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Sample records for shear flow dynamics

  1. Shear flow by molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyes, D. M.

    1985-08-01

    A detailed comparison is made between a number of methods for generating shear flow in Molecular Dynamics computer simulation. Algorithms which closely mimic most experimental methods for producing shear flow are those by Trozzi and Ciccotti, and Ashurst and Hoover. They employ hard wall boundaries and fluid walls respectively (with sheared cell periodicity being only in two dimensions). The sheared fluid properties are therefore inextricably linked with interfacial effects. These problems are largely eliminated by the Lees and Edwards scheme which creates a pseudo-infinite sheared material. There are a number of derivatives of this model including one favoured by the author for investigating non-linear viscoelastic phenomena. A number of results from this scheme pertaining to the Lennard-Jones liquid are presented.

  2. Vesicle dynamics in shear and capillary flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi; Gompper, Gerhard

    2005-11-01

    The deformation of vesicles in flow is studied by a mesoscopic simulation technique, which combines multi-particle collision dynamics for the solvent with a dynamically triangulated surface model for the membrane. Shape transitions are investigated both in simple shear flows and in cylindrical capillary flows. We focus on reduced volumes, where the discocyte shape of fluid vesicles is stable, and the prolate shape is metastable. In simple shear flow at low membrane viscosity, the shear induces a transformation from discocyte to prolate with increasing shear rate, while at high membrane viscosity, the shear induces a transformation from prolate to discocyte, or tumbling motion accompanied by oscillations between these two morphologies. In capillary flow, at small flow velocities the symmetry axis of the discocyte is found not to be oriented perpendicular to the cylinder axis. With increasing flow velocity, a transition to a prolate shape occurs for fluid vesicles, while vesicles with shear-elastic membranes (like red blood cells) transform into a coaxial parachute-like shape.

  3. Dynamics of flexible fibers in shear flow

    SciTech Connect

    Słowicka, Agnieszka M.; Wajnryb, Eligiusz; Ekiel-Jeżewska, Maria L.

    2015-09-28

    Dynamics of flexible non-Brownian fibers in shear flow at low-Reynolds-number are analyzed numerically for a wide range of the ratios A of the fiber bending force to the viscous drag force. Initially, the fibers are aligned with the flow, and later they move in the plane perpendicular to the flow vorticity. A surprisingly rich spectrum of different modes is observed when the value of A is systematically changed, with sharp transitions between coiled and straightening out modes, period-doubling bifurcations from periodic to migrating solutions, irregular dynamics, and chaos.

  4. Dynamic modes of red blood cells in oscillatory shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2010-06-01

    The dynamics of red blood cells (RBCs) in oscillatory shear flow was studied using differential equations of three variables: a shape parameter, the inclination angle θ , and phase angle ϕ of the membrane rotation. In steady shear flow, three types of dynamics occur depending on the shear rate and viscosity ratio. (i) tank-treading (TT): ϕ rotates while the shape and θ oscillate. (ii) tumbling (TB): θ rotates while the shape and ϕ oscillate. (iii) intermediate motion: both ϕ and θ rotate synchronously or intermittently. In oscillatory shear flow, RBCs show various dynamics based on these three motions. For a low shear frequency with zero mean shear rate, a limit-cycle oscillation occurs, based on the TT or TB rotation at a high or low shear amplitude, respectively. This TT-based oscillation well explains recent experiments. In the middle shear amplitude, RBCs show an intermittent or synchronized oscillation. As shear frequency increases, the vesicle oscillation becomes delayed with respect to the shear oscillation. At a high frequency, multiple limit-cycle oscillations coexist. The thermal fluctuations can induce transitions between two orbits at very low shear amplitudes. For a high mean shear rate with small shear oscillation, the shape and θ oscillate in the TT motion but only one attractor exists even at high shear frequencies. The measurement of these oscillatory modes is a promising tool for quantifying the viscoelasticity of RBCs, synthetic capsules, and lipid vesicles.

  5. Dynamics of a trapped Brownian particle in shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzer, Lukas; Bammert, Jochen; Rzehak, Roland; Zimmermann, Walter

    2010-04-01

    The Brownian motion of a particle in a harmonic potential, which is simultaneously exposed either to a linear shear flow or to a plane Poiseuille flow is investigated. In the shear plane of both flows the probability distribution of the particle becomes anisotropic and the dynamics is changed in a characteristic manner compared to a trapped particle in a quiescent fluid. The particle distribution takes either an elliptical or a parachute shape or a superposition of both depending on the mean particle position in the shear plane. Simultaneously, shear-induced cross-correlations between particle fluctuations along orthogonal directions in the shear plane are found. They are asymmetric in time. In Poiseuille flow thermal particle fluctuations perpendicular to the flow direction in the shear plane induce a shift of the particle’s mean position away from the potential minimum. Two complementary methods are suggested to measure shear-induced cross-correlations between particle fluctuations along orthogonal directions.

  6. Dynamics of a deformable active particle under shear flow.

    PubMed

    Tarama, Mitsusuke; Menzel, Andreas M; ten Hagen, Borge; Wittkowski, Raphael; Ohta, Takao; Löwen, Hartmut

    2013-09-14

    The motion of a deformable active particle in linear shear flow is explored theoretically. Based on symmetry considerations, we propose coupled nonlinear dynamical equations for the particle position, velocity, deformation, and rotation. In our model, both, passive rotations induced by the shear flow as well as active spinning motions, are taken into account. Our equations reduce to known models in the two limits of vanishing shear flow and vanishing particle deformability. For varied shear rate and particle propulsion speed, we solve the equations numerically in two spatial dimensions and obtain a manifold of different dynamical modes including active straight motion, periodic motions, motions on undulated cycloids, winding motions, as well as quasi-periodic and chaotic motions induced at high shear rates. The types of motion are distinguished by different characteristics in the real-space trajectories and in the dynamical behavior of the particle orientation and its deformation. Our predictions can be verified in experiments on self-propelled droplets exposed to a linear shear flow.

  7. Shear flow behavior of a dynamically symmetric polymeric bicontinuous microemulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ning

    2005-03-01

    Soft materials with complex internal structure often exhibit fascinating rheological behavior. For example, under flow the poly (ethylethylene) (PEE)/poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS)/PEE-PDMS polymeric bicontinuous microemulsion (BμE) showed shear-induced macrophase separation.^ 1 This was tentatively attributed to the extreme dynamical asymmetry of the two homopolymers, i.e., their viscosities differed by three orders of magnitude. To understand the role of the dynamic symmetry of a BμE when subjected to shear flow, we have developed a new ternary polymer blend system poly(butylene oxide) (PBO)/ poly(ethylenepropylene) (PEP)/PEP-PBO, which is dynamically almost symmetric. We will report on the shear flow behavior of this new BμE. Reference: [1] Krishnan et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2001, 87, 098301

  8. Dynamics of prolate spheroidal elastic particles in confined shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villone, M. M.; D'Avino, G.; Hulsen, M. A.; Maffettone, P. L.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate through numerical simulations the dynamics of a neo-Hookean elastic prolate spheroid suspended in a Newtonian fluid under shear flow. Both initial orientations of the particle within and outside the shear plane and both unbounded and confined flow geometries are considered. In unbounded flow, when the particle starts on the shear plane, two stable regimes of motion are found, i.e., trembling, where the particle shape periodically elongates and compresses in the shear plane and the angle between its major semiaxis and the flow direction oscillates around a positive mean value, and tumbling, where the particle shape periodically changes and its major axis performs complete revolutions around the vorticity axis. When the particle is initially oriented out of the shear plane, more complex dynamics arise. Geometric confinement of the particle between the moving walls also influences its deformation and regime of motion. In addition, when the particle is initially located in an asymmetric position with respect to the moving walls, particle lateral migration is detected. The effects on the particle dynamics of the geometric and physical parameters that rule the system are investigated.

  9. Full dynamics of a red blood cell in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Dupire, Jules; Socol, Marius; Viallat, Annie

    2012-12-18

    At the cellular scale, blood fluidity and mass transport depend on the dynamics of red blood cells in blood flow, specifically on their deformation and orientation. These dynamics are governed by cellular rheological properties, such as internal viscosity and cytoskeleton elasticity. In diseases in which cell rheology is altered genetically or by parasitic invasion or by changes in the microenvironment, blood flow may be severely impaired. The nonlinear interplay between cell rheology and flow may generate complex dynamics, which remain largely unexplored experimentally. Under simple shear flow, only two motions, "tumbling" and "tank-treading," have been described experimentally and relate to cell mechanics. Here, we elucidate the full dynamics of red blood cells in shear flow by coupling two videomicroscopy approaches providing multidirectional pictures of cells, and we analyze the mechanical origin of the observed dynamics. We show that contrary to common belief, when red blood cells flip into the flow, their orientation is determined by the shear rate. We discuss the "rolling" motion, similar to a rolling wheel. This motion, which permits the cells to avoid energetically costly deformations, is a true signature of the cytoskeleton elasticity. We highlight a hysteresis cycle and two transient dynamics driven by the shear rate: an intermittent regime during the "tank-treading-to-flipping" transition and a Frisbee-like "spinning" regime during the "rolling-to-tank-treading" transition. Finally, we reveal that the biconcave red cell shape is highly stable under moderate shear stresses, and we interpret this result in terms of stress-free shape and elastic buckling. PMID:23213229

  10. Dynamics of poloidal flows in enhanced reverse shear bifurcation

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, R.; Avinash, K.

    2005-07-15

    A simple reduced enhanced reverse shear (RERS) model is constructed to study the dynamics of poloidal flows during the ERS transition. This model predicts that a reversal of poloidal flow shear occurs just prior to the transition, as seen in experiment [R. E. Bell et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 1429 (1998)]. This transition front propagates until the radial location where the safety factor (q) is minimum and becomes locked there due to insufficient input power to overcome the threshold requirement for the bifurcation. This study also reveals that there can be many routes to ERS transition depending upon various tunable parameters.

  11. Chaotic dynamics of red blood cells in oscillating shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, Prosenjit; Cordasco, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    A 3D computational study of deformable red blood cells in dilute suspension and subject to sinusoidally oscillating shear flow is considered. It is observed that the cell exhibits either a periodic motion or a chaotic motion. In the periodic motion, the cell reverses its orientation either about the flow direction or about the flow gradient, depending on the initial conditions. In certain parameter range, the initial conditions are forgotten and the cells become entrained in the same sequence of horizontal reversals. The chaotic dynamics is characterized by a nonperiodic sequence of horizontal and vertical reversals, and swings. The study provides the first conclusive evidence of the chaotic dynamics of fully deformable cells in oscillating flow using a deterministic numerical model without the introduction of any stochastic noise. An analysis of the chaotic dynamics shows that chaos is only possible in certain frequency bands when the cell membrane can rotate by a certain amount allowing the cells to swing near the maximum shear rate. We make a novel observation that the occurrence of the vertical or horizontal reversal depends only on whether a critical angle, that is independent of the flow frequency, is exceeded at the instant of flow reversal.

  12. Zonal flow dynamics in the double tearing mode with antisymmetric shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Aohua; Li, Jiquan; Liu, Jinyuan; Kishimoto, Yasuaki

    2014-05-15

    The generation dynamics and the structural characteristics of zonal flows are investigated in the double tearing mode (DTM) with antisymmetric shear flows. Two kinds of zonal flow oscillations are revealed based on reduced resistive magnetohydrodynamics simulations, which depend on the shear flow amplitudes corresponding to different DTM eigen mode states, elaborated by Mao et al. [Phys. Plasmas 20, 022114 (2013)]. For the weak shear flows below an amplitude threshold, v{sub c}, at which two DTM eigen states with antisymmetric or symmetric magnetic island structure are degenerated, the zonal flows grow oscillatorily in the Rutherford regime during the nonlinear evolution of the DTMs. It is identified that the oscillation mechanism results from the nonlinear interaction between the distorted islands and the zonal flows through the modification of shear flows. However, for the medium shear flows above v{sub c} but below the critical threshold of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, an oscillatory growing zonal flow occurs in the linear phase of the DTM evolution. It is demonstrated that the zonal flow oscillation originates from the three-wave mode coupling or a modulation instability pumped by two DTM eigen modes with the same frequency but opposite propagating direction. With the shear flows increasing, the amplitude of zonal flow oscillation increases first and then decreases, whilst the oscillation frequency as twice of the Doppler frequency shift increases. Furthermore, impacts of the oscillatory zonal flows on the nonlinear evolution of DTM islands and the global reconnection are also discussed briefly.

  13. Evolution of shear banding flows in metallic glasses characterized by molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Li; Luan, Yingwei

    2016-06-01

    To reveal the evolution of shear banding flows, one-dimensional nanostructure metallic glass composites have been studied with molecular dynamics. The inherent size determines the initial thickness of shear bands, and the subsequent broadening can be restricted to some extent. The vortex-like flows evoke the atomic motion perpendicular to the shear plane, which accelerates the interatomic diffusion. The reduction of local strain rate causes the flow softening for monolithic Cu-Zr glass, but the participation of Cu-atoms in the shear banding flow gradually leads to the shear hardening for the composites.

  14. Coupled dynamics of flow, microstructure, and conductivity in sheared suspensions.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Tyler; Helal, Ahmed; McKinley, Gareth H; Kamrin, Ken

    2016-09-28

    We propose a model for the evolution of the conductivity tensor for a flowing suspension of electrically conductive particles. We use discrete particle numerical simulations together with a continuum physical framework to construct an evolution law for the suspension microstructure during flow. This model is then coupled with a relationship between the microstructure and the electrical conductivity tensor. Certain parameters of the joint model are fit experimentally using rheo-electrical conductivity measurements of carbon black suspensions under flow over a range of shear rates. The model is applied to the case of steady shearing as well as time-varying conductivity of unsteady flow experiments. We find that the model prediction agrees closely with the measured experimental data in all cases. PMID:27532243

  15. Brownian-dynamics simulation studies of a charge-stabilized colloidal suspension under shear flow

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, J. ); Sood, A.K.; Krishnamurthy, H.R. Jawaharlal Nehru Center for Advanced Scientific Research, Indian Institute of Science campus, Bangalore 560012 )

    1994-11-01

    We have carried out Brownian-dynamics simulations of a charged colloidal suspension under oscillatory shear flow with both Couette and Poiseuille velocity profiles. We show that in the steady-shear'' limit, for both of the velocity profiles, the enhancement of the self-diffusion coefficient in directions transverse to the flow shows a crossover from a [dot [gamma

  16. Brownian Dynamics Simulation for Suspension of Oblate Spheroidal Particles in Simple Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Takehiro; Suga, Takanori; Mori, Noriyasu

    2004-04-01

    Brownian dynamics simulations have been carried out for suspensions of oblate spheroidal particles interacting via the Gay-Berne potential. The system changed from isotropic phase to nematic one with increasing the particle concentration. In addition, the behavior of particles in simple shear flows was simulated; the shear was imposed on the systems in nematic phase at rest. The systems exhibited various motions of the director depending on the shear rate, e.g. continuous rotations of director at low shear rates and flow aligning at high shear rates.

  17. Hydrodynamic correlations in shear flow: Multiparticle-collision-dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Anoop; Huang, Chien-Cheng; Winkler, Roland G; Gompper, Gerhard

    2015-11-01

    The nonequilibrium hydrodynamic correlations of a multiparticle-collision-dynamics (MPC) fluid in shear flow are studied by analytical calculations and simulations. The Navier-Stokes equations for a MPC fluid are linearized about the shear flow and the hydrodynamic modes are evaluated as an expansion in the wave vector. The shear-rate dependence and anisotropy of the transverse and longitudinal velocity correlations are analyzed. We demonstrate that hydrodynamic correlations in shear flow are anisotropic, specifically, the two transverse modes are no longer identical. In addition, our simulations reveal the directional dependence of the frequency and attenuation of the longitudinal velocity correlation function. Furthermore, the velocity autocorrelation functions of a tagged fluid particle in shear flow are determined. The simulation results for various hydrodynamic correlations agree very well with the theoretical predictions. PMID:26651774

  18. Vortex dynamics in a turbulent shear flow over a cavity at near-zero Mach number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Shiyao; Ceccio, Steven; Driscoll, James

    2007-11-01

    A kilohertz frame-rate Cinematographic Particle Imaging Velocimetry system was used to acquire time series of whole-field velocity data for an incompressible, turbulent shear flow over a rectangular, shallow cavity with ReL = 2.87 x 10^5, where L is the cavity length. The cavity shear layer was divided into three regions that exhibited different vortex dynamics: formation, convection/evolution, and impingement. The second region is similar to a free shear layer, with vortex roll-up that is well predicted by linear, inviscid instability theory. The impinging shear layer produces a jet-like flow along the downstream wall, resulting in a large-scale recirculation zone in the cavity. This flow impinges on the shear layer in the formation region, increasing the shear layer growth rate. No self-sustained pressure or flow-field oscillations were observed for a variety of flow speeds. The dynamics of the shear layer in the impingement region was found to be correlated with the dynamic pressure on the downstream wall.

  19. Dynamic Deformation and Recovery Response of Red Blood Cells to a Cyclically Reversing Shear Flow: Effects of Frequency of Cyclically Reversing Shear Flow and Shear Stress Level

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Nobuo; Kataoka, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Toshitaka; Takatani, Setsuo

    2006-01-01

    Dynamic deformation and recovery responses of red blood cells (RBCs) to a cyclically reversing shear flow generated in a 30-μm clearance, with the peak shear stress of 53, 108, 161, and 274 Pa at the frequency of 1, 2, 3, and 5 Hz, respectively, were studied. The RBCs' time-varying velocity varied after the glass plate velocity without any time lag, whereas the L/W change, where L and W were the major and minor axes of RBCs' ellipsoidal shape, exhibited a rapid increase and gradual decay during the deformation and recovery phase. The time of minimum L/W occurrence lagged behind the zero-velocity time of the glass plate (zero stress), and the delay time normalized to the one-cycle duration remained constant at 8.0%. The elongation of RBCs at zero stress time became larger with the reversing frequency. A simple mechanical model consisting of an elastic linear element during a rapid elongation period and a parallel combination of elements such as a spring and dashpot during the nonlinear recovery phase was suggested. The dynamic response behavior of RBCs under a cyclically reversing shear flow was different from the conventional shape change where a steplike force was applied to and completely released from the RBCs. PMID:16766612

  20. The effect of shear flow on nanoparticle agglomeration and deposition in in vitro dynamic flow models.

    PubMed

    Grabinski, Christin; Sharma, Monita; Maurer, Elizabeth; Sulentic, Courtney; Mohan Sankaran, R; Hussain, Saber

    2016-01-01

    Traditional in vitro toxicity experiments typically involve exposure of a mono- or co-culture of cells to nanoparticles (NPs) in static conditions with the assumption of 100% deposition (i.e. dose) of well-dispersed particles. However, cellular dose can be affected by agglomeration and the unique transport kinetics of NPs in biological media. We hypothesize that shear flow can address these issues and achieve more predictable dosage. Here, we compare the behavior of gold NPs with diameters of 5, 10 and 30 nm in static and dynamic in vitro models. We also utilize transport modeling to approximate the shear rate experienced by the cells in dynamic conditions to evaluate physiological relevance. The transport kinetics show that NP behavior is governed by both gravity and diffusion forces in static conditions and only diffusion in dynamic conditions. Our results reveal that dynamic systems are capable of producing a more predictable dose compared to static systems, which has strong implications for improving repeatability in nanotoxicity assessments. PMID:25961858

  1. Phase Diagram and Breathing Dynamics of Red Blood Cell Motion in Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, Prosenjit; Yazdani, Alireza

    2011-11-01

    We present phase diagrams of red blood cell dynamics in shear flow using three-dimensional numerical simulations. By considering a wide range of shear rate and interior-to-exterior fluid viscosity ratio, it is shown that the cell dynamics is often more complex than the well-known tank-treading, tumbling and swinging motion, and is characterized by an extreme variation of the cell shape. We identify such complex shape dynamics as `breathing' dynamics. During the breathing motion, the cell either completely aligns with the flow direction and the membrane folds inward forming two cusps, or, it undergoes large swinging motion while deep, crater-like dimples periodically emerge and disappear. At lower bending rigidity, the breathing motion occurs over a wider range of shear rates, and is often characterized by the emergence of a quad-concave shape. The effect of the breathing dynamics on the tank-treading-to-tumbling transition is illustrated by detailed phase diagrams which appear to be more complex and richer than those of vesicles. In a remarkable departure from classical theory of nondeformable cells, we find that there exists a critical viscosity ratio below which the transition is dependent on shear rate only. Supported by NSF.

  2. Tumbling dynamics of isolated polymer chains in strong shear flows and the effects of chain resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Ronald; Saha Dalal, Indranil; Albaugh, Alex; Hoda, Nazish

    2012-02-01

    Using Brownian dynamics simulations, without hydrodynamic and excluded volume interactions, on polymer chain models encompassing a wide range of resolutions, we present a detailed investigation on the behavior of isolated chains in shear flow. We find a highly non-monotonic behavior for all models, with chain compression occurring at ultra-high shear rates that is consistent with the recent simulation studies. However, results obtained using highly refined models, with resolutions lower than a Kuhn step, reveal that this transition is an artifact of the level of chain discretization. Also, our results clearly indicate that, at high shear rates, the chain thickness in the shear-gradient direction is independent of the chain length, which differ from previously reported scaling law. We show that the chain thickness is fixed by the distance a sub-section of the chain can diffuse in the shear-gradient direction before convection stretches it out and suppresses further diffusion. Simple physical arguments are then used to derive the correct scaling laws for the coil width and the tumbling time at high shear rates. We believe that our findings presented here will provide the foundation for a better understanding of this basic problem in polymer dynamics.

  3. Steady shear rheometry of dissipative particle dynamics models of polymer fluids in reverse Poiseuille flow

    PubMed Central

    Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Karniadakis, George Em; Caswell, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Polymer fluids are modeled with dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) as undiluted bead-spring chains and their solutions. The models are assessed by investigating their steady shear-rate properties. Non-Newtonian viscosity and normal stress coefficients, for shear rates from the lower to the upper Newtonian regimes, are calculated from both plane Couette and plane Poiseuille flows. The latter is realized as reverse Poiseuille flow (RPF) generated from two Poiseuille flows driven by uniform body forces in opposite directions along two-halves of a computational domain. Periodic boundary conditions ensure the RPF wall velocity to be zero without density fluctuations. In overlapping shear-rate regimes the RPF properties are confirmed to be in good agreement with those calculated from plane Couette flow with Lees–Edwards periodic boundary conditions (LECs), the standard virtual rheometer for steady shear-rate properties. The concentration and the temperature dependence of the properties of the model fluids are shown to satisfy the principles of concentration and temperature superposition commonly employed in the empirical correlation of real polymer-fluid properties. The thermodynamic validity of the equation of state is found to be a crucial factor for the achievement of time-temperature superposition. With these models, RPF is demonstrated to be an accurate and convenient virtual rheometer for the acquisition of steady shear-rate rheological properties. It complements, confirms, and extends the results obtained with the standard LEC configuration, and it can be used with the output from other particle-based methods, including molecular dynamics, Brownian dynamics, smooth particle hydrodynamics, and the lattice Boltzmann method. PMID:20405981

  4. Steady shear rheometry of dissipative particle dynamics models of polymer fluids in reverse Poiseuille flow.

    PubMed

    Fedosov, Dmitry A; Karniadakis, George Em; Caswell, Bruce

    2010-04-14

    Polymer fluids are modeled with dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) as undiluted bead-spring chains and their solutions. The models are assessed by investigating their steady shear-rate properties. Non-Newtonian viscosity and normal stress coefficients, for shear rates from the lower to the upper Newtonian regimes, are calculated from both plane Couette and plane Poiseuille flows. The latter is realized as reverse Poiseuille flow (RPF) generated from two Poiseuille flows driven by uniform body forces in opposite directions along two-halves of a computational domain. Periodic boundary conditions ensure the RPF wall velocity to be zero without density fluctuations. In overlapping shear-rate regimes the RPF properties are confirmed to be in good agreement with those calculated from plane Couette flow with Lees-Edwards periodic boundary conditions (LECs), the standard virtual rheometer for steady shear-rate properties. The concentration and the temperature dependence of the properties of the model fluids are shown to satisfy the principles of concentration and temperature superposition commonly employed in the empirical correlation of real polymer-fluid properties. The thermodynamic validity of the equation of state is found to be a crucial factor for the achievement of time-temperature superposition. With these models, RPF is demonstrated to be an accurate and convenient virtual rheometer for the acquisition of steady shear-rate rheological properties. It complements, confirms, and extends the results obtained with the standard LEC configuration, and it can be used with the output from other particle-based methods, including molecular dynamics, Brownian dynamics, smooth particle hydrodynamics, and the lattice Boltzmann method.

  5. Dynamics and rheology of concentrated, finite-Reynolds-number suspensions in a homogeneous shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Kyongmin; Maxey, Martin R.

    2013-05-01

    We present the lubrication-corrected force-coupling method for the simulation of concentrated suspensions under finite inertia. Suspension dynamics are investigated as a function of the particle-scale Reynolds number Re_{dot{γ }} and the bulk volume fraction ϕ in a homogeneous linear shear flow, in which Re_{dot{γ }} is defined from the density ρf and dynamic viscosity μ of the fluid, particle radius a, and the shear rate dot{γ } as Re_{dot{γ }}= ρ _f dot{γ } a^2 / μ. It is shown that the velocity fluctuations in the velocity-gradient and vorticity directions decrease at larger Re_{dot{γ }}. However, the particle self-diffusivity is found to be an increasing function of Re_{dot{γ }} as the motion of the suspended particles develops a longer auto-correlation under finite fluid inertia. It is shown that finite-inertia suspension flows are shear-thickening and the particle stresses become highly intermittent as Re_{dot{γ }} increases. To study the detailed changes in the suspension microstructure and rheology, we introduce a particle-stress-weighted pair-distribution function. The stress-weighted pair-distribution function clearly shows that the increase of the effective viscosity at high Re_{dot{γ }} is mostly related to the strong normal lubrication interaction in the compressive principal axis of the shear flow.

  6. Simulating Fiber Ordering and Aggregation In Shear Flow Using Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stimatze, Justin T.

    We have developed a mesoscale simulation of fiber aggregation in shear flow using LAMMPS and its implementation of dissipative particle dynamics. Understanding fiber aggregation in shear flow and flow-induced microstructural fiber networks is critical to our interest in high-performance composite materials. Dissipative particle dynamics enables the consideration of hydrodynamic interactions between fibers through the coarse-grained simulation of the matrix fluid. Correctly simulating hydrodynamic interactions and accounting for fluid forces on the microstructure is required to correctly model the shear-induced aggregation process. We are able to determine stresses, viscosity, and fiber forces while simulating the evolution of a model fiber system undergoing shear flow. Fiber-fiber contact interactions are approximated by combinations of common pairwise forces, allowing the exploration of interaction-influenced fiber behaviors such as aggregation and bundling. We are then able to quantify aggregate structure and effective volume fraction for a range of relevant system and fiber-fiber interaction parameters. Our simulations have demonstrated several aggregate types dependent on system parameters such as shear rate, short-range attractive forces, and a resistance to relative rotation while in contact. A resistance to relative rotation at fiber-fiber contact points has been found to strongly contribute to an increased angle between neighboring aggregated fibers and therefore an increase in average aggregate volume fraction. This increase in aggregate volume fraction is strongly correlated with a significant enhancement of system viscosity, leading us to hypothesize that controlling the resistance to relative rotation during manufacturing processes is important when optimizing for desired composite material characteristics.

  7. Modeling Nanoparticle Targeting to a Vascular Surface in Shear Flow Through Diffusive Particle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Bei; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Yihua; Yang, Longxiang; Zhang, Guocheng; Liu, Yaling

    2015-05-01

    Nanoparticles are regarded as promising carriers for targeted drug delivery and imaging probes. A fundamental understanding of the dynamics of polymeric nanoparticle targeting to receptor-coated vascular surfaces is therefore of great importance to enhance the design of nanoparticles toward improving binding ability. Although the effects of particle size and shear flow on the binding of nanoparticles to a vessel wall have been studied at the particulate level, a computational model to investigate the details of the binding process at the molecular level has not been developed. In this research, dissipative particle dynamics simulations are used to study nanoparticles with diameters of several nanometers binding to receptors on vascular surfaces under shear flow. Interestingly, shear flow velocities ranging from 0 to 2000 s-1 had no effect on the attachment process of nanoparticles very close to the capillary wall. Increased binding energy between the ligands and wall caused a corresponding linear increase in bonding ability. Our simulations also indicated that larger nanoparticles and those of rod shape with a higher aspect ratio have better binding ability than those of smaller size or rounder shape.

  8. Shear flow and drift wave turbulence dynamics in a cylindrical plasma device

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Z.; Tynan, G. R.; Holland, C.; Xu, M.; Mueller, S. H.; Yu, J. H.

    2010-03-15

    The experimental observations of the dynamics of the coupled drift wave turbulence (DWT)/sheared zonal flow (ZF) system in a cylindrical plasma device using a combination of Langmuir probe and fast-framing imaging measurements are reported. The results show the presence of an azimuthal ZF that exhibits low frequency (approx250 Hz) fluctuations. The envelope of the higher frequency (above 5 kHz) floating potential fluctuations associated with the DWT, the density gradient, and the turbulent radial particle flux are all modulated out of phase with the strength of the ZF. The divergence of the turbulent Reynolds stress is also modulated at the same slow time scale in a phase-coherent manner consistent with a turbulent-driven shear flow sustained against the collisional and viscous damping. The radial turbulence correlation length and cross-field particle transport are reduced during periods of strong flow shear. The results are qualitatively consistent with theoretical expectations for coupled DWT-ZF dynamics.

  9. Brownian dynamics of a self-propelled particle in shear flow.

    PubMed

    ten Hagen, Borge; Wittkowski, Raphael; Löwen, Hartmut

    2011-09-01

    Brownian dynamics of a self-propelled particle in linear shear flow is studied analytically by solving the Langevin equation and in simulation. The particle has a constant propagation speed along a fluctuating orientation and is additionally subjected to a constant torque. In two spatial dimensions, the mean trajectory and the mean square displacement (MSD) are calculated as functions of time t analytically. In general, the mean trajectories are cycloids that are modified by finite temperature effects. With regard to the MSD, different regimes are identified where the MSD scales with t(ν) with ν=0,1,2,3,4. In particular, an accelerated (ν=4) motion emerges if the particle is self-propelled along the gradient direction of the shear flow.

  10. Effect of internal viscosity on Brownian dynamics of DNA molecules in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Dong; Melnik, Roderick V N

    2007-04-01

    The results of Brownian dynamics simulations of a single DNA molecule in shear flow are presented taking into account the effect of internal viscosity. The dissipative mechanism of internal viscosity is proved necessary in the research of DNA dynamics. A stochastic model is derived on the basis of the balance equation for forces acting on the chain. The Euler method is applied to the solution of the model. The extensions of DNA molecules for different Weissenberg numbers are analyzed. Comparison with the experimental results available in the literature is carried out to estimate the contribution of the effect of internal viscosity.

  11. Dynamics and topology of a flexible chain: knots in steady shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slowicka, Agnieszka; Kuei, Steve; Ekiel-Jezewska, Maria; Wajnryb, Eligiusz; Stone, Howard

    2015-11-01

    Dynamics of particles in a water-base liquid is a very important subject of research from the point of view of biological, medical and industrial applications. Motion of microorganisms, biopolymers, proteins or artificial particles immersed in a flowing liquid is complex and such systems have numerous applications but, on the other hand,the dynamics has not been yet very well understood. I our paper we performed numerical simulations of a bead-spring model chain to investigate the dynamics of long and flexible elastic fibers in a steady shear flow. For a class of rather open conformations and different parameters of flexibility, we identify two district conformational modes with different final size, shape, and orientation. Through further analysis we identify slipknots in the chain. We also analyzed evolution of the fibers which initially form ``open'' trefoils for different chain flexibilities and initial orientations with respect to the flow direction. We found examples, which illustrate that the shear flow can unknot a flexible chain and then knot it again; this phenomenon sometimes repeats several times.

  12. Two-dimensional vesicle dynamics under shear flow: Effect of confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaoui, Badr; Harting, Jens; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2011-06-01

    Dynamics of a single vesicle under shear flow between two parallel plates is studied in two-dimensions using lattice-Boltzmann simulations. We first present how we adapted the lattice-Boltzmann method to simulate vesicle dynamics, using an approach known from the immersed boundary method. The fluid flow is computed on an Eulerian regular fixed mesh while the location of the vesicle membrane is tracked by a Lagrangian moving mesh. As benchmarking tests, the known vesicle equilibrium shapes in a fluid at rest are found and the dynamical behavior of a vesicle under simple shear flow is being reproduced. Further, we focus on investigating the effect of the confinement on the dynamics, a question that has received little attention so far. In particular, we study how the vesicle steady inclination angle in the tank-treading regime depends on the degree of confinement. The influence of the confinement on the effective viscosity of the composite fluid is also analyzed. At a given reduced volume (the swelling degree) of a vesicle we find that both the inclination angle, and the membrane tank-treading velocity decrease with increasing confinement. At sufficiently large degree of confinement the tank-treading velocity exhibits a nonmonotonous dependence on the reduced volume and the effective viscosity shows a nonlinear behavior.

  13. Dynamics of a semiflexible polymer or polymer ring in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Lang, Philipp S; Obermayer, Benedikt; Frey, Erwin

    2014-02-01

    Polymers exposed to shear flow exhibit a remarkably rich tumbling dynamics. While rigid rods rotate on Jeffery orbits, a flexible polymer stretches and coils up during tumbling. Theoretical results show that in both of these asymptotic regimes the corresponding tumbling frequency f(c) in a linear shear flow of strength γ scales as a power law Wi(2/3) in the Weissenberg number Wi = γτ, where τ is a characteristic time of the polymer's relaxational dynamics. For a flexible polymer these theoretical results are well confirmed by a large body of experimental single molecule studies. However, for the intermediate semiflexible regime, especially relevant for cytoskeletal filaments like F-actin and microtubules, the situation is less clear. While recent experiments on single F-actin filaments are still interpreted within the classical Wi(2/3) scaling law, theoretical results indicated deviations from it. Here we perform extensive Brownian dynamics simulations to explore the tumbling dynamics of semiflexible polymers over a broad range of shear strength and the polymer's persistence length l(p). We find that the Weissenberg number alone does not suffice to fully characterize the tumbling dynamics, and the classical scaling law breaks down. Instead, both the polymer's stiffness and the shear rate are relevant control parameters. Based on our Brownian dynamics simulations we postulate that in the parameter range most relevant for cytoskeletal filaments there is a distinct scaling behavior with f(c) τ* = Wi(3/4)f(c)(x) with Wi = γτ* and the scaling variable x = (l(p)/L)(Wi)(-1/3); here τ* is the time the polymer's center of mass requires to diffuse its own contour length L. Comparing these results with experimental data on F-actin we find that the Wi(3/4) scaling law agrees quantitatively significantly better with the data than the classical Wi(2/3) law. Finally, we extend our results to single ring polymers in shear flow, and find similar results as for linear

  14. Dynamics of a semiflexible polymer or polymer ring in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Philipp S.; Obermayer, Benedikt; Frey, Erwin

    2014-02-01

    Polymers exposed to shear flow exhibit a remarkably rich tumbling dynamics. While rigid rods rotate on Jeffery orbits, a flexible polymer stretches and coils up during tumbling. Theoretical results show that in both of these asymptotic regimes the corresponding tumbling frequency fc in a linear shear flow of strength γ scales as a power law Wi2/3 in the Weissenberg number Wi=γτ, where τ is a characteristic time of the polymer's relaxational dynamics. For a flexible polymer these theoretical results are well confirmed by a large body of experimental single molecule studies. However, for the intermediate semiflexible regime, especially relevant for cytoskeletal filaments like F-actin and microtubules, the situation is less clear. While recent experiments on single F-actin filaments are still interpreted within the classical Wi2/3 scaling law, theoretical results indicated deviations from it. Here we perform extensive Brownian dynamics simulations to explore the tumbling dynamics of semiflexible polymers over a broad range of shear strength and the polymer's persistence length lp. We find that the Weissenberg number alone does not suffice to fully characterize the tumbling dynamics, and the classical scaling law breaks down. Instead, both the polymer's stiffness and the shear rate are relevant control parameters. Based on our Brownian dynamics simulations we postulate that in the parameter range most relevant for cytoskeletal filaments there is a distinct scaling behavior with fcτ*=Wi3/4f ̂c(x) with Wi =γτ* and the scaling variable x =(lp/L)(Wi)-1/3; here τ* is the time the polymer's center of mass requires to diffuse its own contour length L. Comparing these results with experimental data on F-actin we find that the Wi3/4 scaling law agrees quantitatively significantly better with the data than the classical Wi2/3 law. Finally, we extend our results to single ring polymers in shear flow, and find similar results as for linear polymers with slightly different

  15. Nature and dynamics of overreflection of Alfvén waves in MHD shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogichaishvili, D.; Chagelishvili, G.; Chanishvili, R.; Lominadze, J.; Lominadze

    2014-10-01

    Our goal is to gain new insights into the physics of wave overreflection phenomenon in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) nonuniform/shear flows changing the existing trend/approach of the phenomenon study. The performed analysis allows to separate from each other different physical processes, grasp their interplay and, by this way, construct the basic physics of the overreflection in incompressible MHD flows with linear shear of mean velocity, U 0=(Sy,0,0), that contain two different types of Alfvén waves. These waves are reduced to pseudo- and shear-Alfvén waves when wavenumber along Z-axis equals zero (i.e. when kz =0). Therefore, for simplicity, we labeled these waves as: P-Alfvén and S-Alfvén waves (P-AWs and S-AWs). We show that: (1) the linear coupling of counter-propagating waves determines the overreflection, (2) counter-propagating P-AWs are coupled with each other, while counter-propagating S-AWs are not coupled with each other, but are asymmetrically coupled with P-AWs; S-AWs do not participate in the linear dynamics of P-AWs, (3) the transient growth of S-AWs is somewhat smaller compared with that of P-AWs, (4) the linear transient processes are highly anisotropic in wave number space, (5) the waves with small streamwise wavenumbers exhibit stronger transient growth and become more balanced, (6) maximal transient growth (and overreflection) of the wave energy occurs in the two-dimensional case - at zero spanwise wavenumber. To the end, we analyze nonlinear consequences of the described anisotropic linear dynamics - they should lead to an anisotropy of nonlinear cascade processes significantly changing their essence, pointing to a need of revisiting the existing concepts of cascade processes in MHD shear flows.

  16. Dynamic and Thermal Turbulent Time Scale Modelling for Homogeneous Shear Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwab, John R.; Lakshminarayana, Budugur

    1994-01-01

    A new turbulence model, based upon dynamic and thermal turbulent time scale transport equations, is developed and applied to homogeneous shear flows with constant velocity and temperature gradients. The new model comprises transport equations for k, the turbulent kinetic energy; tau, the dynamic time scale; k(sub theta), the fluctuating temperature variance; and tau(sub theta), the thermal time scale. It offers conceptually parallel modeling of the dynamic and thermal turbulence at the two equation level, and eliminates the customary prescription of an empirical turbulent Prandtl number, Pr(sub t), thus permitting a more generalized prediction capability for turbulent heat transfer in complex flows and geometries. The new model also incorporates constitutive relations, based upon invariant theory, that allow the effects of nonequilibrium to modify the primary coefficients for the turbulent shear stress and heat flux. Predictions of the new model, along with those from two other similar models, are compared with experimental data for decaying homogeneous dynamic and thermal turbulence, homogeneous turbulence with constant temperature gradient, and homogeneous turbulence with constant temperature gradient and constant velocity gradient. The new model offers improvement in agreement with the data for most cases considered in this work, although it was no better than the other models for several cases where all the models performed poorly.

  17. Dynamics of a double-stranded DNA segment in a shear flow.

    PubMed

    Panja, Debabrata; Barkema, Gerard T; van Leeuwen, J M J

    2016-04-01

    We study the dynamics of a double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) segment, as a semiflexible polymer, in a shear flow, the strength of which is customarily expressed in terms of the dimensionless Weissenberg number Wi. Polymer chains in shear flows are well known to undergo tumbling motion. When the chain lengths are much smaller than the persistence length, one expects a (semiflexible) chain to tumble as a rigid rod. At low Wi, a polymer segment shorter than the persistence length does indeed tumble as a rigid rod. However, for higher Wi the chain does not tumble as a rigid rod, even if the polymer segment is shorter than the persistence length. In particular, from time to time the polymer segment may assume a buckled form, a phenomenon commonly known as Euler buckling. Using a bead-spring Hamiltonian model for extensible dsDNA fragments, we first analyze Euler buckling in terms of the oriented deterministic state (ODS), which is obtained as the steady-state solution of the dynamical equations by turning off the stochastic (thermal) forces at a fixed orientation of the chain. The ODS exhibits symmetry breaking at a critical Weissenberg number Wi_{c}, analogous to a pitchfork bifurcation in dynamical systems. We then follow up the analysis with simulations and demonstrate symmetry breaking in computer experiments, characterized by a unimodal to bimodal transformation of the probability distribution of the second Rouse mode with increasing Wi. Our simulations reveal that shear can cause strong deformation for a chain that is shorter than its persistence length, similar to recent experimental observations. PMID:27176342

  18. Dynamics of a double-stranded DNA segment in a shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panja, Debabrata; Barkema, Gerard T.; van Leeuwen, J. M. J.

    2016-04-01

    We study the dynamics of a double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) segment, as a semiflexible polymer, in a shear flow, the strength of which is customarily expressed in terms of the dimensionless Weissenberg number Wi. Polymer chains in shear flows are well known to undergo tumbling motion. When the chain lengths are much smaller than the persistence length, one expects a (semiflexible) chain to tumble as a rigid rod. At low Wi, a polymer segment shorter than the persistence length does indeed tumble as a rigid rod. However, for higher Wi the chain does not tumble as a rigid rod, even if the polymer segment is shorter than the persistence length. In particular, from time to time the polymer segment may assume a buckled form, a phenomenon commonly known as Euler buckling. Using a bead-spring Hamiltonian model for extensible dsDNA fragments, we first analyze Euler buckling in terms of the oriented deterministic state (ODS), which is obtained as the steady-state solution of the dynamical equations by turning off the stochastic (thermal) forces at a fixed orientation of the chain. The ODS exhibits symmetry breaking at a critical Weissenberg number Wic, analogous to a pitchfork bifurcation in dynamical systems. We then follow up the analysis with simulations and demonstrate symmetry breaking in computer experiments, characterized by a unimodal to bimodal transformation of the probability distribution of the second Rouse mode with increasing Wi. Our simulations reveal that shear can cause strong deformation for a chain that is shorter than its persistence length, similar to recent experimental observations.

  19. Inertia-dependent dynamics of three-dimensional vesicles and red blood cells in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zheng Yuan; Wang, Shu Qi; He, Long; Xu, Feng; Bai, Bo Feng

    2013-10-28

    A three-dimensional (3D) simulation study of the effect of inertia on the dynamics of vesicles and red blood cells (RBCs) has not been reported. Here, we developed a 3D model based on the front tracking method to investigate how inertia affects the dynamics of spherical/non-spherical vesicles and biconcave-shaped RBCs with the Reynolds number ranging from 0.1 to 10. The results showed that inertia induced non-spherical vesicles transitioned from tumbling to swinging, which was not observed in previous 2D models. The critical viscosity ratio of inner/outer fluids for the tumbling–swinging transition remarkably increased with an increasing Reynolds number. The deformation of vesicles was greatly enhanced by inertia, and the frequency of tumbling and tank-treading was significantly decreased by inertia. We also found that RBCs can transit from tumbling to steady tank-treading through the swinging regime when the Reynolds number increased from 0.1 to 10. These results indicate that inertia needs to be considered at moderate Reynolds number (Re ~ 1) in the study of blood flow in the human body and the flow of deformable particle suspension in inertial microfluidic devices. The developed 3D model provided new insights into the dynamics of RBCs under shear flow, thus holding great potential to better understand blood flow behaviors under normal/disease conditions.

  20. Brownian dynamics simulations of polyelectrolyte adsorption in shear flow with hydrodynamic interaction.

    PubMed

    Hoda, Nazish; Kumar, Satish

    2007-12-21

    The adsorption of single polyelectrolyte molecules in shear flow is studied using Brownian dynamics simulations with hydrodynamic interaction (HI). Simulations are performed with bead-rod and bead-spring chains, and electrostatic interactions are incorporated through a screened Coulombic potential with excluded volume accounted for by the repulsive part of a Lennard-Jones potential. A correction to the Rotne-Prager-Yamakawa tensor is derived that accounts for the presence of a planar wall. The simulations show that migration away from an uncharged wall, which is due to bead-wall HI, is enhanced by increases in the strength of flow and intrachain electrostatic repulsion, consistent with kinetic theory predictions. When the wall and polyelectrolyte are oppositely charged, chain behavior depends on the strength of electrostatic screening. For strong screening, chains get depleted from a region close to the wall and the thickness of this depletion layer scales as N(1/3)Wi(2/3) at high Wi, where N is the chain length and Wi is the Weissenberg number. At intermediate screening, bead-wall electrostatic attraction competes with bead-wall HI, and it is found that there is a critical Weissenberg number for desorption which scales as N(-1/2)kappa(-3)(l(B)|sigmaq|)(3/2), where kappa is the inverse screening length, l(B) is the Bjerrum length, sigma is the surface charge density, and q is the bead charge. When the screening is weak, adsorbed chains are observed to align in the vorticity direction at low shear rates due to the effects of repulsive intramolecular interactions. At higher shear rates, the chains align in the flow direction. The simulation method and results of this work are expected to be useful for a number of applications in biophysics and materials science in which polyelectrolyte adsorption plays a key role.

  1. The mechanism of the self-assembly of associating DNA molecules under shear flow: Brownian dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Min Sun; Lee, Jysoo

    2005-05-01

    A shear flow induces the assembly of DNAs with the sticky spots. In order to strictly interpret the mechanism of shear-induced DNA assembly, Brownian dynamics simulations with the bead-spring model were carried out for these molecules at various ranges of the Weissenberg numbers (We). We calculate a formation time and analyze the radial distribution function of end beads and the probability distribution of fractional extension at the formation time to understand the mechanism of shear-induced assembly. At low Weissenberg number the formation time, which is defined as an elapsed time until a multimer forms for the first time, decreases rapidly, reaching a plateau at We = 1000. A shear flow changes the radial distribution of end beads, which is almost the same regardless of the Weissenberg number. A shear flow deforms and stretches the molecules and generates different distributions between end beads with a stickly spot. The fractional extension progresses rapidly in shear flow from a Gaussian-like distribution to a uniform distribution. The progress of the distribution of fractional extension increases the possibility of meeting of end beads. In shear flow, the inducement of the assembly mainly results from the progress of the probability distribution of fractional extension. We also calculate properties such as the radius of gyration, stretch, and so on. As the Weissenberg number increases, the radius of gyration at the formation time also increases rapidly, reaching a plateau at We = 1000.

  2. A master dynamic flow diagram for the shear thickening transition in micellar solutions.

    PubMed

    Bautista, F; Tepale, N; Fernández, V V A; Landázuri, G; Hernández, E; Macías, E R; Soltero, J F A; Escalante, J I; Manero, O; Puig, J E

    2016-01-01

    The shear thickening behavior of dilute micellar solutions of hexadecyltrimethylammonium-type surfactants with different counterions (tosylate, 3- and 4-fluorobenzoate, vinylbenzoate and salicylate) and of n-alkyltetradecylammonium bromide (CnTAB), with n = 14, 16 and 18, is examined here. These solutions undergo a shear thickening transition due to the formation of shear-induced structures (SISs) in the shear range studied. Here we report a relationship between the shear thickening intensity and the differences in the hydrophobicity of counterions according to the Hofmeister-like anion series, which leads to a master flow diagram. This master flow diagram is produced by plotting a normalized shear thickening intensity (Iη - 1)/(Imax - 1) versus CD/CD,max, where Iη is the shear-thickening intensity, defined as the largest viscosity obtained in the shear-thickening transition (STT) at a given surfactant concentration CD divided by the Newtonian viscosity η0, and Imax is the largest intensity value obtained in the STT at a surfactant concentration CD,max. The master flow diagram is built using several cetyltrimethylammonium-type surfactants with different counterions, according to a Hofmeister-like series, and by n-alkyltetradecylammonium bromide surfactants with different alkyl chain lengths.

  3. Visualization of topological landscape in shear-flow dynamics of amorphous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Takeshi; Ohara, Koji; Miura, Keiji; Hirata, Akihiko; Kotani, Motoko; Nishiura, Yasumasa; Chen, Mingwei

    2015-05-01

    A potential energy landscape (PEL) gives rise to diverse non-equilibrium dynamics in complex systems. In this study, we visualize the topological landscape of a steady-state flow under shear deformation in a model metallic glass. We use the “state space network” as the best predictor of state transitions in terms of statistical model selection. The proposed scheme visualizes the underlying PEL regarding α transitions associated with irreversible cage-breaking events as the cooperative motion of clusters. By characterizing the topological property of the state space network, we observe characteristics of a small-world network. The proposed scheme has a significant potential to enable the understanding of the underlying mechanisms of glass physics, and is analogous to biological networks.

  4. State diagram for adhesion dynamics of deformable capsules under shear flow.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zheng Yuan; Bai, Bo Feng

    2016-08-17

    Due to the significance of understanding the underlying mechanisms of cell adhesion in biological processes and cell capture in biomedical applications, we numerically investigate the adhesion dynamics of deformable capsules under shear flow by using a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamic model. This model is based on the coupling of the front tracking-finite element method for elastic mechanics of the capsule membrane and the adhesion kinetics simulation for adhesive interactions between capsules and functionalized surfaces. Using this model, three distinct adhesion dynamic states are predicted, such as detachment, rolling and firm-adhesion. Specifically, the effects of capsule deformability quantified by the capillary number on the transitions of these three dynamic states are investigated by developing an adhesion dynamic state diagram for the first time. At low capillary numbers (e.g. Ca < 0.0075), whole-capsule deformation confers the capsule a flattened bottom in contact with the functionalized surface, which hence promotes the rolling-to-firm-adhesion transition. It is consistent with the observations from previous studies that cell deformation promotes the adhesion of cells lying in the rolling regime. However, it is surprising to find that, at relatively high capillary numbers (e.g. 0.0075 < Ca < 0.0175), the effect of capsule deformability on its adhesion dynamics is far more complex than just promoting adhesion. High deformability of capsules makes their bottom take a concave shape with no adhesion bond formation in the middle. The appearance of this specific capsule shape inhibits the transitions of both rolling-to-firm-adhesion and detachment-to-rolling, and it means that capsule deformation no longer promotes the capsule adhesion. Besides, it is interesting to note that, when the capillary number exceeds a critical value (e.g. Ca = 0.0175), the rolling state no longer appears, since capsules exhibit large deviation from the spherical shape

  5. Local Turbulence Suppression and Flow Shear Dynamics During qmin-Triggered Internal Transport Barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafer, M. W.; McKee, G. R.; Schlossberg, D. J.; Austin, M. E.; Waltz, R. E.; Candy, J.

    2007-11-01

    Turbulence is observed to transiently decrease locally during the formation of internal transport barriers (ITBs) following the appearance of low-order rational qmin surfaces in negative central shear discharges on DIII-D. Simultaneously, increased poloidal flow shear is observed. To further study this phenomenon, localized 2D density fluctuation measurements of turbulence and turbulence flow were obtained over 0.3 < r/a < 0.7 via the high-sensitivity beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic. Both the reduction in fluctuations and the poloidal velocity shear are found to propagate radially outward at about 1 m/s. Initial observations suggest that these effects follow the q=2 surface. Related GYRO simulations suggest transient zonal flows form near the q=2 surface to trigger these ITBs. High-frequency poloidal velocity measurements will be used to examine this mechanism.

  6. Numerical modelling of a healthy/malaria-infected erythrocyte in shear flow using dissipative particle dynamics method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Ting; Phan-Thien, Nhan; Cheong Khoo, Boo; Teck Lim, Chwee

    2014-06-01

    In the present paper, the dynamics of healthy and malaria-infected erythrocytes in the shear flow are investigated using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), a particle-based method. A discrete model is developed, where the computational domain is discretized into a set of particles to represent the suspending liquid, as well as erythrocytes as suspended deformable particles. The particles on an erythrocyte surface are connected into a triangular network to represent the membrane. The interaction between any two particles is modelled by the DPD method, which conserves both mass and momentum. In order to validate this model, the deformation of a spherical capsule in the shear flow is firstly simulated, and a good agreement is found with previously published works. Then, the dynamics of a healthy biconcave erythrocyte in a shear flow is investigated. The results demonstrate that a healthy erythrocyte undergoes a tank-treading motion at a high capillary number, and a tumbling motion at a low capillary number or at a high viscosity ratio, internal (erythrocyte) to external fluids. Two other types of trembling motions, breathing with tumbling and swinging with tank-treading, are also found at an intermediate capillary number or viscosity ratio. Finally, the dynamics of malaria-infected erythrocyte in a shear flow is studied. At the same shear rate, if the healthy erythrocyte undergoes a tumbling motion, the malaria-infected one will exhibit a tumbling motion only. If the healthy erythrocyte undergoes a trembling motion, the malaria-infected one cannot exhibit tank-treading motion. If the healthy erythrocyte undergoes a tank-treading motion, the malaria-infected one will exhibit one of three dynamic motions: tumbling, trembling or tank-treading motion.

  7. Shear stress and flow dynamics of the femoral vein among obese patients who qualify for bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Wiewiora, Maciej; Piecuch, Jerzy; Glűck, Marek; Slowinska-Lozynska, Ludmila; Sosada, Krystyn

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of obesity on wall shear stress and its relationship to erythrocyte aggregation. We studied 35 morbidly obese patients who were qualified for bariatric surgery. The control group consisted of 20 non-obese people. Blood rheological measurements were performed using the Laser-assisted Optical Rotational Cell Analyzer (Mechatronics, the Netherlands) and a cone-plate viscometer (Brookfield DV-II). The venous flow dynamics were assessed using a duplex ultrasound. The shear rate was estimated from the measured blood flow velocity and the diameter of the femoral vein. Venous wall shear stress was calculated from the whole blood viscosity and the shear rate. The shear rate (P < 0.005) and the venous wall shear stress (P < 0.05) were significantly lower in obese patients compared with the controls. The aggregation index (P < 0.001), syllectogram amplitude - AMP (P < 0.05) and Tslow (P < 0.001) were significantly higher in the obese patients; the aggregation half-time (P < 0.001) and Tfast (P < 0.001) were decreased compared with the control group. Multivariate regression analyses found waist circumference (β -0.31, P < 0.05), thigh circumference (β 0.33, P < 0.05) and Tslow (β -0.47, P < 0.005) to be variables that independently influenced the shear rate. Nevertheless, the AMP (β 0.34, P < 0.05) and Tslow (β -0.47, P < 0.01) were independent predictors that influenced the wall shear stress. This study indicates that there is a relationship between wall shear stress in the femoral vein and the rheological impairment of the RBC among obese patients, but further studies are necessary to confirm this suggestion.

  8. Phase diagram and breathing dynamics of a single red blood cell and a biconcave capsule in dilute shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, Alireza Z. K.; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2011-08-01

    We present phase diagrams of the single red blood cell and biconcave capsule dynamics in dilute suspension using three-dimensional numerical simulations. The computational geometry replicates an in vitro linear shear flow apparatus. Our model includes all essential properties of the cell membrane, namely, the resistance against shear deformation, area dilatation, and bending, as well as the viscosity difference between the cell interior and suspending fluids. By considering a wide range of shear rate and interior-to-exterior fluid viscosity ratio, it is shown that the cell dynamics is often more complex than the well-known tank-treading, tumbling, and swinging motion and is characterized by an extreme variation of the cell shape. As a result, it is often difficult to clearly establish whether the cell is swinging or tumbling. Identifying such complex shape dynamics, termed here as “breathing” dynamics, is the focus of this article. During the breathing motion at moderate bending rigidity, the cell either completely aligns with the flow direction and the membrane folds inward, forming two cusps, or it undergoes large swinging motion while deep, craterlike dimples periodically emerge and disappear. At lower bending rigidity, the breathing motion occurs over a wider range of shear rates, and is often characterized by the emergence of a quad-concave shape. The effect of the breathing dynamics on the tank-treading-to-tumbling transition is illustrated by detailed phase diagrams which appear to be more complex and richer than those of vesicles. In a remarkable departure from the vesicle dynamics, and from the classical theory of nondeformable cells, we find that there exists a critical viscosity ratio below which the transition is independent of the viscosity ratio, and dependent on shear rate only. Further, unlike the reduced-order models, the present simulations do not predict any intermittent dynamics of the red blood cells.

  9. New plane shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Conley, A.

    1994-12-31

    A classical problem in fluid dynamics is the study of the stability of plane Couette flow. This flow experimentally sustains turbulence for Reynolds numbers greater than 1440 {+-} 40. (The Reynolds number is based on channel width and wall velocity difference). Since plane Couette flow is linearly stable for all Reynolds numbers, obtaining non-trivial mathematical solutions to the plane Couette flow equations is difficult. However, M. Nagata finds a non-trivial number solution of the plane Couette flow equations at low Reynolds number. We confirm these solutions. We compute the minimum Reynolds number at which they exist. We study their stability. We also study the effect of a Coriolis force on plane Poiseuille flow.

  10. Parallel shear flow instabilities in strongly coupled Yukawa liquids: A comparison of generalized hydrodynamic model and molecular dynamics results

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwin, J.; Ganesh, R.

    2010-10-15

    Using a generalized hydrodynamic (GH) model, the growth rate spectra of Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability has been obtained analytically for a step shear profile in strongly coupled Yukawa liquids. The class of shear flows studied is assumed to be incompressible in nature. The growth rate spectra calculated exhibit viscous damping at high mode numbers, destabilization at stronger coupling, and in the limit {tau}{sub m} (viscoelastic relaxation time){yields}0, reduce to the regular Navier-Stokes growth rate spectra. A direct comparison is made with previous molecular dynamics (MD) simulations [Ashwin J. and R. Ganesh, Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 215003 (2010)] of KH instability. We find that for a given value of Reynolds number R and coupling parameter 1<{Gamma}<100, the GH and MD growth rates are in a qualitative agreement. The inclusion of the effect of shear heating as an effective coupling parameter {Gamma}{sub e} appears to improve the quantitative comparison as well.

  11. Magnetorheological Shear Flow Near Jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vågberg, Daniel; Tighe, Brian

    2015-03-01

    Flow in magnetorheological (MR) fluids and systems near jamming both display hallmarks of complex fluid rheology, including yield stresses and shear thinning viscosities. They are also tunable, which means that both phenomena can be used as a switching mechanism in ``smart'' fluids, i.e. fluids where properties can be tuned rapidly and reversibly by changing external parameters. We use numerical simulations to investigate the rheological properties of MR fluids close to the jamming transition as a function of the applied field and volume fraction. We are especially interested in the crossover region where both phenomena are needed to describe the observed dynamics. Funded by the Dutch Organization for Scientific Research (NWO).

  12. Brownian dynamics simulation of aerosol coagulation: effect of shear flow of fluid, Brownian motion, and van der Waals interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, D.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of shear flow, Brownian motion and interparticle forces on the coagulation coefficient are studied; and effects of many-body interactions on the coagulation coefficient for concentrated dispersions are analyzed. This study is conducted in two parts. In the first part, computer experiments are performed using Brownian Dynamics simulation methods. The relative importance of shear flow and Brownian motion, and of shear flow and van der Waals attraction, are characterized by the Peclet number, Pe, and the Flow number, FI, respectively. Results from computer experiments for FL ..-->.. infinity (i.e. no interparticle interactions) show that the principle of superposition underestimates the coagulation rate at low Pe (by as much as 100%) and overestimates the coagulation rate at large Pe (by roughly 30 to 40%). In the second part, the potential of mean force concept from dense gas kinetic theory is used to investigate the effect of particle volume fraction, Phi. It is shown that for large values of Phi, a shielding effect due to surrounding particles results in an attractive force on the particles. This leads to an overall enhancement in the coagulation rate when compared with the results based on the binary interaction potential.

  13. Reaction front dynamics under shear flow for arbitrary Damköhler numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandopadhyay, Aditya; Méheust, Yves; Le Borgne, Tanguy

    2016-04-01

    Reaction fronts where two reactive fluids displace one another play an important role in a range of applications, including contaminant plume transport and reaction, soil and aquifer remediation, CO2 sequestration, geothermal dipoles and the development of hotspots of reaction in mixing zones. The background flow induces enhanced mixing, and therefore reaction, through interfacial shear. Hence the coupling of fluid flow with chemical reactions is pivotal in understanding and quantifying effective reaction kinetics in reaction fronts. While this problem has been addressed in the limit of fast reactions (e.g. de Simoni 2005, Le Borgne 2014), in natural systems reactions can span a large range of Damköhler numbers since their characteristic reaction times vary over a large range of typical values. Here the coupling of shear flow and reversible chemical reactions is studied for a reaction front with initially separated reactants at arbitrary Damköhler numbers. Approximate analytical expressions for the global production rate are derived based on a reactive lamella approach. We observe three distinct regimes, each of them characterized by different scalings of the global production rate and width of the reactive zone. We describe the dependency of these scalings and the associated characteristic transition times as a function of Damköhler and Péclet numbers. These results are validated against 2D numerical simulations. The study is expected to shed light on the inherently complex cases of reactive mixing with varying reaction rates under the influence of an imposed flow. de Simoni et al. (2005) Water Resour. Res., 41, W11410 Le Borgne et al. (2014) GRL, 41(22), 7898

  14. Quantitative analysis of the angular dynamics of a single spheroid in simple shear flow at moderate Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosén, Tomas; Nordmark, Arne; Aidun, Cyrus K.; Do-Quang, Minh; Lundell, Fredrik

    2016-08-01

    A spheroidal particle in simple shear flow shows surprisingly complicated angular dynamics; caused by effects of fluid inertia (characterized by the particle Reynolds number Rep) and particle inertia (characterized by the Stokes number St). Understanding this behavior can provide important fundamental knowledge of suspension flows with spheroidal particles. Up to now only qualitative analysis has been available at moderate Rep. Rigorous analytical methods apply only to very small Rep and numerical results lack accuracy due to the difficulty in treating the moving boundary of the particle. Here we show that the dynamics of the rotational motion of a prolate spheroidal particle in a linear shear flow can be quantitatively analyzed through the eigenvalues of the log-rolling particle (particle aligned with vorticity). This analysis provides an accurate description of stable rotational states in terms of Rep,St, and particle aspect ratio (rp). Furthermore we find that the effect on the orientational dynamics from fluid inertia can be modeled with a Duffing-Van der Pol oscillator. This opens up the possibility of developing a reduced-order model that takes into account effects from both fluid and particle inertia.

  15. Shear-flow trapped-ion-mode interaction revisited. II. Intermittent transport associated with low-frequency zonal flow dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ghizzo, A.; Palermo, F.

    2015-08-15

    We address the mechanisms underlying low-frequency zonal flow generation in turbulent system and the associated intermittent regime of ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) turbulence. This model is in connection with the recent observation of quasi periodic zonal flow oscillation at a frequency close to 2 kHz, at the low-high transition, observed in the ASDEX Upgrade [Conway et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 065001 (2011)] and EAST tokamak [Xu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett 107, 125001 (2011)]. Turbulent bursts caused by the coupling of Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) driven shear flows with trapped ion modes (TIMs) were investigated by means of reduced gyrokinetic simulations. It was found that ITG turbulence can be regulated by low-frequency meso-scale zonal flows driven by resonant collisionless trapped ion modes (CTIMs), through parametric-type scattering, a process in competition with the usual KH instability.

  16. Electroosmotic shear flow in microchannels.

    PubMed

    Mampallil, Dileep; van den Ende, Dirk

    2013-01-15

    We generate and study electroosmotic shear flow in microchannels. By chemically or electrically modifying the surface potential of the channel walls a shear flow component with controllable velocity gradient can be added to the electroosmotic flow caused by double layer effects at the channel walls. Chemical modification is obtained by treating the channel wall with a cationic polymer. In case of electric modification, we used gate electrodes embedded in the channel wall. By applying a voltage to the gate electrode, the zeta potential can be varied and a controllable, uniform shear stress can be applied to the liquid in the channel. The strength of the shear stress depends on both the gate voltage and the applied field which drives the electroosmotic shear flow. Although the stress range is still limited, such a microchannel device can be used in principle as an in situ micro-rheometer for lab on a chip purposes. PMID:23089595

  17. The dynamics of inextensible capsules in shear flow under the effect of the natural state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Tsorng-Whay; Niu, Xiting; Glowinski, Roland

    2015-11-01

    The effect of the natural state on the motion of an inextensible capsule in two-dimensional shear flow has been studied numerically. The energy barrier based on such natural state plays a role for having the transition between two well-known motions, tumbling and tank-treading (TT) with the long axis oscillating about a fixed inclination angle (a swinging mode), when varying the shear rate. Between tumbling and TT with a swinging mode, the intermittent region has been obtained for the capsule with a biconcave rest shape. The estimated critical value of the swelling ratio for having the intermittent region is < 0 . 7 , i.e., the capsule with the rest shape closer to a full disk has no intermittent behavior. The capsule intermittent behavior is a mixture of tumbling and TT. Just like the TT with a swinging mode, which can be viewed as TT with an incomplete tumbling, the membrane tank-treads backward and forward within a small range while tumbling. The transition between tumbling and TT with a swinging mode has been studied. This work is supported by an NSF grant DMS-0914788.

  18. Dynamic blood flow and wall shear stress in pulmonary hypertensive disease.

    PubMed

    Postles, Arthur; Clark, Alys R; Tawhai, Merryn H

    2014-01-01

    This study provides new model of pulsatile flow in the pulmonary circulation in health and pulmonary hypertensive disease. Structural vascular remodeling typical of pulmonary hypertensive disease was implemented in the model by progressively altering the mechanical properties of the arterial geometry and progressively increasing the inlet pulse pressure (PP). The transmission of PP throughout the tree was shown to increase in advanced stages of disease, creating the potential for a `vicious-cycle' of damage to vasculature. Wall shear stress (WSS) was shown to be highest in the terminal arteries of the model and increased significantly with disease. A further trend observed in WSS results was that high WSS values began to `climb' the arterial tree towards the proximal vessels as disease progressed. This suggests a link between WSS and distal remodeling in pulmonary hypertensive disease, which initiates in the small muscular arteries and arterioles and spreads into larger arteries as the disease progresses. PMID:25571282

  19. Brownian dynamics simulation of orientational behavior, flow-induced structure, and rheological properties of a suspension of oblate spheroid particles under simple shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Takehiro; Suga, Takanori; Mori, Noriyasu

    2005-08-01

    Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations were carried out for suspensions of oblate spheroid particles interacting via the Gay-Berne (GB) potential. The oblate spheroid particles were applied as a model of disc-like particles and the system of suspension of the particles was considered. Numerically analyzed were both the change in phase with the number density of the particles at equilibrium state and the behavior of the particles in simple shear flows. The system changed from isotropic phase to nematic one with increasing the particle concentration. In the simulation of shear flows, the shear was imposed upon the systems in nematic phase at equilibrium. The systems exhibited various motions of the director depending on the shear rate, e.g. the continuous rotation of director at low shear rates, the wagging at moderate shear rates, and the flow aligning at high shear rates. Temporal change in inner structure of suspensions was also analyzed and collapse of initial particle configurations due to shear was found. Moreover, rheological properties of the suspension were investigated. The numerical simulation predicted the shear-thinning in viscosity, negative first normal stress difference, and positive second normal stress difference, and these results qualitatively agreed with the predictions using a constitutive equation for discotic nematics. The present study proved that the BD simulation using spheroid particles interacting via the GB potential is an effective approach for investigating the flow behavior and flow-induced structure of suspensions of disklike particles at a particulate level.

  20. Dynamical systems models of wall-bounded, shear-flow turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, John Francis

    A rigid wall constrains and simplifies turbulence in its vicinity. In the near-wall region, turbulent flow is dominated by a few energetic structures. Aubry, Holmes, Lumley, and Stone [1] developed low-dimensional dynamical systems models of the turbulent boundary layer, using the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) to identify the dominant structures and Galerkin projection of the Navier-Stokes equations to derive their equations of motion. Their models reproduced important qualitative features of boundary-layer dynamics, most importantly, the growth, bursting, and reformation of counter-rotating streamwise vortices. We reexamine Aubry et al.'s models, in an effort to improve their quantitative accuracy, in both predictive and statistical senses. We find that POD models are stable in some parameter regions, despite the lack of upper-surface velocity boundary conditions. For predictive accuracy, however, enforcement of velocity boundary conditions and accurate specification of the upper-surface pressure signal are necessary, for the cases considered. We propose that plane Couette flow is a closely related but better-posed test case than the boundary-layer for dynamical-systems modeling of turbulence. For the simplest plane Couette systems, we find that very large truncation dimensions (0(1000)) are necessary to reproduce the qualitative behavior and statistical measures of the dominant structures. We find that eddy-viscosity is an ineffective model for the unresolved modes of moderate truncation dimensions (O(100)), but numerical results suggest that unresolved-mode modeling is possible in principle.

  1. Brownian dynamics simulations of coagulation of dilute uniform and anisotropic particles under shear flow spanning low to high Peclet numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Maziar; Larson, Eric D.; Liu, Jun; Larson, Ronald G.

    2015-01-01

    Brownian dynamics simulations are performed to study the binding kinetics in the dilute-sphere limit by considering interactions of two spheres under shear flow across the entire range of Peclet numbers, spanning both perikinetic (diffusion-controlled) and orthokinetic (flow-controlled) coagulation regimes. The dilute regime is attained by carrying out two-sphere simulations in periodic boxes of different sizes and aspect ratios and extrapolating toward the infinite box limit. Effects of particle type (Janus and isotropic particles), shear rate, hydrodynamic interactions, and inter-particle potential are explored. We find that rectangular boxes with appropriate aspect ratios overcome a particle "shadow effect" that cannot be overcome with cubic boxes unless huge boxes are used. With rectangular boxes, we obtain converged binding kinetics for the whole Peclet number range, while cubic boxes of increasing size allow converged results only in the absence of flow. We consider the effect of binding both in a secondary minimum controlled by a combination of electrostatic repulsion and depletion attraction, as well as in a primary minimum governed by induced-dipole attraction. Results are computed using both realistic interaction potentials and by replacing the potential with a simple cutoff gap distance at which binding is deemed to occur. Results agree with several existing reports including Smoluchowski predictions in the zero- and infinite-shear-rate limits, and high-Pe perturbation results of Feke and Schowalter [J. Fluid Mech. 133, 17-35 (1983)] at Peclet numbers (Pe) above 100. Finally, we compute binding times for anisotropic Janus particles which have both repulsive and attractive faces, for a wide range of Pe number.

  2. Flow fields, bed shear stresses, and suspended bed sediment dynamics in bifurcations of a large river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szupiany, R. N.; Amsler, M. L.; Hernandez, J.; Parsons, D. R.; Best, J. L.; Fornari, E.; Trento, A.

    2012-11-01

    Channel bifurcations associated with bars and islands are important nodes in braided rivers and may control flow partitioning and thus affect downstream confluences, as well as the formation and dynamics of bars. However, the morphodynamic processes associated with bar formation are poorly understood, and previous studies have largely concerned laboratory experiments, small natural streams, or numerical analyses with large Froude numbers, high slopes, and low Shields stresses. In these cases, the morphologic changes at bifurcations are relatively rapid, with predominant bed load transport and the suspended load playing a minor role. In this paper, the evolution of the flow structure and suspended bed sediment transport along four expansion-diffluence units in the Rio Paraná, Argentina, are described. The Rio Paraná is a large multichannel river with a bed composed of medium and fine sands and possesses low Froude numbers and high suspended bed material transport. Primary and secondary flow velocity components were measured with an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) along the expansion-diffluence units, and the backscatter signal of the ADCP was calibrated to allow simultaneous measurements of suspended bed sediment concentrations. The interactions between these variables show that the cores of primary flow velocity and suspended bed sediment concentration do not necessarily follow the thalweg at the bifurcation and that inertial effects on the suspended bed sediment may influence the morphodynamics of bar formation. It is suggested that changes in flow stage, as well as the presence of vegetation, may further increase the deposition of suspended bed sediment at the bar head. This study suggests that the ratio of suspended bed material to bed load is an important factor controlling the morphodynamics of bifurcations in large sand bed braided rivers.

  3. Dynamic shear-stress-enhanced rates of nutrient consumption in gas-liquid semi-continuous-flow suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belfiore, Laurence A.; Volpato, Fabio Z.; Paulino, Alexandre T.; Belfiore, Carol J.

    2011-12-01

    The primary objective of this investigation is to establish guidelines for generating significant mammalian cell density in suspension bioreactors when stress-sensitive kinetics enhance the rate of nutrient consumption. Ultra-low-frequency dynamic modulations of the impeller (i.e., 35104 Hz) introduce time-dependent oscillatory shear into this transient analysis of cell proliferation under semi-continuous creeping flow conditions. Greater nutrient consumption is predicted when the amplitude A of modulated impeller rotation increases, and stress-kinetic contributions to nutrient consumption rates increase linearly at higher modulation frequency via an application of fluctuation-dissipation response. Interphase mass transfer is required to replace dissolved oxygen as it is consumed by aerobic nutrient consumption in the liquid phase. The theory and predictions described herein could be important at small length scales in the creeping flow regime where viscous shear is significant at the interface between the nutrient medium and isolated cells in suspension. Two-dimensional flow around spherically shaped mammalian cells, suspended in a Newtonian culture medium, is analyzed to calculate the surface-averaged magnitude of the velocity gradient tensor and modify homogeneous rates of nutrient consumption that are stimulated by viscous shear, via the formalism of stress-kinetic reciprocal relations that obey Curie's theorem in non-equilibrium thermodynamics. Time constants for stress-free free and stress-sensitive stress nutrient consumption are defined and quantified to identify the threshold (i.e., stress,threshold) below which the effect of stress cannot be neglected in accurate predictions of bioreactor performance. Parametric studies reveal that the threshold time constant for stress-sensitive nutrient consumption stress,threshold decreases when the time constant for stress

  4. Studies of shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, S. J.; Johnston, J. P.; Moffat, R. J.

    1986-03-01

    The objective of the work reported is construction of zonal models for accurate prediction of turbulent flows in rapid-running computer programs. The work follows the ideas set down in the discussion of zonal modeling by S. J. Kline in Vol. 2 of the Proceedings of the 1980-81 AFOSR-Stanford Conference on Complex Turbulent Flows. This discussion noted that the fast-running models available lack sufficient span to predict all classes of turbulent flows of engineering importance in a standard, invariant form. It therefore suggested that the models be treated as zonal. In the zonal approach, the constants in th models are adjusted for each important zone of the flow, where the word zone implies a region with a particular type of flow physics. In the proposal for the work, it was also noted that the parametrization of the flows and the selection of appropriate constants would ultimately need to be guided by the domain over which accurate results could be obtained, and that might well be different from pre-conceptions embodied in conventional taxonomies of the flows.

  5. Dynamic scaling of unsteady shear-thinning non-Newtonian fluid flows in a large-scale model of a distal anastomosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, J. D.; Owen, I.; Escudier, M. P.

    2007-10-01

    Dimensional analysis has been applied to an unsteady pulsatile flow of a shear-thinning power-law non-Newtonian liquid. An experiment was then designed in which both Newtonian and non-Newtonian liquids were used to model blood flow through a large-scale (38.5 mm dia.), simplified, rigid arterial junction (a distal anastomosis of a femorodistal bypass). The flow field within the junction was obtained by Particle Imaging Velocimetry and near-wall velocities were used to calculate the wall shear stresses. Dimensionless wall shear stresses were obtained at different points in the cardiac cycle for two different but dynamically similar non-Newtonian fluids; the good agreement between the measured dimensionless wall shear stresses confirm the validity of the dimensional analysis. However, blood exhibits a constant viscosity at high-shear rates and to obtain complete dynamic similarity between large-scale experiments and life-scale flows, the high-shear viscosity also needs to be included in the analysis. How this might be done is discussed in the paper.

  6. Red blood cell in simple shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Wei; Hew, Yayu; Chen, Yeng-Long

    2013-03-01

    The dynamics of red blood cells (RBC) in blood flow is critical for oxygen transport, and it also influences inflammation (white blood cells), thrombosis (platelets), and circulatory tumor migration. The physical properties of a RBC can be captured by modeling RBC as lipid membrane linked to a cytoskeletal spectrin network that encapsulates cytoplasm rich in hemoglobin, with bi-concave equilibrium shape. Depending on the shear force, RBC elasticity, membrane viscosity, and cytoplasm viscosity, RBC can undergo tumbling, tank-treading, or oscillatory motion. We investigate the dynamic state diagram of RBC in shear and pressure-driven flow using a combined immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method with a multi-scale RBC model that accurately captures the experimentally established RBC force-deformation relation. It is found that the tumbling (TU) to tank-treading (TT) transition occurs as shear rate increases for cytoplasm/outer fluid viscosity ratio smaller than 0.67. The TU frequency is found to be half of the TT frequency, in agreement with experiment observations. Larger viscosity ratios lead to the disappearance of stable TT phase and unstable complex dynamics, including the oscillation of the symmetry axis of the bi-concave shape perpendicular to the flow direction. The dependence on RBC bending rigidity, shear modulus, the order of membrane spectrin network and fluid field in the unstable region will also be discussed.

  7. Vesicles in a shear and Poiseuille flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misbah, Chaouqi

    2010-11-01

    Vesicles, capsules and Red Blood Cells (RBCs) under flow are subject to considerable attention from theoretical, numerical and experimental point of views. Understanding their motions and dynamics is essential both at the fundamental level as a branch of biocomplex fluids, and at the technological level, such as the lab-on-chip technologies, targeted drug delivery, and blood flow diseases. First, we describe the dynamics of individual biomimetic (vesicles and capsules) and biological entities (RBCs) under a simple shear flow, and overview the current state of the knowledge. Comparison with available experiments will be provided. We then discuss the non-trivial rheology of dilute vesicle suspensions and results from experiments involving oscillatory shear with non-zero mean shear rate. Finally, we address a longstanding puzzle in the blood microcirculatory research: why do red blood cells adopt a non-symmetrical shape (called slipper shape) even in a symmetric flow? Our work shows that the symmetric shape is unstable in flow conditions encountered in microvasculature. Moreover, by adopting a slipper shape, the RBC acquires higher flow efficiency than the symmetric (parachute) shape. The extension of this study to a collection of cells will be outlined.

  8. On acoustic wave generation in uniform shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoberidze, G.

    2016-07-01

    The linear dynamics of acoustic waves and vortices in uniform shear flow is studied. For flows with very low shear rates, the dynamics of perturbations is adiabatic and can be described by the WKB approximation. However, for flows with moderate and high shear rates the WKB approximation is not appropriate, and alternative analysis shows that two important phenomena occur: acoustic wave over-reflection and wave generation by vortices. The later phenomenon is a known linear mechanisms for sound generation in shear flows, a mechanism that is related to the continuous spectrum that arises in linear shear flow dynamics. A detailed analytical study of these phenomena is performed and the main quantitative and qualitative characteristics of the radiated acoustic field are obtained and analyzed.

  9. Active shear flow control for improved combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutmark, E.; Parr, T. P.; Hanson-Parr, D. M.; Schadow, K. C.

    1990-01-01

    The acoustical and fluid dynamic facets of an excited premixed flame were studied experimentally to evaluate possibilities for development of a stabilizing closed-loop control system. The flame was analyzed as a nonlinear system which includes different subcomponents: acoustics, fluid dynamics, and chemical reaction. Identification of the acoustical and fluid dynamics subsystems is done by analyzing the transfer function, which was obtained by driving the system with both white-noise and a frequency-sweeping sine-wave. The features obtained by this analysis are compared to results of flow visualization and hot-wire flow-field and spectral measurements. The acoustical subsystem is determined by the resonant acoustic modes of the settling chamber. These modes are subsequently filtered and amplified by the flow shear layer, whose instability characteristics are dominated by the preferred mode frequency.

  10. Diffusing-wave spectroscopy with dynamic contrast variation: disentangling the effects of blood flow and extravascular tissue shearing on signals from deep tissue.

    PubMed

    Ninck, Markus; Untenberger, Markus; Gisler, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the effects of blood flow and extravascular tissue shearing on diffusing-wave spectroscopy (DWS) signals from deep tissue, using an ex vivo porcine kidney model perfused artificially at controlled arterial pressure and flow. Temporal autocorrelation functions g((1))(τ) of the multiply scattered light field show a decay which is described by diffusion for constant flow, with a diffusion coefficient scaling linearly with volume flow rate. Replacing blood by a non-scattering fluid reveals a flow-independent background dynamics of the extravascular tissue. For a sinusoidally driven perfusion, field autocorrelation functions g((1))(τ, t') depend on the phase t' within the pulsation cycle and are approximately described by diffusion. The effective diffusion coefficient D(eff)(t') is modulated at the driving frequency in the presence of blood, showing coupling with flow rate; in the absence of blood, D(eff)(t') is modulated at twice the driving frequency, indicating shearing of extravascular tissue as the origin of the DWS signal. For both constant and pulsatile flow the contribution of extravascular tissue shearing to the DWS signal is small.

  11. Thin front propagation in random shear flows.

    PubMed

    Chinappi, M; Cencini, M; Vulpiani, A

    2006-01-01

    Front propagation in time-dependent laminar flows is investigated in the limit of very fast reaction and very thin fronts--i.e., the so-called geometrical optics limit. In particular, we consider fronts stirred by random shear flows, whose time evolution is modeled in terms of Ornstein-Uhlembeck processes. We show that the ratio between the time correlation of the flow and an intrinsic time scale of the reaction dynamics (the wrinkling time tw) is crucial in determining both the front propagation speed and the front spatial patterns. The relevance of time correlation in realistic flows is briefly discussed in light of the bending phenomenon--i.e., the decrease of propagation speed observed at high flow intensities.

  12. A dynamic jamming point for shear thickening suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Eric; Jaeger, Heinrich

    2008-11-01

    Densely packed suspensions can shear thicken, in which the viscosity increases with shear rate. We performed rheometry measurements on two model systems: corn starch in water and glass spheres in oils. In both systems we observed shear thickening up to a critical packing fraction φc (=0.55 for spherical grains) above which the flow abruptly transitions to shear thinning. The viscosity and yield stress diverge as power laws at φc. Extrapolating the dynamic ranges of shear rate and stress in the shear thickening regime up to φc suggests a finite change in shear stress with zero change in shear rate. This is a dynamic analog to the jamming point with a yield stress at zero shear rate.

  13. Simulation of two- and three-dimensional dense-fluid shear flows via nonequilibrium molecular dynamics: Comparison of time-and-space-averaged stresses from homogeneous Doll's and Sllod shear algorithms with those from boundary-driven shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Wm. G.; Hoover, Carol G.; Petravic, Janka

    2008-10-01

    Homogeneous shear flows (with constant strainrate dvx/dy ) are generated with the Doll’s and Sllod algorithms and compared to corresponding inhomogeneous boundary-driven flows. We use one-, two-, and three-dimensional smooth-particle weight functions for computing instantaneous spatial averages. The nonlinear normal-stress differences are small, but significant, in both two and three space dimensions. In homogeneous systems the sign and magnitude of the shearplane stress difference, Pxx-Pyy , depend on both the thermostat type and the chosen shearflow algorithm. The Doll’s and Sllod algorithms predict opposite signs for this normal-stress difference, with the Sllod approach definitely wrong, but somewhat closer to the (boundary-driven) truth. Neither of the homogeneous shear algorithms predicts the correct ordering of the kinetic temperatures: Txx>Tzz>Tyy .

  14. Organized motions underlying turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waleffe, F.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this project is to determine the nature and significance of the organized motions underlying turbulent shear flow. There is considerable experimental evidence for the existence of such motions. In particular, one consistently observes longitudinal streaks with a spacing of about 100 in wall units in the near-wall region of wall-bounded shear flows. Recently, an analysis based on the direct resonance mechanism has predicted the appearance of streaks with precisely such a spacing. Also, the minimum channel simulations of Jimenez and Moin have given a strong dynamical significance to that spanwise length scale. They have shown that turbulent-like flows can not be maintained when the spanwise wavelength of the motion is constrained to be less than about that critical number. A critical review of the direct resonance ideas and the non-linear theory of Benney and Gustavsson is presented first. It is shown how this leads to the later mean flow-first harmonic theory of Benney. Finally, we note that a different type of analysis has led to the prediction streaks with a similar spacing. This latter approach consists of looking for optimum fields and directly provides deep insights into why a particular structure or a particular scale should be preferred.

  15. Computed Turbulent Free Shear Flow Of Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viegas, J. R.; Rubesin, M. W.

    1992-01-01

    Standard k-epsilon model of turbulence yields fairly accurate results. Symposium paper discusses numerical simulation of turbulent free shear flow of nonreacting compressible fluid. Ability to compute such flows essential to advances in design.

  16. Dynamic bulk and shear moduli due to grain-scale local fluid flow in fluid-saturated cracked poroelastic rocks: Theoretical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yongjia; Hu, Hengshan; Rudnicki, John W.

    2016-07-01

    Grain-scale local fluid flow is an important loss mechanism for attenuating waves in cracked fluid-saturated poroelastic rocks. In this study, a dynamic elastic modulus model is developed to quantify local flow effect on wave attenuation and velocity dispersion in porous isotropic rocks. The Eshelby transform technique, inclusion-based effective medium model (the Mori-Tanaka scheme), fluid dynamics and mass conservation principle are combined to analyze pore-fluid pressure relaxation and its influences on overall elastic properties. The derivation gives fully analytic, frequency-dependent effective bulk and shear moduli of a fluid-saturated porous rock. It is shown that the derived bulk and shear moduli rigorously satisfy the Biot-Gassmann relationship of poroelasticity in the low-frequency limit, while they are consistent with isolated-pore effective medium theory in the high-frequency limit. In particular, a simplified model is proposed to quantify the squirt-flow dispersion for frequencies lower than stiff-pore relaxation frequency. The main advantage of the proposed model over previous models is its ability to predict the dispersion due to squirt flow between pores and cracks with distributed aspect ratio instead of flow in a simply conceptual double-porosity structure. Independent input parameters include pore aspect ratio distribution, fluid bulk modulus and viscosity, and bulk and shear moduli of the solid grain. Physical assumptions made in this model include (1) pores are inter-connected and (2) crack thickness is smaller than the viscous skin depth. This study is restricted to linear elastic, well-consolidated granular rocks.

  17. Measurement of particle trajectories, dynamics, surface adhesion and detachment in near-wall shear flows using 3D velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guasto, Jeffrey; Schmidt, Brian; Lawrence, Michael; Breuer, Kenneth

    2007-11-01

    Three-dimensional total internal reflection velocimetry (3D-TIRV) is used to measure the trajectories of fluorescent tracer particles within 200 nm of a wall. Diffusion and shear-induced motion can result in mean velocity measurement errors, and by taking measurements using different particle sizes and sampling times, we quantify these effects and compare with theory. We also use 3D-TIRV to observe and characterize the adhesion, surface rolling and release dynamics of particles that can adhere to the surface through the action of biological binding proteins. Particles coated with P-Selectin are allowed to adhere to and detach from a PSGL-1-coated microchannel surface, modeling the interaction between leukocytes (white blood cells) and blood vessels, respectively. Binding affinities, bond strengths and hydrodynamic interactions are inferred from the trajectory data.

  18. Interaction of equal-size bubbles in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Jai; Lavrenteva, Olga M; Byk, Leonid; Nir, Avinoam

    2013-04-01

    The inertia-induced forces on two identical spherical bubbles in a simple shear flow at small but finite Reynolds number, for the case when the bubbles are within each other's inner viscous region, are calculated making use of the reciprocal theorem. This interaction force is further employed to model the dynamics of air bubbles injected to a viscous fluid sheared in a Couette device at the first shear flow instability where the bubbles are trapped inside the stable Taylor vortex. It was shown that, during a long time scale, the inertial interaction between the bubbles in the primary shear flow drives them away from each other and, as a result, equal-size bubbles eventually assume an ordered string with equal separation distances between all neighbors. We report on experiments showing the dynamic evolution of various numbers of bubbles. The results of the theory are in good agreement with the experimental observations.

  19. Dynamics of Sheared Granular Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondic, Lou; Utter, Brian; Behringer, Robert P.

    2002-01-01

    characterize the transition region in an earth-bound experiment. In the DE modeling, we analyze dynamics of a sheared granular system in Couette geometry in two (2D) and three (3D) space dimensions. Here, the idea is to both better understand what we might encounter in a reduced-g environment, and at a deeper level to deduce the physics of sheared systems in a density regime that has not been addressed by past experiments or simulations. One aspect of the simulations addresses sheared 2D system in zero-g environment. For low volume fractions, the expected dynamics of this type of system is relatively well understood. However, as the volume fraction is increased, the system undergoes a phase transition, as explained above. The DES concentrate on the evolution of the system as the solid volume fraction is slowly increased, and in particular on the behavior of very dense systems. For these configurations, the simulations show that polydispersity of the sheared particles is a crucial factor that determines the system response. Figures 1 and 2 below, that present the total force on each grain, show that even relatively small (10 %) nonuniformity of the size of the grains (expected in typical experiments) may lead to significant modifications of the system properties, such as velocity profiles, temperature, force propagation, and formation shear bands. The simulations are extended in a few other directions, in order to provide additional insight to the experimental system analyzed above. In one direction, both gravity, and driving due to vibrations are included. These simulations allow for predictions on the driving regime that is required in the experiments in order to analyze the jamming transition. Furthermore, direct comparison of experiments and DES will allow for verification of the modeling assumptions. We have also extended our modeling efforts to 3D. The (preliminary) results of these simulations of an annular system in zero-g environment will conclude the presentation.

  20. Coherent motion in excited free shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wygnanski, Israel J.; Petersen, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    The application of the inviscid instability approach to externally excited turbulent free shear flows at high Reynolds numbers is explored. Attention is given to the cases of a small-deficit plane turbulent wake, a plane turbulent jet, an axisymmetric jet, the nonlinear evolution of instabilities in free shear flows, the concept of the 'preferred mode', vortex pairing in turbulent mixing layers, and experimental results for the control of free turbulent shear layers. The special features often attributed to pairing or to the preferred mode are found to be difficult to comprehend; the concept of feedback requires further substantiation in the case of incompressible flow.

  1. Dynamics of the longitudinal and transverse modes in presence of equilibrium shear flow in a strongly coupled dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Garai, S.; Banerjee, D.; Janaki, M. S.; Chakrabarti, N.

    2014-02-11

    In strongly coupled limit the general hydrodynamic (GH) model shows that the dusty plasma, acquiring significant rigidity, is able to support the 'shear' like mode [P. K. Kaw and A. Sen, Phys. Plasmas 5, 3552 (1998)]. In presence of velocity shear, this shear like mode is coupled with the dust acoustic mode which is generated by the compressibility effect of the dust fluid due to the finite temperature of the dust, electron and ion fluids. Local dispersion shows the velocity shear is also responsible for the instabilities of the shear mode, acoustic mode, as well as the shear-acoustic coupled mode. The present work, carried out in GH visco-elastic formalism, also gives the clear insight of the instabilities of the coupled mode in non local regime with a hyperbolic tangent velocity shear profile over a finite width.

  2. Shear Fractures of Extreme Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Boris

    2016-10-01

    Natural and laboratory observations show that shear ruptures (faults) can propagate with extreme dynamics (up to intersonic rupture velocities) through intact materials and along pre-existing faults with frictional and coherent (bonded) interfaces. The rupture propagation is accompanied by significant fault strength weakening in the rupture head. Although essential for understanding earthquakes, rock mechanics, tribology and fractures, the question of what physical processes determine how that weakening occurs is still unresolved. The general approach today to explain the fault weakening is based upon the strong velocity-weakening friction law according to which the fault strength drops rapidly with slip velocity. Different mechanisms of strength weakening caused by slip velocity have been proposed including thermal effect, high-frequency compressional waves, expansion of pore fluid, macroscopic melting and gel formation. This paper proposes that shear ruptures of extreme dynamics propagating in intact materials and in pre-existing frictional and coherent interfaces are governed by the same recently identified mechanism which is associated with an intensive microcracking process in the rupture tip observed for all types of extreme ruptures. The microcracking process creates, in certain conditions, a special fan-like microstructure shear resistance of which is extremely low (up to an order of magnitude less than the frictional strength). The fan-structure representing the rupture head provides strong interface weakening and causes high slip and rupture velocities. In contrast with the velocity-weakening dependency, this mechanism provides the opposite weakening-velocity effect. The fan-mechanism differs remarkably from all reported earlier mechanisms, and it can provide such important features observed in extreme ruptures as: extreme slip and rupture velocities, high slip velocity without heating, off-fault tensile cracking, transition from crack-like to pulse

  3. Shear dispersion in dense granular flows

    SciTech Connect

    Christov, Ivan C.; Stone, Howard A.

    2014-04-18

    We formulate and solve a model problem of dispersion of dense granular materials in rapid shear flow down an incline. The effective dispersivity of the depth-averaged concentration of the dispersing powder is shown to vary as the Péclet number squared, as in classical Taylor–Aris dispersion of molecular solutes. An extension to generic shear profiles is presented, and possible applications to industrial and geological granular flows are noted.

  4. Shear banding in molecular dynamics of polymer melts.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jing; Likhtman, Alexei E

    2012-01-13

    In order to establish constitutive equations for a viscoelastic fluid uniform shear flow is usually required. However, in the last 10 years S. Q. Wang and co-workers have demonstrated that some entangled polymers do not flow with the uniform shear rate as usually assumed, but instead choose to separate into fast and slow flowing regions. This phenomenon, known as shear banding, causes flow instabilities and in principle invalidates all rheological measurements when it occurs. In this Letter we report the first observation of shear banding in molecular dynamics simulations of entangled polymer melts. We show that our observations are in a very good agreement with the phenomenology developed by Fielding and Olmsted. Our findings provide a simple way of validating the empirical macroscopic phenomenology of shear banding.

  5. Scaling properties of turbulence driven shear flow

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Z.; Tynan, G. R.; Holland, C.; Xu, M.; Muller, S. H.; Yu, J. H.

    2010-01-15

    The characteristics and scaling properties of the turbulence driven shear flow are investigated in a cylindrical laboratory plasma device. For a given plasma pressure, the density fluctuation amplitude and radial particle flux increase with the applied magnetic field. Strong flow shear is found to coexist at high magnetic fields (>700 G) with approx10 kHz drift wave turbulence, but not at low magnetic fields (<700 G). The absolute value of the divergence of the turbulent Reynolds stress at the shear layer is shown to increase with the magnetic field as well. For a fixed magnetic field, the shear flow is found to decrease as the discharge gas pressure is increased. The density fluctuation amplitude and divergence of the turbulent Reynolds stress also decrease with the plasma pressure. For both situations the cross phase between the radial and azimuthal components of the velocity is found to be a key factor to determine variations in the turbulent Reynolds stress at different magnetic fields and discharge pressures. The results show that the generation of the shear flow is related to the development of specific frequency components of the drift wave turbulence for a variety of plasma conditions. The linear stability analysis shows that the observed variation in the turbulence and shear flow with magnetic field is also consistent with a critical gradient behavior.

  6. Flow between eccentric cylinders: a shear-extensional controllable flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Guoqiang; Wang, Mengmeng; Wang, Xiaolin; Jin, Gang

    2016-05-01

    In this work the non-Newtonian fluid between eccentric cylinders is simulated with finite element method. The flow in the annular gap between the eccentric rotating cylinders was found to be a shear-extensional controllable flow. The influence of rotating speed, eccentricity as well as the radius ratio on the extensional flow in the vicinity of the minimum gap between the inner and outer cylinder was quantitatively investigated. It was found that both the strengths of shear flow and extensional flow could be adjusted by changing the rotating speed. In respect to extensional flow, it was also observed that the eccentricity and radius ratio exert significant influences on the ratio of extensional flow. And it should be noted that the ratio of extensional flow in the mix flow could be increased when increasing the eccentricity and the ratio of shear flow in the mix flow could be increased when increasing the radius ratio.

  7. Shear dynamics in higher dimensional FLRW cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahwa, Isha; Nandan, Hemwati; Goswami, Umananda Dev

    2015-12-01

    We study the shear dynamics of higher dimensional Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) cosmology by considering a non-perfect fluid which exerts different pressure in the normal and extra dimensions. We generalise the definition of shear tensor for higher dimensional spacetime and prove it to be consistent with the evolution equation for shear tensor obtained from the Ricci identities. The shear tensor however vanishes for the case of usual FLRW metric in four dimensions. The evolution of shear tensor for higher dimensional FLRW cosmology is investigated numerically. The role of extra dimensions and other parameters involved in shear dynamics is discussed in detail. We find that with increase in anisotropy parameter, time of decay of shear increases while with increase in number of extra dimensions, shear tends to decay early.

  8. Shear-flow Effects in Open Traps

    SciTech Connect

    Beklemishev, A. D.

    2008-11-01

    Interaction between shear flows and plasma instabilities and turbulence in open traps can lead to improved confinement both in experiments and in simulations. Shear flows, driven by biasing end-plates and limiters or by off-axis electron heating, in combination with the finite-larmor-radius (FLR) effects are shown to be efficient in confining plasmas even with unstable flute modes. Interpretation of the observed effects as the ''vortex confinement,'' i.e., confinement of the plasma core in the dead-flow zone of the driven vortex, is shown to agree well with simulations.

  9. Thermodynamics of dilute gases in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jou, D.; Criado-Sancho, M.

    2001-03-01

    We consider the effect of shear and normal viscous pressures on the non-equilibrium entropy of ideal gases in Couette flow. These results extend the previous ones (Bidar et al., Physica A 233 (1996) 163), where normal pressure effects were ignored. Furthermore, we analyze the non-equilibrium contributions to the chemical potential, which may be useful in the analysis of shear-induced effects on colligative properties and chemical equilibrium.

  10. The Radiation Hydrodynamics of Relativistic Shear Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, Eric R.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2016-07-01

    We present a method for analyzing the interaction between radiation and matter in regions of intense, relativistic shear that can arise in many astrophysical situations. We show that there is a simple velocity profile that should be manifested in regions of large shear that have “lost memory” of their boundary conditions, and we use this self-similar velocity profile to construct the surface of last scattering, or the τ ≃ 1 surface, as viewed from any comoving point within the flow. We demonstrate that a simple treatment of scattering from this τ ≃ 1 surface exactly conserves photon number, and we derive the rate at which the radiation field is heated due to the shear present in the flow. The components of the comoving radiation energy–momentum tensor are calculated, and we show that they have relatively simple, approximate forms that interpolate between the viscous (small shear) and streaming (large shear) limits. We put our expression for the energy–momentum tensor in a covariant form that does not depend on the explicit velocity profile within the fluid and, therefore, represents a natural means for analyzing general, radiation-dominated, relativistic shear flows.

  11. Optimal disturbances in shearing and swirling flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, Conor

    2011-11-01

    Over the past twenty years transient energy density growth of linearly stable disturbances has shown to be the likely instigator for transition to turbulence in parallel shear flows. In this vein, optimal linear perturbations are calculated for two flows which have a mixture of forces acting on the fluid body. These are; rotating plane Couette flow (RPCF), which combines pressure-driven shear and swirl, and cylindrical Couette-Poiseuille flow (CCPF), which combines pressure-driven and Couette shear. Contours are presented of the maximum achievable linear transient growth, G, over the full range of wavenumbers within the linearly stable parameter regimes. Reference is made to experimental works on each flow and we examine the role that optimal disturbances have in the different transition phenomena that are observed. It is found that the contours of G fall qualitatively alongside the points of transition in the two flows, in support of the notion that large linear transient growth can act a precursor to transition. Despite the combination of effects acting on each fluid, transition in both flows falls in the range 102 < G <10 2 . 5 suggesting that in both flows the same mechanism may be at work. This work is funded by EPSRC.

  12. Modeling of Turbulent Free Shear Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoder, Dennis A.; DeBonis, James R.; Georgiadis, Nicolas J.

    2013-01-01

    The modeling of turbulent free shear flows is crucial to the simulation of many aerospace applications, yet often receives less attention than the modeling of wall boundary layers. Thus, while turbulence model development in general has proceeded very slowly in the past twenty years, progress for free shear flows has been even more so. This paper highlights some of the fundamental issues in modeling free shear flows for propulsion applications, presents a review of past modeling efforts, and identifies areas where further research is needed. Among the topics discussed are differences between planar and axisymmetric flows, development versus self-similar regions, the effect of compressibility and the evolution of compressibility corrections, the effect of temperature on jets, and the significance of turbulent Prandtl and Schmidt numbers for reacting shear flows. Large eddy simulation greatly reduces the amount of empiricism in the physical modeling, but is sensitive to a number of numerical issues. This paper includes an overview of the importance of numerical scheme, mesh resolution, boundary treatment, sub-grid modeling, and filtering in conducting a successful simulation.

  13. Shear flow induced unfolding of collapsed polymers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander-Katz, Alfredo; Netz, Roland

    2006-03-01

    In the process of clotting in small vessels, platelets form a plug in an injured zone only in the presence of a protein known as the von Willebrand Factor (vWF). The absence or malfunction of the vWF leads to a bleeding disorder, the so-called von Willebrand disease. It is believed that the protein is collapsed (or globular) when released into the blood flow, and that it undergoes a transition at high shear rates that allows it to bind platelets. Using hydrodynamic simulations of a simple model of the vWF in shear flow, we show that a globular polymer undergoes a globule-stretch transition at a critical shear rate. Below this threshold shear rate the polymer remains collapsed and slightly deformed, while above it the chain displays strong elongations in the direction of the flow. Finally, we discuss the relevance of our results in the case of blood flow, and compare them to the physiological values present in the body.

  14. Zonal flow formation in the presence of ambient mean shear

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Pei-Chun; Diamond, P. H.

    2015-02-15

    The effect of mean shear flows on zonal flow formation is considered in the contexts of plasma drift wave turbulence and quasi-geostrophic turbulence models. The generation of zonal flows by modulational instability in the presence of large-scale mean shear flows is studied using the method of characteristics as applied to the wave kinetic equation. It is shown that mean shear flows reduce the modulational instability growth rate by shortening the coherency time of the wave spectrum with the zonal shear. The scalings of zonal flow growth rate and turbulent vorticity flux with mean shear are determined in the strong shear limit.

  15. Buoyancy Driven Shear Flows of Bubble Suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, D. L.; Hill, R. J.; Chellppannair, T.; Zenit, R.; Zenit, R.; Spelt, P. D. M.

    1999-01-01

    In this work the gas volume fraction and the root-mean-squared fluid velocity are measured in buoyancy driven shear flows of bubble suspensions in a tall, inclined, rectangular channel. The experiments are performed under conditions where We << 1a nd Re >> 1, for which comparisons are made with kinetic theory and numerical simulations. Here Re = gamma(a(exp 2)/nu is the Reynolds number and We = rho(gamma(exp 2))a(exp 3)/sigma is the Weber number; gamma is the shear rate, a is the bubble radius, nu is the kinematic viscosity of the liquid, rho is the density of the liquid, and sigma is the surface tension of the gas/liquid interface. Kang et al. calculated the bubble phase pressure and velocity variance of sheared bubble suspensions under conditions where the bubbles are spherical and the liquid phase velocity field can be approximated using potential flow theory, i.e. We= 0 and Re >> 1. Such conditions can be achieved in an experiment using gas bubbles, with a radius of O(0.5mm), in water. The theory requires that there be no average relative motion of the gas and liquid phases, hence the motivation for an experimental program in microgravity. The necessity of performing preliminary, Earth based experiments, however, requires performing experiments where the gas phase rises in the liquid, which significantly complicates the comparison of experiments with theory. Rather than comparing experimental results with theory for a uniform, homogeneous shear flow, experiments can be compared directly with solutions of the averaged equations of motion for bubble suspensions. This requires accounting for the significant lift force acting on the gas phase when the bubbles rise parallel to the average velocity of the sheared suspension. Shear flows can be produced in which the bubble phase pressure gradient, arising from shear induced collisions amongst the bubbles, balances a body force (centrifugal or gravitational) on the gas phase. A steady, non-uniform gas volume fraction

  16. Buoyancy Driven Shear Flows of Bubble Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, R. J.; Zenit, R.; Chellppannair, T.; Koch, D. L.; Spelt, P. D. M.; Sangani, A.

    1998-11-01

    In this work the gas volume fraction and the root-mean-squared fluid velocity are measured in buoyancy driven shear flows of bubble suspensions in a tall, inclined, rectangular channel. The experiments are performed under conditions where We << 1 and Re >> 1 , so that the bubbles are relatively undeformed and the flow is inviscid and approximately irrotational. Nitrogen is introduced through an array of capillaries at the base of a .2x.02x2 m channel filled with an aqueous electrolyte solution (0.06 molL-1 MgSO_4). The rising bubbles generate a unidirectional shear flow, where the denser suspension at the lower surface of the channel falls, while the less dense suspension at the upper surface rises. Hot-film anemometry is used to measure the resulting gas volume fraction and fluid velocity profiles. The bubble collision rate with the sensor is related to the gas volume fraction and the mean and variance of the bubble velocity using an experimentally measured collision surface area for the sensor. Bubble collisions with the sensor are identified by the characteristic slope of the hot-film anemometer signal when bubbles collide with the sensor. It is observed that the steady shear flow develops a bubble phase pressure gradient across the channel gap as the bubbles interchange momentum through direct collisions. The discrete phase presssure gradient balances the buoyancy force driving bubbles toward the upper surface resulting in a steady void fraction profile across the gap width. The strength of the shear flow is controlled by the extent of bubble segregation and by the effective viscosity of the bubble phase. The measurements are compared with solutions of the averaged equations of motion (Kang et al. 1997; Spelt and Sangani, 1998), for a range of gas volume fractions and channel inclination angles.

  17. Dynamic shear deformation in high purity Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Cerreta, Ellen K; Bingert, John F; Trujillo, Carl P; Lopez, Mike F; Gray, George T

    2009-01-01

    The forced shear test specimen, first developed by Meyer et al. [Meyer L. et al., Critical Adiabatic Shear Strength of Low Alloyed Steel Under Compressive Loading, Metallurgical Applications of Shock Wave and High Strain Rate Phenomena (Marcel Decker, 1986), 657; Hartmann K. et al., Metallurgical Effects on Impact Loaded Materials, Shock Waves and High Strain rate Phenomena in Metals (Plenum, 1981), 325-337.], has been utilized in a number of studies. While the geometry of this specimen does not allow for the microstructure to exactly define the location of shear band formation and the overall mechanical response of a specimen is highly sensitive to the geometry utilized, the forced shear specimen is useful for characterizing the influence of parameters such as strain rate, temperature, strain, and load on the microstructural evolution within a shear band. Additionally, many studies have utilized this geometry to advance the understanding of shear band development. In this study, by varying the geometry, specifically the ratio of the inner hole to the outer hat diameter, the dynamic shear localization response of high purity Fe was examined. Post mortem characterization was performed to quantify the width of the localizations and examine the microstructural and textural evolution of shear deformation in a bcc metal. Increased instability in mechanical response is strongly linked with development of enhanced intergranular misorientations, high angle boundaries, and classical shear textures characterized through orientation distribution functions.

  18. Colloidal Suspensions in Shear Flow : a Real Space Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derks, D.

    2006-09-01

    We investigate the effect of shear flow on the microstructure of colloidal suspensions by means of microscopy. Systems of nearly equally sized particles are used, whose interactions and phase behavior are predominantly determined by their size and shape, and can further be tuned by the addition of polymers. Recently, a new type of shear cell was developed to study flowing suspensions in real space. The key property of this setup is the counter-rotating principle of the cone and plate, opening up the possibility to create a stationary layer in the bulk of the cell. In Chapter 2, we elaborate on the details of this setup and its performance. Fluorescence confocal microscopy is used to visualize the sheared suspension, and allows imaging of individual particles in the bulk in the stationary plane for a prolonged time. This way, the particle positions in a layer of, for example, a sheared colloidal crystal can be tracked. The particle dynamics in colloidal crystals in shear flow are the subject of Chapter 3. Here, the particles interact through a (nearly) hard sphere potential. Apart from the alignment of the crystal in the shear field and the collective zigzag motion, which had also been deduced from early scattering experiments, we find that random particle displacements increase with shear rate. Those increased fluctuations result in shear induced melting when their mean square displacement has reached about 13 % of the particle separation. Apart from hard spheres, we investigate mixtures of colloids and polymers in shear flow. The polymers cause an effective attraction between the spheres, leading to phase separation into a colloid rich (polymer poor) and a colloid poor (polymer rich) phase at sufficiently high colloid and polymer concentration. In Chapter 4, we study the demixing process in the (spinodal) two-phase region of the phase diagram. The system is quenched from an initially almost homogeneous state at very high shear rate to a low shear rate. A spinodal

  19. Shear-thinning-induced chaos in taylor-couette flow

    PubMed

    Ashrafi; Khayat

    2000-02-01

    The effect of weak shear thinning on the stability of the Taylor-Couette flow is explored for a Carreau-Bird fluid in the narrow-gap limit. The Galerkin projection method is used to derive a low-order dynamical system from the conservation of mass and momentum equations. In comparison with the Newtonian system, the present equations include additional nonlinear coupling in the velocity components through the viscosity. It is found that the critical Taylor number, corresponding to the loss of stability of the base (Couette) flow, becomes lower as the shear-thinning effect increases. That is, shear thinning tends to precipitate the onset of Taylor vortex flow. Similar to Newtonian fluids, there is an exchange of stability between the Couette and Taylor vortex flows, which coincides with the onset of a supercritical bifurcation. However, unlike the Newtonian model, the Taylor vortex cellular structure loses its stability in turn as the Taylor number reaches a critical value. At this point, a Hopf bifurcation emerges, which exists only for shear-thinning fluids. PMID:11046426

  20. Waves in Turbulent Stably Stratified Shear Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobitz, F. G.; Rogers, M. M.; Ferziger, J. H.; Parks, John W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Two approaches for the identification of internal gravity waves in sheared and unsheared homogeneous stratified turbulence are investigated. First, the phase angle between the vertical velocity and density fluctuations is considered. It was found, however, that a continuous distribution of the phase angle is present in weakly and strongly stratified flow. Second, a projection onto the solution of the linearized inviscid equations of motion of unsheared stratified flow is investigated. It was found that a solution of the fully nonlinear viscous Navier-Stokes equations can be represented by the linearized inviscid solution. The projection yields a decomposition into vertical wave modes and horizontal vortical modes.

  1. Propagation of sound through a sheared flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolley, J. P.; Smith, C. A.; Karamcheti, K.

    1978-01-01

    Sound generated in a moving fluid must propagate through a shear layer in order to be measured by a fixed instrument. These propagation effects were evaluated for noise sources typically associated with single and co-flowing subsonic jets and for subcritical flow over airfoils in such jets. The techniques for describing acoustic propagation fall into two categories: geometric acoustics and wave acoustics. Geometric acoustics is most convenient and accurate for high frequency sound. In the frequency range of interest to the present study (greater than 150 Hz), the geometric acoustics approach was determined to be most useful and practical.

  2. Transport of micro-bubbles in turbulent shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gualtieri, P.; Battista, F.; Casciola, C. M.

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of micro-bubbles, which are typical in many industrial applications, is addressed by means the Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of two prototypal flows, namely a homogeneous shear flow and a fully developed pipe flows. This preliminary study has a two-fold purpose. The homogenous turbulent shear flow is useful to characterize the bubble dynamics in terms of their eventual clustering properties which is expected to be controlled by the Stokes number. The time history of the fluid pressure experienced by the bubbles during their evolution is recorded and successively employed to force the Rayleigh-Plesset equation [1]. The ensuing data are used to address a posteriori the bubble diameter statistics in view of bubble collapse induced by strong and intermittent turbulent pressure fluctuations. The turbulent pipe flow simulations serve to address the bubble dynamics in wall bounded flows. Here the bubbles are observed to accumulate in the near-wall region with different intensity depending on the bubble dimensions.

  3. Shear flow promotes amyloid-{beta} fibrilization.

    PubMed

    Dunstan, Dave E; Hamilton-Brown, Paul; Asimakis, Peter; Ducker, William; Bertolini, Joseph

    2009-12-01

    The rate of formation of amyloid fibrils in an aqueous solution of amyloid-beta (Abeta) is greatly increased when the solution is sheared. When Abeta solution is stirred with a magnetic stirrer bar at 37 degrees C, a rapid increase in thioflavin T fluorescence is observed. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) images show the formation of aggregates, the growth of fibrils and the intertwining of the fibrils with time. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy of samples taken after stirring shows a transition from random coil to alpha-helix to beta-sheet secondary structure over 20 h at 37 degrees C. The fluorescence, AFM and CD measurements are all consistent with the formation of amyloid fibrils. Quiescent, non-stirred solutions incubated at 37 degrees C showed no evidence of amyloid formation over a period of 3 days. Couette flow was found to accelerate the formation of amyloid fibrils demonstrating that the primary effect of stirring is not mixing but shearing. Only very small shear forces are applied to individual molecules in our experiments. Simple calculation suggests that the force is too small to support a hypothesis that shearing promotes partial unfolding of the protein as is observed. PMID:19850675

  4. Effect of functionality on unentangled star polymers at equilibrium and under shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaolei; Chen, Jizhong

    2016-06-01

    The properties of unentangled star polymers with arm length Nf = 20 beads and functionality f (3 ≤ f ≤ 60) are investigated at equilibrium and under shear flow by coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. At equilibrium, the star polymer shows a crossover from a linear, freely penetrable, extremely soft object to a spherical, slightly hard object with an impenetrable center with increasing f. The results confirm that the arm relaxation is essentially independent of f and stars of large f form a liquid-like structure. In shear flow, the polymer deformation and alignment are calculated as well as the shear-induced rotational dynamics as function of shear rate. These properties are found to exhibit qualitative changes at an f-independent shear rate, γ p ˙ , which is a consequence of competition between chain relaxation and imposed flow. Shear thinning is characterized by shear viscosity and normal stress differences. With increasing f, the critical shear rate for the onset of shear thinning decreases from γ p ˙ for f = 3 to a smaller value. Our results also show that shear thinning of stars of large f arise from the collapse of liquid-like structures at low shear rates ( γ ˙ ≪ γ p ˙), where chains have no deformation; at high shear rates ( γ ˙ ≫ γ p ˙), shear thinning is mainly attributed to the chain stretching and orientation as linear polymers.

  5. Effect of functionality on unentangled star polymers at equilibrium and under shear flow.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaolei; Chen, Jizhong

    2016-06-28

    The properties of unentangled star polymers with arm length Nf = 20 beads and functionality f (3 ≤ f ≤ 60) are investigated at equilibrium and under shear flow by coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. At equilibrium, the star polymer shows a crossover from a linear, freely penetrable, extremely soft object to a spherical, slightly hard object with an impenetrable center with increasing f. The results confirm that the arm relaxation is essentially independent of f and stars of large f form a liquid-like structure. In shear flow, the polymer deformation and alignment are calculated as well as the shear-induced rotational dynamics as function of shear rate. These properties are found to exhibit qualitative changes at an f-independent shear rate, γṗ, which is a consequence of competition between chain relaxation and imposed flow. Shear thinning is characterized by shear viscosity and normal stress differences. With increasing f, the critical shear rate for the onset of shear thinning decreases from γṗ for f = 3 to a smaller value. Our results also show that shear thinning of stars of large f arise from the collapse of liquid-like structures at low shear rates (γ̇≪γṗ), where chains have no deformation; at high shear rates (γ̇≫γṗ), shear thinning is mainly attributed to the chain stretching and orientation as linear polymers. PMID:27369542

  6. Nonlinear evolution of layered stratified shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Victoria; Caulfield, Colm-Cille

    2000-11-01

    We investigate numerically and theoretically the nonlinear evolution of a parallel shear flow at moderate Reynolds number which has embedded within it a mixed layer of intermediate fluid. Linear stability theory predicts that such flows are unstable to stationary vortical disturbances which are a generalization of an inviscid instability first considered by G. I. Taylor. We investigate the behaviour of these Taylor modes at finite amplitude through numerical simulations. Through considering the long-time evolution of such flows, we investigate how secondary instabilities, and the layered background density profile, affect merging between neighbouring Taylor billows, and alter the irreversible mixing of the background stratification as the flow undergoes transition to small-scale disorder.

  7. Structure of a reattaching supersonic shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samimy, M.; Abu-Hijleh, B. A. K.

    1988-01-01

    A Mach 1.83 fully developed turbulent boundary layer with boundary layer thickness, free stream velocity, and Reynolds number of 7.5 mm, 476 m/s, and 6.2 x 10 to the 7th/m, respectively, was separated at a 25.4-mm backward step and formed a shear layer. Fast-response pressure transducers, schlieren photography, and LDV were used to study the structure of this reattaching shear flow. The preliminary results show that large-scale relatively organized structures with limited spanwise extent form in the free shear layer. Some of these structures appear to survive the recompression and reattachment processes, while others break down into smaller scales and the flow becomes increasingly three-dimensional. The survived large-scale structures lose their organization through recompression/reattachment, but regain it after reattachment. The structures after reattachment form a 40-45-degree angle relative to the free stream and deteriorate gradually as they move downstream.

  8. Particle Segregation in Collisional Shearing Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, J. T.; Louge, M. Y.

    1999-01-01

    The size segregation of flowing or shaken grains is a commonly observed phenomenon in industrial processes and in nature. In systems that do not involve much agitation of the grains, several mechanisms that involve gravity have been identified as leading to such segregation. In highly agitated flows, there is a mechanism independent of gravity that is available to drive separation of different grains. This is associated with spatial gradients in the energy of their velocity fluctuations. Because collisions between grains inevitably dissipate energy, collisional granular shear flows are usually of limited extent in the direction transverse to the flow. One consequence of this is that shear flows are strongly influenced by their boundaries. Because grains, on average, slip relative to boundaries, a bumpy or frictional boundary can convert slip energy into fluctuation energy. However, because each collision between a grain and the boundary dissipates fluctuation energy, there is a competition between production and dissipation. In principle, it is possible to design the geometry of the boundary - for example, the size and spacing of the bumps - so that the boundary either produces or dissipates fluctuation energy. This permits the control of the component of the spatial gradient of the fluctuation energy that is normal to the boundary. The gradients in fluctuation energy established by such boundaries may be exploited to drive the separation by size or other properties in a binary mixture of spherical grains. Microgravity makes the visual observations possible by permitting us to employ moderate rates of shear. On earth, the effects of gravity can be minimized by shearing so rapidly that the particle pressure overwhelms gravity. However, in this event, separation takes place too rapidly for visual observation, buoyancy and/or condensation associated with the centripetal acceleration must be accounted for, and the particles can be severely damaged. Because, in the

  9. Toroidal Flow Shear Driven turbulence and Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weixing; Ethier, S.; Hinton, F. L.; Hahm, T. S.; Tang, W. M.

    2012-10-01

    New results from global nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations with the GTS code show that strong flow shear can drive a negative compressibility mode [1-3] unstable in tokamak geometry in some experimentally relevant parameter regimes. The modes reside in a low-k range, similar to that of ITG mode, with smaller but almost constant growth rate over a wider kθ range, while the mode frequency increases strongly with kθ. More interestingly, the flow shear modes show significantly finite k//, unlike ITG and TEM. The nonlinear energy transfer to longer wavelength via toroidal mode coupling and corresponding strong zonal flow and geodestic acoustic mode (GAM) generation are shown to play a critical role in the nonlinear saturation of the instability. The associated turbulence fluctuations can produce significant momentum and energy transport, including an intrinsic torque in the co-current direction. Remarkably, strong ``resonance'' in the fluctuations and associated transport peaks at the lowest order rational surfaces with integer q-number (rather than fractional), consistent with theoretical calculation. As a consequence, local ``corrugations'' are generated in all plasma profiles (temperatures, density and toroidal rotation), potentially impacting transport barrier formation near the rational surface. Discussions on flow optimization for minimizing plasma transport will be reported.[4pt] [1] N. Mattor and P. H. Diamond, Phys. Fluids 31, 1180 (1988).[0pt] [2] P. J. Catto et al., Phys. Fluids 16, 1719 (1973).[0pt] [3] M. Artun and W. M. Tang, Phys. Fluids B4, 1102 (1992).

  10. Effects of dynamic shear and transmural pressure on wall shear stress sensitivity in collecting lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Kornuta, Jeffrey A; Nepiyushchikh, Zhanna; Gasheva, Olga Y; Mukherjee, Anish; Zawieja, David C; Dixon, J Brandon

    2015-11-01

    Given the known mechanosensitivity of the lymphatic vasculature, we sought to investigate the effects of dynamic wall shear stress (WSS) on collecting lymphatic vessels while controlling for transmural pressure. Using a previously developed ex vivo lymphatic perfusion system (ELPS) capable of independently controlling both transaxial pressure gradient and average transmural pressure on an isolated lymphatic vessel, we imposed a multitude of flow conditions on rat thoracic ducts, while controlling for transmural pressure and measuring diameter changes. By gradually increasing the imposed flow through a vessel, we determined the WSS at which the vessel first shows sign of contraction inhibition, defining this point as the shear stress sensitivity of the vessel. The shear stress threshold that triggered a contractile response was significantly greater at a transmural pressure of 5 cmH2O (0.97 dyne/cm(2)) than at 3 cmH2O (0.64 dyne/cm(2)). While contraction frequency was reduced when a steady WSS was applied, this inhibition was reversed when the applied WSS oscillated, even though the mean wall shear stresses between the conditions were not significantly different. When the applied oscillatory WSS was large enough, flow itself synchronized the lymphatic contractions to the exact frequency of the applied waveform. Both transmural pressure and the rate of change of WSS have significant impacts on the contractile response of lymphatic vessels to flow. Specifically, time-varying shear stress can alter the inhibition of phasic contraction frequency and even coordinate contractions, providing evidence that dynamic shear could play an important role in the contractile function of collecting lymphatic vessels.

  11. Predicting bed shear stress and its role in sediment dynamics and restoration potential of the Everglades and other vegetated flow systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larsen, L.G.; Harvey, J.W.; Crimaldi, J.P.

    2009-01-01

    Entrainment of sediment by flowing water affects topography, habitat suitability, and nutrient cycling in vegetated floodplains and wetlands, impacting ecosystem evolution and the success of restoration projects. Nonetheless, restoration managers lack simple decision-support tools for predicting shear stresses and sediment redistribution potential in different vegetation communities. Using a field-validated numerical model, we developed state-space diagrams that provide these predictions over a range of water-surface slopes, depths, and associated velocities in Everglades ridge and slough vegetation communities. Diminished bed shear stresses and a consequent decrease in bed sediment redistribution are hypothesized causes of a recent reduction in the topographic and vegetation heterogeneity of this ecosystem. Results confirmed the inability of present-day flows to entrain bed sediment. Further, our diagrams showed bed shear stresses to be highly sensitive to emergent vegetation density and water-surface slope but less sensitive to water depth and periphyton or floating vegetation abundance. These findings suggested that instituting a pulsing flow regime could be the most effective means to restore sediment redistribution to the Everglades. However, pulsing flows will not be sufficient to erode sediment from sloughs with abundant spikerush, unless spikerush density first decreases by natural or managed processes. Our methods provide a novel tool for identifying restoration parameters and performance measures in many types of vegetated aquatic environments where sediment erosion and deposition are involved.

  12. Tank-treading of swollen erythrocytes in shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodson, W. R., III; Dimitrakopoulos, P.

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate computationally the oscillatory tank-treading motion of healthy swollen human erythrocytes (owing to lower than physiological plasma osmolarity) in shear flows with capillary number Ca=O(1) and small to moderate viscosity ratios 0.01≤λ≤2.75. Swollen cells show similar shear flow dynamics with normal cells but with significantly higher inclination and tank-treading speed owing to the higher cell thickness. For a given viscosity ratio, as the flow rate increases, the steady-state erythrocyte length L (in the shear plane) increases logarithmically while its depth W (normal to the shear plane) decreases logarithmically; increase of the viscosity ratio results in lower cell deformation. The erythrocyte width S, which exists in the shear plane, is practically invariant in time, flow rate, and viscosity ratio and corresponds to a real cell thickness of about 2.5μm at physiological osmolarity (300mO) and 3.4μm at an osmolarity of 217 mO. The erythrocyte inclination decreases as the flow rate increases or as the surrounding fluid viscosity decreases, owing to the increased inner rotational flow which tends to align the cell toward the flow direction. The ektacytometry deformation of swollen cells increases logarithmically with the shear stress but with a slower slope than that for normal cells owing mainly to the higher orientation of the more swollen cells. As the cell swelling increases, the tank-treading period decreases owing to the higher thickness of the actual cell which overcomes the opposite action of the reduced shape-memory effects (i.e., the more spherical-like erythrocyte's reference shape of shearing resistance). The local area incompressibility tensions from the lipid bilayer increase with the cell swelling and cause a higher cytoskeleton prestress; this increased prestress results in smaller, but still measurable, local area changes on the spectrin skeleton of the more swollen erythrocytes. Our work provides insight on

  13. Analysis of red blood cell deformation under fast shear flow for better estimation of hemolysis.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Masanori; Bessho, Sadao; Wada, Shigeo

    2014-01-01

    We examined the deformation behavior of a red blood cell (RBC) in various flow fields to determine whether the extent of RBC deformation is correlated with the shear stress used as a hemolysis index. The RBC model was introduced to a simple shear flow (Couette flow) and to slightly complex flows (unsteady shear flows and stenosed flows). The RBC deformation was assessed by the maximum first principal strain over the RBC membrane and compared with the shear stress. Although the results were consistent under steady Couette flow, this was not the case under unsteady Couette flow or stenosed flow due to the viscoelastic nature of the RBC deformation caused by fluid forces. These results suggest that there is a limitation in accurately estimating the mechanical damage of RBCs solely from a macroscopic flow field, indicating the necessity of taking into account the dynamic deformation of RBCs to provide a better estimation of hemolysis.

  14. Direct observation of dynamic shear jamming in dense suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Ivo R.; Majumdar, Sayantan; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2016-04-01

    Liquid-like at rest, dense suspensions of hard particles can undergo striking transformations in behaviour when agitated or sheared. These phenomena include solidification during rapid impact, as well as strong shear thickening characterized by discontinuous, orders-of-magnitude increases in suspension viscosity. Much of this highly non-Newtonian behaviour has recently been interpreted within the framework of a jamming transition. However, although jamming indeed induces solid-like rigidity, even a strongly shear-thickened state still flows and thus cannot be fully jammed. Furthermore, although suspensions are incompressible, the onset of rigidity in the standard jamming scenario requires an increase in particle density. Finally, whereas shear thickening occurs in the steady state, impact-induced solidification is transient. As a result, it has remained unclear how these dense suspension phenomena are related and how they are connected to jamming. Here we resolve this by systematically exploring both the steady-state and transient regimes with the same experimental system. We demonstrate that a fully jammed, solid-like state can be reached without compression and instead purely with shear, as recently proposed for dry granular systems. This state is created by transient shear-jamming fronts, which we track directly. We also show that shear stress, rather than shear rate, is the key control parameter. From these findings we map out a state diagram with particle density and shear stress as variables. We identify discontinuous shear thickening with a marginally jammed regime just below the onset of full, solid-like jamming. This state diagram provides a unifying framework, compatible with prior experimental and simulation results on dense suspensions, that connects steady-state and transient behaviour in terms of a dynamic shear-jamming process.

  15. Direct observation of dynamic shear jamming in dense suspensions.

    PubMed

    Peters, Ivo R; Majumdar, Sayantan; Jaeger, Heinrich M

    2016-04-14

    Liquid-like at rest, dense suspensions of hard particles can undergo striking transformations in behaviour when agitated or sheared. These phenomena include solidification during rapid impact, as well as strong shear thickening characterized by discontinuous, orders-of-magnitude increases in suspension viscosity. Much of this highly non-Newtonian behaviour has recently been interpreted within the framework of a jamming transition. However, although jamming indeed induces solid-like rigidity, even a strongly shear-thickened state still flows and thus cannot be fully jammed. Furthermore, although suspensions are incompressible, the onset of rigidity in the standard jamming scenario requires an increase in particle density. Finally, whereas shear thickening occurs in the steady state, impact-induced solidification is transient. As a result, it has remained unclear how these dense suspension phenomena are related and how they are connected to jamming. Here we resolve this by systematically exploring both the steady-state and transient regimes with the same experimental system. We demonstrate that a fully jammed, solid-like state can be reached without compression and instead purely with shear, as recently proposed for dry granular systems. This state is created by transient shear-jamming fronts, which we track directly. We also show that shear stress, rather than shear rate, is the key control parameter. From these findings we map out a state diagram with particle density and shear stress as variables. We identify discontinuous shear thickening with a marginally jammed regime just below the onset of full, solid-like jamming. This state diagram provides a unifying framework, compatible with prior experimental and simulation results on dense suspensions, that connects steady-state and transient behaviour in terms of a dynamic shear-jamming process. PMID:27042934

  16. Shear flow effects on the nonlinear evolution of thermal instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Leboeuf, J.; Charlton, L.A.; Carreras, B.A. )

    1993-08-01

    In the weak radiation drive regime, the coupling between the thermal instability driven by impurity radiation and the self-consistent flow profile modification leads to a simple dynamical system that can be approximated by the Volterra--Lotka equations. In this system the shear flow acts as a predator and the temperature fluctuations act as prey. The solutions are oscillatory, and their behavior resembles that of edge-localized modes (ELM's). The solutions of the simplified model are compared with the three-dimensional and two-dimensional nonlinear numerical results for this instability.

  17. Permeative flows in cholesterics: shear and Poiseuille flows.

    PubMed

    Marenduzzo, D; Orlandini, E; Yeomans, J M

    2006-05-28

    By using a lattice Boltzmann scheme that solves the Beris-Edwards equations of motion describing liquid-crystal hydrodynamics, we study the response of cholesterics to shear and Poiseuille flows. The geometry we focus on is a flow along the direction of the helical axis, which is known to give rise to permeation. For both shear and Poiseuille flow we find that the boundary conditions on the director field are crucial in determining the rheological properties of the liquid crystal. For helices pinned at the boundaries, a small forcing leads to a large viscosity increase whereas a stronger forcing induces a sharp decrease towards the Newtonian value. This shear thinning behavior is in agreement with experiments and previous analytic results. If, on the other hand, the director is free to rotate at the walls, different behaviors are found depending on the symmetry of the steady-state primary flow. Some of the cases considered are compared to a similar imposed flow but with the helix lying perpendicular to the plates, for which no viscosity increase is observed. PMID:16774383

  18. Final Report - Investigation of Intermittent Turbulence and Turbulent Structures in the Presence of Controlled Sheared Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, Mark A.

    2013-06-27

    Final Report for grant DE-FG02-06ER54898. The dynamics and generation of intermittent plasma turbulent structures, widely known as "blobs" have been studied in the presence of sheared plasma flows in a controlled laboratory experiment.

  19. Limb positioning and shear flows in tetrapods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boryskina, O. P.; Al-Kilani, A.; Fleury, V.

    2011-08-01

    There is increasing evidence that animal morphogenesis consists of a large scale tissue flow, which defines the gross characteristics of the animal body at a very early developmental stage. We have studied the vertebrate embryo cell trajectories between a moment when it is flat and formless, to a moment when the body plan is recognizable (chicken embryo days 2-3 of development). We find that a large vortex flow patterns the vertebrate bauplan, and especially the limb territories, both hindlimbs and forelimbs. In vivo velocity measurements show that the vortices are dragged by a localized shear oriented along the median axis. A simple hydrodynamic model accounts for the lenticular shape of the limb plates. On the hindlimb plate, the flow propagates in the form of a solid-body vortex on the limb plate, dragged by a Poiseuille flow along the backbone. In vivo tonometry measurements show that there exist stress gradients in the embryonic tissue, and that the flow pattern is congruent with the direction of decrease of stress magnitude.

  20. Evolution of hairpin vortices in a shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hon, T.-L.; Walker, J. D. A.

    1988-01-01

    Recent experimental studies suggest that the hairpin vortex plays an important (and perhaps dominant) role in the dynamics of turbulent flows near walls. In this study a numerical procedure is developed to allow the accurate computation of the trajectory of a 3-D vortex having a small core radius. For hairpin vortices which are convected in a shear flow above a wall, the calculated results show that a 2-D vortex containing a small 3-D disturbance distorts into a complex shape with subsidiary hairpin vortices forming outboard of the original hairpin vortex. As the vortex moves above the wall, it induces unsteady motion in the viscous flow near the wall: numerical solutions suggest that the boundary-layer flow near the wall will ultimately erupt in response to the motion of the hairpin vortex and in the process a secondary hairpin vortex will be created. The computer results agree with recent experimental investigations.

  1. Molecular shear heating and vortex dynamics in thermostatted two dimensional Yukawa liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Akanksha; Ganesh, Rajaraman; Joy, Ashwin

    2016-07-01

    It is well known that two-dimensional macroscale shear flows are susceptible to instabilities leading to macroscale vortical structures. The linear and nonlinear fate of such a macroscale flow in a strongly coupled medium is a fundamental problem. A popular example of a strongly coupled medium is a dusty plasma, often modelled as a Yukawa liquid. Recently, laboratory experiments and molecular dynamics (MD) studies of shear flows in strongly coupled Yukawa liquids indicated the occurrence of strong molecular shear heating, which is found to reduce the coupling strength exponentially leading to the destruction of macroscale vorticity. To understand the vortex dynamics of strongly coupled molecular fluids undergoing macroscale shear flows and molecular shear heating, MD simulation has been performed, which allows the macroscopic vortex dynamics to evolve, while at the same time "removes" the microscopically generated heat without using the velocity degrees of freedom. We demonstrate that by using a configurational thermostat in a novel way, the microscale heat generated by shear flow can be thermostatted out efficiently without compromising the large scale vortex dynamics. In the present work, using MD simulations, a comparative study of shear flow evolution in Yukawa liquids in the presence and absence of molecular or microscopic heating is presented for a prototype shear flow, namely, Kolmogorov flow.

  2. Modeling and analysis of electrorheological suspensions in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Seo, Youngwook P; Seo, Yongsok

    2012-02-14

    A model capable of describing the flow behavior of electrorheological (ER) suspensions under different electric field strengths and over the full range of shear rates is proposed. Structural reformation in the low shear rate region is investigated where parts of a material are in an undeformed state, while aligned structures reform under the shear force. The model's predictions were compared with the experimental data of some ER fluids as well as the CCJ (Cho-Choi-Jhon) model. This simple model's predictions of suspension flow behavior with subsequent aligned structure reformation agreed well with the experimental data, both quantitatively and qualitatively. The proposed model plausibly predicted the static yield stress, whereas the CCJ model and the Bingham model predicted only the dynamic yield stress. The master curve describing the apparent viscosity was obtained by appropriate scaling both axes, which showed that a combination of dimensional analysis and flow curve analysis using the proposed model yielded a quantitatively and qualitatively precise description of ER fluid rheological behavior based on relatively few experimental measurements.

  3. Prediction of hemolysis in turbulent shear orifice flow.

    PubMed

    Tamagawa, M; Akamatsu, T; Saitoh, K

    1996-06-01

    This study proposes a method of predicting hemolysis induced by turbulent shear stress (Reynolds stress) in a simplified orifice pipe flow. In developing centrifugal blood pumps, there has been a serious problem with hemolysis at the impeller or casing edge; because of flow separation and turbulence in these regions. In the present study, hemolysis caused by turbulent shear stress must occur at high shear stress levels in regions near the edge of an orifice pipe flow. We have computed turbulent shear flow using the low-Reynolds number k-epsilon model. We found that the computed turbulent shear stress near the edge was several hundreds times that of the laminar shear stress (molecular shear stress). The peak turbulent shear stress is much greater than that obtained in conventional hemolysis testing using a viscometer apparatus. Thus, these high turbulent shear stresses should not be ignored in estimating hemolysis in this blood flow. Using an integrated power by shear force, it is optimal to determine the threshold of the turbulent shear stress by comparing computed stress levels with those of hemolysis experiments or pipe orifice blood flow.

  4. Molecular dynamics study of the effect of atomic roughness on the slip length at the fluid-solid boundary during shear flow.

    PubMed

    Galea, T M; Attard, Phil

    2004-04-13

    A systematic study into the effect of solid roughness on the slip boundary condition during shear flow is presented. Atomic roughness is modeled by varying the size and spacing between solid atoms at constant packing fraction while the interaction parameters and the thermodynamic state of the fluid are kept constant. It is shown that the fluid structure as manifest in the amplitude of the density oscillations increases with increasing smoothness of the surfaces. The fluid-solid slip length is shown to exhibit nonmonotonic behavior as the solid structure is varied from smooth to rough. Slip occurs for both smooth and rough surfaces, and stick occurs only for surfaces commensurate with the fluid.

  5. Dynamic shear jamming in granular suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Ivo; Majumdar, Sayantan; Jaeger, Heinrich

    2014-11-01

    Jamming by shear allows a frictional granular packing to transition from an unjammed state into a jammed state while keeping the system volume and average packing fraction constant. Shear jamming of dry granular media can occur quasi-statically, but boundaries are crucial to confine the material. We perform experiments in aqueous starch suspension where we apply shear using a rheometer with a large volume (400 ml) cylindrical Couette cell. In our suspensions the packing fraction is sufficiently low that quasi-static deformation does not induce a shear jammed state. Applying a shock-like deformation however, will turn the suspension into a jammed solid. A fully jammed state is reached within tens of microseconds, and can be sustained for at least several seconds. High speed imaging of the initial process reveals a jamming front propagating radially outward through the suspension, while the suspension near the outer boundary remains quiescent. This indicates that granular suspensions can be shear jammed without the need of confining solid boundaries. Instead, confinement is most likely provided by the dynamics in the front region.

  6. Vortex Formation in a High Speed Dust Flow with Large Velocity Shear in RF Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Iizuka, Satoru; Gohda, Takuma

    2008-09-07

    We have investigated a rotation of a dust cloud disc with strong velocity shear in a radio frequency (RF) plasma. The flow pattern of the dusts was evaluated by the Navier Stokes Equation with shear viscosity due to the Coulomb interactions. We have clarified dynamic behaviors of the dusts and observed generation of micro-vortices around rotational center, when the velocity shear is enhanced.

  7. Dynamics of micelle-nanoparticle systems undergoing shear. A coarse-grained molecular dynamics approach

    SciTech Connect

    Rolfe, Bryan A.; Chun, Jaehun; Joo, Yong L.

    2013-09-05

    Recent experimental work has shown that polymeric micelles can template nanoparticles via interstitial sites in shear-ordered micelle solutions. In the current study, we report simulation results based on a coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) model of a solvent/polymer/nanoparticle system. Our results demonstrate the importance of polymer concentration and the micelle corona length in 2D shear-ordering of neat block copolymer solutions. Although our results do not show strong 3D ordering during shear, we find that cessation of shear allows the system to relax into a 3D configuration of greater order than without shear. It is further shown that this post-shear relaxation is strongly dependent on the length of the micelle corona. For the first time, we demonstrate the presence and importance of a flow disturbance surrounding micelles in simple shear flow at moderate Péclet numbers. This disturbance is similar to what is observed around simulated star polymers and ellipsoids. The extent of the flow disturbance increases as expected with a longer micelle corona length. It is further suggested that without proper consideration of these dynamics, a stable nanoparticle configuration would be difficult to obtain.

  8. Shear flow simulations of biaxial nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarman, Sten

    1997-08-01

    We have calculated the viscosities of a biaxial nematic liquid crystal phase of a variant of the Gay-Berne fluid [J. G. Gay and B. J. Berne, J. Chem. Phys. 74, 3316 (1981)] by performing molecular dynamics simulations. The equations of motion have been augmented by a director constraint torque that fixes the orientation of the directors. This makes it possible to fix them at different angles relative to the stream lines in shear flow simulations. In equilibrium simulations the constraints generate a new ensemble. One finds that the Green-Kubo relations for the viscosities become linear combinations of time correlation function integrals in this ensemble whereas they are complicated rational functions in the conventional canonical ensemble. We have evaluated these Green-Kubo relations for all the shear viscosities and all the twist viscosities. We have also calculated the alignment angles, which are functions of the viscosity coefficients. We find that there are three real alignment angles but a linear stability analysis shows that only one of them corresponds to a stable director orientation. The Green-Kubo results have been cross checked by nonequilibrium shear flow simulations. The results from the different methods agree very well. Finally, we have evaluated the Miesowicz viscosities [D. Baalss, Z. Naturforsch. Teil A 45, 7 (1990)]. They vary by more than 2 orders of magnitude. The viscosity is consequently highly orientation dependent.

  9. Interaction of monopoles, dipoles, and turbulence with a shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques Rosas Fernandes, V. H.; Kamp, L. P. J.; van Heijst, G. J. F.; Clercx, H. J. H.

    2016-09-01

    Direct numerical simulations have been conducted to examine the evolution of eddies in the presence of large-scale shear flows. The numerical experiments consist of initial-value-problems in which monopolar and dipolar vortices as well as driven turbulence are superposed on a plane Couette or Poiseuille flow in a periodic two-dimensional channel. The evolution of the flow has been examined for different shear rates of the background flow and different widths of the channel. Results found for retro-grade and pro-grade monopolar vortices are consistent with those found in the literature. Boundary layer vorticity, however, can significantly modify the straining and erosion of monopolar vortices normally seen for unbounded domains. Dipolar vortices are shown to be much more robust coherent structures in a large-scale shear flow than monopolar eddies. An analytical model for their trajectories, which are determined by self-advection and advection and rotation by the shear flow, is presented. Turbulent kinetic energy is effectively suppressed by the shearing action of the background flow provided that the shear is linear (Couette flow) and of sufficient strength. Nonlinear shear as present in the Poiseuille flow seems to even increase the turbulence strength especially for high shear rates.

  10. Elastic instabilities in parallel shear flows of a viscoelastic shear-thinning liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, R. J.

    2016-08-01

    We report the results of an experimental study of the fully developed flow of a viscoelastic, shear-thinning aqueous polymer solution through two large-scale parallel shear flows: a pipe and channel-flow facility. We show that, at low flow rates, the velocity profile in both geometries is steady and is in good agreement with expected analytical solutions. However, in both geometries at higher flow rates the flow becomes weakly time dependent and the mean velocity profile is radically altered, exhibiting an overshoot near the duct center, a reduced shear rate at the wall, and an inflection point (i.e., a nonmonotonic gradient). Although inertia is not completely negligible at instability onset, we speculate that the origin of these unstable flows lies in the combination of elasticity and strong shear thinning.

  11. Microalga propels along vorticity direction in a shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chengala, Anwar; Hondzo, Miki; Sheng, Jian

    2013-05-01

    Using high-speed digital holographic microscopy and microfluidics, we discover that, when encountering fluid flow shear above a threshold, unicellular green alga Dunaliella primolecta migrates unambiguously in the cross-stream direction that is normal to the plane of shear and coincides with the local fluid flow vorticity. The flow shear drives motile microalgae to collectively migrate in a thin two-dimensional horizontal plane and consequently alters the spatial distribution of microalgal cells within a given suspension. This shear-induced algal migration differs substantially from periodic rotational motion of passive ellipsoids, known as Jeffery orbits, as well as gyrotaxis by bottom-heavy swimming microalgae in a shear flow due to the subtle interplay between torques generated by gravity and viscous shear. Our findings could facilitate mechanistic solutions for modeling planktonic thin layers and sustainable cultivation of microalgae for human nutrition and bioenergy feedstock.

  12. Brownian dynamics simulations of nanosheet solutions under shear.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yueyi; Green, Micah J

    2014-07-14

    The flow-induced conformation dynamics of nanosheets are simulated using a Brownian Dynamics (BD) formulation applied to a bead-rod sheetlike molecular model. This is the first-ever use of BD to simulate flow-induced dynamics of two-dimensional structures. Using this framework, we simulate dilute suspensions of coarse-grained nanosheets and compute conformation dynamics for simple shear flow. The data show power law scaling relationships between nanosheet parameters (such as bending moduli and molecular weight) and the resulting intrinsic viscosity and conformation. For nonzero bending moduli, an effective dimension of 2.77 at equilibrium is calculated from the scaling relationship between radius of gyration and molecular weight. We also find that intrinsic viscosity varies with molecular weight with an exponent of 2.12 ± 0.23; this dependence is significantly larger than those found for linear polymers. Weak shear thinning is observed at high Weissenberg number (Wi). This simulation method provides a computational basis for developing manufacturing processes for nanosheet-derived materials by relating flow forces and nanosheet parameters to the resulting material morphology.

  13. Oscillatory tank-treading motion of erythrocytes in shear flows

    PubMed Central

    Dodson, W. R.; Dimitrakopoulos, P.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the oscillatory dynamics of the tank-treading motion of healthy human erythrocytes in shear flows with capillary number Ca = O(1) and small to moderate viscosity ratios 0.01 ≤ λ ≤ 1.5. These conditions correspond to a wide range of surrounding medium viscosities (4 to 600 mPa s) and shear flow rates (2 to 560 s−1), and match those used in ektacytometry systems. For a given viscosity ratio, as the flow rate increases, the steady-state erythrocyte length L (in the shear plane) increases logarithmically while its depth W (normal to the shear plane) decreases logarithmically. In addition, the flow rate increase dampens the oscillatory erythrocyte inclination but not its lengths oscillations (which show relative variations of about 5–8%). For a given flow rate, as the viscosity ratio increases, the erythrocyte length L contracts while its depth W increases (i.e. the cell becomes less deformed) with small decrease in the lengths variations. The average orientation angle of the erythrocyte shows a significant decrease with the viscosity ratio as does the angle oscillation while the oscillation period increases. These trends continue in higher viscosity ratios resulting eventually in the transition from a (weakly oscillatory) tank-treading motion to a tumbling motion. Our computations show that the erythrocyte width S, which exists in the shear plane, is practically invariant in time, capillary number and viscosity ratio, and corresponds to a real cell thickness of about 2.5 μm. Comparison of our computational results with the predictions of (low degree-of-freedom) theoretical models and experimental findings, suggests that the energy dissipation due to the shape-memory effects is more significant than the energy dissipation due to the membrane viscosity. Our work shows that the oscillatory tank-treading motion can account for more than 50% of the variations found in ektacytometry systems; thus, researchers who wish to study inherent

  14. Oscillatory tank-treading motion of erythrocytes in shear flows.

    PubMed

    Dodson, W R; Dimitrakopoulos, P

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate the oscillatory dynamics of the tank-treading motion of healthy human erythrocytes in shear flows with capillary number Ca = O(1) and small to moderate viscosity ratios 0.01 ≤ λ ≤ 1.5. These conditions correspond to a wide range of surrounding medium viscosities (4-600 m Pa s) and shear flow rates (2-560 s(-1)), and match those used in ektacytometry systems. For a given viscosity ratio, as the flow rate increases, the steady-state erythrocyte length L (in the shear plane) increases logarithmically while its depth W (normal to the shear plane) decreases logarithmically. In addition, the flow rate increase dampens the oscillatory erythrocyte inclination but not its length oscillations (which show relative variations of about 5-8%). For a given flow rate, as the viscosity ratio increases, the erythrocyte length L contracts while its depth W increases (i.e., the cell becomes less deformed) with a small decrease in the length variations. The average orientation angle of the erythrocyte shows a significant decrease with the viscosity ratio as does the angle oscillation while the oscillation period increases. These trends continue in higher viscosity ratios resulting eventually in the transition from a (weakly oscillatory) tank-treading motion to a tumbling motion. Our computations show that the erythrocyte width S, which exists in the shear plane, is practically invariant in time, capillary number, and viscosity ratio, and corresponds to a real cell thickness of about 2.5 μm. Comparison of our computational results with the predictions of (low degree-of-freedom) theoretical models and experimental findings, suggests that the energy dissipation due to the shape-memory effects is more significant than the energy dissipation due to the membrane viscosity. Our work shows that the oscillatory tank-treading motion can account for more than 50% of the variations found in ektacytometry systems; thus, researchers who wish to study inherent

  15. Free turbulent shear flows. Volume 2: Summary of data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birch, S. F.

    1973-01-01

    The proceedings of a conference on free turbulent shear flows are presented. Objectives of the conference are as follows: (1) collect and process data for a variety of free mixing problems, (2) assess present theoretical capability for predicting mean velocity, concentration, and temperature distributions in free turbulent flows, (3) identify and recommend experimental studies to advance knowledge of free shear flows, and (4) increase understanding of basic turbulent mixing process for application to free shear flows. Examples of specific cases of jet flow are included.

  16. Self-organization in suspensions of end-functionalized semiflexible polymers under shear flow.

    PubMed

    Myung, Jin Suk; Winkler, Roland G; Gompper, Gerhard

    2015-12-28

    The nonequilibrium dynamical behavior and structure formation of end-functionalized semiflexible polymer suspensions under flow are investigated by mesoscale hydrodynamic simulations. The hybrid simulation approach combines the multiparticle collision dynamics method for the fluid, which accounts for hydrodynamic interactions, with molecular dynamics simulations for the semiflexible polymers. In equilibrium, various kinds of scaffold-like network structures are observed, depending on polymer flexibility and end-attraction strength. We investigate the flow behavior of the polymer networks under shear and analyze their nonequilibrium structural and rheological properties. The scaffold structure breaks up and densified aggregates are formed at low shear rates, while the structural integrity is completely lost at high shear rates. We provide a detailed analysis of the shear- rate-dependent flow-induced structures. The studies provide a deeper understanding of the formation and deformation of network structures in complex materials.

  17. Self-organization in suspensions of end-functionalized semiflexible polymers under shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myung, Jin Suk; Winkler, Roland G.; Gompper, Gerhard

    2015-12-01

    The nonequilibrium dynamical behavior and structure formation of end-functionalized semiflexible polymer suspensions under flow are investigated by mesoscale hydrodynamic simulations. The hybrid simulation approach combines the multiparticle collision dynamics method for the fluid, which accounts for hydrodynamic interactions, with molecular dynamics simulations for the semiflexible polymers. In equilibrium, various kinds of scaffold-like network structures are observed, depending on polymer flexibility and end-attraction strength. We investigate the flow behavior of the polymer networks under shear and analyze their nonequilibrium structural and rheological properties. The scaffold structure breaks up and densified aggregates are formed at low shear rates, while the structural integrity is completely lost at high shear rates. We provide a detailed analysis of the shear- rate-dependent flow-induced structures. The studies provide a deeper understanding of the formation and deformation of network structures in complex materials.

  18. Surface deformation and shear flow in ligand mediated cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Sircar, Sarthok; Roberts, Anthony J

    2016-10-01

    We present a unified, multiscale model to study the attachment/detachment dynamics of two deforming, charged, near spherical cells, coated with binding ligands and subject to a slow, homogeneous shear flow in a viscous, ionic fluid medium. The binding ligands on the surface of the cells experience both attractive and repulsive forces in an ionic medium and exhibit finite resistance to rotation via bond tilting. The microscale drag forces and couples describing the fluid flow inside the small separation gap between the cells, are calculated using a combination of methods in lubrication theory and previously published numerical results. For a selected range of material and fluid parameters, a hysteretic transition of the sticking probability curves (i.e., the function [Formula: see text]) between the adhesion phase (when [Formula: see text]) and the fragmentation phase (when [Formula: see text]) is attributed to a nonlinear relation between the total nanoscale binding forces and the separation gap between the cells. We show that adhesion is favoured in highly ionic fluids, increased deformability of the cells, elastic binders and a higher fluid shear rate (until a critical threshold value of shear rate is reached). Within a selected range of critical shear rates, the continuation of the limit points (i.e., the turning points where the slope of [Formula: see text] changes sign) predict a bistable region, indicating an abrupt switching between the adhesion and the fragmentation regimes. Although, bistability in the adhesion-fragmentation phase diagram of two deformable, charged cells immersed in an ionic aqueous environment has been identified by some in vitro experiments, but until now, has not been quantified theoretically.

  19. Hydrodynamic interaction of two deformable drops in confined shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yongping; Wang, Chengyao

    2014-09-01

    We investigate hydrodynamic interaction between two neutrally buoyant circular drops in a confined shear flow based on a computational fluid dynamics simulation using the volume-of-fluid method. The rheological behaviors of interactive drops and the flow regimes are explored with a focus on elucidation of underlying physical mechanisms. We find that two types of drop behaviors during interaction occur, including passing-over motion and reversing motion, which are governed by the competition between the drag of passing flow and the entrainment of reversing flow in matrix fluid. With the increasing confinement, the drop behavior transits from the passing-over motion to reversing motion, because the entrainment of the reversing-flow matrix fluid turns to play the dominant role. The drag of the ambient passing flow is increased by enlarging the initial lateral separation due to the departure of the drop from the reversing flow in matrix fluid, resulting in the emergence of passing-over motion. In particular, a corresponding phase diagram is plotted to quantitatively illustrate the dependence of drop morphologies during interaction on confinement and initial lateral separation.

  20. Hydrodynamic interaction of two deformable drops in confined shear flow.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongping; Wang, Chengyao

    2014-09-01

    We investigate hydrodynamic interaction between two neutrally buoyant circular drops in a confined shear flow based on a computational fluid dynamics simulation using the volume-of-fluid method. The rheological behaviors of interactive drops and the flow regimes are explored with a focus on elucidation of underlying physical mechanisms. We find that two types of drop behaviors during interaction occur, including passing-over motion and reversing motion, which are governed by the competition between the drag of passing flow and the entrainment of reversing flow in matrix fluid. With the increasing confinement, the drop behavior transits from the passing-over motion to reversing motion, because the entrainment of the reversing-flow matrix fluid turns to play the dominant role. The drag of the ambient passing flow is increased by enlarging the initial lateral separation due to the departure of the drop from the reversing flow in matrix fluid, resulting in the emergence of passing-over motion. In particular, a corresponding phase diagram is plotted to quantitatively illustrate the dependence of drop morphologies during interaction on confinement and initial lateral separation. PMID:25314532

  1. Dilute rigid dumbbell suspensions in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow: Shear stress response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, R. B.; Giacomin, A. J.; Schmalzer, A. M.; Aumnate, C.

    2014-02-01

    We examine the simplest relevant molecular model for large-amplitude shear (LAOS) flow of a polymeric liquid: the suspension of rigid dumbbells in a Newtonian solvent. We find explicit analytical expressions for the shear rate amplitude and frequency dependences of the first and third harmonics of the alternating shear stress response. We include a detailed comparison of these predictions with the corresponding results for the simplest relevant continuum model: the corotational Maxwell model. We find that the responses of both models are qualitatively similar. The rigid dumbbell model relies entirely on the dumbbell orientation to explain the viscoelastic response of the polymeric liquid, including the higher harmonics in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow. Our analysis employs the general method of Bird and Armstrong ["Time-dependent flows of dilute solutions of rodlike macromolecules," J. Chem. Phys. 56, 3680 (1972)] for analyzing the behavior of the rigid dumbbell model in any unsteady shear flow. We derive the first three terms of the deviation of the orientational distribution function from the equilibrium state. Then, after getting the "paren functions," we use these for evaluating the shear stress for LAOS flow. We find the shapes of the shear stress versus shear rate loops predicted to be reasonable.

  2. Investigation of Compressibility Effect for Aeropropulsive Shear Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramanyam, M. S.; Chen, C. P.

    2005-01-01

    Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) engines operate within a wide range of Mach numbers and altitudes. Fundamental fluid dynamic mechanisms involve complex choking, mass entrainment, stream mixing and wall interactions. The Propulsion Research Center at the University of Alabama in Huntsville is involved in an on- going experimental and numerical modeling study of non-axisymmetric ejector-based combined cycle propulsion systems. This paper attempts to address the modeling issues related to mixing, shear layer/wall interaction in a supersonic Strutjet/ejector flow field. Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solutions incorporating turbulence models are sought and compared to experimental measurements to characterize detailed flow dynamics. The effect of compressibility on fluids mixing and wall interactions were investigated using an existing CFD methodology. The compressibility correction to conventional incompressible two- equation models is found to be necessary for the supersonic mixing aspect of the ejector flows based on 2-D simulation results. 3-D strut-base flows involving flow separations were also investigated.

  3. Spontaneous formation of permanent shear bands in a mesoscopic model of flowing disordered matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, Kirsten; Bocquet, Lydéric; Barrat, Jean-Louis

    2012-02-01

    In this presentation we propose a coherent scenario of the formation of permanent shear bands in the flow of yield stress materials. Within a minimalistic mesoscopic model we investigate the spatial organisation of plasticity. The most important parameter is the typical time needed to regain the original structure after a local rearrangement. In agreement with a recent mean field study [Coussot et al., Eur. Phys. J. E, 2010, 33, 183] we observe a spontaneous formation of permanent shear bands, when this restructuring time is large compared to the typical stress release time in a rearrangement. This heterogeneous flow behaviour is different in nature from the transient dynamical heterogeneities that one observes in the small shear rate limit in flow without shear-banding [Martens et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2011, 106, 156001]. We analyse the dependence of the shear bands on system size, shear rate and restructuring time. Further we rationalise the scenario within a mean field version of the model, that explains the instability of the homogeneous flow below a critical shear rate. Our study therefore strongly supports the idea that the characteristic time scales involved in the local dynamics are at the physical origin of permanent shear bands.

  4. Molecularly based criteria for shear banding in transient flow of entangled polymeric fluids.

    PubMed

    Mohagheghi, Mouge; Khomami, Bamin

    2016-06-01

    Dissipative particle dynamics simulations of polymeric melts in a start-up of shear flow as a function of ramp time to its steady state value is studied. Herein, we report the molecular findings showing the effect of ramp time on the formation of shear banded structures and chain relaxation behavior. Specifically, it is shown that shear banding emerges at a rapid start-up; however, homogeneous shear prevails when the deformation rate ramp time is sufficiently slow. This finding is in full consistency with prior continuum level linear stability analysis of shear banding in start-up of shear flows as well as experimental observations of entangled DNA and polymer solutions. Further, it has been revealed that the ratio of the longest chain orientation relaxation time to that of the time for the imposed deformation rate to reach its steady state value plays a central role in determining whether local strain inhomogeneities that lead to the formation of shear banded flow structures are created. In addition, we have shown that the gradient of the number of entanglements along the velocity gradient direction should reach a critical value for the creation of localized strain inhomogeneity. Moreover, the relation between the local process leading to shear banded flows and the relaxation mechanism of the chain is discussed. Overall, a molecular picture for the interrelation between the longest chain orientation and stress relaxation time, local inhomogeneities, and shear banding has been proposed and corroborated with extensive analysis. PMID:27415319

  5. Molecularly based criteria for shear banding in transient flow of entangled polymeric fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohagheghi, Mouge; Khomami, Bamin

    2016-06-01

    Dissipative particle dynamics simulations of polymeric melts in a start-up of shear flow as a function of ramp time to its steady state value is studied. Herein, we report the molecular findings showing the effect of ramp time on the formation of shear banded structures and chain relaxation behavior. Specifically, it is shown that shear banding emerges at a rapid start-up; however, homogeneous shear prevails when the deformation rate ramp time is sufficiently slow. This finding is in full consistency with prior continuum level linear stability analysis of shear banding in start-up of shear flows as well as experimental observations of entangled DNA and polymer solutions. Further, it has been revealed that the ratio of the longest chain orientation relaxation time to that of the time for the imposed deformation rate to reach its steady state value plays a central role in determining whether local strain inhomogeneities that lead to the formation of shear banded flow structures are created. In addition, we have shown that the gradient of the number of entanglements along the velocity gradient direction should reach a critical value for the creation of localized strain inhomogeneity. Moreover, the relation between the local process leading to shear banded flows and the relaxation mechanism of the chain is discussed. Overall, a molecular picture for the interrelation between the longest chain orientation and stress relaxation time, local inhomogeneities, and shear banding has been proposed and corroborated with extensive analysis.

  6. Polymer brushes with nanoinclusions under shear: A molecular dynamics investigation

    PubMed Central

    Milchev, A.; Dimitrov, D. I.; Binder, K.

    2010-01-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations with a dissipative particle dynamics thermostat to study the behavior of nanosized inclusions (colloids) in a polymer brush under shear whereby the solvent is explicitly included in the simulation. The brush is described by a bead-spring model for flexible polymer chains, grafted on a solid substrate, while the polymer-soluble nanoparticles in the solution are taken as soft spheres whose diameter is about three times larger than that of the chain segments and the solvent. We find that the brush number density profile, as well as the density profiles of the nanoinclusions and the solvent, remains insensitive to strong shear although the grafted chains tilt in direction of the flow. The thickness of the penetration layer of nanoinclusions, as well as their average concentration in the brush, stays largely unaffected even at the strongest shear. Our result manifests the remarkable robustness of polymer brushes with embedded nanoparticles under high shear which could be of importance for technological applications. PMID:21045924

  7. Drop deformation and breakup in flows with and without shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kékesi, Tímea; Amberg, Gustav; Prahl Wittberg, Lisa

    2015-11-01

    The deformation and breakup of liquid drops in gaseous flows are studied numerically using the Volume of Fluid method. Fragmentation of fuel drops has a key role in combustion, determining the rate of mixing and the efficiency of the process. It is common to refer to Weber number 12 as the onset of breakup, and to define breakup mode regimes as a function of Weber number. These definitions are established for simple flows and do not take density and viscosity ratios into account. The main objective of this work is the dynamics of the drop leading to breakup. Fully developed uniform flows and flows with various shear rates are considered. A Weber number of 20, Reynolds numbers 20-200, density ratios 20-80, and viscosity ratios 0.5-50 were used. Results for uniform flows are presented in Kékesi T. et al. (2014). The final aim of the project is to extend existing atomization models for fuel sprays by accounting for density and viscosity ratios in addition to the Reynolds and Weber numbers already present in current models. Estimations for the lifetime of the drop are provided; furthermore, the history of the drag coefficient is compared for several cases. Examples of the observed phenomena and ideas for possible model modifications will be presented. This work is supported by the Swedish Research Council and the Linné FLOW Centre.

  8. Application of Photon Correlation Spectroscopy to Uniform Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, Hyuk K.; Sur, Jeanman; Lee, Sangjun; Kim, Kipom

    1996-11-01

    We study the application of photon correlation spectroscopy to a system of randomly diffusing particles suspended in a uniform shear flow fluid. Unifrom shear flow is generated in Zimm viscometer type Taylor Couette cell. Detecting the scattered intensity from the diffusing particles through a single slit or multiple slit, one can not only study the uniform shear nature of Taylor-Couette flow but also transform the spatial information of the scattering volume into the time information using a photon correlation technique. We discuss useful applications of this technique.

  9. Effective temperature dynamics of shear bands in metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Daub, Eric G; Klaumünzer, David; Löffler, Jörg F

    2014-12-01

    We study the plastic deformation of bulk metallic glasses with shear transformation zone (STZ) theory, a physical model for plasticity in amorphous systems, and compare it with experimental data. In STZ theory, plastic deformation occurs when localized regions rearrange due to applied stress and the density of these regions is determined by a dynamically evolving effective disorder temperature. We compare the predictions of STZ theory to experiments that explore the low-temperature deformation of Zr-based bulk metallic glasses via shear bands at various thermal temperatures and strain rates. By following the evolution of effective temperature with time, strain rate, and temperature through a series of approximate and numerical solutions to the STZ equations, we successfully model a suite of experimentally observed phenomena, including shear-band aging as apparent from slide-hold-slide tests, a temperature-dependent steady-state flow stress, and a strain-rate- and temperature-dependent transition from stick-slip (serrated flow) to steady-sliding (nonserrated flow). We find that STZ theory quantitatively matches the observed experimental data and provides a framework for relating the experimentally measured energy scales to different types of atomic rearrangements. PMID:25615110

  10. Hydrodynamics of fluid-solid coexistence in dense shear granular flow.

    PubMed

    Khain, Evgeniy

    2007-05-01

    We consider dense rapid shear flow of inelastically colliding hard disks. Navier-Stokes granular hydrodynamics is applied accounting for the recent finding that shear viscosity diverges at a lower density than the rest of the constitutive relations. New interpolation formulas for constitutive relations between dilute and dense cases are proposed and justified in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. A linear stability analysis of the uniform shear flow is performed and the full phase diagram is presented. It is shown that when the inelasticity of particle collision becomes large enough, the uniform sheared flow gives way to a two-phase flow, where a dense "solidlike" striped cluster is surrounded by two fluid layers. The results of the analysis are verified in event-driven MD simulations, and a good agreement is observed.

  11. Electrostatic ion perturbations in kinematically complex shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osmanov, Z.; Rogava, A.; Poedts, S.

    2015-04-01

    The scope of the present paper is to determine how ion electrostatic wave perturbations in plasma flows are influenced by the presence of a kinematically complex velocity shear. For this purpose we consider a model based on the following set of physical equations: the equation of motion, the continuity equation and the Poisson equation for the electric potential governing the evolution of the system. After linearizing the equations, we solve them numerically. We find out that for a variety of specific values of parameters the system may exhibit quite interesting dynamic behaviour. In particular, we demonstrate that the system exhibits two different kinds of shear flow instabilities: (a) when the wave vectors evolve exponentially, the ion sound modes become unstable as well; while, (b) on the other hand, one can find areas in a parametric space where, when the wave vectors vary periodically, the physical system is subject to a strongly pronounced parametric instability. We also show the possibility of the generation of beat wave phenomena, characterized by a noteworthy quasi-periodic temporal behaviour. In the conclusion, we discuss the possible areas of applications and further directions of generalization of the presented work.

  12. DYNAMIC SHEAR-INFLUENCED COLLAGEN SELF-ASSEMBLY

    PubMed Central

    Saeidi, Nima; Sander, Edward A.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to influence the direction of polymerization of a self-assembling biomolecular system has the potential to generate materials with extremely high anisotropy. In biological systems where highly-oriented cellular populations give rise to aligned and often load-bearing tissue such organized molecular scaffolds could aid in the contact guidance of cells for engineered tissue constructs (e.g cornea and tendon). In this investigation we examine the detailed dynamics of pepsin-extracted type I bovine collagen assembly on a glass surface under the influence of flow between two plates. Differential Interference Contrast (DIC) imaging (60x-1.4NA) with focal plane stabilization was used to resolve and track the growth of collagen aggregates on borosilicate glass for 4 different shear rates (500, 80, 20, and 9 s-1). The detailed morphology of the collagen fibrils/aggregates was examined using Quick Freeze Deep Etch electron microscopy. Nucleation of fibrils on the glass was observed to occur rapidly (~2 min) followed by continued growth of the fibrils. The growth rates were dependent on flow in a complex manner with the highest rate of axial growth (0.1 microns/sec) occurring at a shear rate of 9 s-1. The lowest growth rate occurred at the highest shear. Fibrils were observed to both branch and join during the experiments. The best alignment of fibrils was observed at intermediate shear rates of 20 and 80s-1. However, the investigation revealed that fibril directional growth was not stable. At high shear rates, fibrils would often turn downstream forming what we term “hooks” which are likely the combined result of monomer interaction with the initial collagen layer or “mat” and the high shear rate. Further, QFDE examination of fibril morphology demonstrated that the assembled fibrillar structure did not possess native D-periodicity. Instead, fibrils comprised a collection of generally aligned, monomers which were self-assembled to form a fibril

  13. Traction Forces of Endothelial Cells under Slow Shear Flow

    PubMed Central

    Perrault, Cecile M.; Brugues, Agusti; Bazellieres, Elsa; Ricco, Pierre; Lacroix, Damien; Trepat, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cells are constantly exposed to fluid shear stresses that regulate vascular morphogenesis, homeostasis, and disease. The mechanical responses of endothelial cells to relatively high shear flow such as that characteristic of arterial circulation has been extensively studied. Much less is known about the responses of endothelial cells to slow shear flow such as that characteristic of venous circulation, early angiogenesis, atherosclerosis, intracranial aneurysm, or interstitial flow. Here we used a novel, to our knowledge, microfluidic technique to measure traction forces exerted by confluent vascular endothelial cell monolayers under slow shear flow. We found that cells respond to flow with rapid and pronounced increases in traction forces and cell-cell stresses. These responses are reversible in time and do not involve reorientation of the cell body. Traction maps reveal that local cell responses to slow shear flow are highly heterogeneous in magnitude and sign. Our findings unveil a low-flow regime in which endothelial cell mechanics is acutely responsive to shear stress. PMID:26488643

  14. Electromagnetic effects in the stabilization of turbulence by sheared flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, M. D. J.; Newton, S. L.; Cowley, S. C.; Loureiro, N. F.; Dickinson, D.; Roach, C.; Connor, J. W.

    2014-01-01

    We have extended our study of the competition between the drive and stabilization of plasma microinstabilities by sheared flow to include electromagnetic effects at low plasma β (the ratio of plasma to magnetic pressure). The extended system of characteristic equations is formulated, for a dissipative fluid model developed from the gyrokinetic equation, using a twisting mode representation in sheared slab geometry and focusing on the ion temperature gradient mode. Perpendicular flow shear convects perturbations along the field at the speed we denote as Mcs (where cs is the sound speed). M \\gt 1/ \\sqrt{\\beta} is required to make the system characteristics unidirectional and inhibit eigenmode formation, leaving only transitory perturbations in the system. This typically represents a much larger flow shear than in the electrostatic case, which only needs M > 1. Numerical investigation of the region M \\lt 1/\\sqrt{\\beta} shows the driving terms can conflict, as in the electrostatic case, giving low growth rates over a range of parameters. Also, at modest drive strengths and low β values typical of experiments, including electromagnetic effects does not significantly alter the growth rates. For stronger flow shear and higher β, geometry characteristic of the spherical tokamak mitigates the effect of an instability of the shear Alfvén wave, driven by the parallel flow shear.

  15. Onset of three-dimensional shear in granular flow.

    SciTech Connect

    Lechman, Jeremy B.; Nagel, Sidney, R.; Grest, Gary Stephen; Mobius, Matthias E.; Karczmar, Greg S.; Heinrich, M. Jaeger; Barbero, Antonio F.; Cheng, Xiang

    2005-07-01

    The evolution of granular shear flow is investigated as a function of height in a split-bottom Couette cell. Using particle tracking, magnetic-resonance imaging, and large-scale simulations, we find a transition in the nature of the shear as a characteristic height H* is exceeded. Below H* there is a central stationary core; above H* we observe the onset of additional axial shear associated with torsional failure. Radial and axial shear profiles are qualitatively different: the radial extent is wide and increases with height, while the axial width remains narrow and fixed.

  16. Damage Surrounding Dynamically Propagating Shear Cracks in Granodiorite (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulkner, D. R.; Faulkner, R. G.; Cembrano, J. M.; Jensen, E.

    2009-12-01

    Quantifying the microfracture damage surrounding faults and fractures is important for predicting the fluid flow properties of rock masses. Damage surrounding faults has been attributed to fault growth, geometric irregularities, and earthquake rupture. Up to now, earthquake rupture can only be inferred when pseudotachylyte is present, indicating shear heating leading to melt production. We describe shear fractures that have developed a relatively isotropic granodioritic protolith within the Atacama fault system in northern Chile. These fractures have an alteration zone produced as a result of intense microfracture damage surrounding the fractures. These alteration zones taper out towards the fracture tips. The alteration zone also shows asymmetry either side of the fracture that can be used to infer the propagation direction of the fracture. We interpret these observations as being due to a waning fracture tip stress field of a dynamically propagating shear crack. In contrast, simple fracture mechanics models indicate a quasi-statically propagating fracture would be expected to produce an expanding zone of damage at the crack tip as displacement accumulates. Another explanation for the reduction in alteration zone width might be extension of the fracture tips by sub-critical crack growth. The width of alteration zone has a positive correlation with the shear displacement and a zero intercept. The slope of this correlation is steeper than for microfracture damage zone widths measured on larger displacement faults in the same region. We suggest that this indicates a different mode of formation; that of damage surrounding a dynamically propagating shear fracture. At higher displacements, additional processes such as those mentioned earlier contribute to the width of the microfracture damage zone, and the rate of growth with displacement is not so pronounced.

  17. Structure, folding dynamics, and amyloidogenesis of D76N β2-microglobulin: roles of shear flow, hydrophobic surfaces, and α-crystallin.

    PubMed

    Mangione, P Patrizia; Esposito, Gennaro; Relini, Annalisa; Raimondi, Sara; Porcari, Riccardo; Giorgetti, Sofia; Corazza, Alessandra; Fogolari, Federico; Penco, Amanda; Goto, Yuji; Lee, Young-Ho; Yagi, Hisashi; Cecconi, Ciro; Naqvi, Mohsin M; Gillmore, Julian D; Hawkins, Philip N; Chiti, Fabrizio; Rolandi, Ranieri; Taylor, Graham W; Pepys, Mark B; Stoppini, Monica; Bellotti, Vittorio

    2013-10-25

    Systemic amyloidosis is a fatal disease caused by misfolding of native globular proteins, which then aggregate extracellularly as insoluble fibrils, damaging the structure and function of affected organs. The formation of amyloid fibrils in vivo is poorly understood. We recently identified the first naturally occurring structural variant, D76N, of human β2-microglobulin (β2m), the ubiquitous light chain of class I major histocompatibility antigens, as the amyloid fibril protein in a family with a new phenotype of late onset fatal hereditary systemic amyloidosis. Here we show that, uniquely, D76N β2m readily forms amyloid fibrils in vitro under physiological extracellular conditions. The globular native fold transition to the fibrillar state is primed by exposure to a hydrophobic-hydrophilic interface under physiological intensity shear flow. Wild type β2m is recruited by the variant into amyloid fibrils in vitro but is absent from amyloid deposited in vivo. This may be because, as we show here, such recruitment is inhibited by chaperone activity. Our results suggest general mechanistic principles of in vivo amyloid fibrillogenesis by globular proteins, a previously obscure process. Elucidation of this crucial causative event in clinical amyloidosis should also help to explain the hitherto mysterious timing and location of amyloid deposition. PMID:24014031

  18. Three-sphere magnetic swimmer in a shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghiloo, Maryam; Miri, MirFaez

    2013-08-01

    We consider a low-Reynolds-number swimmer made from three spheres linked by two slender arms, and explore its motion in a shear flow. This rodlike three-sphere swimmer finally follows the direction dictated by the shear flow. To overcome this shortcoming, we propose a model in which the two outer spheres have permanent magnetic moments along the arms. This magnetic swimmer can be navigated to a desired direction by applying an external static and uniform magnetic field.

  19. Dynamics of edge dislocations in a sheared lamellar mesophase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumaran, V.

    2013-10-01

    The dynamics and interactions of edge dislocations in a nearly aligned sheared lamellar mesophase is analysed to provide insights into the relationship between disorder and rheology. First, the mesoscale permeation and momentum equations for the displacement field in the presence of external forces are derived from the model H equations for the concentration and momentum field. The secondary flow generated due to the mean shear around an isolated defect is calculated, and the excess viscosity due to the presence of the defect is determined from the excess energy dissipation due to the secondary flow. The excess viscosity for an isolated defect is found to increase with system size in the cross-stream direction as L3/2 for an isolated defect, though this divergence is cut-off due to interactions in a defect suspension. As the defects are sheared past each other due to the mean flow, the Peach-Koehler force due to elastic interaction between pairs of defects is found to cause no net displacement relative to each other as they approach from large separation to the distance of closest approach. The equivalent force due to viscous interactions is found to increase the separation for defects of opposite sign, and decrease the separation for defects of same sign. During defect interactions, we find that there is no buckling instability due to dilation of layers for systems of realistic size. However, there is another mechanism, which is the velocity difference generated across a slightly deformed bilayer due to the mean shear, which could result in the creation of new defects.

  20. Wave-particle transport by weak electrostatic flow shear fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, S. P.; Schwartz, S. J.

    1981-01-01

    A description is presented of the first consistent theoretical treatment of transport due to weak electrostatic fluctuations from microinstabilities driven by a shear in plasma flow parallel to a uniform magnetic field. The model used considers electrostatic fluctuations in a Vlasov plasma with sheared bulk velocity parallel to a uniform magnetic field. The linear stability theory for the model has been studied by Gary and Schwartz (1980). In the current investigation, a calculation is performed of the wave-particle transport associated with the electrostatic flow shear instability.

  1. Dynamic pore-pressure fluctuations in rapidly shearing granular materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, R.M.; LaHusen, R.G.

    1989-01-01

    Results from two types of experiments show that intergranular pore pressures fluctuated dynamically during rapid, steady shear deformation of water-saturated granular materials. During some fluctuations, the pore water locally supported all normal and shear stresses, while grain-contact stresses transiently fell to zero. Fluctuations also propagated outward from the shear zone; this process modifies grain-contact stresses in adjacent areas and potentially instigates shear-zone growth.

  2. Scaling of the magnetic reconnection rate with symmetric shear flow

    SciTech Connect

    Cassak, P. A.; Otto, A.

    2011-07-15

    The scaling of the reconnection rate during (fast) Hall magnetic reconnection in the presence of an oppositely directed bulk shear flow parallel to the reconnecting magnetic field is studied using two-dimensional numerical simulations of Hall reconnection with two different codes. Previous studies noted that the reconnection rate falls with increasing flow speed and shuts off entirely for super-Alfvenic flow, but no quantitative expression for the reconnection rate in sub-Alfvenic shear flows is known. An expression for the scaling of the reconnection rate is presented.

  3. The effect of shear flow on the rotational diffusivity of a single axisymmetric particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, Brian; Koch, Donald; Cohen, Itai

    2014-11-01

    Colloidal suspensions of nonspherical particles abound in the world around us, from red blood cells in arteries to kaolinite discs in clay. Understanding the orientation dynamics of these particles is important for suspension rheology and particle self-assembly. However, even for the simplest case of dilute suspensions in simple shear flow, the orientation dynamics of Brownian nonspherical particles are poorly understood at large shear rates. Here, we analytically calculate the time-dependent orientation distributions of particles confined to the flow-gradient plane when the rotary diffusion is small but nonzero. For both startup and oscillatory shear flows, we find a coordinate change that maps the convection-diffusion equation to a simple diffusion equation with an enhanced diffusion constant, simplifying the orientation dynamics. For oscillatory shear, this enhanced diffusion drastically alters the quasi-steady orientation distributions. Our theory of the unsteady orientation dynamics provides an understanding of a nonspherical particle suspension's rheology for a large class of unsteady flows. For particles with aspect ratio 10 under oscillatory shear, the rotary diffusion and intrinsic viscosity vary with amplitude by a factor of ~ 40 and ~ 2 , respectively.

  4. Shear flow energy redistribution stipulated by the internal-gravity wavy structures in the dissipative ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aburjania, G. D.; Chargazia, K. Z.; Kharshiladze, O. A.

    2013-07-01

    The linear mechanism of generation, intensification and further nonlinear dynamics of internal gravity waves (IGW) in stably stratified dissipative ionosphere with non-uniform zonal wind (shear flow) is studied. In case of the shear flows the operators of linear problem are non-selfadjoint, and the corresponding Eigen functions - nonorthogonal. Thus, canonical - modal approach is of less use studying such motions. Non-modal mathematical analysis becomes more adequate for such problems. On the basis of non-modal approach, the equations of dynamics and the energy transfer of IGW disturbances in the ionosphere with a shear flow is obtained. Exact analytical solutions of the linear as well as the nonlinear dynamic equations of the problem are built. The increment of shear instability of IGW is defined. It is revealed that the transient amplification of IGW disturbances due time does not flow exponentially, but in algebraic - power law manner. The effectiveness of the linear amplification mechanism of IGW at interaction with non-uniform zonal wind is analyzed. It is shown that at initial linear stage of evolution IGW effectively temporarily draws energy from the shear flow significantly increasing (by an order of magnitude) own amplitude and energy. With amplitude growth the nonlinear mechanism turns on and the process ends with self-organization of nonlinear solitary, strongly localized IGW vortex structures (the monopole vortex, the transverse vortex chain or the longitudinal vortex street). Accumulation of these vortices in the ionospheric medium can create the strongly turbulent state.

  5. Scaling properties in the production range of shear dominated flows.

    PubMed

    Casciola, C M; Gualtieri, P; Jacob, B; Piva, R

    2005-07-01

    In large Reynolds number turbulence, isotropy is recovered as the scale is reduced and homogeneous-isotropic scalings are eventually observed. This picture is violated in many cases, e.g., wall bounded flows, where, due to the shear, different scaling laws emerge. This effect has been ascribed to the contamination of the inertial range by the larger anisotropic scales. The issue is addressed here by analyzing both numerical and experimental data for a homogeneous shear flow. In fact, under strong shear, the alteration of the scaling exponents is not induced by the contamination from the anisotropic sectors. Actually, the exponents are universal properties of the isotropic component of the structure functions of shear dominated flows. The implications are discussed in the context of turbulence near solid walls, where improved closure models would be advisable.

  6. An integral turbulent kinetic energy analysis of free shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, C. E.; Phares, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    Mixing of coaxial streams is analyzed by application of integral techniques. An integrated turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) equation is solved simultaneously with the integral equations for the mean flow. Normalized TKE profile shapes are obtained from incompressible jet and shear layer experiments and are assumed to be applicable to all free turbulent flows. The shear stress at the midpoint of the mixing zone is assumed to be directly proportional to the local TKE, and dissipation is treated with a generalization of the model developed for isotropic turbulence. Although the analysis was developed for ducted flows, constant-pressure flows were approximated with the duct much larger than the jet. The axisymmetric flows under consideration were predicted with reasonable accuracy. Fairly good results were also obtained for the fully developed two-dimensional shear layers, which were computed as thin layers at the boundary of a large circular jet.

  7. Segregation dynamics in debris flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, K. M.; Fei, M.

    2014-12-01

    Debris flows are massive flows consisting of mixtures of particles of different sizes and interstitial fluids such as water and mud. In sheared mixtures of different-sized (same density) particles, it is well known that larger particles tend to go up (toward the free surface), and the smaller particles, down, commonly referred to as the "Brazil-nut problem" or "kinetic sieving". When kinetic sieving fluxes are combined with advection in flows, they can give rise to a spectacular range of segregation patterns. These segregation / advection dynamics are recognized as playing a role in the coarsening of a debris flow front (its "snout") and the coarsening of the self-formed channel sides or levees. Since particle size distribution influences the flow dynamics including entrainment of bed materials, modeling segregation dynamics in debris flows is important for modeling the debris flows themselves. In sparser systems, the Brazil-nut segregation is well-modeled using kinetic theory applied to dissipative systems, where an underlying assumption involves random, uncorrelated collisions. In denser systems, where kinetic theory breaks down we have recently developed a new mixture model that demonstrates the segregation fluxes are driven by two effects associated with the kinetic stress or granular temperature (the kinetic energy associated with velocity fluctuations): (1) the difference between the partitioning of kinetic and contact stresses among the species in the mixture and (2) a kinetic stress gradient. Both model frameworks involve the temperature gradient as a driving force for segregation, but kinetic theory sends larger particles toward lower temperatures, and our mixture model sends larger particles away from lower temperatures. Which framework works under what conditions appears to depend on correlations in the flow such as those manifested in clusters and force chains. We discuss the application of each theoretical framework to representing segregation dynamics

  8. Characterizations and Correlations of Wall Shear Stress in Aneurysmal Flow.

    PubMed

    Arzani, Amirhossein; Shadden, Shawn C

    2016-01-01

    Wall shear stress (WSS) is one of the most studied hemodynamic parameters, used in correlating blood flow to various diseases. The pulsatile nature of blood flow, along with the complex geometries of diseased arteries, produces complicated temporal and spatial WSS patterns. Moreover, WSS is a vector, which further complicates its quantification and interpretation. The goal of this study is to investigate WSS magnitude, angle, and vector changes in space and time in complex blood flow. Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) was chosen as a setting to explore WSS quantification. Patient-specific computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were performed in six AAAs. New WSS parameters are introduced, and the pointwise correlation among these, and more traditional WSS parameters, was explored. WSS magnitude had positive correlation with spatial/temporal gradients of WSS magnitude. This motivated the definition of relative WSS gradients. WSS vectorial gradients were highly correlated with magnitude gradients. A mix WSS spatial gradient and a mix WSS temporal gradient are proposed to equally account for variations in the WSS angle and magnitude in single measures. The important role that WSS plays in regulating near wall transport, and the high correlation among some of the WSS parameters motivates further attention in revisiting the traditional approaches used in WSS characterizations. PMID:26592536

  9. Instability of Stratified Shear Flow: Intermittency and Length Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ecke, Robert; Odier, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    The stability of stratified shear flows which occur in oceanic overflows, wind-driven thermoclines, and atmospheric inversion layers is governed by the Richardson Number Ri , a non-dimensional balance between stabilizing stratification and destabilizing shear. For a shear flow with velocity difference U, density difference Δρ and characteristic length H, one has Ri = g (Δρ / ρ) H /U2 . A more precise definition is the gradient Richardson Number Rig =N2 /S2 where the buoyancy frequency N =√{ (g / ρ) ∂ρ / ∂z } , the mean strain S = ∂U / ∂z with z parallel to gravity and with ensemble or time averages defining the gradients. We explore the stability and mixing properties of a wall-bounded shear flow for 0 . 1 < Rig < 1 using simultaneous measurements of density and velocity fields. The flow, confined from the top by a horizontal boundary, is a lighter alcohol-water mixture injected from a nozzle into quiescent heavier salt-water fluid. The injected flow is turbulent with Taylor Reynolds number about 75. We compare a set of length scales that characterize the mixing properties of our turbulent stratified shear flow including Thorpe Length LT, Ozmidov Length LO, and Ellison Length LE.

  10. Transport bifurcation induced by sheared toroidal flow in tokamak plasmasa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Highcock, E. G.; Barnes, M.; Parra, F. I.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Roach, C. M.; Cowley, S. C.

    2011-10-01

    First-principles numerical simulations are used to describe a transport bifurcation in a differentially rotating tokamak plasma. Such a bifurcation is more probable in a region of zero magnetic shear than one of finite magnetic shear, because in the former case the component of the sheared toroidal flow that is perpendicular to the magnetic field has the strongest suppressing effect on the turbulence. In the zero-magnetic-shear regime, there are no growing linear eigenmodes at any finite value of flow shear. However, subcritical turbulence can be sustained, owing to the existence of modes, driven by the ion temperature gradient and the parallel velocity gradient, which grow transiently. Nonetheless, in a parameter space containing a wide range of temperature gradients and velocity shears, there is a sizeable window where all turbulence is suppressed. Combined with the relatively low transport of momentum by collisional (neoclassical) mechanisms, this produces the conditions for a bifurcation from low to high temperature and velocity gradients. A parametric model is constructed which accurately describes the combined effect of the temperature gradient and the flow gradient over a wide range of their values. Using this parametric model, it is shown that in the reduced-transport state, heat is transported almost neoclassically, while momentum transport is dominated by subcritical parallel-velocity-gradient-driven turbulence. It is further shown that for any given input of torque, there is an optimum input of heat which maximises the temperature gradient. The parametric model describes both the behaviour of the subcritical turbulence (which cannot be modelled by the quasi-linear methods used in current transport codes) and the complicated effect of the flow shear on the transport stiffness. It may prove useful for transport modelling of tokamaks with sheared flows.

  11. Two-dimensional nonlinear cylindrical equilibria with reversed magnetic shear and sheared flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuiroukidis, Ap; Throumoulopoulos, G. N.; Throumoulopoulos

    2014-02-01

    Nonlinear translational symmetric equilibria with up to quartic flux terms in free functions, reversed magnetic shear, and sheared flow are constructed in two ways: (i) quasi-analytically by an ansatz, which reduces the pertinent generalized Grad-Shafranov equation to a set of ordinary differential equations and algebraic constraints which is then solved numerically, and (ii) completely numerically by prescribing analytically a boundary having an X-point. This latter case presented in Sec. 4 is relevant to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor project. The equilibrium characteristics are then examined by means of pressure, safety factor, current density, and electric field. For flows parallel to the magnetic field, the stability of the equilibria constructed is also examined by applying a sufficient condition. It turns out that the equilibrium nonlinearity has a stabilizing impact, which is slightly enhanced by the sheared flow. In addition, the results indicate that the stability is affected by the up-down asymmetry.

  12. Resonant alignment of microswimmer trajectories in oscillatory shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hope, Alexander; Croze, Ottavio A.; Poon, Wilson C. K.; Bees, Martin A.; Haw, Mark D.

    2016-09-01

    Oscillatory flows are commonly experienced by swimming micro-organisms in the environment, industrial applications, and rheological investigations. We characterize experimentally the response of the alga Dunaliella salina to oscillatory shear flows and report the surprising discovery that algal swimming trajectories orient perpendicular to the flow-shear plane. The ordering has the characteristics of a resonance in the driving parameter space. The behavior is qualitatively reproduced by a simple model and simulations accounting for helical swimming, suggesting a mechanism for ordering and criteria for the resonant amplitude and frequency. The implications of this work for active oscillatory rheology and industrial algal processing are discussed.

  13. Molecular origins of higher harmonics in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow: Shear stress response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, P. H.; Giacomin, A. J.

    2016-10-01

    Recent work has focused on deepening our understanding of the molecular origins of the higher harmonics that arise in the shear stress response of polymeric liquids in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow. For instance, these higher harmonics have been explained by just considering the orientation distribution of rigid dumbbells suspended in a Newtonian solvent. These dumbbells, when in dilute suspension, form the simplest relevant molecular model of polymer viscoelasticity, and this model specifically neglects interactions between the polymer molecules [R. B. Bird et al., "Dilute rigid dumbbell suspensions in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow: Shear stress response," J. Chem. Phys. 140, 074904 (2014)]. In this paper, we explore these interactions by examining the Curtiss-Bird model, a kinetic molecular theory designed specifically to account for the restricted motions that arise when polymer chains are concentrated, thus interacting and specifically, entangled. We begin our comparison using a heretofore ignored explicit analytical solution [X.-J. Fan and R. B. Bird, "A kinetic theory for polymer melts. VI. Calculation of additional material functions," J. Non-Newtonian Fluid Mech. 15, 341 (1984)]. For concentrated systems, the chain motion transverse to the chain axis is more restricted than along the axis. This anisotropy is described by the link tension coefficient, ɛ, for which several special cases arise: ɛ = 0 corresponds to reptation, ɛ > 1/8 to rod-climbing, 1/5 ≤ ɛ ≤ 3/4 to reasonable predictions for shear-thinning in steady simple shear flow, and ɛ = 1 to the dilute solution without hydrodynamic interaction. In this paper, we examine the shapes of the shear stress versus shear rate loops for the special cases ɛ = (" separators=" 0 , 1 / 8 , 3 / 8 , 1 ) , and we compare these with those of rigid dumbbell and reptation model predictions.

  14. Multi-Scale Investigation of Sheared Flows In Magnetized Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Edward, Jr., Thomas

    2014-09-19

    Flows parallel and perpendicular to magnetic fields in a plasma are important phenomena in many areas of plasma science research. The presence of these spatially inhomogeneous flows is often associated with the stability of the plasma. In fusion plasmas, these sheared flows can be stabilizing while in space plasmas, these sheared flows can be destabilizing. Because of this, there is broad interest in understanding the coupling between plasma stability and plasma flows. This research project has engaged in a study of the plasma response to spatially inhomogeneous plasma flows using three different experimental devices: the Auburn Linear Experiment for Instability Studies (ALEXIS) and the Compact Toroidal Hybrid (CTH) stellarator devices at Auburn University, and the Space Plasma Simulation Chamber (SPSC) at the Naval Research Laboratory. This work has shown that there is a commonality of the plasma response to sheared flows across a wide range of plasma parameters and magnetic field geometries. The goal of this multi-device, multi-scale project is to understand how sheared flows established by the same underlying physical mechanisms lead to different plasma responses in fusion, laboratory, and space plasmas.

  15. Tests Of Shear-Flow Model For Acoustic Impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrot, Tony L.; Watson, Willie R.; Jones, Michael G.

    1992-01-01

    Tests described in report conducted to validate two-dimensional shear-flow analytical model for determination of acoustic impedance of acoustic liner in grazing-incidence, grazing-flow environment by use of infinite-waveguide method. Tests successful for both upstream and downstream propagations. Work has potential for utility in testing of engine ducts in commercial aircraft.

  16. Solution of the complete Curtiss-Bird model for polymeric liquids subjected to simple shear flow.

    PubMed

    Stephanou, Pavlos S; Kröger, Martin

    2016-03-28

    The complete kinetic theory model for concentrated polymer solutions and melts proposed by Curtiss and Bird is solved for shear flow: (a) analytically by providing a solution for the single-link (or configurational) distribution function as a real basis spherical harmonics expansion and then calculating the materials functions in shear flow up to second order in the dimensionless shear rate and, (b) numerically via the execution of Brownian dynamics simulations. These two methods are actually complementary to each other as the former is accurate only for small dimensionless shear rates where the latter produces results with increasingly large uncertainties. The analytical expansions of the material functions with respect to the dimensionless shear rate reduce to those of the extensively studied, simplified Curtiss-Bird model when ε' = 0, and to the rigid rod when ε' = 1. It is known that the power-law behavior at high shear rates is very different for these two extremal cases. We employ Brownian dynamics simulation to not only recover the limiting cases but to find a gradual variation of the power-law behaviors at large dimensionless shear rates upon varying ε'. The fact that experimental data are usually located between these two extremes strongly advocates the significance of studying the solution of the Curtiss-Bird model. This is exemplified in this work by comparing the solution of this model with available rheological data for semiflexible biological systems that are clearly not captured by the original Doi-Edwards or simplified Curtiss-Bird models. PMID:27036477

  17. Evolution of forced shear flows in polytropic atmospheres: A comparison of forcing methods and energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witzke, V.; Silvers, L. J.; Favier, B.

    2016-08-01

    Shear flows are ubiquitous in astrophysical objects including planetary and stellar interiors, where their dynamics can have significant impact on thermo-chemical processes. Investigating the complex dynamics of shear flows requires numerical calculations that provide a long time evolution of the system. To achieve a sufficiently long lifetime in a local numerical model the system has to be forced externally. However, at present, there exist several different forcing methods to sustain large-scale shear flows in local models. In this paper we examine and compare various methods used in the literature in order to resolve their respective applicability and limitations. These techniques are compared during the exponential growth phase of a shear flow instability, such as the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability, and some are examined during the subsequent non-linear evolution. A linear stability analysis provides reference for the growth rate of the most unstable modes in the system and a detailed analysis of the energetics provides a comprehensive understanding of the energy exchange during the system's evolution. Finally, we discuss the pros and cons of each forcing method and their relation with natural mechanisms generating shear flows.

  18. Destabilisation of shear flows by counter-propagating Alfven waves at localised magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    The instability of shear flows in the presence of magnetic fields is fundamental to understanding a wide range of geophysical and astrophysical phenomena. We investigate the simplest paradigm problem of interest, which is the linear instability of a plane parallel shear flow with aligned field, to two-dimensional disturbances. We focus on cases where the shear flow has no inflexion points and is thus hydrodynamically stable, and show how such flows can be destabilised by the addition of two thin regions of magnetic field. An explicit analytical solution is presented for the case of a flow with uniform shear and where the magnetic fields are of infinitesimal width, showing that there is always instability for some range of along-stream wavenumbers. The strength of the instability is reduced for the more realistic case of magnetic fields of finite width, which can be investigated numerically, or analytically using matched-asymptotic expansions. The instability can be unambiguously attributed to the mutual amplification of a pair of counter-propagating Alfven waves, and should therefore be viewed as an extension to astrophysical fluid dynamics of various classical shear instabilities in geophysical fluid dynamics involving counter-propagating Rossby waves or gravity waves.

  19. Evolution of forced shear flows in polytropic atmospheres: a comparison of forcing methods and energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witzke, V.; Silvers, L. J.; Favier, B.

    2016-11-01

    Shear flows are ubiquitous in astrophysical objects including planetary and stellar interiors, where their dynamics can have significant impact on thermochemical processes. Investigating the complex dynamics of shear flows requires numerical calculations that provide a long-time evolution of the system. To achieve a sufficiently long lifetime in a local numerical model, the system has to be forced externally. However, at present, there exist several different forcing methods to sustain large-scale shear flows in local models. In this paper, we examine and compare various methods used in the literature in order to resolve their respective applicability and limitations. These techniques are compared during the exponential growth phase of a shear flow instability, such as the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability, and some are examined during the subsequent non-linear evolution. A linear stability analysis provides reference for the growth rate of the most unstable modes in the system and a detailed analysis of the energetics provides a comprehensive understanding of the energy exchange during the system's evolution. Finally, we discuss the pros and cons of each forcing method and their relation with natural mechanisms generating shear flows.

  20. Boundary-Driven Colloidal Crystallization in Simple Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shereda, Laura T.; Larson, Ronald G.; Solomon, Michael J.

    2010-11-01

    Using confocal microscopy, we directly observe that simple shear flow induces transient crystallization of colloids by wall-normal propagation of crystallization fronts from each shearing surface. The initial rate of the front propagation was 1.75±0.07 colloidal layers per unit of applied strain. The rate slowed to 0.29±0.04 colloidal layers per unit of applied strain as the two fronts approached each other at the midplane. The retardation of the front propagation is caused by self-concentration of shear strain in the growing bands of the lower-viscosity crystal, an effect that leads to a progressive reduction of the shear rate in the remaining amorphous material. These findings differ significantly from previous hypotheses for flow-induced colloidal crystallization by homogeneous mechanisms.

  1. Transverse electron-scale instability in relativistic shear flows.

    PubMed

    Alves, E P; Grismayer, T; Fonseca, R A; Silva, L O

    2015-08-01

    Electron-scale surface waves are shown to be unstable in the transverse plane of a sheared flow in an initially unmagnetized collisionless plasma, not captured by (magneto)hydrodynamics. It is found that these unstable modes have a higher growth rate than the closely related electron-scale Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in relativistic shears. Multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations verify the analytic results and further reveal the emergence of mushroomlike electron density structures in the nonlinear phase of the instability, similar to those observed in the Rayleigh Taylor instability despite the great disparity in scales and different underlying physics. This transverse electron-scale instability may play an important role in relativistic and supersonic sheared flow scenarios, which are stable at the (magneto)hydrodynamic level. Macroscopic (≫c/ωpe) fields are shown to be generated by this microscopic shear instability, which are relevant for particle acceleration, radiation emission, and to seed magnetohydrodynamic processes at long time scales.

  2. Identification and Control of Separated Shear Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shao-Ching; Kim, John

    2002-11-01

    There has been increased interest in applying modern control theory to flow-control problems. For simple flows, such as turbulent channel and boundary layers, several investigators have constructed controllers based on linear optimal control theory, which requires certain information of the system to be controlled. However, for complex flows, such as separated flow past an airfoil, the required system information is not readily available, thus hindering the construction of controllers following the same procedure used for the simple flows. In this study, we use the system identification theory to construct a model of flow system for controller design. The model, as an approximation to the actual system, is based on the input-output relationship of the actual system. The locations of sensors and actuators are determined based on the spatial and temporal correlations of the flow field and practical measurement considerations. The system identification approach has been applied to both simple and complex flows. Linear and nonlinear disturbances to selected flow systems are considered to evaluate the performance of the constructed model. A series of numerical experiments have been performed to assess the validity of using linear approximations for nonlinear complex flows.

  3. Coherent structures in compressible free-shear-layer flows

    SciTech Connect

    Aeschliman, D.P.; Baty, R.S.; Kennedy, C.A.; Chen, J.H.

    1997-08-01

    Large scale coherent structures are intrinsic fluid mechanical characteristics of all free-shear flows, from incompressible to compressible, and laminar to fully turbulent. These quasi-periodic fluid structures, eddies of size comparable to the thickness of the shear layer, dominate the mixing process at the free-shear interface. As a result, large scale coherent structures greatly influence the operation and efficiency of many important commercial and defense technologies. Large scale coherent structures have been studied here in a research program that combines a synergistic blend of experiment, direct numerical simulation, and analysis. This report summarizes the work completed for this Sandia Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project.

  4. A Rotary Flow Channel for Shear Stress Sensor Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Scott, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    A proposed shear sensor calibrator consists of a rotating wheel with the sensor mounted tangential to the rim and positioned in close proximity to the rim. The shear stress generated by the flow at the sensor position is simply tau(sub omega) = (mu)r(omega)/h, where mu is the viscosity of the ambient gas, r the wheel radius, omega the angular velocity of the wheel, and h the width of the gap between the wheel rim and the sensor. With numerical values of mu = 31 (mu)Pa s (neon at room temperature), r = 0.5 m, omega = 754 /s (7200 rpm), and h = 50.8 m, a shear stress of tau(sub omega) = 231 Pa can be generated. An analysis based on one-dimensional flow, with the flow velocity having only an angular component as a function of the axial and radial coordinates, yields corrections to the above simple formula for the curvature of the wheel, flatness of the sensor, and finite width of the wheel. It is assumed that the sensor mount contains a trough (sidewalls) to render a velocity release boundary condition at the edges of the rim. The Taylor number under maximum flow conditions is found to be 62.3, sufficiently low to obviate flow instability. The fact that the parameters entering into the evaluation of the shear stress can be measured to high accuracy with well-defined uncertainties makes the proposed calibrator suitable for a physical standard for shear stress calibration.

  5. Parametric Dependence of Homogeneous Turbulent Shear Flow on Reynolds Number and Shear Parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaza, Juan; Vaithianathan, T.

    2005-11-01

    The combined role of the Shear Parameter, S^* = S k / ɛ, and the Reynolds number in homogeneous turbulent shear flow is studied using direct numerical simulations (DNS). The parametric investigation involves DNS of 256^3, 512^3 and 1024^3 with a constant shear parameter, S^*, between 1 and 100. Particular attention is given to velocity derivatives (strain and rotation) and higher-order structure functions and their scaling with the two parameters. This study is in line with some recent results reported by Schumacher, [Phys. Fluids 16, 2004]. Due to the high level of shear investigated, a new algorithm that avoids the remeshing step is used. The 20% - 40% loss in kinetic energy and dissipation rate reported by Lee et al. [JFM, 216, 1990] using the Rogallo code is consequently avoided.

  6. Predicting Buoyant Shear Flows Using Anisotropic Dissipation Rate Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, R. M. C.; Zhao, C. Y.; Gatski, T. B.

    1999-01-01

    This paper examines the modeling of two-dimensional homogeneous stratified turbulent shear flows using the Reynolds-stress and Reynolds-heat-flux equations. Several closure models have been investigated-, the emphasis is placed on assessing the effect of modeling the dissipation rate tensor in the Reynolds-stress equation. Three different approaches are considered: one is an isotropic approach while the other two are anisotropic approaches. The isotropic approach is based on Kolmogorov's hypothesis and a dissipation rate equation modified to account for vortex stretching. One of the anisotropic approaches is based on an algebraic representation of the dissipation rate tensor, while another relies on solving a modeled transport equation for this tensor. In addition, within the former anisotropic approach, two different algebraic representations are examined one is a function of the Reynolds-stress anisotropy tensor, and the other is a function of' the mean velocity gradients. The performance of these closure models is evaluated against experimental and direct numerical simulation data of pure shear flows. pure buoyant flows and buoyant shear flows. Calculations have been carried out over a range of Richardson numbers (Ri) and two different Prandtl numbers (Pr); thus the effect of Pr on the development of counter-gradient heat flux in a stratified shear flow can be assessed. At low Ri, the isotropic model performs well in the predictions of stratified shear flows; however, its performance deteriorates as Ri increases. At high Ri, the transport equation model for the dissipation rate tensor gives the best result. Furthermore, the results also lend credence to the algebraic dissipation rate model based on the Reynolds stress anisotropy tensor. Finally, it is found that Pr has an effect on the development of counter-gradient heat flux. The calculations show that, under the action of shear, counter-gradient heat flux does not occur even at Ri = 1 in an air flow.

  7. Effect of spanwise shear on flow past a square cylinder at intermediate Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visakh, M. G.; Saha, Arun K.; Muralidhar, K.

    2016-03-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulation of flow past a square cylinder with linear spanwise shear has been performed in the Reynolds numbers range of 165-250. Navier-Stokes equations are discretized using second order central differencing for both advection and diffusion terms, explicitly marching in time using the second order Adams-Bashforth scheme. The solution methodology used is the Simplified Marker and Cell algorithm. Spanwise shear is simulated by providing a linear variation in the inlet velocity profile along the spanwise direction and the resulting wake characteristics are compared with uniform inflow. Presence of mode-A, mode-B, and large scale vortical irregularities of two-sided symmetrical vortex dislocations is detected when the inflow is uniform. With shear, oblique and cellular vortex shedding are identified for the square cylinder. Shedding frequency of the vortices varies in a stepwise manner along the span, giving rise to local cells of constant frequency. Constant frequency cell sizes are found to be longer for a square cylinder in shear flow as compared to the circular one. Spanwise shear leads to vortex splitting and one-sided vortex dislocation, contrary to the naturally occurring two-sided vortex dislocation for uniform flow. Reynolds number dependence of spanwise shear flow is studied by comparing wake dynamics at three mid-span Reynolds numbers of 165, 200, and 250 with a shear parameter of 0.025. With an increase in the average Reynolds number, cell sizes decrease and dislocations become irregular in space and time. Simulations with three different shear parameters of 0.0125, 0.025, and 0.05 have been carried out for an average Reynolds number of 250. With an increase in the shear parameter, the frequency of occurrence of vortex dislocations increases in the wake. In addition, obliqueness of the primary vortices and the number of cells also show an increase.

  8. Modified ion-acoustic solitary waves in plasmas with field-aligned shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Saleem, H.; Haque, Q.

    2015-08-15

    The nonlinear dynamics of ion-acoustic waves is investigated in a plasma having field-aligned shear flow. A Korteweg-deVries-type nonlinear equation for a modified ion-acoustic wave is obtained which admits a single pulse soliton solution. The theoretical result has been applied to solar wind plasma at 1 AU for illustration.

  9. Modified ion-acoustic solitary waves in plasmas with field-aligned shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleem, H.; Ali, S.; Haque, Q.

    2015-08-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of ion-acoustic waves is investigated in a plasma having field-aligned shear flow. A Koeteweg-deVries-type nonlinear equation for a modified ion-acoustic wave is obtained which admits a single pulse soliton solution. The theoretical result has been applied to solar wind plasma at 1 AU for illustration.

  10. Upward swimming of a sperm cell in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omori, Toshihiro; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2016-03-01

    Mammalian sperm cells are required to swim over long distances, typically around 1000-fold their own length. They must orient themselves and maintain a swimming motion to reach the ovum, or egg cell. Although the mechanism of long-distance navigation is still unclear, one possible mechanism, rheotaxis, was reported recently. This work investigates the mechanism of the rheotaxis in detail by simulating the motions of a sperm cell in shear flow adjacent to a flat surface. A phase diagram was developed to show the sperm's swimming motion under different shear rates, and for varying flagellum waveform conditions. The results showed that, under shear flow, the sperm is able to hydrodynamically change its swimming direction, allowing it to swim upwards against the flow, which suggests that the upward swimming of sperm cells can be explained using fluid mechanics, and this can then be used to further understand physiology of sperm cell navigation.

  11. Upward swimming of a sperm cell in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Omori, Toshihiro; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2016-03-01

    Mammalian sperm cells are required to swim over long distances, typically around 1000-fold their own length. They must orient themselves and maintain a swimming motion to reach the ovum, or egg cell. Although the mechanism of long-distance navigation is still unclear, one possible mechanism, rheotaxis, was reported recently. This work investigates the mechanism of the rheotaxis in detail by simulating the motions of a sperm cell in shear flow adjacent to a flat surface. A phase diagram was developed to show the sperm's swimming motion under different shear rates, and for varying flagellum waveform conditions. The results showed that, under shear flow, the sperm is able to hydrodynamically change its swimming direction, allowing it to swim upwards against the flow, which suggests that the upward swimming of sperm cells can be explained using fluid mechanics, and this can then be used to further understand physiology of sperm cell navigation. PMID:27078385

  12. Upward swimming of a sperm cell in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Omori, Toshihiro; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2016-03-01

    Mammalian sperm cells are required to swim over long distances, typically around 1000-fold their own length. They must orient themselves and maintain a swimming motion to reach the ovum, or egg cell. Although the mechanism of long-distance navigation is still unclear, one possible mechanism, rheotaxis, was reported recently. This work investigates the mechanism of the rheotaxis in detail by simulating the motions of a sperm cell in shear flow adjacent to a flat surface. A phase diagram was developed to show the sperm's swimming motion under different shear rates, and for varying flagellum waveform conditions. The results showed that, under shear flow, the sperm is able to hydrodynamically change its swimming direction, allowing it to swim upwards against the flow, which suggests that the upward swimming of sperm cells can be explained using fluid mechanics, and this can then be used to further understand physiology of sperm cell navigation.

  13. Multiparticle collision dynamics simulations of viscoelastic fluids: shear-thinning Gaussian dumbbells.

    PubMed

    Kowalik, Bartosz; Winkler, Roland G

    2013-03-14

    The structural, dynamical, and rheological properties are studied of a multiparticle collision dynamics (MPC) fluid composed of shear-thinning Gaussian dumbbells. MPC is a mesoscale hydrodynamic simulation technique, which has successfully been applied in simulations of a broad range of complex fluids with Newtonian solvent. The MPC particles are replaced by Gaussian dumbbells, where we enforce a constant mean square length even under nonequilibrium conditions, which leads to shear thinning. This conserves the simplicity and efficiency of the original MPC fluid dynamics, since the analytical solution is known of Newton's equations of motion of the Gaussian dumbbells. Moreover, analytically obtained nonequilibrium structural, dynamical, and rheological properties are presented of Gaussian dumbbells under shear flow within the preaveraging approximation of hydrodynamic interactions. The comparison of the analytical and simulation results shows good agreement, with small deviations only due to the preaveraging approximation. In particular, we observe shear thinning and a nonzero second normal stress coefficient.

  14. Generalized transport coefficients for inelastic Maxwell mixtures under shear flow.

    PubMed

    Garzó, Vicente; Trizac, Emmanuel

    2015-11-01

    The Boltzmann equation framework for inelastic Maxwell models is considered to determine the transport coefficients associated with the mass, momentum, and heat fluxes of a granular binary mixture in spatially inhomogeneous states close to the simple shear flow. The Boltzmann equation is solved by means of a Chapman-Enskog-type expansion around the (local) shear flow distributions f(r)(0) for each species that retain all the hydrodynamic orders in the shear rate. Due to the anisotropy induced by the shear flow, tensorial quantities are required to describe the transport processes instead of the conventional scalar coefficients. These tensors are given in terms of the solutions of a set of coupled equations, which can be analytically solved as functions of the shear rate a, the coefficients of restitution α(rs), and the parameters of the mixture (masses, diameters, and composition). Since the reference distribution functions f(r)(0) apply for arbitrary values of the shear rate and are not restricted to weak dissipation, the corresponding generalized coefficients turn out to be nonlinear functions of both a and α(rs). The dependence of the relevant elements of the three diffusion tensors on both the shear rate and dissipation is illustrated in the tracer limit case, the results showing that the deviation of the generalized transport coefficients from their forms for vanishing shear rates is in general significant. A comparison with the previous results obtained analytically for inelastic hard spheres by using Grad's moment method is carried out, showing a good agreement over a wide range of values for the coefficients of restitution. Finally, as an application of the theoretical expressions derived here for the transport coefficients, thermal diffusion segregation of an intruder immersed in a granular gas is also studied.

  15. Generalized transport coefficients for inelastic Maxwell mixtures under shear flow.

    PubMed

    Garzó, Vicente; Trizac, Emmanuel

    2015-11-01

    The Boltzmann equation framework for inelastic Maxwell models is considered to determine the transport coefficients associated with the mass, momentum, and heat fluxes of a granular binary mixture in spatially inhomogeneous states close to the simple shear flow. The Boltzmann equation is solved by means of a Chapman-Enskog-type expansion around the (local) shear flow distributions f(r)(0) for each species that retain all the hydrodynamic orders in the shear rate. Due to the anisotropy induced by the shear flow, tensorial quantities are required to describe the transport processes instead of the conventional scalar coefficients. These tensors are given in terms of the solutions of a set of coupled equations, which can be analytically solved as functions of the shear rate a, the coefficients of restitution α(rs), and the parameters of the mixture (masses, diameters, and composition). Since the reference distribution functions f(r)(0) apply for arbitrary values of the shear rate and are not restricted to weak dissipation, the corresponding generalized coefficients turn out to be nonlinear functions of both a and α(rs). The dependence of the relevant elements of the three diffusion tensors on both the shear rate and dissipation is illustrated in the tracer limit case, the results showing that the deviation of the generalized transport coefficients from their forms for vanishing shear rates is in general significant. A comparison with the previous results obtained analytically for inelastic hard spheres by using Grad's moment method is carried out, showing a good agreement over a wide range of values for the coefficients of restitution. Finally, as an application of the theoretical expressions derived here for the transport coefficients, thermal diffusion segregation of an intruder immersed in a granular gas is also studied. PMID:26651684

  16. Sheared Flow as a Stabilizing Mechanism in Astrophysical Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanex, Lucas F.

    2007-05-01

    It has been hypothesized that the sustained narrowness observed in the asymptotic cylindrical region of bipolar outflows from Young Stellar Objects (YSO) suggests that an intrinsic collimating mechanism is present in these jets. The jz × Bθ force observed in z-pinch plasmas is a possible explanation for these observations. However, z-pinch plasmas are subject to current driven instabilities (CDI). The interest in using z-pinches for controlled nuclear fusion has lead to an extensive theory on the stability of magnetically confined plasmas. Analytical, numerical, and experimental evidence from this field suggest that sheared flow in magnetized plasmas can reduce the growth rates of the sausage and kink instabilities. Here we propose the hypothesis that sheared helical flow can exert a similar stabilizing influence on CDI in YSO jets. Experimental, analytical, and numerical analysis of sheared flow in magnetohydrodynamic plasmas with and without helical magnetic fields is presented. The results support the hypothesis that sheared flow and sheared magnetic fields may impart a stabilizing influence in astrophysical jets. Future laboratory experiments are proposed that will provide enhanced support for this conclusion. Work supported by DOE/NNSA under UNR grant DE-FC52-01NV14050.

  17. Resolving electron scale turbulence in spherical tokamaks with flow shear

    SciTech Connect

    Guttenfelder, W.; Candy, J.

    2011-02-15

    This paper presents nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence based on spherical tokamak (ST) parameters. Most significantly the simulations include the strong toroidal flow and flow shear present in STs that suppress ion-scale turbulence while using kinetic ions at full mass ratio (m{sub i}/m{sub e}=3600). The flow shear provides a physical long-wavelength cutoff mechanism that aids saturation of the simulations, which has previously been demonstrated to be problematic depending on magnetic shear. As magnetic shear varies widely in STs we systematically demonstrate saturation and convergence of the ETG simulations with respect to grid resolution, physical domain size, and boundary conditions. While using reduced ion mass or adiabatic ions can lessen computational expense they do not always provide reliable results. The resulting spectra from converged simulations are anisotropic everywhere in contrast to previous ETG simulations without flow shear. These results have implications for interpreting turbulence measurements, and represent an important step in determining when and where ETG turbulence is expected to be relevant in ST plasmas. They are also important in the context of validating simulations with both experimental transport analysis and turbulence measurements.

  18. Effects of shear flow on phase nucleation and crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mura, Federica; Zaccone, Alessio

    2016-04-01

    Classical nucleation theory offers a good framework for understanding the common features of new phase formation processes in metastable homogeneous media at rest. However, nucleation processes in liquids are ubiquitously affected by hydrodynamic flow, and there is no satisfactory understanding of whether shear promotes or slows down the nucleation process. We developed a classical nucleation theory for sheared systems starting from the molecular level of the Becker-Doering master kinetic equation and we analytically derived a closed-form expression for the nucleation rate. The theory accounts for the effect of flow-mediated transport of molecules to the nucleus of the new phase, as well as for the mechanical deformation imparted to the nucleus by the flow field. The competition between flow-induced molecular transport, which accelerates nucleation, and flow-induced nucleus straining, which lowers the nucleation rate by increasing the nucleation energy barrier, gives rise to a marked nonmonotonic dependence of the nucleation rate on the shear rate. The theory predicts an optimal shear rate at which the nucleation rate is one order of magnitude larger than in the absence of flow.

  19. Pulsatile blood flow, shear force, energy dissipation and Murray's Law

    PubMed Central

    Painter, Page R; Edén, Patrik; Bengtsson, Hans-Uno

    2006-01-01

    Background Murray's Law states that, when a parent blood vessel branches into daughter vessels, the cube of the radius of the parent vessel is equal to the sum of the cubes of the radii of daughter blood vessels. Murray derived this law by defining a cost function that is the sum of the energy cost of the blood in a vessel and the energy cost of pumping blood through the vessel. The cost is minimized when vessel radii are consistent with Murray's Law. This law has also been derived from the hypothesis that the shear force of moving blood on the inner walls of vessels is constant throughout the vascular system. However, this derivation, like Murray's earlier derivation, is based on the assumption of constant blood flow. Methods To determine the implications of the constant shear force hypothesis and to extend Murray's energy cost minimization to the pulsatile arterial system, a model of pulsatile flow in an elastic tube is analyzed. A new and exact solution for flow velocity, blood flow rate and shear force is derived. Results For medium and small arteries with pulsatile flow, Murray's energy minimization leads to Murray's Law. Furthermore, the hypothesis that the maximum shear force during the cycle of pulsatile flow is constant throughout the arterial system implies that Murray's Law is approximately true. The approximation is good for all but the largest vessels (aorta and its major branches) of the arterial system. Conclusion A cellular mechanism that senses shear force at the inner wall of a blood vessel and triggers remodeling that increases the circumference of the wall when a shear force threshold is exceeded would result in the observed scaling of vessel radii described by Murray's Law. PMID:16923189

  20. Asymptotic persistence of collective modes in shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Mahajan, S.M. |; Rogava, A.D. |

    1998-03-31

    A new nonasymptotic method is presented that reveals an unexpected richness in the spectrum of fluctuations sustained by a shear flow with nontrivial arbitrary mean kinematics. The vigor of the method is illustrated by analyzing a two-dimensional, compressible hydrodynamic shear flow. The temporal evolution of perturbations spans a wide range of nonexponential behavior from growth-cum oscillations to monotonic growth. The principal characteristic of the revealed exotic collective modes in their asymptotic persistence. {open_quotes}Echoing{close_quotes} as well as unstable (including parametrically-driven) solutions are displayed. Further areas of application, for both the method and the new physics, are outlined.

  1. Comminution of Ceramic Materials Under High-Shear Dynamic Compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homel, Michael; Loiseau, Jason; Higgins, Andrew; Herbold, Eric; Hogan, Jamie

    The post-failure ``granular flow'' response of high-strength lightweight ceramics has important implications on the materials' effectiveness for ballistic protection. We study the dynamic compaction and shear flow of ceramic fragments and powders using computational and experimental analysis of a collapsing thick-walled cylinder geometry. Using newly developed tools for mesoscale simulation of brittle materials, we study the effect of fracture, comminution, shear-enhanced dilatation, and frictional contact on the continuum compaction response. Simulations are directly validated through particle Doppler velocimetry measurements at the inner surface of the cylindrical powder bed. We characterize the size distribution and morphologies of the initial and compacted material fragments to both validate the computational model and to elucidate the dominant failure processes. A portion of this work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC. LLNL-ABS-678862.

  2. Discontinuous shear thickening in Brownian suspensions by dynamic simulation

    PubMed Central

    Mari, Romain; Seto, Ryohei; Morris, Jeffrey F.; Denn, Morton M.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic particle-scale numerical simulations are used to show that the shear thickening observed in dense colloidal, or Brownian, suspensions is of a similar nature to that observed in noncolloidal suspensions, i.e., a stress-induced transition from a flow of lubricated near-contacting particles to a flow of a frictionally contacting network of particles. Abrupt (or discontinuous) shear thickening is found to be a geometric rather than hydrodynamic phenomenon; it stems from the strong sensitivity of the jamming volume fraction to the nature of contact forces between suspended particles. The thickening obtained in a colloidal suspension of purely hard frictional spheres is qualitatively similar to experimental observations. However, the agreement cannot be made quantitative with only hydrodynamics, frictional contacts, and Brownian forces. Therefore, the role of a short-range repulsive potential mimicking the stabilization of actual suspensions on the thickening is studied. The effects of Brownian and repulsive forces on the onset stress can be combined in an additive manner. The simulations including Brownian and stabilizing forces show excellent agreement with experimental data for the viscosity η and the second normal stress difference N2. PMID:26621744

  3. Discontinuous shear thickening in Brownian suspensions by dynamic simulation.

    PubMed

    Mari, Romain; Seto, Ryohei; Morris, Jeffrey F; Denn, Morton M

    2015-12-15

    Dynamic particle-scale numerical simulations are used to show that the shear thickening observed in dense colloidal, or Brownian, suspensions is of a similar nature to that observed in noncolloidal suspensions, i.e., a stress-induced transition from a flow of lubricated near-contacting particles to a flow of a frictionally contacting network of particles. Abrupt (or discontinuous) shear thickening is found to be a geometric rather than hydrodynamic phenomenon; it stems from the strong sensitivity of the jamming volume fraction to the nature of contact forces between suspended particles. The thickening obtained in a colloidal suspension of purely hard frictional spheres is qualitatively similar to experimental observations. However, the agreement cannot be made quantitative with only hydrodynamics, frictional contacts, and Brownian forces. Therefore, the role of a short-range repulsive potential mimicking the stabilization of actual suspensions on the thickening is studied. The effects of Brownian and repulsive forces on the onset stress can be combined in an additive manner. The simulations including Brownian and stabilizing forces show excellent agreement with experimental data for the viscosity η and the second normal stress difference N2. PMID:26621744

  4. Experimental assessment of wall shear flow in models.

    PubMed

    Affeld, K; Kertzscher, U; Goubergrits, L

    2002-01-01

    The blood flow immediately adjacent to the wall of a blood vessel or an artificial surface is of great interest. This flow defines the shear stress at the wall and is known to have a great physiological importance. The use of models is a viable method to investigate this flow. However, even in models the shear stress at the wall is difficult to assess. A new optical method is based on transparent models and uses particles in the model fluid, which are only visible near the wall. This is achieved with a model fluid having a defined opacity. This fluid obscures particles in the center of the models, but permits the observation and recording of particles close to the wall. The method has been applied for Hagen-Poiseuille flow and for the likewise well researched flow in a tube with a sudden expansion. PMID:12122270

  5. Direct Numerical Simulation of Surfactant-Stabilized Emulsions Morphology and Shear Viscosity in Starting Shear Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Roar Skartlien; Espen Sollum; Andreas Akselsen; Paul Meakin

    2012-07-01

    A 3D lattice Boltzmann model for two-phase flow with amphiphilic surfactant was used to investigate the evolution of emulsion morphology and shear stress in starting shear flow. The interfacial contributions were analyzed for low and high volume fractions and varying surfactant activity. A transient viscoelastic contribution to the emulsion rheology under constant strain rate conditions was attributed to the interfacial stress. For droplet volume fractions below 0.3 and an average capillary number of about 0.25, highly elliptical droplets formed. Consistent with affine deformation models, gradual elongation of the droplets increased the shear stress at early times and reduced it at later times. Lower interfacial tension with increased surfactant activity counterbalanced the effect of increased interfacial area, and the net shear stress did not change significantly. For higher volume fractions, co-continuous phases with a complex topology were formed. The surfactant decreased the interfacial shear stress due mainly to advection of surfactant to higher curvature areas. Our results are in qualitative agreement with experimental data for polymer blends in terms of transient interfacial stresses and limited enhancement of the emulsion viscosity at larger volume fractions where the phases are co-continuous.

  6. Relation between shear parameter and Reynolds number in statistically stationary turbulent shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Jörg

    2004-08-01

    Studies of the relation between the shear parameter S* and the Reynolds number Re are presented for a nearly homogeneous and statistically stationary turbulent shear flow. The parametric investigations are in line with a generalized perspective on the return to local isotropy in shear flows that was outlined recently [J. Schumacher, K. R. Sreenivasan, and P. K. Yeung, Phys. Fluids 15, 84 (2003)]. Therefore, two parameters, the constant shear rate S and the level of initial turbulent fluctuations as prescribed by an energy injection rate ɛin, are varied systematically. The investigations suggest that the shear parameter levels off for larger Reynolds numbers which is supported by dimensional arguments. It is found that the skewness of the transverse derivative shows a different decay behavior with respect to Reynolds number when the sequence of simulation runs follows different pathways across the two-parameter plane. The study can shed new light on different interpretations of the decay of odd order moments in high-Reynolds number experiments.

  7. In vivo shear flow and erythrocyte membrane fluidity in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed Central

    Le Sang Quan, K H; Levenson, J; Del Pino, M; Simon, A; Devynck, M A

    1993-01-01

    1. To evaluate the response of red blood cells subjected to the shear flow in hypertension, the relationships between wall shear phenomena determined in vivo in the brachial artery of hypertensive patients and the modifications of the membrane dynamics measured in vitro in erythrocyte ghosts of 32 patients were investigated. 2. Two fluorescent probes, diphenylhexatriene (DPH) and its trimethylamino-derivative (TMA-DPH), localized respectively in the lipid membrane core and at the lipid-water interface, were used. 3. Shear rate, shear stress and blood velocity were positively correlated with TMA-DPH anisotropy (P = 0.015, 0.005 and 0.026, respectively), but not with that of DPH. This indicates that wall shear forces were associated with the microviscosity of the outer part of the cell membrane. 4. The changes in wall shear forces and erythrocyte membrane microviscosity probed by TMA-DPH or DPH were observed to vary in parallel under nitrendipine therapy. 5. These results suggest that in vivo shear forces participate in the control of erythrocyte membrane fluidity or that erythrocytes adapt their membrane properties to blood flow conditions. PMID:12959291

  8. Coevolution of inverse cascade and nonlinear heat front in shear flows of strongly coupled Yukawa liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwin, J.; Ganesh, R.

    2011-08-15

    Using classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we report on the development and propagation of a nonlinear heat front in parallel shear flows of a strongly coupled Yukawa liquid. At a given coupling strength, a subsonic shear profile is superposed on an equilibrated Yukawa liquid and Kelvin Helmholtz (KH) instability is observed. Coherent vortices are seen to emerge towards the nonlinear regime of the instability. It is seen that while inverse cascade leads to a continuous transfer of flow energy towards the largest scales, there is also a simultaneous transfer of flow energy into the thermal velocities of grains at the smallest scale. The latter is an effect of velocity shear and thus leads to the generation of a nonlinear heat front. In the linear regime, the heat front is seen to propagate at speed much lesser than the adiabatic sound speed of the liquid. Spatio-temporal growth of this heat front occurs concurrently with the inverse cascade of KH modes.

  9. Numerical simulation of a compressible homogeneous, turbulent shear flow. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feiereisen, W. J.; Reynolds, W. C.; Ferziger, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    A direct, low Reynolds number, numerical simulation was performed on a homogeneous turbulent shear flow. The full compressible Navier-Stokes equations were used in a simulation on the ILLIAC IV computer with a 64,000 mesh. The flow fields generated by the code are used as an experimental data base, to examine the behavior of the Reynols stresses in this simple, compressible flow. The variation of the structure of the stresses and their dynamic equations as the character of the flow changed is emphasized. The structure of the tress tensor is more heavily dependent on the shear number and less on the fluctuating Mach number. The pressure-strain correlation tensor in the dynamic uations is directly calculated in this simulation. These correlations are decomposed into several parts, as contrasted with the traditional incompressible decomposition into two parts. The performance of existing models for the conventional terms is examined, and a model is proposed for the 'mean fluctuating' part.

  10. Shear-Rate-Independent Diffusion in Granular Flows.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yi; Umbanhowar, Paul B; Ottino, Julio M; Lueptow, Richard M

    2015-08-21

    We computationally study the behavior of the diffusion coefficient D in granular flows of monodisperse and bidisperse particles spanning regions of relatively high and low shear rate in open and closed laterally confined heaps. Measurements of D at various flow rates, streamwise positions, and depths collapse onto a single curve when plotted as a function of γd2, where d is the local mean particle diameter and γ is the local shear rate. When γ is large, D is proportional to γd2, as in previous studies. However, for γd2 below a critical value, D is independent of γd2. The acceleration due to gravity g and particle stiffness (or, equivalently, the binary collision time t(c)) together determine the transition in D between regimes. This suggests that while shear rate and particle size determine diffusion at relatively high shear rates in surface-driven flows, diffusion at low shear rates is an elastic phenomenon with time and length scales dependent on gravity (sqrt d/g) and particle stiffness (t(c)sqrt(dg), respectively.

  11. Shear stress related blood damage in laminar couette flow.

    PubMed

    Paul, Reinhard; Apel, Jörn; Klaus, Sebastian; Schügner, Frank; Schwindke, Peter; Reul, Helmut

    2003-06-01

    Artificial organs within the blood stream are generally associated with flow-induced blood damage, particularly hemolysis of red blood cells. These damaging effects are known to be dependent on shear forces and exposure times. The determination of a correlation between these flow-dependent properties and actual hemolysis is the subject of this study. For this purpose, a Couette device has been developed. A fluid seal based on fluorocarbon is used to separate blood from secondary external damage effects. The shear rate within the gap is controlled by the rotational speed of the inner cylinder, and the exposure time by the amount of blood that is axially pumped through the device per given time. Blood damage is quantified by the index of hemolysis (IH), which is calculated from photometric plasma hemoglobin measurements. Experiments are conducted at exposure times from texp=25 - 1250 ms and shear rates ranging from tau=30 up to 450 Pa ensuring Taylor-vortex free flow characteristics. Blood damage is remarkably low over a broad range of shear rates and exposure times. However, a significant increase in blood damage can be observed for shear stresses of tau>or= 425 Pa and exposure times of texp>or= 620 ms. Maximum hemolysis within the investigated range is IH=3.5%. The results indicate generally lower blood damage than reported in earlier studies with comparable devices, and the measurements clearly indicate a rather abrupt (i.e., critical levels of shear stresses and exposure times) than gradual increase in hemolysis, at least for the investigated range of shear rates and exposure times. PMID:12780506

  12. Precessing rotating flows with additional shear: Stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salhi, A.; Cambon, C.

    2009-03-01

    We consider unbounded precessing rotating flows in which vertical or horizontal shear is induced by the interaction between the solid-body rotation (with angular velocity Ω0 ) and the additional “precessing” Coriolis force (with angular velocity -ɛΩ0 ), normal to it. A “weak” shear flow, with rate 2ɛ of the same order of the Poincaré “small” ratio ɛ , is needed for balancing the gyroscopic torque, so that the whole flow satisfies Euler’s equations in the precessing frame (the so-called admissibility conditions). The base flow case with vertical shear (its cross-gradient direction is aligned with the main angular velocity) corresponds to Mahalov’s [Phys. Fluids A 5, 891 (1993)] precessing infinite cylinder base flow (ignoring boundary conditions), while the base flow case with horizontal shear (its cross-gradient direction is normal to both main and precessing angular velocities) corresponds to the unbounded precessing rotating shear flow considered by Kerswell [Geophys. Astrophys. Fluid Dyn. 72, 107 (1993)]. We show that both these base flows satisfy the admissibility conditions and can support disturbances in terms of advected Fourier modes. Because the admissibility conditions cannot select one case with respect to the other, a more physical derivation is sought: Both flows are deduced from Poincaré’s [Bull. Astron. 27, 321 (1910)] basic state of a precessing spheroidal container, in the limit of small ɛ . A Rapid distortion theory (RDT) type of stability analysis is then performed for the previously mentioned disturbances, for both base flows. The stability analysis of the Kerswell base flow, using Floquet’s theory, is recovered, and its counterpart for the Mahalov base flow is presented. Typical growth rates are found to be the same for both flows at very small ɛ , but significant differences are obtained regarding growth rates and widths of instability bands, if larger ɛ values, up to 0.2, are considered. Finally, both flow cases

  13. Diffusion of Brownian Particles under Oscillatory Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takikawa, Yoshinori; Orihara, Hiroshi

    2012-12-01

    Brownian motion has been investigated in oscillatory flows. A number of polystyrene spheres dispersed in water were traced with a confocal scanning laser microscope, and the time dependences of their coordinates were obtained. From the trajectories of the particles observed, mean-square displacements (MSDs) were calculated. We found that although the MSD in the vorticity direction is independent of the amplitude of shear strain, that of MSD in the flow direction increases as the amplitude of shear strain is increased, and that the effective diffusion constant depends on both the amplitude and initial phase of the applied sinusoidal shear strains. All experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical results derived from the Langevin equation.

  14. Laboratory observation of magnetic field growth driven by shear flow

    SciTech Connect

    Intrator, T. P. Feng, Y.; Sears, J.; Weber, T.; Dorf, L.; Sun, X.

    2014-04-15

    Two magnetic flux ropes that collide and bounce have been characterized in the laboratory. We find screw pinch profiles that include ion flow v{sub i}, magnetic field B, current density J, and plasma pressure. The electron flow v{sub e} can be inferred, allowing the evaluation of the Hall J×B term in a two fluid magnetohydrodynamic Ohm's Law. Flux ropes that are initially cylindrical are mutually attracted and compress each other, which distorts the cylindrical symmetry. Magnetic field is created via the ∇×v{sub e}×B induction term in Ohm's Law where in-plane (perpendicular) shear of parallel flow (along the flux rope) is the dominant feature, along with some dissipation and magnetic reconnection. We predict and measure the growth of a quadrupole out-of-plane magnetic field δB{sub z}. This is a simple and coherent example of a shear flow driven dynamo. There is some similarity with two dimensional reconnection scenarios, which induce a current sheet and thus out-of-plane flow in the third dimension, despite the customary picture that considers flows only in the reconnection plane. These data illustrate a general and deterministic mechanism for large scale sheared flows to acquire smaller scale magnetic features, disordered structure, and possibly turbulence.

  15. Shear flow effects on ion thermal transport in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, T.; Horton, W.; Dong, J.Q.; Kishimoto, Y.

    1995-03-01

    From various laboratory and numerical experiments, there is clear evidence that under certain conditions the presence of sheared flows in a tokamak plasma can significantly reduce the ion thermal transport. In the presence of plasma fluctuations driven by the ion temperature gradient, the flows of energy and momentum parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field are coupled with each other. This coupling manifests itself as significant off-diagonal coupling coefficients that give rise to new terms for anomalous transport. The authors derive from the gyrokinetic equation a set of velocity moment equations that describe the interaction among plasma turbulent fluctuations, the temperature gradient, the toroidal velocity shear, and the poloidal flow in a tokamak plasma. Four coupled equations for the amplitudes of the state variables radially extended over the transport region by toroidicity induced coupling are derived. The equations show bifurcations from the low confinement mode without sheared flows to high confinement mode with substantially reduced transport due to strong shear flows. Also discussed is the reduced version with three state variables. In the presence of sheared flows, the radially extended coupled toroidal modes driven by the ion temperature gradient disintegrate into smaller, less elongated vortices. Such a transition to smaller spatial correlation lengths changes the transport from Bohm-like to gyrobohm-like. The properties of these equations are analyzed. The conditions for the improved confined regime are obtained as a function of the momentum-energy deposition rates and profiles. The appearance of a transport barrier is a consequence of the present theory.

  16. Shear-induced alignment and dynamics of elongated granular particles.

    PubMed

    Börzsönyi, Tamás; Szabó, Balázs; Wegner, Sandra; Harth, Kirsten; Török, János; Somfai, Ellák; Bien, Tomasz; Stannarius, Ralf

    2012-11-01

    The alignment, ordering, and rotation of elongated granular particles was studied in shear flow. The time evolution of the orientation of a large number of particles was monitored in laboratory experiments by particle tracking using optical imaging and x-ray computed tomography. The experiments were complemented by discrete element simulations. The particles develop an orientational order. In the steady state the time- and ensemble-averaged direction of the main axis of the particles encloses a small angle with the streamlines. This shear alignment angle is independent of the applied shear rate, and it decreases with increasing grain aspect ratio. At the grain level the steady state is characterized by a net rotation of the particles, as dictated by the shear flow. The distribution of particle rotational velocities was measured both in the steady state and also during the initial transients. The average rotation speed of particles with their long axis perpendicular to the shear alignment angle is larger, while shear aligned particles rotate slower. The ratio of this fast/slow rotation increases with particle aspect ratio. During the initial transient starting from an unaligned initial condition, particles having an orientation just beyond the shear alignment angle rotate opposite to the direction dictated by the shear flow.

  17. Statistical physics of shear flow: a non-equilibrium problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, R. M. L.

    2010-09-01

    Complex fluids are easily and reproducibly driven into non-equilibrium steady states by the action of shear flow. The statistics of the microstructure of non-equilibrium fluids is important to the material properties of every complex fluid that flows, e.g. axle grease on a rotating bearing; blood circulating in capillaries; molten plastic flowing into a mould; the non-equilibrium onion phase of amphiphiles used for drug delivery; the list is endless. Such states are as diverse and interesting as equilibrium states, but are not governed by the same statistics as equilibrium materials. I review some recently discovered principles governing the probabilities of various types of molecular re-arrangements taking place within a sheared fluid. As well as providing new foundations for the study of non-equilibrium matter, the principles are applied to some simple models of particles interacting under flow, showing that the theory exhibits physically convincing behaviour.

  18. Sensor for Boundary Shear Stress in Fluid Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Chang, Zensheu; Trease, Brian P.; Kerenyi, Kornel; Widholm, Scott E.; Ostlund, Patrick N.

    2012-01-01

    The formation of scour patterns at bridge piers is driven by the forces at the boundary of the water flow. In most experimental scour studies, indirect processes have been applied to estimate the shear stress using measured velocity profiles. The estimations are based on theoretical models and associated assumptions. However, the turbulence flow fields and boundary layer in the pier-scour region are very complex and lead to low-fidelity results. In addition, available turbulence models cannot account accurately for the bed roughness effect. Direct measurement of the boundary shear stress, normal stress, and their fluctuations are attractive alternatives. However, most direct-measurement shear sensors are bulky in size or not compatible to fluid flow. A sensor has been developed that consists of a floating plate with folded beam support and an optical grid on the back, combined with a high-resolution optical position probe. The folded beam support makes the floating plate more flexible in the sensing direction within a small footprint, while maintaining high stiffness in the other directions. The floating plate converts the shear force to displacement, and the optical probe detects the plate s position with nanometer resolution by sensing the pattern of the diffraction field of the grid through a glass window. This configuration makes the sensor compatible with liquid flow applications.

  19. Studies of compressible shear flows and turbulent drag reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orszag, S. A.

    1981-01-01

    Compressible shear flows and drag reduction were examined and three methods are addressed: (1) the analytical and numerical aspects of conformal mapping were summarized and a new method for computation of these maps is presented; (2) the computer code SPECFD for solution of the three dimensional time dependent Navier-Stokes equations for compressible flow on the CYBER 203 computer is described; (3) results of two equation turbulence modeling of turbulent flow over wavy walls are presented. A modified Jones-Launder model is used in two dimensional spectral code for flow in general wavy geometries.

  20. Dynamic shear of granular material under variable gravity conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, B. R.; Klein, S. P.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes some experiments with granular materials which recently have been conducted aboard the NASA KC-135 aircraft during variable gravity maneuvers. The main experimental apparatus consisted of a small drum containing granular material which was rotated slowly while the angle assumed by the slip surface with respect to the horizontal was observed and recorded photographically. Conventional wisdom has held that this 'dynamic angle of response' was a material constant, independent of (among other things) gravitational level. The results presented here are quite contrary, suggesting instead an angle that varies with the reciprocal of the square root of gravity. This finding may have important consequences on the understanding of many active processes in Planetary Geology involving granular materials and may provide qualitative confirmation of some of the theoretical predictions of modern models of granular shear flows.

  1. Dynamics of shear velocity layer with bent magnetic field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galinsky, V. L.; Sonnerup, B. U. Ö.

    A fully three-dimensional, magnetohydro-dynamic simulation of velocity-sheared plasma flow in an ambient transverse magnetic field with bent magnetic field lines has been performed. “Ionospheric-like” boundary conditions were used for closing field-aligned currents, the two ionospheres being represented by conducting plates with constant resistivity. Compared to the standard plane 2D case with a uniform transverse magnetic field, the growth rate of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability drops significantly as bending increases. Under conditions representative of the Earth's low latitude boundary layer, the instability may be suppressed completely by the magnetic field-line tension if the field-line bending is sufficiently strong. For weak bending, a combination of the tearing mode instability and the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability leads to the formation of localized 3D current/vortex tubes, the ionospheric foot prints of which are possible models of the auroral bright spots observed by the Viking satellite.

  2. Entrainment and mixing in stratified shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strang, Eric James

    1997-12-01

    The results of a laboratory experiment designed to study turbulent entrainment at sheared density interfaces are described. In the parameter ranges investigated the entrainment problem is mainly determined by two parameters, the bulk Richardson number RiB = /Delta bD//Delta U2 and the frequency ratio fN = ND//Delta U. When RiB > 1.5, the buoyancy effects play a governing role, whence interfacial instabilities locally mix heavy and light fluids. The nature of interfacial instabilities is governed by RiB or a related quantity, the mean local gradient Richardson number /overline [Ri]g=/overline [N(z)]2/(/overline[/partial u//partial z)]2, where N(z) is the Brunt-Vaisala frequency local to the interface. When RiB < 5 (or /overline [Rig] < 1), the interfacial mixing is dominated by Kelvin- Helmholtz (K-H) instabilities. Interfacial swelling as a result of the collective breakdown of K-H billows into turbulence persists for a time dictated by the rates of local generation and removal of mixed fluid, and the two processes appear to be coadjutant (with a maximum flux Richardson number or mixing efficiency of Rif ~ 0.15-0.4) when RiB≃ 3-5. At RiB~ 5, the K-H regime transitions to a new regime wherein the interface is dominated by interfacial/Holmboe wave instabilities. Here, the entrainment rates are much smaller and there is no evidence of interfacial swelling. In the K-H regime, the swelling of the interface introduces its own forcing time scale, which excites and radiates internal waves in the lower layer if it is continuously stratified. Consequently, the amount of energy available for entrainment decreases and, depending on fN, the entrainment velocities in the linearly stratified case can be substantially smaller than the two-layer case (up to 50%). In the interfacial/Holmboe wave breaking regime, internal wave radiation to the bottom layer is much smaller, so as the difference in entrainment rates of the two-layer and linearly stratified cases. Furthermore, when Ri

  3. The importance of flow history in mixed shear and extensional flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Caroline; McKinley, Gareth

    2015-11-01

    Many complex fluid flows of experimental and academic interest exhibit mixed kinematics with regions of shear and elongation. Examples include flows through planar hyperbolic contractions in microfluidic devices and through porous media or geometric arrays. Through the introduction of a ``flow-type parameter'' α which varies between 0 in pure shear and 1 in pure elongation, the local velocity fields of all such mixed flows can be concisely characterized. It is tempting to then consider the local stress field and interpret the local state of stress in a complex fluid in terms of shearing or extensional material functions. However, the material response of such fluids exhibit a fading memory of the entire deformation history. We consider a dilute solution of Hookean dumbbells and solve the Oldroyd-B model to obtain analytic expressions for the entire stress field in any arbitrary mixed flow of constant strain rate and flow-type parameter α. We then consider a more complex flow for which the shear rate is constant but the flow-type parameter α varies periodically in time (reminiscent of flow through a periodic array or through repeated contractions and expansions). We show that the flow history and kinematic sequencing (in terms of whether the flow was initialized as shearing or extensional) is extremely important in determining the ensuing stress field and rate of dissipated energy in the flow, and can only be ignored in the limit of infinitely slow flow variations.

  4. Cavitation Inception in Immersed Jet Shear Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockett, R. D.; Ndamuso, N.; Price, R.

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation inception occurring in immersed jets was investigated in a purpose-built mechanical flow rig. The rig utilized custom-built cylindrical and conical nozzles to direct high-velocity jets of variable concentration n-octane-hexadecane mixtures into a fused silica optically accessible receiver. The fluid pressure upstream and down-stream of the nozzles were manually controlled. The study employed a variety of acrylic and metal nozzles. The results show that the critical upstream pressure to downstream pressure ratio for incipient cavitation decreases with increasing n-octane concentration for the cylindrical nozzles, and increases with increasing n-octane concentration for the conical nozzle.

  5. Experimental measurement of dynamic fluid shear stress on the aortic surface of the aortic valve leaflet

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Choon Hwai; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Tamilselvan, Gowthami

    2011-01-01

    Aortic valve (AV) calcification is a highly prevalent disease with serious impact on mortality and morbidity. Although exact causes and mechanisms of AV calcification are unclear, previous studies suggest that mechanical forces play a role. Since calcium deposits occur almost exclusively on the aortic surfaces of AV leaflets, it has been hypothesized that adverse patterns of fluid shear stress on the aortic surface of AV leaflets promote calcification. The current study characterizes AV leaflet aortic surface fluid shear stresses using Laser Doppler velocimetry and an in vitro pulsatile flow loop. The valve model used was a native porcine valve mounted on a suturing ring and preserved using 0.15% glutaraldehyde solution. This valve model was inserted in a mounting chamber with sinus geometries, which is made of clear acrylic to provide optical access for measurements. To understand the effects of hemodynamics on fluid shear stress, shear stress was measured across a range of conditions: varying stroke volumes at the same heart rate and varying heart rates at the same stroke volume. Systolic shear stress magnitude was found to be much higher than diastolic shear stress magnitude due to the stronger flow in the sinuses during systole, reaching up to 20 dyn/cm2 at mid-systole. Upon increasing stroke volume, fluid shear stresses increased due to stronger sinus fluid motion. Upon increasing heart rate, fluid shear stresses decreased due to reduced systolic duration that restricted the formation of strong sinus flow. Significant changes in the shear stress waveform were observed at 90 beats/ min, most likely due to altered leaflet dynamics at this higher heart rate. Overall, this study represents the most well-resolved shear stress measurements to date across a range of conditions on the aortic side of the AV. The data presented can be used for further investigation to understand AV biological response to shear stresses. PMID:21416247

  6. Interplay between toroidal rotation and flow shear in turbulence stabilisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camenen, Y.; Casson, F. J.; Manas, P.; Peeters, A. G.

    2016-02-01

    The interplay between toroidal rotation u, parallel flow shear u', and perpendicular flow shear γE in the stabilisation of tokamak turbulence is investigated in non-linear flux-tube gyrokinetic simulations. The simulations are performed for a reference L-mode DIII-D plasma (the so-called shortfall case) at r /a =0.8 , varying the flow parameters around their nominal values. Depending on the respective signs of u, u', and γE, turbulence is found to be enhanced, reduced, or unchanged. When the coupling is favorable, the overall effect on the non-linear heat fluxes can be very large, even at moderate flow values. The ion heat flux is, for instance, decreased by a factor of 3 when the direction of the parallel flow shear is reversed with respect to its nominal value. Even more surprising, keeping u' and γE at their nominal values, the ion heat flux decreases by more than 50% when the toroidal flow is reversed. The relevance of this mechanism in the experiments which depends on the ability to decouple u, u', and γE is discussed. The interplay between u and u' observed in the non-linear simulations qualitatively follows the linear stability results and is interpreted in the frame of a simple fluid model.

  7. Flow induced protein nucleation: Insulin oligomerization under shear.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dexter, Andrew; Azadani, Ali; Sorci, Mirco; Belfort, Georges; Hirsa, Amir

    2007-11-01

    A large number of diseases are associated with protein aggregation and misfolding, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and human prion diseases such as Creutzveld-Jakob disease. Characteristic of these diseases is the presence of amyloid fibrils and their precursors, oligomers and protofibrils. Considerable evidence exists that a shearing flow strongly influences amyloid formation both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the stability of protein-based pharmaceuticals is essential for conventional therapeutic preparations and drug delivery systems. By studying the nucleation and growth of insulin fibrils in a well-defined flow system, we expect to identify the flow conditions that impact protein aggregation kinetics and which lead to protein destabilization. The present flow system consists of an annular region bounded by stationary inner and outer cylinders and is driven by rotation of the floor. Preliminary results indicate that a continuous shearing flow can accelerate the aggregation process. The interfacial shear viscosity was found to drastically increase during aggregation and appears to be a useful parameter to probe protein oligomerization and the effects of flow.

  8. Stick-slip instabilities in sheared granular flow: The role of friction and acoustic vibrations.

    PubMed

    Lieou, Charles K C; Elbanna, Ahmed E; Langer, J S; Carlson, J M

    2015-08-01

    We propose a theory of shear flow in dense granular materials. A key ingredient of the theory is an effective temperature that determines how the material responds to external driving forces such as shear stresses and vibrations. We show that, within our model, friction between grains produces stick-slip behavior at intermediate shear rates, even if the material is rate strengthening at larger rates. In addition, externally generated acoustic vibrations alter the stick-slip amplitude, or suppress stick-slip altogether, depending on the pressure and shear rate. We construct a phase diagram that indicates the parameter regimes for which stick-slip occurs in the presence and absence of acoustic vibrations of a fixed amplitude and frequency. These results connect the microscopic physics to macroscopic dynamics and thus produce useful information about a variety of granular phenomena, including rupture and slip along earthquake faults, the remote triggering of instabilities, and the control of friction in material processing.

  9. Investigations of coherent structures in free turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussain, A. K. M. F.

    1979-01-01

    The dynamics of large-scale coherent structures in general, and studies based on flow-visualization and phase-locked hot-wire measurements of the structures in the near fields of circular jets are considered. A study involving the nature of coherent structures under conditions of stable vortex pairing induced by controlled axisymmetric acoustic excitation reveals that azimuthal coherence initially enhanced by the excitation is lost before the end of the potential core through evolution of azimuthal lobe structures and turbulent breakdown. The evolution of a spark-induced spot in an axisymmetric turbulent mixing layer is also investigated, and the coherent Reynolds stress associated with the spot is found to be much higher than the background turbulence Reynolds stress. In addition, the state of organization in a high Reynolds number unperturbed axisymmetric mixing layer is examined, and it is shown that the shear layer is infrequently organized and the motions are intensely three-dimensional, while tearing and fractional pairing occur as frequently as complete pairing.

  10. Nonlinear transverse cascade and two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic subcritical turbulence in plane shear flows.

    PubMed

    Mamatsashvili, G R; Gogichaishvili, D Z; Chagelishvili, G D; Horton, W

    2014-04-01

    We find and investigate via numerical simulations self-sustained two-dimensional turbulence in a magnetohydrodynamic flow with a maximally simple configuration: plane, noninflectional (with a constant shear of velocity), and threaded by a parallel uniform background magnetic field. This flow is spectrally stable, so the turbulence is subcritical by nature and hence it can be energetically supported just by a transient growth mechanism due to shear flow non-normality. This mechanism appears to be essentially anisotropic in the spectral (wave-number) plane and operates mainly for spatial Fourier harmonics with streamwise wave numbers less than the ratio of flow shear to Alfvén speed, kyshear rate). We focus on analysis of the character of nonlinear processes and the underlying self-sustaining scheme of the turbulence, i.e., on the interplay between linear transient growth and nonlinear processes, in the spectral plane. Our study, being concerned with a new type of energy-injecting process for turbulence-the transient growth-represents an alternative to the main trends of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence research. We find similarity of the nonlinear dynamics to the related dynamics in hydrodynamic flows: to the bypass concept of subcritical turbulence. The essence of the analyzed nonlinear MHD processes appears to be a transverse redistribution of kinetic and magnetic spectral energies in the wave-number plane [as occurs in the related hydrodynamic flow; see Horton et al., Phys. Rev. E 81, 066304 (2010)] and differs fundamentally from the existing concepts of (anisotropic direct and inverse) cascade processes in MHD shear flows.

  11. Nonlinear transverse cascade and two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic subcritical turbulence in plane shear flows.

    PubMed

    Mamatsashvili, G R; Gogichaishvili, D Z; Chagelishvili, G D; Horton, W

    2014-04-01

    We find and investigate via numerical simulations self-sustained two-dimensional turbulence in a magnetohydrodynamic flow with a maximally simple configuration: plane, noninflectional (with a constant shear of velocity), and threaded by a parallel uniform background magnetic field. This flow is spectrally stable, so the turbulence is subcritical by nature and hence it can be energetically supported just by a transient growth mechanism due to shear flow non-normality. This mechanism appears to be essentially anisotropic in the spectral (wave-number) plane and operates mainly for spatial Fourier harmonics with streamwise wave numbers less than the ratio of flow shear to Alfvén speed, kyshear rate). We focus on analysis of the character of nonlinear processes and the underlying self-sustaining scheme of the turbulence, i.e., on the interplay between linear transient growth and nonlinear processes, in the spectral plane. Our study, being concerned with a new type of energy-injecting process for turbulence-the transient growth-represents an alternative to the main trends of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence research. We find similarity of the nonlinear dynamics to the related dynamics in hydrodynamic flows: to the bypass concept of subcritical turbulence. The essence of the analyzed nonlinear MHD processes appears to be a transverse redistribution of kinetic and magnetic spectral energies in the wave-number plane [as occurs in the related hydrodynamic flow; see Horton et al., Phys. Rev. E 81, 066304 (2010)] and differs fundamentally from the existing concepts of (anisotropic direct and inverse) cascade processes in MHD shear flows. PMID:24827349

  12. Shearing Box Simulations Of Circumplanetary Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Val-Borro, Miguel

    2008-09-01

    We study the accretion flow from a gaseous protoplanetary disk onto an embedded protoplanet. We use a code based on FLASH with block-structured adaptive mesh refinement to achieve high resolution inside the Hill sphere and in the proximity of shocks. The code solves the local Hill equations in Cartesian and polar coordinates centered on the planet with typical resolution near the planet of 0.001 gravitational radius. A circumplanetary disk forms inside the Hill radius while spiral arms are created for the case of massive planets extending to the point where the fluid becames subsonic in our frame of reference. We find that the two-dimensional approximation gives a correct estimate of the accretion rate for the terrestrial planet simulations.

  13. Turbulent Sediment Suspension and Induced Ripple Dynamics Absent Mean Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. A.; Cowen, E.

    2014-12-01

    The uprush and backwash phases in the swash zone, the region of the beach that is alternately covered and uncovered by wave run-up, are fundamentally different events. Backwash is dominated by a growing boundary layer where the turbulence is set by the bed shear stress. In this phase traditional boundary layer turbulence models and Shields-type critical stress pickup functions work well. However, the uprush phase, while often viewed in the context of traditional boundary layer turbulence models, has little in common with the backwash phase. During uprush, the entire water column is turbulent, as it rapidly advects well-stirred highly turbulent flow generated offshore from breaking waves or collapsing bores. Turbulence levels in the uprush are several times higher than turbulent boundary layer theory would predict and hence the use of a boundary layer model to predict turbulence levels during uprush grossly under predicts the turbulence and subsequent sediment suspension in the swash zone. To study the importance of this advected turbulence to sediment suspension we conduct experiments in a water tank designed to generate horizontally homogeneous isotropic turbulence absent mean shear using randomly actuated synthetic jet arrays suspended above both a solid glass plate and a narrowly graded sediment bed. Using jet arrays with different jet spacings allows the generation of high Reynolds number turbulence with variable integral length scales, which we hypothesize control the characteristic length scales in the induced ripple field. Particle image velocimetry and acoustic Doppler velocimetry measurements are used to characterize the near-bed flow and this unique turbulent boundary layer. Metrics include the mean flow and turbulence intensities and stresses, temporal and spatial spectra, dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy, and integral length scales of the turbulence. We leverage our unique dataset to compare the flows over impermeable fixed and permeable mobile

  14. Relativistic thermal electron scale instabilities in sheared flow plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Evan D.; Rogers, Barrett N.

    2016-04-01

    > The linear dispersion relation obeyed by finite-temperature, non-magnetized, relativistic two-fluid plasmas is presented, in the special case of a discontinuous bulk velocity profile and parallel wave vectors. It is found that such flows become universally unstable at the collisionless electron skin-depth scale. Further analyses are performed in the limits of either free-streaming ions or ultra-hot plasmas. In these limits, the system is highly unstable in the parameter regimes associated with either the electron scale Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (ESKHI) or the relativistic electron scale sheared flow instability (RESI) recently highlighted by Gruzinov. Coupling between these modes provides further instability throughout the remaining parameter space, provided both shear flow and temperature are finite. An explicit parameter space bound on the highly unstable region is found.

  15. Calculation of turbulent shear stress in supersonic boundary layer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, C. C.; Childs, M. E.

    1974-01-01

    An analysis of turbulent boundary layer flow characteristics and the computational procedure used are discussed. The integrated mass and momentum flux profiles and differentials of the integral quantities are used in the computations so that local evaluation of the streamwise velocity gradient is not necessary. The computed results are compared with measured shear stress data obtained by using hot wire anemometer and laser velocimeter techniques. The flow measurements were made upstream and downstream of an adiabatic unseparated interaction of an oblique shock wave with the turbulent boundary layer on the flat wall of a two dimensional wind tunnel. A comparison of the numerical analysis and actual measurements is made and the effects of small differences in mean flow profiles on the computed shear stress distributions are discussed.

  16. Biological effects of dynamic shear stress in cardiovascular pathologies and devices

    PubMed Central

    Girdhar, Gaurav; Bluestein, Danny

    2010-01-01

    Altered and highly dynamic shear stress conditions have been implicated in endothelial dysfunction leading to cardiovascular disease, and in thromboembolic complications in prosthetic cardiovascular devices. In addition to vascular damage, the pathological flow patterns characterizing cardiovascular pathologies and blood flow in prosthetic devices induce shear activation and damage to blood constituents. Investigation of the specific and accentuated effects of such flow-induced perturbations on individual cell-types in vitro is critical for the optimization of device design, whereby specific design modifications can be made to minimize such perturbations. Such effects are also critical in understanding the development of cardiovascular disease. This review addresses limitations to replicate such dynamic flow conditions in vitro and also introduces the idea of modified in vitro devices, one of which is developed in the authors' laboratory, with dynamic capabilities to investigate the aforementioned effects in greater detail. PMID:18331179

  17. Transient Shear Flow of Model Lithium Lubricating Greases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, M. A.; Franco, J. M.; Valencia, C.; Kuhn, E.; Gallegos, C.

    2008-07-01

    This work deals with the analysis of the transient shear flow behaviour of lithium lubricating greases differing in soap concentration and base oil viscosity. The shear-induced evolution of lithium grease microstructure has been studied by means of stress-growth experiments. With this aim, different lubricating grease formulations were manufactured by modifying lithium 12-hydroxystearate concentration and base oil viscosity. Different rheological parameters, related to both the elastic response and the structural breakdown of greases, have been analysed. In this sense, it has been found that the elastic properties of lithium lubricating greases were highly influenced by soap concentration and oil viscosity. Moreover, an asymptotic tendency has been found for the stress overshoot by increasing shear rate. The asymptotic values of this parameter have been correlated to the friction coefficient obtained in a ball-disc tribometer.

  18. Anisotropic Developments for Homogeneous Shear Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambon, Claude; Rubinstein, Robert

    2006-01-01

    The general decomposition of the spectral correlation tensor R(sub ij)(k) by Cambon et al. (J. Fluid Mech., 202, 295; J. Fluid Mech., 337, 303) into directional and polarization components is applied to the representation of R(sub ij)(k) by spherically averaged quantities. The decomposition splits the deviatoric part H(sub ij)(k) of the spherical average of R(sub ij)(k) into directional and polarization components H(sub ij)(sup e)(k) and H(sub ij)(sup z)(k). A self-consistent representation of the spectral tensor in the limit of weak anisotropy is constructed in terms of these spherically averaged quantities. The directional polarization components must be treated independently: models that attempt the same representation of the spectral tensor using the spherical average H(sub ij)(k) alone prove to be inconsistent with Navier-Stokes dynamics. In particular, a spectral tensor consistent with a prescribed Reynolds stress is not unique. The degree of anisotropy permitted by this theory is restricted by realizability requirements. Since these requirements will be less severe in a more accurate theory, a preliminary account is given of how to generalize the formalism of spherical averages to higher expansion of the spectral tensor. Directionality is described by a conventional expansion in spherical harmonics, but polarization requires an expansion in tensorial spherical harmonics generated by irreducible representations of the spatial rotation group SO(exp 3). These expansions are considered in more detail in the special case of axial symmetry.

  19. Unsteady Shear Disturbances Within a Two Dimensional Stratified Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yokota, Jeffrey W.

    1992-01-01

    The origin and evolution of shear disturbances within a stratified, inviscid, incompressible flow are investigated numerically by a Clebsch/Weber decomposition based scheme. In contrast to homogeneous flows, within which vorticity can be redistributed but not generated, the presence of a density stratification can render an otherwise irrotational flow vortical. In this work, a kinematic decomposition of the unsteady Euler equations separates the unsteady velocity field into rotational and irrotational components. The subsequent evolution of these components is used to study the influence various velocity disturbances have on both stratified and homogeneous flows. In particular, the flow within a two-dimensional channel is used to investigate the evolution of rotational disturbances, generated or convected, downstream from an unsteady inflow condition. Contrasting simulations of both stratified and homogeneous flows are used to distinguish between redistributed inflow vorticity and that which is generated by a density stratification.

  20. Single molecule studies of flexible polymers under shear and mixed flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, Rodrigo Esquivel

    We combine manipulation and single molecule visualization of flexible DNA polymers with the generation of controlled simple shear and planar mixed flows for the investigation of polymer flow physics. With the ability to observe polymer conformation directly and follow its evolution in both dilute and entangled regimes we provide a direct test for molecular models. The coil-stretch transition of polymer extension was investigated in planar mixed flows approaching simple shear. Visualization of individual molecules revealed a sharp coil-stretch transition in the steady-state length of the polymer with increasing strain rate in flows slightly more straining than rotational. In slightly more rotational flows significant transient polymer deformation was observed. Next, dilute polymers were visualized in the flow-gradient plane of a steady shear flow. By exploiting the linear proportionality between polymer mass and image intensity, the radius of gyration tensor elements ( Gij) were measured over time. Then, the Giesekus stress tensor was used to obtain the bulk shear viscosity and first normal stress coefficient, thus performing rheology measurements from single molecule conformations. End-over-end tumbling was discovered for the first time, confirming a long-standing prediction and numerous single-chain computer simulation studies. The tumbling frequency followed Wi0.62, and an equation derived from simple advection and diffusion arguments was able to reproduce these observations. Power spectral densities of chain orientation trajectories were found to be single-peaked around the tumbling frequency, thus suggesting a periodic character for polymer dynamics. Finally, we investigated well-entangled polymer solutions. Identical preparations were used in both rheological characterizations and single molecule observations under a variety of shear flow histories. Polymer extension relaxations after the cessation of a fast shear flow revealed two intrinsic characteristic

  1. Lava Flow Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, G. Jeffrey

    1996-01-01

    This grant originally had four major tasks, all of which were addressed to varying extents during the course of the research: (1) Measure the fractal dimensions of lava flows as a function of topography, substrate, and rheology; (2) The nature of lava tube systems and their relation to flow fields; (3) A quantitative assessment of lava flow dynamics in light of the fractal nature of lava flow margins; and (4) Development and application of a new remote sensing tool based on fractal properties. During the course of the research, the project expanded to include the following projects: (1) A comparison of what we can-learn from remote sensing studies of lava flow morphology and from studies of samples of lava flows; (2) Study of a terrestrial analog of the nakhlites, one of the groups of meteorites from Mars; and (3) Study of the textures of Hawaiian basalts as an aid in understanding the dynamics (flow rates, inflation rates, thermal history) of flow interiors. In addition, during the first year an educational task (development and writing of a teacher's guide and activity set to accompany the lunar sample disk when it is sent to schools) was included.

  2. Scaling laws for homogeneous turbulent shear flows in a rotating frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speziale, Charles G.; Mhuiris, Nessan Macgiolla

    1989-01-01

    The scaling properties of plane homogeneous turbulent shear flows in a rotating frame are examined mathematically by a direct analysis of the Navier-Stokes equations. It is proved that two such shear flows are dynamically similar if and only if their initial dimensionless energy spectrum E star (k star, 0), initial dimensionless shear rate SK sub 0/epsilon sub 0, initial Reynolds number K squared sub 0/nu epsilon sub 0, and the ration of the rotation rate to the shear rate omega/S are identical. Consequently, if universal equilibrium states exist, at high Reynolds numbers, they will only depend on the single parameter omega/S. The commonly assumed dependence of such equilibrium states on omega/S through the Richardson number Ri = -2(omega/S)(1-2 omega/S) is proven to be inconsistent with the full Navier-Stokes equations and to constitute no more than a weak approximation. To be more specific, Richardson number similarity is shown to only rigorously apply to certain low-order truncations of the Navier-Stokes equations (i.e., to certain second-order closure models) wherein closure is achieved at the second-moment level by assuming that the higher-order moments are a small perturbation of their isotropic states. The physical dependence of rotating turbulent shear flows on omega/S is discussed in detail along with the implications for turbulence modeling.

  3. Scaling laws for homogeneous turbulent shear flows in a rotating frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speziale, Charles G.; Mhuiris, Nessan Macgiolla

    1988-01-01

    The scaling properties of plane homogeneous turbulent shear flows in a rotating frame are examined mathematically by a direct analysis of the Navier-Stokes equations. It is proved that two such shear flows are dynamically similar if and only if their initial dimensionless energy spectrum E star (k star, 0), initial dimensionless shear rate SK sub 0/epsilon sub 0, initial Reynolds number K squared sub 0/nu epsilon sub 0, and the ration of the rotation rate to the shear rate omega/S are identical. Consequently, if universal equilibrium states exist, at high Reynolds numbers, they will only depend on the single parameter omega/S. The commonly assumed dependence of such equilibrium states on omega/S through the Richardson number Ri=-2(omega/S)(1-2 omega/S) is proven to be inconsistent with the full Navier-Stokes equations and to constitute no more than a weak approximation. To be more specific, Richardson number similarity is shown to only rigorously apply to certain low-order truncations of the Navier-Stokes equations (i.e., to certain second-order closure models) wherein closure is achieved at the second-moment level by assuming that the higher-order moments are a small perturbation of their isotropic states. The physical dependence of rotating turbulent shear flows on omega/S is discussed in detail along with the implications for turbulence modeling.

  4. Assembly of vorticity-aligned hard-sphere colloidal strings in a simple shear flow

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiang; Xu, Xinliang; Rice, Stuart A.; Dinner, Aaron R.; Cohen, Itai

    2012-01-01

    Colloidal suspensions self-assemble into equilibrium structures ranging from face- and body-centered cubic crystals to binary ionic crystals, and even kagome lattices. When driven out of equilibrium by hydrodynamic interactions, even more diverse structures can be accessed. However, mechanisms underlying out-of-equilibrium assembly are much less understood, though such processes are clearly relevant in many natural and industrial systems. Even in the simple case of hard-sphere colloidal particles under shear, there are conflicting predictions about whether particles link up into string-like structures along the shear flow direction. Here, using confocal microscopy, we measure the shear-induced suspension structure. Surprisingly, rather than flow-aligned strings, we observe log-rolling strings of particles normal to the plane of shear. By employing Stokesian dynamics simulations, we address the mechanism leading to this out-of-equilibrium structure and show that it emerges from a delicate balance between hydrodynamic and interparticle interactions. These results demonstrate a method for assembling large-scale particle structures using shear flows. PMID:22198839

  5. Effect of thermal noise on vesicles and capsules in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Abreu, David; Seifert, Udo

    2012-07-01

    We add thermal noise consistently to reduced models of undeformable vesicles and capsules in shear flow and derive analytically the corresponding stochastic equations of motion. We calculate the steady-state probability distribution function and construct the corresponding phase diagrams for the different dynamical regimes. For fluid vesicles, we predict that at small shear rates thermal fluctuations induce a tumbling motion for any viscosity contrast. For elastic capsules, due to thermal mixing, an intermittent regime appears in regions where deterministic models predict only pure tank treading or tumbling. PMID:23005361

  6. Molecular cloud formation in high-shear, magnetized colliding flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogerty, E.; Frank, A.; Heitsch, F.; Carroll-Nellenback, J.; Haig, C.; Adams, M.

    2016-08-01

    The colliding flows (CF) model is a well-supported mechanism for generating molecular clouds. However, to-date most CF simulations have focused on the formation of clouds in the normal-shock layer between head-on colliding flows. We performed simulations of magnetized colliding flows that instead meet at an oblique-shock layer. Oblique shocks generate shear in the post-shock environment, and this shear creates inhospitable environments for star formation. As the degree of shear increases (i.e. the obliquity of the shock increases), we find that it takes longer for sink particles to form, they form in lower numbers, and they tend to be less massive. With regard to magnetic fields, we find that even a weak field stalls gravitational collapse within forming clouds. Additionally, an initially oblique collision interface tends to reorient over time in the presence of a magnetic field, so that it becomes normal to the oncoming flows. This was demonstrated by our most oblique shock interface, which became fully normal by the end of the simulation.

  7. Heterogeneous flow kinematics of cellulose nanofibril suspensions under shear.

    PubMed

    Martoïa, F; Perge, C; Dumont, P J J; Orgéas, L; Fardin, M A; Manneville, S; Belgacem, M N

    2015-06-28

    The rheology of NFC suspensions that exhibited different microstructures and colloidal stability, namely TEMPO and enzymatic NFC suspensions, was investigated at the macro and mesoscales using a transparent Couette rheometer combined with optical observations and ultrasonic speckle velocimetry (USV). Both NFC suspensions showed a complex rheology, which was typical of yield stress, non-linear and thixotropic fluids. Hysteresis loops and erratic evolutions of the macroscale shear stress were also observed, thereby suggesting important mesostructural changes and/or inhomogeneous flow conditions. The in situ optical observations revealed drastic mesostructural changes for the enzymatic NFC suspensions, whereas the TEMPO NFC suspensions did not exhibit mesoscale heterogeneities. However, for both suspensions, USV measurements showed that the flow was heterogeneous and exhibited complex situations with the coexistence of multiple flow bands, wall slippage and possibly multidimensional effects. Using USV measurements, we also showed that the fluidization of these suspensions could presumably be attributed to a progressive and spatially heterogeneous transition from a solid-like to a liquid-like behavior. As the shear rate was increased, the multiple coexisting shear bands progressively enlarged and nearly completely spanned over the rheometer gap, whereas the plug-like flow bands were eroded.

  8. Experimental Investigation of Entrainment Rate by Debris Flows: from Shear Stress to Granular Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, K. M.; Longjas, A.; Moberly, D.

    2015-12-01

    Debris flows - flows of boulders, gravel, sand, fine particles, and fluids - erode sediment from steep hillsides and deposit them at lower slopes. Current model frameworks for erosion by debris flow vary significantly and include those that consider macroscopic fields such as excess shear stresses, similar to traditional models of bedload transport, to those that consider the "granular" physics, from force chains (related to bed fabric) to granular temperatures (related to random kinetic energy of the flow). We perform experiments to investigate the underlying mechanics associated with entrainment of bed materials by overlying flows in an instrumented laboratory debris flow flume. In particular, we investigate how the erosion rate of a flowing mass impinging on an erodible bed of particles depends on boundary conditions, dynamics of the flow, and the state of the bed. Using high speed imaging to capture average and instantaneous particle dynamics simultaneously with bed stress measurements, we investigate the effectiveness of a variety of model frameworks for capturing the relationships between flow dynamics and erosion rates. We find no correlation between the bed shear stress associated with the mass of the flow and erosion rate. Similarly, we found no correlation between the erosion rate and a Reynolds stress, that is, the stress associated with correlations between downstream and vertical velocity fluctuations. On the other hand, we found that granular temperature is well-correlated with entrainment rate during particular phases of our experimental debris flow. In particular, we found the instantaneous entrainment rate ɛ is linearly dependent on the ratio of the granular temperature Tg to the kinetic energy associated with the average flow velocity u: ɛ ~ (Tg / ρm u2) where ρm is the local instantaneous density of the flow. We present these results and discuss how they vary with the state of the flow, boundary conditions, and particle mixtures.

  9. Application of Flow Laws to the Rheology of Shear Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirth, Greg

    2015-04-01

    A limitation in the application of experimental flow laws is that lab data are often obtained from single phase aggregates, rather than rocks. Using a combination of microstructural observations, thermobarometry, metamorphic petrology and thermochronology (where possible), we have identified several scenarios where shear zone rheology appears to operate at conditions where the nominally stronger multi-phase rock deforms by diffusion creep and the single-phase regions of the same rocks deform by dislocation creep of the weak phase. Examples include mafic rocks from the oceanic crust (Mehl and Hirth, 2008), hydrated mafic rocks from lower continental crust (Getsinger et al., 2013) and ophiolites (Homburg et al., 2010), and peridotites from both oceanic transform (Warren and Hirth, 2006) and ophiolites (Skemer et al., 2010). In each case, the extrapolation of experimental data provide evidence that the texture of the poly-phase rock evolves such that the effective viscosity of poly-phase regions deforming by diffusion creep is comparable to that of the single-phase regions deforming by dislocation creep. As such, these scenarios suggest that in many situations using flow laws for single phase aggregates actually provides a reasonable approximation for shear zone rheology. In this presentation, I will provide examples of these scenarios, discuss mechanisms for the grain size evolution of the poly-phase rocks that facilitate the production of the "uniform viscosity layers" in shear zones, and the implications of these observations for the rheology of shear zones and the interpretation of post-seismic geodetic data.

  10. Transverse electron-scale instability in relativistic shear flows.

    PubMed

    Alves, E P; Grismayer, T; Fonseca, R A; Silva, L O

    2015-08-01

    Electron-scale surface waves are shown to be unstable in the transverse plane of a sheared flow in an initially unmagnetized collisionless plasma, not captured by (magneto)hydrodynamics. It is found that these unstable modes have a higher growth rate than the closely related electron-scale Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in relativistic shears. Multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations verify the analytic results and further reveal the emergence of mushroomlike electron density structures in the nonlinear phase of the instability, similar to those observed in the Rayleigh Taylor instability despite the great disparity in scales and different underlying physics. This transverse electron-scale instability may play an important role in relativistic and supersonic sheared flow scenarios, which are stable at the (magneto)hydrodynamic level. Macroscopic (≫c/ωpe) fields are shown to be generated by this microscopic shear instability, which are relevant for particle acceleration, radiation emission, and to seed magnetohydrodynamic processes at long time scales. PMID:26382337

  11. On the nature of magnetic turbulence in rotating, shearing flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Justin; Lesur, Geoffroy; Boldyrev, Stanislav

    2016-03-01

    The local properties of turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in rotating, shearing flows are studied in the framework of a shearing-box model. Based on numerical simulations, we propose that the MRI-driven turbulence comprises two components: the large-scale shear-aligned strong magnetic field and the small-scale fluctuations resembling magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. The energy spectrum of the large-scale component is close to k-2, whereas the spectrum of the small-scale component agrees with the spectrum of strong MHD turbulence k-3/2. While the spectrum of the fluctuations is universal, the outer-scale characteristics of the turbulence are not; they depend on the parameters of the system, such as the net magnetic flux. However, there is remarkable universality among the allowed turbulent states - their intensity v0 and their outer scale λ0 satisfy the balance condition v0/λ0 ˜ dΩ/dln r, where dΩ/dln r is the local orbital shearing rate of the flow. Finally, we find no sustained dynamo action in the Pm = 1 zero net-flux case for Reynolds numbers as high as 45 000, casting doubts on the existence of an MRI dynamo in the Pm ≤ 1 regime.

  12. Transverse electron-scale instability in relativistic shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, E. P.; Grismayer, T.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2015-08-01

    Electron-scale surface waves are shown to be unstable in the transverse plane of a sheared flow in an initially unmagnetized collisionless plasma, not captured by (magneto)hydrodynamics. It is found that these unstable modes have a higher growth rate than the closely related electron-scale Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in relativistic shears. Multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations verify the analytic results and further reveal the emergence of mushroomlike electron density structures in the nonlinear phase of the instability, similar to those observed in the Rayleigh Taylor instability despite the great disparity in scales and different underlying physics. This transverse electron-scale instability may play an important role in relativistic and supersonic sheared flow scenarios, which are stable at the (magneto)hydrodynamic level. Macroscopic (≫c /ωp e ) fields are shown to be generated by this microscopic shear instability, which are relevant for particle acceleration, radiation emission, and to seed magnetohydrodynamic processes at long time scales.

  13. SAXS/WAXS studies of flow-induced crystallization of poly(1-butene) in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Binbin; Burghardt, Wesley

    2013-03-01

    Flow-induced crystallization of poly(1-butene) was studied in shear flow. Flow was produced using a Linkam shear cell that has been modified to allow x-ray access for in situ studies of polymer structure using synchrotron x-ray scattering techniques. After loading in the the shear cell, samples were first heated well into the melt, and then cooled to a crystallization temperature selected such that negligible quiescent crystallization would occur on reasonable time scales. A short burst of shear flow was then applied at various rates, after which simultaneous wide- and small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS and WAXS) data were collected to study the resulting accelerated crystallization kinetics, as well as the morphology of the resulting crystallites (e.g. degree of crystallite orientation). The impact of both deformation rate and total applied strain on the crystallization process were examined.

  14. Transport barriers with and without shear flows in a magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Martinell, Julio J.

    2014-01-14

    Different ways of producing a transport barrier in a toroidal magnetized plasma are discussed and the properties of the barriers are analyzed. The first mechanism is associated with the presence of a sheared plasma flow that is present in a limited region of the plasma, which creates a zonal flow. In contrast to the usual paradigm stating that the sheared flow reduces the turbulence correlation length and leads to suppression of the fluctuation driven transport in the region of highest shear, it is shown that from the perspective of chaotic transport of plasma particles in the fluctuation fields, the transport barrier is formed in the region of zero shear and it can be destroyed when the fluctuation level is high enough. It is also shown that finite gyroradius effects modify the dynamics and introduces new conditions for barrier formation. The second mechanism considers a method in which radio-frequency waves injected into the plasma can stabilize the drift waves and therefore the anomalous transport is reduced, creating a barrier. This process does not involve the presence of sheared flows and depends only on the effect of the RF wave field on the drift waves. The stabilizing effect in this case is due to the nonlinear ponderomotive force which acts in a way that offsets the pressure gradient destabilization. Finally, a mechanism based on the ponderomotive force of RF waves is described which produces poloidal plasma rotation around the resonant surface due to the asymmetry of induced transport; it creates a transport barrier by shear flow stabilization of turbulence.

  15. Nonlinear evolution of a layered stratified shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, V.; Caulfield, C. P.

    2001-10-01

    We investigate numerically and theoretically the nonlinear evolution of a parallel shear flow at moderate Reynolds number which has embedded within it a mixed layer of intermediate fluid. The two relatively thin strongly stratified density interfaces are centered on the edges of the shear layer. We are particularly interested in the development of primary and secondary instabilities. We present the results of a stability analysis which predicts that such flows may be unstable to stationary vortical disturbances which are a generalization of an inviscid instability first considered by G.I. Taylor. We investigate the behavior of these "Taylor billows" at finite amplitude through two-dimensional numerical simulations. We observe that the braid regions connecting adjacent primary Taylor billows are susceptible to secondary, inherently two-dimensional instabilities. We verify that these secondary instabilities, which take the form of small elliptical vortices, arise due to a local intensification of the spanwise vorticity in the braid region.

  16. Sheared Flow as a Stabilizing Mechanism in Astrophysical Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanex, Lucas F.; Tendeland, Erik

    2007-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that the sustained narrowness observed in the asymptotic cylindrical region of bipolar outflows from Young Stellar Objects (YSO) indicates that these jets are magnetically collimated. The j z × B ϕ force observed in z-pinch plasmas is a possible explanation for these observations. However, z-pinch plasmas are subject to current driven instabilities (CDI). The interest in using z-pinches for controlled nuclear fusion has lead to an extensive theory of the stability of magnetically confined plasmas. Analytical, numerical, and experimental evidence from this field suggest that sheared flow in magnetized plasmas can reduce the growth rates of the sausage and kink instabilities. Here we propose the hypothesis that sheared helical flow can exert a similar stabilizing influence on CDI in YSO jets.

  17. Ideal ballooning modes, shear flow and the stable continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J. B.

    2012-11-01

    There is a well-established theory of ballooning modes in a toroidal plasma. The cornerstone of this is a local eigenvalue λ on each magnetic surface—which also depends on the ballooning phase angle k. In stationary plasmas, λ(k) is required only near its maximum, but in rotating plasmas its average over k is required. Unfortunately in many cases λ(k) does not exist for some range of k, because the spectrum there contains only a stable continuum. This limits the application of the theory, and raises the important question of whether this ‘stable interval’ gives rise to significant damping. This question is re-examined using a new, simplified, model—which leads to the conclusion that there is no appreciable damping at small shear flow. In particular, therefore, a small shear flow should not affect ballooning mode stability boundaries.

  18. Effect of wall shear rate on biofilm deposition and grazing in drinking water flow chambers.

    PubMed

    Paris, Tony; Skali-Lami, Salaheddine; Block, Jean-Claude

    2007-08-15

    The effect of four-wall shear rates (34.9, 74.8, 142.5, and 194.5 s(-1)) on bacterial deposition on glass slides in drinking water flow chambers was studied. Biofilm image acquisition was performed over a 50-day period. Bacterial accumulation and surface coverage curves were obtained. Microscopic observations allowed us to obtain information about the dynamics and spatial distribution of the biofilm. During the first stage of biofilm formation (210-518 h), bacterial accumulation was a function of the wall shear rate: the higher the wall shear rate, the faster the bacterial deposition (1.1 and 1.9 x 10(4) bacterial cells . cm(-2) for wall shear rates of 34.9 and 142.5 s(-1), respectively). A new similarity relationship characteristic of a non-dimensional time and function of the wall shear rate was proposed to describe initial bacterial deposition. After 50 days of exposure to drinking water, surface coverage was more or less identical under the entire wall shear rates (7.44 +/- 0.9%), suggesting that biofilm bacterial density cannot be controlled using hydrodynamics. However, the spatial distribution of the biofilm was clearly different. Under low wall shear rate, aggregates were composed of bacterial cells able to "vibrate" independently on the surface, whereas, under a high wall shear rate, aggregates were more cohesive. Therefore, susceptibility to the hydraulic discontinuities occurring in drinking water system may not be similar. In all the flow chambers, significant decreases in bacterial biomass (up to 77%) were associated with the presence of amoebae. This grazing preferentially targeted small, isolated cells.

  19. Transition and mixing in layered stratified shear flows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Victoria; Caulfield, C. P.

    2001-11-01

    Flows with step-wise density distributions, i.e. well-mixed layers of fluid separated by narrow regions of high density gradient, are common in geophysics. We investigate numerically and theoretically the nonlinear evolution of a parallel shear flow at a moderate Reynolds number which has embedded within it a mixed layer of intermediate fluid. Linear stability theory predicts that the flow may be unstable to stationary vortical disturbances which are a generalization of an inviscid instability first considered by G. I. Taylor. We investigate the behaviour of these "Taylor waves" at finite amplitude through 3D nonlinear numerical simulations. We follow the development of primary and secondary instabilities which contribute to the eventual breakdown of the layered flow. In particular, we are interested in the mixing properties of the flow as it undergoes transition to small-scale disorder.

  20. A review of Reynolds stress models for turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speziale, Charles G.

    1995-01-01

    A detailed review of recent developments in Reynolds stress modeling for incompressible turbulent shear flows is provided. The mathematical foundations of both two-equation models and full second-order closures are explored in depth. It is shown how these models can be systematically derived for two-dimensional mean turbulent flows that are close to equilibrium. A variety of examples are provided to demonstrate how well properly calibrated versions of these models perform for such flows. However, substantial problems remain for the description of more complex turbulent flows where there are large departures from equilibrium. Recent efforts to extend Reynolds stress models to nonequilibrium turbulent flows are discussed briefly along with the major modeling issues relevant to practical naval hydrodynamics applications.

  1. Time-dependent rheological behavior of natural polysaccharide xanthan gum solutions in interrupted shear and step-incremental/reductional shear flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ji-Seok; Song, Ki-Won

    2015-11-01

    The objective of the present study is to systematically elucidate the time-dependent rheological behavior of concentrated xanthan gum systems in complicated step-shear flow fields. Using a strain-controlled rheometer (ARES), step-shear flow behaviors of a concentrated xanthan gum model solution have been experimentally investigated in interrupted shear flow fields with a various combination of different shear rates, shearing times and rest times, and step-incremental and step-reductional shear flow fields with various shearing times. The main findings obtained from this study are summarized as follows. (i) In interrupted shear flow fields, the shear stress is sharply increased until reaching the maximum stress at an initial stage of shearing times, and then a stress decay towards a steady state is observed as the shearing time is increased in both start-up shear flow fields. The shear stress is suddenly decreased immediately after the imposed shear rate is stopped, and then slowly decayed during the period of a rest time. (ii) As an increase in rest time, the difference in the maximum stress values between the two start-up shear flow fields is decreased whereas the shearing time exerts a slight influence on this behavior. (iii) In step-incremental shear flow fields, after passing through the maximum stress, structural destruction causes a stress decay behavior towards a steady state as an increase in shearing time in each step shear flow region. The time needed to reach the maximum stress value is shortened as an increase in step-increased shear rate. (iv) In step-reductional shear flow fields, after passing through the minimum stress, structural recovery induces a stress growth behavior towards an equilibrium state as an increase in shearing time in each step shear flow region. The time needed to reach the minimum stress value is lengthened as a decrease in step-decreased shear rate.

  2. Gyrokinetic analysis of shear flow instability in torodial geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Eisung; Hahm, T. S.

    2008-11-01

    Motivated by recent observation of intrinsic rotation in tokamak plasmas, we study linear stability of ion gyroradius scale short wavelength fluctuations in the presence of sheared parallel flow, ion temperature gradient, and toroidal mode coupling. Our gyrokinetic approach in toroidal geometry is an extension of previous studies including those by Catto et al., [Phys. Fluids 16 1719 (1973)] Mattor and Diamond [Phys. Fluids 31 1180 (1988)], and Artun and Tang [Phys. Fluids B 4 1102 (1992)].

  3. Universal behavior of entrainment due to coherent structures in turbulent shear flow.

    PubMed

    Govindarajan, Rama

    2002-04-01

    A solution is suggested for a persistent mystery in the physics of turbulent flows: cumulus clouds rise to towering heights, practically without entraining the ambient medium, while apparently similar turbulent jets quickly lose their identity through entrainment and mixing. Dynamical system computations on a model vortical flow show that entrainment due to coherent structures depends sensitively on relative speeds of fluid parcels. Local heating, for example, can alter drastically the sizes of Kolmogorov-Arnol'd-Moser tori and chaotic mixing regions. The entrainment rate and, hence, the lifetime of a turbulent shear flow show a universal, nonmonotone dependence on the heating.

  4. Quantifying blood flow and wall shear stresses in the outflow tract of chick embryonic hearts

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Aiping; Nickerson, Andrew; Troyer, Aaron; Yin, Xin; Cary, Robert; Thornburg, Kent; Wang, Ruikang; Rugonyi, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    Wall shear stresses (WSS) exerted by blood flow on cardiac tissues modulate growth and development of the heart. To study the role of hemodynamic conditions on cardiac morphogenesis, here, we present a methodology that combines imaging and finite element modeling to quantify the in vivo blood flow dynamics and WSS in the cardiac outflow tract (OFT) of early chicken embryos (day 3 out of 21-day incubation period). We found a distinct blood flow field and heterogeneous distribution of WSS in the chicken embryonic heart OFT, which have physiological implications for OFT morphogenesis. PMID:21572557

  5. Entrainment-Zone Restratification and Flow Structures in Stratified Shear Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reif, B. Anders Pettersson; Werne, Joseph; Andreassen, Oyvind; Meyer, Christian; Davis-Mansour, Melissa

    2002-01-01

    Late-time dynamics and morphology of a stratified turbulent shear layer are examined using 1) Reynolds-stress and heat-flux budgets, 2) the single-point structure tensors introduced by Kassinos et al. (2001), and 3) flow visualization via 3D volume rendering. Flux reversal is observed during restratification in the edges of the turbulent layer. We present a first attempt to quantify the turbulence-mean-flow interaction and to characterize the predominant flow structures. Future work will extend this analysis to earlier times and different values of the Reynolds and Richardson numbers.

  6. Ion flow in a strongly sheared electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Y.; Conn, R.W.; Schmitz, L.; Tynan, G. )

    1993-02-01

    Ion orbits and equilibrium ion flow in crossed electric and magnetic fields are examined for the case of a strongly nonuniform electric field such as found in edge plasmas of tokamak fusion experiments and in space plasmas. It is shown that the [bold E][times][bold B] drift approximation no longer applies, either to the motion of a single ion or to the collective response of the ion species when the absolute value of the shear parameter, [vert bar][zeta][vert bar], defined as the absolute value of the ratio of the gradient of [bold E][times][bold B] speed to ion gyrofrequency, is order one. It is also found that the ion velocity is strongly dependent on the electric field geometry. The results suggest that the existence of a strongly sheared electric field does not necessarily indicate the existence of strongly sheared plasma flow, and that the spatial shape of the electric field, when [vert bar][zeta][vert bar] is order one, may be a dominant factor in determining the resulting plasma flow speed.

  7. Incomplete mixing and reactions in laminar shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paster, A.; Aquino, T.; Bolster, D.

    2015-07-01

    Incomplete mixing of reactive solutes is well known to slow down reaction rates relative to what would be expected from assuming perfect mixing. In purely diffusive systems, for example, it is known that small initial fluctuations in reactant concentrations can lead to reactant segregation, which in the long run can reduce global reaction rates due to poor mixing. In contrast, nonuniform flows can enhance mixing between interacting solutes. Thus, a natural question arises: Can nonuniform flows sufficiently enhance mixing to restrain incomplete mixing effects and, if so, under what conditions? We address this question by considering a specific and simple case, namely, a laminar pure shear reactive flow. Two solution approaches are developed: a Lagrangian random walk method and a semianalytical solution. The results consistently highlight that if shear effects in the system are not sufficiently strong, incomplete mixing effects initially similar to purely diffusive systems will occur, slowing down the overall reaction rate. Then, at some later time, dependent on the strength of the shear, the system will return to behaving as if it were well mixed, but represented by a reduced effective reaction rate.

  8. MHD simulation studies of z-pinch shear flow stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paraschiv, I.; Bauer, B. S.; Sotnikov, V. I.; Makhin, V.; Siemon, R. E.

    2003-10-01

    The development of the m=0 instability in a z-pinch in the presence of sheared plasma flows is investigated with the aid of a two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation code (MHRDR). The linear growth rates are compared to the results obtained by solving the ideal MHD linearized equations [1] and to the results obtained using a 3D hybrid simulation code [2]. The instability development is followed into the nonlinear regime where its growth and saturation are examined. [1] V.I. Sotnikov, I. Paraschiv, V. Makhin, B.S. Bauer, J.-N. Leboeuf, and J.M. Dawson, "Linear analysis of sheared flow stabilization of global magnetohydrodynamic instabilities based on the Hall fluid mode", Phys. Plasmas 9, 913 (2002). [2] V.I. Sotnikov, V. Makhin, B.S. Bauer, P. Hellinger, P. Travnicek, V. Fiala, J.-N. Leboeuf, "Hybrid Simulations of Current-Carrying Instabilities in Z-pinch Plasmas with Sheared Axial Flow", AIP Conference Proceedings, Volume 651, Dense Z-Pinches: 5th International Conference on Dense Z-Pinches, edited by J. Davis et al., page 396, June 2002.

  9. Phase transition of polymer mixtures under simple shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Takeji; Takebe, Tomoaki; Asakawa, Koji

    1993-03-01

    Self-assembled structure in semidilute solutions of polystyrene and polybutadiene in dioctylphthalate just above (Regime V) and below (Regime IV) the critical shear rate c for shear-induced homogenization was investigated by a light scattering method. The scaled structure factor was distinctly different in Regimes IV and V, being squared Lorentzian in the former and simple Lorentzian in the latter. This difference implies that concentration fluctuations occur in phase-separated domains in Regime IV and thermal concentration fluctuations in the single-phase state in Regime V. The shear-rate γ dependence of the steady-state structure factors in Regimes IV and V as well as that of the time-evolution of structure due to spinodal decomposition after sudden change in shear-rate from Regime V to Regime IV were found to scale with the effective quench depth ΔT( γ˙) given by ΔT(0) × [1 - ( {γ˙}/{γ˙c}) {1}/{2}] . Thus, shearing affects structure self-assembly as if it pushes down the phase diagram and thus changes time- and spatial scales for the structure formation. Moreover, there was a close similarity between the γ dependence of the characteristic length (ξ ⊥) d for the domains in Regime IV and the time dependence of the characteristic wavenumber for the coarsened structure after the cessation of shear flow across γ c. In quantitative terms, increasing γ has the effect equivalent to shortening the linear time scale t, i.e., t∼γ -1.

  10. Transient shear flow of model lithium lubricating greases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, M. A.; Franco, J. M.; Valencia, C.; Kuhn, E.; Gallegos, C.

    2009-03-01

    This paper deals with the analysis of the transient shear flow behavior of lithium lubricating greases differing in soap concentration and base oil viscosity. The shear-induced evolution of grease microstructure has been studied by means of stress-growth experiments. With this aim, different lubricating grease formulations were manufactured by modifying the concentration of lithium 12-hydroxystearate and the viscosity of the base oil, according to a RSM statistical design. Moreover, atomic force microscopy (AFM) observations were carried out. The transient stress response can be successfully described by the generalized Leider-Bird model based on two exponential terms. Different rheological parameters, related to both the elastic response and the structural breakdown of greases, have been analysed. In this sense, it has been found that the elastic properties of lithium lubricating greases were highly influenced by soap concentration and oil viscosity. The stress overshoot, τ max , depends linearly on both variables in the whole shear rate range studied, although the effect of base oil viscosity on this parameter is opposite at low and high shear rates. Special attention has been given to the first part of the stress-growth curve. In this sense, it can be deduced that the “yielding” energy density not only depends on grease composition, but also on shear rate. Moreover, an interesting asymptotic tendency has been found for both the “yielding” energy density and the stress overshoot by increasing shear rate. The asymptotic values of these parameters have been correlated to the friction coefficient obtained in a ball-disc tribometer.

  11. Interaction of bubbles in an inviscid and low-viscosity shear flow.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Jai; Lavrenteva, Olga M; Nir, Avinoam

    2013-08-01

    The pressure loads on two identical spherical bubbles impulsively introduced in an inviscid simple shear flow are calculated. The interaction force due to these pressure loads is employed to model the dynamics of air bubbles injected to a low-viscosity fluid sheared in a Couette device at the first shear flow instability where the bubbles are trapped inside the stable Taylor vortex. It was shown that the interaction between the bubbles in the primary shear flow drives them away from each other. The performed simulations revealed that in an inviscid flow the separation distances between equal size bubbles undergo complex periodic motion. The presence of low-viscosity results in a qualitative change of the interaction pattern: The bubbles either eventually assume an ordered string with equal separation distances between all neighbors or some of them collide. The first regime is qualitatively similar to the behavior of bubbles at low Reynolds number [Prakash et al., Phys. Rev. E 87, 043002 (2013)]. Furthermore, if the Reynolds number exceeds some critical value the temporal behavior of the separations becomes nonmonotonic and exhibits over- and undershooting of the equilibrium separations. The latter effects were observed in the experiments, but are not predicted by the low Reynolds number model of the process [Prakash et al., Phys. Rev. E 87, 043002 (2013)].

  12. Self-Sustaining Nonlinear Dynamo Process in Keplerian Shear Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Rincon, F.; Ogilvie, G. I.; Proctor, M. R. E.

    2007-06-22

    A three-dimensional nonlinear dynamo process is identified in rotating plane Couette flow in the Keplerian regime. It is analogous to the hydrodynamic self-sustaining process in nonrotating shear flows and relies on the magnetorotational instability of a toroidal magnetic field. Steady nonlinear solutions are computed numerically for a wide range of magnetic Reynolds numbers but are restricted to low Reynolds numbers. This process may be important to explain the sustenance of coherent fields and turbulent motions in Keplerian accretion disks, where all its basic ingredients are present.

  13. Molecular Origins of Higher Harmonics in Large-Amplitude Oscillatory Shear Flow: Shear Stress Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Peter; Giacomin, A. Jeffrey; Schmalzer, Andrew; Bird, R. B.

    Recent work has focused on understanding the molecular origins of higher harmonics that arise in the shear stress response of polymeric liquids in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow. These higher harmonics have been explained using only the orientation distribution of a dilute suspension of rigid dumbbells in a Newtonian fluid, which neglects molecular interactions and is the simplest relevant molecular model of polymer viscoelasticity [R.B. Bird et al., J Chem Phys, 140, 074904 (2014)]. We explore these molecular interactions by examining the Curtiss-Bird model, a kinetic molecular theory that accounts for restricted polymer motions arising when chains are concentrated [Fan and Bird, JNNFM, 15, 341 (1984)]. For concentrated systems, the chain motion transverse to the chain axis is more restricted than along the axis. This anisotropy is described by the link tension coefficient, ɛ, for which several special cases arise: ɛ =0 corresponds to reptation, ɛ > 1 1 8 8 to rod-climbing, 1 1 2 2 >= ɛ >= 3 3 4 4 to reasonable shear-thinning predictions in steady simple shear flow, and ɛ =1 to a dilute solution of chains. We examine the shapes of the shear stress versus shear rate loops for the special cases, ɛ = 0 , 1 0 , 1 8 , 3 3 8 8 8 , 3 3 8 8 , 1 , of the Curtiss-Bird model, and we compare these with those

  14. Shear viscosity and out of equilibrium dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    El, Andrej; Xu Zhe; Greiner, Carsten; Muronga, Azwinndini

    2009-04-15

    Using Grad's method, we calculate the entropy production and derive a formula for the second-order shear viscosity coefficient in a one-dimensionally expanding particle system, which can also be considered out of chemical equilibrium. For a one-dimensional expansion of gluon matter with Bjorken boost invariance, the shear tensor and the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio {eta}/s are numerically calculated by an iterative and self-consistent prescription within the second-order Israel-Stewart hydrodynamics and by a microscopic parton cascade transport theory. Compared with {eta}/s obtained using the Navier-Stokes approximation, the present result is about 20% larger at a QCD coupling {alpha}{sub s}{approx}0.3 (with {eta}/s{approx_equal}0.18) and is a factor of 2-3 larger at a small coupling {alpha}{sub s}{approx}0.01. We demonstrate an agreement between the viscous hydrodynamic calculations and the microscopic transport results on {eta}/s, except when employing a small {alpha}{sub s}. On the other hand, we demonstrate that for such small {alpha}{sub s}, the gluon system is far from kinetic and chemical equilibrium, which indicates the break down of second-order hydrodynamics because of the strong nonequilibrium evolution. In addition, for large {alpha}{sub s} (0.3-0.6), the Israel-Stewart hydrodynamics formally breaks down at large momentum p{sub T} > or approx. 3 GeV but is still a reasonably good approximation.

  15. A dilation-driven vortex flow in sheared granular materials explains a rheometric anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Krishnaraj, K. P.; Nott, Prabhu R.

    2016-01-01

    Granular flows occur widely in nature and industry, yet a continuum description that captures their important features is yet not at hand. Recent experiments on granular materials sheared in a cylindrical Couette device revealed a puzzling anomaly, wherein all components of the stress rise nearly exponentially with depth. Here we show, using particle dynamics simulations and imaging experiments, that the stress anomaly arises from a remarkable vortex flow. For the entire range of fill heights explored, we observe a single toroidal vortex that spans the entire Couette cell and whose sense is opposite to the uppermost Taylor vortex in a fluid. We show that the vortex is driven by a combination of shear-induced dilation, a phenomenon that has no analogue in fluids, and gravity flow. Dilatancy is an important feature of granular mechanics, but not adequately incorporated in existing models. PMID:26864086

  16. Magnetic Field Generation and Particle Energization in Relativistic Shear Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Edison; Boettcher, Markus; Smith, Ian

    2012-10-01

    We present Particle-in-Cell simulation results of magnetic field generation by relativistic shear flows in collisionless electron-ion (e-ion) and electron-positron (e+e-) plasmas. In the e+e- case, small current filaments are first generated at the shear interface due to streaming instabilities of the interpenetrating particles from boundary perturbations. Such current filaments create transverse magnetic fields which coalesce into larger and larger flux tubes with alternating polarity, eventually forming ordered flux ropes across the entire shear boundary layer. Particles are accelerated across field lines to form power-law tails by semi-coherent electric fields sustained by oblique Langmuir waves. In the e-ion case, a single laminar slab of transverse flux rope is formed at the shear boundary, sustained by thin current sheets on both sides due to different drift velocities of electrons and ions. The magnetic field has a single polarity for the entire boundary layer. Electrons are heated to a fraction of the ion energy, but there is no evidence of power-law tail forming in this case.

  17. Second order modeling of boundary-free turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, T.-H.; Chen, Y.-Y.; Lumley, J. L.

    1991-01-01

    A set of realizable second order models for boundary-free turbulent flows is presented. The constraints on second order models based on the realizability principle are re-examined. The rapid terms in the pressure correlations for both the Reynolds stress and the passive scalar flux equations are constructed to exactly satisfy the joint realizability. All other model terms (return-to-isotropy, third moments, and terms in the dissipation equations) already satisfy realizability. To correct the spreading rate of the axisymmetric jet, an extra term is added to the dissipation equation which accounts for the effect of mean vortex stretching on dissipation. The test flows used in this study are the mixing shear layer, plane jet, axisymmetric jet, and plane wake. The numerical solutions show that the unified model equations predict all these flows reasonably. It is expected that these models would be suitable for more complex and critical flows.

  18. Hydrodynamic screening of star polymers in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Ripoll, M; Winkler, R G; Gompper, G

    2007-08-01

    The mutual effects of the conformations of a star polymer in simple shear flow and the deformation of the solvent flow field are investigated by a hybrid mesoscale simulation technique. We characterize the flow field near the star polymer as a function of its functionality (arm number) f . A strong screening of the imposed flow is found inside the star polymer, which increases with increasing f . To elucidate the importance of hydrodynamic screening, we compare results for hydrodynamic and random solvents. The dependence of the polymer orientation angle on the Weissenberg number shows a power law behavior with super-universal exponent --independent of hydrodynamic and excluded-volume interactions. In contrast, the polymer rotation frequency changes qualitatively when hydrodynamic interactions are switched on.

  19. Prediction of Anomalous Blood Viscosity in Confined Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiébaud, Marine; Shen, Zaiyi; Harting, Jens; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2014-06-01

    Red blood cells play a major role in body metabolism by supplying oxygen from the microvasculature to different organs and tissues. Understanding blood flow properties in microcirculation is an essential step towards elucidating fundamental and practical issues. Numerical simulations of a blood model under a confined linear shear flow reveal that confinement markedly modifies the properties of blood flow. A nontrivial spatiotemporal organization of blood elements is shown to trigger hitherto unrevealed flow properties regarding the viscosity η, namely ample oscillations of its normalized value [η]=(η-η0)/(η0ϕ) as a function of hematocrit ϕ (η0=solvent viscosity). A scaling law for the viscosity as a function of hematocrit and confinement is proposed. This finding can contribute to the conception of new strategies to efficiently detect blood disorders, via in vitro diagnosis based on confined blood rheology. It also constitutes a contribution for a fundamental understanding of rheology of confined complex fluids.

  20. Pattern formation in crystal growth under parabolic shear flow.

    PubMed

    Ueno, K

    2003-08-01

    Morphological instability of the solid-liquid interface occurring in a crystal growing from an undercooled thin liquid bounded on one side by a free surface and flowing down inclined plane, is investigated by a linear stability analysis under shear flow. It is found that restoring forces due to gravity and surface tension is an important factor for stabilization of the solid-liquid interface on long length scales. This is a stabilizing effect different from the Gibbs-Thomson effect. A particular long wavelength mode of about 1 cm of wavy pattern, observed on the surface of icicles covered with a thin layer of flowing water is obtained from the dispersion relation, including the effect of flow and restoring forces.

  1. Numerical simulation of non-Newtonian free shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homsy, G. M.; Azaiez, J.

    1993-01-01

    Free shear flows, like those of mixing layers, are encountered in aerodynamics, in the atmosphere, and in the ocean as well as in many industrial applications such as flow reactors or combustion chambers. It is, therefore, crucial to understand the mechanisms governing the process of transition to turbulence in order to predict and control the evolution of the flow. Delaying transition to turbulence as far downstream as possible allows a gain in energy expenditure while accelerating the transition can be of interest in processes where high mixing is desired. Various methods, including the use of polymer additives, can be effective in controlling fluid flows. The drag reduction obtained by the addition of small amounts of high polymers has been an active area of research for the last three decades. It is now widely believed that polymer additives can affect the stability of a large variety of flows and that dilute solutions of these polymers have been shown to produce drag reductions of over 80 percent in internal flows and over 60 percent in external flows under a wide range of conditions. The major thrust of this work is to study the effects of polymer additives on the stability of the incompressible mixing layer through large scale numerical simulations. In particular, we focus on the two dimensional flow and examine how the presence of viscoelasticity may affect the typical structures of the flow, namely roll-up and pairing of vortices.

  2. Breakup dynamics and dripping-to-jetting transition in a Newtonian/shear-thinning multiphase microsystem.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yong; Liu, Zhou; Shum, Ho Cheung

    2015-01-01

    The breakup dynamics in non-Newtonian multiphase microsystems is associated with a variety of industrial applications such as food production and biomedical engineering. In this study, we numerically and experimentally characterize the dripping-to-jetting transition under various flow conditions in a Newtonian/shear-thinning multiphase microsystem. Our work can help to predict the formation of undesirable satellite droplets, which is one of the challenges in dispensing non-Newtonian fluids. We also demonstrate the variations in breakup dynamics between shear-thinning and Newtonian fluids under the same flow conditions. For shear-thinning fluids, the droplet size increases when the capillary number is smaller than a critical value, while it decreases when the capillary number is beyond the critical value. The variations highlight the importance of rheological effects in flows with a non-Newtonian fluid. The viscosity of shear-thinning fluids significantly affects the control over the droplet size, therefore necessitating the manipulation of the shear rate through adjusting the flow rate and the dimensions of the nozzle. Consequently, the droplet size can be tuned in a controlled manner. Our findings can guide the design of novel microdevices for generating droplets of shear-thinning fluids with a predetermined droplet size. This enhances the ability to fabricate functional particles using an emulsion-templated approach. Moreover, elastic effects are also investigated experimentally using a model shear-thinning fluid that also exhibits elastic behaviors: droplets are increasingly deformed with increasing elasticity of the continuous phase. The overall understanding in the model multiphase microsystem will facilitate the use of a droplet-based approach for non-Newtonian multiphase applications ranging from energy to biomedical sciences. PMID:25316203

  3. Open boundary molecular dynamics of sheared star-polymer melts.

    PubMed

    Sablić, Jurij; Praprotnik, Matej; Delgado-Buscalioni, Rafael

    2016-02-28

    Open boundary molecular dynamics (OBMD) simulations of a sheared star polymer melt under isothermal conditions are performed to study the rheology and molecular structure of the melt under a fixed normal load. Comparison is made with the standard molecular dynamics (MD) in periodic (closed) boxes at a fixed shear rate (using the SLLOD dynamics). The OBMD system exchanges mass and momentum with adjacent reservoirs (buffers) where the external pressure tensor is imposed. Insertion of molecules in the buffers is made feasible by implementing there a low resolution model (blob-molecules with soft effective interactions) and then using the adaptive resolution scheme (AdResS) to connect with the bulk MD. Straining with increasing shear stress induces melt expansion and a significantly different redistribution of pressure compared with the closed case. In the open sample, the shear viscosity is also a bit lowered but more stable against the viscous heating. At a given Weissenberg number, molecular deformations and material properties (recoverable shear strain and normal stress ratio) are found to be similar in both setups. We also study the modelling effect of normal and tangential friction between monomers implemented in a dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) thermostat. Interestingly, the tangential friction substantially enhances the elastic response of the melt due to a reduction of the kinetic stress viscous contribution. PMID:26820315

  4. Analysis of fluid flow and wall shear stress patterns inside partially filled agitated culture well plates.

    PubMed

    Salek, M Mehdi; Sattari, Pooria; Martinuzzi, Robert J

    2012-03-01

    The appearance of highly resistant bacterial biofilms in both community and hospitals environments is a major challenge in modern clinical medicine. The biofilm structural morphology, believed to be an important factor affecting the behavioral properties of these "super bugs", is strongly influenced by the local hydrodynamics over the microcolonies. Despite the common use of agitated well plates in the biology community, they have been used rather blindly without knowing the flow characteristics and influence of the rotational speed and fluid volume in these containers. The main purpose of this study is to characterize the flow in these high-throughput devices to link local hydrodynamics to observed behavior in cell cultures. In this work, the flow and wall shear stress distribution in six-well culture plates under planar orbital translation is simulated using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Free surface, flow pattern and wall shear stress for two shaker speeds (100 and 200 rpm) and two volumes of fluid (2 and 4 mL) were investigated. Measurements with a non-intrusive optical shear stress sensor and High Frame-rate Particle Imaging Velocimetry (HFPIV) are used to validate CFD predictions. An analytical model to predict the free surface shape is proposed. Results show a complex three-dimensional flow pattern, varying in both time and space. The distribution of wall shear stress in these culture plates has been related to the topology of flow. This understanding helps explain observed endothelial cell orientation and bacterial biofilm distributions observed in culture dishes. The results suggest that the mean surface stress field is insufficient to capture the underlying dynamics mitigating biological processes. PMID:22042624

  5. Analysis of fluid flow and wall shear stress patterns inside partially filled agitated culture well plates.

    PubMed

    Salek, M Mehdi; Sattari, Pooria; Martinuzzi, Robert J

    2012-03-01

    The appearance of highly resistant bacterial biofilms in both community and hospitals environments is a major challenge in modern clinical medicine. The biofilm structural morphology, believed to be an important factor affecting the behavioral properties of these "super bugs", is strongly influenced by the local hydrodynamics over the microcolonies. Despite the common use of agitated well plates in the biology community, they have been used rather blindly without knowing the flow characteristics and influence of the rotational speed and fluid volume in these containers. The main purpose of this study is to characterize the flow in these high-throughput devices to link local hydrodynamics to observed behavior in cell cultures. In this work, the flow and wall shear stress distribution in six-well culture plates under planar orbital translation is simulated using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Free surface, flow pattern and wall shear stress for two shaker speeds (100 and 200 rpm) and two volumes of fluid (2 and 4 mL) were investigated. Measurements with a non-intrusive optical shear stress sensor and High Frame-rate Particle Imaging Velocimetry (HFPIV) are used to validate CFD predictions. An analytical model to predict the free surface shape is proposed. Results show a complex three-dimensional flow pattern, varying in both time and space. The distribution of wall shear stress in these culture plates has been related to the topology of flow. This understanding helps explain observed endothelial cell orientation and bacterial biofilm distributions observed in culture dishes. The results suggest that the mean surface stress field is insufficient to capture the underlying dynamics mitigating biological processes.

  6. Flow in the well: computational fluid dynamics is essential in flow chamber construction

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Jörg; Frank, Wolfram; Schroten, Horst

    2007-01-01

    A perfusion system was developed to generate well defined flow conditions within a well of a standard multidish. Human vein endothelial cells were cultured under flow conditions and cell response was analyzed by microscopy. Endothelial cells became elongated and spindle shaped. As demonstrated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD), cells were cultured under well defined but time varying shear stress conditions. A damper system was introduced which reduced pulsatile flow when using volumetric pumps. The flow and the wall shear stress distribution were analyzed by CFD for the steady and unsteady flow field. Usage of the volumetric pump caused variations of the wall shear stresses despite the controlled fluid environment and introduction of a damper system. Therefore the use of CFD analysis and experimental validation is critical in developing flow chambers and studying cell response to shear stress. The system presented gives an effortless flow chamber setup within a 6-well standard multidish. PMID:19002993

  7. Coronal Rain in Magnetic Arcades: Rebound Shocks, Limit Cycles, and Shear Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, X.; Xia, C.; Keppens, R.; Van Doorsselaere, T.

    2015-07-01

    We extend our earlier multidimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations of coronal rain occurring in magnetic arcades with higher resolution, grid-adaptive computations covering a much longer (>6 hr) time span. We quantify how blob-like condensations forming in situ grow along and across field lines and show that rain showers can occur in limit cycles, here demonstrated for the first time in 2.5D setups. We discuss dynamical, multi-dimensional aspects of the rebound shocks generated by the siphon inflows and quantify the thermodynamics of a prominence-corona transition-region-like structure surrounding the blobs. We point out the correlation between condensation rates and the cross-sectional size of loop systems where catastrophic cooling takes place. We also study the variations of the typical number density, kinetic energy, and temperature while blobs descend, impact, and sink into the transition region. In addition, we explain the mechanisms leading to concurrent upflows while the blobs descend. As a result, there are plenty of shear flows generated with relative velocity difference around 80 km s-1 in our simulations. These shear flows are siphon flows set up by multiple blob dynamics and they in turn affect the deformation of the falling blobs. In particular, we show how shear flows can break apart blobs into smaller fragments, within minutes.

  8. CORONAL RAIN IN MAGNETIC ARCADES: REBOUND SHOCKS, LIMIT CYCLES, AND SHEAR FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, X.; Xia, C.; Keppens, R.; Doorsselaere, T. Van

    2015-07-10

    We extend our earlier multidimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations of coronal rain occurring in magnetic arcades with higher resolution, grid-adaptive computations covering a much longer (>6 hr) time span. We quantify how blob-like condensations forming in situ grow along and across field lines and show that rain showers can occur in limit cycles, here demonstrated for the first time in 2.5D setups. We discuss dynamical, multi-dimensional aspects of the rebound shocks generated by the siphon inflows and quantify the thermodynamics of a prominence–corona transition-region-like structure surrounding the blobs. We point out the correlation between condensation rates and the cross-sectional size of loop systems where catastrophic cooling takes place. We also study the variations of the typical number density, kinetic energy, and temperature while blobs descend, impact, and sink into the transition region. In addition, we explain the mechanisms leading to concurrent upflows while the blobs descend. As a result, there are plenty of shear flows generated with relative velocity difference around 80 km s{sup −1} in our simulations. These shear flows are siphon flows set up by multiple blob dynamics and they in turn affect the deformation of the falling blobs. In particular, we show how shear flows can break apart blobs into smaller fragments, within minutes.

  9. Lagrangian and Eulerian Acceleration Statistics in Turbulent Stratified Shear Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobitz, Frank; Schneider, Kai; Farge, Marie

    2014-11-01

    The Lagrangian and Eulerian acceleration statistics in homogeneous turbulence with shear and stratification are studied using direct numerical simulations. The Richardson number is varied from Ri = 0 , corresponding to unstratified shear flow, to Ri = 1 , corresponding to strongly stratified shear flow. In addition, the scale dependence of the acceleration statistics is studied using a wavelet-based approach. The probability density functions (pdfs) of both Lagrangian and Eulerian accelerations show a strong and similar influence on the Richardson number and extreme values for Eulerian acceleration are stronger than those observed for the Lagrangian acceleration. Similarly, the Eulerian time-rate of change of fluctuating density is observed to have larger extreme values than that of the Lagrangian time-rate of change. Hence, the time-rate of change of fluctuating density obtained at a fixed location by an Eulerian observer is mainly due to advection of fluctuating density through this location, while the time-rate of change of fluctuating density following a fluid particle is substantially smaller, and due to production and dissipation of fluctuating density.

  10. Predicting equilibrium states with Reynolds stress closures in channel flow and homogeneous shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abid, R.; Speziale, C. G.

    1992-01-01

    Turbulent channel flow and homogeneous shear flow have served as basic building block flows for the testing and calibration of Reynolds stress models. A direct theoretical connection is made between homogeneous shear flow in equilibrium and the log-layer of fully-developed turbulent channel flow. It is shown that if a second-order closure model is calibrated to yield good equilibrium values for homogeneous shear flow it will also yield good results for the log-layer of channel flow provided that the Rotta coefficient is not too far removed from one. Most of the commonly used second-order closure models introduce an ad hoc wall reflection term in order to mask deficient predictions for the log-layer of channel flow that arise either from an inaccurate calibration of homogeneous shear flow or from the use of a Rotta coefficient that is too large. Illustrative model calculations are presented to demonstrate this point which has important implications for turbulence modeling.

  11. Endothelial shear stress estimation in the human carotid artery based on Womersley versus Poiseuille flow.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Janina C V; Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; Nederveen, Aart J; Stroes, Erik S G; VanBavel, Ed

    2015-03-01

    Endothelial shear stress (ESS) dynamics are a major determinant of atherosclerosis development. The frequently used Poiseuille method to estimate ESS dynamics has important limitations. Therefore, we investigated whether Womersley flow may provide a better alternative for estimation of ESS while requiring equally simple hemodynamic parameters. Common carotid blood flow, centerline velocity, lumen diameter and mean wall thickness (MWT) were measured with 3T-MRI in 45 subjects at three different occasions. Mean ESS and two measures of pulsatility [shear pulsatility index (SPI) and oscillatory shear index (OSI)] were estimated based on Poiseuille and Womersley flow and compared to the more complex velocity gradient modelling method. The association between ESS and MWT was tested with multiple linear regression analysis; interscan reproducibility was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). Mean ESS and pulsatility indices based on Womersley flow (ESSwq β = -0.18, P = 0.04; SPIwq β = 0.24, P = 0.02; OSIwq β = 0.18, P = 0.045), showed equally good correlations with carotid MWT as the velocity gradient method (ESSvg β = -0.23, P = 0.01; SPIvg β = 0.21, P = 0.02; OSIvg β = 0.07, P = 0.47). This in contrast to the Poiseuille flow method that only showed a good correlation for mean ESS (ESSpq β = -0.18, P = 0.04; SPIpq β = 0.14, P = 0.14; OSIpq β = 0.04, P = 0.69). Womersley and Poiseuille methods had high intraclass correlation coefficients indicating good interscan reproducibility (both ICC = 0.84, 95% confidence interval 0.75-0.90). Estimation of ESS dynamics based on Womersley flow modelling is superior to Poiseuille flow modelling and has good interscan reproducibility.

  12. Mechanical picture of the linear transient growth of vortical perturbations in incompressible smooth shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chagelishvili, George; Hau, Jan-Niklas; Khujadze, George; Oberlack, Martin

    2016-08-01

    The linear dynamics of perturbations in smooth shear flows covers the transient exchange of energies between (1) the perturbations and the basic flow and (2) different perturbations modes. Canonically, the linear exchange of energies between the perturbations and the basic flow can be described in terms of the Orr and the lift-up mechanisms, correspondingly for two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) perturbations. In this paper the mechanical basis of the linear transient dynamics is introduced and analyzed for incompressible plane constant shear flows, where we consider the dynamics of virtual fluid particles in the framework of plane perturbations (i.e., perturbations with plane surfaces of constant phase) for the 2D and 3D case. It is shown that (1) the formation of a pressure perturbation field is the result of countermoving neighboring sets of incompressible fluid particles in the flow, (2) the keystone of the energy exchange mechanism between the basic flow and perturbations is the collision of fluid particles with the planes of constant pressure in accordance with the classical theory of elastic collision of particles with a rigid wall, making the pressure field the key player in this process, (3) the interplay of the collision process and the shear flow kinematics describes the transient growth of plane perturbations and captures the physics of the growth, and (4) the proposed mechanical picture allows us to reconstruct the linearized Euler equations in spectral space with a time-dependent shearwise wave number, the linearized Euler equations for Kelvin modes. This confirms the rigor of the presented analysis, which, moreover, yields a natural generalization of the proposed mechanical picture of the transient growth to the well-established linear phenomenon of vortex-wave-mode coupling.

  13. Rate-dependent extensional "dynamic ligaments" using shear thickening fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nenno, Paul T.; Wetzel, Eric D.

    2014-04-01

    A novel "dynamic ligament" smart material that exhibits a strongly rate-dependent response in extension is developed and characterized. The devices, based on elastomeric polymers and shear thickening fluids, exhibit low resistance to extension at rates below 10 mm/s, but when stretched at 100 mm/s or higher resist with up to 7 × higher force. A link between the shear thickening fluid's rheology and the dynamic ligament's tensile performance is presented to explain the rate-dependent response. Future recommendations for improving device performance are presented, along with a host of different potential application areas including safety equipment, adaptive braces, sporting goods, and military equipment.

  14. Fourier decomposition of polymer orientation in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow

    PubMed Central

    Giacomin, A. J.; Gilbert, P. H.; Schmalzer, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    In our previous work, we explored the dynamics of a dilute suspension of rigid dumbbells as a model for polymeric liquids in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow, a flow experiment that has gained a significant following in recent years. We chose rigid dumbbells since these are the simplest molecular model to give higher harmonics in the components of the stress response. We derived the expression for the dumbbell orientation distribution, and then we used this function to calculate the shear stress response, and normal stress difference responses in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow. In this paper, we deepen our understanding of the polymer motion underlying large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow by decomposing the orientation distribution function into its first five Fourier components (the zeroth, first, second, third, and fourth harmonics). We use three-dimensional images to explore each harmonic of the polymer motion. Our analysis includes the three most important cases: (i) nonlinear steady shear flow (where the Deborah number λω is zero and the Weissenberg number λγ˙0 is above unity), (ii) nonlinear viscoelasticity (where both λω and λγ˙0 exceed unity), and (iii) linear viscoelasticity (where λω exceeds unity and where λγ˙0 approaches zero). We learn that the polymer orientation distribution is spherical in the linear viscoelastic regime, and otherwise tilted and peanut-shaped. We find that the peanut-shaping is mainly caused by the zeroth harmonic, and the tilting, by the second. The first, third, and fourth harmonics of the orientation distribution make only slight contributions to the overall polymer motion. PMID:26798789

  15. Fourier decomposition of polymer orientation in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow.

    PubMed

    Giacomin, A J; Gilbert, P H; Schmalzer, A M

    2015-03-01

    In our previous work, we explored the dynamics of a dilute suspension of rigid dumbbells as a model for polymeric liquids in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow, a flow experiment that has gained a significant following in recent years. We chose rigid dumbbells since these are the simplest molecular model to give higher harmonics in the components of the stress response. We derived the expression for the dumbbell orientation distribution, and then we used this function to calculate the shear stress response, and normal stress difference responses in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow. In this paper, we deepen our understanding of the polymer motion underlying large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow by decomposing the orientation distribution function into its first five Fourier components (the zeroth, first, second, third, and fourth harmonics). We use three-dimensional images to explore each harmonic of the polymer motion. Our analysis includes the three most important cases: (i) nonlinear steady shear flow (where the Deborah number [Formula: see text] is zero and the Weissenberg number [Formula: see text] is above unity), (ii) nonlinear viscoelasticity (where both [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] exceed unity), and (iii) linear viscoelasticity (where [Formula: see text] exceeds unity and where [Formula: see text] approaches zero). We learn that the polymer orientation distribution is spherical in the linear viscoelastic regime, and otherwise tilted and peanut-shaped. We find that the peanut-shaping is mainly caused by the zeroth harmonic, and the tilting, by the second. The first, third, and fourth harmonics of the orientation distribution make only slight contributions to the overall polymer motion. PMID:26798789

  16. Fourier decomposition of polymer orientation in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow

    SciTech Connect

    Giacomin, A. J.; Gilbert, P. H.; Schmalzer, A. M.

    2015-03-19

    In our previous work, we explored the dynamics of a dilute suspension of rigid dumbbells as a model for polymeric liquids in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow, a flow experiment that has gained a significant following in recent years. We chose rigid dumbbells since these are the simplest molecular model to give higher harmonics in the components of the stress response. We derived the expression for the dumbbell orientation distribution, and then we used this function to calculate the shear stress response, and normal stress difference responses in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow. In this paper, we deepen our understanding of the polymer motion underlying large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow by decomposing the orientation distribution function into its first five Fourier components (the zeroth, first, second, third, and fourth harmonics). We use three-dimensional images to explore each harmonic of the polymer motion. Our analysis includes the three most important cases: (i) nonlinear steady shear flow (where the Deborah number λω is zero and the Weissenberg number λγ 0 is above unity), (ii) nonlinear viscoelasticity (where both λω and λγ 0 exceed unity), and (iii) linear viscoelasticity (where λω exceeds unity and where λγ 0 approaches zero). We learn that the polymer orientation distribution is spherical in the linear viscoelastic regime, and otherwise tilted and peanut-shaped. We find that the peanut-shaping is mainly caused by the zeroth harmonic, and the tilting, by the second. The first, third, and fourth harmonics of the orientation distribution make only slight contributions to the overall polymer motion.

  17. Fourier decomposition of polymer orientation in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Giacomin, A. J.; Gilbert, P. H.; Schmalzer, A. M.

    2015-03-19

    In our previous work, we explored the dynamics of a dilute suspension of rigid dumbbells as a model for polymeric liquids in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow, a flow experiment that has gained a significant following in recent years. We chose rigid dumbbells since these are the simplest molecular model to give higher harmonics in the components of the stress response. We derived the expression for the dumbbell orientation distribution, and then we used this function to calculate the shear stress response, and normal stress difference responses in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow. In this paper, we deepen our understanding of themore » polymer motion underlying large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow by decomposing the orientation distribution function into its first five Fourier components (the zeroth, first, second, third, and fourth harmonics). We use three-dimensional images to explore each harmonic of the polymer motion. Our analysis includes the three most important cases: (i) nonlinear steady shear flow (where the Deborah number λω is zero and the Weissenberg number λγ 0 is above unity), (ii) nonlinear viscoelasticity (where both λω and λγ 0 exceed unity), and (iii) linear viscoelasticity (where λω exceeds unity and where λγ 0 approaches zero). We learn that the polymer orientation distribution is spherical in the linear viscoelastic regime, and otherwise tilted and peanut-shaped. We find that the peanut-shaping is mainly caused by the zeroth harmonic, and the tilting, by the second. The first, third, and fourth harmonics of the orientation distribution make only slight contributions to the overall polymer motion.« less

  18. Anisotropic particle in viscous shear flow: Navier slip, reciprocal symmetry, and Jeffery orbit.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiaolong; Xu, Xinpeng; Qian, Tiezheng

    2015-03-01

    The hydrodynamic reciprocal theorem for Stokes flows is generalized to incorporate the Navier slip boundary condition, which can be derived from Onsager's variational principle of least energy dissipation. The hydrodynamic reciprocal relations and the Jeffery orbit, both of which arise from the motion of a slippery anisotropic particle in a simple viscous shear flow, are investigated theoretically and numerically using the fluid particle dynamics method [Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 1338 (2000)]. For a slippery elliptical particle in a linear shear flow, the hydrodynamic reciprocal relations between the rotational torque and the shear stress are studied and related to the Jeffery orbit, showing that the boundary slip can effectively enhance the anisotropy of the particle. Physically, by replacing the no-slip boundary condition with the Navier slip condition at the particle surface, the cross coupling between the rotational torque and the shear stress is enhanced, as manifested through a dimensionless parameter in both of the hydrodynamic reciprocal relations and the Jeffery orbit. In addition, simulations for a circular particle patterned with portions of no-slip and Navier slip are carried out, showing that the particle possesses an effective anisotropy and follows the Jeffery orbit as well. This effective anisotropy can be tuned by changing the ratio of no-slip portion to slip potion. The connection of the present work to nematic liquid crystals' constitutive relations is discussed.

  19. Direct numerical simulations of agglomeration of circular colloidal particles in two-dimensional shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Young Joon; Djilali, Ned

    2016-01-01

    Colloidal agglomeration of nanoparticles in shear flow is investigated by solving the fluid-particle and particle-particle interactions in a 2D system. We use an extended finite element method in which the dynamics of the particles is solved in a fully coupled manner with the flow, allowing an accurate description of the fluid-particle interfaces without the need of boundary-fitted meshes or of empirical correlations to account for the hydrodynamic interactions between the particles. Adaptive local mesh refinement using a grid deformation method is incorporated with the fluid-structure interaction algorithm, and the particle-particle interaction at the microscopic level is modeled using the Lennard-Jones potential. Motivated by the process used in fabricating fuel cell catalysts from a colloidal ink, the model is applied to investigate agglomeration of colloidal particles under external shear flow in a sliding bi-periodic Lees-Edwards frame with varying shear rates and particle fraction ratios. Both external shear and particle fraction are found to have a crucial impact on the structure formation of colloidal particles in a suspension. Segregation intensity and graph theory are used to analyze the underlying agglomeration patterns and structures, and three agglomeration regimes are identified.

  20. Breakup modes of fluid drops in confined shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barai, Nilkamal; Mandal, Nibir

    2016-07-01

    Using a conservative level set method we investigate the deformation behavior of isolated spherical fluid drops in a fluid channel subjected to simple shear flows, accounting the following three non-dimensional parameters: (1) degree of confinement (Wc = 2a/h, where a is the drop radius and h is the channel thickness); (2) viscosity ratio between the two fluids (λ = μd/μm, where μd is the drop viscosity and μm is the matrix viscosity); and (3) capillary number (Ca). For a given Wc, a drop steadily deforms to attain a stable geometry (Taylor number and inclination of its long axis to the shear direction) when Ca < 0.3. For Ca > 0.3, the deformation behavior turns to be unsteady, leading to oscillatory variations of both its shape and orientation with progressive shear. This kind of unsteady deformation also occurs in a condition of high viscosity ratios (λ > 2). Here we present a detailed parametric analysis of the drop geometry with increasing shear as a function of Wc, Ca, and λ. Under a threshold condition, deforming drops become unstable, resulting in their breakup into smaller droplets. We recognize three principal modes of breakup: Mode I (mid-point pinching), Mode II (edge breakup), and Mode III (homogeneous breakup). Each of these modes is shown to be most effective in the specific field defined by Ca and λ. Our study also demonstrates the role of channel confinement (Wc) in controlling the transition of Mode I to III. Finally, we discuss implications of the three modes in determining characteristic drop size distributions in multiphase flows.

  1. On the self-organizing process of large scale shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, Andrew P. L.; Kim, Eun-jin; Liu, Han-Li

    2013-09-15

    Self organization is invoked as a paradigm to explore the processes governing the evolution of shear flows. By examining the probability density function (PDF) of the local flow gradient (shear), we show that shear flows reach a quasi-equilibrium state as its growth of shear is balanced by shear relaxation. Specifically, the PDFs of the local shear are calculated numerically and analytically in reduced 1D and 0D models, where the PDFs are shown to converge to a bimodal distribution in the case of finite correlated temporal forcing. This bimodal PDF is then shown to be reproduced in nonlinear simulation of 2D hydrodynamic turbulence. Furthermore, the bimodal PDF is demonstrated to result from a self-organizing shear flow with linear profile. Similar bimodal structure and linear profile of the shear flow are observed in gulf stream, suggesting self-organization.

  2. Dynamics of Polymers in Colloidal Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsieh; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    2011-03-01

    This research is motivated by recent studies on the von Willebrand factor (vWF), a large multimeric protein that plays an essential role in the initial stages of blood clotting in blood vessels. Recent experiments substantiated the hypothesis that the vWF is activated by shear stress in blood flow that causes its shape to transform from a compact globule to an extended state, and biological function is obtained only in the extended state. Simple simulations (which only consider a single polymer in bulk shear flow) have successfully reproduced the observed dynamics of the vWF. However, a more refined model is still demanding for the better understanding of the behaviors of this biomolecule in the physiological environments. Here we refine the existing model by adding the drifting colloids into the flows to mimic the presence of the blood cells in the bloodstream. Preliminary result shows that colloids greatly influence the dynamics of the polymers. It is observed that the average extensions of polymers along and perpendicular to the shear flow direction are both increased with the presence of the colloids.

  3. Measurement of wall shear stress in a pulsatile pipe flow system using micro-pillar shear sensor (MPS3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghav, Vrishank; Garcia, Christine; Gnanamanickam, Ebenezer; Yoganathan, Ajit; GT-Embry-Riddle Collaboration

    2014-11-01

    The measurement of unsteady wall shear stress (WSS) in a pulsatile flow system is quite a challenge in experimental fluid mechanics. Recent developments in micro fabrication techniques have resulted in a novel measurement technique called the micro-pillar shear stress sensor (MPS3). It is a micro-pillar mounted on the surface of interest, which deflects an amount proportional to the shear stress it experiences. This technique has been widely used, validated and applied to measure turbulent WSS in several flow configurations. In this work, the MPS3 technique is used to measure WSS for a pulsatile fully developed pipe flow. The main objective here is to validate this technique for pulsatile pipe flow applications. For this purpose the WSS measurements obtained are compared with those obtained from analytical womersley solutions of the pulsatile flow system in the laminar flow regime. Statistical metrics will be used to better understand the measured WSS through the time period of the pulsatile flow.

  4. Solid-fluid transition in a granular shear flow.

    PubMed

    Orpe, Ashish V; Khakhar, D V

    2004-08-01

    The rheology of a granular shear flow is studied in a quasi-2D rotating cylinder. Measurements are carried out near the midpoint along the length of the surface flowing layer where the flow is steady and nonaccelerating. Streakline photography and image analysis are used to obtain particle velocities and positions. Different particle sizes and rotational speeds are considered. We find a sharp transition in the apparent viscosity (eta) variation with rms velocity (u). Below the transition depth we find that the rms velocity decreases with depth and eta proportional to u(-1.5) for all the different cases studied. The material approaches an amorphous solidlike state deep in the layer. The velocity distribution is Maxwellian above the transition point and a Poisson velocity distribution is obtained deep in the layer. The results indicate a sharp transition from a fluid to a fluid + solid state with decreasing rms velocity.

  5. A new energy transfer model for turbulent free shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, William W.-W.

    1992-01-01

    A new model for the energy transfer mechanism in the large-scale turbulent kinetic energy equation is proposed. An estimate of the characteristic length scale of the energy containing large structures is obtained from the wavelength associated with the structures predicted by a weakly nonlinear analysis for turbulent free shear flows. With the inclusion of the proposed energy transfer model, the weakly nonlinear wave models for the turbulent large-scale structures are self-contained and are likely to be independent flow geometries. The model is tested against a plane mixing layer. Reasonably good agreement is achieved. Finally, it is shown by using the Liapunov function method, the balance between the production and the drainage of the kinetic energy of the turbulent large-scale structures is asymptotically stable as their amplitude saturates. The saturation of the wave amplitude provides an alternative indicator for flow self-similarity.

  6. Finite-amplitude waves in inviscid shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, D. W.; Saffman, P. G.

    1982-08-01

    This paper examines the existence and properties of steady finite-amplitude waves of cats-eye form superposed on a unidirectional inviscid, incompressible shear flow. The problem is formulated as the solution of nonlinear Poisson equations for the stream function with boundary conditions on the unknown edges of the cats-eyes. The dependence of vorticity on stream function is assumed outside the cats-eyes to be as in the undisturbed flow, and uniform unknown vorticity is assumed inside. It is argued on the basis of a finite difference discretization that the problem is determinate, and numerical solutions are obtained for Couette-Poiseuille channel flow. These are compared with the predictions of a weakly nonlinear theory based on the approach of Benney and Bergeron (1969) and Davis (1969). The phase speed of the waves is found to be linear in the wave amplitude.

  7. Steady axisymmetric vortex flows with swirl and shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elcrat, Alan R.; Fornberg, Bengt; Miller, Kenneth G.

    A general procedure is presented for computing axisymmetric swirling vortices which are steady with respect to an inviscid flow that is either uniform at infinity or includes shear. We consider cases both with and without a spherical obstacle. Choices of numerical parameters are given which yield vortex rings with swirl, attached vortices with swirl analogous to spherical vortices found by Moffatt, tubes of vorticity extending to infinity and Beltrami flows. When there is a spherical obstacle we have found multiple solutions for each set of parameters. Flows are found by numerically solving the Bragg-Hawthorne equation using a non-Newton-based iterative procedure which is robust in its dependence on an initial guess.

  8. Role of pressure diffusion in non-homogeneous shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuren, A. O.; Lele, S. K.; Durbin, P.

    1994-01-01

    A non-local model is presented for approximating the pressure diffusion in calculations of turbulent free shear and boundary layer flows. It is based on the solution of an elliptic relaxation equation which enables local diffusion sources to be distributed over lengths of the order of the integral scale. The pressure diffusion model was implemented in a boundary layer code within the framework of turbulence models based on both the kappa-epsilon-(bar)upsilon(exp 2) system of equations and the full Reynolds stress equations. Model computations were performed for mixing layers and boundary layer flows. In each case, the pressure diffusion model enabled the well-known free-stream edge singularity problem to be eliminated. There was little effect on near-wall properties. Computed results agreed very well with experimental and DNS data for the mean flow velocity, the turbulent kinetic energy, and the skin-friction coefficient.

  9. Fibrillization kinetics of insulin solution in an interfacial shearing flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaraj, Vignesh; McBride, Samantha; Hirsa, Amir; Lopez, Juan

    2015-11-01

    Although the association of fibril plaques with neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's is well established, in-depth understanding of the roles played by various physical factors in seeding and growth of fibrils is far from well known. Of the numerous factors affecting this complex phenomenon, the effect of fluid flow and shear at interfaces is paramount as it is ubiquitous and the most varying factor in vivo. Many amyloidogenic proteins have been found to denature upon contact at hydrophobic interfaces due to the self-assembling nature of protein in its monomeric state. Here, fibrillization kinetics of insulin solution is studied in an interfacial shearing flow. The transient surface rheological response of the insulin solution to the flow and its effect on the bulk fibrillization process has been quantified. Minute differences in hydrophobic characteristics between two variants of insulin- Human recombinant and Bovine insulin are found to result in very different responses. Results presented will be in the form of fibrillization assays, images of fibril plaques formed, and changes in surface rheological properties of the insulin solution. The interfacial velocity field, measured from images (via Brewster Angle Microscopy), is compared with computations. Supported by NNX13AQ22G, National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  10. Relation between Turbulence Suppression and Flow Shear for Interchange Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentle, Kenneth; Rowan, William; Williams, Chad; Li, Bo

    2013-10-01

    The Helimak is an approximation to the infinite cylindrical slab with a size large compared with turbulence transverse scale lengths, but with open field lines of finite length. Interchange modes are the dominant instability. Radially-segmented isolated end plates allow application of radial electric fields. Above a threshold in applied voltage, the fractional turbulent amplitude is greatly reduced. Reductions are observed for both bias polarities over a broad range of collisionality and parallel connection length. Simultaneous measurements of the ion flow velocity profile are made by Doppler spectroscopy of the argon plasma ion. Turbulence reductions are weakly correlated with reductions in radial correlation length, but neither turbulence levels nor turbulence reductions are correlated with velocity flow shear. No evidence of zonal flows has been found. The turbulence - density and potential fluctuations, is compared with simulations from a two-fluid model for this geometry, which also show turbulence stabilization with bias without increased shear. Work supported by the Department of Energy OFES DE-FG02-04ER54766.

  11. Coherent structures - Reality and myth. [in turbulent shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussain, A. K. M. F.

    1983-01-01

    Large-scale coherent structures (CS) in turbulent shear flows are characterized, reviewing recent theoretical and experimental investigations. The use of computers as a research tool and the flow-visualization experimental technique are introduced, CS are defined, the history of their discovery is traced, and their main characteristics are listed. Topics discussed and illustrated include the initial condition of the free shear layer, triple and double decomposition, topological features of CS, detection and eduction of CS, phase alignment via cross correlation, induced versus natural structures, the bursting phenomenon, turbulent spot, streaks, bursting frequency, the axisymmetric mixing layer, vortex pairing in an axisymmetric jet, CS and jet noise, broadband noise amplification via pure-tone excitation, CS interaction in a plane-jet near field, the Taylor hypothesis applied to CS, negative production, and the validity of the Reynolds-number similarity hypothesis. It is found that the coherent Reynolds stress, vorticity, and production are not much greater than the time-averaged values for fully developed flows with significant incoherent turbulence, suggesting that the importance of CS may have been exaggerated in some recent studies.

  12. Foam rheology: A model of viscous effects in shear flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kraynik, A.M.; Reinelt, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Foams consisting of gas bubbles dispersed in a continuous network of thin liquid films display a remarkable range of rheological characteristics that include a finite shear modulus, yield stress, non-Newtonian viscosity, and slip at the wall. Progress in developing micromechanical theories to describe foam rheology has depended upon two-dimensional models, which in most cases are assumed to have perfectly ordered structure. Princen accounted for surface tension and geometrical effects, and analyzed the nonlinear elastic response of a spatially periodic foam in simple shear. His analysis has been extended to account for more general deformations. Khan and Armstrong and Kraynik and Hansen have proposed ad hoc models for viscous effects in foam rheology. Their models capture numerous qualitative phenomena but incorporate relaxation mechanisms based upon overly simplified assumptions of liquid flow in the thin films. Mysels, Shinoda, and Frankel considered soap films with interfaces that are inextensible due to the presence of surfactants. They analyzed the primary flow that occurs when such films are slowly withdrawn from or recede into essentially static junction regions such as the Plateau borders in a foam. Adopting this mechanism, Schwartz and Princen considered small periodic deformations of a foam and calculated the energy dissipation due to viscous flow in the thin films. In the following, we also adopt the basic interfacial and viscous mechanisms introduced by Mysels et al. and analyze simple shearing deformations of finite amplitude. The configuration and effective stress of the foam are determined. Under these deformation conditions, the foam is a nonlinear viscoelastic material. Results for the uniform expansion of a foam are also presented. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Suppression of repeated adiabatic shear banding by dynamic large strain extrusion machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, S. L.; Dai, L. H.

    2014-12-01

    High speed machining (HSM) is an advanced production technology with great future potential. Chip serration or segmentation is a commonly observed phenomenon during high speed machining of metals, which is found to be ascribed to a repeated shear band formation fueled by thermo-plastic instability occurring within the primary shear zone. The occurrence of serrated chips leads to the cutting force fluctuation, decreased tool life, degradation of the surface finish and less accuracy in machine parts during high speed machining. Hence, understanding and controlling serrated chip formation in HSM are extremely important. In this work, a novel dynamic large strain extrusion machining (DLSEM) technique is developed for suppressing formation of serrated chips. The systematic DLSEM experiments of Ti-6Al-4V and Inconel 718 alloy with varying degrees of imposed extrusion constraint were carried out. It is found that there is a prominent chip morphology transition from serrated to continuous state and shear band spacing decreases with the constraint degree increasing. In order to uncover underlying mechanism of the imposed extrusion constraint suppressing repeated adiabatic shear banding in DLSEM, new theoretical models are developed where the effects of extrusion constraint, material convection due to chip flow and momentum diffusion during shear band propagation are included. The analytical expressions for the onset criterion of adiabatic shear band and shear band spacing in DLSEM are obtained. The theoretical predictions are in agreement with the experimental results.

  14. Single Molecule Visualization of DNA in Pure Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Connie; Duggal, Rajat; Pasquali, Matteo

    2003-03-01

    Polymers are ever-present in society from plastic bottles to DNA. The study of single molecule dynamics will provide the opportunity for advances in fields from synthetic polymer coatings to gene therapy. Many applications involve flow of dilute polymer solutions in viscous solvents. These long, flexible polymer chains (DNA) are coiled at rest in solution. The configuration of the molecules is altered by the applied flow which, in turn, affects the dynamics of the flow. Control of flow allows for manipulation of the DNA molecules. Our apparatus consists of a rectangular channel that has been plasma etched into a silicon wafer with pressure driven flow (pulse-free syringe pump). The dynamics of the DNA molecules in flow are monitored using fluorescence microscopy and digital imaging. The flow channel was designed to allow for visualization of the molecules in the plane defined by velocity and velocity gradient instead of the plane identified by the velocity and the vorticity (previously studied by Smith et al (1999) and LeDuc et al (1999)). Moreover, we can visualize the DNA in a flow where the velocity gradient is not uniform. The individual and average conformations (size and orientation) of the flowing DNA molecules are being studied as a function of the Weissenberg number (product of strain rate and DNA relaxation time) and distance from the channel walls.

  15. Pressure anisotropy generation in a magnetized plasma configuration with a shear flow velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Camillis, S.; Cerri, S. S.; Califano, F.; Pegoraro, F.

    2016-04-01

    The nonlinear evolution of the Kelvin Helmholtz instability in a magnetized plasma with a perpendicular flow close to, or in, the supermagnetosonic regime can produce a significant parallel-to-perpendicular pressure anisotropy. This anisotropy, localized inside the flow shear region, can make the configuration unstable either to the mirror or to the firehose instability and, in general, can affect the development of the KHI. The interface between the solar wind and the Earth’s magnetospheric plasma at the magnetospheric equatorial flanks provides a relevant setting for the development of this complex nonlinear dynamics.

  16. Contributions to the understanding of large-scale coherent structures in developing free turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, J. T. C.

    1986-01-01

    Advances in the mechanics of boundary layer flow are reported. The physical problems of large scale coherent structures in real, developing free turbulent shear flows, from the nonlinear aspects of hydrodynamic stability are addressed. The presence of fine grained turbulence in the problem, and its absence, lacks a small parameter. The problem is presented on the basis of conservation principles, which are the dynamics of the problem directed towards extracting the most physical information, however, it is emphasized that it must also involve approximations.

  17. Local isotropy in high Reynolds number turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saddoughi, Seyed G.

    1993-01-01

    This is a report on the continuation of experiments, which Dr. Srinivas Veeravalli and the present author started in 1991, to investigate the hypothesis of local isotropy in shear flows. This hypothesis, which states that at sufficiently high Reynolds numbers the small-scale structures of turbulent motions are independent of large-scale structures and mean deformations, has been used in theoretical studies of turbulence and computational methods like large-eddy simulation. The importance of Kolmogorov's ideas arises from the fact that they create a foundation for turbulence theory.

  18. Local dissipation scales in strongly inhomogeneous turbulent shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morshed, Khandakar; Dasi, Lakshmi

    2014-11-01

    We have previously shown that the distribution of dissipation scales, Q (η) , is dependent on the shear-dissipation Reynolds number Res ≡ < ɛ > / (S2 ν) along the streamwise homogeneous direction. This dependency is further explored through a generalized theoretical framework linking Q (η) , with the two-point correlation function, as well as the Reynolds stress tensor orientation relative to the mean axes of principal deformation. Time-resolved particle image velocimetry measurements were performed in a stationary turbulent flow past a backward facing step at Reynolds numbers 13,600, 9,000, and 5,500 based on the maximum velocity and step size. Q (η) were measured in all directions at different points in the measurement region with varying mean shear magnitude. Results show anisotropic Q (η) distributions strongly reflecting the anisotropy in the two-point correlation function and the Reynolds stress tensor. Based on these results the previous Res dependency is generalized to inhomogeneous directions while discussing the physical role of strong mean shear in inducing local anisotropy.

  19. Turbulent shear flow in a rapidly rotating spherical annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Daniel S.

    This dissertation presents experimental measurements of torque, wall shear stress, pressure, and velocity in the boundary-driven turbulent flow of water between concentric, independently rotating spheres, commonly known as spherical Couette flow. The spheres' radius ratio is 0.35, geometrically similar to that of Earth's core. The measurements are performed at unprecedented Reynolds number for this geometry, as high as fifty-six million. The role of rapid overall rotation on the turbulence is investigated. A number of different turbulent flow states are possible, selected by the Rossby number, a dimensionless measure of the differential rotation. In certain ranges of the Rossby number near state borders, bistable co-existence of states is possible. In these ranges the flow undergoes intermittent transitions between neighboring states. At fixed Rossby number, the flow properties vary with Reynolds number in a way similar to that of other turbulent flows. At most parameters investigated, the large scales of the turbulent flow are characterized by system-wide spatial and temporal correlations that co-exist with intense broadband velocity fluctuations. Some of these wave-like motions are identifiable as inertial modes. All waves are consistent with slowly drifting large scale patterns of vorticity, which include Rossby waves and inertial modes as a subset. The observed waves are generally very energetic, and imply significant inhomogeneity in the turbulent flow. Increasing rapidity of rotation as the Ekman number is lowered intensifies those waves identified as inertial modes with respect to other velocity fluctuations. The turbulent scaling of the torque on inner sphere is a focus of this dissertation. The Rossby-number dependence of the torque is complicated. We normalize the torque at a given Reynolds number in the rotating states by that when the outer sphere is stationary. We find that this normalized quantity can be considered a Rossby-dependent friction factor

  20. Membrane viscosity determined from shear-driven flow in giant vesicles.

    PubMed

    Honerkamp-Smith, Aurelia R; Woodhouse, Francis G; Kantsler, Vasily; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2013-07-19

    The viscosity of lipid bilayer membranes plays an important role in determining the diffusion constant of embedded proteins and the dynamics of membrane deformations, yet it has historically proven very difficult to measure. Here we introduce a new method based on quantification of the large-scale circulation patterns induced inside vesicles adhered to a solid surface and subjected to simple shear flow in a microfluidic device. Particle image velocimetry based on spinning disk confocal imaging of tracer particles inside and outside of the vesicle and tracking of phase-separated membrane domains are used to reconstruct the full three-dimensional flow pattern induced by the shear. These measurements show excellent agreement with the predictions of a recent theoretical analysis, and allow direct determination of the membrane viscosity.

  1. Membrane viscosity determined from shear-driven flow in giant vesicles.

    PubMed

    Honerkamp-Smith, Aurelia R; Woodhouse, Francis G; Kantsler, Vasily; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2013-07-19

    The viscosity of lipid bilayer membranes plays an important role in determining the diffusion constant of embedded proteins and the dynamics of membrane deformations, yet it has historically proven very difficult to measure. Here we introduce a new method based on quantification of the large-scale circulation patterns induced inside vesicles adhered to a solid surface and subjected to simple shear flow in a microfluidic device. Particle image velocimetry based on spinning disk confocal imaging of tracer particles inside and outside of the vesicle and tracking of phase-separated membrane domains are used to reconstruct the full three-dimensional flow pattern induced by the shear. These measurements show excellent agreement with the predictions of a recent theoretical analysis, and allow direct determination of the membrane viscosity. PMID:23909365

  2. Exploiting similarity in turbulent shear flows for turbulence modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, David F.; Harris, Julius E.; Hassan, H. A.

    1992-01-01

    It is well known that current k-epsilon models cannot predict the flow over a flat plate and its wake. In an effort to address this issue and other issues associated with turbulence closure, a new approach for turbulence modeling is proposed which exploits similarities in the flow field. Thus, if we consider the flow over a flat plate and its wake, then in addition to taking advantage of the log-law region, we can exploit the fact that the flow becomes self-similar in the far wake. This latter behavior makes it possible to cast the governing equations as a set of total differential equations. Solutions of this set and comparison with measured shear stress and velocity profiles yields the desired set of model constants. Such a set is, in general, different from other sets of model constants. The rational for such an approach is that if we can correctly model the flow over a flat plate and its far wake, then we can have a better chance of predicting the behavior in between. It is to be noted that the approach does not appeal, in any way, to the decay of homogeneous turbulence. This is because the asymptotic behavior of the flow under consideration is not representative of the decay of homogeneous turbulence.

  3. A Reduced Nonlinear Model of Wall-Bounded Shear Flow Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, Brian; Ioannou, Petros; Nikolaidis, Marios; Lozano-Duran, Adrian; Jimenez, Javier; Gayme, Dennice; Thomas, Vaughan

    2015-11-01

    The roll/streak is the dominant structure in the dynamics of wall-bounded shear flow turbulence. It appears that this structure arises from a nonlinear instability, the various proposed mechanisms for which are referred to as self-sustaining processes. However, even once the nonlinear instability is identified there remains the problem of understanding how this instability is regulated to maintain the observed turbulent state. Here both of these questions will be addressed by adopting the perspective of statistical state dynamics (SSD), specifically its reduced nonlinear (RNL) implementation. RNL comprises the joint evolution of the streamwise constant mean flow (first cumulant) and second order perturbation statistics (second cumulant). This restriction greatly reduces the complexity of the dynamics while retaining a realistic SSP. The perturbations supporting the SSP in RNL arise from parametric instability of the time-dependence streak the statistical stability of these perturbations being enforced by a feedback mediated control process operating between the mean flow and the perturbations. In this talk it will be shown how the maintenance and regulation of RNL turbulence allows insight into the mechanism of turbulence in wall-bounded shear flow.

  4. Non-Newtonian hydrodynamics for a dilute granular suspension under uniform shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamorro, Moisés G.; Reyes, Francisco Vega; Garzó, Vicente

    2015-11-01

    We study in this work a steady shearing laminar flow with null heat flux (usually called "uniform shear flow") in a gas-solid suspension at low density. The solid particles are modeled as a gas of smooth hard spheres with inelastic collisions while the influence of the surrounding interstitial fluid on the dynamics of grains is modeled by means of a volume drag force, in the context of a rheological model for suspensions. The model is solved by means of three different but complementary routes, two of them being theoretical (Grad's moment method applied to the corresponding Boltzmann equation and an exact solution of a kinetic model adapted to granular suspensions) and the other being computational (Monte Carlo simulations of the Boltzmann equation). Unlike in previous studies on granular sheared suspensions, the collisional moment associated with the momentum transfer is determined in Grad's solution by including all the quadratic terms in the stress tensor. This theoretical enhancement allows for the detection and evaluation of the normal stress differences in the plane normal to the laminar flow. In addition, the exact solution of the kinetic model gives the explicit form of the velocity moments of the velocity distribution function. Comparison between our theoretical and numerical results shows in general a good agreement for the non-Newtonian rheological properties, the kurtosis (fourth velocity moment of the distribution function), and the velocity distribution of the kinetic model for quite strong inelasticity and not too large values of the (scaled) friction coefficient characterizing the viscous drag force. This shows the accuracy of our analytical results that allows us to describe in detail the flow dynamics of the granular sheared suspension.

  5. Non-Newtonian hydrodynamics for a dilute granular suspension under uniform shear flow.

    PubMed

    Chamorro, Moisés G; Reyes, Francisco Vega; Garzó, Vicente

    2015-11-01

    We study in this work a steady shearing laminar flow with null heat flux (usually called "uniform shear flow") in a gas-solid suspension at low density. The solid particles are modeled as a gas of smooth hard spheres with inelastic collisions while the influence of the surrounding interstitial fluid on the dynamics of grains is modeled by means of a volume drag force, in the context of a rheological model for suspensions. The model is solved by means of three different but complementary routes, two of them being theoretical (Grad's moment method applied to the corresponding Boltzmann equation and an exact solution of a kinetic model adapted to granular suspensions) and the other being computational (Monte Carlo simulations of the Boltzmann equation). Unlike in previous studies on granular sheared suspensions, the collisional moment associated with the momentum transfer is determined in Grad's solution by including all the quadratic terms in the stress tensor. This theoretical enhancement allows for the detection and evaluation of the normal stress differences in the plane normal to the laminar flow. In addition, the exact solution of the kinetic model gives the explicit form of the velocity moments of the velocity distribution function. Comparison between our theoretical and numerical results shows in general a good agreement for the non-Newtonian rheological properties, the kurtosis (fourth velocity moment of the distribution function), and the velocity distribution of the kinetic model for quite strong inelasticity and not too large values of the (scaled) friction coefficient characterizing the viscous drag force. This shows the accuracy of our analytical results that allows us to describe in detail the flow dynamics of the granular sheared suspension.

  6. Non-Newtonian hydrodynamics for a dilute granular suspension under uniform shear flow.

    PubMed

    Chamorro, Moisés G; Reyes, Francisco Vega; Garzó, Vicente

    2015-11-01

    We study in this work a steady shearing laminar flow with null heat flux (usually called "uniform shear flow") in a gas-solid suspension at low density. The solid particles are modeled as a gas of smooth hard spheres with inelastic collisions while the influence of the surrounding interstitial fluid on the dynamics of grains is modeled by means of a volume drag force, in the context of a rheological model for suspensions. The model is solved by means of three different but complementary routes, two of them being theoretical (Grad's moment method applied to the corresponding Boltzmann equation and an exact solution of a kinetic model adapted to granular suspensions) and the other being computational (Monte Carlo simulations of the Boltzmann equation). Unlike in previous studies on granular sheared suspensions, the collisional moment associated with the momentum transfer is determined in Grad's solution by including all the quadratic terms in the stress tensor. This theoretical enhancement allows for the detection and evaluation of the normal stress differences in the plane normal to the laminar flow. In addition, the exact solution of the kinetic model gives the explicit form of the velocity moments of the velocity distribution function. Comparison between our theoretical and numerical results shows in general a good agreement for the non-Newtonian rheological properties, the kurtosis (fourth velocity moment of the distribution function), and the velocity distribution of the kinetic model for quite strong inelasticity and not too large values of the (scaled) friction coefficient characterizing the viscous drag force. This shows the accuracy of our analytical results that allows us to describe in detail the flow dynamics of the granular sheared suspension. PMID:26651687

  7. Shear flow of angular grains: Acoustic effects and nonmonotonic rate dependence of volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieou, Charles K. C.; Elbanna, Ahmed E.; Langer, J. S.; Carlson, J. M.

    2014-09-01

    Naturally occurring granular materials often consist of angular particles whose shape and frictional characteristics may have important implications on macroscopic flow rheology. In this paper, we provide a theoretical account for the peculiar phenomenon of autoacoustic compaction—nonmonotonic variation of shear band volume with shear rate in angular particles—recently observed in experiments. Our approach is based on the notion that the volume of a granular material is determined by an effective-disorder temperature known as the compactivity. Noise sources in a driven granular material couple its various degrees of freedom and the environment, causing the flow of entropy between them. The grain-scale dynamics is described by the shear-transformation-zone theory of granular flow, which accounts for irreversible plastic deformation in terms of localized flow defects whose density is governed by the state of configurational disorder. To model the effects of grain shape and frictional characteristics, we propose an Ising-like internal variable to account for nearest-neighbor grain interlocking and geometric frustration and interpret the effect of friction as an acoustic noise strength. We show quantitative agreement between experimental measurements and theoretical predictions and propose additional experiments that provide stringent tests on the new theoretical elements.

  8. Shear flow induced wave couplings in the solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Poedts, S.; Rogava, A.D. |; Mahajan, S.M. |

    1998-01-01

    A sheared background flow in a plasma induces coupling between different MHD wave modes, resulting in their mutual transformations with corresponding energy redistributing between the modes. In this way, the energy can be transfered from one wave mode to the other, but energy can also be added to or extracted from the background flow. In the present paper it is investigated whether the wave coupling and energy transfer mechanisms can operate under solar wind conditions. It is shown that this is indeed the case. Hence, the long-period waves observed in the solar wind at r > 0.3 AU might be generated by much faster periodic oscillations in the photosphere of the Sun. Other possible consequences for observable beat phenomena in the wind and the acceleration of the solar wind particles are also discussed.

  9. Interfacial shear modeling in two-phase annular flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.; Edwards, D.P.

    1996-07-01

    A new interfacial shear stress model called the law of the interface model, based on the law of the wall approach in turbulent flows, has been developed and locally applied in a fully developed, adiabatic, two-phase annular flow in a duct. Numerical results have been obtained using this model in conjunction with other models available in the literature that are required for the closure of the continuity and momentum equations. These results have been compared with droplet velocity data (using laser Doppler velocimetry and hot film anemometry), void fraction data (using gamma densitometry) and pressure drop data obtained in a R-134A refrigerant test facility. Droplet velocity results match the experimental data well, however, the prediction of the void fraction is less accurate. The poor prediction of void fraction, especially for the low void fraction cases, appears to be due to the lack of a good mechanistic model for entrainment.

  10. Interfacial shear modeling in two-phase annular flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.; Edwards, D.P.

    1996-11-01

    A new interfacial shear stress model called the law of the interface model, based on the law of the wall approach in turbulent flows, has been developed and locally applied in a fully developed, adiabatic, two-phase annular flow in a duct. Numerical results have been obtained using this model in conjunction with other models available in the literature that are required for the closure of the continuity and momentum equations. These results have been compared with droplet velocity data (using laser Doppler velocimetry and hot film anemometry), void fraction data (using gamma densitometry) and pressure drop data obtained in a R-134A refrigerant test facility. Droplet velocity results match the experimental data well, however, the prediction of the void fraction is less accurate. The poor prediction of void fraction, especially for the low void fraction cases, appears to be due to the lack of a good mechanistic model for entrainment.

  11. A numerical study of bifurcations in a barotropic shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huerre, P.; Keefe, L. R.; Meunier, G.; Redekopp, L. G.; Spalart, P. R.; Rogers, M. M.

    1988-01-01

    In the last few years, more and more evidence has emerged suggesting that transition to turbulence may be viewed as a succession of bifurcations to deterministic chaos. Most experimental and numerical observations have been restricted to Rayleigh-Benard convection and Taylor-Couette flow between concentric cylinders. An attempt is made to accurately describe the bifurcation sequence leading to chaos in a 2-D temporal free shear layer on the beta-plane. The beta-plane is a locally Cartesian reduction of the equations describing the dynamicss of a shallow layer of fluid on a rotating spherical planet. It is a valid model for large scale flows of interest in meteorology and oceanography.

  12. Viscosity and Shear Flows in Magnetized Dusty Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Talamas, C. A.; Bates, E. M.; Birmingham, W. J.; Rivera, W. F.; Takeno, J.; Knop, S.

    2015-11-01

    Magnetized dusty plasma experiments are planned at the Dusty Plasma Laboratory of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), to investigate E x B rotation with dust of at least 500 nm in diameter. At this size, individual particles can be tracked and viscosity, shear flow, and temperature can be measured directly using a methodology similar to that used for linear shear flow configurations [Feng et al. PRL 109, 185002 (2012)]. The experiments are planned with a specially designed Bitter-type magnet that can be configured to achieve up to 10 T for at least 10 seconds, to minutes, with much longer operation times at lower fields also possible. At the highest field, the dust will be fully magnetized and thus we aim to achieve direct E x B rotation of the dust (and not just by ion drag). The motivation for these experiments comes from observations of electron and ion temperatures in excess of 100 eV in E x B rotating plasmas [R. Reid et al. Phys. Plasmas 21, 063305 (2014)]. The experimental setup and planned diagnostics for the magnetized dusty plasma are presented.

  13. Experimental investigations of the time and flow-direction responses of shear-stress-sensitive liquid crystal coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reda, Daniel C.; Muratore, Joseph J., Jr.; Heineck, James T.

    1993-01-01

    Time and flow-direction responses of shearstress-sensitive liquid crystal coatings were explored experimentally. For the time-response experiments, coatings were exposed to transient, compressible flows created during the startup and off-design operation of an injector-driven supersonic wind tunnel. Flow transients were visualized with a focusing Schlieren system and recorded with a 1000 frame/sec color video camera. Liquid crystal responses to these changing-shear environments were then recorded with the same video system, documenting color-play response times equal to, or faster than, the time interval between sequential frames (i.e., 1 millisecond). For the flow-direction experiments, a planar test surface was exposed to equal-magnitude and known-direction surface shear stresses generated by both normal and tangential subsonic jet-impingement flows. Under shear, the sense of the angular displacement of the liquid crystal dispersed (reflected) spectrum was found to be a function of the instantaneous direction of the applied shear. This technique thus renders dynamic flow reversals or flow divergences visible over entire test surfaces at image recording rates up to 1 KHz. Extensions of the technique to visualize relatively small changes in surface shear stress direction appear feasible.

  14. Dynamic shear behavior of alumina-filled epoxy

    SciTech Connect

    Costin, L.S.

    1982-03-01

    Thin-walled tubular specimens of alumina-filled epoxy were loaded in torsion at a strain rate of approximately 10/sup 3/ s/sup -1/ using a stored-torque Kolsky bar. In addition to measuring the time resolved shear stress and shear strain in the specimen, the axial stress generated by the dilation of the material during shear deformation was also obtained as a function of time. Tests were conducted at room temperature and at -60/sup 0/C. At room temperature, a moderate amount of plastic deformation occurred before failure. Material dilation was associated with the plastic flow. At -60/sup 0/C, there was a marked increase in failure stress over the failure stress at room temperature. However, little or no plastic deformation or dilation occurred before failure.

  15. Towards enhancing and delaying disturbances in free shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criminale, W. O.; Jackson, T. L.; Lasseigne, D. G.

    1994-01-01

    The family of shear flows comprising the jet, wake, and the mixing layer are subjected to perturbations in an inviscid incompressible fluid. By modeling the basic mean flows as parallel with piecewise linear variations for the velocities, complete and general solutions to the linearized equations of motion can be obtained in closed form as functions of all space variables and time when posed as an initial value problem. The results show that there is a continuous as well as the discrete spectrum that is more familiar in stability theory and therefore there can be both algebraic and exponential growth of disturbances in time. These bases make it feasible to consider control of such flows. To this end, the possibility of enhancing the disturbances in the mixing layer and delaying the onset in the jet and wake is investigated. It is found that growth of perturbations can be delayed to a considerable degree for the jet and the wake but, by comparison, cannot be enhanced in the mixing layer. By using moving coordinates, a method for demonstrating the predominant early and long time behavior of disturbances in these flows is given for continuous velocity profiles. It is shown that the early time transients are always algebraic whereas the asymptotic limit is that of an exponential normal mode. Numerical treatment of the new governing equations confirm the conclusions reached by use of the piecewise linear basic models. Although not pursued here, feedback mechanisms designed for control of the flow could be devised using the results of this work.

  16. Erosion and deposition of particles on a bed sheared by a viscous flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charru, F.; Mouilleron, H.; Eiff, O.

    2004-11-01

    Experiments are reported on the dynamics of a bed of particles sheared by a viscous Couette flow in an annular channel, with emphasis on the distributions of particle velocities, durations and lengths of the small saltation flights, and surface density of the moving particles. The velocity distributions are shown to decay approximately exponentially, with mean value, U_{p}, equal to 0.1 gamma d, where gamma is the shear rate and d is the particle diameter. The duration of the flights does not depend on the shear rate, and is equal to 15 times the settling time d/V_{S}, where V_{S} is the Stokes settling velocity. Starting from an initially loosely packed bed, the surface density of the moving particles, N_{p}, was observed to decrease slowly over several days, unlike their velocity which remains constant with time. This decay is related to the increase of the threshold shear rate for particle motion, and corresponds to rearrangement of the particles near the bed surface (armouring). When the stationary state is reached, N_{p} depends linearly on the shear rate, so that the particle flow rate, Q_{p} {=} N_{p}U_{p}, is a quadratic function of the shear rate. Two theoretical models are proposed to account for these observations. In the first one, the erosion and deposition rates are modelled using the two hydrodynamic time scales: the inverse shear rate gamma(-1) for the erosion rate, and the settling time d/V_{S} for the deposition rate. This model accounts for the linear dependence of N_{p} on the shear rate. The second model was developed to capture the slow decrease of N_{p}, by considering the trapping of moving particles into troughs of the bed. This trapping model does recover the main features observed experimentally, although the characteristic time for the decrease of N_{p} still remains too short. Our observations are, finally, compared to existing numerical and experimental studies on turbulent flows.

  17. Granular mass flows and Coulomb's friction in shear cell experiments: Implications for geophysical flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagnoli, B.; Manga, M.

    2004-12-01

    Granular mass flows of rock fragments are studied in the lab by means of a high-speed video camera at 2000 frames per second. These granular flows are generated using beds of pumice fragments positioned on a rough rotating disk, whose angular velocity is controlled by a motor. The experimental apparatus allows an understanding of the arrangement of the particles in granular mass flows with relatively small and relatively large values of the Savage number (the Savage number represents the ratio between grain collision stresses and gravitational grain contact stresses). In particular, these flows develop a basal layer of agitated and colliding particles underneath a relatively rigid upper layer. Our experimental results suggest the validity, on average, of the Coulomb's relationship between shear and normal forces at the base of granular mass flows irrespective of their Savage number value. In Coulomb's equation the shear stresses do not depend on the shear rate. We expect the Coulomb friction law to be valid also in moving pyroclastic flows. Our experiments suggest that the collisions and subsequent comminution of pumice fragments in moving pyroclastic flows could provide ash for the overriding ash clouds. In our experiments the amount of ash generated by particle-particle and particle-boundary interactions increases as the value of the Savage number increases. In nature, part of this ash may also simply move toward the base of the flows because of kinetic sieving.

  18. Azimuthal instability of the interface in a shear banded flow by direct visual observation.

    PubMed

    Decruppe, J P; Bécu, L; Greffier, O; Fazel, N

    2010-12-17

    The stability of the shear banded flow of a Maxwellian fluid is studied from an experimental point of view using rheology and flow visualization with polarized light. We show that the one-layer homogeneous flow cannot sustain shear rates corresponding to the end of the stress plateau. The high shear rate branch is not found and the shear stress oscillates at the end of the plateau. An azimuthal instability appears: the shear induced band becomes unstable and the interface between the two bands undulates in time and space with a period τ, a wavelength λ and a wave vector k parallel to the direction of the tangential velocity.

  19. Dynamic response of wall shear stress on the stenosed artery.

    PubMed

    Sen, S; Chakravarty, S

    2009-10-01

    The present study deals with an appropriate mathematical model of an artery in the presence of constriction in which the generated wall shear stress due to blood flow is analysed. The geometry of the stenosed arterial segment in the diseased state, causing malfunction of the cardiovascular system, is formed mathematically. The flowing blood contained in the stenosed artery is treated as non-Newtonian and the flow is considered to be two-dimensional. The motion of the arterial wall and its effect on local fluid mechanics is not ruled out from the present pursuit. The flow analysis applies the time-dependent, two-dimensional incompressible nonlinear Navier-Stokes equations for non-Newtonian fluids. The flow-field can be obtained primarily following the radial coordinate transformation, using the appropriate boundary conditions and finally adopting a suitable finite difference scheme numerically. The influences of flow unsteadiness, the arterial wall distensibility and the presence of stenosis on the flow-field and the wall shear stresses are quantified in order to indicate the susceptibility to atherosclerotic lesions and thereby to validate the applicability of the present theoretical model. PMID:19294542

  20. A new parallel plate shear cell for in situ real-space measurements of complex fluids under shear flow.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu Ling; Brand, Joost H J; van Gemert, Josephus L A; Verkerk, Jaap; Wisman, Hans; van Blaaderen, Alfons; Imhof, Arnout

    2007-10-01

    We developed and tested a parallel plate shear cell that can be mounted on top of an inverted microscope to perform confocal real-space measurements on complex fluids under shear. To follow structural changes in time, a plane of zero velocity is created by letting the plates move in opposite directions. The location of this plane is varied by changing the relative velocities of the plates. The gap width is variable between 20 and 200 microm with parallelism better than 1 microm. Such a small gap width enables us to examine the total sample thickness using high numerical aperture objective lenses. The achieved shear rates cover the range of 0.02-10(3) s(-1). This shear cell can apply an oscillatory shear with adjustable amplitude and frequency. The maximum travel of each plate equals 1 cm, so that strains up to 500 can be applied. For most complex fluids, an oscillatory shear with such a large amplitude can be regarded as a continuous shear. We measured the flow profile of a suspension of silica colloids in this shear cell. It was linear except for a small deviation caused by sedimentation. To demonstrate the excellent performance and capabilities of this new setup we examined shear induced crystallization and melting of concentrated suspensions of 1 microm diameter silica colloids.

  1. Evaluation of the time dependent surface shear stress in turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandborn, V. A.

    1979-01-01

    The time dependent surface shear stress has been evaluated using surface heat transfer measurements. For fully developed turbulent pipe and open channel water flows, and incompressible and compressible turbulent boundary layer air flows the measurements indicate the absolute magnitude of the surface shear stress fluctuations will be greater than two times the mean values. The root-mean-square shear stress fluctuations were of the order of 0.2 to 0.4 times the mean surface shear values. Due to these large surface shear stress fluctuations and the nonlinear relation between heat transfer and shear stress, a special technique has been developed to evaluate the measurements. It was found that the non-linear averaging errors for a hot film-surface shear stress gauge in a fully developed pipe flow was of the order of 10 percent at low velocities. A hot wire-surface shear stress gauge was employed for measurements of turbulent boundary layers in air.

  2. Multiscale modeling of mechanosensing channels on vesicles and cell membranes in 3D constricted flows and shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhangli; Pak, On Shun; Young, Yuan-Nan; Liu, Allen; Stone, Howard

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the gating of mechanosensing channels (Mscls) on vesicles and cell membranes under different flow conditions using a multiscale approach. At the cell level (microns), the membrane tension is calculated using a 3D two-component whole-cell membrane model based on dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), including the cortex cytoskeleton and its interactions with the lipid bilayer. At the Mscl level (nanometers), we predict the relation between channel gating and the membrane tension obtained from a cell-level model using a semi-analytical model based on the bilayer hydrophobic mismatch energy. We systematically study the gating of Mscls of vesicles and cell membranes in constricted channel flows and shear flows, and explore the dependence of the gating on flow rate, cell shape and size. The results provide guidance for future experiments in inducing Mscl opening for various purposes such as drug delivery.

  3. A technique for combined dynamic compression-shear test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, P. D.; Lu, F. Y.; Chen, R.; Lin, Y. L.; Li, J. L.; Lu, L.; Sun, G. L.

    2011-03-01

    It is critically important to study the dynamic response of materials under a combined compression-shear loading for developing constitutive laws more accurately and fully. We present a novel technique to achieve the combined compression and shear loadings at high strain rates. The main apparatus consists of a strike bar, an incident bar, and two transmission bars. The close-to-specimen end of the incident bar is wedge-shaped with 90°. In each experiment, there are two identical specimens, respectively, agglutinated between one side of the wedge and one of transmission bars. When a loading impulse travels to specimens along the incident bar, because of the special geometrical shape, the specimen-incident bar interface gets an axial and a transverse velocity. Specimens endure a combined compression-shear loading at high strain rates. The compression stress and strain of the specimens are deduced from signals recorded by strain gages mounted on the bars. The shear stress is measured by two piezoelectric transducers of quartz (Y-cut with rotation angle 17.7°) embedded at the close-to-specimen end of transmission bars; the shear strain is measured with a novel optical technique, which is based on the luminous flux method. An analytic model was proposed and validated by the numerical simulations. The simulation results yield good agreement with the analytic results. The proposed technique was then validated through experiments carried out on lead specimens, by comparing experimental results with that of the split Hopkinson pressure bar experiments.

  4. Influence of equilibrium shear flow on peeling-ballooning instability and edge localized mode crash

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, P. W.; Xu, X. Q.; Wang, X. G.; Xia, T. Y.

    2012-09-15

    The E Multiplication-Sign B shear flow plays a dual role on peeling-ballooning modes and their subsequently triggered edge localized mode (ELM) crashes. On one hand, the flow shear can stabilize high-n modes and twist the mode in the poloidal direction, constraining the mode's radial extent and reducing the size of the corresponding ELM. On the other hand, the shear flow also introduces the Kelvin-Helmholtz drive, which can destabilize peeling-ballooning modes. The overall effect of equilibrium shear flow on peeling-ballooning modes and ELM crashes depends on the competition between these two effects. When the flow shear is either small or very large, it can reduce ELM size. However, for moderate values of flow shear, the destabilizing effect from the Kelvin-Helmholtz term is dominant and leads to larger ELM crashes.

  5. Flow visualization and wall shear stress of a flapping model hummingbird wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanton, Erik W. M.; Vanier, Blake A.; Mohseni, Kamran

    2010-09-01

    The unsteady low Reynolds number aerodynamics of flapping flight was investigated experimentally through flow visualization by suspended particle imagery and wall shear stress measurement from micro-array hot-film anemometry. In conjunction, a mechanism was developed to create a flapping motion with three degrees of freedom and adjustable flapping frequency. The flapping kinematics and wing shape were selected for dynamic similarity to a hummingbird during hovering flight. Flow visualization was used to validate the anemometry observations of leading edge vortex (LEV) characteristics and to investigate the necessity of spanwise flow in LEV stability. The shear sensors determined LEV characteristics throughout the translation section of the stroke period for various wing speeds. It was observed that a minimum frequency between 2 and 3.5 Hz is required for the formation and stabilization of a LEV. The vortex strength peaked around 30% of the flapping cycle (corresponding to just past the translation midpoint), which agrees with results from previous studies conducted by others. The shear sensors also indicated a mild growth in LEV size during translation sections of the wing’s motion. This growth magnitude was nearly constant through a range of operating frequencies.

  6. A numerical and experimental study of a dynamic resonant shear stress sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu

    A new dynamic resonant wall shear stress sensor based on an oscillating sensor element operating near its resonant frequency has been investigated both numerically and experimentally. The experimental results of this study showed that, with a change in the mean shear stress acting on the sensor surface, measurable sensor sensitivity in the oscillation amplitude occurs for both open loop and closed loop control of the sensor. This is definitive experimental evidence that a resonant system can be made sensitive to wall shear stress and it is suggested that the concept of a dynamic resonant wall shear stress sensor would work. Furthermore, these results agree qualitatively with numerical results in boundary layer flow and provide a rigorous basis upon which further development of the dynamic resonant sensor can be pursued. At the same time, the sensor's working principle was numerically investigated and sensor parameters effects (oscillating amplitude, oscillating frequency; and sensor size), pressure gradient effects were also numerical estimated. In the end three dimensional effects that include aspect ratio effects, inflow angle effects and gap effects were also discussed by building three-dimensional dynamic models in Fluent.

  7. Numerical study of the phase separation in binary lipid membrane containing protein inclusions under stationary shear flow.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Bo; Shi, Hui-Ji; Niu, Li-Sha

    2009-03-26

    The phase separation of lipids is believed to be responsible for the formation of lipid rafts in biological cell membrane. In the present work, a continuum model and a particle model are constructed to study the phase separation in binary lipid membrane containing inclusions under stationary shear flow. In each model, employing the cell dynamical system (CDS) approach, the kinetic equations of the confusion-advection process are numerically solved. Snapshot figures of the phase morphology are performed to intuitively display such phase evolving process. Considering the effects from both the inclusions and the shear flow, the time growth law of the characteristic domain size is discussed.

  8. Variational necessary and sufficient stability conditions for inviscid shear flow

    PubMed Central

    Hirota, M.; Morrison, P. J.; Hattori, Y.

    2014-01-01

    A necessary and sufficient condition for linear stability of inviscid parallel shear flow is formulated by developing a novel variational principle, where the velocity profile is assumed to be monotonic and analytic. It is shown that unstable eigenvalues of Rayleigh's equation (which is a non-self-adjoint eigenvalue problem) can be associated with positive eigenvalues of a certain self-adjoint operator. The stability is therefore determined by maximizing a quadratic form, which is theoretically and numerically more tractable than directly solving Rayleigh's equation. This variational stability criterion is based on the understanding of Kreĭn signature for continuous spectra and is applicable to other stability problems of infinite-dimensional Hamiltonian systems. PMID:25484600

  9. Vlasov tokamak equilibria with sheared toroidal flow and anisotropic pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiroukidis, Ap; Throumoulopoulos, G. N.; Tasso, H.

    2015-08-15

    By choosing appropriate deformed Maxwellian ion and electron distribution functions depending on the two particle constants of motion, i.e., the energy and toroidal angular momentum, we reduce the Vlasov axisymmetric equilibrium problem for quasineutral plasmas to a transcendental Grad-Shafranov-like equation. This equation is then solved numerically under the Dirichlet boundary condition for an analytically prescribed boundary possessing a lower X-point to construct tokamak equilibria with toroidal sheared ion flow and anisotropic pressure. Depending on the deformation of the distribution functions, these steady states can have toroidal current densities either peaked on the magnetic axis or hollow. These two kinds of equilibria may be regarded as a bifurcation in connection with symmetry properties of the distribution functions on the magnetic axis.

  10. Dynamics of intrinsic axial flows in unsheared, uniform magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. C.; Diamond, P. H.; Xu, X. Q.; Tynan, G. R.

    2016-05-01

    A simple model for the generation and amplification of intrinsic axial flow in a linear device, controlled shear decorrelation experiment, is proposed. This model proposes and builds upon a novel dynamical symmetry breaking mechanism, using a simple theory of drift wave turbulence in the presence of axial flow shear. This mechanism does not require complex magnetic field structure, such as shear, and thus is also applicable to intrinsic rotation generation in tokamaks at weak or zero magnetic shear, as well as to linear devices. This mechanism is essentially the self-amplification of the mean axial flow profile, i.e., a modulational instability. Hence, the flow development is a form of negative viscosity phenomenon. Unlike conventional mechanisms where the residual stress produces an intrinsic torque, in this dynamical symmetry breaking scheme, the residual stress induces a negative increment to the ambient turbulent viscosity. The axial flow shear is then amplified by this negative viscosity increment. The resulting mean axial flow profile is calculated and discussed by analogy with the problem of turbulent pipe flow. For tokamaks, the negative viscosity is not needed to generate intrinsic rotation. However, toroidal rotation profile gradient is enhanced by the negative increment in turbulent viscosity.

  11. Linear and nonlinear effect of sheared plasma flow on resistive tearing modes

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Qiming Hu, Xiwei; Yu, Q.

    2014-12-15

    The effect of sheared plasma flow on the m/n = 2/1 tearing mode is studied numerically (m and n are the poloidal and toroidal mode numbers). It is found that in the linear phase the plasma flow with a weak or moderate shear plays a stabilizing effect on tearing mode. However, the mode is driven to be more unstable by sufficiently strong sheared flow when approaching the shear Alfvén resonance (AR). In the nonlinear phase, a moderate (strong) sheared flow leads to a smaller (larger) saturated island width. The stabilization of tearing modes by moderate shear plasma flow is enhanced for a larger plasma viscosity and a lower Alfvén velocity. It is also found that in the nonlinear phase AR accelerates the plasma rotation around the 2/1 rational surface but decelerates it at the AR location, and the radial location satisfying AR spreads inwards towards the magnetic axis.

  12. Tension of red blood cell membrane in simple shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omori, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Barthès-Biesel, D.; Salsac, A.-V.; Imai, Y.; Yamaguchi, T.

    2012-11-01

    When a red blood cell (RBC) is subjected to an external flow, it is deformed by the hydrodynamic forces acting on its membrane. The resulting elastic tensions in the membrane play a key role in mechanotransduction and govern its rupture in the case of hemolysis. In this study, we analyze the motion and deformation of an RBC in a simple shear flow and the resulting elastic tensions on the membrane. The large deformation of the red blood cell is modelled by coupling a finite element method to solve the membrane mechanics and a boundary element method to solve the flows of the internal and external liquids. Depending on the capillary number Ca, ratio of the viscous to elastic forces, we observe three kinds of RBC motion: tumbling at low Ca, swinging at larger Ca, and breathing at the transitions. In the swinging regime, the region of the high principal tensions periodically oscillates, whereas that of the high isotropic tensions is almost unchanged. Due to the strain-hardening property of the membrane, the deformation is limited but the membrane tension increases monotonically with the capillary number. We have quantitatively compared our numerical results with former experimental results. It indicates that a membrane isotropic tension O(10-6 N/m) is high enough for molecular release from RBCs and that the typical maximum membrane principal tension for haemolysis would be O(10-4 N/m). These findings are useful to clarify not only the membrane rupture but also the mechanotransduction of RBCs.

  13. Steady State Erosion of Granular Particles by Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Benjamin; Kudrolli, Arshad

    2015-11-01

    Despite decades of scientific observation of rivers, streams and laboratory experiments the process of erosion still is not understood. Empirical fits are used to determine when erosion starts with more than an order of magnitude scatter or a shifting power law determining how much material erodes away. In order to study the many body problem of multiple particles we first need to understand the basics of a single particle eroding from a potential well in laminar flow. Using different particle densities and different barrier heights we looked at the onset of erosion and the balance of forces and torques to create a predictive model of when a single particle will erode over a barrier of a given height as a function of shear rate and viscosity. We then create a steady state system in which to image erosion as it happens and simultaneously measure flow velocity and particle movement. Measuring particle movement allows us to determine when steady state erosion occurs and calculate the fluxes and slip velocities at the beginning of the erosion process as we transition from rolling particles to particles suspended in the fluid flow. NSF Grant Number CBET 1335928.

  14. Velocity and shear rate estimates of some non-Newtonian oscillatory flows in tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutev, N.; Tabakova, S.; Radev, S.

    2016-10-01

    The two-dimensional Newtonian and non-Newtonian (Carreau viscosity model used) oscillatory flows in straight tubes are studied theoretically and numerically. The corresponding analytical solution of the Newtonian flow and the numerical solution of the Carreau viscosity model flow show differences in velocity and shear rate. Some estimates for the velocity and shear rate differences are theoretically proved. As numerical examples the blood flow in different type of arteries and the polymer flow in pipes are considered.

  15. Numerical simulation of the phase separation in binary lipid membrane under the effect of stationary shear flow.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Bo; Niu, Li-Sha; Shi, Hui-Ji

    2008-06-01

    A numerical simulation of the phase separation in binary lipid membrane under the effect of stationary shear flow is performed. We numerically solved the modified two-dimensional time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau (TDGL) equations with an external velocity term, employing the CDS (i.e., Cell Dynamical System) technique. In the present simulation, stationary shear flows with different shear rates are taken into account. The evolution process of the phase separation is illustrated macroscopically via the snapshot figures and simulated scattering patterns at several typical moments. For each case, the growth exponents of the characteristic domain sizes in both directions parallel and perpendicular to the flow are studied, and the domain area as well. Also, the behavior of the excess viscosity has been investigated, which is a peculiar rheological indicator of such a membrane system with domain structures.

  16. Investigation of the Swimming and Flagellar Dynamics of Shear guided Motile Alga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chengala, Anwar; Hondzo, Miki; Sheng, Jian

    2011-11-01

    We examine the behavior of force-free swimming cell in a shear flow having spheroidal bodies with two flagella located at the anterior part of the cell that uses breast-like motion for its propulsion. The cell, Dunaliella primolecta, displays a unique behavior of propelling along the local vorticity direction in a linear shear flow. The cell rotation is absent during this display and the flagella beating is observed to be asynchronous. The forces and moments generated by the flagella are estimated numerically. Based on the Resistive Force Theory approach, we attempt to demonstrate that the moments generated by beating flagella and their alignment to flow are necessary to counter-act the vorticity of the flow. In addition, we explore the various mechanisms that cell may use to re-orient while in a shear flow as well as how critical the variations in the flagellar beating pattern are to a cell's swimming dynamics. NSF (No: CBET-0844647), Minnesota Futures Grant.

  17. Two dimensional mechanical correlation analysis on nonlinear oscillatory shear flow of yield stress fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kai; Wang, Jun; Yu, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Large amplitude oscillation shear (LAOS) is used to investigate the yielding and flow behavior of yield stress materials. Considering the problems in determination of the yield stress from the apparent dynamic moduli and relative harmonic intensity using Fourier Transform Rheology, we proposed a new approach based on 2D mechanical correlation spectra (2D-MCS) to quantify the yield stress. We have proved that the nonlinear synchronous self-correlation intensity as functions of stress/strain amplitude can be used to determine the yield stress unambiguously from the change of scaling exponent. The yield stresses from 2D-MCS analysis are well consistent with those from the stress ramp experiments.

  18. EFFECT OF ION B DRIFT DIRECTION ON TURBULENCE FLOW AND FLOW SHEAR

    SciTech Connect

    FENZI,C; McKEE,G.R; BURRELL,K.H; CARLSTROM,T.N; FONCK,R.J; GROEBNER,R.J

    2003-07-01

    The divertor magnetic geometry has a significant effect on the poloidal flow and resulting flow shear of turbulence in the outer region of L-mode tokamak plasmas, as determined via two-dimensional measurements of density fluctuations with Beam Emission Spectroscopy on DIII-D. Plasmas with similar parameters, except that in one case the ion {del}B drift points towards the divertor X-point (lower single-null, LSN), and in the other case, the ion {del}B drift points away from the divertor X-point (upper single-null, USN), are compared. Inside of r/a=0.9, the turbulence characteristics (amplitude, flow direction, correlation lengths) are similar in both cases, while near r/a=0.92, a dramatic reversal of the poloidal flow of turbulence relative to the core flow direction is observed in plasmas with the ion {del}B drift pointing towards the divertor X-point. No such flow reversal is observed in plasmas with the ion {del}B drift pointing away from the divertor X-point. This poloidal flow reversal results in a significantly larger local shear in the poloidal turbulence flow velocity in plasmas with the ion {del}B drift pointing towards the divertor X-point. Additionally, these plasmas locally exhibit significant dispersion, with two distinct and counter-propagating turbulence modes. Likewise, the radial correlation length of the turbulence is reduced in these plasmas, consistent with biorthogonal decomposition measurements of dominant turbulence structures. The naturally occurring turbulence flow shear in these LSN plasmas may facilitate the LH transition that occurs at an input power of roughly one-half to one-third that of corresponding plasmas with the ion {del}B drift pointing away from the X-point.

  19. Cooperativity flows and shear-bandings: a statistical field theory approach.

    PubMed

    Benzi, R; Sbragaglia, M; Bernaschi, M; Succi, S; Toschi, F

    2016-01-14

    Cooperativity effects have been proposed to explain the non-local rheology in the dynamics of soft jammed systems. Based on the analysis of the free-energy model proposed by L. Bocquet, A. Colin and A. Ajdari, Phys. Rev. Lett., 2009, 103, 036001, we show that cooperativity effects resulting from the non-local nature of the fluidity (inverse viscosity) are intimately related to the emergence of shear-banding configurations. This connection materializes through the onset of inhomogeneous compact solutions (compactons), wherein the fluidity is confined to finite-support subregions of the flow and strictly zero elsewhere. The compacton coexistence with regions of zero fluidity ("non-flowing vacuum") is shown to be stabilized by the presence of mechanical noise, which ultimately shapes up the equilibrium distribution of the fluidity field, the latter acting as an order parameter for the flow-noflow transitions occurring in the material. PMID:26486875

  20. Measurements of energy spectra in two-dimensional turbulence with sheared mean flow.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, P. W.; Kearney-Fischer, M.; Rogers, S.; Windell, S.

    2006-11-01

    Measurements of forced turbulence in the presence of mean flow shear in quasi-two-dimensional flows in a circular Couette cell are underway. Initial observations indicate suppression of the turbulence by the shear, as suggested by observations of transport barriers in geostrophic flows and laboratory fusion plasmas. The apparatus generates flows in a liquid film of dilute soap solution suspended freely in a horizontal annular channel. The channel is 7 cm wide with an average radius of 46.5 cm. Turbulence is forced electromagnetically, while mean flow shear is generated independently by rotating the outer boundary. The mean sheared flow profiles provide a new method of estimating the coefficient of drag between the films and the air; the result, ˜9 s-1, is compared with estimates from other soap film experiments using different techniques. Two-dimensional turbulence spectra are measured using particle imaging velocimetry, and data showing the effect of shear on the spectrum are presented.

  1. Unsteady turbulent shear flow in shock tube discontinuities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. A., III; Ramaiah, R.; Lin, I.

    1981-01-01

    A pressure-ruptured shock tube and an arc driven shock tube, have been used to study the evolution of turbulent fluctuations at contact surfaces with N2O4-2NO2 mixtures and at ionizing shock fronts in argon. The study has focused on point density diagnostics derived from crossed light beam correlations and electric probes. Turbulent bursts are found for which dynamical and spectral analyses suggest a particle-like evolution of fluctuation segments with a unique and characteristic frequency, independent of flow history and overall flow conditions.

  2. Sediment transport and shear stress partitioning in a vegetated flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bouteiller, Caroline; Venditti, J. G.

    2015-04-01

    Vegetation is a common feature in natural coastal and riverine water ways, interacting with both the water flow and sediment transport. However, the physical processes governing these interactions are still poorly understood, which makes it difficult to predict sediment transport and morphodynamics in a vegetated environment. We performed a simple experiment to study how sediment transport responds to the presence of flexible, single-blade vegetation, and how this response is influenced by the vegetation density. We found that the skin friction and sediment transport are reduced in a plant patch, and that this effect is larger for denser vegetation. We then evaluated several methods to calculate the skin friction in a vegetated flow, which is the key to sediment transport prediction. Among these, the inversion of bed load transport formulas and the Einstein and Banks (1950) methods appeared to produce the most reasonable values of the skin friction. Finally, we suggest using the parameter α, which is the ratio of the skin friction computed by these methods to the total bed shear stress, to make more realistic sediment transport predictions in morphodynamic models.

  3. Dynamic mechanoelectrochemistry of polypyrrole membranes via shear-force tracking.

    PubMed

    Northcutt, Robert G; Heinemann, Christian; Sundaresan, Vishnu Baba

    2016-07-14

    Mechanoelectrochemistry is the study of elastic and plastic deformation of materials during reversible reduction and oxidation processes. In this article, we introduce shear-force tracking as a method to dynamically measure mechanical (strain), chemical (ion transport), and electrical (applied redox potentials) responses of the conducting polymer polypyrrole (PPy) during redox reactions. This tracking technique uses a control algorithm to maintain a set distance between a ultramicroelectrode (UME) tip and a surface via shear-force regulation. Due to the sensitivity of shear-force signals in the near field of substrate surfaces, a significantly improved signal to noise ratio (20 : 1) is possible and allows for nanoscale measurement of redox events. Chemomechanical coupling (the ratio of ion transport to resultant extensional actuation) is calculated for PPy-based membranes of various thicknesses based on a mechanistic interpretation of charge storage in redox active conducting polymers. The measured dynamic response demonstrates that chemomechanical coupling is not a constant, as assumed in literature, but is dependent on the polymers state of charge and the direction (ingress/egress) of ion transport. PMID:27263628

  4. Shear flow destabilization of a slowly rotating tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, M. S.

    1998-01-01

    The Kelvin-Helmholtz destabilizing effect of shear in toroidal rotation on ideal magnetohydrodynamic localized interchange is studied in a tokamak with a general geometry. The method of maximizing the growth rate given by Frieman and Rotenberg is utilized. An explicit stability criterion is given for a slowly rotating tokamak with a non-negligible shearing rate in its rotation profile. It is found that rotation shear can weaken the stabilizing effect of the magnetic field shear and also allow the coupling of the sound wave to the shear Alfvén wave which destabilizes the plasma.

  5. Review of passive shear-flow control research for improved subsonic and supersonic combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Schadow, K.C.; Gutmark, E.

    1989-01-01

    Shear-flow investigations have been conducted in the high-Re, turbulent initial-condition combustion regime representative of flow configurations encountered in ramjets and in supersonic plumes. Large-scale vortical structures were identified and characterized in both nonreacting and combustion-reaction experimental conditions; attention was given to these structures' role in mixing, and their breakup into fine-scale turbulence. Shear-flow/combustion control was obtained by actively enlisting duct acoustics and passively employing noncircular flow cross-sections. The investigations were extended to supersonic shear flows, yielding improved mixing for supersonic combustion. 44 refs.

  6. Shear flow driven Rossby-Khantadze electromagnetic planetary vortices in the ionospheric E-layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaladze, T. D.; Kahlon, L. Z.; Horton, W.; Pokhotelov, O.; Onishchenko, O.

    2014-04-01

    A system of equations describing the nonlinear interaction of coupled Rossby-Khantadze electromagnetic waves with a sheared zonal flow in the Earth's ionospheric E-layer is obtained. For the linear regime the corresponding region of phase velocities is analyzed and the appropriate stability condition of zonal flow is deduced. It is shown that the sheared zonal flow may excite solitary vortical structures in the form of a row of counter-rotating vortices whose amplitudes decrease with the increase of the zonal flow parameter. This conclusion is consistent with the stabilizing idea of a sheared zonal flow. The possibility of an intense magnetic-field generation is shown.

  7. Electrical percolation networks of carbon nanotubes in a shear flow.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Gyemin; Heo, Youhee; Shin, Kwanwoo; Sung, Bong June

    2012-01-01

    The effect of shear on the electrical percolation network of carbon nanotube (CNT)-polymer composites is investigated using computer simulations. Configurations of CNTs in a simple shear, obtained by using Monte Carlo simulations, are used to locate the electrical percolation network of CNTs and calculate the electric conductivity. When exposed to the shear, CNTs align parallel to the shear direction and the electrical percolation threshold CNT concentration decreases. Meanwhile, after a certain period of the shear imposition above a critical shear rate, CNTs begin to form an aggregate and the percolating network of CNTs is broken, thus decreasing the electric conductivity significantly. We also construct quasiphase diagrams for the aggregate formation and the electrical percolation network formation to investigate the effect of the shear rate and CNT concentration. PMID:22400548

  8. The role of Poiseuille flow in creating depth-variation of asthenospheric shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarov, Svetlana I.; Conrad, Clinton P.

    2012-09-01

    Asthenospheric flow accommodates differential shear between plate and mantle motions (Couette flow) and hosts additional flow driven by horizontal pressure gradients (Poiseuille flow) that may be associated with mantle upwelling and subduction. Large uncertainties in the upper mantle flow field and its rheological structure have thus far hindered our ability to constrain the relative importance of Couette and Poiseuille flows in the asthenosphere. However, quantifying the relative contributions of asthenospheric Couette and Poiseuille flows and determining the pattern of their distribution around the globe could help discriminate among competing theories of asthenospheric origin and shed light on thermal history of the Earth. We propose a new method to quantify asthenospheric Poiseuille flow using observations of the depth-dependence of azimuthal seismic anisotropy, which can be obtained from frequency-dependent surface wave tomography models. In particular, we employ a simple 1-D Couette-Poiseuille flow model and analytically solve for depth-profiles of the strain axis orientations, which approximates the orientations of azimuthal seismic anisotropy. We show that Couette-Poiseuille flow induces rotation of azimuthal seismic anisotropy with depth provided that the horizontal pressure gradient has a component transverse to plate motion. We then construct an algorithm that uses depth rotations of azimuthal anisotropy to invert for horizontal pressure gradients everywhere in the asthenosphere and test it on a global numerical mantle flow model. A comparison of pressure gradients predicted using our method with those computed directly from the numerical model shows that our algorithm is stable and accurate, unless the pressure gradient is nearly parallel to plate motion. Applying this method to seismic data will require additional constraints on asthenospheric geometry and viscosity structure. In the numerical model, we establish that Poiseuille flow drives ˜40 per

  9. Vortex Dynamics and Shear-Layer Instability in High-Intensity Cyclotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerfon, Antoine J.

    2016-04-01

    We show that the space-charge dynamics of high-intensity beams in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field in cyclotrons is described by the two-dimensional Euler equations for an incompressible fluid. This analogy with fluid dynamics gives a unified and intuitive framework to explain the beam spiraling and beam breakup behavior observed in experiments and in simulations. Specifically, we demonstrate that beam breakup is the result of a classical instability occurring in fluids subject to a sheared flow. We give scaling laws for the instability and predict the nonlinear evolution of beams subject to it. Our work suggests that cyclotrons may be uniquely suited for the experimental study of shear layers and vortex distributions that are not achievable in Penning-Malmberg traps.

  10. Vortex Dynamics and Shear-Layer Instability in High-Intensity Cyclotrons.

    PubMed

    Cerfon, Antoine J

    2016-04-29

    We show that the space-charge dynamics of high-intensity beams in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field in cyclotrons is described by the two-dimensional Euler equations for an incompressible fluid. This analogy with fluid dynamics gives a unified and intuitive framework to explain the beam spiraling and beam breakup behavior observed in experiments and in simulations. Specifically, we demonstrate that beam breakup is the result of a classical instability occurring in fluids subject to a sheared flow. We give scaling laws for the instability and predict the nonlinear evolution of beams subject to it. Our work suggests that cyclotrons may be uniquely suited for the experimental study of shear layers and vortex distributions that are not achievable in Penning-Malmberg traps. PMID:27176525

  11. Influence of equilibrium shear flow in the parallel magnetic direction on edge localized mode crash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Y.; Chen, S. Y.; Huang, J.; Xiong, Y. Y.; Tang, C. J.

    2016-04-01

    The influence of the parallel shear flow on the evolution of peeling-ballooning (P-B) modes is studied with the BOUT++ four-field code in this paper. The parallel shear flow has different effects in linear simulation and nonlinear simulation. In the linear simulations, the growth rate of edge localized mode (ELM) can be increased by Kelvin-Helmholtz term, which can be caused by the parallel shear flow. In the nonlinear simulations, the results accord with the linear simulations in the linear phase. However, the ELM size is reduced by the parallel shear flow in the beginning of the turbulence phase, which is recognized as the P-B filaments' structure. Then during the turbulence phase, the ELM size is decreased by the shear flow.

  12. Succeed escape: Flow shear promotes tumbling of Escherichia colinear a solid surface

    PubMed Central

    Molaei, Mehdi; Sheng, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how bacteria move close to a surface under various stimuli is crucial for a broad range of microbial processes including biofilm formation, bacterial transport and migration. While prior studies focus on interactions between single stimulus and bacterial suspension, we emphasize on compounding effects of flow shear and solid surfaces on bacterial motility, especially reorientation and tumble. We have applied microfluidics and digital holographic microscopy to capture a large number (>105) of 3D Escherichia coli trajectories near a surface under various flow shear. We find that near-surface flow shear promotes cell reorientation and mitigates the tumble suppression and re-orientation confinement found in a quiescent flow, and consequently enhances surface normal bacterial dispersion. Conditional sampling suggests that two complimentary hydrodynamic mechanisms, Jeffrey Orbit and shear-induced flagella unbundling, are responsible for the enhancement in bacterial tumble motility. These findings imply that flow shear may mitigate cell trapping and prevent biofilm initiation. PMID:27752062

  13. A comparative numerical analysis of linear and nonlinear aerodynamic sound generation by vortex disturbances in homentropic constant shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Hau, Jan-Niklas Oberlack, Martin; Chagelishvili, George; Khujadze, George; Tevzadze, Alexander

    2015-12-15

    Aerodynamic sound generation in shear flows is investigated in the light of the breakthrough in hydrodynamics stability theory in the 1990s, where generic phenomena of non-normal shear flow systems were understood. By applying the thereby emerged short-time/non-modal approach, the sole linear mechanism of wave generation by vortices in shear flows was captured [G. D. Chagelishvili, A. Tevzadze, G. Bodo, and S. S. Moiseev, “Linear mechanism of wave emergence from vortices in smooth shear flows,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 3178-3181 (1997); B. F. Farrell and P. J. Ioannou, “Transient and asymptotic growth of two-dimensional perturbations in viscous compressible shear flow,” Phys. Fluids 12, 3021-3028 (2000); N. A. Bakas, “Mechanism underlying transient growth of planar perturbations in unbounded compressible shear flow,” J. Fluid Mech. 639, 479-507 (2009); and G. Favraud and V. Pagneux, “Superadiabatic evolution of acoustic and vorticity perturbations in Couette flow,” Phys. Rev. E 89, 033012 (2014)]. Its source is the non-normality induced linear mode-coupling, which becomes efficient at moderate Mach numbers that is defined for each perturbation harmonic as the ratio of the shear rate to its characteristic frequency. Based on the results by the non-modal approach, we investigate a two-dimensional homentropic constant shear flow and focus on the dynamical characteristics in the wavenumber plane. This allows to separate from each other the participants of the dynamical processes — vortex and wave modes — and to estimate the efficacy of the process of linear wave-generation. This process is analyzed and visualized on the example of a packet of vortex modes, localized in both, spectral and physical, planes. Further, by employing direct numerical simulations, the wave generation by chaotically distributed vortex modes is analyzed and the involved linear and nonlinear processes are identified. The generated acoustic field is anisotropic in the wavenumber

  14. A comparative numerical analysis of linear and nonlinear aerodynamic sound generation by vortex disturbances in homentropic constant shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hau, Jan-Niklas; Chagelishvili, George; Khujadze, George; Oberlack, Martin; Tevzadze, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    Aerodynamic sound generation in shear flows is investigated in the light of the breakthrough in hydrodynamics stability theory in the 1990s, where generic phenomena of non-normal shear flow systems were understood. By applying the thereby emerged short-time/non-modal approach, the sole linear mechanism of wave generation by vortices in shear flows was captured [G. D. Chagelishvili, A. Tevzadze, G. Bodo, and S. S. Moiseev, "Linear mechanism of wave emergence from vortices in smooth shear flows," Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 3178-3181 (1997); B. F. Farrell and P. J. Ioannou, "Transient and asymptotic growth of two-dimensional perturbations in viscous compressible shear flow," Phys. Fluids 12, 3021-3028 (2000); N. A. Bakas, "Mechanism underlying transient growth of planar perturbations in unbounded compressible shear flow," J. Fluid Mech. 639, 479-507 (2009); and G. Favraud and V. Pagneux, "Superadiabatic evolution of acoustic and vorticity perturbations in Couette flow," Phys. Rev. E 89, 033012 (2014)]. Its source is the non-normality induced linear mode-coupling, which becomes efficient at moderate Mach numbers that is defined for each perturbation harmonic as the ratio of the shear rate to its characteristic frequency. Based on the results by the non-modal approach, we investigate a two-dimensional homentropic constant shear flow and focus on the dynamical characteristics in the wavenumber plane. This allows to separate from each other the participants of the dynamical processes — vortex and wave modes — and to estimate the efficacy of the process of linear wave-generation. This process is analyzed and visualized on the example of a packet of vortex modes, localized in both, spectral and physical, planes. Further, by employing direct numerical simulations, the wave generation by chaotically distributed vortex modes is analyzed and the involved linear and nonlinear processes are identified. The generated acoustic field is anisotropic in the wavenumber plane, which

  15. Experimental Studies of the Interaction Between a Parallel Shear Flow and a Directionally-Solidifying Front

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Meng; Maxworthy, Tony

    1999-01-01

    It has long been recognized that flow in the melt can have a profound influence on the dynamics of a solidifying interface and hence the quality of the solid material. In particular, flow affects the heat and mass transfer, and causes spatial and temporal variations in the flow and melt composition. This results in a crystal with nonuniform physical properties. Flow can be generated by buoyancy, expansion or contraction upon phase change, and thermo-soluto capillary effects. In general, these flows can not be avoided and can have an adverse effect on the stability of the crystal structures. This motivates crystal growth experiments in a microgravity environment, where buoyancy-driven convection is significantly suppressed. However, transient accelerations (g-jitter) caused by the acceleration of the spacecraft can affect the melt, while convection generated from the effects other than buoyancy remain important. Rather than bemoan the presence of convection as a source of interfacial instability, Hurle in the 1960s suggested that flow in the melt, either forced or natural convection, might be used to stabilize the interface. Delves considered the imposition of both a parabolic velocity profile and a Blasius boundary layer flow over the interface. He concluded that fast stirring could stabilize the interface to perturbations whose wave vector is in the direction of the fluid velocity. Forth and Wheeler considered the effect of the asymptotic suction boundary layer profile. They showed that the effect of the shear flow was to generate travelling waves parallel to the flow with a speed proportional to the Reynolds number. There have been few quantitative, experimental works reporting on the coupling effect of fluid flow and morphological instabilities. Huang studied plane Couette flow over cells and dendrites. It was found that this flow could greatly enhance the planar stability and even induce the cell-planar transition. A rotating impeller was buried inside the

  16. Lubrication analysis of interacting rigid cylindrical particles in confined shear flow

    SciTech Connect

    Cardinaels, R.; Stone, H. A.

    2015-07-15

    Lubrication analysis is used to determine analytical expressions for the elements of the resistance matrix describing the interaction of two rigid cylindrical particles in two-dimensional shear flow in a symmetrically confined channel geometry. The developed model is valid for non-Brownian particles in a low-Reynolds-number flow between two sliding plates with thin gaps between the two particles and also between the particles and the walls. Using this analytical model, a comprehensive overview of the dynamics of interacting cylindrical particles in shear flow is presented. With only hydrodynamic interactions, rigid particles undergo a reversible interaction with no cross-streamline migration, irrespective of the confinement value. However, the interaction time of the particle pair substantially increases with confinement, and at the same time, the minimum distance between the particle surfaces during the interaction substantially decreases with confinement. By combining our purely hydrodynamic model with a simple on/off non-hydrodynamic attractive particle interaction force, the effects of confinement on particle aggregation are qualitatively mapped out in an aggregation diagram. The latter shows that the range of initial relative particle positions for which aggregation occurs is increased substantially due to geometrical confinement. The interacting particle pair exhibits tangential and normal lubrication forces on the sliding plates, which will contribute to the rheology of confined suspensions in shear flow. Due to the combined effects of the confining walls and the particle interaction, the particle velocities and resulting forces both tangential and perpendicular to the walls exhibit a non-monotonic evolution as a function of the orientation angle of the particle pair. However, by incorporating appropriate scalings of the forces, velocities, and doublet orientation angle with the minimum free fraction of the gap height and the plate speed, master curves for

  17. Flow restrictive and shear reducing effect of magnetization relaxation in ferrofluid cavity flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Chamkor; Das, Arup Kumar; Das, Prasanta Kumar

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we report the effects of a uniform stationary magnetic field on the flow of ferrofluid (FF) inside a boundary driven cavity. A coupled set of conservation equations for the flow field, the Maxwell's magnetostatic equations, and the constitutive magnetization equation are solved numerically. The non-dimensional groups primarily influencing the phenomenon are first systematically identified through the normalization of the complete set of equations. We find the magnetization relaxation effects, under the stationary uniform field, to be flow restrictive in nature. The misalignment between the local magnetic field and the magnetization suppresses the vorticity field in the cavity, shifts the primary central vortex, and reduces the average shear stress at the boundaries. As a consequence, it becomes apparent that at a given Reynolds number, the application of uniform magnetic field can reduce the shear drag at the boundaries of the cavity, of course at an expense of reduced flow rate in their vicinity. Our study uniquely reveals that the relaxation time effects are dominant in the regions of ferrofluid flow where the change in the magnitude of the vorticity takes place over a length scale which is much smaller than the characteristic length scale of the flow geometry. Depending on the magnitudes of influencing parameters, the solution exhibits anomalous characteristics, such as creeping and saturating behavior.

  18. A global view of shear wave splitting and mantle flow in subduction systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Maureen; Silver, Paul; Hanna, Jenny; Wirth, Erin; Kincaid, Chris; Montesi, Laurent

    2010-05-01

    The character of the mantle flow field in subduction zone regions remains poorly understood, despite its importance for our understanding of subduction dynamics. Observations of seismic anisotropy, which manifests itself in shear wave splitting, can shed light on the geometry of mantle flow in subduction zones, but placing constraints on anisotropy in various parts of the subduction system (including the overriding plate, the mantle wedge, the subducting slab, and the sub-slab mantle) remains challenging from an observational point of view. In order to identify dynamic processes that make first-order contributions to the pattern of mantle flow in subduction zones, we analyze a global compilation of shear wave splitting measurements for a variety of ray paths, including SK(K)S and teleseismic S phases as well as local S and source-side splitting from slab earthquakes. Key challenges associated with assembling such a compilation include correctly assessing and accounting for any dependence of local S splitting parameters on frequency and correctly characterizing any contribution to SKS splitting measurements from anisotropy within the subducting slab that is unrelated to active mantle flow. We present local case studies from the Japan and Izu-Bonin-Marianas subduction zones that explore frequency-dependent splitting due to heterogeneous anisotropy in the mantle wedge and that use a variety of raypath combinations to isolate the contribution from anisotropy within the slab. Keeping these results in mind, we have compiled shear wave splitting measurements from subduction zones globally from the literature and from our own work to produce estimates of average shear wave splitting parameters - and their spatial variation - for the mantle wedge and the sub-wedge region for individual subduction segments. These estimates are then compared to other parameters that describe subduction. The sub-wedge splitting signal is relatively simple and is dominated by trench

  19. Theory to Predict Shear Stress on Cells in Turbulent Blood Flow

    PubMed Central

    Morshed, Khandakar Niaz; Bark Jr., David; Forleo, Marcio; Dasi, Lakshmi Prasad

    2014-01-01

    Shear stress on blood cells and platelets transported in a turbulent flow dictates the fate and biological activity of these cells. We present a theoretical link between energy dissipation in turbulent flows to the shear stress that cells experience and show that for the case of physiological turbulent blood flow: (a) the Newtonian assumption is valid, (b) turbulent eddies are universal for the most complex of blood flow problems, and (c) shear stress distribution on turbulent blood flows is possibly universal. Further we resolve a long standing inconsistency in hemolysis between laminar and turbulent flow using the theoretical framework. This work demonstrates that energy dissipation as opposed to bulk shear stress in laminar or turbulent blood flow dictates local mechanical environment of blood cells and platelets universally. PMID:25171175

  20. Experimental and computational validation of Hele-Shaw stagnation flow with varying shear stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tefft, Brandon J.; Kopacz, Adrian M.; Liu, Wing Kam; Liu, Shu Q.

    2013-12-01

    An in vitro flow model system with continuous variation of fluid shear stress can be used to test cell responses to a range of shear stresses. In this investigation, we validated such a flow system computationally for steady and unsteady flow conditions and experimentally for steady flow conditions. The unsteady flow validation is important for studying cells such as endothelial cells that experience unsteady flow conditions in their native environment. The system is capable of exposing cells in different regions of the chamber to steady or unsteady shear stress conditions with average values ranging linearly from 0 to 30 dyn/cm. These tests and analyses demonstrate that the variable-width parallel plate flow system can be used to test the influence of a range of steady and unsteady fluid shear stress levels on cell activities.

  1. Theory to predict shear stress on cells in turbulent blood flow.

    PubMed

    Morshed, Khandakar Niaz; Bark, David; Forleo, Marcio; Dasi, Lakshmi Prasad

    2014-01-01

    Shear stress on blood cells and platelets transported in a turbulent flow dictates the fate and biological activity of these cells. We present a theoretical link between energy dissipation in turbulent flows to the shear stress that cells experience and show that for the case of physiological turbulent blood flow: (a) the Newtonian assumption is valid, (b) turbulent eddies are universal for the most complex of blood flow problems, and (c) shear stress distribution on turbulent blood flows is possibly universal. Further we resolve a long standing inconsistency in hemolysis between laminar and turbulent flow using the theoretical framework. This work demonstrates that energy dissipation as opposed to bulk shear stress in laminar or turbulent blood flow dictates local mechanical environment of blood cells and platelets universally.

  2. Dynamics of shear layers at the interface of a highly porous medium and a pure fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniadis, P. D.; Papalexandris, M. V.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report on shear flows in domains that contain a macroscopic interface between a highly porous medium and a pure fluid. Our study is based on the single-domain approach, according to which, the same set of governing equations is employed for both inside the porous medium and in the pure-fluid domain. In particular, we introduce a mathematical model for the flows of interest that is derived directly from a continuum theory for fluid-saturated granular materials. The resulting set of equations is a variation of the well-known unsteady Darcy-Brinkman model. First, we employ this model to perform a linear stability analysis of inviscid shear layers over a highly porous medium. Our analysis shows that such layers are unconditionally unstable. Next, we present results from numerical simulations of temporally evolving shear layers in both two and three dimensions. The simulations are performed via a recently designed algorithm that employs a predictor-corrector time-marching scheme and a projection method for the computation of the pressure field on a collocated grid. According to our numerical predictions, the onset of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability leads to the formation of vortices that extend to both sides of the material interface, thus producing substantial recirculation inside the porous medium. These vortices eventually merge, leading to significant growth of the shear layer and, in three dimensional flows, transition to turbulence. The dynamics of the shear layers, including growth rate and self-similarity, is presented and analysed. Finally, the structure of these layers is described in detail and compared to the one of plain mixing layers.

  3. Dynamic jamming under impact in shear thickening suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Shomeek

    2015-03-01

    Shear thickening fluids such as cornstarch and water show remarkable impact response allowing, for example, a person to run on the surface. We perform constant velocity impact experiments and imaging in shear thickening fluids at velocities lower than 500 mm/s and suspension heights of a few cm. In this regime where inertial effects are insignificant, we find that fronts with a dynamically jammed (DJ) region behind it are generated under impact. When this front and the DJ region reaches the opposite boundary it is able to support large stresses like a solid. These stresses are sufficient to support the weight of a running person. In addition we find a shear thickening transition under impact due to collision of the fronts with the boundary. There is a critical velocity required to generate these impact activated fronts. Using the observations on fronts, DJ region and using energy balance arguments we construct a model to explain the phenomena of running on the surface of cornstarch suspensions. The model shows quantitative agreement with our measurements using high-speed video of running on cornstarch and water suspensions. Supported by NSF DMR 1410157.

  4. Binary mixtures of rod-like colloids under shear: microscopically-based equilibrium theory and order-parameter dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lugo-Frías, Rodrigo; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2016-06-22

    This paper is concerned with the dynamics of a binary mixture of rod-like, repulsive colloidal particles driven out of equilibrium by means of a steady shear flow (Couette geometry). To this end we first derive, starting from a microscopic density functional in Parsons-Lee approximation, a mesoscopic free energy functional whose main variables are the orientational order parameter tensors. Based on this mesoscopic functional we then explore the stability of isotropic and nematic equilibrium phases in terms of composition and rod lengths. Second, by combining the equilibrium theory with the Doi-Hess approach for the order parameter dynamics under shear, we investigate the orientational dynamics of binary mixtures for a range of shear rates and coupling parameters. We find a variety of dynamical states, including synchronized oscillatory states of the two components, but also symmetry breaking behavior where the components display different in-plane oscillatory states.

  5. Binary mixtures of rod-like colloids under shear: microscopically-based equilibrium theory and order-parameter dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lugo-Frías, Rodrigo; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2016-06-22

    This paper is concerned with the dynamics of a binary mixture of rod-like, repulsive colloidal particles driven out of equilibrium by means of a steady shear flow (Couette geometry). To this end we first derive, starting from a microscopic density functional in Parsons-Lee approximation, a mesoscopic free energy functional whose main variables are the orientational order parameter tensors. Based on this mesoscopic functional we then explore the stability of isotropic and nematic equilibrium phases in terms of composition and rod lengths. Second, by combining the equilibrium theory with the Doi-Hess approach for the order parameter dynamics under shear, we investigate the orientational dynamics of binary mixtures for a range of shear rates and coupling parameters. We find a variety of dynamical states, including synchronized oscillatory states of the two components, but also symmetry breaking behavior where the components display different in-plane oscillatory states. PMID:27115342

  6. Binary mixtures of rod-like colloids under shear: microscopically-based equilibrium theory and order-parameter dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugo-Frías, Rodrigo; Klapp, Sabine H. L.

    2016-06-01

    This paper is concerned with the dynamics of a binary mixture of rod-like, repulsive colloidal particles driven out of equilibrium by means of a steady shear flow (Couette geometry). To this end we first derive, starting from a microscopic density functional in Parsons-Lee approximation, a mesoscopic free energy functional whose main variables are the orientational order parameter tensors. Based on this mesoscopic functional we then explore the stability of isotropic and nematic equilibrium phases in terms of composition and rod lengths. Second, by combining the equilibrium theory with the Doi-Hess approach for the order parameter dynamics under shear, we investigate the orientational dynamics of binary mixtures for a range of shear rates and coupling parameters. We find a variety of dynamical states, including synchronized oscillatory states of the two components, but also symmetry breaking behavior where the components display different in-plane oscillatory states.

  7. Shear thinning effects on blood flow in straight and curved tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherry, Erica M.; Eaton, John K.

    2013-07-01

    Simulations were performed to determine the magnitude and types of errors one can expect when approximating blood in large arteries as a Newtonian fluid, particularly in the presence of secondary flows. This was accomplished by running steady simulations of blood flow in straight and curved tubes using both Newtonian and shear-thinning viscosity models. In the shear-thinning simulations, the viscosity was modeled as a shear rate-dependent function fit to experimental data. Simulations in straight tubes were modeled after physiologically relevant arterial flows, and flow parameters for the curved tube simulations were chosen to examine a variety of secondary flow strengths. The diameters ranged from 1 mm to 10 mm and the Reynolds numbers from 24 to 1500. Pressure and velocity data are reported for all simulations. In the straight tube simulations, the shear-thinning flows had flattened velocity profiles and higher pressure gradients compared to the Newtonian simulations. In the curved tube flows, the shear-thinning simulations tended to have blunted axial velocity profiles, decreased secondary flow strengths, and decreased axial vorticity compared to the Newtonian simulations. The cross-sectionally averaged pressure drops in the curved tubes were higher in the shear-thinning flows at low Reynolds number but lower at high Reynolds number. The maximum deviation in secondary flow magnitude averaged over the cross sectional area was 19% of the maximum secondary flow and the maximum deviation in axial vorticity was 25% of the maximum vorticity.

  8. Asymmetric magnetic reconnection with out-of-plane shear flows in a two dimensional hybrid model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lin; Wang, Xiao-Gang; Wang, Xian-Qu; Liu, Yue

    2015-05-15

    Effects of out-of-plane shear flows on asymmetric magnetic reconnect are investigated in a two-dimensional (2D) hybrid model with an initial Harris sheet equilibrium. It is found that the out-of-plane flow with an in-plane shear can significantly change the asymmetric reconnection process as well as the related geometry. The magnetic flux, out-of-plane magnetic field, in-plane flow vorticity, plasma density, and the reconnection rate are discussed in detail. The results are in comparison with the cases without the shear flows to further understand the effect.

  9. Off-plane motion of a non-spherical capsule in simple shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omori, Toshihiro; Ishikawa, Takuji; Imai, Yohsuke; Yamaguchi, Takami

    2012-11-01

    Dynamics of a capsule and a biological cell in fluid flow is now of great interest in chemical engineering and bioengineering. In this study, we numerically investigated the motion of a spheroid capsule in simple shear flow including a red blood cell type biconcave disk. The membrane of a capsule was modeled by a two-dimensional hyperelastic material, and its large deformation was solved by a finite element method. The motion of internal and external liquids was estimated as a Stokes flow and solved by a boundary element method. The results showed that the orientation of a spheroid capsule is variant under time reversal, though that of a rigid spheroid is invariant. The final orientation of a spheroid capsule over a long time duration tends to converge to a certain direction depending on the shear rate despite initial placement with random orientation. These results can be utilized for a particle alignment technique and form a fundamental basis of the suspension mechanics of capsules and biological cells.

  10. Drift and pseudomomentum in bounded turbulent shear flows.

    PubMed

    Phillips, W R C

    2015-10-01

    This paper is concerned with the evaluation of two Lagrangian measures which arise in oscillatory or fluctuating shear flows when the fluctuating field is rotational and the spectrum of wave numbers which comprise it is continuous. The measures are the drift and pseudomomentum. Phillips [J. Fluid Mech. 430, 209 (2001)] has shown that the measures are, in such instances, succinctly expressed in terms of Lagrangian integrals of Eulerian space-time correlations. But they are difficult to interpret, and the present work begins by expressing them in a more insightful form. This is achieved by assuming the space-time correlations are separable as magnitude, determined by one-point velocity correlations, and spatial diminution. The measures then parse into terms comprised of the mean Eulerian velocity, one-point velocity correlations, and a family of integrals of spatial diminution, which in turn define a series of Lagrangian time and velocity scales. The pseudomomentum is seen to be strictly negative and related to the turbulence kinetic energy, while the drift is mixed and strongly influenced by the Reynolds stress. Both are calculated for turbulent channel flow for a range of Reynolds numbers and appear, as the Reynolds number increases, to approach a terminal form. At all Reynolds numbers studied, the pseudomomentum has a sole peak located in wall units in the low teens, while at the highest Reynolds number studied, Re(τ)=5200, the drift is negative in the vicinity of that peak, positive elsewhere, and largest near the rigid boundary. In contrast, the time and velocity scales grow almost logarithmically over much of the layer. Finally, the drift and pseudomomentum are discussed in the context of coherent wall layer structures with which they are intricately linked. PMID:26565328

  11. Drift and pseudomomentum in bounded turbulent shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, W. R. C.

    2015-10-01

    This paper is concerned with the evaluation of two Lagrangian measures which arise in oscillatory or fluctuating shear flows when the fluctuating field is rotational and the spectrum of wave numbers which comprise it is continuous. The measures are the drift and pseudomomentum. Phillips [J. Fluid Mech. 430, 209 (2001), 10.1017/S0022112000002858] has shown that the measures are, in such instances, succinctly expressed in terms of Lagrangian integrals of Eulerian space-time correlations. But they are difficult to interpret, and the present work begins by expressing them in a more insightful form. This is achieved by assuming the space-time correlations are separable as magnitude, determined by one-point velocity correlations, and spatial diminution. The measures then parse into terms comprised of the mean Eulerian velocity, one-point velocity correlations, and a family of integrals of spatial diminution, which in turn define a series of Lagrangian time and velocity scales. The pseudomomentum is seen to be strictly negative and related to the turbulence kinetic energy, while the drift is mixed and strongly influenced by the Reynolds stress. Both are calculated for turbulent channel flow for a range of Reynolds numbers and appear, as the Reynolds number increases, to approach a terminal form. At all Reynolds numbers studied, the pseudomomentum has a sole peak located in wall units in the low teens, while at the highest Reynolds number studied, Reτ=5200 , the drift is negative in the vicinity of that peak, positive elsewhere, and largest near the rigid boundary. In contrast, the time and velocity scales grow almost logarithmically over much of the layer. Finally, the drift and pseudomomentum are discussed in the context of coherent wall layer structures with which they are intricately linked.

  12. Disturbed flow mediated modulation of shear forces on endothelial plane: A proposed model for studying endothelium around atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Balaguru, Uma Maheswari; Sundaresan, Lakshmikirupa; Manivannan, Jeganathan; Majunathan, Reji; Mani, Krishnapriya; Swaminathan, Akila; Venkatesan, Saravanakumar; Kasiviswanathan, Dharanibalan; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2016-01-01

    Disturbed fluid flow or modulated shear stress is associated with vascular conditions such as atherosclerosis, thrombosis, and aneurysm. In vitro simulation of the fluid flow around the plaque micro-environment remains a challenging approach. Currently available models have limitations such as complications in protocols, high cost, incompetence of co-culture and not being suitable for massive expression studies. Hence, the present study aimed to develop a simple, versatile model based on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation. Current observations of CFD have shown the regions of modulated shear stress by the disturbed fluid flow. To execute and validate the model in real sense, cell morphology, cytoskeletal arrangement, cell death, reactive oxygen species (ROS) profile, nitric oxide production and disturbed flow markers under the above condition were assessed. Endothelium at disturbed flow region which had been exposed to low shear stress and swirling flow pattern showed morphological and expression similarities with the pathological disturbed flow environment reported previously. Altogether, the proposed model can serve as a platform to simulate the real time micro-environment of disturbed flow associated with eccentric plaque shapes and the possibilities of studying its downstream events. PMID:27255968

  13. Disturbed flow mediated modulation of shear forces on endothelial plane: A proposed model for studying endothelium around atherosclerotic plaques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaguru, Uma Maheswari; Sundaresan, Lakshmikirupa; Manivannan, Jeganathan; Majunathan, Reji; Mani, Krishnapriya; Swaminathan, Akila; Venkatesan, Saravanakumar; Kasiviswanathan, Dharanibalan; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2016-06-01

    Disturbed fluid flow or modulated shear stress is associated with vascular conditions such as atherosclerosis, thrombosis, and aneurysm. In vitro simulation of the fluid flow around the plaque micro-environment remains a challenging approach. Currently available models have limitations such as complications in protocols, high cost, incompetence of co-culture and not being suitable for massive expression studies. Hence, the present study aimed to develop a simple, versatile model based on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation. Current observations of CFD have shown the regions of modulated shear stress by the disturbed fluid flow. To execute and validate the model in real sense, cell morphology, cytoskeletal arrangement, cell death, reactive oxygen species (ROS) profile, nitric oxide production and disturbed flow markers under the above condition were assessed. Endothelium at disturbed flow region which had been exposed to low shear stress and swirling flow pattern showed morphological and expression similarities with the pathological disturbed flow environment reported previously. Altogether, the proposed model can serve as a platform to simulate the real time micro-environment of disturbed flow associated with eccentric plaque shapes and the possibilities of studying its downstream events.

  14. Disturbed flow mediated modulation of shear forces on endothelial plane: A proposed model for studying endothelium around atherosclerotic plaques

    PubMed Central

    Balaguru, Uma Maheswari; Sundaresan, Lakshmikirupa; Manivannan, Jeganathan; Majunathan, Reji; Mani, Krishnapriya; Swaminathan, Akila; Venkatesan, Saravanakumar; Kasiviswanathan, Dharanibalan; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2016-01-01

    Disturbed fluid flow or modulated shear stress is associated with vascular conditions such as atherosclerosis, thrombosis, and aneurysm. In vitro simulation of the fluid flow around the plaque micro-environment remains a challenging approach. Currently available models have limitations such as complications in protocols, high cost, incompetence of co-culture and not being suitable for massive expression studies. Hence, the present study aimed to develop a simple, versatile model based on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation. Current observations of CFD have shown the regions of modulated shear stress by the disturbed fluid flow. To execute and validate the model in real sense, cell morphology, cytoskeletal arrangement, cell death, reactive oxygen species (ROS) profile, nitric oxide production and disturbed flow markers under the above condition were assessed. Endothelium at disturbed flow region which had been exposed to low shear stress and swirling flow pattern showed morphological and expression similarities with the pathological disturbed flow environment reported previously. Altogether, the proposed model can serve as a platform to simulate the real time micro-environment of disturbed flow associated with eccentric plaque shapes and the possibilities of studying its downstream events. PMID:27255968

  15. Interfacial shear stress in stratified flow in a horizontal rectangular duct

    SciTech Connect

    Lorencez, C.; Kawaji, M.; Murao, Y.

    1995-09-01

    Interfacial shear stress has been experimentally examined for both cocurrent and countercurrent stratified wavy flows in a horizontal interfacial shear stress from the measurements were examined and the results have been compared with existing correlations. Some differences were found in the estimated interfacial shear stress from the measurements were examined and the results have been compared with existing correlations. Some differences were found in the estimated interfacial shear stress values at high gas flow rates which could be attributed to the assumptions and procedures involved in each method. The interfacial waves and secondary motions were also found to have significant effects on the accuracy of Reynolds stress and turbulence kinetic energy extrapolation methods.

  16. Direct numerical simulation of statistically stationary and homogeneous shear turbulence and its relation to other shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekimoto, Atsushi; Dong, Siwei; Jiménez, Javier

    2016-03-01

    Statistically stationary and homogeneous shear turbulence (SS-HST) is investigated by means of a new direct numerical simulation code, spectral in the two horizontal directions and compact-finite-differences in the direction of the shear. No remeshing is used to impose the shear-periodic boundary condition. The influence of the geometry of the computational box is explored. Since HST has no characteristic outer length scale and tends to fill the computational domain, long-term simulations of HST are "minimal" in the sense of containing on average only a few large-scale structures. It is found that the main limit is the spanwise box width, Lz, which sets the length and velocity scales of the turbulence, and that the two other box dimensions should be sufficiently large (Lx ≳ 2Lz, Ly ≳ Lz) to prevent other directions to be constrained as well. It is also found that very long boxes, Lx ≳ 2Ly, couple with the passing period of the shear-periodic boundary condition, and develop strong unphysical linearized bursts. Within those limits, the flow shows interesting similarities and differences with other shear flows, and in particular with the logarithmic layer of wall-bounded turbulence. They are explored in some detail. They include a self-sustaining process for large-scale streaks and quasi-periodic bursting. The bursting time scale is approximately universal, ˜20S-1, and the availability of two different bursting systems allows the growth of the bursts to be related with some confidence to the shearing of initially isotropic turbulence. It is concluded that SS-HST, conducted within the proper computational parameters, is a very promising system to study shear turbulence in general.

  17. Measurements of Shear Lift Force on a Bubble in Channel Flow in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Motil, Brian J.; Skor, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Under microgravity conditions, the shear lift force acting on bubbles, droplets or solid particles in multiphase flows becomes important because under normal gravity, this hydrodynamic force is masked by buoyancy. This force plays an important role in furnishing the detachment process of bubbles in a setting where a bubble suspension is needed in microgravity. In this work, measurements of the shear lift force acting on a bubble in channel flow are performed. The shear lift force is deduced from the bubble kinematics using scaling and then compared with predictions from models in literature that address different asymptotic and numerical solutions. Basic trajectory calculations are then performed and the results are compared with experimental data of position of the bubble in the channel. A direct comparison of the lateral velocity of the bubbles is also made with the lateral velocity prediction from investigators, whose work addressed the shear lift on a sphere in different two-dimensional shear flows including Poiseuille flow.

  18. Subsonic and Supersonic shear flows in laser driven high-energy-density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, E. C.; Drake, R. P.; Gillespie, R. S.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Kuranz, C. C.; Visco, A.; Ditmar, J. R.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Weaver, J. L.; Velikovich, A. L.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hansen, J. F.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Bono, M. J.; Plewa, T.

    2009-05-01

    Shear flows arise in many high-energy-density (HED) and astrophysical systems, yet few laboratory experiments have been carried out to study their evolution in these extreme environments. Fundamentally, shear flows can initiate mixing via the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability and may eventually drive a transition to turbulence. We present two dedicated shear flow experiments that created subsonic and supersonic shear layers in HED plasmas. In the subsonic case the Omega laser was used to drive a shock wave along a rippled plastic interface, which subsequently rolled-upped into large KH vortices. In the supersonic shear experiment the Nike laser was used to drive Al plasma across a low-density foam surface also seeded with a ripple. Unlike the subsonic case, detached shocks developed around the ripples in response to the supersonic Al flow.

  19. Shear flow induced nanostructure-micostructure transition in a polymeric bicontinuous microemulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Kasiraman; Bates, Frank S.; Lodge, Timothy P.; Burghardt, Wesley R.

    2001-03-01

    The effects of shear flow on a polymeric bicontinuous microemulsion have been studied using scattering, microscopy and rheology. The microemulsion consists of a ternary blend of poly(ethyl ethylene) (PEE), poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) and the diblock copolymer PEE-PDMS. Steady shear experiments reveal four regimes as a function of shear rate. At low shear rates (regime I), the bicontinuous nanostructure is unperturbed and the sample behaves as a Newtonian fluid. Shear thinning is observed at intermediate shear rates (regime II) concurrent with the development of anisotropy in the structure. Further increase of shear rate results in flow-induced phase separation; the stress is independent of shear rate in this regime III. Light scattering shows a streak-like pattern perpendicular to the flow direction while microscopy reveals a string-like, micron-sized morphology. Higher shear rates (regime IV) lead to binary blend-like behavior with the block copolymer playing no significant role; the stress increases strongly with the shear rate.

  20. Sheared E×B flow and plasma turbulence viscosity in a Reversed Field Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vianello, N.; Antoni, V.; Spada, E.; Spolaore, M.; Serianni, G.; Regnoli, G.; Zuin, M.; Cavazzana, R.; Bergsåker, H.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.

    2004-11-01

    The relationship between electromagnetic turbulence and sheared plasma flow in Reversed Field Pinch configuration is addressed. The momentum balance equation for a compressible plasma is considered and the terms involved are measured in the outer region of Extrap-T2R RFP device. It results that electrostatic fluctuations determine the plasma flow through the electrostatic component of Reynolds Stress tensor. This term involves spatial and temporal scales comparable to those of MHD activity. The derived experimental perpendicular viscosity is consistent with anomalous diffusion, the latter being discussed in terms of electrostatic turbulence background and coherent structures emerging from fluctuations. The results indicate a dynamical interplay between turbulence, anomalous transport and mean E×B profiles. The momentum balance has been studied also in non-stationary condition during the application of Pulsed Poloidal Current Drive, which is known to reduce the amplitude of MHD modes.

  1. Theory for modeling the equatorial evening ionosphere and the origin of the shear in the horizontal plasma flow

    SciTech Connect

    Haerendel, G.; Eccles, J.V.; Cakir, S. )

    1992-02-01

    Companion papers in this series present (1) the role of equatorial E region postsunset ionosphere, (2) the origin of horizontal plasma shear flow in the postsunset equatorial ionosphere (this paper), (3) the Colored Bubbles experiments results, and (4) computer simulations of artificial initiation of plasma density depletions (bubbles) in the equatorial ionosphere. Within this paper, equations describing the time evolution of the equatorial ionosphere are developed using flux tube integrated and flux tube weighted quantities which model the chemistry, dynamics, and electrodynamics of the equatorial ionosphere. The resulting two-dimensional set of equations can be used to investigate equatorial ionosphere. The resulting two-dimensional set of equations can be used to investigate equatorial electric fields neglecting small-scale phenomena ({lambda} < 1 km). An immediate result derived from the integrated current equations is an equation describing the physics of the shear in the horizontal flow of the equatorial plasma during the evening hours. The profile of the horizontal flow has three important contributing terms relating to the neutral wind dynamo, Hall conduction, and the equatorial electrojet current divergence. Using a one-dimensional model of the velocity shear equation and the integrated ionosphere transport equations, a time history of the development of the shear feature during postsunset hours is presented. The one-dimensional model results are compared to the velocity shear measurements from the Colored Bubbles experiments.

  2. The structure and dynamics of coherent vortex tubes in rotating shear turbulence of zero-mean-absolute vorticity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Mitsuru; Yanase, Shinichiro

    2010-05-01

    The effect of the system rotation on shear flow turbulence is one of the central issues of fluid mechanics in relation to geophysical and astrophysical phenomena as well as engineering applications such as turbo machinery, so is still being vigorously investigated. If a turbulent shear flow is rotated as a whole about the axis parallel to the mean-shear vorticity, the flow structure is significantly influenced by the magnitude and direction of vorticity associated with the mean shear relative to those of the system rotation. The flow field is called either cyclonic or anti-cyclonic accordingly as vorticities associated with the mean shear and the system rotation are parallel or anti-parallel. Turbulence has a tendency to keep its two-dimensional structure along the system rotation both for cyclonic and for an anti-cyclonic regions for rapid system rotation, whereas the two-dimensional structure is unstable and easily broken down to three-dimensional in an anti-cyclonic region if the system rotation is relatively slow to the mean-shear vorticity. If the flow field is anti-cyclonic and the mean-shear vorticity cancels out that of the system rotation, the mean absolute vorticity is zero in the flow field, and then it is called the zero-mean-absolute-vorticity state (ZAVS). ZAVS, which is neutral to the above-mentioned instability, is observed in many rotating shear flow turbulence. One of the most remarkable features of ZAVS turbulence is the generation of very coherent quasi-streamwise vortex tubes which are not observed in other cases of rotating or nonrotating turbulence. Though the importance of the role of vortex tubes in shear flow turbulence is generally recognized, it is not easy to study their dynamics due to the interactions between vortex tubes and vortex-shear layers which are generated from the background mean-shear vorticity. In ZAVS, on the other hand, it is rather easy to investigate vortex tubes in turbulence because they are stable and long

  3. Theoretical Analysis of Shear Wave Interference Patterns by Means of Dynamic Acoustic Radiation Forces.

    PubMed

    Hoyt, Kenneth

    2011-03-01

    Acoustic radiation forces associated with high intensity focused ultrasound stimulate shear wave propagation allowing shear wave speed and shear viscosity estimation of tissue structures. As wave speeds are meters per second, real time displacement tracking over an extend field-of-view using ultrasound is problematic due to very high frame rate requirements. However, two spatially separated dynamic external sources can stimulate shear wave motion leading to shear wave interference patterns. Advantages are shear waves can be imaged at lower frame rates and local interference pattern spatial properties reflect tissue's viscoelastic properties. Here a theoretical analysis of shear wave interference patterns by means of dynamic acoustic radiation forces is detailed. Using a viscoelastic Green's function analysis, tissue motion due to a pair of focused ultrasound beams and associated radiation forces are presented. Overall, this paper theoretically demonstrates shear wave interference patterns can be stimulated using dynamic acoustic radiation forces and tracked using conventional ultrasound imaging.

  4. The Dynamics of Flowing Waters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattingly, Rosanna L.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a series of activities designed to help students understand the dynamics of flowing water. Includes investigations into determining water discharge, calculating variable velocities, utilizing flood formulas, graphing stream profiles, and learning about the water cycle. (TW)

  5. Turbulent kinetic energy production and flow structures in compressible homogeneous shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zongqiang; Xiao, Zuoli

    2016-09-01

    The production of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and flow structures in compressible homogeneous turbulent shear flow (HTSF) are investigated by using direct numerical simulation. A theoretical analysis suggests that the vertical turbulent transport process should be responsible for the production of TKE in HTSF. It is manifested based on a conditional average method that the pure TKE production becomes increasingly larger in strain regions than in vortex regions of the flow. The velocity-derivative correlation in the shear plane is employed to identify the streaky structures in HTSF, which also tend to occur predominantly in strain regions of turbulence. Localized analyses of conditional averages reveal that the streaky structures in compressible HTSF are closely related to the negative productions of TKE. A comparative study implies that flow compressibility has a considerable effect on the spatial distributions and patterns of the strain- and vortex-dominated fields, which in turn cause the discrepancies in distribution of the TKE production and streaky structures between incompressible and compressible HTSFs.

  6. Dynamic transverse shear modulus for a heterogeneous fluid-filled porous solid containing cylindrical inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yongjia; Hu, Hengshan; Rudnicki, John W.; Duan, Yunda

    2016-06-01

    An exact analytical solution is presented for the effective dynamic transverse shear modulus in a heterogeneous fluid-filled porous solid containing cylindrical inclusions. The complex and frequency-dependent properties of the dynamic shear modulus are caused by the physical mechanism of mesoscopic-scale wave-induced fluid flow whose scale is smaller than wavelength but larger than the size of pores. Our model consists of three phases: a long cylindrical inclusion, a cylindrical shell of poroelastic matrix material with different mechanical and/or hydraulic properties than the inclusion and an outer region of effective homogeneous medium of laterally infinite extent. The behavior of both the inclusion and the matrix is described by Biot's consolidation equations, whereas the surrounding effective medium which is used to describe the effective transverse shear properties of the inner poroelastic composite is assumed to be a viscoelastic solid whose complex transverse shear modulus needs to be determined. The determined effective transverse shear modulus is used to quantify the S-wave attenuation and velocity dispersion in heterogeneous fluid-filled poroelastic rocks. The calculation shows the relaxation frequency and relative position of various fluid saturation dispersion curves predicted by this study exhibit very good agreement with those of a previous two-dimensional finite-element simulation. For the double-porosity model (inclusions having a different solid frame than the matrix but the same pore fluid as the matrix) the effective shear modulus also exhibits a size-dependent characteristic that the relaxation frequency moves to lower frequencies by two orders of magnitude if the radius of the cylindrical poroelastic composite increases by one order of magnitude. For the patchy-saturation model (inclusions having the same solid frame as the matrix but with a different pore fluid from the matrix), the heterogeneity in pore fluid cannot cause any attenuation in

  7. Dynamic transverse shear modulus for a heterogeneous fluid-filled porous solid containing cylindrical inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yongjia; Hu, Hengshan; Rudnicki, John W.; Duan, Yunda

    2016-09-01

    An exact analytical solution is presented for the effective dynamic transverse shear modulus in a heterogeneous fluid-filled porous solid containing cylindrical inclusions. The complex and frequency-dependent properties of the dynamic shear modulus are caused by the physical mechanism of mesoscopic-scale wave-induced fluid flow whose scale is smaller than wavelength but larger than the size of pores. Our model consists of three phases: a long cylindrical inclusion, a cylindrical shell of poroelastic matrix material with different mechanical and/or hydraulic properties than the inclusion and an outer region of effective homogeneous medium of laterally infinite extent. The behavior of both the inclusion and the matrix is described by Biot's consolidation equations, whereas the surrounding effective medium which is used to describe the effective transverse shear properties of the inner poroelastic composite is assumed to be a viscoelastic solid whose complex transverse shear modulus needs to be determined. The determined effective transverse shear modulus is used to quantify the S-wave attenuation and velocity dispersion in heterogeneous fluid-filled poroelastic rocks. The calculation shows the relaxation frequency and relative position of various fluid saturation dispersion curves predicted by this study exhibit very good agreement with those of a previous 2-D finite-element simulation. For the double-porosity model (inclusions having a different solid frame than the matrix but the same pore fluid as the matrix) the effective shear modulus also exhibits a size-dependent characteristic that the relaxation frequency moves to lower frequencies by two orders of magnitude if the radius of the cylindrical poroelastic composite increases by one order of magnitude. For the patchy-saturation model (inclusions having the same solid frame as the matrix but with a different pore fluid from the matrix), the heterogeneity in pore fluid cannot cause any attenuation in the

  8. Dynamics and electrorheology of sheared immiscible fluid mixtures.

    PubMed

    Sakaue, Takahiro; Shitara, Kyohei; Ohta, Takao

    2014-05-01

    We analyze the electrorheological effect in immiscible fluid mixtures with dielectric mismatch. By taking the electric field effect into account, which couples to the dynamics of domain morphology under flow, we propose a set of electrorheological constitutive equations valid under the condition where the relative magnitude of the flow field is stronger than that of the electric field. Through comparison with recent experiments, we point out a unique dynamical stress response inherent in situations where the cross-coupling between different fields is essential.

  9. Surface-enhanced unfolding of collapsed polymers in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander-Katz, A.; Netz, R. R.

    2007-10-01

    Using hydrodynamic simulations we study the shear-induced unfolding of a collapsed polymer near a planar wall. Above a well-defined threshold shear rate \\dot{\\gamma}^* , the globule becomes unstable and displays stretching-refolding events. With decreasing distance from the surface, the critical shear rate \\dot{\\gamma}^* goes down, which is rationalized within a scaling analysis in terms of increased hydrodynamic stress due to a surface-induced slowing-down of globule rotation and translation. Our results are relevant for protein-assisted blood clotting in capillary vessels.

  10. The stability of dissipative magnetohydrodynamic shear flow in a parallel magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerner, J.; Knobloch, E.

    1985-01-01

    The linear stability properties of dissipative field-aligned shear flow are described analytically. The results are used to calculate the decay bounds of linearized perturbations occurring in unbounded planes of Couette flow in a parallel magnetic field. It is shown that the perturbations associated with small-amplitude localized disturbances may take the form of rolls along the shear, and exhibit ordinary potential decay, while misaligned perturbations exhibit enhanced decay in the presence of dissipation. A decay criterion is established for MHD shear flow in an accretion disk on the basis of the analytical results.

  11. The production of premixed flame surface area in turbulent shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trouve, A.

    1993-01-01

    In the present work, we use three-dimensional Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of premixed flames in turbulent shear flow to characterize the effect of a mean shear motion on flame surface production. The shear is uniform in the unburnt gas, and simulations are performed for different values of the mean shear rate, S. The data base is then used to estimate and compare the different terms appearing in the Sigma-equation as a function of S. The analysis gives in particular the relative weights f the turbulent flow and mean flow components, a(sub T) and A(sub T), of the flame surface production term. This comparison indicates whether the dominant effects of a mean flow velocity gradient on flame surface area are implicit and scale with the modified turbulent flow parameters, kappa and epsilon, or explicit and scale directly with the rate of deformation.

  12. Fluctuation-induced shear flow and energy transfer in plasma interchange turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Li, B.; Sun, C. K.; Wang, X. Y.; Zhou, A.; Wang, X. G.; Ernst, D. R.

    2015-11-15

    Fluctuation-induced E × B shear flow and energy transfer for plasma interchange turbulence are examined in a flux-driven system with both closed and open magnetic field lines. The nonlinear evolution of interchange turbulence shows the presence of two confinement regimes characterized by low and high E × B flow shear. In the first regime, the large-scale turbulent convection is dominant and the mean E × B shear flow is at a relatively low level. By increasing the heat flux above a certain threshold, the increased turbulent intensity gives rise to the transfer of energy from fluctuations to mean E × B flows. As a result, a transition to the second regime occurs, in which a strong mean E × B shear flow is generated.

  13. Parallel-plate flow chamber and continuous flow circuit to evaluate endothelial progenitor cells under laminar flow shear stress.

    PubMed

    Lane, Whitney O; Jantzen, Alexandra E; Carlon, Tim A; Jamiolkowski, Ryan M; Grenet, Justin E; Ley, Melissa M; Haseltine, Justin M; Galinat, Lauren J; Lin, Fu-Hsiung; Allen, Jason D; Truskey, George A; Achneck, Hardean E

    2012-01-01

    The overall goal of this method is to describe a technique to subject adherent cells to laminar flow conditions and evaluate their response to well quantifiable fluid shear stresses. Our flow chamber design and flow circuit (Fig. 1) contains a transparent viewing region that enables testing of cell adhesion and imaging of cell morphology immediately before flow (Fig. 11A, B), at various time points during flow (Fig. 11C), and after flow (Fig. 11D). These experiments are illustrated with human umbilical cord blood-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and porcine EPCs. This method is also applicable to other adherent cell types, e.g. smooth muscle cells (SMCs) or fibroblasts. The chamber and all parts of the circuit are easily sterilized with steam autoclaving. In contrast to other chambers, e.g. microfluidic chambers, large numbers of cells (> 1 million depending on cell size) can be recovered after the flow experiment under sterile conditions for cell culture or other experiments, e.g. DNA or RNA extraction, or immunohistochemistry (Fig. 11E), or scanning electron microscopy. The shear stress can be adjusted by varying the flow rate of the perfusate, the fluid viscosity, or the channel height and width. The latter can reduce fluid volume or cell needs while ensuring that one-dimensional flow is maintained. It is not necessary to measure chamber height between experiments, since the chamber height does not depend on the use of gaskets, which greatly increases the ease of multiple experiments. Furthermore, the circuit design easily enables the collection of perfusate samples for analysis and/or quantification of metabolites secreted by cells under fluid shear stress exposure, e.g. nitric oxide (Fig. 12).

  14. Analysis of hydrodynamic fluctuations in heterogeneous adjacent multidomains in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Xin; Deng, Mingge; Tang, Yu-Hang; Karniadakis, George Em

    2016-03-01

    We analyze hydrodynamic fluctuations of a hybrid simulation under shear flow. The hybrid simulation is based on the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations on one domain and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) on the other. The two domains overlap, and there is an artificial boundary for each one within the overlapping region. To impose the artificial boundary of the NS solver, a simple spatial-temporal averaging is performed on the DPD simulation. In the artificial boundary of the particle simulation, four popular strategies of constraint dynamics are implemented, namely the Maxwell buffer [Hadjiconstantinou and Patera, Int. J. Mod. Phys. C 08, 967 (1997), 10.1142/S0129183197000837], the relaxation dynamics [O'Connell and Thompson, Phys. Rev. E 52, R5792 (1995), 10.1103/PhysRevE.52.R5792], the least constraint dynamics [Nie et al., J. Fluid Mech. 500, 55 (2004), 10.1017/S0022112003007225; Werder et al., J. Comput. Phys. 205, 373 (2005), 10.1016/j.jcp.2004.11.019], and the flux imposition [Flekkøy et al., Europhys. Lett. 52, 271 (2000), 10.1209/epl/i2000-00434-8], to achieve a target mean value given by the NS solver. Going beyond the mean flow field of the hybrid simulations, we investigate the hydrodynamic fluctuations in the DPD domain. Toward that end, we calculate the transversal autocorrelation functions of the fluctuating variables in k space to evaluate the generation, transport, and dissipation of fluctuations in the presence of a hybrid interface. We quantify the unavoidable errors in the fluctuations, due to both the truncation of the domain and the constraint dynamics performed in the artificial boundary. Furthermore, we compare the four methods of constraint dynamics and demonstrate how to reduce the errors in fluctuations. The analysis and findings of this work are directly applicable to other hybrid simulations of fluid flow with thermal fluctuations.

  15. Analysis of hydrodynamic fluctuations in heterogeneous adjacent multidomains in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Bian, Xin; Deng, Mingge; Tang, Yu-Hang; Karniadakis, George Em

    2016-03-01

    We analyze hydrodynamic fluctuations of a hybrid simulation under shear flow. The hybrid simulation is based on the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations on one domain and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) on the other. The two domains overlap, and there is an artificial boundary for each one within the overlapping region. To impose the artificial boundary of the NS solver, a simple spatial-temporal averaging is performed on the DPD simulation. In the artificial boundary of the particle simulation, four popular strategies of constraint dynamics are implemented, namely the Maxwell buffer [Hadjiconstantinou and Patera, Int. J. Mod. Phys. C 08, 967 (1997)], the relaxation dynamics [O’Connell and Thompson, Phys. Rev. E 52, R5792 (1995)], the least constraint dynamics [Nie et al.,J. Fluid Mech. 500, 55 (2004); Werder et al., J. Comput. Phys. 205, 373 (2005)], and the flux imposition [Flekkøy et al., Europhys. Lett. 52, 271 (2000)], to achieve a target mean value given by the NS solver. Going beyond the mean flow field of the hybrid simulations, we investigate the hydrodynamic fluctuations in the DPD domain. Toward that end, we calculate the transversal autocorrelation functions of the fluctuating variables in k space to evaluate the generation, transport, and dissipation of fluctuations in the presence of a hybrid interface. We quantify the unavoidable errors in the fluctuations, due to both the truncation of the domain and the constraint dynamics performed in the artificial boundary. Furthermore, we compare the four methods of constraint dynamics and demonstrate how to reduce the errors in fluctuations. The analysis and findings of this work are directly applicable to other hybrid simulations of fluid flow with thermal fluctuations. PMID:27078489

  16. Experimental investigation and kinetic-theory-based model of a rapid granular shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildman, R. D.; Martin, T. W.; Huntley, J. M.; Jenkins, J. T.; Viswanathan, H.; Fen, X.; Parker, D. J.

    An experimental investigation of an idealized rapidly sheared granular flow was performed to test the predictions of a model based on the kinetic theory of dry granular media. Glass ballotini beads were placed in an annular shear cell and the lower boundary rotated to induce a shearing motion in the bed. A single particle was tracked using the positron emission particle tracking (PEPT) technique, a method that determines the location of a particle through the triangulation of gamma photons emitted by a radioactive tracer particle. The packing fraction and velocity fields within the three-dimensional flow were measured and compared to the predictions of a model developed using the conservation and balance equations applicable to dissipative systems, and solved incorporating constitutive relations derived from kinetic theory. The comparison showed that kinetic theory is able to capture the general features of a rapid shear flow reasonably well over a wide range of shear rates and confining pressures.

  17. Evidence for modified transport due to sheared E x B flows in high-temperature plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Groebner, R.J.; Burrell, K.H.; Austin, M.E.

    1994-11-01

    Sheared mass flows are generated in many fluids and are often important for the dynamics of instabilities in these fluids. Similarly, large values of the E x B velocity have been observed in magnetic confinement machines and there is theoretical and experimental evidence that sufficiently large shear in this velocity may stabilize important instabilities. Two examples of this phenomenon have been observed in the DIII-D tokamak. In the first example, sufficient heating power can lead to the L-H transition, a rapid improvement in confinement in the boundary layer of the plasma. For discharges with heating power close to the threshold required to get the transition, changes in the edge radial electric field are observed to occur prior to the transition itself. In the second example, certain classes of discharges with toroidal momentum input from neutral beam injection exhibit a further improvement of confinement in the plasma core leading to a regime called the VH-mode. In both examples, the region of improved confinement is characterized by an increase of shear in the radial electric field E{sub r}, reduced levels of turbulence and increases in gradients of temperatures and densities. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that the improved confinement is caused by an increase in shear of the E x B velocity which leads to a reduction of turbulence. For the VH-mode, the dominant term controlling E{sub r} is the toroidal rotation v{sub {phi}}, indicating that the E{sub r} profile is controlled by the source and transport of toroidal momentum.

  18. Modeling of Wall-Bounded Complex Flows and Free Shear Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Zhu, Jiang; Lumley, John L.

    1994-01-01

    Various wall-bounded flows with complex geometries and free shear flows have been studied with a newly developed realizable Reynolds stress algebraic equation model. The model development is based on the invariant theory in continuum mechanics. This theory enables us to formulate a general constitutive relation for the Reynolds stresses. Pope was the first to introduce this kind of constitutive relation to turbulence modeling. In our study, realizability is imposed on the truncated constitutive relation to determine the coefficients so that, unlike the standard k-E eddy viscosity model, the present model will not produce negative normal stresses in any situations of rapid distortion. The calculations based on the present model have shown an encouraging success in modeling complex turbulent flows.

  19. Modelling shear flows with smoothed particle hydrodynamics and grid-based methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junk, Veronika; Walch, Stefanie; Heitsch, Fabian; Burkert, Andreas; Wetzstein, Markus; Schartmann, Marc; Price, Daniel

    2010-09-01

    Given the importance of shear flows for astrophysical gas dynamics, we study the evolution of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) analytically and numerically. We derive the dispersion relation for the two-dimensional KHI including viscous dissipation. The resulting expression for the growth rate is then used to estimate the intrinsic viscosity of four numerical schemes depending on code-specific as well as on physical parameters. Our set of numerical schemes includes the Tree-SPH code VINE, an alternative smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) formulation developed by Price and the finite-volume grid codes FLASH and PLUTO. In the first part, we explicitly demonstrate the effect of dissipation-inhibiting mechanisms such as the Balsara viscosity on the evolution of the KHI. With VINE, increasing density contrasts lead to a continuously increasing suppression of the KHI (with complete suppression from a contrast of 6:1 or higher). The alternative SPH formulation including an artificial thermal conductivity reproduces the analytically expected growth rates up to a density contrast of 10:1. The second part addresses the shear flow evolution with FLASH and PLUTO. Both codes result in a consistent non-viscous evolution (in the equal as well as in the different density case) in agreement with the analytical prediction. The viscous evolution studied with FLASH shows minor deviations from the analytical prediction.

  20. Flow-parametric regulation of shear-driven phase separation in two and three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ã` Náraigh, Lennon; Shun, Selma; Naso, Aurore

    2015-06-01

    The Cahn-Hilliard equation with an externally prescribed chaotic shear flow is studied in two and three dimensions. The main goal is to compare and contrast the phase separation in two and three dimensions, using high-resolution numerical simulation as the basis for the study. The model flow is parametrized by its amplitudes (thereby admitting the possibility of anisotropy), length scales, and multiple time scales, and the outcome of the phase separation is investigated as a function of these parameters as well as the dimensionality. In this way, a parameter regime is identified wherein the phase separation and the associated coarsening phenomenon are not only arrested but in fact the concentration variance decays, thereby opening up the possibility of describing the dynamics of the concentration field using the theories of advection diffusion. This parameter regime corresponds to long flow correlation times, large flow amplitudes and small diffusivities. The onset of this hyperdiffusive regime is interpreted by introducing Batchelor length scales. A key result is that in the hyperdiffusive regime, the distribution of concentration (in particular, the frequency of extreme values of concentration) depends strongly on the dimensionality. Anisotropic scenarios are also investigated: for scenarios wherein the variance saturates (corresponding to coarsening arrest), the direction in which the domains align depends on the flow correlation time. Thus, for correlation times comparable to the inverse of the mean shear rate, the domains align in the direction of maximum flow amplitude, while for short correlation times, the domains initially align in the opposite direction. However, at very late times (after the passage of thousands of correlation times), the fate of the domains is the same regardless of correlation time, namely alignment in the direction of maximum flow amplitude. A theoretical model to explain these features is proposed. These features and the theoretical

  1. Flow-parametric regulation of shear-driven phase separation in two and three dimensions.

    PubMed

    Náraigh, Lennon Ó; Shun, Selma; Naso, Aurore

    2015-06-01

    The Cahn-Hilliard equation with an externally prescribed chaotic shear flow is studied in two and three dimensions. The main goal is to compare and contrast the phase separation in two and three dimensions, using high-resolution numerical simulation as the basis for the study. The model flow is parametrized by its amplitudes (thereby admitting the possibility of anisotropy), length scales, and multiple time scales, and the outcome of the phase separation is investigated as a function of these parameters as well as the dimensionality. In this way, a parameter regime is identified wherein the phase separation and the associated coarsening phenomenon are not only arrested but in fact the concentration variance decays, thereby opening up the possibility of describing the dynamics of the concentration field using the theories of advection diffusion. This parameter regime corresponds to long flow correlation times, large flow amplitudes and small diffusivities. The onset of this hyperdiffusive regime is interpreted by introducing Batchelor length scales. A key result is that in the hyperdiffusive regime, the distribution of concentration (in particular, the frequency of extreme values of concentration) depends strongly on the dimensionality. Anisotropic scenarios are also investigated: for scenarios wherein the variance saturates (corresponding to coarsening arrest), the direction in which the domains align depends on the flow correlation time. Thus, for correlation times comparable to the inverse of the mean shear rate, the domains align in the direction of maximum flow amplitude, while for short correlation times, the domains initially align in the opposite direction. However, at very late times (after the passage of thousands of correlation times), the fate of the domains is the same regardless of correlation time, namely alignment in the direction of maximum flow amplitude. A theoretical model to explain these features is proposed. These features and the theoretical

  2. Dynamic deformability of sickle red blood cells in microphysiological flow

    PubMed Central

    Alapan, Y.; Matsuyama, Y.; Little, J. A.; Gurkan, U. A.

    2016-01-01

    In sickle cell disease (SCD), hemoglobin molecules polymerize intracellularly and lead to a cascade of events resulting in decreased deformability and increased adhesion of red blood cells (RBCs). Decreased deformability and increased adhesion of sickle RBCs lead to blood vessel occlusion (vaso-occlusion) in SCD patients. Here, we present a microfluidic approach integrated with a cell dimensioning algorithm to analyze dynamic deformability of adhered RBC at the single-cell level in controlled microphysiological flow. We measured and compared dynamic deformability and adhesion of healthy hemoglobin A (HbA) and homozygous sickle hemoglobin (HbS) containing RBCs in blood samples obtained from 24 subjects. We introduce a new parameter to assess deformability of RBCs: the dynamic deformability index (DDI), which is defined as the time-dependent change of the cell’s aspect ratio in response to fluid flow shear stress. Our results show that DDI of HbS-containing RBCs were significantly lower compared to that of HbA-containing RBCs. Moreover, we observed subpopulations of HbS containing RBCs in terms of their dynamic deformability characteristics: deformable and non-deformable RBCs. Then, we tested blood samples from SCD patients and analyzed RBC adhesion and deformability at physiological and above physiological flow shear stresses. We observed significantly greater number of adhered non-deformable sickle RBCs than deformable sickle RBCs at flow shear stresses well above the physiological range, suggesting an interplay between dynamic deformability and increased adhesion of RBCs in vaso-occlusive events. PMID:27437432

  3. Dynamics of blood flow in a microfluidic ladder network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddala, Jeevan; Zilberman-Rudenko, Jevgenia; McCarty, Owen

    The dynamics of a complex mixture of cells and proteins, such as blood, in perturbed shear flow remains ill-defined. Microfluidics is a promising technology for improving the understanding of blood flow under complex conditions of shear; as found in stent implants and in tortuous blood vessels. We model the fluid dynamics of blood flow in a microfluidic ladder network with dimensions mimicking venules. Interaction of blood cells was modeled using multiagent framework, where cells of different diameters were treated as spheres. This model served as the basis for predicting transition regions, collision pathways, re-circulation zones and residence times of cells dependent on their diameters and device architecture. Based on these insights from the model, we were able to predict the clot formation configurations at various locations in the device. These predictions were supported by the experiments using whole blood. To facilitate platelet aggregation, the devices were coated with fibrillar collagen and tissue factor. Blood was perfused through the microfluidic device for 9 min at a physiologically relevant venous shear rate of 600 s-1. Using fluorescent microscopy, we observed flow transitions near the channel intersections and at the areas of blood flow obstruction, which promoted larger thrombus formation. This study of integrating model predictions with experimental design, aids in defining the dynamics of blood flow in microvasculature and in development of novel biomedical devices.

  4. Doppler optical coherence tomography imaging of local fluid flow and shear stress within microporous scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yali; Bagnaninchi, Pierre O.; Yang, Ying; Haj, Alicia El; Hinds, Monica T.; Kirkpatrick, Sean J.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2009-05-01

    Establishing a relationship between perfusion rate and fluid shear stress in a 3D cell culture environment is an ongoing and challenging task faced by tissue engineers. We explore Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) as a potential imaging tool for in situ monitoring of local fluid flow profiles inside porous chitosan scaffolds. From the measured fluid flow profiles, the fluid shear stresses are evaluated. We examine the localized fluid flow and shear stress within low- and high-porosity chitosan scaffolds, which are subjected to a constant input flow rate of 0.5 ml.min-1. The DOCT results show that the behavior of the fluid flow and shear stress in micropores is strongly dependent on the micropore interconnectivity, porosity, and size of pores within the scaffold. For low-porosity and high-porosity chitosan scaffolds examined, the measured local fluid flow and shear stress varied from micropore to micropore, with a mean shear stress of 0.49+/-0.3 dyn.cm-2 and 0.38+/-0.2 dyn.cm-2, respectively. In addition, we show that the scaffold's porosity and interconnectivity can be quantified by combining analyses of the 3D structural and flow images obtained from DOCT.

  5. Effect of velocity ratio on coherent-structure dynamics in turbulent free shear layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryanarayanan, Saikishan; Narasimha, Roddam

    2014-11-01

    The relevance of the vortex-gas model to the large scale dynamics of temporally evolving turbulent free shear layers has been established by extensive simulations (Phys. Rev. E 89, 013009 (2014)). The effects of velocity ratio (r =U2 /U1) on shear layer dynamics are revealed by spatially evolving vortex-gas shear-layer simulations using a computational model based on Basu et al. (Appl. Math. Modelling 19, (1995)), but with a crucial improvement that ensures conservation of global circulation. The simulations show that the initial conditions and downstream boundaries can significantly affect the flow over substantial part of the domain, but the equilibrium spread rate is a universal function of r, and is within the experimental scatter. The spread in the r = 0 limit is higher than Galilean-transformed temporal value. The present 2D simulations at r = 0 show continuous growth of structures, while merger-dominated evolution is observed for r = 0 . 23 (and higher). These two mechanisms were observed across the same two values of r in the experiments of D'Ovidio & Coats (J. Fluid Mech. 737, 2013), but the continuous growth was instead attributed to mixing-transition and 3D. The 2D mechanisms responsible for the observed continuous growth of structures are analyzed in detail. Supported in part by RN/Intel/4288 and RN/DRDO/4124.

  6. Nonlinear Generation of shear flows and large scale magnetic fields by small scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aburjania, G.

    2009-04-01

    EGU2009-233 Nonlinear Generation of shear flows and large scale magnetic fields by small scale turbulence in the ionosphere by G. Aburjania Contact: George Aburjania, g.aburjania@gmail.com,aburj@mymail.ge

  7. Shear-induced particle diffusion and its effects on the flow of concentrated suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Acrivos, A.

    1996-12-31

    The mechanism underlying shear-induced particle diffusion in concentrated suspensions is clarified. Examples are then presented where this diffusion process plays a crucial role in determining the manner by which such suspensions flow under laminar conditions.

  8. Analysis of structure and orientation of adsorbed polymers in solution subject to a dynamic shear stress

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.; Baker, S.; Toprakcioglu, C.

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Polymer-based separation techniques rely on the ability of a binding portion of the polymer to interact with a specific molecule in a solution flowing past the polymer. The location of the binding site within or out of the entangled polymer chains is thus crucial to the effectiveness of these methods. For this reason, the details of flow induced deformation of the polymer chains is important in such applications as exclusion chromatography, waste water treatment, ultrafiltration, enhanced oil recovery and microbial adhesion. Few techniques exist to examine the structure and orientation of polymeric materials, and even fewer to examine systems in a dynamic fluid flow. The goal of this project was to understand the molecular structure and orientation of adsorbed polymers with and without active binding ligands as a function of solvent shear rate, solvent power, polymer molecular weight, surface polymer coverage and heterogeneity of the surface polymer chains by neutron reflectometry in a newly designed shear cell. Geometrical effects on binding of molecules in the flow was also studied subject to the same parameters.

  9. Vertically deflected mantle flow at the eastern edge of the African Large Low Shear Velocity Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, H. A.; Long, M. D.; He, X.; Lynner, C.

    2014-12-01

    Despite the abundantly clear evidence for the existence of two Large Low Shear Velocity Provinces (LLSVPs) in the lower mantle, the origin, composition, and dynamics are still not well understood, nor is the relationship of the LLSVPs to the greater mantle. Observations of seismic anisotropy are often used to better understand flow in the mantle, but their utility is limited in the mostly isotropic lower mantle. An exception to this is in the lowermost mantle (D") where observations of seismic anisotropy are numerous; however, the interpretation of such measurements in terms of dynamic processes remains challenging. Here we use observations of seismic anisotropy at the eastern edge of the African LLSVP beneath the Afar hotspot to 1) test the consistency of different mechanisms for D" anisotropy with observations, and 2) constrain the geometry of mantle flow at an LLSVP edge. Our observational data set consists of measurements of differential S-ScS and discrepant SKS-SKKS splitting, totaling 22 SKS, SKKS and ScS phases, corrected for upper mantle anisotropy. By utilizing different raypath combinations, we are able to sample the edge structure of the African LLSVP from five distinct raypath orientations, an improvement over previous work. Through forward modeling using mineral physics constraints, we find that our splitting observations are best fit by a model of crystallographically aligned post-perovskite, with the [100] axis oriented either vertically, or highly oblique to the horizontal plane. Such an alignment suggests that mantle flow at the eastern edge of the African LLSVP has an upward component, consistent with either the vertical deflection of material at the LLSVP or with sheet-like upwellings. Placing our preferred flow scenario(s) in context with other recent work, we propose that the edge of the African LLSVP acts as a barrier to mantle flow, ultimately deflecting flow upwards along the margins.

  10. Dynamics of fluid mixing in separated flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leder, A.

    1991-05-01

    Separated flows at high Re (>103) are highly turbulent. In some situations the turbulence generation and mixing processes associated with flow separation are desirable, e.g., in heat exchangers or in many chemical engineering applications. In others, e.g., stalled airfoils, separation must be avoided as it causes loss in pressure and kinetic energy. To control the phenomenon effectively, physical mechanisms of flow separation and related aspects, such as the growth of flow instabilities in shear layers, the process of vortex formation, and the dynamics of fluid mixing in recirculating flow regions, must be understood. In many cases numerical procedures, e.g., Navier-Stokes calculations including k-ɛ turbulence modeling, fail to predict real physical mechanisms in separated flows.1,2 Separated flows in the lee of bluff bodies have been studied for many years.3,4 However, accurate measurements of the magnitude and direction of velocities and the magnitude of the terms of the Reynolds stress tensor have been restricted by the unsuitability of the hot-wire anemometer in recirculating flows. The development of the pulsed-wire anemometer, flying hot-wire anemometer, and laser-Doppler anemometry (LDA) allows more reliable measurements also in turbulent separated flows.5-8 The aim of this paper is to investigate the dynamics of undisturbed fluid mixing in separated regions of 2-D, incompressible flows with visualization techniques and LDA. Measurements were performed with a vertical flat plate model, mounted in a closed-circuit wind tunnel at low blockage ratio. Because of the noninvasive character, optical techniques like LDA are more suitable to analyze complex fluid motions than pulsed-wire and flying-wire anemometry. The LDA system used to investigate turbulent flow structures consists of a two-channel version operating in backscatter mode and a specifically developed phase detector to extract phase-averaged information from recorded measurement ensembles.9 Endplates

  11. Dynamic response of shear thickening fluid under laser induced shock

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xianqian Yin, Qiuyun; Huang, Chenguang; Zhong, Fachun

    2015-02-16

    The dynamic response of the 57 vol./vol. % dense spherical silica particle-polyethylene glycol suspension at high pressure was investigated through short pulsed laser induced shock experiments. The measured back free surface velocities by a photonic Doppler velocimetry showed that the shock and the particle velocities decreased while the shock wave transmitted in the shear thickening fluid (STF), from which an equation of state for the STF was obtained. In addition, the peak stress decreased and the absorbed energy increased rapidly with increasing the thickness for a thin layer of the STF, which should be attributed to the impact-jammed behavior through compression of particle matrix, the deformation or crack of the hard-sphere particles, and the volume compression of the particles and the polyethylene glycol.

  12. An alternative assessment of second-order closure models in turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speziale, Charles G.; Gatski, Thomas B.

    1994-01-01

    The performance of three recently proposed second-order closure models is tested in benchmark turbulent shear flows. Both homogeneous shear flow and the log-layer of an equilibrium turbulent boundary layer are considered for this purpose. An objective analysis of the results leads to an assessment of these models that stands in contrast to that recently published by other authors. A variety of pitfalls in the formulation and testing of second-order closure models are uncovered by this analysis.

  13. Steady flow on to a conveyor belt - Causal viscosity and shear shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Syer, D.; Narayan, Ramesh

    1993-01-01

    Some hydrodynamical consequences of the adoption of a causal theory of viscosity are explored. Causality is introduced into the theory by letting the coefficient of viscosity go to zero as the flow velocity approaches a designated propagation speed for viscous signals. Consideration is given to a model of viscosity which has a finite propagation speed of shear information, and it is shown that it produces two kinds of shear shock. A 'pure shear shock' corresponds to a transition from a superviscous to a subviscous state with no discontinuity in the velocity. A 'mixed shear shock' has a shear transition occurring at the same location as a normal adiabatic or radiative shock. A generalized version of the Rankine-Hugoniot conditions for mixed shear shocks is derived, and self-consistent numerical solutions to a model 2D problem in which an axisymmetric radially infalling stream encounters a spinning star are presented.

  14. Self-limiting feedback between baroclinic waves and a NAO-like sheared zonal flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Masahiro

    2009-04-01

    The eddy-mean flow interaction associated with the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) is examined by using the baroclinic wave life cycle experiments. When a sheared zonal flow perturbation akin to the NAO-related dipole wind anomaly is added to the basic state, momentum fluxes due to baroclinic waves tend to reinforce the initial zonal flow dipole in the upper troposphere both for the anticyclonic and cyclonic shears. The eddy feedback is stronger for the anticyclonic shear because the node of the dipole flow is asymmetric about the basic jet, suggesting that the positive NAO is more favored by the eddy feedback. For the zonal wind anomaly with extremely large amplitude, the baroclinic wave breaking cannot efficiently intensify the zonal flow dipole, indicating a self-limitation in the positive eddy feedback to the NAO-like zonal flow anomaly.

  15. A Numerical Study of Shear Flow in Partially Vegetated Open Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Jingfang; Chen, S.; Yu, Jie; Li, Xiaolin

    Shear flow at the interface between a porous layer and an open conduit is a problem of fundamental importance to problems ranging from natural to engineered flows. Such shear flows are known to be unstable, inducing waves and coherent vortices via Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. These coherent flow structures can strongly enhance the exchange of scalar variables and vector variable such as momentum in and out of the canopy, hence playing an important role in controlling environmental quality of these system. We developed a numerical model using finite difference method for flow in open channel occupied by a vegetation canopy. We apply the method to simulate the shear flow and compare with the experimental study by White and Nepf in 2007. Preliminary comparisons with the experimental data show good agreements.

  16. Modeling and analysis of electrorheological suspensions in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Youngwook P.; Chua, Wei Huan; Seo, Yongsok

    2015-05-01

    A new rheological model was applied to the analysis of the electrorheological behavior of a fluid containing silica nanoparticle-decorated polyaniline nanofibers. A model's predictions were compared with the experimental data, revealing that the proposed model correctly predicted the shear stress behavior both quantitatively and qualitatively. The shear stress data of the electrorheological fluid showing aligned fibers' structural reformation as a function of the shear rate agreed well with the new model which required fewer parameters than the CCJ (Cho-Choi-Jhon) model. The static yield stress was found to be quadratically dependent on the field strength, in agreement with the predictions of the polarization model. A scaling function was used to model the yield stress behavior of the electrorheological fluid over a range of electric fields, and it correctly predicted the static yield stress behavior both quantitatively and qualitatively.

  17. Lava crusts and flow dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilburn, C. R. J.

    1993-01-01

    Lava flows can be considered as hot viscous cores within thinner, solidified crusts. Interaction between crust and core determines a flow's morphological and dynamical evolution. When the lava core dominates, flow advance approaches a steady state. When crusts are the limiting factor, advance is more irregular. These two conditions can be distinguished by a timescale ratio comparing rates of core deformation and crustal formation. Aa and budding pahoehoe lavas are used as examples of core- and crustal-dominated flows, respectively. A simple model describes the transition between pahoehoe and aa flow in terms of lava discharge rate, underlying slope, and either the thickness or velocity of the flow front. The model shows that aa morphologies are characterized by higher discharge rates and frontal velocities and yields good quantitative agreement with empirical relations distinguishing pahoehoe and aa emplacement on Hawaii.

  18. Spatio-temporal intermittency in stratified shear flow: effects of Prandtl number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefauve, Adrien; Linden, Paul

    2015-11-01

    We present laboratory experiments of a stratified shear flow in an inclined square duct, connecting two reservoirs of water at different densities. The exchange flow in which a layer of dense salt-water flows beneath a layer of lighter fresh-water moving in the opposite direction is known to host a rich zoo of behaviors. As the driving density difference or inclination angle is increased, the initially sharp and flat density interface can support Holmboe waves, and then transition to a statistically steady turbulent intermediate mixed layer. Here we report on the significantly different dynamics observed when stratification is achieved by heat instead of salt. Even moderate values of density difference or inclination angle now allow the dramatic growth of interfacial waves causing the flow to transition to a fully-turbulent state, before it relaxes back to a laminar state and so forth. These novel laminar-turbulent cycles exhibit a remarkable periodicity and suggest that the Prandtl number (Pr = 700 for salt vs Pr = 7 for heat) affects the intermittency and mixing properties of stratified turbulence. Supported by EPSRC Programme Grant EP/K034529/1 entitled ``Mathematical Underpinnings of Stratified Turbulence''

  19. Introductory Applicaton of Defocusing DPIV to the Study of Bubbly Shear Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Francisco; Gharib, Morteza; Dabiri, Dana; Modarress, Darius

    1999-11-01

    A study of a three-dimensional bubbly flow is presented to demonstrate the applicability of the newly developed defocusing digital particle image velocimetry technique. The DDPIV instrument provides bubble size and location information within a one cubic foot volume. A three-dimensional two-phase flow measurement is performed to obtain a full-field quantitative description of the global dynamics of air bubbles in a vortical shear flow generated by a model boat propeller. Clouds of sub-millimeter air bubbles are injected upstream the propeller. The velocity field is calculated from volumetric cross-correlation of consecutive three-dimensional sets of bubble locations, whereas the bubble size information is estimated from the blurred image of bubbles. Flow analysis is presented in terms of vorticity and bubble trajectory. The bubble size distribution upstream and downstream the propeller is discussed. Growth and collapse of bubbles are detected and related to the respective velocity field in the suction and high-pressure regions of the propeller.

  20. [Comparison of adhesion of different endothelial cells under shear stress load in the flow field in vitro].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhenghua; Zhang, Bengui; Zhang, Eryong; Xu, Weilin; Shi, Yingkang; Guo, Yingqiang

    2011-02-01

    This study was aimed to compare the differences of adhesion properties of endothelial cells (EC) from arteries (AEC), veins (VEC) and capillaries (MVEC) under shear stress condition, and to explore whether they can get the same adhesive ability as graft in similar shear stress conditions. With mended parallel plate flow apparatus and peristalsis pump providing fluid shear stress used, endothelial culture models were established in vitro with the same environmental factors as steady culture. To compare the adhesion among three kinds of endothelial cells under dynamic condition and static condition, the dynamic change of cytoskeletal actin filaments and the effects of different adhesive proteins coated on the adhesion of EC to the glass were studied. The cultured endothelial cells under flow conditions were extended and arranged along the direction of flow. The adhesive ability from high to low under static condition were AEC, MVEC and VEC (VEC compared with AEC or MVEC, P < 0.05), sequentially. The adhesion of endothelial cells from variety sources under dynamic culture condition was significantly increased than that of the static groups. The ratio of cell retention was not significantly different between AEC and MVEC. But VEC was significantly different (P < 0.05) compared with AEC or MVEC. The actin filaments (F-actin) were bundled together and arranged along the direction of flow after fluid culture. Dense peripheral band (DPB) gradually disappeared and distinct stress fibers were formed, which even interconnected to form a whole in the MVEC. The adhesion of AEC, VEC and MVEC under shear stress conditions are more significantly increased than those under the static culture conditions, and the MVEC can achieve the same adhesion as AEC.

  1. Over-reflection of slow magnetosonic waves by homogeneous shear flow: Analytical solution

    SciTech Connect

    Dimitrov, Z. D.; Maneva, Y. G.; Hristov, T. S.; Mishonov, T. M.

    2011-08-15

    We have analyzed the amplification of slow magnetosonic (or pseudo-Alfvenic) waves (SMW) in incompressible shear flow. As found here, the amplification depends on the component of the wave-vector perpendicular to the direction of the shear flow. Earlier numerical results are consistent with the general analytic solution for the linearized magnetohydrodynamic equations, derived here for the model case of pure homogeneous shear (without Coriolis force). An asymptotically exact analytical formula for the amplification coefficient is derived for the case when the amplification is sufficiently large.

  2. Single Polymer Dynamics under Large Amplitude Oscillatory Extensional (LAOE) Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuecheng; Schroeder, Charles M.

    Over the past two decades, advances in fluorescence imaging and particle manipulation have enabled the direct observation of single polymer dynamics in model flows such as shear flow and planar extensional flow. The vast majority of single polymer studies, however, has focused on chain dynamics using simple transient step forcing functions. In order to study single polymer dynamics in non-idealized model flows, there is a clear need to implement more complicated transient flow forcing functions. In bulk rheology, large amplitude oscillatory shear (LAOS) was widely used to study the linear and nonlinear viscoelasticity of materials, but not yet been applied to molecular rheology. In this work, we directly probe single polymer dynamics using oscillatory extensional flow in precisely controlled microfluidic devices. We are able to generate large and small amplitude sinusoidal oscillatory extensional flow in a cross-slot microfluidic device while imaging the conformational dynamics of a single polymer trapped at the stagnation point. In this flow, polymer chains are stretched, squeezed, and rotated between extensional/compressional axes in a highly dynamic and transient manner. Using this technique, we studied the dynamics and coil-stretch transition of a single λ-DNA as a function of the Weissenberg number (Wi) and Deborah number (De). Moreover, we use Brownian dynamics simulation to map a wide range of Pipkin space for polymers from linear steady-state conditions to non-linear unsteady-states. Our results reveal a critical Wi at the coil-stretch transition that is function of the De in LAOE flow. Department of Materials Science and Engineering.

  3. Local parametric instability near elliptic points in vortex flows under shear deformation.

    PubMed

    Koshel, Konstantin V; Ryzhov, Eugene A

    2016-08-01

    The dynamics of two point vortices embedded in an oscillatory external flow consisted of shear and rotational components is addressed. The region associated with steady-state elliptic points of the vortex motion is established to experience local parametric instability. The instability forces the point vortices with initial positions corresponding to the steady-state elliptic points to move in spiral-like divergent trajectories. This divergent motion continues until the nonlinear effects suppress their motion near the region associated with the steady-state separatrices. The local parametric instability is then demonstrated not to contribute considerably to enhancing the size of the chaotic motion regions. Instead, the size of the chaotic motion region mostly depends on overlaps of the nonlinear resonances emerging in the perturbed system. PMID:27586607

  4. Sheared ion flow driven nonlinear coherent structures in inhomogeneous electron-positron-ion quantum magnetoplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masood, W.; Mirza, Arshad M.

    2012-12-01

    Nonlinear equations governing the dynamics of finite amplitude drift-acoustic-waves are derived by taking into account sheared ion flow perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field in a quantum magnetoplasma comprised of electrons, positrons, and ions. It is shown that stationary solution of the nonlinear equations can be represented in the form of a counter-rotating vortex for a particular choice of the equilibrium profile. The counter rotating vortices are, however, observed to form on very short scales i.e., of the order of ion Larmor radius ρ i in quantum plasmas. It is observed that the scalelengths over which these structures form get modified in the presence of quantum statistical and Bohm potential terms as well as the positron concentration. The relevance of the present investigation with regard to dense astrophysical environments is also pointed out.

  5. Local parametric instability near elliptic points in vortex flows under shear deformation.

    PubMed

    Koshel, Konstantin V; Ryzhov, Eugene A

    2016-08-01

    The dynamics of two point vortices embedded in an oscillatory external flow consisted of shear and rotational components is addressed. The region associated with steady-state elliptic points of the vortex motion is established to experience local parametric instability. The instability forces the point vortices with initial positions corresponding to the steady-state elliptic points to move in spiral-like divergent trajectories. This divergent motion continues until the nonlinear effects suppress their motion near the region associated with the steady-state separatrices. The local parametric instability is then demonstrated not to contribute considerably to enhancing the size of the chaotic motion regions. Instead, the size of the chaotic motion region mostly depends on overlaps of the nonlinear resonances emerging in the perturbed system.

  6. Local parametric instability near elliptic points in vortex flows under shear deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshel, Konstantin V.; Ryzhov, Eugene A.

    2016-08-01

    The dynamics of two point vortices embedded in an oscillatory external flow consisted of shear and rotational components is addressed. The region associated with steady-state elliptic points of the vortex motion is established to experience local parametric instability. The instability forces the point vortices with initial positions corresponding to the steady-state elliptic points to move in spiral-like divergent trajectories. This divergent motion continues until the nonlinear effects suppress their motion near the region associated with the steady-state separatrices. The local parametric instability is then demonstrated not to contribute considerably to enhancing the size of the chaotic motion regions. Instead, the size of the chaotic motion region mostly depends on overlaps of the nonlinear resonances emerging in the perturbed system.

  7. Turbulance boundary conditions for shear flow analysis, using the DTNS flow solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizukami, M.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of different turbulence boundary conditions were examined for two classical flows: a turbulent plane free shear layer and a flat plate turbulent boundary layer with zero pressure gradient. The flow solver used was DTNS, an incompressible Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes solver with k-epsilon turbulence modeling, developed at the U.S. Navy David Taylor Research Center. Six different combinations of turbulence boundary conditions at the inflow boundary were investigated: In case 1, 'exact' k and epsilon profiles were used; in case 2, the 'exact' k profile was used, and epsilon was extrapolated upstream; in case 3, both k and epsilon were extrapolated; in case 4, the turbulence intensity (I) was 1 percent, and the turbulent viscosity (mu(sub t)) was equal to the laminar viscosity; in case 5, the 'exact' k profile was used and mu(sub t) was equal to the laminar viscosity; in case 6, the I was 1 percent, and epsilon was extrapolated. Comparisons were made with experimental data, direct numerical simulation results, or theoretical predictions as applicable. Results obtained with DTNS showed that turbulence boundary conditions can have significant impacts on the solutions, especially for the free shear layer.

  8. Optimizing the rotor design for controlled-shear affinity filtration using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Francis, Patrick; Martinez, D Mark; Taghipour, Fariborz; Bowen, Bruce D; Haynes, Charles A

    2006-12-20

    Controlled shear affinity filtration (CSAF) is a novel integrated processing technology that positions a rotor directly above an affinity membrane chromatography column to permit protein capture and purification directly from cell culture. The conical rotor is intended to provide a uniform and tunable shear stress at the membrane surface that inhibits membrane fouling and cell cake formation by providing a hydrodynamic force away from and a drag force parallel to the membrane surface. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations are used to show that the rotor in the original CSAF device (Vogel et al., 2002) does not provide uniform shear stress at the membrane surface. This results in the need to operate the system at unnecessarily high rotor speeds to reach a required shear stress of at least 0.17 Pa at every radial position of the membrane surface, compromising the scale-up of the technology. Results from CFD simulations are compared with particle image velocimetry (PIV) experiments and a numerical solution for low Reynolds number conditions to confirm that our CFD model accurately describes the hydrodynamics in the rotor chamber of the CSAF device over a range of rotor velocities, filtrate fluxes, and (both laminar and turbulent) retentate flows. CFD simulations were then carried out in combination with a root-finding method to optimize the shape of the CSAF rotor. The optimized rotor geometry produces a nearly constant shear stress of 0.17 Pa at a rotational velocity of 250 rpm, 60% lower than the original CSAF design. This permits the optimized CSAF device to be scaled up to a maximum rotor diameter 2.5 times larger than is permissible in the original device, thereby providing more than a sixfold increase in volumetric throughput. PMID:16937405

  9. Stochastic Aspects of Bridging Bonds of Induced Structure of Electro-Rheological Fluids in Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riha, P.; Kimura, H.; Takimoto, J.; Koyama, K.

    The bridging of electrodes by clusters of polarizable elements occurs to be a dominant feature of the response of certain electrorheological fluid suspensions and liquid polymeric blends to the imposed electric field. The evolution of the bridging structure in deformation and flow is described as a stochastic process and identified with the macroscopic flow behavior. The effect of structure is introduced into the rheological equation providing its non-linear modification. The comparisons are presented showing how the proposed rheological equation describes rheological characteristics measured at steady shearing flow and start-up shearing flow.

  10. Measurement of the Shear Lift Force on a Bubble in a Channel Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Motil, Brian; Skor, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Two-phase flow systems play vital roles in the design of some current and anticipated space applications of two-phase systems which include: thermal management systems, transfer line flow in cryogenic storage, space nuclear power facilities, design and operation of thermal bus, life support systems, propulsion systems, In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU), and space processes for pharmaceutical applications. The design of two-phase flow systems for space applications requires a clear knowledge of the behaviors of the dispersed phase (bubble), its interaction with the continuous phase (liquid) and its effect on heat and mass transfer processes, The need to understand the bubble generation process arises from the fact that for all space applications, the size and distribution of bubbles are extremely crucial for heat and mass transfer control. One important force in two-phase flow systems is the lift force on a bubble or particle in a liquid shear flow. The shear lift is usually overwhelmed by buoyancy in normal gravity, but it becomes an important force in reduced gravity. Since the liquid flow is usually sheared because of the confining wall, the trajectories of bubbles and particles injected into the liquid flow are affected by the shear lift in reduced gravity. A series of experiments are performed to investigate the lift force on a bubble in a liquid shear flow and its effect on the detachment of a bubble from a wall under low gravity conditions. Experiments are executed in a Poiseuille flow in a channel. An air-water system is used in these experiments that are performed in the 2.2 second drop tower. A bubble is injected into the shear flow from a small injector and the shear lift is measured while the bubble is held stationary relative to the fluid. The trajectory of the bubble prior, during and after its detachment from the injector is investigated. The measured shear lift force is calculated from the trajectory of the bubble at the detachment point. These

  11. Animal models of surgically manipulated flow velocities to study shear stress-induced atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Winkel, Leah C; Hoogendoorn, Ayla; Xing, Ruoyu; Wentzel, Jolanda J; Van der Heiden, Kim

    2015-07-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arterial tree that develops at predisposed sites, coinciding with locations that are exposed to low or oscillating shear stress. Manipulating flow velocity, and concomitantly shear stress, has proven adequate to promote endothelial activation and subsequent plaque formation in animals. In this article, we will give an overview of the animal models that have been designed to study the causal relationship between shear stress and atherosclerosis by surgically manipulating blood flow velocity profiles. These surgically manipulated models include arteriovenous fistulas, vascular grafts, arterial ligation, and perivascular devices. We review these models of manipulated blood flow velocity from an engineering and biological perspective, focusing on the shear stress profiles they induce and the vascular pathology that is observed.

  12. Motion of cells sedimenting on a solid surface in a laminar shear flow.

    PubMed Central

    Tissot, O; Pierres, A; Foa, C; Delaage, M; Bongrand, P

    1992-01-01

    Cell adhesion often occurs under dynamic conditions, as in flowing blood. A quantitative understanding of this process requires accurate knowledge of the topographical relationships between the cell membrane and potentially adhesive surfaces. This report describes an experimental study made on both the translational and rotational velocities of leukocytes sedimenting of a flat surface under laminar shear flow. The main conclusions are as follows: (a) Cells move close to the wall with constant velocity for several tens of seconds. (b) The numerical values of translational and rotational velocities are inconsistent with Goldman's model of a neutrally buoyant sphere in a laminar shear flow, unless a drag force corresponding to contact friction between cells and the chamber floor is added. The phenomenological friction coefficient was 7.4 millinewton.s/m. (c) Using a modified Goldman's theory, the width of the gap separating cells (6 microns radius) from the chamber floor was estimated at 1.4 micron. (d) It is shown that a high value of the cell-to-substrate gap may be accounted for by the presence of cell surface protrusions of a few micrometer length, in accordance with electron microscope observations performed on the same cell population. (e) In association with previously reported data (Tissot, O., C. Foa, C. Capo, H. Brailly, M. Delaage, and P. Bongrand. 1991. Biocolloids and Biosurfaces. In press), these results are consistent with the possibility that cell-substrate attachment be initiated by the formation of a single molecular bond, which might be considered as the rate limiting step. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 8 PMID:1540690

  13. Motion of cells sedimenting on a solid surface in a laminar shear flow.

    PubMed

    Tissot, O; Pierres, A; Foa, C; Delaage, M; Bongrand, P

    1992-01-01

    Cell adhesion often occurs under dynamic conditions, as in flowing blood. A quantitative understanding of this process requires accurate knowledge of the topographical relationships between the cell membrane and potentially adhesive surfaces. This report describes an experimental study made on both the translational and rotational velocities of leukocytes sedimenting of a flat surface under laminar shear flow. The main conclusions are as follows: (a) Cells move close to the wall with constant velocity for several tens of seconds. (b) The numerical values of translational and rotational velocities are inconsistent with Goldman's model of a neutrally buoyant sphere in a laminar shear flow, unless a drag force corresponding to contact friction between cells and the chamber floor is added. The phenomenological friction coefficient was 7.4 millinewton.s/m. (c) Using a modified Goldman's theory, the width of the gap separating cells (6 microns radius) from the chamber floor was estimated at 1.4 micron. (d) It is shown that a high value of the cell-to-substrate gap may be accounted for by the presence of cell surface protrusions of a few micrometer length, in accordance with electron microscope observations performed on the same cell population. (e) In association with previously reported data (Tissot, O., C. Foa, C. Capo, H. Brailly, M. Delaage, and P. Bongrand. 1991. Biocolloids and Biosurfaces. In press), these results are consistent with the possibility that cell-substrate attachment be initiated by the formation of a single molecular bond, which might be considered as the rate limiting step.

  14. Inertial effects at moderate Reynolds number in thin-film rimming flows driven by surface shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, E. D.; Hibberd, S.; Power, H.

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, we study two-dimensional thin-film flow inside a stationary circular cylinder driven by an imposed surface shear stress. Modelling is motivated by a need to understand the cooling and film dynamics provided by oil films in an aero-engine bearing chamber characterised by conditions of very high surface shear and additional film mass flux from oil droplets entering the film through the surface. In typical high-speed operation, film inertial effects can provide a significant leading-order mechanism neglected in existing lubrication theory models. Inertia at leading-order is included within a depth-averaged formulation where wall friction is evaluated similar to hydraulic models. This allows key nonlinear inertial effects to be included while retaining the ability to analyse the problem in a mathematically tractable formulation and compare with other approaches. In constructing this model, a set of simplified mass and momentum equations are integrated through the depth of the film yielding a spatially one-dimensional depth-averaged formulation of the problem. An a priori assumed form of velocity profile is needed to complete the system. In a local Stokes flow analysis, a quadratic profile is the exact solution for the velocity field though it must be modified when inertial effects become important. Extension of the velocity profile to a cubic profile is selected enabling specification of a wall friction model to include the roughness of the cylinder wall. A modelling advantage of including the inertia term, relevant to the applications considered, is that a smooth progression in solution can be obtained between cases of low Reynolds number corresponding to lubrication theory, and high Reynolds number corresponding to uniform rimming-flow. Importantly, we also investigate the effect of inertia on some typical solutions from other studies and present a greater insight to existing and new film solutions which arise from including inertia effects.

  15. Creep cavitation can establish a dynamic granular fluid pump in ductile shear zones.

    PubMed

    Fusseis, F; Regenauer-Lieb, K; Liu, J; Hough, R M; De Carlo, F

    2009-06-18

    The feedback between fluid migration and rock deformation in mid-crustal shear zones is acknowledged as being critical for earthquake nucleation, the initiation of subduction zones and the formation of mineral deposits. The importance of this poorly understood feedback is further highlighted by evidence for shear-zone-controlled advective flow of fluids in the ductile lower crust and the recognition that deformation-induced grain-scale porosity is a key to large-scale geodynamics. Fluid migration in the middle crust cannot be explained in terms of classical concepts. The environment is considered too hot for a dynamic fracture-sustained permeability as in the upper crust, and fluid pathways are generally too deformed to be controlled by equilibrium wetting angles that apply to hotter, deeper environments. Here we present evidence that mechanical and chemical potentials control a syndeformational porosity generation in mid-crustal shear zones. High-resolution synchrotron X-ray tomography and scanning electron microscopy observations allow us to formulate a model for fluid migration in shear zones where a permeable porosity is dynamically created by viscous grain-boundary sliding, creep cavitation, dissolution and precipitation. We propose that syndeformational fluid migration in our 'granular fluid pump' model is a self-sustained process controlled by the explicit role of the rate of entropy production of the underlying irreversible mechanical and chemical microprocesses. The model explains fluid transfer through the middle crust, where strain localization in the creep regime is required for plate tectonics, the formation of giant ore deposits, mantle degassing and earthquake nucleation. Our findings provide a key component for the understanding of creep instabilities in the middle crust. PMID:19536262

  16. Linear mechanism of surface gravity wave generation in horizontally sheared flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kalashnik, M. V.

    2008-01-15

    An analysis is presented of a linear mechanism of surface gravity wave generation in a horizontally sheared flow in a fluid layer with free boundary. A free-surface flow of this type is found to be algebraically unstable. The development of instability leads to the formation of surface gravity waves whose amplitude grows with time according to a power law. Flow stability is analyzed by using a nonmodal approach in which the behavior of a spatial Fourier harmonic of a disturbance is considered in a semi-Lagrangian frame of reference moving with the flow. Shear-flow disturbances are divided into two classes (wave and vortex disturbances) depending on the value of potential vorticity. It is shown that vortex disturbances decay with time while the energy of wave disturbances increases indefinitely. Transformation of vortex disturbances into wave ones under strong shear is described.

  17. Nonlinear Instability of a Uni-directional Transversely Sheared Mean Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wundrow, David W.; Goldstein, Marvin E.

    1994-01-01

    It is well known that the presence of a weak cross flow in an otherwise two-dimensional shear flow results in a spanwise variation in the mean streamwise velocity profile that can lead to an amplification of certain three-dimensional disturbances through a kind of resonant-interaction mechanism (Goldstein and Wundrow 1994). The spatial evolution of an initially linear, finite-growth-rate, instability wave in such a spanwise-varying shear flow is considered, The base flow, which is governed by the three-dimensional parabolized Navier-Stokes equations, is initiated by imposing a spanwise- periodic cross-flow velocity on an otherwise two-dimensional shear flow at some fixed streamwise location. The resulting mean-flow distortion initially grows with increasing streamwise distance, reaches a maximum and eventually decays through the action of viscosity. This decay, which coincides with the viscous spread of of the shear layer, means that the local growth rate of the instability wave will eventually decrease as the wave propagates downstream. Nonlinear effects can then become important within a thin spanwise-modulated critical layer once the local instability-wave amplitude and growth rate become sufficiently large and small, respectively. The amplitude equation that describes this stage of evolution is shown to be a generalization of the one obtained by Goldstein and Choi (1989) who considered the related problem of the interaction of two oblique modes in a two-dimensional shear layer.

  18. Single deformable bubble interaction with turbulence in uniform and shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jinyong; Bolotnov, Igor

    2014-11-01

    Combined direct numerical simulation (DNS) and interface tracking method (ITM) approach is utilized to study the effect of bubble deformability on the bubble-induced turbulence. Set of simulations is performed with 5mm diameter bubble in laminar and turbulent flows. Uniform shear and constant mean velocity profiles are used to perform evaluation of bubble-induced turbulence in various cases. The simulation capabilities allow estimating the turbulent kinetic energy before and after the bubble thus providing the information about bubble's influence on the liquid turbulence. The effect of bubble deformability is studied by separately changing the surface tension parameter. The bubble is controlled in one location of the domain using external forces. The force evolution is managed by proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller. The steady-state values of the lateral and stream-wise forces result in the lift and drag force estimates on the bubble. DNS approach allows for comprehensive, well-defined studies of bubble-induced turbulence and interfacial forces by separately varying bubble's deformability, relative velocity, level of turbulence and local shear. This work presents new opportunities for the development of multiphase computational fluid dynamics closure laws. The presented work is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1333993.

  19. Dynamics of spheroid particles in channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Wenbin; Alexeev, Alexander

    2012-11-01

    The effect of inertia on the dynamics of rigid spheroid microparticles in a pressure-driven channel flow is studied using a hybrid lattice Boltzmann and lattice spring method. We find distinctive behaviors of particles depending on the particle shape, initial orientation, and ratio of particle size to the channel size. Two possible stable modes of motion are found for prolate spheroids. Particles either tumble in a shear plane or spin with the axis parallel to the vortex direction. We present a phase diagram showing the transition between these two modes. Cross-stream migration and equilibrium trajectories of particles are also investigated and found to depend on the particle shape and mode of motion. The simulations results are compared with experimental data showing favorable agreement. Our results will be useful for separating biological and synthetic particles by size and shape.

  20. Cylindrically confined pair-ion-electron and pair-ion plasmas having axial sheared flow and radial gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Batool, Nazia; Saleem, H.

    2013-10-15

    The linear and nonlinear dynamics of pair-ion (PI) and pair-ion-electron plasmas (PIE) have been investigated in a cylindrical geometry with a sheared plasma flow along the axial direction having radial dependence. The coupled linear dispersion relation of low frequency electrostatic waves has been presented taking into account the Guassian profile of density and linear gradient of sheared flow. It is pointed out that the quasi-neutral cold inhomogeneous pure pair ion plasma supports only the obliquely propagating convective cell mode. The linear dispersion relation of this mode has been solved using boundary conditions. The nonlinear structures in the form of vortices formed by different waves have been discussed in PI and PIE plasmas.

  1. Shear-thinning effects on vortex breakdown in swirling pipe flows: experiments and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, David; Petit, Tom; Thompson, Deacon; Poole, Robert

    2014-11-01

    Laminar pipe flow with a controllable wall swirl has been studied both numerically and experimentally to explore the behaviour of inelastic shear-thinning fluids. The pipe consists of two smoothly joined sections that can be rotated independently about the same axis. The circumstances of flow entering a stationary pipe from a rotating pipe (decaying swirl) and flow entering a rotating pipe from a stationary pipe (growing swirl) have been investigated. A numerical parametric study using a simple power law model is conducted and reveals the axial length of the recirculation region is increased for shear-thinning fluids and decreased for shear-thickening (in comparison to the Newtonian reference). The critical swirl ratio required to induce the breakdown at a range of Reynolds numbers and extent of shear-thinning is investigated and a method of scaling is presented that collapses all the data for all fluids (shear-thickening, Newtonian and shear-thinning) onto a single universal curve. Experimental visualisations using an aqueous solution of Xantham Gum (shear-thinning) confirm the conclusions drawn from the numerical results.

  2. Instability of streaks in pipe flow of shear-thinning fluids.

    PubMed

    López Carranza, S N; Jenny, M; Nouar, C

    2013-08-01

    This study is motivated by recent experimental results dealing with the transition to turbulence in a pipe flow of shear-thinning fluids, where a streaky flow with an azimuthal wave number n=1 is observed in the transitional regime. Here, a linear stability analysis of pipe flow of shear-thinning fluids modulated azimuthally by finite amplitude streaks is performed. The shear-thinning behavior of the fluid is described by the Carreau model. The streaky base flows considered are obtained from two-dimensional direct numerical simulation using finite amplitude longitudinal rolls as the initial condition and by extracting the velocity field at time t(max), where the amplitude of the streaks reaches its maximum, denoted by A(max). It is found that the amplitude A(max) increases with increasing Reynolds number as well as with increasing amplitude E(0) of the initial longitudinal rolls. For sufficiently large streaks amplitude, streamwise velocity profiles develop inflection points, leading to instabilities. Depending on the threshold amplitude A(c), two different modes may trigger the instability of the streaks. If A(c) exceeds approximately 41.5% of the centerline velocity, the instability mode is located near the axis of the pipe, i.e., it is a "center mode." For weaker amplitude A(c), the instability mode is located near the pipe wall, in the region of highest wall normal shear, i.e., it is a "wall mode." The threshold amplitude A(c) decreases with increasing shear-thinning effects. The energy equation analysis indicates that (i) wall modes are driven mainly by the work of the Reynolds stress against the wall normal shear and (ii) for center modes, the contribution of the normal wall shear remains dominant; however, it is noted that the contribution of the Reynolds stress against the azimuthal shear increases with increasing shear-thinning effects.

  3. Experimental Study of the Vortex-Induced Vibration of Drilling Risers under the Shear Flow with the Same Shear Parameter at the Different Reynolds Numbers

    PubMed Central

    Liangjie, Mao; Qingyou, Liu; Shouwei, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    A considerable number of studies for VIV under the uniform flow have been performed. However, research on VIV under shear flow is scarce. An experiment for VIV under the shear flow with the same shear parameter at the two different Reynolds numbers was conducted in a deep-water offshore basin. Various measurements were obtained by the fiber bragg grating strain sensors. Experimental data were analyzed by modal analysis method. Results show several valuable features. First, the corresponding maximum order mode of the natural frequency for shedding frequency is the maximum dominant vibration mode and multi-modal phenomenon is appeared in VIV under the shear flow, and multi-modal phenomenon is more apparent at the same shear parameter with an increasing Reynolds number under the shear flow effect. Secondly, the riser vibrates at the natural frequency and the dominant vibration frequency increases for the effect of the real-time tension amplitude under the shear flow and the IL vibration frequency is the similar with the CF vibration frequency at the Reynolds number of 1105 in our experimental condition and the IL dominant frequency is twice the CF dominant frequency with an increasing Reynolds number. In addition, the displacement trajectories at the different locations of the riser appear the same shape and the shape is changed at the same shear parameter with an increasing Reynolds number under the shear flow. The diagonal displacement trajectories are observed at the low Reynolds number and the crescent-shaped displacement trajectories appear with an increasing Reynolds number under shear flow in the experiment. PMID:25118607

  4. Experimental study of the vortex-induced vibration of drilling risers under the shear flow with the same shear parameter at the different Reynolds numbers.

    PubMed

    Liangjie, Mao; Qingyou, Liu; Shouwei, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    A considerable number of studies for VIV under the uniform flow have been performed. However, research on VIV under shear flow is scarce. An experiment for VIV under the shear flow with the same shear parameter at the two different Reynolds numbers was conducted in a deep-water offshore basin. Various measurements were obtained by the fiber bragg grating strain sensors. Experimental data were analyzed by modal analysis method. Results show several valuable features. First, the corresponding maximum order mode of the natural frequency for shedding frequency is the maximum dominant vibration mode and multi-modal phenomenon is appeared in VIV under the shear flow, and multi-modal phenomenon is more apparent at the same shear parameter with an increasing Reynolds number under the shear flow effect. Secondly, the riser vibrates at the natural frequency and the dominant vibration frequency increases for the effect of the real-time tension amplitude under the shear flow and the IL vibration frequency is the similar with the CF vibration frequency at the Reynolds number of 1105 in our experimental condition and the IL dominant frequency is twice the CF dominant frequency with an increasing Reynolds number. In addition, the displacement trajectories at the different locations of the riser appear the same shape and the shape is changed at the same shear parameter with an increasing Reynolds number under the shear flow. The diagonal displacement trajectories are observed at the low Reynolds number and the crescent-shaped displacement trajectories appear with an increasing Reynolds number under shear flow in the experiment.

  5. Experimental study of the vortex-induced vibration of drilling risers under the shear flow with the same shear parameter at the different Reynolds numbers.

    PubMed

    Liangjie, Mao; Qingyou, Liu; Shouwei, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    A considerable number of studies for VIV under the uniform flow have been performed. However, research on VIV under shear flow is scarce. An experiment for VIV under the shear flow with the same shear parameter at the two different Reynolds numbers was conducted in a deep-water offshore basin. Various measurements were obtained by the fiber bragg grating strain sensors. Experimental data were analyzed by modal analysis method. Results show several valuable features. First, the corresponding maximum order mode of the natural frequency for shedding frequency is the maximum dominant vibration mode and multi-modal phenomenon is appeared in VIV under the shear flow, and multi-modal phenomenon is more apparent at the same shear parameter with an increasing Reynolds number under the shear flow effect. Secondly, the riser vibrates at the natural frequency and the dominant vibration frequency increases for the effect of the real-time tension amplitude under the shear flow and the IL vibration frequency is the similar with the CF vibration frequency at the Reynolds number of 1105 in our experimental condition and the IL dominant frequency is twice the CF dominant frequency with an increasing Reynolds number. In addition, the displacement trajectories at the different locations of the riser appear the same shape and the shape is changed at the same shear parameter with an increasing Reynolds number under the shear flow. The diagonal displacement trajectories are observed at the low Reynolds number and the crescent-shaped displacement trajectories appear with an increasing Reynolds number under shear flow in the experiment. PMID:25118607

  6. Deformation behavior of metallic glasses with shear band like atomic structure: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Zhong, C; Zhang, H; Cao, Q P; Wang, X D; Zhang, D X; Ramamurty, U; Jiang, J Z

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were employed to investigate the plastic deformation within the shear bands in three different metallic glasses (MGs). To mimic shear bands, MG specimens were first deformed until flow localization occurs, and then the volume of the material within the localized regions was extracted and replicated. Homogeneous deformation that is independent of the size of the specimen was observed in specimens with shear band like structure, even at a temperature that is far below the glass transition temperature. Structural relaxation and rapid cooling were employed to examine the effect of free volume content on the deformation behavior. This was followed by detailed atomic structure analyses, employing the concepts of Voronoi polyhedra and "liquid-like" regions that contain high fraction of sub-atomic size open volumes. Results suggest that the total fraction of atoms in liquid-like regions is a key parameter that controls the plastic deformation in MGs. These are discussed in the context of reported experimental results and possible strategies for synthesizing monolithic amorphous materials that can accommodate large tensile plasticity are suggested. PMID:27480496

  7. Deformation behavior of metallic glasses with shear band like atomic structure: a molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, C.; Zhang, H.; Cao, Q. P.; Wang, X. D.; Zhang, D. X.; Ramamurty, U.; Jiang, J. Z.

    2016-08-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were employed to investigate the plastic deformation within the shear bands in three different metallic glasses (MGs). To mimic shear bands, MG specimens were first deformed until flow localization occurs, and then the volume of the material within the localized regions was extracted and replicated. Homogeneous deformation that is independent of the size of the specimen was observed in specimens with shear band like structure, even at a temperature that is far below the glass transition temperature. Structural relaxation and rapid cooling were employed to examine the effect of free volume content on the deformation behavior. This was followed by detailed atomic structure analyses, employing the concepts of Voronoi polyhedra and “liquid-like” regions that contain high fraction of sub-atomic size open volumes. Results suggest that the total fraction of atoms in liquid-like regions is a key parameter that controls the plastic deformation in MGs. These are discussed in the context of reported experimental results and possible strategies for synthesizing monolithic amorphous materials that can accommodate large tensile plasticity are suggested.

  8. Deformation behavior of metallic glasses with shear band like atomic structure: a molecular dynamics study

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, C.; Zhang, H.; Cao, Q. P.; Wang, X. D.; Zhang, D. X.; Ramamurty, U.; Jiang, J. Z.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were employed to investigate the plastic deformation within the shear bands in three different metallic glasses (MGs). To mimic shear bands, MG specimens were first deformed until flow localization occurs, and then the volume of the material within the localized regions was extracted and replicated. Homogeneous deformation that is independent of the size of the specimen was observed in specimens with shear band like structure, even at a temperature that is far below the glass transition temperature. Structural relaxation and rapid cooling were employed to examine the effect of free volume content on the deformation behavior. This was followed by detailed atomic structure analyses, employing the concepts of Voronoi polyhedra and “liquid-like” regions that contain high fraction of sub-atomic size open volumes. Results suggest that the total fraction of atoms in liquid-like regions is a key parameter that controls the plastic deformation in MGs. These are discussed in the context of reported experimental results and possible strategies for synthesizing monolithic amorphous materials that can accommodate large tensile plasticity are suggested. PMID:27480496

  9. Deformation behavior of metallic glasses with shear band like atomic structure: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Zhong, C; Zhang, H; Cao, Q P; Wang, X D; Zhang, D X; Ramamurty, U; Jiang, J Z

    2016-08-02

    Molecular dynamics simulations were employed to investigate the plastic deformation within the shear bands in three different metallic glasses (MGs). To mimic shear bands, MG specimens were first deformed until flow localization occurs, and then the volume of the material within the localized regions was extracted and replicated. Homogeneous deformation that is independent of the size of the specimen was observed in specimens with shear band like structure, even at a temperature that is far below the glass transition temperature. Structural relaxation and rapid cooling were employed to examine the effect of free volume content on the deformation behavior. This was followed by detailed atomic structure analyses, employing the concepts of Voronoi polyhedra and "liquid-like" regions that contain high fraction of sub-atomic size open volumes. Results suggest that the total fraction of atoms in liquid-like regions is a key parameter that controls the plastic deformation in MGs. These are discussed in the context of reported experimental results and possible strategies for synthesizing monolithic amorphous materials that can accommodate large tensile plasticity are suggested.

  10. Dynamics and correlation length scales of a glass-forming liquid in quiescent and sheared conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wen-Sheng; Sun, Zhao-Yan; An, Li-Jia

    2012-08-01

    We numerically study dynamics and correlation length scales of a colloidal liquid in both quiescent and sheared conditions to further understand the origin of slow dynamics and dynamic heterogeneity in glass-forming systems. The simulation is performed in a weakly frustrated two-dimensional liquid, where locally preferred order is allowed to develop with increasing density. The four-point density correlations and bond-orientation correlations, which have been frequently used to capture dynamic and static length scales ξ in a quiescent condition, can be readily extended to a system under steady shear in this case. In the absence of shear, we confirmed the previous findings that the dynamic slowing down accompanies the development of dynamic heterogeneity. The dynamic and static length scales increase with α-relaxation time τα as a power law \\xi \\sim {\\tau }_{\\alpha }^{\\mu }, with μ > 0. In the presence of shear, both viscosity and τα have power-law dependences on shear rate in the marked shear-thinning regime. However, the dependence of correlation lengths cannot be described by power laws in the same regime. Furthermore, the relation \\xi \\sim {\\tau }_{\\alpha }^{\\mu } between length scales and dynamics holds for not too strong shear where thermal fluctuations and external forces are both important in determining the properties of dense liquids. Thus, our results demonstrate a link between slow dynamics and structure in glass-forming liquids even under nonequilibrium conditions.

  11. Angular Momentum Transport in Convectively Unstable Shear Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Käpylä, Petri J.; Brandenburg, Axel; Korpi, Maarit J.; Snellman, Jan E.; Narayan, Ramesh

    2010-08-01

    Angular momentum transport due to hydrodynamic turbulent convection is studied using local three-dimensional numerical simulations employing the shearing box approximation. We determine the turbulent viscosity from non-rotating runs over a range of values of the shear parameter and use a simple analytical model in order to extract the non-diffusive contribution (Λ-effect) to the stress in runs where rotation is included. Our results suggest that the turbulent viscosity is on the order of the mixing length estimate and weakly affected by rotation. The Λ-effect is non-zero and a factor of 2-4 smaller than the turbulent viscosity in the slow rotation regime. We demonstrate that for Keplerian shear, the angular momentum transport can change sign and be outward when the rotation period is greater than the turnover time, i.e., when the Coriolis number is below unity. This result seems to be relatively independent of the value of the Rayleigh number.

  12. ANGULAR MOMENTUM TRANSPORT IN CONVECTIVELY UNSTABLE SHEAR FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Kaepylae, Petri J.; Korpi, Maarit J.; Snellman, Jan E.; Brandenburg, Axel; Narayan, Ramesh

    2010-08-10

    Angular momentum transport due to hydrodynamic turbulent convection is studied using local three-dimensional numerical simulations employing the shearing box approximation. We determine the turbulent viscosity from non-rotating runs over a range of values of the shear parameter and use a simple analytical model in order to extract the non-diffusive contribution ({Lambda}-effect) to the stress in runs where rotation is included. Our results suggest that the turbulent viscosity is on the order of the mixing length estimate and weakly affected by rotation. The {Lambda}-effect is non-zero and a factor of 2-4 smaller than the turbulent viscosity in the slow rotation regime. We demonstrate that for Keplerian shear, the angular momentum transport can change sign and be outward when the rotation period is greater than the turnover time, i.e., when the Coriolis number is below unity. This result seems to be relatively independent of the value of the Rayleigh number.

  13. Non-isothermal rimming flow with the effects of surface shear and droplet impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, E. D.; Hibberd, S.; Power, H.

    2015-12-01

    We present a mathematical model for the flow and temperature in a thin liquid film flow coating the inside of a cylinder driven at the surface by an air shear and distributed flux of liquid droplets with liquid removal through a region of the cylinder wall. Modelling is motivated by the industrial application of droplet-cooling of thin oil films in aero-engine bearing chambers where films may be fast-moving which involve significant inertia and heat convection. To account for these effects, we allow the Reynolds and Péclet numbers of the film to be sufficiently large that they persist at leading-order in the thin-film limit. We adopt a Karman-Pohlhausen integral approach of boundary layer theory to extend previous studies to include surface droplet impact and cooling. Example numerical results are presented to illustrate how inertial effects and the impacting droplets influence film dynamics. Thermal characteristics of a selection of flows subject to droplet cooling are investigated.

  14. Steady shear flow properties of Cordia myxa leaf gum as a function of concentration and temperature.

    PubMed

    Chaharlang, Mahmood; Samavati, Vahid

    2015-08-01

    The steady shear flow properties of dispersions of Cordia myxa leaf gum (CMLG) were determined as a function of concentration (0.5-2.5%, w/w), and temperature (10-50 °C). The CMLG dispersions exhibited strong shear-thinning behavior at all concentrations and temperatures. The Power-law (Ostwald-Waele's) and Herschel-Bulkley models were employed to characterize flow behavior of CMLG solutions at 0.1-100 s(-1) shear rate. Non-Newtonian shear-thinning behavior was observed at all temperatures and concentrations. While increase in temperature decreased the viscosity and increased the flow behavior indices, adverse effect was obtained by increasing the concentration. The Power-law model was found the best model to describe steady shear flow behavior of CMLG. The pseudoplasticity of CMLG increased markedly with concentration. An Arrhenius-type model was also used to describe the effect of temperature. The activation energy (Ea) appeared in the range of 5.972-18.104 kJ/mol, as concentration increased from 0.5% to 2.5%, at a shear rate of 10 s(-1).

  15. A molten globule intermediate of the von Willebrand factor A1 domain firmly tethers platelets under shear flow.

    PubMed

    Tischer, Alexander; Madde, Pranathi; Blancas-Mejia, Luis M; Auton, Matthew

    2014-05-01

    Clinical mutations in patients diagnosed with Type 2A von Willebrand disease (VWD) have been identified that break the single disulfide bond linking N- and C-termini in the vWF A1 domain. We have modeled the effect of these mutations on the disulfide-bonded structure of A1 by reducing and carboxy-amidating these cysteines. Solution biophysical studies show that loss of this disulfide bond induces a molten globule conformational state lacking global tertiary structure but retaining residual secondary structure. The conformational dependence of platelet adhesion to these native and molten globule states of A1 is quantitatively compared using real-time high-speed video microscopy analysis of platelet translocation dynamics under shear flow in a parallel plate microfluidic flow chamber. While normal platelets translocating on surface-captured native A1 domain retain the catch-bond character of pause times that increase as a function of shear rate at low shear and decrease as a function of shear rate at high shear, platelets that interact with A1 lacking the disulfide bond remain stably attached and do not translocate. Based on these findings, we propose that the shear stress-sensitive regulation of the A1-GPIb interaction is due to folding the tertiary structure of this domain. Removal of the tertiary structure by disrupting the disulfide bond destroys this regulatory mechanism resulting in high-strength interactions between platelets and vWF A1 that are dependent only on residual secondary structure elements present in the molten globule conformation. PMID:24265179

  16. Tank-Treading of Erythrocytes in Strong Shear Flows via a Nonstiff Cytoskeleton-Based Continuum Computational Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Dodson, W.R.; Dimitrakopoulos, P.

    2010-01-01

    We develop a computationally efficient cytoskeleton-based continuum erythrocyte algorithm. The cytoskeleton is modeled as a two-dimensional elastic solid with comparable shearing and area-dilatation resistance that follows a material law (Skalak, R., A. Tozeren, R. P. Zarda, and S. Chien. 1973. Strain energy function of red blood cell membranes. Biophys. J. 13:245–264). Our modeling enforces the global area-incompressibility of the spectrin skeleton (being enclosed beneath the lipid bilayer in the erythrocyte membrane) via a nonstiff, and thus efficient, adaptive prestress procedure which accounts for the (locally) isotropic stress imposed by the lipid bilayer on the cytoskeleton. In addition, we investigate the dynamics of healthy human erythrocytes in strong shear flows with capillary number Ca = O(1) and small-to-moderate viscosity ratios 0.001 ≤ λ ≤ 1.5. These conditions correspond to a wide range of surrounding medium viscosities (4–600 mPa s) and shear flow rates (0.02–440 s−1), and match those used in ektacytometry systems. Our computational results on the cell deformability and tank-treading frequency are compared with ektacytometry findings. The tank-treading period is shown to be inversely proportional to the shear rate and to increase linearly with the ratio of the cytoplasm viscosity to that of the suspending medium. Our modeling also predicts that the cytoskeleton undergoes measurable local area dilatation and compression during the tank-treading of the cells. PMID:21044588

  17. X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy studies of structural irreversibility in a colloidal gel subjected to oscillatory shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kweon, Mu Sung; Burghardt, Wesley; Ramakrishnan, Subramanian; Louis, Golda; Thomas, Danica; Narayanan, Suresh

    2015-03-01

    X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) is used to probe the microscopic structural reversibility in a colloidal gel subjected to oscillatory shear flow. Silicon dioxide particles in decalin aggregate into a gel structure as a result of depletion interactions associated with dissolved polystyrene molecules. XPCS studies on aged quiescent gels show negligible structural dynamics on time scales of tens of seconds. Such samples were subjected to oscillatory shear with varying stain amplitude using a rheometer installed in the XPCS beam line and x-ray capable polycarbonate fixtures; this enable simultaneous rheological measurements during the XPCS experiment. In the presence of unidirectional shear flow, the decay of the XPCS autocorrelation function is dominated by the convective motion induced by the applied deformation. In oscillatory shearing of samples in the absence of significant structural relaxation, the autocorrelation function becomes periodic, returning to its initial value once every oscillation period. At higher strains, irreversible motions at the microscopic level lead to decay in the 'echos' of the autocorrelation function. Interestingly, structural irreversibility is detected by XPCS only at strains that are significantly higher than those at which nonlinearity

  18. Shear-slip analysis in multiphase fluid-flow reservoir engineeringap plications using TOUGH-FLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Birkholzer, Jens; Cappa, Frederic; Oldenburg,Curt; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-15

    This paper describes and demonstrates the use of the coupledTOUGH-FLAC simulator for geomechanical shear-slip (failure) analysis inmultiphase fluid-flow reservoir-engineering applications. Two approachesfor analyzing shear-slip are described, one using continuum stress-strainanalysis and another using discrete fault analysis. The use of shear-slipanalysis in TOUGH-FLAC is demonstrated on application examples related toCO2 sequestration and geothermal energy extraction. In the case of CO2sequestration, the shear-slip analysis is used to evaluate maximumsustainable CO2-injection pressure under increasing reservoir pressure,whereas in the case of geothermal energy extraction, the shear-slipanalysis is used to study induced seismicity during steam productionunder decreasing reservoir pressure and temperature.

  19. Study of spatial growth of disturbances in an Incompressible Double Shear Layer flow configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, Hareshram; Jacobs, Gustaaf

    2014-11-01

    The spatial growth of disturbance within the linear instability regime in an incompressible 2D double shear layer flow configuration is studied by performing a Direct Numerical Simulation. The motivation of this study is to characterize the effect of the presence of an additional shear layer on the spatial growth of a shear layer instability. Initially, a DNS of an incompressible single shear layer is performed and the spatial growth rate of various disturbance frequency modes are validated with Linear Stability Analysis. The addtional shear layer is found to impact the spatial growth rates of the different disturbances and the frequency of the mode with the maximum growth rate is found to be shifted.

  20. Sheared velocity flows as a source of pressure anisotropy in low collisionality plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Sarto, D.; Pegoraro, F.; Califano, F.

    2014-12-01

    Non-Maxwellian metaequilibrium states may exist in low-collisionality plasmas as evidenced by direct (particle distributions) and indirect (e.g., instabilities driven by pressure anisotropy) satellite and laboratory measurements. These are directly observed in the solar wind (e.g. [1]), in magnetospheric reconnection events [2], in magnetically confined plasmas [3] or in simulations of Vlasov turbulence [4]. By including the full pressure tensor dynamics in a fluid plasma model, we show that a sheared velocity field can provide an effective mechanism that makes an initial isotropic state anisotropic. We discuss how the propagation of magneto-elastic waves can affect the pressure tensor anisotropization and the small scale formation that arise from the interplay between the gyrotropic terms due to the magnetic field and the flow vorticity and the non-gyropropic effect of the flow strain tensor. We support this analysis by a numerical integration of the nonlinear equations describing the pressure tensor evolution. This anisotropization mechanism might provide a good candidate for the understanding of the observed correlation between the presence of a sheared velocity flow and the signature of pressure anisotropies which are not yet explained within the standard models based e.g. on the CGL paradigm. Examples of these signatures are provided e.g. by the threshold lowering of ion-Weibel instabilities in the geomagnetic tail, observed in concomitance to the presence of a velocity shear in the near-earth plasma profile [5], or by the relatively stronger anisotropization measured for core protons in the fast solar wind [4,6] or in "space simulation" laboratory plasma experiments [3]. [1] E. Marsch et al., Journ. Geophys. Res. 109, A04120 (2004); Yu. V. Khotyainstev at el., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 165001 (2011). [2] N. Aunai et al., Ann. Geophys. 29, 1571 (2011); N. Aunai et al., Journ. Geophys. Res. 116, A09232 (2011). [3] E.E. Scime et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 2157 (2000). [4

  1. Sheared velocity flows as a source of pressure anisotropy in low collisionality plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Sarto, Daniele; Pegoraro, Francesco; Cerri, Silvio Sergio; Califano, Francesco; Tenerani, Anna

    2015-04-01

    Non-Maxwellian metaequilibrium states may exist in low-collisionality plasmas as evidenced by direct (particle distributions) and indirect (e.g., instabilities driven by pressure anisotropy) satellite and laboratory measurements. These are directly observed in the solar wind (e.g. [1]), in magnetospheric reconnection events [2], in magnetically confined plasmas [3] or in simulations of Vlasov turbulence [4]. By including the full pressure tensor dynamics in a fluid plasma model, we show that a sheared velocity field can provide an effective mechanism that makes an initial isotropic state anisotropic. We discuss how the propagation of "magneto-elastic" waves can affect the pressure tensor anisotropization and the small scale formation that arise from the interplay between the gyrotropic terms due to the magnetic field and flow vorticity, and the non-gyropropic effect of the flow strain tensor. We support this analysis by a numerical integration of the nonlinear equations describing the pressure tensor evolution. This anisotropization mechanism might provide a good candidate for the understanding of the observed correlation between the presence of a sheared velocity flow and the signature of pressure anisotropies which are not yet explained within the standard models based e.g. on the CGL paradigm (see also [5]). Examples of these signatures are provided by the threshold lowering of ion-Weibel instabilities in the geomagnetic tail, observed in concomitance to the presence of a velocity shear in the near-earth plasma profile [6], or by the relatively stronger anisotropization measured for core protons in the fast solar wind [4,7] or in "space simulation" laboratory plasma experiments [3]. 1] E. Marsch et al., Journ. Geophys. Res. 109, A04120 (2004); Yu. V. Khotyainstev at el., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 165001 (2011). [2] N. Aunai et al., Ann. Geophys. 29, 1571 (2011); N. Aunai et al., Journ. Geophys. Res. 116, A09232 (2011). [3] E.E. Scime et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 2157

  2. Two-point-vortex evolution in an oscillatory shear flow with rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhov, E. A.; Koshel, K. V.

    2014-10-01

    We concern ourselves with the bounded and unbounded quasi-periodic motions of two point vortices of unequal strengths unfolding in a two-dimensional incompressible inviscid fluid under the influence of an oscillatory shear flow with rotation and study in detail their impact on passive tracer transport. We deal with all the possible vortex sign combinations, thus considering general vortex motion along and against the rotation direction. All the sets of the vortex signs are shown to induce qualitatively divergent transport patterns. In general, if the vortices due to self-influence tend to move in the direction coinciding with the exterior rotation, then the induced transport will be less effective compared to the vortex motion aligned mainly against the rotation. Regions enduring effective stretching, and consequently prone to intense mixing are identified by means of finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLE). Looking into the local structure of the tracer field in the vicinity of the vortices, we show that varying external fields has almost no impact on the dynamics, inducing almost indistinguishable FTLE patterns. However, we establish that slightly further from the vortices the transport dynamics for both cases, bounded and unbounded, differs significantly, tending to rather elongated invariant manifolds in the unbounded motion case, and to round ones, enveloping stagnation zones with dominantly regular dynamics, otherwise. An exponential growth of the standard deviation of a tracer patch is established in the unbounded motion regime.

  3. What Can the Kinematic Complexity of Astrophysical Shear Flows Lead To

    SciTech Connect

    Mahajan, S.M. ); Rogava, A.D. )

    1999-06-01

    We develop a method for investigating waves and instabilities in astrophysical shear flows with complex kinematics. Using new tools, we find an unexpected richness in the spectrum of compressible fluctuations sustained by such a flow. The principal characteristic of the revealed exotic phenomena is their [ital asymptotic persistence] in the absence of viscosity. [open quotes]Echoing[close quotes] as well as strongly unstable (including parametrically driven) solutions are identified. Examples of astrophysical shear flows with nontrivial velocity structure where these method and results can be applied are also discussed. [copyright] [ital [copyright] 1999.] [ital The American Astronomical Society

  4. What Can the Kinematic Complexity of Astrophysical Shear Flows Lead To?

    SciTech Connect

    Mahajan, S.M.; Rogava, A.D.

    1999-06-01

    We develop a method for investigating waves and instabilities in astrophysical shear flows with complex kinematics. Using new tools, we find an unexpected richness in the spectrum of compressible fluctuations sustained by such a flow. The principal characteristic of the revealed exotic phenomena is their {ital asymptotic persistence} in the absence of viscosity. {open_quotes}Echoing{close_quotes} as well as strongly unstable (including parametrically driven) solutions are identified. Examples of astrophysical shear flows with nontrivial velocity structure where these method and results can be applied are also discussed. {copyright} {ital {copyright} 1999.} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

  5. The Sobolev Stability Threshold for 2D Shear Flows Near Couette

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedrossian, Jacob; Vicol, Vlad; Wang, Fei

    2016-08-01

    We consider the 2D Navier-Stokes equation on T × R , with initial datum that is ɛ -close in H^N to a shear flow (U(y), 0), where Vert U(y) - yVert _{H^{N+4}} ≪ 1 and N>1 . We prove that if ɛ ≪ ν ^{1/2} , where ν denotes the inverse Reynolds number, then the solution of the Navier-Stokes equation remains ɛ -close in H^1 to (e^{t ν partial _{yy}}U(y),0) for all t>0 . Moreover, the solution converges to a decaying shear flow for times t ≫ ν ^{-1/3} by a mixing-enhanced dissipation effect, and experiences a transient growth of gradients. In particular, this shows that the stability threshold in finite regularity scales no worse than ν ^{1/2} for 2D shear flows close to the Couette flow.

  6. 3D-PTV measurement of the phototactic movement of algae in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Tatsuyuki; Ishikawa, Takuji; Ueno, Hironori; Numayama-Tsuruta, Keiko; Imai, Yosuke; Yamaguchi, Takami

    2012-11-01

    Recently, swimming motion of algae cells is researched actively, because algae fuel is one of the hottest topic in engineering. It is known that algae swim toward the light for photosynthesis however, the effect of a background flow on the unidirectional swimming is unclear. In this study, we used Volvox as a model alga and placed them in a simple shear flow with or without light stimulus. The shear flow was generated by moving two flat sheets in the opposite direction tangentially. A red LED light (wave length 660 nm) was used as an observation light source, and a white LED light was used to stimulate cells for the phototaxis. The trajectories of individual cells were measured by a 3D-PTV system, consists of a pair of high-speed camera with macro lenses. The results were analyzed to understand the effect of the background shear flow on the phototaxis of cells.

  7. Bingham and Response Characteristics of ER Fluids in Shear and Flow Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H. G.; Choi, S. B.; Han, S. S.; Kim, J. H.; Suh, M. S.

    This paper presents field-dependent Bingham and response characteristics of ER fluid under shear and flow modes. Two different types of electroviscometers are designed and manufactured for the shear mode and flow mode, respectively. An ER fluid consisting of soluble chemical starches (particles) and silicon oil is made and its field-dependent yield stress is experimentally distilled at two different temperatures using the electroviscometers. Time responses of the ER fluid to step electric fields are also evaluated under two operating modes. In addition, a cylindrical ER damper, which is operated under the flow mode, is adopted and its measured damping force is compared with predicted one obtained from Bingham model of the shear and flow mode, respectively.

  8. Dynamically triggered slip leading to sustained fault gouge weakening under laboratory shear conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, P. A.; Carmeliet, J.; Savage, H. M.; Scuderi, M.; Carpenter, B. M.; Guyer, R. A.; Daub, E. G.; Marone, C.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate dynamic wave-triggered slip under laboratory shear conditions. The experiment is composed of a three-block system containing two gouge layers composed of glass beads and held in place by a fixed load in a biaxial configuration. When the system is sheared under steady state conditions at a normal load of 4 MPa, we find that shear failure may be instantaneously triggered by a dynamic wave, corresponding to material weakening and softening if the system is in a critical shear stress state (near failure). Following triggering, the gouge material remains in a perturbed state over multiple slip cycles as evidenced by the recovery of the material strength, shear modulus, and slip recurrence time. This work suggests that faults must be critically stressed to trigger under dynamic conditions and that the recovery process following a dynamically triggered event differs from the recovery following a spontaneous event.

  9. Resonant behavior of trapped Brownian particles in an oscillatory shear flow.

    PubMed

    Kählert, Hanno; Löwen, Hartmut

    2012-10-01

    The response of harmonically trapped Brownian particles to an externally imposed oscillatory shear flow is explored by theory and computer simulation. The special case of a single trapped particle is solved analytically. We present explicit results for the time-dependent density and the velocity distribution. The response of the many-body problem is studied by computer simulations. In particular, we investigate the influence of oscillatory shear flow on the internal modes of the cluster. As a function of the shear oscillation frequency, we find resonant behavior for certain (antisymmetric) normal modes, implying that they can be efficiently excited by oscillatory shear. Our results are verifiable in experiments on dusty plasmas and trapped colloidal dispersions.

  10. Hydraulic theory for a debris flow supported on a collisional shear layer.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, J. T.; Askari, E.

    1999-09-01

    We consider a heap of grains driven by gravity down an incline. We assume that the heap is supported at its base on a relatively thin carpet of intensely sheared, highly agitated grains that interact through collisions. We adopt the balance laws, constitutive relations, and boundary conditions of a kinetic theory for dense granular flows and determine the relationship between the shear stress, normal stress, and relative velocity of the boundaries in the shear layer in an analysis of a steady shearing flow between identical bumpy boundaries. This relationship permits us to close the hydraulic equations governing the evolution of the shape of the heap and the velocity distribution at its base. We integrate the resulting equations numerically for typical values of the parameters for glass spheres. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics. PMID:12779861

  11. Criteria for Shear Banding in Time-Dependent Flows of Complex Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorcroft, Robyn L.; Fielding, Suzanne M.

    2013-02-01

    We study theoretically the onset of shear banding in the three most common time-dependent rheological protocols: step stress, finite strain ramp (a limit of which gives a step strain), and shear startup. By means of a linear stability analysis we provide a fluid-universal criterion for the onset of banding for each protocol, which depends only on the shape of the experimentally measured time-dependent rheological response function, independent of the constitutive law and internal state variables of the particular fluid in question. Our predictions thus have the same highly general status, in these time-dependent flows, as the widely known criterion for banding in steady state (of negatively sloping shear stress vs shear rate). We illustrate them with simulations of the Rolie-Poly model of polymer flows, and the soft glassy rheology model of disordered soft solids.

  12. Experimental characterization of shear transformation zones for plastic flow of bulk metallic glasses

    PubMed Central

    Pan, D.; Inoue, A.; Sakurai, T.; Chen, M. W.

    2008-01-01

    We report experimental characterization of shear transformation zones (STZs) for plastic flow of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) based on a newly developed cooperative shearing model [Johnson WL, Samwer K (2005) A universal criterion for plastic yielding of metallic glasses with a (T/Tg)2/3 temperature dependence. Phys Rev Lett 95: 195501]. The good agreement between experimental measurements and theoretical predictions in the STZ volumes provides compelling evidence that the plastic flow of metallic glasses occurs through cooperative shearing of unstable STZs activated by shear stresses. Moreover, the ductility of BMGs was found to intrinsically correlate with their STZ volumes. The experiments presented herein pave a way to gain a quantitative insight into the atomic-scale mechanisms of BMG mechanical behavior. PMID:18815377

  13. Flow around spheres by dissipative particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuo; Phan-Thien, Nhan; Khoo, Boo Cheong; Fan, Xi Jun

    2006-10-01

    The dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) method is used to study the flow behavior past a sphere. The sphere is represented by frozen DPD particles while the surrounding fluids are modeled by simple DPD particles (representing a Newtonian fluid). For the surface of the sphere, the conventional model without special treatment and the model with specular reflection boundary condition proposed by Revenga et al. [Comput. Phys. Commun. 121-122, 309 (1999)] are compared. Various computational domains, in which the sphere is held stationary at the center, are investigated to gage the effects of periodic conditions and walls for Reynolds number (Re)=0.5 and 50. Two types of flow conditions, uniform flow and shear flow are considered, respectively, to study the drag force and torque acting on the stationary sphere. It is found that the calculated drag force imposed on the sphere based on the model with specular reflection is slightly lower than the conventional model without special treatment. With the conventional model the drag force acting on the sphere is in better agreement with experimental correlation obtained by Brown and Lawler [J. Environ. Eng. 129, 222 (2003)] for the case of larger radius up to Re of about 5. The computed torque also approaches the analytical Stokes value when Re <1. For a force-free and torque-free sphere, its motion in the flow is captured by solving the translational and rotational equations of motion. The effects of different DPD parameters (a, γ, and σ) on the drag force and torque are studied. It shows that the dissipative coefficient (γ) mainly affects the drag force and torque, while random and conservative coefficient have little influence on them. Furthermore the settling of a single sphere in square tube is investigated, in which the wall effect is considered. Good agreement is found with the experiments of Miyamura et al. [Int. J. Multiphase Flow 7, 31 (1981)] and lattice-Boltzmann simulation results of Aidun