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Sample records for shaped charge pressed

  1. Conical shaped charge pressed powder, metal liner jet characterization and penetration in aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, M.G.

    1997-05-01

    This work was conducted as part of a Near-wellbore Mechanics program at Sandia National Laboratories. An understanding of the interaction of the perforator jet from an explosive shaped charge with the fluid filled porous sandstone media is of basic importance to the completion of oil wells. Tests were conducted using the five-head Flash X-ray Test Site to measure the jet tip velocities and jet geometry for the OMNI and CAPSULE Conical Shaped Charge (CSC) oil well perforator jets fired into air. These tests were conducted to generate jet velocity and geometry information to be used in validating the CTH hydrocode modeling/simulation development of pressed powder, metal liner jets in air. Ten tests were conducted to determine the CSC jet penetration into 6061-T6 aluminum targets. Five tests were conducted with the OMNI CSC at 0.25, 6.0, and 19 inch standoffs from the target. Five tests were conducted with the CAPSULE CSC at 0.60, 5.0, 10.0, and 19 inch standoffs from the target. These tests were conducted to generate jet penetration into homogeneous target information for use in validating the CTH code modeling/simulation of pressed powder, metal liner jets penetrating aluminum targets. The Flash X-ray radiographs, jet velocities, jet diameters, and jet lengths data for jets fired into air are presented in this report. The jet penetration into aluminum and penetration hole profile data are also presented for the OMNI and CAPSULE perforators. Least Squares fits are presented for the measured jet velocity and jet penetration data.

  2. Free form hemispherical shaped charge

    DOEpatents

    Haselman, L.C. Jr.

    1996-06-04

    A hemispherical shaped charge has been modified such that one side of the hemisphere is spherical and the other is aspherical allowing a wall thickness variation in the liner. A further modification is to use an elongated hemispherical shape. The liner has a thick wall at its pole and a thin wall at the equator with a continually decreasing wall thickness from the pole to the equator. The ratio of the wall thickness from the pole to the equator varies depending on liner material and HE shape. Hemispherical shaped charges have previously been limited to spherical shapes with no variations in wall thicknesses. By redesign of the basic liner thicknesses, the jet properties of coherence, stability, and mass distribution have been significantly improved. 8 figs.

  3. Free form hemispherical shaped charge

    DOEpatents

    Haselman, Jr., Leonard C.

    1996-01-01

    A hemispherical shaped charge has been modified such that one side of the hemisphere is spherical and the other is aspherical allowing a wall thickness variation in the liner. A further modification is to use an elongated hemispherical shape. The liner has a thick wall at its pole and a thin wall at the equator with a continually decreasing wall thickness from the pole to the equator. The ratio of the wall thickness from the pole to the equator varies depending on liner material and HE shape. Hemispherical shaped charges have previously been limited to spherical shapes with no variations in wall thicknesses. By redesign of the basic liner thicknesses, the jet properties of coherence, stability, and mass distribution have been significantly improved.

  4. VIEW OF INTERIOR SPACE WITH RECTANGULAR SHAPE STRETCH PRESS CONTAINMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF INTERIOR SPACE WITH RECTANGULAR SHAPE STRETCH PRESS CONTAINMENT PIT IN BACKGROUND, FACING NORTH. - Douglas Aircraft Company Long Beach Plant, Aircraft Parts Shipping & Receiving Building, 3855 Lakewood Boulevard, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  5. VIEW OF INTERIOR SPACE WITH SQUARE SHAPE STRETCH PRESS CONTAINMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF INTERIOR SPACE WITH SQUARE SHAPE STRETCH PRESS CONTAINMENT PITS CENTER, FACING NORTH. - Douglas Aircraft Company Long Beach Plant, Aircraft Parts Shipping & Receiving Building, 3855 Lakewood Boulevard, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  6. Shaped charge with an axial channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malygin, A. V.; Proskuryakov, E. V.; Sorokin, M. V.; Fomin, V. M.

    2011-05-01

    A shaped charge with an axial channel is considered. The charge is initiated by an impact of an annular plate. As a result, the shaped charge is initiated at all points of the domain shaped as a ring. The impact plate material and parameters (velocity, thickness, width, and distance covered by the plate) that ensure stable penetration of the shaped charge are determined. The results obtained can be used to develop a composite (e.g., "tandem") shaped charge of the "base-head" type (the charge located farther from the target is first initiated, followed by initiation of the charge located closer to the target).

  7. Pressure enhanced penetration with shaped charge perforators

    DOEpatents

    Glenn, Lewis A.

    2001-01-01

    A downhole tool, adapted to retain a shaped charge surrounded by a superatmospherically pressurized light gas, is employed in a method for perforating a casing and penetrating reservoir rock around a wellbore. Penetration of a shaped charge jet can be enhanced by at least 40% by imploding a liner in the high pressure, light gas atmosphere. The gas pressure helps confine the jet on the axis of penetration in the latter stages of formation. The light gas, such as helium or hydrogen, is employed to keep the gas density low enough so as not to inhibit liner collapse.

  8. Measurements of Shaped Charge Jet Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hongfa

    2013-06-01

    Penetration depth is an important requirement in oil/gas well perforating jobs. The depth determines how far the wellbore can directly communicate with reservoir fluids. Deep perforation charges are widely used in oilfield industry and most of those are powder metal liner charge for no carrot-like slug left as solid liner does. Comprehensive measurements for the powder metal liner shaped charge jet characteristics, namely, the jet density and velocity, are needed to predict the shaped charge performance and to plan the perforating job. This paper focuses on an experimental work of jet velocity measurements. A medium size of powder metal liner charges (27 grams HMX) is used in the tests. The powder jet shoots through a stack of limestone blocks with shorting switch set in between. Half inch air-gap between two blocks is design to provide space for jet traveling in air to record free fly velocity, meanwhile the jet penetration velocity in the limestone is measured. Aluminum foil switches are used to record the jet Time of Arrival (TOA). The charged switch shorted by the metal jet when it arrives. The shorting signal is recorded. The two velocities can be used to estimate the jet penetration effectiveness. A series of TOA tests show that jet velocity along its length linearly decreases from jet tip to tail until the stagnation points referring to which jet material moves in opposite direction.

  9. Method for hot pressing irregularly shaped refractory articles

    DOEpatents

    Steinkamp, William E.; Ballard, Ambrose H.

    1982-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method for hot pressing irregularly haped refractory articles with these articles of varying thickness being provided with high uniform density and dimensional accuracy. Two partially pressed compacts of the refractory material are placed in a die cavity between displaceable die punches having compact-contacting surfaces of the desired article configuration. A floating, rotatable block is disposed between the compacts. The displacement of the die punches towards one another causes the block to rotate about an axis normal to the direction of movement of the die punches to uniformly distribute the pressure loading upon the compacts for maintaining substantially equal volume displacement of the powder material during the hot pressing operation.

  10. Lexan Linear Shaped Charge Holder with Magnets and Backing Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maples, Matthew W.; Dutton, Maureen L.; Hacker, Scott C.; Dean, Richard J.; Kidd, Nicholas; Long, Chris; Hicks, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    A method was developed for cutting a fabric structural member in an inflatable module, without damaging the internal structure of the module, using linear shaped charge. Lexan and magnets are used in a charge holder to precisely position the linear shaped charge over the desired cut area. Two types of charge holders have been designed, each with its own backing plate. One holder cuts fabric straps in the vertical configuration, and the other charge holder cuts fabric straps in the horizontal configuration.

  11. Jet Flight Patterns of Linear Shaped Charges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Seokbin

    2016-01-01

    A typical jet flight pattern of linear shaped charges (LSCs) is studied, and analytical expressions are built for two important parameters of the angle of liner collapse line φ and jet projection angle ω. In order to simplify the nonlinear nature of the liner collapse behavior of LSCs, important assumptions are made, including (1) a constant jet projection velocity at the given standoff distance and (2) the liner collapse occurs in a steady-state fashion, generating a single straight collapse line during the detonation. Based on the assumptions, analytical expressions are derived and the result is compared with side-view images of LSC jet flight to evaluate accuracy and applicability. The analytical approach delivers reasonable accuracy in a given range and is applicable to a short range of standoff distances.

  12. Systems tunnel linear shaped charge lightning strike

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, M.

    1989-01-01

    Simulated lightning strike testing of the systems tunnel linear shaped charge (LSC) was performed at the Thiokol Lightning Test Complex in Wendover, Utah, on 23 Jun. 1989. The test article consisted of a 160-in. section of the LSC enclosed within a section of the systems tunnel. The systems tunnel was bonded to a section of a solid rocket motor case. All test article components were full scale. The systems tunnel cover of the test article was subjected to three discharges (each discharge was over a different grounding strap) from the high-current generator. The LSC did not detonate. All three grounding straps debonded and violently struck the LSC through the openings in the systems tunnel floor plates. The LSC copper surface was discolored around the areas of grounding strap impact, and arcing occurred at the LSC clamps and LSC ends. This test verified that the present flight configuration of the redesigned solid rocket motor systems tunnel, when subjected to simulated lightning strikes with peak current levels within 71 percent of the worst-case lightning strike condition of NSTS-07636, is adequate to prevent LSC ignition. It is therefore recommended that the design remain unchanged.

  13. Optimized conical shaped charge design using the SCAP (Shaped Charge Analysis Program) code

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, M.G.

    1988-09-01

    The Shaped Charge Analysis Program (SCAP) is used to analytically model and optimize the design of Conical Shaped Charges (CSC). A variety of existing CSCs are initially modeled with the SCAP code and the predicted jet tip velocities, jet penetrations, and optimum standoffs are compared to previously published experimental results. The CSCs vary in size from 0.69 inch (1.75 cm) to 9.125 inch (23.18 cm) conical liner inside diameter. Two liner materials (copper and steel) and several explosives (Octol, Comp B, PBX-9501) are included in the CSCs modeled. The target material was mild steel. A parametric study was conducted using the SCAP code to obtain the optimum design for a 3.86 inch (9.8 cm) CSC. The variables optimized in this study included the CSC apex angle, conical liner thickness, explosive height, optimum standoff, tamper/confinement thickness, and explosive width. The non-dimensionalized jet penetration to diameter ratio versus the above parameters are graphically presented. 12 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

  14. Development of the barium shaped charge technique in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, J.

    1982-09-01

    In order to generate an artificial, barium luminescent cloud for the study of magnetic or electric field line configurations in the upper atmosphere, it is necessary to initiate a well collimated barium jet with an initial velocity of 8-12 km/sec by means of a shaped charge. Attention is presently given to recent developments in barium shaped charge techniques, including the molding of barium liners, the prevention of rust on the metallic barium charge, the production of a plane detonation wave, and a method for the ground testing of a barium ion jet.

  15. Manufacture of astroloy turbine disk shapes by hot isostatic pressing, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eng, R. D.; Evans, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    The Materials in Advanced Turbine Engines project was conducted to demonstrate container technology and establish manufacturing procedures for fabricating direct Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) of low carbon Astroloy to ultrasonic disk shapes. The HIP processing procedures including powder manufacture and handling, container design and fabrication, and HIP consolidation techniques were established by manufacturing five HIP disks. Based upon dimensional analysis of the first three disks, container technology was refined by modifying container tooling which resulted in closer conformity of the HIP surfaces to the sonic shape. The microstructure, chemistry and mechanical properties of two HIP low carbon Astroloy disks were characterized. One disk was subjected to a ground base experimental engine test, and the results of HIP low carbon Astroloy were analyzed and compared to conventionally forged Waspaloy. The mechanical properties of direct HIP low carbon Astroloy exceeded all property goals and the objectives of reduction in material input weight and reduction in cost were achieved.

  16. High Resolution Diagnostics of a Linear Shaped Charge Jet

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, J.B.; Kuklo, R.M.; Shaw, L.L.; Carter, D.L.; Baum, D.W.

    1999-08-10

    The linear shaped charge is designed to produce a knife blade-like flat jet, which will perforate and sever one side of a modestly hard target from the other. This charge is approximately plane wave initiated and used a water pipe quality circular copper liner. To establish the quality of this jet we report about an experiment using several of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory high-resolution diagnostics previously published in this meeting [1]. Image converter tube camera stereo image pairs were obtained early in the jet formation process. Individual IC images were taken just after the perforation of a thin steel plate. These pictures are augmented with 70 mm format rotating mirror framing images, orthogonal 450 KeV flash radiograph pairs, and arrival time switches (velocity traps) positioned along the length of the jet edge. We have confirmed that linear shaped charges are subject to the same need for high quality copper as any other metal jetting device.

  17. Evaluation of electroformed copper for shaped charge applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dini, J.W.; Gourdin, W.H.

    1989-06-01

    In this paper, we present our observations of the behavior of conical shaped charge liners electroformed in a proprietary acid copper sulfate solution and compare these to the dynamic failure observed in rapidly expanding ring experiments with the same material. Although the electroforms performed poorly in both tests, exhibiting low ductility at the high strain rates encountered, results from the two tests agreed quite favorably. This suggests that the electromagnetic ring test, which is considerably less expensive to perform than explosive tests on full size liners, can be used as a screening test for evaluating materials for shaped charge liner applications. Reasons for the poor performance of the copper are hypothesized and plans for future work outlined. 11 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. An Empirically Based Shaped Charge Jet Break-Up Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Ernest; Pham, James; Vuong, Tan

    2013-06-01

    This paper discusses an empirically based shaped charge jet break-up model based around Walsh's breakup theory and provides significant experimental confirmation over a broad range of velocity gradients. The parameters which affect jet length and breakup times are fairly well known, but there is some controversy over the exact nature of the dependencies. Walsh theorized that the dependence of jet length would take a particular form, based on his determination of a dimensionless parameter for the problem and numerical experiments in which initial perturbation strengths were varied. Walsh did not present comparisons with experimental results. Chou has presented a variety of different jet break-up models with some data comparisons. Mostert [3] has suggested that breakup time is proportional to (Δm/Δv) 1/3. It is shown here that the parameter (Δm/Δv)1/2 or (dm/dv)1/3, closely related to Walsh's dimensionless parameter, whose values were obtained from either experiments or simulations correlates quite well with jet breakup times for a very wide variety of shaped charge devices. The values of Δm and Δv are respectively the jet mass and the velocity difference of the portion of jet in question. For a typical shaped charge Δm/Δv is essentially invariant with respect to time. In this paper, we present the mathematical basis for an empirically based break-up model with a similar basis to Walsh and Mostert, as well as supporting empirical data for a broad range of shaped charge geometries.

  19. Precision linear shaped charge analyses for severance of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, M.G.

    1996-08-01

    The Precision Linear Shaped Charge (PLSC) design concept involves the independent fabrication and assembly of the liner (wedge of PLSC), the tamper/confinement, and explosive. The liner is the most important part of a linear shaped charge (LSC) and should be fabricated by a more quality controlled, precise process than the tamper material. Also, this concept allows the liner material to be different from the tamper material. The explosive can be loaded between the liner and tamper as the last step in the assembly process rather than the first step as in conventional LSC designs. PLSC designs have been shown to produce increased jet penetrations in given targets, more reproducible jet penetration, and more efficient explosive cross-section geometries using a minimum amount of explosive. The Linear Explosive Shaped Charge Analysis (LESCA) code developed at Sandia National Laboratories has been used to assist in the design of PLSCs. LESCA predictions for PLSC jet tip velocities, jet-target impact angles, and jet penetration in aluminum and steel targets are compared to measured data. The advantages of PLSC over conventional LSC are presented. As an example problem, the LESCA code was used to analytically develop a conceptual design for a PLSC component to sever a three-inch thick 1018 steel plate at a water depth of 500 feet (15 atmospheres).

  20. Charging of Basic Structural Shapes in a Simulated Lunar Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craven, P.; Schneider, T.; Vaughn, J.; Wang, J.; Polansky, J.

    2012-01-01

    In order to understand the effect of the charging environment on and around structures on the lunar surface, we have exposed basic structural shapes to electrons and Vacuum Ultra-Violet (VUV) radiation. The objects were, in separate runs, isolated, grounded, and placed on dielectric surfaces. In this presentation, the effects of electron energy, VUV flux, and sample orientation, on the charging of the objects will be examined. The potential of each of the object surfaces was monitored in order to determine the magnitude of the ram and wake effects under different orientations relative to the incoming beams (solar wind). This is a part of, and complementary to, the study of the group at USC under Dr. J. Wang, the purpose of which is to model the effects of the charging environment on structures on the lunar surface.

  1. Charging of Basic Structural Shapes in a Simulated Lunar Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craven, P.; Schneider, T.; Vaughn, J.; Wang, J.; Polansky, J.

    2012-12-01

    In order to understand the effect of the charging environment on and around structures on the lunar surface, we have exposed basic structural shapes to electrons and Vacuum Ultra-Violet (VUV) radiation. The objects were, in separate runs, isolated, grounded, and placed on dielectric surfaces. In this presentation, the effects of electron energy, VUV flux, and sample orientation, on the charging of the objects will be examined. The potential of each of the object surfaces was monitored in order to determine the magnitude of the ram and wake effects under different orientations relative to the incoming beams (solar wind). This is a part of, and complementary to, the study of the group at USC under Dr. J. Wang, the purpose of which is to model the effects of the charging environment on structures on the lunar surface.

  2. Analysis of ``soft`` recovered shaped charge jet particles

    SciTech Connect

    Lassila, D.H.; Nikkel, D.J. Jr.; Kershaw, R.P.; Walters, W.P.

    1996-04-01

    A shaped charge with an 81 mm diameter, 42{degree} apex angle oxygen-free high-conductivity (OFHC) copper conical liner was fired into a ``soft`` recovery bunker to allow metallurgical examination of recovered jet particles and the slug. The initial weight of the copper liner was 245 g, of which 184 g was recovered. The number of jet particles recovered was 37 (approximately 63% of the particles formed by the charge). Extensive metallurgical analyses were performed on the recovered slug and jet particles. The microstructural features associated with voids, e.g., dendritic grain growth, clearly indicate that the regions in the vicinity of the centerline of the slug and jet particles were melted. In this work the authors present calculations of jet temperature as a function of constitutive behavior. In order to predict melt in the center region of the jet they find it necessary to scale flow stress with a pressure dependent shear modulus.

  3. Novel Processing of 81-mm Cu Shaped Charge Liners

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, A; Korzekwa, D

    2002-01-16

    A seven-step procedure was developed for producing shaped charge liner blanks by back extrusion at liquid nitrogen temperatures. Starting with a 38.1-mm diameter, 101.6-mm long cylinder at 77K, three forging steps with a flat-top die are required to produce the solid cone while maintaining low temperature. The solid cone is forged in four individual back extrusions at 77K to produce the rough liner blank. This procedure is capable of being run in batch processes to improve the time efficiency.

  4. Inhibited Shaped Charge Launcher Testing of Spacecraft Shield Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosch, Donald J.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes a test program in which several orbital debris shield designs were impact tested using the inhibited shaped charge launcher facility at Southwest Research Institute. This facility enables researchers to study the impact of one-gram aluminum projectiles on various shielding designs at velocities above 11 km/s. A total of twenty tests were conducted on targets provided by NASA-MSFC. This report discusses in detail the shield design, the projectile parameters and the test configuration used for each test. A brief discussion of the target damage is provided, as the detailed analysis of the target response will be done by NASA-MSFC.

  5. Precision linear shaped charge severance of graphite-epoxy materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vigil, Manuel G.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents Precision Linear Shaped Charge (PLSC) components designed to sever a variety of target materials. Recent data for the severance of graphite-epoxy panels or targets with PLSC's are presented. A brief history of the requirement to originate the development of PLSC's for weapon components at Sandia National Laboratories is presented. The Department of Energy's (DOE) nuclear weapon systems have continually decreased in size. Today's relatively small weapons require the design of much more efficient, lighter, and smaller explosive components because fragments, air shocks, and pyro-shocks associated with the function of these components can damage electrical and other sensitive components located nearby. The DOE requirements for PLSC's are listed. Therefore, linear shaped charge (LSC) components for weapon systems can no longer be empirically or experimentally designed for a given application. Many of today's designs require severing concentric cylinders, for example, where the LSC jet is designed to sever only one of the two cylinders as was the case for the B90/Nuclear Depth Strike Bomb. Therefore, code modeling and simulation technology must be utilized to obtain a better understanding of the LSC jet hydrodynamic penetration, fracture, shear, and spall mechanisms associated with the severance of metallic as well as composite targets.

  6. Matching of operation of "base-head" composite shaped-charge stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malygin, A. V.; Proskuryakov, E. V.; Sorokin, M. V.

    2012-01-01

    A composite shaped charge of a "base-head" type in which the charge located further from the target, in the base part of the projectile, operates first and forms a hole in the target is considered. After a certain time necessary for operation of the first shaped charge, the second shaped charge located in the head part of the projectile is initiated, which exerts a repeated action on the target (make the hole deeper).

  7. Mechanism of anomalous penetration of shaped charge jet into ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumyantsev, Boris V.; Klimenko, Vladimir Yu.

    2012-03-01

    The mechanism of penetration of the jet in silicon carbide had been investigated experimentally and numerically. In contrast to of metals, the penetration of shaped-charge jet into ceramics has an anomalous character and a smaller depth of penetration. The penetration into ceramics is accompanied by a radial interaction of a crater wall fragments with the jet elements and this leads to a partial melting and evaporation of the elements. Appearance of a "gas" phase enables dispersion of the elements, mixing with the wall fragments, formation of an internal absorption volume, and destabilization of further part of the jet. As a result a considerable part of the jet loses the ability by the penetration.

  8. Shaped charges and explosively formed penetrators: background for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Morrison, J J; Mahoney, P F; Hodgetts, T

    2007-09-01

    Shaped Charges (SC) have been used in High Explosive Anti-Tank (HEAT) munitions and the mining industry since World War II. An explosive is used to propel a liner material of low mass at speeds in excess of 5 times the speed of sound. The subsequent projectile is capable of penetrating the steel of armoured vehicles and inflicting significant injury to any enclosed personnel. Explosively Formed Penetrators (EFP) are a variant of a SC, using higher mass at lower speed to deliver their kinetic energy. The Iraq conflict has seen the use of Improvised Explosive Devices utilising EFP (IED-EFP) by insurgent groups attacking military vehicles. The major wounding mechanisms are from fragmentation and burns. This article is a brief overview of the history and science behind SC and EFP.

  9. Manufacture of low carbon astroloy turbine disk shapes by hot isostatic pressing. Volume 2, project 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eng, R. D.; Evans, D. J.

    1979-01-01

    The performance of a hot isotatic pressed disk installed in an experimental engine and exposed to realistic operating conditions in a 150-hour engine test and a 1000 cycle endurance test is documented. Post test analysis, based on visual, fluorescent penetrant and dimensional inspection, revealed no defects in the disk and indicated that the disk performed satisfactorily.

  10. Experimental investigation of penetration performance of shaped charge into concrete targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cheng; Ma, Tianbao; Ning, Jianguo

    2008-06-01

    In order to develop a tandem warhead that can effectively destroy concrete targets, this paper explores the penetration performance of shaped charges with different cone angles and liner materials into concrete targets by means of experiments. The penetration process and the destruction mechanism of concrete targets by shaped charges and kinetic energy projectiles are analyzed and compared. Experimental results suggest that both kinetic energetic projectile and shaped charge are capable of destroying concrete targets, but the magnitudes of damage are different. Compared with a kinetic energy projectile, a shaped charge has more significant effect of penetration into the target, and causes very large spalling area. Hence, a shaped charge is quite suitable for first-stage charge of tandem warhead. It is also found that, with the increase of shaped charge liner cone angle, the depth of penetration decreases gradually while the hole diameter becomes larger. Penetration depth with copper liner is larger than of aluminum liner but hole diameter is relatively smaller, and the shaped charge with steel liner is between the above two cases. The shaped charge with a cone angle of 100° can form a jet projectile charge (JPC). With JPC, a hole with optimum depth and diameter on concrete targets can be formed, which guarantees that the second-stage warhead smoothly penetrates into the hole and explodes at the optimum depth to achieve the desired level of destruction in concrete targets.

  11. Hot isostatically pressed manufacture of high strength MERL 76 disk and seal shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eng, R. D.; Evans, D. J.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of using MERL 76, an advanced high strength direct hot isostatic pressed powder metallurgy superalloy, as a full scale component in a high technology, long life, commercial turbine engine were demonstrated. The component was a JT9D first stage turbine disk. The JT9D disk rim temperature capability was increased by at least 22 C and the weight of JT9D high pressure turbine rotating components was reduced by at least 35 pounds by replacement of forged Superwaspaloy components with hot isostatic pressed (HIP) MERL 76 components. The process control plan and acceptance criteria for manufacture of MERL 76 HIP consolidated components were generated. Disk components were manufactured for spin/burst rig test, experimental engine tests, and design data generation, which established lower design properties including tensile, stress-rupture, 0.2% creep and notched (Kt = 2.5) low cycle fatigue properties, Sonntag, fatigue crack propagation, and low cycle fatigue crack threshold data. Direct HIP MERL 76, when compared to conventionally forged Superwaspaloy, is demonstrated to be superior in mechanical properties, increased rim temperature capability, reduced component weight, and reduced material cost by at least 30% based on 1980 costs.

  12. SR90, strontium shaped-charge critical ionization velocity experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, Eugene M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, Hans; Swift, Daniel W.; Valenzuela, Arnoldo; Rees, David

    1990-01-01

    In May 1986 an experiment was performed to test Alfven's critical ionization velocity (CIV) effect in free space, using the first high explosive shaped charge with a conical liner of strontium metal. The release, made at 540 km altitude at dawn twilight, was aimed at 48 deg to B. The background electron density was 1.5 x 10(exp 4) cu cm. A faint field-aligned Sr(+) ion streak with tip velocity of 2.6 km/s was observed from two optical sites. Using two calibration methods, it was calculated that between 4.5 x 10(exp 20) and 2 x 10(exp 21) ions were visible. An ionization time constant of 1920 s was calculated for Sr from the solar UV spectrum and ionization cross section which combined with a computer simulation of the injection predicts 1.7 x 10(exp 21) solar UV ions in the low-velocity part of the ion streak. Thus all the observed ions are from solar UV ionization of the slow (less than critical) velocity portion of the neutral jet. The observed neutral Sr velocity distribution and computer simulations indicate that 2 x 10(exp 21) solar UV ions would have been created from the fast (greater than critical) part of the jet. They would have been more diffuse, and were not observed. Using this fact it was estimated that any CIV ions created were less than 10(exp 21). It was concluded that future Sr CIV free space experiments should be conducted below the UV shadow height and in much larger background plasma density.

  13. Attitude dynamics of a pendulum-shaped charged satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakawa, Hiroshi; Hachiyama, Shinji; Bando, Mai

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the possibility of the use of the Lorentz force, which acts on charged satellite when it is moving through the magnetic field, as a means of satellite attitude control. We first derive the equations of attitude motion of charged satellite and then investigate the stability of the motion. Finally we propose an attitude control method using the Lorentz force. Our method requires moderate charge level for future Lorentz-augmented satellite.

  14. Shape oscillations of an electrically charged diamagnetically levitated droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, R. J. A.; Eaves, L.

    2012-03-01

    We use diamagnetic levitation to investigate the effect of electrical charge on the normal mode vibration frequencies of charged water droplets with radii 4.5-7.5 mm. This technique allows us to levitate almost spherical droplets, enabling us to directly compare the measured frequencies of the first seven modes with theoretical values calculated by Lord Rayleigh, with which we find good agreement.

  15. Thermal softening of metallic shaped-charge jets formed by the collapse of shaped-charge liners in the presence of a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, S. V.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the possibility of increasing the ultimate stretching and penetration capability of metallic shaped-charge jets in the presence of an axial magnetic field in the shaped-charge liner due to heating and thermal softening of the jet material as a result of a sharp increase in the magnetic-field induction in the jet formation region upon liner collapse. This process is studied by numerical simulation in a quasi-two-dimensional formulation taking into account the inertial stretching of the conductive rigid-plastic rod in the presence of a longitudinal magnetic field in it.

  16. Properties of Porous TiNbZr Shape Memory Alloy Fabricated by Mechanical Alloying and Hot Isostatic Pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, L. W.; Chung, C. Y.; Tong, Y. X.; Zheng, Y. F.

    2011-07-01

    In the past decades, systematic researches have been focused on studying Ti-Nb-based SMAs by adding ternary elements, such as Mo, Sn, Zr, etc. However, only arc melting or induction melting methods, with subsequent hot or cold rolling, were used to fabricate these Ni-free SMAs. There is no work related to powder metallurgy and porous structures. This study focuses on the fabrication and characterization of porous Ti-22Nb-6Zr (at.%) shape memory alloys produced using elemental powders by means of mechanical alloying and hot isostatic pressing. It is found that the porous Ti-22Nb-6Zr alloys prepared by the HIP process exhibit a homogenous pore distribution with spherical pores, while the pores have irregular shape in the specimen prepared by conventional sintering. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the solid solution-treated Ti-22Nb-6Zr alloy consists of both β phase and α″ martensite phase. Morphologies of martensite were observed. Finally, the porous Ti-22Nb-6Zr SMAs produced by both MA and HIP exhibit good mechanical properties, such as superior superelasticity, with maximum recoverable strain of ~3% and high compressive strength.

  17. Multiscale Numerical Simulation of the Shaped Charge Jet Generated from Tungsten-Copper Powder Liner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jintao, Liu; Hongnian, Cai; Fuchi, Wang; Qunbo, Fan

    2013-03-01

    Formation process of the shaped charge jet of W-Cu powder liner was simulated with smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method of LS-DYNA software. With the digital image process technique and macro-micro coupling method, a multiscale finite element model was established, and the high speed deformation process of the microstructure driven by explosive detonation in the liner of shaped charge was successfully simulated. The Cu phases were susceptible to serious deformation while the tungsten phase has less deformation. Besides, the temperature field of the microstructure during the shaped charge deforming was calculated, and a discussion of the deformation mechanism of the liner was given. The methods proposed in this paper would be of help in microstructure design of shaped charge materials.

  18. Active experiments using rocket-borne shaped charge barium releases. [solar-terrestrial magnetospheric physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.; Davis, T. N.

    1980-01-01

    A reliable payload system and scaled down shaped charges were developed for carrying out experiments in solar-terrestrial magnetospheric physics. Four Nike-Tomahawk flights with apogees near 450 km were conducted to investigate magnetospheric electric fields, and two Taurus-Tomahawk rockets were flown in experiments on the auroral acceleration process in discrete auroras. In addition, a radial shaped charge was designed for plasma perturbation experiments.

  19. Charge transport anisotropy in n-type disk-shaped triphenylene-tris(aroyleneimidazole)s.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Hanifi, David; Alvarez, Steven; Antonio, Francisco; Pun, Andrew; Klivansky, Liana M; Hexemer, Alexander; Ma, Biwu; Liu, Yi

    2011-12-16

    Two novel n-type disk-shaped molecules containing a triphenylene core and three fused naphthaleneimide imidazole or peryleneimide imidazole "arms" are synthesized and characterized. The n-type charge carrier mobilities of these molecules are evaluated by both field effect transistors and space-charge limited-current measurements, which exhibit drastically different mobility anisotropy. A strong correlation between film morphology and the charge transport behavior is established by X-ray scattering and atomic force microscopic analyses.

  20. Probes of shape transitions from mass and charge radii of nuclear ground states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, B. H.; Liu, C. Y.

    2016-09-01

    The masses and sizes of nuclear ground states constitute two of the most precise and extensive arrays of experimental information. These data make a model-independent view of microscopic nuclear structure possible. Relevant differential observables of nuclear mass and charge radius can be highly sensitive to nuclear shape transitions. In this contribution, we examine the correlation of these two bulk properties to nuclear shape transitions. By combining different observables, it is even possible to isolate shape transitions from nuclear shell closures.

  1. Axisymmetric shapes and stability of charged drops in an external electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basaran, O. A.; Scriven, L. E.

    1989-05-01

    A highly conducting charged drop that is surrounded by a fluid insulator of another density can be levitated by suitably applying a uniform electric field. Axisymmetric equilibrium shapes and stability of the levitated drop are found by solving simultaneously the augmented Young-Laplace equation for surface shape and the Laplace equation for the electric field, together with constraints of fixed drop volume, charge, and center of mass. The means are a method of subdomains, finite element basis functions, and Galerkin's method of weighted residuals, all facilitated by a large-scale computer. Shape families of fixed charge are treated systematically by first-order continuation. Previous analyses by Abbas et al. in 1967 and Abbas and Latham in 1969, in which the shapes of levitated drops are approximated as spheroids, are corrected. The new analysis shows that drops charged to less than the Rayleigh limit lose shape stability at turning points, with respect to external field strength, and that the instability seen in experiments of Doyle et al. in 1964 and others is not a bifurcation to a family of two-lobed shapes, but rather is a related imperfect bifurcation.

  2. Axisymmetric shapes and stability of charged drops in an external electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basaran, O. A.; Scriven, L. E.

    1989-05-01

    A highly conducting charged drop that is surrounded by a fluid insulator of another density can be levitated by suitably applying a uniform electric field. Axisymmetric equilibrium shapes and stability of the levitated drop are found by solving simultaneously the augmented Young-Laplace equation for surface shape and the Laplace equation for the elecric field, together with constraints of fixed drop volume, charge, and center of mass. The means are a method of subdomains, finite element basis functions, and Galerkin's method of weighted residuals, all facilitated by a large-scale computer. Shape families of fixed charge are treated systematically by first-order continuation. Previous analyses by Abbas et al. in 1967 and Abbas and Latham in 1969, in which the shapes of levitated drops are approximated as spheroids, are corrected. The new analysis shows that drops charged to less than the Rayleigh limit lose shape stability at turning points, with respect to external field strength, and that the instability seen in experiments of Doyle et al. in 1964 and others is not a bifurcation to a family of two-lobed shapes, but rather is a related imperfect bifurcation.

  3. The Global University Press

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    The modern world's understanding of American university press has long been shaped by university-press books. American university-press books are good international advertisements for the universities whose logos grace their spines. The growth of transnational scholarship and the expansion of digital communications networks are converging in ways…

  4. Effect of surface charge convection and shape deformation on the dielectrophoretic motion of a liquid drop.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Shubhadeep; Bandopadhyay, Aditya; Chakraborty, Suman

    2016-04-01

    The dielectrophoretic motion and shape deformation of a Newtonian liquid drop in an otherwise quiescent Newtonian liquid medium in the presence of an axisymmetric nonuniform dc electric field consisting of uniform and quadrupole components is investigated. The theory put forward by Feng [J. Q. Feng, Phys. Rev. E 54, 4438 (1996)10.1103/PhysRevE.54.4438] is generalized by incorporating the following two nonlinear effects-surface charge convection and shape deformation-towards determining the drop velocity. This two-way coupled moving boundary problem is solved analytically by considering small values of electric Reynolds number (ratio of charge relaxation time scale to the convection time scale) and electric capillary number (ratio of electrical stress to the surface tension) under the framework of the leaky dielectric model. We focus on investigating the effects of charge convection and shape deformation for different drop-medium combinations. A perfectly conducting drop suspended in a leaky (or perfectly) dielectric medium always deforms to a prolate shape and this kind of shape deformation always augments the dielectrophoretic drop velocity. For a perfectly dielectric drop suspended in a perfectly dielectric medium, the shape deformation leads to either increase (for prolate shape) or decrease (for oblate shape) in the dielectrophoretic drop velocity. Both surface charge convection and shape deformation affect the drop motion for leaky dielectric drops. The combined effect of these can significantly increase or decrease the dielectrophoretic drop velocity depending on the electrohydrodynamic properties of both the liquids and the relative strength of the electric Reynolds number and electric capillary number. Finally, comparison with the existing experiments reveals better agreement with the present theory. PMID:27176410

  5. Effect of surface charge convection and shape deformation on the dielectrophoretic motion of a liquid drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Shubhadeep; Bandopadhyay, Aditya; Chakraborty, Suman

    2016-04-01

    The dielectrophoretic motion and shape deformation of a Newtonian liquid drop in an otherwise quiescent Newtonian liquid medium in the presence of an axisymmetric nonuniform dc electric field consisting of uniform and quadrupole components is investigated. The theory put forward by Feng [J. Q. Feng, Phys. Rev. E 54, 4438 (1996), 10.1103/PhysRevE.54.4438] is generalized by incorporating the following two nonlinear effects—surface charge convection and shape deformation—towards determining the drop velocity. This two-way coupled moving boundary problem is solved analytically by considering small values of electric Reynolds number (ratio of charge relaxation time scale to the convection time scale) and electric capillary number (ratio of electrical stress to the surface tension) under the framework of the leaky dielectric model. We focus on investigating the effects of charge convection and shape deformation for different drop-medium combinations. A perfectly conducting drop suspended in a leaky (or perfectly) dielectric medium always deforms to a prolate shape and this kind of shape deformation always augments the dielectrophoretic drop velocity. For a perfectly dielectric drop suspended in a perfectly dielectric medium, the shape deformation leads to either increase (for prolate shape) or decrease (for oblate shape) in the dielectrophoretic drop velocity. Both surface charge convection and shape deformation affect the drop motion for leaky dielectric drops. The combined effect of these can significantly increase or decrease the dielectrophoretic drop velocity depending on the electrohydrodynamic properties of both the liquids and the relative strength of the electric Reynolds number and electric capillary number. Finally, comparison with the existing experiments reveals better agreement with the present theory.

  6. Effect of surface charge convection and shape deformation on the dielectrophoretic motion of a liquid drop.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Shubhadeep; Bandopadhyay, Aditya; Chakraborty, Suman

    2016-04-01

    The dielectrophoretic motion and shape deformation of a Newtonian liquid drop in an otherwise quiescent Newtonian liquid medium in the presence of an axisymmetric nonuniform dc electric field consisting of uniform and quadrupole components is investigated. The theory put forward by Feng [J. Q. Feng, Phys. Rev. E 54, 4438 (1996)10.1103/PhysRevE.54.4438] is generalized by incorporating the following two nonlinear effects-surface charge convection and shape deformation-towards determining the drop velocity. This two-way coupled moving boundary problem is solved analytically by considering small values of electric Reynolds number (ratio of charge relaxation time scale to the convection time scale) and electric capillary number (ratio of electrical stress to the surface tension) under the framework of the leaky dielectric model. We focus on investigating the effects of charge convection and shape deformation for different drop-medium combinations. A perfectly conducting drop suspended in a leaky (or perfectly) dielectric medium always deforms to a prolate shape and this kind of shape deformation always augments the dielectrophoretic drop velocity. For a perfectly dielectric drop suspended in a perfectly dielectric medium, the shape deformation leads to either increase (for prolate shape) or decrease (for oblate shape) in the dielectrophoretic drop velocity. Both surface charge convection and shape deformation affect the drop motion for leaky dielectric drops. The combined effect of these can significantly increase or decrease the dielectrophoretic drop velocity depending on the electrohydrodynamic properties of both the liquids and the relative strength of the electric Reynolds number and electric capillary number. Finally, comparison with the existing experiments reveals better agreement with the present theory.

  7. On the equilibrium shape of a heavily charged drop suspended in a weak electrostatic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiryaeva, S. O.; Petrushov, N. A.; Grigor'ev, A. I.

    2015-08-01

    The object of investigation is the shape of a heavily charged drop placed in a weak electrostatic field. Calculations were carried out in the fourth order of smallness in the eccentricity, through which the steady-state deformation of the drop is measured. It is shown that the equilibrium shape of such a drop can be approximated by a prolate spheroid. This shape is due to the self-charge of the drop rather than to the external field, which is very weak and merely specifies a preferred direction. In an electrostatic suspension, where such a situation may take place, the deformation-related measurement inaccuracy of the critical charge can be totally eliminated if fine droplets are used.

  8. Experimental and simulation optimization analysis of the Whipple shields against shaped charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, G.; Hameed, A.; Horsfall, I.; Barton, P.; Malik, A. Q.

    2012-06-01

    Occasionally, the Whipple shields are used for the protection of a space station and a satellite against the meteoroids and orbital debris. In the Whipple shields each layer of the shield depletes part of high speed projectile energy either by breaking the projectile or absorbing its energy. Similarly, this investigation uses the Whipple shields against the shaped charge to protect the light armour such as infantry fighting vehicles with a little modification in their design. The unsteady multiple interactions of shaped charge jet with the Whipple shield package against the steady homogeneous target is scrutinized to optimize the shield thickness. Simulations indicate that the shield thickness of 0.75 mm offers an optimum configuration against the shaped charge. Experiments also support this evidence.

  9. Pyrotechnic shock: A literature survey of the Linear Shaped Charge (LSC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    Linear shaped charge (LSC) literature for the past 20 years is reviewed. The following topics are discussed: (1) LSC configuration; (2) LSC usage; (3) LSC induced pyroshock; (4) simulated pyrotechnic testing; (5) actual pyrotechnic testing; (6) data collection methods; (7) data analysis techniques; (8) shock reduction methods; and (9) design criteria. Although no new discoveries have been made in LSC research, charge shapes are improved to allow better cutting performance, testing instrumentation is refined, and some new explosives, for use in LSC, are formulated.

  10. Numerical simulation of damage and fracture in concrete from shaped charge jets

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, M J; Baum, D W; Clark, D B; McGuire, E M; Simonson, S C

    2000-09-13

    This paper addresses numerical simulation of damage and fracture in concrete from the impact and penetration of shaped charge jets. We have modeled the jet penetration process with CALE, a two dimensional arbitrary Lagrange Eulerian hydrocode. We have looked at several constitutive models ranging from simple pressure dependent yield to more complex deviatoric models that include the effects of dilatency. Evaluation of the concrete material models is based on comparison to experimental results of an aluminum lined shaped charge fired against a high strength concrete target at several standoff distances.

  11. Charge Transport Anisotropy in n-Type Disk-Shaped Triphenylene-Tris(aroyleneimidazole)s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, Steven; Zhang, Yue; Hanifi, David; Antonio, Francisco; Pun, Andrew; Klivansky, Liana; Hexemer, Alexander; Ma, Biwu; Liu, Yi

    2012-02-01

    Two novel n-type disk-shaped molecules containing a triphenylene core and three fused naphthaleneimide imidazole or peryleneimide imidazole ``arms'' are synthesized and characterized. Their optical and electronic properties are consistent with the pi-extended structural feature of the aromatic cores. The n-type charge carrier mobilities of these molecules are evaluated by both field effect transistors and space-charge limited-current measurements, which show drastically different mobility anisotropy. A strong correlation between film morphology and the charge transport behavior is established by X-ray scattering and atomic force microscopic analyses.

  12. Annular precision linear shaped charge flight termination system for the ODES program

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, M.G.; Marchi, D.L.

    1994-06-01

    The work for the development of an Annular Precision Linear Shaped Charge (APLSC) Flight Termination System (FTS) for the Operation and Deployment Experiment Simulator (ODES) program is discussed and presented in this report. The Precision Linear Shaped Charge (PLSC) concept was recently developed at Sandia. The APLSC component is designed to produce a copper jet to cut four inch diameter holes in each of two spherical tanks, one containing fuel and the other an oxidizer that are hyperbolic when mixed, to terminate the ODES vehicle flight if necessary. The FTS includes two detonators, six Mild Detonating Fuse (MDF) transfer lines, a detonator block, detonation transfer manifold, and the APLSC component. PLSCs have previously been designed in ring components where the jet penetrating axis is either directly away or toward the center of the ring assembly. Typically, these PLSC components are designed to cut metal cylinders from the outside inward or from the inside outward. The ODES program requires an annular linear shaped charge. The (Linear Shaped Charge Analysis) LESCA code was used to design this 65 grain/foot APLSC and data comparing the analytically predicted to experimental data are presented. Jet penetration data are presented to assess the maximum depth and reproducibility of the penetration. Data are presented for full scale tests, including all FTS components, and conducted with nominal 19 inch diameter, spherical tanks.

  13. The Effect of Aerodynamic Heating on Air Penetration by Shaped Charge Jets and Their Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backofen, Joseph

    2009-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to present recent work modeling thermal coupling between shaped charge jets and their particles with air while it is being penetrated to form a crater that subsequently collapses back onto the jet. This work complements research published at International Symposia on Ballistics: 1) 1987 - Shaped Charge Jet Aerodynamics, Particulation and Blast Field Modeling; and 2) 2007 - Air Cratering by Eroding Shaped Charge Jets. The current work shows how and when a shaped charge jet's tip and jet particles are softened enough that they can erode in a hydrodynamic manner as modeled in these papers. This paper and its presentation includes models for heat transfer from shocked air as a function of jet velocity as well as heat flow within the jet or particle. The work is supported by an extensive bibliographic search including publications on meteors and ballistic missile re-entry vehicles. The modeling shows that a jet loses its strength to the depth required to justify hydrodynamic erosion when its velocity is above a specific velocity related to the shock properties of air and the jet material's properties. As a result, the portion of a jet's kinetic energy converted at the aerodynamic shock into heating transferred back onto the jet affects the energy deposited into the air through drag and ablation which in turn affect air crater expansion and subsequent collapse back onto the jet and its particles as shown in high-speed photography.

  14. Preshock Desensitization Phenomena during Initiation of Covered Heterogeneous Explosives by Shaped Charge Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Tariq; Liu, Yan; Huang, Fenglei; Tanver, Abbas

    2016-04-01

    The initiation of heterogeneous explosives by shaped charge jets is discussed. A reactive flow model, specially modified to account for the desensitization effects due to preshocking in heterogeneous explosives, is used to investigate the initiation of explosives by a shaped charge jet. Previously reported shaped charge jet initiation experimental setups are simulated using hydrodynamic software LS-DYNA with the desensitization model implemented as a user-defined equation of state. The simulation results indicate that the desensitization effects caused by the shocks preceding the jet play a significant role in determination of the run to detonation distance for covered explosives initiated by jets. The failure in initiation in the first explosive sample that is in contact with the steel plate and initiation of the second sample separated further by an air gap during penetration of the jet can be explained on the basis of desensitization phenomena. The simulation qualitatively reproduces various shock interaction phenomenon occurring in explosives during penetration by a shaped charge jet.

  15. Characterization and comparison of microstructures in the shaped-charge regime: Copper and tantalum

    SciTech Connect

    Gurevitch, A.C.; Murr, L.E.; Shih, H.K.; Niou, C.S.; Advani, A.H.; Manuel, D. ); Zernow, L. )

    1993-04-01

    Light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy techniques were employed, along with a novel technique for building up small, recovered jet fragments using electrodeposition of copper, to examine specific segments of fabricated shaped charge liner cones and corresponding, residual jet fragments. Oxygen-free electronic copper and tantalum shaped charge regimes (liner cones and recovered jet fragments) were compared, and a reduction in the average grain size of recovered jet fragments as compared to the starting liner cones was a consistent observation. The average grain sizes for all cones was 35 [mu]m, and the maximum grain reduction occurred for an annealed, equiaxed tantalum cone, which resulted in a residual jet fragment grain size between 1 and 5 [mu]m. This is indicative of dynamic recrystallization during jet elongation and microstructure evolution. The most recent US military use of shaped charges was in the high explosive antitank shells used in the 1990-1991 conflict with Iraq. Shaped charges are also used in the oil and gas industries, steel industries, mining and quarrying, specialty cutting, and perhaps most prominently in building demolition work within cities.

  16. Identified charged hadron production in Pb-Pb collisions with event shape engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangaro, Marco Antonio; ALICE Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    The Event Shape Engineering technique allows the selection of different event shapes for a definite centrality and colliding system. The event selection is based on the azimuthal distribution of produced particles, using the so-called flow vector. For such shape selected events, the elliptic flow coefficient (v2) is significantly different with respect to the unbiased events. Moreover, recent Monte-Carlo studies show a strong correlation between the (final state) event shape selection and the (initial state) eccentricity of the collision. This opens the opportunity to characterize events according to the initial geometry. An approach to select the eccentricity of the event with the Event Shape Engineering is presented. Then the effect of this selection on identified particle spectra, mean transverse momentum and v2 of charged particles in heavy-ion collisions at \\sqrt{sNN} = 2.76 TeV center-of-mass energy is discussed.

  17. CPM: a deformable model for shape recovery and segmentation based on charged particles.

    PubMed

    Jalba, Andrei C; Wilkinson, Michael H F; Roerdink, Jos B T M

    2004-10-01

    A novel, physically motivated deformable model for shape recovery and segmentation is presented. The model, referred to as the charged-particle model (CPM), is inspired by classical electrodynamics and is based on a simulation of charged particles moving in an electrostatic field. The charges are attracted towards the contours of the objects of interest by an electrostatic field, whose sources are computed based on the gradient-magnitude image. The electric field plays the same role as the potential forces in the snake model, while internal interactions are modeled by repulsive Coulomb forces. We demonstrate the flexibility and potential of the model in a wide variety of settings: shape recovery using manual initialization, automatic segmentation, and skeleton computation. We perform a comparative analysis of the proposed model with the active contour model and show that specific problems of the latter are surmounted by our model. The model is easily extendable to 3D and copes well with noisy images.

  18. Scaling symmetry and conserved charge for shape-invariant optical fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawhary, Omar El; Severini, Sergio

    2013-02-01

    In this work we present an extensive study of the scaling symmetry typical of a paraxial wave theory. In particular, by means of a Lagrangian approach we derive the conservation law and the corresponding generalized charge associated with the scale invariance symmetry. In general, such a conserved charge, qs say, can take any value that remains constant during propagation. However, it is explicitly proven that for the whole class of physically realizable shape-invariant fields, that is, fields whose intensity distribution maintains its shape on propagation, qs must necessarily vanish. Finally, an interesting relation between such charge qs and the effective radius of a beam, as introduced by Siegman some years ago, is derived.

  19. Pore structure and function of synthetic nanopores with fixed charges: tip shape and rectification properties.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Patricio; Apel, Pavel Yu; Cervera, Javier; Mafé, Salvador

    2008-08-01

    We present a complete theoretical study of the relationship between the structure (tip shape and dimensions) and function (selectivity and rectification) of asymmetric nanopores on the basis of previous experimental studies. The theoretical model uses a continuum approach based on the Nernst-Planck equations. According to our results, the nanopore transport properties, such as current-voltage (I-V) characteristics, conductance, rectification ratio, and selectivity, are dictated mainly by the shape of the pore tip (we have distinguished bullet-like, conical, trumpet-like, and hybrid shapes) and the concentration of pore surface charges. As a consequence, the nanopore performance in practical applications will depend not only on the base and tip openings but also on the pore shape. In particular, we show that the pore opening dimensions estimated from the pore conductance can be very different, depending on the pore shape assumed. The results obtained can also be of practical relevance for the design of nanopores, nanopipettes, and nanoelectrodes, where the electrical interactions between the charges attached to the nanostructure and the mobile charges confined in the reduced volume of the inside solution dictate the device performance in practical applications. Because single tracks are the elementary building blocks for nanoporous membranes, the understanding and control of their individual properties should also be crucial in protein separation, water desalination, and bio-molecule detection using arrays of identical nanopores.

  20. Phase equilibria of charge-, size-, and shape-asymmetric model electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qiliang; de Pablo, Juan J

    2002-03-01

    The low-temperature phase behavior of two 2:1 hard-core electrolyte models has been investigated by Monte Carlo simulations. In the first model, both bivalent cations and monovalent anions are spherical, and the charges are located at the ion's centers; in the second model, bivalent cations are modeled as rigid dimers composed of two tangent hard spheres, each carrying a positive charge at the center. It is found that the critical temperature and the critical density are strongly affected by the size asymmetry and the shape of the ions. The results presented in this work provide insights into the behavior of charged colloidal suspensions and polyelectrolytes, where large, symmetric or asymmetric ionic species carrying like charges can attract each other and give rise to thermodynamically unstable conditions.

  1. Energy transfer through a multi-layer liner for shaped charges

    DOEpatents

    Skolnick, Saul; Goodman, Albert

    1985-01-01

    This invention relates to the determination of parameters for selecting materials for use as liners in shaped charges to transfer the greatest amount of energy to the explosive jet. Multi-layer liners constructed of metal in shaped charges for oil well perforators or other applications are selected in accordance with the invention to maximize the penetrating effect of the explosive jet by reference to four parameters: (1) Adjusting the explosive charge to liner mass ratio to achieve a balance between the amount of explosive used in a shaped charge and the areal density of the liner material; (2) Adjusting the ductility of each layer of a multi-layer liner to enhance the formation of a longer energy jet; (3) Buffering the intermediate layers of a multi-layer liner by varying the properties of each layer, e.g., composition, thickness, ductility, acoustic impedance and areal density, to protect the final inside layer of high density material from shattering upon impact of the explosive force and, instead, flow smoothly into a jet; and (4) Adjusting the impedance of the layers in a liner to enhance the transmission and reduce the reflection of explosive energy across the interface between layers.

  2. Simulations of the Formation and Hydrodynamic Penetration of Micro-Shaped Charge Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, D. Scott; Najjar, Fady M.; Szuck, Matthew; Glumac, Nick

    2011-11-01

    An explosively formed shape charge jet can be generated by the action of a detonation in explosive charge that surrounds a hollow cone of metal, embedded in the explosive, that collapses the cone on the central axis in order to form a forward-going jet of metal. We discuss the results of a series of multi-material simulations for very small charges and cones, for which the thickness of the metal (copper) cone is less than 1/100th of an inch. We look at the ability of these micro-shaped charge jets ability to penetrate aluminum target blocks and compare against experiment. We examine the effects of shape defects in the cone liner and how they affect the penetration depth. The LLNL multi-physics hydrodynamic code ALE3D is used to carry out the simulations. DSS, MS and NG were supported by AFRL/RW AF FA8651-10-1-0004. FMN's work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-491793.

  3. Fission-Fragment Charge Yields in a Brownian Shape-Motion Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, P.; Randrup, J.

    2014-09-01

    We use a recent model for fission-fragment yield distributions based on Brownian shape motion on 5D potential-energy surfaces to calculate fission-fragment charge yields for the complete U and Th isotope chains observed in the seminal GSI experiment by K.H. Schmidt et al. Previously it was shown that this model describes the transition between symmetric and asymmetric fission in the light Th region; however in these studies the damping of shell corrections with energy was not taken into account. Here we use a generalized Brownian shape-motion model that includes damping of shell corrections with energy.

  4. Ignition-and-Growth Modeling of NASA Standard Detonator and a Linear Shaped Charge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oguz, Sirri

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to quantitatively investigate the ignition and shock sensitivity of NASA Standard Detonator (NSD) and the shock wave propagation of a linear shaped charge (LSC) after being shocked by NSD flyer plate. This combined explosive train was modeled as a coupled Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) model with LS-DYNA hydro code. An ignition-and-growth (I&G) reactive model based on unreacted and reacted Jones-Wilkins-Lee (JWL) equations of state was used to simulate the shock initiation. Various NSD-to-LSC stand-off distances were analyzed to calculate the shock initiation (or failure to initiate) and detonation wave propagation along the shaped charge. Simulation results were verified by experimental data which included VISAR tests for NSD flyer plate velocity measurement and an aluminum target severance test for LSC performance verification. Parameters used for the analysis were obtained from various published data or by using CHEETAH thermo-chemical code.

  5. Particulation in jets from free-form hemispherical shaped charges with copper liners

    SciTech Connect

    Simonson, S.C. III; Haselman, L.C. Jr.; Breithaupt, R.D.

    1995-05-01

    Particulation in free-form hemispherical shaped charge jets is considerably different from that in conical shaped charge jets. From the analysis of the particulation data for 23 experiments covering ten free-form hemi designs with copper liners, it is concluded that jets with higher convergence pressures have delayed particulation, sometimes by as much as a factor of two. Breakup is also found to be design dependent, with free-form hemis have delayed breakup compared with cones. Also, in going from the earlier, boat-tail high explosive (HE) designs to later, more efficient hemispherical HE designs, it is found that particulation is delayed in the tail of the jet. These effects indicate the potential for deeper armor penetration based on control of particulation.

  6. Validation of Two Hydrocodes with a Bi-Metallic Shaped Charge Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ingraham, Daniel J.

    2012-08-16

    Staggered grid (SGH) and cell-centered (CCH) Lagrangian Hydro are two approaches to modeling high explosives (HE) experiments. HE experiments involve complex flows. For example, the discontinuity in the tangential velocity across a frictionless contact surface. In this work, the SGH and CCH schemes with a contact surface algorithm are used to simulate a bimetallic shaped charge experiment using FLAG. Experiment will be performed at LANL in the coming year and used to validate the SGH and CCH schemes results.

  7. Deflection and focusing of charged particles by cavities of general shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinderer, G.

    1991-04-01

    The integrated transverse momentum change of a charged particle in the rf field of a cavity can be related to the change of its voltage gain due to a virtual transverse displacement of its orbit. Formulas for the particle deflection are derived, which are a generalisation of the Panofsky-Wenzel theorem to an arbitrary cavity shape and to curved orbits through the cavity. In addition, some useful formulas for the transverse and longitudinal focusing are presented.

  8. Prediction of part shape and associated material properties in hot-press forming using Unite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hwigeon; Ha, Jinjin; Lee, Myoung-Gyu; Barlat, Frederic

    2016-08-01

    The hot-press forming of a U-channel was conducted on a boron-steel blank. The die consisted of two separate parts in order to perform the partial quenching process. The cold die was initially at 25 °C while the heated die was set to five different temperatures, namely, 25, 120, 220, 320 and 400 °C. The cooling temperature history, Vickers hardness and springback of the channel were measured. A thermo-mechanical-metallurgical model, which accounts for the prior austenite deformation effect, was successfully implemented in the LS-DYNA explicit solver to simulate the hot-press forming process under partial quenching conditions. The predicted and experimental results were compared and found in reasonable agreement.

  9. Neutrino energy reconstruction and the shape of the charged current quasielastic-like total cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieves, J.; Sánchez, F.; Simo, I. Ruiz; Vacas, M. J. Vicente

    2012-06-01

    We show that because of the multinucleon mechanism effects, the algorithm used to reconstruct the neutrino energy is not adequate when dealing with quasielastic-like events, and a distortion of the total flux-unfolded cross-section shape is produced. This amounts to a redistribution of strength from high to low energies, which gives rise to a sizable excess (deficit) of low (high) energy neutrinos. This distortion of the shape leads to a good description of the MiniBooNE unfolded charged current quasielastic-like cross sections published by A. A. Aguilar-Arevalo [(MiniBooNE Collaboration), Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ1550-7998 81, 092005 (2010)]10.1103/PhysRevD.81.092005. However, these changes in the shape are artifacts of the unfolding process that ignores multinucleon mechanisms.

  10. Transmission of slow highly charged ions through glass capillaries: Role of the capillary shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, C. L.; Simon, M.; Ikeda, T.; Guillous, S.; Iskandar, W.; Méry, A.; Rangama, J.; Lebius, H.; Benyagoub, A.; Grygiel, C.; Müller, A.; Döbeli, M.; Tanis, J. A.; Cassimi, A.

    2013-11-01

    Comparison of the transmission of 27-keV Ar9+ ions through insulating funnel- and conical-shaped glass capillaries of outlet diameters of ˜22 μm is reported. Beam intensities of 1, 5, and 10 pA were injected into both capillaries. Transmission at the untilted angle of 0° was measured as well as at a tilt angle of ˜0.5° for the funnel capillary and a tilt angle of ˜1.1° for the conical capillary. For the funnel capillary, blocking of transmission was observed, whereas, the transmission was continuous for the conical capillary. These measurements suggest that conical-shaped capillaries have transport properties that are different than funnel-shaped capillaries for slow highly charged ions.

  11. The role of shape on electronic structure and charge transport in faceted PbSe nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Ananth P; Lukose, Binit; Clancy, Paulette

    2014-03-25

    We have determined the effect of shape on the charge transport characteristics of nanocrystals. Our study looked at the explicit determination of the electronic properties of faceted nanocrystals that essentially probe the limit of current computational reach, i.e., nanocrystals from 1.53 to 2.1 nm in diameter. These nanocrystals, which resemble PbSe systems, are either bare or covered in short ligands. They also differ in shape, octahedral vs cube-octahedral, and in superlattice symmetry (fcc vs bcc). We have provided insights on electron and hole coupling along different facets and overall charge mobility in bcc and fcc superlattices. We have determined that the relative areas of (100) to (111) facets, and facet atom types are important factors governing the optimization of charge transport. The calculated electronic density of states shows no role of -SCH3- ligands on states near the band gap. Electron coupling between nanocrystals is significantly higher than that of hole coupling; thiol ligands lower the ratio between electron and hole couplings. Stronger coupling exists between smaller nanocrystals. PMID:24548107

  12. Effects of high pressure strength of rock material on penetration by shaped charge jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hongfa

    2012-03-01

    Perforating of oil/gas well creates communication tunnel between reservoir and wellbore. Shaped charges are widely used as perforators in oilfield industry. The liners of the charges are mostly made of powder metal to prevent solid slug clogging the entrance hole of well casing or locking the hole in perforating gun. High speed jet from the shaped charge pierces through perforating gun, well fluid, well casing, and then penetrates into reservoir formation. Prediction of jet penetration in reservoir rock is critical in modeling of well production. An analytical penetration model developed for solid rod by Tate and Alekseevskii is applied in this work. For better results, strength of formation rock at high pressure needs to be measured. Lateral stress gauge measurements in plate impact tests are conducted. Piezoelectric pressure gauges are imbedded in samples to measure the longitudinal and transverse stress simultaneously. The two stresses provide Hugoniot and material compressive strength. Indiana limestone, a typical rock in perforation testing, is selected as target sample material in the plate impact tests. Since target strength effect on penetration is more important in late stage of penetration when the strength of material becomes significant compared to the impact pressure, all the impact tests are focused on lower impact pressure up to 9 GPa. The measurements show that the strength increases with impact pressure. The results are applied in the penetration calculations. The final penetration matches testing data very well.

  13. Beam splitter for guided polar molecules with a Y-shaped charged wire.

    PubMed

    Deng, Lianzhong; Yin, Jianping

    2007-06-15

    We propose a beam splitter for cold polar molecules in weak-field-seeking states that uses a Y-shaped charged wire half embedded in a substrate and sandwiched by a charged metallic parallel-plate capacitor. We demonstrate our molecular-beam splitter and study its dynamic beam-splitting process for the guided cold molecules by using Monte Carlo simulation. Our study shows that cold polar molecules from a supersonic beam source with a mean velocity of a few hundred meters per second can be split with a fixed 0.5/0.5 splitting ratio, and an adjustable splitting ratio of about 0.03-0.97 can be realized by introducing a small alteration to the scheme.

  14. Biochemistry students' ideas about shape and charge in enzyme-substrate interactions.

    PubMed

    Linenberger, Kimberly J; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2014-01-01

    Biochemistry is a visual discipline that requires students to develop an understanding of numerous representations. However, there is very little known about what students actually understand about the representations that are used to communicate ideas in biochemistry. This study investigated biochemistry students' understanding of multiple representations of enzyme-substrate interactions through both student interviews (N = 25) and responses by a national sample (N = 707) to the Enzyme-Substrate Interactions Concept Inventory. This manuscript reports the findings regarding one category of misconceptions measured by the concept inventory, namely, students' understandings of shape and charge in the context of enzyme-substrate interactions. Students interpret molecular representations depicting such interactions by determining the complementarity between enzyme and substrate by focusing upon charge and hydrogen bonding, but with a disregard for stereochemistry.

  15. Charge-signal multiplication mediated by urea wires inside Y-shaped carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, Mei; Liu, Zengrong; He, Bing; Xiu, Peng E-mail: ystu@shu.edu.cn; Tu, Yusong E-mail: ystu@shu.edu.cn

    2014-07-28

    In previous studies, we reported molecular dynamics (MD) simulations showing that single-file water wires confined inside Y-shaped single-walled carbon nanotubes (Y-SWNTs) held strong and robust capability to convert and multiply charge signals [Y. S. Tu, P. Xiu, R. Z. Wan, J. Hu, R. H. Zhou, and H. P. Fang, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 106, 18120 (2009); Y. Tu, H. Lu, Y. Zhang, T. Huynh, and R. Zhou, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 015104 (2013)]. It is fascinating to see whether the signal multiplication can be realized by other kinds of polar molecules with larger dipole moments (which make the experimental realization easier). In this article, we use MD simulations to study the urea-mediated signal conversion and multiplication with Y-SWNTs. We observe that when a Y-SWNT with an external charge of magnitude 1.0 e (the model of a signal at the single-electron level) is solvated in 1 M urea solutions, urea can induce drying of the Y-SWNT and fill its interiors in single-file, forming Y-shaped urea wires. The external charge can effectively control the dipole orientation of the urea wire inside the main channel (i.e., the signal can be readily converted), and this signal can further be multiplied into 2 (or more) output signals by modulating dipole orientations of urea wires in bifurcated branch channels of the Y-SWNT. This remarkable signal transduction capability arises from the strong dipole-induced ordering of urea wires under extreme confinement. We also discuss the advantage of urea as compared with water in the signal multiplication, as well as the robustness and biological implications of our findings. This study provides the possibility for multiplying signals by using urea molecules (or other polar organic molecules) with Y-shaped nanochannels and might also help understand the mechanism behind signal conduction in both physical and biological systems.

  16. Charge-signal multiplication mediated by urea wires inside Y-shaped carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Lv, Mei; He, Bing; Liu, Zengrong; Xiu, Peng; Tu, Yusong

    2014-07-28

    In previous studies, we reported molecular dynamics (MD) simulations showing that single-file water wires confined inside Y-shaped single-walled carbon nanotubes (Y-SWNTs) held strong and robust capability to convert and multiply charge signals [Y. S. Tu, P. Xiu, R. Z. Wan, J. Hu, R. H. Zhou, and H. P. Fang, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 106, 18120 (2009); Y. Tu, H. Lu, Y. Zhang, T. Huynh, and R. Zhou, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 015104 (2013)]. It is fascinating to see whether the signal multiplication can be realized by other kinds of polar molecules with larger dipole moments (which make the experimental realization easier). In this article, we use MD simulations to study the urea-mediated signal conversion and multiplication with Y-SWNTs. We observe that when a Y-SWNT with an external charge of magnitude 1.0 e (the model of a signal at the single-electron level) is solvated in 1 M urea solutions, urea can induce drying of the Y-SWNT and fill its interiors in single-file, forming Y-shaped urea wires. The external charge can effectively control the dipole orientation of the urea wire inside the main channel (i.e., the signal can be readily converted), and this signal can further be multiplied into 2 (or more) output signals by modulating dipole orientations of urea wires in bifurcated branch channels of the Y-SWNT. This remarkable signal transduction capability arises from the strong dipole-induced ordering of urea wires under extreme confinement. We also discuss the advantage of urea as compared with water in the signal multiplication, as well as the robustness and biological implications of our findings. This study provides the possibility for multiplying signals by using urea molecules (or other polar organic molecules) with Y-shaped nanochannels and might also help understand the mechanism behind signal conduction in both physical and biological systems.

  17. Charge-signal multiplication mediated by urea wires inside Y-shaped carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Mei; He, Bing; Liu, Zengrong; Xiu, Peng; Tu, Yusong

    2014-07-01

    In previous studies, we reported molecular dynamics (MD) simulations showing that single-file water wires confined inside Y-shaped single-walled carbon nanotubes (Y-SWNTs) held strong and robust capability to convert and multiply charge signals [Y. S. Tu, P. Xiu, R. Z. Wan, J. Hu, R. H. Zhou, and H. P. Fang, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 106, 18120 (2009); Y. Tu, H. Lu, Y. Zhang, T. Huynh, and R. Zhou, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 015104 (2013)]. It is fascinating to see whether the signal multiplication can be realized by other kinds of polar molecules with larger dipole moments (which make the experimental realization easier). In this article, we use MD simulations to study the urea-mediated signal conversion and multiplication with Y-SWNTs. We observe that when a Y-SWNT with an external charge of magnitude 1.0 e (the model of a signal at the single-electron level) is solvated in 1 M urea solutions, urea can induce drying of the Y-SWNT and fill its interiors in single-file, forming Y-shaped urea wires. The external charge can effectively control the dipole orientation of the urea wire inside the main channel (i.e., the signal can be readily converted), and this signal can further be multiplied into 2 (or more) output signals by modulating dipole orientations of urea wires in bifurcated branch channels of the Y-SWNT. This remarkable signal transduction capability arises from the strong dipole-induced ordering of urea wires under extreme confinement. We also discuss the advantage of urea as compared with water in the signal multiplication, as well as the robustness and biological implications of our findings. This study provides the possibility for multiplying signals by using urea molecules (or other polar organic molecules) with Y-shaped nanochannels and might also help understand the mechanism behind signal conduction in both physical and biological systems.

  18. Experiments and Simulations of Penetration into Granite by an Aluminum Shaped Charge

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, M J; Randers-Pehrson, G; Kuklo, R M; Rambur, T A; Switzer, L L; Summes, M A

    2003-07-27

    This paper describes experimental results and numerical simulations of jet penetration into granite from an aluminum lined shaped charge. Several penetration versus standoff experiments were conducted into an in-situ granite formation located in the Climax Ridge region of the Nevada Test Site. Simulations of the jet penetration were modeled with a two dimensional arbitrary lagrange eulerian hydrocode. The effects of variations in the granite flow stress, porosity, and EOS have been evaluated. The work described in this paper is a continuation of our studies on jet penetration and modeling into high strength concrete.

  19. Characterization of topological charge and orbital angular momentum of shaped optical vortices.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Anderson M; Falcão-Filho, Edilson L; de Araújo, Cid B

    2014-12-01

    Optical vortices (OV) are usually associated to cylindrically symmetric light beams. However, they can have more general geometries that extends their applicability. Since the typical experimental characterization methods are not appropriate for OV with arbitrary shapes, we discuss in this work how the definitions of the classical orbital angular momentum and the topological charge can be used to retrieve these informations in the general case. The concepts discussed are experimentally demonstrated and may be specially useful in areas such as optical tweezers and plasmonics.

  20. Minimizing the energy spread within a single bunch by shaping its charge distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Loew, G.A.; Wang, J.W.

    1985-03-01

    It has been known for some time that partial compensation of the longitudinal wake field effects can be obtained for any bunch by placing it ahead of the accelerating crest (in space), thereby letting the positive rising sinusoidal field offset the negative beam loading field. The work presented in this paper shows that it is possible to obtain complete compensation, i.e., to reduce the energy spread essentially to zero by properly shaping the longitudinal charge distribution of the bunch and by placing it at the correct position on the wave. 3 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Experiments and simulations of penetration into granite by an aluminum shaped charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, M. J.; Randers-Pehrson, G.; Kuklo, R. M.; Rambur, T. A.; Switzer, L. L.; Summers, M. A.

    2003-09-01

    This paper describes experimental results and numerical simulations of jet penetration into granite from an aluminum lined shaped charge. Several penetration versus standoff experiments were conducted into an in-situ granite formation located in the Climax Ridge region of the Nevada Test Site. Simulations of the jet penetration were modeled with a two dimensional arbitrary lagrange eulerian hydrocode. The effects of variations in the granite flow stress, porosity, and EOS have been evaluated. The work described in this paper is a continuation of our studies on jet penetration and modeling into high strength concrete[1].

  2. Optimization of integration limit in the charge comparison method based on signal shape function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhonghai; Zeng, Jun; Zhu, Tonghua; Wang, Yudong; Yang, Chaowen; Zhou, Rong

    2014-10-01

    A novel method is proposed to analyze neutron and gamma-ray signal shapes in liquid scintillation detectors. Specifically, the signal shape functions for a BC501 detector were characterized and a statistical model was used to analyze the discrimination of neutrons and gamma rays. The model varied the starting points of tail integration in the charge comparison method (CCM), and an optimized starting point was determined. Experimental measurements were performed to verify the model, and the results indicated good agreement. For a BC501 scintillator with 8.07 ns and 74.63 ns decay time constants we found optimal time to start the tail integration at 24 ns past the decay maximum.

  3. Quantitative measurements of vaporization, burst ionization, and emission characteristics of shaped charge barium releases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoch, Edward L.; Hallinan, Thomas J.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, Hans C.

    1994-01-01

    Intensity-calibrated color video recordings of three barium-shaped charge injections in the ionopshere were used to determine the initial ionization, the column density corresponding to unity optical depth, and the yield of vaporized barium in the fast jet. It was found that the initial ionization at the burst was less than 1% and that 0% burst ionization was consistent with the observations. Owing to the Doppler shift, the column density for optical thickness in the neutral barium varies somewhat according to the velocity distribution. For the cases examined here, the column density was 2-5 x 10(exp 10) atoms/sq cm. This value, which occurred 12 to 15 s after release, should be approximately valid for most shaped charge experiments. The yield was near 30% (15% in the fast jet) for two of the releases and was somewhat lower in the third, which also had a lower peak velocity. This study also demonstrated the applicability of the computer simulation code developed for chemical releases by Stenbaek-Nielsen and provided experimental verification of the Doppler-corrected emission rates calculated b Stenbaek-Nielsen (1989).

  4. Quantitative measurements of vaporization, burst ionization, and emission characteristics of shaped charge barium releases

    SciTech Connect

    Hoch, E.L.; Hallinan, T.J.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H.C.

    1994-07-01

    Intensity-calibrated color video recordings of three barium-shaped charge injections in the ionosphere were used to determine the initial ionization, the column density corresponding to unity optical depth, and the yield of vaporized barium in the fast jet. It was found that the initial ionization at the burst was less than 1% and that 0% burst ionization was consistent with the observations. Owing to the Doppler shift, the column density for optical thickness in the neutral barium varies somewhat according to the velocity distribution. For the cases examined here, the column density was 2-5x10{sup 10} atoms/cm{sup 2}. This value, which occurred 12 to 15 s after release, should be approximately valid for most shaped charge experiments. The yield was near 30% (15% in the fast jet) for two of the releases and was somewhat lower in the third, which also had a lower peak velocity. This study also demonstrated the applicability of the computer simulation code developed for chemical releases by Stenbaek-Nielsen and provided experimental verification of the Doppler-corrected emission rates calculated by Stenbaek-Nielsen (1989). 22 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Sialyltransferase inhibitors: consideration of molecular shape and charge/hydrophobic interactions.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rishi; Nasi, Ravindranath; Bhasin, Milan; Huan Khieu, Nam; Hsieh, Margaret; Gilbert, Michel; Jarrell, Harold; Zou, Wei; Jennings, Harold J

    2013-08-30

    In order to evaluate the importance of molecular shape of inhibitor molecules and the charge/H-bond and hydrophobic interactions, we synthesized three types of molecules and tested them against a sialyltransferase. The first type of compounds were designed as substrate mimics in which the phosphate in CMP-Neu5NAc was replaced by a non-hydrolysable, uncharged 1,2,3-triazole moiety. The second type of compound contained a 2-deoxy-2,3-dehydro-acetylneuraminic moiety which was linked to cytidine through its carboxylic acid and amide linkers. In the third type of compound the sialyl phosphate was substituted by an aryl sulfonamide which was then linked to cytidine. Inhibition study of these cytidine conjugates against Campylobacter jejuni sialyltransferase Cst 06 showed that the first type of molecules are competitive inhibitors, whereas the other two could only inhibit the enzyme non-competitively. The results indicate that although the binding specificity may be guided by molecular shape and H-bond interaction, the charge and hydrophobic interactions contributed most to the binding affinity.

  6. High-speed, high-resolution observations of shaped-charge jets undergoing particulation

    SciTech Connect

    Winer, K.; Breithaupt, D.; Shaw, L.; Muelder, S.; Baum, D.

    1995-02-28

    Image-converter (IC) camera photography has provided spectacular images and quantitative records of liner collapse and early jet formation in shaped charges. We have extended the application of the IC camera to observations of shaped charge jet surfaces undergoing particulation. Sequential, high-resolution photographs were taken following the same 10-cm portion of jet at 2.5-{mu}s intervals. Simultaneous color rotating-mirror framing camera photographs and 450-keV flash x-ray radiographs were also taken of the same region. This combination provides a detailed record of the evolution of surface structure during jet necking and particulation. In the high-resolution photographs, individual features on the jet surfaces as small as {approximately}100 {mu}m can easily be detected and followed as they evolve over time. The jet surface structure is rough with overlapping slip dislocation lines running along the surface at 45{degree} to either side of the jet axis. This is similar to the texture that develops in long rods undergoing static tension. We discuss the implications of these images for increasing jet particulation times.

  7. Closed-form model for the analysis of W-type shaped charges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdian, A.; Ghayour, M.; Liaghat, G. H.

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents a closed-form model for the analysis of symmetric planar W-type shaped charges (WSCs) with two V-sections, which produce two primary cores and two primary jets. If these two V-sections have proper asymmetry, these primary cores will force two primary jets into a secondary core formed on the axis of symmetry of a planar symmetric WSC. For the analysis of such a planar WSC, a complete generalized model for an asymmetric planar V-shaped charge (VSC) with any desired order of asymmetry is mandatory. In this paper, the model is applied to describe the secondary jet formation in the WSC. By presenting a closed-form analysis of the WSC, the secondary jet specifications can be easily evaluated and, thus, can be compared with respect to the jet quantities in symmetric or asymmetric VSCs. Finally, for the primary and secondary jets, the coherency conditions are investigated, and the critical parameters responsible for these conditions are determined.

  8. Jet Velocity Profile of Linear Shaped Charges Based on an Arced Liner Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Seokbin

    2013-10-01

    The jet formation process of linear shaped charges (LSCs) heavily depends on the liner behavior before it collapses. The linear behavior includes the physical shape/deformation, material properties, the projection velocity before impact of the liner, etc. Due to the axially propagating detonation front along the charge, the interaction between the liner and detonation products is one of the important factors that controls the jetting process. In this study, the liner deformation (or arc) caused by the rarefaction is taken into account when analytically calculating the LSC jet velocity based on Birkhoff theory. Based on the formation of an arc in the liner, an analytical calculation of the jet velocity is accomplished in the detonation front, assuming that the entire liner is projecting at the same time. The arc of the LSC liner during projection, which was determined by fitting data generated from hydrocode simulations, allows a non-steady jetting profile. The analytical model described herein is compared to hydrocode simulation results and is shown to exhibit favorable results.

  9. A new 3D computational model for shaped charge jet breakup

    SciTech Connect

    Zernow, L.; Chapyak, E.J.; Mosso, S.J.

    1996-09-01

    This paper reviews prior 1D and 2D axisymmetric, analytical and computational studies, as well as empirical studies of the shaped charge jet particulation problem and discusses their associated insights and problems. It proposes a new 3D computational model of the particulation process, based upon a simplified version of the observed counter-rotating, double helical surface perturbations, found on softly recovered shaped charge jet particles, from both copper and tantalum jets. This 3D approach contrasts with the random, axisymmetric surface perturbations which have previously been used, to try to infer the observed length distribution of jet particles, on the basis of the most unstable wavelength concept, which leads to the expectation of a continuous distribution of particle lengths. The 3D model, by its very nature, leads to a non-random, periodic distribution of potential initial necking loci, on alternate sides of the stretching jet. This in turn infers a potentially periodic, overlapping, multi-modal distribution of associated jet particle lengths. Since it is unlikely that all potential initial necking sites will be activated simultaneously, the 3D model also suggests that longer jet particles containing partial, but unseparated necks, should be observed fairly often. The computational analysis is in its very early stages and the problems involved in inserting the two helical grooves and in defining the initial conditions and boundary conditions for the computation will be discussed. Available initial results from the 3D computation will be discussed and interpreted.

  10. Signal shape and charge sharing between electrodes of GEM in dimethyl ether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Y.; Tamagawa, T.; Asami, F.; Yoshikawa, A.; Iwahashi, T.; Konami, S.; Iwakiri, W.

    2012-03-01

    We have performed a systematic investigation of the gain properties of the GEM foil made from copper-clad liquid crystal polymer insulator (LCP-GEM), which will be used for a satellite mission. We have measured the gain curve of LCP-GEM in pure DME at 190 Torr, and achieved a gain of 3 × 104 at an applied high voltage of 605 V between the LCP-GEM electrodes with a thickness of 100 μm. The charge sharing between the GEM electrodes and readout pad were measured as a function of drift (Ed) or induction (Ei) field. We found that the parallel plate multiplication occurred between the bottom electrode of LCP-GEM and the readout pad above Ei = 6 kV, and the amount of charge collected in each electrode was almost constant with Ed. We investigated the signal shape obtained in each electrode and found that the rise time of signals was explained as induced charge by moving ions and electrons.

  11. Influence of molecular shape, conformability, net surface charge, and tissue interaction on transscleral macromolecular diffusion.

    PubMed

    Srikantha, Nishanthan; Mourad, Fatma; Suhling, Klaus; Elsaid, Naba; Levitt, James; Chung, Pei Hua; Somavarapu, Satyanarayana; Jackson, Timothy L

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of molecular shape, conformability, net surface charge and tissue interaction on transscleral diffusion. Unfixed, porcine sclera was clamped in an Ussing chamber. Fluorophore-labelled neutral albumin, neutral dextran, or neutral ficoll were placed in one hemi-chamber and the rate of transscleral diffusion was measured over 24 h using a spectrophotometer. Experiments were repeated using dextrans and ficoll with positive or negative net surface charges. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) was undertaken to compare transscleral diffusion with diffusion through a solution. All molecules were 70 kDa. With FRAP, the diffusion coefficient (D) of neutral molecules was highest for albumin, followed by ficoll, then dextran (p < 0.0001). Positive dextrans diffused fastest, followed by negative, then neutral dextrans (p = 0.0004). Neutral ficoll diffused the fastest, followed by positive then negative ficoll (p = 0.5865). For the neutral molecules, transscleral D was highest for albumin, followed by dextran, then ficoll (p < 0.0001). D was highest for negative ficoll, followed by neutral, then positive ficoll (p < 0.0001). By contrast, D was highest for positive dextran, followed by neutral, then negative dextran (p = 0.0021). In conclusion, diffusion in free solution does not predict transscleral diffusion and the molecular-tissue interaction is important. Molecular size, shape, and charge may all markedly influence transscleral diffusion, as may conformability to a lesser degree, but their effects may be diametrically opposed in different molecules, and their influence on diffusion is more complex than previously thought. Each variable cannot be considered in isolation, and the interplay of all these variables needs to be tested, when selecting or designing drugs for transscleral delivery. PMID:22846670

  12. Influence of molecular shape, conformability, net surface charge, and tissue interaction on transscleral macromolecular diffusion.

    PubMed

    Srikantha, Nishanthan; Mourad, Fatma; Suhling, Klaus; Elsaid, Naba; Levitt, James; Chung, Pei Hua; Somavarapu, Satyanarayana; Jackson, Timothy L

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of molecular shape, conformability, net surface charge and tissue interaction on transscleral diffusion. Unfixed, porcine sclera was clamped in an Ussing chamber. Fluorophore-labelled neutral albumin, neutral dextran, or neutral ficoll were placed in one hemi-chamber and the rate of transscleral diffusion was measured over 24 h using a spectrophotometer. Experiments were repeated using dextrans and ficoll with positive or negative net surface charges. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) was undertaken to compare transscleral diffusion with diffusion through a solution. All molecules were 70 kDa. With FRAP, the diffusion coefficient (D) of neutral molecules was highest for albumin, followed by ficoll, then dextran (p < 0.0001). Positive dextrans diffused fastest, followed by negative, then neutral dextrans (p = 0.0004). Neutral ficoll diffused the fastest, followed by positive then negative ficoll (p = 0.5865). For the neutral molecules, transscleral D was highest for albumin, followed by dextran, then ficoll (p < 0.0001). D was highest for negative ficoll, followed by neutral, then positive ficoll (p < 0.0001). By contrast, D was highest for positive dextran, followed by neutral, then negative dextran (p = 0.0021). In conclusion, diffusion in free solution does not predict transscleral diffusion and the molecular-tissue interaction is important. Molecular size, shape, and charge may all markedly influence transscleral diffusion, as may conformability to a lesser degree, but their effects may be diametrically opposed in different molecules, and their influence on diffusion is more complex than previously thought. Each variable cannot be considered in isolation, and the interplay of all these variables needs to be tested, when selecting or designing drugs for transscleral delivery.

  13. Mass estimation of shaped charge jets from x-ray shadow graph with new calibration curve method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Fumikazu; Kishimura, Hiroaki; Kumakura, Akira; Sakai, Shun

    2015-06-01

    In order to assess the penetration capability of the Al and Cu metal jets against a bumper structure (such as Al plate and/or Al block), we measured the initial formation process of the metal jets generated from conical shaped charge device. The shaped charge device configurations employed in the experimental and numerical investigations have conical aluminum (and cupper) liner and steel casing with PBX explosive charge. The profile and velocity of the jets are measured with flash x-ray and x-ray film system. The mass of the jet tip are estimated from x-ray images by a calibration curve method proposed by our group. Al targets are used to evaluate a penetration performance of the jets. Additionally, we have simulated the initial formation process of the shaped charge jets with Autodyne-2D hydrodynamic code, which proposed important data to compare the experimental one.

  14. Chemical Control of Lead Sulfide Quantum Dot Shape, Self-Assembly, and Charge Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhail, Martin R.

    Lead(II) sulfide quantum dots (PbS QDs) are a promising excitonic material for numerous application that require that control of fluxes of charge and energy at nanoscale interfaces, such as solar energy conversion, photo- and electrocatalysis, light emitting diodes, chemical sensing, single-electron logic elements, field effect transistors, and photovoltaics. PbS QDs are particularly suitable for photonics applications because they exhibit size-tunable band-edge absorption and fluorescence across the entire near-infrared spectrum, undergo efficient multi-exciton generation, exhibit a long radiative lifetime, and possess an eight-fold degenerate ground-state. The effective integration of PbS QDs into these applications requires a thorough understanding of how to control their synthesis, self-assembly, and charge transport phenomena. In this document, I describe a series of experiments to elucidate three levels of chemical control on the emergent properties of PbS QDs: (1) the role of surface chemistry in controlling PbS QD shape during solvothermal synthesis, (2) the role of QD shape and ligand functionalization in self-assembly at a liquid-air interface, and (3) the role of QD packing structure on steady-state conductivity and transient current dynamics. At the synthetic level (1), I show that the final shape and surface chemistry of PbS QDs is highly sensitive to the formation of organosulfur byproducts by commonly used sulfur reagents. The insight into PbS QD growth gained from this work is then developed to controllably tune PbS QD shape from cubic to octahedral to hexapodal while maintaining QD size. At the following level of QD self-assembly (2), I show how QD size and shape dictate packing geometry in extended 2D arrays and how this packing can be controllably interrupted in mixed monolayers. I also study the role of ligand structure on the reorganization of QD arrays at a liquid-air interface and find that the specific packing defects in QD arrays vary

  15. Using an Effective Charges Method to extract Λ from event shape moments in ee annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, C. J.; Morgan, K. E.

    2012-05-01

    We use an Effective Charges (ECH) method to extract Λ, and hence α(M), from event shape moments in ee annihilation. We compare these results with ones obtained using standard MS¯ perturbation theory. The ECH method at NLO is found to perform better than standard MS¯ perturbation theory when applied to means of event shape observables. For example, when we apply the NLO ECH method to <1-T> we get α(M)=0.1193±0.0003. However ECH at NNLO is found to work less well than ECH at NLO, and the ECH method also fails to describe data for higher moments of event shapes. We attempt to explain this by considering the ECH β-function as an asymptotic series. We also examine the effect of adding two different models for non-perturbative power corrections to the perturbative approximation given by the ECH method and MS¯ perturbation theory. Whilst only small power corrections are required when using ECH at NLO, it is found that these models are insufficient to counteract the undesirable behaviour of ECH at NNLO.

  16. Characterization of the internal ion environment of biofilms based on charge density and shape of ion.

    PubMed

    Kurniawan, Andi; Tsuchiya, Yuki; Eda, Shima; Morisaki, Hisao

    2015-12-01

    Biofilm polymers contain both electrically positively and negatively charged sites. These charged sites enable the biofilm to trap and retain ions leading to an important role of biofilm such as nutrient recycling and pollutant purification. Much work has focused on the ion-exchange capacity of biofilms, and they are known to adsorb ions through an exchange mechanism between the ions in solution and the ions adsorbed to the charged sites on the biofilm polymer. However, recent studies suggest that the adsorption/desorption behavior of ions in a biofilm cannot be explained solely by this ion exchange mechanism. To examine the possibility that a substantial amount of ions are held in the interstitial region of the biofilm polymer by an electrostatic interaction, intact biofilms formed in a natural environment were immersed in distilled water and ion desorption was investigated. All of the detected ion species were released from the biofilms over a short period of time, and very few ions were subsequently released over more time, indicating that the interstitial region of biofilm polymers is another ion reserve. The extent of ion retention in the interstitial region of biofilms for each ion can be determined largely by charge density, |Z|/r, where |Z| is the ion valence as absolute value and r is the ion radius. The higher |Z|/r value an ion has, the stronger it is retained in the interstitial region of biofilms. Ion shape is also a key determinant of ion retention. Spherical and non-spherical ions have different correlations between the condensation ratio and |Z|/r. The generality of these findings were assured by various biofilm samples. Thus, the internal regions of biofilms exchange ions dynamically with the outside environment.

  17. Measurements of the time constant for steady ionization in shaped-charge barium releases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoch, Edward L.; Hallinan, Thomas J.

    1993-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of three solar illuminated shaped-charge barium releases injected at small angles to the magnetic field were made using a calibrated color television camera. Two of the releases were from 1989. The third release, a reanalysis of an event included in Hallinan's 1988 study of three 1986 releases, was included to provide continuity between the two studies. Time constants for ionization, measured during the first 25 s of each release, were found to vary considerably. The two 1989 time constants differed substantially, and both were significantly less than any of the 1986 time constants. On the basis of this variability, we conclude that the two 1989 releases showed evidence of continuous nonsolar ionization. One release showed nonsolar ionization which could not he attributed to Alfven's critical ionization velocity process, which requires a component of velocity perpendicular to the magnetic field providing a perpendicular energy greater than the ionization potential.

  18. Observed rate of ionization in shaped-charge releases of barium in the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallinan, Thomas J.

    1988-01-01

    Data from 36 Ba shaped-charge releases carried out at an angle of less than 25 deg to the magnetic field, by the technique of Wescott et al. (1972) and Michel (1974), were examined for evidence of a sustained rate of ionization in excess of that attributable to sunlight. In four of the experiments, the time constant for the decay of the neutrals was measured using an ultrasensitive color TV camera and was found to have a value of about 30 sec, consistent with slow (solar) ionization. Although the qualitative appearance of most jets was found to be consistent with a slow process of ionization, some releases produced a thin confined jet that was suggestive of rapid ionization. Two of these jets were analyzed in detail, but no evidence of anomalous ionization was produced. The data obtained in this work agree with the geometrical predictions of the Swift model.

  19. Role of texture in spin formed Cu shaped-charge liners

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, A J; Busche, M J; Becker, R; Kumar, M; Nikkel, D J

    2001-01-10

    Spin formed Cu shaped charge liners are known to produce a rotating jet and are used for the spin compensation effect. The causes of spin compensation can be mechanical in nature or can be grounded in microstructural issues such as texture, residual stress, grain size, and morphology variations. This investigation focuses on determining specific microstructural parameters that influence jet rotation and modeling the jet formation process using anisotropic plasticity in a 3-D finite element framework. The experimental texture has been mapped onto a finite element grid for 3-D modeling to obtain the normal-shear deformation coupling information needed to construct a plastic flow potential. Simulations of a collapsing ring and extending rod demonstrate rotation.

  20. L = 1.24 conjugate magnetic field line tracing experiments with barium shaped charges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Davis, T. N.; Peek, H. M.; Bottoms, P. J.; Rieger, E. P.

    1974-01-01

    Description of three experiments involving the injection of barium ions into magnetic flux tubes with the aid of high-explosive shaped charges with hollow conical liners of barium metal. In these experiments (called Alco, Bubia, and Loro, respectively) the explosive charges were detonated at altitudes above 500 km, producing jets of barium plasma with initial velocities ranging from 8 to 20 km/sec. The most interesting result of the experiments, which were carried out near L = 1.24 and were successful in tracing an entire field line some 7000 km to the conjugate ionosphere, was the observation that for Loro and probably Alco the direction and rate of drift of the two ends of the field line were identical, whereas those for Bubia differed significantly. In the case of the Bubia event significant differences in magnitude and direction at the conjugate points are noted, which lead to the conclusion that the field line could not have been equipotential during the interval of observation.

  1. Optimal control of charge transfer for slow H+ + D collisions with shaped laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Shu, Chuan-Cun; Ho, Tak-San; Rabitz, Herschel; Cong, Shu-Lin

    2014-03-01

    We show that optimally shaped laser pulses can beneficially influence charge transfer in slow H(+)+D collisions. Time-dependent wave packet optimal control simulations are performed based on a two-state adiabatic Hamiltonian. Optimal control is performed using either an adaptive or a fixed target to obtain the desired laser control field. In the adaptive target scheme, the target state is updated according to the renormalized fragmentary yield in the exit channel throughout the optimization process. In the fixed target scheme, the target state in the exit channel is a normalized outgoing Gaussian wave packet located at a large internuclear separation. Both approaches produced excellent optimal outcomes, far exceeding that achieved in the field-free collisional charge transfer. The adaptive target scheme proves to be more efficient, and often with complex final wave packet. In contrast, the fixed target scheme, although more slowly convergent, is found to produce high fidelity for the desired target wave packet. The control mechanism in both cases utilizes bound vibrational states of the transient HD(+) complex.

  2. Optimal control of charge transfer for slow H+ + D collisions with shaped laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Shu, Chuan-Cun; Ho, Tak-San; Rabitz, Herschel; Cong, Shu-Lin

    2014-03-01

    We show that optimally shaped laser pulses can beneficially influence charge transfer in slow H++D collisions. Time-dependent wave packet optimal control simulations are performed based on a two-state adiabatic Hamiltonian. Optimal control is performed using either an adaptive or a fixed target to obtain the desired laser control field. In the adaptive target scheme, the target state is updated according to the renormalized fragmentary yield in the exit channel throughout the optimization process. In the fixed target scheme, the target state in the exit channel is a normalized outgoing Gaussian wave packet located at a large internuclear separation. Both approaches produced excellent optimal outcomes, far exceeding that achieved in the field-free collisional charge transfer. The adaptive target scheme proves to be more efficient, and often with complex final wave packet. In contrast, the fixed target scheme, although more slowly convergent, is found to produce high fidelity for the desired target wave packet. The control mechanism in both cases utilizes bound vibrational states of the transient HD+ complex.

  3. Charge and current beats in T-shaped qubit-detector systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taranko, R.; Kwapiński, T.

    2015-06-01

    The time evolution of a charge qubit coupled electrostatically with different detectors in the forms of single, double and triple quantum dot linear systems in the T-shaped configuration between two reservoirs is theoretically considered. The correspondence between the qubit quantum dot oscillations and the detector current is studied for different values of the inter-dot tunneling amplitudes and the qubit-detector interaction strength. We have found that even for a qubit coupled with a single QD detector, the coherent beat patterns appear in the oscillations of the qubit charge. This effect is more evident for a qubit coupled with double or triple-QD detectors. The beats can be also observed in both the detector current and the detector quantum dot occupations. Moreover, in the presence of beats the qubit oscillations hold longer in time in comparison with the beats-free systems with monotonously decaying oscillations. The dependence of the qubit dynamics on different initial occupations of the detector sites (memory effect) is also analyzed.

  4. Effect of electric current on the depth of penetration of shaped-charge jets into targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvetsov, G. A.; Matrosov, A. D.; Stankevich, S. V.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of experimental and numerical studies of the behavior of metallic shaped-charge jets (SCJs) through which electric current flows. The possibility of decreasing and increasing the depth of penetration of SCJs into targets is considered. The concepts are introduced of the critical current density and the ideal shape of the current pulse at which necking magnetohydrodynamic instability develops in the jet, accompanied by volume explosion of the SCJ elements at their exit from the interelectrode gap. The development of necking magnetohydrodynamic instability in the SCJ and subsequent volume explosion of the jet material lead to a reduction in the jet length and density, and as a consequence, to a decrease in the depth of SCJ penetration into the target. It has been shown that this process can be controlled by changing the electric pulse parameters. The possibility of increasing the depth of SCJ penetration into targets under conditions where the electric current flowing through the SCJ is less than the critical value is analyzed. The process of heating of SCJs of different materials (Cu, Fe, Mo, Ta, W, etc.) by the electric current flowing through them is considered. It is shown that the use of electric current to heat SCJs may be a promising approach to increase the depth of penetration of SCJs into targets.

  5. Use of shutdown of the capacitive storage in implementing electrical action on metallic shaped-charge jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, S. V.

    2016-03-01

    Tto improve the efficiency of electrical action on metallic shaped-charge jets, it is proposed to use shutdown of the capacitive storage at the time when the voltage on it during passage of an alternating discharge becomes zero. It has been shown that using this expedient eliminates recharging of the capacitive storage and provides better matching between the current pulse and the time of motion of various parts of the shaped-charge jet through the electrode gap. Studies have been conducted using a computational procedure in which the development of magnetohydrodynamic instability of the jet and the dispersion of its material are considered possible physical mechanisms reducing the penetration capability of shaped-charge jets under the action of high current pulses.

  6. Capability of charge signal conversion and transmission by water chains confined inside Y-shaped carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Tu, Yusong; Lu, Hangjun; Zhang, Yuanzhao; Huynh, Tien; Zhou, Ruhong

    2013-01-01

    The molecular scale signal conversion, transmission, and amplification by a single external charge through a water-mediated Y-shaped nanotube have been studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Our results show that the signal converting capability is highly sensitive to the magnitude of the charge, while the signal transmitting capability is independent of the charge signal. There is a sharp two-state-like transition in the signal converting capacity for both positive and negative charges. When the charge magnitude is above a threshold (|q| ≥ ~0.7 e), the water dipole orientations in the main tube can be effectively controlled by the signaling charge (i.e., signal conversion), and then be transmitted and amplified through the Y-junction, despite the thermal noises and interferences between branch signals. On the other hand, the signal transmitting capability, characterized by the correlation between the two water dipole orientations in the two branches, is found to be always larger than 0.6, independent of charge signals, indicating that the water-mediated Y-tube is an excellent signal transmitter. These findings may provide useful insights for the future design of molecular scale signal processing devices based on Y-shaped nanotubes.

  7. Capability of charge signal conversion and transmission by water chains confined inside Y-shaped carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Yusong; Lu, Hangjun; Zhang, Yuanzhao; Huynh, Tien; Zhou, Ruhong

    2013-01-01

    The molecular scale signal conversion, transmission, and amplification by a single external charge through a water-mediated Y-shaped nanotube have been studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Our results show that the signal converting capability is highly sensitive to the magnitude of the charge, while the signal transmitting capability is independent of the charge signal. There is a sharp two-state-like transition in the signal converting capacity for both positive and negative charges. When the charge magnitude is above a threshold (|q| ≥ ˜0.7 e), the water dipole orientations in the main tube can be effectively controlled by the signaling charge (i.e., signal conversion), and then be transmitted and amplified through the Y-junction, despite the thermal noises and interferences between branch signals. On the other hand, the signal transmitting capability, characterized by the correlation between the two water dipole orientations in the two branches, is found to be always larger than 0.6, independent of charge signals, indicating that the water-mediated Y-tube is an excellent signal transmitter. These findings may provide useful insights for the future design of molecular scale signal processing devices based on Y-shaped nanotubes.

  8. Postglomerular capillary solute flux restricted by shape and charge in the dog

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteside, C.; Silverman, M. )

    1987-09-01

    The permselectivity characteristics of the postglomerular (PG) microcirculation in dog kidney were investigated employing {sup 3}H-labeled cationic (DEAE) and anionic sulfated dextrans (dextran-SO{sub 4}) ranging from 19 to 29 {angstrom} Stokes-Einstein Radius. With the use of the multiple-indicator dilution (MID) technique, a bolus injection was made into the left renal artery and timed serial samples were obtained from renal venous and urine outflows. The injection solution contained {sup 125}I-labeled albumin (plasma reference), ({sup 14}C)inulin and/or creatinine (glomerular and interstitial references), and a test ({sup 3}H)dextran probe. A control run was carried out with tracer, then charge interaction was analyzed by repeating the MID run with excess unlabeled compound or after protamine sulfate infusion. After loading, renal vein recovery and mean transit time ({bar t}) were unchanged relative to ({sup 14}C)inulin for ({sup 3}H)dextran-SO{sub 4}. But excess DEAE resulted in reduced recovery and decreased {bar t} for ({sup 3}H)DEAE. After protamine sulfate, the renal vein and urine recoveries of ({sup 3}H)dextran-SO{sub 4} decreased and the renal vein {bar t} increased. These findings demonstrate saturable anionic binding sites in the PG microcirculation. Under conditions where charge interaction was eliminated, the ratio of renal vein {bar t} for {sup 125}I-albumin to cationic or anionic dextran was always less than its ratio to neutral dextran, implying a larger apparent volume of distribution. The authors concluded that PG capillaries also limit solute flux on the basis of shape.

  9. Critical nuclear charge and shape resonances for the two-electron Hamiltonian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Z.-C.; Ho, Y. K.

    2015-09-01

    The hydrogen negative ion H$^-$ is the simplest two-electron system that exists in nature. This system is not only important in astrophysics but it also serves as an ideal ground to study electron-electron correlations. The peculiar balance of the correlations between the two electrons with the interaction of electron-nucleus in H$^-$ makes this system to have only two bound states, one being the ground state $1s^2\\,^{1}\\!S^e$ and the other the doubly-excited metastable state $2p^2\\,^{3}\\!P^e$ embedded below the hydrogen $n=2$ threshold. Here we report a calculation for the $2p^2\\,^{3}\\!P^e$ state of H$^-$ that yields the energy eigenvalue $E=-0.125\\,355\\,451\\,242\\,864\\,058\\,376\\,012\\,313\\,25(2)$, in atomic units. Our result substantially improves the best available result by 16 orders of magnitude. We further study the critical nuclear charge $Z_{\\rm cr}$, the minimum value of nuclear charge $Z$ that is required to bind a nucleus and two electrons. Our determination of $Z_{\\rm cr}$ for the $2p^2\\,^{3}\\!P^e$ state of two-electron systems is $Z_{\\rm cr}=0.994\\,781\\,292\\,240\\,366\\,246\\,3(1)$, corresponding to $1/Z_{\\rm cr}= 1.005\\,246\\,085\\,546\\,985\\,509\\,4(1)$, which improves the best published value of $Z_{\\rm cr}$ by about 10 orders of magnitude. We further investigate in a definitive way the unexplored regime of $Z < Z_{\\rm cr}$ using the method of complex scaling and establish precise shape resonance poles for the state of $2p^2\\,^{3}\\!P^e$ in the complex energy plane.

  10. An internal charge transfer-dependent solvent effect in V-shaped azacyanines.

    PubMed

    Tasior, Mariusz; Bald, Ilko; Deperasińska, Irena; Cywiński, Piotr J; Gryko, Daniel T

    2015-12-28

    New V-shaped non-centrosymmetric dyes, possessing a strongly electron-deficient azacyanine core, have been synthesized based on a straightforward two-step approach. The key step in this synthesis involves palladium-catalysed cross-coupling of dibromo-N,N'-methylene-2,2'-azapyridinocyanines with arylacetylenes. The resulting strongly polarized π-expanded heterocycles exhibit green to orange fluorescence and they strongly respond to changes in solvent polarity. We demonstrate that differently electron-donating peripheral groups have a significant influence on the internal charge transfer, hence on the solvent effect and fluorescence quantum yield. TD-DFT calculations confirm that, in contrast to the previously studied bis(styryl)azacyanines, the proximity of S1 and T2 states calculated for compounds bearing two 4-N,N-dimethylaminophenylethynyl moieties establishes good conditions for efficient intersystem crossing and is responsible for its low fluorescence quantum yield. Non-linear properties have also been determined for new azacyanines and the results show that depending on peripheral groups, the synthesized dyes exhibit small to large two-photon absorption cross sections reaching 4000 GM.

  11. Kinetic Spraying Deposition of Reactive-Enhanced Al-Ni Composite for Shaped Charge Liner Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Gyeongjun; Kim, Jaeick; Lee, Changhee; Kim, See Jo; Lee, Seong

    2016-02-01

    Liners used in shaped charges (SC) must possess good penetration ability and explosive power. Producing the reactive layer (i.e., the Al-Ni composite) on a well-penetrating liner (i.e., Cu) via spray coating is a novel method; the exothermic reaction of this reactive layer can be enhanced by controlling the structure of the feedstock material. However, preceding studies have been unable to completely succeed in achieving this goal. There is still an opportunity to improve the performance of reactive layers in SC liner applications. In order to address this problem, a reactive Al-Ni composite powder was produced via arrested reactive milling (ARM) and deposited by a kinetic spray process. Afterward, the deposition state and self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) reaction behavior of the ARMed Al-Ni deposit were investigated. The deposition state was degraded by the ARM process due to the remaining solid lubricant and the strain-hardening effect, but the practically estimated bond strength was not poor (~40 MPa). No SHS reactions were induced by the ARM and kinetic spray process, which resulted in the quantitative maximization of the exothermic reaction. It is noteworthy that the initiation temperature of the SHS reaction was highly advanced (~300 °C) relative to preceding studies (~500 °C); this change is due to the additional mechanical activation initiated by the kinetic spray deposition.

  12. Initial results obtained from a 3D computational model of the shaped charge jet particulation process

    SciTech Connect

    Zernow, L.; Chapyak, E.J.

    1998-02-01

    In a previous paper, the authors discussed a 3D computational model for the particulation of a stretching shaped charge jet, based on the experimentally observed double-helix surface perturbations on softly recovered jet particles. The 3D problem was derived from the unperturbed 2D problem, which was first used to generate a stretching jet. A portion of this 2D jet was selected for study in the cylindrical 3D mode, and the double-helix perturbations were placed on the cylinder surface. This initial computation was greatly simplified, to make it feasible to run on a CM 200 massively parallel processor. The initial output of this computation, which is being published here for the first time, leads to a significant simplification of the analysis of the particulation process, by avoiding the search for the elusive ``most favored wavelength`` which is characteristic of 2D axi-symmetric analyses. Previously unnoticed characteristics of flash radiographs from Viper jets, appear to support the computational results obtained, despite a counter-intuitive prediction of the location of necking loci, relative to the perturbing helices. The approximations used in this initial computation are discussed critically. Planned improvements are defined. A vision of future fundamental computations, which become possible with more powerful ASCI machines, is projected.

  13. The effect of failure diameter on the initiation of explosives by shaped charge jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Hugh R.; Mellor, Christopher; Goff, Michael J.

    2012-03-01

    Experiments on two explosives, where the selected shaped charge jet had a diameter that was larger than the failure diameter for the HMX-based explosive, but much smaller than the failure diameter of the TATB-based explosive, show similarities in the initiation behaviour generated by the impact shock. In this "prompt" shock initiation regime both explosives show similar lengthening of run distances when the jet impacts approach the initiation threshold. Theoretical investigations using the CREST reactive burn model showed that reaction started reasonably promptly across the diameter of the jet in both explosives, and in the case of the jet being smaller than the failure diameter, the extended runs were due to the delay in corner turning out of this restricted diameter experienced by the detonation in the TATB composition. For the HMX composition, the rather sparse number of results appears to compare with regular projectile data which show increased run distances as the projectile diameter approaches the failure diameter. More work is required to establish the exact mechanism in this regime.

  14. The formation and stretching of bi-material shaped charge jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, John Philip; Smith, Frank Thomas; White, Alexander

    2012-03-01

    The equations for the formation of a bi-material jet from a laminated shaped charge liner are presented. A coupled pair of boundary-value problems is then established for an idealised stretching jet in cases where the outer material occupies a hollow uniform cylinder surrounding the inner material in the uniform hollow. This is done first where the materials are inviscid fluids. Making the assumption that the axial velocity in each part of the jet is the same and linearly decreasing from the front to the rear of the composite jet, solutions for the pressure field in each part are obtained. The problem is then reformulated where the two materials are both perfectly plastic solids but with differing densities and yield strengths. The equations of plastic flow (Levy-Mises with von-Mises yield criterion) are solved for each material to derive the stress field in both parts of the jet. These analytical solutions offer a basis for future stability and target penetration studies.

  15. The Optimization of a Shaped-Charge Design Using Parallel Computers

    SciTech Connect

    GARDNER,DAVID R.; VAUGHAN,COURTENAY T.

    1999-11-01

    Current supercomputers use large parallel arrays of tightly coupled processors to achieve levels of performance far surpassing conventional vector supercomputers. Shock-wave physics codes have been developed for these new supercomputers at Sandia National Laboratories and elsewhere. These parallel codes run fast enough on many simulations to consider using them to study the effects of varying design parameters on the performance of models of conventional munitions and other complex systems. Such studies maybe directed by optimization software to improve the performance of the modeled system. Using a shaped-charge jet design as an archetypal test case and the CTH parallel shock-wave physics code controlled by the Dakota optimization software, we explored the use of automatic optimization tools to optimize the design for conventional munitions. We used a scheme in which a lower resolution computational mesh was used to identify candidate optimal solutions and then these were verified using a higher resolution mesh. We identified three optimal solutions for the model and a region of the design domain where the jet tip speed is nearly optimal, indicating the possibility of a robust design. Based on this study we identified some of the difficulties in using high-fidelity models with optimization software to develop improved designs. These include developing robust algorithms for the objective function and constraints and mitigating the effects of numerical noise in them. We conclude that optimization software running high-fidelity models of physical systems using parallel shock wave physics codes to find improved designs can be a valuable tool for designers. While current state of algorithm and software development does not permit routine, ''black box'' optimization of designs, the effort involved in using the existing tools may well be worth the improvement achieved in designs.

  16. A compact T-shaped nanodevice for charge sensing of a tunable double quantum dot in scalable silicon technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagliaferri, M. L. V.; Crippa, A.; De Michielis, M.; Mazzeo, G.; Fanciulli, M.; Prati, E.

    2016-03-01

    We report on the fabrication and the characterization of a tunable complementary-metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) system consisting of two quantum dots and a MOS single electron transistor (MOSSET) charge sensor. By exploiting a compact T-shaped design and few gates fabricated by electron beam lithography, the MOSSET senses the charge state of either a single or double quantum dot at 4.2 K. The CMOS compatible fabrication process, the simplified control over the number of quantum dots and the scalable geometry make such architecture exploitable for large scale fabrication of multiple spin-based qubits in circuital quantum information processing.

  17. Shape, Transverse Size, and Charged Hadron Multiplicity of Jets in pp Collisions at 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2012-06-01

    Measurements of jet characteristics from inclusive jet production in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV are presented. The data sample was collected with the CMS detector at the LHC during 2010 and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 36 inverse picobarns. The mean charged hadron multiplicity, the differential and integral jet shape distributions, and two independent moments of the shape distributions are measured as functions of the jet transverse momentum for jets reconstructed with the anti-kT algorithm. The measured observables are corrected to the particle level and compared with predictions from various QCD Monte Carlo generators.

  18. Studies of neutron-γ pulse shape discrimination in EJ-309 liquid scintillator using charge integration method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawełczak, I. A.; Ouedraogo, S. A.; Glenn, A. M.; Wurtz, R. E.; Nakae, L. F.

    2013-05-01

    Pulse shape discrimination capability based on the charge integration has been investigated for liquid scintillator EJ-309. The effectiveness of neutron-γ discrimination in 4-in. diameter and 3-in. thick EJ-309 cells coupled with 3-in. photomultiplier tubes has been carefully studied in the laboratory environment and compared to the commonly used EJ-301 liquid scintillator formulation. Influences of distortions in pulse shape caused by 13.7-m long cables necessary for some remote operations have been examined. The parameter space for an effective neutron-γ discrimination for these assays, such as position and width of a gate used for integration of the delayed light, has been explored.

  19. Shape, transverse size, and charged-hadron multiplicity of jets in pp collisions at sqrt {s} = 7TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hoch, M.; Hormann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Krammer, M.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schofbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Teischinger, F.; Trauner, C.; Wagner, P.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Bansal, S.; Benucci, L.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Maes, T.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Charaf, O.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hammad, G. H.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wickens, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Ryckbosch, D.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Vanelderen, L.; Verwilligen, P.; Walsh, S.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, J.; Ceard, L.; Cortina Gil, E.; De Favereau De Jeneret, J.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Grégoire, G.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Ovyn, S.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Schul, N.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Alves, G. A.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Alda Júnior, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Custodio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Figueiredo, D. Matos; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Oguri, V.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Silva do Amaral, S. M.; Sznajder, A.; Anjos, T. S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Darmenov, N.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Karadzhinova, A.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Ban, Y.; Guo, S.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Zhu, B.; Zou, W.; Cabrera, A.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Osorio Oliveros, A. F.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Dzelalija, M.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Kamel, A. Ellithi; Khalil, S.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Hektor, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Azzolini, V.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Czellar, S.; Harkonen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Maenpaä, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Karjalainen, A.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Sillou, D.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Marionneau, M.; Millischer, L.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Shreyber, I.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Broutin, C.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Dobrzynski, L.; Elgammal, S.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Thiebaux, C.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Cardaci, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Ferro, C.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Greder, S.; Juillot, P.; Karim, M.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Fassi, F.; Mercier, D.; Baty, C.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bedjidian, M.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Boumediene, D.; Brun, H.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Falkiewicz, A.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Le Grand, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sordini, V.; Tosi, S.; Tschudi, Y.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Lomidze, D.; Anagnostou, G.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.; Jussen, R.; Klein, K.; Merz, J.; Ostapchuk, A.; Perieanu, A.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Sprenger, D.; Weber, H.; Weber, M.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Erdmann, M.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hinzmann, A.; Hoepfner, K.; Klimkovich, T.; Klingebiel, D.; Kreuzer, P.; Lanske, D.; Lingemann, J.; Magass, C.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Papacz, P.; Pieta, H.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Steggemann, J.; Teyssier, D.; Bontenackels, M.; Cherepanov, V.; Davids, M.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Giffels, M.; Ahmad, W. Haj; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Linn, A.; Nowack, A.; Perchalla, L.; Pooth, O.; Rennefeld, J.; Sauerland, P.; Stahl, A.; Tornier, D.; Zoeller, M. H.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Behrenhoff, W.; Behrens, U.; Bergholz, M.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Cakir, A.; Campbell, A.; Castro, E.; Dammann, D.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Flossdorf, A.; Flucke, G.; Geiser, A.; Hauk, J.; Jung, H.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, H.; Knutsson, A.; Kramer, M.; Krücker, D.; Kuznetsova, E.; Lange, W.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Marienfeld, M.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Olzem, J.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Raspereza, A.; Rosin, M.; Schmidt, R.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Sen, N.; Spiridonov, A.; Stein, M.; Tomaszewska, J.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Autermann, C.; Blobel, V.; Bobrovskyi, S.; Draeger, J.; Enderle, H.; Gebbert, U.; Görner, M.; Hermanns, T.; Kaschube, K.; Kaussen, G.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Lange, J.; Mura, B.; Nowak, F.; Pietsch, N.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schroder, M.; Schum, T.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Thomsen, J.; Barth, C.; Bauer, J.; Berger, J.; Buege, V.; Chwalek, T.; De Boer, W.; Dierlamm, A.; Dirkes, G.; Feindt, M.; Gruschke, J.; Guthoff, M.; Hackstein, C.; Hartmann, F.; Heinrich, M.; Held, H.; Hoffmann, K. H.; Honc, S.; Katkov, I.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Kuhr, T.; Martschei, D.; Mueller, S.; Müller, Th.; Niegel, M.; Oberst, O.; Oehler, A.; Ott, J.; Peiffer, T.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Ratnikov, F.; Ratnikova, N.; Renz, M.; Rocker, S.; Saout, C.; Scheurer, A.; Schieferdecker, P.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schmanau, M.; Schott, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Troendle, D.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Weiler, T.; Zeise, M.; Ziebarth, E. B.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Kesisoglou, S.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Manolakos, I.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Mavrommatis, C.; Ntomari, E.; Petrakou, E.; Gouskos, L.; Mertzimekis, T. J.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Stiliaris, E.; Evangelou, I.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Patras, V.; Triantis, F. A.; Aranyi, A.; Bencze, G.; Boldizsar, L.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Kapusi, A.; Krajczar, K.; Sikler, F.; Veres, G. I.; Vesztergombi, G.; Beni, N.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Veszpremi, V.; Karancsi, J.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Dhingra, N.; Gupta, R.; Jindal, M.; Kaur, M.; Kohli, J. M.; Mehta, M. Z.; Nishu, N.; Saini, L. K.; Sharma, A.; Singh, A. P.; Singh, J.; Singh, S. P.; Ahuja, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Gupta, P.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Dutta, S.; Gomber, B.; Jain, S.; Jain, S.; Khurana, R.; Sarkar, S.; Choudhury, R. K.; Dutta, D.; Kailas, S.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Aziz, T.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Maity, M.; Majumder, D.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Saha, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Wickramage, N.; Banerjee, S.; Dugad, S.; Mondal, N. K.; Arfaei, H.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Hashemi, M.; Hesari, H.; Jafari, A.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi, A.; Najafabadi, M. Mohammadi; Mehdiabadi, S. Paktinat; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Barbone, L.; Calabria, C.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Lusito, L.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Manna, N.; Marangelli, B.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pacifico, N.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Romano, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tupputi, S.; Zito, G.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, M.; Grandi, C.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Meneghelli, M.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Odorici, F.; Perrotta, A.; Primavera, F.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G.; Travaglini, R.; Albergo, S.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Frosali, S.; Gallo, E.; Gonzi, S.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Colafranceschi, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Fabbricatore, P.; Musenich, R.; Benaglia, A.; De Guio, F.; Di Matteo, L.; Gennai, S.; Ghezzi, A.; Malvezzi, S.; Martelli, A.; Massironi, A.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Sala, S.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Cavallo, N.; De Cosa, A.; Dogangun, O.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lista, L.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bellan, P.; Bisello, D.; Branca, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Fanzago, F.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gozzelino, A.; Gulmini, M.; Lacaprara, S.; Lazzizzera, I.; Margoni, M.; Mazzucato, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Nespolo, M.; Perrozzi, L.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Vanini, S.; Zotto, P.; Zumerle, G.; Baesso, P.; Berzano, U.; Ratti, S. P.; Riccardi, C.; Torre, P.; Vitulo, P.; Viviani, C.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Caponeri, B.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Lucaroni, A.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Nappi, A.; Romeo, F.; Santocchia, A.; Taroni, S.; Valdata, M.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Kraan, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Palmonari, F.; Rizzi, A.; Segneri, G.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Franci, D.; Grassi, M.; Longo, E.; Meridiani, P.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Organtini, G.; Pandolfi, F.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Sigamani, M.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Biino, C.; Botta, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Castello, R.; Costa, M.; Demaria, N.; Graziano, A.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Potenza, A.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Belforte, S.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; Marone, M.; Montanino, D.; Penzo, A.; Heo, S. G.; Nam, S. K.; Chang, S.; Chung, J.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, J. E.; Kong, D. J.; Park, H.; Ro, S. R.; Son, D. C.; Son, T.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, Zero J.; Song, S.; Jo, H. Y.; Choi, S.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, T. J.; Lee, K. S.; Moon, D. H.; Park, S. K.; Seo, E.; Sim, K. S.; Choi, M.; Kang, S.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. H.; Park, C.; Park, I. C.; Park, S.; Ryu, G.; Cho, Y.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Goh, J.; Kim, M. S.; Lee, B.; Lee, J.; Lee, S.; Seo, H.; Yu, I.; Bilinskas, M. J.; Grigelionis, I.; Janulis, M.; Martisiute, D.; Petrov, P.; Polujanskas, M.; Sabonis, T.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; La Cruz, I. Heredia-de; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Magaña Villalba, R.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Villasenor-Cendejas, L. M.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Reyes-Santos, M. A.; Krofcheck, D.; Tam, J.; Bell, A. J.; Butler, P. H.; Doesburg, R.; Reucroft, S.; Silverwood, H.; Ahmad, M.; Asghar, M. I.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khalid, S.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Qazi, S.; Shah, M. A.; Shoaib, M.; Brona, G.; Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Bialkowska, H.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Gokieli, R.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Wrochna, G.; Zalewski, P.; Almeida, N.; Bargassa, P.; David, A.; Faccioli, P.; Parracho, P. G. Ferreira; Gallinaro, M.; Musella, P.; Nayak, A.; Pela, J.; Ribeiro, P. Q.; Seixas, J.; Varela, J.; Afanasiev, S.; Belotelov, I.; Bunin, P.; Gavrilenko, M.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbunov, I.; Karjavin, V.; Konoplyanikov, V.; Kozlov, G.; Lanev, A.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Shmatov, S.; Smirnov, V.; Volodko, A.; Zarubin, A.; Evstyukhin, S.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, An.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Matveev, V.; Pashenkov, A.; Toropin, A.; Troitsky, S.; Epshteyn, V.; Erofeeva, M.; Gavrilov, V.; Kossov, M.; Krokhotin, A.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Safronov, G.; Semenov, S.; Stolin, V.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Markina, A.; Obraztsov, S.; Perfilov, M.; Petrushanko, S.; Sarycheva, L.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Mesyats, G.; Rusakov, S. V.; Vinogradov, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Grishin, V.; Kachanov, V.; Konstantinov, D.; Korablev, A.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Djordjevic, M.; Ekmedzic, M.; Krpic, D.; Milosevic, J.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Arce, P.; Battilana, C.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Diez Pardos, C.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Ferrando, A.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Lopez, S. Goy; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Merino, G.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Santaolalla, J.; Soares, M. S.; Willmott, C.; Albajar, C.; Codispoti, G.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Chuang, S. H.; Duarte Campderros, J.; Felcini, M.; Fernandez, M.; Gomez, G.; Gonzalez Sanchez, J.; Jorda, C.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Sobron Sanudo, M.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Bernet, C.; Bialas, W.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Breuker, H.; Bunkowski, K.; Camporesi, T.; Cerminara, G.; Christiansen, T.; Coarasa Perez, J. A.; Curé, B.; D'Enterria, D.; De Roeck, A.; Di Guida, S.; Dobson, M.; Dupont-Sagorin, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Frisch, B.; Funk, W.; Gaddi, A.; Georgiou, G.; Gerwig, H.; Giffels, M.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Giunta, M.; Glege, F.; Garrido, R. Gomez-Reino; Gouzevitch, M.; Govoni, P.; Gowdy, S.; Guida, R.; Guiducci, L.; Gundacker, S.; Hansen, M.; Hartl, C.; Harvey, J.; Hegeman, J.; Hegner, B.; Hoffmann, H. F.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kaadze, K.; Karavakis, E.; Lecoq, P.; Lenzi, P.; Lourenço, C.; Mäki, T.; Malberti, M.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Masetti, L.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moser, R.; Mozer, M. U.; Mulders, M.; Nesvold, E.; Nguyen, M.; Orimoto, T.; Orsini, L.; Cortezon, E. Palencia; Perez, E.; Petrilli, A.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Pimiä, M.; Piparo, D.; Polese, G.; Quertenmont, L.; Racz, A.; Reece, W.; Antunes, J. Rodrigues; Rolandi, G.; Rommerskirchen, T.; Rovelli, C.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Santanastasio, F.; Schafer, C.; Schwick, C.; Segoni, I.; Sharma, A.; Siegrist, P.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiga, D.; Spiropulu, M.; Stoye, M.; Tsirou, A.; Vichoudis, P.; Wöhri, H. K.; Worm, S. D.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Gabathuler, K.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; König, S.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Meier, F.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Sibille, J.; Bäni, L.; Bortignon, P.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Chen, Z.; Cittolin, S.; Deisher, A.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Eugster, J.; Freudenreich, K.; Grab, C.; Lecomte, P.; Lustermann, W.; Marchica, C.; del Arbol, P. Martinez Ruiz; Milenovic, P.; Mohr, N.; Moortgat, F.; Nägeli, C.; Nef, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pape, L.; Pauss, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Ronga, F. J.; Rossini, M.; Sala, L.; Sanchez, A. K.; Sawley, M.-C.; Starodumov, A.; Stieger, B.; Takahashi, M.; Tauscher, L.; Thea, A.; Theofilatos, K.; Treille, D.; Urscheler, C.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Wehrli, L.; Weng, J.; Aguilo, E.; Amsler, C.; Chiochia, V.; De Visscher, S.; Favaro, C.; Rikova, M. Ivova; Mejias, B. Millan; Otiougova, P.; Robmann, P.; Schmidt, A.; Snoek, H.; Verzetti, M.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, K. H.; Kuo, C. M.; Li, S. W.; Lin, W.; Liu, Z. K.; Lu, Y. J.; Mekterovic, D.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. S.; Bartalini, P.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Dietz, C.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Kao, K. Y.; Lei, Y. J.; Lu, R.-S.; Shiu, J. G.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Wan, X.; Wang, M.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Cerci, S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Topaksu, A. Kayis; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatoz, A.; Sogut, K.; Cerci, D. Sunar; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Uzun, D.; Vergili, L. N.; Vergili, M.; Akin, I. V.; Aliev, T.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Deniz, M.; Gamsizkan, H.; Guler, A. M.; Ocalan, K.; Ozpineci, A.; Serin, M.; Sever, R.; Surat, U. E.; Yalvac, M.; Yildirim, E.; Zeyrek, M.; Deliomeroglu, M.; Gülmez, E.; Isildak, B.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Özbek, M.; Ozkorucuklu, S.; Sonmez, N.; Levchuk, L.; Bostock, F.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Frazier, R.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Kreczko, L.; Metson, S.; Newbold, D. M.; Nirunpong, K.; Poll, A.; Senkin, S.; Smith, V. J.; Basso, L.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Camanzi, B.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Jackson, J.; Kennedy, B. W.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Tomalin, I. R.; Womersley, W. J.; Bainbridge, R.; Ball, G.; Beuselinck, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Colling, D.; Cripps, N.; Cutajar, M.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; Della Negra, M.; Ferguson, W.; Fulcher, J.; Futyan, D.; Gilbert, A.; Guneratne Bryer, A.; Hall, G.; Hatherell, Z.; Hays, J.; Iles, G.; Jarvis, M.; Karapostoli, G.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Marrouche, J.; Mathias, B.; Nandi, R.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Papageorgiou, A.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Pioppi, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Rogerson, S.; Rompotis, N.; Rose, A.; Ryan, M. J.; Seez, C.; Sharp, P.; Sparrow, A.; Tapper, A.; Tourneur, S.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Wakefield, S.; Wardle, N.; Wardrope, D.; Whyntie, T.; Barrett, M.; Chadwick, M.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leslie, D.; Martin, W.; Reid, I. D.; Teodorescu, L.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Scarborough, T.; Henderson, C.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Jarrin, E. Carrera; Fantasia, C.; Heister, A.; John, J. St.; Lawson, P.; Lazic, D.; Rohlf, J.; Sperka, D.; Sulak, L.; Bhattacharya, S.; Cutts, D.; Ferapontov, A.; Heintz, U.; Jabeen, S.; Kukartsev, G.; Landsberg, G.; Luk, M.; Narain, M.; Nguyen, D.; Segala, M.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Tsang, K. V.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; De La Barca Sanchez, M. Calderon; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Dolen, J.; Erbacher, R.; Houtz, R.; Ko, W.; Kopecky, A.; Lander, R.; Mall, O.; Maruyama, S.; Miceli, T.; Pellett, D.; Robles, J.; Rutherford, B.; Searle, M.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Tripathi, M.; Vasquez Sierra, R.; Andreev, V.; Arisaka, K.; Cline, D.; Cousins, R.; Duris, J.; Erhan, S.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Jarvis, C.; Plager, C.; Rakness, G.; Schlein, P.; Tucker, J.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Babb, J.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Giordano, F.; Hanson, G.; Jeng, G. Y.; Kao, S. C.; Liu, H.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Nguyen, H.; Paramesvaran, S.; Sturdy, J.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wilken, R.; Wimpenny, S.; Andrews, W.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Evans, D.; Golf, F.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Lebourgeois, M.; Letts, J.; Mangano, B.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Petrucciani, G.; Pi, H.; Pieri, M.; Ranieri, R.; Sani, M.; Sfiligoi, I.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Sudano, E.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Yoo, J.; Barge, D.; Bellan, R.; Campagnari, C.; D'Alfonso, M.; Danielson, T.; Flowers, K.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Kalavase, P.; Koay, S. A.; Kovalskyi, D.; Krutelyov, V.; Lowette, S.; Mccoll, N.; Mullin, S. D.; Pavlunin, V.; Rebassoo, F.; Ribnik, J.; Richman, J.; Rossin, R.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; Vlimant, J. R.; West, C.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Di Marco, E.; Duarte, J.; Gataullin, M.; Ma, Y.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Rogan, C.; Timciuc, V.; Traczyk, P.; Veverka, J.; Wilkinson, R.; Yang, Y.; Zhu, R. Y.; Akgun, B.; Carroll, R.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Jang, D. W.; Jun, S. Y.; Liu, Y. F.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Dinardo, M. E.; Drell, B. R.; Edelmaier, C. J.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Heyburn, B.; Lopez, E. Luiggi; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Zang, S. L.; Agostino, L.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Eggert, N.; Gibbons, L. K.; Heltsley, B.; Hopkins, W.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Kreis, B.; Kaufman, G. Nicolas; Patterson, J. R.; Puigh, D.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Shi, X.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Vaughan, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Biselli, A.; Cirino, G.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Atac, M.; Bakken, J. A.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bloch, I.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Chetluru, V.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Cooper, W.; Eartly, D. P.; Elvira, V. D.; Esen, S.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gao, Y.; Gottschalk, E.; Green, D.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jensen, H.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kousouris, K.; Kunori, S.; Kwan, S.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Miao, T.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Musienko, Y.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Pivarski, J.; Pordes, R.; Prokofyev, O.; Schwarz, T.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Tan, P.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitmore, J.; Wu, W.; Yang, F.; Yumiceva, F.; Yun, J. C.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Chen, M.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Dobur, D.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Fu, Y.; Furic, I. K.; Gartner, J.; Goldberg, S.; Hugon, J.; Kim, B.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Park, M.; Remington, R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Schmitt, M.; Scurlock, B.; Sellers, P.; Skhirtladze, N.; Snowball, M.; Wang, D.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Gaultney, V.; Lebolo, L. M.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Chen, J.; Diamond, B.; Gleyzer, S. V.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Jenkins, M.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Sekmen, S.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Baarmand, M. M.; Dorney, B.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Vodopiyanov, I.; Adams, M. R.; Anghel, I. M.; Apanasevich, L.; Bai, Y.; Bazterra, V. E.; Betts, R. R.; Callner, J.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dragoiu, C.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Khalatyan, S.; Kunde, G. J.; Lacroix, F.; Malek, M.; O'Brien, C.; Silkworth, C.; Silvestre, C.; Strom, D.; Varelas, N.; Akgun, U.; Albayrak, E. A.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Duru, F.; Griffiths, S.; Lae, C. K.; McCliment, E.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Newsom, C. R.; Norbeck, E.; Olson, J.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Sen, S.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yetkin, T.; Yi, K.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Bonato, A.; Eskew, C.; Fehling, D.; Giurgiu, G.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Hu, G.; Maksimovic, P.; Rappoccio, S.; Swartz, M.; Tran, N. V.; Whitbeck, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Grachov, O.; Kenny, R. P., Iii; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Wood, J. S.; Zhukova, V.; Barfuss, A. F.; Bolton, T.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Shrestha, S.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Boutemeur, M.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kirn, M.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Peterman, A.; Rossato, K.; Rumerio, P.; Skuja, A.; Temple, J.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Twedt, E.; Alver, B.; Bauer, G.; Bendavid, J.; Busza, W.; Butz, E.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Dutta, V.; Ceballos, G. Gomez; Goncharov, M.; Hahn, K. A.; Harris, P.; Kim, Y.; Klute, M.; Lee, Y.-J.; Li, W.; Luckey, P. D.; Ma, T.; Nahn, S.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rudolph, M.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stöckli, F.; Sumorok, K.; Sung, K.; Velicanu, D.; Wenger, E. A.; Wolf, R.; Wyslouch, B.; Xie, S.; Yang, M.; Yilmaz, Y.; Yoon, A. S.; Zanetti, M.; Cooper, S. I.; Cushman, P.; Dahmes, B.; De Benedetti, A.; Franzoni, G.; Gude, A.; Haupt, J.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Pastika, N.; Rekovic, V.; Rusack, R.; Sasseville, M.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Perera, L.; Rahmat, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Butt, J.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Eads, M.; Jindal, P.; Keller, J.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Malbouisson, H.; Malik, S.; Snow, G. R.; Baur, U.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Jain, S.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Smith, K.; Wan, Z.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Trocino, D.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Anastassov, A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Ofierzynski, R. A.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Antonelli, L.; Berry, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kolb, J.; Kolberg, T.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Morse, D. M.; Pearson, T.; Ruchti, R.; Slaunwhite, J.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Ziegler, J.; Adam, N.; Berry, E.; Elmer, P.; Gerbaudo, D.; Halyo, V.; Hebda, P.; Hunt, A.; Laird, E.; Pegna, D. Lopes; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Raval, A.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Acosta, J. G.; Huang, X. T.; Lopez, A.; Mendez, H.; Oliveros, S.; Vargas, J. E. Ramirez; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Alagoz, E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bolla, G.; Borrello, L.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Everett, A.; Gutay, L.; Hu, Z.; Jones, M.; Koybasi, O.; Kress, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Leonardo, N.; Maroussov, V.; Merkel, P.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Marono, M. Vidal; Yoo, H. D.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Guragain, S.; Parashar, N.; Adair, A.; Boulahouache, C.; Cuplov, V.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Chung, Y. S.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Flacher, H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Gotra, Y.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Miner, D. C.; Petrillo, G.; Sakumoto, W.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Zielinski, M.; Bhatti, A.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Lungu, G.; Malik, S.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Atramentov, O.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Hits, D.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Richards, A.; Rose, K.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Cerizza, G.; Hollingsworth, M.; Spanier, S.; Yang, Z. C.; York, A.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Safonov, A.; Sengupta, S.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Toback, D.; Akchurin, N.; Bardak, C.; Damgov, J.; Dudero, P. R.; Jeong, C.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Mane, P.; Roh, Y.; Sill, A.; Volobouev, I.; Wigmans, R.; Yazgan, E.; Appelt, E.; Brownson, E.; Engh, D.; Florez, C.; Gabella, W.; Gurrola, A.; Issah, M.; Johns, W.; Johnston, C.; Kurt, P.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Balazs, M.; Boutle, S.; Conetti, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goadhouse, S.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Yohay, R.; Gollapinni, S.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Don, C. Kottachchi Kankanamge; Lamichhane, P.; Mattson, M.; Milstène, C.; Sakharov, A.; Anderson, M.; Bachtis, M.; Belknap, D.; Bellinger, J. N.; Bernardini, J.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Efron, J.; Friis, E.; Gray, L.; Grogg, K. S.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Klukas, J.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Leonard, J.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Pierro, G. A.; Ross, I.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Swanson, J.; Weinberg, M.

    2012-06-01

    Measurements of jet characteristics from inclusive jet production in protonproton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV are presented. The data sample was collected with the CMS detector at the LHC during 2010 and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 36 pb-1. The mean charged-hadron multiplicity, the differential and integral jet shape distributions, and two independent moments of the shape distributions are measured as functions of the jet transverse momentum for jets reconstructed with the anti- k T algorithm. The measured observables are corrected to the particle level and compared with predictions from various QCD Monte Carlo generators.

  20. Role of electric charge in shaping equilibrium configurations of fluid tori encircling black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Kovar, Jiri; Slany, Petr; Stuchlik, Zdenek; Karas, Vladimir; Cremaschini, Claudio; Miller, John C.

    2011-10-15

    Astrophysical fluids may acquire nonzero electrical charge because of strong irradiation or charge separation in a magnetic field. In this case, electromagnetic and gravitational forces may act together and produce new equilibrium configurations, which are different from the uncharged ones. Following our previous studies of charged test particles and uncharged perfect fluid tori encircling compact objects, we introduce here a simple test model of a charged perfect fluid torus in strong gravitational and electromagnetic fields. In contrast to ideal magnetohydrodynamic models, we consider here the opposite limit of negligible conductivity, where the charges are tied completely to the moving matter. This is an extreme limiting case which can provide a useful reference against which to compare subsequent more complicated astrophysically motivated calculations. To clearly demonstrate the features of our model, we construct three-dimensional axisymmetric charged toroidal configurations around Reissner-Nordstroem black holes and compare them with equivalent configurations of electrically neutral tori.

  1. Role of electric charge in shaping equilibrium configurations of fluid tori encircling black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovář, Jiří; Slaný, Petr; Stuchlík, Zdeněk; Karas, Vladimír; Cremaschini, Claudio; Miller, John C.

    2011-10-01

    Astrophysical fluids may acquire nonzero electrical charge because of strong irradiation or charge separation in a magnetic field. In this case, electromagnetic and gravitational forces may act together and produce new equilibrium configurations, which are different from the uncharged ones. Following our previous studies of charged test particles and uncharged perfect fluid tori encircling compact objects, we introduce here a simple test model of a charged perfect fluid torus in strong gravitational and electromagnetic fields. In contrast to ideal magnetohydrodynamic models, we consider here the opposite limit of negligible conductivity, where the charges are tied completely to the moving matter. This is an extreme limiting case which can provide a useful reference against which to compare subsequent more complicated astrophysically motivated calculations. To clearly demonstrate the features of our model, we construct three-dimensional axisymmetric charged toroidal configurations around Reissner-Nordström black holes and compare them with equivalent configurations of electrically neutral tori.

  2. Coarse-grained simulations of an ionic liquid-based capacitor: II. Asymmetry in ion shape and charge localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitsprecher, Konrad; Košovan, Peter; Holm, Christian

    2014-07-01

    In this work, which is a continuation of part I, we introduce a primitive model for an ionic liquid (IL) that can account for the planar shape of cations typical for ILs like imidazolium. The model consists of a spherical anion and a triangular cation consisting of three spheres, where one or all three vertices of the triangle can carry electric charge. We use molecular dynamics simulations to study the differential capacitance Cd of an ionic liquid confined between two planar electrodes. Our goal is to elucidate the complex dependence of Cd on the electrode potential U in terms of simple entities such as the shape and charge distribution of the ions. For this purpose, we compare the results from the current model to the results based on the models with spherical cations that possess asymmetry in ion valence and shape that were analyzed in detail in part I of this work. We show that the various possible stackings of the triangles near the cathode lead to noticeable new features in Cd(U) as compared to the spherical models. Different distributions of charges on the triangle lead to different preferred orientations of the cations near the cathode that are moreover potential dependent.

  3. Open apex shaped charge-type explosive device having special disc means with slide surface thereon to influence movement of open apex shaped charge liner during collapse of same during detonation

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, M.J.

    1993-10-12

    An open apex shape charge explosive device is disclosed having an inner liner defining a truncated cone, an explosive charge surrounding the truncated inner liner, a primer charge, and a disc located between the inner liner and the primer charge for directing the detonation of the primer charge around the end edge of the disc means to the explosive materials surrounding the inner liner. The disc comprises a material having one or more of: a higher compressive strength, a higher hardness, and/or a higher density than the material comprising the inner liner, thereby enabling the disc to resist deformation until the liner collapses. The disc has a slide surface thereon on which the end edge of the inner liner slides inwardly toward the vertical axis of the device during detonation of the main explosive surrounding the inner liner, to thereby facilitate the inward collapse of the inner liner. In a preferred embodiment, the geometry of the slide surface is adjusted to further control the collapse or [beta] angle of the inner liner. 12 figures.

  4. Open apex shaped charge-type explosive device having special disc means with slide surface thereon to influence movement of open apex shaped charge liner during collapse of same during detonation

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    An open apex shape charge explosive device is disclosed having an inner liner defining a truncated cone, an explosive charge surrounding the truncated inner liner, a primer charge, and a disc located between the inner liner and the primer charge for directing the detonation of the primer charge around the end edge of the disc means to the explosive materials surrounding the inner liner. The disc comprises a material having one or more of: a higher compressive strength, a higher hardness, and/or a higher density than the material comprising the inner liner, thereby enabling the disc to resist deformation until the liner collapses. The disc has a slide surface thereon on which the end edge of the inner liner slides inwardly toward the vertical axis of the device during detonation of the main explosive surrounding the inner liner, to thereby facilitate the inward collapse of the inner liner. In a preferred embodiment, the geometry of the slide surface is adjusted to further control the collapse or .beta. angle of the inner liner.

  5. A new method for charge-loss correction of room-temperature semiconductor detectors using digital trapezoidal pulse shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakhostin, M.; Veeramani, P.

    2012-06-01

    It is well known that semiconductor detectors operating at room temperature can be read out at high rate, with good noise performance and low sensitivity to ballistic deficit, by using trapezoidal (flat-topped) pulse shaping. Nevertheless, the energy resolution of these detectors is also affected by chargetrapping inside the detector crystal, which can not be compensated by the standard trapezoidal pulse shaping. A new digital algorithm based on trapezoidal pulse shaping, to compensate for the charge-trapping effect while minimizing the electronic noise, has been developed. The application of the pulse processing algorithm to a 5 × 5 × 1 mm3 planar Schottky CdTe detector leads to an energy resolution of 1.15% FWHM at 662 keV at room temperature, which is considerably superior to the results of the standard pulse filters.

  6. The Shape And Charge Of Lunar Dust Simulant (LHT) Under Electron Bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlu, J.; Beranek, M.; Richterova, I.; Safrankova, J.; Nemecek, Z.

    2011-11-29

    Since the processes in dusty plasmas are rather complex, the study of charging individual dust grains within simplified conditions becomes very important. Detailed investigations and characterization of charging processes taking place not only in dusty plasmas but also in dust-rich space plasmas are possible for example in traps where a single dust grain can be captured for a long time and its temporal evolution with respect to surrounding conditions can be continuously recorded. The specific charge, surface potential, and mass of the observed grain can be determined. The paper shows partial results on secondary emission from lunar dust LHT simulant.

  7. The Shape And Charge Of Lunar Dust Simulant (LHT) Under Electron Bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlu˚, J.; Beránek, M.; Richterová, I.; Šafránková, J.; Němeček, Z.

    2011-11-01

    Since the processes in dusty plasmas are rather complex, the study of charging individual dust grains within simplified conditions becomes very important. Detailed investigations and characterization of charging processes taking place not only in dusty plasmas but also in dust-rich space plasmas are possible for example in traps where a single dust grain can be captured for a long time and its temporal evolution with respect to surrounding conditions can be continuously recorded. The specific charge, surface potential, and mass of the observed grain can be determined. The paper shows partial results on secondary emission from lunar dust LHT simulant.

  8. U-shaped temperature dependence of rate constant of intramolecular photoinduced charge separation in zinc-porphyrin-bridge-quinone compounds.

    PubMed

    Kichigina, Anna O; Ionkin, Vladimir N; Ivanov, Anatoly I

    2013-06-20

    The multichannel stochastic point transition model of photoinduced electron transfer from both a vibrationally unrelaxed and a relaxed states involving the vibrational relaxation in donor-acceptor pairs has been elaborated. The U-shaped temperature dependencies of the rate constants of the intramolecular photoinduced charge separation from both the vibrationally unrelaxed and the relaxed states observed in Zn-porphyrin-bridge-quinone compounds in 2-methyltetrahydrofuran solvent have been reproduced in the framework of the proposed model that accounts for the temperature dependencies of the charge separation free energy gap and the medium reorganization energy. This modeling has allowed uncovering the mechanism of such a variation of the rate constant with the temperature. In the high temperature region, 310-125 K, the charge separation proceeds in the solvent controlled regime and its rate constant decreases with decreasing the temperature mirroring the temperature dependence of the medium relaxation rate. Further lowering the temperature leads to a rise of the reaction free energy gap so that it becomes larger than the medium reorganization energy. In this region the dynamic solvent effect is strongly suppressed and the charge separation rate constant becomes independent from the solvent relaxation rate. Although the medium relaxation rate continues to decrease with decreasing the temperature, the charge separation rate constant starts to rise because the reaction proceeds in the barrierless region.

  9. U-shaped temperature dependence of rate constant of intramolecular photoinduced charge separation in zinc-porphyrin-bridge-quinone compounds.

    PubMed

    Kichigina, Anna O; Ionkin, Vladimir N; Ivanov, Anatoly I

    2013-06-20

    The multichannel stochastic point transition model of photoinduced electron transfer from both a vibrationally unrelaxed and a relaxed states involving the vibrational relaxation in donor-acceptor pairs has been elaborated. The U-shaped temperature dependencies of the rate constants of the intramolecular photoinduced charge separation from both the vibrationally unrelaxed and the relaxed states observed in Zn-porphyrin-bridge-quinone compounds in 2-methyltetrahydrofuran solvent have been reproduced in the framework of the proposed model that accounts for the temperature dependencies of the charge separation free energy gap and the medium reorganization energy. This modeling has allowed uncovering the mechanism of such a variation of the rate constant with the temperature. In the high temperature region, 310-125 K, the charge separation proceeds in the solvent controlled regime and its rate constant decreases with decreasing the temperature mirroring the temperature dependence of the medium relaxation rate. Further lowering the temperature leads to a rise of the reaction free energy gap so that it becomes larger than the medium reorganization energy. In this region the dynamic solvent effect is strongly suppressed and the charge separation rate constant becomes independent from the solvent relaxation rate. Although the medium relaxation rate continues to decrease with decreasing the temperature, the charge separation rate constant starts to rise because the reaction proceeds in the barrierless region. PMID:23721362

  10. Interplay of anisotropy in shape and interactions in charged platelet suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabbari-Farouji, Sara; Weis, Jean-Jacques; Davidson, Patrick; Levitz, Pierre; Trizac, Emmanuel

    2014-12-01

    Motivated by the intriguing phase behavior of charged colloidal platelets, we investigate the structure and dynamics of charged repulsive disks by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The electrostatic interactions are taken into account through an effective two-body potential, obtained within the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann formalism, which has the form of anisotropic screened Coulomb potential. Recently, we showed that the original intrinsic anisotropy of the electrostatic potential in competition with excluded volume effects leads to a rich phase behavior that not only includes various liquid-crystalline phases but also predicts the existence of novel structures composed of alternating nematic-antinematic sheets. Here, we examine the structural and dynamical signatures of each of the observed structures for both translational and rotational degrees of freedom. Finally, we discuss the influence of effective charge value and our results in relation to experimental findings on charged platelet suspensions.

  11. How Do the Size, Charge and Shape of Nanoparticles Affect Amyloid β Aggregation on Brain Lipid Bilayer?

    PubMed

    Kim, Yuna; Park, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Hyojin; Nam, Jwa-Min

    2016-01-01

    Here, we studied the effect of the size, shape, and surface charge of Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) on amyloid beta (Aβ) aggregation on a total brain lipid-based supported lipid bilayer (brain SLB), a fluid platform that facilitates Aβ-AuNP aggregation process. We found that larger AuNPs induce large and amorphous aggregates on the brain SLB, whereas smaller AuNPs induce protofibrillar Aβ structures. Positively charged AuNPs were more strongly attracted to Aβ than negatively charged AuNPs, and the stronger interactions between AuNPs and Aβ resulted in fewer β-sheets and more random coil structures. We also compared spherical AuNPs, gold nanorods (AuNRs), and gold nanocubes (AuNCs) to study the effect of nanoparticle shape on Aβ aggregation on the brain SLB. Aβ was preferentially bound to the long axis of AuNRs and fewer fibrils were formed whereas all the facets of AuNCs interacted with Aβ to produce the fibril networks. Finally, it was revealed that different nanostructures induce different cytotoxicity on neuroblastoma cells, and, overall, smaller Aβ aggregates induce higher cytotoxicity. The results offer insight into the roles of NPs and brain SLB in Aβ aggregation on the cell membrane and can facilitate the understanding of Aβ-nanostructure co-aggregation mechanism and tuning Aβ aggregate structures. PMID:26782664

  12. How Do the Size, Charge and Shape of Nanoparticles Affect Amyloid β Aggregation on Brain Lipid Bilayer?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yuna; Park, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Hyojin; Nam, Jwa-Min

    2016-01-01

    Here, we studied the effect of the size, shape, and surface charge of Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) on amyloid beta (Aβ) aggregation on a total brain lipid-based supported lipid bilayer (brain SLB), a fluid platform that facilitates Aβ-AuNP aggregation process. We found that larger AuNPs induce large and amorphous aggregates on the brain SLB, whereas smaller AuNPs induce protofibrillar Aβ structures. Positively charged AuNPs were more strongly attracted to Aβ than negatively charged AuNPs, and the stronger interactions between AuNPs and Aβ resulted in fewer β-sheets and more random coil structures. We also compared spherical AuNPs, gold nanorods (AuNRs), and gold nanocubes (AuNCs) to study the effect of nanoparticle shape on Aβ aggregation on the brain SLB. Aβ was preferentially bound to the long axis of AuNRs and fewer fibrils were formed whereas all the facets of AuNCs interacted with Aβ to produce the fibril networks. Finally, it was revealed that different nanostructures induce different cytotoxicity on neuroblastoma cells, and, overall, smaller Aβ aggregates induce higher cytotoxicity. The results offer insight into the roles of NPs and brain SLB in Aβ aggregation on the cell membrane and can facilitate the understanding of Aβ-nanostructure co-aggregation mechanism and tuning Aβ aggregate structures.

  13. Shape-dependent charge and spin transport through an electron waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, Yue; Sherman, E. Ya.

    2013-01-01

    We study electron transport in nanosized semiconductor waveguides of different shapes. The spin-dependent transport through these nonuniform nanostructures is investigated in the presence of spin-orbit coupling of the Rashba and Dresselhaus types. The resulting spin rotation strongly depends on the shape of the waveguide. The crossover from the classical motion to the tunneling regime can be controlled in the waveguide with narrowing by modulating the strength of the Rashba spin-orbit coupling.

  14. An algorithm for charge-integration, pulse-shape discrimination and estimation of neutron/photon misclassification in organic scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polack, J. K.; Flaska, M.; Enqvist, A.; Sosa, C. S.; Lawrence, C. C.; Pozzi, S. A.

    2015-09-01

    Organic scintillators are frequently used for measurements that require sensitivity to both photons and fast neutrons because of their pulse shape discrimination capabilities. In these measurement scenarios, particle identification is commonly handled using the charge-integration pulse shape discrimination method. This method works particularly well for high-energy depositions, but is prone to misclassification for relatively low-energy depositions. A novel algorithm has been developed for automatically performing charge-integration pulse shape discrimination in a consistent and repeatable manner. The algorithm is able to estimate the photon and neutron misclassification corresponding to the calculated discrimination parameters, and is capable of doing so using only the information measured by a single organic scintillator. This paper describes the algorithm and assesses its performance by comparing algorithm-estimated misclassification to values computed via a more traditional time-of-flight estimation. A single data set was processed using four different low-energy thresholds: 40, 60, 90, and 120 keVee. Overall, the results compared well between the two methods; in most cases, the algorithm-estimated values fell within the uncertainties of the TOF-estimated values.

  15. Identification of light charged particles and heavy ions in silicon detectors by means of pulse-shape discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Pausch, G.; Ortlepp, H.G.; Bohne, W.

    1996-06-01

    Pulse-shape discrimination with totally depleted Si-detectors in reverse mount has been investigated and shown to be an excellent method of charged-particle identification in the energy range of {approx}2 to 20 AMeV. In test experiments with heavy-ion beams the authors obtained element identification up to Ti and isotope resolution even for elements heavier than carbon. The promising results and the simplicity of the electronics recommend this technique for applications in multidetector arrays. In particular, small and compact 4{pi} Si balls with relatively low thresholds for charged-particle identification to be combined with 4{pi} neutron detectors or {gamma} arrays can be constructed.

  16. Strain rate response of a Ni-Ti shape memory alloy after hydrogen charging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamaoun, Fehmi; Hassine, Tarak; Bouraoui, Tarak

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the susceptibility of Ni-Ti superelastic wires to the strain rates during tensile testing after hydrogen charging. Cathodic hydrogen charging is performed at a current density of 10 A/m² during 2-12 h in 0.9% NaCl solution and aged for 24 h at room temperature. Specimens underwent one cycle of loading-unloading reaching a stress value of 700 MPa. During loading, strain rates from 10-6 to 5 × 10-2 s-1 have been achieved. After 8 h of hydrogen charging, an embrittlement has been detected in the tensile strain rate range of 10-6 to 10-4 s-1. In contrast, no embrittlement has been detected for strain rates of 10-3 s-1 and higher. However, after 12 h of hydrogen charging and 24 h of annealing at room temperature, the embrittlement occurs in the beginning of the austenite-martensite transformation for all the studied strain rate values. These results show that for a range of critical amounts of diffused hydrogen, the embrittlement of the Ni-Ti superelastic alloy strongly depends on the strain rate during the tensile test. Moreover, it has been shown that this embrittlement occurs for low values of strain rates rather than the higher ones. This behaviour is attributed to the interaction between the diffused hydrogen and growth of the martensitic domain.

  17. Charge transfer emission of T-shaped π-conjugated molecules: impact of quinoid character on the excited state properties.

    PubMed

    Inouchi, Toshifumi; Nakashima, Takuya; Kawai, Tsuyoshi

    2014-04-10

    We investigate the impact of quinoid character of a π-conjugation system on the emission properties of T-shaped cross-conjugated molecules. Three π-conjugated systems with different quinoid nature including benzothiophene, 2-phenylthiophene, and 2-phenylthieno[3,2-b]thiophene were connected orthogonally to a π-conjugated bis(phenylethynyl)arylene with an acid responsive N-methylbenzimidazole junction. The enhancement of quinoid character of a vertical π-system effectively suppressed the twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) emission, leading to a more planar ICT state with enhanced emission intensity as well as a shortened Stokes shift.

  18. Dicyanobenzene and dicyanopyrazine derived X-shaped charge-transfer chromophores: comparative and structure-property relationship study.

    PubMed

    Dokládalová, L; Bureš, F; Kuznik, W; Kityk, I V; Wojciechowski, A; Mikysek, T; Almonasy, N; Ramaiyan, M; Padělková, Z; Kulhánek, J; Ludwig, M

    2014-08-01

    A series of novel X-shaped push-pull compounds based on benzene-1,2-dicarbonitrile has been designed, synthesized and further investigated by X-ray analysis, electrochemistry, absorption and emission spectra, SHG experiment and quantum-chemical calculations. The obtained data were compared with those for isolobal 5,6-disubstituted pyrazine-2,3-dicarbonitriles. Structure-property relationships were elucidated. The extension, composition and planarization of the π-linker used as well as the electron-withdrawing ability of both dicyano-substituted acceptor units affect the linear and nonlinear properties of the target charge-transfer chromophores most significantly.

  19. Tunable coupling in circuit quantum electrodynamics using a superconducting charge qubit with a V-shaped energy level diagram.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, S J; Hoffman, A J; Gambetta, J M; Houck, A A

    2011-02-25

    We introduce a new type of superconducting charge qubit that has a V-shaped energy spectrum and uses quantum interference to provide independently tunable qubit energy and coherent coupling to a superconducting cavity. Dynamic access to the strong coupling regime is demonstrated by tuning the coupling strength from less than 200 kHz to greater than 40 MHz. This tunable coupling can be used to protect the qubit from cavity-induced relaxation and avoid unwanted qubit-qubit interactions in a multiqubit system.

  20. Electrical polarizability of differently shaped dielectric objects in the presence of localized interfacial charge distribution: a unifying scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Biasio, A.; Ambrosone, L.; Cametti, C.

    2013-02-01

    We present the dielectric relaxation spectra of non-spherical shelled particles (namely cylindrical and toroidal particles) with a layer of localized electrical charges at the interfaces, uniformly dispersed in a continuous aqueous phase. Our numerical simulations extend over a wide frequency range, covering both the relaxation region due to the presence of localized layers of charges at the interface (α-relaxation) and the one due to the mismatch of the permittivity and conductivity of the adjoining phases (β-relaxation or the Maxwell-Wagner effect). Although there is a general formulation for determining the electrical polarizability α(ω) of arbitrarily shaped particles, based on the knowledge of the internal electric field distribution, the presence of the localized charge distribution makes its use formally rather elaborate. Contrarily, in this paper we show that, in the dipolar approximation, the polarizability α(ω), assuming the same functional dependence for spherical, cylindrical and toroidal particles, can be calculated in a very simple way and that the dielectric (and conductometric) properties of particle suspensions, adopting a simple inductive procedure, can be treated under a unifying scenario. Moreover, the method holds both for homogeneous and heterogeneous layered particles. A detailed prediction of the dielectric relaxations for both α- and β-processes in heterogeneous systems composed of spherical, cylindrical and toroidal particles is made for a wide range of electrical phase parameter values.

  1. Laser interferometric measurement of ion electrode shape and charge exchange erosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macrae, Gregory S.; Mercer, Carolyn R.

    1991-01-01

    A projected fringe profilometry system was applied to surface contour measurements of an accelerator electrode from an ion thrustor. The system permitted noncontact, nondestructive evaluation of the fine and gross structure of the electrode. A 3-D surface map of a dished electrode was generated without altering the electrode surface. The same system was used to examine charge exchange erosion pits near the periphery of the electrode to determine the depth, location, and volume of material lost. This electro-optical measurement system allowed rapid, nondestructive, digital data acquisition coupled with automated computer data processing. In addition, variable sensitivity allowed both coarse and fine measurements of objects having various surface finishes.

  2. Laser interferometric measurement of ion electrode shape and charge exchange erosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macrae, Gregory S.; Mercer, Carolyn R.

    1991-01-01

    A novel projected fringe profilometry system was applied to surface contour measurements of an accelerator electrode from an ion thruster. The system permitted noncontact, nondestructive evaluation of the fine and gross structure of the electrode. A 3D surface map of a dished electrode was generated without altering the electrode surface. The same system was used to examine charge exchange erosion pits near the periphery of the electrode to determine the depth, location, and volume of material lost. This electro-optical measurement system allowed rapid nondestructive digital data acquisition coupled with automated computer data-processing. In addition, variable sensitivity allowed both coarse and fine measurements of objects having various surface finishes.

  3. Measurement of charged-particle event shape variables in inclusive (s)=7TeV proton-proton interactions with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Atkinson, M.; Aubert, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barbaro Galtieri, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, V.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beale, S.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, A. K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertella, C.; Bertin, A.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bittner, B.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blazek, T.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. B.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, C. N.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Branchini, P.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brendlinger, K.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brown, G.; Brown, H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckingham, R. M.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Budick, B.; Büscher, V.; Bugge, L.; Bulekov, O.; Bundock, A. C.; Bunse, M.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgess, T.; Burke, S.; Busato, E.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, B.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Buttinger, W.; Byszewski, M.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L. P.; Caloi, R.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canale, V.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Capasso, L.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capriotti, D.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, B.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo Montoya, G. D.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Cascella, M.; Caso, C.; Castaneda Hernandez, A. M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Cataldi, G.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalleri, P.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chan, K.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Chapman, J. W.; Chareyre, E.; Charlton, D. G.; Chavda, V.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Cheung, S. L.; Chevalier, L.; Chiefari, G.; Chikovani, L.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choudalakis, G.; Chouridou, S.; Christidi, I. A.; Christov, A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Cirkovic, P.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Cogan, J. G.; Coggeshall, J.; Cogneras, E.; Colas, J.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collins, N. J.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Colon, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M. C.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Courneyea, L.; Cowan, G.; Cowden, C.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crescioli, F.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cuciuc, C.-M.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Curatolo, M.; Curtis, C. J.; Cuthbert, C.; Cwetanski, P.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; D'Orazio, A.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dameri, M.; Damiani, D. S.; Danielsson, H. O.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G. L.; Dassoulas, J. A.; Davey, W.; Davidek, T.; Davidson, N.; Davidson, R.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davignon, O.; Davison, A. R.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. 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I.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Živković, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.

    2013-08-01

    The measurement of charged-particle event shape variables is presented in inclusive inelastic pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV using the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The observables studied are the transverse thrust, thrust minor, and transverse sphericity, each defined using the final-state charged particles’ momentum components perpendicular to the beam direction. Events with at least six charged particles are selected by a minimum-bias trigger. In addition to the differential distributions, the evolution of each event shape variable as a function of the leading charged-particle transverse momentum, charged-particle multiplicity, and summed transverse momentum is presented. Predictions from several Monte Carlo models show significant deviations from data.

  4. Emittance control of a beam by shaping the transverse charge distribution, using a tomography diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Yakimenko, V.; Babzien, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Malone, R.; Wang, X.J.

    1998-06-01

    A high-brightness beam is very important for many applications. A diagnostic that measures the multi-dimensional phase-space density-distribution of the electron bunch is a must for obtaining such beams. Measurement of a slice emittance has been achieved. Tomographic reconstruction of phase space was suggested and implemented using a single quadrupole scan. In the present work the authors give special attention to the accuracy of the phase space reconstruction and present an analysis using a transport line with nine focusing magnets and techniques to control the optical functions and phases. This diagnostic, coupled with control of the radial charge distribution of presents an opportunity to improve the beam brightness. Combining the slice emittance and tomography diagnostics lead to an unprecedented visualization of phase space distributions in 5 dimensional phase-space and an opportunity to perform high-order emittance corrections.

  5. EMITTANCE CONTROL OF A BEAM BY SHAPING THE TRANSVERSE CHARGE DISTRIBUTION, USING A TOMOGRAPHY DIAGNOSTIC.

    SciTech Connect

    YAKIMENKO,V.

    1998-06-26

    A high-brightness beam is very important for many applications. A diagnostic that measures the multi-dimensional phase-space density-distribution of the electron bunch is a must for obtaining such beams. Measurement of a slice emittance has been achieved [1]. Tomographic reconstruction of phase space was suggested [2] and implemented [3,4] using a single quadrupole scan. In the present work we give special attention to the accuracy of the phase space reconstruction and present an analysis using a transport line with nine focusing magnets and techniques to control the optical functions and phases. This diagnostic, coupled with control of the radial charge distribution of presents an opportunity to improve the beam brightness. Combining the slice emittance and tomography diagnostics lead to an unprecedented visualization of phase space distributions in 5 dimensional phase-space and an opportunity to perform high-order emittance corrections.

  6. Verification and Validation of computational models for shaped charge jet completion of well bores in fluid saturated sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brannon, Rebecca M.

    2011-06-01

    Completion of cased and cemented wells by shaped charge perforation is a now standard method to establish a pathway liberating oil entrained in reservoir sandstone. However, the penetration event causes its own damage to the formation, potentially reducing well productivity by lodging fragmentation fines in pore throats. To simulate the perforation and penetration process, a computational framework must accommodate massive deformations (usually necessitating an Eulerian solver) while at the same time preserving the integrity of highly history-dependent internal state variables in constitutive models for inelastic flow, damage, and fracture. Results from a three year effort to improve predictive capability of numerical models of well bore completion are summarized. A hierarchical approach to verification and validation (V & V) is underway that begins with numerous straightforward verification tests, then introduces simple partial constitutive validation tests for simple loading (such as demonstrations that the constitutive models can reproduce observed unconfined and confined uniaxial stress data for drained and undrained sandstone), partial validation of the solvers for penetration of aluminium plates, and culminating in a full-scale simulation of the entire completion process consisting of: manufacture of the shaped charge jet liners, explosive formation of the jet, perforation of the metal well bore casing and cement, penetration of the compressed saturated sandstone, and subsequent flow of water and oil from the formation. The parts of this V & V effort to be discussed include: qualitative trend testing of the manufacturing process for power-compacted liners, trend testing (with some quantitative verification against idealized models) of the new effective-stress component of the sandstone constitutive model, convergence testing for benchmark tests of localization and fracture, massive deformation kinematics trend testing in a converging plate problem (which

  7. A Theoretical Exploration of the Differences between Prompt and Bow Shock Initiation of Explosives by Shaped Charge Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellor, Christopher; James, Hugh; Goff, Michael

    2011-06-01

    The use of the CREST reactive burn model in conjunction with results from the open literature demonstrates the differences between prompt and bow shock initiation, even when the diameter of the shaped charge jet is much larger than the failure diameter of the explosive. The burn model shows the need for the bow shock to build in strength before reaching an amplitude where significant reaction is triggered, and hence explains the observed very long runs to detonation required by this mechanism. While the compression of the explosive between the bow shock and the jet provides much greater pressures than those seen in the bow shock, the relative thermodynamic inefficiency of the compression process means that this region contributes little to the direct generation of reaction.

  8. Experiments and computer simulations of the dynamic cavity formed by a particulated shaped-charge jet in sand

    SciTech Connect

    Simonson, S.C.; Winer, K.A.; Reaugh, J.E.; Breithaupt, R.D.; Baum, D.W.

    1995-02-28

    Experiments have been carried out to measure the dynamic cavity growth of dry sand during penetration by particulated jets from Viper 65-mm-diameter, Cu-lined conical shaped charges at 1,000-mm standoff. The sand target was instrumented with foil switches, piezoelectric pins, and pressure transducers. Flash radiography at 450-keV was used to characterize the jets before impact and to image the target hole during jet penetration. The authors have developed a dry sand equation of state based on existing Hugoniot data as input to a porous material model incorporated in the 2-D arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian hydrocode CALE. They have carried out sand penetration simulations in which the particulated jet is modeled as hot copper rods. By varying parameters in the sand and copper descriptions they identify those features that affect the dynamic cavity formation.

  9. Censorship and the Student Press.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oettinger, Lauren

    The First Amendment rights provided to journalists--freedom of speech and of the press--are fundamental beliefs held by Americans. What students learn in the government class, however, may not be what they learn as editors-in-chief of student newspapers. U.S. schools are being charged with the censorship of student publications at an…

  10. Charge-controlled nano-structuring in partially collapsed star-shaped macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Uhlík, Filip; Košovan, Peter; Zhulina, Ekaterina B; Borisov, Oleg V

    2016-05-25

    Hydrophobic polyelectrolytes exhibit intra-molecular nano-scale self-organization instead of macroscopic phase separation because of the interplay between short-range hydrophobic attraction and long-range electrostatic repulsion. We aim to unravel how the morphology of the intra-molecular nanostructures can be controlled through the topology of the macromolecule on one hand and by adjustable ionization on the other hand. Specifically, we focus on hydrophobic star-branched polyelectrolytes, composed of either strong or weak acidic monomers. While both collapse in a globule when uncharged, and expand to full stretching of arms at high ionization, they exhibit quite different intermediate scenarios. For the strong ones, we observe the formation of bundles of arms as the main structural motif, and for the weak ones the intramolecular micelle-like structure is found at the same overall charge of the macromolecule. Here intramolecular disproportionation leaves some arms in a collapsed virtually neutral core, while others are substantially ionized and stretched in the corona.

  11. Unstable ring-shaped ion distribution functions induced by charge-exchange collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloch, W. J.; Pécseli, H. L.; Trulsen, J. K.

    2013-12-01

    The stability of ion velocity distributions in magnetized plasmas is studied under conditions where the plasma has an E0 × B/B2-drift with respect to a neutral background. Charge-exchange collisions can give rise to velocity distributions having the form of a ring or a loss-cone that can become linearly unstable. Sometimes the distributions have distorted forms and a stability analysis is not straightforward. Numerical simulations offer the most convenient method of a stability analysis in such cases. By numerical simulations using a particle-in-cell code that includes collisional interactions we demonstrate the formation of such velocity distributions and study the instabilities associated with them. We observe the saturation of the linear instability by quasi-linear velocity space diffusion. The parameter dependence of the instability conditions is illustrated by examples. The results are relevant for explaining some of the low frequency oscillations observed in the lower parts of the Earth's ionosphere (E- and F-regions), where collisions with neutrals are abundant. The results are important for laboratory experiments as well.

  12. Charge-controlled nano-structuring in partially collapsed star-shaped macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Uhlík, Filip; Košovan, Peter; Zhulina, Ekaterina B; Borisov, Oleg V

    2016-05-25

    Hydrophobic polyelectrolytes exhibit intra-molecular nano-scale self-organization instead of macroscopic phase separation because of the interplay between short-range hydrophobic attraction and long-range electrostatic repulsion. We aim to unravel how the morphology of the intra-molecular nanostructures can be controlled through the topology of the macromolecule on one hand and by adjustable ionization on the other hand. Specifically, we focus on hydrophobic star-branched polyelectrolytes, composed of either strong or weak acidic monomers. While both collapse in a globule when uncharged, and expand to full stretching of arms at high ionization, they exhibit quite different intermediate scenarios. For the strong ones, we observe the formation of bundles of arms as the main structural motif, and for the weak ones the intramolecular micelle-like structure is found at the same overall charge of the macromolecule. Here intramolecular disproportionation leaves some arms in a collapsed virtually neutral core, while others are substantially ionized and stretched in the corona. PMID:27140226

  13. Characteristics of copper shaped-charge liner materials at tensile strain rates of 10 sup 4 s sup minus 1

    SciTech Connect

    Gourdin, W.H.

    1990-05-29

    We have studied the mechanical behavior of 81-mm shaped-charge liners made from oxygen-free electronic (OFE) and electrolytic tough pitch (ETP) copper at tensile strain rates of 10{sup 4} s{sup {minus}1} by using electromagnetic ring expansion. The OFE copper was processed to yield an uniform grain size of approximately 25 {mu}m, whereas the ETP material was reportedly processed in such a way as to encourage excessive grain growth and a broad distribution of grain sizes. However, the microstructures of the materials we studied are all similar, and we find no evidence of gross secondary grain growth in the ETP liners, although they do contain oxide inclusions. The OFE liners are characterized by reproducible stress-strain relationships nearly identical to independently processed OFE copper of comparable grain size. The flow stress of the ETP specimens, in contrast, is both lower and generally more erratic than that of the OFE specimens. Elongation at failure for the OFE linear materials are consistently large (0.55 {plus minus} 0.01) and are significantly larger than values observed for annealed 10-{mu}m OFE (0.49 {plus minus} 0.04). The ETP materials appear to show somewhat less elongation at failure, although their erratic behavior makes comparisons difficult. We suggest that the erratic behavior of ETP shaped-charge liners under test and their poor performance relative to OFE copper are the result of chemical impurities and related microstructural nonuniformities, rather than differences in grain size alone. 12 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Shape-controlled synthesis of NiCo2S4 and their charge storage characteristics in supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yufei; Ma, Mingze; Yang, Jun; Sun, Chencheng; Su, Haiquan; Huang, Wei; Dong, Xiaochen

    2014-07-01

    In this work, a facile hydrothermal approach for the shape-controlled synthesis of NiCo2S4 architectures is reported. Four different morphologies, urchin-, tube-, flower-, and cubic-like NiCo2S4 microstructures, have been successfully synthesized by employing various solvents. The obtained precursors and products have been characterized by X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. It is revealed that the supersaturation of nucleation and crystal growth is determined by the solvent polarity and solubility, which can precisely control the morphology of NiCo2S4 microstructures. The detailed electrochemical performances of the various NiCo2S4 microstructures are investigated by cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge-discharge measurements. The results indicate that the tube-like NiCo2S4 exhibits promising capacitive properties with high capacitance and excellent retention. Its specific capacitance can reach 1048 F g-1 at the current density of 3.0 A g-1 and 75.9% of its initial capacitance is maintained at the current density of 10.0 A g-1 after 5000 charge-discharge cycles.

  15. Transport phenomena in a model cheese: the influence of the charge and shape of solutes on diffusion.

    PubMed

    Silva, J V C; Peixoto, P D S; Lortal, S; Floury, J

    2013-10-01

    During cheese ripening, microorganisms grow as immobilized colonies, metabolizing substrates present in the matrix and generating products from enzymatic reactions. Local factors that limit the rates of diffusion, either within the general cheese matrix or near the colonies, may influence the metabolic activity of the bacteria during ripening, affecting the final quality of the cheese. The objective of this study was to determine the diffusion coefficients of solutes as a function of their different physicochemical characteristics (size, charge, and shape) in an ultrafiltrate (UF) model cheese (based on ultrafiltered milk) to enable better understanding of the ripening mechanisms. Diffusion coefficients of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextrans (4 kDa to 2 MDa) and FITC-labeled dairy proteins (α-lactalbumin, β-lactoglobulin, and BSA) were measured using the technique of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). This study showed that macromolecules up to 2 MDa and proteins could diffuse through the UF model cheese. The larger FITC-dextrans were not more hindered by the structure of the UF model cheese compared with the smaller ones. Any decrease in the diffusion coefficients of solutes was related only to their hydrodynamic radii. The FITC-dextran diffusion data were fitted to an obstruction model, resulting in a constant obstruction factor (k ~0.42). Diffusion in the model cheese was sensitive to the physicochemical characteristics of the solute. The FITC-dairy proteins studied (rigid and negatively charged molecules) were hindered to a greater degree than the FITC-dextrans (flexible and charge-neutral molecules) in the UF model cheese. The existence of steric and electrostatic interactions between the protein matrix of the UF model cheese and the FITC-dairy proteins could explain the decrease in diffusion compared with FITC-dextrans.

  16. Press Start

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harteveld, Casper

    This level sets the stage for the design philosophy called “Triadic Game Design” (TGD). This design philosophy can be summarized with the following sentence: it takes two to tango, but it takes three to design a meaningful game or a game with a purpose. Before the philosophy is further explained, this level will first delve into what is meant by a meaningful game or a game with a purpose. Many terms and definitions have seen the light and in this book I will specifically orient at digital games that aim to have an effect beyond the context of the game itself. Subsequently, a historical overview is given of the usage of games with a serious purpose which starts from the moment we human beings started to walk on our feet till our contemporary society. It turns out that we have been using games for all kinds of non-entertainment purposes for already quite a long time. With this introductory material in the back of our minds, I will explain the concept of TGD by means of a puzzle. After that, the protagonist of this book, the game Levee Patroller, is introduced. Based on the development of this game, the idea of TGD, which stresses to balance three different worlds, the worlds of Reality, Meaning, and Play, came into being. Interested? Then I suggest to quickly “press start!”

  17. Hot isostatic pressing: Conference proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Froes, F.H.; Hebeisen, J.; Widmer, R.

    1996-12-31

    The International Conference on Hot Isostatic Pressing was held on May 20-22, 1996, in Andover, Massachusetts. This conference discussed the state-of-the-art of hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and competing compaction techniques. HIP allows complex cost-effective near net shapes to be produced from powder products, densification of castings thereby enhancing performance, retention of metastable structures such as nano-sized grains, and even creative food processing. Sections in the conference covered such items as fundamentals, mathematical modeling, equipment and instrumentation, advanced materials and processes, composite materials, casting densification, surface treatments, HIP bonding, and competing technologies. Forty five papers were processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  18. Analysis of the Dynamic Sensitivity of Hemisphere-Shaped Electrostatic Sensors’ Circular Array for Charged Particle Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xin; Chen, Zhong-Sheng; Li, Yue; Hu, Zheng; Yang, Yong-Min

    2016-01-01

    Electrostatic sensor arrays (ESAs) are promising in industrial applications related to charged particle monitoring. Sensitivity is a fundamental and commonly-used sensing characteristic of an ESA. However, the usually used spatial sensitivity, which is called static sensitivity here, is not proper for moving particles or capable of reflecting array signal processing algorithms integrated in an ESA. Besides, reports on ESAs for intermittent particles are scarce yet, especially lacking suitable array signal processing algorithms. To solve the problems, the dynamic sensitivity of ESA is proposed, and a hemisphere-shaped electrostatic sensors’ circular array (HSESCA) along with its application in intermittent particle monitoring are taken as an example. In detail, a sensing model of the HSESCA is built. On this basis, its array signals are analyzed; the dynamic sensitivity is thereupon defined by analyzing the processing of the array signals. Besides, a component extraction-based array signal processing algorithm for intermittent particles is proposed, and the corresponding dynamic sensitivity is analyzed quantitatively. Moreover, simulated and experimental results are discussed, which validate the accuracy of the models and the effectiveness of the relevant approaches. The proposed dynamic sensitivity of ESA, as well as the array signal processing algorithm are expected to provide references in modeling, designing and using ESAs. PMID:27589767

  19. Hypervelocity Impact Testing of International Space Station Meteoroid/Orbital Debris Shielding Using an Inhibited Shaped Charge Launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, Justin H.; Grosch, Donald

    2001-01-01

    Engineers at the NASA Johnson Space Center have conducted hypervelocity impact (HVI) performance evaluations of spacecraft meteoroid and orbital debris (M/OD) shields at velocities in excess of 7 km/s. The inhibited shaped charge launcher (ISCL), developed by the Southwest Research Institute, launches hollow, circular, cylindrical jet tips to approximately 11 km/s. Since traditional M/OD shield ballistic limit performance is defined as the diameter of sphere required to just perforate or spall a spacecraft pressure wall, engineers must decide how to compare ISCL derived data with those of the spherical impactor data set. Knowing the mass of the ISCL impactor, an equivalent sphere diameter may be calculated. This approach is conservative since ISCL jet tips are more damaging than equal mass spheres. A total of 12 tests were recently conducted at the Southwest Research Institute (SWRI) on International Space Station M/OD shields. Results of these tests are presented and compared to existing ballistic limit equations. Modification of these equations is suggested based on the results.

  20. A new V-shaped organic fluorescent compound integrated with crystallization-induced emission enhancement and intramolecular charge transfer.

    PubMed

    Gu, Pei-Yang; Zhang, You-Hao; Liu, Gao-Yan; Ge, Jian-Feng; Xu, Qing-Feng; Zhang, Qichun; Lu, Jian-Mei

    2013-09-01

    The emission behavior of a new V-shaped organic fluorescent compound (p,p′-bis(2-aryl-1,3,4-oxadiazol-5-yl)diphenyl sulfone (OZA-SO)), consisting of diethylamino (donor) and sulfone (acceptor) units, has been studied in various polar solvents and with different morphologies. As expected, there is the gradual transition from the locally excited state to the intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) state with the increasing solvent polarity. The photoluminescence intensity of OZA-SO initially decreases with a low water fraction (f(w)), owing to ICT effect, and then increases with a high f(w), owing to crystallization-induced emission enhancement. At the same time, the fluorescence lifetime of OZA-SO increases from 0.062 ns in dimethylformamide (DMF) to 5.80 ns in a solution containing 90 % water, and then to 7.49 ns in a solution containing 60 % water. Furthermore, the solid-state emission of OZA-SO can be tuned reversibly from green to yellow by fuming/grinding or fuming/heating owing to morphological changes. This color-switchable feature of OZA-SO may have potential applications in optical-recording and temperature-sensing materials.

  1. Analysis of the Dynamic Sensitivity of Hemisphere-Shaped Electrostatic Sensors' Circular Array for Charged Particle Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xin; Chen, Zhong-Sheng; Li, Yue; Hu, Zheng; Yang, Yong-Min

    2016-01-01

    Electrostatic sensor arrays (ESAs) are promising in industrial applications related to charged particle monitoring. Sensitivity is a fundamental and commonly-used sensing characteristic of an ESA. However, the usually used spatial sensitivity, which is called static sensitivity here, is not proper for moving particles or capable of reflecting array signal processing algorithms integrated in an ESA. Besides, reports on ESAs for intermittent particles are scarce yet, especially lacking suitable array signal processing algorithms. To solve the problems, the dynamic sensitivity of ESA is proposed, and a hemisphere-shaped electrostatic sensors' circular array (HSESCA) along with its application in intermittent particle monitoring are taken as an example. In detail, a sensing model of the HSESCA is built. On this basis, its array signals are analyzed; the dynamic sensitivity is thereupon defined by analyzing the processing of the array signals. Besides, a component extraction-based array signal processing algorithm for intermittent particles is proposed, and the corresponding dynamic sensitivity is analyzed quantitatively. Moreover, simulated and experimental results are discussed, which validate the accuracy of the models and the effectiveness of the relevant approaches. The proposed dynamic sensitivity of ESA, as well as the array signal processing algorithm are expected to provide references in modeling, designing and using ESAs. PMID:27589767

  2. A computational exploration of the differences between prompt and bow shock initiation of explosives by shaped charge jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellor, Christopher; James, Hugh R.; Goff, Michael J.

    2012-03-01

    The use of the CREST reactive burn model in conjunction with results from the open literature demonstrates the differences between prompt and bow shock initiation where the diameter of the shaped charge jet is much larger than the failure diameter of the explosive. The type of cover plate protecting the explosive can play an important role in determining the bow shock structure. For most scenarios of interest the burn model shows the need for the bow shock to build in strength before reaching an amplitude where significant reaction is triggered, and hence explains the observed very long runs to detonation that are often required by this mechanism. While the compression of the explosive between the bow shock and the jet provides much greater pressures than those seen in the bow shock, the relative thermodynamic inefficiency of the compression process means that this region contributes little to the direct generation of reaction. In contrast prompt shocks exhibit complete explosive burn at an early stage and the occasional long run distance is due to delays in this reaction achieving a diverging detonation.

  3. Living Dangerously--Changing Press Law in India.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Timothy

    An examination of the changes in press laws after India gained its independence in 1947 shows how a free press is shaped mostly by the structure and evolution of the democratic society that it is intended to serve. The most salient features that have characterized the Indian press, from the early nineteenth century to the present day, are…

  4. Tailoring of keV-ion beams by image charge when transmitting through rhombic and rectangular shaped nanocapillaries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H-Q; Akram, N; Skog, P; Soroka, I L; Trautmann, C; Schuch, R

    2012-05-11

    We report on an unexpected effect of tailoring transmission profiles of Ne(7+) ions through nanocapillaries of rhombic and rectangular cross sections in mica. We find that capillaries of rhombic cross sections produce rectangular shaped ion transmission profiles and, vice versa, that capillaries of rectangular geometry give a rhombic beam shape. This shaping effect only occurs for transmitted ions and is absent for the small fraction of neutralized particles. The experimental findings and simulations of the projectile trajectories give clear evidence that the observed effect is due to the image forces experienced by the transmitting ions. This novel beam shaping mechanism suggests applications for the guiding, focusing, and shaping of ion beams.

  5. Tailoring of keV-Ion Beams by Image Charge when Transmitting through Rhombic and Rectangular Shaped Nanocapillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.-Q.; Akram, N.; Skog, P.; Soroka, I. L.; Trautmann, C.; Schuch, R.

    2012-05-01

    We report on an unexpected effect of tailoring transmission profiles of Ne7+ ions through nanocapillaries of rhombic and rectangular cross sections in mica. We find that capillaries of rhombic cross sections produce rectangular shaped ion transmission profiles and, vice versa, that capillaries of rectangular geometry give a rhombic beam shape. This shaping effect only occurs for transmitted ions and is absent for the small fraction of neutralized particles. The experimental findings and simulations of the projectile trajectories give clear evidence that the observed effect is due to the image forces experienced by the transmitting ions. This novel beam shaping mechanism suggests applications for the guiding, focusing, and shaping of ion beams.

  6. Reciprocating pellet press

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Charles W.

    1981-04-07

    A machine for pressing loose powder into pellets using a series of reciprocating motions has an interchangeable punch and die as its only accurately machines parts. The machine reciprocates horizontally between powder receiving and pressing positions. It reciprocates vertically to press, strip and release a pellet.

  7. Correlating shaped charge performance with processing conditions and microstructure of an aluminum alloy 1100 liner enabled by a new method to arrest nascent jet formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheid, James Eric

    Aluminum-lined shaped charges are used in special applications where jet and / or slug residue in the target is undesired. The three different microstructures of the aluminum liners studied herein resulted from three different manufacturing interpretations of the same design. One interpretation was completely machining the liners from best available annealed round stock. The second was to cold-forge the liners from annealed round-stock in an open-die forge to near-final dimensions, and then machine the liners to the final dimensions. The third variant in this study was to use the above forged liner, but with annealing after the machining. These three manufacturing choices resulted in significant variations in shaped charge performance. The goal of this research was to clarify the relationships between the liner metal microstructure and properties, and the corresponding shaped charge dynamic flow behavior. What began as an investigation into user-reported performance problems associated inherently with liner manufacturing processes and resultant microstructure, resolved into new understandings of the relationships between aluminum liner microstructure and shaped charge collapse kinetics. This understanding was achieved through an extensive literature review and the comprehensive characterization of the material properties of three variants of an 1100 aluminum shaped charge liner with a focus on collapse and nascent jet formation. The machined liner had a microstructure with large millimeter-sized grains and fine particles aligned in bands parallel to the charge axis. The forged liner microstructure consisted of very small one micrometer-sized (1 mum) subgrains and fine particles aligned largely in bands elongated parallel to the liner contour. The annealed liner was characterized by ten micrometer (10 mum) sized equiaxed grains with residual fine particles in the forged alignment. This characterization was enabled by the development, execution and validation of a

  8. Charge Conservation and the Shape of the Ridge of Two-Particle Correlations in Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bożek, Piotr; Broniowski, Wojciech

    2012-08-01

    We demonstrate that, in the framework of the event-by-event hydrodynamics followed by statistical hadronization, the proper charge conservation in the mechanism of hadron production provides the crucial nonflow component and leads to agreement with the two-dimensional two-particle correlation data in relative azimuthal angle and pseudorapidity at soft transverse momenta (pT<2GeV). The falloff of the same-side ridge in relative pseudorapidity follows from the fact that a pair of particles with balanced charges is emitted from the same fluid element, whose collective velocity collimates the momenta of the pair. We reproduce basic experimental features of the two-dimensional correlation function, such as the dependence on the relative charge and centrality, as well as the related charge balance functions and the harmonic flow coefficients as functions of the relative pseudorapidity.

  9. University Presses: Problems and Prospects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meeker, Robert B.

    Historical information on university presses and their problems are considered. University presses in the United States have their roots in 15th century England when the Oxford University Press was established in 1478. The first U.S. press to use the term "university press" was Cornell University; the press operated from 1869 until it was closed…

  10. Effect of the shape of the electron energy distribution function on the dust grain charge and its screening in glow discharge plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Derbenev, I. N.; Dyatko, N. A.; Filippov, A. V.

    2012-03-15

    The dust grain charge in the plasma of a glow discharge in noble gases and nitrogen is calculated in the orbit motion limited model for reduced fields in the range of E/N = 1-20 Td. The calculations were performed using the electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) obtained by solving the Boltzmann equation numerically with allowance for elastic and inelastic electron scattering and analytically with allowance for only elastic scattering and (for nitrogen) excitation of rotational levels, as well as using a Maxwellian EEDF. In the latter case, either the characteristic electron energy or mean electron energy multiplied by two thirds was used as the electron temperature. It is shown that the calculations with the use of a Maxwellian EEDF yield larger values of the grain charge as compared to those calculated with EEDFs obtained by solving the Boltzmann equation. The range of E/N values is determined in which analytical expressions for the EEDF obtained with allowance for elastic scattering and excitation of rotational levels are applicable to calculating the grain charge. The effect of the EEDF shape on the screening of the dust grain charge in plasma is investigated. The Debye screening length in case of a Maxwellian EEDF is shown to be shorter than that obtained with EEDFs calculated by numerically solving the Boltzmann equation.

  11. Effect of the shape of the electron energy distribution function on the dust grain charge and its screening in glow discharge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derbenev, I. N.; Dyatko, N. A.; Filippov, A. V.

    2012-03-01

    The dust grain charge in the plasma of a glow discharge in noble gases and nitrogen is calculated in the orbit motion limited model for reduced fields in the range of E/N = 1-20 Td. The calculations were performed using the electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) obtained by solving the Boltzmann equation numerically with allowance for elastic and inelastic electron scattering and analytically with allowance for only elastic scattering and (for nitrogen) excitation of rotational levels, as well as using a Maxwellian EEDF. In the latter case, either the characteristic electron energy or mean electron energy multiplied by two thirds was used as the electron temperature. It is shown that the calculations with the use of a Maxwellian EEDF yield larger values of the grain charge as compared to those calculated with EEDFs obtained by solving the Boltzmann equation. The range of E/N values is determined in which analytical expressions for the EEDF obtained with allowance for elastic scattering and excitation of rotational levels are applicable to calculating the grain charge. The effect of the EEDF shape on the screening of the dust grain charge in plasma is investigated. The Debye screening length in case of a Maxwellian EEDF is shown to be shorter than that obtained with EEDFs calculated by numerically solving the Boltzmann equation.

  12. Evaluation of the cone-shaped pickup performance for low charge sub-10 fs arrival-time measurements at free electron laser facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelovski, Aleksandar; Kuntzsch, Michael; Czwalinna, Marie Kristin; Penirschke, Andreas; Hansli, Matthias; Sydlo, Cezary; Arsov, Vladimir; Hunziker, Stephan; Schlarb, Holger; Gensch, Michael; Schlott, Volker; Weiland, Thomas; Jakoby, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    An evaluation of the cone-shaped pickup performance as a part of the high bandwidth bunch arrival-time monitors (BAMs) for a low charge sub-10 fs arrival-time measurements is presented. Three sets of pickups are installed at the free electron laser FLASH at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, the quasi-cw SRF accelerator ELBE at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf and the SwissFEL injector test facility at Paul Scherrer Institute. Measurements and simulations are in good agreement and the pickups fulfill the design specifications. Utilizing the high bandwidth BAM with the cone-shaped pickups, an improvement of the signal slope by a factor of 10 is demonstrated at ELBE compared to the BAM with a low bandwidth.

  13. Slow excited state injection and charge recombination at star-shaped ruthenium polypyridyl compounds--TiO2 interfaces.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Patrik G; Zhang, Yongyi; Abrahamsson, Maria; Meyer, Gerald J; Galoppini, Elena

    2011-06-14

    The excited states of two star-shaped nanometre-sized ruthenium polypyridyl compounds were largely unchanged when anchored to nanocrystalline TiO(2) thin films due to a highly symmetrical and rigid ligand structure that isolated the chromophoric core from the semiconductor. Interfacial electron transfer occurred on unusually slow time scales.

  14. High School Press Freedom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maurer, Diana J.

    This report focuses on controversial articles written by the high school press, decisions made by the courts regarding students' press freedoms, and reactions to the articles and rulings. Particular attention is given to two rulings concerning censorship of articles about students' sexual atttiudes and activities, the issue of prior restraint of…

  15. High School Press Pressures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Luella P.

    History shows that the high school press suffers through cycles that reflect economic factors and cultural climates within communities, states, and the nation. The direction of that cycle in the 1960s and early 1970s was toward more open, free-flowing information by a vigorous student press, but those economic and cultural signs now are pointing…

  16. Lyndon Johnson's Press Conferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Stephen

    Because President Lyndon Johnson understood well the publicity value of the American news media, he sought to exploit them. He saw reporters as "torch bearers" for his programs and policies and used the presidential press conference chiefly for promotional purposes. Although he met with reporters often, his press conferences were usually…

  17. Measuring the electric charge and zeta potential of nanometer-sized objects using pyramidal-shaped nanopores.

    PubMed

    Arjmandi, Nima; Van Roy, Willem; Lagae, Liesbet; Borghs, Gustaaf

    2012-10-16

    Nanometer-scale pores are capable of detecting the size and concentration of nanometer-sized analytes at low concentrations upon analyzing their translocation through the pore, in small volumes and over a short time without labeling. Here, we present a simple, widely applicable, robust, and precise method to measure the zeta-potential of different nano-objects using nanopores. Zeta-potential i.e., a quantity that represents electrical charge in nanocolloids, is an important property in manufacturing of pharmaceuticals, inks, foams, cosmetics, and food. Its use is also imperative in understanding basic properties of complex dispersions including blood, living organisms, and their interaction with the environment. The characterization methods for zeta-potential are limited. Using the nanopore technique, the zeta-potential and the charge of nanoparticles can be measured independently of other parameters, such as particle size. This simple method is based on measuring the duration of the translocation of analytes through a nanopore as a function of applied voltage. A simple analytical model has been developed to extract the zeta-potential. This method is able to detect and differentiate nanometer-sized objects of similar size; it also enables the direct and precise quantitative measurement of their zeta-potential. We have applied this method to a wide range of different nanometer-sized particles and compared the results with values measured by commercially available tools. Furthermore, potential capability of this method in detection and characterization of virions is shown by measuring the low zeta-potential of HIV and EBV viruses.

  18. An investigation of the cratering-induced motions occurring during the formation of bowl-shaped craters. [using high explosive charges as the cratering source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piekutowski, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of the dynamic processes which occur during crater formation were examined using small hemispherical high-explosive charges detonated in a tank which had one wall constructed of a thick piece of clear plexiglas. Crater formation and the motions of numerous tracer particles installed in the cratering medium at the medium-wall interface were viewed through the wall of this quarter-space tank and recorded with high-speed cameras. Subsequent study and analysis of particle motions and events recorded on the film provide data needed to develop a time-sequence description of the formation of a bowl-shaped crater. Tables show the dimensions of craters produced in a quarter-space tank compared with dimensions of craters produced in normal half-space tanks. Crater growth rate summaries are also tabulated.

  19. Tuning the Direction of Intramolecular Charge Transfer and the Nature of the Fluorescent State in a T-Shaped Molecular Dyad.

    PubMed

    Felouat, Abdellah; D'Aléo, Anthony; Charaf-Eddin, Azzam; Jacquemin, Denis; Le Guennic, Boris; Kim, Eunsun; Lee, Kwang Jin; Woo, Jae Heun; Ribierre, Jean-Charles; Wu, Jeong Weon; Fages, Frédéric

    2015-06-18

    Controlling photoinduced intramolecular charge transfer at the molecular scale is key to the development of molecular devices for nanooptoelectronics. Here, we describe the design, synthesis, electronic characterization, and photophysical properties of two electron donor-acceptor molecular systems that consist of tolane and BF2-containing curcuminoid chromophoric subunits connected in a T-shaped arrangement. The two π-conjugated segments intersect at the electron acceptor dioxaborine core. From steady-state electronic absorption and fluorescence emission, we find that the photophysics of the dialkylamino-substituted analogue is governed by the occurrence of two closely lying excited states. From DFT calculations, we show that excitation in either of these two states results in a distinct shift of the electron density, whether it occurs along the curcuminoid or tolane moiety. Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy confirmed these findings. As a consequence, the nature of the emitting state and the photophysical properties are strongly dependent on solvent polarity. Moreover, these characteristics can also be switched by protonation or complexation at the nitrogen atom of the amino group. These features set new approaches toward the construction of a three-terminal molecular system in which the lateral branch would transduce a change of electronic state and ultimately control charge transport in a molecular-scale device.

  20. Comparison of charged particle identification using pulse shape discrimination and ΔE-E methods between front and rear side injection in silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Neindre, N.; Bougault, R.; Barlini, S.; Bonnet, E.; Borderie, B.; Casini, G.; Chbihi, A.; Edelbruck, P.; Frankland, J. D.; Gruyer, D.; Legouée, E.; Lopez, O.; Marini, P.; Pârlog, M.; Pasquali, G.; Petcu, M.; Rivet, M. F.; Salomon, F.; Vient, E.; Alba, R.; Baiocco, G.; Bardelli, L.; Bini, M.; Borcea, R.; Bruno, M.; Carboni, S.; Cinausero, M.; Cruceru, I.; Degerlier, M.; Dueñas, J. A.; GaŞior, K.; Gramegna, F.; Grzeszczuk, A.; Kamuda, M.; Kozik, T.; Kravchuk, V.; Lombardo, I.; Maiolino, C.; Marchi, T.; Morelli, L.; Negoita, F.; Olmi, A.; Petrascu, H.; Piantelli, S.; Poggi, G.; Rosato, E.; Santonocito, D.; Spadaccini, G.; Stefanini, A. A.; Twaróg, T.; Vigilante, M.; Fazia Collaboration

    2013-02-01

    The response of silicon-silicon-CsI(Tl) telescopes, developed within the FAZIA collaboration, to fragments produced in nuclear reactions 84Kr+120-124Sn at 35 A MeV, has been used to study ion identification methods. Two techniques are considered for the identification of the nuclear products in the silicon stages. The standard ΔE-E one requires signals induced in two detection layers by ions punching through the first one. Conversely, the digital Pulse Shape Analysis (PSA) allows the identification of ions stopped in the first silicon layer. The capabilities of these two identification methods have been compared for different mountings of the silicons, i.e. rear (particles entering through the low electric field side) or front (particles entering through the high electric field side) side injection. The ΔE-E identification method gives exactly the same results in both configurations. At variance, the pulse shape discrimination is very sensitive to the detector mounting. In case of rear side injection, the identification with the “energy vs. charge rise time” PSA method presents energy thresholds which are significantly lower than in the case of front side injection.

  1. Evaluation of the intrinsic charge carrier transporting properties of linear- and bent-shaped π-extended benzo-fused thieno[3,2-b]thiophenes.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Yusuke; Sakurai, Tsuneaki; Minami, Sojiro; Hirano, Koji; Satoh, Tetsuya; Matsuda, Wakana; Kato, Kenichi; Takata, Masaki; Miura, Masahiro; Seki, Shu

    2015-04-21

    The intrinsic charge carrier transporting properties of two isomeric linear- and bent-shaped 7-ring benzo-fused thieno[3,2-b] thiophenes and their octyl-substituted analogues were newly investigated using flash-photolysis (FP-) and field-induced (FI-) time-resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC) techniques. FP-TRMC study in the solid state revealed that octyl-substitution potentially improved the photoconductivity due to the enhanced crystalline lamellar packing. After this screening process, local-scale hole mobilities at the thienoacene-poly(methylmethacrylate) insulator interfaces were precisely recorded using FI-TRMC, reaching up to 4.5 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) for the linear-shaped non-alkylated thienoacene. The combination of FP- and FI-TRMC measurements provides a rapid and quantitative evaluation scheme even for a variety of compounds with some issues in the processing conditions, leading to the optimized structure of the compounds used as active (interfacial) layers in practical electronic devices.

  2. A Guide to Press Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fibre Box Association, Chicago, IL.

    Stressing that a positive press-relations program can be extremely helpful to businesses, this publication offers suggestions for establishing press contacts, preparing press releases, holding press conferences, illustrating a story, preparing materials for use in radio and television broadcasts, and developing policies to be followed in emergency…

  3. Press-On Optics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorson, Jon C.

    1972-01-01

    The article discusses the design, application, and clinical uses of press-on optics which are descirbed as 1 millimeter thick, flexible lenses or prisms that may be produced in virtually any desired plus or minus dioptric power as ophthalmic lenses, or in any range of usable prism diopter power. (GW)

  4. Optically Aligned Drill Press

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adderholdt, Bruce M.

    1994-01-01

    Precise drill press equipped with rotary-indexing microscope. Microscope and drill exchange places when turret rotated. Microscope axis first aligned over future hole, then rotated out of way so drill axis assumes its precise position. New procedure takes less time to locate drilling positions and produces more accurate results. Apparatus adapted to such other machine tools as milling and measuring machines.

  5. Reinventing the University Press.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Eric

    1994-01-01

    Discusses how librarians and university press staffers could cooperate to improve the scholarly communication system. Causes of system decline, the environment for cooperation, several change models, possible changes to the publish or perish tenure system, and the probability of a slow transition to a new scholarly communications model are…

  6. Formation of T-shaped versus charge-transfer molecular adducts in the reactions between bis(thiocarbonyl) donors and Br2 and I2.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Annalisa; Aragoni, M Carla; Bricklebank, Neil; Castellano, Carlo; Demartin, Francesco; Isaia, Francesco; Lippolis, Vito; Pintus, Anna; Arca, Massimiliano

    2013-03-01

    The reactions of 4,5,6,7-tetrathiocino-[1,2-b:3,4-b']-1,3,8,10-tetrasubstituted-diimidazolyl-2,9-dithiones (R(2),R'(2)-todit; 1: R=R'=Et; 2: R=R'=Ph; 3: R=Et, R'=Ph) with Br(2) exclusively afforded 1:1 and 1:2 "T-shaped" adducts, as established by FT-Raman spectroscopy and single-crystal X-ray diffraction in the case of complex 1·2Br(2). On the other hand, the reactions of compounds 1-3 with molecular I(2) provided charge-transfer (CT) "spoke" adducts, among which the solvated species 3·2I(2)·(1-x)I(2)·xCH(2)Cl(2) (x=0.94) and (3)(2)·7I(2)·xCH(2)Cl(2), (x=0.66) were structurally characterized. The nature of all of the reaction products was elucidated based on elemental analysis and FT-Raman spectroscopy and supported by theoretical calculations at the DFT level.

  7. VIEW OF THE INSTALLATION OF AN EXTRUSION PRESS IN THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF THE INSTALLATION OF AN EXTRUSION PRESS IN THE HIGH BAY AREA OF BUILDING 865. THE EXTRUSION PRESS WAS USED TO PRODUCE CYLINDRICAL BARS, HOLLOW TUBES, AND SHAPES WITH IRREGULAR CROSS-SECTIONS BY FORCING PREHEATED METAL THROUGH A DIE ORIFICE UNDER HIGH PRESSURE. (5/22/70) - Rocky Flats Plant, Metal Research & Development Laboratory, South of Central Avenue at south end of terminus of Ninth Avenue, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  8. CIDER PRESS, LOOKING SOUTHEAST ACROSS THE SCHUYLKILL RIVER. THIS PRESS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CIDER PRESS, LOOKING SOUTHEAST ACROSS THE SCHUYLKILL RIVER. THIS PRESS, CARVED OUT OF A LARGE BOULDER AT THE RIVERS EDGE, PROBABLY DATES FROM THE LIFETIME OF JOHN BARTRAM, IF NOT TO THE SWEDISH SETTLERS BEFORE HIM. THE IRON FENCE IS A NINETEENTH-CENTURY ADDITION - John Bartram House & Garden, 54th Street & Lindbergh Boulevard, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  9. PRESS SHOP. SEVEN BLISS PRESSES STAMP OUT A VARIETY OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PRESS SHOP. SEVEN BLISS PRESSES STAMP OUT A VARIETY OF CARTRIDGE AND SHELL CASINGS. THIS DEPARTMENT WAS TRANSFORMED FROM A MONEY-LOSING OPERATION TO A PROFIT CENTER UNDER THE FIRST WORKER-MANAGED QUALITY CIRCLE IN THE PLANT. - American Brass Foundry, 70 Sayre Street, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  10. Development of a technology for pressing high-density products using gas-draining methods

    SciTech Connect

    Mamedov, A.T.

    1994-11-01

    The factors that hinder the formation of high-density compacts by cold-pressing of powders are considered. The main factors are the gases present in the charge and the technological lubricant introduced to facilitate the work of the press mold. A procedure has been developed for calculating the efficiency of gas drainage from a mold and the pressure in gas pores in the compacts. Recommendations are made for increasing the density of compacts from iron powders by a single cold pressing.

  11. A varied shaping time noise analysis of Al0.8Ga0.2As and GaAs soft X-ray photodiodes coupled to a low-noise charge sensitive preamplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, A. M.; Lees, J. E.; Bassford, D. J.; Ng, J. S.

    2012-05-01

    The noise sources affecting Al0.8Ga0.2As and GaAs spectroscopic X-ray photon counting p+-i-n+ photodiodes connected to a custom low-noise charge sensitive preamplifier are quantified by analysing the system's response to pulses from a signal generator and varying the system's shaping amplifier's shaping time (from 0.5 μs to 10 μs). The system is investigated at three temperatures (-10 °C, +20 °C and +50 °C) in order to characterise the variation of the component noise sources and optimum shaping time with temperature for Al0.8Ga0.2As and GaAs diodes. The analysis shows that the system is primarily limited by dielectric noise, hypothesised to be mainly from the packaging surrounding the detector, for both types of diode and at each temperature.

  12. PR and the Student Press.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, Sandy

    1994-01-01

    Techniques for college public relations professionals to use in promoting a cooperative relationship with the student press are outlined. These include being available to students, having regular meetings, providing access to administrators, providing information that creates context for news, and releasing news directly to the student press. (MSE)

  13. Press, Politics and Popular Government.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Will, George F., Ed.

    A panel discussion on politics and the press was held at the convention of the American Political Science Association in September 1971. This volume contains an essay delivered at that panel on the various functions or activities of the press--adversary, surrogate, sovereign--and remarks of the three discussants. In addition, an essay especially…

  14. The CIA and the Press.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carvalho, Bernardo A.

    The involvement of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) with both United States and foreign news media has been recorded in numerous publications. This report reviews the important aspects of the CIA-press relationships as they have appeared in print and discusses the implications of these relationsihps for the credibility of the press. Media…

  15. Electrostatically shaped membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverberg, Larry M. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Disclosed is a method and apparatus for electrostatically shaping a membrane suitable for use in antennas or the like, comprising an electrically conductive thin membrane where the periphery of said membrane is free to move in at least one direction, a first charge on the electrically conductive thin membrane to electrostatically stiffen the membrane, a second charge which shapes the electrostatically stiffened thin membrane and a restraint for limiting the movement of at least one point of the thin membrane relative to the second charge. Also disclosed is a method and apparatus for adaptively controlling the shape of the thin membrane by sensing the shape of the membrane and selectively controlling the first and second charge to achieve a desired performance characteristic of the membrane.

  16. A comparison of impulse drying to double felted pressing on pilot- scale shoe presses and roll presses

    SciTech Connect

    Orloff, D.I.

    1992-08-01

    Pilot-scale shoe press and roll press experiments have been conducted to compare impulse drying and double felted pressing. Both ceramic coated and Beloit Type C press rolls have been evaluated. The experiments show that impulse drying can provide significantly higher outgoing solids than double felled pressing at the same impulse. For example, at an impulse of 0.234 MPa seconds (34 psi seconds), sheets at an ingoing solids of 52% were impulse dried (using the Beloit Type C press roll) to 68% solids while optimized double felled pressing could only yield press dryness of, at most, 60%.

  17. The Nation's Scholastic Press Association Directors Describe the State of High School Journalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Lyle D.; And Others

    A national survey of 154 scholastic press association directors (who play a crucial role in guiding and shaping high school journalism) garnered an overview of the state of scholastic journalism in the United States today. Seventy-eight scholastic press association directors, representing over 30 states and 4 national associations, responded to…

  18. Radical cation of star-shaped condensed oligofluorenes having isotruxene as a core: importance of rigid planar structure on charge delocalization.

    PubMed

    Fujitsuka, Mamoru; Cho, Dae Won; Tojo, Sachiko; Choi, Jungkweon; Huang, Hsin-Hau; Yang, Jye-Shane; Majima, Tetsuro

    2014-03-27

    Because of their excellent optical and electronic properties, oligofluorenes and polyfluorenes have been investigated for years. Recently developed star-shaped oligomers bearing a truxene or isotruxene core are interesting two-dimensional oligomers. Since employment of a condensed ring system will be effective in further extension of π-conjugation system, we studied electronic and vibrational properties of radical cation of CITFn, star-shaped condensed oligomer with isotruxene core and fluorene unit, by means of the radiation chemical methods. Absorption spectra of radical cation of CITFn were measured in the wide spectral range, which revealed extended π-conjugation of CITFn. Furthermore, time-resolved resonance Raman spectra during pulse radiolysis revealed that the oxidation of CITFn induced structural change to enhance quinoidal character. The Raman data and theoretical calculation indicated that the rigid framework of the present star-shaped oligomer which makes the oligomer a planar structure is quite important in extension of the conjugation pathway.

  19. Radial Electromagnetic Press for Ignitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzuto, A.; Capriccioli, A.; Gasparotto, M.; Palmieri, A.; Rita, C.; Roccella, M.; Coppi, B.

    1996-11-01

    The active vertical press included so far in the Ignitor design can be substituted advantageously (e.g. in terms of the machine maintenance procedure) by a radial electromagnetic press, without involving modification of the main machine components. Only the bracing ring of the radial mechanical preloading system that is permanently applied requires some changes. The radial press has to compensate for the reduced ring load (from 200 MN to 120 MN) and the original vertical press load of 35 MN. To get an equivalent preloading system, the radial press load has to be 140 MN, which is 25 MN higher, to account for the lower efficiency of the radial load. The current needed to originate the 140 MN force is about 3.2 MA. The press is active for 2 s starting from the plasma current rise. The temperature increase is about 20 ^oC. The stray field at the plasma border is well within the allowable value and can be easily compensated by varying slightly the current of one couple of poloidal coils. The new machine layout is illustrated and the electromagnetic and mechanical analyses carried out for the new configuration are given. Sponsored by ENEA, CNR and ASP, of Italy, and by the US DoE

  20. Canning Of Powdered Metal For Hot Isostatic Pressing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhas, John J.

    1989-01-01

    Quality of specimen enhanced by improved canning process. Method developed for canning specimens for hot isostatic pressing. Specimen placed inside refractory-metal ring, then sandwiched between two refractory-metal face sheets. Assembly placed inside die, then positioned in vacuum hot press. Heated to set temperature at prescribed vacuum to burn off all of binder in specimen. Advantages: powder-metallurgy composite totally purged of binder sealed in can in single operation, maintains size, shape, and uniformity of specimen. Weld region does not recrystallize, and little possibility of cracking.

  1. 7 CFR 550.29 - Press releases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Press releases. 550.29 Section 550.29 Agriculture... Program Management § 550.29 Press releases. Press releases or other forms of public notification will be... opportunity to review, in advance, all written press releases and any other written information to be...

  2. 7 CFR 550.29 - Press releases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Press releases. 550.29 Section 550.29 Agriculture... Program Management § 550.29 Press releases. Press releases or other forms of public notification will be... opportunity to review, in advance, all written press releases and any other written information to be...

  3. 7 CFR 550.29 - Press releases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Press releases. 550.29 Section 550.29 Agriculture... Program Management § 550.29 Press releases. Press releases or other forms of public notification will be... opportunity to review, in advance, all written press releases and any other written information to be...

  4. 7 CFR 550.29 - Press releases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Press releases. 550.29 Section 550.29 Agriculture... Program Management § 550.29 Press releases. Press releases or other forms of public notification will be... opportunity to review, in advance, all written press releases and any other written information to be...

  5. 7 CFR 550.29 - Press releases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Press releases. 550.29 Section 550.29 Agriculture... Program Management § 550.29 Press releases. Press releases or other forms of public notification will be... opportunity to review, in advance, all written press releases and any other written information to be...

  6. Method for hot press forming articles

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Robert R.; Hartsock, Dale L.

    1982-01-01

    This disclosure relates to an improved method for achieving the best bond strength and for minimizing distortion and cracking of hot pressed articles. In particular, in a method for hot press forming both an outer facing circumferential surface of and an inner portion of a hub, and of bonding that so-formed outer facing circumferential surface to an inner facing circumferential surface of a pre-formed ring thereby to form an article, the following improvement is made. Normally, in this method, the outside ring is restrained by a restraining sleeve of ring-shaped cross-section having an inside diameter. A die member, used to hot press form the hub, is so-formed as to have an outside diameter sized to engage the inside diameter of the restraining sleeve in a manner permitting relative movement therebetween. The improved method is one in which several pairs of matched restraining sleeve and die member are formed with each matched pair having a predetermined diameter. The predetermined diameter of each matched pair is different from another matched pair by stepped increments. The largest inside diameter of a restraining sleeve is equal to the diameter of the outer facing circumferential surface of the hub. Each pair of the matched restraining sleeve and die member is used to form an article in which an inside hub is bonded to an outside ring. The several samples so-formed are evaluated to determine which sample has the best bond formed between the hub and the ring with the least or no cracking or distortion in the ring portion of the article. Thereafter, the matched restraining sleeve and die member which form the article having the best bonding characteristics and least distortion cracking is then used for repeated formations of articles.

  7. Training Guidelines: Hand Blowing, Pressing, & Shaping of Glass.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ceramics, Glass, and Mineral Products Industry Training Board, Harrow (England).

    This manual of training guidelines describes the procedure for personnel intake and traces the training process which a worker must go through to become a glass craftsman. A number of charts present the skills and items of knowledge which the individual craftsman must master. Examples are included of theoretical and practical test items to certify…

  8. The preparation, surface structure, zeta potential, surface charge density and photocatalytic activity of TiO2 nanostructures of different shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grover, Inderpreet Singh; Singh, Satnam; Pal, Bonamali

    2013-09-01

    Titania based nanocatalysts such as sodium titanates of different morphology having superior surface properties are getting wide importance in photocatalysis research. Despite having sodium (Na) contents and its high temperature synthesis (that generally deteriorate the photoreactivity), these Na-titanates often exhibit better photoactivity than P25-TiO2 catalyst. Hence, this work demonstrated the influence of crystal structure, BET surface area, surface charge, zeta potential (ζ) and metal loading on the photocatalytic activity of as-prepared sodium titanate nanotube (TNT) and titania nanorod (TNR). Straw like hollow orthorhombic-TNT (Na2Ti2O5·H2O) particles (W = 9-12 nm and L = 82-115 nm) and rice like pure anatase-TNR particles (W = 8-13 nm and L = 81-134 nm) are obtained by the hydrothermal treatment of P25-TiO2 with NaOH, which in fact, altered the net surface charge of TNT and TNR particles. The observed ζ = -2.82 (P25-TiO2), -13.5 (TNT) and -22.5 mV (TNR) are significantly altered by the Ag and Cu deposition. It has been found here that TNT displayed best photocatalytic activity for the imidacloprid insecticide (C9H10ClN5O2) degradation to CO2 formation under UV irradiation because of its largest surface area 176 m2 g-1 among the catalysts studied.

  9. Charge reviews can beef up bottom lines.

    PubMed

    Hendershot, M C

    1991-03-01

    Traditionally, healthcare organizations have been reluctant to pursue charge reviews until pressed to do so by third-party challenges to their charges. But a hospital pursuing either a concurrent or retrospective review may realize significant revenue enhancement--and not only from correcting undercharges on charge-based accounts. Charge reviews can lead to smoothed patient documentation, better cost accounting, more appropriate Medicare payment, and, ultimately, an improved bottom line.

  10. Apollo 13 Facts: Press Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Flight Director Gene Krantz gives an overview of the Apollo 13 mission as corrections are made in the power down checklist, passive thermal control, and orbital burns after the spacecraft runs into problems. He then answers questions from the press with the help of Tony England, Bill Peters, and Dick Thorson. Footage then shows newspaper headlines 'We're Not Concerned' and 'Getting Ready to Land' as people watch televisions to see if the astronauts landed safely. The press conference section of this video has sound, the headlines section does not.

  11. Spectrograph of charged particles consisting of a discrete plane electrode with different potential distributions and a grounded box-shaped electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishkova, T. Ya.

    2015-06-01

    A simple two-electrode spectrograph that has been proposed by the author for fast analysis of the beams of charged particles with respect to energy is theoretically studied. A specific feature of such a spectrograph lies in the fact that the system makes it possible to apply different potentials to fragments of the split plane electrode. Computer simulation is used to determine the optimal working regimes of the spectrograph in which the range of simultaneously measured energies of the beams that are focused on one line increases with a decrease in the growth rate of potentials at the discrete plane electrode and amounts to a maximum known level of two orders of magnitude.

  12. EPR Line Shifts and Line Shape Changes Due to Spin Exchange of Nitroxide Free Radicals in Liquids 7. Singly-charged surfactant nitroxide

    PubMed Central

    Bales, Barney L; Harris, Francis L.; Peric, Mirna; Peric, Miroslav

    2009-01-01

    EPR spectra of aqueous solutions of the singly-charged surfactant nitroxide 4-[N,N-dimethyl-N-(n-dodecyl)ammonium]-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyl-N-oxy bromide-d16 (DCAT12) are studied as functions of the molar concentration, c = 0.1 – 8 mM, and the temperature from 273 to 353 K. This concentration range is below the critical micelle concentration, cmc, at which DCAT12 forms micelles. Spin-spin broadening of the EPR lines averaged over the three lines is separated into contributions due to spin exchange, 〈Be〉, and dipolar, 〈Bdip〉, interactions yielding values of the fractional broadening by spin exchange, Ω(T), that vary from near unity at 353 K to approximately 50% at 273 K. This compares with a variation from unity to approximately 77% for a neutral spin probe perdeuterated 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-oxopiperidine-1-oxyl (PDT) over the same range. Unlike PDT and the Stokes-Einstein prediction, the broadening constant by spin exchange, d 〈Be〉/dc, is not linear with T / η where η is the shear viscosity, instead following a quadratic dependence. Nevertheless, d 〈Be〉/dc is remarkable close to a hydrodynamic prediction using the Stokes-Einstein equation modified to take the spin probe charge into account. Compared with PDT, values of d 〈Be〉/dc are decreased and d 〈Bdip〉/dc increased at all temperatures, while the values of the re-encounter rate, τRE−1, deduced from line shifts, are reduced. Interestingly, values of d 〈Bdip〉/dc, Ω(T), and τRE−1 are comparable for PDT and DCAT12 when compared at the same rotational diffusion rates. PMID:19639954

  13. Interpretative repertoires that shape low-income African American women's reproductive health care seeking: "don't want to know" and "taking charge of your health".

    PubMed

    Golden, Annis G; Pomerantz, Anita

    2015-01-01

    In the context of reproductive and sexual health, African American women have higher incidence of disease and poorer outcomes on key indicators when compared with White women. In this study, we used discourse analysis to identify and examine the workings of two clusters of interpretive resources ("interpretative repertoires") associated with reproductive/sexual health care seeking among low-income African American women who participated in semistructured interviews as part of a health promotion initiative. Interpretative repertoires are ways of accounting for engaging in or refraining from engaging in actions, which are shared by people in a community. We labeled the two interpretative repertoires "Don't Want to Know," and "Take Charge of Your Health." Within the "Don't Want to Know" repertoire, that testing would lead to threatening findings was assumed, a chain of devastating consequences was imagined, and a preference for uncertainty over certain knowledge was expressed. Conversely, the "Take Charge of Your Health" repertoire valued certainty over uncertainty, though in both interpretive frameworks, knowledge-based and emotion-based decision-making were intertwined. We conclude that health promotion initiatives--if they are to succeed in encouraging women to obtain valuable preventive health care services--must respond, in their choices of language and outreach strategies, to the expressed dilemma of wishing for reassurance but fearing bad news, to the intertwining of emotional reasoning and technorationality in health decision making, and to the particular relational experiences of African American women. Failure to do so will contribute to the continuation of reproductive and sexual health disparities.

  14. Law and the Student Press.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, George E.; Webster, John B.

    Court cases and legal decisions involving the student press in the late 1960s and early 1970s are brought together in this book in order to show how the law has been applied to school officials and student journalists in high school, college, and the underground. The ten chapters cover the following topics: censorship, libel, obscenity, contempt,…

  15. Gifted Education Press Quarterly, 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Maurice D., Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This document consists of the four issues of the newsletter "Gifted Education Press Quarterly" published during 1995. This newsletter addresses issues in the education of gifted children and youth. The major articles are: (1) "Using Today's Technology: Parents Can Help Challenge Gifted Children" (Adrienne O'Neill); (2) "Outcomes-Based Education…

  16. The Alternative Press in Microform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsang, Daniel C.

    Presented is an analysis of what has been done regarding the preservation of alternative publications in microfilm. The alternative press was defined, for the purposes of this study, as "nonstandard, nonestablishment publications." Two projects undertaken to microfilm such publications, one by the Microphoto Division of Bell and Howell and the…

  17. Mars Observer Press Conference JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Mars Observer mission spacecraft was primarily designed for exploring Mars and the Martian environment. The Mars Observer was launched on September 25, 1992. The spacecraft was lost in the vicinity of Mars on August 21, 1993 when the spacecraft began its maneuvering sequence for Martian orbital insertion. This videotape shows a press briefing, held after the spacecraft had not responded to attempts to communicate with it, to explain to the press the problems and the steps that were being taken to re-establish communication with the spacecraft. The communications had been shutdown prior to the orbital insertion burn to protect the instruments. At the time of the press conference, the communications system was still not operational, and attempts were being made to re-establish communication. Bob McMillan of the Public Affairs Office at JPL gives the initial announcement of the continuing communication problem with the spacecraft. Mr. McMillan introduces William Piotrowski, acting director of solar system exploration, who reiterates that there is indeed no communication with the Observer spacecraft. He is followed by Glenn Cunningham, the Project Manager of the Mars Observer who speaks about the attempts to re-establish contact. Mr. Cunningham is followed by Satenios Dallas, the Mission Manager for the Mars Observer Project, who speaks about the sequence of events leading up to the communication failure, and shows an animated video presenting the orbital insertion maneuvers. The briefing was then opened up for questions from the assembled press, both at JPL and at the other NASA Centers. The questions are about the possible reasons for the communication failure, and the attempts to restore communications with the spacecraft. Dr. Arden L. Albee, chief scientist for the Mars Observer Mission, joins the other panel members to answer questions. At the end of the press briefing the animation of the Mars orbital insertion is shown again.

  18. PREPARATION OF METAL POWDER COMPACTS PRIOR TO PRESSING

    DOEpatents

    Mansfield, H.

    1958-08-26

    A method of fabricating uranium by a powder metallurgical technique is described. It consists in introducing powdered uranium hydride into a receptacle shaped to coincide with the coatour of the die cavity and heating the hydride so that it decomposes to uranium metal. The metal particles cohere in the shapw of the receptacle and thereafter the prefurmed metal powder is pressed and sintered to obtain a dense compact.

  19. Apollo 11 preflight press conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The three prime crewmen of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission participate in a pre-flight press conference in the bldg 1 auditorium on July 5, 1969. Left to right, are Astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot; and Michael Collins, command module pilot. The box-like enclosure surrounding the three astronauts was part of elaborate precautions in effect to reduce the possibility of exposing the crewmen to infectious disease in the preflight period.

  20. The Burger Court and the Press.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higdon, Philip R.

    This report discusses recent cases involving freedom of the press that have been heard before the Burger court of the United States Supreme Court. The report discerns a trend toward treating the press like an ordinary citizen; this is a reversal of the view of the Warren court that the First Amendment creates special rights for the press so that…

  1. 28 CFR 540.64 - Press pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Press pools. 540.64 Section 540.64... PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Contact With News Media § 540.64 Press pools. (a) The Warden may establish a press pool whenever he or she determines that the frequency of requests for interviews and...

  2. 28 CFR 540.64 - Press pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Press pools. 540.64 Section 540.64... PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Contact With News Media § 540.64 Press pools. (a) The Warden may establish a press pool whenever he or she determines that the frequency of requests for interviews and...

  3. 28 CFR 540.64 - Press pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Press pools. 540.64 Section 540.64... PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Contact With News Media § 540.64 Press pools. (a) The Warden may establish a press pool whenever he or she determines that the frequency of requests for interviews and...

  4. 28 CFR 540.64 - Press pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Press pools. 540.64 Section 540.64... PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Contact With News Media § 540.64 Press pools. (a) The Warden may establish a press pool whenever he or she determines that the frequency of requests for interviews and...

  5. Attention that Indicators Receive in the Press

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendriks, Maria; Barzano, Giovanna; Brumana, Emanuela; Cremonesi, Claudia

    2004-01-01

    With the release of each edition of Education at a Glance, the Office for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) prepares a press briefing to be used for the international press release and which individual countries in preparing their national press releases can also use. Similarly, the European Union prepares a summary, not for use at the…

  6. 28 CFR 540.64 - Press pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Press pools. 540.64 Section 540.64... PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Contact With News Media § 540.64 Press pools. (a) The Warden may establish a press pool whenever he or she determines that the frequency of requests for interviews and...

  7. Near Net Shape Manufacturing of New Titanium Powders for Industry

    SciTech Connect

    2009-05-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to develop a manufacturing technology to process new titanium powders into fully consolidated near net shape components for industrial applications. This will be achieved using various technologies, including press and sinter, pneumatic isostatic forging (PIF), hot isostatic pressing (HIP), and adiabatic compaction.

  8. On shape and charges in colloidal dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trizac, Emmanuel

    Coulomb interactions are paramount in determining structural and dynamical properties for a wealth of anisotropic soft matter systems (clays, mineral crystallites, exfoliated nanosheets, patchy colloids, cement etc). The interplay between screening effects and anisotropy leads to distinctive yet often overlooked features, that will be discussed. In turn, the competition between the resulting effective potential and hard core constraints will be addressed. This competition can lead to non trivial structures, or impose strong dynamical slowing down. A distinction will be operated between weak and strong Coulomb coupling regimes.

  9. NASA/MSFC Large Stretch Press Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choate, M. W.; Nealson, W. P.; Jay, G. C.; Buss, W. D.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to: A. assess and document the advantages/disadvantages of a government agency investment in a large stretch form press on the order of 5000 tons capacity (per jaw); B. develop a procurement specification for the press; and C. provide trade study data that will permit an optimum site location. Tasks were separated into four major elements: cost study, user survey, site selection, and press design/procurement specification.

  10. [The press and family planning].

    PubMed

    Abraham De D'ornellas, R

    1987-01-01

    The treatment in the press of family planning hinges on two fundamental factors: the taboo of the leftist groups and the taboo of the Catholic Church, whose head is against abortion under any circumstances. Leftist views insinuate that family planning is the genocidal plan of North American imperialists against the Third World and, in particular, against Latin America. This genocidal plan is supposed to subject poor populations to international schemes. In the press family planning is often treated in a sanctimonious fashion, lumping it together with topics like pornography, sex, and violence. In 1983 the daily newspaper Expreso published a supplement running every week for almost three months about the issue of population, which dealt fairly extensively with such topics as population and housing, education, employment, and urban proliferation, as well as responsible parenthood and child survival. In addition, there was a detailed description of contraceptive methods. In October 1986 another surprising thing happened: the President of Peru talked about the topic of family planning, which at the time was an act of courage. Since then much has changed; the whole world is interested in family planning and certain aspects of population. Since October 1986 more has been published in this domain than during the preceding 20 years. In contrast, the Church reacted differently to this issue: after some initial caution, the conference of Peruvian bishops attacked all methods of modern contraceptives and private institutions of family planning. The information boom in family planning will certainly continue. At the moment this flood of articles and editorials about the issue is an expression of the anxiety of families related to uncontrolled reproduction and the fear of overpopulation in large cities devoid of minimal services. PMID:12281466

  11. The Press vs. Professional Wrestling: How the Press Covered WrestleMania III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortizano, Giacomo L.

    This paper analyzes the relationship between the press and professional wrestling. It examines professional wrestling as a business and the conflicting goals of the promoters and the press. The paper focuses on how the press covered the most widely viewed professional wrestling show of all time, WrestleMania III (looking at newspaper coverage…

  12. A comparison of impulse drying to double felted pressing on pilot- scale shoe presses and roll presses. Progress report, No. 6

    SciTech Connect

    Orloff, D.I.

    1992-08-01

    Pilot-scale shoe press and roll press experiments have been conducted to compare impulse drying and double felted pressing. Both ceramic coated and Beloit Type C press rolls have been evaluated. The experiments show that impulse drying can provide significantly higher outgoing solids than double felled pressing at the same impulse. For example, at an impulse of 0.234 MPa seconds (34 psi seconds), sheets at an ingoing solids of 52% were impulse dried (using the Beloit Type C press roll) to 68% solids while optimized double felled pressing could only yield press dryness of, at most, 60%.

  13. In the Stocks: Perilous Press Releases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, Linda P.; Loving, Bill

    1994-01-01

    Reviews some of the legal responsibilities of public relations practitioners in the preparation of press releases. Discusses legal criteria for judging the fraudulence of press releases and discusses the timeframe for fraudulent action. Concludes with lessons that practitioners need to understand. (SR)

  14. The Egyptian Press: An Official Fourth Estate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawhorne, Clifton O.

    A descriptive study based on Egyptian law, printed sources, and interviews clarifies our picture of the Egyptian Press by examining its status as a constitutionally mandated "Fourth Estate." The constitutional amendment, the resultant Egyptian Press Law, and the "Law Of Shame" (all passed in 1980), are designed to create a heavily controlled press…

  15. Fracture toughness of hot-pressed beryllium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemon, D. D.; Brown, W. F., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation into the fracture toughness, sustained-load flaw growth, and fatigue-crack propagation resistance of S200E hot-pressed beryllium at room temperature. It also reviews the literature pertaining to the influence of various factors on the fracture toughness of hot-pressed beryllium determined using fatigue-cracked specimens.

  16. Particle-Charge Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuerstenau, Stephen; Wilson, Gregory R.

    2008-01-01

    An instrument for rapidly measuring the electric charges and sizes (from approximately 1 to approximately 100 micrometers) of airborne particles is undergoing development. Conceived for monitoring atmospheric dust particles on Mars, instruments like this one could also be used on Earth to monitor natural and artificial aerosols in diverse indoor and outdoor settings for example, volcanic regions, clean rooms, powder-processing machinery, and spray-coating facilities. The instrument incorporates a commercially available, low-noise, ultrasensitive charge-sensing preamplifier circuit. The input terminal of this circuit--the gate of a field-effect transistor--is connected to a Faraday-cage cylindrical electrode. The charged particles of interest are suspended in air or other suitable gas that is made to flow along the axis of the cylindrical electrode without touching the electrode. The flow can be channeled and generated by any of several alternative means; in the prototype of this instrument, the gas is drawn along a glass capillary tube (see upper part of figure) coaxial with the electrode. The size of a particle affects its rate of acceleration in the flow and thus affects the timing and shape of the corresponding signal peak generated by the charge-sensing amplifier. The charge affects the magnitude (and thus also the shape) of the signal peak. Thus, the signal peak (see figure) conveys information on both the size and electric charge of a sensed particle. In experiments thus far, the instrument has been found to be capable of measuring individual aerosol particle charges of magnitude greater than 350 e (where e is the fundamental unit of electric charge) with a precision of +/- 150 e. The instrument can sample particles at a rate as high as several thousand per second.

  17. Powder pressing in a macrosonic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Protipopescu, A.; Dragan, O.; Ciovica, D.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to extend the technology of powder product manufacturing to new forms and sizes, to improve their quality as well as pressing efficiency and to reduce waste. In the course of metal and nonmetal powder briquette pressing, macrosounds were associated with the external static pressing force, which led to an increase in the relative height, density and physicomechanical characteristics of the briquettes. This method permits the extension of the range of products that can be manufactured from powders and the improvement of their quality.

  18. STS-8 onboard crew press conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Six news reporters listen to a response from Astronaut Guion S. Bluford (note TV monitor) in a rare space-to-Earth press conference involving all the STS-8 crew. The participants are, left to right, Gary Schwitzer, Cable News Network; Morton Dean, CBS; Roy Neal, NBC; Lynn Sherr, ABC; Howard Benedict, Associated Press; Al Rossiter, United Press International. The astronauts on the monitor are Richard H. Truly, cneter left, crew commander; Daniel C. Brandenstein, lower left, pilot; and Dr. William E. Thornton, upper left, Guion S. Bluford, upper right; and Dale E. Gardner, all mission specialists.

  19. Enery Efficient Press and Sinter of Titanium Powder for Low-Cost Components in Vehicle Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Zwitter; Phillip Nash; Xiaoyan Xu; Chadwick Johnson

    2011-03-31

    This is the final technical report for the Department of Energy NETL project NT01931 Energy Efficient Press and Sinter of Titanium Powder for Low-Cost Components in Vehicle Applications. Titanium has been identified as one of the key materials with the required strength that can reduce the weight of automotive components and thereby reduce fuel consumption. Working with newly developed sources of titanium powder, Webster-Hoff will develop the processing technology to manufacture low cost vehicle components using the single press/single sinter techniques developed for iron based powder metallurgy today. Working with an automotive or truck manufacturer, Webster-Hoff will demonstrate the feasibility of manufacturing a press and sinter titanium component for a vehicle application. The project objective is two-fold, to develop the technology for manufacturing press and sinter titanium components, and to demonstrate the feasibility of producing a titanium component for a vehicle application. The lowest cost method for converting metal powder into a net shape part is the Powder Metallurgy Press and Sinter Process. The method involves compaction of the metal powder in a tool (usually a die and punches, upper and lower) at a high pressure (up to 60 TSI or 827 MPa) to form a green compact with the net shape of the final component. The powder in the green compact is held together by the compression bonds between the powder particles. The sinter process then converts the green compact to a metallurgically bonded net shape part through the process of solid state diffusion. The goal of this project is to expand the understanding and application of press and sinter technology to Titanium Powder applications, developing techniques to manufacture net shape Titanium components via the press and sinter process. In addition, working with a vehicle manufacturer, demonstrate the feasibility of producing a titanium component for a vehicle. This is not a research program, but rather a

  20. Acoustic energy shaping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. G.; Elleman, D. D. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A suspended mass is shaped by melting all or a selected portion of the mass and applying acoustic energy in varying amounts to different portions of the mass. In one technique for forming an optical waveguide slug, a mass of oval section is suspended and only a portion along the middle of the cross-section is heated to a largely fluid consistency. Acoustic energy is applied to opposite edges of the oval mass to press the unheated opposite edge portions together so as to form bulges at the middle of the mass. In another technique for forming a ribbon of silicon for constructing solar cells, a cylindrical thread of silicon is drawn from a molten mass of silicon, and acoustic energy is applied to opposite sides of the molten thread to flatten it into a ribbon.

  1. Gas-driven filter pressing in magmas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sisson, T.W.; Bacon, C.R.

    1999-01-01

    Most silicic and some mafic magmas expand via second boiling if they crystallize at depths of about 10 km or less. The buildup of gas pressure due to second boiling can be relieved by expulsion of melt out of the region of crystallization, and this process of gas-driven filter pressing assists the crystallization differentiation of magmas. For gas-driven filter pressing to be effective, the region of crystallization must inflate slowly relative to buildup of pressure and expulsion of melt These conditions are satisfied in undercooled magmatic inclusions and in thin sheets of primitive magma underplating cooler magma reservoirs. Gas-driven filter pressing thereby adds fractionated melt to magma bodies. Gas-driven filter pressing is probably the dominant process by which highly evolved melts segregate from crystal mush to form aplitic dikes in granitic plutons; this process could also account for the production of voluminous, crystal-poor rhyolites.

  2. CHARGE IMBALANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, John

    1980-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the theory of charge imbalance, and to discuss its relevance to a number of experimental situations. We introduce the concepts of quasiparticle charge and charge imbalance, and discuss the generation and detection of charge imbalance by tunneling. We describe the relaxation of the injected charge imbalance by inelastic scattering processes, and show how the Boltzmann equation can be solved to obtain the steady state quasiparticle distribution and the charge relaxation rate. Details are given of experiments to measure charge imbalance and the charge relaxation rate when inelastic scattering is the predominant relaxation mechanism. Experiments on and theories of other charge relaxation mechanisms are discussed, namely relaxation via elastic scattering in the presence of energy gap anisotropy, or in the presence of a pair breaking mechanism such as magnetic impurities or an applied supercurrent or magnetic field. We describe three other situations in which charge imbalance occurs, namely the resistance of the NS interface, phase slip centers, and the flow of a supercurrent in the presence of a temperature gradient.

  3. Continuous equal channel angular pressing

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Yuntian T.; Lowe, Terry C.; Valiev, Ruslan Z.; Raab, Georgy J.

    2006-12-26

    An apparatus that continuously processes a metal workpiece without substantially altering its cross section includes a wheel member having an endless circumferential groove, and a stationary constraint die that surrounds the wheel member, covers most of the length of the groove, and forms a passageway with the groove. The passageway has a rectangular shaped cross section. An abutment member projects from the die into the groove and blocks one end of the passageway. The wheel member rotates relative to the die in the direction toward the abutment member. An output channel in the die adjacent the abutment member has substantially the same cross section as the passageway. A metal workpiece is fed through an input channel into the passageway and carried in the groove by frictional drag in the direction towards the abutment member, and is extruded through the output channel without any substantial change in cross section.

  4. Internal Charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.

    2014-01-01

    (1) High energy (>100keV) electrons penetrate spacecraft walls and accumulate in dielectrics or isolated conductors; (2) Threat environment is energetic electrons with sufficient flux to charge circuit boards, cable insulation, and ungrounded metal faster than charge can dissipate; (3) Accumulating charge density generates electric fields in excess of material breakdown strenght resulting in electrostatic discharge; and (4) System impact is material damage, discharge currents inside of spacecraft Faraday cage on or near critical circuitry, and RF noise.

  5. High density crystalline boron prepared by hot isostatic pressing in refractory metal containers

    DOEpatents

    Hoenig, Clarence L.

    1993-01-01

    Boron powder is hot isostatically pressed in a refractory metal container to produce a solid boron monolith with a bulk density at least 2.22 g/cc and up to or greater than 2.34 g/cc. The refractory metal container is formed of tantalum, niobium, tungsten, molybdenum or alloys thereof in the form of a canister or alternatively plasma sprayed or chemical vapor deposited onto a powder compact. Hot isostatic pressing at 1800.degree. C. and 30 KSI (206.8 MPa) argon pressure for four hours produces a bulk density of 2.34 g/cc. Complex shapes can be made.

  6. High density-high purity graphite prepared by hot isostatic pressing in refractory metal containers

    DOEpatents

    Hoenig, Clarence L.

    1994-01-01

    Porous graphite in solid form is hot isostatically pressed in a refractory metal container to produce a solid graphite monolith with a bulk density greater than or equal to 2.10 g/cc. The refractory metal container is formed of tantalum, niobium, tungsten, molybdenum or alloys thereof in the form of a canister or alternatively plasma sprayed, chemically vapor deposited, or coated by some other suitable means onto graphite. Hot isostatic pressing at 2200.degree. C. and 30 KSI (206.8 MPa) argon pressure for two hours produces a bulk density of 2.10 g/cc. Complex shapes can be made.

  7. High density crystalline boron prepared by hot isostatic pressing in refractory metal containers

    DOEpatents

    Hoenig, C.L.

    1993-08-31

    Boron powder is hot isostatically pressed in a refractory metal container to produce a solid boron monolith with a bulk density at least 2.22 g/cc and up to or greater than 2.34 g/cc. The refractory metal container is formed of tantalum, niobium, tungsten, molybdenum or alloys thereof in the form of a canister or alternatively plasma sprayed or chemical vapor deposited onto a powder compact. Hot isostatic pressing at 1,800 C and 30 PSI (206.8 MPa) argon pressure for four hours produces a bulk density of 2.34 g/cc. Complex shapes can be made.

  8. High density-high purity graphite prepared by hot isostatic pressing in refractory metal containers

    DOEpatents

    Hoenig, C.L.

    1994-08-09

    Porous graphite in solid form is hot isostatically pressed in a refractory metal container to produce a solid graphite monolith with a bulk density greater than or equal to 2.10 g/cc. The refractory metal container is formed of tantalum, niobium, tungsten, molybdenum or alloys thereof in the form of a canister or alternatively plasma sprayed, chemically vapor deposited, or coated by some other suitable means onto graphite. Hot isostatic pressing at 2,200 C and 30 KSI (206.8 MPa) argon pressure for two hours produces a bulk density of 2.10 g/cc. Complex shapes can be made. 1 fig.

  9. Spacecraft charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, N. John

    1989-01-01

    The effects of spacecraft charging on spacecraft materials are studied. Spacecraft charging interactions seem to couple environment to system performance through materials. Technology is still developing concerning both environment-driven and operating system-driven interactions. The meeting addressed environment but lacked specific mission requirements, as a result system definition are needed to prioritize interactions.

  10. [Representations of mental illness in the Greek Press: 2001 vs 2011].

    PubMed

    Economou, M; Louki, E; Charitsi, M; Alexiou, T; Patelakis, A; Christakaki, A; Papadimitriou, G N

    2015-01-01

    The media seem to have played a prominent role in shaping the contemporary social image of people with mental illness, by perpetuating the stigma attached to it. Worldwide, a vast amount of research findings converge to the stigmatizing representation of people with mental illness by the media, with reference to the dominant stereotype of violence. The present study aims to explore the representations of mental illness in the Greek Press using a quantitative and qualitative approach. Potential changes in the media portrayal of mental illness during the last decade are also being examined: findings are compared to those of a previous research that took place in 2001, following the same methodology. The sample consisted of press articles referring to mental illness, that were indexed daily from the Greek newspapers during the period July-November 2011. The items were categorized into thematic categories and further analyzed taking in account the use of stigmatizing vocabulary, the reproduction of common myths concerning mental illness, the overall valence of each article (stigmatizing, neutral or anti-stigmatizing) towards people with mental illness, as well as the contextual implications conveyed in the use of psychiatric terms as a metaphor. The largest thematic category that emerged from the sample was that referring to the repercussions of the economic crisis to mental health, followed by the category of articles where psychiatric terms are used as a metaphor. The comparisons made between 2001 and 2011 revealed an improved representation of mental illness in terms of stigma, especially regarding schizophrenia. The public expression of stigma has decreased, with fewer stigmatizing articles and notably more neutral in valence articles. The findings of this study suggest a decline of the media propensity for emotionally charged descriptions and a shift towards objective journalism regarding mental illness. This is most likely to be attributed to the anti

  11. [Representations of mental illness in the Greek Press: 2001 vs 2011].

    PubMed

    Economou, M; Louki, E; Charitsi, M; Alexiou, T; Patelakis, A; Christakaki, A; Papadimitriou, G N

    2015-01-01

    The media seem to have played a prominent role in shaping the contemporary social image of people with mental illness, by perpetuating the stigma attached to it. Worldwide, a vast amount of research findings converge to the stigmatizing representation of people with mental illness by the media, with reference to the dominant stereotype of violence. The present study aims to explore the representations of mental illness in the Greek Press using a quantitative and qualitative approach. Potential changes in the media portrayal of mental illness during the last decade are also being examined: findings are compared to those of a previous research that took place in 2001, following the same methodology. The sample consisted of press articles referring to mental illness, that were indexed daily from the Greek newspapers during the period July-November 2011. The items were categorized into thematic categories and further analyzed taking in account the use of stigmatizing vocabulary, the reproduction of common myths concerning mental illness, the overall valence of each article (stigmatizing, neutral or anti-stigmatizing) towards people with mental illness, as well as the contextual implications conveyed in the use of psychiatric terms as a metaphor. The largest thematic category that emerged from the sample was that referring to the repercussions of the economic crisis to mental health, followed by the category of articles where psychiatric terms are used as a metaphor. The comparisons made between 2001 and 2011 revealed an improved representation of mental illness in terms of stigma, especially regarding schizophrenia. The public expression of stigma has decreased, with fewer stigmatizing articles and notably more neutral in valence articles. The findings of this study suggest a decline of the media propensity for emotionally charged descriptions and a shift towards objective journalism regarding mental illness. This is most likely to be attributed to the anti

  12. Charging machine

    DOEpatents

    Medlin, John B.

    1976-05-25

    A charging machine for loading fuel slugs into the process tubes of a nuclear reactor includes a tubular housing connected to the process tube, a charging trough connected to the other end of the tubular housing, a device for loading the charging trough with a group of fuel slugs, means for equalizing the coolant pressure in the charging trough with the pressure in the process tubes, means for pushing the group of fuel slugs into the process tube and a latch and a seal engaging the last object in the group of fuel slugs to prevent the fuel slugs from being ejected from the process tube when the pusher is removed and to prevent pressure liquid from entering the charging machine.

  13. Graphic Arts: Book Three. The Press and Related Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farajollahi, Karim; And Others

    The third of a three-volume set of instructional materials for a graphic arts course, this manual consists of nine instructional units dealing with presses and related processes. Covered in the units are basic press fundamentals, offset press systems, offset press operating procedures, offset inks and dampening chemistry, preventive maintenance…

  14. Textbook Sales Drop, and University Presses Search for Reasons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    This article reports that textbook sales are falling at many university presses, a trend that has accelerated in the past couple of months. That's the word from press directors anxious about the decline but unsure what's causing it or how to stop it. Not every press has been affected. Two of the biggest players, Oxford University Press and…

  15. Along Freedom's Double Edge: The Arab Press Under Israeli Occupation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nasser, Munir K.

    This paper examines the Arab press under Israeli occupation and presents two hypotheses: freedom of the press under occupation serves both Israeli interests and the Arab population, and freedom of the Arab press under occupation is "relative" and "controlled." By allowing freedom of expression, the Israelis achieve several aims: a free press will…

  16. Particle Characterization of Pressed Granular HMX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnside, N. J.; Son, S. F.; Skidmore, C. B.; Asay, B. W.

    1997-07-01

    Often, little material characterization is reported in studies that use granular explosives, such as deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) experiments. This lack of characterization makes modeling and interpretation of the experiments difficult. Further, very little is known about how particle size changes with compaction processes, even for quasi-static pressing. Changes in available surface area could significantly affect the initiation of such materials. In this work we report measurements of the particle size distribution of original granular HMX, as well as the size distribution of pressed (higher density) samples. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) pictures are presented and are found to be useful in interpreting the size distribution measurements of the granular HMX, as well as helping to more fully characterizing the state of the particles. We find that the particle size distribution changes significantly with pressing. That is, particles are observed to be highly fractured and damaged at higher pressed densities. Also, we have found that sample preparation can significantly affect size distribution measurements. In particular, even short duration sonication can have a significant effect on the measured size distributions of pressed HMX samples.

  17. Lever-press conditioning in the crab.

    PubMed

    Abramson, C I; Feinman, R D

    1990-08-01

    An operant chamber has been developed for studying lever-press conditioning in the green crab Carcinus maenas. In one series of experiments, animals were presented with a single bar and were reinforced with food for every bar press. Performance increased over time and high rates of responding were observed after 2 days of training. The response rate was always higher than that for a yoked (noncontingent) control group. When the contingencies were switched, the animals adjusted to the new conditions. Discrimination in the lever-press apparatus was demonstrated in a second experiment in which crabs had to choose between two bars, one (S+) caused food to be dispensed while the other (S-) was inactive. Experimental animals pressed the S+ bar at a significantly higher rate than the S- bar. When the contingencies associated with the lever were reversed, animals learned to switch to the correct bar by the second day. It was not necessary to reinforce every response: animals maintained high rates of responding on a schedule where every other response was reinforced. Animals used different methods of pressing the bar; the most common was extension of the claw, predominantly at the meropodite-carpopodite joint. PMID:2255730

  18. AUPress: A Comparison of an Open Access University Press with Traditional Presses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGreal, Rory; Chen, Nian-Shing

    2011-01-01

    This study is a comparison of AUPress with three other traditional (non-open access) Canadian university presses. The analysis is based on the rankings that are correlated with book sales on Amazon.com and Amazon.ca. Statistical methods include the sampling of the sales ranking of randomly selected books from each press. The results of one-way…

  19. Speaking of a Free Press: 200 Years of Notable Quotations about Press Freedoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Newspaper Publishers Association Foundation, Washington, DC.

    Intended to summarize the ideals underlying the struggle for freedom of the press and to reinforce the basic Constitutional principles upon which the United States functions, this collection of quotations reflects the beliefs of prominent people throughout history who have championed press freedom, as well as the ideas of some who have opposed it.…

  20. The Hot-Pressing of Hafnium Carbide (Melting Point, 7030 F)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, William A.; Grisaffe, Salvatore J.

    1960-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to determine the effects of the hot-pressing variables (temperature, pressure, and time) on the density and grain size of hafnium carbide disks. The purpose was to provide information necessary for the production of high-density test shapes for the determination of physical and mechanical properties. Hot-pressing of -325 mesh hafnium carbide powder was accomplished with a hydraulic press and an inductively heated graphite die assembly. The ranges investigated for each variable were as follows: temperature, 3500 to 4870 F; pressure, 1000 to 6030 pounds per square inch; and time, 5 to 60 minutes. Hafnium carbide bodies of approximately 98 percent theoretical density can be produced under the following minimal conditions: 4230 F, 3500 pounds per square inch, and 15 minutes. Further increases in temperature and time resulted only in greater grain size.

  1. Numerical simulation of mold shape’s influence on NbTi cold-pressing superconducting joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Feng; Cheng, Junsheng; Dai, Yinming; Wang, Qiuliang; Yan, Luguang

    2014-03-01

    The cold-pressing welding methods are employed to fabricate joints between NbTi multi-filamentary conductors, and a series of joints are made with the molds of different shapes for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) magnet applications. The Abaqus-Explicit method was used to do a quasi-static analysis of the cold-pressing welding process. In the simulation, we analyzed four molds with different shapes: plate mold, cap mold, square mold, and radial compression. The simulation shows that the deformation of filaments is the most uniform in the case of radial compression and the square mold is the optimum one for decreasing joint resistance.

  2. Pistol-shaped dosimeter charger

    DOEpatents

    Maples, Robert A.

    1985-01-01

    A pistol-shaped charger assembly clamps a cylindrical radiation dosimeter against one edge thereof. A triggerlike lever on the handgrip of the assembly is manually pivoted to actuate a piezoelectric current generator held in the handgrip and thereby charge the dosimeter.

  3. Pistol-shaped dosimeter charger

    SciTech Connect

    Maples, R.A.

    1985-01-15

    A pistol-shaped charger assembly clamps a cylindrical radiation dosimeter against one edge thereof. A triggerlike lever on the handgrip of the assembly is manually pivoted to actuate a piezoelectric current generator held in the handgrip and thereby charge the dosimeter.

  4. Pistol-shaped dosimeter charger

    DOEpatents

    Maples, R.A.

    A pistol-shaped charger assembly clamps a cylindrical radiation dosimeter against one edge thereof. A triggerlike lever on the handgrip of the assembly is manually pivoted to actuate a piezoelectric current generator held in the handgrip and thereby charge the dosimeter.

  5. Aerial view of the Press Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    In this aerial view, The News Center sits beyond a large parking lot, on a hill at the northeastern end of the Launch Complex 39 Area , next to the turn basin (at left). From left, the grandstand faces the launch pads several miles away on the Atlantic seashore; behind it, the television studio is the site of media conferences; next, the large white-roofed building is the hub of information and activity for press representatives. Lined up on the right of the Press Site are various buildings and trailers, home to major news networks. The parking lot can accommodate the hundreds of media personnel who attend Space Shuttle launches.

  6. Hot-isostatic-press joining of cemented carbides

    SciTech Connect

    Miodownik, M.; Derby, B.

    1999-12-01

    Hot isostatic pressing (HIPing) is investigated as a technique for joining the cermet AC-15% Co to itself. Encapsulation of the specimens prior to HIPing was carried out using steel encapsulation, glass encapsulation, and self-encapsulation. The bonds were evaluated using a four-point-bend method. It is shown that the glass and steel encapsulation methods have a number of inherent problems which make them inappropriate for near net shape processing. In contrast the novel self-encapsulation method, described for the first time in this communication, is both simple and effective, producing joined material with bulk strength. The concept of self-encapsulation is potentially widely applicable for joining composite materials.

  7. Including die and press deformations in sheet metal forming simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilthammar, Johan; Sigvant, Mats; Kao-Walter, Sharon

    2016-08-01

    Structural analysis, in Abaqus, of a stamping die and subsequent morphing of the tool surfaces in AutoForm were performed to improve a sheet metal forming simulation. First, the tool surfaces of the XC90 rear door inner were scanned. They were not matching when the die was unloaded and could therefore not give any satisfying results in sheet metal forming simulations. Scanned surface geometries were then added to a structural FE-model of the complete stamping die and some influential parts of the production press. The structural FE- model was analysed with Abaqus to obtain the structural deformations of the die. The calculated surface shapes were then transferred to AutoForm where a forming simulation was performed. Results from the different sheet metal forming simulations were compared to measured draw in curves and showed a substantial increase in accuracy and ability to analyse dies in running production when the morphed surfaces were used.

  8. Predicting the performance of belt filter presses using the Crown Press for laboratory simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, T.M.

    1999-07-26

    Belt filter presses (BFPs) are among the most commonly used devices to dewater wastewater sludge. The concept used by a BFP to achieve dewatered cake solids is relatively simple; however, replicating this performance in the laboratory in order to predict the performance of a BFP with reasonable reliability has proven to be a challenge. The Crown Press is one tool that has been shown to replicate the performance of anaerobically digested sludge on a BFP. This study used the Crown Press to replicate and predict the performance of waste activated sludge (WAS) from the Mauldin Road wastewater treatment plant on BFPs. Several operational variables, including belt speed, belt tension, polymer type, and polymer dose, were changed on the Crown Press to predict how the changes on the BFP would affect performance. Two polymers were chosen to be tested on the BFPs at Mauldin Road based on Crown Press predictions. The first polymer performed the same as the plant`s current polymer in the lab, and the second performed better (achieved higher final cake solids) than the current polymer. These predictions were borne out in the BFP tests, showing that the Crown Press predictions were accurate. The Crown Press predictions were also compared to the predictions made by the capillary suction time (CST) and specific resistance to filtration (SRF) tests. The Crown Press provided more information regarding the affect of polymer type and dose on cake solids than either CST or SRF. The Crown Press was shown to be a viable tool to assess potential changes in BFP performance with WAS when operational variables change.

  9. A Journalist's Guide to the Free Press.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingelhart, Louis

    1996-01-01

    Summarizes the content of the federal constitution and various state constitutions regarding freedom of the press. Examines certain borderline issues, including actions and expressions, pornography, defamation, libel, and copyrighted material. States that regulation of unprotected material must be reasonable, specific, and clear. Discusses what…

  10. Press Site Auditorium dedicated to John Holliman

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A ceremony dedicated the KSC Press Site auditorium as the John Holliman Auditorium to honor the correspondent for his enthusiastic, dedicated coverage of America's space program. The auditorium was built in 1980 and has been the focal point for new coverage of Space Shuttle launches. The ceremony followed the 94th launch of a Space Shuttle, on mission STS-96, earlier this morning.

  11. Neo-Lysenkoism, IQ, and the Press.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Bernard D.

    1983-01-01

    In "The Mismeasure of Man," a history of efforts to measure intelligence, Stephen Jay Gould is highly selective in his account, and tests for scientific truth by the standards of his own social and political convictions. Specifically, to combat racist approaches to theories of intelligence, Gould presses for equal and opposite bias. (Author/GC)

  12. Be Prepared to Meet the Press.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedro, Nick J.

    1989-01-01

    Offers school administrators tips for sharpening their public relations skills. Educators interviewed by the press should do research beforehand, answer practice questions, listen before speaking, admit ignorance, make every statement count, be circumspect, ask for a review copy, attend to follow-up, keep a clipping file, and maintain open…

  13. Press kit kicks off new branding.

    PubMed

    Rees, Tom

    2004-01-01

    A smartly produced press kit resulted in unprecedented news coverage when Denver's Porter Adventist Hospital recently unveiled plans for an extensive 80 million dollars redevelopment. A news conference was held to announce this plan, along with the opening of the hospital's new emergency department. The overall effort is part of the new branding strategy of the 75-year-old hospital.

  14. Communications in Agriculture: The American Farm Press.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, James F.; Salcedo, Rodolfo N.

    This book studies communications in agriculture, focusing on the American farm press. As defined here, a commercial farm periodical is directed to farmers and supports itself through the sale of subscriptions or advertising. It includes local as well as regional and national periodicals. A 90-year analysis, from 1880 to 1970, was chosen because…

  15. STS-9 Spacelab 1 Press Kit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Press information on the STS-9/SPACELAB 1 mission is provided. Launch preparations, launch window, flight objectives, experiments, life sciences baseline data collection, SPACELAB 1 payload operations and control crew and specialists, and tracking and data management are among the topics explained.

  16. Student Press Corps (Use the News).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahler, Susan

    1989-01-01

    Describes the Student Press Corps, a program in which high school students submit weekly columns concerning local high school events for editing and possible publication by the local newspaper. Reports that training sessions have been fully enrolled for two years and that all participants are extremely positive about the program. (RS)

  17. 7 CFR 58.421 - Press.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Press. 58.421 Section 58.421 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE...

  18. The Press, Privacy, and Community Mores.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasser, Theodore L.

    Because of judicial indifference and legislative inaction, the conflict between the right of privacy and the freedom of the press is no closer to a resolution than it was a century ago. William Prosser's reduction of the common law of privacy into four separate torts has not solved the problem. The concept of "newsworthiness" has not been helpful…

  19. Freedom of the Press: Foundations and Attitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Martin Leroy, Jr.

    This study reports the results of a national survey of the attitudes of five demographic groups toward freedom of the press. The groups are newsmen, state legislators, high school teachers, high school students, and the general public. The survey is broken into two parts, the first dealing with general principles (e.g., support for a law against…

  20. Free Press in a Constitutional Democracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucianek, Christine

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a lesson in which students will examine several views expressed by the founders to understand the context for including freedom of the press in the First Amendment. Students will be asked to think about the role that the news media and the need to be an informed citizen continue to play in our democracy. Students will…

  1. When International Press Rights "Are" the News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedman, Eric

    2006-01-01

    In many countries, reporters and editors face criminal prosecution, censorship, self-censorship, exile, tax audits, loss of broadcast and publication licenses, loss of jobs, assault, and even assassination based on how they practice their profession. Press rights and human rights advocacy groups try to draw media and official attention to those…

  2. 7 CFR 58.421 - Press.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL... maintained in good repair and in a sanitary condition. Single service press cloths shall be used only once....

  3. The Press and the Bolivian National Revolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knudson, Jerry W.

    1973-01-01

    Social revolutions, which frequently use the press as a propaganda weapon, have been rare in Latin America despite the striking social inequalities of the region. Only three classic socioeconomic revolutions have unfolded in the hemisphere--in Mexico in 1910, in Bolivia in 1952, and in Cuba in 1959. Bolivia attempted to effect radical reforms…

  4. The Moral Universes of Libertarian Press Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wuliger, Gregory T.

    1991-01-01

    Uses Kantian logic to analyze the statement of Libertarian press theory "Truth beats falsehood in a free marketplace of ideas" as a definition, an observation, and a universal truth. Notes three corresponding moral universes, with differing ethical obligations. Discusses strengths and weaknesses of each. Cautions media ethics analysts against…

  5. An Introduction to Bibliographical Press Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, John V., Jr.

    This guide to the literature of bibliographical press work is comprised of brief introductory notes on the field and this bibliography, followed by citations listed in seven categories: (1) book production, (2) handmade paper, (3) printer's ink, (4) type design, (5) book design, (6) hand printing, and (7) hand bookbinding. Introductory as well as…

  6. Law of the Student Press. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Student Press Law Center, Washington, DC.

    Noting dramatic changes in First Amendment protections for high school students and new legal issues facing college newspaper editors, this book describes in detail the legal rights and responsibilities of both the high school and college press. While the book is extensively footnoted, it intentionally avoids "legal-ese" and "brings law to life"…

  7. Accuracy of Press Reports in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, B. E.; Hurley, K.; Nemiroff, R. J.; Branch, D.; Perlmutter, S.; Schaefer, M. W.; Consolmagno, G. J.; McSween, H.; Strom, R.

    1999-12-01

    Most Americans learn about modern science from press reports, while such articles have a bad reputation among scientists. We have performed a study of 403 news articles on three topics (gamma-ray astronomy, supernovae, and Mars) to quantitatively answer the questions 'How accurate are press reports of astronomy?' and 'What fraction of the basic science claims in the press are correct?' We have taken all articles on the topics from five news sources (UPI, NYT, S&T, SN, and 5 newspapers) for one decade (1987-1996). All articles were evaluated for a variety of errors, ranging from the fundamental to the trivial. For 'trivial' errors, S&T and SN were virtually perfect while the various newspapers averaged roughly one trivial error every two articles. For meaningful errors, we found that none of our 403 articles significantly mislead the reader or misrepresented the science. So a major result of our study is that reporters should be rehabilitated into the good graces of astronomers, since they are actually doing a good job. For our second question, we rated each story with the probability that its basic new science claim is correct. We found that the average probability over all stories is 70%, regardless of source, topic, importance, or quoted pundit. How do we reconcile our findings that the press does not make significant errors yet the basic science presented is 30% wrong? The reason is that the nature of news reporting is to present front-line science and the nature of front-line science is that reliable conclusions have not yet been reached. So a second major result of our study is to make the distinction between textbook science (with reliability near 100%) and front-line science which you read in the press (with reliability near 70%).

  8. Kiln for hot-pressing compacts in a continuous manner

    DOEpatents

    Reynolds, C.D Jr.

    1983-08-08

    The invention is directed to a hot pressing furnace or kiln which is capable of preheating, hot pressing, and cooling a plurality of articles in a sequential and continuous manner. The hot pressing furnace of the present invention comprises an elongated, horizontally disposed furnace capable of holding a plurality of displaceable pusher plates each supporting a die body loaded with refractory or ceramic material to be hot pressed. Each of these plates and the die body supported thereby is sequentially pushed through the preheating zone, a temperature stabilizing and a hot pressing zone, and a cooling zone so as to provide a continuous hot-pressing operation of a plurality of articles.

  9. Kiln for hot-pressing compacts in a continuous manner

    DOEpatents

    Reynolds, Jr., Carl D.

    1985-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a hot pressing furnace or kiln which is capable of preheating, hot pressing, and cooling a plurality of articles in a sequential and continuous manner. The hot pressing furnace of the present invention comprises an elongated, horizontally disposed furnace capable of holding a plurality of displaceable pusher plates each supporting a die body loaded with refractory or ceramic material to be hot pressed. Each of these plates and the die body supported thereby is sequentially pushed through the preheating zone, a temperature stabilizing and a hot pressing zone, and a cooling zone so as to provide a continuous hot-pressing operation of a plurality of articles.

  10. A method to calculate fission-fragment yields Y(Z,N) versus proton and neutron number in the Brownian shape-motion model. Application to calculations of U and Pu charge yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, Peter; Ichikawa, Takatoshi

    2015-12-01

    We propose a method to calculate the two-dimensional (2D) fission-fragment yield Y(Z,N) versus both proton and neutron number, with inclusion of odd-even staggering effects in both variables. The approach is to use the Brownian shape-motion on a macroscopic-microscopic potential-energy surface which, for a particular compound system is calculated versus four shape variables: elongation (quadrupole moment Q2), neck d , left nascent fragment spheroidal deformation ɛ_{f1}, right nascent fragment deformation ɛ_{f2} and two asymmetry variables, namely proton and neutron numbers in each of the two fragments. The extension of previous models 1) introduces a method to calculate this generalized potential-energy function and 2) allows the correlated transfer of nucleon pairs in one step, in addition to sequential transfer. In the previous version the potential energy was calculated as a function of Z and N of the compound system and its shape, including the asymmetry of the shape. We outline here how to generalize the model from the "compound-system" model to a model where the emerging fragment proton and neutron numbers also enter, over and above the compound system composition.

  11. The mechanics of pressed-pellet separators in molten salt batteries.

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Kevin Nicholas; Roberts, Christine Cardinal; Roberts, Scott Alan; Grillet, Anne

    2014-06-01

    We present a phenomenological constitutive model that describes the macroscopic behavior of pressed-pellet materials used in molten salt batteries. Such materials include separators, cathodes, and anodes. The purpose of this model is to describe the inelastic deformation associated with the melting of a key constituent, the electrolyte. At room temperature, all constituents of these materials are solid and do not transport cations so that the battery is inert. As the battery is heated, the electrolyte, a constituent typically present in the separator and cathode, melts and conducts charge by flowing through the solid skeletons of the anode, cathode, and separator. The electrochemical circuit is closed in this hot state of the battery. The focus of this report is on the thermal-mechanical behavior of the separator, which typically exhibits the most deformation of the three pellets during the process of activating a molten salt battery. Separator materials are composed of a compressed mixture of a powdered electrolyte, an inert binder phase, and void space. When the electrolyte melts, macroscopically one observes both a change in volume and shape of the separator that depends on the applied boundary conditions during the melt transition. Although porous flow plays a critical role in the battery mechanics and electrochemistry, the focus of this report is on separator behavior under flow-free conditions in which the total mass of electrolyte is static within the pellet. Specific poromechanics effects such as capillary pressure, pressure-saturation, and electrolyte transport between layers are not considered. Instead, a phenomenological model is presented to describe all such behaviors including the melting transition of the electrolyte, loss of void space, and isochoric plasticity associated with the binder phase rearrangement. The model is appropriate for use finite element analysis under finite deformation and finite temperature change conditions. The model

  12. 9. INTERIOR VIEW OF EYE PRESS AREA; TO LEFT IS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. INTERIOR VIEW OF EYE PRESS AREA; TO LEFT IS A TWO-BAY SLOTTED TYPE FURNACE, TO CENTER IS EYE PRESS, TO RIGHT IS CURCULAR SAW - Warwood Tool Company, Foot of Nineteenth Street, Wheeling, Ohio County, WV

  13. Students Deserve Broad View in Advertising-Press Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynn, Jerry R.

    1979-01-01

    Argues that the advertising industry's influence on the press is primarily indirect and that journalism educators should divert student attention from the negative aspects of advertising's role in the press. (RL)

  14. Method for hot pressing beryllium oxide articles

    DOEpatents

    Ballard, Ambrose H.; Godfrey, Jr., Thomas G.; Mowery, Erb H.

    1988-01-01

    The hot pressing of beryllium oxide powder into high density compacts with little or no density gradients is achieved by employing a homogeneous blend of beryllium oxide powder with a lithium oxide sintering agent. The lithium oxide sintering agent is uniformly dispersed throughout the beryllium oxide powder by mixing lithium hydroxide in an aqueous solution with beryllium oxide powder. The lithium hydroxide is converted in situ to lithium carbonate by contacting or flooding the beryllium oxide-lithium hydroxide blend with a stream of carbon dioxide. The lithium carbonate is converted to lithium oxide while remaining fixed to the beryllium oxide particles during the hot pressing step to assure uniform density throughout the compact.

  15. Glass Coats For Hot Isostatic Pressing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ecer, Gunes M.

    1989-01-01

    Surface voids sealed from pressurizing gas. Coating technique enables healing of surface defects by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). Internal pores readily closed by HIP, but surface voids like cracks and pores in contact with pressurizing gas not healed. Applied to casting or weldment as thick slurry of two glass powders: one melts at temperature slightly lower than used for HIP, and another melts at higher temperature. For example, powder is glass of 75 percent SiO2 and 25 percent Na2O, while other powder SiO2. Liquid component of slurry fugitive organic binder; for example, mixture of cellulose acetate and acetone. Easy to apply, separates voids from surrounding gas, would not react with metal part under treatment, and easy to remove after pressing.

  16. Reducing VOC Press Emission from OSB Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Gary D. McGinnis; Laura S. WIlliams; Amy E. Monte; Jagdish Rughani: Brett A. Niemi; Thomas M. Flicker

    2001-12-31

    Current regulations require industry to meet air emission standards with regard to particulates, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) and other gases. One of many industries that will be affected by the new regulations is the wood composites industry. This industry generates VOCs, HAPs, and particulates mainly during the drying and pressing of wood. Current air treatment technologies for the industry are expensive to install and operate. As regulations become more stringent, treatment technologies will need to become more efficient and cost effective. The overall objective of this study is to evaluate the use of process conditions and chemical additives to reduce VOC/HAPs in air emitted from presses and dryers during the production of oriented strand board.

  17. Screen Secures Detonator to Explosive Charge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moshenrose, H. D.; Kindsfather, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    Brass screen sleeve attaches blasting cap to fuse, shaped charge, detonating cord, or other formed explosive. Screen makes it easy to control distance between cap and charge, because user can see both parts, and to cool cap by convection, making use of low-cost blasting caps possible for some hot environments.

  18. Through the Looking Glass: Press Responses to Genocide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipstadt, Deborah E.

    1991-01-01

    Examines press coverage of the Holocaust to analyze the response of the United States and the world to the Jewish extermination. Compares this coverage to earlier press responses to the Armenian genocide and Ukraine famines. Argues the press was unwilling to face the Holocaust's magnitude. Urges teachers to teach about the Holocaust and similar…

  19. Graphic Arts: The Press and Finishing Processes. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crummett, Dan

    This document contains teacher and student materials for a course in graphic arts concentrating on printing presses and the finishing process for publications. Seven units of instruction cover the following topics: (1) offset press systems; (2) offset inks and dampening chemistry; (3) offset press operating procedures; (4) preventive maintenance…

  20. The Historical Importance of Jury to Press Freedom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olasky, Marvin N.

    Staggered by some recent libel verdicts, many journalists are neglecting lessons about press freedom learned at great cost during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Journalists then learned that state power over the press, residing in the hands of either censors or judges, leads to a decrease in press freedom. In 1986, though, many media…

  1. The Press, Japanese Americans, and the Concentration Camps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okihiro, Gary Y.; Sly, Julie

    1983-01-01

    A study of the wartime press suggests that the plan to incarcerate Japanese Americans (under Executive Order 9066) was government-initiated, that the public and the press initially disapproved of such treatment, and that events emanating from the government influenced shifts in press and public opinion that allowed implementation of the plan.…

  2. The Theater of Terror: Effects of Press Coverage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weimann, Gabriel

    1983-01-01

    Compared attitudes before and after students read press clippings describing two separate terrorist incidents. Found that students exposed to press coverage tended to consider the event more noteworthy and to call for a solution. Concluded that press attention enhances the status of the people, problem, or cause behind a terrorist event. (PD)

  3. The American Native Press and American Indian Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littlefield, Daniel F., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    As product and process, the Native American press has a long history. The establishment of the first native-run press in 1828 began a press history that continues today. That history is represented by more than 2,000 periodical titles alone, two-thirds of which have been established during the past 20 years. Impressive collections of these…

  4. The Rice University Press Initiative: An Interview with Charles Henry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trevitte, Chad; Henry, Charles

    2007-01-01

    In this interview Charles Henry, publisher of the Rice University Press (RUP), discusses RUP's rebirth as a fully digital university press. Henry addresses the circumstances that led to this decision, and he further outlines the RUP business model whereby the press will publish its own titles--both digitally and in print-on-demand--while…

  5. Equilibrium Shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzo, Dario; Petazzi, Lorenzo

    2006-08-01

    We present a satellite path planning technique able to make identical spacecraft aquire a given configuration. The technique exploits a behaviour-based approach to achieve an autonomous and distributed control over the relative geometry making use of limited sensorial information. A desired velocity is defined for each satellite as a sum of different contributions coming from generic high level behaviours: forcing the final desired configuration the behaviours are further defined by an inverse dynamic calculation dubbed Equilibrium Shaping. We show how considering only three different kind of behaviours it is possible to acquire a number of interesting formations and we set down the theoretical framework to find the entire set. We find that allowing a limited amount of communication the technique may be used also to form complex lattice structures. Several control feedbacks able to track the desired velocities are introduced and discussed. Our results suggest that sliding mode control is particularly appropriate in connection with the developed technique.

  6. The Inter American Press Association as Champion of Press Freedom: Reality or Rhetoric? The Bolivian Experience, 1952-1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knudson, Jerry W.

    Each year a committee on freedom of the press, established in 1946 by the Inter American Press Association (IAPA), exposes those countries which it feels do not have freedom of the press. In 1952 Bolivia underwent a social and economic revolution. As a result, angry mobs forced the closure of the two newspapers with the largest circulation in…

  7. Ewald Electrostatics for Mixtures of Point and Continuous Line Charges.

    PubMed

    Antila, Hanne S; Tassel, Paul R Van; Sammalkorpi, Maria

    2015-10-15

    Many charged macro- or supramolecular systems, such as DNA, are approximately rod-shaped and, to the lowest order, may be treated as continuous line charges. However, the standard method used to calculate electrostatics in molecular simulation, the Ewald summation, is designed to treat systems of point charges. We extend the Ewald concept to a hybrid system containing both point charges and continuous line charges. We find the calculated force between a point charge and (i) a continuous line charge and (ii) a discrete line charge consisting of uniformly spaced point charges to be numerically equivalent when the separation greatly exceeds the discretization length. At shorter separations, discretization induces deviations in the force and energy, and point charge-point charge correlation effects. Because significant computational savings are also possible, the continuous line charge Ewald method presented here offers the possibility of accurate and efficient electrostatic calculations.

  8. Ewald Electrostatics for Mixtures of Point and Continuous Line Charges.

    PubMed

    Antila, Hanne S; Tassel, Paul R Van; Sammalkorpi, Maria

    2015-10-15

    Many charged macro- or supramolecular systems, such as DNA, are approximately rod-shaped and, to the lowest order, may be treated as continuous line charges. However, the standard method used to calculate electrostatics in molecular simulation, the Ewald summation, is designed to treat systems of point charges. We extend the Ewald concept to a hybrid system containing both point charges and continuous line charges. We find the calculated force between a point charge and (i) a continuous line charge and (ii) a discrete line charge consisting of uniformly spaced point charges to be numerically equivalent when the separation greatly exceeds the discretization length. At shorter separations, discretization induces deviations in the force and energy, and point charge-point charge correlation effects. Because significant computational savings are also possible, the continuous line charge Ewald method presented here offers the possibility of accurate and efficient electrostatic calculations. PMID:26352781

  9. Effect of hot pressing additives on the leachability of hot pressed sodium hydrous titanium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, T.M.; Sambell, R.A.J.

    1980-01-01

    Sodium hydrous titanium oxide is an ion exchange resin which can be used for immobilizing medium level waste (MLW) liquors. When hot pressed, it undergoes conversion to a ceramic. Three low melting point materials (borax, bismuth trioxide, and a mixture of PbO/CuO) were added to the (Na)HTiO and the effect that each of these had on aiding densification was assessed. Hot pressing temperature, applied pressure, and percentage addition of hot pressing aid were varied. Percentage open porosity, flexural strength, and leachability were measured. There was a linear relationship between the percentage open porosity and the logarithm of the leach rate for a constant percentage addition of each additive.

  10. Remote plunger removal device for small-scale incremental pressing

    SciTech Connect

    Burnside, N.J.; Son, S.F.; Asay, B.W.

    1997-09-01

    Small-scale pressing of high explosives (HE) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and elsewhere is routinely performed using pneumatic presses. Blast shields provide protection to the operator during the pressing procedure, but safety of the operator is a concern during removal of the plunger, which is currently performed manually. To minimize this risk, very high tolerances between the plunger and the die are required. These tolerances are often very costly, especially in the case of long, relatively narrow dies. The safety issue is an even greater concern with incremental pressing in which cleaning the die between increments is difficult or impossible. To better protect press operators, a device has been designed and constructed to allow remote plunger removal in a standard HE press. In this report the authors describe this modified press that allows remote removal of the plunger.

  11. Press Site Auditorium dedicated to John Holliman

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    From left, Center Director Roy Bridges and NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin applaud as Jay Holliman, with the help of his mother, Mrs. Dianne Holliman, unveils a plaque honoring his father, the late John Holliman. At right is Tom Johnson, news group chairman of CNN. The occasion was the dedication of the KSC Press Site auditorium as the John Holliman Auditorium to honor the CNN national correspondent for his enthusiastic, dedicated coverage of America's space program. The auditorium was built in 1980 and has been the focal point for new coverage of Space Shuttle launches. The ceremony followed the 94th launch of a Space Shuttle, on mission STS-96, earlier this morning.

  12. Press Site Auditorium dedicated to John Holliman

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin hands Mrs. Dianne Holliman a plaque honoring her late husband, John Holliman, a CNN national correspondent. Standing behind Goldin is Center Director Roy Bridges. At right is Tom Johnson, news group chairman of CNN. A ceremony dedicated the KSC Press Site auditorium as the John Holliman Auditorium to honor the correspondent for his enthusiastic, dedicated coverage of America's space program. The auditorium was built in 1980 and has been the focal point for new coverage of Space Shuttle launches. The ceremony followed the 94th launch of a Space Shuttle, on mission STS-96, earlier this morning.

  13. Charged membranes.

    PubMed

    Thatcher, Jack D

    2013-04-16

    This Teaching Resource provides three animated lessons that describe the storage and utilization of energy across plasma membranes. The "Na,K ATPase" animation explains how these pumps establish the electrochemical gradient that stores energy across plasma membranes. The "ATP synthesizing complexes" animation shows how these complexes transfer energy from the inner mitochondrial membrane to adenosine triphosphate (ATP). The "action potential" lesson explains how charged membranes are used to propagate signals along the axons of neurons. These animations serve as valuable resources for any collegiate-level course that describes these important factors. Courses that might employ them include introductory biology, biochemistry, biophysics, cell biology, pharmacology, and physiology.

  14. Superordinate Shape Classification Using Natural Shape Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilder, John; Feldman, Jacob; Singh, Manish

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the classification of shapes into broad natural categories such as "animal" or "leaf". We asked whether such coarse classifications can be achieved by a simple statistical classification of the shape skeleton. We surveyed databases of natural shapes, extracting shape skeletons and tabulating their parameters within each…

  15. Abstracts of Suburban Press Research Series Papers Produced by the Suburban Press Research Center from July 1966 to February 1973. Suburban Press Research Series No. 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb. Suburban Press Research Center.

    Abstracts of 13 research investigations, speeches, and bibliographic resources, collected by the Suburban Press Research Center, are provided in this paper. Topics of discussion include the following aspects of the suburban press: pretrial coverage, characteristics of communities served by suburban newspapers, science news coverage, the role of…

  16. Where is the British national press?

    PubMed

    MacInnes, John; Rosie, Michael; Petersoo, Pille; Condor, Susan; Kennedy, James

    2007-06-01

    Although globalization has highlighted the danger of conflating state, society and nation, sociologists remain insufficiently alert to such banal nationalism. Newspapers offer a strong test case of the extent of diversity in the construction of state, national and social boundaries, since Billig and Anderson have argued they comprise a special case where their orientation to an audience simultaneously located in a state, society and nation allows them to reproduce a sense of national identity. However, despite the commonsense obviousness of the term, it proves remarkably difficult to define what the 'British national press' might comprise. Circulation density of titles varies substantially across different parts of the UK and editorial copy is altered to address diverse 'national' readerships. 'British' newspapers also circulate in other states, especially the Republic of Ireland. After reviewing how newspapers might be defined as 'national' and/or 'British', we conclude that both Anderson and Billig over-estimate the congruence, relevance and obviousness of state, society and national boundaries. If the conceptualization of such boundaries is problematic in the case of the press, it follows that it must be still more so for most other objects of sociological analysis, including that of 'society' itself.

  17. High density hexagonal boron nitride prepared by hot isostatic pressing in refractory metal containers

    DOEpatents

    Hoenig, Clarence L.

    1992-01-01

    Boron nitride powder with less than or equal to the oxygen content of starting powder (down to 0.5% or less) is hot isostatically pressed in a refractory metal container to produce hexagonal boron nitride with a bulk density greater than 2.0 g/cc. The refractory metal container is formed of tantalum, niobium, tungsten, molybdenum or alloys thereof in the form of a canister or alternatively plasma sprayed or chemical vapor deposited onto a powder compact. Hot isostatic pressing at 1800.degree. C. and 30 KSI (206.8 MPa) argon pressure for four hours produces a bulk density of 2.21 g/cc. Complex shapes can be made.

  18. Charged Surfaces and Interfacial Ions.

    PubMed

    Kallay; Zalac

    2000-10-01

    Interfacial charge in a solid/liquid system is due to interactions of ions with surface sites affected by the electrostatic potential that is a consequence of their accumulation. The present theoretical approach is based on the so-called Surface Complexation Model that has several modifications known as either the 1-pK, the 2-pK, or the "MUSIC" model. These models assume different surface reactions and their equilibrium constants, taking into account electrostatic interactions. For that purpose the relationships between potentials affecting the state of interfacial ions and their surface densities need to be known, so that a certain model of the electrical interfacial layer should be introduced. The complexity of the problem results in the use of a variety of different theoretical approaches that cannot be distinguished experimentally. This article discusses several aspects of the problem, such as counterion association, structure of the electrical interfacial layer, potential-charge relationships, surface potentials, the zero charge condition, enthalpy of surface reactions, and the influence of the interfacial ionic equilibrium on the colloid stability. Copyright 2000 Academic Press. PMID:10998282

  19. Direct drive digital servo press with high parallel control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, Chikara; Yabe, Jun; Endou, Junichi; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi

    2013-12-01

    Direct drive digital servo press has been developed as the university-industry joint research and development since 1998. On the basis of this result, 4-axes direct drive digital servo press has been developed and in the market on April of 2002. This servo press is composed of 1 slide supported by 4 ball screws and each axis has linearscale measuring the position of each axis with high accuracy less than μm order level. Each axis is controlled independently by servo motor and feedback system. This system can keep high level parallelism and high accuracy even with high eccentric load. Furthermore the 'full stroke full power' is obtained by using ball screws. Using these features, new various types of press forming and stamping have been obtained by development and production. The new stamping and forming methods are introduced and 'manufacturing' need strategy of press forming with high added value and also the future direction of press forming are also introduced.

  20. Aggregation of Heterogeneously Charged Colloids.

    PubMed

    Dempster, Joshua M; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2016-06-28

    Patchy colloids are attractive as programmable building blocks for metamaterials. Inverse patchy colloids, in which a charged surface is decorated with patches of the opposite charge, are additionally noteworthy as models for heterogeneously charged biological materials such as proteins. We study the phases and aggregation behavior of a single charged patch in an oppositely charged colloid with a single-site model. This single-patch inverse patchy colloid model shows a large number of phases when varying patch size. For large patch sizes we find ferroelectric crystals, while small patch sizes produce cross-linked gels. Intermediate values produce monodisperse clusters and unusual worm structures that preserve finite ratios of area to volume. The polarization observed at large patch sizes is robust under extreme disorder in patch size and shape. We examine phase-temperature dependence and coexistence curves and find that large patch sizes produce polarized liquids, in contrast to mean-field predictions. Finally, we introduce small numbers of unpatched charged colloids. These can either suppress or encourage aggregation depending on their concentration and the size of the patches on the patched colloids. These effects can be exploited to control aggregation and to measure effective patch size.

  1. The Multianvil Press Research Facility at GSECARS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Uchida, T.; Rivers, M. L.; Sutton, S. R.; Weidner, D. J.; Durham, W. B.

    2002-12-01

    The multianvil press high pressure synchrotron research facility at the GSECARS beamlines consists of two large-volume presses (LVP): a 2.5 MN (250 ton) system at the bending magnet beamline (13-BM-D) and a 10 MN system at the insertion device beamline (13-ID-D). Both systems are now fully operational, with steadily increasing annual usage from ~70 days in 1998 to ~120 days in 2001. Here we present a system overview with brief scientific highlights illustrating the breadth of research and achievements made using this facility. Construction and operation of the facility are supported by the NSF Geosciences Instrumentation and Facilities Program. A DIA-type cubic-anvil apparatus and a split-cylinder apparatus (T-Cup) with 10 mm WC cubes are used to generate pressures and temperatures up to 24 GPa and 2400 K, on millimeter-sized samples, at 13-BM-D. In 13-ID-D, a large T-Cup apparatus with 25 mm anvils is used to reach pressure and temperature conditions of 25 GPa and 2500K simultaneously. Both high-pressure apparatus are mounted in die-sets, which can be easily transported in and out of the hydraulic press. Therefore all pressure generating apparatus can be used at any beamline, depending on research needs. A new deformation DIA (DDIA) was commissioned in August, 2002. This apparatus is capable of generating 30% strain on a 1 mm sample at pressures to ~15 GPa, allowing quantitative triaxial deformation experiments. Close to 400 runs have been carried out at our facility in a wide range of research areas: (1) P-V-T equation of state measurements on important mantle minerals, Fe alloys, and pressure standards, (2) in situ determination of phase relations of silicates, Fe alloys, and semiconductors using X-ray diffraction, (3) falling sphere measurements using radiography to determine viscosity of the silicate and metallic melts, (4) ultrasonic velocity measurements on mantle minerals, especially non-quenchable high pressure phases (e.g., high-pressure clinoenstatite

  2. 30. BUILDING NO. 527, DEHYDRATING PRESSES, LOOKING SOUTH. ALUMINUM NARROWGUAGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. BUILDING NO. 527, DEHYDRATING PRESSES, LOOKING SOUTH. ALUMINUM NARROW-GUAGE GONDOLA CAR IN LEFT BACKGROUND BROUGHT MOISTENED GUN COTTON FROM REST HOUSE (BUILDING NO. 320-B) IN CANS. (ONE OF THESE CANS IS ON UNLOADING PLATFORM RUNNING BESIDE PRESSES). CONTENTS OF CANS WERE UNLOADED INTO PRESSES BY HAND. - Picatinny Arsenal, 500 Area, Powder Factory & Power House, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  3. Photographic Study Of A Dead-Pressed Explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swallowe, G. M.; Field, J. E.

    1983-03-01

    High speed photography in conjunction with electron microscopy and a pressure measuring technique have been used to investigate the differences between dead-pressed and non-dead-pressed samples of the primary explosive Mercury Fulminate (Hg Ful). Photographs of reaction propagation were taken in transmitted light using a specially adapted drop-weight machine with transparent anvils. The results of these experiments suggested a mechanism for dead-pressing in Hg Ful based on the microscopic internal structure of the compacted explosive.

  4. Steam press hand burns: a serious burn injury.

    PubMed

    Woods, J A; Cobb, A T; Drake, D B; Edlich, R F

    1996-01-01

    Steam presses cause full-thickness burns when the operator's extremity is caught between the buck and the head of the steam press. Patients with serious steam press burns should be referred to a regional burn center for excision of the full-thickness burn and coverage by either a split-thickness skin graft or a flap. The safety features in steam presses that could prevent this serious injury include: (1) emergency safety releases, (2) peripheral safety bars, and (3) two-hand operator control.

  5. STS-114: Discovery Launch Readiness Press Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Michael Griffin, NASA Administrator; Wayne Hale, Space Shuttle Deputy Program Manager; Mike Wetmore, Director of Shuttle Processing; and 1st Lieutenant Mindy Chavez, Launch Weather Officer-United States Air Force 45th Weather Squadron are in attendance for this STS-114 Discovery launch readiness press conference. The discussion begins with Wayne Hale bringing to the table a low level sensor device for everyone to view. He talks in detail about all of the extensive tests that were performed on these sensors and the completion of these ambient tests. Chavez presents her weather forecast for the launch day of July 26th 2005. Michael Griffin and Wayne Hale answer questions from the news media pertaining to the sensors and launch readiness. The video ends with footage of Pilot Jim Kelly and Commander Eileen Collins conducting test flights in a Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA) that simulates Space Shuttle landing.

  6. Thermoelectric properties of pressed bismuth nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hostler, Stephen R.; Qu, Yu Qiao; Demko, Michael T.; Abramson, Alexis R.; Qiu, Xiaofeng; Burda, Clemens

    2008-03-01

    Theory predicts a substantial increase in the dimensionless figure of merit as the dimensionality and characteristic size of a material are decreased. We explore the use of bismuth nanoparticles pressed into pellets as potential increased efficiency thermoelectric materials. The figure of merit of these pellets is determined by independently measuring the electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and Seebeck coefficient. The results from the nanoparticle sample are compared to microparticle-based samples. Both sample types show a slight reduction in thermal conductivity relative to bulk bismuth and a Seebeck coefficient near or slightly larger in magnitude than bulk bismuth. These changes are dwarfed by a hundred-fold decrease in the electrical conductivity due to porosity and an oxide layer on the particles. The low conductivity leads to figures of merit at least two orders of magnitude smaller than bulk bismuth. Oxide layer removal and reduced pellet porosity will be required to increase the figure of merit.

  7. Hot isostatic pressing of titanium based materials

    SciTech Connect

    Froes, F.H.; Widmer, R.; Hebeisen, J.

    1996-12-31

    The importance of titanium in demanding aerospace and terrestrial applications is presented, and the necessity to reduce cost to increase use is discussed. Hot isostatic pressing (HIP`ing) can be utilized with titanium based materials to obtain cost reduction and to enhance performance. The science/technology of various facets of the titanium scenario where HIP`ing can be used to advantage is presented, including powder metallurgy, castings, metal matrix composites and use of thermochemical processing. The major application of HIP`ing for titanium based materials is in castings; followed by blended elemental concepts. Much work has been conducted on continuous fiber reinforced materials, with the first use in actual commercial components likely to occur in engine components. Discontinuously reinforced products are already in use in aerospace and terrestrial applications. For the future, developing processing such as mechanical alloying, nanostructured materials and rapidly solidified product could benefit from compaction by HIP`ing. 55 refs., 30 figs.

  8. Texaco presses projects for gasification process

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-06

    This paper reports that Texaco Inc. continues to press international ventures for its gasification process. A combine of Italian companies plans an $800 million integrated gasification/combined cycle power plant at a refinery in Sicily that will use Texaco's process to gasify refinery residual to produce electrical power. Other Italian refiners are expected to follow suit with similar projects. Meanwhile, Texaco and Bitor America Corp., have signed a letter of agreement to develop integrated gasification/combined cycle electrical power generation projects. The venture plans to use Texaco's gasification process and Orimulsion, a boiler fuel that is an emulsion of Venezuelan heavy crude, water, and surfactant, as feedstock. Bitor, Boca Raton, Fla., and its parent, Bitumenes Orinoco SA, are units of Venezuela's state oil company Petroleos de Venezuela SA.

  9. Hot Isostatic Pressing of 60-Nitinol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, Malcolm K.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of varying the time, temperature and pressure during consolidation of 60-Nitinol (Nickel Titanium alloy) by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) were examined. Six HIP cycles with a cycle time of either 2 or 20 hours, temperature of 900 or 1000 degrees Centigrade, and a chamber pressure of either 100 or 200 millipascals were used. The cycle representing the shortest cycle time at the highest temperature and pressure (2 hours/1000 degrees Centigrade/200 millipascals) produced material with the highest hardness (720 Vickers Pyramid Number (HV)). A modest increase in average grain size and significant porosity reduction were observed in material subjected to the longest cycle time at the highest temperature, regardless of the pressure applied. The intent of this study is to facilitate the technology transfer involved in the processing of this material.

  10. Explosive bulk charge

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Jacob Lee

    2015-04-21

    An explosive bulk charge, including: a first contact surface configured to be selectively disposed substantially adjacent to a structure or material; a second end surface configured to selectively receive a detonator; and a curvilinear side surface joining the first contact surface and the second end surface. The first contact surface, the second end surface, and the curvilinear side surface form a bi-truncated hemispherical structure. The first contact surface, the second end surface, and the curvilinear side surface are formed from an explosive material. Optionally, the first contact surface and the second end surface each have a substantially circular shape. Optionally, the first contact surface and the second end surface consist of planar structures that are aligned substantially parallel or slightly tilted with respect to one another. The curvilinear side surface has one of a smooth curved geometry, an elliptical geometry, and a parabolic geometry.

  11. Coaxial charged particle energy analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Michael A. (Inventor); Bryson, III, Charles E. (Inventor); Wu, Warren (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A non-dispersive electrostatic energy analyzer for electrons and other charged particles having a generally coaxial structure of a sequentially arranged sections of an electrostatic lens to focus the beam through an iris and preferably including an ellipsoidally shaped input grid for collimating a wide acceptance beam from a charged-particle source, an electrostatic high-pass filter including a planar exit grid, and an electrostatic low-pass filter. The low-pass filter is configured to reflect low-energy particles back towards a charged particle detector located within the low-pass filter. Each section comprises multiple tubular or conical electrodes arranged about the central axis. The voltages on the lens are scanned to place a selected energy band of the accepted beam at a selected energy at the iris. Voltages on the high-pass and low-pass filters remain substantially fixed during the scan.

  12. A comparative study between spiral-filter press and belt press implemented in a cloudy apple juice production process.

    PubMed

    De Paepe, Domien; Coudijzer, Katleen; Noten, Bart; Valkenborg, Dirk; Servaes, Kelly; De Loose, Marc; Diels, Ludo; Voorspoels, Stefan; Van Droogenbroeck, Bart

    2015-04-15

    In this study, advantages and disadvantages of the innovative, low-oxygen spiral-filter press system were studied in comparison with the belt press, commonly applied in small and medium size enterprises for the production of cloudy apple juice. On the basis of equivalent throughput, a higher juice yield could be achieved with spiral-filter press. Also a more turbid juice with a higher content of suspended solids could be produced. The avoidance of enzymatic browning during juice extraction led to an attractive yellowish juice with an elevated phenolic content. Moreover, it was found that juice produced with spiral-filter press demonstrates a higher retention of phenolic compounds during the downstream processing steps and storage. The results demonstrates the advantage of the use of a spiral-filter press in comparison with belt press in the production of a high quality cloudy apple juice rich in phenolic compounds, without the use of oxidation inhibiting additives.

  13. A comparative study between spiral-filter press and belt press implemented in a cloudy apple juice production process.

    PubMed

    De Paepe, Domien; Coudijzer, Katleen; Noten, Bart; Valkenborg, Dirk; Servaes, Kelly; De Loose, Marc; Diels, Ludo; Voorspoels, Stefan; Van Droogenbroeck, Bart

    2015-04-15

    In this study, advantages and disadvantages of the innovative, low-oxygen spiral-filter press system were studied in comparison with the belt press, commonly applied in small and medium size enterprises for the production of cloudy apple juice. On the basis of equivalent throughput, a higher juice yield could be achieved with spiral-filter press. Also a more turbid juice with a higher content of suspended solids could be produced. The avoidance of enzymatic browning during juice extraction led to an attractive yellowish juice with an elevated phenolic content. Moreover, it was found that juice produced with spiral-filter press demonstrates a higher retention of phenolic compounds during the downstream processing steps and storage. The results demonstrates the advantage of the use of a spiral-filter press in comparison with belt press in the production of a high quality cloudy apple juice rich in phenolic compounds, without the use of oxidation inhibiting additives. PMID:25466116

  14. CHARGING OF AGGREGATE GRAINS IN ASTROPHYSICAL ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Qianyu; Matthews, Lorin S.; Hyde, Truell W.; Land, Victor

    2013-02-15

    The charging of dust grains in astrophysical environments has been investigated with the assumption that these grains are homogeneous spheres. However, there is evidence which suggests that many grains in astrophysical environments are irregularly shaped aggregates. Recent studies have shown that aggregates acquire higher charge-to-mass ratios due to their complex structures, which in turn may alter their subsequent dynamics and evolution. In this paper, the charging of aggregates is examined including secondary electron emission and photoemission in addition to primary plasma currents. The results show that the equilibrium charge on aggregates can differ markedly from spherical grains with the same mass, but that the charge can be estimated for a given environment based on structural characteristics of the grain. The 'small particle effect' due to secondary electron emission is also important for de terming the charge of micron-sized aggregates consisting of nano-sized particles.

  15. Majorana approach to the stochastic theory of line shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komijani, Yashar; Coleman, Piers

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by recent Mössbauer experiments on strongly correlated mixed-valence systems, we revisit the Kubo-Anderson stochastic theory of spectral line shapes. Using a Majorana representation for the nuclear spin we demonstrate how to recast the classic line-shape theory in a field-theoretic and diagrammatic language. We show that the leading contribution to the self-energy can reproduce most of the observed line-shape features including splitting and line-shape narrowing, while the vertex and the self-consistency corrections can be systematically included in the calculation. This approach permits us to predict the line shape produced by an arbitrary bulk charge fluctuation spectrum providing a model-independent way to extract the local charge fluctuation spectrum of the surrounding medium. We also derive an inverse formula to extract the charge fluctuation from the measured line shape.

  16. Like Charges Attract?

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tianshan; Zhou, Jian; Wang, Qian; Jena, Puru

    2016-07-21

    Using multiscale first-principles calculations, we show that two interacting negatively charged B12I9(-) monoanions not only attract, in defiance of the Coulomb's law, but also the energy barrier at 400 K is small enough that these two moieties combine to form a stable B24I18(2-) moiety. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations further confirm its stability up to 1500 K. Studies of other B12X9(-) (X = Br, Cl, F, H, Au, CN) show that while all of these B24X18(2-) moieties are stable against dissociation, the energy barrier, with the exception of B24Au18(2-), is large so as to hinder their experimental observation. Our results explain the recent experimental observation of the "spontaneous" formation of B24I18(2-) in an ion trap. A simple model based upon electrostatics shows that this unusual behavior is due to competition between the attractive dipole-dipole interaction caused by the aspherical shape of the particle and the repulsive interaction between the like charges. PMID:27351125

  17. Hot isostatically pressed manufacture of high strength MERL 76 disk and seal shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. J.

    1982-01-01

    The performance of a HIP MERL 76 disk installed in an experimental engine and exposed to realistic operating conditions in a 150 hour, 1500 cycle endurance test is examined. Post test analysis, based on visual, fluorescence penetrant and dimensional inspection, indicates that the disk performs satisfactorily.

  18. Korean and Japanese Press: A Study in Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruidl, Richard A.

    During a time of crisis, it is instructive to examine the national press of Japan and Korea, two economic allies that view each other with suspicion. The Japanese press is relatively free and liberal-oriented on the domestic scene but is closely aligned with big business and government with regard to international concerns. The South Korean…

  19. State Free Expression Laws and Scholastic Press Censorship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paxton, Mark; Dickson, Tom

    2000-01-01

    Surveys high school newspaper advisors, finding remarkably similar attitudes, in states with scholastic freedom of press laws and states without such laws, regarding scholastic press freedom, the way they exercise their duty in overseeing the newspaper, censorship and self-censorship, and controversy over newspaper content. Finds differences in…

  20. Letting The Nasa Press Engine Work For You

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, Kimberly A.

    2006-09-01

    You have an amazing result based on NASA data or a NASA mission, you have written your seminal paper and submitted it to your favorite journal. You believe it has press potential and maybe you've even gotten help from your PR folks in writing a press release. Now you would really like NASA to issue this as a press release. But how do you do that? This presentation will illustrate the steps required to engage NASA in helping promote your story. What are NASA's requirements for newsworthiness? Should your news be released as a web feature story or in the local media? Does your news rise to the level of a full-blown press conference or will it be a media teleconference? How do you obtain approval for a NASA press event? Once your result is scheduled to be issued as a press release, how can you improve your chances of getting the best possible coverage for your story? I will discuss the NASA press process and suggest how to consider factors like timing, working with your collaborating institutions in an efficient way, and not letting the cat out of the bag until the press event.

  1. Nigerian Press under Imperialists and Dictators, 1903-1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogbondah, Chris W.

    Comparing the Nigerian press during the colonial period of British rule and the post-independence period, a case study examined two press laws: the Newspaper Ordinance No. 10 of 1903, and Decree No. 4 of 1984 (Public Officers Protection against False Accusation Decree). Using qualitative research methodology, the study investigated how the…

  2. University Presses As "Gatekeepers of Ideas" within Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Paul

    University presses serve a prominent gatekeeping role in scholarly publishing because they, unlike commercial presses, can select books which transmit knowledge without being wholly captive to the marketplace. To analyze the cyclical flow that continually advances intellectual life, this selection procedure was examined with a study of the…

  3. University Presses See Opportunities in Shakeup in the Publishing World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillen, Liz

    1997-01-01

    Recent closings in the commercial publishing industry and reduction in serious nonfiction publications may open doors for university presses to fill the gap. University presses are already anticipating the changing market, reviewing book lists, and looking at new areas for publication development. Changes in the commercial publishing industry are…

  4. 19. REMAINS OF FLYWHEEL OF No. 1 PRESS PUMPING ENGINE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. REMAINS OF FLYWHEEL OF No. 1 PRESS PUMPING ENGINE. GEARS ON EITHER SIDE OF THE FLYWHEEL WERE TURNED INTERMEDIATE GEARS WHICH POWERED THE PUMPS. - U.S. Steel Homestead Works, Press Shop No. 1, Along Monongahela River, Homestead, Allegheny County, PA

  5. 29 CFR 1910.217 - Mechanical power presses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., hot bending and hot metal presses, forging presses and hammers, riveting machines and similar types of... equipment. Air controlling equipment shall be protected against foreign material and water entering the... shall be kept in good condition and free from obstructions, grease, oil, and water. (4) Overloading....

  6. 29 CFR 1910.217 - Mechanical power presses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., hot bending and hot metal presses, forging presses and hammers, riveting machines and similar types of... equipment. Air controlling equipment shall be protected against foreign material and water entering the... shall be kept in good condition and free from obstructions, grease, oil, and water. (4) Overloading....

  7. 29 CFR 1910.217 - Mechanical power presses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., hot bending and hot metal presses, forging presses and hammers, riveting machines and similar types of... equipment. Air controlling equipment shall be protected against foreign material and water entering the... surrounding floors shall be kept in good condition and free from obstructions, grease, oil, and water....

  8. Press Releases vs. Newspaper Coverage of California Supreme Court Decisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, F. Dennis

    1978-01-01

    A study comparing the coverage in newspapers and press releases regarding one year's decisions of the California Supreme Court revealed that the press releases influenced the kinds of decisions that were reported but not the quantity of coverage by the newspapers. (GT)

  9. 10. VIEW OF MODULE B, INSTALLATION OF A HYDRAULIC PRESS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. VIEW OF MODULE B, INSTALLATION OF A HYDRAULIC PRESS. THE PRESS WILL EVENTUALLY BE CONNECTED TO A GLOVE BOX LINE. (9/29/69) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Manufacturing Facility, North-central section of Plant, just south of Building 776/777, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  10. 9. DETAILED VIEW OF BRIQUETTING PRESS HOUSED IN A GLOVE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. DETAILED VIEW OF BRIQUETTING PRESS HOUSED IN A GLOVE BOX. THE PRESS FORMED SCRAP PLUTONIUM METAL FROM FOUNDRY AND FABRICATION PROCESSES INTO SMALL BRIQUETTES. THESE BRIQUETTES BECAME PART OF THE FEED MATERIALS FOR THE FOUNDRY. (5/6/59) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Fabrication, Central section of Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  11. 6. Interior, first floor front room. View of pressed metal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Interior, first floor front room. View of pressed metal ceiling visible through opening in dropped ceiling. (Below the pressed metal ceiling are three wooden joists, two electrical wires and the edges of the dropped ceiling where a panel had been removed). - Ferree Building, 417 Ninth Street, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  12. The Role of the Black Press during the "Great Migration."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Felecia G.

    Between the years of 1916 and 1918 southern blacks began populating the urban centers of the north in a movement known as the "Great Migration." This movement was significant to the development of the black press, for it was during this period that the black press became a protest organ and rose to its greatest level of prominence and influence.…

  13. First Amendment Speech and Press Theory: Preferred Position Postulate Reexamined.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stonecipher, Harry W.

    If the United States Supreme Court is to exercise its historic role as guardian of the fundamental freedoms flowing from the speech and press clauses of the first amendment, it is imperative that those basic freedoms be placed in a preferred position. The preferred position doctrine provides adequate safeguards for both speech and press guarantees…

  14. New Realities for Scholarly Presses in Trying Economic Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blakesley, David

    2014-01-01

    The author explains that Parlor Press is an independent publisher and distributor of scholarly and trade books in print and digital formats. It was founded in 2002 to address the need for an alternative scholarly, academic press attentive to emergent ideas and forms while maintaining the highest possible standards of quality, credibility, and…

  15. 7. VIEW OF HYDRAULIC HAMMER STAMPING PRESS ON SIDE A ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW OF HYDRAULIC HAMMER STAMPING PRESS ON SIDE A OF BUILDING 883. THIS TYPE OF PRESS WAS USED FOR BOTH STAINLESS STEEL AND FOR DEPLETED URANIUM. (7/2/86) - Rocky Flats Plant, Uranium Rolling & Forming Operations, Southeast section of plant, southeast quadrant of intersection of Central Avenue & Eighth Street, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  16. 6. VIEW OF THE BRIQUETTING PRESS AND CHIP CLEANING HOOD. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF THE BRIQUETTING PRESS AND CHIP CLEANING HOOD. SCRAPS OF ENRICHED URANIUM FROM MACHINING OPERATIONS WERE CLEANED IN A SOLVENT BATH, THEN PRESSED INTO BRIQUETTS. THE BRIQUETTS WERE USED AS FEED MATERIAL FOR THE FOUNDRY. (4/4/66) - Rocky Flats Plant, General Manufacturing, Support, Records-Central Computing, Southern portion of Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  17. Shape-Shifting Plastic

    SciTech Connect

    2015-05-20

    A new plastic developed by ORNL and Washington State University transforms from its original shape through a series of temporary shapes and returns to its initial form. The shape-shifting process is controlled through changes in temperature

  18. Modeling of planetesimal compaction by hot pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, W.; Breuer, D.; Spohn, T.

    2014-07-01

    Compaction of initially porous material prior to melting is an important process that has influenced the interior structure and the thermal evolution of planetesimals in their early history. On one hand, compaction decreases the porosity resulting in a reduction of the radius. On the other hand, the loss of porosity results in an increase of the thermal conductivity of the material and, thus, in a more efficient cooling. Porosity loss by hot pressing is the most efficient process of compaction in planetesimals and can be described by creep flow, which depends on temperature and stress. Hot pressing has been repeatedly modeled using a simplified approach, for which the porosity is gradually reduced in some fixed temperature interval between ~650 K and 700 K [see e.g. 1--3]. This approach neglects the dependence of compaction on stress. In the present study [see 4], we compare this ''parametrized'' method with a self-consistent calculation of porosity loss via a ''creep-related'' approach. We use our thermal evolution model from previous studies [5] to model compaction of an initially porous ordinary chondritic body and consider four basic packings of spherical dust grains (simple cubic, orthorhombic, rhombohedral, and body-centered cubic). Depending on the grain packing, we calculate the effective stress and the associated porosity change via the thermally activated creep flow. For comparison, compaction is also modeled by simply reducing the initial porosity linearly to zero between 650 and 700 K. Since we are interested in thermal metamorphism and not melting, we only consider bodies that experience a maximum temperature below the solidus temperature of the metal phase. For the creep related approach, the temperature interval in which compaction takes place depends strongly on the size of the planetesimal and is not fixed as assumed in the parametrized approach. Depending on the radius, the initial grain size, the activation energy, the initial porosity, and the

  19. Parallelization of Rocket Engine Simulator Software (PRESS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cezzar, Ruknet

    1997-01-01

    Parallelization of Rocket Engine System Software (PRESS) project is part of a collaborative effort with Southern University at Baton Rouge (SUBR), University of West Florida (UWF), and Jackson State University (JSU). The second-year funding, which supports two graduate students enrolled in our new Master's program in Computer Science at Hampton University and the principal investigator, have been obtained for the period from October 19, 1996 through October 18, 1997. The key part of the interim report was new directions for the second year funding. This came about from discussions during Rocket Engine Numeric Simulator (RENS) project meeting in Pensacola on January 17-18, 1997. At that time, a software agreement between Hampton University and NASA Lewis Research Center had already been concluded. That agreement concerns off-NASA-site experimentation with PUMPDES/TURBDES software. Before this agreement, during the first year of the project, another large-scale FORTRAN-based software, Two-Dimensional Kinetics (TDK), was being used for translation to an object-oriented language and parallelization experiments. However, that package proved to be too complex and lacking sufficient documentation for effective translation effort to the object-oriented C + + source code. The focus, this time with better documented and more manageable PUMPDES/TURBDES package, was still on translation to C + + with design improvements. At the RENS Meeting, however, the new impetus for the RENS projects in general, and PRESS in particular, has shifted in two important ways. One was closer alignment with the work on Numerical Propulsion System Simulator (NPSS) through cooperation and collaboration with LERC ACLU organization. The other was to see whether and how NASA's various rocket design software can be run over local and intra nets without any radical efforts for redesign and translation into object-oriented source code. There were also suggestions that the Fortran based code be

  20. Droplet-model predictions of charge moments

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, W.D.

    1982-04-01

    The Droplet Model expressions for calculating various moments of the nuclear charge distribution are given. There are contributions to the moments from the size and shape of the system, from the internal redistribution induced by the Coulomb repulsion, and from the diffuseness of the surface. A case is made for the use of diffuse charge distributions generated by convolution as an alternative to Fermi-functions.

  1. Spontaneous splitting of a quadruply charged vortex.

    PubMed

    Isoshima, T; Okano, M; Yasuda, H; Kasa, K; Huhtamäki, J A M; Kumakura, M; Takahashi, Y

    2007-11-16

    We studied the splitting instability of a quadruply charged vortex both experimentally and theoretically. The density defect, which is a signature of the vortex core, is experimentally observed to deform into a linear shape. The deformed defect is theoretically confirmed to be an array of four linearly aligned singly charged vortices. The array of vortices rotates and precesses simultaneously with different angular velocities. The initial state of the system is not rotationally symmetric, which enables spontaneous splitting without external perturbations. PMID:18233124

  2. Spontaneous Splitting of a Quadruply Charged Vortex

    SciTech Connect

    Isoshima, T.; Okano, M.; Yasuda, H.; Kasa, K.; Huhtamaeki, J. A. M.; Kumakura, M.; Takahashi, Y.

    2007-11-16

    We studied the splitting instability of a quadruply charged vortex both experimentally and theoretically. The density defect, which is a signature of the vortex core, is experimentally observed to deform into a linear shape. The deformed defect is theoretically confirmed to be an array of four linearly aligned singly charged vortices. The array of vortices rotates and precesses simultaneously with different angular velocities. The initial state of the system is not rotationally symmetric, which enables spontaneous splitting without external perturbations.

  3. Nuclear shapes: from earliest ideas to multiple shape coexisting structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyde, K.; Wood, J. L.

    2016-08-01

    The concept of the atomic nucleus being characterized by an intrinsic property such as shape came as a result of high precision hyperfine studies in the field of atomic physics, which indicated a non-spherical nuclear charge distribution. Herein, we describe the various steps taken through ingenious experimentation and bold theoretical suggestions that mapped the way for later work in the early 50s by Aage Bohr, Ben Mottelson and James Rainwater. We lay out a long and winding road that marked, in the period of 50s to 70s, the way shell-model and collective-model concepts were reconciled. A rapid increase in both accelerator and detection methods (70s towards the early 2000s) opened new vistas into nuclear shapes, and their coexistence, in various regions of the nuclear mass table. Next, we outline a possible unified view of nuclear shapes: emphasizing decisive steps taken as well as questions remaining, next to the theoretical efforts that could result in an emerging understanding of nuclear shapes, building on the nucleus considered as a strongly interacting system of nucleons as the microscopic starting point.

  4. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... The appearance of normal teeth varies, especially the molars. ... conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth ...

  5. STS-114: Discovery Post MMT Press Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Bruce Buckingham of NASA Public Affairs hosted this press conference. Wayne Hill, Space Shuttle Deputy Program Manager; John Muratore, Shuttle Systems and Integration Manager; Mike Wetmore, Director for Shuttle Processing were present. Wayne started with a video from Shuttle Logistics Depot showing details of a point sensor box commonly named the black box. Work with the trouble shooting continues on a day to day basis, no definite launching date is set. John reports that they are in a mission support mode all over the country until the sensor problem is solved. Mike reports his team will complete scrub and securing tasks through the next day, restore the facility to its normal mode, and will start to a four day process of getting back to launch once trouble shooting is completed. Tanking test, thermal environment, problem identification, engine cut-off sensor problems, sensors, risk, design reviews, test and analysis, correlation of the problem with Columbia, are some of the topics covered with the News media.

  6. Hot isostatic press waste option study report

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, N.E.; Taylor, D.D.

    1998-02-01

    A Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho mandates that all high-level radioactive waste now stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant be treated so that it is ready to move out of Idaho for disposal by the target date of 2035. This study investigates the immobilization of all Idaho Chemical Processing Plant calcine, including calcined sodium bearing waste, via the process known as hot isostatic press, which produces compact solid waste forms by means of high temperature and pressure (1,050 C and 20,000 psi), as the treatment method for complying with the settlement agreement. The final waste product would be contained in stainless-steel canisters, the same type used at the Savannah River Site for vitrified waste, and stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory until a national geological repository becomes available for its disposal. The waste processing period is from 2013 through 2032, and disposal at the High Level Waste repository will probably begin sometime after 2065.

  7. Rotary press utilizing a flexible die wall.

    PubMed

    Amidon, G E; Smith, D P; Hiestand, E N

    1981-06-01

    A die with a flexible wall was constructed and evaluated on a specially modified instrumented rotary tablet press. The design permits an inward deflection of the die wall by a side punch, which rolls past a side compression roll during compression-decompression. The side compression roll is instrumented to monitor the applied side compression roll forces. On decompression, return of the die wall to its original position permits release of residual die wall pressure. The decreased residual die wall pressure can decrease fracture and capping of tablets for problem formulations. The performance was tested on three experimental formulations. For these formulations, tablets made in a conventional die exhibited severe capping problems. However, most tablets compressed in the special die were superior. With proper adjustment of punch and die wall compression forces, excellent tablets could be manufactured. The merits of the special die and modified tablet machine are substantiated, although this initial design did not provide adequate die wall pressure for all formulations. Further engineering efforts could result in practical production equipment.

  8. Filter-pressing of alumina dispersions

    SciTech Connect

    Fries, R.; Rand, B.

    1996-06-01

    The filter-pressing characteristics of aqueous alumina dispersions containing either submicron or nano-sized particles have been compared with respect to ionic strength. The highest green densities for both systems were achieved at electrolyte concentrations < 0.01 mol dm{sup -3} where long-range repulsive interparticle forces stabilize the slips. A slight increase in density with ionic strength in this range was attributed to an increase in the ratio of particle radius-to-double layer thickness, Ka. At higher electrolyte concentrations, above the critical coagulation concentration, the green densities dropped to significantly lower values due to the onset of flocculation and the formation of open particle networks characterized by strong attraction which resisted rearrangement into a dense green microstructure. The green densities of the compacts consolidated from the submicron dispersions at ionic strength > 1 mol dm{sup -3} were significantly higher than those prepared close to the critical coagulation concentration although the slips exhibited properties typical for a flocculated structure. The results may indicate the presence of short-range repulsive forces at high salt concentration for the submicron slips not accounted for by the classical DLVO-theory. In order to characterize the early stages of filter-cake consolidation the initial cake permeability was determined from the compaction curves.

  9. [Gender and health in the daily press].

    PubMed

    Revuelta, Gemma; Alonso, Inma; Tomás, Sonia; Guerrero, Marcela; Rohlfs, Izabella

    2004-05-01

    To have a better understanding on the role of the press in the communication of gender and health issues, the content of the five most spread newspapers in Spain was studied (El País, ABC, El Mundo, La Vanguardia and El Periódico de Catalunya) for five years (1997-2001) and the electronic version of The New York Times of the period 1990-1999. An unequal distribution was observed in the responsibility as for the information related to three aspects: positions of responsibility in the newspapers (out of 71 main posts, 67 were men and 4 women); the authors of the articles on health issues (61.2% men and 38,8% women, among the articles that include the author) and the mentioned information sources (81.43% men and 17.77% women). Among the 120 health issues that were covered during the period of the study, only 20 explicitly mentioned a woman (16.67%). Those subjects that included more frequently explicit references were: ablation, iatrogenics, sterilization, sexual and reproductive health, incontinence, beauty and domestic violence. The analysis of the approach to these subjects helped to identify the stereotypes of gender inequality, in the language as well as in the approach.

  10. Plasmon Resonances of Nanoshells of Spheroidal Shape

    PubMed Central

    Norton, Stephen J.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2009-01-01

    Plasmon resonances are computed for nanoshells of prolate and oblate spheroidal shape. Both longitudinal and transverse resonances are investigated as a function of aspect ratio and shell thickness. Formulas for the surface charge density on the outside and inside shell surfaces are derived. PMID:23976876

  11. Quick spacecraft charging primer

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, Brian Arthur

    2014-03-12

    This is a presentation in PDF format which is a quick spacecraft charging primer, meant to be used for program training. It goes into detail about charging physics, RBSP examples, and how to identify charging.

  12. Manufacture of die casting dies by hot isostatic pressing. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, S.; Ren, W.; Luk, K.; Brucher, H.G.

    1998-09-01

    The reason for this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Doehler-Jarvis was to investigate the manufacture die-casting dies with internal water-cooling lines by hot-isostatic pressing (HIPing) of H13 tool steel powder. The use of HIPing will allow the near-net-shape manufacture of dies and the strategic placement of water-cooling lines during manufacture. The production of near-net-shape dies by HIPing involves the generation of HIPing diagrams, the design of the can that can be used for HIPing a die with complex details, strategic placement of water-cooling lines in the die, computer modeling to predict movement of the water lines during HIPing, and the development of strategies for placing water lines in the appropriate locations. The results presented include a literature review, particle analysis and characterization of H13 tool steel powder, and modeling of the HIPing process.

  13. Electrostatic charge bounds for ball lightning models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephan, Karl D.

    2008-03-01

    Several current theories concerning the nature of ball lightning predict a substantial electrostatic charge in order to account for its observed motion and shape (Turner 1998 Phys. Rep. 293 1; Abrahamson and Dinniss 2000 Nature 403 519). Using charged soap bubbles as a physical model for ball lightning, we show that the magnitude of charge predicted by some of these theories is too high to allow for the types of motion commonly observed in natural ball lightning, which includes horizontal motion above the ground and movement near grounded conductors. Experiments show that at charge levels of only 10-15 nC, 3-cm-diameter soap bubbles tend to be attracted by induced charges to the nearest grounded conductor and rupture. We conclude with a scaling rule that can be used to extrapolate these results to larger objects and surroundings.

  14. Shape memory polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Thomas S.; Bearinger, Jane P.

    2015-06-09

    New shape memory polymer compositions, methods for synthesizing new shape memory polymers, and apparatus comprising an actuator and a shape memory polymer wherein the shape memory polymer comprises at least a portion of the actuator. A shape memory polymer comprising a polymer composition which physically forms a network structure wherein the polymer composition has shape-memory behavior and can be formed into a permanent primary shape, re-formed into a stable secondary shape, and controllably actuated to recover the permanent primary shape. Polymers have optimal aliphatic network structures due to minimization of dangling chains by using monomers that are symmetrical and that have matching amine and hydroxyl groups providing polymers and polymer foams with clarity, tight (narrow temperature range) single transitions, and high shape recovery and recovery force that are especially useful for implanting in the human body.

  15. 57. ORIGINAL TILE PRESS AND EXPERIMENTAL DENTAL KILN, SECOND FLOOR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    57. ORIGINAL TILE PRESS AND EXPERIMENTAL DENTAL KILN, SECOND FLOOR, NORTH WING, HENRY MERCER USED THE KILN FOR HIS EARLIEST GLAZE TESTS. THE PRESS WAS DESIGNED TO BE USED WITH METAL CASED MOLDS. SINCE ONLY THE EARLIEST TILE DESIGNS ARE IN METAL CASES. THIS TECHNIQUE WAS PROBABLY DISCONTINUED. THIS PRESS WAS, THEREFORE, PROBABLY NOT USED EXTENSIVELY AT THIS SITE. THE UPPER PART OF GLAZE KILN No. 2 IS AT THE LEFT REAR. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  16. Pyrometry in the Multianvil Press: New approach for temperature measurement in large volume press experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanehira, T.; Wang, Y.; Prakapenka, V.; Rivers, M. L.

    2008-12-01

    Temperature measurement in large volume press experiments has been based on thermocouple emf, which has well known problems: unknown pressure dependence of emf [e.g., 1], chemical reaction between thermocouple and other materials, deformation related texture development in the thermocouple wires [2], and so on. Thus, different techniques to measure temperatures in large volume press experiments other than thermocouples are required to measure accurate temperatures under high pressures. Here we report a new development using pyrometry in the multianvil press, where temperatures are derived on the basis of spectral radiometry. Several high pressure runs were conducted using the 1000 ton press with a DIA module installed at 13 ID-D GSECARS beamline at Advanced Photon Source (APS) [3]. The cubic pressure medium, 14 mm edge length, was made of soft-fired pyrophyllite with a graphite furnace. A moissanite (SiC) single crystal was built inside the pressure medium as a window for the thermal emission signal to go through. An MgO disk with 1.0 mm thickness was inserted in a gap between the top of the SiC crystal and thermocouple hot junction. The bottom of the window crystal was in direct contact with the tip of the anvil, which had a 1.5 mm diameter hole drilled all the way through the anvil axis. An optical fiber was inserted in this hole and the open end of fiber was in contact with the SiC crystal. Thermal spectral radiance from the inner cell assembly was obtained via the fiber and recorded by an Ocean Optics HP2000 spectrometer. The system response of spectrometer was calibrated by a tungsten ribbon ramp (OL550S, Optronic Laboratories, Inc.) with standard of spectral radiance. The cell assembly was compressed up to target value of 15 tons and then temperature was increased up to 1573 K. Radiation spectra were mainly obtained above 873 K and typical integration time was 1 ms or 10 ms. Data collection was done in the process of increase and decrease of temperature. In

  17. Investigation on penetration model of shaped charge jet in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jinwei; Luo, Xingbai; Li, Jinming; Jiang, Jianwei

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the process of jet penetration in water medium quantitatively, the properties of jet penetration spaced target with water interlayer were studied through test and numerical simulation. Two theoretical models of jet penetration in water were proposed. The theoretical model 1 was established considering the impact of the shock wave, combined with the shock equation Rankine-Hugoniot and the virtual origin calculation method. The theoretical model 2 was obtained by fitting theoretical analysis and numerical simulation results. The effectiveness and universality of the two theoretical models were compared through the numerical simulation results. Both the models can reflect the relationship between the penetration velocity and the penetration distance in water well, and both the deviation and stability of theoretical model 1 are better than 2, the lower penetration velocity, and the larger deviation of the theoretical model 2. Therefore, the theoretical model 1 can reflect the properties of jet penetration in water effectively, and provide the reference of model simulation and theoretical research.

  18. Floating liquid bridge charge dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teschke, Omar; Soares, David Mendez; Gomes, Whyllerson Evaristo; Valente Filho, Juracyr Ferraz

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of liquid with electric fields is investigated in a configuration where up to 13 kV are applied between electrodes resulting in a 106 V/m electric field in the capillaries and where there is the formation of a free-standing fluid bridge in the interelectrode gap. The Mott-Gurney equation was fitted to the measured ionization current vs applied voltage curve which indicates that the ionization rate at the high-voltage anode electrode dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) interface and space charging in the interelectrode gap determine the floating liquid bridge current for a given cathode-to-anode voltage. Space charge effects were measured in the cathode becker and also at the liquid bridge since the ionized charges at the anode migrate to the bridge outer surface and decrease the interfacial tension from 43 mJ/m2 to 29 mJ/m2. Two distinct structural regions then form the bridge, a charged plastic (bulk modulus ˜100 MPa) conducting outer layer with a surface conductivity of ˜10-9 Ω-1, which shapes and supports the floating fluid structure, and an inner liquid cylinder, where DMSO molecules flow.

  19. 5. Interior, second floor. Pressed metal ceiling, and wooden floors ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Interior, second floor. Pressed metal ceiling, and wooden floors visible. Overhead light source toward rear of building indicates location of skylight. - 25-27 East Hanover Street (Commercial Building), 25-27 East Hanover Street, Trenton, Mercer County, NJ

  20. Renovation of the hot press in the Plutonium Experimental Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Congdon, J.W.; Nelson, G.H.

    1990-03-05

    The Plutonium Experimental Facility (PEF) will be used to develop a new fuel pellet fabrication process and to evaluate equipment upgrades. The facility was used from 1978 until 1982 to optimize the parameters for fuel pellet production using a process which was developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The PEF was shutdown and essentially abandoned until mid-1987 when the facility renovations were initiated by the Actinide Technology Section (ATS) of SRL. A major portion of the renovation work was related to the restart of the hot press system. This report describes the renovations and modifications which were required to restart the PEF hot press. The primary purpose of documenting this work is to help provide a basis for Separations to determine the best method of renovating the hot press in the Plutonium Fuel Fabrication (PuFF) facility. This report also includes several SRL recommendations concerning the renovation and modification of the PuFF hot press. 4 refs.

  1. Hot isostatic pressing of ceramic waste from spent nuclear fuel.

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, K.J.; Rigg, R.H.; Wiest, J.D.

    2002-03-08

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed a process to immobilize waste salt containing fission products, uranium, and transuranic elements as chlorides in a glass-bonded ceramic waste form. This salt was generated in the electrorefining operation used in electrometallurgical treatment of spent Experimental Breeder Reactor-II fuel. The ceramic waste process culminated with a hot isostatic pressing operation. This paper reviews the installation and operation of a hot isostatic press in a radioactive environment. Processing conditions for the hot isostatic press are presented for non-irradiated material and irradiated material. Sufficient testing was performed to demonstrate that a hot isostatic press could be used as the final step of the processing of ceramic waste for the electrometallurgical spent fuel treatment process.

  2. Study of pressing machine pressure relief characteristics based on AMESim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chuanli; Zhang, Hui; Yu, Caofeng; Wu, Xiaolei

    2016-01-01

    When a working cylinder of the pressing machine working cylinder was stuck and underwent retracted conversion, pressure shock was high in working cylinder cavity and flow pulsation was distinct in the pipeline due to the high working pressure and frequent retracted transformation of the working cylinder, which not only shortened the service life of the pressing machine, but also exerted serious impacts on the machining precision and quality, especially after the pressing machine applied loads and high-pressure oil in work rod end cavity of working cylinder needed to be relieved in a short time. In order to research and analyze the better pressure relief characteristics of the two types of pressure relief circuits of the pressing machine, the paper established models, carried out simulation and analysis and then made contrastive analysis of the working cylinder rod velocity, rod acceleration and port pressure pulsation according to the simulation results.

  3. 13. RADIAL DRILL, ENGINE LATHE, DRILL PRESS, AND GRINDER (L ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. RADIAL DRILL, ENGINE LATHE, DRILL PRESS, AND GRINDER (L TO R)-LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - W. A. Young & Sons Foundry & Machine Shop, On Water Street along Monongahela River, Rices Landing, Greene County, PA

  4. INTERIOR VIEW WITH CARLTON RADIAL ARM DRILL PRESS (THE CARLTON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW WITH CARLTON RADIAL ARM DRILL PRESS (THE CARLTON MACHINE TOOL CO., CINCINNATI, OHIO) WITH MACHINE OPERATOR, EDDIE BURTTRAM. - O'Neal Steel, Incorporated, Fabrication Shop, 744 Forty-first Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  5. Drill press in foreground is one of few machine tools ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Drill press in foreground is one of few machine tools in operating condition which is still operated occasionally for public demonstrations. - Thomas A. Edison Laboratories, Building No. 5, Main Street & Lakeside Avenue, West Orange, Essex County, NJ

  6. 5. FOURTH FLOOR, HOTEL SOAP LINES TO NORTHWEST: PRESS (LEFT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. FOURTH FLOOR, HOTEL SOAP LINES TO NORTHWEST: PRESS (LEFT CENTER), MANUAL CUTTERS (CENTER, RIGHT CENTER) - Colgate & Company Jersey City Plant, Building No. B-15, 90-96 Greene Street, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  7. AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SHOP, DETAIL OF FABRICATING PRESS IN EAST END ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SHOP, DETAIL OF FABRICATING PRESS IN EAST END OF MAIN WING, WITH SCALE. - Cedar City Automotive Repair Shop, Automotive Repair Shop, 820 North Main Street, Cedar City, Iron County, UT

  8. 2ND FLOOR HALLWAY LOOKING EAST, NOTE PRESSED TIN CEILING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2ND FLOOR HALLWAY LOOKING EAST, NOTE PRESSED TIN CEILING - New York State Soldiers & Sailors Home, Building No. 29, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 76 Veterans Avenue, Bath, Steuben County, NY

  9. 8. Second floor front apartment showing ornately painted pressed metal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Second floor front apartment showing ornately painted pressed metal ceiling, as well as modern partitions and wall treatments. View looking north. - Franklin Grocery Company Building, 1 South Main Street, Franklin, Merrimack County, NH

  10. Differential Suppression by Punishment of Nonconsummatory Licking and Lever Pressing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Gary C.; Herring, Barbara

    1978-01-01

    Five experiments investigated the differential effects of shock punishment on nonconsummatory licking (dry licking) and lever pressing. Results support a motivationally based theory of punishment involving the role of incentive stimuli associated with the particular responses studied. (Editor/RK)

  11. 10. INTERIOR VIEW OF EYE PRESS AREA, SAME AS ABOVE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. INTERIOR VIEW OF EYE PRESS AREA, SAME AS ABOVE WITH MEN AT WORK: CRAIG TSCHAPPAT, HEATER; JEFF MILLER, OPERATOR; JOHN TOTH, SAWMAN - Warwood Tool Company, Foot of Nineteenth Street, Wheeling, Ohio County, WV

  12. Looking north into oing press of the saw line in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking north into o-ing press of the saw line in bay 7 of the main pipe mill building. - U.S. Steel National Tube Works, Main Pipe Mill Building, Along Monongahela River, McKeesport, Allegheny County, PA

  13. Oing press of the saw line in bay 7 of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    O-ing press of the saw line in bay 7 of the main pipe mill building looking northeast. - U.S. Steel National Tube Works, Main Pipe Mill Building, Along Monongahela River, McKeesport, Allegheny County, PA

  14. VIEW OF INTERIOR SPACE WITH HUFFORD BULLDOZIER FORMING PRESS IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF INTERIOR SPACE WITH HUFFORD BULLDOZIER FORMING PRESS IN FOREGROUND, FACING NORTHWEST. - Douglas Aircraft Company Long Beach Plant, Aircraft Parts Shipping & Receiving Building, 3855 Lakewood Boulevard, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  15. Grain refinement of aluminum using equal-channel angular pressing

    SciTech Connect

    Horita, Z.; Furukawa, M.; Nemoto, M.; Langdon, T.G.

    2000-07-01

    Using the technique of equal-channel angular (ECA) pressing, it is possible to reduce the grain size of polycrystalline materials to the submicrometer level. Thus, this processing technique has the potential for producing materials which may exhibit superplasticity. This paper describes various factors affecting the development and evolution of the microstructure produced by ECA pressing. Optimization of such factors is then presented for the advent of superplasticity.

  16. Gemini 10 prime crew during post flight press conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    At podium during Gemini 10 press conference are (l-r) Dr. Robert C. Seamans, Astronauts John Young and Michael Collins and Dr. Robert R. Gilruth (39895); Wide angle view of the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) News Center during the Gemini 10 prime crew post flight press conference (38786); Astronaut Young draws diagram on chalk board of tethered extravehicular activity accomplished during Gemini 10 flight (39897).

  17. Low-loss binder for hot pressing boron nitride

    DOEpatents

    Maya, Leon

    1991-01-01

    Borazine derivatives used as low-loss binders and precursors for making ceramic boron nitride structures. The derivative forms the same composition as the boron nitride starting material, thereby filling the voids with the same boron nitride material upon forming and hot pressing. The derivatives have a further advantage of being low in carbon thus resulting in less volatile byproduct that can result in bubble formation during pressing.

  18. 55. QUARRY TILE CUTTERS, SECOND FLOOR, NORTH WING. WORKERS PRESSED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    55. QUARRY TILE CUTTERS, SECOND FLOOR, NORTH WING. WORKERS PRESSED THE CUTTERS INTO SLABS OF CLAY, LIFTED THEM ONTO DRYING BOARDS AND PRESSED THE PLUNGERS TO RELEASE THE CUT TILES. REPRODUCTIONS CUTTERS ARE NOT USED IN PRODUCTION. WOODEN FORMS FOR PRODUCING CLAY SLABS WITH ROLLING PINS REST AGAINST THE WALL. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  19. Bending strength studies on hot-pressed silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kriegesmann, J.

    1984-01-01

    The 4-point bending strength of 4 grades of hot-pressed SiC was determined at different temperatures. With a transgranular mode of fracture the values for bending strength are retained up to high temperatures. For intergranular fracture the decrease of strength is governed by subcritical crack growth. The intergranular fracture is caused by a high content of silicate glassy phase at the grain boundaries of hot-pressed SiC.

  20. Method for vacuum pressing electrochemical cell components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Craig C. (Inventor); Murphy, Oliver J. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Assembling electrochemical cell components using a bonding agent comprising aligning components of the electrochemical cell, applying a bonding agent between the components to bond the components together, placing the components within a container that is essentially a pliable bag, and drawing a vacuum within the bag, wherein the bag conforms to the shape of the components from the pressure outside the bag, thereby holding the components securely in place. The vacuum is passively maintained until the adhesive has cured and the components are securely bonded. The bonding agent used to bond the components of the electrochemical cell may be distributed to the bonding surface from distribution channels in the components. To prevent contamination with bonding agent, some areas may be treated to produce regions of preferred adhesive distribution and protected regions. Treatments may include polishing, etching, coating and providing protective grooves between the bonding surfaces and the protected regions.

  1. Sensationalism or sensitivity: use of words in stories on acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) by Associated Press Videotext.

    PubMed

    Drushel, B E

    1991-01-01

    Although it appeared initially reluctant to cover the story at all, the mainstream press in the United States has supplied almost daily reports on AIDS since the mid-1980s. The author examined four weeks of stories on the Associated Press Videotext service in early 1986 in an effort to evaluate the validity of critics' charges that journalists were over-emphasizing the role of homosexuals in the progress of the disease, and that their stories were laden with negative or sensationalistic terms. The author found little evidence from the words used in the stories of distortion in telling the AIDS story, but speculated that such distortion might be found in selection, editing, and presentation decisions made by gatekeepers. PMID:1856471

  2. Head-Tail Modes for Strong Space Charge

    SciTech Connect

    Burov, Alexey

    2008-12-01

    Head-tail modes are described here for the space charge tune shift significantly exceeding the synchrotron tune. General equation for the modes is derived. Spatial shapes of the modes, their frequencies, and coherent growth rates are explored. The Landau damping rates are also found. Suppression of the transverse mode coupling instability by the space charge is explained.

  3. Shape Optimization for Trailing Edge Noise Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsden, Alison; Wang, Meng; Mohammadi, Bijan; Moin, Parviz

    2001-11-01

    Noise generated by turbulent boundary layers near the trailing edge of lifting surfaces continues to pose a challenge for many applications. In this study, we explore noise reduction strategies through shape optimization. A gradient based shape design method is formulated and implemented for use with large eddy simulation of the flow over an airfoil. The cost function gradient is calculated using the method of incomplete sensitivities (Mohammadi and Pironneau 2001 ph Applied shape Optimization for Fluids, Oxford Univ. Press). This method has the advantage that effects of geometry changes on the flow field can be neglected when computing the gradient of the cost function, making it far more cost effective than solving the full adjoint problem. Validation studies are presented for a model problem of the unsteady laminar flow over an acoustically compact airfoil. A section of the surface is allowed to deform and the cost function is derived based on aeroacoustic theroy. Rapid convergence of the trailing-edge shape and significant reduction of the noise due to vortex shedding and wake instability have been achieved. The addition of constraints and issues of extension to fully turbulent flows past an acoustically noncompact airfoil are also discussed.

  4. Fragment oriented molecular shapes.

    PubMed

    Hain, Ethan; Camacho, Carlos J; Koes, David Ryan

    2016-05-01

    Molecular shape is an important concept in drug design and virtual screening. Shape similarity typically uses either alignment methods, which dynamically optimize molecular poses with respect to the query molecular shape, or feature vector methods, which are computationally less demanding but less accurate. The computational cost of alignment can be reduced by pre-aligning shapes, as is done with the Volumetric-Aligned Molecular Shapes (VAMS) method. Here, we introduce and evaluate fragment oriented molecular shapes (FOMS), where shapes are aligned based on molecular fragments. FOMS enables the use of shape constraints, a novel method for precisely specifying molecular shape queries that provides the ability to perform partial shape matching and supports search algorithms that function on an interactive time scale. When evaluated using the challenging Maximum Unbiased Validation dataset, shape constraints were able to extract significantly enriched subsets of compounds for the majority of targets, and FOMS matched or exceeded the performance of both VAMS and an optimizing alignment method of shape similarity search. PMID:27085751

  5. The Shape of Thought

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markson, Lori; Diesendruck, Gil; Bloom, Paul

    2008-01-01

    When children learn the name of a novel object, they tend to extend that name to other objects similar in shape--a phenomenon referred to as the shape bias. Does the shape bias stem from learned associations between names and categories of objects, or does it derive from more general properties of children's understanding of language and the…

  6. The Hue of Shapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albertazzi, Liliana; Da Pos, Osvaldo; Canal, Luisa; Micciolo, Rocco; Malfatti, Michela; Vescovi, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    This article presents an experimental study on the naturally biased association between shape and color. For each basic geometric shape studied, participants were asked to indicate the color perceived as most closely related to it, choosing from the Natural Color System Hue Circle. Results show that the choices of color for each shape were not…

  7. Improving outpatient charge capture.

    PubMed

    Gautschi, Daniel; Sanderson, Brian

    2014-10-01

    Hospitals can identify opportunities to enhance revenue collection by closely analyzing outpatient charge-capture data. A hospital can bolster its charge-capture analysis by performing a charge-capture process walk-through and scrutinizing subsystem links, third-party payer contracts, and electronic health record structures. The hospital then can integrate charge-integrity functions into clinical departments as needed by developing charge-reconciliation tools and reports and monitoring their utilization, and incorporating charge-reconciliation responsibilities into clinical department managers' job descriptions and goals. PMID:25647902

  8. The Shape of Io from Galileo Limb Measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, P.C.; Davies, M.E.; Colvin, T.R.; Oberst, J.; Schuster, P.; Neukum, G.; Carr, M.H.; McEwen, A.; Schubert, G.; Belton, M.J.S.

    1998-01-01

    Galileo CCD images of the limb of Io provide improved data for determining the shape of this synchronously rotating satellite. The best ellipsoidal fit is within 0.3 km of the best equilibrium fit of 1829.7, 1819.2, 1815.8 km. The shape is consistent with substantial mass concentration in a core and with gravity measurements from tracking of the Galileo spacecraft. The surface of Io is largely plains and isolated peaks, with little long-wavelength topography over 1 km in amplitude. ?? 1998 Academic Press.

  9. COSMIC DUST AGGREGATION WITH STOCHASTIC CHARGING

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Lorin S.; Hyde, Truell W.; Shotorban, Babak

    2013-10-20

    The coagulation of cosmic dust grains is a fundamental process which takes place in astrophysical environments, such as presolar nebulae and circumstellar and protoplanetary disks. Cosmic dust grains can become charged through interaction with their plasma environment or other processes, and the resultant electrostatic force between dust grains can strongly affect their coagulation rate. Since ions and electrons are collected on the surface of the dust grain at random time intervals, the electrical charge of a dust grain experiences stochastic fluctuations. In this study, a set of stochastic differential equations is developed to model these fluctuations over the surface of an irregularly shaped aggregate. Then, employing the data produced, the influence of the charge fluctuations on the coagulation process and the physical characteristics of the aggregates formed is examined. It is shown that dust with small charges (due to the small size of the dust grains or a tenuous plasma environment) is affected most strongly.

  10. Linear decay of charge in electrets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Małecki, J. A.

    1999-04-01

    The processes leading to very long lifetimes of implanted electric charge are discussed. A model assuming a competition between the rate of current carrier generation in activation processes, and the rate of carrier annihilation on electrodes and by free, implanted charge was considered. The discussed processes lead to a very pronounced decrease in electric conductivity, and in consequence to long lifetimes of implanted charge, in agreement with experimental data. The important feature of our model is that exponential decay of charge takes place only for short times-hours or days for polymers. For the longer periods-hundreds or thousands of years in the case of Teflon films-a linear decay is predicted. The importance of the shape of a dielectric plate and the unusual stability of thin electrets are also discussed.

  11. Local Solid Shape

    PubMed Central

    Koenderink, Jan; van Doorn, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Local solid shape applies to the surface curvature of small surface patches—essentially regions of approximately constant curvatures—of volumetric objects that are smooth volumetric regions in Euclidean 3-space. This should be distinguished from local shape in pictorial space. The difference is categorical. Although local solid shape has naturally been explored in haptics, results in vision are not forthcoming. We describe a simple experiment in which observers judge shape quality and magnitude of cinematographic presentations. Without prior training, observers readily use continuous shape index and Casorati curvature scales with reasonable resolution. PMID:27648217

  12. Local Solid Shape

    PubMed Central

    Koenderink, Jan; van Doorn, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Local solid shape applies to the surface curvature of small surface patches—essentially regions of approximately constant curvatures—of volumetric objects that are smooth volumetric regions in Euclidean 3-space. This should be distinguished from local shape in pictorial space. The difference is categorical. Although local solid shape has naturally been explored in haptics, results in vision are not forthcoming. We describe a simple experiment in which observers judge shape quality and magnitude of cinematographic presentations. Without prior training, observers readily use continuous shape index and Casorati curvature scales with reasonable resolution.

  13. Local Solid Shape.

    PubMed

    Koenderink, Jan; van Doorn, Andrea; Wagemans, Johan

    2015-10-01

    Local solid shape applies to the surface curvature of small surface patches-essentially regions of approximately constant curvatures-of volumetric objects that are smooth volumetric regions in Euclidean 3-space. This should be distinguished from local shape in pictorial space. The difference is categorical. Although local solid shape has naturally been explored in haptics, results in vision are not forthcoming. We describe a simple experiment in which observers judge shape quality and magnitude of cinematographic presentations. Without prior training, observers readily use continuous shape index and Casorati curvature scales with reasonable resolution. PMID:27648217

  14. 22 CFR 9b.3 - Press correspondents employed by foreign media organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Press correspondents employed by foreign media... OF STATE PRESS BUILDING PASSES § 9b.3 Press correspondents employed by foreign media organizations... media organizations must: (a) Present to the Office of Press Relations, Department of State,...

  15. 22 CFR 9b.3 - Press correspondents employed by foreign media organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Press correspondents employed by foreign media... OF STATE PRESS BUILDING PASSES § 9b.3 Press correspondents employed by foreign media organizations... media organizations must: (a) Present to the Office of Press Relations, Department of State,...

  16. 22 CFR 9b.3 - Press correspondents employed by foreign media organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Press correspondents employed by foreign media... OF STATE PRESS BUILDING PASSES § 9b.3 Press correspondents employed by foreign media organizations... media organizations must: (a) Present to the Office of Press Relations, Department of State,...

  17. 22 CFR 9b.3 - Press correspondents employed by foreign media organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Press correspondents employed by foreign media... OF STATE PRESS BUILDING PASSES § 9b.3 Press correspondents employed by foreign media organizations... media organizations must: (a) Present to the Office of Press Relations, Department of State,...

  18. 22 CFR 9b.3 - Press correspondents employed by foreign media organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Press correspondents employed by foreign media... OF STATE PRESS BUILDING PASSES § 9b.3 Press correspondents employed by foreign media organizations... media organizations must: (a) Present to the Office of Press Relations, Department of State,...

  19. An Update of Freedom of the Press and Information in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrison, Bruce; Munoz, Julio E.

    This paper is based on a review of the literature that included reports from the Inter-American Press Association's general assembly in Los Angeles in October 1984, the mid-year meeting of the Inter-American Press Association in Panama City in March 1985, and the 1983 world press freedom review of the International Press Institute. Other material…

  20. Evaluation of a sheathed permissible explosive charge for open shooting in flammable atmospheres: Adobe charge program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainiero, R. J.; Hay, J. E.

    1982-04-01

    A prototype nonincendive explosive rock-breaker charge that can be fired unconfined in underground bituminous coal mines without the danger of igniting a flammable atmosphere that might be present is described. At present, unconfined shooting in underground coal mines is prohibited, but there are situations where the use of such shots would yield an overall improvement in safety. The charge consists of 1-1/2 lb of permissible water gel explosive in the form of a short cylinder 7 inches in diameter and 7/8 inches high, surrounded by a 1/2-inch-thick layer of damp salt, and encased in latex rubber reinforced with cheese cloth. The latex rubber housing provides a charge package that is strong enough to resist rough handling yet is pliable enough to conform to an irregular stone surface. A charge of this shape was found to be more effective at breaking rock than charges with lined or unlined cavities.

  1. Alternative Regression Equations for Estimation of Annual Peak-Streamflow Frequency for Undeveloped Watersheds in Texas using PRESS Minimization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asquith, William H.; Thompson, David B.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Texas Department of Transportation and in partnership with Texas Tech University, investigated a refinement of the regional regression method and developed alternative equations for estimation of peak-streamflow frequency for undeveloped watersheds in Texas. A common model for estimation of peak-streamflow frequency is based on the regional regression method. The current (2008) regional regression equations for 11 regions of Texas are based on log10 transformations of all regression variables (drainage area, main-channel slope, and watershed shape). Exclusive use of log10-transformation does not fully linearize the relations between the variables. As a result, some systematic bias remains in the current equations. The bias results in overestimation of peak streamflow for both the smallest and largest watersheds. The bias increases with increasing recurrence interval. The primary source of the bias is the discernible curvilinear relation in log10 space between peak streamflow and drainage area. Bias is demonstrated by selected residual plots with superimposed LOWESS trend lines. To address the bias, a statistical framework based on minimization of the PRESS statistic through power transformation of drainage area is described and implemented, and the resulting regression equations are reported. Compared to log10-exclusive equations, the equations derived from PRESS minimization have PRESS statistics and residual standard errors less than the log10 exclusive equations. Selected residual plots for the PRESS-minimized equations are presented to demonstrate that systematic bias in regional regression equations for peak-streamflow frequency estimation in Texas can be reduced. Because the overall error is similar to the error associated with previous equations and because the bias is reduced, the PRESS-minimized equations reported here provide alternative equations for peak-streamflow frequency estimation.

  2. Charge regulation circuit

    DOEpatents

    Ball, Don G.

    1992-01-01

    A charge regulation circuit provides regulation of an unregulated voltage supply in the range of 0.01%. The charge regulation circuit is utilized in a preferred embodiment in providing regulated voltage for controlling the operation of a laser.

  3. General shape optimization capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chargin, Mladen K.; Raasch, Ingo; Bruns, Rudolf; Deuermeyer, Dawson

    1991-01-01

    A method is described for calculating shape sensitivities, within MSC/NASTRAN, in a simple manner without resort to external programs. The method uses natural design variables to define the shape changes in a given structure. Once the shape sensitivities are obtained, the shape optimization process is carried out in a manner similar to property optimization processes. The capability of this method is illustrated by two examples: the shape optimization of a cantilever beam with holes, loaded by a point load at the free end (with the shape of the holes and the thickness of the beam selected as the design variables), and the shape optimization of a connecting rod subjected to several different loading and boundary conditions.

  4. Bilberry and bilberry press cake as sources of dietary fibre

    PubMed Central

    Aura, Anna-Marja; Holopainen-Mantila, Ulla; Sibakov, Juhani; Kössö, Tuija; Mokkila, Mirja; Kaisa, Poutanen

    2015-01-01

    Background Dietary recommendations for Nordic countries urge the use of plant foods as a basis for healthy nutrition. Currently, the level of dietary fibre (DF) intake is not adequate. Berries are an elementary part of the recommended Nordic healthy diet and could be consumed in higher amounts. Materials and methods Finnish bilberries and a bilberry press cake from juice processing were studied for DF content, carbohydrate composition, and non-carbohydrate fibre content, which was analysed as sulphuric acid insoluble and soluble material. The microstructure of all samples was also studied using light microscopy and toluidine blue O, calcofluor, and acid fuchsin staining. Results The total DF contents of fresh and freeze-dried bilberries and the press cake were 3.0, 24.1, and 58.9%, respectively. Most of the DF was insoluble. Only about half of it was carbohydrate, the rest being mostly sulphuric acid–insoluble material, waxy cutin from skins, and resilient seeds. Bilberry seeds represented over half of the press cake fraction, and in addition to skin, they were the major DF sources. Microscopy revealed that skins in the press cake were intact and the surface of the seeds had thick-walled cells. Conclusions Bilberry press cake is thus a good source of insoluble non-carbohydrate DF, and could be used to provide DF-rich foods to contribute to versatile intake of DF. PMID:26652738

  5. A Study on the Specifications of Cold Pressed Colza Oil.

    PubMed

    Yazdani-Nasab, Zahra; Piravi-Vanak, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Cold pressed oil extraction is the preferred method for seeds with high contents of oil, such as colza. Generally speaking, expeller pressing is less complex, more cost efficient and safer than solvent extraction. Moreover, cold pressed oils retain their natural properties better. Cold pressed colza oil has been found to have numerous health benefits. This was an original and unique study conducted as part of the research for the international Codex standard for cold pressed fats and oils, and aims to examine the chemical properties of two varieties of Iranian colza seed, Hyola and Okapi. The studied factors included (a) chemical properties, and (b) physicochemical and quality characteristics. Based on our findings, both varieties of colza seeds in this study had satisfactory levels of oleic and linoleic acid, and no trans-fatty acids. Although both samples had good nutritional properties, the Hyola variety was higher in oleic acid, indicating better oxidative stability. Due to the considerable amounts of β-sitosterol in both varieties, they may be effective in reducing cholesterol and preventing cancer.

  6. Quality parameters for cold pressed edible argan oils.

    PubMed

    Matthäus, Bertrand

    2013-01-01

    Argan oil belongs to the high-price vegetable oils on the market. Therefore, consumers have the right to purchase a high-quality product. The quality of edible vegetable oils is defined in food standards in which sensory quality is the most important feature. Additional parameters are defined to assess the identity of oils or to evaluate their oxidative state. The sensory quality of cold pressed argan oil is altered if the production has not been performed with reasonable care regarding raw material and extraction. Only oil from roasted seeds extracted by a screw-press had a sufficient sensory quality over a period of 20 weeks without unacceptable sensory attributes. Under accelerated storage conditions oil from roasted seeds extracted by a screw-press remained below the limits given by the Codex Alimentarius or the German guideline for Edible Fats and Oils for peroxide and totox value. Oil from unroasted seeds or oil from goat-digested roasted seeds and extracted by a screw-press, as well as oil from roasted seeds traditionally extracted, exceeded these limits. Initial oxidative stability of oil from unroasted seeds was significantly lower than that of the other oils. After 35 days under accelerated storage, oil from roasted seeds obtained using a screw-press showed the highest oxidative stability. Moreover, tocopherol and phytosterol compositions are useful features of argan oil.

  7. Charge Exchange with Highly Charged Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glick, Jeremy; Ferri, Kevin; Schmitt, Jaclyn; Hanson, Joshua; Marler, Joan

    2016-05-01

    A detailed study of the physics of highly charged ions (HCIs) is critical for a deep understanding of observed phenomena resulting from interactions of HCIs with neutral atoms in astrophysical and fusion environments. Specifically the charge transfer rates and spectroscopy of the subsequent decay fluorescence are of great interest to these communities. Results from a laboratory based investigation of these rates will be presented. The experiment takes advantage of an energy and charge state selected beam of HCIs from the recently on-line Clemson University EBIT (CUEBIT). Progress towards an experimental apparatus for retrapping HCIs towards precision spectroscopy of HCIs will also be presented.

  8. Conformation of charged vesicles: the Debye Huckel and the low curvature limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Kumari Priti; Thaokar, Rochish M., , Prof.

    The shape as well as tension and pressure inside an uncharged vesicle are determined by the reduced volume. These parameters are important for a vesicle or a biological cell, since it can affect bio-physical processes such as osmosis and permeation, interaction with external agents such as bio- macromolecules and thermal fluctuations of the bilayer membrane of a vesicle. Charged membranes are ubiquitous in nature, most biological cell bio-membranes are charged, and therefore the knowledge of shape, tension and pressure of charged vesicles is critical. Additionally, the distribution of charges in the inner and outer leaflets is also important as it can affect the spatial interaction of a bilayer membrane with proteins. This work addresses these issues in the low charge and curvature limit. Our analysis indicates that despite a very strong two-way coupling between the charge and the curvature, the shapes of charged vesicles remain similar to that of uncharged vesicles at comparable reduced volumes, even for reasonable values of total charge. However, the tension and pressure values are higher, and are accurately estimated. Similarly the charge distribution on the outer and inner leaflet is strongly affected by the curvature. The value of spontaneous curvature due to charge redistribution is estimated. The insensitivity of the shape to charges persists even when only the outer leaflet is charged instead of charged inner and outer leaflets

  9. Conformation of charged vesicles: the Debye-Hückel and the low-curvature limit.

    PubMed

    Priti Sinha, Kumari; M Thaokar, Rochish

    2016-07-01

    The shape as well as tension and pressure inside an uncharged vesicle are understood to be determined by the reduced volume of a vesicle. These parameters are important for a vesicle or a biological cell, since they can affect bio-physical processes such as osmosis and permeation, interaction with external agents such as bio-macromolecules as well as thermal fluctuations in a bilayer membrane of a vesicle. Charged membranes are ubiquitous in nature, most biological cell bio-membranes are charged, and therefore the knowledge of shape, tension and pressure of charged vesicles is critical. Additionally, the distribution of charges in the inner and outer leaflets is also important as it can affect the spatial interaction of a bilayer membrane with proteins and other micro and macromolecular species. This work addresses these issues in the low-charge and low-curvature limit. Our analysis indicates that despite a very strong two-way coupling between the charge and the curvature, the shapes of charged vesicles remain similar to that of uncharged vesicles at comparable reduced volumes, even for reasonable values of total charge. However, the tension and pressure values are higher, and are accurately estimated in our analysis. The charge distribution on the outer and inner leaflet which is strongly affected by the curvature is calculated. The value of spontaneous curvature due to charge redistribution is also estimated. The insensitivity of the shape to charges persists even when only the outer leaflet is charged instead of charged inner and outer leaflets. PMID:27450654

  10. Charge exchange system

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Oscar A.

    1978-01-01

    An improved charge exchange system for substantially reducing pumping requirements of excess gas in a controlled thermonuclear reactor high energy neutral beam injector. The charge exchange system utilizes a jet-type blanket which acts simultaneously as the charge exchange medium and as a shield for reflecting excess gas.

  11. Particle charge spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuerstenau, Stephen D. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An airflow through a tube is used to guide a charged particle through the tube. A detector may be used to detect charge passing through the tube on the particle. The movement of the particle through the tube may be used to both detect its charge and size.

  12. Spacecraft Charging Technology, 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The third Spacecraft Charging Technology Conference proceedings contain 66 papers on the geosynchronous plasma environment, spacecraft modeling, charged particle environment interactions with spacecraft, spacecraft materials characterization, and satellite design and testing. The proceedings is a compilation of the state of the art of spacecraft charging and environmental interaction phenomena.

  13. Solutions to Challenges Facing a University Digital Library and Press

    PubMed Central

    D'Alessandro, Michael P.; Galvin, Jeffrey R.; Colbert, Stephana I.; D'Alessandro, Donna M.; Choi, Teresa A.; Aker, Brian D.; Carlson, William S.; Pelzer, Gay D.

    2000-01-01

    During the creation of a university digital library and press intended to serve as a medical reference and education tool for health care providers and their patients, six distinct and complex digital publishing challenges were encountered. Over nine years, through a multidisciplinary approach, solutions were devised to the challenges of digital content ownership, management, mirroring, translation, interactions with users, and archiving. The result is a unique, author-owned, internationally mirrored, university digital library and press that serves as an authoritative medical reference and education tool for users around the world. The purpose of this paper is to share the valuable digital publishing lessons learned and outline the challenges facing university digital libraries and presses. PMID:10833161

  14. Solutions to challenges facing a university digital library and press.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, M P; Galvin, J R; Colbert, S I; D'Alessandro, D M; Choi, T A; Aker, B D; Carlson, W S; Pelzer, G D

    2000-01-01

    During the creation of a university digital library and press intended to serve as a medical reference and education tool for health care providers and their patients, six distinct and complex digital publishing challenges were encountered. Over nine years, through a multidisciplinary approach, solutions were devised to the challenges of digital content ownership, management, mirroring, translation, interactions with users, and archiving. The result is a unique, author-owned, internationally mirrored, university digital library and press that serves as an authoritative medical reference and education tool for users around the world. The purpose of this paper is to share the valuable digital publishing lessons learned and outline the challenges facing university digital libraries and presses.

  15. Natural Hazards and the press in the western Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llasat-Botija, M.; Llasat, M. C.; López, L.

    2007-07-01

    This study analyses press articles published between 1982 and 2005 in an attempt to describe the social perception of natural hazards in Catalonia. The articles included in the database have been classified according to different types of risk. In addition, the study examines the evolution of each type of risk in the press coverage during the study period. Finally, the results have been compared to data provided by insurance companies with respect to compensations paid out for damages. Conclusions show that floods are the most important natural hazard in the region, but that the number of headlines for each event is greater in the case of snowfalls and forest fires. Factors such as the season of the year, the proximity of the affected region to the capital, the topical issues at the time, and the presence of other important news must be considered when the impact in the press is analysed.

  16. Using equal-channel angular pressing for refining grain size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langdon, Terence G.; Furukawa, Minoru; Nemoto, Minoru; Horita, Zenji

    2000-04-01

    Equal-channel angular pressing is an effective tool for attaining ultrafine grain sizes in bulk materials. An important advantage of this technique over conventional metalworking processes, such as extrusion and rolling, is that very high strains may be attained without any concomitant change in the cross-sectional dimensions of the sample. The microstructures introduced by equalchannel angular pressing critically depend on a number of experimental factors, including the nature of the slip systems introduced during the pressing operation and the total strain imposed on the sample. These factors are illustrated by reference to experiments conducted on pure aluminum; results are also included to demonstrate the influence of alloying additions and especially the remarkably small grain sizes that may be achieved in materials having low rates of recovery.

  17. Processing zirconia by sintering/hot isostatic pressing

    SciTech Connect

    Druschitz, A.P. )

    1988-05-01

    Sintering followed by hot isostatic pressing is a potential method for improving the mechanical properties of ceramic materials. Encouraging data have been presented and published but these data do not clearly show the origin of the benefits. Here, the effects of green density, time, temperature, and pressure on sintered density, grain size, and pore size of slip-cast ZrO{sub 2}-3 mol% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} are described. The data demonstrate that, when compared to pressureless sintering, the sintering/hot isostatic pressing process produces an equivalent maximum density at reduced temperature and significant reductions in pore size, but no reduction in minimum grain size. The maximum density obtainable by the sinter/hot isostatic pressing process was limited by both open porosity and large pores; the processing conditions required to produce the maximum process advantage are described.

  18. Joining of ceramics of different biofunction by hot isostatic pressing

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jianguo . Center for Dental Technology and Biomaterials); Harmansson, L. ); Soeremark, R. . Dept. of Prosthodontics)

    1993-10-01

    Monolithic zirconia (Z) and zirconia-hydroxyapatite (Z/HA) composites were joined by cold isostatic pressing (CIP at 300 MPa) and subsequently by glass-encapsulated hot isostatic pressing (HIP at 1225 C, 1 h and 200 MPa). The physical and mechanical properties of the materials were measured. The fracture surface was studied using a light microscope. The results indicate a strength level of the joint similar to that of the corresponding composite material (Z/HA), 845 and 860 MPa, respectively. Similar experiments with monolithic alumina (A) and alumina-hydroxyapatite (A/HA) were carried out without success. Cracking occurred in the joint area during the cold isostatic pressing process. It seems that ceramics with high green strength and similar green density are essential when joining ceramics by combined CIP and HIP processes.

  19. Crack toughness evaluation of hot pressed and forged beryllium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, M. H.; Bubsey, R. T.; Brown, W. F., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    Beryllium fracture toughness test specimens were fatigue cracked using reversed cycling with a compression load two to three times the tension load. In worked beryllium, textures may be produced which result in fatigue cracks that are out of plane with the starter notch. Specimens of hot pressed stock exhibited load displacement records which were nonlinear throughout their course. Fracture specimens of both hot pressed and forged stock showed essentially no reduction of thickness and the fracture surfaces were flat and normal to the load axis. However, the stress intensity factor at maximum load increased with decreasing thickness. Load-displacement and electric potential records for the hot pressed beryllium specimens exhibited several anomalies such as negative residual crack mouth displacements and a decrease in electrical potential with increasing load.

  20. Thermal conductance of pressed contacts at liquid helium temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salerno, L. J.; Kittel, P.; Spivak, A. L.

    1983-01-01

    It is pointed out that the optimum design of cryogenic instruments requires accurate thermal models. The present models are limited by a lack of knowledge of the low temperature thermal conductance of the bolted joints which are typically used in the instrument-to-system interface. In connection with studies of pressed contacts, it has been found that the thermal conductance does not obey the Wiedemann-Franz law. The present investigation is concerned with the characterization of the thermal conductance of pressed contacts at liquid helium-4 temperatures, taking into account the dependence of thermal contact conductance on applied force and temperature. It is shown that for the 0.4 micron OFHC copper pressed contact pair, the thermal conductance varies roughly as the second power of the temperature, and increases with increasing applied force.

  1. Press chamber coating as external lubrication for high speed rotary presses: lubricant spray rate optimization.

    PubMed

    Jahn, T; Steffens, K-J

    2005-12-01

    Lubrication of the tooling (punches and dies) is necessary to produce tablets. The most commonly used lubricant is magnesium stearate. Adding and blending magnesium stearate to the tablet mass often has negative effects on the properties of the compressed tablets (e.g., decreasing the tensile strength of the tablet). To avoid these negative effects, external lubrication systems were developed. This study investigated the functionality and the influence of a new press chamber coating system called the PKB II. The major difference between the PKB II and previous systems is its ability to spray a mixture of powdered magnesium stearate and air directly onto the punches and dies which was determined to allow the running of the rotor at higher speeds. The data showed a clear correlation between the spray rate of the lubricant and the concentration of the magnesium stearate per tablet. The PKB II was designed to allow for adjustments, in order to optimize the spray rate, by using the ejection force. The concentration of magnesium stearate was reduced to approximately 0.04% per tablet, using the PKB II. Additionally, the most common negative effects, such as the decrease in tablet tensile strength, were avoided by using this system.

  2. Process design of press hardening with gradient material property influence

    SciTech Connect

    Neugebauer, R.; Schieck, F.; Rautenstrauch, A.

    2011-05-04

    Press hardening is currently used in the production of automotive structures that require very high strength and controlled deformation during crash tests. Press hardening can achieve significant reductions of sheet thickness at constant strength and is therefore a promising technology for the production of lightweight and energy-efficient automobiles. The manganese-boron steel 22MnB5 have been implemented in sheet press hardening owing to their excellent hot formability, high hardenability, and good temperability even at low cooling rates. However, press-hardened components have shown poor ductility and cracking at relatively small strains. A possible solution to this problem is a selective increase of steel sheet ductility by press hardening process design in areas where the component is required to deform plastically during crash tests. To this end, process designers require information about microstructure and mechanical properties as a function of the wide spectrum of cooling rates and sequences and austenitizing treatment conditions that can be encountered in production environments. In the present work, a Continuous Cooling Transformation (CCT) diagram with corresponding material properties of sheet steel 22MnB5 was determined for a wide spectrum of cooling rates. Heating and cooling programs were conducted in a quenching dilatometer. Motivated by the importance of residual elasticity in crash test performance, this property was measured using a micro-bending test and the results were integrated into the CCT diagrams to complement the hardness testing results. This information is essential for the process design of press hardening of sheet components with gradient material properties.

  3. Accuracy of press reports on gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.; Nemiroff, Robert J.; Hurley, Kevin

    2000-09-01

    Most Americans learn about modern science from press reports, while such articles have a bad reputation among scientists. We have performed a study of 148 news articles on gamma-ray astronomy to quantitatively answer the questions ``How accurate are press reports of gamma-ray astronomy?'' and ``What fraction of the basic claims in the press are correct?'' We have taken all articles on the topic from five news sources (UPI, New York Times, Sky & Telescope, Science News, and five middle-sized city newspapers) for one decade (1987-1996) We found an average rate of roughly one trivial error every two articles, while none of our 148 articles significantly mislead the reader or misrepresented the science. This quantitative result is in stark contrast to the nearly universal opinion among scientists that the press frequently butchers science stories. So a major result from our study is that reporters should be rehabilitated into the good graces of astrophysicists, since they actually are doing a good job. For our second question, we rated each story with the probability that its basic new science claim is correct. We found that the average probability over all stories is 70%. Since the reporters and the scientists are both doing good jobs, then why is 30% of the science you read in the press wrong? The reason is that the nature of news reporting is to present front-line science and the nature of front-line science is that reliable conclusions have not yet been reached. The combination of these two natures forces fast breaking science news to have frequent incorrect ideas that are subsequently identified and corrected. So a second major result from our study is to make the distinction between textbook science (with reliabilities near 100%) and front-line science which you read about in the press (with reliabilities near 70%). .

  4. Shape Remodeling Assemblies in Biologically Inspired Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safinya, Cyrus

    2013-03-01

    Much of our research is inspired by, and directed at, understanding the formation of novel structures (both relatively static and highly dynamic) with distinct shapes and morphologies observed in charged biological systems. The structures, in turn, often correlate to specific functions. For example, charged nanoscale tubules and rods and their assemblies are of interest in a range of applications, including as templates for hierarchical nanostructures, encapsulation systems, and biosensors. A series of studies will be described on charged biological assemblies exhibiting ``molecularly-triggered'' dynamical shape changes. In particular, we will focus on protein and lipid based nanotubule formation through small molecule stimuli-induced shape remodeling events. The systems include invertible protein nanotubes from two-state tubulin-protein building blocks and lipid nanotubes and nanorods from curvature stabilizing lipids (mimicking membrane curvature generating proteins). Funded by DOE-BES grant number DOE-DE-FG02-06ER46314 (protein and lipid assembly, lipid synthesis, structure-function) and NSF-DMR-1101900 (phase behavior).

  5. Complexation behavior of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes: Effect of charge distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Mingtian; Zhou, Jihan; Su, Cuicui; Niu, Lin; Liang, Dehai; Li, Baohui

    2015-05-01

    Complexation behavior of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes in a solution is investigated using a combination of computer simulations and experiments, focusing on the influence of polyelectrolyte charge distributions along the chains on the structure of the polyelectrolyte complexes. The simulations are performed using Monte Carlo with the replica-exchange algorithm for three model systems where each system is composed of a mixture of two types of oppositely charged model polyelectrolyte chains (EGEG)5/(KGKG)5, (EEGG)5/(KKGG)5, and (EEGG)5/(KGKG)5, in a solution including explicit solvent molecules. Among the three model systems, only the charge distributions along the chains are not identical. Thermodynamic quantities are calculated as a function of temperature (or ionic strength), and the microscopic structures of complexes are examined. It is found that the three systems have different transition temperatures, and form complexes with different sizes, structures, and densities at a given temperature. Complex microscopic structures with an alternating arrangement of one monolayer of E/K monomers and one monolayer of G monomers, with one bilayer of E and K monomers and one bilayer of G monomers, and with a mixture of monolayer and bilayer of E/K monomers in a box shape and a trilayer of G monomers inside the box are obtained for the three mixture systems, respectively. The experiments are carried out for three systems where each is composed of a mixture of two types of oppositely charged peptide chains. Each peptide chain is composed of Lysine (K) and glycine (G) or glutamate (E) and G, in solution, and the chain length and amino acid sequences, and hence the charge distribution, are precisely controlled, and all of them are identical with those for the corresponding model chain. The complexation behavior and complex structures are characterized through laser light scattering and atomic force microscopy measurements. The order of the apparent weight-averaged molar

  6. Complexation behavior of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes: Effect of charge distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Mingtian; Li, Baohui E-mail: baohui@nankai.edu.cn; Zhou, Jihan; Su, Cuicui; Niu, Lin; Liang, Dehai E-mail: baohui@nankai.edu.cn

    2015-05-28

    Complexation behavior of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes in a solution is investigated using a combination of computer simulations and experiments, focusing on the influence of polyelectrolyte charge distributions along the chains on the structure of the polyelectrolyte complexes. The simulations are performed using Monte Carlo with the replica-exchange algorithm for three model systems where each system is composed of a mixture of two types of oppositely charged model polyelectrolyte chains (EGEG){sub 5}/(KGKG){sub 5}, (EEGG){sub 5}/(KKGG){sub 5}, and (EEGG){sub 5}/(KGKG){sub 5}, in a solution including explicit solvent molecules. Among the three model systems, only the charge distributions along the chains are not identical. Thermodynamic quantities are calculated as a function of temperature (or ionic strength), and the microscopic structures of complexes are examined. It is found that the three systems have different transition temperatures, and form complexes with different sizes, structures, and densities at a given temperature. Complex microscopic structures with an alternating arrangement of one monolayer of E/K monomers and one monolayer of G monomers, with one bilayer of E and K monomers and one bilayer of G monomers, and with a mixture of monolayer and bilayer of E/K monomers in a box shape and a trilayer of G monomers inside the box are obtained for the three mixture systems, respectively. The experiments are carried out for three systems where each is composed of a mixture of two types of oppositely charged peptide chains. Each peptide chain is composed of Lysine (K) and glycine (G) or glutamate (E) and G, in solution, and the chain length and amino acid sequences, and hence the charge distribution, are precisely controlled, and all of them are identical with those for the corresponding model chain. The complexation behavior and complex structures are characterized through laser light scattering and atomic force microscopy measurements. The order

  7. 25. Paper ready for the calender presses. This picture shows ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. Paper ready for the calender presses. This picture shows the paper after it has been coated and dried, as shown on page 238, and it being rolled at the end of the coating-machine. It is now ready to be sent to the big presses which calender it (or iron it, as popular pariance would have it). The pictures on pages 238 and 239 show a continuous process over a single machine; but on account of the length of teh machine, the process is illustrated in sections. (p.239.) - Champion-International Paper Company, West bank of Spicket River at Canal Street, Lawrence, Essex County, MA

  8. Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP): Techniques, applications and economical use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousack, H.

    1985-01-01

    Hot isostatic pressing (HIP) is used to regenerate defect components exposed to dynamic and permanent static loads causing pore formation. It consists in compacting and bonding of powders and solids by encapsulation. The HIP-equipment consists of a high pressure vessel, an oven and a rare gas system for production of isostatic pressure. The compacting procedure using diffusion and deformation processes depends on the pressing temperature. It is used in the production of hard metals, superalloys, fiber composites and ceramic components. It saves energy material and costs.

  9. Properties of Hot Pressed Titanium Alloy Powders for Cryogenic Applications.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, G. I.; Kazaroff, J. M.

    1970-01-01

    Evaluation of strength and toughness of hot-pressed titanium alloy powders at room and at cryogenic temperatures. The purpose was to determine how the mechanical properties of solid bodies formed from powder would compare with wrought specimens of the same size and with the same chemical analysis. It was found that of five titanium powder-making processes investigated, only the Rotating Electrode Process (REP) was capable of producing ELI-grade titanium alloy powder. Blocks hot-pressed from spherical REP powders had tensile properties equivalent to or better than those obtained from wrought bar.

  10. Preparation of dense bulk high T/sub c/ superconducting materials using hot isostatic pressing

    SciTech Connect

    Imam, M.A.; Sadananda, K.; Osofsky, M.

    1989-03-01

    It is important to improve the intergrain contact by eliminating internal porosity in sintered products. This is accomplished for Ba-Cu-O with Er or Nd, Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O and Tl-Ba-Ca-Cu-O systems using hot isostatic pressing (HIP). Sintered superconducting materials were encapsulated in an evacuated stainless steel or pyrex glass containers and processed in a HIP unit a high temperatures and pressures. Optimum HIP conditions to obtain bulk samples of nearly theoretical density were determined. Results indicate that in addition to density, HIP also improved T/sub c/. Furthermore, for the 1-2-3 system, the grain size is significantly reduced during HIP and is attributed to fracturing of course particles in the sintered compact due to high strain rates experienced during the pressurization. HIP materials can be machined to any shape and size and is being used for making specimens for J/sub c/ measurements and superconducting devices.

  11. Pessimal shapes for packing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallus, Yoav

    2014-03-01

    The question of which convex shapes leave the most empty space in their densest packing is the subject of Reinhardt's conjecture in two dimensions and Ulam's conjecture in three dimensions. Such conjectures about pessimal packing shapes have proven notoriously difficult to make progress on. I show that the regular heptagon is a local pessimum among all convex shapes, and that the 3D ball is a local pessimum among origin-symmetric shapes. Any shape sufficiently close in the space of shapes to these local pessima can be packed at a greater efficiency than they. In two dimensions and in dimensions above three, the ball is not a local pessimum, so the situation in 3D is unusual and intriguing. I will discuss what conditions conspire to make the 3D ball a local pessimum and whether we can prove that it is also a global pessimum.

  12. Electron Dynamics Near a Charged Radiator

    SciTech Connect

    Dufty, James W.; Wrighton, Jeffrey M.

    2008-10-22

    Time correlation functions for electron dynamics near a positively charged radiator are described by a mean field kinetic theory that is exact in the short time limit. The important case of the electric field autocorrelation function is examined and the dependence on radiator charge number is shown to be dominated by the bound states of the electron-ion potential. A very simple practical model is proposed and shown to be accurate over a wide range of electron-ion coupling conditions. The model is expected to be useful for more complex conditions confronted in recent theories for line shapes.

  13. A reappraisal of the CHARGE association.

    PubMed Central

    Oley, C A; Baraitser, M; Grant, D B

    1988-01-01

    We describe 14 boys and six girls, including monozygotic twins, with the CHARGE association. All of the children had at least four of the seven major features included in the mnemonic CHARGE and all had ear anomalies or deafness or both and either coloboma or choanal atresia or both. All the boys had evidence of hypogonadism. A characteristic facial appearance (unusually shaped ears, unilateral facial palsy, square face, malar flattening, pinched nostrils) was observed in many of our cases. The aetiology remains unknown. All our cases are sporadic. Images PMID:3351900

  14. Study of digital charge coupled devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D. D.; Young, V. F.

    1980-01-01

    Charge coupled devices represent unique usage of the metal oxide semiconductor concept. These devices can sample an AC signal at the input, transfer charge proportional to this signal through the CCD shift register and then provide an output of the same frequency and shape as the input. The delay time between input and output is controlled by the CCD operating frequency and the number of stages in the shift resistor. This work is a reliability evaluation of the buried channel and surface channel CCD technologies. The constructions are analyzed, failure modes are described, and test results are reported.

  15. The shape of Tethys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, P. C.; Dermott, S. F.

    1991-01-01

    After considering the most important relationships between density, rotation rate, shape, and internal structure on the basis of equilibrium figures, the shape of the Saturn satellite Tethys is established from limb-coordinate data. Attention is given to the shape's significance for Tethys' internal structure. It is alternatively concluded that Tethys is either differentiated, and possesses a small rocky core, or has been interpreted as possessing a mass that is too low by about 15 percent.

  16. The Shape of Eros

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Looking at a few pictures of Eros under the right lighting conditions gives a reasonable idea of the shape of the asteroid, but analysis of NEAR Shoemaker data requires a very accurate digital model of Eros' shape. This 'shape model' helps the NEAR team analyze images and other types of data. For example, comparing the brightness of imaged regions with the orientation of the corresponding parts of the surface, taken from the shape model, allows scientists to determine whether bright areas are due to just surface orientation or also to surface properties. By 'filling

  17. Shape optimization for DSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouaknin, Gaddiel; Laachi, Nabil; Delaney, Kris; Fredrickson, Glenn; Gibou, Frederic

    2016-03-01

    Directed self-assembly using block copolymers for positioning vertical interconnect access in integrated circuits relies on the proper shape of a confined domain in which polymers will self-assemble into the targeted design. Finding that shape, i.e., solving the inverse problem, is currently mainly based on trial and error approaches. We introduce a level-set based algorithm that makes use of a shape optimization strategy coupled with self-consistent field theory to solve the inverse problem in an automated way. It is shown that optimal shapes are found for different targeted topologies with accurate placement and distances between the different components.

  18. DISJUNCTIVE NORMAL SHAPE MODELS

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Nisha; Mesadi, Fitsum; Cetin, Mujdat; Tasdizen, Tolga

    2016-01-01

    A novel implicit parametric shape model is proposed for segmentation and analysis of medical images. Functions representing the shape of an object can be approximated as a union of N polytopes. Each polytope is obtained by the intersection of M half-spaces. The shape function can be approximated as a disjunction of conjunctions, using the disjunctive normal form. The shape model is initialized using seed points defined by the user. We define a cost function based on the Chan-Vese energy functional. The model is differentiable, hence, gradient based optimization algorithms are used to find the model parameters. PMID:27403233

  19. The fabrication of a carbon nanotube transparent conductive film by electrophoretic deposition and hot-pressing transfer.

    PubMed

    Pei, Songfeng; Du, Jinhong; Zeng, You; Liu, Chang; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2009-06-10

    A super-flexible single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) transparent conductive film (TCF) was produced based on a combination of electrophoretic deposition (EPD) and hot-pressing transfer. EPD was performed in a diluted SWCNT suspension with high zeta potential prepared by a pre-dispersion-then-dilution procedure using sodium dodecyl sulfate as the surfactant and negative charge supplier. A SWCNT film was deposited on a stainless steel anode surface by direct current electrophoresis and then transferred to a poly(ethylene terephthalate) substrate by hot-pressing to achieve a flexible SWCNT TCF. The SWCNT TCF obtained by this technique can achieve a sheet resistance of 220 Omega/sq with 81% transparency at 550 nm wavelength and a strong adhesion to the substrate. More importantly, no decrease in the conductivity of the SWCNT TCF was detected after 10 000 cycles of repeated bending. The result indicates that the EPD and hot-pressing transfer technique is an effective approach for fabricating a carbon nanotube TCF with excellent flexibility. PMID:19451674

  20. The public science of Louis Pasteur: the experiment on anthrax vaccine in the popular press of the time.

    PubMed

    Bucchi, M

    1997-01-01

    The paper focuses on Pasteur's public experimentation of the anthrax vaccine (Pouilly-le-Fort, 1881) as portrayed in the English and French popular press of the time. It is argued that this 'popular' level of representation did not merely provide additional publicity for Pasteur's ideas. Rather, the nature and meaning of the experiment itself and of the related controversy on immunisation were substantially negotiated and shaped within the public arena. The multifold consequences of this framing at the public level are explored. In particular, attention is drawn to the relationships that in such process were established with other issues debated at the same time in the arena, namely homeopathy, vivisection and vaccination.

  1. Formation of bowl-shaped craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piekutowski, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    High-explosive charges are used to form, in several types of granular media, laboratory-scale examples of the bowl-shaped craters that are found to be the largest and simplest class of impact structure on planetary and lunar surfaces. High-speed films of the experiments yield crater growth rate and particle displacement data, including quantitative stress, strain, displacement, and velocity data. These results are compared with the particle displacement and velocity data from large explosion experiments which have produced bowl-shaped craters. A time-sequence description of large, bowl-shaped impact crater formation is developed from the results of these comparisons, as well as those of the morphological features and structural deformations of large explosions and impact craters.

  2. 18. Interior detail, drill press and grinder, Machine Shop, Roundhouse ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Interior detail, drill press and grinder, Machine Shop, Roundhouse Machine Shop Extension, Southern Pacific Railroad Carlin Shops, view to east (135mm lens). - Southern Pacific Railroad, Carlin Shops, Roundhouse Machine Shop Extension, Foot of Sixth Street, Carlin, Elko County, NV

  3. 19. Interior detail, grinder and drill press, Machine Shop, Roundhouse ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Interior detail, grinder and drill press, Machine Shop, Roundhouse Machine Shop Extension, Southern Pacific Railroad Carlin Shops, view to south (135mm lens). - Southern Pacific Railroad, Carlin Shops, Roundhouse Machine Shop Extension, Foot of Sixth Street, Carlin, Elko County, NV

  4. DETAIL VIEW OF FILTER PRESS REMAINS, BOILER, SECONDARY ORE BIN, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF FILTER PRESS REMAINS, BOILER, SECONDARY ORE BIN, TRAM TRESTLE AND WATER TANK, LOOKING NORTHWEST. HIS VIEW IS TAKEN FROM THE THIRD LEVEL OF THE MILL, NEARBY THE BLACKSMITH'S FORGE. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  5. The Press and California Higher Education. A Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chance, William

    This study examined the media coverage of California higher education in the popular press in four of the state's major dailies. In particular the study examined the roles that the San Francisco Chronicle, the Sacramento Bee, the Los Angeles Times, and the San Jose Mercury News play in fostering the public debate about higher education. All the…

  6. Toward a Normative Theory of Freedom of the Press.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Dwight Wm.

    In considering the possibility of a normative theory of freedom of the press, this paper examines arguments about such freedom in the Third World and elsewhere. Some of the arguments discussed in the paper are derived from the theories of John Locke and Karl Marx; others are drawn from the concepts of divine rights, elitism, liberal democracy, and…

  7. Student Press and Distribution Issues: Rights and Responsibilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Larry D.

    1984-01-01

    This review analyzes case law in the area of student press and distribution and offers some guidelines for developing and implementing school policy and rules. Litigation is reviewed in order to clarify students' rights, limitations on administrative authority in matters of censorship and prior restraint, and actions in connection with writing and…

  8. The Press in Black Africa: Philosophy and Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Dennis Lee

    This dissertation is a descriptive, comparative study of press-government relationships in the 34 nations of independent Black Africa south of the Sahara. Excluded from consideration are territories under European administration and those nations that have white minority governments. The 34 sovereign states are analyzed and systematically…

  9. Argonne Director Eric Isaacs addresses the National Press Club

    ScienceCinema

    Eric Isaccs

    2016-07-12

    Argonne Director Eric Isaacs addresses the National Press Club on 9/15/2009. To build a national economy based on sustainable energy, the nation must first "reignite its innovation ecology," he said. Issacs makes the case for investing in science to secure America's future.

  10. A Community College District/University Press Copublishing Venture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caraway, Georgia Kemp

    1994-01-01

    Describes cooperation between the Dallas County Community College District (DCCCD) and University of North Texas Press, resulting in the publication of a collection of short stories and a book of poetry written by DCCCD faculty and staff. Provides information on sales, marketing and promotion, classroom use of the books, and opportunities for…

  11. Book Review: Stars (Copyright 1985, Golden Press; New York)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marigza, R. N., Jr.

    2009-06-01

    Stars is a part of the Golden Guides collection produced by Golden Press. It is a small 160 page paperback guide to the constellations, the sun, the moon, planets, and other celestial bodies. The book is convenient to carry along wherever you go, making it an easy to access reference material.

  12. Reconstructing Suicide: Reporting Suicide in the Israeli Press.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weimann, Gabriel; Fishman, Gideon

    1995-01-01

    Presents a content analysis of suicide stories in the Israeli Press (1955-90) and measures of real suicide events to highlight the selective, distorted, and reconstructed nature of reporting suicide. Argues that such reporting may account for at least some of the contradictory findings of studies on the impact of publicized suicide stories on…

  13. 19. SOUTHEAST TO CIRCA 1900 FOURSPINDLE PRODUCTION DRILL PRESS ALONG ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. SOUTHEAST TO CIRCA 1900 FOUR-SPINDLE PRODUCTION DRILL PRESS ALONG EAST INTERIOR WALL OF FACTORY, SHOWING SHELVES AND BINS WITH TOOLS AND PARTS FOR PUMP AND WATER SYSTEM REPAIR. - Kregel Windmill Company Factory, 1416 Central Avenue, Nebraska City, Otoe County, NE

  14. 20. NORTHEAST TO CIRCA 1900 FOURSPINDLE PRODUCTION DRILL PRESS ALONG ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. NORTHEAST TO CIRCA 1900 FOUR-SPINDLE PRODUCTION DRILL PRESS ALONG EAST INTERIOR WALL OF FACTORY, SHOWING SHELVES AND BINS WITH TOOLS AND PARTS FOR PUMP AND WATER SYSTEM REPAIR. - Kregel Windmill Company Factory, 1416 Central Avenue, Nebraska City, Otoe County, NE

  15. Ten Ways to Get Attention with Your Press Releases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Kooten, Valerie

    1994-01-01

    Recommends 10 steps that can increase chances of having press release published. Advises readers to use required format; determine what constitutes news; keep release short; include contact person in release; incorporate good quotes; send releases to right person; understand that release will be edited; time arrival of release; follow up with…

  16. University Press Meeting Dominated by Donor Proposal and Digital Publishing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    A surprise request for proposals from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and a forthcoming report on university publishing in the digital age were among topics discussed at the annual meeting of the Association of American University Presses. The offer from the Mellon Foundation concerns support for collaborative, monograph-centered projects in…

  17. Ethics and the Press: Readings in Mass Media Morality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrill, John C., Ed.; Barney, Ralph D., Ed.

    This collection of 35 articles addresses the topic of the ethical considerations and implications involved in reporting the news. Included in this book are such articles as: "Ethics and Journalism" by John Merrill, "Quality in Mass Communications" by Wilbur Schramm, "The American Press: Some Truths About Truths" by Edward Jay Epstein, "The New…

  18. 29 CFR 1910.217 - Mechanical power presses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... equipment. Air controlling equipment shall be protected against foreign material and water entering the... tools are intended for placing and removing materials in and from the press. Hand feeding tools are not... hazard areas to lubricate material, punches or dies. (e) Inspection, maintenance, and modification...

  19. 29 CFR 1910.217 - Mechanical power presses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... equipment. Air controlling equipment shall be protected against foreign material and water entering the... tools are intended for placing and removing materials in and from the press. Hand feeding tools are not... hazard areas to lubricate material, punches or dies. (e) Inspection, maintenance, and modification...

  20. Institutional Stress: Conflicting Normative Models in the Catholic Press.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorn, William; Garrison, M. Bruce

    To determine whether the diocesan newspapers of the Catholic church are based on an autonomous, adversarial model or on an institutional, public relations model of the press, a survey was conducted of 148 editors and 145 bishops or publishers of such newspapers. Results showed that the editors and bishops agreed on the three major roles of the…

  1. The Press, the Government, and the Ethics Vacuum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrill, John C.

    Immanuel Kant's idea of a will to do the right thing--to be ethical--is essentially a dead concept with both press and government. The reasons for this "ethics vacuum" are two-fold: the foundations of ethics in both circles are vague, confusing, and beset by relativism and pragmatism so that no system of ethics ever really coalesces; and neither…

  2. African-American Press Coverage of Clarence Thomas Nomination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fearn-Banks, Kathleen

    1994-01-01

    Examines pressures facing the African American press by focusing on its coverage of the 1991 nomination of Clarence Thomas to the United States Supreme Court. Discusses the dilemma these newspapers faced in choosing between supporting African Americans and supporting civil rights, with their mixed coverage of the story reflecting this dilemma. (SR)

  3. Democratic Socialism: Toward a Fifth Theory of the Press.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Picard, Robert G.

    For more than 25 years, the "four theories" paradigm has been dominant in the study of the relationships among the press, society, and the state. Asserting that the major approaches to such study are the libertarian, social responsibility, authoritarian, and Soviet/communist theories, this paradigm fails to account for economic and social…

  4. 42. PRESSING A SLAB OF CLAY ONTO A MOSAIC MOLD. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. PRESSING A SLAB OF CLAY ONTO A MOSAIC MOLD. THE MOLD, WHICH HAS A RAISED DESIGN, LEAVES AND OUTLINE IN THE SLAB, THE PIECES THUS DEFINED, ARE THEN CUT APART TO BE FIRED SEPARATELY AND REASSEMBLED. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  5. The Mutilated Boy and the Press: A Rumor Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Lee

    Responsible editors avoid printing falsehoods, but the public sometimes demands that rumors be covered in the press. One example of such rumors and the way editors deal with them is the "Mutilated Boy." The "Mutilated Boy" rumor has been circulating for decades and involves a brutal attack upon a small boy in a public rest room. The "crime" is…

  6. Gemini 8 prime and backup crews during press conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Gemini 8 prime and backup crews during press conference. Left to right are Astronauts David R. Scott, prime crew pilot; Neil A. Armstrong, prime crew command pilot; Charles Conrad Jr., backup crew command pilot; and Richard F. Gordon Jr., backup crew pilot.

  7. Googling "Deaf": Deafness in the World's English-Language Press

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, Des

    2007-01-01

    An Internet search tool, Google Alert, was used to survey the global English-language press July-December 2005 for references to deaf people. The survey found that such references focus on people who are deaf rather than the disability itself, thus demonstrating how well deaf people fit into the mainstream. Derogatory terminology such as "deaf and…

  8. Looking north at uing press of the submerged arc weld ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking north at u-ing press of the submerged arc weld (saw) line of the main pipe mill building, bay 7. - U.S. Steel National Tube Works, Main Pipe Mill Building, Along Monongahela River, McKeesport, Allegheny County, PA

  9. 9. VIEW OF MOLTEN SALT BATH EQUIPMENT AND ROLLER PRESSES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW OF MOLTEN SALT BATH EQUIPMENT AND ROLLER PRESSES BEING INSTALLED ON THE WEST SIDE (SIDE B) OF BUILDING 883. SIDE B OF BUILDING 883 WAS USED TO PROCESS ENRICHED URANIUM FROM 1957-66. (1/23/57) - Rocky Flats Plant, Uranium Rolling & Forming Operations, Southeast section of plant, southeast quadrant of intersection of Central Avenue & Eighth Street, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  10. Relation of Questions and Answers in Kennedy's Press Conferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostman, Ronald E.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Analyzes the questions posed by reporters and the answers given by President John F. Kennedy in his formal press conferences. Concludes that questions that followed the rules for interviewing set forth by experts produced better answers than those that did not follow rules. (FL)

  11. Attitudes of High School Principals about Press Freedom after Hazelwood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickson, Thomas V.

    1989-01-01

    Surveys high school principals in Missouri to examine how they have responded to their new authority over the student press following the Supreme Court's Hazelwood decision. Reports that while principals say that student newspapers are open forums, most also say that they would censor certain types of material. (MM)

  12. Argonne Director Eric Isaacs addresses the National Press Club

    SciTech Connect

    Eric Isaccs

    2009-09-17

    Argonne Director Eric Isaacs addresses the National Press Club on 9/15/2009. To build a national economy based on sustainable energy, the nation must first "reignite its innovation ecology," he said. Issacs makes the case for investing in science to secure America's future.

  13. Quid Pro Quo: Tobacco Companies and the Black Press

    PubMed Central

    McCandless, Phyra M.; Yerger, Valerie B.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We explored the relationship between tobacco companies and the Black press, which plays an important role in conveying information and opinions to Black communities. Methods. In this archival case study, we analyzed data from internal tobacco industry documents and archives of the National Newspaper Publishers Association (NNPA), the trade association of the Black press. Results. In exchange for advertising dollars and other support, the tobacco industry expected and received support from Black newspapers for tobacco industry policy positions. Beginning in the 1990s, resistance from within the Black community and reduced advertising budgets created counterpressures. The tobacco industry, however, continued to sustain NNPA support. Conclusions. The quid pro quo between tobacco companies and the Black press violated journalistic standards and represented an unequal trade. Although numerous factors explain today's tobacco-related health disparities, the Black press's service to tobacco companies is problematic because of the trust that the community placed in such media. Understanding the relationship between the tobacco industry and the NNPA provides insight into strategies that the tobacco industry may use in other communities and countries. PMID:21852652

  14. Rollercoaster loop shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendrill, Ann-Marie

    2005-11-01

    Many modern rollercoasters feature loops. Although textbook loops are often circular, real rollercoaster loops are not. In this paper, we look into the mathematical description of various possible loop shapes, as well as their riding properties. We also discuss how a study of loop shapes can be used in physics education.

  15. Crystal Shape Bingo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rule, Audrey C.

    This document describes a game that provides students with practice in recognizing three dimensional crystal shapes and planar geometric shapes of crystal faces. It contains information on the objective of the game, game preparation, and rules for playing. Play cards are included (four to a page). (ASK)

  16. Pulse shaping system

    DOEpatents

    Skeldon, Mark D.; Letzring, Samuel A.

    1999-03-23

    Temporally shaped electrical waveform generation provides electrical waveforms suitable for driving an electro-optic modulator (EOM) which produces temporally shaped optical laser pulses for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research. The temporally shaped electrical waveform generation is carried out with aperture coupled transmission lines having an input transmission line and an aperture coupled output transmission line, along which input and output pulses propagate in opposite directions. The output electrical waveforms are shaped principally due to the selection of coupling aperture width, in a direction transverse to the lines, which varies along the length of the line. Specific electrical waveforms, which may be high voltage (up to kilovolt range), are produced and applied to the EOM to produce specifically shaped optical laser pulses.

  17. Pulse shaping system

    DOEpatents

    Skeldon, M.D.; Letzring, S.A.

    1999-03-23

    Temporally shaped electrical waveform generation provides electrical waveforms suitable for driving an electro-optic modulator (EOM) which produces temporally shaped optical laser pulses for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research. The temporally shaped electrical waveform generation is carried out with aperture coupled transmission lines having an input transmission line and an aperture coupled output transmission line, along which input and output pulses propagate in opposite directions. The output electrical waveforms are shaped principally due to the selection of coupling aperture width, in a direction transverse to the lines, which varies along the length of the line. Specific electrical waveforms, which may be high voltage (up to kilovolt range), are produced and applied to the EOM to produce specifically shaped optical laser pulses. 8 figs.

  18. Charge Islands Through Tunneling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Daryl C.

    2002-01-01

    It has been recently reported that the electrical charge in a semiconductive carbon nanotube is not evenly distributed, but rather it is divided into charge "islands." This paper links the aforementioned phenomenon to tunneling and provides further insight into the higher rate of tunneling processes, which makes tunneling devices attractive. This paper also provides a basis for calculating the charge profile over the length of the tube so that nanoscale devices' conductive properties may be fully exploited.

  19. Battery formation charging apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, J.L.

    1987-08-04

    An apparatus is describe for charging electric storage batteries, the apparatus comprising: (a) a host computer for providing charging information to and receiving status information from at least one slave computer by means of a data link; and (b) at least one control module coupled to the slave computer for applying charging current to at least one electric storage battery in response to instructions received from the slave computer, and for providing feedback and status information to the slave computer.

  20. Cast-to-shape electrokinetic trapping medium

    SciTech Connect

    Shepodd, Timothy J.; Franklin, Elizabeth; Prickett, Zane T.; Artau, Alexander

    2004-08-03

    A three-dimensional microporous polymer network material, or monolith, cast-to-shape in a microchannel. The polymer monolith, produced by a phase separation process, is capable of trapping and retaining charged protein species from a mixture of charged and uncharged species under the influence of an applied electric field. The retained charged protein species are released from the porous polymer monolith by a pressure driven flow in the substantial absence of the electric field. The pressure driven flow is independent of direction and thus neither means to reverse fluid flow nor a multi-directional flow field is required, a single flow through the porous polymer monolith can be employed, in contrast to prior art systems. The monolithic polymer material produced by the invention can function as a chromatographic medium. Moreover, by virtue of its ability to retain charged protein species and quantitatively release the retained species the porous polymer monolith can serve as a means for concentrating charged protein species from, for example, a dilute solution.