Science.gov

Sample records for shared electronic medical

  1. Sharing electronic medical records across multiple heterogeneous and competing institutions.

    PubMed Central

    Kohane, I. S.; van Wingerde, F. J.; Fackler, J. C.; Cimino, C.; Kilbridge, P.; Murphy, S.; Chueh, H.; Rind, D.; Safran, C.; Barnett, O.; Szolovits, P.

    1996-01-01

    Most early reports of implemented World-Wide Web (W3) medical record systems describe single institution architectures. We describe W3-EMRS, a multi-institutional architecture, and its implementation. Thorny problems in data sharing underlined by the W3-EMRS project are reviewed. PMID:8947738

  2. Prevalence of Sharing Access Credentials in Electronic Medical Records.

    PubMed

    Hassidim, Ayal; Korach, Tzfania; Shreberk-Hassidim, Rony; Thomaidou, Elena; Uzefovsky, Florina; Ayal, Shahar; Ariely, Dan

    2017-07-01

    Confidentiality of health information is an important aspect of the physician patient relationship. The use of digital medical records has made data much more accessible. To prevent data leakage, many countries have created regulations regarding medical data accessibility. These regulations require a unique user ID for each medical staff member, and this must be protected by a password, which should be kept undisclosed by all means. We performed a four-question Google Forms-based survey of medical staff. In the survey, each participant was asked if he/she ever obtained the password of another medical staff member. Then, we asked how many times such an episode occurred and the reason for it. A total of 299 surveys were gathered. The responses showed that 220 (73.6%) participants reported that they had obtained the password of another medical staff member. Only 171 (57.2%) estimated how many time it happened, with an average estimation of 4.75 episodes. All the residents that took part in the study (45, 15%) had obtained the password of another medical staff member, while only 57.5% (38/66) of the nurses reported this. The use of unique user IDs and passwords to defend the privacy of medical data is a common requirement in medical organizations. Unfortunately, the use of passwords is doomed because medical staff members share their passwords with one another. Strict regulations requiring each staff member to have it's a unique user ID might lead to password sharing and to a decrease in data safety.

  3. Focusing on Patient Safety: the Challenge of Securely Sharing Electronic Medical Records in Complex Care Continuums.

    PubMed

    Key, Diana; Ferneini, Elie M

    2015-09-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act's (PPACA) regulated approach to inclusive provision of care will increase the challenge health care administrators face ensuring secure communication and secure sharing of electronic medical records between divisions and care subcontractors. This analysis includes a summary overview of the PPACA; the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act (HCERA) of 2010; and required Essential Health Benefits (EHB). The analysis integrates an overview of how secure communication and secure sharing of electronic medical records will be essential to clinical outcomes across complex care continuums; as well as the actionable strategies health care leadership can employ to overcome associated IT security challenges.

  4. Information sharing: transparency, nursing ethics, and practice implications with electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Milton, Constance L

    2009-07-01

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 has spurred national and international debate over possible ethical implications for a mandated electronic database for medical records. What role(s) will the discipline of nursing assume and what policy statements will the discipline of nursing articulate with regard to the need for enhancing privacy and confidentiality with access to medical and nursing documentation found in the electronic database? In this column the author provides an ethical discussion on information sharing and human freedom, and the need for transparency as specified in the humanbecoming leadership model.

  5. Risk mitigation of shared electronic records system in campus institutions: medical social work practice in singapore.

    PubMed

    Ow Yong, Lai Meng; Tan, Amanda Wei Li; Loo, Cecilia Lay Keng; Lim, Esther Li Ping

    2014-10-01

    In 2013, the Singapore General Hospital (SGH) Campus initiated a shared electronic system where patient records and documentations were standardized and shared across institutions within the Campus. The project was initiated to enhance quality of health care, improve accessibility, and ensure integrated (as opposed to fragmented) care for best outcomes in our patients. In mitigating the risks of ICT, it was found that familiarity with guiding ethical principles, and ensuring adherence to regulatory and technical competencies in medical social work were important. The need to negotiate and maneuver in a large environment within the Campus to ensure proactive integrative process helped.

  6. Improving detection and treatment of osteoporosis: redesigning care using the electronic medical record and shared medical appointments.

    PubMed

    Ayoub, W T; Newman, E D; Blosky, M A; Stewart, W F; Wood, G C

    2009-01-01

    To determine whether a process redesign could improve detection and treatment of osteoporosis, at-risk women over the age of 65 were identified using an electronic medical record and proactively contacted by letter and phone call. This resulted in a significant increase in testing for osteoporosis by DXA scan. The high-risk patients were then offered a shared medical appointment, which resulted in improved treatment outcomes compared to usual care. Our objective was to determine if redesigning care through proactive contact with women 65 at-risk of osteoporosis increased BMD testing and to determine if a shared medical appointment (SMA) improved treatment for high-risk women. Two primary care sites received the redesign intervention and two other sites served as the usual care controls. At the intervention sites, all women 65 who had not had a DXA scan performed in the prior 2 years were contacted by mail and phone calls. High-risk patients were invited to attend a SMA or follow-up visit with their primary physician. A significantly higher proportion of women at the intervention sites had a DXA (39.6% vs. 13.2%, p < 0.0001). Patients who attended the SMA were more likely to have calcium and vitamin D recommended, a vitamin D level checked, and receive a prescription medicine than those patients who had follow-up with their primary care physician. The redesigned process was highly effective in improving BMD testing for women 65. The SMA was shown to be a more effective method to make calcium and vitamin D recommendations, to evaluate secondary causes of low bone density, and to prescribe prescription medications, compared to usual care with the PCP.

  7. Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence and Use of an Electronic Shared Medical Record Among People Living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Saberi, Parya; Catz, Sheryl L; Leyden, Wendy A; Stewart, Christine; Ralston, James D; Horberg, Michael A; Grothaus, Louis; Silverberg, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    Electronic shared medical records (SMR) are emerging healthcare technologies that allow patients to engage in their healthcare by communicating with providers, refilling prescriptions, scheduling appointments, and viewing portions of medical records. We conducted a pre-post cohort study of HIV-positive adults who used and did not use SMR in two integrated healthcare systems. We compared the difference in antiretroviral refill adherence between SMR users and age- and sex-frequency matched non-users from the 12-month period prior to SMR useto the 12-month period starting 6 months after initiation of SMR use. High adherence was maintained among SMR users (change = -0.11 %) but declined among non-users (change = -2.05 %; p = 0.003). Among SMR users, there was a steady improvement in adherence as monthly frequency of SMR use increased (p = 0.009). SMR use, particularly more frequent use, is associated with maintaining high adherence and non-use is associated with declines in adherence over time among patients with access to these online services.

  8. Experiences sharing of implementing Template-based Electronic Medical Record System (TEMRS) in a Hong Kong medical organization.

    PubMed

    Ting, S L; Kwok, S K; Tsang, Albert H C; Lee, W B; Yee, K F

    2011-12-01

    This paper aims to investigate the efficacy and feasibility of Template-based Electronic Medical Record System (TEMRS) and factors for its successful implementation. A TEMRS was designed and implemented in one core clinic of a Hong Kong professional multi-disciplinary medical services provider with four core clinics located in different parts of Hong Kong. Eight doctors participated in the study. Surveys and interviews were conducted to acquire the users' feedback and satisfaction level. The design, development, and the factors related to the success of the implementation of TEMRS were analyzed. In the study period, 3,032 cases were collected. The most encountered diagnosis were upper respiratory tract infection (50.59%), gastroenteritis (10.19%), dermatitis (5.87%), dyspepsia (5.28%) and rhinitis (4.82%). The system gained an overall satisfaction by the users and the most satisfied areas were rapid retrieving the necessary information of patient (75%) and fasten the diagnostic selection (75%). TEMRS is an enabling system which can reduce the user resistance in new technology with its flexibility. The consideration of cost, security, human, technical, data migration and standardization issues are essential in the implementation of the TEMRS and further research should be conducted to expand the TEMRS's implementation in health care system.

  9. Medical high-resolution image sharing and electronic whiteboard system: A pure-web-based system for accessing and discussing lossless original images in telemedicine.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Liang; Li, Ying; Chen, Xin; Yang, Sheng; Gao, Peng; Liu, Hongjun; Feng, Zhengquan; Nian, Yongjian; Qiu, Mingguo

    2015-09-01

    There are various medical image sharing and electronic whiteboard systems available for diagnosis and discussion purposes. However, most of these systems ask clients to install special software tools or web plug-ins to support whiteboard discussion, special medical image format, and customized decoding algorithm of data transmission of HRIs (high-resolution images). This limits the accessibility of the software running on different devices and operating systems. In this paper, we propose a solution based on pure web pages for medical HRIs lossless sharing and e-whiteboard discussion, and have set up a medical HRI sharing and e-whiteboard system, which has four-layered design: (1) HRIs access layer: we improved an tile-pyramid model named unbalanced ratio pyramid structure (URPS), to rapidly share lossless HRIs and to adapt to the reading habits of users; (2) format conversion layer: we designed a format conversion engine (FCE) on server side to real time convert and cache DICOM tiles which clients requesting with window-level parameters, to make browsers compatible and keep response efficiency to server-client; (3) business logic layer: we built a XML behavior relationship storage structure to store and share users' behavior, to keep real time co-browsing and discussion between clients; (4) web-user-interface layer: AJAX technology and Raphael toolkit were used to combine HTML and JavaScript to build client RIA (rich Internet application), to meet clients' desktop-like interaction on any pure webpage. This system can be used to quickly browse lossless HRIs, and support discussing and co-browsing smoothly on any web browser in a diversified network environment. The proposal methods can provide a way to share HRIs safely, and may be used in the field of regional health, telemedicine and remote education at a low cost. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Inviting patients and care partners to read doctors' notes: OpenNotes and shared access to electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Jennifer L; Darer, Jonathan D; Berger, Andrea; Clarke, Deserae; Green, Jamie A; Stametz, Rebecca A; Delbanco, Tom; Walker, Jan

    2016-08-07

    We examined the acceptability and effects of delivering doctors' visit notes electronically (via OpenNotes) to patients and care partners with authorized access to patients' electronic medical records. Adult patients and care partners at Geisinger Health System were surveyed at baseline and after 12 months of exposure to OpenNotes. Reporting on care partner access to OpenNotes, patients and care partners stated that they had better agreement about patient treatment plans and more productive discussions about their care. At follow-up, patients were more confident in their ability to manage their health, felt better prepared for office visits, and reported understanding their care better than at baseline. Care partners were more likely to access and use patient portal functionality and reported improved communication with patients' providers at follow-up. Our findings suggest that offering patients and care partners access to doctors' notes is acceptable and improves communication and patients' confidence in managing their care.

  11. Coordinating shared care using electronic data interchange.

    PubMed

    Branger, P; van't Hooft, A; van der Wouden, H C

    1995-01-01

    Shared care is the situation in which physicians jointly treat the same patient. Shared care may occur with elderly patients suffering from several health problems, patients with chronic disorders such as diabetes, mellitus, obstructive pulmonary diseases, or cardiological disorders. For a number of health problems, including diabetes, shared care protocols have been developed involving division of tasks between health care providers from different disciplines [1]. Optimal communication is considered to be a vital aspect of shared care, both from medical and cost-effectiveness points of view, but at the same time communication forms the bottleneck as physicians often lack time to comply with the protocol [2]. At present, new technologies are emerging that hold the promise of improving communication between health care providers. One such technology is Electronic Data Interchange (EDI), defined as "the replacement of paper documents by standard electronic messages conveyed from one computer to another without manual intervention" [3]. In Europe, the ISO syntax standard EDIFACT has been adopted as the standard for defining EDI-messages [4]. In The Netherlands, coordination of the standardization of health care messages is performed by a national organization. At present, several standardized messages are available for a variety of purposes. One is a message for data exchange between physicians; in this message, however, only physician-patient- and hospital-identifying data are structured, and all medical data is transferred as free text. Consequently, using this message, the receiving system is unable to integrate the data into the computer-based patient record. In order to support shared care, a message is needed that can also transfer the structure of the data in a computer-based record in order to allow integration of records from multiple sources. Therefore, we developed a new message, called MEDEUR, that is designed for integrated patient data exchange between

  12. To Share or Not to Share: Ethical Acquisition and Use of Medical Data

    PubMed Central

    Hollis, Kate Fultz

    2016-01-01

    The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act proposes the meaningful use of interoperable electronic health records throughout the United States health care delivery system as a critical national goal. As we have moved from medical records on paper to interoperable electronic health records, the rapid and easy sharing of medical data through the Internet makes medical data insecure. Electronic data is easy to share but many steps to ensure security of the data need to be taken. Beyond medical data security, we need to ethically acquire, use and manage data so that all people involved with the data from producer to data manager are recognized and respected. This paper advocates that sharing medical data can be ethically the right choice for everyone in health care if data sharing guidelines are available for people to use, modify and strengthen for specific purposes. PMID:27570683

  13. Pack-Year Cigarette Smoking History for Determination of Lung Cancer Screening Eligibility. Comparison of the Electronic Medical Record versus a Shared Decision-making Conversation.

    PubMed

    Modin, Hannah E; Fathi, Joelle T; Gilbert, Christopher R; Wilshire, Candice L; Wilson, Andrew K; Aye, Ralph W; Farivar, Alexander S; Louie, Brian E; Vallières, Eric; Gorden, Jed A

    2017-08-01

    Implementation of lung cancer screening programs is occurring across the United States. Programs vary in approaches to patient identification and shared decision-making. The eligibility of persons referred to screening programs, the outcomes of eligibility determination during shared decision-making, and the potential for the electronic medical record (EMR) to identify eligible individuals have not been well described. Our objectives were to assess the eligibility of individuals referred for lung cancer screening and compare information extracted from the EMR to information derived from a shared decision-making conversation for the determination of eligibility for lung cancer screening. We performed a retrospective analysis of individuals referred to a centralized lung cancer screening program serving a five-hospital health services system in Seattle, Washington between October 2014 and January 2016. Demographics, referral, and outcomes data were collected. A pack-year smoking history derived from the EMR was compared with the pack-year history obtained during a shared decision-making conversation performed by a licensed nurse professional representing the lung cancer screening program. A total of 423 individuals were referred to the program, of whom 59.6% (252 of 423) were eligible. Of those, 88.9% (224 of 252) elected screening. There was 96.2% (230 of 239) discordance in pack-year smoking history between the EMR and the shared decision-making conversation. The EMR underreported pack-years of smoking for 85.2% (196 of 230) of the participants, with a median difference of 29.2 pack-years. If identification of eligible individuals relied solely on the accuracy of the pack-year smoking history recorded in the EMR, 53.6% (128 of 239) would have failed to meet the 30-pack-year threshold for screening. Many individuals referred for lung cancer screening may be ineligible. Overreliance on the EMR for identification of individuals at risk may lead to missed opportunities

  14. Why a shared care record is an official medical record.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yulong; Orr, Martin; Warren, Jim; Humphrey, Gayl; Day, Karen; Tibby, Sarah; Fitzpatrick, Jo

    2013-10-18

    The literature describes three categories of health records: the Official Medical Records held by healthcare providers, Personal Health Records owned by patients, and--a possible in between case--the Shared Care Record. New complications and challenges arise with electronic storage of this latter class of record; for instance, an electronic shared care record may have multiple authors, which presents challenges regarding the roles and responsibilities for record-keeping. This article discusses the definitions and implementations of official medical records, personal health records and shared care records. We also consider the case of a New Zealand pilot of developing and implementing a shared care record in the National Shared Care Planning Programme. The nature and purpose of an official medical record remains the same whether in paper or electronic form. We maintain that a shared care record is an official medical record; it is not a personal health record that is owned and controlled by patients, although it is able to be viewed and interacted with by patients. A shared care record needs to meet the same criteria for medico-legal and ethical duties in the delivery of shared care as pertain to any official medical record.

  15. Silicones in medical electronics.

    PubMed

    Bruner, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    The use of silicones, although already extensive, is set to grow in medical electronics. Silicones used in medical device applications as tubing or moulded parts should also be considered for electronic applications in the same device. This article outlines the potential reduction in complexity that this solution offers. Benefits include eliminating negative materials interactions and avoiding bonding problems.

  16. Secure medical information sharing in cloud computing.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhiyi; Yang, Bo; Zhang, Wenzheng; Zhao, Yi; Wu, Zhenqiang; Miao, Meixia

    2015-01-01

    Medical information sharing is one of the most attractive applications of cloud computing, where searchable encryption is a fascinating solution for securely and conveniently sharing medical data among different medical organizers. However, almost all previous works are designed in symmetric key encryption environment. The only works in public key encryption do not support keyword trapdoor security, have long ciphertext related to the number of receivers, do not support receiver revocation without re-encrypting, and do not preserve the membership of receivers. In this paper, we propose a searchable encryption supporting multiple receivers for medical information sharing based on bilinear maps in public key encryption environment. In the proposed protocol, data owner stores only one copy of his encrypted file and its corresponding encrypted keywords on cloud for multiple designated receivers. The keyword ciphertext is significantly shorter and its length is constant without relation to the number of designated receivers, i.e., for n receivers the ciphertext length is only twice the element length in the group. Only the owner knows that with whom his data is shared, and the access to his data is still under control after having been put on the cloud. We formally prove the security of keyword ciphertext based on the intractability of Bilinear Diffie-Hellman problem and the keyword trapdoor based on Decisional Diffie-Hellman problem.

  17. Electronic Resource Sharing. SPEC Kit 222.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, Donna R., Comp.; Dahlbach, Barbara J., Comp.

    The Systems and Procedures Exchange Center (SPEC) surveyed Association of Research Libraries (ARL) institutions to measure the degree of electronic resource sharing in ARL libraries; to discover which resources are being shared and between what kinds of institutions; and what documentation is available. Of the 119 ARL institutions surveyed, 53…

  18. Electronic Procedures for Medical Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2015-01-01

    Electronic procedures are replacing text-based documents for recording the steps in performing medical operations aboard the International Space Station. S&K Aerospace, LLC, has developed a content-based electronic system-based on the Extensible Markup Language (XML) standard-that separates text from formatting standards and tags items contained in procedures so they can be recognized by other electronic systems. For example, to change a standard format, electronic procedures are changed in a single batch process, and the entire body of procedures will have the new format. Procedures can be quickly searched to determine which are affected by software and hardware changes. Similarly, procedures are easily shared with other electronic systems. The system also enables real-time data capture and automatic bookmarking of current procedure steps. In Phase II of the project, S&K Aerospace developed a Procedure Representation Language (PRL) and tools to support the creation and maintenance of electronic procedures for medical operations. The goal is to develop these tools in such a way that new advances can be inserted easily, leading to an eventual medical decision support system.

  19. 38 CFR 17.241 - Sharing medical information services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., research centers, and individual members of the medical profession, under which medical information and... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sharing medical... AFFAIRS MEDICAL Sharing of Medical Facilities, Equipment, and Information § 17.241 Sharing...

  20. 38 CFR 17.241 - Sharing medical information services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., research centers, and individual members of the medical profession, under which medical information and... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sharing medical... AFFAIRS MEDICAL Sharing of Medical Facilities, Equipment, and Information § 17.241 Sharing...

  1. 38 CFR 17.241 - Sharing medical information services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., research centers, and individual members of the medical profession, under which medical information and... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sharing medical... AFFAIRS MEDICAL Sharing of Medical Facilities, Equipment, and Information § 17.241 Sharing...

  2. 38 CFR 17.241 - Sharing medical information services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., research centers, and individual members of the medical profession, under which medical information and... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sharing medical... AFFAIRS MEDICAL Sharing of Medical Facilities, Equipment, and Information § 17.241 Sharing...

  3. Adopting electronic medical records

    PubMed Central

    Price, Morgan; Singer, Alex; Kim, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To understand the key challenges to adoption of advanced features of electronic medical records (EMRs) in office practice, and to better understand these challenges in a Canadian context. Design Mixed-methods study. Setting Manitoba. Participants Health care providers and staff in 5 primary care offices. Methods Level of EMR adoption was assessed, and field notes from interviews and discussion groups were qualitatively analyzed for common challenges and themes across all sites. Main findings Fifty-seven interviews and 4 discussion groups were conducted from November 2011 to January 2012. Electronic medical record adoption scores ranged from 2.3 to 3.0 (out of a theoretical maximum of 5). Practices often scored lower than expected on use of decision support, providing patients with access to their own data, and use of practice-reporting tools. Qualitative analysis showed there were ceiling effects to EMR adoption owing to how the EMR was implemented, the supporting eHealth infrastructure, lack of awareness or availability of EMR functionality, and poor EMR data quality. Conclusion Many practitioners used their EMRs as “electronic paper records” and were not using advanced features of their EMRs that could further enhance practice. Data-quality issues within the EMRs could affect future attempts at using these features. Education and quality improvement activities to support data quality and EMR optimization are likely needed to support practices in maximizing their use of EMRs. PMID:23851560

  4. Applying XDS for sharing CDA-based medical records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joong Il; Jang, Bong Mun; Han, Dong Hoon; Yang, Keon Ho; Kang, Won-Suk; Jung, Haijo; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2006-03-01

    Many countries have set long-term objectives for establishing an Electronic Healthcare Records system(EHRs). Various IT Strategies note that integration of EHR systems has a high priority. Because the EHR systems are based on different information models and different technology platforms, one of the key integration problems in the realization of the EHRs for the continuity of patient care, is the inability to share patient records between various institutions. Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) committee has defined the detailed implementations of existing standards such as DICOM, HL7, in a publicly available document called the IHE technical framework (IHE-TF). Cross-enterprise document sharing (XDS), one of IHE technical frameworks, is describing how to apply the standards into the information systems for the sharing of medical documents among hospitals. This study aims to design Clinical Document Architecture (CDA) schema based on HL7, and to apply implementation strategies of XDS using this CDA schema.

  5. 38 CFR 17.240 - Sharing specialized medical resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... medical resources. 17.240 Section 17.240 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Sharing of Medical Facilities, Equipment, and Information § 17.240 Sharing specialized medical resources. Subject to such terms and conditions as the Under Secretary for Health shall prescribe...

  6. Developing and sharing medical effectiveness information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzmaurice, J. M.

    1995-10-01

    In our health care environment, managed care, capitated payments, and a growing national information infrastructure are becoming major forces that shape decisions about how medical resources are organized and used. Health care decision makers prize medical effectiveness information based on patient care data that are linked with other data, such as costs. Obtaining uniform, accurate patient care data requires determining conditions of access to the data and standards. Under the National Information Infrastructure Initiative, principles have been developed to guide users and providers of individually identifiable data, and U.S. standards developers are at work to improve the definitions and electronic transmission of patient care data. When aggregated, these data can serve many uses, including improving quality of care. Their use for computing clinical performance measures, such as the Health Plan Employer Data Set (HEDIS), and a study that classifies such sets are highlighted.

  7. 12 CFR 7.5010 - Shared electronic space.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Shared electronic space. 7.5010 Section 7.5010 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BANK ACTIVITIES AND OPERATIONS Electronic Activities § 7.5010 Shared electronic space. National banks that share electronic space, including...

  8. 12 CFR 7.5010 - Shared electronic space.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Shared electronic space. 7.5010 Section 7.5010 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BANK ACTIVITIES AND OPERATIONS Electronic Activities § 7.5010 Shared electronic space. National banks that share electronic space,...

  9. 12 CFR 7.5010 - Shared electronic space.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Shared electronic space. 7.5010 Section 7.5010 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BANK ACTIVITIES AND OPERATIONS Electronic Activities § 7.5010 Shared electronic space. National banks that share electronic space,...

  10. 12 CFR 334.32 - Sharing medical information with affiliates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sharing medical information with affiliates... STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY FAIR CREDIT REPORTING Medical Information § 334.32 Sharing medical information... of the Federal Reserve System) and insured State branches of foreign banks. (b) In general....

  11. Shared medical appointments for preoperative evaluation of symptomatic macromastia.

    PubMed

    Giladi, Aviram M; Brown, David L; Alderman, Amy K

    2014-12-01

    Shared medical appointments combine individual patient-physician encounters with a group educational segment. This allows for patients' needs to be addressed individually and for patients to benefit from shared learning. Shared medical appointments enhance knowledge, understanding, and management of disease by providing a variety of perspectives and experiences. In addition, physician-patient contact time and clinic efficiency are increased. This study assesses patient satisfaction and provider efficiency with shared medical appointments for symptomatic macromastia. Patients were offered a shared medical appointment or traditional individual appointment. After the appointment, patients completed a satisfaction survey. Provider efficiency was measured by comparing visits per hour. Over 6 months, 26 of 28 shared medical appointment patients and 26 of 29 traditional individual appointment patients completed the survey. Patients reported 89 percent satisfaction with traditional individual appointments and shared medical appointments (p = 0.1), and both groups reported 92 percent satisfaction with thoroughness of care (p = 0.1). Seventy-seven percent of the shared medical appointment group said it was very or extremely likely they would participate in a shared medical appointment in the future. Provider efficiency increased nearly 250 percent, as patients-per-hour averaged 6.4 for shared medical appointments versus 2.67 for traditional individual appointments. Shared medical appointments for macromastia resulted in high patient satisfaction. Results were comparable to those of traditional individual appointments. No patients were dissatisfied, and provider efficiency improved. Shared medical appointments have unique benefits in patient education without compromising thoroughness or patient satisfaction, and offer an alternative delivery model that improves efficiency.

  12. Access Control Model for Sharing Composite Electronic Health Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jing; Ahn, Gail-Joon; Covington, Michael J.; Zhang, Xinwen

    The adoption of electronically formatted medical records, so called Electronic Health Records (EHRs), has become extremely important in healthcare systems to enable the exchange of medical information among stakeholders. An EHR generally consists of data with different types and sensitivity degrees which must be selectively shared based on the need-to-know principle. Security mechanisms are required to guarantee that only authorized users have access to specific portions of such critical record for legitimate purposes. In this paper, we propose a novel approach for modelling access control scheme for composite EHRs. Our model formulates the semantics and structural composition of an EHR document, from which we introduce a notion of authorized zones of the composite EHR at different granularity levels, taking into consideration of several important criteria such as data types, intended purposes and information sensitivities.

  13. Shared medical appointments: An innovative approach to patient care.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Cora A

    2015-09-13

    This article provides an overview of shared medical appointments, an innovative approach to managing patients with chronic conditions. The Diabetes Shared Medical Appointment of the Veterans Affairs Loma Linda Healthcare System, conducted by an interprofessional team and led by a nurse practitioner, is described.

  14. Implementing an electronic medication overview in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Storms, Hannelore; Marquet, Kristel; Nelissen, Katherine; Hulshagen, Leen; Lenie, Jan; Remmen, Roy; Claes, Neree

    2014-12-16

    An accurate medication overview is essential to reduce medication errors. Therefore, it is essential to keep the medication overview up-to-date and to exchange healthcare information between healthcare professionals and patients. Digitally shared information yields possibilities to improve communication. However, implementing a digitally shared medication overview is challenging. This articles describes the development process of a secured, electronic platform designed for exchanging medication information as executed in a pilot study in Belgium, called "Vitalink". The goal of "Vitalink" is to improve the exchange of medication information between professionals working in healthcare and patients in order to achieve a more efficient cooperation and better quality of care. Healthcare professionals of primary and secondary health care and patients of four Belgian regions participated in the project. In each region project groups coordinated implementation and reported back to the steering committee supervising the pilot study. The electronic medication overview was developed based on consensus in the project groups. The steering committee agreed to establish secured and authorized access through the use of electronic identity documents (eID) and a secured, eHealth-platform conform prior governmental regulations regarding privacy and security of healthcare information. A successful implementation of an electronic medication overview strongly depends on the accessibility and usability of the tool for healthcare professionals. Coordinating teams of the project groups concluded, based on their own observations and on problems reported to them, that secured and quick access to medical data needed to be pursued. According to their observations, the identification process using the eHealth platform, crucial to ensure secured data, was very time consuming. Secondly, software packages should meet the needs of their users, thus be adapted to daily activities of healthcare

  15. Shared medical appointments save money for capitated groups.

    PubMed

    2003-02-01

    Shared medical appointments aren't money-makers for Palo Alto Medical Foundation, but they do cut expenses, improve patient healing and free up physician schedules. The group nature of the encounters also encourages patients to follow medical orders. Find out more.

  16. 38 CFR 17.240 - Sharing specialized medical resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... medical resources. 17.240 Section 17.240 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... medical resources. Subject to such terms and conditions as the Under Secretary for Health shall prescribe, agreements may be entered into for sharing medical resources with other hospitals, including State or...

  17. 38 CFR 17.240 - Sharing specialized medical resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... medical resources. 17.240 Section 17.240 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... medical resources. Subject to such terms and conditions as the Under Secretary for Health shall prescribe, agreements may be entered into for sharing medical resources with other hospitals, including State or...

  18. 38 CFR 17.240 - Sharing specialized medical resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... medical resources. 17.240 Section 17.240 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... medical resources. Subject to such terms and conditions as the Under Secretary for Health shall prescribe, agreements may be entered into for sharing medical resources with other hospitals, including State or...

  19. 38 CFR 17.240 - Sharing specialized medical resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... medical resources. 17.240 Section 17.240 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... medical resources. Subject to such terms and conditions as the Under Secretary for Health shall prescribe, agreements may be entered into for sharing medical resources with other hospitals, including State or...

  20. Electronic Medical Business Operations System

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, D. T.; Metcalf, J. R.; North, M. P.; Richardson, T. L.; Underwood, S. A.; Shelton, P. M.; Ray, W. B.; Morrell, M. L.; Caldwell, III, D. C.

    2012-04-16

    Electronic Management of medical records has taken a back seat both in private industry and in the government. Record volumes continue to rise every day and management of these paper records is inefficient and very expensive. In 2005, the White House announced support for the development of electronic medical records across the federal government. In 2006, the DOE issued 10 CFR 851 requiring all medical records be electronically available by 2015. The Y-12 National Security Complex is currently investing funds to develop a comprehensive EMR to incorporate the requirements of an occupational health facility which are common across the Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC). Scheduling, workflow, and data capture from medical surveillance, certification, and qualification examinations are core pieces of the system. The Electronic Medical Business Operations System (EMBOS) will provide a comprehensive health tool solution to 10 CFR 851 for Y-12 and can be leveraged to the Nuclear Weapon Complex (NWC); all site in the NWC must meet the requirements of 10 CFR 851 which states that all medical records must be electronically available by 2015. There is also potential to leverage EMBOS to the private4 sector. EMBOS is being developed and deployed in phases. When fully deployed the EMBOS will be a state-of-the-art web-enabled integrated electronic solution providing a complete electronic medical record (EMR). EMBOS has been deployed and provides a dynamic electronic medical history and surveillance program (e.g., Asbestos, Hearing Conservation, and Respirator Wearer) questionnaire. Table 1 below lists EMBOS capabilities and data to be tracked. Data to be tracked: Patient Demographics – Current/Historical; Physical Examination Data; Employee Medical Health History; Medical Surveillance Programs; Patient and Provider Schedules; Medical Qualification/Certifications; Laboratory Data; Standardized Abnormal Lab Notifications; Prescription Medication Tracking and Dispensing; Allergies

  1. Prescription Medication Sharing: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Beyene, Kebede A.; Sheridan, Janie; Aspden, Trudi

    2014-01-01

    We reviewed the literature on nonrecreational prescription medication sharing. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and a customized multidatabase for all relevant articles published through 2013; our final sample comprised 19 studies from 9 countries with 36 182 participants, ranging in age from children to older adults, and published between 1990 and 2011. The prevalence rate for borrowing someone’s prescription medication was 5% to 51.9% and for lending prescription medication to someone else was 6% to 22.9%. A wide range of medicines were shared between family members, friends, and acquaintances. Sharing of many classes of prescription medication was common. Further research should explore why people share, how they decide to lend or borrow, whether they are aware of the risks, and how they assess the relevance of those risks. PMID:24524496

  2. ["MonDossierMedical.ch": an efficient tool for sharing medical data between patients and doctors].

    PubMed

    Rosemberg, Aurélie; Plaut, Olivier; Sepulchre, Xavier; Spahni, Stéphane

    2015-05-13

    "MonDossierMedical.ch" is a project led by the canton of Geneva, making it possible for every patient to access his own electronic health record (EHR) and to share the medical files with his doctors. It was introduced across the canton in mid-2013, and provided to all patients free of charge. it is based on the first Swiss-wide e-health-compliant pilot project "e-toile". The canton of Geneva developed "e-toile" as a public-private partnership together with Swiss Post and it was launched in 2009 in some of the canton's municipalities. Back then, Geneva's EHR represented the first Swiss attempt to link all healthcare professionals in the treatment chain. Today, it serves more than 4,600 patients and 380 physicians. This number is growing regularly, as well as the health care institutions (physicians, private hospitals, labs) joining the community. Added value tools, such as a shared care plan and a shared medication list will make the platform even more attractive.

  3. Patient cost sharing and medical expenditures for the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Kazuya; Mizuoka, Sou; Yamamoto, Shunsuke; Iizuka, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Despite the rapidly aging population, relatively little is known about how cost sharing affects the elderly's medical spending. Exploiting longitudinal claims data and the drastic reduction of coinsurance from 30% to 10% at age 70 in Japan, we find that the elderly's demand responses are heterogeneous in ways that have not been previously reported. Outpatient services by orthopedic and eye specialties, which will continue to increase in an aging society, are particularly price responsive and account for a large share of the spending increase. Lower cost sharing increases demand for brand-name drugs but not for generics. These high price elasticities may call for different cost-sharing rules for these services. Patient health status also matters: receiving medical services appears more discretionary for the healthy than the sick in the outpatient setting. Finally, we found no evidence that additional medical spending improved short-term health outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. 12 CFR 41.32 - Sharing medical information with affiliates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... CREDIT REPORTING Medical Information § 41.32 Sharing medical information with affiliates. (a) Scope. This section applies to national banks, Federal branches and agencies of foreign banks, and their respective operating subsidiaries. (b) In general. The exclusions from the term “consumer report” in section 603(d)(2...

  5. Streamlining medical image sharing for continuity of care.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Ken H

    2013-01-01

    Sharing patient medical history can be inconvenient and unreliable. Massive strides have been made to address the wasteful aspects of healthcare today, but hospitals and healthcare providers are still searching for ways to improve the efficiency of medical image sharing. To ensure that a patient's historical medical images can be promptly accessed by all caregivers, a solution architecture is needed that anticipates and supports the need for images to be available along with the rest of the patient's required medical history. Healthcare facilities can quickly and affordably use existing technologies, combined with a unified approach for sharing images to greatly improve transitions of care for their patients. Images would no longer need to be burned on to CDs and transported.

  6. Lowering medical costs through the sharing of savings by physicians and patients: inclusive shared savings.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Harald; Emanuel, Ezekiel J

    2014-12-01

    Current approaches to controlling health care costs have strengths and weaknesses. We propose an alternative, "inclusive shared savings," that aims to lower medical costs through savings that are shared by physicians and patients. Inclusive shared savings may be particularly attractive in situations in which treatments, such as those for gastric cancer, are similar in clinical effectiveness and have modest differences in convenience but substantially differ in cost. Inclusive shared savings incorporates features of typical insurance coverage, shared savings, and value-based insurance design but differs from value-based insurance design, which merely seeks to decrease or eliminate out-of-pocket costs. Inclusive shared savings offers financial incentives to physicians and patients to promote the use of lower-cost, but equally effective, interventions and should be evaluated in a rigorous trial or demonstration project.

  7. Medical Electronics and Physiological Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochrane, T.

    1989-01-01

    Described are developments in medical electronics and physiological measurement. Discussed are electrocardiology, audiology, and urology as mature applications; applied potential tomography, magnetic stimulation of nerves, and laser Doppler flowmetry as new techniques; and optical sensors, ambulatory monitoring, and biosensors as future…

  8. Medical Electronics and Physiological Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochrane, T.

    1989-01-01

    Described are developments in medical electronics and physiological measurement. Discussed are electrocardiology, audiology, and urology as mature applications; applied potential tomography, magnetic stimulation of nerves, and laser Doppler flowmetry as new techniques; and optical sensors, ambulatory monitoring, and biosensors as future…

  9. Electronic Media: A Motif for Shared Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lightner, Stanley L.; Johnson, W. C.

    2000-01-01

    A survey of trade and industrial education supervisors from 10 states determined the degree of use of electronic education methods. Instructors in these states used presentation software and web-based exercises most often; fewer used video, CD-ROM, and distance technologies; 70% had been taught electronic presentation methods in preservice or…

  10. Electronic Media: A Motif for Shared Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lightner, Stanley L.; Johnson, W. C.

    2000-01-01

    A survey of trade and industrial education supervisors from 10 states determined the degree of use of electronic education methods. Instructors in these states used presentation software and web-based exercises most often; fewer used video, CD-ROM, and distance technologies; 70% had been taught electronic presentation methods in preservice or…

  11. Moving beyond Bermuda: sharing data to build a medical information commons.

    PubMed

    Cook-Deegan, Robert; McGuire, Amy L

    2017-04-03

    The ubiquity of DNA sequencing and the advent of medical imaging, electronic health records, and "omics" technologies have produced a deluge of data. Making meaning of those data-creating scientific knowledge and useful clinical information-will vastly exceed the capacity of even the largest institutions. Data must be shared to achieve the promises of genomic science and precision medicine.

  12. A maturity model to deliver a national shared medications system, options, practice, and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Bainbridge, Michael; Pearce, Christopher; Taggart, Richard

    2013-01-01

    In July 2012 Australia launched the Personally Controlled electronic Health Record (PCEHR). This structured record allows health related information to be shared between providers as well as between providers and consumers. The next big challenge in delivering value for consumers is to use the medicines information distributed throughout the record in a way that allows better medications management at all levels. This poster points to the design and usability challenges being dealt with in that process during a national roll out and proposes a maturity model to accelerate the delivery of shared medication records. It is suggested that this model will have relevance in other jurisdictions.

  13. Shared leadership in a medical practice: keys to success.

    PubMed

    Daiker, Barbara L

    2009-01-01

    Medical practices are in a complex industry and require the expertise of both physician and business leaders to be successful. Sharing the leadership between these two professionals brings with it challenges that are best met if the environment is supportive. This support comes in the form of external aspects such as selection, role definition, organizational hierarchy, time, and process. Critical to shared leadership is communication, both frequency and quality. Conflicts are likely to occur, and how they are resolved is what determines the strength of a shared governance relationship. Reality is that finding the balance in shared governance is diffcult, but with effort and commitment, it can provide the organization with the performance it hopes to achieve.

  14. Secure public cloud platform for medical images sharing.

    PubMed

    Pan, Wei; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Bouslimi, Dalel; Prigent, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Cloud computing promises medical imaging services offering large storage and computing capabilities for limited costs. In this data outsourcing framework, one of the greatest issues to deal with is data security. To do so, we propose to secure a public cloud platform devoted to medical image sharing by defining and deploying a security policy so as to control various security mechanisms. This policy stands on a risk assessment we conducted so as to identify security objectives with a special interest for digital content protection. These objectives are addressed by means of different security mechanisms like access and usage control policy, partial-encryption and watermarking.

  15. Shared decision making: skill acquisition for year III medical students.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Cathleen E; Reed, Virginia A; Eliassen, M Scottie; Imset, Inger

    2011-01-01

    A foundation of care within a Patient-centered Medical Home (PCMH) is respect for patients' values and preferences. Shared decision making (SDM) involves a set of principles and approaches to working with patients that integrates medical information and data with the preferences, values, and support systems of individual patients facing medical decisions. The value of SDM is increasingly evidenced by the incorporation of principles of SDM into the definitions of patient-centered care and PCMHs, accountable care organizations, and the language of the Health Reform Act of 2010. We developed and integrated a curriculum on SDM in the third-year Family Medicine Clerkship at Dartmouth Medical School. The curriculum consisted of a mix of experiential, classroom, and online experiences designed to provide students with opportunities to learn content, practice skills, and share observations from their preceptorships. Student feedback was an important component of evaluating the SDM curriculum. Themes identified from students' reflections on their own behavior in a Simulated Patient Encounter included an increase in confidence and competence in their ability to use SDM, while noting the disconnect that may exist between what is taught in the clerkship and what they experience in their preceptorships. As this curriculum has developed, we have acquired a deep appreciation of the benefits and challenges of attempting to teach sophisticated communication and decision-making precepts to medical students who are working to master fundamentals of clinical work and who may or may not see such precepts reinforced in practice.

  16. Toward a shared language for competency-based medical education.

    PubMed

    Englander, Robert; Frank, Jason R; Carraccio, Carol; Sherbino, Jonathan; Ross, Shelley; Snell, Linda

    2017-06-01

    The paradigm shift brought about by the advent of competency-based medical education (CBME) can be characterized as an adaptive change. Currently, its development and implementation suffer from the lack of a lingua franca. A shared language is needed to support collaboration and dissemination across the world community of medical educators. The International CBME Collaborators held a second summit in 2013 to explore this and other contemporary CBME issues. We present the resulting International CBME Collaborator's glossary of CBME terms. Particular attention is given to the terms competency, entrustable professional activity (EPA), and milestone and their interrelationships. Medical education scholars and enthusiasts of the competency-based approach are encouraged to adopt these terms and definitions, although no doubt the vocabulary of CBME will continue to evolve.

  17. [The "Susami information sharing system" facilitates cooperation between medical care, nursing care and senior care].

    PubMed

    Takagaki, Yusaku; Yamamoto, Shuji; Kubo, Mayu; Kunitatsu, Kosei

    2014-01-01

    Susami is a typical rural town of which about 5,000 with a 40% aging rate, located in the south of Wakayama prefecture. The needs with regard to medical care, nursing care and senior care has been increasing every year. However, there are few staff members involved in such care services. To take better care of our community, we developed the "Susami information sharing system." The subjects consisted of 2,600 people from Susami who provided their consent for their information to be shared. Using the information sharing system, the medical information, including prescriptions, infusions, imaging and laboratory data is automatically extracted from the electronic medical records at Susami hospital. Home nursing information is uploaded by a handheld unit by nurses at home nursing stations. Senior care information is also shared by care workers as part of the Susami social welfare association. Welfare information, including the results of basic medical examinations, cancer screening and vaccination data are uploaded by staff of the government office. Infrared motion sensors are installed in the homes of subjects living on their own to monitor their life activities. All information is collected by a shared host server through each information disclosure server. All information can be seen in the electronic medical records and PC monitors. The Susami government office administers this system under an annual budget, 3,800,000 yen. Most of the budget is the maintenance cost of the infrared motion sensors. The annual administration expense for the system's servers is 680,000 yen. Because the maintenance cost is relatively low, it is not difficult for small-scale governments like that in Susami to maintain this system. In the near future, we will consider allowing other departments and practitioners to connect to our system. This system has strengthened both mutual understanding and cooperation between patients, health care providers, nurses and caregivers.

  18. Anonymization of Longitudinal Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Tamersoy, Acar; Loukides, Grigorios; Nergiz, Mehmet Ercan; Saygin, Yucel; Malin, Bradley

    2013-01-01

    Electronic medical record (EMR) systems have enabled healthcare providers to collect detailed patient information from the primary care domain. At the same time, longitudinal data from EMRs are increasingly combined with biorepositories to generate personalized clinical decision support protocols. Emerging policies encourage investigators to disseminate such data in a deidentified form for reuse and collaboration, but organizations are hesitant to do so because they fear such actions will jeopardize patient privacy. In particular, there are concerns that residual demographic and clinical features could be exploited for reidentification purposes. Various approaches have been developed to anonymize clinical data, but they neglect temporal information and are, thus, insufficient for emerging biomedical research paradigms. This paper proposes a novel approach to share patient-specific longitudinal data that offers robust privacy guarantees, while preserving data utility for many biomedical investigations. Our approach aggregates temporal and diagnostic information using heuristics inspired from sequence alignment and clustering methods. We demonstrate that the proposed approach can generate anonymized data that permit effective biomedical analysis using several patient cohorts derived from the EMR system of the Vanderbilt University Medical Center. PMID:22287248

  19. Curriculum inventory: Modeling, sharing and comparing medical education programs.

    PubMed

    Ellaway, Rachel H; Albright, Susan; Smothers, Valerie; Cameron, Terri; Willett, Timothy

    2014-03-01

    Abstract descriptions of how curricula are structured and run. The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) MedBiquitous Curriculum Inventory Standard provides a technical syntax through which a wide range of different curricula can be expressed and subsequently compared and analyzed. This standard has the potential to shift curriculum mapping and reporting from a somewhat disjointed and institution-specific undertaking to something that is shared among multiple medical schools and across whole medical education systems. Given the current explosion of different models of curricula (time-free, competency-based, socially accountable, distributed, accelerated, etc.), the ability to consider this diversity using a common model has particular value in medical education management and scholarship. This article describes the development and structure of the Curriculum Inventory Standard as a way of standardizing the modeling of different curricula for audit, evaluation and research purposes. It also considers the strengths and limitations of the current standard and the implications for a medical education world in which this level of commonality, precision, and accountability for curricular practice is the norm rather than the exception.

  20. Comprehensive Healthcare module: medical and pharmacy students’ shared learning experiences

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Chai-Eng; Jaffar, Aida; Tong, Seng-Fah; Hamzah, Majmin Sheikh; Mohamad, Nabishah

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The Comprehensive Healthcare (CHC) module was developed to introduce pre-clinical medical and pharmacy students to the concept of comprehensive healthcare. This study aims to explore their shared learning experiences within this module. Methodology During this module, medical and pharmacy students conducted visits to patients’ homes and to related community-based organisations in small groups. They were required to write a reflective journal on their experiences regarding working with other professions as part of their module assessment. Highly scored reflective journals written by students from the 2011/2012 academic session were selected for analysis. Their shared learning experiences were identified via thematic analysis. We also analysed students’ feedback regarding the module. Results Analysis of 25 selected reflective journals revealed several important themes: ‘Understanding of impact of illness and its relation to holistic care’, ‘Awareness of the role of various healthcare professions’ and ‘Generic or soft skills for inter-professional collaboration’. Although the primary objective of the module was to expose students to comprehensive healthcare, the students learnt skills required for future collaborative practice from their experiences. Discussion The CHC module provided early clinical exposure to community-based health issues and incorporated some elements of inter-professional education. The students learnt about the roles of other healthcare professions and acquired soft skills required for future collaborative practice during this module. PMID:25327980

  1. Comprehensive Healthcare module: medical and pharmacy students' shared learning experiences.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chai-Eng; Jaffar, Aida; Tong, Seng-Fah; Hamzah, Majmin Sheikh; Mohamad, Nabishah

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The Comprehensive Healthcare (CHC) module was developed to introduce pre-clinical medical and pharmacy students to the concept of comprehensive healthcare. This study aims to explore their shared learning experiences within this module. Methodology During this module, medical and pharmacy students conducted visits to patients' homes and to related community-based organisations in small groups. They were required to write a reflective journal on their experiences regarding working with other professions as part of their module assessment. Highly scored reflective journals written by students from the 2011/2012 academic session were selected for analysis. Their shared learning experiences were identified via thematic analysis. We also analysed students' feedback regarding the module. Results Analysis of 25 selected reflective journals revealed several important themes: 'Understanding of impact of illness and its relation to holistic care', 'Awareness of the role of various healthcare professions' and 'Generic or soft skills for inter-professional collaboration'. Although the primary objective of the module was to expose students to comprehensive healthcare, the students learnt skills required for future collaborative practice from their experiences. Discussion The CHC module provided early clinical exposure to community-based health issues and incorporated some elements of inter-professional education. The students learnt about the roles of other healthcare professions and acquired soft skills required for future collaborative practice during this module.

  2. Comprehensive Healthcare module: medical and pharmacy students' shared learning experiences.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chai-Eng; Jaffar, Aida; Tong, Seng-Fah; Hamzah, Majmin Sheikh; Mohamad, Nabishah

    2014-01-01

    The Comprehensive Healthcare (CHC) module was developed to introduce pre-clinical medical and pharmacy students to the concept of comprehensive healthcare. This study aims to explore their shared learning experiences within this module. During this module, medical and pharmacy students conducted visits to patients' homes and to related community-based organisations in small groups. They were required to write a reflective journal on their experiences regarding working with other professions as part of their module assessment. Highly scored reflective journals written by students from the 2011/2012 academic session were selected for analysis. Their shared learning experiences were identified via thematic analysis. We also analysed students' feedback regarding the module. Analysis of 25 selected reflective journals revealed several important themes: 'Understanding of impact of illness and its relation to holistic care', 'Awareness of the role of various healthcare professions' and 'Generic or soft skills for inter-professional collaboration'. Although the primary objective of the module was to expose students to comprehensive healthcare, the students learnt skills required for future collaborative practice from their experiences. The CHC module provided early clinical exposure to community-based health issues and incorporated some elements of inter-professional education. The students learnt about the roles of other healthcare professions and acquired soft skills required for future collaborative practice during this module.

  3. Supporting medical communication for older patients with a shared touch-screen computer.

    PubMed

    Piper, Anne Marie; Hollan, James D

    2013-11-01

    Increasingly health care facilities are adopting electronic medical record systems and installing computer workstations in patient exam rooms. The introduction of computer workstations into the medical interview process makes it important to consider the impact of such technology on older patients as well as new types of interfaces that may better suit the needs of older adults. While many older adults are comfortable with a traditional computer workstation with a keyboard and mouse, this article explores how a large horizontal touch-screen (i.e., a surface computer) may suit the needs of older patients and facilitates the doctor-patient interview process. Twenty older adults (age 60 to 88) used a prototype multiuser, multitouch system in our research laboratory to examine seven health care scenarios. Behavioral observations as well as results from questionnaires and a structured interview were analyzed. The older adults quickly adapted to the prototype system and reported that it was easy to use. Participants also suggested that having a shared view of one's medical records, especially charts and images, would enhance communication with their doctor and aid understanding. While this study is exploratory and some areas of interaction with a surface computer need to be refined, the technology is promising for sharing electronic patient information during medical interviews involving older adults. Future work must examine doctors' and nurses' interaction with the technology as well as logistical issues of installing such a system in a real world medical setting. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparison of consumers’ views on electronic data sharing for healthcare and research

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Jill G; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2015-01-01

    New models of healthcare delivery such as accountable care organizations and patient-centered medical homes seek to improve quality, access, and cost. They rely on a robust, secure technology infrastructure provided by health information exchanges (HIEs) and distributed research networks and the willingness of patients to share their data. There are few large, in-depth studies of US consumers’ views on privacy, security, and consent in electronic data sharing for healthcare and research together. Objective This paper addresses this gap, reporting on a survey which asks about California consumers’ views of data sharing for healthcare and research together. Materials and Methods The survey conducted was a representative, random-digit dial telephone survey of 800 Californians, performed in Spanish and English. Results There is a great deal of concern that HIEs will worsen privacy (40.3%) and security (42.5%). Consumers are in favor of electronic data sharing but elements of transparency are important: individual control, who has access, and the purpose for use of data. Respondents were more likely to agree to share deidentified information for research than to share identified information for healthcare (76.2% vs 57.3%, p < .001). Discussion While consumers show willingness to share health information electronically, they value individual control and privacy. Responsiveness to these needs, rather than mere reliance on Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), may improve support of data networks. Conclusion Responsiveness to the public’s concerns regarding their health information is a pre-requisite for patient-centeredness. This is one of the first in-depth studies of attitudes about electronic data sharing that compares attitudes of the same individual towards healthcare and research. PMID:25829461

  5. Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Ellen K; Skipenes, Eva; Hausken, Marie F; Skeie, Svein; Østbye, Truls; Iversen, Marjolein M

    2017-05-01

    Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

  6. Sharing medical images: a proposal of a reference image database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Marcelo; Furuie, Sérgio S.

    2006-03-01

    Due to increasing number of digital images used in medical diagnosis, the image processing and analysis are becoming essential for many tasks in medicine. One of the obstacles within the field of medical image processing is the lack of reference image datasets freely available for groups and/or individual users, in order to evaluate their new methods and applications. In order to improve this situation, this work presents the development of a framework to make available a free, online, multipurpose and multimodality medical image database for software and algorithm evaluation. The project is implemented as a distributed architecture for medical image database including a publishing workflow, authoring tools, and role-based access control. Our effort aims to offer a testbed and a set of resources including software, links to scientific papers, gold standards, reference and post-processed images, enabling the medical image processing community (scientists, physicians, students and industrials) to be more aware of evaluation issues. The proposed approach has been used as an electronic teaching system in Radiology as well.

  7. A patient-centric distribution architecture for medical image sharing.

    PubMed

    Constantinescu, Liviu; Kim, Jinman; Kumar, Ashnil; Haraguchi, Daiki; Wen, Lingfeng; Feng, Dagan

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, rapid development of imaging technologies has resulted in the introduction of improved imaging devices, such as multi-modality scanners that produce combined positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) images. The adoption of picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) in hospitals have dramatically improved the ability to digitally share medical image studies via portable storage, mobile devices and the Internet. This has in turn led to increased productivity, greater flexibility, and improved communication between hospital staff, referring physicians, and outpatients. However, many of these sharing and viewing capabilities are limited to proprietary vendor-specific applications. Furthermore, there are still interoperability and deployment issues which reduce the rate of adoption of such technologies, thus leaving many stakeholders, particularly outpatients and referring physicians, with access to only traditional still images with no ability to view or interpret the data in full. In this paper, we present a distribution architecture for medical image display across numerous devices and media, which uses a preprocessor and an in-built networking framework to improve compatibility and promote greater accessibility of medical data. Our INVOLVE2 system consists of three main software modules: 1) a preprocessor, which collates and converts imaging studies into a compressed and distributable format; 2) a PACS-compatible workflow for self-managing distribution of medical data, e.g. via CD USB, network etc; 3) support for potential mobile and web-based data access. The focus of this study was on cultivating patient-centric care, by allowing outpatient users to comfortably access and interpret their own data. As such, the image viewing software included on our cross-platform CDs was designed with a simple and intuitive user-interface (UI) for use by outpatients and referring physicians. Furthermore, digital image access via

  8. Do continuing medical education articles foster shared decision making?

    PubMed

    Labrecque, Michel; Lafortune, Valérie; Lajeunesse, Judith; Lambert-Perrault, Anne-Marie; Manrique, Hermes; Blais, Johanne; Légaré, France

    2010-01-01

    Defined as reviews of clinical aspects of a specific health problem published in peer-reviewed and non-peer-reviewed medical journals, offered without charge, continuing medical education (CME) articles form a key strategy for translating knowledge into practice. This study assessed CME articles for mention of evidence-based information on benefits and harms of available treatment and/or preventive options that are deemed essential for shared decision making (SDM) to occur in clinical practice. Articles were selected from 5 medical journals that publish CME articles and are provided free of charge to primary-care physicians of the Province of Quebec, Canada. Two individuals independently scored each article with the use of a 10-item checklist based on the International Patient Decision Aid Standards. In case of discrepancy, the item score was established by team consensus. Scores were added to produce a total article score ranging from 0 (no item present) to 10 (all items present). Thirty articles (6 articles per journal) were selected. Total article scores ranged from 1 to 9, with a mean (+/- SD) of 3.1 +/- 2.0 (95% confidence interval 2.8-4.3). Health conditions and treatment options were the items most frequently discussed in the articles; next came treatment benefits. Possible harms, the use of the same denominators for benefits and harms, and methods to facilitate the communication of benefits and harms to patients were almost never described. No significant differences between journals were observed. The CME articles evaluated did not include the evidence-based information necessary to foster SDM in clinical practice. Peer-reviewed and non-peer-reviewed medical journals should require CME articles to include this type of information.

  9. Electronic Medical Consultation: A New Zealand Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Brebner, Campbell; Jones, Raymond; Marshall, Wendy; Parry, Graham

    2001-01-01

    Electronic medical consultation is available worldwide through access to the World Wide Web (WWW). This article outlines a research study on the adoption of electronic medical consultation as a means of health delivery. It focuses on the delivery of healthcare specifically for New Zealanders, by New Zealanders. It is acknowledged that the WWW is a global marketplace and that it is therefore difficult to identify New Zealanders' use of such a global market; nevertheless, we attempt to provide a New Zealand perspective on electronic medical consultation. PMID:11720955

  10. Medical Data GRIDs as approach towards secure cross enterprise document sharing (based on IHE XDS).

    PubMed

    Wozak, Florian; Ammenwerth, Elske; Breu, Micheal; Penz, Robert; Schabetsberger, Thomas; Vogl, Raimund; Wurz, Manfred

    2006-01-01

    Quality and efficiency of health care services is expected to be improved by the electronic processing and trans-institutional availability of medical data. A prototype architecture based on the IHE-XDS profile is currently being developed. Due to legal and organizational requirements specific adaptations to the IHE-XDS profile have been made. In this work the services of the health@net reference architecture are described in details, which have been developed with focus on compliance to both, the IHE-XDS profile and the legal situation in Austria. We expect to gain knowledge about the development of a shared electronic health record using Medical Data Grids as an Open Source reference implementation and how proprietary Hospital Information systems can be integrated in this environment.

  11. Identifying discrepancies in electronic medical records through pharmacist medication reconciliation.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Autumn L; Lynch, Kevin J

    2012-01-01

    To describe the types and causes of medication discrepancies in the electronic medical record identified by pharmacist medication reconciliation during outpatient medical visits and to identify patient characteristics associated with the presence of discrepancies. Observational case series study. Indigent primary care clinic in Pittsburgh, PA, from April 2009 to May 2010. 219 adults presenting for follow-up medical visits and self-reporting medication use. Medication reconciliation as part of patient interview and concurrent chart review. Frequency, types, and reasons for medication discrepancies and demographic variables, patient knowledge, and adherence. Of 219 patients interviewed, 162 (74%) had at least one discrepancy. The most common type of discrepancy was an incorrect medication documented on the chart. The most common reasons included over-the-counter (OTC) use of medications and patients not reporting use of medications. The presence of one or more medication discrepancies was associated with the use of three or more medications. Patient factors such as gender, age, and race were not associated with discrepancies. Patients able to recall the strength for more than 75% of their medications had fewer discrepancies, while knowledge of the medication name, indication, or regimen had no association with discrepancies. Pharmacists play a critical role in identifying discrepancies between charted medication lists and self-reported medication use, independent of adherence. Inaccuracies in charted medications are frequent and often are related to use of OTC therapies and lack of communication and documentation during physician office visits. Knowledge of patient-related variables and other reasons for discrepancies may be useful in identifying patients at greatest risk for discrepancies and interventions to prevent and resolve them.

  12. Moving electronic medical records upstream: incorporating social determinants of health.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Laura M; Tirozzi, Karen J; Manchanda, Rishi; Burns, Abby R; Sandel, Megan T

    2015-02-01

    Knowledge of the biological pathways and mechanisms connecting social factors with health has increased exponentially over the past 25 years, yet in most clinical settings, screening and intervention around social determinants of health are not part of standard clinical care. Electronic medical records provide new opportunities for assessing and managing social needs in clinical settings, particularly those serving vulnerable populations. To illustrate the feasibility of capturing information and promoting interventions related to social determinants of health in electronic medical records. Three case studies were examined in which electronic medical records have been used to collect data and address social determinants of health in clinical settings. From these case studies, we identified multiple functions that electronic medical records can perform to facilitate the integration of social determinants of health into clinical systems, including screening, triaging, referring, tracking, and data sharing. If barriers related to incentives, training, and privacy can be overcome, electronic medical record systems can improve the integration of social determinants of health into healthcare delivery systems. More evidence is needed to evaluate the impact of such integration on health care outcomes before widespread adoption can be recommended. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The "nuts and bolts" of implementing shared medical appointments: the Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates experience.

    PubMed

    Berger-Fiffy, Jill

    2012-01-01

    Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates (Harvard Vanguard) decided to develop a Shared Medical Appointment (SMA) program in 2007 for a variety of reasons. The program has launched 86 SMAs in 17 specialties at 12 sites and has exceeded 13 000 patient visits. Currently, the practice offers 54 SMAs and is believed to be the largest program in the country. This article provides an overview regarding staffing, space and equipment, project planning, promotional materials, training programs, workflow development, and the use of quality improvement (ie, LEAN) tools used to monitor the work to be completed and the metrics to date.

  14. Integration services to enable regional shared electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Ilídio C; Cunha, João P S

    2011-01-01

    eHealth is expected to integrate a comprehensive set of patient data sources into a coherent continuum, but implementations vary and Portugal is still lacking on electronic patient data sharing. In this work, we present a clinical information hub to aggregate multi-institution patient data and bridge the information silos. This integration platform enables a coherent object model, services-oriented applications development and a trust framework. It has been instantiated in the Rede Telemática de Saúde (www.RTSaude.org) to support a regional Electronic Health Record approach, fed dynamically from production systems at eight partner institutions, providing access to more than 11,000,000 care episodes, relating to over 350,000 citizens. The network has obtained the necessary clearance from the Portuguese data protection agency.

  15. Sharing prescription medication among teenage girls: potential danger to unplanned/undiagnosed pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Katherine Lyon; Honein, Margaret A; Moore, Cynthia A

    2003-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine how often children and adolescents share prescription medications and, because of teratogenic concerns, assess specific reasons why girls might engage in medication-sharing behaviors. Data were collected as part of Youthstyles, a mail survey of children and adolescents 9 through 18 years of age (764 girls and 804 boys) about health issues, attitudinal variables, and media preferences. Information collected by the survey included the respondent's history of borrowing or sharing prescription medications, the frequency with which sharing occurred, the reasons why medications might be borrowed or shared, and who influences their decisions to borrow or share medication. A total of 20.1% of girls and 13.4% of boys reported ever borrowing or sharing medications. Of the girls surveyed, 15.7% reported borrowing prescription medications from others, and 14.5% reported sharing their prescription medication with someone else. The reported likelihood of sharing increased with age. Medication sharing or borrowing was not a "one time only" emergency use for many: 7.3% of girls 15 through 18 years of age had shared medications >3 times. Reasons that girls gave for why they would share medications included having a prescription for the same medicine (40.2%), getting the medication from a family member (33.4%), having the same problem as the person who had the medication (29%), or wanting something strong for pimples or oily skin (10.5%). Medication sharing is relatively common among children and adolescents and is more common among girls than boys. An adolescent who receives a medication via sharing does not receive the appropriate information about its actions and possible negative interactions with other medications or any other associated risks. Sharing potentially teratogenic drugs is of special concern. Many barriers exist to communicating the risk about teratogenic drugs to women and girls, particularly if they are not planning a

  16. Gated electron sharing within dynamic naphthalene diimide-based oligorotaxanes.

    PubMed

    Avestro, Alyssa-Jennifer; Gardner, Daniel M; Vermeulen, Nicolaas A; Wilson, Eleanor A; Schneebeli, Severin T; Whalley, Adam C; Belowich, Matthew E; Carmieli, Raanan; Wasielewski, Michael R; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2014-04-22

    The controlled self-assembly of well-defined and spatially ordered π-systems has attracted considerable interest because of their potential applications in organic electronics. An important contemporary pursuit relates to the investigation of charge transport across noncovalently coupled components in a stepwise fashion. Dynamic oligorotaxanes, prepared by template-directed methods, provide a scaffold for directing the construction of monodisperse one-dimensional assemblies in which the functional units communicate electronically through-space by way of π-orbital interactions. Reported herein is a series of oligorotaxanes containing one, two, three and four naphthalene diimide (NDI) redox-active units, which have been shown by cyclic voltammetry, and by EPR and ENDOR spectroscopies, to share electrons across the NDI stacks. Thermally driven motions between the neighboring NDI units in the oligorotaxanes influence the passage of electrons through the NDI stacks in a manner reminiscent of the conformationally gated charge transfer observed in DNA. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Adoption of a Nationwide Shared Medical Record in France: Lessons Learnt after 5 Years of Deployment

    PubMed Central

    Séroussi, Brigitte; Bouaud, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Information sharing among health practitioners, either for coordinated or unscheduled care, is necessary to guarantee care quality and patient safety. In most countries, nationwide programs have provided tools to support information sharing, from centralized care records to health information exchange between electronic health records (EHRs). The French personal medical record (DMP) is a centralized patient-controlled record, created according to the opt-in consent model. It contains the documents health practitioners voluntarily push into the DMP from their EHRs. Five years after the launching of the program in December 2010, there were nearly 570,000 DMPs covering only 1.5% of the target population in December 2015. Reasons for this poor level of adoption are discussed in the perspective of other countries’ initiatives. The new French governmental strategy for the DMP deployment in 2016 is outlined, with the implementation of measures similar to the US Meaningful Use. PMID:28269907

  18. Privacy, confidentiality, and electronic medical records.

    PubMed Central

    Barrows, R C; Clayton, P D

    1996-01-01

    The enhanced availability of health information in an electronic format is strategic for industry-wide efforts to improve the quality and reduce the cost of health care, yet it brings a concomitant concern of greater risk for loss of privacy among health care participants. The authors review the conflicting goals of accessibility and security for electronic medical records and discuss nontechnical and technical aspects that constitute a reasonable security solution. It is argued that with guiding policy and current technology, an electronic medical record may offer better security than a traditional paper record. PMID:8653450

  19. Cost-effectiveness of shared medical appointments for neuromuscular patients.

    PubMed

    Seesing, Femke M; Groenewoud, Hans J; Drost, Gea; van Engelen, Baziel G M; van der Wilt, Gert Jan

    2015-08-18

    To assess whether shared medical appointments (SMAs) for neuromuscular patients represent a way of using clinicians' time efficiently without compromising quality of care for patients. Patients with a chronic neuromuscular disease (NMD) (n = 272) were randomly allocated to either an SMA or a regular individual annual appointment and followed up for a period of 6 months. Data on resource utilization and quality of life (EQ-5D) were collected prospectively, using a health care perspective. Incremental costs and changes in quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) were computed using a probabilistic decision model. Factors critical to the incremental cost-effectiveness of SMAs were explored in sensitivity analyses. No substantial differences between SMAs and individual visits in terms of costs per QALY were found (incremental cost-effectiveness ratio €-960.00; 95% confidence interval €-34,600.00, €+36,800.00). Sensitivity analyses showed that the cost-effectiveness ratio was particularly sensitive to SMA group size and proportion of patients seeing their treating neurologist. Cost-effectiveness of SMAs did not show a significant difference vs that of individual appointments based on data from our randomized controlled trial. On the other hand, we were able to show that a minimum of 6 patients per SMA and 75% of patients attending their treating neurologist are specific conditions under which SMAs qualify as a cost-effective alternative. This implies that SMAs may be a means to increase productivity of the physician without compromising quality of care. This study provides Class III evidence that SMAs are not significantly more cost-effective than individual appointments for patients with NMDs. The study lacks the precision to exclude important differences in cost-effectiveness between SMAs and individual appointments. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  20. Shared medical appointments for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men.

    PubMed

    Stevens, John A; Dixon, John; Binns, Andrew; Morgan, Bob; Richardson, Jeff; Egger, Garry

    2016-06-01

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health is generally the worst of any population group in Australia. Inaccessibility to health services is one possible cause of this. Shared medical appointments (SMAs) appear to be a culturally competent and appropriate way of improving access to, and the quality of, primary healthcare services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. The objective of this article is to assess the acceptability and appropriateness of SMAs as an adjunct process in primary care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men. As part of a broader study on SMAs, three SMA sessions were delivered at an Aboriginal men's health centre in northern New South Wales. One-day training sessions in SMA facilitation were also provided to two groups of 12-14 Aboriginal health workers (AHWs). Mixed methods were used to assess patient and provider satisfaction, subjective outcomes, and operational procedures in the SMA groups, as well as interest in the SMA process by AHWs. Satisfaction with SMAs among Aboriginal men was unanimously positive, with the numbers in the group increasing over time. Patients most enjoyed the 'yarn up' nature of SMAs with peer support, which reduced the 'scary' and culturally 'unnatural' nature of one-on-one consultations with a general practitioner (GP). AHWs who were trained to a level to conduct SMAs saw this as an effective way of improving cultural competence in, and accessibility of, their various Aboriginal health services. The results, though not generalisable, suggest that SMAs may offer a culturally safe and appropriate tool to enhance Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples' access to primary care.

  1. Enhancing Practice Efficiency and Patient Care by Sharing Electronic Health Records.

    PubMed

    Keller, Megan E; Kelling, Sarah E; Cornelius, Douglas C; Oni, Hafusat A; Bright, David R

    2015-01-01

    One primary function of community pharmacies is to dispense medications to patients. In doing so, pharmacists frequently communicate with physicians' offices to clarify prescription orders and obtain additional information to ensure the safe and accurate dispensing of medications. Such communication is often done by telephone or fax, which is inefficient for both the pharmacy and the physician's office. This problem was highlighted in a recent American Medical Association resolution defining certain pharmacy inquiries as "interference with the practice of medicine and unwarranted." As a result, many are seeking to understand how to balance the needs of the patient care process with the need for operational efficiency in the physician's office and pharmacy. This study presents one example of a health information technology-based solution involving shared access to an electronic health record (EHR), and describes a case in which a physician's office and a community pharmacy experimented with this model to promote practice efficiency while also providing enhanced access to clinical information in both directions. The rationale behind the process change, a brief description of how the new process came into existence, and a description of how information sharing can be helpful in related clinical situations are provided. Similar models that involve sharing of EHRs may create valuable opportunities for collaboration between physicians and pharmacists to enhance patient care and improve workflow efficiency.

  2. The evaluation of the need to share medical data on the community medical ICT network service in Nagasaki, Japan.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takehiro; Honda, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    The Community Medical ICT Network service at the Nagasaki, Japan was established in 2009. Medical information network for sharing patients data was investigated focused on the access log data from April of 2009 and October of 2010. The total number of the access to the medical information was 30,914 of 2,213 patients. And the total number of access of the image including diagnostic imaging report, medical examination, treatment and medical documents was 10,278(33.2%), 8,949(28.9%), 6,896(22.3%) and 4,791(15.5%) respectively. These results showed that these medical information had enough valued for sharing in the regional medicine. In conclusion, many types of medical information should be required for sharing in the community medical ICT network in Japan.

  3. Beyond abuse and exposure: framing the impact of prescription-medication sharing.

    PubMed

    Goldsworthy, Richard C; Schwartz, Nancy C; Mayhorn, Christopher B

    2008-06-01

    We sought to document the frequency, circumstances, and consequences of prescription medication-sharing behaviors and to use a medication-sharing impact framework to organize the resulting data regarding medication-loaning and -borrowing practices. One-on-one interviews were conducted in 2006, and participants indicated (1) prescription medicine taken in the past year, (2) whether they had previously loaned or borrowed prescription medicine, (3) scenarios in which they would consider loaning or borrowing prescription medicine, and (4) the types of prescription medicines they had loaned or borrowed. Of the 700 participants, 22.9% reported having loaned their medications to someone else and 26.9% reported having borrowed someone else's prescription. An even greater proportion of participants reported situations in which medication sharing was acceptable to them. Sharing prescription medication places individuals at risk for diverse consequences, and further research regarding medication loaning and borrowing behaviors and their associated consequences is merited.

  4. [Introduction to Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap) and REDCap2SDTM, a Conversion Tool to Facilitate Clinical Research Data Sharing].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Keiichi

    2017-07-01

    Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC), Study Data Tabulation Model (SDTM) is used in new drug application studies and for sharing and reuse of accumulated clinical research data. Clinical trial manuscripts submitted to International Committee of Medical Journal Editors member journals are required to contain a statement on data sharing. We introduce here Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap) and REDCap2SDTM, a tool for converting research data to CDISC SDTM for facilitating data sharing. This tool will help reduce the workload in new drug application studies and allow the effective reuse of clinical research data.

  5. Electronic medical records in clinical teaching.

    PubMed

    Warboys, Ina; Mok, Wai Yin; Frith, Karen H

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the project was to provide students with experiences to develop their technology competency and examine student perceptions about an academic electronic medical record (EMR) as a learning tool. Nurse educators need to integrate EMRs into their curricula to give students practice in the use of electronic documentation and retrieval of clinical information. The findings of this study indicated that students' use of EMRs at least 5 times resulted in the development of positive perceptions about their EMR experience.

  6. Access Scheme for Controlling Mobile Agents and its Application to Share Medical Information.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yu-Ting; Chen, Tzer-Shyong; Chen, Tzer-Long; Chung, Yu-Fang; Chen, Yu- Xin; Hwang, Jen-Hung; Wang, Huihui; Wei, Wei

    2016-05-01

    This study is showing the advantage of mobile agents to conquer heterogeneous system environments and contribute to a virtual integrated sharing system. Mobile agents will collect medical information from each medical institution as a method to achieve the medical purpose of data sharing. Besides, this research also provides an access control and key management mechanism by adopting Public key cryptography and Lagrange interpolation. The safety analysis of the system is based on a network attacker's perspective. The achievement of this study tries to improve the medical quality, prevent wasting medical resources and make medical resources access to appropriate configuration.

  7. Efficient medical information retrieval in encrypted Electronic Health Records.

    PubMed

    Pruski, Cédric; Wisniewski, François

    2012-01-01

    The recent development of eHealth platforms across the world, whose main objective is to centralize patient's healthcare information to ensure the best continuity of care, requires the development of advanced tools and techniques for supporting health professionals in retrieving relevant information in this vast quantity of data. However, for preserving patient's privacy, some countries decided to de-identify and encrypt data contained in the shared Electronic Health Records, which reinforces the complexity of proposing efficient medical information retrieval approach. In this paper, we describe an original approach exploiting standards metadata as well as knowledge organizing systems to overcome the barriers of data encryption for improving the results of medical information retrieval in centralized and encrypted Electronic Health Records. This is done through the exploitation of semantic properties provided by knowledge organizing systems, which enable query expansion. Furthermore, we provide an overview of the approach together with illustrating examples and a discussion on the advantages and limitations of the provided framework.

  8. Using clinically nuanced cost sharing to enhance consumer access to specialty medications.

    PubMed

    Buxbaum, Jason; de Souza, Jonas; Fendrick, A Mark

    2014-06-01

    With specialty pharmaceutical prices on the rise, patients are often expected to pay anywhere from 30% to 50% of the specialty-tier drug price through co-insurance-based cost sharing. As these prices continue to climb, patients may choose lower-value medications for their medical needs or become nonadherent for cost-related reasons. Value-based insurance design implementations for specialty medications connect cost sharing and clinical value by moving high-value medications into lower-priced tiers, adjusting cost-sharing based on patient-specific variables, applying the "reward the good soldier" strategy, and encouraging patients to seek high-performing providers.

  9. Asymmetric electron energy sharing in electron-impact double ionization of helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silenou Mengoue, M.; Tetchou Nganso, H. M.

    2016-12-01

    We present the fully fivefold differential cross sections (FDCSs) for (e ,3 e ) processes in helium within the first Born approximation. The calculation is performed for a coplanar geometry in which the incident electron is fast (˜6 keV), the momentum transfer is small (0.24 a.u.), and for an asymmetric energy sharing between both slow ejected electrons at excess energy of 20 eV. Two cases have been considered: E1=15 eV, E2=5 eV and E1=8 eV, E2=12 eV. While waiting for new theoretical and experimental results for confrontations, in particular for asymmetric energy sharing, our results clearly demonstrate that, for the same incident energy, the same momentum transfer and the same excess energy, the (e ,3 e ) process in helium with asymmetric energy sharing between ejected electrons is more likely than the case with symmetric energy sharing. The two- and three-dimensional representation of the FDCSs covering all possible values of the angle of ejections are presented and discussed. The theoretical cross sections are calculated by using a compact-kernel-integral-equation approach associated with the Jacobi matrix method to calculate a three-body wave function and which leads to a full convergence in terms of the basis size.

  10. Consultation of medical narratives in the electronic medical record.

    PubMed

    Tange, H J

    1999-12-01

    This article presents an overview of a research project concerning the consultation of medical narratives in the electronic medical record (EMR). It describes an analysis of user needs, the design and implementation of a prototype EMR system, and the evaluation of the ease of consultation of medical narratives when using this system. In a questionnaire survey, 85 hospital physicians judged the quality of their paper-based medical record with respect to data entry, information retrieval and some other aspects. Participants were more positive about the paper medical record than the literature suggests. They wished to maintain the flexibility of data entry but indicated the need to improve the retrieval of information. A prototype EMR system was developed to facilitate the consultation of medical narratives. These parts were divided into labeled segments that could be arranged source-oriented and problem-oriented. This system was used to evaluate the ease of information retrieval of 24 internists and 12 residents at a teaching hospital when using free-text medical narratives divided at different levels of detail. They solved, without time pressure, some predefined problems concerning three voluminous, inpatient case records. The participants were randomly allocated to a sequence that was balanced by patient case and learning effect. The division of medical narratives affected speed, but not completeness of information retrieval. Progress notes divided into problem-related segments could be consulted 22% faster than when undivided. Medical history and physical examination divided into segments at organ-system level could be consulted 13% faster than when divided into separate questions and observations. These differences were statistically significant. The fastest divisions were also appreciated as the best combination of easy searching and best insight in the patient case. The results of our evaluation study suggest a trade-off between searching and reading: too much

  11. Physical understanding through variational reasoning: electron sharing and covalent bonding.

    PubMed

    Ruedenberg, Klaus; Schmidt, Michael W

    2009-03-12

    Energy changes of stationary states resulting from geometric parameter changes in the Hamiltonian can be understood by variational reasoning in terms of the physical attributes of the kinetic and the potential energy functionals. In atoms as well as molecules, the energy minimization determines the ground state as the optimal compromise between the potential pull of the nuclear attractions and the localization-resisting kinetic pressure of the electron cloud. This variational competition is analyzed for the exact ab initio ground-state wave function of the hydrogen molecule ion to elucidate the formation of the bond. Its electronic wave function is shown to differ from the ground-state wave function of the hydrogen atom by polarization, sharing, and contraction, and the corresponding contributions to the binding energy are examined in detail. All told, the critical feature is that a molecular orbital, contracting (in the variational context) toward two nuclei simultaneously, can lower its potential energy while maintaining a certain degree of delocalization. As a consequence, its kinetic energy functional has a lower value than that of an orbital contracting toward a single nucleus equally closely. By contrast, the potential energy functional is lowered equally effectively whether the orbital contracts toward one nucleus or simultaneously toward two nuclei. Because of this weaker kinetic energy pressure, the electrostatic potential pull of the nuclei in the molecule is able to attach the orbital more tightly to each of the nuclei than the pull of the single nucleus in the atom is able to do. The role of the virial theorem is clarified. Generalizations to other molecules are discussed.

  12. Effects of Shared Electronic Health Record Systems on Drug-Drug Interaction and Duplication Warning Detection

    PubMed Central

    Rinner, Christoph; Grossmann, Wilfried; Sauter, Simone Katja; Wolzt, Michael; Gall, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Shared electronic health records (EHRs) systems can offer a complete medication overview of the prescriptions of different health care providers. We use health claims data of more than 1 million Austrians in 2006 and 2007 with 27 million prescriptions to estimate the effect of shared EHR systems on drug-drug interaction (DDI) and duplication warnings detection and prevention. The Austria Codex and the ATC/DDD information were used as a knowledge base to detect possible DDIs. DDIs are categorized as severe, moderate, and minor interactions. In comparison to the current situation where only DDIs between drugs issued by a single health care provider can be checked, the number of warnings increases significantly if all drugs of a patient are checked: severe DDI warnings would be detected for 20% more persons, and the number of severe DDI warnings and duplication warnings would increase by 17%. We show that not only do shared EHR systems help to detect more patients with warnings but DDIs are also detected more frequently. Patient safety can be increased using shared EHR systems. PMID:26682218

  13. Effects of Shared Electronic Health Record Systems on Drug-Drug Interaction and Duplication Warning Detection.

    PubMed

    Rinner, Christoph; Grossmann, Wilfried; Sauter, Simone Katja; Wolzt, Michael; Gall, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Shared electronic health records (EHRs) systems can offer a complete medication overview of the prescriptions of different health care providers. We use health claims data of more than 1 million Austrians in 2006 and 2007 with 27 million prescriptions to estimate the effect of shared EHR systems on drug-drug interaction (DDI) and duplication warnings detection and prevention. The Austria Codex and the ATC/DDD information were used as a knowledge base to detect possible DDIs. DDIs are categorized as severe, moderate, and minor interactions. In comparison to the current situation where only DDIs between drugs issued by a single health care provider can be checked, the number of warnings increases significantly if all drugs of a patient are checked: severe DDI warnings would be detected for 20% more persons, and the number of severe DDI warnings and duplication warnings would increase by 17%. We show that not only do shared EHR systems help to detect more patients with warnings but DDIs are also detected more frequently. Patient safety can be increased using shared EHR systems.

  14. Lead User Design: Medication Management in Electronic Medical Records.

    PubMed

    Price, Morgan; Weber, Jens H; Davies, Iryna; Bellwood, Paule

    2015-01-01

    Improvements in medication management may lead to a reduction of preventable errors. Usability and user experience issues are common and related to achieving benefits of Electronic Medical Records (EMRs). This paper reports on a novel study that combines the lead user method with a safety engineering review to discover an innovative design for the medication management module in EMRs in primary care. Eight lead users were recruited that represented prescribers and clinical pharmacists with expertise in EMR design, evidence-based medicine, medication safety and medication research. Eight separate medication management module designs were prototyped and validated, one with each lead user. A parallel safety review of medicaiton management was completed. The findings were synthesized into a single common set of goals, activities and one interactive, visual prototype. The lead user method with safety review proved to be an effective way to elicit diverse user goals and synthesize them into a common design. The resulting design ideas focus on meeting the goals of quality, efficiency, safety, reducing the cognitive load on the user, and improving communication wih the patient and the care team. Design ideas are being adapted to an existing EMR product, providing areas for further work.

  15. Fighting cancer together: Development and implementation of shared medical appointments to standardize and improve chemotherapy education.

    PubMed

    Prescott, Lauren S; Dickens, Andrea S; Guerra, Sandra L; Tanha, Jila M; Phillips, Desiree G; Patel, Katherine T; Umberson, Katie M; Lozano, Miguel A; Lowe, Kathryn B; Brown, Alaina J; Taylor, Jolyn S; Soliman, Pamela T; Garcia, Elizabeth A; Levenback, Charles F; Bodurka, Diane C

    2016-01-01

    Shared medical appointments offer a novel approach to improve efficiency and quality of care consistent with the goals of the Institute of Medicine. Our objective was to develop and implement a shared medical appointment for gynecologic cancer patients initiating chemotherapy. We first assessed the level of interest in shared medical appointments among our patients and providers through qualitative interviews. Both patients and providers identified pre-chemotherapy as an optimal area to pilot shared medical appointments. We subsequently created a multidisciplinary team comprised of physicians, advanced practice providers, nurses, pharmacists, administrators, health education specialists and members of the Quality Improvement Department to establish a Shared Medical Appointment and Readiness Teaching (SMART) program for all gynecologic oncology patients initiating chemotherapy with platinum- and/or taxane-based regimens. We developed a standardized chemotherapy education presentation and provided patients with a tool kit that consisted of chemotherapy drug education, a guide to managing side effects, advance directives, and center contact information. From May 9, 2014 to June 26, 2015, 144 patients participated in 51 SMART visits. The majority of patients had ovarian cancer and were treated with carboplatin/paclitaxel. Surveyed patients reported being highly satisfied with the group visit and would recommend shared medical appointments to other patients. This model of care provides patient education within a framework of social support that empowers patients. Shared medical appointments for oncology patients initiating chemotherapy are both feasible and well accepted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Fighting Cancer Together: Development and Implementation of Shared Medical Appointments to Standardize and Improve Chemotherapy Education

    PubMed Central

    Prescott, Lauren S.; Dickens, Andrea S.; Guerra, Sandra L.; Tanha, Jila M.; Phillips, Desiree G.; Patel, Katherine T.; Umberson, Katie M.; Lozano, Miguel A.; Lowe, Kathryn B.; Brown, Alaina J.; Taylor, Jolyn S.; Soliman, Pamela T.; Garcia, Elizabeth A.; Levenback, Charles F.; Bodurka, Diane C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Shared medical appointments offer a novel approach to improve efficiency and quality of care consistent with the goals of the Institute of Medicine. Our objective was to develop and implement a shared medical appointment for gynecologic cancer patients initiating chemotherapy. Methods We first assessed the level of interest in shared medical appointments among our patients and providers through qualitative interviews. Both patients and providers identified pre-chemotherapy as an optimal area to pilot shared medical appointments. We subsequently created a multidisciplinary team comprised of physicians, advanced practice providers, nurses, pharmacists, administrators, health education specialists and members of the Quality Improvement Department to establish a Shared Medical Appointment and Readiness Teaching (SMART) program for all gynecologic oncology patients initiating chemotherapy with platinum- and/or taxane-based regimens. We developed a standardized chemotherapy education presentation and provided patients with a tool kit that consisted of chemotherapy drug education, a guide to managing side effects, advance directives, and center contact information. Results From May 9, 2014 to June 26, 2015, 144 patients participated in 51 SMART visits. The majority of patients had ovarian cancer and were treated with carboplatin/paclitaxel. Surveyed patients reported being highly satisfied with the group visit and would recommend shared medical appointments to other patients. Conclusions This model of care provides patient education within a framework of social support that empowers patients. Shared medical appointments for oncology patients initiating chemotherapy are both feasible and well accepted. PMID:26549108

  17. [A distributed storage architecture for regional medical image sharing and cooperation based on HDFS].

    PubMed

    LI, Peng-jun; CHEN, Guang-jie; GUO, Wen-ming

    2011-03-01

    Given the importance of regional centers for medical image sharing and cooperation is important for resource balancing, healthcare service enhancement and medical expense reduction, building such regional medical image sharing and cooperation centers faces huge challenges. In this paper we analyze the advantages and weakness of two storage architectures, and designed a hybrid storage architecture combining FC SAN and Hadoop HDFS. A HDFS suitable medical image file format, called S-DICOM, and a set of S-DICOM operating middleware, SDFO (S-DICOM File Operator), was developed. The results of performance testing indicated that this hybrid storage architecture is suitable for storing and managing large volume of medical images.

  18. Can or can not? Electronic information sharing influence the participation behavior of the employees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, M. A.; Eman, Y.; Huda, I.; Thamer, A.

    2015-12-01

    Information sharing refers to information being shared between employees inside or outside an agency, or by providing accessibility of their information and data to other agencies so as to allow effective decision making. Electronic information sharing is a key to effective government. This study is conducted to investigate the factors of electronic information sharing that influence the participation behavior so as to augment it amongst the employees in public organizations. Eleven domains of factors that are considered in this study are benefits, risk, social network, Information stewardship, information quality, trust, privacy, reciprocity. The paper proposes electronic information sharing factors in public sector to increase the participation.

  19. Can or can not? Electronic information sharing influence the participation behavior of the employees

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammed, M. A. Eman, Y. Huda, I. Thamer, A.

    2015-12-11

    Information sharing refers to information being shared between employees inside or outside an agency, or by providing accessibility of their information and data to other agencies so as to allow effective decision making. Electronic information sharing is a key to effective government. This study is conducted to investigate the factors of electronic information sharing that influence the participation behavior so as to augment it amongst the employees in public organizations. Eleven domains of factors that are considered in this study are benefits, risk, social network, Information stewardship, information quality, trust, privacy, reciprocity. The paper proposes electronic information sharing factors in public sector to increase the participation.

  20. Do Continuing Medical Education Articles Foster Shared Decision Making?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labrecque, Michel; Lafortune, Valerie; Lajeunesse, Judith; Lambert-Perrault, Anne-Marie; Manrique, Hermes; Blais, Johanne; Legare, France

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Defined as reviews of clinical aspects of a specific health problem published in peer-reviewed and non-peer-reviewed medical journals, offered without charge, continuing medical education (CME) articles form a key strategy for translating knowledge into practice. This study assessed CME articles for mention of evidence-based…

  1. Shared control of a medical robot with haptic guidance.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Linfei; Chng, Chin Boon; Chui, Chee Kong; Yu, Peiwu; Li, Yao

    2017-01-01

    Tele-operation of robotic surgery reduces the radiation exposure during the interventional radiological operations. However, endoscope vision without force feedback on the surgical tool increases the difficulty for precise manipulation and the risk of tissue damage. The shared control of vision and force provides a novel approach of enhanced control with haptic guidance, which could lead to subtle dexterity and better maneuvrability during MIS surgery. The paper provides an innovative shared control method for robotic minimally invasive surgery system, in which vision and haptic feedback are incorporated to provide guidance cues to the clinician during surgery. The incremental potential field (IPF) method is utilized to generate a guidance path based on the anatomy of tissue and surgical tool interaction. Haptic guidance is provided at the master end to assist the clinician during tele-operative surgical robotic task. The approach has been validated with path following and virtual tumor targeting experiments. The experiment results demonstrate that comparing with vision only guidance, the shared control with vision and haptics improved the accuracy and efficiency of surgical robotic manipulation, where the tool-position error distance and execution time are reduced. The validation experiment demonstrates that the shared control approach could help the surgical robot system provide stable assistance and precise performance to execute the designated surgical task. The methodology could also be implemented with other surgical robot with different surgical tools and applications.

  2. Intelligent consumer-centric electronic medical record.

    PubMed

    Luo, Gang; Thomas, Selena B; Tang, Chunqiang

    2009-01-01

    Web-based, consumer-centric electronic medical records (CEMRs) are currently undergoing widespread deployment. Existing CEMRs, however, have limited intelligence and cannot satisfy users' many needs. This paper proposes the concept of intelligent CEMR. We introduce and extend expert system and web search technology into the CEMR domain. The resulting intelligent CEMRs can automatically provide users with personalized healthcare information to facilitate their daily activities. We use automatic home medical product recommendation as a concrete application to demonstrate the benefits offered by intelligent CEMRs.

  3. Recent perspectives of electronic medical record systems

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, XIAO-YING; ZHANG, PEIYING

    2016-01-01

    Implementation of electronic medical record (EMR) systems within developing contexts as part of efforts to monitor and facilitate the attainment of health-related aims has been on the increase. However, these efforts have been concentrated on urban hospitals. Recent findings showed that development processes of EMR systems are associated with various discrepancies between protocols and work practices. These discrepancies were mainly caused by factors including high workload, lack of medical resources, misunderstanding of the protocols by health workers, and client/patient practices. The present review focused on the effects of EMRs on patient care work, and on appropriate EMR designs principles and strategies to ameliorate these systems. PMID:27284289

  4. Recent perspectives of electronic medical record systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Peiying

    2016-06-01

    Implementation of electronic medical record (EMR) systems within developing contexts as part of efforts to monitor and facilitate the attainment of health-related aims has been on the increase. However, these efforts have been concentrated on urban hospitals. Recent findings showed that development processes of EMR systems are associated with various discrepancies between protocols and work practices. These discrepancies were mainly caused by factors including high workload, lack of medical resources, misunderstanding of the protocols by health workers, and client/patient practices. The present review focused on the effects of EMRs on patient care work, and on appropriate EMR designs principles and strategies to ameliorate these systems.

  5. A web service for enabling medical image retrieval integrated into a social medical image sharing platform.

    PubMed

    Niinimäki, Marko; Zhou, Xin; de la Vega, Enrique; Cabrer, Miguel; Müller, Henning

    2010-01-01

    Content-based visual image access is in the process from a research domain towards real applications. So far, most image retrieval applications have been in one specialized domain such as lung CTs as diagnosis aid or for classification of general images based on anatomic region, modality, and view. This article describes the use of a content-based image retrieval system in connection with the medical image sharing platform MEDTING, so a data set with a very large variety. Similarity retrieval is possible for all cases of the social image sharing platform, so cases can be linked by either visual similarity or similarity in keywords. The visual retrieval search is based on the GIFT (GNU Image Finding Tool). The technology for updating the index with new images added by users employs RSS (Really Simple Syndication) feeds. The ARC (Advanced Resource Connector) middleware is used for the implementation of a web service for similarity retrieval, simplifying the integration of this service. Novelty of this article is the application/integration and image updating strategy. Retrieval methods themselves employ existing techniques that are all open source and can easily be reproduced.

  6. Implementation methods of medical image sharing for collaborative health care based on IHE XDS-I profile

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianguo; Zhang, Kai; Yang, Yuanyuan; Sun, Jianyong; Ling, Tonghui; Wang, Mingqing; Bak, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. IHE XDS-I profile proposes an architecture model for cross-enterprise medical image sharing, but there are only a few clinical implementations reported. Here, we investigate three pilot studies based on the IHE XDS-I profile to see whether we can use this architecture as a foundation for image sharing solutions in a variety of health-care settings. The first pilot study was image sharing for cross-enterprise health care with federated integration, which was implemented in Huadong Hospital and Shanghai Sixth People’s Hospital within the Shanghai Shen-Kang Hospital Management Center; the second pilot study was XDS-I–based patient-controlled image sharing solution, which was implemented by the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) team in the USA; and the third pilot study was collaborative imaging diagnosis with electronic health-care record integration in regional health care, which was implemented in two districts in Shanghai. In order to support these pilot studies, we designed and developed new image access methods, components, and data models such as RAD-69/WADO hybrid image retrieval, RSNA clearinghouse, and extension of metadata definitions in both the submission set and the cross-enterprise document sharing (XDS) registry. We identified several key issues that impact the implementation of XDS-I in practical applications, and conclude that the IHE XDS-I profile is a theoretically good architecture and a useful foundation for medical image sharing solutions across multiple regional health-care providers. PMID:26835497

  7. Implementation methods of medical image sharing for collaborative health care based on IHE XDS-I profile.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianguo; Zhang, Kai; Yang, Yuanyuan; Sun, Jianyong; Ling, Tonghui; Wang, Mingqing; Bak, Peter

    2015-10-01

    IHE XDS-I profile proposes an architecture model for cross-enterprise medical image sharing, but there are only a few clinical implementations reported. Here, we investigate three pilot studies based on the IHE XDS-I profile to see whether we can use this architecture as a foundation for image sharing solutions in a variety of health-care settings. The first pilot study was image sharing for cross-enterprise health care with federated integration, which was implemented in Huadong Hospital and Shanghai Sixth People's Hospital within the Shanghai Shen-Kang Hospital Management Center; the second pilot study was XDS-I-based patient-controlled image sharing solution, which was implemented by the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) team in the USA; and the third pilot study was collaborative imaging diagnosis with electronic health-care record integration in regional health care, which was implemented in two districts in Shanghai. In order to support these pilot studies, we designed and developed new image access methods, components, and data models such as RAD-69/WADO hybrid image retrieval, RSNA clearinghouse, and extension of metadata definitions in both the submission set and the cross-enterprise document sharing (XDS) registry. We identified several key issues that impact the implementation of XDS-I in practical applications, and conclude that the IHE XDS-I profile is a theoretically good architecture and a useful foundation for medical image sharing solutions across multiple regional health-care providers.

  8. 38 CFR 17.241 - Sharing medical information services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., may enter into agreements with medical schools, Federal, State or local, public or private hospitals... such an agreement, an environment of academic medicine which will help the hospital attract and retain...

  9. [Nurse's coworking to electronic medical record].

    PubMed

    Maresca, M; Gavaciuto, D; Cappelli, G

    2007-01-01

    Nephrologists need to register and look at a great number of clinical data. The use of electronic medical records may improve efficiency and reduce errors. Aim of our work is to report the experience of Villa Scassi Hospital in Genoa, where a "patient file" has been performed to improve nephrology practice management. The file contains all clinical records, laboratory and radiology data, therapy, dialysis clinics, in addition to reports of out-patients department. This system allowed a better efficiency in diagnosis and treatment of the patient. Moreover experience of nurses in employing electronic medical records is reported. A reduced number of errors was found in therapy administering, because of a only one data source for physicians and nurses.

  10. Medical electronics: A need and a challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimeoff, J.

    1973-01-01

    Space programs have led to the development of telemetry pills for diagnosis of diseases of the digestive tract, reusable X-ray image storage plates that require no chemical processing, and muscular augmentation systems for the handicapped. These examples, together with countless other examples of technological innovation that can be drawn from research and development programs supported by government funds, offer a potential opportunity to stimulate growth and to control rising costs in medical electronics.

  11. Medical electronics: A need and a challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimeoff, J.

    1973-01-01

    Space programs have led to the development of telemetry pills for diagnosis of diseases of the digestive tract, reusable X-ray image storage plates that require no chemical processing, and muscular augmentation systems for the handicapped. These examples, together with countless other examples of technological innovation that can be drawn from research and development programs supported by government funds, offer a potential opportunity to stimulate growth and to control rising costs in medical electronics.

  12. Shared decision-making in medication management: development of a training intervention.

    PubMed

    Stead, Ute; Morant, Nicola; Ramon, Shulamit

    2017-08-01

    Shared decision-making is a collaborative process in which clinicians and patients make treatment decisions together. Although it is considered essential to patient-centred care, the adoption of shared decision-making into routine clinical practice has been slow, and there is a need to increase implementation. This paper describes the development and delivery of a training intervention to promote shared decision-making in medication management in mental health as part of the Shared Involvement in Medication Management Education (ShIMME) project. Three stakeholder groups (service users, care coordinators and psychiatrists) received training in shared decision-making, and their feedback was evaluated. The programme was mostly well received, with all groups rating interaction with peers as the best aspect of the training. This small-scale pilot shows that it is feasible to deliver training in shared decision-making to several key stakeholders. Larger studies will be required to assess the effectiveness of such training.

  13. Architecture of authorization mechanism for medical data sharing on the grid.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Takahito; Date, Susume; Takeda, Singo; Hasegawa, Ichiro; Shimojo, Shinji

    2006-01-01

    Data security is becoming increasingly important as the Grid matures. The advances of the Grid have allowed scientists and researchers to build a data grid where they can share and exchange research-related data and information. In reality, however, these specialists do not benefit enough from this data grid. The reason is that the current Grid does not have sufficiently robust and flexible data security. We investigate a medical data-sharing environment where medical doctors and scientists can securely share clinical and medical research data. We show medical data sharing that takes advantage of PERMIS, or an RBAC-based authorization system that achieves XML element level access control. We also describe the lessons learnt in designing the environment as well as a comparison with other existing authorization mechanisms.

  14. [Electronic medical record--interface specifications with medical informatics systems].

    PubMed

    Mocanu, Carmen; Mocanu, Mihai

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents the initial efforts of description and implementation for a new scheme of electronic patients recording, based on distributed database for chronic ophthalmologic diseases. Structural specifications derived from principal system's goals are the implementation of an efficient and flexible way of patients' data administration, using actual Web technologies, permitting future extensions, without reducing in performances and without exponential cost increasing. A very important aspect, that must be take into consideration is their interfacing with other medical programs and systems, as the systems for recording clinical data, monitoring systems (Patient Administrations Systems - PAS) for demographical data, systems for monitoring of treatment (Hippocrates program), web systems, including wireless.

  15. Electron-nuclear energy sharing in above-threshold multiphoton dissociative ionization of H2.

    PubMed

    Wu, J; Kunitski, M; Pitzer, M; Trinter, F; Schmidt, L Ph H; Jahnke, T; Magrakvelidze, M; Madsen, C B; Madsen, L B; Thumm, U; Dörner, R

    2013-07-12

    We report experimental observation of the energy sharing between electron and nuclei in above-threshold multiphoton dissociative ionization of H2 by strong laser fields. The absorbed photon energy is shared between the ejected electron and nuclei in a correlated fashion, resulting in multiple diagonal lines in their joint energy spectrum governed by the energy conservation of all fragment particles.

  16. A Model to Support Shared Decision Making in Electronic Health Records Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lenert, Leslie; Dunlea, Robert; Del Fio, Guilherme; KellyHall, Leslie

    2014-01-01

    Shared Decision Making (SDM) is an approach to medical care based on collaboration between provider and patient with both sharing in medical decisions. When patients’ values and preferences are incorporated in decision-making, then care is more appropriate, ethically sound, and often lower in cost. However, SDM is difficult to implement in routine practice because of the time required for SDM methods, the lack of integration of SDM approaches into electronic health records systems (EHRs), and absence of explanatory mechanisms for providers on the results of patients’ use of decision aids. This paper discusses potential solutions including the concept of a “Personalize Button” for EHRs. Leveraging a four-phased clinical model for SDM, this article describes how computer decision support (CDS) technologies integrated into EHRs can help insure that healthcare is delivered in a way that is respectful of those preferences. The architecture described herein, called CDS for SDM, is built upon recognized standards that are currently integrated into certification requirements for EHRs as part of Meaningful Use regulations. While additional work is needed on modeling of preferences and on techniques for rapid communication models of preferences to clinicians, unless EHRs are re-designed to support SDM around and during clinical encounters, they are likely to continue to be an unintended barrier to SDM. With appropriate development, EHRs could be a powerful tool to promote SDM by reminding providers of situations for SDM and monitoring on going care to insure treatments are consistent with patients’ preferences. PMID:25224366

  17. Price elasticity and medication use: cost sharing across multiple clinical conditions.

    PubMed

    Gatwood, Justin; Gibson, Teresa B; Chernew, Michael E; Farr, Amanda M; Vogtmann, Emily; Fendrick, A Mark

    2014-11-01

    To address the impact that out-of-pocket prices may have on medication use, it is vital to understand how the demand for medications may be affected when patients are faced with changes in the price to acquire treatment and how price responsiveness differs across medication classes.  To examine the impact of cost-sharing changes on the demand for 8 classes of prescription medications. This was a retrospective database analysis of 11,550,363 commercially insured enrollees within the 2005-2009 MarketScan Database. Patient cost sharing, expressed as a price index for each medication class, was the main explanatory variable to examine the price elasticity of demand. Negative binomial fixed effect models were estimated to examine medication fills. The elasticity estimates reflect how use changes over time as a function of changes in copayments. Model estimates revealed that price elasticity of demand ranged from -0.015 to -0.157 within the 8 categories of medications (P  less than  0.01 for 7 of 8 categories). The price elasticity of demand for smoking deterrents was largest (-0.157, P  less than  0.0001), while demand for antiplatelet agents was not responsive to price (P  greater than 0.05). The price elasticity of demand varied considerably by medication class, suggesting that the influence of cost sharing on medication use may be related to characteristics inherent to each medication class or underlying condition.

  18. Neutron yield of medical electron accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    McCall, R.C.

    1987-11-01

    Shielding calculations for medical electron accelerators above about 10 MeV require some knowledge of the neutron emission from the machine. This knowledge might come from the manufacturer's specifications or from published measurements of the neutron leakage of that particular model and energy of accelerator. In principle, the yield can be calculated if details of the accelerator design are known. These details are often not available because the manufacturer considers them proprietary. A broader knowledge of neutron emission would be useful and it is the purpose of this paper to present such information. 5 refs., 1 tab.

  19. The electronic medical office: optimizing solutions.

    PubMed

    Kirschenbaum, Ira H; Mabrey, Jay D; Wood, George W; Alexander, A Herbert; Rhoades, Charles E; Alexander, Ian J; Golladay, Gregory J; Wheeless, Clifford

    2008-01-01

    Optimizing the care for patients in the orthopaedic clinical setting involves a wide range of issues. Surgical techniques, preoperative and postoperative care, long-term outcomes follow-up, continuing education, and patient communication are a few of the important areas that surgeons deal with on a regular basis. Successful management of this information has an impact on clinical outcomes, direct patient care, financial decisions, and management of the surgeon's time. The development of a comprehensive electronic medical office is a powerful and probably necessary tool to successfully manage such information and achieve the goals of an effective and safe orthopaedic practice.

  20. Electronic medication packaging devices and medication adherence: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Checchi, Kyle D; Huybrechts, Krista F; Avorn, Jerry; Kesselheim, Aaron S

    2014-09-24

    Medication nonadherence, which has been estimated to affect 28% to 31% of US patients with hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes, may be improved by electronic medication packaging (EMP) devices (adherence-monitoring devices incorporated into the packaging of a prescription medication). To investigate whether EMP devices are associated with improved adherence and to identify and describe common features of EMP devices. Systematic review of peer-reviewed studies testing the effectiveness of EMP systems in the MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, and Sociological Abstracts databases from searches conducted to June 13, 2014, with extraction of associations between the interventions and adherence, as well as other key findings. Each study was assessed for bias using the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions; features of EMP devices and interventions were qualitatively assessed. Thirty-seven studies (32 randomized and 5 nonrandomized) including 4326 patients met inclusion criteria (10 patient interface-only "simple" interventions and 29 "complex" interventions integrated into the health care system [2 qualified for both categories]). Overall, the effect estimates for differences in mean adherence ranged from a decrease of 2.9% to an increase of 34.0%, and the those for differences in the proportion of patients defined as adherent ranged from a decrease of 8.0% to an increase of 49.5%. We identified 5 common EMP characteristics: recorded dosing events and stored records of adherence, audiovisual reminders to cue dosing, digital displays, real-time monitoring, and feedback on adherence performance. Many varieties of EMP devices exist. However, data supporting their use are limited, with variability in the quality of studies testing EMP devices. Devices integrated into the care delivery system and designed to record dosing events are most frequently associated with improved adherence, compared with other

  1. Impact of an electronic medication administration record on medication administration efficiency and errors.

    PubMed

    McComas, Jeffery; Riingen, Michelle; Chae Kim, Son

    2014-12-01

    The study aims were to evaluate the impact of electronic medication administration record implementation on medication administration efficiency and occurrence of medication errors as well as to identify the predictors of medication administration efficiency in an acute care setting. A prospective, observational study utilizing time-and-motion technique was conducted before and after electronic medication administration record implementation in November 2011. A total of 156 cases of medication administration activities (78 pre- and 78 post-electronic medication administration record) involving 38 nurses were observed at the point of care. A separate retrospective review of the hospital Midas+ medication error database was also performed to collect the rates and origin of medication errors for 6 months before and after electronic medication administration record implementation. The mean medication administration time actually increased from 11.3 to 14.4 minutes post-electronic medication administration record (P = .039). In a multivariate analysis, electronic medication administration record was not a predictor of medication administration time, but the distractions/interruptions during medication administration process were significant predictors. The mean hospital-wide medication errors significantly decreased from 11.0 to 5.3 events per month post-electronic medication administration record (P = .034). Although no improvement in medication administration efficiency was observed, electronic medication administration record improved the quality of care with a significant decrease in medication errors.

  2. Developing a framework to support shared decision making for youth mental health medication treatment.

    PubMed

    Crickard, Elizabeth L; O'Brien, Megan S; Rapp, Charles A; Holmes, Cheryl L

    2010-10-01

    Medical shared decision making has demonstrated success in increasing collaboration between clients and practitioners for various health decisions. As the importance of a shared decision making approach becomes increasingly valued in the adult mental health arena, transfer of these ideals to youth and families of youth in the mental health system is a logical next step. A review of the literature and preliminary, formative feedback from families and staff at a Midwestern urban community mental health center guided the development of a framework for youth shared decision making. The framework includes three functional areas (1) setting the stage for youth shared decision making, (2) facilitating youth shared decision making, and (3) supporting youth shared decision making. While still in the formative stages, the value of a specific framework for a youth model in support of moving from a client-practitioner value system to a systematic, intentional process is evident.

  3. Sharing and selling of prescription medications in a college student sample

    PubMed Central

    Garnier, Laura M.; Arria, Amelia M.; Caldeira, Kimberly M.; Vincent, Kathryn B.; O’Grady, Kevin E.; Wish, Eric D.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the prevalence of prescription medication diversion among college students; to compare classes of medications with respect to the likelihood of diversion; to document the most common methods of diversion; and to examine the characteristics of students who diverted medications. Method A cross-sectional analysis of personal interview data collected between August 2006 and August 2007 as part of an ongoing longitudinal study. The cohort of students, who were between the ages 17 and 19 at study onset, attended a large public university in the mid-Atlantic region. Information was gathered regarding a wide variety of variables, including demographics, diversion of medically prescribed drugs, illicit drug use, and childhood conduct problems. Results Among 483 students prescribed a medication, 35.8% diverted a medication at least once in their lifetime. The most commonly diverted medication classes were prescription ADHD medication, with a 61.7% diversion rate, and prescription analgesics (35.1% diversion rate). Sharing was the most common method of diversion, with 33.6% of students sharing their medication(s) and 9.3% selling in their lifetime. Comparative analyses revealed that prescription medication diverters had used more illicit drugs in the past year and had more childhood conduct problems than non-diverters. Conclusions If confirmed, these findings have important clinical implications for improved physician-patient communication and vigilance regarding prescribing analgesic and stimulant medications for young adults. PMID:20331930

  4. Sharing and selling of prescription medications in a college student sample.

    PubMed

    Garnier, Laura M; Arria, Amelia M; Caldeira, Kimberly M; Vincent, Kathryn B; O'Grady, Kevin E; Wish, Eric D

    2010-03-01

    To estimate the prevalence of prescription medication diversion among college students; to compare classes of medications with respect to the likelihood of diversion; to document the most common methods of diversion; and to examine the characteristics of students who diverted medications. A cross-sectional analysis of personal interview data collected between August 2006 and August 2007 as part of an ongoing longitudinal study. The cohort of students, who were between the ages of 17 and 19 years at study onset, attended a large public university in the mid-Atlantic region. Information was gathered regarding a wide variety of variables, including demographics, diversion of medically prescribed drugs, illicit drug use, and childhood conduct problems. Among 483 students prescribed a medication, 35.8% diverted a medication at least once in their lifetime. The most commonly diverted medication classes were prescription attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder medication (61.7% diversion rate) and prescription analgesics (35.1% diversion rate). Sharing was the most common method of diversion, with 33.6% of students sharing their medication(s) and 9.3% selling in their lifetime. Comparative analyses revealed that prescription medication diverters had used more illicit drugs in the past year and had more childhood conduct problems than nondiverters. If confirmed, these findings have important clinical implications for improved physician-patient communication and vigilance regarding prescribing analgesic and stimulant medications for young adults. (c) 2010 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  5. Electronic medication packaging devices and medication adherence: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Checchi, Kyle D.; Huybrechts, Krista F.; Avorn, Jerry; Kesselheim, Aaron S.

    2014-01-01

    Importance Medication non-adherence, which has been estimated to affect 28-31% of US patients with hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes, may be improved by electronic medication packaging (EMP) devices. Objective To investigate whether EMP devices are associated with improved adherence and to identify and describe common features of EMP devices. Evidence Acquisition We systematically reviewed peer-reviewed studies testing the effectiveness of EMP systems in the MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts databases from searches conducted to June 13, 2014. We extracted the associations between the interventions and adherence, as well as other key findings. We assessed each study for bias using the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. We qualitatively assessed features of EMP devices and interventions. Results 37 studies (32 randomized and 5 non-randomized) including 4,326 patients met review criteria: 10 patient-interface-only “simple” interventions and 29 “complex” interventions integrated into the health care system (2 qualified for both categories). Overall, the effect estimates for mean adherence ranged from -2.9 to 34.0% and the effect estimates for the proportion of patients defined as adherent ranged from -8.0 to 49.5%. We identified 5 common EMP characteristics: recording dosing events and storing a record of adherence, audiovisual reminders to cue dosing, digital displays, real-time monitoring, and providing patients with adherence performance feedback. Conclusion and Relevance Many varieties of EMP exist. However, data supporting their use are limited, with variability in the quality of studies testing EMP devices and evidence of reporting bias. Devices that are integrated into the care delivery system and that are designed to record dosing events are most frequently associated with improved adherence. Higher quality evidence is needed to determine the effect, if any, of these low cost

  6. SmartWADO: an Extensible WADO Middleware for Regional Medical Image Sharing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lijun; Liu, Li; Fu, Xiaodong; Huang, Qingsong; Zhang, Yin; Luo, Qiaoyi; Xiong, Xin

    2015-10-01

    Medical image sharing is an important problem in modern radiology, with wide applications in Internet and mobile devices. Some important features need to be added and optimized to medical image sharing. In this paper, we present an extensible Web Access to DICOM Persistent Objects (WADO) middleware based on image cache and real-time Web monitor technology for regional medical image sharing. We first develop the extension method of WADO standard and workflow of extended WADO service. Then, we design a medical image cache method to improve the performance of medical image on-demand transmission. Using the real-time monitor can discover the performance bottlenecks and optimized critical points. The experimental results show that the middleware effectively delivers medical images and reports to Web clients over the Internet, regardless of the platform used for access. It can be deployed in one hospital to provide WADO service to medical workers and also can be applied to regional picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) to transmit medical images and reports to Internet users in a way that is transparent to end-user applications.

  7. Beyond Abuse and Exposure: Framing the Impact of Prescription-Medication Sharing

    PubMed Central

    Goldsworthy, Richard C.; Schwartz, Nancy C.; Mayhorn, Christopher B.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives. We sought to document the frequency, circumstances, and consequences of prescription medication–sharing behaviors and to use a medication-sharing impact framework to organize the resulting data regarding medication-loaning and -borrowing practices. Methods. One-on-one interviews were conducted in 2006, and participants indicated (1) prescription medicine taken in the past year, (2) whether they had previously loaned or borrowed prescription medicine, (3) scenarios in which they would consider loaning or borrowing prescription medicine, and (4) the types of prescription medicines they had loaned or borrowed. Results. Of the 700 participants, 22.9% reported having loaned their medications to someone else and 26.9% reported having borrowed someone else’s prescription. An even greater proportion of participants reported situations in which medication sharing was acceptable to them. Conclusions. Sharing prescription medication places individuals at risk for diverse consequences, and further research regarding medication loaning and borrowing behaviors and their associated consequences is merited. PMID:18445792

  8. Understanding behavioral intent to participate in shared decision-making in medically uncertain situations.

    PubMed

    Maffei, Roxana M; Dunn, K; Zhang, J; Hsu, C E; Holmes, J H

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the process undertaken to identify and validate behavioral and normative beliefs and behavioral intent based on the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) and applied to men between the ages of 45 and 70 in the context of their participation in shared decision-making (SDM) in medically uncertain situations. This article also discusses the preliminary results of the aforementioned processes and explores potential future uses of this information that may facilitate greater understanding, efficiency and effectiveness of clinician-patient consultations. Twenty-five male subjects from the Philadelphia community participated in this study. Individual semi-structure patient interviews were conducted until data saturation was reached. Based on their review of the patient interview transcripts, researchers conducted a qualitative content analysis to identify prevalent themes and, subsequently, create a category framework. Qualitative indicators were used to evaluate respondents' experiences, beliefs, and behavioral intent relative to participation in shared decision-making during medical uncertainty. Based on the themes uncovered through the content analysis, a category framework was developed to facilitate understanding and increase the accuracy of predictions related to an individual's behavioral intent to participate in shared decision-making in medical uncertainty. The emerged themes included past experience with medical uncertainty, individual personality, and the relationship between the patient and his physician. The resulting three main framework categories include 1) an individual's Foundation for the concept of medical uncertainty, 2) how the individual Copes with medical uncertainty, and 3) the individual's Behavioral Intent to seek information and participate in shared decision-making during times of medically uncertain situations. The theme of Coping (with uncertainty) emerged as a particularly critical behavior/characteristic amongst the

  9. How to choose an electronic medical record.

    PubMed

    Lanier, Bob G

    2006-01-01

    I chose a Windows-based file system over a server-based system with a proprietary database, or a web-based system which has both a proprietary database and which also required a full time Internet connection. My reasoning was that I found it uncomplicated. I was familiar with the Windows interface and it required little effort to enter my existing data and was simple to operate the system. If one laptop crashes, my other computers still work. I don't fear failure of an Internet connection source, a modem or a server, power surges or other possible single points of failure that might prevent my patient care. I can incorporate all document types, I can update jump drives with any needed medical information. I can share information instantly with other systems. I can store my own data in a flexible and open format. I have no maintenance contract and I can make changes in my system or can even change vendors at any time. Last but certainly not least, I do not need a highly trained technical staff to operate or maintain our system.

  10. mEducator: A Best Practice Network for Repurposing and Sharing Medical Educational Multi-type Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamidis, Panagiotis D.; Kaldoudi, Eleni; Pattichis, Costas

    Although there is an abundance of medical educational content available in individual EU academic institutions, this is not widely available or easy to discover and retrieve, due to lack of standardized content sharing mechanisms. The mEducator EU project will face this lack by implementing and experimenting between two different sharing mechanisms, namely, one based one mashup technologies, and one based on semantic web services. In addition, the mEducator best practice network will critically evaluate existing standards and reference models in the field of e-learning in order to enable specialized state-of-the-art medical educational content to be discovered, retrieved, shared, repurposed and re-used across European higher academic institutions. Educational content included in mEducator covers and represents the whole range of medical educational content, from traditional instructional teaching to active learning and experiential teaching/studying approaches. It spans the whole range of types, from text to exam sheets, algorithms, teaching files, computer programs (simulators or games) and interactive objects (like virtual patients and electronically traced anatomies), while it covers a variety of topics. In this paper, apart from introducing the relevant project concepts and strategies, emphasis is also placed on the notion of (dynamic) user-generated content, its advantages and peculiarities, as well as, gaps in current research and technology practice upon its embedding into existing standards.

  11. Shared decision making in senior medical students: results from a national survey.

    PubMed

    Zeballos-Palacios, Claudia; Quispe, Renato; Mongilardi, Nicole; Diaz-Arocutipa, Carlos; Mendez-Davalos, Carlos; Lizarraga, Natalia; Paz, Aldo; Montori, Victor M; Malaga, German

    2015-05-01

    To explore perceptions and experiences of Peruvian medical students about observed, preferred, and feasible decision-making approaches. We surveyed senior medical students from 19 teaching hospitals in 4 major cities in Peru. The self-administered questionnaire collected demographic information, current approach, exposure to role models for and training in shared decision making, and perceptions of the pertinence and feasibility of the different decision-making approaches in general as well as in challenging scenarios. A total of 327 senior medical students (51% female) were included. The mean age was 25 years. Among all respondents, 2% reported receiving both theoretical and practical training in shared decision making. While 46% of students identified their current decision-making approach as clinician-as-perfect-agent, 50% of students identified their teachers with the paternalistic approach. Remarkably, 53% of students thought shared decision making should be the preferred approach and 50% considered it feasible in Peru. Among the 10 challenging scenarios, shared decision making reached a plurality (40%) in only one scenario (terminally ill patients). Despite limited exposure and training, Peruvian medical students aspire to practice shared decision making but their current attitude reflects the less participatory approaches they see role modeled by their teachers. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Electronic medical records and the gastroenterologist.

    PubMed

    Kosinski, Lawrence R

    2012-01-01

    This is an age of disruptive innovation in health care in which the business model is changing. Fee-for-service, volume-based systems are being replaced by fixed-fee, value-based systems. One of the major facilitating forces behind this change has been the development of the electronic health record, which is providing the medical community with the ability to have real-time quality metrics that will drive the development of web-based clinical decision support tools that will transform the current peer-review-based rules of practice with an eclectic fluid environment of continuous quality measurement and improvement. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The Use of Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Makoul, Gregory; Curry, Raymond H.; Tang, Paul C.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To assess physician–patient communication patterns associated with use of an electronic medical record (EMR) system in an outpatient setting and provide an empirical foundation for larger studies. Design: An exploratory, observational study involving analysis of videotaped physician–patient encounters, questionnaires, and medical-record reviews. Setting: General internal medicine practice at an academic medical center. Participants: Three physicians who used an EMR system (EMR physicians) and three who used solely a paper record (control physicians). A total of 204 patient visits were included in the analysis (mean, 34 for each physician). Main Outcome Measures: Content analysis of whether physicians accomplished communication tasks during encounters; qualitative analysis of how EMR physicians used the EMR and how control physicians used the paper chart. Results: Compared with the control physicians, EMR physicians adopted a more active role in clarifying information, encouraging questions, and ensuring completeness at the end of a visit. A trend suggested that EMR physicians might be less active than control physicians in three somewhat more patient-centered areas (outlining the patient's agenda, exploring psychosocial/ emotional issues, discussing how health problems affect a patient's life). Physicians in both groups tended to direct their attention to the patient record during the initial portion of the encounter. The relatively fixed position of the computer limited the extent to which EMR physicians could physically orient themselves toward the patient. Although there was no statistically significant difference between the EMR and control physicians in terms of mean time across all visits, a difference did emerge for initial visits: Initial visits with EMR physicians took an average of 37.5 percent longer than those with control physicians. Summary: An EMR system may enhance the ability of physicians to complete informationintensive tasks but

  14. Market factors and electronic medical record adoption in medical practices.

    PubMed

    Menachemi, Nir; Mazurenko, Olena; Kazley, Abby Swanson; Diana, Mark L; Ford, Eric W

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies identified individual or practice factors that influence practice-based physicians' electronic medical record (EMR) adoption. Less is known about the market factors that influence physicians' EMR adoption. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between environmental market characteristics and physicians' EMR adoption. The Health Tracking Physician Survey 2008 and Area Resource File (2008) were combined and analyzed. Binary logistic regression was used to examine the relationship between three dimensions of the market environment (munificence, dynamism, and complexity) and EMR adoption controlling for several physician and practice characteristics. In a nationally representative sample of 4,720 physicians, measures of market dynamism including increases in unemployment, odds ratio (OR) = 0.95, 95% confidence interval (CI) [0.91, 0.99], or poverty rates, OR = 0.93, 95% CI [0.89, 0.96], were negatively associated with EMR adoption. Health maintenance organization penetration, OR = 3.01, 95% CI [1.49, 6.05], another measure of dynamism, was positively associated with EMR adoption. Physicians practicing in areas with a malpractice crisis, OR = 0.82, 95% CI [0.71, 0.94], representing environmental complexity, had lower EMR adoption rates. Understanding how market factors relate to practice-based physicians' EMR adoption can assist policymakers to better target limited resources as they work to realize the national goal of universal EMR adoption and meaningful use.

  15. Collaborative work and medical talk: opportunities for learning through knowledge sharing.

    PubMed

    Nilsen, Line Lundvoll; Ludvigsen, Sten R

    2010-01-01

    Teleconsultations provide new opportunities for learning in medical settings. This study explores the conditions under which learning among physicians takes place. The empirical context is 47 real-time video conferences carried out to examine collaborative work and the medical talk involved. Sixteen of the observations were consultations wherein general practitioners (GPs) and specialists shared knowledge with the purpose of solving a medical problem related to a patient under treatment. In this exploratory study, the learning opportunities are seen as what medical practitioners with different types of expertise achieve through interaction while working with patients over periods of time. The analysis of medical talk in consultations shows that collaborative work among GPs and specialists creates a shared understanding of the patient's clinical history and treatment trajectory. As knowledge is demanded and attributed and gaps of knowledge become shared, consultations create a work tool that expands the medical work and talk. Collaborative work in and between different levels of the health care service expands knowledge, creates opportunities for learning in everyday settings, and improves the quality of knowledge distribution in the health care system.

  16. Sharing medical data for health research: the early personal health record experience.

    PubMed

    Weitzman, Elissa R; Kaci, Liljana; Mandl, Kenneth D

    2010-05-25

    Engaging consumers in sharing information from personally controlled health records (PCHRs) for health research may promote goals of improving care and advancing public health consistent with the federal Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act. Understanding consumer willingness to share data is critical to advancing this model. The objective was to characterize consumer willingness to share PCHR data for health research and the conditions and contexts bearing on willingness to share. A mixed method approach integrating survey and narrative data was used. Survey data were collected about attitudes toward sharing PCHR information for health research from early adopters (n = 151) of a live PCHR populated with medical records and self-reported behavioral and social data. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and logistic regression to characterize willingness, conditions for sharing, and variations by sociodemographic factors. Narrative data were collected through semistructured focus group and one-on-one interviews with a separate sample of community members (n = 30) following exposure to PCHR demonstrations. Two independent analysts coded narrative data for major and minor themes using a shared rubric of a priori defined codes and an iterative inductive process. Findings were triangulated with survey results to identify patterns. Of PHCR users, 138 out of 151 (91%) were willing to share medical information for health research with 89 (59%) favoring an opt-in sharing model. Willingness to share was conditioned by anonymity, research use, engagement with a trusted intermediary, transparency around PCHR access and use, and payment. Consumer-determined restrictions on content and timing of sharing may be prerequisites to sharing. Select differences in support for sharing under different conditions were observed across social groups. No gender differences were observed; however differences in age, role, and self-rated health

  17. Sharing Medical Data for Health Research: The Early Personal Health Record Experience

    PubMed Central

    Kaci, Liljana; Mandl, Kenneth D

    2010-01-01

    Background Engaging consumers in sharing information from personally controlled health records (PCHRs) for health research may promote goals of improving care and advancing public health consistent with the federal Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act. Understanding consumer willingness to share data is critical to advancing this model. Objective The objective was to characterize consumer willingness to share PCHR data for health research and the conditions and contexts bearing on willingness to share. Methods A mixed method approach integrating survey and narrative data was used. Survey data were collected about attitudes toward sharing PCHR information for health research from early adopters (n = 151) of a live PCHR populated with medical records and self-reported behavioral and social data. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and logistic regression to characterize willingness, conditions for sharing, and variations by sociodemographic factors. Narrative data were collected through semistructured focus group and one-on-one interviews with a separate sample of community members (n = 30) following exposure to PCHR demonstrations. Two independent analysts coded narrative data for major and minor themes using a shared rubric of a priori defined codes and an iterative inductive process. Findings were triangulated with survey results to identify patterns. Results Of PHCR users, 138 out of 151 (91%) were willing to share medical information for health research with 89 (59%) favoring an opt-in sharing model. Willingness to share was conditioned by anonymity, research use, engagement with a trusted intermediary, transparency around PCHR access and use, and payment. Consumer-determined restrictions on content and timing of sharing may be prerequisites to sharing. Select differences in support for sharing under different conditions were observed across social groups. No gender differences were observed; however differences

  18. Adapting electronic adherence monitors to standard packages of topical medications.

    PubMed

    Tusa, Mark G; Ladd, Mitchell; Kaur, Mandeep; Balkrishnan, Rajesh; Feldman, Steven R

    2006-11-01

    Adherence to topical medications is poorly characterized. Electronic monitors can provide objective adherence data, but these monitors are not designed to work with tubes of medications. We sought to adapt standard electronic monitors to commonly used medication tubes. An adapter was created to fit over standard medication tubes. Screw threads on the adapter were designed to fit standard electronic monitors. Adapters and monitors were tested with tubes of gel, ointment, and cream over an 8-week test period during which the adapters were opened and closed twice daily. The adapters were easily mated to both plastic and aluminum topical medication tubes. The bond between the adapter and the tube was maintained throughout the study. Electronic monitors were 100% accurate at identifying medication events over the study period. We conclude that adapting existing electronic monitors to medication tubes should facilitate a much better understanding of adherence to topical treatment.

  19. Can medical students from two cultures learn effectively from a shared web-based learning environment?

    PubMed

    Evans, Phillip; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Begg, Michael; Lam, Wayne

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to establish whether medical students from 2 different cultures can learn effectively from a shared web-based learning environment. Students from the College of Medicine, Edinburgh, UK and the Medical School, Gifu, Japan shared 2 weeks of teaching and learning in clinical genetics, using problem-based learning in a web-based application (WBA). Questions about language, time zone, agreement about the curriculum (learning outcomes, tutor activity and assessment) and specific pedagogical issues about the educational effectiveness of students' learning were considered. The evidence indicates that a shared WBA is practical where the learning outcomes and problem scenarios are common and students are fluent in the same language. Problem-based learning transfers itself best to online discussion boards when the numbers in the group are 16 or more. Students do not use the WBA as a primary source of resource material, and they augment the discussion boards with face-to-face meetings with peers and tutors.

  20. Integrated secure solution for electronic healthcare records sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yehong; Zhang, Chenghao; Sun, Jianyong; Jin, Jin; Zhang, Jianguo

    2007-03-01

    The EHR is a secure, real-time, point-of-care, patient-centric information resource for healthcare providers. Many countries and regional districts have set long-term goals to build EHRs, and most of EHRs are usually built based on the integration of different information systems with different information models and platforms. A number of hospitals in Shanghai are also piloting the development of an EHR solution based on IHE XDS/XDS-I profiles with a service-oriented architecture (SOA). The first phase of the project targets the Diagnostic Imaging domain and allows seamless sharing of images and reports across the multiple hospitals. To develop EHRs for regional coordinated healthcare, some factors should be considered in designing architecture, one of which is security issue. In this paper, we present some approaches and policies to improve and strengthen the security among the different hospitals' nodes, which are compliant with the security requirements defined by IHE IT Infrastructure (ITI) Technical Framework. Our security solution includes four components: Time Sync System (TSS), Digital Signature Manage System (DSMS), Data Exchange Control Component (DECC) and Single Sign-On (SSO) System. We give a design method and implementation strategy of these security components, and then evaluate the performance and overheads of the security services or features by integrating the security components into an image-based EHR system.

  1. Electronic business in the home medical equipment industry.

    PubMed

    Wei, June; Graham, Michael J; Liu, Lai C

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims at developing electronic business solutions to increase value for the home medical equipment industry. First, an electronic strategic value chain model was developed for the home medical equipment industry. Second, electronic business solutions were mapped from this model. Third, the top 20 dominant companies in the home medical equipment industry were investigated to see the current adoption patterns of these electronic business solutions. The solutions will be beneficial to decision-makers in the information technology adoptions in the home medical equipment industry to increase the business values.

  2. Effectiveness of Shared Medical Appointments Versus Traditional Clinic Visits for Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Everest, Erica; Akhtar, Sara; Sumego, Marianne; Zeizoun, Alaa; Worley, Sarah; Tang, Anne S; Dorsey, Allison; Smith, Ann; Schweiger, Bahareh

    2016-01-01

    Shared medical appointments began in the United States in 1996 to advance quality of care and enhance patients' ability to self-manage. Group visits gather patients with the same diagnosis for individual examinations followed by group education sessions taught by the provider. This leads to the opportunity to learn from the experiences of others. The Cleveland Clinic Department of Pediatric Endocrinology offers a shared medical appointment group for pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes called the ESCALAIT clinic (Enrichment Services and Care for Adolescents Living with Autoimmune Insulin Dependent Type 1 Diabetes). The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of traditional clinic visits with shared medical appointments for adolescents with type 1 diabetes in terms of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) improvement. Eighty ESCALAIT patients, aged 11 to 19 years were compared with 516 clinic controls of the same age. Visits were approximately 3 months apart for both patient groups. Changes in HbA1c between groups were calculated from the first to fourth visits. There was a statistically significant difference between the ESCALAIT clinic patients and the control patients. Our results revealed that the group visit patients had less improvement in HbA1c values at the last visit approximately 1 year later, but we would argue that the difference is not clinically significant. However, there were many benefits to shared medical appointment visits including increased access to care as well as peer support. Shared medical appointments are therefore a valid alternative to traditional clinic visits in this patient population.

  3. Shared responsibility for electronic records: governance in perinatal data entry.

    PubMed

    Craswell, Alison; Moxham, Lorna; Broadbent, Marc

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents research undertaken as part of a larger research project to examine the factors that influence midwives when entering perinatal data. A grounded theory methodology was used to undertake qualitative interviews with 15 participants from 12 different hospitals across Queensland, Australia using three different systems for perinatal data collection. The findings surrounding accountability are presented revealing that a shift in governance relating to responsibility and accountability is not occurring in midwifery units across Queensland. Without assignation of responsibility for entries and accountability for mistakes or omissions, perinatal data records can be left incomplete or inaccurate. Increasing use of electronic health records and creation of digital hospitals indicates these issues are highly relevant in planning for these services.

  4. How to conduct a workshop on medical writing: Tips, advice and experience sharing.

    PubMed

    Rathore, Farooq Azam; Mansoor, Sahibzada Nasir

    2015-06-01

    Medical writing has become an essential skill for anybody in academia and engaged in teaching. Workshops on medical writing are an effective way to teach the essential skills of medical writing to students and faculty members. There is a huge demand for these workshops all around the globe. Usually there is no curriculum of medical writing for the undergraduates or dedicated structured training sessions for the faculty members. One of the authors won an Author AID grant to conduct a series of workshops on medical writing. Eight workshops were conducted in three months, benefitting more than 200 students and faculty staff. We share our experience of holding this successful series of workshops with the aim that it might serve as a guide for researchers and faculty members who are eager to share and transfer their skills and knowledge. We also offer lessons learnt during this educational activity, tips to improve the quality and delivery of the content with limited resources and maximizing the impact. Experienced medical writers need to conduct these workshops to transfer their skills and to facilitate their colleagues and students to become better medical writers. Planning, rehearsal, motivation, resource management, good team work, audience analysis and feedback can make a workshop successful. Well prepared workshop content delivered in an interactive way with a variety of activities makes the workshop an engaging and interesting educational activity.

  5. MEDRIS: The Problem Oriented Electronic Medical Record in Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Rifat, Sami F.; Robert, Shanthi; Trace, David; Prakash, Sanjeev; Naeymi-Rad, Frank; Barnett, David; Pannicia, Gregory; Hammergren, David; Carmony, Lowell; Evens, Martha

    1990-01-01

    MEDRIS (The Medical Record Interface System) is an object oriented HyperCard interface designed to help physicians enter patient information as comfortably and naturally as possible. It can function as a stand alone system producing its own reports or serve as an interface to a medical expert system (e.g., MEDAS). MEDRIS plays an important role in the clinical education of medical students at the Chicago Medical School. MEDRIS portrays an intuitive, graphically oriented system that will provide a learning environment for the problem oriented medical record (POMR) that forms the basis of the structure of the history and physical exam. The enthusiasm shown by the medical students for this project has garnered support for including MEDRIS in the curriculum of the Introduction to Clinical Medicine course this semester. MEDRIS, developed using HyperCard, can be used as a tool not only for teaching POMR and physical diagnosis, but also computer literacy.

  6. A patient-controlled journal for an electronic medical record: issues and challenges.

    PubMed

    Wald, Jonathan S; Middleton, Blackford; Bloom, Amy; Walmsley, Dan; Gleason, Mary; Nelson, Elizabeth; Li, Qi; Epstein, Marianna; Volk, Lynn; Bates, David W

    2004-01-01

    Partners Healthcare System, Boston, MA, has developed a patient Web portal that features a patient-controlled electronic "journal" to allow patients to interact with their physician's electronic medical record. Patients can view and respond to health reminders, critique electronic chart information maintained by their doctor's office, enter additional clinical information, and prepare information summaries before an office visit. Creating shared information resources to support a collaborative care model required analysis of the business, architectural, and workflow requirements of the patient-controlled clinical portal and the physician-controlled electronic medical record system. In this paper we describe the challenges in aligning the two systems and serving the different user groups. Coupling the Patient Gateway system, serving over 8700 patients of 90 physicians as of September, 2003, with the Longitudinal Medical Record system, serving over 4000 physicians, has required a clear definition of user goals and workflow, well-defined interfaces, and careful consideration of system assumptions to succeed.

  7. Impact of type 2 diabetes medication cost sharing on patient outcomes and health plan costs.

    PubMed

    Thornton Snider, Julia; Seabury, Seth; Lopez, Janice; McKenzie, Scott; Goldman, Dana P

    2016-06-01

    To study the association between cost sharing for diabetes medications, adherence, hospitalization rates, and healthcare costs, with relationship to patient risk. A retrospective claims analysis of data from 35 large, private, self-insured employers (2004 to 2012). We examined outcomes for 92,410 patients aged 18 to 64 years with a type 2 diabetes (T2D) diagnosis who filled at least 1 T2D prescription. First, we examined the relationship between adherence, measured as the proportion of days covered, and cost sharing, measured as the out-of-pocket cost to purchase a pre-specified bundle of T2D prescriptions. We then examined the association between adherence and hospital days. Simulations showed the effect of increased cost sharing on adherence and inpatient utilization. A $10 increase in out-of-pocket cost was associated with a 1.9% reduction in adherence (P < .01). In turn, a 10% reduction in adherence was associated with a 15% increase in per-patient hospital days (0.17 days; P < .01). For the average plan, switching from low to high cost sharing reduced per-patient medication costs by $242 and increased per-patient hospitalization costs by $342, for a net increase of $100 in plan costs. Increases in per-patient costs were greater for high-risk patients, such as those with heart failure ($1328). Increased cost sharing for T2D medication was associated with reductions in pharmacy costs, but higher total costs for patients with T2D. This problem is particularly acute for patients with 1 or more cardiovascular comorbidities. The results suggest that increased diabetes cost sharing may hamper efforts to lower the total cost of diabetes care.

  8. [Design and Implementation of a Mobile Operating Room Information Management System Based on Electronic Medical Record].

    PubMed

    Liu, Baozhen; Liu, Zhiguo; Wang, Xianwen

    2015-06-01

    A mobile operating room information management system with electronic medical record (EMR) is designed to improve work efficiency and to enhance the patient information sharing. In the operating room, this system acquires the information from various medical devices through the Client/Server (C/S) pattern, and automatically generates XML-based EMR. Outside the operating room, this system provides information access service by using the Browser/Server (B/S) pattern. Software test shows that this system can correctly collect medical information from equipment and clearly display the real-time waveform. By achieving surgery records with higher quality and sharing the information among mobile medical units, this system can effectively reduce doctors' workload and promote the information construction of the field hospital.

  9. Social media, FOAMed in medical education and knowledge sharing: Local experiences with international perspective.

    PubMed

    Cevik, Arif Alper; Aksel, Gokhan; Akoglu, Haldun; Eroglu, Serkan Emre; Dogan, Nurettin Ozgur; Altunci, Yusuf Ali

    2016-09-01

    Social media, through the Internet and other web-based technologies, have become a means of communication and knowledge-sharing. In this article, we provide details about the social media traffic of various scientific activities, the organizations of which we have played an active role in. We also provide information in our native language through our FOAMed website, which has been published for about 30 months, with us acting as editors. We are comparing these local and limited ventures with examples from the world and aim to remind that social media sources play a very important role in sharing knowledge in medical training and encouraging local initiatives, like ours, with limited resources.

  10. Gauging the feasibility of cost-sharing and medical student interest groups to reduce interview costs.

    PubMed

    Lieber, Bryan A; Wilson, Taylor A; Bell, Randy S; Ashley, William W; Barrow, Daniel L; Wolfe, Stacey Quintero

    2014-11-01

    Indirect costs of the interview tour can be prohibitive. The authors sought to assess the desire of interviewees to mitigate these costs through ideas such as sharing hotel rooms and transportation, willingness to stay with local students, and the preferred modality to coordinate this collaboration. A survey link was posted on the Uncle Harvey website and the Facebook profile page of fourth-year medical students from 6 different medical schools shortly after the 2014 match day. There were a total of 156 respondents to the survey. The majority of the respondents were postinterview medical students (65.4%), but preinterview medical students (28.2%) and current residents (6.4%) also responded to the survey. Most respondents were pursuing a field other than neurosurgery (75.0%) and expressed a desire to share a hotel room and/or transportation (77.4%) as well as stay in the dorm room of a medical student at the program in which they are interviewing (70.0%). Students going into neurosurgery were significantly more likely to be interested in sharing hotel/transportation (89.2% neurosurgery vs 72.8% nonneurosurgery; p = 0.040) and in staying in the dorm room of a local student when on interviews (85.0% neurosurgery vs 57.1% nonneurosurgery; p = 0.040) than those going into other specialties. Among postinterview students, communication was preferred to be by private, email identification-only chat room. Given neurosurgery resident candidates' interest in collaborating to reduce interview costs, consideration should be given to creating a system that could allow students to coordinate cost sharing between interviewees. Moreover, interviewees should be connected to local students from neurosurgery interest groups as a resource.

  11. Technology Acceptance of Electronic Medical Records by Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocker, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Technology Acceptance Model's (TAM) relevance of the intention of nurses to use electronic medical records in acute health care settings. The basic technology acceptance research of Davis (1989) was applied to the specific technology tool of electronic medical records (EMR) in a specific setting…

  12. Technology Acceptance of Electronic Medical Records by Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocker, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Technology Acceptance Model's (TAM) relevance of the intention of nurses to use electronic medical records in acute health care settings. The basic technology acceptance research of Davis (1989) was applied to the specific technology tool of electronic medical records (EMR) in a specific setting…

  13. Proposal for a European Public Health Research Infrastructure for Sharing of health and Medical administrative data (PHRIMA).

    PubMed

    Burgun, Anita; Oksen, Dina V; Kuchinke, Wolfgang; Prokosch, Hans-Ulrich; Ganslandt, Thomas; Buchan, Iain; van Staa, Tjeerd; Cunningham, James; Gjerstorff, Marianne L; Dufour, Jean-Charles; Gibrat, Jean-Francois; Nikolski, Macha; Verger, Pierre; Cambon-Thomsen, Anne; Masella, Cristina; Lettieri, Emanuele; Bertele, Paolo; Salokannel, Marjut; Thiebaut, Rodolphe; Persoz, Charles; Chêne, Geneviève; Ohmann, Christian

    2015-01-01

    In Europe, health and medical administrative data is increasingly accumulating on a national level. Looking further than re-use of this data on a national level, sharing health and medical administrative data would enable large-scale analyses and European-level public health projects. There is currently no research infrastructure for this type of sharing. The PHRIMA consortium proposes to realise the Public Health Research Infrastructure for Sharing of health and Medical Administrative data (PHRIMA) which will enable and facilitate the efficient and secure sharing of healthcare data.

  14. Data-driven approach for creating synthetic electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Buczak, Anna L; Babin, Steven; Moniz, Linda

    2010-10-14

    New algorithms for disease outbreak detection are being developed to take advantage of full electronic medical records (EMRs) that contain a wealth of patient information. However, due to privacy concerns, even anonymized EMRs cannot be shared among researchers, resulting in great difficulty in comparing the effectiveness of these algorithms. To bridge the gap between novel bio-surveillance algorithms operating on full EMRs and the lack of non-identifiable EMR data, a method for generating complete and synthetic EMRs was developed. This paper describes a novel methodology for generating complete synthetic EMRs both for an outbreak illness of interest (tularemia) and for background records. The method developed has three major steps: 1) synthetic patient identity and basic information generation; 2) identification of care patterns that the synthetic patients would receive based on the information present in real EMR data for similar health problems; 3) adaptation of these care patterns to the synthetic patient population. We generated EMRs, including visit records, clinical activity, laboratory orders/results and radiology orders/results for 203 synthetic tularemia outbreak patients. Validation of the records by a medical expert revealed problems in 19% of the records; these were subsequently corrected. We also generated background EMRs for over 3000 patients in the 4-11 yr age group. Validation of those records by a medical expert revealed problems in fewer than 3% of these background patient EMRs and the errors were subsequently rectified. A data-driven method was developed for generating fully synthetic EMRs. The method is general and can be applied to any data set that has similar data elements (such as laboratory and radiology orders and results, clinical activity, prescription orders). The pilot synthetic outbreak records were for tularemia but our approach may be adapted to other infectious diseases. The pilot synthetic background records were in the 4

  15. The Effects of Cost Sharing on Adherence to Medications Prescribed for Concurrent Use: Do Definitions Matter?

    PubMed

    Sacks, Naomi C; Burgess, James F; Cabral, Howard J; McDonnell, Marie E; Pizer, Steven D

    2015-08-01

    Accurate estimates of the effects of cost sharing on adherence to medications prescribed for use together, also called concurrent adherence, are important for researchers, payers, and policymakers who want to reduce barriers to adherence for chronic condition patients prescribed multiple medications concurrently. But measure definition consensus is lacking, and the effects of different definitions on estimates of cost-related nonadherence are unevaluated. To (a) compare estimates of cost-related nonadherence using different measure definitions and (b) provide guidance for analyses of the effects of cost sharing on concurrent adherence. This is a retrospective cohort study of Medicare Part D beneficiaries aged 65 years and older who used multiple oral antidiabetics concurrently in 2008 and 2009. We compared patients with standard coverage, which contains cost-sharing requirements in deductible (100%), initial (25%), and coverage gap (100%) phases, to patients with a low-income subsidy (LIS) and minimal cost-sharing requirements. Data source was the IMS Health Longitudinal Prescription Database. Patients with standard coverage were propensity matched to controls with LIS coverage. Propensity score was developed using logistic regression to model likelihood of Part D standard enrollment, controlling for sociodemographic and health status characteristics. For analysis, 3 definitions were used for unadjusted and adjusted estimates of adherence: (1) patients adherent to All medications; (2) patients adherent on Average; and (3) patients adherent to Any medication. Analyses were conducted using the full study sample and then repeated in analytic subgroups where patients used (a) 1 or more costly branded oral antidiabetics or (b) inexpensive generics only. We identified 12,771 propensity matched patients with Medicare Part D standard (N = 6,298) or LIS (N = 6,473) coverage who used oral antidiabetics in 2 or more of the same classes in 2008 and 2009. In this sample

  16. Technical guidelines for enhancing privacy and data protection in modern electronic medical environments.

    PubMed

    Gritzalis, Stefanos; Lambrinoudakis, Costas; Lekkas, Dimitrios; Deftereos, Spyros

    2005-09-01

    Raising awareness and providing guidance to on-line data protection is undoubtedly a crucial issue worldwide. Equally important is the issue of applying privacy-related legislation in a coherent and coordinated way. Both these topics gain extra attention when referring to medical environments and, thus, to the protection of patients' privacy and medical data. Electronic medical transactions require the transmission of personal and medical information over insecure communication channels like the Internet. It is, therefore, a rather straightforward task to capture the electronic medical behavior of a patient, thus constructing "patient profiles," or reveal sensitive information related to a patient's medical history. The consequence is clearly a potential violation of the patient's privacy. We performed a risk analysis study for a Greek shared care environment for the treatment of patients suffering from beta-thalassemia, an empirically embedded scenario that is representative of many other electronic medical environments; we capitalized on its results to provide an assessment of the associated risks, focusing on the description of countermeasures, in the form of technical guidelines that can be employed in such medical environments for protecting the privacy of personal and medical information.

  17. Implementation of an Electronic Medical Records System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-07

    their patients and their previous medical history. Capitalizing on progress made in the informational technology realm, which include more...example, medication and allergy list, problem list and past medical and family/ social history); • Building the descriptive tags for a lab or radiology...clinical trials. Arch Fam Med. 1996; 5: 271-278. 14. Mitchell E, Sullivan F. A descriptive feast but an evaluative famine: systematic review of

  18. [Part-time medical specialist training; experiences with job-sharing for trainee internists].

    PubMed

    Bevers, K; Nauta, S; Stuyt, P M

    2004-02-14

    Due to various factors such as social changes, an increasing number of couples with two incomes, and a growing proportion of female doctors, there has been a growing demand for part-time work in recent years. This is also true for resident physicians. Objections such as a discontinuity in care and the decline in the quality of education frequently prevent resident physicians from working part-time. Over the past two years, the University Medical Centre Nijmegen, the Netherlands, has experimented with job-sharing on clinical wards for resident physicians in internal medicine. This approach works well in practice, as long as a number of conditions, including the proper transfer of medical information and good communication, are satisfied. Job-sharing is one means of satisfying the growing demand for part-time work among resident physicians and specialists.

  19. The annual wellness visit shared medical appointment: innovative delivery of preventive care to the elderly.

    PubMed

    Kainkaryam, Vasanth

    2013-01-01

    The Hartford HealthCare Medical Group instituted 3 types of shared medical appointments (SMAs) in 2013, one being for the Medicare Annual Wellness Visit (AWV). While traditionally there have been 2 types of SMAs-either a chronic disease follow-up model or an annual physical examination model, the SMA AWV offers a preventive care focus in a dedicated visit for the elderly population, without co-pays and without logistics of conducting a physical examination. This article reviews the benefits and challenges of SMAs, including those specific to conducting the AWV, as well as the overall patient experience with the AWV SMA.

  20. Diabetes and cancer II: role of diabetes medications and influence of shared risk factors.

    PubMed

    Onitilo, Adedayo A; Engel, Jessica M; Glurich, Ingrid; Stankowski, Rachel V; Williams, Gail M; Doi, Suhail A

    2012-07-01

    An association between type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and cancer has long been postulated, but the biological mechanism responsible for this association has not been defined. In part one of this review, we discussed the epidemiological evidence for increased risk of cancer, decreased cancer survival, and decreased rates of cancer screening in diabetic patients. Here we review the risk factors shared by cancer and DM and how DM medications play a role in altering cancer risk. Hyperinsulinemia stands out as a major factor contributing to the association between DM and cancer, and modulation of circulating insulin levels by DM medications appears to play an important role in altering cancer risk. Drugs that increase circulating insulin, including exogenous insulin, insulin analogs, and insulin secretagogues, are generally associated with an increased cancer risk. In contrast, drugs that regulate insulin signaling without increasing levels, especially metformin, appear to be associated with a decreased cancer risk. In addition to hyperinsulinemia, the effect of DM medications on other shared risk factors including hyperglycemia, obesity, and oxidative stress as well as demographic factors that may influence the use of certain DM drugs in different populations are described. Further elucidation of the mechanisms behind the association between DM, cancer, and the role of DM medications in modulating cancer risk may aid in the development of better prevention and treatment options for both DM and cancer. Additionally, incorporation of DM medication use into cancer prediction models may lead to the development of improved risk assessment tools for diabetic patients.

  1. Diabetes and cancer II: role of diabetes medications and influence of shared risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Jessica M.; Glurich, Ingrid; Stankowski, Rachel V.; Williams, Gail M.; Doi, Suhail A.

    2014-01-01

    An association between type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and cancer has long been postulated, but the biological mechanism responsible for this association has not been defined. In part one of this review, we discussed the epidemiological evidence for increased risk of cancer, decreased cancer survival, and decreased rates of cancer screening in diabetic patients. Here we review the risk factors shared by cancer and DM and how DM medications play a role in altering cancer risk. Hyperinsulinemia stands out as a major factor contributing to the association between DM and cancer, and modulation of circulating insulin levels by DM medications appears to play an important role in altering cancer risk. Drugs that increase circulating insulin, including exogenous insulin, insulin analogs, and insulin secretagogues, are generally associated with an increased cancer risk. In contrast, drugs that regulate insulin signaling without increasing levels, especially metformin, appear to be associated with a decreased cancer risk. In addition to hyperinsulinemia, the effect of DM medications on other shared risk factors including hyperglycemia, obesity, and oxidative stress as well as demographic factors that may influence the use of certain DM drugs in different populations are described. Further elucidation of the mechanisms behind the association between DM, cancer, and the role of DM medications in modulating cancer risk may aid in the development of better prevention and treatment options for both DM and cancer. Additionally, incorporation of DM medication use into cancer prediction models may lead to the development of improved risk assessment tools for diabetic patients. PMID:22527174

  2. Variation of the Occupancy of Two Medical Units with the Amount of Sharing Between the Units

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Rodger D.

    1968-01-01

    Prediction of gain in occupancy and reduction of overflow effected by sharing beds between two previously disjoint medical units is related to the number of beds in each unit and to a variable number of beds that each unit makes available to the other when not in use. The methodology, here applied to two wards at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, is applicable wherever it is desired to estimate the effect of making beds interchangeable between wards or services. PMID:5701983

  3. Toward secure distribution of electronic health records: quantitative feasibility study on secure E-mail systems for sharing patient records.

    PubMed

    Gomi, Yuichiro; Nogawa, Hiroki; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2005-12-01

    If the quality and efficiency of medical services are to be ensured, electronic health records (EHR) and EHR-supporting infrastructure must be prevalent. Many hospitals, however, have EHR systems for their internal use only, and the standardization process for the exchange of medical information is still in process. This standardization process addresses information security and is considering public key infrastructure (PKI) as one security measure, but PKI is rarely used by medical practioners because of its poor user-friendliness. Here we propose an effective use of the identity-based encryption (IBE) system as a security measure. This system enables us to send encrypted and signed messages without requiring the receiver to get a public key, and it enables us to deliver secured messages to ambiguous receivers like those to whom letters of reference are sent. We evaluated the feasibility of this technology by using the analytic hierarchy process, which is an effective analysis tool when selection and judgment depend on nonquantitative psychological factors, to analyze the results of an experiment in which medical workers used E-mail agents with and without PKI and IBE. We found that medical practioners and researchers avoid using PKI because of its poor user-friendliness and instead use IBE even though it is harder to install. We therefore think IBE would encourage medical institutions to share patient records.

  4. Shared decision-making in medical encounters regarding breast cancer treatment: the contribution of methodological triangulation.

    PubMed

    Durif-Bruckert, C; Roux, P; Morelle, M; Mignotte, H; Faure, C; Moumjid-Ferdjaoui, N

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study on shared decision-making in the doctor-patient encounter about surgical treatment for early-stage breast cancer, conducted in a regional cancer centre in France, was to further the understanding of patient perceptions on shared decision-making. The study used methodological triangulation to collect data (both quantitative and qualitative) about patient preferences in the context of a clinical consultation in which surgeons followed a shared decision-making protocol. Data were analysed from a multi-disciplinary research perspective (social psychology and health economics). The triangulated data collection methods were questionnaires (n = 132), longitudinal interviews (n = 47) and observations of consultations (n = 26). Methodological triangulation revealed levels of divergence and complementarity between qualitative and quantitative results that suggest new perspectives on the three inter-related notions of decision-making, participation and information. Patients' responses revealed important differences between shared decision-making and participation per se. The authors note that subjecting patients to a normative behavioural model of shared decision-making in an era when paradigms of medical authority are shifting may undermine the patient's quest for what he or she believes is a more important right: a guarantee of the best care available.

  5. Procurement of shared data instruments for Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap).

    PubMed

    Obeid, Jihad S; McGraw, Catherine A; Minor, Brenda L; Conde, José G; Pawluk, Robert; Lin, Michael; Wang, Janey; Banks, Sean R; Hemphill, Sheree A; Taylor, Rob; Harris, Paul A

    2013-04-01

    REDCap (Research Electronic Data Capture) is a web-based software solution and tool set that allows biomedical researchers to create secure online forms for data capture, management and analysis with minimal effort and training. The Shared Data Instrument Library (SDIL) is a relatively new component of REDCap that allows sharing of commonly used data collection instruments for immediate study use by research teams. Objectives of the SDIL project include: (1) facilitating reuse of data dictionaries and reducing duplication of effort; (2) promoting the use of validated data collection instruments, data standards and best practices; and (3) promoting research collaboration and data sharing. Instruments submitted to the library are reviewed by a library oversight committee, with rotating membership from multiple institutions, which ensures quality, relevance and legality of shared instruments. The design allows researchers to download the instruments in a consumable electronic format in the REDCap environment. At the time of this writing, the SDIL contains over 128 data collection instruments. Over 2500 instances of instruments have been downloaded by researchers at multiple institutions. In this paper we describe the library platform, provide detail about experience gained during the first 25months of sharing public domain instruments and provide evidence of impact for the SDIL across the REDCap consortium research community. We postulate that the shared library of instruments reduces the burden of adhering to sound data collection principles while promoting best practices.

  6. Procurement of Shared Data Instruments for Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap)

    PubMed Central

    Obeid, Jihad S; McGraw, Catherine A; Minor, Brenda L; Conde, José G; Pawluk, Robert; Lin, Michael; Wang, Janey; Banks, Sean R; Hemphill, Sheree A; Taylor, Rob; Harris, Paul A

    2012-01-01

    REDCap (Research Electronic Data Capture) is a web-based software solution and tool set that allows biomedical researchers to create secure online forms for data capture, management and analysis with minimal effort and training. The Shared Data Instrument Library (SDIL) is a relatively new component of REDCap that allows sharing of commonly used data collection instruments for immediate study use by 3 research teams. Objectives of the SDIL project include: 1) facilitating reuse of data dictionaries and reducing duplication of effort; 2) promoting the use of validated data collection instruments, data standards and best practices; and 3) promoting research collaboration and data sharing. Instruments submitted to the library are reviewed by a library oversight committee, with rotating membership from multiple institutions, which ensures quality, relevance and legality of shared instruments. The design allows researchers to download the instruments in a consumable electronic format in the REDCap environment. At the time of this writing, the SDIL contains over 128 data collection instruments. Over 2500 instances of instruments have been downloaded by researchers at multiple institutions. In this paper we describe the library platform, provide detail about experience gained during the first 25 months of sharing public domain instruments and provide evidence of impact for the SDIL across the REDCap consortium research community. We postulate that the shared library of instruments reduces the burden of adhering to sound data collection principles while promoting best practices. PMID:23149159

  7. [Sharing information of urological cancer patient in terminal stage using Cybozulive® for home medical care].

    PubMed

    Yumura, Yasushi; Hattori, Yusuke; Gobara, Ayako; Takamoto, Daiji; Yasuda, Kengo; Nakamura, Masafumi; Noguchi, Kazumi; Asahina, Kan; Kamijo, Takeo

    2014-09-01

    It is very important to share patient information because home patient care involves several different specialties of care. We introduced Cybozulive ® , a cloud-based free groupware, for 14 terminal-stage patients with urological cancer to share information among doctors and co-medical staff. This system enables access to patient information regardless of time and place. Of the 14 patients (mean age 74.4 years), 11 died of cancer. The average period in which Cybozulive® was used for the patients was 210 days. The average number of entries to the electronic bulletin board in this period was 88.4. We were able to obtain more information about the patients from the website. There was no difference in the average number of times that the patient consulted the out patient clinic before and after the introduction of Cybozulive® (before 7.0 ; after 6.3). After introduction of this system, eleven patients were hospitalized in our department 21 times. Eighteen of these 21 times, since we had acquired patient information from the website beforehand, there was a quick response for management of the emergency admission. This system could be used to construct a network for home care and may be helpful for sharing patient information in homecare.

  8. Electron sharing and anion-π recognition in molecular triangular prisms.

    PubMed

    Schneebeli, Severin T; Frasconi, Marco; Liu, Zhichang; Wu, Yilei; Gardner, Daniel M; Strutt, Nathan L; Cheng, Chuyang; Carmieli, Raanan; Wasielewski, Michael R; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2013-12-02

    Stacking on a full belly: Triangular molecular prisms display electron sharing among their triangularly arranged naphthalenediimide (NDI) redox centers. Their electron-deficient cavities encapsulate linear triiodide anions, leading to the formation of supramolecular helices in the solid state. Chirality transfer is observed from the six chiral centers of the filled prisms to the single-handed helices. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Increased electronic information sharing by sexual health services: confidentiality and consent.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Inga; Haining Ede, Gael; Whiddett, Richard

    2014-03-01

    New Zealand is moving towards an integrated health-care model with information accessible electronically regardless of location, linking existing health provider systems, regional clinical results repositories and a shared care record. However, such information sharing has been a major concern for patients attending sexual health services. In this study, we investigated patient attitudes towards a change in practice to support an integrated care model. Outcomes showed that confidentiality remains a significant concern, and routine sharing of patient information may create barriers to attendance for some, leading to a potential increase in untreated infections. We conclude that sexual health services may be able to change their information management practices to an opt-out consent system and routinely share health information with other health providers, but further public discussion to ensure informed consent is needed before this can happen. Regardless of national policy, it is still necessary to keep clinic visit details confidential for some patients attending sexual health services.

  10. Development of Mobile Platform Integrated with Existing Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Kim, YoungAh; Kang, Simon; Kim, Kyungduk; Kim, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This paper describes a mobile Electronic Medical Record (EMR) platform designed to manage and utilize the existing EMR and mobile application with optimized resources. Methods We structured the mEMR to reuse services of retrieval and storage in mobile app environments that have already proven to have no problem working with EMRs. A new mobile architecture-based mobile solution was developed in four steps: the construction of a server and its architecture; screen layout and storyboard making; screen user interface design and development; and a pilot test and step-by-step deployment. This mobile architecture consists of two parts, the server-side area and the client-side area. In the server-side area, it performs the roles of service management for EMR and documents and for information exchange. Furthermore, it performs menu allocation depending on user permission and automatic clinical document architecture document conversion. Results Currently, Severance Hospital operates an iOS-compatible mobile solution based on this mobile architecture and provides stable service without additional resources, dealing with dynamic changes of EMR templates. Conclusions The proposed mobile solution should go hand in hand with the existing EMR system, and it can be a cost-effective solution if a quality EMR system is operated steadily with this solution. Thus, we expect this example to be shared with hospitals that currently plan to deploy mobile solutions. PMID:25152837

  11. Development of mobile platform integrated with existing electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Kim, YoungAh; Kim, Sung Soo; Kang, Simon; Kim, Kyungduk; Kim, Jun

    2014-07-01

    This paper describes a mobile Electronic Medical Record (EMR) platform designed to manage and utilize the existing EMR and mobile application with optimized resources. We structured the mEMR to reuse services of retrieval and storage in mobile app environments that have already proven to have no problem working with EMRs. A new mobile architecture-based mobile solution was developed in four steps: the construction of a server and its architecture; screen layout and storyboard making; screen user interface design and development; and a pilot test and step-by-step deployment. This mobile architecture consists of two parts, the server-side area and the client-side area. In the server-side area, it performs the roles of service management for EMR and documents and for information exchange. Furthermore, it performs menu allocation depending on user permission and automatic clinical document architecture document conversion. Currently, Severance Hospital operates an iOS-compatible mobile solution based on this mobile architecture and provides stable service without additional resources, dealing with dynamic changes of EMR templates. The proposed mobile solution should go hand in hand with the existing EMR system, and it can be a cost-effective solution if a quality EMR system is operated steadily with this solution. Thus, we expect this example to be shared with hospitals that currently plan to deploy mobile solutions.

  12. Risk perception about medication sharing among patients: a focus group qualitative study on borrowing and lending of prescription analgesics

    PubMed Central

    Markotic, Filipa; Vrdoljak, Davorka; Puljiz, Marijana; Puljak, Livia

    2017-01-01

    Background One form of self-medication is sharing of medications, defined as borrowing or lending medications in situations where the receiver of these drugs is not the individual to whom the medications were allocated. Objective To explore experiences and opinions of patients about sharing prescription analgesics, reasons for sharing prescription analgesics, the way in which patients choose to share those medications, their awareness of risk regarding sharing prescription analgesics, and how they estimated the potential risk. Methods This qualitative study was conducted by focus group discussions with 40 participants led by a moderator trained in focus group methodology using a semi-structured moderator guide. Adults aged ≥18 years who had received a prescription for an analgesic at least once in a lifetime were included. Six separate focus groups were conducted to discuss participants’ perception of risks associated with sharing of prescription analgesics among patients. Additionally, participants filled out two questionnaires on demographic data, their own behavior regarding sharing analgesics, and their attitudes about risks associated with sharing prescription analgesics. Results In a questionnaire, 55% of the participants indicated that they personally shared prescription analgesics, while subsequently in the focus group discussions, 76% confessed to such behavior. Participants recognized certain risks related to sharing of prescription analgesics, mentioned a number of reasons for engaging in such behavior, and indicated certain positive aspects of such behavior. Forty-five percent of the participants indicated that sharing prescription analgesics is riskier than sharing nonprescription analgesics. Conclusion There is a prevalent attitude among participants that sharing prescription analgesics is a positive behavior, where potential benefits outweigh risks. PMID:28243140

  13. Eavesdropping on Electronic Guidebooks: Observing Learning Resources in Shared Listening Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodruff, Allison; Aoki, Paul M.; Grinter, Rebecca E.; Hurst, Amy; Szymanski, Margaret H.; Thornton, James D.

    This paper describes an electronic guidebook, "Sotto Voce," that enables visitors to share audio information by eavesdropping on each others guidebook activity. The first section discusses the design and implementation of the guidebook device, key aspects of its user interface, the design goals for the audio environment, the eavesdropping…

  14. Medical education in the electronic medical record (EMR) era: benefits, challenges, and future directions.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Michael J; Pageler, Natalie M; Kahana, Madelyn; Pantaleoni, Julie L; Longhurst, Christopher A

    2013-06-01

    In the last decade, electronic medical record (EMR) use in academic medical centers has increased. Although many have lauded the clinical and operational benefits of EMRs, few have considered the effect these systems have on medical education. The authors review what has been documented about the effect of EMR use on medical learners through the lens of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's six core competencies for medical education. They examine acknowledged benefits and educational risks to use of EMRs, consider factors that promote their successful use when implemented in academic environments, and identify areas of future research and optimization of EMRs' role in medical education.

  15. A Mis-recognized Medical Vocabulary Correction System for Speech-based Electronic Medical Record

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hwa Jeong; Kim, Ju Han; Sakabe, Nagamasa

    2002-01-01

    Speech recognition as an input tool for electronic medical record (EMR) enables efficient data entry at the point of care. However, the recognition accuracy for medical vocabulary is much poorer than that for doctor-patient dialogue. We developed a mis-recognized medical vocabulary correction system based on syllable-by-syllable comparison of speech text against medical vocabulary database. Using specialty medical vocabulary, the algorithm detects and corrects mis-recognized medical vocabularies in narrative text. Our preliminary evaluation showed 94% of accuracy in mis-recognized medical vocabulary correction.

  16. Predictors of Difficulty in Medication Intake in Europe: a Cross-country Analysis Based on SHARE.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Daniela; Teixeira, Laetitia; Poveda, Veronica; Paúl, Constança; Santos-Silva, Alice; Costa, Elísio

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the prevalence and the predictors of difficulty in medication intake across Europe, using a cross-sectional design. We used data from all participants in the wave 4 of the SHARE (Survey of Health, Ageing, and Retirement in Europe) database, which is a cross national European survey. The difficulty in take medication was evaluated using an item from the "Limitations with activities of daily living". Clinical and sociodemographic variables were evaluated as potential predictors. A total of 58 124 individual have been included in this work (mean age=64.9 ± 10.4 years; 43.3% male). The rate of difficulty in taking medication across the 16 European evaluated countries was 2.1%, presenting Spain the highest rate (5.7%) and Switzerland the lowest (0.6%). Increasing age, physical inactivity, physical limitations (mobility, arms function and fine motor limitations, and difficulties in picking up a small coin from a table), a poor sense of meaning in life, and losses in memory and concentration are independent and significant variables associated with difficulty in medication intake across Europe. Predictors of difficulties in medication intake are multicausal, including factors related to physical, cognitive and psychological conditions. Interventions aiming to optimize adherence to medication, particularly in elderly population, need to consider this diversity of determinants.

  17. Predictors of Difficulty in Medication Intake in Europe: a Cross-country Analysis Based on SHARE

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Daniela; Teixeira, Laetitia; Poveda, Veronica; Paúl, Constança; Santos-Silva, Alice; Costa, Elísio

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the prevalence and the predictors of difficulty in medication intake across Europe, using a cross-sectional design. We used data from all participants in the wave 4 of the SHARE (Survey of Health, Ageing, and Retirement in Europe) database, which is a cross national European survey. The difficulty in take medication was evaluated using an item from the “Limitations with activities of daily living”. Clinical and sociodemographic variables were evaluated as potential predictors. A total of 58 124 individual have been included in this work (mean age=64.9 ± 10.4 years; 43.3% male). The rate of difficulty in taking medication across the 16 European evaluated countries was 2.1%, presenting Spain the highest rate (5.7%) and Switzerland the lowest (0.6%). Increasing age, physical inactivity, physical limitations (mobility, arms function and fine motor limitations, and difficulties in picking up a small coin from a table), a poor sense of meaning in life, and losses in memory and concentration are independent and significant variables associated with difficulty in medication intake across Europe. Predictors of difficulties in medication intake are multicausal, including factors related to physical, cognitive and psychological conditions. Interventions aiming to optimize adherence to medication, particularly in elderly population, need to consider this diversity of determinants. PMID:27330839

  18. Process improvements and shared medical appointments for cardiovascular disease prevention in women.

    PubMed

    Pastore, Lisa M; Rossi, Ann M; Tucker, Amy L

    2014-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is clinically unique in women and is often underdiagnosed and undertreated. Chronic diseases account for 75% of healthcare expenditures in the United States, of which 70% are preventable through lifestyle changes and active medical management. Lifestyle modification is difficult in the context of the traditional medical visit. The Club Red Clinic uses a novel approach to enhance the care of women at risk for or with CVD. Through shared medical appointments (SMAs) and a multidisciplinary team approach, Club Red provides lifestyle training in addition to evidence-based practice to reduce CVD risk factors in women. In Club Red, nurse practitioners function independently and effectively in delivering lifestyle intervention for the management and prevention of CVD. The clinic functions within an academic medical school at the University of Virginia. Patient access, patient satisfaction, provider efficiency, and frequency of cardiovascular visits. Process improvements include reduced appointment wait times, improved provider efficiency (more patients seen with the SMAs), high patient satisfaction (96%), and improved adherence to recommended medical monitoring (3.8 visits/year). Club Red improved patient access, patient satisfaction, medical and behavioral management, and health promotion education for women with or at risk for CVD. ©2013 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  19. Navigating the Decision Space: Shared Medical Decision Making as Distributed Cognition.

    PubMed

    Lippa, Katherine D; Feufel, Markus A; Robinson, F Eric; Shalin, Valerie L

    2017-06-01

    Despite increasing prominence, little is known about the cognitive processes underlying shared decision making. To investigate these processes, we conceptualize shared decision making as a form of distributed cognition. We introduce a Decision Space Model to identify physical and social influences on decision making. Using field observations and interviews, we demonstrate that patients and physicians in both acute and chronic care consider these influences when identifying the need for a decision, searching for decision parameters, making actionable decisions Based on the distribution of access to information and actions, we then identify four related patterns: physician dominated; physician-defined, patient-made; patient-defined, physician-made; and patient-dominated decisions. Results suggests that (a) decision making is necessarily distributed between physicians and patients, (b) differential access to information and action over time requires participants to transform a distributed task into a shared decision, and (c) adverse outcomes may result from failures to integrate physician and patient reasoning. Our analysis unifies disparate findings in the medical decision-making literature and has implications for improving care and medical training.

  20. Electronic Medical Records and Their Impact on Resident and Medical Student Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keenan, Craig R.; Nguyen, Hien H.; Srinivasan, Malathi

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Electronic medical records (EMRs) are becoming prevalent and integral tools for residents and medical students. EMRs can integrate point-of-service information delivery within the context of patient care. Though it may be an educational tool, little is known about how EMR technology is currently used for medical learners. Method: The…

  1. Electronic Medical Records and Their Impact on Resident and Medical Student Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keenan, Craig R.; Nguyen, Hien H.; Srinivasan, Malathi

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Electronic medical records (EMRs) are becoming prevalent and integral tools for residents and medical students. EMRs can integrate point-of-service information delivery within the context of patient care. Though it may be an educational tool, little is known about how EMR technology is currently used for medical learners. Method: The…

  2. Truthful Channel Sharing for Self Coexistence of Overlapping Medical Body Area Networks

    PubMed Central

    Dutkiewicz, Eryk; Zheng, Guanglou

    2016-01-01

    As defined by IEEE 802.15.6 standard, channel sharing is a potential method to coordinate inter-network interference among Medical Body Area Networks (MBANs) that are close to one another. However, channel sharing opens up new vulnerabilities as selfish MBANs may manipulate their online channel requests to gain unfair advantage over others. In this paper, we address this issue by proposing a truthful online channel sharing algorithm and a companion protocol that allocates channel efficiently and truthfully by punishing MBANs for misreporting their channel request parameters such as time, duration and bid for the channel. We first present an online channel sharing scheme for unit-length channel requests and prove that it is truthful. We then generalize our model to settings with variable-length channel requests, where we propose a critical value based channel pricing and preemption scheme. A bid adjustment procedure prevents unbeneficial preemption by artificially raising the ongoing winner’s bid controlled by a penalty factor λ. Our scheme can efficiently detect selfish behaviors by monitoring a trust parameter α of each MBAN and punish MBANs from cheating by suspending their requests. Our extensive simulation results show our scheme can achieve a total profit that is more than 85% of the offline optimum method in the typical MBAN settings. PMID:26844888

  3. Truthful Channel Sharing for Self Coexistence of Overlapping Medical Body Area Networks.

    PubMed

    Fang, Gengfa; Orgun, Mehmet A; Shankaran, Rajan; Dutkiewicz, Eryk; Zheng, Guanglou

    2016-01-01

    As defined by IEEE 802.15.6 standard, channel sharing is a potential method to coordinate inter-network interference among Medical Body Area Networks (MBANs) that are close to one another. However, channel sharing opens up new vulnerabilities as selfish MBANs may manipulate their online channel requests to gain unfair advantage over others. In this paper, we address this issue by proposing a truthful online channel sharing algorithm and a companion protocol that allocates channel efficiently and truthfully by punishing MBANs for misreporting their channel request parameters such as time, duration and bid for the channel. We first present an online channel sharing scheme for unit-length channel requests and prove that it is truthful. We then generalize our model to settings with variable-length channel requests, where we propose a critical value based channel pricing and preemption scheme. A bid adjustment procedure prevents unbeneficial preemption by artificially raising the ongoing winner's bid controlled by a penalty factor λ. Our scheme can efficiently detect selfish behaviors by monitoring a trust parameter α of each MBAN and punish MBANs from cheating by suspending their requests. Our extensive simulation results show our scheme can achieve a total profit that is more than 85% of the offline optimum method in the typical MBAN settings.

  4. Medical device reporting: electronic submission requirements. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2014-02-14

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is revising its postmarket medical device reporting regulation and making technical corrections. This final rule requires device manufacturers and importers to submit mandatory reports of individual medical device adverse events, also known as medical device reports (MDRs), to the Agency in an electronic format that FDA can process, review, and archive. Mandatory electronic reporting will improve the Agency's process for collecting and analyzing postmarket medical device adverse event information. Electronic reporting is also available to user facilities, but this rule permits user facilities to continue to submit written reports to FDA. This final rule also identifies changes to the content of required MDRs to reflect reprocessor information collected on the Form FDA 3500A as required by the Medical Device User Fee and Modernization Act of 2002 (MDUFMA).

  5. Medical Applications of Remote Electronic Browsing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chadwick, Joseph

    The purposes of this study are to identify and define viable remote browsing techniques and the requirements for an interactive medical information system that would permit the use of such techniques. The main emphasis is in the areas of: (1) remote viewing of page material; and (2) remote interrogation of fact banks with question-answering…

  6. Shared decision making for psychiatric medication management: beyond the micro-social.

    PubMed

    Morant, Nicola; Kaminskiy, Emma; Ramon, Shulamit

    2016-10-01

    Mental health care has lagged behind other health-care domains in developing and applying shared decision making (SDM) for treatment decisions. This is despite compatibilities with ideals of modern mental health care such as self-management and recovery-oriented practice, and growing policy-level interest. Psychiatric medication is a mainstay of mental health treatment, but there are known problems with prescribing practices, and service users report feeling uninvolved in medication decisions and concerned about adverse effects. SDM has potential to produce better tailoring of psychiatric medication to individuals' needs. This conceptual review argues that several aspects of mental health care that differ from other health-care contexts (e.g. forms of coercion, questions about service users' insight and disempowerment) may impact on processes and possibilities for SDM. It is therefore problematic to uncritically import models of SDM developed in other health-care contexts. We argue that decision making for psychiatric medication is better understood in a broader way that moves beyond the micro-social focus of a medical consultation. Contextualizing specific medication-related consultations within longer term relationships, and broader service systems enables recognition of the multiple processes, actors and agendas that shape how psychiatric medication is prescribed, managed and used, and which may facilitate or impede SDM. A broad conceptualization of decision making for psychiatric medication that moves beyond the micro-social can account for why SDM in this domain remains a rarity. It has both conceptual and practical utility for evaluating research evidence, identifying future research priorities and highlighting fruitful ways of developing and implementing SDM in mental health care. © 2015 The Authors Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. A shared random effects model for censored medical costs and mortality.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Wolfe, Robert A; Kalbfleisch, John D

    2007-01-15

    In this paper, we propose a model for medical costs recorded at regular time intervals, e.g. every month, as repeated measures in the presence of a terminating event, such as death. Prior models have related monthly medical costs to time since entry, with extra costs at the final observations at the time of death. Our joint model for monthly medical costs and survival time incorporates two important new features. First, medical cost and survival may be correlated because more 'frail' patients tend to accumulate medical costs faster and die earlier. A joint random effects model is proposed to account for the correlation between medical costs and survival by a shared random effect. Second, monthly medical costs usually increase during the time period prior to death because of the intensive care for dying patients. We present a method for estimating the pattern of cost prior to death, which is applicable if the pattern can be characterized as an additive effect that is limited to a fixed time interval, say b units of time before death. This 'turn back time' method for censored observations censors cost data b units of time before the actual censoring time, while keeping the actual censoring time for the survival data. Time-dependent covariates can be included. Maximum likelihood estimation and inference are carried out through a Monte Carlo EM algorithm with a Metropolis-Hastings sampler in the E-step. An analysis of monthly outpatient EPO medical cost data for dialysis patients is presented to illustrate the proposed methods.

  8. Instruments for evaluating shared medical decision making: a structured literature review.

    PubMed

    Dy, Sydney Morss

    2007-12-01

    The author conducted a structured literature review of instruments for evaluating shared medical decision making. She included relevant instruments that were generalizable beyond specific situations and had been formally evaluated and organized them by domains of values or preferences, information and communication in decision making, and other aspects of decision making. For values or preferences, the author identified 11 instruments, mostly on preferences for roles and information. For information and communication, she found a systematic review of instruments for observational assessment of decision making, 3 additional observational instruments, and 3 questionnaires. For other aspects of decision making, the author identified 3 instruments in domains such as decision self-efficacy and 4 multidimensional instruments. Although instrument development tended to cluster in several areas and there were clear gaps in the literature, the diversity of instruments demonstrates the broad range of constructs involved in assessing shared decision making.

  9. Impact of incorporating pharmacy claims data into electronic medication reconciliation.

    PubMed

    Phansalkar, Shobha; Her, Qoua L; Tucker, Alisha D; Filiz, Esen; Schnipper, Jeffrey; Getty, George; Bates, David W

    2015-02-01

    The potential value of adding pharmacy claims data to the medication history in the electronic health record (EHR) to improve the accuracy of medication reconciliation was studied. Three medication history sources were used for this evaluation: a gold-standard preadmission medication list (PAML) created by reviewing all available medication history information, an EHR-generated PAML, and pharmacy claims data. The study population consisted of patients from the Partners Medication Reconciliation Study with medication history information available from all three medication history sources. The aggregated medication list from each medication history source was compared with the gold-standard PAML to identify and categorize missing medications, additional medications, and discrepancies in the various attributes of a medication order, including dose, route, and frequency. McNemar's test was used to compare paired proportions of medication entries across each source to the gold-standard PAMLs. Fifteen patients had medication histories in all three medication history sources. Medication entries across all three sources included 169 from the gold- standard PAMLs, 158 from the EHR-PAMLs, and 351 from pharmacy claims data. The EHR-PAMLs and pharmacy claims data correctly reflected 52.1% and 43.2% of the gold-standard PAMLs, respectively. Combining the EHR-PAMLs and pharmacy claims resulted in 69.2% of the gold-standard PAMLs correctly reflected (p < 0.0001). Combining these two data sources increased the accuracy of medication history by 17.1%. Combining the EHR-PAML and pharmacy claims data resulted in a significant increase in the number of medications correctly reflected in the gold-standard PAML compared with the EHR-PAML or claims data separately. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A tool for sharing annotated research data: the "Category 0" UMLS (Unified Medical Language System) vocabularies.

    PubMed

    Berman, Jules J

    2003-06-16

    Large biomedical data sets have become increasingly important resources for medical researchers. Modern biomedical data sets are annotated with standard terms to describe the data and to support data linking between databases. The largest curated listing of biomedical terms is the the National Library of Medicine's Unified Medical Language System (UMLS). The UMLS contains more than 2 million biomedical terms collected from nearly 100 medical vocabularies. Many of the vocabularies contained in the UMLS carry restrictions on their use, making it impossible to share or distribute UMLS-annotated research data. However, a subset of the UMLS vocabularies, designated Category 0 by UMLS, can be used to annotate and share data sets without violating the UMLS License Agreement. The UMLS Category 0 vocabularies can be extracted from the parent UMLS metathesaurus using a Perl script supplied with this article. There are 43 Category 0 vocabularies that can be used freely for research purposes without violating the UMLS License Agreement. Among the Category 0 vocabularies are: MESH (Medical Subject Headings), NCBI (National Center for Bioinformatics) Taxonomy and ICD-9-CM (International Classification of Diseases-9-Clinical Modifiers). The extraction file containing all Category 0 terms and concepts is 72,581,138 bytes in length and contains 1,029,161 terms. The UMLS Metathesaurus MRCON file (January, 2003) is 151,048,493 bytes in length and contains 2,146,899 terms. Therefore the Category 0 vocabularies, in aggregate, are about half the size of the UMLS metathesaurus.A large publicly available listing of 567,921 different medical phrases were automatically coded using the full UMLS metatathesaurus and the Category 0 vocabularies. There were 545,321 phrases with one or more matches against UMLS terms while 468,785 phrases had one or more matches against the Category 0 terms. This indicates that when the two vocabularies are evaluated by their fitness to find at least one term

  11. GIFT-Cloud: A data sharing and collaboration platform for medical imaging research.

    PubMed

    Doel, Tom; Shakir, Dzhoshkun I; Pratt, Rosalind; Aertsen, Michael; Moggridge, James; Bellon, Erwin; David, Anna L; Deprest, Jan; Vercauteren, Tom; Ourselin, Sébastien

    2017-02-01

    Clinical imaging data are essential for developing research software for computer-aided diagnosis, treatment planning and image-guided surgery, yet existing systems are poorly suited for data sharing between healthcare and academia: research systems rarely provide an integrated approach for data exchange with clinicians; hospital systems are focused towards clinical patient care with limited access for external researchers; and safe haven environments are not well suited to algorithm development. We have established GIFT-Cloud, a data and medical image sharing platform, to meet the needs of GIFT-Surg, an international research collaboration that is developing novel imaging methods for fetal surgery. GIFT-Cloud also has general applicability to other areas of imaging research. GIFT-Cloud builds upon well-established cross-platform technologies. The Server provides secure anonymised data storage, direct web-based data access and a REST API for integrating external software. The Uploader provides automated on-site anonymisation, encryption and data upload. Gateways provide a seamless process for uploading medical data from clinical systems to the research server. GIFT-Cloud has been implemented in a multi-centre study for fetal medicine research. We present a case study of placental segmentation for pre-operative surgical planning, showing how GIFT-Cloud underpins the research and integrates with the clinical workflow. GIFT-Cloud simplifies the transfer of imaging data from clinical to research institutions, facilitating the development and validation of medical research software and the sharing of results back to the clinical partners. GIFT-Cloud supports collaboration between multiple healthcare and research institutions while satisfying the demands of patient confidentiality, data security and data ownership. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF IT TRIAGE SYSTEM (TRACY) TO SHARE REGIONAL DISASTER MEDICAL INFORMATION

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Numada, Muneyoshi; Hada, Yasunori; Ohara, Miho; Meguro, Kimiro

    We developed an IT triage system for collecting disaster medical information in real time. FeliCa cards and card readers are used to obtain the number and cond ition of patients. The system is composed of two elements. First, the number of patie nts for each triage level and the accepted number of patients in each diagnosis and treatment department are obtained in real time, including response for changing triage level. Second, this information can be shared among hospitals, the administration, and residents in real time who are searching for their family. A disaster drill utiliz ing this system was held at the University of Yamanashi Hospital with 450 participants.

  13. Data-driven approach for creating synthetic electronic medical records

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background New algorithms for disease outbreak detection are being developed to take advantage of full electronic medical records (EMRs) that contain a wealth of patient information. However, due to privacy concerns, even anonymized EMRs cannot be shared among researchers, resulting in great difficulty in comparing the effectiveness of these algorithms. To bridge the gap between novel bio-surveillance algorithms operating on full EMRs and the lack of non-identifiable EMR data, a method for generating complete and synthetic EMRs was developed. Methods This paper describes a novel methodology for generating complete synthetic EMRs both for an outbreak illness of interest (tularemia) and for background records. The method developed has three major steps: 1) synthetic patient identity and basic information generation; 2) identification of care patterns that the synthetic patients would receive based on the information present in real EMR data for similar health problems; 3) adaptation of these care patterns to the synthetic patient population. Results We generated EMRs, including visit records, clinical activity, laboratory orders/results and radiology orders/results for 203 synthetic tularemia outbreak patients. Validation of the records by a medical expert revealed problems in 19% of the records; these were subsequently corrected. We also generated background EMRs for over 3000 patients in the 4-11 yr age group. Validation of those records by a medical expert revealed problems in fewer than 3% of these background patient EMRs and the errors were subsequently rectified. Conclusions A data-driven method was developed for generating fully synthetic EMRs. The method is general and can be applied to any data set that has similar data elements (such as laboratory and radiology orders and results, clinical activity, prescription orders). The pilot synthetic outbreak records were for tularemia but our approach may be adapted to other infectious diseases. The pilot synthetic

  14. The electronic patient records of the Hannover Medical School.

    PubMed

    Porth, A J; Niehoff, C; Matthies, H K

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, the successful introduction of a commercially available electronic patient record archiving system at the Hannover Medical School is described. Since 1996, more than 11 million document sheets of 130,000 patient records have been stored electronically. Currently, 100,000 sheets are stored each week.

  15. Shared learning in medical science education in the Islamic Republic of Iran: an investigation.

    PubMed

    Irajpour, Alireza; Barr, Hugh; Abedi, Heidarali; Salehi, Shayesteh; Changiz, Tahereh

    2010-03-01

    Almost all information about interprofessional education (IPE) comes from a few western countries; little from the rest of the world. This paper helps to rectify that omission. It reports the first phase of a study of "shared learning" between health professions in "medical sciences education" in the Islamic Republic of Iran based on a documentary search and national survey of all government affiliated medical sciences universities (MSUs) with examples which meet some of the criteria for IPE. The second phase, to be reported later, will present findings from an analysis of interviews with administrators at governmental level and teachers and organizers at institutional level regarding their perceptions, experience and expectations of such learning. The study is set in the context of reforms in the organization and delivery of higher education and health care services in Iran.

  16. Constraints on Biological Mechanism from Disease Comorbidity Using Electronic Medical Records and Database of Genetic Variants

    PubMed Central

    Bagley, Steven C.; Sirota, Marina; Chen, Richard; Butte, Atul J.; Altman, Russ B.

    2016-01-01

    Patterns of disease co-occurrence that deviate from statistical independence may represent important constraints on biological mechanism, which sometimes can be explained by shared genetics. In this work we study the relationship between disease co-occurrence and commonly shared genetic architecture of disease. Records of pairs of diseases were combined from two different electronic medical systems (Columbia, Stanford), and compared to a large database of published disease-associated genetic variants (VARIMED); data on 35 disorders were available across all three sources, which include medical records for over 1.2 million patients and variants from over 17,000 publications. Based on the sources in which they appeared, disease pairs were categorized as having predominant clinical, genetic, or both kinds of manifestations. Confounding effects of age on disease incidence were controlled for by only comparing diseases when they fall in the same cluster of similarly shaped incidence patterns. We find that disease pairs that are overrepresented in both electronic medical record systems and in VARIMED come from two main disease classes, autoimmune and neuropsychiatric. We furthermore identify specific genes that are shared within these disease groups. PMID:27115429

  17. Effectiveness of an electronic inpatient medication record in reducing medication errors in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Choo, Janet; Johnston, Linda; Manias, Elizabeth

    2014-06-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of an inpatient electronic medication record system in reducing medication errors in Singaporean hospitals. This pre- and post-intervention study involving a control group was undertaken in two Singaporean acute care hospitals. In one hospital the inpatient electronic medication record system was implemented while in another hospital the paper-based medication record system was used. The mean incidence difference in medication errors of 0.06 between pre-intervention (0.72 per 1000 patient days) and post-intervention (0.78 per 1000 patient days) for the two hospitals was not statistically significant (95%, CI: [0.26, 0.20]). The mean incidence differences in medication errors relating to prescription, dispensing, and administration were also not statistically different. Common system failures involved a lack of medication knowledge by health professionals and a lack of a systematic approach in identifying correct dosages. There was no difference in the incidence of medication errors following the introduction of the electronic medication record system. More work is needed on how this system can reduce medication error rates and improve medication safety. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. Integrating TRENCADIS components in gLite to share DICOM medical images and structured reports.

    PubMed

    Blanquer, Ignacio; Hernández, Vicente; Salavert, José; Segrelles, Damià

    2010-01-01

    The problem of sharing medical information among different centres has been tackled by many projects. Several of them target the specific problem of sharing DICOM images and structured reports (DICOM-SR), such as the TRENCADIS project. In this paper we propose sharing and organizing DICOM data and DICOM-SR metadata benefiting from the existent deployed Grid infrastructures compliant with gLite such as EGEE or the Spanish NGI. These infrastructures contribute with a large amount of storage resources for creating knowledge databases and also provide metadata storage resources (such as AMGA) to semantically organize reports in a tree-structure. First, in this paper, we present the extension of TRENCADIS architecture to use gLite components (LFC, AMGA, SE) on the shake of increasing interoperability. Using the metadata from DICOM-SR, and maintaining its tree structure, enables federating different but compatible diagnostic structures and simplifies the definition of complex queries. This article describes how to do this in AMGA and it shows an approach to efficiently code radiology reports to enable the multi-centre federation of data resources.

  19. Good Neighbors: Shared Challenges and Solutions Toward Increasing Value at Academic Medical Centers and Universities.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Gerard P

    2015-12-01

    Academic medical centers (AMCs) and universities are experiencing increasing pressure to enhance the value they offer at the same time that they are facing challenges related to outcomes, controlling costs, new competition, and government mandates. Yet, rarely do the leaders of these academic neighbors work cooperatively to enhance value. In this Perspective the author, a former university regional campus president with duties in an AMC as an academic physician, shares his insights into the shared challenges these academic neighbors face in improving the value of their services in complex environments. He describes the successes some AMCs have had in generating revenues from new clinical programs that reduce the overall cost of care for larger populations. He also describes how several universities have taken a comprehensive approach to reduce overhead and administrative costs. The author identifies six themes related to successful value improvement efforts and provides examples of successful strategies used by AMCs and their university neighbors to improve the overall value of their programs. He concludes by encouraging leaders of AMCs and universities to share information about their successes in value improvements with each other, to seek additional joint value enhancement efforts, and to market their value improvements to the public.

  20. Public Trust in Health Information Sharing: Implications for Biobanking and Electronic Health Record Systems

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Jodyn; Kardia, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Biobanks are made all the more valuable when the biological samples they hold can be linked to health information collected in research, electronic health records, or public health practice. Public trust in such systems that share health information for research and health care practice is understudied. Our research examines characteristics of the general public that predict trust in a health system that includes researchers, health care providers, insurance companies and public health departments. We created a 119-item survey of predictors and attributes of system trust and fielded it using Amazon’s MTurk system (n = 447). We found that seeing one’s primary care provider, having a favorable view of data sharing and believing that data sharing will improve the quality of health care, as well as psychosocial factors (altruism and generalized trust) were positively and significantly associated with system trust. As expected, privacy concern, but counterintuitively, knowledge about health information sharing were negatively associated with system trust. We conclude that, in order to assure the public’s trust, policy makers charged with setting best practices for governance of biobanks and access to electronic health records should leverage critical access points to engage a diverse public in joint decision making. PMID:25654300

  1. Electronic medical record use in pediatric primary care

    PubMed Central

    Alessandrini, Evaline A; Forrest, Christopher B; Khan, Saira; Localio, A Russell; Gerber, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To characterize patterns of electronic medical record (EMR) use at pediatric primary care acute visits. Design Direct observational study of 529 acute visits with 27 experienced pediatric clinician users. Measurements For each 20 s interval and at each stage of the visit according to the Davis Observation Code, we recorded whether the physician was communicating with the family only, using the computer while communicating, or using the computer without communication. Regression models assessed the impact of clinician, patient and visit characteristics on overall visit length, time spent interacting with families, and time spent using the computer while interacting. Results The mean overall visit length was 11:30 (min:sec) with 9:06 spent in the exam room. Clinicians used the EMR during 27% of exam room time and at all stages of the visit (interacting, chatting, and building rapport; history taking; formulation of the diagnosis and treatment plan; and discussing prevention) except the physical exam. Communication with the family accompanied 70% of EMR use. In regression models, computer documentation outside the exam room was associated with visits that were 11% longer (p=0.001), and female clinicians spent more time using the computer while communicating (p=0.003). Limitations The 12 study practices shared one EMR. Conclusions Among pediatric clinicians with EMR experience, conversation accompanies most EMR use. Our results suggest that efforts to improve EMR usability and clinician EMR training should focus on use in the context of doctor–patient communication. Further study of the impact of documentation inside versus outside the exam room on productivity is warranted. PMID:21134975

  2. A secure semantic interoperability infrastructure for inter-enterprise sharing of electronic healthcare records.

    PubMed

    Boniface, Mike; Watkins, E Rowland; Saleh, Ahmed; Dogac, Asuman; Eichelberg, Marco

    2006-01-01

    Healthcare professionals need access to accurate and complete healthcare records for effective assessment, diagnosis and treatment of patients. The non-interoperability of healthcare information systems means that interenterprise access to a patient's history over many distributed encounters is difficult to achieve. The ARTEMIS project has developed a secure semantic web service infrastructure for the interoperability of healthcare information systems. Healthcare professionals share services and medical information using a web service annotation and mediation environment based on functional and clinical semantics derived from healthcare standards. Healthcare professionals discover medical information about individuals using a patient identification protocol based on pseudonymous information. The management of care pathways and access to medical information is based on a well-defined business process allowing healthcare providers to negotiate collaboration and data access agreements within the context of strict legislative frameworks.

  3. Medical imaging document sharing solutions for various kinds of healthcare services based on IHE XDS/XDS-I profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianguo; Yang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Kai; Sun, Jianyong; Ling, Tonghui; Wang, Tusheng; Wang, Mingqing; Bak, Peter

    2014-03-01

    One key problem for continuity of patient care is identification of a proper method to share and exchange patient medical records among multiple hospitals and healthcare providers. This paper focuses in the imaging document component of medical record. The XDS-I (Cross- Enterprise Document Sharing - Image) Profile based on the IHE IT-Infrastructure extends and specializes XDS to support imaging "document" sharing in an affinity domain. We present three studies about image sharing solutions based on IHE XDS-I Profile. The first one is to adopt the IHE XDS-I profile as a technical guide to design image and report sharing mechanisms between hospitals for regional healthcare service in Shanghai. The second study is for collaborating image diagnosis in regional healthcare services. The latter study is to investigate the XDS-I based clearinghouse for patient controlled image sharing in the RSNA Image Sharing Network Project. We conclude that the IHE XDS/XDS-I profiles can be used as the foundation to design medical image document sharing for Various Healthcare Services.

  4. Medication adherence and older renal transplant patients' perceptions of electronic medication monitoring.

    PubMed

    Russell, Cynthia L; Owens, Sarah; Hamburger, Karen Q; Thompson, Denise A; Leach, Rebecca R; Cetingok, Muammer; Hathaway, Donna; Conn, Vicki S; Ashbaugh, Catherine; Peace, Leanne; Madsen, Richard; Winsett, Rebecca P; Wakefield, Mark R

    2009-10-01

    This study evaluated older renal transplant recipients' perceptions of electronic medication monitoring and the influence of these perceptions on medication adherence. A sample of 73 older adult renal transplant recipients who used the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS(®)) TrackCaps for 12 months provided their perceptions of device use. Participants perceived that the MEMS had a neutral effect on their medication-taking routine (65%), believed the MEMS was practical (56%), and could not describe any instances in which using the MEMS was difficult (56%). No significant difference in medication adherence was found between those who perceived the MEMS's influence negatively/neutrally and those who perceived the MEMS positively (p = 0.22). Medication adherence data from older adult renal transplant recipients can be used regardless of their perceptions of the MEMS's influence on their medication taking without biasing medication adherence data.

  5. Electronic health records and online medical records: an asset or a liability under current conditions?

    PubMed

    Allen-Graham, Judith; Mitchell, Lauren; Heriot, Natalie; Armani, Roksana; Langton, David; Levinson, Michele; Young, Alan; Smith, Julian A; Kotsimbos, Tom; Wilson, John W

    2017-01-20

    Objective The aim of the present study was to audit the current use of medical records to determine completeness and concordance with other sources of medical information.Methods Medical records for 40 patients from each of five Melbourne major metropolitan hospitals were randomly selected (n=200). A quantitative audit was performed for detailed patient information and medical record keeping, as well as data collection, storage and utilisation. Using each hospital's current online clinical database, scanned files and paperwork available for each patient audited, the reviewers sourced as much relevant information as possible within a 30-min time allocation from both the record and the discharge summary.Results Of all medical records audited, 82% contained medical and surgical history, allergy information and patient demographics. All audited discharge summaries lacked at least one of the following: demographics, medication allergies, medical and surgical history, medications and adverse drug event information. Only 49% of records audited showed evidence the discharge summary was sent outside the institution.Conclusions The quality of medical data captured and information management is variable across hospitals. It is recommended that medical history documentation guidelines and standardised discharge summaries be implemented in Australian healthcare services.What is known about this topic? Australia has a complex health system, the government has approved funding to develop a universal online electronic medical record system and is currently trialling this in an opt-out style in the Napean Blue Mountains (NSW) and in Northern Queensland. The system was originally named the personally controlled electronic health record but has since been changed to MyHealth Record (2016). In Victoria, there exists a wide range of electronic health records used to varying degrees, with some hospitals still relying on paper-based records and many using scanned medical records. This

  6. The psychiatric medical record, HIPAA, and the use of electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Houston, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This article addresses the practical and legal issues related to the psychiatric medical record, with an emphasis on the issues related to confidentiality. Implications of HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) legislation for the practice of child and adolescent psychiatry are addressed. The advantages and disadvantages of electronic medical records are reviewed, with guidelines for selecting software for solo and group practices.

  7. Building a national electronic medical record exchange system - experiences in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Chuan Jack; Yen, Ju-Chuan; Chiu, Wen-Ta; Jian, Wen-Shan; Syed-Abdul, Shabbir; Hsu, Min-Huei

    2015-08-01

    There are currently 501 hospitals and about 20,000 clinics in Taiwan. The National Health Insurance (NHI) system, which is operated by the NHI Administration, uses a single-payer system and covers 99.9% of the nation's total population of 23,000,000. Taiwan's NHI provides people with a high degree of freedom in choosing their medical care options. However, there is the potential concern that the available medical resources will be overused. The number of doctor consultations per person per year is about 15. Duplication of laboratory tests and prescriptions are not rare either. Building an electronic medical record exchange system is a good method of solving these problems and of improving continuity in health care. In November 2009, Taiwan's Executive Yuan passed the 'Plan for accelerating the implementation of electronic medical record systems in medical institutions' (2010-2012; a 3-year plan). According to this plan, a patient can, at any hospital in Taiwan, by using his/her health insurance IC card and physician's medical professional IC card, upon signing a written agreement, retrieve all important medical records for the past 6 months from other participating hospitals. The focus of this plan is to establish the National Electronic Medical Record Exchange Centre (EEC). A hospital's information system will be connected to the EEC through an electronic medical record (EMR) gateway. The hospital will convert the medical records for the past 6 months in its EMR system into standardized files and save them on the EMR gateway. The most important functions of the EEC are to generate an index of all the XML files on the EMR gateways of all hospitals, and to provide search and retrieval services for hospitals and clinics. The EEC provides four standard inter-institution EMR retrieval services covering medical imaging reports, laboratory test reports, discharge summaries, and outpatient records. In this system, we adopted the Health Level 7 (HL7) Clinical Document

  8. Shared medical appointments - an adjunct for chronic disease management in Australia?

    PubMed

    Egger, Garry; Binns, Andrew; Cole, Mary-Anne; Ewald, Dan; Davies, Lynne; Meldrum, Hamish; Stevens, John; Noffsinger, Ed

    2014-03-01

    The incidence of chronic disease continues largely unabated in modern western societies. While the content (physiology, determinants) of these diseases is well studied, processes of dealing with them at the clinical level have been less well considered. Shared medical appointments (SMAs) or group consultations (also often referred to as group visits) are 'a series of individual office visits sequentially attending to each patient's unique medical needs individually, but in a supportive group setting where all can listen, interact and learn'. To examine the potential acceptability of SMAs for the management of chronic diseases in the Australian context. SMAs were developed in the US to improve access to care, utilise peer support, reduce costs and improve patient and provider satisfaction in the management of chronic disease. An SMA is a comprehensive medical visit, not just a group education session, where a significant part of the added value comes from the facilitated peer interaction, particularly around aspects of self-management and empowerment. While more studies are required to compare outcomes with conventional one-on-one consultations, the reported gains in time efficiency, patient numbers managed, and patient as well as provider satisfaction, are sufficient to justify further consideration of a trial of SMAs in Australia.

  9. Best practices: a program to support shared decision making in an outpatient psychiatric medication clinic.

    PubMed

    Deegan, Patricia E; Rapp, Charles; Holter, Mark; Riefer, Melody

    2008-06-01

    This column presents preliminary findings of an intervention to support shared decision making in psychopharmacology consultation. The waiting area in an urban psychiatric medication clinic was transformed into a peer-run Decision Support Center featuring a user-friendly, Internet-based software program with which clients could create a one-page computer-generated report for use in the medication consultation. The Decision Support Center was used 662 times by 189 unique users from a young-adult and general adult case management team from October 2006 to September 2007. All clients had severe mental disorders. Only ten clients refused to use the intervention at some point during the pilot study. Focus groups with medical staff (N=4), clients (N=16), case managers (N=14), and peer-specialist staff (N=3) reported that the intervention helped to create efficiencies in the consultation and empower clients to become more involved in treatment-related decision making. A randomized controlled trial is currently in process.

  10. Security and confidentiality in an electronic medical record.

    PubMed

    Olson, L A; Peters, S G; Stewart, J B

    1998-01-01

    The maintenance of privacy and confidentially must remain a core principle of the interaction between patients and medical staff. Traditionally, the single paper copy of the medical history has been treated with systematic handling, careful tracking, and respect for the integrity and confidentiality of the contents. The widespread availability of computerized information requires that these principles be maintained in the electronic environment. Security measures should protect sensitive data without hindering medical practice. At Mayo, we have established data security policies and standards for the handling of all electronic information. Dissemination and communication of these standards and guidelines are an ongoing challenge. Technical maneuvers can be employed to protect data integrity, identify users, and monitor compliance. Personnel policies must be updated to reflect the responsibilities and liabilities of the electronic environment. Practice efficiencies and access to clinical data must be balanced by individual responsibility and accountability for privileged patient information.

  11. Privacy preserving index for encrypted electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Chi; Horng, Gwoboa; Lin, Yi-Jheng; Chen, Kuo-Chang

    2013-12-01

    With the development of electronic systems, privacy has become an important security issue in real-life. In medical systems, privacy of patients' electronic medical records (EMRs) must be fully protected. However, to combine the efficiency and privacy, privacy preserving index is introduced to preserve the privacy, where the EMR can be efficiently accessed by this patient or specific doctor. In the literature, Goh first proposed a secure index scheme with keyword search over encrypted data based on a well-known primitive, Bloom filter. In this paper, we propose a new privacy preserving index scheme, called position index (P-index), with keyword search over the encrypted data. The proposed index scheme is semantically secure against the adaptive chosen keyword attack, and it also provides flexible space, lower false positive rate, and search privacy. Moreover, it does not rely on pairing, a complicate computation, and thus can search over encrypted electronic medical records from the cloud server efficiently.

  12. Using the Electronic Medical Record to Enhance Physician-Nurse Communication Regarding Patients' Discharge Status.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Molly; Gurka, David

    2015-01-01

    The fast-paced environment of hospitals contributes to communication failures between health care providers while impacting patient care and patient flow. An effective mechanism for sharing patients' discharge information with health care team members is required to improve patient throughput. The communication of a patient's discharge plan was identified as crucial in alleviating patient flow delays at a tertiary care, academic medical center. By identifying the patients who were expected to be discharged the following day, the health care team could initiate discharge preparations in advance to improve patient care and patient flow. The patients' electronic medical record served to convey dynamic information regarding the patients' discharge status to the health care team via conditional discharge orders. Two neurosciences units piloted a conditional discharge order initiative. Conditional discharge orders were designed in the electronic medical record so that the conditions for discharge were listed in a dropdown menu. The health care team was trained on the conditional discharge order protocol, including when to write them, how to find them in the patients' electronic medical record, and what actions should be prompted by these orders. On average, 24% of the patients discharged had conditional discharge orders written the day before discharge. The average discharge time for patients with conditional discharge orders decreased by 83 minutes (0.06 day) from baseline. Qualitatively, the health care team reported improved workflows with conditional orders. The conditional discharge orders allowed physicians to communicate pending discharges electronically to the multidisciplinary team. The initiative positively impacted patient discharge times and workflows.

  13. [A practicable model of a secure electronic medical record system].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuan-zhong; Zhong, Le-Haiz

    2006-09-01

    In this article, a new application model has been given for digital signing technology used in the Electronic Medical Record system, which uses digital signature to implement authentication mechanism and doctor signing, and uses a notarial digital signature server to implement the third party's digital signature for notarial mechanism. It can prevent the others from modifying the doctor's record and prevent the doctor himself from modifying the record as well. Case history database preserves signed data to ensure the authenticity and validity, in law, of the Electronic Medical Record.

  14. Neuroinformatics Software Applications Supporting Electronic Data Capture, Management, and Sharing for the Neuroimaging Community

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, B. Nolan; Pohl, Kilian M.

    2017-01-01

    Accelerating insight into the relation between brain and behavior entails conducting small and large-scale research endeavors that lead to reproducible results. Consensus is emerging between funding agencies, publishers, and the research community that data sharing is a fundamental requirement to ensure all such endeavors foster data reuse and fuel reproducible discoveries. Funding agency and publisher mandates to share data are bolstered by a growing number of data sharing efforts that demonstrate how information technologies can enable meaningful data reuse. Neuroinformatics evaluates scientific needs and develops solutions to facilitate the use of data across the cognitive and neurosciences. For example, electronic data capture and management tools designed to facilitate human neurocognitive research can decrease the setup time of studies, improve quality control, and streamline the process of harmonizing, curating, and sharing data across data repositories. In this article we outline the advantages and disadvantages of adopting software applications that support these features by reviewing the tools available and then presenting two contrasting neuroimaging study scenarios in the context of conducting a cross-sectional and a multisite longitudinal study. PMID:26267019

  15. A user assessment of the potential for shared medical appointments in Australia.

    PubMed

    Stevens, John; Cole, Mary-Anne; Binns, Andrew; Dixon, John; Egger, Garry

    2014-11-01

    In some countries, shared medical appointments (SMAs) have been shown to be more effective than single consultations for managing chronic diseases. Our study was designed as the first stage of a Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP) funded project to assess potential patient and provider support for SMAs if they were to become available in Australia. We conducted focus groups with healthcare providers and patients with diabetes in four large regional health centres in NSW. The data were analysed using rigorous qualitative processes. Healthcare provider participants appeared overwhelmingly in favour of SMAs, while patients were divided on the process. Where opposed, patients cited concerns about confidentiality and their satisfaction with the status quo. There appears to be a groundswell of interest in SMAs that warrants further investigation in the Australian healthcare system. Issues of reimbursement, homogeneity of groups and training need further consideration.

  16. Shared medical appointments: facilitating care for children with asthma and their caregivers.

    PubMed

    Wall-Haas, Constance L; Kulbok, Pamela; Kirchgessner, John; Rovnyak, Virginia

    2012-01-01

    As important members of the health care team, patients and caregivers must be empowered to recognize their asthma status and to act accordingly. Education about asthma, complications, and successful management of asthma provide the best way to empower children and their caregivers. A Shared Medical Appointment (SMA) is a unique health care delivery approach that integrates disease management and patient education. The SMA described here is a 90-minute group appointment for four to nine patients who share a diagnosis of asthma, bronchospasm, or wheeze and their caregivers. The appointment includes a brief individual examination, health education delivered to the group, and the opportunity for interaction between group members. Because a supporting theoretic framework is not identified in the original design proposals for the SMA model or in the literature on its use, for the purposes of this project, Social Cognitive Theory is identified as the theoretical framework that best explains and reinforces the benefits of the SMA. The theoretic framework is important to direct the development and continued success of this treatment model. This project report describes the first nurse practitioner-led SMA as a tool for improving quality of care and service for children with asthma and their caregivers. Copyright © 2012 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Shared medical appointments: improving access, outcomes, and satisfaction for patients with chronic cardiac diseases.

    PubMed

    Bartley, Kelly Bauer; Haney, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    Improving access to care, health outcomes, and patient satisfaction are primary objectives for healthcare practices. This article outlines benefits, concerns, and possible challenges of shared medical appointments (SMAs) for patients and providers. The SMA model was designed to support providers' demanding schedules by allowing patients with the same chronic condition to be seen in a group setting. By concentrating on patient education and disease management, interactive meetings provide an opportunity for patients to share both successes and struggles with others experiencing similar challenges. Studies demonstrated that SMAs improved patient access, enhanced outcomes, and promoted patient satisfaction. This article describes the potential benefits of SMAs for patients with chronic heart disease, which consumes a large number of healthcare dollars related to hospital admissions, acute exacerbations, and symptom management. Education for self-management of chronic disease can become repetitive and time consuming. The SMA model introduces a fresh and unique style of healthcare visits, allowing providers to devote more time and attention to patients and improve productivity. The SMA model provides an outstanding method for nurse practitioners to demonstrate their role as a primary care provider, by leading patients in group discussions and evaluating their current health status. Patient selection, preparation, and facilitation of an SMA are discussed to demonstrate the complementary nature of an SMA approach in a healthcare practice.

  18. [Security specifications for electronic medical records on the Internet].

    PubMed

    Mocanu, Mihai; Mocanu, Carmen

    2007-01-01

    The extension for the Web applications of the Electronic Medical Record seems both interesting and promising. Correlated with the expansion of Internet in our country, it allows the interconnection of physicians of different specialties and their collaboration for better treatment of patients. In this respect, the ophthalmologic medical applications consider the increased possibilities for monitoring chronic ocular diseases and for the identification of some elements for early diagnosis and risk factors supervision. We emphasize in this survey some possible solutions to the problems of interconnecting medical information systems to the Internet: the achievement of interoperability within medical organizations through the use of open standards, the automated input and processing for ocular imaging, the use of data reduction techniques in order to increase the speed of image retrieval in large databases, and, last but not least, the resolution of security and confidentiality problems in medical databases.

  19. The electronic medical record system: health care marvel or morass?

    PubMed

    Silverman, D C

    1998-01-01

    The author considers the potential advantages and disadvantages, as well as possible unintended consequences, of introducing electronic medical record systems in health care organizations. Special consideration is given to the issues such information systems raise concerning privacy, confidentiality, and quality of care from both patient and provider perspectives. The potential gains from computerizing medical records include the benefit of instantaneous availability of patients' medical history, treatment regimes, and current health status in routine and emergency clinical situations. Ease of access to this information should reduce adverse outcomes. The added value of a complete and up-to-date medical record immediately available to medical caregivers seems undeniable. The potential disadvantages include issues around patient confidentiality and unauthorized access to records, the enormous capital investment for computer hardware, and system maintenance.

  20. [EHealth, health networks and electronic health record: towards a culture of sharing and trust].

    PubMed

    Nicolas, L

    2012-09-01

    In Belgium, the computerization of the ambulatory care sector and general practice in particular has been continuously progressing over the last ten years. Although regional differences exist, 75% of the Belgian general practitioners own today a software to assist them in the management of their patients. To date however, general practitioners have been hardly using their electronic system to share or communicate with other actors of the system. The silo culture remains the norm. Aside from certain group practices, computerization has thus not yet contributed to improve in a significant way the quality of care of the patient. The implementation in 2012 of the "shared electronic health record" thanks to the deployment in production of the 5 health networks connected via the federal directory of references is due to deeply change this situation. Communication flows between health care professionals will thus rapidly intensify and the amount of information available at the point of care will increase significantly. This is however only the first step. The future electronic patient record (EPR) will need to make room for a deep integration of the actors around the patient thanks--among other things--to the implementation of a global semantic interoperability strategy. This integration of actors together with the empowerment of the patient are indeed essential preliminary conditions in order to adapt our health system to the enormous challenges that we will all have to face in the next 10 years.

  1. E-Cigarette Topics Shared by Medical Professionals: A Comparison of Tweets from the United States and United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Glowacki, Elizabeth M; Lazard, Allison J; Wilcox, Gary B

    2017-02-01

    Medical professionals are now relying on social media platforms like Twitter to express their recommendations for the use or avoidance of products like electronic cigarettes (e-cigs), which may have long-term health consequences for users. The goal of this study is to compare how physicians from the United States and the United Kingdom talk about e-cigs on Twitter and identify the topics that these groups perceive as salient. Comparing tweets from the U.S. and U.K. will allow for a better understanding of how medical professionals from these countries differ in their attitudes toward e-cigs. This information can be also used to inform policies designed to regulate the use of e-cigs. Using a text-mining program, we analyzed approximately 3,800 original tweets sent by physicians from the U.S. and the U.K. within a 1-year time span (June 2015 through June 2016). The program clustered the tweets by topics, which allowed us to categorize the topics by importance. Both sets of tweets contained debates about the degree to which e-cigs pose a threat to health, but the U.S. tweets emphasized the dangers of e-cig use for teens, while the U.K. tweets focused more on the potential that e-cigs have to be used as a smoking cessation aid. Doctors are using Twitter to share timely information about the potential risks, benefits, and regulations associated with e-cigs. Evaluating these tweets allows researchers to collect information about topics that doctors find important and make comparisons about how medical professionals from the U.S. and the U.K. regard e-cigs.

  2. Physician Sensemaking and Readiness for Electronic Medical Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riesenmy, Kelly Rouse

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore physician sensemaking and readiness to implement electronic medical records (EMR) as a first step to finding strategies that enhance EMR adoption behaviors. Design/methodology/approach: The case study approach provides a detailed analysis of individuals within an organizational unit. Using a…

  3. PAMFOnline: integrating EHealth with an electronic medical record system.

    PubMed

    Tang, Paul C; Black, William; Buchanan, Jenny; Young, Charles Y; Hooper, David; Lane, Steven R; Love, Barbara; Mitchell, Charlotte; Smith, Nancy; Turnbull, Jenifer R

    2003-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine stressed the need for continuous healing relationships, yet the delivery of health care has traditionally been confined to the physician office or hospital. We implemented an eHealth application tightly integrated with our electronic medical record system that provides patients with a convenient, continuously available communication channel to their physician's office. Patients can view summary data from their medical record, including the results of diagnostic tests, and request medical advice, prescription renewals, appointments, or updates to their demographic information. We have found that patients embrace this new communication channel and are using the service appropriately. Patients especially value electronic messaging with their physicians and timely access to their test results. While initially concerned about an increase in work, physicians have found that use of electronic messaging can be an efficient method for handling non-urgent communication with their patients. Online tools for patients, when integrated with an electronic medical record, can provide patients with better access to health information, improve patient satisfaction, and improve operational efficiency.

  4. Northern Territory HealthConnect: shared electronic health record service implementation experiences and benefits realised in indigenous health.

    PubMed

    Moo, Stephen; Fletcher, John

    2007-01-01

    This presentation summarises the learnings from the HealthConnect Northern Territory (HCNT) Shared Electronic Health Record Service (SEHR) from Trial to Implementation and the emerging benefits realized as the project is implemented across the Northern Territory of Australia. The presentation: * explores the challenges and experiences of implementing a SEHR service in urban and in some of the remotest regions on the Australian continent. * demonstrates the emerging health benefits e-Health can provide in enabling the sharing of medical information between public and private health service providers in particular the service delivery and benefits provided to a highly mobile Indigenous population who currently experience the greatest health problems and experience difficulties accessing continuum of care created by factors which include remoteness, mobility and communication. * explores the evolvement of the "opt in" consumer consent model adopted by the Territory for the implementation of the HCNT SEHR.* advises of plans for future development, which inform other implementations, and NeHTA standards development for the implementation of the National SEHR Service. * Informs project plans to incorporate NeHTA standards as they are developed and transition the HCNT SEHR to the National SEHR Service when implemented recognising the importance of developing strong partnerships with key stakeholders, in particular consumers, health care providers and system vendors who inform project development and implementation.

  5. Secure scalable disaster electronic medical record and tracking system.

    PubMed

    Demers, Gerard; Kahn, Christopher; Johansson, Per; Buono, Colleen; Chipara, Octav; Griswold, William; Chan, Theodore

    2013-10-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) are considered superior in documentation of care for medical practice. Current disaster medical response involves paper tracking systems and radio communication for mass-casualty incidents (MCIs). These systems are prone to errors, may be compromised by local conditions, and are labor intensive. Communication infrastructure may be impacted, overwhelmed by call volume, or destroyed by the disaster, making self-contained and secure EMR response a critical capability. Report As the prehospital disaster EMR allows for more robust content including protected health information (PHI), security measures must be instituted to safeguard these data. The Wireless Internet Information System for medicAl Response in Disasters (WIISARD) Research Group developed a handheld, linked, wireless EMR system utilizing current technology platforms. Smart phones connected to radio frequency identification (RFID) readers may be utilized to efficiently track casualties resulting from the incident. Medical information may be transmitted on an encrypted network to fellow prehospital team members, medical dispatch, and receiving medical centers. This system has been field tested in a number of exercises with excellent results, and future iterations will incorporate robust security measures. A secure prehospital triage EMR improves documentation quality during disaster drills.

  6. Value of Pharmacist Medication Interviews on Optimizing the Electronic Medication Reconciliation Process

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Arjun; Boro, Maureen; Korman, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Few studies have explored the impact of using different methods for obtaining accurate medication histories on medication safety. This study was conducted to compare the accuracy and clinical impact of pharmacist medication histories obtained by electronic medical record review (EMRR) alone with those obtained by direct interviews combined with EMRR. Method: This 18-week prospective study included patients who were admitted to the Inpatient Medicine Service at the study institution and who had a pharmacist-conducted medication reconciliation EMRR within 48 hours of hospital admission. A chart review was performed to collect data to determine whether differences existed in the number of discrepancies, recommendations, and medication errors between the EMRR alone group compared to the EMRR combined with the patient interview group. Results: Five hundred thirteen discrepancies were identified with the EMRR group compared to 986 from the combined EMRR and patient interview group (P < .001). Significantly more recommendations were made in the combination interview group compared to the EMRR alone group (260 vs 97; P < .001). Fewer medication errors were identified for the EMRR alone group compared to the combination interview group (55 vs 134; P < .001). The most common errors were omitted medications followed by extra dose/failure to discontinue therapy and wrong dose/frequency errors. Conclusion: Pharmacist-conducted admission medication interviews combined with EMRR can potentially identify harmful medication discrepancies and prevent medication errors. PMID:24958970

  7. Influence of shared medical appointments on patient satisfaction: a retrospective 3-year study.

    PubMed

    Heyworth, Leonie; Rozenblum, Ronen; Burgess, James F; Baker, Errol; Meterko, Mark; Prescott, Debra; Neuwirth, Zeev; Simon, Steven R

    2014-07-01

    Shared medical appointments (SMAs) are becoming popular, but little is known about their association with patient experience in primary care. We performed an exploratory analysis examining overall satisfaction and patient-centered care experiences across key domains of the patient-centered medical home among patients attending SMAs vs usual care appointments. We undertook a cross-sectional study using a mailed questionnaire measuring levels of patient satisfaction and other indicators of patient-centered care among 921 SMA and 921 usual care patients between 2008 and 2010. Propensity scores adjusted for potential case mix differences between the groups. Multivariate logistic regression assessed propensity-matched patients' ratings of care. Generalized estimating equations accounted for physician-level clustering. A total of 40% of SMA patients and 31% of usual care patients responded. In adjusted analyses, SMA patients were more likely to rate their overall satisfaction with care as "very good" when compared with usual care counterparts (odds ratio=1.26; 95% CI, 1.05-1.52). In the analysis of patient-centered medical home elements, SMA patients rated their care as more accessible and more sensitive to their needs, whereas usual care patients reported greater satisfaction with physician communication and time spent during their appointment. Overall, SMA patients appear more satisfied with their care relative to patients receiving usual care. SMAs may also improve access to care and deliver care that patients find to be sensitive to their needs. Further research should focus on enhancing patient-clinician communication within an SMA as this model of care becomes more widely adopted. © 2014 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  8. Influence of Shared Medical Appointments on Patient Satisfaction: A Retrospective 3-Year Study

    PubMed Central

    Heyworth, Leonie; Rozenblum, Ronen; Burgess, James F.; Baker, Errol; Meterko, Mark; Prescott, Debra; Neuwirth, Zeev; Simon, Steven R.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Shared medical appointments (SMAs) are becoming popular, but little is known about their association with patient experience in primary care. We performed an exploratory analysis examining overall satisfaction and patient-centered care experiences across key domains of the patient-centered medical home among patients attending SMAs vs usual care appointments. METHODS We undertook a cross-sectional study using a mailed questionnaire measuring levels of patient satisfaction and other indicators of patient-centered care among 921 SMA and 921 usual care patients between 2008 and 2010. Propensity scores adjusted for potential case mix differences between the groups. Multivariate logistic regression assessed propensity-matched patients’ ratings of care. Generalized estimating equations accounted for physician-level clustering. RESULTS A total of 40% of SMA patients and 31% of usual care patients responded. In adjusted analyses, SMA patients were more likely to rate their overall satisfaction with care as “very good” when compared with usual care counterparts (odds ratio = 1.26; 95% CI, 1.05–1.52). In the analysis of patient-centered medical home elements, SMA patients rated their care as more accessible and more sensitive to their needs, whereas usual care patients reported greater satisfaction with physician communication and time spent during their appointment. CONCLUSIONS Overall, SMA patients appear more satisfied with their care relative to patients receiving usual care. SMAs may also improve access to care and deliver care that patients find to be sensitive to their needs. Further research should focus on enhancing patient-clinician communication within an SMA as this model of care becomes more widely adopted. PMID:25024240

  9. Implementation of standardized nomenclature in the electronic medical record.

    PubMed

    Klehr, Joan; Hafner, Jennifer; Spelz, Leah Mylrea; Steen, Sara; Weaver, Kathy

    2009-01-01

    To describe a customized electronic medical record documentation system which provides an electronic health record, Epic, which was implemented in December 2006 using standardized taxonomies for nursing documentation. Descriptive data is provided regarding the development, implementation, and evaluation processes for the electronic medical record system. Nurses used standardized nursing nomenclature including NANDA-I diagnoses, Nursing Interventions Classification, and Nursing Outcomes Classification in a measurable and user-friendly format using the care plan activity. Key factors in the success of the project included close collaboration among staff nurses and information technology staff, ongoing support and encouragement from the vice president/chief nursing officer, the ready availability of expert resources, and nursing ownership of the project. Use of this evidence-based documentation enhanced institutional leadership in clinical documentation.

  10. The comparison of different medical electronic endoscope systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Wei; Wang, Liqiang; Duan, Huilong

    2011-11-01

    This paper presents a miniaturized CMOS camera for high-definition (HD) medical electronic endoscope system with resolution of 1.3 MegaPixel. LVDS technology is used for image data stream transmission between the sensor and the HD image workstation to realize a long distance, high speed, high signal integrity and low noise system. Considering the real-time video image processing and the complexity of the design of HD image workstation, four solutions for medical electronic endoscope systems, namely USB based image acquisition system, PCIe acquisition data board based method, ARM embedded system based solution and DSP based electronic endoscope system have been proposed, analyzed and compared with each other. We found that the four solutions have their own advantages and disadvantages. Taking into account the strong control capacity of ARM, powerful data processing ability and high operating speed of DSP, good portability and other factors, we decided to use ARM + DSP embedded based system.

  11. The politics of healthcare informatics: knowledge management using an electronic medical record system.

    PubMed

    Bar-Lev, Shirly

    2015-03-01

    The design and implementation of an electronic medical record system pose significant epistemological and practical complexities. Despite optimistic assessments of their potential contribution to the quality of care, their implementation has been problematic, and their actual employment in various clinical settings remains controversial. Little is known about how their use actually mediates knowing. Employing a variety of qualitative research methods, this article attempts an answer by illustrating how omitting, editing and excessive reporting were employed as part of nurses' and physicians' political efforts to shape knowledge production and knowledge sharing in a technologically mediated healthcare setting.

  12. The effect of shared medical visits on knowledge and self-care in patients with heart failure: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Yehle, Karen S; Sands, Laura P; Rhynders, Patricia A; Newton, Gail D

    2009-01-01

    Patients with heart failure need education and support to improve knowledge and self-care. Shared medical groups that provide education and support have been successful in other patient populations. This study compares an advanced practice nurse-led shared medical appointment intervention in the office setting with standard care relative to self-care and knowledge among community-living adults with heart failure. Participants were randomized to shared appointment and standard care groups, and completed the Heart Failure Knowledge Test and Self-Care Heart Failure Index at baseline and 8 weeks. From baseline to 8 weeks, Heart Failure Knowledge Test scores improved more for the intervention group than the control group (F time X group = 4.90, df = 1.21; P = .038). There was no difference in groups' rates of change on the total Self-Care Heart Failure Index. The findings reveal improved knowledge when education and support are provided in a shared medical appointment setting. The shared medical visit model may be feasible as a way to provide patients with heart failure and their families with ongoing education and a supportive environment.

  13. MDPHnet: Secure, Distributed Sharing of Electronic Health Record Data for Public Health Surveillance, Evaluation, and Planning

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Joshua; Brown, Jeffrey S.; Land, Thomas; Platt, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Electronic health record systems contain clinically detailed data from large populations of patients that could significantly enrich public health surveillance. Clinical practices’ security, privacy, and proprietary concerns, however, have limited their willingness to share these data with public health agencies. We describe a novel distributed network for public health surveillance called MDPHnet. The system allows the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH) to initiate custom queries against participating practices’ electronic health records while the data remain behind each practice’s firewall. Practices can review proposed queries before execution and approve query results before releasing them to the health department. MDPH is using the system for routine surveillance for priority conditions and to evaluate the impact of public health interventions. PMID:25322301

  14. MDPHnet: secure, distributed sharing of electronic health record data for public health surveillance, evaluation, and planning.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Joshua; Brown, Jeffrey S; Land, Thomas; Platt, Richard; Klompas, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Electronic health record systems contain clinically detailed data from large populations of patients that could significantly enrich public health surveillance. Clinical practices' security, privacy, and proprietary concerns, however, have limited their willingness to share these data with public health agencies. We describe a novel distributed network for public health surveillance called MDPHnet. The system allows the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH) to initiate custom queries against participating practices' electronic health records while the data remain behind each practice's firewall. Practices can review proposed queries before execution and approve query results before releasing them to the health department. MDPH is using the system for routine surveillance for priority conditions and to evaluate the impact of public health interventions.

  15. Primary Care Provider Perspectives on Electronic Medication Refill History.

    PubMed

    Comer, Dominique; Mearns, Elizabeth; Olivere, Lindsey; Elliott, Daniel J

    Improvements in health information technology have made aggregate multipayer pharmacy claims data increasingly available through the electronic health record (EHR). The objective of this study was to assess the current awareness, utilization, and impact of pharmacy history data available in the EHR on primary care provider (PCP) decision making. A 14-question survey was distributed to all PCPs in a large medical practice. Of the 55/72 responding PCPs, 47 (85.5%) were aware of the EHR medication history function, and 36 (65.5%) had used it previously. Respondents indicated the medication history could be most useful when considering prescribing a narcotic (33/36, 92%) and when addressing nonadherence concerns (28/35, 80%). Barriers included delays in data loading and the time pressures of clinical practice. Access to aggregate multipayer pharmacy history data has the potential to affect medication reconciliation, yet future implementation should focus on making these data complete and easily available in routine practice.

  16. Shared responsibility for managing electronic waste: a case study of Maine, USA.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Travis P

    2009-12-01

    Based on high disposal and low recycling rates of electronic waste (e-waste) and continued exportation to developing countries, reliance on municipal responsibility for e-waste management has been unsuccessful in the United States. This case study examines Maine's program, which was the first US state to mandate producer responsibility for recycling household e-waste. Maine's program established a shared cost responsibility among producers, municipalities, and consumers. The study found that Maine's program resulted in a significant reduction in disposal and a corresponding increase in environmentally sound recycling. In the first 3 years of the program, 6.406 million kg of household e-waste was collected and recycled for a population of 1.32 million. The new program, implemented in 2006, increased the number of e-waste items collected and recycled by 108% in the first year, 170% in the second year, and 221% in the third year. The program decreased direct economic costs to municipalities and households because of the shared cost approach and for the first time established costs for producers. There was no empirical evidence indicating that producers have or will improve the recyclability of electronic products to reduce recycling costs. While other weaknesses were that found potentially limit the adoption of Maine's program, its positive aspects warrant consideration by other governments.

  17. Shared responsibility for managing electronic waste: A case study of Maine, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Travis P.

    2009-12-15

    Based on high disposal and low recycling rates of electronic waste (e-waste) and continued exportation to developing countries, reliance on municipal responsibility for e-waste management has been unsuccessful in the United States. This case study examines Maine's program, which was the first US state to mandate producer responsibility for recycling household e-waste. Maine's program established a shared cost responsibility among producers, municipalities, and consumers. The study found that Maine's program resulted in a significant reduction in disposal and a corresponding increase in environmentally sound recycling. In the first 3 years of the program, 6.406 million kg of household e-waste was collected and recycled for a population of 1.32 million. The new program, implemented in 2006, increased the number of e-waste items collected and recycled by 108% in the first year, 170% in the second year, and 221% in the third year. The program decreased direct economic costs to municipalities and households because of the shared cost approach and for the first time established costs for producers. There was no empirical evidence indicating that producers have or will improve the recyclability of electronic products to reduce recycling costs. While other weaknesses were that found potentially limit the adoption of Maine's program, its positive aspects warrant consideration by other governments.

  18. A Requirement Engineering Framework for Electronic Data Sharing of Health Care Data Between Organizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xia; Peyton, Liam; Kuziemsky, Craig

    Health care is increasingly provided to citizens by a network of collaboration that includes multiple providers and locations. Typically, that collaboration is on an ad-hoc basis via phone calls, faxes, and paper based documentation. Internet and wireless technologies provide an opportunity to improve this situation via electronic data sharing. These new technologies make possible new ways of working and collaboration but it can be difficult for health care organizations to understand how to use the new technologies while still ensuring that their policies and objectives are being met. It is also important to have a systematic approach to validate that e-health processes deliver the performance improvements that are expected. Using a case study of a palliative care patient receiving home care from a team of collaborating health organizations, we introduce a framework based on requirements engineering. Key concerns and objectives are identified and modeled (privacy, security, quality of care, and timeliness of service). And, then, proposed business processes which use new technologies are modeled in terms of these concerns and objectives to assess their impact and ensure that electronic data sharing is well regulated.

  19. Medical Student Documentation in the Electronic Medical Record: Patterns of Use and Barriers.

    PubMed

    Wittels, Kathleen; Wallenstein, Joshua; Patwari, Rahul; Patel, Sundip

    2017-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHR) have become ubiquitous in emergency departments. Medical students rotating on emergency medicine (EM) clerkships at these sites have constant exposure to EHRs as they learn essential skills. The Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME), and the Alliance for Clinical Education (ACE) have determined that documentation of the patient encounter in the medical record is an essential skill that all medical students must learn. However, little is known about the current practices or perceived barriers to student documentation in EHRs on EM clerkships. We performed a cross-sectional study of EM clerkship directors at United States medical schools between March and May 2016. A 13-question IRB-approved electronic survey on student documentation was sent to all EM clerkship directors. Only one response from each institution was permitted. We received survey responses from 100 institutions, yielding a response rate of 86%. Currently, 63% of EM clerkships allow medical students to document a patient encounter in the EHR. The most common reasons cited for not permitting students to document a patient encounter were hospital or medical school rule forbidding student documentation (80%), concern for medical liability (60%), and inability of student notes to support medical billing (53%). Almost 95% of respondents provided feedback on student documentation with supervising faculty being the most common group to deliver feedback (92%), followed by residents (64%). Close to two-thirds of medical students are allowed to document in the EHR on EM clerkships. While this number is robust, many organizations such as the AAMC and ACE have issued statements and guidelines that would look to increase this number even further to ensure that students are prepared for residency as well as their future careers. Almost all EM clerkships provided feedback on student documentation indicating the importance for

  20. Medical Student Documentation in the Electronic Medical Record: Patterns of Use and Barriers

    PubMed Central

    Wittels, Kathleen; Wallenstein, Joshua; Patwari, Rahul; Patel, Sundip

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Electronic health records (EHR) have become ubiquitous in emergency departments. Medical students rotating on emergency medicine (EM) clerkships at these sites have constant exposure to EHRs as they learn essential skills. The Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME), and the Alliance for Clinical Education (ACE) have determined that documentation of the patient encounter in the medical record is an essential skill that all medical students must learn. However, little is known about the current practices or perceived barriers to student documentation in EHRs on EM clerkships. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study of EM clerkship directors at United States medical schools between March and May 2016. A 13-question IRB-approved electronic survey on student documentation was sent to all EM clerkship directors. Only one response from each institution was permitted. Results We received survey responses from 100 institutions, yielding a response rate of 86%. Currently, 63% of EM clerkships allow medical students to document a patient encounter in the EHR. The most common reasons cited for not permitting students to document a patient encounter were hospital or medical school rule forbidding student documentation (80%), concern for medical liability (60%), and inability of student notes to support medical billing (53%). Almost 95% of respondents provided feedback on student documentation with supervising faculty being the most common group to deliver feedback (92%), followed by residents (64%). Conclusion Close to two-thirds of medical students are allowed to document in the EHR on EM clerkships. While this number is robust, many organizations such as the AAMC and ACE have issued statements and guidelines that would look to increase this number even further to ensure that students are prepared for residency as well as their future careers. Almost all EM clerkships provided feedback on student

  1. In-silico bonding schemes to encode chemical bonds involving sharing of electrons in molecular structures.

    PubMed

    Punnaivanam, Sankar; Sathiadhas, Jerome Pastal Raj; Panneerselvam, Vinoth

    2016-05-01

    Encoding of covalent and coordinate covalent bonds in molecular structures using ground state valence electronic configuration is achieved. The bonding due to electron sharing in the molecular structures is described with five fundamental bonding categories viz. uPair-uPair, lPair-uPair, uPair-lPair, vPair-lPair, and lPair-lPair. The involvement of lone pair electrons and the vacant electron orbitals in chemical bonding are explained with bonding schemes namely "target vacant promotion", "source vacant promotion", "target pairing promotion", "source pairing promotion", "source cation promotion", "source pairing double bond", "target vacant occupation", and "double pairing promotion" schemes. The bonding schemes are verified with a chemical structure editor. The bonding in the structures like ylides, PCl5, SF6, IF7, N-Oxides, BF4(-), AlCl4(-) etc. are explained and encoded unambiguously. The encoding of bonding in the structures of various organic compounds, transition metals compounds, coordination complexes and metal carbonyls is accomplished.

  2. Low power signal processing electronics for wearable medical devices.

    PubMed

    Casson, Alexander J; Rodriguez-Villegas, Esther

    2010-01-01

    Custom designed microchips, known as Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs), offer the lowest possible power consumption electronics. However, this comes at the cost of a longer, more complex and more costly design process compared to one using generic, off-the-shelf components. Nevertheless, their use is essential in future truly wearable medical devices that must operate for long periods of time from physically small, energy limited batteries. This presentation will demonstrate the state-of-the-art in ASIC technology for providing online signal processing for use in these wearable medical devices.

  3. WE-G-BRA-03: Enhancing Medical Imaging Physics Education on a Global Basis with Shared Resources.

    PubMed

    Sprawls, P

    2012-06-01

    To enhance and enrich medical imaging physics education by first translating personal professional experience into highly-effective educational resources and then sharing with both learners and medical physics educators on a global basis as an open and free resource. Effective medical imaging physics education that contributes to high-quality and safe clinical procedures requires medical physicists and students, anywhere in the world, having access to the science of contemporary imaging methods and procedures in a form that enriches both the teaching and learning activities. This is being achieved in two phases. The first (and continuing) phase is the translation of personal experience as a practicing clinical medical physicist in to a synergistic collection of educational resources including textbooks, online modules, and especially highly- effective visuals that can be used in classroom presentations and small group discussions. It is the availability of these visuals that enhances the performance of medical physicists as teachers who can devote their efforts to guiding the class learning activities and sharing their personal experiences and not be burdened with the production of extensive teaching materials. The second (and overlapping) phase is the development of a model and method for sharing as an open and free resource. This is achieved through a web site developed for that purpose, www.(blinded for review).org. These resources are used to support medical physics educators, programs, and individual learners both in the US and in over 100 different countries with an average of over 1000 users each day. The production and sharing of educational resources by an individual medical physicist complements and extends beyond the programs and activities of institutions and organizations. It is of significant value to learners anywhere in the world because the availability is not limited by costly course enrollment, membership, meeting registration, or geographic

  4. Focusing of a megavoltage electron beam in a medical accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrichs, P. B.; Konrad, G. T.

    1991-05-01

    Due to packaging constraints in the radiotherapy machine gantry of Siemens Mevatrons, the electron linac used in the lower energy models has a long drift tube between the end of the linae and the 270° achromatic bend assembly. Space charge effects cause the electron beam to grow so that it frequently impinges upon the entrance hole to the bend assembly. A compact solenoid has been designed that is effective in increasing the transmitted beam through the bend assembly by over 40%. A permanent magnet design proved to be unsuccessful because of high transverse fields within the magnet. Trajectory calculations obtained through the electron linac design code PARMELA (Public domain code supplied to Siemens Medical Laboratories, Inc. by L.M. Young, Los Alamos National Laboratories, Los Alamos, NM) support the experimentally observed results. Data is presented for several electron energies over the normal operating range of 4-6 MV photons from these Mevatrons.

  5. Materials Advances for Next-Generation Ingestible Electronic Medical Devices.

    PubMed

    Bettinger, Christopher J

    2015-10-01

    Electronic medical implants have collectively transformed the diagnosis and treatment of many diseases, but have many inherent limitations. Electronic implants require invasive surgeries, operate in challenging microenvironments, and are susceptible to bacterial infection and persistent inflammation. Novel materials and nonconventional device fabrication strategies may revolutionize the way electronic devices are integrated with the body. Ingestible electronic devices offer many advantages compared with implantable counterparts that may improve the diagnosis and treatment of pathologies ranging from gastrointestinal infections to diabetes. This review summarizes current technologies and highlights recent materials advances. Specific focus is dedicated to next-generation materials for packaging, circuit design, and on-board power supplies that are benign, nontoxic, and even biodegradable. Future challenges and opportunities are also highlighted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Shared medical appointments improve QOL in neuromuscular patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Seesing, Femke Marie; Drost, Gea; Groenewoud, Johannes; van der Wilt, Gert Jan; van Engelen, Baziel G M

    2014-07-15

    To systematically study the effects of shared medical appointments (SMAs) compared with individual appointments for patients with a chronic neuromuscular disorder and their partners. In this randomized controlled trial with a follow-up of 6 months, we included patients with a chronic neuromuscular disorder and their partners. Participants were randomly allocated to an SMA or an individual outpatient appointment. The primary outcome measure was patients' health-related quality of life (QOL) (36-Item Short Form Health Survey). Secondary outcome measures included self-efficacy, social support, patient and partner satisfaction with the appointment, and time available per patient. Two hundred seventy-two patients and 149 partners were included. Health-related QOL showed greater improvement in patients who had attended an SMA (mean difference 2.8 points, 95% confidence interval 0.0-5.7, p = 0.05). Secondary outcomes showed small improvements in the control group for satisfaction with the appointment (p = 0.01). Neurologists spent less time per patient during the SMAs: mean 16 minutes (range 11-30) vs. 25 minutes (range 20-30) for individual appointments. This study provides evidence that SMAs can improve aspects of QOL of patients with a chronic neuromuscular disorder. This could result in an alternative to individual appointments and improvements in both effectiveness and efficiency. Further research to optimize SMAs and to identify critical success factors seems warranted. These data extend evidence on SMAs for neurologic patients. This study provides Class III evidence that for patients with chronic neuromuscular disorders, SMAs improve QOL as compared with individual medical appointments. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  7. National electronic medical records integration on cloud computing system.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Hebah; El-Masri, Samir

    2013-01-01

    Few Healthcare providers have an advanced level of Electronic Medical Record (EMR) adoption. Others have a low level and most have no EMR at all. Cloud computing technology is a new emerging technology that has been used in other industry and showed a great success. Despite the great features of Cloud computing, they haven't been utilized fairly yet in healthcare industry. This study presents an innovative Healthcare Cloud Computing system for Integrating Electronic Health Record (EHR). The proposed Cloud system applies the Cloud Computing technology on EHR system, to present a comprehensive EHR integrated environment.

  8. eMedication Meets eHealth with the Electronic Medication Management Assistant (eMMA).

    PubMed

    Tschanz, Mauro; Dorner, Tim Lucas; Denecke, Kerstin

    2017-01-01

    A patient's healthcare team is often missing a complete overview on the prescribed and dispensed medication. This is due to an inconsistent information flow between the different actors of the healthcare system. Often, only the patient himself knows exactly which drugs he is actually taking. Our objective is to exploit different eHealth technologies available or planned in Switzerland to improve the information flow of the medication data among the stakeholder and to support the patient in managing his medication. This work is embedded in the "Hospital of the Future Live" project, involving 16 companies and 6 hospitals in order to develop IT solutions for future optimized health care processes. A comprehensive set of requirements was collected from the different actors and project partners. Further, specifications of the available or planned eHealth infrastructure were reviewed to integrate relevant technologies into a coherent concept. We developed a concept that combines the medication list and an eHealth platform. The resulting electronic medication management assistant (eMMA) designed for the patient provides the current medication plan at any time and supports by providing relevant information through a conversational user interface. In Switzerland, we still need a bridging technology to combine the medication information from the electronic patient record with the medication plan's associated QR-Code. The developed app is intended to provide such bridge and demonstrates the usefulness of the eMediplan. It enables the patient to have all data regarding his medication on his personal mobile phone and he can - if necessary - provide the current medication to the health professional.

  9. How pressure is applied in shared decisions about antipsychotic medication: a conversation analytic study of psychiatric outpatient consultations.

    PubMed

    Quirk, Alan; Chaplin, Rob; Lelliott, Paul; Seale, Clive

    2012-01-01

    The professional identity of psychiatry depends on it being regarded as one amongst many medical specialties and sharing ideals of good practice with other specialties, an important marker of which is the achievement of shared decision-making and avoiding a reputation for being purely agents of social control. Yet the interactions involved in trying to achieve shared decision-making are relatively unexplored in psychiatry. This study analyses audiotapes of 92 outpatient consultations involving nine consultant psychiatrists focusing on how pressure is applied in shared decisions about antipsychotic medication. Detailed conversation analysis reveals that some shared decisions are considerably more pressured than others. At one end of a spectrum of pressure are pressured shared decisions, characterised by an escalating cycle of pressure and resistance from which it is difficult to exit without someone losing face. In the middle are directed decisions, where the patient cooperates with being diplomatically steered by the psychiatrist. At the other extreme are open decisions where the patient is allowed to decide, with the psychiatrist exerting little or no pressure. Directed and open decisions occurred most frequently; pressured decisions were rarer. Patient risk did not appear to influence the degree of pressure applied in these outpatient consultations. © 2011 The Authors. Sociology of Health & Illness © 2011 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Knowledge representation and sharing using visual semantic modeling for diagnostic medical image databases.

    PubMed

    Barb, Adrian S; Shyu, Chi-Ren; Sethi, Yash P

    2005-12-01

    Information technology offers great opportunities for supporting radiologists' expertise in decision support and training. However, this task is challenging due to difficulties in articulating and modeling visual patterns of abnormalities in a computational way. To address these issues, well established approaches to content management and image retrieval have been studied and applied to assist physicians in diagnoses. Unfortunately, most of the studies lack the flexibility of sharing both explicit and tacit knowledge involved in the decision making process, while adapting to each individual's opinion. In this paper, we propose a knowledge repository and exchange framework for diagnostic image databases called "evolutionary system for semantic exchange of information in collaborative environments" (Essence). This framework uses semantic methods to describe visual abnormalities, and offers a solution for tacit knowledge elicitation and exchange in the medical domain. Also, our approach provides a computational and visual mechanism for associating synonymous semantics of visual abnormalities. We conducted several experiments to demonstrate the system's capability of matching synonym terms, and the benefit of using tacit knowledge in improving the meaningfulness of semantic queries.

  11. Shared medical appointments to screen for geriatric syndromes: preliminary data from a quality improvement initiative.

    PubMed

    May, Suepattra G; Cheng, Peter H; Tietbohl, Caroline K; Trujillo, Laurel; Reilly, Kelly; Frosch, Dominick L; Lin, Grace A

    2014-12-01

    Older adults are at greater risk of developing conditions that affect health outcomes, quality of life, and costs of care. Screening for geriatric conditions such as memory loss, fall risk, and depression may contribute to the prevention of adverse physical and mental comorbidities, unnecessary hospitalizations, and premature nursing home admissions. Because screening is not consistently performed in primary care settings, a shared medical appointment (SMA) program was developed to fill this gap in care. The goals of the program were to improve early identification of at-risk individuals and ensure appropriate follow-up for memory loss, fall risk, and depression; facilitate discussion about prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of these conditions; implement strategies to reduce risks for these conditions; and increase access to screening and expand preventive health services for older adults. Between August 2011 and May 2013, 136 individuals aged 60 and older participated in the program. Three case studies highlighting the psychosocial and physiological findings of participation in the program are presented. Preliminary data suggest that SMAs are an effective model of regularly screening at-risk older adults that augments primary care practice by facilitating early detection and referral for syndromes that may otherwise be missed or delayed. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  12. Association of prescription abandonment with cost share for high-cost specialty pharmacy medications.

    PubMed

    Gleason, Patrick P; Starner, Catherine I; Gunderson, Brent W; Schafer, Jeremy A; Sarran, H Scott

    2009-10-01

    In 2008, specialty medications accounted for 15.1% of total pharmacy benefit medication spending, and per member expenditures have increased by 11.1% annually from 2004 to 2008 within a commercially insured population of 8 million members. Insurers face increasing pressure to control specialty medication expenditures and to rely on increasing member cost share through creation of a fourth copayment tier within the incentive-based formulary pharmacy benefit system. Data are needed on the influence that member out-of-pocket (OOP) expense may have on prescription abandonment (defined as the patient never actually taking possession of the medication despite evidence of a written prescription generated by a prescriber). To explore the relationship between prescription abandonment and OOP expense among individuals newly initiating high-cost medication therapy with a tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blocker or multiple sclerosis (MS) biologic agent. This observational cross-sectional study queried a midwestern and southern U.S. database of 13,172,480 commercially insured individuals to find members with a pharmacy benefit-adjudicated claim for a TNF blocker or MS specialty medication during the period from July 2006 through June 2008. Prescription abandonment was assessed among continuously enrolled members newly initiating TNF blocker or MS therapy. Prescription abandonment was defined as reversal of the adjudicated claim with no evidence of a subsequent additional adjudicated paid claim in the ensuing 90 days. Separate analyses for MS and TNF blocker therapy were performed to assess the association between member OOP expense and abandonment rate using the Cochran-Armitage test for trend and multivariate logistic regression. Members were placed into 1 of the 7 following OOP expense groups per claim: $0-$100, $101-$150, $151-$200, $201-$250, $251-$350, $351-$500, or more than $500. The association of MS or TNF blocker abandonment rate with OOP expense was tested with logistic

  13. 6 Tips to Avoid Medication Mistakes

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Updates 6 Tips to Avoid Medication Mistakes Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... dietary supplements you use. back to top Computerized Medication Box FDA has cleared for marketing the Electronic ...

  14. Shared Medical Appointments: Impact on Clinical and Quality Outcomes in Veterans With Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Harris, Marianne D; Kirsh, Susan; Higgins, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    Managing diabetes poses substantial challenges to the over 29.1 million Americans afflicted, and is financially overwhelming to the US health care system. One potential strategy is utilizing a group approach to care delivery or shared medical appointment (SMA). The purpose of this 3-year retrospective VA study was to investigate differences in clinical and quality outcome measures in veterans with type 2 diabetes who used SMAs and those who received only usual care (UC) one-on-one with their doctor. This observational, 2-group cohort study used abstracted medical records from a large Midwestern Veterans Administration hospital. Clinical outcome metrics included hemoglobin A1c (hbA1c), systolic blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and emergency department (ED) visits. Quality outcomes included Veterans' Administration (VA) Department of Defense clinical practice guidelines for the management of diabetes. A total of 988 total VA cases were examined retrospectively over 3 years: 371 cases had used SMAs and 617 were in the UC cohort, and had never attended a diabetes SMA. The study period used abstracted VA medical records from 2008 to 2010. There were no statistically significant differences in HbA1c, systolic blood pressure, and ED visits between groups; however, hbA1c for individuals who attended SMAs was 8.55 (standard deviation [SD] = 1.72) and UC was 7.49 (SD = 1.28) (P < .001). All clinical outcomes were worse at baseline for the SMA cohort. UC had mean ED visits/3 years (mean = 18.62, SD = 13.53, P < .001) versus SMA participants (mean = 27.97, SD = 14.00, P <. 001), revealing a propensity for high health care utilization. SMA providers had statistically significant differences over UC cases on quality measures, including ordering annual ophthalmology and podiatry examinations (P < .001) and prescribing aspirin and angiotension-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I). SMAs may provide a venue for assessing and delivering quality care for patients

  15. Social work and medical care: electronic reminders to address adherence.

    PubMed

    Whisenhunt, Allison

    2014-01-01

    Social workers are often involved with patients and families around adherence, both to clinic appointments as well as to the medication regimen. An evidence-based practice project was created and implemented to determine the efficacy of electronic reminders such as text messaging on adherence. The implications of improving adherence can positively impact the patient on an individual level as well as reduce costs and increase revenue at a systems level.

  16. [The medical records of home health care patients: a complement or alternative to an electronic file?].

    PubMed

    Perrot, P; Baudier, F; Schmitt, B

    2005-06-01

    Home health care services for dependant people involve participation and interventions of professionals from the health care, medico-social and social sectors. In order to ensure quality care, the flow of information must appropriately circulate between all of the various care providers. The establishment of an electronic medical file for these patients is a possible solution which has been proposed to be conducted in next years. A paper medical record is the property of the patient and offers the possibility of an alternative and complementary solution. The electronic file would use the existing available file as a starting point, and without any additional organisational structures being implicated, it allows for better coordination of the health, medical and social activities. An experimental implementation of this in the Franch-Comte region of France demonstrated the advantages and benefits of such a tool based on a logic centered upon the individual and the open sharing of practices between professionals in the medical and social sectors.

  17. Medical free-electron laser: fact or fiction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, James P.; Ponikvar, Donald R.

    1994-07-01

    The free electron laser (FEL) has long been proposed as a flexible tool for a variety of medical applications, and yet the FEL has not seen widespread acceptance in the medical community. The issues have been the laser's size, cost, and complexity. Unfortunately, research on applications of FELs has outpaced the device development efforts. This paper describes the characteristics of the FEL, as they have been demonstrated in the U.S. Army's FEL technology development program, and identifies specific medical applications where demonstrated performance levels would suffice. This includes new photodynamic therapies for cancer and HIV treatment, orthopedic applications, tissue welding applications, and multiwavelength surgical techniques. A new tunable kilowatt class FEL device is described, which utilizes existing hardware from the U.S. Army program. An assessment of the future potential, based on realistic technology scaling is provided.

  18. Views of Ethical Best Practices in Sharing Individual-Level Data From Medical and Public Health Research

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Nia; Parker, Michael

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing support for sharing individual-level data generated by medical and public health research. This scoping review of empirical research and conceptual literature examined stakeholders’ perspectives of ethical best practices in data sharing, particularly in low- and middle-income settings. Sixty-nine empirical and conceptual articles were reviewed, of which, only five were empirical studies and eight were conceptual articles focusing on low- and middle-income settings. We conclude that support for sharing individual-level data is contingent on the development and implementation of international and local policies and processes to support ethical best practices. Further conceptual and empirical research is needed to ensure data sharing policies and processes in low- and middle-income settings are appropriately informed by stakeholders’ perspectives. PMID:26297745

  19. A web based prototype system for patient use confirming Taiwan electronic medical-record templates.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chiu-Ming; Jian, Wen-Shan; Chang, Po-Lun; Hsu, Chien-Yeh

    2005-01-01

    Taiwanese Department of Health (DOH) proposed the basic format template of electronic medical records (EMR), for the reference of healthcare institutions nationwide. It facilitates the establishment of EMR in healthcare institutions and the foundation of the sharing and exchange center of EMR. We use this basic content format template as the data exchange carrier, and build a EMR prototype system by using web-based XML structured documents, which can thoroughly show the information needed by patients and healthcare institutions, offer web browser inverted exclamation mark|s HTML-style viewing, provide people and institutions with the operation interface for browsing and downloading relevant medical record formats, and realize the dream that people can actually own their EMR.

  20. Disciplined doctors: the electronic medical record and physicians' changing relationship to medical knowledge.

    PubMed

    Reich, Adam

    2012-04-01

    This study explores the effects of the electronic medical record (EMR) on the power of the medical profession. It is based on twenty-five in-depth interviews with administrators and physicians across three departments of a large, U.S. integrated health system, as well as ethnographic observation, all of which took place between September of 2009 and December of 2010. While scholarship on professional power has tended toward the opposite poles of professional dominance and deprofessionalization or proletarianization, I find that doctors' interactions with the EMR reconcile these perspectives by making physicians' professional identities consistent with their subordination to bureaucratic authority. After examining the electronic medical record as a disciplinary technology, the paper analyzes variation in the extent to which practitioners' professional identities are reconciled with bureaucratic subordination across the different departments studies.

  1. Development of a tool within the electronic medical record to facilitate medication reconciliation after hospital discharge

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Catherine L; Hamann, Claus; Karson, Andrew S; Palchuk, Matvey B; McCarthy, Patricia C; Sherlock, Melanie; Turchin, Alexander; Bates, David W

    2011-01-01

    Serious medication errors occur commonly in the period after hospital discharge. Medication reconciliation in the postdischarge ambulatory setting may be one way to reduce the frequency of these errors. The authors describe the design and implementation of a novel tool built into an ambulatory electronic medical record (EMR) to facilitate postdischarge medication reconciliation. The tool compares the preadmission medication list within the ambulatory EMR to the hospital discharge medication list, highlights all changes, and allows the EMR medication list to be easily updated. As might be expected for a novel tool intended for use in a minority of visits, use of the tool was low at first: 20% of applicable patient visits within 30 days of discharge. Clinician outreach, education, and a pop-up reminder succeeded in increasing use to 41% of applicable visits. Review of feedback identified several usability issues that will inform subsequent versions of the tool and provide generalizable lessons for how best to design medication reconciliation tools for this setting. PMID:21486889

  2. Implementation and Impact of Psychiatric Electronic Medical Records in a Public Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Anna Q.; Acosta, Frank X.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study describes the efforts to implement electronic charting in a large public psychiatric outpatient clinic with the objective to improve clinical documentation. Methods Data made available through the quality review process are utilized to evaluate the effectiveness of the electronic intervention. The study is a comparative analysis of the three years before and three years after the point of implementation of electronic charting. Results Statistical analyses indicate significant findings (p <.0001) in the comparison of the periods before and after implementation in terms of note completion and documentation of medication management, supporting the study's hypothesis that electronic intervention will improve the quality of clinical documentation. Conclusions This study contributes new knowledge to improve our understanding of the barriers and benefits of implementing and maintaining electronic charting in mental health settings. PMID:27843422

  3. Accuracy of Electronic Medical Record Medication Reconciliation in Emergency Department Patients.

    PubMed

    Monte, Andrew A; Anderson, Peter; Hoppe, Jason A; Weinshilboum, Richard M; Vasiliou, Vasilis; Heard, Kennon J

    2015-07-01

    Medication history discrepancies have the potential to cause significant adverse clinical effects for patients. More than 40% of medication errors can be traced to inadequate reconciliation. The objective of this study was to determine the accuracy of electronic medical record (EMR)-reconciled medication lists obtained in an academic emergency department (ED). Comprehensive research medication ingestion histories for the 48 h preceding ED visit were performed and compared to reconciled EMR medication lists in a convenience sample of ED patients. The reconciled EMR list of prescription, nonprescription, vitamins, herbals, and supplement medications were compared against a structured research medication history tool. We measured the accuracy of the reconciled EMR list vs. the research history for all classes of medications as the primary outcome. Five hundred and two subjects were enrolled. The overall accuracy of EMR-recorded ingestion histories in the preceding 48 h was poor. The EMR was accurate in only 21.9% of cases. Neither age ≥ 65 years (odds ratio [OR] = 1.3; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.6-2.6) nor sex (female vs. male: OR = 1.5; 95% CI 0.9-2.5) were predictors of accurate EMR history. In the inaccurate EMRs, prescription lists were more likely to include medications that the subject did not report using (78.9%), while the EMR was more likely not to capture nonprescriptions (76.1%), vitamins (73.0%), supplements (67.3%), and herbals (89.1%) that the subject reported using. Medication ingestion histories procured through triage EMR reconciliation are often inaccurate, and additional strategies are needed to obtain an accurate list. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Mass-Gathering Medical Care in Electronic Dance Music Festivals.

    PubMed

    FitzGibbon, Kathleen M; Nable, Jose V; Ayd, Benjamin; Lawner, Benjamin J; Comer, Angela C; Lichenstein, Richard; Levy, Matthew J; Seaman, Kevin G; Bussey, Ian

    2017-10-01

    Introduction Electronic dance music (EDM) festivals represent a unique subset of mass-gathering events with limited guidance through literature or legislation to guide mass-gathering medical care at these events. Hypothesis/Problem Electronic dance music festivals pose unique challenges with increased patient encounters and heightened patient acuity under-estimated by current validated casualty predication models. This was a retrospective review of three separate EDM festivals with analysis of patient encounters and patient transport rates. Data obtained were inserted into the predictive Arbon and Hartman models to determine estimated patient presentation rate and patient transport rates. The Arbon model under-predicted the number of patient encounters and the number of patient transports for all three festivals, while the Hartman model under-predicted the number of patient encounters at one festival and over-predicted the number of encounters at the other two festivals. The Hartman model over-predicted patient transport rates for two of the three festivals. Electronic dance music festivals often involve distinct challenges and current predictive models are inaccurate for planning these events. The formation of a cohesive incident action plan will assist in addressing these challenges and lead to the collection of more uniform data metrics. FitzGibbon KM , Nable JV , Ayd B , Lawner BJ , Comer AC , Lichenstein R , Levy MJ , Seaman KG , Bussey I . Mass-gathering medical care in electronic dance music festivals. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2017;32(5):563-567.

  5. Report on audit of fire and emergency medical services cost sharing between the Department of Energy and Los Alamos County

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-02

    Los Alamos County was created in 1964 as a response to a Congressional mandate, promulgated in the Atomic Energy Act of 1954. Because the county came into existence via the Atomic Energy Act, the Department provided fire and emergency medical services. In the intervening years, however, the Department and the county have worked toward making the county self-sufficient. The contract for fire and emergency medical services represented a step in the direction of self-sufficiency by requiring the county to begin paying for its share of the related costs. The purpose of the audit was to determine if the costs for fire and emergency medical services were shared appropriately commensurate with the use of the services.

  6. Quality improvement and practice-based research in neurology using the electronic medical record

    PubMed Central

    Frigerio, Roberta; Kazmi, Nazia; Meyers, Steven L.; Sefa, Meredith; Walters, Shaun A.; Silverstein, Jonathan C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We describe quality improvement and practice-based research using the electronic medical record (EMR) in a community health system–based department of neurology. Our care transformation initiative targets 10 neurologic disorders (brain tumors, epilepsy, migraine, memory disorders, mild traumatic brain injury, multiple sclerosis, neuropathy, Parkinson disease, restless legs syndrome, and stroke) and brain health (risk assessments and interventions to prevent Alzheimer disease and related disorders in targeted populations). Our informatics methods include building and implementing structured clinical documentation support tools in the EMR; electronic data capture; enrollment, data quality, and descriptive reports; quality improvement projects; clinical decision support tools; subgroup-based adaptive assignments and pragmatic trials; and DNA biobanking. We are sharing EMR tools and deidentified data with other departments toward the creation of a Neurology Practice-Based Research Network. We discuss practical points to assist other clinical practices to make quality improvements and practice-based research in neurology using the EMR a reality. PMID:26576324

  7. Condition Self-Management in Pediatric Spina Bifida: A Longitudinal Investigation of Medical Adherence, Responsibility-Sharing, and Independence Skills

    PubMed Central

    Psihogios, Alexandra M.; Kolbuck, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate rates of medical adherence, responsibility, and independence skills across late childhood and adolescence in youth with spina bifida (SB) and to explore associations among these disease self-management variables. Method 111 youth with SB, their parents, and a health professional participated at two time points. Informants completed questionnaires regarding medical adherence, responsibility-sharing, and child independence skills. Results Youth gained more responsibility and independence skills across time, although adherence rates did not follow a similar trajectory. Increased child medical responsibility was related to poorer adherence, and father-reported independence skills were associated with increased child responsibility. Conclusions This study highlights medical domains that are the most difficult for families to manage (e.g., skin checks). Although youth appear to gain more autonomy across time, ongoing parental involvement in medical care may be necessary to achieve optimal adherence across adolescence. PMID:26002195

  8. Introduction of shared electronic records: multi-site case study using diffusion of innovation theory.

    PubMed

    Greenhalgh, Trisha; Stramer, Katja; Bratan, Tanja; Byrne, Emma; Mohammad, Yara; Russell, Jill

    2008-10-23

    To explore the introduction of a centrally stored, shared electronic patient record (the summary care record (SCR)) in England and draw wider lessons about the implementation of large scale information technology projects in health care. Multi-site, mixed method case study applying utilisation focused evaluation. Four early adopter sites for the SCR in England-three in urban areas of relative socioeconomic deprivation and the fourth in a relatively affluent rural area. Data sources and analysis Data included 250 staff interviews, 1500 hours of ethnographic observation, interviews and focus groups with 170 patients and carers, 2500 pages of correspondence and documentary evidence, and incorporation of relevant surveys and statistics produced by others. These were analysed by using a thematic approach drawing on (and extending) a theoretical model of complex change developed in a previous systematic review. Main findings The mixed fortunes of the SCR programme in its first year were largely explained by eight interacting influences. The first was the SCR's material properties (especially technical immaturity and lack of interoperability) and attributes (especially the extent to which potential adopters believed the benefits outweighed the risks). The second was adopters' concerns (especially about workload and the ethicality of sharing "confidential" information on an implied consent model). The third influence was interpersonal influence (for example, opinion leaders, champions, facilitators), and the fourth was organisational antecedents for innovation (for example past experience with information technology projects, leadership and management capacity, effective data capture systems, slack resources). The fifth was organisational readiness for the SCR (for example, innovation-system fit, tension for change, power balances between supporters and opponents, baseline data quality). The sixth was the implementation process (including the nature of the change model and

  9. A Pharmacy Blueprint for Electronic Medical Record Implementation Success

    PubMed Central

    Bach, David S.; Risko, Kenneth R.; Farber, Margo S.; Polk, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Implementation of an integrated, electronic medical record (EMR) has been promoted as a means of improving patient safety and quality. While there are a few reports of such processes that incorporate computerized prescriber order entry, pharmacy verification, an electronic medication administration record (eMAR), point-of-care barcode scanning, and clinical decision support, there are no published reports on how a pharmacy department can best participate in implementing such a process across a multihospital health care system. Method: This article relates the experience of the design, build, deployment, and maintenance of an integrated EMR solution from the pharmacy perspective. It describes a 9-month planning and build phase and the subsequent rollout at 8 hospitals over the following 13 months. Results: Key components to success are identified, as well as a set of guiding principles that proved invaluable in decision making and dispute resolution. Labor/personnel requirements for the various stages of the process are discussed, as are issues involving medication workflow analysis, drug database considerations, the development of clinical order sets, and incorporation of bar-code scanning of medications. Recommended implementation and maintenance strategies are presented, and the impact of EMR implementation on the pharmacy practice model and revenue analysis are examined. Conclusion: Adherence to the principles and practices outlined in this article can assist pharmacy administrators and clinicians during all medication-related phases of the development, implementation, and maintenance of an EMR solution. Furthermore, review and incorporation of some or all of practices presented may help ease the process and ensure its success. PMID:26405340

  10. Retrieval of publications addressing shared decision making: an evaluation of full-text searches on medical journal websites.

    PubMed

    Blanc, Xavier; Collet, Tinh-Hai; Auer, Reto; Iriarte, Pablo; Krause, Jan; Légaré, France; Cornuz, Jacques; Clair, Carole

    2015-04-07

    Full-text searches of articles increase the recall, defined by the proportion of relevant publications that are retrieved. However, this method is rarely used in medical research due to resource constraints. For the purpose of a systematic review of publications addressing shared decision making, a full-text search method was required to retrieve publications where shared decision making does not appear in the title or abstract. The objective of our study was to assess the efficiency and reliability of full-text searches in major medical journals for identifying shared decision making publications. A full-text search was performed on the websites of 15 high-impact journals in general internal medicine to look up publications of any type from 1996-2011 containing the phrase "shared decision making". The search method was compared with a PubMed search of titles and abstracts only. The full-text search was further validated by requesting all publications from the same time period from the individual journal publishers and searching through the collected dataset. The full-text search for "shared decision making" on journal websites identified 1286 publications in 15 journals compared to 119 through the PubMed search. The search within the publisher-provided publications of 6 journals identified 613 publications compared to 646 with the full-text search on the respective journal websites. The concordance rate was 94.3% between both full-text searches. Full-text searching on medical journal websites is an efficient and reliable way to identify relevant articles in the field of shared decision making for review or other purposes. It may be more widely used in biomedical research in other fields in the future, with the collaboration of publishers and journals toward open-access data.

  11. Retrieval of Publications Addressing Shared Decision Making: An Evaluation of Full-Text Searches on Medical Journal Websites

    PubMed Central

    Collet, Tinh-Hai; Auer, Reto; Iriarte, Pablo; Krause, Jan; Légaré, France; Cornuz, Jacques; Clair, Carole

    2015-01-01

    Background Full-text searches of articles increase the recall, defined by the proportion of relevant publications that are retrieved. However, this method is rarely used in medical research due to resource constraints. For the purpose of a systematic review of publications addressing shared decision making, a full-text search method was required to retrieve publications where shared decision making does not appear in the title or abstract. Objective The objective of our study was to assess the efficiency and reliability of full-text searches in major medical journals for identifying shared decision making publications. Methods A full-text search was performed on the websites of 15 high-impact journals in general internal medicine to look up publications of any type from 1996-2011 containing the phrase “shared decision making”. The search method was compared with a PubMed search of titles and abstracts only. The full-text search was further validated by requesting all publications from the same time period from the individual journal publishers and searching through the collected dataset. Results The full-text search for “shared decision making” on journal websites identified 1286 publications in 15 journals compared to 119 through the PubMed search. The search within the publisher-provided publications of 6 journals identified 613 publications compared to 646 with the full-text search on the respective journal websites. The concordance rate was 94.3% between both full-text searches. Conclusions Full-text searching on medical journal websites is an efficient and reliable way to identify relevant articles in the field of shared decision making for review or other purposes. It may be more widely used in biomedical research in other fields in the future, with the collaboration of publishers and journals toward open-access data. PMID:25854180

  12. RF-Medisys: a radio frequency identification-based electronic medical record system for improving medical information accessibility and services at point of care.

    PubMed

    Ting, Jacky S L; Tsang, Albert H C; Ip, Andrew W H; Ho, George T S

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an innovative electronic medical records (EMR) system, RF-MediSys, which can perform medical information sharing and retrieval effectively and which is accessible via a 'smart' medical card. With such a system, medical diagnoses and treatment decisions can be significantly improved when compared with the conventional practice of using paper medical records systems. Furthermore, the entire healthcare delivery process, from registration to the dispensing or administration of medicines, can be visualised holistically to facilitate performance review. To examine the feasibility of implementing RF-MediSys and to determine its usefulness to users of the system, a survey was conducted within a multi-disciplinary medical service organisation that operates a network of medical clinics and paramedical service centres throughout Hong Kong Island, the Kowloon Peninsula and the New Territories. Questionnaires were distributed to 300 system users, including nurses, physicians and patients, to collect feedback on the operation and performance of RF-MediSys in comparison with conventional paper-based medical record systems. The response rate to the survey was 67%. Results showed a medium to high level of user satisfaction with the radiofrequency identification (RFID)-based EMR system. In particular, respondents provided high ratings on both 'user-friendliness' and 'system performance'. Findings of the survey highlight the potential of RF-MediSys as a tool to enhance quality of medical services and patient safety.

  13. Advancing medical education: connecting interprofessional collaboration and education opportunities with integrative medicine initiatives to build shared learning.

    PubMed

    Templeman, Kate; Robinson, Anske; McKenna, Lisa

    2016-12-01

    BackgroundImproved teamwork between conventional and complementary medicine (CM) practitioners is indicated to achieve effective healthcare. However, little is known about interprofessional collaboration and education in the context of integrative medicine (IM). MethodsThis paper reports the findings from a constructivist-grounded theory method study that explored and highlighted Australian medical students' experiences and opportunities for linking interprofessional collaboration and learning in the context of IM. Following ethical approval, in-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with 30 medical students from 10 medical education faculties across Australian universities. Results Medical students recognised the importance of interprofessional teamwork between general medical practitioners and CM professionals in patient care and described perspectives of shared responsibilities, profession-specific responsibilities, and collaborative approaches within IM. While students identified that limited interprofessional collaboration currently occurred in the medical curriculum, interprofessional education was considered a means of increasing communication and collaboration between healthcare professionals, helping coordinate effective patient care, and understanding each healthcare team members' professional role and value. Conclusions The findings suggest that medical curricula should include opportunities for medical students to develop required skills, behaviours, and attitudes for interprofessional collaboration and interprofessional education within the context of IM. While this is a qualitative study that reflects theoretical saturation from a selected cohort of medical students, the results also point to the importance of including CM professionals within interprofessional collaboration, thus contributing to more person-centred care.

  14. Does a One-Size-Fits-All Cost-Sharing Approach Incentivize Appropriate Medication Use? A Roundtable on the Fairness and Ethics Associated with Variable Cost Sharing.

    PubMed

    Graff, Jennifer S; Shih, Chuck; Barker, Thomas; Dieguez, Gabriela; Larson, Cheryl; Sherman, Helen; Dubois, Robert W

    2017-06-01

    Tiered formularies, in which patients pay copays or coinsurance out-of-pocket (OOP), are used to manage costs and encourage more efficient health care resource use. Formulary tiers are typically based on the cost of treatment rather than the medical appropriateness for the patient. Cost sharing may have unintended consequences on treatment adherence and health outcomes. Use of higher-cost, higher-tier medications can be due to a variety of factors, including unsuccessful treatment because of lack of efficacy or side effects, patient clinical or genetic characteristics, patient preferences to avoid potential side effects, or patient preferences based on the route of administration. For example, patients with rheumatoid arthritis may be required to fail low-cost generic treatments before obtaining coverage for a higher-tier tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitor for which they would have a larger financial burden. Little is known about stakeholders' views on the acceptability of greater patient cost sharing if the individual patient characteristics lead to the higher-cost treatments. To identify and discuss the trade-offs associated with variable cost sharing in pharmacy benefits. To discuss the trade-offs associated with variable cost sharing in pharmacy benefits, we convened an expert roundtable of patient, payer, and employer representatives (panelists). Panelists reviewed background white papers, including an ethics framework; actuarial analysis; legal review; and stakeholder perspectives representing health plan, employer, and patient views. Using case studies, panelists were asked to consider (a) when it would be more (or less) acceptable to require higher cost sharing; (b) the optimal distribution of financial burdens across patients, all plan members, and employers; and (c) the existing barriers and potential solutions to align OOP costs with medically appropriate treatments. Panelists felt it was least acceptable for patients to have greater OOP costs if the

  15. Effects and Satisfaction of Medical Device Safety Information Reporting System Using Electronic Medical Record.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hye Jung; Choi, Young Deuk; Kim, Nam Hyun

    2017-04-01

    This paper describes an evaluation study on the effectiveness of developing an in-hospital medical device safety information reporting system for managing safety information, including adverse incident data related to medical devices, following the enactment of the Medical Device Act in Korea. Medical device safety information reports were analyzed for 190 cases that took place prior to the application of a medical device safety information reporting system and during a period when the reporting system was used. Also, questionnaires were used to measure the effectiveness of the medical device safety information reporting system. The analysis was based on the questionnaire responses of 15 reporters who submitted reports in both the pre- and post-reporting system periods. Sixty-two reports were submitted in paper form, but after the system was set up, this number more than doubled to 128 reports in electronic form. In terms of itemized reporting, a total of 45 items were reported. Before the system was used, 23 items had been reported, but this increased to 32 items after the system was put to use. All survey variables of satisfaction received a mean of over 3 points, while positive attitude, potential benefits, and positive benefits all exceeded 4 points, each receiving 4.20, 4.20, and 4.13, respectively. Among the variables, time-consuming and decision-making had the lowest mean values, each receiving 3.53. Satisfaction was found to be high for system quality and user satisfaction, but relatively low for time-consuming and decision-making. We were able to verify that effective reporting and monitoring of adverse incidents and the safety of medical devices can be implemented through the establishment of an in-hospital medical device safety information reporting system that can enhance patient safety and medical device risk management.

  16. Effects and Satisfaction of Medical Device Safety Information Reporting System Using Electronic Medical Record

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hye Jung; Choi, Young Deuk

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This paper describes an evaluation study on the effectiveness of developing an in-hospital medical device safety information reporting system for managing safety information, including adverse incident data related to medical devices, following the enactment of the Medical Device Act in Korea. Methods Medical device safety information reports were analyzed for 190 cases that took place prior to the application of a medical device safety information reporting system and during a period when the reporting system was used. Also, questionnaires were used to measure the effectiveness of the medical device safety information reporting system. The analysis was based on the questionnaire responses of 15 reporters who submitted reports in both the pre- and post-reporting system periods. Results Sixty-two reports were submitted in paper form, but after the system was set up, this number more than doubled to 128 reports in electronic form. In terms of itemized reporting, a total of 45 items were reported. Before the system was used, 23 items had been reported, but this increased to 32 items after the system was put to use. All survey variables of satisfaction received a mean of over 3 points, while positive attitude, potential benefits, and positive benefits all exceeded 4 points, each receiving 4.20, 4.20, and 4.13, respectively. Among the variables, time-consuming and decision-making had the lowest mean values, each receiving 3.53. Satisfaction was found to be high for system quality and user satisfaction, but relatively low for time-consuming and decision-making. Conclusions We were able to verify that effective reporting and monitoring of adverse incidents and the safety of medical devices can be implemented through the establishment of an in-hospital medical device safety information reporting system that can enhance patient safety and medical device risk management. PMID:28523207

  17. Diffusion of Electronic Medical Record Based Public Hospital Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyoung Won; Kim, Seong Min; An, Chang-Ho; Chae, Young Moon

    2015-07-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the adoption behavior of a newly developed Electronic Medical Record (EMR)-based information system (IS) at three public hospitals in Korea with a focus on doctors and nurses. User satisfaction scores from four performance layers were analyzed before and two times after the newly develop system was introduced to evaluate the adoption process of the IS with Rogers' diffusion theory. The 'intention to use' scores, the most important indicator for determining whether or not to adopt the IS in Rogers' confirmation stage for doctors, were very high in the third survey (4.21). In addition, the scores for 'reduced medication errors', which is the key indicator for evaluating the success of the IS, increased in the third survey for both doctors and nurses. The factors influencing 'intention to use' with a high odds ratio (>1.5) were the 'frequency of attendance of user training sessions', 'mandatory use of system', 'reduced medication errors', and 'reduced medical record documentation time' for both doctors and nurses. These findings show that the new EMR-based IS was well accepted by doctors. Both doctors and nurses also positively considered the effects of the new IS on their clinical environments.

  18. Evaluation of a BCMA’s Electronic Medication Administration Record

    PubMed Central

    Staggers, Nancy; Iribarren, Sarah; Guo, Jia-Wen; Weir, Charlene

    2015-01-01

    Barcode medication administration (BCMA) systems can reduce medication errors, but sociotechnical issues are quite common. Although crucial to nurses’ work, few usability evaluations are available for electronic medication administration record screens (eMARs). The purpose of this research was to identify current usability problems in the VA’s eMAR/BCMA system and explore how these might impact nurses’ situation awareness. Three expert evaluators used 10 tasks/elements, heuristic evaluation techniques and explored potential impacts using a situation awareness perspective. The results yielded 99 usability problems categorized into 440 heuristic violations with the largest volume in the category of Match with the Real World. Fifteen usability issues were rated as catastrophic with the Administer/Chart medications task having the most. Situational awareness was impacted at all levels, especially at Level 2, Comprehension. Usability problems point to important areas for improvement because these issues have the potential to impact nurses’ situation awareness, “at a glance” information, nurse productivity and patient safety. PMID:25601936

  19. Medical guidelines presentation and comparing with Electronic Health Record.

    PubMed

    Veselý, Arnost; Zvárová, Jana; Peleska, Jan; Buchtela, David; Anger, Zdenek

    2006-01-01

    Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems are now being developed in many places. More advanced systems provide also reminder facilities, usually based on if-then rules. In this paper we propose a method how to build the reminder facility directly upon the guideline interchange format (GLIF) model of medical guidelines. The method compares data items on the input of EHR system with medical guidelines GLIF model and is able to reveal if the input data item, that represents patient diagnosis or proposed patient treatment, contradicts with medical guidelines or not. The reminder facility can be part of EHR system itself or it can be realized by a stand-alone reminder system (SRS). The possible architecture of stand-alone reminder system is described in this paper and the advantages of stand-alone solution are discussed. The part of the EHR system could be also a browser that would present graphical GLIF model in easy to understand manner on the user screen. This browser can be data driven and focus attention of user to the relevant part of medical guidelines GLIF model.

  20. The University of Washington electronic medical record experience*

    PubMed Central

    Welton, Nanette J

    2010-01-01

    The Health Sciences Library at the University of Washington initiated and continues to develop a role in the electronic medical record, starting with the development of the first integrated web-based interface, called MINDscape. An Integrated Academic Information Management System (IAIMS) grant in 1992 began the process, which also led to the development of a clinical medical librarian position. Over the years, the librarian's role in the clinical environment became more established, and with the advent of clinical online resources, it offered further opportunities for librarians to provide the expertise needed to incorporate the appropriate resources. The collaborative journey continues as librarians, now able to directly access the EMRs, provide information about what resources to use and where best to place them and design how best to provide notes or feedback to clinicians. PMID:20648254

  1. Using Organizational Development for Electronic Medical Record Transformation.

    PubMed

    Kiel, Joan M

    With mandates requiring the transition from paper medical records to the use of electronic medical records, organizations are embarking on a change process. To engender this process, organizational development models and interventions based predominantly on the theories of Chris Argyris, Warren Bennis, and the team of Paul Lawrence and Jay Lorsch are explored. Interventions are subdivided into behavioral and structural as organizations benefit by recognizing a need for change and, perhaps, a cultural shift in addition to refocusing their mission. To support these interventions, a champion or super user is recommended to maintain the momentum of the transformation and enculturation. With so many changes in the internal and external environments, organizations must respond systematically for, in health care, lives depend on it.

  2. A qualitative analysis of information sharing for children with medical complexity within and across health care organizations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Children with medical complexity (CMC) are characterized by substantial family-identified service needs, chronic and severe conditions, functional limitations, and high health care use. Information exchange is critically important in high quality care of complex patients at high risk for poor care coordination. Written care plans for CMC are an excellent test case for how well information sharing is currently occurring. The purpose of this study was to identify the barriers to and facilitators of information sharing for CMC across providers, care settings, and families. Methods A qualitative study design with data analysis informed by a grounded theory approach was utilized. Two independent coders conducted secondary analysis of interviews with parents of CMC and health care professionals involved in the care of CMC, collected from two studies of healthcare service delivery for this population. Additional interviews were conducted with privacy officers of associated organizations to supplement these data. Emerging themes related to barriers and facilitators to information sharing were identified by the two coders and the research team, and a theory of facilitators and barriers to information exchange evolved. Results Barriers to information sharing were related to one of three major themes; 1) the lack of an integrated, accessible, secure platform on which summative health care information is stored, 2) fragmentation of the current health system, and 3) the lack of consistent policies, standards, and organizational priorities across organizations for information sharing. Facilitators of information sharing were related to improving accessibility to a common document, expanding the use of technology, and improving upon a structured communication plan. Conclusions Findings informed a model of how various barriers to information sharing interact to prevent optimal information sharing both within and across organizations and how the use of technology to

  3. A qualitative analysis of information sharing for children with medical complexity within and across health care organizations.

    PubMed

    Quigley, Laura; Lacombe-Duncan, Ashley; Adams, Sherri; Hepburn, Charlotte Moore; Cohen, Eyal

    2014-06-30

    Children with medical complexity (CMC) are characterized by substantial family-identified service needs, chronic and severe conditions, functional limitations, and high health care use. Information exchange is critically important in high quality care of complex patients at high risk for poor care coordination. Written care plans for CMC are an excellent test case for how well information sharing is currently occurring. The purpose of this study was to identify the barriers to and facilitators of information sharing for CMC across providers, care settings, and families. A qualitative study design with data analysis informed by a grounded theory approach was utilized. Two independent coders conducted secondary analysis of interviews with parents of CMC and health care professionals involved in the care of CMC, collected from two studies of healthcare service delivery for this population. Additional interviews were conducted with privacy officers of associated organizations to supplement these data. Emerging themes related to barriers and facilitators to information sharing were identified by the two coders and the research team, and a theory of facilitators and barriers to information exchange evolved. Barriers to information sharing were related to one of three major themes; 1) the lack of an integrated, accessible, secure platform on which summative health care information is stored, 2) fragmentation of the current health system, and 3) the lack of consistent policies, standards, and organizational priorities across organizations for information sharing. Facilitators of information sharing were related to improving accessibility to a common document, expanding the use of technology, and improving upon a structured communication plan. Findings informed a model of how various barriers to information sharing interact to prevent optimal information sharing both within and across organizations and how the use of technology to improve communication and access to

  4. Application of an Electronic Medical Record in Space Medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGinnis, Patrick J.

    2000-01-01

    Electronic Medical Records (EMR) have been emerging over the past decade. Today, they are replacing the paper chart in clinics throughout the nation. Approximately three years ago, the NASA-JSC Flight Medicine Clinic initiated an assessment of the EMRs available on the market. This assessment included comparing these products with the particular scope of practice at JSC. In 1998, the Logician EMR from Medicalogic was selected for the JSC Flight Medicine Clinic. This presentation reviews the process of selection and implementation of the EMR into the unique practice of aerospace medicine at JSC.

  5. Financial analysis projects clear returns from electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Karl F; Wofford, David A

    2002-01-01

    Implementing an electronic medical record (EMR) is a major initiative that should be undertaken only after a thoughtful analysis of the costs and benefits involved. Unfortunately, demonstrating financial returns on an EMR often is regarded as an inexact science at best, which has caused many healthcare executives to avoid adopting this technology. With the right approach, however, it is possible to demonstrate convincingly that the financial benefits will far outweigh the costs. To do this, it is necessary to involve representatives from operational areas throughout the organization, because they are best able to identify the potential for cost savings and additional revenue opportunities.

  6. Electronic photography: a new age of medical imaging?

    PubMed

    Tübergen, D; Manegold, B C

    1993-07-01

    This is a critical overview of present conceptions of the introduction of electronic photography in medicine. It is not a complete list of products, rather it is a description of how the requirements of the physician have influenced medical illustration in the past and will continue to do so in the future. Video systems are widely used in medicine. Besides the learning and teaching of effects of television, minimal invasive surgery (MIS) has become reality through endoscopy, rapidly accepted worldwide. Documentation of endoscopic procedures and their effects is becoming routine. Therefore, the conversion of complex optical information into binary units is a logical development to save space for storage. The reproduction, storage and transfer of detailed images is already realized by digital camera systems, photo CD, scanners and picture archiving and communicating system (PACS). Now electronic imaging in medicine has to be regarded as a matter of routine. The real impact of accelerated editing will be shown in the future.

  7. Shared Genetic Etiology of Autoimmune Diseases in Patients from a Biorepository Linked to De-identified Electronic Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo, Nicole A.; Butkiewicz, Mariusz; McGrath, Josephine A.; Crawford, Dana C.

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases represent a significant medical burden affecting up to 5–8% of the U.S. population. While genetics is known to play a role, studies of common autoimmune diseases are complicated by phenotype heterogeneity, limited sample sizes, and a single disease approach. Here we performed a targeted genetic association study for cases of multiple sclerosis (MS), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and Crohn's disease (CD) to assess which common genetic variants contribute individually and pleiotropically to disease risk. Joint modeling and pathway analysis combining the three phenotypes were performed to identify common underlying mechanisms of risk of autoimmune conditions. European American cases of MS, RA, and CD, (n = 119, 53, and 129, respectively) and 1924 controls were identified using de-identified electronic health records (EHRs) through a combination of International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) billing codes, Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes, medication lists, and text matching. As expected, hallmark SNPs in MS, such as DQA1 rs9271366 (OR = 1.91; p = 0.008), replicated in the present study. Both MS and CD were associated with TIMMDC1 rs2293370 (OR = 0.27, p = 0.01; OR = 0.25, p = 0.02; respectively). Additionally, PDE2A rs3781913 was significantly associated with both CD and RA (OR = 0.46, p = 0.02; OR = 0.32, p = 0.02; respectively). Joint modeling and pathway analysis identified variants within the KEGG NOD-like receptor signaling pathway and Shigellosis pathway as being correlated with the combined autoimmune phenotype. Our study replicated previously-reported genetic associations for MS and CD in a population derived from de-identified EHRs. We found evidence to support a shared genetic etiology between CD/MS and CD/RA outside of the major histocompatibility complex region and identified KEGG pathways indicative of a bacterial pathogenesis risk for autoimmunity in a joint model. Future work to

  8. Usefulness of the functionalities of an electronic medical record on a Latin American medical web portal.

    PubMed

    Flichtentrei, Daniel; Braga, Florencia; García, Darío; Jamsech, Jorge; Otero, Carlos; Waldhorn, Martín; Luna, Daniel; de Quiros, Fernan Gonzalez Bernaldo

    2010-01-01

    The medical record is a key component in the modern health systems, a fundamental basis of higher functionalities that guaranties quality care and the possibility of improved clinical management. The dissemination of information systems for the electronic medical record (EMR) has a growing acceptance and use in developed countries. This type of recognition however has not been widespread in Latin America. Realizing this we conducted a web survey to users of a Latin American medical portal to assess their perception of the EMRs usefulness. Among the results we found that over 90% of respondents were in favor of its use, with values that exceed 80% in the analysis of the utilities by categories. More in-depth studies are needed to determine the reasons for the lack of dissemination and implementation of EMR in our region.

  9. The influence of electronic medical record usage on nonverbal communication in the medical interview.

    PubMed

    McGrath, John M; Arar, Nedal H; Pugh, Jacqueline A

    2007-06-01

    This study examined nonverbal communication in relation to electronic medical record (EMR) use during the medical interview. Six physicians were videotaped during their consultations with 50 different patients at a single setting Veterans Administration Hospital. Three different office spatial designs were identified and named 'open,' 'closed' and 'blocked'. The ;open' arrangement put physicians in a position to establish better eye contact and physical orientation than did the alternative 'closed' and 'blocked' office configurations. Physicians who accessed the EMR and took 'breakpoints' (short periods of no computer use and sustained eye contact with patients) used more nonverbal cues than physicians who tended to talk with their patients while continuously working on the computer. Long pauses in conversational turn taking associated with EMR use may have positively influenced doctor-patient communication. High EMR use interviews were associated with patients asking more questions than they did in low EMR use interviews. Implications for medical education and future research are discussed.

  10. Hospice shared-care saved medical expenditure and reduced the likelihood of intensive medical utilization among advanced cancer patients in Taiwan--a nationwide survey.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wen-Yuan; Chiu, Tai-Yuan; Ho, Chih-Te; Davidson, Lance E; Hsu, Hua-Shui; Liu, Chiu-Shong; Chiu, Chang-Fang; Peng, Ching-Tien; Chen, Chih-Yi; Hu, Wen-Yu; Hsu, Ling-Nu; Li, Chia-Ing; Li, Tsai-Chung; Lin, Chin-Yu; Chen, Ching-Yu; Lin, Cheng-Chieh

    2014-07-01

    Hospice shared care (HSC) is a new care model that has been adopted to treat inpatient advanced cancer patients in Taiwan since 2005. Our aim was to assess the effect of HSC on medical expenditure and the likelihood of intensive medical utilization by advanced cancer patients. This is a nationwide retrospective study. HSC was defined as using "Hospice palliative care (HPC) teams to provide consultation and service to advanced cancer patients admitted in the nonhospice care ward." There were 120,481 deaths due to cancer between 2006 and 2008 in Taiwan. Patients receiving HSC were matched by propensity score to patients receiving usual care. Of the 120,481 cancer deaths, 12,137 paired subjects were matched. Medical expenditures for 1 year before death were assessed between groups using a database from the Bureau of National Health Insurance. Paired t and McNemar's tests were applied for comparing the medical expenditure and intensive medical utilization before death between paired groups. Compared to the non-HSC group, subjects receiving HSC had a lower average medical expenditure per person (US$3,939 vs. US$4,664; p<0.001). The HSC group had an adjusted net savings of US$557 (13.3%; p<0.001) in inpatient medical expenditure per person compared with the non-HSC group. Subjects that received different types of HPC had 15.4-44.9% less average medical expenditure per person and significantly lower likelihood of intensive medical utilization than those that did not receive HPC. HSC is associated with significant medical expenditure savings and reduced likelihood of intensive medical utilization. All types of HPC are associated with medical expenditure savings.

  11. Utilizing Electronic Medical Records to Discover Changing Trends of Medical Behaviors Over Time*

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Liangying; Dong, Wei; He, Chunhua; Duan, Huilong

    2017-01-01

    Summary Objectives Medical behaviors are playing significant roles in the delivery of high quality and cost-effective health services. Timely discovery of changing frequencies of medical behaviors is beneficial for the improvement of health services. The main objective of this work is to discover the changing trends of medical behaviors over time. Methods This study proposes a two-steps approach to detect essential changing patterns of medical behaviors from Electronic Medical Records (EMRs). In detail, a probabilistic topic model, i.e., Latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA), is firstly applied to disclose yearly treatment patterns in regard to the risk stratification of patients from a large volume of EMRs. After that, the changing trends by comparing essential/critical medical behaviors in a specific time period are detected and analyzed, including changes of significant patient features with their values, and changes of critical treatment interventions with their occurring time stamps. Results We verify the effectiveness of the proposed approach on a clinical dataset containing 12,152 patient cases with a time range of 10 years. Totally, 135 patients features and 234 treatment interventions in three treatment patterns were selected to detect their changing trends. In particular, evolving trends of yearly occurring probabilities of the selected medical behaviors were categorized into six content changing patterns (i.e, 112 growing, 123 declining, 43 up-down, 16 down-up, 35 steady, and 40 jumping), using the proposed approach. Besides, changing trends of execution time of treatment interventions were classified into three occurring time changing patterns (i.e., 175 early-implemented, 50 steady-implemented and 9 delay-implemented). Conclusions Experimental results show that our approach has an ability to utilize EMRs to discover essential evolving trends of medical behaviors, and thus provide significant potential to be further explored for health services redesign and

  12. [Study on network architecture of a tele-medical information sharing platform].

    PubMed

    Pan, Lin; Yu, Lun; Chen, Jin-xiong

    2006-07-01

    In the article,a plan of network construction which satisfies the demand of applications for a telemedical information sharing platform is proposed. We choice network access plans in view of user actual situation, through the analysis of the service demand and many kinds of network access technologies. Hospital servers that locate in LAN link sharing platform with node servers, should separate from the broadband network of sharing platform in order to ensure the security of the internal hospital network and the administration management. We use the VPN technology to realize the safe transmission of information in the platform network. Preliminary experiments have proved the plan is practicable.

  13. Shared medical appointments for patients with diabetes mellitus: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Edelman, David; Gierisch, Jennifer M; McDuffie, Jennifer R; Oddone, Eugene; Williams, John W

    2015-01-01

    Shared medical appointments (SMAs) are an increasingly used system-redesign strategy for improving access to and quality of chronic illness care. We conducted a systematic review of the existing literature on SMA interventions for patients with diabetes in order to understand their impact on outcomes. MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and Web of Science from January 1996 through April 2012. PubMed search updated June 2013. English-language peer-reviewed publications of randomized controlled trials (RCTs), nonrandomized cluster controlled trials, controlled before-and-after studies, or interrupted time-series designs conducted among adult patients with diabetes. Two independent reviewers used prespecified criteria to screen titles and abstracts for full text review. Two different reviewers abstracted data and rated study quality and strength of evidence. When possible, we used random-effects models to synthesize the effects quantitatively, reporting by a weighted difference of the means when the same scale was used across studies, and a standardized mean difference when the scales differed. We measured heterogeneity in study effects using Forest Plots, Cochran's Q, and I(2), and explored heterogeneity by using subgroup analyses for categorical variables and meta-regression analyses for continuous or discrete variables. Outcomes not suitable to meta-analysis were summarized qualitatively. Twenty-five articles representing 17 unique studies compared SMA interventions with usual care. Among patients with diabetes, SMAs improved hemoglobin A1c (∆ = -0.55 percentage points [95 % CI, -0.11 to -0.99]); improved systolic blood pressure (∆ = -5.2 mmHg [95 % CI, -3.0 to -7.4]); and did not improve LDL cholesterol (∆ = -6.6 mg/dl [95 % CI, 2.8 to -16.1]). Nonbiophysical outcomes, including economic outcomes, were reported too infrequently to meta-analyze, or to draw conclusions from. The A1c result had significant heterogeneity among studies, likely secondary to the

  14. Electronic Resource Sharing in Community Colleges: A Snapshot of Florida, Wisconsin, Texas, and Louisiana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Brian D.

    2000-01-01

    States that several states are establishing networks for resource sharing. Florida offers these resources through the Florida Distance Learning Library Initiative, Wisconsin has BadgerLink and WISCAT, TexShare provides library resource sharing in Texas, and Louisiana has LOUIS and LLN. These are some of the states successfully demonstrating…

  15. Effect of cost sharing on adherence to evidence-based medications in patients with acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    González López-Valcárcel, Beatriz; Librero, Julián; García-Sempere, Aníbal; Peña, Luz María; Bauer, Sofía; Puig-Junoy, Jaume; Oliva, Juan; Peiró, Salvador; Sanfélix-Gimeno, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Cost-sharing scheme for pharmaceuticals in Spain changed in July 2012. Our aim was to assess the impact of this change on adherence to essential medication in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in the region of Valencia. Methods Population-based retrospective cohort of 10 563 patients discharged alive after an ACS in 2009–2011. We examined a control group (low-income working population) that did not change their coinsurance status, and two intervention groups: pensioners who moved from full coverage to 10% coinsurance and middle-income to high-income working population, for whom coinsurance rose from 40% to 50% or 60%. Weekly adherence rates measured from the date of the first prescription. Days with available medication were estimated by linking prescribed and filled medications during the follow-up period. Results Cost-sharing change made no significant differences in adherence between intervention and control groups for essential medications with low price and low patient maximum coinsurance, such as antiplatelet and beta-blockers. For costlier ACE inhibitor or an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ACEI/ARB) and statins, it had an immediate effect in the proportion of adherence in the pensioner group as compared with the control group (6.8% and 8.3% decrease of adherence, respectively, p<0.01 for both). Adherence to statins decreased for the middle-income to high-income group as compared with the control group (7.8% increase of non-adherence, p<0.01). These effects seemed temporary. Conclusions Coinsurance changes may lead to decreased adherence to proven, effective therapies, especially for higher priced agents with higher patient cost share. Consideration should be given to fully exempt high-risk patients from drug cost sharing. PMID:28249992

  16. Effect of cost sharing on adherence to evidence-based medications in patients with acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    González López-Valcárcel, Beatriz; Librero, Julián; García-Sempere, Aníbal; Peña, Luz María; Bauer, Sofía; Puig-Junoy, Jaume; Oliva, Juan; Peiró, Salvador; Sanfélix-Gimeno, Gabriel

    2017-07-01

    Cost-sharing scheme for pharmaceuticals in Spain changed in July 2012. Our aim was to assess the impact of this change on adherence to essential medication in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in the region of Valencia. Population-based retrospective cohort of 10 563 patients discharged alive after an ACS in 2009-2011. We examined a control group (low-income working population) that did not change their coinsurance status, and two intervention groups: pensioners who moved from full coverage to 10% coinsurance and middle-income to high-income working population, for whom coinsurance rose from 40% to 50% or 60%. Weekly adherence rates measured from the date of the first prescription. Days with available medication were estimated by linking prescribed and filled medications during the follow-up period. Cost-sharing change made no significant differences in adherence between intervention and control groups for essential medications with low price and low patient maximum coinsurance, such as antiplatelet and beta-blockers. For costlier ACE inhibitor or an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ACEI/ARB) and statins, it had an immediate effect in the proportion of adherence in the pensioner group as compared with the control group (6.8% and 8.3% decrease of adherence, respectively, p<0.01 for both). Adherence to statins decreased for the middle-income to high-income group as compared with the control group (7.8% increase of non-adherence, p<0.01). These effects seemed temporary. Coinsurance changes may lead to decreased adherence to proven, effective therapies, especially for higher priced agents with higher patient cost share. Consideration should be given to fully exempt high-risk patients from drug cost sharing. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. Electronic assistive technology use in Australian shared supported accommodation: rates and user characteristics.

    PubMed

    Jamwal, Rebecca; Callaway, Libby; Farnworth, Louise; Winkler, Di

    2017-08-03

    Electronic assistive technologies (EATs) are fast becoming considered an essential component of everyday life. To date, there has been little research on the use of EAT by people living in shared supported accommodation (SSA), one of the major community-based housing options for people with disability (PwD) in Australia. This study aimed to (1) audit current EAT use by PwD living in SSA, (2) describe the impact of Internet access on EAT use, and (3) examine potential relationships between individual characteristics and EAT use. A customized survey administered with 32 house managers, representing 52 SSAs, gathered data on the EAT use of 254 people. Only 45.7% of residents used EAT, and devices available to the mainstream market were most frequently used. Access to home-based Internet was not a predictor of the number of devices in use. Disability type (congenital or acquired) was found to be significantly correlated with the number of devices in use, however, associations across a number of variables suggest complex mediational interactions. These findings provide an insight into the EAT use trends of PwD living in SSA, indicating that further work needs to be done to support the uptake and continued use of EAT by PwD Implications for Rehabilitation Further work needs to be done to promote the uptake and use of electronic assistive technology (EAT) by people with disability (PwD). Personal characteristics and experiences need to be considered in the prescription of EAT to PwD, as these may explain variations in use between individuals.

  18. Understanding the Factors That Influence the Adoption and Meaningful Use of Social Media by Physicians to Share Medical Information

    PubMed Central

    Wasko, Molly; Vartabedian, Bryan Steven; Miller, Robert S; Freiherr, Desirae D; Abdolrasulnia, Maziar

    2012-01-01

    Background Within the medical community there is persistent debate as to whether the information available through social media is trustworthy and valid, and whether physicians are ready to adopt these technologies and ultimately embrace them as a format for professional development and lifelong learning. Objective To identify how physicians are using social media to share and exchange medical information with other physicians, and to identify the factors that influence physicians’ use of social media as a component of their lifelong learning and continuing professional development. Methods We developed a survey instrument based on the Technology Acceptance Model, hypothesizing that technology usage is best predicted by a physician’s attitudes toward the technology, perceptions about the technology’s usefulness and ease of use, and individual factors such as personal innovativeness. The survey was distributed via email to a random sample of 1695 practicing oncologists and primary care physicians in the United States in March 2011. Responses from 485 physicians were analyzed (response rate 28.61%). Results Overall, 117 of 485 (24.1%) of respondents used social media daily or many times daily to scan or explore medical information, whereas 69 of 485 (14.2%) contributed new information via social media on a daily basis. On a weekly basis or more, 296 of 485 (61.0%) scanned and 223 of 485 (46.0%) contributed. In terms of attitudes toward the use of social media, 279 of 485 respondents (57.5%) perceived social media to be beneficial, engaging, and a good way to get current, high-quality information. In terms of usefulness, 281 of 485 (57.9%) of respondents stated that social media enabled them to care for patients more effectively, and 291 of 485 (60.0%) stated it improved the quality of patient care they delivered. The main factors influencing a physician’s usage of social media to share medical knowledge with other physicians were perceived ease of use and

  19. Understanding the factors that influence the adoption and meaningful use of social media by physicians to share medical information.

    PubMed

    McGowan, Brian S; Wasko, Molly; Vartabedian, Bryan Steven; Miller, Robert S; Freiherr, Desirae D; Abdolrasulnia, Maziar

    2012-09-24

    Within the medical community there is persistent debate as to whether the information available through social media is trustworthy and valid, and whether physicians are ready to adopt these technologies and ultimately embrace them as a format for professional development and lifelong learning. To identify how physicians are using social media to share and exchange medical information with other physicians, and to identify the factors that influence physicians' use of social media as a component of their lifelong learning and continuing professional development. We developed a survey instrument based on the Technology Acceptance Model, hypothesizing that technology usage is best predicted by a physician's attitudes toward the technology, perceptions about the technology's usefulness and ease of use, and individual factors such as personal innovativeness. The survey was distributed via email to a random sample of 1695 practicing oncologists and primary care physicians in the United States in March 2011. Responses from 485 physicians were analyzed (response rate 28.61%). Overall, 117 of 485 (24.1%) of respondents used social media daily or many times daily to scan or explore medical information, whereas 69 of 485 (14.2%) contributed new information via social media on a daily basis. On a weekly basis or more, 296 of 485 (61.0%) scanned and 223 of 485 (46.0%) contributed. In terms of attitudes toward the use of social media, 279 of 485 respondents (57.5%) perceived social media to be beneficial, engaging, and a good way to get current, high-quality information. In terms of usefulness, 281 of 485 (57.9%) of respondents stated that social media enabled them to care for patients more effectively, and 291 of 485 (60.0%) stated it improved the quality of patient care they delivered. The main factors influencing a physician's usage of social media to share medical knowledge with other physicians were perceived ease of use and usefulness. Respondents who had positive

  20. Measuring the success of electronic medical record implementation using electronic and survey data.

    PubMed Central

    Keshavjee, K.; Troyan, S.; Holbrook, A. M.; VanderMolen, D.

    2001-01-01

    Computerization of physician practices is increasing. Stakeholders are demanding demonstrated value for their Electronic Medical Record (EMR) implementations. We developed survey tools to measure medical office processes, including administrative and physician tasks pre- and post-EMR implementation. We included variables that were expected to improve with EMR implementation and those that were not expected to improve, as controls. We measured the same processes pre-EMR, at six months and 18 months post-EMR. Time required for most administrative tasks decreased within six months of EMR implementation. Staff time spent on charting increased with time, in keeping with our anecdotal observations that nurses were given more responsibility for charting in many offices. Physician time to chart increased initially by 50%, but went down to original levels by 18 months. However, this may be due to the drop-out of those physicians who had a difficult time charting electronically. PMID:11825201

  1. Measuring the success of electronic medical record implementation using electronic and survey data.

    PubMed

    Keshavjee, K; Troyan, S; Holbrook, A M; VanderMolen, D

    2001-01-01

    Computerization of physician practices is increasing. Stakeholders are demanding demonstrated value for their Electronic Medical Record (EMR) implementations. We developed survey tools to measure medical office processes, including administrative and physician tasks pre- and post-EMR implementation. We included variables that were expected to improve with EMR implementation and those that were not expected to improve, as controls. We measured the same processes pre-EMR, at six months and 18 months post-EMR. Time required for most administrative tasks decreased within six months of EMR implementation. Staff time spent on charting increased with time, in keeping with our anecdotal observations that nurses were given more responsibility for charting in many offices. Physician time to chart increased initially by 50%, but went down to original levels by 18 months. However, this may be due to the drop-out of those physicians who had a difficult time charting electronically.

  2. An Evaluation of Shared Mental Models and Mutual Trust on General Medical Units: Implications for Collaboration, Teamwork, and Patient Safety.

    PubMed

    McComb, Sara A; Lemaster, Matthew; Henneman, Elizabeth A; Hinchey, Kevin T

    2015-02-24

    This study examines nurse-physician teamwork and collaboration, a critical component in the delivery of safe patient care, on general medical units. To that end, we assess shared mental models and mutual trust, 2 coordinating mechanisms that help facilitate teamwork, among nurses and physicians working on general medical units. Data were collected from 37 nurses and 42 physicians at an urban teaching medical center in the Northeastern United States. Shared mental model questionnaire items were iteratively developed with experts' input to ensure content validity. Mutual trust items were adapted from an existing scale; items were reliable. Data were analyzed using χ and independent 2-tailed t tests. Physicians and nurses reported significant differences in their perceptions of the professional responsible for a variety of roles (e.g., advocating for the patient [P = 0.0007], identifying a near miss/error [P = 0.003]). Medication reconciliation is only role for which nurses perceive less responsibility than physicians perceive nurses have. Regarding mutual trust, both groups reported significantly more trust within their own professions; both groups reported similar levels of trust in physicians, with physicians reporting significantly less trust in their nursing colleagues than nurses perceive (P < 0.0001). Although many efforts have been directed at improving nurse-physician collaboration, more work is needed. To that end, we propose increasing knowledge about their respective roles, providing opportunities for nurse and physician collaboration through rounding or committee work and enhancing the preparedness and professionalism of interactions.

  3. Challenges of self-reported medical conditions and electronic medical records among members of a large military cohort

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Besa; Chu, Laura K; Smith, Tyler C; Amoroso, Paul J; Boyko, Edward J; Hooper, Tomoko I; Gackstetter, Gary D; Ryan, Margaret AK

    2008-01-01

    Background Self-reported medical history data are frequently used in epidemiological studies. Self-reported diagnoses may differ from medical record diagnoses due to poor patient-clinician communication, self-diagnosis in the absence of a satisfactory explanation for symptoms, or the "health literacy" of the patient. Methods The US Department of Defense military health system offers a unique opportunity to evaluate electronic medical records with near complete ascertainment while on active duty. This study compared 38 self-reported medical conditions to electronic medical record data in a large population-based US military cohort. The objective of this study was to better understand challenges and strengths in self-reporting of medical conditions. Results Using positive and negative agreement statistics for less-prevalent conditions, near-perfect negative agreement and moderate positive agreement were found for the 38 diagnoses. Conclusion This report highlights the challenges of using self-reported medical data and electronic medical records data, but illustrates that agreement between the two data sources increases with increased surveillance period of medical records. Self-reported medical data may be sufficient for ruling out history of a particular condition whereas prevalence studies may be best served by using an objective measure of medical conditions found in electronic healthcare records. Defining medical conditions from multiple sources in large, long-term prospective cohorts will reinforce the value of the study, particularly during the initial years when prevalence for many conditions may still be low. PMID:18644098

  4. SU-E-E-03: Shared Space Fosters Didactic and Professional Learning Across Professions for Medical and Physics Residents

    SciTech Connect

    Dieterich, S; Perks, J; Fragoso, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Medical Physicists and Radiation Oncologists are two professions who should be working as a team for optimal patient care, yet lack of mutual understanding about each others respective role and work environment creates barriers To improve collaboration and learning, we designed a shared didactic and work space for physics and radiation oncology residents to maximize interaction throughout their professional training. Methods: Physician and Physics residents are required to take the same didactic classes, including journal clubs and respective seminars. The residents also share an office environment among the seven physician and two physic residents. Results: By maximizing didactic overlap and sharing office space, the two resident groups have developed a close professional relationship and supportive work environment. Several joint research projects have been initiated by the residents. Awareness of physics tasks in the clinic has led to a request by the physician residents to change physics didactics, converting the physics short course into a lab-oriented course for the medical residents which is in part taught by the physics residents. The physics seminar is given by both residency groups; increased motivation and interest in learning about physics has led to several medical resident-initiated topic selections which generated lively discussion. The physics long course has changed toward including more discussion among residents to delve deeper into topics and study beyond what passing the boards would require. A supportive work environment has developed, embedding the two physics residents into a larger residents group, allowing them to find mentor and peers more easily. Conclusion: By creating a shared work and didactic environment, physician and physics residents have improved their understanding of respective professional practice. Resident-initiated changes in didactic practice have led to improved learning and joint research. A strong social

  5. Medical Image Resource Center--making electronic teaching files from PACS.

    PubMed

    Lim, C C Tchoyoson; Yang, Guo Liang; Nowinski, Wieslaw L; Hui, Francis

    2003-12-01

    A picture archive and communications system (PACS) is a rich source of images and data suitable for creating electronic teaching files (ETF). However, the potential for PACS to support nonclinical applications has not been fully realized: at present there is no mechanism for PACS to identify and store teaching files; neither is there a standardized method for sharing such teaching images. The Medical Image Resource Center (MIRC) is a new central image repository that defines standards for data exchange among different centers. We developed an ETF server that retrieves digital imaging and communication in medicine (DICOM) images from PACS, and enables users to create teaching files that conform to the new MIRC schema. We test-populated our ETF server with illustrative images from the clinical case load of the National Neuroscience Institute, Singapore. Together, PACS and MIRC have the potential to benefit radiology teaching and research.

  6. Sustainability and shared smart and mutual--green growth (SSaM-GG) in Korean medical waste management.

    PubMed

    Koo, Ja-Kong; Jeong, Seung-Ik

    2015-05-01

    Since medical insurance was introduced in the Republic of Korea, there have been several increases concerning medical waste. In order to solve these problems, we have applied life cycle assessment and life cycle cost. But these methods cannot be a perfect decision-making tool because they can only evaluate environmental and economic burdens. Thus, as one of many practical methods the shared smart and mutual - green growth considers economic growth, environmental protection, social justice, science technology and art, and mutual voluntarism when applied to medical waste management in the Republic of Korea. Four systems were considered: incineration, incineration with heat recovery, steam sterilisation, and microwave disinfection. This research study aimed to assess pollutant emissions from treatment, transport, and disposal. Global warming potential, photochemical oxidant creation potential, acidifications potential, and human toxicity are considered to be environmental impacts. Total investment cost, transport cost, operation, and maintenance cost for the medical waste are considered in the economy evaluations though life cycle cost. The social development, science technology and art, and mutual voluntarism are analysed through the Delphi-method conducted by expert groups related to medical waste. The result is that incineration with heat recovery is the best solution. However, when heat recovery is impossible, incineration without heat recovery becomes the next best choice. That is why 95% of medical waste is currently treated by both incineration and incineration with heat recovery within the Republic of Korea.

  7. The Cooperative Sharing of Audiovisual Materials in Medical Schools; a Network Approach. Case Study 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Medical Audiovisual Center of the National Library of Medicine, Atlanta, GA.

    The evolution of medical schools from their post-Renaissance Italian prototypes to present modern facilities has been marked by a variety of philosophies, methodologies, and pedagogical styles. Pressures to improve medical curriculum led to the educational media movement of the 1950's. By 1970, the Association of Professors of Gynecology and…

  8. Jewish and secular medical ethics share themes but diverge on issues such as heroic measures

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, L

    1997-01-01

    An american expert on Jewish medical ethics explained the nuances of these rules during a recent address in Ottawa. Although Jewish and secular rules concerning medical ethics often coincide, they diverge in several important areas, including the subject of patient autonomy. PMID:9371074

  9. Top 10 Lessons Learned from Electronic Medical Record Implementation in a Large Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Rizer, Milisa K; Kaufman, Beth; Sieck, Cynthia J; Hefner, Jennifer L; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2015-01-01

    Electronic medical record (EMR) implementation efforts face many challenges, including individual and organizational barriers and concerns about loss of productivity during the process. These issues may be particularly complex in large and diverse settings with multiple specialties providing inpatient and outpatient care. This case report provides an example of a successful EMR implementation that emphasizes the importance of flexibility and adaptability on the part of the implementation team. It also presents the top 10 lessons learned from this EMR implementation in a large midwestern academic medical center. Included are five overarching lessons related to leadership, initial approach, training, support, and optimization as well as five lessons related to the EMR system itself that are particularly important elements of a successful implementation.

  10. Development and psychometric testing of a scale assessing the sharing of medical information and interprofessional communication: the CSI scale

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Interprofessional collaboration is essential in creating a safer patient environment. It includes the need to develop communication and coordination between professionals, implying a better sharing of medical information. Several questionnaires exist in the literature, but none of them have been developed in the French context. The objective was to develop and test the psychometric properties of the communication and sharing information (CSI) scale which assesses specifically interprofessional communication, especially the sharing of medical information and the effectiveness of communication between members of the team. Methods The questionnaire construction process used a literature review and involved a panel of voluntary professionals. A list of 32 items explored the quality of shared information delivered to patients and the effectiveness of interprofessional communication. The study was conducted in 16 voluntary units in a University Hospital (France), which included medical, surgical, obstetrics, intensive care, pediatrics, oncology and rehabilitation care. The scale-development process comprised an exploratory principal component analysis, Cronbach’s α-coefficients and structural equation modeling (SEM). Results From these 16 units, a total of 503 health professionals took part in the study. Among them, 23.9% were physicians (n = 120), 43.9% nurses (n = 221) and 32.2% nurse assistants (n = 162). The validated questionnaire comprised 13 items and 3 dimensions relative to “the sharing of medical information” (5 items), “communication between physicians” (4 items) and “communication between nurses and nurse assistants” (4 items). The 3 dimensions accounted for 63.7% of the variance of the final questionnaire. Their respective Cronbach’s alpha coefficients were 0.80, 0.87 and 0.81. SEM confirmed the existence of the 3 latent dimensions but the best characteristics were obtained with a hierarchical model including the three

  11. Use of Electronic Medication Administration Records to Reduce Perceived Stress and Risk of Medication Errors in Nursing Homes.

    PubMed

    Alenius, Malin; Graf, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Concerns have been raised about the effects of current medication administration processes on the safety of many of the aspects of medication administration. Keeping electronic medication administration records could decrease many of these problems. Unfortunately, there has not been much research on this topic, especially in nursing homes. A prospective case-control survey was consequently performed at two nursing homes; the electronic record system was introduced in one, whereas the other continued to use paper records. The personnel were asked to fill in a questionnaire of their perceptions of stress and risk of medication errors at baseline (n = 66) and 20 weeks after the intervention group had started recording medication administration electronically (n = 59). There were statistically significant decreases in the perceived risk of omitting a medication, of medication errors occurring because of communication problems, and of medication errors occurring because of inaccurate medication administration records in the intervention group (all P < .01 vs the control group). The perceived overall daily stress levels were also reduced in the intervention group (P < .05). These results indicate that the utilization of electronic medication administration records will reduce many of the concerns regarding the medication administration process.

  12. Impact of the Development of a Light Microscopy Shared Resource for the University of Rochester Medical Center: A Quantitative Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Jepson, M.; Jordan, P.; Kasischke, K.; Brown, E.; Reed, A.; Lentine, M.; Bushnell, T.; Puzas, E.; Callahan, L.M.

    2014-01-01

    The University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC) determined the need for a shared Light Microscopy facility to support researchers requiring high-end light microscopy for their research programs. URMC Shared Resource Laboratories (SRLs) represent a strategic investment in technology, targeted expertise, and space administration to systematically support and advance the research mission of the institution. Recognizing the need for centralized light microscopy resources to support the University of Rochester Medical Center, a task force of senior researchers, investigators, and administration developed a plan to create a light microscopy resource. Through strategic investment for instrument upgrades and acquisition as well as hiring of additional staff, the LM resource has grown since its inception in 2008 with expanded capacity and capabilities to support the diverse needs and studies of the URMC researchers. The data presented here address the impact of the LM Shared Resource on the URMC research community in quantitative areas such as publications, new grant funding, and training as well as addressing qualitative measures of success including impact on graduate education and new research avenues.

  13. Forward secure digital signature for electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yao-Chang; Huang, To-Yeh; Hou, Ting-Wei

    2012-04-01

    The Technology Safeguard in Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Title II has addressed a way to maintain the integrity and non-repudiation of Electronic Medical Record (EMR). One of the important cryptographic technologies is mentioned in the ACT is digital signature; however, the ordinary digital signature (e.g. DSA, RSA, GQ...) has an inherent weakness: if the key (certificate) is updated, than all signatures, even the ones generated before the update, are no longer trustworthy. Unfortunately, the current most frequently used digital signature schemes are categorized into the ordinary digital signature scheme; therefore, the objective of this paper is to analyze the shortcoming of using ordinary digital signatures in EMR and to propose a method to use forward secure digital signature to sign EMR to ensure that the past EMR signatures remain trustworthy while the key (certificate) is updated.

  14. Change Management – Recommendations for Successful Electronic Medical Records Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Shoolin, J.S.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Change is difficult and managing change even more so. With the advent of Electronic Medical Records (EMRs) and the difficulty of its acceptance, understanding physician’s attitudes and the psychology of change management is imperative. While many authors describe change management theories, one comes nearest to describing this particularly difficult transition. In 1969, Elizabeth Kübler-Ross wrote her seminal treatise, On Death and Dying, detailing the psychological changes terminally ill patients undergo. Her grieving model is a template to examine the impact of change. By following a physician through the EMR maze, understanding the difficulties he/she perceives and developing a plan other change agents are able to use, the paper gives practical recommendations to EMR change management. PMID:23616842

  15. Change management - recommendations for successful electronic medical records implementation.

    PubMed

    Shoolin, J S

    2010-01-01

    Change is difficult and managing change even more so. With the advent of Electronic Medical Records (EMRs) and the difficulty of its acceptance, understanding physician's attitudes and the psychology of change management is imperative. While many authors describe change management theories, one comes nearest to describing this particularly difficult transition. In 1969, Elizabeth Kübler-Ross wrote her seminal treatise, On Death and Dying, detailing the psychological changes terminally ill patients undergo. Her grieving model is a template to examine the impact of change. By following a physician through the EMR maze, understanding the difficulties he/she perceives and developing a plan other change agents are able to use, the paper gives practical recommendations to EMR change management.

  16. Development of medical electronic devices in the APL space department

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, A. L.

    1985-01-01

    Several electronic devices for automatically correcting specific defects in a body's physiologic regulation and allowing approximately normal functioning are described. A self-injurious behavior inhibiting system (SIBIS) is fastened to the arm of a person with chronic self-injurious behavior patterns. An electric shock is delivered into the arm whenever the device senses above-threshold acceleration of the head such as occur with head-bangers. Sounding a buzzer tone with the shock eventually allows transference of the aversive stimulus to the buzzer so shocks are no longer necessary. A programmable implantable medication system features a solenoid pump placed beneath the skin and refueled by hypodermic needle. The pump functions are programmable and can deliver insulin, chemotherapy mixes and/or pain killers according to a preset schedule or on patient demand. Finally, an automatic implantible defibrillator has four electrodes attached directly to the heart for sensing electrical impulses or emitting them in response to cardiac fibrillation.

  17. Pulsed-Electron-Beam Processing of Materials for Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koval, N. N.; Ivanov, Yu. F.; Teresov, A. D.; Denisova, Yu. A.; Petrikova, E. A.

    2014-02-01

    The data on investigation of sample materials used for fabrication of medical implants (stainless steel 316L, and VT1-0 and CoCrMo (Wironit) alloys) are reported, which were subjected to surface treatment with the pulsed electron beam having the following parameters: pulse duration - 20-200 μs, energy density per pulse - 8-20 J/cm2, number of pulses - 1-5, and pulse repetition frequency - 0.3-1 Hz. A significant structure rearrangement is revealed, which is followed by changes in the modified surface layer properties of these materials. The surface roughness is found to decrease, while the corrosion resistance is improved; slight changes are also observed in the modified layer microhardness compared to the initial state.

  18. Development of medical electronic devices in the APL space department

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, A. L.

    1985-01-01

    Several electronic devices for automatically correcting specific defects in a body's physiologic regulation and allowing approximately normal functioning are described. A self-injurious behavior inhibiting system (SIBIS) is fastened to the arm of a person with chronic self-injurious behavior patterns. An electric shock is delivered into the arm whenever the device senses above-threshold acceleration of the head such as occur with head-bangers. Sounding a buzzer tone with the shock eventually allows transference of the aversive stimulus to the buzzer so shocks are no longer necessary. A programmable implantable medication system features a solenoid pump placed beneath the skin and refueled by hypodermic needle. The pump functions are programmable and can deliver insulin, chemotherapy mixes and/or pain killers according to a preset schedule or on patient demand. Finally, an automatic implantible defibrillator has four electrodes attached directly to the heart for sensing electrical impulses or emitting them in response to cardiac fibrillation.

  19. Construction and Validation of Synthetic Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Moniz, Linda; Buczak, Anna L.; Hung, Lang; Babin, Steven; Dorko, Michael; Lombardo, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    There is a current and pressing need for a test bed of electronic medical records (EMRs) to insure consistent development, validation and verification of public health related algorithms that operate on EMRs. However, access to full EMRs is limited and not generally available to the academic algorithm developers who support the public health community. This paper describes a set of algorithms that produce synthetic EMRs using real EMRs as a model. The algorithms were used to generate a pilot set of over 3000 synthetic EMRs that are currently available on CDC’s Public Health grid. The properties of the synthetic EMRs were validated, both in the entire aggregate data set and for individual (synthetic) patients. We describe how the algorithms can be extended to produce records beyond the initial pilot data set. PMID:23569572

  20. Creating, curating, and sharing online faculty development resources: the medical education in cases series experience.

    PubMed

    Chan, Teresa M; Thoma, Brent; Lin, Michelle

    2015-06-01

    It is difficult to engage clinicians in continuing medical education that does not focus on clinical expertise. Evolving online technologies (e.g., massive open online courses [MOOCs]) are disrupting and transforming medical education, but few online nonclinical professional development resources exist. In August 2013, the Academic Life in Emergency Medicine Web site launched the Medical Education in Cases (MEdIC) series to engage clinicians in an online professional development exercise. Each month, a complex, realistic scenario featuring a nonclinical medical education dilemma is published with accompanying discussion questions. A weeklong discussion is moderated on Twitter and the Web site. This discussion is curated to create a community commentary, which is published alongside presolicited expert responses. Case resources are available for download. The first six MEdIC cases (published August 2013-January 2014) emphasized different CanMEDS and/or Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education competencies. Median reader engagement metrics (interquartile range 25%-75%) in the first week following publication were 861 (634-1,114) pageviews, 767 (518-953) unique visitors from 326 (218-405) cities in 45 (32-50) countries, 30 (24-39) comments, 52 (40-56) tweets, 17 (13-30) Facebook Likes, and 5 (5-7) Google Plus +1s. The MEdIC series is proof of concept that online activities can engage clinicians in nonclinical professional development. The early experience suggests the connectivist nature of MEdIC allows for crowdsourcing solutions to ill-defined problems via the wisdom of readers. This methodology may also be effective for other nonclinical and medical education topics.

  1. Development of an electronic medical report delivery system to 3G GSM mobile (cellular) phones for a medical imaging department.

    PubMed

    Lim, Eugene Y; Lee, Chiang; Cai, Weidong; Feng, Dagan; Fulham, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Medical practice is characterized by a high degree of heterogeneity in collaborative and cooperative patient care. Fast and effective communication between medical practitioners can improve patient care. In medical imaging, the fast delivery of medical reports to referring medical practitioners is a major component of cooperative patient care. Recently, mobile phones have been actively deployed in telemedicine applications. The mobile phone is an ideal medium to achieve faster delivery of reports to the referring medical practitioners. In this study, we developed an electronic medical report delivery system from a medical imaging department to the mobile phones of the referring doctors. The system extracts a text summary of medical report and a screen capture of diagnostic medical image in JPEG format, which are transmitted to 3G GSM mobile phones.

  2. Information Sharing for Medical Triage Tasking During Mass Casualty/Humanitarian Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    Mobile file sharing, Humanitarian response, Mass Casualty, WiFi network cloud 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT Unclassified 18... WiFi Cloud ........................60 2. Setup of the Portal ..........................60 3. Command Post Setup ...........................61 4...56 Figure 11. Cisco Aironet Wireless Access Point.............59 Figure 12. Pelican Case w/Customizing Padding..............60 Figure 13. WiFi

  3. Key success factors behind electronic medical record adoption in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Narattharaksa, Kanida; Speece, Mark; Newton, Charles; Bulyalert, Damrongsak

    2016-09-19

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the elements that health care personnel in Thailand believe are necessary for successful adoption of electronic medical record (EMR) systems. Design/methodology/approach Initial qualitative in-depth interviews with physicians to adapt key elements from the literature to the Thai context. The 12 elements identified included things related to managing the implementation and to IT expertise. The nationwide survey was supported by the Ministry of Public Health and returned 1,069 usable questionnaires (response rate 42 percent) from a range of medical personnel. Findings The key elements clearly separated into a managerial dimension and an IT dimension. All were considered fairly important, but managerial expertise was more critical. In particular, there should be clear EMR project goals and scope, adequate budget allocation, clinical staff must be involved in implementation, and the IT should facilitate good electronic communication. Research limitations/implications Thailand is representative of middle-income developing countries, but there is no guarantee findings can be generalized. National policies differ, as do economic structures of health care industries. The focus is on management at the organizational level, but future research must also examine macro-level issues, as well as gain more depth into thinking of individual health care personnel. Practical implications Technical issues of EMR implementation are certainly important. However, it is clear actual adoption and use of the system also depends very heavily on managerial issues. Originality/value Most research on EMR implementation has been in developed countries, and has often focussed more on technical issues rather than examining managerial issues closely. Health IT is also critical in developing economies, and management of health IT implementation must be well understood.

  4. A next generation electronic triage to aid mass casualty emergency medical response.

    PubMed

    Gao, Tia; White, D

    2006-01-01

    For years, emergency medical response communities have relied upon paper triage tags, clipboards of notes, and voice communications to share information during medical emergencies. This workflow, however, has proven labor intensive, time consuming, and prone to human error [1]. In collaboration with three EMS groups in the Washington, DC Metropolitan area, we have developed a next generation triage system to improve the effectiveness of emergency response. This system includes: 1) electronic triage tags, 2) wearable vital sign sensors, 3) base stations laptops to monitor and manage patients, 4) pervasive tracking software to locate patients at all stages of the disaster response process, and 5) PDAs to support documentation and communication. Our system has evolved through three iterations of rapid-development, field-studies, usability reviews, and focus-group interview. This paper summarizes engineering considerations for technologies that must operate under constraints of medical emergencies. It is our hope that the lessons reported in this paper will help technologists in developing future emergency response systems.

  5. Analysis Of Electronic Medication Orders With Large Overdoses

    PubMed Central

    Kirkendall, E.S.; Kouril, M.; Minich, T.; Spooner, SA.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Users of electronic health record (EHR) systems frequently prescribe doses outside recommended dose ranges, and tend to ignore the alerts that result. Since some of these dosing errors are the result of system design flaws, analysis of large overdoses can lead to the discovery of needed system changes. Objectives To develop database techniques for detecting and extracting large overdose orders from our EHR. To identify and characterize users’ responses to these large overdoses. To identify possible causes of large-overdose errors and to mitigate them. Methods We constructed a data mart of medication-order and dosing-alert data from a quaternary pediatric hospital from June 2011 to May 2013. The data mart was used along with a test version of the EHR to explain how orders were processed and alerts were generated for large (>500%) and extreme (>10,000%) overdoses. User response was characterized by the dosing alert salience rate, which expresses the proportion of time users take corrective action. Results We constructed an advanced analytic framework based on workflow analysis and order simulation, and evaluated all 5,402,504 medication orders placed within the 2 year timeframe as well as 2,232,492 dose alerts associated with some of the orders. 8% of orders generated a visible alert, with ¼ of these related to overdosing. Alerts presented to trainees had higher salience rates than those presented to senior colleagues. Salience rates were low, varying between 4–10%, and were lower with larger overdoses. Extreme overdoses fell into eight causal categories, each with a system design mitigation. Conclusions Novel analytic systems are required to accurately understand prescriber behavior and interactions with medication-dosing CDS. We described a novel analytic system that can detect apparent large overdoses (≥500%) and explain the sociotechnical factors that drove the error. Some of these large overdoses can be mitigated by system changes. EHR

  6. Leading employers share strategies for managing promising, high-cost biotech medications.

    PubMed

    Hom, David; Mahoney, Jack; Wells, Kenneth D; Lednar, Wayne M

    2008-07-01

    Companies and organizations nationwide struggle to find the best way to address the complex, multifaceted challenges involved in providing their employees with access to necessary--and often expensive--medications. The introduction of new bio-derived medications has compounded these challenges. Biotech medications offer a high level of therapeutic value, but do so at a high monthly cost per patient. Employers are developing new and innovative approaches to benefit design in an effort to protect their organization's assets, yet develop a benefit design that provides therapeutic value to all employees. This article outlines strategies that some of the nation's leading employers have incorporated into their benefit programs.

  7. Low energy electron-impact ionization of hydrogen atom for coplanar equal-energy-sharing kinematics in Debye plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Zhang, Song Bin; Ye, Bang Jiao; Wang, Jian Guo; Janev, R. K.

    2016-12-01

    Low energy electron-impact ionization of hydrogen atom in Debye plasmas has been investigated by employing the exterior complex scaling method. The interactions between the charged particles in the plasma have been represented by Debye-Hückel potentials. Triple differential cross sections (TDCS) in the coplanar equal-energy-sharing geometry at an incident energy of 15.6 eV for different screening lengths are reported. As the screening strength increases, TDCS change significantly. The evolutions of dominant typical peak structures of the TDCS are studied in detail for different screening lengths and for different coplanar equal-energy-sharing geometries.

  8. Personal health records as portal to the electronic medical record.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Jennifer E; Gilbert, Mark R; Armstrong, Terri S

    2014-03-01

    This topic review discusses the evolving clinical challenges associated with the implementation of electronic personal health records (PHR) that are fully integrated with electronic medical records (EMR). The benefits of facilitating patient access to the EMR through web-based, PHR-portals may be substantial; foremost is the potential to enhance the flow of information between patient and healthcare practitioner. The benefits of improved communication and transparency of care are presumed to be a reduction in clinical errors, increased quality of care, better patient-management of disease, and better disease and symptom comprehension. Yet PHR databases allow patients open access to newly-acquired clinical data without the benefit of concurrent expert clinical interpretation, and therefore may create the potential for greater patient distress and uncertainty. With specific attention to neuro-oncology patients, this review focuses on the developing conflicts and consequences associated with the use of a PHR that parallels data acquisition of the EMR in real-time. We conclude with a discussion of recommendations for implementing fully-integrated PHR for neuro-oncology patients.

  9. Shared medical appointments after cardiac surgery-the process of implementing a novel pilot paradigm to enhance comprehensive postdischarge care.

    PubMed

    Harris, Marianne D

    2010-01-01

    To facilitate the physical and emotional needs of patients undergoing cardiac surgery and their families, our Cardiac Surgery Outpatient Clinic at Cleveland Clinic, a nonprofit multispecialty academic medical center in Cleveland, Ohio, decided to implement a trial of a novel care delivery paradigm called Shared Medical Appointments (SMAs). The purpose of this venture was to facilitate timely access to care 3 to 5 days after hospital discharge, include family members in the education process and the care of the patient, and provide a forum for support and shared learning among patients who have been through like surgical experiences. The clinic system, which performed 3,597 open heart surgeries and 213 robotically assisted cardiac surgeries in 2008, already used family education classes to provide instruction to the patients and family prior to surgery. Because this medium was an effective way to disseminate knowledge, we theorized that using an SMA would be an effective strategy to provide timely medical care after discharge and garner support, education, and increased access to timely medical care after discharge. Although there were many physicians in subspecialties performing these types of clinic visits at our institution since 2002, by the spring of 2007, a group of cardiothoracic nurses decided to perform a trial on this model in this cohort of patients and be a fully nurse-led SMA to provide comprehensive care after discharge. Preliminary patient satisfaction surveys have revealed that 92% of post-cardiac surgery patients rated the experience as good or excellent, and 82% would prefer an SMA for their next clinic visit rather than an individual visit. These data are consistent with physician-led SMA satisfaction surveys in our organization to date. Although still in its relative infancy, an SMA for this cohort appears to have merit in enhancing the support and education as well as providing for the complex medical needs of these patients.

  10. Condition Self-Management in Pediatric Spina Bifida: A Longitudinal Investigation of Medical Adherence, Responsibility-Sharing, and Independence Skills.

    PubMed

    Psihogios, Alexandra M; Kolbuck, Victoria; Holmbeck, Grayson N

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate rates of medical adherence, responsibility, and independence skills across late childhood and adolescence in youth with spina bifida (SB) and to explore associations among these disease self-management variables. 111 youth with SB, their parents, and a health professional participated at two time points. Informants completed questionnaires regarding medical adherence, responsibility-sharing, and child independence skills. Youth gained more responsibility and independence skills across time, although adherence rates did not follow a similar trajectory. Increased child medical responsibility was related to poorer adherence, and father-reported independence skills were associated with increased child responsibility. This study highlights medical domains that are the most difficult for families to manage (e.g., skin checks). Although youth appear to gain more autonomy across time, ongoing parental involvement in medical care may be necessary to achieve optimal adherence across adolescence. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Sharing Wisdom(s) to Enrich Knowledge: Working in a Transdisciplinary Research Team in Medical Anthropology.

    PubMed

    Carceller-Maicas, Natalia

    2015-06-01

    This paper explains our experience working in a transdisciplinary research team focused on adolescence mental health. It introduces briefly the two key theoretical concepts: participation and transdisciplinarity. In order to be followed with a deep description of the methodology and the creation of the two principal materials resulting from our research: a guide of best practices in adolescent mental health, and a documentary film. Showing in a practical way how the research could be enhanced by the sharing of knowledge.

  12. Policy Challenges in Building the Medical Home: Do We Have a Shared Blueprint?

    PubMed Central

    Stenger, Robert J.; DeVoe, Jennifer E.

    2016-01-01

    Background The notion of a patient-centered medical home features prominently in policy reform initiatives across the country, with both state and federal legislation focusing on this new model. We sought to understand the views of key stakeholders and to examine the challenging landscape facing policymakers and practitioners as they attempt to translate the medical home concept into widespread practice change. Methods We reviewed legislative documents from state legislative sessions in the year 2007 to identify pieces of legislation that included the medical home concept. Concurrently we conducted an in-depth qualitative analysis of de-identified field notes from a purposeful sample of semistructured interviews conducted with key stakeholders in Oregon after the passage of health reform legislation in 2007. Results Legislation that further defined and expounded on the medical home concept was introduced in states across the country in 2007, and some federal and state demonstration projects were already underway. However, we identified a number of barriers to widespread implementation of the medical home, most notably lack of a clear operational definition. Key stakeholders had widely disparate views about elements central to the success of medical home demonstrations, including delivery system reform, payment reform, and performance incentives for providers. Conclusions Since 2007 the concept of the medical home has gained increasing attention in health care reform debates. Our findings suggest that translating this concept into successful, widespread reform will require that policymakers build further consensus among key stakeholders and require them to address critical barriers to avoid repeating pitfalls of past reform efforts. PMID:20453185

  13. Diversion of methadone and buprenorphine from opioid substitution treatment: patients who regularly sell or share their medication.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Björn; Richert, Torkel

    2015-01-01

    Diversion-the practice of patients selling or sharing their medication-is a much debated problem of opioid substitution treatment. Regular diversion by patients was studied at 11 opioid substitution treatment programs in the south of Sweden. Using quantitative and qualitative data, it was investigated whether those patients differ from other patients, their motives for and means of diversion, and who the recipients are. Regular diverters are a small, yet heterogeneous group. Continued illicit drug use, however, stands out as a common risk factor. Pecuniary need and a desire to help friends are other important motives. The client base mainly consists of people from the regular diverters' own drug milieus.

  14. Data Sharing: A New Editorial Initiative of the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors. Implications for the Editors’ Network

    PubMed Central

    Alfonso, Fernando; Adamyan, Karlen; Artigou, Jean-Yves; Aschermann, Michael; Boehm, Michael; Buendia, Alfonso; Chu, Pao-Hsien; Cohen, Ariel; Dei Cas, Livio; Dilic, Mirza; Doubell, Anton; Echeverri, Dario; Enç, Nuray; Ferreira-González, Ignacio; J. Filipiak, Krzysztof; Flammer, Andreas; Fleck, Eckart; Gatzov, Plamen; Ginghina, Carmen; Goncalves, Lino; Haouala, Habib; Hassanein, Mahmoud; Heusch, Gerd; Huber, Kurt; Hulín, Ivan; Ivanusa, Mario; Krittayaphong, Rungroj; Lau, Chu-Pak; Marinskis, Germanas; Mach, François; Moreira, Luiz Felipe; Nieminen, Tuomo; Oukerraj, Latifa; Perings, Stefan; Pierard, Luc; Potpara, Tatjana; Reyes-Caorsi, Walter; Rim, Se-Joong; Rødevand, Olaf; Saade, Georges; Sander, Mikael; Shlyakhto, Evgeny; Timuralp, Bilgin; Tousoulis, Dimitris; Ural, Dilek; Piek, J. J.; Varga, Albert; Lüscher, Thomas F.

    2017-01-01

    The International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) provides recommendations to improve the editorial standards and scientific quality of biomedical journals. These recommendations range from uniform technical requirements to more complex and elusive editorial issues including ethical aspects of the scientific process. Recently, registration of clinical trials, conflicts of interest disclosure, and new criteria for authorship- emphasizing the importance of responsibility and accountability-, have been proposed. Last year, a new editorial initiative to foster sharing of clinical trial data was launched. This review discusses this novel initiative with the aim of increasing awareness among readers, investigators, authors and editors belonging to the Editors’ Network of the European Society of Cardiology. PMID:28630534

  15. A context-aware approach for progression tracking of medical concepts in electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Chang, Nai-Wen; Dai, Hong-Jie; Jonnagaddala, Jitendra; Chen, Chih-Wei; Tsai, Richard Tzong-Han; Hsu, Wen-Lian

    2015-12-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) for diabetic patients contain information about heart disease risk factors such as high blood pressure, cholesterol levels, and smoking status. Discovering the described risk factors and tracking their progression over time may support medical personnel in making clinical decisions, as well as facilitate data modeling and biomedical research. Such highly patient-specific knowledge is essential to driving the advancement of evidence-based practice, and can also help improve personalized medicine and care. One general approach for tracking the progression of diseases and their risk factors described in EMRs is to first recognize all temporal expressions, and then assign each of them to the nearest target medical concept. However, this method may not always provide the correct associations. In light of this, this work introduces a context-aware approach to assign the time attributes of the recognized risk factors by reconstructing contexts that contain more reliable temporal expressions. The evaluation results on the i2b2 test set demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed approach, which achieved an F-score of 0.897. To boost the approach's ability to process unstructured clinical text and to allow for the reproduction of the demonstrated results, a set of developed .NET libraries used to develop the system is available at https://sites.google.com/site/hongjiedai/projects/nttmuclinicalnet.

  16. Rapid Identification of Myocardial Infarction Risk Associated With Diabetes Medications Using Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Brownstein, John S.; Murphy, Shawn N.; Goldfine, Allison B.; Grant, Richard W.; Sordo, Margarita; Gainer, Vivian; Colecchi, Judith A.; Dubey, Anil; Nathan, David M.; Glaser, John P.; Kohane, Isaac S.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the ability to identify potential association(s) of diabetes medications with myocardial infarction using usual care clinical data obtained from the electronic medical record. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We defined a retrospective cohort of patients (n = 34,253) treated with a sulfonylurea, metformin, rosiglitazone, or pioglitazone in a single academic health care network. All patients were aged >18 years with at least one prescription for one of the medications between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2006. The study outcome was acute myocardial infarction requiring hospitalization. We used a cumulative temporal approach to ascertain the calendar date for earliest identifiable risk associated with rosiglitazone compared with that for other therapies. RESULTS Sulfonylurea, metformin, rosiglitazone, or pioglitazone therapy was prescribed for 11,200, 12,490, 1,879, and 806 patients, respectively. A total of 1,343 myocardial infarctions were identified. After adjustment for potential myocardial infarction risk factors, the relative risk for myocardial infarction with rosiglitazone was 1.3 (95% CI 1.1–1.6) compared with sulfonylurea, 2.2 (1.6–3.1) compared with metformin, and 2.2 (1.5–3.4) compared with pioglitazone. Prospective surveillance using these data would have identified increased risk for myocardial infarction with rosiglitazone compared with metformin within 18 months of its introduction with a risk ratio of 2.1 (95% CI 1.2–3.8). CONCLUSIONS Our results are consistent with a relative adverse cardiovascular risk profile for rosiglitazone. Our use of usual care electronic data sources from a large hospital network represents an innovative approach to rapid safety signal detection that may enable more effective postmarketing drug surveillance. PMID:20009093

  17. eGender-from e-Learning to e-Research: a web-based interactive knowledge-sharing platform for sex- and gender-specific medical education.

    PubMed

    Seeland, Ute; Nauman, Ahmad T; Cornelis, Alissa; Ludwig, Sabine; Dunkel, Mathias; Kararigas, Georgios; Regitz-Zagrosek, Vera

    2016-01-01

    into the accredited Master of Public Health at Charité-Berlin. The eGender platform is a flexible and user-friendly electronical knowledge-sharing platform providing evidence-based high-quality learning material used by a growing number of registered users. The eGender Medicine learning modules could be key in the reform of medical curricula to integrate Sex and Gender Medicine into the education of health professionals.

  18. A qualitative study of Swedes' opinions about shared electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Lehnbom, Elin C; McLachlan, Andrew J; Brien, Jo-anne E

    2013-01-01

    European countries are world-leading in the development and implementation of e-Health. In Sweden, all primary healthcare centres and most hospitals use digital records. Some regions use the same software which allows for clinical information to be shared (regionally shared EHRs), but there is a movement towards making all EHRs inter-operable to allow for a National Patient Summary (NPS). The aim of this study was to explore the opinions of Swedish consumers and health professionals about shared EHRs and the NPS. Semi-structered phone interviews were conducted with consumers and health professionals. The majority of interviewed health professionals were currently using regionally shared EHRs. In their experience, having access to regionally shared EHRs facilitated a holistic patient approach, assisted in patient follow-up, and reduced inappropriate (over)prescribing. Consumers had a poor level of knowledge about shared EHRs and the NPS. Unlike health professionals, consumers perceived a NPS to be of great value. The findings indicate that there was a discrepancy between health professionals and consumers' knowledge of, and the perceived need for, a NPS.

  19. Voluntary Electronic Reporting of Medical Errors and Adverse Events

    PubMed Central

    Milch, Catherine E; Salem, Deeb N; Pauker, Stephen G; Lundquist, Thomas G; Kumar, Sanjaya; Chen, Jack

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the rate and types of events reported in acute care hospitals using an electronic error reporting system (e-ERS). DESIGN Descriptive study of reported events using the same e-ERS between January 1, 2001 and September 30, 2003. SETTING Twenty-six acute care nonfederal hospitals throughout the U.S. that voluntarily implemented a web-based e-ERS for at least 3 months. PARTICIPANTS Hospital employees and staff. INTERVENTION A secure, standardized, commercially available web-based reporting system. RESULTS Median duration of e-ERS use was 21 months (range 3 to 33 months). A total of 92,547 reports were obtained during 2,547,154 patient-days. Reporting rates varied widely across hospitals (9 to 95 reports per 1,000 inpatient-days; median=35). Registered nurses provided nearly half of the reports; physicians contributed less than 2%. Thirty-four percent of reports were classified as nonmedication-related clinical events, 33% as medication/infusion related, 13% were falls, 13% as administrative, and 6% other. Among 80% of reports that identified level of impact, 53% were events that reached a patient (“patient events”), 13% were near misses that did not reach the patient, and 14% were hospital environment problems. Among 49,341 patient events, 67% caused no harm, 32% temporary harm, 0.8% life threatening or permanent harm, and 0.4% contributed to patient deaths. CONCLUSIONS An e-ERS provides an accessible venue for reporting medical errors, adverse events, and near misses. The wide variation in reporting rates among hospitals, and very low reporting rates by physicians, requires investigation. PMID:16390502

  20. Osteoporosis guideline implementation in family medicine using electronic medical records

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, Janet; Karampatos, Sarah; Ioannidis, George; Adachi, Jonathan; Thabane, Lehana; Nash, Lynn; Mehan, Upe; Kozak, Joseph; Feldman, Sid; Hirsch, Steve; Jovaisas, Algis V.; Cheung, Angela; Lohfeld, Lynne; Papaioannou, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To identify family physicians’ learning needs related to osteoporosis care; determine family physicians’ preferred modes of learning; and identify barriers to using electronic medical records (EMRs) to implement osteoporosis guidelines in practice. Design Web-based survey. Setting Ontario. Participants Family physicians. Main outcome measures Quantitative and qualitative data about learning needs related to osteoporosis diagnosis and management; preferred mode of learning about guidelines; and barriers to using EMRs to implement guidelines. Results Of the 12 332 family physicians invited to participate in the survey, 8.5% and 7.0% provided partial or fully completed surveys, respectively. More than 80% of respondents agreed that the priority areas for education were as follows: selecting laboratory tests for secondary osteoporosis and interpreting the test results; interpreting bone mineral density results; determining appropriate circumstances for ordering anterior-posterior lumbar spine x-ray scans; and understanding duration, types, and adverse effects of pharmacotherapy. Qualitative analysis revealed that managing moderate-risk patients was a learning need. Continuing medical education was the preferred mode of learning. Approximately 80% of respondents agreed that the scarcity of EMR tools to aid in guideline implementation was a barrier to using guidelines, and 50% of respondents agreed that if EMR-embedded tools were available, time would limit their ability to use them. Conclusion This survey identified key diagnostic- and treatment-related topics in osteoporosis care that should be the focus of future continuing professional development for family physicians. Developers of EMR tools, physicians, and researchers aiming to implement guidelines to improve osteoporosis care should consider the potential barriers indicated in this study.

  1. Publication trends of shared decision making in 15 high impact medical journals: a full-text review with bibliometric analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Shared Decision Making (SDM) is increasingly advocated as a model for medical decision making. However, there is still low use of SDM in clinical practice. High impact factor journals might represent an efficient way for its dissemination. We aimed to identify and characterize publication trends of SDM in 15 high impact medical journals. Methods We selected the 15 general and internal medicine journals with the highest impact factor publishing original articles, letters and editorials. We retrieved publications from 1996 to 2011 through the full-text search function on each journal website and abstracted bibliometric data. We included publications of any type containing the phrase “shared decision making” or five other variants in their abstract or full text. These were referred to as SDM publications. A polynomial Poisson regression model with logarithmic link function was used to assess the evolution across the period of the number of SDM publications according to publication characteristics. Results We identified 1285 SDM publications out of 229,179 publications in 15 journals from 1996 to 2011. The absolute number of SDM publications by journal ranged from 2 to 273 over 16 years. SDM publications increased both in absolute and relative numbers per year, from 46 (0.32% relative to all publications from the 15 journals) in 1996 to 165 (1.17%) in 2011. This growth was exponential (P < 0.01). We found fewer research publications (465, 36.2% of all SDM publications) than non-research publications, which included non-systematic reviews, letters, and editorials. The increase of research publications across time was linear. Full-text search retrieved ten times more SDM publications than a similar PubMed search (1285 vs. 119 respectively). Conclusion This review in full-text showed that SDM publications increased exponentially in major medical journals from 1996 to 2011. This growth might reflect an increased dissemination of the SDM concept to the

  2. How physician electronic health record screen sharing affects patient and doctor non-verbal communication in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Asan, Onur; Young, Henry N.; Chewning, Betty; Montague, Enid

    2015-01-01

    Objective Use of electronic health records (EHRs) in primary-care exam rooms changes the dynamics of patient-physician interaction. This study examines and compares doctor-patient non-verbal communication (eye-gaze patterns) during primary care encounters for three different screen/information sharing groups: 1) active information sharing, 2) passive information sharing, and 3) technology withdrawal. Methods Researchers video recorded 100 primary-care visits and coded the direction and duration of doctor and patient gaze. Descriptive statistics compared the length of gaze patterns as a percentage of visit length. Lag sequential analysis determined whether physician eye-gaze influenced patient eye gaze, and vice versa, and examined variations across groups. Results Significant differences were found in duration of gaze across groups. Lag sequential analysis found significant associations between several gaze patterns. Some, such as DGP-PGD (“doctor gaze patient” followed by “patient gaze doctor”) were significant for all groups. Others, such DGT-PGU (“doctor gaze technology” followed by “patient gaze unknown”) were unique to one group. Conclusion Some technology use styles (active information sharing) seem to create more patient engagement, while others (passive information sharing) lead to patient disengagement. Practice Implications Doctors can engage patients in communication by using EHRs in the visits. EHR training and design should facilitate this. PMID:25534022

  3. How physician electronic health record screen sharing affects patient and doctor non-verbal communication in primary care.

    PubMed

    Asan, Onur; Young, Henry N; Chewning, Betty; Montague, Enid

    2015-03-01

    Use of electronic health records (EHRs) in primary-care exam rooms changes the dynamics of patient-physician interaction. This study examines and compares doctor-patient non-verbal communication (eye-gaze patterns) during primary care encounters for three different screen/information sharing groups: (1) active information sharing, (2) passive information sharing, and (3) technology withdrawal. Researchers video recorded 100 primary-care visits and coded the direction and duration of doctor and patient gaze. Descriptive statistics compared the length of gaze patterns as a percentage of visit length. Lag sequential analysis determined whether physician eye-gaze influenced patient eye gaze, and vice versa, and examined variations across groups. Significant differences were found in duration of gaze across groups. Lag sequential analysis found significant associations between several gaze patterns. Some, such as DGP-PGD ("doctor gaze patient" followed by "patient gaze doctor") were significant for all groups. Others, such DGT-PGU ("doctor gaze technology" followed by "patient gaze unknown") were unique to one group. Some technology use styles (active information sharing) seem to create more patient engagement, while others (passive information sharing) lead to patient disengagement. Doctors can engage patients in communication by using EHRs in the visits. EHR training and design should facilitate this. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Medical Data Management in Time-Sharing: Findings of the DIRAC Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludwig, Herbert; Vallee, Jacques

    In terms of examples drawn from clinical and research data files, one of the objectives of this study is to illustrate several factors that have combined to delay the implementation of medical data bases. A primary factor has been inherent in the design of computer software. The languages currently on the market are procedural in nature: they…

  5. Collaborative Counselor and Medical Training at a Family Practice Residency Program: A Sharing of the Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, LeBron; Pilkington, Lloyd; Murray, Paige Johnson; Whitfield, Donna

    2000-01-01

    The reactions of a Ph.D.-level, counselor-in-training, a medical student, and a family practice resident to collaborative systems clinical training at a family practice residency program are given in this article. Addresses the initial impressions of the content and process of the teaching model and how the experience changed their views of…

  6. Consumers' Perceptions of Patient-Accessible Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Vaughon, Wendy L; Czaja, Sara J; Levy, Joslyn; Rockoff, Maxine L

    2013-01-01

    Background Electronic health information (eHealth) tools for patients, including patient-accessible electronic medical records (patient portals), are proliferating in health care delivery systems nationally. However, there has been very limited study of the perceived utility and functionality of portals, as well as limited assessment of these systems by vulnerable (low education level, racial/ethnic minority) consumers. Objective The objective of the study was to identify vulnerable consumers’ response to patient portals, their perceived utility and value, as well as their reactions to specific portal functions. Methods This qualitative study used 4 focus groups with 28 low education level, English-speaking consumers in June and July 2010, in New York City. Results Participants included 10 males and 18 females, ranging in age from 21-63 years; 19 non-Hispanic black, 7 Hispanic, 1 non-Hispanic White and 1 Other. None of the participants had higher than a high school level education, and 13 had less than a high school education. All participants had experience with computers and 26 used the Internet. Major themes were enhanced consumer engagement/patient empowerment, extending the doctor’s visit/enhancing communication with health care providers, literacy and health literacy factors, improved prevention and health maintenance, and privacy and security concerns. Consumers were also asked to comment on a number of key portal features. Consumers were most positive about features that increased convenience, such as making appointments and refilling prescriptions. Consumers raised concerns about a number of potential barriers to usage, such as complex language, complex visual layouts, and poor usability features. Conclusions Most consumers were enthusiastic about patient portals and perceived that they had great utility and value. Study findings suggest that for patient portals to be effective for all consumers, portals must be designed to be easy to read, visually

  7. Consumers' perceptions of patient-accessible electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Zarcadoolas, Christina; Vaughon, Wendy L; Czaja, Sara J; Levy, Joslyn; Rockoff, Maxine L

    2013-08-26

    Electronic health information (eHealth) tools for patients, including patient-accessible electronic medical records (patient portals), are proliferating in health care delivery systems nationally. However, there has been very limited study of the perceived utility and functionality of portals, as well as limited assessment of these systems by vulnerable (low education level, racial/ethnic minority) consumers. The objective of the study was to identify vulnerable consumers' response to patient portals, their perceived utility and value, as well as their reactions to specific portal functions. This qualitative study used 4 focus groups with 28 low education level, English-speaking consumers in June and July 2010, in New York City. Participants included 10 males and 18 females, ranging in age from 21-63 years; 19 non-Hispanic black, 7 Hispanic, 1 non-Hispanic White and 1 Other. None of the participants had higher than a high school level education, and 13 had less than a high school education. All participants had experience with computers and 26 used the Internet. Major themes were enhanced consumer engagement/patient empowerment, extending the doctor's visit/enhancing communication with health care providers, literacy and health literacy factors, improved prevention and health maintenance, and privacy and security concerns. Consumers were also asked to comment on a number of key portal features. Consumers were most positive about features that increased convenience, such as making appointments and refilling prescriptions. Consumers raised concerns about a number of potential barriers to usage, such as complex language, complex visual layouts, and poor usability features. Most consumers were enthusiastic about patient portals and perceived that they had great utility and value. Study findings suggest that for patient portals to be effective for all consumers, portals must be designed to be easy to read, visually engaging, and have user-friendly navigation.

  8. Progress in electronic medical record adoption in Canada.

    PubMed

    2015-12-01

    To determine the rate of adoption of electronic medical records (EMRs) by physicians across Canada, provincial incentives, and perceived benefits of and barriers to EMR adoption. Data on EMR adoption in Canada were collected from CINAHL, MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, the Health Council of Canada, Canada Health Infoway, government websites, regional EMR associations, and health professional association websites. After removal of duplicate articles, 236 documents were found matching the original search. After using the filter Canada, 12 documents remained. Additional documents were obtained from each province's EMR website and from the Canada Health Infoway website. Since 2006, Canadian EMR adoption rates have increased from about 20% of practitioners to an estimated 62% of practitioners in 2013, with substantial regional disparities ranging from roughly 40% of physicians in New Brunswick and Quebec to more than 75% of physicians in Alberta. Provincial incentives vary widely but appear to have only a weak relationship with the rate of adoption. Many adopters use only a fraction of their software's available functions. User-cited benefits to adoption include time savings, improved record keeping, heightened patient safety, and confidence in retrieved data when EMRs are used efficiently. Barriers to adoption include financial and time constraints, lack of knowledgeable support personnel, and lack of interoperability with hospital and pharmacy systems. Canadian physicians remain at the stage of EMR adoption. Progression in EMR use requires experienced, knowledgeable technical support during implementation, and financial support for the transcription of patient data from paper to electronic media. The interoperability of EMR offerings for hospitals, pharmacies, and clinics is the rate-limiting factor in achieving a unified EMR solution for Canada.

  9. Progress in electronic medical record adoption in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Feng; Gupta, Nishi

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the rate of adoption of electronic medical records (EMRs) by physicians across Canada, provincial incentives, and perceived benefits of and barriers to EMR adoption. Data sources Data on EMR adoption in Canada were collected from CINAHL, MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, the Health Council of Canada, Canada Health Infoway, government websites, regional EMR associations, and health professional association websites. Study selection After removal of duplicate articles, 236 documents were found matching the original search. After using the filter Canada, 12 documents remained. Additional documents were obtained from each province’s EMR website and from the Canada Health Infoway website. Synthesis Since 2006, Canadian EMR adoption rates have increased from about 20% of practitioners to an estimated 62% of practitioners in 2013, with substantial regional disparities ranging from roughly 40% of physicians in New Brunswick and Quebec to more than 75% of physicians in Alberta. Provincial incentives vary widely but appear to have only a weak relationship with the rate of adoption. Many adopters use only a fraction of their software’s available functions. User-cited benefits to adoption include time savings, improved record keeping, heightened patient safety, and confidence in retrieved data when EMRs are used efficiently. Barriers to adoption include financial and time constraints, lack of knowledgeable support personnel, and lack of interoperability with hospital and pharmacy systems. Conclusion Canadian physicians remain at the stage of EMR adoption. Progression in EMR use requires experienced, knowledgeable technical support during implementation, and financial support for the transcription of patient data from paper to electronic media. The interoperability of EMR offerings for hospitals, pharmacies, and clinics is the rate-limiting factor in achieving a unified EMR solution for Canada. PMID:27035020

  10. The REEME project: a cooperative model for sharing international medical education materials.

    PubMed

    Iserson, Kenneth V

    2008-07-01

    Although the Internet has become an excellent source of medical education materials, in many specialties, including Emergency Medicine (EM), most of the information is in English. Few international EM practitioners can attend costly specialty conferences, importing foreign experts to teach at these conferences is costly and, even then, these experts are available for a limited time to relatively few people. Countries with minimal health care or medical education budgets find providing even basic materials for professional medical education difficult. An exciting international project now freely distributes Spanish language educational programs to health care professionals on topics relating to EM. The Recursos Educacionales en Español para Medicina de Emergencia (REEME; Educational Resources in Spanish for EM) Project (www.reeme.arizona.edu) was developed to overcome some of these problems by providing language-specific specialty information and widespread international availability, and by promoting international cooperation among professional health care educators. It also provides a ready source of Spanish medical vocabulary for those trying to learn the language. With computer support from the University of Arizona's Learning and Technology Center, REEME first went "live" on November 1, 2004. Three years later, as of November 1, 2007, the site had 575 programs from 411 donors representing 19 countries and the United Nations. There are currently about 645 downloads per month to users in 73 countries. The REEME Project demonstrates the power of the Internet as a means to achieve international cooperation in medical education, and can serve as a model for similar projects in other specialties and languages.

  11. Cancer Counseling of Low-Income Limited English Proficient Latina Women Using Medical Interpreters: Implications for Shared Decision-Making.

    PubMed

    Kamara, Daniella; Weil, Jon; Youngblom, Janey; Guerra, Claudia; Joseph, Galen

    2017-08-09

    In cancer genetic counseling (CGC), communication across language and culture challenges the model of practice based on shared decision-making. To date, little research has examined the decision-making process of low-income, limited English proficiency (LEP) patients in CGC. This study identified communication patterns in CGC sessions with this population and assessed how these patterns facilitate or inhibit the decision-making process during the sessions. We analyzed 24 audio recordings of CGC sessions conducted in Spanish via telephone interpreters at two public hospitals. Patients were referred for risk of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer; all were offered genetic testing. Audio files were coded by two bilingual English-Spanish researchers and analyzed using conventional content analysis through an iterative process. The 24 sessions included 13 patients, 6 counselors, and 18 interpreters. Qualitative data analyses identified three key domains - Challenges Posed by Hypothetical Explanations, Misinterpretation by the Medical Interpreter, and Communication Facilitators - that reflect communication patterns and their impact on the counselor's ability to facilitate shared decision-making. Overall, we found an absence of patient participation in the decision-making process. Our data suggest that when counseling LEP Latina patients via medical interpreter, prioritizing information with direct utility for the patient and organizing information into short- and long-term goals may reduce information overload and improve comprehension for patient and interpreter. Further research is needed to test the proposed counseling strategies with this population and to assess how applicable our findings are to other populations.

  12. Characterization of Statin Dose-response within Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei-Qi; Feng, Qiping; Jiang, Lan; Waitara, Magarya S.; Iwuchukwu, Otito F.; Roden, Dan M.; Jiang, Min; Xu, Hua; Krauss, Ronald M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Davis, Robert L.; Berg, Richard L.; Peissig, Peggy L.; McCarty, Catherine A.; Wilke, Russell A.; Denny, Joshua C.

    2013-01-01

    Efforts to define the genetic architecture underlying variable statin response have met with limited success possibly because previous studies were limited to effect based on one-single-dose. We leveraged electronic medical records (EMRs) to extract potency (ED50) and efficacy (Emax) of statin dose-response curves and tested them for association with 144 pre-selected variants. Two large biobanks were used to construct dose-response curves for 2,026 (simvastatin) and 2,252 subjects (atorvastatin). Atorvastatin was more efficacious, more potent, and demonstrated less inter-individual variability than simvastatin. A pharmacodynamic variant emerging from randomized trials (PRDM16) was associated with Emax for both. For atorvastatin, Emax was 51.7 mg/dl in homozygous for the minor allele versus 75.0 mg/dl for those homozygous for the major allele. We also identified several loci associated with ED50. The extraction of rigorously defined traits from EMRs for pharmacogenetic studies represents a promising approach to further understand of genetic factors contributing to drug response. PMID:24096969

  13. A critical pathway for electronic medical record selection.

    PubMed

    Holbrook, A; Keshavjee, K; Langton, K; Troyan, S; Millar, S; Olantunji, S; Pray, M; Tytus, R; Ford, P T

    2001-01-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) are increasingly becoming a necessary tool in health care. Given their potential to influence every aspect of health care, there has been surprisingly little rigorous research applied to this important piece of emerging health technology. An initial phase of the COMPETE study, which is examining the impact of EMRs on efficiency, quality of care and privacy concerns, involved a rigorous "critical pathway" approach to EMR selection for the study. A multidisciplinary team with clinical, technical and research expertise led an 8-stage evaluation process with direct input from user physicians at each stage. An iterative sequence of review of EMR specifications and features, live product demonstrations, site visits, and negotiations with vendors led to a progressive narrowing of the field of eligible EMR systems. Final scoring was based on 3 main themes of clinical usability, data quality and support/vendor issues. We believe that a rigorous, multidisciplinary process such as this is required to maximize success of any EMR implementation project.

  14. A critical pathway for electronic medical record selection.

    PubMed Central

    Holbrook, A.; Keshavjee, K.; Langton, K.; Troyan, S.; Millar, S.; Olantunji, S.; Pray, M.; Tytus, R.; Ford, P. T.

    2001-01-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) are increasingly becoming a necessary tool in health care. Given their potential to influence every aspect of health care, there has been surprisingly little rigorous research applied to this important piece of emerging health technology. An initial phase of the COMPETE study, which is examining the impact of EMRs on efficiency, quality of care and privacy concerns, involved a rigorous "critical pathway" approach to EMR selection for the study. A multidisciplinary team with clinical, technical and research expertise led an 8-stage evaluation process with direct input from user physicians at each stage. An iterative sequence of review of EMR specifications and features, live product demonstrations, site visits, and negotiations with vendors led to a progressive narrowing of the field of eligible EMR systems. Final scoring was based on 3 main themes of clinical usability, data quality and support/vendor issues. We believe that a rigorous, multidisciplinary process such as this is required to maximize success of any EMR implementation project. PMID:11825192

  15. Implementation of electronic medical records: theory-informed qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Greiver, Michelle; Barnsley, Jan; Glazier, Richard H; Moineddin, Rahim; Harvey, Bart J

    2011-10-01

    To apply the diffusion-of-innovations theory to the examination of factors that are perceived by family physicians as influencing the implementation of electronic medical records (EMRs). Qualitative study with 2 focus groups 18 months after EMR implementation; participants also took part in a concurrent quantitative study examining EMR implementation and preventive services. Toronto, Ont. Twelve community-based family physicians. We employed a semistructured interview guide. The interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim; 2 researchers independently categorized and coded the transcripts and then met to compare and contrast their findings, category mapping, and interpretations. Findings were then mapped to an existing theoretical framework. Multiple barriers to EMR implementation were described. These included lack of relative advantage for many processes, high complexity of the system, low compatibility with physician needs and past experiences, difficulty with adaptation of the EMR to the organization and adaptation of the organization to the EMR, and lack of organizational slack. Positive factors were the presence of a champion and relative advantages for some processes. Early EMR implementation experience is consistent with theoretical concepts associated with implementation of innovations. A problematic implementation process helps to explain, at least in part, the lack of improvement in preventive services in our quantitative results.

  16. Shared agency and collaboration between the family and professionals in medical rehabilitation of children with severe disabilities.

    PubMed

    Järvikoski, Aila; Martin, Marjatta; Autti-Rämö, Ilona; Härkäpää, Kristiina

    2013-03-01

    Implementation of medical rehabilitation for children with severe disabilities, arranged by the Social Insurance Institution of Finland, is based on collaboration of the family with several professionals and organizations providing the necessary services. Therefore, it sets special challenges for service provision. Parents' experiences of shared agency and participation during children's rehabilitation process were analyzed in relation to the following research questions: what factors, describing the planning and implementation of rehabilitation, were associated with (a) the parents' satisfaction with planning, (b) the correspondence between the plans and the needs of the child, and (c) the correspondence between the received rehabilitation and the needs and wishes of the child and the parents. A questionnaire survey for the children's parents (n=496) included items on rehabilitation planning and implementation of services. The results were analyzed using cross-tabulations and logistic regression analyses. Taking into account of the parents' and children's preferences in rehabilitation and active participation of the rehabilitation counselor and the therapist were positively associated with parents' satisfaction with planning and the correspondence between the plan and the needs. The rehabilitation process was considered as more successful if the information received was sufficient, the parents were heard in all phases of the process, and the child was motivated to participate. Several stakeholders have responsibilities in medical rehabilitation for individuals with severe disabilities. Parents' experience of good rehabilitation planning in healthcare requires shared agency; that is, rehabilitation professionals listening to the family's preferences in decision making. Parents' experience with a successful rehabilitation process is dependent on information sharing, becoming heard, and collaboration in all phases of the process.

  17. Spaced education in medical residents: An electronic intervention to improve competency and retention of medical knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Matos, Jason; Petri, Camille R.; Mukamal, Kenneth J.; Vanka, Anita

    2017-01-01

    Background Spaced education is a novel method that improves medical education through online repetition of core principles often paired with multiple-choice questions. This model is a proven teaching tool for medical students, but its effect on resident learning is less established. We hypothesized that repetition of key clinical concepts in a “Clinical Pearls” format would improve knowledge retention in medical residents. Methods This study investigated spaced education with particular emphasis on using a novel, email-based reinforcement program, and a randomized, self-matched design, in which residents were quizzed on medical knowledge that was either reinforced or not with electronically-administered spaced education. Both reinforced and non-reinforced knowledge was later tested with four quizzes. Results Overall, respondents incorrectly answered 395 of 1008 questions (0.39; 95% CI, 0.36–0.42). Incorrect response rates varied by quiz (range 0.34–0.49; p = 0.02), but not significantly by post-graduate year (PGY1 0.44, PGY2 0.33, PGY3 0.38; p = 0.08). Although there was no evidence of benefit among residents (RR = 1.01; 95% CI, 0.83–1.22; p = 0.95), we observed a significantly lower risk of incorrect responses to reinforced material among interns (RR = 0.83, 95% CI, 0.70–0.99, p = 0.04). Conclusions Overall, repetition of Clinical Pearls did not statistically improve test scores amongst junior and senior residents. However, among interns, repetition of the Clinical Pearls was associated with significantly higher test scores, perhaps reflecting their greater attendance at didactic sessions and engagement with Clinical Pearls. Although the study was limited by a low response rate, we employed test and control questions within the same quiz, limiting the potential for selection bias. Further work is needed to determine the optimal spacing and content load of Clinical Pearls to maximize retention amongst medical residents. This particular protocol of

  18. Spaced education in medical residents: An electronic intervention to improve competency and retention of medical knowledge.

    PubMed

    Matos, Jason; Petri, Camille R; Mukamal, Kenneth J; Vanka, Anita

    2017-01-01

    Spaced education is a novel method that improves medical education through online repetition of core principles often paired with multiple-choice questions. This model is a proven teaching tool for medical students, but its effect on resident learning is less established. We hypothesized that repetition of key clinical concepts in a "Clinical Pearls" format would improve knowledge retention in medical residents. This study investigated spaced education with particular emphasis on using a novel, email-based reinforcement program, and a randomized, self-matched design, in which residents were quizzed on medical knowledge that was either reinforced or not with electronically-administered spaced education. Both reinforced and non-reinforced knowledge was later tested with four quizzes. Overall, respondents incorrectly answered 395 of 1008 questions (0.39; 95% CI, 0.36-0.42). Incorrect response rates varied by quiz (range 0.34-0.49; p = 0.02), but not significantly by post-graduate year (PGY1 0.44, PGY2 0.33, PGY3 0.38; p = 0.08). Although there was no evidence of benefit among residents (RR = 1.01; 95% CI, 0.83-1.22; p = 0.95), we observed a significantly lower risk of incorrect responses to reinforced material among interns (RR = 0.83, 95% CI, 0.70-0.99, p = 0.04). Overall, repetition of Clinical Pearls did not statistically improve test scores amongst junior and senior residents. However, among interns, repetition of the Clinical Pearls was associated with significantly higher test scores, perhaps reflecting their greater attendance at didactic sessions and engagement with Clinical Pearls. Although the study was limited by a low response rate, we employed test and control questions within the same quiz, limiting the potential for selection bias. Further work is needed to determine the optimal spacing and content load of Clinical Pearls to maximize retention amongst medical residents. This particular protocol of spaced education, however, was unique and readily

  19. The Medical Data Index (MDI) dependency module: a shared database to assist discharge planning and audit.

    PubMed

    Pheby, D F; Thorne, P

    1994-08-01

    As part of the development of integrated, patient-based hospital information technology (IT) systems in the South-Western Region of England, a module has been developed which will hold core data pertaining to the functional status and current resources of elderly or disabled patients. Its purpose is to assist early identification of unmet needs and facilitate prompt transfer to community care. The module provides a shared database, which is completed or updated as necessary on admission and is then available to all appropriate users of the hospital system, avoiding duplication of data collection. In addition to details of home circumstances and support, it includes brief, standardized assessment scales for activities of daily living and mental state, which will identify the need for specialist referral. A summary is provided for easy communication with other care agencies.

  20. An Efficient Searchable Encryption Against Keyword Guessing Attacks for Sharable Electronic Medical Records in Cloud-based System.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yilun; Lu, Xicheng; Su, Jinshu; Chen, Peixin

    2016-12-01

    Preserving the privacy of electronic medical records (EMRs) is extremely important especially when medical systems adopt cloud services to store patients' electronic medical records. Considering both the privacy and the utilization of EMRs, some medical systems apply searchable encryption to encrypt EMRs and enable authorized users to search over these encrypted records. Since individuals would like to share their EMRs with multiple persons, how to design an efficient searchable encryption for sharable EMRs is still a very challenge work. In this paper, we propose a cost-efficient secure channel free searchable encryption (SCF-PEKS) scheme for sharable EMRs. Comparing with existing SCF-PEKS solutions, our scheme reduces the storage overhead and achieves better computation performance. Moreover, our scheme can guard against keyword guessing attack, which is neglected by most of the existing schemes. Finally, we implement both our scheme and a latest medical-based scheme to evaluate the performance. The evaluation results show that our scheme performs much better performance than the latest one for sharable EMRs.

  1. Meaningful use: an electronic medical record tool for cerebrospinal fluid shunt history.

    PubMed

    Governale, Lance S; Hoffman, Jeffrey M

    2017-02-10

    The care of patients with shunted hydrocephalus can be complicated. The best assessment is provided when all data are available to the neurosurgery practitioner. However, data can be time-consuming to gather, especially in the setting of a busy practice, a trainee environment with duty-hour restrictions, and an electronic medical record (EMR) not specifically designed for the needs of subspecialists. For these reasons, the complete clinical picture, especially the historical component, is sometimes not assembled. To address these shortcomings, the authors created a patient-level electronic CSF shunt history tool that leverages the power of the EMR concordant with the United States Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services meaningful use principles. It is immediately available within the EMR for all users in all patient care contexts (e.g., outpatient, inpatient, perioperative, emergency, and remote access), centrally located, and designed to capture the vast range of circumstances inherent to the hydrocephalus population. Essential shunt data can be rapidly acquired and, as such, may decrease the likelihood of error in diagnosis and/or treatment. The tool also has the potential to aid the practicing neurosurgeon from clinical, quality improvement, and research standpoints. The authors have endeavored to describe this tool in a manner that would allow an interested neurosurgeon to share this publication with health information technology professionals to facilitate the development of a similar tool within their institution's own EMR platform.

  2. A Survey Aimed at General Citizens of the US and Japan about Their Attitudes toward Electronic Medical Data Handling

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Michio; Nakaya, Jun; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Toshiro; Nakayasu, Kazuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To clarify the views of the general population of two countries (US and Japan), concerning the handling of their medical records electronically. Methods: We contacted people nationwide in the United States at random via Random Digit Dialing (RDD) to obtain 200 eligible responders. The questionnaire was for obtaining the information on their attitudes towards handling of their medical records, disclosure of the name of disease, secondary usage of information, compiling their records into a lifelong medical record, and access to their medical records on the Internet. We had also surveyed people of Shizuoka prefecture in Japan using same questionnaires sent by mail, for which we obtained 457 valid answers. Results: Even in an unidentifiable manner, US people feel profit-oriented usage of medical data without specific consent is not acceptable. There is a significant difference between usage of unidentifiable medical data for profit (about 50% feel negatively) and for official/research purposes (about 30% feel negatively). About 60% of the US responders have a negative view on the proposal that unidentifiable medical information be utilized for profit by private companies to attain healthcare cost savings. As regards compiling a lifelong medical record, positive answers and negative answers are almost equally divided in the US (46% vs. 38%) while more positive attitudes are seen in Japan (74% vs. 12%). However, any incentive measures aimed at changing attitudes to such a compiling including the discount of healthcare costs or insurance fees are unwelcomed by people regardless of their age or health condition in both surveys. Regarding the access to their own medical record via the Internet, 38% of the US responders feel this is unacceptable while 50.5% were willing to accept it. Conclusions: Participants from the US think that the extent of the sharing their identifiable medical records should be limited to the doctors-in-charge and specified doctors

  3. A survey aimed at general citizens of the US and Japan about their attitudes toward electronic medical data handling.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Michio; Nakaya, Jun; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Toshiro; Nakayasu, Kazuyuki

    2014-04-25

    To clarify the views of the general population of two countries (US and Japan), concerning the handling of their medical records electronically. We contacted people nationwide in the United States at random via Random Digit Dialing (RDD) to obtain 200 eligible responders. The questionnaire was for obtaining the information on their attitudes towards handling of their medical records, disclosure of the name of disease, secondary usage of information, compiling their records into a lifelong medical record, and access to their medical records on the Internet. We had also surveyed people of Shizuoka prefecture in Japan using same questionnaires sent by mail, for which we obtained 457 valid answers. Even in an unidentifiable manner, US people feel profit-oriented usage of medical data without specific consent is not acceptable. There is a significant difference between usage of unidentifiable medical data for profit (about 50% feel negatively) and for official/research purposes (about 30% feel negatively). About 60% of the US responders have a negative view on the proposal that unidentifiable medical information be utilized for profit by private companies to attain healthcare cost savings. As regards compiling a lifelong medical record, positive answers and negative answers are almost equally divided in the US (46% vs. 38%) while more positive attitudes are seen in Japan (74% vs. 12%). However, any incentive measures aimed at changing attitudes to such a compiling including the discount of healthcare costs or insurance fees are unwelcomed by people regardless of their age or health condition in both surveys. Regarding the access to their own medical record via the Internet, 38% of the US responders feel this is unacceptable while 50.5% were willing to accept it. Participants from the US think that the extent of the sharing their identifiable medical records should be limited to the doctors-in-charge and specified doctors referred to by their own doctors. On the other

  4. World Bank's Global Development Learning Network: Sharing Knowledge Electronically between Nations To "Fight Poverty."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorenzo, George

    2002-01-01

    Describes the Global Development Learning Network (GDLN), a satellite-driven global communication system developed by the World Bank to help developing countries fight poverty and share in a global exchange of information. Explains Distance Learning Centers that are used by private and public organizations and institutions for distance education…

  5. World Bank's Global Development Learning Network: Sharing Knowledge Electronically between Nations To "Fight Poverty."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorenzo, George

    2002-01-01

    Describes the Global Development Learning Network (GDLN), a satellite-driven global communication system developed by the World Bank to help developing countries fight poverty and share in a global exchange of information. Explains Distance Learning Centers that are used by private and public organizations and institutions for distance education…

  6. Fundoplication and the pediatric surgeon: implications for shared decision-making and the medical home.

    PubMed

    Fox, David; Barnard, Juliana; Campagna, Elizabeth J; Dickinson, L Miriam; Bruny, Jennifer; Kempe, Allison

    2012-01-01

    Almost one-half of all pediatric gastrostomy tube insertions are accompanied by a fundoplication, yet little is understood about the surgical decision-making for these procedures. The objective of this study was to examine the decision-making process of surgeons about whether to perform a fundoplication in children already scheduled to have a gastrostomy tube placed. A written questionnaire of all pediatric surgeons at a major children's hospital was completed for each planned gastrostomy procedure over the course of 1 year; the questionnaire asked about various influences on the fundoplication decision: primary care and subspecialty physicians' opinions, patient characteristics, and parent opinions. Patient demographics and clinical characteristics from the medical record, as well as questionnaire responses, were summarized for each gastrostomy occurrence. We modeled the association of questionnaire responses and patient characteristics with the outcome of having a fundoplication. We received questionnaires on 161 of 169 eligible patients (95%). A total of 52% of patients had fundoplication. Primary care physicians were involved in 44% of decisions, and when involved had "a lot" of influence on the fundoplication decision only 28% of time, compared with neonatologists (61%), hospitalists (44%), pediatric pulmonologists (42%), and pediatric gastroenterologists (40%). A total of 86% of patients had a subspecialist involved, and 28% had >1 subspecialist. A pH probe was performed in 7.5% of cases, and failed pharmacotherapy was noted by the surgeons in only 26.5% of the fundoplications performed. The decision to do a fundoplication was rarely based on definitive testing or failed medical treatment. From the surgeon's perspective, subspecialists were more influential than primary care physicians, which is at odds with current concepts of the medical home. Copyright © 2012 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. DRUG-DRUG INTERACTION PROFILES OF MEDICATION REGIMENS EXTRACTED FROM A DE-IDENTIFIED ELECTRONIC MEDICAL RECORDS SYSTEM

    PubMed Central

    Butkiewicz, Mariusz; Restrepo, Nicole A.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Crawford, Dana C.

    2016-01-01

    With age, the number of prescribed medications increases and subsequently raises the risk for adverse drug-drug interactions. These adverse effects lower quality of life and increase health care costs. Quantifying the potential burden of adverse effects before prescribing medications can be a valuable contribution to health care. This study evaluated medication lists extracted from a subset of the Vanderbilt de-identified electronic medical record system. Reported drugs were cross-referenced with the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes DRUG database to identify known drug-drug interactions. On average, a medication regimen contained 6.58 medications and 2.68 drug-drug interactions. Here, we quantify the burden of potential adverse events from drug-drug interactions through drug-drug interaction profiles and include a number of alternative medications as provided by the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification System. PMID:27570646

  8. Electron-impact ionization of helium for equal-energy-sharing kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Stelbovics, A.T.; Bray, I.; Fursa, D.V.; Bartschat, K.

    2005-05-15

    The close-coupling approach to electron-helium single ionization is analyzed and several ways of defining the scattering amplitudes are determined, for both equal- and unequal-energy outgoing electrons. Nevertheless, the various definitions all lead to the same cross section. The convergent close-coupling (CCC) method with Laguerre (CCC-L) and box-based (CCC-B) target functions is applied to calculate electron-impact ionization of helium for the cases where the two outgoing electrons have equal energy. Excellent absolute agreement with experiment is obtained for all available cases of comparison.

  9. Towards improved knowledge sharing: assessment of the HL7 Reference Information Model to support medical logic module queries.

    PubMed

    Jenders, R A; Sujansky, W; Broverman, C A; Chadwick, M

    1997-01-01

    Because clinical databases vary in structure, access methods and vocabulary used to represent data, the Arden Syntax does not define a standard model for querying databases. Consequently, database queries are encoded in ad hoc ways and enclosed in "curly braces" in Medical Logic Modules (MLMs). However, the nonstandard representation of queries impairs sharing of MLMs, an impediment that has come to be known as the "curly braces problem." As a first step in solving this problem, we evaluated the proposed HL7 Reference Information Model (RIM) as a foundation for a standard query model for the Arden Syntax. Specifically, we analyzed the MLM knowledge base at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center and compared the queries in these MLMs to the RIM. We studied 488 queries in 104 MLMs, identifying 674 total query data elements. Laboratory tests accounted for 45.8% of these elements, while demographic and ADT data accounted for 37.6%. Pharmacy orders accounted for 10.5%, medical problems for 4.3% and MLM output messages for 1.6%. We found that the RIM encompasses all but those data elements signifying MLM output (1.6% of the total). We conclude that the majority of queries in the CPMC knowledge base access a relatively small set of data elements and that the RIM encompasses these elements. We propose extensions of this analysis to continue construction of an Arden query model capable of solving the "curly braces problem."

  10. Relevance of the electronic computer to hospital medical records*

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, J. H.

    1969-01-01

    During the past 30 years an “information explosion” has completely changed patterns of illness. Unit files of individual patients have become so large that they are increasingly difficult both to store physically and to assimilate mentally. We have reached a communications barriers which poses a major threat to the efficient practice of clinical medicine. At the same time a new kind of machine, the electronic digital computer, which was invented only 26 years ago, has already come to dominate large areas of military, scientific, commercial, and industrial activity. Its supremacy rests on its ability to perform any data procedure automatically and incredibly quickly. Computers are being employed in clinical medicine in hospitals for various purposes. They can act as arithmetic calculators, they can process and analyse output from recording devices, and they can make possible the automation of various machine systems. However, in the field of case records their role is much less well defined, for here the organization of data as a preliminary to computer input is the real stumbling-block. Data banks of retrospective selected clinical information have been in operation in some centres for a number of years. Attempts are now being made to design computerized “total information systems” to replace conventional paper records, and the possibility of automated diagnosis is being seriously discussed. In my view, however, the medical profession is in danger of being dazzled by optimistic claims about the usefulness of computers in case record processing. The solution to the present problems of record storage and handling is very simple, and does not involve computerization. PMID:4898564

  11. Acupuncture and chiropractic care: utilization and electronic medical record capture.

    PubMed

    Elder, Charles; DeBar, Lynn; Ritenbaugh, Cheryl; Vollmer, William; Deyo, Richard A; Dickerson, John; Kindler, Lindsay

    2015-07-01

    To describe acupuncture and chiropractic use among patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP) at a health maintenance organization, and explore issues of benefit design and electronic medical record (EMR) capture. Cross-sectional survey. Kaiser Permanente members meeting EMR diagnostic criteria for CMP were invited to participate. The survey included questions about self-identified presence of CMP, use of acupuncture and chiropractic care, use of ancillary self-care modalities, and communication with conventional medicine practitioners. Analysis of survey data was supplemented with a retrospective review of EMR utilization data. Of 6068 survey respondents, 32% reported acupuncture use, 47% reported chiropractic use, 21% used both, and 42% used neither. For 25% of patients using acupuncture and 43% of those using chiropractic care, utilization was undetected by the EMR. Thirty-five percent of acupuncture users and 42% of chiropractic users did not discuss this care with their health maintenance organization (HMO) clinicians. Among chiropractic users, those accessing care out of plan were older (P < .01), were more likely to use long-term opioids (P = .03), and had more pain diagnoses (P = .01) than those accessing care via clinician referral or self-referral. For acupuncture, those using the clinician referral mechanism exhibited these same characteristics. A majority of participants had used acupuncture, chiropractic care, or both. While benefit structure may materially influence utilization patterns, many patients with CMP use acupuncture and chiropractic care without regard to their insurance coverage. A substantial percentage of acupuncture and chiropractic use thus occurs beyond detection of EMR systems, and many patients do not report such care to their HMO clinicians.

  12. Identifying Axial Spondyloarthritis in Electronic Medical Records of US Veterans.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Jessica A; Shao, Yijun; Leng, Jianwei; He, Tao; Teng, Chia-Chen; Redd, Doug; Treitler Zeng, Qing; Burningham, Zachary; Clegg, Daniel O; Sauer, Brian C

    2017-09-01

    Large database research in axial spondyloarthritis (SpA) is limited by a lack of methods for identifying most types of axial SpA. Our objective was to develop methods for identifying axial SpA concepts in the free text of documents from electronic medical records. Veterans with documents in the national Veterans Health Administration Corporate Data Warehouse between January 1, 2005 and June 30, 2015 were included. Methods were developed for exploring, selecting, and extracting meaningful terms that were likely to represent axial SpA concepts. With annotation, clinical experts reviewed sections of text containing the meaningful terms (snippets) and classified the snippets according to whether or not they represented the intended axial SpA concept. With natural language processing (NLP) tools, computers were trained to replicate the clinical experts' snippet classifications. Three axial SpA concepts were selected by clinical experts, including sacroiliitis, terms including the prefix spond*, and HLA-B27 positivity (HLA-B27+). With supervised machine learning on annotated snippets, NLP models were developed with accuracies of 91.1% for sacroiliitis, 93.5% for spond*, and 97.2% for HLA-B27+. With independent validation, the accuracies were 92.0% for sacroiliitis, 91.0% for spond*, and 99.0% for HLA-B27+. We developed feasible and accurate methods for identifying axial SpA concepts in the free text of clinical notes. Additional research is required to determine combinations of concepts that will accurately identify axial SpA phenotypes. These novel methods will facilitate previously impractical observational research in axial SpA and may be applied to research with other diseases. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  13. Anonymization of DICOM electronic medical records for radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Newhauser, Wayne; Jones, Timothy; Swerdloff, Stuart; Newhauser, Warren; Cilia, Mark; Carver, Robert; Halloran, Andy; Zhang, Rui

    2014-10-01

    Electronic medical records (EMR) and treatment plans are used in research on patient outcomes and radiation effects. In many situations researchers must remove protected health information (PHI) from EMRs. The literature contains several studies describing the anonymization of generic Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM) files and DICOM image sets but no publications were found that discuss the anonymization of DICOM radiation therapy plans, a key component of an EMR in a cancer clinic. In addition to this we were unable to find a commercial software tool that met the minimum requirements for anonymization and preservation of data integrity for radiation therapy research. The purpose of this study was to develop a prototype software code to meet the requirements for the anonymization of radiation therapy treatment plans and to develop a way to validate that code and demonstrate that it properly anonymized treatment plans and preserved data integrity. We extended an open-source code to process all relevant PHI and to allow for the automatic anonymization of multiple EMRs. The prototype code successfully anonymized multiple treatment plans in less than 1min/patient. We also tested commercial optical character recognition (OCR) algorithms for the detection of burned-in text on the images, but they were unable to reliably recognize text. In addition, we developed and tested an image filtering algorithm that allowed us to isolate and redact alpha-numeric text from a test radiograph. Validation tests verified that PHI was anonymized and data integrity, such as the relationship between DICOM unique identifiers (UID) was preserved.

  14. Hospital electronic medical record enterprise application strategies: do they matter?

    PubMed

    Fareed, Naleef; Ozcan, Yasar A; DeShazo, Jonathan P

    2012-01-01

    Successful implementations and the ability to reap the benefits of electronic medical record (EMR) systems may be correlated with the type of enterprise application strategy that an administrator chooses when acquiring an EMR system. Moreover, identifying the most optimal enterprise application strategy is a task that may have important linkages with hospital performance. This study explored whether hospitals that have adopted differential EMR enterprise application strategies concomitantly differ in their overall efficiency. Specifically, the study examined whether hospitals with a single-vendor strategy had a higher likelihood of being efficient than those with a best-of-breed strategy and whether hospitals with a best-of-suite strategy had a higher probability of being efficient than those with best-of-breed or single-vendor strategies. A conceptual framework was used to formulate testable hypotheses. A retrospective cross-sectional approach using data envelopment analysis was used to obtain efficiency scores of hospitals by EMR enterprise application strategy. A Tobit regression analysis was then used to determine the probability of a hospital being inefficient as related to its EMR enterprise application strategy, while moderating for the hospital's EMR "implementation status" and controlling for hospital and market characteristics. The data envelopment analysis of hospitals suggested that only 32 hospitals were efficient in the study's sample of 2,171 hospitals. The results from the post hoc analysis showed partial support for the hypothesis that hospitals with a best-of-suite strategy were more likely to be efficient than those with a single-vendor strategy. This study underscores the importance of understanding the differences between the three strategies discussed in this article. On the basis of the findings, hospital administrators should consider the efficiency associations that a specific strategy may have compared with another prior to moving toward

  15. The perception of shared medical decision making of expert and lay people: effects of observing a movie clip depicting a medical consultation.

    PubMed

    Arcuri, Luciano; Montagnini, Barbara; Calvi, Gabriella; Goss, Claudia

    2013-04-01

    To test for differences between experts and lay people in assessment of the degree to which a doctor engaged in a shared decision making (SDM) with a patient using the OPTION scale and a movie clip as stimulus material. A segment of the movie 'Wit', depicting the communication of the diagnosis and the therapy proposed of a cancer, was shown to (a) university students with no knowledge about doctor-patient communication; (b) nurses working in medicine departments; (c) advanced medical students; (d) hospital physicians. The participants were asked to complete the OPTION scale which measures the extent to which physicians involve patients in medical decisions. An analysis of variance was used to compare OPTION scores across the four groups and to compare males and females. Being female [F(1,190)=11.9; p<.001] and being familiar with medical issues [F(3,190)=11.09; p<.001] were both significantly associated with a negative evaluations of the doctor's ability to involve the patient in the SDM. Lay people and males (including male experts), are less demanding regarding SDM abilities. A more systematic use of videos and the OPTION scale as validated outcome measure could be helpful educational strategy for the teaching of SDM. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Why Does Electron Sharing Lead to Covalent Bonding? A Variational Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ruedenberg, K.; Schmidt, M.

    2006-07-20

    Ground state energy differences between related systems can be elucidated by a comparative variational analysis of the energy functional, in which the concepts of variational kinetic pressure and variational electrostatic potential pull are found useful. This approach is applied to the formation of the bond in the hydrogen molecule ion. A highly accurate wavefunction is shown to be the superposition of two quasiatomic orbitals, each of which consists to 94% of the respective atomic 1s orbital, the remaining 6% deformation being 73% spherical and 27% nonspherical in character. The spherical deformation can be recovered to 99.9% by scaling the 1s orbital. These results quantify the conceptual metamorphosis of the free-atom wavefunction into the molecular wavefunction by orbital sharing, orbital contraction, and orbital polarization. Starting with the 1s orbital on one atom as the initial trial function, the value of the energy functional of the molecule at the equilibrium distance is stepwise lowered along several sequences of wavefunction modifications, whose energies monotonically decrease to the ground state energy of H{sub 2}{sup +}. The contributions of sharing, contraction and polarization to the overall lowering of the energy functional and their kinetic and potential components exhibit a consistent pattern that can be related to the wavefunction changes on the basis of physical reasoning, including the virial theorem. It is found that orbital sharing lowers the variational kinetic energy pressure and that this is the essential cause of covalent bonding in this molecule.

  17. Data Sharing: A New Editorial Initiative of the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors. Implications for the Editors' Network.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Fernando; Adamyan, Karlen; Artigou, Jean-Yves; Aschermann, Michael; Boehm, Michael; Buendia, Alfonso; Chu, Pao-Hsien; Cohen, Ariel; Cas, Livio Dei; Dilic, Mirza; Doubell, Anton; Echeverri, Dario; Enç, Nuray; Ferreira-González, Ignacio; Filipiak, Krzysztof J; Flammer, Andreas; Fleck, Eckart; Gatzov, Plamen; Ginghina, Carmen; Goncalves, Lino; Haouala, Habib; Hassanein, Mahmoud; Heusch, Gerd; Huber, Kurt; Hulín, Ivan; Ivanusa, Mario; Krittayaphong, Rungroj; Lau, Chu-Pak; Marinskis, Germanas; Mach, François; Moreira, Luiz Felipe; Nieminen, Tuomo; Oukerraj, Latifa; Perings, Stefan; Pierard, Luc; Potpara, Tatjana; Reyes-Caorsi, Walter; Rim, Se-Joong; Rødevand, Olaf; Saade, Georges; Sander, Mikael; Shlyakhto, Evgeny; Timuralp, Bilgin; Tousoulis, Dimitris; Ural, Dilek; Piek, J J; Varga, Albert; Lüscher, Thomas F

    The International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) provides recommendations to improve the editorial standards and scientific quality of biomedical journals. These recommendations range from uniform technical requirements to more complex and elusive editorial issues including ethical aspects of the scientific process. Recently, registration of clinical trials, conflicts of interest disclosure, and new criteria for authorship - emphasizing the importance of responsibility and accountability -, have been proposed. Last year, a new editorial initiative to foster sharing of clinical trial data was launched. This review discusses this novel initiative with the aim of increasing awareness among readers, investigators, authors and editors belonging to the Editors' Network of the European Society of Cardiology. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A.

  18. Shared Medical Appointments: A Promising Innovation to Improve Patient Engagement and Ease the Primary Care Provider Shortage.

    PubMed

    Stults, Cheryl D; McCuistion, Mary H; Frosch, Dominick L; Hung, Dorothy Y; Cheng, Peter H; Tai-Seale, Ming

    2016-02-01

    The Affordable Care Act has extended coverage for uninsured and underinsured Americans, but it could exacerbate existing problems of access to primary care. Shared medical appointments (SMAs) are one way to improve access and increase practice productivity, but few studies have examined the patient's perspective on participation in SMAs. To understand patient experiences, 5 focus group sessions were conducted with a total of 30 people in the San Francisco Bay Area. The sessions revealed that most participants felt that they received numerous tangible and intangible benefits from SMAs, particularly enhanced engagement with other patients and physicians, learning, and motivation for health behavior change. Most importantly, participants noted changes in the power dynamic during SMA visits as they increasingly saw themselves empowered to impart information to the physician. Although SMAs improve access, engagement with physicians and other patients, and knowledge of patients' health, they also help to ease the workload for physicians.

  19. Electronic teaching materials for inter-professional education in a college of medical professionals.

    PubMed

    Toyama, Hinako; Inoue, Rie; Ito, Yumi; Sakamoto, Chieko; Ishikawa, Toru; Eda, Tetsuya; Saito, Keiichi

    2013-01-01

    In order to promote the utilization of digital clinical information among medical professionals, an education program and electronic teaching materials involving fictitious model patients were developed for students in a health and welfare college. The purposes of this program were for students to learn the role of each medical professional and to understand the medical records written by each medical staff member in interdisciplinary medicine (a collaborative approach to medicine). The materials for fictitious patients, including medical records, study results, medical images and the associated documents, were stored in a database on a virtual private network. The electronic medical records were easily modified according to the specialty of the students in each class. Fictional medical records of patients with lacunar infarction, fracture of the distal radius, fracture of the femur, diabetes mellitus and breast cancer were generated and evaluated in inter-professional education classes.

  20. Putting the Medical Library Online: Electronic Bulletin Boards. . . and Beyond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kittle, Paul W.

    1985-01-01

    Describes use of microcomputers with system called "TBBS" ("The Bread Board System") at Loma Linda University Medical Center to allow users enhanced services from home, whether library facilities are open or not. Flexibility and security, dialing into medical library, and suggestions for setting up similar computerized…

  1. Putting the Medical Library Online: Electronic Bulletin Boards. . . and Beyond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kittle, Paul W.

    1985-01-01

    Describes use of microcomputers with system called "TBBS" ("The Bread Board System") at Loma Linda University Medical Center to allow users enhanced services from home, whether library facilities are open or not. Flexibility and security, dialing into medical library, and suggestions for setting up similar computerized…

  2. Electronic security systems and active implantable medical devices.

    PubMed

    Irnich, Werner

    2002-08-01

    How do active implantable medical devices react in the presence of strong magnetic fields in the frequency range between extremely low frequency (ELF) to radiofrequency (RF) as they are emitted by electronic security systems (ESS)? There are three different sorts of ESSs: electronic article surveillance (EAS) devices, metal detector (MDS) devices, and radiofrequency identification (RFID) systems. Common to all is the production of magnetic fields. There is an abundance of literature concerning interference by ESS gates with respect to if there is an influence possible and if such an influence can bear a risk for the AIMD wearers. However, there has been no attempt to study the physical mechanism nor to develop a model of how and under which conditions magnetic fields can influence pacemakers and defibrillators and how they could be disarmed by technological means. It is too often assumed that interference of AIMD with ESS is inevitable. Exogenous signals of similar intensity and rhythm to heart signals can be misinterpreted and, thus, confuse the implant. Important for the interference coupling mechanism is the differentiation between a "unipolar" and a "bipolar" system. With respect to magnetic fields, the left side implanted pacemaker is the most unfavorable case as the lead forms approximately a semicircular area of maximum 225 cm2 into which a voltage can be induced. This assumption yields an interference coupling model that can be expressed by simple mathematics. The worst-case conditions for induced interference voltages are a coupling area of 225 cm2 that is representative for a large human, a homogeneous magnetic field perpendicular to the area formed by the lead, and a unipolar ventricular pacemaker system that is implanted on the left side of the thorax and has the highest interference sensitivity. In bipolar systems the fields must be 17 times larger when compared to a unipolar system to have the same effect. The magnetic field for interfering with ICDs

  3. Photon momentum sharing between an electron and an ion in photoionization: from one-photon (photoelectric effect) to multiphoton absorption.

    PubMed

    Chelkowski, Szczepan; Bandrauk, André D; Corkum, Paul B

    2014-12-31

    We investigate photon-momentum sharing between an electron and an ion following different photoionization regimes. We find very different partitioning of the photon momentum in one-photon ionization (the photoelectric effect) as compared to multiphoton processes. In the photoelectric effect, the electron acquires a momentum that is much greater than the single photon momentum ℏω/c [up to (8/5) ℏω/c] whereas in the strong-field ionization regime, the photoelectron only acquires the momentum corresponding to the photons absorbed above the field-free ionization threshold plus a momentum corresponding to a fraction (3/10) of the ionization potential Ip. In both cases, due to the smallness of the electron-ion mass ratio, the ion takes nearly the entire momentum of all absorbed N photons (via the electron-ion center of mass). Additionally, the ion takes, as a recoil, the photoelectron momentum resulting from mutual electron-ion interaction in the electromagnetic field. Consequently, the momentum partitioning of the photofragments is very different in both regimes. This suggests that there is a rich, unexplored physics to be studied between these two limits which can be generated with current ultrafast laser technology.

  4. The Genetic Intersection of Neurodevelopmental Disorders and Shared Medical Comorbidities - Relations that Translate from Bench to Bedside.

    PubMed

    Plummer, Jasmine T; Gordon, Alexis J; Levitt, Pat

    2016-01-01

    Most psychiatric disorders are considered neurodevelopmental, and the associated genes often are expressed in tissues outside of the brain. This suggests a biological relatedness with medical co-occurrences that could have broad clinical implications for diagnosis and patient management over a lifetime. A qualitative integration of public data from genetic consortia of psychiatric disorders and medical comorbidities explores the question of whether genetically associated psychiatric illnesses present with co-occurring disturbances can be used to define specific mental-physical health relations. Novel patterns of gene-disorder relations appear with approximately one-third of conservatively defined, consortia-generated candidate risk genes with multiple psychiatric diagnoses. Moreover, nearly as many genes overlap with non-psychiatric phenotypes, including cardiovascular, renal, respiratory, and metabolic disturbances. While the landscape of genetic risk will change as study populations are expanded and biological confirmations accrue, the current relationships suggest that a mostly siloed perspective of gene relatedness to one categorical psychiatric diagnosis is not clinically useful. The future holds the promise that once candidates are fully validated, genome screening and mutation identification will bring more precision for predicting the risk for complex health conditions. Our view is that as genetic data are refined, continuing to decipher a shared pattern of genetic risk for brain and peripheral organ pathophysiology is not simply an academic exercise. Rather, determining relatedness will impact predictions of multifaceted health risks, patient treatment, and management.

  5. The Genetic Intersection of Neurodevelopmental Disorders and Shared Medical Comorbidities – Relations that Translate from Bench to Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Plummer, Jasmine T.; Gordon, Alexis J.; Levitt, Pat

    2016-01-01

    Most psychiatric disorders are considered neurodevelopmental, and the associated genes often are expressed in tissues outside of the brain. This suggests a biological relatedness with medical co-occurrences that could have broad clinical implications for diagnosis and patient management over a lifetime. A qualitative integration of public data from genetic consortia of psychiatric disorders and medical comorbidities explores the question of whether genetically associated psychiatric illnesses present with co-occurring disturbances can be used to define specific mental–physical health relations. Novel patterns of gene-disorder relations appear with approximately one-third of conservatively defined, consortia-generated candidate risk genes with multiple psychiatric diagnoses. Moreover, nearly as many genes overlap with non-psychiatric phenotypes, including cardiovascular, renal, respiratory, and metabolic disturbances. While the landscape of genetic risk will change as study populations are expanded and biological confirmations accrue, the current relationships suggest that a mostly siloed perspective of gene relatedness to one categorical psychiatric diagnosis is not clinically useful. The future holds the promise that once candidates are fully validated, genome screening and mutation identification will bring more precision for predicting the risk for complex health conditions. Our view is that as genetic data are refined, continuing to decipher a shared pattern of genetic risk for brain and peripheral organ pathophysiology is not simply an academic exercise. Rather, determining relatedness will impact predictions of multifaceted health risks, patient treatment, and management. PMID:27597832

  6. A smart medication recommendation model for the electronic prescription.

    PubMed

    Syed-Abdul, Shabbir; Nguyen, Alex; Huang, Frank; Jian, Wen-Shan; Iqbal, Usman; Yang, Vivian; Hsu, Min-Huei; Li, Yu-Chuan

    2014-11-01

    The report from the Institute of Medicine, To Err Is Human: Building a Safer Health System in 1999 drew a special attention towards preventable medical errors and patient safety. The American Reinvestment and Recovery Act of 2009 and federal criteria of 'Meaningful use' stage 1 mandated e-prescribing to be used by eligible providers in order to access Medicaid and Medicare incentive payments. Inappropriate prescribing has been identified as a preventable cause of at least 20% of drug-related adverse events. A few studies reported system-related errors and have offered targeted recommendations on improving and enhancing e-prescribing system. This study aims to enhance efficiency of the e-prescribing system by shortening the medication list, reducing the risk of inappropriate selection of medication, as well as in reducing the prescribing time of physicians. 103.48 million prescriptions from Taiwan's national health insurance claim data were used to compute Diagnosis-Medication association. Furthermore, 100,000 prescriptions were randomly selected to develop a smart medication recommendation model by using association rules of data mining. The important contribution of this model is to introduce a new concept called Mean Prescription Rank (MPR) of prescriptions and Coverage Rate (CR) of prescriptions. A proactive medication list (PML) was computed using MPR and CR. With this model the medication drop-down menu is significantly shortened, thereby reducing medication selection errors and prescription times. The physicians will still select relevant medications even in the case of inappropriate (unintentional) selection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The use of focused electronic medical record forms to improve health-care outcomes.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Bryan D; Katz, Robert D; Pascarella, Eugene M

    2011-01-01

    We tested the use of specifically designed electronic medical record forms, thereby demonstrating the ability to electronically capture, report, and compare clinical data. To that end, podiatric physicians can determine what constitutes the most effective program or treatment for specific conditions by documenting their treatment outcomes. A prospective case series was initiated to determine the value of using focused electronic medical record forms to track walking programs in the practices of podiatric physicians. Three patients were observed for 48 weeks using focused electronic medical record forms to input data (body mass index, cholesterol level, hemoglobin A(1c) level, blood pressure, and other vital information). Patients were given pedometers so that they could log their mileage and their podiatric physicians could enter it into the medical record. Information was collected using an electronic medical record system with the ability to link multiple templates together and assign logic to create flexible entry completion requirements. The clinical data generated are captured in a common database, where the data offer future opportunity to compare statistics among a multitude of practices in various demographic regions. Focused electronic medical record forms were effectively used to track improvements and overall health benefits in a walking program supervised by podiatric physicians. Valuable information can be ascertained with focused electronic medical record forms to help determine treatment effectiveness. This information can later be compared with practices across many different demographics to ascertain the best evidence-based practice.

  8. Special requirements of electronic medical record systems in obstetrics and gynecology.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Michael J; Diamond, Anne M; Strunk, Albert L

    2010-07-01

    There is growing recognition of the importance and potential benefit of information technology and electronic medical records in providing quality care for women. Incorporation of obstetrician-gynecologist-specific requirements by electronic medical record vendors is essential to achieve appropriate electronic medical record functionality for obstetrician-gynecologists. Obstetricians and gynecologists record and document patient care in ways that are unique to medicine. Current electronic medical record systems are often limited in their usefulness for the practice of obstetrics and gynecology because of the absence of obstetrician-gynecologist specialty-specific requirements and functions. The Certification Commission on Health Information Technology is currently the only federally recognized body for certification of electronic medical record systems. As Certification Commission on Health Information Technology expands the certification criteria for electronic medical records, the special requirements identified in this report will be used as a framework for developing obstetrician-gynecologist specialty-specific criteria to be incorporated into the Certification Commission on Health Information Technology endorsement for electronic medical records used by obstetrician-gynecologists.

  9. Accuracy of medication documentation in hospital discharge summaries: A retrospective analysis of medication transcription errors in manual and electronic discharge summaries.

    PubMed

    Callen, Joanne; McIntosh, Jean; Li, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Medication errors in hospital discharge summaries have the potential to cause serious harm to patients. These errors are generally associated with manual transcription of medications between medication charts and discharge summaries. Studies also show junior doctors are more likely to contribute to discharge medication error rates. Electronic discharge summaries have the potential to reduce discharge medication errors to ensure the safe handover of care to the primary care provider. (1) Quantify and compare the medication transcription error rate from handwritten medications on manual discharge summaries to typed medications on electronic discharge summaries, and (2) examine the quality of medication documentation according to the level of medical training of the doctors who created the discharge summaries. A retrospective examination of 966 handwritten and 842 electronically generated discharge summaries was conducted in an Australian metropolitan hospital. The electronic discharge summaries at the study site were not integrated with an electronic medication management system and hence discharge medications were typed into the electronic discharge summary by the doctor. The discharge medication documentation in both types of summaries was transcribed, either handwritten or typed, from inpatient medication charts in paper-based medical records. Documentation differences between medications in discharge summaries and inpatient medication charts constituted medication errors. 12.1% of handwritten and 13.3% of electronic summaries contained medication errors. The highest number of errors occurred with cardiovascular drugs. Medication omission was the commonest error. The confidence intervals of all odds ratios indicate handwritten and electronic summaries were similar for all areas of medication error. Error rates regarding all 13,566 individual medications for the 1808 summaries were similar by doctor medical training level (intern, resident, and registrar). Similar

  10. Atigeo at TREC 2012 Medical Records Track: ICD-9 Code Description Injection to Enhance Electronic Medical Record Search Accuracy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    codes that represent the diagnoses and procedures described in those medical records. We have developed a suite of natural language processing (NLP...to promote the research and development of free-text search engines that can find electronic medical records (EMRs or reports) that are relevant to...test and refine the natural language processing (NLP) components we have developed to support our xPatterns Computer-Aided Coding (CAC) product

  11. [Information extraction methodology used in electronic medical records].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yingying; Ye, Feng

    2011-01-01

    We try to use information extraction technology in some parts of the medical records and extract disease information to accumulate experience for extracting complete information from medical records. This paper attempts to use dictionary and rules to achieve the named entity recognition. Information extraction is based on shallow parsing and use pattern sentence matching method with the help of a 3 levels finite state automaton.

  12. User Preferences in the Classification of Electronic Bookmarks: Implications for a Shared System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottlieb, Lisa; Dilevko, Juris

    2001-01-01

    Using the financial industry as a context, this study addresses the issue of the classification of electronic bookmarks in a multi-user system by investigating the factors that influence how individuals develop categories for bookmarks and how they choose to classify bookmarks within those organizational categories. Sample participant…

  13. Exploring clinician adoption of a novel evidence request feature in an electronic medical record system

    PubMed Central

    Jerome, Rebecca N.; Bettinsoli Giuse, Nunzia; Rosenbloom, S. Trent; Arbogast, Patrick G.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The research evaluated strategies for facilitating physician adoption of an evidence-based medicine literature request feature recently integrated into an existing electronic medical record (EMR) system. Methods: This prospective study explored use of the service by 137 primary care physicians by using service usage statistics and focus group and survey components. The frequency of physicians' requests for literature via the EMR during a 10-month period was examined to explore the impact of several enhanced communication strategies launched mid-way through the observation period. A focus group and a 25-item survey explored physicians' experiences with the service. Results: There was no detectable difference in the proportion of physicians utilizing the service after implementation of the customized communication strategies (11% in each time period, P=1.0, McNemar's test). Forty-eight physicians (35%) responded to the survey. Respondents who had used the service (n=19) indicated that information provided through the service was highly relevant to clinical practice (mean rating 4.6, scale 1 “not relevant”–5 “highly relevant”), and most (n=15) reported sharing the information with colleagues. Conclusion: The enhanced communication strategies, though well received, did not significantly affect use of the service. However, physicians noted the relevance and utility of librarian-summarized evidence from the literature, highlighting the potential benefits of providing expert librarian services in clinical workflow. PMID:18219379

  14. Development of electronic progress tables for multidisciplinary medical education in a university.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Rie; Toyama, Hinako; Ishikawa, Toru; Eda, Tetsuya; Kuroda, Fumihiro; Saito, Keiichi

    2013-01-01

    In the education of medical professionals, imitation medical records and associated documents were developed as electronic teaching materials for students in order to teach collaboration among medical professionals such as nurses, therapists and medical social workers. The roles of each medical professional and the flow of clinical practice were taught using progress tables, including medical treatment, clinical examination, and the contents of care, so that the contents of medical examination were understood based on a time series. Students' understanding of the flow of medical practice was evaluated based on the amount of description in the table before and after explanation of the important points of the clinical process concerning each medical professional. The comments of students who received the lessons suggested that this approach was useful for understanding actual clinical practice and how to utilize a progress table and to prepare information.

  15. Neurophysiological analytics for all! Free open-source software tools for documenting, analyzing, visualizing, and sharing using electronic notebooks

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Neurophysiology requires an extensive workflow of information analysis routines, which often includes incompatible proprietary software, introducing limitations based on financial costs, transfer of data between platforms, and the ability to share. An ecosystem of free open-source software exists to fill these gaps, including thousands of analysis and plotting packages written in Python and R, which can be implemented in a sharable and reproducible format, such as the Jupyter electronic notebook. This tool chain can largely replace current routines by importing data, producing analyses, and generating publication-quality graphics. An electronic notebook like Jupyter allows these analyses, along with documentation of procedures, to display locally or remotely in an internet browser, which can be saved as an HTML, PDF, or other file format for sharing with team members and the scientific community. The present report illustrates these methods using data from electrophysiological recordings of the musk shrew vagus—a model system to investigate gut-brain communication, for example, in cancer chemotherapy-induced emesis. We show methods for spike sorting (including statistical validation), spike train analysis, and analysis of compound action potentials in notebooks. Raw data and code are available from notebooks in data supplements or from an executable online version, which replicates all analyses without installing software—an implementation of reproducible research. This demonstrates the promise of combining disparate analyses into one platform, along with the ease of sharing this work. In an age of diverse, high-throughput computational workflows, this methodology can increase efficiency, transparency, and the collaborative potential of neurophysiological research. PMID:27098025

  16. Neurophysiological analytics for all! Free open-source software tools for documenting, analyzing, visualizing, and sharing using electronic notebooks.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, David M; Horn, Charles C

    2016-08-01

    Neurophysiology requires an extensive workflow of information analysis routines, which often includes incompatible proprietary software, introducing limitations based on financial costs, transfer of data between platforms, and the ability to share. An ecosystem of free open-source software exists to fill these gaps, including thousands of analysis and plotting packages written in Python and R, which can be implemented in a sharable and reproducible format, such as the Jupyter electronic notebook. This tool chain can largely replace current routines by importing data, producing analyses, and generating publication-quality graphics. An electronic notebook like Jupyter allows these analyses, along with documentation of procedures, to display locally or remotely in an internet browser, which can be saved as an HTML, PDF, or other file format for sharing with team members and the scientific community. The present report illustrates these methods using data from electrophysiological recordings of the musk shrew vagus-a model system to investigate gut-brain communication, for example, in cancer chemotherapy-induced emesis. We show methods for spike sorting (including statistical validation), spike train analysis, and analysis of compound action potentials in notebooks. Raw data and code are available from notebooks in data supplements or from an executable online version, which replicates all analyses without installing software-an implementation of reproducible research. This demonstrates the promise of combining disparate analyses into one platform, along with the ease of sharing this work. In an age of diverse, high-throughput computational workflows, this methodology can increase efficiency, transparency, and the collaborative potential of neurophysiological research.

  17. Seamless Management of Paper and Electronic Documents for Task Knowledge Sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Hiroyuki; Iwata, Ken

    Due to the progress of Internet technology and the increase of distributed information on networks, the present knowledge management has been based more and more on the performance of various experienced users. In addition to the increase of electronic documents, the use of paper documents has not been reduced because of their convenience. This paper describes a method of tracking paper document locations and contents using radio frequency identification (RFID) technology. This research also focuses on the expression of a task process and the seamless structuring of related electronic and paper documents as a result of task knowledge formalization using information organizing. A system is proposed here that implements information organization for both Web documents and paper documents with the task model description and RFID technology. Examples of a prototype system are also presented.

  18. Electronic Surveillance of Testicular Cancer: Understanding Patient Perspectives on Access to Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Groll, Ryan J.; Leonard, Kevin J.; Eakin, Joan; Warde, Padraig; Bender, Jackie; Jewett, Michael A.S.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To understand patient perceptions and attitudes regarding online access to testicular cancer surveillance test results, and to identify factors that may be important in maximizing referencing of electronic medical records (EMRs) by patients for these results. Methods: In this qualitative study, seven focus groups were conducted with a total of 22 patients undergoing surveillance for testicular cancer. Transcript data were analyzed iteratively using combined manual and computerized coding by two independent coders to generate a theoretic framework grounded in the data. Results: Practicality, meaning of information, patient-physician relationship, risk of recurrence, and role of technology were identified as interrelated factors that frame how patients regard potential surveillance technology. The influence of each factor hinged on its relationship with reassurance—the central predominant factor. Additionally, time since start of surveillance seemed to affect the relative importance of all other factors. Conclusion: Prevailing models of technology acceptance understate the complexity of the situation of the patient user and the implications of online access to health information. Surveillance for testicular cancer seems to be a suitable context for patient access to EMR information if patient perspectives are to be understood and considered. Reassurance is the overriding element influencing attitudes. PMID:20856632

  19. Evolutions in both co-payment and generic market share for common medication in the Belgian reference pricing system.

    PubMed

    Fraeyman, Jessica; Verbelen, Moira; Hens, Niel; Van Hal, Guido; De Loof, Hans; Beutels, Philippe

    2013-10-01

    In Belgium, a co-insurance system is applied in which patients pay a portion of the cost for medicines, called co-payment. Co-payment is intended to make pharmaceutical consumers more responsible, increase solidarity, and avoid or reduce moral hazards. Our objective was to study the possible influence of co-payment on sales volume and generic market share in two commonly used medicine groups: cholesterol-lowering medication [statins (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors) and fibrates] and acid-blocking agents (proton pump inhibitors and histamine H2 receptor antagonists). The data were extracted from the Pharmanet database, which covers pharmaceutical consumption in all Belgian ambulatory pharmacies. First, the proportion of sales volume and costs of generic products were modelled over time for the two medicine groups. Second, we investigated the relation between co-payment and contribution by the national insurance agency using change-point linear mixed models. The change-point analysis suggested several influential events. First, the generic market share in total sales volume was negatively influenced by the abolishment of the distinction in the maximum co-payment level for name brands and generics in 2001. Second, relaxation of the reimbursement conditions for generic omeprazole stimulated generic sales volume in 2004. Finally, an increase in co-payment for generic omeprazole was associated with a significant decrease in omeprazole sales volume in 2005. The observational analysis demonstrated several changes over time. First, the co-payment amounts for name-brand and generic drugs converged in the observed time period for both medicine groups under study. Second, the proportion of co-payment for the total cost of simvastatin and omeprazole increased over time for small packages, and more so for generic than for name-brand products. For omeprazole, both the proportion and the amount of co-payment increased over time. Third, over time the prescription of small packages

  20. Taiwan's perspective on electronic medical records' security and privacy protection: lessons learned from HIPAA.

    PubMed

    Yang, Che-Ming; Lin, Herng-Ching; Chang, Polun; Jian, Wen-Shan

    2006-06-01

    The protection of patients' health information is a very important concern in the information age. The purpose of this study is to ascertain what constitutes an effective legal framework in protecting both the security and privacy of health information, especially electronic medical records. All sorts of bills regarding electronic medical data protection have been proposed around the world including Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) of the U.S. The trend of a centralized bill that focuses on managing computerized health information is the part that needs our further attention. Under the sponsor of Taiwan's Department of Health (DOH), our expert panel drafted the "Medical Information Security and Privacy Protection Guidelines", which identifies nine principles and entails 12 articles, in the hope that medical organizations will have an effective reference in how to manage their medical information in a confidential and secured fashion especially in electronic transactions.

  1. Practical considerations to guide development of access controls and decision support for genetic information in electronic medical records

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Genetic testing is increasingly used as a tool throughout the health care system. In 2011 the number of clinically available genetic tests is approaching 2,000, and wide variation exists between these tests in their sensitivity, specificity, and clinical implications, as well as the potential for discrimination based on the results. Discussion As health care systems increasingly implement electronic medical record systems (EMRs) they must carefully consider how to use information from this wide spectrum of genetic tests, with whom to share information, and how to provide decision support for clinicians to properly interpret the information. Although some characteristics of genetic tests overlap with other medical test results, there are reasons to make genetic test results widely available to health care providers and counterbalancing reasons to restrict access to these test results to honor patient preferences, and avoid distracting or confusing clinicians with irrelevant but complex information. Electronic medical records can facilitate and provide reasonable restrictions on access to genetic test results and deliver education and decision support tools to guide appropriate interpretation and use. Summary This paper will serve to review some of the key characteristics of genetic tests as they relate to design of access control and decision support of genetic test information in the EMR, emphasizing the clear need for health information technology (HIT) to be part of optimal implementation of genetic medicine, and the importance of understanding key characteristics of genetic tests when designing HIT applications. PMID:22047175

  2. Medical resident choices of electronic drug information resources.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Gregory J; Patel, Priti; Mason, Christopher

    2015-06-01

    To determine medical residents' day-to-day use of drug information resources since their choices of these resources, when faced with common questions, are unknown. An online survey including simulated drug information questions was administered to 146 medical residents in the Department of General Internal Medicine during July 2012. Residents were given a wide range of choices in drug information resources to answer these questions and were instructed to select what they would choose in actual practice. A score was assigned to each resource corresponding to a "best," "intermediate," or "not good" choice. Seventy-three respondents completed the survey and results were analyzed for statistical significance. Fifty-seven percent of respondents reported receiving no formal training regarding drug information. Statistical analyses revealed there were no significant differences in performance based on postgraduate year (P = .43) or extent of prior training (P = .45). Individual question responses revealed a generally infrequent selection of "best" choices. Less than 10% of the respondents chose the "best" answer for drug information questions related to drug interactions, herbal supplements, adverse events, and medication identification. Further training in drug information resource selection is warranted in the medical residency program to increase the frequency of use of higher quality resources. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Shared Medical Appointments: A Portal for Nutrition and Culinary Education in Primary Care-A Pilot Feasibility Project.

    PubMed

    Delichatsios, Helen K; Hauser, Michelle E; Burgess, Jonathan D; Eisenberg, David M

    2015-11-01

    Diseases linked to obesity such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, degenerative joint disease, gastroesophageal reflux, and sleep apnea constitute a large portion of primary care visits. Patients with these conditions often lack knowledge, skills, and support needed to maintain health. Shared medical appointments (SMAs) that include culinary skills and nutrition education offer a novel, cost-effective way to address these diseases in primary care. Adult patients in a primary care practice at a large academic hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, who had at least 1 cardiovascular risk factor were invited to participate in SMAs that included cooking demonstrations and teaching about nutrition in addition to medical management of their conditions. Sessions were conducted by a physician and an assistant in a conference room of a traditional primary care practice as part of a pilot feasibility project. Seventy patients, contributing a total of 156 patient visits, attended 17 nutrition-focused SMAs over a 4-year period. Patients were surveyed after each visit and indicated that they enjoyed the SMAs, would consider alternating SMAs with traditional one-on-one visits, and would recommend SMAs to others. Half would pay out of pocket or a higher copay to attend SMAs. Financially, the practice broke even compared with traditional one-onone office visits. In this feasibility study, chronic disease SMAs conducted with a culinary/nutrition focus were feasible, cost-effective, and well received by patients. Follow-up studies are needed to evaluate short- and long-term outcomes of this SMA model on obesity-related diseases.

  4. Shared Medical Appointments: A Portal for Nutrition and Culinary Education in Primary Care—A Pilot Feasibility Project

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Michelle E.; Burgess, Jonathan D.; Eisenberg, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Diseases linked to obesity such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, degenerative joint disease, gastroesophageal reflux, and sleep apnea constitute a large portion of primary care visits. Patients with these conditions often lack knowledge, skills, and support needed to maintain health. Shared medical appointments (SMAs) that include culinary skills and nutrition education offer a novel, cost-effective way to address these diseases in primary care. Methods: Adult patients in a primary care practice at a large academic hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, who had at least 1 cardiovascular risk factor were invited to participate in SMAs that included cooking demonstrations and teaching about nutrition in addition to medical management of their conditions. Sessions were conducted by a physician and an assistant in a conference room of a traditional primary care practice as part of a pilot feasibility project. Results: Seventy patients, contributing a total of 156 patient visits, attended 17 nutrition-focused SMAs over a 4-year period. Patients were surveyed after each visit and indicated that they enjoyed the SMAs, would consider alternating SMAs with traditional one-on-one visits, and would recommend SMAs to others. Half would pay out of pocket or a higher copay to attend SMAs. Financially, the practice broke even compared with traditional one-onone office visits. Conclusion: In this feasibility study, chronic disease SMAs conducted with a culinary/nutrition focus were feasible, cost-effective, and well received by patients. Follow-up studies are needed to evaluate short- and long-term outcomes of this SMA model on obesity-related diseases. PMID:26665019

  5. Electronic Medical Record and Quality Ratings of Long Term Care Facilities Long-Term Care Facility Characteristics and Reasons and Barriers for Adoption of Electronic Medical Record

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Cheryl Andrea

    2013-01-01

    With the growing elderly population, compounded by the retirement of the babyboomers, the need for long-term care (LTC) facilities is expected to grow. An area of great concern for those that are seeking a home for their family member is the quality of care provided by the nursing home to the residents. Electronic medical records (EMR) are often…

  6. Electronic Medical Record and Quality Ratings of Long Term Care Facilities Long-Term Care Facility Characteristics and Reasons and Barriers for Adoption of Electronic Medical Record

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Cheryl Andrea

    2013-01-01

    With the growing elderly population, compounded by the retirement of the babyboomers, the need for long-term care (LTC) facilities is expected to grow. An area of great concern for those that are seeking a home for their family member is the quality of care provided by the nursing home to the residents. Electronic medical records (EMR) are often…

  7. Medication counseling: analysis of electronic documentation using the clinical care classification system.

    PubMed

    Saranto, Kaija; Moss, Jacqueline; Jylhä, Virpi

    2010-01-01

    Medication counseling is a central aspect of medication safety. Counseling refers to the process of informing, advising and administering medication to help patients manage their medication regimen. This pilot study examined 379 descriptions of medication counseling carried out in surgical care and documented in an electronic patient record system by using the Clinical Care Classification System. The objective was to identify counseling methods and to evaluate the need for additional counseling descriptor codes in the record. Eleven counseling methods were identified and the data were classified according to counseling methods with and without documentation of the nature of the interaction with patients. There were no descriptions of the nature of counseling conducted in 127 of the documented entries. These results can be used when developing the documentation of medication care in electronic patient records.

  8. Medical faculty's use of print and electronic journals: changes over time and in comparison with scientists.

    PubMed

    Tenopir, Carol; King, Donald W; Bush, Amy

    2004-04-01

    The objectives are to determine how medical faculty members use scholarly journals, whether print or electronic journals are read more, whether there is a pattern among types of users, and what similarities and differences there are between the use of journals by medical faculty and faculty in other disciplines. Medical faculty of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC) multi-campus system were surveyed, and their responses estimated using critical incident technique to characterize the different aspects of their use of print and electronic journals. Medical faculty read a great deal, especially compared to scientists. The most frequently reported principal purpose of reading is to support their primary research (30% of reading). The majority of reading comes from recently published articles, mostly from personal subscriptions. Medical faculty continue to rely on print journals (approximately 70% of readings) versus electronic journals. Age of faculty does not appear to influence the choice of print or electronic format. Medical faculty read more articles than others on average and need information digested and verified in a way to save them time. Convenience and currency are highly valued attributes. It can be asserted that librarians and publishers must find ways to provide the attributes of convenience and currency and match the portability of personal subscriptions in an electronic journal format for medical faculty.

  9. Medical faculty's use of print and electronic journals: changes over time and in comparison with scientists

    PubMed Central

    Tenopir, Carol; King, Donald W.; Bush, Amy

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: The objectives are to determine how medical faculty members use scholarly journals, whether print or electronic journals are read more, whether there is a pattern among types of users, and what similarities and differences there are between the use of journals by medical faculty and faculty in other disciplines. Methods: Medical faculty of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC) multi-campus system were surveyed, and their responses estimated using critical incident technique to characterize the different aspects of their use of print and electronic journals. Results: Medical faculty read a great deal, especially compared to scientists. The most frequently reported principal purpose of reading is to support their primary research (30% of reading). The majority of reading comes from recently published articles, mostly from personal subscriptions. Medical faculty continue to rely on print journals (approximately 70% of readings) versus electronic journals. Age of faculty does not appear to influence the choice of print or electronic format. Medical faculty read more articles than others on average and need information digested and verified in a way to save them time. Convenience and currency are highly valued attributes. Conclusions: It can be asserted that librarians and publishers must find ways to provide the attributes of convenience and currency and match the portability of personal subscriptions in an electronic journal format for medical faculty. PMID:15098053

  10. Evaluation of potential induced radioactivity in medical products as a function of electron energy in electron beam sterilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Commercial sterilization of medical devices may be performed using electron beam irradiators at various electron energies. The potential for activating components of the devices has been discussed, with current standards stating that electron energy greater than 10 MeV requires assessment of potential induced radioactivity. This paper evaluates the potential for induced activity in medical products sterilized in electron beam as a function of the electron maximum energy. Monte Carlo simulation of a surrogate medical device was used to calculate photon and neutron fields resulting from electron irradiation, which were used to calculate concentrations for several radionuclides. The experiments confirmed that 10 MeV is a conservative assumption for limiting induced radioactivity. However, under the conditions as evaluated, which is a limited total quantity of metal in the material being irradiated and absent a limited number of elements; the amount of induced activity at 12 MeV could also be considered insignificant. The comparison of the sum-of-fractions to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission exempt concentration limits is less than unity for all energies below 12.1 MeV, which suggests that there is minimal probability of significant induced activity at energies above the 10 MeV upper energy limit.

  11. Current status and trends in performance-based risk-sharing arrangements between healthcare payers and medical product manufacturers.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Josh J; Gries, Katharine S; Yeung, Kai; Sullivan, Sean D; Garrison, Louis P

    2014-06-01

    Our objective was to identify and characterize publicly available cases and related trends for performance-based risk-sharing arrangements (PBRSAs). We performed a review of PBRSAs over the past 20 years (1993-2013) using available databases and reports from colleagues and healthcare experts. These were categorized according to a previously published taxonomy of scheme types and assessed in terms of the underlying product and market attributes for each scheme. Macro-level trends were identified related to the timing of scheme adoption, countries involved, types of arrangements, and product and market factors. Our search yielded 148 arrangements. From this set, 65 arrangements included a coverage with an evidence development component, 20 included a conditional treatment continuation component, 54 included a performance-linked reimbursement component, and 42 included a financial utilization component. Each type of scheme addresses fundamental uncertainties that exist when products enter the market. The pace of adoption appears to be slowing, but new countries continue to implement PBRSAs. Over this 20-year period, there has been a consistent movement toward arrangements that minimize administrative burden. In conclusion, the pace of PBRSA adoption appears to be slowing but still has traction in many health systems. These remain a viable coverage and reimbursement mechanism for a wide range of medical products. The long-term viability and growth of these arrangements will rest in the ability of the parties to develop mutually beneficial arrangements that entail minimal administrative burden in their development and implementation.

  12. Implementation of a diabetes self-management education program in primary care for adults using shared medical appointments.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Iris

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to implement diabetes self-management education in primary care using the Chronic Care Model and shared medical appointments (SMA) to provide evidence-based interventions to improve process and measure outcomes. A quality improvement project using the Plan-Do-Check-Act cycle was implemented in a primary care setting in South Texas to provide diabetes self-management education for adults. Biological measures were evaluated in 70 patients at initiation of the project and thereafter based on current practice guidelines. The results of the project were consistent with the literature regarding the benefits, sustainability, and viability of SMA. As compared with that in studies presented in the literature, the patient population who participated in SMA had similar outcomes regarding improvement in A1C, self-management skills, and satisfaction. SMA are an innovative system redesign concept with the potential to provide comprehensive and coordinated care for patients with multiple and chronic health conditions while still being an efficient, effective, financially viable, and sustainable program. As the incidence and prevalence of diabetes increase, innovative models of care can meet the growing demand for access and utilization of diabetes self-management education programs. Programs focusing on chronic conditions to improve outcomes can be replicated by health care providers in primary care settings. SMA can increase revenue and productivity, improve disease management, and increase provider and patient satisfaction.

  13. Urban Alabama Physicians and the Electronic Medical Record: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiggle, Michele

    2012-01-01

    The electronic medical record (EMR) is an information technology tool supporting the examination, treatment, and care of a patient. The EMR allows physicians to view a patient's record showing current medications, a history of visits from health care providers with notes from those visits, a problem list, a functional status assessment, a schedule…

  14. Organizational Learning and Large-Scale Change: Adoption of Electronic Medical Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chavis, Virginia D.

    2010-01-01

    Despite implementation of electronic medical record (EMR) systems in the United States and other countries, there is no organizational development model that addresses medical professionals' attitudes toward technology adoption in a learning organization. The purpose of this study was to assess whether a model would change those attitudes toward…

  15. Urban Alabama Physicians and the Electronic Medical Record: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiggle, Michele

    2012-01-01

    The electronic medical record (EMR) is an information technology tool supporting the examination, treatment, and care of a patient. The EMR allows physicians to view a patient's record showing current medications, a history of visits from health care providers with notes from those visits, a problem list, a functional status assessment, a schedule…

  16. Organizational Learning and Large-Scale Change: Adoption of Electronic Medical Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chavis, Virginia D.

    2010-01-01

    Despite implementation of electronic medical record (EMR) systems in the United States and other countries, there is no organizational development model that addresses medical professionals' attitudes toward technology adoption in a learning organization. The purpose of this study was to assess whether a model would change those attitudes toward…

  17. Optimizing Inpatient Urine Culture Ordering Practices Using the Electronic Medical Record: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Shirley, Daniel; Scholtz, Harry; Osterby, Kurt; Musuuza, Jackson; Fox, Barry; Safdar, Nasia

    2017-04-01

    A prospective quasi-experimental before-and-after study of an electronic medical record-anchored intervention of embedded education on appropriate urine culture indications and indication selection reduced the number of urine cultures ordered for catheterized patients at an academic medical center. This intervention could be a component of CAUTI-reduction bundles. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:486-488.

  18. Factors Influencing Electronic Clinical Information Exchange in Small Medical Group Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kralewski, John E.; Zink, Therese; Boyle, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify the organizational factors that influence electronic health information exchange (HIE) by medical group practices in rural areas. Methods: A purposive sample of 8 small medical group practices in 3 experimental HIE regions were interviewed to determine the extent of clinical information exchange…

  19. Factors Influencing Electronic Clinical Information Exchange in Small Medical Group Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kralewski, John E.; Zink, Therese; Boyle, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify the organizational factors that influence electronic health information exchange (HIE) by medical group practices in rural areas. Methods: A purposive sample of 8 small medical group practices in 3 experimental HIE regions were interviewed to determine the extent of clinical information exchange…

  20. Does electronic clinical microbiology results reporting influence medical decision making: a pre- and post-interview study of medical specialists

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Clinicians view the accuracy of test results and the turnaround time as the two most important service aspects of the clinical microbiology laboratory. Because of the time needed for the culturing of infectious agents, final hardcopy culture results will often be available too late to have a significant impact on early antimicrobial therapy decisions, vital in infectious disease management. The clinical microbiologist therefore reports to the clinician clinically relevant preliminary results at any moment during the diagnostic process, mostly by telephone. Telephone reporting is error prone, however. Electronic reporting of culture results instead of reporting on paper may shorten the turnaround time and may ensure correct communication of results. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of the implementation of electronic reporting of final microbiology results on medical decision making. Methods In a pre- and post-interview study using a semi-structured design we asked medical specialists in our hospital about their use and appreciation of clinical microbiology results reporting before and after the implementation of an electronic reporting system. Results Electronic reporting was highly appreciated by all interviewed clinicians. Major advantages were reduction of hardcopy handling and the possibility to review results in relation to other patient data. Use and meaning of microbiology reports differ significantly between medical specialties. Most clinicians need preliminary results for therapy decisions quickly. Therefore, after the implementation of electronic reporting, telephone consultation between clinician and microbiologist remained the key means of communication. Conclusions Overall, electronic reporting increased the workflow efficiency of the medical specialists, but did not have an impact on their decision-making. PMID:21447199

  1. Applying ethical and legal principles to new technology: the University of Auckland Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences' policy 'Taking and Sharing Images of Patients.'

    PubMed

    Jonas, Monique; Malpas, Phillipa; Kersey, Kate; Merry, Alan; Bagg, Warwick

    2017-01-27

    To develop a policy governing the taking and sharing of photographic and radiological images by medical students. The Rules of the Health Information Privacy Code 1994 and the Code of Health and Disability Services Consumers' Rights were applied to the taking, storing and sharing of photographic and radiological images by medical students. Stakeholders, including clinicians, medical students, lawyers at district health boards in the Auckland region, the Office of the Privacy Commissioner and the Health and Disability Commissioner were consulted and their recommendations incorporated. The policy 'Taking and Sharing Images of Patients' sets expectations of students in relation to: photographs taken for the purpose of providing care; photographs taken for educational or professional practice purposes and photographic or radiological images used for educational or professional practice purposes. In addition, it prohibits students from uploading images of patients onto image-sharing apps such as Figure 1. The policy has since been extended to apply to all students at the Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences at the University of Auckland. Technology-driven evolutions in practice necessitate regular review to ensure compliance with existing legal regulations and ethical frameworks. This policy offers a starting point for healthcare providers to review their own policies and practice, with a view to ensuring that patients' trust in the treatment that their health information receives is upheld.

  2. Cost sharing and decreased branded oral anti-diabetic medication adherence among elderly Part D Medicare beneficiaries.

    PubMed

    Sacks, Naomi C; Burgess, James F; Cabral, Howard J; Pizer, Steven D; McDonnell, Marie E

    2013-07-01

    Although the Medicare Part D coverage gap phase-out should reduce cost-related nonadherence (CRN) among seniors with diabetes, preferential generic prescribing may have already decreased CRN, while smaller numbers of patients using more costly branded oral anti-diabetic (OAD) medications remain vulnerable to CRN. To estimate the effects of cost sharing in the Part D standard (non-LIS) benefit on adherence to different OAD classes, comparing two classes dominated by inexpensive generic medications and two by more costly branded medications. Retrospective cohort study using dispensed prescription data for elderly non-LIS (N=81,047) and LIS (low-income subsidy) (N=150,359) beneficiaries using same class OAD(s) in 2008 and 2009. Logistic regression modeled non-LIS likelihood; LIS and non-LIS patients matched using propensity outcome (N=38,054). Logistic regression, controlling for demographic and health status characteristics, modeled effects of non-LIS coverage on 2009 OAD class adherence. Main outcome measures were within-class OAD coverage year adherence, with patients considered adherent when days supplied to calendar days ratio at least 0.8. Non-LIS patients had 0.52 and 0.57 times the odds of branded-only DPP-4 Inhibitor (N=1,812; 95 % CI: 0.43, 0.63; P<0.001) and Thiazolidinedione (TZD) (N=6,290; 95 % CI: 0.52, 0.63; P<0.001) adherence. Most patients (N=32,510; 82 %) used OADs in primarily generic classes, where we found no significant (Biguanides; N=21,377) or small differences (Sulfonylureas/Glinides [N=19,240; OR: 0.91; 95 % CI: 0.86, 0.97; P=0.002]) in adherence odds. Crude adherence rates were sub-optimal when CRN was not a factor (Non-LIS/LIS: Biguanides: 65 %/65 %; Sulfonylureas/Glinides: 66 %/68 %; LIS: DPP-4 Inhibitors: 66 %; TZDs: 67 %). Gap elimination would not affect generic, but should reduce branded OAD CRN. Branded copayments may continue to lead to CRN. Policy initiatives and benefit changes targeting both cost deterrents for patients with more

  3. Physician Interaction with Electronic Medical Records: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noteboom, Cherie Bakker

    2010-01-01

    The integration of EHR (Electronic Health Records) in IT infrastructures supporting organizations enable improved access to and recording of patient data, enhanced ability to make better and more-timely decisions, and improved quality and reduced errors. Despite these benefits, there are mixed results as to the use of EHR. The literature suggests…

  4. Physician Interaction with Electronic Medical Records: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noteboom, Cherie Bakker

    2010-01-01

    The integration of EHR (Electronic Health Records) in IT infrastructures supporting organizations enable improved access to and recording of patient data, enhanced ability to make better and more-timely decisions, and improved quality and reduced errors. Despite these benefits, there are mixed results as to the use of EHR. The literature suggests…

  5. SynapticDB, effective web-based management and sharing of data from serial section electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Shi, Bitao; Bourne, Jennifer; Harris, Kristen M

    2011-03-01

    Serial section electron microscopy (ssEM) is rapidly expanding as a primary tool to investigate synaptic circuitry and plasticity. The ultrastructural images collected through ssEM are content rich and their comprehensive analysis is beyond the capacity of an individual laboratory. Hence, sharing ultrastructural data is becoming crucial to visualize, analyze, and discover the structural basis of synaptic circuitry and function in the brain. We devised a web-based management system called SynapticDB (http://synapses.clm.utexas.edu/synapticdb/) that catalogues, extracts, analyzes, and shares experimental data from ssEM. The management strategy involves a library with check-in, checkout and experimental tracking mechanisms. We developed a series of spreadsheet templates (MS Excel, Open Office spreadsheet, etc) that guide users in methods of data collection, structural identification, and quantitative analysis through ssEM. SynapticDB provides flexible access to complete templates, or to individual columns with instructional headers that can be selected to create user-defined templates. New templates can also be generated and uploaded. Research progress is tracked via experimental note management and dynamic PDF forms that allow new investigators to follow standard protocols and experienced researchers to expand the range of data collected and shared. The combined use of templates and tracking notes ensures that the supporting experimental information is populated into the database and associated with the appropriate ssEM images and analyses. We anticipate that SynapticDB will serve future meta-analyses towards new discoveries about the composition and circuitry of neurons and glia, and new understanding about structural plasticity during development, behavior, learning, memory, and neuropathology.

  6. Enhancing Participant Safety through Electronically Generated Medication Order Sets in a Clinical Research Environment: A Medical Informatics Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Formea, Christine M.; Picha, Andrew F.; Griffin, Monica G.; Schaller, Jane A.; Lee, Mary R.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract While clinical medicine is often well supported by health system information technology infrastructure, clinical research may need to create strategies to use clinical‐medicine informational technology tools. The authors describe a medication‐safety initiative that was carried out in a National Institutes of Health Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA)‐sponsored clinical research environment. A web based, medical informatics application was designed and implemented that allowed research groups to build protocol specific, electronic medication templates that were subsequently used to create participant‐specific medication order sets for conductance of clinical research activities in the CTSA‐sponsored clinical research environment. The medical informatics initiative eliminated typewritten or handwritten medication orders, created research protocol‐specific templates meeting institutional order‐writing requirements, and formalized a rigorous review and approval process. Enhancing safety in medication ordering and prescribing practices in a clinical research environment provided the background for multidisciplinary cooperation in medical informatics. Clin Trans Sci 2010; Volume 3: 312–315 PMID:21167008

  7. Medical Content Searching, Retrieving, and Sharing Over the Internet: Lessons Learned From the mEducator Through a Scenario-Based Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Spachos, Dimitris; Mylläri, Jarkko; Giordano, Daniela; Dafli, Eleni; Mitsopoulou, Evangelia; Schizas, Christos N; Pattichis, Constantinos; Nikolaidou, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background The mEducator Best Practice Network (BPN) implemented and extended standards and reference models in e-learning to develop innovative frameworks as well as solutions that enable specialized state-of-the-art medical educational content to be discovered, retrieved, shared, and re-purposed across European Institutions, targeting medical students, doctors, educators and health care professionals. Scenario-based evaluation for usability testing, complemented with data from online questionnaires and field notes of users’ performance, was designed and utilized for the evaluation of these solutions. Objective The objective of this work is twofold: (1) to describe one instantiation of the mEducator BPN solutions (mEducator3.0 - “MEdical Education LINnked Arena” MELINA+) with a focus on the metadata schema used, as well as on other aspects of the system that pertain to usability and acceptance, and (2) to present evaluation results on the suitability of the proposed metadata schema for searching, retrieving, and sharing of medical content and with respect to the overall usability and acceptance of the system from the target users. Methods A comprehensive evaluation methodology framework was developed and applied to four case studies, which were conducted in four different countries (ie, Greece, Cyprus, Bulgaria and Romania), with a total of 126 participants. In these case studies, scenarios referring to creating, sharing, and retrieving medical educational content using mEducator3.0 were used. The data were collected through two online questionnaires, consisting of 36 closed-ended questions and two open-ended questions that referred to mEducator 3.0 and through the use of field notes during scenario-based evaluations. Results The main findings of the study showed that even though the informational needs of the mEducator target groups were addressed to a satisfactory extent and the metadata schema supported content creation, sharing, and retrieval from an end

  8. Doctors' use of electronic medical records systems in hospitals: cross sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Lærum, Hallvard; Ellingsen, Gunnar; Faxvaag, Arild

    2001-01-01

    Objectives To compare the use of three electronic medical records systems by doctors in Norwegian hospitals for general clinical tasks. Design Cross sectional questionnaire survey. Semistructured telephone interviews with key staff in information technology in each hospital for details of local implementation of the systems. Setting 32 hospital units in 19 Norwegian hospitals with electronic medical records systems. Participants 227 (72%) of 314 hospital doctors responded, equally distributed between the three electronic medical records systems. Main outcome measures Proportion of respondents who used the electronic system, calculated for each of 23 tasks; difference in proportions of users of different systems when functionality of systems was similar. Results Most tasks listed in the questionnaire (15/23) were generally covered with implemented functions in the electronic medical records systems. However, the systems were used for only 2-7 of the tasks, mainly associated with reading patient data. Respondents showed significant differences in frequency of use of the different systems for four tasks for which the systems offered equivalent functionality. The respondents scored highly in computer literacy (72.2/100), and computer use showed no correlation with respondents' age, sex, or work position. User satisfaction scores were generally positive (67.2/100), with some difference between the systems. Conclusions Doctors used electronic medical records systems for far fewer tasks than the systems supported. What is already known on this topicElectronic information systems in health care have not undergone systematic evaluation, and few comparisons between electronic medical records systems have been madeGiven the information intensive nature of clinical work, electronic medical records systems should be of help to doctors for most clinical tasksWhat this study addsDoctors in Norwegian hospitals reported a low level of use of all electronic medical records systems

  9. The Affordable Care Act and the Burden of High Cost Sharing and Utilization Management Restrictions on Access to HIV Medications for People Living with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Zamani-Hank, Yasamean

    2016-08-01

    The HIV/AIDS epidemic continues to be a critical public health issue in the United States, where an estimated 1.2 million individuals live with HIV infection. Viral suppression is one of the primary public health goals for People Living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). A crucial component of this goal involves adequate access to health care, specifically anti-retroviral HIV medications. The enactment of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in 2010 raised hopes for millions of PLWHA without access to health care coverage. High cost-sharing requirements enacted by health plans place a financial burden on PLWHA who need ongoing access to these life-saving medications. Plighted with poverty, Detroit, Michigan, is a center of attention for examining the financial burden of HIV medications on PLWHA under the new health plans. From November 2014 to January 2015, monthly out-of-pocket costs and medication utilization requirements for 31 HIV medications were examined for the top 12 insurance carriers offering Qualified Health Plans on Michigan's Health Insurance Marketplace Exchange. The percentage of medications requiring quantity limits and prior authorization were calculated. The average monthly out-of-pocket cost per person ranged from $12 to $667 per medication. Three insurance carriers placed all 31 HIV medications on the highest cost-sharing tier, charging 50% coinsurance. High out-of-pocket costs and medication utilization restrictions discourage PLWHA from enrolling in health plans and threaten interrupted medication adherence, drug resistance, and increased risk of viral transmission. Health plans inflicting high costs and medication restrictions violate provisions of the ACA and undermine health care quality for PLWHA. (Population Health Management 2016;19:272-278).

  10. Impact of electronic medication reconciliation at hospital admission on clinician workflow.

    PubMed

    Vawdrey, David K; Chang, Nancy; Compton, Audrey; Tiase, Vicky; Hripcsak, George

    2010-11-13

    Many hospitals have experienced challenges with accomplishing the Joint Commission's National Patient Safety Goal for medication reconciliation. Our institution implemented a fully electronic process for performing and documenting medication reconciliation at hospital admission. The process used a commercial EHR and relied on a longitudinal medication list called the "Outpatient Medication Profile" (OMP). Clinician compliance with documenting medication reconciliation was difficult to achieve, but approached 100% after a "hard-stop" reminder was implemented. We evaluated the impact of the process at a large urban academic medical center. Before the new process was adopted, the average number of medications contained in the OMP for a patient upon admission was <2. One year after adoption, the average number had increased to 4.7, and there were regular updates made to the list. Updating the OMP was predominantly done by physicians, NPs, and PAs (94%), followed by nurses (5%) and pharmacists (1%).

  11. Medical device integration: CIOs must bridge the digital divide between devices and electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Raths, David

    2009-02-01

    To get funding approved for medical device integration, ClOs suggest focusing on specific patient safety or staff efficiency pain points. Organizations that make clinical engineering part of their IT team report fewer chain-of-command issues. It also helps IT people understand the clinical goals because the engineering people have been working closely with clinicians for years. A new organization has formed to work on collaboration between clinical engineers and IT professionals. For more information, go to www.ceitcollaboration.org. ECRI Institute has written a guide to handling the convergence of medical technology and hospital networks. Its "Medical Technology for the IT Professional: An Essential Guide for Working in Today's Healthcare Setting" also details how IT professionals can assist hospital technology planning and acquisition, and provide ongoing support for IT-based medical technologies. For more information, visit www.ecri.org/ITresource.

  12. Trial of an electronic decision support system to facilitate shared decision making in community mental health.

    PubMed

    Woltmann, Emily M; Wilkniss, Sandra M; Teachout, Alexandra; McHugo, Gregory J; Drake, Robert E

    2011-01-01

    Involvement of community mental health consumers in mental health decision making has been consistently associated with improvements in health outcomes. Electronic decision support systems (EDSSs) that support both consumer and provider decision making may be a sustainable way to improve dyadic communication in a field with approximately 50% workforce turnover per year. This study examined the feasibility of such a system and investigated proximal outcomes of the system's performance. A cluster randomized design was used to evaluate an EDSS at three urban community mental health sites. Case managers (N=20) were randomly assigned to the EDSS-supported planning group or to the usual care planning group. Consumers (N=80) were assigned to the same group as their case managers. User satisfaction with the care planning process was assessed for consumers and case managers (possible scores range from 1 to 5, with higher summary scores indicating more satisfaction). Recall of the care plan was assessed for consumers. Linear regression with adjustment for grouping by worker was used to assess satisfaction scores. A Wilcoxon rank-sum test was used to examine knowledge of the care plan. Compared with case managers in the control group, those in the intervention group were significantly more satisfied with the care planning process (mean ± SD score=4.0 ± .5 versus 3.3 ± .5; adjusted p=.01). Compared with consumers in the control group, those in the intervention group had significantly greater recall of their care plans three days after the planning session (mean proportion of plan goals recalled=75% ± 28% versus 57% ± 32%; p=.02). There were no differences between the clients in the intervention and control groups regarding satisfaction. This study demonstrated that clients can build their own care plans and negotiate and revise them with their case managers using an EDSS.

  13. Family Registration Card as electronic medical carrier in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

    PubMed

    Novo, Ahmed; Masic, Izet; Toromanovic, Selim; Loncarevic, Nedim; Junuzovic, Dzelaludin; Dizdarevic, Jadranka

    2004-01-01

    Medical documentation is a very important part of the medical documentalistics and is occupies a large part of daily work of medical staff working in Primary Health Care. Paper documentation is going to be replaced by electronic cards in Bosnia and Herzegovina and a new Health Care System is under development, based on an Electronic Family Registration Card. Developed countries proceeded from the manual and semiautomatic method of medical data processing to the new method of entering, storage, transferring, searching and protecting data, using electronic equipment. Currently, many European countries have developed a Medical Card Based Electronic Information System. Three types of electronic card are currently in use: a Hybrid Card, a Smart Card and a Laser Card. The dilemma is which card should be used as a data carrier. The Electronic Family Registration Cared is a question of strategic interest for B&H, but also a great investment. We should avoid the errors of other countries that have been developing card-based system. In this article we present all mentioned cards and compare advantages and disadvantages of different technologies.

  14. Standardizing Terminology and Definitions of Medication Adherence and Persistence in Research employing Electronic Databases

    PubMed Central

    Raebel, Marsha A.; Schmittdiel, Julie; Karter, Andrew J.; Konieczny, Jennifer L.; Steiner, John F.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To propose a unifying set of definitions for prescription adherence research utilizing electronic health record prescribing databases, prescription dispensing databases, and pharmacy claims databases and to provide a conceptual framework to operationalize these definitions consistently across studies. Methods We reviewed recent literature to identify definitions in electronic database studies of prescription-filling patterns for chronic oral medications. We then develop a conceptual model and propose standardized terminology and definitions to describe prescription-filling behavior from electronic databases. Results The conceptual model we propose defines two separate constructs: medication adherence and persistence. We define primary and secondary adherence as distinct sub-types of adherence. Metrics for estimating secondary adherence are discussed and critiqued, including a newer metric (New Prescription Medication Gap measure) that enables estimation of both primary and secondary adherence. Discussion Terminology currently used in prescription adherence research employing electronic databases lacks consistency. We propose a clear, consistent, broadly applicable conceptual model and terminology for such studies. The model and definitions facilitate research utilizing electronic medication prescribing, dispensing, and/or claims databases and encompasses the entire continuum of prescription-filling behavior. Conclusion Employing conceptually clear and consistent terminology to define medication adherence and persistence will facilitate future comparative effectiveness research and meta-analytic studies that utilize electronic prescription and dispensing records. PMID:23774515

  15. Standardised electronic information exchange between nurses in home care and GPs - the medication information processes.

    PubMed

    Lyngstad, Merete; Melby, Line; Hellesø, Ragnhild

    2012-01-01

    Improving the transfer of medication information between home care nurses and patient's general practitioners (GP) is assessed as essential for ensuring safe care. In this paper, we report on a Norwegian study in which we investigated how home care nurses experienced using standardised electronic messages in their communication with the GPs. Standardised electronic solutions were developed and implemented to resolve gaps in the medication information processes when patients received nursing care in their homes. Data was collected combining focus group interviews and individual interviews with nurses from home care in two municipalities in Norway. The data was analysed using systematic text condensation. We found that the nurses reported mostly advantages, but also some disadvantages regarding accuracy, consistency, availability and efficiency in the medication information process when they used standardised electronic messages. Efforts to refine the electronic messages to achieve better work processes and patient safety should be addressed.

  16. Standardised electronic information exchange between nurses in home care and GPs – the medication information processes

    PubMed Central

    Lyngstad, Merete; Melby, Line; Hellesø, Ragnhild

    2012-01-01

    Improving the transfer of medication information between home care nurses and patient’s general practitioners (GP) is assessed as essential for ensuring safe care. In this paper, we report on a Norwegian study in which we investigated how home care nurses experienced using standardised electronic messages in their communication with the GPs. Standardised electronic solutions were developed and implemented to resolve gaps in the medication information processes when patients received nursing care in their homes. Data was collected combining focus group interviews and individual interviews with nurses from home care in two municipalities in Norway. The data was analysed using systematic text condensation. We found that the nurses reported mostly advantages, but also some disadvantages regarding accuracy, consistency, availability and efficiency in the medication information process when they used standardised electronic messages. Efforts to refine the electronic messages to achieve better work processes and patient safety should be addressed. PMID:24199097

  17. Patient experiences with electronic medical records: Lessons learned

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Dale; Richter, Louiseann T; Kapustin, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To describe the lived experience of patients communicating with their nurse practitioners and physicians while using paper health records (PHRs) and electronic health records (EHRs) in the examination rooms. The significance of the study lies in the salience of communication between the patient and provider in promoting optimal clinical outcomes and the highest level of patient satisfaction. Data sources The study used a qualitative, phenomenological design. Audio-taped focus group interviews were conducted with 21 patients from a diabetes clinic in Baltimore, Maryland. Patients had visits with the provider before and after implementation of EHRs in the clinic. Conclusions The four themes that emerged from the three focus groups included communication issues, patient preferences for electronic records, safety and security concerns, and transition problems with implementation of EHRs. Implications for practice Potential benefits for nurse practitioners implementing the recommendations in this study include enhanced communication between patients and providers while using EHRs, increased patient satisfaction, higher levels of nurse practitioner and physician satisfaction, and avoidance of communication issues during implementation of EHR systems. PMID:25234112

  18. Options for diabetes management in sub-Saharan Africa with an electronic medical record system.

    PubMed

    Kouematchoua Tchuitcheu, G; Rienhoff, O

    2011-01-01

    An increase of diabetes prevalence of up to 80% is predicted in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) by 2025 exceeding the worldwide 55%. Mortality rates of diabetes and HIV/AIDS are similar. Diabetes shares several common factors with HIV/AIDS and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). The latter two health problems have been efficiently managed by an open source electronic medical record system (EMRS) in Latin America. Therefore a similar solution for diabetes in SSA could be extremely helpful. The aim was to design and validate a conceptual model for an EMRS to improve diabetes management in SSA making use of the HIV and TB experience. A review of the literature addressed diabetes care and management in SSA as well as existing examples of information and communication technology (ICT) use in SSA. Based on a need assessment conducted in SSA a conceptual model based on the traditionally structured healthcare system in SSA was mapped into a three-layer structure. Application modules were derived and a demonstrator programmed based on an open source EMRS. Then the approach was validated by SSA experts. A conceptual model could be specified and validated which enhances a problem-oriented approach to diabetes management processes. The prototyp EMRS demonstrates options for a patient portal and simulation tools for education of health professional and patients in SSA. It is possible to find IT solutions for diabetes care in SSA which follow the same efficiency concepts as HIV or TB modules in Latin America. The local efficiency and sustainability of the solution will, however, depend on training and changes in work behavior.

  19. Analysis of an electronic medication reconciliation and information at discharge programme for frail elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Moro Agud, Marta; Menéndez Colino, Rocío; Mauleón Ladrero, María Del Coro; Ruano Encinar, Margarita; Díez Sebastián, Jesús; Villamañán Bueno, Elena; Herrero Ambrosio, Alicia; González Montalvo, Juan Ignacio

    2016-08-01

    Background During care transitions, discrepancies and medication errors often occur, putting patients at risk, especially older patients with polypharmacy. Objective To assess the results of a medication reconciliation and information programme for discharge of geriatric patients conducted through hospital information systems. Setting A 1300-bed university hospital in Madrid, Spain. Method A prospective observational study. Geriatricians selected candidates for medication reconciliation at discharge, and sent an electronic inter-consultation request to the pharmacy department. Pharmacists reviewed the medication list, comparing it with electronic prescriptions, medication previously prescribed by primary care physicians and other medical records, and resolved any discrepancies. An individualized and tailored drug information at discharge sheet was sent to geriatricians and made available to primary care physicians. Main outcome measure The number and type of discrepancies, the number, type and severity of errors, and the main pharmacological groups involved. Results Medication reconciliation was performed for 118 patients with a mean age of 87 years (SD 5.9), involving a total of 2054 medications, or 17.4 per patient. Discrepancies were found in 723 (35 %) drugs, 105 of which were considered medication errors (15 %); 66 patients (56 %) had at least one error. This gave 0.9 reconciliation errors per patient reviewed and 1.6 per patient with errors. Of the 105 errors, 14 (13 %) were considered serious. The most frequent errors were incomplete prescriptions (40 %) and omissions (35 %). Conclusion An electronic medication reconciliation programme helps pharmacists detect serious medication errors in frail elderly patients and provides complete and up-to-date written information to prevent additional errors at home.

  20. [Electronic medical handbooks--are they suitable for implementation of guidelines in health care?].

    PubMed

    Grimsmo, Anders

    2006-09-21

    The Directorate for Health and Social Affairs commissioned a project to evaluate the distribution and use of a Norwegian electronic medical handbook (NEL). NEL uses multimedia techniques and is distributed on a CD twice a year. A questionnaire about the use of NEL was given to 91 medical students. Health professionals at two hospitals and 12 health centres were interviewed. The use of the electronic handbook differed more within than between groups of professionals. NEL is applied for three main purposes: decision support, quality assurance and as a source for information pamphlets designed for patients. The professionals believed that NEL has contributed to patients' receiving more information and more uniform treatment. Criticism was made about the price and for the lack of integration with the electronic patient record. The study has revealed some barriers to implementation and use of electronic information sources. Under certain circumstances an electronic handbook might be suitable way for authorities and others to distribute professional guidelines.

  1. [Correlation Study between Electronic Bronchus Mirror and Chinese Medical Syndrome TVDinci of Mycoplasma pneumonia Children].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiu-tai; Li, Rui-feng; Yang, Pei-li

    2016-02-01

    To explore the correlation between electronic bronchus mirror and Chinese medical syndrome typing of Mycoplasma pneumonia children. Totally 198 Mycoplasma pneumonia children inpatients were assigned to three syndrome types according to Chinese medical syndrome typing and self-formulated typing standards of electronic bronchus mirror, i.e., Fei-qi accumulation of damp and heat syndrome, Fei-qi accumulation of toxicity and heat syndrome, deficient vital qi leading to lingering of pathogen syndrome. The correlation between electronic bronchus mirror and Chinese medical syndrome typing was explored. As for comparison between electronic bronchus mirror and Chinese medical syndrome typing, Kappa value (K^) was 0.645 and Spearman coefficient correlation (r) was 0.653 (P < 0.01) for Fei-qi accumulation of damp and heat syndrome; K^ was 0.724 and r(s) was 0.727 (P < 0.01) for Fei-qi accumulation of toxicity and heat syndrome; K^ was 0.506 and r(s) was 0.515 (P < 0.01) for deficient vital qi leading to lingering of pathogen syndrome. Chinese medical syndrome typing of Mycoplasma pneumonia children was moderately in line with inspection typing under electronic bronchoscope with significant correlation.

  2. University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences electronic health record and medical informatics training for undergraduate health professionals*

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Jan K; Newton, Bruce W; Boone, Steven E

    2010-01-01

    The University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) is planning interprofessional training in electronic health records (EHRs) and medical informatics. Training will be integrated throughout the curricula and will include seminars on broad concepts supplemented with online modules, didactic lectures, and hands-on experiences. Training will prepare future health professionals to use EHRs, evidence-based medicine, medical decision support, and point-of-care tools to reduce errors, improve standards of care, address Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act requirements and accreditation standards, and promote appropriate documentation to enable data retrieval for clinical research. UAMS will ensure that graduates are ready for the rapidly evolving practice environment created by the HITECH Act. PMID:20648253

  3. University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences electronic health record and medical informatics training for undergraduate health professionals.

    PubMed

    Hart, Jan K; Newton, Bruce W; Boone, Steven E

    2010-07-01

    The University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) is planning interprofessional training in electronic health records (EHRs) and medical informatics. Training will be integrated throughout the curricula and will include seminars on broad concepts supplemented with online modules, didactic lectures, and hands-on experiences. Training will prepare future health professionals to use EHRs, evidence-based medicine, medical decision support, and point-of-care tools to reduce errors, improve standards of care, address Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act requirements and accreditation standards, and promote appropriate documentation to enable data retrieval for clinical research. UAMS will ensure that graduates are ready for the rapidly evolving practice environment created by the HITECH Act.

  4. Medical assistants' roles in electronic health record processes in primary care practices: the untold story.

    PubMed

    Adewale, Victoria; Anthony, David; Borkan, Jeffery

    2014-01-01

    The role of the medical assistant has been undervalued in the past. Many publications have detailed the integral role of the nursing staff and physicians, but the medical assistant role has come last in formal recognition. As healthcare settings move toward a more Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) model, the attitudes of this model will need to be adopted, two of which are team-based care and adoption of the electronic health record (EHR). As the EHR continues to gain more traction in healthcare, a thorough understanding of it, by everyone, will be vital for its success. In this article, the medical assistant's relationship with the EHR is outlined through qualitative interviews and observations with medical assistants in PCMH programs. The data describe diverse EHR experiences and how these experiences are influenced by and reflected in workflow issues, training, patient care, and an expanding role of the medical assistant.

  5. Views of patients and professionals about electronic multicompartment medication devices: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Jill; Bond, Christine; Kinnear, Moira; McKinstry, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore the perceived acceptability, advantages and disadvantages of electronic multicompartment medication devices. Design Qualitative study using 8 focus groups and 10 individual semistructured interviews. Recordings were transcribed and analysed thematically. Strategies were employed to ensure the findings were credible and trustworthy. Participants and setting Community pharmacists (n=11), general practitioners (n=9), community nurses (n=12) and social care managers (n=8) were recruited from the National Health Service (NHS) and local authority services. Patients (n=15) who were current conventional or electronic multicompartment medication device users or had medication adherence problems were recruited from community pharmacies. 3 informal carers participated. Results Electronic multicompartment medication devices which prompt the patient to take medication may be beneficial for selected individuals, particularly those with cognitive impairment, but who are not seriously impaired, provided they have a good level of dexterity. They may also assist individuals where it is important that medication is taken at fixed time intervals. These are likely to be people who are being supported to live alone. No single device suited everybody; smaller/lighter devices were preferred but their usefulness was limited by the small number/size of storage compartments. Removing medications was often challenging. Transportability was an important factor for patients and carers. A carer's alert if medication is not taken was problematic with multiple barriers to implementation and no consensus as to who should receive the alert. There was a lack of enthusiasm among professionals, particularly among pharmacists, due to concerns about responsibility and funding for devices as well as ensuring devices met regulatory standards for storage and labelling. Conclusions This study provides indicators of which patients might benefit from an electronic multicompartment

  6. Inferring Clinical Workflow Efficiency via Electronic Medical Record Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, You; Xie, Wei; Gunter, Carl A; Liebovitz, David; Mehrotra, Sanjay; Zhang, He; Malin, Bradley

    2015-01-01

    Complexity in clinical workflows can lead to inefficiency in making diagnoses, ineffectiveness of treatment plans and uninformed management of healthcare organizations (HCOs). Traditional strategies to manage workflow complexity are based on measuring the gaps between workflows defined by HCO administrators and the actual processes followed by staff in the clinic. However, existing methods tend to neglect the influences of EMR systems on the utilization of workflows, which could be leveraged to optimize workflows facilitated through the EMR. In this paper, we introduce a framework to infer clinical workflows through the utilization of an EMR and show how such workflows roughly partition into four types according to their efficiency. Our framework infers workflows at several levels of granularity through data mining technologies. We study four months of EMR event logs from a large medical center, including 16,569 inpatient stays, and illustrate that over approximately 95% of workflows are efficient and that 80% of patients are on such workflows. At the same time, we show that the remaining 5% of workflows may be inefficient due to a variety of factors, such as complex patients. PMID:26958173

  7. Inferring Clinical Workflow Efficiency via Electronic Medical Record Utilization.

    PubMed

    Chen, You; Xie, Wei; Gunter, Carl A; Liebovitz, David; Mehrotra, Sanjay; Zhang, He; Malin, Bradley

    Complexity in clinical workflows can lead to inefficiency in making diagnoses, ineffectiveness of treatment plans and uninformed management of healthcare organizations (HCOs). Traditional strategies to manage workflow complexity are based on measuring the gaps between workflows defined by HCO administrators and the actual processes followed by staff in the clinic. However, existing methods tend to neglect the influences of EMR systems on the utilization of workflows, which could be leveraged to optimize workflows facilitated through the EMR. In this paper, we introduce a framework to infer clinical workflows through the utilization of an EMR and show how such workflows roughly partition into four types according to their efficiency. Our framework infers workflows at several levels of granularity through data mining technologies. We study four months of EMR event logs from a large medical center, including 16,569 inpatient stays, and illustrate that over approximately 95% of workflows are efficient and that 80% of patients are on such workflows. At the same time, we show that the remaining 5% of workflows may be inefficient due to a variety of factors, such as complex patients.

  8. Application of Traditional and Nanostructure Materials for Medical Electron Beams Collimation: Numerical Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloichikova, I. A.; Stuchebrov, S. G.; Zhaksybayeva, G. K.; Wagner, A. R.

    2015-11-01

    Nowadays, the commercial application of the electron accelerators grows in the industry, in the research investigations, in the medical diagnosis and treatment. In this regard, the electron beam profile modification in accordance with specific purposes is an actual task. In this paper the model of the TPU microtron extracted electron beam developed in the program “Computer Laboratory (PCLab)” is described. The internal beam divergence influence for the electron beam profile and depth dose distribution in the air is considered. The possibility of using the nanostructure materials for the electron beam formation was analyzed. The simulation data of the electron beam shape collimated by different materials (lead, corund- zirconia nanoceramic, gypsum) are shown. The collimator material influence for the electron beam profile and shape are analyzed.

  9. Electronic Documentation Support Tools and Text Duplication in the Electronic Medical Record

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wrenn, Jesse

    2010-01-01

    In order to ease the burden of electronic note entry on physicians, electronic documentation support tools have been developed to assist in note authoring. There is little evidence of the effects of these tools on attributes of clinical documentation, including document quality. Furthermore, the resultant abundance of duplicated text and…

  10. Effects of shared medical appointments on quality of life and cost-effectiveness for patients with a chronic neuromuscular disease. Study protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Shared medical appointments are a series of one-to-one doctor-patient contacts, in presence of a group of 6-10 fellow patients. This group visits substitute the annual control visits of patients with the neurologist. The same items attended to in a one-to- one appointment are addressed. The possible advantages of a shared medical appointment could be an added value to the present management of neuromuscular patients. The currently problem-focused one-to-one out-patient visits often leave little time for the patient's psychosocial needs, patient education, and patient empowerment. Methods/design A randomized, prospective controlled study (RCT) with a follow up of 6 months will be conducted to evaluate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of shared medical appointments compared to usual care for 300 neuromuscular patients and their partners at the Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center. Every included patient will be randomly allocated to one of the two study arms. This study has been reviewed and approved by the medical ethics committee of the region Arnhem-Nijmegen, the Netherlands. The primary outcome measure is quality of life as measured by the EQ-5D, SF-36 and the Individualized neuromuscular Quality of Life Questionnaire. The primary analysis will be an intention-to-treat analysis on the area under the curve of the quality of life scores. A linear mixed model will be used with random factor group and fixed factors treatment, baseline score and type of neuromuscular disease. For the economic evaluation an incremental cost-effectiveness analysis will be conducted from a societal perspective, relating differences in costs to difference in health outcome. Results are expected in 2012. Discussion This study will be the first randomized controlled trial which evaluates the effect of shared medical appointments versus usual care for neuromuscular patients. This will enable to determine if there is additional value of shared medical appointments to the

  11. Effects of shared medical appointments on quality of life and cost-effectiveness for patients with a chronic neuromuscular disease. Study protocol of a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Seesing, Femke M; Drost, Gea; van der Wilt, Gert-Jan; van Engelen, Baziel G M

    2011-08-23

    Shared medical appointments are a series of one-to-one doctor-patient contacts, in presence of a group of 6-10 fellow patients. This group visits substitute the annual control visits of patients with the neurologist. The same items attended to in a one-to-one appointment are addressed. The possible advantages of a shared medical appointment could be an added value to the present management of neuromuscular patients. The currently problem-focused one-to-one out-patient visits often leave little time for the patient's psychosocial needs, patient education, and patient empowerment. A randomized, prospective controlled study (RCT) with a follow up of 6 months will be conducted to evaluate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of shared medical appointments compared to usual care for 300 neuromuscular patients and their partners at the Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center. Every included patient will be randomly allocated to one of the two study arms. This study has been reviewed and approved by the medical ethics committee of the region Arnhem-Nijmegen, The Netherlands. The primary outcome measure is quality of life as measured by the EQ-5D, SF-36 and the Individualized neuromuscular Quality of Life Questionnaire. The primary analysis will be an intention-to-treat analysis on the area under the curve of the quality of life scores. A linear mixed model will be used with random factor group and fixed factors treatment, baseline score and type of neuromuscular disease. For the economic evaluation an incremental cost-effectiveness analysis will be conducted from a societal perspective, relating differences in costs to difference in health outcome. Results are expected in 2012. This study will be the first randomized controlled trial which evaluates the effect of shared medical appointments versus usual care for neuromuscular patients. This will enable to determine if there is additional value of shared medical appointments to the current therapeutical spectrum. When

  12. The role of frontline RNs in the selection of an electronic medical record business partner.

    PubMed

    Wilhoit, Kathryn; Mustain, Jane; King, Marjorie

    2006-01-01

    Frontline RNs knowledgeable in the strategic objectives of their organization made a difference in the selection of an electronic medical record business partner for a large, complex healthcare system. Their impact was significant because of the chief nurse executive's personal articulation of the organization's strategic goals and of her investment in their education. These factors provided the frontline RNs with a foundational base of knowledge about a variety of electronic medical record systems. The preparation and exposure enabled the frontline RNs to make a valuable contribution to the selection of an electronic medical record business partner. The RNs were a major force in affecting philosophical change from the organization's original pursuit of "best-of-breed" interfaced systems to a fully integrated, "best-of-class" vendor business partner. The learning experiences of the frontline RNs are explored to answer the following question: Why must frontline RNs play a key role in this process?

  13. Injectable 3-D Fabrication of Medical Electronics at the Target Biological Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Chao; Zhang, Jie; Li, Xiaokang; Yang, Xueyao; Li, Jingjing; Liu, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Conventional transplantable biomedical devices generally request sophisticated surgery which however often causes big trauma and serious pain to the patients. Here, we show an alternative way of directly making three-dimensional (3-D) medical electronics inside the biological body through sequential injections of biocompatible packaging material and liquid metal ink. As the most typical electronics, a variety of medical electrodes with different embedded structures were demonstrated to be easily formed at the target tissues. Conceptual in vitro experiments provide strong evidences for the excellent performances of the injectable electrodes. Further in vivo animal experiments disclosed that the formed electrode could serve as both highly efficient ECG (Electrocardiograph) electrode and stimulator electrode. These findings clarified the unique features and practicability of the liquid metal based injectable 3-D fabrication of medical electronics. The present strategy opens the way for directly manufacturing electrophysiological sensors or therapeutic devices in situ via a truly minimally invasive approach. PMID:24309385

  14. Injectable 3-D Fabrication of Medical Electronics at the Target Biological Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chao; Zhang, Jie; Li, Xiaokang; Yang, Xueyao; Li, Jingjing; Liu, Jing

    2013-12-01

    Conventional transplantable biomedical devices generally request sophisticated surgery which however often causes big trauma and serious pain to the patients. Here, we show an alternative way of directly making three-dimensional (3-D) medical electronics inside the biological body through sequential injections of biocompatible packaging material and liquid metal ink. As the most typical electronics, a variety of medical electrodes with different embedded structures were demonstrated to be easily formed at the target tissues. Conceptual in vitro experiments provide strong evidences for the excellent performances of the injectable electrodes. Further in vivo animal experiments disclosed that the formed electrode could serve as both highly efficient ECG (Electrocardiograph) electrode and stimulator electrode. These findings clarified the unique features and practicability of the liquid metal based injectable 3-D fabrication of medical electronics. The present strategy opens the way for directly manufacturing electrophysiological sensors or therapeutic devices in situ via a truly minimally invasive approach.

  15. Injectable 3-D fabrication of medical electronics at the target biological tissues.

    PubMed

    Jin, Chao; Zhang, Jie; Li, Xiaokang; Yang, Xueyao; Li, Jingjing; Liu, Jing

    2013-12-06

    Conventional transplantable biomedical devices generally request sophisticated surgery which however often causes big trauma and serious pain to the patients. Here, we show an alternative way of directly making three-dimensional (3-D) medical electronics inside the biological body through sequential injections of biocompatible packaging material and liquid metal ink. As the most typical electronics, a variety of medical electrodes with different embedded structures were demonstrated to be easily formed at the target tissues. Conceptual in vitro experiments provide strong evidences for the excellent performances of the injectable electrodes. Further in vivo animal experiments disclosed that the formed electrode could serve as both highly efficient ECG (Electrocardiograph) electrode and stimulator electrode. These findings clarified the unique features and practicability of the liquid metal based injectable 3-D fabrication of medical electronics. The present strategy opens the way for directly manufacturing electrophysiological sensors or therapeutic devices in situ via a truly minimally invasive approach.

  16. Using an iconic language to improve access to electronic medical records in general medicine.

    PubMed

    Simon, Christian; Hassler, Sylvain; Beuscart-Zephir, Marie-Catherine; Favre, Madeleine; Venot, Alain; Duclos, Catherine; Lamy, Jean-Baptiste

    2014-01-01

    Physicians have difficulties to access and analyse information in a medical record. In a previous work on drug databanks, we have shown that with an iconic language as VCM, an icon-based presentation can help physicians to access medical information. Our objective, herein, is to study whether VCM can be used in an electronic medical record for facilitating physician access in general practice. We identify the data and the functionalities of an electronic medical record that could benefit from VCM icons representing clinical findings, patient history, etc. We also present a preliminary evaluation of this new icon-focused interface. We conclude by discussing the results like the assessment of the user's satisfaction and pointing out the importance of coding data.

  17. A SWOT Analysis of the Various Backup Scenarios Used in Electronic Medical Record Systems.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hwa Jeong; Kim, Hye Hyeon; Kim, Ju Han

    2011-09-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) are increasingly being used by health care services. Currently, if an EMR shutdown occurs, even for a moment, patient safety and care can be seriously impacted. Our goal was to determine the methodology needed to develop an effective and reliable EMR backup system. Our "independent backup system by medical organizations" paradigm implies that individual medical organizations develop their own EMR backup systems within their organizations. A "personal independent backup system" is defined as an individual privately managing his/her own medical records, whereas in a "central backup system by the government" the government controls all the data. A "central backup system by private enterprises" implies that individual companies retain control over their own data. A "cooperative backup system among medical organizations" refers to a networked system established through mutual agreement. The "backup system based on mutual trust between an individual and an organization" means that the medical information backup system at the organizational level is established through mutual trust. Through the use of SWOT analysis it can be shown that cooperative backup among medical organizations is possible to be established through a network composed of various medical agencies and that it can be managed systematically. An owner of medical information only grants data access to the specific person who gave the authorization for backup based on the mutual trust between an individual and an organization. By employing SWOT analysis, we concluded that a linkage among medical organizations or between an individual and an organization can provide an efficient backup system.

  18. Opportunities and challenges in integrating electronic health records into undergraduate medical education: a national survey of clerkship directors.

    PubMed

    Hammoud, Maya M; Margo, Katherine; Christner, Jennifer G; Fisher, Jonathan; Fischer, Shira H; Pangaro, Louis N

    2012-01-01

    Few studies have reported on the utilization and the effect of electronic health records on the education of medical students. The purpose of this study was to describe the current use of electronic health records by medical students in the United States and explore the opportunities and challenges of integrating electronic health records into daily teaching of medical students. A survey with 24 questions regarding the use of electronic health records by medical students was developed by the Alliance for Clinical Educators and sent to clerkship directors across the United States. Both quantitative and qualitative responses were collected and analyzed to determine current access to and use of electronic health records by medical students. This study found that an estimated 64% of programs currently allow student use of electronic health records, of which only two thirds allowed students to write notes within the electronic record. Overall, clerkship directors' opinions on the effects of electronic health records on medical student education were neutral, and despite acknowledging many advantages to electronic health records, there were many concerns raised regarding their use in education. Medical students are using electronic health records at higher rates than physicians in practice. Although this is overall reassuring, educators have to be cautious about the limitations being placed on student's documentation in electronic health records as this can potentially have consequences on their training, and they need to explore ways to maximize the benefits of electronic health records in medical education.

  19. Outpatients flow management and ophthalmic electronic medical records system in university hospital using Yahgee Document View.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Toshihiko; Gochi, Akira; Hirakawa, Tsuyoshi; Ito, Tadashi; Kohno, Yoshihisa

    2010-10-01

    General electronic medical records systems remain insufficient for ophthalmology outpatient clinics from the viewpoint of dealing with many ophthalmic examinations and images in a large number of patients. Filing systems for documents and images by Yahgee Document View (Yahgee, Inc.) were introduced on the platform of general electronic medical records system (Fujitsu, Inc.). Outpatients flow management system and electronic medical records system for ophthalmology were constructed. All images from ophthalmic appliances were transported to Yahgee Image by the MaxFile gateway system (P4 Medic, Inc.). The flow of outpatients going through examinations such as visual acuity testing were monitored by the list "Ophthalmology Outpatients List" by Yahgee Workflow in addition to the list "Patients Reception List" by Fujitsu. Patients' identification number was scanned with bar code readers attached to ophthalmic appliances. Dual monitors were placed in doctors' rooms to show Fujitsu Medical Records on the left-hand monitor and ophthalmic charts of Yahgee Document on the right-hand monitor. The data of manually-inputted visual acuity, automatically-exported autorefractometry and non-contact tonometry on a new template, MaxFile ED, were again automatically transported to designated boxes on ophthalmic charts of Yahgee Document. Images such as fundus photographs, fluorescein angiograms, optical coherence tomographic and ultrasound scans were viewed by Yahgee Image, and were copy-and-pasted to assigned boxes on the ophthalmic charts. Ordering such as appointments, drug prescription, fees and diagnoses input, central laboratory tests, surgical theater and ward room reservations were placed by functions of the Fujitsu electronic medical records system. The combination of the Fujitsu electronic medical records and Yahgee Document View systems enabled the University Hospital to examine the same number of outpatients as prior to the implementation of the computerized filing system.

  20. A cost-benefit analysis of electronic medical records in primary care.

    PubMed

    Wang, Samuel J; Middleton, Blackford; Prosser, Lisa A; Bardon, Christiana G; Spurr, Cynthia D; Carchidi, Patricia J; Kittler, Anne F; Goldszer, Robert C; Fairchild, David G; Sussman, Andrew J; Kuperman, Gilad J; Bates, David W

    2003-04-01

    Electronic medical record systems improve the quality of patient care and decrease medical errors, but their financial effects have not been as well documented. The purpose of this study was to estimate the net financial benefit or cost of implementing electronic medical record systems in primary care. We performed a cost-benefit study to analyze the financial effects of electronic medical record systems in ambulatory primary care settings from the perspective of the health care organization. Data were obtained from studies at our institution and from the published literature. The reference strategy for comparisons was the traditional paper-based medical record. The primary outcome measure was the net financial benefit or cost per primary care physician for a 5-year period. The estimated net benefit from using an electronic medical record for a 5-year period was 86,400 US dollars per provider. Benefits accrue primarily from savings in drug expenditures, improved utilization of radiology tests, better capture of charges, and decreased billing errors. In one-way sensitivity analyses, the model was most sensitive to the proportion of patients whose care was capitated; the net benefit varied from a low of 8400 US dollars to a high of 140,100 US dollars . A five-way sensitivity analysis with the most pessimistic and optimistic assumptions showed results ranging from a 2300 US dollars net cost to a 330,900 US dollars net benefit. Implementation of an electronic medical record system in primary care can result in a positive financial return on investment to the health care organization. The magnitude of the return is sensitive to several key factors. Copyright 2003 by Excerpta Medica Inc.

  1. Invite yourself to the table: librarian contributions to the electronic medical record.

    PubMed

    Brandes, Susan; Wells, Karen; Bandy, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Librarians from Exempla Healthcare hospitals initiated contact with the chief medical information officer regarding evidence-based medicine activities related to the development of the system's Electronic Medical Record (EMR). This column reviews the librarians' involvement in specific initiatives that included providing comparative information on point-of-care resources to integrate into the EMR, providing evidence as needed for the order sets being developed, and participating with clinicians on an evidence-based advisory committee.

  2. A realist review of shared medical appointments: How, for whom, and under what circumstances do they work?

    PubMed

    Kirsh, Susan R; Aron, David C; Johnson, Kimberly D; Santurri, Laura E; Stevenson, Lauren D; Jones, Katherine R; Jagosh, Justin

    2017-02-04

    Shared medical appointments (SMAs) are doctor-patient visits in which groups of patients are seen by one or more health care providers in a concurrent session. There is a growing interest in understanding the potential benefits of SMAs in various contexts to improve clinical outcomes and reduce healthcare costs. This study builds upon the existing evidence base that suggests SMAs are indeed effective. In this study, we explored how they are effective in terms of the underlying mechanisms of action and under what circumstances. Realist review methodology was used to synthesize the literature on SMAs, which included a broad search of 800+ published articles. 71 high quality primary research articles were retained to build a conceptual model of SMAs and 20 of those were selected for an in depth analysis using realist methodology (i.e.,middle-range theories and and context-mechanism-outcome configurations). Nine main mechanisms that serve to explain how SMAs work were theorized from the data immersion process and configured in a series of context-mechanism-outcome configurations (CMOs). These are: (1) Group exposure in SMAs combats isolation, which in turn helps to remove doubts about one's ability to manage illness; (2) Patients learn about disease self-management vicariously by witnessing others' illness experiences; (3) Patients feel inspired by seeing others who are coping well; (4) Group dynamics lead patients and providers to developing more equitable relationships; (5) Providers feel increased appreciation and rapport toward colleagues leading to increased efficiency; (6) Providers learn from the patients how better to meet their patients' needs; (7) Adequate time allotment of the SMA leads patients to feel supported; (8) Patients receive professional expertise from the provider in combination with first-hand information from peers, resulting in more robust health knowledge; and (9) Patients have the opportunity to see how the physicians interact with fellow

  3. Risk factors for medication errors in the electronic and manual prescription 1

    PubMed Central

    Volpe, Cris Renata Grou; de Melo, Eveline Maria Magalhães; de Aguiar, Lucas Barbosa; Pinho, Diana Lúcia Moura; Stival, Marina Morato

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to compare electronic and manual prescriptions of a public hospital of Brasilia, identifying risk factors for the occurrence of medication errors. Method: descriptive-exploratory, comparative and retrospective study. Data collection occurred from July 2012 to January 2013, using an instrument for the review of the information contained in medical records related to the medication process. A total of 190 manual and 199 electronic records composed the sample, with 2027 prescriptions each. Results: compared to the manual prescription, a significant reduction was observed in the risk factors after implantation of the electronic prescription, in items such as "lack of the form of dilution" (71.1% to 22.3%) and "prescription with brand name" (99.5% to 31.5%). Conversely, the risk factors "no check" and "lack of CRM of the prescriber" increased. The lack of the allergy registration and the occurrences related to medication were the same for both groups. Conclusion: generally, the use of the electronic prescription system was associated with a significant reduction in risk factors for medication errors, concerning the following aspects: illegibility, prescription with brand name and presence of essential items that provide a safe and effective prescription. PMID:27508913

  4. Survey of electronic veterinary medical record adoption and use by independent small animal veterinary medical practices in Massachusetts

    PubMed Central

    Krone, Lauren M.; Brown, Catherine M.; Lindenmayer, Joann M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To estimate the proportion of independent small animal veterinary medical practices in Massachusetts that use electronic veterinary medical records (EVMRs), determine the purposes for which EVMRs are used, and identify perceived barriers to their use. Design Survey. Sample 100 veterinarians. Procedures 213 of 517 independent small animal veterinary practices operating in Massachusetts were randomly chosen for study recruitment. One veterinarian at each practice was invited by telephone to answer a hardcopy survey regarding practice demographics, medical records type (electronic, paper, or both), purposes of EVMR use, and perceived barriers to adoption. Surveys were mailed to the first 100 veterinarians who agreed to participate. Practices were categorized by record type and size (large [≥ 5 veterinarians], medium [3 to 4 veterinarians], or small [1 to 2 veterinarians]). Results 84 surveys were returned; overall response was 84 of 213 (39.4%). The EVMRs were used alone or together with paper records in 66 of 82 (80.5%) practices. Large and medium-sized practices were significantly more likely to use EVMRs combined with paper records than were small practices. The EVMRs were most commonly used for ensuring billing, automating reminders, providing cost estimates, scheduling, recording medical and surgical information, and tracking patient health. Least common uses were identifying emerging infectious diseases, research, and insurance. Eleven veterinarians in paper record–only practices indicated reluctance to change, anticipated technological problems, time constraints, and cost were barriers to EVMR use. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance Results indicated EVMRs were underutilized as a tool for tracking and improving population health and identifying emerging infectious diseases. Efforts to facilitate adoption of EVMRs for these purposes should be strengthened by the veterinary medical, human health, and public health professions. PMID:25029312

  5. Survey of electronic veterinary medical record adoption and use by independent small animal veterinary medical practices in Massachusetts.

    PubMed

    Krone, Lauren M; Brown, Catherine M; Lindenmayer, Joann M

    2014-08-01

    To estimate the proportion of independent small animal veterinary medical practices in Massachusetts that use electronic veterinary medical records (EVMRs), determine the purposes for which EVMRs are used, and identify perceived barriers to their use. Survey. 100 veterinarians. 213 of 517 independent small animal veterinary practices operating in Massachusetts were randomly chosen for study recruitment. One veterinarian at each practice was invited by telephone to answer a hardcopy survey regarding practice demographics, medical records type (electronic, paper, or both), purposes of EVMR use, and perceived barriers to adoption. Surveys were mailed to the first 100 veterinarians who agreed to participate. Practices were categorized by record type and size (large [≥ 5 veterinarians], medium [3 to 4 veterinarians], or small [1 to 2 veterinarians]). 84 surveys were returned; overall response was 84 of 213 (39.4%). The EVMRs were used alone or together with paper records in 66 of 82 (80.5%) practices. Large and medium-sized practices were significantly more likely to use EVMRs combined with paper records than were small practices. The EVMRs were most commonly used for ensuring billing, automating reminders, providing cost estimates, scheduling, recording medical and surgical information, and tracking patient health. Least common uses were identifying emerging infectious diseases, research, and insurance. Eleven veterinarians in paper record-only practices indicated reluctance to change, anticipated technological problems, time constraints, and cost were barriers to EVMR use. Results indicated EVMRs were underutilized as a tool for tracking and improving population health and identifying emerging infectious diseases. Efforts to facilitate adoption of EVMRs for these purposes should be strengthened by the veterinary medical, human health, and public health professions.

  6. [Medical decision making in hospital--results of an exploratory study on the value of shared decision making from the physicians point of view].

    PubMed

    Ernst, J; Holze, S; Sonnefeld, C; Götze, H; Schwarz, R

    2007-04-01

    The changes in the relationship between doctors and patients and the transfer of shared decision making into medical treatment has often been discussed. The role and the perspective of the patients are primarily described. The aim of our study is to examine the attitudes of physicians regarding the shared decision making concept, based on 15 interviews with clinical doctors. Our findings show that most doctors know the content of the concept and mostly agree with it. Practical barriers for the realisation of shared decision making are often stressed. The meaning of the concept of shared decision making for the physicians is in some respects different from the meaning of this concept for the patients. It is important to examine this concept more particularly with standardised instruments. It will be necessary to explore not only the role of patients and physicians in the medical decision making process but also the position of other relevant persons like the relatives of the patients or the nursing staff.

  7. Design and implementation of web-based mobile electronic medication administration record.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Sung-Huai; Hou, I-Ching; Cheng, Po-Hsun; Tan, Ching-Ting; Shen, Po-Chao; Hsu, Kai-Ping; Hsieh, Sheau-Ling; Lai, Feipei

    2010-10-01

    Patients' safety is the most essential, critical issue, however, errors can hardly prevent, especially for human faults. In order to reduce the errors caused by human, we construct Electronic Health Records (EHR) in the Health Information System (HIS) to facilitate patients' safety and to improve the quality of medical care. During the medical care processing, all the tasks are based upon physicians' orders. In National Taiwan University Hospital (NTUH), the Electronic Health Record committee proposed a standard of order flows. There are objectives of the standard: first, to enhance medical procedures and enforce hospital policies; secondly, to improve the quality of medical care; third, to collect sufficient, adequate data for EHR in the near future. Among the proposed procedures, NTUH decides to establish a web-based mobile electronic medication administration record (ME-MAR) system. The system, build based on the service-oriented architecture (SOA) as well as embedded the HL7/XML standard, is installed in the Mobile Nursing Carts. It also implement accompany with the advanced techniques like Asynchronous JavaScript and XML (Ajax) or Web services to enhance the system usability. According to researches, it indicates that medication errors are highly proportion to total medical faults. Therefore, we expect the ME-MAR system can reduce medication errors. In addition, we evaluate ME-MAR can assist nurses or healthcare practitioners to administer, manage medication properly. This successful experience of developing the NTUH ME-MAR system can be easily applied to other related system. Meanwhile, the SOA architecture of the system can also be seamless integrated to NTUH or other HIS system.

  8. Shared Canadian Curriculum in Family Medicine (SHARC-FM): Creating a national consensus on relevant and practical training for medical students.

    PubMed

    Keegan, David A; Scott, Ian; Sylvester, Michael; Tan, Amy; Horrey, Kathleen; Weston, W Wayne

    2017-04-01

    In 2006, leaders of undergraduate family medicine education programs faced a series of increasing curriculum mandates in the context of limited time and financial resources. Additionally, it became apparent that a hidden curriculum against family medicine as a career choice was active in medical schools. The Shared Canadian Curriculum in Family Medicine was developed by the Canadian Undergraduate Family Medicine Education Directors and supported by the College of Family Physicians of Canada as a national collaborative project to support medical student training in family medicine clerkship. Its key objective is to enable education leaders to meet their educational mandates, while at the same time countering the hidden curriculum and providing a route to scholarship. The Shared Canadian Curriculum in Family Medicine is an open-access, shared, national curriculum (www.sharcfm.ca). It contains 23 core clinical topics (determined through a modified Delphi process) with demonstrable objectives for each. It also includes low- and medium-fidelity virtual patient cases, point-of-care learning resources (clinical cards), and assessment tools, all aligned with the core topics. French translation of the resources is ongoing. The core topics, objectives, and educational resources have been adopted by medical schools across Canada, according to their needs. The lessons learned from mounting this multi-institutional collaborative project will help others develop their own collaborative curricula. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  9. Electronic medical records as tools for quality improvement in ambulatory practice: theory and a case study.

    PubMed

    Ornstein, S M; Jenkins, R G; MacFarlane, L; Glaser, A; Snyder, K; Gundrum, T

    1998-11-01

    Information management is critical in today's health care environment. Traditional paper-based medical records are inadequate information management tools. Electronic medical records (EMRs) overcome many problems with paper records and are ideally suited to help physicians increase productivity and improve the quality of care they provide. The Department of Family Medicine at the Medical University of South Carolina uses the Practice Partner Patient Record EMR system. Department members have developed a quality improvement model based on this EMR system. The model has been used to improve care for acute bronchitis, diabetes mellitus, tobacco abuse, asthma, and postmenopausal osteoporosis.

  10. Fast Model Adaptation for Automated Section Classification in Electronic Medical Records.

    PubMed

    Ni, Jian; Delaney, Brian; Florian, Radu

    2015-01-01

    Medical information extraction is the automatic extraction of structured information from electronic medical records, where such information can be used for improving healthcare processes and medical decision making. In this paper, we study one important medical information extraction task called section classification. The objective of section classification is to automatically identify sections in a medical document and classify them into one of the pre-defined section types. Training section classification models typically requires large amounts of human labeled training data to achieve high accuracy. Annotating institution-specific data, however, can be both expensive and time-consuming; which poses a big hurdle for adapting a section classification model to new medical institutions. In this paper, we apply two advanced machine learning techniques, active learning and distant supervision, to reduce annotation cost and achieve fast model adaptation for automated section classification in electronic medical records. Our experiment results show that active learning reduces the annotation cost and time by more than 50%, and distant supervision can achieve good model accuracy using weakly labeled training data only.

  11. Architecture of portable electronic medical records system integrated with streaming media.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Shih, Chien-Chou

    2012-02-01

    Due to increasing occurrence of accidents and illness during business trips, travel, or overseas studies, the requirement for portable EMR (Electronic Medical Records) has increased. This study proposes integrating streaming media technology into the EMR system to facilitate referrals, contracted laboratories, and disease notification among hospitals. The current study encoded static and dynamic medical images of patients into a streaming video format and stored them in a Flash Media Server (FMS). Based on the Taiwan Electronic Medical Record Template (TMT) standard, EMR records can be converted into XML documents and used to integrate description fields with embedded streaming videos. This investigation implemented a web-based portable EMR interchanging system using streaming media techniques to expedite exchanging medical image information among hospitals. The proposed architecture of the portable EMR retrieval system not only provides local hospital users the ability to acquire EMR text files from a previous hospital, but also helps access static and dynamic medical images as reference for clinical diagnosis and treatment. The proposed method protects property rights of medical images through information security mechanisms of the Medical Record Interchange Service Center and Health Certificate Authorization to facilitate proper, efficient, and continuous treatment of patients.

  12. Assessment of the impact on time to complete medical record using an electronic medical record versus a paper record on emergency department patients: a study.

    PubMed

    Perry, Jeffrey J; Sutherland, Jane; Symington, Cheryl; Dorland, Katie; Mansour, Marlene; Stiell, Ian G

    2014-12-01

    Electronic medical records are becoming an integral part of healthcare delivery. The goal of this study was to compare paper documentation versus electronic medical record for non-traumatic chest pain to determine differences in time for physicians to complete medical records using paper versus electronic mediums. We also assessed physician satisfaction with the electronic format. We conducted this before-after study in a single large tertiary care academic emergency department. In the 'Before Period', stopwatches determined the time for paper medical recording. In the 'After Period', a template-based electronic medical record was introduced and the time for electronic recording was measured. The time to record in the before and after periods were compared using a two-sided t test. We surveyed physicians to assess satisfaction. We enrolled 100 non-traumatic patients with chest pain in the before period and 73 in the after period. The documentation time was longer using electronic charting, (9.6±5.9 min vs 6.1±2.5 min; p<0.001). 18 of 20 physicians participating in the after period completed surveys. Physicians were not satisfied with the electronic patient recording for non-traumatic chest pain. This is the first study that we are aware of which compared paper versus electronic medical records in the emergency department. Electronic recording took longer than paper records. Physicians were not satisfied using this electronic record. Given the time pressures on emergency physicians, a solution to minimise the charting time using electronic medical records must be found before widespread uptake of electronic charting will be possible. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. Novel multi-beam X-ray source for vacuum electronics enabled medical imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neculaes, V. Bogdan

    2013-10-01

    For almost 100 of years, commercial medical X-ray applications have relied heavily on X-ray tube architectures based on the vacuum electronics design developed by William Coolidge at the beginning of the twentieth century. Typically, the Coolidge design employs one hot tungsten filament as the electron source; the output of the tube is one X-ray beam. This X-ray source architecture is the state of the art in today's commercial medical imaging applications, such as Computed Tomography. Recently, GE Global Research has demonstrated the most dramatic extension of the Coolidge vacuum tube design for Computed Tomography (CT) in almost a century: a multi-beam X-ray source containing thirty two cathodes emitting up to 1000 mA, in a cathode grounded - anode at potential architecture (anode up to 140 kV). This talk will present the challenges of the X-ray multi-beam vacuum source design - space charge electron gun design, beam focusing to compression ratios needed in CT medical imaging applications (image resolution is critically dependent on how well the electron beam is focused in vacuum X-ray tubes), electron emitter choice to fit the aggressive beam current requirements, novel electronics for beam control and focusing, high voltage and vacuum solutions, as well as vacuum chamber design to sustain the considerable G forces typically encountered on a CT gantry (an X-ray vacuum tube typically rotates on the CT gantry at less than 0.5 s per revolution). Consideration will be given to various electron emitter technologies available for this application - tungsten emitters, dispenser cathodes and carbon nano tubes (CNT) - and their tradeoffs. The medical benefits potentially enabled by this unique vacuum multi-beam X-ray source are: X-ray dose reduction, reduction of image artifacts and improved image resolution. This work was funded in part by NIH grant R01EB006837.

  14. [The development and operation of a package inserts service system for electronic medical records].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hidetoshi; Nishimura, Sachiho; Shimamori, Yoshimitsu; Sato, Seiji; Hayase, Yukitoshi

    2003-03-01

    To promote the appropriate use of pharmaceuticals and to prevent side effects, physicians need package inserts on medicinal drugs as soon as possible. A medicinal drug information service system was established for electronic medical records to speed up and increase the efficiency of package insert communications within a medical institution. Development of this system facilitates access to package inserts by, for example, physicians. The time required to maintain files of package inserts was shortened, and the efficiency of the drug information service increased. As a source of package inserts for this system, package inserts using a standard generalized markup language (SGML) form were used, which are accessible to the public on the homepage of the Organization for Pharmaceutical Safety and Research (OPSR). This study found that a delay occurred in communicating revised package inserts from pharmaceutical companies to the OPSR. Therefore a pharmaceutical department page was set up as part of the homepage of the medical institution for electronic medical records to shorten the delay in the revision of package inserts posted on the medicinal drug information service homepage of the OPSR. The usefulness of this package insert service system for electronic medical records is clear. For more effective use of this system based on the OPSR homepage pharmaceutical companies have been requested to provide quicker updating of package inserts.

  15. Are In-Bed Electronic Weights Recorded in the Medical Record Accurate?

    PubMed

    Gerl, Heather; Miko, Alexandra; Nelson, Mandy; Godaire, Lori

    2016-01-01

    This study found large discrepancies between in-bed weights recorded in the medical record and carefully obtained standing weights with a calibrated, electronic bedside scale. This discrepancy appears to be related to inadequate bed calibration before patient admission and having excessive linen, clothing, and/or equipment on the bed during weighing by caregivers.

  16. Electronic Medical Records Adoption and Usage among Osteopathic Physicians in New York State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Jon I.

    2012-01-01

    In 2010, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology reported a slow rate of adoption of electronic medical records. The present research sought to explore possible reasons for this situation by examining factors that distinguished between users and nonusers of electronic…

  17. Organizational Leader Sensemaking in Healthcare Process Changes: The Development of the Electronic Medical Records Expectation Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riesenmy, Kelly Rouse

    2011-01-01

    Physicians play a unique role in the adoption of electronic medical records (EMR) within the healthcare organization. As leaders, they are responsible for setting the standards for this new technology within their sphere of influence while concurrently being required to learn and integrate EMR into their own workflow and process as the recipients…

  18. Organizational Leader Sensemaking in Healthcare Process Changes: The Development of the Electronic Medical Records Expectation Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riesenmy, Kelly Rouse

    2011-01-01

    Physicians play a unique role in the adoption of electronic medical records (EMR) within the healthcare organization. As leaders, they are responsible for setting the standards for this new technology within their sphere of influence while concurrently being required to learn and integrate EMR into their own workflow and process as the recipients…

  19. An Evaluation of Authentic Learning in an Electronic Medical Records System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Sandra L.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined participants' perceptions of the effectiveness of a new job-training program designed to enhance the authentic learning in adult learners using an electronic medical records system at a naval health clinic. This job-training program lacked data about participants' perceptions of this learning process by which to gauge its…

  20. Strategies Nurse Managers Used to Offset Challenges during Electronic Medical Records Implementation: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Easterling, Latasha

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative, descriptive case study was to discover successful approaches used, by nurse managers, to reduce barriers during the implementation of electronic medical record system in one hospital. Fourteen nurse managers were interviewed from an academic health science center in Mississippi. A pilot study was conducted to…

  1. Developing a Systematic Architecture Approach for Designing an Enhanced Electronic Medical Record (EEMR) System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldukheil, Maher A.

    2013-01-01

    The Healthcare industry is characterized by its complexity in delivering care to the patients. Accordingly, healthcare organizations adopt and implement Information Technology (IT) solutions to manage complexity, improve quality of care, and transform to a fully integrated and digitized environment. Electronic Medical Records (EMR), which is…

  2. Electronic Medical Records Adoption and Usage among Osteopathic Physicians in New York State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Jon I.

    2012-01-01

    In 2010, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology reported a slow rate of adoption of electronic medical records. The present research sought to explore possible reasons for this situation by examining factors that distinguished between users and nonusers of electronic…

  3. Health Care Professionals' Perceptions of the Use of Electronic Medical Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adeyeye, Adebisi

    2015-01-01

    Electronic medical record (EMR) use has improved significantly in health care organizations. However, many barriers and factors influence the success of EMR implementation and adoption. The purpose of the descriptive qualitative single-case study was to explore health care professionals' perceptions of the use of EMRs at a hospital division of a…

  4. Integrating traditional nursing service orientation content with electronic medical record orientation.

    PubMed

    Harton, Brenda B; Borrelli, Larry; Knupp, Ann; Rogers, Necolen; West, Vickie R

    2009-01-01

    Traditional nursing service orientation classes at an acute care hospital were integrated with orientation to the electronic medical record to blend the two components in a user-friendly format so that the learner is introduced to the culture, processes, and documentation methods of the organization, with an opportunity to document online in a practice domain while lecture and discussion information is fresh.</