Science.gov

Sample records for shaped charge pressed

  1. Conical shaped charge pressed powder, metal liner jet characterization and penetration in aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, M.G.

    1997-05-01

    This work was conducted as part of a Near-wellbore Mechanics program at Sandia National Laboratories. An understanding of the interaction of the perforator jet from an explosive shaped charge with the fluid filled porous sandstone media is of basic importance to the completion of oil wells. Tests were conducted using the five-head Flash X-ray Test Site to measure the jet tip velocities and jet geometry for the OMNI and CAPSULE Conical Shaped Charge (CSC) oil well perforator jets fired into air. These tests were conducted to generate jet velocity and geometry information to be used in validating the CTH hydrocode modeling/simulation development of pressed powder, metal liner jets in air. Ten tests were conducted to determine the CSC jet penetration into 6061-T6 aluminum targets. Five tests were conducted with the OMNI CSC at 0.25, 6.0, and 19 inch standoffs from the target. Five tests were conducted with the CAPSULE CSC at 0.60, 5.0, 10.0, and 19 inch standoffs from the target. These tests were conducted to generate jet penetration into homogeneous target information for use in validating the CTH code modeling/simulation of pressed powder, metal liner jets penetrating aluminum targets. The Flash X-ray radiographs, jet velocities, jet diameters, and jet lengths data for jets fired into air are presented in this report. The jet penetration into aluminum and penetration hole profile data are also presented for the OMNI and CAPSULE perforators. Least Squares fits are presented for the measured jet velocity and jet penetration data.

  2. Linear shaped charge

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, David; Stofleth, Jerome H.; Saul, Venner W.

    2017-07-11

    Linear shaped charges are described herein. In a general embodiment, the linear shaped charge has an explosive with an elongated arrowhead-shaped profile. The linear shaped charge also has and an elongated v-shaped liner that is inset into a recess of the explosive. Another linear shaped charge includes an explosive that is shaped as a star-shaped prism. Liners are inset into crevices of the explosive, where the explosive acts as a tamper.

  3. Free form hemispherical shaped charge

    DOEpatents

    Haselman, L.C. Jr.

    1996-06-04

    A hemispherical shaped charge has been modified such that one side of the hemisphere is spherical and the other is aspherical allowing a wall thickness variation in the liner. A further modification is to use an elongated hemispherical shape. The liner has a thick wall at its pole and a thin wall at the equator with a continually decreasing wall thickness from the pole to the equator. The ratio of the wall thickness from the pole to the equator varies depending on liner material and HE shape. Hemispherical shaped charges have previously been limited to spherical shapes with no variations in wall thicknesses. By redesign of the basic liner thicknesses, the jet properties of coherence, stability, and mass distribution have been significantly improved. 8 figs.

  4. Free form hemispherical shaped charge

    DOEpatents

    Haselman, Jr., Leonard C.

    1996-01-01

    A hemispherical shaped charge has been modified such that one side of the hemisphere is spherical and the other is aspherical allowing a wall thickness variation in the liner. A further modification is to use an elongated hemispherical shape. The liner has a thick wall at its pole and a thin wall at the equator with a continually decreasing wall thickness from the pole to the equator. The ratio of the wall thickness from the pole to the equator varies depending on liner material and HE shape. Hemispherical shaped charges have previously been limited to spherical shapes with no variations in wall thicknesses. By redesign of the basic liner thicknesses, the jet properties of coherence, stability, and mass distribution have been significantly improved.

  5. VIEW OF INTERIOR SPACE WITH SQUARE SHAPE STRETCH PRESS CONTAINMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF INTERIOR SPACE WITH SQUARE SHAPE STRETCH PRESS CONTAINMENT PITS CENTER, FACING NORTH. - Douglas Aircraft Company Long Beach Plant, Aircraft Parts Shipping & Receiving Building, 3855 Lakewood Boulevard, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  6. VIEW OF INTERIOR SPACE WITH RECTANGULAR SHAPE STRETCH PRESS CONTAINMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF INTERIOR SPACE WITH RECTANGULAR SHAPE STRETCH PRESS CONTAINMENT PIT IN BACKGROUND, FACING NORTH. - Douglas Aircraft Company Long Beach Plant, Aircraft Parts Shipping & Receiving Building, 3855 Lakewood Boulevard, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  7. Shape optimization of the modular press body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabiszczak, Stanisław

    2016-12-01

    A paper contains an optimization algorithm of cross-sectional dimensions of a modular press body for the minimum mass criterion. Parameters of the wall thickness and the angle of their inclination relative to the base of section are assumed as the decision variables. The overall dimensions are treated as a constant. The optimal values of parameters were calculated using numerical method of the tool Solver in the program Microsoft Excel. The results of the optimization procedure helped reduce body weight by 27% while maintaining the required rigidity of the body.

  8. Improved Analytical Shaped Charge Code: BASC

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    Comparison between BASC Code and Experimental Results for Scaled , Heavily-Confined, Shaped-Charge (Reference 10). Jet and Collapse Velocities vs % of...hydrodynamic, computer codes that have been applied to shaped-charge problems. 1 , 2 Althou2h these codes are adaptable to vari- ous geometrical...calculation of jet tip or lead pellet behavior and confined charges. Extensive semi-empirical functions, regaring liner acceleration and confinement

  9. Energy Transfer of a Shaped Charge.

    SciTech Connect

    Milinazzo, Jared Joseph

    2016-11-01

    A cylinder of explosive with a hollow cavity on one and a detonator at the other is considered a hollow charge. When the explosive is detonated the detonation products form a localized intense force. If the hollow charge is placed near or in contact with a steel plate then the damage to the plate is greater than a solid cylinder of explosive even though there is a greater amount of explosive in the latter charge. The hollow cavity can take almost any geometrical shape with differing amounts of damage associated with each shape. This phenomenon is known in the United States as the Munroe effect.

  10. Explosive shaped charge penetration into tuff rock

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, M.G.

    1988-10-01

    Analysis and data for the use of Explosive Shaped Charges (ESC) to generate holes in tuff rock formation is presented. The ESCs evaluated include Conical Shaped Charges (CSC) and Explosive Formed Projectiles (EFP). The CSCs vary in size from 0.158 to 9.1 inches inside cone diameter. The EFPs were 5.0 inches in diameter. Data for projectile impact angles of 30 and 90 degrees are presented. Analytically predicted depth of penetration data generally compared favorably with experimental data. Predicted depth of penetration versus ESC standoff data and hole profile dimensions in tuff are also presented. 24 refs., 45 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Pressure enhanced penetration with shaped charge perforators

    DOEpatents

    Glenn, Lewis A.

    2001-01-01

    A downhole tool, adapted to retain a shaped charge surrounded by a superatmospherically pressurized light gas, is employed in a method for perforating a casing and penetrating reservoir rock around a wellbore. Penetration of a shaped charge jet can be enhanced by at least 40% by imploding a liner in the high pressure, light gas atmosphere. The gas pressure helps confine the jet on the axis of penetration in the latter stages of formation. The light gas, such as helium or hydrogen, is employed to keep the gas density low enough so as not to inhibit liner collapse.

  12. Expendable Precision Laser Aimer for Shaped Charges

    SciTech Connect

    Ault, S; Kuklo, R

    2007-10-25

    Certain shaped-charge cutting operations require a precision aiming system that is operationally convenient, robust, and constructed to allow the aiming system to be left in place for last-minute alignment verification until it is expended when the charge is fired. This report describes an aiming system made from low cost doubled-Nd:YAG 532 nm laser modules of the type used in green laser pointers. Drawings and detailed procedures for constructing the aiming system are provided, as are the results of some minimal tests performed on a prototype device.

  13. A Brief History of Shaped Charges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    liner geometry may be conical, hemispherical, parabolic, or any arcuate device. If the liner is “bow shaped” it is called an explosively formed...apex. Other Japanese studies related to detonation physics and methods of focusing the gas flow, calculation of the target hole volume and...rounds, and other devices using shaped charges. Many of these improvements and research activities are well documented, for example, in the

  14. Method for hot pressing irregularly shaped refractory articles

    DOEpatents

    Steinkamp, William E.; Ballard, Ambrose H.

    1982-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method for hot pressing irregularly haped refractory articles with these articles of varying thickness being provided with high uniform density and dimensional accuracy. Two partially pressed compacts of the refractory material are placed in a die cavity between displaceable die punches having compact-contacting surfaces of the desired article configuration. A floating, rotatable block is disposed between the compacts. The displacement of the die punches towards one another causes the block to rotate about an axis normal to the direction of movement of the die punches to uniformly distribute the pressure loading upon the compacts for maintaining substantially equal volume displacement of the powder material during the hot pressing operation.

  15. Press to grasp: how action dynamics shape object categorization.

    PubMed

    Triberti, Stefano; Repetto, Claudia; Costantini, Marcello; Riva, Giuseppe; Sinigaglia, Corrado

    2016-03-01

    Action and object are deeply linked to each other. Not only can viewing an object influence an ongoing action, but motor representations of action can also influence visual categorization of objects. It is tempting to assume that this influence is effector-specific. However, there is indirect evidence suggesting that this influence may be related to the action goal and not just to the effector involved in achieving it. This paper aimed, for the first time, to tackle this issue directly. Participants were asked to categorize different objects in terms of the effector (e.g. hand or foot) typically used to act upon them. The task was delivered before and after a training session in which participants were instructed either just to press a pedal with their foot or to perform the same foot action with the goal of guiding an avatar's hand to grasp a small ball. Results showed that pressing a pedal to grasp a ball influenced how participants correctly identified graspable objects as hand-related ones, making their responses more uncertain than before the training. Just pressing a pedal did not have any similar effect. This is evidence that the influence of action on object categorization can be goal-related rather than effector-specific.

  16. Lexan Linear Shaped Charge Holder with Magnets and Backing Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maples, Matthew W.; Dutton, Maureen L.; Hacker, Scott C.; Dean, Richard J.; Kidd, Nicholas; Long, Chris; Hicks, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    A method was developed for cutting a fabric structural member in an inflatable module, without damaging the internal structure of the module, using linear shaped charge. Lexan and magnets are used in a charge holder to precisely position the linear shaped charge over the desired cut area. Two types of charge holders have been designed, each with its own backing plate. One holder cuts fabric straps in the vertical configuration, and the other charge holder cuts fabric straps in the horizontal configuration.

  17. Jet Flight Patterns of Linear Shaped Charges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Seokbin

    2016-01-01

    A typical jet flight pattern of linear shaped charges (LSCs) is studied, and analytical expressions are built for two important parameters of the angle of liner collapse line φ and jet projection angle ω. In order to simplify the nonlinear nature of the liner collapse behavior of LSCs, important assumptions are made, including (1) a constant jet projection velocity at the given standoff distance and (2) the liner collapse occurs in a steady-state fashion, generating a single straight collapse line during the detonation. Based on the assumptions, analytical expressions are derived and the result is compared with side-view images of LSC jet flight to evaluate accuracy and applicability. The analytical approach delivers reasonable accuracy in a given range and is applicable to a short range of standoff distances.

  18. Solid explosive plane-wave lenses pressed-to-shape with dies

    SciTech Connect

    Olinger, B.

    2007-11-01

    Solid-explosive plane-wave lenses 1", 2" and 4¼" in diameter have been mass-produced from components pressed-to-shape with aluminum dies. The method used to calculate the contour between the solid plane-wave lens components pressed-to-shape with the dies is explained. The steps taken to press, machine, and assemble the lenses are described. The method of testing the lenses, the results of those tests, and the corrections to the dies are reviewed. The work on the ½", 8", and 12" diameter lenses is also discussed.

  19. Systems tunnel linear shaped charge lightning strike

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, M.

    1989-01-01

    Simulated lightning strike testing of the systems tunnel linear shaped charge (LSC) was performed at the Thiokol Lightning Test Complex in Wendover, Utah, on 23 Jun. 1989. The test article consisted of a 160-in. section of the LSC enclosed within a section of the systems tunnel. The systems tunnel was bonded to a section of a solid rocket motor case. All test article components were full scale. The systems tunnel cover of the test article was subjected to three discharges (each discharge was over a different grounding strap) from the high-current generator. The LSC did not detonate. All three grounding straps debonded and violently struck the LSC through the openings in the systems tunnel floor plates. The LSC copper surface was discolored around the areas of grounding strap impact, and arcing occurred at the LSC clamps and LSC ends. This test verified that the present flight configuration of the redesigned solid rocket motor systems tunnel, when subjected to simulated lightning strikes with peak current levels within 71 percent of the worst-case lightning strike condition of NSTS-07636, is adequate to prevent LSC ignition. It is therefore recommended that the design remain unchanged.

  20. Optimized conical shaped charge design using the SCAP (Shaped Charge Analysis Program) code

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, M.G.

    1988-09-01

    The Shaped Charge Analysis Program (SCAP) is used to analytically model and optimize the design of Conical Shaped Charges (CSC). A variety of existing CSCs are initially modeled with the SCAP code and the predicted jet tip velocities, jet penetrations, and optimum standoffs are compared to previously published experimental results. The CSCs vary in size from 0.69 inch (1.75 cm) to 9.125 inch (23.18 cm) conical liner inside diameter. Two liner materials (copper and steel) and several explosives (Octol, Comp B, PBX-9501) are included in the CSCs modeled. The target material was mild steel. A parametric study was conducted using the SCAP code to obtain the optimum design for a 3.86 inch (9.8 cm) CSC. The variables optimized in this study included the CSC apex angle, conical liner thickness, explosive height, optimum standoff, tamper/confinement thickness, and explosive width. The non-dimensionalized jet penetration to diameter ratio versus the above parameters are graphically presented. 12 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. Shaped Charge Liner Materials: Resources, Processes, Properties, Costs, and Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-02-01

    SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Shaped Charge Liner Materials: Resources, Processes, Properties, Costs, and Applications 2 6. AUTHOC Steven M. Buc 7...summaries of the mineral availability, Cq prmarymetal refinement processeb, material costs in raw form and as finished shaped charge liners , relevant... liner materials. 94-11479 gI 14, SUBJECT TERMS iSt NUMBER OF PAGIS 13chrg wrhad :xplosively formed penetrators material R. PRCE COEV" processing

  2. Shaped Charge Jet Flash Radiograph Digitization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    radiograph digitization of shaped chare jets provides warhead designers with the data required for empirically based models , as well as the jet...characterization used for comparison with high rate continuum modeling . Reduced digitization results include jet tip velocity, jet accumulated length...using CALCOMP model 9500 digitizing tablet. It has the resolution of 0.25 x 10-3 in., accuracy of ± 0.003 in. and about 6 ft in length. The digitized

  3. Hydrophobicity and Charge Shape Cellular Metabolite Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Even, Arren; Noor, Elad; Flamholz, Avi; Buescher, Joerg M.; Milo, Ron

    2011-01-01

    What governs the concentrations of metabolites within living cells? Beyond specific metabolic and enzymatic considerations, are there global trends that affect their values? We hypothesize that the physico-chemical properties of metabolites considerably affect their in-vivo concentrations. The recently achieved experimental capability to measure the concentrations of many metabolites simultaneously has made the testing of this hypothesis possible. Here, we analyze such recently available data sets of metabolite concentrations within E. coli, S. cerevisiae, B. subtilis and human. Overall, these data sets encompass more than twenty conditions, each containing dozens (28-108) of simultaneously measured metabolites. We test for correlations with various physico-chemical properties and find that the number of charged atoms, non-polar surface area, lipophilicity and solubility consistently correlate with concentration. In most data sets, a change in one of these properties elicits a ∼100 fold increase in metabolite concentrations. We find that the non-polar surface area and number of charged atoms account for almost half of the variation in concentrations in the most reliable and comprehensive data set. Analyzing specific groups of metabolites, such as amino-acids or phosphorylated nucleotides, reveals even a higher dependence of concentration on hydrophobicity. We suggest that these findings can be explained by evolutionary constraints imposed on metabolite concentrations and discuss possible selective pressures that can account for them. These include the reduction of solute leakage through the lipid membrane, avoidance of deleterious aggregates and reduction of non-specific hydrophobic binding. By highlighting the global constraints imposed on metabolic pathways, future research could shed light onto aspects of biochemical evolution and the chemical constraints that bound metabolic engineering efforts. PMID:21998563

  4. Manufacture of astroloy turbine disk shapes by hot isostatic pressing, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eng, R. D.; Evans, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    The Materials in Advanced Turbine Engines project was conducted to demonstrate container technology and establish manufacturing procedures for fabricating direct Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) of low carbon Astroloy to ultrasonic disk shapes. The HIP processing procedures including powder manufacture and handling, container design and fabrication, and HIP consolidation techniques were established by manufacturing five HIP disks. Based upon dimensional analysis of the first three disks, container technology was refined by modifying container tooling which resulted in closer conformity of the HIP surfaces to the sonic shape. The microstructure, chemistry and mechanical properties of two HIP low carbon Astroloy disks were characterized. One disk was subjected to a ground base experimental engine test, and the results of HIP low carbon Astroloy were analyzed and compared to conventionally forged Waspaloy. The mechanical properties of direct HIP low carbon Astroloy exceeded all property goals and the objectives of reduction in material input weight and reduction in cost were achieved.

  5. High Resolution Diagnostics of a Linear Shaped Charge Jet

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, J.B.; Kuklo, R.M.; Shaw, L.L.; Carter, D.L.; Baum, D.W.

    1999-08-10

    The linear shaped charge is designed to produce a knife blade-like flat jet, which will perforate and sever one side of a modestly hard target from the other. This charge is approximately plane wave initiated and used a water pipe quality circular copper liner. To establish the quality of this jet we report about an experiment using several of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory high-resolution diagnostics previously published in this meeting [1]. Image converter tube camera stereo image pairs were obtained early in the jet formation process. Individual IC images were taken just after the perforation of a thin steel plate. These pictures are augmented with 70 mm format rotating mirror framing images, orthogonal 450 KeV flash radiograph pairs, and arrival time switches (velocity traps) positioned along the length of the jet edge. We have confirmed that linear shaped charges are subject to the same need for high quality copper as any other metal jetting device.

  6. The Shaped Charge Concept. Part 2. The History of Shaped Charges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    was called lde Beethoven and had a disamee of 180 an with 5,000 kg of high explosive. The Beethoven was designed for ums against ships mnd ground...foificauions. During the Normandy invasion, the Beethoven destroyed two batleships and four large uumrport ships. The Beethoven was the formunnir of die...large Gennan holov charge called the "MISTERIE?" (This is undoubtedl) the MISTEL which evo ved fhom the Beethoven charge discussed earlier). From the

  7. Induced charge electro osmotic mixer: Obstacle shape optimization

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Mranal; Yeung, Anthony; Nandakumar, K.

    2009-01-01

    Efficient mixing is difficult to achieve in miniaturized devices due to the nature of low Reynolds number flow. Mixing can be intentionally induced, however, if conducting or nonconducting obstacles are embedded within the microchannel. In the case of conducting obstacles, vortices can be generated in the vicinity of the obstacle due to induced charge electro-osmosis (ICEO) which enhances mixing of different streams: the obstacle shape affects the induced zeta potential on the conducting surface, which in turn influences the flow profile near the obstacle. This study deals with optimization of the geometric shape of a conducting obstacle for the purpose of micromixing. The obstacle boundary is parametrically represented by nonuniform rational B-spline curves. The optimal obstacle shape, which maximizes the mixing for given operating conditions, is found using genetic algorithms. Various case studies at different operating conditions demonstrated that the near right triangle shape provides optimal mixing in the ICEO flow dominant regime, whereas rectangular shape is the optimal shape in diffusion dominant regime. The tradeoff between mixing and transport is examined for symmetric and nonsymmetric obstacle shapes. PMID:19693348

  8. Statistical analysis of the particulation of shaped charge jets

    SciTech Connect

    Minich, R W, Baker, E L; Schwartz, A J

    1999-08-12

    A statistical analysis of shaped charge jet break-up was carried out in order to investigate the role of nonlinear instabilities leading to the particulation of the jet. Statistical methods generally used for studying fluctuations in nonlinear dynamical systems are applied to experimentally measured velocities of the individual particles. In particular we present results suggesting the deviation of non-Gaussian behavior for interparticle velocity correlations, characteristic of nonlinear dynamical systems. Results are presented for two silver shaped charge jets that differ primarily in their material processing. We provide evidence that the particulation of a jet is not random, but has its origin in a deterministic dynamical process involving the nonlinear coupling of two oscillators analogous to the underling dynamics observed in Rayleigh-Benard convection and modeled in the return map of Curry and Yorke.

  9. HNS aluminum linear shaped charge (ALSC) performance study

    SciTech Connect

    Campos, C.A.

    1980-07-01

    A study was performed to determine the HNS conversion process which yields the best material for use in manufacturing aluminum linear shaped charges (ALSC). Destructive testing was performed in two phases. Phase I established optimum standoff for each lot of material, and Phase II evaluated performance under varied temperature conditions. Both optimum standoff and performance were determined by measuring ALSC depth of penetration into an aluminum witness plate. Detonation velocity was also measured.

  10. Precision linear shaped charge analyses for severance of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, M.G.

    1996-08-01

    The Precision Linear Shaped Charge (PLSC) design concept involves the independent fabrication and assembly of the liner (wedge of PLSC), the tamper/confinement, and explosive. The liner is the most important part of a linear shaped charge (LSC) and should be fabricated by a more quality controlled, precise process than the tamper material. Also, this concept allows the liner material to be different from the tamper material. The explosive can be loaded between the liner and tamper as the last step in the assembly process rather than the first step as in conventional LSC designs. PLSC designs have been shown to produce increased jet penetrations in given targets, more reproducible jet penetration, and more efficient explosive cross-section geometries using a minimum amount of explosive. The Linear Explosive Shaped Charge Analysis (LESCA) code developed at Sandia National Laboratories has been used to assist in the design of PLSCs. LESCA predictions for PLSC jet tip velocities, jet-target impact angles, and jet penetration in aluminum and steel targets are compared to measured data. The advantages of PLSC over conventional LSC are presented. As an example problem, the LESCA code was used to analytically develop a conceptual design for a PLSC component to sever a three-inch thick 1018 steel plate at a water depth of 500 feet (15 atmospheres).

  11. Analysis of ``soft`` recovered shaped charge jet particles

    SciTech Connect

    Lassila, D.H.; Nikkel, D.J. Jr.; Kershaw, R.P.; Walters, W.P.

    1996-04-01

    A shaped charge with an 81 mm diameter, 42{degree} apex angle oxygen-free high-conductivity (OFHC) copper conical liner was fired into a ``soft`` recovery bunker to allow metallurgical examination of recovered jet particles and the slug. The initial weight of the copper liner was 245 g, of which 184 g was recovered. The number of jet particles recovered was 37 (approximately 63% of the particles formed by the charge). Extensive metallurgical analyses were performed on the recovered slug and jet particles. The microstructural features associated with voids, e.g., dendritic grain growth, clearly indicate that the regions in the vicinity of the centerline of the slug and jet particles were melted. In this work the authors present calculations of jet temperature as a function of constitutive behavior. In order to predict melt in the center region of the jet they find it necessary to scale flow stress with a pressure dependent shear modulus.

  12. Novel Processing of 81-mm Cu Shaped Charge Liners

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, A; Korzekwa, D

    2002-01-16

    A seven-step procedure was developed for producing shaped charge liner blanks by back extrusion at liquid nitrogen temperatures. Starting with a 38.1-mm diameter, 101.6-mm long cylinder at 77K, three forging steps with a flat-top die are required to produce the solid cone while maintaining low temperature. The solid cone is forged in four individual back extrusions at 77K to produce the rough liner blank. This procedure is capable of being run in batch processes to improve the time efficiency.

  13. Inhibited Shaped Charge Launcher Testing of Spacecraft Shield Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosch, Donald J.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes a test program in which several orbital debris shield designs were impact tested using the inhibited shaped charge launcher facility at Southwest Research Institute. This facility enables researchers to study the impact of one-gram aluminum projectiles on various shielding designs at velocities above 11 km/s. A total of twenty tests were conducted on targets provided by NASA-MSFC. This report discusses in detail the shield design, the projectile parameters and the test configuration used for each test. A brief discussion of the target damage is provided, as the detailed analysis of the target response will be done by NASA-MSFC.

  14. Inhibited Shaped Charge Launcher Testing of Spacecraft Shield Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosch, Donald J.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes a test program in which several orbital debris shield designs were impact tested using the inhibited shaped charge launcher facility at Southwest Research Institute. This facility enables researchers to study the impact of one-gram aluminum projectiles on various shielding designs at velocities above 11 km/s. A total of twenty tests were conducted on targets provided by NASA-MSFC. This report discusses in detail the shield design, the projectile parameters and the test configuration used for each test. A brief discussion of the target damage is provided, as the detailed analysis of the target response will be done by NASA-MSFC.

  15. IECDS: an improved electrical charge distribution on the shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Minmin; Li, Zhiyang; Wu, Junfeng; Liu, Zhaobin; Qu, Wenyu

    2017-02-01

    Since correct critical points are crucial for most shape decomposition algorithms, a variety of part-related measures have been presented to detect these critical points. Among this, the electrical charge distribution on the shape (ECDS) and its variants have some distinguishing characteristics and advantages, such as invariance and smoothness. However, we find it is still challenging to obtain satisfactory critical points, especially in the flat area such as the tails and legs of shapes. In this paper, we propose a novel way to make ECDS exhibit low values at given critical points. That is to say, critical points from other part-related measures can be introduced in ECDS, which will highly improve its descriptive ability. To achieve it, we propose to add constraints to linear equations, meanwhile relax these constraints in an anisotropy heat diffusion manner. Furthermore, we put forward a novel approach to find the stable extreme points of the improved ECDS (IECDS), which usually corresponding to critical points. Finally, we conduct experiments on the shapes in the MPEG-7 dataset, demonstrating that our method can obtain more meaningful critical points than existing methods.

  16. Precision linear shaped charge severance of graphite-epoxy materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vigil, Manuel G.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents Precision Linear Shaped Charge (PLSC) components designed to sever a variety of target materials. Recent data for the severance of graphite-epoxy panels or targets with PLSC's are presented. A brief history of the requirement to originate the development of PLSC's for weapon components at Sandia National Laboratories is presented. The Department of Energy's (DOE) nuclear weapon systems have continually decreased in size. Today's relatively small weapons require the design of much more efficient, lighter, and smaller explosive components because fragments, air shocks, and pyro-shocks associated with the function of these components can damage electrical and other sensitive components located nearby. The DOE requirements for PLSC's are listed. Therefore, linear shaped charge (LSC) components for weapon systems can no longer be empirically or experimentally designed for a given application. Many of today's designs require severing concentric cylinders, for example, where the LSC jet is designed to sever only one of the two cylinders as was the case for the B90/Nuclear Depth Strike Bomb. Therefore, code modeling and simulation technology must be utilized to obtain a better understanding of the LSC jet hydrodynamic penetration, fracture, shear, and spall mechanisms associated with the severance of metallic as well as composite targets.

  17. Precision linear shaped charge severance of graphite-epoxy materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vigil, Manuel G.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents Precision Linear Shaped Charge (PLSC) components designed to sever a variety of target materials. Recent data for the severance of graphite-epoxy panels or targets with PLSC's are presented. A brief history of the requirement to originate the development of PLSC's for weapon components at Sandia National Laboratories is presented. The Department of Energy's (DOE) nuclear weapon systems have continually decreased in size. Today's relatively small weapons require the design of much more efficient, lighter, and smaller explosive components because fragments, air shocks, and pyro-shocks associated with the function of these components can damage electrical and other sensitive components located nearby. The DOE requirements for PLSC's are listed. Therefore, linear shaped charge (LSC) components for weapon systems can no longer be empirically or experimentally designed for a given application. Many of today's designs require severing concentric cylinders, for example, where the LSC jet is designed to sever only one of the two cylinders as was the case for the B90/Nuclear Depth Strike Bomb. Therefore, code modeling and simulation technology must be utilized to obtain a better understanding of the LSC jet hydrodynamic penetration, fracture, shear, and spall mechanisms associated with the severance of metallic as well as composite targets.

  18. A Review of One Dimensional Shaped Charge Theory. Part 1. Jet Formation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-01

    o A REVIEW OF ONE DIMENSIONAL SHAPED CHARGE THEORY PART 1 - JET FORMATION 1o INTRODUCTION -,. ". The shaped charge warhead , based on the Munroe...these weapons has recently been given by Backofen (1]. Shaped charge warheads are currently in use by the Australian Army in the 66 mm M72L A2 (IAW) and...charge warheads for defeat of submarine pressure hulls, as in the Stingray torpedo used by the Royal Navy. MRL has been engaged on various investigations

  19. Performance oriented packaging report for charge, demolition, shaped, 40 pound, M3A1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sniezek, F.M.

    1992-11-02

    This POP report is for the Charge, Demolition, Shaped, 40 Pound, M3Al which is packaged 1 charge/Mil-B-2427 wood box. This report describes the results of testing conducted.... Performance oriented packaging, POP, Charge, Demolition, Shaped, 40 Pound, M3Al, Mil-B-2427 Wood box.

  20. Performance oriented packaging report for charge, demolition, shaped, 15 pound, M2A4. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sniezek, F.M.

    1992-11-02

    This POP report is for the Charge, Demolition, Shaped, 15 Pound, M2A4 which is packaged 4 charges/Mil-B-2427 wood box. This report describes the results of testing conducted. Performance Oriented Packaging, POP, Charge, Demolition, Shaped, 15 Pound, M2A4, Mil-B-2427 Wood box.

  1. Electrode shapes for high-power diodes with non-space-charge-limited flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, William

    1992-04-01

    Electrode shapes appropriate to diodes with non-space-charge-limited flow (e.g., laser-irradiated photocathodes) and high-power (eV0 ≳ mc2) are derived. The electrode shapes are designed to keep the electron beam rectilinear, and generalize the shapes derived by Pierce for space-charge-limited cathodes in low-power diodes.

  2. Discussions to Shaped Charge Jet Tests after MIL-STD-2105B

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    Distribution Statement A: Approved for public release, distribution is unlimited. DISCUSSIONS TO SHAPED CHARGE JET TESTS AFTER MIL STD 2105 B...ABSTRACT In contrast to the fragment impact test the shaped charge jet impact test No. 5.2.6 of MIL STD 2105 B is very conservative. The detailed...description for the shaped charges, which should be used, is already modified from the first edition of the MIL STD 2105 B. The 50 mm Rockeye warhead

  3. Experimental investigation of penetration performance of shaped charge into concrete targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cheng; Ma, Tianbao; Ning, Jianguo

    2008-06-01

    In order to develop a tandem warhead that can effectively destroy concrete targets, this paper explores the penetration performance of shaped charges with different cone angles and liner materials into concrete targets by means of experiments. The penetration process and the destruction mechanism of concrete targets by shaped charges and kinetic energy projectiles are analyzed and compared. Experimental results suggest that both kinetic energetic projectile and shaped charge are capable of destroying concrete targets, but the magnitudes of damage are different. Compared with a kinetic energy projectile, a shaped charge has more significant effect of penetration into the target, and causes very large spalling area. Hence, a shaped charge is quite suitable for first-stage charge of tandem warhead. It is also found that, with the increase of shaped charge liner cone angle, the depth of penetration decreases gradually while the hole diameter becomes larger. Penetration depth with copper liner is larger than of aluminum liner but hole diameter is relatively smaller, and the shaped charge with steel liner is between the above two cases. The shaped charge with a cone angle of 100° can form a jet projectile charge (JPC). With JPC, a hole with optimum depth and diameter on concrete targets can be formed, which guarantees that the second-stage warhead smoothly penetrates into the hole and explodes at the optimum depth to achieve the desired level of destruction in concrete targets.

  4. Mass and charge transport in arbitrarily shaped microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruus, Henrik; Asger Mortensen, Niels; Okkels, Fridolin; Hoejgaard Olesen, Laurits

    2006-11-01

    We consider laminar flow of incompressible electrolytes in long, straight channels driven by pressure and electro-osmosis. We use a Hilbert space eigenfunction expansion to address the problem of arbitrarily shaped cross sections and obtain general results in linear-response theory for the mass and charge transport coefficients which satisfy Onsager relations [1,2]. In the limit of non-overlapping Debye layers the transport coefficients are simply expressed in terms of parameters of the electrolyte as well as half the hydraulic diameter R=2 A/P with A and P being the cross- sectional area and perimeter, respectively. In particular, we consider the limits of thin non-overlapping as well as strongly overlapping Debye layers, respectively, and calculate the corrections to the hydraulic resistance due to electro- hydrodynamic interactions.[1] N. A. Mortensen, F. Okkels, and H. Bruus, Phys. Rev. E 71, 057301 (2005) [2] N. A. Mortensen, L. H. Olesen, and H. Bruus, New J. Phys. 8, 37 (2006)

  5. Manufacture of low carbon astroloy turbine disk shapes by hot isostatic pressing. Volume 2, project 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eng, R. D.; Evans, D. J.

    1979-01-01

    The performance of a hot isotatic pressed disk installed in an experimental engine and exposed to realistic operating conditions in a 150-hour engine test and a 1000 cycle endurance test is documented. Post test analysis, based on visual, fluorescent penetrant and dimensional inspection, revealed no defects in the disk and indicated that the disk performed satisfactorily.

  6. SR90, strontium shaped-charge critical ionization velocity experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, Eugene M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, Hans; Swift, Daniel W.; Valenzuela, Arnoldo; Rees, David

    1990-01-01

    In May 1986 an experiment was performed to test Alfven's critical ionization velocity (CIV) effect in free space, using the first high explosive shaped charge with a conical liner of strontium metal. The release, made at 540 km altitude at dawn twilight, was aimed at 48 deg to B. The background electron density was 1.5 x 10(exp 4) cu cm. A faint field-aligned Sr(+) ion streak with tip velocity of 2.6 km/s was observed from two optical sites. Using two calibration methods, it was calculated that between 4.5 x 10(exp 20) and 2 x 10(exp 21) ions were visible. An ionization time constant of 1920 s was calculated for Sr from the solar UV spectrum and ionization cross section which combined with a computer simulation of the injection predicts 1.7 x 10(exp 21) solar UV ions in the low-velocity part of the ion streak. Thus all the observed ions are from solar UV ionization of the slow (less than critical) velocity portion of the neutral jet. The observed neutral Sr velocity distribution and computer simulations indicate that 2 x 10(exp 21) solar UV ions would have been created from the fast (greater than critical) part of the jet. They would have been more diffuse, and were not observed. Using this fact it was estimated that any CIV ions created were less than 10(exp 21). It was concluded that future Sr CIV free space experiments should be conducted below the UV shadow height and in much larger background plasma density.

  7. Justice Dept. to Use New Civil-Rights Law to Press Segregation Charge against Alabama's Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaschik, Scott

    1988-01-01

    The U.S. Justice Department is renewing its charge, overturned last year, that Alabama's public colleges are racially segregated, focusing on discrimination in individual programs receiving federal funds. (MSE)

  8. Design of a System for Cutting Shaped Charge Jets for Penetration Experiments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    System for Cutting Shaped Charge Jets for Penetration Experiments 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Franz, Robert E. and Lawrence, William 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b...necessary and identify by block number) h experimental system to selectively cut a copper jet from a 34.9 mm diameter shaped-charge is described

  9. Hot isostatically pressed manufacture of high strength MERL 76 disk and seal shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eng, R. D.; Evans, D. J.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of using MERL 76, an advanced high strength direct hot isostatic pressed powder metallurgy superalloy, as a full scale component in a high technology, long life, commercial turbine engine were demonstrated. The component was a JT9D first stage turbine disk. The JT9D disk rim temperature capability was increased by at least 22 C and the weight of JT9D high pressure turbine rotating components was reduced by at least 35 pounds by replacement of forged Superwaspaloy components with hot isostatic pressed (HIP) MERL 76 components. The process control plan and acceptance criteria for manufacture of MERL 76 HIP consolidated components were generated. Disk components were manufactured for spin/burst rig test, experimental engine tests, and design data generation, which established lower design properties including tensile, stress-rupture, 0.2% creep and notched (Kt = 2.5) low cycle fatigue properties, Sonntag, fatigue crack propagation, and low cycle fatigue crack threshold data. Direct HIP MERL 76, when compared to conventionally forged Superwaspaloy, is demonstrated to be superior in mechanical properties, increased rim temperature capability, reduced component weight, and reduced material cost by at least 30% based on 1980 costs.

  10. Development of new punch shape to replicate scale-up issues in laboratory tablet press II: a new design of punch head to emulate consolidation and dwell times in commercial tablet press.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Shigeru; Uchiyama, Jumpei; Ito, Manabu

    2014-06-01

    Differences between laboratory and commercial tablet presses are frequently observed during scale-up of tableting process. These scale-up issues result from the differences in total compression time that is the sum of consolidation and dwell times. When a lubricated blend is compressed into tablets, the tablet thickness produced by the commercial tablet press is often thicker than that by a laboratory tablet press. A new punch shape design, designated as shape adjusted for scale-up (SAS), was developed and used to demonstrate the ability to replicate scale-up issues in commercial-scale tableting processes. It was found that the consolidation time can be slightly shortened by changing the vertical curvature of the conventional punch head rim. However, this approach is not enough to replicate the consolidation time. A secondary two-stage SAS punch design and an embossed punch head was designed to replicate the consolidation and dwell times on a laboratory tablet press to match those of a commercial tablet press. The resulting tablet thickness using this second SAS punch on a laboratory tablet press was thicker than when using a conventional punch in the same laboratory tablet press. The secondary SAS punches are more useful tools for replicating and understanding potential scale-up issues. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  11. A changing climate of skepticism: The factors shaping climate change coverage in the US press.

    PubMed

    Schmid-Petri, Hannah; Adam, Silke; Schmucki, Ivo; Häussler, Thomas

    2017-05-01

    Skepticism toward climate change has a long tradition in the United States. We focus on mass media as the conveyors of the image of climate change and ask: Is climate change skepticism still a characteristic of US print media coverage? If so, to what degree and in what form? And which factors might pave the way for skeptics entering mass media debates? We conducted a quantitative content analysis of US print media during one year (1 June 2012 to 31 May 2013). Our results show that the debate has changed: fundamental forms of climate change skepticism (such as denial of anthropogenic causes) have been abandoned in the coverage, being replaced by more subtle forms (such as the goal to avoid binding regulations). We find no evidence for the norm of journalistic balance, nor do our data support the idea that it is the conservative press that boosts skepticism.

  12. Shapes and Fissility of Highly Charged and Rapidly Rotating Levitated Liquid Drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, L.; Hill, R. J. A.

    2017-09-01

    We use diamagnetic levitation to investigate the shapes and the stability of free electrically charged and spinning liquid drops of volume ˜1 ml. In addition to binary fission and Taylor cone-jet fission modes observed at low and high charge density, respectively, we also observe an unusual mode which appears to be a hybrid of the two. Measurements of the angular momentum required to fission a charged drop show that nonrotating drops become unstable to fission at the amount of charge predicted by Lord Rayleigh. This result is in contrast to the observations of most previous experiments on fissioning charged drops, which typically exhibit fission well below Rayleigh's limit.

  13. Modeling Close-In Airblast from ANFO Cylindrical and Box-Shaped Charges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    ANFO ) were detonated at various heights above a heavy steel plate. The plate was instrumented with twelve PCB piezoelectric pressure sensors with a...MODELING CLOSE-IN AIRBLAST FROM ANFO CYLINDRICAL AND BOX-SHAPED CHARGES Bob Britt, Tyler Oesch, Bob Walker, Dave Hyde, and Will McMahon...pressures) through a series of experiments and numerical simulations. Cylindrical and box-shaped charges of ammonium nitrate with fuel oil ( ANFO ) were

  14. Active experiments using rocket-borne shaped charge barium releases. [solar-terrestrial magnetospheric physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.; Davis, T. N.

    1980-01-01

    A reliable payload system and scaled down shaped charges were developed for carrying out experiments in solar-terrestrial magnetospheric physics. Four Nike-Tomahawk flights with apogees near 450 km were conducted to investigate magnetospheric electric fields, and two Taurus-Tomahawk rockets were flown in experiments on the auroral acceleration process in discrete auroras. In addition, a radial shaped charge was designed for plasma perturbation experiments.

  15. Influence of Material Viscosity on the Theory of Shaped-Charge Jet Formation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-08-01

    No. 5, May 1952. 12. M. .rýfourneaux, "Hydrodynamic Theory of Shaped Charges and of Jet Penetration, Memorial De L’art Illerie Francasise-T, 44...UNCLASSIFIED AD NUMBER ADB041485 NEW LIMITATION CHANGE TO Approved for public release, distribution unlimited FROM Distribution authorized to U.S...DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED, AD- ( , MEMORANDUM REPORT ARBRL-MR-02941 INFLUENCE OF MATERIAL VISCOSITY ON THE 00, THEORY OF SHAPED -CHARGE JET FORMATION William P

  16. The Effect of Finite Conductivity on MHD Instabilities in Axisymmetric Shaped Charge Jets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    200words) In an earlier report by Powell and Littlefield, the effect of azimuthal magnetic fields on the stability of an axisymmetric shaped charge jet...conductivity on the stability of the jet. An axial electric current is introduced in the jet at time f = 0 and permitted to diffuse over time. Linear perturbtion...29 electromagnetic disruption, shaped charge jets, jet stability , MHD stability , 16. PRICE CODE magnetic fields 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 18

  17. An infrared pyroelectric detector improved by cool isostatic pressing with cup-shaped PZT thick film on silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Q. X.; Wu, C. G.; Luo, W. B.; Chen, C.; Cai, G. Q.; Sun, X. Y.; Qian, D. P.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we presented a new pyroelectric detector with back to back silicon cups and micro-bridge structure. The PZT thick film shaped in the front cup was directly deposited with designed pattern by electrophoresis deposition (EPD). Pt/Ti Metal film, which was fabricated by standard photolithography and lift-off technology, was sputtered to connect the top electrode and the bonding pad. The cold isostatic press (CIP) treatment could be applied to improve the pyroelectric properties of PZT thick film. The infrared (IR) properties the CIP-optimized detector were measured. The voltage responsivity (RV) was 4.5 × 102 V/W at 5.3 Hz, the specific detectivity (D*) was greater than 6.34 × 108 cm Hz1/2 W-1 (frequency > 110 Hz), and the thermal time constant was 51 ms, respectively.

  18. Properties of Porous TiNbZr Shape Memory Alloy Fabricated by Mechanical Alloying and Hot Isostatic Pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, L. W.; Chung, C. Y.; Tong, Y. X.; Zheng, Y. F.

    2011-07-01

    In the past decades, systematic researches have been focused on studying Ti-Nb-based SMAs by adding ternary elements, such as Mo, Sn, Zr, etc. However, only arc melting or induction melting methods, with subsequent hot or cold rolling, were used to fabricate these Ni-free SMAs. There is no work related to powder metallurgy and porous structures. This study focuses on the fabrication and characterization of porous Ti-22Nb-6Zr (at.%) shape memory alloys produced using elemental powders by means of mechanical alloying and hot isostatic pressing. It is found that the porous Ti-22Nb-6Zr alloys prepared by the HIP process exhibit a homogenous pore distribution with spherical pores, while the pores have irregular shape in the specimen prepared by conventional sintering. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the solid solution-treated Ti-22Nb-6Zr alloy consists of both β phase and α″ martensite phase. Morphologies of martensite were observed. Finally, the porous Ti-22Nb-6Zr SMAs produced by both MA and HIP exhibit good mechanical properties, such as superior superelasticity, with maximum recoverable strain of ~3% and high compressive strength.

  19. History of the Shaped Charge Effect: The First 100 Years

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-22

    reported in 1883 3 Gustav Bloem’s U.S. patent issued in 1886 4 Munroe’s guncotton experiments, Scribners Mag. 1888 5 Munroe’s safe defeat by dynamite shaped...34 (Question, is the latter the same as a captain?) Gustav Bloem -1885 A U.S. Patent (Ref. 3) issued in May 1886 to Gustav Bloem of Dusseldorf, Kingdom of...0 ,4 boN I N 40 4 A) 0 118D 25.5-in. 12-in. D. AGX-31 00 Warhead 30.0-in. 10.2-in. D. .y -., AGX-3200 (for BULLPUP) 10.75-in. D. 250-lb. Mk 19

  20. Axisymmetric shapes and stability of charged drops in an external electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basaran, O. A.; Scriven, L. E.

    1989-05-01

    A highly conducting charged drop that is surrounded by a fluid insulator of another density can be levitated by suitably applying a uniform electric field. Axisymmetric equilibrium shapes and stability of the levitated drop are found by solving simultaneously the augmented Young-Laplace equation for surface shape and the Laplace equation for the elecric field, together with constraints of fixed drop volume, charge, and center of mass. The means are a method of subdomains, finite element basis functions, and Galerkin's method of weighted residuals, all facilitated by a large-scale computer. Shape families of fixed charge are treated systematically by first-order continuation. Previous analyses by Abbas et al. in 1967 and Abbas and Latham in 1969, in which the shapes of levitated drops are approximated as spheroids, are corrected. The new analysis shows that drops charged to less than the Rayleigh limit lose shape stability at turning points, with respect to external field strength, and that the instability seen in experiments of Doyle et al. in 1964 and others is not a bifurcation to a family of two-lobed shapes, but rather is a related imperfect bifurcation.

  1. Axisymmetric shapes and stability of charged drops in an external electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basaran, O. A.; Scriven, L. E.

    1989-05-01

    A highly conducting charged drop that is surrounded by a fluid insulator of another density can be levitated by suitably applying a uniform electric field. Axisymmetric equilibrium shapes and stability of the levitated drop are found by solving simultaneously the augmented Young-Laplace equation for surface shape and the Laplace equation for the electric field, together with constraints of fixed drop volume, charge, and center of mass. The means are a method of subdomains, finite element basis functions, and Galerkin's method of weighted residuals, all facilitated by a large-scale computer. Shape families of fixed charge are treated systematically by first-order continuation. Previous analyses by Abbas et al. in 1967 and Abbas and Latham in 1969, in which the shapes of levitated drops are approximated as spheroids, are corrected. The new analysis shows that drops charged to less than the Rayleigh limit lose shape stability at turning points, with respect to external field strength, and that the instability seen in experiments of Doyle et al. in 1964 and others is not a bifurcation to a family of two-lobed shapes, but rather is a related imperfect bifurcation.

  2. Effect of surface charge convection and shape deformation on the dielectrophoretic motion of a liquid drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Shubhadeep; Bandopadhyay, Aditya; Chakraborty, Suman

    2016-04-01

    The dielectrophoretic motion and shape deformation of a Newtonian liquid drop in an otherwise quiescent Newtonian liquid medium in the presence of an axisymmetric nonuniform dc electric field consisting of uniform and quadrupole components is investigated. The theory put forward by Feng [J. Q. Feng, Phys. Rev. E 54, 4438 (1996), 10.1103/PhysRevE.54.4438] is generalized by incorporating the following two nonlinear effects—surface charge convection and shape deformation—towards determining the drop velocity. This two-way coupled moving boundary problem is solved analytically by considering small values of electric Reynolds number (ratio of charge relaxation time scale to the convection time scale) and electric capillary number (ratio of electrical stress to the surface tension) under the framework of the leaky dielectric model. We focus on investigating the effects of charge convection and shape deformation for different drop-medium combinations. A perfectly conducting drop suspended in a leaky (or perfectly) dielectric medium always deforms to a prolate shape and this kind of shape deformation always augments the dielectrophoretic drop velocity. For a perfectly dielectric drop suspended in a perfectly dielectric medium, the shape deformation leads to either increase (for prolate shape) or decrease (for oblate shape) in the dielectrophoretic drop velocity. Both surface charge convection and shape deformation affect the drop motion for leaky dielectric drops. The combined effect of these can significantly increase or decrease the dielectrophoretic drop velocity depending on the electrohydrodynamic properties of both the liquids and the relative strength of the electric Reynolds number and electric capillary number. Finally, comparison with the existing experiments reveals better agreement with the present theory.

  3. Comparison of shaped charge liner cone and recovered jet fragment microstructures to elucidate dynamic recrystallization phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murr, L. E.; Niou, C.-S.; Sanchez, J. C.; Zernow, L.

    1995-01-01

    In order to prove the occurrence of dynamic recrystallization (DRX) following detonation of copper and tantalum shape charge liner cones, reductions in the starting grain size of the liner cones and recovered slug and jet fragments were compared. Forged copper cone liner having a grain size of 15 micrometer was also produced and the end point microstructures were compared with previous results and observations for a starting cone grain size of 35 micrometer. Microstructures in shaped charge starting liner cones and recovered jet fragments were observed by both optical metallography and transmission electron microscopy.

  4. Application of the Pugh, Eichelberg and Rostoker Theory to the MRL 38 mm Shaped Charge,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    66 m M72 LIA2 (LAW) and 84 mm Carl Gustaf anti-tank weapons, and there Is continuing interest in the 103 .’"’’ mm MILAN, a shaped charge warhead which...others are the DESC-1 code of Carleone et al of Dyna East Corp. [7], the JETFORM code at RARDE [8], and the TB/ISL code of Hennequin in France [9...38 mm shaped charge may be too small for exact scaling to-0 apply. The velocity of the tail end of the jet predicted from Fig. 8 is 0.18 mm/us and

  5. Pyrotechnic shock: A literature survey of the Linear Shaped Charge (LSC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    Linear shaped charge (LSC) literature for the past 20 years is reviewed. The following topics are discussed: (1) LSC configuration; (2) LSC usage; (3) LSC induced pyroshock; (4) simulated pyrotechnic testing; (5) actual pyrotechnic testing; (6) data collection methods; (7) data analysis techniques; (8) shock reduction methods; and (9) design criteria. Although no new discoveries have been made in LSC research, charge shapes are improved to allow better cutting performance, testing instrumentation is refined, and some new explosives, for use in LSC, are formulated.

  6. Numerical simulation of damage and fracture in concrete from shaped charge jets

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, M J; Baum, D W; Clark, D B; McGuire, E M; Simonson, S C

    2000-09-13

    This paper addresses numerical simulation of damage and fracture in concrete from the impact and penetration of shaped charge jets. We have modeled the jet penetration process with CALE, a two dimensional arbitrary Lagrange Eulerian hydrocode. We have looked at several constitutive models ranging from simple pressure dependent yield to more complex deviatoric models that include the effects of dilatency. Evaluation of the concrete material models is based on comparison to experimental results of an aluminum lined shaped charge fired against a high strength concrete target at several standoff distances.

  7. SCAP - a Shaped Charge Analysis Program: user's manual for SCAP 1. 0

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, A.C.

    1985-04-01

    The basic modeling and format for a shaped charge analysis program, SCAP, is described. The code models the motion of liner elements due to explosive loading, jet formation, jet breakup and target penetration through application of a series of analytical approximations. The structure of the code is intended to provide flexibility in shaped charge device and target configurations and in modeling techniques. The code is designed for interactive use and produces both printed and plotted output. Examples of code output are given and compared with experimental data. 19 refs., 13 figs.

  8. Modulation of Asymmetric Flux in Heterotypic Gap Junctions by Pore Shape, Particle Size and Charge.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Abhijit; Sachse, Frank B; Moreno, Alonso P

    2017-01-01

    Gap junction channels play a vital role in intercellular communication by connecting cytoplasm of adjoined cells through arrays of channel-pores formed at the common membrane junction. Their structure and properties vary depending on the connexin isoform(s) involved in forming the full gap junction channel. Lack of information on the molecular structure of gap junction channels has limited the development of computational tools for single channel studies. Currently, we rely on cumbersome experimental techniques that have limited capabilities. We have earlier reported a simplified Brownian dynamics gap junction pore model and demonstrated that variations in pore shape at the single channel level can explain some of the differences in permeability of heterotypic channels observed in in vitro experiments. Based on this computational model, we designed simulations to study the influence of pore shape, particle size and charge in homotypic and heterotypic pores. We simulated dye diffusion under whole cell voltage clamping. Our simulation studies with pore shape variations revealed a pore shape with maximal flux asymmetry in a heterotypic pore. We identified pore shape profiles that match the in silico flux asymmetry results to the in vitro results of homotypic and heterotypic gap junction formed out of Cx43 and Cx45. Our simulation results indicate that the channel's pore-shape established flux asymmetry and that flux asymmetry is primarily regulated by the sizes of the conical and/or cylindrical mouths at each end of the pore. Within the set range of particle size and charge, flux asymmetry was found to be independent of particle size and directly proportional to charge magnitude. While particle charge was vital to creating flux asymmetry, charge magnitude only scaled the observed flux asymmetry. Our studies identified the key factors that help predict asymmetry. Finally, we suggest the role of such flux asymmetry in creating concentration imbalances of messenger

  9. Numerical study on the matching law between charge caliber and delay time of the rod-shaped explosively formed projectile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, H. M.; Li, W. B.; Wang, X. M.; Li, W. B.

    2017-09-01

    To study the application of multi-point initiation technology on shaped charge warhead, numerically simulated the influence of initiating delay time of different charge caliber on detonation wave and performance forming of penetrator. The study found that as charge caliber increased, the allowable initiating delay time also increased. For the commonly used small and medium-charge caliber shaped charge warhead, the charge caliber(Dk ) and the delay time (σ) presented a linear relationship σ = ‑12.79+1.25Dk . As charge caliber continue increasing, the initiating allowable delay time started to increase exponentially. The study reveals the matching law between charge caliber, initiating delay time and performance forming of penetrator, and it offers guidance for the design of multi-point initiation network for shaped charge.

  10. Effect of interior surface finish on the break-up of commercial shaped charge liners

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, E L; Schwartz, A J

    1999-08-11

    A series of experiments aimed at understanding the influence of the liner interior surface finish on the break-up of shaped charge jets has been completed. The experiments used a standard 81-mm shaped charge design, loaded with LX-14 high explosive; incorporating high-precision copper shaped charged liners. The results indicate that a significant reduction of jet break-up time occurs between a surface finish of 99.30 microinches and 375.65 microinches. Surface finishes of 4.78, 44.54 and 99.30 microinches produced significantly better ductility and associated break-up times than the 375.65-microinch finish. The baseline production process high-precision liners were measured to have an average surface finish of 44.54 microinches. The results show that for the shaped charge warhead geometry and explosive combination investigated, some care must be taken in respect to surface finish, but that very fine surface finishes do not significantly improve the jet ductility and associated break-up times.

  11. Characterization and comparison of microstructures in the shaped-charge regime: Copper and tantalum

    SciTech Connect

    Gurevitch, A.C.; Murr, L.E.; Shih, H.K.; Niou, C.S.; Advani, A.H.; Manuel, D. ); Zernow, L. )

    1993-04-01

    Light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy techniques were employed, along with a novel technique for building up small, recovered jet fragments using electrodeposition of copper, to examine specific segments of fabricated shaped charge liner cones and corresponding, residual jet fragments. Oxygen-free electronic copper and tantalum shaped charge regimes (liner cones and recovered jet fragments) were compared, and a reduction in the average grain size of recovered jet fragments as compared to the starting liner cones was a consistent observation. The average grain sizes for all cones was 35 [mu]m, and the maximum grain reduction occurred for an annealed, equiaxed tantalum cone, which resulted in a residual jet fragment grain size between 1 and 5 [mu]m. This is indicative of dynamic recrystallization during jet elongation and microstructure evolution. The most recent US military use of shaped charges was in the high explosive antitank shells used in the 1990-1991 conflict with Iraq. Shaped charges are also used in the oil and gas industries, steel industries, mining and quarrying, specialty cutting, and perhaps most prominently in building demolition work within cities.

  12. The Velocity Difference Between Particulated Shaped Charge Jet Particles for Face-Centered-Cubic Liner Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-01

    A model was derived to predict the average jet velocity difference between particulated shaped charge jet particles. The model is based on the ’ wire ... drawing formula presented by Kolsky, the plastic instability criterion, and the Zerilli-Armstrong constitutive equation for face-centered-cubic

  13. Annular precision linear shaped charge flight termination system for the ODES program

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, M.G.; Marchi, D.L.

    1994-06-01

    The work for the development of an Annular Precision Linear Shaped Charge (APLSC) Flight Termination System (FTS) for the Operation and Deployment Experiment Simulator (ODES) program is discussed and presented in this report. The Precision Linear Shaped Charge (PLSC) concept was recently developed at Sandia. The APLSC component is designed to produce a copper jet to cut four inch diameter holes in each of two spherical tanks, one containing fuel and the other an oxidizer that are hyperbolic when mixed, to terminate the ODES vehicle flight if necessary. The FTS includes two detonators, six Mild Detonating Fuse (MDF) transfer lines, a detonator block, detonation transfer manifold, and the APLSC component. PLSCs have previously been designed in ring components where the jet penetrating axis is either directly away or toward the center of the ring assembly. Typically, these PLSC components are designed to cut metal cylinders from the outside inward or from the inside outward. The ODES program requires an annular linear shaped charge. The (Linear Shaped Charge Analysis) LESCA code was used to design this 65 grain/foot APLSC and data comparing the analytically predicted to experimental data are presented. Jet penetration data are presented to assess the maximum depth and reproducibility of the penetration. Data are presented for full scale tests, including all FTS components, and conducted with nominal 19 inch diameter, spherical tanks.

  14. The Effect of Aerodynamic Heating on Air Penetration by Shaped Charge Jets and Their Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backofen, Joseph

    2009-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to present recent work modeling thermal coupling between shaped charge jets and their particles with air while it is being penetrated to form a crater that subsequently collapses back onto the jet. This work complements research published at International Symposia on Ballistics: 1) 1987 - Shaped Charge Jet Aerodynamics, Particulation and Blast Field Modeling; and 2) 2007 - Air Cratering by Eroding Shaped Charge Jets. The current work shows how and when a shaped charge jet's tip and jet particles are softened enough that they can erode in a hydrodynamic manner as modeled in these papers. This paper and its presentation includes models for heat transfer from shocked air as a function of jet velocity as well as heat flow within the jet or particle. The work is supported by an extensive bibliographic search including publications on meteors and ballistic missile re-entry vehicles. The modeling shows that a jet loses its strength to the depth required to justify hydrodynamic erosion when its velocity is above a specific velocity related to the shock properties of air and the jet material's properties. As a result, the portion of a jet's kinetic energy converted at the aerodynamic shock into heating transferred back onto the jet affects the energy deposited into the air through drag and ablation which in turn affect air crater expansion and subsequent collapse back onto the jet and its particles as shown in high-speed photography.

  15. Hydration, charge, size, and shape characteristics of peptides from their CZE analyses.

    PubMed

    Peirotti, Marta B; Piaggio, Maria V; Deiber, Julio A

    2008-02-01

    A CZE model is presented for peptide characterization on the basis of well-established physicochemical equations. The effective mobility is used as basic data in the model to estimate relevant peptide properties such as, for instance, hydration, net and total electrical charge numbers, hydrodynamic size and shape, particle average orientation, and pH-microenvironment from the charge regulation phenomenon. Therefore 102 experimental effective mobilities of different peptides are studied and discussed in relation to previous work. An equation for the estimation of peptide hydration as a function of ionizing, polar, and non-polar amino acid residues is included in the model. It is also shown that the shape-orientation factor of peptides may be either lower or higher than one, and its value depends on a complex interplay among total charge number, molar mass, hydration, and amino acid sequence.

  16. Pore structure and function of synthetic nanopores with fixed charges: tip shape and rectification properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez, Patricio; Apel, Pavel Yu; Cervera, Javier; Mafé, Salvador

    2008-08-01

    We present a complete theoretical study of the relationship between the structure (tip shape and dimensions) and function (selectivity and rectification) of asymmetric nanopores on the basis of previous experimental studies. The theoretical model uses a continuum approach based on the Nernst-Planck equations. According to our results, the nanopore transport properties, such as current-voltage (I-V) characteristics, conductance, rectification ratio, and selectivity, are dictated mainly by the shape of the pore tip (we have distinguished bullet-like, conical, trumpet-like, and hybrid shapes) and the concentration of pore surface charges. As a consequence, the nanopore performance in practical applications will depend not only on the base and tip openings but also on the pore shape. In particular, we show that the pore opening dimensions estimated from the pore conductance can be very different, depending on the pore shape assumed. The results obtained can also be of practical relevance for the design of nanopores, nanopipettes, and nanoelectrodes, where the electrical interactions between the charges attached to the nanostructure and the mobile charges confined in the reduced volume of the inside solution dictate the device performance in practical applications. Because single tracks are the elementary building blocks for nanoporous membranes, the understanding and control of their individual properties should also be crucial in protein separation, water desalination, and bio-molecule detection using arrays of identical nanopores.

  17. Energy transfer through a multi-layer liner for shaped charges

    DOEpatents

    Skolnick, Saul; Goodman, Albert

    1985-01-01

    This invention relates to the determination of parameters for selecting materials for use as liners in shaped charges to transfer the greatest amount of energy to the explosive jet. Multi-layer liners constructed of metal in shaped charges for oil well perforators or other applications are selected in accordance with the invention to maximize the penetrating effect of the explosive jet by reference to four parameters: (1) Adjusting the explosive charge to liner mass ratio to achieve a balance between the amount of explosive used in a shaped charge and the areal density of the liner material; (2) Adjusting the ductility of each layer of a multi-layer liner to enhance the formation of a longer energy jet; (3) Buffering the intermediate layers of a multi-layer liner by varying the properties of each layer, e.g., composition, thickness, ductility, acoustic impedance and areal density, to protect the final inside layer of high density material from shattering upon impact of the explosive force and, instead, flow smoothly into a jet; and (4) Adjusting the impedance of the layers in a liner to enhance the transmission and reduce the reflection of explosive energy across the interface between layers.

  18. The Global University Press

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    The modern world's understanding of American university press has long been shaped by university-press books. American university-press books are good international advertisements for the universities whose logos grace their spines. The growth of transnational scholarship and the expansion of digital communications networks are converging in ways…

  19. The Global University Press

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    The modern world's understanding of American university press has long been shaped by university-press books. American university-press books are good international advertisements for the universities whose logos grace their spines. The growth of transnational scholarship and the expansion of digital communications networks are converging in ways…

  20. Ignition-and-Growth Modeling of NASA Standard Detonator and a Linear Shaped Charge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oguz, Sirri

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to quantitatively investigate the ignition and shock sensitivity of NASA Standard Detonator (NSD) and the shock wave propagation of a linear shaped charge (LSC) after being shocked by NSD flyer plate. This combined explosive train was modeled as a coupled Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) model with LS-DYNA hydro code. An ignition-and-growth (I&G) reactive model based on unreacted and reacted Jones-Wilkins-Lee (JWL) equations of state was used to simulate the shock initiation. Various NSD-to-LSC stand-off distances were analyzed to calculate the shock initiation (or failure to initiate) and detonation wave propagation along the shaped charge. Simulation results were verified by experimental data which included VISAR tests for NSD flyer plate velocity measurement and an aluminum target severance test for LSC performance verification. Parameters used for the analysis were obtained from various published data or by using CHEETAH thermo-chemical code.

  1. Particulation in jets from free-form hemispherical shaped charges with copper liners

    SciTech Connect

    Simonson, S.C. III; Haselman, L.C. Jr.; Breithaupt, R.D.

    1995-05-01

    Particulation in free-form hemispherical shaped charge jets is considerably different from that in conical shaped charge jets. From the analysis of the particulation data for 23 experiments covering ten free-form hemi designs with copper liners, it is concluded that jets with higher convergence pressures have delayed particulation, sometimes by as much as a factor of two. Breakup is also found to be design dependent, with free-form hemis have delayed breakup compared with cones. Also, in going from the earlier, boat-tail high explosive (HE) designs to later, more efficient hemispherical HE designs, it is found that particulation is delayed in the tail of the jet. These effects indicate the potential for deeper armor penetration based on control of particulation.

  2. Modulation of Asymmetric Flux in Heterotypic Gap Junctions by Pore Shape, Particle Size and Charge

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Abhijit; Sachse, Frank B.; Moreno, Alonso P.

    2017-01-01

    Gap junction channels play a vital role in intercellular communication by connecting cytoplasm of adjoined cells through arrays of channel-pores formed at the common membrane junction. Their structure and properties vary depending on the connexin isoform(s) involved in forming the full gap junction channel. Lack of information on the molecular structure of gap junction channels has limited the development of computational tools for single channel studies. Currently, we rely on cumbersome experimental techniques that have limited capabilities. We have earlier reported a simplified Brownian dynamics gap junction pore model and demonstrated that variations in pore shape at the single channel level can explain some of the differences in permeability of heterotypic channels observed in in vitro experiments. Based on this computational model, we designed simulations to study the influence of pore shape, particle size and charge in homotypic and heterotypic pores. We simulated dye diffusion under whole cell voltage clamping. Our simulation studies with pore shape variations revealed a pore shape with maximal flux asymmetry in a heterotypic pore. We identified pore shape profiles that match the in silico flux asymmetry results to the in vitro results of homotypic and heterotypic gap junction formed out of Cx43 and Cx45. Our simulation results indicate that the channel's pore-shape established flux asymmetry and that flux asymmetry is primarily regulated by the sizes of the conical and/or cylindrical mouths at each end of the pore. Within the set range of particle size and charge, flux asymmetry was found to be independent of particle size and directly proportional to charge magnitude. While particle charge was vital to creating flux asymmetry, charge magnitude only scaled the observed flux asymmetry. Our studies identified the key factors that help predict asymmetry. Finally, we suggest the role of such flux asymmetry in creating concentration imbalances of messenger

  3. Validation of Two Hydrocodes with a Bi-Metallic Shaped Charge Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ingraham, Daniel J.

    2012-08-16

    Staggered grid (SGH) and cell-centered (CCH) Lagrangian Hydro are two approaches to modeling high explosives (HE) experiments. HE experiments involve complex flows. For example, the discontinuity in the tangential velocity across a frictionless contact surface. In this work, the SGH and CCH schemes with a contact surface algorithm are used to simulate a bimetallic shaped charge experiment using FLAG. Experiment will be performed at LANL in the coming year and used to validate the SGH and CCH schemes results.

  4. Role of geometrical shape in like-charge attraction of DNA.

    PubMed

    Kuron, Michael; Arnold, Axel

    2015-03-01

    While the phenomenon of like-charge attraction of DNA is clearly observed experimentally and in simulations, mean-field theories fail to predict it. Kornyshev et al. argued that like-charge attraction is due to DNA's helical geometry and hydration forces. Strong-coupling (SC) theory shows that attraction of like-charged rods is possible through ion correlations alone at large coupling parameters, usually by multivalent counterions. However for SC theory to be applicable, counterion-counterion correlations perpendicular to the DNA strands need to be sufficiently small, which is not a priori the case for DNA even with trivalent counterions. We study a system containing infinitely long DNA strands and trivalent counterions by computer simulations employing varying degrees of coarse-graining. Our results show that there is always attraction between the strands, but its magnitude is indeed highly dependent on the specific shape of the strand. While discreteness of the charge distribution has little influence on the attractive forces, the role of the helical charge distribution is considerable: charged rods maintain a finite distance in equilibrium, while helices collapse to close contact with a phase shift of π, in full agreement with SC predictions. The SC limit is applicable because counterions strongly bind to the charged sites of the helices, so that helix-counterion interactions dominate over counterion-counterion interactions. Thus DNA's helical geometry is not crucial for like-charge DNA attraction, but strongly enhances it, and electrostatic interactions in the strong-coupling limit are sufficient to explain this attraction.

  5. Ion-channel entrances influence permeation. Net charge, size, shape, and binding considerations.

    PubMed Central

    Dani, J A

    1986-01-01

    Many ion channels have wide entrances that serve as transition zones to the more selective narrow region of the pore. Here some physical features of these vestibules are explored. They are considered to have a defined size, funnel shape, and net-negative charge. Ion size, ionic screening of the negatively charged residues, cation binding, and blockage of current are analyzed to determine how the vestibules influence transport. These properties are coupled to an Eyring rate theory model for the narrow length of the pore. The results include the following: Wide vestibules allow the pore to have a short narrow region. Therefore, ions encounter a shorter length of restricted diffusion, and the channel conductance can be greater. The potential produced by the net-negative charge in the vestibules attracts cations into the pore. Since this potential varies with electrolyte concentration, the conductance measured at low electrolyte concentrations is larger than expected from measurements at high concentrations. Net charge inside the vestibules creates a local potential that confers some cation vs. anion, and divalent vs. monovalent selectivity. Large cations are less effective at screening (diminishing) the net-charge potential because they cannot enter the pore as well as small cations. Therefore, at an equivalent bulk concentration the attractive negative potential is larger, which causes large cations to saturate sites in the pore at lower concentrations. Small amounts of large or divalent cations can lead to misinterpretation of the permeation properties of a small monovalent cation. PMID:2421791

  6. All-in-One Shape-Adaptive Self-Charging Power Package for Wearable Electronics.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hengyu; Yeh, Min-Hsin; Lai, Ying-Chih; Zi, Yunlong; Wu, Changsheng; Wen, Zhen; Hu, Chenguo; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-11-22

    Recently, a self-charging power unit consisting of an energy harvesting device and an energy storage device set the foundation for building a self-powered wearable system. However, the flexibility of the power unit working under extremely complex deformations (e.g., stretching, twisting, and bending) becomes a key issue. Here, we present a prototype of an all-in-one shape-adaptive self-charging power unit that can be used for scavenging random body motion energy under complex mechanical deformations and then directly storing it in a supercapacitor unit to build up a self-powered system for wearable electronics. A kirigami paper based supercapacitor (KP-SC) was designed to work as the flexible energy storage device (stretchability up to 215%). An ultrastretchable and shape-adaptive silicone rubber triboelectric nanogenerator (SR-TENG) was utilized as the flexible energy harvesting device. By combining them with a rectifier, a stretchable, twistable, and bendable, self-charging power package was achieved for sustainably driving wearable electronics. This work provides a potential platform for the flexible self-powered systems.

  7. Effects of high pressure strength of rock material on penetration by shaped charge jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hongfa

    2012-03-01

    Perforating of oil/gas well creates communication tunnel between reservoir and wellbore. Shaped charges are widely used as perforators in oilfield industry. The liners of the charges are mostly made of powder metal to prevent solid slug clogging the entrance hole of well casing or locking the hole in perforating gun. High speed jet from the shaped charge pierces through perforating gun, well fluid, well casing, and then penetrates into reservoir formation. Prediction of jet penetration in reservoir rock is critical in modeling of well production. An analytical penetration model developed for solid rod by Tate and Alekseevskii is applied in this work. For better results, strength of formation rock at high pressure needs to be measured. Lateral stress gauge measurements in plate impact tests are conducted. Piezoelectric pressure gauges are imbedded in samples to measure the longitudinal and transverse stress simultaneously. The two stresses provide Hugoniot and material compressive strength. Indiana limestone, a typical rock in perforation testing, is selected as target sample material in the plate impact tests. Since target strength effect on penetration is more important in late stage of penetration when the strength of material becomes significant compared to the impact pressure, all the impact tests are focused on lower impact pressure up to 9 GPa. The measurements show that the strength increases with impact pressure. The results are applied in the penetration calculations. The final penetration matches testing data very well.

  8. Prediction of part shape and associated material properties in hot-press forming using Unite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hwigeon; Ha, Jinjin; Lee, Myoung-Gyu; Barlat, Frederic

    2016-08-01

    The hot-press forming of a U-channel was conducted on a boron-steel blank. The die consisted of two separate parts in order to perform the partial quenching process. The cold die was initially at 25 °C while the heated die was set to five different temperatures, namely, 25, 120, 220, 320 and 400 °C. The cooling temperature history, Vickers hardness and springback of the channel were measured. A thermo-mechanical-metallurgical model, which accounts for the prior austenite deformation effect, was successfully implemented in the LS-DYNA explicit solver to simulate the hot-press forming process under partial quenching conditions. The predicted and experimental results were compared and found in reasonable agreement.

  9. Shape of magnetic domain walls formed by coupling to mobile charges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Ryo; Hayami, Satoru; Barros, Kipton; Motome, Yukitoshi

    2017-09-01

    Magnetic domain walls, which are crucially important in both fundamental physics and technical applications, often have a preference in their form due to many different origins, such as the crystalline shape, lattice symmetry, and magnetic anisotropy. We theoretically investigate yet another origin stemming from the coupling to mobile charges in itinerant magnets. Performing a large-scale numerical simulation in a minimal model for itinerant magnets, i.e., the Kondo lattice model with classical localized spins, we show that the shape of magnetic domain walls depends on the electronic band structure and electron filling. While Néel and 120∘ antiferromagnetic states do not show a strong preference in the shape of domain walls, noncoplanar spin states with scalar chiral ordering have distinct directional preferences of the domain walls depending on the electron filling. We find that the directional preference is rationalized by the wave-number dependence of the effective magnetic interactions induced by the mobile charges, which are set by the band structure and electron filling. We also observe that, in the noncoplanar chiral states, an electric current is induced along the domain walls owing to the spin Berry phase mechanism, with different spatial distributions depending on whether the bulk state is metallic or insulating.

  10. Biochemistry students' ideas about shape and charge in enzyme-substrate interactions.

    PubMed

    Linenberger, Kimberly J; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2014-01-01

    Biochemistry is a visual discipline that requires students to develop an understanding of numerous representations. However, there is very little known about what students actually understand about the representations that are used to communicate ideas in biochemistry. This study investigated biochemistry students' understanding of multiple representations of enzyme-substrate interactions through both student interviews (N = 25) and responses by a national sample (N = 707) to the Enzyme-Substrate Interactions Concept Inventory. This manuscript reports the findings regarding one category of misconceptions measured by the concept inventory, namely, students' understandings of shape and charge in the context of enzyme-substrate interactions. Students interpret molecular representations depicting such interactions by determining the complementarity between enzyme and substrate by focusing upon charge and hydrogen bonding, but with a disregard for stereochemistry.

  11. Beam splitter for guided polar molecules with a Y-shaped charged wire.

    PubMed

    Deng, Lianzhong; Yin, Jianping

    2007-06-15

    We propose a beam splitter for cold polar molecules in weak-field-seeking states that uses a Y-shaped charged wire half embedded in a substrate and sandwiched by a charged metallic parallel-plate capacitor. We demonstrate our molecular-beam splitter and study its dynamic beam-splitting process for the guided cold molecules by using Monte Carlo simulation. Our study shows that cold polar molecules from a supersonic beam source with a mean velocity of a few hundred meters per second can be split with a fixed 0.5/0.5 splitting ratio, and an adjustable splitting ratio of about 0.03-0.97 can be realized by introducing a small alteration to the scheme.

  12. Charge-signal multiplication mediated by urea wires inside Y-shaped carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, Mei; Liu, Zengrong; He, Bing; Xiu, Peng E-mail: ystu@shu.edu.cn; Tu, Yusong E-mail: ystu@shu.edu.cn

    2014-07-28

    In previous studies, we reported molecular dynamics (MD) simulations showing that single-file water wires confined inside Y-shaped single-walled carbon nanotubes (Y-SWNTs) held strong and robust capability to convert and multiply charge signals [Y. S. Tu, P. Xiu, R. Z. Wan, J. Hu, R. H. Zhou, and H. P. Fang, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 106, 18120 (2009); Y. Tu, H. Lu, Y. Zhang, T. Huynh, and R. Zhou, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 015104 (2013)]. It is fascinating to see whether the signal multiplication can be realized by other kinds of polar molecules with larger dipole moments (which make the experimental realization easier). In this article, we use MD simulations to study the urea-mediated signal conversion and multiplication with Y-SWNTs. We observe that when a Y-SWNT with an external charge of magnitude 1.0 e (the model of a signal at the single-electron level) is solvated in 1 M urea solutions, urea can induce drying of the Y-SWNT and fill its interiors in single-file, forming Y-shaped urea wires. The external charge can effectively control the dipole orientation of the urea wire inside the main channel (i.e., the signal can be readily converted), and this signal can further be multiplied into 2 (or more) output signals by modulating dipole orientations of urea wires in bifurcated branch channels of the Y-SWNT. This remarkable signal transduction capability arises from the strong dipole-induced ordering of urea wires under extreme confinement. We also discuss the advantage of urea as compared with water in the signal multiplication, as well as the robustness and biological implications of our findings. This study provides the possibility for multiplying signals by using urea molecules (or other polar organic molecules) with Y-shaped nanochannels and might also help understand the mechanism behind signal conduction in both physical and biological systems.

  13. Experiments and Simulations of Penetration into Granite by an Aluminum Shaped Charge

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, M J; Randers-Pehrson, G; Kuklo, R M; Rambur, T A; Switzer, L L; Summes, M A

    2003-07-27

    This paper describes experimental results and numerical simulations of jet penetration into granite from an aluminum lined shaped charge. Several penetration versus standoff experiments were conducted into an in-situ granite formation located in the Climax Ridge region of the Nevada Test Site. Simulations of the jet penetration were modeled with a two dimensional arbitrary lagrange eulerian hydrocode. The effects of variations in the granite flow stress, porosity, and EOS have been evaluated. The work described in this paper is a continuation of our studies on jet penetration and modeling into high strength concrete.

  14. Minimizing the energy spread within a single bunch by shaping its charge distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Loew, G.A.; Wang, J.W.

    1985-03-01

    It has been known for some time that partial compensation of the longitudinal wake field effects can be obtained for any bunch by placing it ahead of the accelerating crest (in space), thereby letting the positive rising sinusoidal field offset the negative beam loading field. The work presented in this paper shows that it is possible to obtain complete compensation, i.e., to reduce the energy spread essentially to zero by properly shaping the longitudinal charge distribution of the bunch and by placing it at the correct position on the wave. 3 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Observation of compressibility-related effects in shaped charge jet penetration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, J. J., III; Wahll, M. J.; Backofen, J. E., Jr.

    1982-06-01

    Penetration results are reported for four low strength materials attacked by a non-precision, copper-shaped charge jet. The materials are methanol, Plexiglas, glycerol, and mild steel. The results are not entirely consistent with the recent compressibility-based predictions by B. S. Haugstad and O. S. Dullum [J. Appl. Phys. 52, 5066 (1981)] and by N. A. Zlatin and A. A. Kozhushko [Combust. Explos. Shock Waves USSR 16, 559 (1980)]. Methanol and Plexiglas have extraordinary penetration resistance due to a combination of shock wave formation, plastic flow resistance, vaporization, and decomposition. The more chemically stable glycerol has simpler behavior that is similar to mild steel.

  16. Size and shape of charged micelles of ionic surfactants in aqueous salt solutions.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, S; Ozeki, S; Hayashi, S

    1980-06-01

    Light-scattering has been measured on aqueous NaCl solutions of dodecyldimethylammonium chloride and sodium dodecyl sulfate. From molecular weight determination it is confirmed that spherical micelles are formed at low NaCl concentrations, but at high NaCl concentrations the small micelles formed at the critical micelle concentration further associate to form large rod-like micelles with increasing micelle concentration. The reduction of repulsion between charged groups induces the sphere-rod transition of micelle shape. The dependence of molecular weight on ionic strength can be expressed by double logarithmic relations, which are dependent on the micelle shape. While dodecyldimethylammonium chloride dissolves even in 4.00 M NaCl, sodium dodecyl sulfate solutions exhibit some XXX in angular dissymmetry at NaCl concentrations higher than 0.50 M at low temperatures.

  17. A new 3D computational model for shaped charge jet breakup

    SciTech Connect

    Zernow, L.; Chapyak, E.J.; Mosso, S.J.

    1996-09-01

    This paper reviews prior 1D and 2D axisymmetric, analytical and computational studies, as well as empirical studies of the shaped charge jet particulation problem and discusses their associated insights and problems. It proposes a new 3D computational model of the particulation process, based upon a simplified version of the observed counter-rotating, double helical surface perturbations, found on softly recovered shaped charge jet particles, from both copper and tantalum jets. This 3D approach contrasts with the random, axisymmetric surface perturbations which have previously been used, to try to infer the observed length distribution of jet particles, on the basis of the most unstable wavelength concept, which leads to the expectation of a continuous distribution of particle lengths. The 3D model, by its very nature, leads to a non-random, periodic distribution of potential initial necking loci, on alternate sides of the stretching jet. This in turn infers a potentially periodic, overlapping, multi-modal distribution of associated jet particle lengths. Since it is unlikely that all potential initial necking sites will be activated simultaneously, the 3D model also suggests that longer jet particles containing partial, but unseparated necks, should be observed fairly often. The computational analysis is in its very early stages and the problems involved in inserting the two helical grooves and in defining the initial conditions and boundary conditions for the computation will be discussed. Available initial results from the 3D computation will be discussed and interpreted.

  18. Experimental evidence for sulfur induced loss of ductility in copper shaped-charge jets

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, D.K.; Lassila, D.H.; King, W.E.; Baker, E.L.

    1996-12-01

    The authors have observed that a change in the bulk sulfur content of oxygen-free electronic copper markedly affects its high temperature (400--1,000 C), high strain-rate (>10{sup 3} s{sup {minus}1}) deformation and fracture behavior. These conditions are typical of those found in jets formed from the explosive deformation of copper shaped-charge liners. Specifically, an increase in the bulk sulfur concentration from 4 ppm to 8 ppm shortens the breakup time, t{sub b}, of the copper jets by nearly 10% as measured using flash x-ray radiographs recorded during breakup of the jets. At bulk concentrations of 4 ppm, the jet was observed to be uniform and axisymmetric with a breakup time of 186 {micro}s. Jet particles exhibited length-to-diameter ratios of roughly 8:1. The addition of sulfur transformed the jet breakup behavior to non-uniform, non-axisymmetric rupture and reduced the breakup time to 147 {micro}s. The length-to-diameter ratios decreased to roughly 5:1 in the sulfur-doped samples. Previously measured sulfur solubilities and diffusivities in copper at the temperatures where this material was processed indicates nearly all of the sulfur was localized to grain boundaries. Therefore, the authors infer that the increase in sulfur content at grain boundaries is directly responsible for the change in breakup performance of the shaped-charge jets.

  19. Quantitative measurements of vaporization, burst ionization, and emission characteristics of shaped charge barium releases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoch, Edward L.; Hallinan, Thomas J.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, Hans C.

    1994-01-01

    Intensity-calibrated color video recordings of three barium-shaped charge injections in the ionopshere were used to determine the initial ionization, the column density corresponding to unity optical depth, and the yield of vaporized barium in the fast jet. It was found that the initial ionization at the burst was less than 1% and that 0% burst ionization was consistent with the observations. Owing to the Doppler shift, the column density for optical thickness in the neutral barium varies somewhat according to the velocity distribution. For the cases examined here, the column density was 2-5 x 10(exp 10) atoms/sq cm. This value, which occurred 12 to 15 s after release, should be approximately valid for most shaped charge experiments. The yield was near 30% (15% in the fast jet) for two of the releases and was somewhat lower in the third, which also had a lower peak velocity. This study also demonstrated the applicability of the computer simulation code developed for chemical releases by Stenbaek-Nielsen and provided experimental verification of the Doppler-corrected emission rates calculated b Stenbaek-Nielsen (1989).

  20. Analysis of Computational Models of Shaped Charges for Jet Formation and Penetration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haefner, Jonah; Ferguson, Jim

    2016-11-01

    Shaped charges came into use during the Second World War demonstrating the immense penetration power of explosively formed projectiles and since has become a tool used by nearly every nation in the world. Penetration is critically dependent on how the metal liner is collapsed into a jet. The theory of jet formation has been studied in depth since the late 1940s, based on simple models that neglect the strength and compressibility of the metal liner. Although attempts have been made to improve these models, simplifying assumptions limit the understanding of how the material properties affect the jet formation. With a wide range of material and strength models available for simulation, a validation study was necessary to guide code users in choosing models for shaped charge simulations. Using PAGOSA, a finite-volume Eulerian hydrocode designed to model hypervelocity materials and strong shock waves developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory, and experimental data, we investigated the effects of various equations of state and material strength models on jet formation and penetration of a steel target. Comparing PAGOSA simulations against modern experimental data, we analyzed the strengths and weaknesses of available computational models. LA-UR-16-25639 Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  1. Shape and Charge of Gold Nanomaterials Influence Survivorship, Oxidative Stress and Moulting of Daphnia magna

    PubMed Central

    Nasser, Fatima; Davis, Adam; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Lynch, Iseult

    2016-01-01

    Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are materials with at least one dimension between 1–100 nm. The small size of ENMs results in a large surface area to volume ratio, giving ENMs novel characteristics that are not traditionally exhibited by larger bulk materials. Coupled with large surface area is an enormous capacity for surface functionalization of ENMs, e.g., with different ligands or surface changes, leading to an almost infinite array of variability of ENMs. Here we explore the effects of various shaped (spheres, rods) and charged (negative, positive) gold ENMs on Daphnia magna (D. magna) in terms of survival, ENM uptake and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), a key factor in oxidative stress responses. We also investigate the effects of gold ENMs binding to the carapace of D. magna and how this may induce moulting inhibition in addition to toxicity and stress. The findings suggest that ENM shape and surface charge play an important role in determining ENM uptake and toxicity. PMID:28335350

  2. Influence of molecular shape, conformability, net surface charge, and tissue interaction on transscleral macromolecular diffusion.

    PubMed

    Srikantha, Nishanthan; Mourad, Fatma; Suhling, Klaus; Elsaid, Naba; Levitt, James; Chung, Pei Hua; Somavarapu, Satyanarayana; Jackson, Timothy L

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of molecular shape, conformability, net surface charge and tissue interaction on transscleral diffusion. Unfixed, porcine sclera was clamped in an Ussing chamber. Fluorophore-labelled neutral albumin, neutral dextran, or neutral ficoll were placed in one hemi-chamber and the rate of transscleral diffusion was measured over 24 h using a spectrophotometer. Experiments were repeated using dextrans and ficoll with positive or negative net surface charges. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) was undertaken to compare transscleral diffusion with diffusion through a solution. All molecules were 70 kDa. With FRAP, the diffusion coefficient (D) of neutral molecules was highest for albumin, followed by ficoll, then dextran (p < 0.0001). Positive dextrans diffused fastest, followed by negative, then neutral dextrans (p = 0.0004). Neutral ficoll diffused the fastest, followed by positive then negative ficoll (p = 0.5865). For the neutral molecules, transscleral D was highest for albumin, followed by dextran, then ficoll (p < 0.0001). D was highest for negative ficoll, followed by neutral, then positive ficoll (p < 0.0001). By contrast, D was highest for positive dextran, followed by neutral, then negative dextran (p = 0.0021). In conclusion, diffusion in free solution does not predict transscleral diffusion and the molecular-tissue interaction is important. Molecular size, shape, and charge may all markedly influence transscleral diffusion, as may conformability to a lesser degree, but their effects may be diametrically opposed in different molecules, and their influence on diffusion is more complex than previously thought. Each variable cannot be considered in isolation, and the interplay of all these variables needs to be tested, when selecting or designing drugs for transscleral delivery.

  3. Mass estimation of shaped charge jets from x-ray shadow graph with new calibration curve method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Fumikazu; Kishimura, Hiroaki; Kumakura, Akira; Sakai, Shun

    2015-06-01

    In order to assess the penetration capability of the Al and Cu metal jets against a bumper structure (such as Al plate and/or Al block), we measured the initial formation process of the metal jets generated from conical shaped charge device. The shaped charge device configurations employed in the experimental and numerical investigations have conical aluminum (and cupper) liner and steel casing with PBX explosive charge. The profile and velocity of the jets are measured with flash x-ray and x-ray film system. The mass of the jet tip are estimated from x-ray images by a calibration curve method proposed by our group. Al targets are used to evaluate a penetration performance of the jets. Additionally, we have simulated the initial formation process of the shaped charge jets with Autodyne-2D hydrodynamic code, which proposed important data to compare the experimental one.

  4. Chemical Control of Lead Sulfide Quantum Dot Shape, Self-Assembly, and Charge Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhail, Martin R.

    Lead(II) sulfide quantum dots (PbS QDs) are a promising excitonic material for numerous application that require that control of fluxes of charge and energy at nanoscale interfaces, such as solar energy conversion, photo- and electrocatalysis, light emitting diodes, chemical sensing, single-electron logic elements, field effect transistors, and photovoltaics. PbS QDs are particularly suitable for photonics applications because they exhibit size-tunable band-edge absorption and fluorescence across the entire near-infrared spectrum, undergo efficient multi-exciton generation, exhibit a long radiative lifetime, and possess an eight-fold degenerate ground-state. The effective integration of PbS QDs into these applications requires a thorough understanding of how to control their synthesis, self-assembly, and charge transport phenomena. In this document, I describe a series of experiments to elucidate three levels of chemical control on the emergent properties of PbS QDs: (1) the role of surface chemistry in controlling PbS QD shape during solvothermal synthesis, (2) the role of QD shape and ligand functionalization in self-assembly at a liquid-air interface, and (3) the role of QD packing structure on steady-state conductivity and transient current dynamics. At the synthetic level (1), I show that the final shape and surface chemistry of PbS QDs is highly sensitive to the formation of organosulfur byproducts by commonly used sulfur reagents. The insight into PbS QD growth gained from this work is then developed to controllably tune PbS QD shape from cubic to octahedral to hexapodal while maintaining QD size. At the following level of QD self-assembly (2), I show how QD size and shape dictate packing geometry in extended 2D arrays and how this packing can be controllably interrupted in mixed monolayers. I also study the role of ligand structure on the reorganization of QD arrays at a liquid-air interface and find that the specific packing defects in QD arrays vary

  5. Characterization of the internal ion environment of biofilms based on charge density and shape of ion.

    PubMed

    Kurniawan, Andi; Tsuchiya, Yuki; Eda, Shima; Morisaki, Hisao

    2015-12-01

    Biofilm polymers contain both electrically positively and negatively charged sites. These charged sites enable the biofilm to trap and retain ions leading to an important role of biofilm such as nutrient recycling and pollutant purification. Much work has focused on the ion-exchange capacity of biofilms, and they are known to adsorb ions through an exchange mechanism between the ions in solution and the ions adsorbed to the charged sites on the biofilm polymer. However, recent studies suggest that the adsorption/desorption behavior of ions in a biofilm cannot be explained solely by this ion exchange mechanism. To examine the possibility that a substantial amount of ions are held in the interstitial region of the biofilm polymer by an electrostatic interaction, intact biofilms formed in a natural environment were immersed in distilled water and ion desorption was investigated. All of the detected ion species were released from the biofilms over a short period of time, and very few ions were subsequently released over more time, indicating that the interstitial region of biofilm polymers is another ion reserve. The extent of ion retention in the interstitial region of biofilms for each ion can be determined largely by charge density, |Z|/r, where |Z| is the ion valence as absolute value and r is the ion radius. The higher |Z|/r value an ion has, the stronger it is retained in the interstitial region of biofilms. Ion shape is also a key determinant of ion retention. Spherical and non-spherical ions have different correlations between the condensation ratio and |Z|/r. The generality of these findings were assured by various biofilm samples. Thus, the internal regions of biofilms exchange ions dynamically with the outside environment.

  6. Dry pressing technical ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, W.A. Jr.

    1996-04-01

    Dry pressing of technical ceramics is a fundamental method of producing high-quality ceramic components. The goals of dry pressing technical ceramics are uniform compact size and green density, consistent part-to-part green density and defect-free compact. Dry pressing is the axial compaction of loosely granulated dry ceramic powders (< 3% free moisture) within a die/punch arrangement. The powder, under pressure, conforms to the specific shape of the punch faces and die. Powder compaction occurs within a rigid-walled die and usually between a top and bottom punch. Press configurations include anvil, rotary, multiple-punch and multiple-action.

  7. Measurements of the time constant for steady ionization in shaped-charge barium releases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoch, Edward L.; Hallinan, Thomas J.

    1993-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of three solar illuminated shaped-charge barium releases injected at small angles to the magnetic field were made using a calibrated color television camera. Two of the releases were from 1989. The third release, a reanalysis of an event included in Hallinan's 1988 study of three 1986 releases, was included to provide continuity between the two studies. Time constants for ionization, measured during the first 25 s of each release, were found to vary considerably. The two 1989 time constants differed substantially, and both were significantly less than any of the 1986 time constants. On the basis of this variability, we conclude that the two 1989 releases showed evidence of continuous nonsolar ionization. One release showed nonsolar ionization which could not he attributed to Alfven's critical ionization velocity process, which requires a component of velocity perpendicular to the magnetic field providing a perpendicular energy greater than the ionization potential.

  8. Observed rate of ionization in shaped-charge releases of barium in the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallinan, Thomas J.

    1988-01-01

    Data from 36 Ba shaped-charge releases carried out at an angle of less than 25 deg to the magnetic field, by the technique of Wescott et al. (1972) and Michel (1974), were examined for evidence of a sustained rate of ionization in excess of that attributable to sunlight. In four of the experiments, the time constant for the decay of the neutrals was measured using an ultrasensitive color TV camera and was found to have a value of about 30 sec, consistent with slow (solar) ionization. Although the qualitative appearance of most jets was found to be consistent with a slow process of ionization, some releases produced a thin confined jet that was suggestive of rapid ionization. Two of these jets were analyzed in detail, but no evidence of anomalous ionization was produced. The data obtained in this work agree with the geometrical predictions of the Swift model.

  9. Effects of charge, size, and shape-asymmetry on the phase behavior of model electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Qiliang; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2002-02-01

    Monte Carlo simulations have been conducted to investigate the phase behavior of 2:1 hard-core electrolyte models. Two distinct cases have been considered: In the first, both bivalent cations and monovalent anions are spherical. In the second, bivalent cations are modeled as rigid dimers composed of two tangent hard spheres, each carrying a positive charge at the center. Critical temperatures and densities have been calculated as a function of the size asymmetry between positive and negative ions. The simulated critical temperature and critical density are strongly influenced by size asymmetry and by the shape of the ions. Changes in the critical constants are traced back to ground-state energy configurations of small ionic clusters. The trends observed in simulations for the critical temperature and density as a function of size asymmetry are shown to contradict the predictions of available theoretical formalisms.

  10. The Role of Tip Geometry in the Initiation of Explosives by Shaped Charge Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, H. R.

    2004-07-01

    Shaped charge designs are shown to give a surprisingly consistent bimodal geometric effect when initiating bare or thinly cased explosives. Results from jets, when compared to those from regular projectile impacts, show that they behave either as a flat- or round-nosed rod. Experiments with TATB-based explosives confirm this dichotomy. This geometric divergence disappears for thick-cased targets, or for very small diameter jets. In those instances the jet requires a supersonic penetration regime in order to achieve initiation, and in this regime all jets behave as round-nosed rods, or (for small jets) show a tendency towards this behaviour. These changes in behaviour are consistent with a change of initiation mode in going from an impact shock mechanism for the geometry-dependent regime, to a bow shock for the mode that is independent of geometry.

  11. Analytical solutions of minimum ionization particle induced current shapes of silicon detectors and simulation of charge collection properties

    SciTech Connect

    Eremin, V.; Chen, W.; Li, Z.

    1993-11-01

    A new analytical, one dimensional method to obtain the induced current shapes and simulation of chasrge shapes for p{sup +} {minus}n{minus}n{sup +} silicon detectors in the case of minimum ionization particle has been developed here. jExact solutions have been found for both electron and hole current shapes. Simulations of induced charge shapes of detectors have also been given. The results of this work are consistent with the earlier work where a semi-analytical method had been used.

  12. Transient space-charge-limited current pulse shapes in molecularly doped polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldie, D. M.

    1999-12-01

    The transient current response of molecularly doped polymers have been numerically modelled under space-charge-limited (SCL) conditions for the situation in which a step potential is applied to an ideal injecting contact. Under trap-free conditions, the transient SCL current pulse shape is found to be sensitive not only to the underlying field dependence of the injected carrier mobilities and diffusivities, but also to the magnitude of the applied step potential. A progressive reduction in the ratio of the peak current density jp to the final steady-state magnitude jss is obtained by increasing either the field strength of the mobility or the relative amount of diffusion. It is demonstrated, however, that for times preceding the location tp of the current peak, the rate of current increase displays a gradual transition from a super-linear to linear time dependence upon the introduction of diffusion. The diminishing observability of jp/jss is accompanied by a shift in the position of tp relative to the space-charge-free carrier transit time t0. The classical fixed-mobility value tp/t0 = 0.786 is modestly reduced as the field strength of the mobility or amount of carrier diffusion is enhanced. The numerical predictions are compared with experimental SCL current transients obtained from hydrazone doped polyester samples fitted with gold contacts.

  13. Size, surface charge, and shape determine therapeutic effects of nanoparticles on brain and retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Jo, Dong Hyun; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Lee, Tae Geol; Kim, Jeong Hun

    2015-10-01

    Nanoparticles can be valuable therapeutic options to overcome physical barriers to reach central nervous system. Systemically administered nanoparticles can pass through blood-neural barriers; whereas, locally injected nanoparticles directly reach neuronal and perineuronal cells. In this review, we highlight the importance of size, surface charge, and shape of nanoparticles in determining therapeutic effects on brain and retinal diseases. These features affect overall processes of delivery of nanoparticles: in vivo stability in blood and other body fluids, clearance via mononuclear phagocyte system, attachment with target cells, and penetration into target cells. Furthermore, they are also determinants of nano-bio interfaces: they determine corona formation with proteins in body fluids. Taken together, we emphasize the importance of considerations on characteristics of nanoparticles more suitable for the treatment of brain and retinal diseases in the development of nanoparticle-based therapeutics. The central nervous system (CNS) remains an area where drug access and delivery are difficult clinically due to the blood brain barrier. With advances in nanotechnology, many researchers have designed and produced nanoparticle-based systems in an attempt to solve this problem. In this concise review, the authors described the current status of drug delivery to the CNS, based on particle size and shape. This article should stimulate more research to be done on future drug design. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Use of shutdown of the capacitive storage in implementing electrical action on metallic shaped-charge jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, S. V.

    2016-03-01

    Tto improve the efficiency of electrical action on metallic shaped-charge jets, it is proposed to use shutdown of the capacitive storage at the time when the voltage on it during passage of an alternating discharge becomes zero. It has been shown that using this expedient eliminates recharging of the capacitive storage and provides better matching between the current pulse and the time of motion of various parts of the shaped-charge jet through the electrode gap. Studies have been conducted using a computational procedure in which the development of magnetohydrodynamic instability of the jet and the dispersion of its material are considered possible physical mechanisms reducing the penetration capability of shaped-charge jets under the action of high current pulses.

  15. Drill Presses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelbrecht, Nancy; And Others

    These instructional materials provide an orientation to the drill press for use at the postsecondary level. The first of seven sections lists seven types of drill presses. The second section identifies 14 drill press parts. The third section lists 21 rules for safe use of drilling machines. The fourth section identifies the six procedures for…

  16. Postglomerular capillary solute flux restricted by shape and charge in the dog

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteside, C.; Silverman, M. )

    1987-09-01

    The permselectivity characteristics of the postglomerular (PG) microcirculation in dog kidney were investigated employing {sup 3}H-labeled cationic (DEAE) and anionic sulfated dextrans (dextran-SO{sub 4}) ranging from 19 to 29 {angstrom} Stokes-Einstein Radius. With the use of the multiple-indicator dilution (MID) technique, a bolus injection was made into the left renal artery and timed serial samples were obtained from renal venous and urine outflows. The injection solution contained {sup 125}I-labeled albumin (plasma reference), ({sup 14}C)inulin and/or creatinine (glomerular and interstitial references), and a test ({sup 3}H)dextran probe. A control run was carried out with tracer, then charge interaction was analyzed by repeating the MID run with excess unlabeled compound or after protamine sulfate infusion. After loading, renal vein recovery and mean transit time ({bar t}) were unchanged relative to ({sup 14}C)inulin for ({sup 3}H)dextran-SO{sub 4}. But excess DEAE resulted in reduced recovery and decreased {bar t} for ({sup 3}H)DEAE. After protamine sulfate, the renal vein and urine recoveries of ({sup 3}H)dextran-SO{sub 4} decreased and the renal vein {bar t} increased. These findings demonstrate saturable anionic binding sites in the PG microcirculation. Under conditions where charge interaction was eliminated, the ratio of renal vein {bar t} for {sup 125}I-albumin to cationic or anionic dextran was always less than its ratio to neutral dextran, implying a larger apparent volume of distribution. The authors concluded that PG capillaries also limit solute flux on the basis of shape.

  17. Contribution of Shape and Charge to the Inhibition of a Family GH99 endo-α-1,2-Mannanase

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitor design incorporating features of the reaction coordinate and transition-state structure has emerged as a powerful approach for the development of enzyme inhibitors. Such inhibitors find use as mechanistic probes, chemical biology tools, and therapeutics. Endo-α-1,2-mannosidases and endo-α-1,2-mannanases, members of glycoside hydrolase family 99 (GH99), are interesting targets for inhibitor development as they play key roles in N-glycan maturation and microbiotal yeast mannan degradation, respectively. These enzymes are proposed to act via a 1,2-anhydrosugar “epoxide” mechanism that proceeds through an unusual conformational itinerary. Here, we explore how shape and charge contribute to binding of diverse inhibitors of these enzymes. We report the synthesis of neutral dideoxy, glucal and cyclohexenyl disaccharide inhibitors, their binding to GH99 endo-α-1,2-mannanases, and their structural analysis by X-ray crystallography. Quantum mechanical calculations of the free energy landscapes reveal how the neutral inhibitors provide shape but not charge mimicry of the proposed intermediate and transition state structures. Building upon the knowledge of shape and charge contributions to inhibition of family GH99 enzymes, we design and synthesize α-Man-1,3-noeuromycin, which is revealed to be the most potent inhibitor (KD 13 nM for Bacteroides xylanisolvens GH99 enzyme) of these enzymes yet reported. This work reveals how shape and charge mimicry of transition state features can enable the rational design of potent inhibitors. PMID:27992199

  18. Effect of sulfur on the ductility of copper shaped-charge jets

    SciTech Connect

    Lassila, D.H.; Chan, D.K.; King, W.E.; Schwartz, A.J.; Baker, E.L.

    1996-07-01

    We have observed that a change in bulk sulfur (S) content imposed by doping has a marked effect on ductility of copper shaped-charge jets as measured by breakup times and length-to-diameter ratios of the particulated jet. Baseline material was Oxygen-Free-Electronic (ofe) copper with a S concentration of 3-4 ppM. Several liners were doped using a Cu sulfide powder pack method to increase the S level up to 9 ppM, while keeping other impurities and microstructure unchanged. Using flash x-ray radiographs to record the formation of jets, both the length-to-diameter ratios of the jet particles and breakup times were measured. Increasing the bulk S content of ofe Cu to 9 ppM, the breakup times decreased from 186 to 147 {mu}s, while the length-to- diameter ratios observed at 260 {mu}s decreased from 8:1 to 5:1. Since the solubility of S in Cu at the processing temperatures is extremely low, we conclude that the bulk rise in S content is due to S segregating to the grain boundaries. Thus, the decrease in ductility of liners doped with S appears directly related to the S content at the grain boundaries.

  19. Kinetic Spraying Deposition of Reactive-Enhanced Al-Ni Composite for Shaped Charge Liner Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Gyeongjun; Kim, Jaeick; Lee, Changhee; Kim, See Jo; Lee, Seong

    2016-02-01

    Liners used in shaped charges (SC) must possess good penetration ability and explosive power. Producing the reactive layer (i.e., the Al-Ni composite) on a well-penetrating liner (i.e., Cu) via spray coating is a novel method; the exothermic reaction of this reactive layer can be enhanced by controlling the structure of the feedstock material. However, preceding studies have been unable to completely succeed in achieving this goal. There is still an opportunity to improve the performance of reactive layers in SC liner applications. In order to address this problem, a reactive Al-Ni composite powder was produced via arrested reactive milling (ARM) and deposited by a kinetic spray process. Afterward, the deposition state and self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) reaction behavior of the ARMed Al-Ni deposit were investigated. The deposition state was degraded by the ARM process due to the remaining solid lubricant and the strain-hardening effect, but the practically estimated bond strength was not poor (~40 MPa). No SHS reactions were induced by the ARM and kinetic spray process, which resulted in the quantitative maximization of the exothermic reaction. It is noteworthy that the initiation temperature of the SHS reaction was highly advanced (~300 °C) relative to preceding studies (~500 °C); this change is due to the additional mechanical activation initiated by the kinetic spray deposition.

  20. Experiments in Support of Pressure Enhanced Penetration with Shaped Charge Perforators

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn, L.A.; Chase, J.B.; Barker, J.; Leidel, D.J.

    1999-11-01

    Computational analysis demonstrated that the penetration of a shaped charge could be substantially enhanced by imploding the liner in a high pressure light gas atmosphere. The gas pressure helps confine the jet on the axis of penetration in the latter stages of formation. A light gas, such as helium or hydrogen, is required in order to keep the gas density low enough so as not to inhibit liner collapse. These results have now been confirmed by experiment. Identical 5-foot long guns, each containing 37 perforators at a shot density of 12 SPF, were inserted in two API Section 1 concrete targets, poured on the same day and cured for the same period. One of the guns was fired with interior ambient (0.1 MPa) air pressure and the other with helium at 13.8 MPa (2,000 psia). The average penetration from the 37 perforations with the helium system increased 40.3% over that obtained with the conventional system.

  1. Evaluation of tungsten shaped-charge liners spray-formed using the low-pressure plasma spray process

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, E.R.; Sickinger, A.

    1994-12-31

    This paper documents the results of a DARPA Phase 1 SBIR program which was awarded following a solicitation to develop new technologies for the forming of refractory metal shaped-charge liners. Holtgren had proposed to manufacture liners by spraying refractory metal powder onto a rapidly-rotating mandrel inside the chamber of a low-pressure plasma spray system. A total of nine tungsten shaped-charge liners were sprayed during the course of the program. Metallographic evaluation of the liners revealed that the as-sprayed microstructure was dense, averaging 98.5% density. The grain structure is equiaxed and fine, averaging five microns in diameter. The sprayed shapes were then processed to the final liner configuration by cylindrical grinding. The liners were ductile enough to withstand the strains of grinding and normal handling.

  2. Effect of the quasi-continuous equal-channel angular pressing on the structure and functional properties of Ti-Ni-based shape-memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khmelevskaya, I. Yu.; Karelin, R. D.; Prokoshkin, S. D.; Andreev, V. A.; Yusupov, V. S.; Perkas, M. M.; Prosvirnin, V. V.; Shelest, A. E.; Komarov, V. S.

    2017-03-01

    The effect of severe plastic deformation by equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) under normal and quasi-continuous regimes on the structure and the mechanical and functional properties of a Ti-50.2 at % Ni shape-memory alloy (SMA) has been studied. ECAP was carried out at an angle of intersection of channels of 120° in the normal regime with heating between passes at 450°C for 20 passes and in the quasi-continuous regime at the temperature of 400°C for three, five, and seven passes. The hot screw rolling with subsequent annealing at 750°C for 30 min and cooling in water was used as a control treatment (CT). A mixed submicrocrystalline and nanosubgrained structure was formed. The increase in the number of passes from three to seven led to a decrease in the average size of structural elements from 115 ± 5 to 103 ± 5 nm and to an increase in the fraction of grains/subgrains having a size less than 100 nm. After ECAP (seven passes) and post-deformation annealing at the temperature of 400°C for 1 h, a completely recoverable strain was 9.5%; after normal ECAP, 7.2%; after CT, 4.0%.

  3. The Optimization of a Shaped-Charge Design Using Parallel Computers

    SciTech Connect

    GARDNER,DAVID R.; VAUGHAN,COURTENAY T.

    1999-11-01

    Current supercomputers use large parallel arrays of tightly coupled processors to achieve levels of performance far surpassing conventional vector supercomputers. Shock-wave physics codes have been developed for these new supercomputers at Sandia National Laboratories and elsewhere. These parallel codes run fast enough on many simulations to consider using them to study the effects of varying design parameters on the performance of models of conventional munitions and other complex systems. Such studies maybe directed by optimization software to improve the performance of the modeled system. Using a shaped-charge jet design as an archetypal test case and the CTH parallel shock-wave physics code controlled by the Dakota optimization software, we explored the use of automatic optimization tools to optimize the design for conventional munitions. We used a scheme in which a lower resolution computational mesh was used to identify candidate optimal solutions and then these were verified using a higher resolution mesh. We identified three optimal solutions for the model and a region of the design domain where the jet tip speed is nearly optimal, indicating the possibility of a robust design. Based on this study we identified some of the difficulties in using high-fidelity models with optimization software to develop improved designs. These include developing robust algorithms for the objective function and constraints and mitigating the effects of numerical noise in them. We conclude that optimization software running high-fidelity models of physical systems using parallel shock wave physics codes to find improved designs can be a valuable tool for designers. While current state of algorithm and software development does not permit routine, ''black box'' optimization of designs, the effort involved in using the existing tools may well be worth the improvement achieved in designs.

  4. Role of electric charge in shaping equilibrium configurations of fluid tori encircling black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Kovar, Jiri; Slany, Petr; Stuchlik, Zdenek; Karas, Vladimir; Cremaschini, Claudio; Miller, John C.

    2011-10-15

    Astrophysical fluids may acquire nonzero electrical charge because of strong irradiation or charge separation in a magnetic field. In this case, electromagnetic and gravitational forces may act together and produce new equilibrium configurations, which are different from the uncharged ones. Following our previous studies of charged test particles and uncharged perfect fluid tori encircling compact objects, we introduce here a simple test model of a charged perfect fluid torus in strong gravitational and electromagnetic fields. In contrast to ideal magnetohydrodynamic models, we consider here the opposite limit of negligible conductivity, where the charges are tied completely to the moving matter. This is an extreme limiting case which can provide a useful reference against which to compare subsequent more complicated astrophysically motivated calculations. To clearly demonstrate the features of our model, we construct three-dimensional axisymmetric charged toroidal configurations around Reissner-Nordstroem black holes and compare them with equivalent configurations of electrically neutral tori.

  5. Shape, Transverse Size, and Charged Hadron Multiplicity of Jets in pp Collisions at 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2012-06-01

    Measurements of jet characteristics from inclusive jet production in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV are presented. The data sample was collected with the CMS detector at the LHC during 2010 and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 36 inverse picobarns. The mean charged hadron multiplicity, the differential and integral jet shape distributions, and two independent moments of the shape distributions are measured as functions of the jet transverse momentum for jets reconstructed with the anti-kT algorithm. The measured observables are corrected to the particle level and compared with predictions from various QCD Monte Carlo generators.

  6. Analysis of the interplay among charge, hydration and shape of proteins through the modeling of their CZE mobility data.

    PubMed

    Piaggio, Maria V; Peirotti, Marta B; Deiber, Julio A

    2009-07-01

    Electrophoretic mobility data of four proteins are analyzed and interpreted through a physicochemical CZE model, which provides estimates of quantities like equivalent hydrodynamic radius (size), effective charge number, shape orientation factor, hydration, actual pK values of ionizing groups, and pH near molecule, among others. Protein friction coefficients are simulated through the creeping flow theory of prolate spheroidal particles. The modeling of the effective electrophoretic mobility of proteins requires consideration of hydrodynamic size and shape coupled to hydration and effective charge. The model proposed predicts native protein hydration within the range of values obtained experimentally from other techniques. Therefore, this model provides consistently other physicochemical properties such as average friction and diffusion coefficients and packing fractal dimension. As the pH varies from native conditions to those that are denaturing the protein, hydration and packing fractal dimension change substantially. Needs for further research are also discussed and proposed.

  7. ICSU press

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The International Council of Scientific Unions (ICSU) has established a publishing arm called ICSU Press. The Press is intended to complement the publishing activities of its member scientific unions in several ways: initiate special publications of research findings and new journals of reviews or research; advise, or act as publishers for, members requesting such service; and engage in copublishing ventures with international bodies outside of ICSU whose goals are consistent with ICSU's.Plans for ICSU Press also include preparation of television programs in cooperation with BBC-2 in Britain and PBS and ABC in the United States.

  8. Open apex shaped charge-type explosive device having special disc means with slide surface thereon to influence movement of open apex shaped charge liner during collapse of same during detonation

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, M.J.

    1993-10-12

    An open apex shape charge explosive device is disclosed having an inner liner defining a truncated cone, an explosive charge surrounding the truncated inner liner, a primer charge, and a disc located between the inner liner and the primer charge for directing the detonation of the primer charge around the end edge of the disc means to the explosive materials surrounding the inner liner. The disc comprises a material having one or more of: a higher compressive strength, a higher hardness, and/or a higher density than the material comprising the inner liner, thereby enabling the disc to resist deformation until the liner collapses. The disc has a slide surface thereon on which the end edge of the inner liner slides inwardly toward the vertical axis of the device during detonation of the main explosive surrounding the inner liner, to thereby facilitate the inward collapse of the inner liner. In a preferred embodiment, the geometry of the slide surface is adjusted to further control the collapse or [beta] angle of the inner liner. 12 figures.

  9. Open apex shaped charge-type explosive device having special disc means with slide surface thereon to influence movement of open apex shaped charge liner during collapse of same during detonation

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    An open apex shape charge explosive device is disclosed having an inner liner defining a truncated cone, an explosive charge surrounding the truncated inner liner, a primer charge, and a disc located between the inner liner and the primer charge for directing the detonation of the primer charge around the end edge of the disc means to the explosive materials surrounding the inner liner. The disc comprises a material having one or more of: a higher compressive strength, a higher hardness, and/or a higher density than the material comprising the inner liner, thereby enabling the disc to resist deformation until the liner collapses. The disc has a slide surface thereon on which the end edge of the inner liner slides inwardly toward the vertical axis of the device during detonation of the main explosive surrounding the inner liner, to thereby facilitate the inward collapse of the inner liner. In a preferred embodiment, the geometry of the slide surface is adjusted to further control the collapse or .beta. angle of the inner liner.

  10. The Shape And Charge Of Lunar Dust Simulant (LHT) Under Electron Bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlu, J.; Beranek, M.; Richterova, I.; Safrankova, J.; Nemecek, Z.

    2011-11-29

    Since the processes in dusty plasmas are rather complex, the study of charging individual dust grains within simplified conditions becomes very important. Detailed investigations and characterization of charging processes taking place not only in dusty plasmas but also in dust-rich space plasmas are possible for example in traps where a single dust grain can be captured for a long time and its temporal evolution with respect to surrounding conditions can be continuously recorded. The specific charge, surface potential, and mass of the observed grain can be determined. The paper shows partial results on secondary emission from lunar dust LHT simulant.

  11. U-shaped temperature dependence of rate constant of intramolecular photoinduced charge separation in zinc-porphyrin-bridge-quinone compounds.

    PubMed

    Kichigina, Anna O; Ionkin, Vladimir N; Ivanov, Anatoly I

    2013-06-20

    The multichannel stochastic point transition model of photoinduced electron transfer from both a vibrationally unrelaxed and a relaxed states involving the vibrational relaxation in donor-acceptor pairs has been elaborated. The U-shaped temperature dependencies of the rate constants of the intramolecular photoinduced charge separation from both the vibrationally unrelaxed and the relaxed states observed in Zn-porphyrin-bridge-quinone compounds in 2-methyltetrahydrofuran solvent have been reproduced in the framework of the proposed model that accounts for the temperature dependencies of the charge separation free energy gap and the medium reorganization energy. This modeling has allowed uncovering the mechanism of such a variation of the rate constant with the temperature. In the high temperature region, 310-125 K, the charge separation proceeds in the solvent controlled regime and its rate constant decreases with decreasing the temperature mirroring the temperature dependence of the medium relaxation rate. Further lowering the temperature leads to a rise of the reaction free energy gap so that it becomes larger than the medium reorganization energy. In this region the dynamic solvent effect is strongly suppressed and the charge separation rate constant becomes independent from the solvent relaxation rate. Although the medium relaxation rate continues to decrease with decreasing the temperature, the charge separation rate constant starts to rise because the reaction proceeds in the barrierless region.

  12. How Do the Size, Charge and Shape of Nanoparticles Affect Amyloid β Aggregation on Brain Lipid Bilayer?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yuna; Park, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Hyojin; Nam, Jwa-Min

    2016-01-01

    Here, we studied the effect of the size, shape, and surface charge of Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) on amyloid beta (Aβ) aggregation on a total brain lipid-based supported lipid bilayer (brain SLB), a fluid platform that facilitates Aβ-AuNP aggregation process. We found that larger AuNPs induce large and amorphous aggregates on the brain SLB, whereas smaller AuNPs induce protofibrillar Aβ structures. Positively charged AuNPs were more strongly attracted to Aβ than negatively charged AuNPs, and the stronger interactions between AuNPs and Aβ resulted in fewer β-sheets and more random coil structures. We also compared spherical AuNPs, gold nanorods (AuNRs), and gold nanocubes (AuNCs) to study the effect of nanoparticle shape on Aβ aggregation on the brain SLB. Aβ was preferentially bound to the long axis of AuNRs and fewer fibrils were formed whereas all the facets of AuNCs interacted with Aβ to produce the fibril networks. Finally, it was revealed that different nanostructures induce different cytotoxicity on neuroblastoma cells, and, overall, smaller Aβ aggregates induce higher cytotoxicity. The results offer insight into the roles of NPs and brain SLB in Aβ aggregation on the cell membrane and can facilitate the understanding of Aβ-nanostructure co-aggregation mechanism and tuning Aβ aggregate structures. PMID:26782664

  13. How Do the Size, Charge and Shape of Nanoparticles Affect Amyloid β Aggregation on Brain Lipid Bilayer?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yuna; Park, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Hyojin; Nam, Jwa-Min

    2016-01-01

    Here, we studied the effect of the size, shape, and surface charge of Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) on amyloid beta (Aβ) aggregation on a total brain lipid-based supported lipid bilayer (brain SLB), a fluid platform that facilitates Aβ-AuNP aggregation process. We found that larger AuNPs induce large and amorphous aggregates on the brain SLB, whereas smaller AuNPs induce protofibrillar Aβ structures. Positively charged AuNPs were more strongly attracted to Aβ than negatively charged AuNPs, and the stronger interactions between AuNPs and Aβ resulted in fewer β-sheets and more random coil structures. We also compared spherical AuNPs, gold nanorods (AuNRs), and gold nanocubes (AuNCs) to study the effect of nanoparticle shape on Aβ aggregation on the brain SLB. Aβ was preferentially bound to the long axis of AuNRs and fewer fibrils were formed whereas all the facets of AuNCs interacted with Aβ to produce the fibril networks. Finally, it was revealed that different nanostructures induce different cytotoxicity on neuroblastoma cells, and, overall, smaller Aβ aggregates induce higher cytotoxicity. The results offer insight into the roles of NPs and brain SLB in Aβ aggregation on the cell membrane and can facilitate the understanding of Aβ-nanostructure co-aggregation mechanism and tuning Aβ aggregate structures.

  14. Exploring the evaluation of net charge, hydrodynamic size and shape of peptides through experimental electrophoretic mobilities obtained from CZE.

    PubMed

    Piaggio, Maria V; Peirotti, Marta B; Deiber, Julio A

    2006-12-01

    This work explores the validity of simple CZE models to analyze the electrophoretic mobilities of 102 peptides reported in literature. These models are based mainly on fundamental physicochemical theories providing analytical expressions amenable to relatively simple numerical analysis. Thus, the Linderstrøm-Lang capillary electrophoresis model (LLCEM) and its perturbed version (PLLCEM), proposed and applied previously to the CZE of globular proteins, are adapted and used here for peptides. Also the effects of pK-shifts on net charge, hydration and hydrodynamic size and shape of peptides are analyzed and discussed. Emphasis is placed on the fact that these parameters are physically coupled, and thus a variation in the net charge may produce an appreciable change in the hydrodynamic size of peptides. Within the framework of CZE, peptides may be assumed as having a hydrodynamic volume associated with either spherical or spheroidal particles. The effects on peptide net charge and hydrodynamic size, of electrostatic interaction between a pair of charged groups in the chain and electrical permitivitty around the peptide domain are studied. The predictions of the PLLCEM and LLCEM are in good agreement with results reported previously in the literature. Several limitations concerning these models and some needs for further research are also described.

  15. Some Aspects of Shaped Charge Jet Direct Impact Upon a Propellant Bed

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-01

    prp_-."•t to be tested was from the HELP1 family. In the following sections of this r.pott, several lot numbers will be mentioned and we will use their...abbreviated form for convenience. Table 1 lists these lot numbers , their abbreviated forms, and their dimensions. 4 Confkmirhm Blw Propellant Charge

  16. Strain rate response of a Ni-Ti shape memory alloy after hydrogen charging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamaoun, Fehmi; Hassine, Tarak; Bouraoui, Tarak

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the susceptibility of Ni-Ti superelastic wires to the strain rates during tensile testing after hydrogen charging. Cathodic hydrogen charging is performed at a current density of 10 A/m² during 2-12 h in 0.9% NaCl solution and aged for 24 h at room temperature. Specimens underwent one cycle of loading-unloading reaching a stress value of 700 MPa. During loading, strain rates from 10-6 to 5 × 10-2 s-1 have been achieved. After 8 h of hydrogen charging, an embrittlement has been detected in the tensile strain rate range of 10-6 to 10-4 s-1. In contrast, no embrittlement has been detected for strain rates of 10-3 s-1 and higher. However, after 12 h of hydrogen charging and 24 h of annealing at room temperature, the embrittlement occurs in the beginning of the austenite-martensite transformation for all the studied strain rate values. These results show that for a range of critical amounts of diffused hydrogen, the embrittlement of the Ni-Ti superelastic alloy strongly depends on the strain rate during the tensile test. Moreover, it has been shown that this embrittlement occurs for low values of strain rates rather than the higher ones. This behaviour is attributed to the interaction between the diffused hydrogen and growth of the martensitic domain.

  17. Tunable coupling in circuit quantum electrodynamics using a superconducting charge qubit with a V-shaped energy level diagram.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, S J; Hoffman, A J; Gambetta, J M; Houck, A A

    2011-02-25

    We introduce a new type of superconducting charge qubit that has a V-shaped energy spectrum and uses quantum interference to provide independently tunable qubit energy and coherent coupling to a superconducting cavity. Dynamic access to the strong coupling regime is demonstrated by tuning the coupling strength from less than 200 kHz to greater than 40 MHz. This tunable coupling can be used to protect the qubit from cavity-induced relaxation and avoid unwanted qubit-qubit interactions in a multiqubit system. © 2011 American Physical Society

  18. Laser interferometric measurement of ion electrode shape and charge exchange erosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macrae, Gregory S.; Mercer, Carolyn R.

    1991-01-01

    A novel projected fringe profilometry system was applied to surface contour measurements of an accelerator electrode from an ion thruster. The system permitted noncontact, nondestructive evaluation of the fine and gross structure of the electrode. A 3D surface map of a dished electrode was generated without altering the electrode surface. The same system was used to examine charge exchange erosion pits near the periphery of the electrode to determine the depth, location, and volume of material lost. This electro-optical measurement system allowed rapid nondestructive digital data acquisition coupled with automated computer data-processing. In addition, variable sensitivity allowed both coarse and fine measurements of objects having various surface finishes.

  19. Laser interferometric measurement of ion electrode shape and charge exchange erosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macrae, Gregory S.; Mercer, Carolyn R.

    1991-01-01

    A projected fringe profilometry system was applied to surface contour measurements of an accelerator electrode from an ion thrustor. The system permitted noncontact, nondestructive evaluation of the fine and gross structure of the electrode. A 3-D surface map of a dished electrode was generated without altering the electrode surface. The same system was used to examine charge exchange erosion pits near the periphery of the electrode to determine the depth, location, and volume of material lost. This electro-optical measurement system allowed rapid, nondestructive, digital data acquisition coupled with automated computer data processing. In addition, variable sensitivity allowed both coarse and fine measurements of objects having various surface finishes.

  20. Emittance control of a beam by shaping the transverse charge distribution, using a tomography diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Yakimenko, V.; Babzien, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Malone, R.; Wang, X.J.

    1998-06-01

    A high-brightness beam is very important for many applications. A diagnostic that measures the multi-dimensional phase-space density-distribution of the electron bunch is a must for obtaining such beams. Measurement of a slice emittance has been achieved. Tomographic reconstruction of phase space was suggested and implemented using a single quadrupole scan. In the present work the authors give special attention to the accuracy of the phase space reconstruction and present an analysis using a transport line with nine focusing magnets and techniques to control the optical functions and phases. This diagnostic, coupled with control of the radial charge distribution of presents an opportunity to improve the beam brightness. Combining the slice emittance and tomography diagnostics lead to an unprecedented visualization of phase space distributions in 5 dimensional phase-space and an opportunity to perform high-order emittance corrections.

  1. EMITTANCE CONTROL OF A BEAM BY SHAPING THE TRANSVERSE CHARGE DISTRIBUTION, USING A TOMOGRAPHY DIAGNOSTIC.

    SciTech Connect

    YAKIMENKO,V.

    1998-06-26

    A high-brightness beam is very important for many applications. A diagnostic that measures the multi-dimensional phase-space density-distribution of the electron bunch is a must for obtaining such beams. Measurement of a slice emittance has been achieved [1]. Tomographic reconstruction of phase space was suggested [2] and implemented [3,4] using a single quadrupole scan. In the present work we give special attention to the accuracy of the phase space reconstruction and present an analysis using a transport line with nine focusing magnets and techniques to control the optical functions and phases. This diagnostic, coupled with control of the radial charge distribution of presents an opportunity to improve the beam brightness. Combining the slice emittance and tomography diagnostics lead to an unprecedented visualization of phase space distributions in 5 dimensional phase-space and an opportunity to perform high-order emittance corrections.

  2. Verification and Validation of computational models for shaped charge jet completion of well bores in fluid saturated sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brannon, Rebecca M.

    2011-06-01

    Completion of cased and cemented wells by shaped charge perforation is a now standard method to establish a pathway liberating oil entrained in reservoir sandstone. However, the penetration event causes its own damage to the formation, potentially reducing well productivity by lodging fragmentation fines in pore throats. To simulate the perforation and penetration process, a computational framework must accommodate massive deformations (usually necessitating an Eulerian solver) while at the same time preserving the integrity of highly history-dependent internal state variables in constitutive models for inelastic flow, damage, and fracture. Results from a three year effort to improve predictive capability of numerical models of well bore completion are summarized. A hierarchical approach to verification and validation (V & V) is underway that begins with numerous straightforward verification tests, then introduces simple partial constitutive validation tests for simple loading (such as demonstrations that the constitutive models can reproduce observed unconfined and confined uniaxial stress data for drained and undrained sandstone), partial validation of the solvers for penetration of aluminium plates, and culminating in a full-scale simulation of the entire completion process consisting of: manufacture of the shaped charge jet liners, explosive formation of the jet, perforation of the metal well bore casing and cement, penetration of the compressed saturated sandstone, and subsequent flow of water and oil from the formation. The parts of this V & V effort to be discussed include: qualitative trend testing of the manufacturing process for power-compacted liners, trend testing (with some quantitative verification against idealized models) of the new effective-stress component of the sandstone constitutive model, convergence testing for benchmark tests of localization and fracture, massive deformation kinematics trend testing in a converging plate problem (which

  3. Proof-of-Concept Study for Uncertainty Quantification and Sensitivity Analysis using the BRL Shaped-Charge Example

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, Justin Matthew

    2016-07-28

    These are the slides for a graduate presentation at Mississippi State University. It covers the following: the BRL Shaped-Charge Geometry in PAGOSA, mesh refinement study, surrogate modeling using a radial basis function network (RBFN), ruling out parameters using sensitivity analysis (equation of state study), uncertainty quantification (UQ) methodology, and sensitivity analysis (SA) methodology. In summary, a mesh convergence study was used to ensure that solutions were numerically stable by comparing PDV data between simulations. A Design of Experiments (DOE) method was used to reduce the simulation space to study the effects of the Jones-Wilkins-Lee (JWL) Parameters for the Composition B main charge. Uncertainty was quantified by computing the 95% data range about the median of simulation output using a brute force Monte Carlo (MC) random sampling method. Parameter sensitivities were quantified using the Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test (FAST) spectral analysis method where it was determined that detonation velocity, initial density, C1, and B1 controlled jet tip velocity.

  4. Shape-controlled synthesis of NiCo2S4 and their charge storage characteristics in supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yufei; Ma, Mingze; Yang, Jun; Sun, Chencheng; Su, Haiquan; Huang, Wei; Dong, Xiaochen

    2014-07-01

    In this work, a facile hydrothermal approach for the shape-controlled synthesis of NiCo2S4 architectures is reported. Four different morphologies, urchin-, tube-, flower-, and cubic-like NiCo2S4 microstructures, have been successfully synthesized by employing various solvents. The obtained precursors and products have been characterized by X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. It is revealed that the supersaturation of nucleation and crystal growth is determined by the solvent polarity and solubility, which can precisely control the morphology of NiCo2S4 microstructures. The detailed electrochemical performances of the various NiCo2S4 microstructures are investigated by cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge-discharge measurements. The results indicate that the tube-like NiCo2S4 exhibits promising capacitive properties with high capacitance and excellent retention. Its specific capacitance can reach 1048 F g-1 at the current density of 3.0 A g-1 and 75.9% of its initial capacitance is maintained at the current density of 10.0 A g-1 after 5000 charge-discharge cycles.

  5. Transport phenomena in a model cheese: the influence of the charge and shape of solutes on diffusion.

    PubMed

    Silva, J V C; Peixoto, P D S; Lortal, S; Floury, J

    2013-10-01

    During cheese ripening, microorganisms grow as immobilized colonies, metabolizing substrates present in the matrix and generating products from enzymatic reactions. Local factors that limit the rates of diffusion, either within the general cheese matrix or near the colonies, may influence the metabolic activity of the bacteria during ripening, affecting the final quality of the cheese. The objective of this study was to determine the diffusion coefficients of solutes as a function of their different physicochemical characteristics (size, charge, and shape) in an ultrafiltrate (UF) model cheese (based on ultrafiltered milk) to enable better understanding of the ripening mechanisms. Diffusion coefficients of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextrans (4 kDa to 2 MDa) and FITC-labeled dairy proteins (α-lactalbumin, β-lactoglobulin, and BSA) were measured using the technique of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). This study showed that macromolecules up to 2 MDa and proteins could diffuse through the UF model cheese. The larger FITC-dextrans were not more hindered by the structure of the UF model cheese compared with the smaller ones. Any decrease in the diffusion coefficients of solutes was related only to their hydrodynamic radii. The FITC-dextran diffusion data were fitted to an obstruction model, resulting in a constant obstruction factor (k ~0.42). Diffusion in the model cheese was sensitive to the physicochemical characteristics of the solute. The FITC-dairy proteins studied (rigid and negatively charged molecules) were hindered to a greater degree than the FITC-dextrans (flexible and charge-neutral molecules) in the UF model cheese. The existence of steric and electrostatic interactions between the protein matrix of the UF model cheese and the FITC-dairy proteins could explain the decrease in diffusion compared with FITC-dextrans.

  6. Molecular size, shape, and electric charges: essential for perylene bisimide-based DNA intercalator to localize in cell nuclei and inhibit cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zejun; Cheng, Wenyu; Guo, Kunru; Yu, Jieshi; Shen, Jie; Tang, Jun; Yang, Wantai; Yin, Meizhen

    2015-05-13

    The molecular properties concerning size, shape, and electric charges of the planar aromatic DNA intercalators are still poorly understood. Herein, a series of water-soluble perylene bisimide (PBI) derivatives containing a rigid and planar aromatic nanoscaffold with different size, shape, and electric charges were synthesized. Using histochemistry and cell viability assays on animal tissues and cancer cells, we revealed the molecular properties required for successful DNA intercalators to localize in cell nuclei and inhibit cancer cells. Small molecular size and the strong polarity of hydrophilic substituents are prerequisites for PBI-based DNA intercalators. A large number of charges facilitate the nucleic accumulation of these DNA intercalators, while fewer charges and planar aromatic nanoscaffold more efficiently inhibit cancer cell growth.

  7. Press Start

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harteveld, Casper

    This level sets the stage for the design philosophy called “Triadic Game Design” (TGD). This design philosophy can be summarized with the following sentence: it takes two to tango, but it takes three to design a meaningful game or a game with a purpose. Before the philosophy is further explained, this level will first delve into what is meant by a meaningful game or a game with a purpose. Many terms and definitions have seen the light and in this book I will specifically orient at digital games that aim to have an effect beyond the context of the game itself. Subsequently, a historical overview is given of the usage of games with a serious purpose which starts from the moment we human beings started to walk on our feet till our contemporary society. It turns out that we have been using games for all kinds of non-entertainment purposes for already quite a long time. With this introductory material in the back of our minds, I will explain the concept of TGD by means of a puzzle. After that, the protagonist of this book, the game Levee Patroller, is introduced. Based on the development of this game, the idea of TGD, which stresses to balance three different worlds, the worlds of Reality, Meaning, and Play, came into being. Interested? Then I suggest to quickly “press start!”

  8. Censorship and the Student Press.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oettinger, Lauren

    The First Amendment rights provided to journalists--freedom of speech and of the press--are fundamental beliefs held by Americans. What students learn in the government class, however, may not be what they learn as editors-in-chief of student newspapers. U.S. schools are being charged with the censorship of student publications at an…

  9. Performance oriented packaging testing of the six-foot flexible linear shaped charge box for packing group II hazardous materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Libbert, K.J.

    1992-10-01

    The wood box (Drawing 53711-6665109) for six-foot flexible linear shaped charges was tested for conformance to Performance Oriented Packaging standards specified by the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 49 CFR, Parts 107 through 178, dated 31 December 1991. The box was tested with a gross weight of 14 kilograms and met all the requirements.

  10. Equilibrium crystal shape of BaZrO3 and space charge formation in the (011) surface by using ab-initio thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ji-Su; Kim, Yeong-Cheol

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the equilibrium crystal shape of BaZrO3 and the space charge formation in an O-terminated (011) surface by using ab-initio thermodynamics. Twenty-two low-indexed (001), (011), and (111) surfaces were calculated to analyze their surface Gibbs-free energy under the stable condition of BaZrO3. Based on the Gibbs-Wulff theorem, the equilibrium crystal shape of BaZrO3 changed from cubic to decaoctahedral with decreasing Ba chemical potential. The dominant facets of BaZrO3 were {001} and {011}, which were well consistent with experimental observations. The space charge formation in the (011) surface was evaluated using the space-charge model. We found that the (011) surface was even more resistive than the (001) surface.

  11. Hypervelocity Impact Testing of International Space Station Meteoroid/Orbital Debris Shielding Using an Inhibited Shaped Charge Launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, Justin H.; Grosch, Donald

    2001-01-01

    Engineers at the NASA Johnson Space Center have conducted hypervelocity impact (HVI) performance evaluations of spacecraft meteoroid and orbital debris (M/OD) shields at velocities in excess of 7 km/s. The inhibited shaped charge launcher (ISCL), developed by the Southwest Research Institute, launches hollow, circular, cylindrical jet tips to approximately 11 km/s. Since traditional M/OD shield ballistic limit performance is defined as the diameter of sphere required to just perforate or spall a spacecraft pressure wall, engineers must decide how to compare ISCL derived data with those of the spherical impactor data set. Knowing the mass of the ISCL impactor, an equivalent sphere diameter may be calculated. This approach is conservative since ISCL jet tips are more damaging than equal mass spheres. A total of 12 tests were recently conducted at the Southwest Research Institute (SWRI) on International Space Station M/OD shields. Results of these tests are presented and compared to existing ballistic limit equations. Modification of these equations is suggested based on the results.

  12. Analysis of the Dynamic Sensitivity of Hemisphere-Shaped Electrostatic Sensors' Circular Array for Charged Particle Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xin; Chen, Zhong-Sheng; Li, Yue; Hu, Zheng; Yang, Yong-Min

    2016-08-31

    Electrostatic sensor arrays (ESAs) are promising in industrial applications related to charged particle monitoring. Sensitivity is a fundamental and commonly-used sensing characteristic of an ESA. However, the usually used spatial sensitivity, which is called static sensitivity here, is not proper for moving particles or capable of reflecting array signal processing algorithms integrated in an ESA. Besides, reports on ESAs for intermittent particles are scarce yet, especially lacking suitable array signal processing algorithms. To solve the problems, the dynamic sensitivity of ESA is proposed, and a hemisphere-shaped electrostatic sensors' circular array (HSESCA) along with its application in intermittent particle monitoring are taken as an example. In detail, a sensing model of the HSESCA is built. On this basis, its array signals are analyzed; the dynamic sensitivity is thereupon defined by analyzing the processing of the array signals. Besides, a component extraction-based array signal processing algorithm for intermittent particles is proposed, and the corresponding dynamic sensitivity is analyzed quantitatively. Moreover, simulated and experimental results are discussed, which validate the accuracy of the models and the effectiveness of the relevant approaches. The proposed dynamic sensitivity of ESA, as well as the array signal processing algorithm are expected to provide references in modeling, designing and using ESAs.

  13. Charged-current muon neutrino shape and rate analysis at the T2K off-axis near detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordoni, S.; Dewhurst, D.; Stowell, P.; T2K Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The experimental evidence that neutrinos can convert from one flavour to another and therefore have non-vanishing mass, has been recently honoured by a Nobel Prize. However, the completeness of the three-neutrino mixing paradigm, parametrised by the PMNS matrix, was challenged in the last two decades. Sterile neutrinos - singlet fermions that contribute to weak interactions only through mixing with active neutrinos - might help to explain some anomalies to the three-neutrino scenario reported by several experiments. However, the existing results are puzzling and the existence of such particles is still an open question. The T2K off-axis near detector (ND280), located at 280m from the proton target, can contribute to the search for sterile neutrinos. Shape and rate measurements for charged-current muon neutrino interactions are studied and tested against the current cross-section model uncertainties to see whether it’s possible to detect short-baseline neutrino oscillations within the 3+1 model.

  14. Analysis of the Dynamic Sensitivity of Hemisphere-Shaped Electrostatic Sensors’ Circular Array for Charged Particle Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xin; Chen, Zhong-Sheng; Li, Yue; Hu, Zheng; Yang, Yong-Min

    2016-01-01

    Electrostatic sensor arrays (ESAs) are promising in industrial applications related to charged particle monitoring. Sensitivity is a fundamental and commonly-used sensing characteristic of an ESA. However, the usually used spatial sensitivity, which is called static sensitivity here, is not proper for moving particles or capable of reflecting array signal processing algorithms integrated in an ESA. Besides, reports on ESAs for intermittent particles are scarce yet, especially lacking suitable array signal processing algorithms. To solve the problems, the dynamic sensitivity of ESA is proposed, and a hemisphere-shaped electrostatic sensors’ circular array (HSESCA) along with its application in intermittent particle monitoring are taken as an example. In detail, a sensing model of the HSESCA is built. On this basis, its array signals are analyzed; the dynamic sensitivity is thereupon defined by analyzing the processing of the array signals. Besides, a component extraction-based array signal processing algorithm for intermittent particles is proposed, and the corresponding dynamic sensitivity is analyzed quantitatively. Moreover, simulated and experimental results are discussed, which validate the accuracy of the models and the effectiveness of the relevant approaches. The proposed dynamic sensitivity of ESA, as well as the array signal processing algorithm are expected to provide references in modeling, designing and using ESAs. PMID:27589767

  15. Introduction to Shaped Charges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    reading............................................................................................................2 Figure 4. The Munroe effect ...3 Figure 5. The Munroe effect (continued...3 Figure 6. The lined-cavity effect

  16. Using a novel technique to shape a refractory castable by Cold Isostatic Pressing and a study of the effect of pressure on the hydration reaction of high-alumina cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emadi, Rahmatollah; Monshi, Ahmad; Shafyei, Ali

    2007-02-01

    Calcium aluminate cements are the most hydraulically setting cements used for refractory castables. The anhydrous phases of this type of cements incorporate CA, CA2 and traces of C12A7 and alpha-alumina where C and A stand for CaO and Al2O3, respectively. Hydration starts to form the hexagonal crystals of CAH10 (H denoting H2O) and C2AH8, which convert to the cubic crystals of C3AH6 and AH3 by the passage of hydration time. In this work, Al2O3-C (alumina-graphite) castables were shaped by cold isostatic pressing at 100 to 400 bars (≈100 to 400 Kg/cm2). Hydration and conversion reactions were studied using the Ratio of Slopes Method for quantitative XRD studies after 3 and 28 days. The results showed that by increasing the pressure, the kinetics of the hydration reaction will increase and higher strengths can be obtained, which supports the idea of forming this graphite containing castable by Cold Isostatic Pressing (CIP) in industrial applications for special refractories.

  17. Ficoll and dextran vs. globular proteins as probes for testing glomerular permselectivity: effects of molecular size, shape, charge, and deformability.

    PubMed

    Venturoli, Daniele; Rippe, Bengt

    2005-04-01

    Polydisperse mixtures of dextran or Ficoll have been frequently used as molecular probes for studies of glomerular permselectivity because they are largely inert and not processed (reabsorbed) by the proximal tubules. However, dextrans are linear, flexible molecules, which apparently are hyperpermeable across the glomerular barrier. By contrast, the Ficoll molecule is almost spherical. Still, there is ample evidence that Ficoll fractional clearances (sieving coefficients) across the glomerular capillary wall (GCW) are markedly higher than those for neutral globular proteins of an equivalent in vitro Stokes-Einstein (SE) radius. Physical data, obtained by "crowding" experiments or measurements of intrinsic viscosity, suggest that the Ficoll molecule exhibits a rather open, deformable structure and thus deviates from an ideally hard sphere. This is also indicated from the relationship between (log) in vitro SE radius and (log) molecular weight (MW). Whereas globular proteins seem to behave in a way similar to hydrated hard spheres, polydisperse dextran and Ficoll exhibit in vitro SE radii that are much larger than those for compact spherical molecules of equivalent MW. For dextran, this can be partially explained by a high-molecular-size asymmetry. However, for Ficoll the explanation may be that the Ficoll molecule is more flexible (deformable) than are globular proteins. An increased compressibility of Ficoll and an increased deformability and size asymmetry for dextran may be the explanation for the fact that the permeability of the GCW is significantly higher when assessed using polysaccharides such as Ficoll or dextran compared with that obtained using globular proteins as molecular size probes. We suggest that molecular deformability, besides molecular size, shape, and charge, plays a crucial role in determining the glomerular permeability to molecules of different species.

  18. Shape similarity of charge-transfer (CT) excitation energy curves in a series of donor-acceptor complexes and its description with a transferable energy of CT orbital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsenko, O. V.

    2017-08-01

    A simple nature of charge-transfer (CT) in the prototype complexes Dp -F2 (Dp =NH3 , H2O) manifests itself in a very close shape of their CT excitation energy curves ωCT (R) along the donor-acceptor separation R. It affords a simple orbital description in terms of the CT orbitals (CTOs) obtained with a transformation of the virtual orbitals of the standard local density approximation (LDA). The transferable energy of the relevant CTO as a function of R closely approximates the common shape of ωCT (R) , while the height of the individual curve is determined with the ionization potential of Dp .

  19. Correlating shaped charge performance with processing conditions and microstructure of an aluminum alloy 1100 liner enabled by a new method to arrest nascent jet formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheid, James Eric

    Aluminum-lined shaped charges are used in special applications where jet and / or slug residue in the target is undesired. The three different microstructures of the aluminum liners studied herein resulted from three different manufacturing interpretations of the same design. One interpretation was completely machining the liners from best available annealed round stock. The second was to cold-forge the liners from annealed round-stock in an open-die forge to near-final dimensions, and then machine the liners to the final dimensions. The third variant in this study was to use the above forged liner, but with annealing after the machining. These three manufacturing choices resulted in significant variations in shaped charge performance. The goal of this research was to clarify the relationships between the liner metal microstructure and properties, and the corresponding shaped charge dynamic flow behavior. What began as an investigation into user-reported performance problems associated inherently with liner manufacturing processes and resultant microstructure, resolved into new understandings of the relationships between aluminum liner microstructure and shaped charge collapse kinetics. This understanding was achieved through an extensive literature review and the comprehensive characterization of the material properties of three variants of an 1100 aluminum shaped charge liner with a focus on collapse and nascent jet formation. The machined liner had a microstructure with large millimeter-sized grains and fine particles aligned in bands parallel to the charge axis. The forged liner microstructure consisted of very small one micrometer-sized (1 mum) subgrains and fine particles aligned largely in bands elongated parallel to the liner contour. The annealed liner was characterized by ten micrometer (10 mum) sized equiaxed grains with residual fine particles in the forged alignment. This characterization was enabled by the development, execution and validation of a

  20. Reciprocating pellet press

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Charles W.

    1981-04-07

    A machine for pressing loose powder into pellets using a series of reciprocating motions has an interchangeable punch and die as its only accurately machines parts. The machine reciprocates horizontally between powder receiving and pressing positions. It reciprocates vertically to press, strip and release a pellet.

  1. Living Dangerously--Changing Press Law in India.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Timothy

    An examination of the changes in press laws after India gained its independence in 1947 shows how a free press is shaped mostly by the structure and evolution of the democratic society that it is intended to serve. The most salient features that have characterized the Indian press, from the early nineteenth century to the present day, are…

  2. A Study of Shaped-Charge Collapse and Jet Formation Using the HEMP (hydrodynamic, Elastic, Magneto, and Plastic) Code and a Comparison with Experimental Observations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    at BRL was used for the copper liners. A plotting package developed by Mr. John Harrison of BRL was included in the version of HEMP used in this study...AD-A149 472 AD IB MEMORANDUM REPORT BRL-MR-3417 L A STUDY OF SHAPED-CHARGE COLLAPSE AND JET FORMATION USING THE HEMP CODE AND A COMPARISON WITH...FORMATION USING THE HEMP CODE AND A COMPARISON FINAL WITH EXPERIMENTAL OBSERVATIONS S. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMOER 7. AUTHOR(-) 8. CONTRACT OR GRANT

  3. Method for decomposing observed line shapes resulting from multiple causes - Application to plasma charge-exchange-neutral spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patch, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    A method is given for decomposing the widths of observed spectral lines resulting from unresolved line splitting, additive kinetic processes of different types, instrumental broadening (slit function), Doppler broadening, etc. all superimposed. The second moments are used as measures of the various widths involved. The method is not applicable if dispersion type (Lorentz) broadening occurs. Application is made to plasma charge-exchange-neutral spectra of hydrogen, deuterium, and helium.

  4. A New Internal Energy Calculation for the HELP Code and Its Implications to Conical Shaped Charge Simulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-06-01

    quantity) plus its fluctuation ( primed quantity). Componentwise, we have "u a u + u’ and v = v v’ The associated specific kinetic energy is 2 , 2...via eq. (5). The accuracy of the internal energy calculation is of prime importance, since the pressure, temperature and strength properties of the...This stagnation point divides the collapsed liner into the slug and jet. It is the jet which pierces the armor and is of prime concern to the shaped

  5. Shaping of nested potentials for electron cooling of highly-charged ions in a cooler Penning trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Stefan; Kootte, Brian; Lascar, Daniel; Gwinner, Gerald; Dilling, Jens; Titan Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    TRIUMF's Ion Trap for Atomic and Nuclear science (TITAN) is dedicated to mass spectrometry and decay spectroscopy of short-lived radioactive nuclides in a series of ion traps including a precision Penning trap. In order to boost the achievable precision of mass measurements TITAN deploys an Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) providing Highly-Charged Ions (HCI). However, the charge breeding process in the EBIT leads to an increase in the ion bunch's energy spread which is detrimental to the overall precision gain. To reduce this effect a new cylindrical Cooler PEnning Trap (CPET) is being commissioned to sympathetically cool the HCI via a simultaneously trapped electron plasma. Simultaneous trapping of ions and electrons requires a high level of control over the nested potential landscape and sophisticated switching schemes for the voltages on CPET's multiple ring electrodes. For this purpose, we are currently setting up a new experimental control system for multi-channel voltage switching. The control system employs a Raspberry Pi communicating with a digital-to-analog board via a serial peripheral interface. We report on the implementation of the voltage control system and its performance with respect to electron and ion manipulation in CPET. University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

  6. University Presses: Problems and Prospects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meeker, Robert B.

    Historical information on university presses and their problems are considered. University presses in the United States have their roots in 15th century England when the Oxford University Press was established in 1478. The first U.S. press to use the term "university press" was Cornell University; the press operated from 1869 until it…

  7. High School Press Pressures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Luella P.

    History shows that the high school press suffers through cycles that reflect economic factors and cultural climates within communities, states, and the nation. The direction of that cycle in the 1960s and early 1970s was toward more open, free-flowing information by a vigorous student press, but those economic and cultural signs now are pointing…

  8. The Greenwood School Press.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, Jane

    1984-01-01

    A turn-of-the-century printing press motivates elementary students to write. Children write, edit, and print their own stories on the Greenwood School Press. This self-supporting enterprise introduces children to various aspects of writing and producing literature. (DF)

  9. Press Councils in Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reddick, David B.

    Established in the early 1970s to respond to complaints about and from the media, the four press councils in Canada (the Alberta, Ontario, Quebec, and Windsor Press Councils) have been accepted, but not overwhelmingly so by either newspapers or the public. The success and acceptability of the councils seems to be related to the kinds of complaints…

  10. Lyndon Johnson's Press Conferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Stephen

    Because President Lyndon Johnson understood well the publicity value of the American news media, he sought to exploit them. He saw reporters as "torch bearers" for his programs and policies and used the presidential press conference chiefly for promotional purposes. Although he met with reporters often, his press conferences were usually…

  11. High School Press Pressures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Luella P.

    History shows that the high school press suffers through cycles that reflect economic factors and cultural climates within communities, states, and the nation. The direction of that cycle in the 1960s and early 1970s was toward more open, free-flowing information by a vigorous student press, but those economic and cultural signs now are pointing…

  12. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    Dean Acosta, NASA Deputy Assistant Administrator and Press Secretary, moderates a press conference with NASA Administrator Michael Griffin Scott Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems and Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  13. Press Relations: Carter's Example.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kindsvatter, Peter S.

    Although different philosophies may motivate presidential-press relations, causing frequent friction or adversity, there is nevertheless a strong degree of cooperation and collaboration between the press and a president of the United States. This interdependence has been particularly evident in recent administrations, and it progresses…

  14. The Greenwood School Press.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, Jane

    1984-01-01

    A turn-of-the-century printing press motivates elementary students to write. Children write, edit, and print their own stories on the Greenwood School Press. This self-supporting enterprise introduces children to various aspects of writing and producing literature. (DF)

  15. An investigation of the cratering-induced motions occurring during the formation of bowl-shaped craters. [using high explosive charges as the cratering source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piekutowski, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of the dynamic processes which occur during crater formation were examined using small hemispherical high-explosive charges detonated in a tank which had one wall constructed of a thick piece of clear plexiglas. Crater formation and the motions of numerous tracer particles installed in the cratering medium at the medium-wall interface were viewed through the wall of this quarter-space tank and recorded with high-speed cameras. Subsequent study and analysis of particle motions and events recorded on the film provide data needed to develop a time-sequence description of the formation of a bowl-shaped crater. Tables show the dimensions of craters produced in a quarter-space tank compared with dimensions of craters produced in normal half-space tanks. Crater growth rate summaries are also tabulated.

  16. TiO2 nanorods: a facile size- and shape-tunable synthesis and effective improvement of charge collection kinetics for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjun; Xie, Yan; Xiong, Dehua; Zeng, Xianwei; Li, Zhihong; Wang, Mingkui; Cheng, Yi-Bing; Chen, Wei; Yan, Keyou; Yang, Shihe

    2014-06-25

    In this paper, we present a novel, high-yield, and cost-effective hydrothermal method for the preparation of single crystal-like anatase TiO2 nanorods (NRs) with specific {101} exposed crystal planes and preferred [001] growth direction, which is governed by the "oriented attachment" mechanism. The successful synthesis of TiO2 NRs and fine tuning on their size and shape could be easily accomplished by adjusting the solvent compositions. The salient feature of these NRs, in lieu of traditional nanoparticles as building blocks of photoanodes in dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) system, rests with their significantly reduced grain boundaries. The electron diffusion and recombination kinetics have been critically compared for the first time with respect to the size and shape of the novel building blocks. A high efficiency of 8.87% has finally been achieved for DSSC based on long-thin NRs rather than short-thin or long-thick NRs, which possesses balanced optimizations on charge collection and light-harvesting properties.

  17. Expedition 52 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-10

    Expedition 52 flight engineer Randy Bresnik of NASA answers a reporter's question during a crew press conference at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC), Monday, July 10, 2017 in Star City, Russia. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  18. STS-135 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-30

    JSC2011-E-060448 (30 June 2011) --- NASA astronaut Rex Walheim, STS-135 mission specialist, fields a question from a reporter during a preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center. Photo credit: NASA

  19. Expedition 52 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-10

    Expedition 52 flight engineer Sergey Ryazanskiy of Roscosmos answers a reporter's question during a crew press conference at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC), Monday, July 10, 2017 in Star City, Russia. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  20. STS-135 Press Briefings

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-30

    JSC2011-E-060720 (30 June 2011) -- STS-135 lead flight director Kwatsi Alibaruho responds to a question from a reporter during a mission overview press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center. Photo credit: NASA

  1. STS-135 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-30

    JSC2011-E-060450 (30 June 2011) --- NASA astronaut Rex Walheim, STS-135 mission specialist, responds to a question from a reporter during a preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center. Photo credit: NASA

  2. Expedition 32 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-07-13

    Quarantined Expedition 32 Canadian backup crewmember Chris Hadfield answers reporters questions from behind glass during a prelaunch press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel on Friday, July 13, 2012 in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Photo Credit (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  3. STS-134 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-03-24

    JSC2011-E-028493 (24 March 2011) --- NASA astronaut Mark Kelly, STS-134 commander, responds to a question from a reporter during a preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  4. STS-135 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-30

    JSC2011-E-060415 (30 June 2011) --- NASA astronaut Sandy Magnus, STS-135 mission specialist, responds to a question from a reporter during a preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center. Photo credit: NASA

  5. STS-135 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-30

    JSC2011-E-060445 (30 June 2011) --- NASA astronaut Sandy Magnus, STS-135 mission specialist, responds to a question from a reporter during a preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center. Photo credit: NASA

  6. Expedition 52 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-10

    Expedition 52 flight engineer Paolo Nespoli of ESA answers a reporter's question during a crew press conference at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC), Monday, July 10, 2017 in Star City, Russia. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  7. STS-134 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-03-24

    JSC2011-E-028492 (24 March 2011) --- NASA astronaut Greg Chamitoff, STS-134 mission specialist, fields a question from a reporter during a preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  8. STS-135 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-30

    JSC2011-E-060413 (30 June 2011) --- NASA astronaut Chris Ferguson, STS-135 commander, responds to a question from a reporter during a preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center. Photo credit: NASA

  9. Expedition 6 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-05-05

    Expedition 6 Commander Ken Bowersox, left and NASA International Space Station Science Officer Don Pettit speak during a press conference at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia, Thursday, May 6, 2003. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  10. Expedition 6 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-05-05

    Expedition 6 International Space Station Science Officer Don Pettit speaks during a press conference at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia, Thursday, May 6, 2003. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  11. STS-132 press conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-05-03

    JSC2010-E-063790 (3 May 2010) --- NASA astronaut Garrett Reisman, STS-132 mission specialist, fields a question from a reporter during an STS-132 preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

  12. STS-132 press conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-05-03

    JSC2010-E-063807 (3 May 2010) --- NASA astronaut Mike Good, STS-132 mission specialist, responds to a question from a reporter during an STS-132 preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

  13. STS-131 press conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-03-09

    JSC2010-E-038795 (9 March 2010) --- NASA astronaut Stephanie Wilson, STS-131 mission specialist, fields a question from a reporter during an STS-131 preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

  14. STS-132 press conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-05-03

    JSC2010-E-063799 (3 May 2010) --- NASA astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-132 mission specialist, fields a question from a reporter during an STS-132 preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

  15. STS-132 press conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-05-03

    JSC2010-E-063808 (3 May 2010) --- NASA astronaut Garrett Reisman, STS-132 mission specialist, responds to a question from a reporter during an STS-132 preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

  16. STS-131 press conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-03-09

    JSC2010-E-038797 (9 March 2010) --- NASA astronaut Rick Mastracchio, STS-131 mission specialist, responds to a question from a reporter during an STS-131 preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

  17. STS-132 press conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-05-03

    JSC2010-E-063797 (3 May 2010) --- NASA astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-132 mission specialist, fields a question from a reporter during an STS-132 preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

  18. STS-131 press conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-03-09

    JSC2010-E-038794 (9 March 2010) --- NASA astronaut Alan Poindexter, STS-131 commander, responds to a question from a reporter during an STS-131 preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

  19. STS-135 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-30

    JSC2011-E-060439 (30 June 2011) --- NASA astronaut Chris Ferguson, STS-135 commander, responds to a question from a reporter during a preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center. Photo credit: NASA

  20. STS-125 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-04-23

    JSC2009-E-087199 (23 April 2009) --- Astronaut Michael Good, STS-125 mission specialist, responds to a question from a reporter during a STS-125 preflight press briefing at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

  1. STS-131 press conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-03-09

    JSC2010-E-038799 (9 March 2010) --- NASA astronaut Clayton Anderson, STS-131 mission specialist, responds to a question from a reporter during an STS-131 preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

  2. Expedition 19 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-03-24

    Expedition 19 Flight Engineer Michael R. Barratt smiles at his family from a quarantined glass room after a press conference on Wednesday, March 25, 2009 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  3. EPOXI Mission Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-11-18

    Michael A'Hearn, EPOXI Principal Investigator, University of Maryland, holds a plastic bottle containing ice to illustrate a point during a press conference, Thursday, Nov. 18, 2010, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. The press conference was held to discuss the Nov. 4 successful flyby of Comet Hartley 2 by NASA's EPOXI Mission Spacecraft. Images from the flyby provided scientists the most extensive observations of a comet in history. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  4. EPOXI Mission Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-11-18

    Dr. James Green, Director of Planetary Science, NASA Headquarters, at podium, speaks during a press conference, Thursday, Nov. 18, 2010, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. The press conference was held to discuss the Nov. 4 successful flyby of Comet Hartley 2 by NASA's EPOXI Mission Spacecraft. Images from the flyby provided scientists the most extensive observations of a comet in history. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  5. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    NASA Administrator Michael Griffin, seated left, Scott Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems and Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, right, are seen during a press conference outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Dean Acosta, NASA Deputy Assistant Administrator and Press Secretary, far left, moderates the program. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  6. MAVEN Press Briefing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-10-28

    Dwayne Brown, NASA Public Affairs Officer, takes a question from a member of the press on theupcoming launch of the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) mission, at a press conference at NASA Headquarters in Washington on Monday, Oct. 28th, 2013. MAVEN is the agency's next mission to Mars and the first devoted to understanding the upper atmosphere of the Red Planet. (Photo credit: NASA/Jay Westcott)

  7. The Shaped Charge Concept. Part 3. Applications of Shaped Charges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-01

    held (bazooka type) rounds, Sun launched rouds (e.g., rifle penades), cannon launched rounds, and various bombs. The targes are armors , bunkers...FOLD HERE ----------------------------------------- -.... DEPARTMENT OF THE ARmy 111 Director II INO P09TAGE U.S. Army Balistic kcsevch

  8. A Guide to Press Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fibre Box Association, Chicago, IL.

    Stressing that a positive press-relations program can be extremely helpful to businesses, this publication offers suggestions for establishing press contacts, preparing press releases, holding press conferences, illustrating a story, preparing materials for use in radio and television broadcasts, and developing policies to be followed in emergency…

  9. Post Launch Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-12-05

    In the Kennedy Space Center’s Press Site auditorium, agency leaders spoke to members of the news media about the successful Orion Flight Test. From left are: Rachel Kraft, of NASA Public Affairs, Bill Gerstenmaier, NASA associate administrator for Human Exploration and Operations, Mark Geyer, Orion program manager, Mike Hawes, Lockheed Martin Orion Program manager, and NASA astronaut Rex Walheim.

  10. MAVEN Press Briefing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-10-28

    Kelly Fast, MAVEN program scientist, NASA Headquarters, discusses the upcoming launch of the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) mission, at a press conference at NASA Headquarters in Washington on Monday, Oct. 28th, 2013. MAVEN is the agency's next mission to Mars and the first devoted to understanding the upper atmosphere of the Red Planet. (Photo credit: NASA/Jay Westcott)

  11. Press Conference - Skylab 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1972-08-14

    S72-46699 (19 Jan. 1972) --- Prime crew members of the scheduled second Skylab mission are introduced to the media during a press conference in January 1972 at the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC). From left to right are astronauts Jack R. Lousma, pilot; Owen K. Garriott, science pilot, and Alan L. Bean, commander. Photo credit: NASA

  12. Defining the University Press

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Janet

    1978-01-01

    Reports discussion at the annual meeting of the Association of American University Presses (AAUP) on such topics as overproduction, government support, "on demand" publishing, profitability, library photocopying, and selection in library acquisitions, as they relate to the roles of librarians and publishers. (JPF)

  13. STS-134 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-03-24

    JSC2011-E-028491 (24 March 2011) --- European Space Agency astronaut Roberto Vittori, STS-134 mission specialist, fields a question from a reporter during a preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  14. STS-134 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-03-24

    JSC2011-E-028498 (24 March 2011) --- European Space Agency astronaut Roberto Vittori, STS-134 mission specialist, responds to a question from a reporter during a preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  15. Expedition 34 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-12-18

    Russian backup crew member Fyodor Yurchikin, right, answers a reporter's question at a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel, on Tuesday, Dec. 18, 2012, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Seen next to him are NASA backup crew member Karen Nyberg and Expedition 34/35 Canadian Space Agency astronaut Chris Hadfield. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  16. STS-134 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-03-24

    JSC2011-E-028488 (24 March 2011) --- NASA astronaut Greg H. Johnson, STS-134 pilot, responds to a question from a reporter during a preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  17. STS-134 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-03-24

    JSC2011-E-028490 (24 March 2011) --- NASA astronaut Michael Fincke, STS-134 mission specialist, responds to a question from a reporter during a preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  18. STS-134 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-03-24

    JSC2011-E-028496 (24 March 2011) --- NASA astronaut Andrew Feustel, STS-134 mission specialist, responds to a question from a reporter during a preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  19. Expedition 28 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-06

    Expedition 28 NASA Flight Engineer Mike Fossum, left, and Soyuz Commander Sergei Volkov of Russia share a laugh during a press conference, Monday, June 6, 2011, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch on Tuesday, June 8, from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  20. Expedition 29 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-12

    Expedition 29 Soyuz Commander Anton Shkaplerov answers a reporter’s question during a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan on Saturday, Nov. 12, 2011. The mission is set to launch November 14 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  1. Expedition 28 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-06

    Expedition 28 NASA Flight Engineer Mike Fossum, speaks during a press conference, Monday, June 6, 2011, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch on Tuesday, June 8, from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  2. Expedition 28 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-06

    Expedition 28 NASA Flight Engineer Mike Fossum speaks during a press conference, Monday, June 6, 2011, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch on Tuesday, June 8, from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  3. Expedition 28 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-06

    Expedition 28 NASA Flight Engineer Mike Fossum, left, and Soyuz Commander Sergei Volkov of Russia are seen during a press conference, Monday, June 6, 2011, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch on Tuesday, June 8, from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  4. Expedition 29 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-12

    Expedition 29 backup crew members NASA Flight Engineer Joseph Acaba, far left, Russian Soyuz Commander Gennady Padalka, center, and Russian Flight Engineer Sergei Revin are seen at a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan on Saturday, Nov. 12, 2011. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  5. Expedition 29 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-12

    Expedition 29 NASA Flight Engineer Dan Burbank answers a reporter’s question during a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan on Saturday, Nov. 12, 2011. The launch of the Soyuz spacecraft with Expedition 29 NASA Flight Engineer Dan Burbank, Soyuz Commander Anton Shkaplerov and Flight Engineer Anatoly Ivanishin is scheduled for November 14. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  6. Expedition 28 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-06

    Expedition 28 NASA backup Flight Engineer Don Pettit looks on during a press conference, Monday, June 6, 2011, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch on Tuesday, June 8, from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  7. Expedition 28 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-06

    Expedition 28 Soyuz Commander Sergei Volkov of Russia speaks during a press conference, Monday, June 6, 2011, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch on Tuesday, June 7, from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  8. Expedition 29 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-12

    Expedition 29 NASA backup crew member Joe Acaba is seen at a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel, Saturday, Nov. 12, 2011 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch November 14 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  9. Expedition 28 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-06

    NASA backup Flight Engineer Don Pettit speaks during a press conference, Monday, June 6, 2011, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch on Tuesday, June 8, from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  10. Expedition 28 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-06

    Expedition 28 Soyuz Commander Sergei Volkov speaks during a press conference, Monday, June 6, 2011, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch on Tuesday, June 8, from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  11. Expedition 39 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-24

    Expedition 39 flight engineer Steve Swanson of NASA is seen in quarantine, behind glass, during the final press conference be Monday, March 24, 2014, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission to the International Space Station is set to launch March 26 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  12. Expedition 28 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-06

    Russian backup Flight Engineer Oleg Kononenko speaks during a press conference, Monday, June 6, 2011, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch on Tuesday, June 8, from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  13. Expedition 29 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-12

    Expedition 29 backup crew members Joseph Acaba, left, and Russian Flight Engineer Gennady Padalka share a few words during a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan on Saturday, Nov. 12, 2011. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  14. Expedition 29 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-12

    Expedition 29 Flight Engineer Anatoly Ivanishin is seen at a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel, Saturday, Nov. 12, 2011 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch November 14 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  15. Expedition 40 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-27

    A man taking a picture with a cell phone is seen reflected in the glass separating the quarantined crew during a press conference on Tuesday, May 27, 2014, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission to the International Space Station is set to launch May 29 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Joel Kowsky)

  16. Expedition 29 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-12

    Expedition 29 Russian Flight Engineer Anatoly Ivanishin answers a reporter’s question during a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan on Saturday, Nov. 12, 2011. The launch of the Soyuz spacecraft with Ivanishin, Soyuz Commander Anton Shkaplerov and NASA Flight Engineer Dan Burbank is scheduled for November 14. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  17. Expedition 28 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-06

    Expedition 28 NASA Flight Engineer Mike Fossum, left, looks on as Soyuz Commander Sergei Volkov speaks during a press conference, Monday, June 6, 2011, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch on Tuesday, June 8, from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  18. Expedition 41 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-24

    NASA Expedition 41 backup crew member Flight Engineer Mikhail Kornienko of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) answers a question during a press conference Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The prime crew is set to launch Sept. 26 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  19. Meet the Press

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quick, Brian L.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To field questions from a room of students simulating a press conference. Type of speech: Impromptu. Point value: 10 participation points. To receive all 10 points, students must (1) address three questions from the lectern and ask three questions from their seat (3 points), (2) respond thoroughly to each question by providing a…

  20. Expedition 6 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-05-05

    Expedition 6 Flight Engineer Nikolai Budarin, left, Commander Ken Bowersox and International Space Station Science Officer Don Pettit, right, pose for photos at a press conference at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia, Thursday, May 6, 2003. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  1. Expedition 6 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-05-05

    Expedition 6 Flight Engineer Nikolai Budarin, left, Commander Ken Bowersox and NASA International Space Station Science Officer Don Pettit, right, answer questions during a press conference at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia, Thursday, May 6, 2003. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  2. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    NASA Administrator Michael Griffin, left, Scott Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems and Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, right, are seen during a press conference outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  3. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    Scott Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems, center, speaks as Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, right, looks on during a press conference outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  4. Google Moon Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    Andrew Chaikin, author of "A Man on the Moon" speaks during a press conference, Monday, July 20, 2009, announcing the launch of Moon in Google Earth, an immersive 3D atlas of the Moon, accessible within Google Earth 5.0, Monday, July 20, 2009, at the Newseum in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  5. Google Moon Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    Buzz Aldrin, the second man to walk on the moon, speaks during a press conference, Monday, July 20, 2009, announcing the launch of Moon in Google Earth, an immersive 3D atlas of the Moon, accessible within Google Earth 5.0, Monday, July 20, 2009, at the Newseum in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  6. Google Moon Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin, the second man to walk on the Moon, speaks during a press conference, Monday, July 20, 2009, announcing the launch of Moon in Google Earth, an immersive 3D atlas of the Moon, accessible within Google Earth 5.0, Monday, July 20, 2009, at the Newseum in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  7. Google Moon Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver, speaks during a press conference, Monday, July 20, 2009, announcing the launch of Moon in Google Earth, an immersive 3D atlas of the Moon, accessible within Google Earth 5.0, Monday, July 20, 2009, at the Newseum in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  8. Google Moon Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    Tiffany Montague, Technical Program Manager for NASA and Google Lunar X PRIZE, Google, Inc., speaks during a press conference, Monday, July 20, 2009, announcing the launch of Moon in Google Earth, an immersive 3D atlas of the Moon, accessible within Google Earth 5.0, Monday, July 20, 2009, at the Newseum in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  9. Google Moon Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    Brian McLendon, VP of Engineering, Google, Inc., speaks during a press conference, Monday, July 20, 2009, announcing the launch of Moon in Google Earth, an immersive 3D atlas of the Moon, accessible within Google Earth 5.0, Monday, July 20, 2009, at the Newseum in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  10. Google Moon Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    Yoshinori Yoshimura, a respresentative from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), speaks during a press conference, Monday, July 20, 2009, announcing the launch of Moon in Google Earth, an immersive 3D atlas of the Moon, accessible within Google Earth 5.0, Monday, July 20, 2009, at the Newseum in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  11. Google Moon Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    Michael Weiss-Malik, Product Manager for Moon in Google Earth, Google, Inc., speaks during a press conference, Monday, July 20, 2009, announcing the launch of Moon in Google Earth, an immersive 3D atlas of the Moon, accessible within Google Earth 5.0, Monday, July 20, 2009, at the Newseum in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  12. Google Moon Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    Miles O'Brien, former chief science and tech correspondent for CNN, speaks during a press conference, Monday, July 20, 2009, announcing the launch of Moon in Google Earth, an immersive 3D atlas of the Moon, accessible within Google Earth 5.0, Monday, July 20, 2009, at the Newseum in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  13. Meet the Press

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quick, Brian L.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To field questions from a room of students simulating a press conference. Type of speech: Impromptu. Point value: 10 participation points. To receive all 10 points, students must (1) address three questions from the lectern and ask three questions from their seat (3 points), (2) respond thoroughly to each question by providing a…

  14. Expedition 52 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-10

    Expedition 52 flight engineers Paolo Nespoli of ESA, left, Sergey Ryazanskiy of Roscosmos, center, and Expedition 52 flight engineer Randy Bresnik of NASA pose for group photograph at the conclusion of their crew press conference at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC), Monday, July 10, 2017 in Star City, Russia. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  15. Expedition 50 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-26

    Expedition 50 NASA astronaut Peggy Whitson, left, Russian cosmonaut Oleg Novitskiy of Roscosmos, center, and ESA astronaut Thomas Pesquet pose for a group photograph at the conclusion of a press conference, Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2016, at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC) in Star City, Russia. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  16. MAVEN Press Briefing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-10-28

    A model of the MAVEN spacecraft is pictured during a press conference for the upcoming launch of the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) mission, at NASA Headquarters in Washington on Monday, Oct. 28th, 2013. MAVEN is the agency's next mission to Mars and the first devoted to understanding the upper atmosphere of the Red Planet. (Photo credit: NASA/Jay Westcott)

  17. MAVEN Press Briefing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-10-28

    Jim Green, director, Planetary Science Division, NASA Headquarters, discusses the upcoming launch of the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) mission, at a press conference at NASA Headquarters in Washington on Monday, Oct. 28th, 2013. MAVEN is the agency's next mission to Mars and the first devoted to understanding the upper atmosphere of the Red Planet. (Photo credit: NASA/Jay Westcott)

  18. Expedition 52 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-10

    A painting of Yuri Gagarin is seen in the lobby of the building where the Expedition 52 prime and backup crews held a crew press conference on the grounds of the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC), Monday, July 10, 2017 in Star City, Russia. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  19. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, speaks during a press conference outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  20. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    Scott Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems, left, looks on as Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, speaks during a press conference outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  1. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    NASA Administrator Michael Griffin, left, looks on as Scott Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems speaks during a press conference outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  2. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    Members of the media listen during a press conference with NASA Administrator Michael Griffin, Scott Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems and Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  3. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    NASA Administrator Michael Griffin, speaks during a press conference outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  4. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    Scott Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems, left, and Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, are seen during a press conference outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  5. Optically Aligned Drill Press

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adderholdt, Bruce M.

    1994-01-01

    Precise drill press equipped with rotary-indexing microscope. Microscope and drill exchange places when turret rotated. Microscope axis first aligned over future hole, then rotated out of way so drill axis assumes its precise position. New procedure takes less time to locate drilling positions and produces more accurate results. Apparatus adapted to such other machine tools as milling and measuring machines.

  6. Optically Aligned Drill Press

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adderholdt, Bruce M.

    1994-01-01

    Precise drill press equipped with rotary-indexing microscope. Microscope and drill exchange places when turret rotated. Microscope axis first aligned over future hole, then rotated out of way so drill axis assumes its precise position. New procedure takes less time to locate drilling positions and produces more accurate results. Apparatus adapted to such other machine tools as milling and measuring machines.

  7. America's Enduring Ethnic Press.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marzolf, Marion

    Studies of the history of newspapers in the United States have virtually ignored the ethnically oriented, foreign language press. This gap in journalistic investigation should be filled by considering the two conflicting roles which ethnic newspapers fill: assimilation of the ethnic group into the mainstream of American culture and maintenance and…

  8. Drill Press Work Sample.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational-Technical High School, Billerica, MA.

    This manual contains a work sample intended to assess a handicapped student's interest in and to screen interested students into a training program in basic machine shop I. (The course is based on the entry level of the drill press operator.) Section 1 describes the assessment, correlates the work performed and worker traits required for…

  9. Google Moon Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    Alan Eustace, Senior VP of Engineering and Research, Google, Inc., speaks during a press conference, Monday, July 20, 2009, announcing the launch of Moon in Google Earth, an immersive 3D atlas of the Moon, accessible within Google Earth 5.0, Monday, July 20, 2009, at the Newseum in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  10. STEREO Press Briefing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-08-17

    Craig DeForest, a staff scientist at the Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colo., speaks during a press briefing, Thursday, Aug. 18, 2011, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. The briefing was held to discusses new details about the structure of solar storms and the impact they have on Earth. The new information comes from NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory, or STEREO, spacecraft and other NASA probes. Photo Credit: (NASA/GSFC/Rebecca Roth)

  11. STEREO Press Briefing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-08-17

    Madhulika Guhathakurta, seated left, STEREO program scientist, speaks during a press briefing, Thursday, Aug. 18, 2011, at NASA Headquarters in Washington as Craig DeForest, David Webb and Alysha Reinard, look on. The briefing was held to discusses new details about the structure of solar storms and the impact they have on Earth. The new information comes from NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory, or STEREO, spacecraft and other NASA probes. Photo Credit: (NASA/GSFC/Rebecca Roth)

  12. STEREO Press Briefing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-08-17

    Craig DeForest, second from left, speaks during a press briefing, Thursday, Aug. 18, 2011, at NASA Headquarters in Washington as Madhulika Guhathakurta, left, David Webb and Alysha Reinard look on. The briefing was held to discusses new details about the structure of solar storms and the impact they have on Earth. The new information comes from NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory, or STEREO, spacecraft and other NASA probes. Photo Credit: (NASA/GSFC/Rebecca Roth)

  13. STEREO Press Briefing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-08-17

    Madhulika Guhathakurta, seated left, STEREO program scientist, speaks during a press briefing, Thursday, Aug. 18, 2011, at NASA Headquarters in Washington as Craig DeForest, David Webb and Alysha Reinard, look on. The briefing was held to discusses new details about the structure of solar storms and the impact they have on Earth. The new information comes from NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory, or STEREO, spacecraft and other NASA probes. Photo Credit: (NASA/GSFC/Rebecca Roth).

  14. STEREO Press Briefing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-08-17

    David Webb, a research physicist from the Institute for Scientific Research at Boston College speaks during a press briefing, Thursday, Aug. 18, 2011, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. The briefing was held to discuss new details about the structure of solar storms and the impact they have on Earth. The new information comes from NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory, or STEREO, spacecraft and other NASA probes. Photo Credit: (NASA/GSFC/Rebecca Roth)

  15. Expedition 41 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-24

    Expedition 41 Soyuz Commander Alexander Samokutyaev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) and Flight Engineer Elena Serova of Roscosmos hold up tiger toys that will be carried with them to the International Space Station to commemorate International Tiger Day at a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan on Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014. The mission is set to launch Sept. 26 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  16. Expedition 32 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-07-13

    Quarantined Expedition 32 JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) Flight Engineer Akihiko Hoshide answers reporters questions from behind glass during a prelaunch press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel on Friday, July 13, 2012 in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The launch of the Soyuz spacecraft with Hoshide, Soyuz Commander Yuri Malenchenko, and NASA Flight Engineer Sunita Williams is scheduled for 8:40 a.m. local time on Sunday, July 15. Photo Credit (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  17. Expedition 34 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-12-18

    Expedition 34/35 NASA Flight Engineer Tom Marshburn answers a reporter's question at a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel, on Tuesday, Dec. 18, 2012, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Launch of the Soyuz rocket is scheduled for December 19 and will send Marshburn, Roman Romanenko of ROSCOSMOS and Chris Hadfield of the Canadian Space Agency on a five-month mission aboard the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  18. Expedition 32 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-07-13

    Quarantined Expedition 32 JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) Flight Engineer Akihiko Hoshide, left, answers reporters questions from behind glass during a prelaunch press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel on Friday, July 13, 2012 in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Seated next to him is Soyuz Commander Yuri Malenchenko. The launch of the Soyuz spacecraft with Hoshide, Malenchenko, and NASA Flight Engineer Sunita Williams is scheduled for 8:40 a.m. local time on Sunday, July 15. Photo Credit (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  19. Expedition 34 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-12-18

    Expedition 34/35 Flight Engineer and Expedition 35 Commander Chris Hadfield of the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) answers a reporter's question at a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel, on Tuesday, Dec. 18, 2012, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Launch of the Soyuz rocket is scheduled for December 19 and will send Hadfield, Tom Marshburn of NASA and Roman Romanenko of ROSCOSMOS on a five-month mission aboard the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  20. Expedition 33 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-10-22

    Expedition 33 Soyuz Commander Oleg Novitskiy answers a reporters question during a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel, on Monday, October 22, 2012, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Launch of the Soyuz rocket is scheduled for October 23 and will send Expedition 33/34 Flight Engineer Kevin Ford of NASA, Soyuz Commander Oleg Novitskiy and Flight Engineer Evgeny Tarelkin of ROSCOSMOS on a five-month mission aboard the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  1. Expedition 32 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-07-13

    Quarantined Expedition 32 Soyuz Commander Yuri Malenchenko, right, answers reporters questions from behind glass during a prelaunch press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel on Friday, July 13, 2012 in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Seated next to him is JAXA Flight Engineer Akihiko Hoshide. The launch of the Soyuz spacecraft with Malenchenko, NASA Flight Engineer Sunita Williams and Hoshide is scheduled for 8:40 a.m. local time on Sunday, July 15. Photo Credit (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  2. Expedition 37 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-09-24

    Expedition 37 NASA Flight Engineer Michael Hopkins answers a reporter's question at a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel, on Tuesday, Sept. 24, 2013, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Launch of the Soyuz rocket is scheduled for September 26 and will send Hopkins, Soyuz Commander Oleg Kotov and Russian Flight Engineer Sergei Ryazansky on a five and a half-month mission aboard the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  3. Expedition 37 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-09-24

    Expedition 37 backup crewmember Alexander Skvortsov anwers a reporter’s question at a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel, on Tuesday, Sept. 24, 2013, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Launch of the Soyuz rocket is scheduled for September 26 and will send Kotov, Hopkins and Ryazansky on a five and a half-month mission aboard the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  4. Astrobiology Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-12-02

    Steven Benner, a distinguished fellow at the Foundation for Applied Molecular Evolution, speaks during a press conference, Thursday, Dec. 2, 2010, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. NASA-funded astrobiology research has changed the fundamental knowledge about what comprises all known life on Earth. Researchers conducting tests in the harsh environment of Mono Lake in California have discovered the first known microorganism on Earth able to thrive and reproduce using the toxic chemical arsenic. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  5. Astrobiology Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-12-02

    Felisa Wolfe-Simon, a lead researcher and NASA astrobiology research fellow, speaks during a press conference, Thursday, Dec. 2, 2010, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. NASA-funded astrobiology research has changed the fundamental knowledge about what comprises all known life on Earth. Researchers conducting tests in the harsh environment of Mono Lake in California have discovered the first known microorganism on Earth able to thrive and reproduce using the toxic chemical arsenic. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  6. Astrobiology Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-12-02

    Felisa Wolfe-Simon, director, Astrobiology Program, NASA Headquarters, speaks during a press conference, Thursday, Dec. 2, 2010, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. NASA-funded astrobiology research has changed the fundamental knowledge about what comprises all known life on Earth. Researchers conducting tests in the harsh environment of Mono Lake in California have discovered the first known microorganism on Earth able to thrive and reproduce using the toxic chemical arsenic. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  7. Astrobiology Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-12-02

    Pamela Conrad, an astrobiologist from Goddard Space Flight Center, speaks during a press conference, Thursday, Dec. 2, 2010, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. NASA-funded astrobiology research has changed the fundamental knowledge about what comprises all known life on Earth. Researchers conducting tests in the harsh environment of Mono Lake in California have discovered the first known microorganism on Earth able to thrive and reproduce using the toxic chemical arsenic. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  8. Expedition 38 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-06

    Expedition 38 backup crew member Reid Wiseman of NASA is seen in quarantine, behind glass, during the final press conference held a day ahead of the launch of Expedition 38 prime crew members; Flight Engineer Koichi Wakata of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Soyuz Commander Mikhail Tyurin of Roscosmos, and, Flight Engineer Rick Mastracchio of NASA, to the International Space Station, Wednesday, Nov. 6, 2013 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  9. Expedition 41 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-24

    NASA Expedition 41 backup crew member Flight Engineer Scott Kelly of NASA answers a question during a press conference Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Expedition 41 Flight Engineer Barry Wilmore of NASA, Soyuz Commander Alexander Samokutyaev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), and Flight Engineer Elena Serova of Roscosmos are set to launch Sept. 26 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  10. Expedition 38 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-06

    Expedition 38 Soyuz Commander Mikhail Tyurin of Roscosmos, right, talks as Flight Engineer Koichi Wakata of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, listens, from quarantine behind glass, during the final press conference held a day ahead of their launch with fellow crew mate, Flight Engineer Rick Mastracchio of NASA, to the International Space Station, Wednesday, Nov. 6, 2013 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  11. Expedition 38 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-06

    Expedition 38 Flight Engineer Koichi Wakata of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency is seen in quarantine, behind glass, during the final press conference held a day ahead of his launch with fellow crew mates, Expedition 38 Soyuz Commander Mikhail Tyurin of Roscosmos, and, Flight Engineer Rick Mastracchio of NASA, to the International Space Station, Wednesday, Nov. 6, 2013 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  12. Expedition 41 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-24

    Expedition 41 Flight Engineer Barry Wilmore of NASA answers a question during a press conference on Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Launch of the Soyuz rocket is scheduled for Sept. 26 and will carry Wilmore, Elena Serova of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), and Alexander Samokutyaev of Roscosmos into orbit to begin their five and a half month mission on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  13. Expedition 38 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-06

    Expedition 38 Soyuz Commander Mikhail Tyurin of Roscosmos is seen in quarantine behind glass during the final press conference held a day ahead of his launch with fellow crew mates, Flight Engineer Koichi Wakata of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, and, Flight Engineer Rick Mastracchio of NASA, to the International Space Station, Wednesday, Nov. 6, 2013 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  14. Expedition 38 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-06

    Expedition 38 backup crew member Alexander Gerst of the European Space Agency is seen in quarantine, behind glass, during the final press conference held a day ahead of the launch of Expedition 38 prime crew members; Flight Engineer Koichi Wakata of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Soyuz Commander Mikhail Tyurin of Roscosmos, and, Flight Engineer Rick Mastracchio of NASA, to the International Space Station, Wednesday, Nov. 6, 2013 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  15. Kepler Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-08-05

    William Bo-Ricki, Kepler principal investigator at NASA's Ames Research Center, speaks during a press conference, Thursday, Aug. 6, 2009, at NASA Headquarters in Washington about the scientific observations coming from the Kepler spacecraft that was launched this past March. Kepler is NASA's first mission that is capable of discovering earth-sized planets in the habitable zones of stars like our Sun. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  16. Kepler Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-08-05

    Jon Morse, NASA's Astrophysics Division Director, left, speaks during a press conference, Thursday, Aug. 6, 2009, at NASA Headquarters in Washington about the scientific observations coming from the Kepler spacecraft that was launched this past March asWilliam Bo-Ricki, Kepler principal investigator at NASA's Ames Research Center, looks on. Kepler is NASA's first mission that is capable of discovering earth-sized planets in the habitable zones of stars like our Sun. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  17. Kepler Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-08-05

    Sara Seager, Professor of Planetary Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, speaks during a press conference, Thursday, Aug. 6, 2009, at NASA Headquarters in Washington about the scientific observations coming from the Kepler spacecraft that was launched this past March. Kepler is NASA's first mission that is capable of discovering earth-sized planets in the habitable zones of stars like our Sun. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  18. MAVEN Press Briefing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-10-28

    Bruce Jakosky, MAVEN principal investigator, University of Colorado Boulder Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, discusses the upcoming launch of the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) mission, at a press conference at NASA Headquarters in Washington on Monday, Oct. 28th, 2013. MAVEN is the agency's next mission to Mars and the first devoted to understanding the upper atmosphere of the Red Planet. (Photo credit: NASA/Jay Westcott)

  19. STEREO Press Briefing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-08-17

    Madhulika Guhathakurta, seated left, STEREO program scientist, speaks during a press briefing, Thursday, Aug. 18, 2011, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. The briefing was held to discusses new details about the structure of solar storms and the impact they have on Earth. The new information comes from NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory, or STEREO, spacecraft and other NASA probes. Photo Credit: (NASA/GSFC/Rebecca Roth)

  20. STEREO Press Briefing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-08-17

    Alysha Reinard, as research scientist with National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the University of Colorado Boulder, speaks during a press briefing, Thursday, Aug. 18, 2011, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. The briefing was held to discusses new details about the structure of solar storms and the impact they have on Earth. The new information comes from NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory, or STEREO, spacecraft and other NASA probes. Photo Credit: (NASA/GSFC/Rebecca Roth)

  1. Expedition 41 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-24

    Expedition 41 prime crew members, Flight Engineer Barry Wilmore of NASA, left, Soyuz Commander Alexander Samokutyaev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), center, and Flight Engineer Elena Serova of Roscosmos, right, pose for a photo at the conclusion of the press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan on Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014. Their mission to the International Space Station is set to launch Sept. 26 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  2. Expedition 52 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-10

    Expedition 52 prime and backup crews: Paolo Nespoli of ESA, left, Randy Bresnik of NASA, Sergey Ryazanskiy of Roscosmos, Alexander Misurkin of Roscosmos, Norishige Kanai of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and, Mark Vande Hei of NASA pose for group photograph at the conclusion of their crew press conference at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC), Monday, July 10, 2017 in Star City, Russia. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  3. Expedition 40 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-27

    Expedition 40 Flight Engineer Alexander Gerst of the European Space Agency, ESA, left, Soyuz Commander Maxim Suraev of the Russian Federal Space Agency, Roscosmos, center, and Flight Engineer Reid Wiseman of NASA, right, wave to those gathered at the conclusion of a press conference, Tuesday, May 27, 2014, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission to the International Space Station is set to launch May 29 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Joel Kowsky)

  4. Expedition 42 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-22

    Expedition 42 Flight Engineer Terry Virts of NASA (left), Soyuz Commander Anton Shkaplerov of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) (center), and Flight Engineer Samantha Cristoforetti of the European Space Agency (right), pose for a photo at the conclusion of the press conference, Saturday, Nov. 22, 2014, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission to the International Space Station is set to launch Nov. 24 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  5. Expedition 40 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-27

    Expedition 40 Flight Engineer Alexander Gerst of the European Space Agency, ESA, left, Soyuz Commander Maxim Suraev of the Russian Federal Space Agency, Roscosmos, center, and Flight Engineer Reid Wiseman of NASA, right, pose for a picture at the conclusion of a press conference, Tuesday, May 27, 2014, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission to the International Space Station is set to launch May 29 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Joel Kowsky)

  6. Expedition 41 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-24

    Expedition 41 Flight Engineer Barry Wilmore of NASA, left, Soyuz Commander Alexander Samokutyaev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), center, and Flight Engineer Elena Serova of Roscosmos, right, wave to the crowd at the conclusion of the press conference, Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission to the International Space Station is set to launch Sept. 26 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  7. MAVEN Press Briefing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-10-28

    John Grunsfeld, associate administrator for the Science Mission Directorate, NASA Headquarters, Washington, introduces a panel to discuss the upcoming launch of the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) mission, at a press conference at NASA Headquarters in Washington on Monday, Oct. 28th, 2013. MAVEN is the agency's next mission to Mars and the first devoted to understanding the upper atmosphere of the Red Planet. (Photo credit: NASA/Jay Westcott)

  8. MAVEN Press Briefing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-10-28

    John Grunsfeld, associate administrator for the Science Mission Directorate, NASA Headquarters, Washington, discusses the upcoming launch of the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) mission, at a press conference at NASA Headquarters in Washington on Monday, Oct. 28th, 2013. MAVEN is the agency's next mission to Mars and the first devoted to understanding the upper atmosphere of the Red Planet. (Photo credit: NASA/Jay Westcott)

  9. MAVEN Press Briefing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-10-28

    David Mitchell, MAVEN project manager, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, discusses the upcoming launch of the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) mission, at a press conference at NASA Headquarters in Washington on Monday, Oct. 28th, 2013. MAVEN is the agency's next mission to Mars and the first devoted to understanding the upper atmosphere of the Red Planet. (Photo credit: NASA/Jay Westcott)

  10. Kepler Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-08-05

    Alan Boss, an astrophyscist at the Carnegie Institution at the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism speaks during a press conference, Thursday, Aug. 6, 2009, at NASA Headquarters in Washington about the scientific observations coming from the Kepler spacecraft that was launched this past March. Kepler is NASA's first mission that is capable of discovering earth-sized planets in the habitable zones of stars like our Sun. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  11. 37. PRESSING TILES FROM PLASTER MOLDS, USING A HAND PRESS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. PRESSING TILES FROM PLASTER MOLDS, USING A HAND PRESS CONSTRUCTED IN 1986. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  12. Expedition 18 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-10-10

    Expedition 18 Commander Michael Fincke answers reporters' questions during a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel, Saturday, Oct. 11, 2008, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Fincke will launch on the Soyuz TMA-13 spacecraft along with Expedition 18 Flight Engineer Yuri V. Lonchakov and American spaceflight participant Richard Garriott on Oct. 12 and dock with the International Space Station on Oct. 14. Fincke and Lonchakov will spend six months on the station, while Garriott will return to Earth Oct. 24 with two of the Expedition 17 crew members currently on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  13. Expedition 18 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-10-10

    American spaceflight participant Richard Garriott, left, and Expedition 18 Commander Michael Fincke answer reporters' questions during a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel, Saturday, Oct. 11, 2008, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Garriott and Fincke will launch on the Soyuz TMA-13 spacecraft along with Expedition 18 Flight Engineer Yuri V. Lonchakov on Oct. 12 and dock with the International Space Station on Oct. 14. Fincke and Lonchakov will spend six months on the station, while Garriott will return to Earth Oct. 24 with two of the Expedition 17 crew members currently on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  14. Expedition 18 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-10-10

    Expedition 18 Flight Engineer Yuri V. Lonchakov, right, Expedition 18 Commander Michael Fincke and American spaceflight participant Richard Garriott, left, pose for photographs after a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel, Saturday, Oct. 11, 2008, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The Expedition 18 crew will launch on the Soyuz TMA-13 spacecraft on Oct. 12 and dock with the International Space Station on Oct. 14. Fincke and Lonchakov will spend six months on the station, while Garriott will return to Earth Oct. 24 with two of the Expedition 17 crew members currently on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  15. Expedition 18 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-10-10

    The quarantined crew, from left, American spaceflight participant Richard Garriott, Expedition 18 Commander Michael Fincke, Flight Engineer Yuri V. Lonchakov, back up Expedition 18 Commander Gennady Padalka, Flight Engineer Mike Barratt and spaceflight participant Nik Halik answer reporters questions during a press conference at the Cosmonaut Hotel, Saturday, Oct. 11, 2008, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Fincke, Lonchakov and Garriott are scheduled to launch Oct. 12 and dock with the International Space Station on Oct. 14. Fincke and Lonchakov will spend six months on the station, while Garriott will return to Earth Oct. 24 with two of the Expedition 17 crew members currently on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  16. Expedition 18 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-10-10

    Expedition 18 Commander Michael Fincke, left, and Flight Engineer Yuri V. Lonchakov answer reporters' questions during a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel, Saturday, Oct. 11, 2008, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Fincke and Lonchakov will launch on the Soyuz TMA-13 spacecraft along with American spaceflight participant Richard Garriott on Oct. 12 and dock with the International Space Station on Oct. 14. Fincke and Lonchakov will spend six months on the station, while Garriott will return to Earth Oct. 24 with two of the Expedition 17 crew members currently on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  17. Expedition 18 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-10-10

    American spaceflight participant Richard Garriott answers reporters' questions during a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel, Saturday, Oct. 11, 2008, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Garriott will launch on the Soyuz TMA-13 spacecraft along with Expedition 18 Commander Michael Fincke and Flight Engineer Yuri V. Lonchakov on Oct. 12 and dock with the International Space Station on Oct. 14. Fincke and Lonchakov will spend six months on the station, while Garriott will return to Earth Oct. 24 with two of the Expedition 17 crew members currently on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  18. Expedition 18 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-10-10

    Expedition 18 Flight Engineer Yuri V. Lonchakov answers reporters' questions during a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel, Saturday, Oct. 11, 2008, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Lonchakov will launch on the Soyuz TMA-13 spacecraft along with Expedition 18 Commander Michael Fincke and American spaceflight participant Richard Garriott on Oct. 12 and dock with the International Space Station on Oct. 14. Fincke and Lonchakov will spend six months on the station, while Garriott will return to Earth Oct. 24 with two of the Expedition 17 crew members currently on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  19. Expedition 43 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-03-26

    Expedition 43 Russian cosmonaut Gennady Padalka of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) listens to a reporter’s question as he and, Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko of Roscosmos, and NASA Astronaut Scott Kelly participate in a crew press conference, Thursday, March 26, 2015, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Kelly, Kornienko, and Padalka launched to the International Space Station in the Soyuz TMA-16M spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan March 28, Kazakh time (March 27 Eastern time.) As the one-year crew, Kelly and Kornienko will return to Earth on Soyuz TMA-18M in March 2016. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  20. Expedition 43 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-03-26

    Expedition 43 Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) answers reporter’s questions as he and, Russian cosmonaut Gennady Padalka of Roscosmos, and NASA Astronaut Scott Kelly participate in a crew press conference, Thursday, March 26, 2015, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Kelly, Kornienko, and Padalka launched to the International Space Station in the Soyuz TMA-16M spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan March 28, Kazakh time (March 27 Eastern time.) As the one-year crew, Kelly and Kornienko will return to Earth on Soyuz TMA-18M in March 2016. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  1. Expedition 40 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-27

    Expedition 40 Soyuz Commander Maxim Suraev of the Russian Federal Space Agency, Roscosmos, second left, reacts as he is introduced during a press conference, Tuesday, May 27, 2014, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Expedition 40 Soyuz Commander Maxim Suraev of the Russian Federal Space Agency, Roscosmos, Flight Engineer Alexander Gerst of the European Space Agency, ESA, and Flight Engineer Reid Wiseman of NASA will launch aboard their Soyuz TMA-13M spacecraft on their mission to the International Space Station in the early hours of May 29. Photo Credit: (NASA/Joel Kowsky)

  2. Astrobiology Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-12-02

    Steven Benner, a distinguished fellow at the Foundation for Applied Molecular Evolution, right, speaks during a press conference as Mary Voytek, director of the Astrobiology Program at NASA looks on, Thursday, Dec. 2, 2010, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. NASA-funded astrobiology research has changed the fundamental knowledge about what comprises all known life on Earth. Researchers conducting tests in the harsh environment of Mono Lake in California have discovered the first known microorganism on Earth able to thrive and reproduce using the toxic chemical arsenic. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  3. Astrobiology Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-12-02

    Felisa Wolfe-Simon, a lead researcher and NASA astrobiology research fellow, speaks during a press conference, as Mary Voytek, Steven Benner and Pamela Conrad look on, Thursday, Dec. 2, 2010, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. NASA-funded astrobiology research has changed the fundamental knowledge about what comprises all known life on Earth. Researchers conducting tests in the harsh environment of Mono Lake in California have discovered the first known microorganism on Earth able to thrive and reproduce using the toxic chemical arsenic. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  4. Kepler Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-08-05

    William Bo-Ricki, Kepler principal investigator at NASA's Ames Research Center, second from left, speaks during a press conference, Thursday, Aug. 6, 2009, at NASA Headquarters in Washington about the scientific observations coming from the Kepler spacecraft that was launched this past March as Jon Morse, NASA's Astrophysics Division Director, left, looks on. Kepler is NASA's first mission that is capable of discovering earth-sized planets in the habitable zones of stars like our Sun. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  5. Kepler Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-08-05

    William Bo-Ricki, Kepler principal investigator at NASA's Ames Research Center, second from left, speaks during a press conference, Thursday, Aug. 6, 2009, at NASA Headquarters in Washington about the scientific observations coming from the Kepler spacecraft that was launched this past March. Others seated include Jon Morse, NASA's Astrophysics Director, Sara Seager, Professor of Planetary Science and Physics at MIT, and Alan Boss, an Astrophysicist at the Carnegie Institution at the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism in Washington, right. Kepler is NASA's first mission that is capable of discovering earth-sized planets in the habitable zones of stars like our Sun. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  6. Expedition 40 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-27

    Expedition 40 prime crew members Flight Engineer Alexander Gerst of the European Space Agency, ESA, far left, Soyuz Commander Maxim Suraev of the Russian Federal Space Agency, Roscosmos, second left, and Flight Engineer Reid Wiseman of NASA, center, pose for a picture with Expedition 40 backup crew members Flight Engineer Terry Virts of NASA, third right, Soyuz Commander Anton Shkaplerov of Roscosmos, and Flight Engineer Samantha Cristoforetti of ESA at the conclusion a press conference, Tuesday, May 27, 2014, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission to the International Space Station is set to launch May 29 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Joel Kowsky)

  7. Expedition 42 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-22

    Family visits with Expedition 42 Soyuz Commander Anton Shkaplerov of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) through glass at the conclusion of the press conference, Saturday, Nov. 22, 2014, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Launch of the Soyuz rocket is scheduled for Nov. 24 and will carry Shkaplerov, Flight Engineer Terry Virts of NASA , and Flight Engineer Samantha Cristoforetti of the European Space Agency into orbit to begin their five and a half month mission on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  8. Expedition 42 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-22

    Flight Engineer Samantha Cristoforetti of the European Space Agency (ESA) speaks with friends and family through glass at the conclusion of the press conference, Saturday, Nov. 22, 2014, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Launch of the Soyuz rocket is scheduled for Nov. 24 and will carry Cristoforetti, Flight Engineer Terry Virts of NASA , and Soyuz Commander Anton Shkaplerov of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) into orbit to begin their five and a half month mission on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  9. Expedition 41 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-24

    Expedition 41 prime crew members, Flight Engineer Barry Wilmore of NASA, right, Soyuz Commander Alexander Samokutyaev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), center, and Flight Engineer Elena Serova of Roscosmos, left, pose for a photo with items they will take with them to the International Space Station at the conclusion of the press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan on Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014. The mission is set to launch Sept. 26 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  10. Expedition 40 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-27

    A reflection of the audience can been seen in the quarantine glass as Expedition 40 Flight Engineer Alexander Gerst of the European Space Agency, ESA, left, Soyuz Commander Maxim Suraev of the Russian Federal Space Agency, Roscosmos, center, and Flight Engineer Reid Wiseman of NASA, right, pose for a group picture at the conclusion of a press conference, Tuesday, May 27, 2014, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission to the International Space Station is set to launch May 29 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Joel Kowsky)

  11. Kepler Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-08-05

    William Bo-Ricki, Kepler principal investigator at NASA's Ames Research Center, second from left, is joined by Jon Morse, left, Sara Seager, and Alan Boss while speaking at a press conference, Thursday, Aug. 6, 2009, at NASA Headquarters in Washington about the scientific observations coming from the Kepler spacecraft that was launched this past March. Kepler is NASA's first mission that is capable of discovering earth-sized planets in the habitable zones of stars like our Sun. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  12. Four Theories of the Press.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siebert, Fred S.; And Others

    A systematic understanding of the press requires an understanding of the social and political structures within which the press operates. This book discusses four theories that have determined the kind of press the Western world has had: authoritarian, libertarian, socially responsible, and Soviet communist. Each chapter discusses press…

  13. MAVEN Press Briefing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-10-28

    L-R: Dwayne Brown, NASA Public Affairs Officer, Jim Green, director, Planetary Science Division, NASA Headquarters, Lisa May, MAVEN program executive, NASA Headquarters, Kelly Fast, MAVEN program scientist, NASA Headquarters, Bruce Jakosky, MAVEN principal investigator, University of Colorado Boulder Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, and David Mitchell, MAVEN project manager, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. discuss the upcoming launch of the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) mission, at a press conference at NASA Headquarters in Washington on Monday, Oct. 28th, 2013. MAVEN is the agency's next mission to Mars and the first devoted to understanding the upper atmosphere of the Red Planet. (Photo credit: NASA/Jay Westcott)

  14. MAVEN Press Briefing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-10-28

    L-R: Jim Green, director, Planetary Science Division, NASA Headquarters, Lisa May, MAVEN program executive, NASA Headquarters, Kelly Fast, MAVEN program scientist, NASA Headquarters, Bruce Jakosky, MAVEN principal investigator, University of Colorado Boulder Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, and David Mitchell, MAVEN project manager, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. are applauded at the end of a panel discussion on the upcoming launch of the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) mission, at a press conference at NASA Headquarters in Washington on Monday, Oct. 28th, 2013. MAVEN is the agency's next mission to Mars and the first devoted to understanding the upper atmosphere of the Red Planet. (Photo credit: NASA/Jay Westcott)

  15. Expedition 38 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-06

    Expedition 38 Flight Engineer Koichi Wakata of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency is seen in quarantine, behind glass, during the final press conference held a day ahead of his launch with fellow crew mates, Expedition 38 Soyuz Commander Mikhail Tyurin of Roscosmos, and, Flight Engineer Rick Mastracchio of NASA, to the International Space Station, Wednesday, Nov. 6, 2013 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. An Olympic torch that will be launched with the crew for a four-day visit to the station is seen on the left. The torch will return to Earth with another trio of station residents on Nov. 11 and will be part of the torch relay that ends with the lighting of the flame at the Fisht Stadium in Sochi, Russia Feb. 7 to mark the opening of the 2014 Winter Olympics. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  16. Expedition 38 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-06

    Expedition 38 Flight Engineer Rick Mastracchio of NASA talks, while in quarantine behind glass, during the final press conference held a day ahead of his launch with fellow crew mates, Soyuz Commander Mikhail Tyurin of Roscosmos, and, Flight Engineer Koichi Wakata of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, to the International Space Station, Wednesday, Nov. 6, 2013 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. An Olympic torch that will be launched with the crew for a four-day visit to the station is seen next to Mastracchio. The torch will return to Earth with another trio of station residents on Nov. 11 and will be part of the torch relay that ends with the lighting of the flame at the Fisht Stadium in Sochi, Russia Feb. 7 to mark the opening of the 2014 Winter Olympics. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  17. VIEW OF THE INSTALLATION OF AN EXTRUSION PRESS IN THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF THE INSTALLATION OF AN EXTRUSION PRESS IN THE HIGH BAY AREA OF BUILDING 865. THE EXTRUSION PRESS WAS USED TO PRODUCE CYLINDRICAL BARS, HOLLOW TUBES, AND SHAPES WITH IRREGULAR CROSS-SECTIONS BY FORCING PREHEATED METAL THROUGH A DIE ORIFICE UNDER HIGH PRESSURE. (5/22/70) - Rocky Flats Plant, Metal Research & Development Laboratory, South of Central Avenue at south end of terminus of Ninth Avenue, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  18. CIDER PRESS, LOOKING SOUTHEAST ACROSS THE SCHUYLKILL RIVER. THIS PRESS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CIDER PRESS, LOOKING SOUTHEAST ACROSS THE SCHUYLKILL RIVER. THIS PRESS, CARVED OUT OF A LARGE BOULDER AT THE RIVERS EDGE, PROBABLY DATES FROM THE LIFETIME OF JOHN BARTRAM, IF NOT TO THE SWEDISH SETTLERS BEFORE HIM. THE IRON FENCE IS A NINETEENTH-CENTURY ADDITION - John Bartram House & Garden, 54th Street & Lindbergh Boulevard, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  19. PRESS SHOP. SEVEN BLISS PRESSES STAMP OUT A VARIETY OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PRESS SHOP. SEVEN BLISS PRESSES STAMP OUT A VARIETY OF CARTRIDGE AND SHELL CASINGS. THIS DEPARTMENT WAS TRANSFORMED FROM A MONEY-LOSING OPERATION TO A PROFIT CENTER UNDER THE FIRST WORKER-MANAGED QUALITY CIRCLE IN THE PLANT. - American Brass Foundry, 70 Sayre Street, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  20. Commercial Human Spaceflight Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-02

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden speaks during a press conference, Tuesday, Feb. 2, 2010, at the National Press Club in Washington, where it was announced that NASA has awarded $50 million through funded agreements to further the commercial sector's capability to support transport of crew to and from low Earth orbit. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  1. Commercial Human Spaceflight Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-02

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden's reflection is seen in a TV monitor during a press conference, Tuesday, Feb. 2, 2010, at the National Press Club in Washington, where it was announced that NASA has awarded $50 million through funded agreements to further the commercial sector's capability to support transport of crew to and from low Earth orbit. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  2. Commercial Human Spaceflight Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-02

    Mike Gass, President and Chief Executive, United Launch Alliance is seen during a press conference, Tuesday, Feb. 2, 2010, at the National Press Club in Washington, where it was announced that NASA has awarded $50 million through funded agreements to further the commercial sector's capability to support transport of crew to and from low Earth orbit. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  3. Commercial Human Spaceflight Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-02

    Jane Poynter, President and Chair, Paragon Space Development Corp. is seen during a press conference, Tuesday, Feb. 2, 2010, at the National Press Club in Washington, where it was announced that NASA has awarded $50 million through funded agreements to further the commercial sector's capability to support transport of crew to and from low Earth orbit. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  4. Commercial Human Spaceflight Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-02

    Robert Millman of Blue Origin is seen during a press conference, Tuesday, Feb. 2, 2010, at the National Press Club in Washington, where it was announced that NASA has awarded $50 million through funded agreements to further the commercial sector's capability to support transport of crew to and from low Earth orbit. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  5. Commercial Human Spaceflight Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-02

    Brewster Shaw, VP and General Manager, NASA Systems, Boeing is seen during a press conference, Tuesday, Feb. 2, 2010, at the National Press Club in Washington, where it was announced that NASA has awarded $50 million through funded agreements to further the commercial sector's capability to support transport of crew to and from low Earth orbit. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  6. The CIA and the Press.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carvalho, Bernardo A.

    The involvement of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) with both United States and foreign news media has been recorded in numerous publications. This report reviews the important aspects of the CIA-press relationships as they have appeared in print and discusses the implications of these relationsihps for the credibility of the press. Media…

  7. Press Secretaries: A Brief Look.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Hines E., III

    The role of press secretary has attained a new significance during the past ten years because of presidential efforts to concentrate the focus of news on the White House. Originally intended to serve the public, the press secretary is now an important government official who not only conveys information but also explains and defends presidential…

  8. The Chilean Press Since Allende.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knudson, Jerry W.

    Based on interviews with 19 Chilean editors, government officials, heads of professional associations, and journalism education directors, this paper deals with the role of the press in Chile and with its future under the current military government. Following a review of the events concerning press control and censorship that followed the…

  9. Instabilities of Charged Polyampholytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kardar, Mehran

    1996-03-01

    We consider polymers formed from a (quenched) random sequence of charged monomers of opposite signs. Such polymers, known as polyampholytes (PAs), are compact when completely neutral and expanded when highly charged.footnote Y. Kantor and M. Kardar, Europhys. Lett. 27, 643 (1994). We examine the transition between the two regimes by Monte Carlo simulations, exact enumeration studies, and by analogies to charged drops. We find that the overall excess charge, Q, is the main determinant of the size of the PA. A polymer composed of N charges of ± q0 is compact for Qshape instability of a charged drop. A uniform excess charge causes the breakup of a fluid drop. We speculate that a uniformly charged polymer stretches out to a necklace shape. The inhomogeneities in charge distort the shape away from an ordered necklace.footnote Y. Kantor and M. Kardar, Phys. Rev. E 51, 1299 (1995).

  10. Expedition 21 Prelaunch Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-09-28

    Expedition 21 Flight Engineer Jeffrey N. Williams answers questions from behind glass during a press conference on Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2009 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  11. Orion L-1 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-12-03

    In the Kennedy Space Center’s Press Site auditorium, members of the news media listen as agency and industry leaders updated progress as the Orion spacecraft and its Delta IV Heavy rocket were being prepared for launch.

  12. Hubble Servicing Mission Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-04-22

    Mike Klenlen, the Hubble Deputy Project Manager, speaks during a press conference on the upcoming Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission, Thursday, April 23, 2009, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul. E. Alers)

  13. Hubble Servicing Mission Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-04-22

    Preston Burch, Hubble Program Manager, speaks during a press conference on the upcoming Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission, Thursday, April 23, 2009, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul. E. Alers)

  14. The Press Research Centre, 1956-1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Press Research Centre, Krakow (Poland).

    In 1956, the Press Research Centre was established in Cracow, Poland by a group of journalists and publishers, for the purpose of instituting press research that would have practical applications. The aims of the Centre were to conduct studies on the history of the Polish press, the contemporary press, press readership, and editorial techniques.…

  15. Commercial Human Spaceflight Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-02

    Assistant to the President for Science and Technology and Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy Dr. John P. Holdren speaks during a press conference, Tuesday, Feb. 2, 2010, at the National Press Club in Washington, where it was announced that NASA has awarded $50 million through funded agreements to further the commercial sector's capability to support transport of crew to and from low Earth orbit. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  16. Commercial Human Spaceflight Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-02

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden, left, and Assistant to the President for Science and Technology and Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy Dr. John P. Holdren are seen during a press conference, Tuesday, Feb. 2, 2010, at the National Press Club in Washington, where it was announced that NASA has awarded $50 million through funded agreements to further the commercial sector's capability to support transport of crew to and from low Earth orbit. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  17. Commercial Human Spaceflight Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-02

    Mark Sirangelo, VP and Chair, SNC Space Systems Board, Sierra Nevada Corp. is seen during a press conference, Tuesday, Feb. 2, 2010, at the National Press Club in Washington, where it was announced that NASA has awarded $50 million through funded agreements to further the commercial sector's capability to support transport of crew to and from low Earth orbit. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  18. STS-102 Prelaunch Press Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Joel Wells, NASA Public Affairs, introduces Ron Dittemore, NASA Shuttle Program Manager, Tommy Holloway, NASA International Space Station Program Manager, Dave King, NASA Director of Shuttle Processing, and Captain Clif Stargardt, US Air Force Meteorologist, in this STS-102 prelaunch press conference. The men give an overview of the prelaunch processing for the Discovery Orbiter (such as the PRSD loading) and give a weather forecast for launch. They then answer questions from the press.

  19. The preparation, surface structure, zeta potential, surface charge density and photocatalytic activity of TiO2 nanostructures of different shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grover, Inderpreet Singh; Singh, Satnam; Pal, Bonamali

    2013-09-01

    Titania based nanocatalysts such as sodium titanates of different morphology having superior surface properties are getting wide importance in photocatalysis research. Despite having sodium (Na) contents and its high temperature synthesis (that generally deteriorate the photoreactivity), these Na-titanates often exhibit better photoactivity than P25-TiO2 catalyst. Hence, this work demonstrated the influence of crystal structure, BET surface area, surface charge, zeta potential (ζ) and metal loading on the photocatalytic activity of as-prepared sodium titanate nanotube (TNT) and titania nanorod (TNR). Straw like hollow orthorhombic-TNT (Na2Ti2O5·H2O) particles (W = 9-12 nm and L = 82-115 nm) and rice like pure anatase-TNR particles (W = 8-13 nm and L = 81-134 nm) are obtained by the hydrothermal treatment of P25-TiO2 with NaOH, which in fact, altered the net surface charge of TNT and TNR particles. The observed ζ = -2.82 (P25-TiO2), -13.5 (TNT) and -22.5 mV (TNR) are significantly altered by the Ag and Cu deposition. It has been found here that TNT displayed best photocatalytic activity for the imidacloprid insecticide (C9H10ClN5O2) degradation to CO2 formation under UV irradiation because of its largest surface area 176 m2 g-1 among the catalysts studied.

  20. Training Guidelines: Hand Blowing, Pressing, & Shaping of Glass.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ceramics, Glass, and Mineral Products Industry Training Board, Harrow (England).

    This manual of training guidelines describes the procedure for personnel intake and traces the training process which a worker must go through to become a glass craftsman. A number of charts present the skills and items of knowledge which the individual craftsman must master. Examples are included of theoretical and practical test items to certify…

  1. The Conscientious American Press: Shaping the American Psyche.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, John D.

    1982-01-01

    An essay on the responsibilities of news media discusses the priorities of network news coverage, distorted editing, and the need for consumer awareness and concern about mass media inadequacies. (FG)

  2. A comparison of impulse drying to double felted pressing on pilot- scale shoe presses and roll presses

    SciTech Connect

    Orloff, D.I.

    1992-08-01

    Pilot-scale shoe press and roll press experiments have been conducted to compare impulse drying and double felted pressing. Both ceramic coated and Beloit Type C press rolls have been evaluated. The experiments show that impulse drying can provide significantly higher outgoing solids than double felled pressing at the same impulse. For example, at an impulse of 0.234 MPa seconds (34 psi seconds), sheets at an ingoing solids of 52% were impulse dried (using the Beloit Type C press roll) to 68% solids while optimized double felled pressing could only yield press dryness of, at most, 60%.

  3. Investing in a Large Stretch Press

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choate, M.; Nealson, W.; Jay, G.; Buss, W.

    1986-01-01

    Press for forming large aluminum parts from plates provides substantial economies. Study assessed advantages and disadvantages of investing in large stretch-forming press, and also developed procurement specification for press.

  4. Interpretative repertoires that shape low-income African American women's reproductive health care seeking: "don't want to know" and "taking charge of your health".

    PubMed

    Golden, Annis G; Pomerantz, Anita

    2015-01-01

    In the context of reproductive and sexual health, African American women have higher incidence of disease and poorer outcomes on key indicators when compared with White women. In this study, we used discourse analysis to identify and examine the workings of two clusters of interpretive resources ("interpretative repertoires") associated with reproductive/sexual health care seeking among low-income African American women who participated in semistructured interviews as part of a health promotion initiative. Interpretative repertoires are ways of accounting for engaging in or refraining from engaging in actions, which are shared by people in a community. We labeled the two interpretative repertoires "Don't Want to Know," and "Take Charge of Your Health." Within the "Don't Want to Know" repertoire, that testing would lead to threatening findings was assumed, a chain of devastating consequences was imagined, and a preference for uncertainty over certain knowledge was expressed. Conversely, the "Take Charge of Your Health" repertoire valued certainty over uncertainty, though in both interpretive frameworks, knowledge-based and emotion-based decision-making were intertwined. We conclude that health promotion initiatives--if they are to succeed in encouraging women to obtain valuable preventive health care services--must respond, in their choices of language and outreach strategies, to the expressed dilemma of wishing for reassurance but fearing bad news, to the intertwining of emotional reasoning and technorationality in health decision making, and to the particular relational experiences of African American women. Failure to do so will contribute to the continuation of reproductive and sexual health disparities.

  5. Method for hot press forming articles

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Robert R.; Hartsock, Dale L.

    1982-01-01

    This disclosure relates to an improved method for achieving the best bond strength and for minimizing distortion and cracking of hot pressed articles. In particular, in a method for hot press forming both an outer facing circumferential surface of and an inner portion of a hub, and of bonding that so-formed outer facing circumferential surface to an inner facing circumferential surface of a pre-formed ring thereby to form an article, the following improvement is made. Normally, in this method, the outside ring is restrained by a restraining sleeve of ring-shaped cross-section having an inside diameter. A die member, used to hot press form the hub, is so-formed as to have an outside diameter sized to engage the inside diameter of the restraining sleeve in a manner permitting relative movement therebetween. The improved method is one in which several pairs of matched restraining sleeve and die member are formed with each matched pair having a predetermined diameter. The predetermined diameter of each matched pair is different from another matched pair by stepped increments. The largest inside diameter of a restraining sleeve is equal to the diameter of the outer facing circumferential surface of the hub. Each pair of the matched restraining sleeve and die member is used to form an article in which an inside hub is bonded to an outside ring. The several samples so-formed are evaluated to determine which sample has the best bond formed between the hub and the ring with the least or no cracking or distortion in the ring portion of the article. Thereafter, the matched restraining sleeve and die member which form the article having the best bonding characteristics and least distortion cracking is then used for repeated formations of articles.

  6. Commercial Human Spaceflight Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-02

    From left, Jane Poynter, President and Chair, Paragon Space Development Corp., Brewster Shaw, VP and General Manager, NASA Systems, Boeing, Robert Millman of Blue Origin and Mike Gass, President and Chief Executive, United Launch Alliance are seen during a press conference, Tuesday, Feb. 2, 2010, at the National Press Club in Washington, where it was announced that NASA has awarded $50 million through funded agreements to further the commercial sector's capability to support transport of crew to and from low Earth orbit. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  7. Commercial Human Spaceflight Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-02

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden listens to his introduction by Assistant to the President for Science and Technology and Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy Dr. John P. Holdren during a press conference, Tuesday, Feb. 2, 2010, at the National Press Club in Washington, where it was announced that NASA has awarded $50 million through funded agreements to further the commercial sector's capability to support transport of crew to and from low Earth orbit. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  8. Apollo 13 Facts: Press Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Flight Director Gene Krantz gives an overview of the Apollo 13 mission as corrections are made in the power down checklist, passive thermal control, and orbital burns after the spacecraft runs into problems. He then answers questions from the press with the help of Tony England, Bill Peters, and Dick Thorson. Footage then shows newspaper headlines 'We're Not Concerned' and 'Getting Ready to Land' as people watch televisions to see if the astronauts landed safely. The press conference section of this video has sound, the headlines section does not.

  9. Apollo 13 Facts: Press Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Flight Director Gene Krantz gives an overview of the Apollo 13 mission as corrections are made in the power down checklist, passive thermal control, and orbital burns after the spacecraft runs into problems. He then answers questions from the press with the help of Tony England, Bill Peters, and Dick Thorson. Footage then shows newspaper headlines 'We're Not Concerned' and 'Getting Ready to Land' as people watch televisions to see if the astronauts landed safely. The press conference section of this video has sound, the headlines section does not.

  10. Hot isostatic pressing of intermetallic powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, R. J.; Kushner, B. G.

    The application of the intelligent processing of materials (IPM) approach to powder densification by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) is made possible by the development of in situ sensors, process models and adaptive control strategies. The challenge is to optimize the process schedule for new materials to achieve densification, shape and microstructural goals. The development of an IPM system for HIP of intermetallic powders is described. The primary sensor used in this system employs eddy currents to measure changes of sample dimensions, while the process model is that of Ashby et al., reformulated to more closely describe real materials in real HIP process cycles. Process cycles are developed by combining a knowledge base derived from experts with the process model refined by sensor measurements.

  11. STS-121/Discovery: Launch Readiness Press Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Participants in the briefing included: Bruce Buckingham (NASA Public Affairs), John Shannon (Chairman, Mission Management Team), Mike Suffredini (ISS Program Manager), Mike Leinbach (Shuttle Launch Director), Alan Thirkettle (ISS Program Manager, ESA) and 1st Lt. Kaleb Nordgen (USAF 45th Weather Squadron). There are no constraints to launch except for questionable weather. The crew is ready to go. PROGRESS has provided logistics and is ready to be installed. No cryogenics have been loaded because of a Phase 1 lightning advisory. The shuttle crew is in good shape, just waiting for the weather to clear. ISS is making preparations for the Columbus Mission and future plans are to increase the crew from 3 to 6 people. The floor was opened to questions from the press.

  12. Automation of a laboratory particleboard press

    Treesearch

    Robert L. Geimer; Gordon H. Stevens; Richard E. Kinney

    1982-01-01

    A manually operated particleboard press was converted to a fully automatic, programable system with updated data collection capabilities. Improved control has permitted observations of very small changes in pressing variables resulting in the development of a technique capable of reducing press times by 70 percent. Accurate control of the press is obtained through an...

  13. 7 CFR 550.29 - Press releases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Press releases. 550.29 Section 550.29 Agriculture... Program Management § 550.29 Press releases. Press releases or other forms of public notification will be... opportunity to review, in advance, all written press releases and any other written information to be...

  14. Rainbow over the Press Site

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-10

    As rain showers dissipate, a rainbow appeared over the Kennedy Space Center's Press Site and turn basin. In the foreground is the historic countdown clock. In the background, is Launch Pad 39B where agency's Space Launch System will launch astronauts aboard the Orion spacecraft to deep-space destinations such as an asteroid and Mars.

  15. The Schools and the Press.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Ann Chambers

    This book acquaints the school administrator with the need for good press relations and suggests ways to obtain such relations. A brief overview of the internal workings and concerns of a newspaper staff is presented. Methods of writing news copy for release and how to time releases for maximum news coverage are explained. Throughout the volume,…

  16. Expedition 21 Prelaunch Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-09-28

    Spaceflight Participant Guy Laliberté, left, and Expedition 21 Flight Engineer Maxim Suraev, talk to each other at the start of the press conference, Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2009 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  17. Expedition 21 Prelaunch Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-09-28

    Spaceflight Participant Guy Laliberté, left, Expedition 21 Flight Engineer Maxim Suraev, center, and Expedition 21 Flight Engineer Jeffrey N. Williams wave hello and point to members of their families at the start of the press conference, Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2009 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  18. Expedition 21 Prelaunch Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-09-28

    Spaceflight Participant Guy Laliberté, left, Expedition 21 Flight Engineer Maxim Suraev, center, and Expedition 21 Flight Engineer Jeffrey N. Williams pose for a group photograph at the end of the press conference, Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2009 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  19. Expedition 21 Prelaunch Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-09-28

    Backup Spaceflight Participant Barbara Barrett, left, backup Expedition 21 Commander Aleksandr Skvortsov, center, and backup Expedition 21 Flight Engineer Shannon Walker are seen during a press conference, Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2009 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  20. Gifted Education Press Quarterly, 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Maurice D., Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This document consists of the four issues of the newsletter "Gifted Education Press Quarterly" published during 1995. This newsletter addresses issues in the education of gifted children and youth. The major articles are: (1) "Using Today's Technology: Parents Can Help Challenge Gifted Children" (Adrienne O'Neill); (2)…

  1. The Alternative Press in Microform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsang, Daniel C.

    Presented is an analysis of what has been done regarding the preservation of alternative publications in microfilm. The alternative press was defined, for the purposes of this study, as "nonstandard, nonestablishment publications." Two projects undertaken to microfilm such publications, one by the Microphoto Division of Bell and Howell…

  2. Law and the Student Press.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, George E.; Webster, John B.

    Court cases and legal decisions involving the student press in the late 1960s and early 1970s are brought together in this book in order to show how the law has been applied to school officials and student journalists in high school, college, and the underground. The ten chapters cover the following topics: censorship, libel, obscenity, contempt,…

  3. Mars Observer Press Conference JPL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-08-01

    The Mars Observer mission spacecraft was primarily designed for exploring Mars and the Martian environment. The Mars Observer was launched on September 25, 1992. The spacecraft was lost in the vicinity of Mars on August 21, 1993 when the spacecraft began its maneuvering sequence for Martian orbital insertion. This videotape shows a press briefing, held after the spacecraft had not responded to attempts to communicate with it, to explain to the press the problems and the steps that were being taken to re-establish communication with the spacecraft. The communications had been shutdown prior to the orbital insertion burn to protect the instruments. At the time of the press conference, the communications system was still not operational, and attempts were being made to re-establish communication. Bob McMillan of the Public Affairs Office at JPL gives the initial announcement of the continuing communication problem with the spacecraft. Mr. McMillan introduces William Piotrowski, acting director of solar system exploration, who reiterates that there is indeed no communication with the Observer spacecraft. He is followed by Glenn Cunningham, the Project Manager of the Mars Observer who speaks about the attempts to re-establish contact. Mr. Cunningham is followed by Satenios Dallas, the Mission Manager for the Mars Observer Project, who speaks about the sequence of events leading up to the communication failure, and shows an animated video presenting the orbital insertion maneuvers. The briefing was then opened up for questions from the assembled press, both at JPL and at the other NASA Centers. The questions are about the possible reasons for the communication failure, and the attempts to restore communications with the spacecraft. Dr. Arden L. Albee, chief scientist for the Mars Observer Mission, joins the other panel members to answer questions. At the end of the press briefing the animation of the Mars orbital insertion is shown again.

  4. Mars Observer Press Conference JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Mars Observer mission spacecraft was primarily designed for exploring Mars and the Martian environment. The Mars Observer was launched on September 25, 1992. The spacecraft was lost in the vicinity of Mars on August 21, 1993 when the spacecraft began its maneuvering sequence for Martian orbital insertion. This videotape shows a press briefing, held after the spacecraft had not responded to attempts to communicate with it, to explain to the press the problems and the steps that were being taken to re-establish communication with the spacecraft. The communications had been shutdown prior to the orbital insertion burn to protect the instruments. At the time of the press conference, the communications system was still not operational, and attempts were being made to re-establish communication. Bob McMillan of the Public Affairs Office at JPL gives the initial announcement of the continuing communication problem with the spacecraft. Mr. McMillan introduces William Piotrowski, acting director of solar system exploration, who reiterates that there is indeed no communication with the Observer spacecraft. He is followed by Glenn Cunningham, the Project Manager of the Mars Observer who speaks about the attempts to re-establish contact. Mr. Cunningham is followed by Satenios Dallas, the Mission Manager for the Mars Observer Project, who speaks about the sequence of events leading up to the communication failure, and shows an animated video presenting the orbital insertion maneuvers. The briefing was then opened up for questions from the assembled press, both at JPL and at the other NASA Centers. The questions are about the possible reasons for the communication failure, and the attempts to restore communications with the spacecraft. Dr. Arden L. Albee, chief scientist for the Mars Observer Mission, joins the other panel members to answer questions. At the end of the press briefing the animation of the Mars orbital insertion is shown again.

  5. UK science press officers, professional vision and the generation of expectations

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Gabrielle; Williams, Clare; Gardner, John

    2015-01-01

    Science press officers can play an integral role in helping promote expectations and hype about biomedical research. Using this as a starting point, this article draws on interviews with 10 UK-based science press officers, which explored how they view their role as science reporters and as generators of expectations. Using Goodwin’s notion of ‘professional vision’, we argue that science press officers have a specific professional vision that shapes how they produce biomedical press releases, engage in promotion of biomedical research and make sense of hype. We discuss how these insights can contribute to the sociology of expectations, as well as inform responsible science communication. PMID:26265709

  6. UK science press officers, professional vision and the generation of expectations.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Gabrielle; Williams, Clare; Gardner, John

    2015-08-11

    Science press officers can play an integral role in helping promote expectations and hype about biomedical research. Using this as a starting point, this article draws on interviews with 10 UK-based science press officers, which explored how they view their role as science reporters and as generators of expectations. Using Goodwin's notion of 'professional vision', we argue that science press officers have a specific professional vision that shapes how they produce biomedical press releases, engage in promotion of biomedical research and make sense of hype. We discuss how these insights can contribute to the sociology of expectations, as well as inform responsible science communication.

  7. Commercial Human Spaceflight Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-02

    From left, Ken Bowersox, VP Astronaut Safety, SpaceX, David Thompson, CEO, Orbital Science Corporation, Mark Sirangelo, VP and Chair, SNC Space Systems Board, Sierra Nevada Corp., NASA Administrator Charles Bolden, Assistant to the President for Science and Technology and Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy Dr. John P. Holdren, Jane Poynter, President and Chair, Paragon Space Development Corp., Brewster Shaw, VP and General Manager, NASA Systems, Boeing, Robert Millman of Blue Origin, and, Mike Gass, President and Chief Executive, United Launch Alliance, pose for a group photo during a press conference, Tuesday, Feb. 2, 2010, at the National Press Club in Washington, where it was announced that NASA has awarded $50 million through funded agreements to further the commercial sector's capability to support transport of crew to and from low Earth orbit. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  8. Orion Post Scrub Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-12-04

    In the Kennedy Space Center’s Press Site auditorium, agency and industry leaders spoke to members of the news media about the postponement of the Orion Flight Test launch due to an issue related to fill and drain valves on the Delta IV Heavy rocket. From left are: Brandi Dean of NASA Public Affairs, Mark Geyer, NASA's Orion program manager, Mike Hawes, Lockheed Martin Orion Program manager, and Dan Collins, United Launch Alliance chief operating officer.

  9. Expedition 24 Prelaunch Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-06-13

    Expedition 24 European Space Agency back-up crew member Paolo Nespoli listens to a reporter’s question during a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan on Monday, June 14, 2010. The launch of the Soyuz spacecraft with Expedition 24 NASA Flight Engineers Shannon Walker and Douglas Wheelock, and Soyuz Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin is scheduled for Wednesday, June 16, 2010 at 3:35 a.m. Kazakhstan time. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  10. Expedition 22 Prelaunch Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-19

    Expedition Flight Engineer Timothy J. Creamer, left, Soyuz Commander Oleg Kotov of Russia, center, and Flight Engineer Soichi Noguchi of the Japan listen to a reporter's question during a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Saturday, Dec., 19, 2009. The launch of the Soyuz spacecraft with Creamer, Kotov, and Noguchi, is scheduled for Monday, Dec., 21, 2009 at 3:52a.m. Kazakhstan time. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  11. Expedition 21 Prelaunch Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-09-28

    Expedition 21 Flight Engineer Maxim Suraev, left, answers a reporter's question while looking at Expedition 21 Flight Engineer Jeffrey N. Williams during a press conference, Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2009 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Suraev is scheduled to launch onboard a Soyuz rocket to the International Space Station (ISS) with Williams and Spaceflight Participant Guy Laliberté on Wednesday, Sept. 30, 2009 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  12. Expedition 24 Prelaunch Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-06-13

    Expedition 24 Flight Engineer Doug Wheelock, left, answers a reporter’s question during a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, while Soyuz Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin looks on, Monday, June 14, 2010. The launch of the Soyuz spacecraft with Expedition 24 NASA Flight Engineers Shannon Walker and Douglas Wheelock, and Soyuz Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin is scheduled for Wednesday, June 16, 2010 at 3:35 a.m. Kazakhstan time. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  13. Expedition 31 Crew Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-05-14

    Quarantined Expedition 31 Flight Engineer Joe Acaba answers reporters questions from behind glass during a prelaunch press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel on Monday, May 14, 2012 in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The launch of the Soyuz spacecraft with Acaba, Soyuz Commander Gennady Padalka, and Flight Engineer Sergei Revin is scheduled for 9:01 a.m. local time on Tuesday, May 15. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  14. Expedition 21 Prelaunch Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-09-28

    Expedition 21 Flight Engineer Jeffrey N. Williams listens to a reporter's question at a press conference, Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2009 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Williams is scheduled to launch onboard a Soyuz rocket to the International Space Station (ISS) with Expedition 21 Flight Engineer Maxim Suraev and Spaceflight Participant Guy Laliberté on Wednesday, Sept. 30, 2009 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  15. Expedition 31 Crew Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-05-14

    Quarantined Expedition 31 Soyuz Commander Gennady Padalka answers reporters questions from behind glass during a prelaunch press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel on Monday, May 14, 2012 in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The launch of the Soyuz spacecraft with Padalka, Flight Engineer Sergei Revin of Russia, and prime NASA Flight Engineer Joe Acaba is scheduled for 9:01 a.m. local time on Tuesday, May 15. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  16. Expedition 21 Prelaunch Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-09-28

    Spaceflight Participant Guy Laliberté answers reporters questions at a press conference, Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2009 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Liberté is scheduled to launch with Expedition 21 Flight Engineer Maxim Suraev and Expedition 21 Flight Engineer Jeffrey N. Williams on Wednesday, Sept. 30, 2009 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on a Soyuz TMA-16 spacecraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  17. Expedition 21 Prelaunch Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-09-28

    Expedition 21 Flight Engineer Maxim Suraev listens to a reporter's question at a press conference, Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2009 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Suraev is scheduled to launch onboard a Soyuz rocket to the International Space Station (ISS) with Expedition 21 Flight Engineer Jeffrey N. Williams and Spaceflight Participant Guy Laliberté on Wednesday, Sept. 30, 2009 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  18. Expedition 22 Prelaunch Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-19

    Expedition 22 NASA Flight Engineer Timothy J. Creamer answers a reporter's question during a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Saturday, Dec., 19, 2009. The launch of the Soyuz spacecraft with Expedition 22 NASA Flight Engineer Timothy J. Creamer of the U.S., Soyuz Commander Oleg Kotov of Russia and Flight Engineer Soichi Noguchi of Japan, is scheduled for Monday, Dec., 21, 2009 at 3:52a.m. Kazakhstan time. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  19. Expedition 31 Crew Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-05-14

    Quarantined Expedition 31 Flight Engineer Sergei Revin of Russia answers reporters questions from behind glass during a prelaunch press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel on Monday, May 14, 2012 in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The launch of the Soyuz spacecraft with Revin, Soyuz Commander Gennady Padalka, and NASA Flight Engineer Joe Acaba is scheduled for 9:01 a.m. local time on Tuesday, May 15. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  20. Expedition 21 Prelaunch Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-09-28

    Spaceflight Participant Guy Laliberté holds a red clown nose while answering reporters' questions at a press conference, Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2009 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Laliberté is scheduled to launch with Expedition 21 Flight Engineer Maxim Suraev and Expedition 21 Flight Engineer Jeffrey N. Williams on Wednesday, Sept. 30, 2009 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on a Soyuz TMA-16 spacecraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  1. Expedition 21 Prelaunch Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-09-28

    Expedition 21 Flight Engineer Jeffrey N. Williams answers a reporter's question during a press conference, Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2009 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Williams is scheduled to launch onboard a Soyuz rocket to the International Space Station (ISS) with Expedition 21 Flight Engineer Maxim Suraev and Spaceflight Participant Guy Laliberté on Wednesday, Sept. 30, 2009 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  2. Expedition 23 Prelaunch Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-03-31

    Expedition 23 Flight Engineer Mikhail Kornienko answers a reporters' question during a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan on Thursday, April 1, 2010. The launch of the Soyuz spacecraft with Expedition 23 NASA Flight Engineer Mikhail Kornienko, Soyuz Commander Alexander Skvortsov and Flight Engineer Tracy Caldwell Dyson is scheduled for Friday, April 2, 2010 at 10:04 a.m. Kazakhstan time. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  3. Antares Post Launch Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-09-18

    Frank Culbertson, executive vice president, Orbital Sciences Corporation, talks during a press conference held after the successful launch of the Antares rocket, with the Cygnus cargo spacecraft aboard, Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013, NASA Wallops Flight Facility, Virginia. Cygnus is on its way to rendezvous with the space station. The spacecraft will deliver about 1,300 pounds (589 kilograms) of cargo, including food and clothing, to the Expedition 37 crew. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  4. Expedition 22 Prelaunch Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-19

    Expedition 22 Flight Engineer Soichi Noguchi answers a reporter's question during a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Saturday, Dec., 19, 2009. The launch of the Soyuz spacecraft with Expedition 22 NASA Flight Engineer Timothy J. Creamer of the U.S., Soyuz Commander Oleg Kotov of Russia and Flight Engineer Soichi Noguchi of Japan, is scheduled for Monday, Dec., 21, 2009 at 3:52a.m. Kazakhstan time. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  5. Expedition 22 Prelaunch Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-19

    Expedition 22 Soyuz Commander Oleg Kotov listens to a reporter's question during a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Saturday, Dec., 19, 2009. The launch of the Soyuz spacecraft with Expedition 22 NASA Flight Engineer Timothy J. Creamer of the U.S., Soyuz Commander Oleg Kotov of Russia and Flight Engineer Soichi Noguchi of Japan, is scheduled for Monday, Dec., 21, 2009 at 3:52a.m. Kazakhstan time. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  6. STS-97 Prelaunch Press Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Bruce Buckingham, NASA Public Affairs, introduces Ron Dittemore, NASA Shuttle Program Manager, Bob Cabana, International Space Station (ISS) Manager, International Operations, NASA, Michael Vachon, Canadian Space Agency, David King, NASA Director of Shuttle Processing, and Lieutenant Ken Ferland, 45th Weather Squadron, US Air Force. They each give a brief statement on the STS-97 Endeavour mission, launch, and weather status and answer questions from the press.

  7. Apollo 11 preflight press conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The three prime crewmen of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission participate in a pre-flight press conference in the bldg 1 auditorium on July 5, 1969. Left to right, are Astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot; and Michael Collins, command module pilot. The box-like enclosure surrounding the three astronauts was part of elaborate precautions in effect to reduce the possibility of exposing the crewmen to infectious disease in the preflight period.

  8. Press Conference - First Gemini Astronauts

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1964-04-13

    S64-19466 (13 April 1964) --- A press conference was held in the Bldg. 1 auditorium at the NASA Manned Spacecraft Center to announce the first Gemini astronaut selections. Shown left to right are Paul Haney, MSC Public Affairs Officer (standing); astronauts Walter Schirra and Thomas Stafford; Dr. Robert Gilruth, director of MSC; astronauts Virgil Grissom and John Young; and Donald K. Slayton, assistant director of Flight Crew Operations at MSC.

  9. Antares Post Launch Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-09-18

    Alan Lindenmoyer, program manager, NASA's Commercial Crew and Cargo Program, talks during a press conference held after the successful launch of the Orbital Sciences Corporation Antares rocket, with the Cygnus cargo spacecraft aboard, Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013, NASA Wallops Flight Facility, Virginia. Cygnus is on its way to rendezvous with the space station. The spacecraft will deliver about 1,300 pounds (589 kilograms) of cargo, including food and clothing, to the Expedition 37 crew. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  10. Hubble Servicing Mission Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-04-22

    Ed Weiler, Associate Administrator, Science Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters, seated second from left, speaks during a press conference on the upcoming Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission as David Leckrone, Hubble Project Scientist, Preston Burch and Mike Klenlen, seated right, look on, Thursday, April 23, 2009, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. J.D. Harrington, Public Affairs officer for the Science Mission Directorate looks on at left. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul. E. Alers)

  11. International Nurses Day and press coverage in South Africa.

    PubMed

    van Zyl, G S; Christofides, N J

    2014-06-01

    In some countries, nursing's appeal as a profession is diminishing, partly due to poor press coverage and the media's portrayal of an over-loaded, poorly paid profession. The media is important for shaping public perceptions and raising policy issues. International Nurses Day gives nurses an opportunity to profile their critical contribution to quality health care. To determine the influence of this commemorative day on press coverage about nursing by examining whether there was a difference in the proportion of South African press articles on nursing between January-April and May-June 2010. A quantitative content analysis was conducted of all press articles mentioning 'nursing' or 'nurse/s' in the South African lay press from 1 January-31 June 2010. Articles were coded for theme, slant and prominence, and inter-coder reliability was assessed. Descriptive statistics with chi square or Fisher's exact tests were used to compare the two time periods. We identified 242 articles in 95 publications. The month of May had almost double the press coverage of January. International Nurses Day articles were mainly positive, and appeared in May to June in weekly community publications rather than in daily national and regional newspapers. When they were excluded, most articles portrayed nursing negatively. The 6-month period may not be representative of the entire year. Only the dominant topic was coded, which possibly influenced the analysis. International Nurses Day positively influenced the extent and slant of press coverage. Efforts to sustain coverage beyond the event through strategic partnerships and media engagement should be strengthened. The media's portrayal of nurses and nursing may influence the choice of nursing as a career. International Nurses Day is an opportunity to portray nursing positively. Media training may help nurses to advocate for their profession in the media. © 2014 International Council of Nurses.

  12. PREPARATION OF METAL POWDER COMPACTS PRIOR TO PRESSING

    DOEpatents

    Mansfield, H.

    1958-08-26

    A method of fabricating uranium by a powder metallurgical technique is described. It consists in introducing powdered uranium hydride into a receptacle shaped to coincide with the coatour of the die cavity and heating the hydride so that it decomposes to uranium metal. The metal particles cohere in the shapw of the receptacle and thereafter the prefurmed metal powder is pressed and sintered to obtain a dense compact.

  13. 7 CFR 58.421 - Press.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... openings readily cleanable. The pressure device shall be the continuous type. Press cloths shall be maintained in good repair and in a sanitary condition. Single service press cloths shall be used only once....

  14. 7 CFR 58.421 - Press.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... openings readily cleanable. The pressure device shall be the continuous type. Press cloths shall be maintained in good repair and in a sanitary condition. Single service press cloths shall be used only once....

  15. 7 CFR 58.421 - Press.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... openings readily cleanable. The pressure device shall be the continuous type. Press cloths shall be maintained in good repair and in a sanitary condition. Single service press cloths shall be used only once....

  16. Orion L-1 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-12-03

    In the Kennedy Space Center’s Press Site auditorium, agency and industry leaders spoke to members of the news media as the Orion spacecraft and its Delta IV Heavy rocket were being prepared for launch. From left are: Brandi Dean of NASA Public Affairs, Mark Geyer, Orion program manager, Mike Hawes, Lockheed Martin Orion Program manager, Jeff Angermeier, Exploration Flight Test-1 Ground Systems Development and Operations mission manager, Ron Fortson, United Launch Alliance director of mission management, and Kathy Winters, U.S. Air Force 45th Space Wing Launch Weather officer.

  17. Mars Science Laboratory Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-22

    Michael Watkins (third from left), mission manager and project engineer, Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), Jet Propulsion Lab, Pasadena, Calif., speaks at a press conference at the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum on Friday, July 22, 2011 in Washington. From left to right, Watkins is joined by Dwayne Brown, NASA Headquarters public affairs officer; Michael Meyer, lead scientist Mars Exploration Program, NASA Headquarters; Watkins; John Grant, geologist, Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington; Dawn Sumner, geologist, University of California, Davis and John Grotzinger, MSL project scientist, JPL. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  18. Mars Science Laboratory Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-22

    John Grotzinger, Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) project scientist, Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL), Pasadena, Calif., answers a reporter's question at a press conference at the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum on Friday, July 22, 2011 in Washington. The MSL is scheduled to launch late this year from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida and land in August 2012. Curiosity is twice as long and more than five times as heavy as previous Mars rovers. The rover will study whether the landing region at Gale crater had favorable environmental conditions for supporting microbial life and for preserving clues about whether life ever existed. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  19. Mars Science Laboratory Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-22

    John Grotzinger, Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) project scientist, Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL), Pasadena, Calif., holds up a model of the MSL, or Curiosity, at a press conference at the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum on Friday, July 22, 2011 in Washington. The MSL is scheduled to launch late this year from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida and land in August 2012. Curiosity is twice as long and more than five times as heavy as previous Mars rovers. The rover will study whether the landing region at Gale crater had favorable environmental conditions for supporting microbial life and for preserving clues about whether life ever existed. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  20. Antares Post Launch Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-09-18

    Alan Lindenmoyer, program manager, NASA's Commercial Crew and Cargo Program, left, and, Frank Culbertson, executive vice president, Orbital Sciences Corporation,are seen during a press conference held after the successful launch of the Orbital Sciences Antares rocket, with the Cygnus cargo spacecraft aboard, Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013, NASA Wallops Flight Facility, Virginia. Cygnus is on its way to rendezvous with the space station. The spacecraft will deliver about 1,300 pounds (589 kilograms) of cargo, including food and clothing, to the Expedition 37 crew. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  1. Antares Post Launch Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-09-18

    Josh Byerly, public affairs officer, NASA, left, Robert Lightfoot, associate administrator, NASA, second from left, Alan Lindenmoyer, program manager, NASA's Commercial Crew and Cargo Program, and, Frank Culbertson, executive vice president, Orbital Sciences Corporation, right, are seen during a press conference held after the successful launch of the Antares rocket, with the Cygnus cargo spacecraft aboard, Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013, NASA Wallops Flight Facility, Virginia. Cygnus is on its way to rendezvous with the space station. The spacecraft will deliver about 1,300 pounds (589 kilograms) of cargo, including food and clothing, to the Expedition 37 crew. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  2. Expedition 22 Prelaunch Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-19

    Expedition 22 Soyuz Commander Oleg Kotov, left, answers a reporter's question as Flight Engineer Soichi Noguchi of the Japan looks on during a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Saturday, Dec., 19, 2009. The launch of the Soyuz spacecraft with Expedition 22 NASA Flight Engineer Timothy J. Creamer of the U.S., Soyuz Commander Oleg Kotov of Russia and Flight Engineer Soichi Noguchi of Japan, is scheduled for Monday, Dec., 21, 2009 at 3:52a.m. Kazakhstan time. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  3. Expedition 22 Prelaunch Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-19

    Expedition 22 Flight Engineer Soichi Noguchi of Japan, right, and backup crew member Satoshi Furakawa wave farewell to reporters and family after a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Saturday, Dec., 19, 2009. The launch of the Soyuz spacecraft with Expedition 22 NASA Flight Engineer Timothy J. Creamer of the U.S., Soyuz Commander Oleg Kotov of Russia and Flight Engineer Soichi Noguchi of Japan, is scheduled for Monday, Dec., 21, 2009 at 3:52a.m. Kazakhstan time. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  4. Expedition 22 Prelaunch Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-19

    Expedition 22 backup crew members, from left, NASA’s Doug Wheelock, Russian Anton Shkaplerov and Japan’s Satoshi Furakawa are seen during during a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Saturday, Dec., 19, 2009. The launch of the Soyuz spacecraft with Expedition 22 NASA Flight Engineer Timothy J. Creamer of the U.S., Soyuz Commander Oleg Kotov of Russia and Flight Engineer Soichi Noguchi of Japan, is scheduled for Monday, Dec., 21, 2009 at 3:52a.m. Kazakhstan time. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  5. Expedition 22 Prelaunch Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-19

    Expedition 22 Soyuz Commander Oleg Kotov, right, answers a reporter's question as Flight Engineer Timothy J. Creamer looks on during a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Saturday, Dec., 19, 2009. The launch of the Soyuz spacecraft with Expedition 22 NASA Flight Engineer Timothy J. Creamer of the U.S., Soyuz Commander Oleg Kotov of Russia and Flight Engineer Soichi Noguchi of Japan, is scheduled for Monday, Dec., 21, 2009 at 3:52a.m. Kazakhstan time. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  6. Mars Science Laboratory Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-22

    John Grant, geologist, Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington, speaks at a Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) press conference at the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum on Friday, July 22, 2011 in Washington. The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), or Curiosity, is scheduled to launch late this year from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida and land in August 2012. Curiosity is twice as long and more than five times as heavy as previous Mars rovers. The rover will study whether the landing region at Gale crater had favorable environmental conditions for supporting microbial life and for preserving clues about whether life ever existed. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  7. Mars Science Laboratory Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-22

    NASA chief scientist, Dr. Waleed Abdalati, speaks at a Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) press conference at the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum on Friday, July 22, 2011 in Washington. The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), or Curiosity, is scheduled to launch late this year from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida and land in August 2012. Curiosity is twice as long and more than five times as heavy as previous Mars rovers. The rover will study whether the landing region at Gale crater had favorable environmental conditions for supporting microbial life and for preserving clues about whether life ever existed. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  8. Mars Science Laboratory Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-22

    Dawn Sumner, geologist, University of California, Davis speaks at a Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) press conference at the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum on Friday, July 22, 2011 in Washington. The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), or Curiosity, is scheduled to launch late this year from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida and land in August 2012. Curiosity is twice as long and more than five times as heavy as previous Mars rovers. The rover will study whether the landing region at Gale crater had favorable environmental conditions for supporting microbial life and for preserving clues about whether life ever existed. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  9. Expedition 21 Prelaunch Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-09-28

    Spaceflight Participant Guy Laliberté, left, Expedition 21 Flight Engineer Maxim Suraev, center, and Expedition 21 Flight Engineer Jeffrey N. Williams reveal t-shirts showing their faces superimposed on characters from the Russian movie "White Sun of the Desert" at the end of the press conference, Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2009 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. It is tradition for all crews flying on the Soyuz to watch this movie several days before they launch. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  10. Yale University Press: Disseminating "Lux et Veritas"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrott, John B.

    2010-01-01

    America's university presses are situated within a network of over one hundred universities, learned societies, and scholarly associations. According to a pamphlet put out by the American Association of University Presses, these presses "make available to the broader public the full range and value of research generated by university faculty."…

  11. The Small Book Press: A Cultural Essential.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Bill

    1984-01-01

    Discussion of small literary book publishers notes works of small-press authors (Thomas Paine, Washington Irving, Walt Whitman, Mark Twain, Upton Sinclair, Anais Nin); today's outstanding presses (Creative Arts Book Company, Persea Books, Full Court Press, Reed and Cannon Company, Tuumba Books); and role of little magazines. Thirty-seven…

  12. 7 CFR 58.421 - Press.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Press. 58.421 Section 58.421 Agriculture Regulations... Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Equipment and Utensils § 58.421 Press. The cheese press should be constructed of stainless steel and all joints welded and all surfaces, seams...

  13. The Small Book Press: A Cultural Essential.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Bill

    1984-01-01

    Discussion of small literary book publishers notes works of small-press authors (Thomas Paine, Washington Irving, Walt Whitman, Mark Twain, Upton Sinclair, Anais Nin); today's outstanding presses (Creative Arts Book Company, Persea Books, Full Court Press, Reed and Cannon Company, Tuumba Books); and role of little magazines. Thirty-seven…

  14. Yale University Press: Disseminating "Lux et Veritas"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrott, John B.

    2010-01-01

    America's university presses are situated within a network of over one hundred universities, learned societies, and scholarly associations. According to a pamphlet put out by the American Association of University Presses, these presses "make available to the broader public the full range and value of research generated by university faculty."…

  15. Attention that Indicators Receive in the Press

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendriks, Maria; Barzano, Giovanna; Brumana, Emanuela; Cremonesi, Claudia

    2004-01-01

    With the release of each edition of Education at a Glance, the Office for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) prepares a press briefing to be used for the international press release and which individual countries in preparing their national press releases can also use. Similarly, the European Union prepares a summary, not for use at the…

  16. The Burger Court and the Press.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higdon, Philip R.

    This report discusses recent cases involving freedom of the press that have been heard before the Burger court of the United States Supreme Court. The report discerns a trend toward treating the press like an ordinary citizen; this is a reversal of the view of the Warren court that the First Amendment creates special rights for the press so that…

  17. Shaped Charge Jet Penetration of Discontinuous Media

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-07-01

    dimensional Computer Code 20L A96TRACT (Cidow on tevem sM N nmeaev and IlmttUy by block number) A computer study was made of the penetration by a copper ...operational at the Ballistic1Research Laboratory. These codes are OIL, 1 TOIL, 2 DORF, 3 and HELP,4 ,5 which are Eulerian formulated, and HEMP ,6 which...computer study of rod-target interaction consisted of a copper rod, or jet, impacting normally upon a steel plate which, in turn, was backed-up by a semi

  18. An Empirical Shaped Charge Jet Breakup Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) U.S. Army ARDEC, ESIC Knowledge & Process Management (RDAR-EIK) Picatinny Arsenal, NJ 07806-5000 10. SPONSOR...u Rx 2 2 (1) Where all parameters are defined at the moment of jet formation,  is a dimensionless parameter, ux is velocity

  19. CSA/ASC Press Briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Nicole Gignac, Senior Communications Advisor Canadian Space Agency (CSA), introduces the panel for this CSA/ASC press briefing. The panel consist of: Dr. Steve Maclean, CSA astronaut; Dr. Paul Cooper, Deputy General Manager, MacDonald, Dettwiler and Associates Ltd. (MDA); and Dr. Iain Christie, Director of Research and Development from NEPTEC. Maclean will fly on the STS-115 Mission in February of 2006. He presents pictures and talks about the crewmembers of the Space Shuttle Columbia and Space Shuttle Discovery. Maclean also discusses entry risks as it pertains to the leading edge wing of Discovery. Paul Cooper explains and shows a video presentation of Canadarm robotics. The briefing ends with Dr Christie explaining the sensitive three dimensional inspections are performed in space that looks for cracks in the leading edge wing of the Space Shuttle Discovery.

  20. Mars Science Laboratory Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-22

    Michael Watkins (right), mission manager and Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) engineer, Jet Propulsion Lab, Pasadena, Calif., speaks at a press conference, as Michael Meyer, Mars Exploration Program lead scientist looks on, at the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum on Friday, July 22, 2011 in Washington. The MSL, or Curiosity, is scheduled to launch late this year from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida and land in August 2012. Curiosity is twice as long and more than five times as heavy as previous Mars rovers. The rover will study whether the landing region at Gale crater had favorable environmental conditions for supporting microbial life and for preserving clues about whether life ever existed. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  1. [The press and family planning].

    PubMed

    Abraham De D'ornellas, R

    1987-01-01

    The treatment in the press of family planning hinges on two fundamental factors: the taboo of the leftist groups and the taboo of the Catholic Church, whose head is against abortion under any circumstances. Leftist views insinuate that family planning is the genocidal plan of North American imperialists against the Third World and, in particular, against Latin America. This genocidal plan is supposed to subject poor populations to international schemes. In the press family planning is often treated in a sanctimonious fashion, lumping it together with topics like pornography, sex, and violence. In 1983 the daily newspaper Expreso published a supplement running every week for almost three months about the issue of population, which dealt fairly extensively with such topics as population and housing, education, employment, and urban proliferation, as well as responsible parenthood and child survival. In addition, there was a detailed description of contraceptive methods. In October 1986 another surprising thing happened: the President of Peru talked about the topic of family planning, which at the time was an act of courage. Since then much has changed; the whole world is interested in family planning and certain aspects of population. Since October 1986 more has been published in this domain than during the preceding 20 years. In contrast, the Church reacted differently to this issue: after some initial caution, the conference of Peruvian bishops attacked all methods of modern contraceptives and private institutions of family planning. The information boom in family planning will certainly continue. At the moment this flood of articles and editorials about the issue is an expression of the anxiety of families related to uncontrolled reproduction and the fear of overpopulation in large cities devoid of minimal services.

  2. SHAPE Selection (SHAPES) enrich for RNA structure signal in SHAPE sequencing-based probing data.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Line Dahl; Kielpinski, Lukasz Jan; Salama, Sofie R; Krogh, Anders; Vinther, Jeppe

    2015-05-01

    Selective 2' Hydroxyl Acylation analyzed by Primer Extension (SHAPE) is an accurate method for probing of RNA secondary structure. In existing SHAPE methods, the SHAPE probing signal is normalized to a no-reagent control to correct for the background caused by premature termination of the reverse transcriptase. Here, we introduce a SHAPE Selection (SHAPES) reagent, N-propanone isatoic anhydride (NPIA), which retains the ability of SHAPE reagents to accurately probe RNA structure, but also allows covalent coupling between the SHAPES reagent and a biotin molecule. We demonstrate that SHAPES-based selection of cDNA-RNA hybrids on streptavidin beads effectively removes the large majority of background signal present in SHAPE probing data and that sequencing-based SHAPES data contain the same amount of RNA structure data as regular sequencing-based SHAPE data obtained through normalization to a no-reagent control. Moreover, the selection efficiently enriches for probed RNAs, suggesting that the SHAPES strategy will be useful for applications with high-background and low-probing signal such as in vivo RNA structure probing. © 2015 Poulsen et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  3. Deformation Mechanism of Zr702 Processed by Equal Channel Angular Pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, W. Q.; Yu, S. H.; Chun, Y. B.; Shin, D. H.; Hwang, S. K.

    2007-11-01

    Commercial purity zirconium (Zr702) was deformed by equal channel angular (ECA) pressing up to eight passes, and the resulting microstructure and texture were studied by electron backscattered diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction. The most prominent feature of the substructure was the dislocation cell blocks (CBs), indicating that the dislocation slip rather than twinning was the main mechanism of deformation. With two passes of ECA pressing, pancake-shape grains of 0.25 μm in thickness were obtained. The grain refinement achieved by the ECA pressing was attributed to the evolution of low-angle geometrically necessary boundaries (GNBs) into high-angle grain boundaries (HAGBs) during accumulation of strain by repeated pressing. The texture characteristics were such that a shear texture was predominant in the single-pass specimen, whereas a high-strain rolling texture became apparent in the specimens repeatedly pressed.

  4. Incremental non-equal channel angular pressing - FE simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosochowski, Andrzej; Olejnik, Lech

    2016-10-01

    Equal channel angular pressing is the most popular process of severe plastic deformation used to refine grain structure in metals in order to improve their properties. One of the features of severe plastic deformation is lack of change of billet's shape and dimensions. However, for practical reasons, departure from this pure definition might be useful. This paper considers a possibility of changing billet's cross section in the first pass of the incremental version of equal channel angular pressing from round to rectangular to avoid material loss when machining the initial billet. The process has been simulated using a finite element program Abaqus. This simulation showed feasibility of the process and provided information regarding tool geometry and required forces.

  5. Slurry-pressing consolidation of silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, William A.; Kiser, James D.; Freedman, Marc R.

    1988-01-01

    A baseline slurry-pressing method for a silicon nitride material is developed. The Si3N4 composition contained 5.8 wt percent SiO2 and 6.4 wt percent Y2O3. Slurry-pressing variables included volume percent solids, application of ultrasonic energy, and pH. Twenty vol percent slurry-pressed material was approximately 11 percent stronger than both 30 vol percent slurry-pressed and dry-pressed materials. The Student's t-test showed the difference to be significant at the 99 percent confidence level. Twenty volume percent (300 h) slurry-pressed test bars exhibited strengths as high as 980 MPa. Large, columnar beta-Si3N4 grains caused failure in the highest strength specimens. The improved strength correlated with better structural uniformity as determined by radiography, optical microscopy, and image analysis.

  6. Cold press sintering of simulated lunar basalt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altemir, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    In order to predict the conditions for which the lunar regolith may be adequately sintered, experiments were conducted in which samples of simulated lunar basalt (MLS-1) were pressed at high pressures and then heated in an electric furnace. This sintering process may be referred to as cold press sintering since the material is pressed at room temperature. Although test articles were produced which possessed compressive strengths comparable to that of terrestrial concrete, the cold press sintering process requires very high press pressures and sintering temperatures in order to achieve that strength. Additionally, the prospect of poor internal heat transfer adversely affecting the quality of sintered lunar material is a major concern. Therefore, it is concluded that cold press sintering will most likely be undesirable for the production of lunar construction materials.

  7. NASA/MSFC Large Stretch Press Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choate, M. W.; Nealson, W. P.; Jay, G. C.; Buss, W. D.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to: A. assess and document the advantages/disadvantages of a government agency investment in a large stretch form press on the order of 5000 tons capacity (per jaw); B. develop a procurement specification for the press; and C. provide trade study data that will permit an optimum site location. Tasks were separated into four major elements: cost study, user survey, site selection, and press design/procurement specification.

  8. STS-99 Prelaunch Press Briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The primary objective of the STS-99 mission was to complete high resolution mapping of large sections of the Earth's surface using the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), a specially modified radar system. This radar system produced unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's Surface. The mission was launched at 12:31 on February 11, 2000 onboard the space shuttle Endeavour, and led by Commander Kevin Kregel. The crew was Pilot Dominic L. Pudwill Gorie and Mission Specialists Janet L. Kavandi, Janice E. Voss, Mamoru Mohri from the National Space Development Agency (Japanese Space Agency), and Gerhard P. J. Thiele from DARA (German Space Agency). This videotape shows a press briefing about a mechanical problem that the shuttle was having. There was discussion about possibly scrubbing the launch due to the problem with the Enhanced Master Events Controller. A problem with a fuel pump part had also become evident and there was discussion about the impact that this could have on the flight.

  9. Method for Fabricating Composite Structures Using Continuous Press Forming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method for fabricating composite structures at a low-cost. moderate-to-high production rate. A first embodiment of the method includes employing a continuous press forming fabrication process. A second embodiment of the method includes employing a pultrusion process for obtaining composite structures. The methods include coating yarns with matrix material, weaving the yarn into fabric to produce a continuous fabric supply and feeding multiple layers of net-shaped fabrics having optimally oriented fibers into a debulking tool to form an undebulked preform. The continuous press forming fabrication process includes partially debulking the preform, cutting the partially debulked preform and debulking the partially debulked preform to form a net-shape. An electron-beam or similar technique then cures the structure. The pultrusion fabric process includes feeding the undebulked preform into a heated die and gradually debulking the undebulked preform. The undebulked preform in the heated die changes dimension until a desired cross-sectional dimension is achieved. This process further includes obtaining a net-shaped infiltrated uncured preform, cutting the uncured preform to a desired length and electron-beam curing (or similar technique) the uncured preform. These fabrication methods produce superior structures formed at higher production rates. resulting in lower cost and high structural performance.

  10. Dispersion and space charge

    SciTech Connect

    Venturini, Marco; Kishek, Rami A.; Reiser, Martin

    1998-11-05

    The presence of space charge affects the value of the dispersion function. On the other hand dispersion has a role in shaping the beam distribution and therefore in determining the resulting forces due to space charge. In this paper we present a framework where the interplay between space charge and dispersion for a continuous beam can be simultaneously treated. We revise the derivation of a new set of rms envelope-dispersion equations we have recently proposed. The new equations generalize the standard rms envelope equations currently used for matching to the case where bends and a longitudinal momentum spread are present. We report a comparison between the solutions of the rms envelope-dispersion equations and the results obtained using WARP, a Particle in Cell (PIC) code, in the modeling of the Maryland Electron Ring.

  11. Dispersion and space charge

    SciTech Connect

    Venturini, M.; Kishek, R.A.; Reiser, M.

    1998-11-01

    The presence of space charge affects the value of the dispersion function. On the other hand dispersion has a role in shaping the beam distribution and therefore in determining the resulting forces due to space charge. In this paper we present a framework where the interplay between space charge and dispersion for a continuous beam can be simultaneously treated. We revise the derivation of a new set of rms envelope-dispersion equations we have recently proposed in [1]. The new equations generalize the standard rms envelope equations currently used for matching to the case where bends and a longitudinal momentum spread are present. We report a comparison between the solutions of the rms envelope-dispersion equations and the results obtained using WARP, a Particle in Cell (PIC) code, in the modeling of the Maryland Electron Ring. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Design and Evaluation of Ion Source for Satellite Charge Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-01

    Plasma Clouds in the Magnetosphere ," Journal of Geophysical Research, v. 76, 1971. DeForest, S.E., " Spacecraft Charging at Synchronous... Charging : A Review," Progress in Astronautics and Aeronautics, v. 71, pp. 167-226, 1980. Grard,R., Knott, K., and Pederson, A., Spacecraft Charging ...Satellite Program," Spacecraft Charging by Magnetospheric Plasmas , v.47, AIAA, ed. A. Rosen, AIAA with MIT Press, 1976. Moore, J.H., Davis, C.C.,

  13. Charging machine

    DOEpatents

    Medlin, John B.

    1976-05-25

    A charging machine for loading fuel slugs into the process tubes of a nuclear reactor includes a tubular housing connected to the process tube, a charging trough connected to the other end of the tubular housing, a device for loading the charging trough with a group of fuel slugs, means for equalizing the coolant pressure in the charging trough with the pressure in the process tubes, means for pushing the group of fuel slugs into the process tube and a latch and a seal engaging the last object in the group of fuel slugs to prevent the fuel slugs from being ejected from the process tube when the pusher is removed and to prevent pressure liquid from entering the charging machine.

  14. The Egyptian Press: An Official Fourth Estate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawhorne, Clifton O.

    A descriptive study based on Egyptian law, printed sources, and interviews clarifies our picture of the Egyptian Press by examining its status as a constitutionally mandated "Fourth Estate." The constitutional amendment, the resultant Egyptian Press Law, and the "Law Of Shame" (all passed in 1980), are designed to create a…

  15. Fracture toughness of hot-pressed beryllium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemon, D. D.; Brown, W. F., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation into the fracture toughness, sustained-load flaw growth, and fatigue-crack propagation resistance of S200E hot-pressed beryllium at room temperature. It also reviews the literature pertaining to the influence of various factors on the fracture toughness of hot-pressed beryllium determined using fatigue-cracked specimens.

  16. Free Press & Fair Trial. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Newspaper Publishers Association Foundation, Washington, DC.

    In relation to law enforcement and the courts, the press serves to inform the public about crimes and how government institutions deal with them. The press also plays a crucial role in assuring that the rights of individuals guaranteed by the Sixth Amendment are protected. The issue of prejudice, caused by news coverage of crime and criminal…

  17. Linguistic Cohabitation: Frenglish in the Mauritius Press.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miles, William F. S.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the use of Frenglish on the island of Mauritius. An examination of the local press over a nine-month period turned up ten categories of Frenglish. Frenglish in the Mauritian press highlights the uniqueness of local society by linguistically contextualizing broad ranges of social, economic, political, legal, and administrative life.…

  18. Retractions, press releases and newspaper coverage.

    PubMed

    Rada, Roy F

    2007-09-01

    To explore how often newspapers cover the retraction of a medical journal article and whether newspaper coverage corresponds with the appearance of a press release about the retraction. Fifty citations were identified in PubMed that had been indexed with the Medical Subject Heading 'Retracted Publication'. Next, the archives of LexisNexis's 'Major Newspapers' and EurekAlert's press releases were searched to find references to those retracted publications. Newspaper articles addressed exactly three of the 50 retracted publications, and press releases, exactly four of the 50 retracted publications. All three retracted publications that received newspaper coverage also had a press release. In other words, newspapers only covered a retraction that had been introduced by a press release. One would expect that newspaper coverage would increase after a press release, but the suggested relationships among a medical journal article retraction, a press release and newspaper coverage should be further investigated. If the linkage suggested by the data of this study holds, and if newspaper coverage stimulates library patron interest, then a medical library might prepare itself for information requests following a press release.

  19. Teenagers as Victims in the Press

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersson, Gunvor; Lundstrom, Tommy

    2007-01-01

    Research into press reporting on young people has tended to concentrate on young people as offenders. In contrast, this article focuses on press coverage of teenagers as victims. Reports in two Swedish newspapers (a morning broadsheet and an evening tabloid) were studied over a period of four months and subjected to a qualitative analysis of…

  20. Evaluating the aluminum content of pressed dross

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevorkijan, V.

    2002-02-01

    Pressing of skimmed hot drosses in a press is a very popular technology for cooling hot dross and obtaining the maximum in-house recovery of aluminum alloy. As a result of the pressing action, part of the molten aluminum alloy is squeezed out, while the rest of the free metal remains in the pressed skulls. Thus, pressed skulls are a valuable waste product, consisting of 30 70 wt.% free aluminum. Other constituents are aluminum oxide and oxides of alloying metals. Pressed skulls are generally valued on a free-metal recovery basis, which necessarily involves practical determination of their free aluminum content. Because most analytical methods are limited to the laboratory level and representative sub-samples, there is a practical interest in developing a routine, cost-effective, and non-destructive method to predict the free aluminum content in entire pressed skulls, based on their density. To develop such a method, a relation between the bulk density, porosity, and free aluminum content of pressed skulls was established. This article offers a review of those experiments and an analysis of their results.

  1. Freedom of the Press vs. Public Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Benno C., Jr.

    This book surveys the implications of freedom of the press for a constitutionally rooted public right of access to electronic and print media. Part one provides general perspectives on access to the media, including discussions of access in relation to the Supreme Court, to First Amendment history and theory, to current perceptions of the press,…

  2. In the Stocks: Perilous Press Releases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, Linda P.; Loving, Bill

    1994-01-01

    Reviews some of the legal responsibilities of public relations practitioners in the preparation of press releases. Discusses legal criteria for judging the fraudulence of press releases and discusses the timeframe for fraudulent action. Concludes with lessons that practitioners need to understand. (SR)

  3. Continuous equal channel angular pressing

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Yuntian T.; Lowe, Terry C.; Valiev, Ruslan Z.; Raab, Georgy J.

    2006-12-26

    An apparatus that continuously processes a metal workpiece without substantially altering its cross section includes a wheel member having an endless circumferential groove, and a stationary constraint die that surrounds the wheel member, covers most of the length of the groove, and forms a passageway with the groove. The passageway has a rectangular shaped cross section. An abutment member projects from the die into the groove and blocks one end of the passageway. The wheel member rotates relative to the die in the direction toward the abutment member. An output channel in the die adjacent the abutment member has substantially the same cross section as the passageway. A metal workpiece is fed through an input channel into the passageway and carried in the groove by frictional drag in the direction towards the abutment member, and is extruded through the output channel without any substantial change in cross section.

  4. A comparison of impulse drying to double felted pressing on pilot- scale shoe presses and roll presses. Progress report, No. 6

    SciTech Connect

    Orloff, D.I.

    1992-08-01

    Pilot-scale shoe press and roll press experiments have been conducted to compare impulse drying and double felted pressing. Both ceramic coated and Beloit Type C press rolls have been evaluated. The experiments show that impulse drying can provide significantly higher outgoing solids than double felled pressing at the same impulse. For example, at an impulse of 0.234 MPa seconds (34 psi seconds), sheets at an ingoing solids of 52% were impulse dried (using the Beloit Type C press roll) to 68% solids while optimized double felled pressing could only yield press dryness of, at most, 60%.

  5. STS-8 onboard crew press conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Six news reporters listen to a response from Astronaut Guion S. Bluford (note TV monitor) in a rare space-to-Earth press conference involving all the STS-8 crew. The participants are, left to right, Gary Schwitzer, Cable News Network; Morton Dean, CBS; Roy Neal, NBC; Lynn Sherr, ABC; Howard Benedict, Associated Press; Al Rossiter, United Press International. The astronauts on the monitor are Richard H. Truly, cneter left, crew commander; Daniel C. Brandenstein, lower left, pilot; and Dr. William E. Thornton, upper left, Guion S. Bluford, upper right; and Dale E. Gardner, all mission specialists.

  6. STS-8 onboard crew press conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Six news reporters listen to a response from Astronaut Guion S. Bluford (note TV monitor) in a rare space-to-Earth press conference involving all the STS-8 crew. The participants are, left to right, Gary Schwitzer, Cable News Network; Morton Dean, CBS; Roy Neal, NBC; Lynn Sherr, ABC; Howard Benedict, Associated Press; Al Rossiter, United Press International. The astronauts on the monitor are Richard H. Truly, cneter left, crew commander; Daniel C. Brandenstein, lower left, pilot; and Dr. William E. Thornton, upper left, Guion S. Bluford, upper right; and Dale E. Gardner, all mission specialists.

  7. Near Net Shape Manufacturing of New Titanium Powders for Industry

    SciTech Connect

    2009-05-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to develop a manufacturing technology to process new titanium powders into fully consolidated near net shape components for industrial applications. This will be achieved using various technologies, including press and sinter, pneumatic isostatic forging (PIF), hot isostatic pressing (HIP), and adiabatic compaction.

  8. Producing metal parts with selective laser sintering/hot isostatic pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Suman; Wohlert, Martin; Beaman, Joseph J.; Bourell, David L.

    1998-12-01

    Selective laser sintering/hot isostatic pressing is a hybrid direct laser fabrication method that combines the strengths of both processes. Selective laser sintering can produce complexly shaped metal components with an integral, gas-impermeable skin. These components can then be directly post-processed to full density by containerless hot isostatic pressing. The use of the hybrid fabrication method, envisioned as a rapid, low-cost replacement for conventional metal-can hot isostatic pressing, is currently being studied for alloy 625 and Ti-6Al-4V alloys. The micro-structure and mechanical properties of selective-laser-sintering processed and hot isostatically pressed post-processed material compare well with those of conventionally processed material.

  9. Quasi-3D space charge simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xi; /Fermilab

    2007-04-01

    The longitudinal space charge effect is simulated by binning the longitudinal beam profile in order to calculate the force on the bins using the binned particle distribution via FFT, and applying momentum kick based upon this space charge force to macro-particles. Usually, the longitudinal space charge kick is calculated once per turn since the longitudinal profile doesn't change much in a single turn. Besides, the longitudinal profile is used as a weighting factor for the transverse space charge force. The transverse space charge effect is simulated by projecting the 3-D beam to a 2-D Gaussian distribution in order to use the complex error function to compute the transverse space charge force, and applying this space charge force to macro-particles. One transverse space charge calculation per scale length of the beam shape variation requires at least ten transverse space charge force calculations per betatron oscillation.

  10. Apollo 40th Anniversary Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    Eugene Cernan (Apollo 17) speaks during the 40th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission and the walk on the moon press conference, Monday, July 20, 2009, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  11. Apollo 13 Facts [Post Flight Press Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Apollo 13 astronauts, James Lovell, Jr., John Swigert, Jr., and Fred Haise, Jr., are seen during this post flight press conference. They describe their mission and answer questions from the audience.

  12. Press Association Directors Discuss Responsibilities, Concerns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodd, Julie E.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses scholastic press association directors and high school journalism workshop directors' assessments of their duties. Offers the directors' suggestions for publication advisers--what they can do to make the life of the director less stressful. (MS)

  13. Thermal Conductances of Pressed Copper Contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salerno, L.; Kittel, P.; Spivak, A.

    1986-01-01

    Report describes investigation of thermal conductivities of smooth copper contacts pressed together at liquid-helium temperatures. Investigation prompted by need for accurate thermal models for infrared detectors and other cryogenic instruments.

  14. Gas-driven filter pressing in magmas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sisson, T.W.; Bacon, C.R.

    1999-01-01

    Most silicic and some mafic magmas expand via second boiling if they crystallize at depths of about 10 km or less. The buildup of gas pressure due to second boiling can be relieved by expulsion of melt out of the region of crystallization, and this process of gas-driven filter pressing assists the crystallization differentiation of magmas. For gas-driven filter pressing to be effective, the region of crystallization must inflate slowly relative to buildup of pressure and expulsion of melt These conditions are satisfied in undercooled magmatic inclusions and in thin sheets of primitive magma underplating cooler magma reservoirs. Gas-driven filter pressing thereby adds fractionated melt to magma bodies. Gas-driven filter pressing is probably the dominant process by which highly evolved melts segregate from crystal mush to form aplitic dikes in granitic plutons; this process could also account for the production of voluminous, crystal-poor rhyolites.

  15. STS-105 Pre-Launch Press Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    George Diller, NASA Public Affairs, introduces Bill Gerstenmaier, Deputy Manager of the ISS Program, Dave King, NASA Director of Shuttle Processing, and Judy Konecky, Staff Meteorologist, in this STS-105 press conference. An overview is given of the success of the Expedition 2 crew, the expectations of the Expedition 3 crew, the launch countdown status, and the weather forecast for the Shuttle launch. They then answer questions from the press.

  16. STS-104 Pre-Launch Press Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    George Diller, NASA Public Affairs, introduces Jim Halsell, Shuttle Program Launch Integration Manager, Dave King, NASA Director of Shuttle Processing, Michael Hawes, Deputy Associate Administrator for ISS, and John Weems, Launch Weather Officer, in this STS-104 press conference. An overview is given of the launch and mission activities, International Space Station activities during the mission, and the weather forecast for the launch. The men then answer questions from the press.

  17. STS-105 Pre-Launch Press Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    George Diller, NASA Public Affairs, introduces Bill Gerstenmaier, Deputy Manager of the ISS Program, Dave King, NASA Director of Shuttle Processing, and Judy Konecky, Staff Meteorologist, in this STS-105 press conference. An overview is given of the success of the Expedition 2 crew, the expectations of the Expedition 3 crew, the launch countdown status, and the weather forecast for the Shuttle launch. They then answer questions from the press.

  18. STS-121: Discovery Post Landing Press Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    On July 17, 2006 Dean Acosta (NASA Press Secretary), Mike Griffin (Administrator), Bill Gerstenmaier (Associate Administrator of Space Operations), and Mike Leinbach (NASA Launch Director) expressed how proud they were to be a part of the STS-121/ Discovery team. They also explained how flawlessly the mission performed and how it was the best mission ever flown. They proceeded to answer numerous questions from the press.

  19. Enery Efficient Press and Sinter of Titanium Powder for Low-Cost Components in Vehicle Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Zwitter; Phillip Nash; Xiaoyan Xu; Chadwick Johnson

    2011-03-31

    This is the final technical report for the Department of Energy NETL project NT01931 Energy Efficient Press and Sinter of Titanium Powder for Low-Cost Components in Vehicle Applications. Titanium has been identified as one of the key materials with the required strength that can reduce the weight of automotive components and thereby reduce fuel consumption. Working with newly developed sources of titanium powder, Webster-Hoff will develop the processing technology to manufacture low cost vehicle components using the single press/single sinter techniques developed for iron based powder metallurgy today. Working with an automotive or truck manufacturer, Webster-Hoff will demonstrate the feasibility of manufacturing a press and sinter titanium component for a vehicle application. The project objective is two-fold, to develop the technology for manufacturing press and sinter titanium components, and to demonstrate the feasibility of producing a titanium component for a vehicle application. The lowest cost method for converting metal powder into a net shape part is the Powder Metallurgy Press and Sinter Process. The method involves compaction of the metal powder in a tool (usually a die and punches, upper and lower) at a high pressure (up to 60 TSI or 827 MPa) to form a green compact with the net shape of the final component. The powder in the green compact is held together by the compression bonds between the powder particles. The sinter process then converts the green compact to a metallurgically bonded net shape part through the process of solid state diffusion. The goal of this project is to expand the understanding and application of press and sinter technology to Titanium Powder applications, developing techniques to manufacture net shape Titanium components via the press and sinter process. In addition, working with a vehicle manufacturer, demonstrate the feasibility of producing a titanium component for a vehicle. This is not a research program, but rather a

  20. Pistol-shaped dosimeter charger

    DOEpatents

    Maples, R.A.

    A pistol-shaped charger assembly clamps a cylindrical radiation dosimeter against one edge thereof. A triggerlike lever on the handgrip of the assembly is manually pivoted to actuate a piezoelectric current generator held in the handgrip and thereby charge the dosimeter.

  1. Pistol-shaped dosimeter charger

    DOEpatents

    Maples, Robert A.

    1985-01-01

    A pistol-shaped charger assembly clamps a cylindrical radiation dosimeter against one edge thereof. A triggerlike lever on the handgrip of the assembly is manually pivoted to actuate a piezoelectric current generator held in the handgrip and thereby charge the dosimeter.

  2. [Representations of mental illness in the Greek Press: 2001 vs 2011].

    PubMed

    Economou, M; Louki, E; Charitsi, M; Alexiou, T; Patelakis, A; Christakaki, A; Papadimitriou, G N

    2015-01-01

    The media seem to have played a prominent role in shaping the contemporary social image of people with mental illness, by perpetuating the stigma attached to it. Worldwide, a vast amount of research findings converge to the stigmatizing representation of people with mental illness by the media, with reference to the dominant stereotype of violence. The present study aims to explore the representations of mental illness in the Greek Press using a quantitative and qualitative approach. Potential changes in the media portrayal of mental illness during the last decade are also being examined: findings are compared to those of a previous research that took place in 2001, following the same methodology. The sample consisted of press articles referring to mental illness, that were indexed daily from the Greek newspapers during the period July-November 2011. The items were categorized into thematic categories and further analyzed taking in account the use of stigmatizing vocabulary, the reproduction of common myths concerning mental illness, the overall valence of each article (stigmatizing, neutral or anti-stigmatizing) towards people with mental illness, as well as the contextual implications conveyed in the use of psychiatric terms as a metaphor. The largest thematic category that emerged from the sample was that referring to the repercussions of the economic crisis to mental health, followed by the category of articles where psychiatric terms are used as a metaphor. The comparisons made between 2001 and 2011 revealed an improved representation of mental illness in terms of stigma, especially regarding schizophrenia. The public expression of stigma has decreased, with fewer stigmatizing articles and notably more neutral in valence articles. The findings of this study suggest a decline of the media propensity for emotionally charged descriptions and a shift towards objective journalism regarding mental illness. This is most likely to be attributed to the anti

  3. Speaking of a Free Press: 200 Years of Notable Quotations about Press Freedoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Newspaper Publishers Association Foundation, Washington, DC.

    Intended to summarize the ideals underlying the struggle for freedom of the press and to reinforce the basic Constitutional principles upon which the United States functions, this collection of quotations reflects the beliefs of prominent people throughout history who have championed press freedom, as well as the ideas of some who have opposed it.…

  4. AUPress: A Comparison of an Open Access University Press with Traditional Presses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGreal, Rory; Chen, Nian-Shing

    2011-01-01

    This study is a comparison of AUPress with three other traditional (non-open access) Canadian university presses. The analysis is based on the rankings that are correlated with book sales on Amazon.com and Amazon.ca. Statistical methods include the sampling of the sales ranking of randomly selected books from each press. The results of one-way…

  5. AUPress: A Comparison of an Open Access University Press with Traditional Presses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGreal, Rory; Chen, Nian-Shing

    2011-01-01

    This study is a comparison of AUPress with three other traditional (non-open access) Canadian university presses. The analysis is based on the rankings that are correlated with book sales on Amazon.com and Amazon.ca. Statistical methods include the sampling of the sales ranking of randomly selected books from each press. The results of one-way…

  6. Aerial view of the Press Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    In this aerial view, The News Center sits beyond a large parking lot, on a hill at the northeastern end of the Launch Complex 39 Area , next to the turn basin (at left). From left, the grandstand faces the launch pads several miles away on the Atlantic seashore; behind it, the television studio is the site of media conferences; next, the large white-roofed building is the hub of information and activity for press representatives. Lined up on the right of the Press Site are various buildings and trailers, home to major news networks. The parking lot can accommodate the hundreds of media personnel who attend Space Shuttle launches.

  7. STS-121: Discovery Post Launch Press Briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    The briefing begins with Dean Acousta (NASA Press Secretary) introducing Michael Griffin (NASA Administrator), Bill Gerstenmaier (Associate Administrator for Space Operations) Wayne Hale (Space Shuttle Program Manager), John Shannon (Chairman, Mission Management Team, JSC), and Mike Leinbach (NASA Launch Director). The teams effort and dedication paid off in the form of a perfect launch and the weather cooperated. The Mission Management Team no problems during inspection. Debris assessment at 2 min. 47 sec. and 4 min. 50 sec. will be discussed when that information becomes available.The floor was then open for questions from the press.

  8. High density crystalline boron prepared by hot isostatic pressing in refractory metal containers

    DOEpatents

    Hoenig, C.L.

    1993-08-31

    Boron powder is hot isostatically pressed in a refractory metal container to produce a solid boron monolith with a bulk density at least 2.22 g/cc and up to or greater than 2.34 g/cc. The refractory metal container is formed of tantalum, niobium, tungsten, molybdenum or alloys thereof in the form of a canister or alternatively plasma sprayed or chemical vapor deposited onto a powder compact. Hot isostatic pressing at 1,800 C and 30 PSI (206.8 MPa) argon pressure for four hours produces a bulk density of 2.34 g/cc. Complex shapes can be made.

  9. High density-high purity graphite prepared by hot isostatic pressing in refractory metal containers

    DOEpatents

    Hoenig, C.L.

    1994-08-09

    Porous graphite in solid form is hot isostatically pressed in a refractory metal container to produce a solid graphite monolith with a bulk density greater than or equal to 2.10 g/cc. The refractory metal container is formed of tantalum, niobium, tungsten, molybdenum or alloys thereof in the form of a canister or alternatively plasma sprayed, chemically vapor deposited, or coated by some other suitable means onto graphite. Hot isostatic pressing at 2,200 C and 30 KSI (206.8 MPa) argon pressure for two hours produces a bulk density of 2.10 g/cc. Complex shapes can be made. 1 fig.

  10. High density crystalline boron prepared by hot isostatic pressing in refractory metal containers

    DOEpatents

    Hoenig, Clarence L.

    1993-01-01

    Boron powder is hot isostatically pressed in a refractory metal container to produce a solid boron monolith with a bulk density at least 2.22 g/cc and up to or greater than 2.34 g/cc. The refractory metal container is formed of tantalum, niobium, tungsten, molybdenum or alloys thereof in the form of a canister or alternatively plasma sprayed or chemical vapor deposited onto a powder compact. Hot isostatic pressing at 1800.degree. C. and 30 KSI (206.8 MPa) argon pressure for four hours produces a bulk density of 2.34 g/cc. Complex shapes can be made.

  11. High density-high purity graphite prepared by hot isostatic pressing in refractory metal containers

    DOEpatents

    Hoenig, Clarence L.

    1994-01-01

    Porous graphite in solid form is hot isostatically pressed in a refractory metal container to produce a solid graphite monolith with a bulk density greater than or equal to 2.10 g/cc. The refractory metal container is formed of tantalum, niobium, tungsten, molybdenum or alloys thereof in the form of a canister or alternatively plasma sprayed, chemically vapor deposited, or coated by some other suitable means onto graphite. Hot isostatic pressing at 2200.degree. C. and 30 KSI (206.8 MPa) argon pressure for two hours produces a bulk density of 2.10 g/cc. Complex shapes can be made.

  12. Thermal conductance of a pressed Al-Al contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanner, M.

    1981-01-01

    Thermal conductance of a screw-fastened joint between two blocks of Al-alloys has been measured. An AlMg4.5Mn-block, the end of which is cooled by liquid helium, constitutes the upper part of the sample and the contact is formed at the face surface of a cylindrical extension of that block onto which a cylinder, made of AlMgSi1, is pressed by means of a copper-nickel screw. Pressing of the contact was carried out at room temperature by applying a defined torque, M, to the fastening screw. Three samples of the same shape but with differently treated surfaces of contact (machined flat, electro-chemically polished, with gold plated contacts) were studied. The results showed that the machined flat surfaces yield the best contact and that the contact conductance (measured in the range 4.2 K to 1.8 K) of all samples increased with increasing torque. In addition to thermal measurements, a study of the electrical conductance would be very interesting to determine the different contributions of phonon and electron heat conduction by means of the Wiedemann-Franz law. The work is useful for the GIRL (German Infra-Red Laboratory) space experiment.

  13. Including die and press deformations in sheet metal forming simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilthammar, Johan; Sigvant, Mats; Kao-Walter, Sharon

    2016-08-01

    Structural analysis, in Abaqus, of a stamping die and subsequent morphing of the tool surfaces in AutoForm were performed to improve a sheet metal forming simulation. First, the tool surfaces of the XC90 rear door inner were scanned. They were not matching when the die was unloaded and could therefore not give any satisfying results in sheet metal forming simulations. Scanned surface geometries were then added to a structural FE-model of the complete stamping die and some influential parts of the production press. The structural FE- model was analysed with Abaqus to obtain the structural deformations of the die. The calculated surface shapes were then transferred to AutoForm where a forming simulation was performed. Results from the different sheet metal forming simulations were compared to measured draw in curves and showed a substantial increase in accuracy and ability to analyse dies in running production when the morphed surfaces were used.

  14. Ewald Electrostatics for Mixtures of Point and Continuous Line Charges.

    PubMed

    Antila, Hanne S; Tassel, Paul R Van; Sammalkorpi, Maria

    2015-10-15

    Many charged macro- or supramolecular systems, such as DNA, are approximately rod-shaped and, to the lowest order, may be treated as continuous line charges. However, the standard method used to calculate electrostatics in molecular simulation, the Ewald summation, is designed to treat systems of point charges. We extend the Ewald concept to a hybrid system containing both point charges and continuous line charges. We find the calculated force between a point charge and (i) a continuous line charge and (ii) a discrete line charge consisting of uniformly spaced point charges to be numerically equivalent when the separation greatly exceeds the discretization length. At shorter separations, discretization induces deviations in the force and energy, and point charge-point charge correlation effects. Because significant computational savings are also possible, the continuous line charge Ewald method presented here offers the possibility of accurate and efficient electrostatic calculations.

  15. Steam-assisted hot-pressing of construction plywood

    Treesearch

    Ronald W. Jokerst; Robert L. Geimer

    1994-01-01

    This study was designed to determine if steam injection pressing used for fiberboard, particleboard, and flakeboard could be adapted to the pressing of plywood. Plywood panels were fabricated with and without adhesive and then pressed to determine the effects of steam injection Lime, steam injection pressure, and press pressure on heat transfer rate, moisture...

  16. Graphic Arts: Book Three. The Press and Related Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farajollahi, Karim; And Others

    The third of a three-volume set of instructional materials for a graphic arts course, this manual consists of nine instructional units dealing with presses and related processes. Covered in the units are basic press fundamentals, offset press systems, offset press operating procedures, offset inks and dampening chemistry, preventive maintenance…

  17. Textbook Sales Drop, and University Presses Search for Reasons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    This article reports that textbook sales are falling at many university presses, a trend that has accelerated in the past couple of months. That's the word from press directors anxious about the decline but unsure what's causing it or how to stop it. Not every press has been affected. Two of the biggest players, Oxford University Press and…

  18. Development of Press Hardening Steel with High Resistance to Hydrogen Embrittlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Jian; Mohrbacher, Hardy; Lu, Hongzhou; Wang, Wenjun

    Press hardening has become the state-of-art technology in the car body manufacturing to enhance safety standard and to reduce CO2 emission of new vehicles. However the delayed cracking due to hydrogen embrittlement remains to be a critical issue. Generally press hardening steel is susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement due to ultra-high strength and martensitic microstructure. The hydrogen charging tests clearly demonstrate that only a few ppm of diffusible hydrogen is sufficient to cause such embrittlement. Currently the hydrogen embrittlement cannot be detected in the press hardened components and the embitteled components could collapse in the crash situation with fatal consequences arisen through dramatic loss in both strength and ductility. This paper introduces a new metallurgical solution to increase the resistance to hydrogen embrittlement of conventional press hardening steel based on 22MnB5 by Nb microalloying. In the hydrogen embrittlement and permeation tests the impact of Nb microalloying on the hydrogen embrittlement behavior was investigated under different hydrogen charging conditions and constant load. The test results revealed that Nb addition increases the resistance to hydrogen embrittlement due to reduced hydrogen diffusivity. The focus of this paper is to investigate the precipitation behavior of microalloying elements by using TEM and STEM and to find out the mechanisms leading to higher performance against hydrogen embrittlement of Nb alloyed steels.

  19. An Introduction to Bibliographical Press Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, John V., Jr.

    This guide to the literature of bibliographical press work is comprised of brief introductory notes on the field and this bibliography, followed by citations listed in seven categories: (1) book production, (2) handmade paper, (3) printer's ink, (4) type design, (5) book design, (6) hand printing, and (7) hand bookbinding. Introductory as well as…

  20. The Moral Universes of Libertarian Press Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wuliger, Gregory T.

    1991-01-01

    Uses Kantian logic to analyze the statement of Libertarian press theory "Truth beats falsehood in a free marketplace of ideas" as a definition, an observation, and a universal truth. Notes three corresponding moral universes, with differing ethical obligations. Discusses strengths and weaknesses of each. Cautions media ethics analysts…