggests that the Eramosa is not the product of exceptional preservation in an atypical environment, a bias claimed for many post-Cambrian Lagerstätten. The Eramosa Lagerstätte may provide a more reliable, balanced measure of what has been lost from the Silurian fossil record.

  16. Strangelove Ocean and Deposition of Unusual Shallow-Water Carbonates After the End-Permian Mass Extinction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rampino, Michael R.; Caldeira, Ken

    2003-01-01

    The severe mass extinction of marine and terrestrial organisms at the end of the Permian Period (approx. 251 Ma) was accompanied by a rapid negative excursion of approx. 3 to 4 per mil in the carbon-isotope ratio of the global surface oceans and atmosphere that persisted for some 500,000 into the Early Triassic. Simulations with an ocean-atmosphere/carbon-cycle model suggest that the isotope excursion can be explained by collapse of ocean primary productivity (a Strangelove Ocean) and changes in the delivery and cycling of carbon in the ocean and on land. Model results also suggest that perturbations of the global carbon cycle resulting from the extinctions led to short-term fluctuations in atmospheric pCO2 and ocean carbonate deposition, and to a long-term (>1 Ma) decrease in sedimentary burial of organic carbon in the Triassic. Deposition of calcium carbonate is a major sink of river-derived ocean alkalinity and for CO2 from the ocean/atmosphere system. The end of the Permian was marked by extinction of most calcium carbonate secreting organisms. Therefore, the reduction of carbonate accumulation made the oceans vulnerable to a build-up of alkalinity and related fluctuations in atmospheric CO2. Our model results suggest that an increase in ocean carbonate-ion concentration should cause increased carbonate accumulation rates in shallow-water settings. After the end-Permian extinctions, early Triassic shallow-water sediments show an abundance of abiogenic and microbial carbonates that removed CaCO3 from the ocean and may have prevented a full 'ocean-alkalinity crisis' from developing.

  17. Massive marine methane emissions from near-shore shallow coastal areas.

    PubMed

    Borges, Alberto V; Champenois, Willy; Gypens, Nathalie; Delille, Bruno; Harlay, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Methane is the second most important greenhouse gas contributing to climate warming. The open ocean is a minor source of methane to the atmosphere. We report intense methane emissions from the near-shore southern region of the North Sea characterized by the presence of extensive areas with gassy sediments. The average flux intensities (~130 μmol m(-2) d(-1)) are one order of magnitude higher than values characteristic of continental shelves (~30 μmol m(-2) d(-1)) and three orders of magnitude higher than values characteristic of the open ocean (~0.4 μmol m(-2) d(-1)). The high methane concentrations (up to 1,128 nmol L(-1)) that sustain these fluxes are related to the shallow and well-mixed water column that allows an efficient transfer of methane from the seafloor to surface waters. This differs from deeper and stratified seep areas where there is a large decrease of methane between bottom and surface by microbial oxidation or physical transport. Shallow well-mixed continental shelves represent about 33% of the total continental shelf area, so that marine coastal methane emissions are probably under-estimated. Near-shore and shallow seep areas are hot spots of methane emission, and our data also suggest that emissions could increase in response to warming of surface waters. PMID:27283125

  18. Massive marine methane emissions from near-shore shallow coastal areas

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Alberto V.; Champenois, Willy; Gypens, Nathalie; Delille, Bruno; Harlay, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Methane is the second most important greenhouse gas contributing to climate warming. The open ocean is a minor source of methane to the atmosphere. We report intense methane emissions from the near-shore southern region of the North Sea characterized by the presence of extensive areas with gassy sediments. The average flux intensities (~130 μmol m−2 d−1) are one order of magnitude higher than values characteristic of continental shelves (~30 μmol m−2 d−1) and three orders of magnitude higher than values characteristic of the open ocean (~0.4 μmol m−2 d−1). The high methane concentrations (up to 1,128 nmol L−1) that sustain these fluxes are related to the shallow and well-mixed water column that allows an efficient transfer of methane from the seafloor to surface waters. This differs from deeper and stratified seep areas where there is a large decrease of methane between bottom and surface by microbial oxidation or physical transport. Shallow well-mixed continental shelves represent about 33% of the total continental shelf area, so that marine coastal methane emissions are probably under-estimated. Near-shore and shallow seep areas are hot spots of methane emission, and our data also suggest that emissions could increase in response to warming of surface waters. PMID:27283125

  19. Massive marine methane emissions from near-shore shallow coastal areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges, Alberto V.; Champenois, Willy; Gypens, Nathalie; Delille, Bruno; Harlay, Jérôme

    2016-06-01

    Methane is the second most important greenhouse gas contributing to climate warming. The open ocean is a minor source of methane to the atmosphere. We report intense methane emissions from the near-shore southern region of the North Sea characterized by the presence of extensive areas with gassy sediments. The average flux intensities (~130 μmol m‑2 d‑1) are one order of magnitude higher than values characteristic of continental shelves (~30 μmol m‑2 d‑1) and three orders of magnitude higher than values characteristic of the open ocean (~0.4 μmol m‑2 d‑1). The high methane concentrations (up to 1,128 nmol L‑1) that sustain these fluxes are related to the shallow and well-mixed water column that allows an efficient transfer of methane from the seafloor to surface waters. This differs from deeper and stratified seep areas where there is a large decrease of methane between bottom and surface by microbial oxidation or physical transport. Shallow well-mixed continental shelves represent about 33% of the total continental shelf area, so that marine coastal methane emissions are probably under-estimated. Near-shore and shallow seep areas are hot spots of methane emission, and our data also suggest that emissions could increase in response to warming of surface waters.

  20. Massive marine methane emissions from near-shore shallow coastal areas.

    PubMed

    Borges, Alberto V; Champenois, Willy; Gypens, Nathalie; Delille, Bruno; Harlay, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Methane is the second most important greenhouse gas contributing to climate warming. The open ocean is a minor source of methane to the atmosphere. We report intense methane emissions from the near-shore southern region of the North Sea characterized by the presence of extensive areas with gassy sediments. The average flux intensities (~130 μmol m(-2) d(-1)) are one order of magnitude higher than values characteristic of continental shelves (~30 μmol m(-2) d(-1)) and three orders of magnitude higher than values characteristic of the open ocean (~0.4 μmol m(-2) d(-1)). The high methane concentrations (up to 1,128 nmol L(-1)) that sustain these fluxes are related to the shallow and well-mixed water column that allows an efficient transfer of methane from the seafloor to surface waters. This differs from deeper and stratified seep areas where there is a large decrease of methane between bottom and surface by microbial oxidation or physical transport. Shallow well-mixed continental shelves represent about 33% of the total continental shelf area, so that marine coastal methane emissions are probably under-estimated. Near-shore and shallow seep areas are hot spots of methane emission, and our data also suggest that emissions could increase in response to warming of surface waters.

  1. Static versus dynamic fracturing in shallow carbonate fault zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fondriest, M.; Doan, M. L.; Aben, F. M.; Fusseis, F.; Mitchell, T. M.; Di Toro, G.

    2015-12-01

    Moderate to large earthquakes often nucleate within and propagate through carbonates in the shallow crust, therefore several field and experimental studies were recently aimed to constrain earthquake-related deformation processes within carbonate fault rocks. In particular, the occurrence of thick belts (10-100s m) of low-strain fault-related breccias (average size of rock fragments >1 cm), which is relatively common within carbonate damage zones, was generally interpreted as resulting from the quasi-static growth of fault zones rather than from the cumulative effect of multiple earthquake ruptures. Here we report the occurrence of up to hundreds of meters thick belts of intensely fragmented dolostones along the major transpressive Foiana Fault Zone (Italian Southern Alps) which was exhumed from < 2 km depth. Such dolostones are reduced into fragments ranging from few centimeters down to few millimeters in size with ultrafine-grained layers in proximity to the principal slip zones. Preservation of the original bedding indicates a lack of significant shear strain in the fragmented dolostones which seem to have been shattered in situ. To investigate the origin of the in-situ shattered rocks, the host dolostones were deformed in uniaxial compression both under quasi-static loading (strain rate ~10-3 s-1) and dynamic loading (strain rate >50 s-1). Dolostones deformed up to failure under low-strain rate were affected by single to multiple discrete (i.e. not interconnected) extensional fractures sub-parallel to the loading direction. Dolostones deformed under high-strain rate were shattered above a strain rate threshold of ~200 s-1(strain >1.2%) while they were split in few fragments or were macroscopically intact for lower strain rates. Experimentally shattered dolostones were reduced into a non-cohesive material with most rock fragments a few millimeters in size and elongated parallel to the loading direction. Fracture networks were investigated by X

  2. Carbonate concretions as a significant component of ancient marine carbon cycles: Insights from paired organic and inorganic carbon isotope analyses of a Cretaceous shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyd, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonate concretions often occur within fine-grained, organic-rich sedimentary rocks. This association reflects the common production of diagenetic minerals through biologic cycling of organic matter. Chemical analysis of carbonate concretions provides the rare opportunity to explore ancient shallow diagenetic environments, which are inherently transient due to progressive burial but are an integral component of the marine carbon cycle. The late Cretaceous Holz Shale (~80 Ma) contains abundant calcite concretions that exhibit textural and geochemical characteristics indicative of relatively shallow formation (i.e., near the sediment-water interface). Sampled concretions contain between 5.4 and 9.8 wt.% total inorganic carbon (TIC), or ~45 and 82 wt.% CaCO3, compared to host shale values which average ~1.5 wt.% TIC. Organic carbon isotope compositions (δ13Corg) are relatively constant in host and concretion samples ranging from ­-26.3 to -24.0‰ (VPDB). Carbonate carbon isotope compositions (δ13Ccarb) range from -22.5 to -3.4‰, indicating a significant but not entirely organic source of carbon. Concretions of the lower Holz Shale exhibit considerably elevated δ13Ccarb values averaging -4.8‰, whereas upper Holz Shale concretions express an average δ13Ccarb value of -17.0‰. If the remaining carbonate for lower Holz Shale concretions is sourced from marine fluids and/or dissolved marine carbonate minerals (e.g., shells), a simple mass balance indicates that ~28% of concretion carbon was sourced from organic matter and ~72% from late Cretaceous marine inorganic carbon (with δ13C ~ +2.5‰). Upper Holz Shale calculations indicate a ~73% contribution from organic matter and a ~27% contribution from inorganic carbon. When normalized for carbonate, organic contents within the concretions are ~2-13 wt.% enriched compared to host contents. This potentially reflects the protective nature of cementation that acts to limit permeability and chemical destruction of

  3. Increased carbonate ion saturation in shallow deep waters at the Eocene-Oligocene Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohaty, S. M.; Lear, C. H.; Paelike, H.

    2013-12-01

    Global cooling and growth of large ice sheets across the Eocene-Oligocene Transition (EOT) were associated with a two-stage deepening of the calcite compensation depth (CCD) in the equatorial Pacific Ocean. It is uncertain, however, if changes in carbonate chemistry in the deep Pacific were mirrored in other ocean basins and in higher levels of the water column. In conjunction with CCD histories, geochemical records from benthic foraminifera can provide information on the timing and nature of changes in deep-water carbonate chemistry and may pinpoint mechanisms of EOT climate change and related shifts in global carbon cycling. We use benthic foraminiferal boron/calcium (B/Ca) ratios to reconstruct changes in carbonate ion saturation (Δ[CO32-]) at multiple drillsites in the Atlantic and Indian Ocean basins occupying a range of paleodepths (~1000 to 3500 m). In shallow deep waters of the Indian Ocean (ODP Site 763; ~1000 m), a pronounced increase in Δ[CO32-] is evident at the onset of the EOT that corresponds to the first step of the positive global shift in benthic δ18O values (EOT-1). More subdued increases in Δ[CO32-] occurred synchronously at deeper sites in both the Atlantic and Indian basins (ODP Sites 522 and 711). These results, in conjunction with observed multi-site patterns of CCD change, indicate that the initial phase of climate change during the EOT was associated with major fluctuations in deep-ocean carbonate chemistry that were sustained for ~150 kyr immediately prior to and during EOT-1. Earth system and carbon-cycle box models are currently being employed to help interpret these results. Combined information from both proxy data and models suggest that destabilization of deep-ocean carbonate chemistry at the onset of the EOT resulted from a perturbation in the long-term carbon cycle involving changes in continental weathering rates and/or shifting patterns of marine carbonate burial. We further hypothesize that the shift to more alkaline deep

  4. Carbon cycling fed by methane seepage at the shallow Cumberland Bay, South Georgia, sub-Antarctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geprägs, Patrizia; Torres, Marta E.; Mau, Susan; Kasten, Sabine; Römer, Miriam; Bohrmann, Gerhard

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the marine contribution of methane from shallow regions and melting marine-terminating glaciers may have been underestimated. Here we report on methane sources and potential sinks associated with methane seeps in Cumberland Bay, South Georgia's largest fjord system. The average organic carbon content in the upper 8 m of the sediment is around 0.65 wt %; this observation combined with Parasound data suggest that the methane gas accumulations probably originate from peat-bearing sediments currently located several tens of meters below the seafloor. Only one of our cores indicates upward advection; instead most of the methane is transported via diffusion. Sulfate and methane flux estimates indicate that a large fraction of methane is consumed by anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Carbon cycling at the sulfate-methane transition (SMT) results in a marked fractionation of the δ13C-CH4 from an estimated source value of -65‰ to a value as low as -96‰ just below the SMT. Methane concentrations in sediments are high, especially close to the seepage sites (˜40 mM); however, concentrations in the water column are relatively low (max. 58 nM) and can be observed only close to the seafloor. Methane is trapped in the lowermost water mass; however, measured microbial oxidation rates reveal very low activity with an average turnover of 3.1 years. We therefore infer that methane must be transported out of the bay in the bottom water layer. A mean sea-air flux of only 0.005 nM/m2 s confirms that almost no methane reaches the atmosphere.

  5. Palaeo-equatorial temperatures and carbon-cycle evolution at the Triassic- Jurassic boundary: A stable isotope perspective from shallow-water carbonates from the UAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honig, M. R.; John, C. M.

    2013-12-01

    The Triassic-Jurassic boundary was marked by global changes including carbon-cycle perturbations and the opening of the Atlantic Ocean. These changes were accompanied by one of the major extinction events of the Phanerozoic. The carbon-cycle perturbations have been recorded in carbon isotope curves from bulk carbonates, organic carbon and fossil wood in several Tethyan locations and have been used for chemostratigraphic purposes. Here we present data from shallow-marine carbonates deposited on a homoclinal Middle Eastern carbonate ramp (United Arab Emirates). Our site was located at the equator throughout the Late Triassic and the Early Jurassic, and this study provides the first constraints of environmental changes at the low-latitudes for the Triassic-Jurassic boundary. Shallow-marine carbonate depositional systems are extremely sensitive to palaeoenvironmental changes and their usefulness for chemostratigraphy is being debated. However, the palaeogeographic location of the studied carbonate ramp gives us a unique insight into a tropical carbonate factory at a time of severe global change. Stable isotope measurements (carbon and oxygen) are being carried out on micrite, ooids and shell material along the Triassic-Jurassic boundary. The stable isotope results on micrite show a prominent negative shift in carbon isotope values of approximately 2 ‰ just below the inferred position of the Triassic-Jurassic boundary. A similar isotopic trend is also observed across the Tethys but with a range of amplitudes (from ~2 ‰ to ~4 ‰). These results seem to indicate that the neritic carbonates from our studied section can be used for chemostratigraphic purposes, and the amplitudes of the carbon isotope shifts provide critical constraints on the magnitude of carbon-cycle perturbations at low latitudes across the Triassic-Jurassic boundary. Seawater temperatures across the Triassic-Jurassic boundary will be constrained using the clumped isotope palaeo-thermometer applied

  6. Complex communities of small protists and unexpected occurrence of typical marine lineages in shallow freshwater systems

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Marianne; Jardillier, Ludwig; Deschamps, Philippe; Moreira, David; Restoux, Gwendal; Bertolino, Paola; López-García, Purificación

    2014-01-01

    Summary Although inland water bodies are more heterogeneous and sensitive to environmental variation than oceans, the diversity of small protists in these ecosystems is much less well-known. Some molecular surveys of lakes exist, but little information is available from smaller, shallower and often ephemeral freshwater systems, despite their global distribution and ecological importance. We carried out a comparative study based on massive pyrosequencing of amplified 18S rRNA gene fragments of protists in the 0.2-5 μm-size range in one brook and four shallow ponds located in the Natural Regional Park of the Chevreuse Valley, France. Our study revealed a wide diversity of small protists, with 812 stringently defined operational taxonomic units (OTUs) belonging to the recognized eukaryotic supergroups (SAR –Stramenopiles, Alveolata, Rhizaria–, Archaeplastida, Excavata, Amoebozoa, Opisthokonta) and to groups of unresolved phylogenetic position (Cryptophyta, Haptophyta, Centrohelida, Katablepharida, Telonemida, Apusozoa). Some OTUs represented deep-branching lineages (Cryptomycota, Aphelida, Colpodellida, Tremulida, clade-10 Cercozoa, HAP-1 Haptophyta). We identified several lineages previously thought to be marine including, in addition to MAST-2 and MAST-12, already detected in freshwater, MAST-3 and possibly MAST-6. Protist community structures were different in the five ecosystems. These differences did not correlate with geographical distances, but seemed to be influenced by environmental parameters. PMID:25115943

  7. Complex communities of small protists and unexpected occurrence of typical marine lineages in shallow freshwater systems.

    PubMed

    Simon, Marianne; Jardillier, Ludwig; Deschamps, Philippe; Moreira, David; Restoux, Gwendal; Bertolino, Paola; López-García, Purificación

    2015-10-01

    Although inland water bodies are more heterogeneous and sensitive to environmental variation than oceans, the diversity of small protists in these ecosystems is much less well known. Some molecular surveys of lakes exist, but little information is available from smaller, shallower and often ephemeral freshwater systems, despite their global distribution and ecological importance. We carried out a comparative study based on massive pyrosequencing of amplified 18S rRNA gene fragments of protists in the 0.2-5 μm size range in one brook and four shallow ponds located in the Natural Regional Park of the Chevreuse Valley, France. Our study revealed a wide diversity of small protists, with 812 stringently defined operational taxonomic units (OTUs) belonging to the recognized eukaryotic supergroups (SAR--Stramenopiles, Alveolata, Rhizaria--Archaeplastida, Excavata, Amoebozoa, Opisthokonta) and to groups of unresolved phylogenetic position (Cryptophyta, Haptophyta, Centrohelida, Katablepharida, Telonemida, Apusozoa). Some OTUs represented deep-branching lineages (Cryptomycota, Aphelida, Colpodellida, Tremulida, clade-10 Cercozoa, HAP-1 Haptophyta). We identified several lineages previously thought to be marine including, in addition to MAST-2 and MAST-12, already detected in freshwater, MAST-3 and possibly MAST-6. Protist community structures were different in the five ecosystems. These differences did not correlate with geographical distances, but seemed to be influenced by environmental parameters.

  8. Ecological Turnover of Shallow Water Carbonate Producers Following the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, A.; Martindale, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    Modern coral reef ecosystems are under threat from global climate change (and associated, synergistic stresses) and local environmental degradation. Therefore, it is important for ecologists to understand how ecosystems adapt and recover from climate change. The fossil record provides excellent case studies of similar events, such as the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM). Although Paleocene and Eocene shallow water carbonates have not received the same degree of attention as the deep-water record, the PETM provides an opportunity to study the role of alternative stable states in maintaining the health and diversity of shallow water carbonate environments. It is generally accepted that during the PETM there is a transition from reef systems to foraminiferal shoals as the dominant shallow water carbonate producers. In fact, previous work has documented this interval as one of the major metazoan reef collapses of the Phanerozoic. This study fills an important gap in the shallow-water PETM record by quantitatively measuring the changes in carbonate production and ecology of 15 localities as they shift from coral reefs to foraminiferal shoal. The quantitative and semi-quantitative analysis is accomplished by using data from the PaleoReefs database and a simple carbonate production calculation to estimate the productivity of the shallow water system. Ecological data are gathered through a literature review of the localities. The results of this study will enable a better understanding of how modern reefs may react to global climate and environmental change.

  9. Late Miocene fossils from shallow marine sediments in Brunei Darussalam: systematics, palaeoenvironment and ecology.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roslim, Amajida; Briguglio, Antonino; Kocsis, László; Ćorić, Stjepan; Razak, Hazirah

    2016-04-01

    The geology of Brunei Darussalam is fascinating but difficult to approach: rainforests and heavy precipitation tend to erode and smoothen the landscape limiting rocks exposure, whereas abundant constructions sites and active quarries allow the creation of short time available outcrop, which have to be immediately sampled. The stratigraphy of Brunei Darussalam comprises mainly Neogene sediments deposited in a wave to tide dominated shallow marine environment in a pure siliciclastic system. Thick and heavily bioturbated sandstone layers alternate to claystone beds which occasionally yield an extraordinary abundance and diversity of fossils. The sandstones, when not bioturbated, are commonly characterized by a large variety of sedimentary structures (e.g., ripple marks, planar laminations and cross beddings). In this study, we investigate the sediments and the fossil assemblages to record the palaeoenvironmental evolution of the shallow marine environment during the late Miocene, in terms of sea level change, chemostratigraphy and sedimentation rate. The study area is one of the best in terms of accessibility, extension, abundance and preservation of fossils; it is located in the region -'Bukit Ambug' (Ambug Hill), Tutong District. The fossils fauna collected encompasses mollusks, decapods, otoliths, shark and ray teeth, amber, foraminifera and coccolithophorids. In this investigation, sediment samples were taken along a section which measures 62.5 meters. A thick clay layer of 9 meters was sampled each 30 cm to investigate microfossils occurrences. Each sample was treated in peroxide and then sieved trough 63 μm, 150μm, 250μm, 450μm, 600μm, 1mm and 2mm sieves. Results point on the changes in biodiversity of foraminifera along the different horizons collected reflecting sea level changes and sediment production. The most abundant taxa identified are Pseoudorotalia schroeteriana, Ampistegina lessonii, Elphidium advenum, Quinqueloculina sp., Bolivina sp

  10. Characteristics and Propagation of Airgun Pulses in Shallow Water with Implications for Effects on Small Marine Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Hermannsen, Line; Tougaard, Jakob; Beedholm, Kristian; Nabe-Nielsen, Jacob; Madsen, Peter Teglberg

    2015-01-01

    Airguns used in seismic surveys are among the most prevalent and powerful anthropogenic noise sources in marine habitats. They are designed to produce most energy below 100 Hz, but the pulses have also been reported to contain medium-to-high frequency components with the potential to affect small marine mammals, which have their best hearing sensitivity at higher frequencies. In shallow water environments, inhabited by many of such species, the impact of airgun noise may be particularly challenging to assess due to complex propagation conditions. To alleviate the current lack of knowledge on the characteristics and propagation of airgun pulses in shallow water with implications for effects on small marine mammals, we recorded pulses from a single airgun with three operating volumes (10 in3, 25 in3 and 40 in3) at six ranges (6, 120, 200, 400, 800 and 1300 m) in a uniform shallow water habitat using two calibrated Reson 4014 hydrophones and four DSG-Ocean acoustic data recorders. We show that airgun pulses in this shallow habitat propagated out to 1300 meters in a way that can be approximated by a 18log(r) geometric transmission loss model, but with a high pass filter effect from the shallow water depth. Source levels were back-calculated to 192 dB re µPa2s (sound exposure level) and 200 dB re 1 µPa dB Leq-fast (rms over 125 ms duration), and the pulses contained substantial energy up to 10 kHz, even at the furthest recording station at 1300 meters. We conclude that the risk of causing hearing damage when using single airguns in shallow waters is small for both pinnipeds and porpoises. However, there is substantial potential for significant behavioral responses out to several km from the airgun, well beyond the commonly used shut-down zone of 500 meters. PMID:26214849

  11. Shallow and marginal marine Triassic trace fossils and ichnofabric from northwest Australia (ocean drilling program leg 122)

    SciTech Connect

    Droser, M.L. ); O'Connell, S. )

    1990-05-01

    The ichnofabric index method of ranking amount of bioturbation was used for the first time in conjunction with discrete trace fossils to examine shallow-water marine cores. Previous ichnological studies on cores have focused primarily on outer shelf and deep-sea discrete trace fossils. Upper Triassic cores examined in this study were recovered off northwest Australia during ODP Leg 122. These sediments were deposited in a shallow-water and continental shelf setting, which included swamp and prodelta environments. The most common lithology is siltstone with interbedded mudstone and sandstone. Sediments deposited in a swamp setting have rootlets and coal beds with an ichnological record consisting primarily of mottled bedding rather than discrete trace fossils. Ichnofabric indices 1 through 5 were recorded. Marginal marine/lagoonal facies have a low trace fossil diversity with common Chondrites, Planolites, and Teichichnus. Recorded ichnofabric indices include 1, 2, and 3. Laminated mudstones and siltstones (ii1) are most common. Fully marine open shelf strata are thoroughly bioturbated (ii5 and ii6) with Thalassinoides, Zoophycos, Teichichnus, and Planolites. Wackestone and packstone occur in discrete uppermost Triassic intervals and have ii1 through ii6 represented. In part due to the drilling process, sandstones and reefal limestones were poorly recovered and ichnofabric is not well preserved. Physical sedimentary structures and lateral facies relationships can be difficult to discern in core. In shallow marine deposits, the distribution of ichnofabric indices and discrete trace fossils within these strata provide an additional important data base to evaluate depositional environments.

  12. Differential antioxidant protection in tissues from marine mammals with distinct diving capacities. Shallow/short vs. deep/long divers.

    PubMed

    Cantú-Medellín, Nadiezhda; Byrd, Barbie; Hohn, Aleta; Vázquez-Medina, José Pablo; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2011-04-01

    The diving response in marine mammals results in bradycardia and peripheral vasoconstriction, with blood flow redistributing preferentially to nervous and cardiac tissues. Therefore, some tissues are rendered ischemic during a dive; with the first breath after a dive, blood flow to all tissues is reestablished. In terrestrial mammals, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production increases in response to ischemia/reperfusion and oxidative damage can occur. The capacity of marine mammals to tolerate repeated ischemia/reperfusion cycles associated with diving appears to be due to an enhanced antioxidant system. However, it is not known if diving depth and/or duration elicit differences in tissue capacity to produce ROS and antioxidant defenses in marine mammals. The objective of this study was to analyze ROS production, antioxidant defenses and oxidative damage in marine mammal species that perform shallow/short vs. deep/long dives. We measured production of superoxide radical (O(2)(•-)), oxidative damage to lipids and proteins, activity of antioxidant enzymes, and glutathione levels in tissues from shallow/short divers (Tursiops truncatus) and deep/long divers (Kogia spp.). We found that differences between the diving capacity of dolphins and Kogia spp. are reflected in O(2)(•-) production and antioxidant levels. These differences suggest that shallow/short and deep/long divers have distinct mechanisms to successfully maintain redox balance.

  13. The benthic marine assemblages of the estuarine and shallow marine Upper Burdigalian deposits of the Korneuburg Basin in Lower Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hengst, Babette; Zuschin, Martin; Harzhauser, Mathias; Mandic, Oleg; Roetzel, Reinhard

    2010-05-01

    In the course of highway constructions (Wiener Außenring-Schnellstraße (S1)) a detailed sedimentological transect of 1.8 km length was logged in deposits of the Central Paratethys near the village of Stetten, N of Korneuburg in Lower Austria. A total of 324 sediment- and 118 molluscan samples was studied. The siliciclastic succession consists of pelitic and sandy sediments and sandstones and is rich in fossils. The fossil remains consist of sponges, corals, serpulids, molluscs, balanids, echinoderms, fish and micromammals. Quantitatively the molluscs dominate and have been studied in detail. 139 species were determined from more than 11,000 shells. Two gastropod species, Agapilia pachii und Granulolabium bicinctum make up more than 53% of the assemblage. Another 11 species (Nassarius edlaueri, Bittium spina, Loripes dujardini, Hydrobia spp., Paphia subcarinata, Cyllenina ternodosa, Turritella gradata, Corbula gibba, Cerastoderma praeplicata, Striarca lactea, Sandbergeria perpusilla) each contributes more than 1% to the total molluscan composition, but all other 126 species are quantitatively unimportant. A conspicuous alternation between intertidal and shallow subtidal mollusc associations is evident. The intertidal is dominated by the superabundant Agapilia pachii and Granulolabium plicatum, whereas the heavily bioturbated fully marine subtidal is characterized by a more diverse assemblage including Turritella gradata, Nassarius edlaueri, Anadara diluvii and various venerids. Additionally, layers with large fragments of Crassostrea and thin coal deposits with Terebralia bidentata are quite abundant in the section. Washed in land snails (e.g., Planorbidae) and river snails (Melanopsidae) occur occasionally. This faunal composition, along with its typical alternation points to a vivid dynamic within this Lower Miocene, subtropical ecosystem in the paleo-estuary of the southern Korneuburg basin.

  14. Acoustic and satellite remote sensing of shallow nearshore marine habitats in the Gwaii Haanas National Marine Conservation Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshitnyk, Luba Yvanka

    The ability to map nearshore habitat (i.e. submerged aquatic vegetation) is an integral component of marine conservation. The main goal of this thesis was to examine the ability of high resolution, multispectral satellite imagery and a single-beam acoustic ground discrimination system to map the location of marine habitats in Bag Harbour, found in the Gwaii Haanas National Marine Conservation Area Reserve. To meet this goal, two objectives were addressed: (1) Using the QTC View V sing-beam acoustic ground discrimination system, identify which frequency (50 kHz or 200 kHz) is best suited for mapping marine habitat; (2) evaluate the ability to map nearshore marine habitat using WorldView-2 high resolution, multispectral satellite imagery and compare the results of marine habitat maps derived from the acoustic and satellite datasets. Ground-truth data for both acoustic and satellite data were collected via towed underwater video camera on June 3rd and 4th, 2012. Acoustic data (50 and 200 kHz) were collected on June 23rd and 24 th, 2012, respectively. The results of this study are organized into two papers. The first paper focuses on objective 1 where the QTC View V single-beam acoustic ground discrimination system was used to map nearshore habitat at a site within the Gwaii Haanas National Marine Conservation Area using two survey frequencies -- 50 kHz and 200 kHz. The results show that the 200 kHz data outperformed the 50 kHz data set in both thematic and spatial accuracy. The 200 kHz dataset was able to identify two species of submerged aquatic vegetation, eelgrass ( Zostera marina) and a red algae (Chondrocanthus exasperatus ) while the 50 kHz dataset was only able to detect the distribution of eelgrass. The best overall accuracy achieved with the 200 kHz dataset was 86% for a habitat map with three classes (dense eelgrass, dense red algae and unvegetated substrate) compared to the 50 kHz habitat classification with two classes (dense eelgrass and unvegetated

  15. Anomalous 13C enrichment in modern marine organic carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arthur, M.A.; Dean, W.E.; Claypool, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Marine organic carbon is heavier isotopically (13C enriched) than most land-plant or terrestrial organic C1. Accordingly, ??13C values of organic C in modern marine sediments are routinely interpreted in terms of the relative proportions of marine and terrestrial sources of the preserved organic matter2,3. When independent geochemical techniques are used to evaluate the source of organic matter in Cretaceous or older rocks, those rocks containing mostly marine organic C are found typically to have lighter (more-negative) ??13C values than rocks containing mostly terrestrial organic C. Here we conclude that marine photosynthesis in mid-Cretaceous and earlier oceans generally resulted in a greater fractionation of C isotopes and produced organic C having lighter ??13C values. Modern marine photosynthesis may be occurring under unusual geological conditions (higher oceanic primary production rates, lower PCO2) that limit dissolved CO2 availability and minimize carbon isotope fractionation4. ?? 1985 Nature Publishing Group.

  16. Integrating Sensors into a Marine Drone for Bathymetric 3D Surveys in Shallow Waters.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Francesco; Mattei, Gaia; Parente, Claudio; Peluso, Francesco; Santamaria, Raffaele

    2015-12-29

    This paper demonstrates that accurate data concerning bathymetry as well as environmental conditions in shallow waters can be acquired using sensors that are integrated into the same marine vehicle. An open prototype of an unmanned surface vessel (USV) named MicroVeGA is described. The focus is on the main instruments installed on-board: a differential Global Position System (GPS) system and single beam echo sounder; inertial platform for attitude control; ultrasound obstacle-detection system with temperature control system; emerged and submerged video acquisition system. The results of two cases study are presented, both concerning areas (Sorrento Marina Grande and Marechiaro Harbour, both in the Gulf of Naples) characterized by a coastal physiography that impedes the execution of a bathymetric survey with traditional boats. In addition, those areas are critical because of the presence of submerged archaeological remains that produce rapid changes in depth values. The experiments confirm that the integration of the sensors improves the instruments' performance and survey accuracy.

  17. Antimicrobial Activity of Marine Bacterial Symbionts Retrieved from Shallow Water Hydrothermal Vents.

    PubMed

    Eythorsdottir, Arnheidur; Omarsdottir, Sesselja; Einarsson, Hjorleifur

    2016-06-01

    Marine sponges and other sessile macro-organisms were collected at a shallow water hydrothermal site in Eyjafjörður, Iceland. Bacteria were isolated from the organisms using selective media for actinomycetes, and the isolates were screened for antimicrobial activity. A total of 111 isolates revealed antimicrobial activity displaying different antimicrobial patterns which indicates production of various compounds. Known test strains were grown in the presence of ethyl acetate extracts from one selected isolate, and a clear growth inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus was observed down to 0.1 % extract concentration in the medium. Identification of isolates shows different species of Actinobacteria with Streptomyces sp. playing the largest role, but also members of Bacilli, Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria. Sponges have an excellent record regarding production of bioactive compounds, often involving microbial symbionts. At the hydrothermal vents, however, the majority of active isolates originated from other invertebrates such as sea anemones or algae. The results indicate that antimicrobial assays involving isolates in full growth can detect activity not visible by other methods. The macro-organisms inhabiting the Eyjafjörður hydrothermal vent area host diverse microbial species in the phylum Actinobacteria with antimicrobial activity, and the compounds responsible for the activity will be subject to further research. PMID:27147438

  18. A complex shallow-marine gas reservoir: A South African case study

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, J.R.T.; McAloon, W.

    1995-08-01

    The gas-field was discovered by Soekor in 1989 and is located in the Bredasdorp Basin, off the south coast of South Africa, 110 km from the nearest landfall, at a water depth of 160m. Domal structural trapping is formed by segmented roll-over against a major bounding fault. The reservoir itself is highly faulted. Three boreholes have intersected the reservoir at depths of between 3616 and 3714m. Gas sand thicknesses vary between 24m and 70m and consist of stacked, blocky and upward-coarsening shallow-marine sandstone cyclic units, representing an overall transgressive phase of barrier-bar progradation. The reservoir is highly overpressured. The appraisal challenge has been to reconcile the fact that, although pressure data indicates that the three boreholes are in hydraulic communication, a gas-water contact has yet to be intersected, and gas-down-to depths differ by as much as 54m. There is also a dramatic regional variation in reservoir quality across the field. Permeability, in particular, varies for a given flow unit from an average of 1 MD to 250 MD at different boreholes. The reservoir has been characterised using a genetic approach in order to investigate the spatial relationship of reservoir parameters. In calculating in-place volumes and constructing appropriate development scenarios, emphasis has been placed on geological/depositional modelling, as well as the use of mapping seismic attributes using impedance data derived from an extensive 3-D seismic survey.

  19. Integrating Sensors into a Marine Drone for Bathymetric 3D Surveys in Shallow Waters

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Francesco; Mattei, Gaia; Parente, Claudio; Peluso, Francesco; Santamaria, Raffaele

    2015-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that accurate data concerning bathymetry as well as environmental conditions in shallow waters can be acquired using sensors that are integrated into the same marine vehicle. An open prototype of an unmanned surface vessel (USV) named MicroVeGA is described. The focus is on the main instruments installed on-board: a differential Global Position System (GPS) system and single beam echo sounder; inertial platform for attitude control; ultrasound obstacle-detection system with temperature control system; emerged and submerged video acquisition system. The results of two cases study are presented, both concerning areas (Sorrento Marina Grande and Marechiaro Harbour, both in the Gulf of Naples) characterized by a coastal physiography that impedes the execution of a bathymetric survey with traditional boats. In addition, those areas are critical because of the presence of submerged archaeological remains that produce rapid changes in depth values. The experiments confirm that the integration of the sensors improves the instruments’ performance and survey accuracy. PMID:26729117

  20. Integrating Sensors into a Marine Drone for Bathymetric 3D Surveys in Shallow Waters.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Francesco; Mattei, Gaia; Parente, Claudio; Peluso, Francesco; Santamaria, Raffaele

    2015-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that accurate data concerning bathymetry as well as environmental conditions in shallow waters can be acquired using sensors that are integrated into the same marine vehicle. An open prototype of an unmanned surface vessel (USV) named MicroVeGA is described. The focus is on the main instruments installed on-board: a differential Global Position System (GPS) system and single beam echo sounder; inertial platform for attitude control; ultrasound obstacle-detection system with temperature control system; emerged and submerged video acquisition system. The results of two cases study are presented, both concerning areas (Sorrento Marina Grande and Marechiaro Harbour, both in the Gulf of Naples) characterized by a coastal physiography that impedes the execution of a bathymetric survey with traditional boats. In addition, those areas are critical because of the presence of submerged archaeological remains that produce rapid changes in depth values. The experiments confirm that the integration of the sensors improves the instruments' performance and survey accuracy. PMID:26729117

  1. Antimicrobial Activity of Marine Bacterial Symbionts Retrieved from Shallow Water Hydrothermal Vents.

    PubMed

    Eythorsdottir, Arnheidur; Omarsdottir, Sesselja; Einarsson, Hjorleifur

    2016-06-01

    Marine sponges and other sessile macro-organisms were collected at a shallow water hydrothermal site in Eyjafjörður, Iceland. Bacteria were isolated from the organisms using selective media for actinomycetes, and the isolates were screened for antimicrobial activity. A total of 111 isolates revealed antimicrobial activity displaying different antimicrobial patterns which indicates production of various compounds. Known test strains were grown in the presence of ethyl acetate extracts from one selected isolate, and a clear growth inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus was observed down to 0.1 % extract concentration in the medium. Identification of isolates shows different species of Actinobacteria with Streptomyces sp. playing the largest role, but also members of Bacilli, Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria. Sponges have an excellent record regarding production of bioactive compounds, often involving microbial symbionts. At the hydrothermal vents, however, the majority of active isolates originated from other invertebrates such as sea anemones or algae. The results indicate that antimicrobial assays involving isolates in full growth can detect activity not visible by other methods. The macro-organisms inhabiting the Eyjafjörður hydrothermal vent area host diverse microbial species in the phylum Actinobacteria with antimicrobial activity, and the compounds responsible for the activity will be subject to further research.

  2. Wave Glider Monitoring of Sediment Transport and Dredge Plumes in a Shallow Marine Sandbank Environment

    PubMed Central

    Van Lancker, Vera; Baeye, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    As human pressure on the marine environment increases, safeguarding healthy and productive seas increasingly necessitates integrated, time- and cost-effective environmental monitoring. Employment of a Wave Glider proved very useful for the study of sediment transport in a shallow sandbank area in the Belgian part of the North Sea. During 22 days, data on surface and water-column currents and turbidity were recorded along 39 loops around an aggregate-extraction site. Correlation with wave and tidal-amplitude data allowed the quantification of current- and wave-induced advection and resuspension, important background information to assess dredging impacts. Important anomalies in suspended particulate matter concentrations in the water column suggested dredging-induced overflow of sediments in the near field (i.e., dynamic plume), and settling of finer-grained material in the far field (i.e., passive plume). Capturing the latter is a successful outcome to this experiment, since the location of dispersion and settling of a passive plume is highly dependent on the ruling hydro-meteorological conditions and thus difficult to predict. Deposition of the observed sediment plumes may cause habitat changes in the long-term. PMID:26070156

  3. Mg Isotopic Compositions of Modern Marine Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krogstad, E.; Bizzarro, M.; Hemming, N.

    2003-12-01

    We have used a MC-ICP-MS to measure the isotopic composition of magnesium in a number of samples of modern marine carbonate. Due to the large mass difference between 26Mg and 24Mg (similar to that between 13C and 12C), there is potential for mass fractionation during geologic and biologic processes that may make this isotope system useful for geochemical studies. These samples are from the study of Hemming and Hanson (1992, GCA 56: 537-543). The carbonate minerals analyzed include aragonite, low-Mg calcite, and high-Mg calcite. The samples include corals, echinoderms, ooids, etc., from subtropical to Antarctic settings. Mg purification was accomplished by ion-exchange chromatography, using Bio-Rad AG50W-X12 resin on which greater than 99 percent recovery of Mg is achieved. Samples were introduced into the MC-ICP-MS (VG Axiom) using a Cetac MCN-6000 nebuliser. We use a standard-sample-standard bracketing technique, and samples are analysed at least three times. For lab standards we find that the reproducibility on the 26Mg/24Mg to be about ñ 0.12 permil (2 s.d.). We monitored our separated samples for Na and Ca, as we have found that high Ca/Mg and Na/Mg produce variable magnesium isotopic fractionation during mass spectrometry due to as yet unclear matrix effects. We have normalized our results to our measured values for seawater. We observed a d26Mg(s.w.) range of -1.4 to -2.4 permil in our modern carbonate samples relative to present day seawater. Due to the long residence time of Mg in the oceans (ca. 50 my), this must be due to kinetic or biologic effects. Our d25Mg(s.w.) variations as a function of d26Mg(s.w.) plot along the terrestrial fractionation trend. With an average d26Mg(s.w.) of ca. +0.5 permil in all samples of mantle lithologies and mantle-derived igneous rocks (Bizzarro et al., Goldschmidt abs., 2003), we can assume that the Mg isotopic composition of Earth's river water lies between ca. -2.4 and +0.5 permil (relative to seawater). The actual

  4. Reburial of fossil organic carbon in marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Dickens, Angela F; Gélinas, Yves; Masiello, Caroline A; Wakeham, Stuart; Hedges, John I

    2004-01-22

    Marine sediments act as the ultimate sink for organic carbon, sequestering otherwise rapidly cycling carbon for geologic timescales. Sedimentary organic carbon burial appears to be controlled by oxygen exposure time in situ, and much research has focused on understanding the mechanisms of preservation of organic carbon. In this context, combustion-derived black carbon has received attention as a form of refractory organic carbon that may be preferentially preserved in soils and sediments. However, little is understood about the environmental roles, transport and distribution of black carbon. Here we apply isotopic analyses to graphitic black carbon samples isolated from pre-industrial marine and terrestrial sediments. We find that this material is terrestrially derived and almost entirely depleted of radiocarbon, suggesting that it is graphite weathered from rocks, rather than a combustion product. The widespread presence of fossil graphitic black carbon in sediments has therefore probably led to significant overestimates of burial of combustion-derived black carbon in marine sediments. It could be responsible for biasing radiocarbon dating of sedimentary organic carbon, and also reveals a closed loop in the carbon cycle. Depending on its susceptibility to oxidation, this recycled carbon may be locked away from the biologically mediated carbon cycle for many geologic cycles.

  5. Hotspots in ground and surface water carbon fluxes through a freshwater to marine (mangrove) transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, J.; Welti, N.; Hayes, M.; Lockington, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    The transfer of carbon and water from coastal freshwater wetlands to intertidal and marine zones is significant for sustaining ecosystem processes, particularly within mangroves environments. Large increases in carbon and nutrient fluxes within spatially confined zones (hotspots) are significant as drivers for broader cycling. How these processes relate to the transfers between surface and groundwater systems, as well as the transition from freshwater to marine environments, remains poorly understood. We investigated the flux of carbon and water from a freshwater wetland, to a saltmarsh and then mangroves, both within the main surface channel and within a comprehensive shallow groundwater bore network. We were able to characterise the main spatial trends in water gradients and mixing (using salinity, hydraulic gradients, stable water isotopes, and temperature) over seasonal cycles. In addition, at the same time we investigated the changes in dissolved organic carbon concentration and quality (fluorescence, UV), as well as nutrients (NO3, NH4). This revealed the river and tidal channel to be a significant export pathway for organic carbon, which was generally highly aromatic and recalcitrant. However, we also found that isolated sections of the brackish groundwater mixing zone between freshwater and marine provided a consistently high DOC 'hotspot' of very high quality carbon. This hotspot has high lateral groundwater gradients and therefore likely transports this carbon to the rest of the mangrove subsurface, where it is rapidly assimilated. These results imply large spatial heterogeneity in the carbon cycling between freshwater and marine environments, and have significant implications for the processing of the organic matter, and therefore also the respiration of greenhouse gases such as CO2 and CH4.

  6. The Microbial Carbon Pump: A new Concept in Marine Biogeochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinbauer, Markus; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2013-04-01

    Traditionally, three mechanisms, called pumps, have been suggested to explain the vertical distribution of carbon in the water column: The solubility pump, the carbonate pump and biological carbon pump (BCP). Recently, the conceptual framework of the microbial carbon pump (MCP) has been developed by the SCOR (Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research) WG 134. The MCP is defined as the transfer of labile organic matter into recalcitrant organic matter by microbial activity (microbial loop and viral shunt) causing long-term storage of carbon. The major pathways of the MCP are: 1) Direct exudation of microbial cells during production and proliferation, 2) viral lysis of microbial cells releasing microbial cell wall and cell surface macromolecules and 3) organic aggregate (particle) degradation and transformation.The MCP is important for understanding the marine carbon cycle, since the carbon content in marine dissolved organic matter (DOM, DOC) is similar to the carbon content of CO2 in the atmosphere. First estimates indiacte that the capacity of carbon sequestration into deep marine waters and sediments of the BCP and MCP is in the same order of magnitude (0.4 and 0.5-0.6 Gt C per yr). The fourth carbon pump is likely an important mechanism in the marine carbon cycle and potentially vulnerable to global change.

  7. Carbon co-implantation for ultra-shallow P{sup +}-N junction formation

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, M.; Sultan, A.; Banerjee, S.

    1996-12-31

    Carbon co-implantation in silicon has been studied as an approach for achieving ultra-shallow dopant profiles. Carbon implants to a dose of 1{times}10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} were performed in conjunction with 2 and 5 keV boron and BF{sub 2} implants. Annealed samples implanted with carbon and boron exhibited junction depths up to 250{angstrom} shallower than control samples. However, no change was observed in dopant profiles when BF{sub 2} was used as the implanted dopant species. Residual defect analysis and electrical characterization of boron implanted samples suggest that enhanced carbon levels inhibit defect dissolution mechanisms thereby degrading electrical properties of the junctions. Alternatively, carbon and BF{sub 2} implanted samples exhibit no changes in these parameters from control samples.

  8. C02 Huff-n-Puff Process in a Light Oil Shallow Shelf Carbonate Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Kovar; Scott Wehner

    1998-01-31

    The principal objective of this CO2 Huf-n-Puff (H-n-P) project is to determine the feasibility and practicality of the technology in a waterflooded shallow shelf carbonate environment. The results of parametric simulation of the CO2 H-n-P process, coupled with reservoir characterization components are to be used to determine if this process is technically and economically feasible for field implementation. The technology transfer objective of the project is to disseminate the knowledge gained through an innovative plan of increasing oil production and deferring abandonment of shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs.

  9. Shallow-water carbonate records of hyperthermals: do Pacific Ocean guyots hold the key? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, S. A.

    2010-12-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM; ~55.8 Ma) is associated with a rapid and large carbon cycle perturbation, transient warming and deep-sea acidification, and is the best-known example of a hyperthermal event. Although this event is widely known from pelagic, hemipelagic and continental records, the lack of in situ, shallow-water, carbonate-platform sections inhibits interpretations of whether the PETM had a significant effect on shallow-water carbonate ecosystems. Guyots in the Pacific Ocean are submerged seamounts that comprise a volcanic pedestal, topped with shallow-water carbonates (that accumulated at or close to sea-level) and a pelagic cap that formed after the platform ‘drowned’ (sunk below the photic zone). The isolated carbonate platforms on these guyots formed far from terrigenous input and runoff, both detrimental effects for calcifying organisms. The isolation and thickness of the carbonate platforms on guyots makes them ideal localities at which to investigate the response of shallow-water carbonate ecosystems to changes in surface ocean temperature and chemistry, free from the complications that can affect continental margin settings. Limalok Guyot (ODP Site 871) in the Pacific Ocean comprises a volcanic pedestal topped by a Paleogene carbonate platform that drowned in the middle Eocene. Carbon-isotope stratigraphy of the platform carbonate sediments will be presented, in conjunction with existing biostratigraphy, to refine the stratigraphic framework of the carbonate platform. Although core recovery was poor, the major Late Paleocene-Middle Eocene stratigraphic trends in carbon-isotopes can be recognized, including a prominent ~3‰ negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE), recording the onset of the PETM. The lithological and paleontological record of the PETM on Limalok Guyot shows no major evidence for a carbonate production crisis, suggesting that the effects of any changes in temperatures or surface ocean pH were relatively short

  10. Short-term community transition and selection in shallow marine embayment fauna from Pennsylvanian of north-central Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Cate, A.S.

    1988-02-01

    Community and size-frequency analyses were obtained for macrofauna from a thin fossiliferous interval within an otherwise barren shallow marine embayment facies in the East Mountain Shale (Strawn Group). Vertically contiguous sampling of this discrete unit allowed reconstruction of short-term community transition and detection of shifts in the population structure of two gastropod species (Glabrocingulum G. grayvillensis, Straparollus A. catilloides). These biological phenomena could be related to environmental shifts brought about by deltaic progradation.

  11. Recognition of Early Eocene global carbon isotope excursions using lipids of marine Thaumarchaeota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoon, Petra L.; Heilmann-Clausen, Claus; Pagh Schultz, Bo; Sluijs, Appy; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Schouten, Stefan

    2013-07-01

    reconstruct the δ13C of DIC in sediments that are devoid of carbonates, but relatively rich in organic matter, such as shallow marine coastal settings.

  12. Evaluating the integrity of the Ce anomaly as a paleoredox tracer using modern marine carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X. M.; Hardisty, D. S.; Lyons, T. W.; Swart, P. K.

    2015-12-01

    general agreement with seawater, indicate that the Ce anomaly in shallow marine carbonates has the potential to preserve records of primary deposition even in bulk carbonates with muliple styles of post-depositional diagenetic alteration. References: 1. Melim et al. (1995) Geology 23; 755-758. 2. Zhang and Nozaki (1998) GCA 62-8; 1307-1317.

  13. Seafloor bathymetry in deep and shallow water marine CSEM responses of Nigerian Niger Delta oil field: Effects and corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folorunso, Adetayo Femi; Li, Yuguo

    2015-12-01

    Topography distortions in bathymetrically acquired marine Controlled-Source Electromagnetic (mCSEM) responses are capable of misleading interpretation to the presence or absence of the target if not corrected for. For this reason, the effects and correction of bathymetry distortions on the deep and shallow seafloor mCSEM responses of the Niger Delta Oil province were examined in this paper. Marine CSEM response of the Niger Delta geological structure was modelled by using a 2.5D adaptive finite element forward modelling code. In both the deep water and shallow water cases, the bathymetry distortions in the electric field amplitude and phase were found to get smaller with increasing Tx-Rx offsets and contain short-wavelength components in the amplitude curves which persist at all Tx-Rx offsets. In the deep water, topographic effects on the reservoir signatures are not significant, but as water depth reduces, bathymetric distortions become more significant as a result of the airwave effects, masking the target signatures. The correction technique produces a good agreement between the flat-seafloor reservoir model and its equivalent bathymetric model in deep water at 0.25 Hz, while in shallow water, the corrected response only shows good agreement at shorter offsets but becomes complicated at longer offsets due to airwave effects. Transmission frequency was extended above and below 0.25 Hz in the frequency spectrum and the correction method applied. The bathymetry correction at higher frequency (1.75 Hz) is not effective in removing the topographic effects in either deep or shallow water. At 0.05 Hz for both seafloor scenarios, we obtained the best corrected amplitude profiles, removing completely the distortions from both topographic undulation and airwave effects in the shallow water model. Overall, the work shows that the correction technique is effective in reducing bathymetric effects in deep water at medium frequency and in both deep and shallow waters at a low

  14. Flume studies of mud deposition: Implications for shallow marine mud deposition and the stratigraphic record (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schieber, J.

    2010-12-01

    Racetrack flumes with paddle-belt drives, designed to avoid destruction of floccules, were used to examine mud deposition from swift moving suspensions. At flow velocities that transport and deposit sand (20-35 cm/s, 5 cm flow depth) muddy suspensions produce deposition-prone floccules that form migrating floccule ripples. Mud beds that form as a consequence of floccule ripple accretion appear parallel laminated at first glance, but reveal internal low angle cross-lamination on closer inspection. In plan view, the observed pattern of ripple foresets is identical to rib and furrow structure in sandstones. In experiments at marine salinity, where clays were mixed with quartz silt, uniform as well as gradually decelerating currents produce deposits that show low relief coarser silt ripples at the base, followed by low angle inclined silty laminae and an increasing clay component upwards. Once examined with proper care, the clay-rich upper portion of the deposits shows internal laminae and cross-laminae. We also observed comparable sedimentary features in various ancient shallow marine mudstone successions. When examined at the hand specimen or drill core scale, above experimental deposits show the same features that have been widely reported from fluid-mud event layers in modern shelf settings. The latter have been attributed to gravity flows that are triggered by wave re-suspension of surficial muds. Whereas that model is consistent with the features attributed to the purported process, our experiments point to a potential alternative scenario. In addition to fluid muds, meaning high concentration sediment suspensions with mass concentrations > 10 g/l, the low concentration sediment suspensions (<10 g/l) from our experiments appear to be able to create equivalent deposits when given sufficient time for advective sediment transport. Graded muddy deposits on modern shelves and in ancient shelf successions thus may be of multiple origins. In addition to being the result

  15. Integrated stratigraphy of a shallow marine Paleocene-Eocene boundary section, MCBR cores, Maryland (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Self-Trail, J. M.; Robinson, M. M.; Edwards, L. E.; Powars, D. S.; Wandless, G. A.; Willard, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    An exceptional Paleocene-Eocene boundary section occurs in a cluster of six short (<15m) coreholes (MCBR 1 through 6) drilled near Mattawoman Creek in western Charles County, Maryland. The sediments consist of glauconite-rich sand of the upper Paleocene Aquia Formation and silty clay of the lower Eocene Marlboro Clay. Sediment samples were analyzed for carbon and oxygen isotopes, percent calcium carbonate, calcareous nannofossils, planktic and benthic foraminifera, dinoflagellates, pollen, and lithology. A well-defined carbon isotope excursion (CIE) documents a gradual negative shift in δ13C values that starts below the lithologic break between the Aquia Formation and the Marlboro Clay. A benthic foraminifer extinction event, reduction of calcareous nannofossil assemblages, and change in core color from gray to alternating gray and pink also occurs within the CIE transition. These alternating changes in color coincide with cyclic peaks in the carbon isotope and percent calcium carbonate curves, where gray color corresponds to a positive shift in carbon isotope values and to a corresponding increase in percent benthic and planktic foraminifera. The upper third of the Marlboro Clay is barren of all calcareous microfossil material, although the presence of foraminiferal molds and linings proves that deposition occurred in a marine environment. Co-occurrence of the dinoflagellates Apectodinium augustum and Phthanoperidinium crenulatum at the top of the Marlboro Clay suggests that the Marlboro Clay at Mattawoman Creek is truncated. This is corroborated by the absence in the Marlboro of specimens of the calcareous nannofossil Rhomboaster-Discoaster assemblage, which is restricted to early Eocene Zone NP9b. Based on planktic/benthic foraminifera ratios, deposition of sediments at Mattawoman Creek occurred predominantly in an inner neritic environment, at water depths between 25-50 m. Occasional deepening to approximately 75m (middle neritic environment) occurred in the

  16. Marine pisolites from Upper Proterozoic carbonates of East Greenland and Spitsbergen.

    PubMed

    Swett, K; Knoll, A H

    1989-01-01

    Upper Proterozoic carbonate successions from central East Greenland (the Limestone-Dolomite 'Series' of the Eleonore Bay Group) and Svalbard (the Backlundtoppen Formation of the Akademikerbreen) Group, Spitsbergen, and the Upper Russo Formation of the Raoldtoppen Group, Nordaustlandet) contain thick sequences dominated by pisolites. These rocks were generated in shallow marine environments, and the pisoids are essentially oversized ooids. A marine environment is supported by the thickness and lateral extent of the carbonates; by a sedimentary association of pisolites with stromatolites, flake-conglomerates, calcarenites, calcilutites, microphytolites, and ooids similar to that found in numerous other Proterozoic carbonate successions; by sedimentary structures, including cross-beds and megaripples that characterize the pisolitic beds; and by microorganisms that inhabit modern marine ooids of the Bahama Banks. Petrographic features and strontium abundances suggest that the pisoids were originally aragonitic, but neomorphism, silicification, calcitization, and dolomitization have extensively modified original mineralogies and fabrics. The East Greenland and Svalbard pisolitic carbonates reflect similar depositional environments and diagenetic histories, reinforcing previous bio-, litho-, and chemostratigraphic interpretations that the two sequences accumulated contiguously in a coastal zone of pisoid genesis which extended for at least 600, and probably 1000 or more, kilometres. PMID:11542187

  17. Marine pisolites from Upper Proterozoic carbonates of East Greenland and Spitsbergen.

    PubMed

    Swett, K; Knoll, A H

    1989-01-01

    Upper Proterozoic carbonate successions from central East Greenland (the Limestone-Dolomite 'Series' of the Eleonore Bay Group) and Svalbard (the Backlundtoppen Formation of the Akademikerbreen) Group, Spitsbergen, and the Upper Russo Formation of the Raoldtoppen Group, Nordaustlandet) contain thick sequences dominated by pisolites. These rocks were generated in shallow marine environments, and the pisoids are essentially oversized ooids. A marine environment is supported by the thickness and lateral extent of the carbonates; by a sedimentary association of pisolites with stromatolites, flake-conglomerates, calcarenites, calcilutites, microphytolites, and ooids similar to that found in numerous other Proterozoic carbonate successions; by sedimentary structures, including cross-beds and megaripples that characterize the pisolitic beds; and by microorganisms that inhabit modern marine ooids of the Bahama Banks. Petrographic features and strontium abundances suggest that the pisoids were originally aragonitic, but neomorphism, silicification, calcitization, and dolomitization have extensively modified original mineralogies and fabrics. The East Greenland and Svalbard pisolitic carbonates reflect similar depositional environments and diagenetic histories, reinforcing previous bio-, litho-, and chemostratigraphic interpretations that the two sequences accumulated contiguously in a coastal zone of pisoid genesis which extended for at least 600, and probably 1000 or more, kilometres.

  18. Marine pisolites from Upper Proterozoic carbonates of East Greenland and Spitsbergen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swett, K.; Knoll, A. H.

    1989-01-01

    Upper Proterozoic carbonate successions from central East Greenland (the Limestone-Dolomite 'Series' of the Eleonore Bay Group) and Svalbard (the Backlundtoppen Formation of the Akademikerbreen) Group, Spitsbergen, and the Upper Russo Formation of the Raoldtoppen Group, Nordaustlandet) contain thick sequences dominated by pisolites. These rocks were generated in shallow marine environments, and the pisoids are essentially oversized ooids. A marine environment is supported by the thickness and lateral extent of the carbonates; by a sedimentary association of pisolites with stromatolites, flake-conglomerates, calcarenites, calcilutites, microphytolites, and ooids similar to that found in numerous other Proterozoic carbonate successions; by sedimentary structures, including cross-beds and megaripples that characterize the pisolitic beds; and by microorganisms that inhabit modern marine ooids of the Bahama Banks. Petrographic features and strontium abundances suggest that the pisoids were originally aragonitic, but neomorphism, silicification, calcitization, and dolomitization have extensively modified original mineralogies and fabrics. The East Greenland and Svalbard pisolitic carbonates reflect similar depositional environments and diagenetic histories, reinforcing previous bio-, litho-, and chemostratigraphic interpretations that the two sequences accumulated contiguously in a coastal zone of pisoid genesis which extended for at least 600, and probably 1000 or more, kilometres.

  19. Microbial Response to Carbon Dioxide Injection in a Shallow Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rook, A.; Faehndrich, D.; O'Mullan, G.; Mailloux, B.; Matter, J.; Stute, M.; Goldberg, D.

    2007-12-01

    Extensive research is underway to investigate the geophysical and geochemical dynamics of subsurface carbon sequestration, but there has been only theoretical consideration of the microbial response. Microbial dynamics are capable of altering the range and rates of geochemical reactions in the subsurface. The goal of this field experiment is to link geochemical changes due to CO2 injection to alterations in the microbial community and to provide an initial characterization of the microbial response. A seven week push-pull experiment was conducted at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory Test Well. 200L of groundwater was extracted, bubbled with carbon dioxide, augmented with a bromide tracer, and injected to 230m depth below ground surface. The hydraulically isolated injection zone marked the contact area between dolerite sill and sedimentary rock. Samples were taken on a weekly basis. Geochemically, a drop in pH from 9.4 to 4.5 at injection was coupled with a release of Fe2+ from the formation. As neutralization and mixing caused pH to return toward background levels, Fe2+ concentrations decreased. The aquifer remained anoxic throughout the experiment. DNA was successfully extracted and the gene encoding 16S ribosomal RNA was amplified from all samples with the exception of the injection fluid. Sequencing from clone libraries and tRFLP analyses were used to characterize microbial dynamics during the seven week study. Whereas the number of microbial groups detected remained relatively constant over the course of the experiment, changes were observed in both the dominant microbes phylogenetic identity and relative abundance. Methane concentrations increased from background levels (below 50 nM) to 4.2 nM after injection, but initial attempts to amplify archaeal and methanogen-specific genes were unsuccessful, bringing into question the presence of a significant methanogenic population. These results confirm that there is a microbial response to carbon dioxide

  20. Comparative Taphonomy, Taphofacies, and Bonebeds of the Mio-Pliocene Purisima Formation, Central California: Strong Physical Control on Marine Vertebrate Preservation in Shallow Marine Settings

    PubMed Central

    Boessenecker, Robert W.; Perry, Frank A.; Schmitt, James G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Taphonomic study of marine vertebrate remains has traditionally focused on single skeletons, lagerstätten, or bonebed genesis with few attempts to document environmental gradients in preservation. As such, establishment of a concrete taphonomic model for shallow marine vertebrate assemblages is lacking. The Neogene Purisima Formation of Northern California, a richly fossiliferous unit recording nearshore to offshore depositional settings, offers a unique opportunity to examine preservational trends across these settings. Methodology/Principal Findings Lithofacies analysis was conducted to place vertebrate fossils within a hydrodynamic and depositional environmental context. Taphonomic data including abrasion, fragmentation, phosphatization, articulation, polish, and biogenic bone modification were recorded for over 1000 vertebrate fossils of sharks, bony fish, birds, pinnipeds, odontocetes, mysticetes, sirenians, and land mammals. These data were used to compare both preservation of multiple taxa within a single lithofacies and preservation of individual taxa across lithofacies to document environmental gradients in preservation. Differential preservation between taxa indicates strong preservational bias within the Purisima Formation. Varying levels of abrasion, fragmentation, phosphatization, and articulation are strongly correlative with physical processes of sediment transport and sedimentation rate. Preservational characteristics were used to delineate four taphofacies corresponding to inner, middle, and outer shelf settings, and bonebeds. Application of sequence stratigraphic methods shows that bonebeds mark major stratigraphic discontinuities, while packages of rock between discontinuities consistently exhibit onshore-offshore changes in taphofacies. Conclusions/Significance Changes in vertebrate preservation and bonebed character between lithofacies closely correspond to onshore-offshore changes in depositional setting, indicating that the

  1. Palaeoecology, facies and stratigraphy of shallow marine macrofauna from the Upper Oligocene (Palaeogene) of the southern Pre-North Sea Basin of Astrup (NW Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diedrich, Cajus

    2012-03-01

    The 22 meter thick marine carbonate Upper Oligocene series of Astrup (NW Germany) is correlated with the Chattian type section of Doberg. It indicates a more constrained palaeogeographical and biostratigraphical position ranging from the biozones of Chlamys (C.) decussata (upper Chattian A) to Chlamys (C.) semistriatus (lower Chattian C). The macrofauna can be subdivided into three main benthic communities: A. the "coarse gravel spondylid beach fauna" of the shore zone with "pebble beach facies" dominated by sessile brachiopods, large balanids, spondylids, oysters or small regular echinoids. Borings are common in pebbles; B. the "glauconite fine gravel brachiopod-bryozoan littoral fauna" of the shallow subtidal zone where a terebratulid/lithothamnid dominated fauna/flora is present. The rhodophyceans were most possibly anker stones and substrates for cirripeds and serpulids; C. the "glauconite carbonate sand phytal fauna" of the shallow subtidal zone with a rich benthic mollusc dominated fauna. Indirect evidence for seagrass and macroalgae occurs on the attachment negatives of balanids and oysters, and also on Cibicides foraminifera or bryozoans like Cellepora. The facies types along the Wiehengebirge Island and Teutoburger Wald Peninsula coasts of the southern Pre-North Sea Basin differ with respect to their benthic communities to that of the siliciclastic Leipziger and the Rhenish Bay facies.

  2. Palaeoecology, facies and stratigraphy of shallow marine macrofauna from the Upper Oligocene (Palaeogene) of the southern Pre-North Sea Basin of Astrup (NW Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diedrich, Cajus G.

    2012-03-01

    The 22 meter thick marine carbonate Upper Oligocene series of Astrup (NW Germany) is correlated with the Chattian type section of Doberg. It indicates a more constrained palaeogeographical and biostratigraphical position ranging from the biozones of Chlamys ( C.) decussata (upper Chattian A) to Chlamys ( C.) semistriatus (lower Chattian C). The macrofauna can be subdivided into three main benthic communities: A. the "coarse gravel spondylid beach fauna" of the shore zone with "pebble beach facies" dominated by sessile brachiopods, large balanids, spondylids, oysters or small regular echinoids. Borings are common in pebbles; B. the "glauconite fine gravel brachiopod-bryozoan littoral fauna" of the shallow subtidal zone where a terebratulid/lithothamnid dominated fauna/flora is present. The rhodophyceans were most possibly anker stones and substrates for cirripeds and serpulids; C. the "glauconite carbonate sand phytal fauna" of the shallow subtidal zone with a rich benthic mollusc dominated fauna. Indirect evidence for seagrass and macroalgae occurs on the attachment negatives of balanids and oysters, and also on Cibicides foraminifera or bryozoans like Cellepora. The facies types along the Wiehengebirge Island and Teutoburger Wald Peninsula coasts of the southern Pre-North Sea Basin differ with respect to their benthic communities to that of the siliciclastic Leipziger and the Rhenish Bay facies.

  3. Geochemistry of post-extinction microbialites as a powerful tool to assess the oxygenation of shallow marine water in the immediate aftermath of the end-Permian mass extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collin, P. Y.; Kershaw, S.; Tribovillard, N.; Forel, M. B.; Crasquin, S.

    2015-06-01

    Rapid and profound changes in earth surface environments and biota across the Permian-Triassic boundary are well known and relate to the end-Permian mass extinction event. This major crisis is demonstrated by abrupt facies change and the development of microbialite carbonates on the shallow marine shelves around Palaeo-Tethys and western Panthalassa. Microbialites have been described from a range of sites in end-Permian and basal Triassic marine sedimentary rocks, immediately following the end-Permian mass extinction. Here, we present geochemical data primarily focused on microbialites. Our geochemical analysis shows that U, V, Mo and REE (Ce anomaly) may be used as robust redox proxies so that the microbialites record the chemistry of the ancient ambient sea water. Among the three trace metals reputed to be reliable redox proxies, one (V) is correlated here with terrigenous supply, the other two elements (U and Mo) do not show any significant authigenic enrichment, thereby indicating that oxic conditions prevailed during the growth of microbialites. REE profiles show a prominent negative Ce anomaly, also showing that the shallow marine waters were oxic. Our geochemical data are consistent with the presence of some benthic organisms (ostracods, scattered microgastropods, microbrachiopods and foraminifers) in shallow marine waters that survived the mass extinction event.

  4. Airgun inter-pulse noise field during a seismic survey in an Arctic ultra shallow marine environment.

    PubMed

    Guan, Shane; Vignola, Joseph; Judge, John; Turo, Diego

    2015-12-01

    Offshore oil and gas exploration using seismic airguns generates intense underwater pulses that could cause marine mammal hearing impairment and/or behavioral disturbances. However, few studies have investigated the resulting multipath propagation and reverberation from airgun pulses. This research uses continuous acoustic recordings collected in the Arctic during a low-level open-water shallow marine seismic survey, to measure noise levels between airgun pulses. Two methods were used to quantify noise levels during these inter-pulse intervals. The first, based on calculating the root-mean-square sound pressure level in various sub-intervals, is referred to as the increment computation method, and the second, which employs the Hilbert transform to calculate instantaneous acoustic amplitudes, is referred to as the Hilbert transform method. Analyses using both methods yield similar results, showing that the inter-pulse sound field exceeds ambient noise levels by as much as 9 dB during relatively quiet conditions. Inter-pulse noise levels are also related to the source distance, probably due to the higher reverberant conditions of the very shallow water environment. These methods can be used to quantify acoustic environment impacts from anthropogenic transient noises (e.g., seismic pulses, impact pile driving, and sonar pings) and to address potential acoustic masking affecting marine mammals. PMID:26723302

  5. Airgun inter-pulse noise field during a seismic survey in an Arctic ultra shallow marine environment.

    PubMed

    Guan, Shane; Vignola, Joseph; Judge, John; Turo, Diego

    2015-12-01

    Offshore oil and gas exploration using seismic airguns generates intense underwater pulses that could cause marine mammal hearing impairment and/or behavioral disturbances. However, few studies have investigated the resulting multipath propagation and reverberation from airgun pulses. This research uses continuous acoustic recordings collected in the Arctic during a low-level open-water shallow marine seismic survey, to measure noise levels between airgun pulses. Two methods were used to quantify noise levels during these inter-pulse intervals. The first, based on calculating the root-mean-square sound pressure level in various sub-intervals, is referred to as the increment computation method, and the second, which employs the Hilbert transform to calculate instantaneous acoustic amplitudes, is referred to as the Hilbert transform method. Analyses using both methods yield similar results, showing that the inter-pulse sound field exceeds ambient noise levels by as much as 9 dB during relatively quiet conditions. Inter-pulse noise levels are also related to the source distance, probably due to the higher reverberant conditions of the very shallow water environment. These methods can be used to quantify acoustic environment impacts from anthropogenic transient noises (e.g., seismic pulses, impact pile driving, and sonar pings) and to address potential acoustic masking affecting marine mammals.

  6. Carbon budgets and potential blue carbon stores in Scotland's coastal and marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, John; austin, william

    2016-04-01

    The role of marine ecosystems in storing blue carbon has increasingly become a topic of interest to both scientists and politicians. This is the first multidisciplinary study to assess Scotland's marine blue carbon stores, using GIS to collate habitat information based on existing data. Relevant scientific information on primary habitats for carbon uptake and storage has been reviewed, and quantitative rates of production and storage were obtained. Habitats reviewed include kelp, phytoplankton, saltmarshes, biogenic reefs (including maerl), marine sediments (coastal and shelf), and postglacial geological sediments. Each habitat has been individually assessed for any specific threats to its carbon sequestration ability. Here we present an ecosystem-scale inventory of the key rates and ultimate sequestration capacity of each habitat. Coastal and offshore sediments are the main repositories for carbon in Scotland's marine environment. Habitat-forming species on the coast (seagrasses, saltmarsh, bivalve beds, coralline algae), are highly productive but their contribution to the overall carbon budget is very small because of the limited extent of each habitat. This study highlights the importance of marine carbon stores in global carbon cycles, and the implications of climate change on the ability of marine ecosystems to sequester carbon.

  7. Robustness of fossil fish teeth for seawater neodymium isotope reconstructions under variable redox conditions in an ancient shallow marine setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, Claire E.; van de Flierdt, Tina; Jiménez-Espejo, Francisco J.; Bohaty, Steven M.; Röhl, Ursula; Hammond, Samantha J.

    2016-03-01

    Fossil fish teeth from pelagic open ocean settings are considered a robust archive for preserving the neodymium (Nd) isotopic composition of ancient seawater. However, using fossil fish teeth as an archive to reconstruct seawater Nd isotopic compositions in different sedimentary redox environments and in terrigenous-dominated, shallow marine settings is less proven. To address these uncertainties, fish tooth and sediment samples from a middle Eocene section deposited proximal to the East Antarctic margin at Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Site U1356 were analyzed for major and trace element geochemistry, and Nd isotopes. Major and trace element analyses of the sediments reveal changing redox conditions throughout deposition in a shallow marine environment. However, variations in the Nd isotopic composition and rare earth element (REE) patterns of the associated fish teeth do not correspond to redox changes in the sediments. REE patterns in fish teeth at Site U1356 carry a typical mid-REE-enriched signature. However, a consistently positive Ce anomaly marks a deviation from a pure authigenic origin of REEs to the fish tooth. Neodymium isotopic compositions of cleaned and uncleaned fish teeth fall between modern seawater and local sediments and hence could be authigenic in nature, but could also be influenced by sedimentary fluxes. We conclude that the fossil fish tooth Nd isotope proxy is not sensitive to moderate changes in pore water oxygenation. However, combined studies on sediments, pore waters, fish teeth, and seawater are needed to fully understand processes driving the reconstructed signature from shallow marine sections in proximity to continental sources.

  8. Colored dissolved organic matter in shallow estuaries: relationships between carbon sources and light attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oestreich, W. K.; Ganju, N. K.; Pohlman, J. W.; Suttles, S. E.

    2016-02-01

    Light availability is of primary importance to the ecological function of shallow estuaries. For example, benthic primary production by submerged aquatic vegetation is contingent upon light penetration to the seabed. A major component that attenuates light in estuaries is colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM). CDOM is often measured via a proxy, fluorescing dissolved organic matter (fDOM), due to the ease of in situ fDOM sensor measurements. Fluorescence must be converted to CDOM absorbance for use in light attenuation calculations. However, this CDOM-fDOM relationship varies among and within estuaries. We quantified the variability in this relationship within three estuaries along the mid-Atlantic margin of the eastern United States: West Falmouth Harbor (MA), Barnegat Bay (NJ), and Chincoteague Bay (MD/VA). Land use surrounding these estuaries ranges from urban to developed, with varying sources of nutrients and organic matter. Measurements of fDOM (excitation and emission wavelengths of 365 nm (±5 nm) and 460 nm (±40 nm), respectively) and CDOM absorbance were taken along a terrestrial-to-marine gradient in all three estuaries. The ratio of the absorption coefficient at 340 nm (m-1) to fDOM (QSU) was higher in West Falmouth Harbor (1.22) than in Barnegat Bay (0.22) and Chincoteague Bay (0.17). The CDOM : fDOM absorption ratio was variable between sites within West Falmouth Harbor and Barnegat Bay, but consistent between sites within Chincoteague Bay. Stable carbon isotope analysis for constraining the source of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in West Falmouth Harbor and Barnegat Bay yielded δ13C values ranging from -19.7 to -26.1 ‰ and -20.8 to -26.7 ‰, respectively. Concentration and stable carbon isotope mixing models of DOC (dissolved organic carbon) indicate a contribution of 13C-enriched DOC in the estuaries. The most likely source of 13C-enriched DOC for the systems we investigated is Spartina cordgrass. Comparison of DOC source to CDOM : f

  9. Colored dissolved organic matter in shallow estuaries: relationships between carbon sources and light attenuation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oestreich, W.K.; Ganju, Neil Kamal; Pohlman, John; Suttles, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Light availability is of primary importance to the ecological function of shallow estuaries. For example, benthic primary production by submerged aquatic vegetation is contingent upon light penetration to the seabed. A major component that attenuates light in estuaries is colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM). CDOM is often measured via a proxy, fluorescing dissolved organic matter (fDOM), due to the ease of in situ fDOM sensor measurements. Fluorescence must be converted to CDOM absorbance for use in light attenuation calculations. However, this CDOM–fDOM relationship varies among and within estuaries. We quantified the variability in this relationship within three estuaries along the mid-Atlantic margin of the eastern United States: West Falmouth Harbor (MA), Barnegat Bay (NJ), and Chincoteague Bay (MD/VA). Land use surrounding these estuaries ranges from urban to developed, with varying sources of nutrients and organic matter. Measurements of fDOM (excitation and emission wavelengths of 365 nm (±5 nm) and 460 nm (±40 nm), respectively) and CDOM absorbance were taken along a terrestrial-to-marine gradient in all three estuaries. The ratio of the absorption coefficient at 340 nm (m−1) to fDOM (QSU) was higher in West Falmouth Harbor (1.22) than in Barnegat Bay (0.22) and Chincoteague Bay (0.17). The CDOM : fDOM absorption ratio was variable between sites within West Falmouth Harbor and Barnegat Bay, but consistent between sites within Chincoteague Bay. Stable carbon isotope analysis for constraining the source of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in West Falmouth Harbor and Barnegat Bay yielded δ13C values ranging from −19.7 to −26.1 ‰ and −20.8 to −26.7 ‰, respectively. Concentration and stable carbon isotope mixing models of DOC (dissolved organic carbon) indicate a contribution of 13C-enriched DOC in the estuaries. The most likely source of 13C-enriched DOC for the systems we investigated is Spartina cordgrass. Comparison of

  10. C02 Huff-n-Puff Process in a Light Oil shallow Shelf Carbonate Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Kovar, Mark; Wehner, Scott

    1997-06-30

    The principal objective of this CO2 Huff-n-Puff (H-n-P) project is to determine the feasibility and practicality of the technology in a waterflooded shallow shelf carbonate environment. The results of parametric simulation of the CO2 H-n-P process, coupled with the Central Vacuum Unit (CVU) reservoir characterization components will be used to determine if this process is technically and economically feasible for field implementation. The technology transfer objective of the project is to disseminate the knowledge gained through an innovative plan in support of the Department of Energy's (DOE) objective of increasing domestic oil production and deferring the abandonment of shallow shelf carbonate (SSC) reservoirs. Tasks associated with this objective are carried out in what is considered a timely effort for near-term goals.

  11. Marine bird and cetacean associations with bathymetric habitats and shallow-water topographies: implications for trophic transfer and conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Peggy P. W.; Sydeman, William J.; Hyrenbach, K. David

    2004-09-01

    We investigated the aggregative response of marine birds and cetaceans to bathymetric features in central California over 4 years, 1996-1997 and 2001-2002. A total of 1700 km 2 of ocean habitat was surveyed over six cruises. We considered the distribution of the most abundant marine birds and mammals in relation to bathymetry. We focused our analyses on eight focal taxa: Cassin's auklet ( Ptychoramphus aleuticus), common murre ( Uria aalge), sooty shearwater ( Puffinus grieus), phalarope species (red, and red-necked: Phalaropus fulicaria, Phalaropus lobatus), Dall's porpoise ( Phocoenoides dalli), Pacific white-sided dolphin ( Lagenorhynchus obliquidens), humpback whale ( Megaptera novaeangliae), and Risso's dolphin ( Grampus griseus). We evaluated associations of top predators with seven bathymetric indices and three distance measurements to shallow-water topographies. The bathymetric descriptors included (1) median depth, (2) depth coefficient of variation, (3) contour index, and shortest distance to (4) the mainland, (5) the continental shelf-break (200-m isobath), (6) the continental slope (1000-m isobath), and (7) pelagic waters (3000-m isobath). The measurements of shallow water topographies included the shortest distance to: (8) the Cordell Bank seamount, (9) the Farallon Island Archipelago (a breeding colony for auklets and murres), and (10) Monterey Canyon. We documented two instances of spatial autocorrelation (for Cassin's auklet and common murre) at lags (distances) of 0-3 and 3-9 km, respectively, and accounted for this spatial pattern in analyses of habitat associations. We found similar relationships between cetaceans and bathymetric features at both interannual and weekly time scales. Seabirds revealed both persistent and variable relationships through time. For the resident breeding murres, we detected an interannual trend in habitat use, with these birds shifting their distribution offshore over time. Our study demonstrates that resident and

  12. An Upper Turonian fine-grained shallow marine stromatolite bed from the Muñecas Formation, Northern Iberian Ranges, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Martínez, M.; Sánchez, F.; Walliser, E. O.; Reitner, J.

    2012-07-01

    A fine-grained stromatolite bed, laterally continuous on the kilometer scale and with small synoptic relief, crops out in the Muñecas Formation in the Northern Iberian Ranges. The Muñecas Fm. was deposited during the late Turonian on a shallow water platform in the Upper Cretaceous intracratonic Iberian basin. The stromatolite bed has a tabular to domed biostromal macrostructure. Its internal mesostructure consists of planar, wavy to hemispherical stromatoids that display a broad spectrum of microstructures, including dense micrite, bahamite peloids, peloidal to clotted microfabrics, irregular micritic-wall tubes, which are suggestive of algae and filamentous microframeworks, which are suggestive of filamentous cyanobacteria. Various stromatolite growth stages have been linked to the dominance of different accretion processes. The accretion of the entire fine-grained stromatolite involves a complex mosaic of processes: trapping and binding of quartz-silt grains and bahamites, which form the agglutinated parts of some laminae, and microbially induced precipitation, which forms spongiostromic and micritic laminae. Tubiform and filamentous microframeworks resembling porostromatate or skeletal stromatolitic growth were also recognized. Laser ICP-MS measurements of Al, Si, Mg, Mn, Sr, S and Fe were analyzed to detect the influence of siliciclastic inputs and major trends during stromatolite accretion. Carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions from the stromatolite and associated facies were used to identify possible microbial signatures. These data describes a unique and well-preserved example of a shallow marine Upper Turonian fine-grained stromatolite.

  13. Multiple Suppression and Imaging of Marine Seismic Data from The Shallow Water Area in Southern East China Sea Shelf Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, J.; Luan, X.; Yang, C.

    2015-12-01

    Neither surface-related multiple elimination(SRME) nor predictive de-convolution method is effective to suppress the multiple of marine seismic data from the shallow water area. The former method needs the accurate reflection of seafloor, which is mixed with the direct wave in the near offset range. The other one could probably lose the primary wave when applied to the shallow water seismic data. We introduced the new method: deterministic water-layer de-multiple method (DWD) which is capable for the poor extrapolate result of near-offset traces. Firstly, the data shifts as downward continuation in tau-p domain with a water-layer period and the multiple model will be obtained. Then, the original seismic subtracts adaptively with the multiple model. Finally, we would get the de-multiple data after inverse tau-p transform. Marine seismic real data is from southern part of East China Sea Shelf Basin. This area has become the potential target for marine hydrocarbon exploration, it is located in the junction of the Eurasian plate pacific plate and Indian plate. Because the average water depth is less than 100 meters, seismic data contains abundant of multiple, especially the surface-related multiple. As a result it is difficult to distinguish the strata structure clearly. We used DWD approach to remove the water-layer multiple, cut off the seafloor reflection events and then suppressed the residual surface-related multiple by the traditional SRME. At last , the radon transform was applied to eliminate the multiple with long period . With these steps, we suppressed the multiple of marine seismic data from this area effectively. After multiple is removed , we acquired more accurate velocity to build the velocity model of migration. With the pre-stack migration technique, reflections from each geological period are shown clearly in the seismic section. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation of China(grant no. 41476053).

  14. A quantitative micropaleontologic method for shallow marine peleoclimatology: Application to Pliocene deposits of the western North Atlantic Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, T. M.; Dowsett, H.J.

    1990-01-01

    A transfer function was developed to estimate summer and winter paleotemperatures for arctic to tropical regions of the western North Atlantic Ocean using fossil ostracode assemblages. Q-mode factor analysis was run on ostracode assemblages from 100 modern bottom sediment samples from continental shelves of North America, Greenland and the Caribbean using 59 ostracode taxa. Seven factors accounting for 80% of the variance define assemblages that correspond to frigid, subfrigid, cold temperate, mild temperate, warm temperate, subtropical and tropical climatic zones. Multiple regression of the factor matrix against observed February and August bottom temperatures yielded an astracode transfer function with an accuracy of about ??2??C. The transfer function was used to reconstruct middle Pliocene (3.5-3.0 Ma) shallow marine climates of the western North Atlantic during the marine transgression that deposited the Yorktown Formation (Virginia and North Carolina), the Duplin Formation (South and North Carolina) and the Pinecrest beds (Florida). Middle Pliocene paleowater temperatures in Virginia averaged 19??C in August and 13.5??C in February, about 5??C to 8??C warmer than at comparable depths off Virginia today. August and February water temperatures in North Carolina were 23??C and 13.4??C, in South Carolina about 23??C and 13.5??C and in southern Florida about 24.6??C and 15.4??C. Marine climates north of 35??N were warmer than today; south of 35??N, they were about the same or slightly cooler. Thermal gradients along the coast were generally not as steep as they are today. The North Atlantic transfer function can be applied to other shallow marine Pliocene and Pleistocene deposits of eastern North America. ?? 1990 Elsevier Science Publishers B.V.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulations of the Nip7 proteins from the marine deep- and shallow-water Pyrococcus species

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The identification of the mechanisms of adaptation of protein structures to extreme environmental conditions is a challenging task of structural biology. We performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the Nip7 protein involved in RNA processing from the shallow-water (P. furiosus) and the deep-water (P. abyssi) marine hyperthermophylic archaea at different temperatures (300 and 373 K) and pressures (0.1, 50 and 100 MPa). The aim was to disclose similarities and differences between the deep- and shallow-sea protein models at different temperatures and pressures. Results The current results demonstrate that the 3D models of the two proteins at all the examined values of pressures and temperatures are compact, stable and similar to the known crystal structure of the P. abyssi Nip7. The structural deviations and fluctuations in the polypeptide chain during the MD simulations were the most pronounced in the loop regions, their magnitude being larger for the C-terminal domain in both proteins. A number of highly mobile segments the protein globule presumably involved in protein-protein interactions were identified. Regions of the polypeptide chain with significant difference in conformational dynamics between the deep- and shallow-water proteins were identified. Conclusions The results of our analysis demonstrated that in the examined ranges of temperatures and pressures, increase in temperature has a stronger effect on change in the dynamic properties of the protein globule than the increase in pressure. The conformational changes of both the deep- and shallow-sea protein models under increasing temperature and pressure are non-uniform. Our current results indicate that amino acid substitutions between shallow- and deep-water proteins only slightly affect overall stability of two proteins. Rather, they may affect the interactions of the Nip7 protein with its protein or RNA partners. PMID:25315147

  16. Probabilistic evaluation of shallow groundwater resources at a hypothetical carbon sequestration site

    DOE PAGES

    Dai, Zhenxue; Keating, Elizabeth; Bacon, Diana H.; Viswanathan, Hari; Stauffer, Philip; Jordan, Amy B.; Pawar, Rajesh

    2014-03-07

    Carbon sequestration in geologic reservoirs is an important approach for mitigating greenhouse gases emissions to the atmosphere. This study first develops an integrated Monte Carlo method for simulating CO2 and brine leakage from carbon sequestration and subsequent geochemical interactions in shallow aquifers. Then, we estimate probability distributions of five risk proxies related to the likelihood and volume of changes in pH, total dissolved solids, and trace concentrations of lead, arsenic, and cadmium for two possible consequence thresholds. The results indicate that shallow groundwater resources may degrade locally around leakage points by reduced pH and increased total dissolved solids (TDS). Themore » volumes of pH and TDS plumes are most sensitive to aquifer porosity, permeability, and CO2 and brine leakage rates. The estimated plume size of pH change is the largest, while that of cadmium is the smallest among the risk proxies. Plume volume distributions of arsenic and lead are similar to those of TDS. The scientific results from this study provide substantial insight for understanding risks of deep fluids leaking into shallow aquifers, determining the area of review, and designing monitoring networks at carbon sequestration sites.« less

  17. Probabilistic evaluation of shallow groundwater resources at a hypothetical carbon sequestration site

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Zhenxue; Keating, Elizabeth; Bacon, Diana; Viswanathan, Hari; Stauffer, Philip; Jordan, Amy; Pawar, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Carbon sequestration in geologic reservoirs is an important approach for mitigating greenhouse gases emissions to the atmosphere. This study first develops an integrated Monte Carlo method for simulating CO2 and brine leakage from carbon sequestration and subsequent geochemical interactions in shallow aquifers. Then, we estimate probability distributions of five risk proxies related to the likelihood and volume of changes in pH, total dissolved solids, and trace concentrations of lead, arsenic, and cadmium for two possible consequence thresholds. The results indicate that shallow groundwater resources may degrade locally around leakage points by reduced pH and increased total dissolved solids (TDS). The volumes of pH and TDS plumes are most sensitive to aquifer porosity, permeability, and CO2 and brine leakage rates. The estimated plume size of pH change is the largest, while that of cadmium is the smallest among the risk proxies. Plume volume distributions of arsenic and lead are similar to those of TDS. The scientific results from this study provide substantial insight for understanding risks of deep fluids leaking into shallow aquifers, determining the area of review, and designing monitoring networks at carbon sequestration sites. PMID:24844225

  18. Probabilistic evaluation of shallow groundwater resources at a hypothetical carbon sequestration site

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Zhenxue; Keating, Elizabeth; Bacon, Diana H.; Viswanathan, Hari; Stauffer, Philip; Jordan, Amy B.; Pawar, Rajesh

    2014-03-07

    Carbon sequestration in geologic reservoirs is an important approach for mitigating greenhouse gases emissions to the atmosphere. This study first develops an integrated Monte Carlo method for simulating CO2 and brine leakage from carbon sequestration and subsequent geochemical interactions in shallow aquifers. Then, we estimate probability distributions of five risk proxies related to the likelihood and volume of changes in pH, total dissolved solids, and trace concentrations of lead, arsenic, and cadmium for two possible consequence thresholds. The results indicate that shallow groundwater resources may degrade locally around leakage points by reduced pH and increased total dissolved solids (TDS). The volumes of pH and TDS plumes are most sensitive to aquifer porosity, permeability, and CO2 and brine leakage rates. The estimated plume size of pH change is the largest, while that of cadmium is the smallest among the risk proxies. Plume volume distributions of arsenic and lead are similar to those of TDS. The scientific results from this study provide substantial insight for understanding risks of deep fluids leaking into shallow aquifers, determining the area of review, and designing monitoring networks at carbon sequestration sites.

  19. Calorific and carbon values of marine and freshwater Protozoa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlay, B. J.; Uhlig, G.

    1981-12-01

    Calorific and carbon values were determined for a variety of marine and freshwater Protozoa ( Noctiluca miliaris, Euplotes sp., Eufolliculina sp. respectively Tetrahymena pyriformis, Paramecium caudatum), their food sources (Bacteria, Dunaliella primolecta, Ceratium hirundinella), and for Protozoa-dominated plankton samples. Most calorific values lie close to the centre of the range covering organisms in general. Low values in some marine samples probably resulted from the retention of bound water in the dried material. When all results were combined with data selected from the literature, the dependence of calorific value on carbon content was highly significant. This relationship is probably also adequately described by an energy-carbon regression through the variety of organic compounds commonly found in organisms. Calorific value expressed per unit carbon is shown to vary little in Protozoa (mean conversion factor 46 J [mg C]-1) or throughout the range of biological materials considered in this study (45 J [mg C]-1).

  20. Shallow stratification prevailed for ∼1700 to ∼1300 Ma ocean: Evidence from organic carbon isotopes in the North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Genming; Junium, Christopher K.; Kump, Lee R.; Huang, Junhua; Li, Chao; Feng, Qinglai; Shi, Xiaoying; Bai, Xiao; Xie, Shucheng

    2014-08-01

    The Late Paleoproterozoic to Early Mesoproterozoic (from ∼1700 Ma to ∼1300 Ma) was highlighted by the assembly of the Nuna supercontinent, expansion of euxinic marine environments and apparent stasis in the diversity of eukaryotes. The isotopic composition of carbonate carbon (δ13Ccarb) was surprisingly constant during this interval, but little is known about the secular variation in the organic carbon isotopic composition (δ13Corg). Here we report δ13Corg data from the latest Paleoproterozoic (>1650 Ma) to Early Mesoproterozoic (∼1300 Ma) succession in North China. The δ13Corg values range from -25‰ to -34‰, and are dependent on sedimentary facies. In subtidal and deeper environments δ13Corg values are low and constant, ca. -32‰, but relatively enriched and more variable in shallower intertidal and supratidal environments. We attribute the facies-dependent variation in δ13Corg to the presence of a shallow chemocline. A probable result of a shallow chemocline is that it supported significant contributions of organic matter produced by chemoautotrophic and/or anaerobic photoautotrophic microbes in relatively deep environments from the latest Paleoproterozoic to Early Mesoproterozoic continental shelf of North China.

  1. Bony fish and their contribution to marine inorganic carbon cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salter, Michael; Perry, Chris; Wilson, Rod; Harborne, Alistair

    2016-04-01

    Conventional understanding of the marine inorganic carbon cycle holds that CaCO3 (mostly as low Mg-calcite and aragonite) precipitates in the upper reaches of the ocean and sinks to a point where it either dissolves or is deposited as sediment. Thus, it plays a key role controlling the distribution of DIC in the oceans and in regulating their capacity to absorb atmospheric CO2. However, several aspects of this cycle remain poorly understood and have long perplexed oceanographers, such as the positive alkalinity anomaly observed in the upper water column of many of the world's oceans, above the aragonite and calcite saturation horizons. This anomaly would be explained by extensive dissolution of a carbonate phase more soluble than low Mg-calcite or aragonite, but major sources for such phases remain elusive. Here we highlight marine bony fish as a potentially important primary source of this 'missing' high-solubility CaCO3. Precipitation of CaCO3 takes place within the intestines of all marine bony fish as part of their normal physiological functioning, and global production models suggest it could account for up to 45 % of total new marine CaCO3 production. Moreover, high Mg-calcite containing >25 % mol% MgCO3 - a more soluble phase than aragonite - is a major component of these precipitates. Thus, fish CaCO3 may at least partially explain the alkalinity anomaly in the upper water column. However, the issue is complicated by the fact that carbonate mineralogy actually varies among fish species, with high Mg-calcite (HMC), low Mg-calcite (LMC), aragonite, and amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) all being common products. Using data from 22 Caribbean fish species, we have generated a novel production model that resolves phase proportions. We evaluate the preservation/dissolution potential of these phases and consider potential implications for marine inorganic carbon cycling. In addition, we consider the dramatic changes in fish biomass structure that have resulted

  2. Substantial role of macroalgae in marine carbon sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause-Jensen, Dorte; Duarte, Carlos M.

    2016-10-01

    Vegetated coastal habitats have been identified as important carbon sinks. In contrast to angiosperm-based habitats such as seagrass meadows, salt marshes and mangroves, marine macroalgae have largely been excluded from discussions of marine carbon sinks. Macroalgae are the dominant primary producers in the coastal zone, but they typically do not grow in habitats that are considered to accumulate large stocks of organic carbon. However, the presence of macroalgal carbon in the deep sea and sediments, where it is effectively sequestered from the atmosphere, has been reported. A synthesis of these data suggests that macroalgae could represent an important source of the carbon sequestered in marine sediments and the deep ocean. We propose two main modes for the transport of macroalgae to the deep ocean and sediments: macroalgal material drifting through submarine canyons, and the sinking of negatively buoyant macroalgal detritus. A rough estimate suggests that macroalgae could sequester about 173 TgC yr-1 (with a range of 61-268 TgC yr-1) globally. About 90% of this sequestration occurs through export to the deep sea, and the rest through burial in coastal sediments. This estimate exceeds that for carbon sequestered in angiosperm-based coastal habitats.

  3. Feeding habits of amphipods (Crustacea: Malacostraca) from shallow soft bottom communities: Comparison between marine caves and open habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro-Barranco, Carlos; Tierno-de-Figueroa, José Manuel; Guerra-García, José Manuel; Sánchez-Tocino, Luis; García-Gómez, José Carlos

    2013-04-01

    Marine caves are environments of great interest since the organisms that inhabit them are forced to develop specific adaptations to high constraint conditions. Because of some of these particular conditions, such as light absence or oligotrophy, it can be expected that feeding strategies into caves differ from that present outside them. Nevertheless, no studies have been done to compare the trophic structure of marine caves and open habitats, at least for amphipod communities, considering their importance both inside and outside of the caves. In this study, the diet of the dominant amphipod species living on shallow sediments, both inside and outside of six marine caves in western Mediterranean, was characterized. Thereby, the gut content of 17 amphipod species was studied, being this study the first attempt to establish the feeding habit of most of these species. Analysis of digestive contents of the species showed that amphipod diet is less diverse in sediments than in other environments, such as algae and seagrasses. No herbivorous species were found in the sediment and carnivorous amphipods showed a little variety of prey, feeding mainly on crustaceans. Differences in the trophic structure were also found between marine caves and open habitats sediments: while outside the caves detritivorous was the dominant group (both in number of species and number of individuals), amphipods mainly play the role of carnivorous inside the caves. No detritivorous species were found into the caves, where carnivorous represents almost 60% of amphipods species and more than 80% of amphipod individuals. This pattern obtained in amphipods differ from the general trend observed in marine cave organisms, for which a generalist diet, such as omnivory, usually is an advantage in these oligotrophic conditions. The possible causes of this pattern are discussed.

  4. Silicification of carbonate clasts in a marine environment (Upper Miocene, Vera Basin, SE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín Penela, Antonio J.; Barragán, Guillermo

    1995-06-01

    Upper Miocene marine sediments in the Vera Basin (SE Spain) contain abundant silicified marble pebbles and bivalves. The silicification of these marble pebbles and bivalves represents one of the stages of their sedimentary history, associated with small fluctuations in relative sea level. During the late Tortonian alluvial fan deposits containing the marble pebbles were invaded by the sea, which caused reworking of the pebbles and the establishment of a marine biota in the environment. After shallow burial numerous marble pebbles and bivalve remains were silicified. Both types of clasts were partially replaced by opal-CT or quartz from opaline silica derived from dissolution of skeletal debris. The silicified zones (rinds) now consist of quartzine or quartz. Silicification of the clasts must have taken place under shallow burial conditions during early diagenesis, while pyrite formed in favourable anoxic sites. Iron oxides also precipitated during early diagenesis, but after silicification. Finally, part of the deposits containing the silicified clasts were transported by gravitational mass flows and redeposited in deeper areas of the basin. If the hypothesis proposed for the diagenetic process is correct, it indicates that the uncommon silicification of carbonate clasts does not only occur in continental environments, in which it has previously been described.

  5. Hydrogeologic assessment of shallow clastic and carbonate rock aquifers in Hendry and Collier counties, southwestern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, C. Erwin; Krulikas, R.K.; Brendle, D.L.

    1996-01-01

    Direct-current electrical resistivity data were collected from 109 vertical electrical sounding sites in Hendry and Collier Counties, southwestern Florida. Selected direct-current electrical resistivity surveys, together with available borehole geologic and geophysical data, were used to determine the approximate areal extent of the shallow clastic aquifers composed of thick sands and carbonate lithologies. Results indicated that a complex pattern of shallow sands, clays, and carbonate lithologies occur throughout the area. Buried channel sands were found as deep as 50 meters below land surface in some places. The channels contain unconsolidated fine- to medium-grained quartz sand interbedded with sandy limestone, shell fragments, and gray-green sandy clay. Both surface and borehole geophysical techniques with lithologic data were necessary to approximately locate and define layers that might behave as confining layers and to locate and define the extent of any buried sand aquifers. The borehole geophysical data were used to analyze the zones of higher resistivity. Direct-current electrical resistivity data indicated the approximate location of certain layer boundaries. The conjunctive use of natural gamma and short- and long-normal resistivity logs was helpful in determining lithologic effects. Geohydrologic sections were prepared to identify potential locations of buried channels and carbonates containing freshwater. Buried channel sands and carbonate rock sections were identified in the subsurface that potentially may contain freshwater supplies.

  6. CO2 Huff-n-Puff Process in a Light Oil Shallow Shelf Carbonate Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    John Prieditis; Mark Kovar; Roger Cole; Scott Wehner

    1998-02-02

    The principal objective of the Sundown Slaughter Unit (SSU) CO2 Huff- n- Puff (H- n- P) project is to determine the feasibility and practicality of the technology in a waterflooded shallow shelf carbonate environment. Sundown Slaughter Unit is the second demonstration site associated with this project, following the unsuccessful test at Central Vacuum Unit. The ultimate goal will be to develop guidelines based on commonly available data that other operators in the industry can use to investigate the applicability of the process within other fields. The technology transfer objective of the project is to disseminate the knowledge gained through an innovative plan in support of the Department of Energy's (DOE) objective of increasing domestic oil production and deferring the abandonment of shallow shelf carbonate (SSC) reservoirs. Tasks associated with this objective are carried out in what is a timely effort for near- term goals. The goal of this Sundown Slaughter Unit Project is to demonstrate the CO2 Huff- n- Puff process in a waterflooded, light oil, shallow shelf carbonate reservoir within the Permian Basin. The CO2 Huff- n- Puff process is a proven enhanced oil recovery technology for Louisiana- Texas gulf coast sandstone reservoirs. The reader is referred to three Society of Petroleum Engineer (SPE) papers, No. 15502, No. 16720 & No. 20208 for a review of the theory, mechanics of the process, and several case histories. The process has even been shown to be moderately effective in conjunction with steam on heavy California crude oils. Although the technology is proven in gulf coast sandstones, it continues to be a very underutilized enhanced recovery option for carbonates. The goal of this technology demonstration is to gain an overall understanding of the reservoir qualities that influence CO2 Huff- n- Puff production responses within a heterogeneous reservoir such as the shallow shelf carbonate environment of the Sundown Slaughter Unit. A generalized

  7. AMS Carbon-14 Dating of Microbial Carbonates of Shallow-Water Holocene Coral Reefs in the Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, S. Y.; Li, H. C.; Siringan, F. P.

    2015-12-01

    Microbial carbonates (microbialites) occurred in the Holocene coral reefs at Paraoir and Currimao of western Luzon, the Philippines, as revealed in drill cores. These microbialites appeal grayish to buff in color with a laminated to thrombolitic structures, and encrust on corals directly or on a thin layer of calcareous red algae or encrusting foraminifers that covered the corals first. At both study sites, the microbial carbonates tend to occur in the lower (earlier) parts of the Holocene reef sequence where Heliopora coerulea dominated. No microbial carbonates were observed in the upper (younger) part of the Holocene reefs that is interpreted to grow in water depth shallower than 6 m on the basis of coral community. Selected samples of microbial carbonate and associated coral were dated by AMS 14C. The results show that the microbialites formed about 9 to 8 thousands years ago, coeval to or a few hundred years younger than the corals on which the microbialites encrusted. Some corals above or below the dated microbialites were 230Th dated in previous study. The AMS 14C ages of samples recovered at reef margins are consistent to 230Th ages, but those recovered in the back reef are much older that the 230Th ages and believed to be reworked. The current consensus is that microbial carbonates result from carbonate precipitation induced by bacteria (cyanobacteria or others) activity, or sedimentation trapped by microbial mat. Considering the ages and occurrences of the microbialites, it is proposed that the microbialites in coral reefs of western Luzon formed from 9 to 8 ky ago in dysphotic condition at greater water depth when the deglacial sea level was rising rapidly. Toward 7 ky ago when the sea-level rise slowed down and coral reef caught up, the condition became favorable to corals prospered in euphotic shallow water, and no longer suitable for microbial carbonate formation.

  8. I6nterstitial carbon-oxygen center and hydrogen related shallow thermal donors in Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutinho, J.; Jones, R.; Briddon, P. R.; Öberg, S.; Murin, L. I.; Markevich, V. P.; Lindström, J. L.

    2002-01-01

    The interstitial carbon-oxygen defect is a prominent defect formed in e-irradiated Cz-Si containing carbon. Previous stress alignment investigations have shown that the oxygen atom weakly perturb the carbon interstitial but the lack of a high-frequency oxygen mode has been taken to imply that the oxygen atom is severely affected and becomes overcoordinated. Local vibrational mode spectroscopy and ab initio modeling are used to investigate the defect. We find new modes whose oxygen isotopic shifts give further evidence for oxygen overcoordination. Moreover, we find that the calculated stress-energy tensor and energy levels are in good agreement with experimental values. The complexes formed by adding both single (CiOiH) and a pair of H atoms (CiOiH2), as well as the addition of a second oxygen atom, are considered theoretically. It is shown that the first is bistable with a shallow donor and deep acceptor level, while the second is passive. The properties of CiOiH and CiO2iH are strikingly similar to the first two members of a family of shallow thermal donors that contain hydrogen.

  9. Chemistry of calcium carbonate-rich shallow water sediments in the Bahamas

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, J.W.; Zullig, J.J.; Bernstein, L.D.; Millero, F.J.; Milne, P.; Mucci, A.; Choppin, G.R.

    1985-02-01

    The geochemistry of calcium carbonate-rich sediments from a variety of environments throughout the Bahamas was investigated with particular emphasis on the factors that control the pore water chemistry. Most sediments are supersaturated with respect to aragonite, the most abundant carbonate component. Experimental studies indicate that the observed in situ calcium carbonate ion activity products can often be produced as reversible metastable equilibria between the sediments and seawater. This is interpreted as being the result of interactions between the solutions and the minor high Mg-calcite component present in these sediments. Although the overlying waters are more supersaturated than the pore waters, carbonate dissolution, not precipitation, dominates in these sediments as a result of organic matter oxidation and the resulting increase in P/sub CO/sub 2//. The carbonate sediments of the Bahamas are remarkable for their purity, with the exception of special environments such as mangrove swamps and tidal flats with algal mats. Organic matter and heavy metal content is extremely low. Only minor sulfate reduction is occurring in most sediments. Phosphate is undetectable in all pore waters, probably as a result of adsorption on carbonate mineral surfaces. Other dissolved pore water components such as ammonia and DOC are much lower than typically found in shallow water fine-grained terrigeneous sediments.

  10. The infill of a supradetachment(?) basin: the continental to shallow-marine Upper Permian succession in the Dolomites and Carnia (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massari, F.; Neri, C.

    1997-06-01

    In the Dolomites and Carnia (eastern Southern Alps), the Upper Permian succession is represented by red beds of Val Gardena Sandstone, grading upwards and eastwards into the evaporitic and carbonate deposits of the Bellerophon Formation. An overall transgressive pattern is shown by the general trend of the depositional setting, which evolved from flashy alluvial fans, through multiple-channel bedload rivers, mixed-load sinuous rivers, terminal fans, coastal sabkha and evaporitic lagoon, to a shallow, low-gradient marine ramp. The inferred fluvial regime was subject to rapid and erratic fluctuations in discharge. Palaeosols are represented by calcic soils, and suggest a warm to hot, semi-arid or dry subhumid climate with strongly seasonal rainfall. Vertic features are associated with more inland alluvial complexes: they are missing in the terminal-fan deposits, suggesting greater aridity in lowland (coastal) areas. The Bellerophon Fm. consists of two units: a lower evaportte-bearing unit, deposited in a barred basin, and an upper shallow-marine carbonate unit, laid down on a very low-energy, low-gradient ramp. Five third-order sequences and the lower part of a sixth sequence, collectively showing a backstepping pattern, have been identified in the succession. Due to the presence of a very low-gradient ramp margin, and the consequent ineffectiveness of relative sea-level falls in producing large-scale erosion in coastal areas, it is suggested that, rather than eustatic changes, degradational episodes marking sequence boundaries in the red-bed succession reflect changes in the climate-modulated intrinsic variables of discharge and sediment supply, and/or tectonic uplift. Base level rises in, red-bed sequences are recorded by upward change from thick channel-belt sandstone bodies with an often high connectedness ratio, to progressively thinner channel deposits, ranging from isolated ribbons to channel-belt sandstone bodies potentially reaching high width

  11. Mollusks of the Upper Jurassic (upper Oxfordian-lower Kimmeridgian) shallow marine Minas Viejas Formation, northeastern Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zell, Patrick; Beckmann, Seija; Stinnesbeck, Wolfgang; Götte, Martin

    2015-10-01

    We present the first systematic description of Late Jurassic (late Oxfordian-early Kimmeridgian) invertebrates from the shallow marine Minas Viejas Formation of northeastern Mexico. The unit was generally considered to be extremely poor in fossils, due to an overall evaporitic character. The collection described here includes three taxa of ammonites, 10 taxa of bivalves and five taxa of gastropods. The fossils were discovered near Galeana and other localities in southern Nuevo León and northeastern San Luis Potosí, in thin-bedded marly limestones intercalated between gypsum units. Due to complex internal deformation of the sediments, fossils used for this study cannot be assigned to precise layers of origin. However, the taxa identified suggest a Late Jurassic (late Oxfordian-early Kimmeridgian) age for these fossil-bearing layers and allow us, for the first time, to assign a biostratigraphic age to Upper Jurassic strata in the region underlying the La Caja and La Casita formations.

  12. Paleocene-Eocene δ13C of marine and terrestrial organic matter: implications for the magnitude of total organic carbon hyperthermal isotope excursions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sluijs, A.; Dickens, G. R.

    2011-12-01

    A series of "hyperthermals" occurred during the Late Paleocene and Early Eocene (~58-50 Ma). These transient global warming events were characterized by prominent negative excursions in the stable carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) of carbon-bearing phases, and widespread dissolution of deep-sea carbonate; they were almost certainly geologically brief intervals of rapid and massive injection of 13C-depleted carbon into the combined ocean-atmosphere-biosphere system. However, the carbon masses involved remain the source of considerable debate, in part because the carbon isotope excursions (CIEs) are expressed differently, depending on the substrate analyzed and the location. For example, the CIE across the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM; ~56 Ma), now measured in numerous phases at over 100 locations, ranges between 2 - 8 %, even after discounting sections with truncated records. Three factors might cause individual carbon isotope records to differ in shape and magnitude from changes in the global exogenic carbon cycle during hyperthermal events: (i) Changes in the isotope composition of the proximal carbon source (e.g., DIC); (ii) Changes in isotope fractionation through physiological response to ecological change; and (iii) Changes in the relative abundance of components with different δ13C. All three factors likely influence the magnitude of the CIE in many records across hyperthermal events. Here, we discuss how the third factor impacts the δ13C of total organic carbon (TOC) in a shallow marine sequence. Over the past years, bulk organic δ13C, BIT index and palynomorph records have been published for the late Paleocene-early Eocene interval at IODP Hole 4A on Lomonosov Ridge, Arctic Ocean. These records show a long-term -3 % decrease in TOC and a long-term increase in the proportion of marine organic carbon; they also show a rapid -5.5 % CIE in TOC and the proportion of marine organic carbon across the PETM. After correcting for long-term variations in

  13. Radiated signal characteristics of marine vessels in the cepstral domain for shallow underwater channel.

    PubMed

    Das, Arnab; Kumar, Arun; Bahl, Rajendar

    2010-10-01

    This work examines the distribution of cepstral energy of the radiated signal of a marine vessel and the underwater channel modeled as a block-adaptive linear system. Detailed simulation analysis of the signal at the receiver of a passive sonar has led to the observation that, in the cepstral domain the radiated signal of a marine vessel largely occupies the lower cepstral indices while the underwater channel occupies the higher indices, such that for several range and depth conditions, the two can be separated out. This finding can facilitate the design of filters in the cepstral domain for reducing distortions due to the underwater channel. The work presents analytical justification and simulation studies in this regard.

  14. Different carbon sources affect PCB accumulation by marine bivalves.

    PubMed

    Laitano, M V; Silva Barni, M F; Costa, P G; Cledón, M; Fillmann, G; Miglioranza, K S B; Panarello, H O

    2016-02-01

    Pampean creeks were evaluated in the present study as potential land-based sources of PCB marine contamination. Different carbon and nitrogen sources from such creeks were analysed as boosters of PCB bioaccumulation by the filter feeder bivalve Brachidontes rodriguezii and grazer limpet Siphonaria lessoni. Carbon of different source than marine and anthropogenic nitrogen assimilated by organisms were estimated through their C and N isotopic composition. PCB concentration in surface sediments and mollusc samples ranged from 2.68 to 6.46 ng g(-1) (wet weight) and from 1074 to 4583 ng g(-1) lipid, respectively, reflecting a punctual source of PCB contamination related to a landfill area. Thus, despite the low flow of creeks, they should not be underestimated as contamination vectors to the marine environment. On the other hand, mussels PCB bioaccumulation was related with the carbon source uptake which highlights the importance to consider this factor when studying PCB distribution in organisms of coastal systems.

  15. Different carbon sources affect PCB accumulation by marine bivalves.

    PubMed

    Laitano, M V; Silva Barni, M F; Costa, P G; Cledón, M; Fillmann, G; Miglioranza, K S B; Panarello, H O

    2016-02-01

    Pampean creeks were evaluated in the present study as potential land-based sources of PCB marine contamination. Different carbon and nitrogen sources from such creeks were analysed as boosters of PCB bioaccumulation by the filter feeder bivalve Brachidontes rodriguezii and grazer limpet Siphonaria lessoni. Carbon of different source than marine and anthropogenic nitrogen assimilated by organisms were estimated through their C and N isotopic composition. PCB concentration in surface sediments and mollusc samples ranged from 2.68 to 6.46 ng g(-1) (wet weight) and from 1074 to 4583 ng g(-1) lipid, respectively, reflecting a punctual source of PCB contamination related to a landfill area. Thus, despite the low flow of creeks, they should not be underestimated as contamination vectors to the marine environment. On the other hand, mussels PCB bioaccumulation was related with the carbon source uptake which highlights the importance to consider this factor when studying PCB distribution in organisms of coastal systems. PMID:26606107

  16. Latitudinal Gradients in Degradation of Marine Dissolved Organic Carbon

    PubMed Central

    Arnosti, Carol; Steen, Andrew D.; Ziervogel, Kai; Ghobrial, Sherif; Jeffrey, Wade H.

    2011-01-01

    Heterotrophic microbial communities cycle nearly half of net primary productivity in the ocean, and play a particularly important role in transformations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The specific means by which these communities mediate the transformations of organic carbon are largely unknown, since the vast majority of marine bacteria have not been isolated in culture, and most measurements of DOC degradation rates have focused on uptake and metabolism of either bulk DOC or of simple model compounds (e.g. specific amino acids or sugars). Genomic investigations provide information about the potential capabilities of organisms and communities but not the extent to which such potential is expressed. We tested directly the capabilities of heterotrophic microbial communities in surface ocean waters at 32 stations spanning latitudes from 76°S to 79°N to hydrolyze a range of high molecular weight organic substrates and thereby initiate organic matter degradation. These data demonstrate the existence of a latitudinal gradient in the range of complex substrates available to heterotrophic microbial communities, paralleling the global gradient in bacterial species richness. As changing climate increasingly affects the marine environment, changes in the spectrum of substrates accessible by microbial communities may lead to shifts in the location and rate at which marine DOC is respired. Since the inventory of DOC in the ocean is comparable in magnitude to the atmospheric CO2 reservoir, such a change could profoundly affect the global carbon cycle. PMID:22216139

  17. Blue carbon in human-dominated estuarine and shallow coastal systems.

    PubMed

    Kuwae, Tomohiro; Kanda, Jota; Kubo, Atsushi; Nakajima, Fumiyuki; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Sohma, Akio; Suzumura, Masahiro

    2016-04-01

    Estuarine and shallow coastal systems (ESCS) are recognized as not only significant organic carbon reservoirs but also emitters of CO2 to the atmosphere through air-sea CO2 gas exchange, thus posing a dilemma on ESCS's role in climate change mitigation measures. However, some studies have shown that coastal waters take up atmospheric CO2 (Catm), although the magnitude and determinants remain unclear. We argue that the phenomenon of net uptake of Catm by ESCS is not unusual under a given set of terrestrial inputs and geophysical conditions. We assessed the key properties of systems that show the net Catm uptake and found that they are often characteristic of human-dominated systems: (1) input of high terrestrial nutrients, (2) input of treated wastewater in which labile carbon is highly removed, and (3) presence of hypoxia. We propose that human-dominated ESCS are worthy of investigation as a contributor to climate change mitigation. PMID:26531815

  18. Dual impact of temperature on growth and mortality of marine fish larvae in a shallow estuarine habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arula, Timo; Laur, Kerli; Simm, Mart; Ojaveer, Henn

    2015-12-01

    High individual growth and mortality rates of herring Clupea harengus membras and goby Pomatoschistus spp. larvae were observed in the estuarine habitat of the Gulf of Riga, Baltic Sea. Both instantaneous mortality (0.76-1.05) as well as growth rate (0.41-0.82 mm day-1) of larval herring were amongst highest observed elsewhere previously. Mortality rates of goby larvae were also high (0.57-1.05), while first ever data on growth rates were provided in this study (0.23-0.35 mm day-1). Our study also evidenced that higher growth rate of marine fish larvae did not result in lower mortalities. We suggest that high growth and mortality rates primarily resulted from a rapidly increasing and high (>18 °C) water temperature that masked potential food-web effects. The explanation for observed patterns lies in the interactive manner temperature contributed: i) facilitating prey production, which supported high growth rate and decreased mortalities; ii) exceeding physiological thermal optimum of larvae, which resulted in decreased growth rate and generally high mortalities. Our investigation suggests that the projected climate warming may have significant effect on early life history stages of the dominating marine fish species inhabiting shallow estuaries.

  19. Low endemism, continued deep-shallow interchanges, and evidence for cosmopolitan distributions in free-living marine nematodes (order Enoplida)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Nematodes represent the most abundant benthic metazoa in one of the largest habitats on earth, the deep sea. Characterizing major patterns of biodiversity within this dominant group is a critical step towards understanding evolutionary patterns across this vast ecosystem. The present study has aimed to place deep-sea nematode species into a phylogenetic framework, investigate relationships between shallow water and deep-sea taxa, and elucidate phylogeographic patterns amongst the deep-sea fauna. Results Molecular data (18 S and 28 S rRNA) confirms a high diversity amongst deep-sea Enoplids. There is no evidence for endemic deep-sea lineages in Maximum Likelihood or Bayesian phylogenies, and Enoplids do not cluster according to depth or geographic location. Tree topologies suggest frequent interchanges between deep-sea and shallow water habitats, as well as a mixture of early radiations and more recently derived lineages amongst deep-sea taxa. This study also provides convincing evidence of cosmopolitan marine species, recovering a subset of Oncholaimid nematodes with identical gene sequences (18 S, 28 S and cox1) at trans-Atlantic sample sites. Conclusions The complex clade structures recovered within the Enoplida support a high global species richness for marine nematodes, with phylogeographic patterns suggesting the existence of closely related, globally distributed species complexes in the deep sea. True cosmopolitan species may additionally exist within this group, potentially driven by specific life history traits of Enoplids. Although this investigation aimed to intensively sample nematodes from the order Enoplida, specimens were only identified down to genus (at best) and our sampling regime focused on an infinitesimal small fraction of the deep-sea floor. Future nematode studies should incorporate an extended sample set covering a wide depth range (shelf, bathyal, and abyssal sites), utilize additional genetic loci (e.g. mtDNA) that are

  20. New insights on shallow and deep crustal geological structures of BABEL line 7 marine reflection seismic data revealed from reprocessing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahrokhi, H.; Malehmir, A.; Sopher, D.

    2012-04-01

    The BABEL project (Baltic And Bothnian Echoes from the Lithosphere) was a collaboration among British, Danish, Finnish, German and Swedish geoscientists to collect deep-crustal reflection and wide-angle refraction profiles in Baltic Shield and Gulf of Bothnia. The acquisition of 2,268km of deep marine reflection seismic data was carried out in 1989. The BABEL line 7 runs in E-W direction in the Bothnian Sea, north of the Åland islands and east of the city of Gävle. Several authors presented the seismic results but with a main focus of imaging and interpreting deep crustal geological structures and the nature and the depth of Moho discontinuity along line 7. Based on this seismic data, several publications about velocity distributions within the crust, the depth and texture of Moho discontinuity and seismic reflectivity patterns in the crust were presented. Some evidence from the reflection seismic data was also presented to suggest Early Proterozoic plate tectonics in the Baltic Shield. Previous seismic images of the BABEL line 7 reflection data show a dramatic change in the reflectivity pattern from weakly reflective lower crust in the west to a more reflective lower crust in the east, which was attributed to a change from a rigid crust to a plastic crust from the west to the east. The BABEL line 7 reflection data were acquired with a total profile length of 174km, a set of 48 airguns towed at 7.5m depth, and 3000m long streamer with 60 channels spaced with 50m intervals and towed at 15m depth. Seismic data were recorded for 25s using 4ms sampling interval and 75m shot interval. Seismic data is characterized by strong source-generated noise at shallow travel times and strong but randomly distributed spurious spikes at later arrival times. In this study, we have recovered and reprocessed the seismic data along BABEL line 7. Using modern processing and imaging techniques, which were not available at the time, and with a focus on the shallow parts of the seismic

  1. High-resolution sequence-stratigraphic correlation between shallow-marine and terrestrial strata: Examples from the Sunnyside Member of the Cretaceous Blackhawk Formation Book Cliffs eastern Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, R.; Howell, J.; Boyd, R.; Flint, S.; Diessel, C.

    2006-07-15

    The Sunnyside Member of the Upper Cretaceous Blackhawk Formation in the Book Cliffs of eastern Utah provides an ideal opportunity to investigate high-resolution sequence-stratigraphic correlation between shallow-marine and terrestrial strata in an area of outstanding outcrop exposure. The thick, laterally extensive coal seam that caps the Sunnyside Member is critical for correlating between its shallow-marine and terrestrial components. Petrographic analysis of 281 samples obtained from 7 vertical sections spanning more than 30 km (18 mi) of depositional dip enabled us to recognize a series of transgressive-regressive coal facies trends in the seam. On this basis, we were able to identify a high-resolution record of accommodation change throughout the deposition of the coal, as well as a series of key sequence-stratigraphic surfaces. The stratigraphic relationships between the coal and the siliciclastic components of the Sunnyside Member enable us to correlate this record with that identified in the time-equivalent shallow-marine strata and to demonstrate that the coal spans the formation of two marine parasequences and two high-frequency, fourth-order sequence boundaries. This study has important implications for improving the understanding of sequence-stratigraphic expression in terrestrial strata and for correlating between marine and terrestrial records of base-level change. It may also have implications for improving the predictability of vertical and lateral variations in coal composition for mining and coalbed methane projects.

  2. Microbialites in the shallow-water marine environments of the Holy Cross Mountains (Poland) in the aftermath of the Frasnian-Famennian biotic crisis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakociński, Michał; Racki, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    Microbial carbonates, consisting of abundant girvanellid oncoids, are described from cephalopod-crinoid and crinoid-brachiopod coquinas (rudstones) occurring in the lowermost Famennian of the Holy Cross Mountains, Poland. A Girvanella-bearing horizon (consist with numerous girvanellid oncoids) has been recognised at the Psie Górki section, and represents the northern slope succession of the drowned Dyminy Reef. This occurrence of microbialites in the aftermath of the Frasnian-Famennian event is interpreted as the result of opportunistic cyanobacteria blooms, which, as 'disaster forms', colonised empty shallow-water ecological niches during the survival phase following the Frasnian metazoan reef collapse, due to collapsed activity of epifaunal, grazing, and/or burrowing animals. The anachronistic lithofacies at Psie Górki is linked with catastrophic mass mortality of the cephalopod and crinoid-brachiopod communities during the heavy storm events. This mass occurrence of girvanellid oncoids, along with Frutexites-like microbial shrubs and, at least partly, common micritisation of some skeletal grains, records an overall increase in microbial activity in eutrophic normal marine environments. Microbial communities in the Holy Cross Mountains are not very diverse, being mainly represented by girvanellid oncoids, and stand in contrast to the very rich microbial communities known from the Guilin area (China), Canning Basin (Australia) and the Timan-northern Ural area (Russia). The association from Poland is similar to more diverse microbial communities represented by oncoids, trombolites and stromatolites, well known from the Canadian Alberta basin.

  3. Cultivation of methanogens from shallow marine sediments at Hydrate Ridge, Oregon

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, Melissa M.; Boone, David R.

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about the methanogenic degradation of acetate, the fate of molecular hydrogen and formate or the ability of methanogens to grow and produce methane in cold, anoxic marine sediments. The microbes that produce methane were examined in permanently cold, anoxic marine sediments at Hydrate Ridge (44°35' N, 125°10' W, depth 800 m). Sediment samples (15 to 35 cm deep) were collected from areas of active methane ebullition or areas where methane hydrates occurred. The samples were diluted into enrichment medium with formate, acetate or trimethylamine as catabolic substrate. After 2 years of incubation at 4 °C to 15 °C, enrichment cultures produced methane. PCR amplification and sequencing of the rRNA genes from the highest dilutions with growth suggested that each enrichment culture contained a single strain of methanogen. The level of sequence similarity (91 to 98%) to previously characterized prokaryotes suggested that these methanogens belonged to novel genera or species within the orders Methanomicrobiales and Methanosarcinales. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene libraries from DNA extracted directly from the sediment samples revealed phylotypes that were either distantly related to cultivated methanogens or possible anaerobic methane oxidizers related to the ANME-1 and ANME-2 groups of the Archaea. However, no methanogenic sequences were detected, suggesting that methanogens represented only a small proportion of the archaeal. PMID:16877319

  4. Extremely heat tolerant photo-symbiosis in a shallow marine benthic foraminifera

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, C.; Titelboim, D.; Brandt, J.; Herut, B.; Abramovich, S.; Almogi-Labin, A.; Kucera, M.

    2016-01-01

    Bleaching, the loss of algal symbionts, occurs in marine photosymbiotic organisms at water temperatures minimally exceeding average summer SST (sea surface temperatures). Pre-adaptation allows organisms to persist under warmer conditions, providing the tolerance can be carried to new habitats. Here we provide evidence for the existence of such adaptation in the benthic foraminifera Pararotalia calcariformata. This species occurs at a thermally polluted site in the Mediterranean, where water temperatures reach a maxima daily average of 36 °C during the summer. To test whether this occurrence represents a widespread adaptation, we conducted manipulative experiments exposing this species from an unpolluted site to elevated temperatures (20–42 °C). It was kept in co-culture with the more thermally sensitive foraminifera Amphistegina lobifera in two experiments (20–36 °C). Reduced photosynthetic activity in A. lobifera occurred at 32 °C whereas photochemical stress in P. calcariformata was first observed during exposure to 36 °C. Pararotalia calcariformata survived all treatment conditions and grew under 36 °C. The photosymbiosis in P. calcariformata is unusually thermally tolerant. These observations imply that marine eukaryote-eukaryote photosymbiosis can respond to elevated temperatures by drawing on a pool of naturally occurring pre-adaptations. It also provides a perspective on the massive occurrence of symbiont-bearing foraminifera in the early Cenozoic hothouse climate. PMID:27502580

  5. Temporal patterns in the soundscape of the shallow waters of a Mediterranean marine protected area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscaino, Giuseppa; Ceraulo, Maria; Pieretti, Nadia; Corrias, Valentina; Farina, Almo; Filiciotto, Francesco; Maccarrone, Vincenzo; Grammauta, Rosario; Caruso, Francesco; Giuseppe, Alonge; Mazzola, Salvatore

    2016-09-01

    The study of marine soundscapes is an emerging field of research that contributes important information about biological compositions and environmental conditions. The seasonal and circadian soundscape trends of a marine protected area (MPA) in the Mediterranean Sea have been studied for one year using an autonomous acoustic recorder. Frequencies less than 1 kHz are dominated by noise generated by waves and are louder during the winter; conversely, higher frequencies (4–96 kHz) are dominated by snapping shrimp, which increase their acoustic activity at night during the summer. Fish choruses, below 2 kHz, characterize the soundscape at sunset during the summer. Because there are 13 vessel passages per hour on average, causing acoustic interference with fish choruses 46% of the time, this MPA cannot be considered to be protected from noise. On the basis of the high seasonal variability of the soundscape components, this study proposes a one-year acoustic monitoring protocol using the soundscape methodology approach and discusses the concept of MPA size.

  6. Temporal patterns in the soundscape of the shallow waters of a Mediterranean marine protected area

    PubMed Central

    Buscaino, Giuseppa; Ceraulo, Maria; Pieretti, Nadia; Corrias, Valentina; Farina, Almo; Filiciotto, Francesco; Maccarrone, Vincenzo; Grammauta, Rosario; Caruso, Francesco; Giuseppe, Alonge; Mazzola, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    The study of marine soundscapes is an emerging field of research that contributes important information about biological compositions and environmental conditions. The seasonal and circadian soundscape trends of a marine protected area (MPA) in the Mediterranean Sea have been studied for one year using an autonomous acoustic recorder. Frequencies less than 1 kHz are dominated by noise generated by waves and are louder during the winter; conversely, higher frequencies (4–96 kHz) are dominated by snapping shrimp, which increase their acoustic activity at night during the summer. Fish choruses, below 2 kHz, characterize the soundscape at sunset during the summer. Because there are 13 vessel passages per hour on average, causing acoustic interference with fish choruses 46% of the time, this MPA cannot be considered to be protected from noise. On the basis of the high seasonal variability of the soundscape components, this study proposes a one-year acoustic monitoring protocol using the soundscape methodology approach and discusses the concept of MPA size. PMID:27677956

  7. Extremely heat tolerant photo-symbiosis in a shallow marine benthic foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, C.; Titelboim, D.; Brandt, J.; Herut, B.; Abramovich, S.; Almogi-Labin, A.; Kucera, M.

    2016-08-01

    Bleaching, the loss of algal symbionts, occurs in marine photosymbiotic organisms at water temperatures minimally exceeding average summer SST (sea surface temperatures). Pre-adaptation allows organisms to persist under warmer conditions, providing the tolerance can be carried to new habitats. Here we provide evidence for the existence of such adaptation in the benthic foraminifera Pararotalia calcariformata. This species occurs at a thermally polluted site in the Mediterranean, where water temperatures reach a maxima daily average of 36 °C during the summer. To test whether this occurrence represents a widespread adaptation, we conducted manipulative experiments exposing this species from an unpolluted site to elevated temperatures (20–42 °C). It was kept in co-culture with the more thermally sensitive foraminifera Amphistegina lobifera in two experiments (20–36 °C). Reduced photosynthetic activity in A. lobifera occurred at 32 °C whereas photochemical stress in P. calcariformata was first observed during exposure to 36 °C. Pararotalia calcariformata survived all treatment conditions and grew under 36 °C. The photosymbiosis in P. calcariformata is unusually thermally tolerant. These observations imply that marine eukaryote-eukaryote photosymbiosis can respond to elevated temperatures by drawing on a pool of naturally occurring pre-adaptations. It also provides a perspective on the massive occurrence of symbiont-bearing foraminifera in the early Cenozoic hothouse climate.

  8. Extremely heat tolerant photo-symbiosis in a shallow marine benthic foraminifera.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, C; Titelboim, D; Brandt, J; Herut, B; Abramovich, S; Almogi-Labin, A; Kucera, M

    2016-01-01

    Bleaching, the loss of algal symbionts, occurs in marine photosymbiotic organisms at water temperatures minimally exceeding average summer SST (sea surface temperatures). Pre-adaptation allows organisms to persist under warmer conditions, providing the tolerance can be carried to new habitats. Here we provide evidence for the existence of such adaptation in the benthic foraminifera Pararotalia calcariformata. This species occurs at a thermally polluted site in the Mediterranean, where water temperatures reach a maxima daily average of 36 °C during the summer. To test whether this occurrence represents a widespread adaptation, we conducted manipulative experiments exposing this species from an unpolluted site to elevated temperatures (20-42 °C). It was kept in co-culture with the more thermally sensitive foraminifera Amphistegina lobifera in two experiments (20-36 °C). Reduced photosynthetic activity in A. lobifera occurred at 32 °C whereas photochemical stress in P. calcariformata was first observed during exposure to 36 °C. Pararotalia calcariformata survived all treatment conditions and grew under 36 °C. The photosymbiosis in P. calcariformata is unusually thermally tolerant. These observations imply that marine eukaryote-eukaryote photosymbiosis can respond to elevated temperatures by drawing on a pool of naturally occurring pre-adaptations. It also provides a perspective on the massive occurrence of symbiont-bearing foraminifera in the early Cenozoic hothouse climate. PMID:27502580

  9. Stable carbon isotope ratios of intact GDGTs indicate heterogeneous sources to marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Ann; Hurley, Sarah J.; Walter, Sunita R. Shah; Kusch, Stephanie; Lichtin, Samantha; Zhang, Yi Ge

    2016-05-01

    Thaumarchaeota, the major sources of marine glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether lipids (GDGTs), are believed to fix the majority of their carbon directly from dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). The δ13C values of GDGTs (δ13CGDGT) may be powerful tools for reconstructing variations in the ocean carbon cycle, including paleoproductivity and water mass circulation, if they can be related to values of δ13CDIC. To date, isotope measurements primarily are made on the C40 biphytane skeletons of GDGTs, rather than on complete tetraether structures. This approach erases information revealed by the isotopic heterogeneity of GDGTs within a sample and may impart an isotopic fractionation associated with the ether cleavage. To circumvent these issues, we present δ13C values for GDGTs from twelve recent sediments representing ten continental margin locations. Samples are purified by orthogonal dimensions of HPLC, followed by measurement of δ13C values by Spooling Wire Microcombustion (SWiM)-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) with 1σ precision and accuracy of ±0.25‰. Using this approach, we confirm that GDGTs, generally around -19‰, are isotopically "heavy" compared to other marine lipids. However, measured δ13CGDGT values are inconsistent with predicted values based on the 13C content of DIC in the overlying water column and the previously-published biosynthetic isotope fractionation for a pure culture of an autotrophic marine thaumarchaeon. In some sediments, the isotopic composition of individual GDGTs differs, indicating multiple source inputs. The data appear to confirm that crenarchaeol primarily is a biomarker for Thaumarchaeota, but its δ13C values still cannot be explained solely by autotrophic carbon fixation. Overall the complexity of the results suggests that both organic carbon assimilation (ca. 25% of total carbon) and multiple source(s) of exogenous GDGTs (contributing generally <30% of input to sediments) are necessary to explain the observed

  10. Carbon Concentrating Mechanisms & C4 Enzymes In Marine Phytoplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moolna, A.; Hermoso, M.; Rickaby, R.

    2009-12-01

    Photosynthetic CO2 assimilation by marine phytoplankton is a major sink in the Earth’s carbon cycle. Understanding the molecular biogeochemistry of this carbon capture is crucial to predicting how the Earth will respond to the carbon emissions driving human-induced climate change. We are investigating the connection of phytoplankton photosynthesis to different CO2 levels using the diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii and the coccolithophores Emiliania huxleyi and Gephyrocapsa oceanica. Phytoplankton in equilibrium with present-day atmospheric CO2 levels have carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) that increase their internal concentration of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) relative to their surrounding seawater. By acclimating cultures to seawater with quadrupled DIC availability, the CCM physiology is relaxed. This is demonstrated by resuspending the phytoplankton in CO2-free seawater and then plotting the response curve of photosynthetic O2 evolution rate against the addition of specific concentrations of DIC (Figure 1). Relaxation implies less energy used for CCMs and so more energy may be available for carbon fixation. Scanning electron micrographs of high DIC G. oceanica cultures, for example, show that the size of both the coccosphere and of individual coccoliths is unchanged; but the external shield of the coccolith extends further into the central area. This suggests an increase in calcification, with implications for carbon partition between organic and inorganic fluxes to the seafloor. Of particular interest is the possibility that C4 photosynthesis could provide a CCM for marine phytoplankton. The carbon-fixing Rubisco enzyme can only use CO2 as a substrate but, due to reaction between CO2 and H2O, most of the CO2 dissolved in seawater is actually present as HCO3-. In C4 land plants, CO2 for Rubisco is provided via a four-carbon intermediate compound generated from HCO3-; and the basic C4 machinery is found in all photosynthetic life because of

  11. Study of dilution, height, and lateral spread of vertical dense jets in marine shallow water.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Nadeem; Suzuki, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    This study provides information for the design of sea outfalls to dispose of brine from desalination plants into shallow lagoons of the sea. The behavior of vertical dense jets was studied experimentally by discharging cold saline water vertically upward into a tank filled with hot freshwater under stagnant ambient conditions. The minimum return point dilution, μmin, was determined using thermocouples, and the maximum height, Z(m), and the lateral spread, R(sp), of the fountains were determined by observing shadowgraph pictures. The flow was turbulent and the densimetric Froude number Fr(0) varied from 9 to 18.8. Three mixing regimes were identified: deep, intermediate, and impinging mixing regimes. In the intermediate mixing regime, μ(min) and Z(m) were analyzed and compared with the results of deep water studies. The μ(min) and Z(m) values of fountains at an intermediate water depth were found to be higher than those of fountains at deep water depths. In the impinging regime, μ(min) decreases rapidly when a fountain starts to continuously impinge on the water surface, showing a noticeable disturbance in the water surface. Therefore, a good rule of thumb is to reduce the flow through multiport diffusers from desalination plants when the noticeable disturbance is observed from the top water surface.

  12. Study of dilution, height, and lateral spread of vertical dense jets in marine shallow water.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Nadeem; Suzuki, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    This study provides information for the design of sea outfalls to dispose of brine from desalination plants into shallow lagoons of the sea. The behavior of vertical dense jets was studied experimentally by discharging cold saline water vertically upward into a tank filled with hot freshwater under stagnant ambient conditions. The minimum return point dilution, μmin, was determined using thermocouples, and the maximum height, Z(m), and the lateral spread, R(sp), of the fountains were determined by observing shadowgraph pictures. The flow was turbulent and the densimetric Froude number Fr(0) varied from 9 to 18.8. Three mixing regimes were identified: deep, intermediate, and impinging mixing regimes. In the intermediate mixing regime, μ(min) and Z(m) were analyzed and compared with the results of deep water studies. The μ(min) and Z(m) values of fountains at an intermediate water depth were found to be higher than those of fountains at deep water depths. In the impinging regime, μ(min) decreases rapidly when a fountain starts to continuously impinge on the water surface, showing a noticeable disturbance in the water surface. Therefore, a good rule of thumb is to reduce the flow through multiport diffusers from desalination plants when the noticeable disturbance is observed from the top water surface. PMID:27332845

  13. Selective recharge and isotopic composition of shallow groundwater within temperate, epigenic carbonate aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florea, Lee J.

    2013-05-01

    This paper considers the variation of δ18O and δ2H (VSMOW) in precipitation and shallow groundwater from carbonate aquifers that lend insight into the source and timing of recharge within temperate, epigenic karst. The shallow groundwater collected during 2010 and 2011 at Stream Cave (SC) and Natural Bridge Caverns (NBC) represent one input to and the primary output from the Redmond Creek karst aquifer in the Cumberland Plateau of southeast Kentucky, respectively. These data are compared with the isotopic composition of concurrent samples of precipitation from the same watershed that covers some 1900 ha. Values of δ18O and δ2H at SC and NBC are statistically similar and cluster at the midpoint of the local meteoric water line. These values remain surprisingly constant despite seasonal changes in temperature regimens and discharge. Samples in 2012 from regional springs that include Redmond Creek are more depleted in the heavier isotope and similarly stable despite coming from aquifers of a range of sizes and physical characteristics. Applying a Priestly-Taylor model for daily values of potential evapotranspiration, only 43% of the 1.10 m of precipitation in the 2010-2011 dataset remains as potential recharge, primarily during cooler months with lower solar insolation. Weighting δ18O and δ2H values of precipitation by potential recharge creates a better match with the isotopic composition of shallow groundwater than by weighting by precipitation amount. The isotopic composition and deuterium excess of precipitation samples are directly and inversely proportional to temperature, respectively. Deuterium excess in this study and displays intra- and inter-annual variation that ranges from a minimum of +11.1‰ to a maximum of +29.5‰ that demonstrate the higher-than-average deuterium excess in greater Appalachia and the shifting latitude of moisture sources, including a significant winter component of re-evaporated, continental moisture.

  14. CO2 Huff-n-Puff Process in a Light Oil Shallow Shelf Carbonate Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Boomer, R.J.; Cole, R.; Kovar, M.; Prieditis, J.; Vogt, J.; Wehner, S.

    1999-02-24

    The application cyclic CO2, often referred to as the CO2 Huff-n-Puff process, may find its niche in the maturing waterfloods of the Permian Basin. Coupling the CO2 Huff-n-Puff process to miscible flooding applications could provide the needed revenue to sufficiently mitigate near-term negative cash flow concerns in capital-intensive miscible projects. Texaco Exploration and Production Inc. and the US Department of Energy have teamed up in a attempt to develop the CO2 Huff-n-Puff process in the Grayburg and San Andres formations which are light oil, shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs that exist throughout the Permian Basin. This cost-shared effort is intended to demonstrate the viability of this underutilized technology in a specific class of domestic reservoir.

  15. Antecedent conditions control carbon loss and downstream water quality from shallow, damaged peatlands.

    PubMed

    Grand-Clement, E; Luscombe, D J; Anderson, K; Gatis, N; Benaud, P; Brazier, R E

    2014-09-15

    Losses of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from drained peatlands are of concern, due to the effects this has on the delivery of ecosystem services, and especially on the long-term store of carbon and the provision of drinking water. Most studies have looked at the effect of drainage in deep peat; comparatively, little is known about the behaviour of shallow, climatically marginal peatlands. This study examines water quality (DOC, Abs(400), pH, E4/E6 and C/C) during rainfall events from such environments in the south west UK, in order to both quantify DOC losses, and understand their potential for restoration. Water samples were taken over a 19 month period from a range of drains within two different experimental catchments in Exmoor National Park; data were analysed on an event basis. DOC concentrations ranging between 4 and 21 mg L(-1) are substantially lower than measurements in deep peat, but remain problematic for the water treatment process. Dryness plays a critical role in controlling DOC concentrations and water quality, as observed through spatial and seasonal differences. Long-term changes in depth to water table (30 days before the event) are likely to impact on DOC production, whereas discharge becomes the main control over DOC transport at the time scale of the rainfall/runoff event. The role of temperature during events is attributed to an increase in the diffusion of DOC, and therefore its transport. Humification ratios (E4/E6) consistently below 5 indicate a predominance of complex humic acids, but increased decomposition during warmer summer months leads to a comparatively higher losses of fulvic acids. This work represents a significant contribution to the scientific understanding of the behaviour and functioning of shallow damaged peatlands in climatically marginal locations. The findings also provide a sound baseline knowledge to support research into the effects of landscape restoration in the future. PMID:25010944

  16. Comparison of methods to determine Q in shallow marine sediments from vertical reflection seismograms

    SciTech Connect

    Jannsen, D.; Theilen, F.; Voss, J.

    1985-06-01

    Four methods for the determination of Q in marine sediments are compared: two traditional methods, i.e. the risetime and the spectral ratio method, and two newly established ones, the spectrum modeling and the wavelet modeling method. In the latter one Q and the reflection time T are determined simultaneously, which gives a much better accuracy for T than reading it from the seismogram. The risetime and the spectral ratio methods are used for obtaining Q directly from the data. The principle of the modeling methods is to calculate the effect of absorption and dispersion on a reference wavelet or its spectrum for various values of Q, and the best fit between the observed and the calculated data leads to the optimum result. Numerical tests on synthetic data show that a precision of more than 25% for data containing noise or superposed arrivals can hardly be achieved; in any case, wavelet modeling is the superior method. Application to data from a vertical reflection profile in the Baltic Sea yields Q in the range of 15-100 for different layers, which is to be expected in the sedimentary environment of this area.

  17. Pliocene shallow water paleoceanography of the North Atlantic ocean based on marine ostracodes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, T. M.

    1991-01-01

    Middle Pliocene marine ostracodes from coastal and shelf deposits of North and Central America and Iceland were studied to reconstruct paleotemperatures of shelf waters bordering portions of the Western Boundary Current System (including the Gulf Loop Current, Florida Current, Gulf Stream and North Atlantic Drift). Factor analytic transfer functions provided Pliocene August and February bottom-water temperatures of eight regions from the tropics to the subfrigid. The results indicate: (1) meridional temperature gradients in the western North Atlantic were less steep during the Pliocene than either today or during Late Pleistocene Isotope Stage 5e; (2) tropical and subtropical shelf waters during the Middle Pliocene were as warm as, or slightly cooler than today; (3) slightly cooler water was on the outer shelf off the southeastern and mid-Atlantic coast of the U.S., possibly due to summer upwelling of Gulf Stream water; (4) the shelf north of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina may have been influenced by warm water incursions from the western edge of the Gulf Stream, especially in summer; (5) the northeast branch of the North Atlantic Drift brought warm water to northern Iceland between 4 and 3 Ma; evidence from the Iceland record indicates that cold East Greenland Current water did not affect coastal Iceland between 4 and 3 Ma; (6) Middle Pliocene North Atlantic circulation may have been intensified, transporting more heat from the tropics to the Arctic than it does today. ?? 1991.

  18. Constraining porosity of the shallow forearc and plate interface offshore Nicaragua with marine electromagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naif, S.; Key, K.; Constable, S.; Evans, R. L.

    2015-12-01

    We imaged the electrical resistivity structure of the incoming plate and outer forearc across the Middle America Trench with 2-D inversion of marine controlled-source electromagnetic data. The inverted data reveal a high conductivity channel that is congruent with the geometry of the plate interface, which we infer to be subducted sediments. We used the resistivity model to estimate the porosity of the upper plate and underthrust sediments. The sediment porosity decays exponentially as it is subducted along the plate interface, in good agreement with existing constraints from compaction studies. The plate interface is overlain by an upper plate that is one to two orders of magnitude more resistive, requiring low porosities (<15%) that are consistent with a non-accreting margin composed of crystalline basement or lithified sediments.At 18 to 23 km landward of the trench, the conductive channel diverges from the plate interface and extends 1-2 km into the overlying plate below a cluster of active seafloor seeps. The location of the anomaly at depth is synonymous with a rapid steepening of the seafloor slope. The steepened slope occurs at 15 to 25 km landward of the trench and is extensive, persisting for more than 100 km along the margin. This correlation leads us to conclude that the cause of the conductive feature is sediment underplating. The implications for the 1992 tsunami earthquake will be discussed.

  19. New approach to global barium cycle understanding: barium isotopic composition of marine carbonates and seawater.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pretet, Chloé; Nägler, Thomas F.; Reynaud, Stéphanie; de Lange, Gert J.; Turpin, Mélanie; Immenhauser, Adrian; Böttcher, Michael E.; Samankassou, Elias

    2013-04-01

    In this communication we present the Ba isotope fractionation (delta137/134Ba) study on marine carbonates and seawater, initiated to gain a first order view of the marine Ba isotope cycle. A special focus is the question whether the nutrient type distribution of Ba in the water column, as well as different Ba sources, are reflected in Ba isotope ratios of carbonate archives. The approach ultimately aims to provide an improved Ba based paleonutrient proxy. The data set is composed of carbonates (micrites and limestone standard), coral skeleton and seawater (IAPSO standard and Mediterranean seawater). Part of the corals were cultured in monitored environments (CSM, Monaco) others originate from natural environments (shallow and warm water corals from the Bahamas/Florida and cold water corals from the Norwegian shelf). The analytical procedure includes the application of a 130Ba/135Ba double spike, a cation exchange column followed by isotope measurements on a Nu Instruments Multicollector ICP-MS. The Ba fractionation of the samples is compared to a Ba nitrate standard solution and a standard natural limestone BSC-CRM 393 (0.05 ± 0.04 ‰, 2SEM). No isotopic fractionation has been observed in the limestone standard and micrites (N=8) (-0.01 ± 0.04 ‰, 2SEM) compared to the Ba nitrate standard. On the contrary, coral skeletons show a significant positive fractionation (mean = 0.4 ± 0.05 ‰, 2 SEM). No significant difference was found between different cultured coral species. Thus no species-specific fractionation is identified within the same environmental conditions. Diagenetic influence on Ba isotopic composition was further tested on 5 natural samples with varying calcite to aragonite ratios (0 to 0.3). No significant effect was observed. Moreover, the Ba isotope composition seems independant from the Ba concentration in the studied coral skeleton, within our measurement resolution. Seawater isotopic composition (-0.05 ± 0.07 ‰, 2SD) is lighter than coral

  20. Ground-Penetrating Radar and Dielectric Characterization of Shallow Reservoir Analogs in Central Texas Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Damayanti; Heggy, Essam; Khan, Shuhab D.; Sullivan, Charlotte E.

    2007-10-01

    as a result of existing dielectric contrasts arising from a variation of moisture content and permeability. This effort characterizes shallow reservoir geometry and their dielectric heterogeneity in 3D, useful not only in hydrocarbon exploration in shallow realms but also in hydrological applications in carbonate terrains.

  1. Active Marine Subsurface Bacterial Population Composition in Low Organic Carbon Environments from IODP Expedition 320

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepard, A.; Reese, B. K.; Mills, H. J.; IODP Expedition 320 Shipboard Science Party

    2011-12-01

    Proteobacteria) at 8%, and Formosa (phylum Bacteroidetes) at 7%. These lineages support a paradigm suggesting the importance of fermentation in the subsurface. However, this study extends the predicted range for fermentation below the shallow subsurface and into organic carbon limited marine sediments. Other previously characterized subsurface active populations from environments with higher organic carbon concentrations do not show similar levels of reduced diversity or predominance of fermentative populations. This study further emphasizes the spatial variability of microbial populations in the deep subsurface and highlights the need for continued exploration.

  2. Evidence of orbital forcing in 510 to 530 million year old shallow marine cycles, Utah and western Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, Gerard C.; Beavan, John; Kominz, Michelle A.; Devlin, William

    1992-01-01

    Spectral analyses of two sequences of shallow marine sedimentary cycles that were deposited between 510 and 530 million years ago were completed. One sequence is from Middle Cambrian rocks in southern Utah and the other is from Upper Cambrian rocks in the southern Canadian Rockies. In spite of the antiquity of these strata, and even though there are differences in the age, location, and cycle facies between the two sequences, both records have distinct spectral peaks with surprisingly similar periodicities. A null model constructed to test for significance of the spectral peaks and circulatory in the methodology indicates that all but one of the spectral peaks are significant at the 90 percent confidence level. When the ratios between the statistically significant peaks are measured, we find a consistent relation to orbital forcing; specifically, the spectral peak ratios in both the Utah and Canadian examples imply that a significant amount of the variance in the cyclic records is driven by the short eccentricity (approximately 109 ky) and by the precessional (approximately 21 ky) components of the Earth's orbital variations. Neither section contains a significant component of variance at the period of the obliquity cycle, however.

  3. Sulfur and carbon cycling in organic-rich marine sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martens, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    Nearshore, continental shelf, and slope sediments are important sites of microbially mediated carbon and sulfur cycling. Marine geochemists investigated the rates and mechanisms of cycling processes in these environments by chemical distribution studies, in situ rate measurements, and steady state kinetic modeling. Pore water chemical distributions, sulfate reduction rates, and sediment water chemical fluxes were used to describe cycling on a ten year time scale in a small, rapidly depositing coastal basin, Cape Lookout Bight, and at general sites on the upper continental slope off North Carolina, U.S.A. In combination with 210 Pb sediment accumulation rates, these data were used to establish quantitative carbon and sulfur budgets as well as the relative importance of sulfate reduction and methanogeneis as the last steps in the degradation of organic matter.

  4. Assessment of intrinsic bioremediation of gasoline contamination in the shallow aquifer, Laurel Bay Exchange, Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landmeyer, J.E.; Chapelle, Francis; Bradley, P.M.

    1996-01-01

    Laboratory, field, and digital solute-transport- modeling studies demonstrate that microorganisms indigenous to the shallow ground-water system at Laurel Bay Exchange, Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort, South Carolina, can degrade petroleum hydrocarbons in gasoline released at the site. Microorganisms in aquifer sediments incubated in the laboratory under aerobic and anaerobic conditions mineralized radiolabeled carbon 14-toluene to 14C-carbon dioxide with first-order rate constants of Kbio = -0.640 per day and Kbio = -0.003 per day, respectively. Digital solute- transport modeling using the numerical code SUTRA revealed that anaerobic biodegradation of benzene occurs with a first-order rate constant near Kbio = -0.00025 per day. Sandy aquifer material beneath Laurel Bay Exchange is characterized by relatively high hydraulic conductivities (Kaq = 8.9 to 17.3 feet per day), average ground-water flow rate of about 60 feet per year, and a relatively uniform hydraulic gradient of 0.004 feet per foot. The sandy aquifer material also has low adsorptive potentials for toluene and benzene (both about Kad = 2.0 x 10-9 cubic feet per milligram), because of the lack of natural organic matter in the aquifer. The combination of this ground-water-flow rate and absence of significant adsorptive capacity in the aquifer permits toluene and benzene concentrations to be detected downgradient from the source area in monitoring wells, even though biodegradation of these compounds has been demonstrated. Solute-transport simulations, however, indicate that toluene and benzene will not reach the Broad River, the nearest point of contact with wildlife or human populations, about 3,600 feet west of the site boundary. These simulations also show that contamination will not be transported to the nearest Marine Corps property line about 2,400 feet south of the site. This is primarily because the source of contaminants has essentially been removed, and the low adsorptive capacity of the aquifer

  5. Sensitivity of climate and atmospheric CO2 to deep-ocean and shallow-ocean carbonate burial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volk, Tyler

    1989-01-01

    A model of the carbonate-silicate geochemical cycle is presented that distinguishes carbonate masses produced by shallow-ocean and deep-ocean carbonate burial and shows that reasonable increases in deep-ocean burial could produce substantial warmings over a few hundred million years. The model includes exchanges between crust and mantle; transients from burial shifts are found to be sensitive to the fraction of nondegassed carbonates subducted into the mantle. Without the habitation of the open ocean by plankton such as foraminifera and coccolithophores, today's climate would be substantially colder.

  6. Geological and reservoir characterization of shallow-shelf carbonate fields, Southern Paradox Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Chidsey, T.C. Jr. ); Eby, D.E. )

    1996-01-01

    The Paradox basin of Utah, Colorado, and Arizona contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate mounds within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to three wells with primary per field production ranging from 700 MBO to 2 MMBO at a 15-20% recovery rate. Five fields (Anasazi, Mule, Blue Hogan, Heron North, and Runway) within the Navajo Nation of southeastern Utah have been evaluated for CO[sub 2]-flood projects based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling. Conventional cores from the five fields show that three compositional reservoir types are present: (1) phylloid algal, (2) bioclastic calcarenite, and (3) bryozoan-dominated. Phylloid algal mounds are abundant in four of the five fields, and exhibit the best overall porosity and permeability. This mound type developed where shallow water depths and low energy allowed establishment of calcareous algal colonies possibly on paleohighs. The principal reservoir rock is algal bafflestone composed mostly of the phylloid Ivanovia and occasionally dolomitized. The Heron North field is a bioclastic calcarenite reservoir. It represents high-energy conditions resulting in carbonate beaches developed over foreshore carbonate rubble. The principal reservoir rocks are grainstones and rudstones having grain-selective dissolution and complete dolomitization. Bryozoan-dominated mounds present in Runway field developed in quiet, below wave-base settings that appear to be localized along Mississippian fault blocks trends. The principal reservoir rocks are bindstone and framestone with no dolomitization. The resulting model suggests that CO[sub 2] miscible flooding of these and other small carbonate reservoirs in the Paradox basin could significantly increase ultimate recovery of oil.

  7. Geological and reservoir characterization of shallow-shelf carbonate fields, Southern Paradox Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Chidsey, T.C. Jr.; Eby, D.E.

    1996-12-31

    The Paradox basin of Utah, Colorado, and Arizona contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate mounds within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to three wells with primary per field production ranging from 700 MBO to 2 MMBO at a 15-20% recovery rate. Five fields (Anasazi, Mule, Blue Hogan, Heron North, and Runway) within the Navajo Nation of southeastern Utah have been evaluated for CO{sub 2}-flood projects based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling. Conventional cores from the five fields show that three compositional reservoir types are present: (1) phylloid algal, (2) bioclastic calcarenite, and (3) bryozoan-dominated. Phylloid algal mounds are abundant in four of the five fields, and exhibit the best overall porosity and permeability. This mound type developed where shallow water depths and low energy allowed establishment of calcareous algal colonies possibly on paleohighs. The principal reservoir rock is algal bafflestone composed mostly of the phylloid Ivanovia and occasionally dolomitized. The Heron North field is a bioclastic calcarenite reservoir. It represents high-energy conditions resulting in carbonate beaches developed over foreshore carbonate rubble. The principal reservoir rocks are grainstones and rudstones having grain-selective dissolution and complete dolomitization. Bryozoan-dominated mounds present in Runway field developed in quiet, below wave-base settings that appear to be localized along Mississippian fault blocks trends. The principal reservoir rocks are bindstone and framestone with no dolomitization. The resulting model suggests that CO{sub 2} miscible flooding of these and other small carbonate reservoirs in the Paradox basin could significantly increase ultimate recovery of oil.

  8. The cycling and oxidation pathways of organic carbon in a shallow estuary along the Texas Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect

    Warnken, Kent W.; Santschi, Peter H.; Roberts, Kimberly A.; Gill, Gary A.

    2007-08-08

    The cycling and oxidation pathways of organic carbon were investigated at a single shallow water estuarine site in Trinity Bay, Texas, the uppermost lobe of Galveston Bay, during November 2000. Radio-isotopes were used to estimate sediment mixing and accumulation rates, and benthic chamber and pore water measurements were used to determine sediment-water exchange fluxes of oxygen, nutrients and metals, and infer carbon oxidation rates.

  9. Sedimentology and reservoir potential of Matilija sandstone: an Eocene sand-rich deep-sea fan and shallow-marine complex, California

    SciTech Connect

    Link, M.H.; Welton, J.E.

    1982-10-01

    A deep-sea fan facies model for the Matilija Sandstone (southern California) regression from turbidite to shallow-marine to brackish deposits are documented. In addition, reservoir characteristics and the diagenetic history of the deep-sea fan complex is discussed. Despite thick, favorable source beds and generally good initial reservoir characteristics, the Matilija Sandstone is not a productive unit of the Ventura basin because of low reservoir permeability and porosity.

  10. Factors influencing organic carbon preservation in marine sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, D. E.

    1994-01-01

    The organic matter that escapes decomposition is buried and preserved in marine sediments, with much debate as to whether the amount depends on bottom-water O2 concentration. One group argues that decomposition is more efficient with O2, and hence, organic carbon will be preferentially oxidized in its presence, and preserved in its absence. Another group argues that the kinetics of organic matter decomposition are similar in the presence and absence of O2, and there should be no influence of O2 on preservation. A compilation of carbon preservation shows that both groups are right, depending on the circumstances of deposition. At high rates of deposition, such as near continental margins, little difference in preservation is found with varying bottom-water O2. It is important that most carbon in these sediments decomposes by anaerobic pathways regardless of bottom-water O2. Hence, little influence of bottom-water O2 on preservation would, in fact, be expected. As sedimentation rate drops, sediments deposited under oxygenated bottom water become progressively more aerobic, while euxinic sediments remain anaerobic. Under these circumstances, the relative efficiencies of aerobic and anaerobic decomposition could affect preservation. Indeed, enhanced preservation is observed in low-O2 and euxinic environments. To explore in detail the factors contributing to this enhanced carbon preservation, aspects of the biochemistries of the aerobic and anaerobic process are reviewed. Other potential influences on preservation are also explored. Finally, a new model for organic carbon decomposition, the "pseudo-G" model, is developed. This model couples the degradation of refractory organic matter to the overall metabolic activity of the sediment, and has consequences for carbon preservation due to the mixing together of labile and refractory organic matter by bioturbation.

  11. Estimating rates of authigenic carbonate precipitation in modern marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitnick, E. H.; Lammers, L. N.; DePaolo, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The formation of authigenic carbonate (AC) in marine sediments provides a plausible explanation for large, long-lasting marine δ13C excursions that does not require extreme swings in atmospheric O2 or CO2. AC precipitation during diagenesis is driven by alkalinity production during anaerobic organic matter oxidation and is coupled to sulfate reduction. To evaluate the extent to which this process contributes to global carbon cycling, we need to relate AC production to the geochemical and geomicrobiological processes and ocean chemical conditions that control it. We present a method to estimate modern rates of AC precipitation using an inversion approach based on the diffusion-advection-reaction equation and sediment pore fluid chemistry profiles as a function of depth. SEM images and semi-quantitative elemental map analyses provide further constraints. Our initial focus is on ODP sites 807 and 1082. We sum the diffusive, advective, and reactive terms that describe changes in pore fluid Ca and Mg concentrations due to precipitation of secondary carbonate. We calculate the advective and diffusive terms from the first and second derivatives of the Ca and Mg pore fluid concentrations using a spline fit to the data. Assuming steady-state behavior we derive net AC precipitation rates of up to 8 x 10-4 mmol m-2 y-1 for Site 807 and 0.6 mmol m-2 y-1 for Site 1082. Site 1082 sediments contain pyrite, which increases in amount down-section towards the estimated peak carbonate precipitation rate, consistent with sulfate-reduction-induced AC precipitation. However, the presence of gypsum and barite throughout the sediment column implies incomplete sulfate reduction and merits further investigation of the biogeochemical reactions controlling authigenesis. Further adjustments to our method could account for the small but non-negligible fraction of groundmass with a CaSO4 signature. Our estimates demonstrate that AC formation may represent a sizeable flux in the modern global

  12. Shallow water marine sediment bacterial community shifts along a natural CO2 gradient in the Mediterranean Sea off Vulcano, Italy.

    PubMed

    Kerfahi, Dorsaf; Hall-Spencer, Jason M; Tripathi, Binu M; Milazzo, Marco; Lee, Junghoon; Adams, Jonathan M

    2014-05-01

    The effects of increasing atmospheric CO(2) on ocean ecosystems are a major environmental concern, as rapid shoaling of the carbonate saturation horizon is exposing vast areas of marine sediments to corrosive waters worldwide. Natural CO(2) gradients off Vulcano, Italy, have revealed profound ecosystem changes along rocky shore habitats as carbonate saturation levels decrease, but no investigations have yet been made of the sedimentary habitat. Here, we sampled the upper 2 cm of volcanic sand in three zones, ambient (median pCO(2) 419 μatm, minimum Ω(arag) 3.77), moderately CO(2)-enriched (median pCO(2) 592 μatm, minimum Ω(arag) 2.96), and highly CO(2)-enriched (median pCO(2) 1611 μatm, minimum Ω(arag) 0.35). We tested the hypothesis that increasing levels of seawater pCO(2) would cause significant shifts in sediment bacterial community composition, as shown recently in epilithic biofilms at the study site. In this study, 454 pyrosequencing of the V1 to V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene revealed a shift in community composition with increasing pCO(2). The relative abundances of most of the dominant genera were unaffected by the pCO(2) gradient, although there were significant differences for some 5 % of the genera present (viz. Georgenia, Lutibacter, Photobacterium, Acinetobacter, and Paenibacillus), and Shannon Diversity was greatest in sediments subject to long-term acidification (>100 years). Overall, this supports the view that globally increased ocean pCO(2) will be associated with changes in sediment bacterial community composition but that most of these organisms are resilient. However, further work is required to assess whether these results apply to other types of coastal sediments and whether the changes in relative abundance of bacterial taxa that we observed can significantly alter the biogeochemical functions of marine sediments. PMID:24493461

  13. Biomarker evidence for shallow water marine euxinia through the PTB in the Panthalassic Ocean (Peace River Basin Embayment, Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hays, L. E.; Beatty, T.; Henderson, C. M.; Summons, R. E.; Love, G. D.

    2007-12-01

    Protracted euxinic conditions in the late Paleozoic and early Mesozoic oceans may have been an important paleoenvironmental factor in the Permian-Triassic Boundary (PTB) extinction. Release of hydrogen sulfide during upwelling or transgressive events from such an ocean (Kump et al. 2005; Riccardi et al. 2006) may have been a driver of the extinction in both marine and terrestrial environments. Worldwide marine PTB sections show evidence for a stratified water column and the presence of sulfidic deep water, at least episodically (Isozaki 1997; Grice et al. 2005). Taxa that are particularly characteristic of such an environment are the green sulfur bacteria, or Chlorobiaceae. These anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria utilize sulfide as an electron donor for photosynthesis and live in modern stratified water columns where euxinia extends into the photic zone. Indeed, biomarkers derived from these organisms have been identified at a number of the PTB sections. The Peace River embayment in western Canada has been identified as a section that spans the PTB based on conodont biostratigraphy (Henderson 1997). Samples from five drill cores in this section provide new insight into the state of the Panthalassic Ocean during this time of unprecedented turnover in Earth's biota. Using standard biomarker protocols, we identified aromatic hydrocarbons that are diagentic products of the carotenoids isorenieratene and chlorobactene, which are diagnostic for the brown and green strains, respectively, of the Chlorobiaceae. The occurrence of chlorobactane is especially notable since the green-pigmented varieties of the Chlorobiaceae require higher light intensities than the brown-pigmented forms and, in modern environments where they have been found, occur between 13 and 30 m of the surface. This is the first time that chlorobactane has been reported from a PTB section and it suggests a particularly shallow chemocline periodically at this location. The δ13C values for the aryl

  14. Valuing blue carbon: carbon sequestration benefits provided by the marine protected areas in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Zarate-Barrera, Tatiana G; Maldonado, Jorge H

    2015-01-01

    Marine protected areas are aimed to protect and conserve key ecosystems for the provision of a number of ecosystem services that are the basis for numerous economic activities. Among the several services that these areas provide, the capacity of sequestering (capturing and storing) organic carbon is a regulating service, provided mainly by mangroves and seagrasses, that gains importance as alternatives for mitigating global warming become a priority in the international agenda. The objective of this study is to value the services associated with the capture and storage of oceanic carbon, known as Blue Carbon, provided by a new network of marine protected areas in Colombia. We approach the monetary value associated to these services through the simulation of a hypothetical market for oceanic carbon. To do that, we construct a benefit function that considers the capacity of mangroves and seagrasses for capturing and storing blue carbon, and simulate scenarios for the variation of key variables such as the market carbon price, the discount rate, the natural rate of loss of the ecosystems, and the expectations about the post-Kyoto negotiations. The results indicate that the expected benefits associated to carbon capture and storage provided by these ecosystems are substantial but highly dependent on the expectations in terms of the negotiations surrounding the extension of the Kyoto Protocol and the dynamics of the carbon credit's demand and supply. We also find that the natural loss rate of these ecosystems does not seem to have a significant effect on the annual value of the benefits. This approach constitutes one of the first attempts to value blue carbon as one of the services provided by conservation.

  15. Valuing blue carbon: carbon sequestration benefits provided by the marine protected areas in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Zarate-Barrera, Tatiana G; Maldonado, Jorge H

    2015-01-01

    Marine protected areas are aimed to protect and conserve key ecosystems for the provision of a number of ecosystem services that are the basis for numerous economic activities. Among the several services that these areas provide, the capacity of sequestering (capturing and storing) organic carbon is a regulating service, provided mainly by mangroves and seagrasses, that gains importance as alternatives for mitigating global warming become a priority in the international agenda. The objective of this study is to value the services associated with the capture and storage of oceanic carbon, known as Blue Carbon, provided by a new network of marine protected areas in Colombia. We approach the monetary value associated to these services through the simulation of a hypothetical market for oceanic carbon. To do that, we construct a benefit function that considers the capacity of mangroves and seagrasses for capturing and storing blue carbon, and simulate scenarios for the variation of key variables such as the market carbon price, the discount rate, the natural rate of loss of the ecosystems, and the expectations about the post-Kyoto negotiations. The results indicate that the expected benefits associated to carbon capture and storage provided by these ecosystems are substantial but highly dependent on the expectations in terms of the negotiations surrounding the extension of the Kyoto Protocol and the dynamics of the carbon credit's demand and supply. We also find that the natural loss rate of these ecosystems does not seem to have a significant effect on the annual value of the benefits. This approach constitutes one of the first attempts to value blue carbon as one of the services provided by conservation. PMID:26018814

  16. Valuing Blue Carbon: Carbon Sequestration Benefits Provided by the Marine Protected Areas in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Marine protected areas are aimed to protect and conserve key ecosystems for the provision of a number of ecosystem services that are the basis for numerous economic activities. Among the several services that these areas provide, the capacity of sequestering (capturing and storing) organic carbon is a regulating service, provided mainly by mangroves and seagrasses, that gains importance as alternatives for mitigating global warming become a priority in the international agenda. The objective of this study is to value the services associated with the capture and storage of oceanic carbon, known as Blue Carbon, provided by a new network of marine protected areas in Colombia. We approach the monetary value associated to these services through the simulation of a hypothetical market for oceanic carbon. To do that, we construct a benefit function that considers the capacity of mangroves and seagrasses for capturing and storing blue carbon, and simulate scenarios for the variation of key variables such as the market carbon price, the discount rate, the natural rate of loss of the ecosystems, and the expectations about the post-Kyoto negotiations. The results indicate that the expected benefits associated to carbon capture and storage provided by these ecosystems are substantial but highly dependent on the expectations in terms of the negotiations surrounding the extension of the Kyoto Protocol and the dynamics of the carbon credit’s demand and supply. We also find that the natural loss rate of these ecosystems does not seem to have a significant effect on the annual value of the benefits. This approach constitutes one of the first attempts to value blue carbon as one of the services provided by conservation. PMID:26018814

  17. Dynamic relationships between body size, species richness, abundance, and energy use in a shallow marine epibenthic faunal community

    PubMed Central

    Labra, Fabio A; Hernández-Miranda, Eduardo; Quiñones, Renato A

    2015-01-01

    We study the temporal variation in the empirical relationships among body size (S), species richness (R), and abundance (A) in a shallow marine epibenthic faunal community in Coliumo Bay, Chile. We also extend previous analyses by calculating individual energy use (E) and test whether its bivariate and trivariate relationships with S and R are in agreement with expectations derived from the energetic equivalence rule. Carnivorous and scavenger species representing over 95% of sample abundance and biomass were studied. For each individual, body size (g) was measured and E was estimated following published allometric relationships. Data for each sample were tabulated into exponential body size bins, comparing species-averaged values with individual-based estimates which allow species to potentially occupy multiple size classes. For individual-based data, both the number of individuals and species across body size classes are fit by a Weibull function rather than by a power law scaling. Species richness is also a power law of the number of individuals. Energy use shows a piecewise scaling relationship with body size, with energetic equivalence holding true only for size classes above the modal abundance class. Species-based data showed either weak linear or no significant patterns, likely due to the decrease in the number of data points across body size classes. Hence, for individual-based size spectra, the SRA relationship seems to be general despite seasonal forcing and strong disturbances in Coliumo Bay. The unimodal abundance distribution results in a piecewise energy scaling relationship, with small individuals showing a positive scaling and large individuals showing energetic equivalence. Hence, strict energetic equivalence should not be expected for unimodal abundance distributions. On the other hand, while species-based data do not show unimodal SRA relationships, energy use across body size classes did not show significant trends, supporting energetic

  18. Dynamic relationships between body size, species richness, abundance, and energy use in a shallow marine epibenthic faunal community.

    PubMed

    Labra, Fabio A; Hernández-Miranda, Eduardo; Quiñones, Renato A

    2015-01-01

    We study the temporal variation in the empirical relationships among body size (S), species richness (R), and abundance (A) in a shallow marine epibenthic faunal community in Coliumo Bay, Chile. We also extend previous analyses by calculating individual energy use (E) and test whether its bivariate and trivariate relationships with S and R are in agreement with expectations derived from the energetic equivalence rule. Carnivorous and scavenger species representing over 95% of sample abundance and biomass were studied. For each individual, body size (g) was measured and E was estimated following published allometric relationships. Data for each sample were tabulated into exponential body size bins, comparing species-averaged values with individual-based estimates which allow species to potentially occupy multiple size classes. For individual-based data, both the number of individuals and species across body size classes are fit by a Weibull function rather than by a power law scaling. Species richness is also a power law of the number of individuals. Energy use shows a piecewise scaling relationship with body size, with energetic equivalence holding true only for size classes above the modal abundance class. Species-based data showed either weak linear or no significant patterns, likely due to the decrease in the number of data points across body size classes. Hence, for individual-based size spectra, the SRA relationship seems to be general despite seasonal forcing and strong disturbances in Coliumo Bay. The unimodal abundance distribution results in a piecewise energy scaling relationship, with small individuals showing a positive scaling and large individuals showing energetic equivalence. Hence, strict energetic equivalence should not be expected for unimodal abundance distributions. On the other hand, while species-based data do not show unimodal SRA relationships, energy use across body size classes did not show significant trends, supporting energetic

  19. Dynamic relationships between body size, species richness, abundance, and energy use in a shallow marine epibenthic faunal community.

    PubMed

    Labra, Fabio A; Hernández-Miranda, Eduardo; Quiñones, Renato A

    2015-01-01

    We study the temporal variation in the empirical relationships among body size (S), species richness (R), and abundance (A) in a shallow marine epibenthic faunal community in Coliumo Bay, Chile. We also extend previous analyses by calculating individual energy use (E) and test whether its bivariate and trivariate relationships with S and R are in agreement with expectations derived from the energetic equivalence rule. Carnivorous and scavenger species representing over 95% of sample abundance and biomass were studied. For each individual, body size (g) was measured and E was estimated following published allometric relationships. Data for each sample were tabulated into exponential body size bins, comparing species-averaged values with individual-based estimates which allow species to potentially occupy multiple size classes. For individual-based data, both the number of individuals and species across body size classes are fit by a Weibull function rather than by a power law scaling. Species richness is also a power law of the number of individuals. Energy use shows a piecewise scaling relationship with body size, with energetic equivalence holding true only for size classes above the modal abundance class. Species-based data showed either weak linear or no significant patterns, likely due to the decrease in the number of data points across body size classes. Hence, for individual-based size spectra, the SRA relationship seems to be general despite seasonal forcing and strong disturbances in Coliumo Bay. The unimodal abundance distribution results in a piecewise energy scaling relationship, with small individuals showing a positive scaling and large individuals showing energetic equivalence. Hence, strict energetic equivalence should not be expected for unimodal abundance distributions. On the other hand, while species-based data do not show unimodal SRA relationships, energy use across body size classes did not show significant trends, supporting energetic

  20. Near-surface, marine seismic-reflection data defines potential hydrogeologic confinement bypass in a tertiary carbonate aquifer, southeastern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, Kevin J.; Walker, Cameron; Westcott, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 210 km of near-surface, high-frequency, marine seismic-reflection data were acquired on the southeastern part of the Florida Platform between 2007 and 2011. Many high-resolution, seismic-reflection profiles, interpretable to a depth of about 730 m, were collected on the shallow-marine shelf of southeastern Florida in water as shallow as 1 m. Landward of the present-day shelf-margin slope, these data image middle Eocene to Pleistocene strata and Paleocene to Pleistocene strata on the Miami Terrace. This high-resolution data set provides an opportunity to evaluate geologic structures that cut across confining units of the Paleocene to Oligocene-age carbonate rocks that form the Floridan aquifer system.Seismic profiles image two structural systems, tectonic faults and karst collapse structures, which breach confining beds in the Floridan aquifer system. Both structural systems may serve as pathways for vertical groundwater flow across relatively low-permeability carbonate strata that separate zones of regionally extensive high-permeability rocks in the Floridan aquifer system. The tectonic faults occur as normal and reverse faults, and collapse-related faults have normal throw. The most common fault occurrence delineated on the reflection profiles is associated with karst collapse structures. These high-frequency seismic data are providing high quality structural analogs to unprecedented depths on the southeastern Florida Platform. The analogs can be used for assessment of confinement of other carbonate aquifers and the sealing potential of deeper carbonate rocks associated with reservoirs around the world.

  1. Self-limiting geothermal convection in marine carbonate platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean-Baptiste, P.; Leclerc, A. M.

    2000-03-01

    Large scale inward and upward density-driven convective circulations occur in the porous structure of many marine carbonate platforms. Their geochemical implications are of prime importance for a variety of problems where a substantial transport of chemical species is required. In the present study we show, using simple thermal and hydraulic arguments, that there is a negative feedback between convective flow and heat transfer. This results in an upper limit on geothermally-driven vertical fluxes, irrespective of the hydraulic conductivity of the medium. This concept is potentially applicable to a variety of problems. Taking the example of two on-going debated questions in the reef scientific community, i.e., diagenesis and nutrient cycling, we show unambiguously that whereas convective circulations in coral reefs are compatible with dolomitization models, they are too low by at least one to two orders of magnitude to be a significant process in the nutrient budget of coral reefs.

  2. Carbon disulphide production in laboratory cultures of marine phytoplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Huixiang; Scarratt, Michael G.; Moore, Robert M.

    Carbon disulphide (CS 2) data were collected from axenic monocultures of six species of marine phytoplankton. The tested species included Chaetoceros calcitrans, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Phaeocystis sp., Porphyridium purpureum, Synechococcus sp. and Isochrysis sp. For a period of between two weeks and forty days, substantial accumulation of CS 2 was found in the cultures of C. calcitrans, P. tricornutum and Phaeocystis sp., whereas the change of CS 2 concentration in the remaining cultures was insignificant. C. calcitrans had a potential for CS 2 production about 10 times higher than P. tricornutum or Phaeocystis sp. The formation of the compound was strongly dependent on the physiological state of the cultured species. More investigation is needed to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for the formation of this sulphur compound in these cultures.

  3. Shallow water carbonate platforms (Late Aptian-Early Albian, Southern Apennines) in the context of supraregional to global changes: re-appraisal of palaeoecological events as reflectors of carbonate factory response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raspini, A.

    2012-08-01

    This paper discusses the palaeoenvironmental significance of the "Orbitolina Level", the microbial carbonates and the Salpingoporella dinarica-rich deposits encased in the Aptian/Albian shallow water carbonate platform strata of Monte Tobenna and Monte Faito (Southern Italy). These facies show a peculiar field appearance due to their color and/or fossil content. In the shallow water carbonate strata, the Late Aptian "Orbitolina Level" was formed during a period of decreasing accommodation space. Microbial carbonates occur in different levels in the composite section. They reach their maximum thickness around the sequence boundaries just above the "Orbitolina Level" and close to the Aptian-Albian transition, and were not deposited during maximum flooding. S. dinarica-rich deposits occur in the lower part of the Monte Tobenna-Monte Faito composite section, in both restricted and more open lagoonal sediments. S. dinarica has its maximum abundance below the "Orbitolina Level" and disappears 11 m above this layer. On the basis of δ13C and δ18O values recorded at Tobenna-Faito, the succession has been correlated to global sea-level changes and to the main volcanic and climatic events during the Aptian. Deterioration of the inner lagoon environmental conditions was related to high trophic levels triggered by volcano-tectonic activity. Microbial carbonates were deposited especially in periods of third-order sea level lowering. In such a scenario, periods of increased precipitation during the Gargasian induced the mobilization of clay during flooding of the exposed platform due to high-frequency sea-level changes, with consequent terrigenous input to the lagoon. This and the high nutrient levels made the conditions unsuitable for the principle carbonate producers, and an opportunistic biota rich in orbitolinids (Mesorbitolina texana and M. parva) populated the platform. In the more open marine domain, the increased nutrient input enhanced the production of organic matter

  4. Deep-to-shallow carbonate ramp transition in Viola Limestone (Ordovician), southwest Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Glavin, P.K.

    1983-03-01

    The Viola Limestone (Middle and Upper Ordovician) of the southwest Arbuckle Mountains was deposited on a carbonate ramp within the southern Oklahoma Aulacogen. Depositional environments include (1) anaerobic, deep-ramp setting represented by microfacies RL, CH, CGL, and A, (2) dysaerobic, mid-ramp setting represented by microfacies B, and (3) aerobic, shallow-ramp setting represented by microfacies C and D. Deposition in the deep- and mid-ramp environments was dominated by bottom-hugging currents produced by off-platform flow of denser waters. Primary sedimentary structures include millimeter-size laminations, starved ripples, and concave-up and inclined erosional surfaces. Shelly benthic fauna are rare in A and B; trace fossils are common only in B. Deposits associated with the line-source gully, microfacies RL, CH, and CGL, are laterally confined; they have been observed only in the southwest Arbuckle Mountains. Primary sedimentary structures present in RL include wavy and ripple-cross laminae. Microfacies CH, contained within RL and interpreted as a submarine channel deposit, is present only at one locality. Primary sedimentary structures present in CH include an erosional base and several internal erosional surfaces, lateral accretionary sets, and imbricated, locally derived intraclasts. High total organic carbon (TOC) values have been reported for the lower Viola. TOC values of 1% have been reported from microfacies A, and TOC values of 5% have been reported from microfacies RL. These high values suggest that A and RL may act as hydrocarbon source rocks. Recognition of these microfacies in the subsurface will contribute to our knowledge of the Viola Limestone as an exploration target.

  5. Middle Cretaceous to Oligocene rise of the Middle American landbridge - documented by south-eastwards younging shallow water carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner-Mora, Claudia; Baumgartner, Peter O.; Barat, Flore

    2013-04-01

    Basements of Southern Central America are oceanic in origin, including the southern half of the classical "Chortis Block" formed by subduction/accretion mélanges named Mesquito Composite Oceanic Terrane (MCOT). The rise of these oceanic basements into the photic zone and eventual emergence was controlled by convergent, collision tectonics, and/or arc development. In this context, shallow carbonate palaeo-environments were short-lived and formed not only on uplifted basements and arcs, but also on (now accreted) volcanic edifices of Pacific oceanic seamounts. From Northern Nicaragua (NW) to Eastern Panama (SE) we observe a systematic younging of the first shallow water carbonate facies encroaching on basements and/or older deep-water formations: In the Siuna area (NE-Nicaragua) Aptian-Albian shallow water limestones dated by rudists and Orbitolina texana rest unconformably on the Jurassic/Early Cretaceous Siuna Serpentinite Mélange, part of the MCOT. In N-Costa Rica, the assembly of several terranes (Santa Elena Ultramafic Unit, Nicoya Complex s. s., Matambu and Manzanillo Terranes) is overlapped by Late Campanian-Maastrichtian shallow water facies dated by rudists and Larger Foraminifera, such as Pseudorbitoides rutteni, Pseudorbitoides israelski, Sulcoperculina sp. and Sulcoperculina globosa. Reworked Campanian-Maastrichtian shallow water material including Larger Foraminifera was found in the Herradura Promontory (central Pacific coast of Costa Rica). It could be derived from an accreted seamount. No shallow carbonates are known so far from the early Palaeocene. The Tempisque Basin (N-Costa Rica) hosts the Barra Honda carbonate Platform (originally >900 km2) dated as late Palaeocene (Thanetian) by planktonic Foraminifera, 87Sr / 86Sr ratios and Ranikothalia spp. Other late Palaeocene shallow carbonates documented in S-Costa Rica/W-Panama (Quepos, Burica) are interpreted as insular carbonate shoals (atolls?) on now accreted seamounts. To the SE of the S

  6. Carbon isotope ratios of Phanerozoic marine cements: Re-evaluating the global carbon and sulfur systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Scott J.; Lohmann, Kyger C.

    1997-11-01

    Original δ 13C values of abiotically precipitated marine cements from a variety of stratigraphic intervals have been used to document secular variations in the δ 13C values of Phanerozoic oceans. These, together with the ° 34S values of coeval marine sulfates, are used to examine the global cycling of carbon and sulfur. It is generally accepted that secular variation in δ 13C and δ 34S values of marine carbonates and sulfates is controlled by balanced oxidation-reduction reactions and that their long-term, steady-state variation can be predicted from the present-day isotopic fractionation ratio (Δ c/Δ s) the ratio of the riverine flux of sulfur and carbon ( Fs/ Fc). The predicted slope of the linear relation between δ 13C carb and δ 34S sulfate values is approximately -0.10 to -0.14. However, temporal variation observed in marine cement δ 13C values and the 6345 values of coeval marine sulfates produces a highly significant linear relation ( r2 = 0.80; α > 95%) with a slope of -0.24; approximately twice the predicted value. This discordance suggests that either the Phanerozoic average riverine Fs/ Fc was 1.6-3.3 times greater than today's estimates or that an additional source of 34S-depleted sulfur or 13C-enriched carbon, other than continental reservoirs, was active during the Phanerozoic. This new relation between marine δ 13C and δ 34S values suggests that the flux of reduced sulfur, iron, and manganese from seafloor hydrothermal systems affects oceanic O2 levels which, in turn, control the oxidation or burial of organic matter, and thus the δ 13C value of marine DIC. Therefore, the sulfur system (driven by seafloor hydrothermal systems) controls the carbon system rather than organic carbon burial controlling the response of δ 34S values (via formation of sedimentary pyrite). Secular variation of marine 87Sr/86Sr ratios and δ 13C values argues for a coupling of δ 34S and δ 34S values to variation in the relative contribution of seafloor

  7. Role of the marine biosphere in the global carbon cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Longhurst, A.R. )

    1991-12-01

    The geographical disequilibrium of our planet is due mainly to carbon sequestration by marine organisms over geological time. Changes in atmospheric CO{sub 2} during interglacial-glacial transitions require biological sequestration of carbon in the oceans. Nutrient-limited export flux from new production in surface waters is the key process in this sequestrian. The most common model for export flux ignores potentially important nutrient sources and export mechanisms. Export flux occurs as a result of biological processes whose complexity appears not to be accommodated by the principal classes of simulation models, this being especially true for food webs dominated by single-celled protists whose trophic function is more dispersed than among the multicelled metazoa. The fashionable question concerning a hypothetical missing sink' for CO{sub 2} emissions is unanswerable because of imprecision in our knowledge of critical flux rates. This question also diverts attention from more relevant studies of how the biological pump may be perturbed by climatic consequences of CO{sub 2} emissions. Under available scenarios for climate change, such responses may seem more likely to reinforce, rather than mitigate, the rate of increase of atmospheric CO{sub 2}.

  8. Carbon System Dynamics within the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kealoha, A. K.; Winn, C. D.; Kahng, S.; Alin, S. R.; Mackenzie, F. T.; Kosaki, R.

    2013-12-01

    Continuous underway measurements of atmospheric CO2, oceanic pCO2, pH, salinity, temperature, and oxygen were collected in surface waters within Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument (PMNM). Transects were conducted in the summers of 2011 and 2012 and encompassed the entire length of monument waters from approximately 21° to 28°N. Discrete samples were obtained from the underway system for the determination of spectrophotometric pH and titration alkalinity. The discrete pH samples were used to assess the consistency of the underway pH electrode and indicate that the electrode generated consistent and precise data over the duration of each cruise. The underway data collected over the entire transects show considerable variability in carbon parameters and reflects mainly the intense biological activity that occurs within coral reef ecosystems in and around the atolls comprising the Northwestern Hawaiian Archipelago. The impact of organic and inorganic metabolism on the carbon system in nearshore water was based primarily on measurements taken at French Frigate Shoals (FFS), where our most intense sampling occurred. For this analysis, all of the data collected within the area encompassed by the atoll and the surrounding ocean roughly 10 km from the 50-meter depth contour were included. These data, which span an approximate 300-km2 area, clearly show that nearshore metabolic processes influence surface water chemistry out to at least 10 km away from the shallow-water environment. Our data also show that, while the spatio-temporal complexities associated with analyzing underway data can complicate the interpretation of pCO2 and pH variability, an obvious diel trend in total alkalinity (TA) was apparent. In addition, plotting temporal changes in total dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and TA revealed the relative contributions of organic and inorganic metabolism to net reef metabolism.

  9. Application of Reservoir Characterization and Advanced Technology to Improve Recovery and Economics in a Lower Quality Shallow Shelf Carbonate Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Hickman, Scott T.; Justice James L.; Taylor, Archie R.

    1999-10-28

    The Class 2 Project at West Welch was designed to demonstrate the use of advanced technologies to enhance the economics of improved oil recovery (IOR) projects in lower quality Shallow Shelf Carbonate (SSC) reservoirs, resulting in recovery of additional oil that would otherwise be left in the reservoir at project abandonment. Accurate reservoir description is critical to the effective evaluation and efficient design of IOR projects in the heterogeneous SSC reservoirs.

  10. One carbon metabolism in SAR11 pelagic marine bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Steindler, Laura; Thrash, J Cameron; Halsey, Kimberly H; Smith, Daniel P; Carter, Amy E; Landry, Zachary C; Giovannoni, Stephen J

    2011-01-01

    The SAR11 Alphaproteobacteria are the most abundant heterotrophs in the oceans and are believed to play a major role in mineralizing marine dissolved organic carbon. Their genomes are among the smallest known for free-living heterotrophic cells, raising questions about how they successfully utilize complex organic matter with a limited metabolic repertoire. Here we show that conserved genes in SAR11 subgroup Ia (Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique) genomes encode pathways for the oxidation of a variety of one-carbon compounds and methyl functional groups from methylated compounds. These pathways were predicted to produce energy by tetrahydrofolate (THF)-mediated oxidation, but not to support the net assimilation of biomass from C1 compounds. Measurements of cellular ATP content and the oxidation of (14)C-labeled compounds to (14)CO(2) indicated that methanol, formaldehyde, methylamine, and methyl groups from glycine betaine (GBT), trimethylamine (TMA), trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), and dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) were oxidized by axenic cultures of the SAR11 strain Ca. P. ubique HTCC1062. Analyses of metagenomic data showed that genes for C1 metabolism occur at a high frequency in natural SAR11 populations. In short term incubations, natural communities of Sargasso Sea microbial plankton expressed a potential for the oxidation of (14)C-labeled formate, formaldehyde, methanol and TMAO that was similar to cultured SAR11 cells and, like cultured SAR11 cells, incorporated a much larger percentage of pyruvate and glucose (27-35%) than of C1 compounds (2-6%) into biomass. Collectively, these genomic, cellular and environmental data show a surprising capacity for demethylation and C1 oxidation in SAR11 cultures and in natural microbial communities dominated by SAR11, and support the conclusion that C1 oxidation might be a significant conduit by which dissolved organic carbon is recycled to CO(2) in the upper ocean. PMID:21886845

  11. Carbon conversion and metabolic rate in two marine sponges.

    PubMed

    Koopmans, M; van Rijswijk, P; Martens, D; Egorova-Zachernyuk, T A; Middelburg, J J; Wijffels, R H

    2011-01-01

    The carbon metabolism of two marine sponges, Haliclona oculata and Dysidea avara, has been studied using a (13)C isotope pulse-chase approach. The sponges were fed (13)C-labeled diatoms (Skeletonema costatum) for 8 h and they took up between 75 and 85%. At different times, sponges were sampled for total (13)C enrichment, and fatty acid (FA) composition and (13)C enrichment. Algal biomarkers present in the sponges were highly labeled after feeding but their labeling levels decreased until none was left 10 days after enrichment. The sponge-specific FAs incorporated (13)C label already during the first day and the amount of (13)C label inside these FAs kept increasing until 3 weeks after labeling. The algal-derived carbon captured by the sponges during the 8-h feeding period was thus partly respired and partly metabolized during the weeks following. Apparently, sponges are able to capture enough food during short periods to sustain longer-term metabolism. The change of carbon metabolic rate of fatty acid synthesis due to mechanical damage of sponge tissue was studied by feeding sponges with (13)C isotope-labeled diatom (Pheaodactylum tricornutum) either after or before damaging and tracing back the (13)C content in the damaged and healthy tissue. The filtration and respiration in both sponges responded quickly to damage. The rate of respiration in H. oculata reduced immediately after damage, but returned to its initial level after 6 h. The (13)C data revealed that H. oculata has a higher metabolic rate in the tips where growth occurs compared to the rest of the tissue and that the metabolic rate is increased after damage of the tissue. For D. avara, no differences were found between damaged and non-damaged tissue. However, the filtration rate decreased directly after damage. PMID:24489407

  12. Interpreting the Ca isotope record of marine biogenic carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sime, Neil G.; De La Rocha, Christina L.; Tipper, Edward T.; Tripati, Aradhna; Galy, Albert; Bickle, Michael J.

    2007-08-01

    An 18 million year record of the Ca isotopic composition (δ 44/42Ca) of planktonic foraminiferans from ODP site 925, in the Atlantic, on the Ceara Rise, provides the opportunity for critical analysis of Ca isotope-based reconstructions of the Ca cycle. δ 44/42Ca in this record averages +0.37 ± 0.05 (1 σ SD) and ranges from +0.21‰ to +0.52‰. The record is a good match to previously published Neogene Ca isotope records based on foraminiferans, but is not similar to the record based on bulk carbonates, which has values that are as much as 0.25‰ lower. Bulk carbonate and planktonic foraminiferans from core tops differ slightly in their δ 44/42Ca (i.e., by 0.06 ± 0.06‰ ( n = 5)), while the difference between bulk carbonate and foraminiferan values further back in time is markedly larger, leaving open the question of the cause of the difference. Modeling the global Ca cycle from downcore variations in δ 44/42Ca by assuming fixed values for the isotopic composition of weathering inputs (δ 44/42Ca w) and for isotope fractionation associated with the production of carbonate sediments (Δ sed) results in unrealistically large variations in the total mass of Ca 2+ in the oceans over the Neogene. Alternatively, variations of ±0.05‰ in the Ca isotope composition of weathering inputs or in the extent of fractionation of Ca isotopes during calcareous sediment formation could entirely account for variations in the Ca isotopic composition of marine carbonates. Ca isotope fractionation during continental weathering, such as has been recently observed, could easily result in variations in δ 44/42Ca w of a few tenths of permil. Likewise a difference in the fractionation factors associated with aragonite versus calcite formation could drive shifts in Δ sed of tenths of permil with shifts in the relative output of calcite and aragonite from the ocean. Until better constraints on variations in δ 44/42Ca w and Δ sed have been established, modeling the Ca 2+ content

  13. Chromium Isotopes in Marine Carbonates - an Indicator for Climatic Change?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frei, R.; Gaucher, C.

    2010-12-01

    Chromium (Cr) stable isotopes experience an increased interest as a tracer of Cr (VI) reduction in groundwater and thus showed their potential as a monitor of remediation of anthropogenic and natural contamination in water (Berna et al., 2009; Izbicki et al., 2008). Chromium stable isotopes in Fe-rich chemical sediments (BIFs and Fe-cherts) have recently also been used as a tracer for Earth's atmospheric oxygenation through time (Frei et al., 2009). We have applied the Cr isotope system to organic-rich carbonates from a late Ediacaran succession in Uruguay (Polanco Formation), from which we have previously analyzed BIFs with extremely fractionated (δ53Cr up to 5.0 ‰) Cr isotope signatures that are part of an underlying deep water clastic sediment (shale-dominated) sequence (Yerbal Formation) deposited in a glacio-marine environment (Gaucher et al.,2004). δ53Cr values of organic rich carbonates correlate with positive and negative carbon isotope excursions (δ13C PDB between -3 and +3 ‰) and with systematic changes in strontium isotope compositions, commonly interpreted as to reflect fluctuations in organic (photosynthetic algae) production related to fluctuations in atmospheric oxygen and weathering intensities, respectively. Slightly positively fractioned δ53Cr values (up to +0.25‰), paralleling positive (δ13C PDB and 87Sr/86Sr ratio excursions would thereby trace elevated atmospheric oxygen levels/pulses possibly related to glacier retreat/melting stages that caused bioproductivity to increase. While the causal link between these multiple isotopic tracers and the mechanisms of Cr stripping into carbonates has to be further investigated in detail, the first indications from this study point to a potentially promising use of stable Cr isotopes in organic-rich carbonates to monitor fluctuations of atmospheric oxygen, particularly over the Neoproterozoic and Phanerozoic ice age periods. E.C. Berna et al. (2010) Cr stable isotopes as indicators of Cr

  14. Organic carbon burial in fjords: Terrestrial versus marine inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xingqian; Bianchi, Thomas S.; Savage, Candida; Smith, Richard W.

    2016-10-01

    Fjords have been identified as sites of enhanced organic carbon (OC) burial and may play an important role in regulating climate change on glacial-interglacial timescales. Understanding sediment processes and sources of sedimentary OC are necessary to better constrain OC burial in fjords. In this study, we use Fiordland, New Zealand, as a case study and present data on surface sediments, sediment down-cores and terrestrial end-members to examine dynamics of sediments and the sources of OC in fjord sediments. Sediment cores showed evidence of multiple particle sources, frequent bioturbation and mass-wasting events. A multi-proxy approach (stable isotopes, lignin-phenols and fatty acids) allowed for separation of marine, soil and vascular plant OC in surface sediments. The relationship between mass accumulation rate (MAR) and OC contents in fjord surface sediments suggested that mineral dilution is important in controlling OC content on a global scale, but is less important for specific regions (e.g., New Zealand). The inconsistency of OC budgets calculated by using MAR weighted %OC and OC accumulation rates (AR; 6 vs 21-31 Tg OC yr-1) suggested that sediment flux in fjords was likely underestimated. By using end-member models, we propose that 55% to 62% of total OC buried in fjords is terrestrially derived, and accounts for 17 ± 12% of the OCterr buried in all marine sediments. The strong correlation between MAR and OC AR indicated that OC flux will likely decrease in fjords in the future with global warming due to decrease in sediment flux caused by glacier denudation.

  15. A diagenetic control on the Early Triassic Smithian-Spathian carbon isotopic excursions recorded in the marine settings of the Thaynes Group (Utah, USA).

    PubMed

    Thomazo, C; Vennin, E; Brayard, A; Bour, I; Mathieu, O; Elmeknassi, S; Olivier, N; Escarguel, G; Bylund, K G; Jenks, J; Stephen, D A; Fara, E

    2016-05-01

    In the aftermath of the end-Permian mass extinction, Early Triassic sediments record some of the largest Phanerozoic carbon isotopic excursions. Among them, a global Smithian-negative carbonate carbon isotope excursion has been identified, followed by an abrupt increase across the Smithian-Spathian boundary (SSB; ~250.8 Myr ago). This chemostratigraphic evolution is associated with palaeontological evidence that indicate a major collapse of terrestrial and marine ecosystems during the Late Smithian. It is commonly assumed that Smithian and Spathian isotopic variations are intimately linked to major perturbations in the exogenic carbon reservoir. We present paired carbon isotopes measurements from the Thaynes Group (Utah, USA) to evaluate the extent to which the Early Triassic isotopic perturbations reflect changes in the exogenic carbon cycle. The δ(13) Ccarb variations obtained here reproduce the known Smithian δ(13) Ccarb -negative excursion. However, the δ(13) C signal of the bulk organic matter is invariant across the SSB and variations in the δ(34) S signal of sedimentary sulphides are interpreted here to reflect the intensity of sediment remobilization. We argue that Middle to Late Smithian δ(13) Ccarb signal in the shallow marine environments of the Thaynes Group does not reflect secular evolution of the exogenic carbon cycle but rather physicochemical conditions at the sediment-water interface leading to authigenic carbonate formation during early diagenetic processes. PMID:26842810

  16. Whole-lake experiments reveal the fate of terrestrial particulate organic carbon in benthic food webs of shallow lakes.

    PubMed

    Scharnweber, K; Syväranta, J; Hilt, S; Brauns, M; Vanni, M J; Brothers, S; Köhler, J; Knezević-Jarić, J; Mehner, T

    2014-06-01

    Lake ecosystems are strongly linked to their terrestrial surroundings by material and energy fluxes across ecosystem boundaries. However, the contribution of terrestrial particulate organic carbon (tPOC) from annual leaf fall to lake food webs has not yet been adequately traced and quantified. In this study, we conducted whole-lake experiments to trace artificially added tPOC through the food webs of two shallow lakes of similar eutrophic status, but featuring alternative stable regimes (macrophyte rich vs. phytoplankton dominated). Lakes were divided with a curtain, and maize (Zea mays) leaves were added, as an isotopically distinct tPOC source, into one half of each lake. To estimate the balance between autochthonous carbon fixation and allochthonous carbon input, primary production and tPOC and tDOC (terrestrial dissolved organic carbon) influx were calculated for the treatment sides. We measured the stable isotope ratios of carbon (delta13C) of about 800 samples from all trophic consumer levels and compared them between lake sides, lakes, and three seasons. Leaf litter bag experiments showed that added maize leaves were processed at rates similar to those observed for leaves from shoreline plants, supporting the suitability of maize leaves as a tracer. The lake-wide carbon influx estimates confirmed that autochthonous carbon fixation by primary production was the dominant carbon source for consumers in the lakes. Nevertheless, carbon isotope values of benthic macroinvertebrates were significantly higher with maize additions compared to the reference side of each lake. Carbon isotope values of omnivorous and piscivorous fish were significantly affected by maize additions only in the macrophyte-dominated lake and delta13C of zooplankton and planktivorous fish remained unaffected in both lakes. In summary, our results experimentally demonstrate that tPOC in form of autumnal litterfall is rapidly processed during the subsequent months in the food web of shallow

  17. COMPLEX INTERACTIONS BETWEEN AUTOTROPHS IN SHALLOW MARINE AND FRESHWATER ECOSYSTEMS: IMPLICATIONS FOR COMMUNITY RESPONSES TO NUTRIENT STRESS. (U915532)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relative biomass of autotrophs (vascular plants, macroalgae, microphytobenthos, phytoplankton) in shallow aquatic ecosystems is thought to be controlled by nutrient inputs and underwater irradiance. Widely accepted conceptual models indicate that this is the case both in m...

  18. On the Likelihood of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Causing Adverse Marine Ecological Effects

    EPA Science Inventory

    This brief article discusses the ecological effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)in the marine environment. Based on new research and a review of the scientific literature, the paper concludes that SWNTs are unlikely to cause adverse ecological effects in the marine ...

  19. Exploration of resistive targets within shallow marine environments using the circular electrical dipole and the differential electrical dipole methods: a time-domain modelling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haroon, Amir; Mogilatov, Vladimir; Goldman, Mark; Bergers, Rainer; Tezkan, Bülent

    2016-05-01

    Two novel transient controlled source electromagnetic methods called circular electrical dipole (CED) and differential electrical dipole (DED) are theoretically analysed for applications in shallow marine environments. 1-D and 3-D time-domain modelling studies are used to investigate the detectability and applicability of the methods when investigating resistive layers/targets representing hydrocarbon-saturated formations. The results are compared to the conventional time-domain horizontal electrical dipole (HED) and vertical electrical dipole (VED) sources. The applied theoretical modelling studies demonstrate that CED and DED have higher signal detectability towards resistive targets compared to TD-CSEM, but demonstrate significantly poorer signal amplitudes. Future CED/DED applications will have to solve this issue prior to measuring. Furthermore, the two novel methods have very similar detectability characteristics towards 3-D resistive targets embedded in marine sediments as VED while being less susceptible towards non-verticality. Due to the complex transmitter design of CED/DED the systems are prone to geometrical errors. Modelling studies show that even small transmitter inaccuracies have strong effects on the signal characteristics of CED making an actual marine application difficult at the present time. In contrast, the DED signal is less affected by geometrical errors in comparison to CED and may therefore be more adequate for marine applications.

  20. Shallow marine event sedimentation in a volcanic arc-related setting: The Ordovician Suri Formation, Famatina range, northwest Argentina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mangano, M.G.; Buatois, L.A.

    1996-01-01

    level fall. Pyroclastic detritus, andesites, and a non-volcanic terrain were eroded and their detritus was transported basinward and redeposited by sediment gravity flows during the low stand. The local coexistence of juvenile pyroclastic detritus and fossils suggests reworking of rare ash-falls. The upper part of the Loma del Kilo??metre Member records a transgression with no evidence of contemporaneous volcanism. Biostratinomic, paleoecologic, and ichnologic analyses support this paleoenvironmental interpretations and provide independent evidence for the dominance of episodic sedimentation in an arc-related shallow marine setting. Fossil concentrations were mainly formed by event processes, such as storms and volcaniclastic mass flows. High depositional rates inhibited formation of sediment-starved biogenic concentrations. Collectively, trace fossils belong to the Cruziana ichnofacies. Low diversity, scarcity, and presence of relatively simple forms indicate benthic activity under stressful conditions, most probably linked to high sedimentation rates. Contrasting sedimentary dynamics between 'normal shelves' and their volcaniclastic counterparts produce distinct and particular signatures in the stratigraphic record. Arc-related shelves are typified by event deposition with significant participation of sediment gravity flows, relatively high sedimentation rates, textural and mineralogical immaturity of sediments, scarcity and low diversity of trace fossils, and dominance of transported and reworked faunal assemblages genetically related to episodic processes.

  1. Origin of particulate organic carbon in the marine atmosphere as indicated by it stable carbon isotopic composition

    SciTech Connect

    Chesselet, R.; Fontugne, M.; Buat-Menard, P.; Ezat, U.; Lambert, C.E.

    1981-04-01

    Organic carbon concentration and isotopic composition were determined in samples of atmospheric particulate matter collected in 1979 at remote marine locations (Enewetak atoll, Sargasso Sea) during the SEAREX (Sea-Air Exchange) program field experiments. Atmospheric Particulate Organic Carbon (POC) concentrations were found to be in the range of 0.3 to 1.2 mg. m/sup -3/, in agreement with previous literature data. The major mass of POC was found on the smallest particles (r<0.5 mm). The /sup 13/C//sup 12/C of the small particles is close to the one expected (d/sup 13/C = 26 +- 2/sup 0///sub infinity/) for atmospheric POC of continental origin. For all the samples analysed so far, it appears that more than 80% of atmospheric POC over remote marine areas is of continental origin. This can be explained either by long-range transport of small sized continental organic aserosols or by the production of POC in the marine atmosphere from a vapor phase organic carbon pool of continental origin. The POC in the large size fraction of marine aerosols (<20% of the total concentration) is likely to have a direct marine origin since its carbon isotopic composition is close to the expected value (d/sup 13/C = -21 +- 2/sup 0///sub 00/) for POC associated with sea-salt droplets transported to the marine atmosphere.

  2. Impact of volcanic eruptions on the marine carbon cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segschneider, Joachim; Ulrike, Niemeier; Martin, Wiesner; Claudia, Timmreck

    2010-05-01

    The impact of volcanic eruptions on the marine carbon cycle is investigated for the example of the Pinatubo eruption with model simulations of the distribution of the ash cloud and deposition on the ocean surface and the impact of the nutrient addition from ash leachates on the oceanic biological production and hence biological carbon pump. Natural variations of aerosols, especially due to large-magnitude volcanic eruptions, are recognized as a significant climate forcing, altering the Earth's radiation balance and thus tending to cause global temperature changes. While the impact of such events on climate and the terrestrial biosphere is relatively well documented, scientific knowledge of their effects on marine ecosystems and consequent feedbacks to the atmosphere is still very limited. In the deep sea, subaerial eruptive events of global significance are commonly recorded as widespread ash layers, which were often found to be associated with increased abundances of planktic organisms. This has led to the hypothesis that the influx of volcanic ash may provide an external nutrient source for primary production (in particular through iron fertilization) in ocean surface waters. Recent laboratory experiments have demonstrated that pristine volcanic ash indeed releases significant amounts of macronutrients and bioactive trace metals (including phosphate, iron and silica) adsorbed to the surface of the ash particles. The release of these components most likely has its largest impact in ocean regions where their availability is crucial for the growth of oceanic biomass, which are the high-nutrient but low-productivity (low-iron) areas in the Pacific and the Southern Ocean. These in turn are neighbored by most of those subaerially active volcanoes that are capable of ejecting huge amounts of aerosols into the high-velocity stratospheric wind fields. The dispersal and fallout of ash thus has a high potential to induce globally significant, transient net CO2 removal from

  3. Sulfur Cycling Mediates Calcium Carbonate Geochemistry in Modern Marine Stromatolites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Visscher, P. T.; Hoeft, S. E.; Bebout, B. M.; Reid, R. P.

    2004-01-01

    Modem marine stromatolites forming in Highborne Cay, Exumas (Bahamas), contain microbial mats dominated by Schizothrix. Although saturating concentrations of Ca2+ and CO32- exist, microbes mediate CaCO3 precipitation. Cyanobacterial photosynthesis in these stromatolites aids calcium carbonate precipitation by removal of HS+ through CO2 use. Photorespiration and exopolymer production predominantly by oxygenic phototrophs fuel heterotrophic activity: aerobic respiration (approximately 60 umol/sq cm.h) and sulfate reduction (SR; 1.2 umol SO42-/sq cm.h) are the dominant C- consuming processes. Aerobic microbial respiration and the combination of SR and H2S oxidation both facilitate CaCO3 dissolution through H+ production. Aerobic respiration consumes much more C on an hourly basis, but duel fluctuating O2 and H2 depth profiles indicate that overall, SR consumes only slightly less (0.2-0.5) of the primary production. Moreover, due to low O2 concentrations when SR rates are peaking, reoxidation of the H2S formed is incomplete: both thiosulfate and polythionates are formed. The process of complete H2S oxidation yields H+. However, due to a low O2 concentration late in the day and relatively high O2 concentrations early in the following morning, a two-stage oxidation takes place: first, polythionates are formed from H2S, creating alkalinity which coincides with CaCO3 precipitation; secondly, oxidation of polythionates to sulfate yields acidity, resulting in dissolution, etc. Vertical profiles confirmed that the pH peaked late in the afternoon (greater than 8.8) and had the lowest values (less than 7.4) early in the morning. Thus, the effect of this S-cycling through alkalinity production, followed by acidification during H2S oxidation, results in a six times stronger fluctuation in acidity than photosynthesis plus aerobic respiration accomplish. This implies that anaerobic processes play a pivotal role in stromatolite formation.

  4. Global warming and marine carbon cycle feedbacks on future atmospheric CO2

    PubMed

    Joos; Plattner; Stocker; Marchal; Schmittner

    1999-04-16

    A low-order physical-biogeochemical climate model was used to project atmospheric carbon dioxide and global warming for scenarios developed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. The North Atlantic thermohaline circulation weakens in all global warming simulations and collapses at high levels of carbon dioxide. Projected changes in the marine carbon cycle have a modest impact on atmospheric carbon dioxide. Compared with the control, atmospheric carbon dioxide increased by 4 percent at year 2100 and 20 percent at year 2500. The reduction in ocean carbon uptake can be mainly explained by sea surface warming. The projected changes of the marine biological cycle compensate the reduction in downward mixing of anthropogenic carbon, except when the North Atlantic thermohaline circulation collapses.

  5. Global warming and marine carbon cycle feedbacks on future atmospheric CO2

    PubMed

    Joos; Plattner; Stocker; Marchal; Schmittner

    1999-04-16

    A low-order physical-biogeochemical climate model was used to project atmospheric carbon dioxide and global warming for scenarios developed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. The North Atlantic thermohaline circulation weakens in all global warming simulations and collapses at high levels of carbon dioxide. Projected changes in the marine carbon cycle have a modest impact on atmospheric carbon dioxide. Compared with the control, atmospheric carbon dioxide increased by 4 percent at year 2100 and 20 percent at year 2500. The reduction in ocean carbon uptake can be mainly explained by sea surface warming. The projected changes of the marine biological cycle compensate the reduction in downward mixing of anthropogenic carbon, except when the North Atlantic thermohaline circulation collapses. PMID:10205049

  6. Oxygenation of the shallow ocean after the Great Oxidation Event: Geochemistry and Carbon isotopes of the Paleoproterozoic Hutuo Group in North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    She, Z.; Yang, F.; Papineau, D.

    2013-12-01

    The Paleoproterozoic was known as a period of profound perturbations in marine environments and biogeochemical cycles due to the Great Oxidation Event (GOE), but the interconnections and consequences of these events remain poorly understood. We investigated the geochemistry and C isotopes of the 2.09-1.96 Ga Hutuo Group in the North China Craton (NCC) which provide evidence for the oxygenation of shallow oceans. The Hutuo Group is a >10-km-thick clastic and carbonate sequence with intercalated basalts and has undergone lower greenschist facies metamorphism. Diverse stromatolite morphotypes, ranging from small domical, conical, and columnar forms to bioherms with diameters up to 4 meters, as well as giant oncoids, are developed in the Hutuo carbonates. C isotopes of the Hutuo carbonates are characterized by a general decrease in δ13Ccarb values upsection. It consists of a lower part with δ13Ccarb ranging from 1.3 ‰ to 3.4 ‰, a middle part showing alternating positive and negative excursions of δ13Ccarb from -3.6 ‰ to 2.7 ‰, and a upper part of exclusively negative excursions with δ13Ccarb as light as -5.6 ‰. Most samples have δ18Ocarb greater than -10 ‰ and show no correlation between δ18Ocarb and δ13Ccarb. This, along with relatively low Mn/Sr ratios (mostly < 10), exclude significant diagenetic modification of the C isotopes. δ13Corg of acid-insoluble residues of stromatolitic carbonates range between -30.9 ‰ and -22.3 ‰, consistent with C-fixation with the cyanobacterial RuBisCO enzymes. Therefore, the positive excursions are probably related to burial of organic matter produced by primary producers, consistent with the ending of the 2.22-2.06 Ga Lomagundi-Jatuli event. Similar positive C isotope excursions have also been reported from contemporaneous successions elsewhere in the NCC, including the Songshan Group in Henan and Liaohe Group in Liaoning. The following negative excursions, which is consistent with the excursions reported from

  7. Pliocene-Lower Pleistocene shallow-water mixed siliciclastics and carbonates (Yanigua and Los Haitises formations) in eastern Hispaniola (Dominican Republic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga, Juan C.; Díaz de Neira, Alberto; Lasseur, Eric; Mediato, José; Aguirre, Julio; Abad, Manuel; Hernaiz-Huerta, Pedro P.; Monthel, Jacques; Pérez-Valera, Fernando; Lopera, Eusebio

    2012-07-01

    The virtually unfolded sedimentary cover of the Cordilleras Central and Oriental in the eastern Dominican Republic (eastern Hispaniola, tropical North Atlantic) largely consists of Pliocene to Early Pleistocene mixed siliciclastics and carbonates. These deposits have been grouped into two laterally interfingering mapping units, the Yanigua and Los Haitises formations. The former (mainly siliciclastics) comprises marl, marly limestone, and minor conglomerate, sandstone, lignite, and carbonaceous clay and crops out closest to the basement. The Los Haitises Formation mainly consists of limestone and intercalating beds of marly limestone and marl. Lithological mapping at the 1:50,000 scale and facies analysis of twelve measured sections and of additional fourteen outcrops suggest that these deposits mainly formed on a shallow-water marine platform fringing the precursor reliefs of the Cordillera Oriental and the southeastern end of the Cordillera Central. Only a limited proportion of sediment formed in floodplains and marshes. Marl and marly limestone dominated the inner platform sediments. Terrigenous mud decreased away from the emergent basement and carbonate sedimentation dominated the more external platform. Corals, molluscs, echinoids, foraminifers, bryozoans, coralline algae, and Halimeda are the main components with varying amounts of carbonate mud. The platform was generally a low-energy environment with seagrass patches. In the inner platform, corals grew as isolated colonies or as small patch reefs dominated by Porites in marly and bioclastic substrates. Branching corals (Stylophora and Acropora) grew in extensive carpets in more distal areas. At least in the last stage of its development (Early Pleistocene), the platform was rimmed by a reef barrier similar to the Holocene Caribbean barrier reefs, with Acropora gr. palmata, A. cervicornis, Porites, Montastrea, Siderastrea, and Diploria as the main reef builders.

  8. Tidal-to-seasonal variability in the parameters of the carbonate system in a shallow tidal creek influenced by anthropogenic inputs, Rio San Pedro (SW Iberian Peninsula)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Paz, Mercedes; Gómez-Parra, Abelardo; Forja, Jesús

    2008-06-01

    The main objective of the present study is to assess the temporal variability of the carbonate system, and the mechanisms driving that variability, in the Rio San Pedro, a tidal creek located in the Bay of Cadiz (SW Iberian Peninsula). This shallow tidal creek is affected by effluents of organic matter and nutrients from surrounding marine fish farms. In 2004, 11 tidal samplings, seasonally distributed, were carried out for the measurement of total alkalinity (TA), pH, dissolved oxygen and Chlorophyll- a (Chl- a) using a fixed station. In addition, several longitudinal samplings were carried out both in the tidal creek and in the adjacent waters of the Bay of Cadiz, in order to obtain a spatial distribution of the carbonate parameters. Tidal mixing is the main factor controlling the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) variability, showing almost conservative behaviour on a tidal time scale. The amplitude of the daily oscillations of DIC, pH and chlorophyll show a high dependence on the spring-neap tide sequence, with the maximum amplitude associated with spring tides. Additionally, a marked seasonality has been found in the DIC, pH and oxygen concentrations. This seasonality seems to be related to the increase in metabolic rates with the temperature, the alternation of storm events and high evaporation rates, together with intense seasonal variability in the discharges from fish farms. In addition, the export of DIC from the Rio San Pedro to the adjacent coastal area has been evaluated using the tidal prism model, obtaining a net export of 1.05×10 10 g C yr -1.

  9. Response of shallow-water carbonates and reef systems to the Toarcian Ocean Anoxic Event (183 Ma) on the Dinaric Carbonate Platform (Slovenia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martindale, R. C.; Kosir, A.; Schaller, M. F.

    2015-12-01

    With rising concerns regarding the persistence of coral reefs through the 21st century, there is a crucial need to understand how these ecosystems will respond to future environmental deterioration (e.g. ocean warming, acidification, and decreased oxygenation). Several ancient events have been identified as good analogues for modern ecological changes, however, most of these correspond to mass extinction events. By studying carbon cycle perturbations that caused more minor ecosystem collapse, such as the Toarcian Ocean Anoxic Event (T-OAE), the key physiological, ecological, and environmental features that correlate with species and community survival can be assessed. The Dinaric Carbonate Platform, which extends from northeastern Italy to northwestern Albania, is one of the few platforms in Europe that captures an almost continuous shallow-water record of Pliensbachian and Toarcian strata. Specifically, this comparatively poorly studied platform captures the T-OAE in shallow-water carbonates. One such outcrop on the Trnovski Gozd karst plateau in western Slovenia contains both Pleinsbachian lithiotid (bivalve) biostromes and coral bioherms (i.e. coral reefs). The occurrence of both lithiotid and coral buildups in one section is extremely rare and provides the opportunity to study the response of both communities, as well as the carbonate system as a whole, to the T-OAE. This research focuses on the lithology and chemostratigraphy from this locality, particularly identifying the T-OAE horizon more precisely. Additionally, (micro)facies analyses and paleontological analyses of the reefs themselves will be presented. These data will establish the paleoenvironmental conditions that favored reef growth in the Pliensbachian, as well as what conditions changed at the stage boundary and T-OAE to cause the collapse of the shallow-water carbonates and reef systems.

  10. Impact of Early Aptian carbon cycle perturbations on evolution of a marine shelf system in the Basque-Cantabrian Basin (Aralar, N Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millán, M. I.; Weissert, H. J.; Fernández-Mendiola, P. A.; García-Mondéjar, J.

    2009-10-01

    The Aptian Oceanic Anoxic Event 1a (OAE1a, ca.120 Ma ago) is one of the most prominent of a series of geologically brief intervals in the Cretaceous reflecting a major perturbation in the global carbon cycle. This carbon cycle perturbation is recorded in the C-isotope stratigraphy. In this study we present a new carbonate and organic carbon isotope record across OAE1a from expanded shallow marine sections (Igaratza and Iribas) in the Basque-Cantabrian Basin (N Spain). The sediments studied were accumulated on a mixed carbonate-siliciclastic and carbonate shelf. The δ13C carb and δ13C org curves obtained show a pronounced negative spike in the Deshayesites weissi Zone and a subsequent positive excursion within the newly described D. deshayesi-D. furcata transition Zone, approximately equivalent to the upper D. deshayesi Zone of other sections. Specific changes in facies patterns and a reduction in neritic carbonate production predate the negative C-isotope perturbation. These changes coincide with global carbonate crises in neritic and pelagic environments. Corresponding with the beginning of OAE1a (Selli level) a condensed interval rich in ammonites is observed. This horizon is linked to a major transgression with high biodiversity. The "ammonite bloom" suggests enhanced primary productivity in the surface waters of the Basque-Cantabrian Basin at improving environmental conditions for selected biocalcifiers. The ultimate recovery of shelf carbonate deposition occurred after OAE1a and it coincided in time with the most positive values of the carbon-isotope excursion. Based on carbon-isotope stratigraphy it has been deduced that black shales corresponding to Selli Level are missing in Aralar, so that anoxia is not recorded in the studied sections of the marine shelf environment. An organic-rich interval (Aparein level) postdates the Early Aptian major positive excursion. The Aparein event should be considered in the future research of OAEs.

  11. Coupled ocean-atmosphere loss of marine refractory dissolved organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieber, David J.; Keene, William C.; Frossard, Amanda A.; Long, Michael S.; Maben, John R.; Russell, Lynn M.; Kinsey, Joanna D.; Tyssebotn, Inger Marie B.; Quinn, Patricia K.; Bates, Timothy S.

    2016-03-01

    The oceans hold a massive quantity of organic carbon, nearly all of which is dissolved and more than 95% is refractory, cycling through the oceans several times before complete removal. The vast reservoir of refractory dissolved organic carbon (RDOC) is a critical component of the global carbon cycle that is relevant to our understanding of fundamental marine biogeochemical processes and the role of the oceans in climate change with respect to long-term storage and sequestration of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Here we show that RDOC includes surface-active organic matter that can be incorporated into primary marine aerosol produced by bursting bubbles at the sea surface. We propose that this process will deliver RDOC from the sea surface to the atmosphere wherein its photochemical oxidation corresponds to a potentially important and hitherto unknown removal mechanism for marine RDOC.

  12. Experimental Constraints on the Solubility and Partitioning of Carbon between Metallic and Silicate Melt in a Shallow Magma Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Han

    The budget and origin of carbon in Earth and other terrestrial planets are debated and one of the key unknowns is the behavior and fate of carbon during early planetary processes including accretion, core formation, and magma ocean crystallization. Here we determine, experimentally, the solubility of carbon in coexisting Fe-Ni alloy melt and basaltic silicate melt in shallow magma ocean conditions, i.e., at 1-3 GPa, 1500-1800 °C. Oxygen fugacity of the experiments, estimated based on Fe (in metallic alloy melt)-FeO (in silicate melt) equilibrium, varied from IW-0.37 and IW-1.02, where IW refers to the oxygen fugacity imposed by the coexistence of iron and wustite. Four different starting mixes, each with 7:3 silicate:metal mass ratio, with silicate melt NBO/T (estimated proportion of non-bridging oxygen with respect to tetrahedral cations) ranging from 0.81 to 1.54 were studied. Concentrations of carbon in the alloy melt were determined using electron microprobe whereas carbon contents of quenched basaltic glasses were determined using secondary ionization mass spectrometry (SIMS). Identification of carbon and hydrogen-bearing species in silicate glasses was performed using Raman spectroscopy. Our results show that carbon in the metallic melt varies between 4.39 and 7.43 wt.% and increases with increasing temperature and modestly with increasing pressure. Carbon concentration in the silicate melts, on the other hand, varies from 11+/-1 ppm to 111+/-7 ppm and is negatively correlated with pressure but positively correlated with temperature, the NBO/T (non-bridging per tetrahydron, an index of the depolymerization of the silicate melt), the oxygen fugacity and the water content of the silicate melts. Raman and FT-IR results show that at our experimental conditions, carbon in silicate melt is dissolved as hydrogenated species, in addition to . The calculated carbon partition coefficient varies from 510+/-53 to 5369+/-217 and varies systematically as a function of P

  13. Design and Implementation of a CO2 Flood Utilizing Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Horizontal Injection Wells In a Shallow Shelf Carbonate Approaching Waterflood Depletion, Class II

    SciTech Connect

    Czirr, K.L.; Gaddis, M.P.; Moshell, M.K.

    2002-02-21

    The principle objective of this project is to demonstrate the economic viability and widespread applicability of an innovative reservoir management and carbon dioxide (CO2) flood project development approach for improving CO2 flood project economics in shallow shelf carbonate (SSC) reservoirs.

  14. Design and Implementation of a C02 Flood Utilizing Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Horizontal Injection Wells in a Shallow Shelf Carbonate Approaching Waterflood Depletion

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    The objective is to utilize reservoir characteristics and advanced technologies to optimize the design of a carbon dioxide (CO2) project for the South Cowden Unit (SCU) located in Ector County, Texas. The SCU is a mature, relatively small, shallow shelf carbonate unit nearing waterflood depletion. Also the project seeks to demonstrate the performance and economic viability of the project in the field.

  15. Sedimentary process control on carbon isotope composition of sedimentary organic matter in an ancient shallow-water shelf succession

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, S. J.; Leng, M. J.; Macquaker, J. H. S.; Hawkins, K.

    2012-11-01

    Source and delivery mechanisms of organic matter are rarely considered when interpreting changing δ13C through sedimentary successions even though isotope excursions are widely used to identify and correlate global perturbations in the carbon cycle. Combining detailed sedimentology and geochemistry we demonstrate how organic carbon abundance and δ13C values from sedimentary organic matter from Carboniferous-aged mudstones are influenced by the proportion of terrestrial versus water column-derived organic matter. Silt-bearing clay-rich shelf mudstones that were deposited by erosive density flows are characterized by 1.8-2.4% organic carbon and highδ13C values (averaging -22.9 ± 0.3‰, n = 12). Typically these mudstones contain significant volumes of terrestrial plant-derived material. In contrast, clay-rich lenticular mudstones, with a marine macrofauna, are the products of the transport of mud fragments, eroded from pre-existing water-rich shelfal muds, when shorelines were distant and biological productivity in the water column was high. Higher organic carbon (2.1-5.2%) and lowerδ13C values (averaging -24.3 ± 0.5‰, n = 11) characterize these mudstones and are interpreted to reflect a greater contribution by (isotopically more negative) amorphous organic matter derived from marine algae. Differences in δ13C between terrestrial and marine organic matter allow the changing proportions from different sources to be tracked through this succession. Combining δ13C values with zirconium (measured from whole rock), here used as a proxy for detrital silt input, provides a novel approach to distinguishing mudstone provenance and ultimately using δ13C to identify oil-prone organic matter in potential source rocks. These results have important implications for using bulk organic matter to identify and characterize global C-isotope excursions.

  16. Effects of light pollution on the emergent fauna of shallow marine ecosystems: Amphipods as a case study.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Barranco, Carlos; Hughes, Lauren Elizabeth

    2015-05-15

    Light pollution from coastal urban development is a widespread and increasing threat to biodiversity. Many amphipod species migrate between the benthos and the pelagic environment and light seems is a main ecological factor which regulates migration. We explore the effect of artificial lighting on amphipod assemblages using two kind of lights, LED and halogen, and control traps in shallow waters of the Great Barrier Reef. Both types of artificial light traps showed a significantly higher abundance of individuals for all species in comparison to control traps. LED lights showed a stronger effect over the amphipod assemblages, with these traps collecting a higher number of individuals and differing species composition, with some species showing a specific attraction to LED light. As emergent amphipods are a key ecological group in the shallow water environment, the impact of artificial light can affect the broader functioning of the ecosystem.

  17. Pore water profiles and authigenic mineralization in shallow marine sediments above the methane-charged system on Umitaka Spur, Japan Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Glen T.; Hiruta, Akihiro; Matsumoto, Ryo; Dickens, Gerald R.; Tomaru, Hitoshi; Takeuchi, Rika; Komatsubara, Junko; Ishida, Yasushi; Yu, Hua

    2007-06-01

    Umitaka Spur, situated on an unusual collisional plate boundary along the eastern margin of the Japan Sea, hosts gas seeps, pock-marks, collapse structures, and gas hydrates. Piston cores were recovered from this ridge to understand carbon cycling, pore fluid gradients and authigenic mineralization above a methane-charged system. We present the chemistry of fluids and solids from three cores adjacent to seep locations. High fluxes of CH 4 and alkalinity transport carbon from a deep zone of methanogenesis toward the seafloor. Methane, however, reacts with SO42- across a shallow sulfate-methane transition (SMT), which generates additional alkalinity and HS -. A fraction of these CH 4 oxidation products form authigenic carbonate and pyrite. These minerals are not readily apparent from visual inspection of split cores, because they exist as micritic coatings on microfossils or as framboidal pyrite. They are, however, readily observed in chemical analyses as peaks of "labile" Ca, Sr, Ba or S in sediment at or near the SMT. Carbon inputs and outputs nicely balance across the SMT in all three cores if one considers four relevant fluxes: loss of alkalinity to the seafloor, addition of methane from below, addition of alkalinity from below, and carbonate precipitation. Importantly, in all cores, the magnitude of the fluxes decreases in this order. Although some carbon rising from depth forms authigenic carbonate, most (>80%) escapes to the ocean as alkalinity. Nonetheless, authigenic fronts in sediment on Umitaka Spur are a significant reservoir of inorganic carbon. Given calculated pore fluid fluxes for Ca and Sr, the fronts require tens of thousands of years to form, suggesting that the present state and loss of carbon represent long-lived processes.

  18. A herbivore knows its patch: luderick, Girella tricuspidata, exhibit strong site fidelity on shallow subtidal reefs in a temperate marine park.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Adrian M; Harvey, Euan S; Taylor, Matthew D; Knott, Nathan A

    2013-01-01

    Understanding movement patterns, habitat use and behaviour of fish is critical to determining how targeted species may respond to protection provided by "no-take" sanctuary zones within marine parks. We assessed the fine and broad scale movement patterns of an exploited herbivore, luderick (Girella tricuspidata), using acoustic telemetry to evaluate how this species may respond to protection within Jervis Bay (New South Wales, Australia). We surgically implanted fourteen fish with acoustic transmitters and actively and passively tracked individuals to determine fine and broad scale movement patterns respectively. Eight fish were actively tracked for 24 h d¯(1) for 6 d (May 2011), and then intermittently over the following 30 d. Six fish were passively tracked from December 2011 to March 2012, using a fixed array of receivers deployed across rocky reefs around the perimeter of the bay. Luderick exhibited strong site fidelity on shallow subtidal reefs, tending to remain on or return consistently to the reef where they were caught and released. All eight fish actively tracked used core areas solely on their release reef, with the exception of one fish that used multiple core areas, and four of the six fish passively tracked spent between 75 to 96% of days on release reefs over the entire tracking period. Luderick did move frequently to adjacent reefs, and occasionally to more distant reefs, however consistently returned to their release reef. Luderick also exhibited predictable patterns in movement between spatially distinct daytime and night-time core use areas. Night-time core use areas were generally located in sheltered areas behind the edge of reefs. Overall, our data indicate luderick exhibit strong site fidelity on shallow subtidal reefs in Jervis Bay and suggests that this important herbivore may be likely to show a positive response to protection within the marine park. PMID:23741515

  19. A Herbivore Knows Its Patch: Luderick, Girella tricuspidata, Exhibit Strong Site Fidelity on Shallow Subtidal Reefs in a Temperate Marine Park

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Adrian M.; Harvey, Euan S.; Taylor, Matthew D.; Knott, Nathan A.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding movement patterns, habitat use and behaviour of fish is critical to determining how targeted species may respond to protection provided by “no-take” sanctuary zones within marine parks. We assessed the fine and broad scale movement patterns of an exploited herbivore, luderick (Girella tricuspidata), using acoustic telemetry to evaluate how this species may respond to protection within Jervis Bay (New South Wales, Australia). We surgically implanted fourteen fish with acoustic transmitters and actively and passively tracked individuals to determine fine and broad scale movement patterns respectively. Eight fish were actively tracked for 24 h d¯1 for 6 d (May 2011), and then intermittently over the following 30 d. Six fish were passively tracked from December 2011 to March 2012, using a fixed array of receivers deployed across rocky reefs around the perimeter of the bay. Luderick exhibited strong site fidelity on shallow subtidal reefs, tending to remain on or return consistently to the reef where they were caught and released. All eight fish actively tracked used core areas solely on their release reef, with the exception of one fish that used multiple core areas, and four of the six fish passively tracked spent between 75 to 96% of days on release reefs over the entire tracking period. Luderick did move frequently to adjacent reefs, and occasionally to more distant reefs, however consistently returned to their release reef. Luderick also exhibited predictable patterns in movement between spatially distinct daytime and night-time core use areas. Night-time core use areas were generally located in sheltered areas behind the edge of reefs. Overall, our data indicate luderick exhibit strong site fidelity on shallow subtidal reefs in Jervis Bay and suggests that this important herbivore may be likely to show a positive response to protection within the marine park. PMID:23741515

  20. Variability of the carbonate chemistry in a shallow, seagrass-dominated ecosystem: implications for ocean acidification experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Challener, Roberta; Robbins, Lisa L.; Mcclintock, James B.

    2016-01-01

    Open ocean observations have shown that increasing levels of anthropogenically derived atmospheric CO2 are causing acidification of the world's oceans. Yet little is known about coastal acidification and studies are just beginning to characterise the carbonate chemistry of shallow, nearshore zones where many ecologically and economically important organisms occur. We characterised the carbonate chemistry of seawater within an area dominated by seagrass beds (Saint Joseph Bay, Florida) to determine the extent of variation in pH and pCO2 over monthly and daily timescales. Distinct diel and seasonal fluctuations were observed at daily and monthly timescales respectively, indicating the influence of photosynthetic and respiratory processes on the local carbonate chemistry. Over the course of a year, the range in monthly values of pH (7.36-8.28), aragonite saturation state (0.65-5.63), and calculated pCO2 (195-2537 μatm) were significant. When sampled on a daily basis the range in pH (7.70-8.06), aragonite saturation state (1.86-3.85), and calculated pCO2 (379-1019 μatm) also exhibited significant range and indicated variation between timescales. The results of this study have significant implications for the design of ocean acidification experiments where nearshore species are utilised and indicate that coastal species are experiencing far greater fluctuations in carbonate chemistry than previously thought.

  1. Biostratigraphy of Late Cretaceous carbonate platforms based on larger foraminifera: the Late Cretaceous shallow benthic zones (LKSBZ)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caus, Esmeralda; Parente, Mariano; Albrich, Sergi; Boix, Carme; Consorti, Lorenzo; Di Lucia, Matteo; Frijia, Gianluca; Robles, Raquel; Villalonga, Raquel

    2014-05-01

    The larger foraminifera are single-celled organisms extremely abundant and diverse in tropical-to-subtropical shallow-water oligotrophic-to- mesotrophic environments, especially in carbonate platforms. They cover all the environments within the platform, from the littoral areas to the lower limit of the photic zone. In the geological past, starting from the Late Carboniferous, the same ecological niches where inhabited by different assemblages that evolved in subsequent global community maturation cycles (GCMCs). These cycles are bounded by global palaeoenvironmental crises marked by increased extinction rates or even mass extinctions. This work focuses on the Late Cretaceous Global Community Maturation cycle (LKGCMC), which is bracketed between two mass extinction events: the Cenomanian-Turonian boundary event at the base and the Cretaceous-Palaeogene boundary event at the top. Ten shallow benthic zones (SBZs) are proposed for the time span going from the base of the Turonian up to the Maastrichtian-Danian boundary. A SBZ is a composite zone of parallel phylogenetic lineages that covers at least the most common facies realms of shallow-water deposits. Each zone corresponds to the "total range zone" of some larger foraminifera taxa, and is defined using integrated evidence on multiple first appearances and last occurrences of taxa from all available neritic palaeoenvironments. The new biozonaton is based on an extensive regional data set derived from well exposed shallow-water carbonate successions on both sides of the Pyrenees (Northern Spain and Southern France). The LKSBZ 1 corresponds to the earliest phase of the LKGCM cycle. This biozone is characterized by the presence of few Cenomanian survivors. The LKSBZs 2-4 are characterized by the great development of the structurally complex porcellaneous groups and the first diversification of rotaliids. The LKSBZ 5-10 are dominated by lamellar-perforate foraminifera, with three main groups: Orbitoidids

  2. Experimental approaches to marine and meteoric dissolution-to-repreciptiation cycles of fine-grained marine carbonate sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Immenhauser, Adrian; Buhl, Dieter; Riechelmann, Sylvia; Kwiecien, Ola; Lokier, Stephen; Neuser, Rolf

    2016-04-01

    Fine-grained carbonate (carbonate ooze), or microcrystalline carbonate (micrite), its lithified counterpart, forms a main constituent of limestones throughout much of Earth's history. Fine-grained carbonates are deposited below the permanent fair-weather wave base in neritic lagoonal environments or below the storm-wave base in basinal settings. The origin of components forming these fine-grained carbonates often remains poorly understood and represents a major challenge in carbonate sedimentology, particularly when these materials are used as carbonate archives (bulk micrite geochemistry). Here we present a novel experimental approach exposing natural, fine-grained carbonate sediments to dissolution-reprecipitation cycles under non-sterile conditions that mimick earth-surface conditions. In a first stage, the experiment simulated subaerial exposure of an ooid (aragonite) shoal and leaching and carbonate dissolution under meteoric phreatic conditions. In a second stage, CO2 was added to the experimental fluid (natural rainwater) representing soil-zone activity. In a third stage, partly dissolved (micro-karstified) sediments were exposed to marine phreatic conditions simulating renewed flooding of the shoal carbonates. During the third stage, precipitation was induced by degassing the CO2 in the fluid with N2. Degassing induced nucleation and growth of a diagenetic inorganic aragonite (and subordinate calcite) phase upon the surface of carbonate particles. The outcome of these first experiments is promising. The CO2 concentration of the fluid and the air are low under atmospheric conditions and increase as expected due to adding CO2 to the experiment resulting in a lower pH. Carbonate dissolution increases conductivity, alkalinity, and calcium concentration reaching a plateau at the end of the first experimental phase. Small surficial damages to ooids represent zones of weakness and form the preferred sites of dissolution leading to a deepening and widening of these

  3. Sulfate reduction and oxic respiration in marine sediments: implications for organic carbon preservation in euxinic environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, D. E.; DeVincenzi, D. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1989-01-01

    Compilations have been made of sulfate reduction rates and oxic respiration rates over the entire range of marine sedimentation rates, and sedimentary environments, including several euxinic sites. These data show, consistent with the findings of Jorgensen (1982, Nature, 296, 643-645), that sulfate reduction and oxic respiration oxidize equal amounts of organic carbon in nearshore sediments. As sedimentation rates decrease, oxic respiration, becomes progressively more important, and in deep-sea sediments 100-1000 times more organic carbon is oxidized by oxic respiration than by sulfate reduction. By contrast, nearly as much organic carbon is oxidized by sulfate reduction in euxinic sediments as is oxidized by the sum of sulfate reduction and oxic respiration in normal marine sediments of similar deposition rate. This observation appears at odds with the enhanced preservation of organic carbon observed in euxinic sediments. However, only small reductions in (depth-integrated) organic carbon decomposition rates (compared to normal marine) are required to give both high organic carbon concentrations and enhanced carbon preservation in euxinic sediments. Lower rates of organic carbon decomposition (if only by subtle amounts) are explained by the diminished ability of anaerobic bacteria to oxidize the full suite of sedimentary organic compounds.

  4. IMPORTANCE OF BLACK CARBON IN DISTRIBUTION AND BIOACCUMULATION MODELS OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN CONTAMINATED MARINE SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The roles and relative importance of nonpyrogenic organic carbon (NPOC) and black carbon (BC) as binding phases of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were assessed by their ability to estimate pore water concentrations and biological uptake in various marine sediments. Sedim...

  5. Observations of shallow water marine ambient sound: the low frequency underwater soundscape of the central Oregon coast.

    PubMed

    Haxel, Joseph H; Dziak, Robert P; Matsumoto, Haru

    2013-05-01

    A year-long experiment (March 2010 to April 2011) measuring ambient sound at a shallow water site (50 m) on the central OR coast near the Port of Newport provides important baseline information for comparisons with future measurements associated with resource development along the inner continental shelf of the Pacific Northwest. Ambient levels in frequencies affected by surf-generated noise (f < 100 Hz) characterize the site as a high-energy end member within the spectrum of shallow water coastal areas influenced by breaking waves. Dominant sound sources include locally generated ship noise (66% of total hours contain local ship noise), breaking surf, wind induced wave breaking and baleen whale vocalizations. Additionally, an increase in spectral levels for frequencies ranging from 35 to 100 Hz is attributed to noise radiated from distant commercial ship commerce. One-second root mean square (rms) sound pressure level (SPLrms) estimates calculated across the 10-840 Hz frequency band for the entire year long deployment show minimum, mean, and maximum values of 84 dB, 101 dB, and 152 dB re 1 μPa.

  6. Ground penetrating radar application in a shallow marine Oxfordian limestone sequence located on the eastern flank of the Paris Basin, NE France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagallier, Guy; Laitinen, Ari I.; Malartre, Fabrice; Van Campenhout, Ignace P. A. M.; Veeken, Paul C. H.

    2000-02-01

    A Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) survey has been carried out in Upper Jurassic limestones located on the eastern flank of the Paris Basin (NE France). The potential of the investigation method is assessed for delineating geologically meaningful stratifications in the shallow subsurface. The fundamentals of the GPR technique are described. Penetration depth and vertical resolution depends on the soil conditions, the characteristics of input signal and the configuration of the transmitter-receiver assembly. In the studied carbonates the penetration level is rather good and the electromagnetic signal reaches up to 1000 nanoseconds maximum (i.e. approximately 55 m). Several depositional units are outlined on the GPR profiles. Six different lithological units are recognised with distinct GPR reflection characteristics. The profiles illustrate the internal 3D organisation of the carbonate platform and its geometry. They provide detailed insight into the nature of an Oxfordian reefal build-up. The high-resolution subsurface model is directly calibrated with geological field observations and it results in a predictive 3D depositional working model. The GPR method is a non-destructive remote sensing technique that is cost effective. The method is considered complementary to other conventional high-resolution reservoir characterisation studies. It represents a powerful investigation tool in earth science studies concerning the imaging of the structure of the shallow subsurface.

  7. Modelling carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon and methane in marine porewaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meister, Patrick; Liu, Bo; Khalili, Arzhang; Barker Jørgensen, Bo

    2014-05-01

    Carbon isotope compositions of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and methane (CH4) in marine sedimentary porewaters at near surface temperatures show extremely large variation in apparent fractionation covering a range from -100 ‰ to +30 ‰. This fractionation is essentially the result of microbial activity, but the mechanisms and factors controlling this fractionation are still incompletely understood. This study provides a reaction transport model approach to evaluate the effects of the most important processes and factors on carbon isotope distribution with the goal to better understand carbon isotope distribution in modern sediment porewaters and in the geological record. Our model results show that kinetic fractionation during methanogenesis, both through the acetoclastic and autotrophic pathways, results in a nearly symmetrical distribution of δ13C values in DIC and CH4 with respect to the isotope value of buried organic matter. An increased fractionation factor during methanogenesis leads to a larger difference between δ13CDIC and δ13CCH4. Near the sulphate methane transition zone, DIC is more depleted in 13C due to diffusive mixing with DIC produced by anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) and organoclastic sulphate reduction. The model also shows that an upward decrease in δ13CCH4 near the SMT can only be caused by equilibrium fractionation during AOM including a backward "leakage" of carbon from DIC to CH4 through the enzymatic pathway. However, this effect of reversibility has no influence on the DIC pool as long as methane is completely consumed at the SMT. Only a release of methane at the sediment-water interface, due to a fraction of the methane escaping re-oxidation, results in a small shift towards more positive δ13CDIC values. Methane escape at the SMT is possible if either the methane flux is too high to be entirely oxidized by AOM, or if bubbles of methane gas by-pass the sulphate reduction zone and escape episodically into the water column

  8. Carbon and hydrogen isotopic composition of bacterial methane in a shallow freshwater lake

    SciTech Connect

    Woltemate, I.; Whiticar, M.J.; Schoell, M.

    1984-09-01

    Anoxic sediments from freshwater environments such as bogs, swamps, and lakes undergoing early diagenesis are frequently characterized by the formation of biogenic methane. Freshwater biogenic methanes exhibit carbon and hydrogen isotopic values strongly depleted in C-13 and deuterium relative to the respective values for carbon dioxide and formation water. The percentages of methane generated by fermentation and carbon dioxide reduction can be estimated by comparison of hydrogen isotopes in the formation water and methane. On the basis of these hydrogen isotope data, about 75% of the methane formation in Wurmsee comes from acetate reduction. Fermentation is thus the dominant although not exclusive process. Carbon dioxide reduction contributed the balance of the bacterial methane generated. 35 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  9. Towards a model of postglacial biogeography in shallow marine species along the Patagonian Province: lessons from the limpet Nacella magellanica (Gmelin, 1791)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Patagonia extends for more than 84,000 km of irregular coasts is an area especially apt to evaluate how historic and contemporary processes influence the distribution and connectivity of shallow marine benthic organisms. The true limpet Nacella magellanica has a wide distribution in this province and represents a suitable model to infer the Quaternary glacial legacy on marine benthic organisms. This species inhabits ice-free rocky ecosystems, has a narrow bathymetric range and consequently should have been severely affected by recurrent glacial cycles during the Quaternary. We performed phylogeographic and demographic analyses of N. magellanica from 14 localities along its distribution in Pacific Patagonia, Atlantic Patagonia, and the Falkland/Malvinas Islands. Results Mitochondrial (COI) DNA analyses of 357 individuals of N. magellanica revealed an absence of genetic differentiation in the species with a single genetic unit along Pacific Patagonia. However, we detected significant genetic differences among three main groups named Pacific Patagonia, Atlantic Patagonia and Falkland/Malvinas Islands. Migration rate estimations indicated asymmetrical gene flow, primarily from Pacific Patagonia to Atlantic Patagonia (Nem=2.21) and the Falkland/Malvinas Islands (Nem=16.6). Demographic reconstruction in Pacific Patagonia suggests a recent recolonization process (< 10 ka) supported by neutrality tests, mismatch distribution and the median-joining haplotype genealogy. Conclusions Absence of genetic structure, a single dominant haplotype, lack of correlation between geographic and genetic distance, high estimated migration rates and the signal of recent demographic growth represent a large body of evidence supporting the hypothesis of rapid postglacial expansion in this species in Pacific Patagonia. This expansion could have been sustained by larval dispersal following the main current system in this area. Lower levels of genetic diversity in inland sea areas

  10. Gas flux and carbonate occurrence at a shallow seep of thermogenic natural gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinnaman, Franklin S.; Kimball, Justine B.; Busso, Luis; Birgel, Daniel; Ding, Haibing; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Valentine, David L.

    2010-06-01

    The Coal Oil Point seep field located offshore Santa Barbara, CA, consists of dozens of named seeps, including a peripheral ˜200 m2 area known as Brian Seep, located in 10 m water depth. A single comprehensive survey of gas flux at Brian Seep yielded a methane release rate of ˜450 moles of CH4 per day, originating from 68 persistent gas vents and 23 intermittent vents, with gas flux among persistent vents displaying a log normal frequency distribution. A subsequent series of 33 repeat surveys conducted over a period of 6 months tracked eight persistent vents, and revealed substantial temporal variability in gas venting, with flux from each individual vent varying by more than a factor of 4. During wintertime surveys sediment was largely absent from the site, and carbonate concretions were exposed at the seafloor. The presence of the carbonates was unexpected, as the thermogenic seep gas contains 6.7% CO2, which should act to dissolve carbonates. The average δ13C of the carbonates was -29.2 ± 2.8‰ VPDB, compared to a range of -1.0 to +7.8‰ for CO2 in the seep gas, indicating that CO2 from the seep gas is quantitatively not as important as 13C-depleted bicarbonate derived from methane oxidation. Methane, with a δ13C of approximately -43‰, is oxidized and the resulting inorganic carbon precipitates as high-magnesium calcite and other carbonate minerals. This finding is supported by 13C-depleted biomarkers typically associated with anaerobic methanotrophic archaea and their bacterial syntrophic partners in the carbonates (lipid biomarker δ13C ranged from -84 to -25‰). The inconsistency in δ13C between the carbonates and the seeping CO2 was resolved by discovering pockets of gas trapped near the base of the sediment column with δ13C-CO2 values ranging from -26.9 to -11.6‰. A mechanism of carbonate formation is proposed in which carbonates form near the sediment-bedrock interface during times of sufficient sediment coverage, in which anaerobic oxidation

  11. El Nino-southern oscillation related fluctuations of the marine carbon cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Winguth, A.M.E.; Heimann, M.; Kurz, K.D.; Maier-Reimer, E.; Mikolajewicz, U.; Segschneider, J. )

    1994-03-01

    The yearly increase in global atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration is not constant, fluctuating around a mean growth rate. Some previous work has been done looking at the relationship of CO2 fluctuations with the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events in the Pacific. This paper describes the response of the three-dimensional ocean circulation model (Hamburg LSG) coupled on-line with a oceanic carbon cycle model (HAMOCC-3) to realistic wind and air temperature field anomalies. The focus is the marine carbon cycle and the interannual variations of carbon fluxes between ocean and atmosphere during the strong El Nino of 1982/83. 53 refs., 14 figs.

  12. Carbon Processing in the Marine Subsurface: What Are They Doing Down There?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biddle, J.; Martino, A. J.; Russell, J. A., III; Christman, G.; House, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    The deep marine subsurface is a place where small amounts of carbon are deposited, yet the majority of microorganisms appear to have heterotrophic lifestyles and carbon accumulates on a global scale. In this enviroment, how are heterotrophic organisms gathering their carbon and utilizing it? This talk will utilize subsurface metagenomics and amplicon data to discuss the interactions of deep microorganisms with buried sedimentary carbon. We will compare the Peru, Iberian and Costa Rica Margins to the abyssopelagic Equatorial Pacific. Specific organisms and their anticipated functions will be discussed. Additionally, we will discuss the potential for small scale trophic levels to form between bacteria and eukaryotes in deep basalts.

  13. Distributed deformation structures in shallow water carbonates subsiding through a simple stress field (Jandaira Formation, NE Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertotti, Giovanni; Bisdom, Kevin; Bezerra, Hilario; Reijmer, John; Cazarin, Carol

    2016-04-01

    Despite the scarcity of major deformation structures such as folds and faults, the flat-lying, post-rift shallow water carbonates of the Jandaira Formation (Potiguar Basin, NE Brazil) display well-organized fracture systems distributed of tens of km2. Structures observed in the outcropping carbonates are sub-vertical, generally N-S trending mode I and hybrid veins and barren fractures, sub-vertical roughly E-W trending stylolites and sub-horizontal stylolites. These features developed during subsidence in a simple and constant stress field characterized by, beside gravity, a significant horizontal stress probably of tectonic origin. The corresponding depth curves have different origin and slopes and, therefore, cross each other resulting in position of the principal stresses which change with depth. As a result, the type and amount of fractures affecting subsiding rocks change despite the fact that the far-field stresses remain constant. Following early diagenesis and porosity elimination in the first 100-200m depth, Jandaira carbonates experienced wholesale fracturing at depths of 400-800m resulting in a network of NNW-NE trending fractures partly organized in conjugate sets with a low interfault angle and a sub-vertical intersection, and sub-vertical stylolites roughly perpendicular to the fractures. Intense fluid circulation was activated as a consequence through the carbonates. With increasing subsidence, sub-horizontal stylolites formed providing calcite which precipitated in the open fractures transforming them in veins. The Jandaira formation lost thereby the permeability it had reached during the previous stage. Because of the lack of major deformation, the outcrops of the Jandaira Formation is an excellent analog for carbonate reservoirs in the Middle East, South Atlantic and elsewhere.

  14. Mapping faults and intrusions onshore Disko Island by use of Vibroseismic data, shallow marine seismic data and electromagnetic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausen, Ole R.; Nørmark, Egon; Gulbrandsen, Pelle; Sabra, Henrik

    2014-05-01

    The west Greenland margin is characterized by sedimentary basins containing high density of intrusions (dikes and sills) originating from the Cenozoic breakup and separation of Greenland and North American. The magmatic rocks have lately attracted interest due to observations of hydrocarbons associated to the intrusions but here due to the ore potential associated to the same intrusions. In 2000 a marine seismic campaign by GEUS in the coastal areas of West Greenland showed that it is possible to identify magmatic intrusions in the sedimentary succession as well as map normal faults, and that the intrusions are heterogeneous distributed and probably related to the normal faults. The presence of normal faults is known from the regional onshore geological mapping campaigns performed by GEUS. However, the marine seismic data indicate a much more complicated structural pattern than presented in the onshore maps, which is a well-known phenomenon (Marcussen et al., 2002). In 2012 and 2013 seismic data were acquired onshore on the northern coast of Disko as part of a research project funded by Avannaa Resources . The objective was initially to test whether it is possible to acquire data of a quality enabling the observation and mapping of intrusions in the subsurface. Later it was followed by a more extensive survey where it was attempted to map the depth to and geometry of the intrusions. The relatively dense seismic grid onshore -compared to the marine seismic data offshore west Greenland- enable the identification and more important the mapping of several intrusions. They show some of the same characteristics as intrusions observed at e.q. the Norwegian margin of the North Atlantic (Hansen et al., 2004). The preliminary results which integrate both marine and onshore seismic data revise the structural understanding of the area and indicate a close relation between the intrusions and the rift related normal faults. The results are consistent with remote sensing methods

  15. Magnetostratigraphy of Mesozoic shallow-water carbonates: Preliminary results from the Middle Jurassic of the Paris basin

    SciTech Connect

    Aissaoui, D.M.; Kirschvink, J.L. )

    1991-03-01

    The use of sedimentary paleomagnetism has enhanced greatly our understanding of the timing of deposition and diagenesis of Cenozoic platform and reefal carbonates. Its application to similar but older deposits will have direct implications for economic exploration and development. The authors report here preliminary paleomagnetic results from the Middle Jurassic limestones of the Paris basin (France). The samples consist mainly of bioclastic and oolitic limestones deposited in ancient counterpart of the shallow-water environments of the Bahama platform. The Jurassic samples are stable to progressive, incremental demagnetization and exhibit magnetization patterns identical to Cenozoic rocks from the Bahama platform or Mururoa Atoll. The natural remanent magnetization of these limestones is weak and comprised between 7.7 x 10{sup {minus}9} to 1.8 x 10{sup {minus}8} AM{sup 2}/kg. Magnetic components of both normal and reversed polarity are observed. Paired isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) and alternating field demagnetization experiments show that most of the remanence is lost between 20 and 45 mT, which is typical of single-domain biogenic magnetite or maghemite. The ratio of IRM at H{sub RG} to the saturation IRM ranges from 35 to 42% indicating a moderate to low interparticle interaction. This is confirmed by the anhysteretic remanent magnetization as compared with intact, freeze-dried cells of magnetotactic bacteria and chiton teeth. Magnetic minerals extracted from the Jurassic samples are examined to further confirm the occurrence of SD magnetite within the Middle Jurassic limestones of the Paris basin. The preliminary results suggest that the strata should be good for the paleomagnetic investigation of Mesozoic shallow-water carbonates.

  16. Dissolved inorganic carbon and alkalinity fluxes from coastal marine sediments: model estimates for different shelf environments and sensitivity to global change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumins, V.; Gehlen, M.; Arndt, S.; van Cappellen, P.; Regnier, P.

    2012-07-01

    We present a one-dimensional reactive transport model to estimate benthic fluxes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and alkalinity (AT) from coastal marine sediments. The model incorporates the transport processes of sediment accumulation, molecular diffusion, bioturbation and bioirrigation, while the reactions included are the redox pathways of organic carbon oxidation, re-oxidation of reduced nitrogen, iron and sulfur compounds, pore water acid-base equilibria, and dissolution of particulate inorganic carbon (calcite, aragonite, and Mg-calcite). The coastal zone is divided into four environmental units with different particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) and particulate organic carbon (POC) fluxes: reefs, banks and bays, carbonate shelves and non-carbonate shelves. Model results are analyzed separately for each environment and then scaled up to the whole coastal ocean. The model-derived estimate for the present-day global coastal benthic DIC efflux is 126 Tmol yr-1, based on a global coastal reactive POC depositional flux of 117 Tmol yr-1. The POC decomposition leads to a~carbonate dissolution from shallow marine sediments of 7 Tmol yr-1 (on the order of 0.1 Pg C yr-1). Assuming complete re-oxidation of aqueous sulfide released from sediments, the effective net flux of alkalinity to the water column is 29 Teq yr-1, primarily from PIC dissolution (46%) and ammonification (33%). Because our POC depositional flux falls in the high range of global values given in the literature, the reported DIC and alkalinity fluxes should be viewed as upper-bound estimates. Increasing coastal seawater DIC to what might be expected in year 2100 due to the uptake of anthropogenic CO2 increases PIC dissolution by 2.3 Tmol yr-1 and alkalinity efflux by 4.8 Teq yr-1. Our reactive transport modeling approach not only yields global estimates of benthic DIC, alkalinity and nutrient fluxes under variable scenarios of ocean productivity and chemistry, but also provides insights into the

  17. Dissolved inorganic carbon and alkalinity fluxes from coastal marine sediments: model estimates for different shelf environments and sensitivity to global change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumins, V.; Gehlen, M.; Arndt, S.; Van Cappellen, P.; Regnier, P.

    2013-01-01

    We present a one-dimensional reactive transport model to estimate benthic fluxes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and alkalinity (AT) from coastal marine sediments. The model incorporates the transport processes of sediment accumulation, molecular diffusion, bioturbation and bioirrigation, while the reactions included are the redox pathways of organic carbon oxidation, re-oxidation of reduced nitrogen, iron and sulfur compounds, pore water acid-base equilibria, and dissolution of particulate inorganic carbon (calcite, aragonite, and Mg-calcite). The coastal zone is divided into four environmental units with different particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) and particulate organic carbon (POC) fluxes: reefs, banks and bays, carbonate shelves and non-carbonate shelves. Model results are analyzed separately for each environment and then scaled up to the whole coastal ocean. The model-derived estimate for the present-day global coastal benthic DIC efflux is 126 Tmol yr-1, based on a global coastal reactive POC depositional flux of 117 Tmol yr-1. The POC decomposition leads to a carbonate dissolution from shallow marine sediments of 7 Tmol yr-1 (on the order of 0.1 Pg C yr-1. Assuming complete re-oxidation of aqueous sulfide released from sediments, the effective net flux of alkalinity to the water column is 29 Teq. yr-1, primarily from PIC dissolution (46%) and ammonification (33%). Because our POC depositional flux falls in the high range of global values given in the literature, the reported DIC and alkalinity fluxes should be viewed as upper-bound estimates. Increasing coastal seawater DIC to what might be expected in year 2100 due to the uptake of anthropogenic CO2 increases PIC dissolution by 2.3 Tmol yr-1and alkalinity efflux by 4.8 Teq. yr-1. Our reactive transport modeling approach not only yields global estimates of benthic DIC, alkalinity and nutrient fluxes under variable scenarios of ocean productivity and chemistry, but also provides insights into the

  18. Shallow Remineralization in the Sargasso Sea Estimated from Seasonal Variations in Oxygen and Dissolved Inorganic Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ono, S.; Ennyu, A.; Najjar, R. G.; Bates, N.

    1998-01-01

    A diagnostic model of the mean annual cycles of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and oxygen below the mixed layer at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) site is presented and used to estimate organic carbon remineralization in the seasonal thermocline. The model includes lateral and vertical advection as well as vertical, diffusion. Very good agreement is found for the remineralization estimates based on oxygen and DIC. Net remineralization averaged from mid-spring to early fall is found to be a maximum between 120 and 140 in. Remineralization integrated between 100 (the compensation depth) and 250 m during this period is estimated to be about 1 mol C/sq m. This flux is consistent with independent estimates of the loss of particulate and dissolved organic carbon.

  19. CO2 Huff-n-Puff Process in a Light Oil Shallow Shelf Carbonate Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Kovar, Mark; Wehner, Scott

    1998-01-13

    The application of cyclic CO2, often referred to as the CO2 Huff-n-Puff process, may find its niche in the maturing waterfloods of the Permian Basin. Coupling the CO2 Huff-n-Puff process to miscible flooding applications could provide the needed revenue to sufficiently mitigate near-term negative cash flow concerns in the capital-intensive miscible projects. Texaco Exploration & Production Inc. and the U. S. Department of Energy have teamed up in an attempt to develop the CO2 Huff-n-Puff process in the Grayburg and San Andres formations which are light oil, shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs that exist throughout the Permian Basin. This cost-shared effort is intended to demonstrate the viability of this underutilized technology in a specific class of domestic reservoir. A significant amount of oil reserves are located in carbonate reservoirs. Specifically, the carbonates deposited in shallow shelf (SSC) environments make up the largest percentage of known reservoirs within the Permian Basin of North America. Many of these known resources have been under waterflooding operations for decades and are at risk of abandonment if crude oil recoveries cannot be economically enhanced. The selected sites for this demonstration project are the Central Vacuum Unit waterflood in Lea County, New Mexico and the Sundown Slaughter Field in Hockley County, Texas. Miscible CO2 flooding is the process of choice for enhancing recovery of light oils and already accounts for over 12% of the Permian Basin's daily production. There are significant probable reserves associated with future miscible CO2 projects. However, many are marginally economic at current market conditions due to large up-front capital commitments for a peak response, which may be several years in the future. The resulting negative cash-flow is sometimes too much for an operator to absorb. The CO2 Huff-n-Puff process is being investigated as a near

  20. Tracing Organic Carbon from the Terrestrial to Marine Environment via Coupled Stable Carbon Isotope and Lignin Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childress, L. B.; Blair, N. E.; Leithold, E. L.

    2010-12-01

    The Waipaoa sedimentary system of New Zealand offers an opportunity to study the impacts of tectonic, climatic and anthropogenic forcings on the export of organic carbon from land and its preservation in the seabed. The dominant sources of organic carbon from the watershed are sedimentary rocks, aged soils, and flora. Marine C is added to sediment mid-shelf. Differential export and burial of the organic C from the different sources provides an organic geochemical record of changes in terrestrial and marine processes. Analyses of four marine sediment cores collected near the mouth of the Waipaoa River by the MATACORE in 2006 reveal both downcore (temporal) as well as across shelf (spatial) trends in carbon isotope and lignin parameters. These trends, coupled with measurements from soil profiles, rocks and riverine suspended sediments reveal changes in organic carbon sources that relate to terrestrial mass wasting processes and plant succession. As examples, approximately 4 kyr ago an event characterized by increased woody gymnosperm input was captured. This event may have been initiated by extensive landsliding of forested terrain. Upcore from that interval, a shift to non-woody angiosperms is documented. This succession coincides with a period of volcanic eruptions and later, human intrusion.

  1. Shallow terraces in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands: Implications for carbonate accretion and sea level variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, J. R.; Edwards, M.; Fletcher, C. H.; Rooney, J. J.; Clague, D. A.

    2009-12-01

    High-resolution multibeam bathymetry and backscatter data recently collected by the NOAA Coral Reef Ecosystem Division permit the first detailed analysis of the submarine geomorphology of the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (NWHI). Here we focus on the character, spatial extent, depth, and number of terraces, scarps, and other shallow seafloor features in the NWHI. The islands and atolls at or near sea level and the flat top banks have terraces and scarps at a variety of depths above the major breaks in slope and consistent paleoreef complexes are present at average depths of 30-45 m, 55-65 m, and 110-130 m. Their geomorphology is controlled by vertical coral reef accretion during sea-level highstands and erosion and karstification during lowstands. Wave energy also plays a major role in shaping the NWHI. Our results suggest that although the NWHI features are discontinuous and probably occupied by sea level on more than one occasion they group into general depth ranges that correlate with late-Quaternary sea-level features in the MHI and phases of postglacial reef growth separated by melt-water pulses. Identification and correlation of these features is important for developing sea-level and reef accretion histories in the Hawaiian Islands. Further work is needed to constrain the absolute ages of these reef features and construct an accurate sea-level curve for the Hawaiian Archipelago.

  2. Carbon-saturated monosulfide melting in the shallow mantle: solubility and effect on solidus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhou; Lentsch, Nathan; Hirschmann, Marc M.

    2015-12-01

    We present high-pressure experiments from 0.8 to 7.95 GPa to determine the effect of carbon on the solidus of mantle monosulfide. The graphite-saturated solidus of monosulfide (Fe0.69Ni0.23Cu0.01S1.00) is described by a Simon and Glatzel (Z Anorg Allg Chem 178:309-316, 1929) equation T (°C) = 969.0[ P (GPa)/5.92 + 1]0.39 (1 ≤ P ≤ 8) and is 80 ± 25 °C below the melting temperature found for carbon-free conditions. A series of comparison experiments using different capsule configurations and preparations document that the observed solidus-lowering is owing to graphite saturation and not an artifact of different capsules or hydrogen contamination. Concentrations of carbon in quenched graphite-saturated monosulfide melt measured by electron microprobe are 0.1-0.3 wt% in monosulfide melt and below the detection limit (<0.2 wt%) in crystalline monosulfide solid solution. Although there is only a small amount of carbon dissolved in monosulfide melts, the substantial effect on monosulfide solidus temperature means that the carbon-saturated monosulfide (Fe0.69Ni0.23Cu0.01S1.00) solidus intersects continental mantle geotherms inferred from diamond inclusion geobarometry at 6-7 GPa ( 200 km), whereas carbon-free monosulfide (Fe0.69Ni0.23Cu0.01S1.00) solidus does not. The composition investigated (Fe0.69Ni0.23Cu0.01S1.00) has a comparatively low metal/sulfur (M/S) ratio and low Ni/(Fe + Ni), but sulfides with higher (M/S) and with greater Ni/(Fe + Ni) should melt at lower temperatures and these should have a broader melt stability field in the diamond formation environment and in the continental lithosphere. Low carbon solubility in monosulfide melt excludes the possibility that diamonds are crystallized from sulfide melt. Although monosulfide melt can store no more than 2 ppm C in a bulk mantle with 225 ppm S, melts with higher M/S could be a primary host of carbon in the deeper part of the upper mantle. For example, the storage capacity of C in sulfide melts in the

  3. Connecting Terrestrial and Marine Carbon: The Missing Link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smeaton, Craig; Austin, William; Davies, Althea; Howe, John

    2014-05-01

    The poster introduces some initial ideas and concepts from my research (starting October 2013) which aims to create a carbon inventory for sea lochs on the west coast of Scotland; future aims the research will focus on aspects of carbon cycling. There is currently a disparity in carbon research: deep ocean and terrestrial carbon are both intensely researched areas within both a Scottish and global context. In comparison, carbon research in coastal regions is sparse, but there is a growing awareness of key transfers in the carbon cycle at these locations, suggesting that they are key areas for understanding the global storage and cycling of carbon. Coastal environments are the repository of significant quantities of terrestrial carbon, with estimates ranging between 334.5 x1012 g a-1 (Degens et al. 1991) and 500 x 1012 g a-1 (Spitzy & Ittekkot 1991). The lack of research in the coastal zones has implications for all areas of carbon research: without a better understanding of carbon in our coastal waters, the understanding of carbon transfer from source to sink will remain incomplete. This project sets out to address some of the main questions that are required to fill the gaps in our knowledge and generate a better understanding of carbon in the coastal environment. Here we focus on establishing first-order inventories of the carbon stored in sea loch (fjord) sediments. We intend to use the West coast of Scotland as our study area. The region contains multiple types of coastal environment with minimal human disturbance. The main focus of the study will be sea lochs as relatively few investigations of biogeochemical cycling in sea loch systems have been conducted (Loh et al. 2002, 2008, 2010; Nuwer & Keil 2005) and even fewer organic carbon investigations have been undertaken in such systems (e.g. Overnell & Young 1995). Sea lochs also provide a semi-enclosed system, making them ideal for this type of study. Initially the project aims to use existing literature and

  4. Response of organic carbon burial to trophic level changes in a shallow eutrophic lake in SE China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pengbao; Gao, Chao; Chen, Furong; Yu, Shiyong

    2016-08-01

    Lakes are an important component of terrestrial carbon cycling. As the trend of eutrophication in many lakes continues, the mechanisms of organic carbon (OC) burial remain unclear. This paper aims to understand the distribution of OC and the effect of trophic level changes on OC burial in Chaohu Lake, a shallow eutrophic lake located in the lower reaches of the Yangtze River, SE China. Two hundred and one surface sediment samples (0-20cm) and 53 subsurface samples (150-200cm) from the lake were collected. The OC accumulation rates (OCARs) are relatively low, with an average of 10.01g/m(2)/year in the surface sediments. The spatial distribution of the OCARs is similar to that of allochthonous OC. The difference in total phosphate (TP) content between the surface and subsurface sediments (ΔTP) is significantly correlated with the autochthonous OC, suggesting that TP loading is a critical limiting nutrient for the lake's primary productivity. It is concluded that allochthonous OC is the dominant source of total OC in surface sediments compared to autochthonous OC. The primary productivity of Lake Chaohu increased due to increasing nutrient loading. However, the autochthonous OC contributed 11% of the total OC in the surface sediments. This could be ascribed to strong mineralization in the water column or surface sediments. PMID:27521954

  5. The impact of CO2 on shallow groundwater chemistry: observations at a natural analog site and implications for carbon sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Keating, Elizabeth; Fessenden, Julianna; Kanjorski, Nancy; Koning, Dan; Pawar, Rajesh

    2008-01-01

    In a natural analog study of risks associated with carbon sequestration, impacts of CO{sub 2} on shallow groundwater quality have been measured in a sandstone aquifer in New Mexico, USA. Despite relatively high levels of dissolved CO{sub 2}, originating from depth and producing geysering at one well, pH depression and consequent trace element mobility are relatively minor effects due to the buffering capacity of the aquifer. However, local contamination due to influx of saline waters in a subset of wells is significant. Geochemical modeling of major ion concentrations suggests that high alkalinity and carbonate mineral dissolution buffers pH changes due to CO{sub 2} influx. Analysis oftrends in dissolved trace elements, chloride, and CO2 reveal no evidence of in-situ trace element mobilization. There is clear evidence, however, that As, U, and Pb are locally co-transported into the aquifer with CO{sub 2}-rich saline water. This study illustrates the role that local geochemical conditions will play in determining the effectiveness of monitoring strategies for CO{sub 2} leakage. For example, if buffering is significant, pH monitoring may not effectively detect CO2 leakage. This study also highlights potential complications that CO{sub 2}carrier fluids, such as saline waters, pose in monitoring impacts ofgeologic sequestration.

  6. Present-day and fossil rhodolith pavements compared: Their potential for analysing shallow-water carbonate deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassi, Davide; Nebelsick, James H.; Checconi, Alessio; Hohenegger, Johann; Iryu, Yasufumi

    2009-02-01

    Coralline red algae represent the main biogenic components in most shallow-water carbonate successions from the Eocene to the Recent. They contribute significantly to sediment production on open platforms. Carbonate sediments formed by unattached coralline algae include rhodolith pavements (RPs) which represent dense accumulations of rhodoliths, as well as maërl which is composed of rhodoliths, coralline algal branches and their detritus. Recent RPs sampled off Sesoko-jima (Okinawa-jima, southern Japan) occur at depths of 50-70 m on a submarine terrace. The taxonomic coralline composition is dominated by melobesioids associated with minor amounts of mastophoroids and sporolithaceans. The rhodoliths are characterised by various nuclei, an encrusting inner arrangement, encrusting to warty outer growth-forms and sub-spheroidal shapes. Bioerosion, encrustation and abrasion are the most prevalent taphonomic features. Possible fossil counterparts were identified in Chattian and Priabonian RPs from middle-ramp depositional systems from the Venetian area, north-east Italy. A direct comparison between Recent and fossil RPs is possible by contrasting the constituent rhodolith characteristics including taxonomic composition, nature of the nucleus, inner arrangement, outer growth-forms, size and shape as well as taphonomic signatures. This allows factors controlling rhodolith formation and growth in RPs to be compared especially with respect to hydrodynamic regimes and substrate type.

  7. Effects of lower surface ocean pH upon the stability of shallow water carbonate sediments.

    PubMed

    Tynan, Sarah; Opdyke, Bradley N

    2011-02-15

    It is predicted that surface ocean pH will reach 7.9, possibly 7.8 by the end of this century due to increased carbon dioxide (CO(2)) in the atmosphere and in the surface ocean. While aragonite-rich sediments don't begin to dissolve until a threshold pH of ~7.8 is reached, dissolution from high-Mg calcites is evident with any drop in pH. Indeed, it is high-Mg calcite that dominates the reaction of carbonate sediments with increased CO(2), which undergoes a rapid neomorphism process to a more stable, low-Mg calcite. This has major implications for the future of the high-Mg calcite producing organisms within coral reef ecosystems. In order to understand any potential buffering system offered by the dissolution of carbonate sediments under a lower oceanic pH, this process of high-Mg calcite dissolution in the reef environment must be further elucidated.

  8. Late Miocene threshold response of marine algae to carbon dioxide limitation.

    PubMed

    Bolton, Clara T; Stoll, Heather M

    2013-08-29

    Coccolithophores are marine algae that use carbon for calcification and photosynthesis. The long-term adaptation of these and other marine algae to decreasing carbon dioxide levels during the Cenozoic era has resulted in modern algae capable of actively enhancing carbon dioxide at the site of photosynthesis. This enhancement occurs through the transport of dissolved bicarbonate (HCO3(-)) and with the help of enzymes whose expression can be modulated by variable aqueous carbon dioxide concentration, [CO2], in laboratory cultures. Coccolithophores preserve the geological history of this adaptation because the stable carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions of their calcite plates (coccoliths), which are preserved in the fossil record, are sensitive to active carbon uptake and transport by the cell. Here we use a model of cellular carbon fluxes and show that at low [CO2] the increased demand for HCO3(-) at the site of photosynthesis results in a diminished allocation of HCO3(-) to calcification, which is most pronounced in larger cells. This results in a large divergence between the carbon isotopic compositions of small versus large coccoliths only at low [CO2]. Our evaluation of the oxygen and carbon isotope record of size-separated fossil coccoliths reveals that this isotopic divergence first arose during the late Miocene to the earliest Pliocene epoch (about 7-5 million years ago). We interpret this to be a threshold response of the cells' carbon acquisition strategies to decreasing [CO2]. The documented coccolithophore response is synchronous with a global shift in terrestrial vegetation distribution between 8 and 5 Myr ago, which has been interpreted by some studies as a floral response to decreasing partial pressures of carbon dioxide () in the atmosphere. We infer a global decrease in carbon dioxide levels for this time interval that has not yet been identified in the sparse proxy record but is synchronous with global cooling and progressive glaciations.

  9. Sensitivities of marine carbon fluxes to ocean change

    PubMed Central

    Riebesell, Ulf; Körtzinger, Arne; Oschlies, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Throughout Earth's history, the oceans have played a dominant role in the climate system through the storage and transport of heat and the exchange of water and climate-relevant gases with the atmosphere. The ocean's heat capacity is ≈1,000 times larger than that of the atmosphere, its content of reactive carbon more than 60 times larger. Through a variety of physical, chemical, and biological processes, the ocean acts as a driver of climate variability on time scales ranging from seasonal to interannual to decadal to glacial–interglacial. The same processes will also be involved in future responses of the ocean to global change. Here we assess the responses of the seawater carbonate system and of the ocean's physical and biological carbon pumps to (i) ocean warming and the associated changes in vertical mixing and overturning circulation, and (ii) ocean acidification and carbonation. Our analysis underscores that many of these responses have the potential for significant feedback to the climate system. Because several of the underlying processes are interlinked and nonlinear, the sign and magnitude of the ocean's carbon cycle feedback to climate change is yet unknown. Understanding these processes and their sensitivities to global change will be crucial to our ability to project future climate change. PMID:19995981

  10. Aeolian to shallow-marine shelf architecture off a major desert since the Late Pleistocene (northern Mauritania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanebuth, T. J. J.; Mersmeyer, H.; Kudrass, H. R.; Westphal, H.

    2013-12-01

    Continental shelves off major desert regions are not expected to host substantial amounts of sediments due to long-lasting and unfocused material supply and a high re-mobilization potential of aeolian material. This study, in contrast, demonstrates that significant volumes of sediments have accumulated on the northern Mauritanian shelf under the arid climate conditions and prevail over consecutive climatic cycles. Eight late Pleistocene to Holocene depositional units, each formed under contrasting depositional conditions, are identified in high-resolution seismo-acoustic data and dated sediment cores. These are: (1) a highly differentiated Pleistocene paleo-landscape older than the past climatic cycle, (2) a continental dune complex (MIS-4), (3) a thick regressive shallow-water clinoform (late MIS-3), (4) a regressive to lowstand shore deposit (latest MIS-3), and (5) a local transgressive cover (LGM to deglacial). Additionally, (6) an open-shelf highstand cover, (7) an outer-shelf highstand wedge and (8) mid-shelf mud depocenters have formed during the Holocene sea-level highstand. The common local offshore formation and preservation of confined stratigraphic units, in particular from during MIS-3, mark the interplay of: a) episodes of pronounced arid climatic conditions resulting in enhanced aeolian and coastal sediment input, b) shelf current patterns focusing sediment deposition locally, and c) early post-depositional sediment stabilization providing protection against erosion. Prominent internal surfaces at 63 and 115 m modern water depths indicate widespread and intense erosional activity during late MIS-3 regression and MIS-2 lowstand to post-LGM transgression, hosting coarse shell sands and gravels from beach and shoreface paleo-environments. The reasons for the high preservation potential of confined stratigraphic units are: a) carbonaceous cementation, b) sediment composition (massive widespread shore-related gravel and shell beds with subtle minor

  11. Characterization of nonmarine and shallow marine sediments using electrofacies and advanced volumetric methods, eastern San Joaquin Valley

    SciTech Connect

    Mulhern, M.E.; Senecal, J.E.; Long, W.T.

    1986-04-01

    The Delmontian Chanac and Pliocene Etchegoin Formations of the Kern Front field, Kern County, California, were studied to relate log response to lithofacies in nonmarine and transitional marine depositional environments. Six wells in a roughly north-south cross section were analyzed by the Multiwell Faciolog data-reduction technique. A lithology-sensitive data base created by the bulk-density, neutron-porosity, gamma-ray (also a relative grain-size indicator), and effective photoelectric cross section index logs was calibrated using detailed core and side-wall data. VOLAN volumetric analyses, using wireline-log data including EPT measurements, then provided reservoir property measures of porosity, permeability, and saturation. Ten electrofacies were identified, including three types of claystone, a siltstone, and six types of sandstone. A spectrum of sandstone composition ranged from very argillaceous to somewhat clayey with carbonaceous stringers to silty to relatively clean. Two sands showing gas effect were also defined. The thin-bedded shaly Chanac strata are characterized by rapid vertical and horizontal changes in lithology, which make well-to-well correlations difficult. The beds were deposited chiefly as fluvial channels and alluvial fans with interbedded lutites representing overbank or ephemeral lacustrine deposits. Many channels are stacked. Etchegoin strata are composed of an upward-coarsening shoreface sequence, culminated by seaward-prograding tidal channels. Stratigraphy at least partly controls the trap and complicates steamflood efforts.

  12. Geochemical Analyses of Surface and Shallow Gas Flux and Composition Over a Proposed Carbon Sequestration Site in Eastern Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Parris; Michael Solis; Kathryn Takacs

    2009-12-31

    Using soil gas chemistry to detect leakage from underground reservoirs (i.e. microseepage) requires that the natural range of soil gas flux and chemistry be fully characterized. To meet this need, soil gas flux (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}) and the bulk (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}) and isotopic chemistry ({delta}{sup 13}C-CO2) of shallow soil gases (<1 m, 3.3 ft) were measured at 25 locations distributed among two active oil and gas fields, an active strip mine, and a relatively undisturbed research forest in eastern Kentucky. The measurements apportion the biologic, atmospheric, and geologic influences on soil gas composition under varying degrees of human surface disturbance. The measurements also highlight potential challenges in using soil gas chemistry as a monitoring tool where the surface cover consists of reclaimed mine land or is underlain by shallow coals. For example, enrichment of ({delta}{sup 13}C-CO2) and high CH{sub 4} concentrations in soils have been historically used as indicators of microseepage, but in the reclaimed mine lands similar soil chemistry characteristics likely result from dissolution of carbonate cement in siliciclastic clasts having {delta}{sup 13}C values close to 0{per_thousand} and degassing of coal fragments. The gases accumulate in the reclaimed mine land soils because intense compaction reduces soil permeability, thereby impeding equilibration with the atmosphere. Consequently, the reclaimed mine lands provide a false microseepage anomaly. Further potential challenges arise from low permeability zones associated with compacted soils in reclaimed mine lands and shallow coals in undisturbed areas that might impede upward gas migration. To investigate the effect of these materials on gas migration and composition, four 10 m (33 ft) deep monitoring wells were drilled in reclaimed mine material and in undisturbed soils with and without coals. The wells, configured with sampling zones at discrete intervals, show the persistence of some of the

  13. Pennsylvanian carbonate buildups, Paradox basin: Increasing reserves in heterogeneous, shallow-shelf reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Montgomery, S.L.; Chidsey, T.C.; Eby, D.E.; Lorenz, D.M.; Culham, W.E.

    1999-01-01

    Productive carbonate buildups of Pennsylvanian age in the southern Paradox basin, Utah, contain up to 200 million bbl remaining oil potentially recoverable by enhanced recovery methods. These buildups comprise over 100 satellite fields to the giant Greater Aneth field, where secondary recovery operations thus far have been concentrated. Several types of satellite buildups exist and produce oil from the Desert Creek zone of the Paradox Formation. Many of the relevant fields have undergone early abandonment; wells in Desert Creek carbonate mounds commonly produce at very high initial rates (>1000 bbl/day) and then suffer precipitous declines. An important new study focused on the detailed characterization of five separate reservoirs has resulted in significant information relevant to their future redevelopment. Completed assessment of Anasazi field suggests that phylloid algal mounds, the major productive buildup type in this area, consist of ten separate lithotypes and can be described in terms of a two-level reservoir system with an underlying high-permeability mound-core interval overlain by a lower permeability but volumetrically larger supramound (mound capping) interval. Reservoir simulations and related performance predictions indicate that CO2 flooding of these reservoirs should have considerable success in recovering remaining oil reserves.Productive carbonate buildups of Pennsylvanian age in the southern Paradox basin, Utah, contain up to 200 million bbl remaining oil potentially recoverable by enhanced recovery methods. These buildups comprise over 100 satellite fields to the giant Greater Aneth field, where secondary recovery operations thus far have been concentrated. Several types of satellite buildups exist and produce oil from the Desert Creek zone of the Paradox Formation. Many of the relevant fields have undergone early abandonment; wells in Desert Creek carbonate mounds commonly produce at very high initial rates (>1000 bbl/day) and then suffer

  14. Triassic-Jurassic marine anoxia in response to massive carbon release from CAMP?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhl, M.; Bjerrum, C. J.; Canfield, D. E.; Frei, R.

    2012-04-01

    The end-Triassic mass extinction [~201.3 Ma], marked by marine and terrestrial ecosystem collapse and global marine biodiversity loss, coincides with the onset of extensive volcanic activity and emplacement of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP). Massive and rapid greenhouse gas release from surface basalts, subsurface organic rich strata and ocean-floor clathrate-hydrates had a profound impact on the global exogenic carbon cycle and it dramatically increased atmospheric pCO2 values. Although Permian-Triassic [~252 Ma] and early Toarcian [~183 Ma] volcanic carbon release is thought to have initiated global ocean anoxic events, ocean redox changes at the end-Triassic mass extinction are poorly constrained. Marine anoxia is only suggested by organic-rich, finely laminated sediment deposition in marginal marine basins. We studied the biostratigraphically well-constrained Triassic-Jurassic marine sedimentary record from St. Audrie's Bay (UK), which is astronomically calibrated to the continental geomagnetic polarity time-scale (GPTS) of the continental Newark basin. This marine geological archive is marked by precession paced black-shale deposition, similar to Neogene Mediterranean sapropels. We studied redox-sensitive trace element concentrations (e.g. Mo, U, V, Cu, Ni), iron-speciation (FeHR/FeT, FePY/FeHR) and δ34S-pyrite through the end-Triassic mass extinction and subsequent 3 million years of the lower Jurassic. We observe direct stratigraphic correlation between CAMP flood basalt emplacement, strong atmospheric pCO2 increase and development of marine anoxia. This now allows evaluation of mechanistic relations between massive greenhouse gas emissions initiated by CAMP volcanism, subsequent environmental change and upper Triassic and lower Jurassic biotic response.

  15. Controls on reef development and the terrigenous-carbonate interface on a shallow shelf, Nicaragua (Central America)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, H. H.; Murray, S. P.

    1983-06-01

    Marine geology and physical oceanographic data collected during two field projects (˜4 months) on the Caribbean shelf of Nicaragua indicate a surprising dominance of carbonate deposition and reef growth on a shelf that is receiving an abnormally large volume of terrigenous sediments. High rainfall rates (˜400 500 cm/year), coupled with a warm tropical climate, encourage rapid denudation of the country's central volcanic highland and transport of large volumes of terrigenous sediment and fresh water to the coast. Estimates suggest that three times more fresh water and fifteen times more sediment are introduced per unit length of coastline than on the east coast of the United States. Distribution of the terrigenous facies, development of carbonate sediment suites, and the location and quality of viable reefs are strongly controlled by the dynamic interaction near the coasts of highly turbid fresh to brackish water effluents from thirteen rivers with clear marine waters of the shelf. Oceanic water from the central Caribbean drift current intersects the shelf and moves slowely in a dominant northwest direction toward the Yucatan Channel. A sluggish secondary gyre moves to the south toward Costa Rica. In contrast, the turbid coastal water is deflected to the south in response to density gradients, surface water slopes, and momentum supplied by the steady northeast trade winds. A distinct two-layered flow is commonly present in the sediment-rich coastal boundary zone, which is typically 10 20 km wide. The low-salinity upper layer is frictionally uncoupled from the ambient shelf water and therefore can expand out of the normally coherent coastal boundary zone during periods of abnormal flooding or times when instability is introduced into the northeast trades. Reef distribution, abruptness of the terrigenous-carbonate interface, and general shelf morphology reflect the long-term dynamic structure of the shelf waters. A smooth-bottomed ramp of siliciclastic sands to

  16. Marine mollusc predator-escape behaviour altered by near-future carbon dioxide levels

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Sue-Ann; Lefevre, Sjannie; McCormick, Mark I.; Domenici, Paolo; Nilsson, Göran E.; Munday, Philip L.

    2014-01-01

    Ocean acidification poses a range of threats to marine invertebrates; however, the potential effects of rising carbon dioxide (CO2) on marine invertebrate behaviour are largely unknown. Marine gastropod conch snails have a modified foot and operculum allowing them to leap backwards rapidly when faced with a predator, such as a venomous cone shell. Here, we show that projected near-future seawater CO2 levels (961 µatm) impair this escape behaviour during a predator–prey interaction. Elevated-CO2 halved the number of snails that jumped from the predator, increased their latency to jump and altered their escape trajectory. Physical ability to jump was not affected by elevated-CO2 indicating instead that decision-making was impaired. Antipredator behaviour was fully restored by treatment with gabazine, a GABA antagonist of some invertebrate nervous systems, indicating potential interference of neurotransmitter receptor function by elevated-CO2, as previously observed in marine fishes. Altered behaviour of marine invertebrates at projected future CO2 levels could have potentially far-reaching implications for marine ecosystems. PMID:24225456

  17. Marine mollusc predator-escape behaviour altered by near-future carbon dioxide levels.

    PubMed

    Watson, Sue-Ann; Lefevre, Sjannie; McCormick, Mark I; Domenici, Paolo; Nilsson, Göran E; Munday, Philip L

    2014-01-01

    Ocean acidification poses a range of threats to marine invertebrates; however, the potential effects of rising carbon dioxide (CO2) on marine invertebrate behaviour are largely unknown. Marine gastropod conch snails have a modified foot and operculum allowing them to leap backwards rapidly when faced with a predator, such as a venomous cone shell. Here, we show that projected near-future seawater CO2 levels (961 µatm) impair this escape behaviour during a predator-prey interaction. Elevated-CO2 halved the number of snails that jumped from the predator, increased their latency to jump and altered their escape trajectory. Physical ability to jump was not affected by elevated-CO2 indicating instead that decision-making was impaired. Antipredator behaviour was fully restored by treatment with gabazine, a GABA antagonist of some invertebrate nervous systems, indicating potential interference of neurotransmitter receptor function by elevated-CO2, as previously observed in marine fishes. Altered behaviour of marine invertebrates at projected future CO2 levels could have potentially far-reaching implications for marine ecosystems.

  18. Marine mollusc predator-escape behaviour altered by near-future carbon dioxide levels.

    PubMed

    Watson, Sue-Ann; Lefevre, Sjannie; McCormick, Mark I; Domenici, Paolo; Nilsson, Göran E; Munday, Philip L

    2014-01-01

    Ocean acidification poses a range of threats to marine invertebrates; however, the potential effects of rising carbon dioxide (CO2) on marine invertebrate behaviour are largely unknown. Marine gastropod conch snails have a modified foot and operculum allowing them to leap backwards rapidly when faced with a predator, such as a venomous cone shell. Here, we show that projected near-future seawater CO2 levels (961 µatm) impair this escape behaviour during a predator-prey interaction. Elevated-CO2 halved the number of snails that jumped from the predator, increased their latency to jump and altered their escape trajectory. Physical ability to jump was not affected by elevated-CO2 indicating instead that decision-making was impaired. Antipredator behaviour was fully restored by treatment with gabazine, a GABA antagonist of some invertebrate nervous systems, indicating potential interference of neurotransmitter receptor function by elevated-CO2, as previously observed in marine fishes. Altered behaviour of marine invertebrates at projected future CO2 levels could have potentially far-reaching implications for marine ecosystems. PMID:24225456

  19. Control of phosphorus concentration through adsorption and desorption in shallow groundwater of subtropical carbonate estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flower, Hilary; Rains, Mark; Lewis, David; Zhang, Jia-Zhong; Price, René

    2016-02-01

    The changes in the proportion of fresh and marine water sources in coastal mixing zones can affect phosphorus (P) availability, one of the important drivers of primary productivity. This study focuses on an abiotic portion of the P cycle in the mangrove ecotone of Taylor Slough, coastal Everglades, Florida. We investigated the P sorption properties of sediment with three distinct water sources in this region: 1) fresh groundwater from the inland Everglades, 2) bicarbonate enriched groundwater from the mangrove ecotone, and 3) surface saltwater from Florida Bay. Soluble reactive P (SPR) in ecotone groundwater exhibit markedly low sorption efficiency (Kd = 0.2 L g-1) onto the sediment compared to fresh groundwater and Florida Bay water (11.3 L g-1 and 3.4 L g-1, respectively). The low SRP buffering capacity of the sediment in ecotone groundwater would maintain a higher ambient water SRP concentration in ecotone groundwater than in the other two waters. The relative sorption efficiency is consistent with the measured zero equilibrium SRP concentration being highest in ecotone groundwater (0.094 ± 0.003 μM) and lower in fresh groundwater and Florida Bay surface water (0.075 ± 0.005 μM and 0.058 ± 0.004 μM, respectively). The temporal variability of SRP concentration in groundwater at the ecotone field station is greater than the range of zero equilibrium SRP concentration for all three waters, so very low SRP concentration in the ambient water would induce desorption of P from the sediment. Such desorption processes would result in a higher ambient SRP concentration in ecotone groundwater than the other two water types. Our results suggest that ecotone groundwater, due to its higher bicarbonate content, would release more SRP from mangrove sediments compared to the upstream and downstream waters, as evidenced by both its lower P sorption efficiency and its higher zero equilibrium SRP concentration.

  20. Periodicities in sediment temperature time-series at a marine shallow water hydrothermal vent in Milos Island (Aegean Volcanic arc, Eastern Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliani, Stefano; Meloni, Roberto; Dando, Paul R.

    2004-05-01

    Time-series data sets of total bottom pressure (tidal plus atmospheric), seawater temperature and sediment temperature from a marine shallow hydrothermal vent (Milos, Hellenic Volcanic Arc, Aegean Sea) were studied to determine factors influencing periodicity at the vents. Bottom pressure and vent temperature were mainly opposite in phase, with the main fluctuations of vent temperature occurring at tidal frequencies. Although the fluctuations in atmospheric pressure were of the same order as those due to tidal pressure, the contribution of atmospheric pressure was considerably weaker at diurnal frequencies. Some sudden discontinuities in sediment temperature were recorded, at least one of these may have been caused by seismic events. Seawater temperature changes were not reflected in the sediment temperature record. Transient loadings, such as tidal loadings, barometric pressure and earth tides, may affect the pore pressure in sediments, influencing fluid expulsion and sediment temperature as a consequence. Most of the contribution to the fluctuations in sediment temperature depends on tidal loadings. Gravitational forces, in the form of earth tides, can also be involved and barometric pressure is probably responsible for long period temperature oscillations.

  1. Disturbance of shallow marine soft-bottom environments and megabenthos assemblages by a huge tsunami induced by the 2011 M9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquake.

    PubMed

    Seike, Koji; Shirai, Kotaro; Kogure, Yukihisa

    2013-01-01

    Huge tsunami waves associated with megathrust earthquakes have a severe impact on shallow marine ecosystems. We investigated the impact of a tsunami generated by the 2011 M9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquake on the seafloor and large benthic animals in muddy and sandy ria coasts (Otsuchi and Funakoshi bays) in northeastern Japan. We conducted underwater field surveys using scuba equipment in water depths of <20 m before the tsunami (September 2010) and after the tsunami (September 2011 and September 2012). During the study period, episodic changes in topography and grain-size composition occurred on the seafloor of the study area. Megabenthos sampling revealed a distinct pattern of distribution succession for each benthic species. For example, the protobranch bivalve Yoldia notabilis (Bivalvia: Nuculanidae) and the heterodont bivalve Felaniella usta (Bivalvia: Ungulinidae) disappeared after the tsunami event, whereas the distribution of the venus clam Gomphina melanaegis (Bivalvia: Veneridae) remained unchanged. In addition, the patterns of succession for a single species, such as the giant button top shell Umbonium costatum (Gastropoda: Trochidae) and the heart urchin Echinocardium cordatum (Echinoidea: Loveniidae), varied between the two bays studied. Our data also show that reestablishment of some benthic animal populations began within 18 months of the tsunami disturbance.

  2. A new approach to reservoir heterogeneity modelling: conditional simulation of 2-D parasequences in shallow marine depositional systems using an attributed controlled grammar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Taizhong; Griffiths, Cedric M.; Johnsen, Sverre O.

    1999-07-01

    An attributed controlled grammar (ACG) has been formally used to represent the parasequences of a clastic shallow-marine system. The lithofacies distribution has been conditionally simulated in two dimensions using the ACG. In knowledge representation, the ACG has been shown to have several advantages over context-free, programmed and attributed grammars. The ACG for the parasequences is manually constructed by domain experts based on a conditioning dataset, combined with related sedimentological knowledge. The dataset includes several geological sections measured from outcrops and interpreted from boreholes. A parasequence is decomposed into coastal plain, foreshore, upper shoreface, lower shoreface and offshore facies tracts and their boundaries. Within each tract, lithofacies distribution is described by the facies transition relationship, which can be constructed directly from the dataset and adjusted in terms of related sedimentological knowledge. The boundaries between the tracts are represented by point chains, whereas the facies transitions are controlled by a transitional probability matrix and both vertical and horizontal extensions of the corresponding lithofacies. The simulation results show the following features: (1) the simulation honors the conditioning dataset, (2) the lithofacies distribution simulated from the ACG shows increased variability compared to traditional interpolations between geological sections and (3) the simulated lithofacies distribution is controlled mainly by the uncertainty of the vertical and horizontal extension of each lithofacies, which cannot usually be obtained directly from the conditional dataset, and is not formally considered in traditional geological correlation and interpretation. Work is underway to quantify such lateral and vertical extension in present-day systems.

  3. Disturbance of Shallow Marine Soft-Bottom Environments and Megabenthos Assemblages by a Huge Tsunami Induced by the 2011 M9.0 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake

    PubMed Central

    Seike, Koji; Shirai, Kotaro; Kogure, Yukihisa

    2013-01-01

    Huge tsunami waves associated with megathrust earthquakes have a severe impact on shallow marine ecosystems. We investigated the impact of a tsunami generated by the 2011 M9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquake on the seafloor and large benthic animals in muddy and sandy ria coasts (Otsuchi and Funakoshi bays) in northeastern Japan. We conducted underwater field surveys using scuba equipment in water depths of <20 m before the tsunami (September 2010) and after the tsunami (September 2011 and September 2012). During the study period, episodic changes in topography and grain-size composition occurred on the seafloor of the study area. Megabenthos sampling revealed a distinct pattern of distribution succession for each benthic species. For example, the protobranch bivalve Yoldia notabilis (Bivalvia: Nuculanidae) and the heterodont bivalve Felaniella usta (Bivalvia: Ungulinidae) disappeared after the tsunami event, whereas the distribution of the venus clam Gomphina melanaegis (Bivalvia: Veneridae) remained unchanged. In addition, the patterns of succession for a single species, such as the giant button top shell Umbonium costatum (Gastropoda: Trochidae) and the heart urchin Echinocardium cordatum (Echinoidea: Loveniidae), varied between the two bays studied. Our data also show that reestablishment of some benthic animal populations began within 18 months of the tsunami disturbance. PMID:23762365

  4. A new species of Ischyodus (Chondrichthyes: Holocephali: Callorhynchidae) from Upper Maastrichtian Shallow marine facies of the Fox Hills and Hell Creek Formations, Williston basin, North Dakota, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoganson, J.W.; Erickson, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    A new species of chimaeroid, Ischyodus rayhaasi sp. nov., is described based primarily upon the number and configuration of tritors on palatine and mandibular tooth plates. This new species is named in honour of Mr Raymond Haas. Fossils of I. rayhaasi have been recovered from the Upper Maastrichtian Fox Hills Formation and the Breien Member and an unnamed member of the Hell Creek Formation at sites in south-central North Dakota and north-central South Dakota, USA. Ischyodus rayhaasi inhabited shallow marine waters in the central part of the Western Interior Seaway during the latest Cretaceous. Apparently it was also present in similar habitats at that time in the Volga region of Russia. Ischyodus rayhaasi is the youngest Cretaceous species Ischyodus known to exist before the Cretaceous/Tertiary extinction, and the species apparently did not survive that event. It was replaced by Ischyodus dolloi, which is found in the Paleocene Cannonball Formation of the Williston Basin region of North Dakota and is widely distributed elsewhere. ?? The Palaeontological Association.

  5. Biofilm architecture of Phanerozoic cryptic carbonate marine veneers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riding, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Thin (<150 μm) micritic veneers lining crypts in Paleozoic and Mesozoic reef, microbial, and bioclastic carbonates have the dimensions and architecture of modern uncalcified bacterial biofilm. Morphologic attributes include rounded aggregate nanofabric, internal channels, external towers, mushrooms, and plumes. All can be interpreted as characteristics of attached bacterial communities, i.e., aggregates as microcolonies, originally embedded in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances; channels as water conduits and/or uncolonized nutrient-poor spaces; external protuberances as localized growths; and plumes as surface streamers. Cryptic habitat favored pristine biofilm preservation by precluding disturbance and overgrowth, and suggests aphotic and anoxic conditions. These examples provide diagnostic morphologic criteria for wider recognition of biofilm in Phanerozoic and older carbonates.

  6. Molecular and Metabolic Mechanisms of Carbon Sequestration in Marine Thrombolites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mobberley, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    The overall goal of my dissertation project has been to examine the molecular processes underlying carbon sequestration in lithifying microbial ecosystems, known as thrombolitic mats, and assess their feasibility for use in bioregenerative life support systems. The results of my research and education efforts funded by the Graduate Student Researchers Program can be summarized in four peer-reviewed research publication, one educational publication, two papers in preparation, and six research presentations at local and national science meetings (see below for specific details).

  7. Tracking small mountainous river derived terrestrial organic carbon across the active margin marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childress, L. B.; Blair, N. E.; Orpin, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    Active margins are particularly efficient in the burial of organic carbon due to the close proximity of highland sources to marine sediment sinks and high sediment transport rates. Compared with passive margins, active margins are dominated by small mountainous river systems, and play a unique role in marine and global carbon cycles. Small mountainous rivers drain only approximately 20% of land, but deliver approximately 40% of the fluvial sediment to the global ocean. Unlike large passive margin systems where riverine organic carbon is efficiently incinerated on continental shelves, small mountainous river dominated systems are highly effective in the burial and preservation of organic carbon due to the rapid and episodic delivery of organic carbon sourced from vegetation, soil, and rock. To investigate the erosion, transport, and burial of organic carbon in active margin small mountainous river systems we use the Waipaoa River, New Zealand. The Waipaoa River, and adjacent marine depositional environment, is a system of interest due to a large sediment yield (6800 tons km-2 yr-1) and extensive characterization. Previous studies have considered the biogeochemistry of the watershed and tracked the transport of terrestrially derived sediment and organics to the continental shelf and slope by biogeochemical proxies including stable carbon isotopes, lignin phenols, n-alkanes, and n-fatty acids. In this work we expand the spatial extent of investigation to include deep sea sediments of the Hikurangi Trough. Located in approximately 3000 m water depth 120 km from the mouth of the Waipaoa River, the Hikurangi Trough is the southern extension of the Tonga-Kermadec-Hikurangi subduction system. Piston core sediments collected by the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA, NZ) in the Hikurangi Trough indicate the presence of terrestrially derived material (lignin phenols), and suggest a continuum of deposition, resuspension, and transport across the margin

  8. Bacterial diversity in shallow oligotrophic marine benthos and overlying waters: effects of virus infection, containment, and nutrient enrichment.

    PubMed

    Hewson, I; Vargo, G A; Fuhrman, J A

    2003-10-01

    Little is known of the factors shaping sediment bacterial communities, despite their high abundance and reports of high diversity. Two factors hypothesized to shape bacterial communities in the water column are nutrient (resource) availability and virus infection. The role these factors play in benthic bacterial diversity was assessed in oligotrophic carbonate-based sediments of Florida Bay (USA). Sediment-water mesocosm enclosures were made from 1-m diameter clear polycarbonate cylinders which were pushed into sediments to approximately 201 cm sediment depth enclosing approximately 80 L of water. Mesocosms were amended each day for 14 d with 10 microM NH4+ and 1 microM PO4(3-). In a second experiment, viruses from a benthic flocculent layer were concentrated and added back to flocculent layer samples which were collected near the mesocosm enclosures. Photosynthesis by microalgae in virus-amended incubations was monitored by pulse-amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorescence. In both experiments, bacterial diversity was estimated using automated rRNA intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA), a high-resolution fingerprinting approach. Initial sediment bacterial operational taxonomic unit (OTU) richness (236 +/- 3) was higher than in the water column (148 +/- 9), where an OTU was detectable when its amplified DNA represented >0.09% of the total amplified DNA. Effects on bacterial diversity and operational taxonomic unit (OTU) richness in nutrient-amended mesocosms may have been masked by the effects of containment, which stimulated OTU richness in the water column, but depressed OTU richness and diversity in sediments. Nutrient addition significantly elevated virus abundance and the ratio of viruses to bacteria (p < 0.05 for both) in the sediments, concomitant with elevated bacterial diversity. However, water column bacterial diversity (in unamended controls) was not affected by nutrient amendments, which may be due to rapid nutrient uptake by sediment organisms or adsorption of

  9. Schaben field, Kansas: Improving performance in a Mississippian shallow-shelf carbonate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Montgomery, S.L.; Franseen, E.K.; Bhattacharya, S.; Gerlach, P.; Byrnes, A.; Guy, W.; Carr, T.R.

    2000-01-01

    Schaben field (Kansas), located along the northeastern shelf of the Hugoton embayment, produces from Mississippian carbonates in erosional highs immediately beneath a regional unconformity. Production comes from depths of around 4400 ft (1342 m) in partially dolomitized shelf deposits. A detailed reservoir characterization/simulation study, recently performed as part of a Department of Energy Reservoir Class Oil Field Demonstration Project, has led to important revision in explanations for observed patterns of production. Cores recovered from three new data wells identify three main facies: Spicule-rich wackestone-packstone, echinoderm wackestone/packstone/grainstone, and dolomitic mudstone-wackestone. Reservoir quality is highest in spicule-rich wackestone/packstones but is subject to a very high degree of vertical heterogeneity due to facies interbedding, silification, and variable natural fracturing. The oil reservoir is underlain by an active aquifer, which helps maintain reservoir pressure but supports significant water production. Reservoir simulation, using public-domain, PC-based software, suggests that infill drilling is an efficient approach to enhanced recovery. Recent drilling directed by simulation results has shown considerable success in improving field production rates. Results from the Schaben field demonstration project are likely to have wide application for independent oil and exploration companies in western Kansas.Schaben field (Kansas), located along the northeastern shelf of the Hugoton embayment, produces from Mississippian carbonates in erosional highs immediately beneath a regional unconformity. Production comes from depths of around 4400 ft (1342 m) in partially dolomitized shelf deposits. A detailed reservoir characterization/simulation study, recently performed as part of a Department of Energy Reservoir Class Oil Field Demonstration Project, has led to important revision in explanations for observed patterns of production. Cores

  10. High resolution sequence stratigraphy in the upper Jurassic carbonate platform of the Paris basin: Reservoir geometries in lagoonal, protected marine and ooids shoals environments

    SciTech Connect

    Pascal, H.; Villalobos, L. Guillocheau, F.

    1995-08-01

    Reservoir geometry reconstruction within carbonate platforms has been carried out in the Upper Jurassic of the Paris Basin based on high-resolution sequence stratigraphy correlations (cores and well-logs). 18 cored wells over 25 kM{sup 2} have been correlated (Saint-Clair-sur-Epte field, Gaz de France). During lower and middle Oxfordian the Paris Basin is a carbonate platform prograding southward. This progradational trend can be subdivided into three upper order sequences (parasequences sets, mean duration: one m.y.). The lower parasequence-set is a stacking of shallowing-upward parasequences made up of tidal ooids bars surrounded laterally and backward by more protected environments (large variety of coated grains). The middle parasequence-set is recorded in lagoonal environments with numerous channels and lobes of storm washover-fans. Metric-thick sequences have been correlated over the field. They are ernersive upward (subtidal lagoonal deposits cut by storm-induced channels and lobes, covered by small karsts). The upper parasequence-set is made-up of protected-marine deposits grading into lagoonal sediments. The metric thick shallowing-upward sequences are composed by sheet-shaped, strongly bioturbated, medium to coarse-grained bioclastic limestones. Correlation levels are the deepest facies (strongly monospecifically bioturbated wackstones). Shape and size of reservoirs will be quantified.

  11. Predicting export of dissolved organic carbon from forested catchments in glaciated landscapes with shallow soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creed, I. F.; Beall, F. D.; Clair, T. A.; Dillon, P. J.; Hesslein, R. H.

    2008-12-01

    This study presents a simple model of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) loading to surface waters that is applicable to headwater catchments in forested regions on glaciated landscapes. Average annual DOC export was highly variable among the 33 experimental catchments along an east-west transect, ranging from 0.90 to 13.74 g C/m2/a. It was hypothesized that the proportion of wetlands within the catchments would explain the majority of variation in average annual DOC export. To test this hypothesis, digital terrain analysis was used to derive wetlands automatically under both open and closed forest canopies by identifying the probability of a grid cell being a depression and/or flat. Using a 10 m digital elevation model (DEM) derived from readily available sources, the proportion of wetlands explained 63% of the variance in average annual DOC export among the 33 experimental catchments. Inclusion of regional climatic indicators, including the number of growing degree days (with a base of 10°C) and the runoff coefficient, increased explanation of variance from 63% to 89%, once catchments with lakes (>5% of catchment area) adjacent to the catchment outlets were removed. This study shows that DOC export can be predicted accurately from headwater catchments in forested regions on glaciated landscapes using a simple model based on the proportion of wetlands and easily calculated climatic variables.

  12. Microbial Controlled Carbon Monoxide Budget in the Marine Surface Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Y. S.; Rhee, T. S.

    2015-12-01

    In the upper ocean, the dissolved CO exhibits typical diurnal cycle being produced by photolytic decomposition of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM), consumed by microbes, and outgassed by the gas exchange processes. To investigate the CO budget in the mixed layer, we measured air-sea gas exchange, microbial consumption rate, and CDOM on-board at two stark different marine environments in summer season of 2012: the Amundsen Sea, Antractica, and the North Pacific. Dark incubation experiments revealed that microbial consumption rate in the North Pacific was 4.5 nM d-1 whilst 0.8 nM d-1 in the Amundsen Sea. Also CO production rate was about 3.5-times higher in the North Pacific (2.4 nM d-1) likely due to weak dilution and strong photochemical production. This different CO budget between the two regions renders different amplitude of diurnal variation of dissolved CO. That is, compared to the Amundsen Sea, CO was produced faster at daytime and removed faster at nighttime in the North Pacific where the amplitude of CO cycle is larger. In both regions, sea-to-air flux was insignificant (about 0.1 nM d-1 for the both regions) and microbial consumption overwhelmed CO sinks. A simple mass-balance model simulated well our observations, suggesting that other processes than mentioned above were unrevealed.

  13. Dynamic recrystallization and mirror-like slip surfaces: potential coseismic microstructures in shallow crustal carbonate faults (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. A.; Fondriest, M.; Di Toro, G.; Nielsen, S. B.

    2013-12-01

    - and crystallographic-preferred orientations (Smith et al., 2013, Geology). 2) In dolomite gouges, the slip surfaces developed a shiny 'mirror-like' appearance after displacements of a few centimeters. The fault 'mirrors' had mean surface roughness of ~4 μm (from White Light Interferometry analysis over areas ~200×300 μm2) and were associated with instantaneous frictional power densities (shear stress*slip rate) in the range 1-10 MW/m2, comparable to natural earthquakes (Fondriest et al., In Press, Geology). The experimental results suggest that localized dynamic recrystallization (in calcite gouges) and small-displacement mirror-like slip surfaces (in dolostones gouges) are indicators of seismic slip in shallow crustal carbonate-bearing fault zones. In addition to the experimental evidence, natural examples of comparable microstructures that formed in carbonate faults at shallow depths (<3 km) will be presented.

  14. Reassessing the dissolution of marine carbonates: I. Solubility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehlen, M.; Bassinot, F. C.; Chou, L.; McCorkle, D.

    2005-08-01

    We studied the solubility of the [63-150 μm] and the greater than 150 μm size fractions of sediments from two bathymetric transects in the eastern tropical Atlantic (Sierra Leone rise and Cape Verde Plateau). Both fractions are made mainly of foraminiferal shells and fragments. We determined the calcite crystallinity (full width at half maximum of XRD (104) calcite peak) of the >150 μm size fraction. Equilibration experiments were carried out in artificial seawater (20 °C, pCO 2=3100 ppm) for up to 57 days starting from undersaturation with respect to calcite and supersaturation with respect to aragonite. Experiments starting from supersaturation yielded concentration products close to aragonite solubility for sediments from the shallowest stations, suggesting the presence of trace levels of aragonite in these samples. Concentration products computed for the deeper stations were intermediate between aragonite and calcite solubility. Our results indicate the formation of a high-Mg coating. The equilibration period was too short to allow the complete recrystallization of these Mg-rich overgrowths. Experiments initiated from undersaturation yield concentration products that are between 4% and 24% higher than the reported stoichiometric concentration product of synthetic calcite. These differences between estimates of calcite stoichiometric solubility products are explained in terms of variations in experimental conditions (artificial versus natural seawater) and related choices of carbonic acid dissociation constants. They do not reflect a true difference in solubility between biogenic and synthetic calcite. The thinning of the foraminiferal calcite (104) XRD peak from 0.168°( 2θ) to 0.148°( 2θ) along the depth transects is interpreted as reflecting an improvement in calcite crystallinity. This and the change in specific surface area are consistent with the progressive change of the carbonate assemblage. The evolution of the bulk composition of the carbonate

  15. Geochemical and climatic effects of increased marine organic carbon burial at the Cenomanian/Turonian boundary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arthur, M.A.; Dean, W.E.; Pratt, L.M.

    1988-01-01

    Perhaps the most significant event in the Cretaceous record of the carbon isotope composition of carbonate1,2, other than the 1-2.5??? negative shift in the carbon isotope composition of calcareous plankton at the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary3, is the rapid global positive excursion of ???2??? (13C enrichment) which took place between ???91.5 Myr and 90.3 Myr (late Cenomanian to earliest Turonian (C/T boundary event))1,4,5. This excursion has been attributed to a change in the isotope composition of the marine total dissolved carbon (TDC) reservoir resulting from an increase in rate of burial of 13C-depleted organic carbon, which coincided with a major global rise in sea level5 during the so-called C/T oceanic anoxic event (OAE)6. Here we present new data, from nine localities, which demonstrate that a positive excursion in the carbon isotope composition of organic carbon at or near the C/T boundary7,8 is nearly synchronous with that for carbonate and is widespread throughout the Tethys and Atlantic basins (Fig. 1), as well as in more high-latitude epicontinental seas. The postulated increase in the rate of burial of organic carbon may have had a significant effect on CO2 and O2 concentrations in the oceans and atmosphere, and consequent effects on global climate and sedimentary facies. ?? 1988 Nature Publishing Group.

  16. CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff process in a light oil shallow shelf carbonate reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    The application of cyclic CO{sub 2}, often referred to as the CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff process, may find its niche in the maturing waterfloods of the Permian Basin. Coupling the CO{sub 2} H-n-P process to miscible flooding applications could provide the needed revenue to sufficiently mitigate near-term negative cash flow concerns in the capital intensive miscible projects. Texaco Exploration and Production Inc. and the US Department of Energy have teamed up in an attempt to develop the CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff process in the Grayburg and San Andres formations, a light oil, shallow shelf carbonate reservoir that exists throughout the Permian Basin. This cost-shared effort is intended to demonstrate the viability of this underutilized technology in a specific class of domestic reservoir. The selected site for this demonstration project is the Central Vacuum Unit waterflood in Lea County, New Mexico. The goals of the project are the development of guidelines for cost-effective selection of candidate reservoirs and wells, along with estimating recovery potential. This project has two defined budget periods. The first budget period primarily involves tasks associated with reservoir analysis and characterization, characterizing existing producibility problems, and reservoir simulation of the proposed technology. The final budget period covers the actual field demonstration of the proposed technology. Technology transfer spans the entire course of the project. This report covers the concluding tasks performed under the second budget period.

  17. The Central Carbon and Energy Metabolism of Marine Diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Obata, Toshihiro; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano

    2013-01-01

    Diatoms are heterokont algae derived from a secondary symbiotic event in which a eukaryotic host cell acquired an eukaryotic red alga as plastid. The multiple endosymbiosis and horizontal gene transfer processes provide diatoms unusual opportunities for gene mixing to establish distinctive biosynthetic pathways and metabolic control structures. Diatoms are also known to have significant impact on global ecosystems as one of the most dominant phytoplankton species in the contemporary ocean. As such their metabolism and growth regulating factors have been of particular interest for many years. The publication of the genomic sequences of two independent species of diatoms and the advent of an enhanced experimental toolbox for molecular biological investigations have afforded far greater opportunities than were previously apparent for these species and re-invigorated studies regarding the central carbon metabolism of diatoms. In this review we discuss distinctive features of the central carbon metabolism of diatoms and its response to forthcoming environmental changes and recent advances facilitating the possibility of industrial use of diatoms for oil production. Although the operation and importance of several key pathways of diatom metabolism have already been demonstrated and determined, we will also highlight other potentially important pathways wherein this has yet to be achieved. PMID:24957995

  18. Environmental science. Rethinking the marine carbon cycle: factoring in the multifarious lifestyles of microbes.

    PubMed

    Worden, Alexandra Z; Follows, Michael J; Giovannoni, Stephen J; Wilken, Susanne; Zimmerman, Amy E; Keeling, Patrick J

    2015-02-13

    The profound influence of marine plankton on the global carbon cycle has been recognized for decades, particularly for photosynthetic microbes that form the base of ocean food chains. However, a comprehensive model of the carbon cycle is challenged by unicellular eukaryotes (protists) having evolved complex behavioral strategies and organismal interactions that extend far beyond photosynthetic lifestyles. As is also true for multicellular eukaryotes, these strategies and their associated physiological changes are difficult to deduce from genome sequences or gene repertoires—a problem compounded by numerous unknown function proteins. Here, we explore protistan trophic modes in marine food webs and broader biogeochemical influences. We also evaluate approaches that could resolve their activities, link them to biotic and abiotic factors, and integrate them into an ecosystems biology framework.

  19. A cyclic carbonate and related polyketides from a marine-derived fungus of the genus Phoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zimin; Jensen, Paul R; Fenical, William

    2003-09-01

    Two metabolites, phomoxin and phomoxide, as well as the previously synthesized antibiotic eupenoxide, have been isolated from the fermentation broth of a marine-derived fungus of the genus Phoma (strain CNC-651). The new compounds are highly oxygenated polyketides of a new structural class. Phomoxin contains an unusual cyclic carbonate functionality that is rare among natural products. The structures of the new metabolites were assigned by spectroscopic methods that relied heavily on 2D NMR spectroscopic analysis.

  20. Magnetic record of Milankovitch rhythms in lithologically noncyclic marine carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latta, Diana K.; Anastasio, David J.; Hinnov, Linda A.; Elrick, Maya; Kodama, Kenneth P.

    2006-01-01

    Rock magnetic variations record cyclicity within lithologically homogeneous basinal lime mudstones of the Lower Cretaceous San Angel Limestone, northeastern Mexico. Variations in ferromagnetic mineral concentrations, as measured by anhysteretic remanent magnetization (ARM), occur at frequencies consistent with Milankovitch orbital rhythms. Magnetic mineral compositions, grain-size distributions, and grain shapes from digested samples are congruent with far-traveled atmospheric dust. Prevailing winds and the proximity of the Cretaceous basin to an African eolian source support the encoding of orbitally modulated changes in wind intensity or source-area aridity. ARM measurements offer great potential to calibrate the pace of depositional processes in carbonates and to investigate high-frequency orbitally driven climate change in basinal strata throughout geologic time.

  1. Marine microalgae growth and carbon partitioning as a function of nutrient availability.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Tomásia; Fernandes, Igor; Andrade, Carlos A P; Cordeiro, Nereida

    2016-08-01

    To understand in which way the structural differences of three marine microalgae (Nannochloropsis gaditana, Rhodomonas marina and Isochrysis sp.) affect their carbon partitioning, growth and applicability; a stoichiometric imbalance was imposed by steady carbon and other nutrients variation. Towards high nutrients concentrations/low carbon availability a decrease of 12-51% in C/N microalgae ratio was observed and maximum cell densities were achieved. Moreover, linear correlation between the nutrient input and microalgae protein content were observed. The macromolecular ratios pointed that carbohydrate was the main contributor for the C/N decrement. Although lipid content in R. marina remained constant throughout the experiment, a rise of 37-107% in N. gaditana and Isochrysis sp. was verified. Lipid fractions revealed high percentages of glycolipids in all microalgae (57-73% of total lipids). The present study shows an easy way to understand and modulate microalgae carbon partitioning relying on the field of application. PMID:27179298

  2. Bacterioplankton: a sink for carbon in a coastal marine plankton community

    SciTech Connect

    Ducklow, H.W.; Purdie, D.A.; Williams, P.J.LeB.; Davis, J.M.

    1986-05-16

    Recent determinations of high production rates (up to 30% of primary production in surface waters) implicate free-living marine bacterioplankton as a link in a microbial loop that supplements phytoplankton as food for herbivores. An enclosed water column of 300 cubic meters was used to test the microbial loop hypothesis by following the fate of carbon-14-labeled bacterioplankton for over 50 days. Only 2% of the label initially fixed from carbon-14-labeled glucose by bacteria was present in larger organisms after 13 days, at which time about 20% of the total label added remained in the particulate fraction. Most of the label appeared to pass directly from particles smaller than 1 micrometer (heterotrophic bacterioplankton and some bacteriovores) to respired labeled carbon dioxide or to regenerated dissolved organic carbon-14. Secondary (and, by implication, primary) production by organisms smaller than 1 micrometer may not be an important food source in marine food chains. Bacterioplankton can be a sink for carbon in planktonic food webs and may serve principally as agents of nutrient regeneration rather than as food.

  3. Carbon source utilization by the marine Dendryphiella species D. arenaria and D. salina.

    PubMed

    dela Cruz, Thomas Edison E; Schulz, Barbara E; Kubicek, Christian P; Druzhinina, Irina S

    2006-12-01

    Carbon utilization by the marine Dendryphiella species, D. arenaria and D. salina, was investigated to detect differences in utilization and traits associated with their adaptation to the marine habitat. Fifty-four strains were isolated world-wide and tested for the utilization of various carbon sources using BIOLOG phenotype MicroArray (PM) and for the production of extracellular enzymes on solid culture media and on API ZYM assay strips. PM analysis showed that the fastest growth occurred on several monosaccharides and amino acids, 2-keto-d-gluconic acid, succinamide and turanose. Some polyols were poor carbon sources. However, the two species differed in their utilization rates of carbon sources, forming three major clusters: two separate clusters for D. arenaria and D. salina and a third cluster in which strains of the two species formed separate subclades that correlated with geographic origin. Several carbon sources were also found useful in differentiating the two speices. Dendryphiella salina did not utilize xylitol and quinic acid, whereas D. arenaria grew well on these substrates. The latter failed to grow on sorbitol and grew slowly on mannitol, both were good substrates for the former. There were also no qualitative differences between the extracellular enzymes produced, although laccase and peroxidase activities were confined only to some strains. The physiological similarities exhibited by the two species support the close relationship between D. arenaria and D. salina.

  4. Marine biological controls on climate via the carbon and sulphur geochemical cycles

    PubMed Central

    Watson, A. J.

    1998-01-01

    We review aspects of the influence of the marine biota on climate, focusing particularly on their role in mediating surface temperatures via their influence on atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and dimethyl sulphide (DMS) concentrations. Variation in natural CO2 concentrations occurring over 103 to 105 years are set by oceanic processes, and in particular by conditions in the Southern Ocean, so it is to this region that we must look to understand the glacial-interglacial changes in CO2 concentrations. It seems likely that marine productivity in the Southern Ocean is limited by a combination of restricted iron supply to the region and insufficient light. Plankton-produced DMS is thought to influence climate by changing the numbers of cloud condensation nuclei available in remote regions; the efficiency of this mechanism is still unknown, but calculations suggest it may be a powerful influence on climate. It has a much shorter time-scale than the CO2 effect, and as a consequence may well be a player on the 'global change' timescale. The direction of both the CO2 and the DMS mechanisms is such that more marine productivity would lead to lower global temperatures, and we speculate that the overall effect of the marine biota today is to cool the planet by ca. 6°C as a result of these two mechanisms, with one-third of this figure being due to CO2 effects and two-thirds due to DMS. While the marine biota influence climate, climate also influences the marine biota, chiefly via changing atmospheric circulation. This in turn alters ocean circulation patterns, responsible for mixing up sub-surface nutrients, and also influences the transport of nutrients, such as iron, in atmospheric dust. A more vigorous atmospheric circulation would be expected to increase the productivity of the marine biota on both counts. Thus during glacial time, the colder and drier climate might be expected to stimulate greater marine productivity than occurs today. Since more production leads to

  5. Biogeochemical Hotspots in Shallow to Bedrock Zones: Sources of Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) in the Appalachian Mountain Region of the Eastern USA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corcoran, K.; Gannon, J. P.; Bailey, S. W.; McGuire, K. J.; Green, M.

    2015-12-01

    Sources of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to headwater streams are important in understanding carbon delivery and metal mobilization to downstream ecosystems. We investigated DOC sources in shallow soils on top of bedrock near the catchment divide to assess the hypothesis that organic matter in this portion of the catchment is a significant contributor of DOC to streamwater. In order to examine this hypothesis in the Appalachian mountain region of the eastern USA, we instrumented catchments at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF), NH, Upper Long Branch Experimental Watershed (UPL), NC and Panthertown Valley (PV), NC. Soils in the HBEF developed in glacial till while the soils in ULB and PV developed in unglaciated residuum. No-tension lysimeters were installed under the base layer of organic horizons in both shallow organic soils and the deeper mineral soils found downslope. Throughfall collectors were installed near sample sites to understand the differences of DOC concentration in coniferous and hardwood forests and inputs into the soil. DOC concentrations were compared to organic horizon thickness and flow regime to determine relationships controlling DOC sources. Shallow soils on top of bedrock had the highest DOC concentrations in the catchment in contrast to throughfall and streamwater chemistry. As shallow soils on bedrock are shown to be hotspots for DOC, future work should focus on the mobilization of metals in these zones due to complexation with organic compounds.

  6. Accumulation and preservation of organic carbon in marine sediments: The roles of anoxia vs. production

    SciTech Connect

    Calvert, S.E.; Pedersen, T.F. )

    1990-05-01

    Organic carbon enrichments in marine sediments and sedimentary rocks commonly are explained by the preferential preservation of the deposited organic matter under anoxic conditions; the role of primary organic (plankton) production is seldom considered. A review of the available information shows that modern marine sediment accumulating in oxic and anoxic basins in similar topographic and sedimentary settings have very similar carbon contents. On continental slopes, carbon maxima are apparently produced by the complex interplay between the supply of carbon to the sea floor, the texture of the sediment, the dilution of carbon by other sediment components, and the decreasing settling flux of carbon in the deeper waters of the open ocean. Contrary to contemporary thought, there is no causal relationship between such maxima and the position of the oxygen minimum. The degradation of sedimentary organic matter by aerobes and by sulfate reducers is very similar where the supply of fresh organic matter to the sea floor is similar. Hence, there is no evidence for the preferential preservation of organic matter under anoxic conditions. Terrestrial organic matter, however, appears to be degraded to a lesser extent by sulfate reducers. The burial of carbon below the surficial, oxygenated horizons of a sediment removes the easily oxidized fractions leaving material that may be less susceptible to attack by sulfate reducers. Sedimentary carbon maxima in Pleistocene glacial horizons are due to the increased settling flux of organic matter brought about by climatically induced increases in upwelling in the equatorial and marginal areas of the ocean. Changes in bottom water oxygen levels during these periods plays a minor role in producing these signals. Previous work that claimed that anoxic bottom waters were prevalent during the accumulation of organic-rich black shales in the geological record should be reevaluated.

  7. Hydrous carbonates on Mars?: evidence from Mariner 6/7 infrared spectrometer and ground-based telescopic spectra

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calvin, W.M.; King, T.V.V.; Clark, R.N.

    1994-01-01

    Absorption features at 2.28 and 5.4 ??m identified in Mariner 6/7 infrared spectrometer and terrestrial telescopic spectra are consistent with the spectra of hydrous magnesium carbonates such as hydromagnesite and artinite. Spectral characteristics of these hydrous carbonates are different from those of the anhydrous carbonates, as the former do not have the strong spectral features typically associated with anhydrous carbonates such as calcite and siderite. Although the spectroscopic evidence for anhydrous carbonates is scant, the possible presence of hydrous carbonates provides an appealing mechanism for the existence of carbonates on Mars. -from Authors

  8. Potential of Conodont (U-Th)/He Thermochronometry to Resolve Shallow Crustal Thermal Histories in Carbonates and Shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landman, R.; Flowers, R. M.; Rosenau, N. A.

    2014-12-01

    Acquisition of thermochronology data in carbonates and shales has traditionally been elusive owing to the absence of dateable minerals of suitable size for analysis. Development of such a thermochronometer is highly attractive owing to the widespread occurrence of these lithologies - including in large sections of sedimentary basins where thermal histories are relevant for hydrocarbon exploration - as well as the possibility of coupling this tool with other geochemical proxies in these units. Conodont (U-Th)/He thermochonometry has the potential to fill this niche. Conodonts are toothlike bioapatite structures common in Paleozoic through early Mesozoic marine carbonates and shales. They are well-known to the petroleum industry through use of their color alteration index (CAI) as a semi-quantitative indicator of peak temperature. Moreover, the only published conodont He study showed intriguing promise (Peppe and Reiners, 2007). Here we present a conodont (U-Th)/He thermochronology dataset from the Illinois Basin that displays both the potential of this tool and the outstanding questions that remain in its development. We acquired conodont He data for 7 drillcore samples of Pennsylvanian marine black shale and limestone. The conodonts have CAI values of 1-1.5, indicating maximum burial temperatures of ≤ 90 °C. First, the conodonts yield He dates substantially younger than their depositional age, indicating that the ≤ 90 °C temperatures were sufficient to cause He loss, and therefore implying that the conodont He closure temperature is no higher than the conventional apatite He system (70-80 °C). This result is compatible with conodont laboratory diffusion experiments. Second, most of our conodont dates are < 90 Ma, consistent with regional apatite He data for basement drillcore samples and suggesting that the conodonts and apatites record similar thermal histories. Finally, several samples contain dates that range from 100 to 250 Ma. The least reproducible

  9. CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff process in a light oil shallow shelf carbonate reservoir. Quarterly technical progress report, July--September, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, R.; Prieditis, J.; Vogt, J. Wehner, S.

    1995-10-15

    The principal objective of the Central Vacuum Unit (CVU) CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff (H-n-P) project is to determine the feasibility and practicality of the technology in a waterflooded shallow shelf carbonate environment. The results of parametric simulation of the CO{sub 2} H-n-P process, coupled with the CVU reservoir characterization components will determine if this process is technically and economically feasible for field implementation. The technology transfer objective of the project is to disseminate the knowledge gained through an innovative plan in support of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) objective of increasing domestic oil production and deferring the abandonment of shallow shelf carbonate (SSC) reservoirs. Tasks associated with this objective are carried out in what is considered a timely effort for near-term goals.

  10. CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff process in a light oil shallow shelf carbonate reservoir. Topical report No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, R.; Prieditis, J.; Vogt, J.; Wehner, S.

    1995-10-01

    The principle objective of the Central Vacuum Unit (CVU) CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff (H-n-P) project is to determine the feasibility and practicality of the technology in a waterflooded shallow shelf carbonate environment. The results of parametric simulation of the CO{sub 2} H-n-P process coupled with the CVU reservoir characterization components will determine if this process is technically and economic for field implementation. The ultimate goal will be to develop guidelines based on commonly available data that other operators in the industry can use to investigate the applicability of the process within other field. The technology transfer objective of the project is to disseminate the knowledge gained through an innovative plan in support of the Department of Energy`s objective to increasing domestic oil production and deferring the abandonment of shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs. Accomplishments to date are described in this report.

  11. Interactions of the marine phosphorus and carbon cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froelich, P. N.

    1984-01-01

    About 30 to 50% of the fluvial P-input to the oceans derives from release of reactive-P from particles during their passage through estuaries. The input is matched by P-removal into three approximately equivalent sink: (1) burial in phosphorites on productive shelves; (2) burial with (org) in the deep-sea; and (3) burial with biogenic calcite in the deep-sea. The P/C burial ratio in these three phases is very different: P/C (org) approximately .004; P/C (CaCO3) approximately .001; and P/C (PHOS) approximately .03. The removal mechanisms are all coupled to primary production in the surface ocean, but the details of the feedback mechanisms controlling the steady-state nutrient and carbon budgets in the sea are doscured by lack of knowledge of how the P/C ratios in the sinks adjust, and how shifts in oceanic nutrients affect oceanic ecology and the relative fraction of biogenic CaCO3 and (org) production.

  12. Evaluating the Influence of Pore Architecture and Initial Saturation on Wettability and Relative Permeability in Heterogeneous, Shallow-Shelf Carbonates

    SciTech Connect

    Byrnes, Alan P.; Bhattacharya, Saibal; Victorine, John; Stalder, Ken

    2007-09-30

    carbonate reservoirs of widely varying moldic pore systems that represent the major of reservoirs in Kansas and are important nationally and worldwide. A goal of the project is to measure wettability, using representative oils from Kansas fields, on a wide range of moldic-porosity lithofacies that are representative of Kansas and midcontinent shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs. This investigation will discern the relative influence of wetting and pore architecture. In the midcontinent, reservoir water saturations are frequently greater than 'irreducible' because many reservoirs are largely in the capillary transition zone. This can change the imbibition oil-water relative permeability relations. Ignoring wettability and transition-zone relative permeabilities in reservoir modeling can lead to over- and under-prediction of oil recovery and recovery rates, and less effective improved recovery management. A goal of this project is to measure drainage and imbibition oil-water relative permeabilities for a large representative range of lithofacies at differ ent initial water saturations to obtain relations that can be applied everywhere in the reservoir. The practical importance of these relative permeability and wettability models will be demonstrated by using reservoir simulation studies on theoretical/generic and actual reservoir architectures. The project further seeks to evaluate how input of these new models affects reservoir simulation results at varying scales. A principal goal is to obtain data that will allow us to create models that will show how to accurately simulate flow in the shallow-structure, complex carbonate reservoirs that lie in the transition zone. Tasks involved to meet the project objectives include collection and consolidation of available data into a publicly accessible relational digital database and collection of oil and rock samples from carbonate fields around the state (Task 1). Basic properties of these rocks and oils will be measured and used in

  13. Application of Reservoir Characterization and Advanced Technology to Improve Recovery and Economics in a Lower Quality Shallow Shelf Carbonate Reservoir, Class II

    SciTech Connect

    Hickman, T. Scott; Justice, James J.; Egg, Rebecca

    2001-08-07

    The Oxy operated Class 2 Project at West Welch Project is designed to demonstrate how the use of advanced technology can improve the economics of miscible CO2 injection projects in lower quality Shallow Shelf Carbonate reservoirs. The research and design phase (Budget Period 1) primarily involved advanced reservoir demonstration characterization. The current demonstration phase (Budget Period 2) is the implementation of the reservoir management plan for an optimum miscible CO2 flood design based on the reservoir characterization.

  14. Taxon-specific response of marine nitrogen fixers to elevated carbon dioxide concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchins, David A.; Fu, Fei-Xue; Webb, Eric A.; Walworth, Nathan; Tagliabue, Alessandro

    2013-09-01

    Much of the bioavailable nitrogen that supports open ocean food webs and biogeochemical cycles is fixed from the atmosphere by marine cyanobacteria of the genera Trichodesmium and Crocosphaera. In previous experiments carried out with a limited set of cyanobacterial isolates, rates of cyanobacterial nitrogen fixation were shown to increase with carbon dioxide concentrations. Here, we report results from a series of laboratory experiments in which we grew seven strains of Trichodesmium and Crocosphaera from the Atlantic and Pacific oceans under a wide range of carbon dioxide concentrations, and monitored rates of nitrogen fixation and growth. We document large, strain-specific differences in the relationship between nitrogen fixation and carbon dioxide concentration, suggesting that individual strains within each genus are adapted to grow and fix nitrogen at different concentrations of carbon dioxide. We apply kinetic constants from the individual carbon dioxide response curves to an illustrative biogeochemical model of the ocean in 2100, which suggests that strains adapted to high carbon dioxide concentrations could potentially be favoured in a future acidified ocean. We suggest that surface ocean carbon dioxide concentrations could constitute a previously unrecognized selective force that shapes the community composition and diversity of nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria.

  15. Application of Reservoir Characterization and Advanced Technology to Improve Recovery and Economics in a Lower Quality Shallow Shelf Carbonate Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Rebecca Egg

    2002-09-30

    The OXY-operated Class 2 Project at West Welch is designed to demonstrate how the use of advanced technology can improve the economics of miscible CO{sub 2} injection projects in lower quality Shallow Shelf Carbonate reservoirs. The research and design phase (Budget Period 1) primarily involved advanced reservoir characterization. The current demonstration phase (Budget Period 2) is the implementation of the reservoir management plan for an optimum miscible CO{sub 2} flood design based on the reservoir characterization. Although Budget Period 1 for the Project officially ended 12/31/96, reservoir characterization and simulation work continued during the Budget Period 2. During the fifth and sixth annual reporting periods (8/3/98-8/2/00) covered by this report, work continued on interpretation of the cross well seismic data to create porosity and permeability profiles which were distributed into the reservoir geostatistically. The initial interwell seismic CO{sub 2} monitor survey was conducted, the acquired data processed and interpretation started. Only limited well work and facility construction was conducted in the project area. The CO{sub 2} injection initiated in October 1997 was continued, although the operator had to modify the operating plan in response to low injection rates, well performance and changes in CO{sub 2} supply. CO{sub 2} injection was focused in a smaller area to increase the reservoir processing rate. By the end of the reporting period three producers had shown sustained oil rate increases and ten wells had experienced gas (CO{sub 2}) breakthrough.

  16. CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff process in a light oil shallow shelf carbonate reservoir. 1994 Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Wehner, S.C.

    1995-05-01

    It is anticipated that this project will show that the application of the CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff process in shallow shelf carbonates can be economically implemented to recover appreciable volumes of light oil. The goals of the project are the development of guidelines for cost-effective selection of candidate reservoirs and wells, along with estimating recovery potential. The selected site for the demonstration project is the Central Vacuum Unit waterflood in Lea County, New Mexico. Work is nearing completion on the reservoir characterization components of the project. The near-term emphasis is to, (1) provide an accurate distribution of original oil-in-place on a waterflood pattern entity level, (2) evaluate past recovery efficiencies, (3) perform parametric simulations, and (4) forecast performance for a site specific field demonstration of the proposed technology. Macro zonation now exists throughout the study area and cross-sections are available. The Oil-Water Contact has been defined. Laboratory capillary pressure data was used to define the initial water saturations within the pay horizon. The reservoir`s porosity distribution has been enhanced with the assistance of geostatistical software. Three-Dimensional kriging created the spatial distributions of porosity at interwell locations. Artificial intelligence software was utilized to relate core permeability to core porosity, which in turn was applied to the 3-D geostatistical porosity gridding. An Equation-of-State has been developed and refined for upcoming compositional simulation exercises. Options for local grid-refinement in the model are under consideration. These tasks will be completed by mid-1995, prior to initiating the field demonstrations in the second budget period.

  17. INFLUENCE OF SOOT CARBON ON THE BIOACCULUMATION OF SEDIMENT-BOUND POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS BY MARINE BENTHIC INVERTEBRATES: AN INTERSPECIES COMPARISON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to soot carbon in marine sediments has been hypothesized to reduce PAH bioavailability. This hypothesis was tested for eight species of marine benthic invertebrates (four polychaete worms, Clymenella torquata, Nereis virens,...

  18. Titration of the Earth: Ocean-Atmosphere Evolution Recorded in Marine Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kah, L. C.

    2012-12-01

    The enzymatic production of carbonate biominerals marks a clear association between biological processes and carbonate mineral formation. Prior to the evolution of skeletonizing metazoans, however, biotic activity played a less critical role in the morphological development of carbonate minerals. Instead, carbonate mineral morphology was more strongly affected by abiotic parameters that affect carbonate nucleation and growth. The texture of non-enzymatically controlled carbonate precipitation in the Precambrian may therefore provide us with an additional window through which to observe fundamental changes in the chemical evolution of the global ocean. The Precambrian ocean experienced a progressive evolution from CO2-rich and O2-poor, to CO2-poor and O2-rich. Changes in CO2-availability fundamentally affect marine carbonate saturation state, which is reflected primarily in the rate of crystal growth. By contrast, redox evolution appears to have played a fundamental role in regulating carbonate precipitation via the differential inhibition of mineral nucleation. Carbonate mineral textures that indicate differential nucleation and growth can be traced both spatially and temporally in the Precambrian sedimentary record. Textures that are dominated by high rates of growth relative to nucleation are common in Archean, and become progressively restricted in their distribution by the latter Proterozoic. Spatial restriction, particularly of fabrics associated with redox-controlled nucleation, suggesting the development of chemically discrete oceanic environments. Such observations are consistent with recent models of suggesting that ocean oxygenation occurred in a top-down fashion, with well-oxygenated surface waters underlain by either anoxic deep-waters or oxygen-depleted substrate pore-waters. Deciphering relationships among these environments permits attribution of carbonate fabrics to specific geochemical conditions within the water column and provides critical

  19. Nonlinear Interactions between Climate and Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Drivers of Terrestrial and Marine Carbon Cycle Changes from 1850 to 2300

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, F. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Moore, J. K.; Goulden, M.; Lindsay, K. T.; Munoz, E.; Fu, W.; Swann, A. L. S.; Koven, C. D.; Mahowald, N. M.; Bonan, G. B.

    2015-12-01

    Quantifying feedbacks between the global carbon cycle and Earth's climate system is important for predicting future atmospheric CO2 levels and informing carbon management and energy policies. We applied a feedback analysis framework to three sets of Historical (1850-2005), Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5 (2006-2100), and its extension (2101-2300) simulations from the Community Earth System Model version 1.0 (CESM1(BGC)) to quantify drivers of terrestrial and ocean responses of carbon uptake. In the biogeochemically coupled simulation (BGC), the effects of CO2 fertilization and nitrogen deposition influenced marine and terrestrial carbon cycling. In the radiatively coupled simulation (RAD), the effects of rising temperature and circulation changes due to radiative forcing from CO2, other greenhouse gases, and aerosols were the sole drivers of carbon cycle changes. In the third, fully coupled simulation (FC), both the biogeochemical and radiative coupling effects acted simultaneously. We found that climate-carbon sensitivities derived from RAD simulations produced a net ocean carbon storage climate sensitivity that was weaker and a net land carbon storage climate sensitivity that was stronger than those diagnosed from the FC and BGC simulations. For the ocean, this nonlinearity was associated with warming-induced weakening of ocean circulation and mixing that limited exchange of dissolved inorganic carbon between surface and deeper water masses. For the land, this nonlinearity was associated with strong gains in gross primary production in the FC simulation, driven by enhancements in the hydrological cycle and increased nutrient availability. We developed and applied a nonlinearity metric to rank model responses and driver variables. The climate-carbon cycle feedback gain at 2300 was 42% higher when estimated from climate-carbon sensitivities derived from the difference between FC and BGC than when derived from RAD. These differences are important to

  20. Phytoplankton lysis predicts dissolved organic carbon release in marine plankton communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agustí, S.; Duarte, C. M.

    2013-03-01

    The relationship between the percent extracellular carbon release (PER) and the specific lysis rates of phytoplankton was examined across a range of communities spanning from highly oligotrophic ones in the subtropical Atlantic Ocean to productive ones in the N. African upwelling and the Southern Ocean. Communities in oligotrophic waters supported high phytoplankton cell lysis rates and low particulate primary production rates but high dissolved primary production and PER. The percent extracellular carbon released increased with increasing lysis rates to reach an asymptote at about 80% PER with specific lysis rates > 1.5 d-1, observed in the most oligotrophic conditions tested. These results confirm that high phytoplankton mortality in the oligotrophic ocean leads to high PER, accounting for the large fraction of the photosynthetic carbon channelled through bacteria characteristic of oligotrophic marine communities.

  1. Natural abundances of carbon isotopes in acetate from a coastal marine sediment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, N. E.; Martens, C. S.; Des Marais, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of the natural abundances of carbon isotopes were made in acetate samples isolated from the anoxic marine sediment of Cape Lookout Bight, North Carolina. The typical value of the total acetate carbon isotope ratio (delta 13C) was -16.1 +/- 0.2 per mil. The methyl and carboxyl groups were determined to be -26.4 +/- 0.3 and -6.0 +/- 0.3 per mil, respectively, for one sample. The isotopic composition of the acetate is thought to have resulted from isotopic discriminations that occurred during the cycling of that molecule. Measurements of this type, which have not been made previously in the natural environment, may provide information about the dominant microbial pathways in anoxic sediments as well as the processes that influence the carbon isotopic composition of biogenic methane from many sources.

  2. Size-resolved parameterization of primary organic carbon in fresh marine aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Michael S; Keene, William C; Erickson III, David J

    2009-12-01

    Marine aerosols produced by the bursting of artificially generated bubbles in natural seawater are highly enriched (2 to 3 orders of magnitude based on bulk composition) in marine-derived organic carbon (OC). Production of size-resolved particulate OC was parameterized based on a Langmuir kinetics-type association of OC to bubble plumes in seawater and resulting aerosol as constrained by measurements of aerosol produced from highly productive and oligotrophic seawater. This novel approach is the first to account for the influence of adsorption on the size-resolved association between marine aerosols and OC. Production fluxes were simulated globally with an eight aerosol-size-bin version of the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM v3.5.07). Simulated number and inorganic sea-salt mass production fell within the range of published estimates based on observationally constrained parameterizations. Because the parameterization does not consider contributions from spume drops, the simulated global mass flux (1.5 x 10{sup 3} Tg y{sup -1}) is near the lower limit of published estimates. The simulated production of aerosol number (2.1 x 10{sup 6} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}) and OC (49 Tg C y{sup -1}) fall near the upper limits of published estimates and suggest that primary marine aerosols may have greater influences on the physiochemical evolution of the troposphere, radiative transfer and climate, and associated feedbacks on the surface ocean than suggested by previous model studies.

  3. Lab-Scale Study of the Calcium Carbonate Dissolution and Deposition by Marine Cyanobacterium Phormidium subcapitatum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karakis, S. G.; Dragoeva, E. G.; Lavrenyuk, T. I.; Rogochiy, A.; Gerasimenko, L. M.; McKay, D. S.; Brown, I. I.

    2006-01-01

    Suggestions that calcification in marine organisms changes in response to global variations in seawater chemistry continue to be advanced (Wilkinson, 1979; Degens et al. 1985; Kazmierczak et al. 1986; R. Riding 1992). However, the effect of [Na+] on calcification in marine cyanobacteria has not been discussed in detail although [Na+] fluctuations reflect both temperature and sea-level fluctuations. The goal of these lab-scale studies therefore was to study the effect of environmental pH and [Na+] on CaCO3 deposition and dissolution by marine cyanobacterium Phormidium subcapitatum. Marine cyanobacterium P. subcapitatum has been cultivated in ASN-III medium. [Ca2+] fluctuations were monitored with Ca(2+) probe. Na(+) concentrations were determined by the initial solution chemistry. It was found that the balance between CaCO3 dissolution and precipitation induced by P. subcapitatum grown in neutral ASN III medium is very close to zero. No CaCO3 precipitation induced by cyanobacterial growth occurred. Growth of P. subcapitatum in alkaline ASN III medium, however, was accompanied by significant oscillations in free Ca(2+) concentration within a Na(+) concentration range of 50-400 mM. Calcium carbonate precipitation occurred during the log phase of P. subcapitatum growth while carbonate dissolution was typical for the stationary phase of P. subcapitatum growth. The highest CaCO3 deposition was observed in the range of Na(+) concentrations between 200-400 mM. Alkaline pH also induced the clamping of P. subcapitatum filaments, which appeared to have a strong affinity to envelop particles of chemically deposited CaCO3 followed by enlargement of those particles size. EDS analysis revealed the presence of Mg-rich carbonate (or magnesium calcite) in the solution containing 10-100 mM Na(+); calcite in the solution containing 200 mM Na(+); and aragonite in the solution containing with 400 mM Na(+). Typical present-day seawater contains xxmM Na(+). Early (Archean) seawater was

  4. Clay mineral continental amplifier for marine carbon sequestration in a greenhouse ocean.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Martin J; Wagner, Thomas

    2011-06-14

    The majority of carbon sequestration at the Earth's surface occurs in marine continental margin settings within fine-grained sediments whose mineral properties are a function of continental climatic conditions. We report very high mineral surface area (MSA) values of 300 and 570 m(2) g in Late Cretaceous black shales from Ocean Drilling Program site 959 of the Deep Ivorian Basin that vary on subcentennial time scales corresponding with abrupt increases from approximately 3 to approximately 18% total organic carbon (TOC). The observed MSA changes with TOC across multiple scales of variability and on a sample-by-sample basis (centimeter scale), provides a rigorous test of a hypothesized influence on organic carbon burial by detrital clay mineral controlled MSA. Changes in TOC also correspond with geochemical and sedimentological evidence for water column anoxia. Bioturbated intervals show a lower organic carbon loading on mineral surface area of 0.1 mg-OC m(-2) when compared to 0.4 mg-OC m(-2) for laminated and sulfidic sediments. Although either anoxia or mineral surface protection may be capable of producing TOC of < 5%, when brought together they produced the very high TOC (10-18%) apparent in these sediments. This nonlinear response in carbon burial resulted from minor precession-driven changes of continental climate influencing clay mineral properties and runoff from the African continent. This study identifies a previously unrecognized land-sea connection among continental weathering, clay mineral production, and anoxia and a nonlinear effect on marine carbon sequestration during the Coniacian-Santonian Oceanic Anoxic Event 3 in the tropical eastern Atlantic.

  5. Clay mineral continental amplifier for marine carbon sequestration in a greenhouse ocean

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Martin J.; Wagner, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The majority of carbon sequestration at the Earth’s surface occurs in marine continental margin settings within fine-grained sediments whose mineral properties are a function of continental climatic conditions. We report very high mineral surface area (MSA) values of 300 and 570 m2 g in Late Cretaceous black shales from Ocean Drilling Program site 959 of the Deep Ivorian Basin that vary on subcentennial time scales corresponding with abrupt increases from approximately 3 to approximately 18% total organic carbon (TOC). The observed MSA changes with TOC across multiple scales of variability and on a sample-by-sample basis (centimeter scale), provides a rigorous test of a hypothesized influence on organic carbon burial by detrital clay mineral controlled MSA. Changes in TOC also correspond with geochemical and sedimentological evidence for water column anoxia. Bioturbated intervals show a lower organic carbon loading on mineral surface area of 0.1 mg-OC m-2 when compared to 0.4 mg-OC m-2 for laminated and sulfidic sediments. Although either anoxia or mineral surface protection may be capable of producing TOC of < 5%, when brought together they produced the very high TOC (10–18%) apparent in these sediments. This nonlinear response in carbon burial resulted from minor precession-driven changes of continental climate influencing clay mineral properties and runoff from the African continent. This study identifies a previously unrecognized land–sea connection among continental weathering, clay mineral production, and anoxia and a nonlinear effect on marine carbon sequestration during the Coniacian-Santonian Oceanic Anoxic Event 3 in the tropical eastern Atlantic. PMID:21576498

  6. Non-marine carbonate facies, facies models and palaeogeographies of the Purbeck Formation (Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous) of Dorset (Southern England).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallois, Arnaud; Bosence, Dan; Burgess, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Non-marine carbonates are relatively poorly understood compared with their more abundant marine counterparts. Sedimentary facies and basin architecture are controlled by a range of environmental parameters such as climate, hydrology and tectonic setting but facies models are few and limited in their predictive value. Following the discovery of extensive Early Cretaceous, non-marine carbonate hydrocarbon reservoirs in the South Atlantic, the interest of understanding such complex deposits has increased during recent years. This study is developing a new depositional model for non-marine carbonates in a semi-arid climate setting in an extensional basin; the Purbeck Formation (Upper Jurassic - Lower Cretaceous) in Dorset (Southern England). Outcrop study coupled with subsurface data analysis and petrographic study (sedimentology and early diagenesis) aims to constrain and improve published models of depositional settings. Facies models for brackish water and hypersaline water conditions of these lacustrine to palustrine carbonates deposited in the syn-rift phase of the Wessex Basin will be presented. Particular attention focusses on the factors that control the accumulation of in-situ microbialite mounds that occur within bedded inter-mound packstones-grainstones in the lower Purbeck. The microbialite mounds are located in three units (locally known as the Skull Cap, the Hard Cap and the Soft Cap) separated by three fossil soils (locally known as the Basal, the Lower and the Great Dirt Beds) respectively within three shallowing upward lacustrine sequences. These complex microbialite mounds (up to 4m high), are composed of tabular small-scale mounds (flat and long, up to 50cm high) divided into four subfacies. Many of these small-scale mounds developed around trees and branches which are preserved as moulds (or silicified wood) which are surrounded by a burrowed mudstone-wackestone collar. Subsequently a thrombolite framework developed on the upper part only within

  7. Marine Group II Archaea, potentially important players in the global ocean carbon cycle

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chuanlun L.; Xie, Wei; Martin-Cuadrado, Ana-Belen; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Marine Group (MG) I (currently known as Thaumarchaeota) and MG II Archaea were first reported over two decades ago. While significant progress has been made on MG I microbiology and ecology, the progress on MG II has been noticeably slower. The common understanding is that while MG I mainly function as chemolithoautotrophs and occur predominantly in the deep ocean, MG II reside mostly in the photic zone and live heterotrophically. Studies to date have shown that MG II are abundant in the marine aquatic environment and display great seasonal and spatial variation and phylogenetic diversity. They also show unique patterns of organic carbon degradation and their energy requirements may be augmented by light in the photic zone. However, no pure culture of MG II has been obtained and thus their precise ecological role remains elusive. PMID:26528260

  8. Marine mixotrophy increases trophic transfer efficiency, mean organism size, and vertical carbon flux

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Ben A.; Follows, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Mixotrophic plankton, which combine the uptake of inorganic resources and the ingestion of living prey, are ubiquitous in marine ecosystems, but their integrated biogeochemical impacts remain unclear. We address this issue by removing the strict distinction between phytoplankton and zooplankton from a global model of the marine plankton food web. This simplification allows the emergence of a realistic trophic network with increased fidelity to empirical estimates of plankton community structure and elemental stoichiometry, relative to a system in which autotrophy and heterotrophy are mutually exclusive. Mixotrophy enhances the transfer of biomass to larger sizes classes further up the food chain, leading to an approximately threefold increase in global mean organism size and an ∼35% increase in sinking carbon flux. PMID:26831076

  9. Marine mixotrophy increases trophic transfer efficiency, mean organism size, and vertical carbon flux.

    PubMed

    Ward, Ben A; Follows, Michael J

    2016-03-15

    Mixotrophic plankton, which combine the uptake of inorganic resources and the ingestion of living prey, are ubiquitous in marine ecosystems, but their integrated biogeochemical impacts remain unclear. We address this issue by removing the strict distinction between phytoplankton and zooplankton from a global model of the marine plankton food web. This simplification allows the emergence of a realistic trophic network with increased fidelity to empirical estimates of plankton community structure and elemental stoichiometry, relative to a system in which autotrophy and heterotrophy are mutually exclusive. Mixotrophy enhances the transfer of biomass to larger sizes classes further up the food chain, leading to an approximately threefold increase in global mean organism size and an ∼35% increase in sinking carbon flux. PMID:26831076

  10. Marine Group II Archaea, potentially important players in the global ocean carbon cycle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuanlun L; Xie, Wei; Martin-Cuadrado, Ana-Belen; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Marine Group (MG) I (currently known as Thaumarchaeota) and MG II Archaea were first reported over two decades ago. While significant progress has been made on MG I microbiology and ecology, the progress on MG II has been noticeably slower. The common understanding is that while MG I mainly function as chemolithoautotrophs and occur predominantly in the deep ocean, MG II reside mostly in the photic zone and live heterotrophically. Studies to date have shown that MG II are abundant in the marine aquatic environment and display great seasonal and spatial variation and phylogenetic diversity. They also show unique patterns of organic carbon degradation and their energy requirements may be augmented by light in the photic zone. However, no pure culture of MG II has been obtained and thus their precise ecological role remains elusive.

  11. Meteoric-like fabrics forming in marine waters. Implications for the use of petrography to identify diagenetic environments

    SciTech Connect

    Melim, L.A.; Swart, P.K.; Maliva, R.G.

    1995-08-01

    Petrographic fabrics have long been used to identify meteoric diagnesis of carbonate sediments. However, on the basis of oxygen isotopic data, we document similar fabrics forming in marine pore fluids in the shallow subsurface of Great Bahama Bank. Therefore, petrographic fabrics alone are not reliable indicators of diagenetic environments, even for shallow-water sediments. In our study, skeletal grainstones show two distinct diagenetic assemblages: either dissolution of aragonitic grains and minimal cementation (high-permeability intervals) or abundant blocky spar cement and neomorphism of aragonitic skeletal grains (low-permeability intervals). These marine-burial fabrics are present as shallow as 110 m below sea level, well above the aragonite compensation depth, a feature that must be considered for models of diagenesis in ancient carbonate sediments. Marine-burial diagenesis may be important in ancient carbonate sediments deposited in moderate water depths or in shallow water during rising sea level where meteoric diagenesis is suppressed. 17 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Marine vertebrates from the Santonian coastal carbonates of northwestern Germany - a tool for the reconstruction of a Proto- North Sea Basin intertidal dinosaur-exchange bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diedrich, Cajus G.; Scheer, Udo

    2015-09-01

    A diverse vertebrate fauna, dominated by shark teeth, is recorded from conglomerates within the limestones of the Upper Cretaceous (Santonian) Burgsteinfurt Formation of northwestern Germany. The conglomerate beds comprise carbonatic, glauconitic and phosphate nodules, as well as Triassic, Jurassic and Cretaceous extraclasts. The Burgsteinfurt Formation conglomerates contain fining-upwards parasequences 2-20 cm in thickness, interpreted as tempestite layers within a unit formed by larger-scale Milankovitch Cycles. The presence of the inoceramid Sphenoceramus patootensis and belemnite Gonioteuthis granulata indicate a late Santonian age for the unit. The studied vertebrate fauna from the Weiner Esch locality consists of 20 selachian species (14 macroselachians and 6 microselachians), a few teleosts, rare marine mosasaur remains, and one tooth from a theropod dinosaur. 95% of the vertebrates in the assemblage are depositionally autochthonous, with the remaining material reworked from older underlying Cenomanian-Coniacian (lower Upper Cretaceous) limestones. On the basis of observed sedimentary structures, the scarcity of deep-sea selachians, and the dominance of the Mitsukurinidae (59% of the preserved shark fauna) in the fossil assemblage, the unit is interpreted as a shallow (0-3 metres deep), subtidal, nearshore environment, or even subaerial carbonate-sand islands, located on the southern margin of a submarine swell. The presence of a Santonian theropod in this deposit, and other dinosaur records in northern Germany, together support the interpretation of a short-lived uplift event with strong upwelling influence for the Northwestphalian-Lippe submarine swell north of the Rhenish Massif in the southern Proto- North Sea Basin. A new migration model for dinosaurs moving along carbonate coasts or intertidal zones of shallow carbonate-sand islands in Central Europe is presented, which may explain the scattered distribution of dinosaur remains across Europe in the

  13. Radiocarbon ages of sedimentary lipids as tracers of organic carbon input to marine sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Eglinton, T.I.; Nelson, B.; McNichol, A.P.

    1996-10-01

    A novel analytical approach, Preparative Capillary Gas Chromatography (PCGC), has been used to isolate sufficient quantities of individual hydrocarbon lipids from two marine surface sediments (Black Sea, Arabian Sea) for radiocarbon dating by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). {Delta}{sup 14}C values for bulk sedimentary organic carbon (OC) from the Black and Arabian Sea samples are -105 and -112{per_thousand} respectively. In the Black Sea, extended [higher plant] n-alkanes (n-C{sub 29}, n-C{sub 31}) are significantly enriched relative to bulk OC (ave -80{per_thousand}), indicating input of {open_quotes}fresh{close_quotes} terrestrial organic matter, while shorter chain homologues (n-C{sub 23}, n-C{sub 25}) exhibit depleted (ca. -160{per_thousand}) values, in keeping with the total hydrocarbon fraction (-150{per_thousand}). Arabian Sea hydrocarbons exhibit a much wider range of {Delta}{sup 14}C values (from -38 to -780{per_thousand}). Markers for diatoms (highly branched isoprenoid alkenes) show the youngest radiocarbon ages while saturated hydrocarbons display the oldest ages. We interpret these variations in terms of uptake of atmospheric CO{sub 2} and contributions from relic carbon sources. These and related data will be discussed in the context of organic carbon input and preservation in these marine systems.

  14. An Assessment of the Influence of Orbital Forcing on Late Pliocene Global Sea-Level Using a Shallow-Marine Sedimentary Record from the Wanganui Basin, New Zealand.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sefton, J.; Naish, T.; Mckay, R. M.; Turner, G. M.; Morgans, H. E. G.; Seward, D.; Alloway, B.

    2015-12-01

    Classical Milankovitch Theory suggests variance in the orbital cycles of precession (21 kyr) and obliquity (41 kyr) should have a profound influence on insolation and ice volume. However, the globally-integrated ice volume proxy record (benthic δ18O) during the Late Pliocene (3.0-2.6 Ma) is dominated by obliquity-paced cycles, and lacks a significant precession component. A number of hypotheses have been proposed to explain this phenomenon, but paleoclimate records independent of the benthic δ18O record are required to test these. The Wanganui Basin, New Zealand, contains a shallow-marine Neogene sedimentary succession that is widely recognised as an important site for examining sea-level/ice volume changes at orbital frequencies. Here, we present a record of paleobathymetric changes at an orbital resolution from the Late Pliocene Mangaweka Mudstone outcrop succession. Modern analogue-calibrated water-depth proxies of grainsize and benthic foraminifera census data were used to evaluate paleobathymetric changes. An integrated magneto-, bio- and tephrostratigraphy was developed that constrains the outcrop succession to between ~3.0 Ma and 2.58 Ma. Nine distinct cycles spanning ~400,000 years are identified in the grainsize and benthic foraminifera assemblages. Within the uncertainty of the age model, the Mangaweka Mudstone grainsize cycles can be matched one-for-one to the δ18O cycles, as they display a similar pattern of frequency and amplitude. The frequency of these cycles (and the corresponding interval in the δ18O record) are dominated by the 41 kyr year obliquity cycle, but with a subordinate eccentricity component. Therefore, the fluctuations in the grainsize and benthic foraminifera proxies likely represent an indirect response to global sea-level fluctuations via their effect on continental shelf sediment transport mechanisms. The implications for the orbital theory of the ice ages are that during the Late Pliocene, global ice volume changes responded

  15. The recycling of marine carbonates and sources of HIMU and FOZO ocean island basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, Paterno R.

    2015-02-01

    Many, and perhaps all, oceanic island basalts (OIB) clearly contain a component of crustal materials that have been returned to the mantle through subduction or other processes. One of the first recycled materials to be identified as a potential source of OIB was mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB), and this was later fine-tuned as having a long time-integrated (b.y.) high U/Pb ratio or high μ (HIMU) and producing OIB with the most radiogenic Pb isotopic ratios (206Pb/204Pb > 20). However, it is becoming more evident that the compositional connection between subducted MORB and HIMU basalts is problematic. As an alternative hypothesis, a small amount (a few %) of recycled Archaean marine carbonates (primarily CaCO3) is proposed to be the main source of the distinct 206Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb and 87Sr/86Sr isotopic and major-trace element compositions of classic HIMU and post-Archaean marine carbonates for younger HIMU or the so-called FOZO mantle source. As an extension of the hypothesis, a conceptual model that combines the separate evolutionary histories of ancient oceanic lithosphere, which is the source of OIB, and upper mantle, which is the source of MORB, is also proposed. The model claims that FOZO mainly consists of the lithospheric mantle portion of the ancient metamorphosed oceanic slabs that have accumulated in the deep mantle. Such an ultramafic source is geochemically depleted due to prior extraction of basaltic melt plus removal of the enriched subduction component from the slab through dehydration and metamorphic processes. Combined with other proposed models in the literature, the conceptual model can provide reasonable solutions for the 208Pb/204Pb, 143Nd/144Nd, 176Hf/177Hf, and 3He/4He isotopic paradoxes or complexities of oceanic lavas. Although these simultaneous solutions for individual paradoxes are qualitative and non-unique, these are unified under a single, marine carbonate recycling hypothesis.

  16. Comparison of marine macrophytes for their contributions to blue carbon sequestration.

    PubMed

    Trevathan-Tackett, Stacey M; Kelleway, Jeffrey; Macreadie, Peter I; Beardall, John; Ralph, Peter; Bellgrove, Alecia

    2015-11-01

    Many marine ecosystems have the capacity for long-term storage of organic carbon (C) in what are termed "blue carbon" systems. While blue carbon systems (saltmarsh, mangrove, and seagrass) are efficient at long-term sequestration of organic carbon (C), much of their sequestered C may originate from other (allochthonous) habitats. Macroalgae, due to their high rates of production, fragmentation, and ability to be transported, would also appear to be able to make a significant contribution as C donors to blue C habitats. In order to assess the stability of macroalgal tissues and their likely contribution to long-term pools of C, we applied thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) to 14 taxa of marine macroalgae and coastal vascular plants. We assessed the structural complexity of multiple lineages of plant and tissue types with differing cell wall structures and found that decomposition dynamics varied significantly according to differences in cell wall structure and composition among taxonomic groups and tissue function (photosynthetic vs. attachment). Vascular plant tissues generally exhibited greater stability with a greater proportion of mass loss at temperatures > 300 degrees C (peak mass loss -320 degrees C) than macroalgae (peak mass loss between 175-300 degrees C), consistent with the lignocellulose matrix of vascular plants. Greater variation in thermogravimetric signatures within and among macroalgal taxa, relative to vascular plants, was also consistent with the diversity of cell wall structure and composition among groups. Significant degradation above 600 degrees C for some macroalgae, as well as some belowground seagrass tissues, is likely due to the presence of taxon-specific compounds. The results of this study highlight the importance of the lignocellulose matrix to the stability of vascular plant sources and the potentially significant role of refractory, taxon-specific compounds (carbonates, long-chain lipids, alginates, xylans, and sulfated

  17. Effect of CO2 concentration on the carbon acquisition of bloom-forming marine phytoplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rost, B.; Sültemeyer, D.; Riebesell, U.

    2003-04-01

    In the framework of global change one of the prominent anthropogenic perturbations is the progressive increase in atmospheric CO2 partial pressure (pCO2). The corresponding changes in surface ocean carbonate chemistry are bound to affect marine phytoplankton, in particular their carbon acquisition. Phytoplankton cells have to invest considerable resources in carbon acquisition to ensure high rates of photosynthesis. This constraint is mainly due to the 'imperfection' of their primary carboxylating enzyme RubisCO, which requires high CO2 concentrations for optimal performance. To overcome the low substrate affinity of RubisCO, most phytoplankton species have developed mechanisms to enhance their intracellular CO2 concentration. These CO2 concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) involve active uptake of CO2 and/or HCO3-, as well as the conversion of HCO3- to CO2 catalyzed by carbonic anhydrase (CA). The efficiency and regulation of CCMs appear to differ strongly between major phytoplankton groups, which gives rise to the possibility that increasing CO2 concentrations affect phytoplankton species differently. To assess the effect of CO2 supply on carbon acquisition of phytoplankton we have measured in vivo activities of extracellular CA, photosynthetic O2 evolution, CO2 and HCO3- uptake rates in three bloom-forming phytoplankton species acclimated to different pCO2 levels. The diatom Skeletonema costatum, the flagellate Phaeocystis globosa, and the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi, are representatives of main phytoplankton 'functional groups', which each serve a distinct role in marine ecosystem regulation and biogeochemical cycling. Large differences were obtained between the investigated species both with regard to their efficiency to achieve carbon-saturation in photosynthesis and their capability to regulate their CCM as a function of CO2 supply. The observed taxon-specific differences in CO2-sensitivity, if representative for the natural environment, suggest that changes

  18. Comparison of marine macrophytes for their contributions to blue carbon sequestration.

    PubMed

    Trevathan-Tackett, Stacey M; Kelleway, Jeffrey; Macreadie, Peter I; Beardall, John; Ralph, Peter; Bellgrove, Alecia

    2015-11-01

    Many marine ecosystems have the capacity for long-term storage of organic carbon (C) in what are termed "blue carbon" systems. While blue carbon systems (saltmarsh, mangrove, and seagrass) are efficient at long-term sequestration of organic carbon (C), much of their sequestered C may originate from other (allochthonous) habitats. Macroalgae, due to their high rates of production, fragmentation, and ability to be transported, would also appear to be able to make a significant contribution as C donors to blue C habitats. In order to assess the stability of macroalgal tissues and their likely contribution to long-term pools of C, we applied thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) to 14 taxa of marine macroalgae and coastal vascular plants. We assessed the structural complexity of multiple lineages of plant and tissue types with differing cell wall structures and found that decomposition dynamics varied significantly according to differences in cell wall structure and composition among taxonomic groups and tissue function (photosynthetic vs. attachment). Vascular plant tissues generally exhibited greater stability with a greater proportion of mass loss at temperatures > 300 degrees C (peak mass loss -320 degrees C) than macroalgae (peak mass loss between 175-300 degrees C), consistent with the lignocellulose matrix of vascular plants. Greater variation in thermogravimetric signatures within and among macroalgal taxa, relative to vascular plants, was also consistent with the diversity of cell wall structure and composition among groups. Significant degradation above 600 degrees C for some macroalgae, as well as some belowground seagrass tissues, is likely due to the presence of taxon-specific compounds. The results of this study highlight the importance of the lignocellulose matrix to the stability of vascular plant sources and the potentially significant role of refractory, taxon-specific compounds (carbonates, long-chain lipids, alginates, xylans, and sulfated

  19. Toward Describing the Effects of Ozone Depletion on Marine Primary Productivity and Carbon Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullen, John J.

    1995-01-01

    This project was aimed at improved predictions of the effects of UVB and ozone depletion on marine primary productivity and carbon flux. A principal objective was to incorporate a new analytical description of photosynthesis as a function of UV and photosynthetically available radiation (Cullen et. al., Science 258:646) into a general oceanographic model. We made significant progress: new insights into the kinetics of photoinhibition were used in the analysis of experiments on Antarctic phytoplankton to generate a general model of UV-induced photoinhibition under the influence of ozone depletion and vertical mixing. The way has been paved for general models on a global scale.

  20. Chemical composition of the graphitic black carbon fraction in riverine and marine sediments at sub-micron scales using carbon X-ray spectromicroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberstroh, Paul R.; Brandes, Jay A.; Gélinas, Yves; Dickens, Angela F.; Wirick, Sue; Cody, George

    2006-03-01

    The chemical composition of the graphitic black carbon (GBC) fraction of marine organic matter was explored in several marine and freshwater sedimentary environments along the west coast of North America and the Pacific Ocean. Analysis by carbon X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy shows the GBC fraction of Stillaguamish River surface sediments to be dominated by more highly ordered and impure forms of graphite, together forming about 80% of the GBC, with a smaller percent of an aliphatic carbon component. Eel River Margin surface sediments had very little highly ordered graphite, and were instead dominated by amorphous carbon and to a lesser extent, impure graphite. However, the GBC of surface sediments from the Washington State Slope and the Mexico Margin was composed almost solely of amorphous carbon. Pre-anthropogenic, highly oxidized deep-sea sediments from the open Equatorial Pacific Ocean contained over half their GBC in different forms of graphite as well as highly aliphatic carbon, low aromatic/highly acidic aliphatic carbon, low aromatic/highly aliphatic carbon, and amorphous forms of carbon. Our results clearly show the impact of graphite and amorphous C phases in the BC fraction in modern riverine sediments and nearby marine shelf deposits. The pre-anthropogenic Equatorial Pacific GBC fraction is remarkable in the existence of highly ordered graphite.

  1. Chemical Composition of the Graphitic Black Carbon Fraction in Riverine and Marine Sediments at Submicron Scales using Carbon X-ray Spectromicroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Haberstroh,P.; Brandes, J.; Gelinas, Y.; Dickens, A.; Wirick, S.; Cody, G.

    2006-01-01

    The chemical composition of the graphitic black carbon (GBC) fraction of marine organic matter was explored in several marine and freshwater sedimentary environments along the west coast of North America and the Pacific Ocean. Analysis by carbon x-ray absorption near edge structure (C-XANES) spectroscopy and scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) show the GBC-fraction of Stillaguamish River surface sediments to be dominated by more highly-ordered and impure forms of graphite, together forming about 80% of the GBC, with a smaller percent of an aliphatic carbon component. Eel River Margin surface sediments had very little highly-ordered graphite, and were instead dominated by amorphous carbon and to a lesser extent, impure graphite. However, the GBC of surface sediments from the Washington State Slope and the Mexico Margin were composed almost solely of amorphous carbon. Pre-anthropogenic, highly-oxidized deep-sea sediments from the open Equatorial Pacific Ocean contained over half their GBC in different forms of graphite as well as highly-aliphatic carbon, low aromatic/highly-acidic aliphatic carbon, low aromatic/highly aliphatic carbon, and amorphous forms of carbon. Our results clearly show the impact of graphite and amorphous C phases in the BC fraction in modern riverine sediments and nearby marine shelf deposits. The pre-anthropogenic Equatorial Pacific GBC fraction is remarkable in the existence of highly-ordered graphite.

  2. Gas Transfer Controls Carbon Limitation During Biomass Production by Marine Microalgae.

    PubMed

    Tamburic, Bojan; Evenhuis, Christian R; Suggett, David J; Larkum, Anthony W D; Raven, John A; Ralph, Peter J

    2015-08-24

    This study presents the first in-depth analysis of CO2 limitation on the biomass productivity of the biofuel candidate marine microalga Nannochloropsis oculata. Net photosynthesis decreased by 60% from 125 to 50 μmol O2 L(-1)h(-1) over a 12 h light cycle as a direct result of carbon limitation. Continuous dissolved O2 and pH measurements were used to develop a detailed diurnal mechanism for the interaction between photosynthesis, gas exchange and carbonate chemistry in the photo-bioreactor. Gas exchange determined the degree of carbon limitation experienced by the algae. Carbon limitation was confirmed by delivering more CO2 , which increased net photosynthesis back to its steady-state maximum. This study highlights the importance of maintaining replete carbon concentrations in photo-bioreactors and other culturing facilities, either by constant pH operation or preferably by designing a feedback loop based on the dissolved O2 concentration. PMID:26212226

  3. Gas Transfer Controls Carbon Limitation During Biomass Production by Marine Microalgae.

    PubMed

    Tamburic, Bojan; Evenhuis, Christian R; Suggett, David J; Larkum, Anthony W D; Raven, John A; Ralph, Peter J

    2015-08-24

    This study presents the first in-depth analysis of CO2 limitation on the biomass productivity of the biofuel candidate marine microalga Nannochloropsis oculata. Net photosynthesis decreased by 60% from 125 to 50 μmol O2 L(-1)h(-1) over a 12 h light cycle as a direct result of carbon limitation. Continuous dissolved O2 and pH measurements were used to develop a detailed diurnal mechanism for the interaction between photosynthesis, gas exchange and carbonate chemistry in the photo-bioreactor. Gas exchange determined the degree of carbon limitation experienced by the algae. Carbon limitation was confirmed by delivering more CO2 , which increased net photosynthesis back to its steady-state maximum. This study highlights the importance of maintaining replete carbon concentrations in photo-bioreactors and other culturing facilities, either by constant pH operation or preferably by designing a feedback loop based on the dissolved O2 concentration.

  4. Analysis of reservoir heterogeneities due to shallowing-upward cycles in carbonate rocks of the Pennsylvanian Wahoo Limestone of Northeastern Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, K.

    1992-09-01

    The primary objective of this project is to develop an integrated database to characterize reservoir heterogeneities resulting from numerous small-scale shallowing-upward cycles (parasequences) comprising the carboniferous Pennsylvanian Wahoo Limestone. The Wahoo Limestone is the upper formation of an extensive carbonate platform sequence of the Carboniferous Lisburne Group which is widely exposed in the Brooks Range and is a widespread hydrocarbon reservoir unit in the subsurface of the North Slope of Alaska. A principal goal is to determine lateral and vertical variations in the complex mosaic of carbonate facies comprising the Wahoo Limestone. This report presents the preliminary results of research accomplished by a team of specialists in carbonate petrology, biostratigraphy, and diagenesis during the 1990--1991 fiscal year.It includes a summary of regional geological framework studies, a discussion conodont analyses, an overview of diagenetic studies, a brief description of progress in computerized database development, and appendices containing some of the new data on petrographic analyses, conodont analyses, and locality and sample information. Our correlation scheme, which uses cyclic stratigraphy, biostratigraphy, and cement stratigraphy, will allow interpretation of the depositional history and paleogeographic evolution of the region. We have developed predictive facies models and will make paleogeographic maps to illustrate different stages in the history of the Wahoo carbonate ramp. Our detailed analyses of the Wahoo Limestone will provide a basis for interpreting correlative rocks in the adjacent subsurface of the coastal plain of ANWR, a potential hydrocarbon lease-sale area. In a broader sense, our work will provide an excellent generic example of carbonate shallowing-upward cycles which typify carbonate sediments.

  5. Analysis of reservoir heterogeneities due to shallowing-upward cycles in carbonate rocks of the Pennsylvanian Wahoo Limestone of Northeastern Alaska. Annual report, October 1990--September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, K.

    1992-09-01

    The primary objective of this project is to develop an integrated database to characterize reservoir heterogeneities resulting from numerous small-scale shallowing-upward cycles (parasequences) comprising the carboniferous Pennsylvanian Wahoo Limestone. The Wahoo Limestone is the upper formation of an extensive carbonate platform sequence of the Carboniferous Lisburne Group which is widely exposed in the Brooks Range and is a widespread hydrocarbon reservoir unit in the subsurface of the North Slope of Alaska. A principal goal is to determine lateral and vertical variations in the complex mosaic of carbonate facies comprising the Wahoo Limestone. This report presents the preliminary results of research accomplished by a team of specialists in carbonate petrology, biostratigraphy, and diagenesis during the 1990--1991 fiscal year.It includes a summary of regional geological framework studies, a discussion conodont analyses, an overview of diagenetic studies, a brief description of progress in computerized database development, and appendices containing some of the new data on petrographic analyses, conodont analyses, and locality and sample information. Our correlation scheme, which uses cyclic stratigraphy, biostratigraphy, and cement stratigraphy, will allow interpretation of the depositional history and paleogeographic evolution of the region. We have developed predictive facies models and will make paleogeographic maps to illustrate different stages in the history of the Wahoo carbonate ramp. Our detailed analyses of the Wahoo Limestone will provide a basis for interpreting correlative rocks in the adjacent subsurface of the coastal plain of ANWR, a potential hydrocarbon lease-sale area. In a broader sense, our work will provide an excellent generic example of carbonate shallowing-upward cycles which typify carbonate sediments.

  6. The effect of temperature on organic carbon degradation in marine sediments

    PubMed Central

    Malinverno, Alberto; Martinez, Ernesto A.

    2015-01-01

    The degradation of sedimentary particulate organic carbon (POC) is a key carbon cycle process that fuels the deep subseafloor biosphere. The reactivity of POC is expected to decrease with increasing sediment age, severely restricting the energy available to microorganisms. Conversely, increasing temperatures during burial have been proposed to stimulate POC degradation, possibly supplying significant energy to the deep biosphere. To test the importance of temperature, we assembled POC measurements in two global sets of drill sites where sediments underwent either relatively low or high temperatures during burial, which should have resulted in different rates of POC degradation. For ages 5–10 Ma, the decrease of the average POC content with burial is clearly more pronounced in the sites with high temperature histories. Our results support the hypothesis that temperature is one of the fundamental controls on the rate of POC degradation within deeply buried marine sediments. PMID:26640172

  7. Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS): Risk assessment focused on marine bacteria.

    PubMed

    Borrero-Santiago, A R; DelValls, T A; Riba, I

    2016-09-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is one of the options to mitigate the negative effects of the climate change. However, this strategy may have associated some risks such as CO2 leakages due to an escape from the reservoir. In this context, marine bacteria have been underestimated. In order to figure out the gaps and the lack of knowledge, this work summarizes different studies related to the potential effects on the marine bacteria associated with an acidification caused by a CO2 leak from CSS. An improved integrated model for risk assessment is suggested as a tool based on the rapid responses of bacterial community. Moreover, this contribution proposes a strategy for laboratory protocols using Pseudomona stanieri (CECT7202) as a case of study and analyzes the response of the strain under different CO2 conditions. Results showed significant differences (p≤0.05) under six diluted enriched medium and differences about the days in the exponential growth phase. Dilution 1:10 (Marine Broth 2216 with seawater) was selected as an appropriate growth medium for CO2 toxicity test in batch cultures. This work provide an essential and a complete tool to understand and develop a management strategy to improve future works related to possible effects produced by potential CO2 leaks.

  8. Electrochemical Prevention of Marine Biofouling with a Carbon-Chloroprene Sheet

    PubMed Central

    Nakasono, Satoshi; Burgess, J. Grant; Takahashi, Kanjo; Koike, Masami; Murayama, Chisei; Nakamura, Shigeoki; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    1993-01-01

    A carbon-chloroprene sheet (CCS) electrode was used for the electrochemical disinfection of the marine gram-negative bacterium Vibrio alginolyticus. When the electrode was incubated in seawater containing 105 cells per ml for 90 min, the amount of adsorbed cells was 4.5 × 103 cells per cm2. When a potential of 1.2 V versus a saturated calomel electrode was applied to the CCS for 20 min, 67% of adsorbed cells were killed. This disinfection was due to the direct electrochemical oxidation of cells and not to a change in pH or to the generation of toxic substances, such as chlorine. In a 1-year field experiment, marine biofouling of a CCS-coated cooling pipe caused by attachment of bacteria and invertebrates was considerably reduced by application of a potential of 1.2 V versus a saturated calomel electrode. Since this method requires low potential electrical energy, use of a CCS coating appears to be a suitable method for the clean prevention of marine biofouling. Images PMID:16349089

  9. Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS): Risk assessment focused on marine bacteria.

    PubMed

    Borrero-Santiago, A R; DelValls, T A; Riba, I

    2016-09-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is one of the options to mitigate the negative effects of the climate change. However, this strategy may have associated some risks such as CO2 leakages due to an escape from the reservoir. In this context, marine bacteria have been underestimated. In order to figure out the gaps and the lack of knowledge, this work summarizes different studies related to the potential effects on the marine bacteria associated with an acidification caused by a CO2 leak from CSS. An improved integrated model for risk assessment is suggested as a tool based on the rapid responses of bacterial community. Moreover, this contribution proposes a strategy for laboratory protocols using Pseudomona stanieri (CECT7202) as a case of study and analyzes the response of the strain under different CO2 conditions. Results showed significant differences (p≤0.05) under six diluted enriched medium and differences about the days in the exponential growth phase. Dilution 1:10 (Marine Broth 2216 with seawater) was selected as an appropriate growth medium for CO2 toxicity test in batch cultures. This work provide an essential and a complete tool to understand and develop a management strategy to improve future works related to possible effects produced by potential CO2 leaks. PMID:27107627

  10. Microbial fuel cell biosensor for rapid assessment of assimilable organic carbon under marine conditions.

    PubMed

    Quek, Soon Bee; Cheng, Liang; Cord-Ruwisch, Ralf

    2015-06-15

    The development of an assimilable organic carbon (AOC) detecting marine microbial fuel cell (MFC) biosensor inoculated with microorganisms from marine sediment was successful within 36 days. This established marine MFC was tested as an AOC biosensor and reproducible microbiologically produced electrical signals in response to defined acetate concentration were achieved. The dependency of the biosensor sensitivity on the potential of the electron-accepting electrode (anode) was investigated. A linear correlation (R(2) > 0.98) between electrochemical signals (change in anodic potential and peak current) and acetate concentration ranging from 0 to 150 μM (0-3600 μg/L of AOC) was achieved. However, the present biosensor indicated a different-linear relation at somewhat elevated acetate concentration ranging from 150 to 450 μM (3600-10,800 μg/L of AOC). This high concentration of acetate addition could be measured by coulombic measurement (cumulative charges) with a linear correlation. For the acetate concentration detected in this study, the sensor recovery time could be controlled within 100 min.

  11. Microbial fuel cell biosensor for rapid assessment of assimilable organic carbon under marine conditions.

    PubMed

    Quek, Soon Bee; Cheng, Liang; Cord-Ruwisch, Ralf

    2015-06-15

    The development of an assimilable organic carbon (AOC) detecting marine microbial fuel cell (MFC) biosensor inoculated with microorganisms from marine sediment was successful within 36 days. This established marine MFC was tested as an AOC biosensor and reproducible microbiologically produced electrical signals in response to defined acetate concentration were achieved. The dependency of the biosensor sensitivity on the potential of the electron-accepting electrode (anode) was investigated. A linear correlation (R(2) > 0.98) between electrochemical signals (change in anodic potential and peak current) and acetate concentration ranging from 0 to 150 μM (0-3600 μg/L of AOC) was achieved. However, the present biosensor indicated a different-linear relation at somewhat elevated acetate concentration ranging from 150 to 450 μM (3600-10,800 μg/L of AOC). This high concentration of acetate addition could be measured by coulombic measurement (cumulative charges) with a linear correlation. For the acetate concentration detected in this study, the sensor recovery time could be controlled within 100 min. PMID:25846984

  12. The Marine Carbon Cycle After the Extinction at the End of the Cretaceous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, E.; Alegret, L.; Schmidt, D. N.; Ridgwell, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    The oceanic carbon isotope gradient between surface and deep waters, as observed in δ13C in surface and deep ocean calcifiers, disappeared or reversed in the aftermath of the Cretaceous/Paleogene asteroid impact and associated mass extinction. This lack in vertical gradient has been interpreted as indicating a near-complete collapse of marine productivity for several hundred thousand to millions of years (a 'Strangelove' Ocean), or a decline in functioning of the biological pump, ranging from minor to catastrophic ('Living Ocean' model). A long-term cessation or catastrophic decline in the transfer of organic matter to the deep sea does not agree with the observed absence of significant extinction of benthic foraminifera. We investigated by how much the biological pump may have weakened sufficiently to interpret the carbon isotopic data using an Earth system model, and taking into account the role of the oceanic solubility pump, imprinting a gradient opposite in sign to that generated by the biological pump. We find that a weakening, which is considerably less than a complete collapse in organic matter export to the deep sea, can explain the carbon isotope record, in agreement with the lack of benthic extinction. The oceanic carbon isotope record can account for much of the magnitude of observed atmospheric excursion. In addition, we obtain new insight in the mechanistic workings of the ocean carbon cycle: significant organic carbon rain to depth continued even when carbonate mineral ballast production was effectively shut down due to the mass extinction of pelagic calcifiers. Oceanic ecosystems, thus the composition of the exported material and mode of export may have changed profoundly, but the strength of the biological pump was not dramatically disrupted for geologically long periods.

  13. Quantitative Analysis of Carbon Flow into Photosynthetic Products Functioning as Carbon Storage in the Marine Coccolithophore, Emiliania huxleyi.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Yoshinori; Yamazaki, Masatoshi; Suzuki, Iwane; Shiraiwa, Yoshihiro

    2015-08-01

    The bloom-forming coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi (Haptophyta) is a dominant marine phytoplankton, cells of which are covered with calcareous plates (coccoliths). E. huxleyi produces unique lipids of C37-C40 long-chain ketones (alkenones) with two to four trans-unsaturated bonds, β-glucan (but not α-glucan) and acid polysaccharide (AP) associated with the morphogenesis of CaCO3 crystals in coccoliths. Despite such unique features, there is no detailed information on the patterns of carbon allocation into these compounds. Therefore, we performed quantitative estimation of carbon flow into various macromolecular products by conducting (14)C-radiotracer experiments using NaH(14)CO3 as a substrate. Photosynthetic (14)C incorporation into low molecular-mass compounds (LMC), extracellular AP, alkenones, and total lipids except alkenones was estimated to be 35, 13, 17, and 25 % of total (14)C fixation in logarithmic growth phase cells and 33, 19, 18, and 18 % in stationary growth phase cells, respectively. However, less than 1 % of (14)C was incorporated into β-glucan in both cells. (14)C-mannitol occupied ca. 5 % of total fixed (14)C as the most dominant LMC product. Levels of all (14)C compounds decreased in the dark. Therefore, alkenones and LMC (including mannitol), but not β-glucan, function in carbon/energy storage in E. huxleyi, irrespective of the growth phase. Compared with other algae, the low carbon flux into β-glucan is a unique feature of carbon metabolism in E. huxelyi.

  14. CO2 Huff-n-Puff process in a light oil shallow shelf carbonate reservoir. Annual report, January 1, 1995--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Wehner, S.C.; Boomer, R.J.; Cole, R.; Preiditus, J.; Vogt, J.

    1996-09-01

    The application of cyclic CO{sub 2}, often referred to as the CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff process, may find its niche in the maturing waterfloods of the Permian Basin. Coupling the CO{sub 2} H-n-P process to miscible flooding applications could provide the needed revenue to sufficiently mitigate near-term negative cash flow concerns in the capital intensive miscible projects. Texaco Exploration & Production Inc. and the U.S. Department of Energy have teamed up in an attempt to develop the CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff process in the Grayburg/San Andres formation; a light oil, shallow shelf carbonate reservoir within the Permian Basin. This cost-shared effort is intended to demonstrate the viability of this underutilized technology in a specific class of domestic reservoir. A significant amount of oil reserves are located in carbonate reservoirs. Specifically, the carbonates deposited in shallow shelf (SSC) environments make up the largest percentage of known reservoirs within the Permian Basin of North America. Many of these known resources have been under waterflooding operations for decades and are at risk of abandonment if crude oil recoveries cannot be economically enhanced. The selected site for this demonstration project is the Central Vacuum Unit waterflood in Lea County, New Mexico.

  15. Evaluation and intercomparison of three-dimensional global marine carbon cycle models

    SciTech Connect

    Caldeira, K., LLNL

    1998-07-01

    -Reimer, 1990; Sarmiento et al., 1992, Najjar et al., 1992). These twin needs for the development of marine carbon cycle models are expressed in two of the main elements of JGOFS SMP: (1) extrapolation and prediction, and (2) global and regional balances of carbon and related biologically-active substances. We propose to address these program elements through a coordinated, multi-investigator project to evaluate and intercompare several 3-D global marine carbon cycle models.

  16. Integrated network modelling for identifying microbial mechanisms of particulate organic carbon accumulation in coastal marine systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Karlie; Turk, Valentina; Mozetič, Patricija; Tinta, Tinkara; Malfatti, Francesca; Hannah, David; Krause, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Accumulation of particulate organic carbon (POC) has the potential to change the structure and function of marine ecosystems. High abidance of POC can develop into aggregates, known as marine snow or mucus aggregates that can impair essential marine ecosystem functioning and services. Currently marine POC formation, accumulation and sedimentation processes are being explored as potential pathways to remove CO2 from the atmosphere by CO2 sequestration via fixation into biomass by phytoplankton. However, the current ability of scientists, environmental managers and regulators to analyse and predict high POC concentrations is restricted by the limited understanding of the dynamic nature of the microbial mechanisms regulating POC accumulation events in marine environments. We present a proof of concept study that applies a novel Bayesian Networks (BN) approach to integrate relevant biological and physical-chemical variables across spatial and temporal scales in order to identify the interactions of the main contributing microbial mechanisms regulating POC accumulation in the northern Adriatic Sea. Where previous models have characterised only the POC formed, the BN approach provides a probabilistic framework for predicting the occurrence of POC accumulation by linking biotic factors with prevailing environmental conditions. In this paper the BN was used to test three scenarios (diatom, nanoflagellate, and dinoflagellate blooms). The scenarios predicted diatom blooms to produce high chlorophyll a at the water surface while nanoflagellate blooms were predicted to occur at lower depths (> 6m) in the water column and produce lower chlorophyll a concentrations. A sensitivity analysis identified the variables with the greatest influence on POC accumulation being the enzymes protease and alkaline phosphatase, which highlights the importance of microbial community interactions. The developed proof of concept BN model allows for the first time to quantify the impacts of

  17. Reconsidering the role of carbonate ion concentration in calcification by marine organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, L. T.

    2015-08-01

    Marine organisms precipitate 0.5-2.0 Gt of carbon as calcium carbonate (CaCO3) every year with a profound impact on global biogeochemical element cycles. Biotic calcification relies on calcium ions (Ca2+) and usually on bicarbonate ions (HCO3-) as CaCO3 substrates and can be inhibited by high proton (H+) concentrations. The seawater concentration of carbonate ions (CO32-) and the CO32--dependent CaCO3 saturation state (ΩCaCO3) seem to be irrelevant in this production process. Nevertheless, calcification rates and the success of calcifying organisms in the oceans often correlate surprisingly well with these two carbonate system parameters. This study addresses this dilemma through the rearrangement of carbonate system equations which revealed an important proportionality between [CO32-] or ΩCaCO3and the ratio of [HCO3-] to [H+]. Due to this proportionality, calcification rates will always correlate as well with [HCO3-] / [H+] as they do with [CO32-] or ΩCaCO3 when temperature, salinity, and pressure are constant. Hence, [CO32-] and ΩCaCO3 may simply be very good proxies for the control by [HCO3-] / [H+], where [HCO3-] serves as the inorganic carbon substrate and [H+] functions as a calcification inhibitor. If the "substrate-inhibitor ratio" (i.e., [HCO3-] / [H+]) rather than [CO32-] or ΩCaCO3 controls biotic CaCO3 formation, then some of the most common paradigms in ocean acidification research need to be reviewed. For example, the absence of a latitudinal gradient in [HCO3-] / [H+] in contrast to [CO32-] and ΩCaCO3 could modify the common assumption that high latitudes are affected most severely by ocean acidification.

  18. Reconsidering the role of carbonate ion concentration in calcification by marine organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, L. T.

    2015-05-01

    Marine organisms precipitate 0.5-2.0 Gt of carbon as calcium carbonate (CaCO3) every year with a profound impact on global biogeochemical element cycles. Biotic calcification relies on calcium ions (Ca2+) and generally on bicarbonate ions (HCO3-) as CaCO3 substrates and can be inhibited by high proton (H+) concentrations. The seawater concentration of carbonate ions (CO32-) and the CO32--dependent CaCO3 saturation state (ΩCaCO3) seem to be irrelevant in this production process. Nevertheless, calcification rates and the success of calcifying organisms in the oceans often correlate surprisingly well with these two carbonate system parameters. This study addresses this dilemma through rearrangement of carbonate system equations which revealed an important proportionality between [CO32-] or ΩCaCO3 and the ratio of [HCO3-] to [H+]. Due to this proportionality, calcification rates will always correlate equally well with [HCO3-]/[H+] as with [CO32-] or ΩCaCO3 when temperature, salinity, and pressure are constant. Hence, [CO32-] and ΩCaCO3 may simply be very good proxies for the control by [HCO3-]/[H+] where [HCO3-] would be the inorganic carbon substrate and [H+] would function as calcification inhibitor. If the "substrate-inhibitor ratio" (i.e. [HCO3-]/[H+]) rather than [CO32-] or ΩCaCO3 controls CaCO3 formation then some of the most common paradigms in ocean acidification research need to be reviewed. For example, the absence of a latitudinal gradient in [HCO3-]/[H+] in contrast to [CO32-] and ΩCaCO3 could modify the common assumption that high latitudes are affected most severely by ocean acidification.

  19. Insights from In-situ Measurements of Black Carbon During the Marine Stratus Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzoleni, C.; Dubey, M.; Chylek, P.; Arnott, P. W.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Varutbangkul, V.; Murphy, S. M.; Sorooshian, A.; Rissman, T. A.; Jonsson, H. H.; Buzorius, G.

    2005-12-01

    As part of DOE's marine stratus experiment (MASE) field campaign in Marina, CA a photoacoustic (PA) aerosol absorption instrument was deployed on the CIRPAS (Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely Piloted Aircraft Studies) Twin Otter during July 2005. The aim of these measurements was to elucidate aerosol processes regulating marine stratus clouds. Marine stratus play a dominant role in the Earth's radiative balance and improved stratus microphysical parameterizations are needed to quantify indirect effects of anthropogenic aerosols on climate. In particular, the effects of black carbon on clouds physical and optical properties are still poorly understood, and in-situ, real-time measurements can be used to improve our physical and chemical understanding. The PA instrument developed at the Desert Research Institute of Reno, NV was installed on board the Twin Otter airplane and flown over the Pacific Ocean near Monterey, CA in proximity of the California coast, where marine stratus are a common occurrence. The instrument measured simultaneously aerosol absorption and ~180° integrated scattering at 870nm. The aircraft carried other instrumentation that measured microphysical and chemical properties of aerosols and clouds. We report here a preliminary analysis of absorption and scattering measurements together with data from other on-board instruments. The aerosol absorption was often low and indistinguishable from instrumental noise (~0.6 Mm-1 for 2 minutes averages), indicating clean conditions resulting from the offshore flow and an extensive marine stratus deck. However, we sampled interesting short-term events with higher absorption and scattering values during almost every flight. Often these episodes were related to ship tracks and/or anthropogenic pollution from land. Our simultaneous measurements of absorption and scattering yielded a single scattering albedo (SSA) of about 0.75 to 1, which is consistent with previous studies. SSA values can give information

  20. Ecology and location of marine animals revealed by carbon and nitrogen isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenzie, K. M.; Trueman, C. N.; Palmer, M. R.

    2012-04-01

    Direct monitoring of animals at sea is difficult and expensive. The isotopic composition of carbon and nitrogen in tissues such as fish scales, however, provides information not only on the trophic level and nutritional status of the fish, but also on the state of primary production at feeding sites, which can be used to infer migration patterns. Archives of salmon scales dating back decades exist around Europe and may be used to assess historical trends in ecology. In this project three geographically distinct scale archives from the UK are used: the Cefas North Sea driftnet, the CEH/GWCT Dorset River Frome and the Environment Agency Welsh River Dee archives (all records span 1985-2002). These archives have been selected following an extensive search for salmon scale archives from UK rivers, and were chosen as the longest and most complete archives for comparison. We are using carbon stable isotope data to identify marine feeding grounds for these fish (MacKenzie et al., 2011), and therefore the extent of population-specific geographic separation. We also test isotopically whether climatically-driven changes in ocean conditions correlate with periods of high or low marine mortality or with changes in trophic level and body condition of the returning fish. The results are compared both within and between populations, in particular assessing differences in marine behaviour of fish that return as 1SW (1 sea-winter) or as MSW (multi sea-winter) fish. The magnitude and timing of fluctuations in δ13C data are not consistent between archives, and can be used in conjunction with coeval sea surface temperature records as a novel means to determine the areas in which the tissues were grown. Results show a complex, population-specific relationship between ocean productivity, climate indices, migration and fish survival. We are using these results to produce isoscape-style maps showing strengths of covariation between δ13C in these salmon scales and oceanographic variables

  1. Simultaneous quantification of methane and carbon dioxide fluxes reveals that a shallow arctic methane seep is a net sink for greenhouse gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlman, J.; Greinert, J.; Ruppel, C. D.; Silyakova, A.; Vielstädte, L.; Magen, C.; Casso, M.; Bunz, S.; Mienert, J.

    2015-12-01

    Warming of high-latitude continental-margin oceans has the potential to release large quantities of carbon from gas hydrate and other sedimentary reservoirs. To assess how carbon mobilized from the seafloor might amplify global warming or alter ocean chemistry, a robust analysis of the concentrations and isotopic content of methane and carbon dioxide (CO2) in the water column and atmosphere is required. To this effect, a gas analysis system consisting of three cavity ring-down spectrometers was developed to obtain a real-time, three-dimensional characterization of the distribution and isotopic variability of methane and CO2 at a shallow (<100 m water depth) bubbling methane seep offshore of western Svalbard. Surface water methane concentrations from the continuous-flow CRDS system agreed remarkably well with discrete samples analyzed by the GC-based headspace analysis technique and with a CRDS-based discrete sample analysis module. Reliable carbon isotope data were also obtained from the CRDSs once an isotopic calibration routine was applied. The resulting data revealed that CO2 uptake from the atmosphere within the surface water methane plume overlying the gas seep was elevated by 36-45% relative to surrounding waters. In comparison to the positive radiative forcing effect expected from the methane emissions, the negative radiative forcing potential from CO2 uptake was 32-43 times greater. Lower water temperatures, elevated chlorophyll-fluorescence and 13C-enriched CO2 within the surface methane plume suggest that bubble-driven upwelling of cold, nutrient-rich water stimulated CO2 uptake by phytoplankton. The observation that a shallow methane seep has a net negative radiative forcing effect challenges the widely-held perception that methane seeps contribute to the global atmospheric greenhouse gas burden.

  2. Marine carbonate records of terrigenous input into Paleotethyan seawater: Geochemical constraints from Carboniferous limestones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ming-Yu; Zheng, Yong-Fei

    2014-09-01

    A combined study of trace elements, carbon and oxygen isotopes was carried out for Carboniferous marine limestones from the Lower Yangtze platform in South China. The results provide insights into the influence of terrigenous input to Paleotethyan seawater, from which pure and impure carbonates precipitated. In terms of the correlations between the concentrations of elements with different properties, variable extents of two-component mixing are evident between seawater and terrigenous detritus. This is quantitatively dictated by such parameters as the calcite-seawater partition coefficients (DX) and the seawater-continental upper crust partition coefficients (KX). Water-soluble elements with high and medium KX values, such as Na, Mg, P, V, Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr, Mo and U, are susceptible to incorporation into carbonate lattices, and thus their concentrations represent the geochemical composition of paleoseawater. In contrast, water-insoluble elements with low KX values, such as Be, Al, Sc, Co, Ga, Cs, REE, Hf and Th, cannot be incorporated into carbonate lattices, thus providing a proxy for contributions from terrigenous material. The Carboniferous marine limestones from a stratigraphic profile exhibit three positive and three negative δ13C excursions from the late Visean to Gzhelian. These δ13C excursions generally match those of contemporaneous carbonates elsewhere in the world, which can be linked to the alternative occurrences of cold and warm paleoclimates in the Carboniferous. The lowest δ13C values in the profile are generally associated with the lowest values of Y/Ho and the highest values of (Nd/Yb)PAAS, Th, Sc and insoluble residue. This indicates a significant contribution from the terrigenous material to the negative δ13C excursions. The effect from the warm paleoclimate is also indicated by high chemical indices of alteration for the insoluble residue from the three intervals of high terrigenous input. On the other hand, the positive δ13C excursions

  3. Using Recent Advances in 2D Seismic Technology and Surface Geochemistry to Economically Redevelop a Shallow Shelf Carbonate Reservoir: Vernon Field, Isabella County, M, Class III

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, James R.; Bornhorst, T.J.; Chittick, S.D.; Harrison, William B.; Tayjor, W. Quinlan

    2001-08-07

    In this project a consortium consisting of Cronus Exploration (Traverse City, MI), Michigan Technological University (Houghton, MI) and Western Michigan University (Kalamazoo, MI) proposed to develop and execute an economical and environmentally sensitive plan for recovery of hydrocarbons from an abandoned shallow-shelf carbonate field that is typical of many fields in the U.S. Midwest. This is a 5-year project that will use surface geochemistry as a tool to reduce risk in locating and producing hydrocarbons in Class II fields. The project will develop new techniques for measuring hydrocarbon gases in the soil horizon to locate new and bypassed oil in the shallow-shelf carbonate environments typified by the Dundee and Trenton Formations of the Michigan Basin (Fisher et. al., 1988). In Phase I of the project, the consortium proposes to re-develop the Vernon Oil field located in Vernon Twp, Isabella County, Michigan and produce both bypassed hydrocarbons from the original field and to locate and produce extensions of the original field.

  4. The origin of meter-scale upward-shallowing parasequences in carbonate stratigraphy: Comparing the Holocene of northwest Andros Island, Bahamas to the Paleozoic and Precambrian (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloof, A. C.; Grotzinger, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    We present a field study of Holocene peritidal carbonate accumulation at Triple Goose Creek, northwest Andros Island, Bahamas. Our aim is to understand the possible origin of the meter-scale upward-shallowing parasequences that frequently dominate stratigraphic records of ancient carbonate platforms. We determine the relative importance of channel migration and sea level change in controlling parasequence architecture by integrating surface lithofacies maps and differential GPS topographic surveys with 187 sediment cores that each span the entire Holocene stratigraphy. We show that channels have migrated at rates of 0-6 cm per year. Visibly very different lithofacies are sensitive to elevation changes as small as 5 cm, and are responding to both internal (sediment supply) and external (sea level rise) controls. Therefore, although the location of channels is responsible for the modern mosaic of lithofacies, these lithofacies and the channels that control them have not migrated substantially during the 1200 years of sediment accumulation at Triple Goose Creek. We discuss the evolution of the Holocene upward-shallowing parasequence at Triple Goose Creek, and compare it to pre-Cenozoic icehouse and greenhouse examples.

  5. Chemoautotrophic carbon fixation rates and active bacterial communities in intertidal marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Boschker, Henricus T S; Vasquez-Cardenas, Diana; Bolhuis, Henk; Moerdijk-Poortvliet, Tanja W C; Moodley, Leon

    2014-01-01

    Chemoautotrophy has been little studied in typical coastal marine sediments, but may be an important component of carbon recycling as intense anaerobic mineralization processes in these sediments lead to accumulation of high amounts of reduced compounds, such as sulfides and ammonium. We studied chemoautotrophy by measuring dark-fixation of 13C-bicarbonate into phospholipid derived fatty acid (PLFA) biomarkers at two coastal sediment sites with contrasting sulfur chemistry in the Eastern Scheldt estuary, The Netherlands. At one site where free sulfide accumulated in the pore water right to the top of the sediment, PLFA labeling was restricted to compounds typically found in sulfur and ammonium oxidizing bacteria. At the other site, with no detectable free sulfide in the pore water, a very different PLFA labeling pattern was found with high amounts of label in branched i- and a-PLFA besides the typical compounds for sulfur and ammonium oxidizing bacteria. This suggests that other types of chemoautotrophic bacteria were also active, most likely Deltaproteobacteria related to sulfate reducers. Maximum rates of chemoautotrophy were detected in first 1 to 2 centimeters of both sediments and chemosynthetic biomass production was high ranging from 3 to 36 mmol C m(-2) d(-1). Average dark carbon fixation to sediment oxygen uptake ratios were 0.22±0.07 mol C (mol O2)(-1), which is in the range of the maximum growth yields reported for sulfur oxidizing bacteria indicating highly efficient growth. Chemoautotrophic biomass production was similar to carbon mineralization rates in the top of the free sulfide site, suggesting that chemoautotrophic bacteria could play a crucial role in the microbial food web and labeling in eukaryotic poly-unsaturated PLFA was indeed detectable. Our study shows that dark carbon fixation by chemoautotrophic bacteria is a major process in the carbon cycle of coastal sediments, and should therefore receive more attention in future studies on

  6. Chemoautotrophic carbon fixation rates and active bacterial communities in intertidal marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Boschker, Henricus T S; Vasquez-Cardenas, Diana; Bolhuis, Henk; Moerdijk-Poortvliet, Tanja W C; Moodley, Leon

    2014-01-01

    Chemoautotrophy has been little studied in typical coastal marine sediments, but may be an important component of carbon recycling as intense anaerobic mineralization processes in these sediments lead to accumulation of high amounts of reduced compounds, such as sulfides and ammonium. We studied chemoautotrophy by measuring dark-fixation of 13C-bicarbonate into phospholipid derived fatty acid (PLFA) biomarkers at two coastal sediment sites with contrasting sulfur chemistry in the Eastern Scheldt estuary, The Netherlands. At one site where free sulfide accumulated in the pore water right to the top of the sediment, PLFA labeling was restricted to compounds typically found in sulfur and ammonium oxidizing bacteria. At the other site, with no detectable free sulfide in the pore water, a very different PLFA labeling pattern was found with high amounts of label in branched i- and a-PLFA besides the typical compounds for sulfur and ammonium oxidizing bacteria. This suggests that other types of chemoautotrophic bacteria were also active, most likely Deltaproteobacteria related to sulfate reducers. Maximum rates of chemoautotrophy were detected in first 1 to 2 centimeters of both sediments and chemosynthetic biomass production was high ranging from 3 to 36 mmol C m(-2) d(-1). Average dark carbon fixation to sediment oxygen uptake ratios were 0.22±0.07 mol C (mol O2)(-1), which is in the range of the maximum growth yields reported for sulfur oxidizing bacteria indicating highly efficient growth. Chemoautotrophic biomass production was similar to carbon mineralization rates in the top of the free sulfide site, suggesting that chemoautotrophic bacteria could play a crucial role in the microbial food web and labeling in eukaryotic poly-unsaturated PLFA was indeed detectable. Our study shows that dark carbon fixation by chemoautotrophic bacteria is a major process in the carbon cycle of coastal sediments, and should therefore receive more attention in future studies on

  7. Trace Elements in Calcifying Marine Invertebrates Indicate Diverse Sensitivities to the Seawater Carbonate System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doss, W. C.

    2015-12-01

    Surface ocean absorption of anthropogenic CO2 emissions resulting in ocean acidification may interfere with the ability of calcifying marine organisms to biomineralize, since the drop in pH is accompanied by reductions in CaCO3 saturation state. However, recent experiments show that net calcification rates of cultured benthic invertebrate taxa exhibit diverse responses to pCO2-induced changes in saturation state (Ries et al., 2009). Advancement of geochemical tools as biomineralization indicators will enable us to better understand these results and therefore help predict the impacts of ongoing and future decrease in seawater pH on marine organisms. Here we build upon previous work on these specimens by measuring the elemental composition of biogenic calcite and aragonite precipitated in four pCO2 treatments (400; 600; 900; and 2850 ppm). Element ratios (including Sr/Ca, Mg/Ca, Li/Ca, B/Ca, U/Ca, Ba/Ca, Cd/Ca, and Zn/Ca) were analyzed in 18 macro-invertebrate species representing seven phyla (crustacea, cnidaria, echinoidea, rhodophyta, chlorophyta, gastropoda, bivalvia, annelida), then compared to growth rate data and experimental seawater carbonate system parameters: [CO32-], [HCO3-], pH, saturation state, and DIC. Correlations between calcite or aragonite composition and seawater carbonate chemistry are highly taxa-specific, but do not resemble trends observed in growth rate for all species. Apparent carbonate system sensitivities vary widely by element, ranging from strongly correlated to no significant response. Interpretation of these results is guided by mounting evidence for the capacity of individual species to modulate pH and/or saturation state at the site of calcification in response to ambient seawater chemistry. Such biomineralization pathways and strategies in turn likely influence elemental fractionation during CaCO3 precipitation. Ries, J.B., A.L. Cohen, A.L., and D.C. McCorkle (2009), Marine calcifiers exhibit mixed responses to CO2-induced ocean

  8. Optimizing sample pretreatment for compound-specific stable carbon isotopic analysis of amino sugars in marine sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, R.; Lin, Y.-S.; Lipp, J. S.; Meador, T. B.; Hinrichs, K.-U.

    2014-09-01

    Amino sugars are quantitatively significant constituents of soil and marine sediment, but their sources and turnover in environmental samples remain poorly understood. The stable carbon isotopic composition of amino sugars can provide information on the lifestyles of their source organisms and can be monitored during incubations with labeled substrates to estimate the turnover rates of microbial populations. However, until now, such investigation has been carried out only with soil samples, partly because of the much lower abundance of amino sugars in marine environments. We therefore optimized a procedure for compound-specific isotopic analysis of amino sugars in marine sediment, employing gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The whole procedure consisted of hydrolysis, neutralization, enrichment, and derivatization of amino sugars. Except for the derivatization step, the protocol introduced negligible isotopic fractionation, and the minimum requirement of amino sugar for isotopic analysis was 20 ng, i.e., equivalent to ~8 ng of amino sugar carbon. Compound-specific stable carbon isotopic analysis of amino sugars obtained from marine sediment extracts indicated that glucosamine and galactosamine were mainly derived from organic detritus, whereas muramic acid showed isotopic imprints from indigenous bacterial activities. The δ13C analysis of amino sugars provides a valuable addition to the biomarker-based characterization of microbial metabolism in the deep marine biosphere, which so far has been lipid oriented and biased towards the detection of archaeal signals.

  9. Bioavailability, Bioaccumulation and Biotransformation of arsenic in coral reef organisms surrounding an arsenic-rich marine shallow-water hydrothermal vent system in the coastal waters of Ambitle Island, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichler, T.; Wallschläger, D.; Price, R. E.

    2009-12-01

    Marine shallow-water hydrothermal systems are often enriched in biologically toxic elements, thus making them ideal natural analogs for coastal anthropogenic pollution. Here, we report our investigation of the bioavailability, bioaccumulation, and biotransformation of hydrothermally-derived arsenic into several coral reef organisms from the arsenic-rich marine shallow-water hydrothermal system of Tutum Bay, Ambitle Island, in northeastern Papua New Guinea. Hydrothermal venting provided bioavailable As by two major pathways throughout Tutum Bay: 1) easily-exchangeable As from hydrothermally influenced sediments to as far away as 200 m from focused venting, and 2) in surface seawaters, which may allow for biological uptake by phytoplankton and transfer up the food web. The soft coral Clavularia sp., the calcareous algae Halimeda sp., and the tunicate Polycarpa sp. collected from the hydrothermal area each displayed distinctly higher (up to 20 times) total arsenic compared to the control site, with increasing trends while approaching focused hydrothermal venting. Organic and inorganic arsenic species were extracted intact from the tissues of each organism, separated by anion exchange chromatography, and analyzed by inductively-coupled plasma-dynamic reaction cell-mass spectrometry. Overall, speciation patterns for Clavularia were similar for the control site versus the hydrothermal site, although the concentrations were much higher. Elevated concentrations of DMA and cationic forms of arsenic, most likely AB, in Clavularia, both from the control site and from the hydrothermal area suggest its metabolic pathway is not altered due to hydrothermal activity, and is similar to other marine organisms. Arsenic speciation patterns in Polycarpa were also similar for both sites, and suggests uptake of arsenic via food chain, containing neither As(III) nor As(V), but abundant excluded As and DMA. It is unclear if methylation is taking place within this organism or prior to

  10. Badlands and the Carbon cycle: a significant source of petrogenic organic carbon in rivers and marine environments?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copard, Yoann; Eyrolle-Boyer, Frederique; Radakovitch, Olivier; Poirel, Alain; Raimbault, Patrick; Lebouteiller, Caroline; Gairoard, Stéphanie; Di-Giovanni, Christian

    2016-04-01

    A key issue in the study of carbon biogeochemical cycle is to well constrain each carbon origin in term of fluxes between all C-reservoirs. From continental surfaces to oceans, rivers convey particulate organic carbon originate from the biomass (biospheric OC) and /or from the sedimentary rocks (petrogenic OC). Existence and importance of this petrogenic OC export to oceans was debated for several decades (see Copard et al., 2007 and ref.), but it is now assumed that 20% of the global carbon export to ocean has a geological origin (Galy et al., 2015). The main current challenge is to constrain the major contributors to this petrogenic OC flux. Amongst the expected sedimentary sources of petrogenic OC in rivers, sedimentary rocks forming badlands can be rightly considered as some viable candidates. Indeed these rocks show a strong erosion rate, may exceed 50 kt km-2 y-1 and in addition, shales, marls and argillaceous rocks, frequently forming badlands (see Nadal-Romero et al., 2011 for the Mediterranean area), contain a significant amount of petrogenic OC (frequently over 0.50 wt. %, Ronov and Yaroshevsky 1976). Our work illustrates the contribution of badlands, mainly distributed within the Durance catchment (a main tributary of the Rhône river), in the petrogenic OC export to the Mediterranean Sea. The approach is based on (i) the use of previous and new data on radiogenic carbon, (ii) bulk organic geochemistry (Rock-Eval pyrolysis), (iii) optical quantification of particulate OM (palynofacies), performed on suspended sediments from the Durance, the Rhône rivers and from small rivers draining the badlands. A mean erosion rate of badlands, previously calculated for instrumented catchments (SOERE Draix-Bléone, Graz et al., 2012) was also applied to the badlands disseminated within the Durance catchment. These different methodologies converge to a petrogenic contribution of the OC export to the Mediterranean Sea close to 30 %. Badlands from the Durance catchment

  11. Soil organic carbon stocks in estuarine and marine mangrove ecosystems are driven by nutrient colimitation of P and N.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Christian; Weiss, Joanna; Boy, Jens; Iskandar, Issi; Mikutta, Robert; Guggenberger, Georg

    2016-07-01

    Mangroves play an important role in carbon sequestration, but soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks differ between marine and estuarine mangroves, suggesting differing processes and drivers of SOC accumulation. Here, we compared undegraded and degraded marine and estuarine mangroves in a regional approach across the Indonesian archipelago for their SOC stocks and evaluated possible drivers imposed by nutrient limitations along the land-to-sea gradients. SOC stocks in natural marine mangroves (271-572 Mg ha(-1) m(-1)) were much higher than under estuarine mangroves (100-315 Mg ha(-1) m(-1)) with a further decrease caused by degradation to 80-132 Mg ha(-1) m(-1). Soils differed in C/N ratio (marine: 29-64; estuarine: 9-28), δ (15)N (marine: -0.6 to 0.7‰; estuarine: 2.5 to 7.2‰), and plant-available P (marine: 2.3-6.3 mg kg(-1); estuarine: 0.16-1.8 mg kg(-1)). We found N and P supply of sea-oriented mangroves primarily met by dominating symbiotic N2 fixation from air and P import from sea, while mangroves on the landward gradient increasingly covered their demand in N and P from allochthonous sources and SOM recycling. Pioneer plants favored by degradation further increased nutrient recycling from soil resulting in smaller SOC stocks in the topsoil. These processes explained the differences in SOC stocks along the land-to-sea gradient in each mangrove type as well as the SOC stock differences observed between estuarine and marine mangrove ecosystems. This first large-scale evaluation of drivers of SOC stocks under mangroves thus suggests a continuum in mangrove functioning across scales and ecotypes and additionally provides viable proxies for carbon stock estimations in PES or REDD schemes. PMID:27547332

  12. Soil organic carbon stocks in estuarine and marine mangrove ecosystems are driven by nutrient colimitation of P and N.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Christian; Weiss, Joanna; Boy, Jens; Iskandar, Issi; Mikutta, Robert; Guggenberger, Georg

    2016-07-01

    Mangroves play an important role in carbon sequestration, but soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks differ between marine and estuarine mangroves, suggesting differing processes and drivers of SOC accumulation. Here, we compared undegraded and degraded marine and estuarine mangroves in a regional approach across the Indonesian archipelago for their SOC stocks and evaluated possible drivers imposed by nutrient limitations along the land-to-sea gradients. SOC stocks in natural marine mangroves (271-572 Mg ha(-1) m(-1)) were much higher than under estuarine mangroves (100-315 Mg ha(-1) m(-1)) with a further decrease caused by degradation to 80-132 Mg ha(-1) m(-1). Soils differed in C/N ratio (marine: 29-64; estuarine: 9-28), δ (15)N (marine: -0.6 to 0.7‰; estuarine: 2.5 to 7.2‰), and plant-available P (marine: 2.3-6.3 mg kg(-1); estuarine: 0.16-1.8 mg kg(-1)). We found N and P supply of sea-oriented mangroves primarily met by dominating symbiotic N2 fixation from air and P import from sea, while mangroves on the landward gradient increasingly covered their demand in N and P from allochthonous sources and SOM recycling. Pioneer plants favored by degradation further increased nutrient recycling from soil resulting in smaller SOC stocks in the topsoil. These processes explained the differences in SOC stocks along the land-to-sea gradient in each mangrove type as well as the SOC stock differences observed between estuarine and marine mangrove ecosystems. This first large-scale evaluation of drivers of SOC stocks under mangroves thus suggests a continuum in mangrove functioning across scales and ecotypes and additionally provides viable proxies for carbon stock estimations in PES or REDD schemes.

  13. In Situ Activity and Functional Diversity of Microbes Linking Carbon and Nitrogen Cycles in Marine Ecosystems: BI-OMP Program

    SciTech Connect

    Hodson, Robert E.

    2004-05-01

    We developed methods to simultaneously detect genes or gene expression involved with carbon and nitrogen cycling in individual marine bacterial cells in their natural matrices. The technique focuses on in situ polymerase chain reaction which we were the first lab to successfully obtain with intact prokaryotic cells. We listed the papers published to date from this project and summarize highlights of our results.

  14. Black carbon concentrations and sources in the marine boundary layer of the tropical Atlantic Ocean using four methodologies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Combustion-derived aerosols in the marine boundary layer have been poorly studied, especially in remote environments such as the open Atlantic Ocean. The tropical Atlantic has the potential to contain a high concentration of aerosols, such as black carbon, due to the African emis...

  15. Bioaccumulation and Toxicity of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes to Benthic Organisms at the Base of the Marine Food Chain

    EPA Science Inventory

    As the use of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) increases over time, so does the potential for environmental release. This research aimed to determine the toxicity, bioavailability, and bioaccumulation of SWNTs in marine benthic organisms at the base of the food chain. The t...

  16. Towards quantitative ecological risk assessment of elevated carbon dioxide levels in the marine environment.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Pepijn; Tamis, Jacqueline E; Foekema, Edwin M; Klok, Chris; Murk, Albertinka J

    2013-08-30

    The environmental impact of elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) levels has become of more interest in recent years. This, in relation to globally rising CO2 levels and related considerations of geological CO2 storage as a mitigating measure. In the present study effect data from literature were collected in order to conduct a marine ecological risk assessment of elevated CO2 levels, using a Species Sensitivity Distribution (SSD). It became evident that information currently available from the literature is mostly insufficient for such a quantitative approach. Most studies focus on effects of expected future CO2 levels, testing only one or two elevated concentrations. A full dose-response relationship, a uniform measure of exposure, and standardized test protocols are essential for conducting a proper quantitative risk assessment of elevated CO2 levels. Improvements are proposed to make future tests more valuable and usable for quantitative risk assessment.

  17. Climate and marine carbon cycle response to changes in the strength of the Southern Hemispheric westerlies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menviel, L.; Timmermann, A.; Mouchet, A.; Timm, O.

    2008-12-01

    It has been previously suggested that changes in the strength and position of the Southern Hemisphere westerlies could be a key contributor to glacial-interglacial atmospheric CO2 variations. To test this hypothesis, we perform a series of sensitivity experiments using an Earth system model of intermediate complexity. A strengthening of the climatological mean surface winds over the Southern Ocean induces stronger upwelling and increases the formation of Antarctic Bottom Water. Enhanced Ekman pumping brings more dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC)-rich waters to the surface. However, the stronger upwelling also supplies more nutrients to the surface, thereby enhancing marine export production in the Southern Hemisphere and decreasing the DIC content in the euphotic zone. The net response is a small atmospheric CO2 increase (˜5 ppmv) compared to the full glacial-interglacial CO2 amplitude of ˜90 ppmv. Roughly the opposite results are obtained for a weakening of the Southern Hemisphere westerly winds.

  18. Carbon allocation under light and nitrogen resource gradients in two model marine phytoplankton(1).

    PubMed

    Bittar, Thais B; Lin, Yajuan; Sassano, Lara R; Wheeler, Benjamin J; Brown, Susan L; Cochlan, William P; Johnson, Zackary I

    2013-06-01

    Marine phytoplankton have conserved elemental stoichiometry, but there can be significant deviations from this Redfield ratio. Moreover, phytoplankton allocate reduced carbon (C) to different biochemical pools based on nutritional status and light availability, adding complexity to this relationship. This allocation influences physiology, ecology, and biogeochemistry. Here, we present results on the physiological and biochemical properties of two evolutionarily distinct model marine phytoplankton, a diatom (cf. Staurosira sp. Ehrenberg) and a chlorophyte (Chlorella sp. M. Beijerinck) grown under light and nitrogen resource gradients to characterize how carbon is allocated under different energy and substrate conditions. We found that nitrogen (N)-replete growth rate increased monotonically with light until it reached a threshold intensity (~200 μmol photons · m(-2)  · s(-1) ). For Chlorella sp., the nitrogen quota (pg · μm(-3) ) was greatest below this threshold, beyond which it was reduced by the effect of N-stress, while for Staurosira sp. there was no trend. Both species maintained constant maximum quantum yield of photosynthesis (mol C · mol photons(-1) ) over the range of light and N-gradients studied (although each species used different photophysiological strategies). In both species, C:chl a (g · g(-1) ) increased as a function of light and N-stress, while C:N (mol · mol(-1) ) and relative neutral lipid:C (rel. lipid · g(-1) ) were most strongly influenced by N-stress above the threshold light intensity. These results demonstrated that the interaction of substrate (N-availability) and energy gradients influenced C-allocation, and that general patterns of biochemical responses may be conserved among phytoplankton; they provided a framework for predicting phytoplankton biochemical composition in ecological, biogeochemical, or biotechnological applications.

  19. Endocrine regulation of carbonate precipitate formation in marine fish intestine by stanniocalcin and PTHrP.

    PubMed

    Gregório, Sílvia F; Carvalho, Edison S M; Campinho, Marco A; Power, Deborah M; Canário, Adelino V M; Fuentes, Juan

    2014-05-01

    In marine fish, high epithelial bicarbonate secretion by the intestine generates luminal carbonate precipitates of divalent cations that play a key role in water and ion homeostasis. In vitro studies highlight the involvement of the calciotropic hormones PTHrP (parathyroid hormone-related protein) and stanniocalcin (STC) in the regulation of epithelial bicarbonate transport. The present study tested the hypothesis that calciotropic hormones have a regulatory role in carbonate precipitate formation in vivo. Sea bream (Sparus aurata) juveniles received single intraperitoneal injections of piscine PTHrP(1-34), the PTH/PTHrP receptor antagonist PTHrP(7-34) or purified sea bream STC, or were passively immunized with polyclonal rabbit antisera raised against sea bream STC (STC-Ab). Endocrine effects on the expression of the basolateral sodium bicarbonate co-transporter (Slc4a4.A), the apical anion exchangers Slc26a6.A and Slc26a3.B, and the V-type proton pump β-subunit (Atp6v1b) in the anterior intestine were evaluated. In keeping with their calciotropic nature, the hypocalcaemic factors PTHrP(7-34) and STC up-regulated gene expression of all transporters. In contrast, the hypercalcaemic factor PTHrP(1-34) and STC antibodies down-regulated transporters involved in the bicarbonate secretion cascade. Changes in intestine luminal precipitate contents provoked by calcaemic endocrine factors validated these results: 24 h post-injection either PTHrP(1-34) or immunization with STC-Ab reduced the carbonate precipitate content in the sea bream intestine. In contrast, the PTH/PTHrP receptor antagonist PTHrP(7-34) increased not only the precipitated fraction but also the concentration of HCO3(-) equivalents in the intestinal fluid. These results confirm the hypothesis that calciotropic hormones have a regulatory role in carbonate precipitate formation in vivo in the intestine of marine fish. Furthermore, they illustrate for the first time in fish the counteracting effect of PTHr

  20. Physiological and Molecular Biological Characterization of Intracellular Carbonic Anhydrase from the Marine Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum1

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Dan; Hiraoka, Yasutaka; Colman, Brian; Matsuda, Yusuke

    2001-01-01

    A single intracellular carbonic anhydrase (CA) was detected in air-grown and, at reduced levels, in high CO2-grown cells of the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum (UTEX 642). No external CA activity was detected irrespective of growth CO2 conditions. Ethoxyzolamide (0.4 mm), a CA-specific inhibitor, severely inhibited high-affinity photosynthesis at low concentrations of dissolved inorganic carbon, whereas 2 mm acetazolamide had little effect on the affinity for dissolved inorganic carbon, suggesting that internal CA is crucial for the operation of a carbon concentrating mechanism in P. tricornutum. Internal CA was purified 36.7-fold of that of cell homogenates by ammonium sulfate precipitation, and two-step column chromatography on diethylaminoethyl-sephacel and p-aminomethylbenzene sulfone amide agarose. The purified CA was shown, by SDS-PAGE, to comprise an electrophoretically single polypeptide of 28 kD under both reduced and nonreduced conditions. The entire sequence of the cDNA of this CA was obtained by the rapid amplification of cDNA ends method and indicated that the cDNA encodes 282 amino acids. Comparison of this putative precursor sequence with the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the purified CA indicated that it included a possible signal sequence of up to 46 amino acids at the N terminus. The mature CA was found to consist of 236 amino acids and the sequence was homologous to β-type CAs. Even though the zinc-ligand amino acid residues were shown to be completely conserved, the amino acid residues that may constitute a CO2-binding site appeared to be unique among the β-CAs so far reported. PMID:11500545

  1. Quantification of extracellular carbonic anhydrase activity in two marine diatoms and investigation of its role.

    PubMed

    Hopkinson, Brian M; Meile, Christof; Shen, Chen

    2013-06-01

    Many microalgae induce an extracellular carbonic anhydrase (eCA), associated with the cell surface, at low carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations. This enzyme is thought to aid inorganic carbon uptake by generating CO2 at the cell surface, but alternative roles have been proposed. We developed a new approach to quantify eCA activity in which a reaction-diffusion model is fit to data on (18)O removal from inorganic carbon. In contrast to previous methods, eCA activity is treated as a surface process, allowing the effects of eCA on cell boundary-layer chemistry to be assessed. Using this approach, we measured eCA activity in two marine diatoms (Thalassiosira pseudonana and Thalassiosira weissflogii), characterized the kinetics of this enzyme, and studied its regulation as a function of culture pH and CO2 concentration. In support of a role for eCA in CO2 supply, eCA activity specifically responded to low CO2 rather than to changes in pH or HCO3(-), and the rates of eCA activity are nearly optimal for maintaining cell surface CO2 concentrations near those in the bulk solution. Although the CO2 gradients abolished by eCA are small (less than 0.5 μm concentration difference between bulk and cell surface), CO2 uptake in these diatoms is a passive process driven by small concentration gradients. Analysis of the effects of short-term and long-term eCA inhibition on photosynthesis and growth indicates that eCA provides a small energetic benefit by reducing the surface-to-bulk CO2 gradient. Alternative roles for eCA in CO2 recovery as HCO3(-) and surface pH regulation were investigated, but eCA was found to have minimal effects on these processes.

  2. Miocene ocean circulation inferred from marine carbon cycle modeling combined with benthic isotope records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butzin, Martin; Lohmann, Gerrit; Bickert, Torsten

    2011-02-01

    In a modeling sensitivity study we investigate the evolution of the ocean circulation and of marine carbon isotope (δ13C) records during the Miocene (about 23-5 million years ago). For this purpose we ran an ocean-circulation carbon cycle model of intermediate complexity (Large Scale Geostrophic- Hamburg Ocean Carbon Cycle Model, version 2s) exploring various seaway configurations. Our investigations confirm that the Central American Seaway played a decisive role in the history of the Miocene ocean circulation. In simulations with a deep Central American Seaway (depth range 1-3 km), typical for the early to middle Miocene, deep water production in the North Atlantic is absent or weak, while the meridional overturning circulation is dominated by water mass formation in the Southern Ocean. Deep water formation in the North Atlantic begins when the Central American Seaway shoals to a few hundreds of meters, which is typical for the late Miocene. Our results do not support ideas that the mid-Miocene closing of the Eastern Tethys contributed to Antarctic glaciation. On the other hand, we find some water exchange between the Indian Ocean and the Atlantic via the Eastern Tethys during the early Miocene. Our model results for the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation and for Atlantic δ13C during the late Miocene are largely independent from depth variations of the Greenland-Scotland Ridge. To a large extent, the evolution of Miocene deep-sea δ13C records can be explained with large-scale ocean circulation changes. Our model-data comparison for the middle and early Miocene suggests that during the early Neogene the seaway effect on benthic δ13C may have been superimposed by further factors such as climate regime shifts and/or terrestrial carbon cycle changes.

  3. CO{sub 2} huff-n-puff process in a light oil shallow carbonate reservoir. Annual report, January 1, 1996--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Prieditis, J.; Wehner, S.

    1998-01-01

    The application of cyclic CO{sub 2}, often referred to as the CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff process, may find its niche in the maturing waterfloods of the Permian Basin. Coupling the CO{sub 2} H-n-P process to miscible flooding applications could provide the needed revenue to sufficiently mitigate near-term negative cash flow concerns in the capital intensive miscible projects. Texaco Exploration & Production Inc. and the U.S. Department of Energy have teamed up in an attempt to develop the CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff process in the Grayburg and San Andres formations; a light oil, shallow shelf carbonate reservoir that exists throughout the Permian Basin. A significant amount of oil reserves are located in carbonate reservoirs. Specifically, the carbonates deposited in shallow shelf (SSC) environments make up the largest percentage of known reservoirs within the Permian Basin of North America. Many of these known resources have been under waterflooding operations for decades and are at risk of abandonment if crude oil recoveries cannot be economically enhanced. The selected site for this demonstration project is the Central Vacuum Unit waterflood in Lea County, New Mexico. Miscible CO{sub 2} flooding is the process of choice for enhancing recovery of light oils and already accounts for over 12% of the Permian Basin`s daily production. There are significant probable reserves associated with future miscible CO{sub 2} projects. However, many are marginally economic at current market conditions due to large up-front capital commitments for a peak response which may be several years in the future. The resulting negative cash-flow is sometimes too much for an operator to absorb. The CO{sub 2} H-n-P process is being investigated as a near-term option to mitigate the negative cash-flow situation--allowing acceleration of inventoried miscible CO{sub 2} projects when coupled together.

  4. Modeling Shallow Groundwater Geochemistry and Carbon Isotopes: Test of Methodology for CO2 Storage Evaluation at an EOR Site, West Texas, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanak, K. D.; Smyth, R. C.; Yang, C.; Hovorka, S. D.

    2009-05-01

    Geochemical mixing, reaction, and isotopic models are being used to study the Dockum aquifer above the SACROC oilfield in Scurry County, Texas, the longest running (>35 years) engineered CO2 injection on record. Geochemical data used in the modeling are from fresh to slightly saline groundwater (200 to 500 ft depth Triassic-age Dockum Fm. and Permian-age evaporite horizons), and brine from the deeper (6,000 to 7,000 ft) injection/production zone. The goals of this study are to: 1) assess the degree of interaction between shallow groundwater and CO2 injectate, and 2) develop low-cost methods for monitoring shallow groundwater at CO2 sequestration sites. Injectate CO2 is not evident in freshwater above SACROC. Geochemical parameters in groundwater samples do not differ significantly from regional trends and partial pressures (PCO2) of dissolved CO2 are within normal ranges (10-1.6 to 10-3.0). PHREEQC model results show that cation exchange and mixing of Dockum groundwater with Ca-SO4 water from underlying Permian evaporite deposits (< 22%) and Na-Cl produced brines (< 0.8%) drives dedolomitization [Ca2+ + CaMg(CO3)2 = Mg2+ + 2CaCO2] of aquifer carbonate. This is in contrast to calcite dissolution [CO2 + H2O + CaCO2 = Ca2+ + 2HCO3-], which is a common effect of CO2 gas in freshwater aquifers. Modeling of carbon isotopes (after Appelo and Postma, 2005) indicates the d13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the Dockum (-3.6 to -13.2 per mil) is dominated by dissolution of dolomite (-2.5 to -7.7 per mil) with initial DIC conditions (-15 to -20 per mil) in equilibrium with a microbial CO2 source (-23 to -28 per mil). Because CO2 gas is not a reactant (carbonate for calcite precipitation originates from dolomite dissolution), input of injectate CO2 has little or no impact on isotopes for normal ranges of PCO2. Therefore carbon isotope ratios may not be useful parameters for monitoring groundwater impacts from CO2 injection in areas where mixing and dedolomitization

  5. The influence of the biological pump on ocean chemistry: implications for long-term trends in marine redox chemistry, the global carbon cycle, and marine animal ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Meyer, K M; Ridgwell, A; Payne, J L

    2016-05-01

    The net export of organic matter from the surface ocean and its respiration at depth create vertical gradients in nutrient and oxygen availability that play a primary role in structuring marine ecosystems. Changes in the properties of this 'biological pump' have been hypothesized to account for important shifts in marine ecosystem structure, including the Cambrian explosion. However, the influence of variation in the behavior of the biological pump on ocean biogeochemistry remains poorly quantified, preventing any detailed exploration of how changes in the biological pump over geological time may have shaped long-term shifts in ocean chemistry, biogeochemical cycling, and ecosystem structure. Here, we use a 3-dimensional Earth system model of intermediate complexity to quantitatively explore the effects of the biological pump on marine chemistry. We find that when respiration of sinking organic matter is efficient, due to slower sinking or higher respiration rates, anoxia tends to be more prevalent and to occur in shallower waters. Consequently, the Phanerozoic trend toward less bottom-water anoxia in continental shelf settings can potentially be explained by a change in the spatial dynamics of nutrient cycling rather than by any change in the ocean phosphate inventory. The model results further suggest that the Phanerozoic decline in the prevalence ocean anoxia is, in part, a consequence of the evolution of larger phytoplankton, many of which produce mineralized tests. We hypothesize that the Phanerozoic trend toward greater animal abundance and metabolic demand was driven more by increased oxygen concentrations in shelf environments than by greater food (nutrient) availability. In fact, a lower-than-modern ocean phosphate inventory in our closed system model is unable to account for the Paleozoic prevalence of bottom-water anoxia. Overall, these model simulations suggest that the changing spatial distribution of photosynthesis and respiration in the oceans has

  6. The influence of the biological pump on ocean chemistry: implications for long-term trends in marine redox chemistry, the global carbon cycle, and marine animal ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Meyer, K M; Ridgwell, A; Payne, J L

    2016-05-01

    The net export of organic matter from the surface ocean and its respiration at depth create vertical gradients in nutrient and oxygen availability that play a primary role in structuring marine ecosystems. Changes in the properties of this 'biological pump' have been hypothesized to account for important shifts in marine ecosystem structure, including the Cambrian explosion. However, the influence of variation in the behavior of the biological pump on ocean biogeochemistry remains poorly quantified, preventing any detailed exploration of how changes in the biological pump over geological time may have shaped long-term shifts in ocean chemistry, biogeochemical cycling, and ecosystem structure. Here, we use a 3-dimensional Earth system model of intermediate complexity to quantitatively explore the effects of the biological pump on marine chemistry. We find that when respiration of sinking organic matter is efficient, due to slower sinking or higher respiration rates, anoxia tends to be more prevalent and to occur in shallower waters. Consequently, the Phanerozoic trend toward less bottom-water anoxia in continental shelf settings can potentially be explained by a change in the spatial dynamics of nutrient cycling rather than by any change in the ocean phosphate inventory. The model results further suggest that the Phanerozoic decline in the prevalence ocean anoxia is, in part, a consequence of the evolution of larger phytoplankton, many of which produce mineralized tests. We hypothesize that the Phanerozoic trend toward greater animal abundance and metabolic demand was driven more by increased oxygen concentrations in shelf environments than by greater food (nutrient) availability. In fact, a lower-than-modern ocean phosphate inventory in our closed system model is unable to account for the Paleozoic prevalence of bottom-water anoxia. Overall, these model simulations suggest that the changing spatial distribution of photosynthesis and respiration in the oceans has

  7. Delayed recovery of non-marine tetrapods after the end-Permian mass extinction tracks global carbon cycle

    PubMed Central

    Irmis, Randall B.; Whiteside, Jessica H.

    2012-01-01

    During the end-Permian mass extinction, marine ecosystems suffered a major drop in diversity, which was maintained throughout the Early Triassic until delayed recovery during the Middle Triassic. This depressed diversity in the Early Triassic correlates with multiple major perturbations to the global carbon cycle, interpreted as either intrinsic ecosystem or external palaeoenvironmental effects. In contrast, the terrestrial record of extinction and recovery is less clear; the effects and magnitude of the end-Permian extinction on non-marine vertebrates are particularly controversial. We use specimen-level data from southern Africa and Russia to investigate the palaeodiversity dynamics of non-marine tetrapods across the Permo-Triassic boundary by analysing sample-standardized generic richness, evenness and relative abundance. In addition, we investigate the potential effects of sampling, geological and taxonomic biases on these data. Our analyses demonstrate that non-marine tetrapods were severely affected by the end-Permian mass extinction, and that these assemblages did not begin to recover until the Middle Triassic. These data are congruent with those from land plants and marine invertebrates. Furthermore, they are consistent with the idea that unstable low-diversity post-extinction ecosystems were subject to boom–bust cycles, reflected in multiple Early Triassic perturbations of the carbon cycle. PMID:22031757

  8. Delayed recovery of non-marine tetrapods after the end-Permian mass extinction tracks global carbon cycle.

    PubMed

    Irmis, Randall B; Whiteside, Jessica H

    2012-04-01

    During the end-Permian mass extinction, marine ecosystems suffered a major drop in diversity, which was maintained throughout the Early Triassic until delayed recovery during the Middle Triassic. This depressed diversity in the Early Triassic correlates with multiple major perturbations to the global carbon cycle, interpreted as either intrinsic ecosystem or external palaeoenvironmental effects. In contrast, the terrestrial record of extinction and recovery is less clear; the effects and magnitude of the end-Permian extinction on non-marine vertebrates are particularly controversial. We use specimen-level data from southern Africa and Russia to investigate the palaeodiversity dynamics of non-marine tetrapods across the Permo-Triassic boundary by analysing sample-standardized generic richness, evenness and relative abundance. In addition, we investigate the potential effects of sampling, geological and taxonomic biases on these data. Our analyses demonstrate that non-marine tetrapods were severely affected by the end-Permian mass extinction, and that these assemblages did not begin to recover until the Middle Triassic. These data are congruent with those from land plants and marine invertebrates. Furthermore, they are consistent with the idea that unstable low-diversity post-extinction ecosystems were subject to boom-bust cycles, reflected in multiple Early Triassic perturbations of the carbon cycle. PMID:22031757

  9. Linked changes in marine dissolved organic carbon molecular size and radiocarbon age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, B. D.; Primeau, F. W.; Beaupré, S. R.; Guilderson, T. P.; Druffel, E. R. M.; McCarthy, M. D.

    2016-10-01

    Marine dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is a major global carbon reservoir, yet its cycling remains poorly understood. Previous work suggests that DOC molecular size and chemical composition can significantly affect its bioavailability. Thus, DOC size and composition may control DOC cycling and radiocarbon age (via Δ14C). Here we show that DOC molecular size is correlated to DOC Δ14C in the Pacific Ocean. Our results, based on a series of increasing molecular size fractions from three depths in the Pacific, show increasing DOC Δ14C with increasing molecular size. We use a size-age distribution model to predict the DOC and Δ14C of ultrafiltered DOC. The model predicts both large and small surface DOC with high Δ14C and a narrow range (200-500 Da) of low Δ14C DOC. Deep model offsets suggest different size distributions and/or Δ14C sources at 670-915 m. Our results suggest that molecular size and composition are linked to DOC reactivity and storage in the ocean.

  10. Organic carbon composition of marine sediments: effect of oxygen exposure on oil generation potential.

    PubMed

    Gélinas, Y; Baldock, J A; Hedges, J I

    2001-10-01

    Anaerobic sedimentary conditions have traditionally been linked to the generation of the source rocks for petroleum formation. However, the influence of sedimentary redox conditions on the composition of freshly deposited organic matter (OM) is not clear. We assessed the effect of in situ exposure time to oxic conditions on the composition of OM accumulating in different coastal and deep-sea sediments using solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). 13C NMR spectra were resolved into mixtures of model components to distinguish between alkyl carbon present in protein and nonprotein structures. There is an inverse relation between the length of exposure to oxic conditions and the relative abundance of nonprotein alkyl (alkylNP) carbon, whose concentration is two orders of magnitude higher in coastal sediments with short exposure times than in deep-sea sediments with long exposure times. All alkylNP-rich samples contain a physically separate polymethylene component similar in composition to algaenans and kerogens in type I oil shales. The duration of exposure to oxic conditions appears to directly influence the quality and oil generation potential of OM in marine shales.

  11. Geochemistry of metastable carbonate minerals from the Brush Creek marine interval (Missourian), Indiana County, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Cercone, K.R.; Kime, A.; Mutchler, S.; Rittle, K. )

    1991-08-01

    Many marine fossils from the Missourian Brush Creek interval of western Pennsylvania display partial preservation of metastable aragonite and high-magnesium calcite shell material. Bivalve mollusks have been shown by x-ray diffraction to contain as much as 96% aragonite, with lesser amounts of both high-magnesium and low-magnesium calcite. Stable carbon and oxygen isotopic ratios from these bivalves suggest they precipitated in equilibrium with Pennsylvanian ocean water. The bellerophontid Pharkidonotus, which exhibits partial recrystallization textures under scanning electron microscopy, consists of 45% aragonite and 55% low-magnesium calcite, and has slightly more depleted isotopic values than bivalves. Crinoids also appear to have been partially recrystallized, resulting in a mixture of primary high-magnesium calcite and secondary low-magnesium calcite and microdolomite, with much of the original shell structure still preserved. The degree of preservation of metastable carbonate minerals varies both stratigraphically and spatially within the Brush Creek interval. Maximum preservation occurs in organic-rich shales deposited in low-lying areas of the Brush Creek sea floor. The preservation of aragonite and high-magnesium calcite in such units may have resulted from a lack of circulating porewater during early diagenesis.

  12. Relationship between carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios for lower trophic ecosystem in marine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aita, M. N.; Ishii, R.; Tadokoro, K.; Smith, S. L.; Wada, E.

    2012-12-01

    To examine the relationship between carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios (δ13C and δ15N) along food chains, we analyzed using the data from the Oyashio waters at the western North Pacific (samples collected from March to October 2009), the warm-core ring 86-B derived from the Kuroshio extension region (preserved samples), and previously published data from the Gulf of Alaska and Antarctic Ocean. The statistical analysis suggested a common slope of δ15N versus δ13C (Δδ15N/Δδ13C) among regions. We attribute this similarity to common physiological aspects of feeding processes (e.g., kinetic isotope effects inherent in the processes of amino acid synthesis). We also compared seasonal differences seasonal in Δδ15N/Δδ13C for the euphotic layers of the Oyashio waters. The Δδ15N/Δδ13C slope of the food chain during the spring bloom differs from its common value in other seasons. If we could better understand both carbon and nitrogen trophic fractionation within ecosystems, the stable isotope ratios may help to elucidate migratory behavior of higher trophic levels such as fishes in marine ecosystems as well as frame work of biogeochemical cycles in question.

  13. Remanence Acquisition in Marine Carbonates: a Lesson from the K-T Boundary Interval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrajevitch, A.; Kodama, K.

    2008-12-01

    An apparently complete carbonate-rich Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary interval in ODP section 119-738C- 20R-5 from the southern Kerguelen Plateau provides a unique insight into processes of magnetization acquisition in marine carbonates. The boundary interval is characterized by a 1-m-thick clay-rich zone. The basal 15 cm of this zone is finely laminated, the upper part is bioturbated. It has been inferred that the clay- rich zone formed over a long time interval, and the bulk of the clay in this zone has a local provenance. Although the elevated Ir concentration and the evolutionary change in the nannofossil assemblage are spread over the laminated interval, there is no recognizable change in the composition of the clay mineral assemblage between the laminated and bioturbated zones. No faunal, mineralogical, or chemical evidence for anoxic/sulfate-reducing conditions within the clay-rich zone was found. The total iron content of the clay-rich zone co-varies with the alumosilicate content, indicating detrital source for iron. Normalized by the alumosilicate content, the laminated and bioturbated intervals have comparable total iron values, yet strikingly different magnetic properties. The initial susceptibility and NRM intensities are approximately an order of magnitude higher in the bioturbated interval compared to the laminated one. Our detailed rock magnetic study indicates that PSD magnetite grains likely of biogenic origin are the dominant iron-bearing phase in the bioturbated interval. In the laminated interval, apart from a small ferromagnetic fraction with MD-like behavior, non-silicate-bound iron is mainly sequestered in paramagnetic phases, probably (poorly crystalline) oxyhydroxides. It appears that a shut-down of biological productivity after the K-T event allowed preservation of the initial detrital/early authigenic iron phases that are dominated by reactive iron oxyhydroxides. With the recovery of normal biological activity as evidenced by the resumption

  14. Primary Ediacaran Ooid Formation Texture Changes as an Indicator of Shifts in Local Shallow-Sea Chemistry: Exploring Diagenetic Effects on Preservation of Carbonate Associated Nitrate in the Johnnie Formation, Death Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, D. A.; Prokopenko, M. G.; Bergmann, K.; Gaines, R. R.; Corsetti, F. A.

    2015-12-01

    We examined a stratigraphic section of the Johnnie Oolite containing a large Ediacaran negative d13C excursion to evaluate potential effects of diagenesis on Carbonate Associated Nitrate (CAN). Previously, high concentrations of CAN have been determined in this carbonate sequence, potentially pointing to a large perturbation in the marine nitrogen cycle prior to the onset of the d13C excursion. The main source of nitrate within the ocean comes from oxidation of biologically fixed nitrogen. Nitrate enters the carbonate mineral lattice in trace quantities, and may serve as a proxy for the degree of ocean oxygenation as well as for the concentration of fixed nitrogen in the environment. Until now no work has been done to address potential diagenetic alteration of the CAN concentrations. Here we conducted a comparative study between a set of redox-sensitive trace metals, carbonate textures and CAN concentrations in order to place some initial constraints on the extent of diagenetic processes, and in doing so to determine whether the CAN signal within the Johnnie Oolite is primary. We found no clear relationship between CAN and any considered diagenetic markers, pointing to a likely primary nature of the CAN signature. Furthermore, examination of the properties of the ooids that form the rock revealed potential indications of primary environmental changes recorded within the Johnnie Oolite. Ooids are known to form by two distinct mechanisms, which produce either tangential-concentric ooids or radial. Focusing on a single ~3 m stratigraphic section, the North Springs Mountains area, we found a clear shift from tangential-concentric formation at the base to radial formation near the top, with a distinct change occurring between 2-2.5 m. The distinction between ooid formation mechanisms is often thought to be governed by changes in the turbidity of their shallow depositional environments; however, the lack of any marked changes in sedimentary sorting point to a chemical

  15. IMBER (Integrated Marine Biogeochemistry and Ecosystem Research: Support of Ocean Carbon Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimetz-Planchon, J.; Gattuso, J.; Maddison, L.; Bakker, D. C.; Gruber, N.

    2011-12-01

    IMBER (Integrated Marine Biogeochemistry and Ecosystem Research), co-sponsored by SCOR (Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research) and IGBP (International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme), coordinates research that focuses on understanding and predicting changes in oceanic food webs and biogeochemical cycles that arise from global change. An integral part of this overall goal is to understand the marine carbon cycle, with emphasis on changes that may occur as a result of a changing climate, increased atmospheric CO2 levels and/or reduced oceanic pH. To address these key ocean carbon issues, IMBER and SOLAS (Surface Ocean Lower Atmosphere Study), formed the joint SOLAS-IMBER Carbon, or SIC Working Group. The SIC Working Group activities are organised into three sub-groups. Sub-group 1 (Surface Ocean Systems) focuses on synthesis, instrumentation and technology development, VOS (Voluntary Observing Ships) and mixed layer sampling strategies. The group contributed to the development of SOCAT (Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas, www.socat.info), a global compilation of underway surface water fCO2 (fugacity of CO2) data in common format. It includes 6.3 million measurements from 1767 cruises from 1968 and 2008 by more than 10 countries. SOCAT will be publically available and will serve a wide range of user communities. Its public release is planned for September 2011. SOCAT is strongly supported by IOCCP and CARBOOCEAN. Sub-group 2 (Interior Ocean Carbon Storage) covers inventory and observations, natural variability, transformation and interaction with modelling. It coordinated a review of vulnerabilities of the decadal variations of the interior ocean carbon and oxygen cycle. It has also developed a plan to add dissolved oxygen sensors to the ARGO float program in order to address the expected loss of oxygen as a result of ocean warming. The group also focuses on the global synthesis of ocean interior carbon observations to determine the oceanic uptake of anthropogenic CO2 since

  16. Heterogeneous Shallow-Shelf Carbonate Buildups in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado: Targets for Increased Oil Production and Reserves Using Horizontal Drilling Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Chidsey, Thomas C. Jr.; Eby, David E.; Wray, Laura L.

    2001-04-19

    The primary objective of this project was to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and transfer of horizontal drilling technology in the Paradox basin, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, then the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 25 to 50 million barrels (40-80 million m3) of oil. This project was designed to characterize several shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvania (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation, choose the best candidate(s) for a pilot demonstration project to drill horizontally from existing vertical wells, monitor well performances, and report associated validation activities.

  17. Heterogeneous Shallow-Shelf Carbonate Buildups in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado: Targets for Increased Oil Production and Reserves Using Horizontal Drilling Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Chidsey, Jr., Thomas C.; Eby, David E.; Wray, Laural L.

    2001-11-26

    The project's primary objective was to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and transfer of horizontal drilling technology in the Paradox Basin, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, then the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox Basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 25 to 50 million barrels (4-8 million m3) of oil. This project was designed to characterize several shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation, choose the best candidate(s) for a pilot demonstration project to drill horizontally from existing vertical wells, monitor well performance(s), and report associated validation activities.

  18. Ballast minerals and the sinking carbon flux in the ocean: carbon-specific respiration rates and sinking velocities of macroscopic organic aggregates (marine snow)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iversen, M. H.; Ploug, H.

    2010-05-01

    Recent observations have shown that fluxes of ballast minerals (calcium carbonate, opal, and lithogenic material) and organic carbon fluxes are closely correlated in the bathypelagic zones of the ocean. Hence it has been hypothesized that incorporation of biogenic minerals within marine aggregates could either protect the organic matter from decomposition and/or increase the sinking velocity via ballasting of the aggregates. Here we present the first combined data on size, sinking velocity, carbon-specific respiration rate, and composition measured directly in three aggregate types; Emiliania huxleyi aggregates (carbonate ballasted), Skeletonema costatum aggregates (opal ballasted), and aggregates made from a mix of both E. huxleyi and S. costatum (carbonate and opal ballasted). Overall average carbon-specific respiration rate was ~0.13 d-1 and did not vary with aggregate type and size. Ballasting from carbonate resulted in 2- to 2.5-fold higher sinking velocities than aggregates ballasted by opal. We compiled literature data on carbon-specific respiration rate and sinking velocity measured in aggregate of different composition and sources. Compiled carbon-specific respiration rates (including this study) vary between 0.08 d-1 and 0.20 d-1. Sinking velocity increases with increasing aggregate size within homogeneous sources of aggregates. When compared across different particle and aggregate sources, however, sinking velocity appeared to be independent of particle or aggregate size. The calculated carbon remineralization length scale due to microbial respiration and sinking velocity of mm-large marine aggregates was higher for calcite ballasted aggregates as compared to opal-ballasted aggregates. It varied between 0.0002 m-1 and 0.0030 m-1, and decreased with increasing aggregate size.

  19. Seasonality of water chemistry, carbonate production, and biometric features of two species of Chara in a shallow clear water lake.

    PubMed

    Pukacz, Andrzej; Pełechaty, Mariusz; Frankowski, Marcin; Kowalski, Artur; Zwijacz-Koszałka, Kinga

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the temporal variability of biometric features and the carbonate production of two charophytes: Chara polyacantha A. Braun and Chara rudis A. Braun against the background of the physical-chemical properties of water. The investigation was carried out in a small, mid-forest Lake Jasne (western Poland). It is a polymictic, mesotrophic, hardwater ecosystem dominated by charophyte vegetation. Each month, 10 individuals of each species were characterized in terms of morphometric features, fresh and dry weight, and the percentage of calcium carbonate. Additionally, physical-chemical parameters of the water were studied. The results of physical-chemical analyses indicated similar habitat conditions for both species. Despite smaller dry weight C. polyacantha was characterized by greater morphological variability and higher rates of growth and percentage share of calcium carbonate in dry mass than C. rudis. The percentage of calcium carbonates in dry mass did not differ significantly between the species and exceeded 60%, reaching the maximum (76% in C. polyacantha) in July and August. For both species, distinct correlations between the structure of biomass and morphological features were found. The obtained results show the great importance of charophyte vegetation in carbon cycling and functioning of lake ecosystems.

  20. Seasonality of water chemistry, carbonate production, and biometric features of two species of Chara in a shallow clear water lake.

    PubMed

    Pukacz, Andrzej; Pełechaty, Mariusz; Frankowski, Marcin; Kowalski, Artur; Zwijacz-Koszałka, Kinga

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the temporal variability of biometric features and the carbonate production of two charophytes: Chara polyacantha A. Braun and Chara rudis A. Braun against the background of the physical-chemical properties of water. The investigation was carried out in a small, mid-forest Lake Jasne (western Poland). It is a polymictic, mesotrophic, hardwater ecosystem dominated by charophyte vegetation. Each month, 10 individuals of each species were characterized in terms of morphometric features, fresh and dry weight, and the percentage of calcium carbonate. Additionally, physical-chemical parameters of the water were studied. The results of physical-chemical analyses indicated similar habitat conditions for both species. Despite smaller dry weight C. polyacantha was characterized by greater morphological variability and higher rates of growth and percentage share of calcium carbonate in dry mass than C. rudis. The percentage of calcium carbonates in dry mass did not differ significantly between the species and exceeded 60%, reaching the maximum (76% in C. polyacantha) in July and August. For both species, distinct correlations between the structure of biomass and morphological features were found. The obtained results show the great importance of charophyte vegetation in carbon cycling and functioning of lake ecosystems. PMID:25401126

  1. Telling time in shallow water carbonates - from the Cambrian of Morocco to the Holocene of the Bahamas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloof, A. C.; Bowring, S. A.; Fike, D. A.; Grotzinger, J. P.

    2008-12-01

    Virtually all pre-Mesozoic records of changing ocean-atmosphere chemistry and temperature are derived from chemical sediments deposited on continental shelves. Paired isotope studies of these carbonate rocks have placed the evolution of life in the context of a variable and, at times, non-uniformitarian carbon-sulfur cycle. Furthermore, paired δ13C and 87Sr/86Sr have allowed for global correlation of these stratigraphic successions and have built a framework for studying the history of global change. However, in the absence of quantitative constraints on the rate and duration of geochemical variability, paired stable isotope data tell us little about the processes most important to the variable carbon-sulfur cycle and the co-evolution of life and the surface environment. We discuss two methods of telling time in shelfal carbonate successions. First, we illustrate the use of interbedded volcanic ashes in determining the rate of isotopic change during the Cambrian radiation of animals in Morocco. Next, we present a study of Holocene stratigraphy in the Bahamas that sheds light on the characteristic timescales for the dominant processes controlling carbonate production on continental shelves, and discuss the promise and risk of determining an absolute timescale in the absence of geochronology.

  2. Seasonality of Water Chemistry, Carbonate Production, and Biometric Features of Two Species of Chara in a Shallow Clear Water Lake

    PubMed Central

    Pełechaty, Mariusz; Kowalski, Artur; Zwijacz-Koszałka, Kinga

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the temporal variability of biometric features and the carbonate production of two charophytes: Chara polyacantha A. Braun and Chara rudis A. Braun against the background of the physical-chemical properties of water. The investigation was carried out in a small, mid-forest Lake Jasne (western Poland). It is a polymictic, mesotrophic, hardwater ecosystem dominated by charophyte vegetation. Each month, 10 individuals of each species were characterized in terms of morphometric features, fresh and dry weight, and the percentage of calcium carbonate. Additionally, physical-chemical parameters of the water were studied. The results of physical-chemical analyses indicated similar habitat conditions for both species. Despite smaller dry weight C. polyacantha was characterized by greater morphological variability and higher rates of growth and percentage share of calcium carbonate in dry mass than C. rudis. The percentage of calcium carbonates in dry mass did not differ significantly between the species and exceeded 60%, reaching the maximum (76% in C. polyacantha) in July and August. For both species, distinct correlations between the structure of biomass and morphological features were found. The obtained results show the great importance of charophyte vegetation in carbon cycling and functioning of lake ecosystems. PMID:25401126

  3. OBSERVATIONS ON THE TRANSPORT OF CARBON DIOXIDE IN THE BLOOD OF SOME MARINE INVERTEBRATES.

    PubMed

    Parsons, T R; Parsons, W

    1923-11-20

    Although the results we have recorded merely serve to indicate the possibilities of this interesting field of investigation, we have sufficient data to enable us to draw certain general conclusions. In the first place it is evident that the bloods of the more highly developed marine invertebrates, such as the active Crustacia and the Cephalopods, are specially adapted for the carriage of carbon dioxide. The quantity of carbon dioxide taken up by the blood of Maia, Palinurus, or Octopus at any given tension of the gas is, in general, about twice or three times as great as that which is taken up by sea water under the same conditions. On the other hand, the blood of a slow, creeping form, such as Aplysia, or of a sessile animal such as the ascidian Phallusia shows no more adaptation for the carriage of carbon dioxide than does sea water. But our estimations of the CO(2) content of the blood as it circulates in the bodies of these more active invertebrates show that the conditions of transport of this gas differ considerably in some respects from those which obtain in mammals. For the invertebrate blood in the body contains only a relatively small quantity of carbon dioxide, averaging in the forms we examined from 3 to 10 cc. per 100 cc. of blood. This forms a marked contrast with the condition found in mammals where even the arterial blood contains about 50 cc. of CO(2) per 100 cc. of blood. The invertebrate, therefore, works at a very low CO(2) tension. There is a twofold significance in this circumstance. In the first place, it means that only the first portion of the carbon dioxide dissociation curve is in use in the respiratory mechanism. Now an inspection of our curves will show that at these low carbon dioxide tensions the dissociation curves tend to be steeper than at higher tensions. As we intend to show in a later paper it can be proved mathematically that, other things being equal, a blood with a carbon dissociation curve of moderate steepness, i.e. one in

  4. Thallium isotope evidence for a permanent increase in marine organic carbon export in the early Eocene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nielsen, S.G.; Mar-Gerrison, S.; Gannoun, A.; LaRowe, D.; Klemm, V.; Halliday, A.N.; Burton, K.W.; Hein, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    The first high resolution thallium (Tl) isotope records in two ferromanganese crusts (Fe-Mn crusts), CD29 and D11 from the Pacific Ocean are presented. The crusts record pronounced but systematic changes in 205Tl/203Tl that are unlikely to reflect diagenetic overprinting or changes in isotope fractionation between seawater and Fe-Mn crusts. It appears more likely that the Fe-Mn crusts track the Tl isotope composition of seawater over time. The present-day oceanic residence time of Tl is estimated to be about 20,000??yr, such that the isotopic composition should reflect ocean-wide events. New and published Os isotope data are used to construct age models for these crusts that are consistent with each other and significantly different from previous age models. Application of these age models reveals that the Tl isotope composition of seawater changed systematically between ~ 55??Ma and ~ 45??Ma. Using a simple box model it is shown that the present day Tl isotope composition of seawater depends almost exclusively on the ratio between the two principal output fluxes of marine Tl. These fluxes are the rate of removal of Tl from seawater via scavenging by authigenic Fe-Mn oxyhydroxide precipitation and the uptake rate of Tl during low temperature alteration of oceanic crust. It is highly unlikely that the latter has changed greatly. Therefore, assuming that the marine Tl budget has also not changed significantly during the Cenozoic, the low 205Tl/203Tl during the Paleocene is best explained by a more than four-fold higher sequestration of Tl by Fe-Mn oxyhydroxides compared with at the present day. The calculated Cenozoic Tl isotopic seawater curve displays a striking similarity to that of S, providing evidence that both systems may have responded to the same change in the marine environment. A plausible explanation is a marked and permanent increase in organic carbon export from ~ 55??Ma to ~ 45??Ma, which led to higher pyrite burial rates and a significantly reduced

  5. INTERACTION OF METALS AND ORGAINIC CARBON COLLOIDS IN ANOXIC INTERSTITIAL WATERS OF MARINE SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Marine colloids are an important component of natural water geochemistry critical to the cycling, speciation and bioavailability of metals in marine sediments. In sediment, metals exist in three phases: particulate, colloidal and dissolved. Dissolved metal concentrations have bee...

  6. Stable isotope composition of calcite fossils and bulk carbonate as a proxy for the reconstruction of Jurassic marine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabas, A. Z.

    2012-12-01

    Changes in global ocean productivity may be studied by means of carbon isotope analyses of marine carbonates. The analyses of the isotopic composition of carbonate oxygen are a basis for seawater temperature reconstructions, which are indicative of environmental and climatic changes. In this study we use carbon and oxygen isotope composition for the evaluation of the environmental changes in the Pieniny Klippen Basin (PKB) during the Jurassic. PKB is a narrow and long structure separating the Outer and Central Carpathians. The sample set includes the stratigraphically well-dated bulk carbonates and calcite fossils from several outcrops in Polish, Slovakian and Ukrainian parts of the PKB. Sample screening for the state of preservation was conducted using cathodoluminescence microscopy and optical emission spectrometry method. The aims of the project are: (i) to reconstruct the evolution of sea water temperatures using the oxygen isotope composition and Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios of the belemnite rostra; (ii) to trace the secular changes in the carbonate carbon isotope composition in order to present temporal variations in δ13C values of Jurassic bulk carbonates and belemnite rostra; (iii) to compare the obtained δ13C curves with the previously reported records of the isotope composition of carbonate carbon. Preliminary results of the study show that: (i) a negative excursion of the bulk carbonate δ13C curve during the Toarcian may correspond to the Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event; (ii) high Middle Oxfordian δ13C values of bulk carbonate and calcite fossils correspond to the global positive isotope excursion in carbonate carbon; (iii) for Upper Jurassic belemnite δ18O values range from -0.8 to 0.4 ‰VPDB what implies temperatures of 13 ± 2°C.

  7. Deposition of organic carbon-rich sediments in narrow marine basins and open-marine upwelling environments - New results from the ocean drilling program

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, R. )

    1988-08-01

    Detailed sedimentological and organic geochemical investigations have been performed on Neogene sediments from ODP site 645 (Baffin Bay), ODP site 658 (upwelling area of northwest Africa), and ODP site 679 (upwelling area off Peru). The study is mainly based on (1) data derived from total organic carbon and nitrogen analyses, Rock-Eval pyrolysis, and kerogen microscopy (2) sedimentation rates, and (3) x-ray diffraction analyses. The main objective of this study was to point out the most important factors controlling the accumulation of organic carbon in the different sedimentary environments, such as supply of terrigenous organic matter, productivity of marine organic matter, and preservation of organic matter. These new results from the investigation of ODP sediments are compared with DSDP data from the Mesozoic Atlantic Ocean to characterize the depositional environments of Mesozoic black shales.

  8. Microbial assimilation of dissolved organic matter in shallow aquitards constrained using organic speciation and stable carbon isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartland, Adam; Timms, Wendy

    2016-04-01

    Low-permeability aquifer sediments (aquitards) are globally widespread and exert important controls on groundwater quality by decreasing flow rates and limiting gas exchange. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in aquitards is likely to be a prime substrate for anaerobic microbial metabolism, with potential to facilitate the reduction of important groundwater contaminants, such as nitrate (NO3-). However, it is difficult to estimate microbial assimilation based solely on DOM stable isotope composition (d13C) because interactions with the aquifer matrix (e.g. DOM adsorption/desorption) also alter d13C values. We constrained the extent of microbial fractionation of DOM by modelling the proportion of DOM fractionation due to changes in (13C enriched) hydrophilic DOM (HiDOM) and (13C depleted) hydrophobic DOM (HoDOM) in two shallow aquitard systems (0 to ~40 m depth) with contrasting vadose zone (VZ) thicknesses, overlying deep gravel aquifers (~40 to ~150 m depth). Results indicate that adsorption of HoDOM was most important in the aquitard with a 20m VZ, but minimally important in the system with 1-2m VZ. Microbial fractionation of DOM in deep, anaerobic groundwater coincided with decreases in terminal electron acceptor concentrations at the same depth. The availability of reactive DOM, influenced by unsaturated zone thickness and flow rates, is therefore likely to be an important control on aquitard redox chemistry.

  9. The effects of biomanipulation on the biogeochemistry, carbon isotopic composition and pelagic food web relations of a shallow turf lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bontes, B. M.; Pel, R.; Ibelings, B. W.; Boschker, H. T. S.; Middelburg, J. J.; van Donk, E.

    2005-08-01

    The effects of fish removal on the biogeochemistry and lower-trophic level food web relations were studied in a shallow eutrophied turf lake. Biomanipulation led to an increase in transparency and macrophyte biomass and decrease in phytoplankton abundance, but zooplankton numbers did not increase. Moreover, fish removal resulted in high pH, high O2, low CO2, and more negative δ13CDIC values than expected, which is proposed to be the likely result of chemical enhanced diffusion with large negative fractionation (-13). By combining fluorescence activated cell sorting and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) of fatty acids we were able to obtain group specific δ13C signatures and to trace possible shifts in δ13C resulting from fish removal. Fractionation values of green algae (20) and diatoms (22) were uniform and independent of treatment, while fractionation factors of filamentous cyanobacteria were variable between the treatments that differed in CO2 availability. 13C-labeling of the phytoplankton groups showed that biomanipulation led to increased growth rates of green algae and diatoms at the expense of cyanobacteria. Finally, the primary consumer Chydorus appeared to prefer cyanobacteria, whilst Asplanchna grazed predominantly upon eukaryotes.

  10. Marine Carbonate δ53Cr Values Reflect Inputs From LIP Volcanism During OAE 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmden, C. E.; Jacobson, A. D.; Sageman, B. B.; Hurtgen, M.

    2014-12-01

    Cr stable isotopes record mass dependent fractionations that reflect changes in the element's oxidation state. Weathering of igneous rocks on the continents releases Cr(III), which then reacts with manganese dioxide minerals to form Cr(VI) under oxidizing conditions. Cr(VI) is both soluble and mobile in continental weathering environments and eventually accumulates in the oceans. Laboratory experiments show that reduction of Cr(VI) causes light Cr isotopes to partition into the reduced Cr(III), which is insoluble, thus leaving the unreacted pool of soluble Cr(VI) enriched in the heavy isotopes. As Cr(VI) is the thermodynamically favoured species in oxygenated seawater, this leads to the hypothesis that drawdown of seawater Cr(VI) during ocean anoxic events should correlate with positive shifts in seawater derived Cr isotope values in marine sedimentary successions, if the fractionation factor and the various Cr input fluxes remained constant. To test this hypothesis, we measured seawater δ53Cr values preserved in pelagic carbonate sediment deposited in the Western Interior Seaway during OAE 2. Our results show that the onset of ocean anoxia correlates with a decrease in sedimentary δ53Cr, which is opposite to the model prediction. The discrepancy may be reconciled if the sedimentation flux of light Cr isotopes into anoxic sediment was offset by an increase in the input flux of light Cr isotopes to the oceans. Eruption and weathering of the Caribbean Large Igneous Province (LIP) provides one such source.. Other studies have implicated LIP volcanism as a source of anomalously high trace metal abundances in the studied carbonates, as well as mantle-like initial Os isotope ratios in related black shales. We conclude similarly that the increased input of light Cr isotopes to the oceans during OAE 2 masked the expected isotopic response of the ocean Cr cycle to increased ocean anoxia.

  11. Factors that control the stable carbon isotopic composition of methane produced in an anoxic marine sediment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alperin, M. J.; Blair, Neal E.; Albert, D. B.; Hoehler, T. M.; Martens, C. S.

    1993-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of methane produced in anoxic marine sediment is controlled by four factors: (1) the pathway of methane formation, (2) the isotopic composition of the methanogenic precursors, (3) the isotope fractionation factors for methane production, and (4) the isotope fractionation associated with methane oxidation. The importance of each factor was evaluated by monitoring stable carbon isotope ratios in methane produced by a sediment microcosm. Methane did not accumulate during the initial 42-day period when sediment contained sulfate, indicating little methane production from 'noncompetitive' substrates. Following sulfate depletion, methane accumulation proceeded in three distinct phases. First, CO2 reduction was the dominant methanogenic pathway and the isotopic composition of the methane produced ranged from -80 to -94 per thousand. The acetate concentration increased during this phase, suggesting that acetoclastic methanogenic bacteria were unable to keep pace with acetate production. Second, acetate fermentation became the dominant methanogenic pathway as bacteria responded to elevated acetate concentrations. The methane produced during this phase was progressively enriched in C-13, reaching a maximum delta(C-13) value of -42 per thousand. Third, the acetate pool experienced a precipitous decline from greater than 5 mM to less than 20 micro-M and methane production was again dominated by CO2 reduction. The delta(C-13) of methane produced during this final phase ranged from -46 to -58 per thousand. Methane oxidation concurrent with methane production was detected throughout the period of methane accumulation, at rates equivalent to 1 to 8 percent of the gross methane production rate. Thus methane oxidation was too slow to have significantly modified the isotopic signature of methane. A comparison of microcosm and field data suggests that similar microbial interactions may control seasonal variability in the isotopic composition of methane

  12. A Simple, Buoy Deployable Instrument for Accurate Dissolved Carbon Dioxide and Dissolved Inorganic Carbon Measurements in Freshwater and Marine Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browne, B. A.; Wyss, J. R.; Bowling, J. M.; Schueller, D. J.; Sherman, J. F.

    2007-05-01

    The need for better knowledge of (1) the oceanic sink for anthropogenic CO2, (2) the impact of anthropogenic CO2 on the oceanic CaCO3 system and (3) lake and stream metabolism in freshwater ecosystems is driving growing interest in real-time technologies to measure pCO2 and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). To be useful, these technologies must meet stringent data quality requirements of marine and freshwater biogeochemical research initiatives such as the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study, the Coral Reef Environmental Observatory Network, the National Ecological Observatory Network, and the Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network. In this presentation, we introduce new methodology and a device for unaccompanied measurement of pCO2 and DIC on research buoys or ocean/freshwater vessels. This small-scale, essentially "plug and play" device (shoe box size) has limited power requirements (≤1.8 amps) for continuous or discontinuous (e.g., one reading per hour) measurements and does not bio-foul. DIC and pCO2 can be measured in sequence using one infrared detector or in parallel using two. The accuracy and precision (<0.15% coefficient of variation) for pCO2 and DIC meet or approximate the data quality requirements for large-scale biogeochemical research initiatives. Training requirements are minimal, providing flexibility for deployments on multiple vessel types. The device works by induction of ebullition. A hydrostatic pressure drop upstream of a pump causes a temporary condition of gas oversaturation. The collection cell downstream of the pump then acts like an overpressurized soda bottle. As pressure is released within the collection cell, the dissolved gas streams passively and reliably into the infrared detector(s), at a nominal rate of 7 mL per minute, carrying CO2 into the cell essentially at its in-situ partial pressure. To measure DIC, a valve allows for the addition of acid to the sampling line upstream of the pump converting all DIC to CO2 prior to reaching

  13. Seismic attribute extraction based on HHT and its application in a marine carbonate area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ya-Ping; Geng, Jian-Hua; Zhong, Guang-Fa; Guo, Tong-Lou; Pu, Yong; Ding, Kong-Yun; Ma, Ji-Qiang

    2011-06-01

    The Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) is a new analysis method suitable for nonlinear and non-stationary signals. It is very appropriate to seismic signals because they show both non-stationary and nonlinear characteristics. We first introduce the realization of HHT empirical mode decomposition (EMD) and then comparatively analyze three instantaneous frequency algorithms based on intrinsic mode functions (IMF) resulting from EMD, of which one uses the average instantaneous frequency of two sample intervals having higher resolution which can determine that the signal frequency components change with time. The method is used with 3-D poststack migrated seismic data of marine carbonate strata in southern China to effectively extract the three instantaneous attributes. The instantaneous phase attributes of the second intrinsic mode functions (IMF2) better describe the reef facies of the platform margin and the IMF2 instantaneous frequency attribute has better zoning. Combining analysis of the three IMF2 instantaneous seismic attributes and drilling data can identify the distribution of sedimentary facies well.

  14. The Inhibition of Marine Nitrification by Ocean Disposal of Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Huesemann, Michael H. ); Skillman, Ann D. ); Crecelius, Eric A. )

    2002-02-01

    In an attempt to reduce the threat of global warming, it has been proposed that the rise of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations be reduced by the ocean disposal of CO2 from the flue gases of fossil fuel fired power plants. The release of large amounts of CO2 into mid or deep ocean waters will result in large plumes of acidified seawater with pH values ranging from 6 to 8. In an effort to determine whether these CO2-induced pH changes have any effect on marine nitrification processes, surficial (euphotic zone) and deep (aphotic zone) seawater samples were sparged with CO2 for varying time durations to achieve a specified pH reduction and the rate of microbial ammonia oxidation was measured spectrophotometrically as a function of pH. For both seawater samples taken from either the euphotic or aphotic zone, the nitrification rates dropped drastically with decreasing pH. Relative to nitrification rates in the original seawater at pH 8, nitrification rates are reduced by ca. 50% at pH 7 and more than 90% at pH 6.5. Nitrification is essentially completely inhibited at pH 6.

  15. Relations between electrical resistivity, carbon dioxide flux, and self-potential in the shallow hydrothermal system of Solfatara (Phlegrean Fields, Italy).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrdina, Svetlana; Vandemeulebrouck, Jean; Cardellini, Carlo; Legaz, Aurelie; Camerlynck, Christian; Chiodini, Giovanni; Lebourg, Thomas; Letort, Jean; Motos, Ghislan; Carrier, Aurore; Bascou, Pascale

    2014-05-01

    In the frame of the Geo-Supersite Med-Suv project, we present the results of an electric resistivity tomography (ERT) survey, combined with mappings of diffuse carbon dioxide flux, ground temperature and self-potential (SP) at Solfatara, Phlegrean Fields, Italy. This ensemble of methods aims to image the hydrothermal system of Solfatara, understand the geometry of the fluid circulation, and precise the extension of the hydrothermal plume evidenced by Bruno et al. (2007). Solfatara is the most active crater of Phlegrean Fields, characterized by an intense carbon dioxide degassing, about 1500 T/day (Chiodini et al, 2005). Its main structures are Bocca Grande fumarole and several lesser fumaroles aligned along two normal faults, and Fangaia mud pool where the aquifer reaches the surface. Solfatara appears as a globally conductive structure, with resistivity in the range 1 - 100 Ohmm. Comparison between spatial variations of resistivity and gas flux rate indicates that resistivity changes at depth are related to gas ratio content and the fluid temperature. Broad negative anomaly of self-potential in the inner part of Solfatara with a minimum in the area of the Bocca Grande suggests a significant downward flow of condensing liquid water. Our results delineate several distinct zones: 1) a vegetation-covered area, relatively undisturbed by a hydrothermal activity and characterized by a high resistivity (up to 100 Ohm-m) of the shallow layer (vadose zone), and low carbon dioxide flux. In this area, self-potential takes zero or positive values with little spatial variations. 2) In the central part, below a superficial vadose zone, a resistive layer (20 - 100 Ohm-m), between 30 - 100 m depth, interpreted as a gas-saturated body, is systematically overlain by a conductive aquifer (1 - 5 Ohm-m). In this area, the self-potential displays a negative anomaly with an average value of -100 mV and the carbon dioxide flux is > 1000 g m-2day-1. 3) Close to Bocca Grande fumarole, the

  16. Importance of black carbon in distribution and bioaccumulation models of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in contaminated marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Vinturella, Amy E; Burgess, Robert M; Coull, Brent A; Thompson, Kimberly M; Shine, James P

    2004-11-01

    The roles and relative importance of nonpyrogenic organic carbon (NPOC) and black carbon (BC) as binding phases of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were assessed by their ability to estimate pore water concentrations and biological uptake in various marine sediments. Sediment bioaccumulation tests were performed with the marine polychaete Nereis virens, using a polyethylene device to estimate pore water concentrations of PAHs. Using existing partitioning data for pyrene and phenanthrene, it was found that the traditional Equilibrium Partitioning model, which assumes all organic carbon is NPOC (EqP(OC)), overestimated the measured pore water concentrations in the test sediments by one to three orders of magnitude. Instead, the measured pore water concentrations were better predicted from a distribution scenario that uses both BC and NPOC (EqP(NPOc,BC)) When comparing actual worm body burdens of pyrene and phenanthrene with the two model estimates of worm tissue concentrations, the EqP(OC) model tended to overestimate actual body burdens by three orders of magnitude, while the EqP(NPOC,BC) model came much closer to the true body burden values. The observed distribution of PAHs in the test sediments was used to calculate BC partition coefficients for five PAHs, which were one to two orders of magnitude higher than their corresponding organic carbon-normalized distribution coefficients, or K(OC)s. Together, these results suggest that, in certain situations, adding black carbon to distribution models may be necessary to predict accurately the bioavailability of PAHs.

  17. The macroalgal carbonate factory at a cool-to-warm temperate marine transition, Southern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Noel P.; Reid, Catherine M.; Bone, Yvonne; Levings, Andrew; Malcolm, Isabelle

    2013-06-01

    The shallow neritic seafloor to depths of ~ 30 m along the coast of southwestern Victoria Australia, is the site of rocky reefs on volcanic and aeolianite bathymetric highs. The region, located near the warm- to cool-temperate environmental transition, is a site of prolific macroalgae (kelp) growth. Kelps are most prolific and diverse in high-energy, open-ocean environments whereas broad-leafed seagrasses, at their cold-water eastern limit, are restricted to local protected embayments. The seagrasses are reduced to one species of Amphibolis whereas the kelps are diverse and include the large intertidal bull kelp (Durvillaea), not present in warmer waters. The macroalgal forest extends from the intertidal to ~ 30 mwd (metres water depth) as a series of distinct biomes; 1) the Peritidal, 2) the Phaeophyte Forest (0-17 mwd), 3) the Rhodophyte Thicket (17-15 mwd), and 4) the Invertebrate Coppice (> 25 mwd). The Phaeophyte Forest is partitioned into a Durvillaea zone (0-2 mwd), a Phyllospora zone (2-10 mwd) and an Ecklonia zone (10-17mwd). The two major habitats within each biome comprise 1) an upward facing illuminated surface that supports a macroalgal canopy over an understorey of coralline algae and herbivorous gastropods, and 2) a separate, cryptic, shaded habitat dominated by a diverse community of filter-feeding invertebrates. These communities produce two different sediments; 1) geniculate and encrusting corallines and diverse gastropods from the upper surface, and 2) bryozoans, molluscs, barnacles, chitons, serpulids, and benthic foraminifers from the shaded, cryptic habitats. These particles are blended together with the latter becoming proportionally more abundant with increasing depth. Results of this study, when integrated with recent investigations in warm-temperate (South Australia) and cool-temperate (New Zealand) environments now define carbonate sedimentology of the macroalgal reef depositional system in this part of the northern Southern Ocean.

  18. Magnesium isotopic compositions of the Mesoproterozoic dolostones: Implications for Mg isotopic systematics of marine carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kang-Jun; Shen, Bing; Lang, Xian-Guo; Tang, Wen-Bo; Peng, Yang; Ke, Shan; Kaufman, Alan J.; Ma, Hao-Ran; Li, Fang-Bing

    2015-09-01

    Available Mg isotope data indicate that dolostones of different ages have overlapping range of Mg isotopic composition (δ26Mg) and there is no systematic difference among different types of dolomites. To further explore the Mg isotopic systematics of dolomite formation, we measured Mg isotopic compositions of Mesoproterozoic dolostones from the Wumishan Formation in North China Block, because dolomite formation in Mesoproterozoic might have been fundamentally different from the younger counterparts. Based on petrographic observations, three texturally-different dolomite phases (dolomicrite, subhedral dolomite and anhedral dolomite) are recognized in the Wumishan dolostones. Nevertheless, these three types of dolomites have similar δ26Mg values, ranging from -1.35‰ to -1.72‰, which are indistinguishable from Neoproterozoic and Phanerozoic dolostones. To explain δ26Mg values of dolostones, we simulate the Mg isotopic system during dolomite formation by applying the one-dimensional Diffusion-Advection-Reaction (1D-DAR) model, assuming that the contemporaneous seawater is the Mg source of dolostone. The 1D-DAR modeling results indicate that the degree of dolomitization is controlled by sedimentation rate, seawater Mg concentration, temperature, and reaction rate of dolomite formation, whereas Mg isotopic composition of dolostone is not only dependent on these factors, but also affected by δ26Mg of seawater and isotope fractionation during dolomite formation. Moreover, the 1D-DAR model predicts that dolomite formation within sediments has limited range of variation in δ26Mg with respect to limestones. Furthermore, the modeling results demonstrate that dolostone is always isotopically heavier than Ca-carbonate precipitated from seawater, explaining the systematic isotopic difference between dolostones and limestones. Finally, we can infer from the 1D-DAR model that early-formed dolostone at shallower depth of sediments is always isotopically lighter than that

  19. Metaproteomics of a gutless marine worm and its symbiotic microbial community reveal unusual pathways for carbon and energy use

    SciTech Connect

    Kleiner, Manuel; Wentrop, C.; Lott, C.; Teeling, Hanno; Wetzel, Silke; Young, Jacque C; Chang, Y.; Shah, Manesh B; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Zarzycki, Jan; Fuchs, Georg; Markert, Stephanie; Hempel, Kristina

    2012-01-01

    Low nutrient and energy availability has led to the evolution of numerous strategies for overcoming these limitations, of which symbiotic associations represent a key mechanism. Particularly striking are the associations between chemosynthetic bacteria and marine animals that thrive in nutrient-poor environments such as the deep-sea because the symbionts allow their hosts to grow on inorganic energy and carbon sources such as sulfide and CO2. Remarkably little is known about the physiological strategies that enable chemosynthetic symbioses to colonize oligotrophic environments. In this study, we used metaproteomics and metabolomics to investigate the intricate network of metabolic interactions in the chemosynthetic association between Olavius algarvensis, a gutless marine worm, and its bacterial symbionts. We propose novel pathways for coping with energy and nutrient limitation, some of which may be widespread in both free-living and symbiotic bacteria. These include (i) a pathway for symbiont assimilation of the host waste products acetate, propionate, succinate and malate, (ii) the potential use of carbon monoxide as an energy source, a substrate previously not known to play a role in marine invertebrate symbioses, (iii) the potential use of hydrogen as an energy source, (iv) the strong expression of high affinity uptake transporters, and (v) novel energy efficient steps in CO2 fixation and sulfate reduction. The high expression of proteins involved in pathways for energy and carbon uptake and conservation in the O. algarvensis symbiosis indicates that the oligotrophic nature of its environment exerted a strong selective pressure in shaping these associations.

  20. Genome Sequence of Vibrio sp. Strain EJY3, an Agarolytic Marine Bacterium Metabolizing 3,6-Anhydro-l-Galactose as a Sole Carbon Source

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Hanseong; Yun, Eun Ju; Lee, Saeyoung; Ko, Hyeok-Jin; Kim, Sujin; Kim, Byung-Yong; Song, Heesang; Lim, Kwang-il

    2012-01-01

    The metabolic fate of 3,6-anhydro-l-galactose (l-AHG) is unknown in the global marine carbon cycle. Vibrio sp. strain EJY3 is an agarolytic marine bacterium that can utilize l-AHG as a sole carbon source. To elucidate the metabolic pathways of l-AHG, we have sequenced the complete genome of Vibrio sp. strain EJY3. PMID:22535948

  1. Comparative studies of inorganic carbon utilization in Emiliania huxleyi and some non-calcifying marine microalgae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang-Feng, Dong; Merrett, M. J.; Chao-Yuan, Wu

    1999-09-01

    Inorganic carbon utilization in the non-calcifying marine microalgae, Nannochloropsis oculata, Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Porphyridium purpureum was compared with high- and low-calcifying strains of Emiliania huxleyi grown in artificial seawater medium aerated with either air (0.03% V/V CO2) or CO2-free air. For high-calcifying strain of E. oculata and P. tricornutem, similar growth patterns were observed in air-and CO2-free air-grown cultures. P. purpureum showed a less final cell density in CO2-free air than in air-grown culture. However, low-calcifying strain of E. huxleyi was able to grow only in air-grown culture, but not in CO2-free air-grown culture. Measurements of alkalinity, pH, concentration of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and free CO2 showed different patterns of DIC utilization. With N. oculata, P. tricornutum and P. purpureum the pattern of DIC utilization was characterized by an increase of pH and a decrease of DIC but a constant alkalinity in the cultures aerated with air or CO2-free air, suggesting that bicarbonate utilization was concomitant with an efflux of OH-. Both alkalinity and pH were maintained rather constant in air-grown culture of low-calcifying strain of E. huxleyi, suggesting that diffusive entry of CO2 could meet the requirement of DIC for its photosynthesis and growth. High-calcifying strain of E. huxleyi, however, showed a pattern of decrease of alkalinity and DIC but an almost constant pH, indicating that bicarbonate was the major form of inorganic carbon utilised by this organism and bicarbonate uptake is unlikely to be accompanied by an efflux of OH-. The final pH values reached by N. oculata, P. tricornutum and P. purpureum in a closed system were 10.75, 10.60 and 9.85 respectively, showing that bicarbonate utilisation is concomitant with an efflux of OH-. While the final pH of 8.4 in high-calcifying E. huxleyi suggests that bicarbonate utilization was not accompanied by an efflux of OH-.

  2. A First Look at the Turnover Dynamics of Low Molecular Weight Organic Carbon in Shallow and Deep Soils of Coastal Prairie Grassland Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mcfarland, J. W.; Lawrence, C. R.; Haw, M.; Waldrop, M. P.

    2015-12-01

    The functional importance of low molecular weight organic compounds (LMWOC) is in disproportion to their abundance within soil organic carbon (SOC) pools. They are critical in driving microbial metabolism, though microbial utilization of LMWOC is likely dependent on C chemistry. Studies of C turnover in soils tend to focus in shallower horizons despite that for many ecosystems a substantial fraction of SOC resides below 1 m. In this study, we examined the fate of two important components of soluble SOC, sugars and carboxylic acids, through a soil profile extending to 150 cm. Our objective was to evaluate the turnover of LMWOC under varying physical, biological, and chemical conditions through the soil column. Our study area is part of a soil chronosequence near Santa Cruz, CA. From the side wall of a soil pit we installed intact soil collars and injected 13C-labeled glucose (GLU), 13C-labeled oxalic acid (OA), or deionized water (control) into the A, B (argillic) , and B/C (mottled) horizons at depths of 25, 75, and 125 cm, respectively. We sampled soil gas for 13CO2 intensively at graduated sampling intervals (6 hours to 2 weeks). The entire experiment was also replicated in the laboratory. We measured dissolved organic C (DOC) and microbial biomass C (MBC), and calculated total recovery of 13C in atmospheric and soil pools. Measures of DOC indicated a significant priming effect in the deepest (mottled) horizon and an increase in MBC in the argillic and mottled horizons. In all instances residence time was significantly lower for GLU than OA and increased with depth for both substrates. Mass balance calculations from the laboratory component indicated stronger retention for GLU than OA for the upper soils; however, this trend reversed below the argillic horizon. We hypothesize the greater retention of OA in the deepest (mottled) soil horizon may result from enhanced organo-metal complexation (e.g., between OA and dissolved Fe or Al). This hypothesis is consistent

  3. Adaptation and acclimatization to ocean acidification in marine ectotherms: an in situ transplant experiment with polychaetes at a shallow CO2 vent system.

    PubMed

    Calosi, Piero; Rastrick, Samuel P S; Lombardi, Chiara; de Guzman, Heidi J; Davidson, Laura; Jahnke, Marlene; Giangrande, Adriana; Hardege, Jörg D; Schulze, Anja; Spicer, John I; Gambi, Maria-Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic rate determines the physiological and life-history performances of ectotherms. Thus, the extent to which such rates are sensitive and plastic to environmental perturbation is central to an organism's ability to function in a changing environment. Little is known of long-term metabolic plasticity and potential for metabolic adaptation in marine ectotherms exposed to elevated pCO2. Consequently, we carried out a series of in situ transplant experiments using a number of tolerant and sensitive polychaete species living around a natural CO2 vent system. Here, we show that a marine metazoan (i.e. Platynereis dumerilii) was able to adapt to chronic and elevated levels of pCO2. The vent population of P. dumerilii was physiologically and genetically different from nearby populations that experience low pCO2, as well as smaller in body size. By contrast, different populations of Amphiglena mediterranea showed marked physiological plasticity indicating that adaptation or acclimatization are both viable strategies for the successful colonization of elevated pCO2 environments. In addition, sensitive species showed either a reduced or increased metabolism when exposed acutely to elevated pCO2. Our findings may help explain, from a metabolic perspective, the occurrence of past mass extinction, as well as shed light on alternative pathways of resilience in species facing ongoing ocean acidification.

  4. Adaptation and acclimatization to ocean acidification in marine ectotherms: an in situ transplant experiment with polychaetes at a shallow CO2 vent system

    PubMed Central

    Calosi, Piero; Rastrick, Samuel P. S.; Lombardi, Chiara; de Guzman, Heidi J.; Davidson, Laura; Jahnke, Marlene; Giangrande, Adriana; Hardege, Jörg D.; Schulze, Anja; Spicer, John I.; Gambi, Maria-Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic rate determines the physiological and life-history performances of ectotherms. Thus, the extent to which such rates are sensitive and plastic to environmental perturbation is central to an organism's ability to function in a changing environment. Little is known of long-term metabolic plasticity and potential for metabolic adaptation in marine ectotherms exposed to elevated pCO2. Consequently, we carried out a series of in situ transplant experiments using a number of tolerant and sensitive polychaete species living around a natural CO2 vent system. Here, we show that a marine metazoan (i.e. Platynereis dumerilii) was able to adapt to chronic and elevated levels of pCO2. The vent population of P. dumerilii was physiologically and genetically different from nearby populations that experience low pCO2, as well as smaller in body size. By contrast, different populations of Amphiglena mediterranea showed marked physiological plasticity indicating that adaptation or acclimatization are both viable strategies for the successful colonization of elevated pCO2 environments. In addition, sensitive species showed either a reduced or increased metabolism when exposed acutely to elevated pCO2. Our findings may help explain, from a metabolic perspective, the occurrence of past mass extinction, as well as shed light on alternative pathways of resilience in species facing ongoing ocean acidification. PMID:23980245

  5. Multicomponent simulation of wastewater-derived nitrogen and carbon in shallow unconfined aquifers. I. Model formulation and performance.

    PubMed

    MacQuarrie, K T; Sudicky, E A

    2001-01-01

    One of the most common methods to dispose of domestic wastewater involves the release of septic effluent from drains located in the unsaturated zone. Nitrogen from such systems is currently of concern because of nitrate contamination of drinking water supplies and eutrophication of coastal waters. The objectives of this study are to develop and assess the performance of a mechanistic flow and reactive transport model which couples the most relevant physical, geochemical and biochemical processes involved in wastewater plume evolution in sandy aquifers. The numerical model solves for variably saturated groundwater flow and reactive transport of multiple carbon- and nitrogen-containing species in a three-dimensional porous medium. The reactive transport equations are solved using the Strang splitting method which is shown to be accurate for Monod and first- and second-order kinetic reactions, and two to four times more efficient than sequential iterative splitting. The reaction system is formulated as a fully kinetic chemistry problem, which allows for the use of several special-purpose ordinary differential equation (ODE) solvers. For reaction systems containing both fast and slow kinetic reactions, such as the combined nitrogen-carbon system, it is found that a specialized stiff explicit solver fails to obtain a solution. An implicit solver is more robust and its computational performance is improved by scaling of the fastest reaction rates. The model is used to simulate wastewater migration in a 1-m-long unsaturated column and the results show significant oxidation of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), the generation of nitrate by nitrification, and a slight decrease in pH.

  6. The Role of the C4 Pathway in Carbon Accumulation and Fixation in a Marine Diatom1

    PubMed Central

    Reinfelder, John R.; Milligan, Allen J.; Morel, François M.M.

    2004-01-01

    The role of a C4 pathway in photosynthetic carbon fixation by marine diatoms is presently debated. Previous labeling studies have shown the transfer of photosynthetically fixed carbon through a C4 pathway and recent genomic data provide evidence for the existence of key enzymes involved in C4 metabolism. Nonetheless, the importance of the C4 pathway in photosynthesis has been questioned and this pathway is seen as redundant to the known CO2 concentrating mechanism of diatoms. Here we show that the inhibition of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase) by 3,3-dichloro-2-dihydroxyphosphinoylmethyl-2-propenoate resulted in a more than 90% decrease in whole cell photosynthesis in Thalassiosira weissflogii cells acclimated to low CO2 (10 μm), but had little effect on photosynthesis in the C3 marine Chlorophyte, Chlamydomonas sp. In 3,3-dichloro-2-dihydroxyphosphinoylmethyl-2-propenoate-treated T. weissflogii cells, elevated CO2 (150 μm) or low O2 (80–180 μm) restored photosynthesis to the control rate linking PEPCase inhibition with CO2 supply in this diatom. In C4 organic carbon-inorganic carbon competition experiments, the 12C-labeled C4 products of PEPCase, oxaloacetic acid and its reduced form malic acid suppressed the fixation of 14C-labeled inorganic carbon by 40% to 50%, but had no effect on O2 evolution in photosynthesizing diatoms. Oxaloacetic acid-dependent O2 evolution in T. weissflogii was twice as high in cells acclimated to 10 μm rather than 22 μm CO2, indicating that the use of C4 compounds for photosynthesis is regulated over the range of CO2 concentrations observed in marine surface waters. Short-term 14C uptake (silicone oil centrifugation) and CO2 release (membrane inlet mass spectrometry) experiments that employed a protein denaturing cell extraction solution containing the PEPCKase inhibitor mercaptopicolinic acid revealed that much of the carbon taken up by diatoms during photosynthesis is stored as organic carbon before being fixed in the

  7. Shallow sediment and upper crustal structure beneath the Salton Sea as imaged by active source marine seismic refraction in conjunction with the Salton Seismic Imaging Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kell, A. M.; Sahakian, V. J.; Harding, A. J.; Kent, G.; Driscoll, N. W.

    2012-12-01

    In the spring of 2011 we expanded a campaign of marine seismic reflection efforts in the Salton Sea in conjunction with the Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) to collect active-source marine refraction data using Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBSs) and a marine airgun. The Salton Trough presents an opportunity to study rifting processes similar to those seen in the Gulf of California, as well as the seismic hazards associated with the southern terminus of the San Andreas Fault (SAF). An areal array, comprised of 78 OBS deployments, was focused in the southern part of the sea but also included a line parallel to the San Andreas Fault (SAF) , line 1, extending then length of the sea, and a line perpendicular to the SAF, crossing the northern basin, line 7. These lines are collinear with high-resolution reflection profiles and existing chirp profiles. The OBS array was concentrated in the southern Salton Sea to investigate the pull-apart deformation reported by Brothers et al. (2009). Using the methods of Van Avendonk (2004) we seek to constrain upper crustal velocities in this region by travel-time tomography. Beginning with P-wave arrival times we trace the ray paths through the model space and invert for seismic velocities. By iterating from the forward picking to the inversion, we reduce the chi-squared error to produce a 2D depth profile of the seismic velocities while maintaining a stable model. Line 1 uses 38 OBSs and 470 shots from a 210 cu. in. airgun to model the upper 4 km beneath the Salton Sea. Velocities vary from 1.5 km/s in the upper 1 km to an apparent 4 km deep basement velocity of 5.5 km/s. Velocity variations with depth agree with major boundaries in the co-linear seismic reflection profiles and the divergence toward the south/fault structure is also captured in these early models. Preliminary results for line 7 show similarly varying velocities - 1.5 to 3 km/s in the upper 2 kilometers of the crust, to slightly over 4 km/s at 4 km depth. Further

  8. Heterogeneous Shallow-Shelf Carbonate Buildups in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado: Targets for Increased Oil Production and Reserves Using Horizontal Drilling Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas C. Chidsey; Kevin McClure; Craig D. Morgan

    2003-10-05

    facies of the upper Ismay zone, where microporosity is well developed. In Bug field, the most productive wells are located structurally downdip from the updip porosity pinch out in the dolomitized lower Desert Creek zone, where micro-box-work porosity is well developed. Microporosity and micro-box-work porosity have the greatest hydrocarbon storage and flow capacity, and potential horizontal drilling target in these fields. Diagenesis is the main control on the quality of Ismay and Desert Creek reservoirs. Most of the carbonates present within the lower Desert Creek and Ismay have retained a marine-influenced carbon isotope geochemistry throughout marine cementation as well as through post-burial recycling of marine carbonate components during dolomitization, stylolitization, dissolution, and late cementation. Meteoric waters do not appear to have had any effect on the composition of the dolomites in these zones. Light oxygen values obtained from reservoir samples for wells located along the margins or flanks of Bug field may be indicative of exposure to higher temperatures, to fluids depleted in {sup 18}O relative to sea water, or to hypersaline waters during burial diagenesis. The samples from Bug field with the lightest oxygen isotope compositions are from wells that have produced significantly greater amounts of hydrocarbons. There is no significant difference between the oxygen isotope compositions from lower Desert Creek dolomite samples in Bug field and the upper Ismay limestones and dolomites from Cherokee field. Carbon isotopic compositions for samples from Patterson Canyon field can be divided into two populations: isotopically heavier mound cement and isotopically lighter oolite and banded cement. Technology transfer activities consisted of exhibiting a booth display of project materials at the annual national convention of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, a technical presentation, a core workshop, and publications. The project home page was

  9. The effects of atmospheric [CO2] on carbon isotope fractionation and magnesium incorporation into biogenic marine calcite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vieira, Veronica

    1997-01-01

    The influences of atmospheric carbon dioxide on the fractionation of carbon isotopes and the magnesium incorporation into biogenic marine calcite were investigated using samples of the calcareous alga Amphiroa and benthic foraminifer Sorites grown in the Biosphere 2 Ocean system under variable atmospheric CO2 concentrations (approximately 500 to 1200 ppm). Carbon isotope fractionation was studied in both the organic matter and the skeletal carbonate. Magnesium analysis was to be performed on the carbonate removed during decalcification. These data have not been collected due to technical problems. Carbon isotope data from Amphiroa yields a linear relation between [CO2] and Delta(sup 13)C(sub Corg)values suggesting that the fractionation of carbon isotopes during photosynthesis is positively correlated with atmospheric [CO2]. [CO2] and Delta(sup 13)C(sub Corg) values for Sorites produce a relation that is best described by a hyperbolic function where Delta(sup 13)C(sub Corg) values increase between 300 and 700 ppm and decrease from 700 to 1200 ppm. Further investigation of this relation and Sorites physiology is needed.

  10. Running hotter, faster, shallower: acceleration of the marine nitrogen cycle from the Last Glacial Maximum to the pre-industrial, and implications for the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galbraith, E. D.

    2015-12-01

    Biologically-available nitrogen is the primary limiting nutrient in the global ocean. The complex physical-biological interdependencies of nitrogen fixation and denitrification, the source and sink of bioavailable nitrogen, have led to uncertainty over their future trajectories under higher CO2. Sedimentary nitrogen isotope evidence suggests that the global rate of denitrification was on the order of 50% lower during the last glacial maximum, and reveals that significant changes in denitrification have occurred on a decadal-centennial timescale. Coupled atmosphere-ocean-biogeochemistry models simulate similar changes, through physically-driven changes in anoxia, which then feed back on nitrogen fixation through the availability of phosphorus to diazotrophs. In addition, diazotroph culture experiments suggest that nitrogen fixation was further limited during glacial maxima by low CO2, causing an additional slowdown of the nitrogen cycle. The emergent picture suggests that deglaciation accelerated both sides of the N cycle, with more rapid loss encouraged by expanded shallow anoxia, and more rapid gain encouraged by higher CO2. It will be argued that the net effect on the nitrogen inventory can be approximated by knowing the distribution of surface ocean PO4, given the observed correlation of surface PO4 concentrations on the P:C ratio of exported organic matter.

  11. Dynamics of soundscape in a shallow water marine environment: a study of the habitat of the Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin.

    PubMed

    Guan, Shane; Lin, Tzu-Hao; Chou, Lien-Siang; Vignola, Joseph; Judge, John; Turo, Diego

    2015-05-01

    The underwater acoustic field is an important ecological element for many aquatic animals. This research examines the soundscape of a critically endangered Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin population in the shallow water environment off the west coast of Taiwan. Underwater acoustic recordings were conducted between late spring and late fall in 2012 at Yunlin (YL), which is close to a shipping lane, and Waisanding (WS), which is relatively pristine. Site-specific analyses were performed on the dynamics of the temporal and spectral acoustic characteristics for both locations. The results highlight the dynamics of the soundscape in two major octave bands: 150-300 Hz and 1.2-2.4 kHz. The acoustic energy in the former frequency band is mainly associated with passing container vessels near YL, while the latter frequency band is from sonic fish chorus at nighttime in both recording sites. In addition, large variation of low frequency acoustic energy throughout the study period was noticed at WS, where the water depths ranged between 1.5 and 4.5 m depending on tidal cycle. This phenomenon suggests that besides certain sound sources in the environment, the coastal soundscape may also be influenced by its local bathymetry and the dynamics of the physical environment. PMID:25994720

  12. Ballast minerals and the sinking carbon flux in the ocean: carbon-specific respiration rates and sinking velocity of marine snow aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iversen, M. H.; Ploug, H.

    2010-09-01

    Recent observations have shown that fluxes of ballast minerals (calcium carbonate, opal, and lithogenic material) and organic carbon fluxes are closely correlated in the bathypelagic zones of the ocean. Hence it has been hypothesized that incorporation of biogenic minerals within marine aggregates could either protect the organic matter from decomposition and/or increase the sinking velocity via ballasting of the aggregates. Here we present the first combined data on size, sinking velocity, carbon-specific respiration rate, and composition measured directly in three aggregate types; Emiliania huxleyi aggregates (carbonate ballasted), Skeletonema costatum aggregates (opal ballasted), and aggregates made from a mix of both E. huxleyi and S. costatum (carbonate and opal ballasted). Overall average carbon-specific respiration rate was ~0.13 d-1 and did not vary with aggregate type and size. Ballasting from carbonate resulted in 2- to 2.5-fold higher sinking velocities than those of aggregates ballasted by opal. We compiled literature data on carbon-specific respiration rate and sinking velocity measured in aggregates of different composition and sources. Compiled carbon-specific respiration rates (including this study) vary between 0.08 d-1 and 0.20 d-1. Sinking velocity increases with increasing aggregate size within homogeneous sources of aggregates. When compared across different particle and aggregate sources, however, sinking velocity appeared to be independent of particle or aggregate size. The carbon-specific respiration rate per meter settled varied between 0.0002 m-1 and 0.0030 m-1, and decreased with increasing aggregate size. It was lower for calcite ballasted aggregates as compared to that of similar sized opal ballasted aggregates.

  13. Marine ecotoxicity of nitramines, transformation products of amine-based carbon capture technology.

    PubMed

    Coutris, Claire; Macken, Ailbhe L; Collins, Andrew R; El Yamani, Naouale; Brooks, Steven J

    2015-09-15

    In the context of reducing CO2 emissions to the atmosphere, chemical absorption with amines is emerging as the most advanced technology for post-combustion CO2 capture from exhaust gases of fossil fuel power plants. Despite amine solvent recycling during the capture process, degradation products are formed and released into the environment, among them aliphatic nitramines, for which the environmental impact is unknown. In this study, we determined the acute and chronic toxicity of two nitramines identified as important transformation products of amine-based carbon capture, dimethylnitramine and ethanolnitramine, using a multi-trophic suite of bioassays. The results were then used to produce the first environmental risk assessment for the marine ecosystem. In addition, the in vivo genotoxicity of nitramines was studied by adapting the comet assay to cells from experimentally exposed fish. Overall, based on the whole organism bioassays, the toxicity of both nitramines was considered to be low. The most sensitive response to both compounds was found in oysters, and dimethylnitramine was consistently more toxic than ethanolnitramine in all bioassays. The Predicted No Effect Concentrations for dimethylnitramine and ethanolnitramine were 0.08 and 0.18 mg/L, respectively. The genotoxicity assessment revealed contrasting results to the whole organism bioassays, with ethanolnitramine found to be more genotoxic than dimethylnitramine by three orders of magnitude. At the lowest ethanolnitramine concentration (1mg/L), 84% DNA damage was observed, whereas 100mg/L dimethylnitramine was required to cause 37% DNA damage. The mechanisms of genotoxicity were also shown to differ between the two compounds, with oxidation of the DNA bases responsible for over 90% of the genotoxicity of dimethylnitramine, whereas DNA strand breaks and alkali-labile sites were responsible for over 90% of the genotoxicity of ethanolnitramine. Fish exposed to >3mg/L ethanolnitramine had virtually no DNA

  14. Low particulate carbon to nitrogen ratios in marine surface waters of the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, David W.; Wyatt, Shea N.; Wrohan, Ian A.; Cefarelli, Adrián. O.; Giesbrecht, Karina E.; Kelly, Brianne; Varela, Diana E.

    2015-12-01

    During the Canada's Three Oceans and Joint Ocean Ice Study projects in the summers of 2007 and 2008, we measured particulate organic carbon to nitrogen ratios (POC:PON) throughout the euphotic zone in Subarctic and Arctic waters. Average depth-integrated values (2.65 ± 0.19) in the Beaufort Sea and Canada Basin (BS-CB domain) were much lower than both the Redfield ratio (6.6) and the average ratios (3.9 to 5.6) measured across other Arctic-Subarctic domains. Average uptake ratios of C and N (ρC:ρN) were also lower (0.87 ± 0.14) in BS-CB than in the other four domains (2.10 to 3.51). Decreasing POC:PON ratios were associated with low concentrations of phytoplankton C, reduced abundance of biogenic silica (bSiO2), a smaller relative contribution of the >5 µm fraction to total chlorophyll a and a larger relative contribution of small flagellates (<8 µm) to total phytoplankton C. In the subsurface chlorophyll a maximum (SCM) within the BS-CB domain, phytoplankton C represented only ~13% of POC; and therefore, the presence of heterotrophic microbes may have decreased POC:PON. These ratios are supported by data obtained during other Arctic programs in 2006, 2008, and 2009. Previous work has suggested a link between freshening of surface waters and increasing dominance of picophytoplankton and bacterioplankton in the Canada Basin, and the low POC:PON ratios measured during this study may be a consequence of this shift. Our results have ramifications for the conversion between C- and N-based estimates of primary productivity, and for biogeochemical modeling of marine Arctic waters.

  15. Marine ecotoxicity of nitramines, transformation products of amine-based carbon capture technology.

    PubMed

    Coutris, Claire; Macken, Ailbhe L; Collins, Andrew R; El Yamani, Naouale; Brooks, Steven J

    2015-09-15

    In the context of reducing CO2 emissions to the atmosphere, chemical absorption with amines is emerging as the most advanced technology for post-combustion CO2 capture from exhaust gases of fossil fuel power plants. Despite amine solvent recycling during the capture process, degradation products are formed and released into the environment, among them aliphatic nitramines, for which the environmental impact is unknown. In this study, we determined the acute and chronic toxicity of two nitramines identified as important transformation products of amine-based carbon capture, dimethylnitramine and ethanolnitramine, using a multi-trophic suite of bioassays. The results were then used to produce the first environmental risk assessment for the marine ecosystem. In addition, the in vivo genotoxicity of nitramines was studied by adapting the comet assay to cells from experimentally exposed fish. Overall, based on the whole organism bioassays, the toxicity of both nitramines was considered to be low. The most sensitive response to both compounds was found in oysters, and dimethylnitramine was consistently more toxic than ethanolnitramine in all bioassays. The Predicted No Effect Concentrations for dimethylnitramine and ethanolnitramine were 0.08 and 0.18 mg/L, respectively. The genotoxicity assessment revealed contrasting results to the whole organism bioassays, with ethanolnitramine found to be more genotoxic than dimethylnitramine by three orders of magnitude. At the lowest ethanolnitramine concentration (1mg/L), 84% DNA damage was observed, whereas 100mg/L dimethylnitramine was required to cause 37% DNA damage. The mechanisms of genotoxicity were also shown to differ between the two compounds, with oxidation of the DNA bases responsible for over 90% of the genotoxicity of dimethylnitramine, whereas DNA strand breaks and alkali-labile sites were responsible for over 90% of the genotoxicity of ethanolnitramine. Fish exposed to >3mg/L ethanolnitramine had virtually no DNA

  16. Reactive transport modeling of the impact of ocean acidification on global carbon fluxes in coastal marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumins, Valdis; van Cappellen, Philippe; Regnier, Pierre

    2010-05-01

    Because of relatively high productivity of both calcifying and non-calcifying phytoplankton in coastal zones, coastal sediments can act as a significant carbon sink. Ocean acidification is likely to impact productivity of these groups differently, raising the question of the overall effect of ocean acidification on carbon burial in coastal sediments. We modeled the effect of varying depositional fluxes of particulate organic carbon (POC) and particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) on carbon cycling in coastal marine sediments using a one-dimensional reactive transport model. Transport processes include sediment burial, advection, diffusion, bioturbation and bioirrigation. The model incorporates the hydrolysis of macromolecular organic matter, the redox pathways of POC oxidation, re-oxidation reactions of the reduced compounds produced during POC decomposition, the acid-base chemical equilibria, and the dissolution of PIC (calcite, aragonite, and Mg-calcite) in the upper 50 cm of sediment. The following processes are also included: precipitation of iron sulfide and iron carbonate, sorption of Fe(II), ammonium and phosphate, sulfidization of organic matter, and pyritization. The global return fluxes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and alkalinity are estimated by modeling sediments at 25 m, 75 m, and 150 m depths, and multiplying by the global area of seafloor depths 0-50 m, 50-100 m, and 100-200 m, respectively. We determined the sensitivity of carbon and nutrient return fluxes to changes in pH, PIC and POC fluxes, as well as to poorly constrained Fe(III) deposition fluxes. Inorganic carbon return fluxes are influenced most by the particulate organic and inorganic carbon depositional fluxes; the seawater pH has a limited effect. Modeled sediment pH profiles and PIC dissolution are also sensitive to the iron deposition flux. The overreaching goal of the research is to forecast the global response of coastal sediment return fluxes as a result of anthropogenic ocean

  17. Why is the South Orkney Island shelf (the world's first high seas marine protected area) a carbon immobilization hotspot?

    PubMed

    Barnes, David K A; Ireland, Louise; Hogg, Oliver T; Morley, Simon; Enderlein, Peter; Sands, Chester J

    2016-03-01

    The Southern Ocean archipelago, the South Orkney Islands (SOI), became the world's first entirely high seas marine protected area (MPA) in 2010. The SOI continental shelf (~44 000 km(2) ), was less than half covered by grounded ice sheet during glaciations, is biologically rich and a key area of both sea surface warming and sea-ice losses. Little was known of the carbon cycle there, but recent work showed it was a very important site of carbon immobilization (net annual carbon accumulation) by benthos, one of the few demonstrable negative feedbacks to climate change. Carbon immobilization by SOI bryozoans was higher, per species, unit area and ice-free day, than anywhere-else polar. Here, we investigate why carbon immobilization has been so high at SOI, and whether this is due to high density, longevity or high annual production in six study species of bryozoans (benthic suspension feeders). We compared benthic carbon immobilization across major regions around West Antarctica with sea-ice and primary production, from remotely sensed and directly sampled sources. Lowest carbon immobilization was at the northernmost study regions (South Georgia) and southernmost Amundsen Sea. However, data standardized for age and density showed that only SOI was anomalous (high). High immobilization at SOI was due to very high annual production of bryozoans (rather than high densities or longevity), which were 2x, 3x and 5x higher than on the Bellingshausen, South Georgia and Amundsen shelves, respectively. We found that carbon immobilization correlated to the duration (but not peak or integrated biomass) of phytoplankton blooms, both in directly sampled, local scale data and across regions using remote-sensed data. The long bloom at SOI seems to drive considerable carbon immobilization, but sea-ice losses across West Antarctica mean that significant carbon sinks and negative feedbacks to climate change could also develop in the Bellingshausen and Amundsen seas.

  18. Why is the South Orkney Island shelf (the world's first high seas marine protected area) a carbon immobilization hotspot?

    PubMed

    Barnes, David K A; Ireland, Louise; Hogg, Oliver T; Morley, Simon; Enderlein, Peter; Sands, Chester J

    2016-03-01

    The Southern Ocean archipelago, the South Orkney Islands (SOI), became the world's first entirely high seas marine protected area (MPA) in 2010. The SOI continental shelf (~44 000 km(2) ), was less than half covered by grounded ice sheet during glaciations, is biologically rich and a key area of both sea surface warming and sea-ice losses. Little was known of the carbon cycle there, but recent work showed it was a very important site of carbon immobilization (net annual carbon accumulation) by benthos, one of the few demonstrable negative feedbacks to climate change. Carbon immobilization by SOI bryozoans was higher, per species, unit area and ice-free day, than anywhere-else polar. Here, we investigate why carbon immobilization has been so high at SOI, and whether this is due to high density, longevity or high annual production in six study species of bryozoans (benthic suspension feeders). We compared benthic carbon immobilization across major regions around West Antarctica with sea-ice and primary production, from remotely sensed and directly sampled sources. Lowest carbon immobilization was at the northernmost study regions (South Georgia) and southernmost Amundsen Sea. However, data standardized for age and density showed that only SOI was anomalous (high). High immobilization at SOI was due to very high annual production of bryozoans (rather than high densities or longevity), which were 2x, 3x and 5x higher than on the Bellingshausen, South Georgia and Amundsen shelves, respectively. We found that carbon immobilization correlated to the duration (but not peak or integrated biomass) of phytoplankton blooms, both in directly sampled, local scale data and across regions using remote-sensed data. The long bloom at SOI seems to drive considerable carbon immobilization, but sea-ice losses across West Antarctica mean that significant carbon sinks and negative feedbacks to climate change could also develop in the Bellingshausen and Amundsen seas. PMID:26682944

  19. Groundwater Quality Impacts Related to Carbon Dioxide, Brine and Trace Metal Leakage into a Shallow, Unconfined Limestone Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacon, D. H.; Hou, Z.; Dai, Z.; Zheng, L.

    2012-12-01

    Accurate prediction of the impact of leaks related to geologic carbon sequestration on groundwater quality is limited by the complexity of subsurface aquifers and the geochemical reactions that control drinking water compositions. As a result, there is a high uncertainty associated with predictions, hampering monitoring plans, interpretation of the monitoring results, and mitigation plans for a given site. As a part of the National Risk Assessment Program (NRAP), funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, a model of the Edwards Aquifer in Texas has been developed to examine the geochemical impacts of leakage of CO2 and brine containing trace metals into an oxidizing unconfined, carbonate aquifer. We use STOMP-CO2-R, which is a multiphase flow simulator, coupled with the reactive transport module ECKEChem, both developed at PNNL, to simulate CO2 sequestration in deep saline formations and the associated reactions with formation minerals. The limestone almost entirely consists of calcite, with lesser amounts of dolomite and trace metals adsorbed on minor amounts of clay and iron oxides. A reduced order model of this more complex chemistry and physics based model has been developed to be included in a framework for quantifying the overall risks associated with CO2 injection, leaks and groundwater impacts. The aquifer model uses reduced-order models, provided by other NRAP groups, of CO2 and brine leakage from wellbores and faults as inputs. Geochemical input parameters were varied to determine parameter sensitivity and to generate a response surface of output variables. The output variables were pH < 6.5 or TDS > 500 ppm plume size and CO2 flux to atmosphere, as well the volume of aquifer with trace metal concentrations greater than their U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Maximum Contaminant Levels. The uncertain input parameters were CO2/brine leak rate, brine composition, mineral surface area and volumetric percent, equilibrium coefficients, and kinetic rates

  20. HyFlux - Part II: Subsurface sequestration of methane-derived carbon in gas-hydrate- bearing marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naehr, T. H.; Asper, V. L.; Garcia, O.; Kastner, M.; Leifer, I.; MacDonald, I. R.; Solomon, E. A.; Yvon-Lewis, S.; Zimmer, B.

    2008-12-01

    The recently funded DOE/NETL study "HyFlux: Remote sensing and sea-truth measurements of methane flux to the atmosphere" (see MacDonald et al.: HyFlux - Part I) will combine sea surface, water column and shallow subsurface observations to improve our estimates of methane flux from submarine seeps and associated gas hydrate deposits to the water column and atmosphere along the Gulf of Mexico continental margin and other selected areas world-wide. As methane-rich fluids rise towards the sediment-water interface, they will interact with sulfate-rich pore fluids derived from overlying bottom water, which results in the formation of an important biogeochemical redox boundary, the so-called sulfate-methane interface, or SMI. Both methane and sulfate are consumed within the SMI and dissolved inorganic carbon, mostly bicarbonate (HCO3-) and hydrogen sulfide are produced, stimulating authigenic carbonate precipitation at and immediately below the SMI. Accordingly, the formation of authigenic carbonates in methane- and gas-hydrate-rich sediments will sequester a portion of the methane-derived carbon. To date, however, little is known about the quantitative aspects of these reactions. Rates of DIC production are not well constrained, but recent biogeochemical models indicate that CaCO3 precipitation rates may be as high as 120 μmol cm-2a-1. Therefore, AOM-driven carbonate precipitation must be considered when assessing the impact of gas-hydrate-derived methane on the global carbon cycle. As part of HyFlux, we will conduct pore water analyses (DOC, DIC, CH4, δ13CDIC, δ13CDOC, δ13CCH4, δ18O, and δD isotope ratios) to evaluate the importance of authigenic carbonate precipitation as a sequestration mechanism for methane- derived carbon. In addition, sediment and seafloor carbonate samples will be analyzed for bulk sedimentary carbonate (δ13C and δ18O) and bulk sedimentary organic matter (δ13C and δ15N), as well as sulfur, bulk mineralogy, texture and morphological

  1. Exposure, vegetation and sediment as primary factors for mobile epibenthic faunal community structure and production in shallow marine soft bottom areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pihl, L.

    Mobile epibenthic fauna was quantitatively assessed in 22 shallow-water (0-1.5 m), soft-bottom areas on the Swedish west coast. Relationships between faunal structure, density, biomass and annual production on the one hand, and physical factors such as exposure, vegetation cover and sediment structure on the other, were investigated. The areas were grouped according to their physical characteristics into 4 categories: exposed, semi-exposed and sheltered with little or no vegetation and vegetated. Species number, density, biomass and annual production were shown to be significantly higher in vegetated areas ( Zostera marina L.) than in mainly unvegetated ones. The epibenthic production in Z. marina meadows was 6 g (AFDW)-m -2·y -1. Species composition was also different and Carcinus maenas L. was the only dominant species occurring in both vegetated and unvegetated areas. In all unvegetated areas the number and composition of species were about the same, regardless of exposure, whereas biomass and production varied with the degree of exposure. Highest production (3 to 5.5 g (AFDW)-m -2·y -1) in these areas was found in semi-exposed areas. In exposed and sheltered areas production was 1.1 to 3.3 g and 0.6 to 1.7 g (AFDW)-m -2·y -1, respectively. Degree of exposure, vegetation cover and sediment structure are suggested as the primary factors affecting the composition and quantity of mobile epibenthic fauna in the investigated areas. Biotic factors e.g. predation and competition are generally considered to be subordinate to these physical factors.

  2. From the pore scale to reservoir scale: Lithohydraulic flow unit characterization of a shallow shelf carbonate reservoir, North Robertson Unit, West Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Vessell, R.K.; Davies, D.K. )

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the results of integrated geological-petrophysical reservoir characterization performed as part of the US Department of Energy Class II reservoir program. Petrographic image analysis, using a specially equipped SEM, allowed for the identification of 8 petrophysical rock types at the North Robertson Unit. Detailed log analysis resulted in the development of algorithms for the log-based identification of these rock types in 109 wells. Porosity was related to permeability for each Rock Type: thus permeability is determined from well log data. Evaluation of porosity, permeability, Sw and HPV distribution has allowed for the identification of 12 lithohydraulic flow units. These flow units have been mapped across the unit. The technique allows for the development of log-based reservoir models that are simulator-ready. The results of this study have application to all heterogeneous, shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs, they demonstrate that large fields can be successfully characterized using few cores and emphasize the importance of integrated geological-engineering analysis in reservoir characterization.

  3. From the pore scale to reservoir scale: Lithohydraulic flow unit characterization of a shallow shelf carbonate reservoir, North Robertson Unit, West Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Vessell, R.K.; Davies, D.K.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents the results of integrated geological-petrophysical reservoir characterization performed as part of the US Department of Energy Class II reservoir program. Petrographic image analysis, using a specially equipped SEM, allowed for the identification of 8 petrophysical rock types at the North Robertson Unit. Detailed log analysis resulted in the development of algorithms for the log-based identification of these rock types in 109 wells. Porosity was related to permeability for each Rock Type: thus permeability is determined from well log data. Evaluation of porosity, permeability, Sw and HPV distribution has allowed for the identification of 12 lithohydraulic flow units. These flow units have been mapped across the unit. The technique allows for the development of log-based reservoir models that are simulator-ready. The results of this study have application to all heterogeneous, shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs, they demonstrate that large fields can be successfully characterized using few cores and emphasize the importance of integrated geological-engineering analysis in reservoir characterization.

  4. Shallow structure and stratigraphy of the carbonate West Florida continental slope and their implications to sedimentation and geohazards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doyle, Larry J.

    1983-01-01

    An 1800-joule sparker survey of the West Florida continental slope between about 26?N and 29?15?N showed a top bed of Pleistocene age forming an irregular drape over a surface that is probably Pliocene. The contact between the top two layers is unconformable in the south and, in some places, shows karst collapse and solution features. Karst topography grades into a more hummocky erosional surface to the north, which in turn smoothes out; the contact become conformable still further north. A period of folding, which is widespread over the outer portion of the study area and which may be related to large scale mass wasting, occurred at about the same time represented by the unconformity. Significant subsidence has occurred as late as Pleistocene. The surface layer thins to a minimum (0 in the south) at about 525-meters water depth and then thickens again dramatically to the west, downslope. This thinning is interpreted to be due to the Loop Current, which flows from north to south in the area and which acts to block deposition and scour the bottom. Despite the fact that the margin is dominated by carbonates, usually associated with low sedimentation rates, there is widespread evidence of mass wasting affecting ancient and surficial deposits on the outer part of the upper slope. Three potential groups of geohazards identified are: 1. Potential bottom failure in areas where a thin top layer overlies the karst surface. 2. Potential for sliding and slumping. 3. Scour due to currents which could also affect drilling and engineering activities.

  5. Combined effects of warming, acidification and changing ocean circulation on the marine carbon cycle during the PETM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinze, M.; Ilyina, T.

    2014-12-01

    We are studying the ocean biogeochemistry during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM; 55 million years ago) with an Earth System Model (ESM). During this period of abrupt environmental change the climate underwent a significant transformation within short geological timescales (~10 ky). The PETM is globally recorded in proxy-data by a negative δ13C carbon isotope excursion and carbonate dissolution in the ocean, suggesting that the occurred warming was caused by massive carbon release. To investigate the marine biogeochemistry before and during the onset of the PETM we use the ESM of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology to simulate scenarios with different rates of carbon release over several thousand years. Starting from an already warmer background climate than present, the atmospheric CO2 increase and concomitant warming lead to acidification and deoxygenation of mid and deep ocean waters. Our results indicate that a weakening of deep water formation, caused by global warming, plays a major role in producing inhospitable conditions for benthic organisms during the PETM. We show how the interaction between biological and physical responses to the carbon perturbation lead to the observed calcite sediment dissolution in the deep ocean. At the surface a weakening of the physical and biological carbon pump restricts the oceanic uptake capacity of atmospheric CO2 which helps to maintain elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations and temperatures throughout the event.

  6. Revisiting ODP Site 690 to Assess the Responses of Marine Carbonate Chemistry to the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, D. C.; Zachos, J. C.; Bralower, T. J.; Schellenberg, S. A.

    2004-12-01

    The close of the Paleocene epoch (ca. 55 Ma) is punctuated by a transient (<100 kyr) global warming event referred to as the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM). In the marine realm, hallmark signatures of the PETM are a negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE) on the order of 3 per mil, widespread carbonate dissolution, and a benthic foraminiferal mass extinction. The rapid onset and anomalous magnitude of the CIE has been attributed to a sudden release of some 2000 Gt of methane into earth's surficial carbon reservoir. Presumably, oxidation of this methane elevated pCO2 levels in the atmosphere/ocean system, fueling global greenhouse warmth and carbonate dissolution. Here we revisit what is arguably the most complete deep-sea record of the PETM recovered from ODP Site 690 to explore the dynamic coupling between atmospheric CO2 levels, marine carbonate chemistry, continental weathering and global climate. The abrupt onset of the CIE is accompanied by a sharp decline in wt.% carbonate, yet wt.% coarse-fraction (>63 microns, foraminiferal shells) values remain fairly constant. These sedimentological shifts collectively point toward the selective removal of fine-fraction (<63 microns) carbonate produced by calcareous nannoplankton during peak oceanic warmth. We believe this selective pattern of "dissolution" actually reflects, in part, reduced calcification among some calcareous nannofossil taxa. An important corollary of this interpretation is that rising pCO2 levels attained a critical threshold that inhibited nannoplankton calcification. Decreased surface-ocean carbonate production triggered a shoaling of the local lysocline and concomitantly enhanced the ocean's carbon-storage capacity providing an important sink for atmospheric CO2. The character of carbonate sedimentation is reversed during the later, recovery stages of the CIE. It is within this stratigraphically expanded portion of the CIE that wt.% carbonate values and the relative proportion of wt.% fine

  7. Photosynthetic Carbon Isotope Fractionation of the Marine Dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense: A Chemostat Investigation of Taxonomic and Physiological Controls on the Stable Carbon Isotope Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkes, E.; Carter, S. J.; Pearson, A.

    2015-12-01

    Interpretations of stable carbon isotope excursions in the sedimentary record are strengthened by laboratory culture studies investigating the photosynthetic carbon isotope fractionation (ɛp) of marine phytoplankton taxa with long geological records. These studies are essential for understanding organic matter δ13C signals in terms of environmental changes (e.g., atmospheric pCO2 and nutrient availability) or taxonomic changes (e.g., algal species succession and community composition). Dinoflagellates are among the most widespread and ecologically dominant primary producers in modern oceans and throughout the Mesozoic and Cenozoic. Compared to more recently evolved phytoplankton taxa, however, dinoflagellate carbon isotope fractionation has received relatively little mechanistic study. Several dilute batch culture experiments with dinoflagellates have investigated ɛp as a function of CO2 availability, but the influences of changing growth rates, nutrient limitation, pH, and irradiance require further systematic exploration. We investigated stable carbon isotope fractionation in the marine dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense under nitrate-limited conditions in a chemostat culture system in which full DIC system parameters, including the concentration and δ13C value of CO2, were determined. Growth rates were varied between experiments, and cells were grown under continuous light. Previously reported ɛp values for seven dinoflagellate species including A. tamarense ranged from approximately -1 to 14‰ in nutrient-replete batch culture studies ([CO2] = 0-50 µmol kg-1). In contrast, in chemostat conditions we measured ɛp values on the order of 20‰ ([CO2] = 20-30 µmol kg-1). These experiments provide an initial step toward understanding the physiological controls on ɛp in dinoflagellates and illuminating the role of algal taxonomy in shaping the Phanerozoic stable carbon isotope record.

  8. Metaproteomics of a gutless marine worm and its symbiotic microbial community reveal unusual pathways for carbon and energy use.

    PubMed

    Kleiner, Manuel; Wentrup, Cecilia; Lott, Christian; Teeling, Hanno; Wetzel, Silke; Young, Jacque; Chang, Yun-Juan; Shah, Manesh; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C; Zarzycki, Jan; Fuchs, Georg; Markert, Stephanie; Hempel, Kristina; Voigt, Birgit; Becher, Dörte; Liebeke, Manuel; Lalk, Michael; Albrecht, Dirk; Hecker, Michael; Schweder, Thomas; Dubilier, Nicole

    2012-05-01

    Low nutrient and energy availability has led to the evolution of numerous strategies for overcoming these limitations, of which symbiotic associations represent a key mechanism. Particularly striking are the associations between chemosynthetic bacteria and marine animals that thrive in nutrient-poor environments such as the deep sea because the symbionts allow their hosts to grow on inorganic energy and carbon sources such as sulfide and CO(2). Remarkably little is known about the physiological strategies that enable chemosynthetic symbioses to colonize oligotrophic environments. In this study, we used metaproteomics and metabolomics to investigate the intricate network of metabolic interactions in the chemosynthetic association between Olavius algarvensis, a gutless marine worm, and its bacterial symbionts. We propose previously undescribed pathways for coping with energy and nutrient limitation, some of which may be widespread in both free-living and symbiotic bacteria. These pathways include (i) a pathway for symbiont assimilation of the host waste products acetate, propionate, succinate and malate; (ii) the potential use of carbon monoxide as an energy source, a substrate previously not known to play a role in marine invertebrate symbioses; (iii) the potential use of hydrogen as an energy source; (iv) the strong expression of high-affinity uptake transporters; and (v) as yet undescribed energy-efficient steps in CO(2) fixation and sulfate reduction. The high expression of proteins involved in pathways for energy and carbon uptake and conservation in the O. algarvensis symbiosis indicates that the oligotrophic nature of its environment exerted a strong selective pressure in shaping these associations. PMID:22517752

  9. Response of marine and freshwater algae to nitric acid and elevated carbon dioxide levels simulating environmental effects of bolide impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boston, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    One of the intriguing facets of the Cretaceous-Tertiary extinction is the apparently selective pattern of mortality amongst taxa. Some groups of organisms were severely affected and some remained relatively unscathed as they went through the K/T boundary. While there is argument concerning the exact interpretation of the fossil record, one of the best documented extinctions at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary is that of the calcareous nannoplankton. These organisms include coccolithic algae and foraminiferans. Attempts to explain their decline at the K/T boundary center around chemistry which could affect their calcium carbonate shells while leaving their silica-shelled cousins less affected or unaffected. Two environmental consequences of an extraterrestrial body impact which were suggested are the production of large quantities of nitrogen oxides generated by the shock heating of the atmosphere and the possible rise in CO2 from the dissolution of CaCO3 shells. Both of these phenomena would acidify the upper layers of the oceans and bodies of freshwater not otherwise buffered. The effects of nitric acid, carbon dioxide, or both factors on the growth and reproduction of calcareous marine coccoliths and non-calcareous marine and freshwater species of algae were considered. These experiments demonstrate that nitric acid and carbon dioxide have significant effects on important aspects of the physiology and reproduction of modern algae representative of extinct taxa thought to have suffered significant declines at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary. Furthermore, calcareous species showed more marked effects than siliceous species and marine species tested were more sensitive than freshwater species.

  10. Correlating Mediterranean shallow water deposits with global Oligocene–Miocene stratigraphy and oceanic events☆

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Markus; Piller, Werner E.; Brandano, Marco; Harzhauser, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    Shallow-marine sediment records have the strong potential to display sensitive environmental changes in sedimentary geometries and skeletal content. However, the time resolution of most neritic carbonate records is not high enough to be compared with climatic events as recorded in the deep-sea sediment archives. In order to resolve the paleoceanographic and paleoclimatic changes during the Oligocene–Miocene transition in the Mediterranean shallow water carbonate systems with the best possible time resolution, we re-evaluated the Decontra section on the Maiella Platform (central Apennines, Italy), which acts as a reference for the correlation of Oligocene–Miocene shallow water deposits in the Mediterranean region. The 120-m-thick late Oligocene–late Miocene carbonate succession is composed of larger foraminiferal, bryozoan and corallinacean limestones interlayered with distinct planktonic foraminiferal carbonates representing a mostly outer neritic setting. Integrated multi-proxy and facies analyses indicate that CaCO3 and total organic carbon contents as well as gamma-ray display only local to regional processes on the carbonate platform and are not suited for stratigraphic correlation on a wider scale. In contrast, new biostratigraphic data correlate the Decontra stable carbon isotope record to the global deep-sea carbon isotope record. This links relative sea level fluctuations, which are reflected by facies and magnetic susceptibility changes, to third-order eustatic cycles. The new integrated bio-, chemo-, and sequence stratigraphic framework enables a more precise timing of environmental changes within the studied time interval and identifies Decontra as an important locality for correlating not only shallow and deep water sediments of the Mediterranean region but also on a global scale. PMID:25844021

  11. Magnesium and calcium isotopic characteristics of Tengchong volcanics: Recycling of marine carbonates into the SE Tibetan mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, F.; Zhang, Z.; Liu, Y.; Zhu, H.; Kang, J.; Zhang, C.; Sun, W.; Wang, G. Q.

    2015-12-01

    Post-collisional high-K calc-alkaline volcanic rocks are widely distributed in Tengchong in the southeastern margin of Tibetan Plateau. Previous considerable petrological and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic researches undoubtedly indicate that the mantle beneath Tengchong is heterogeneous and enriched. However, the genesis of such a kind of mantle is still poor understood and needs more constrains. One of the key points lead to the answer to this question is that, is there any recycled carbonate involved? Therefore, Magnesium and calcium isotopic compositions of mantle-derived volcanics should be investigated because they are good candidates to be potentially used to trace recycling of ancient marine carbonates into the mantle. In this study, we report high-precision Mg and Ca isotopic compositions for calc-alkaline volcanic rocks in Tengchong. These volcanic rocks show significantly lighter δ26Mg values (-0.44 to -0.36‰) than the mantle value (-0.25±0.07‰). Similarly, they display lighter δ44Ca values (0.65-0.80‰) than the mantle value (1.05±0.04‰). Because neither δ26Mg nor δ44Ca are correlated with SiO2 (50.8-61.6 wt.%) contents, and there is no relationships between δ26Mg or δ44Ca and typical trace element abundance ratios (e.g. Sm/Yb, Ba/Y), we conclude that magma differentiation or partial melting would lead to limited Mg and Ca isotopes fractionation. Thus, low δ26Mg and δ44Ca signatures of Tengchong volcanic rocks probably reflect that the δ26Mg and δ44Ca characteristics of the underneath mantle source, and are resulted from adding ancient marine carbonates into the primitive mantle which has low Mg and Ca isotopic compositions. Our model simulation using a two end-member mixing between Mg-Ca isotopic compositions of primitive mantle and ancient marine carbonate indicates that carbonates involved in the mantle source is mainly dolostone with minor limestone. Combined with the geotectonic evolution history in Tengchong, we propose that the enriched

  12. Minor-element composition and organic carbon content of marine and nonmarine shales of Late Cretaceous age in the western interior of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tourtelot, H.A.

    1964-01-01

    The composition of nonmarine shales of Cretaceous age that contain less than 1 per cent organic carbon is assumed to represent the inherited minor-element composition of clayey sediments delivered to the Cretaceous sea that occupied the western interior region of North America. Differences in minor-element content between these samples and samples of 1. (a) nonmarine carbonaceous shales (1 to 17 per cent organic carbon), 2. (b) nearshore marine shales (less than 1 per cent organic carbon), and 3. (c) offshore marine shales (as much as 8 per cent organic carbon), all of the same age, reveal certain aspects of the role played by clay minerals and organic materials in affecting the minor-element composition of the rocks. The organic carbon in the nonmarine rocks occurs in disseminated coaly plant remains. The organic carbon in the marine rocks occurs predominantly in humic material derived from terrestrial plants. The close similarity in composition between the organic isolates from the marine samples and low-rank coal suggests that the amount of marine organic material in these rocks is small. The minor-element content of the two kinds of nonmarine shales is the same despite the relatively large