Science.gov

Sample records for shear velocity ratio

  1. Variable aspect ratio method in the Xu-White model for shear-wave velocity estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Jun-Yu; Yue, Cheng-Qi; Liang, Yi-Qiang; Song, Zhi-Xiang; Ling, Su; Zhang, Yang; Wu, Wei

    2013-06-01

    Shear-wave velocity logs are useful for various seismic interpretation applications, including bright spot analyses, amplitude-versus-offset analyses and multicomponent seismic interpretations. This paper presents a method for predicting the shear-wave velocity of argillaceous sandstone from conventional log data and experimental data, based on Gassmann's equations and the Xu-White model. This variable aspect ratio method takes into account all the influences of the matrix nature, shale content, porosity size and pore geometry, and the properties of pore fluid of argillaceous sandstone, replacing the fixed aspect ratio assumption in the conventional Xu-White model. To achieve this, we first use the Xu-White model to derive the bulk and shear modulus of dry rock in a sand-clay mixture. Secondly, we use Gassmann's equations to calculate the fluid-saturated elastic properties, including compressional and shear-wave velocities. Finally, we use the variable aspect ratio method to estimate the shear-wave velocity. The numerical results indicate that the variable aspect ratio method provides an important improvement in the application of the Xu-White model for sand-clay mixtures and allows for a variable aspect ratio log to be introduced into the Xu-White model instead of the constant aspect ratio assumption. This method shows a significant improvement in predicting velocities over the conventional Xu-White model.

  2. Effect of velocity ratio on coherent-structure dynamics in turbulent free shear layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryanarayanan, Saikishan; Narasimha, Roddam

    2014-11-01

    The relevance of the vortex-gas model to the large scale dynamics of temporally evolving turbulent free shear layers has been established by extensive simulations (Phys. Rev. E 89, 013009 (2014)). The effects of velocity ratio (r =U2 /U1) on shear layer dynamics are revealed by spatially evolving vortex-gas shear-layer simulations using a computational model based on Basu et al. (Appl. Math. Modelling 19, (1995)), but with a crucial improvement that ensures conservation of global circulation. The simulations show that the initial conditions and downstream boundaries can significantly affect the flow over substantial part of the domain, but the equilibrium spread rate is a universal function of r, and is within the experimental scatter. The spread in the r = 0 limit is higher than Galilean-transformed temporal value. The present 2D simulations at r = 0 show continuous growth of structures, while merger-dominated evolution is observed for r = 0 . 23 (and higher). These two mechanisms were observed across the same two values of r in the experiments of D'Ovidio & Coats (J. Fluid Mech. 737, 2013), but the continuous growth was instead attributed to mixing-transition and 3D. The 2D mechanisms responsible for the observed continuous growth of structures are analyzed in detail. Supported in part by RN/Intel/4288 and RN/DRDO/4124.

  3. System and method to estimate compressional to shear velocity (VP/VS) ratio in a region remote from a borehole

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung; Nihei, Kurt T; Schmitt, Denis P; Skelt, Christopher; Johnson, Paul A; Guyer, Robert; TenCate, James A; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves

    2012-10-16

    In some aspects of the disclosure, a method for creating three-dimensional images of non-linear properties and the compressional to shear velocity ratio in a region remote from a borehole using a conveyed logging tool is disclosed. In some aspects, the method includes arranging a first source in the borehole and generating a steered beam of elastic energy at a first frequency; arranging a second source in the borehole and generating a steerable beam of elastic energy at a second frequency, such that the steerable beam at the first frequency and the steerable beam at the second frequency intercept at a location away from the borehole; receiving at the borehole by a sensor a third elastic wave, created by a three wave mixing process, with a frequency equal to a difference between the first and second frequencies and a direction of propagation towards the borehole; determining a location of a three wave mixing region based on the arrangement of the first and second sources and on properties of the third wave signal; and creating three-dimensional images of the non-linear properties using data recorded by repeating the generating, receiving and determining at a plurality of azimuths, inclinations and longitudinal locations within the borehole. The method is additionally used to generate three dimensional images of the ratio of compressional to shear acoustic velocity of the same volume surrounding the borehole.

  4. System and method for investigating sub-surface features and 3D imaging of non-linear property, compressional velocity VP, shear velocity VS and velocity ratio VP/VS of a rock formation

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Skelt, Christopher; Nihei, Kurt; Johnson, Paul A.; Guyer, Robert; Ten Cate, James A.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Larmat, Carene S.

    2015-06-02

    A system and a method for generating a three-dimensional image of a rock formation, compressional velocity VP, shear velocity VS and velocity ratio VP/VS of a rock formation are provided. A first acoustic signal includes a first plurality of pulses. A second acoustic signal from a second source includes a second plurality of pulses. A detected signal returning to the borehole includes a signal generated by a non-linear mixing process from the first and second acoustic signals in a non-linear mixing zone within an intersection volume. The received signal is processed to extract the signal over noise and/or signals resulting from linear interaction and the three dimensional image of is generated.

  5. Velocity ratio and its application to predicting velocities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.

    2003-01-01

    The velocity ratio of water-saturated sediment derived from the Biot-Gassmann theory depends mainly on the Biot coefficient?a property of dry rock?for consolidated sediments with porosity less than the critical porosity. With this theory, the shear moduli of dry sediments are the same as the shear moduli of water-saturated sediments. Because the velocity ratio depends on the Biot coefficient explicitly, Biot-Gassmann theory accurately predicts velocity ratios with respect to differential pressure for a given porosity. However, because the velocity ratio is weakly related to porosity, it is not appropriate to investigate the velocity ratio with respect to porosity (f). A new formulation based on the assumption that the velocity ratio is a function of (1?f)n yields a velocity ratio that depends on porosity, but not on the Biot coefficient explicitly. Unlike the Biot-Gassmann theory, the shear moduli of water-saturated sediments depend not only on the Biot coefficient but also on the pore fluid. This nonclassical behavior of the shear modulus of water-saturated sediment is speculated to be an effect of interaction between fluid and the solid matrix, resulting in softening or hardening of the rock frame and an effect of velocity dispersion owing to local fluid flow. The exponent n controls the degree of softening/hardening of the formation. Based on laboratory data measured near 1 MHz, this theory is extended to include the effect of differential pressure on the velocity ratio by making n a function of differential pressure and consolidation. However, the velocity dispersion and anisotropy are not included in the formulation.

  6. Shear wave velocity measurements in marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, J. E.

    1982-09-01

    Pulsed ultrasonic techniques for the measurement of sound speed are reliable and well documented. Extension of these techniques to the measurement of shear wave velocities in marine sediments, generally was unsuccessful. Recently developed shear wave transducers, based upon piezoelectric benders operated at sonic frequencies, provide significantly improved transducer-sample mechanical coupling. This improved coupling allows the application of pulsed techniques to the measurement of shear wave velocities in marine sediments, and the rapid determination of sediment dynamic elastic properties. Two types of bender-based shear wave transducer and preliminary data are described: 1) a probe configuration for box core samples, and 2) a modification to the Hamilton Frame Velocimeter for cut samples.

  7. Global horizontal shear velocity structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, T. M.; Priestley, K. F.; Debayle, E.; Chapman, C. H.

    2013-12-01

    Rayleigh wave data have been used extensively to produce various SV-wave tomographic models of the upper mantle. Love wave data are more difficult to deal with resulting in fewer SH-wave tomographic models. The models also do not incorporate higher mode information which can place better constraints on the model. We have assembled a large, horizontal component data set and have inverted these seismogram in the 4-13 mHz band including higher mode information. We use a version of the automated waveform inversion technique modified for Love waves. We have explored the effects of various crustal models and because of the greater sensitivity of Love waves to the crustal structure, at present, we limit our inversion to this lower frequency band. Due to the higher mode Love waves having similar group velocities between the periods of 50-100 s for oceanic paths, interference occurs which partition techniques have difficulties dealing with. The modified technique used here does not require partitioning the data and can help extract the data more easily at these period bands. We present a new VSH and Xi model for the upper mantle. High VSH extending to about 250 km depth occurs beneath the cratons and Tibet; Low VSH occurs beneath the mid-ocean ridges, the back arc basins and beneath the Afar hotspot. The Xi model shows that VSH is greater by approximately 3% at 100km and rapidly drops to zero at around 300 km depth where the mantle becomes isotropic. At 250 km depth, there are regions where SV is greater than SH, suggesting more vertical flow beneath mid-ocean ridges at these depths.

  8. Observations of velocity shear driven plasma turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kintner, P. M., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Electrostatic and magnetic turbulence observations from HAWKEYE-1 during the low altitude portion of its elliptical orbit over the Southern Hemisphere are presented. The magnetic turbulence is confined near the auroral zone and is similar to that seen at higher altitudes by HEOS-2 in the polar cusp. The electrostatic turbulence is composed of a background component with a power spectral index of 1.89 + or - .26 and an intense component with a power spectral index of 2.80 + or - .34. The intense electrostatic turbulence and the magnetic turbulence correlate with velocity shears in the convective plasma flow. Since velocity shear instabilities are most unstable to wave vectors perpendicular to the magnetic field, the shear correlated turbulence is anticipated to be two dimensional in character and to have a power spectral index of 3 which agrees with that observed in the intense electrostatic turbulence.

  9. Shear velocity criterion for incipient motion of sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simoes, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    The prediction of incipient motion has had great importance to the theory of sediment transport. The most commonly used methods are based on the concept of critical shear stress and employ an approach similar, or identical, to the Shields diagram. An alternative method that uses the movability number, defined as the ratio of the shear velocity to the particle’s settling velocity, was employed in this study. A large amount of experimental data were used to develop an empirical incipient motion criterion based on the movability number. It is shown that this approach can provide a simple and accurate method of computing the threshold condition for sediment motion.

  10. Electrostatic ion cyclotron velocity shear instability

    SciTech Connect

    Lemons, D.S.; Winske, D.; Gary, S.P. )

    1992-12-01

    An electrostatic ion cyclotron instability driven by sheared velocity flow perpendicular to a uniform magnetic field is investigated in the local approximation. The dispersion equation, which includes all kinetic effects and involves only one important parameter, is cast in the form of Gordeyev integrals and solved numerically. The instability occurs roughly at multiples of the ion cyclotron frequency (but modified by the shear) with the growth rate of the individual harmonics overlapping in wavenumber. At small values of the shear parameter, the instability exists in two branches, one at long wavelength, [kappa][rho][sub i] [approximately] 0.5, and one at short wavelength, [kappa][rho][sub i] > 1.5 ([kappa][rho][sub i] is the wavenumber normalized to the ion gyroradius). At larger values of the shear parameter only the longer wavelength branch persists. The growth rate of the long wavelength mode, maximized over wavenumber and frequency, increases monotonically with the shear parameter. Properties of the instability are compared to those of Ganguli et al. obtained in the nonlocal limit.

  11. Drift-wave transport in the velocity shear layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosalem, K. C.; Roberto, M.; Caldas, I. L.

    2016-07-01

    Particle drift driven by electrostatic wave fluctuations is numerically computed to describe the transport in a gradient velocity layer at the tokamak plasma edge. We consider an equilibrium plasma in large aspect ratio approximation with E × B flow and specified toroidal plasma velocity, electric field, and magnetic field profiles. A symplectic map, previously derived for infinite coherent time modes, is used to describe the transport dependence on the electric, magnetic, and plasma velocity shears. We also show that resonant perturbations and their correspondent islands in the Poincaré maps are much affected by the toroidal velocity profiles. Moreover, shearless transport barriers, identified by extremum values of the perturbed rotation number profiles of the invariant curves, allow chaotic trajectories trapped into the plasma. We investigate the influence of the toroidal plasma velocity profile on these shearless transport barriers.

  12. Single-fluid stability of stationary plasma equilibria with velocity shear and magnetic shear

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, Akira

    2009-10-15

    By using incompressible single-fluid equations with a generalized Ohm's law neglecting the electron inertia, a linear eigenmode equation for a magnetic field perturbation is derived for stationary equilibria in a slab geometry with velocity and magnetic shears. The general eigenmode equation contains a fourth-order derivative of the perturbation in the highest order and contains Alfven and whistler mode components for a homogeneous plasma. The ratio of the characteristic ion inertia length to the characteristic inhomogeneity scale length is chosen as a small parameter for expansion. Neglecting whistler mode in the lowest order, the eigenmode equation becomes a second-order differential equation similar to the ideal magnetohydrodynamic eigenmode equation except for the fact that the unperturbed perpendicular velocity contains both electric and ion diamagnetic drifts. A sufficient condition for stability against the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability driven by shear in the ion diamagnetic drift velocity is derived and then applied to tokamaks.

  13. Hydrodynamic lubrication in nanoscale bearings under high shear velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yunfei; Li, Deyu; Jiang, Kai; Yang, Juekuan; Wang, Xiaohui; Wang, Yujuan

    2006-08-01

    The setting up process in a nanoscale bearing has been modeled by molecular dynamics simulation. Contrary to the prediction from the classical Reynolds' theory, simulation results show that the load capacity of the nanoscale bearing does not increase monotonically with the operation speed. This is attributed to the change of the local shear rate, which will decrease with the shear velocity of the bearing as the shear velocity exceeds a critical value, i.e., the local shear rate has an upper limit. A simple nonlinear dynamic model indicates that the momentum exchange between the liquid and the solid wall is reduced with the shear velocity when the shear velocity is above a critical value. The weak momentum exchange results in a decrease of the local shear rate, which in turn causes a sharp increase of the slip length.

  14. Angular velocity of a spheroid log rolling in a simple shear at small Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meibohm, Jan; Candelier, Fabien; Rosen, Tomas; Einarsson, Jonas; Lundell, Fredrik; Mehlig, Bernhard

    2016-11-01

    We analyse the angular velocity of a small neutrally buoyant spheroid log rolling in a simple shear. When the effect of fluid inertia is negligible the angular velocity ω -> equals half the fluid vorticity. We compute by singular perturbation theory how weak fluid inertia reduces the angular velocity in an unbounded shear, and how this reduction depends upon the shape of the spheroid (on its aspect ratio). In addition we determine the angular velocity by direct numerical simulations. The results are in excellent agreement with the theory at small but not too small values of the shear Reynolds number, for all aspect ratios considered. For the special case of a sphere we find ω / s = - 1 / 2 + 0 . 0540Re 3 / 2 where s is the shear rate and Re is the shear Reynolds number. This result differs from that derived by Lin et al. who obtained a numerical coefficient roughly three times larger.

  15. Shear wave velocity structures of the Arabian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhtar, Talal A.; Al-Saeed, Mohammed M.

    1994-02-01

    The shear velocity structures of the different tectonic provinces of the Arabian Peninsula has been studied using surface wave data recorded by the RYD (Riyadh) station. The inversion of Rayleigh wave group velocities indicates that the Arabian shield can be modeled by two layers, each of which is 20 km thick with a shear velocity of 3.61 km/s in the upper crust and 3.88 km/s in the lower crust. The underlying upper mantle velocity is 4.61 km/s. Inversion of both Love and Rayleigh waves group velocities shows that the Arabian platform upper and lower crusts are comparable in their thicknesses to those of the shield, but with shear velocities of 3.4 and 4 km/s, respectively. The upper mantle velocity beneath the platform is 4.4 km/s and the average total thickness of the crust is 45 km.

  16. Electrostatic ion cyclotron velocity shear instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemons, D. S.; Winske, D.; Gary, S. P.

    1992-01-01

    A local electrostatic dispersion equation is derived for a shear flow perpendicular to an ambient magnetic field, which includes all kinetic effects and involves only one important parameter. The dispersion equation is cast in the form of Gordeyev integrals and is solved numerically. Numerical solutions indicate that an ion cyclotron instability is excited. The instability occurs roughly at multiples of the ion cyclotron frequency (modified by the shear), with the growth rate or the individual harmonics overlapping in the wavenumber. At large values of the shear parameter, the instability is confined to long wavelengths, but at smaller shear, a second distinct branch at shorter wavelengths also appears. The properties of the instability obtained are compared with those obtained in the nonlocal limit by Ganguli et al. (1985, 1988).

  17. Shear velocity structure of the northern California lithosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Levander, A.R. ); Kovach, R.L. )

    1990-11-10

    The authors have determined the regional shear velocity structure of the lithosphere beneath the Coast Ranges and the Great Valley in northern California from inversion of three fundamental mode Rayleigh wave phase velocity curves. The dispersion measurements were made along three different paths crossing the Coast Ranges and Great Valley roughly perpendicular to the North American-Pacific plate boundary. The three dispersion curves diverge at periods greater than about 20 s; phase velocities are systematically higher from the northwest to the southeast along the transform margin. Inverting the phase velocities for crustal and upper mantle structure shows that this divergence is indicative of a 3-5% increase in the upper mantle shear velocity from the Napa-Great Valley region to the Diablo Range-Great Valley region. Crustal shear velocities are consistent with the lithologies expected in the middle and lower crust. The increase in mantle shear velocity from northwest to southeast is anticipated by a tectonic model for the development of the California transform margin in which asthenospheric material is emplaced at the base of the North American crust in the slab gap south of the Mendocino triple junction. Adjacent to the plate boundary, this process creates a subcrustal corridor of cooling asthenosphere which is gradually incorporated in the lithosphere lid. They suggest that this causes the observed increase in upper mantle shear velocity away from the triple junction. Finite difference simulations of Rayleigh wave propagation across asthenosphere corridor models produce synthetic phase velocity curves which are similar to the field observations.

  18. ML shear wave velocity tomography for the Iranian Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheri-Peyrov, Mehdi; Ghods, Abdolreza; Abbasi, Madjid; Bergman, Eric; Sobouti, Farhad

    2016-04-01

    Iranian Plateau reflects several different tectonic styles of collision, and large-scale strike-slip faults. We calculate a high-resolution 2-D ML shear velocity map for the Iranian Plateau to detect lateral crustal thickness changes associated with different tectonic boundaries. The ML velocity is very sensitive to strong lateral variations of crustal thickness and varies between the velocity of Lg and Sn phases. Our data set consists of 65 795 ML amplitude velocity measurements from 2531 precisely relocated events recorded by Iranian networks in the period 1996-2014. Using a constrained least-squares inversion scheme, we inverted the ML velocities for a 2-D shear velocity map of Iran. Our results show that the Zagros and South Caspian Basin (SCB) have shear wave velocities close to the Sn phase, and are thus Lg-blocking regions. High velocities in the High Zagros and the Simply Folded Belt imply significant crustal undulations within these zones. We note that in the central and south Zagros, the velocity border between the Zagros and central Iran is not coincident with the Zagros suture line that marks underthrusting of the Arabian plate beneath central Iran. The low plains of Gilan and Gorgan to the south of the Caspian Sea show high shear velocities similar to the SCB, implying that they are either underlain by an oceanic type crust or a transitional crust with a strong lateral crustal thickness gradient. The Lut block is an Lg-passing block implying that it is not surrounded by any sudden crustal thickness changes along its borders with central Iran. In the Alborz, NW Iran, Kopeh-Dagh, Binalud and most of the central Iran, low shear velocity near the Lg velocity is attributed to smooth or minor Moho undulations within these regions.

  19. Gyrokinetic simulation of momentum transport with residual stress from diamagnetic level velocity shears

    SciTech Connect

    Waltz, R. E.; Staebler, G. M.; Solomon, W. M.

    2011-04-15

    Residual stress refers to the remaining toroidal angular momentum (TAM) flux (divided by major radius) when the shear in the equilibrium fluid toroidal velocity (and the velocity itself) vanishes. Previously [Waltz et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 122507 (2007); errata 16, 079902 (2009)], we demonstrated with GYRO [Candy and Waltz, J. Comp. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] gyrokinetic simulations that TAM pinching from (ion pressure gradient supported or diamagnetic level) equilibrium ExB velocity shear could provide some of the residual stress needed to support spontaneous toroidal rotation against normal diffusive loss. Here we show that diamagnetic level shear in the intrinsic drift wave velocities (or ''profile shear'' in the ion and electron density and temperature gradients) provides a comparable residual stress. The individual signed contributions of these small (rho-star level) ExB and profile velocity shear rates to the turbulence level and (rho-star squared) ion energy transport stabilization are additive if the rates are of the same sign. However because of the additive stabilization effect, the contributions to the small (rho-star cubed) residual stress is not always simply additive. If the rates differ in sign, the residual stress from one can buck out that from the other (and in some cases reduce the stabilization.) The residual stress from these diamagnetic velocity shear rates is quantified by the ratio of TAM flow to ion energy (power) flow (M/P) in a global GYRO core simulation of a ''null'' toroidal rotation DIII-D [Mahdavi and Luxon, Fusion Sci. Technol. 48, 2 (2005)] discharge by matching M/P profiles within experimental uncertainty. Comparison of global GYRO (ion and electron energy as well as particle) transport flow balance simulations of TAM transport flow in a high-rotation DIII-D L-mode quantifies and isolates the ExB shear and parallel velocity (Coriolis force) pinching components from the larger ''diffusive'' parallel velocity shear driven component and

  20. Lithology and shear-wave velocity in Memphis, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomberg, J.; Waldron, B.; Schweig, E.; Hwang, H.; Webbers, A.; Van Arsdale, R.; Tucker, K.; Williams, R.; Street, R.; Mayne, P.; Stephenson, W.; Odum, J.; Cramer, C.; Updike, R.; Hutson, S.; Bradley, M.

    2003-01-01

    We have derived a new three-dimensional model of the lithologic structure beneath the city of Memphis, Tennessee, and examined its correlation with measured shear-wave velocity profiles. The correlation is sufficiently high that the better-constrained lithologic model may be used as a proxy for shear-wave velocities, which are required to calculate site-amplification for new seismic hazard maps for Memphis. The lithologic model and its uncertainties are derived from over 1200 newly compiled well and boring logs, some sampling to 500 m depth, and a moving-least-squares algorithm. Seventy-six new shear-wave velocity profiles have been measured and used for this study, most sampling to 30 m depth or less. All log and velocity observations are publicly available via new web sites.

  1. Molybdenum Sound Velocity and Shear Strength Softening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Jeffrey; Akin, Minta; Chau, Ricky; Fratandouno, Dayne; Ambrose, Pat; Fat'yanov, Oleg; Asimow, Paul; Holmes, Neil

    2013-06-01

    We recently carried out a series of light-gas gun experiments to measure molybdenum acoustic sound speed up to 5 Mbars on the Hugoniot. Our measured sound speeds increase linearly with pressure up to 2.6 Mbars and taper off near the melting pressure. The gradual leveling off of sound speed suggests a possible loss of shear strength near the melt. A linear extrapolation of our data to zero pressure is in good agreement with the sound speed measured at ambient condition. The results indicate that molybdenum remains in the bcc phase on the Hugoniot up to the melting pressure. There is no bcc solid phase transition on the Hugoniot as previously reported. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  2. Vorticity structuring and velocity rolls triggered by gradient shear bands.

    PubMed

    Fielding, Suzanne M

    2007-07-01

    We suggest a mechanism by which vorticity structuring and velocity rolls can form in complex fluids, triggered by the linear instability of one-dimensional gradient shear banded flow. We support this with a numerical study of the diffusive Johnson-Segalman model. In the steady vorticity structured state, the thickness of the interface between the bands remains finite in the limit of zero stress diffusivity, presenting a possible challenge to the accepted theory of shear banding.

  3. A strongly negative shear velocity gradient and lateral variability in the lowermost mantle beneath the Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritsema, Jeroen; Garnero, Edward; Lay, Thorne

    1997-01-01

    A new approach for constraining the seismic shear velocity structure above the core-mantle boundary is introduced, whereby SH-SKS differential travel times, amplitude ratios of SV/SKS, and Sdiff waveshapes are simultaneously modeled. This procedure is applied to the lower mantle beneath the central Pacific using da.ta from numerous deep-focus southwest Pacific earthquakes recorded in North America. We analyze 90 broadband and 248 digitized analog recordings for this source-receiver geometry. SH-SKS times are highly variable and up to 10 s larger than standard reference model predictions, indicating the presence of laterally varying low shear velocities in the study area. The travel times, however, do not constrain the depth extent or velocity gradient of the low-velocity region. SV/SKS amplitude ratios and SH waveforms are sensitive to the radial shear velocity profile, and when analyzed simultaneously with SH-SKS times, rnveal up to 3% shear velocity reductions restricted to the lowermost 190±50 km of the mantle. Our preferred model for the central-eastern Pacific region (Ml) has a strong negative gradient (with 0.5% reduction in velocity relative to the preliminary reference Earth model (PREM) at 2700 km depth and 3% reduction at 2891 km depth) and slight velocity reductions from 2000 to 2700 km depth (0-0.5% lower than PREM). Significant small-scale (100-500 km) shear velocity heterogeneity (0.5%-1%) is required to explain scatter in the differential times and amplitude ratios.

  4. Cardiac Shear Wave Velocity Detection in the Porcine Heart.

    PubMed

    Vos, Hendrik J; van Dalen, Bas M; Heinonen, Ilkka; Bosch, Johan G; Sorop, Oana; Duncker, Dirk J; van der Steen, Antonius F W; de Jong, Nico

    2017-04-01

    Cardiac muscle stiffness can potentially be estimated non-invasively with shear wave elastography. Shear waves are present on the septal wall after mitral and aortic valve closure, thus providing an opportunity to assess stiffness in early systole and early diastole. We report on the shear wave recordings of 22 minipigs with high-frame-rate echocardiography. The waves were captured with 4000 frames/s using a programmable commercial ultrasound machine. The wave pattern was extracted from the data through a local tissue velocity estimator based on one-lag autocorrelation. The wave propagation velocity was determined with a normalized Radon transform, resulting in median wave propagation velocities of 2.2 m/s after mitral valve closure and 4.2 m/s after aortic valve closure. Overall the velocities ranged between 0.8 and 6.3 m/s in a 95% confidence interval. By dispersion analysis we found that the propagation velocity only mildly increased with shear wave frequency.

  5. The velocity shear tensor: tracer of halo alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libeskind, Noam I.; Hoffman, Yehuda; Forero-Romero, Jaime; Gottlöber, Stefan; Knebe, Alexander; Steinmetz, Matthias; Klypin, Anatoly

    2013-01-01

    The alignment of dark matter (DM) haloes and the surrounding large-scale structure (LSS) is examined in the context of the cosmic web. Halo spin, shape and the orbital angular momentum of subhaloes are investigated relative to the LSS using the eigenvectors of the velocity shear tensor evaluated on a grid with a scale of 1 Mpc h-1, deep within the non-linear regime. Knots, filaments, sheets and voids are associated with regions that are collapsing along 3, 2, 1 or 0 principal directions simultaneously. Each halo is tagged with a web classification (i.e. knot halo, filament halo, etc.) according to the nature of the collapse at the halo position. The full distribution of shear eigenvalues is found to be substantially different from that tagged to haloes, indicating that the observed velocity shear is significantly biased. We find that larger mass haloes live in regions where the shear is more isotropic, namely the expansion or collapse is more spherical. A correlation is found between the halo shape and the eigenvectors of the shear tensor, with the longest (shortest) axis of the halo shape being aligned with the slowest (fastest) collapsing eigenvector. This correlation is web independent, suggesting that the velocity shear is a fundamental tracer of the halo alignment. A similar result is found for the alignment of halo spin with the cosmic web. It has been shown that high-mass haloes exhibit a spin flip with respect to the LSS: we find that the mass at which this spin flip occurs is web dependent and not universal as suggested previously. Although weaker than haloes, subhalo orbits too exhibit an alignment with the LSS, providing a possible insight into the highly correlated corotation of the Milky Way's satellite system. The present study suggests that the velocity shear tensor constitutes the natural framework for studying the directional properties of the non-linear LSS and those of haloes and galaxies.

  6. Pumping velocity in homogeneous helical turbulence with shear.

    PubMed

    Rogachevskii, Igor; Kleeorin, Nathan; Käpylä, Petri J; Brandenburg, Axel

    2011-11-01

    Using different analytical methods (the quasilinear approach, the path-integral technique, and the tau-relaxation approximation) we develop a comprehensive mean-field theory for a pumping effect of the mean magnetic field in homogeneous nonrotating helical turbulence with imposed large-scale shear. The effective pumping velocity is proportional to the product of α effect and large-scale vorticity associated with the shear, and causes a separation of the toroidal and poloidal components of the mean magnetic field along the direction of the mean vorticity. We also perform direct numerical simulations of sheared turbulence in different ranges of hydrodynamic and magnetic Reynolds numbers and use a kinematic test-field method to determine the effective pumping velocity. The results of the numerical simulations are in agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  7. Complex Shear Wave Velocity Structure Imaged Beneath Africa and Iceland.

    PubMed

    Ritsema; van Heijst HJ; Woodhouse

    1999-12-03

    A model of three-dimensional shear wave velocity variations in the mantle reveals a tilted low velocity anomaly extending from the core-mantle boundary (CMB) region beneath the southeastern Atlantic Ocean into the upper mantle beneath eastern Africa. This anomaly suggests that Cenozoic flood basalt volcanism in the Afar region and active rifting beneath the East African Rift is linked to an extensive thermal anomaly at the CMB more than 45 degrees away. In contrast, a low velocity anomaly beneath Iceland is confined to the upper mantle.

  8. Shear-wave velocity variation in jointed rock: an attempt to measure tide-induced variations

    SciTech Connect

    Beem, L.I.

    1987-08-01

    The use of the perturbation of seismic wave velocities by solid earth tides as a possible method of exploration for fractured media is discussed. Velocity of compressional seismic waves in fractured homogeneous rock has been observed to vary through solid earth tide cycles by a significant 0.5-0.9%. This variation of seismic velocities may be attributed to the opening and closing of joints by tidal stresses. In an attempt to see if shear-wave velocities show a similar velocity variation, a pneumatic shear-wave generator was used for the source. The 5 receivers, 3-component, 2.0 Hz, moving-coil geophones, were connected to a GEOS digital recorder. The two receivers located 120 m and 110 m from the source showed large shear-to-compression amplitude ratio and a high signal-to-noise ratio. A glaciated valley was chosen for the experiment site, since topography is flat and the granodiorite is jointed by a set of nearly orthogonal vertical joints, with superimposed horizontal sheeting joints. A slight velocity variation was noted in the first 200 consecutive firings; after which, the amplitude of the shear-wave begun to increase. This increase has been attributed to the compacting of the soil beneath the shear-wave generator (SWG). In the future, the soil will be compacted prior to placing the SWG or the SWG will be coupled directly to the rock to alleviate the amplitude fluctuation problem. This research may have application in exploration for fracture permeability in the rock mass between existing wells, by measuring seismic velocities from well to well through the tidal cycle.

  9. Residual turbulence from velocity shear stabilized interchange instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, C. P.; Hassam, A. B.

    2013-01-15

    The stabilizing effect of velocity shear on the macroscopic, broad bandwidth, ideal interchange instability is studied in linear and nonlinear regimes. A 2D dissipative magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code is employed to simulate the system. For a given flow shear, V Prime , linear growth rates are shown to be suppressed to below the shear-free level at both the small and large wavelengths. With increasing V Prime , the unstable band in wavenumber-space shrinks so that the peak growth results for modes that correspond to relatively high wavenumbers, on the scale of the density gradient. In the nonlinear turbulent steady state, a similar turbulent spectrum obtains, and the convection cells are roughly circular. In addition, the density fluctuation level and the degree of flattening of the initial inverted density profile are found to decrease as V Prime increases; in fact, unstable modes are almost completely stabilized and the density profile reverts to laminar when V Prime is a few times the classic interchange growth rate. Moreover, the turbulent particle flux diminishes with increasing velocity shear such that all the flux is carried by the classical diffusive flux in the asymptotic limit. The simulations are compared with measurements of magnetic fluctuations from the Maryland Centrifugal Experiment, MCX, which investigated interchange modes in the presence of velocity shear. The experimental spectral data, taken in the plasma edge, are in general agreement with the numerical data obtained in higher viscosity simulations for which the level of viscosity is chosen consistent with MCX Reynolds numbers at the edge. In particular, the residual turbulence in both cases is dominated by elongated convection cells. Finally, concomitant Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities in the system are also examined. Complete stability to interchanges is obtained only in the parameter space wherein the generalized Rayleigh inflexion theorem is satisfied.

  10. An empirical method to estimate shear wave velocity of soils in the New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wei, B.-Z.; Pezeshk, S.; Chang, T.-S.; Hall, K.H.; Liu, Huaibao P.

    1996-01-01

    In this study, a set of charts are developed to estimate shear wave velocity of soils in the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ), using the standard penetration test (SPT) N values and soil depths. Laboratory dynamic test results of soil samples collected from the NMSZ showed that the shear wave velocity of soils is related to the void ratio and the effective confining pressure applied to the soils. The void ratio of soils can be estimated from the SPT N values and the effective confining pressure depends on the depth of soils. Therefore, the shear wave velocity of soils can be estimated from the SPT N value and the soil depth. To make the methodology practical, two corrections should be made. One is that field SPT N values of soils must be adjusted to an unified SPT N??? value to account the effects of overburden pressure and equipment. The second is that the effect of water table to effective overburden pressure of soils must be considered. To verify the methodology, shear wave velocities of five sites in the NMSZ are estimated and compared with those obtained from field measurements. The comparison shows that our approach and the field tests are consistent with an error of less than of 15%. Thus, the method developed in this study is useful for dynamic study and practical designs in the NMSZ region. Copyright ?? 1996 Elsevier Science Limited.

  11. Hammering Yucca Flat, Part Two: Shear-Wave Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlay, T. S.; Abbott, R. E.; Knox, H. A.; Tang, D. G.; James, S. R.; Haney, M. M.; Hampshire, J. B., II

    2015-12-01

    In preparation for the next phase of the Source Physics Experiment (SPE), we conducted an active-source seismic survey of Yucca Flat, Nevada, on the Nevada National Security Site. Results from this survey will be used to inform the geologic models associated with the SPE project. For this study, we used a novel 13,000 kilogram weight-drop seismic source to interrogate an 18-km North-South transect of Yucca Flat. Source points were spaced every 200 meters and were recorded by 350 to 380 3-component 2-Hz geophones with variable spacings of 10, 20, and 100 meters. We utilized the Refraction-Microtremor (ReMi) technique to create multiple 1D dispersion curves, which were then inverted for shear-wave velocity profiles using the Dix inversion method (Tsai and Haney, 2015). Each of these 1D velocity models was subsequently stitched together to create a 2D profile over the survey area. The dispersion results indicate a general decrease in surface-wave phase velocity to the south. This result is supported by slower shear-wave velocity sediments and increasing basin depth towards the survey's southern extent. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. Non-gyrotropic pressure anisotropy induced by velocity shear.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenerani, A.; Del Sarto, D.; Pegoraro, F.; Califano, F.

    2015-12-01

    We discuss how, in a collisionless magnetized plasma, a sheared velocity field may lead to the anisotropization of an initial Maxwellian state. By including the full pressure tensor dynamics in a fluid plasma model, we show, analytically and numerically, that a sheared velocity field makes an initial isotropic state anisotropic and non-gyrotropic [1], i.e., makes the plasma pressure tensor anisotropic also in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field. The propagation of transverse magneto-elastic waves in the anisotropic plasma affects the process of formation of a non-gyrotropic pressure and can lead to its spatial filamentation. This plasma dynamics implies in particular that isotropic MHD equilibria cease to be equilibria in presence of a stationary sheared flow. Similarly, in the case of turbulence, where small-scale spatial inhomogeneities are naturally developed during the direct cascade, we may expect that isotropic turbulent states are not likely to exist whenever a full pressure tensor evolution is accounted for. These results may be relevant to understanding the agyrotropic pressure configurations which are well documented in solar wind measurements and possibly correlated to plasma flows (see e.g. Refs.[2,3]), and which have also been measured in Vlasov simulations of Alfvenic turbulence [4]. [1] D. Del Sarto, F. Pegoraro, F. Califano, "Pressure anisotropy and small spatial scales induced by a velocity shear", http://arxiv.org/abs/1507.04895 [2] H.F. Astudillo, E. Marsch, S. Livi, H. Rosenbauer, "TAUS measurements of non-gyrotropic distribution functions of solar wind alpha particles", AIP Conf. Proc. 328, 289 (1996). [3] A. Posner, M.W. Liemhon, T.H. Zurbuchen, "Upstream magnetospheric ion flux tube within a magnetic cloud: Wind/STICS", Geophys. Res. Lett. 30, (2003). [4] S. Servidio, F. Valentini, F. Califano, P. Veltri, "Local kinetic effects in Two-Dimensional Plasma Turbulence", Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 045001 (2012).

  13. Anomalous shear wave delays and surface wave velocities at Yellowstone Caldera, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, R.G.; Boore, D.M.

    1982-04-10

    To investigate the effects of a geothermal area on the propagation of intermediate-period (1--30 s) teleseismic body waves and surface waves, a specially designed portable seismograph system was operated in Yellowstone Caldera, Wyoming. Travel time residuals, relative to a station outside the caldera, of up to 2 s for compressional phases are in agreement with short-period residuals for P phases measured by other investigators. Travel time delays for shear arrivals in the intermediate-period band range from 2 to 9 s and decrease with increasing dT/d..delta... Measured Rayleigh wave phase velocities are extremely low, ranging from 3.2 km/s at 27-s period to 2.0 km/s at 7-s period; the estimated uncertainty associated with these values is 15%. We propose a model for compressional and shear velocities and Poisson's ratio beneath the Yellowstone caldera which fits the teleseismic body and surface wave data: it consists of a highly anomalous crust with an average shear velocity of 3.0 km/s overlying an upper mantle with average velocity of 4.1 km/s. The high average value of Poisson's ratio in the crust (0.34) suggests the presence of fluids there; Poisson's ratio in the mantle between 40 and approximately 200 km is more nearly normal (0.29) than in the crust. A discrepancy between normal values of Poisson's ratio in the crust calculated from short-period data and high values calculated from teleseismic data can be resolved by postulating a viscoelastic crustal model with frequency-dependent shear velocity and attenuation.

  14. Compressional and Shear Wave Velocities for Artificial Granular Media Under Simulated Near Surface Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Bonner, B.P.; Berge, P.A.; Wildenschild, D.

    2001-09-09

    Laboratory ultrasonic experiments were made on artificial soil samples in order to observe the effects of slight overburden, sand/clay ratio and pore fluid saturation on compressional and shear wave velocities. Up to several meters of overburden were simulated by applying low uniaxial stress of about 0.1 MPa to a restrained sample. Samples were fabricated from Ottawa sand mixed with a swelling clay (Wyoming bentonite). The amount of clay added was 1 to 40 percent by mass. Most measurements were made under room-dry conditions, but some measurements were made for fully-saturated sand-clay mixtures and for partially-saturated sand samples. For the dry sand-clay samples, compressional (P) velocities were low, ranging from about 200 to 500 m/s for the mixtures at low stress. Shear (S) velocities were about half of the compressional velocity, about 70 to 250 m/s. Dramatic increases in all velocities occurred with small uniaxial loads, indicating strong nonlinearity. Composition and grain packing control the mechanical response at grain contacts and the resulting nonlinear response at low stresses. P and S velocities are sensitive to the amount of clay added, even at low concentrations. At these low equivalent overburden conditions, adhesion and capillarity at grain contacts affect wave amplitudes, velocities, and frequency content in the partial saturation case.

  15. The influence of void ratio on small strain shear modulus of granular materials: A micromechanical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaomin; Cheng, Yipik; Ling, Dongsheng

    2013-06-01

    The small strain shear modulus Gmax of granular materials is highly dependent on their current void ratio and stress state, generally expressed as the famous Hardin and Richart equation. Various forms of void ratio functions have been proposed, either based on experimental or theoretical research. It is noted that each of them can be applied for a certain soil within a limited void ratio range. Micromechanical studies on the influence of void ratio on Gmax are conducted in this paper, using Discrete Element Method. After each sample being isotropically consolidated, shear wave velocity is measured by applying a velocity pulse to the transmitter in a certain direction, and monitoring the corresponding average velocity of the receiver. The capabilities of various existing void ratio functions are examined, together with the relationship between coordination number and void ratio, distribution of coordination number, as well as the contact force network. The void ratio effect on Gmax is further explained in terms of the wave travel length and the travel time for different contact connectivity networks.

  16. Shear velocity of the Rotokawa geothermal field using ambient noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civilini, F.; Savage, M. K.; Townend, J.

    2014-12-01

    Ambient noise correlation is an increasingly popular seismological technique that uses the ambient seismic noise recorded at two stations to construct an empirical Green's function. Applications of this technique include determining shear velocity structure and attenuation. An advantage of ambient noise is that it does not rely on external sources of seismic energy such as local or teleseismic earthquakes. This method has been used in the geothermal industry to determine the depths at which magmatic processes occur, to distinguish between production and non-production areas, and to observe seismic velocity perturbations associated with fluid extraction. We will present a velocity model for the Rotokawa geothermal field near Taupo, New Zealand, produced from ambient noise cross correlations. Production at Rotokawa is based on the "Rotokawa A" combined cycle power station established in 1997 and the "Nga Awa Purua" triple flash power plant established in 2010. Rotokawa Joint Venture, a partnership between Mighty River Power and Tauhara North No. 2 Trust currently operates 174 MW of generation at Rotokawa. An array of short period seismometers was installed in 2008 and occupies an area of roughly 5 square kilometers around the site. Although both cultural and natural noise sources are recorded at the stations, the instrument separation distance provides a unique challenge for analyzing cross correlations produced by both signal types. The inter-station spacing is on the order of a few kilometers, so waves from cultural sources generally are not coherent from one station to the other, while the wavelength produced by natural noise is greater than the station separation. Velocity models produced from these two source types will be compared to known geological models of the site. Depending on the amount of data needed to adequately construct cross-correlations, a time-dependent model of velocity will be established and compared with geothermal production processes.

  17. Deep Mantle Large Low Shear-Wave Velocity Provinces: Principally Thermal Structures?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, R.; Goes, S. D. B.

    2014-12-01

    The two large low shear-wave velocity provinces (LLSVPs) that dominate lower-mantle structure may hold key information on Earth's thermal and chemical evolution. It is generally accepted that these provinces are hotter than background mantle and are likely the main source of mantle plumes. Increasingly, it is also proposed that they hold a dense (primitive and/or recycled) compositional component. The principle evidence that LLSVPs may represent thermo-chemical `piles' comes from seismic constraints, including: (i) their long-wavelength nature; (ii) sharp gradients in shear-wave velocity at their margins; (iii) non-Gaussian distributions of deep mantle shear-wave velocity anomalies; (iv) anti-correlated shear-wave and bulk-sound velocity anomalies (and elevated ratios between shear- and compressional-wave velocity anomalies); (v) anti-correlated shear-wave and density anomalies; and (vi) 1-D/radial profiles of seismic velocity that deviate from those expected for an isochemical, well-mixed mantle. In addition, it has been proposed that hotspots and the reconstructed eruption sites of large igneous provinces correlate in location with LLSVP margins. Here, we review recent results, which indicate that the majority of these constraints do not require thermo-chemical piles: they are equally well (or poorly) explained by thermal heterogeneity alone. Our analyses and conclusions are largely based on comparisons between imaged seismic structure and synthetic seismic structures from a set of thermal and thermo-chemical mantle convection models, which are constrained by 300 Myr of plate motion histories. Modelled physical structure (temperature, pressure and composition) is converted into seismic velocities via a thermodynamic approach that accounts for elastic, anelastic and phase contributions and, subsequently, a tomographic resolution filter is applied to account for the damping and geographic bias inherent to seismic imaging. Our results indicate that, in terms of

  18. Shear wave velocities from noise correlation at local scale

    SciTech Connect

    De Nisco, G.; Nunziata, C.; Vaccari, F.; Panza, G. F.

    2008-07-08

    Cross correlations of ambient seismic noise recordings have been studied to infer shear seismic velocities with depth. Experiments have been done in the crowded and noisy historical centre of Napoli over inter-station distances from 50 m to about 400 m, whereas active seismic spreadings are prohibitive, even for just one receiver. Group velocity dispersion curves have been extracted with FTAN method from the noise cross correlations and then the non linear inversion of them has resulted in Vs profiles with depth. The information of near by stratigraphies and the range of Vs variability for samples of Neapolitan soils and rocks confirms the validity of results obtained with our expeditious procedure. Moreover, the good comparison of noise H/V frequency of the first main peak with 1D and 2D spectral amplifications encourages to continue experiments of noise cross-correlation. If confirmed in other geological settings, the proposed approach could reveal a low cost methodology to obtain reliable and detailed Vs velocity profiles.

  19. Imbalanced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence modified by velocity shear in the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoberidze, G.; Voitenko, Y. M.

    2016-11-01

    We study incompressible imbalanced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the presence of background velocity shears. Using scaling arguments, we show that the turbulent cascade is significantly accelerated when the background velocity shear is stronger than the velocity shears in the subdominant Alfvén waves at the injection scale. The spectral transport is then controlled by the background shear rather than the turbulent shears and the Tchen spectrum with spectral index -1 is formed. This spectrum extends from the injection scale to the scale of the spectral break where the subdominant wave shear becomes equal to the background shear. The estimated spectral breaks and power spectra are in good agreement with those observed in the fast solar wind. The proposed mechanism can contribute to enhanced turbulent cascades and modified -1 spectra observed in the fast solar wind with strong velocity shears. This mechanism can also operate in many other astrophysical environments where turbulence develops on top of non-uniform plasma flows.

  20. The lithospheric shear-wave velocity structure of Saudi Arabia: Young volcanism in an old shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zheng; Julià, Jordi; Mai, P. Martin

    2016-04-01

    We are utilizing receiver function and surface wave dispersion data to investigate the lithospheric shear-wave velocity structure of Saudi Arabia. The Arabian plate consists of the western Arabian shield and the eastern Arabian platform. The Arabian shield is a complicated mélange of several Proterozoic terrains, separated by ophiolite-bearing suture zones and dotted by outcropping Cenozoic volcanic rocks (so-called harrats). The Arabian platform is covered by thick Paleozoic, Mesozoic and Cenozoic sedimentary rocks. To understand the geo-dynamics and present-day geology in western Saudi Arabia, the origin and activity of the harrats needs to be investigated: are they controlled primarily by a local mantle plume underneath western Saudi Arabia or by lateral mantle flow from the Afar and (perhaps) Jordan hotspots? In our study, we first estimate Vp/Vs ratios by applying the H-κ stacking technique and construct local shear-wave velocity-depth profiles by jointly inverting teleseismic P-receiver functions and Rayleigh wave group velocities at 56 broadband stations deployed by the Saudi Geological Survey (SGS). Our results reveal significant lateral variations in crustal thickness, S-velocity, and bulk Vp/Vs ratio. The Arabian shield has, on average a ~34 km thick crust with Vs ~3.72 km/s and Vp/Vs ~1.73. Thinner crust (~25 - 32 km thick) with strong lateral variations is present along the Red Sea coast. In contrast, the Arabian platform reveals a ~41 km thick crust with Vs ~3.52 km/s and Vp/Vs ~1.77. We find anomalously high Vp/Vs ratios at Harrat Lunayyir, interpreted as solidified magma intrusions. Slow shear-velocities in the upper-mantle lid throughout the southernmost and northernmost Arabian shield suggest lateral heating from hot mantle upwellings centered beneath Afar and (perhaps) Jordan. Our findings on crustal S-velocity structures, Vp/Vs ratios, and upper-mantle lid velocities support the hypothesis of lateral mantle flow from the Afar and (perhaps

  1. Shear wave velocity structure of Reed Bank, southern continental margin of the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaodong; Ruan, Aiguo; Zhao, Minghui; Qiu, Xuelin; Wu, Zhenli; Niu, Xiongwei

    2015-03-01

    The shear wave velocity structure of a wide angle seismic profile (OBS973-2) across Reed Bank in the southern continental margin of the South China Sea (SCS) is simulated by 2-D ray-tracing method, based on its previous P-wave model. This profile is 369-km-long and consists of fifteen three-component ocean bottom seismometers (OBS). The main results are as follows.(1) The model consists of seven layers and the shear wave velocity increases from 0.7 km/s at the top of sediment layer to 4.0 km/s in the lower crust. (2) The Moho depth decreases from 20-22 km at the Reed Bank to 9-11 km at the deep oceanic basin with the shear wave velocity of 4.2 km/s below the Moho. (3) The Vp/Vs ratio decreases with depth through the sedimentary layers, attributed to increased compaction and consolidation of the rocks. (4) In the continental upper crust (at model distance 90-170 km), S-wave velocity (2.5-3.2 km/s) is relatively low and Vp/Vs ratio (1.75-1.82) is relatively high compared with the other parts of the crust, corresponding to the lower P-wave velocity in the previous P-wave model and normal faults revealed by MCS data, indicating that a strong regional extensional movement had occurred during the formation process of the SCS at the Reed Bank area. (5) The S-wave structures indicate that Reed Bank crust has different rock compositions from that in the east section of the northern margin, denying the presence of conjugate relationship of Reed Bank with Dongsha islands. According to P-wave models and other data, we inferred that Reed Bank and Macclesfield were separated from the same continental crust during the rifting and break-up process.

  2. Transition from velocity weakening to strong velocity strengthening friction in dense granular shear experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwano, O.; Ando, R.; Hatano, T.

    2009-12-01

    In a "microscopic" view, natural faults generally consist of gouge layers, the frictional properties of which are much richer than the celebrated rate- and state-dependent friction law. One of such examples is intermediate-to-high slip velocity (mm/sec-m/sec) regime, where anomalous weakening and, at the same time, strengthening are reported; the results differ from experiments to experiments. In order to understand such a complicated phenomenon, one must carefully control the physical processes that potentially affect the frictional properties. We seek the nature of granular friction from many-body interaction. Toward this end, experiments are done on dry glass beads layer under low normal stress to exclude the possible effect of melting, comminution, silica gel formation, thermal decomposition, moisture, and so on. In this study, friction experiments of the glass-beads layers at slip rate of 10μm/s-1m/s were conducted. Experiments were performed at constant normal stresses of 10-50kPa using a ring shear apparatus with inner/outer diameters of 15mm/25mm. We used spherical soda-lime glass beads of diameter 200-300μm. The thickness of beads layer is about 2mm. Temperature beneath the lower plate was set to 25 degrees C and kept constant with Peltier Plate. It is found that the power-law dependence of the friction coefficient on slip velocity overwhelms the logarithmic rate dependence which originates from the rate-state friction law. Friction coefficient decreases with increasing slip velocity in low slip velocity regime (10μm/s~1cm/s) with velocity dependence of about -0.01 per decade of slip velocity. In high slip velocity regime (1cm/s~1m/s) it becomes velocity strengthening. This velocity strengthening regime is consistent with the power-law friction in closely-packed granular materials found by one of the authors (Hatano, 2007) by a numerical experiment using the discrete element method. Granular layer dilates with increasing slip velocity in higher velocity

  3. Spatial correlation of shear-wave velocity within San Francisco Bay Sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, E.M.; Baise, L.G.; Kayen, R.E.

    2006-01-01

    Sediment properties are spatially variable at all scales, and this variability at smaller scales influences high frequency ground motions. We show that surface shear-wave velocity is highly correlated within San Francisco Bay Area sediments using shear-wave velocity measurements from 210 seismic cone penetration tests. We use this correlation to estimate the surface sediment velocity structure using geostatistics. We find that the variance of the estimated shear-wave velocity is reduced using ordinary kriging, and that including this velocity structure in 2D ground motion simulations of a moderate sized earthquake improves the accuracy of the synthetics. Copyright ASCE 2006.

  4. Three-Dimensional Shear Wave Velocity Structure of the Peru Flat Slab Subduction Segment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knezevic Antonijevic, S.; Wagner, L. S.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Long, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    Recent studies focused on flat slab subduction segments in central Chile (L. S. Wagner, 2006) and Alaska (B. R. Hacker and G. A. Aber, 2012) suggest significant differences in seismic velocity structures, and hence, composition in the mantle wedge between flat and normal "steep" subducting slabs. Instead of finding the low velocities and high Vp/Vs ratios common in normal subduction zones, these studies find low Vp, high Vs, and very low Vp/Vs above flat slabs. This may indicate the presence of dry, cold material in the mantle wedge. In order to investigate the seismic velocities of the upper mantle above the Peruvian flat segment, we have inverted for 2D Rayleigh wave phase velocity maps using data from the currently deployed 40 station PULSE seismic network and some adjacent stations from the CAUGHT seismic network. We then used the sensitivity of surface waves to shear wave velocity structure with depth to develop a 3D shear wave velocity model. This model will allow us to determine the nature of the mantle lithosphere above the flat slab, and how this may have influenced the development of local topography. For example, dry conditions (high Vs velocities) above the flat slab would imply greater strength of this material, possibly making it capable of causing further inland overthrusting, while wet conditions (low Vs) would imply weaker material. This could provide some insight into the ongoing debate over whether the Fitzcarrald arch (along the northern most flank of the Altiplano) could be a topographical response to the subducted Nazca ridge hundred kilometers away from the trench (N. Espurt, 2012, P. Baby, 2005, V. A. Ramos, 2012) or not (J. Martinod, 2005, M. Wipf, 2008, T. Gerya, 2008).

  5. A special relation between Young's modulus, Rayleigh-wave velocity, and Poisson's ratio.

    PubMed

    Malischewsky, Peter G; Tuan, Tran Thanh

    2009-12-01

    Bayon et al. [(2005). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 117, 3469-3477] described a method for the determination of Young's modulus by measuring the Rayleigh-wave velocity and the ellipticity of Rayleigh waves, and found a peculiar almost linear relation between a non-dimensional quantity connecting Young's modulus, Rayleigh-wave velocity and density, and Poisson's ratio. The analytical reason for this special behavior remained unclear. It is demonstrated here that this behavior is a simple consequence of the mathematical form of the Rayleigh-wave velocity as a function of Poisson's ratio. The consequences for auxetic materials (those materials for which Poisson's ratio is negative) are discussed, as well as the determination of the shear and bulk moduli.

  6. Shear wave velocities of unconsolidated shallow sediments in the Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate shear-wave velocities for shallow sediments are important for a variety of seismic applications such as inver-sion and amplitude versus offset analysis. During the U.S. Department of Energy-sponsored Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II, shear-wave velocities were measured at six wells in the Gulf of Mexico using the logging-while-drilling SonicScope acoustic tool. Because the tool measurement point was only 35 feet from the drill bit, the adverse effect of the borehole condition, which is severe for the shallow unconsolidated sediments in the Gulf of Mexico, was mini-mized and accurate shear-wave velocities of unconsolidated sediments were measured. Measured shear-wave velocities were compared with the shear-wave velocities predicted from the compressional-wave velocities using empirical formulas and the rock physics models based on the Biot-Gassmann theory, and the effectiveness of the two prediction methods was evaluated. Although the empirical equation derived from measured shear-wave data is accurate for predicting shear-wave velocities for depths greater than 500 feet in these wells, the three-phase Biot-Gassmann-theory -based theory appears to be optimum for predicting shear-wave velocities for shallow unconsolidated sediments in the Gulf of Mexico.

  7. How required reserve ratio affects distribution and velocity of money

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Ning; Ding, Ning; Wang, Yougui

    2005-11-01

    In this paper the dependence of wealth distribution and the velocity of money on the required reserve ratio is examined based on a random transfer model of money and computer simulations. A fractional reserve banking system is introduced to the model where money creation can be achieved by bank loans and the monetary aggregate is determined by the monetary base and the required reserve ratio. It is shown that monetary wealth follows asymmetric Laplace distribution and latency time of money follows exponential distribution. The expression of monetary wealth distribution and that of the velocity of money in terms of the required reserve ratio are presented in a good agreement with simulation results.

  8. Vortex Formation in a High Speed Dust Flow with Large Velocity Shear in RF Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Iizuka, Satoru; Gohda, Takuma

    2008-09-07

    We have investigated a rotation of a dust cloud disc with strong velocity shear in a radio frequency (RF) plasma. The flow pattern of the dusts was evaluated by the Navier Stokes Equation with shear viscosity due to the Coulomb interactions. We have clarified dynamic behaviors of the dusts and observed generation of micro-vortices around rotational center, when the velocity shear is enhanced.

  9. Improved Shear Wave Group Velocity Estimation Method Based on Spatiotemporal Peak and Thresholding Motion Search.

    PubMed

    Amador Carrascal, Carolina; Chen, Shigao; Manduca, Armando; Greenleaf, James F; Urban, Matthew W

    2017-04-01

    Quantitative ultrasound elastography is increasingly being used in the assessment of chronic liver disease. Many studies have reported ranges of liver shear wave velocity values for healthy individuals and patients with different stages of liver fibrosis. Nonetheless, ongoing efforts exist to stabilize quantitative ultrasound elastography measurements by assessing factors that influence tissue shear wave velocity values, such as food intake, body mass index, ultrasound scanners, scanning protocols, and ultrasound image quality. Time-to-peak (TTP) methods have been routinely used to measure the shear wave velocity. However, there is still a need for methods that can provide robust shear wave velocity estimation in the presence of noisy motion data. The conventional TTP algorithm is limited to searching for the maximum motion in time profiles at different spatial locations. In this paper, two modified shear wave speed estimation algorithms are proposed. The first method searches for the maximum motion in both space and time [spatiotemporal peak (STP)]; the second method applies an amplitude filter [spatiotemporal thresholding (STTH)] to select points with motion amplitude higher than a threshold for shear wave group velocity estimation. The two proposed methods (STP and STTH) showed higher precision in shear wave velocity estimates compared with TTP in phantom. Moreover, in a cohort of 14 healthy subjects, STP and STTH methods improved both the shear wave velocity measurement precision and the success rate of the measurement compared with conventional TTP.

  10. Effects of ExB velocity shear and magnetic shear on turbulence and transport in magnetic confinement devices

    SciTech Connect

    Burrell, K.H.

    1996-11-01

    One of the scientific success stories of fusion research over the past decade is the development of the ExB shear stabilization model to explain the formation of transport barriers in magnetic confinement devices. This model was originally developed to explain the transport barrier formed at the plasma edge in tokamaks after the L (low) to H (high) transition. This concept has the universality needed to explain the edge transport barriers seen in limiter and divertor tokamaks, stellarators, and mirror machines. More recently, this model has been applied to explain the further confinement improvement from H (high)-mode to VH (very high)-mode seen in some tokamaks, where the edge transport barrier becomes wider. Most recently, this paradigm has been applied to the core transport barriers formed in plasmas with negative or low magnetic shear in the plasma core. These examples of confinement improvement are of considerable physical interest; it is not often that a system self-organizes to a higher energy state with reduced turbulence and transport when an additional source of free energy is applied to it. The transport decrease that is associated with ExB velocity shear effects also has significant practical consequences for fusion research. The fundamental physics involved in transport reduction is the effect of ExB shear on the growth, radial extent and phase correlation of turbulent eddies in the plasma. The same fundamental transport reduction process can be operational in various portions of the plasma because there are a number ways to change the radial electric field Er. An important theme in this area is the synergistic effect of ExB velocity shear and magnetic shear. Although the ExB velocity shear appears to have an effect on broader classes of microturbulence, magnetic shear can mitigate some potentially harmful effects of ExB velocity shear and facilitate turbulence stabilization.

  11. Crustal shear-wave velocity structure beneath Sumatra from receiver function modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bora, Dipok K.; Borah, Kajaljyoti; Goyal, Ayush

    2016-05-01

    We estimated the shear-wave velocity structure and Vp/Vs ratio of the crust beneath the Sumatra region by inverting stacked receiver functions from five three-component broadband seismic stations, located in diverse geologic setting, using a well known non-linear direct search approach, Neighborhood Algorithm (NA). Inversion results show significant variation of sediment layer thicknesses from 1 km beneath the backarc basin (station BKNI and PMBI) to 3-7 km beneath the coastal part of Sumatra region (station LHMI and MNAI) and Nias island (station GSI). Average sediment layer shear velocity (Vss) beneath all the stations is observed to be less (∼1.35 km/s) and their corresponding Vp/Vs ratio is very high (∼2.2-3.0). Crustal thickness beneath Sumatra region varies between 27 and 35 km, with exception of 19 km beneath Nias island, with average crustal Vs ∼3.1-3.4 km/s (Vp/Vs ∼1.8). It is well known that thick sediments with low Vs (and high Vp/Vs) amplify seismic waves even from a small-magnitude earthquake, which can cause huge damage in the zone. This study can provide the useful information of the crust for the Sumatra region. Since, Sumatra is an earthquake prone zone, which suffered the strong shaking of Great Andaman-Sumatra earthquake; this study can also be helpful for seismic hazard assessment.

  12. The Shear Viscosity to Entropy Ratio:. a Status Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremonini, Sera

    This review highlights some of the lessons that the holographic gauge/gravity duality has taught us regarding the behavior of the shear viscosity to entropy density in strongly coupled field theories. The viscosity to entropy ratio has been shown to take on a very simple universal value in all gauge theories with an Einstein gravity dual. Here we describe the origin of this universal ratio, and focus on how it is modified by generic higher derivative corrections corresponding to curvature corrections on the gravity side of the duality. In particular, certain curvature corrections are known to push the viscosity to entropy ratio below its universal value. This disproves a longstanding conjecture that such a universal value represents a strict lower bound for any fluid in nature. We discuss the main developments that have led to insight into the violation of this bound, and consider whether the consistency of the theory is responsible for setting a fundamental lower bound on the viscosity to entropy ratio.

  13. Orbital Transfer Vehicle Engine Technology High Velocity Ratio Diffusing Crossover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lariviere, Brian W.

    1992-01-01

    High speed, high efficiency head rise multistage pumps require continuous passage diffusing crossovers to effectively convey the pumped fluid from the exit of one impeller to the inlet of the next impeller. On Rocketdyne's Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV), the MK49-F, a three stage high pressure liquid hydrogen turbopump, utilizes a 6.23 velocity ratio diffusing crossover. This velocity ratio approaches the diffusion limits for stable and efficient flow over the operating conditions required by the OTV system. The design of the high velocity ratio diffusing crossover was based on advanced analytical techniques anchored by previous tests of stationary two-dimensional diffusers with steady flow. To secure the design and the analytical techniques, tests were required with the unsteady whirling characteristics produced by an impeller. A tester was designed and fabricated using a 2.85 times scale model of the MK49-F turbopumps first stage, including the inducer, impeller, and the diffusing crossover. Water and air tests were completed to evaluate the large scale turbulence, non-uniform velocity, and non-steady velocity on the pump and crossover head and efficiency. Suction performance tests from 80 percent to 124 percent of design flow were completed in water to assess these pump characteristics. Pump and diffuser performance from the water and air tests were compared with the actual MK49-F test data in liquid hydrogen.

  14. Orbital transfer vehicle engine technology high velocity ratio diffusing crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lariviere, Brian W.

    1992-12-01

    High speed, high efficiency head rise multistage pumps require continuous passage diffusing crossovers to effectively convey the pumped fluid from the exit of one impeller to the inlet of the next impeller. On Rocketdyne's Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV), the MK49-F, a three stage high pressure liquid hydrogen turbopump, utilizes a 6.23 velocity ratio diffusing crossover. This velocity ratio approaches the diffusion limits for stable and efficient flow over the operating conditions required by the OTV system. The design of the high velocity ratio diffusing crossover was based on advanced analytical techniques anchored by previous tests of stationary two-dimensional diffusers with steady flow. To secure the design and the analytical techniques, tests were required with the unsteady whirling characteristics produced by an impeller. A tester was designed and fabricated using a 2.85 times scale model of the MK49-F turbopumps first stage, including the inducer, impeller, and the diffusing crossover. Water and air tests were completed to evaluate the large scale turbulence, non-uniform velocity, and non-steady velocity on the pump and crossover head and efficiency. Suction performance tests from 80 percent to 124 percent of design flow were completed in water to assess these pump characteristics. Pump and diffuser performance from the water and air tests were compared with the actual MK49-F test data in liquid hydrogen.

  15. Mantle transition zone shear velocity gradients beneath USArray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmandt, Brandon

    2012-11-01

    Broadband P-to-s scattering isolated by teleseismic receiver function analysis is used to investigate shear velocity (VS) gradients in the mantle transition zone beneath USArray. Receiver functions from 2244 stations were filtered in multiple frequency bands and migrated to depth through P and S tomography models. The depth-migrated receiver functions were stacked along their local 410 and 660 km discontinuity depths to reduce stack incoherence and more accurately recover the frequency-dependent amplitudes of P410s and P660s. The stacked waveforms were inverted for one-dimensional VS between 320 and 840 km depth. First, a gradient-based inversion was used to find a least-squares solution and a subsequent Monte Carlo search about that solution constrained the range of VS profiles that provide an acceptable fit to the receiver function stacks. Relative to standard references models, all the acceptable models have diminished VS gradients surrounding the 410, a local VS gradient maximum at 490-500 km depth, and an enhanced VS gradient above the 660. The total 410 VS increase of 6.3% is greater than in reference models, and it occurs over a thickness of 20 km. However, 60% of this VS increase occurs over only 6 km. The 20 km total thickness of the 410 and diminished VS gradients surrounding the 410 are potential indications of high water content in the regional transition zone. An enhanced VS gradient overlying the 660 likely results from remnants of subduction lingering at the base of the transition zone. Cool temperatures from slabs subducted since the late Cretaceous and longer-term accumulation of former ocean crust both may contribute to the high gradient above the 660. The shallow depth of the 520 km discontinuity, 490-500 km, implies that the regional mean temperature in the transition zone is 110-160 K cooler than the global mean. A concentrated Vs gradient maximum centered near 660 km depth and a low VS gradient below 675 km confirms that the ringwoodite to

  16. Low Velocity Difference Thermal Shear Layer Mixing Rate Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, Robert H.; Culver, Harry C. M.; Weissbein, Dave; Georgiadis, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    Current CFD modeling techniques are known to do a poor job of predicting the mixing rate and persistence of slot film flow in co-annular flowing ducts with relatively small velocity differences but large thermal gradients. A co-annular test was devised to empirically determine the mixing rate of slot film flow in a constant area circular duct (D approx. 1ft, L approx. 10ft). The axial rate of wall heat-up is a sensitive measure of the mixing rate of the two flows. The inflow conditions were varied to simulate a variety of conditions characteristic of moderate by-pass ratio engines. A series of air temperature measurements near the duct wall provided a straightforward means to measure the axial temperature distribution and thus infer the mixing rate. This data provides a characterization of the slot film mixing rates encountered in typical jet engine environments. The experimental geometry and entrance conditions, along with the sensitivity of the results as the entrance conditions vary, make this a good test for turbulence models in a regime important to modern air-breathing propulsion research and development.

  17. The lithospheric shear-wave velocity structure of Saudi Arabia: Young volcanism in an old shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zheng; Julià, Jordi; Zahran, Hani; Mai, P. Martin

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the lithospheric shear-wave velocity structure of Saudi Arabia by conducting H-κ stacking analysis and jointly inverting teleseismic P-receiver functions and fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave group velocities at 56 broadband stations deployed by the Saudi Geological Survey (SGS). The study region, the Arabian plate, is traditionally divided into the western Arabian shield and the eastern Arabian platform: The Arabian shield itself is a complicated mélange of crustal material, composed of several Proterozoic terrains separated by ophiolite-bearing suture zones and dotted by outcropping Cenozoic volcanic rocks (locally known as harrats). The Arabian platform is primarily covered by 8 to 10 km of Paleozoic, Mesozoic and Cenozoic sedimentary rocks. Our results reveal high Vp/Vs ratios in the region of Harrat Lunayyir, which are interpreted as solidified magma intrusions from old magmatic episodes in the shield. Our results also indicate slow velocities and large upper mantle lid temperatures below the southern and northern tips of the Arabian shield, when compared with the values obtained for the central shield. We argue that our inferred patterns of lid velocity and temperature are due to heating by thermal conduction from the Afar plume (and, possibly, the Jordan plume), and that volcanism in western Arabia may result from small-scale adiabatic ascent of magma diapirs.

  18. Alignments of the galaxies in and around the Virgo cluster with the local velocity shear

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jounghun; Rey, Soo Chang; Kim, Suk

    2014-08-10

    Observational evidence is presented for the alignment between the cosmic sheet and the principal axis of the velocity shear field at the position of the Virgo cluster. The galaxies in and around the Virgo cluster from the Extended Virgo Cluster Catalog that was recently constructed by Kim et al. are used to determine the direction of the local sheet. The peculiar velocity field reconstructed from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 is analyzed to estimate the local velocity shear tensor at the Virgo center. Showing first that the minor principal axis of the local velocity shear tensor is almost parallel to the direction of the line of sight, we detect a clear signal of alignment between the positions of the Virgo satellites and the intermediate principal axis of the local velocity shear projected onto the plane of the sky. Furthermore, the dwarf satellites are found to appear more strongly aligned than their normal counterparts, which is interpreted as an indication of the following. (1) The normal satellites and the dwarf satellites fall in the Virgo cluster preferentially along the local filament and the local sheet, respectively. (2) The local filament is aligned with the minor principal axis of the local velocity shear while the local sheet is parallel to the plane spanned by the minor and intermediate principal axes. Our result is consistent with the recent numerical claim that the velocity shear is a good tracer of the cosmic web.

  19. The influence of the arrangements of multi-sensor probe arrays on the accuracy of simultaneously measured velocity and velocity gradient-based statistics in turbulent shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukoslavčević, P. V.; Wallace, J. M.

    2013-06-01

    A highly resolved turbulent channel flow direct numerical simulation (DNS) with Re τ = 200 has been used to investigate the influence of the arrangements of the arrays (array configurations), within the sensing area of a multi-array hot-wire probe on the measurement accuracy of velocity and velocity gradient-based statistics. To eliminate all effects related to the sensor response and array characteristics (such as sensor dimensions, overheat ratio, thermal cross talk, number and orientations of the sensors and uniqueness range) so that this study could be focused solely on the effects of the array configurations (positions and separations), a concept of a perfect array was introduced, that is, one that can exactly and simultaneously measure all three velocity components at its center. The velocity component values, measured by these perfect arrays, are simply the DNS values computed at these points. Using these velocity components, the velocity and velocity gradient-based statistics were calculated assuming a linear velocity variation over the probes' sensing areas. The calculated values are compared to the DNS values for various array arrangements to study the influence of these arrangements on the measurement accuracy. Typical array configurations that previously have been used for physical probes were tested. It is demonstrated that the array arrangements strongly influence the accuracy of some of the velocity and velocity gradient-based statistics and that no single configuration exists, for a given spatial resolution, which gives the best accuracy for all of the statistics characterizing a turbulent shear flow.

  20. Phase-averaged wall shear stress, wall pressure, and near-wall velocity field measurements in a whirling annular seal

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, G.L.; Winslow, R.B.; Thames, H.D. III

    1996-07-01

    The flow field inside a 50 percent eccentric whirling annular seal operating at a Reynolds number of 24,000 and a Taylor number of 6600 has been measured using a three-dimensional laser-Doppler anemometer system. Flush mount pressure and wall shear stress probes have been used to measure the stresses (normal and shear) along the length of the stator. The rotor was mounted eccentrically on the shaft so that the rotor orbit was circular and rotated at the same speed as the shaft (a whirl ratio of 1.0). This paper presents mean pressure, mean wall shear stress magnitude, and mean wall shear stress direction distributions along the length of the seal. Phase-averaged wall pressure and wall shear stress are presented along with phase-averaged mean velocity and turbulence kinetic energy distributions located 0.16c from the stator wall, where c is the seal clearance. The relationships between the velocity, turbulence, wall pressure, and wall shear stress are very complex and do not follow simple bulk flow predictions.

  1. Dynamic Strengthening During High Velocity Shear Experiments with Siliceous Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Z.; Chang, J. C.; Boneh, Y.; Chen, X.; Reches, Z.

    2011-12-01

    It is generally accepted that dynamic-weakening is essential for earthquake instability, and many experimental works have documented this weakening. Recent observations revealed also opposite trends of dynamic-strengthening in experiments (Reches & Lockner, 2010). We present here our experimental results of this dynamic-strengthening and discuss possible implications to earthquake behavior. We ran hundreds of experiments on experimental faults made of siliceous rock including granite, syenite, diorite, and quartzite. The experimental fault is comprised of two solid cylindrical blocks with a raised-ring contact of 7 cm diameter and 1 cm width. We recognized general, three regimes of strength-velocity relations: (I) Dynamic weakening (drop of 20-60% of static strength) as slip velocity increased from ~0.0003 m/s (lowest experimental velocity) to a critical velocity, Vc=0.008-0.16 m/s; (II) Abrupt transition to dynamic strengthening regime during which the fault strength almost regains its static strength; and (III) Quasi-constant strength with further possible drops as velocity approaches ~1 m/s. The critical velocity depends on the sample lithology: Vc is ~0.06 m/s for granite, ~0.008 m/s for syenite, ~0.01 m/s for diorite, and ~0.16 m/s for quartzite. The strengthening stage is associated with temperature increase, wear-rate increase, and the occurrence of intense, high frequency stick-slip events (Reches & Lockner, 2010). Sammis et al., (this meeting) attributed this strengthening to dehydration of the thin water layer that covers the gouge particles as the temperature increases. On the other hand, we note that tens of experiments with dolomite samples (non-siliceous), which were deformed under similar conditions, did not exhibit the velocity strengthening (unpublished). Based on the analyses by Andrews (2004, 2005), we speculate that velocity strengthening may bound the slip velocity. The numerical models of Andrews show that the slip velocity along a slip

  2. The relationships between large-scale variations in shear velocity, density, and compressional velocity in the Earth's mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulik, P.; Ekström, G.

    2016-04-01

    A large data set of surface wave phase anomalies, body wave travel times, normal-mode splitting functions, and long-period waveforms is used to investigate the scaling between shear velocity, density, and compressional velocity in the Earth's mantle. We introduce a methodology that allows construction of joint models with various levels of scaling complexity (ϱ = dlnρ/dlnvS, ν = dlnvS/dlnvP), in order to detect seismological signatures of chemical heterogeneity. We demonstrate that the data sets considered cannot be fit concurrently with a uniform ν or a positive and uniform ϱ throughout the mantle. The variance reductions to P wave travel times and vP-sensitive modes are up to 40% higher with our preferred model of anisotropic shear and compressional velocity than the recent anisotropic shear velocity model S362ANI+M, which was constructed assuming a uniform ν throughout the mantle. Several features reported in earlier tomographic studies persist after the inclusion of new and larger data sets; anticorrelation between bulk sound and shear velocities in the lowermost mantle as well as an increase in ν with depth in the lower mantle are largely independent of the regularization scheme. When correlations between density and shear velocity variations are imposed in the lowermost mantle, variance reductions of several spheroidal and toroidal modes deteriorate by as much as 40%. Recent measurements of the splitting of 0S2, in particular, are largely incompatible with perfectly correlated shear velocity and density heterogeneity throughout the mantle. A way to significantly improve the fits to various data sets is by allowing independent density perturbations in the lowermost mantle. Our preferred joint model consists of denser-than-average anomalies (˜1% peak to peak) at the base of the mantle roughly coincident with the low-velocity superplumes. The relative variation of shear velocity, density, and compressional velocity in our study disfavors a purely thermal

  3. Integrating shear velocity observations of the Hudson Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porritt, R. W.; Miller, M. S.; Darbyshire, F. A.

    2013-12-01

    Hudson Bay is the core of the Laurentia craton of North America. This region contains some of the thickest lithosphere globally, reaching 250-300 km depth. Previous studies have shown that much of this region is composed of amalgamated proto-continents including the Western Churchill and Superior provinces and that much of the structure of these constituents has been retained since the Trans-Hudson Orogen at 1.8 Ga. Using the Hudson Bay Lithospheric Experiment (HuBLE) and other permanent and POLARIS broadband seismic data, we image the region with S to P receiver functions, joint inversion of P to S receiver functions with surface waves, and teleseismic S and P wave travel-times. The receiver function imaging reveals a persistent mid-lithospheric layer at ~80 km depth under all stations, but a variable lithospheric thickness. The teleseismic S delay times show a pattern of early arrivals around the center of the network, beneath Hudson Bay where the lithosphere is thickest, while the P delay times are early in the Superior province relative to the Western Churchill province. This suggests higher Vp/Vs ratios in the Superior province, which is evidence that stacked oceanic plates formed this province. The relatively flat Moho imaged by earlier receiver function studies and the lower mantle Vp/Vs of the Western Churchill province provides evidence of formation by plume head extraction. The joint inversion shows an LAB that is typically a broad discontinuity spanning ~20-30 km at ~220 km depth suggesting a primarily thermal boundary zone. The mid-lithospheric layer is composed of increasing velocity from the ~40 km depth Moho defined by H-k stacking of PRFs to a broad, constant velocity lithospheric lid spanning 80-200 km depth. We suggest this mid-lithospheric layer represents the mantle lithosphere of the proto-continents prior to collision and the lid formed due to post-collisional cooling. The integration of these seismic datasets furthers our understanding of

  4. The radial velocity, velocity dispersion, and mass-to-light ratio of the Sculptor dwarf galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armandroff, T. E.; Da Costa, G. S.

    1986-01-01

    The radial velocity, velocity dispersion, and mass-to-light ratio for 16 K giants in the Sculptor dwarf galaxy are calculated. Spectra at the Ca II triplet are analyzed using cross-correlation techniques in order to obtain the mean velocity of + 107.4 + or - 2.0 km/s. The dimensional velocity dispersion estimated as 6.3 (+1.1, -1.3) km/s is combined with the calculated core radius and observed central surface brightness to produce a mass-to-light ratio of 6.0 in solar units. It is noted that the data indicate that the Sculptor contains a large amount of mass not found in globular clusters, and the mass is either in the form of remnant stars or low-mass dwarfs.

  5. Measurement of shear-wave velocity by ultrasound critical-angle reflectometry (UCR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, S.; Antich, P.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    There exists a growing body of research that relates the measurement of pressure-wave velocity in bone to different physiological conditions and treatment modalities. The shear-wave velocity has been less studied, although it is necessary for a more complete understanding of the mechanical properties of bone. Ultrasound critical-angle reflectometry (UCR) is a noninvasive and nondestructive technique previously used to measure pressure-wave velocities both in vitro and in vivo. This note describes its application to the measurement of shear-wave velocity in bone, whether directly accessible or covered by soft tissue.

  6. Velocity and shear rate estimates of some non-Newtonian oscillatory flows in tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutev, N.; Tabakova, S.; Radev, S.

    2016-10-01

    The two-dimensional Newtonian and non-Newtonian (Carreau viscosity model used) oscillatory flows in straight tubes are studied theoretically and numerically. The corresponding analytical solution of the Newtonian flow and the numerical solution of the Carreau viscosity model flow show differences in velocity and shear rate. Some estimates for the velocity and shear rate differences are theoretically proved. As numerical examples the blood flow in different type of arteries and the polymer flow in pipes are considered.

  7. Spatial correlation of shear-wave velocity in the San Francisco Bay Area sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, E.M.; Baise, L.G.; Kayen, R.E.

    2007-01-01

    Ground motions recorded within sedimentary basins are variable over short distances. One important cause of the variability is that local soil properties are variable at all scales. Regional hazard maps developed for predicting site effects are generally derived from maps of surficial geology; however, recent studies have shown that mapped geologic units do not correlate well with the average shear-wave velocity of the upper 30 m, Vs(30). We model the horizontal variability of near-surface soil shear-wave velocity in the San Francisco Bay Area to estimate values in unsampled locations in order to account for site effects in a continuous manner. Previous geostatistical studies of soil properties have shown horizontal correlations at the scale of meters to tens of meters while the vertical correlations are on the order of centimeters. In this paper we analyze shear-wave velocity data over regional distances and find that surface shear-wave velocity is correlated at horizontal distances up to 4 km based on data from seismic cone penetration tests and the spectral analysis of surface waves. We propose a method to map site effects by using geostatistical methods based on the shear-wave velocity correlation structure within a sedimentary basin. If used in conjunction with densely spaced shear-wave velocity profiles in regions of high seismic risk, geostatistical methods can produce reliable continuous maps of site effects. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Calculation of Near-Bank Velocity and Boundary Shear Stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Detailed knowledge of the flow and boundary shear stress fields near the banks of natural channels is essential for making accurate calculations of rates of near-bank sediment transport and geomorphic adjustment. This paper presents a test of a relatively simple, fully predictive, numerical method f...

  9. Shear Wave Velocity Estimates through Combined Use of Passive Techniques in a Tectonically Active Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Rajib; Baruah, Saurabh

    2016-12-01

    We made an attempt to assess the shear wave velocity values VSand, to a lesser extent, the VP values from ambient noise recordings in an array configuration. Five array sites were situated in the close proximity to borehole sites. Shear wave velocity profiles were modeled at these five array sites with the aid of two computational techniques, viz. spatial autocorrelation (SPAC) and H/V ellipticity. Out of these five array sites, velocity estimates could be reliably inferred at three locations. The shear wave velocities estimated by these methods are found to be quite consistent with each other. The computed VS values up to 30 m depth are in the range from 275 to 375 m/s in most of the sites, which implies prevalence of a low velocity zone at some pocket areas. The results were corroborated by evidence of site geology as well as geotechnical information.

  10. Correlations Between Shear Wave Velocity and In-Situ Penetration Test Results for Korean Soil Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chang-Guk; Cho, Chang-Soo; Son, Minkyung; Shin, Jin Soo

    2013-03-01

    Shear wave velocity ( V S) can be obtained using seismic tests, and is viewed as a fundamental geotechnical characteristic for seismic design and seismic performance evaluation in the field of earthquake engineering. To apply conventional geotechnical site investigation techniques to geotechnical earthquake engineering, standard penetration tests (SPT) and piezocone penetration tests (CPTu) were undertaken together with a variety of borehole seismic tests for a range of sites in Korea. Statistical modeling of the in-situ testing data identified correlations between V S and geotechnical in-situ penetration data, such as blow counts ( N value) from SPT and CPTu data including tip resistance ( q t), sleeve friction ( f s), and pore pressure ratio ( B q). Despite the difference in strain levels between conventional geotechnical penetration tests and borehole seismic tests, it is shown that the suggested correlations in this study is applicable to the preliminary determination of V S for soil deposits.

  11. Agyrotropic pressure tensor induced by the plasma velocity shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pegoraro, Francesco; Del Sarto, Danele; Califano, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    We show that the spatial inhomogeneity of a shear flow in a fluid plasma is transferred to a pressure anisotropy that has both a gyrotropic and a non gyrotropic component. We investigate this process both analytically and numerically by including the full pressure tensor dynamics. We determine the time evolution of the pressure agyrotropy and in general of the pressure tensor anisotropization which arise from the action of both the magnetic eld and the flow strain tensor. This mechanism can affect the onset and development of shear-induced fluid instabilities in plasmas and is relevant to the understanding of the origin of some of the non-Maxwellian distribution functions evidenced both in Vlasov simulations and in space plasma measurements that exhibit pressure agyrotropy.

  12. Animal models of surgically manipulated flow velocities to study shear stress-induced atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Winkel, Leah C; Hoogendoorn, Ayla; Xing, Ruoyu; Wentzel, Jolanda J; Van der Heiden, Kim

    2015-07-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arterial tree that develops at predisposed sites, coinciding with locations that are exposed to low or oscillating shear stress. Manipulating flow velocity, and concomitantly shear stress, has proven adequate to promote endothelial activation and subsequent plaque formation in animals. In this article, we will give an overview of the animal models that have been designed to study the causal relationship between shear stress and atherosclerosis by surgically manipulating blood flow velocity profiles. These surgically manipulated models include arteriovenous fistulas, vascular grafts, arterial ligation, and perivascular devices. We review these models of manipulated blood flow velocity from an engineering and biological perspective, focusing on the shear stress profiles they induce and the vascular pathology that is observed.

  13. Shear banding in a lyotropic lamellar phase. I. Time-averaged velocity profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmon, Jean-Baptiste; Manneville, Sébastien; Colin, Annie

    2003-11-01

    Using velocity profile measurements based on dynamic light scattering and coupled to structural and rheological measurements in a Couette cell, we present evidences for a shear banding scenario in the shear flow of the onion texture of a lyotropic lamellar phase. Time-averaged measurements clearly show the presence of structural shear banding in the vicinity of a shear-induced transition, associated with the nucleation and growth of a highly sheared band in the flow. Our experiments also reveal the presence of slip at the walls of the Couette cell. Using a simple mechanical approach, we demonstrate that our data confirm the classical assumption of the shear banding picture, in which the interface between bands lies at a given stress σ*. We also outline the presence of large temporal fluctuations of the flow field, which are the subject of the second part of this paper [Salmon et al., Phys. Rev. E 68, 051504 (2003)].

  14. Compressional and shear wave velocities in granular materials to 2.5 kilobars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talwani, P.; Nur, A.; Kovach, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    The velocities of seismic compressional waves and, for the first time, shear wave velocities in silica sand, volcanic ash, and basalt powder were determined under hydrostatic confining pressures to 2.5 kb. Simultaneously, the porosity of these materials was obtained as a function of confining pressure. The presented results have important implications for the self-compaction hypothesis that has been postulated to explain the lunar near-surface seismic velocity variation.

  15. Shear-wave velocity of slope sediments near Hudson Canyon from analysis of ambient noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, N. C.; Ten Brink, U. S.; Collins, J. A.; McGuire, J. J.; Flores, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    We present new ambient noise data that help constrain the shear strength of marine sediments on the continental slope north of Hudson Canyon on the U.S. Atlantic margin. Sediment shear strength is a key parameter in models of potentially tsunamigenic, submarine slope failures, but shear strength is difficult to measure in situ and is expected to evolve in time with changes in pore pressure. The ambient noise data were recorded by 11 short-period, ocean-bottom seismometers and hydrophones deployed in a ~1 by 1.5 km array for ~6 months on the continental slope. These high frequency (~0.1 - 50 Hz), narrow-aperture data are expected to record noise propagating as interface waves and/or resonating in the upper ~500 m of sediment. Propagation of interface waves is controlled by the shear-wave velocity of the sediment, which we measure by calculating lag-times in cross-correlations of waveforms recorded by pairs of receivers. These measurements of shear-wave velocity will be used to constrain shear strength. The data also appear to record wind-generated noise resonating in layered sediment. We expect this resonance to also be sensitive to shear-wave velocity, and spectral analysis and modeling of harmonics may provide a second constraint on sediment shear strength. Both the correlogram- and spectral-based measurements can be made using hour- to day-long segments of data, enabling us to constrain temporal evolution of shear-wave velocity and potential forcing mechanisms (e.g., tidal and storm loading and submarine groundwater discharge) through the ~6 month deployment.

  16. Wall Shear Stress, Wall Pressure and Near Wall Velocity Field Relationships in a Whirling Annular Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Winslow, Robert B.; Thames, H. Davis, III

    1996-01-01

    The mean and phase averaged pressure and wall shear stress distributions were measured on the stator wall of a 50% eccentric annular seal which was whirling in a circular orbit at the same speed as the shaft rotation. The shear stresses were measured using flush mounted hot-film probes. Four different operating conditions were considered consisting of Reynolds numbers of 12,000 and 24,000 and Taylor numbers of 3,300 and 6,600. At each of the operating conditions the axial distribution (from Z/L = -0.2 to 1.2) of the mean pressure, shear stress magnitude, and shear stress direction on the stator wall were measured. Also measured were the phase averaged pressure and shear stress. These data were combined to calculate the force distributions along the seal length. Integration of the force distributions result in the net forces and moments generated by the pressure and shear stresses. The flow field inside the seal operating at a Reynolds number of 24,000 and a Taylor number of 6,600 has been measured using a 3-D laser Doppler anemometer system. Phase averaged wall pressure and wall shear stress are presented along with phase averaged mean velocity and turbulence kinetic energy distributions located 0.16c from the stator wall where c is the seal clearance. The relationships between the velocity, turbulence, wall pressure and wall shear stress are very complex and do not follow simple bulk flow predictions.

  17. Shear-wave velocity profiling according to three alternative approaches: A comparative case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Moro, G.; Keller, L.; Al-Arifi, N. S.; Moustafa, S. S. R.

    2016-11-01

    The paper intends to compare three different methodologies which can be used to analyze surface-wave propagation, thus eventually obtaining the vertical shear-wave velocity (VS) profile. The three presented methods (currently still quite unconventional) are characterized by different field procedures and data processing. The first methodology is a sort of evolution of the classical Multi-channel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) here accomplished by jointly considering Rayleigh and Love waves (analyzed according to the Full Velocity Spectrum approach) and the Horizontal-to-Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR). The second method is based on the joint analysis of the HVSR curve together with the Rayleigh-wave dispersion determined via Miniature Array Analysis of Microtremors (MAAM), a passive methodology that relies on a small number (4 to 6) of vertical geophones deployed along a small circle (for the common near-surface application the radius usually ranges from 0.6 to 5 m). Finally, the third considered approach is based on the active data acquired by a single 3-component geophone and relies on the joint inversion of the group-velocity spectra of the radial and vertical components of the Rayleigh waves, together with the Radial-to-Vertical Spectral Ratio (RVSR). The results of the analyses performed while considering these approaches (completely different both in terms of field procedures and data analysis) appear extremely consistent thus mutually validating their performances. Pros and cons of each approach are summarized both in terms of computational aspects as well as with respect to practical considerations regarding the specific character of the pertinent field procedures.

  18. The P-wave boundary of the Large-Low Shear Velocity Province beneath the Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Daniel A.; Rost, Sebastian

    2014-10-01

    The Large Low Shear Velocity Provinces (LLSVPs) in the lower mantle represent volumetrically significant thermal or chemical or thermo-chemical heterogeneities. Their structure and boundaries have been widely studied, mainly using S-waves, but much less is known about their signature in the P-wavefield. We use an extensive dataset recorded at USArray to create, for the first time, a high-resolution map of the location, shape, sharpness, and extent of the boundary of the Pacific LLSVP using P(Pdiff)-waves. We find that the northern edge of the Pacific LLSVP is shallow dipping (26° relative to the horizontal) and diffuse (∼120 km wide transition zone) whereas the eastern edge is steeper dipping (70°) and apparently sharp (∼40 km wide). We trace the LLSVP boundary up to ∼500 km above the CMB in most areas, and 700 km between 120° and 90°W at the eastern extent of the boundary. Apparent P-wave velocity drops are ∼1-3% relative to PREM, indicating a strong influence of LLSVPs on P-wave velocity, at least in the high-frequency wavefield, in contrast to previous studies. A localised patch with a greater velocity drop of ∼15-25% is detected, defined by large magnitude gradients of the travel-time residuals. We identify this as a likely location of an Ultra-Low Velocity Zone (ULVZ), matching the location of a previously detected ULVZ in this area. The boundary of a separate low velocity anomaly, of a similar height to the LLSVP, is detected in the north-west Pacific, matching tomographic images. This outlier appears to be connected to the main LLSVP through a narrow channel close to the CMB and may be in the process of joining or splitting from the main LLSVP. We also see strong velocity increases in the lower mantle to the east of the LLSVP, likely detecting subducted material beneath central America. The LLSVP P-wave boundary is similar to that determined in high-resolution S-wave studies and follows the -0.4% ΔVS iso-velocity contour in the S40RTS

  19. Finite frequency tomography of D″ shear velocity heterogeneity beneath the Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Shu-Huei; Garnero, Edward J.; Chiao, Ling-Yun; Kuo, Ban-Yuan; Lay, Thorne

    2005-07-01

    The shear velocity structure in the lowermost 500 km of the mantle beneath the Caribbean and surrounding areas is determined by seismic tomography applied to a suite of Sd-SKS, ScS-S, (Scd + Sbc)-S, and ScS-(Scd + Sbc) differential times, where (Scd + Sbc) is a pair of overlapping triplication arrivals produced by shear wave interaction with an abrupt velocity increase at the top of the D″ region. The inclusion of the triplication arrivals in the inversion, a first for a deep mantle tomographic model, is possible because of the widespread presence of a D″ velocity discontinuity in the region. The improved ray path sampling provided by the triplication arrivals yields improved vertical resolution of velocity heterogeneity within and above the D″ region. The reference velocity model, taken from a prior study of waveforms in the region, has a 2.9% shear velocity discontinuity 250 km above the core-mantle boundary (CMB). Effects of aspherical structure in the mantle at shallower depths than the inversion volume are suppressed by applying corrections for several different long-wavelength shear velocity tomography models. Born-Fréchet kernels are used to characterize how the finite frequency data sample the structure for all of the differential arrival time combinations; inversions are performed with and without the kernels. The use of three-dimensional kernels stabilizes the tomographic inversion relative to a ray theory parameterization, and a final model with 60- and 50-km correlation lengths in the lateral and radial dimensions, respectively, is retrieved. The resolution of the model is higher than that of prior inversions, with 3-4% velocity fluctuations being resolved within what is commonly described as a circum-Pacific ring of high velocities. A broad zone of relatively high shear velocity material extends throughout the lower mantle volume beneath the Gulf of Mexico, with several percent lower shear velocities being found beneath northern South America

  20. Finite-Frequency Tomography of D'' Shear Velocity Heterogeneity beneath the Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, S.; Garnero, E. J.; Chiao, L.; Kuo, B.; Lay, T.

    2004-12-01

    The shear velocity structure in the lowermost 500 km of the mantle beneath the Caribbean and surrounding areas is determined by seismic tomography applied to a suite of Sdiff-SKS, ScS-S, (Scd+Sbc)-S, and ScS-(Scd+Sbc) differential times, where (Scd+Sbc) is a pair of overlapping triplication arrivals produced by shear wave interaction with an abrupt velocity increase at the top of the D'' region. The inclusion of the triplication arrivals in the inversion, a first for a deep mantle tomographic model, is possible because of the widespread presence of a D'' velocity discontinuity in the region. The additional raypath sampling provided by the triplication arrivals yields improved vertical resolution of velocity heterogeneity within and above the D'' region. The reference velocity model, taken from a prior study of waveforms in the region, has a 2.9% shear velocity discontinuity 250 km above the CMB. Effects of aspherical structure in the mantle at shallower depths than the inversion volume are suppressed by applying corrections for several different long-wavelength shear velocity tomography models. Born-Fréchet kernels are used to characterize how the finite-frequency data sample the structure for all of the differential arrival time combinations; inversions are performed with and without the kernels. The use of 3-D kernels stabilizes the tomographic inversion relative to a ray theory parameterization, and a final model with 60 and 50 km correlation lengths in the the lateral and radial dimensions, respectively, is retrieved. The resolution of the model is higher than that of prior inversions, with 3 to 4% velocity fluctuations being resolved within what is commonly described as a circum-Pacific ring of high velocities. A broad zone of relatively high shear velocity material extends throughout the lower mantle volume beneath the Gulf of Mexico, with several percent lower shear velocities being found beneath northern South America. Concentrated low velocity regions

  1. Single tracking location methods suppress speckle noise in shear wave velocity estimation.

    PubMed

    Elegbe, Etana C; McAleavey, Stephen A

    2013-04-01

    In ultrasound-based elastography methods, the estimation of shear wave velocity typically involves the tracking of speckle motion due to an applied force. The errors in the estimates of tissue displacement, and thus shear wave velocity, are generally attributed to electronic noise and decorrelation due to physical processes. We present our preliminary findings on another source of error, namely, speckle-induced bias in phase estimation. We find that methods that involve tracking in a single location, as opposed to multiple locations, are less sensitive to this source of error since the measurement is differential in nature and cancels out speckle-induced phase errors.

  2. Shear-wave velocity of surficial geologic sediments in Northern California: Statistical distributions and depth dependence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holzer, T.L.; Bennett, M.J.; Noce, T.E.; Tinsley, J. C.

    2005-01-01

    Shear-wave velocities of shallow surficial geologic units were measured at 210 sites in a 140-km2 area in the greater Oakland, California, area near the margin of San Francisco Bay. Differences between average values of shear-wave velocity for each geologic unit computed by alternative approaches were in general smaller than the observed variability. Averages estimated by arithmetic mean, geometric mean, and slowness differed by 1 to 8%, while coefficients of variation ranged from 14 to 25%. With the exception of the younger Bay mud that underlies San Francisco Bay, velocities of the geologic units are approximately constant with depth. This suggests that shear-wave velocities measured at different depths in these surficial geologic units do not need to be normalized to account for overburden stress in order to compute average values. The depth dependence of the velocity of the younger Bay mud most likely is caused by consolidation. Velocities of each geologic unit are consistent with a normal statistical distribution. Average values increase with geologic age, as has been previously reported. Velocities below the water table are about 7% less than those above it. ?? 2005, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  3. Crustal and Uppermost Mantle Shear Velocity Structure across the Mariana Trench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, C.; Wiens, D.; Lizarralde, D.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the shear wave structure of the crust and uppermost mantle across the Northern and Central Mariana trench using data recorded by a temporary network deployed in 2012-2013, including 7 island stations and 20 ocean bottom seismographs (OBSs). The goal of this study is to constrain velocity variations resulting from possible serpentinization of the incoming plate and the forearc mantle, and thus better understand the water budget of subduction zones. We use an ambient noise analysis method to reveal surface wave phase velocities at short period (8-30 s). Vertical component cross correlations show distinct fundamental and 1st higher-mode Rayleigh wave signals, especially between station pairs in the incoming plate. The 1st higher-mode Rayleigh wave is of significant importance for resolving crustal and shallowest upper mantle structure in regions covered by deep water. A multichannel cross correlation method (Eikonal tomography) is applied to Rayleigh waves from teleseismic earthquakes to obtain phase velocity at 25-80 s period. Finally the combined phase velocity curve from noise and teleseismic earthquakes is inverted at each point to determine the shear velocity structure. Preliminary inversion results for the incoming plate indicate slightly thickened crust that may be caused by a large Cretaceous igneous event associated with nearby seamounts. A high velocity anomaly emerges at around 20 km depth in the same region. We will present the entire 3-D shear wave velocity model across the trench during the AGU fall meeting.

  4. D″ shear velocity heterogeneity, anisotropy and discontinuity structure beneath the Caribbean and Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnero, Edward J.; Lay, Thorne

    2003-11-01

    The D″ region in the lowermost mantle beneath the Caribbean and Central America is investigated using shear waves from South American earthquakes recorded by seismic stations in North America. We present a large-scale, composite study of volumetric shear velocity heterogeneity, anisotropy, and the possible presence of a D″ discontinuity in the region. Our data set includes: 328 S( Sdiff)- SKS differential travel times, 300 ScS-S differential travel times, 125 S( Sdiff) and 120 ScS shear wave splitting measurements, and 297 seismograms inspected for Scd, the seismic phase refracted from a high-velocity D″ layer. Broadband digital data are augmented by high-quality digitized analog WWSSN data, providing extensive path coverage in our study area. In all, data from 61 events are utilized. In some cases, a given seismogram can be used for velocity heterogeneity, anisotropy, and discontinuity analyses. Significant mid-mantle structure, possibly associated with the ancient subducted Farallon slab, affects shear wave travel times and must be corrected for to prevent erroneous mapping of D″ shear velocity. All differential times are corrected for contributions from aspherical mantle structure above D″ using a high-resolution tomography model. Travel time analyses demonstrate the presence of pervasive high velocities in D″, with the highest velocities localized to a region beneath Central America, approximately 500-700 km in lateral dimension. Short wavelength variability overprints this general high-velocity background. Corrections are also made for lithospheric anisotropy beneath the receivers. Shear wave splitting analyses of the corrected waveforms reveal D″ anisotropy throughout the study area, with a general correlation with heterogeneity strength. Evidence for Scd arrivals is pervasive across the study area, consistent with earlier work, but there are a few localized regions (100-200 km) lacking clear Scd arrivals, which indicates heterogeneity in the

  5. 3D tomographic reconstruction of the internal velocity field of an immiscible drop in a shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerdraon, Paul; Dalziel, Stuart B.; Goldstein, Raymond E.; Landel, Julien R.; Peaudecerf, Francois J.

    2015-11-01

    We study experimentally the internal flow of a drop attached to a flat substrate and immersed in an immiscible shear flow. Transport inside the drop can play a crucial role in cleaning applications. Internal advection can enhance the mass transfer across the drop surface, thus increasing the cleaning rate. We used microlitre water-glycerol drops on a hydrophobic substrate. The drops were spherical and did not deform significantly under the shear flow. An oil phase of relative viscosity 0.01 to 1 was flowed over the drop. Typical Reynolds numbers inside the drops were of the order of 0.1 to 10. Using confocal microscopy, we performed 3D tomographic reconstruction of the flow field in the drop. The in-plane velocity field was measured using micro-PIV, and the third velocity component was computed from incompressibility. To our knowledge, this study gives the first experimental measurement of the three-dimensional internal velocity field of a drop in a shear flow. Numerical simulations and theoretical models published in the past 30 years predict a toroidal internal recirculation flow, for which the entire surface flows streamwise. However, our measurements reveal a qualitatively different picture with a two-lobed recirculation, featuring two stagnation points at the surface and a reverse surface flow closer to the substrate. This finding appears to be independent of Reynolds number and viscosity ratio in the ranges studied; we conjecture that the observed flow is due to the effect of surfactants at the drop surface.

  6. Preliminary Shear Velocity Tomography of Mt St Helens, Washington from iMUSH Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosbie, K.; Abers, G. A.; Creager, K. C.; Moran, S. C.; Denlinger, R. P.; Ulberg, C. W.

    2015-12-01

    The imaging Magma Under Mount St Helens (iMUSH) experiment will illuminate the crust beneath Mt St Helens volcano. The ambient noise tomography (ANT) component of this experiment measures shear velocity structure, which is more sensitive than P velocity to the presence of melt and other pore fluids. Seventy passive-source broadband seismometers for iMUSH were deployed in the summer of 2014 in a dense array of 100 Km diameter with a 10 km station spacing. We cross correlated ambient noise in 120 s windows and summed the result over many months for pairs of stations. Then frequency-domain methods on these cross correlations are employed to measure the phase velocities (Ekström et al. Geophys Rev Lett, 2009). Unlike velocities attained by group velocity methods, velocities for path lengths as small as one wavelength can be measured, enabling analysis of higher frequency signals and increasing spatial resolution. The minimum station spacing from which signals can be recovered ranges from 12 km at 0.18 Hz, a frequency that dominantly samples the upper crust to 20 km, to 37 km at 0.04 Hz, a frequency sensitive to structure through the crust and uppermost mantle, with lower spacing at higher frequencies. These phase velocities are tomographically inverted to obtain shear velocity maps for each frequency, assuming ray theory. Initial shear velocity maps for frequencies between 0.04-0.18 Hz reveal low-velocity sediments in the Puget Lowland west of Mount St Helens at 0.16-0.18 Hz, and a low velocity zone near 0.10 Hz between Mt Rainier and Mt Adams, east of Mount St Helens. The latter may reflect large-scale crustal plumbing of the arc between volcanic centers. In subsequent analyses these ANT results will be jointly inverted with receiver functions in order to further resolve crustal and upper mantle structure.

  7. Dissipation and velocity distribution at the shear-driven jamming transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, Peter

    2016-04-01

    We investigate energy dissipation and the distribution of particle velocities at the jamming transition for overdamped shear-driven frictionless disks in two dimensions at zero temperature. We find that the dissipation is caused by the fastest particles and that the fraction of particles responsible for the dissipation decreases towards zero as jamming is approached. These particles belong to an algebraic tail of the velocity distribution that approaches ˜v-3 as jamming is approached. We further find that different measures of the velocity diverge differently, which means that concepts such as typical velocity may no longer be used, a finding that should have implications for analytical approaches to shear-driven jamming.

  8. Shear velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle of Madagascar derived from surface wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, Martin J.; Wysession, Michael E.; Aleqabi, Ghassan; Wiens, Douglas A.; Nyblade, Andrew A.; Shore, Patrick; Rambolamanana, Gérard; Andriampenomanana, Fenitra; Rakotondraibe, Tsiriandrimanana; Tucker, Robert D.; Barruol, Guilhem; Rindraharisaona, Elisa

    2017-01-01

    The crust and upper mantle of the Madagascar continental fragment remained largely unexplored until a series of recent broadband seismic experiments. An island-wide deployment of broadband seismic instruments has allowed the first study of phase velocity variations, derived from surface waves, across the entire island. Late Cenozoic alkaline intraplate volcanism has occurred in three separate regions of Madagascar (north, central and southwest), with the north and central volcanism active until <1 Ma, but the sources of which remains uncertain. Combined analysis of three complementary surface wave methods (ambient noise, Rayleigh wave cross-correlations, and two-plane-wave) illuminate the upper mantle down to depths of 150 km. The phase-velocity measurements from the three methods for periods of 8-182 s are combined at each node and interpolated to generate the first 3-D shear-velocity model for sub-Madagascar velocity structure. Shallow (upper 10 km) low-shear-velocity regions correlate well with sedimentary basins along the west coast. Upper mantle low-shear-velocity zones that extend to at least 150 km deep underlie the north and central regions of recent alkali magmatism. These anomalies appear distinct at depths <100 km, suggesting that any connection between the zones lies at depths greater than the resolution of surface-wave tomography. An additional low-shear velocity anomaly is also identified at depths 50-150 km beneath the southwest region of intraplate volcanism. We interpret these three low-velocity regions as upwelling asthenosphere beneath the island, producing high-elevation topography and relatively low-volume magmatism.

  9. Shear Wave Velocity Structure of the Pampean Flat Slab Region from Ambient Noise Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, R. C.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Warren, L. M.; Alvarado, P. M.; Gilbert, H. J.

    2010-12-01

    The South American Cordillera formed by the subduction of the Nazca plate beneath South America. While this is often considered a ‘typical’ compressive upper plate subduction zone, there are several along-strike variations in both the nature of subduction and the style of deformation. From 30° to 32° S the Nazca plate flattens out at 100 km depth for ~300 km before resuming a steeper angle of subduction. Flat slab subduction shutoff of arc magmatism and caused deformation to migrate inboard into the Sierras Pampeanas. While flat slab subduction has had a profound impact on the regions’s tectonics, the presence of preexisting features related to the rifting of Gondwanaland and the accretion of terranes have also had a large impact on deformation. We use ambient noise tomography (ANT) to calculate regional shear wave velocities to better understand the tectonic development of the Pampean flat slab region. ANT utilizes the cross correlation of seismic noise to approximate the Green’s function between two seismic stations. Using this technique, we measure Rayleigh wave phase velocities at periods between 8 and 30 seconds, allowing us to measure shear wave velocities down to 40 km depth. Initial tomography results show a strong correlation between phase velocity and basin structure. Fast phase velocities at the 10 second period correlate with the Sierra de Pie de Palo, Sierra de Valle Fertil in the west and the Sierras de Cordoba in the east, while slow velocities correlate with the Bermejo and Cuyo basins. At longer periods (beyond 20 seconds), there is a pattern of slow phase velocities in the west beneath the Precordillera and the high Andes while fast phase velocities are present in the east beneath the Sierras Pampeanas. These fast velocities most likely reflect faster mid- to lower crustal velocities and a shallower Moho. To further our interpretation we inverted phase velocities to calculate regional shear wave structure. At shallow depths (< 15 km) the

  10. Fiber angle and aspect ratio influence the shear mechanics of oriented electrospun nanofibrous scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Tristan P; Nerurkar, Nandan L; Jacobs, Nathan T; Elliott, Dawn M; Mauck, Robert L

    2011-11-01

    Fibrocartilages, including the knee meniscus and the annulus fibrosus (AF) of the intervertebral disc, play critical mechanical roles in load transmission across joints and their function is dependent upon well-defined structural hierarchies, organization, and composition. All, however, are compromised in the pathologic transformations associated with tissue degeneration. Tissue engineering strategies that address these key features, for example, aligned nanofibrous scaffolds seeded with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), represent a promising approach for the regeneration of these fibrous structures. While such engineered constructs can replicate native tissue structure and uniaxial tensile properties, the multidirectional loading encountered by these tissues in vivo necessitates that they function adequately in other loading modalities as well, including shear. As previous findings have shown that native tissue tensile and shear properties are dependent on fiber angle and sample aspect ratio, respectively, the objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of a changing fiber angle and sample aspect ratio on the shear properties of aligned electrospun poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds, and to determine how extracellular matrix deposition by resident MSCs modulates the measured shear response. Results show that fiber orientation and sample aspect ratio significantly influence the response of scaffolds in shear, and that measured shear strains can be predicted by finite element models. Furthermore, acellular PCL scaffolds possessed a relatively high shear modulus, 2-4 fold greater than native tissue, independent of fiber angle and aspect ratio. It was further noted that under testing conditions that engendered significant fiber stretch, the aggregate resistance to shear was higher, indicating a role for fiber stretch in the overall shear response. Finally, with time in culture, the shear modulus of MSC laden constructs increased, suggesting that

  11. Estimation of near-surface shear-wave velocity by inversion of Rayleigh waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Park, C.B.

    1999-01-01

    The shear-wave (S-wave) velocity of near-surface materials (soil, rocks, pavement) and its effect on seismic-wave propagation are of fundamental interest in many groundwater, engineering, and environmental studies. Rayleigh-wave phase velocity of a layered-earth model is a function of frequency and four groups of earth properties: P-wave velocity, S-wave velocity, density, and thickness of layers. Analysis of the Jacobian matrix provides a measure of dispersion-curve sensitivity to earth properties. S-wave velocities are the dominant influence on a dispersion curve in a high-frequency range (>5 Hz) followed by layer thickness. An iterative solution technique to the weighted equation proved very effective in the high-frequency range when using the Levenberg-Marquardt and singular-value decomposition techniques. Convergence of the weighted solution is guaranteed through selection of the damping factor using the Levenberg-Marquardt method. Synthetic examples demonstrated calculation efficiency and stability of inverse procedures. We verify our method using borehole S-wave velocity measurements.Iterative solutions to the weighted equation by the Levenberg-Marquardt and singular-value decomposition techniques are derived to estimate near-surface shear-wave velocity. Synthetic and real examples demonstrate the calculation efficiency and stability of the inverse procedure. The inverse results of the real example are verified by borehole S-wave velocity measurements.

  12. Finite Larmor radius assisted velocity shear stabilization of the interchange instability in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ng Sheungwah; Hassam, A.B.

    2005-06-15

    Finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects, originally shown to stabilize magnetized plasma interchange modes at short wavelength, are shown to assist velocity shear stabilization of long wavelength interchanges. It is shown that the FLR effects result in stabilization with roughly the same efficacy as the stabilization from dissipative (resistive and viscous) effects found earlier.

  13. Parallel-velocity-shear-modified drift wave in negative ion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichiki, R.; Kaneko, T.; Hayashi, K.; Tamura, S.; Hatakeyama, R.

    2009-03-01

    A systematic investigation of the effects of a parallel velocity shear and negative ions on the collisionless drift wave instability has for the first time been realized by simultaneously using a segmented tungsten hot plate of a Q-machine and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) gas in a magnetized potassium plasma. The parallel velocity shear of the positive ion flow tends to decrease the fluctuation level of the drift wave. The introduction of negative ions first increases the fluctuation level and then starts to decrease it at the negative ion exchange fraction of around 10%, while keeping the above-mentioned shear effect qualitatively. In addition, a simple dispersion relation based on the local model has been calculated to show that it can predict wave characteristics similar to the experimental results. Our findings provide a potential for gaining a more profound insight into the physics of space/circumterrestrial plasmas.

  14. Generation of large-scale vorticity in a homogeneous turbulence with a mean velocity shear.

    PubMed

    Elperin, Tov; Kleeorin, Nathan; Rogachevskii, Igor

    2003-07-01

    An effect of a mean velocity shear on a turbulence and on the effective force which is determined by the gradient of the Reynolds stresses is studied. Generation of a mean vorticity in a homogeneous incompressible nonhelical turbulent flow with an imposed mean velocity shear due to an excitation of a large-scale instability is found. The instability is caused by a combined effect of the large-scale shear motions ("skew-induced" deflection of equilibrium mean vorticity) and "Reynolds stress-induced" generation of perturbations of mean vorticity. Spatial characteristics of the instability, such as the minimum size of the growing perturbations and the size of perturbations with the maximum growth rate, are determined. This instability and the dynamics of the mean vorticity are associated with Prandtl's turbulent secondary flows.

  15. Shear-wave velocity compilation for Northridge strong-motion recording sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borcherdt, Roger D.; Fumal, Thomas E.

    2002-01-01

    Borehole and other geotechnical information collected at the strong-motion recording sites of the Northridge earthquake of January 17, 1994 provide an important new basis for the characterization of local site conditions. These geotechnical data, when combined with analysis of strong-motion recordings, provide an empirical basis to evaluate site coefficients used in current versions of US building codes. Shear-wave-velocity estimates to a depth of 30 meters are derived for 176 strong-motion recording sites. The estimates are based on borehole shear-velocity logs, physical property logs, correlations with physical properties and digital geologic maps. Surface-wave velocity measurements and standard penetration data are compiled as additional constraints. These data as compiled from a variety of databases are presented via GIS maps and corresponding tables to facilitate use by other investigators.

  16. Mixing properties of coaxial jets with large velocity ratios and large inverse density ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander Schumaker, S.; Driscoll, James F.

    2012-05-01

    An experimental study was conducted to better understand the mixing properties of coaxial jets as several parameters were systematically varied, including the velocity ratio, density ratio, and the Reynolds number. Diameters of the inner and outer jet were also varied. Coaxial jets are commonly used to mix fluids due to the simplicity of their geometry and the rapid mixing that they provide. A measure of the overall mixing efficiency is the stoichiometric mixing length (Ls), which is the distance along the jet centerline where the two fluids have mixed to some desired concentration, which was selected to be the stoichiometric concentration for H2/O2 and CH4/O2 in this case. For 56 cases, the profiles of mean mixture fraction, rms mixture fraction fluctuations (unmixedness), and Ls were measured using acetone planar laser induced fluorescence diagnostics. Results were compared to three mixing models. The entrainment model of Villermaux and Rehab showed good agreement with the data, indicating that the proper non-dimensional scaling parameter is the momentum flux ratio M. The work extends the existing database of coaxial jet scalar mixing properties because it considers the specific regime of large values of both the velocity ratio and the inverse density ratio, which is the regime in which rocket injectors operate. Also the work focuses on the mixing up to Ls where previous work focused on the mixing up to the end of the inner core. The Reynolds numbers achieved for a number of cases were considerably larger than previous gas mixing studies, which insures that the jet exit boundary conditions are fully turbulent.

  17. Statistics of particle pair relative velocity in the homogeneous shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gualtieri, P.; Picano, F.; Sardina, G.; Casciola, C. M.

    2012-02-01

    Small scale clustering of inertial particles and relative velocity of particle pairs have been fully characterized for statistically steady homogeneous isotropic flows. Depending on the particle Stokes relaxation time, the spatial distribution of the disperse phase results in a multi-scale manifold characterized by local particle concentration and voids and, because of finite inertia, the two nearby particles have high probability to exhibit large relative velocities. Both effects might explain the speed-up of particle collision rate in turbulent flows. Recently it has been shown that the large scale geometry of the flow plays a crucial role in organizing small scale particle clusters. For instance, a mean shear preferentially orients particle patterns. In this case, depending on the Stokes time, anisotropic clustering may occur even in the inertial range of scales where the turbulent fluctuations which drive the particles have already recovered isotropy. Here we consider the statistics of particle pair relative velocity in the homogeneous shear flow, the prototypical flow which manifests anisotropic clustering at small scales. We show that the mean shear, by imprinting anisotropy on the large scale velocity fluctuations, dramatically affects the particle relative velocity distribution even in the range of small scales where the anisotropic mechanisms of turbulent kinetic energy production are sub-dominant with respect to the inertial energy transfer which drives the carrier fluid velocity towards isotropy. We find that the particles’ populations which manifest strong anisotropy in their relative velocities are the same which exhibit small scale clustering. In contrast to any Kolmogorov-like picture of turbulent transport these phenomena may persist even below the smallest dissipative scales where the residual level of anisotropy may eventually blow-up. The observed anisotropy of particle relative velocity and spatial configuration is suggested to influence the

  18. Frictional strength of wet- and dry- talc gouge in high-velocity shear experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Reches, Z.; Elwood Madden, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    The strength of the creeping segment of the San Andres fault may be controlled by the distinct weakness and stability of talc (Moore & Rymer, 2007). We analyze talc frictional strength at high slip-velocity of 0.002 - 0.66 m/s, long slip-distances of 0.01 m to 33 m, and normal stresses up to 4.1 MPa. This analysis bridges the gap between nucleation stage of low velocity/distance, and the frictional behavior during large earthquakes. We tested wet and dry samples of pure talc gouge in a confined rotary cell, and continuously monitored the slip-velocity, stresses, dilation and temperature. We run 29 experiments of single and stepped velocities to obtain 243 values of quasi-static frictional coefficients. Dry talc gouge showed distinct slip-strengthening: friction coefficient of µ ~0.4 at short slip-distances of D < 0.1 m, and it increased systematically to µ ~0.8 at slip-distances of D = 0.1- 1 m; at D > 1 m, the frictional strength saturated at µ= 0.8 - 1 level. Wet talc gouge (16-20% water) displayed low frictional strength of µ= 0.1-0.3, in agreement with published triaxial tests. The stepped-velocity runs revealed a consistent velocity-strengthening trend. For a velocity jump from V1 to V2, we used VD = (µ2 -µ1)/ln (V2/V1), and found that on average VD = 0.06 and 0.03 for dry and wet talc, respectively, and for slip distances shorter than 1 m. Microstructural analysis of post-shearing wet talc gouge revealed extreme slip localization to a principal-slip-zone of a few microns, and significant shear compaction of 10-30%. In contrast, dry talc gouge exhibited distributed shear in a wide zone and systematic shear dilation (10-50%). We propose slip along weak interlayer talc plates and thermal-pressurization as the possible weakening mechanisms for wet talc. The development of distributed secondary fault network along with substantial grain crushing is responsible for slip-strengthening in dry condition. Fig. 1. Friction maps of talc gouge as function of slip

  19. Effect of low-velocity or ballistic impact damage on the strength of thin composite and aluminum shear panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, G. L.

    1985-01-01

    Impact tests were conducted on shear panels fabricated from 6061-T6 aluminum and from woven fabric prepreg of Du Pont Kevlara fiber/epoxy resin and graphite fiber/epoxy resin. The shear panels consisted of three different composite laminates and one aluminum material configuration. Three panel aspect ratios were evaluated for each material configuration. Composite panels were impacted with a 1.27-cm (0.05-in) diameter aluminum sphere at low velocities of 46 m/sec (150 ft/sec) and 67 m/sec (220 ft/sec). Ballistic impact conditions consisted of a tumbled 0.50-caliber projectile impacting loaded composite and aluminum shear panels. The results of these tests indicate that ballistic threshold load (the lowest load which will result in immediate failure upon penetration by the projectile) varied between 0.44 and 0.61 of the average failure load of undamaged panels. The residual strengths of the panels after ballistic impact varied between 0.55 and 0.75 of the average failure strength of the undamaged panels. The low velocity impacts at 67 m/sec (220 ft/sec) caused a 15 to 20 percent reduction in strength, whereas the impacts at 46 m/sec (150 ft/sec) resulted in negligible strength loss. Good agreement was obtained between the experimental failure strengths and the predicted strength with the point stress failure criterion.

  20. Linear and nonlinear studies of velocity shear driven three dimensional electron-magnetohydrodynamics instability

    SciTech Connect

    Gaur, Gurudatt; Das, Amita

    2012-07-15

    The study of electron velocity shear driven instability in electron magnetohydrodynamics (EMHD) regime in three dimensions has been carried out. It is well known that the instability is non-local in the plane defined by the flow direction and that of the shear, which is the usual Kelvin-Helmholtz mode, often termed as the sausage mode in the context of EMHD. On the other hand, a local instability with perturbations in the plane defined by the shear and the magnetic field direction exists which is termed as kink mode. The interplay of these two modes for simple sheared flow case as well as that when an external magnetic field exists has been studied extensively in the present manuscript in both linear and nonlinear regimes. Finally, these instability processes have been investigated for the exact 2D dipole solutions of EMHD equations [M. B. Isichenko and A. N. Marnachev, Sov. Phys. JETP 66, 702 (1987)] for which the electron flow velocity is sheared. It has been shown that dipoles are very robust and stable against the sausage mode as the unstable wavelengths are typically longer than the dipole size. However, we observe that they do get destabilized by the local kink mode.

  1. Mantle shear-wave velocity structure beneath the Hawaiian hot spot.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Cecily J; Solomon, Sean C; Laske, Gabi; Collins, John A; Detrick, Robert S; Orcutt, John A; Bercovici, David; Hauri, Erik H

    2009-12-04

    Defining the mantle structure that lies beneath hot spots is important for revealing their depth of origin. Three-dimensional images of shear-wave velocity beneath the Hawaiian Islands, obtained from a network of sea-floor and land seismometers, show an upper-mantle low-velocity anomaly that is elongated in the direction of the island chain and surrounded by a parabola-shaped high-velocity anomaly. Low velocities continue downward to the mantle transition zone between 410 and 660 kilometers depth, a result that is in agreement with prior observations of transition-zone thinning. The inclusion of SKS observations extends the resolution downward to a depth of 1500 kilometers and reveals a several-hundred-kilometer-wide region of low velocities beneath and southeast of Hawaii. These images suggest that the Hawaiian hot spot is the result of an upwelling high-temperature plume from the lower mantle.

  2. Improving the shear wave velocity structure beneath Bucharest (Romania) using ambient vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manea, Elena Florinela; Michel, Clotaire; Poggi, Valerio; Fäh, Donat; Radulian, Mircea; Balan, Florin Stefan

    2016-11-01

    Large earthquakes from the intermediate-depth Vrancea seismic zone are known to produce in Bucharest ground motion characterized by predominant long periods. This phenomenon has been interpreted as the combined effect of both seismic source properties and site response of the large sedimentary basin. The thickness of the unconsolidated Quaternary deposits beneath the city is more than 200 m, the total depth of sediments is more than 1000 m. Complex basin geometry and the low seismic wave velocities of the sediments are primarily responsible for the large amplification and long duration experienced during earthquakes. For a better understanding of the geological structure under Bucharest, a number of investigations using non-invasive methods have been carried out. With the goal to analyse and extract the polarization and dispersion characteristics of the surface waves, ambient vibrations and low-magnitude earthquakes have been investigated using single station and array techniques. Love and Rayleigh dispersion curves (including higher modes), Rayleigh waves ellipticity and SH-wave fundamental frequency of resonance (f0SH) have been inverted simultaneously to estimate the shear wave velocity structure under Bucharest down to a depth of about 8 km. Information from existing borehole logs was used as prior to reduce the non-uniqueness of the inversion and to constrain the shallow part of the velocity model (<300 m). In this study, we use data from a 35-km diameter array (the URS experiment) installed by the National Institute for Earth Physics and by the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology during 10 months in the period 2003-2004. The array consisted of 32 three-component seismological stations, deployed in the urban area of Bucharest and adjacent zones. The large size of the array and the broad-band nature of the available sensors gave us the possibility to characterize the surface wave dispersion at very low frequencies (0.05-1 Hz) using frequency-wavenumber techniques

  3. Shear wave velocity structure of the Anatolian Plate and surrounding regions using Ambient Noise Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delph, J. R.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Biryol, C. B.; Ward, K. M.

    2013-12-01

    The Anatolian Plate consists of various lithospheric terranes amalgamated during the closure of the Tethys Ocean, and is currently extruding to the west in response to a combination of the collision of the Arabian plate in the east and the roll back of the Aegean subduction zone in the west. We used Ambient Noise Tomography (ANT) at periods <= 40s to investigate the crust and uppermost mantle structure of the Anatolian Plate. We computed a total of 13,779 unique cross-correlations using one sample-per-second vertical component broadband seismic data from 215 stations from 8 different networks over a period of 7 years to compute fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave dispersion curves following the method of Benson et al. (2007). We then inverted the dispersion data to calculate phase velocity maps for 11 periods from 8 s - 40 s throughout Anatolia and the Aegean regions (Barmin et al. 2001). Using smoothed Moho values derived from Vanacore et al. (2013) in our starting models, we inverted our dispersion curves using a linear least-squares iterative inversion scheme (Herrmann & Ammon 2004) to produce a 3-D shear-wave velocity model of the crust and uppermost mantle throughout Anatolia and the Aegean. We find a good correlation between our seismic shear wave velocities and paleostructures (suture zones) and modern deformation (basin formation and fault deformation). The most prominent crustal velocity contrasts occur across intercontinental sutures zones, resulting from the juxtaposition of the compositionally different basements of the amalgamated terranes. At shallow depths, seismic velocity contrasts correspond closely with surficial features. The Thrace, Cankiri and Tuz Golu basins, and accretionary complexes related to the closure of the Neotethys are characterized by slow shear wave velocities, while the Menderes and Kirsehir Massifs, Pontides, and Istanbul Zone are characterized by fast velocities. We find that the East Anatolia Plateau has slow shear-wave velocities

  4. Three-dimensional shear wave velocity structure in the Atlantic upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Esther Kezia Candace

    Oceanic lithosphere constitutes the upper boundary layer of the Earth's convecting mantle. Its structure and evolution provide a vital window on the dynamics of the mantle and important clues to how the motions of Earth's surface plates are coupled to convection in the mantle below. The three-dimensional shear-velocity structure of the upper mantle beneath the Atlantic Ocean is investigated to gain insight into processes that drive formation of oceanic lithosphere. Travel times are measured for approximately 10,000 fundamental-mode Rayleigh waves, in the period range 30-130 seconds, traversing the Atlantic basin. Paths with >30% of their length through continental upper mantle are excluded to maximize sensitivity to the oceanic upper mantle. The lateral distribution of Rayleigh wave phase velocity in the Atlantic upper mantle is explored with two approaches. One, phase velocity is allowed to vary only as a function of seafloor age. Two, a general two-dimensional parameterization is utilized in order to capture perturbations to age-dependent structure. Phase velocity shows a strong dependence on seafloor age, and removing age-dependent velocity from the 2-D maps highlights areas of anomalously low velocity, almost all of which are proximal to locations of hotspot volcanism. Depth-dependent variations in vertically-polarized shear velocity (Vsv) are determined with two sets of 3-D models: a layered model that requires constant VSV in each depth layer, and a splined model that allows VSV to vary continuously with depth. At shallow depths (˜75 km) the seismic structure shows the expected dependence on seafloor age. At greater depths (˜200 km) high-velocity lithosphere is found only beneath the oldest seafloor; velocity variations beneath younger seafloor may result from temperature or compositional variations within the asthenosphere. The age-dependent phase velocities are used to constrain temperature in the mantle and show that, in contrast to previous results for

  5. Phase velocities and attentuations of shear, Lamb, and Rayleigh waves in plate-like tissues submerged in a fluid (L)

    PubMed Central

    Nenadic, Ivan Z.; Urban, Matthew W.; Bernal, Miguel; Greenleaf, James F.

    2011-01-01

    In the past several decades, the fields of ultrasound and magnetic resonance elastography have shown promising results in noninvasive estimates of mechanical properties of soft tissues. These techniques often rely on measuring shear wave velocity due to an external or internal source of force and relating the velocity to viscoelasticity of the tissue. The mathematical relationship between the measured velocity and material properties of the myocardial wall, arteries, and other organs with non-negligible boundary conditions is often complicated and computationally expensive. A simple relationship between the Lamb–Rayleigh dispersion and the shear wave dispersion is derived for both the velocity and attenuation. The relationship shows that the shear wave velocity is around 20% higher than the Lamb–Rayleigh velocity and that the shear wave attenuation is about 20% lower than the Lamb–Rayleigh attenuation. Results of numerical simulations in the frequency range 0–500 Hz are presented. PMID:22225009

  6. Phase velocities and attenuations of shear, Lamb, and Rayleigh waves in plate-like tissues submerged in a fluid (L).

    PubMed

    Nenadic, Ivan Z; Urban, Matthew W; Bernal, Miguel; Greenleaf, James F

    2011-12-01

    In the past several decades, the fields of ultrasound and magnetic resonance elastography have shown promising results in noninvasive estimates of mechanical properties of soft tissues. These techniques often rely on measuring shear wave velocity due to an external or internal source of force and relating the velocity to viscoelasticity of the tissue. The mathematical relationship between the measured velocity and material properties of the myocardial wall, arteries, and other organs with non-negligible boundary conditions is often complicated and computationally expensive. A simple relationship between the Lamb-Rayleigh dispersion and the shear wave dispersion is derived for both the velocity and attenuation. The relationship shows that the shear wave velocity is around 20% higher than the Lamb-Rayleigh velocity and that the shear wave attenuation is about 20% lower than the Lamb-Rayleigh attenuation. Results of numerical simulations in the frequency range 0-500 Hz are presented.

  7. Shear wave velocity structure of the Anatolian Plate: anomalously slow crust in southwestern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delph, Jonathan R.; Biryol, C. Berk; Beck, Susan L.; Zandt, George; Ward, Kevin M.

    2015-07-01

    The Anatolian Plate is composed of different lithospheric blocks and ribbon continents amalgamated during the closure of the Paleotethys Ocean and Neotethys Ocean along a subduction margin. Using ambient noise tomography, we investigate the crustal and uppermost mantle shear wave velocity structure of the Anatolian Plate. A total of 215 broad-band seismic stations were used spanning 7 yr of recording to compute 13 778 cross-correlations and obtain Rayleigh wave dispersion measurements for periods between 8 and 40 s. We then perform a shear wave inversion to calculate the seismic velocity structure of the crust and uppermost mantle. Our results show that the overall crustal shear wave velocities of the Anatolian crust are low (˜3.4 km s-1), indicative of a felsic overall composition. We find that prominent lateral seismic velocity gradients correlate with Tethyan suture zones, supporting the idea that the neotectonic structures of Turkey are exploiting the lithospheric weaknesses associated with the amalgamation of Anatolia. Anomalously slow shear wave velocities (˜3.15 km s-1 at 25 km) are located in the western limb of the Isparta Angle in southwestern Turkey. In the upper crust, we find that these low shear wave velocities correlate well with the projected location of a carbonate platform unit (Bey Dağlari) beneath the Lycian Nappe complex. In the lower crust and upper mantle of this region, we propose that the anomalously slow velocities are due to the introduction of aqueous fluids related to the underplating of accretionary material from the underthrusting of a buoyant, attenuated continental fragment similar to the Eratosthenes seamount. We suggest that this fragment controlled the location of the formation of the Subduction-Transform Edge Propagator fault in the eastern Aegean Sea during rapid slab rollback of the Aegean Arc in early Miocene times. Lastly, we observe that the uppermost mantle beneath continental Anatolia is generally slow (˜4.2 km s-1

  8. Correlation Analysis between Spin, Velocity Shear, and Vorticity of Baryonic and Dark Matter Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L. L.

    2016-05-01

    Using cosmological hydrodynamic simulations, we investigate the alignments between velocity shear, vorticity, and the spin of dark matter halos, and study the correlation between baryonic and dark matter. We find that (1) mis-alignment between vorticity of baryonic and dark matter would develop on scales < 0.2h-1 Mpc; (2) the vorticity of baryonic matter exhibits stronger alignment/anti-alignment with the eigenvectors of velocity shear than that of dark matter; (3) small/massive halos spinning parallel/perpendicular to the host filaments are sensitive to the identification of cosmic web, simulation box size, and resolution. These factors might complicate the connection between the spins of dark matter halos and galaxies, and affect the correlation signal of the alignments of galaxy spin with nearby large-scale structures.

  9. Interchange and Flow Velocity Shear Instabilities in the Presence of Finite Larmor Radius Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotnikov, V.; Kim, T.; Mishin, E.; Genoni, T.; Rose, D.; Mehlhorn, T.

    2014-09-01

    Ionospheric irregularities cause scintillations of electromagnetic signals that can severely affect navigation and transionospheric communication, in particular during Equatorial Plasma Bubbles (EPBs) events. However, the existing ionospheric models do not describe density irregularities with typical scales of several ion Larmor radii that affect UHF and L bands. These irregularities can be produced in the process of nonlinear evolution of interchange or flow velocity shear instabilities. The model of nonlinear development of these instabilities based on two-fluid hydrodynamic description with inclusion of finite Larmor radius effects will be presented. The derived nonlinear equations will be numerically solved by using the code Flute, which was originally developed for High Energy Density applications and modified to describe interchange and flow velocity shear instabilities in the ionosphere. The high-resolution simulations will be driven by the ambient conditions corresponding to the AFRL C/NOFS satellite low-resolution data during EPBs.

  10. Near-surface characterization of a geotechnical site in north-east Missouri using shear-wave velocity measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ismail, A.; Anderson, N.

    2007-01-01

    Shear-wave velocity (Vs) as a function of soil stiffness is an essential parameter in geotechnical characterization of the subsurface. In this study, multichannel analysis of surface wave (MASW) and downhole methods were used to map the shear-wave velocity-structure and depth to the bed-rock surface at a 125m ?? 125m geotechnical site in Missouri. The main objective was to assess the suitability of the site for constructing a large, heavy building. The acquired multichannel surface wave data were inverted to provide 1D shear-wave velocity profile corresponding to each shot gather. These 1D velocity profiles were interpolated and contoured to generate a suite of 2D shear-wave velocity sections. Integrating the shear-wave velocity data from the MASW method with the downhole velocity data and the available borehole lithologic information enabled us to map shear-wave velocity-structure to a depth on the order of 20m. The bedrock surface, which is dissected by a significant cut-and-fill valley, was imaged. The results suggest that the study site will require special consideration prior to construction. The results also demonstrate the successful use of MASW methods, when integrated with downhole velocity measurements and borehole lithologic information, in the characterization of the near surface at the geotechnical sites. ?? 2007 European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers.

  11. Windblown sand saltation: A statistical approach to fluid threshold shear velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raffaele, Lorenzo; Bruno, Luca; Pellerey, Franco; Preziosi, Luigi

    2016-12-01

    The reliable prediction in probabilistic terms of the consequences of aeolian events related to sand transport phenomena is a key element for human activities in arid regions. Threshold shear velocity generating sand lifting is a key component of such a prediction. It suffers from the effect of uncertainties of different origin, such as those related to the physical phenomena, measurement procedures, and modelling. Semi empirical models are often fitted to a small amount of data, while recent probabilistic models needs the probability distribution of several random variables. Triggered by this motivation, this paper proposes a purely statistical approach to fluid threshold shear velocity for sand saltation, treated as a single comprehensive random variable. A data set is derived from previously published studies. Estimates of conditional probability distributions of threshold shear velocity for given grain diameters are given. The obtained statistical moments are critically compared to some deterministic semi empirical models refitted to the same collected data. The proposed statistical approach allows to obtain high order statistics useful for practical purposes.

  12. Combined Resistivity and Shear Wave Velocity Soil-type Estimation Beneath a Coastal Protection Levee.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzo, J. M.; Goff, D.; Hayashi, K.

    2015-12-01

    Unconsolidated Holocene deltaic sediments comprise levee foundation soils in New Orleans, USA. Whereas geotechnical tests at point locations are indispensable for evaluating soil stability, the highly variable sedimentary facies of the Mississippi delta create difficulties to predict soil conditions between test locations. Combined electrical resistivity and seismic shear wave studies, calibrated to geotechnical data, may provide an efficient methodology to predict soil types between geotechnical sites at shallow depths (0- 10 m). The London Avenue Canal levee flank of New Orleans, which failed in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, 2005, presents a suitable site in which to pioneer these geophysical relationships. Preliminary cross-plots show electrically resistive, high-shear-wave velocity areas interpreted as low-permeability, resistive silt. In brackish coastal environments, low-resistivity and low-shear-wave-velocity areas may indicate both saturated, unconsolidated sands and low-rigidity clays. Via a polynomial approximation, soil sub-types of sand, silt and clay can be estimated by a cross-plot of S-wave velocity and resistivity. We confirm that existent boring log data fit reasonably well with the polynomial approximation where 2/3 of soil samples fall within their respective bounds—this approach represents a new classification system that could be used for other mid-latitude, fine-grained deltas.

  13. Anisotropic Shear-wave Velocity Structure of East Asian Upper Mantle from Waveform Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, J.; Yuan, H.; French, S. W.; Romanowicz, B. A.; Ni, S.

    2012-12-01

    East Asia is a seismically active region featuring active tectonic belts, such as the Himalaya collision zone, western Pacific subduction zones and the Tianshan- Baikal tectonic belt. In this study, we applied full waveform time domain tomography to image 3D isotropic, radially and azimuthally anisotropic upper mantle shear velocity structure of East Asia. High quality teleseismic waveforms were collected for both permanent and temporary stations in the target and its adjacent regions, providing good ray path coverage of the study region. Fundamental and overtone wave packets, filtered down to 60 sec, were inverted for isotropic and radially anisotropic shear wave structure using normal mode asymptotic coupling theory (NACT: Li and Romanowicz, 1995). Joint inversion of SKS measurements and seismic waveforms was then carried out following the methodology described in (Marone and Romanowicz, 2007). The 3D velocity model shows strong lateral heterogeneities in the target region, which correlate well with the surface geology in East Asia. Our model shows that Indian lithosphere has subducted beneath Tibet with a different northern reach from western to eastern Tibet,. We also find variations of the slab geometry in Western Pacific subduction zones. Old and stable regions, such as, Indian shield, Siberia platform, Tarim and Yangtze blocks are found to have higher shear wave velocity in the upper mantle. Lower velocity anomalies are found in regions like Baikal rift, Tienshan, Indochina block, and the regions along Japan island-Ryukyu Trench and Izu-bonin Trench. The dominant fast and slow velocity boundaries in the study region are well correlated with tectonic belts, such as the central Asian orogenic belt and Alty/Qilian-Qinling/Dabie orogenic belt. Our radially anisotropic model shows Vsh> Vsv in oceanic regions and at larger depths(>300km), and Vsv > Vsh in some orogenic zones.. We'll show preliminary results of azimuthally anisotropic joint inversion of SKS

  14. Shallow Shear Velocity and Seismic Microzonation of the Las Vegas Urban Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, T.; Smith, S. B.; Clark, M.; Lopez, C.; Loughner, C.; Park, H.; Scott, J. B.; Thelen, W.; Greschke, B.; Louie, J. N.

    2003-12-01

    In July 2003 we performed a seismic microzonation study of the Las Vegas basin along a 15 kilometer transect. Using 120 Reftek RT-125 "Texans" on loan from PASSCAL, we completed this transect in two days. 4.5-Hz geophones collected Rayleigh-wave data for dispersion analysis and velocity-profile modeling. Only passive urban seismic noise sources are needed for this refraction microtremor analysis; freeway and commuter traffic are used in this case. Using a geophone spacing of 20 meters, fifty 260-m array sections were analyzed to create a transect of 30-m shear velocity measurements 15 km long. The transect runs approximately parallel to Interstate 15 from Cheyenne Avenue at the north to Tropicana Avenue at the south, passing most of The Strip and downtown Las Vegas. We added a few refraction lines, with a sledgehammer source, to augment the microtremor dispersion data with P velocities. The lowest shear velocities observed in Las Vegas are in the NEHRP class D range, at 230 m/s, well above the NEHRP class E range. These lower velocities are found near Interstate 15 and Lake Mead Blvd. Velocities then rise smoothly southward to the middle of the NEHRP-C range (450-600 m/s) near Sahara Blvd. to the south. There appears to be a slight decline further south to Tropicana Blvd. Our results from only 3 km out of the 15-km-long transect have velocities near or below the NEHRP-C/D boundary at 350 m/s. This survey suggests a medium-scale study with a limited budget can be completed in a short time. The study is a crucial new step in the characterization of the effects of ground shaking due to a seismic source in the surrounding region. Similar studies have been completed in the Reno area basin and in the Los Angeles Basin. All of these studies suggest that shallow shear velocity does not correlate well with geologic map units. The range of velocities within one map unit is greater than the average difference between units.

  15. Group velocity dispersion characteristics and one-dimensional regional shear velocity structure of the eastern Indian craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Prantik

    2017-02-01

    In the past three years, a semi-permanent network of fifteen 3-component broadband seismographs has become operational in the eastern Indian shield region occupying the Archean (∼2.5-3.6 Ga) Singhbhum-Odisha craton (SOC) and the Proterozoic (∼1.0-2.5 Ga) Chotanagpur Granitic Gneissic terrane (CGGT). The reliable and accurate broadband data for the recent 2015 Nepal earthquake sequence from 10 broadband stations of this network enabled us to estimate the group velocity dispersion characteristics and one-dimensional regional shear velocity structure of the region. First, we measure fundamental mode Rayleigh- and Love-wave group velocity dispersion curves in the period range of 7-70 s and then invert these curves to estimate the crustal and upper mantle structure below the eastern Indian craton (EIC). We observe that group velocities of Rayleigh and Love waves in SOC are relatively high in comparison to those of CGGT. This could be attributed to a relatively mafic-rich crust-mantle structure in SOC resulting from two episodes of magmatism associated with the 1.6 Ga Dalma and ∼117 Ma Rajmahal volcanisms. The best model for the EIC from the present study is found to be a two-layered crust, with a 14-km thick upper-crust (UC) of average shear velocity (Vs) of 3.0 km/s and a 26-km thick lower-crust (LC) of average Vs of 3.6 km/s. The present study detects a sharp drop in Vs (∼-2 to 3%) at 120-260 km depths, underlying the EIC, representing the probable seismic lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) at 120 km depth. Such sharp fall in Vs below the LAB indicates a partially molten layer. Further, a geothermal gradient extrapolated from the surface heat flow shows that such a gradient would intercept the wet basalt solidus at 88-103 km depths, suggesting a 88-103 km thick thermal lithosphere below the EIC. This could also signal the presence of small amounts of partial melts. Thus, this 2-3% drop in Vs could be attributed to the presence of partial melts in the

  16. Simultaneous inversion for mantle shear velocity and the topography of transition zone discontinuities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Y. J.; Dziewonski, A. M.

    2001-05-01

    A method is presented for the simultaneous inversions of shear velocity in the mantle and the topography of transition zone discontinuities. Each travel time residual, corrected for crust and free surface topography, is modeled as resulting from contributions from three-dimensional shear velocity perturbations to a spherical Earth model and boundary undulations to the 410 and 660 km discontinuities. This approach minimizes tradeoffs between velocity and topography. We expand the lateral variations in velocity and the topography of each discontinuity using 362 spherical B-splines; we expand the radial variations using 14 cubic B-splines. To increase the reliability of the measurements, particularly in the undersampled southern hemisphere, we re-examine the topography of the 410- and 660 km discontinuities from more than 21,000 SH-component records. This new data set is significantly larger than those used earlier studies of SS precursors. The long-wavelength features of our new topography maps of the 410- and 660-km discontinuities are compatible with results of earlier studies: the large-scale patterns are dominated by low degree spherical harmonics, particularly at degrees 1 and 2. We also include an independent measurement of the global transition zone thickness for additional constraints on the structure in the transition zone. The best-fit model from the joint inversion reduces the variance of the absolute and differential travel times of S, SS and ScS by 40 to 70 %, and the differential travel times of SS precursors by up to 90%.

  17. Continuous monitoring of shear wave velocity at the Montevecchio earthflow (Forlì-Cesena Province, Northern Apennines)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertello, Lara; Berti, Matteo; Castellaro, Silvia

    2016-04-01

    of June are not significant because the geophones were buried and moved downslope of about 50 meters. On the 1st of June the monitoring system was retrieved e reinstalled in its original position. From the first week of June to the 25th of July, the landslide slowed down and reached a velocity of 1 cm/d and accordingly, the Vs shows an increasing trend, except for the drop on the 22th-23th of June. Observing the video, the landslide did not accelerate; maybe the drop in shear wave velocity is a direct consequence of a rainfall event that occurred on the 22th, but we are still working on this aspect. A preliminary interpretation of the observed relationship between the displacement rate of the landslide and the shear wave velocity of the moving mass relies on the changes in the consistence of the material. During the phase of fast moving, the soil probably increases the void ratio and loses its stiffness, so Vs are low. At the contrary, during the phase of slow moving, the void ratio is relatively low and Vs are higher.

  18. Noninvasive measurement of steady and pulsating velocity profiles and shear rates in arteries using echo PIV: in vitro validation studies.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyoung-Bum; Hertzberg, Jean; Lanning, Craig; Shandas, Robin

    2004-08-01

    Although accurate measurement of velocity profiles, multiple velocity vectors, and shear stress in arteries is important, there is still no easy method to obtain such information in vivo. We report on the utility of combining ultrasound contrast imaging with particle image velocimetry (PIV) for noninvasive measurement of velocity vectors. This method (echo PIV) takes advantage of the strong backscatter characteristics of small gas-filled microbubbles (contrast) seeded into the flow. The method was tested in vitro. The steady flow analytical solution and optical PIV measurements (for pulsatile flow) were used for comparison. When compared to the analytical solution, both echo PIV and optical PIV resolved the steady velocity profile well. Error in shear rate as measured by echo PIV (8%) was comparable to the error of optical PIV (6.5%). In pulsatile flow, echo PIV velocity profiles agreed well with optical PIV profiles. Echo PIV followed the general profile of pulsatile shear stress across the artery but underestimated wall shear at certain time points. However, error in shear from echo PIV was an order of magnitude less than error from current shear measurement methods. These studies indicate that echo PIV is a promising technique for noninvasive measurement of velocity profiles and shear stress.

  19. On the role of spectral resolution in velocity shear layer measurements by Doppler reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Happel, T.; Blanco, E.; Estrada, T.

    2010-10-15

    The signal quality of a Doppler reflectometer depends strongly on its spectral resolution, which is influenced by the microwave beam properties and the radius of curvature of the cutoff layer in the plasma. If measured close to a strong perpendicular velocity shear layer, the spectrum of the backscattered signal is influenced by different velocities. This can give rise to two Doppler shifted peaks in the spectrum as observed in TJ-II H-mode plasmas. It is shown by two-dimensional full wave simulations that the two peaks are separable provided the spectral resolution of the system is sufficient. However, if the spectral resolution is poor, the two peaks blend into one and yield an intermediate and incorrect velocity.

  20. Shear wave velocity variation across the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand, from receiver function inversion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bannister, S.; Bryan, C.J.; Bibby, H.M.

    2004-01-01

    The Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ), New Zealand is a region characterized by very high magma eruption rates and extremely high heat flow, which is manifest in high-temperature geothermal waters. The shear wave velocity structure across the region is inferred using non-linear inversion of receiver functions, which were derived from teleseismic earthquake data. Results from the non-linear inversion, and from forward synthetic modelling, indicate low S velocities at ???6- 16 km depth near the Rotorua and Reporoa calderas. We infer these low-velocity layers to represent the presence of high-level bodies of partial melt associated with the volcanism. Receiver functions at other stations are complicated by reverberations associated with near-surface sedimentary layers. The receiver function data also indicate that the Moho lies between 25 and 30 km, deeper than the 15 ?? 2 km depth previously inferred for the crust-mantle boundary beneath the TVZ. ?? 2004 RAS.

  1. Site response, shallow shear-wave velocity, and damage in Los Gatos, California, from the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartzell, S.; Carver, D.; Williams, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    Aftershock records of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake are used to calculate site response in the frequency band of 0.5-10 Hz at 24 locations in Los Gatos, California, on the edge of the Santa Clara Valley. Two different methods are used: spectral ratios relative to a reference site on rock and a source/site spectral inversion method. These two methods complement each other and give consistent results. Site amplification factors are compared with surficial geology, thickness of alluvium, shallow shear-wave velocity measurements, and ground deformation and structural damage resulting from the Loma Prieta earthquake. Higher values of site amplification are seen on Quaternary alluvium compared with older Miocene and Cretaceous units of Monterey and Franciscan Formation. However, other more detailed correlations with surficial geology are not evident. A complex pattern of alluvial sediment thickness, caused by crosscutting thrust faults, is interpreted as contributing to the variability in site response and the presence of spectral resonance peaks between 2 and 7 Hz at some sites. Within the range of our field measurements, there is a correlation between lower average shear-wave velocity of the top 30 m and 50% higher values of site amplification. An area of residential homes thrown from their foundations correlates with high site response. This damage may also have been aggravated by local ground deformation. Severe damage to commercial buildings in the business district, however, is attributed to poor masonry construction.

  2. Lithospheric shear velocity structure of South Island, New Zealand, from amphibious Rayleigh wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Justin S.; Sheehan, Anne F.; Stachnik, Joshua C.; Lin, Fan-Chi; Yeck, William L.; Collins, John A.

    2016-05-01

    We present a crust and mantle 3-D shear velocity model extending well offshore of New Zealand's South Island, imaging the lithosphere beneath the South Island as well as the Campbell and Challenger Plateaus. Our model is constructed via linearized inversion of both teleseismic (18-70 s period) and ambient noise-based (8-25 s period) Rayleigh wave dispersion measurements. We augment an array of 4 land-based and 29 ocean bottom instruments deployed off the South Island's east and west coasts in 2009-2010 by the Marine Observations of Anisotropy Near Aotearoa experiment with 28 land-based seismometers from New Zealand's permanent GeoNet array. Major features of our shear wave velocity (Vs) model include a low-velocity (Vs < 4.4 km/s) body extending from near surface to greater than 75 km depth beneath the Banks and Otago Peninsulas and high-velocity (Vs~4.7 km/s) mantle anomalies underlying the Southern Alps and off the northwest coast of the South Island. Using the 4.5 km/s contour as a proxy for the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, our model suggests that the lithospheric thickness of Challenger Plateau and central South Island is substantially greater than that of the inner Campbell Plateau. The high-velocity anomaly we resolve at subcrustal depths (>50 km) beneath the central South Island exhibits strong spatial correlation with upper mantle earthquake hypocenters beneath the Alpine Fault. The ~400 km long low-velocity zone we image beneath eastern South Island and the inner Bounty Trough underlies Cenozoic volcanics and the locations of mantle-derived helium measurements, consistent with asthenospheric upwelling in the region.

  3. Crustal shear velocity structure in the Southern Lau Basin constrained by seafloor compliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Yang; Webb, Spahr C.

    2016-05-01

    Seafloor morphology and crustal structure vary significantly in the Lau back-arc basin, which contains regions of island arc formation, rifting, and seafloor spreading. We analyze seafloor compliance: deformation under long period ocean wave forcing, at 30 ocean bottom seismometers to constrain crustal shear wave velocity structure along and across the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC). Velocity models obtained through Monte Carlo inversion of compliance data show systematic variation of crustal structure in the basin. Sediment thicknesses range from zero thickness at the ridge axis to 1400 m near the volcanic arc. Sediment thickness increases faster to the east than to the west of the ELSC, suggesting a more abundant source of sediment near the active arc volcanoes. Along the ELSC, upper crustal velocities increase from the south to the north where the ridge has migrated farther away from the volcanic arc front. Along the axial ELSC, compliance analysis did not detect a crustal low-velocity body, indicating less melt in the ELSC crustal accretion zone compared to the fast spreading East Pacific Rise. Average upper crust shear velocities for the older ELSC crust produced when the ridge was near the volcanic arc are 0.5-0.8 km/s slower than crust produced at the present-day northern ELSC, consistent with a more porous extrusive layer. Crust in the western Lau Basin, which although thought to have been produced through extension and rifting of old arc crust, is found to have upper crustal velocities similar to older oceanic crust produced at the ELSC.

  4. Anisotropic shear-wave velocity structure of the Earth's mantle: A global model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kustowski, B.; EkströM, G.; DziewońSki, A. M.

    2008-06-01

    We combine a new, large data set of surface wave phase anomalies, long-period waveforms, and body wave travel times to construct a three-dimensional model of the anisotropic shear wave velocity in the Earth's mantle. Our modeling approach is improved and more comprehensive compared to our earlier studies and involves the development and implementation of a new spherically symmetric reference model, simultaneous inversion for velocity and anisotropy, as well as discontinuity topographies, and implementation of nonlinear crustal corrections for waveforms. A comparison of our new three-dimensional model, S362ANI, with two other models derived from comparable data sets but using different techniques reveals persistent features: (1) strong, ˜200-km-thick, high-velocity anomalies beneath cratons, likely representing the continental lithosphere, underlain by weaker, fast anomalies extending below 250 km, which may represent continental roots, (2) weak velocity heterogeneity between 250 and 400 km depths, (3) fast anomalies extending horizontally up to 2000-3000 km in the mantle transition zone beneath subduction zones, (4) lack of strong long-wavelength heterogeneity below 650 km suggesting inhibiting character of the upper mantle-lower mantle boundary, and (5) slow-velocity superplumes beneath the Pacific and Africa. The shear wave radial anisotropy is strongest at 120 km depth, in particular beneath the central Pacific. Lateral anisotropic variations appreciably improve the fit to data that are predominantly sensitive to the uppermost and lowermost mantle but not to the waveforms that control the transition zone and midmantle depths. Tradeoffs between lateral variations in velocity and anisotropy are negligible in the uppermost mantle but noticeable at the bottom of the mantle.

  5. PICASSO: Shear velocities in the Western Mediterranean from Rayleigh Wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palomeras, I.; Thurner, S.; Levander, A.

    2012-12-01

    The Western Mediterranean has been affected by complex subduction and slab rollback, simultaneously with compression due to African-European convergence. The deformed region occupies a wide area from the intra-continental Atlas mountain belt in Morocco to the southern Iberian Massif in Spain. Evolutionary models of the Western Mediterranean invoke extensive slab rollback and compression in the Cenozoic, as well as likely upper mantle delamination scenarios during formation of the Alboran domain, the Betics, Rif, and Atlas Mountains. PICASSO (Program to Investigate Convective Alboran Sea System Overturn) is a multidisciplinary, international investigation of the Alboran System and surrounding areas. In this study we have analyzed data from the 95 PICASSO broadband stations with data from the Spanish IberArray and Siberia Array in Spain and Morocco, the University of Muenster array in the Atlas Mountains and the permanent Spanish and Portuguese networks. We present Rayleigh wave tomography results made from 168 teleseimic events recorded by 237 stations from April 2009 to April 2011. We measured Rayleigh phase velocities using the two-plane-wave method to remove complications due to multi-pathing, and finite-frequency kernels to improve lateral resolution. Phase velocities were then inverted for shear velocity structure on a grid of 0.5 by 0.5 degree to form a well-resolved 3D shear velocity model to 230 km depth. Our results show low S-velocities (2.9 km/s) in the crust beneath the Gibraltar Strait. Low upper mantle S-velocities are mapped beneath the Middle and High Atlas at ~60 km depth suggesting an elevated asthenosphere beneath these young mountain belts, in agreement with receiver functions analysis (Thurner et al, this session). Beneath the Western Alboran Sea, upper-mantle velocities change laterally from high velocities (>4.5 km/s) in the east to lower velocities to the west (~4.3 km/s). The Rayleigh wave tomography is consistent with P-tomography that

  6. Comparing shear-wave velocity profiles inverted from multichannel surface wave with borehole measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Park, C.B.; Hunter, J.A.; Harris, J.B.; Ivanov, J.

    2002-01-01

    Recent field tests illustrate the accuracy and consistency of calculating near-surface shear (S)-wave velocities using multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW). S-wave velocity profiles (S-wave velocity vs. depth) derived from MASW compared favorably to direct borehole measurements at sites in Kansas, British Columbia, and Wyoming. Effects of changing the total number of recording channels, sampling interval, source offset, and receiver spacing on the inverted S-wave velocity were studied at a test site in Lawrence, Kansas. On the average, the difference between MASW calculated Vs and borehole measured Vs in eight wells along the Fraser River in Vancouver, Canada was less than 15%. One of the eight wells was a blind test well with the calculated overall difference between MASW and borehole measurements less than 9%. No systematic differences were observed in derived Vs values from any of the eight test sites. Surface wave analysis performed on surface data from Wyoming provided S-wave velocities in near-surface materials. Velocity profiles from MASW were confirmed by measurements based on suspension log analysis. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Direct ambient noise tomography for 3-D near surface shear velocity structure: methodology and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, H.; Fang, H.; Li, C.; Liu, Y.; Zhang, H.; van der Hilst, R. D.; Huang, Y. C.

    2014-12-01

    Ambient noise tomography has provided essential constraints on crustal and uppermost mantle shear velocity structure in global seismology. Recent studies demonstrate that high frequency (e.g., ~ 1 Hz) surface waves between receivers at short distances can be successfully retrieved from ambient noise cross-correlation and then be used for imaging near surface or shallow crustal shear velocity structures. This approach provides important information for strong ground motion prediction in seismically active area and overburden structure characterization in oil and gas fields. Here we propose a new tomographic method to invert all surface wave dispersion data for 3-D variations of shear wavespeed without the intermediate step of phase or group velocity maps.The method uses frequency-dependent propagation paths and a wavelet-based sparsity-constrained tomographic inversion. A fast marching method is used to compute, at each period, surface wave traveltimes and ray paths between sources and receivers. This avoids the assumption of great-circle propagation that is used in most surface wave tomographic studies, but which is not appropriate in complex media. The wavelet coefficients of the velocity model are estimated with an iteratively reweighted least squares (IRLS) algorithm, and upon iterations the surface wave ray paths and the data sensitivity matrix are updated from the newly obtained velocity model. We apply this new method to determine the 3-D near surface wavespeed variations in the Taipei basin of Taiwan, Hefei urban area and a shale and gas production field in China using the high-frequency interstation Rayleigh wave dispersion data extracted from ambient noisecross-correlation. The results reveal strong effects of off-great-circle propagation of high-frequency surface waves in these regions with above 30% shear wavespeed variations. The proposed approach is more efficient and robust than the traditional two-step surface wave tomography for imaging complex

  8. A global shear velocity model of the mantle from normal modes and surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    durand, S.; Debayle, E.; Ricard, Y. R.; Lambotte, S.

    2013-12-01

    We present a new global shear wave velocity model of the mantle based on the inversion of all published normal mode splitting functions and the large surface wave dataset measured by Debayle & Ricard (2012). Normal mode splitting functions and surface wave phase velocity maps are sensitive to lateral heterogeneities of elastic parameters (Vs, Vp, xi, phi, eta) and density. We first only consider spheroidal modes and Rayleigh waves and restrict the inversion to Vs, Vp and the density. Although it is well known that Vs is the best resolved parameter, we also investigate whether our dataset allows to extract additional information on density and/or Vp. We check whether the determination of the shear wave velocity is affected by the a priori choice of the crustal model (CRUST2.0 or 3SMAC) or by neglecting/coupling poorly resolved parameters. We include the major discontinuities, at 400 and 670 km. Vertical smoothing is imposed through an a priori gaussian covariance matrix on the model and we discuss the effect of coupling/decoupling the inverted structure above and below the discontinuities. We finally discuss the large scale structure of our model and its geodynamical implications regarding the amount of mass exchange between the upper and lower mantle.

  9. Studying the instantaneous velocity field in gas-sheared liquid films in a horizontal duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasques, Joao; Tokarev, Mikhail; Cherdantsev, Andrey; Hann, David; Hewakandamby, Buddhika; Azzopardi, Barry

    2016-11-01

    In annular flow, the experimental validation of the basic assumptions on the liquid velocity profile is vital for developing theoretical models of the flow. However, the study of local velocity of liquid in gas-sheared films has proven to be a challenging task due to the highly curved and disturbed moving interface of the phases, small scale of the area of interrogation, high velocity gradients and irregular character of the flow. This study reports on different optical configurations and interface-tracking methods employed in a horizontal duct in order to obtain high-resolution particle image velocimetry (PIV) data in such types of complex flows. The experimental envelope includes successful measurements in 2D and 3D waves regimes, up to the disturbance wave regime. Preliminary data show the presence of complex structures in the liquid phase, which includes re-circulation areas below the liquid interface due to the gas-shearing action, together with non-uniform transverse movements of the liquid phase close to the wall due to the presence of 3D waves at the interface. With the aid of the moving interface-tracking, PIV, time-resolved particle-tracking velocimetry and vorticity measurements were performed.

  10. Velocity profile and wall shear stress of saccular aneurysms at the anterior communicating artery.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Ryuhei; Ujiie, Hiroshi; Haida, Sayaka; Nakazawa, Nobuhiko; Hori, Tomokatsu

    2008-01-01

    It has recently been shown that the aspect ratio (dome/neck) of an aneurysm correlates well with intraaneurysmal blood flow. Aneurysms with an aspect ratio larger than 1.6 carry a higher risk of rupture. We examined the effect of aspect ratio (AR) on intra-aneurysmal flow using experimental models. Flow visualization with particle imaging velocimetry and measurement of wall shear stress using laser Doppler anemometry were performed on three different aneurysm models: AR 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0. Intraaneurysmal flow consists of inflow, circulation, and outflow. Rapid inflow impinged on the distal neck creating a stagnant point. Rapid flow and maximum wall shear stress were observed in the vicinity of the stagnant point. By changing the Reynold's number, the stagnant point moved. By increasing the AR of the aneurysm, vortices inside the aneurysm sac closed and very slow flow was observed, resulting in very low shear stress markedly at a Reynold's number of 250, compatible with the diastolic phase. In the aneurysm model AR 2.0, both rapid flow at the neck and vortices inside the aneurysm are sufficient to activate platelets, making a thrombus that may anchor on the dome where very slow flow takes place. Hemodynamics in aneurysms larger than AR 2.0 definitely contribute to thrombus formation.

  11. Using pressure and seismological broadband ocean data to model shear wave velocities in the north Atlantic.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios, Celia; Dahm, Torsten; Jegen, Marion

    2010-05-01

    Seafloor compliance is the transfer function between pressure and vertical displacement at the seafloor Infragravity waves in the oceanic layer have long periods in the range of 30 - 500 s and obey a simple frequency-wavenumber relation. Seafloor compliance from infragravity waves can be analyzed with single station recordings to determinate sub-seafloor shear wave velocities. Previous studies in the Pacific Ocean have demonstrated that reliable near-surface shear wave profiles can be derived from infragravity wave compliance. However, these studies indicate that, beside the water depth the compliance measurements are limited by instrument sensitivity, calibration uncertainties and possibly other effects. In this work seafloor compliance and infragravity waves are observed at two different locations in the Atlantic Ocean: the Logatchev hydrothermal field at the Mid Atlantic Ridge and the Azores (Sao Miguel Island). The data was acquired with the broadband ocean compliance station developed at the University of Hamburg as well as ocean station from the German instrument pool for amphibian seismology (DEPAS) equipped with broadband seismometers and pressure sensors. Vertical velocity and pressure data were used to calculate power spectral densities and normalized compliance along two profiles (one in each location). Power spectral densities show a dominant peak at low frequencies (0.01-0.035Hz) limited by the expected cut-off frequency, which is dependent on the water depth at each station. The peak has been interpreted as a strong infragravity wave with values between 10-14 and 10-11 (m/s2)2/Hz and 104 and 106 (Pa2)2/Hz for acceleration and pressure respectively. The results show compliance values between 10-10 and 10-8 1/Pa and its estimations take into account the coherence between seismic and pressure signals in order to confirm that the seismic signals in the infragravity waves are caused by pressure sources. Shear wave velocity models, with depth resolution

  12. Effects of a sheared ion velocity on the linear stability of ITG modes

    SciTech Connect

    Lontano, M.; Lazzaro, E.; Varischetti, M. C.

    2006-11-30

    The linear dispersion of the ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes, in the presence of a non uniform background ion velocity U(parallel sign) U(parallel sign)(x) ez, in the direction of the sheared equilibrium magnetic field B0 = B0(x) ez, has been studied in the frame of the two-fluid guiding center approximation, in slab geometry. Generally speaking, the presence of an ion flow destabilizes the oscillations. The role of the excited K-H instability is discussed.

  13. Stratified shear flow in an inclined duct: near-instantaneous 3D velocity and density measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partridge, Jamie; Lefauve, Adrien; Dalziel, Stuart; Linden, Paul

    2016-11-01

    We present results from a new experimental setup to study the exchange flow in an inclined square duct between two reservoirs containing fluids of different densities. This system can exhibit stratified shear wave motions, and has a distinct parameter threshold above which turbulence is triggered and progressively fills a larger fraction of the duct. To probe these intrinsically 3D flows, we introduce a new setup in which a traversing laser sheet allows us to obtain near-instantaneous 3D velocity and density fields. Three components of velocity are measured on successive 2D planes using stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV) with density information obtained simultaneously using laser induced fluorescence (LIF). Supported by EPSRC Programme Grant EP/K034529/1 entitled "Mathematical Underpinnings of Stratified Turbulence".

  14. Earthquake Energy Dissipation in Light of High-Velocity, Slip-Pulse Shear Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reches, Z.; Liao, Z.; Chang, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the energy dissipation during earthquakes by analysis of high-velocity shear experiments conducted on room-dry, solid samples of granite, tonalite, and dolomite sheared at slip-velocity of 0.0006-1m/s, and normal stress of 1-11.5MPa. The experimental fault were loaded in one of three modes: (1) Slip-pulse of abrupt, intense acceleration followed by moderate deceleration; (2) Impact by a spinning, heavy flywheel (225 kg); and (3) Constant velocity loading. We refer to energy dissipation in terms of power-density (PD=shear stress*slip-velocity; units of MW/m^2), and Coulomb-energy-density (CED= mechanical energy/normal stress; units of m). We present two aspects: Relative energy dissipation of the above loading modes, and relative energy dissipation between impact experiments and moderate earthquakes. For the first aspect, we used: (i) the lowest friction coefficient of the dynamic weakening; (ii) the work dissipated before reaching the lowest friction; and (iii) the cumulative mechanical work during the complete run. The results show that the slip-pulse/impact modes are energy efficient relatively to the constant-velocity mode as manifested by faster, more intense weakening and 50-90% lower energy dissipation. Thus, for a finite amount of pre-seismic crustal energy, the efficiency of slip-pulse would amplify earthquake instability. For the second aspect, we compare the experimental CED of the impact experiments to the reported breakdown energy (EG) of moderate earthquakes, Mw = 5.6 to 7.2 (Chang et al., 2012). In is commonly assumed that the seismic EG is a small fraction of the total earthquake energy, and as expected in 9 out of 11 examined earthquakes, EG was 0.005 to 0.07 of the experimental CED. We thus speculate that the experimental relation of Coulomb-energy-density to total slip distance, D, CED = 0.605 × D^0.933, is a reasonable estimate of total earthquake energy, a quantity that cannot be determined from seismic data.

  15. Three Urban Transects of Shallow Shear-Velocity Using the Refraction Microtremor Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, J. B.; Clark, M.; Lopez, C. T.; Pancha, A.; Rasmussen, T.; Smith, S. B.; Thelen, W. A.; Louie, J. N.

    2004-12-01

    Surveys of shallow shear velocity in the Reno, Los Angeles and Las Vegas urban areas give us information assisting in the mitigation of earthquake hazards, and in response to a damaging earthquake. The three transects (16, 60, and 15 km long respectively) were completed quickly and economically using the refraction microtremor method, providing characterizations of over 300 separate sites. Shear-wave velocity averaged over 30 m depth (Vs30) is unexpectedly smooth along all three transects, exhibiting realistic fractal dimensions of 1.5 to 1.8. For the Reno transect, which follows the Truckee River, most of the urban area shows NEHRP class C velocities. Very little of the profile shows velocities in the NEHRP class D range. Neither geological nor agricultural soil map units can serve to predict NEHRP hazard class or shallow velocities in the Reno area, aside from distinguishing between volcanic rock and sediments. Measured along the San Gabriel River, Vs30 values through Azusa and the Santa Fe Dam area are significantly higher than the NEHRP C/D range (270-555 m/s) expected from existing hazard mapping. Vs30 values in the southern 30 km of the Los Angeles transect were well within the previously expected NEHRP class D range (180-360 m/s). Measurements at Alamitos Bay were slightly above the expected NEHRP D/E range (90-270 m/s). In Las Vegas, the lowest velocities in the transect, at the NEHRP C/D boundary, are near intra-basin faults found near I-15 and Lake Mead Blvd. Velocities then rise smoothly to the middle of the NEHRP-C range near Sahara Blvd. to the south. Caliche cementation of alluvium in parts of Las Vegas elevates Vs30 values to 500-600 m/s. Vs100 values for the three transects, averaging to the 100 m depth to which most of our measurements are valid, show trends mimicking the Vs30 trends. Across all three cities our measurements correlate poorly against available USDA soil maps, geologic mapping, and hazard mapping. Surface maps do not predict the

  16. Shear-wave velocity structure beneath the Ngauruhoe Volcano, New Zealand using receiver function inversion with the genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, I.; Kim, K. Y.; Jolly, A. D.

    2014-12-01

    The Ngauruhoe Volcano is an andesitic volcano of 2,291 m height in the North Island, New Zealand. One-dimensional shear-wave velocity (Vs) structure beneath the OTVZ seismic station near the volcano was inferred by the genetic algorithm (GA) inversion of radial receiver functions (RFs). Radial RFs were derived from 337 teleseismic events (Mw ≥ 5.5 and epicentral distances between 30° and 90°) recorded by a broad-band seismometer at the seismic station during the period from November 11, 2011 to September 11, 2013. Among the derived RFs, only 87 RFs with higher signal to noise ratios were used for the GA inversion method. Three hundred velocity models for 100 generations were derived using velocity models comprising 32 layers with a maximum depth of 60 km. The inverted models were averaged to obtain the final Vs model, which indicates a clear discontinuity at a depth of 18±1 km where Vs abruptly increases from 3.1 to 4.0 km/s. Above the sharp Vs discontinuity indicating the Moho, an average Vs is 2.8 km/s. Low-velocity layers (LVLs) are identified at depths of 10-16 km in the lower crust (Vs < 3.0 km/s) and 28-40 km in the upper mantle (Vs < 4.4 km/s). Corresponding average Vs are 2.8 and 4.2 km/s, respectively. The thin crust with relatively low velocities and existence of LVLs in the lower crust and upper mantle allude to the presence of magma associated with the subducting Pacific Plate. The limited number of teleseismic events recorded at the OTVZ station prevents from further investigation into the effect of RFs of dipping boundaries and anisotropy.

  17. Shear-wave velocity-based probabilistic and deterministic assessment of seismic soil liquefaction potential

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kayen, R.; Moss, R.E.S.; Thompson, E.M.; Seed, R.B.; Cetin, K.O.; Der Kiureghian, A.; Tanaka, Y.; Tokimatsu, K.

    2013-01-01

    Shear-wave velocity (Vs) offers a means to determine the seismic resistance of soil to liquefaction by a fundamental soil property. This paper presents the results of an 11-year international project to gather new Vs site data and develop probabilistic correlations for seismic soil liquefaction occurrence. Toward that objective, shear-wave velocity test sites were identified, and measurements made for 301 new liquefaction field case histories in China, Japan, Taiwan, Greece, and the United States over a decade. The majority of these new case histories reoccupy those previously investigated by penetration testing. These new data are combined with previously published case histories to build a global catalog of 422 case histories of Vs liquefaction performance. Bayesian regression and structural reliability methods facilitate a probabilistic treatment of the Vs catalog for performance-based engineering applications. Where possible, uncertainties of the variables comprising both the seismic demand and the soil capacity were estimated and included in the analysis, resulting in greatly reduced overall model uncertainty relative to previous studies. The presented data set and probabilistic analysis also help resolve the ancillary issues of adjustment for soil fines content and magnitude scaling factors.

  18. Shear velocity estimates on the inner shelf off Grays Harbor, Washington, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherwood, C.R.; Lacy, J.R.; Voulgaris, G.

    2006-01-01

    Shear velocity was estimated from current measurements near the bottom off Grays Harbor, Washington between May 4 and June 6, 2001 under mostly wave-dominated conditions. A downward-looking pulse-coherent acoustic Doppler profiler (PCADP) and two acoustic-Doppler velocimeters (field version; ADVFs) were deployed on a tripod at 9-m water depth. Measurements from these instruments were used to estimate shear velocity with (1) a modified eddy-correlation (EC) technique, (2) the log-profile (LP) method, and (3) a dissipation-rate method. Although values produced by the three methods agreed reasonably well (within their broad ranges of uncertainty), there were important systematic differences. Estimates from the EC method were generally lowest, followed by those from the inertial-dissipation method. The LP method produced the highest values and the greatest scatter. We show that these results are consistent with boundary-layer theory when sediment-induced stratification is present. The EC method provides the most fundamental estimate of kinematic stress near the bottom, and stratification causes the LP method to overestimate bottom stress. These results remind us that the methods are not equivalent and that comparison among sites and with models should be made carefully. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. One-dimensional seismic response of two-layer soil deposits with shear wave velocity inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Ding Yuqin; Pagliaroli, Alessandro; Lanzo, Giuseppe

    2008-07-08

    The paper presents the results of a parametric study with the purpose of investigating the 1D linear and equivalent linear seismic response of a 30 meters two-layer soil deposits characterized by a stiff layer overlying a soft layer. The thickness of the soft layer was assumed equal to 0.25, 0.5 and 0.75 H, being H the total thickness of the deposit. The shear wave velocity of the soft layer was assumed equal to V{sub s} = 90 and 180 m/s while for the stiff layer V{sub s} = 360, 500 and 700 m/s were considered. Six accelerograms extracted by an Italian database characterized by different predominant periods ranging from 0.1 to 0.7 s were used as input outcropping motion. For the equivalent liner analyses, the accelerograms were scaled at three different values of peak ground acceleration (PGA), namely 0.1, 0.3 and 0.5 g. The numerical results show that the two-layer ground motion is generally deamplified in terms of PGA with respect to the outcrop PGA. This reduction is mainly controlled by the shear wave velocity of the soft layer, being larger for lower V{sub s} values, by the amount of nonlinearity experienced by the soft soil during the seismic shaking and, to a minor extent, by the thickness of the soft soil layer.

  20. Effects of neutral interactions on velocity-shear-driven plasma waves

    SciTech Connect

    Enloe, C. L.; Tejero, E. M.; Amatucci, W. E.; Crabtree, C.; Ganguli, G.; Sotnikov, V.

    2014-06-15

    In a laboratory experiment, we demonstrate the substantial effects that collisions between charged and neutral particles have on low-frequency (Ω{sub i} ≪ ω ≪ Ω{sub e}) shear-driven electrostatic lower hybrid waves in a plasma. We establish a strong (up to 2.5 kV/m) highly localized electric field with a length scale shorter than the ion gyroradius, so that the ions in the plasma, unlike the electrons, do not develop the full E × B drift velocity. The resulting shear in the particle velocities initiates the electron-ion hybrid (EIH) instability, and we observe the formation of strong waves in the vicinity of the shear with variations in plasma densities of 10% or greater. Our experimental configuration allows us to vary the neutral background density by more than a factor of two while holding the charged particle density effectively constant. Not surprisingly, increasing the neutral density decreases the growth rate/saturation amplitude of the waves and increases the threshold electric field necessary for wave formation, but the presence of neutrals affects the dominant wave frequency as well. We show that a 50% increase in the neutral density decreases the wave frequency by 20% while also suppressing the electric field dependence of the frequency that is observed when fewer neutrals are present. The majority of these effects, as well as the values of the frequencies we observe, closely match the predictions of previously developed linear EIH instability theory, for which we present the results of a numerical solution.

  1. Isotropic and anisotropic shear velocity model of the NA upper mantle using EarthScope data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiva, J.; Clouzet, P.; French, S. W.; Yuan, H.; Romanowicz, B. A.

    2013-12-01

    The EarthScope TA deployment has provided dense array coverage across the continental US and with it, the opportunity for high resolution 3D seismic velocity imaging of both lithosphere and asthenosphere in the continent. Building upon our previous work, we present a new 3D isotropic, radially and azimuthally anisotropic shear wave model of the North American (NA) lithospheric mantle, using full waveform tomography and shorter-period (40 s) waveform data. Our isotropic velocity model exhibits pronounced spatial correlation between major tectonic localities of the eastern NA continent, as evidenced in the geology, and seismic anomalies, suggesting recurring episodes of tectonic events not only are well exposed at the surface, but also leave persistent scars in the continental lithosphere mantle, marked by isotropic and radially anisotropic velocity anomalies that reach as deep as 100-150 km. In eastern North America, our Vs images distinguish the fast velocity cratonic NA from the deep rooted large volume high velocity blocks which are east of the continent rift margin and extend 200-300 km offshore into Atlantic. In between is a prominent narrow band of low velocities that roughly follows the south and eastern Laurentia rift margin and extends into New England. The lithosphere associated with this low velocity band is thinned likely due to combined effects of repeated rifting processes along the rift margin and northward extension of the Bermuda low-velocity channel across the New England region. Deep rooted high velocity blocks east of the Laurentia margin are proposed to represent the Proterozoic Gondwanian terranes of pan-African affinity, which were captured during the Rodinia formation but left behind during the opening of the Atlantic Ocean. The anisotropy model takes advantage of the up-to-date SKS compilation in the continent and new splitting results from Greenland. The new joint waveform and SKS splitting data inversion is carried out with a 2

  2. Measurement of viscosity and shear wave velocity of a liquid or slurry for on-line process control.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Margaret Stautberg; Bamberger, Judith Ann

    2002-08-01

    An on-line sensor to measure the density of a liquid or slurry, based on longitudinal wave reflection at the solid-fluid interface, has been developed by the staff at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The objective of this research is to employ shear wave reflection at the solid-fluid interface to provide an on-line measurement of viscosity as well. Both measurements are of great interest for process control in many industries. Shear wave reflection measurements were conducted for a variety of liquids. By analyzing multiple reflections within the solid (only 0.63 cm thick-similar to pipe wall thickness) we increased the sensitivity of the measurement. At the sixth echo, sensitivity was increased sufficiently and this echo was used for fluid interrogation. Shear wave propagation of ultrasound in liquids is dependent upon the viscosity and the shear modulus. The data are analyzed using the theory for light liquids (such as water and sugar water solutions) and also using the theory for highly viscous liquids (such as silicone oils). The results show that, for light liquids, the shear wave reflection measurements interrogate the viscosity. However, for highly viscous liquids, it is the shear wave modulus that dominates the shear wave reflection. Since the density is known, the shear wave velocity in the liquid can be determined from the shear wave modulus. The results show that shear wave velocities in silicone oils are very small and range from 315 to 2389 cm/s. Shear wave reflection measurements are perhaps the only way that shear wave velocity in liquids can be determined, because the shear waves in liquids are highly attenuated. These results show that, depending on the fluid characteristics, either the viscosity or the shear wave velocity can be used for process control. There are several novel features of this sensor: (1) The sensor can be mounted as part of the wall of a pipeline or tank or submerged in a tank. (2) The sensor is very compact and can be

  3. Focussing effects at the edge of the Large Low Shear Velocity Provinces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rost, S.; Nowacki, A.

    2015-12-01

    Tomographic images of the Earth's lowermost mantle are dominated by two equatorial and nearly antipodal regions of large-scale reductions in seismic S-wave velocities beneath the central Pacific and Africa. These Large Low Shear Velocity Provinces (LLSVPs) are much less constrained in tomographic P-wave models. This discrepancy, together with other geophysical data, led to the interpretation of LLSVPs as thermo-chemical piles, but models of purely thermal LLSVPs might also be able to explain the geophysical data. Data from seismic arrays and high-resolution processing techniques are able to precisely determine the slowness vector of incoming seismic energy and therefore to extract velocity and directivity information from the seismic data directly. Here we use records of P and Pdiff from the medium aperture, short-period, vertical component Yellowknife array (YKA) located in northern Canada and S/Sdiff from stations of the Canadian POLARIS network. Using seismicity from the western Pacific rim allows good sampling of the lowermost mantle in the region of the Pacific LLSVP and the northern Pacific. The slowness information extracted from the array data using the high-resolution F-statistic allows detailed mapping of the LLSVP boundary and indicates a sharp boundary and velocity reductions of several percent. The data also indicate a second region of strongly reduced seismic velocities to the north of the Pacific LLSVP beneath the Sea of Okhotsk that does not seem to be connected to the main LLSVP, and which is not consistently resolved in S-wave tomography models. We observe very strong focussing and defocussing effects along the LLSVP boundary that indicate strong and small-scale heterogeneities in the vicinity of the LLSVP boundary beyond what can be explained by LLSVP material. This detection allows further insight into the structure and dynamics of the LLSVP. Using seismic wave propagation simulations we are aiming to resolve both structure and shape of these

  4. Probing Near Surface Shear Velocity Structure from Ambient Noise in Hefei Urban Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Yao, H.; Fang, H.

    2014-12-01

    Ambient noise tomography has widely been used to achieve high resolution 3-D crustal velocity structure. Recently, various studies also indicate that high-frequency surface wave signals can be extracted from cross correlation of ambient noise. So it makes ambient noise tomography capable to investigate near surface velocity structure. This is important for studies related to strong motion estimation due to earthquakes and characterization of structure in oil and gas exploration fields. Here we investigate near surface 3-D velocity structure using high-frequency (0.5 - 2 Hz) ambient noise tomography in the urban area of Hefei city, Anhui province in eastern China. We collected continuous ambient noise data of two weeks from 17 stations in the center of city with a lateral scale about 5 km by 7 km. The S-transform technique is used to stack vertical-component cross-correlation functions from hourly data, which yields much higher SNR of the high frequency surface waves than traditional linear stack. We developed a ray-tracing based iterative surface wave tomography method with spatial smoothing constraints (model regularization) based on ray path density.This method is used to construct frequency-dependent phase velocity maps in the study area, which can account for the effect of ray bending in the tomographic inversion. We also developed a new direct surface wave inversion method to iteratively invert surface wave dispersion data of all paths for 3-D variations of shear wave velocity in the study area without the intermediate step of phase or group velocity maps.The method uses frequency dependent propagation paths and a wavelet-based sparsity-constrained tomography inversion. Hefei city is located in a basin and its southern suburb close to the Chao Lake, the fifth largest lake in China. The inversion results show that the north part has much higher velocity(~2.5 km/s) in the top several hundred meters than the south part(~0.8 km/s), basically consistent with the

  5. Comparison of ultrasound B-mode, strain imaging, acoustic radiation force impulse displacement and shear wave velocity imaging using real time clinical breast images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manickam, Kavitha; Machireddy, Ramasubba Reddy; Raghavan, Bagyam

    2016-04-01

    It has been observed that many pathological process increase the elastic modulus of soft tissue compared to normal. In order to image tissue stiffness using ultrasound, a mechanical compression is applied to tissues of interest and local tissue deformation is measured. Based on the mechanical excitation, ultrasound stiffness imaging methods are classified as compression or strain imaging which is based on external compression and Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging which is based on force generated by focused ultrasound. When ultrasound is focused on tissue, shear wave is generated in lateral direction and shear wave velocity is proportional to stiffness of tissues. The work presented in this paper investigates strain elastography and ARFI imaging in clinical cancer diagnostics using real time patient data. Ultrasound B-mode imaging, strain imaging, ARFI displacement and ARFI shear wave velocity imaging were conducted on 50 patients (31 Benign and 23 malignant categories) using Siemens S2000 machine. True modulus contrast values were calculated from the measured shear wave velocities. For ultrasound B-mode, ARFI displacement imaging and strain imaging, observed image contrast and Contrast to Noise Ratio were calculated for benign and malignant cancers. Observed contrast values were compared based on the true modulus contrast values calculated from shear wave velocity imaging. In addition to that, student unpaired t-test was conducted for all the four techniques and box plots are presented. Results show that, strain imaging is better for malignant cancers whereas ARFI imaging is superior than strain imaging and B-mode for benign lesions representations.

  6. First seismic shear wave velocity profile of the lunar crust as extracted from the Apollo 17 active seismic data by wavefield gradient analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sollberger, David; Schmelzbach, Cedric; Robertsson, Johan O. A.; Greenhalgh, Stewart A.; Nakamura, Yosio; Khan, Amir

    2016-04-01

    We present a new seismic velocity model of the shallow lunar crust, including, for the first time, shear wave velocity information. So far, the shear wave velocity structure of the lunar near-surface was effectively unconstrained due to the complexity of lunar seismograms. Intense scattering and low attenuation in the lunar crust lead to characteristic long-duration reverberations on the seismograms. The reverberations obscure later arriving shear waves and mode conversions, rendering them impossible to identify and analyze. Additionally, only vertical component data were recorded during the Apollo active seismic experiments, which further compromises the identification of shear waves. We applied a novel processing and analysis technique to the data of the Apollo 17 lunar seismic profiling experiment (LSPE), which involved recording seismic energy generated by several explosive packages on a small areal array of four vertical component geophones. Our approach is based on the analysis of the spatial gradients of the seismic wavefield and yields key parameters such as apparent phase velocity and rotational ground motion as a function of time (depth), which cannot be obtained through conventional seismic data analysis. These new observables significantly enhance the data for interpretation of the recorded seismic wavefield and allow, for example, for the identification of S wave arrivals based on their lower apparent phase velocities and distinct higher amount of generated rotational motion relative to compressional (P-) waves. Using our methodology, we successfully identified pure-mode and mode-converted refracted shear wave arrivals in the complex LSPE data and derived a P- and S-wave velocity model of the shallow lunar crust at the Apollo 17 landing site. The extracted elastic-parameter model supports the current understanding of the lunar near-surface structure, suggesting a thin layer of low-velocity lunar regolith overlying a heavily fractured crust of basaltic

  7. DETECTION OF THE VELOCITY SHEAR EFFECT ON THE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTIONS OF THE GALACTIC SATELLITES IN ISOLATED SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jounghun; Choi, Yun-Young E-mail: yy.choi@khu.ac.kr

    2015-02-01

    We report a detection of the effect of the large-scale velocity shear on the spatial distributions of the galactic satellites around the isolated hosts. Identifying the isolated galactic systems, each of which consists of a single host galaxy and its satellites, from the Seventh Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and reconstructing linearly the velocity shear field in the local universe, we measure the alignments between the relative positions of the satellites from their isolated hosts and the principal axes of the local velocity shear tensors projected onto the plane of sky. We find a clear signal that the galactic satellites in isolated systems are located preferentially along the directions of the minor principal axes of the large-scale velocity shear field. Those galactic satellites that are spirals, are brighter, are located at distances larger than the projected virial radii of the hosts, and belong to the spiral hosts yield stronger alignment signals, which implies that the alignment strength depends on the formation and accretion epochs of the galactic satellites. It is also shown that the alignment strength is quite insensitive to the cosmic web environment, as well as the size and luminosity of the isolated hosts. Although this result is consistent with the numerical finding of Libeskind et al. based on an N-body experiment, owing to the very low significance of the observed signals, it remains inconclusive whether or not the velocity shear effect on the satellite distribution is truly universal.

  8. Compressional and shear-wave velocity versus depth relations for common rock types in northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brocher, T.M.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents new empirical compressional and shear-wave velocity (Vp and Vs) versus depth relationships for the most common rock types in northern California. Vp versus depth relations were developed from borehole, laboratory, seismic refraction and tomography, and density measurements, and were converted to Vs versus depth relations using new empirical relations between Vp and Vs. The relations proposed here account for increasing overburden pressure but not for variations in other factors that can influence velocity over short distance scales, such as lithology, consolidation, induration, porosity, and stratigraphic age. Standard deviations of the misfits predicted by these relations thus provide a measure of the importance of the variability in Vp and Vs caused by these other factors. Because gabbros, greenstones, basalts, and other mafic rocks have a different Vp and Vs relationship than sedimentary and granitic rocks, the differences in Vs between these rock types at depths below 6 or 7 km are generally small. The new relations were used to derive the 2005 U.S. Geological Survey seismic velocity model for northern California employed in the broadband strong motion simulations of the 1989 Loma Prieta and 1906 San Francisco earthquakes; initial tests of the model indicate that the Vp model generally compares favorably to regional seismic tomography models but that the Vp and Vs values proposed for the Franciscan Complex may be about 5% too high.

  9. Sheared velocity flows as a source of pressure anisotropy in low collisionality plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Sarto, D.; Pegoraro, F.; Califano, F.

    2014-12-01

    Non-Maxwellian metaequilibrium states may exist in low-collisionality plasmas as evidenced by direct (particle distributions) and indirect (e.g., instabilities driven by pressure anisotropy) satellite and laboratory measurements. These are directly observed in the solar wind (e.g. [1]), in magnetospheric reconnection events [2], in magnetically confined plasmas [3] or in simulations of Vlasov turbulence [4]. By including the full pressure tensor dynamics in a fluid plasma model, we show that a sheared velocity field can provide an effective mechanism that makes an initial isotropic state anisotropic. We discuss how the propagation of magneto-elastic waves can affect the pressure tensor anisotropization and the small scale formation that arise from the interplay between the gyrotropic terms due to the magnetic field and the flow vorticity and the non-gyropropic effect of the flow strain tensor. We support this analysis by a numerical integration of the nonlinear equations describing the pressure tensor evolution. This anisotropization mechanism might provide a good candidate for the understanding of the observed correlation between the presence of a sheared velocity flow and the signature of pressure anisotropies which are not yet explained within the standard models based e.g. on the CGL paradigm. Examples of these signatures are provided e.g. by the threshold lowering of ion-Weibel instabilities in the geomagnetic tail, observed in concomitance to the presence of a velocity shear in the near-earth plasma profile [5], or by the relatively stronger anisotropization measured for core protons in the fast solar wind [4,6] or in "space simulation" laboratory plasma experiments [3]. [1] E. Marsch et al., Journ. Geophys. Res. 109, A04120 (2004); Yu. V. Khotyainstev at el., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 165001 (2011). [2] N. Aunai et al., Ann. Geophys. 29, 1571 (2011); N. Aunai et al., Journ. Geophys. Res. 116, A09232 (2011). [3] E.E. Scime et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 2157 (2000). [4

  10. Sheared velocity flows as a source of pressure anisotropy in low collisionality plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Sarto, Daniele; Pegoraro, Francesco; Cerri, Silvio Sergio; Califano, Francesco; Tenerani, Anna

    2015-04-01

    Non-Maxwellian metaequilibrium states may exist in low-collisionality plasmas as evidenced by direct (particle distributions) and indirect (e.g., instabilities driven by pressure anisotropy) satellite and laboratory measurements. These are directly observed in the solar wind (e.g. [1]), in magnetospheric reconnection events [2], in magnetically confined plasmas [3] or in simulations of Vlasov turbulence [4]. By including the full pressure tensor dynamics in a fluid plasma model, we show that a sheared velocity field can provide an effective mechanism that makes an initial isotropic state anisotropic. We discuss how the propagation of "magneto-elastic" waves can affect the pressure tensor anisotropization and the small scale formation that arise from the interplay between the gyrotropic terms due to the magnetic field and flow vorticity, and the non-gyropropic effect of the flow strain tensor. We support this analysis by a numerical integration of the nonlinear equations describing the pressure tensor evolution. This anisotropization mechanism might provide a good candidate for the understanding of the observed correlation between the presence of a sheared velocity flow and the signature of pressure anisotropies which are not yet explained within the standard models based e.g. on the CGL paradigm (see also [5]). Examples of these signatures are provided by the threshold lowering of ion-Weibel instabilities in the geomagnetic tail, observed in concomitance to the presence of a velocity shear in the near-earth plasma profile [6], or by the relatively stronger anisotropization measured for core protons in the fast solar wind [4,7] or in "space simulation" laboratory plasma experiments [3]. 1] E. Marsch et al., Journ. Geophys. Res. 109, A04120 (2004); Yu. V. Khotyainstev at el., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 165001 (2011). [2] N. Aunai et al., Ann. Geophys. 29, 1571 (2011); N. Aunai et al., Journ. Geophys. Res. 116, A09232 (2011). [3] E.E. Scime et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 2157

  11. Effect of velocity ratio on plane mixing layer development - Influence of the splitter plate wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, R. D.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of the velocity ratio on the approach of a plane mixing layer to self-similarity was investigated experimentally. In the experiment, plane mixing layers with velocity ratios 0.5, 0.6, 0.7, 0.8, and 0.9 were generated in a mixing-layer wind tunnel consisting of two individually driven legs, in which the two streams were allowed to merge at the sharp edge of a tappered splitter plate. The leg driven by the bigger blower was operated at a free-stream velocity in the test section of 21 m/s, while the flow speed in the other leg was varied to change the velocity ratio. For each velocity ratio, the mean flow- and turbulence measurements were carried out at eight streamwise locations. Results showed that, for velocity ratios between 0.5 and 0.7, self-similarity of the mixing layer was achieved, with the asymptotic states comparable; mixing layers with higher velocity ratios failed to achieve a self-similar state within the measurement domain.

  12. Large-scale shear velocity structure of the upper mantle beneath Europe and surrounding regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legendre, C. P.; Meier, T. M.; Lebedev, S.; Friederich, W.

    2009-12-01

    The automated multimode waveform inversion technique developed by Lebedev et al. (2005) was applied to available data of broadband stations in Europe and surrounding regions. It performs a fitting of the complete waveform starting from the S-wave onset to the surface wave. Assuming the location and focal mechanism of a considered earthquake as known, the first basic step is to consider each available seismogram separately and to find the 1D-model that can explain the filtered seismogram best. In a second step, each 1D-model serves as a linear constraint in an inversion for a 3D S-wave velocity model of the upper mantle. We collected data for the years from 1990 to 2006 from all permanent stations for which data were available via the data centers of ORFEUS, GEOFON amd IRIS, and from others that build the Virtual European Seismological Network (VEBSN). In addition, we incorporated data from temporary experiments like SVEKALAPKO, TOR and the Eifel plume project as well as permanent stations in France. Just recently we were also able to add the data recorded by the temporary broadband EGELADOS network in the southern Aegean. In this way, a huge data set of about 500000 seismograms came about from which about 60000 1D-models could be constructed. The resulting models exhibit an overwhelming structural detail in relation to the size of the region considered in the inversion. They are to our knowledge the most detailed models of shear wave velocity currently available for the European upper mantle and surroundings. Most prominent features are an extremely sharp demarcation of the East European platform from Western Europe. Narrow high velocity regions follow the Hellenic arc and the Ionian trench toward the north. Whereas high velocities are found beneath the western Alps between about 100 km to 200 km depth, the eastern Alps show a low velocity anomaly at these depths. Low velocity zones are found at depths around 150 km in the Pannonian basin, the back-arc of the

  13. Experimental Measurement of Settling Velocity of Spherical Particles in Unconfined and Confined Surfactant-based Shear Thinning Viscoelastic Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Sahil; Sharma, Mukul M.

    2014-01-01

    An experimental study is performed to measure the terminal settling velocities of spherical particles in surfactant based shear thinning viscoelastic (VES) fluids. The measurements are made for particles settling in unbounded fluids and fluids between parallel walls. VES fluids over a wide range of rheological properties are prepared and rheologically characterized. The rheological characterization involves steady shear-viscosity and dynamic oscillatory-shear measurements to quantify the viscous and elastic properties respectively. The settling velocities under unbounded conditions are measured in beakers having diameters at least 25x the diameter of particles. For measuring settling velocities between parallel walls, two experimental cells with different wall spacing are constructed. Spherical particles of varying sizes are gently dropped in the fluids and allowed to settle. The process is recorded with a high resolution video camera and the trajectory of the particle is recorded using image analysis software. Terminal settling velocities are calculated from the data. The impact of elasticity on settling velocity in unbounded fluids is quantified by comparing the experimental settling velocity to the settling velocity calculated by the inelastic drag predictions of Renaud et al.1 Results show that elasticity of fluids can increase or decrease the settling velocity. The magnitude of reduction/increase is a function of the rheological properties of the fluids and properties of particles. Confining walls are observed to cause a retardation effect on settling and the retardation is measured in terms of wall factors. PMID:24430257

  14. Experimental measurement of settling velocity of spherical particles in unconfined and confined surfactant-based shear thinning viscoelastic fluids.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Sahil; Sharma, Mukul M

    2014-01-03

    An experimental study is performed to measure the terminal settling velocities of spherical particles in surfactant based shear thinning viscoelastic (VES) fluids. The measurements are made for particles settling in unbounded fluids and fluids between parallel walls. VES fluids over a wide range of rheological properties are prepared and rheologically characterized. The rheological characterization involves steady shear-viscosity and dynamic oscillatory-shear measurements to quantify the viscous and elastic properties respectively. The settling velocities under unbounded conditions are measured in beakers having diameters at least 25x the diameter of particles. For measuring settling velocities between parallel walls, two experimental cells with different wall spacing are constructed. Spherical particles of varying sizes are gently dropped in the fluids and allowed to settle. The process is recorded with a high resolution video camera and the trajectory of the particle is recorded using image analysis software. Terminal settling velocities are calculated from the data. The impact of elasticity on settling velocity in unbounded fluids is quantified by comparing the experimental settling velocity to the settling velocity calculated by the inelastic drag predictions of Renaud et al.(1) Results show that elasticity of fluids can increase or decrease the settling velocity. The magnitude of reduction/increase is a function of the rheological properties of the fluids and properties of particles. Confining walls are observed to cause a retardation effect on settling and the retardation is measured in terms of wall factors.

  15. Record of massive upwellings from the Pacific large low shear velocity province

    PubMed Central

    Madrigal, Pilar; Gazel, Esteban; Flores, Kennet E.; Bizimis, Michael; Jicha, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Large igneous provinces, as the surface expression of deep mantle processes, play a key role in the evolution of the planet. Here we analyse the geochemical record and timing of the Pacific Ocean Large Igneous Provinces and preserved accreted terranes to reconstruct the history of pulses of mantle plume upwellings and their relation with a deep-rooted source like the Pacific large low-shear velocity Province during the Mid-Jurassic to Upper Cretaceous. Petrological modelling and geochemical data suggest the need of interaction between these deep-rooted upwellings and mid-ocean ridges in pulses separated by ∼10–20 Ma, to generate the massive volumes of melt preserved today as oceanic plateaus. These pulses impacted the marine biota resulting in episodes of anoxia and mass extinctions shortly after their eruption. PMID:27824054

  16. Record of massive upwellings from the Pacific large low shear velocity province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madrigal, Pilar; Gazel, Esteban; Flores, Kennet E.; Bizimis, Michael; Jicha, Brian

    2016-11-01

    Large igneous provinces, as the surface expression of deep mantle processes, play a key role in the evolution of the planet. Here we analyse the geochemical record and timing of the Pacific Ocean Large Igneous Provinces and preserved accreted terranes to reconstruct the history of pulses of mantle plume upwellings and their relation with a deep-rooted source like the Pacific large low-shear velocity Province during the Mid-Jurassic to Upper Cretaceous. Petrological modelling and geochemical data suggest the need of interaction between these deep-rooted upwellings and mid-ocean ridges in pulses separated by ~10-20 Ma, to generate the massive volumes of melt preserved today as oceanic plateaus. These pulses impacted the marine biota resulting in episodes of anoxia and mass extinctions shortly after their eruption.

  17. Record of massive upwellings from the Pacific large low shear velocity province.

    PubMed

    Madrigal, Pilar; Gazel, Esteban; Flores, Kennet E; Bizimis, Michael; Jicha, Brian

    2016-11-08

    Large igneous provinces, as the surface expression of deep mantle processes, play a key role in the evolution of the planet. Here we analyse the geochemical record and timing of the Pacific Ocean Large Igneous Provinces and preserved accreted terranes to reconstruct the history of pulses of mantle plume upwellings and their relation with a deep-rooted source like the Pacific large low-shear velocity Province during the Mid-Jurassic to Upper Cretaceous. Petrological modelling and geochemical data suggest the need of interaction between these deep-rooted upwellings and mid-ocean ridges in pulses separated by ∼10-20 Ma, to generate the massive volumes of melt preserved today as oceanic plateaus. These pulses impacted the marine biota resulting in episodes of anoxia and mass extinctions shortly after their eruption.

  18. Partially obstructed channel: Contraction ratio effect on the flow hydrodynamic structure and prediction of the transversal mean velocity profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Meftah, M.; Mossa, M.

    2016-11-01

    In this manuscript, we focus on the study of flow structures in a channel partially obstructed by arrays of vertical, rigid, emergent, vegetation/cylinders. Special attention is given to understand the effect of the contraction ratio, defined as the ratio of the obstructed area width to the width of the unobstructed area, on the flow hydrodynamic structures and to analyze the transversal flow velocity profile at the obstructed-unobstructed interface. A large data set of transversal mean flow velocity profiles and turbulence characteristics is reported from experiments carried out in a laboratory flume. The flow velocities and turbulence intensities have been measured with a 3D Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV)-Vectrino manufactured by Nortek. It was observed that the arrays of emergent vegetation/cylinders strongly affect the flow structures, forming a shear layer immediately next to the obstructed-unobstructed interface, followed by an adjacent free-stream region of full velocity flow. The experimental results show that the contraction ratio significantly affects the flow hydrodynamic structure. Adaptation of the Prandtl's log-law modified by Nikuradse led to the determination of a characteristic hydrodynamic roughness height to define the array resistance to the flow. Moreover, an improved modified log-law predicting the representative transversal profile of the mean flow velocity, at the obstructed-unobstructed interface, is proposed. The benefit of this modified log-law is its easier practical applicability, i.e., it avoids the measurements of some sensitive turbulence parameters, in addition, the flow hydrodynamic variables forming it are predictable, using the initial hydraulic conditions.

  19. LITHOSTRATIGRAPHY AND SHEAR-WAVE VELOCITY IN THE CRYSTALLIZED TOPOPAH SPRING TUFF, YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect

    D. BUESCH; K.H. STOKOE; M. SCHUHEN

    2006-03-20

    Evaluation of the seismic response of the proposed spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is in part based on the seismic properties of the host rock, the 12.8-million-year-old Topopah Spring Tuff. Because of the processes that formed the tuff, the densely welded and crystallized part has three lithophysal and three nonlithophysal zones, and each zone has characteristic variations in lithostratigraphic features and structures of the rocks. Lithostratigraphic features include lithophysal cavities, rims on lithophysae and some fractures, spots (which are similar to rims but without an associated cavity or aperture), amounts of porosity resulting from welding, crystallization, and vapor-phase corrosion and mineralization, and fractures. Seismic properties, including shear-wave velocity (V{sub s}), have been measured on 38 pieces of core, and there is a good ''first order'' correlation with the lithostratigraphic zones; for example, samples from nonlithophysal zones have larger V{sub s} values compared to samples from lithophysal zones. Some samples have V{sub s} values that are beyond the typical range for the lithostratigraphic zone; however, these samples typically have one or more fractures, ''large'' lithophysal cavities, or ''missing pieces'' relative to the sample size. Shear-wave velocity data measured in the tunnels have similar relations to lithophysal and nonlithophysal rocks; however, tunnel-based values are typically smaller than those measured in core resulting from increased lithophysae and fracturing effects. Variations in seismic properties such as V{sub s} data from small-scale samples (typical and ''flawed'' core) to larger scale traverses in the tunnels provide a basis for merging our understanding of the distributions of lithostratigraphic features (and zones) with a method to scale seismic properties.

  20. Compositional layering within the large low shear-wave velocity provinces in the lower mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballmer, Maxim D.; Schumacher, Lina; Lekic, Vedran; Thomas, Christine; Ito, Garrett

    2016-12-01

    The large low shear-wave velocity provinces (LLSVP) are thermochemical anomalies in the deep Earth's mantle, thousands of km wide and ˜1800 km high. This study explores the hypothesis that the LLSVPs are compositionally subdivided into two domains: a primordial bottom domain near the core-mantle boundary and a basaltic shallow domain that extends from 1100 to 2300 km depth. This hypothesis reconciles published observations in that it predicts that the two domains have different physical properties (bulk-sound versus shear-wave speed versus density anomalies), the transition in seismic velocities separating them is abrupt, and both domains remain seismically distinct from the ambient mantle. We here report underside reflections from the top of the LLSVP shallow domain, supporting a compositional origin. By exploring a suite of two-dimensional geodynamic models, we constrain the conditions under which well-separated "double-layered" piles with realistic geometry can persist for billions of years. Results show that long-term separation requires density differences of ˜100 kg/m3 between LLSVP materials, providing a constraint for origin and composition. The models further predict short-lived "secondary" plumelets to rise from LLSVP roofs and to entrain basaltic material that has evolved in the lower mantle. Long-lived, vigorous "primary" plumes instead rise from LLSVP margins and entrain a mix of materials, including small fractions of primordial material. These predictions are consistent with the locations of hot spots relative to LLSVPs, and address the geochemical and geochronological record of (oceanic) hot spot volcanism. The study of large-scale heterogeneity within LLSVPs has important implications for our understanding of the evolution and composition of the mantle.

  1. Lithostratigraphy and shear-wave velocity in the crystallized Topopah Spring Tuff, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buesch, D.C.; Stokoe, K.H.; Won, K.C.; Seong, Y.J.; Jung, J.L.; Schuhen, M.D.

    2006-01-01

    Evaluation of the potential future response to seismic events of the proposed spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is in part based on the seismic properties of the host rock, the 12.8-million-year-old Topopah Spring Tuff. Because of the processes that formed the tuff, the densely welded and crystallized part has three lithophysal and three nonlithophysal zones, and each zone has characteristic variations in lithostratigraphic features and structures of the rocks. Lithostratigraphic features include lithophysal cavities; rims on lithophysae and some fractures; spots (which are similar to rims but without an associated cavity or aperture); amounts of porosity resulting from welding, crystallization, and vapor-phase corrosion and mineralization; and fractures. Seismic properties, including shear-wave velocity (Vs), have been measured on 38 pieces of core, and there is a good "first order" correlation with the lithostratigraphic zones; for example, samples from nonlithophysal zones have larger Vs values compared to samples from lithophysal zones. Some samples have Vs values that are outside the typical range for the lithostratigraphic zone; however, these samples typically have one or more fractures, "large" lithophysal cavities, or "missing pieces" relative to the sample size. Shear-wave velocity data measured in the tunnels have similar relations to lithophysal and nonlithophysal rocks; however, tunnel-based values are typically smaller than those measured in core resulting from increased lithophysae and fracturing effects. Variations in seismic properties such as Vs data from small-scale samples (typical and "flawed" core) to larger scale transects in the tunnels provide a basis for merging our understanding of the distributions of lithostratigraphic features (and zones) with a method to scale seismic properties.

  2. Micromechanical processes of frictional aging and the affect of shear stress on fault healing: insights from material characterization and ultrasonic velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, K. L.; Marone, C.

    2015-12-01

    During the seismic cycle, faults repeatedly fail and regain strength. The gradual strength recovery is often referred to as frictional healing, and existing works suggest that healing can play an important role in determining the mode of fault slip ranging from dynamic rupture to slow earthquakes. Laboratory studies can play an important role in identifying the processes of frictional healing and their evolution with shear strain during the seismic cycle. These studies also provide data for laboratory-derived friction constitutive laws, which can improve dynamic earthquake models. Previous work shows that frictional healing varies with shear stress on a fault during the interseismic period. Unfortunately, the micromechanical processes that cause shear stress dependent frictional healing are not well understood and cannot be incorporated into current earthquake models. In fault gouge, frictional healing involves compaction and particle rearrangement within sheared granular layers. Therefore, to address these issues, we investigate the role grain size reduction plays in frictional re-strengthening processes at different levels of shear stress. Sample material was preserved from biaxial deformation experiments on granular Westerly granite. The normal stress was held constant at 25 MPa and we performed several 100 second slide-hold-slide tests in each experiment. We conducted a series of 5 experiments each with a different value of normalized shear stress (ranging from 0 to 1), defined as the ratio of the pre-hold shear stress to the shear stress during the hold. The particle size distribution for each sample was analyzed. In addition, acoustic measurements were recorded throughout our experiments to investigate variations in ultrasonic velocity and signal amplitude that reflect changes in the elastic moduli of the layer. Acoustic monitoring provides information about healing mechanisms and can provide a link between laboratory studies and tectonic fault zones.

  3. Coupling of microprocesses and macroprocesses due to velocity shear: An application to the low-altitude ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganguli, G.; Keskinen, M. J.; Romero, H.; Heelis, R.; Moore, T.; Pollock, C.

    1994-01-01

    Recent observations indicate that low-altitude (below 1500 km) ion energization and thermal ion upwelling are colocated in the convective flow reversal region. In this region the convective velocity V(sub perpendicular) is generally small but spatial gradients in V(sub perpendicular) can be large. As a result, Joule heating is small. The observed high level of ion heating (few electron volts or more) cannot be explained by classical Joule heating alone but requires additional heating sources such as plasma waves. At these lower altitudes, sources of free energy are not obvious and hence the nature of ion energization remains ill understood. The high degree of correlation of ion heating with shear in the convective velocity (Tsunoda et al., 1989) is suggestive of an important role of velocity shear in this phenomenon. We provide more recent evidence for this correlation and show that even a small amount of velocity shear in the transverse flow is sufficient to excite a large-scale Kelvin-Helmholtz mode, which can nonlinearly steepen and give rise to highly stressed regions of strongly sheared flows. Futhermore, these stressed regions of strongly sheared flows may seed plasma waves in the range of ion cyclotron to lower hybrid frequencies, which are potential sources for ion heating. This novle two-step mechanism for ion energization is applied to typical observations of low-altitude thermal ion upwelling events.

  4. OCT-based quantification of flow velocity, shear force, and power generated by a biological ciliated surface (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Brendan K.; Khokha, Mustafa K.; Loewenberg, Michael; Choma, Michael A.

    2016-03-01

    In cilia-driven fluid flow physiology, quantification of flow velocity, shearing force, and power dissipation is important in defining abnormal ciliary function. The capacity to generate flow can be robustly described in terms of shearing force. Dissipated power can be related to net ATP consumption by ciliary molecular motors. To date, however, only flow velocity can be routinely quantified in a non-invasive, non-contact manner. Additionally, traditional power-based metrics rely on metabolic consumption that reflects energy consumption not just from cilia but also from all active cellular processes. Here, we demonstrate the estimation of all three of these quantities (flow velocity, shear force, and power dissipation) using only optical coherence tomography (OCT). Specifically, we develop a framework that can extract force and power information from vectorial flow velocity fields obtained using OCT-based methods. We do so by (a) estimating the viscous stress tensor from flow velocity fields to estimate shearing force and (b) using the viscous stress tensor to estimate the power dissipation function to infer total mechanical power. These estimates have the advantage of (a) requiring only a single modality, (b) being non-invasive in nature, and (c) being reflective of only the net power work generated by a ciliated surface. We demonstrate our all-optical approach to the estimation of these parameters in the Xenopus animal model system under normal and increased viscous loading. Our preliminary data support the hypothesis that the Xenopus ciliated surface can increase force output under loading conditions.

  5. Hamstrings to quadriceps peak torque ratios diverge between sexes with increasing isokinetic angular velocity.

    PubMed

    Hewett, Timothy E; Myer, Gregory D; Zazulak, Bohdanna T

    2008-09-01

    Our purpose was to determine if females demonstrate decreased hamstrings to quadriceps peak torque (H/Q) ratios compared to males and if H/Q ratios increase with increased isokinetic velocity in both sexes. Maturation disproportionately increases hamstrings peak torque at high velocity in males, but not females. Therefore, we hypothesised that mature females would demonstrate decreased H/Q ratios compared to males and the difference in H/Q ratio between sexes would increase as isokinetic velocity increased. Studies that analysed the H/Q ratio with gravity corrected isokinetic strength testing reported between 1967 and 2004 were included in our review and analysis. Keywords were hamstrings/quadriceps, isokinetics, peak torque and gravity corrected. Medline and Smart databases were searched combined with cross-checked bibliographic reference lists of the publications to determine studies to be included. Twenty-two studies were included with a total of 1568 subjects (1145 male, 423 female). Males demonstrated a significant correlation between H/Q ratio and isokinetic velocity (R=0.634, p<0.0001), and a significant difference in the isokinetic H/Q ratio at the lowest angular velocity (47.8+/-2.2% at 30 degrees /s) compared to the highest velocity (81.4+/-1.1% at 360 degrees /s, p<0.001). In contrast, females did not demonstrate a significant relationship between H/Q ratio and isokinetic velocity (R=0.065, p=0.77) or a change in relative hamstrings strength as the speed increased (49.5+/-8.8% at 30 degrees /s; 51.0+/-5.7% at 360 degrees /s, p=0.84). Gender differences in isokinetic H/Q ratios were not observed at slower angular velocities. However, at high knee flexion/extension angular velocities, approaching those that occur during sports activities, significant gender differences were observed in the H/Q ratio. Females, unlike males, do not increase hamstrings to quadriceps torque ratios at velocities that approach those of functional activities.

  6. Physical modelling of the effect of fractures on compressional and shear wave velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurevich, Boris; Lebedev, Maxim; Glubokovskikh, Stanislav; Dyskin, Arcady; Pasternak, Elena; Vialle, Stephanie

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasonic measurements were performed on a sample of polyester resin permeated by multiple fractures. The samples were prepared by mixing high doses of catalyst, about 7-10 % with the liquid resin base. The mix was then heated in an oven at 60° C for a period of 1 hour. This operation produced many shrinkage cracks varying in size from 8 mm to 20 mm (Sahouryeh et al., 2002). The produced samples were parallelepiped 50 mm x 50 mm in cross-section with height of 100 mm. Micro-CT scanning of the sample reveals many open fractures with apertures 0.2 - 0.4 mm. Elastic properties of the fractured samples were derived from ultrasonic measurements using piezo-electric transducers. These measurements give compressional (Vp) and shear (Vs) wave velocities of 2450 and 1190 m/s, respectively, giving Vp/Vs = 2.04. At the same time the velocities in the intact resin are Vp=2460 and Vs=1504 m/s, respectively, with Vp/Vs = 1.63. Thus we see that the fractures have a negligible effect on the Vp (within the measurement error) but a dramatic effect on Vs (about 20%). This contradicts the common understanding that the effects of dry fractures on Vp and Vs are similar in magnitude. Indeed, assuming very roughly that the distribution of fractures is isotropic, we can estimate the cumulative normal fracture compliance from the difference between shear moduli of the intact and fractured resin to be 0.30 GPa-1 and fracture density of 0.41. This value can be used to estimate the effective bulk modulus of the fractured material. The corresponding p-wave velocity, Vp = 1860 m/s, is significantly lower that the observed value. The results suggest that an equivalent medium approximation is not applicable in this case, probably due to the fact that the long-wave approximation is inadequate. Indeed the fractures are larger than the wavelength that corresponds to the peak frequencies of the power spectrum of the signal. This suggests a strong influence of diffraction. Furthermore, the

  7. Fault rupture as a series of nano-seismic events during high-velocity shear experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zu, X.; Reches, Z.; Chen, X.; Chang, J. C.; Carpenter, B. M.

    2015-12-01

    The rupture process of experimental faults is investigated here by monitoring nano-seismic events (NSE) during slip in a rotary shear apparatus. Our experimental faults are made of two rock blocks with one to four miniature 3D accelerometers that are glued to the stationary block at distance of ~ 2 cm from the fault surface. Accelerations in the frequency range of 1 Hz to 200 kHz are recorded in slip-parallel (x), slip-transverse (y), and slip-vertical (z) directions. We conducted a series of 45 experiments on diorite and dolomite samples in two loading styles: classical velocity controlled loading, and power-density loading, in which the power-density (shear stress times slip velocity) is selected, and stick-slip events develop spontaneously according to the experimental fault response. The 3D accelerometer data were recorded at 106 samples/s, with acceleration resolution of 10 mV/g in recoding range of +/- 5 V. The experiments were conducted at slip-velocity of 0.001-0.8 m/s and slip distance up to 1.38 m. The accelerometer observations revealed tens to hundreds of NSEs per slip in both loading styles; peak acceleration ranged from 1g to over 500g. A typical stick-slip with tens of NSEs in Fig. 1, shows: (1) An initial NSE at ~59.72 s (green) that coincides with a small stress drop (~10%, red); (2) Simultaneous macroscopic slip initiation (blue); (3) A swarm of NSEs occur as the fault slips, each NSE lasts 1-2 milliseconds; and (4) Details of the initial NSE are shown in Fig. 2. Based on waveform cross-correlation between frequency band from 20 kHz to 70kHz, we identify several groups of NSE clusters, and apply empirical Green's function method to analyze event source spectra based on Brune-type source model. These NSEs are indicators of rupture propagation during the experimental fault slip.

  8. Shear Induced Alignment of Low Aspect Ratio Gold Nanorods in Newtonian Fluids.

    PubMed

    Xie, Donglin; Lista, Marco; Qiao, Greg G; Dunstan, Dave E

    2015-10-01

    The flow-induced alignment of small gold nanorods ranging in aspect ratio from 2.4 to 4.2 in aqueous sucrose solutions is reported. Optical absorption spectra have been measured over a range of shear rates using polarized incident light in an optically transparent quartz Couette cell. The measured spectral changes are directly attributed to the shear-induced anisotropy in the suspension due to particle alignment that saturates at Péclet number of around 200. The measured optical changes are reversible, indicating that the nanorods do not undergo aggregation during measurement. Numerical simulations show that the spectral shifts are consistent with the rods flipping between extreme orientations of the Jeffery's orbits and that the effect of the Brownian motion on the gold nanorods cannot be ignored even at large Péclet number.

  9. Near-surface shear-wave velocity measurements in unlithified sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richards, B.T.; Steeples, D.; Miller, R.; Ivanov, J.; Peterie, S.; Sloan, S.D.; McKenna, J.R.

    2011-01-01

    S-wave velocity can be directly correlated to material stiffness and lithology making it a valuable physical property that has found uses in construction, engineering, and environmental projects. This study compares different methods for measuring S-wave velocities, investigating and identifying the differences among the methods' results, and prioritizing the different methods for optimal S-wave use at the U. S. Army's Yuma Proving Grounds YPG. Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves MASW and S-wave tomography were used to generate S-wave velocity profiles. Each method has advantages and disadvantages. A strong signal-to-noise ratio at the study site gives the MASW method promising resolution. S-wave first arrivals are picked on impulsive sledgehammer data which were then used for the tomography process. Three-component downhole seismic data were collected in-line with a locking geophone, providing ground truth to compare the data and to draw conclusions about the validity of each data set. Results from these S-wave measurement techniques are compared with borehole seismic data and with lithology data from continuous samples to help ascertain the accuracy, and therefore applicability, of each method. This study helps to select the best methods for obtaining S-wave velocities for media much like those found in unconsolidated sediments at YPG. ?? 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  10. Effect of consolidation ratios on maximum dynamic shear modulus of sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaoming, Yuan; Jing, Sun; Rui, Sun

    2005-06-01

    The dynamic shear modulus (DSM) is the most basic soil parameter in earthquake or other dynamic loading conditions and can be obtained through testing in the field or in the laboratory. The effect of consolidation ratios of the maximum DSM for two types of sand is investigated by using resonant column tests. And, an increment formula to obtain the maximum DSM for cases of consolidation ratio k c>1 is presented. The results indicate that the maximum DSM rises rapidly when k c is near 1 and then slows down, which means that the power function of the consolidation ratio increment k c-1 can be used to describe the variation of the maximum DSM due to k c>1. The results also indicate that the increase in the maximum DSM due to k c>1 is significantly larger than that predicted by Hardin and Black's formula.

  11. Explicit use of the Biot coefficient in predicting shear-wave velocity of water-saturated sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, M.W.

    2006-01-01

    Predicting the shear-wave (S-wave) velocity is important in seismic modelling, amplitude analysis with offset, and other exploration and engineering applications. Under the low-frequency approximation, the classical Biot-Gassmann theory relates the Biot coefficient to the bulk modulus of water-saturated sediments. If the Biot coefficient under in situ conditions can be estimated, the shear modulus or the S-wave velocity can be calculated. The Biot coefficient derived from the compressional-wave (P-wave) velocity of water-saturated sediments often differs from and is less than that estimated from the S-wave velocity, owing to the interactions between the pore fluid and the grain contacts. By correcting the Biot coefficients derived from P-wave velocities of water-saturated sediments measured at various differential pressures, an accurate method of predicting S-wave velocities is proposed. Numerical results indicate that the predicted S-wave velocities for consolidated and unconsolidated sediments agreewell with measured velocities. ?? 2006 European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers.

  12. Slip-localization within confined gouge powder sheared at moderate to high slip-velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reches, Zeev; Chen, Xiaofeng; Morgan, Chance; Madden, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    Slip along faults in the upper crust is always associated with comminution and formation of non-cohesive gouge powder that can be lithified to cataclasite. Typically, the fine-grained powders (grain-size < 1 micron) build a 1-10 cm thick inner-core of a fault-zone. The ubiquitous occurrence of gouge powder implies that gouge properties may control the dynamic weakening of faults. Testing these properties is the present objective. We built a Confined ROtary Cell, CROC, with a ring-shape, ~3 mm thick gouge chamber, with 62.5 and 81.2 mm of inner and outer diameters. The sheared powder is sealed by two sets of seals pressurized by nitrogen. In CROC, we can control the pore-pressure and to inject fluids, and to monitor CO2 and H2O concentration; in addition, we monitor the standard mechanical parameters (slip velocity, stresses, dilation, and temperature). We tested six types of granular materials (starting grain-size in microns): Talc (<250), Kasota dolomite (125-250), ooides grains (125-250), San Andreas fault zone powder (< 840), montmorillonite powder (1-2), kaolinite powder and gypsum. The experimental slip-velocity ranged 0.001-1 m/s, slip distances from a few tens of cm to tens of m, effective normal stress up to 6.1 MPa. The central ultra-microscopic (SEM) observation is that almost invariably the slip was localized along principal-slip-zone (PSZ) within the granular layer. Even though the starting material was loose, coarse granular material, the developed PSZ was cohesive, hard, smooth and shining. The PSZ is about 1 micron thick, and built of agglomerated, ultra-fine grains (20-50 nm) that were pulverized from the original granular material. We noted that PSZs of the different tested compositions display similar characteristics in terms of structure, grain size, and roughness. Further, we found striking similarities between PSZ in the granular samples and the PZS that developed along experimental faults made of solid rock that were sheared at similar

  13. 3-D shear wave radially and azimuthally anisotropic velocity model of the North American upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Huaiyu; Romanowicz, Barbara; Fischer, Karen M.; Abt, David

    2011-03-01

    Using a combination of long period seismic waveforms and SKS splitting measurements, we have developed a 3-D upper-mantle model (SAWum_NA2) of North America that includes isotropic shear velocity, with a lateral resolution of ˜250 km, as well as radial and azimuthal anisotropy, with a lateral resolution of ˜500 km. Combining these results, we infer several key features of lithosphere and asthenosphere structure. A rapid change from thin (˜70-80 km) lithosphere in the western United States (WUS) to thick lithosphere (˜200 km) in the central, cratonic part of the continent closely follows the Rocky Mountain Front (RMF). Changes with depth of the fast axis direction of azimuthal anisotropy reveal the presence of two layers in the cratonic lithosphere, corresponding to the fast-to-slow discontinuity found in receiver functions. Below the lithosphere, azimuthal anisotropy manifests a maximum, stronger in the WUS than under the craton, and the fast axis of anisotropy aligns with the absolute plate motion, as described in the hotspot reference frame (HS3-NUVEL 1A). In the WUS, this zone is confined between 70 and 150 km, decreasing in strength with depth from the top, from the RMF to the San Andreas Fault system and the Juan de Fuca/Gorda ridges. This result suggests that shear associated with lithosphere-asthenosphere coupling dominates mantle deformation down to this depth in the western part of the continent. The depth extent of the zone of increased azimuthal anisotropy below the cratonic lithosphere is not well resolved in our study, although it is peaked around 270 km, a robust result. Radial anisotropy is such that, predominantly, ξ > 1, where ξ= (Vsh/Vsv)2, under the continent and its borders down to ˜200 km, with stronger ξ in the bordering oceanic regions. Across the continent and below 200 km, alternating zones of weaker and stronger radial anisotropy, with predominantly ξ < 1, correlate with zones of small lateral changes in the fast axis direction of

  14. Shear Stress-Normal Stress (Pressure) Ratio Decides Forming Callus in Patients with Diabetic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Amemiya, Ayumi; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Oe, Makoto; Takehara, Kimie; Ohashi, Yumiko; Suzuki, Ryo; Yamauchi, Toshimasa; Kadowaki, Takashi; Sanada, Hiromi; Mori, Taketoshi

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Callus is a risk factor, leading to severe diabetic foot ulcer; thus, prevention of callus formation is important. However, normal stress (pressure) and shear stress associated with callus have not been clarified. Additionally, as new valuables, a shear stress-normal stress (pressure) ratio (SPR) was examined. The purpose was to clarify the external force associated with callus formation in patients with diabetic neuropathy. Methods. The external force of the 1st, 2nd, and 5th metatarsal head (MTH) as callus predilection regions was measured. The SPR was calculated by dividing shear stress by normal stress (pressure), concretely, peak values (SPR-p) and time integral values (SPR-i). The optimal cut-off point was determined. Results. Callus formation region of the 1st and 2nd MTH had high SPR-i rather than noncallus formation region. The cut-off value of the 1st MTH was 0.60 and the 2nd MTH was 0.50. For the 5th MTH, variables pertaining to the external forces could not be determined to be indicators of callus formation because of low accuracy. Conclusions. The callus formation cut-off values of the 1st and 2nd MTH were clarified. In the future, it will be necessary to confirm the effect of using appropriate footwear and gait training on lowering SPR-i.

  15. Shear Stress-Normal Stress (Pressure) Ratio Decides Forming Callus in Patients with Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Hiroshi; Takehara, Kimie; Ohashi, Yumiko; Suzuki, Ryo; Yamauchi, Toshimasa; Kadowaki, Takashi; Sanada, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Callus is a risk factor, leading to severe diabetic foot ulcer; thus, prevention of callus formation is important. However, normal stress (pressure) and shear stress associated with callus have not been clarified. Additionally, as new valuables, a shear stress-normal stress (pressure) ratio (SPR) was examined. The purpose was to clarify the external force associated with callus formation in patients with diabetic neuropathy. Methods. The external force of the 1st, 2nd, and 5th metatarsal head (MTH) as callus predilection regions was measured. The SPR was calculated by dividing shear stress by normal stress (pressure), concretely, peak values (SPR-p) and time integral values (SPR-i). The optimal cut-off point was determined. Results. Callus formation region of the 1st and 2nd MTH had high SPR-i rather than noncallus formation region. The cut-off value of the 1st MTH was 0.60 and the 2nd MTH was 0.50. For the 5th MTH, variables pertaining to the external forces could not be determined to be indicators of callus formation because of low accuracy. Conclusions. The callus formation cut-off values of the 1st and 2nd MTH were clarified. In the future, it will be necessary to confirm the effect of using appropriate footwear and gait training on lowering SPR-i. PMID:28050567

  16. The uppermost mantle shear wave velocity structure of eastern Africa from Rayleigh wave tomography: constraints on rift evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donnell, J. P.; Adams, A.; Nyblade, A. A.; Mulibo, G. D.; Tugume, F.

    2013-08-01

    An expanded model of the 3-D shear wave velocity structure of the uppermost mantle beneath eastern Africa has been developed using earthquakes recorded by the AfricaArray East African Seismic Experiment in conjunction with data from permanent stations and previously deployed temporary stations. The combined data set comprises 331 earthquakes recorded on a total of 95 seismic stations spanning Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Zambia and Malawi. In this study, data from 149 earthquakes were used to determine fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave phase velocities at periods ranging from 20 to 182 s using the two-plane wave method, and then combined with the similarly processed published measurements and inverted for a 3-D shear wave velocity model of the uppermost mantle. New features in the model include (1) a low-velocity region in western Zambia, (2) a high-velocity region in eastern Zambia, (3) a low-velocity region in eastern Tanzania and (4) low-velocity regions beneath the Lake Malawi rift. When considered in conjunction with mapped seismicity, these results support a secondary western rift branch striking southwestwards from Lake Tanganyika, likely exploiting the relatively weak lithosphere of the southern Kibaran Belt between the Bangweulu Block and the Congo Craton. We estimate a lithospheric thickness of ˜150-200 km for the substantial fast shear wave anomaly imaged in eastern Zambia, which may be a southward subsurface extension of the Bangweulu Block. The low-velocity region in eastern Tanzania suggests that the eastern rift branch trends southeastwards offshore eastern Tanzania coincident with the purported location of the northern margin of the proposed Ruvuma microplate. Pronounced velocity lows along the Lake Malawi rift are found beneath the northern and southern ends of the lake, but not beneath the central portion of the lake.

  17. Time evolving bed shear stress due the passage of gravity currents estimated with ADVP velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zordan, Jessica; Schleiss, Anton J.; Franca, Mário J.

    2016-04-01

    Density or gravity currents are geophysical flows driven by density gradients between two contacting fluids. The physical trigger mechanism of these phenomena lays in the density differences which may be caused by differences in the temperature, dissolved substances or concentration of suspended sediments. Saline density currents are capable to entrain bed sediments inducing signatures in the bottom of sedimentary basins. Herein, saline density currents are reproduced in laboratory over a movable bed. The experimental channel is of the lock-exchange type, it is 7.5 m long and 0.3 m wide, divided into two sections of comparable volumes by a sliding gate. An upstream reach serves as a head tank for the dense mixture; the current propagates through a downstream reach where the main measurements are made. Downstream of the channel a tank exist to absorb the reflection of the current and thus artifacts due to the limited length of the channel. High performance thermoplastic polyurethane simulating fine sediments forms the movable bed. Measures of 3D instantaneous velocities will be made with the use of the non-intrusive technique of the ADV (Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler). With the velocity measurements, the evolution in time of the channel-bed shear stress due the passage of gravity currents is estimated. This is in turn related to the observed erosion and to such parameters determinant for the dynamics of the current as initial density difference, lock length and channel slope. This work was funded by the ITN-Programme (Marie Curie Actions) of the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme FP7-PEOPLE-2013-ITN under REA grant agreement n_607394-SEDITRANS.

  18. Predominant Periods and Shear Wave Velocity an indicator for Sediment Thickness, Caracas, Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocabado, V.; Schmitz, M.

    2013-05-01

    Within the Caracas seismic microzoning project, carried out by Venezuelan Foundation for Seismological Research (FUNVISIS), more than 1500 single measurements of ambient noise have been done since mid-90's in order to determinate fundamental periods of soil. In this work we show the result of these single stations applying H/V analysis, with period values between 0.2s and 2.4s, we propose a new relationship to estimate sediment thickness from period values, including the effect of the surface sediment layers, considering the values of shear-wave velocities for the first 30 m (Vs30) and the Vs value of the sedimentary layer, just above bedrock. The results indicate that this relationship generates more accurate estimates of sediment thickness comparing with depth values from other geophysical methods; this relationship was calibrated with information from 4 depth boreholes in Caracas, obtaining accurate depth values. The main objective of this new relationship is consider local information of soils in other cities, for local relationships between periods and sediment thickness, to generate accurate sediment thickness estimates from environmental noise measurements within seismic microzoning projects in Venezuela's most important cities.

  19. A comparison of four geophysical methods for determining the shear wave velocity of soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, N.; Thitimakorn, T.; Ismail, A.; Hoffman, D.

    2007-01-01

    The Missouri Department of Transportation (MoDOT) routinely acquires seismic cone penetrometer (SCPT) shear wave velocity control as part of the routine investigation of soils within the Mississippi Embayment. In an effort to ensure their geotechnical investigations are as effective and efficient as possible, the SCPT tool and several available alternatives (crosshole [CH]; multichannel analysis of surface waves [MASW]; and refraction microtremor [ReMi]) were evaluated and compared on the basis of field data acquired at two test sites in southeast Missouri. These four methods were ranked in terms of accuracy, functionality, cost, other considerations, and overall utility. It is concluded that MASW data are generally more reliable than SCPT data, comparable to quality ReMi data, and only slightly less accurate than CH data. However, the other advantages of MASW generally make it a superior choice over the CH, SCPT, and ReMi methods for general soil classification purposes to depths of 30 m. MASW data are less expensive than CH data and SCPT data and can normally be acquired in areas inaccessible to drill and SCPT rigs. In contrast to the MASW tool, quality ReMi data can be acquired only in areas where there are interpretable levels of "passive" acoustic energy and only when the geophone array is aligned with the source(s) of such energy.

  20. Accuracy of velocity and shear rate measurements using pulsed Doppler ultrasound: a comparison of signal analysis techniques.

    PubMed

    Markou, C P; Ku, D N

    1991-01-01

    An experimental investigation was instituted to evaluate the performance of Doppler ultrasound signal processing techniques for measuring fluid velocity under well-defined flow conditions using a 10-MHz multigated pulsed ultrasound instrument. Conditions of fully developed flow in a rigid, circular tube were varied over a Reynolds number range between 500 and 8000. The velocity across the tube was determined using analog and digital zero crossing detectors and three digital spectrum estimators. Determination of the Doppler frequency from analog or digital zero crossing detectors gave accurate velocity values for laminar and moderately turbulent flow away from the wall (0.969 less than or equal to r less than or equal to 0.986). Three digital spectrum estimators, Fast Fourier Transform, Burg autoregressive method, and minimum variance method, were slightly more accurate than the zero crossing detector (0.984 less than or equal to r less than or equal to 0.994), especially at points close to the walls and with higher levels of turbulence. Steep velocity gradients and transit-time-effects from high velocities produced significantly larger errors in velocity measurement. Wall shear rate estimates were most precise when calculated using the position of the wall and two velocity points. The calculated wall shears were within 20%-30% of theoretically predicted values.

  1. Frictional Properties and Microstructure of Calcite-Rich Fault Gouges Sheared at Sub-Seismic Sliding Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verberne, B. A.; Spiers, C. J.; Niemeijer, A. R.; De Bresser, J. H. P.; De Winter, D. A. M.; Plümper, O.

    2014-10-01

    We report an experimental and microstructural study of the frictional properties of simulated fault gouges prepared from natural limestone (96 % CaCO3) and pure calcite. Our experiments consisted of direct shear tests performed, under dry and wet conditions, at an effective normal stress of 50 MPa, at 18-150 °C and sliding velocities of 0.1-10 μm/s. Wet experiments used a pore water pressure of 10 MPa. Wet gouges typically showed a lower steady-state frictional strength ( μ = 0.6) than dry gouges ( μ = 0.7-0.8), particularly in the case of the pure calcite samples. All runs showed a transition from stable velocity strengthening to (potentially) unstable velocity weakening slip above 80-100 °C. All recovered samples showed patchy, mirror-like surfaces marking boundary shear planes. Optical study of sections cut normal to the shear plane and parallel to the shear direction showed both boundary and inclined shear bands, characterized by extreme grain comminution and a crystallographic preferred orientation. Cross-sections of boundary shears, cut normal to the shear direction using focused ion beam—SEM, from pure calcite gouges sheared at 18 and 150 °C, revealed dense arrays of rounded, ~0.3 μm-sized particles in the shear band core. Transmission electron microscopy showed that these particles consist of 5-20 nm sized calcite nanocrystals. All samples showed evidence for cataclasis and crystal plasticity. Comparing our results with previous models for gouge friction, we suggest that frictional behaviour was controlled by competition between crystal plastic and granular flow processes active in the shear bands, with water facilitating pressure solution, subcritical cracking and intergranular lubrication. Our data have important implications for the depth of the seismogenic zone in tectonically active limestone terrains. Contrary to recent claims, our data also demonstrate that nanocrystalline mirror-like slip surfaces in calcite(-rich) faults are not

  2. Comparison of phase velocities from array measurements of Rayleigh waves associated with microtremor and results calculated from borehole shear-wave velocity profiles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, Hsi-Ping; Boore, David M.; Joyner, William B.; Oppenheimer, David H.; Warrick, Richard E.; Zhang, Wenbo; Hamilton, John C.; Brown, Leo T.

    2000-01-01

    Shear-wave velocities (VS) are widely used for earthquake ground-motion site characterization. VS data are now largely obtained using borehole methods. Drilling holes, however, is expensive. Nonintrusive surface methods are inexpensive for obtaining VS information, but not many comparisons with direct borehole measurements have been published. Because different assumptions are used in data interpretation of each surface method and public safety is involved in site characterization for engineering structures, it is important to validate the surface methods by additional comparisons with borehole measurements. We compare results obtained from a particular surface method (array measurement of surface waves associated with microtremor) with results obtained from borehole methods. Using a 10-element nested-triangular array of 100-m aperture, we measured surface-wave phase velocities at two California sites, Garner Valley near Hemet and Hollister Municipal Airport. The Garner Valley site is located at an ancient lake bed where water-saturated sediment overlies decomposed granite on top of granite bedrock. Our array was deployed at a location where seismic velocities had been determined to a depth of 500 m by borehole methods. At Hollister, where the near-surface sediment consists of clay, sand, and gravel, we determined phase velocities using an array located close to a 60-m deep borehole where downhole velocity logs already exist. Because we want to assess the measurements uncomplicated by uncertainties introduced by the inversion process, we compare our phase-velocity results with the borehole VS depth profile by calculating fundamental-mode Rayleigh-wave phase velocities from an earth model constructed from the borehole data. For wavelengths less than ~2 times of the array aperture at Garner Valley, phase-velocity results from array measurements agree with the calculated Rayleigh-wave velocities to better than 11%. Measurement errors become larger for wavelengths 2

  3. Uncertainty Estimation of Shear-wave Velocity Structure from Bayesian Inversion of Microtremor Array Dispersion Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosso, S. E.; Molnar, S.; Cassidy, J.

    2010-12-01

    Bayesian inversion of microtremor array dispersion data is applied, with evaluation of data errors and model parameterization, to produce the most-probable shear-wave velocity (VS) profile together with quantitative uncertainty estimates. Generally, the most important property characterizing earthquake site response is the subsurface VS structure. The microtremor array method determines phase velocity dispersion of Rayleigh surface waves from multi-instrument recordings of urban noise. Inversion of dispersion curves for VS structure is a non-unique and nonlinear problem such that meaningful evaluation of confidence intervals is required. Quantitative uncertainty estimation requires not only a nonlinear inversion approach that samples models proportional to their probability, but also rigorous estimation of the data error statistics and an appropriate model parameterization. A Bayesian formulation represents the solution of the inverse problem in terms of the posterior probability density (PPD) of the geophysical model parameters. Markov-chain Monte Carlo methods are used with an efficient implementation of Metropolis-Hastings sampling to provide an unbiased sample from the PPD to compute parameter uncertainties and inter-relationships. Nonparametric estimation of a data error covariance matrix from residual analysis is applied with rigorous a posteriori statistical tests to validate the covariance estimate and the assumption of a Gaussian error distribution. The most appropriate model parameterization is determined using the Bayesian information criterion (BIC), which provides the simplest model consistent with the resolving power of the data. Parameter uncertainties are found to be under-estimated when data error correlations are neglected and when compressional-wave velocity and/or density (nuisance) parameters are fixed in the inversion. Bayesian inversion of microtremor array data is applied at two sites in British Columbia, the area of highest seismic risk in

  4. Two-component laser Doppler anemometer for measurement of velocity and turbulent shear stress near prosthetic heart valves.

    PubMed

    Woo, Y R; Yoganathan, A P

    1985-01-01

    The velocity and turbulent shear stress measured in the immediate vicinity of prosthetic heart valves play a vital role in the design and evaluation of these devices. In the past hot wire/film and one-component laser Doppler anemometer (LDA) systems were used extensively to obtain these measurements. Hot wire/film anemometers, however, have some serious disadvantages, including the inability to measure the direction of the flow, the disturbance of the flow field caused by the probe, and the need for frequent calibration. One-component LDA systems do not have these problems, but they cannot measure turbulent shear stresses directly. Since these measurements are essential and are not available in the open literature, a two-component LDA system for measuring velocity and turbulent shear stress fields under pulsatile flow conditions was assembled under an FDA contract. The experimental methods used to create an in vitro data base of velocity and turbulent shear stress fields in the immediate vicinity of prosthetic heart valves of various designs in current clinical use are also discussed.

  5. Predicting the liquefaction phenomena from shear velocity profiling: Empirical approach to 6.3 Mw, May 2006 Yogyakarta earthquake

    SciTech Connect

    Hartantyo, Eddy; Brotopuspito, Kirbani S.; Sismanto; Waluyo

    2015-04-24

    The liquefactions phenomena have been reported after a shocking 6.5Mw earthquake hit Yogyakarta province in the morning at 27 May 2006. Several researchers have reported the damage, casualties, and soil failure due to the quake, including the mapping and analyzing the liquefaction phenomena. Most of them based on SPT test. The study try to draw the liquefaction susceptibility by means the shear velocity profiling using modified Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW). This paper is a preliminary report by using only several measured MASW points. The study built 8-channel seismic data logger with 4.5 Hz geophones for this purpose. Several different offsets used to record the high and low frequencies of surface waves. The phase-velocity diagrams were stacked in the frequency domain rather than in time domain, for a clearer and easier dispersion curve picking. All codes are implementing in Matlab. From these procedures, shear velocity profiling was collected beneath each geophone’s spread. By mapping the minimum depth of shallow water table, calculating PGA with soil classification, using empirical formula for saturated soil weight from shear velocity profile, and calculating CRR and CSR at every depth, the liquefaction characteristic can be identify in every layer. From several acquired data, a liquefiable potential at some depth below water table was obtained.

  6. Predicting the liquefaction phenomena from shear velocity profiling: Empirical approach to 6.3 Mw, May 2006 Yogyakarta earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartantyo, Eddy; Brotopuspito, Kirbani S.; Sismanto, Waluyo

    2015-04-01

    The liquefactions phenomena have been reported after a shocking 6.5Mw earthquake hit Yogyakarta province in the morning at 27 May 2006. Several researchers have reported the damage, casualties, and soil failure due to the quake, including the mapping and analyzing the liquefaction phenomena. Most of them based on SPT test. The study try to draw the liquefaction susceptibility by means the shear velocity profiling using modified Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW). This paper is a preliminary report by using only several measured MASW points. The study built 8-channel seismic data logger with 4.5 Hz geophones for this purpose. Several different offsets used to record the high and low frequencies of surface waves. The phase-velocity diagrams were stacked in the frequency domain rather than in time domain, for a clearer and easier dispersion curve picking. All codes are implementing in Matlab. From these procedures, shear velocity profiling was collected beneath each geophone's spread. By mapping the minimum depth of shallow water table, calculating PGA with soil classification, using empirical formula for saturated soil weight from shear velocity profile, and calculating CRR and CSR at every depth, the liquefaction characteristic can be identify in every layer. From several acquired data, a liquefiable potential at some depth below water table was obtained.

  7. Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity maps and three-dimensional shear velocity structure of the western US from local non-plane surface wave tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, F.F.; Snoke, J. Arthur

    2010-01-01

    We utilize two-and-three-quarter years of vertical-component recordings made by the Transportable Array (TA) component of Earthscope to constrain three-dimensional (3-D) seismic shear wave velocity structure in the upper 200 km of the western United States. Single-taper spectral estimation is used to compile measurements of complex spectral amplitudes from 44 317 seismograms generated by 123 teleseismic events. In the first step employed to determine the Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity structure, we implement a new tomographic method, which is simpler and more robust than scattering-based methods (e.g. multi-plane surface wave tomography). The TA is effectively implemented as a large number of local arrays by defining a horizontal Gaussian smoothing distance that weights observations near a given target point. The complex spectral-amplitude measurements are interpreted with the spherical Helmholtz equation using local observations about a succession of target points, resulting in Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity maps at periods over the range of 18–125 s. The derived maps depend on the form of local fits to the Helmholtz equation, which generally involve the nonplane-wave solutions of Friederich et al. In a second step, the phase-velocity maps are used to derive 3-D shear velocity structure. The 3-D velocity images confirm details witnessed in prior body-wave and surface-wave studies and reveal new structures, including a deep (>100 km deep) high-velocity lineament, of width ∼200 km, stretching from the southern Great Valley to northern Utah that may be a relic of plate subduction or, alternatively, either a remnant of the Mojave Precambrian Province or a mantle downwelling. Mantle seismic velocity is highly correlated with heat flow, Holocene volcanism, elastic plate thickness and seismicity. This suggests that shallow mantle structure provides the heat source for associated magmatism, as well as thinning of the thermal lithosphere, leading to relatively high

  8. Near Surface Shear Wave Velocity Model of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuler, S.; Craig, M. S.; Hayashi, K.; Galvin, J. L.; Deqiang, C.; Jones, M. G.

    2015-12-01

    Multichannel analysis of surface wave measurements (MASW) and microtremor array measurements (MAM) were performed at twelve sites across the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta to obtain high resolution shear wave velocity (VS) models. Deeper surveys were performed at four of the sites using the two station spatial autocorrelation (SPAC) method. For the MASW and MAM surveys, a 48-channel seismic system with 4.5 Hz geophones was used with a 10-lb sledgehammer and a metal plate as a source. Surveys were conducted at various locations on the crest of levees, the toe of the levees, and off of the levees. For MASW surveys, we used a record length of 2.048 s, a sample interval of 1 ms, and 1 m geophone spacing. For MAM, ambient noise was recorded for 65.536 s with a sampling interval of 4 ms and 1 m geophone spacing. VS was determined to depths of ~ 20 m using the MASW method and ~ 40 m using the MAM method. Maximum separation between stations in the two-station SPAC surveys was typically 1600 m to 1800 m, providing coherent signal with wavelengths in excess of 5 km and depth penetration of as much as 2000 m. Measured values of VS30 in the study area ranged from 97 m/s to 257 m/s, corresponding to NEHRP site classifications D and E. Comparison of our measured velocity profiles with available geotechnical logs, including soil type, SPT, and CPT, reveals the existence of a small number of characteristic horizons within the upper 40m in the Delta: levee fill material, peat, transitional silty sand, and eolian sand at depth. Sites with a peat layer at the surface exhibited extremely low values of VS. Based on soil borings, the thickness of peat layers were approximately 0 m to 8 m. The VS for the peat layers ranged from 42 m/s to 150 m/s while the eolian sand layer exhibited VS ranging from of 220 m/s to 370 m/s. Soft near surface soils present in the region pose an increased earthquake hazard risk due to the potential for high ground accelerations.

  9. Low shear velocities in the sub-lithospheric mantle beneath the Indian shield?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, M. Ravi; Saikia, Dipankar; Singh, Arun; Srinagesh, D.; Baidya, P. R.; Dattatrayam, R. S.

    2013-03-01

    Ever since its breakup from the Gondwanaland ~140 Myr ago, the Indian plate was ravaged by four hot spots. Although the surface manifestations of such deep processes are evident in terms of large igneous provinces like the Deccan and the fast drift of the Indian plate, the modifications to the deep structure remain to be grasped. In this study, we investigate the mantle transition zone (TZ) structure beneath the Indian shield region using ~14,000 teleseismic receiver functions from 77 broadband stations sited on diverse geologic terrains. The arrival times of the P-to-s (Ps) conversions from the 410 km discontinuity at most cratonic stations appear to be delayed by ~2 s in comparison with the times observed for other Precambrian shield regions like Africa, Australia, and Canada. Such delays in the conversions from the 410 km discontinuity below the Indian shield suggest low shear wave speeds in the lithospheric and sub-lithospheric mantles due to higher temperatures, together with a thinner high velocity lid that contrasts with a thicker one found beneath most Archean cratons. A thin transition zone beneath most of the cratonic stations lends support to the enhanced temperatures within the TZ itself. Also, a further delay of the TZ discontinuities is observed for stations on the southern granulite terrain, which was under the influence of the Marion plume that is responsible for the separation of Madagascar from India. Although the data do not conclusively show evidence for a 520 km discontinuity, an LVL atop the 410 cannot be ruled out beneath certain geological provinces of the Indian shield.

  10. Lateral heterogeneity scales in regional and global upper mantle shear velocity models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meschede, Matthias; Romanowicz, Barbara

    2015-02-01

    We analyse the lateral heterogeneity scales of recent upper mantle tomographic shear velocity (Vs) global and regional models. Our goal is to constrain the spherical harmonics power spectrum over the largest possible range of scales to get an estimate of the strength and statistical distribution of both long and small-scale structure. We use a spherical multitaper method to obtain high quality power spectral estimates from the regional models. After deconvolution of the employed taper functions, we combine global and regional spectral estimates from scales of 20 000 to around 200 km (degree 100). In contrast to previous studies that focus on linear power spectral densities, we interpret the logarithmic power per harmonic degree l as heterogeneity strength at a particular depth and horizontal scale. Throughout the mantle, we observe in recent global models, that their low degree spectrum is anisotropic with respect to Earth's rotation axis. We then constrain the uppermost mantle spectrum from global and regional models. Their power spectra transfer smoothly into each other in overlapping spectral bands, and model correlation is in general best in the uppermost 250 km (i.e. the `heterosphere'). In Europe, we see good correlation from the largest scales down to features of about 500 km. Detailed analysis and interpretation of spectral shape in this depth range shows that the heterosphere has several characteristic length scales and varying spectral decay rates. We interpret these as expressions of different physical processes. At larger depths, the correlation between different models drops, and the power spectrum exhibits strong small scale structure whose location and strength is not as well resolved at present. The spectrum also has bands with elevated power that likely correspond to length scales that are enhanced due to the inversion process.

  11. Developments in the Use of Proximity and Ratio Cues in Velocity Judgments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shire, Beatrice; Durkin, Kevin

    Young children's responses to a velocity inference task based on static pictorial stimuli giving cues of proximity and ratio were examined. Subjects (N=65) in preschool through second grade viewed pictures of snails moving horizontally or spiders suspended vertically and were asked to estimate which competitor would reach its destination first.…

  12. Heat transfer, velocity-temperature correlation, and turbulent shear stress from Navier-Stokes computations of shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, C. R.; Hingst, W. R.; Porro, A. R.

    1991-01-01

    The properties of 2-D shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction flows were calculated by using a compressible turbulent Navier-Stokes numerical computational code. Interaction flows caused by oblique shock wave impingement on the turbulent boundary layer flow were considered. The oblique shock waves were induced with shock generators at angles of attack less than 10 degs in supersonic flows. The surface temperatures were kept at near-adiabatic (ratio of wall static temperature to free stream total temperature) and cold wall (ratio of wall static temperature to free stream total temperature) conditions. The computational results were studied for the surface heat transfer, velocity temperature correlation, and turbulent shear stress in the interaction flow fields. Comparisons of the computational results with existing measurements indicated that (1) the surface heat transfer rates and surface pressures could be correlated with Holden's relationship, (2) the mean flow streamwise velocity components and static temperatures could be correlated with Crocco's relationship if flow separation did not occur, and (3) the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model should be modified for turbulent shear stress computations in the interaction flows.

  13. Shallow velocity structure and Poisson's ratio at the Tarzana, California, strong-motion accelerometer site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Catchings, R.D.; Lee, W.H.K.

    1996-01-01

    The 17 January 1994, Northridge, California, earthquake produced strong ground shaking at the Cedar Hills Nursery (referred to here as the Tarzana site) within the city of Tarzana, California, approximately 6 km from the epicenter of the mainshock. Although the Tarzana site is on a hill and is a rock site, accelerations of approximately 1.78 g horizontally and 1.2 g vertically at the Tarzana site are among the highest ever instrumentally recorded for an earthquake. To investigate possible site effects at the Tarzana site, we used explosive-source seismic refraction data to determine the shallow (<70 m) P- and S-wave velocity structure. Our seismic velocity models for the Tarzana site indicate that the local velocity structure may have contributed significantly to the observed shaking. P-wave velocities range from 0.9 to 1.65 km/sec, and S-wave velocities range from 0.20 and 0.6 km/sec for the upper 70 m. We also found evidence for a local S-wave low-velocity zone (LVZ) beneath the top of the hill. The LVZ underlies a CDMG strong-motion recording site at depths between 25 and 60 m below ground surface (BGS). Our velocity model is consistent with the near-surface (<30 m) P- and S-wave velocities and Poisson's ratios measured in a nearby (<30 m) borehole. High Poisson's ratios (0.477 to 0.494) and S-wave attenuation within the LVZ suggest that the LVZ may be composed of highly saturated shales of the Modelo Formation. Because the lateral dimensions of the LVZ approximately correspond to the areas of strongest shaking, we suggest that the highly saturated zone may have contributed to localized strong shaking. Rock sites are generally considered to be ideal locations for site response in urban areas; however, localized, highly saturated rock sites may be a hazard in urban areas that requires further investigation.

  14. Poisson's ratio from polarization of acoustic zero-group velocity Lamb mode.

    PubMed

    Baggens, Oskar; Ryden, Nils

    2015-07-01

    Poisson's ratio of an isotropic and free elastic plate is estimated from the polarization of the first symmetric acoustic zero-group velocity Lamb mode. This polarization is interpreted as the ratio of the absolute amplitudes of the surface normal and surface in-plane components of the acoustic mode. Results from the evaluation of simulated datasets indicate that the presented relation, which links the polarization and Poisson's ratio, can be extended to incorporate plates with material damping. Furthermore, the proposed application of the polarization is demonstrated in a practical field case, where an increased accuracy of estimated nominal thickness is obtained.

  15. On the modal damping ratios of shear-type structures equipped with Rayleigh damping systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trombetti, T.; Silvestri, S.

    2006-04-01

    The effects of added manufactured viscous dampers upon shear-type structures are analytically investigated here for the class of Rayleigh damping systems. The definitions of mass proportional damping (MPD) and stiffness proportional damping (SPD) systems are briefly recalled and their physical counterpart is derived. From basic physics, a detailed mathematical demonstration that the first modal damping ratio of a structure equipped with the MPD system is always larger than the first modal damping ratio of a structure equipped with the SPD system is provided here. All results are derived for the class of structures characterised by constant values of lateral stiffness and storey mass, under the equal "total size" constraint. The paper also provides closed form demonstrations of other properties of modal damping ratios which further indicate that the MPD and the SPD systems are respectively characterised by the largest and the smallest damping efficiency among Rayleigh damping systems subjected to base excitation. A numerical application with realistic data corresponding to an actual seven-storey building structure is presented to illustrate and verify the theoretical findings.

  16. Shear wave velocity and attenuation in the upper layer of ocean bottoms from long-range acoustic field measurements.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ji-Xun; Zhang, Xue-Zhen

    2012-12-01

    Several physics-based seabed geoacoustic models (including the Biot theory) predict that compressional wave attenuation α(2) in sandy marine sediments approximately follows quadratic frequency dependence at low frequencies, i.e., α(2)≈kf(n) (dB/m), n=2. A recent paper on broadband geoacoustic inversions from low frequency (LF) field measurements, made at 20 locations around the world, has indicated that the frequency exponent of the effective sound attenuation n≈1.80 in a frequency band of 50-1000 Hz [Zhou et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 125, 2847-2866 (2009)]. Carey and Pierce hypothesize that the discrepancy is due to the inversion models' neglect of shear wave effects [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 124, EL271-EL277 (2008)]. The broadband geoacoustic inversions assume that the seabottom is an equivalent fluid and sound waves interact with the bottom at small grazing angles. The shear wave velocity and attenuation in the upper layer of ocean bottoms are estimated from the LF field-inverted effective bottom attenuations using a near-grazing bottom reflection expression for the equivalent fluid model, derived by Zhang and Tindle [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 98, 3391-3396 (1995)]. The resultant shear wave velocity and attenuation are consistent with the SAX99 measurement at 25 Hz and 1000 Hz. The results are helpful for the analysis of shear wave effects on long-range sound propagation in shallow water.

  17. Studies of Shear Band Velocity Using Spatially and Temporally Resolved Measurements of Strain During Quasistatic Compression of Bulk Metallic Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, W J; Samale, M; Hufnagel, T; LeBlanc, M; Florando, J

    2009-06-15

    We have made measurements of the temporal and spatial features of the evolution of strain during the serrated flow of Pd{sub 40}Ni{sub 40}P{sub 20} bulk metallic glass tested under quasistatic, room temperature, uniaxial compression. Strain and load data were acquired at rates of up to 400 kHz using strain gages affixed to all four sides of the specimen and a piezoelectric load cell located near the specimen. Calculation of the displacement rate requires an assumption about the nature of the shear displacement. If one assumes that the entire shear plane displaces simultaneously, the displacement rate is approximately 0.002 m/s. If instead one assumes that the displacement occurs as a localized propagating front, the velocity of the front is approximately 2.8 m/s. In either case, the velocity is orders of magnitude less than the shear wave speed ({approx}2000 m/s). The significance of these measurements for estimates of heating in shear bands is discussed.

  18. Reynolds shear stress near its maxima, turbulent bursting process and associated velocity profle in a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afzal, Noor

    2014-11-01

    The Reynolds shear stress around maxima, turbulent bursting process and associate velocity profile in ZGP turbulent boundary layer is considered in the intermediate layer/mesolayer proposed by Afzal (1982 Ing. Arch. 53, 355-277), in addition to inner and outer layers. The intermediate length scale δm = δRτ- 1 / 2 having velocity Um = mUe with 1 / 2 <= m <= 2 / 3 where Ue is velocity at boundary layer edge. Long & Chen (1981 JFM) intermediate layer/ mesolayer scale δm = δRτ- 1 / 2 with velocity Um the friction velocity uτ, is untenable assumption (Afzal 1984 AIAA J). For channel/pipe flow, Sreenivasan et al. (1981989, 1997, 2006a,b) proposed critical layer / mesolayer, cited/adopted work Long and Chen and McKeon, B.J. & Sharma, A. 2010 JFM 658, page 370 stated ``retaining the assumption that the critical layer occurs when U (y) = (2 / 3) UCL (i.e. that the critical layer scales with y+ ~Rτ+ 2 / 3),'' both untenable assumptions, but ignored citation of papers Afzal 1982 onwards on pipe flow. The present turbulent boundary layer work shows that Reynolds shear maxima, shape factor and turbulent bursting time scale with mesolayer variables and Taylor length/time scale. Residence, Embassy Hotel Rasal Gang Aligarh 202001 UP India.

  19. Shear velocity structure beneath the central United States: implications for the origin of the Illinois Basin and intraplate seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chen; Gilbert, Hersh; Andronicos, Christopher; Hamburger, Michael W.; Larson, Timothy; Marshak, Stephen; Pavlis, Gary L.; Yang, Xiaotao

    2016-03-01

    We present new estimates of lithospheric shear velocities for the intraplate seismic zones and the Illinois Basin in the U.S. midcontinent by analyzing teleseismic Rayleigh waves. We find that relatively high crustal shear velocities (VS) characterize the southern Illinois Basin, while relatively low crustal velocities characterize the middle and lower crust of the central and northern Illinois Basin. The observed high crustal velocities may correspond to high-density mafic intrusions emplaced into the crust during the development of the Reelfoot Rift, which may have contributed to the subsidence of the Illinois Basin. The low crustal VS beneath the central and northern basin follow the La Salle deformation belt. We also observe relatively low velocities in the mantle beneath the New Madrid seismic zone where VS decreases by about 7% compared to those outside of the rift. The low VS in the upper mantle also extends beneath the Wabash Valley and Ste. Genevieve seismic zones. Testing expected VS reductions based on plausible thermal heterogeneities for the midcontinent indicates that the 7% velocity reduction would not result from elevated temperatures alone. Instead this scale of anomaly requires a contribution from some combination of increased iron and water content. Both rifting and interaction with a mantle plume could introduce these compositional heterogeneities. Similar orientations for the NE-SW low-velocity zone and the Reelfoot Rift suggest a rift origin to the reduced velocities. The low VS upper mantle represents a weak region and the intraplate seismic zones would correspond to concentrated crustal deformation above weak mantle.

  20. Lithospheric Shear Velocity Structure of South Island, New Zealand from Rayleigh Wave Tomography of Amphibious Array Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, J. S.; Sheehan, A. F.; Stachnik, J. C.; Lin, F. C.; Collins, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    We present the first 3D shear velocity model extending well offshore of New Zealand's South Island, imaging the lithosphere beneath Campbell and Challenger plateaus. Our model is constructed via linearized inversion of both teleseismic (18 -70 s period) and ambient noise-based (8 - 25 s period) Rayleigh wave dispersion measurements. We augment an array of 29 ocean-bottom instruments deployed off the South Island's east and west coasts in 2009-2010 with 28 New Zealand land-based seismometers. The ocean-bottom seismometers and 4 of the land seismometers were part of the Marine Observations of Anisotropy Near Aotearoa (MOANA) experiment, and the remaining land seismometers are from New Zealand's permanent GeoNet array. Major features of our shear wave velocity (Vs) model include a low-velocity (Vs<4.3km/s) body extending to at least 75km depth beneath the Banks and Otago peninsulas, a high-velocity (Vs~4.7km/s) upper mantle anomaly underlying the Southern Alps to a depth of 100km, and discontinuous lithospheric velocity structure between eastern and western Challenger Plateau. Using the 4.5km/s contour as a proxy for the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, our model suggests that the lithospheric thickness of Challenger Plateau is substantially greater than that of Campbell Plateau. The high-velocity anomaly we resolve beneath the central South Island exhibits strong spatial correlation with subcrustal earthquake hypocenters along the Alpine Fault (Boese et al., 2013). The ~400km-long low velocity zone we image beneath eastern South Island underlies Cenozoic volcanics and mantle-derived helium observations (Hoke et al., 2000) on the surface. The NE-trending low-velocity zone dividing Challenger Plateau in our model underlies a prominent magnetic discontinuity (Sutherland et al., 1999). The latter feature has been interpreted to represent a pre-Cretaceous crustal boundary, which our results suggest may involve the entire mantle lithosphere.

  1. Shear wave velocity, seismic attenuation, and thermal structure of the continental upper mantle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Artemieva, I.M.; Billien, M.; Leveque, J.-J.; Mooney, W.D.

    2004-01-01

    Seismic velocity and attenuation anomalies in the mantle are commonly interpreted in terms of temperature variations on the basis of laboratory studies of elastic and anelastic properties of rocks. In order to evaluate the relative contributions of thermal and non-thermal effects on anomalies of attenuation of seismic shear waves, QS-1, and seismic velocity, VS, we compare global maps of the thermal structure of the continental upper mantle with global QS-1 and Vs maps as determined from Rayleigh waves at periods between 40 and 150 S. We limit the comparison to three continental mantle depths (50, 100 and 150 km), where model resolution is relatively high. The available data set does not indicate that, at a global scale, seismic anomalies in the upper mantle are controlled solely by temperature variations. Continental maps have correlation coefficients of <0.56 between VS and T and of <0.47 between QS and T at any depth. Such low correlation coefficients can partially be attributed to modelling arrefacts; however, they also suggest that not all of the VS and QS anomalies in the continental upper mantle can be explained by T variations. Global maps show that, by the sign of the anomaly, VS and QS usually inversely correlate with lithospheric temperatures: most cratonic regions show high VS and QS and low T, while most active regions have seismic and thermal anomalies of the opposite sign. The strongest inverse correlation is found at a depth of 100 km, where the attenuation model is best resolved. Significantly, at this depth, the contours of near-zero QS anomalies approximately correspond to the 1000 ??C isotherm, in agreement with laboratory measurements that show a pronounced increase in seismic attenuation in upper mantle rocks at 1000-1100 ??C. East-west profiles of VS, QS and T where continental data coverage is best (50??N latitude for North America and 60??N latitude for Eurasia) further demonstrate that temperature plays a dominant, but non-unique, role in

  2. Sediment and Crustal Shear Velocity Structure offshore New Zealand from Seafloor Compliance, Receiver Functions and Rayleigh Wave Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, J. S.; Sheehan, A. F.; Stachnik, J. C.; Lin, F.; Collins, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    We have developed a joint Monte Carlo inversion of teleseismic receiver functions, seafloor compliance, and Rayleigh wave dispersion and apply it here to ocean bottom seismic (OBS) data from offshore New Zealand. With this method we estimate sediment and crustal thickness and shear velocity structure beneath the Bounty Trough and the Tasman Sea flanking the South Island of New Zealand. Teleseismic receiver functions and surface wave dispersion measurements provide complementary constraints on shear velocity structure and interface depths beneath seismic stations. At ocean bottom seismic (OBS) stations the interpretation of these measurements is complicated by strong sediment reverberations that obscure deeper impedance contrasts such as the Moho. In principle, the seafloor's response to ocean loading from infragravity waves (seafloor compliance) can be used to determine shallow shear velocity information. This velocity information can subsequently be used to better model the receiver function reverberations, allowing deeper interfaces of tectonic interest to be resolved. Data for this study were acquired in 2009-2010 by the Marine Observations of Anisotropy Near Aotearoa (MOANA) experiment, which deployed 30 broadband OBS and differential pressure gauges (DPGs) off the South Island of New Zealand. High-frequency (5Hz) receiver functions were estimated using multitaper cross-correlation for events in a 30-90 degree epicentral distance range. Coherence-weighted stacks binned by epicentral distance were produced in the frequency domain to suppress noise. Seafloor compliance was measured using multitaper pressure and acceleration spectra averaged from 120 days of continuous data without large transient events. Seafloor compliance measurements on the order of 10-9 Pa-1 are sensitive to shear velocity structure in the uppermost 5km of the crust and sediments. Rayleigh dispersion measurements were obtained at periods of 6-27s from ambient noise cross correlation. Sediment

  3. Investigation of Ultrasound-Measured Flow Velocity, Flow Rate and Wall Shear Rate in Radial and Ulnar Arteries Using Simulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaowei; Xia, Chunming; Stephen, Gandy; Khan, Faisel; Corner, George A; Hoskins, Peter R; Huang, Zhihong

    2017-02-21

    Parameters of blood flow measured by ultrasound in radial and ulnar arteries, such as flow velocity, flow rate and wall shear rate, are widely used in clinical practice and clinical research. Investigation of these measurements is useful for evaluating accuracy and providing knowledge of error sources. A method for simulating the spectral Doppler ultrasound measurement process was developed with computational fluid dynamics providing flow-field data. Specific scanning factors were adjusted to investigate their influence on estimation of the maximum velocity waveform, and flow rate and wall shear rate were derived using the Womersley equation. The overestimation in maximum velocity increases greatly (peak systolic from about 10% to 30%, time-averaged from about 30% to 50%) when the beam-vessel angle is changed from 30° to 70°. The Womersley equation was able to estimate flow rate in both arteries with less than 3% error, but performed better in the radial artery (2.3% overestimation) than the ulnar artery (15.4% underestimation) in estimating wall shear rate. It is concluded that measurements of flow parameters in the radial and ulnar arteries with clinical ultrasound scanners are prone to clinically significant errors.

  4. Variation of Crustal Shear Velocity Structure Along the Eastern Lau Back-Arc Spreading Center Constrained By Seafloor Compliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Y.; Webb, S. C.; Dunn, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    Measurements of seafloor compliance, the deformation under long period (typically 30-300 s) ocean wave forcing, are primarily sensitive to crustal shear velocity structure. We analyze seafloor compliance from data collected from a subset of 50 broadband Ocean Bottom Seismographs (OBS) deployed at the Eastern Lau spreading center (ELSC) from 2009 to 2010. The ELSC is a 400-km-long back-arc spreading center lying closely to the Tonga subduction trench in the southwestern Pacific. Seafloor morphology, crustal seismic structure and lava composition data show rapid variations along the ridge as the ridge migrates away from the volcanic arc front to the north, indicating a decreasing influence of the subducting slab. We calculate seafloor compliance functions by taking the spectral transfer function between the vertical displacement and pressure signal recorded by the 4-component OBSs, which are equipped with differential pressure gauges (DPGs). In the ridge perpendicular direction, compliance amplitude vary by more than an order of magnitude from the ridge crest to older seafloor covered by sediment. Along the spreading ridge, compliance measured from on-axis sites increases southwards, indicative of a decrease in the upper crustal shear velocity possibly due to increasing porosity and a thickening extrusive layer [Jacobs et al., 2007; Dunn et al., 2013]. We apply a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method to invert the compliance functions for crustal shear velocities at various locations along the ELSC.

  5. On the Derivation of a High-Velocity Tail from the Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck Equation for Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acedo, L.; Santos, A.; Bobylev, A. V.

    2002-12-01

    Uniform shear flow is a paradigmatic example of a nonequilibrium fluid state exhibiting non-Newtonian behavior. It is characterized by uniform density and temperature and a linear velocity profile U x ( y)= ay, where a is the constant shear rate. In the case of a rarefied gas, all the relevant physical information is represented by the one-particle velocity distribution function f( r, v)= f( V), with V≡ v- U( r), which satisfies the standard nonlinear integro-differential Boltzmann equation. We have studied this state for a two-dimensional gas of Maxwell molecules with a collision rate K( θ)∝lim ∈→0 ∈ -2 δ( θ- ∈), where θ is the scattering angle, in which case the nonlinear Boltzmann collision operator reduces to a Fokker-Planck operator. We have found analytically that for shear rates larger than a certain threshold value a th≃0.3520 ν (where ν is an average collision frequency and a th/ ν is the real root of the cubic equation 64 x 3+16 x 2+12 x-9=0) the velocity distribution function exhibits an algebraic high-velocity tail of the form f( V; a)˜| V|-4- σ( a) Φ( ϕ; a), where ϕ≡tan V y / V x and the angular distribution function Φ( ϕ; a) is the solution of a modified Mathieu equation. The enforcement of the periodicity condition Φ( ϕ; a)= Φ( ϕ+ π; a) allows one to obtain the exponent σ( a) as a function of the shear rate. It diverges when a→ a th and tends to a minimum value σ min≃1.252 in the limit a→∞. As a consequence of this power-law decay for a> a th, all the velocity moments of a degree equal to or larger than 2+ σ( a) are divergent. In the high-velocity domain the velocity distribution is highly anisotropic, with the angular distribution sharply concentrated around a preferred orientation angle ~ϕ( a), which rotates from ~ϕ=- π/4,3 π/4 when a→ a th to ~ϕ=0, π in the limit a→∞.

  6. Shear Wave Velocity Structure of Southern African Crust: Evidence for Compositional Heterogeneity within Archaean and Proterozoic Terrains

    SciTech Connect

    Kgaswane, E M; Nyblade, A A; Julia, J; Dirks, P H H M; Durrheim, R J; Pasyanos, M E

    2008-11-11

    Crustal structure in southern Africa has been investigated by jointly inverting receiver functions and Rayleigh wave group velocities for 89 broadband seismic stations spanning much of the Precambrian shield of southern Africa. 1-D shear wave velocity profiles obtained from the inversion yield Moho depths that are similar to those reported in previous studies and show considerable variability in the shear wave velocity structure of the lower part of the crust between some terrains. For many of the Archaean and Proterozoic terrains in the shield, S velocities reach 4.0 km/s or higher over a substantial part of the lower crust. However, for most of the Kimberley terrain and adjacent parts of the Kheis Province and Witwatersrand terrain, as well as for the western part of the Tokwe terrain, mean shear wave velocities of {le} 3.9 km/s characterize the lower part of the crust along with slightly ({approx}5 km) thinner crust. These findings indicate that the lower crust across much of the shield has a predominantly mafic composition, except for the southwest portion of the Kaapvaal Craton and western portion of the Zimbabwe Craton, where the lower crust is intermediate-to-felsic in composition. The parts of the Kaapvaal Craton underlain by intermediate-to-felsic lower crust coincide with regions where Ventersdorp rocks have been preserved, and thus we suggest that the intermediate-to-felsic composition of the lower crust and the shallower Moho may have resulted from crustal melting during the Ventersdorp tectonomagmatic event at c. 2.7 Ga and concomitant crustal thinning caused by rifting.

  7. Determination of the full elastic moduli of single crystals using shear-wave velocities by Brillouin spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, D.; Mao, Z.; Lin, J.; Yang, J.

    2013-12-01

    Brillouin light scattering (BLS) is the inelastic scattering of monochromatic laser light by phonons in the GHz frequency range [1]. BLS spectroscopy can be used to measure sound velocities traveling along certain directions of a single crystal through the frequency shifts of the scattered light from the acoustic phonons [1]. Over the past few decades, BLS spectroscopy has been widely used to measure the velocities of acoustic waves for a wide range of Earth's materials, in which the full elastic constants were derived from the measured compressional (VP) and shear wave (VS) velocities. However, the VP velocities of minerals normally overlap with the shear-wave velocities of diamonds in Brillouin measurements approximately above 25 GPa [2-5] such that only VS of minerals can be measured experimentally. Theoretical models have showed that the shear-wave velocities of minerals also carry necessary information to invert the full elastic tensors [2], although previous studies at high pressures have focused on measuring velocities within the principle planes of the crystals. This leads to a strong trade-off among individual Cij, preventing the derivation of the full elastic tensors from the VS velocities alone [3-5]. In this study, we have come up with an elastic model to overcome this problem by finding a suitable crystallographic plane that has optimized VS-VP interactions in the elastic tensors. Using MgO, spinel and zoisite as test samples, we have used measured VP/VS or VS velocities of these crystals using BLS spectroscopy to derive their full elastic tensors. This new approach sheds lights on future high-pressure elasticity studies relevant to materials the Earth's deep interior. 1. Sinogeikin, S.V., Bass, J.D., Phys. Earth Planet. Inter., 120, 43 (2000). 2. Every, A. G., Phys. Rev. B., 22, 1746, (1980) 3. Marquardt, H., Speziale, S., Reichmann, H.J., Frost, D.J., and Schilling, F.R., Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 287, 345 (2009). 4. Marquardt, H., Speziale, S

  8. Shear velocity model for the westernmost Mediterranean from ambient noise and ballistic finite-frequency Rayleigh wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palomeras, I.; Villasenor, A.; Thurner, S.; Levander, A.; Gallart, J.; Harnafi, M.

    2014-12-01

    The westernmost Mediterranean comprises the Iberian Peninsula and Morocco, separated by the Alboran Sea and the Algerian Basin. From north to south this region consists of the Pyrenees, resulting from Iberia-Eurasia collision; the Iberian Massif, which has been undeformed since the end of the Paleozoic; the Central System and Iberian Chain, regions with intracontinental Oligocene-Miocene deformation; the Gibraltar Arc (Betics, Rif and Alboran terranes), resulting from post-Oligocene subduction roll-back; and the Atlas Mountains. We analyzed data from recent broad-band array deployments and permanent stations in the area (IberArray and Siberia arrays, the PICASSO array, the University of Munster array, and the Spanish, Portuguese and Moroccan National Networks) to characterize its lithospheric structure. The combined array of 350 stations has an average interstation spacing of ~60 km. We calculated the Rayleigh waves phase velocities from ambient noise (periods 4 to 40 s) and teleseismic events (periods 20 to 167 s). We inverted the phase velocities to obtain a shear velocity model for the lithosphere to ~200 km depth. Our results correlate well with the surface expression of the main structural units with higher crustal velocity for the Iberian Massif than for the Alpine Iberia and Atlas Mountains. The Gibraltar Arc has lower crustal shear velocities than the regional average at all crustal depths. It also shows an arc shaped anomaly with high upper mantle velocities (>4.6 km/s) at shallow depths (<65 km) interpreted as the subducting Alboran slab. The hanging slab is depressing the crust of the Gibraltar arc to ~55 km depth, as seen in receiver function data and active source seismic profiles. Low upper mantle velocities (<4.2 km/s) are observed beneath the Atlas, the northeastern end of the Betic Mountains and the Late Cenozoic volcanic fields in Iberia and Morocco, indicative of high temperatures at relatively shallow depths, and suggesting that the lithosphere

  9. A 3-D shear velocity model of the southern North American and Caribbean plates from ambient noise and earthquake tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaite, B.; Villaseñor, A.; Iglesias, A.; Herraiz, M.; Jiménez-Munt, I.

    2015-02-01

    We use group velocities from earthquake tomography together with group and phase velocities from ambient noise tomography (ANT) of Rayleigh waves to invert for the 3-D shear-wave velocity structure (5-70 km) of the Caribbean (CAR) and southern North American (NAM) plates. The lithospheric model proposed offers a complete image of the crust and uppermost-mantle with imprints of the tectonic evolution. One of the most striking features inferred is the main role of the Ouachita-Marathon-Sonora orogeny front on the crustal seismic structure of the NAM plate. A new imaged feature is the low crustal velocities along the USA-Mexico border. The model also shows a break of the east-west mantle velocity dichotomy of the NAM and CAR plates beneath the Isthmus of the Tehuantepec and the Yucatan Block. High upper-mantle velocities along the Mesoamerican Subduction Zone coincide with inactive volcanic areas while the lowest velocities correspond to active volcanic arcs and thin lithospheric mantle regions.

  10. Compositional layering within the large low shear-wave velocity provinces (LLSVPs) in the lower mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballmer, M. D.; Lekic, V.; Thomas, C.; Schumacher, L.; Ito, G.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic tomography reveals two antipodal LLSVPs in the Earth's mantle, each extending from the core-mantle boundary (CMB) up to ~1000 km depth. The LLSVPs are thought to host primitive mantle materials that bear witness of early-Earth processes, and/or subducted basalt that has cumulated in the mantle over billions of years. A compositional distinction between the LLSVPs and the ambient mantle is supported by anti-correlation of bulk-sound and shear-wave velocity (Vs) anomalies as well as abrupt lateralgradients in Vs along LLSVP margins. Both of these observations, however, are mainly restricted to the LLSVP bottom domains (2300~2900 km depth). Comparison of seismic observations with mineral-physics data suggests that these bottom domains are more likely to be composed of primitive mantle than of basaltic material. On the other hand, the seismic signature of the LLSVP shallow domains (1000~2300 km depth) is consistent with a basaltic composition, though a purely thermal origin cannot be ruled out. Here, we explore the dynamical, seismological, and geochemical implications of the hypothesis that the LLSVPs are compositionally layered with a primitive bottom domain and a basaltic shallow domain (see Fig.). We test this hypothesis using 2D thermochemical mantle-convection models. Depending on the density difference between primitive and basaltic materials, the materials either mix or remain separate as they join to form thermochemical piles in the deep mantle. Separation of both materials within the piles provides an explanation for LLSVP seismic properties, including substantial internal vertical gradients in Vs observed at 400-700 km height above the CMB. Geodynamic models predict short-lived "secondary" plumelets to rise from the roofs of these compositionally layered piles while entraining basaltic material that has evolved in the lower mantle. Long-lived "primary" plumes rise from LLSVP margins and entrain a mix of materials, including small fractions of

  11. Frictional Behavior of Amphibolite at Seismic Slip Rates from High-velocity Rotary Shear Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, S.; Ree, J.; Hirose, T.; Lee, S.

    2012-12-01

    Gabbroic rocks of oceanic crust transform into amphibolite with depth at subduction zone, and thus frictional property of amphibolite may be important for a better understanding of subduction zone earthquakes. We report preliminary results of high-velocity rotary shear experiments on amphibolite at a seismic slip rate (~1.05 m/s) and normal stresses of 2-15 MPa. Amphibolite from the Imjingang belt of South Korea is composed of hornblende (0.5-1.5 mm) and plagioclase (0.25-0.5 mm) with rare occurrence of quartz. The frictional behavior of the amphibolite is characterized by two phases of unstable slip weakening separated by strengthening, followed by a final weakening with a very low steady-state friction coefficient of 0.07. The average coefficient of the first, second and final peak frictions is 0.48, 0.36 and 0.22, respectively. The fault zone consists of a principal slip zone (PSZ, 200-300 μm thick) with molten material mantled by damage zone (1-3 mm thick). In the damage zone, the color of hornblende grains becomes darker toward the PSZ and thin, black stripes occur along cleavage planes of hornblende in plane-polarized light. Also fracture density of hornblende and plagioclase increases relative to those of wall rock. The PSZ comprises molten material and mineral clasts (25-50 μm) and the clasts tend to concentrate along the center of the PSZ. The surface temperature of the fault zones measured by a radiation thermography during experiments is about 1060°C and the internal temperature of the fault zones could be higher than the measured temperature in view of the melting of hornblende and plagioclase. The frictional behavior of amphibolite is much different from that of gabbro where the overall friction is much higher with the final peak friction of 0.84-1.09 and steady-state friction of ~0.6 (Hirose and Shimamoto, 2005 in Journal of Geophysical Research). This difference may be due to dehydration of hornblende by frictional heating and lower viscosity of

  12. Compositional layering within the large low shear-wave velocity provinces (LLSVPs) in the lower mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballmer, Maxim; Lekic, Vedran; Schumacher, Lina; Ito, Garrett; Thomas, Christine

    2016-04-01

    Seismic tomography reveals two antipodal LLSVPs in the Earth's mantle, each extending from the core-mantle boundary (CMB) up to ~1000 km depth. The LLSVPs are thought to host primordial mantle materials that bear witness of early-Earth processes, and/or subducted basalt that has accumulated in the mantle over billions of years. A compositional distinction between the LLSVPs and the ambient mantle is supported by anti-correlation of bulk-sound and shear-wave velocity (Vs) anomalies as well as abrupt lateral gradients in Vs along LLSVP margins. Both of these observations, however, are mainly restricted to the LLSVP bottom domains (2300~2900 km depth), or hereinafter referred to as "deep distinct domains" (DDD). Seismic sensitivity calculations suggest that DDDs are more likely to be composed of primordial mantle material than of basaltic material. On the other hand, the seismic signature of LLSVP shallow domains (1000~2300 km depth) is consistent with a basaltic composition, though a purely thermal origin cannot be ruled out. Here, we explore the dynamical, seismological, and geochemical implications of the hypothesis that the LLSVPs are compositionally layered with a primordial bottom domain (or DDD) and a basaltic shallow domain. We test this hypothesis using 2D thermochemical mantle-convection models. Depending on the density difference between primordial and basaltic materials, the materials either mix or remain separate as they join to form thermochemical piles in the deep mantle. Separation of both materials within these piles provides an explanation for LLSVP seismic properties, including substantial internal vertical gradients in Vs observed at 400-700 km height above the CMB, as well as out-of-plane reflections on LLSVP sides over a range of depths. Predicted geometry of thermochemical piles is compared to LLSVP and DDD shapes as constrained by seismic cluster analysis. Geodynamic models predict short-lived "secondary" plumelets to rise from LLSVP roofs and

  13. FULLY CONVECTIVE MAGNETO-ROTATIONAL TURBULENCE IN LARGE ASPECT-RATIO SHEARING BOXES

    SciTech Connect

    Bodo, G.; Rossi, P.; Cattaneo, F.; Mignone, A.

    2015-01-20

    We present a numerical study of turbulence and dynamo action in stratified shearing boxes with both finite and zero net magnetic flux. We assume that the fluid obeys the perfect gas law and has finite thermal diffusivity. The latter is chosen to be small enough so that vigorous convective states develop. The properties of these convective solutions are analyzed as the aspect ratio of the computational domain is varied and as the value of the mean field is increased. For the cases with zero net flux, we find that a well-defined converged state is obtained for large enough aspect ratios. In the converged state, the dynamo can be extremely efficient and can generate substantial toroidal flux. We identify solutions in which the toroidal field is mostly symmetric about the mid-plane and solutions in which it is mostly anti-symmetric. The symmetric solutions are found to be more efficient at transporting angular momentum and can give rise to a luminosity that is up to an order of magnitude larger than the corresponding value for the anti-symmetric states. In the cases with a finite net flux, the system appears to spend most of the time in the symmetric states.

  14. Shear wave velocity structure of the lower crust in southern Africa: Evidence for compositional heterogeneity within Archaean and Proterozoic terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kgaswane, Eldridge M.; Nyblade, Andrew A.; Juliã, Jordi; Dirks, Paul H. G. M.; Durrheim, Raymond J.; Pasyanos, Michael E.

    2009-12-01

    The nature of the lower crust across the southern African shield has been investigated by jointly inverting receiver functions and Rayleigh wave group velocities for 89 broadband seismic stations located in Botswana, South Africa and Zimbabwe. For large parts of both Archaean and Proterozoic terrains, the velocity models obtained from the inversions show shear wave velocities ≥4.0 km/s below ˜20-30 km depth, indicating a predominantly mafic lower crust. However, for much of the Kimberley terrain and adjacent parts of the Kheis Province and Witwatersrand terrain in South Africa, as well as for the western part of the Tokwe terrain in Zimbabwe, shear wave velocities of ≤3.9 km/s are found below ˜20-30 km depth, indicating an intermediate-to-felsic lower crust. The areas of intermediate-to-felsic lower crust in South Africa coincide with regions where Ventersdorp rocks have been preserved, suggesting that the more evolved composition of the lower crust may have resulted from crustal reworking and extension during the Ventersdorp tectonomagmatic event at c. 2.7 Ga.

  15. First principles study of the C/Si ratio effect on the ideal shear strength of β-SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Wen; Li, Yingying; Nie, Chu; Xiao, Wei; Yan, Liqin

    2016-07-01

    The effect of the C/Si atomic ratio on the ideal shear strength of β-SiC is investigated with first principles calculations. β -SiC samples with different C/Si ratios are generated by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations with empirical inter-atomic SiC potential. Each SiC sample is sheared along the < 100> direction and the stress-strain curve is calculated from first principles. The results show that the ideal shear strength of SiC decreases with the increase of C/Si ratio. For a non-stoichiometric SiC sample, a C-C bond inside a large carbon cluster breaks first under shear strain condition due to the internal strain around the carbon clusters. Because the band gap is narrowed under shear strain conditions, a local maximum stress appears in the elastic region of the stress-strain curve for each SiC sample at certain strain condition. The yield strength may increase with the increase of C/Si ratio.

  16. GAS EXCITATION IN ULIRGs: MAPS OF DIAGNOSTIC EMISSION-LINE RATIOS IN SPACE AND VELOCITY

    SciTech Connect

    Soto, Kurt T.; Martin, Crystal L.

    2012-11-15

    Emission-line spectra extracted at multiple locations across 39 ultraluminous infrared galaxies have been compiled into a spectrophotometric atlas. Line profiles of H{alpha}, [N II], [S II], [O I], H{beta}, and [O III] are resolved and fit jointly with common velocity components. Diagnostic ratios of these line fluxes are presented in a series of plots, showing how the Doppler shift, line width, gas excitation, and surface brightness change with velocity at fixed position and also with distance from the nucleus. One general characteristic of these spectra is the presence of shocked gas extending many kiloparsecs from the nucleus. In some systems, the rotation curves of the emitting gas indicate motions that suggest gas disks, which are most frequent at early merger stages. At these early merger stages, the emission line ratios indicate the presence of shocked gas, which may be triggered by the merger event. We also report the general characteristics of the integrated spectra.

  17. Aeolian Shear Stress Ratio Measurements within Mesquite-Dominated Landscapes of the Chihuahuan Desert, New Mexico, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, James; Nickling, W. G.; Gilliles, J. A.

    2006-01-01

    A field study was conducted to ascertain the amount of protection that mesquite-dominated communities provide to the surface from wind erosion. The dynamics of the locally accelerated evolution of a mesquite/coppice dune landscape and the undetermined spatial dependence of potential erosion by wind from a shear stress partition model were investigated. Sediment transport and dust emission processes are governed by the amount of protection that can be provided by roughness elements. Although shear stress partition models exist that can describe this, their accuracy has only been tested against a limited dataset because instrumentation has previously been unable to provide the necessary measurements. This study combines the use of meteorological towers and surface shear stress measurements with Irwin sensors to measure the partition of shear stress in situ. The surface shear stress within preferentially aligned vegetation (within coppice dune development) exhibited highly skewed distributions, while a more homogenous surface stress was recorded at a site with less developed coppice dunes. Above the vegetation, the logarithmic velocity profile deduced roughness length (based on 10-min averages) exhibited a distinct correlation with compass direction for the site with vegetation preferentially aligned, while the site with more homogenously distributed vegetation showed very little variation in the roughness length. This distribution in roughness length within an area, defines a distribution of a resolved shear stress partitioning model based on these measurements, ultimately providing potential closure to a previously uncorrelated model parameter.

  18. Signal-to-noise ratio, contrast-to-noise ratio and their trade-offs with resolution in axial-shear strain elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thitaikumar, Arun; Krouskop, Thomas A.; Ophir, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    In axial-shear strain elastography, the local axial-shear strain resulting from the application of quasi-static axial compression to an inhomogeneous material is imaged. In this paper, we investigated the image quality of the axial-shear strain estimates in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNRasse) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNRasse) using simulations and experiments. Specifically, we investigated the influence of the system parameters (beamwidth, transducer element pitch and bandwidth), signal processing parameters (correlation window length and axial window shift) and mechanical parameters (Young's modulus contrast, applied axial strain) on the SNRasse and CNRasse. The results of the study show that the CNRasse (SNRasse) is maximum for axial-shear strain values in the range of 0.005-0.03. For the inclusion/background modulus contrast range considered in this study (<10), the CNRasse (SNRasse) is maximum for applied axial compressive strain values in the range of 0.005%-0.03%. This suggests that the RF data acquired during axial elastography can be used to obtain axial-shear strain elastograms, since this range is typically used in axial elastography as well. The CNRasse (SNRasse) remains almost constant with an increase in the beamwidth while it increases as the pitch increases. As expected, the axial shift had only a weak influence on the CNRasse (SNRasse) of the axial-shear strain estimates. We observed that the differential estimates of the axial-shear strain involve a trade-off between the CNRasse (SNRasse) and the spatial resolution only with respect to pitch and not with respect to signal processing parameters. Simulation studies were performed to confirm such an observation. The results demonstrate a trade-off between CNRasse and the resolution with respect to pitch.

  19. Signal-to-noise ratio, contrast-to-noise ratio and their trade-offs with resolution in axial-shear strain elastography.

    PubMed

    Thitaikumar, Arun; Krouskop, Thomas A; Ophir, Jonathan

    2007-01-07

    In axial-shear strain elastography, the local axial-shear strain resulting from the application of quasi-static axial compression to an inhomogeneous material is imaged. In this paper, we investigated the image quality of the axial-shear strain estimates in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR(asse)) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR(asse)) using simulations and experiments. Specifically, we investigated the influence of the system parameters (beamwidth, transducer element pitch and bandwidth), signal processing parameters (correlation window length and axial window shift) and mechanical parameters (Young's modulus contrast, applied axial strain) on the SNR(asse) and CNR(asse). The results of the study show that the CNR(asse) (SNR(asse)) is maximum for axial-shear strain values in the range of 0.005-0.03. For the inclusion/background modulus contrast range considered in this study (<10), the CNR(asse) (SNR(asse)) is maximum for applied axial compressive strain values in the range of 0.005%-0.03%. This suggests that the RF data acquired during axial elastography can be used to obtain axial-shear strain elastograms, since this range is typically used in axial elastography as well. The CNR(asse) (SNR(asse)) remains almost constant with an increase in the beamwidth while it increases as the pitch increases. As expected, the axial shift had only a weak influence on the CNR(asse) (SNR(asse)) of the axial-shear strain estimates. We observed that the differential estimates of the axial-shear strain involve a trade-off between the CNR(asse) (SNR(asse)) and the spatial resolution only with respect to pitch and not with respect to signal processing parameters. Simulation studies were performed to confirm such an observation. The results demonstrate a trade-off between CNR(asse) and the resolution with respect to pitch.

  20. Sperm dilution ratio affects post-thaw motility rate and velocity of Prochilodus lineatus (Characiformes) sperm.

    PubMed

    Viveiros, Ana T M; Leal, Marcelo C

    2016-10-01

    There is a lack of standardization in sperm cryopreservation of aquatic organisms and, thus, a necessity of more accurate investigations in all steps of this process. In this study, the effects of sperm dilution ratio on post-thaw sperm quality of Prochilodus lineatus were evaluated. Sperm was diluted in a standard freezing medium (glucose and methyl glycol) at four different ratios (sperm to final volume = 1:5, 1:10, 1:50 or 1:100), frozen in a nitrogen vapour vessel at -170°C and then stored in liquid nitrogen vessel at -196°C. Post-thaw motility rate and velocities (curvilinear = VCL; average path = VAP; straight line = VSL) were determined using a Computer-Assisted Sperm Analyzer (CASA) at 10 and 40 s post-activation. The highest motility rates were observed when sperm was frozen at a ratio of 1:5 (76%) and 1:10 (75%). The highest VCL (225 μm/s) and VAP (203 μm/s) were observed at a ratio of 1:10, while VSL was similar among samples frozen at 1:5, 1:10 and 1:50 (97-124 μm/s). When those parameters were evaluated again 30 s later, motility decreased significantly in samples frozen at a ratio of 1:5 (57%) and 1:10 (61%), while velocities decreased significantly in all samples regardless of dilution ratio (75-85 μm/s of VCL, 38-53 μm/s of VAP and 25-39 μm/s of VSL). P. lineatus sperm should be frozen at a ratio of 1:10, where both the number of loaded sperm per straw and the post-thaw quality are maximized.

  1. Electrostatic drift-wave instability in a nonuniform quantum magnetoplasma with parallel velocity shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Tariq, Sabeen; Mirza, Arshad M.; Masood, W.

    2010-10-15

    The propagation of high and low frequency (in comparison with the cyclotron frequency) electrostatic drift-waves is investigated in a nonuniform, dense magnetoplasma (composed of electrons and ions), in the presence of parallel shear flow, by employing the quantum magnetohydrodynamic (QMHD) model. Using QMHD model, a new set of equations is presented in order to investigate linear properties of electrostatic drift-waves with sheared plasma flows for dense plasmas. In this regard, dispersion relations for coupled electron-thermal and drift-ion acoustic modes are derived and several interesting limiting cases are discussed. For instance, it is found that sheared ion flow parallel to the external magnetic field can drive the quantum drift-ion acoustic wave unstable, etc. The present investigation may have relevance in dense astrophysical environments where quantum effects are significant.

  2. The shear wave velocity of the upper mantle beneath the Bay of Bengal, Northeast Indian Ocean from interstation phase velocities of surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, S. N.; Mitra, Supriyo; Suresh, G.

    2013-06-01

    The Bay of Bengal evolved along the eastern margin of the Indian subcontinent about 130 Ma with the breakup of India from eastern Gondwanaland. Since then the Indian lithospheric Plate has moved northward, along with the Bay of Bengal, and eventually collided with the Eurasian Plate. The age of the lithosphere beneath the central Bay of Bengal is ˜110 Ma. We evaluate the shear wave velocity structure of the upper mantle beneath the central Bay through inversion of phase velocities of fundamental mode Rayleigh and Love waves along two wave paths: (i) between Port Blair (PBA) and VIS (Visakhapatnam) and (ii) between DGPR (Diglipur) and VIS. The seismological observatories PBA and DGPR are located on the Andaman Island and to the east of the Bay and the observatory at VIS in located on the eastern coast of India to the west of the Bay. Using broad-band records of earthquakes, which lie along the great circle arc joining each pair of observatories, we obtain phase velocities between 20 and 240 s periods for Rayleigh waves and between 23 and 170 s for Love waves. These phase velocities are inverted to find the S-wave velocity structure of the upper mantle down to 400 km. The crustal structure is based on previous studies of the Bay and kept fixed in the inversion. We obtain a radially anisotropic upper-mantle structure, where the SH-wave velocity (VSH) is greater than the SV-wave velocity (VSV) down to 400 km. The S-wave velocity decreases sharply by ˜4.5 per cent for VSV and ˜1.5 per cent for VSH at a depth 110 km, which is considered as the Lithosphere-Asthenosphere boundary (LAB), that is, the bottom of the mantle lid. Based on recent studies, such sharp fall of S-wave velocity below the mantle lid appears to indicate a partially molten thin layer (G-discontinuity) at this depth. The thickness of the mantle lid is intermediate between oceanic and continental regions. The lid is also characterized

  3. Study of the dynamic behavior of earthflows through the analysis of shear wave velocity in the landslide's body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertello, Lara

    2015-04-01

    Over the first year of my PhD, I carried out a literature search about earthflows features and dynamics and conducted periodic ReMi-MASW campaigns to assess the temporal variation of shear velocity for several landslides that were recently reactivated. Literature search was conducted to review recent works related to shear wave velocity as an indicator for rheological changes in clay materials (Mainsant et al., 2012). From January to August 2014 I carried out numerous ReMi-MASW surveys to characterize several active earthflows in the Emilia-Romagna Apennines. I did these measures both inside and outside the landslide's bodies, usually during the first ten days after the reactivation. At first, these measures indicate low shear waves velocity inside the landslide and high velocity outside. This is due to the different consistence of the materials, to the different water content and to the void index. Then I repeated the measures over time in the same places on the same landslide, in order to detect the variability of Vs over time in correlations with the landslide's movements. Periodic ReMi-MASW survey were conducted on the following landslides: • The Montevecchio (FC) earthflow was reactivated the 1th of February 2014 (estimated volume of 240.000 m³) and increased the movement's velocity around the 7th of February 2014, after intense precipitations. Analyzing the data collected inside the landslide's body, I observed an increase of Vs over time, due to the decrease of landslide velocity; • The Silla (BO) complex landslide reactivated the 10th of February 2014 (estimated volume of 900.000 m³), and moved downslope with a maximum velocity in the order of several m/hour. Studying the data, it is possible to notice how the Vs increase over time only in the lower portion of the landslide. In fact the upper portion is still active, so the Vs remained unchanged over time. • the Puzzola-Grizzana Morandi (BO) complex landslide. This landslide was reactivated the 10th

  4. Factors governing hole expansion ratio of steel sheets with smooth sheared edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jae Ik; Jung, Jaimyun; Lee, Hak Hyeon; Kim, Gyo-Sung; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2016-11-01

    Stretch-flangeability measured using hole expansion test (HET) represents the ability of a material to form into a complex shaped component. Despite its importance in automotive applications of advanced high strength steels, stretch-flangeability is a less known sheet metal forming property. In this paper, we investigate the factors governing hole expansion ratio (HER) by means of tensile test and HET. We correlate a wide range of tensile properties with HERs of steel sheet specimens because the stress state in the hole edge region during the HET is almost the same as that of the uniaxial tensile test. In order to evaluate an intrinsic HER of steel sheet specimens, the initial hole of the HET specimen is produced using a milling process after punching, which can remove accumulated shearing damage and micro-void in the hole edge region that is present when using the standard HER evaluation method. It was found that the intrinsic HER of steel sheet specimens was proportional to the strain rate sensitivity exponent and post uniform elongation.

  5. Pressure tensor in the presence of velocity shear: Stationary solutions and self-consistent equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Cerri, S. S.; Pegoraro, F.; Califano, F.; Jenko, F.

    2014-11-15

    Observations and numerical simulations of laboratory and space plasmas in almost collisionless regimes reveal anisotropic and non-gyrotropic particle distribution functions. We investigate how such states can persist in the presence of a sheared flow. We focus our attention on the pressure tensor equation in a magnetized plasma and derive analytical self-consistent plasma equilibria which exhibit a novel asymmetry with respect to the magnetic field direction. These results are relevant for investigating, within fluid models that retain the full pressure tensor dynamics, plasma configurations where a background shear flow is present.

  6. Feasibility of waveform inversion of Rayleigh waves for shallow shear-wave velocity using a genetic algorithm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zeng, C.; Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Tsoflias, G.P.

    2011-01-01

    Conventional surface wave inversion for shallow shear (S)-wave velocity relies on the generation of dispersion curves of Rayleigh waves. This constrains the method to only laterally homogeneous (or very smooth laterally heterogeneous) earth models. Waveform inversion directly fits waveforms on seismograms, hence, does not have such a limitation. Waveforms of Rayleigh waves are highly related to S-wave velocities. By inverting the waveforms of Rayleigh waves on a near-surface seismogram, shallow S-wave velocities can be estimated for earth models with strong lateral heterogeneity. We employ genetic algorithm (GA) to perform waveform inversion of Rayleigh waves for S-wave velocities. The forward problem is solved by finite-difference modeling in the time domain. The model space is updated by generating offspring models using GA. Final solutions can be found through an iterative waveform-fitting scheme. Inversions based on synthetic records show that the S-wave velocities can be recovered successfully with errors no more than 10% for several typical near-surface earth models. For layered earth models, the proposed method can generate one-dimensional S-wave velocity profiles without the knowledge of initial models. For earth models containing lateral heterogeneity in which case conventional dispersion-curve-based inversion methods are challenging, it is feasible to produce high-resolution S-wave velocity sections by GA waveform inversion with appropriate priori information. The synthetic tests indicate that the GA waveform inversion of Rayleigh waves has the great potential for shallow S-wave velocity imaging with the existence of strong lateral heterogeneity. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  7. The Maryland Centrifugal Experiment (MCX): Centrifugal Confinement and Velocity Shear Stabilization of Plasmas in Shaped Open Magnetic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hassam, Adil; Ellis, Richard F.

    2012-01-01

    The Maryland Centrifugal Experiment (MCX) Project has investigated the concepts of centrifugal plasma confinement and stabilization of instabilities by velocity shear. The basic requirement is supersonic plasma rotation about a shaped, open magnetic field. Overall, the MCX Project attained three primary goals that were set out at the start of the project. First, supersonic rotation at Mach number upto 2.5 was obtained. Second, turbulence from flute interchange modes was found considerably reduced from conventional. Third, plasma pressure was contained along the field, as evidenced by density drops of x10 from the center to the mirror throats.

  8. Competing mechanisms of plasma transport in inhomogeneous configurations with velocity shear: the solar-wind interaction with earth's magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Faganello, M; Califano, F; Pegoraro, F

    2008-01-11

    Two-dimensional simulations of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in an inhomogeneous compressible plasma with a density gradient show that, in a transverse magnetic field configuration, the vortex pairing process and the Rayleigh-Taylor secondary instability compete during the nonlinear evolution of the vortices. Two different regimes exist depending on the value of the density jump across the velocity shear layer. These regimes have different physical signatures that can be crucial for the interpretation of satellite data of the interaction of the solar wind with the magnetospheric plasma.

  9. Shear wave velocity structure in North America from large-scale waveform inversions of surface waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alsina, D.; Woodward, R.L.; Snieder, R.K.

    1996-01-01

    A two-step nonlinear and linear inversion is carried out to map the lateral heterogeneity beneath North America using surface wave data. The lateral resolution for most areas of the model is of the order of several hundred kilometers. The most obvious feature in the tomographic images is the rapid transition between low velocities in the technically active region west of the Rocky Mountains and high velocities in the stable central and eastern shield of North America. The model also reveals smaller-scale heterogeneous velocity structures. A high-velocity anomaly is imaged beneath the state of Washington that could be explained as the subducting Juan de Fuca plate beneath the Cascades. A large low-velocity structure extends along the coast from the Mendocino to the Rivera triple junction and to the continental interior across the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico. Its shape changes notably with depth. This anomaly largely coincides with the part of the margin where no lithosphere is consumed since the subduction has been replaced by a transform fault. Evidence for a discontinuous subduction of the Cocos plate along the Middle American Trench is found. In central Mexico a transition is visible from low velocities across the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) to high velocities beneath the Yucatan Peninsula. Two elongated low-velocity anomalies beneath the Yellowstone Plateau and the eastern Snake River Plain volcanic system and beneath central Mexico and the TMVB seem to be associated with magmatism and partial melting. Another low-velocity feature is seen at depths of approximately 200 km beneath Florida and the Atlantic Coastal Plain. The inversion technique used is based on a linear surface wave scattering theory, which gives tomographic images of the relative phase velocity perturbations in four period bands ranging from 40 to 150 s. In order to find a smooth reference model a nonlinear inversion based on ray theory is first performed. After

  10. Amplitude Anomalies of S Waves Caused by Low Shear Velocity Structures at the Base of the Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    To, A.; Capdeville, Y.; Romanowicz, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that the direct S and Sdiff waveforms of earthquakes in Papua New Guinea region recorded by seismographs in Northern America are distorted due to sampling slow shear velocity anomalies at the base of the mantle. The emergence of postcursours to the S/Sdiff waves and the travel time anomalies have been reasonably explained by placing a ultra low velocity zone (ULVZ) in southwest of Hawaii. In this study, we focused on the amplitude anomalies of the S/Sdiff waveforms. The direct S phase show very low amplitude at stations in Southern California, at the distance and azimuth around 90 and 55 degrees from the earthquake. The amplitude is as low as 10% of the synthetic amplitude of a standard 1D model, especially at higher frequency range above 0.025 Hz. We first checked and confirmed that the anomalies are not due to errors in the focal mechanism, which is used to calculate the reference synthetic waveforms. Also we checked that the amplitude anomalies are unlikely to be caused by the structures near the earthquake or near the stations, by looking at the amplitude of the depth phases or waveforms of other earthquakes. We assumed that the anomalies are produced by the focusing and defocusing effect of sampling 3D heterogeneous at the base of the mantle, and searched for the causal structures. Full 3D synthetic waveforms are calculated down to 8 seconds for tens of structural models with slow anomalies of different size and velocity reduction placed on the core-mantle boundary (CMB). The result shows that existing tomographic models do not fully explain the observed amplitude anomalies. Stronger shear velocity anomalies are required. The previously proposed thin large ULVZ placed on the CMB southwest of Hawaii partly explains the observed amplitude reduction, even at the distance as short as 90 degrees from the earthquake. This result indicates the significance of finite frequency effect of the ULVZ structure to the S waves, since the ray

  11. Site response, shallow shear-wave velocity, and wave propagation at the San Jose, California, dense seismic array

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartzell, S.; Carver, D.; Williams, R.A.; Harmsen, S.; Zerva, A.

    2003-01-01

    Ground-motion records from a 52-element dense seismic array near San Jose, California, are analyzed to obtain site response, shallow shear-wave velocity, and plane-wave propagation characteristics. The array, located on the eastern side of the Santa Clara Valley south of the San Francisco Bay, is sited over the Evergreen basin, a 7-km-deep depression with Miocene and younger deposits. Site response values below 4 Hz are up to a factor of 2 greater when larger, regional records are included in the analysis, due to strong surface-wave development within the Santa Clara Valley. The pattern of site amplification is the same, however, with local or regional events. Site amplification increases away from the eastern edge of the Santa Clara Valley, reaching a maximum over the western edge of the Evergreen basin, where the pre-Cenozoic basement shallows rapidly. Amplification then decreases further to the west. This pattern may be caused by lower shallow shear-wave velocities and thicker Quaternary deposits further from the edge of the Santa Clara Valley and generation/trapping of surface waves above the shallowing basement of the western Evergreen basin. Shear-wave velocities from the inversion of site response spectra based on smaller, local earthquakes compare well with those obtained independently from our seismic reflection/refraction measurements. Velocities from the inversion of site spectra that include larger, regional records do not compare well with these measurements. A mix of local and regional events, however, is appropriate for determination of site response to be used in seismic hazard evaluation, since large damaging events would excite both body and surface waves with a wide range in ray parameters. Frequency-wavenumber, plane-wave analysis is used to determine the backazimuth and apparent velocity of coherent phases at the array. Conventional, high-resolution, and multiple signal characterization f-k power spectra and stacked slowness power spectra are

  12. Reynolds number effects on the fluctuating velocity distribution in wall-bounded shear layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenfeng; Roggenkamp, Dorothee; Jessen, Wilhelm; Klaas, Michael; Schröder, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    The streamwise turbulence intensity and wall-shear stress fluctuations of zero pressure gradient (ZPG) turbulent boundary layers are investigated for seven Reynolds numbers based on the momentum thickness in the range of 1009  ⩽  Re θ   ⩽  4070 by particle-image velocimetry (PIV) and micro-particle tracking velocimetry (µ-PTV) at a spatial resolution up to 0.06-0.23 wall units such that the viscous sublayer is well resolved. The statistics evidence good agreement with direct numerical simulations (DNS) and experimental results from the literature. The experimental results show the streamwise turbulence intensity and wall-shear stress fluctuation to grow at increasing Reynolds numbers.

  13. Application of high-velocity friction experiments to the shear rupture of a fault in an elastic half-space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zonghu; Reches, Zeev

    2013-04-01

    We developed a physics-based model for earthquake rupture by numerically simulating shear rupture along a 2D vertical fault with the dynamic frictional strength of granite under high slip velocity. Recent experimental observations indicated that the steady-state frictional strength of silica-rich igneous rocks (granite, syenite, diorite) alternate between dynamic-weakening under low velocity (V < 0.03 m/s) and dynamic-strengthening under higher velocities (V > 0.03 m/s). This strength alternation was attributed to powder-lubrication (weakening), and powder dehydration (strengthening) (Sammis et al., 2011). We used the dynamic friction law which was determined on samples of Sierra White granite under experimental velocities approaching 1 m/s (Reches and Lockner, 2010). We converted their observed friction-distance-velocity relations into an empirical friction model referred to as WEST (WEakening - STrengthening). For the simulation calculations, we used the spectral element code of Ampuero (web.gps.caltech.edu/~ampuero/software), which computes the spontaneous rupture propagation along an anti-plane shear (mode III) fracture in an elastic half-space. In the present analysis, the WEST friction model is used as the fault strength while keeping all other parameters (crust properties and stresses) the same as Version 3 of the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) benchmark problem (Harris et al., 2004). This approach allows for direct comparison between the WEST rupture and the benchmark rupture with a fault of slip-weakening friction model (Rojas et al., 2008). We found the following differences between the ruptures of the two models: (1) WEST-based rupture occurs earlier at all observation points away from the nucleation zone; (2) WEST-based model has lower (~ 35%) peak velocity and shorter rise-time; and (3) WEST-based rupture shows rich, frequent alteration of slip velocity, and consequently, the simulated rupture is more complex in stress drop, displacements

  14. General measurement of optical system aberrations with a continuously variable lateral shear ratio by a randomly encoded hybrid grating.

    PubMed

    Ling, Tong; Yang, Yongying; Liu, Dong; Yue, Xiumei; Jiang, Jiabin; Bai, Jian; Shen, Yibing

    2015-10-20

    A general lateral shearing interferometry method to measure the wavefront aberrations with a continuously variable shear ratio by the randomly encoded hybrid grating (REHG) is proposed. The REHG consists of a randomly encoded binary amplitude grating and a phase chessboard. Its Fraunhofer diffractions contain only four orders which are the ±1 orders in two orthogonal directions due to the combined modulation of the amplitude and phase. As a result, no orders selection mask is needed for the REHG and the shear ratio is continuously variable, which is beneficial to the variation of sensitivity and testing range for different requirements. To determine the fabrication tolerance of this hybrid grating, the analysis of the effects of different errors on the diffraction intensity distributions is carried out. Experiments have shown that the testing method can achieve a continuously variable shear ratio with the same REHG, and the comparison with a ZYGO GPI interferometer exhibits that the aberration testing method by the REHG is highly precise and also has a good repeatability. This testing method by the REHG is available for general use in testing the aberrations of different optical systems in situ.

  15. A joint inversion for shear velocity and anisotropy: the Woodlark Rift, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eilon, Zachary; Abers, Geoffrey A.; Gaherty, James B.

    2016-08-01

    Trade-offs between velocity and anisotropy heterogeneity complicate the interpretation of differential traveltime data and have the potential to bias isotropic tomographic models. By constructing a simple parametrisation to describe an elastic tensor with hexagonal symmetry, we find analytic solutions to the Christoffel equations in terms of fast and slow horizontal velocities that allow us to simultaneously invert differential traveltime data and splitting data from teleseismic S arrivals to recover 3-D velocity and anisotropy structure. This technique provides a constraint on the depth-extent of shallow anisotropy, otherwise absent from interpretations based on SKS splitting alone. This approach is well suited to the young Woodlark Rift, where previous studies have found strong velocity variation and substantial SKS splitting in a continental rift with relatively simple geometry. This study images a low-velocity rift axis with ≤4 per cent spreading-parallel anisotropy at 50-100 km depth that separates regions of pre-existing lithospheric fabric, indicating the synchronous development of extensional crystallographic preferred orientation and lithospheric thinning. A high-velocity slab fragment north of the rift axis is associated with strike-parallel anisotropic fast axes, similar to that seen in the shallow mantle of some subduction zones. In addition to the insights provided by the anisotropy structure, the improvement in fit to the differential traveltime data demonstrates the merit to a joint inversion that accounts for anisotropy.

  16. Fabric-related velocity anisotropy and shear wave splitting in rocks from the Santa Rosa Mylonite Zone, California

    SciTech Connect

    Kern, H. ); Wenk, H.R. )

    1990-07-10

    The directional dependence of P and S wave velocities have been measured at pressures (up to 600 MPa) and temperatures (up to 700C) in rocks from the Santa Rosa Mylonite Zone (southern California). During tectonism, these were progressively deformed from granodiorite protolith to mylonite and ultimately phyllonite. The mineralogical and chemical composition of protolith and mylonite is nearly identical. Thus these rocks provide excellent material for documenting the effect of microstructural and textural changes on rock anisotropy. Velocity anisotropy increases significantly with the degree of deformation, whereas average velocities and densities do not change. At low pressure (50 MPa) the velocity anisotropy ranges from 1.7% in granodiorite up to 19% in phyllonite and is due to both oriented microfractures and crystallographic preferred orientation. At high pressure (600 MPa), the residual anisotropy up to 12% is mainly due to preferred mineral orientation, in particular of biotite. Significant shear wave splitting is measured parallel to the foliation plane and shows a good correlation with the biotite texture. These observations confirm that oriented microcracks and preferred orientation of minerals should be taken into account in the interpretation of seismic reflection and refraction data in terranes with deformed rocks.

  17. Shear wave velocity estimation of the near-surface materials of Chittagong City, Bangladesh for seismic site characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Md. Zillur; Siddiqua, Sumi; Kamal, A. S. M. Maksud

    2016-11-01

    The average shear wave velocity of the near-surface materials down to a depth of 30 m (Vs30) is essential for seismic site characterization to estimate the local amplification factor of the seismic waves during an earthquake. Chittagong City is one of the highest risk cities of Bangladesh for its seismic vulnerability. In the present study, the Vs30 is estimated for Chittagong City using the multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW), small scale microtremor measurement (SSMM), downhole seismic (DS), and correlation between the shear wave velocity (Vs) and standard penetration test blow count (SPT-N). The Vs30 of the near-surface materials of the city varies from 123 m/s to 420 m/s. A Vs30 map is prepared from the Vs30 of each 30 m grid using the relationship between the Holocene soil thickness and the Vs30. Based on the Vs30, the near-surface materials of Chittagong City are classified as site classes C, D, and E according to the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP), USA and as site classes B, C, and D according to the Eurocode 8. The Vs30 map can be used for seismic microzonation, future planning, and development of the city to improve the earthquake resiliency of the city.

  18. Upper mantle shear wave velocity structure of the east Anatolian-Caucasus region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skobeltsyn, Gleb Anatolyevich

    The Eastern Anatolian-Caucasus region is a relatively young part of the Alpine- Himalayan orogenic belt and has been formed as the result of the ongoing continental collision of Arabia and Eurasia. In spite of a number of geological studies that have been conducted in this area, there is still no consensus within the geoscience community about the regional tectonic settings and a model for the late Cenozoic tectonic evolution of the Anatolian Plateau. Knowledge of the upper mantle velocity structure in this region can provide the geological community with important constraints that are crucial for developing an understanding of the regional geology and the processes associated with early stages of mountain building. In the present dissertation, I describe two studies of the regional upper mantle S wave velocity structure. In order to derive the absolute velocity structure of the upper mantle, I have applied surface wave tomography to model Rayleigh wave phase velocities as a function of period. Then I inverted the Rayleigh phase velocities to obtain S wave velocities as a function of depth. The resulted high-resolution 3-D S wave velocity model of the regional upper mantle is characterized by a better depth resolution than any preexisting tomographic models. I also conducted an S wave splitting analysis using traditional methods and developed a two-layer grid search algorithm in order to infer the upper mantle anisotropic structure. The results of the S wave splitting analysis for the stations located in Azerbaijan are the first in the region. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  19. a Global Shear Velocity Model of the Upper Mantle from New Fundamental and Higher Rayleigh Mode Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debayle, E.; Ricard, Y. R.

    2011-12-01

    We present a global SV-wave tomographic model of the upper mantle, built from a new dataset of fundamental and higher mode Rayleigh waveforms. We use an extension of the automated waveform inversion approach of Debayle (1999) designed to improve the extraction of fundamental and higher mode information from a single surface wave seismogram. The improvement is shown to be significant in the transition zone structure which is constrained by the higher modes. The new approach is fully automated and can be run on a Beowulf computer to process massive surface wave dataset. It has been used to match successfully over 350 000 fundamental and higher mode Rayleigh waveforms, corresponding to about 20 millions of new measurements extracted from the seismograms. For each seismogram, we obtain a path average shear velocity and quality factor model, and a set of fundamental and higher mode dispersion and attenuation curves compatible with the recorded waveform. The set of dispersion curves provides a global database for future finite frequency inversion. Our new 3D SV-wave tomographic model takes into account the effect of azimuthal anisotropy and is constrained with a lateral resolution of several hundred kilometers and a vertical resolution of a few tens of kilometers. In the uppermost 200 km, our model shows a very strong correlation with surface tectonics. The slow velocity signature of mid-oceanic ridges extend down to ~100 km depth while the high velocity signature of cratons vanishes below 200 km depth. At depth greater than 400 km, the pattern of seismic velocities appear relatively homogeneous at large scale, except for high velocity slabs which produce broad high velocity regions within the transition zone. Although resolution is still good, the region between 200 and 400 km is associated with a complex pattern of seismic heterogeneities showing no simple correlation with the shallower or deeper structure.

  20. Gas Excitation in ULIRGs: Maps of Diagnostic Emission-line Ratios in Space and Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Kurt T.; Martin, Crystal L.

    2012-11-01

    Emission-line spectra extracted at multiple locations across 39 ultraluminous infrared galaxies have been compiled into a spectrophotometric atlas. Line profiles of Hα, [N II], [S II], [O I], Hβ, and [O III] are resolved and fit jointly with common velocity components. Diagnostic ratios of these line fluxes are presented in a series of plots, showing how the Doppler shift, line width, gas excitation, and surface brightness change with velocity at fixed position and also with distance from the nucleus. One general characteristic of these spectra is the presence of shocked gas extending many kiloparsecs from the nucleus. In some systems, the rotation curves of the emitting gas indicate motions that suggest gas disks, which are most frequent at early merger stages. At these early merger stages, the emission line ratios indicate the presence of shocked gas, which may be triggered by the merger event. We also report the general characteristics of the integrated spectra. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  1. Shear wave transmissivity measurement by color Doppler shear wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakoshi, Yoshiki; Yamazaki, Mayuko; Kasahara, Toshihiro; Sunaguchi, Naoki; Yuminaka, Yasushi

    2016-07-01

    Shear wave elastography is a useful method for evaluating tissue stiffness. We have proposed a novel shear wave imaging method (color Doppler shear wave imaging: CD SWI), which utilizes a signal processing unit in ultrasound color flow imaging in order to detect the shear wave wavefront in real time. Shear wave velocity is adopted to characterize tissue stiffness; however, it is difficult to measure tissue stiffness with high spatial resolution because of the artifact produced by shear wave diffraction. Spatial average processing in the image reconstruction method also degrades the spatial resolution. In this paper, we propose a novel measurement method for the shear wave transmissivity of a tissue boundary. Shear wave wavefront maps are acquired by changing the displacement amplitude of the shear wave and the transmissivity of the shear wave, which gives the difference in shear wave velocity between two mediums separated by the boundary, is measured from the ratio of two threshold voltages required to form the shear wave wavefronts in the two mediums. From this method, a high-resolution shear wave amplitude imaging method that reconstructs a tissue boundary is proposed.

  2. Generation of a pseudo-2D shear-wave velocity section by inversion of a series of 1D dispersion curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Liu, J.; Xu, Y.; Liu, Q.

    2008-01-01

    Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves utilizes a multichannel recording system to estimate near-surface shear (S)-wave velocities from high-frequency Rayleigh waves. A pseudo-2D S-wave velocity (vS) section is constructed by aligning 1D models at the midpoint of each receiver spread and using a spatial interpolation scheme. The horizontal resolution of the section is therefore most influenced by the receiver spread length and the source interval. The receiver spread length sets the theoretical lower limit and any vS structure with its lateral dimension smaller than this length will not be properly resolved in the final vS section. A source interval smaller than the spread length will not improve the horizontal resolution because spatial smearing has already been introduced by the receiver spread. In this paper, we first analyze the horizontal resolution of a pair of synthetic traces. Resolution analysis shows that (1) a pair of traces with a smaller receiver spacing achieves higher horizontal resolution of inverted S-wave velocities but results in a larger relative error; (2) the relative error of the phase velocity at a high frequency is smaller than at a low frequency; and (3) a relative error of the inverted S-wave velocity is affected by the signal-to-noise ratio of data. These results provide us with a guideline to balance the trade-off between receiver spacing (horizontal resolution) and accuracy of the inverted S-wave velocity. We then present a scheme to generate a pseudo-2D S-wave velocity section with high horizontal resolution using multichannel records by inverting high-frequency surface-wave dispersion curves calculated through cross-correlation combined with a phase-shift scanning method. This method chooses only a pair of consecutive traces within a shot gather to calculate a dispersion curve. We finally invert surface-wave dispersion curves of synthetic and real-world data. Inversion results of both synthetic and real-world data demonstrate that

  3. Shear wave velocity measurements of thin epoxy adhesive samples using broadband EMATs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, S.; Edwards, C.; Palmer, S. B.

    2002-05-01

    This paper describes an ultrasonic analysis of thin epoxy resin samples using normal incidence radially polarized shear wave ElectroMagnetic Acoustic Transducers (EMATs). The adhesive thickness in the first set of experiments was approximately 0.5 mm. The adhesive used in the first set of experiments was obtained from a 2 component cartridge and it was found that adhesive extruded from such cartridges can be inhomogeneous within the same cartridge. The second experiment described here demonstrated how material property changes of a thin adhesive layer (70 μm) could be ultrasonically measured during cure via spectral analysis.

  4. Velocity field of a round jet in a cross flow for various jet injection angles and velocity ratios. [Langley V/STOL tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fearn, R. L.; Weston, R. P.

    1979-01-01

    A subsonic round jet injected from a flat plate into a subsonic crosswind of the same temperature was investigated. Velocity and pressure measurements in planes perpendicular to the path of the jet were made for nominal jet injection angles of 45 deg, 60 deg, 75 deg, 90 deg, and 105 deg and for jet/cross flow velocity ratios of four and eight. The velocity measurements were obtained to infer the properties of the vortex pair associated with a jet in a cross flow. Jet centerline and vortex trajectories were determined and fit with an empirical equation that includes the effects of jet injection angle, jet core length, and jet/cross flow velocity ratios.

  5. Near-Surface Shear Wave Velocity Versus Depth Profiles, VS30, and NEHRP Classifications for 27 Sites in Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Odum, Jack K.; Williams, Robert A.; Stephenson, William J.; Worley, David M.; von Hillebrandt-Andrade, Christa; Asencio, Eugenio; Irizarry, Harold; Cameron, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    In 2004 and 2005 the Puerto Rico Seismic Network (PRSN), Puerto Rico Strong Motion Program (PRSMP) and the Geology Department at the University of Puerto Rico-Mayaguez (UPRM) collaborated with the U.S. Geological Survey to study near-surface shear-wave (Vs) and compressional-wave (Vp) velocities in and around major urban areas of Puerto Rico. Using noninvasive seismic refraction-reflection profiling techniques, we acquired velocities at 27 locations. Surveyed sites were predominantly selected on the premise that they were generally representative of near-surface materials associated with the primary geologic units located within the urbanized areas of Puerto Rico. Geologic units surveyed included Cretaceous intrusive and volcaniclastic bedrock, Tertiary sedimentary and volcanic units, and Quaternary unconsolidated eolian, fluvial, beach, and lagoon deposits. From the data we developed Vs and Vp depth versus velocity columns, calculated average Vs to 30-m depth (VS30), and derived NEHRP (National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program) site classifications for all sites except one where results did not reach 30-m depth. The distribution of estimated NEHRP classes is as follows: three class 'E' (VS30 below 180 m/s), nine class 'D' (VS30 between 180 and 360 m/s), ten class 'C' (VS30 between 360 and 760 m/s), and four class 'B' (VS30 greater than 760 m/s). Results are being used to calibrate site response at seismograph stations and in the development of regional and local shakemap models for Puerto Rico.

  6. Reconstructions of shear modulus, Poisson's ratio, and density using approximate mean normal stress lambda epsilon alpha alpha as unknown.

    PubMed

    Sumi, Chikayoshi

    2006-12-01

    As a differential diagnosis technique for living soft tissues, we are developing ultrasonic-strain-measurement-based shear modulus reconstruction methods. Previously, we reported three-dimensional (3-D) and 2-D reconstruction methods utilizing a typical Poisson's ratio very close to 0.5 (nearly-incompressible). However, because a decrease in the accuracy of the reconstructed value was confirmed to be due to the difference between the original value and the set value, we proposed 3-D and 2-D methods of reconstructing Poisson's ratio as well. Furthermore, we proposed methods of reconstructing density and dealing with dynamic deformation. However, due to tissue incompressibility, the reconstructions of shear modulus, Poisson's ratio, and density became unstable. In this report, to obtain stable, unique reconstructions, we describe a new reconstruction method using mean normal stress approximated by the product of one of Lame's constants X and volume strain epsilon alpha alpha as an unknown. Regularization is simultaneously applied to the respective distributions to decrease the instability of the reconstructions due to measurement errors of the deformation. This method also enables stable, unique reconstructions of shear modulus and density under the condition that the mean normal stress remains unknown. We also verify the effectiveness of this method through 3-D simulations, while showing erroneous artifacts occurring when 2-D and 1-D reconstructions are performed.

  7. Asymptotic solution of the turbulent mixing layer for velocity ratio close to unity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higuera, F. J.; Jimenez, J.; Linan, A.

    1996-01-01

    The equations describing the first two terms of an asymptotic expansion of the solution of the planar turbulent mixing layer for values of the velocity ratio close to one are obtained. The first term of this expansion is the solution of the well-known time-evolving problem and the second, which includes the effects of the increase of the turbulence scales in the stream-wise direction, obeys a linear system of equations. Numerical solutions of these equations for a two-dimensional reacting mixing layer show that the correction to the time-evolving solution may explain the asymmetry of the entrainment and the differences in product generation observed in flip experiments.

  8. Ratio of effective temperature to pressure controls the mobility of sheared hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Haxton, Thomas K

    2012-01-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we calculate fluctuations and responses for steadily sheared hard spheres over a wide range of packing fractions φ and shear strain rates γ[over ̇], using two different methods to dissipate energy. To a good approximation, shear stress and density fluctuations are related to their associated response functions by a single effective temperature T(eff) that is equal to or larger than the kinetic temperature T(kin). We find a crossover in the relationship between the relaxation time τ and the the nondimensionalized effective temperature T(eff)/pσ(3), where p is the pressure and σ is the sphere diameter. In the solid response regime, the behavior at a fixed packing fraction satisfies τ ̇γ∝exp(-cpσ(3)/T(eff)), where c depends weakly on φ, suggesting that the average local yield strain is controlled by the effective temperature in a way that is consistent with shear transformation zone theory. In the fluid response regime, the relaxation time depends on T(eff)/pσ(3) as it depends on T(kin)/pσ(3) in equilibrium. This regime includes both near-equilibrium conditions where T(eff)≃T(kin) and far-from-equilibrium conditions where T(eff)≠T(kin). We discuss the implications of our results for systems with soft repulsive interactions.

  9. Particle-in-cell simulation of two-dimensional electron velocity shear driven instability in relativistic domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Chandrasekhar; Das, Amita; Patel, Kartik

    2016-08-01

    We carry out particle-in-cell simulations to study the instabilities associated with a 2-D sheared electron flow configuration against a neutralizing background of ions. Both weak and strong relativistic flow velocities are considered. In the weakly relativistic case, we observe the development of electromagnetic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability with similar characteristics as that predicted by the electron Magnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) model. On the contrary, in a strong relativistic case, the compressibility effects of electron fluid dominate and introduce upper hybrid electrostatic oscillations transverse to the flow which are very distinct from EMHD fluid behavior. In the nonlinear regime, both weak and strong relativistic cases lead to turbulence with broad power law spectrum.

  10. Kinetic effects on the Kelvin–Helmholtz instability in ion-to-magnetohydrodynamic scale transverse velocity shear layers: Particle simulations

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, T. K. M.; Hasegawa, H.; Shinohara, I.

    2010-01-01

    Ion-to-magnetohydrodynamic scale physics of the transverse velocity shear layer and associated Kelvin–Helmholtz instability (KHI) in a homogeneous, collisionless plasma are investigated by means of full particle simulations. The shear layer is broadened to reach a kinetic equilibrium when its initial thickness is close to the gyrodiameter of ions crossing the layer, namely, of ion-kinetic scale. The broadened thickness is larger in B⋅Ω<0 case than in B⋅Ω>0 case, where Ω is the vorticity at the layer. This is because the convective electric field, which points out of (into) the layer for B⋅Ω<0 (B⋅Ω>0), extends (reduces) the gyrodiameters. Since the kinetic equilibrium is established before the KHI onset, the KHI growth rate depends on the broadened thickness. In the saturation phase of the KHI, the ion vortex flow is strengthened (weakened) for B⋅Ω<0 (B⋅Ω>0), due to ion centrifugal drift along the rotational plasma flow. In ion inertial scale vortices, this drift effect is crucial in altering the ion vortex size. These results indicate that the KHI at Mercury-like ion-scale magnetospheric boundaries could show clear dawn-dusk asymmetries in both its linear and nonlinear growth. PMID:20838425

  11. Velocity and attenuation of shear waves in the phantom of a muscle-soft tissue matrix with embedded stretched fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudenko, O. V.; Tsyuryupa, S. N.; Sarvazyan, A. P.

    2016-09-01

    We develop a theory of the elasticity moduli and dissipative properties of a composite material: a phantom simulating muscle tissue anisotropy. The model used in the experiments was made of a waterlike polymer with embedded elastic filaments imitating muscle fiber. In contrast to the earlier developed phenomenological theory of the anisotropic properties of muscle tissue, here we obtain the relationship of the moduli with characteristic sizes and moduli making up the composite. We introduce the effective elasticity moduli and viscosity tensor components, which depend on stretching of the fibers. We measure the propagation velocity of shear waves and the shear viscosity of the model for regulated tension. Waves were excited by pulsed radiation pressure generated by modulated focused ultrasound. We show that with increased stretching of fibers imitating muscle contraction, an increase in both elasticity and viscosity takes place, and this effect depends on the wave propagation direction. The results of theoretical and experimental studies support our hypothesis on the protective function of stretched skeletal muscle, which protects bones and joints from trauma.

  12. VELOCITY-SHEAR-INDUCED MODE COUPLING IN THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE AND SOLAR WIND: IMPLICATIONS FOR PLASMA HEATING AND MHD TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Hollweg, Joseph V.; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.; Kaghashvili, Edisher Kh. E-mail: ekaghash@aer.com

    2013-06-01

    We analytically consider how velocity shear in the corona and solar wind can cause an initial Alfven wave to drive up other propagating signals. The process is similar to the familiar coupling into other modes induced by non-WKB refraction in an inhomogeneous plasma, except here the refraction is a consequence of velocity shear. We limit our discussion to a low-beta plasma, and ignore couplings into signals resembling the slow mode. If the initial Alfven wave is propagating nearly parallel to the background magnetic field, then the induced signals are mainly a forward-going (i.e., propagating in the same sense as the original Alfven wave) fast mode, and a driven signal propagating like a forward-going Alfven wave but polarized like the fast mode; both signals are compressive and subject to damping by the Landau resonance. For an initial Alfven wave propagating obliquely with respect to the magnetic field, the induced signals are mainly forward- and backward-going fast modes, and a driven signal propagating like a forward-going Alfven wave but polarized like the fast mode; these signals are all compressive and subject to damping by the Landau resonance. A backward-going Alfven wave, thought to be important in the development of MHD turbulence, is also produced, but it is very weak. However, we suggest that for oblique propagation of the initial Alfven wave the induced fast-polarized signal propagating like a forward-going Alfven wave may interact coherently with the initial Alfven wave and distort it at a strong-turbulence-like rate.

  13. Bending and shear stresses developed by the instantaneous arrest of the root of a cantilever beam rotating with constant angular velocity about a transverse axis through the root

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stowell, Elbridge Z; Schwartz, Edward B; Houbolt, John C

    1945-01-01

    A theoretical investigation was made of the behavior of a cantilever beam in rotational motion about a transverse axis through the root determining the stresses, the deflections, and the accelerations that occur in the beam as a result of the arrest of motion. The equations for bending and shear stress reveal that, at a given percentage of the distance from root to tip and at a given trip velocity, the bending stresses for a particular mode are independent of the length of the beam and the shear stresses vary inversely with the length. When examined with respect to a given angular velocity instead of a given tip velocity, the equations reveal that the bending stress is proportional to the length of the beam whereas the shear stress is independent of the length. Sufficient experimental verification of the theory has previously been given in connection with another problem of the same type.

  14. Mean velocity and temperature profiles in a sheared diabatic turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dan; Katul, Gabriel G.; Bou-Zeid, Elie

    2012-10-01

    In the atmospheric surface layer, modifications to the logarithmic mean velocity and air temperature profiles induced by thermal stratification or convection are accounted for via stability correction functions ϕm and ϕh, respectively, that vary with the stability parameter ς. These two stability correction functions are presumed to be universal in shape and independent of the surface characteristics. To date, there is no phenomenological theory that explains all the scaling laws in ϕh with ς, how ϕh relates to ϕm, and why ϕh ⩽ ϕm is consistently reported. To develop such a theory, the recently proposed links between the mean velocity profile and the Kolmogorov spectrum of turbulence, which were previously modified to account for the effects of buoyancy, are generalized here to include the mean air temperature profile. The resulting theory explains the observed scaling laws in ϕm and ϕh reported in many field and numerical experiments, predicts their behaviors across a wide range of atmospheric stability conditions, and elucidates why heat is transported more efficiently than momentum in certain stability regimes. In particular, it is shown that the enhancement in heat transport under unstable conditions is linked to a "scale-resonance" between turnover eddies and excursions in the instantaneous air temperature profiles. Excluding this scale-resonance results in the conventional Reynolds analogy with ϕm = ϕh across all stability conditions.

  15. Measuring ion velocity distribution functions through high-aspect ratio holes in inductively coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunge, G.; Darnon, M.; Dubois, J.; Bezard, P.; Mourey, O.; Petit-Etienne, C.; Vallier, L.; Despiau-Pujo, E.; Sadeghi, N.

    2016-02-01

    Several issues associated with plasma etching of high aspect ratio structures originate from the ions' bombardment of the sidewalls of the feature. The off normal angle incident ions are primarily due to their temperature at the sheath edge and possibly to charging effects. We have measured the ion velocity distribution function (IVDF) at the wafer surface in an industrial inductively coupled plasma reactor by using multigrid retarding field analyzers (RFA) in front of which we place 400 μm thick capillary plates with holes of 25, 50, and 100 μm diameters. The RFA then probes IVDF at the exit of the holes with Aspect Ratios (AR) of 16, 8, and 4, respectively. The results show that the ion flux dramatically drops with the increase in AR. By comparing the measured IVDF with an analytical model, we concluded that the ion temperature is 0.27 eV in our plasma conditions. The charging effects are also observed and are shown to significantly reduce the ion energy at the bottom of the feature but only with a "minor" effect on the ion flux and the shape of the IVDF.

  16. Ground-motion site effects from multimethod shear-wave velocity characterization at 16 seismograph stations deployed for aftershocks of the August 2011 Mineral, Virginia earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephenson, William J.; Odum, Jackson K.; McNamara, Daniel E.; Williams, Robert A.; Angster, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    We characterize shear-wave velocity versus depth (Vs profile) at 16 portable seismograph sites through the epicentral region of the 2011 Mw 5.8 Mineral (Virginia, USA) earthquake to investigate ground-motion site effects in the area. We used a multimethod acquisition and analysis approach, where active-source horizontal shear (SH) wave reflection and refraction as well as active-source multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) and passive-source refraction microtremor (ReMi) Rayleigh wave dispersion were interpreted separately. The time-averaged shear-wave velocity to a depth of 30 m (Vs30), interpreted bedrock depth, and site resonant frequency were estimated from the best-fit Vs profile of each method at each location for analysis. Using the median Vs30 value (270–715 m/s) as representative of a given site, we estimate that all 16 sites are National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) site class C or D. Based on a comparison of simplified mapped surface geology to median Vs30 at our sites, we do not see clear evidence for using surface geologic units as a proxy for Vs30 in the epicentral region, although this may primarily be because the units are similar in age (Paleozoic) and may have similar bulk seismic properties. We compare resonant frequencies calculated from ambient noise horizontal:vertical spectral ratios (HVSR) at available sites to predicted site frequencies (generally between 1.9 and 7.6 Hz) derived from the median bedrock depth and average Vs to bedrock. Robust linear regression of HVSR to both site frequency and Vs30 demonstrate moderate correlation to each, and thus both appear to be generally representative of site response in this region. Based on Kendall tau rank correlation testing, we find that Vs30 and the site frequency calculated from average Vs to median interpreted bedrock depth can both be considered reliable predictors of weak-motion site effects in the epicentral region.

  17. Velocity autocorrelation function in supercooled liquids: Long-time tails and anomalous shear-wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, H. L.; Schober, H. R.; Voigtmann, Th.

    2016-12-01

    Molecular dynamic simulations are performed to reveal the long-time behavior of the velocity autocorrelation function (VAF) by utilizing the finite-size effect in a Lennard-Jones binary mixture. Whereas in normal liquids the classical positive t-3 /2 long-time tail is observed, we find in supercooled liquids a negative tail. It is strongly influenced by the transfer of the transverse current wave across the period boundary. The t-5 /2 decay of the negative long-time tail is confirmed in the spectrum of VAF. Modeling the long-time transverse current within a generalized Maxwell model, we reproduce the negative long-time tail of the VAF, but with a slower algebraic t-2 decay.

  18. Tetrahedral vs. polyhedral mesh size evaluation on flow velocity and wall shear stress for cerebral hemodynamic simulation.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, Martin; Redel, Thomas; Zhang, Y Jonathan; Struffert, Tobias; Hornegger, Joachim; Grossman, Robert G; Doerfler, Arnd; Karmonik, Christof

    2011-01-01

    Haemodynamic factors, in particular wall shear stresses (WSSs) may have significant impact on growth and rupture of cerebral aneurysms. Without a means to measure WSS reliably in vivo, computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations are frequently employed to visualise and quantify blood flow from patient-specific computational models. With increasing interest in integrating these CFD simulations into pretreatment planning, a better understanding of the validity of the calculations in respect to computation parameters such as volume element type, mesh size and mesh composition is needed. In this study, CFD results for the two most common aneurysm types (saccular and terminal) are compared for polyhedral- vs. tetrahedral-based meshes and discussed regarding future clinical applications. For this purpose, a set of models were constructed for each aneurysm with spatially varying surface and volume mesh configurations (mesh size range: 5119-258, 481 volume elements). WSS distribution on the model wall and point-based velocity measurements were compared for each configuration model. Our results indicate a benefit of polyhedral meshes in respect to convergence speed and more homogeneous WSS patterns. Computational variations of WSS values and blood velocities are between 0.84 and 6.3% from the most simple mesh (tetrahedral elements only) and the most advanced mesh design investigated (polyhedral mesh with boundary layer).

  19. Crustal shear wave velocity structure of the western United States inferred from ambient seismic noise and earthquake data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moschetti, M. P.; Ritzwoller, M. H.; Lin, F.-C.; Yang, Y.

    2010-10-01

    Surface wave dispersion measurements from ambient seismic noise and array-based measurements from teleseismic earthquakes observed with the EarthScope/USArray Transportable Array (TA) are inverted using a Monte Carlo method for a 3-D VS model of the crust and uppermost mantle beneath the western United States. The combination of data from these methods produces exceptionally broadband dispersion information from 6 to 100 s period, which constrains shear wave velocity structures in the crust and uppermost mantle to a depth of more than 100 km. The high lateral resolution produced by the TA network and the broadbandedness of the dispersion information motivate the question of the appropriate parameterization for a 3-D model, particularly for the crustal part of the model. We show that a relatively simple model in which VS increases monotonically with depth in the crust can fit the data well across more than 90% of the study region, except in eight discrete areas where greater crustal complexity apparently exists. The regions of greater crustal complexity are the Olympic Peninsula, the MendocinoTriple Junction, the Yakima Fold Belt, the southern Cascadia back arc, the Great Central Valley of California, the Salton Trough, the Snake River Plain, and the Wasatch Mountains. We also show that a strong Rayleigh-Love discrepancy exists across much of the western United States, which can be resolved by introducing radial anisotropy in both the mantle and notably the crust. We focus our analysis on demonstrating the existence of crustal radial anisotropy and primarily discuss the crustal part of the isotropic model that results from the radially anisotropic model by Voigt averaging. Model uncertainties from the Monte Carlo inversion are used to identify robust isotropic features in the model. The uppermost mantle beneath the western United States is principally composed of four large-scale shear wave velocity features, but lower crustal velocity structure exhibits far greater

  20. A global horizontal shear velocity model of the upper mantle from multimode Love wave measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Tak; Priestley, Keith; Debayle, Eric

    2016-10-01

    Surface wave studies in the 1960s provided the first indication that the upper mantle was radially anisotropic. Resolving the anisotropic structure is important because it may yield information on deformation and flow patterns in the upper mantle. The existing radially anisotropic models are in poor agreement. Rayleigh waves have been studied extensively and recent models show general agreement. Less work has focused on Love waves and the models that do exist are less well-constrained than are Rayleigh wave models, suggesting it is the Love wave models that are responsible for the poor agreement in the radially anisotropic structure of the upper mantle. We have adapted the waveform inversion procedure of Debayle & Ricard to extract propagation information for the fundamental mode and up to the fifth overtone from Love waveforms in the 50-250 s period range. We have tomographically inverted these results for a mantle horizontal shear wave-speed model (βh(z)) to transition zone depths. We include azimuthal anisotropy (2θ and 4θ terms) in the tomography, but in this paper we discuss only the isotropic βh(z) structure. The data set is significantly larger, almost 500 000 Love waveforms, than previously published Love wave data sets and provides ˜17 000 000 constraints on the upper-mantle βh(z) structure. Sensitivity and resolution tests show that the horizontal resolution of the model is on the order of 800-1000 km to transition zone depths. The high wave-speed roots beneath the oldest parts of the continents appear to extend deeper for βh(z) than for βv(z) as in previous βh(z) models, but the resolution tests indicate that at least parts of these features could be artefacts. The low wave speeds beneath the mid-ocean ridges fade by ˜150 km depth except for the upper mantle beneath the East Pacific Rise which remains slow to ˜250 km depth. The resolution tests suggest that the low wave speeds at deeper depths beneath the East Pacific Rise are not solely due

  1. Upper mantle shear wave velocity structure beneath northern Victoria Land, Antarctica: Volcanism and uplift in the northern Transantarctic Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graw, Jordan H.; Adams, Aubreya N.; Hansen, Samantha E.; Wiens, Douglas A.; Hackworth, Lauren; Park, Yongcheol

    2016-09-01

    The Transantarctic Mountains (TAMs) are the largest non-compressional mountain range on Earth, and while a variety of uplift mechanisms have been proposed, the origin of the TAMs is still a matter of great debate. Most previous seismic investigations of the TAMs have focused on a central portion of the mountain range, near Ross Island, providing little along-strike constraint on the upper mantle structure, which is needed to better assess competing uplift models. Using data recorded by the recently deployed Transantarctic Mountains Northern Network, as well as data from the Transantarctic Mountains Seismic Experiment and from five stations operated by the Korea Polar Research Institute, we investigate the upper mantle structure beneath a previously unexplored portion of the mountain range. Rayleigh wave phase velocities are calculated using a two-plane wave approximation and are inverted for shear wave velocity structure. Our model shows a low velocity zone (LVZ; ∼4.24 km s-1) at ∼160 km depth offshore and adjacent to Mt. Melbourne. This LVZ extends inland and vertically upwards, with more lateral coverage above ∼100 km depth beneath the northern TAMs and Victoria Land. A prominent LVZ (∼4.16-4.24 km s-1) also exists at ∼150 km depth beneath Ross Island, which agrees with previous results in the TAMs near the McMurdo Dry Valleys, and relatively slow velocities (∼4.24-4.32 km s-1) along the Terror Rift connect the low velocity anomalies. We propose that the LVZs reflect rift-related decompression melting and provide thermally buoyant support for the TAMs uplift, consistent with proposed flexural models. We also suggest that heating, and hence uplift, along the mountain front is not uniform and that the shallower LVZ beneath northern Victoria Land provides greater thermal support, leading to higher bedrock topography in the northern TAMs. Young (0-15 Ma) volcanic rocks associated with the Hallett and the Erebus Volcanic Provinces are situated directly

  2. Shear-wave velocity and site-amplification factors for 50 Australian sites determined by the spectral analysis of surface waves method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kayen, Robert E.; Carkin, Bradley A.; Allen, Trevor; Collins, Clive; McPherson, Andrew; Minasian, Diane L.

    2015-01-01

    One-dimensional shear-wave velocity (VS ) profiles are presented at 50 strong motion sites in New South Wales and Victoria, Australia. The VS profiles are estimated with the spectral analysis of surface waves (SASW) method. The SASW method is a noninvasive method that indirectly estimates the VS at depth from variations in the Rayleigh wave phase velocity at the surface.

  3. Shear viscosity to entropy density ratios and implications for (im)perfect fluidity in Fermionic and Bosonic superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyack, Rufus; Guo, Hao; Levin, K.

    2015-03-01

    Recent experiments on both unitary Fermi gases and high temperature superconductors (arxiv:1410.4835 [cond-mat.quant-gas], arxiv:1409.5820 [cond-mat.str-el].) have led to renewed interest in near perfect fluidity in condensed matter systems. This is quantified by studying the ratio of shear viscosity to entropy density. In this talk we present calculations of this ratio in homogeneous bosonic and fermionic superfluids, with the latter ranging from BCS to BEC. While the shear viscosity exhibits a power law (for bosons) or exponential suppression (for fermions), a similar dependence is found for the respective entropy densities. As a result, strict BCS and (true) bosonic superfluids have an analogous viscosity to entropy density ratio, behaving linearly with temperature times the (T-dependent) dissipation rate; this is characteristic of imperfect fluidity in weakly coupled fluids. This is contrasted with the behavior of fermions at unitarity which we argue is a consequence of additional terms in the entropy density thereby leading to more perfect fluidity. (arXiv:1407.7572v1 [cond-mat.quant-gas])

  4. PKP Waveform Complexity and Its Implications to Fine Structure Near the Edge of African Large Low Shear Velocity Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Teh-Ru Alex; Tanaka, Satoru; Takeuchi, Nozomu

    2010-05-01

    and receiver-side structure do not play a predominant role in generating these anomalous PKPab waveforms. We then look into structural anomaly near the core-mantle-boundary (CMB) since PKPab grazes the CMB at a very shallow angle and it can effectively interact with it and possibly produce anomalous PKPab waveforms. We first explore 1-D model space by introducing velocity anomaly directly above the CMB, with a velocity perturbation up to a few tens of percents in S wave velocity and P wave velocity. We calculate synthetics up to 2 Hz by Direct Solution Method (DSM) and Reflectivity Method to examine waveform anomaly at long period band (0.01-0.2 Hz) as well as short-period band (0.5-2 Hz). Our preliminary result indicates that the model with a thin (~ 15 km) ultra-low velocity zone (ULVZ, 30% reduction in P wave and S wave velocity) is capable of reproducing characteristics of these anomalous PKPab waveforms at both frequency bands. The pierce points of PKPab in the source side at CMB are near the southeast Indian Ocean where S wave velocity is only slightly faster than PREM. On the other hand, the pierce points in the receiver side are at the eastern edge of the African Large Low Shear Velocity Province (LLSVP). One interesting feature of our ULVZ model is that dlnVs/dlnVp is about 1, which is different from most ULVZ models where dlnVs/dlnVp is about 3.

  5. A New Potential Predictor of Coronary Artery Disease: The Ratio of Mitral Peak Filling Velocity to Mitral Annular Velocity in Early Diastole

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li; Li, Yanhong; Wu, Zhisheng; Mu, Yuming

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to explore the value of the ratio of mitral peak filling velocity (E) to mitral annular velocity (e’) in early diastole as a predictor of coronary artery disease (CAD). Material/Methods The study population consisted of 83 consecutive patients (aged 38–77 years, 22 women and 61 men) who received coronary angiography. The E/e’ ratio was estimated by echocardiographic examination. Statistical significance was determined by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and multiple logistic regression analyses. Results ROC curve analysis showed that the optimal E/e’ ratio cut-off for predicting CAD was 8.153 with a specificity of 72.4% and sensitivity of 57.4%. The area under the ROC curve was 0.635 with a 95% confidence interval (CI) for normal distribution of 0.515–0.755 (p=0.043). Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the E/e’ ratio was closely associated with CAD (odds ratio [OR], 1.350; 95% CI, 1.087–1.676, p=0.007). Conclusions The E/e’ ratio is a simple and practical predictor of CAD and may be an independent risk factor for CAD. Large-cohort and multi-center studies are required to confirm these observations. PMID:28267707

  6. Upper mantle structure of shear-waves velocities and stratification of anisotropy in the Afar Hotspot region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicilia, D.; Montagner, J.-P.; Cara, M.; Stutzmann, E.; Debayle, E.; Lépine, J.-C.; Lévêque, J.-J.; Beucler, E.; Sebai, A.; Roult, G.; Ayele, A.; Sholan, J. M.

    2008-12-01

    The Afar area is one of the biggest continental hotspots active since about 30 Ma. It may be the surface expression of a mantle "plume" related to the African Superswell. Central Africa is also characterized by extensive intraplate volcanism. Around the same time (30 Ma), volcanic activity re-started in several regions of the African plate and hotspots such as Darfur, Tibesti, Hoggar and Mount Cameroon, characterized by a significant though modest volcanic production. The interactions of mantle upwelling with asthenosphere, lithosphere and crust remain unclear and seismic anisotropy might help in investigating these complex interactions. We used data from the global seismological permanent FDSN networks (GEOSCOPE, IRIS, MedNet, GEO- FON, etc.), from the temporary PASSCAL experiments in Tanzania and Saudi Arabia and a French deployment of 5 portable broadband stations surrounding the Afar Hotspot. A classical two-step tomographic inversion from surface waves performed in the Horn of Africa with selected Rayleigh wave and Love wave seismograms leads to a 3D-model of both S V velocities and azimuthal anisotropy, as well as radial SH/ SV anisotropy, with a lateral resolution of 500 km. The region is characterized by low shear-wave velocities beneath the Afar Hotspot, the Red Sea, the Gulf of Aden and East of the Tanzania Craton to 400 km depth. High velocities are present in the Eastern Arabia and the Tanzania Craton. The results of this study enable us to rule out a possible feeding of the Central Africa hotspots from the "Afar plume" above 150-200 km. The azimuthal anisotropy displays a complex pattern near the Afar Hotspot. Radial anisotropy, although poorly resolved laterally, exhibits S H slower than S V waves down to about 150 km depth, and a reverse pattern below. Both azimuthal and radial anisotropies show a stratification of anisotropy at depth, corresponding to different physical processes. These results suggest that the Afar hotspot has a different and

  7. Can Suspended Iron-Alloy Droplets Explain the Origin, Composition and Properties of Large Low Shear Velocity Provinces?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Dorfman, S. M.; Labidi, J.; Zhang, S.; Manga, M.; Stixrude, L. P.; McDonough, W. F.; Williams, Q. C.

    2014-12-01

    The enigmatic large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs) identified by seismic tomography at the base of the Earth's mantle have been proposed to be reservoirs of primordial mantle composition tapped by hot spot volcanism. The LLSVPs are characterized by anomalously low shear wave speed, VS, slightly elevated bulk sound speed, VB, and high density, ρ, in piles as thick as 1000 km above the core-mantle boundary. This combination of properties could be explained by a few percent dense melt, but the solidus of the lower mantle silicate and oxide assemblage may be too high to produce melt over the large extent of these regions. Iron-rich sulfur-bearing alloy may be molten at the conditions of the LLSVPs and ~1-2% of this component could satisfy both constraints on VS and ρ. An Fe alloy phase in the LLSVPs also has the potential to explain geochemical anomalies associated with hot spot volcanism, and its existence can be constrained by geochemical mass balance. Primordial noble gases such as 3He would be preferentially dissolved in Fe-rich melt rather than crystalline silicates. The reconstructed abundances of the moderately siderophile/chalcophile elements S, Cu and Pb in iron-alloy-bearing LLSVPs do not exceed predicted losses from volatilization, though this depends on the S-content of the alloy. The alloy phase would also be expected to incorporate W, and W isotope anomalies associated with hot spots are thus expected to have important implications for the timing of LLSVP formation. We have developed a model, via CIDER-2014, for the origin and properties of LLSVPs incorporating geochemistry, mineral physics, and fluid dynamic constraints on the generation, capture, and thermoelastic properties of Fe-rich melt droplets. The solidification of a basal magma ocean would produce both solid silicates and metallic melt. The bulk of the alloy generated by this process would sink to merge with the core. However, once the density of the remnant liquid exceeds that of the

  8. New Hybridized Surface Wave Approach for Geotechnical Modeling of Shear Wave Velocity at Strong Motion Recording Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayen, R.; Carkin, B.; Minasian, D.

    2006-12-01

    Strong motion recording (SMR) networks often have little or no shear wave velocity measurements at stations where characterization of site amplification and site period effects is needed. Using the active Spectral Analysis of Surface Waves (SASW) method, and passive H/V microtremor method we have investigated nearly two hundred SMR sites in California, Alaska, Japan, Australia, China and Taiwan. We are conducting these studies, in part, to develop a new hybridized method of site characterization that utilizes a parallel array of harmonic-wave sources for active-source SASW, and a single long period seismometer for passive-source microtremor measurement. Surface wave methods excel in their ability to non-invasively and rapidly characterize the variation of ground stiffness properties with depth below the surface. These methods are lightweight, inexpensive to deploy, and time-efficient. They have been shown to produce accurate and deep soil stiffness profiles. By placing and wiring shakers in a large parallel circuit, either side-by-side on the ground or in a trailer-mounted array, a strong in-phase harmonic wave can be produced. The effect of arraying many sources in parallel is to increase the amplitude of waves received at far-away spaced seismometers at low frequencies so as to extend the longest wavelengths of the captured dispersion curve. The USGS system for profiling uses this concept by arraying between two and eight electro-mechanical harmonic-wave shakers. With large parallel arrays of vibrators, a dynamic force in excess of 1000 lb can be produced to vibrate the ground and produce surface waves. We adjust the harmonic wave through a swept-sine procedure to profile surface wave dispersion down to a frequency of 1 Hz and out to surface wave-wavelengths of 200-1000 meters, depending on the site stiffness. The parallel-array SASW procedure is augmented using H/V microtremor data collected with the active source turned off. Passive array microtremor data

  9. The ZH ratio method for long-period seismic data: inversion for S-wave velocity structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Tomoko; Tanimoto, T.; Rivera, L.

    2009-10-01

    The particle motion of surface waves, in addition to phase and group velocities, can provide useful information for S-wave velocity structure in the crust and upper mantle. In this study, we applied a new method to retrieve velocity structure using the ZH ratio, the ratio between vertical and horizontal surface amplitudes of Rayleigh waves. Analysing data from the GEOSCOPE network, we measured the ZH ratios for frequencies between 0.004 and 0.05 Hz (period between 20 and 250s) and inverted them for S-wave velocity structure beneath each station. Our analysis showed that the resolving power of the ZH ratio is limited and final solutions display dependence on starting models; in particular, the depth of the Moho in the starting model is important in order to get reliable results. Thus, initial models for the inversion need to be carefully constructed. We chose PREM and CRUST2.0 in this study as a starting model for all but one station (ECH). The eigenvalue analysis of the least-squares problem that arises for each step of the iterative process shows a few dominant eigenvalues which explains the cause of the inversion's initial-model dependence. However, the ZH ratio is unique in having high sensitivity to near-surface structure and thus provides complementary information to phase and group velocities. Application of this method to GEOSCOPE data suggest that low velocity zones may exist beneath some stations near hotspots. Our tests with different starting models show that the models with low-velocity anomalies fit better to the ZH ratio data. Such low velocity zones are seen near Hawaii (station KIP), Crozet Island (CRZF) and Djibuti (ATD) but not near Reunion Island (RER). It is also found near Echery (ECH) which is in a geothermal area. However, this method has a tendency to produce spurious low velocity zones and resolution of the low velocity zones requires further careful study. We also performed simultaneous inversions for volumetric perturbation and

  10. Shear velocity model for the Kyrgyz Tien Shan from joint inversion of receiver function and surface wave data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilligan, Amy; Roecker, Steven W.; Priestley, Keith F.; Nunn, Ceri

    2014-10-01

    The Tien Shan is the largest active intracontinental orogenic belt on Earth. To better understand the processes causing mountains to form at great distances from a plate boundary, we analyse passive source seismic data collected on 40 broad-band stations of the MANAS project (2005-2007) and 12 stations of the permanent KRNET seismic network to determine variations in crustal thickness and shear wave speed across the range. We jointly invert P- and S-wave receiver functions with surface wave observations from both earthquakes and ambient noise to reduce the ambiguity inherent in the images obtained from the techniques applied individually. Inclusion of ambient noise data improves constraints on the upper crust by allowing dispersion measurements to be made at shorter periods. Joint inversion can also reduce the ambiguity in interpretation by revealing the extent to which various features in the receiver functions are amplified or eliminated by interference from multiples. The resulting wave speed model shows a variation in crustal thickness across the range. We find that crustal velocities extend to ˜75 km beneath the Kokshaal Range, which we attribute to underthrusting of the Tarim Basin beneath the southern Tien Shan. This result supports the plate model of intracontinental convergence. Crustal thickness elsewhere beneath the range is about 50 km, including beneath the Naryn Valley in the central Tien Shan where previous studies reported a shallow Moho. This difference apparently is the result of wave speed variations in the upper crust that were not previously taken into account. Finally, a high velocity lid appears in the upper mantle of the Central and Northern part of the Tien Shan, which we interpret as a remnant of material that may have delaminated elsewhere under the range.

  11. Isokinetic hamstrings-to-quadriceps peak torque ratio: the influence of sport modality, gender, and angular velocity.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Marilia Dos Santos; De Lira, Claudio Andre Barbosa; Koffes, Fabiana De Carvalho; Mascarin, Naryana Cristina; Benedito-Silva, Ana Amélia; Da Silva, Antonio Carlos

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine differences in hamstrings-to-quadriceps (H/Q) peak torque ratios evaluated at different angular velocities between men and women who participate in judo, handball or soccer. A total of 166 athletes, including 58 judokas (26 females and 32 males), 39 handball players (22 females and 17 males), and 69 soccer players (17 females and 52 males), were evaluated using an isokinetic dynamometer. The H/Q isokinetic peak torque ratios were calculated at angular velocities of 1.05 rad · s⁻¹ and 5.23 rad · s⁻¹. In the analysis by gender, female soccer players produced lower H/Q peak torque ratios at 1.05 rad · s⁻¹ than males involved in the same sport. However, when H/Q peak torque ratio was assessed at 5.23 rad · s⁻¹, there were no significant differences between the sexes. In the analysis by sport, there were no differences among females at 1.05 rad · s⁻¹. In contrast, male soccer players had significantly higher H/Q peak torque ratios than judokas (66 ± 12% vs. 57 ± 14%, respectively). Female handball players produced significantly lower peak torque ratios at 5.23 rad · s⁻¹ than judokas or soccer players, whereas males presented no ratio differences among sports At 5.23 rad · s⁻¹. In the analysis by velocity, women's muscular ratios assessed at 1.05 rad · s⁻¹ were significantly lower than at 5.23 rad · s⁻¹ for all sports; among men, only judokas presented lower ratios at 1.05 rad · s⁻¹ than at 5.23 rad · s⁻¹. The present results suggest that sport modality and angular velocity influence the isokinetic strength profiles of men and women.

  12. Multi-channel analysis of surface waves MASW of models with high shear-wave velocity contrast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanov, J.; Miller, R.D.; Peterie, S.; Zeng, C.; Xia, J.; Schwenk, T.

    2011-01-01

    We use the multi-channel analysis of surface waves MASW method to analyze synthetic seismic data calculated using models with high shear-wave velocity Vs contrast. The MASW dispersion-curve images of the Rayleigh wave are obtained using various sets of source-offset and spread-size configurations from the synthetic seismic data and compared with the theoretically calculated fundamental- and higher-mode dispersion-curves. Such tests showed that most of the dispersion-curve images are dominated by higher-mode energy at the low frequencies, especially when analyzing data from long receiver offsets and thus significantly divert from numerically expected dispersion-curve trends, which can lead to significant Vs overestimation. Further analysis showed that using data with relatively short spread lengths and source offsets can image the desired fundamental-mode of the Rayleigh wave that matches the numerically expected dispersion-curve pattern. As a result, it was concluded that it might be possible to avoid higher-mode contamination at low frequencies at sites with high Vs contrast by appropriate selection of spread size and seismic source offset. ?? 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  13. Shear wave velocities in the Pampean flat-slab region from Rayleigh wave tomography: Implications for slab and upper mantle hydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Ryan; Gilbert, Hersh; Zandt, George; Beck, Susan; Warren, Linda; Calkins, Josh; Alvarado, Patricia; Anderson, Megan

    2012-11-01

    The Pampean flat-slab region, located in central Argentina and Chile between 29° and 34°S, is considered a modern analog for Laramide flat-slab subduction within western North America. Regionally, flat-slab subduction is characterized by the Nazca slab descending to ˜100 km depth, flattening out for ˜300 km laterally before resuming a more "normal" angle of subduction. Flat-slab subduction correlates spatially with the track of the Juan Fernandez Ridge, and is associated with the inboard migration of deformation and the cessation of volcanism within the region. To better understand flat-slab subduction we combine ambient-noise tomography and earthquake-generated surface wave measurements to calculate a regional 3D shear velocity model for the region. Shear wave velocity variations largely relate to changes in lithology within the crust, with basins and bedrock exposures clearly defined as low- and high-velocity regions, respectively. We argue that subduction-related hydration plays a significant role in controlling shear wave velocities within the upper mantle. In the southern part of the study area, where normal-angle subduction is occurring, the slab is visible as a high-velocity body with a low-velocity mantle wedge above it, extending eastward from the active arc. Where flat-slab subduction is occurring, slab velocities increase to the east while velocities in the overlying lithosphere decrease, consistent with the slab dewatering and gradually hydrating the overlying mantle. The hydration of the slab may be contributing to the excess buoyancy of the subducting oceanic lithosphere, helping to drive flat-slab subduction.

  14. Pronounced Shear Velocity Asymmetry in the Mantle Across the Juan de Fuca Ridge and Curious Lack of Features at the Gorda Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, S. W.; Ruan, Y.; Forsyth, D. W.

    2015-12-01

    With new Rayleigh-wave tomography results, we have detected a clear and strong asymmetry in the shear velocity structure of the Juan de Fuca ridge. Concentrated in a relatively thin layer with a depth range of ~30-60km, there lies a region of very low shear velocity, with velocities ranging from ~3.8km/s to 4.0km/s. Such low velocities provide strong evidence for the presence of partial melt. This low-velocity region is highly asymmetric, extending much further west than east of the ridge. Especially at shallow depths of ~35 km, this low-velocity region is concentrated just west of the southern portion of the ridge. Peaking near the Axial Seamount, the youngest of the Cobb-Eickelberg Seamounts, it extends south to the region around the small Vance Seamounts just north of the junction with the Blanco Fracture Zone. The Juan de Fuca plate is relatively stationary in the hotspot reference frame, and the Juan de Fuca ridge migrates westward in the hotspot reference frame. Seamounts are overwhelmingly concentrated on the western flank of the ridge, and an asymmetric upwelling driven by migration in the hotspot reference frame has been proposed to explain the seamount asymmetry (i.e. Davis and Karsten, 1986). Our velocity asymmetry, which matches the seamount asymmetry, provides evidence for this asymmetric upwelling and its connection to migration in the absolute hotspot reference frame. In the shear velocity results, the Gorda ridge displays a remarkable lack of features, with no clearly identifiable expression in the subsurface velocity. There is evidence of a broad low-velocity feature beneath Gorda beginning at a depth of ~150 km, but no clear shallow features can be tied to the ridge. At the depths we can resolve (~25-250km), the anisotropy beneath and within the Juan de Fuca plate is small, indicating a deep source of the shear wave splitting results (Bodmer et al., in press), which indicate a fast axis aligned with the Juan de Fuca plate's absolute motion. Around

  15. Dependences of Ratio of the Luminosity to Ionization on Velocity and Chemical Composition of Meteors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narziev, M.

    2011-01-01

    On the bases of results simultaneous photographic and radio echo observations, the results complex radar and television observations of meteors and also results of laboratory modeling of processes of a luminescence and ionization, correlation between of luminous intensity Ip to linear electronic density q from of velocities and chemical structure are investigated. It is received that by increasing value of velocities of meteors and decrease of nuclear weight of substance of particles, lg Ip/q decreased more than one order.

  16. Structure of turbulent flow at a river confluence with momentum and velocity ratios close to 1: Insight provided by an eddy-resolving numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantinescu, George; Miyawaki, Shinjiro; Rhoads, Bruce; Sukhodolov, Alexander; Kirkil, Gokhan

    2011-05-01

    River confluences are complex hydrodynamic environments where convergence of incoming flows produces complicated patterns of fluid motion, including the development of large-scale turbulence structures. Accurately simulating confluence hydrodynamics represents a considerable challenge for numerical modeling of river flows. This study uses an eddy-resolving numerical model to simulate the mean flow and large-scale turbulence structure at an asymmetrical river confluence with a concordant bed when the momentum ratio between the two incoming streams is close to 1. Results of the simulation are compared with field data on mean flow and turbulence structure. The simulation shows that the mixing interface is populated by quasi-two-dimensional eddies. Successive eddies have opposing senses of rotation. The mixing layer structure resembles that of a wake behind a bluff body (wake mode). Strong streamwise-oriented vortical (SOV) cells form on both sides of the mixing layer, a finding consistent with patterns inferred from the field data. The predicted mean flow fields show that flow curvature has an important influence on streamwise variation of circulation within the cores of the two primary SOV cells. These SOV cells, along with vortices generated by flow over a submerged block of sediment at one of the banks, strongly influence distributions of the streamwise velocity and turbulent kinetic energy downstream of the junction. Comparison of the eddy-resolving simulation results with predictions from the steady Spalart-Allmaras RANS model shows that the latter fails to predict important features of the measured distributions of streamwise velocity and turbulent kinetic energy because the RANS model underpredicts the strength of the SOV cells. Analysis of instantaneous and mean bed shear stress distributions indicates that the SOV cells enhance bed shear stresses to a greater degree than the quasi-two-dimensional eddies in the mixing interface.

  17. Verification of the Velocity Structure in Mexico Basin Using the H/V Spectral Ratio of Microtremors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushima, S.; Sanchez-Sesma, F. J.; Nagashima, F.; Kawase, H.

    2011-12-01

    The authors have been proposing a new theory to calculate the Horizontal-to-Vertical (H/V) spectral ratio of microtremors assuming that the wave field is completely diffuse and have attempted to apply the theory to understand the observed microtremor data. It is anticipated that this new theory can be applied to detect the subsurface velocity structure beneath urban area. Precise information about the subsurface velocity structure is essential for predicting strong ground motion accurately, which is necessary to mitigate seismic disaster. Mexico basin, who witnessed severe damage during the 1985 Michoacán Earthquake (Ms 8.1) several hundreds of kilometers away from the source region, is an interesting location in which the reassessment of soil properties is urgent. Because of subsidence, having improved estimates of properties is mandatory. In order to estimate possible changes in the velocity structure in the Mexico basin, we measured microtremors at strong motion observation sites in Mexico City. At those sites, information about the velocity profiles are available. Using the obtained data, we derive observed H/V spectral ratio and compare it with the theoretical H/V spectral ratio to gauge the goodness of our new theory. First we compared the observed H/V spectral ratios for five stations to see the diverse characteristics of this measurement. Then we compared the observed H/V spectral ratios with the theoretical predictions to confirm our theory. We assumed the velocity model of previous surveys at the strong motions observation sites as an initial model. We were able to closely fit both the peak frequency and amplitude of the observed H/V spectral ratio, by the theoretical H/V spectral ratio calculated by our new method. These results show that we have a good initial model. However, the theoretical estimates need some improvement to perfectly fit the observed H/V spectral ratio. This may be an indication that the initial model needs some adjustments. We

  18. [The radial velocity measurement accuracy of different spectral type low resolution stellar spectra at different signal-to-noise ratio].

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng-Fei; Luo, A-Li; Zhao, Yong-Heng

    2014-02-01

    The radial velocity of the star is very important for the study of the dynamics structure and chemistry evolution of the Milky Way, is also an useful tool for looking for variable or special objects. In the present work, we focus on calculating the radial velocity of different spectral types of low-resolution stellar spectra by adopting a template matching method, so as to provide effective and reliable reference to the different aspects of scientific research We choose high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) spectra of different spectral type stellar from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), and add different noise to simulate the stellar spectra with different SNR. Then we obtain theradial velocity measurement accuracy of different spectral type stellar spectra at different SNR by employing a template matching method. Meanwhile, the radial velocity measurement accuracy of white dwarf stars is analyzed as well. We concluded that the accuracy of radial velocity measurements of early-type stars is much higher than late-type ones. For example, the 1-sigma standard error of radial velocity measurements of A-type stars is 5-8 times as large as K-type and M-type stars. We discuss the reason and suggest that the very narrow lines of late-type stars ensure the accuracy of measurement of radial velocities, while the early-type stars with very wide Balmer lines, such as A-type stars, become sensitive to noise and obtain low accuracy of radial velocities. For the spectra of white dwarfs stars, the standard error of radial velocity measurement could be over 50 km x s(-1) because of their extremely wide Balmer lines. The above conclusion will provide a good reference for stellar scientific study.

  19. Record of the Pacific Large Low Shear Velocity Province Upwellings Preserved in the Cretaceous Large Igneous Provinces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madrigal, P.; Gazel, E.; Flores, K. E.; Bizimis, M.; Jicha, B. R.

    2015-12-01

    As the surface expression of deep mantle dynamics, Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) are associated with the edges of large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVP) rooted at the core-mantle boundary. Instabilities in the LLSVP can cause periodic upwellings of material in the form of mantle plumes, which impact the lithosphere forming LIPs. However, the time frames of these massive lava outpourings are still uncertain. While continental LIPs are more readily accessible, oceanic LIPs have only been studied through drilling and sampling of fragments accreted to continental margins or island arcs, hence, they are relatively less understood. The impact of oceanic LIPs on oceanic biota is conspicuously recorded in global occurrences of black shale deposits that evidence episodes of anoxia and mass extinctions shortly after the formation of LIPs that ultimately can affect life on the entire planet. Our new geochemical and geochronological data of accreted Pacific LIPs found in the coasts of Nicoya Peninsula in Costa Rica record three LIP pulses possibly reflecting upwelling periods of the LLSVP at 140, 120 and 90 Ma. In order to test different models of origin of these LIPS, we created a complete reconstruction of the Pacific Plate configuration from the Mid-Jurassic to Upper-Cretaceous to show the existing correlation between upwelling pulses at edges of the Pacific LLSVP, oceanic anoxic events and the age from Pacific LIPs. We propose that since the formation of the Pacific plate at circa 175-180 Ma, a series of upwellings that interacted with mid-ocean ridge systems separated by 10-20 Ma have affected the planet periodically forming oceanic LIPs that still can be found today on the Pacific seafloor and accreted along the plate margins.

  20. Explicit causal relations between material damping ratio and phase velocity from exact solutions of the dispersion equations of linear viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meza-Fajardo, Kristel C.; Lai, Carlo G.

    2007-12-01

    The theory of linear viscoelasticity is the simplest constitutive model that can be adopted to accurately predict the small-strain mechanical response of materials exhibiting the ability to both store and dissipate strain energy. An important result implied by this theory is the relationship existing between material attenuation and the velocity of propagation of a mechanical disturbance. The functional dependence of these important parameters is represented by the Kramers-Kronig (KK) equations, also known as dispersion equations, which are nothing but a statement of the necessary and sufficient conditions to satisfy physical causality. This paper illustrates the derivation of exact solutions of the KK equations to provide explicit relations between frequency-dependent phase velocity and material damping ratio (or equivalently, quality factor). The assumptions that form the basis of the derivation are not beyond those established by the standard theory of viscoelasticity for a viscoelastic solid. The explicit expression for phase velocity as a function of damping ratio was derived by means of the theory of linear singular integral equations, and in particular by the solution of the associated Homogeneous Riemann Boundary Value Problem. It is shown that the same solution may be obtained also by using the implications of physical causality on the Fourier Transform. On the other hand, the explicit solution for damping ratio as a function of phase velocity was found through the components of the complex wavenumber. The exact solutions make it possible to obtain frequency-dependent material damping ratio solely from phase velocity measurements, and conversely. Hence, these relations provide an innovative and inexpensive tool to determine the small-strain dynamic properties of geomaterials. It is shown that the obtained rigorous solutions are in good agreement with well-known solutions based on simplifying assumptions that have been developed in the fields of seismology

  1. Simulation comparison of a decoupled longitudinal control system and a velocity vector control wheel steering system during landings in wind shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimball, G., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A simulator comparison of the velocity vector control wheel steering (VCWS) system and a decoupled longitudinal control system is presented. The piloting task was to use the electronic attitude direction indicator (EADI) to capture and maintain a 3 degree glide slope in the presence of wind shear and to complete the landing using the perspective runway included on the EADI. The decoupled control system used constant prefilter and feedback gains to provide steady state decoupling of flight path angle, pitch angle, and forward velocity. The decoupled control system improved the pilots' ability to control airspeed and flight path angle during the final stages of an approach made in severe wind shear. The system also improved their ability to complete safe landings. The pilots preferred the decoupled control system in severe winds and, on a pilot rating scale, rated the approach and landing task with the decoupled control system as much as 3 to 4 increments better than use of the VCWS system.

  2. Phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging measurements in intracranial aneurysms in vivo of flow patterns, velocity fields, and wall shear stress: comparison with computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Boussel, Loic; Rayz, Vitaliy; Martin, Alastair; Acevedo-Bolton, Gabriel; Lawton, Michael T; Higashida, Randall; Smith, Wade S; Young, William L; Saloner, David

    2009-02-01

    Evolution of intracranial aneurysms is known to be related to hemodynamic forces such as wall shear stress (WSS) and maximum shear stress (MSS). Estimation of these parameters can be performed using numerical simulations with computational fluid dynamics (CFD), but can also be directly measured with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a time-dependent 3D phase-contrast sequence with encoding of each of the three components of the velocity vectors (7D-MRV). To study the accuracy of 7D-MRV in estimating these parameters in vivo, in comparison with CFD, 7D-MRV and patient-specific CFD modeling was performed for 3 patients who had intracranial aneurysms. Visual and quantitative analyses of the flow pattern and distribution of velocities, MSS, and WSS were performed using the two techniques. Spearman's coefficients of correlation between the two techniques were 0.56 for the velocity field, 0.48 for MSS, and 0.59 for WSS. Visual analysis and Bland-Altman plots showed good agreement for flow pattern and velocities but large discrepancies for MSS and WSS. These results indicate that 7D-MRV can be used in vivo to measure velocity flow fields and for estimating MSS and WSS. Currently, however, this method cannot accurately quantify the latter two parameters.

  3. Shear Wave Velocity and Site Amplification Factors for 25 Strong-Motion Instrument Stations Affected by the M5.8 Mineral, Virginia, Earthquake of August 23, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kayen, Robert; Carkin, Bradley; Corbett, Skye; Zangwill, Aliza; Estevez, Ivan; Lai, Lena

    2015-01-01

    Vertical one-dimensional shear wave velocity (Vs) profiles are presented for 25 strong-motion instrument sites along the Mid-Atlantic eastern seaboard, Piedmont region, and Appalachian region, which surround the epicenter of the M5.8 Mineral, Virginia, Earthquake of August 23, 2011. Testing was performed at sites in Pennsylvania, Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia, the District of Columbia, North Carolina, and Tennessee. The purpose of the study is to determine the detailed site velocity profile, the average velocity in the upper 30 meters of the profile (VS,30), the average velocity for the entire profile (VS,Z), and the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) site classification. The Vs profiles are estimated using a non-invasive continuous-sine-wave method for gathering the dispersion characteristics of surface waves. A large trailer-mounted active source was used to shake the ground during the testing and produce the surface waves. Shear wave velocity profiles were inverted from the averaged dispersion curves using three independent methods for comparison, and the root-mean square combined coefficient of variation (COV) of the dispersion and inversion calculations are estimated for each site.

  4. Three-dimensional shear velocity anisotropic model of Piton de la Fournaise Volcano (La Réunion Island) from ambient seismic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordret, Aurélien; Rivet, Diane; Landès, Matthieu; Shapiro, Nikolaï M.

    2015-01-01

    We cross correlate 4 years of seismic noise from the seismic network of Piton de la Fournaise Volcano (La Réunion Island) to measure the group velocity dispersion curves of Rayleigh and Love waves. We average measurements from vertical and radial components to obtain 577 Rayleigh wave dispersion curves. The transverse components provided 395 Love wave dispersion curves. We regionalize the group velocities measurements into 2-D velocity maps between 0.4 and 8 s. Finally, we locally inverted these maps for a pseudo 3-D anisotropic shear-velocity model down to 3 km below the sea level using a Neighborhood Algorithm. The 3-D isotropic shear-wave model shows three distinct high-velocity anomalies surrounded by a low-velocity ring. The anomaly located below the present "Plaine des Sables" could be related to an old intrusive body at the location of the former volcanic center before it migrated toward its present location. The second high-velocity body located below the summit of the volcano likely corresponds to the actual preferential dyke intrusion zone as highlighted by the seismicity. The third high-velocity anomaly located below the "Grandes Pentes" and the "Grand Brûlé" areas and is an imprint of the solidified magma chamber of the dismantled "Les Alizés" Volcano. Radial anisotropy shows two main anomalies: positive anisotropy above sea level highlighting the recent edifice of Piton de la Fournaise with an accumulation of horizontal lava flows and the second one below the sea level with a negative anisotropy corresponding to the ancient edifice of Piton de la Fournaise dominated by intrusions of vertical dykes.

  5. Downhole Measurements of Shear- and Compression-Wave Velocities in Boreholes C4993, C4996, C4997 and C4998 at the Waste Treatment Plant DOE Hanford Site.

    SciTech Connect

    Redpath, Bruce B.

    2007-04-27

    This report describes the procedures and the results of a series of downhole measurements of shear- and compression-wave velocities performed as part of the Seismic Boreholes Project at the site of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The measurements were made in several stages from October 2006 through early February 2007. Although some fieldwork was carried out in conjunction with the University of Texas at Austin (UT), all data acquired by UT personnel are reported separately by that organization.

  6. Laser induced fluorescence measurements of axial velocity, velocity shear, and parallel ion temperature profiles during the route to plasma turbulence in a linear magnetized plasma device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty Thakur, S.; Adriany, K.; Gosselin, J. J.; McKee, J.; Scime, E. E.; Sears, S. H.; Tynan, G. R.

    2016-11-01

    We report experimental measurements of the axial plasma flow and the parallel ion temperature in a magnetized linear plasma device. We used laser induced fluorescence to measure Doppler resolved ion velocity distribution functions in argon plasma to obtain spatially resolved axial velocities and parallel ion temperatures. We also show changes in the parallel velocity profiles during the transition from resistive drift wave dominated plasma to a state of weak turbulence driven by multiple plasma instabilities.

  7. Ultransonic velocity measurements in sheared granular layers: Implications for the evolution of dynamic elastic moduli of compositionally-diverse cataclastic fault gouges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuth, Matthew William

    The objective of this project was to investigate the mechanical and elastic evolution of laboratory fault gouge analogs during active shear. To do this, I designed, constructed, and implemented a new technique for measuring changes in the elastic properties of granular layers subjected to shear deformation. Granular layers serve as an experimental analog to gouge layers forming in cataclastic faults. The technique combines a double-direct shear configuration with a method of determining ultrasonic elastic compressional and shear wavespeed. Experimental results are divided into chapters based on application to fundamental mechanics or to field cases. The first set of experiments allowed us to develop the technique and apply it to a range of end- member materials including quartz sands, montmorillonite clays, and mixtures of sand and clay. Emphasis is placed on normal stress unload-reload cycles and the resulting behavior as clay content is varied within the layer. We observe consistent decrease in wavespeed with shear for sand, and nonlinear but increasing wavespeed for clay and the sand/clay mixture. The second set of experiments involves the application of this technique to measurements conducted under fluid saturation and controlled pressure conditions, examining the behavior of materials from the Nankai Trough Accretionary Prism under shear. I introduce the effects of variable displacement rate and hold time, with implications for fault stability and rate-and-state frictional sliding. The experiments demonstrate a consistent inverse relationship between sliding velocity and wavespeed, and an increase in wavespeed associated with holds. The third set of experiments deals with velocity through stick-slipping glass beads, which has implications for fundamental granular mechanics questions involving velocity-weakening materials. I find that wavespeed decreases in the time between events and increases at "slips", suggesting a strong control related to changes in

  8. Very Broadband Rayleigh-Wave Dispersion (0.06 - 60 Hz) and Shear-Wave Velocity Structure Under Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schramm, K. A.; Bilek, S. L.; Patton, H. J.; Abbott, R. E.; Stead, R.; Pancha, A.; White, R.

    2009-12-01

    Earth structure plays an important role in the generation of seismic waves for all sources. Nowhere is this more evident than at near-surface depths where man-made sources, such as explosions, are conducted. For example, short-period Rayleigh waves (Rg) are excited and propagate in the upper 2 km of Earth's crust. The importance of Rg in the generation of S waves from explosion sources through near-source scattering depends greatly on the shear-wave velocity structure at very shallow depths. Using three distinct datasets, we present a very broadband Rayleigh-wave phase velocity dispersion curve for the Yucca Flat (YF) region of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The first dataset consists of waveforms of historic NTS explosions recorded on regional seismic networks and will provide information for the lowest frequencies (0.06-0.3 Hz). The second dataset is comprised of waveforms from a non-nuclear explosion on YF recorded at near-local distances and will be used for mid-range frequencies (0.2-1.5 Hz). The third dataset contains high-frequency waveforms recorded from refraction microtremor surveys on YF. This dataset provides information between 1.5 and 60 Hz. Initial results from the high frequency dataset indicate velocities range from 0.45-0.9 km/s at 1.5 Hz and 0.25-0.45 km/s at 60 Hz. The broadband nature of the dispersion curve will allow us to invert for the shear-wave velocity structure to 10 km depth, with focus on shallow depths where nuclear tests were conducted in the YF region. The velocity model will be used by researchers as a tool to aid the development of new explosion source models that incorporate shear wave generation. The new model can also be used to help improve regional distance yield estimation and source discrimination for small events.

  9. Crustal and upper mantle shear velocities of Iberia, the Alboran Sea, and North Africa from ambient noise and ballistic finite-frequency Rayleigh wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palomeras, I.; Villasenor, A.; Thurner, S.; Levander, A.; Gallart, J.; mimoun, H.

    2013-12-01

    The complex Mesozoic-Cenozoic Alpine deformation in the western Mediterranean extends from the Pyrenees in northern Spain to the Atlas Mountains in southern Morocco. The Iberian plate was accreted to the European plate in late Cretaceous, resulting in the formation of the Pyrenees. Cenozoic African-European convergence resulted in subduction of the Tethys oceanic plate beneath Europe. Rapid Oligocene slab rollback from eastern Iberia spread eastward and southward, with the trench breaking into three segments by the time it reached the African coast. One trench segment moved southwestward and westward creating the Alboran Sea, floored by highly extended continental crust, and building the encircling Betics Rif mountains comprising the Gibraltar arc, and the Atlas mountains, which formed as the inversion of a Jurassic rift. A number of recent experiments have instrumented this region with broad-band arrays (the US PICASSO array, Spanish IberArray and Siberia arrays, the University of Munster array), which, including the Spanish, Portuguese, and Moroccan permanent networks, provide a combined array of 350 stations having an average interstation spacing of ~60 km. Taking advantage of this dense deployment, we have calculated the Rayleigh waves phase velocities from ambient noise for short periods (4 s to 40 s) and teleseismic events for longer periods (20 s to 167 s). Approximately 50,000 stations pairs were used to measure the phase velocity from ambient noise and more than 160 teleseismic events to measure phase velocity for longer periods. The inversion of the phase velocity dispersion curves provides a 3D shear velocity for the crust and uppermost mantle. Our results show differences between the various tectonic regions that extend to upper mantle depths (~200 km). In Iberia we obtain, on average, higher upper mantle shear velocities in the western Variscan region than in the younger eastern part. We map high upper mantle velocities (>4.6 km/s) beneath the

  10. A 3-D shear velocity model of the southern North America and the Caribbean plates from ambient noise and earthquake tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaite, B.; Villaseñor, A.; Iglesias, A.; Herraiz, M.; Jiménez-Munt, I.

    2014-10-01

    We use group velocities from earthquake tomography together with group and phase velocities from ambient noise tomography (ANT) of Rayleigh-waves to invert for the 3-D shear-wave velocity structure (5-70 km) of the Caribbean (CAR) and southern North American (NAM) plates. The lithospheric model proposed offers a complete image of the crust and uppermost-mantle with imprints of the tectonic evolution. One of the most striking features inferred is the main role of the Ouachita-Marathon-Sonora orogeny front on the crustal seismic structure of NAM plate. A new imaged feature is the low crustal velocities along USA-Mexico border. The model also shows a break of the E-W mantle velocity dichotomy of the NAM and CAR plates beneath the Isthmus of Tehuantepec and Yucatan Block. High upper-mantle velocities along the Mesoamerican Subduction Zone coincide with inactive volcanic areas while the lowest velocities correspond to active volcanic arcs and thin lithospheric mantle regions.

  11. Late Permian Melt Percolation through the Crust of North-Central Africa and Its Possible Relationship to the African Large Low Shear Velocity Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shellnutt, J. G.; Lee, T. Y.; Yang, C. C.; Wu, J. C.; Wang, K. L.; Lo, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    The Doba gabbro was collected from an exploration well through the Cretaceous Doba Basin of Southern Chad. The gabbro is comprised mostly of plagioclase, clinopyroxene and Fe-Ti oxide minerals and displays cumulus mineral textures. Whole rock 40Ar/39Ar step-heating geochronology yielded a Late Permian plateau age of 257 ± 1 Ma. The major and trace elemental geochemistry shows that the gabbro is mildly alkalic to tholeiitic in composition and has trace element ratios (i.e. La/YbN > 7; Sm/YbPM > 3.4; Nb/Y > 1; Zr/Y > 5) indicative of a basaltic melt derived from a garnet-bearing sublithospheric mantle source. The moderately enriched Sr-Nd isotopes (i.e. ISr = 0.70495 to 0.70839; eNd(T) = -1.0 to -1.3) fall within the mantle array (i.e. OIB-like) and are similar to other Late Permian plutonic rocks of North-Central Africa (i.e. ISr = 0.7040 to 0.7070). The Late Permian plutonic igneous complexes of North-Central Africa are geologically associated with tectonic lineaments suggesting they acted as conduits for sublithospheric melts to migrate to middle/upper crustal levels. The source of the magmas may be related to the spatial-temporal association of North-Central Africa with the African large low shear velocity province (LLSVP). The African LLSVP has remained stable since the Late Carboniferous and was beneath the Doba basin during the Permian. We suggest that melts derived from deep seated sources related to the African LLSVP percolated through the North-Central African crust via older tectonic lineaments and form a discontiguous magmatic province.

  12. SAVANI2: towards a waveform-based image of shear-velocity variations underneath Europe embedded in a global model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auer, Ludwig; Boschi, Lapo; van Driel, Martin; Becker, Thorsten; Nissen-Meyer, Tarje; Sigloch, Karin; Hosseini-zad, Kasra; Giardini, Domenico

    2014-05-01

    In a recent study (Auer et al. 2013, in revision) we have devised a novel tomography approach to image radially anisotropic shear-velocity variations in the Earth's mantle. By applying our tomography toolbox to a comprehensive compilation of surface-wave phase delays from fundamental modes up to the 6th overtone and cross-correlation traveltimes of major body-wave phases, we derived the multi-resolution tomography model SAVANI, which is one of the first whole-mantle models of radial S-wave anisotropy. Here we illustrate the first steps towards the second iteration of our model ("SAVANI2"), in which we define Europe and the surrounding regions as the target area for a higher-resolution regional revision of our initial model. To this end, we augment our global database with additional teleseismic and regional broadband measurements recorded within the last five years. We download raw waveforms from the Orfeus and IRIS data centers in a fully automated way with a python based toolbox and extract multiple-frequency traveltime delays in the period range between 5 and 25 s employing the method of Sigloch et al. (2006). Furthermore, we replace the crustal model CRUST2.0 with its successor CRUST1. Importantly, waveform observations will be interpreted using Fréchet sensitivity kernels computed with AxiSEM (Nissen-Meyer et al., 2007), which is an efficient visco-elastic spectral element solver for axisymmetric background models. The main idea behind SAVANI2 is to keep semi-approximate (ray) theory where appropriate (global long-wavelength structure, surface wave dispersion), but to revert to a full-waveform interpretation where necessary (regional scale, non-geometrical wave phenomena). Our hybrid approach to waveform inversion has multi-scale capabilities and is essentially equivalent to the first iteration step of a Gauss-Newton type inverse problem, thus allowing full access to the model resolution matrix. The set of algorithms we are developing represent a

  13. Anisotropic Shear Velocity Models of the North American Upper Mantle Based on Waveform Inversion and Numerical Wavefield Computations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Earthscope TA deployment across the continental United-State (US) has reached its eastern part, providing the opportunity for high-resolution 3D seismic velocity imaging of both lithosphere and asthenosphere across the entire north-American continent (NA). Previously (Yuan et al., 2014), we presented a 3D radially anisotropic shear wave (Vs) model of North America (NA) lithospheric mantle based on full waveform tomography, combining teleseismic and regional distance data sampling the NA. Regional wavefield computations were performed numerically, using a regional Spectral Element code (RegSEM, Cupillard et al., 2012), while teleseismic computations were performed approximately, using non-linear asymptotic coupling theory (NACT, Li and Romanowicz, 1995). For both datasets, the inversion was performed iteratively, using a Gauss-Newton scheme, with kernels computed using either NACT or the surface wave, path average approximation (PAVA), depending on the source-station distance. We here present a new radially anisotropic lithospheric/asthenospheric model of Vs for NA based entirely on SEM-based numerical waveforms from an augmented dataset of 155 regional events and 70 teleseismic events. The forward wavefield computations are performed using RegSEM down to 40s, starting from our most recent whole mantle 3D radially anisotropic Vs model (SEMUCB-wm1, French and Romanowicz, 2014). To model teleseismic wavefields within our regional computational domain, we developed a new modeling technique which allows us to replace a distant source by virtual sources at the boundary of the computational domain (Masson et al., 2014). Computing virtual sources requires one global simulation per teleseismic events.We then compare two models obtained: one using NACT/PAVA kernels as in our previous work, and another using hybrid kernels, where the Hessian is computed using NACT/PAVA, but the gradient is computed numerically from the adjoint wavefield, providing more accurate kernels

  14. Anisotropic Shear-Velocity Structure of the Lithosphere-Asthenosphere System in the Central Pacific from the NoMelt Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, P.; Gaherty, J. B.; Jin, G.; Collins, J. A.; Lizarralde, D.; Evans, R. L.; Hirth, G.

    2014-12-01

    Recent theoretical models of the seismic properties of mantle rocks predict seismic velocity profiles for mature oceanic lithosphere that are fundamentally inconsistent with the best observations of seismic velocities in two ways. Observations of strong positive velocity gradients with depth, and a very sharp and very shallow low-velocity asthenosphere boundary (LAB), both suggest that non-thermal factors such as bulk composition, mineral fabric, grain size, and dehydration play important roles in controlling the formation of the lithosphere, and thus the underlying LAB. There is little consensus on which of these factors are dominant, in part because observations of detailed lithosphere structure are limited. To address this discrepancy, we conducted the NoMelt experiment on ~70 Ma Pacific lithosphere between the Clarion & Clipperton fracture zones. The experiment consists of a 600x400 km array of broad-band ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) and magnetotelluric instruments, and an active-source reflection/refraction experiment. Here we characterize the shear-velocity structure and its seismic anisotropy across the lithosphere-asthenosphere system beneath the array using surface-wave dispersion. Of the 27 deployed instruments, 21 were recovered, all of which produced useful data on the seismometer and the differential pressure gauge in the 20-200 s period band. Energetic, high S/N Rayleigh waves and useful love waves are observed from over 21 and 8 events with Mw > 6.5 respectively. Models of shear velocity as a function of depth derived from intra-array Rayleigh-wave phase velocities are characterized by a relatively constant, high-velocity lithosphere to ~70 km depth, with a rapid drop in velocity below that depth. The combination of a high-velocity lid with an abrupt transition to the low-velocity zone cannot be explained by plate-cooling models. The Rayleigh waves display strong azimuthal anisotropy with a fast direction parallel to fossil spreading at all

  15. Crustal and upper mantle 3D shear wave velocity structure of the High Lava Plains, Oregon, determined from ambient noise tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson-Hedgecock, S.; Wagner, L.; Fouch, M. J.; James, D. E.

    2011-12-01

    We present the results of inversions for 3D shear velocity structure of the crust and uppermost mantle beneath the High Lava Plains, Oregon using data from ~300 broadband stations of the High Lava Plains seismic experiment and the EarthScope/USArray Transportable Array (TA). The High Lava Plains (HLP) is a WNW progressive silicic volcanism, initiated ~14.5 Ma near the Owyhee Plateau and is currently active at the Newberry caldera. The Yellowstone Snake River Plain (YSRP) volcanic track is temporally contemporaneous with the HLP, but trends to the northeast, parallel to North American plate motion. The cause of volcanism along the HLP is debated and has been variously attributed to Basin and Range extension, back-arc extension, rollback of the subducting Juan de Fuca plate, and an intra-continental hotspot/plume source. Additionally the relationship between the HLP, YSRP, and Columbia River Basalts (CRB), the three major post-17Ma intracontinental volcanic provinces of the Pacific Northwest, is not well understood. The 3D shear velocity structure of the crust and uppermost mantle to ~65km depth is determined from fundamental mode Rayleigh wave ambient noise phase velocity maps at periods up to 40s. The use of ambient noise tomography with the dense station spacing of the combined High Lava Plains seismic experiment and the EarthScope/USArray Transportable Array (TA) datasets allows the shallow structure of the High Lava Plains to be imaged in finer detail than previous ANT studies that focused on the entire western United States. In the crust, low velocities in central Oregon are observed in association with the Brothers Fault Zone, Jordan and Diamond Craters and Steens Mountain regions in addition to the strong low velocity zone associated with the Cascades to the west. To the east of the HLP, low velocities are observed to about 10km depth in the western SRP. In the eastern SRP we observe a shallow veneer of low velocities underlain by a ~10km thick high velocity

  16. Detailed velocity ratio mapping during the aftershock sequence as a tool to monitor the fluid activity within the fault plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachura, Martin; Fischer, Tomáš

    2016-11-01

    The rheological properties of Earth materials are expressed by their seismic velocities and VP /VS ratio, which is easily obtained by the Wadati method. Its double-difference version based on cross-correlated waveforms enables focusing on very local structures and allows tracking, monitoring and analysing the fluid activity along faults. We applied the method to three 2014 mainshock-aftershock sequences in the West Bohemia/Vogtland (Czech Republic) earthquake swarm area and found pronounced VP /VS variations in time and space for different clusters of events located on a steeply dipping fault zone at depths ranging from 7 to 11 km. Each cluster reflects the spatial distribution of earthquakes along the fault plane but also the temporal evolution of the activity. Low values of VP /VS ratio down to 1.59 ± 0.02 were identified in the deeper part of the fault zone whereas higher values up to 1.73 ± 0.01 were estimated for clusters located on a shallower segment of the fault. Temporally the low VP /VS values are associated with the early aftershocks, while the higher VP /VS ratios are related only to later aftershocks. We interpret this behaviour as a result of saturation of the focal zone by compressible fluids: in the beginning the mainshock and early aftershocks driven by over-pressured fluids increased the porosity due to opening the fluid pathways. This process was associated with a decrease of the velocity ratio. In later stages the pressure and porosity decreased and the velocity ratio recovered to levels of 1.73, typical for a Poissonian medium and Earth's crust.

  17. S-wave velocity structures and Vp/Vs ratios beneath the South Yellow Sea from ocean bottom seismograph data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Weina; Zhang, Xunhua; Meng, Xiangjun; Wu, Zhiqiang; Qi, Jianghao; Hao, Tianyao; Zheng, Yanpeng; Kai, Liu

    2017-04-01

    In 2013, a wide-angle seismic survey (OBS2013) was conducted perpendicular to the south coast of the Shandong Peninsula in China, to investigate the crustal structure of the South Yellow Sea (SYS). Previous interpretation of the crustal structure of SYS did not use S-wave and Vp/Vs ratios as a constraint. In this study, we constructed the converted S-wave velocity model and Vp/Vs ratios of the northern SYS. Many receiver gathers showed good reflected and refracted S-phases, particularly in the Qianliyan Uplift. The S-wave crustal structure and Vp/Vs ratios were obtained based on a previous P-wave model which utilized RayInvr software by adjusting travel times. Results demonstrated that the S-wave velocities increased with depth, as in the P-wave model. This paper provided a lithologic interpretation of the velocity model. In the uppermost layer beneath the water, most Vp/Vs ratios were high (> 3). The nappe beneath the northwestern OBS2013 mainly consisted of granite and felsic gneiss. In the North Depression (ND), the Vp/Vs ratios of the marine sedimentary layer displayed the characteristics of carbonate rock. However, in the southeast of the ND, the sediment beneath the continental deposit layer was most likely composed of sandstone. The marine sedimentation in the Central Uplift (CU) mainly probably consisted of carbonate rocks with sandstone. Lack of strata with rich sand in the Permian and Triassic period suggested there was a more drastic uplift in the ND than the one in the CU during the Indo-Chinese epoch.

  18. Lithospheric Shear Velocity and Discontinuity Structure of Hudson Bay from S-to-P Receiver Functions and Jointly Inverted P-to-S Receiver Functions and Rayleigh Wave Phase Velocities.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porritt, R. W.; Miller, M. S.; Darbyshire, F. A.

    2014-12-01

    Hudson Bay overlies some of the thickest Precambrian lithosphere on Earth, whose internal structures contain important clues to the earliest workings of plate formation. The Hudson Bay Lithospheric Experiment (HuBLE) has thus far constrained its seismic wavespeed, anisotropy, and discontinuity structures. However, previous work has either focused on a single imaging method or briefly compared two independent methods. In this study, we combine surface wave dispersion curves with P to S receiver functions (PRF) to jointly invert for 1D shear velocity, and also compute independent S to P receiver functions (SRF) using teleseismic earthquakes recorded at 36 broadband seismic stations from the HuBLE experiment and 9 additional regional stations. High shear velocities are observed to depths of 200-300 km in the region, indicating a thick depleted lithospheric keel, with maximum thickness in the center of Hudson Bay. The 1D shear velocity profiles typically exhibit a low-velocity zone in the lower crust, consistent with the hypothesis of post-orogenic or syn-orogenic lower crustal flow or the tectonic burial of metasediments. Observations of a flat Moho in the Rae domain of northwestern Hudson Bay are consistent with an Archean-aged crust, which has remained unaltered since formation. Structures observed within the mantle lithosphere in the depth-stacked S to P receiver functions appear to dip from the Hearne domain towards the Rae domain, suggestive of lithospheric formation through plate tectonic processes. This implies that plate tectonic processes were in action during the Archean when these provinces formed.

  19. Shear-wave Velocity Structure and Inter-Seismic Strain Accumulation in the Up-Dip Region of the Cascadia Subduction Zone: Similarities to Tohoku?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, J. A.; McGuire, J. J.; Wei, M.

    2013-12-01

    The up-dip region of subduction zone thrusts is difficult to study using land-based seismic and geodetic networks, yet documenting its ability to store and release elastic strain is critical for understanding the mechanics of great subduction earthquakes and tsunami generation. The 2011 Tohoku earthquake produced extremely large slip in the shallowest portion of the subduction zone beneath a region of the fore-arc that is comprised of extremely low-velocity, unconsolidated sediments [Tsuru et al. JGR 2012]. The influence of the sediment material properties on the co-seismic slip distribution and tsunami generation can be considerable through both the effects on the dynamic wavefield during the rupture [Kozdon and Dunham, BSSA 2012] and potentially the build up of strain during the inter-seismic period. As part of the 2010-2011 SeaJade experiment [Scherwath et al, EOS 2011], we deployed 10 ocean bottom seismographs (OBS) on the continental slope offshore of Vancouver Island in the region of the NEPTUNE Canada observatory. One goal of the experiment is to measure the shear modulus of the sediments lying above the subducting plate using the seafloor compliance technique. Using seafloor acceleration measured by broadband seismometer and seafloor pressure measured by Differential Pressure Gauge (DPG), we estimate the compliance spectrum in the infra-gravity wave band (~0.002-0.04 Hz) at 9 sites following the methodology of Crawford et al. [JGR, 1991]. We calibrated DPG sensitivities using laboratory measurements and by comparing teleseismic Rayleigh arrivals recorded on the seismometer and DPG channels [Webb, pers. comm]. We correct the vertical-component seismometer data for tilt using the procedure of Crawford and Webb [BSSA, 2000], Corrections for the gravitational attraction of the surface gravity waves [Crawford et al., JGR, 1998] are important at frequencies of 0.003-0.006 Hz only. Typically, the coherences are high (>0.7) in the 0.006 to 0.03 Hz range. We invert

  20. P, S velocity and VP/VS ratio beneath the Toba caldera complex (Northern Sumatra) from local earthquake tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koulakov, Ivan; Yudistira, Tedi; Luehr, Birger-G.; Wandono

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate the crustal and uppermost mantle structure beneath Toba caldera, which is known as the location of one of the largest Cenozoic eruptions on Earth. The most recent event occurred 74000 yr BP, and had a significant global impact on climate and the biosphere. In this study, we revise data on local seismicity in the Toba area recorded by a temporary PASSCAL network in 1995. We applied the newest version of the LOTOS-07 algorithm, which includes absolute source location, optimization of the starting 1-D velocity model, and iterative tomographic inversion for 3-D seismic P, S (or the VP/VS ratio) and source parameters. Special attention is paid to verification of the obtained results. Beneath the Toba caldera and other volcanoes of the arc, we observe relatively moderate (for volcanic areas) negative P- and S-velocity anomalies that reach 18 per cent in the uppermost layer, 10-12 per cent in the lower crust and about 7 per cent in the uppermost mantle. Much stronger contrasts are observed for the VP/VS ratio that is a possible indicator of dominant effect of melting in origin of seismic anomalies. At a depth of 5 km beneath active volcanoes, we observe small patterns (7-15 km size) with a high VP/VS ratio that might be an image of actual magmatic chambers filled with partially molten material feeding the volcanoes. In the mantle wedge, we observe a vertical anomaly with low P and S velocities and a high VP/VS ratio that link the cluster of events at 120-140 km depth with Toba caldera. This may be an image of ascending fluids and melts released from the subducted slab due to phase transitions. However, taking into account poor vertical resolution, these results should be interpreted with prudence. Although the results show clear signatures that are quite typical for volcanic areas (low velocity and high VP/VS ratio beneath volcanoes), we do not observe any specific features in seismic structure that could characterize Toba as a super volcano.

  1. Velocity shear, turbulent saturation, and steep plasma gradients in the scrape-off layer of inner-wall limited tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpern, F. D.; Ricci, P.

    2017-03-01

    The narrow power decay-length ({λq} ), recently found in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of inner-wall limited (IWL) discharges in tokamaks, is studied using 3D, flux-driven, global two-fluid turbulence simulations. The formation of the steep plasma profiles is found to arise due to radially sheared \\mathbf{E}× \\mathbf{B} poloidal flows. A complex interaction between sheared flows and parallel plasma currents outflowing into the sheath regulates the turbulent saturation, determining the transport levels. We quantify the effects of sheared flows, obtaining theoretical estimates in agreement with our non-linear simulations. Analytical calculations suggest that the IWL {λq} is roughly equal to the turbulent correlation length.

  2. Velocity shear, turbulent saturation, and steep plasma gradients in the scrape-off layer of inner-wall limited tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, Federico D.; Ricci, Paolo

    2016-12-19

    The narrow power decay-length (λq), recently found in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of inner wall limited (IWL) discharges in tokamaks, is studied using 3D, flux-driven, global two fluid turbulence simulations. The formation of the steep plasma profiles is found to arise due to radially sheared E×B poloidal flows. A complex interaction between sheared flows and parallel plasma currents outflowing into the sheath regulates the turbulent saturation, determining the transport levels. We quantify the effects of sheared flows, obtaining theoretical estimates in agreement with our non-linear simulations. As a result, analytical calculations suggest that the IWL λq is roughly equal to the turbulent correlation length.

  3. Velocity shear, turbulent saturation, and steep plasma gradients in the scrape-off layer of inner-wall limited tokamaks

    DOE PAGES

    Halpern, Federico D.; Ricci, Paolo

    2016-12-19

    The narrow power decay-length (λq), recently found in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of inner wall limited (IWL) discharges in tokamaks, is studied using 3D, flux-driven, global two fluid turbulence simulations. The formation of the steep plasma profiles is found to arise due to radially sheared E×B poloidal flows. A complex interaction between sheared flows and parallel plasma currents outflowing into the sheath regulates the turbulent saturation, determining the transport levels. We quantify the effects of sheared flows, obtaining theoretical estimates in agreement with our non-linear simulations. As a result, analytical calculations suggest that the IWL λq is roughly equal tomore » the turbulent correlation length.« less

  4. Transdimensional Love-wave tomography of the British Isles and shear-velocity structure of the East Irish Sea Basin from ambient-noise interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galetti, Erica; Curtis, Andrew; Baptie, Brian; Jenkins, David; Nicolson, Heather

    2017-01-01

    We present the first Love-wave group-velocity and shear-velocity maps of the British Isles obtained from ambient noise interferometry and fully nonlinear inversion. We computed interferometric inter-station Green's functions by cross-correlating the transverse component of ambient noise records retrieved by 61 seismic stations across the UK and Ireland. Group-velocity measurements along each possible inter-station path were obtained using frequency-time analysis and converted into a series of inter-station traveltime data sets between 4 and 15 s period. Traveltime uncertainties estimated from the standard deviation of dispersion curves constructed by stacking randomly selected subsets of daily cross-correlations were observed to be too low to allow reasonable data fits to be obtained during tomography. Data uncertainties were therefore estimated again during the inversion as distance-dependent functionals. We produced Love-wave group-velocity maps within eight different period bands using a fully nonlinear tomography method which combines the transdimensional reversible-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (rj-McMC) algorithm with an eikonal ray tracer. By modelling exact ray paths at each step of the Markov chain we ensured that the nonlinear character of the inverse problem was fully and correctly accounted for. Between 4 and 10 s period, the group-velocity maps show remarkable agreement with the known geology of the British Isles and correctly identify a number of low-velocity sedimentary basins and high-velocity features. Longer period maps, in which most sedimentary basins are not visible, are instead mainly representative of basement rocks. In a second stage of our study we used the results of tomography to produce a series of Love-wave group-velocity dispersion curves across a grid of geographical points focussed around the East Irish Sea sedimentary basin. We then independently inverted each curve using a similar rj-McMC algorithm to obtain a series of 1-D shear-velocity

  5. Transdimensional Love-wave tomography of the British Isles and shear-velocity structure of the East Irish Sea Basin from ambient-noise interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galetti, Erica; Curtis, Andrew; Baptie, Brian; Jenkins, David; Nicolson, Heather

    2016-08-01

    We present the first Love-wave group velocity and shear velocity maps of the British Isles obtained from ambient noise interferometry and fully non-linear inversion. We computed interferometric inter-station Green's functions by cross-correlating the transverse component of ambient noise records retrieved by 61 seismic stations across the UK and Ireland. Group velocity measurements along each possible inter-station path were obtained using frequency-time analysis and converted into a series of inter-station traveltime datasets between 4 and 15 seconds period. Traveltime uncertainties estimated from the standard deviation of dispersion curves constructed by stacking randomly-selected subsets of daily cross-correlations, were observed to be too low to allow reasonable data fits to be obtained during tomography. Data uncertainties were therefore estimated again during the inversion as distance-dependent functionals. We produced Love-wave group velocity maps within 8 different period bands using a fully non-linear tomography method which combines the transdimensional reversible-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (rj-McMC) algorithm with an eikonal raytracer. By modelling exact raypaths at each step of the Markov chain we ensured that the non-linear character of the inverse problem was fully and correctly accounted for. Between 4 and 10 seconds period, the group velocity maps show remarkable agreement with the known geology of the British Isles and correctly identify a number of low-velocity sedimentary basins and high-velocity features. Longer period maps, in which most sedimentary basins are not visible, are instead mainly representative of basement rocks. In a second stage of our study we used the results of tomography to produce a series of Love-wave group velocity dispersion curves across a grid of geographical points focussed around the East Irish Sea sedimentary basin. We then independently inverted each curve using a similar rj-McMC algorithm to obtain a series of

  6. Possibility of modification of the Rayleigh line in a nonequilibrium fluid with a constant shear velocity gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Debendranath; Sood, A. K.

    1984-11-01

    We show that the recent prediction of the García-Colín and Velasco

    [Phys. Rev. A 26 2187 (1982)]
    regarding the modification of the Rayleigh line, in the scattering of light from a fluid kept under a constant shear veloity gradient, is incorrect. A correct application of fluctuating hydrodynamics is shown to predict no such change.

  7. Shear layer structure of a low speed jet. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report, 28 Jun. 1974 - 31 Dec. 1975; [measurements of field pressure and turbulent velocity functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    A series of measurements of near field pressures and turbulent velocity fluctuations were made in a low speed jet with a Reynolds number near 50,000 in order to investigate more quantitatively the character and behavior of the large scale structures and their interactions with each other. The near field measurements were modelled according to the vortex pairing hypothesis to deduce the distribution of pairings along the jet axis and the variances about the mean locations. The hodograph plane description of turbulence was explored in some detail, and a complex correlation quantity was synthesized which has useful properties for turbulence in the presence of mean shear.

  8. Effects of Lewis number, density ratio and gravity on burning velocity and conditional statistics in stagnating turbulent premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Jaesung; Huh, Kang Y.

    2014-09-01

    DNS is performed to analyse the effects of Lewis number (Le), density ratio and gravity in stagnating turbulent premixed flames. The results show good agreement with those of Lee and Huh (Combustion and Flame, Vol. 159, 2012, pp. 1576-1591) with respect to the turbulent burning velocity, ST, in terms of turbulent diffusivity, flamelet thickness, mean curvature and displacement speed at the leading edge. In all four stagnating flames studied, a mean tangential strain rate resulting in a mean flamelet thickness smaller than the unstretched laminar flame thickness leads to an increase in ST. A flame cusp of positive curvature involves a superadiabatic burned gas temperature due to diffusive-thermal instability for an Le less than unity. Wrinkling tends to be suppressed at a larger density ratio, not enhanced by hydrodynamic instability, in the stagnating flow configuration. Turbulence is produced, resulting in highly anisotropic turbulence with heavier unburned gas accelerating through a flame brush by Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Results are also provided on brush thickness, flame surface density and conditional velocities in burned and unburned gas and on flame surfaces to represent the internal brush structures for all four test flames.

  9. Imaging the Anisotropic Shear-wave Velocity in the Earth's Mantle using Free Oscillations, Body Waves, Surface Waves and Long-period Waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulik, P.; Ekstrom, G.

    2013-12-01

    We incorporate normal-mode splitting functions into a framework containing surface-wave phase anomalies, long-period waveforms, and body-wave travel times to investigate the three-dimensional structure of anisotropic shear-wave velocity in the Earth's mantle. In contrast with earlier studies, our modeling approach spans a wider spectrum (0.3-50 mHz) of seismological observables, jointly inverts for velocity and anisotropy apart from the discontinuity topographies, and incorporates new crustal corrections for the splitting functions that are consistent with the nonlinear corrections we employ for the waveforms. Our preferred anisotropic model, S362ANI+, an update to S362ANI, gives better fits to the recently measured splitting functions of spheroidal and toroidal modes that are modeled in this study. The splitting functions require additional isotropic variations in the transition zone and the mid mantle that are geographically distributed in the southern hemisphere. The level of agreement in the isotropic shear-velocity structure is higher between S362ANI+ and other recent studies than in the earlier generation of models. The anisotropic part of S362ANI+ is similar to S362ANI and is restricted to the upper 300 km in the mantle since only small improvements in fits are observed on adding anisotropy at depth. We also show that modeling the splitting functions reduces the tradeoffs between lateral variations in velocity and anisotropy in the lowermost mantle. Therefore, more data should be included to constrain any radial anisotropy in the transition zone and in the lower mantle.

  10. Ultrasonic shear velocities of MgSiO3-perovskite at high pressure and temperature and lower mantle composition

    SciTech Connect

    Sinelnikov,Y.; Chen, G.; Neuville, D.; Liebermann, R.

    1998-01-01

    Ultrasonic interferometric measurements of the shear elastic properties of MgSiO{sub 3} perovskite were conducted on three polycrystalline specimens at conditions up to pressures of 8 gigapascals and temperatures of 800 kelvin. The acoustic measurements produced the pressure (P) and temperature (T) derivatives of the shear modulus (G), namely ({partial_derivative}G/{partial_derivative}P){sub T} = 1.8 {+-} 0.4 and ({partial_derivative}G/{partial_derivative}T){sub P} = 2.9 {+-} 0.3 x 10{sup 2} gigapascals per kelvin. Combining these derivatives with the derivatives that were measured for the bulk modulus and thermal expansion of MgSiO{sub 3} perovskite provided data that suggest lower mantle compositions between pyrolite and C1 carbonaceous chondrite and a lower mantle potential temperature of 1500 {+-} 200 kelvin.

  11. SGLOBE-rani: a new global whole-mantle model of isotropic and radially anisotropic shear-wave velocity structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, A.; Chang, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new global whole-mantle model of isotropic and radially anisotropic S velocity structure (SGLOBE-rani) based on ~43,000,000 surface-wave and ~420,000 bodywave travel time measurements, which is expanded in spherical harmonic basis functions up to degree 35. We incorporate crustal thickness perturbations as model parameters in the inversions to properly consider crustal effects and suppress the leakage of crustal structure into mantle structure. This is possible since we utilize short-period group velocity data with a period range down to 16 s, which are strongly sensitive to the crust. The isotropic S-velocity model shares common features with previous global S-velocity models and shows excellent consistency with several high-resolution upper mantle models. Our anisotropic model also agrees well with previous regional studies. Nevertheless, our new model of 3-D radial anisotropy shows some features not seen in previous whole-mantle models, such as faster SV velocity anomalies along subduction zones at transition zone depths and faster SH velocity beneath slabs in the lower mantle. The derived crustal thickness perturbations also bring potentially important information about the crustal thickness beneath oceanic crusts, which has been difficult to constrain due to poor access compared with continental crusts. We interpret our results in terms of mineralogy and geodynamical processes in the transition zone and uppermost lower mantle.

  12. A self-consistent two-dimensional resistive fluid theory of field-aligned potential structures including charge separation and magnetic and velocity shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael; Birn, Joachim; Schindler, Karl

    1990-01-01

    A self-consistent two-fluid theory that includes the magnetic field and shear patterns is developed to model stationary electrostatic structures with field-aligned potential drops. Shear flow is also included in the theory since this seems to be a prominent feature of the structures of interest. In addition, Ohmic dissipation, a Hall term, and pressure gradients in a generalized Ohm's law, modified for cases without quasi-neutrality, are included. In the analytic theory, the electrostatic force is balanced by field-aligned pressure gradients (i.e., thermal effects in the direction of the magnetic field) and by pressure gradients and magnetic stresses in the perpendicular direction. Within this theory, simple examples of applications are presented to demonstrate the kind of solutions resulting from the model. The results show how the effects of charge separation and shear in the magnetic field and the velocity can be combined to form self-consistent structures such as are found to exist above the aurora, suggested also in association with solar flares.

  13. Shear Wave Velocity Profiles Determined from Surface Wave Measurements at Sites Affected by the August 15th, 2007 Earthquake in Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenblad, B. L.; Bay, J. A.

    2008-05-01

    The shear wave velocity (Vs) profile of near-surface soils is a critical parameter for understanding recorded ground motions and predicting local site effects in an earthquake. In structural design, the Vs profile in the top 30 m is used to modify design response spectra to account for local soil effects. In addition, knowledge of the near- surface Vs profile at strong motion stations can be used to account for changes in frequency content and amplification caused by the local site conditions. Following the August 15th, 2007 earthquake in Peru, a field testing program was performed to measure Vs profiles in the top 20 to 30 m at twenty-two locations in the affected region. The measurements were performed primarily at the sites of damaged school buildings but were also performed at several strong motion station sites as well as a few locations where evidence of soil liquefaction was observed. Nineteen of the sites were located in the severely affected cities of Chincha, Ica, Pisco and Tambo de Mora, with the remaining three sites located in, Lima, Palpa and Paracus. The Vs profiles were determined from surface wave velocity measurements performed with an impact source. The objective of this paper is to present and discuss the range of Vs profile conditions encountered in the regions affected by the Pisco-Peru earthquake. In the city of Ica, the profiles generally exhibited gradually increasing velocities with depth, with velocities which rarely exceeded 400 m/s in the top 30 m. In contrast, the profiles measured in Pisco, often exhibited strong, shallow velocity contrasts with Vs increasing from less than 200 m/s at the surface to over 600 m/s at some sites. The profiles measured in Chincha generally fell in between the ranges measured in Ica and Pisco. Lastly, soil liquefaction was evident throughout Tambo de Mora on the coast of Peru. Measurements indicated very low shear wave velocities of 75 to 125 m/s in the top 4 m, which is consistent with the observed

  14. Can we trace the eastern Gondwanan margin in Australia? New perspectives from transdimensional inversion of ambient noise for 3D shear velocity structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilia, S.; Rawlinson, N.; Direen, N. G.

    2013-12-01

    Although the notion of Rodinia is quite well accepted in the geoscience community, the location and nature of the eastern continental margin of the Gondwana fragment in Australia is still vague and remains one of the most hotly debated topics in Australian geology. Moreover, most post-Rodinian reconstructions models choose not to tackle the ';Tasmanian challenge', and focus only on the tectonic evolution of mainland southeast Australia, thereby conveniently ignoring the wider tectonic implications of Tasmania's complex geological history. One of the chief limitations of the tectonic reconstructions in this region is a lack of information on Paleozoic (possibly Proterozoic) basement structures. Vast Mesozoic-Cainozoic sedimentary and volcanic cover sequences obscure older outcrops and limit the power of direct observational techniques. In response to these challenges, our effort is focused on ambient seismic noise for imaging 3D crustal shear velocity structure using surface waves, which is capable of illuminating basement structure beneath younger cover. The data used in this study is sourced from the WOMBAT transportable seismic array, which is compounded by around 650 stations spanning the majority of southeastern Australia, including Tasmania and several islands in Bass Strait. To produce the highest quality Green's functions, careful processing of the data has been performed, after which group velocity dispersion measurements have been carried out using a frequency-time analysis method on the symmetric component of the empirical Green's functions (EGFs). Group dispersion measurements from the EGFs have been inverted using a novel hierarchical, transdimensional, Bayesian algorithm to obtain Rayleigh-wave group velocity maps at different periods from 2 to 30 s. The new approach has several advantages in that the number and distribution of model parameters are implicitly controlled by the data, in which the noise is treated as unknown in the inversion. This

  15. A new approach to obtaining a 3D shear wave velocity model of the crust and upper mantle: An application to eastern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delph, Jonathan R.; Zandt, George; Beck, Susan L.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new approach to the joint inversion of surface wave dispersion data and receiver functions by utilizing Common Conversion Point (CCP) stacking to reconcile the different sampling domains of the two datasets. Utilizing CCP stacking allows us to suppress noise in the data by waveform stacking, and correct for backazimuthal variations and complex crustal structure by mapping receiver functions back to their theoretical location. When applied to eastern Turkey, this approach leads to a higher resolution image of the subsurface and clearly delineates different tectonic features in eastern Turkey that were not apparent using other approaches. We observe that the slow seismic velocities near the Karliova Triple Junction correlate to moderate strain rates and high heat flow, which leads to a rheologically weak crust that has allowed for the upward propagation of Miocene and younger volcanics near the triple junction. We find seismically fast, presumably rigid blocks located in the southeastern Anatolian Plate and Arabian Plate are separated by a band of low shear wave velocities that correspond to the East Anatolian Fault Zone, which is consistent with the presence of fluids in the fault zone. We observe that the Arabian Plate has underthrust the Eurasian Plate as far as the northern boundary of the Bitlis Massif, which can explain the high exhumation rates in the Bitlis Massif as a result of slab break-off of the Arabian oceanic lithosphere. We also find a shallow ( 33 km) anomaly beneath eastern Turkey that we interpret as a localized wedge of mantle that was underthrust by a crustal fragment during the collision of Arabia and Eurasia. These observations are possible because of the high-resolution images obtained by combining common conversion point receiver function stacks with ambient noise dispersion data to create a data-driven three-dimensional shear wave velocity model.

  16. C[subscript p]/C[subscript V] Ratios Measured by the Sound Velocity Method Using Calculator-Based Laboratory Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branca, Mario; Soletta, Isabella

    2007-01-01

    The velocity of sound in a gas depends on its temperature, molar mass, and [lambda] = C[subscript p]/C[subscript v], ratio (heat capacity at a constant pressure to heat capacity at constant volume). The [lambda] values for air, oxygen, nitrogen, argon, and carbon dioxide were determined by measuring the velocity of the sound through the gases at…

  17. Charts for Determining Preliminary Values of Span-load, Shear, Bending-moment, and Accumulated-torque Distributions of Swept Wings of Various Taper Ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollner, Bertram C

    1948-01-01

    Contains charts for use in determining preliminary values of the spanwise-load, shear, bending-moment, and accumulated-torque distributions of swept wings. The charts are based on strip theory and include four aerodynamic-load distributions, two section-moment distributions, and two inertia-load distributions. The taper ratios considered cover the range from 1.0 to 0 and the results are applicable to any angle of sweep.

  18. Dependencies of pore pressure on elastic wave velocities and Vp/Vs ratio for thermally cracked gabbro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, K.; Uehara, S. I.; Mizoguchi, K.

    2015-12-01

    Marine seismic refraction have found that there are high Vp/Vs ratio regions in oceanic crusts at subducting oceanic plates (e.g, Cascadia subduction zone (2.0-2.8) (Audet et al., 2009)). Previous studies based on laboratory measurements indicated that Vp/Vs ratio is high when porosity and/or pore pressure is high (Christensen, 1984; Peacock et al., 2011). Although several studies have investigated the relationships between fracture distributions and Vp, Vs (e.g., Wang et al., 2012; Blake et al., 2013), the relationships for rocks (e.g., gabbro and basalt) composing oceanic crust are still unclear. This study reports the results of laboratory measurements of Vp, Vs (transmission method) at controlled confining and pore pressure and estimation of Vp/Vs ratio for thermally cracked gabbro which mimic highly fractured rocks in the high Vp/Vs ratio zone, in order to declare the dependence of fracture distributions on Vp/Vs. For the measurements, we prepared three type specimens; a non-heated intact specimen, specimens heated up to 500 °C and 700 °C for 24 hours. Porosities of intact, 500 °C and 700 °C specimens measured under the atmospheric pressure are 0.5, 3.4 and 3.5%, respectively. Measurements were conducted at a constant confining pressure of 50 MPa, with decreasing pore pressure from 49 to 0.1 MPa and then increasing to 49 MPa. While Vp/Vs for the intact specimen is almost constant at elevated pore pressure, the Vp/Vs values for the thermally cracked ones were 2.0~2.2 when pore pressure was larger than 30 MPa. In future, we will reveal the relationship between the measured elastic wave velocities and the characteristics of the microfracture distribution. This work was supported by JSPS Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (Grant Number 26400492).

  19. Computational solution of the velocity and wall shear stress distribution inside a left carotid artery under pulsatile flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arslan, Nurullah; Turmuş, Hakan

    2014-08-01

    Stroke is still one of the leading causes for death after heart diseases and cancer in all over the world. Strokes happen because an artery that carries blood uphill from the heart to the head is clogged. Most of the time, as with heart attacks, the problem is atherosclerosis, hardening of the arteries, calcified buildup of fatty deposits on the vessel wall. In this study, the fluid dynamic simulations were done in a left carotid bifurcation under the pulsatile flow conditions computationally. Pulsatile flow waveform is given in the paper. In vivo geometry and boundary conditions were obtained from a patient who has stenosis located at external carotid artery (ECA) and internal carotid artery (ICA) of his common carotid artery (CCA). The location of critical flow fields such as low wall shear stress (WSS), stagnation regions and separation regions were detected near the highly stenosed region and at branching region.

  20. Cross-shore velocity shear, eddies and heterogeneity in water column properties over fringing coral reefs: West Maui, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storlazzi, C.D.; McManus, M.A.; Logan, J.B.; McLaughlin, B.E.

    2006-01-01

    A multi-day hydrographic survey cruise was conducted to acquire spatially extensive, but temporally limited, high-resolution, three-dimensional measurements of currents, temperature, salinity and turbidity off West Maui in the summer of 2003 to better understand coastal dynamics along a complex island shoreline with coral reefs. These data complement long-term, high-resolution tide, wave, current, temperature, salinity and turbidity measurements made at a number of fixed locations in the study area starting in 2001. Analyses of these hydrographic data, in conjunction with numerous field observations, evoke the following conceptual model of water and turbidity flux along West Maui. Wave- and wind-driven flows appear to be the primary control on flow over shallower portions of the reefs while tidal and subtidal currents dominate flow over the outer portions of the reefs and insular shelf. When the direction of these flows counter one another, which is quite common, they cause a zone of cross-shore horizontal shear and often form a front, with turbid, lower-salinity water inshore of the front and clear, higher-salinity water offshore of the front. It is not clear whether these zones of high shear and fronts are the cause or the result of the location of the fore reef, but they appear to be correlated alongshore over relatively large horizontal distances (orders of kilometers). When two flows converge or when a single flow is bathymetrically steered, eddies can be generated that, in the absence of large ocean surface waves, tend to accumulate material. Areas of higher turbidity and lower salinity tend to correlate with regions of poor coral health or the absence of well-developed reefs, suggesting that the oceanographic processes that concentrate and/or transport nutrients, contaminants, low-salinity water or suspended sediment might strongly influence coral reef ecosystem health and sustainability.

  1. In-plane ultrasonic velocity measurement of longitudinal and shear waves in the machine direction with transducers in rotating wheels

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Maclin S.; Jackson, Theodore G.; Knerr, Christopher

    1998-02-17

    An improved system for measuring the velocity of ultrasonic signals within the plane of moving web-like materials, such as paper, paperboard and the like. In addition to velocity measurements of ultrasonic signals in the plane of the web in the MD and CD, one embodiment of the system in accordance with the present invention is also adapted to provide on-line indication of the polar specific stiffness of the moving web. In another embodiment of the invention, the velocity of ultrasonic signals in the plane of the web are measured by way of a plurality of ultrasonic transducers carried by synchronously driven wheels or cylinders, thus eliminating undue transducer wear due to any speed differences between the transducers and the web. In order to provide relatively constant contact force between the transducers and the webs, the transducers are mounted in a sensor housings which include a spring for biasing the transducer radially outwardly. The sensor housings are adapted to be easily and conveniently mounted to the carrier to provide a relatively constant contact force between the transducers and the moving web.

  2. In-plane ultrasonic velocity measurement of longitudinal and shear waves in the machine direction with transducers in rotating wheels

    DOEpatents

    Hall, M.S.; Jackson, T.G.; Knerr, C.

    1998-02-17

    An improved system for measuring the velocity of ultrasonic signals within the plane of moving web-like materials, such as paper, paperboard and the like. In addition to velocity measurements of ultrasonic signals in the plane of the web in the MD and CD, one embodiment of the system in accordance with the present invention is also adapted to provide on-line indication of the polar specific stiffness of the moving web. In another embodiment of the invention, the velocity of ultrasonic signals in the plane of the web are measured by way of a plurality of ultrasonic transducers carried by synchronously driven wheels or cylinders, thus eliminating undue transducer wear due to any speed differences between the transducers and the web. In order to provide relatively constant contact force between the transducers and the webs, the transducers are mounted in a sensor housings which include a spring for biasing the transducer radially outwardly. The sensor housings are adapted to be easily and conveniently mounted to the carrier to provide a relatively constant contact force between the transducers and the moving web. 37 figs.

  3. RESEARCH NOTE : Shear-wave velocity in marine sediments on young oceanic crust: constraints from dispersion analysis of Scholte waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz-Essen, H.; Grevemeyer, Ingo; Herber, Rolf; Weigel, Wilfried

    1998-01-01

    An experiment with a newly developed implosive source, located about 1 m above the seafloor at 3665 m depth, revealed a slow interface wave. This wave is attributed to S waves in a soft sediment layer covering the hard rock sub-bottom. Dispersion analysis by means of the multiple-filter technique yields the group velocity as a function of frequency. Model calculations showed that the observed dispersion curve can be reproduced by considering a steep gradient of S velocity within the sediment layer. Nearly perfect agreement of experimental and model data could be achieved with a sediment layer thickness of 21.5 m, an S speed of 225 m s- 1 at the water-sediment interface and an increase by 23 s- 1 within the layer. These values are relatively high compared to data from the literature. However, previous estimates of in situ S-wave velocity have been obtained on old oceanic crust in the vicinity of continents or islands, while our experiment was carried out on young Pacific crust. Therefore, we suggest two mechanisms which could support a relatively high S speed in sediments: (1) the input of hydrothermally generated metalliferous sediments from the adjacent spreading axis; and (2) post-depositional diagenesis which has accelerated the induration of sediments.

  4. Numerical Study of Velocity Shear Stabilization of 3D and Theoretical Considerations for Centrifugally Confined Plasmas and Other Interchange-Limited Fusion Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Hassam, Adil

    2015-09-21

    We studied the feasibility of resonantly driving GAMs in tokamaks. A numerical simulation was carried out and showed the essential features and limitations. It was shown further that GAMs can damp by phase-mixing, from temperature gradients, or nonlinear detuning, thus broadening the resonance. Experimental implications of this were quantified. Theoretical support was provided for the Maryland Centrifugal Experiment, funded in a separate grant by DOE. Plasma diamagnetism from supersonic rotation was established. A theoretical model was built to match the data. Additional support to the experiment in terms of numerical simulation of the interchange turbulence was provided. Spectra from residual turbulence on account of velocity shear suppression were obtained and compared favorably to experiment. A new drift wave, driven solely by the thermal force, was identified.

  5. Teleseismic receiver function analysis in Tierra del Fuego Island: an estimation of crustal thickness and Vp/Vs velocity ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buffoni, C.; Sabbione, N. C.; Schimmel, M.; Rosa, M. L.

    2012-04-01

    Tierra del Fuego Island (TdF) is situated in the southern part of South America, where the transform tectonic boundary between the Scotia and South America plates divides the island into two continental blocks. This boundary is represented by a mainly strike-slip lineament known as Magallanes-Fagnano fault system that runs from the western part of the north Scotia ridge to the Chile trench south of 50° S. This fault system is composed of many splays and diverse subparallel faults that overprint the fold-and-thrust belt and are the responsible for the complex tectonic setting that has TdF. Only a few studies have been carried out to constrain the crustal structure and Moho depth in TdF. We present the preliminary estimations on Moho depth and Vp/Vs velocity ratio in TdF Argentinian Island, from teleseismic receiver function analysis with data recorded at five permanent seismic stations. We analyzed data and selected among 40 and 120 events for each seismic station, according to data availability and quality. Earthquakes with magnitudes greater than 5.5 mb and epicentral distances between 30° and 90° were selected. We used Seismic Analysis Code software to pre-process the seismograms. After removing the mean and trend, the data were band-pass filtered using different ranges of frequencies: 0.5-2Hz, 0.08-2Hz and 0.02-1Hz. We applied an iterative deconvolution technique in order to isolate the P-to-S converted waves and obtain the Receiver Functions (RFs). A Gaussian factor of a= 2.5 ( ~1Hz) was selected to reduce the noise and improve the signal coherence in the RFs. Crustal thickness and Vp/Vs ratio were estimated using the H-K stacking method. Since our RFs were not as clear as those typically obtained for simple tectonic settings, we performed different resample techniques to asses the robustness of our results. RFs from clustered events were stacked to increase the signal-to-noise ratio. For this purpose we divided the events into three clusters according event

  6. RESEARCH PAPERS : Wave-theoretical inversion of teleseismic surface waves in a regional network: phase-velocity maps and a three-dimensional upper-mantle shear-wave-velocity model for southern Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friederich, Wolfgang

    1998-01-01

    others, we are able to obtain good reconstructions of test structures from realistic synthetic data with the same station and event distribution as the real data. Moreover, we find that the geometric pattern of the phase-velocity maps obtained from real data depends only weakly on the constraints applied in the inversion, while the amplitude of the phase-velocity perturbations is almost completely determined by the constraints. For all periods considered the fit to the data is extremely good. The reduction of the quadratic misfit relative to the case of plane incoming waves and no structure is dramatic for the shorter periods. The 3-D model of vertical shear-wave velocity down to a depth of 200 km exhibits a basic division into four quadrants separated by a vertical plane intersecting the surface along a nearly west-east line and a horizontal plane at about 130 km depth. The northern rants show high velocities in the top 120 km and low velocities below 140 km. The opposite is the case for the southern quadrants. An exception to this general feature is a pronounced low-velocity zone in the northwestern corner of the region.

  7. Hepatic and Splenic Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Shear Wave Velocity Elastography in Children with Liver Disease Associated with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Cañas, Teresa; Maciá, Araceli; Muñoz-Codoceo, Rosa Ana; Fontanilla, Teresa; González-Rios, Patricia; Miralles, María; Gómez-Mardones, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Background. Liver disease associated with cystic fibrosis (CFLD) is the second cause of mortality in these patients. The diagnosis is difficult because none of the available tests are specific enough. Noninvasive elastographic techniques have been proven to be useful to diagnose hepatic fibrosis. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging is an elastography imaging system. The purpose of the work was to study the utility of liver and spleen ARFI Imaging in the detection of CFLD. Method. 72 patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) were studied and received ARFI imaging in the liver and in the spleen. SWV values were compared with the values of 60 healthy controls. Results. Comparing the SWV values of CFLD with the control healthy group, values in the right lobe were higher in patients with CFLD. We found a SWV RHL cut-off value to detect CFLD of 1.27 m/s with a sensitivity of 56.5% and a specificity of 90.5%. CF patients were found to have higher SWC spleen values than the control group. Conclusions. ARFI shear wave elastography in the right hepatic lobe is a noninvasive technique useful to detect CFLD in our sample of patients. Splenic SWV values are higher in CF patients, without any clinical consequence. PMID:26609528

  8. Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Nathan A. S.; Pownceby, Mark I.; Madsen, Ian C.; Studer, Andrew J.; Manuel, James R.; Kimpton, Justin A.

    2014-12-01

    Effects of basicity, B (CaO:SiO2 ratio) on the thermal range, concentration, and formation mechanisms of silico-ferrite of calcium and aluminum (SFCA) and SFCA-I iron ore sinter bonding phases have been investigated using an in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction-based methodology with subsequent Rietveld refinement-based quantitative phase analysis. SFCA and SFCA-I phases are the key bonding materials in iron ore sinter, and improved understanding of the effects of processing parameters such as basicity on their formation and decomposition may assist in improving efficiency of industrial iron ore sintering operations. Increasing basicity significantly increased the thermal range of SFCA-I, from 1363 K to 1533 K (1090 °C to 1260 °C) for a mixture with B = 2.48, to ~1339 K to 1535 K (1066 °C to 1262 °C) for a mixture with B = 3.96, and to ~1323 K to 1593 K (1050 °C to 1320 °C) at B = 4.94. Increasing basicity also increased the amount of SFCA-I formed, from 18 wt pct for the mixture with B = 2.48 to 25 wt pct for the B = 4.94 mixture. Higher basicity of the starting sinter mixture will, therefore, increase the amount of SFCA-I, considered to be more desirable of the two phases. Basicity did not appear to significantly influence the formation mechanism of SFCA-I. It did, however, affect the formation mechanism of SFCA, with the decomposition of SFCA-I coinciding with the formation of a significant amount of additional SFCA in the B = 2.48 and 3.96 mixtures but only a minor amount in the highest basicity mixture. In situ neutron diffraction enabled characterization of the behavior of magnetite after melting of SFCA produced a magnetite plus melt phase assemblage.

  9. Evolution of a localized vortex in plane nonparallel viscous flows with constant velocity shear. I. Hyperbolic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukhman, I. G.

    2006-09-01

    The framework of the linear theory is employed to study the evolution of an initial compact vortical disturbance in unbounded plane nonparallel viscous incompressible flows with constant velocity gradients. Two types of such flows are known to be possible: hyperbolical and elliptical (as well as an intermediate case of the well-studied parallel Couette flow). The results presented here are obtained for a hyperbolical flow. (Results concerning the elliptical flow are to be issued in a separate publication.) This paper is a development of earlier work by R. R. Lagnado, N. Phan-Thien, and L. G. Leal [Phys. Fluids 27, 1094 (1984)] studying the stability of a hyperbolical flow relative to the simplest perturbations in the form of plane waves with a time-dependent wave vector. The dynamics of vortex intensity is investigated as well as the evolution of its geometrical form and orientation. The results are discussed in the context of the problem of hairpin vortex formation.

  10. In vitro measurements of velocity and wall shear stress in a novel sequential anastomotic graft design model under pulsatile flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Kabinejadian, Foad; Ghista, Dhanjoo N; Su, Boyang; Nezhadian, Mercedeh Kaabi; Chua, Leok Poh; Yeo, Joon Hock; Leo, Hwa Liang

    2014-10-01

    This study documents the superior hemodynamics of a novel coupled sequential anastomoses (SQA) graft design in comparison with the routine conventional end-to-side (ETS) anastomoses in coronary artery bypass grafts (CABG). The flow fields inside three polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) models of coronary artery bypass grafts, including the coupled SQA graft design, a conventional ETS anastomosis, and a parallel side-to-side (STS) anastomosis, are investigated under pulsatile flow conditions using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The velocity field and distributions of wall shear stress (WSS) in the models are studied and compared with each other. The measurement results and WSS distributions, computed from the near wall velocity gradients reveal that the novel coupled SQA design provides: (i) a uniform and smooth flow at its ETS anastomosis, without any stagnation point on the artery bed and vortex formation in the heel region of the ETS anastomosis within the coronary artery; (ii) more favorable WSS distribution; and (iii) a spare route for the blood flow to the coronary artery, to avoid re-operation in case of re-stenosis in either of the anastomoses. This in vitro investigation complements the previous computational studies of blood flow in this coupled SQA design, and is another necessary step taken toward the clinical application of this novel design. At this point and prior to the clinical adoption of this novel design, in vivo animal trials are warranted, in order to investigate the biological effects and overall performance of this anastomotic configuration in vivo.

  11. Velocity Based Modulus Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, W. C.

    2007-12-01

    A new set of equations are derived for the modulus of elasticity E and the bulk modulus K which are dependent only upon the seismic wave propagation velocities Vp, Vs and the density ρ. The three elastic moduli, E (Young's modulus), the shear modulus μ (Lamé's second parameter) and the bulk modulus K are found to be simple functions of the density and wave propagation velocities within the material. The shear and elastic moduli are found to equal the density of the material multiplied by the square of their respective wave propagation-velocities. The bulk modulus may be calculated from the elastic modulus using Poisson's ratio. These equations and resultant values are consistent with published literature and values in both magnitude and dimension (N/m2) and are applicable to the solid, liquid and gaseous phases. A 3D modulus of elasticity model for the Parkfield segment of the San Andreas Fault is presented using data from the wavespeed model of Thurber et al. [2006]. A sharp modulus gradient is observed across the fault at seismic depths, confirming that "variation in material properties play a key role in fault segmentation and deformation style" [Eberhart-Phillips et al., 1993] [EPM93]. The three elastic moduli E, μ and K may now be calculated directly from seismic pressure and shear wave propagation velocities. These velocities may be determined using conventional seismic reflection, refraction or transmission data and techniques. These velocities may be used in turn to estimate the density. This allows velocity based modulus calculations to be used as a tool for geophysical analysis, modeling, engineering and prospecting.

  12. Shear-wave velocity as an indicator for rheological changes in clay materials: Lessons from laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainsant, G.; Jongmans, D.; Chambon, G.; Larose, E.; Baillet, L.

    2012-10-01

    Clay-rich geological formations are responsible for many landslides, the dynamics of which are still poorly understood and intensely debated. Analysis of landslide motion shows that slow clayey slope movements can suddenly accelerate and fluidize as a result of sudden loading or heavy rainfall. This solid-fluid transition, which involves disorganization of the particle network, is accompanied by a loss in rigidity that could potentially be monitored by S-wave velocity (Vs) variations. To investigate this hypothesis, two types of laboratory experiments were performed on clay samples originating from an area affected by numerous landslides (Trièves, French Alps). First, creep and oscillatory rheometric tests revealed the thixotropic behavior of the clay with a highly pronounced viscosity bifurcation at a critical stress τc. In relation with this reduction in apparent viscosity, a significant drop in Vs is also observed over τc. Second, at zero stress, acoustic surface wave propagation experiments showed a rapid linear Vs decrease with the gravimetric water content (w) in the plastic domain, and a much lower decay in the liquid domain. The geotechnically-defined liquid limit then appears as a break in the Vs-w curve. For water contents in the liquid domain in particular, both experiments gave consistent results. These laboratory results demonstrate that rheological changes in clay can be revealed through Vs variations, offering the possibility of monitoring solid-to-fluid transitions in the field.

  13. Shear punch testing of {sup 59}Ni isotopically-doped model austenitic alloys after irradiation in FFTF at different He/dpa ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Hankin, G.L.; Faulkner, R.G.; Hamilton, M.L.; Garner, F.A.

    1998-03-01

    A series of three model alloys, Fe-15Cr-25Ni, Fe-15Cr-25Ni-0.04P and Fe-15Cr45Ni were irradiated side-by-side in FFTF-MOTA in both the annealed and the cold worked condition in each of two variants, one using naturally occurring isotopic mixtures, and another doped with {sup 59}Ni to generate relatively high helium-to-dpa ratios. Previous papers in this series have addressed the influence of helium on radiation-induced evolution of microstructure, dimensional stability and mechanical properties, the latter using miniature-tensile specimens. In the final paper of this experimental series, three sets of irradiations conducted at different temperatures and displacement rates were examined by shear punch testing of standard microscopy disks. The results were used to determine the influence of helium generation rate, alloy starting condition, irradiation temperature and total neutron exposure. The results were also compared with the miniature tensile data obtained earlier. In general, all alloys approached saturation levels of strength and ductility that were relatively independent of He/dpa ratio and starting condition, but were sensitive to the irradiation temperature and total exposure. Some small influence of helium/dpa ratio on the shear strength is visible in the two series that ran at {approximately}490 C, but is not evident at 365 C.

  14. New constraints on the 3D shear wave velocity structure of the upper mantle underneath Southern Scandinavia revealed from non-linear tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawerzinek, B.; Ritter, J. R. R.; Roy, C.

    2013-08-01

    We analyse travel times of shear waves, which were recorded at the MAGNUS network, to determine the 3D shear wave velocity (vS) structure underneath Southern Scandinavia. The travel time residuals are corrected for the known crustal structure of Southern Norway and weighted to account for data quality and pick uncertainties. The resulting residual pattern of subvertically incident waves is very uniform and simple. It shows delayed arrivals underneath Southern Norway compared to fast arrivals underneath the Oslo Graben and the Baltic Shield. The 3D upper mantle vS structure underneath the station network is determined by performing non-linear travel time tomography. As expected from the residual pattern the resulting tomographic model shows a simple and continuous vS perturbation pattern: a negative vS anomaly is visible underneath Southern Norway relative to the Baltic Shield in the east with a contrast of up to 4% vS and a sharp W-E dipping transition zone. Reconstruction tests reveal besides vertical smearing a good lateral reconstruction of the dipping vS transition zone and suggest that a deep-seated anomaly at 330-410 km depth is real and not an inversion artefact. The upper part of the reduced vS anomaly underneath Southern Norway (down to 250 km depth) might be due to an increase in lithospheric thickness from the Caledonian Southern Scandes in the west towards the Proterozoic Baltic Shield in Sweden in the east. The deeper-seated negative vS anomaly (330-410 km depth) could be caused by a temperature anomaly possibly combined with effects due to fluids or hydrous minerals. The determined simple 3D vS structure underneath Southern Scandinavia indicates that mantle processes might influence and contribute to a Neogene uplift of Southern Norway.

  15. Dynamic Site Characterization and Correlation of Shear Wave Velocity with Standard Penetration Test ` N' Values for the City of Agartala, Tripura State, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sil, Arjun; Sitharam, T. G.

    2014-08-01

    Seismic site characterization is the basic requirement for seismic microzonation and site response studies of an area. Site characterization helps to gauge the average dynamic properties of soil deposits and thus helps to evaluate the surface level response. This paper presents a seismic site characterization of Agartala city, the capital of Tripura state, in the northeast of India. Seismically, Agartala city is situated in the Bengal Basin zone which is classified as a highly active seismic zone, assigned by Indian seismic code BIS-1893, Indian Standard Criteria for Earthquake Resistant Design of Structures, Part-1 General Provisions and Buildings. According to the Bureau of Indian Standards, New Delhi (2002), it is the highest seismic level (zone-V) in the country. The city is very close to the Sylhet fault (Bangladesh) where two major earthquakes ( M w > 7) have occurred in the past and affected severely this city and the whole of northeast India. In order to perform site response evaluation, a series of geophysical tests at 27 locations were conducted using the multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) technique, which is an advanced method for obtaining shear wave velocity ( V s) profiles from in situ measurements. Similarly, standard penetration test (SPT-N) bore log data sets have been obtained from the Urban Development Department, Govt. of Tripura. In the collected data sets, out of 50 bore logs, 27 were selected which are close to the MASW test locations and used for further study. Both the data sets ( V s profiles with depth and SPT-N bore log profiles) have been used to calculate the average shear wave velocity ( V s30) and average SPT-N values for the upper 30 m depth of the subsurface soil profiles. These were used for site classification of the study area recommended by the National Earthquake Hazard Reduction Program (NEHRP) manual. The average V s30 and SPT-N classified the study area as seismic site class D and E categories, indicating that

  16. An anisotropic shear velocity model of the Earth's mantle using normal modes, body waves, surface waves and long-period waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulik, P.; Ekström, G.

    2014-12-01

    We use normal-mode splitting functions in addition to surface wave phase anomalies, body wave traveltimes and long-period waveforms to construct a 3-D model of anisotropic shear wave velocity in the Earth's mantle. Our modelling approach inverts for mantle velocity and anisotropy as well as transition-zone discontinuity topographies, and incorporates new crustal corrections for the splitting functions that are consistent with the non-linear corrections we employ for the waveforms. Our preferred anisotropic model, S362ANI+M, is an update to the earlier model S362ANI, which did not include normal-mode splitting functions in its derivation. The new model has stronger isotropic velocity anomalies in the transition zone and slightly smaller anomalies in the lowermost mantle, as compared with S362ANI. The differences in the mid- to lowermost mantle are primarily restricted to features in the Southern Hemisphere. We compare the isotropic part of S362ANI+M with other recent global tomographic models and show that the level of agreement is higher now than in the earlier generation of models, especially in the transition zone and the lower mantle. The anisotropic part of S362ANI+M is restricted to the upper 300 km in the mantle and is similar to S362ANI. When radial anisotropy is allowed throughout the mantle, large-scale anisotropic patterns are observed in the lowermost mantle with vSV > vSH beneath Africa and South Pacific and vSH > vSV beneath several circum-Pacific regions. The transition zone exhibits localized anisotropic anomalies of ˜3 per cent vSH > vSV beneath North America and the Northwest Pacific and ˜2 per cent vSV > vSH beneath South America. However, small improvements in fits to the data on adding anisotropy at depth leave the question open on whether large-scale radial anisotropy is required in the transition zone and in the lower mantle. We demonstrate the potential of mode-splitting data in reducing the trade-offs between isotropic velocity and

  17. Double-difference relocations and spectral ratio analysis of volcanic seismic events in the Mount St. Helens crater using a 3D velocity model suggest slip events under the new dome with constant stress-drop scaling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, R. M.; Kwiatek, G.; Moran, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    Shallow low frequency seismic events are common features associated with restless and erupting volcanoes. The physical mechanisms generating their characteristic low frequency, and often extended duration signals remain poorly understood. Here we present new double-difference relocations and spectral scaling of a group of ~400 shallow low-frequency seismic events occurring within the Mount St. Helens edifice during its 2004-2008 dome-building eruption, as recorded by a temporary seismic array for a month within the crater in 2006. Relocation results suggest that the majority of earthquakes occurred in the center of the crater close to the vent at depths < 500 m, with some events potentially locating under the new dome but ~200-300m southwest of the vent. Low-frequency events exhibit moment-corner frequency scaling roughly consistent with a constant static stress-drop, similar to tectonic earthquakes occurring elsewhere in shallow crustal faults. The scaling suggests that the ~400 events result from stick-slip behavior, and that the low frequency character of the waveforms may result from a combination of path effects and slow rupture speeds. For relocation, we divide the 400 events into eight families based on waveform similarity, and use a subset of nearly 40 earthquakes with clear first arrivals ranging in moment magnitude from 0.4 - 1.8 to calculate hypocenters. We then relocate these events using a double-difference method with a three-dimensional velocity model of the edifice from Waite and Moran (2009). The relocated events are then used to estimate source parameters of the remaining earthquakes via a spectral ratio technique. Spectral corner frequency estimations based on this spectral ratio approach produce stress-drop values of ~1 MPa assuming a shear-wave velocity of 1500 m/s. The estimations also indicate a constant stress-drop scaling for all events, with two event families having lower estimated stress drops of ~0.1 MPa. While localized lithological

  18. Application of the H/V and SPAC Method to Estimate a 3D Shear Wave Velocity Model, in the City of Coatzacoalcos, Veracruz.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, L. E. A. P.; Aguirre, J.; Vazquez Rosas, R.; Suarez, G.; Contreras Ruiz-Esparza, M. G.; Farraz, I.

    2014-12-01

    Methods that use seismic noise or microtremors have become very useful tools worldwide due to its low costs, the relative simplicity in collecting data, the fact that these are non-invasive methods hence there is no need to alter or even perforate the study site, and also these methods require a relatively simple analysis procedure. Nevertheless the geological structures estimated by this methods are assumed to be parallel, isotropic and homogeneous layers. Consequently precision of the estimated structure is lower than that from conventional seismic methods. In the light of these facts this study aimed towards searching a new way to interpret the results obtained from seismic noise methods. In this study, seven triangular SPAC (Aki, 1957) arrays were performed in the city of Coatzacoalcos, Veracruz, varying in sizes from 10 to 100 meters. From the autocorrelation between the stations of each array, a Rayleigh wave phase velocity dispersion curve was calculated. Such dispersion curve was used to obtain a S wave parallel layers velocity (VS) structure for the study site. Subsequently the horizontal to vertical ratio of the spectrum of microtremors H/V (Nogoshi and Igarashi, 1971; Nakamura, 1989, 2000) was calculated for each vertex of the SPAC triangular arrays, and from the H/V spectrum the fundamental frequency was estimated for each vertex. By using the H/V spectral ratio curves interpreted as a proxy to the Rayleigh wave ellipticity curve, a series of VS structures were inverted for each vertex of the SPAC array. Lastly each VS structure was employed to calculate a 3D velocity model, in which the exploration depth was approximately 100 meters, and had a velocity range in between 206 (m/s) to 920 (m/s). The 3D model revealed a thinning of the low velocity layers. This proved to be in good agreement with the variation of the fundamental frequencies observed at each vertex. With the previous kind of analysis a preliminary model can be obtained as a first

  19. P and S Wave Velocity Structure and Vp/Vs Ratios for the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, M.; Deshon, H.; Powell, C.

    2008-12-01

    Three dimensional P and S wave velocity models have been constructed for the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) using double difference local earthquake tomography (tomoDD). TomoDD incorporates catalog arrival times with catalog and waveform cross correlation differential times to solve for P and S wave velocity and for high resolution earthquake locations. For the NMSZ, we utilized 101504 P wave differential times and 67811 S wave differential times from 1157 earthquakes recorded over the time period 2000 to 2007 by the Cooperative NMSZ Network. The NMSZ consists of three intersecting arms of seismicity located in the central United States. There are approximately 200 earthquakes a year in the NMSZ despite the absence of a major plate boundary. Most earthquakes occur along the central Reelfoot Fault leading to uneven source distribution. We use a finite difference travel time calculator combined with an irregular inversion grid of nodes spaced every 5 to 20 kilometers horizontally and 1 to 3 kilometers vertically. Model resolution was examined using chessboard and spike tests and indicated that resolution is highest close to the source region between depths of 5 to 12 kilometers. P and S wave models indicate that velocities close to the source region are slightly low relative to the 1D starting model. The decrease in velocities may be indicative of rock properties, such as increased fluid content and fracturing. A high P and S wave velocity anomaly located away from known faults is associated with a known mafic intrusion to the northwest of seismicity.

  20. Experimental Results Investigating Impact Velocity Effects on Crater Growth and the Transient Depth-to-Diameter Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnouin, O. S.; Ernst, C. M.; Heinick, J. T.; Cintala, M. J.; Crawford, D. A.; Matsui, T.

    2011-01-01

    We performed vertical hypervelocity impacts (0.5-6 km/s) at the NASA Ames Vertical Gun Range to evaluate if increasing impact velocity, which alters the coupling time between the projectile and target, might change the rates of crater growth and transient crater shape.

  1. Shear-wave velocity characterization of the USGS Hawaiian strong-motion network on the Island of Hawaii and development of an NEHRP site-class map

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wong, Ivan G.; Stokoe, Kenneth; Cox, Brady R.; Yuan, Jiabei; Knudsen, Keith L.; Terra, Fabia; Okubo, Paul G.; Lin, Yin-Cheng

    2011-01-01

    To assess the level and nature of ground shaking in Hawaii for the purposes of earthquake hazard mitigation and seismic design, empirical ground-motion prediction models are desired. To develop such empirical relationships, knowledge of the subsurface site conditions beneath strong-motion stations is critical. Thus, as a first step to develop ground-motion prediction models for Hawaii, spectral-analysis-of-surface-waves (SASW) profiling was performed at the 22 free-field U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) strong-motion sites on the Big Island to obtain shear-wave velocity (VS) data. Nineteen of these stations recorded the 2006 Kiholo Bay moment magnitude (M) 6.7 earthquake, and 17 stations recorded the triggered M 6.0 Mahukona earthquake. VS profiling was performed to reach depths of more than 100 ft. Most of the USGS stations are situated on sites underlain by basalt, based on surficial geologic maps. However, the sites have varying degrees of weathering and soil development. The remaining strong-motion stations are located on alluvium or volcanic ash. VS30 (average VS in the top 30 m) values for the stations on basalt ranged from 906 to 1908 ft/s [National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) site classes C and D], because most sites were covered with soil of variable thickness. Based on these data, an NEHRP site-class map was developed for the Big Island. These new VS data will be a significant input into an update of the USGS statewide hazard maps and to the operation of ShakeMap on the island of Hawaii.

  2. Role of CD11/CD18 in shear rate-dependent leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions in cat mesenteric venules.

    PubMed Central

    Perry, M A; Granger, D N

    1991-01-01

    In vivo microscopy was used to assess the relationships among shear rate (and shear stress), leukocyte rolling velocity, and leukocyte adherence in a cat mesentery preparation. Shear rate in individual venules and arterioles of 25-35 microns diameter were varied over a wide range by graded occlusion of an arterial loop. There was a linear decline in leukocyte rolling velocity (Vwbc) as red cell velocity (Vrbc) was reduced. The ratio Vwbc/Vrbc remained constant despite variations in shear stress from 5-25 dyn/cm2. A reduction in shear stress was associated with an increased leukocyte adherence, particularly when Vwbc was reduced below 50 microns/s. Reduction in wall shear rate below 500 s-1 in arterioles allowed 1-3 leukocytes to adhere per 100 microns length of vessel, while venules exposed to the same shear rates had 5-16 adherent leukocytes. In arterioles, leukocyte rolling was only observed at low shear rates. At shear rates less than 250 s-1 leukocyte rolling velocity was faster in arterioles than venules, and the ratio Vwbc/Vrbc for arterioles was 0.08 +/- 0.02, which was fourfold higher than the ratio obtained in venules at similar shear rates. Pretreatment with the CD18-specific antibody (mAb) IB4 increased leukocyte rolling velocity in venules by approximately 20 microns/s at red cell velocities below 2,000 microns/s. mAb IB4 largely prevented the leukocyte adherence to arterioles and venules, and increased the ratio Vwbc/Vrbc observed in venules at low shear elicit a CD18-dependent adhesive interaction between leukocytes and microvascular endothelium, and that differences in shear rates cannot explain the greater propensity for leukocyte rolling and adhesion in venules than arterioles. PMID:1673690

  3. Seismic Site Classification and Correlation between Standard Penetration Test N Value and Shear Wave Velocity for Lucknow City in Indo-Gangetic Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anbazhagan, P.; Kumar, Abhishek; Sitharam, T. G.

    2013-03-01

    Subsurface lithology and seismic site classification of Lucknow urban center located in the central part of the Indo-Gangetic Basin (IGB) are presented based on detailed shallow subsurface investigations and borehole analysis. These are done by carrying out 47 seismic surface wave tests using multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) and 23 boreholes drilled up to 30 m with standard penetration test (SPT) N values. Subsurface lithology profiles drawn from the drilled boreholes show low- to medium-compressibility clay and silty to poorly graded sand available till depth of 30 m. In addition, deeper boreholes (depth >150 m) were collected from the Lucknow Jal Nigam (Water Corporation), Government of Uttar Pradesh to understand deeper subsoil stratification. Deeper boreholes in this paper refer to those with depth over 150 m. These reports show the presence of clay mix with sand and Kankar at some locations till a depth of 150 m, followed by layers of sand, clay, and Kankar up to 400 m. Based on the available details, shallow and deeper cross-sections through Lucknow are presented. Shear wave velocity (SWV) and N-SPT values were measured for the study area using MASW and SPT testing. Measured SWV and N-SPT values for the same locations were found to be comparable. These values were used to estimate 30 m average values of N-SPT ( N 30) and SWV ( V {s/30}) for seismic site classification of the study area as per the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) soil classification system. Based on the NEHRP classification, the entire study area is classified into site class C and D based on V {s/30} and site class D and E based on N 30. The issue of larger amplification during future seismic events is highlighted for a major part of the study area which comes under site class D and E. Also, the mismatch of site classes based on N 30 and V {s/30} raises the question of the suitability of the NEHRP classification system for the study region. Further, 17 sets

  4. Constraints on the 3D shape of the ultra low shear velocity zone at the base of the mantle beneath the central Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    To, A.; Capdeville, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Prominent postcursors to S/Sdiff waves with delays as large as 26 s are observed in Northern America for Papua New Guinea events (To et al., 2011). The emergence of the postcursor is explained by placing a laterally localized ultra low shear velocity zone (ULSVZ, dVs/Vs<-25%) on the CMB, which is fully or partially covered by a broad and weak anomaly region (dVs/Vs~-5%). The ULSVZ is located approximately 900 km southwest of the projection of the Hawaiian hotspot onto the CMB. In the previous study, we limited our focus to an azimuthal range around 60 degrees from the source in Papua New Guinea, where the records show a relatively small azimuthal variation, suggesting a relatively small 3D effect there. The modelling was limited to 2D structure along the great circle plane, partly because of the sparse station distribution in Midwestern US at the time. In this study, we investigated data from USArray and further constrained the 3D shape of the ULSVZ. The postcursors to S/Sdiff waves are observed at 240 USArray stations for an event, which occurred near Papua New Guinea in 2010. The records from the large number of stations enabled us to conduct array analysis. First, we mapped the variation of incident azimuth and slowness of the secondary arrivals to the stations. In southern stations, which are located along the azimuth of approximately 60 degrees from the source, the postcursors arrive from the direction of the source. On the other hand, in northern stations, which are located at the azimuth of approximately 52 degrees from the source, the postcursors arrive from the azimuth of 5 to 10 degrees to the south with respect to the direction toward the source. Second, we compared the observed amplitude of the main S/Sdiff phase with synthetic waveforms created by Direct solution method (Kawai et al., 2006). The comparison shows that the amplitude of the main phase become very small at stations which are located approximately at the distance of 100 degrees and the

  5. High-velocity deformation of Al0.3CoCrFeNi high-entropy alloy: Remarkable resistance to shear failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.; Zhao, S.; Diao, H.; Liaw, P. K.; Meyers, M. A.

    2017-02-01

    The mechanical behavior of a single phase (fcc) Al0.3CoCrFeNi high-entropy alloy (HEA) was studied in the low and high strain-rate regimes. The combination of multiple strengthening mechanisms such as solid solution hardening, forest dislocation hardening, as well as mechanical twinning leads to a high work hardening rate, which is significantly larger than that for Al and is retained in the dynamic regime. The resistance to shear localization was studied by dynamically-loading hat-shaped specimens to induce forced shear localization. However, no adiabatic shear band could be observed. It is therefore proposed that the excellent strain hardening ability gives rise to remarkable resistance to shear localization, which makes this material an excellent candidate for penetration protection applications such as armors.

  6. High-velocity deformation of Al0.3CoCrFeNi high-entropy alloy: Remarkable resistance to shear failure.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Zhao, S; Diao, H; Liaw, P K; Meyers, M A

    2017-02-17

    The mechanical behavior of a single phase (fcc) Al0.3CoCrFeNi high-entropy alloy (HEA) was studied in the low and high strain-rate regimes. The combination of multiple strengthening mechanisms such as solid solution hardening, forest dislocation hardening, as well as mechanical twinning leads to a high work hardening rate, which is significantly larger than that for Al and is retained in the dynamic regime. The resistance to shear localization was studied by dynamically-loading hat-shaped specimens to induce forced shear localization. However, no adiabatic shear band could be observed. It is therefore proposed that the excellent strain hardening ability gives rise to remarkable resistance to shear localization, which makes this material an excellent candidate for penetration protection applications such as armors.

  7. High-velocity deformation of Al0.3CoCrFeNi high-entropy alloy: Remarkable resistance to shear failure

    PubMed Central

    Li, Z.; Zhao, S.; Diao, H.; Liaw, P. K.; Meyers, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of a single phase (fcc) Al0.3CoCrFeNi high-entropy alloy (HEA) was studied in the low and high strain-rate regimes. The combination of multiple strengthening mechanisms such as solid solution hardening, forest dislocation hardening, as well as mechanical twinning leads to a high work hardening rate, which is significantly larger than that for Al and is retained in the dynamic regime. The resistance to shear localization was studied by dynamically-loading hat-shaped specimens to induce forced shear localization. However, no adiabatic shear band could be observed. It is therefore proposed that the excellent strain hardening ability gives rise to remarkable resistance to shear localization, which makes this material an excellent candidate for penetration protection applications such as armors. PMID:28210000

  8. Focal overlap gating in velocity map imaging to achieve high signal-to-noise ratio in photo-ion pump-probe experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivaram, Niranjan; Champenois, Elio G.; Cryan, James P.; Wright, Travis; Wingard, Taylor; Belkacem, Ali

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate a technique in velocity map imaging (VMI) that allows spatial gating of the laser focal overlap region in time resolved pump-probe experiments. This significantly enhances signal-to-noise ratio by eliminating background signal arising outside the region of spatial overlap of pump and probe beams. This enhancement is achieved by tilting the laser beams with respect to the surface of the VMI electrodes which creates a gradient in flight time for particles born at different points along the beam. By suitably pulsing our microchannel plate detector, we can select particles born only where the laser beams overlap. This spatial gating in velocity map imaging can benefit nearly all photo-ion pump-probe VMI experiments especially when extreme-ultraviolet light or X-rays are involved which produce large background signals on their own.

  9. Shear waves in vegetal tissues at ultrasonic frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fariñas, M. D.; Sancho-Knapik, D.; Peguero-Pina, J. J.; Gil-Pelegrín, E.; Gómez Álvarez-Arenas, T. E.

    2013-03-01

    Shear waves are investigated in leaves of two plant species using air-coupled ultrasound. Magnitude and phase spectra of the transmission coefficient around the first two orders of the thickness resonances (normal and oblique incidence) have been measured. A bilayer acoustic model for plant leaves (comprising the palisade parenchyma and the spongy mesophyll) is proposed to extract, from measured spectra, properties of these tissues like: velocity and attenuation of longitudinal and shear waves and hence Young modulus, rigidity modulus, and Poisson's ratio. Elastic moduli values are typical of cellular solids and both, shear and longitudinal waves exhibit classical viscoelastic losses. Influence of leaf water content is also analyzed.

  10. Shear-induced alignment and dynamics of elongated granular particles.

    PubMed

    Börzsönyi, Tamás; Szabó, Balázs; Wegner, Sandra; Harth, Kirsten; Török, János; Somfai, Ellák; Bien, Tomasz; Stannarius, Ralf

    2012-11-01

    The alignment, ordering, and rotation of elongated granular particles was studied in shear flow. The time evolution of the orientation of a large number of particles was monitored in laboratory experiments by particle tracking using optical imaging and x-ray computed tomography. The experiments were complemented by discrete element simulations. The particles develop an orientational order. In the steady state the time- and ensemble-averaged direction of the main axis of the particles encloses a small angle with the streamlines. This shear alignment angle is independent of the applied shear rate, and it decreases with increasing grain aspect ratio. At the grain level the steady state is characterized by a net rotation of the particles, as dictated by the shear flow. The distribution of particle rotational velocities was measured both in the steady state and also during the initial transients. The average rotation speed of particles with their long axis perpendicular to the shear alignment angle is larger, while shear aligned particles rotate slower. The ratio of this fast/slow rotation increases with particle aspect ratio. During the initial transient starting from an unaligned initial condition, particles having an orientation just beyond the shear alignment angle rotate opposite to the direction dictated by the shear flow.

  11. Intra-cyclic distance per stroke phase, velocity fluctuations and acceleration time ratio of a breaststroker's hip: a comparison between elite and nonelite swimmers at different race paces.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, H; Seifert, L; Tourny-Chollet, C; Chollet, D

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the intra-cyclic velocity graphs of breaststroke swimmers at two skill levels in relation to their movement phases. Two groups of nine male swimmers were videotaped underwater at three swimming race paces corresponding to their actual competitive times for the 200-m, 100-m and 50-m breaststroke. Their forward intra-cyclic hip velocity was recorded with a velocity-meter. The breaststroke cycle was divided into four phases: leg propulsion, leg-arm lag phase, arm propulsion, and arm and leg recovery. From the velocity-time data, the following parameters were computed: an index of velocity fluctuations (IVF), the distance covered during each stroke phase, and an acceleration-deceleration time ratio (ADTR). The main results showed that in both groups of swimmers, when the race pace increased, the distance covered during the leg-arm lag phase decreased, while the other swimming phases remained stable. When expressed in relative values, the percentage of distance covered during the leg-arm lag phase decreased. In nonelite swimmers, the percentage of distance covered in the other stroke phases increased significantly, while only a tendency was noted in the elite group. Elite swimmers demonstrated a higher ADTR at the 50-m pace than at their 100-m and 200-m paces. An inter-group comparison showed that elite swimmers had higher values for the IVF and ADTR, which indicated their capacity to accelerate to boost the swim and highlighted the relevancy of these factors to discriminate skill level.

  12. CAT LIDAR wind shear studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goff, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    The studies considered the major meteorological factors producing wind shear, methods to define and classify wind shear in terms significant from an aircraft perturbation standpoint, the significance of sensor location and scan geometry on the detection and measurement of wind shear, and the tradeoffs involved in sensor performance such as range/velocity resolution, update frequency and data averaging interval.

  13. Constructing a starting 3D shear velocity model with sharp interfaces for SEM-based upper mantle tomography in North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calo, M.; Bodin, T.; Yuan, H.; Romanowicz, B. A.; Larmat, C. S.; Maceira, M.

    2013-12-01

    this work we propose instead to directly tackle the non-linearity of the inverse problem by using stochastic methods to construct a 3D starting model with a good estimate of the depths of the main layering interfaces. We present preliminary results of the construction of such a starting 3D model based on: (1) Regionalizing the study area to define provinces within which lateral variations are smooth; (2) Applying trans-dimensional stochastic inversion (Bodin et al., 2012) to obtain accurate 1D models in each province as well as the corresponding error distribution, constrained by receiver function and surface wave dispersion data as well as the previously constructed 3D model (name), and (3) connecting these models laterally using data-driven smoothing operators to obtain a starting 3D model with errors. References Bodin, T.,et al. 2012, Transdimensional inversion of receiver functions and surface wave dispersion, J. Geophys. Res., 117, B02301, doi:10.1029/2011JB008560. Yuan and Romanowicz, 2013, in revison. Yuan, H., et al. 2011, 3-D shear wave radially and azimuthally anisotropic velocity model of the North American upper mantle. Geophysical Journal International, 184: 1237-1260. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-246X.2010.04901.x Yuan, H. & Romanowicz, B., 2010. Lithospheric layering in the North American Craton, Nature, 466, 1063-1068.

  14. Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves and Down-Hole Tests in the Archeological "Palatine Hill" Area (Rome, Italy): Evaluation and Influence of 2D Effects on the Shear Wave Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Fiore, V.; Cavuoto, G.; Tarallo, D.; Punzo, M.; Evangelista, L.

    2016-05-01

    A joint analysis of down-hole (DH) and multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) measurements offers a complete evaluation of shear wave velocity profiles, especially for sites where a strong lateral variability is expected, such as archeological sites. In this complex stratigraphic setting, the high "subsoil anisotropy" (i.e., sharp lithological changes due to the presence of anthropogenic backfill deposits and/or buried man-made structures) implies a different role for DH and MASW tests. This paper discusses some results of a broad experimental program conducted on the Palatine Hill, one of the most ancient areas of the city of Rome (Italy). The experiments were part of a project on seismic microzoning and consisted of 20 MASW and 11 DH tests. The main objective of this study was to examine the difficulties related to the interpretation of the DH and MASW tests and the reliability limits inherent in the application of the noninvasive method in complex stratigraphic settings. As is well known, DH tests provide good determinations of shear wave velocities (Vs) for different lithologies and man-made materials, whereas MASW tests provide average values for the subsoil volume investigated. The data obtained from each method with blind tests were compared and were correlated to site-specific subsurface conditions, including lateral variability. Differences between punctual (DH) and global (MASW) Vs measurements are discussed, quantifying the errors by synthetic comparison and by site response analyses. This study demonstrates that, for archeological sites, VS profiles obtained from the DH and MASW methods differ by more than 15 %. However, the local site effect showed comparable results in terms of natural frequencies, whereas the resolution of the inverted shear wave velocity was influenced by the fundamental mode of propagation.

  15. Performance of single-stage compressor designed on basis of constant total enthalpy with symmetrical velocity diagram at all radii and velocity ratio of 0.7 at rotor hub / Jack R. Burtt and Robert J. Jackson

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burtt, Jack R; Jackson, Robert J

    1951-01-01

    A typical inlet axial-flow compressor inlet stage, which was designed on the basis of constant total enthalpy with symmetrical velocity diagram at all radii, was investigated. At a tip speed of 1126 feet per second, a peak pressure ratio of 1.28 was obtained at an efficiency of 0.76. At a tip speed, the highest practical flow was 28 pounds per second per square foot frontal area with an efficiency of 0.78. Data for a rotor relative inlet Mach number range of from 0.5 to 0.875 indicates that the critical value for any stage radial element is approximately 0.80 for the stage investigated.

  16. Noise from Supersonic Coaxial Jets. Part 3; Inverted Velocity Profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.; Morris, Philip J.

    1997-01-01

    The instability wave noise generation model is used to study the instability waves in the two shear layers of an inverted velocity profile, supersonic, coaxial jet and the noise radiated from the dominant wave. The inverted velocity profile jet has a high speed outer stream surrounding a low speed inner stream and the outer shear layer is always larger than the inner shear layer. The jet mean flows are calculated numerically. The operating conditions are chosen to exemplify the effect of the coaxial jet outer shear layer initial spreading rates. Calculations are made for the stability characteristics in the coaxial jet shear layers and the noise radiated from the instability waves for different operating conditions with the same total thrust, mass flow and exit area as a single reference jet. Results for inverted velocity profile jets indicate that relative maximum instability wave amplitudes and far field peak noise levels can be reduced from that of the reference jet by having higher spreading rates for the outer shear layer, low velocity ratios, and outer streams hotter than the inner stream.

  17. Military Hydrology. Report 15. The Seismic Refraction Compression-Shear Wave Velocity Ratio as an Indicator of Shallow Water Tables: A Field Test,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    Township 40N, on the wes.ern edge of the San Luis Valley in Rio Grande County (Figure 2). The San Luis Valley is at the northern end of the Rio Grande Rift...and is bounded on the east by the Sangre de Cristos, which are fault block mountains, and on the west by vol- canic hills and ridges. The valley is...to the west, specifically in Section 2, Range 4E, Township 40N, in Rio Grande County, Colorado (Figure 3). Area 2 consists of a thin soil layer over

  18. Military Hydrology. Report 15. The Seismic Refraction Compression-Shear Wave Velocity Ratio as an Indicator of Shallow Water Tables. A Field Test.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    Grande County (Figure 2). The San Luis Valley is at the northern end of the Rio Grande Rift and is bounded on the east by the Sangre de Cristos, which...survey was conducted on land owned by the State of Colo- rado in Section I of Range 6E, Township 40N, on the western edge of the San Luis Valley in Rio ...2, was surveyed in the hills to the west, specifically in Section 2, Range 4E, Township 40N, in Rio Grande County, Colorado (Figure 3). Area 2

  19. Theoretical relationship between elastic wave velocity and electrical resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-Sub; Yoon, Hyung-Koo

    2015-05-01

    Elastic wave velocity and electrical resistivity have been commonly applied to estimate stratum structures and obtain subsurface soil design parameters. Both elastic wave velocity and electrical resistivity are related to the void ratio; the objective of this study is therefore to suggest a theoretical relationship between the two physical parameters. Gassmann theory and Archie's equation are applied to propose a new theoretical equation, which relates the compressional wave velocity to shear wave velocity and electrical resistivity. The piezo disk element (PDE) and bender element (BE) are used to measure the compressional and shear wave velocities, respectively. In addition, the electrical resistivity is obtained by using the electrical resistivity probe (ERP). The elastic wave velocity and electrical resistivity are recorded in several types of soils including sand, silty sand, silty clay, silt, and clay-sand mixture. The appropriate input parameters are determined based on the error norm in order to increase the reliability of the proposed relationship. The predicted compressional wave velocities from the shear wave velocity and electrical resistivity are similar to the measured compressional velocities. This study demonstrates that the new theoretical relationship may be effectively used to predict the unknown geophysical property from the measured values.

  20. Shear wave reflectivity and physical properties of the southern Appalachian Thorn Hill Paleozoic sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, J.E.; Christensen, N.I. . Dept. of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    The physical properties of a sequence of Paleozoic sedimentary rocks have been examined in detail, with an emphasis on laboratory measurements of density, shear wave velocity, shear wave splitting, and Vp/Vs ratios. Seismic properties of 147 cores from 49 rock samples collected from the thorn hill sedimentary sequence of eastern Tennessee are examined in terms of implications for future seismic studies in the southern Appalachians. The shear wave velocities of these rocks are strongly influenced by the relatively high shear wave velocity of quartz. Shear wave velocity anisotropy is present in most of the lithologic groups: it is highest in the shales while being almost insignificant in the dolostones. The related phenomenon of shear wave splitting occurs to some degree in all of the lithologies studied and at high pressures originates from mineral orientation. Compressional to shear velocity (Vp/Vs) ratios of approximately 1.82 (dolostones) and 1.95 (limestones) effectively characterize the carbonates while other lithologies display wider ranges of Vp/Vs, primarily due to the influence of accessory minerals such as quartz. Densities of the sample suite range from 2.34 g/cm[sup 3] (shale) to 2.86 g/cm[sup 3] (dolostone). Normal incidence shear and compressional wave synthetic seismograms of the entire Thorn Hill section indicate that three zones of high amplitude reflections would be seen on reflection records obtained over this 3,327 meter thick sequence. differences are seen at some interfaces in the Mississippian-Devonian interval, which are more reflective to shear waves, and in the Ordovician Martinsburg Formation, which appears more reflective to compressional waves.

  1. Turbulence measurement in a reacting and non-reacting shear layer at a high subsonic Mach number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. T.; Marek, C. J.; Wey, C.; Jones, R. A.; Smith, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    The results of two component velocity and turbulence measurements are presented which were obtained on a planar reacting shear layer burning hydrogen. Quantitative LDV and temperature measurements are presented with and without chemical reaction within the shear layer at a velocity ratio of 0.34 and a high speed Mach number of 0.7. The comparison showed that the reacting shear layer grew faster than that without reaction. Using a reduced width coordinate, the reacting and non-reacting profiles were very similar. The peak turbulence for both cases was 20 percent.

  2. Excited waves in shear layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechert, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    The generation of instability waves in free shear layers is investigated. The model assumes an infinitesimally thin shear layer shed from a semi-infinite plate which is exposed to sound excitation. The acoustical shear layer excitation by a source further away from the plate edge in the downstream direction is very weak while upstream from the plate edge the excitation is relatively efficient. A special solution is given for the source at the plate edge. The theory is then extended to two streams on both sides of the shear layer having different velocities and densities. Furthermore, the excitation of a shear layer in a channel is calculated. A reference quantity is found for the magnitude of the excited instability waves. For a comparison with measurements, numerical computations of the velocity field outside the shear layer were carried out.

  3. 2D shear wave velocity mapping of the Hartoušov CO2 degassing area in the Cheb Basin, NW Bohemia (Czech Republic), using Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores Estrella, H.; Henke, M.

    2015-12-01

    For the characterization of the subsurface of the Hartoušov CO2 degassing area in the Cheb Basin, NW Bohemia, Czech Republic several different approaches have been made. However, no active seismic characterization has been presented, nor published. The Multi­channel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) offers an useful tool to estimate vertical and horizontal velocity changes of the shallow subsurface. This can correlate to variations on rock elastic properties and/or fluid content, and represents the subsurface-layering.Surface waves were stimulated using a sledgehammer as source, and were measured with 48 vertical geophones with spacing of 1 m and the roll along method with a setup dis­placement of 2 m. Two source offsets, 10 m and 30 m, were used to increase the data quality and the resolution.The analysis of propagation velocities leads to dispersion curves from which 1D shear wave velocity profiles can be inverted. Those will be interpolated to create a 2D ground stiffness map. The measurements were taken in the NW area of the main degassing zone and are partially in the same spot of former investigations, i.e. CO2 concentration and gas flux measurements, electric and gravimetric surveys and continuous seismic noise mea­surements.Changes in the structure of the 2D velocity maps can be explained potentially with the oc­currence of fluid paths and their diffusion in the subsurface or the existence of the Počatky-Plesná fault zone, which position is not fully understood yet or both features in combination.

  4. Noise from Supersonic Coaxial Jets. Part 2; Normal Velocity Profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, M. D.; Morris, P. J.

    1997-01-01

    Instability waves have been established as noise generators in supersonic jets. Recent analysis of these slowly diverging jets has shown that these instability waves radiate noise to the far field when the waves have components with phase velocities that are supersonic relative to the ambient speed of sound. This instability wave noise generation model has been applied to supersonic jets with a single shear layer and is now applied to supersonic coaxial jets with two initial shear layers. In this paper the case of coaxial jets with normal velocity profiles is considered, where the inner jet stream velocity is higher than the outer jet stream velocity. To provide mean flow profiles at all axial locations, a numerical scheme is used to calculate the mean flow properties. Calculations are made for the stability characteristics in the coaxial jet shear layers and the noise radiated from the instability waves for different operating conditions with the same total thrust, mass flow and exit area as a single reference jet. The effects of changes in the velocity ratio, the density ratio and the area ratio are each considered independently.

  5. A simple method of predicting S-wave velocity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, M.W.

    2006-01-01

    Prediction of shear-wave velocity plays an important role in seismic modeling, amplitude analysis with offset, and other exploration applications. This paper presents a method for predicting S-wave velocity from the P-wave velocity on the basis of the moduli of dry rock. Elastic velocities of water-saturated sediments at low frequencies can be predicted from the moduli of dry rock by using Gassmann's equation; hence, if the moduli of dry rock can be estimated from P-wave velocities, then S-wave velocities easily can be predicted from the moduli. Dry rock bulk modulus can be related to the shear modulus through a compaction constant. The numerical results indicate that the predicted S-wave velocities for consolidated and unconsolidated sediments agree well with measured velocities if differential pressure is greater than approximately 5 MPa. An advantage of this method is that there are no adjustable parameters to be chosen, such as the pore-aspect ratios required in some other methods. The predicted S-wave velocity depends only on the measured P-wave velocity and porosity. ?? 2006 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  6. Influence of the Accuracy of Angiography-Based Reconstructions on Velocity and Wall Shear Stress Computations in Coronary Bifurcations: A Phantom Study

    PubMed Central

    Schrauwen, Jelle T. C.; Karanasos, Antonios; van Ditzhuijzen, Nienke S.; Aben, Jean-Paul; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Wall shear stress (WSS) plays a key role in the onset and progression of atherosclerosis in human coronary arteries. Especially sites with low and oscillating WSS near bifurcations have a higher propensity to develop atherosclerosis. WSS computations in coronary bifurcations can be performed in angiography-based 3D reconstructions. It is essential to evaluate how reconstruction errors influence WSS computations in mildly-diseased coronary bifurcations. In mildly-diseased lesions WSS could potentially provide more insight in plaque progression. Materials Methods Four Plexiglas phantom models of coronary bifurcations were imaged with bi-plane angiography. The lumens were segmented by two clinically experienced readers. Based on the segmentations 3D models were generated. This resulted in three models per phantom: one gold-standard from the phantom model itself, and one from each reader. Steady-state and transient simulations were performed with computational fluid dynamics to compute the WSS. A similarity index and a noninferiority test were used to compare the WSS in the phantoms and their reconstructions. The margin for this test was based on the resolution constraints of angiography. Results The reconstruction errors were similar to previously reported data; in seven out of eight reconstructions less than 0.10 mm. WSS in the regions proximal and far distal of the stenosis showed a good agreement. However, the low WSS areas directly distal of the stenosis showed some disagreement between the phantoms and the readers. This was due to small deviations in the reconstruction of the stenosis that caused differences in the resulting jet, and consequently the size and location of the low WSS area. Discussion This study showed that WSS can accurately be computed within angiography-based 3D reconstructions of coronary arteries with early stage atherosclerosis. Qualitatively, there was a good agreement between the phantoms and the readers. Quantitatively, the

  7. A comparative study of strain and shear-wave elastography in an elasticity phantom.

    PubMed

    Carlsen, Jonathan F; Pedersen, Malene R; Ewertsen, Caroline; Săftoiu, Adrian; Lönn, Lars; Rafaelsen, Søren R; Nielsen, Michael B

    2015-03-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of strain and shear-wave elastography for determining targets of varying stiffness in a phantom. The effect of target diameter on elastographic assessments and the effect of depth on shear-wave velocity were also investigated. MATERIALS AND METHODS. We examined 20 targets of varying diameters (2.5-16.7 mm) and stiffnesses (8, 14, 45, and 80 kPa) with a 4-9-MHz linear-array transducer. Targets were evaluated 10 times with three different methods-shear-wave elastography, strain ratio, and strain histogram analysis-yielding 600 evaluations. AUCs were calculated for data divided between different stiffnesses. A 1.5-6-MHz curved-array transducer was used to assess the effect of depth (3.5 vs 6 cm) on shear-wave elastography in 80 scans. Mixed model analysis was performed to assess the effect of target diameter and depth. RESULTS. Strain ratio and strain histogram AUCs were higher than the shear-wave velocity AUC (p < 0.001) in data divided as 80 versus 45, 14, and 8 kPa. In data divided as 80 and 45 versus 14 and 8 kPa, the methods were equal (p = 0.959 and p = 1.000, respectively). Strain ratios were superior (p = 0.030), whereas strain histograms were not significantly better (p = 0.083) than shear-wave elastography in data divided as 80, 45, and 14 versus 8 kPa. Target diameter had an effect on all three methods (p = 0.001). Depth had an effect on shear-wave velocity (p = 0.001). CONCLUSION. The ability to discern different target stiffnesses varies between shear-wave and strain elastography. Target diameter affected all methods. Shear-wave elastography is affected by target depth.

  8. 3-D shear wave velocity model of Mexico and South US: bridging seismic networks with ambient noise cross-correlations (C1) and correlation of coda of correlations (C3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spica, Zack; Perton, Mathieu; Calò, Marco; Legrand, Denis; Córdoba-Montiel, Francisco; Iglesias, Arturo

    2016-09-01

    This work presents an innovative strategy to enhance the resolution of surface wave tomography obtained from ambient noise cross-correlation (C1) by bridging asynchronous seismic networks through the correlation of coda of correlations (C3). Rayleigh wave group dispersion curves show consistent results between synchronous and asynchronous stations. Rayleigh wave group traveltimes are inverted to construct velocity-period maps with unprecedented resolution for a region covering Mexico and the southern United States. The resulting period maps are then used to regionalize dispersion curves in order to obtain local 1-D shear velocity models (VS) of the crust and uppermost mantle in every cell of a grid of 0.4°. The 1-D structures are obtained by iteratively adding layers until reaching a given misfit, and a global tomography model is considered as an input for depths below 150 km. Finally, a high-resolution 3-D VS model is obtained from these inversions. The major structures observed in the 3-D model are in agreement with the tectonic-geodynamic features and with previous regional and local studies. It also offers new insights to understand the present and past tectonic evolution of the region.

  9. The cooperativity length in simple shear of dry granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ries, Alexander; Brendel, Lothar; Wolf, Dietrich E.

    2016-10-01

    The local flow rule and the cooperativity length are the crucial ingredients of non-local rheology of granular matter. Once they are known as functions of the stress ratio, one can predict steady-state flow in arbitrarily complex geometries. We show how these functions can most easily be extracted from simulated velocity profiles for three-dimensional simple shear. The critical behaviour at the yield threshold and its rounding by finite size effects are discussed. The simple shear is simulated with smooth frictional walls, which provide the spatial inhomogeneity necessary to determine the cooperativity length. They also allow for slip, so that the particle velocity at the wall adjusts itself according to the stress ratio and is sensitive to the bulk yield.

  10. Determination of dynamic young's modulus, shear modulus, and poisson's ratio as a function of temperature for depleted Uranium-0.75 wt% Titanium using the piezoelectric ultrasonic composite oscillator technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keene, K. H.; Hartman, J. T.; Wolfenden, A.; Ludtka, G. M.

    1987-07-01

    Dynamic Young's modulus ( E) and shear modulus ( G) measurements were performed for three microstructures (gamma, alpha + delta, and alpha prime) of a depleted uranium-0.75 wt% titanium alloy. Measurements were made from 298 to 1123 K. From the measured values of E and G, values were obtained for Poisson's ratio (PR). The experimental apparatus was the piezoelectric ultrasonic composite oscillator technique (PUCOT) at 40 or 80 kHz. The ranges of values for E, G, and PR were 193 to 99 GPa, 81 to 35 GPa, and 0.17 to 0.56, respectively. Correlations for E, G, and PR as functions of temperature are presented.

  11. Modeling aeolian sediment transport thresholds on physically rough Martian surfaces: A shear stress partitioning approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillies, John A.; Nickling, William G.; King, James; Lancaster, Nicholas

    2010-09-01

    This paper explores the effect that large roughness elements (0.30 m × 0.26 m × 0.36 m) may have on entrainment of sediment by Martian winds using a shear stress partitioning approach based on a model developed by Raupach et al. (Raupach, M.R., Gillette, D.A., Leys, J.F., 1993. The effect of roughness elements on wind erosion threshold. Journal of Geophysical Research 98(D2), 3023-3029). This model predicts the shear stress partitioning ratio defined as the percent reduction in shear stress on the intervening surface between the roughness elements as compared to the surface in the absence of those elements. This ratio is based on knowledge of the geometric properties of the roughness elements, the characteristic drag coefficients of the elements and the surface, and the assumed effect these elements have on the spatial distribution of the mean and maximum shear stresses. On Mars, unlike on Earth, the shear stress partitioning caused by roughness can be non-linear in that the drag coefficients for the surface as well as for the roughness itself show Reynolds number dependencies for the reported range of Martian wind speeds. The shear stress partitioning model of Raupach et al. is used to evaluate how conditions of the Martian atmosphere will affect the threshold shear stress ratio for Martian surfaces over a range of values of roughness density. Using, as an example, a 125 µm diameter particle with an estimated threshold shear stress on Mars of ≈ 0.06 N m - 2 (shear velocity, u* ≈ 2 m s - 1 on a smooth surface), we evaluate the effect of roughness density on the threshold shear stress ratio for this diameter particle. In general, on Mars higher regional shear stresses are required to initiate particle entrainment for surfaces that have the same physical roughness as defined by the roughness density term ( λ) compared with terrestrial surfaces mainly because of the low Martian atmospheric density.

  12. Shear coaxial injector instability mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puissant, C.; Kaltz, T.; Glogowski, M.; Micci, M.

    1994-01-01

    There is no definitive knowledge of which of several concurrent processes ultimately results in unstable combustion within liquid rocket chambers employing shear coaxial injectors. Possible explanations are a detrimental change in the atomization characteristics due to a decrease in the gas-to-liquid velocity ratio, a change in the gas side injector pressure drop allowing acoustic coupling to the propellant feed system or the disappearance of a stabilizing recirculation region at the base of the LOX post. The aim of this research effort is to investigate these proposed mechanisms under conditions comparable to actual engine operation. Spray characterization was accomplished with flash photography and planar laser imaging to examine the overall spray morphology and liquid jet breakup processes and with a PDPA to quantify the spatial distribution of droplet size and mean axial velocity. A simplified stability model based on the Rayleigh criterion was constructed for the flow dynamics occurring within the chamber and injector to evaluate the potential coupling between the chamber and injector acoustic modes and was supported by high frequency measurements of chamber and injector pressure oscillations. To examine recirculation within the LOX post recess, velocity measurements were performed in the recess region by means of LDV. Present experiments were performed under noncombusting conditions using LOX/GH2 stimulants at pressures up to 4 MPa.

  13. Biot-Gassmann theory for velocities of gas hydrate-bearing sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, M.W.

    2002-01-01

    Elevated elastic velocities are a distinct physical property of gas hydrate-bearing sediments. A number of velocity models and equations (e.g., pore-filling model, cementation model, effective medium theories, weighted equations, and time-average equations) have been used to describe this effect. In particular, the weighted equation and effective medium theory predict reasonably well the elastic properties of unconsolidated gas hydrate-bearing sediments. A weakness of the weighted equation is its use of the empirical relationship of the time-average equation as one element of the equation. One drawback of the effective medium theory is its prediction of unreasonably higher shear-wave velocity at high porosities, so that the predicted velocity ratio does not agree well with the observed velocity ratio. To overcome these weaknesses, a method is proposed, based on Biot-Gassmann theories and assuming the formation velocity ratio (shear to compressional velocity) of an unconsolidated sediment is related to the velocity ratio of the matrix material of the formation and its porosity. Using the Biot coefficient calculated from either the weighted equation or from the effective medium theory, the proposed method accurately predicts the elastic properties of unconsolidated sediments with or without gas hydrate concentration. This method was applied to the observed velocities at the Mallik 2L-39 well, Mackenzie Delta, Canada.

  14. Is Fish Response related to Velocity and Turbulence Magnitudes? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, C. A.; Hockley, F. A.; Cable, J.

    2013-12-01

    Riverine fish are subject to heterogeneous velocities and turbulence, and may use this to their advantage by selecting regions which balance energy expenditure for station holding whilst maximising energy gain through feeding opportunities. This study investigated microhabitat selection by guppies (Poecilia reticulata) in terms of the three-dimensional velocity structure generated by idealised boulders in an experimental flume. Velocity and turbulence influenced intra-species variation in swimming behaviour with respect to size, sex and parasite intensity. With increasing body length, fish swam further and more frequently between boulder regions. Larger guppies spent more time in the high velocity and low turbulence region, whereas smaller guppies preferred the low velocity and high shear stress region directly behind the boulders. Male guppies selected the region of low velocity, indicating a possible reduced swimming ability due to hydrodynamic drag imposed by their fins. With increasing parasite (Gyrodactylus turnbulli) burden, fish preferentially selected the region of moderate velocity which had the lowest bulk measure of turbulence of all regions and was also the most spatially homogeneous velocity and turbulence region. Overall the least amount of time was spent in the recirculation zone which had the highest magnitude of shear stresses and mean vertical turbulent length scale to fish length ratio. Shear stresses were a factor of two greater than in the most frequented moderate velocity region, while mean vertical turbulent length scale to fish length ratio were six times greater. Indeed the mean longitudinal turbulent scale was 2-6 times greater than the fish length in all regions. While it is impossible to discriminate between these two turbulence parameters (shear stress and turbulent length to fish length ratio) in influencing the fish preference, our study infers that there is a bias towards fish spending more time in a region where both the bulk

  15. Jetting of a shear banding fluid in rectangular ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salipante, Paul F.; Little, Charles A. E.; Hudson, Steven D.

    2017-03-01

    Non-Newtonian fluids are susceptible to flow instabilities such as shear banding, in which the fluid may exhibit a markedly discontinuous viscosity at a critical stress. Here we report the characteristics and causes of a jetting flow instability of shear banding wormlike micelle solutions in microfluidic channels with rectangular cross sections over an intermediate volumetric flow regime. Particle-tracking methods are used to measure the three-dimensional flow field in channels of differing aspect ratios, sizes, and wall materials. When jetting occurs, it is self-contained within a portion of the channel where the flow velocity is greater than the surroundings. We observe that the instability forms in channels with aspect ratio greater than 5, and that the location of the high-velocity jet appears to be sensitive to stress localizations. Jetting is not observed in a lower concentration solution without shear banding. Simulations using the Johnson-Segalman viscoelastic model show a qualitatively similar behavior to the experimental observations and indicate that compressive normal stresses in the cross-stream directions support the development of the jetting flow. Our results show that nonuniform flow of shear thinning fluids can develop across the wide dimension in rectangular microfluidic channels, with implications for microfluidic rheometry.

  16. Blind comparisons of shear-wave velocities at closely-spaced sites in San Jose, California: Proceedings of a Workshop held at the US Geological Survey, Menlo Park, May 3, 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asten, Michael W.; Boore, David M.

    2005-01-01

    Shear-wave velocities within several hundred meters of Earth's surface are important in specifying earthquake ground motions for engineering design. Not only are the shearwave velocities used in classifying sites for use of modern building codes, but they are also used in site-specific studies of particularly significant structures. Many are the methods for estimating sub-surface shear-wave velocities, but few are the blind comparisons of a number of the methods at a single site. The word 'blind' is important here and means that the measurements and interpretations are done completely independent of one another. Stephen Hartzell of the USGS office on Golden, Colorado realized that such an experiment would be very useful for assessing the strengths and weaknesses of the various methods, and he and Jack Boatwright of the USGS office in Menlo Park, California, in cooperation with Carl Wentworth of the Menlo Park USGS office found a convenient site in the city of San Jose, California. The site had good access and space for conducting experiments, and a borehole drilled to several hundred meters by the Santa Clara Valley Water District was made available for downhole logging. Jack Boatwright asked David Boore to coordinate the experiment. In turn, David Boore persuaded several teams to make measurements, helped with the local logistics, collected the results, and organized and conducted an International Workshop in May, 2004. At this meeting the participants in the experiment gathered in Menlo Park to describe their measurements and interpretations, and to see the results of the comparisons of the various methods for the first time. This Open-File Report describes the results of that workshop. One of the participants, Michael Asten, offered to help the coordinator prepare this report. Because of his lead role in pulling the report together, Dr. Asten is the lead author of the paper to follow and is also the lead Compiler for the Open-File Report. It is important to

  17. Optimization of hydraulic shear parameters and reactor configuration in the aerobic granular sludge process.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liang; Zhou, Jiaheng; Yu, Haitian; Xu, Xiangyang

    2015-01-01

    The hydraulic shear acts as an important selection pressure in aerobic sludge granulation. The effects of the hydraulic shear rate and reactor configuration on structural characteristics of aerobic granule in view of the hydromechanics. The hydraulic shear analysis was proposed to overcome the limitation of using superficial gas velocity (SGV) to express the hydraulic shear stress. Results showed that the stronger hydraulic shear stress with SGV above 2.4 cm s(-1) promoted the microbial aggregation, and favoured the structural stability of the granular sludge. According to the hydraulic shear analysis, the total shear rate reached (0.56-2.31)×10(5) s(-1) in the granular reactor with a larger ratio of height to diameter (H/D), and was higher than that in the reactor with smaller H/D, where the sequencing airlift bioreactor with smaller H/D had a high total shear rate under the same SGV. Results demonstrated that the granular reactor could provide a stronger hydraulic shear stress which promotes the formation and structural stability of aerobic granules.

  18. Molecularly based criteria for shear banding in transient flow of entangled polymeric fluids.

    PubMed

    Mohagheghi, Mouge; Khomami, Bamin

    2016-06-01

    Dissipative particle dynamics simulations of polymeric melts in a start-up of shear flow as a function of ramp time to its steady state value is studied. Herein, we report the molecular findings showing the effect of ramp time on the formation of shear banded structures and chain relaxation behavior. Specifically, it is shown that shear banding emerges at a rapid start-up; however, homogeneous shear prevails when the deformation rate ramp time is sufficiently slow. This finding is in full consistency with prior continuum level linear stability analysis of shear banding in start-up of shear flows as well as experimental observations of entangled DNA and polymer solutions. Further, it has been revealed that the ratio of the longest chain orientation relaxation time to that of the time for the imposed deformation rate to reach its steady state value plays a central role in determining whether local strain inhomogeneities that lead to the formation of shear banded flow structures are created. In addition, we have shown that the gradient of the number of entanglements along the velocity gradient direction should reach a critical value for the creation of localized strain inhomogeneity. Moreover, the relation between the local process leading to shear banded flows and the relaxation mechanism of the chain is discussed. Overall, a molecular picture for the interrelation between the longest chain orientation and stress relaxation time, local inhomogeneities, and shear banding has been proposed and corroborated with extensive analysis.

  19. Nonlinear Reynolds stress model for turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, J. Michael; Rubinstein, R.; Kirtley, K. R.

    1991-01-01

    A nonlinear algebraic Reynolds stress model, derived using the renormalization group, is applied to equilibrium homogeneous shear flow and fully developed flow in a square duct. The model, which is quadratically nonlinear in the velocity gradients, successfully captures the large-scale inhomogeneity and anisotropy of the flows studied. The ratios of normal stresses, as well as the actual magnitudes of the stresses are correctly predicted for equilibrium homogeneous shear flow. Reynolds normal stress anisotropy and attendant turbulence driven secondary flow are predicted for a square duct. Profiles of mean velocity and normal stresses are in good agreement with measurements. Very close to walls, agreement with measurements diminishes. The model has the benefit of containing no arbitrary constants; all values are determined directly from the theory. It seems that near wall behavior is influenced by more than the large scale anisotropy accommodated in the current model. More accurate near wall calculations may well require a model for anisotropic dissipation.

  20. True Shear Parallel Plate Viscometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethridge, Edwin; Kaukler, William

    2010-01-01

    This viscometer (which can also be used as a rheometer) is designed for use with liquids over a large temperature range. The device consists of horizontally disposed, similarly sized, parallel plates with a precisely known gap. The lower plate is driven laterally with a motor to apply shear to the liquid in the gap. The upper plate is freely suspended from a double-arm pendulum with a sufficiently long radius to reduce height variations during the swing to negligible levels. A sensitive load cell measures the shear force applied by the liquid to the upper plate. Viscosity is measured by taking the ratio of shear stress to shear rate.

  1. Electroosmotic shear flow in microchannels.

    PubMed

    Mampallil, Dileep; van den Ende, Dirk

    2013-01-15

    We generate and study electroosmotic shear flow in microchannels. By chemically or electrically modifying the surface potential of the channel walls a shear flow component with controllable velocity gradient can be added to the electroosmotic flow caused by double layer effects at the channel walls. Chemical modification is obtained by treating the channel wall with a cationic polymer. In case of electric modification, we used gate electrodes embedded in the channel wall. By applying a voltage to the gate electrode, the zeta potential can be varied and a controllable, uniform shear stress can be applied to the liquid in the channel. The strength of the shear stress depends on both the gate voltage and the applied field which drives the electroosmotic shear flow. Although the stress range is still limited, such a microchannel device can be used in principle as an in situ micro-rheometer for lab on a chip purposes.

  2. Bed shear stress estimation on an open intertidal flat using in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Q.; van Prooijen, B. C.; Wang, Z. B.; Ma, Y. X.; Yang, S. L.

    2016-12-01

    Accurate estimations for the bed shear stress are essential to predict the erosion and deposition processes in estuaries and coasts. This study used high-frequency in situ measurements of water depths and near-bed velocities to estimate bed shear stress on an open intertidal flat in the Yangtze Delta, China. To determine the current-induced bed shear stress (τc) the in situ near-bed velocities were first decomposed from the turbulent velocity into separate wave orbital velocities using two approaches: a moving average (MA) and energy spectrum analysis (ESA). τc was then calculated and evaluated using the log-profile (LP), turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), modified TKE (TKEw), Reynolds stress (RS), and inertial dissipation (ID) methods. Wave-induced bed shear stress (τw) was estimated using classic linear wave theory. The total bed shear stress (τcw) was determined based on the Grant-Madsen wave-current interaction model (WCI). The results demonstrate that when the ratio of significant wave height to water depth (Hs/h) is greater than 0.25, τcw is significantly overestimated because the vertical velocity fluctuations are contaminated by the surface waves generated by high winds. In addition, wind enhances the total bed shear stress as a result of the increases in both τw and τc generated by the greater wave height and reinforcing of vertical turbulence, respectively. From a comparison of these various methods, the TKEw method associated with ESA decomposition was found to be the best approach because: (1) this method generates the highest mean index of agreement; (2) it uses vertical velocities that are less affected by Doppler noise; and (3) it is less sensitive to the near-bed stratification structure and uncertainty in bed location and roughness.

  3. Annular flow of R-134a through a high aspect ratio duct: Local void fraction, droplet velocity and droplet size measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Trabold, T.A.; Kumar, R.; Vassallo, P.F.

    1998-11-01

    Local measurements were made in annular flow of R-134a through a vertical duct. Using a gamma densitometer, hot-film anemometer and laser Doppler velocimeter, profiles of void fraction, liquid droplet frequency and droplet velocity were acquired across the narrow test section dimension. Based upon these results, data for liquid droplet size were obtained and compared to previous experimental results from the literature. These data are useful for developing an improved understanding of practical two-phase refrigerant flows, and for assessment of advanced two-fluid computer codes.

  4. Wave propagation in carbon nanotubes under shear deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, K.; Wang, X.

    2006-06-01

    This paper reports the results of an investigation on the effect of shear deformations on wave propagation in carbon nanotubes embedded in an elastic matrix. A multi-walled carbon nanotube is considered as a multiple shell coupled together through van der Waals forces between two adjacent tubes. The surrounding matrix is considered as a spring element defined by the Winkler model. Using the variational calculus of Hamilton's principle, dynamic governing equations considering the shear deformation and rotary inertia terms are derived. Numerical examples describe the effects of shear deformation, rotary inertia and elastic matrix on the velocity, the critical frequency, the cut-off frequency and the amplitude ratio of wave propagation in multi-walled carbon nanotubes embedded in an elastic matrix, respectively. The results obtained show that wave propagation in carbon nanotubes appears in a critical frequency or a cut-off frequency for different wave modes; the effect of shear deformation decreases the value of critical frequency; the critical frequency increases as the matrix stiffness increases; the inertia rotary has an obvious influence on the wave velocity for some wave modes in the higher frequency region.

  5. A Multiresolution Approach to Shear Wave Image Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Hollender, Peter; Bottenus, Nick; Trahey, Gregg

    2015-01-01

    Shear wave imaging techniques build maps of local elasticity estimating the local group velocity of induced mechanical waves. Velocity estimates are formed using the time delay in the motion profile of the medium at two or more points offset from the shear wave source. Because the absolute time-of-flight between any pair of locations scales with the distance between them, there is an inherent trade-off between robustness to time-of-flight errors and lateral spatial resolution based on the number and spacing of the receive points used for each estimate. This work proposes a method of using the time delays measured between all combinations of locations to estimate a noise-robust, high-resolution image. The time-of-flight problem is presented as an overdetermined system of linear equations that can be directly solved with and without spatial regularization terms. Finite element method simulations of acoustic radiation force-induced shear waves are used to illustrate the method, demonstrating superior contrast-to-noise ratio and lateral edge resolution characteristics compared to linear regression of arrival times. This technique may improve shear wave imaging in situations where time-of-flight noise is a limiting factor. PMID:26276953

  6. Experimental study of combustion in a turbulent free shear layer formed at a rearward facing step

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitz, R. W.; Daily, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    A premixed propane-air flame is stabilized in a turbulent free shear layer formed at a rearward facing step. The mean and rms averages of the turbulent velocity flow field are determined by LDV for both reacting (equivalence ratio 0.57) and nonreacting flows (Reynolds number 15,000-37,000 based on step height). The effect of combustion is to shift the layer toward the recirculation zone and reduce the flame spread. For reacting flow, the growth rate is unchanged except very near the step. The probability density function of the velocity is bimodial near the origin of the reacting layer and single-peaked but often skewed elsewhere. Large-scale structures dominate the reacting shear layer. Measurements of their passing frequency from LDV are consistent with high-speed Schlieren movies of the reacting layer and indicate that the coalescence rate of the eddies in the shear layer is reduced by combustion.

  7. Mechanical Response and Shear Initiation of Double-Base Propellants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    dynamic shear punch test using a modified split- Hopkinson bar. Varying the striker bar’s velocity and length controls the shear rate and duration. Shear...for double-base propellants and computational results of the shear punch test . For the simulations, the viscoSCRAM constitutive model was used to...initiation is determined based on their ability to predict the observed response from the dynamic shear punch test . 15. SUBJECT TERMS insensitive

  8. Electrophysiological aspects of sensory conduction velocity in healthy adults. 2. Ratio between the amplitude of sensory evoked potentials at the wrist on stimulating different fingers in both hands.

    PubMed

    Cruz Martínez, A; Barrio, M; Pérez Conde, M C; Ferrer, M T

    1978-12-01

    The normal ratio between the amplitude of the sensory evoked potential (SEP) at the wrist on stimulating digits 1, 2, 3, and 5 was determined in 44 healthy adult subjects. The first digit had the larger amplitude, and the fifth digit the smallest SEP. The amplitude expresses the density of sensory innervation in each finger. The ratio between the amplitude of different fingers varied according to the age of the subject. The amplitude of the SEP from a digit innervated by the median nerve decreased in the elderly more than the SEP amplitude of the digit innervated by the ulnar nerve, probably because of a chronic compression in the carpal tunnel. The changes in the normal amplitude ratio can be applied to the topographic diagnosis of radicular and brachial plexus lesions if a fixed segmental sensory innervation of the hand is accepted. In 44 right handed subjects the amplitude of the sensory evoked potentials at the wrist was significantly larger in the left hand. This asymmetry of sensory innervation between hands could be physiological, and suggests a greater density of sensory innervation in the left hand of right handed subjects.

  9. Electrophysiological aspects of sensory conduction velocity in healthy adults. 2. Ratio between the amplitude of sensory evoked potentials at the wrist on stimulating different fingers in both hands.

    PubMed Central

    Cruz Martínez, A; Barrio, M; Pérez Conde, M C; Ferrer, M T

    1978-01-01

    The normal ratio between the amplitude of the sensory evoked potential (SEP) at the wrist on stimulating digits 1, 2, 3, and 5 was determined in 44 healthy adult subjects. The first digit had the larger amplitude, and the fifth digit the smallest SEP. The amplitude expresses the density of sensory innervation in each finger. The ratio between the amplitude of different fingers varied according to the age of the subject. The amplitude of the SEP from a digit innervated by the median nerve decreased in the elderly more than the SEP amplitude of the digit innervated by the ulnar nerve, probably because of a chronic compression in the carpal tunnel. The changes in the normal amplitude ratio can be applied to the topographic diagnosis of radicular and brachial plexus lesions if a fixed segmental sensory innervation of the hand is accepted. In 44 right handed subjects the amplitude of the sensory evoked potentials at the wrist was significantly larger in the left hand. This asymmetry of sensory innervation between hands could be physiological, and suggests a greater density of sensory innervation in the left hand of right handed subjects. PMID:731255

  10. Ultrasound velocimetry in a shear-thickening wormlike micellar solution: evidence for the coexistence of radial and vorticity shear bands.

    PubMed

    Herle, V; Manneville, S; Fischer, P

    2008-01-01

    We carried out pointwise local velocity measurements on 40 mM cetylpyridinium chloride-sodium salicylate (CPyCl-NaSal) wormlike micellar solution using high-frequency ultrasound velocimetry in a Couette shear cell. The studied wormlike solution exhibits Newtonian, shear-thinning and shear-thickening rheological behavior in a stress-controlled environment. Previous rheology, flow visualization and small-angle light/neutron scattering experiments in the shear-thickening regime of this system showed the presence of stress-driven alternating transparent and turbid rings or vorticity bands along the axis of the Couette geometry. Through local velocity measurements we observe a homogeneous flow inside the 1mm gap of the Couette cell in the shear-thinning (stress-plateau) region. Only when the solution is sheared beyond the critical shear stress (shear-thickening regime) in a stress-controlled experiment, we observe inhomogeneous flow characterized by radial or velocity gradient shear bands with a highly sheared band near the rotor and a weakly sheared band near the stator of the Couette geometry. Furthermore, fast measurements performed in the shear-thickening regime to capture the temporal evolution of local velocities indicate coexistence of both radial and vorticity shear bands. However the same measurements carried out in shear rate controlled mode of the rheometer do not show such rheological complexity.

  11. Elastic wave velocities and Poisson's ratios of amphibolite up to 900 ° C at 1.0 GPa: Effect of dehydration melting on Poisson's ratio of mid- to lower crustal rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojo, S.; Arima, M.; Ishikawa, M.

    2007-12-01

    Vp and Vs measurements at high pressures and high temperatures (up to 900 ° C at 1.0 GPa) were carried out with piston-cylinder apparatus having a 34 mm inner diameter at high-pressure laboratory at Yokohama National University. The amphibolite was collected from Central Graben South, Mariana Trough by JAMSTEC cruise KR02-01. This rock is fine-grained homogeneous rock (grain size < 0.2 mm) without discernable oriented fabric. It consists mainly of hornblende (48.2 vol.%), plagioclase (44.4 vol.%), and substantial amount of magnetite (7.4 vol.%). Vp and Vs were measured using the pulse reflection method for a cylindrical rock sample having 5.7 mm diameter and ~5.0-5.5 mm length enclosed in a welded Pt capsule. Both Vp and Vs linearly decrease while Poisson's ratio increases from room temperature to ~500 ° C. The temperature derivative of Vp is -3.3 × 10-4km s-1 ° C -1and Vs is -2.6 × 10-4 km s-1 ° C -1 below 500 ° C. The temperature derivatives of Vp and Vs show a remarked change above ~500 ° C. The relatively lower Vp and Vs and higher Poisson's ratio at higher temperatures above 500 ° C are attributed to dehydration melting of amphibole-bearing assemblages. We identified substantial amounts of glass (4.1 wt.% at 700 ° C, 12.2 wt.% at 800 ° C and 20.3 wt.% at 900 ° C) in the quenched run products. The glass occurs as isolated pockets and/or pools among grain boundaries. Modal proportion of the glass linearly correlates with the increment of Poisson's ratio. The observed increments in Poisson's ratio with temperature are 0.02 at 700 ° C, 0.12 at 800 ° C, and 0.16 at 900 ° C, relative to the value at 500 ° C.

  12. Parameterization of sheared entrainment in a well-developed CBL. Part II: A simple model for predicting the growth rate of the CBL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peng; Sun, Jianning; Shen, Lidu

    2016-10-01

    Following the parameterization of sheared entrainment obtained in the companion paper, Liu et al. (2016), the present study aims to further investigate the characteristics of entrainment, and develop a simple model for predicting the growth rate of a well-developed and sheared CBL. The relative stratification, defined as the ratio of the stratification in the free atmosphere to that in the entrainment zone, is found to be a function of entrainment flux ratio ( A e). This leads to a simple expression of the entrainment rate, in which A e needs to be parameterized. According to the results in Liu et al. (2016), A e can be simply expressed as the ratio of the convective velocity scale in the sheared CBL to that in the shear-free CBL. The parameterization of the convective velocity scale in the sheared CBL is obtained by analytically solving the bulk model with several assumptions and approximations. Results indicate that the entrainment process is influenced by the dynamic effect, the interaction between mean shear and environmental stratification, and one other term that includes the Coriolis effect. These three parameterizations constitute a simple model for predicting the growth rate of a well-developed and sheared CBL. This model is validated by outputs of LESs, and the results show that it performs satisfactorily. Compared with bulk models, this model does not need to solve a set of equations for the CBL. It is more convenient to apply in numerical models.

  13. Combined Pressure-Shear Ignition Sensitivity Test

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    anrCIDB* propellant showing that sensitivity increase ( from TNT to Comp B to CMDB . The maximum pressure an~d shear velocity were around 1.0 GPa and 60...shear velocity required for ignition. * CMDB is an acronyin for Composite Modified Double Base. S IA I S i-A2 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page LIST OF FIGURES...Reaction ...................... 15 IOA.CMDB slid against CKDB. No reaction ....................... 17 10B.CMDB slid againbt CMDB . Reaction

  14. Wall Effect on the Convective-Absolute Boundary for the Compressible Shear Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinet, Jean-Christophe; Dussauge, Jean-Paul; Casalis, Grégoire

    The linear stability of inviscid compressible shear layers is studied. When the layer develops at the vicinity of a wall, the two parallel flows can have a velocity of the same sign or of opposite signs. This situation is examined in order to obtain first hints on the stability of separated flows in the compressible regime. The shear layer is described by a hyperbolic tangent profile for the velocity component and the Crocco relation for the temperature profile. Gravity effects and the superficial tension are neglected. By examining the temporal growth rate at the saddle point in the wave-number space, the flow is characterized as being either absolutely unstable or convectively unstable. This study principally shows the effect of the wall on the convective-absolute transition in compressible shear flow. Results are presented, showing the amount of the backflow necessary to have this type of transition for a range of primary flow Mach numbers M1 up to 3.0. The boundary of the convective-absolute transition is defined as a function of the velocity ratio, the temperature ratio and the Mach number. Unstable solutions are calculated for both streamwise and oblique disturbances in the shear layer.

  15. DOUBLE-DIFFUSIVE INSTABILITIES OF A SHEAR-GENERATED MAGNETIC LAYER

    SciTech Connect

    Silvers, Lara J.; Proctor, Michael R. E.; Vasil, Geoffrey M.; Brummell, Nicholas H.

    2009-09-01

    Previous theoretical work has speculated about the existence of double-diffusive magnetic buoyancy instabilities of a dynamically evolving horizontal magnetic layer generated by the interaction of forced vertically sheared velocity and a background vertical magnetic field. Here, we confirm numerically that if the ratio of the magnetic to thermal diffusivities is sufficiently low then such instabilities can indeed exist, even for high Richardson number shear flows. Magnetic buoyancy may therefore occur via this mechanism for parameters that are likely to be relevant to the solar tachocline, where regular magnetic buoyancy instabilities are unlikely.

  16. Characteristics of a current sheet shear mode in collisionless magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Keizo

    2016-05-01

    The current study shows the characteristics of the kink-type electromagnetic mode excited in the thin current layer formed around the x-line during the quasi-steady phase of magnetic reconnection. The linear wave analyses are carried out for the realistic current sheet profile which differs significantly from the Harris current sheet. It is found that the peak growth rate is very sensitive to the current sheet width even though the relative drift velocity at the center of the current sheet is fixed. This indicates that the mode is excited by the velocity shear rather than the relative drift velocity. Thus, the mode is termed here a current sheet shear mode. It is also shown that the wavenumber ky has a clear mass ratio dependency as ky λi ∝ (mi /me )1/4, implying the coupling of the ion and electron dynamics, where λi is the ion inertia length.

  17. A study of shear banding in polymer solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cromer, Michael; Fredrickson, Glenn H.; Leal, L. Gary

    2014-06-01

    In a recent letter [M. Cromer, M. C. Villet, G. H. Fredrickson, and L. G. Leal, "Shear banding in polymer solutions," Phys. Fluids 25, 051703 (2013)], we showed the existence of a steady shear-banded velocity profile for a model polymer solution with an underlying monotonic constitutive curve. The driving mechanism is the coupling of the polymer stress to an inhomogeneous concentration profile. To further understand this phenomenon, in this paper we investigate the underlying linear instability as well as probe the model parameters and their effect on transient and steady state solutions. The linear stability analysis of the steady, base homogeneous model shows that, in opposition to diffusion, the polymer concentration moves up stress gradients in a shear flow creating a critical balance such that, for a range of parameters, an instability occurs that drives the system away from homogeneity. The simulation of the full nonlinear equations in planar one-dimensional shear reveals a window within which the linear instability manifests itself as a shear-banded flow. Unlike the case for a nonmonotonic constitutive curve for which two bands are predicted, there is no apparent selection process for a monotonic curve that sets the number of bands in planar shear. Thus, we find the possibility of greater than two bands, the number of which is determined by the ratio of the polymer correlation length to the channel width. In addition to steady shear banding, transient phenomena are also probed revealing a complicated band transition (i.e., number of bands changing in time) as well as elastic recoil in a Taylor-Couette cell, each of which have been observed in experiment. Finally, as we showed in our letter, a nonlinear subcritical instability exists resulting in multiple steady states depending upon the wall ramp speed. Here, we show that this phenomenon can occur for realistic parameter values, in particular those obtained for a particular polymer solution that has shown

  18. Shear Fractures of Extreme Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Boris

    2016-10-01

    Natural and laboratory observations show that shear ruptures (faults) can propagate with extreme dynamics (up to intersonic rupture velocities) through intact materials and along pre-existing faults with frictional and coherent (bonded) interfaces. The rupture propagation is accompanied by significant fault strength weakening in the rupture head. Although essential for understanding earthquakes, rock mechanics, tribology and fractures, the question of what physical processes determine how that weakening occurs is still unresolved. The general approach today to explain the fault weakening is based upon the strong velocity-weakening friction law according to which the fault strength drops rapidly with slip velocity. Different mechanisms of strength weakening caused by slip velocity have been proposed including thermal effect, high-frequency compressional waves, expansion of pore fluid, macroscopic melting and gel formation. This paper proposes that shear ruptures of extreme dynamics propagating in intact materials and in pre-existing frictional and coherent interfaces are governed by the same recently identified mechanism which is associated with an intensive microcracking process in the rupture tip observed for all types of extreme ruptures. The microcracking process creates, in certain conditions, a special fan-like microstructure shear resistance of which is extremely low (up to an order of magnitude less than the frictional strength). The fan-structure representing the rupture head provides strong interface weakening and causes high slip and rupture velocities. In contrast with the velocity-weakening dependency, this mechanism provides the opposite weakening-velocity effect. The fan-mechanism differs remarkably from all reported earlier mechanisms, and it can provide such important features observed in extreme ruptures as: extreme slip and rupture velocities, high slip velocity without heating, off-fault tensile cracking, transition from crack-like to pulse

  19. Transiently Jammed State in Shear Thickening Suspensions under Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Shomeek; Allen, Benjamin; Brown, Eric

    2014-03-01

    We examine the response of a suspension of cornstarch and water under normal impact at controlled velocities. This is a model system to understand why a person can run on the surface of a discontinuous shear thickening fluid. Using simultaneous high-speed imaging of the top and bottom surfaces along with normal force measurements allows us to investigate whether the force response is a result of system spanning structures. We observe a shear thickening transition where above a critical velocity the normal force increases by orders of magnitude. In the high force regime the force response is displacement dependent like a solid rather than velocity dependent like a liquid. The stresses are on the order of 106 Pa which is enough to hold up a person's weight. In this regime imaging shows the existence of a solid like structure that extends to the bottom interface.

  20. Preflare magnetic and velocity fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J.; Gaizauskas, V.; Chapman, G. A.; Deloach, A. C.; Gary, G. A.; Jones, H. P.; Karpen, J. T.; Martres, M.-J.; Porter, J. G.; Schmeider, B.

    1986-01-01

    A characterization is given of the preflare magnetic field, using theoretical models of force free fields together with observed field structure to determine the general morphology. Direct observational evidence for sheared magnetic fields is presented. The role of this magnetic shear in the flare process is considered within the context of a MHD model that describes the buildup of magnetic energy, and the concept of a critical value of shear is explored. The related subject of electric currents in the preflare state is discussed next, with emphasis on new insights provided by direct calculations of the vertical electric current density from vector magnetograph data and on the role of these currents in producing preflare brightenings. Results from investigations concerning velocity fields in flaring active regions, describing observations and analyses of preflare ejecta, sheared velocities, and vortical motions near flaring sites are given. This is followed by a critical review of prevalent concepts concerning the association of flux emergence with flares

  1. 3D near-surface soil response from H/V ambient-noise ratios

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wollery, E.W.; Street, R.

    2002-01-01

    The applicability of the horizontal-to-vertical (H/V) ambient-noise spectral ratio for characterizing earthquake site effects caused by nearsurface topography and velocity structures was evaluated at sites underlain by thick (i.e. >100 m) sediment deposits near the southern-end of the New Madrid seismic zone in the central United States. Three-component ambient-noise and velocity models derived from seismic (shearwave) refraction/reflection surveys showed that a relatively horizontal, sharp shear-wave velocity interface in the soil column resulted in an H/V spectral ratio with a single well-defined peak. Observations at sites with more than one sharp shear-wave velocity contrast and horizontally arranged soil layers resulted in at least two well-defined H/V spectral ratio peaks. Furthermore, at sites where there were sharp shear-wave velocity contrasts in nonhorizontal, near-surface soil layers, the H/V spectra exhibited a broad-bandwidth, relatively low amplitude signal instead of a single well-defined peak. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A control systems approach to quantify wall shear stress normalization by flow-mediated dilation in the brachial artery.

    PubMed

    van Bussel, Frank C G; van Bussel, Bas C T; Hoeks, Arnold P G; Op 't Roodt, Jos; Henry, Ronald M A; Ferreira, Isabel; Vanmolkot, Floris H M; Schalkwijk, Casper G; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Reesink, Koen D

    2015-01-01

    Flow-mediated dilation is aimed at normalization of local wall shear stress under varying blood flow conditions. Blood flow velocity and vessel diameter are continuous and opposing influences that modulate wall shear stress. We derived an index FMDv to quantify wall shear stress normalization performance by flow-mediated dilation in the brachial artery. In 22 fasting presumed healthy men, we first assessed intra- and inter-session reproducibilities of two indices pFMDv and mFMDv, which consider the relative peak and relative mean hyperemic change in flow velocity, respectively. Second, utilizing oral glucose loading, we evaluated the tracking performance of both FMDv indices, in comparison with existing indices [i.e., the relative peak diameter increase (%FMD), the peak to baseline diameter ratio (Dpeak/Dbase), and the relative peak diameter increase normalized to the full area under the curve of blood flow velocity with hyperemia (FMD/shearAUC) or with area integrated to peak hyperemia (FMD/shearAUC_peak)]. Inter-session and intra-session reproducibilities for pFMDv, mFMDv and %FMD were comparable (intra-class correlation coefficients within 0.521-0.677 range). Both pFMDv and mFMDv showed more clearly a reduction after glucose loading (reduction of ~45%, p≤0.001) than the other indices (% given are relative reductions): %FMD (~11%, p≥0.074); Dpeak/Dbase (~11%, p≥0.074); FMD/shearAUC_peak (~20%, p≥0.016) and FMD/shearAUC (~38%, p≤0.038). Further analysis indicated that wall shear stress normalization under normal (fasting) conditions is already far from ideal (FMDv < 1), which (therefore) does not materially change with glucose loading. Our approach might be useful in intervention studies to detect intrinsic changes in shear stress normalization performance in conduit arteries.

  3. Sheared magnetofluids and Bernoulli confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quevado, H. J.; Bengtson, Roger; Mahajan, S. M.; Valanju, P. M.

    2001-10-01

    New magnetofluid states that differ qualitatively from those accessible to either neutral fluids or to conventional MHD plasmas have been predited theoretically. They are predicted to appear if plasmas with strong velocity shear flows (with large initial values of both magnetic and magnetofluid helicity) are created and allowed to relax. The dynamic invariance of these two helicities will force the plasma to self-organize and relax to a long-lived quasi equilibrium state away from thermal equilibrium. The investigation of these states bears critically upon basic plasma confinement and heating issues in both natural and laboratory plasmas. We have built a magnetic mirror device designed to create and investigate these theoretically predicted pressure-confining magnetofluid states. The primary experimental challenge is to create an initial plasma (with significant flows and currents) which is relatively isolated from walls and embedded in a modest magnetic external field. Our machine has a central bias rod to create a radial electric field for generating fast plasma flow, a large mirror ratio for good centrifugal confinement, and magnetic, Langmuir, and Mach probes to measure the evolution of plasma rotation profiles and fluctuations. Initial results will be presented demonstrating plasma rotation.

  4. Miniature Laser Doppler Velocimeter for Measuring Wall Shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gharib, Morteza; Modarress, Darius; Forouhar, Siamak; Fourguette, Dominique; Taugwalder, Federic; Wilson, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    A miniature optoelectronic instrument has been invented as a nonintrusive means of measuring a velocity gradient proportional to a shear stress in a flow near a wall. The instrument, which can be mounted flush with the wall, is a variant of a basic laser Doppler velocimeter. The laser Doppler probe volume can be located close enough to the wall (as little as 100 micron from the surface) to lie within the viscosity-dominated sublayer of a turbulent boundary layer. The instrument includes a diode laser, the output of which is shaped by a diffractive optical element (DOE) into two beams that have elliptical cross sections with very high aspect ratios.

  5. Experimental Reacting Hydrogen Shear Layer Data at High Subsonic Mach Number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. T.; Marek, C. J.; Wey, C.; Wey, C. C.

    1996-01-01

    The flow in a planar shear layer of hydrogen reacting with hot air was measured with a two-component laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) system, a schlieren system, and OH fluorescence imaging. It was compared with a similar air-to-air case without combustion. The high-speed stream's flow speed was about 390 m/s, or Mach 0.71, and the flow speed ratio was 0.34. The results showed that a shear layer with reaction grows faster than one without; both cases are within the range of data scatter presented by the established data base. The coupling between the streamwise and the cross-stream turbulence components inside the shear layers was low, and reaction only increased it slightly. However, the shear layer shifted laterally into the lower speed fuel stream, and a more organized pattern of Reynolds stress was present in the reaction shear layer, likely as a result of the formation of a larger scale structure associated with shear layer corrugation from heat release. Dynamic pressure measurements suggest that coherent flow perturbations existed inside the shear layer and that this flow became more chaotic as the flow advected downstream. Velocity and thermal variable values are listed in this report for a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) benchmark.

  6. Ductile fracture model in the shearing process of zircaloy sheet for nuclear fuel spacer grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jaeyoon; Kim, Naksoo; Lee, Hyungyil

    2012-04-01

    Features of sheared edges are predicted based on material properties of Zircaloy obtained from the tensile test and ductile fracture model such as the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) and Johnson-Cook models. The sheared edges formations are numerically analyzed in each ductile model. An appropriate ductile fracture model is selected to study the relative depth of sheared edges with respect to process parameters. The tendency of failure parameters that are affected by sheared edges and fracture duration is investigated. We applied changes on parameters of failure models to show that the punch force curve and the ratio of characteristic lengths could be coincided, which led us to conclude that the GTN and Johnson-Cook models are equivalent. In the Johnson-Cook model, however, the characteristic length of the sheared edges does not change as each failure parameter reaches a critical value. Hence, the FE prediction model for forming defects is developed using the GTN failure model. Finally, the characteristic length of sheared edges have been measured using the FE prediction model for shearing process parameters such as punch velocities, clearance, and tool wear. Our results showed that the punch-die clearance is the most significant factor that affects forming defects when compared to other factors.

  7. Seismic velocities for hydrate-bearing sediments using weighted equation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, M.W.; Hutchinson, D.R.; Collett, T.S.; Dillon, William P.

    1996-01-01

    A weighted equation based on the three-phase time-average and Wood equations is applied to derive a relationship between the compressional wave (P wave) velocity and the amount of hydrates filling the pore space. The proposed theory predicts accurate P wave velocities of marine sediments in the porosity range of 40-80% and provides a practical means of estimating the amount of in situ hydrate using seismic velocity. The shear (S) wave velocity is derived under the assumption that the P to S wave velocity ratio of the hydrated sediments is proportional to the weighted average of the P to S wave velocity ratios of the constituent components of the sediment. In the case that all constituent components are known, a weighted equation using multiphase time-average and Wood equations is possible. However, this study showed that a three-phase equation with modified matrix velocity, compensated for the clay content, is sufficient to accurately predict the compressional wave velocities for the marine sediments. This theory was applied to the laboratory measurements of the P and S wave velocities in permafrost samples to infer the amount of ice in the unconsolidated sediment. The results are comparable to the results obtained by repeatedly applying the two-phase wave scattering theory. The theory predicts that the Poisson's ratio of the hydrated sediments decreases as the hydrate concentration increases and the porosity decreases. In consequence, the amplitude versus offset (AVO) data for the bottom-simulating reflections may reveal positive, negative, or no AVO anomalies depending on the concentration of hydrates in the sediments.

  8. Shear accommodation in dirty grain boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Upmanyu, M.

    2014-04-01

    The effect of solutes (dirt) on the mechanics of crystalline interfaces remains unexplored. Here, we perform atomic-scale simulations to study the effect of carbon segregation on the shear accommodation at select grain boundaries in the classical α-Fe/C system. For shear velocities larger than the solute diffusion rate, we observe a transition from coupled motion to sliding. Below a critical solute excess, the boundaries break away from the solute cloud and exhibit in a coupled motion. At smaller shear velocities, the extrinsic coupled motion is jerky, occurs at relatively small shear stresses, and is aided by fast convective solute diffusion along the boundary. Our studies underscore the combined effect of energetics and kinetics of solutes in modifying the bicrystallography, temperature and rate dependence of shear accommodation at grain boundaries.

  9. Turbulence structure at high shear rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Moon Joo; Kim, John; Moin, Parviz

    1987-01-01

    The structure of homogeneous turbulence in the presence of a high shear rate is studied using results obtained from three-dimensional time-dependent numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations on a grid of 512 x 128 x 128 node points. It is shown that high shear rate enhances the streamwise fluctuating motion to such an extent that a highly anisotropic turbulence state with a one-dimensional velocity field and two-dimensional small-scale turbulence develops asymptotically as total shear increases. Instantaneous velocity fields show that high shear rate in homogeneous turbulent shear flow produces structures which are similar to the streaks present in the viscous sublayer of turbulent boundary layers.

  10. X-ray Radiography Measurements of Shear Coaxial Rocket Injectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-07

    These injectors rely on the shear between an outer lower-density, high-velocity annulus and a higher-density, low-velocity inner jet to atomize and...velocities and the distance between radial points – Large uncertainty given the small distances, high velocities, and limited number of points

  11. Dynamics of High Pressure Reacting Shear Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-02

    side recirculation zone should be present DISTRIBUTION A: Approved for public release; distribution unlimited 13 Convection Velocities x y Extract...column of pixels at each time along shear layer edge as a function of time, dark streaks represent convecting liquid structures Positive slope streaks...represent upstream traveling features Structures convect at apparent constant velocity Structures start at slow speed and gradually accelerate

  12. Motion of spheroidal particles in vertical shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broday, David; Fichman, Mati; Shapiro, Michael; Gutfinger, Chaim

    1998-01-01

    The motion of non-neutrally buoyant prolate spheroidal particles in vertical shear flows is investigated. Using the generalized Faxen law, we calculate the hydrodynamic forces and moments acting on such inertial and inertialess particles, and their trajectories. The calculations are done for (i) freely rotating particles, and (ii) particles with orientations fixed by means of an external torque exerted by a strong orienting field. Inertial particles are found to migrate across the streamlines, and their trajectories differ considerably from those calculated for inertialess particles. Neutrally buoyant spheroids, inertial or not, which either freely rotate or have fixed orientations in shear flows, translate along the streamlines. Non-neutrally buoyant inertialess spheroids freely moving in simple shear flow translate along periodic trajectories with no net lateral drift. In contrast, inertial particles under similar flow conditions drift laterally toward locations characterized by higher local velocities in a direction opposing gravity. The motion of non-neutrally buoyant inertial particles with fixed orientations may be unstable with the drift velocity growing exponentially with time. Conditions for the occurrence of this unstable motion are formulated analytically in terms of particle and flow parameters. In general, the rate of drift depends on particle shape, via its aspect ratio, and its inertia.

  13. Dispersion of flocculated particles in simple shear flow and elongational flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xueliang

    Experimental studies on the dispersion process of fine flocculated particles in different flows are carried out through visual image analyses and particle size measurements. The flows investigated include a cone-plate shear flow, a cylindrical Couette flow, an orifice contractile flow, and a hyperbolic flow. Visual studies on the mechanisms of floc breakup in different flows are first conducted through a video image acquisition and analysis system. A variety of dynamic processes of the deformation and breakup of fine flocs of size from 3mm to 30mm in the contractile flow, hyperbolic flow, and simple shear flow are visualized. The breakup and erosion process of flocs subjected to a constant shear stress in the cone-plate flow is analyzed based on the changes of floc mass, size, and shape with shear stress and shearing time through the image analysis. A significant portion of the breakup, or size reduction, of the fine flocs takes place upon the application of the shear stress. Floc size continues to decrease through erosion mechanism. The erosion rate depends on the applied shear stress, the floc size, and the floc shape. An orifice flow is applied to break flocs and determine floc strength. The flow field before an orifice of high area ratio is first numerically simulated and analyzed in order to characterize the flow and stress field. The dependence of the maximum centerline velocity gradient on orifice area ratio and Reynolds number is obtained and its asymptotic behavior in high Reynolds number regime is analyzed. The dispersion of flocs in the orifice flow is analyzed based on the floc size distribution measured using a particle size analyzer. Due to the rapid rise of the axial velocity gradient near the orifice entrance, the floc breakup in the orifice flow is instantaneous and the floc erosion mechanism can be excluded. The centerline maximum shear stress in the orifice flow thus gives the floc strength of the resulting flocs whose average size is

  14. Behavior of granular materials under cyclic shear.

    PubMed

    Mueggenburg, Nathan W

    2005-03-01

    The design and development of a parallel plate shear cell for the study of large-scale shear flows in granular materials is presented. The parallel plate geometry allows for shear studies without the effects of curvature found in the more common Couette experiments. A system of independently movable slats creates a well with side walls that deform in response to the motions of grains within the pack. This allows for true parallel plate shear with minimal interference from the containing geometry. The motions of the side walls also allow for a direct measurement of the velocity profile across the granular pack. Results are presented for applying this system to the study of transients in granular shear and for shear-induced crystallization. Initial shear profiles are found to vary from packing to packing, ranging from a linear profile across the entire system to an exponential decay with a width of approximately six bead diameters. As the system is sheared, the velocity profile becomes much sharper, resembling an exponential decay with a width of roughly three bead diameters. Further shearing produces velocity profiles which can no longer be fit to an exponential decay, but are better represented as a Gaussian decay or error function profile. Cyclic shear is found to produce large-scale ordering of the granular pack, which has a profound impact on the shear profile. There exist periods of time in which there is slipping between layers as well as periods of time in which the layered particles lock together resulting in very little relative motion.

  15. Theory and Observations of High Frequency Alfven Eigenmodes in Low Aspect Ratio Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    N.N. Gorelenkov; E. Fredrickson; E. Belova; C.Z. Cheng; D. Gates; S. Kaye; R. White

    2003-06-27

    New observations of sub-cyclotron frequency instability in low aspect ratio plasma in National Spherical Torus Experiments (NSTX) are reported. The frequencies of observed instabilities correlate with the characteristic Alfven velocity of the plasma. A theory of localized Compressional Alfven Eigenmodes (CAE) and Global shear Alfven Eigenmodes (GAE) in low aspect ratio plasma is presented to explain the observed high frequency instabilities. CAE's/GAE's are driven by the velocity space gradient of energetic super-Alfvenic beam ions via Doppler shifted cyclotron resonances. One of the main damping mechanisms of GAE's, the continuum damping, is treated perturbatively within the framework of ideal MHD. Properties of these cyclotron instabilities ions are presented.

  16. Shear dynamo problem: Quasilinear kinematic theory.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, S; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2009-04-01

    Large-scale dynamo action due to turbulence in the presence of a linear shear flow is studied. Our treatment is quasilinear and kinematic but is nonperturbative in the shear strength. We derive the integrodifferential equation for the evolution of the mean magnetic field by systematic use of the shearing coordinate transformation and the Galilean invariance of the linear shear flow. For nonhelical turbulence the time evolution of the cross-shear components of the mean field does not depend on any other components excepting themselves. This is valid for any Galilean-invariant velocity field, independent of its dynamics. Hence the shear-current assisted dynamo is essentially absent, although large-scale nonhelical dynamo action is not ruled out.

  17. Earthquake predictions using seismic velocity ratios

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherburne, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    Since the beginning of modern seismology, seismologists have contemplated predicting earthquakes. The usefulness of earthquake predictions to the reduction of human and economic losses and the value of long-range earthquake prediction to planning is obvious. Not as clear are the long-range economic and social impacts of earthquake prediction to a speicifc area. The general consensus of opinion among scientists and government officials, however, is that the quest of earthquake prediction is a worthwhile goal and should be prusued with a sense of urgency. 

  18. Application of optical analyzer technique for measurements of sound velocities in shock-compressed Al-Mn alloy for calibration of recent elastic-viscous-plastic models

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlov, E. A.; Tarzhanov, V. I.; Pankratov, D. G.; Yakunin, A. K.; Yelkin, V. M.; Mikhailov, V. N.

    2006-08-03

    Registration results of longitudinal CL({sigma}XX) and volume CB({sigma}XX) sound velocities in shock-compressed aluminum alloy are presented. Experimental data were obtained in wide range of longitudinal stress, including the stress, corresponding to solid-liquid shock-induced transformation. By using experimentally measured values of sound velocities, the changes of Poisson ratio and shear modulus were calculated along the shock adiabat. These data are needed for calibration of resent elastic-viscous-plastic models.

  19. Squirming through shear thinning fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datt, Charu; Zhu, Lailai; Elfring, Gwynn J.; Pak, On Shun

    2015-11-01

    Many microorganisms find themselves surrounded by fluids which are non-Newtonian in nature; human spermatozoa in female reproductive tract and motile bacteria in mucosa of animals are common examples. These biological fluids can display shear-thinning rheology whose effects on the locomotion of microorganisms remain largely unexplored. Here we study the self-propulsion of a squirmer in shear-thinning fluids described by the Carreau-Yasuda model. The squirmer undergoes surface distortions and utilizes apparent slip-velocities around its surface to swim through a fluid medium. In this talk, we will discuss how the nonlinear rheological properties of a shear-thinning fluid affect the propulsion of a swimmer compared with swimming in Newtonian fluids.

  20. Spin crossover in ferropericlase and velocity heterogeneities in the lower mantle.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhongqing; Wentzcovitch, Renata M

    2014-07-22

    Deciphering the origin of seismic velocity heterogeneities in the mantle is crucial to understanding internal structures and processes at work in the Earth. The spin crossover in iron in ferropericlase (Fp), the second most abundant phase in the lower mantle, introduces unfamiliar effects on seismic velocities. First-principles calculations indicate that anticorrelation between shear velocity (VS) and bulk sound velocity (Vφ) in the mantle, usually interpreted as compositional heterogeneity, can also be produced in homogeneous aggregates containing Fp. The spin crossover also suppresses thermally induced heterogeneity in longitudinal velocity (VP) at certain depths but not in VS. This effect is observed in tomography models at conditions where the spin crossover in Fp is expected in the lower mantle. In addition, the one-of-a-kind signature of this spin crossover in the RS/P (∂ ln VS/∂ ln VP) heterogeneity ratio might be a useful fingerprint to detect the presence of Fp in the lower mantle.

  1. Modified Biot-Gassmann theory for calculating elastic velocities for unconsolidated and consolidated sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, M.W.

    2002-01-01

    The classical Biot-Gassmann theory (BGT) generally overestimates shear-wave velocities of water-saturated sediments. To overcome this problem, a new theory is developed based on BGT and on the velocity ratio as a function of G(1 - ??)n, where ?? is porosity and n and G are constants. Based on laboratory data measured at ultrasonic frequencies, parameters for the new formulation are derived. This new theory is extended to include the effect of differential pressure and consolidation on the velocity ratio by making n a function of differential pressure and the rate of porosity reduction with respect to differential pressure. A scale G is introduced to compensate for discrepancies between measured and predicted velocities, mainly caused by the presence of clay in the matrix. As differential pressure increases and the rate of porosity reduction with respect to differential pressure decreases, the exponent n decreases and elastic velocities increase. Because velocity dispersion is not considered, this new formula is optimum for analyzing velocities measured at ultrasonic frequencies or for sediments having low dispersion characteristics such as clean sandstone with high permeability and lack of grain-scale local flow. The new formula is applied to predict velocities from porosity or from porosity and P-wave velocity and is in good agreement with laboratory and well log data. ?? 2004 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

  2. Internal hydraulic jumps with large upstream shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, Kelly; Helfrich, Karl

    2015-11-01

    Internal hydraulic jumps in approximately two-layered flows with large upstream shear are investigated using numerical simulations. The simulations allow continuous density and velocity profiles, and a jump is forced to develop by downstream topography, similar to the experiments conducted by Wilkinson and Wood (1971). High shear jumps are found to exhibit significantly more entrainment than low shear jumps. Furthermore, the downstream structure of the flow has an important effect on the jump properties. Jumps with a slow upper (inactive) layer exhibit a velocity minimum downstream of the jump, resulting in a sub-critical downstream state, while flows with the same upstream vertical shear and a larger barotropic velocity remain super-critical downstream of the jump. A two-layer theory is modified to account for the vertical structure of the downstream density and velocity profiles and entrainment is allowed through a modification of the approach of Holland et al. (2002). The resulting theory can be matched reasonably well with the numerical simulations. However, the results are very sensitive to how the downstream vertical profiles of velocity and density are incorporated into the layered model, highlighting the difficulty of the two layer approximation when the shear is large.

  3. Improved determination of vascular blood-flow shear rate using Doppler ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farison, James B.; Begeman, Garett A.; Salles-Cunha, Sergio X.; Beebe, Hugh G.

    1997-05-01

    Shear rate has been linked to endothelial and smooth muscle cell function, neointimal hyperplasia, poststenotic dilation and progression of atherosclerotic plaque. In vivo studies of shear rate have been limited in humans due to the lack of a truly accurate noninvasive method of measuring blood flow. In clinical vascular laboratories, the primary method of wall shear rate estimation is the scaled ratio between the center line systolic velocity and the local arterial radius. The present study compares this method with the shear rate calculated directly from data collected using a Doppler ultrasound scanner. Blood flow in the superficial femoral artery of 20 subjects was measured during three stages of distal resistance. Analysis and display programs were written for use with the MATLAB image processing software package. The experimental values of shear rate were calculated using the formal definition and then compared to the standard estimate. In all three states of distal resistance, the experimental values were significantly higher than the estimated values by a factor of approximately 1.57. These results led to the conclusion that the direct method of measuring shear rate is more precise and should replace the estimation model in the clinical laboratory.

  4. Proposed moduli of dry rock and their application to predicting elastic velocities of sandstones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.

    2005-01-01

    Velocities of water-saturated isotropic sandstones under low frequency can be modeled using the Biot-Gassmann theory if the moduli of dry rocks are known. On the basis of effective medium theory by Kuster and Toksoz, bulk and shear moduli of dry sandstone are proposed. These moduli are related to each other through a consolidation parameter and provide a new way to calculate elastic velocities. Because this parameter depends on differential pressure and the degree of consolidation, the proposed moduli can be used to calculate elastic velocities of sedimentary rocks under different in-place conditions by varying the consolidation parameter. This theory predicts that the ratio of P-wave to S-wave velocity (Vp/Vs) of a dry rock decreases as differential pressure increases and porosity decreases. This pattern of behavior is similar to that of water-saturated sedimentary rocks. If microcracks are present in sandstones, the velocity ratio usually increases as differential pressure increases. This implies that this theory is optimal for sandstones having intergranular porosities. Even though the accurate behavior of the consolidation parameter with respect to differential pressure or the degree of consolidation is not known, this theory presents a new way to predict S-wave velocity from P-wave velocity and porosity and to calculate elastic velocities of gas-hydrate-bearing sediments. For given properties of sandstones such as bulk and shear moduli of matrix, only the consolidation parameter affects velocities, and this parameter can be estimated directly from the measurements; thus, the prediction of S-wave velocity is accurate, reflecting in-place conditions.

  5. Repetitive differential finger motion increases shear strain between the flexor tendon and subsynovial connective tissue.

    PubMed

    Tat, Jimmy; Kociolek, Aaron M; Keir, Peter J

    2013-10-01

    Non-inflammatory fibrosis and thickening of the subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT) are characteristic in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) patients. These pathological changes have been linked to repetitive hand tasks that create shear forces between the flexor tendons and SSCT. We measured the relative motion of the flexor digitorum superficialis tendon and SSCT during two repetitive finger tasks using color Doppler ultrasound. Twelve participants performed flexion-extension cycles for 30 min with the long finger alone (differential movement) and with all four fingers together (concurrent movement). Shear strain index (SSI, a relative measure of excursion in flexion and extension) and maximum velocity ratio (MVR, the ratio of SSCT versus tendon during flexion and extension) were used to represent shear. A linear effect of exertion time was significant and corresponded with larger tendon shear in differential motion. The flexion SSI increased 20.4% from the first to the 30th minute, while MVR decreased 8.9% in flexion and 8.7% in extension. No significant changes were found during concurrent motion. These results suggest that exposure to repetitive differential finger tasks may increase the risk of shear injury in the carpal tunnel.

  6. Transport suppression by shear reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinell, Julio; Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego

    2009-11-01

    The relationship between transport and shear is a problem of considerable interest to magnetically confined plasmas. It is well known that there are cases in which an increase of flow shear can lead to a reduction of turbulent transport. However, this is not a generic result, and there are transport problems in which the opposite is the case. In particular, as originally discussed in Ref. footnotetextdel-Castillo-Negrete and Morrison, Phys. Fluids A 5, 948 (1993), barriers to chaotic transport typically form in regions of vanishing shear. This property, which is generic to the so-called non-twist Hamiltonian systems footnotetextdel-Castillo-Negrete, Greene, and Morrison, Physica D 91, 1 (1996), explains the observed resilience of transport barriers in non-monotonic zonal flows in plasmas and fluids and the robustness of shearless magnetic surfaces in reverse shear configurations. Here we study the role of finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects on the suppression of chaotic transport by shear reduction in a simplified model. Following Ref. footnotetextdel-Castillo-Negrete, Phys. Plasmas, 7, 1702 (2000) we consider a model consisting of a superposition of drift waves and a non-monotonic zonal flow. The FLR effects are incorporated by gyroaveraging the E xB velocity, and transport is studied by following the evolution of ensembles of test particles.

  7. Magnetized stratified rotating shear waves.

    PubMed

    Salhi, A; Lehner, T; Godeferd, F; Cambon, C

    2012-02-01

    We present a spectral linear analysis in terms of advected Fourier modes to describe the behavior of a fluid submitted to four constraints: shear (with rate S), rotation (with angular velocity Ω), stratification, and magnetic field within the linear spectral theory or the shearing box model in astrophysics. As a consequence of the fact that the base flow must be a solution of the Euler-Boussinesq equations, only radial and/or vertical density gradients can be taken into account. Ertel's theorem no longer is valid to show the conservation of potential vorticity, in the presence of the Lorentz force, but a similar theorem can be applied to a potential magnetic induction: The scalar product of the density gradient by the magnetic field is a Lagrangian invariant for an inviscid and nondiffusive fluid. The linear system with a minimal number of solenoidal components, two for both velocity and magnetic disturbance fields, is eventually expressed as a four-component inhomogeneous linear differential system in which the buoyancy scalar is a combination of solenoidal components (variables) and the (constant) potential magnetic induction. We study the stability of such a system for both an infinite streamwise wavelength (k(1) = 0, axisymmetric disturbances) and a finite one (k(1) ≠ 0, nonaxisymmetric disturbances). In the former case (k(1) = 0), we recover and extend previous results characterizing the magnetorotational instability (MRI) for combined effects of radial and vertical magnetic fields and combined effects of radial and vertical density gradients. We derive an expression for the MRI growth rate in terms of the stratification strength, which indicates that purely radial stratification can inhibit the MRI instability, while purely vertical stratification cannot completely suppress the MRI instability. In the case of nonaxisymmetric disturbances (k(1) ≠ 0), we only consider the effect of vertical stratification, and we use Levinson's theorem to demonstrate the

  8. Momentum Transport Studies in High E x B Shear Plasmas in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, W M; Bell, R E; LeBlanc, B P; Menard, J E; Rewoldt, G; Wang, W; Levinton, F M; Yuh, H

    2008-06-26

    Experiments have been conducted on NSTX to study both steady state and perturbative mo mentum transport. These studies are unique in their parameter space under investigation, where the low aspect ratio of NSTX results in rapid plasma rotation with E x B shearing rates high enough to suppress low-k turbulence. In some cases, the ratio of momentum to energy confinement time is found to exceed five. Momentum pinch velocities of order 10-40 m/s are inferred from the measured angular momentum flux evolution after non-resonant magnetic perturbations are applied to brake the plasma.

  9. Fragmentation of multiply charged hydrocarbon molecules C{sub n}H{sup q+} (n{<=} 4, q{<=} 9) produced in high-velocity collisions: Branching ratios and kinetic energy release of the H{sup +} fragment

    SciTech Connect

    Beroff, K.; Pino, T.; Carpentier, Y.; Van-Oanh, N. T.; Chabot, M.; Tuna, T.; Martinet, G.; Le Padellec, A.; Lavergne, L.

    2011-09-15

    Fragmentation branching ratios for channels involving H{sup +} emission and associated kinetic energy release of the H{sup +} fragment [KER(H{sup +})] have been measured for multicharged C{sub n}H{sup q+} molecules produced in high velocity (3.6 a.u.) collisions between C{sub n}H{sup +} projectiles and helium atoms. For CH{sup q+} (q{<=} 4) molecules, measured KER(H{sup +}) were found well below predictions of the simple point charge Coulomb model (PCCM) for all q values. Multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) calculations for ground as well as electronic excited states were performed which allowed a perfect interpretation of the CH{sup q+} experimental results for low charges (q = 2-3) as well as for the highest charge (q = 4). In this last case we could show, on the basis of ionization cross sections calculations and experimental measurements performed on the same systems at slightly higher velocity (4.5 a.u.), the prominent role played by inner-shell ionization followed by Auger relaxation and could extract the lifetime of this Auger relaxation giving rise to the best agreement between the experiment and the calculations. For dissociation of C{sub 2}H{sup q+} and C{sub 3}H{sup q+} with the highest charges (q{>=} 5), inner-shell ionization contributed in a prominent way to the ion production. In these two cases it was shown that measured KER(H{sup +}) were in good agreement with PCCM predictions when those were corrected for Auger relaxation with the same Auger lifetime value as in CH{sup 3+}.

  10. Hydrocarbon saturation determination using acoustic velocities obtained through casing

    DOEpatents

    Moos, Daniel

    2010-03-09

    Compressional and shear velocities of earth formations are measured through casing. The determined compressional and shear velocities are used in a two component mixing model to provides improved quantitative values for the solid, the dry frame, and the pore compressibility. These are used in determination of hydrocarbon saturation.

  11. Profiling of K0 lateral stress coefficient in soils using paired directional G0 ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, Taeseo; Mayne, Paul W.

    2013-07-01

    Using a special database compiled from directional shear wave velocity measurements at 12 well-documented sites, the geostatic stress state and stress history are evaluated from shear stiffness ratios. At each site, a benchmark profile of lateral stress coefficient (K0) was detailed using direct in-situ methods (i.e., self-boring pressuremeter, total stress cells, and/or hydraulic fracture), and/or laboratory methods (i.e., suction, consolidometer, and/or triaxial stress path testing). Also, the yield stress ratio (YSR), or more common parameter: overconsolidation ratio (OCR), was available either from series of consolidation tests on undisturbed samples procured from various depths and/or engineering geology studies, or both. Statistical expressions are derived to relate both K0 and OCR in terms of the ratio G0,HH/G0,VH as well as other factors.

  12. Structure of turbulence at high shear rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Moon Joo; Kim, John; Moin, Parviz

    1990-01-01

    The structure of homogeneous turbulence subject to high shear rate has been investigated by using three-dimensional, time-dependent numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations. This study indicates that high shear rate alone is sufficient for generation of the streaky structures, and that the presence of a solid boundary is not necessary. Evolution of the statistical correlations is examined to determine the effect of high shear rate on the development of anisotropy in turbulence. It is shown that the streamwise fluctuating motions are enhanced so profoundly that a highly anisotropic turbulence state with a 'one-component' velocity field and 'two-component' vorticity field develops asymptotically as total shear increases. Because of high-shear rate, rapid distortion theory predicts remarkably well the anisotropic behavior of the structural quantities.

  13. Time-Resolved Particle Image Velocimetry Measurements with Wall Shear Stress and Uncertainty Quantification for the FDA Nozzle Model.

    PubMed

    Raben, Jaime S; Hariharan, Prasanna; Robinson, Ronald; Malinauskas, Richard; Vlachos, Pavlos P

    2016-03-01

    We present advanced particle image velocimetry (PIV) processing, post-processing, and uncertainty estimation techniques to support the validation of computational fluid dynamics analyses of medical devices. This work is an extension of a previous FDA-sponsored multi-laboratory study, which used a medical device mimicking geometry referred to as the FDA benchmark nozzle model. Experimental measurements were performed using time-resolved PIV at five overlapping regions of the model for Reynolds numbers in the nozzle throat of 500, 2000, 5000, and 8000. Images included a twofold increase in spatial resolution in comparison to the previous study. Data was processed using ensemble correlation, dynamic range enhancement, and phase correlations to increase signal-to-noise ratios and measurement accuracy, and to resolve flow regions with large velocity ranges and gradients, which is typical of many blood-contacting medical devices. Parameters relevant to device safety, including shear stress at the wall and in bulk flow, were computed using radial basis functions. In addition, in-field spatially resolved pressure distributions, Reynolds stresses, and energy dissipation rates were computed from PIV measurements. Velocity measurement uncertainty was estimated directly from the PIV correlation plane, and uncertainty analysis for wall shear stress at each measurement location was performed using a Monte Carlo model. Local velocity uncertainty varied greatly and depended largely on local conditions such as particle seeding, velocity gradients, and particle displacements. Uncertainty in low velocity regions in the sudden expansion section of the nozzle was greatly reduced by over an order of magnitude when dynamic range enhancement was applied. Wall shear stress uncertainty was dominated by uncertainty contributions from velocity estimations, which were shown to account for 90-99% of the total uncertainty. This study provides advancements in the PIV processing methodologies over

  14. Enhancing shear thickening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madraki, Yasaman; Hormozi, Sarah; Ovarlez, Guillaume; Guazzelli, Élisabeth; Pouliquen, Olivier

    2017-03-01

    A cornstarch suspension is the quintessential particulate system that exhibits shear thickening. By adding large non-Brownian spheres to a cornstarch suspension, we show that shear thickening can be significantly enhanced. More precisely, the shear-thickening transition is found to be increasingly shifted to lower critical shear rates. This influence of the large particles on the discontinuous shear-thickening transition is shown to be more dramatic than that on the viscosity or the yield stress of the suspension.

  15. Adaptive Estimation of Intravascular Shear Rate Based on Parameter Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, Naotaka; Takeda, Naoto

    2008-05-01

    The relationships between the intravascular wall shear stress, controlled by flow dynamics, and the progress of arteriosclerosis plaque have been clarified by various studies. Since the shear stress is determined by the viscosity coefficient and shear rate, both factors must be estimated accurately. In this paper, an adaptive method for improving the accuracy of quantitative shear rate estimation was investigated. First, the parameter dependence of the estimated shear rate was investigated in terms of the differential window width and the number of averaged velocity profiles based on simulation and experimental data, and then the shear rate calculation was optimized. The optimized result revealed that the proposed adaptive method of shear rate estimation was effective for improving the accuracy of shear rate calculation.

  16. Shear Brillouin light scattering microscope

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Moonseok; Besner, Sebastien; Ramier, Antoine; Kwok, Sheldon J. J.; An, Jeesoo; Scarcelli, Giuliano; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Brillouin spectroscopy has been used to characterize shear acoustic phonons in materials. However, conventional instruments had slow acquisition times over 10 min per 1 mW of input optical power, and they required two objective lenses to form a 90° scattering geometry necessary for polarization coupling by shear phonons. Here, we demonstrate a confocal Brillouin microscope capable of detecting both shear and longitudinal phonons with improved speeds and with a single objective lens. Brillouin scattering spectra were measured from polycarbonate, fused quartz, and borosilicate in 1-10 s at an optical power level of 10 mW. The elastic constants, phonon mean free path and the ratio of the Pockels coefficients were determined at microscopic resolution. PMID:26832263

  17. Dynamics of vesicles in a wall-bounded shear flow.

    PubMed

    Abkarian, M; Viallat, A

    2005-08-01

    We report a detailed study of the behavior (shapes, experienced forces, velocities) of giant lipid vesicles subjected to a shear flow close to a wall. Vesicle buoyancy, size, and reduced volume were separately varied. We show that vesicles are deformed by the flow and exhibit a tank-treading motion with steady orientation. Their shapes are characterized by two nondimensional parameters: the reduced volume and the ratio of the shear stress with the hydrostatic pressure. We confirm the existence of a force, able to lift away nonspherical buoyant vesicles from the substrate. We give the functional variation and the value of this lift force (up to 150 pN in our experimental conditions) as a function of the relevant physical parameters: vesicle-substrate distance, wall shear rate, viscosity of the solution, vesicle size, and reduced volume. Circulating deformable cells disclosing a nonspherical shape also experience this force of viscous origin, which contributes to take them away from the endothelium and should be taken into account in studies on cell adhesion in flow chambers, where cells membrane and the adhesive substrate are in relative motion. Finally, the kinematics of vesicles along the flow direction can be described in a first approximation with a model of rigid spheres.

  18. Inter-laboratory comparison of wave velocity measures.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waite, William F.; Santamarina, J.C.; Rydzy, M.; Chong, S.H.; Grozic, J.L.H.; Hester, K.; Howard, J.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Lee, J.Y.; Nakagawa, S.; Priest, J.; Reese, E.; Koh, H.; Sloan, E.D.; Sultaniya, A.

    2011-01-01

     This paper presents an eight-laboratory comparison of compressional and shear wave velocities measured in F110 Ottawa sand. The study was run to quantify the physical property variations one should expect in heterogeneous, multiphase porous materials by separately quantifying the variability inherent in the measurement techniques themselves. Comparative tests were run in which the sand was dry, water-saturated, partially water-saturated, partially ice-saturated and partially hydrate-saturated. Each test illustrates a collection of effects that can be classified as inducing either specimen-based or measurement-based variability. The most significant variability is due to void ratio variations between samples. Heterogeneous pore-fill distributions and differences in measurement techniques also contribute to the observed variability, underscoring the need to provide detailed sample preparation and system calibration information when reporting wave velocities in porous media. 

  19. Effect of initial stress on propagation behaviors of shear horizontal waves in piezoelectric/piezomagnetic layered cylinders.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X; Qian, Z H; Zhang, S; Liu, J X

    2015-12-01

    An analytical approach is taken to investigate shear horizontal wave (SH wave) propagation in layered cylinder with initial stress, where a piezomagnetic (PM) material thin layer is bonded to a piezoelectric (PE) cylinder. Two different material combinations are taken into account, and the phase velocities of the SH waves are numerically calculated for the magnetically open and short cases, respectively. It is found that the initial stress, the thickness ratio and the material performance have a great influence on the phase velocity. The results obtained in this paper can offer fundamental significance to the application of PE/PM composite media or structure for the acoustic wave and microwave technologies.

  20. Crosswind Shear Gradient Affect on Wake Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Fred H.; Ahmad, Nashat N.

    2011-01-01

    Parametric simulations with a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model are used to explore the influence of crosswind shear on aircraft wake vortices. Previous studies based on field measurements, laboratory experiments, as well as LES, have shown that the vertical gradient of crosswind shear, i.e. the second vertical derivative of the environmental crosswind, can influence wake vortex transport. The presence of nonlinear vertical shear of the crosswind velocity can reduce the descent rate, causing a wake vortex pair to tilt and change in its lateral separation. The LES parametric studies confirm that the vertical gradient of crosswind shear does influence vortex trajectories. The parametric results also show that vortex decay from the effects of shear are complex since the crosswind shear, along with the vertical gradient of crosswind shear, can affect whether the lateral separation between wake vortices is increased or decreased. If the separation is decreased, the vortex linking time is decreased, and a more rapid decay of wake vortex circulation occurs. If the separation is increased, the time to link is increased, and at least one of the vortices of the vortex pair may have a longer life time than in the case without shear. In some cases, the wake vortices may never link.

  1. Shear alters motility of Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molaei, Mehdi; Jalali, Maryam; Sheng, Jian

    2013-11-01

    Understanding of locomotion of microorganisms in shear flows drew a wide range of interests in microbial related topics such as biological process including pathogenic infection and biophysical interactions like biofilm formation on engineering surfaces. We employed microfluidics and digital holography microscopy to study motility of E. coli in shear flows. We controlled the shear flow in three different shear rates: 0.28 s-1, 2.8 s-1, and 28 s-1 in a straight channel with the depth of 200 μm. Magnified holograms, recorded at 15 fps with a CCD camera over more than 20 minutes, are analyzed to obtain 3D swimming trajectories and subsequently used to extract shear responses of E.coli. Thousands of 3-D bacterial trajectories are tracked. The change of bacteria swimming characteristics including swimming velocity, reorientation, and dispersion coefficient are computed directly for individual trajectory and ensemble averaged over thousands of realizations. The results show that shear suppresses the bacterial dispersions in bulk but promote dispersions near the surface contrary to those in quiescent flow condition. Ongoing analyses are focusing to quantify effect of shear rates on tumbling frequency and reorientation of cell body, and its implication in locating the hydrodynamic mechanisms for shear enhanced angular scattering. NIH, NSF, GoMRI.

  2. Sustained shear flows in Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quist, Tayler; Anders, Evan; Brown, Benjamin; Oishi, Jeffrey

    2016-11-01

    Zonal shear flows play important roles in both the solar and geo dynamos. In two dimensional simulations, and at relatively narrow aspect ratios, Rayleigh-Bénard convection naturally achieves zonal shear flows. These zonal flows are driven by the convection and modify it, significantly altering the heat transport and convective structures. Here we study shear flows in two and three-dimensional simulations of Rayleigh-Bénard convection using the Dedalus pseudospectral framework. At small aspect ratios and at Prandtl number 1, a large horizontal shear naturally occurs. At larger aspect ratios, we find that shearing is naturally prevented unless manually induced; there is a bistability between states dominated by "flywheel" modes and states dominated by large scale shear. We explore these states and the possibilities of sustained large scale shear in 3-D simulations.

  3. Acoustic bed velocity and bed load dynamics in a large sand bed river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaeuman, D.; Jacobson, R.B.

    2006-01-01

    Development of a practical technology for rapid quantification of bed load transport in large rivers would represent a revolutionary advance for sediment monitoring and the investigation of fluvial dynamics. Measurement of bed load motion with acoustic Doppler current profiles (ADCPs) has emerged as a promising approach for evaluating bed load transport. However, a better understanding of how ADCP data relate to conditions near the stream bed is necessary to make the method practical for quantitative applications. In this paper, we discuss the response of ADCP bed velocity measurements, defined as the near-bed sediment velocity detected by the instrument's bottom-tracking feature, to changing sediment-transporting conditions in the lower Missouri River. Bed velocity represents a weighted average of backscatter from moving bed load particles and spectral reflections from the immobile bed. The ratio of bed velocity to mean bed load particle velocity depends on the concentration of the particles moving in the bed load layer, the bed load layer thickness, and the backscatter strength from a unit area of moving particles relative to the echo strength from a unit area of unobstructed bed. A model based on existing bed load transport theory predicted measured bed velocities from hydraulic and grain size measurements with reasonable success. Bed velocities become more variable and increase more rapidly with shear stress when the transport stage, defined as the ratio of skin friction to the critical shear stress for particle entrainment, exceeds a threshold of about 17. This transition in bed velocity response appears to be associated with the appearance of longer, flatter bed forms at high transport stages.

  4. Local transport barrier formation and relaxation in reverse-shear plasmas on the TFTR tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Synakowski, E.J.; Beer, M.A.; Batha, S.H.

    1997-02-01

    The roles of turbulence stabilization by sheared E x B flow and Shafranov-shift gradients are examined for TFTR. Enhanced Reverse-Shear plasmas. Both effects in combination provide the basis of a positive-feedback model that predicts reinforced turbulence suppression with increasing pressure gradient. Local fluctuation behavior at the onset of ERS confinement is consistent with this framework. The power required for transitions into the ERS regime are lower when high power neutral beams are applied earlier in the current profile evolution, consistent with the suggestion that both effects play a role. Separation of the roles of E x B and Shafranov shift effects was performed by varying the E x B shear through changes in the toroidal velocity with nearly-steady-state pressure profiles. Transport and fluctuation levels increase only when E x B shearing rates are driven below a critical value that is comparable to the fastest linear growth rates of the dominant instabilities. While a turbulence suppression criterion that involves the ratio of shearing to linear growth rates is in accord with many of these results, the existence of hidden dependencies of the criterion is suggested in experiments where the toroidal field was varied. The forward transition into the ERS regime has also been examined in strongly rotating plasmas. The power threshold is higher with unidirectional injection than with balanced injection.

  5. Acoustic Effects on Cyclic-Tension Fatigue of Al-4Cu-1Mg Alloy by Ultrasonic Shear Wave Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagishi, H.; Fukuhara, M.; Chiba, A.

    2009-02-01

    Cyclic-tension fatigue of aluminum alloy Al-4Cu-1Mg has been determined by usage of vertically-polarized shear wave (SV) reflection and horizontally-polarized shear wave (SH) transmission methods. Internal friction measured by SV method begins to increase rapidly from normalized fatigue ratio of about 0.5, showing dominating interaction of movable dislocations with the waves, as viscoelastic effect. Propagation time and logarithmic damping ratio in the SH method decrease with an increase of the fatigue degree, due to a shift of residual stress as the acoustoelastic effect. The