Science.gov

Sample records for shear velocity ratio

  1. Effect of velocity ratio on coherent-structure dynamics in turbulent free shear layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryanarayanan, Saikishan; Narasimha, Roddam

    2014-11-01

    The relevance of the vortex-gas model to the large scale dynamics of temporally evolving turbulent free shear layers has been established by extensive simulations (Phys. Rev. E 89, 013009 (2014)). The effects of velocity ratio (r =U2 /U1) on shear layer dynamics are revealed by spatially evolving vortex-gas shear-layer simulations using a computational model based on Basu et al. (Appl. Math. Modelling 19, (1995)), but with a crucial improvement that ensures conservation of global circulation. The simulations show that the initial conditions and downstream boundaries can significantly affect the flow over substantial part of the domain, but the equilibrium spread rate is a universal function of r, and is within the experimental scatter. The spread in the r = 0 limit is higher than Galilean-transformed temporal value. The present 2D simulations at r = 0 show continuous growth of structures, while merger-dominated evolution is observed for r = 0 . 23 (and higher). These two mechanisms were observed across the same two values of r in the experiments of D'Ovidio & Coats (J. Fluid Mech. 737, 2013), but the continuous growth was instead attributed to mixing-transition and 3D. The 2D mechanisms responsible for the observed continuous growth of structures are analyzed in detail. Supported in part by RN/Intel/4288 and RN/DRDO/4124.

  2. System and method to estimate compressional to shear velocity (VP/VS) ratio in a region remote from a borehole

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung; Nihei, Kurt T; Schmitt, Denis P; Skelt, Christopher; Johnson, Paul A; Guyer, Robert; TenCate, James A; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves

    2012-10-16

    In some aspects of the disclosure, a method for creating three-dimensional images of non-linear properties and the compressional to shear velocity ratio in a region remote from a borehole using a conveyed logging tool is disclosed. In some aspects, the method includes arranging a first source in the borehole and generating a steered beam of elastic energy at a first frequency; arranging a second source in the borehole and generating a steerable beam of elastic energy at a second frequency, such that the steerable beam at the first frequency and the steerable beam at the second frequency intercept at a location away from the borehole; receiving at the borehole by a sensor a third elastic wave, created by a three wave mixing process, with a frequency equal to a difference between the first and second frequencies and a direction of propagation towards the borehole; determining a location of a three wave mixing region based on the arrangement of the first and second sources and on properties of the third wave signal; and creating three-dimensional images of the non-linear properties using data recorded by repeating the generating, receiving and determining at a plurality of azimuths, inclinations and longitudinal locations within the borehole. The method is additionally used to generate three dimensional images of the ratio of compressional to shear acoustic velocity of the same volume surrounding the borehole.

  3. System and method for investigating sub-surface features and 3D imaging of non-linear property, compressional velocity VP, shear velocity VS and velocity ratio VP/VS of a rock formation

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Skelt, Christopher; Nihei, Kurt; Johnson, Paul A.; Guyer, Robert; Ten Cate, James A.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Larmat, Carene S.

    2015-06-02

    A system and a method for generating a three-dimensional image of a rock formation, compressional velocity VP, shear velocity VS and velocity ratio VP/VS of a rock formation are provided. A first acoustic signal includes a first plurality of pulses. A second acoustic signal from a second source includes a second plurality of pulses. A detected signal returning to the borehole includes a signal generated by a non-linear mixing process from the first and second acoustic signals in a non-linear mixing zone within an intersection volume. The received signal is processed to extract the signal over noise and/or signals resulting from linear interaction and the three dimensional image of is generated.

  4. Velocity ratio and its application to predicting velocities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.

    2003-01-01

    The velocity ratio of water-saturated sediment derived from the Biot-Gassmann theory depends mainly on the Biot coefficient?a property of dry rock?for consolidated sediments with porosity less than the critical porosity. With this theory, the shear moduli of dry sediments are the same as the shear moduli of water-saturated sediments. Because the velocity ratio depends on the Biot coefficient explicitly, Biot-Gassmann theory accurately predicts velocity ratios with respect to differential pressure for a given porosity. However, because the velocity ratio is weakly related to porosity, it is not appropriate to investigate the velocity ratio with respect to porosity (f). A new formulation based on the assumption that the velocity ratio is a function of (1?f)n yields a velocity ratio that depends on porosity, but not on the Biot coefficient explicitly. Unlike the Biot-Gassmann theory, the shear moduli of water-saturated sediments depend not only on the Biot coefficient but also on the pore fluid. This nonclassical behavior of the shear modulus of water-saturated sediment is speculated to be an effect of interaction between fluid and the solid matrix, resulting in softening or hardening of the rock frame and an effect of velocity dispersion owing to local fluid flow. The exponent n controls the degree of softening/hardening of the formation. Based on laboratory data measured near 1 MHz, this theory is extended to include the effect of differential pressure on the velocity ratio by making n a function of differential pressure and consolidation. However, the velocity dispersion and anisotropy are not included in the formulation.

  5. Magnetogenesis through Relativistic Velocity Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Evan

    Magnetic fields at all scales are prevalent in our universe. However, current cosmological models predict that initially the universe was bereft of large-scale fields. Standard magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) does not permit magnetogenesis; in the MHD Faraday's law, the change in magnetic field B depends on B itself. Thus if B is initially zero, it will remain zero for all time. A more accurate physical model is needed to explain the origins of the galactic-scale magnetic fields observed today. In this thesis, I explore two velocity-driven mechanisms for magnetogenesis in 2-fluid plasma. The first is a novel kinematic 'battery' arising from convection of vorticity. A coupling between thermal and plasma oscillations, this non-relativistic mechanism can operate in flows that are incompressible, quasi-neutral and barotropic. The second mechanism results from inclusion of thermal effects in relativistic shear flow instabilities. In such flows, parallel perturbations are ubiquitously unstable at small scales, with growth rates of order with the plasma frequency over a defined range of parameter-space. Of these two processes, instabilities seem far more likely to account for galactic magnetic fields. Stable kinematic effects will, at best, be comparable to an ideal Biermann battery, which is suspected to be orders of magnitude too weak to produce the observed galactic fields. On the other hand, instabilities grow until saturation is reached, a topic that has yet to be explored in detail on cosmological scales. In addition to investigating these magnetogenesis sources, I derive a general dispersion relation for three dimensional, warm, two species plasma with discontinuous shear flow. The mathematics of relativistic plasma, sheared-flow instability and the Biermann battery are also discussed.

  6. Shear wave velocities in the earth's mantle.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R.; Kovach, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Direct measurement of the travel time gradient for S waves together with travel time data are used to derive a shear velocity model for the earth's mantle. In order to satisfy the data it is necessary to discard the usual assumption of lateral homogeneity below shallow depths. A shear velocity differential is proposed for a region between western North America and areas of the Pacific Ocean. Distinctive features of the velocity model for the upper mantle beneath western North America are a low-velocity zone centered at 100 km depth and zones of high velocity gradient beginning at 400, 650, and 900 km.

  7. Gyrokinetic Simulation of Residual Stress from Diamagnetic Velocity Shears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waltz, R. E.; Staebler, G. M.; Solomon, W. M.

    2010-11-01

    Residual stress refers to the remaining toroidal angular momentum (TAM) flux (divided by major radius) when the shear in the parallel velocity (and parallel velocity itself) vanishes. Previously [1] we demonstrated with gyrokinetic (GYRO) simulations that TAM pinching from the diamagnetic level shear in the ExB velocity could provide the residual stress needed for spontaneous toroidal rotation. Here we show that the shear in the diamagnetic velocities themselves provide comparable residual stress (and level of stabilization). The sign of the residual stress, quantified by the ratio of TAM flow to ion power flow (M/P), depends on the signs of the various velocity shears as well as ion (ITG) versus electron (TEM) mode directed turbulence. The residual stress from these temperature and density gradient diamagnetic velocity shears is demonstrated in global gyrokinetic simulation of ``null'' rotation DIIID discharges by matching M/P profiles within experimental error. 8pt [1] R.E. Waltz, G.M. Staebler, J. Candy, and F.L. Hinton, Phys. Plasmas 14, 122507 (2007); errata 16, 079902 (2009).

  8. Shear velocity criterion for incipient motion of sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simoes, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    The prediction of incipient motion has had great importance to the theory of sediment transport. The most commonly used methods are based on the concept of critical shear stress and employ an approach similar, or identical, to the Shields diagram. An alternative method that uses the movability number, defined as the ratio of the shear velocity to the particle’s settling velocity, was employed in this study. A large amount of experimental data were used to develop an empirical incipient motion criterion based on the movability number. It is shown that this approach can provide a simple and accurate method of computing the threshold condition for sediment motion.

  9. Drift-wave transport in the velocity shear layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosalem, K. C.; Roberto, M.; Caldas, I. L.

    2016-07-01

    Particle drift driven by electrostatic wave fluctuations is numerically computed to describe the transport in a gradient velocity layer at the tokamak plasma edge. We consider an equilibrium plasma in large aspect ratio approximation with E × B flow and specified toroidal plasma velocity, electric field, and magnetic field profiles. A symplectic map, previously derived for infinite coherent time modes, is used to describe the transport dependence on the electric, magnetic, and plasma velocity shears. We also show that resonant perturbations and their correspondent islands in the Poincaré maps are much affected by the toroidal velocity profiles. Moreover, shearless transport barriers, identified by extremum values of the perturbed rotation number profiles of the invariant curves, allow chaotic trajectories trapped into the plasma. We investigate the influence of the toroidal plasma velocity profile on these shearless transport barriers.

  10. Single-fluid stability of stationary plasma equilibria with velocity shear and magnetic shear

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, Akira

    2009-10-15

    By using incompressible single-fluid equations with a generalized Ohm's law neglecting the electron inertia, a linear eigenmode equation for a magnetic field perturbation is derived for stationary equilibria in a slab geometry with velocity and magnetic shears. The general eigenmode equation contains a fourth-order derivative of the perturbation in the highest order and contains Alfven and whistler mode components for a homogeneous plasma. The ratio of the characteristic ion inertia length to the characteristic inhomogeneity scale length is chosen as a small parameter for expansion. Neglecting whistler mode in the lowest order, the eigenmode equation becomes a second-order differential equation similar to the ideal magnetohydrodynamic eigenmode equation except for the fact that the unperturbed perpendicular velocity contains both electric and ion diamagnetic drifts. A sufficient condition for stability against the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability driven by shear in the ion diamagnetic drift velocity is derived and then applied to tokamaks.

  11. Space-time correlations of fluctuating velocities in turbulent shear flows.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; He, Guo-Wei

    2009-04-01

    Space-time correlations or Eulerian two-point two-time correlations of fluctuating velocities are analytically and numerically investigated in turbulent shear flows. An elliptic model for the space-time correlations in the inertial range is developed from the similarity assumptions on the isocorrelation contours: they share a uniform preference direction and a constant aspect ratio. The similarity assumptions are justified using the Kolmogorov similarity hypotheses and verified using the direct numerical simulation (DNS) of turbulent channel flows. The model relates the space-time correlations to the space correlations via the convection and sweeping characteristic velocities. The analytical expressions for the convection and sweeping velocities are derived from the Navier-Stokes equations for homogeneous turbulent shear flows, where the convection velocity is represented by the mean velocity and the sweeping velocity is the sum of the random sweeping velocity and the shear-induced velocity. This suggests that unlike Taylor's model where the convection velocity is dominating and Kraichnan and Tennekes' model where the random sweeping velocity is dominating, the decorrelation time scales of the space-time correlations in turbulent shear flows are determined by the convection velocity, the random sweeping velocity, and the shear-induced velocity. This model predicts a universal form of the space-time correlations with the two characteristic velocities. The DNS of turbulent channel flows supports the prediction: the correlation functions exhibit a fair good collapse, when plotted against the normalized space and time separations defined by the elliptic model.

  12. Displacement velocity effects on rock fracture shear strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleepmek, M.; Khamrat, S.; Thongprapha, T.; Fuenkajorn, K.

    2016-09-01

    Triaxial shear tests are performed to assess the effects of displacement velocity and confining pressure on shear strengths and dilations of tension-induced fractures and smooth saw-cut surfaces prepared in granite, sandstone and marl specimens. A polyaxial load frame is used to apply confining pressures between 1 and 18 MPa with displacement velocities ranging from 1.15 × 10-5 to 1.15 × 10-2 mm/s. The results indicate that the shearing resistances of smooth saw-cut surfaces tend to be independent of the displacement velocity and confining pressure. Under each confinement the peak and residual shear strengths and dilation rates of rough fractures increase with displacement velocities. The sheared-off areas increase when the confining pressure increases, and the displacement rate decreases. The velocity-dependent shear strengths tend to act more under high confining pressures for the rough fractures in strong rock (granite) than for the smoother fractures in weaker rocks (sandstone and marl). An empirical criterion that explicitly incorporates the effects of shear velocity is proposed to describe the peak and residual shear strengths. The criterion fits well to the test results for the three tested rocks.

  13. Electrostatic ion cyclotron velocity shear instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemons, D. S.; Winske, D.; Gary, S. P.

    1992-01-01

    A local electrostatic dispersion equation is derived for a shear flow perpendicular to an ambient magnetic field, which includes all kinetic effects and involves only one important parameter. The dispersion equation is cast in the form of Gordeyev integrals and is solved numerically. Numerical solutions indicate that an ion cyclotron instability is excited. The instability occurs roughly at multiples of the ion cyclotron frequency (modified by the shear), with the growth rate or the individual harmonics overlapping in the wavenumber. At large values of the shear parameter, the instability is confined to long wavelengths, but at smaller shear, a second distinct branch at shorter wavelengths also appears. The properties of the instability obtained are compared with those obtained in the nonlocal limit by Ganguli et al. (1985, 1988).

  14. Shockwave determination of the shear velocity at very high pressures.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, O. L.

    1972-01-01

    Description of a proposed shockwave experiment that may provide some understanding on the behavior of planet core materials in the presence of high temperatures and pressures. Shockwave experimentation is shown to offer promise of revealing some information on shear velocity behavior at high pressures, and its relevance to properties of planet interiors consists in that abrupt changes in shear velocities at boundary layers could be experimentally confirmed where abrupt changes in density are suspected from seismic interpretation.

  15. Convertion Shear Wave Velocity to Standard Penetration Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madun, A.; Tajuddin, S. A. A.; Abdullah, M. E.; Abidin, M. H. Z.; Sani, S.; Siang, A. J. L. M.; Yusof, M. F.

    2016-07-01

    Multichannel Analysis Surface Wave (MASW) measurement is one of the geophysics exploration techniques to determine the soil profile based on shear wave velocity. Meanwhile, borehole intrusive technique identifies the changes of soil layer based on soil penetration resistance, i.e. standard penetration test-number of blows (SPT-N). Researchers across the world introduced many empirical conversions of standard penetration test blow number of borehole data to shear wave velocity or vice versa. This is because geophysics test is a non-destructive and relatively fast assessment, and thus should be promoted to compliment the site investigation work. These empirical conversions of shear wave velocity to SPT-N blow can be utilised, and thus suitable geotechnical parameters for design purposes can be achieved. This study has demonstrated the conversion between MASW and SPT-N value. The study was conducted at the university campus and Sejagung Sri Medan. The MASW seismic profiles at the University campus test site and Sejagung were at a depth of 21 m and 13 m, respectively. The shear wave velocities were also calculated empirically using SPT-N value, and thus both calculated and measured shear wave velocities were compared. It is essential to note that the MASW test and empirical conversion always underestimate the actual shear wave velocity of hard layer or rock due to the effect of soil properties on the upper layer.

  16. ML shear wave velocity tomography for the Iranian Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheri-Peyrov, Mehdi; Ghods, Abdolreza; Abbasi, Madjid; Bergman, Eric; Sobouti, Farhad

    2016-04-01

    Iranian Plateau reflects several different tectonic styles of collision, and large-scale strike-slip faults. We calculate a high-resolution 2-D ML shear velocity map for the Iranian Plateau to detect lateral crustal thickness changes associated with different tectonic boundaries. The ML velocity is very sensitive to strong lateral variations of crustal thickness and varies between the velocity of Lg and Sn phases. Our data set consists of 65 795 ML amplitude velocity measurements from 2531 precisely relocated events recorded by Iranian networks in the period 1996-2014. Using a constrained least-squares inversion scheme, we inverted the ML velocities for a 2-D shear velocity map of Iran. Our results show that the Zagros and South Caspian Basin (SCB) have shear wave velocities close to the Sn phase, and are thus Lg-blocking regions. High velocities in the High Zagros and the Simply Folded Belt imply significant crustal undulations within these zones. We note that in the central and south Zagros, the velocity border between the Zagros and central Iran is not coincident with the Zagros suture line that marks underthrusting of the Arabian plate beneath central Iran. The low plains of Gilan and Gorgan to the south of the Caspian Sea show high shear velocities similar to the SCB, implying that they are either underlain by an oceanic type crust or a transitional crust with a strong lateral crustal thickness gradient. The Lut block is an Lg-passing block implying that it is not surrounded by any sudden crustal thickness changes along its borders with central Iran. In the Alborz, NW Iran, Kopeh-Dagh, Binalud and most of the central Iran, low shear velocity near the Lg velocity is attributed to smooth or minor Moho undulations within these regions.

  17. Gyrokinetic simulation of momentum transport with residual stress from diamagnetic level velocity shears

    SciTech Connect

    Waltz, R. E.; Staebler, G. M.; Solomon, W. M.

    2011-04-15

    Residual stress refers to the remaining toroidal angular momentum (TAM) flux (divided by major radius) when the shear in the equilibrium fluid toroidal velocity (and the velocity itself) vanishes. Previously [Waltz et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 122507 (2007); errata 16, 079902 (2009)], we demonstrated with GYRO [Candy and Waltz, J. Comp. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] gyrokinetic simulations that TAM pinching from (ion pressure gradient supported or diamagnetic level) equilibrium ExB velocity shear could provide some of the residual stress needed to support spontaneous toroidal rotation against normal diffusive loss. Here we show that diamagnetic level shear in the intrinsic drift wave velocities (or ''profile shear'' in the ion and electron density and temperature gradients) provides a comparable residual stress. The individual signed contributions of these small (rho-star level) ExB and profile velocity shear rates to the turbulence level and (rho-star squared) ion energy transport stabilization are additive if the rates are of the same sign. However because of the additive stabilization effect, the contributions to the small (rho-star cubed) residual stress is not always simply additive. If the rates differ in sign, the residual stress from one can buck out that from the other (and in some cases reduce the stabilization.) The residual stress from these diamagnetic velocity shear rates is quantified by the ratio of TAM flow to ion energy (power) flow (M/P) in a global GYRO core simulation of a ''null'' toroidal rotation DIII-D [Mahdavi and Luxon, Fusion Sci. Technol. 48, 2 (2005)] discharge by matching M/P profiles within experimental uncertainty. Comparison of global GYRO (ion and electron energy as well as particle) transport flow balance simulations of TAM transport flow in a high-rotation DIII-D L-mode quantifies and isolates the ExB shear and parallel velocity (Coriolis force) pinching components from the larger ''diffusive'' parallel velocity shear driven component and

  18. Lithology and shear-wave velocity in Memphis, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomberg, J.; Waldron, B.; Schweig, E.; Hwang, H.; Webbers, A.; Van Arsdale, R.; Tucker, K.; Williams, R.; Street, R.; Mayne, P.; Stephenson, W.; Odum, J.; Cramer, C.; Updike, R.; Hutson, S.; Bradley, M.

    2003-01-01

    We have derived a new three-dimensional model of the lithologic structure beneath the city of Memphis, Tennessee, and examined its correlation with measured shear-wave velocity profiles. The correlation is sufficiently high that the better-constrained lithologic model may be used as a proxy for shear-wave velocities, which are required to calculate site-amplification for new seismic hazard maps for Memphis. The lithologic model and its uncertainties are derived from over 1200 newly compiled well and boring logs, some sampling to 500 m depth, and a moving-least-squares algorithm. Seventy-six new shear-wave velocity profiles have been measured and used for this study, most sampling to 30 m depth or less. All log and velocity observations are publicly available via new web sites.

  19. Amorphous silicon under mechanical shear deformations: Shear velocity and temperature effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerrache, Ali; Mousseau, Normand; Lewis, Laurent J.

    2011-04-01

    Mechanical shear deformations lead, in some cases, to effects similar to those resulting from ion irradiation. Here we characterize the effects of shear velocity and temperature on amorphous silicon (a-Si) modeled using classical molecular-dynamics simulations based on the empirical environment-dependent interatomic potential (EDIP). With increasing shear velocity at low temperature, we find a systematic increase in the internal strain leading to the rapid appearance of structural defects (fivefold-coordinated atoms). The impacts of externally applied strain can be almost fully compensated by increasing the temperature, allowing the system to respond more rapidly to the deformation. In particular, we find opposite power-law relations between the temperature and the shear velocity and the deformation energy. The spatial distribution of defects is also found to depend strongly on temperature and strain velocity. For low temperature or high shear velocity, defects are concentrated in a few atomic layers near the center of the cell, while with increasing temperature or decreasing shear velocity, they spread slowly throughout the full simulation cell. This complex behavior can be related to the structure of the energy landscape and the existence of a continuous energy-barrier distribution.

  20. Escaping radio emission from pulsars: Possible role of velocity shear

    SciTech Connect

    Mahajan, S.M. |; Machabeli, G.Z.; Rogava, A.D. |

    1997-01-01

    It is demonstrated that the velocity shear, intrinsic to the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} plasma present in the pulsar magnetosphere, can efficiently convert the nonescaping longitudinal Langmuir waves (produced by some kind of a beam or stream instability) into propagating (escaping) electromagnetic waves. It is suggested that this shear induced transformation may be the basic mechanism needed for the eventual generation of the observed pulsar radio emission.

  1. Anisotropy and shear-velocity heterogeneities in the upper mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nataf, H.-C.; Nakanishi, I.; Anderson, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    Long-period surface waves are used to map lateral heterogeneities of velocity and anisotropy in the upper mantle. The dispersion curves are expanded in spherical harmonics up to degree 6 and inverted to find the depth structure. The data are corrected for the effect of surface layers and both Love and Rayleigh waves are used. Shear wave velocity and shear polarization anisotropy can be resolved down to a depth of about 450 km. The shear wave velocity distribution to 200 km depth correlates with surface tectonics, except in a few anomalous regions. Below that depth the correlation vanishes. Cold subducted material shows up weakly at 350 km as fast S-wave anomalies. In the transition region a large scale pattern appears with fast mantle in the South-Atlantic. S-anisotropy at 200 km can resolve uprising or downwelling currents under some ridges and subduction zones. The Pacific shows a NW-SE fabric.

  2. Seismic velocities and Poisson's ratio of shallow unconsolidated sands

    SciTech Connect

    Bachrach, R.; Dvorkin, J.; Nur, A.M.

    2000-04-01

    The authors determined P- and S-wave velocity depth profiles in shallow, unconsolidated beach sand by analyzing three-component surface seismic data. P- and S-wave velocity profiles were calculated from travel time measurements of vertical and tangential component seismograms, respectively. The results reveal two discrepancies between theory and data. Whereas both velocities were found to be proportional to the pressure raised to the power of 1/6, as predicted by the Hertz-Mindlin contact theory, the actual values of the velocities are less than half of those calculated from this theory. The authors attribute this discrepancy to the angularity of the sand grains. Assuming that the average radii of curvature at the grain contacts are smaller than the average radii of the grains, they modify the Hertz-Hindlin theory accordingly. They found that the ratio of the contact radius to the grain radius is about 0.086. The second disparity is between the observed Poisson's ratio of 0.15 and the theoretical value (0.008 for random pack of quartz spheres). This discrepancy can be reconciled by assuming slip at the grain contacts. Because slip decreases the shearing between grains, Poisson's ratio increases.

  3. Coupling of dust acoustic and shear mode through velocity shear in a strongly coupled dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Garai, S. Janaki, M. S.; Chakrabarti, N.

    2015-07-15

    In the strongly coupled limit, the generalized hydrodynamic model shows that a dusty plasma, acquiring significant rigidity, is able to support a “shear” like mode. It is being demonstrated here that in presence of velocity shear gradient, this shear like mode gets coupled with the dust acoustic mode which is generated by the compressibility effect of the dust fluid due to the finite temperatures of the dust, electron, and ion fluids. In the local analysis, the dispersion relation shows that velocity shear gradient not only couples the two modes but is also responsible for the instabilities of that coupled mode which is confirmed by nonlocal analysis with numerical techniques.

  4. Estimation of seabed shear-wave velocity profiles using shear-wave source data.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hefeng; Nguyen, Thanh-Duong; Duffaut, Kenneth

    2013-07-01

    This paper estimates seabed shear-wave velocity profiles and their uncertainties using interface-wave dispersion curves extracted from data generated by a shear-wave source. The shear-wave source generated a seismic signature over a frequency range between 2 and 60 Hz and was polarized in both in-line and cross-line orientations. Low-frequency Scholte- and Love-waves were recorded. Dispersion curves of the Scholte- and Love-waves for the fundamental mode and higher-order modes are extracted by three time-frequency analysis methods. Both the vertically and horizontally polarized shear-wave velocity profiles in the sediment are estimated by the Scholte- and Love-wave dispersion curves, respectively. A Bayesian approach is utilized for the inversion. Differential evolution, a global search algorithm is applied to estimate the most-probable shear-velocity models. Marginal posterior probability profiles are computed by Metropolis-Hastings sampling. The estimated vertically and horizontally polarized shear-wave velocity profiles fit well with the core and in situ measurements. PMID:23862796

  5. Shear-wave velocity variation in jointed rock: an attempt to measure tide-induced variations

    SciTech Connect

    Beem, L.I.

    1987-08-01

    The use of the perturbation of seismic wave velocities by solid earth tides as a possible method of exploration for fractured media is discussed. Velocity of compressional seismic waves in fractured homogeneous rock has been observed to vary through solid earth tide cycles by a significant 0.5-0.9%. This variation of seismic velocities may be attributed to the opening and closing of joints by tidal stresses. In an attempt to see if shear-wave velocities show a similar velocity variation, a pneumatic shear-wave generator was used for the source. The 5 receivers, 3-component, 2.0 Hz, moving-coil geophones, were connected to a GEOS digital recorder. The two receivers located 120 m and 110 m from the source showed large shear-to-compression amplitude ratio and a high signal-to-noise ratio. A glaciated valley was chosen for the experiment site, since topography is flat and the granodiorite is jointed by a set of nearly orthogonal vertical joints, with superimposed horizontal sheeting joints. A slight velocity variation was noted in the first 200 consecutive firings; after which, the amplitude of the shear-wave begun to increase. This increase has been attributed to the compacting of the soil beneath the shear-wave generator (SWG). In the future, the soil will be compacted prior to placing the SWG or the SWG will be coupled directly to the rock to alleviate the amplitude fluctuation problem. This research may have application in exploration for fracture permeability in the rock mass between existing wells, by measuring seismic velocities from well to well through the tidal cycle.

  6. Aspect ratio dependence in magnetorotational instability shearing box simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodo, G.; Mignone, A.; Cattaneo, F.; Rossi, P.; Ferrari, A.

    2008-08-01

    Aims: We study the changes in the properties of turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability in a shearing box, as the computational domain size in the radial direction is varied relative to the height. Methods: We perform 3D simulations in the shearing box approximation, with a net magnetic flux, and we consider computational domains with different aspect ratios. Results: We find that in boxes of aspect ratio unity the transport of angular momentum is strongly intermittent and dominated by channel solutions in agreement with previous work. In contrast, in boxes with larger aspect ratios, the channel solutions and the associated intermittent behavior disappear. Conclusions: There is strong evidence that, as the aspect ratio becomes larger, the characteristics of the solution become aspect ratio independent. We conclude that shearing box calculations with an aspect ratio of unity or near unity may introduce spurious effects.

  7. Constraints on Shear Velocity in the Cratonic Upper Mantle From Rayleigh Wave Phase Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, A. C.; Dalton, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, the prevailing notion of Precambrian continental lithosphere as a thick boundary layer (200-300 km), defined by a depleted composition and a steady-state conductively cooled temperature structure, has been challenged by several lines of seismological evidence. One, profiles of shear velocity with depth beneath cratons exhibit lower wave speed at shallow depths and higher wave speed at greater depths than can be explained by temperature alone. These profiles are also characterized by positive or flat velocity gradients with depth and anomalously high attenuation in the uppermost mantle, both of which are difficult to reconcile with the low temperatures and large thermal gradient expected with a thermal boundary layer. Two, body-wave receiver-function studies have detected a mid-lithospheric discontinuity that requires a large and abrupt velocity decrease with depth in cratonic regions that cannot be achieved by thermal gradients alone. Here, we used forward-modeling to identify the suite of shear-velocity profiles that are consistent with phase-velocity observations made for Rayleigh waves that primarily traversed cratons in North America, South America, Africa, and Australia. We considered two approaches; with the first, depth profiles of shear velocity were predicted from thermal models of the cratonic upper mantle that correspond to a range of assumed values of mantle potential temperature, surface heat flow, and radiogenic heat production in the crust and upper mantle. With the second approach, depth profiles of shear velocity were randomly generated. In both cases, Rayleigh wave phase velocity was calculated from the Earth models and compared to the observed values. We show that it is very difficult to match the observations with an Earth model containing a low-velocity zone in the upper mantle; instead, the best-fit models contain a flat or positive velocity gradient with depth. We explore the implications of this result for the thermal and

  8. Residual turbulence from velocity shear stabilized interchange instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, C. P.; Hassam, A. B.

    2013-01-15

    The stabilizing effect of velocity shear on the macroscopic, broad bandwidth, ideal interchange instability is studied in linear and nonlinear regimes. A 2D dissipative magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code is employed to simulate the system. For a given flow shear, V Prime , linear growth rates are shown to be suppressed to below the shear-free level at both the small and large wavelengths. With increasing V Prime , the unstable band in wavenumber-space shrinks so that the peak growth results for modes that correspond to relatively high wavenumbers, on the scale of the density gradient. In the nonlinear turbulent steady state, a similar turbulent spectrum obtains, and the convection cells are roughly circular. In addition, the density fluctuation level and the degree of flattening of the initial inverted density profile are found to decrease as V Prime increases; in fact, unstable modes are almost completely stabilized and the density profile reverts to laminar when V Prime is a few times the classic interchange growth rate. Moreover, the turbulent particle flux diminishes with increasing velocity shear such that all the flux is carried by the classical diffusive flux in the asymptotic limit. The simulations are compared with measurements of magnetic fluctuations from the Maryland Centrifugal Experiment, MCX, which investigated interchange modes in the presence of velocity shear. The experimental spectral data, taken in the plasma edge, are in general agreement with the numerical data obtained in higher viscosity simulations for which the level of viscosity is chosen consistent with MCX Reynolds numbers at the edge. In particular, the residual turbulence in both cases is dominated by elongated convection cells. Finally, concomitant Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities in the system are also examined. Complete stability to interchanges is obtained only in the parameter space wherein the generalized Rayleigh inflexion theorem is satisfied.

  9. Gyrokinetic simulation of momentum transport with residual stress from diamagnetic level velocity shears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waltz, R. E.; Staebler, G. M.; Solomon, W. M.

    2011-04-01

    Residual stress refers to the remaining toroidal angular momentum (TAM) flux (divided by major radius) when the shear in the equilibrium fluid toroidal velocity (and the velocity itself) vanishes. Previously [Waltz et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 122507 (2007); errata 16, 079902 (2009)], we demonstrated with GYRO [Candy and Waltz, J. Comp. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] gyrokinetic simulations that TAM pinching from (ion pressure gradient supported or diamagnetic level) equilibrium E ×B velocity shear could provide some of the residual stress needed to support spontaneous toroidal rotation against normal diffusive loss. Here we show that diamagnetic level shear in the intrinsic drift wave velocities (or "profile shear" in the ion and electron density and temperature gradients) provides a comparable residual stress. The individual signed contributions of these small (rho-star level) E ×B and profile velocity shear rates to the turbulence level and (rho-star squared) ion energy transport stabilization are additive if the rates are of the same sign. However because of the additive stabilization effect, the contributions to the small (rho-star cubed) residual stress is not always simply additive. If the rates differ in sign, the residual stress from one can buck out that from the other (and in some cases reduce the stabilization.) The residual stress from these diamagnetic velocity shear rates is quantified by the ratio of TAM flow to ion energy (power) flow (M/P) in a global GYRO core simulation of a "null" toroidal rotation DIII-D [Mahdavi and Luxon, Fusion Sci. Technol. 48, 2 (2005)] discharge by matching M/P profiles within experimental uncertainty. Comparison of global GYRO (ion and electron energy as well as particle) transport flow balance simulations of TAM transport flow in a high-rotation DIII-D L-mode quantifies and isolates the E ×B shear and parallel velocity (Coriolis force) pinching components from the larger "diffusive" parallel velocity shear driven component and

  10. An empirical method to estimate shear wave velocity of soils in the New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wei, B.-Z.; Pezeshk, S.; Chang, T.-S.; Hall, K.H.; Liu, Huaibao P.

    1996-01-01

    In this study, a set of charts are developed to estimate shear wave velocity of soils in the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ), using the standard penetration test (SPT) N values and soil depths. Laboratory dynamic test results of soil samples collected from the NMSZ showed that the shear wave velocity of soils is related to the void ratio and the effective confining pressure applied to the soils. The void ratio of soils can be estimated from the SPT N values and the effective confining pressure depends on the depth of soils. Therefore, the shear wave velocity of soils can be estimated from the SPT N value and the soil depth. To make the methodology practical, two corrections should be made. One is that field SPT N values of soils must be adjusted to an unified SPT N??? value to account the effects of overburden pressure and equipment. The second is that the effect of water table to effective overburden pressure of soils must be considered. To verify the methodology, shear wave velocities of five sites in the NMSZ are estimated and compared with those obtained from field measurements. The comparison shows that our approach and the field tests are consistent with an error of less than of 15%. Thus, the method developed in this study is useful for dynamic study and practical designs in the NMSZ region. Copyright ?? 1996 Elsevier Science Limited.

  11. Hammering Yucca Flat, Part Two: Shear-Wave Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlay, T. S.; Abbott, R. E.; Knox, H. A.; Tang, D. G.; James, S. R.; Haney, M. M.; Hampshire, J. B., II

    2015-12-01

    In preparation for the next phase of the Source Physics Experiment (SPE), we conducted an active-source seismic survey of Yucca Flat, Nevada, on the Nevada National Security Site. Results from this survey will be used to inform the geologic models associated with the SPE project. For this study, we used a novel 13,000 kilogram weight-drop seismic source to interrogate an 18-km North-South transect of Yucca Flat. Source points were spaced every 200 meters and were recorded by 350 to 380 3-component 2-Hz geophones with variable spacings of 10, 20, and 100 meters. We utilized the Refraction-Microtremor (ReMi) technique to create multiple 1D dispersion curves, which were then inverted for shear-wave velocity profiles using the Dix inversion method (Tsai and Haney, 2015). Each of these 1D velocity models was subsequently stitched together to create a 2D profile over the survey area. The dispersion results indicate a general decrease in surface-wave phase velocity to the south. This result is supported by slower shear-wave velocity sediments and increasing basin depth towards the survey's southern extent. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. Non-gyrotropic pressure anisotropy induced by velocity shear.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenerani, A.; Del Sarto, D.; Pegoraro, F.; Califano, F.

    2015-12-01

    We discuss how, in a collisionless magnetized plasma, a sheared velocity field may lead to the anisotropization of an initial Maxwellian state. By including the full pressure tensor dynamics in a fluid plasma model, we show, analytically and numerically, that a sheared velocity field makes an initial isotropic state anisotropic and non-gyrotropic [1], i.e., makes the plasma pressure tensor anisotropic also in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field. The propagation of transverse magneto-elastic waves in the anisotropic plasma affects the process of formation of a non-gyrotropic pressure and can lead to its spatial filamentation. This plasma dynamics implies in particular that isotropic MHD equilibria cease to be equilibria in presence of a stationary sheared flow. Similarly, in the case of turbulence, where small-scale spatial inhomogeneities are naturally developed during the direct cascade, we may expect that isotropic turbulent states are not likely to exist whenever a full pressure tensor evolution is accounted for. These results may be relevant to understanding the agyrotropic pressure configurations which are well documented in solar wind measurements and possibly correlated to plasma flows (see e.g. Refs.[2,3]), and which have also been measured in Vlasov simulations of Alfvenic turbulence [4]. [1] D. Del Sarto, F. Pegoraro, F. Califano, "Pressure anisotropy and small spatial scales induced by a velocity shear", http://arxiv.org/abs/1507.04895 [2] H.F. Astudillo, E. Marsch, S. Livi, H. Rosenbauer, "TAUS measurements of non-gyrotropic distribution functions of solar wind alpha particles", AIP Conf. Proc. 328, 289 (1996). [3] A. Posner, M.W. Liemhon, T.H. Zurbuchen, "Upstream magnetospheric ion flux tube within a magnetic cloud: Wind/STICS", Geophys. Res. Lett. 30, (2003). [4] S. Servidio, F. Valentini, F. Califano, P. Veltri, "Local kinetic effects in Two-Dimensional Plasma Turbulence", Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 045001 (2012).

  13. Compressional and Shear Wave Velocities for Artificial Granular Media Under Simulated Near Surface Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Bonner, B.P.; Berge, P.A.; Wildenschild, D.

    2001-09-09

    Laboratory ultrasonic experiments were made on artificial soil samples in order to observe the effects of slight overburden, sand/clay ratio and pore fluid saturation on compressional and shear wave velocities. Up to several meters of overburden were simulated by applying low uniaxial stress of about 0.1 MPa to a restrained sample. Samples were fabricated from Ottawa sand mixed with a swelling clay (Wyoming bentonite). The amount of clay added was 1 to 40 percent by mass. Most measurements were made under room-dry conditions, but some measurements were made for fully-saturated sand-clay mixtures and for partially-saturated sand samples. For the dry sand-clay samples, compressional (P) velocities were low, ranging from about 200 to 500 m/s for the mixtures at low stress. Shear (S) velocities were about half of the compressional velocity, about 70 to 250 m/s. Dramatic increases in all velocities occurred with small uniaxial loads, indicating strong nonlinearity. Composition and grain packing control the mechanical response at grain contacts and the resulting nonlinear response at low stresses. P and S velocities are sensitive to the amount of clay added, even at low concentrations. At these low equivalent overburden conditions, adhesion and capillarity at grain contacts affect wave amplitudes, velocities, and frequency content in the partial saturation case.

  14. Correlation of densities with shear wave velocities and SPT N values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anbazhagan, P.; Uday, Anjali; Moustafa, Sayed S. R.; Al-Arifi, Nassir S. N.

    2016-06-01

    Site effects primarily depend on the shear modulus of subsurface layers, and this is generally estimated from the measured shear wave velocity (V s) and assumed density. Very rarely, densities are measured for amplification estimation because drilling and sampling processes are time consuming and expensive. In this study, an attempt has been made to derive the correlation between the density (dry and wet density) and V s/SPT (standard penetration test) N values using measured data. A total of 354 measured V s and density data sets and 364 SPT N value and density data sets from 23 boreholes have been used in the study. Separate relations have been developed for all soil types as well as fine-grained and coarse-grained soil types. The correlations developed for bulk density were compared with the available data and it was found that the proposed relation matched well with the existing data. A graphical comparison and validation based on the consistency ratio and cumulative frequency curves was performed and the newly developed relations were found to demonstrate good prediction performance. An attempt has also been made to propose a relation between the bulk density and shear wave velocity applicable for a wide range of soil and rock by considering data from this study as well as that of previous studies. These correlations will be useful for predicting the density (bulk and dry) of sites having measured the shear wave velocity and SPT N values.

  15. Shear velocity of the Rotokawa geothermal field using ambient noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civilini, F.; Savage, M. K.; Townend, J.

    2014-12-01

    Ambient noise correlation is an increasingly popular seismological technique that uses the ambient seismic noise recorded at two stations to construct an empirical Green's function. Applications of this technique include determining shear velocity structure and attenuation. An advantage of ambient noise is that it does not rely on external sources of seismic energy such as local or teleseismic earthquakes. This method has been used in the geothermal industry to determine the depths at which magmatic processes occur, to distinguish between production and non-production areas, and to observe seismic velocity perturbations associated with fluid extraction. We will present a velocity model for the Rotokawa geothermal field near Taupo, New Zealand, produced from ambient noise cross correlations. Production at Rotokawa is based on the "Rotokawa A" combined cycle power station established in 1997 and the "Nga Awa Purua" triple flash power plant established in 2010. Rotokawa Joint Venture, a partnership between Mighty River Power and Tauhara North No. 2 Trust currently operates 174 MW of generation at Rotokawa. An array of short period seismometers was installed in 2008 and occupies an area of roughly 5 square kilometers around the site. Although both cultural and natural noise sources are recorded at the stations, the instrument separation distance provides a unique challenge for analyzing cross correlations produced by both signal types. The inter-station spacing is on the order of a few kilometers, so waves from cultural sources generally are not coherent from one station to the other, while the wavelength produced by natural noise is greater than the station separation. Velocity models produced from these two source types will be compared to known geological models of the site. Depending on the amount of data needed to adequately construct cross-correlations, a time-dependent model of velocity will be established and compared with geothermal production processes.

  16. Shear wave velocities from noise correlation at local scale

    SciTech Connect

    De Nisco, G.; Nunziata, C.; Vaccari, F.; Panza, G. F.

    2008-07-08

    Cross correlations of ambient seismic noise recordings have been studied to infer shear seismic velocities with depth. Experiments have been done in the crowded and noisy historical centre of Napoli over inter-station distances from 50 m to about 400 m, whereas active seismic spreadings are prohibitive, even for just one receiver. Group velocity dispersion curves have been extracted with FTAN method from the noise cross correlations and then the non linear inversion of them has resulted in Vs profiles with depth. The information of near by stratigraphies and the range of Vs variability for samples of Neapolitan soils and rocks confirms the validity of results obtained with our expeditious procedure. Moreover, the good comparison of noise H/V frequency of the first main peak with 1D and 2D spectral amplifications encourages to continue experiments of noise cross-correlation. If confirmed in other geological settings, the proposed approach could reveal a low cost methodology to obtain reliable and detailed Vs velocity profiles.

  17. Dynamics of shear velocity layer with bent magnetic field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galinsky, V. L.; Sonnerup, B. U. Ö.

    A fully three-dimensional, magnetohydro-dynamic simulation of velocity-sheared plasma flow in an ambient transverse magnetic field with bent magnetic field lines has been performed. “Ionospheric-like” boundary conditions were used for closing field-aligned currents, the two ionospheres being represented by conducting plates with constant resistivity. Compared to the standard plane 2D case with a uniform transverse magnetic field, the growth rate of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability drops significantly as bending increases. Under conditions representative of the Earth's low latitude boundary layer, the instability may be suppressed completely by the magnetic field-line tension if the field-line bending is sufficiently strong. For weak bending, a combination of the tearing mode instability and the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability leads to the formation of localized 3D current/vortex tubes, the ionospheric foot prints of which are possible models of the auroral bright spots observed by the Viking satellite.

  18. Imbalanced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence modified by velocity shear in the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoberidze, G.; Voitenko, Y. M.

    2016-11-01

    We study incompressible imbalanced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the presence of background velocity shears. Using scaling arguments, we show that the turbulent cascade is significantly accelerated when the background velocity shear is stronger than the velocity shears in the subdominant Alfvén waves at the injection scale. The spectral transport is then controlled by the background shear rather than the turbulent shears and the Tchen spectrum with spectral index -1 is formed. This spectrum extends from the injection scale to the scale of the spectral break where the subdominant wave shear becomes equal to the background shear. The estimated spectral breaks and power spectra are in good agreement with those observed in the fast solar wind. The proposed mechanism can contribute to enhanced turbulent cascades and modified -1 spectra observed in the fast solar wind with strong velocity shears. This mechanism can also operate in many other astrophysical environments where turbulence develops on top of non-uniform plasma flows.

  19. The lithospheric shear-wave velocity structure of Saudi Arabia: Young volcanism in an old shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zheng; Julià, Jordi; Mai, P. Martin

    2016-04-01

    We are utilizing receiver function and surface wave dispersion data to investigate the lithospheric shear-wave velocity structure of Saudi Arabia. The Arabian plate consists of the western Arabian shield and the eastern Arabian platform. The Arabian shield is a complicated mélange of several Proterozoic terrains, separated by ophiolite-bearing suture zones and dotted by outcropping Cenozoic volcanic rocks (so-called harrats). The Arabian platform is covered by thick Paleozoic, Mesozoic and Cenozoic sedimentary rocks. To understand the geo-dynamics and present-day geology in western Saudi Arabia, the origin and activity of the harrats needs to be investigated: are they controlled primarily by a local mantle plume underneath western Saudi Arabia or by lateral mantle flow from the Afar and (perhaps) Jordan hotspots? In our study, we first estimate Vp/Vs ratios by applying the H-κ stacking technique and construct local shear-wave velocity-depth profiles by jointly inverting teleseismic P-receiver functions and Rayleigh wave group velocities at 56 broadband stations deployed by the Saudi Geological Survey (SGS). Our results reveal significant lateral variations in crustal thickness, S-velocity, and bulk Vp/Vs ratio. The Arabian shield has, on average a ~34 km thick crust with Vs ~3.72 km/s and Vp/Vs ~1.73. Thinner crust (~25 - 32 km thick) with strong lateral variations is present along the Red Sea coast. In contrast, the Arabian platform reveals a ~41 km thick crust with Vs ~3.52 km/s and Vp/Vs ~1.77. We find anomalously high Vp/Vs ratios at Harrat Lunayyir, interpreted as solidified magma intrusions. Slow shear-velocities in the upper-mantle lid throughout the southernmost and northernmost Arabian shield suggest lateral heating from hot mantle upwellings centered beneath Afar and (perhaps) Jordan. Our findings on crustal S-velocity structures, Vp/Vs ratios, and upper-mantle lid velocities support the hypothesis of lateral mantle flow from the Afar and (perhaps

  20. Turbulence, Turbulence Suppression, and Velocity Shear in the Helimak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentle, Kenneth; Rowan, William; Li, Bo

    2012-10-01

    The Helimak is an approximation to the infinite cylindrical slab with a size large compared with turbulence transverse scale lengths, but with open field lines of finite length. Radially-segmented isolated end plates allow application of radial electric fields that drive radial currents. Above a threshold in applied voltage (driven current), the fractional turbulent amplitude is greatly reduced. Reductions are observed for both positive and negative bias over a broad range of collisionality and parallel connection length. Concurrent measurements of the ion flow velocity profile are made by Doppler spectroscopy of the argon plasma ion. Turbulence reductions are broadly correlated with reductions in radial correlation length, but not with velocity flow shear. No evidence of zonal flows has been found. The turbulence -- density, potential, and temperature fluctuations, is compared with simulations from a two-fluid model for this geometry, which also show reduced turbulence with bias. Work supported by the Department of Energy OFES DE-FG02-04ER54766.

  1. Aspect Ratio Dependence in Magnetorotational Instability Shearing Box Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignone, Andrea; Ferrari, Attilio; Bodo, Gianluigi; Rossi, Paola; Cattaneo, Fausto

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of the magnetorotational instability in the shearing box approximation with a nonzero net flux are presented. By changing the size of the computational domain in the radial direction relative to the vertical box height, we find, in agreement with previous studies, that transport of angular momentum (associated with the so-called "channel solution") is strongly intermittent and maximized for boxes of unit aspect ratio. On the other hand, in boxes with larger aspect ratio the intermittent behavior disappears and angular momentum transport is inhibited.

  2. Shear wave anisotropy from aligned inclusions: ultrasonic frequency dependence of velocity and attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Figueiredo, J. J. S.; Schleicher, J.; Stewart, R. R.; Dayur, N.; Omoboya, B.; Wiley, R.; William, A.

    2013-04-01

    To understand their influence on elastic wave propagation, anisotropic cracked media have been widely investigated in many theoretical and experimental studies. In this work, we report on laboratory ultrasound measurements carried out to investigate the effect of source frequency on the elastic parameters (wave velocities and the Thomsen parameter γ) and shear wave attenuation) of fractured anisotropic media. Under controlled conditions, we prepared anisotropic model samples containing penny-shaped rubber inclusions in a solid epoxy resin matrix with crack densities ranging from 0 to 6.2 per cent. Two of the three cracked samples have 10 layers and one has 17 layers. The number of uniform rubber inclusions per layer ranges from 0 to 100. S-wave splitting measurements have shown that scattering effects are more prominent in samples where the seismic wavelength to crack aperture ratio ranges from 1.6 to 1.64 than in others where the ratio varied from 2.72 to 2.85. The sample with the largest cracks showed a magnitude of scattering attenuation three times higher compared with another sample that had small inclusions. Our S-wave ultrasound results demonstrate that elastic scattering, scattering and anelastic attenuation, velocity dispersion and crack size interfere directly in shear wave splitting in a source-frequency dependent manner, resulting in an increase of scattering attenuation and a reduction of shear wave anisotropy with increasing frequency.

  3. Determination of shallow shear wave velocity profiles in the Cologne, Germany area using ambient vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherbaum, Frank; Hinzen, Klaus-G.; Ohrnberger, Matthias

    2003-03-01

    We have used both single-station and array methods to determine shallow shear velocity site profiles in the vicinity of the city of Cologne, Germany from ambient vibration records. Based on fk-analysis we assume that fundamental-mode Rayleigh waves dominate the analysed wavefield in the frequency range of 0.7-2.2 Hz. According to this view a close relation exists between H/V spectral ratios and the ellipticity of the contributing Rayleigh waves. The inversion of the shape of H/V spectral ratios then provides quantitative information concerning the local shear wave velocity structure. However, based on tests with synthetic data believed to represent a typical situation in the Lower Rhine Embayment, dispersion curves were found to provide stronger constraints on the absolute values of the velocity-depth model than the ellipticities. The shape of the ellipticities was found to be subject to a strong trade-off between the layer thickness and the average layer velocity. We have made use of this observation by combining the inversion schemes for dispersion curves and ellipticities such that the velocity-depth dependence is essentially constrained by the dispersion curves while the layer thickness is constrained by the ellipticities. In order to test this method in practice, we have used array recordings of ambient vibrations from three sites where the subsurface geology is fairly well known and geotechnical information is at least partially available. In order to keep the parameter space as simple as possible we attempted to fit only a single layer over a half-space model. However, owing to earlier studies from the region, we assume a power-law depth dependence for sediment velocities. For all three sites investigated, the inversion resulted in models for which the shear wave velocity within the sediment layer both in absolute value at the surface and in depth dependence are found to be remarkably similar to the results obtained by Budny from downhole measurements. This

  4. Spatial correlation of shear-wave velocity within San Francisco Bay Sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, E.M.; Baise, L.G.; Kayen, R.E.

    2006-01-01

    Sediment properties are spatially variable at all scales, and this variability at smaller scales influences high frequency ground motions. We show that surface shear-wave velocity is highly correlated within San Francisco Bay Area sediments using shear-wave velocity measurements from 210 seismic cone penetration tests. We use this correlation to estimate the surface sediment velocity structure using geostatistics. We find that the variance of the estimated shear-wave velocity is reduced using ordinary kriging, and that including this velocity structure in 2D ground motion simulations of a moderate sized earthquake improves the accuracy of the synthetics. Copyright ASCE 2006.

  5. Three-Dimensional Shear Wave Velocity Structure of the Peru Flat Slab Subduction Segment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knezevic Antonijevic, S.; Wagner, L. S.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Long, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    Recent studies focused on flat slab subduction segments in central Chile (L. S. Wagner, 2006) and Alaska (B. R. Hacker and G. A. Aber, 2012) suggest significant differences in seismic velocity structures, and hence, composition in the mantle wedge between flat and normal "steep" subducting slabs. Instead of finding the low velocities and high Vp/Vs ratios common in normal subduction zones, these studies find low Vp, high Vs, and very low Vp/Vs above flat slabs. This may indicate the presence of dry, cold material in the mantle wedge. In order to investigate the seismic velocities of the upper mantle above the Peruvian flat segment, we have inverted for 2D Rayleigh wave phase velocity maps using data from the currently deployed 40 station PULSE seismic network and some adjacent stations from the CAUGHT seismic network. We then used the sensitivity of surface waves to shear wave velocity structure with depth to develop a 3D shear wave velocity model. This model will allow us to determine the nature of the mantle lithosphere above the flat slab, and how this may have influenced the development of local topography. For example, dry conditions (high Vs velocities) above the flat slab would imply greater strength of this material, possibly making it capable of causing further inland overthrusting, while wet conditions (low Vs) would imply weaker material. This could provide some insight into the ongoing debate over whether the Fitzcarrald arch (along the northern most flank of the Altiplano) could be a topographical response to the subducted Nazca ridge hundred kilometers away from the trench (N. Espurt, 2012, P. Baby, 2005, V. A. Ramos, 2012) or not (J. Martinod, 2005, M. Wipf, 2008, T. Gerya, 2008).

  6. Shear wave velocities of unconsolidated shallow sediments in the Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate shear-wave velocities for shallow sediments are important for a variety of seismic applications such as inver-sion and amplitude versus offset analysis. During the U.S. Department of Energy-sponsored Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II, shear-wave velocities were measured at six wells in the Gulf of Mexico using the logging-while-drilling SonicScope acoustic tool. Because the tool measurement point was only 35 feet from the drill bit, the adverse effect of the borehole condition, which is severe for the shallow unconsolidated sediments in the Gulf of Mexico, was mini-mized and accurate shear-wave velocities of unconsolidated sediments were measured. Measured shear-wave velocities were compared with the shear-wave velocities predicted from the compressional-wave velocities using empirical formulas and the rock physics models based on the Biot-Gassmann theory, and the effectiveness of the two prediction methods was evaluated. Although the empirical equation derived from measured shear-wave data is accurate for predicting shear-wave velocities for depths greater than 500 feet in these wells, the three-phase Biot-Gassmann-theory -based theory appears to be optimum for predicting shear-wave velocities for shallow unconsolidated sediments in the Gulf of Mexico.

  7. Vortex Formation in a High Speed Dust Flow with Large Velocity Shear in RF Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Iizuka, Satoru; Gohda, Takuma

    2008-09-07

    We have investigated a rotation of a dust cloud disc with strong velocity shear in a radio frequency (RF) plasma. The flow pattern of the dusts was evaluated by the Navier Stokes Equation with shear viscosity due to the Coulomb interactions. We have clarified dynamic behaviors of the dusts and observed generation of micro-vortices around rotational center, when the velocity shear is enhanced.

  8. How required reserve ratio affects distribution and velocity of money

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Ning; Ding, Ning; Wang, Yougui

    2005-11-01

    In this paper the dependence of wealth distribution and the velocity of money on the required reserve ratio is examined based on a random transfer model of money and computer simulations. A fractional reserve banking system is introduced to the model where money creation can be achieved by bank loans and the monetary aggregate is determined by the monetary base and the required reserve ratio. It is shown that monetary wealth follows asymmetric Laplace distribution and latency time of money follows exponential distribution. The expression of monetary wealth distribution and that of the velocity of money in terms of the required reserve ratio are presented in a good agreement with simulation results.

  9. Shear viscosity to entropy density ratio in nuclear multifragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, Subrata

    2010-05-15

    Nuclear multifragmentation in intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions has long been associated with liquid-gas phase transition. We calculate the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio eta/s for an equilibrated system of nucleons and fragments produced in multifragmentation within an extended statistical multifragmentation model. The temperature dependence of eta/s exhibits behavior surprisingly similar to that of H{sub 2}O. In the coexistence phase of fragments and light particles, the ratio eta/s reaches a minimum of depth comparable to that for water in the vicinity of the critical temperature for liquid-gas phase transition. The effects of freeze-out volume and surface symmetry energy on eta/s in multifragmentation are studied.

  10. Representation of turbulent shear stress by a product of mean velocity differences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, W. H.

    1977-01-01

    A quadratic form in the mean velocity for the turbulent shear stress is presented. It is expressed as the product of two velocity differences whose roots are the maximum velocity in the flow and a cutoff velocity below which the turbulent shear stress vanishes. Application to pipe and channel flows yields the centerline velocity as a function of pressure gradient, as well as the velocity profile. The flat plate, boundary-layer problem is solved by a system of integral equations to obtain friction coefficient, displacement thickness, and momentum-loss thickness. Comparisons are made with experiment.

  11. Effects of ExB velocity shear and magnetic shear on turbulence and transport in magnetic confinement devices

    SciTech Connect

    Burrell, K.H.

    1996-11-01

    One of the scientific success stories of fusion research over the past decade is the development of the ExB shear stabilization model to explain the formation of transport barriers in magnetic confinement devices. This model was originally developed to explain the transport barrier formed at the plasma edge in tokamaks after the L (low) to H (high) transition. This concept has the universality needed to explain the edge transport barriers seen in limiter and divertor tokamaks, stellarators, and mirror machines. More recently, this model has been applied to explain the further confinement improvement from H (high)-mode to VH (very high)-mode seen in some tokamaks, where the edge transport barrier becomes wider. Most recently, this paradigm has been applied to the core transport barriers formed in plasmas with negative or low magnetic shear in the plasma core. These examples of confinement improvement are of considerable physical interest; it is not often that a system self-organizes to a higher energy state with reduced turbulence and transport when an additional source of free energy is applied to it. The transport decrease that is associated with ExB velocity shear effects also has significant practical consequences for fusion research. The fundamental physics involved in transport reduction is the effect of ExB shear on the growth, radial extent and phase correlation of turbulent eddies in the plasma. The same fundamental transport reduction process can be operational in various portions of the plasma because there are a number ways to change the radial electric field Er. An important theme in this area is the synergistic effect of ExB velocity shear and magnetic shear. Although the ExB velocity shear appears to have an effect on broader classes of microturbulence, magnetic shear can mitigate some potentially harmful effects of ExB velocity shear and facilitate turbulence stabilization.

  12. Shear wave velocity structure in West Java, Indonesia as inferred from surface wave dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anggono, Titi; Syuhada

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the crust and upper mantle of West Java, Indonesia by measuring the group velocity dispersion of surface waves. We analyzed waveform from four teleseismic earthquake recorded at three 3-component broadband seismometers. We analyzed fundamental mode of Rayleigh and Love waves from vertical, radial, and transverse components using multiple filter technique. We inverted the measured group velocity to obtain shear wave velocity profile down to 200 km depth. We observed low shear wave velocity zone at depth of about 20 km. Shear velocity reduction is estimated to be 18% compared to the upper and lower velocity layer. The low velocity zone might be associated with the subducting slab of Indo-Australian Plate as similar characteristics of low velocity zones also observed at other subducting regions.

  13. Crustal shear-wave velocity structure beneath Sumatra from receiver function modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bora, Dipok K.; Borah, Kajaljyoti; Goyal, Ayush

    2016-05-01

    We estimated the shear-wave velocity structure and Vp/Vs ratio of the crust beneath the Sumatra region by inverting stacked receiver functions from five three-component broadband seismic stations, located in diverse geologic setting, using a well known non-linear direct search approach, Neighborhood Algorithm (NA). Inversion results show significant variation of sediment layer thicknesses from 1 km beneath the backarc basin (station BKNI and PMBI) to 3-7 km beneath the coastal part of Sumatra region (station LHMI and MNAI) and Nias island (station GSI). Average sediment layer shear velocity (Vss) beneath all the stations is observed to be less (∼1.35 km/s) and their corresponding Vp/Vs ratio is very high (∼2.2-3.0). Crustal thickness beneath Sumatra region varies between 27 and 35 km, with exception of 19 km beneath Nias island, with average crustal Vs ∼3.1-3.4 km/s (Vp/Vs ∼1.8). It is well known that thick sediments with low Vs (and high Vp/Vs) amplify seismic waves even from a small-magnitude earthquake, which can cause huge damage in the zone. This study can provide the useful information of the crust for the Sumatra region. Since, Sumatra is an earthquake prone zone, which suffered the strong shaking of Great Andaman-Sumatra earthquake; this study can also be helpful for seismic hazard assessment.

  14. Near-Surface Shear-Wave Velocity Measurements in Unlithified Sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickards, Benjamin Thomas

    Shear-wave (S-wave) velocity can be directly correlated to material stiffness making it a valuable physical property that has found uses in construction, engineering, and environmental projects. This study compares three different methods, Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW), S-wave tomography, and downhole seismic for measuring S-wave velocities, investigates and identifies the differences among the methods' results, and prioritizes the different methods for S-wave use at the U. S. Army's Yuma Proving Grounds (YPG) north of Yuma, AZ. A large signal-to-noise ratio and a layered depositional architecture at the study site gives the MASW method much potential, but higher-mode energy resulting from velocity discontinuities reduces the effectiveness of the method shallower than 20 ft. First arrival analysis provides evidence of a velocity discontinuity within the first 10 feet of unconsolidated sediment. S-wave first arrivals were picked using impulsive sledgehammer data which were then used for both tomographic inversion and refraction analysis. Three-component downhole seismic data were collected by using a locking geophone coupled with the borehole casing to estimate seismic velocities directly. This study helps to identify the strengths and weaknesses of each of these methods at sites similar to YPG. MASW results show a low-velocity layer at a depth of about 50 feet that is verified by downhole seismic data and is undetectable through traditional refraction tomography. However S-wave refraction tomography provides more convincing results at shallow depths where the MASW method fails. Using both methods in an integrated fashion provide the most accurate depiction of S-wave velocity characteristics in the shallow unconsolidated sediments at YPG.

  15. Orbital Transfer Vehicle Engine Technology High Velocity Ratio Diffusing Crossover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lariviere, Brian W.

    1992-01-01

    High speed, high efficiency head rise multistage pumps require continuous passage diffusing crossovers to effectively convey the pumped fluid from the exit of one impeller to the inlet of the next impeller. On Rocketdyne's Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV), the MK49-F, a three stage high pressure liquid hydrogen turbopump, utilizes a 6.23 velocity ratio diffusing crossover. This velocity ratio approaches the diffusion limits for stable and efficient flow over the operating conditions required by the OTV system. The design of the high velocity ratio diffusing crossover was based on advanced analytical techniques anchored by previous tests of stationary two-dimensional diffusers with steady flow. To secure the design and the analytical techniques, tests were required with the unsteady whirling characteristics produced by an impeller. A tester was designed and fabricated using a 2.85 times scale model of the MK49-F turbopumps first stage, including the inducer, impeller, and the diffusing crossover. Water and air tests were completed to evaluate the large scale turbulence, non-uniform velocity, and non-steady velocity on the pump and crossover head and efficiency. Suction performance tests from 80 percent to 124 percent of design flow were completed in water to assess these pump characteristics. Pump and diffuser performance from the water and air tests were compared with the actual MK49-F test data in liquid hydrogen.

  16. Low Velocity Difference Thermal Shear Layer Mixing Rate Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, Robert H.; Culver, Harry C. M.; Weissbein, Dave; Georgiadis, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    Current CFD modeling techniques are known to do a poor job of predicting the mixing rate and persistence of slot film flow in co-annular flowing ducts with relatively small velocity differences but large thermal gradients. A co-annular test was devised to empirically determine the mixing rate of slot film flow in a constant area circular duct (D approx. 1ft, L approx. 10ft). The axial rate of wall heat-up is a sensitive measure of the mixing rate of the two flows. The inflow conditions were varied to simulate a variety of conditions characteristic of moderate by-pass ratio engines. A series of air temperature measurements near the duct wall provided a straightforward means to measure the axial temperature distribution and thus infer the mixing rate. This data provides a characterization of the slot film mixing rates encountered in typical jet engine environments. The experimental geometry and entrance conditions, along with the sensitivity of the results as the entrance conditions vary, make this a good test for turbulence models in a regime important to modern air-breathing propulsion research and development.

  17. The lithospheric shear-wave velocity structure of Saudi Arabia: Young volcanism in an old shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zheng; Julià, Jordi; Zahran, Hani; Mai, P. Martin

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the lithospheric shear-wave velocity structure of Saudi Arabia by conducting H-κ stacking analysis and jointly inverting teleseismic P-receiver functions and fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave group velocities at 56 broadband stations deployed by the Saudi Geological Survey (SGS). The study region, the Arabian plate, is traditionally divided into the western Arabian shield and the eastern Arabian platform: The Arabian shield itself is a complicated mélange of crustal material, composed of several Proterozoic terrains separated by ophiolite-bearing suture zones and dotted by outcropping Cenozoic volcanic rocks (locally known as harrats). The Arabian platform is primarily covered by 8 to 10 km of Paleozoic, Mesozoic and Cenozoic sedimentary rocks. Our results reveal high Vp/Vs ratios in the region of Harrat Lunayyir, which are interpreted as solidified magma intrusions from old magmatic episodes in the shield. Our results also indicate slow velocities and large upper mantle lid temperatures below the southern and northern tips of the Arabian shield, when compared with the values obtained for the central shield. We argue that our inferred patterns of lid velocity and temperature are due to heating by thermal conduction from the Afar plume (and, possibly, the Jordan plume), and that volcanism in western Arabia may result from small-scale adiabatic ascent of magma diapirs.

  18. Alignments of the galaxies in and around the Virgo cluster with the local velocity shear

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jounghun; Rey, Soo Chang; Kim, Suk

    2014-08-10

    Observational evidence is presented for the alignment between the cosmic sheet and the principal axis of the velocity shear field at the position of the Virgo cluster. The galaxies in and around the Virgo cluster from the Extended Virgo Cluster Catalog that was recently constructed by Kim et al. are used to determine the direction of the local sheet. The peculiar velocity field reconstructed from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 is analyzed to estimate the local velocity shear tensor at the Virgo center. Showing first that the minor principal axis of the local velocity shear tensor is almost parallel to the direction of the line of sight, we detect a clear signal of alignment between the positions of the Virgo satellites and the intermediate principal axis of the local velocity shear projected onto the plane of the sky. Furthermore, the dwarf satellites are found to appear more strongly aligned than their normal counterparts, which is interpreted as an indication of the following. (1) The normal satellites and the dwarf satellites fall in the Virgo cluster preferentially along the local filament and the local sheet, respectively. (2) The local filament is aligned with the minor principal axis of the local velocity shear while the local sheet is parallel to the plane spanned by the minor and intermediate principal axes. Our result is consistent with the recent numerical claim that the velocity shear is a good tracer of the cosmic web.

  19. Dynamic Strengthening During High Velocity Shear Experiments with Siliceous Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Z.; Chang, J. C.; Boneh, Y.; Chen, X.; Reches, Z.

    2011-12-01

    It is generally accepted that dynamic-weakening is essential for earthquake instability, and many experimental works have documented this weakening. Recent observations revealed also opposite trends of dynamic-strengthening in experiments (Reches & Lockner, 2010). We present here our experimental results of this dynamic-strengthening and discuss possible implications to earthquake behavior. We ran hundreds of experiments on experimental faults made of siliceous rock including granite, syenite, diorite, and quartzite. The experimental fault is comprised of two solid cylindrical blocks with a raised-ring contact of 7 cm diameter and 1 cm width. We recognized general, three regimes of strength-velocity relations: (I) Dynamic weakening (drop of 20-60% of static strength) as slip velocity increased from ~0.0003 m/s (lowest experimental velocity) to a critical velocity, Vc=0.008-0.16 m/s; (II) Abrupt transition to dynamic strengthening regime during which the fault strength almost regains its static strength; and (III) Quasi-constant strength with further possible drops as velocity approaches ~1 m/s. The critical velocity depends on the sample lithology: Vc is ~0.06 m/s for granite, ~0.008 m/s for syenite, ~0.01 m/s for diorite, and ~0.16 m/s for quartzite. The strengthening stage is associated with temperature increase, wear-rate increase, and the occurrence of intense, high frequency stick-slip events (Reches & Lockner, 2010). Sammis et al., (this meeting) attributed this strengthening to dehydration of the thin water layer that covers the gouge particles as the temperature increases. On the other hand, we note that tens of experiments with dolomite samples (non-siliceous), which were deformed under similar conditions, did not exhibit the velocity strengthening (unpublished). Based on the analyses by Andrews (2004, 2005), we speculate that velocity strengthening may bound the slip velocity. The numerical models of Andrews show that the slip velocity along a slip

  20. Kinetic Study of Plasma Transport from Turbulence Driven by Parallel Velocity Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, X. Y.; Dong, J. Q.; Horton, W.

    1996-11-01

    Particle, momentum and energy transport from turbulence in plasmas with multiple ion species are studied. The turbulence driven by a parallel velocity shear, a ion temperature gradient and an impurity density gradient is considered. The kinetic theory in a sheared slab configuration is applied. Both positive and negative magnetic shears are studied. The effects of a perpendicular velocity shear of the ions are taken into account. The impurity and hydrogenic ions are treated equally. A special attention is paid to the regimes with a low magnetic shear where it is demonstrated that the turbulence induced Reynold stress is higher, beneficial to the poloidal shear flow generation, and the stabilizing effects of such flow are dramatically enhanced. In addition, it is found that the fluxes may change direction depending on plasma parameters and turbulence driving mechanisms. Quasi-linear evaluations of the transport are given . Possible correlations with tokamak experiments such as formation of an internal transport barrier are discussed.

  1. Integrating shear velocity observations of the Hudson Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porritt, R. W.; Miller, M. S.; Darbyshire, F. A.

    2013-12-01

    Hudson Bay is the core of the Laurentia craton of North America. This region contains some of the thickest lithosphere globally, reaching 250-300 km depth. Previous studies have shown that much of this region is composed of amalgamated proto-continents including the Western Churchill and Superior provinces and that much of the structure of these constituents has been retained since the Trans-Hudson Orogen at 1.8 Ga. Using the Hudson Bay Lithospheric Experiment (HuBLE) and other permanent and POLARIS broadband seismic data, we image the region with S to P receiver functions, joint inversion of P to S receiver functions with surface waves, and teleseismic S and P wave travel-times. The receiver function imaging reveals a persistent mid-lithospheric layer at ~80 km depth under all stations, but a variable lithospheric thickness. The teleseismic S delay times show a pattern of early arrivals around the center of the network, beneath Hudson Bay where the lithosphere is thickest, while the P delay times are early in the Superior province relative to the Western Churchill province. This suggests higher Vp/Vs ratios in the Superior province, which is evidence that stacked oceanic plates formed this province. The relatively flat Moho imaged by earlier receiver function studies and the lower mantle Vp/Vs of the Western Churchill province provides evidence of formation by plume head extraction. The joint inversion shows an LAB that is typically a broad discontinuity spanning ~20-30 km at ~220 km depth suggesting a primarily thermal boundary zone. The mid-lithospheric layer is composed of increasing velocity from the ~40 km depth Moho defined by H-k stacking of PRFs to a broad, constant velocity lithospheric lid spanning 80-200 km depth. We suggest this mid-lithospheric layer represents the mantle lithosphere of the proto-continents prior to collision and the lid formed due to post-collisional cooling. The integration of these seismic datasets furthers our understanding of

  2. The relationships between large-scale variations in shear velocity, density, and compressional velocity in the Earth's mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulik, P.; Ekström, G.

    2016-04-01

    A large data set of surface wave phase anomalies, body wave travel times, normal-mode splitting functions, and long-period waveforms is used to investigate the scaling between shear velocity, density, and compressional velocity in the Earth's mantle. We introduce a methodology that allows construction of joint models with various levels of scaling complexity (ϱ = dlnρ/dlnvS, ν = dlnvS/dlnvP), in order to detect seismological signatures of chemical heterogeneity. We demonstrate that the data sets considered cannot be fit concurrently with a uniform ν or a positive and uniform ϱ throughout the mantle. The variance reductions to P wave travel times and vP-sensitive modes are up to 40% higher with our preferred model of anisotropic shear and compressional velocity than the recent anisotropic shear velocity model S362ANI+M, which was constructed assuming a uniform ν throughout the mantle. Several features reported in earlier tomographic studies persist after the inclusion of new and larger data sets; anticorrelation between bulk sound and shear velocities in the lowermost mantle as well as an increase in ν with depth in the lower mantle are largely independent of the regularization scheme. When correlations between density and shear velocity variations are imposed in the lowermost mantle, variance reductions of several spheroidal and toroidal modes deteriorate by as much as 40%. Recent measurements of the splitting of 0S2, in particular, are largely incompatible with perfectly correlated shear velocity and density heterogeneity throughout the mantle. A way to significantly improve the fits to various data sets is by allowing independent density perturbations in the lowermost mantle. Our preferred joint model consists of denser-than-average anomalies (˜1% peak to peak) at the base of the mantle roughly coincident with the low-velocity superplumes. The relative variation of shear velocity, density, and compressional velocity in our study disfavors a purely thermal

  3. Measurement of shear-wave velocity by ultrasound critical-angle reflectometry (UCR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, S.; Antich, P.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    There exists a growing body of research that relates the measurement of pressure-wave velocity in bone to different physiological conditions and treatment modalities. The shear-wave velocity has been less studied, although it is necessary for a more complete understanding of the mechanical properties of bone. Ultrasound critical-angle reflectometry (UCR) is a noninvasive and nondestructive technique previously used to measure pressure-wave velocities both in vitro and in vivo. This note describes its application to the measurement of shear-wave velocity in bone, whether directly accessible or covered by soft tissue.

  4. Velocity and shear rate estimates of some non-Newtonian oscillatory flows in tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutev, N.; Tabakova, S.; Radev, S.

    2016-10-01

    The two-dimensional Newtonian and non-Newtonian (Carreau viscosity model used) oscillatory flows in straight tubes are studied theoretically and numerically. The corresponding analytical solution of the Newtonian flow and the numerical solution of the Carreau viscosity model flow show differences in velocity and shear rate. Some estimates for the velocity and shear rate differences are theoretically proved. As numerical examples the blood flow in different type of arteries and the polymer flow in pipes are considered.

  5. Spatial correlation of shear-wave velocity in the San Francisco Bay Area sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, E.M.; Baise, L.G.; Kayen, R.E.

    2007-01-01

    Ground motions recorded within sedimentary basins are variable over short distances. One important cause of the variability is that local soil properties are variable at all scales. Regional hazard maps developed for predicting site effects are generally derived from maps of surficial geology; however, recent studies have shown that mapped geologic units do not correlate well with the average shear-wave velocity of the upper 30 m, Vs(30). We model the horizontal variability of near-surface soil shear-wave velocity in the San Francisco Bay Area to estimate values in unsampled locations in order to account for site effects in a continuous manner. Previous geostatistical studies of soil properties have shown horizontal correlations at the scale of meters to tens of meters while the vertical correlations are on the order of centimeters. In this paper we analyze shear-wave velocity data over regional distances and find that surface shear-wave velocity is correlated at horizontal distances up to 4 km based on data from seismic cone penetration tests and the spectral analysis of surface waves. We propose a method to map site effects by using geostatistical methods based on the shear-wave velocity correlation structure within a sedimentary basin. If used in conjunction with densely spaced shear-wave velocity profiles in regions of high seismic risk, geostatistical methods can produce reliable continuous maps of site effects. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of rotation and velocity shear on tearing layer stability in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Ryan L.; Fitzpatrick, Richard

    2015-10-01

    Using a resistive generalization of the Frieman-Rotenberg formalism, the leading-order effects of velocity shear and rotation on linear tearing layer stability are studied for tokamak equilibria. The layer equations for resistive interchange modes are derived for arbitrary equilibrium rotation and velocity shear. The resulting layer equations do not conserve parity and are not simplified by Fourier transform. Thus, many standard numerical techniques cannot be implemented in a straightforward manner. Layer equations are also derived in the constant- Ψ limit. The constant- Ψ dispersion relation is obtained and is used to study the leading-order effects of rotation and velocity shear on the critical value of Δ' required for tearing instability. It is found that rotation and velocity shear can couple with the parallel current and the current gradient in the layer to reduce Δ'crit . If parallel currents are sufficiently weak to compete with second-order effects, velocity shear can be stabilizing, while rotation is found to have a destabilizing effect. Second-order coupling of velocity shear and rotation can have either sign, and thus can affect stability in either direction.

  7. Correlations Between Shear Wave Velocity and In-Situ Penetration Test Results for Korean Soil Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chang-Guk; Cho, Chang-Soo; Son, Minkyung; Shin, Jin Soo

    2013-03-01

    Shear wave velocity ( V S) can be obtained using seismic tests, and is viewed as a fundamental geotechnical characteristic for seismic design and seismic performance evaluation in the field of earthquake engineering. To apply conventional geotechnical site investigation techniques to geotechnical earthquake engineering, standard penetration tests (SPT) and piezocone penetration tests (CPTu) were undertaken together with a variety of borehole seismic tests for a range of sites in Korea. Statistical modeling of the in-situ testing data identified correlations between V S and geotechnical in-situ penetration data, such as blow counts ( N value) from SPT and CPTu data including tip resistance ( q t), sleeve friction ( f s), and pore pressure ratio ( B q). Despite the difference in strain levels between conventional geotechnical penetration tests and borehole seismic tests, it is shown that the suggested correlations in this study is applicable to the preliminary determination of V S for soil deposits.

  8. Animal models of surgically manipulated flow velocities to study shear stress-induced atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Winkel, Leah C; Hoogendoorn, Ayla; Xing, Ruoyu; Wentzel, Jolanda J; Van der Heiden, Kim

    2015-07-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arterial tree that develops at predisposed sites, coinciding with locations that are exposed to low or oscillating shear stress. Manipulating flow velocity, and concomitantly shear stress, has proven adequate to promote endothelial activation and subsequent plaque formation in animals. In this article, we will give an overview of the animal models that have been designed to study the causal relationship between shear stress and atherosclerosis by surgically manipulating blood flow velocity profiles. These surgically manipulated models include arteriovenous fistulas, vascular grafts, arterial ligation, and perivascular devices. We review these models of manipulated blood flow velocity from an engineering and biological perspective, focusing on the shear stress profiles they induce and the vascular pathology that is observed.

  9. A Simple Method to Predict Threshold Shear Velocity in the Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Okin, G. S.; Herrick, J. E.; Miller, M. E.; Munson, S. M.; Belnap, J.

    2009-12-01

    A very important parameter in predicting wind erosion is the threshold shear velocity, which is the minimal shear velocity required to initiate deflation of soil particles. Modeling and wind tunnel are primary methods in predicting threshold shear velocity. However, most models have limited applications in the presence of roughness elements, and running a wind tunnel in the field is labor-intensive and time-consuming. Soil crust (both physical and biological) is known to be a crucial factor affecting soil stability and threshold shear velocity. In this report, a simple and portable field method was tested in multiple locations of Utah for the estimation of threshold shear velocity. This method includes measuring size of holes (length and width) induced by shooting a “bullet ball” or “BB” gun, applying a pocket penetrometer, and a torvane on soil surface in the field. In the first stage of the experiment, a conventional wind tunnel was run in combination with BB gun, penetrometer, and torvane in field conditions for a range of soil texture. Results from both the BB gun and penetrometer applied at 45 degree to the ground were significantly correlated with the threshold shear velocity obtained using the wind tunnel (R2=0.70, P<0.001). In the second stage, BB gun and penetrometer method was applied to a serial of sites which have BSNE wind erosion monitors and known horizontal sediment fluxes. Our results showed that a combination of BB gun and penetrometer is able to provide decent prediction of threshold shear velocity in the presence of vegetation under different soil physical and biological conditions.

  10. Shear banding in a lyotropic lamellar phase. I. Time-averaged velocity profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmon, Jean-Baptiste; Manneville, Sébastien; Colin, Annie

    2003-11-01

    Using velocity profile measurements based on dynamic light scattering and coupled to structural and rheological measurements in a Couette cell, we present evidences for a shear banding scenario in the shear flow of the onion texture of a lyotropic lamellar phase. Time-averaged measurements clearly show the presence of structural shear banding in the vicinity of a shear-induced transition, associated with the nucleation and growth of a highly sheared band in the flow. Our experiments also reveal the presence of slip at the walls of the Couette cell. Using a simple mechanical approach, we demonstrate that our data confirm the classical assumption of the shear banding picture, in which the interface between bands lies at a given stress σ*. We also outline the presence of large temporal fluctuations of the flow field, which are the subject of the second part of this paper [Salmon et al., Phys. Rev. E 68, 051504 (2003)].

  11. Compressional and shear wave velocities in granular materials to 2.5 kilobars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talwani, P.; Nur, A.; Kovach, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    The velocities of seismic compressional waves and, for the first time, shear wave velocities in silica sand, volcanic ash, and basalt powder were determined under hydrostatic confining pressures to 2.5 kb. Simultaneously, the porosity of these materials was obtained as a function of confining pressure. The presented results have important implications for the self-compaction hypothesis that has been postulated to explain the lunar near-surface seismic velocity variation.

  12. Errors in the estimation of arterial wall shear rates that result from curve fitting of velocity profiles.

    PubMed

    Lou, Z; Yang, W J; Stein, P D

    1993-01-01

    An analysis was performed to determine the error that results from the estimation of the wall shear rates based on linear and quadratic curve-fittings of the measured velocity profiles. For steady, fully developed flow in a straight vessel, the error for the linear method is linearly related to the distance between the probe and the wall, dr1, and the error for the quadratic method is zero. With pulsatile flow, especially a physiological pulsatile flow in a large artery, the thickness of the velocity boundary layer, delta is small, and the error in the estimation of wall shear based on curve fitting is much higher than that with steady flow. In addition, there is a phase lag between the actual shear rate and the measured one. In oscillatory flow, the error increases with the distance ratio dr1/delta and, for a quadratic method, also with the distance ratio dr2/dr1, where dr2 is the distance of the second probe from the wall. The quadratic method has a distinct advantage in accuracy over the linear method when dr1/delta < 1, i.e. when the first velocity point is well within the boundary layer. The use of this analysis in arterial flow involves many simplifications, including Newtonian fluid, rigid walls, and the linear summation of the harmonic components, and can provide more qualitative than quantitative guidance. PMID:8478343

  13. Shear-wave velocity of slope sediments near Hudson Canyon from analysis of ambient noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, N. C.; Ten Brink, U. S.; Collins, J. A.; McGuire, J. J.; Flores, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    We present new ambient noise data that help constrain the shear strength of marine sediments on the continental slope north of Hudson Canyon on the U.S. Atlantic margin. Sediment shear strength is a key parameter in models of potentially tsunamigenic, submarine slope failures, but shear strength is difficult to measure in situ and is expected to evolve in time with changes in pore pressure. The ambient noise data were recorded by 11 short-period, ocean-bottom seismometers and hydrophones deployed in a ~1 by 1.5 km array for ~6 months on the continental slope. These high frequency (~0.1 - 50 Hz), narrow-aperture data are expected to record noise propagating as interface waves and/or resonating in the upper ~500 m of sediment. Propagation of interface waves is controlled by the shear-wave velocity of the sediment, which we measure by calculating lag-times in cross-correlations of waveforms recorded by pairs of receivers. These measurements of shear-wave velocity will be used to constrain shear strength. The data also appear to record wind-generated noise resonating in layered sediment. We expect this resonance to also be sensitive to shear-wave velocity, and spectral analysis and modeling of harmonics may provide a second constraint on sediment shear strength. Both the correlogram- and spectral-based measurements can be made using hour- to day-long segments of data, enabling us to constrain temporal evolution of shear-wave velocity and potential forcing mechanisms (e.g., tidal and storm loading and submarine groundwater discharge) through the ~6 month deployment.

  14. Wavefield Analysis of Rayleigh Waves for Near-Surface Shear-Wave Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Chong

    2011-12-01

    Shear (S)-wave velocity is a key property of near-surface materials and is the fundamental parameter for many environmental and engineering geophysical studies. Directly acquiring accurate S-wave velocities from a seismic shot gather is usually difficult due to the poor signal-to-noise ratio. The relationship between Rayleigh-wave phase velocity and frequency has been widely utilized to estimate the S-wave velocities in shallow layers using the multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) technique. Hence, Rayleigh wave is a main focus of most near-surface seismic studies. Conventional dispersion analysis of Rayleigh waves assumes that the earth is laterally homogeneous and the free surface is horizontally flat, which limits the application of surface-wave methods to only 1D earth models or very smooth 2D models. In this study I extend the analysis of Rayleigh waves to a 2D domain by employing the 2D full elastic wave equation so as to address the lateral heterogeneity problem. I first discuss the accurate simulation of Rayleigh waves through finite-difference method and the boundary absorbing problems in the numerical modeling with a high Poisson's ratio (> 0.4), which is a unique near-surface problem. Then I develop an improved vacuum formulation to generate accurate synthetic seismograms focusing on Rayleigh waves in presence of surface topography and internal discontinuities. With these solutions to forward modeling of Rayleigh waves, I evaluate the influence of surface topography to conventional dispersion analysis in 2D and 3D domains by numerical investigations. At last I examine the feasibility of inverting waveforms of Rayleigh waves for shallow S-wave velocities using a genetic algorithm. Results of the study show that Rayleigh waves can be accurately simulated in near surface using the improved vacuum formulation. Spurious reflections during the numerical modeling can be efficiently suppressed by the simplified multiaxial perfectly matched layers. The

  15. Prediction of shear wave velocity using empirical correlations and artificial intelligence methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, Shahoo; Moradzadeh, Ali; Riabi, Reza Ghavami; Gholami, Raoof; Sadeghzadeh, Farhad

    2014-06-01

    Good understanding of mechanical properties of rock formations is essential during the development and production phases of a hydrocarbon reservoir. Conventionally, these properties are estimated from the petrophysical logs with compression and shear sonic data being the main input to the correlations. This is while in many cases the shear sonic data are not acquired during well logging, which may be for cost saving purposes. In this case, shear wave velocity is estimated using available empirical correlations or artificial intelligent methods proposed during the last few decades. In this paper, petrophysical logs corresponding to a well drilled in southern part of Iran were used to estimate the shear wave velocity using empirical correlations as well as two robust artificial intelligence methods knows as Support Vector Regression (SVR) and Back-Propagation Neural Network (BPNN). Although the results obtained by SVR seem to be reliable, the estimated values are not very precise and considering the importance of shear sonic data as the input into different models, this study suggests acquiring shear sonic data during well logging. It is important to note that the benefits of having reliable shear sonic data for estimation of rock formation mechanical properties will compensate the possible additional costs for acquiring a shear log.

  16. Shear-wave velocity profiling according to three alternative approaches: A comparative case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Moro, G.; Keller, L.; Al-Arifi, N. S.; Moustafa, S. S. R.

    2016-11-01

    The paper intends to compare three different methodologies which can be used to analyze surface-wave propagation, thus eventually obtaining the vertical shear-wave velocity (VS) profile. The three presented methods (currently still quite unconventional) are characterized by different field procedures and data processing. The first methodology is a sort of evolution of the classical Multi-channel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) here accomplished by jointly considering Rayleigh and Love waves (analyzed according to the Full Velocity Spectrum approach) and the Horizontal-to-Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR). The second method is based on the joint analysis of the HVSR curve together with the Rayleigh-wave dispersion determined via Miniature Array Analysis of Microtremors (MAAM), a passive methodology that relies on a small number (4 to 6) of vertical geophones deployed along a small circle (for the common near-surface application the radius usually ranges from 0.6 to 5 m). Finally, the third considered approach is based on the active data acquired by a single 3-component geophone and relies on the joint inversion of the group-velocity spectra of the radial and vertical components of the Rayleigh waves, together with the Radial-to-Vertical Spectral Ratio (RVSR). The results of the analyses performed while considering these approaches (completely different both in terms of field procedures and data analysis) appear extremely consistent thus mutually validating their performances. Pros and cons of each approach are summarized both in terms of computational aspects as well as with respect to practical considerations regarding the specific character of the pertinent field procedures.

  17. Observations of intense velocity shear and associated electrostatic waves near an auroral arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, M. C.; Carlson, C. W.

    1977-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements of energetic particles and ac electric fields made by the javelin sounding rocket NASA 8:56 during the late expansion phase of a magnetic storm have revealed an intense shear in plasma flow of magnitude 20 (m/s)/m at the edge of an auroral arc. Structure with two characteristic scales sizes is displayed in the region of shear. Larger structures are of the order of several kilometers in size. Intense irregularities with characteristic wavelengths smaller than the scale size of the shear have also been detected. The large-scale changes in the orientation of the charge sheet at the edge of the arc may be due to the Kelvin-Helmholtz branch; shorter-wavelength modes may be related to the shear driven resistive drift wave. Observations are consistent with the suggestion that velocity shear instabilities may play a role in the formation of high-latitude irregularities.

  18. Estimation of pseudo-2D shear-velocity section by inversion of high frequency surface waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luo, Y.; Liu, J.; Xia, J.; Xu, Y.; Liu, Q.

    2006-01-01

    A scheme to generate pseudo-2D shear-velocity sections with high horizontal resolution and low field cost by inversion of high frequency surface waves is presented. It contains six steps. The key step is the joint method of crossed correlation and phase shift scanning. This joint method chooses only two traces to generate image of dispersion curve. For Rayleigh-wave dispersion is most important for estimation of near-surface shear-wave velocity, it can effectively obtain reliable images of dispersion curves with a couple of traces. The result of a synthetic example shows the feasibility of this scheme. ?? 2005 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  19. Single Tracking Location Methods Suppress Speckle Noise in Shear Wave Velocity Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Elegbe, Etana C.; McAleavey, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    In ultrasound-based elastography methods, the estimation of shear wave velocity typically involves the tracking of speckle motion due to an applied force. The errors in the estimates of tissue displacement, and thus shear wave velocity, are generally attributed to electronic noise and decorrelation due to physical processes. We present our preliminary findings on another source of error, namely, speckle-induced bias in phase estimation. We find that methods that involve tracking in a single location, as opposed to multiple locations, are less sensitive to this source of error since the measurement is differential in nature and cancels out speckle-induced phase errors. PMID:23493611

  20. Shear-wave velocity of surficial geologic sediments in Northern California: Statistical distributions and depth dependence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holzer, T.L.; Bennett, M.J.; Noce, T.E.; Tinsley, J. C.

    2005-01-01

    Shear-wave velocities of shallow surficial geologic units were measured at 210 sites in a 140-km2 area in the greater Oakland, California, area near the margin of San Francisco Bay. Differences between average values of shear-wave velocity for each geologic unit computed by alternative approaches were in general smaller than the observed variability. Averages estimated by arithmetic mean, geometric mean, and slowness differed by 1 to 8%, while coefficients of variation ranged from 14 to 25%. With the exception of the younger Bay mud that underlies San Francisco Bay, velocities of the geologic units are approximately constant with depth. This suggests that shear-wave velocities measured at different depths in these surficial geologic units do not need to be normalized to account for overburden stress in order to compute average values. The depth dependence of the velocity of the younger Bay mud most likely is caused by consolidation. Velocities of each geologic unit are consistent with a normal statistical distribution. Average values increase with geologic age, as has been previously reported. Velocities below the water table are about 7% less than those above it. ?? 2005, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  1. 3D tomographic reconstruction of the internal velocity field of an immiscible drop in a shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerdraon, Paul; Dalziel, Stuart B.; Goldstein, Raymond E.; Landel, Julien R.; Peaudecerf, Francois J.

    2015-11-01

    We study experimentally the internal flow of a drop attached to a flat substrate and immersed in an immiscible shear flow. Transport inside the drop can play a crucial role in cleaning applications. Internal advection can enhance the mass transfer across the drop surface, thus increasing the cleaning rate. We used microlitre water-glycerol drops on a hydrophobic substrate. The drops were spherical and did not deform significantly under the shear flow. An oil phase of relative viscosity 0.01 to 1 was flowed over the drop. Typical Reynolds numbers inside the drops were of the order of 0.1 to 10. Using confocal microscopy, we performed 3D tomographic reconstruction of the flow field in the drop. The in-plane velocity field was measured using micro-PIV, and the third velocity component was computed from incompressibility. To our knowledge, this study gives the first experimental measurement of the three-dimensional internal velocity field of a drop in a shear flow. Numerical simulations and theoretical models published in the past 30 years predict a toroidal internal recirculation flow, for which the entire surface flows streamwise. However, our measurements reveal a qualitatively different picture with a two-lobed recirculation, featuring two stagnation points at the surface and a reverse surface flow closer to the substrate. This finding appears to be independent of Reynolds number and viscosity ratio in the ranges studied; we conjecture that the observed flow is due to the effect of surfactants at the drop surface.

  2. Preliminary Shear Velocity Tomography of Mt St Helens, Washington from iMUSH Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosbie, K.; Abers, G. A.; Creager, K. C.; Moran, S. C.; Denlinger, R. P.; Ulberg, C. W.

    2015-12-01

    The imaging Magma Under Mount St Helens (iMUSH) experiment will illuminate the crust beneath Mt St Helens volcano. The ambient noise tomography (ANT) component of this experiment measures shear velocity structure, which is more sensitive than P velocity to the presence of melt and other pore fluids. Seventy passive-source broadband seismometers for iMUSH were deployed in the summer of 2014 in a dense array of 100 Km diameter with a 10 km station spacing. We cross correlated ambient noise in 120 s windows and summed the result over many months for pairs of stations. Then frequency-domain methods on these cross correlations are employed to measure the phase velocities (Ekström et al. Geophys Rev Lett, 2009). Unlike velocities attained by group velocity methods, velocities for path lengths as small as one wavelength can be measured, enabling analysis of higher frequency signals and increasing spatial resolution. The minimum station spacing from which signals can be recovered ranges from 12 km at 0.18 Hz, a frequency that dominantly samples the upper crust to 20 km, to 37 km at 0.04 Hz, a frequency sensitive to structure through the crust and uppermost mantle, with lower spacing at higher frequencies. These phase velocities are tomographically inverted to obtain shear velocity maps for each frequency, assuming ray theory. Initial shear velocity maps for frequencies between 0.04-0.18 Hz reveal low-velocity sediments in the Puget Lowland west of Mount St Helens at 0.16-0.18 Hz, and a low velocity zone near 0.10 Hz between Mt Rainier and Mt Adams, east of Mount St Helens. The latter may reflect large-scale crustal plumbing of the arc between volcanic centers. In subsequent analyses these ANT results will be jointly inverted with receiver functions in order to further resolve crustal and upper mantle structure.

  3. Dissipation and velocity distribution at the shear-driven jamming transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, Peter

    2016-04-01

    We investigate energy dissipation and the distribution of particle velocities at the jamming transition for overdamped shear-driven frictionless disks in two dimensions at zero temperature. We find that the dissipation is caused by the fastest particles and that the fraction of particles responsible for the dissipation decreases towards zero as jamming is approached. These particles belong to an algebraic tail of the velocity distribution that approaches ˜v-3 as jamming is approached. We further find that different measures of the velocity diverge differently, which means that concepts such as typical velocity may no longer be used, a finding that should have implications for analytical approaches to shear-driven jamming.

  4. Dissipation and velocity distribution at the shear-driven jamming transition.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Peter

    2016-04-01

    We investigate energy dissipation and the distribution of particle velocities at the jamming transition for overdamped shear-driven frictionless disks in two dimensions at zero temperature. We find that the dissipation is caused by the fastest particles and that the fraction of particles responsible for the dissipation decreases towards zero as jamming is approached. These particles belong to an algebraic tail of the velocity distribution that approaches ∼v^{-3} as jamming is approached. We further find that different measures of the velocity diverge differently, which means that concepts such as typical velocity may no longer be used, a finding that should have implications for analytical approaches to shear-driven jamming. PMID:27176359

  5. Shockwave determination of the shear velocity at very high pressures. [for determining properties of planetary interiors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, O. L.

    1972-01-01

    A shock wave experiment is described for confirming changes in density, from seismic interpretation, for determining the properties of planet interiors. The experiment focuses on the problem of measurements in a pressure region, where the shear velocity tends to vanish, or become very small. Pressure-sensitive lattice stability, and the equations for an atomic model of the NaCl lattice are discussed along with the particle velocity shock technique.

  6. In situ Determination of Surface Tension-to-Shear Viscosity Ratio for Quasiliquid Layers on Ice Crystal Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Murata, Ken-Ichiro; Asakawa, Harutoshi; Nagashima, Ken; Furukawa, Yoshinori; Sazaki, Gen

    2015-12-18

    We have experimentally determined the surface tension-to-shear viscosity ratio (the so-called characteristic velocity) of quasiliquid layers (QLLs) on ice crystal surfaces from their wetting dynamics. Using an advanced optical microscope, whose resolution reaches the molecular level in the height direction, we directly observed the coalescent process of QLLs and followed the relaxation modes of their contact lines. The relaxation dynamics is known to be governed by the characteristic velocity, which allows us to access the physical properties of QLLs in a noninvasive way. Here we quantitatively demonstrate that QLLs, when completely wetting ices, have a thickness of 9±3  nm and an approximately 200 times lower characteristic velocity than bulk water, whereas QLLs, when partially wetting ices, have a velocity that is 20 times lower than the bulk. This indicates that ice crystal surfaces significantly affect the physical properties of QLLs localized near the surfaces at a nanometer scale.

  7. Estimation of near-surface shear-wave velocity by inversion of Rayleigh waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Park, C.B.

    1999-01-01

    The shear-wave (S-wave) velocity of near-surface materials (soil, rocks, pavement) and its effect on seismic-wave propagation are of fundamental interest in many groundwater, engineering, and environmental studies. Rayleigh-wave phase velocity of a layered-earth model is a function of frequency and four groups of earth properties: P-wave velocity, S-wave velocity, density, and thickness of layers. Analysis of the Jacobian matrix provides a measure of dispersion-curve sensitivity to earth properties. S-wave velocities are the dominant influence on a dispersion curve in a high-frequency range (>5 Hz) followed by layer thickness. An iterative solution technique to the weighted equation proved very effective in the high-frequency range when using the Levenberg-Marquardt and singular-value decomposition techniques. Convergence of the weighted solution is guaranteed through selection of the damping factor using the Levenberg-Marquardt method. Synthetic examples demonstrated calculation efficiency and stability of inverse procedures. We verify our method using borehole S-wave velocity measurements.Iterative solutions to the weighted equation by the Levenberg-Marquardt and singular-value decomposition techniques are derived to estimate near-surface shear-wave velocity. Synthetic and real examples demonstrate the calculation efficiency and stability of the inverse procedure. The inverse results of the real example are verified by borehole S-wave velocity measurements.

  8. Finite Larmor radius assisted velocity shear stabilization of the interchange instability in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ng Sheungwah; Hassam, A.B.

    2005-06-15

    Finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects, originally shown to stabilize magnetized plasma interchange modes at short wavelength, are shown to assist velocity shear stabilization of long wavelength interchanges. It is shown that the FLR effects result in stabilization with roughly the same efficacy as the stabilization from dissipative (resistive and viscous) effects found earlier.

  9. Velocity-Shear Driven Magnetic Reconnection in Particle-In-Cell Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Carrie; Antiochos, Spiro; DeVore, Rick; Karpen, Judy; Germaschewski, Kai

    2012-10-01

    In the standard model for coronal mass ejections (CME) and/or solar flares, the free energy for the event resides in the strongly sheared magnetic field of a filament channel. The pre-eruption force balance consists of an upward force due to the magnetic pressure of the sheared field balanced by a downward tension due to overlying un-sheared field. Magnetic reconnection is widely believed to be the mechanism that disrupts this force balance, leading to explosive eruption. For understanding CME/flare initiation, therefore, it is critical to model the onset of reconnection that is driven by the buildup of magnetic shear. In MHD simulations, the application of a magnetic field shear is a trivial matter. However, kinetic effects are important in the diffusion region and thus, it is important to examine this process with PIC simulations as well. The implementation of such a driver in PIC methods is nontrivial: it must be done in a self-consistent manner that avoids the generation of waves that destroy the applied shear. In this work, we discuss methods for applying a velocity shear perpendicular to the plane of reconnection within a 2.5D, aperiodic, PIC system. We also discuss the implementation of boundary conditions that allow a net electric current to flow through the walls.

  10. The upper mantle shear wave velocity structure of East Africa derived from Rayleigh wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donnell, J.; Nyblade, A.; Adams, A. N.; Weeraratne, D. S.; Mulibo, G.; Tugume, F.

    2012-12-01

    An expanded model of the three-dimensional shear wave velocity structure of the upper mantle beneath East Africa has been developed using data from the latest phases of the AfricaArray East African Seismic Experiment in conjunction with data from preceding studies. The combined dataset consists of 331 events recorded on a total of 95 seismic stations spanning Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Zambia and Malawi. In this latest study, 149 events were used to determine fundamental mode Rayleigh wave phase velocities at periods ranging from 20 to 182 seconds using the two-plane-wave method. These were subsequently combined with the similarly processed published measurements and inverted for an updated upper mantle three-dimensional shear wave velocity model. Newly imaged features include a substantial fast anomaly in eastern Zambia that may have exerted a controlling influence on the evolution of the Western Rift Branch. Furthermore, there is a suggestion that the Eastern Rift Branch trends southeastward offshore eastern Tanzania.

  11. Frictional strength of wet- and dry- talc gouge in high-velocity shear experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Reches, Z.; Elwood Madden, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    The strength of the creeping segment of the San Andres fault may be controlled by the distinct weakness and stability of talc (Moore & Rymer, 2007). We analyze talc frictional strength at high slip-velocity of 0.002 - 0.66 m/s, long slip-distances of 0.01 m to 33 m, and normal stresses up to 4.1 MPa. This analysis bridges the gap between nucleation stage of low velocity/distance, and the frictional behavior during large earthquakes. We tested wet and dry samples of pure talc gouge in a confined rotary cell, and continuously monitored the slip-velocity, stresses, dilation and temperature. We run 29 experiments of single and stepped velocities to obtain 243 values of quasi-static frictional coefficients. Dry talc gouge showed distinct slip-strengthening: friction coefficient of µ ~0.4 at short slip-distances of D < 0.1 m, and it increased systematically to µ ~0.8 at slip-distances of D = 0.1- 1 m; at D > 1 m, the frictional strength saturated at µ= 0.8 - 1 level. Wet talc gouge (16-20% water) displayed low frictional strength of µ= 0.1-0.3, in agreement with published triaxial tests. The stepped-velocity runs revealed a consistent velocity-strengthening trend. For a velocity jump from V1 to V2, we used VD = (µ2 -µ1)/ln (V2/V1), and found that on average VD = 0.06 and 0.03 for dry and wet talc, respectively, and for slip distances shorter than 1 m. Microstructural analysis of post-shearing wet talc gouge revealed extreme slip localization to a principal-slip-zone of a few microns, and significant shear compaction of 10-30%. In contrast, dry talc gouge exhibited distributed shear in a wide zone and systematic shear dilation (10-50%). We propose slip along weak interlayer talc plates and thermal-pressurization as the possible weakening mechanisms for wet talc. The development of distributed secondary fault network along with substantial grain crushing is responsible for slip-strengthening in dry condition. Fig. 1. Friction maps of talc gouge as function of slip

  12. Effect of low-velocity or ballistic impact damage on the strength of thin composite and aluminum shear panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, G. L.

    1985-01-01

    Impact tests were conducted on shear panels fabricated from 6061-T6 aluminum and from woven fabric prepreg of Du Pont Kevlara fiber/epoxy resin and graphite fiber/epoxy resin. The shear panels consisted of three different composite laminates and one aluminum material configuration. Three panel aspect ratios were evaluated for each material configuration. Composite panels were impacted with a 1.27-cm (0.05-in) diameter aluminum sphere at low velocities of 46 m/sec (150 ft/sec) and 67 m/sec (220 ft/sec). Ballistic impact conditions consisted of a tumbled 0.50-caliber projectile impacting loaded composite and aluminum shear panels. The results of these tests indicate that ballistic threshold load (the lowest load which will result in immediate failure upon penetration by the projectile) varied between 0.44 and 0.61 of the average failure load of undamaged panels. The residual strengths of the panels after ballistic impact varied between 0.55 and 0.75 of the average failure strength of the undamaged panels. The low velocity impacts at 67 m/sec (220 ft/sec) caused a 15 to 20 percent reduction in strength, whereas the impacts at 46 m/sec (150 ft/sec) resulted in negligible strength loss. Good agreement was obtained between the experimental failure strengths and the predicted strength with the point stress failure criterion.

  13. Stabilization of MHD turbulence by applied steady and oscillating velocity shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Ching Pui

    Some aspects of velocity shear stabilization of magnetized plasma instabilities are considered. In the first part, steady externally forced flow shears are considered. In the second part, resonantly excited oscillating flow shears are considered. The stabilizing effect of steady forced velocity shear on the ideal interchange instability is studied in linear and nonlinear regimes, with a 2D dissipative magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code. With increasing flow shear V', the linearly unstable band in wavenumber-space shrinks so that the peak growth results for modes that correspond to intermediate wavenumbers. In the nonlinear turbulent state, the convection cells are roughly circular on the scale of the density gradient. Unstable modes are almost completely stabilized, with the density profile reverting to laminar, when V' is a few times the classic interchange growth rate. The simulations are compared with measurements of magnetic fluctuations from the Maryland Centrifugal Experiment. The spectral data, taken in the plasma edge, are in general agreement with data obtained in higher viscosity simulations. Finally, concomitant Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities in the system are also examined. Geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs) are axisymmetric electrostatic poloidal oscillations of plasma in tokamaks. It has been proposed to drive GAMs resonantly by external drivers, thus setting up velocity shears to suppress turbulence. Here, we study enhanced damping of GAMs from (1) phase mixing of oscillations and (2) nonlinear detuning of the resonance. It is well-known that phase mixing of Alfven waves propagating in inhomogeneous media results in enhanced damping. The enhancement goes as the 1/3 power of the dissipation. We study this phenomenon for GAMs in tokamaks with temperature profiles. Our analysis is verified by numerical simulation. In addition, the system of nonlinear GAM equations is shown to resemble the Duffing oscillator. Resonant amplification is shown to be suppressed

  14. Mixing properties of coaxial jets with large velocity ratios and large inverse density ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander Schumaker, S.; Driscoll, James F.

    2012-05-01

    An experimental study was conducted to better understand the mixing properties of coaxial jets as several parameters were systematically varied, including the velocity ratio, density ratio, and the Reynolds number. Diameters of the inner and outer jet were also varied. Coaxial jets are commonly used to mix fluids due to the simplicity of their geometry and the rapid mixing that they provide. A measure of the overall mixing efficiency is the stoichiometric mixing length (Ls), which is the distance along the jet centerline where the two fluids have mixed to some desired concentration, which was selected to be the stoichiometric concentration for H2/O2 and CH4/O2 in this case. For 56 cases, the profiles of mean mixture fraction, rms mixture fraction fluctuations (unmixedness), and Ls were measured using acetone planar laser induced fluorescence diagnostics. Results were compared to three mixing models. The entrainment model of Villermaux and Rehab showed good agreement with the data, indicating that the proper non-dimensional scaling parameter is the momentum flux ratio M. The work extends the existing database of coaxial jet scalar mixing properties because it considers the specific regime of large values of both the velocity ratio and the inverse density ratio, which is the regime in which rocket injectors operate. Also the work focuses on the mixing up to Ls where previous work focused on the mixing up to the end of the inner core. The Reynolds numbers achieved for a number of cases were considerably larger than previous gas mixing studies, which insures that the jet exit boundary conditions are fully turbulent.

  15. Improving the shear wave velocity structure beneath Bucharest (Romania) using ambient vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manea, Elena-Florinela; Michel, Clotaire; Poggi, Valerio; Fäh, Donat; Radulian, Mircea; Balan, Florin

    2016-08-01

    Large earthquakes from the intermediate-depth Vrancea seismic zone are known to produce in Bucharest ground motion characterized by predominant long periods. This phenomenon has been interpreted as the combined effect of both seismic source properties and site response of the large sedimentary basin. The thickness of the unconsolidated Quaternary deposits beneath the city is more than 200 m, the total depth of sediments is more than 1000 m. Complex basin geometry, and the low seismic wave velocities of the sediments are the primary responsible for the large amplification and long duration experienced during earthquakes. For a better understanding of the geological structure under Bucharest, a number of investigations using non-invasive methods has been carried out. With the goal to analyze and extract the polarization and dispersion characteristics of the surface waves, ambient vibrations and low-magnitude earthquakes have been investigated using single station and array techniques. Love and Rayleigh dispersion curves (including higher modes), Rayleigh waves ellipticity and SH-wave fundamental frequency of resonance (f0SH) have been inverted simultaneously to estimate the shear-wave velocity structure under Bucharest down to a depth of about 8 km. Information from existing borehole logs was used as prior to reduce the non-uniqueness of the inversion and to constrain the shallow part of the velocity model (<300 m). In this study we use data from a 35-km diameter array (the URS experiment) installed by the National Institute for Earth Physics and by the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology during 10 months in the period 2003-2004. The array consisted of 32 three-component seismological stations, deployed in the urban area of Bucharest and adjacent zones. The large size of the array and the broadband nature of the available sensors gave us the possibility to characterize the surface wave dispersion at very low frequencies (0.05-1 Hz) using frequency-wavenumber techniques

  16. Improving the shear wave velocity structure beneath Bucharest (Romania) using ambient vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manea, Elena Florinela; Michel, Clotaire; Poggi, Valerio; Fäh, Donat; Radulian, Mircea; Balan, Florin Stefan

    2016-11-01

    Large earthquakes from the intermediate-depth Vrancea seismic zone are known to produce in Bucharest ground motion characterized by predominant long periods. This phenomenon has been interpreted as the combined effect of both seismic source properties and site response of the large sedimentary basin. The thickness of the unconsolidated Quaternary deposits beneath the city is more than 200 m, the total depth of sediments is more than 1000 m. Complex basin geometry and the low seismic wave velocities of the sediments are primarily responsible for the large amplification and long duration experienced during earthquakes. For a better understanding of the geological structure under Bucharest, a number of investigations using non-invasive methods have been carried out. With the goal to analyse and extract the polarization and dispersion characteristics of the surface waves, ambient vibrations and low-magnitude earthquakes have been investigated using single station and array techniques. Love and Rayleigh dispersion curves (including higher modes), Rayleigh waves ellipticity and SH-wave fundamental frequency of resonance (f0SH) have been inverted simultaneously to estimate the shear wave velocity structure under Bucharest down to a depth of about 8 km. Information from existing borehole logs was used as prior to reduce the non-uniqueness of the inversion and to constrain the shallow part of the velocity model (<300 m). In this study, we use data from a 35-km diameter array (the URS experiment) installed by the National Institute for Earth Physics and by the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology during 10 months in the period 2003-2004. The array consisted of 32 three-component seismological stations, deployed in the urban area of Bucharest and adjacent zones. The large size of the array and the broad-band nature of the available sensors gave us the possibility to characterize the surface wave dispersion at very low frequencies (0.05-1 Hz) using frequency-wavenumber techniques

  17. Shear wave velocity structure of the Anatolian Plate and surrounding regions using Ambient Noise Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delph, J. R.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Biryol, C. B.; Ward, K. M.

    2013-12-01

    The Anatolian Plate consists of various lithospheric terranes amalgamated during the closure of the Tethys Ocean, and is currently extruding to the west in response to a combination of the collision of the Arabian plate in the east and the roll back of the Aegean subduction zone in the west. We used Ambient Noise Tomography (ANT) at periods <= 40s to investigate the crust and uppermost mantle structure of the Anatolian Plate. We computed a total of 13,779 unique cross-correlations using one sample-per-second vertical component broadband seismic data from 215 stations from 8 different networks over a period of 7 years to compute fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave dispersion curves following the method of Benson et al. (2007). We then inverted the dispersion data to calculate phase velocity maps for 11 periods from 8 s - 40 s throughout Anatolia and the Aegean regions (Barmin et al. 2001). Using smoothed Moho values derived from Vanacore et al. (2013) in our starting models, we inverted our dispersion curves using a linear least-squares iterative inversion scheme (Herrmann & Ammon 2004) to produce a 3-D shear-wave velocity model of the crust and uppermost mantle throughout Anatolia and the Aegean. We find a good correlation between our seismic shear wave velocities and paleostructures (suture zones) and modern deformation (basin formation and fault deformation). The most prominent crustal velocity contrasts occur across intercontinental sutures zones, resulting from the juxtaposition of the compositionally different basements of the amalgamated terranes. At shallow depths, seismic velocity contrasts correspond closely with surficial features. The Thrace, Cankiri and Tuz Golu basins, and accretionary complexes related to the closure of the Neotethys are characterized by slow shear wave velocities, while the Menderes and Kirsehir Massifs, Pontides, and Istanbul Zone are characterized by fast velocities. We find that the East Anatolia Plateau has slow shear-wave velocities

  18. Kinetic Reconnection Simulations for CME Initiation Driven by Velocity-Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, C.; Antiochos, S. K.; Karpen, J.; DeVore, C. R.; Germaschewski, K.

    2012-12-01

    In the standard model for coronal mass ejections (CME) and/or solar flares, the free energy for the event resides in the strongly sheared magnetic field of a filament channel. The pre-eruption force balance consists of an upward force due to the magnetic pressure of the sheared field balanced by a downward tension due to overlying unsheared field. Magnetic reconnection is widely believed to be the mechanism that disrupts this force balance, leading to explosive eruption. For understanding CME/flare initiation, therefore, it is critical to model the onset or reconnection that is driven by the buildup of magnetic shear. In MHD simulations, the application of a magnetic field shear is a trivial matter. However, kinetic effects are important in the diffusion region and thus, it is important to examine this process with PIC simulations as well. The implementation of such a driver in PIC methods is nontrivial. The field must be sheared self-consistently/ indirectly to prevent the generation of waves that destroy the desired system. In the work presented here, we discuss methods for applying a velocity shear perpendicular to the plane of reconnection for a nonperiodic system. We also discuss the implementation of boundary conditions that are open to electric currents that flow through the system boundary. C.B. is supported through an appointment to the NASA Postdoctoral Program at GSFC, administered by Oak Ridge Associated Universities through a contract with NASA.

  19. Three-dimensional shear wave velocity structure in the Atlantic upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Esther Kezia Candace

    Oceanic lithosphere constitutes the upper boundary layer of the Earth's convecting mantle. Its structure and evolution provide a vital window on the dynamics of the mantle and important clues to how the motions of Earth's surface plates are coupled to convection in the mantle below. The three-dimensional shear-velocity structure of the upper mantle beneath the Atlantic Ocean is investigated to gain insight into processes that drive formation of oceanic lithosphere. Travel times are measured for approximately 10,000 fundamental-mode Rayleigh waves, in the period range 30-130 seconds, traversing the Atlantic basin. Paths with >30% of their length through continental upper mantle are excluded to maximize sensitivity to the oceanic upper mantle. The lateral distribution of Rayleigh wave phase velocity in the Atlantic upper mantle is explored with two approaches. One, phase velocity is allowed to vary only as a function of seafloor age. Two, a general two-dimensional parameterization is utilized in order to capture perturbations to age-dependent structure. Phase velocity shows a strong dependence on seafloor age, and removing age-dependent velocity from the 2-D maps highlights areas of anomalously low velocity, almost all of which are proximal to locations of hotspot volcanism. Depth-dependent variations in vertically-polarized shear velocity (Vsv) are determined with two sets of 3-D models: a layered model that requires constant VSV in each depth layer, and a splined model that allows VSV to vary continuously with depth. At shallow depths (˜75 km) the seismic structure shows the expected dependence on seafloor age. At greater depths (˜200 km) high-velocity lithosphere is found only beneath the oldest seafloor; velocity variations beneath younger seafloor may result from temperature or compositional variations within the asthenosphere. The age-dependent phase velocities are used to constrain temperature in the mantle and show that, in contrast to previous results for

  20. Shear wave velocity structure of the Anatolian Plate: anomalously slow crust in southwestern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delph, Jonathan R.; Biryol, C. Berk; Beck, Susan L.; Zandt, George; Ward, Kevin M.

    2015-07-01

    The Anatolian Plate is composed of different lithospheric blocks and ribbon continents amalgamated during the closure of the Paleotethys Ocean and Neotethys Ocean along a subduction margin. Using ambient noise tomography, we investigate the crustal and uppermost mantle shear wave velocity structure of the Anatolian Plate. A total of 215 broad-band seismic stations were used spanning 7 yr of recording to compute 13 778 cross-correlations and obtain Rayleigh wave dispersion measurements for periods between 8 and 40 s. We then perform a shear wave inversion to calculate the seismic velocity structure of the crust and uppermost mantle. Our results show that the overall crustal shear wave velocities of the Anatolian crust are low (˜3.4 km s-1), indicative of a felsic overall composition. We find that prominent lateral seismic velocity gradients correlate with Tethyan suture zones, supporting the idea that the neotectonic structures of Turkey are exploiting the lithospheric weaknesses associated with the amalgamation of Anatolia. Anomalously slow shear wave velocities (˜3.15 km s-1 at 25 km) are located in the western limb of the Isparta Angle in southwestern Turkey. In the upper crust, we find that these low shear wave velocities correlate well with the projected location of a carbonate platform unit (Bey Dağlari) beneath the Lycian Nappe complex. In the lower crust and upper mantle of this region, we propose that the anomalously slow velocities are due to the introduction of aqueous fluids related to the underplating of accretionary material from the underthrusting of a buoyant, attenuated continental fragment similar to the Eratosthenes seamount. We suggest that this fragment controlled the location of the formation of the Subduction-Transform Edge Propagator fault in the eastern Aegean Sea during rapid slab rollback of the Aegean Arc in early Miocene times. Lastly, we observe that the uppermost mantle beneath continental Anatolia is generally slow (˜4.2 km s-1

  1. Phase velocities and attenuations of shear, Lamb, and Rayleigh waves in plate-like tissues submerged in a fluid (L).

    PubMed

    Nenadic, Ivan Z; Urban, Matthew W; Bernal, Miguel; Greenleaf, James F

    2011-12-01

    In the past several decades, the fields of ultrasound and magnetic resonance elastography have shown promising results in noninvasive estimates of mechanical properties of soft tissues. These techniques often rely on measuring shear wave velocity due to an external or internal source of force and relating the velocity to viscoelasticity of the tissue. The mathematical relationship between the measured velocity and material properties of the myocardial wall, arteries, and other organs with non-negligible boundary conditions is often complicated and computationally expensive. A simple relationship between the Lamb-Rayleigh dispersion and the shear wave dispersion is derived for both the velocity and attenuation. The relationship shows that the shear wave velocity is around 20% higher than the Lamb-Rayleigh velocity and that the shear wave attenuation is about 20% lower than the Lamb-Rayleigh attenuation. Results of numerical simulations in the frequency range 0-500 Hz are presented. PMID:22225009

  2. Large velocity shears and associated electrostatic waves and turbulence in the auroral F region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Earle, G. D.; Kelley, M. C.; Ganguli, G.

    1989-01-01

    Broadband electrostatic waves at 10-1000 Hz have been observed with very large shears in the plasma flow velocity transverse to the ambient magnetic field in the auroral F region. The shears were detected through their perpendicular electric field signatures, which changed by as much as 200 mV/m over distances of only a few hundred meters. Transverse shears can be uniquely related to field-aligned currents through the current continuity equation, and the resulting field-aligned drift exceeds the threshold for excitation of current-driven electrostatic ion-cyclotron waves. A numerical simulation of this instability has been used to generate electric-field spectra in the rocket frame of reference, and these spectra are similar to the spectra generated form the actual rocket data.

  3. Shear instability of plastically-deforming metals in high-velocity impact welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassiri, Ali; Kinsey, Brad; Chini, Greg

    2016-10-01

    High-speed oblique impact of two metal plates results in the development of an intense shear region at their interface leading to interfacial profile distortion and interatomic bonding. If the relative velocity is sufficient, a distinct wavy morphology with a well-defined amplitude and wavelength is observed. Emergence of this morphology below the melting point of the metal plates is usually taken as evidence of a successful weld. Amongvarious proposed mechanisms, instability owing to large tangential velocity variations near the interface has received significant attention. With one exception, the few quantitative stability analyses of this proposed mechanism have treated an anti-symmetric/shear-layer base profile (i.e., a Kelvin-Helmholtz configuration) and employed an inviscid or Newtonian viscous fluid constitutive relation. The former stipulation implies the energy source for the instability is the presumed relative shearing motion of the two plates, while the latter is appropriate only if melting occurs locally near the interface. In this study, these restrictions, which are at odds with the conditions realized in high-velocity impact welding, are relaxed. A quantitative temporal linear stability analysis is performed to investigate whether the interfacial wave morphology could be the signature of a shear-driven high strain-rate instability of a perfectly plastic material undergoing a jet-like deformation near the interface. The resulting partial differential eigenvalue problem is solved numerically using a spectral collocation method in which customized boundary conditions near the interface are implemented to properly treat the singularity arising from the vanishing of the base flow strain-rate at the symmetry plane of the jet. The solution of the eigenvalue problem yields the wavelength and growth rate of the dominant wave-like disturbances along the interface and confirms that a shear instability of a plastically-deforming material is compatible with the

  4. Interchange and Flow Velocity Shear Instabilities in the Presence of Finite Larmor Radius Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotnikov, V.; Kim, T.; Mishin, E.; Genoni, T.; Rose, D.; Mehlhorn, T.

    2014-09-01

    Ionospheric irregularities cause scintillations of electromagnetic signals that can severely affect navigation and transionospheric communication, in particular during Equatorial Plasma Bubbles (EPBs) events. However, the existing ionospheric models do not describe density irregularities with typical scales of several ion Larmor radii that affect UHF and L bands. These irregularities can be produced in the process of nonlinear evolution of interchange or flow velocity shear instabilities. The model of nonlinear development of these instabilities based on two-fluid hydrodynamic description with inclusion of finite Larmor radius effects will be presented. The derived nonlinear equations will be numerically solved by using the code Flute, which was originally developed for High Energy Density applications and modified to describe interchange and flow velocity shear instabilities in the ionosphere. The high-resolution simulations will be driven by the ambient conditions corresponding to the AFRL C/NOFS satellite low-resolution data during EPBs.

  5. Correlation Analysis between Spin, Velocity Shear, and Vorticity of Baryonic and Dark Matter Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L. L.

    2016-05-01

    Using cosmological hydrodynamic simulations, we investigate the alignments between velocity shear, vorticity, and the spin of dark matter halos, and study the correlation between baryonic and dark matter. We find that (1) mis-alignment between vorticity of baryonic and dark matter would develop on scales < 0.2h-1 Mpc; (2) the vorticity of baryonic matter exhibits stronger alignment/anti-alignment with the eigenvectors of velocity shear than that of dark matter; (3) small/massive halos spinning parallel/perpendicular to the host filaments are sensitive to the identification of cosmic web, simulation box size, and resolution. These factors might complicate the connection between the spins of dark matter halos and galaxies, and affect the correlation signal of the alignments of galaxy spin with nearby large-scale structures.

  6. Effect of bubble flow velocity on drag-force and shear stress working on submerged hollow fibre membrane.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, H; Kurosaka, M; Shibata, N; Kobayashi, M

    2006-01-01

    This study is aimed at elucidating the mechanism by which rising air bubbles induce shear stress on hollow fibre membrane surfaces. Shear stress on hollow fibre membrane surfaces (laterally-set and vertically-set) caused by aeration was measured directly using a two-direction load sensor. In the laterally-set hollow fibre module, time-averaged upward-direction shear stress on the membrane surface was compared to theoretical shear stress values considering the effect of water flow on membrane surface. Measured time-average shear stress values were almost 200 times larger than theoretical values implying strong interactions between bubbles and solid surface. In the vertically-set membrane module, velocity measurement of bubble flow using laser Doppler velocimeter revealed that drag force working on membrane surface was closely related to upward-direction water velocity. Also fluctuation of drag force and shear force on membrane surface was found to be related to velocity fluctuation (turbulence).

  7. Effects of a sheared ion velocity on the linear stability of ITG modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lontano, M.; Varischetti, M. C.; Lazzaro, E.

    2006-11-01

    The linear dispersion of the ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes, in the presence of a non uniform background ion velocity U∥ = U∥(x) ez, in the direction of the sheared equilibrium magnetic field B0 = B0(x) ez, has been studied in the frame of the two-fluid guiding center approximation, in slab geometry. Generally speaking, the presence of an ion flow destabilizes the oscillations. The role of the excited K-H instability is discussed.

  8. Near-surface characterization of a geotechnical site in north-east Missouri using shear-wave velocity measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ismail, A.; Anderson, N.

    2007-01-01

    Shear-wave velocity (Vs) as a function of soil stiffness is an essential parameter in geotechnical characterization of the subsurface. In this study, multichannel analysis of surface wave (MASW) and downhole methods were used to map the shear-wave velocity-structure and depth to the bed-rock surface at a 125m ?? 125m geotechnical site in Missouri. The main objective was to assess the suitability of the site for constructing a large, heavy building. The acquired multichannel surface wave data were inverted to provide 1D shear-wave velocity profile corresponding to each shot gather. These 1D velocity profiles were interpolated and contoured to generate a suite of 2D shear-wave velocity sections. Integrating the shear-wave velocity data from the MASW method with the downhole velocity data and the available borehole lithologic information enabled us to map shear-wave velocity-structure to a depth on the order of 20m. The bedrock surface, which is dissected by a significant cut-and-fill valley, was imaged. The results suggest that the study site will require special consideration prior to construction. The results also demonstrate the successful use of MASW methods, when integrated with downhole velocity measurements and borehole lithologic information, in the characterization of the near surface at the geotechnical sites. ?? 2007 European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers.

  9. Combined Resistivity and Shear Wave Velocity Soil-type Estimation Beneath a Coastal Protection Levee.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzo, J. M.; Goff, D.; Hayashi, K.

    2015-12-01

    Unconsolidated Holocene deltaic sediments comprise levee foundation soils in New Orleans, USA. Whereas geotechnical tests at point locations are indispensable for evaluating soil stability, the highly variable sedimentary facies of the Mississippi delta create difficulties to predict soil conditions between test locations. Combined electrical resistivity and seismic shear wave studies, calibrated to geotechnical data, may provide an efficient methodology to predict soil types between geotechnical sites at shallow depths (0- 10 m). The London Avenue Canal levee flank of New Orleans, which failed in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, 2005, presents a suitable site in which to pioneer these geophysical relationships. Preliminary cross-plots show electrically resistive, high-shear-wave velocity areas interpreted as low-permeability, resistive silt. In brackish coastal environments, low-resistivity and low-shear-wave-velocity areas may indicate both saturated, unconsolidated sands and low-rigidity clays. Via a polynomial approximation, soil sub-types of sand, silt and clay can be estimated by a cross-plot of S-wave velocity and resistivity. We confirm that existent boring log data fit reasonably well with the polynomial approximation where 2/3 of soil samples fall within their respective bounds—this approach represents a new classification system that could be used for other mid-latitude, fine-grained deltas.

  10. Shear-velocity structure, radial anisotropy and dynamics of the Tibetan crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agius, Matthew R.; Lebedev, Sergei

    2014-12-01

    Geophysical and geological data suggest that Tibetan middle crust is a partially molten, mechanically weak layer, but it is debated whether this low-viscosity layer is present beneath the entire plateau, what its properties are, how it deforms, and what role it has played in the plateau's evolution. Broad-band seismic surface waves yield resolution in the entire depth range of the Tibetan crust and can be used to constrain its shear-wave velocity structure (indicative of crustal composition, temperature and partial melting) and radial anisotropy (indicative of the patterns of deformation). We measured Love- and Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity curves in broad period ranges (up to 7-200 s) for a few tens of pairs and groups of stations across Tibet, combining, in each case, hundreds of interstation measurements, made with cross-correlation and waveform-inversion methods. Shear-velocity profiles were then determined by extensive series of non-linear inversions of the data, designed to constrain the depth-dependent ranges of isotropic-average shear speeds and radial anisotropy. Shear wave speeds within the Tibetan middle crust are anomalously low and, also, show strong lateral variations across the plateau. The lowest mid-crustal shear speeds are found in the north and west of the plateau (˜3.1-3.2 km s-1), within a pronounced low-velocity zone. In southeastern Tibet, crustal shear wave speeds increase gradually towards southeast, whereas in the north, the change across the Kunlun Fault is relatively sharp. The lateral variations of shear speeds within the crust are indicative of those in temperature. A mid-crustal temperature of 800 °C, reported previously, can account for the low shear velocities across Lhasa. In the north, the temperature is higher and exceeds the solidus, resulting in partial melting that we estimate at 3-6 per cent. Strong radial anisotropy is required by the data in western-central Tibet (>5 per cent) but not in northeastern Tibet. The amplitude

  11. Determining Sliding Velocity and Shear-Strain Magnitude From Basal Sediments of Past Ice Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iverson, N. R.; Hooyer, T. S.; Thomason, J. F.

    2004-12-01

    Ice sheets slide over their basal sediments and commonly deform them. Despite meticulous description of such sediments, they have not been used to estimate rates or magnitudes of basal motion. Thus, although a common assertion is that modeling of past ice sheets can benefit from studies of basal sediments, their actual utility in modeling studies has been minimal. We have developed methods for estimating sliding velocity and till shear-strain magnitude from basal sediments of past ice sheets. The first method involves balancing shear traction on clasts that have plowed through the bed surface with resistance to plowing provided by the bed. The shear traction on clasts is provided by the sliding theory of Lliboutry, and plowing resistance is estimated using a geotechnical theory of cone penetration. The result is an expression for sliding speed of a past ice sheet that depends only on the size distribution of clasts that plowed and the thermomechanical properties of ice and clasts. This method was applied to sizes of clasts that plowed through outwash near Peoria, Illinois, to estimate the sliding speed of the Illinoian ice sheet in that area: 60-170 m/a. The second method involves shearing till in laboratory experiments to study the evolution of till microstructural properties as a function of shear-strain magnitude. Microstructural anisotropy is quantified by collecting multiple intact samples (20 mm cubes) and determining the strength of fabric defined by principal directions of magnetic susceptibility. These directions depend on alignment of needle-shaped magnetite grains. Fabrics formed by directions of maximum susceptibility do not become steady until shear strains of 20-50. Therefore, laboratory calibrations of fabric strength to shear-strain magnitude allow the extent of bed deformation to be determined from susceptibility fabrics of basal till. These studies can provide quantitative inputs to ice-sheet models that have been unavailable previously.

  12. Anisotropic Shear-wave Velocity Structure of East Asian Upper Mantle from Waveform Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, J.; Yuan, H.; French, S. W.; Romanowicz, B. A.; Ni, S.

    2012-12-01

    East Asia is a seismically active region featuring active tectonic belts, such as the Himalaya collision zone, western Pacific subduction zones and the Tianshan- Baikal tectonic belt. In this study, we applied full waveform time domain tomography to image 3D isotropic, radially and azimuthally anisotropic upper mantle shear velocity structure of East Asia. High quality teleseismic waveforms were collected for both permanent and temporary stations in the target and its adjacent regions, providing good ray path coverage of the study region. Fundamental and overtone wave packets, filtered down to 60 sec, were inverted for isotropic and radially anisotropic shear wave structure using normal mode asymptotic coupling theory (NACT: Li and Romanowicz, 1995). Joint inversion of SKS measurements and seismic waveforms was then carried out following the methodology described in (Marone and Romanowicz, 2007). The 3D velocity model shows strong lateral heterogeneities in the target region, which correlate well with the surface geology in East Asia. Our model shows that Indian lithosphere has subducted beneath Tibet with a different northern reach from western to eastern Tibet,. We also find variations of the slab geometry in Western Pacific subduction zones. Old and stable regions, such as, Indian shield, Siberia platform, Tarim and Yangtze blocks are found to have higher shear wave velocity in the upper mantle. Lower velocity anomalies are found in regions like Baikal rift, Tienshan, Indochina block, and the regions along Japan island-Ryukyu Trench and Izu-bonin Trench. The dominant fast and slow velocity boundaries in the study region are well correlated with tectonic belts, such as the central Asian orogenic belt and Alty/Qilian-Qinling/Dabie orogenic belt. Our radially anisotropic model shows Vsh> Vsv in oceanic regions and at larger depths(>300km), and Vsv > Vsh in some orogenic zones.. We'll show preliminary results of azimuthally anisotropic joint inversion of SKS

  13. Continuous monitoring of shear wave velocity at the Montevecchio earthflow (Forlì-Cesena Province, Northern Apennines)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertello, Lara; Berti, Matteo; Castellaro, Silvia

    2016-04-01

    of June are not significant because the geophones were buried and moved downslope of about 50 meters. On the 1st of June the monitoring system was retrieved e reinstalled in its original position. From the first week of June to the 25th of July, the landslide slowed down and reached a velocity of 1 cm/d and accordingly, the Vs shows an increasing trend, except for the drop on the 22th-23th of June. Observing the video, the landslide did not accelerate; maybe the drop in shear wave velocity is a direct consequence of a rainfall event that occurred on the 22th, but we are still working on this aspect. A preliminary interpretation of the observed relationship between the displacement rate of the landslide and the shear wave velocity of the moving mass relies on the changes in the consistence of the material. During the phase of fast moving, the soil probably increases the void ratio and loses its stiffness, so Vs are low. At the contrary, during the phase of slow moving, the void ratio is relatively low and Vs are higher.

  14. Site response, shallow shear-wave velocity, and damage in Los Gatos, California, from the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartzell, S.; Carver, D.; Williams, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    Aftershock records of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake are used to calculate site response in the frequency band of 0.5-10 Hz at 24 locations in Los Gatos, California, on the edge of the Santa Clara Valley. Two different methods are used: spectral ratios relative to a reference site on rock and a source/site spectral inversion method. These two methods complement each other and give consistent results. Site amplification factors are compared with surficial geology, thickness of alluvium, shallow shear-wave velocity measurements, and ground deformation and structural damage resulting from the Loma Prieta earthquake. Higher values of site amplification are seen on Quaternary alluvium compared with older Miocene and Cretaceous units of Monterey and Franciscan Formation. However, other more detailed correlations with surficial geology are not evident. A complex pattern of alluvial sediment thickness, caused by crosscutting thrust faults, is interpreted as contributing to the variability in site response and the presence of spectral resonance peaks between 2 and 7 Hz at some sites. Within the range of our field measurements, there is a correlation between lower average shear-wave velocity of the top 30 m and 50% higher values of site amplification. An area of residential homes thrown from their foundations correlates with high site response. This damage may also have been aggravated by local ground deformation. Severe damage to commercial buildings in the business district, however, is attributed to poor masonry construction.

  15. Crustal shear velocity structure in the Southern Lau Basin constrained by seafloor compliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Yang; Webb, Spahr C.

    2016-05-01

    Seafloor morphology and crustal structure vary significantly in the Lau back-arc basin, which contains regions of island arc formation, rifting, and seafloor spreading. We analyze seafloor compliance: deformation under long period ocean wave forcing, at 30 ocean bottom seismometers to constrain crustal shear wave velocity structure along and across the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC). Velocity models obtained through Monte Carlo inversion of compliance data show systematic variation of crustal structure in the basin. Sediment thicknesses range from zero thickness at the ridge axis to 1400 m near the volcanic arc. Sediment thickness increases faster to the east than to the west of the ELSC, suggesting a more abundant source of sediment near the active arc volcanoes. Along the ELSC, upper crustal velocities increase from the south to the north where the ridge has migrated farther away from the volcanic arc front. Along the axial ELSC, compliance analysis did not detect a crustal low-velocity body, indicating less melt in the ELSC crustal accretion zone compared to the fast spreading East Pacific Rise. Average upper crust shear velocities for the older ELSC crust produced when the ridge was near the volcanic arc are 0.5-0.8 km/s slower than crust produced at the present-day northern ELSC, consistent with a more porous extrusive layer. Crust in the western Lau Basin, which although thought to have been produced through extension and rifting of old arc crust, is found to have upper crustal velocities similar to older oceanic crust produced at the ELSC.

  16. Lithospheric shear velocity structure of South Island, New Zealand, from amphibious Rayleigh wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Justin S.; Sheehan, Anne F.; Stachnik, Joshua C.; Lin, Fan-Chi; Yeck, William L.; Collins, John A.

    2016-05-01

    We present a crust and mantle 3-D shear velocity model extending well offshore of New Zealand's South Island, imaging the lithosphere beneath the South Island as well as the Campbell and Challenger Plateaus. Our model is constructed via linearized inversion of both teleseismic (18-70 s period) and ambient noise-based (8-25 s period) Rayleigh wave dispersion measurements. We augment an array of 4 land-based and 29 ocean bottom instruments deployed off the South Island's east and west coasts in 2009-2010 by the Marine Observations of Anisotropy Near Aotearoa experiment with 28 land-based seismometers from New Zealand's permanent GeoNet array. Major features of our shear wave velocity (Vs) model include a low-velocity (Vs < 4.4 km/s) body extending from near surface to greater than 75 km depth beneath the Banks and Otago Peninsulas and high-velocity (Vs~4.7 km/s) mantle anomalies underlying the Southern Alps and off the northwest coast of the South Island. Using the 4.5 km/s contour as a proxy for the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, our model suggests that the lithospheric thickness of Challenger Plateau and central South Island is substantially greater than that of the inner Campbell Plateau. The high-velocity anomaly we resolve at subcrustal depths (>50 km) beneath the central South Island exhibits strong spatial correlation with upper mantle earthquake hypocenters beneath the Alpine Fault. The ~400 km long low-velocity zone we image beneath eastern South Island and the inner Bounty Trough underlies Cenozoic volcanics and the locations of mantle-derived helium measurements, consistent with asthenospheric upwelling in the region.

  17. Crust and mantle discontinuities, shear wave velocity structure, and azimuthal anisotropy beneath North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Aibing

    This thesis contains four chapters which investigate seismic discontinuity structure and shear wave velocity structure in the crust and upper mantle beneath the eastern and western edges of the North American craton. In chapters one and two, we imaged the Moho and discontinuities in the upper mantle and transition zone by stacking P to S converted phases on receiver functions recorded at the MOMA array in the eastern United States. The most interesting result is the relatively flat "410" discontinuity, which suggests that the North American lithospheric keel and any associated cold downwelling is largely confined in the upper mantle. A ˜20 km depression on the "660" discontinuity to southwest of the array may pinpoint the location of the subducted Farallon plate in the deep transition zone. Moho depth varies from 30 km to 49 km across the array, and a discontinuity observed at depths of 280 km to 320 km is most plausibly explained as the base of a low velocity zone. In chapters three and four, we applied a surface wave inversion technique to the northeastern United States and to the Colorado Rocky Mountain region. Azimuthally anisotropic phase velocities were obtained and then inverted for shear wave velocity structure. The North American lithospheric keel is imaged with high velocity anomalies in both study areas. Keel morphology is complex at its eastern edge, possibly reflecting erosion by a mantle plume. Strong velocity variations in the crust and shallow upper mantle across the Rocky Mountain region indicate that the mountains are supported by both crustal and mantle buoyancy. The strength of anisotropy increases with period beneath the keel in the east and beneath the central Rockies in the west, suggesting a highly anisotropic asthenosphere and mechanical decoupling between the lithosphere and deeper mantle.

  18. PICASSO: Shear velocities in the Western Mediterranean from Rayleigh Wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palomeras, I.; Thurner, S.; Levander, A.

    2012-12-01

    The Western Mediterranean has been affected by complex subduction and slab rollback, simultaneously with compression due to African-European convergence. The deformed region occupies a wide area from the intra-continental Atlas mountain belt in Morocco to the southern Iberian Massif in Spain. Evolutionary models of the Western Mediterranean invoke extensive slab rollback and compression in the Cenozoic, as well as likely upper mantle delamination scenarios during formation of the Alboran domain, the Betics, Rif, and Atlas Mountains. PICASSO (Program to Investigate Convective Alboran Sea System Overturn) is a multidisciplinary, international investigation of the Alboran System and surrounding areas. In this study we have analyzed data from the 95 PICASSO broadband stations with data from the Spanish IberArray and Siberia Array in Spain and Morocco, the University of Muenster array in the Atlas Mountains and the permanent Spanish and Portuguese networks. We present Rayleigh wave tomography results made from 168 teleseimic events recorded by 237 stations from April 2009 to April 2011. We measured Rayleigh phase velocities using the two-plane-wave method to remove complications due to multi-pathing, and finite-frequency kernels to improve lateral resolution. Phase velocities were then inverted for shear velocity structure on a grid of 0.5 by 0.5 degree to form a well-resolved 3D shear velocity model to 230 km depth. Our results show low S-velocities (2.9 km/s) in the crust beneath the Gibraltar Strait. Low upper mantle S-velocities are mapped beneath the Middle and High Atlas at ~60 km depth suggesting an elevated asthenosphere beneath these young mountain belts, in agreement with receiver functions analysis (Thurner et al, this session). Beneath the Western Alboran Sea, upper-mantle velocities change laterally from high velocities (>4.5 km/s) in the east to lower velocities to the west (~4.3 km/s). The Rayleigh wave tomography is consistent with P-tomography that

  19. Comparing shear-wave velocity profiles inverted from multichannel surface wave with borehole measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Park, C.B.; Hunter, J.A.; Harris, J.B.; Ivanov, J.

    2002-01-01

    Recent field tests illustrate the accuracy and consistency of calculating near-surface shear (S)-wave velocities using multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW). S-wave velocity profiles (S-wave velocity vs. depth) derived from MASW compared favorably to direct borehole measurements at sites in Kansas, British Columbia, and Wyoming. Effects of changing the total number of recording channels, sampling interval, source offset, and receiver spacing on the inverted S-wave velocity were studied at a test site in Lawrence, Kansas. On the average, the difference between MASW calculated Vs and borehole measured Vs in eight wells along the Fraser River in Vancouver, Canada was less than 15%. One of the eight wells was a blind test well with the calculated overall difference between MASW and borehole measurements less than 9%. No systematic differences were observed in derived Vs values from any of the eight test sites. Surface wave analysis performed on surface data from Wyoming provided S-wave velocities in near-surface materials. Velocity profiles from MASW were confirmed by measurements based on suspension log analysis. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Direct ambient noise tomography for 3-D near surface shear velocity structure: methodology and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, H.; Fang, H.; Li, C.; Liu, Y.; Zhang, H.; van der Hilst, R. D.; Huang, Y. C.

    2014-12-01

    Ambient noise tomography has provided essential constraints on crustal and uppermost mantle shear velocity structure in global seismology. Recent studies demonstrate that high frequency (e.g., ~ 1 Hz) surface waves between receivers at short distances can be successfully retrieved from ambient noise cross-correlation and then be used for imaging near surface or shallow crustal shear velocity structures. This approach provides important information for strong ground motion prediction in seismically active area and overburden structure characterization in oil and gas fields. Here we propose a new tomographic method to invert all surface wave dispersion data for 3-D variations of shear wavespeed without the intermediate step of phase or group velocity maps.The method uses frequency-dependent propagation paths and a wavelet-based sparsity-constrained tomographic inversion. A fast marching method is used to compute, at each period, surface wave traveltimes and ray paths between sources and receivers. This avoids the assumption of great-circle propagation that is used in most surface wave tomographic studies, but which is not appropriate in complex media. The wavelet coefficients of the velocity model are estimated with an iteratively reweighted least squares (IRLS) algorithm, and upon iterations the surface wave ray paths and the data sensitivity matrix are updated from the newly obtained velocity model. We apply this new method to determine the 3-D near surface wavespeed variations in the Taipei basin of Taiwan, Hefei urban area and a shale and gas production field in China using the high-frequency interstation Rayleigh wave dispersion data extracted from ambient noisecross-correlation. The results reveal strong effects of off-great-circle propagation of high-frequency surface waves in these regions with above 30% shear wavespeed variations. The proposed approach is more efficient and robust than the traditional two-step surface wave tomography for imaging complex

  1. Shear Velocity Structure Beneath the Las Vegas Valley, Nevada From Regional and Teleseismic Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwan, D. J.; Snelson, C. M.; Tkalcic, H.; Rodgers, A.

    2004-12-01

    The Las Vegas Valley (LVV), Nevada is located in the central Basin and Range province of western North America. The Valley sits atop a broad sedimentary basin and is susceptible to large earthquakes generated by local and regional faults. During ground motion events, the Las Vegas basin has been found to amplify seismic energy. In addition, the crustal and upper mantle structure of the Valley is poorly understood. Therefore, surface wave data have been used to create shear velocity profiles of the crust and upper mantle beneath LVV using regional and teleseismic events. This project is part of a larger collaborative study, which is characterizing the Las Vegas basin for test site readiness and seismic hazards. Although the frequency of large events is small, the risk associated with such an event is very high for the Valley. As a result, the Las Vegas Valley Broadband array (LVVBB) was deployed in late September 2002 by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the University of Nevada Las Vegas. It consists of a mixture of twelve three-component broadband and short period seismometers deployed in a saw-tooth geometry oriented northeast-southwest across the northeastern and central LVV, above the area estimated to be the deepest portion of the basin. Data examined as part of this study include both regional and global earthquake events recorded within a five-month period on seven of the twelve stations. All seven broadband stations used a three-component Guralp CMG40T sensor with a 40 samples/second sampling rate. Group velocity dispersion curves from Rayleigh waves and Love waves were determined using a multiple filter technique. Rayleigh wave group velocities range from 2.7 to 3.5 km/s for periods from 10 to 30s. Love wave group velocities range from 3.1 to 4.0 km/s for periods from 10 to 100s. In addition, Rg and Lg were examined from local events. 1-D shear velocity profiles of the crust and upper mantle have been produced through inversion along regional

  2. Shallow shear-wave velocity profiles and site response characteristics from microtremor array measurements in Metro Manila, the Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grutas, Rhommel; Yamanaka, Hiroaki

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents the outcome of reconnaissance surveys in metropolitan Manila (Metro Manilla), the Philippines, with the aim of mapping shallow shear-wave velocity structures. Metro Manila is a seismically active and densely populated region that is in need of detailed investigation of the subsurface structures, to assess local site effects in seismic hazard estimation. We conducted microtremor array observations and used the spatial autocorrelation method to estimate the shear-wave profiles at 32 sites in major geological settings in Metro Manila. We applied a hybrid genetic simulated annealing algorithm to invert phase velocity data from the spatial autocorrelation method to generate shear-wave velocity models near the global best-fit solution. The comparison between the inferred shear-wave velocity profiles and PS logging showed good agreement in terms of the fundamental mode of Rayleigh waves and site responses. Then, we utilised the inferred shear-wave velocity profiles to compute the site amplifications with reference to the motion in engineering bedrock. Subsequently, the site amplifications have been grouped, based on NEHRP site classes. The amplification factor has also been compared with the average shear-wave velocity of the upper 30m at each site, to produce a power-law regression equation that can be used as a starting basis for further site-effects evaluation in the metropolis.

  3. Effect of mean velocity shear on the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshizawa, Akira; Liou, Meng-Sing

    1992-01-01

    The dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy in incompressible turbulence is investigated using a two-scale DIA. The dissipation rate is shown to consist of two parts; one corresponds to the dissipation rate used in the current turbulence models of eddy-viscosity type, and another comes from the viscous effect that is closely connected with mean velocity shear. This result can elucidate the physical meaning of the dissipation rate used in the current turbulence models and explain part of the discrepancy in the near-wall dissipation rates between the current turbulence models and direct numerical simulation of the Navier-Stokes equation.

  4. Crustal and mantle shear velocity structure of Costa Rica and Nicaragua from ambient noise and teleseismic Rayleigh wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Nicholas; Cruz, Mariela Salas De La; Rychert, Catherine Ann; Abers, Geoffrey; Fischer, Karen

    2013-11-01

    The Costa Rica-Nicaragua subduction zone shows systematic along strike variation in arc chemistry, geology, tectonics and seismic velocity and attenuation, presenting global extremes within a few hundred kilometres. In this study, we use teleseismic and ambient noise derived surface wave tomography to produce a 3-D shear velocity model of the region. We use the 48 stations of the TUCAN array, and up to 94 events for the teleseismic Rayleigh wave inversion, and 18 months of continuous data for cross correlation to estimate Green's functions from ambient noise. In the shallow crust (0-15 km) we observe low-shear velocities directly beneath the arc volcanoes (<3 km s-1) and higher velocities in the backarc of Nicaragua. The anomalies below the volcanoes are likely caused by heated crust, intruded by magma. We estimate crustal thickness by picking the depth to the 4 km s-1 velocity contour. We infer >40-km-thick crust beneath the Costa Rican arc and the Nicaraguan Highlands, thinned crust (˜20 km) beneath the Nicaraguan Depression, and increasing crustal thickness in the backarc region, consistent with receiver function studies. The region of thinned, seismically slow and likely weakened crust beneath the arc in Nicaragua is not localizing deformation associated with oblique subduction. At mantle depths (55-120 km depth) we observe lower shear velocities (up to 3 per cent) beneath the Nicaraguan arc and backarc than beneath Costa Rica. Our low-shear velocity anomaly beneath Nicaragua is in the same location as a low-shear velocity anomaly and displaced towards the backarc from the high VP/VS anomaly observed in body wave tomography. The lower shear velocity beneath Nicaragua may indicate higher melt content in the mantle perhaps due to higher volatile flux from the slab or higher temperature. Finally, we observe a linear high-velocity region at depths >120 km parallel to the trench, which is consistent with the subducting slab.

  5. Earthquake Energy Dissipation in Light of High-Velocity, Slip-Pulse Shear Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reches, Z.; Liao, Z.; Chang, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the energy dissipation during earthquakes by analysis of high-velocity shear experiments conducted on room-dry, solid samples of granite, tonalite, and dolomite sheared at slip-velocity of 0.0006-1m/s, and normal stress of 1-11.5MPa. The experimental fault were loaded in one of three modes: (1) Slip-pulse of abrupt, intense acceleration followed by moderate deceleration; (2) Impact by a spinning, heavy flywheel (225 kg); and (3) Constant velocity loading. We refer to energy dissipation in terms of power-density (PD=shear stress*slip-velocity; units of MW/m^2), and Coulomb-energy-density (CED= mechanical energy/normal stress; units of m). We present two aspects: Relative energy dissipation of the above loading modes, and relative energy dissipation between impact experiments and moderate earthquakes. For the first aspect, we used: (i) the lowest friction coefficient of the dynamic weakening; (ii) the work dissipated before reaching the lowest friction; and (iii) the cumulative mechanical work during the complete run. The results show that the slip-pulse/impact modes are energy efficient relatively to the constant-velocity mode as manifested by faster, more intense weakening and 50-90% lower energy dissipation. Thus, for a finite amount of pre-seismic crustal energy, the efficiency of slip-pulse would amplify earthquake instability. For the second aspect, we compare the experimental CED of the impact experiments to the reported breakdown energy (EG) of moderate earthquakes, Mw = 5.6 to 7.2 (Chang et al., 2012). In is commonly assumed that the seismic EG is a small fraction of the total earthquake energy, and as expected in 9 out of 11 examined earthquakes, EG was 0.005 to 0.07 of the experimental CED. We thus speculate that the experimental relation of Coulomb-energy-density to total slip distance, D, CED = 0.605 × D^0.933, is a reasonable estimate of total earthquake energy, a quantity that cannot be determined from seismic data.

  6. Three-dimensional Shear Wave Velocity Structure of The Upper Mantle Below Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danesi, S.; Morelli, A.

    We measure fundamental-mode Rayleigh and Love surface wave group dispersion curves from seismograms recorded by stations in the Antarctic continent and neigh- boring lands at latitude below -30. Our growing regional dataset is merged with the global dataset of phase velocity measurements by Ekström et al. (1997, JGR 102, 8137-8157). Our inversion procedure is divided in two steps. The first is a linear to- mographic inversion of the dispersion measurements to model laterally heterogeneous group velocity at different periods. Wave slowness is parameterized by spline interpo- lation on a geographical grid, with knots equally spaced by 250 km in an orthographic projection. For each point in these maps we then compute the vertical profile of shear wave velocity vs. depth by iterative nonlinear inversion. Crustal properties are as- sumed to be known and follow the CRUST2.0 model (Bassin et al., 2000, EOS Trans AGU, 81 F897). The resulting vS model shows intense negative anomalies under oceanic ridges, at least down to 150 km. The strongest values are related to young oceanic crust near rapidly opening ridges. Shallow low velocity anomalies characterize volcanic provinces and hot-spots in Marie Byrd Land, Ross Sea, Kerguelen, Balleny and South Sandwich archipelagoes. Only few slow anomalies reach depths below 150km (West Antarctica, Ross Sea and the triple junction among Southeast Pacific-South Pacific- Indian Ridges). The East Antarctica archean craton has deep, fast (cold) continental roots reaching at least 200km in depth.

  7. Shear-wave velocity-based probabilistic and deterministic assessment of seismic soil liquefaction potential

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kayen, R.; Moss, R.E.S.; Thompson, E.M.; Seed, R.B.; Cetin, K.O.; Der Kiureghian, A.; Tanaka, Y.; Tokimatsu, K.

    2013-01-01

    Shear-wave velocity (Vs) offers a means to determine the seismic resistance of soil to liquefaction by a fundamental soil property. This paper presents the results of an 11-year international project to gather new Vs site data and develop probabilistic correlations for seismic soil liquefaction occurrence. Toward that objective, shear-wave velocity test sites were identified, and measurements made for 301 new liquefaction field case histories in China, Japan, Taiwan, Greece, and the United States over a decade. The majority of these new case histories reoccupy those previously investigated by penetration testing. These new data are combined with previously published case histories to build a global catalog of 422 case histories of Vs liquefaction performance. Bayesian regression and structural reliability methods facilitate a probabilistic treatment of the Vs catalog for performance-based engineering applications. Where possible, uncertainties of the variables comprising both the seismic demand and the soil capacity were estimated and included in the analysis, resulting in greatly reduced overall model uncertainty relative to previous studies. The presented data set and probabilistic analysis also help resolve the ancillary issues of adjustment for soil fines content and magnitude scaling factors.

  8. Statistical correlations of shear wave velocity and penetration resistance for soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikmen, Ünal

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, the correlation between shear wave velocity and standard penetration test blow counts (SPT-N) is investigated. The study focused primarily on the correlation of SPT-N and shear wave velocity (Vs) for several soil categories: all soils, sand, silt and clay-type soils. New empirical formulae are suggested to correlate SPT-N and Vs, based on a dataset collected in a part of Eskişehir settlement in the western central Anatolia region of Turkey. The formulae are based on geotechnical soundings and active and passive seismic experiments. The new and previously suggested formulae showing correlations between uncorrected SPT-N and Vs have been compared and evaluated by using the same dataset. The results suggest that better correlations in estimation of Vs are acquired when the uncorrected blow counts are used. The blow count is a major parameter and the soil type has no significant influence on the results. In cohesive soils, the plasticity contents and, in non-cohesive soils except for gravels, the graded contents have no significant effect on the estimation of Vs. The results support most of the conclusions of earlier studies. These practical relationships developed between SPT-N and Vs should be used with caution in geotechnical engineering and should be checked against measured Vs.

  9. Shear velocity estimates on the inner shelf off Grays Harbor, Washington, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherwood, C.R.; Lacy, J.R.; Voulgaris, G.

    2006-01-01

    Shear velocity was estimated from current measurements near the bottom off Grays Harbor, Washington between May 4 and June 6, 2001 under mostly wave-dominated conditions. A downward-looking pulse-coherent acoustic Doppler profiler (PCADP) and two acoustic-Doppler velocimeters (field version; ADVFs) were deployed on a tripod at 9-m water depth. Measurements from these instruments were used to estimate shear velocity with (1) a modified eddy-correlation (EC) technique, (2) the log-profile (LP) method, and (3) a dissipation-rate method. Although values produced by the three methods agreed reasonably well (within their broad ranges of uncertainty), there were important systematic differences. Estimates from the EC method were generally lowest, followed by those from the inertial-dissipation method. The LP method produced the highest values and the greatest scatter. We show that these results are consistent with boundary-layer theory when sediment-induced stratification is present. The EC method provides the most fundamental estimate of kinematic stress near the bottom, and stratification causes the LP method to overestimate bottom stress. These results remind us that the methods are not equivalent and that comparison among sites and with models should be made carefully. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Shear wave velocity estimation in the metropolitan area of Málaga (S Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clavero, D.; Rosa-Cintas, S.; López-Casado, C.; Delgado, J.; Galiana-Merino, J. J.

    2014-10-01

    We carry out a seismic noise study based on array measurements at three sites in the Málaga basin, South Spain, for the further estimation of shear wave velocity profiles. For this purpose, we use both the H/V method and the f-k technique in order to characterize the different materials present in the zone, i.e., Quaternary sediments and Pliocene sedimentary rocks above the bedrock. The H/V analysis shows frequency peaks going from 1 Hz, in areas close to the border of the basin, to 0.3 Hz in places located toward the center of the formation. The f-k analysis allows obtaining the dispersion curves associated with each site and subsequently, estimating the Vs profiles by inversion of the respective group velocities. In this way, the basin basement can be characterized by S-wave velocities greater than 2000 m/s. Regarding the basin fill, it is divided into three layers defined by different wave velocity intervals. The shallowest one is featured by velocities ranging from 150 to 400 m/s and comprises the Quaternary sediments, while velocities going from 550-700 to1200-1600 m/s characterize the two underlying layers composed by Pliocene sediments. Finally, the information provided by the three Vs profiles is integrated in a 2D cross-section of the basin to have a spatial view of its sedimentary structure. The results obtained here, in addition to providing useful information about the infill of the basin near the metropolitan area of Málaga, will be very helpful for future seismic zonation studies in the region.

  11. Effects of neutral interactions on velocity-shear-driven plasma waves

    SciTech Connect

    Enloe, C. L.; Tejero, E. M.; Amatucci, W. E.; Crabtree, C.; Ganguli, G.; Sotnikov, V.

    2014-06-15

    In a laboratory experiment, we demonstrate the substantial effects that collisions between charged and neutral particles have on low-frequency (Ω{sub i} ≪ ω ≪ Ω{sub e}) shear-driven electrostatic lower hybrid waves in a plasma. We establish a strong (up to 2.5 kV/m) highly localized electric field with a length scale shorter than the ion gyroradius, so that the ions in the plasma, unlike the electrons, do not develop the full E × B drift velocity. The resulting shear in the particle velocities initiates the electron-ion hybrid (EIH) instability, and we observe the formation of strong waves in the vicinity of the shear with variations in plasma densities of 10% or greater. Our experimental configuration allows us to vary the neutral background density by more than a factor of two while holding the charged particle density effectively constant. Not surprisingly, increasing the neutral density decreases the growth rate/saturation amplitude of the waves and increases the threshold electric field necessary for wave formation, but the presence of neutrals affects the dominant wave frequency as well. We show that a 50% increase in the neutral density decreases the wave frequency by 20% while also suppressing the electric field dependence of the frequency that is observed when fewer neutrals are present. The majority of these effects, as well as the values of the frequencies we observe, closely match the predictions of previously developed linear EIH instability theory, for which we present the results of a numerical solution.

  12. Isotropic and anisotropic shear velocity model of the NA upper mantle using EarthScope data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiva, J.; Clouzet, P.; French, S. W.; Yuan, H.; Romanowicz, B. A.

    2013-12-01

    The EarthScope TA deployment has provided dense array coverage across the continental US and with it, the opportunity for high resolution 3D seismic velocity imaging of both lithosphere and asthenosphere in the continent. Building upon our previous work, we present a new 3D isotropic, radially and azimuthally anisotropic shear wave model of the North American (NA) lithospheric mantle, using full waveform tomography and shorter-period (40 s) waveform data. Our isotropic velocity model exhibits pronounced spatial correlation between major tectonic localities of the eastern NA continent, as evidenced in the geology, and seismic anomalies, suggesting recurring episodes of tectonic events not only are well exposed at the surface, but also leave persistent scars in the continental lithosphere mantle, marked by isotropic and radially anisotropic velocity anomalies that reach as deep as 100-150 km. In eastern North America, our Vs images distinguish the fast velocity cratonic NA from the deep rooted large volume high velocity blocks which are east of the continent rift margin and extend 200-300 km offshore into Atlantic. In between is a prominent narrow band of low velocities that roughly follows the south and eastern Laurentia rift margin and extends into New England. The lithosphere associated with this low velocity band is thinned likely due to combined effects of repeated rifting processes along the rift margin and northward extension of the Bermuda low-velocity channel across the New England region. Deep rooted high velocity blocks east of the Laurentia margin are proposed to represent the Proterozoic Gondwanian terranes of pan-African affinity, which were captured during the Rodinia formation but left behind during the opening of the Atlantic Ocean. The anisotropy model takes advantage of the up-to-date SKS compilation in the continent and new splitting results from Greenland. The new joint waveform and SKS splitting data inversion is carried out with a 2

  13. Analysis shear wave velocity structure obtained from surface wave methods in Bornova, Izmir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pamuk, Eren; Özdaǧ, Özkan Cevdet; Akgün, Mustafa

    2016-04-01

    Properties of the soil from the bedrock is necessary to describe accurately and reliably for the reduction of earthquake damage. Because seismic waves change their amplitude and frequency content owing to acoustic impedance difference between soil and bedrock. Firstly, shear wave velocity and depth information of layers on bedrock is needed to detect this changing. Shear wave velocity can be obtained using inversion of Rayleigh wave dispersion curves obtained from surface wave methods (MASW- the Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves, ReMi-Refraction Microtremor, SPAC-Spatial Autocorrelation). While research depth is limeted in active source study, a passive source methods are utilized for deep depth which is not reached using active source methods. ReMi method is used to determine layer thickness and velocity up to 100 m using seismic refraction measurement systems.The research carried out up to desired depth depending on radius using SPAC which is utilized easily in conditions that district using of seismic studies in the city. Vs profiles which are required to calculate deformations in under static and dynamic loads can be obtained with high resolution using combining rayleigh wave dispersion curve obtained from active and passive source methods. In the this study, Surface waves data were collected using the measurements of MASW, ReMi and SPAC at the İzmir Bornova region. Dispersion curves obtained from surface wave methods were combined in wide frequency band and Vs-depth profiles were obtained using inversion. Reliability of the resulting soil profiles were provided by comparison with theoretical transfer function obtained from soil paremeters and observed soil transfer function from Nakamura technique and by examination of fitting between these functions. Vs values are changed between 200-830 m/s and engineering bedrock (Vs>760 m/s) depth is approximately 150 m.

  14. Focussing effects at the edge of the Large Low Shear Velocity Provinces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rost, S.; Nowacki, A.

    2015-12-01

    Tomographic images of the Earth's lowermost mantle are dominated by two equatorial and nearly antipodal regions of large-scale reductions in seismic S-wave velocities beneath the central Pacific and Africa. These Large Low Shear Velocity Provinces (LLSVPs) are much less constrained in tomographic P-wave models. This discrepancy, together with other geophysical data, led to the interpretation of LLSVPs as thermo-chemical piles, but models of purely thermal LLSVPs might also be able to explain the geophysical data. Data from seismic arrays and high-resolution processing techniques are able to precisely determine the slowness vector of incoming seismic energy and therefore to extract velocity and directivity information from the seismic data directly. Here we use records of P and Pdiff from the medium aperture, short-period, vertical component Yellowknife array (YKA) located in northern Canada and S/Sdiff from stations of the Canadian POLARIS network. Using seismicity from the western Pacific rim allows good sampling of the lowermost mantle in the region of the Pacific LLSVP and the northern Pacific. The slowness information extracted from the array data using the high-resolution F-statistic allows detailed mapping of the LLSVP boundary and indicates a sharp boundary and velocity reductions of several percent. The data also indicate a second region of strongly reduced seismic velocities to the north of the Pacific LLSVP beneath the Sea of Okhotsk that does not seem to be connected to the main LLSVP, and which is not consistently resolved in S-wave tomography models. We observe very strong focussing and defocussing effects along the LLSVP boundary that indicate strong and small-scale heterogeneities in the vicinity of the LLSVP boundary beyond what can be explained by LLSVP material. This detection allows further insight into the structure and dynamics of the LLSVP. Using seismic wave propagation simulations we are aiming to resolve both structure and shape of these

  15. Comparison of ultrasound B-mode, strain imaging, acoustic radiation force impulse displacement and shear wave velocity imaging using real time clinical breast images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manickam, Kavitha; Machireddy, Ramasubba Reddy; Raghavan, Bagyam

    2016-04-01

    It has been observed that many pathological process increase the elastic modulus of soft tissue compared to normal. In order to image tissue stiffness using ultrasound, a mechanical compression is applied to tissues of interest and local tissue deformation is measured. Based on the mechanical excitation, ultrasound stiffness imaging methods are classified as compression or strain imaging which is based on external compression and Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging which is based on force generated by focused ultrasound. When ultrasound is focused on tissue, shear wave is generated in lateral direction and shear wave velocity is proportional to stiffness of tissues. The work presented in this paper investigates strain elastography and ARFI imaging in clinical cancer diagnostics using real time patient data. Ultrasound B-mode imaging, strain imaging, ARFI displacement and ARFI shear wave velocity imaging were conducted on 50 patients (31 Benign and 23 malignant categories) using Siemens S2000 machine. True modulus contrast values were calculated from the measured shear wave velocities. For ultrasound B-mode, ARFI displacement imaging and strain imaging, observed image contrast and Contrast to Noise Ratio were calculated for benign and malignant cancers. Observed contrast values were compared based on the true modulus contrast values calculated from shear wave velocity imaging. In addition to that, student unpaired t-test was conducted for all the four techniques and box plots are presented. Results show that, strain imaging is better for malignant cancers whereas ARFI imaging is superior than strain imaging and B-mode for benign lesions representations.

  16. DETECTION OF THE VELOCITY SHEAR EFFECT ON THE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTIONS OF THE GALACTIC SATELLITES IN ISOLATED SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jounghun; Choi, Yun-Young E-mail: yy.choi@khu.ac.kr

    2015-02-01

    We report a detection of the effect of the large-scale velocity shear on the spatial distributions of the galactic satellites around the isolated hosts. Identifying the isolated galactic systems, each of which consists of a single host galaxy and its satellites, from the Seventh Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and reconstructing linearly the velocity shear field in the local universe, we measure the alignments between the relative positions of the satellites from their isolated hosts and the principal axes of the local velocity shear tensors projected onto the plane of sky. We find a clear signal that the galactic satellites in isolated systems are located preferentially along the directions of the minor principal axes of the large-scale velocity shear field. Those galactic satellites that are spirals, are brighter, are located at distances larger than the projected virial radii of the hosts, and belong to the spiral hosts yield stronger alignment signals, which implies that the alignment strength depends on the formation and accretion epochs of the galactic satellites. It is also shown that the alignment strength is quite insensitive to the cosmic web environment, as well as the size and luminosity of the isolated hosts. Although this result is consistent with the numerical finding of Libeskind et al. based on an N-body experiment, owing to the very low significance of the observed signals, it remains inconclusive whether or not the velocity shear effect on the satellite distribution is truly universal.

  17. Compressional and shear-wave velocity versus depth relations for common rock types in northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brocher, T.M.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents new empirical compressional and shear-wave velocity (Vp and Vs) versus depth relationships for the most common rock types in northern California. Vp versus depth relations were developed from borehole, laboratory, seismic refraction and tomography, and density measurements, and were converted to Vs versus depth relations using new empirical relations between Vp and Vs. The relations proposed here account for increasing overburden pressure but not for variations in other factors that can influence velocity over short distance scales, such as lithology, consolidation, induration, porosity, and stratigraphic age. Standard deviations of the misfits predicted by these relations thus provide a measure of the importance of the variability in Vp and Vs caused by these other factors. Because gabbros, greenstones, basalts, and other mafic rocks have a different Vp and Vs relationship than sedimentary and granitic rocks, the differences in Vs between these rock types at depths below 6 or 7 km are generally small. The new relations were used to derive the 2005 U.S. Geological Survey seismic velocity model for northern California employed in the broadband strong motion simulations of the 1989 Loma Prieta and 1906 San Francisco earthquakes; initial tests of the model indicate that the Vp model generally compares favorably to regional seismic tomography models but that the Vp and Vs values proposed for the Franciscan Complex may be about 5% too high.

  18. First seismic shear wave velocity profile of the lunar crust as extracted from the Apollo 17 active seismic data by wavefield gradient analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sollberger, David; Schmelzbach, Cedric; Robertsson, Johan O. A.; Greenhalgh, Stewart A.; Nakamura, Yosio; Khan, Amir

    2016-04-01

    We present a new seismic velocity model of the shallow lunar crust, including, for the first time, shear wave velocity information. So far, the shear wave velocity structure of the lunar near-surface was effectively unconstrained due to the complexity of lunar seismograms. Intense scattering and low attenuation in the lunar crust lead to characteristic long-duration reverberations on the seismograms. The reverberations obscure later arriving shear waves and mode conversions, rendering them impossible to identify and analyze. Additionally, only vertical component data were recorded during the Apollo active seismic experiments, which further compromises the identification of shear waves. We applied a novel processing and analysis technique to the data of the Apollo 17 lunar seismic profiling experiment (LSPE), which involved recording seismic energy generated by several explosive packages on a small areal array of four vertical component geophones. Our approach is based on the analysis of the spatial gradients of the seismic wavefield and yields key parameters such as apparent phase velocity and rotational ground motion as a function of time (depth), which cannot be obtained through conventional seismic data analysis. These new observables significantly enhance the data for interpretation of the recorded seismic wavefield and allow, for example, for the identification of S wave arrivals based on their lower apparent phase velocities and distinct higher amount of generated rotational motion relative to compressional (P-) waves. Using our methodology, we successfully identified pure-mode and mode-converted refracted shear wave arrivals in the complex LSPE data and derived a P- and S-wave velocity model of the shallow lunar crust at the Apollo 17 landing site. The extracted elastic-parameter model supports the current understanding of the lunar near-surface structure, suggesting a thin layer of low-velocity lunar regolith overlying a heavily fractured crust of basaltic

  19. Sheared velocity flows as a source of pressure anisotropy in low collisionality plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Sarto, D.; Pegoraro, F.; Califano, F.

    2014-12-01

    Non-Maxwellian metaequilibrium states may exist in low-collisionality plasmas as evidenced by direct (particle distributions) and indirect (e.g., instabilities driven by pressure anisotropy) satellite and laboratory measurements. These are directly observed in the solar wind (e.g. [1]), in magnetospheric reconnection events [2], in magnetically confined plasmas [3] or in simulations of Vlasov turbulence [4]. By including the full pressure tensor dynamics in a fluid plasma model, we show that a sheared velocity field can provide an effective mechanism that makes an initial isotropic state anisotropic. We discuss how the propagation of magneto-elastic waves can affect the pressure tensor anisotropization and the small scale formation that arise from the interplay between the gyrotropic terms due to the magnetic field and the flow vorticity and the non-gyropropic effect of the flow strain tensor. We support this analysis by a numerical integration of the nonlinear equations describing the pressure tensor evolution. This anisotropization mechanism might provide a good candidate for the understanding of the observed correlation between the presence of a sheared velocity flow and the signature of pressure anisotropies which are not yet explained within the standard models based e.g. on the CGL paradigm. Examples of these signatures are provided e.g. by the threshold lowering of ion-Weibel instabilities in the geomagnetic tail, observed in concomitance to the presence of a velocity shear in the near-earth plasma profile [5], or by the relatively stronger anisotropization measured for core protons in the fast solar wind [4,6] or in "space simulation" laboratory plasma experiments [3]. [1] E. Marsch et al., Journ. Geophys. Res. 109, A04120 (2004); Yu. V. Khotyainstev at el., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 165001 (2011). [2] N. Aunai et al., Ann. Geophys. 29, 1571 (2011); N. Aunai et al., Journ. Geophys. Res. 116, A09232 (2011). [3] E.E. Scime et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 2157 (2000). [4

  20. Sheared velocity flows as a source of pressure anisotropy in low collisionality plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Sarto, Daniele; Pegoraro, Francesco; Cerri, Silvio Sergio; Califano, Francesco; Tenerani, Anna

    2015-04-01

    Non-Maxwellian metaequilibrium states may exist in low-collisionality plasmas as evidenced by direct (particle distributions) and indirect (e.g., instabilities driven by pressure anisotropy) satellite and laboratory measurements. These are directly observed in the solar wind (e.g. [1]), in magnetospheric reconnection events [2], in magnetically confined plasmas [3] or in simulations of Vlasov turbulence [4]. By including the full pressure tensor dynamics in a fluid plasma model, we show that a sheared velocity field can provide an effective mechanism that makes an initial isotropic state anisotropic. We discuss how the propagation of "magneto-elastic" waves can affect the pressure tensor anisotropization and the small scale formation that arise from the interplay between the gyrotropic terms due to the magnetic field and flow vorticity, and the non-gyropropic effect of the flow strain tensor. We support this analysis by a numerical integration of the nonlinear equations describing the pressure tensor evolution. This anisotropization mechanism might provide a good candidate for the understanding of the observed correlation between the presence of a sheared velocity flow and the signature of pressure anisotropies which are not yet explained within the standard models based e.g. on the CGL paradigm (see also [5]). Examples of these signatures are provided by the threshold lowering of ion-Weibel instabilities in the geomagnetic tail, observed in concomitance to the presence of a velocity shear in the near-earth plasma profile [6], or by the relatively stronger anisotropization measured for core protons in the fast solar wind [4,7] or in "space simulation" laboratory plasma experiments [3]. 1] E. Marsch et al., Journ. Geophys. Res. 109, A04120 (2004); Yu. V. Khotyainstev at el., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 165001 (2011). [2] N. Aunai et al., Ann. Geophys. 29, 1571 (2011); N. Aunai et al., Journ. Geophys. Res. 116, A09232 (2011). [3] E.E. Scime et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 2157

  1. Generalized shear-ratio tests: A new relation between cosmological distances, and a diagnostic for a redshift-dependent multiplicative bias in shear measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Peter

    2016-08-01

    We derive a new relation between cosmological distances that is valid in any (statistically) isotropic space-time and independent of cosmological parameters or even the validity of the field equation of General Relativity. In particular, this relation yields an equation between those distance ratios that are the geometrical factors determining the strength of the gravitational lensing effect of mass concentrations. Considering a combination of weak-lensing shear ratios, based on lenses at two different redshifts and sources at three different redshifts, we derive a relation between shear-ratio tests that must be identically satisfied. A redshift-dependent multiplicative bias in shear estimates will violate this relation, and thus can be probed by this generalized shear-ratio test. Combining the lensing effect for lenses at three different redshifts and three different source redshifts, a relation between shear ratios is derived that must be valid independent of a multiplicative bias. We propose these generalized shear-ratio tests as a diagnostic for the presence of systematics in upcoming weak-lensing surveys.

  2. Experimental Measurement of Settling Velocity of Spherical Particles in Unconfined and Confined Surfactant-based Shear Thinning Viscoelastic Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Sahil; Sharma, Mukul M.

    2014-01-01

    An experimental study is performed to measure the terminal settling velocities of spherical particles in surfactant based shear thinning viscoelastic (VES) fluids. The measurements are made for particles settling in unbounded fluids and fluids between parallel walls. VES fluids over a wide range of rheological properties are prepared and rheologically characterized. The rheological characterization involves steady shear-viscosity and dynamic oscillatory-shear measurements to quantify the viscous and elastic properties respectively. The settling velocities under unbounded conditions are measured in beakers having diameters at least 25x the diameter of particles. For measuring settling velocities between parallel walls, two experimental cells with different wall spacing are constructed. Spherical particles of varying sizes are gently dropped in the fluids and allowed to settle. The process is recorded with a high resolution video camera and the trajectory of the particle is recorded using image analysis software. Terminal settling velocities are calculated from the data. The impact of elasticity on settling velocity in unbounded fluids is quantified by comparing the experimental settling velocity to the settling velocity calculated by the inelastic drag predictions of Renaud et al.1 Results show that elasticity of fluids can increase or decrease the settling velocity. The magnitude of reduction/increase is a function of the rheological properties of the fluids and properties of particles. Confining walls are observed to cause a retardation effect on settling and the retardation is measured in terms of wall factors. PMID:24430257

  3. Experimental measurement of settling velocity of spherical particles in unconfined and confined surfactant-based shear thinning viscoelastic fluids.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Sahil; Sharma, Mukul M

    2014-01-03

    An experimental study is performed to measure the terminal settling velocities of spherical particles in surfactant based shear thinning viscoelastic (VES) fluids. The measurements are made for particles settling in unbounded fluids and fluids between parallel walls. VES fluids over a wide range of rheological properties are prepared and rheologically characterized. The rheological characterization involves steady shear-viscosity and dynamic oscillatory-shear measurements to quantify the viscous and elastic properties respectively. The settling velocities under unbounded conditions are measured in beakers having diameters at least 25x the diameter of particles. For measuring settling velocities between parallel walls, two experimental cells with different wall spacing are constructed. Spherical particles of varying sizes are gently dropped in the fluids and allowed to settle. The process is recorded with a high resolution video camera and the trajectory of the particle is recorded using image analysis software. Terminal settling velocities are calculated from the data. The impact of elasticity on settling velocity in unbounded fluids is quantified by comparing the experimental settling velocity to the settling velocity calculated by the inelastic drag predictions of Renaud et al.(1) Results show that elasticity of fluids can increase or decrease the settling velocity. The magnitude of reduction/increase is a function of the rheological properties of the fluids and properties of particles. Confining walls are observed to cause a retardation effect on settling and the retardation is measured in terms of wall factors.

  4. Three-dimensional evolution of magnetic and velocity shear driven instabilities in a compressible magnetized jet

    SciTech Connect

    Bettarini, Lapo; Landi, Simone; Velli, Marco; Londrillo, Pasquale

    2009-06-15

    The problem of three-dimensional combined magnetic and velocity shear driven instabilities of a compressible magnetized jet modeled as a plane neutral/current double vortex sheet in the framework of the resistive magnetohydrodynamics is addressed. The resulting dynamics given by the stream+current sheet interaction is analyzed and the effects of a variable geometry of the basic fields are considered. Depending on the basic asymptotic magnetic field configuration, a selection rule of the linear instability modes can be obtained. Hence, the system follows a two-stage path developing either through a fully three-dimensional dynamics with a rapid evolution of kink modes leading to a final turbulent state, or rather through a driving two-dimensional instability pattern that develops on parallel planes on which a reconnection+coalescence process takes place.

  5. Lithostratigraphy and shear-wave velocity in the crystallized Topopah Spring Tuff, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buesch, D.C.; Stokoe, K.H.; Won, K.C.; Seong, Y.J.; Jung, J.L.; Schuhen, M.D.

    2006-01-01

    Evaluation of the potential future response to seismic events of the proposed spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is in part based on the seismic properties of the host rock, the 12.8-million-year-old Topopah Spring Tuff. Because of the processes that formed the tuff, the densely welded and crystallized part has three lithophysal and three nonlithophysal zones, and each zone has characteristic variations in lithostratigraphic features and structures of the rocks. Lithostratigraphic features include lithophysal cavities; rims on lithophysae and some fractures; spots (which are similar to rims but without an associated cavity or aperture); amounts of porosity resulting from welding, crystallization, and vapor-phase corrosion and mineralization; and fractures. Seismic properties, including shear-wave velocity (Vs), have been measured on 38 pieces of core, and there is a good "first order" correlation with the lithostratigraphic zones; for example, samples from nonlithophysal zones have larger Vs values compared to samples from lithophysal zones. Some samples have Vs values that are outside the typical range for the lithostratigraphic zone; however, these samples typically have one or more fractures, "large" lithophysal cavities, or "missing pieces" relative to the sample size. Shear-wave velocity data measured in the tunnels have similar relations to lithophysal and nonlithophysal rocks; however, tunnel-based values are typically smaller than those measured in core resulting from increased lithophysae and fracturing effects. Variations in seismic properties such as Vs data from small-scale samples (typical and "flawed" core) to larger scale transects in the tunnels provide a basis for merging our understanding of the distributions of lithostratigraphic features (and zones) with a method to scale seismic properties.

  6. LITHOSTRATIGRAPHY AND SHEAR-WAVE VELOCITY IN THE CRYSTALLIZED TOPOPAH SPRING TUFF, YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect

    D. BUESCH; K.H. STOKOE; M. SCHUHEN

    2006-03-20

    Evaluation of the seismic response of the proposed spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is in part based on the seismic properties of the host rock, the 12.8-million-year-old Topopah Spring Tuff. Because of the processes that formed the tuff, the densely welded and crystallized part has three lithophysal and three nonlithophysal zones, and each zone has characteristic variations in lithostratigraphic features and structures of the rocks. Lithostratigraphic features include lithophysal cavities, rims on lithophysae and some fractures, spots (which are similar to rims but without an associated cavity or aperture), amounts of porosity resulting from welding, crystallization, and vapor-phase corrosion and mineralization, and fractures. Seismic properties, including shear-wave velocity (V{sub s}), have been measured on 38 pieces of core, and there is a good ''first order'' correlation with the lithostratigraphic zones; for example, samples from nonlithophysal zones have larger V{sub s} values compared to samples from lithophysal zones. Some samples have V{sub s} values that are beyond the typical range for the lithostratigraphic zone; however, these samples typically have one or more fractures, ''large'' lithophysal cavities, or ''missing pieces'' relative to the sample size. Shear-wave velocity data measured in the tunnels have similar relations to lithophysal and nonlithophysal rocks; however, tunnel-based values are typically smaller than those measured in core resulting from increased lithophysae and fracturing effects. Variations in seismic properties such as V{sub s} data from small-scale samples (typical and ''flawed'' core) to larger scale traverses in the tunnels provide a basis for merging our understanding of the distributions of lithostratigraphic features (and zones) with a method to scale seismic properties.

  7. Micromechanical processes of frictional aging and the affect of shear stress on fault healing: insights from material characterization and ultrasonic velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, K. L.; Marone, C.

    2015-12-01

    During the seismic cycle, faults repeatedly fail and regain strength. The gradual strength recovery is often referred to as frictional healing, and existing works suggest that healing can play an important role in determining the mode of fault slip ranging from dynamic rupture to slow earthquakes. Laboratory studies can play an important role in identifying the processes of frictional healing and their evolution with shear strain during the seismic cycle. These studies also provide data for laboratory-derived friction constitutive laws, which can improve dynamic earthquake models. Previous work shows that frictional healing varies with shear stress on a fault during the interseismic period. Unfortunately, the micromechanical processes that cause shear stress dependent frictional healing are not well understood and cannot be incorporated into current earthquake models. In fault gouge, frictional healing involves compaction and particle rearrangement within sheared granular layers. Therefore, to address these issues, we investigate the role grain size reduction plays in frictional re-strengthening processes at different levels of shear stress. Sample material was preserved from biaxial deformation experiments on granular Westerly granite. The normal stress was held constant at 25 MPa and we performed several 100 second slide-hold-slide tests in each experiment. We conducted a series of 5 experiments each with a different value of normalized shear stress (ranging from 0 to 1), defined as the ratio of the pre-hold shear stress to the shear stress during the hold. The particle size distribution for each sample was analyzed. In addition, acoustic measurements were recorded throughout our experiments to investigate variations in ultrasonic velocity and signal amplitude that reflect changes in the elastic moduli of the layer. Acoustic monitoring provides information about healing mechanisms and can provide a link between laboratory studies and tectonic fault zones.

  8. NS shear kinematics across the Lut block from a dense GPS velocity field in eastern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walpersdorf, A.; Tavakoli, F.; Hatzfeld, D.; Jadidi, A. M.; Vergnolle, M. M.; Aghamohammadi, A.; Djamour, Y.; Nankali, H. R.; Sedighi, M.

    2009-12-01

    Since 2004, extensive GPS campaigns and the upcoming Iranian permanent GPS network are monitoring the present-day deformation in eastern Iran. We present a new GPS velocity field extending from Central Iran to the Hellmand block on the Eurasian plate. It permits to monitor the right lateral NS shear across the aseismic Lut block between Central Iran and the Hellmand block. While existing tectonic models propose an increase of slip rate from west to east, we find balanced slip rates on both Lut block boundaries. The total shear between Central Iran and the Lut block (the western limit) is evaluated to 7.0 ± 0.5 mm/yr that are accommodated by the Gowk-Nayband fault system and the Anar fault. It even slightly exceeds the 5.5 ± 0.5 mm/yr of shear between the Lut block and stable Eurasia (the eastern limit), localized on different faults of the Sistan Suture zone. Tectonic models propose that at the northern Lut block limit the regional NS shear leads to left lateral activity of large EW trending strike-slip faults (Doruneh and Dasht-e-Bayaz faults). On none of them a significant left lateral displacement is observed, in spite of the recent seismic activity of the Dasht-e-Bayaz and Abiz faults. The instantaneous active deformation is localized rather on oblique NW-SE oriented thrust faults (Janggal and Ferdows thrusts). Individual instantaneous fault slip rates are compared to short term and long term geological estimates. We find that GPS slip rates are in most cases coherent with short term geologic determinations (from dating of geomorphologic offsets over some 10-100 ka). Some differences with respect to long term estimates (from total geologic fault offsets and onset ages of several Ma) indicate non-constant slip rates over different time scales or that the onset of the present-day deformation presumed to 3-7 Ma in eastern Iran has to be revised.

  9. OCT-based quantification of flow velocity, shear force, and power generated by a biological ciliated surface (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Brendan K.; Khokha, Mustafa K.; Loewenberg, Michael; Choma, Michael A.

    2016-03-01

    In cilia-driven fluid flow physiology, quantification of flow velocity, shearing force, and power dissipation is important in defining abnormal ciliary function. The capacity to generate flow can be robustly described in terms of shearing force. Dissipated power can be related to net ATP consumption by ciliary molecular motors. To date, however, only flow velocity can be routinely quantified in a non-invasive, non-contact manner. Additionally, traditional power-based metrics rely on metabolic consumption that reflects energy consumption not just from cilia but also from all active cellular processes. Here, we demonstrate the estimation of all three of these quantities (flow velocity, shear force, and power dissipation) using only optical coherence tomography (OCT). Specifically, we develop a framework that can extract force and power information from vectorial flow velocity fields obtained using OCT-based methods. We do so by (a) estimating the viscous stress tensor from flow velocity fields to estimate shearing force and (b) using the viscous stress tensor to estimate the power dissipation function to infer total mechanical power. These estimates have the advantage of (a) requiring only a single modality, (b) being non-invasive in nature, and (c) being reflective of only the net power work generated by a ciliated surface. We demonstrate our all-optical approach to the estimation of these parameters in the Xenopus animal model system under normal and increased viscous loading. Our preliminary data support the hypothesis that the Xenopus ciliated surface can increase force output under loading conditions.

  10. Physical modelling of the effect of fractures on compressional and shear wave velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurevich, Boris; Lebedev, Maxim; Glubokovskikh, Stanislav; Dyskin, Arcady; Pasternak, Elena; Vialle, Stephanie

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasonic measurements were performed on a sample of polyester resin permeated by multiple fractures. The samples were prepared by mixing high doses of catalyst, about 7-10 % with the liquid resin base. The mix was then heated in an oven at 60° C for a period of 1 hour. This operation produced many shrinkage cracks varying in size from 8 mm to 20 mm (Sahouryeh et al., 2002). The produced samples were parallelepiped 50 mm x 50 mm in cross-section with height of 100 mm. Micro-CT scanning of the sample reveals many open fractures with apertures 0.2 - 0.4 mm. Elastic properties of the fractured samples were derived from ultrasonic measurements using piezo-electric transducers. These measurements give compressional (Vp) and shear (Vs) wave velocities of 2450 and 1190 m/s, respectively, giving Vp/Vs = 2.04. At the same time the velocities in the intact resin are Vp=2460 and Vs=1504 m/s, respectively, with Vp/Vs = 1.63. Thus we see that the fractures have a negligible effect on the Vp (within the measurement error) but a dramatic effect on Vs (about 20%). This contradicts the common understanding that the effects of dry fractures on Vp and Vs are similar in magnitude. Indeed, assuming very roughly that the distribution of fractures is isotropic, we can estimate the cumulative normal fracture compliance from the difference between shear moduli of the intact and fractured resin to be 0.30 GPa-1 and fracture density of 0.41. This value can be used to estimate the effective bulk modulus of the fractured material. The corresponding p-wave velocity, Vp = 1860 m/s, is significantly lower that the observed value. The results suggest that an equivalent medium approximation is not applicable in this case, probably due to the fact that the long-wave approximation is inadequate. Indeed the fractures are larger than the wavelength that corresponds to the peak frequencies of the power spectrum of the signal. This suggests a strong influence of diffraction. Furthermore, the

  11. Physical modelling of the effect of fractures on compressional and shear wave velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurevich, Boris; Lebedev, Maxim; Glubokovskikh, Stanislav; Dyskin, Arcady; Pasternak, Elena; Vialle, Stephanie

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasonic measurements were performed on a sample of polyester resin permeated by multiple fractures. The samples were prepared by mixing high doses of catalyst, about 7-10 % with the liquid resin base. The mix was then heated in an oven at 60° C for a period of 1 hour. This operation produced many shrinkage cracks varying in size from 8 mm to 20 mm (Sahouryeh et al., 2002). The produced samples were parallelepiped 50 mm x 50 mm in cross-section with height of 100 mm. Micro-CT scanning of the sample reveals many open fractures with apertures 0.2 - 0.4 mm. Elastic properties of the fractured samples were derived from ultrasonic measurements using piezo-electric transducers. These measurements give compressional (Vp) and shear (Vs) wave velocities of 2450 and 1190 m/s, respectively, giving Vp/Vs = 2.04. At the same time the velocities in the intact resin are Vp=2460 and Vs=1504 m/s, respectively, with Vp/Vs = 1.63. Thus we see that the fractures have a negligible effect on the Vp (within the measurement error) but a dramatic effect on Vs (about 20%). This contradicts the common understanding that the effects of dry fractures on Vp and Vs are similar in magnitude. Indeed, assuming very roughly that the distribution of fractures is isotropic, we can estimate the cumulative normal fracture compliance from the difference between shear moduli of the intact and fractured resin to be 0.30 GPa‑1 and fracture density of 0.41. This value can be used to estimate the effective bulk modulus of the fractured material. The corresponding p-wave velocity, Vp = 1860 m/s, is significantly lower that the observed value. The results suggest that an equivalent medium approximation is not applicable in this case, probably due to the fact that the long-wave approximation is inadequate. Indeed the fractures are larger than the wavelength that corresponds to the peak frequencies of the power spectrum of the signal. This suggests a strong influence of diffraction. Furthermore, the

  12. Fault rupture as a series of nano-seismic events during high-velocity shear experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zu, X.; Reches, Z.; Chen, X.; Chang, J. C.; Carpenter, B. M.

    2015-12-01

    The rupture process of experimental faults is investigated here by monitoring nano-seismic events (NSE) during slip in a rotary shear apparatus. Our experimental faults are made of two rock blocks with one to four miniature 3D accelerometers that are glued to the stationary block at distance of ~ 2 cm from the fault surface. Accelerations in the frequency range of 1 Hz to 200 kHz are recorded in slip-parallel (x), slip-transverse (y), and slip-vertical (z) directions. We conducted a series of 45 experiments on diorite and dolomite samples in two loading styles: classical velocity controlled loading, and power-density loading, in which the power-density (shear stress times slip velocity) is selected, and stick-slip events develop spontaneously according to the experimental fault response. The 3D accelerometer data were recorded at 106 samples/s, with acceleration resolution of 10 mV/g in recoding range of +/- 5 V. The experiments were conducted at slip-velocity of 0.001-0.8 m/s and slip distance up to 1.38 m. The accelerometer observations revealed tens to hundreds of NSEs per slip in both loading styles; peak acceleration ranged from 1g to over 500g. A typical stick-slip with tens of NSEs in Fig. 1, shows: (1) An initial NSE at ~59.72 s (green) that coincides with a small stress drop (~10%, red); (2) Simultaneous macroscopic slip initiation (blue); (3) A swarm of NSEs occur as the fault slips, each NSE lasts 1-2 milliseconds; and (4) Details of the initial NSE are shown in Fig. 2. Based on waveform cross-correlation between frequency band from 20 kHz to 70kHz, we identify several groups of NSE clusters, and apply empirical Green's function method to analyze event source spectra based on Brune-type source model. These NSEs are indicators of rupture propagation during the experimental fault slip.

  13. Inversion of surface-wave data for subsurface shear-wave velocity profiles characterised by a thick buried low-velocity layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrugia, Daniela; Paolucci, Enrico; D'Amico, Sebastiano; Galea, Pauline

    2016-05-01

    The islands composing the Maltese archipelago (Central Mediterranean) are characterised by a four-layer sequence of limestones and clays. A common feature found in the western half of the archipelago is Upper Coralline Limestone (UCL) plateaus and hillcaps covering a soft Blue Clay (BC) layer which can be up to 75 m thick. The BC layer introduces a velocity inversion in the stratigraphy, implying that the VS30 (travel-time average shear-wave velocity (VS) in the upper 30 m) parameter is not always suitable for seismic microzonation purposes. Such a layer may produce amplification effects, however might not be included in the VS30 calculations. In this investigation, VS profiles at seven sites characterised by such a lithological sequence are obtained by a joint inversion of the single-station Horizontal-to-Vertical Spectral Ratios (H/V or HVSR) and effective dispersion curves from array measurements analysed using the Extended Spatial Auto-Correlation (ESAC) technique. The lithological sequence gives rise to a ubiquitous H/V peak between 1 and 2 Hz. All the effective dispersion curves obtained exhibit a `normal' dispersive trend at low frequencies, followed by an inverse dispersive trend at higher frequencies. This shape is tentatively explained in terms of the presence of higher mode Rayleigh waves, which are commonly present in such scenarios. Comparisons made with the results obtained at the only site in Malta where the BC is missing below the UCL suggest that the characteristics observed at the other seven sites are due to the presence of the soft layer. The final profiles reveal a variation in the VS of the clay layer with respect to the depth of burial and some regional variations in the UCL layer. This study presents a step towards a holistic seismic risk assessment that includes the implications on the site effects induced by the buried clay layer. Such assessments have not yet been done for Malta.

  14. Shear-Velocity Imaging of the Alpine Lithosphere from Ambient Noise: Validation Against Earthquake Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaestle, Emanuel David; Boschi, Lapo; Meier, Thomas; Soomro, Riaz; Rosenberg, Claudio; Bellahsen, Nicolas

    2015-04-01

    Seismic ambient noise, i.e. seismic signals generated by the coupling of atmosphere and oceans with the solid Earth, have been used extensively over the last decade to derive velocity models of the subsurface. The so-called ambient- noise method benefits from the increasing number of available seismic stations; central Europe, for instance, is now covered by a set of extremely dense seismic networks. We assemble a new database of ambient-noise-based surface-wave dispersion, and validate it by comparison with the more established two-station method, based on earthquake measurements. In ambient-noise theory, the averaging of cross-correlated signals from a specific station couple over a long time period gives an estimate of the empiric Green's function between the two stations where destructive interference will cancel all uncorrelated source signals. However, the Green's function is reproduced correctly only when the distribution of noise sources is truly random, which is clearly not the case in reality. On the other hand, the two-station method uses surface waves generated by earthquakes whose epicenters are aligned with the station couple of interest. The phase spectra of the cross correlation can then be translated into phase velocities. We compare both methods, in order to confirm the validity of the ambient-noise approach both for Rayleigh and Love waves. The results are generally in good agreement and justify the simplifications made in the theoretical derivations. We invert the observed phase velocities to determine a high-resolution image of the Alpine subsurface; the frequency range of noise signals allows us to constrain the shear-velocity structure of the crust down to mid-lithospheric depth. This study is an extension of earlier efforts by Molinari, Verbeke, Boschi and co-workers. These efforts are the first steps toward the identification of a new, reference model of the European crust, taking advantage of a broad variety of data (e.g., joint inversion

  15. Upper mantle structure of the Yellowstone hotspot from teleseismic body-wave velocity tomography and shear-wave anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waite, Gregory Phillip

    The question of whether the Yellowstone hotspot volcanic system is the result of a mantle plume, or shallower convection processes, is addressed by examining the upper mantle seismic isotropic and anisotropic velocity structure with data from temporary and permanent seismographs. Key features of the system can be explained by the motion of the lithosphere over a stationary mantle plume: a series of progressively older calderas that track plate motion for the last 16 million years; a parabolic pattern of high topography, seismicity, and active faulting around the axis of the Snake River Plain (SRP---the hotspot track); and high 3He/4He ratios found at Yellowstone. Alternatively, models involving upper mantle processes may explain these observations. The VP and VS tomography reveals a strong low-velocity anomaly (up to -2.3% for VP and -5.5% for VS) from ˜50 to 200 km beneath the Yellowstone caldera and SRP. A weaker, smaller-volume anomaly (-1.0% VP and -2.5% VS) is imaged from about 250 to at least 350 km depth at a position ˜100 km WNW of the caldera. A prominent high-velocity anomaly (1.2% VP and 1.9% VS) is located at ˜50 to 200 km depth to the SE of Yellowstone. The fast polarization directions measured from splitting of teleseismic shear-wave core phases are generally aligned parallel to the direction of plate motion. This suggests asthenosphere flow is primarily due to shear of the lithosphere. There is little evidence for radial flow away from Yellowstone that is expected for buoyant plume material flattening against a plate. The buoyancy flux of a Yellowstone plume, calculated from the excess temperature and radius inferred from the tomography, is an order of magnitude lower than previous estimates for Yellowstone. The tomography and anisotropy results are inconsistent with a cylindrical, vertical mantle plume. However, the seismic results could be interpreted as a weak plume dipping to the WNW. This upwelling may work in conjunction with lithosphere

  16. Inversion of surface wave data for subsurface shear wave velocity profiles characterized by a thick buried low-velocity layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrugia, Daniela; Paolucci, Enrico; D'Amico, Sebastiano; Galea, Pauline

    2016-08-01

    The islands composing the Maltese archipelago (Central Mediterranean) are characterized by a four-layer sequence of limestones and clays. A common feature found in the western half of the archipelago is Upper Coralline Limestone (UCL) plateaus and hillcaps covering a soft Blue Clay (BC) layer which can be up to 75 m thick. The BC layer introduces a velocity inversion in the stratigraphy, implying that the VS30 (traveltime average sear wave velocity (VS) in the upper 30 m) parameter is not always suitable for seismic microzonation purposes. Such a layer may produce amplification effects, however might not be included in the VS30 calculations. In this investigation, VS profiles at seven sites characterized by such a lithological sequence are obtained by a joint inversion of the single-station Horizontal-to-Vertical Spectral Ratios (H/V or HVSR) and effective dispersion curves from array measurements analysed using the Extended Spatial Auto-Correlation technique. The lithological sequence gives rise to a ubiquitous H/V peak between 1 and 2 Hz. All the effective dispersion curves obtained exhibit a `normal' dispersive trend at low frequencies, followed by an inverse dispersive trend at higher frequencies. This shape is tentatively explained in terms of the presence of higher mode Rayleigh waves, which are commonly present in such scenarios. Comparisons made with the results obtained at the only site in Malta where the BC is missing below the UCL suggest that the characteristics observed at the other seven sites are due to the presence of the soft layer. The final profiles reveal a variation in the VS of the clay layer with respect to the depth of burial and some regional variations in the UCL layer. This study presents a step towards a holistic seismic risk assessment that includes the implications on the site effects induced by the buried clay layer. Such assessments have not yet been done for Malta.

  17. Near-surface shear-wave velocity measurements in unlithified sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richards, B.T.; Steeples, D.; Miller, R.; Ivanov, J.; Peterie, S.; Sloan, S.D.; McKenna, J.R.

    2011-01-01

    S-wave velocity can be directly correlated to material stiffness and lithology making it a valuable physical property that has found uses in construction, engineering, and environmental projects. This study compares different methods for measuring S-wave velocities, investigating and identifying the differences among the methods' results, and prioritizing the different methods for optimal S-wave use at the U. S. Army's Yuma Proving Grounds YPG. Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves MASW and S-wave tomography were used to generate S-wave velocity profiles. Each method has advantages and disadvantages. A strong signal-to-noise ratio at the study site gives the MASW method promising resolution. S-wave first arrivals are picked on impulsive sledgehammer data which were then used for the tomography process. Three-component downhole seismic data were collected in-line with a locking geophone, providing ground truth to compare the data and to draw conclusions about the validity of each data set. Results from these S-wave measurement techniques are compared with borehole seismic data and with lithology data from continuous samples to help ascertain the accuracy, and therefore applicability, of each method. This study helps to select the best methods for obtaining S-wave velocities for media much like those found in unconsolidated sediments at YPG. ?? 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  18. Increased Inlet Blood Flow Velocity Predicts Low Wall Shear Stress in the Cephalic Arch of Patients with Brachiocephalic Fistula Access

    PubMed Central

    Boghosian, Michael; Cassel, Kevin; Watson, Sydeaka; Funaki, Brian; Doshi, Taral; Mahmoudzadeh Akherat, S. M. Javid; Hines, Jane; Coe, Fredric

    2016-01-01

    Background An autogenous arteriovenous fistula is the optimal vascular access for hemodialysis. In the case of brachiocephalic fistula, cephalic arch stenosis commonly develops leading to access failure. We have hypothesized that a contribution to fistula failure is low wall shear stress resulting from post-fistula creation hemodynamic changes that occur in the cephalic arch. Methods Twenty-two subjects with advanced renal failure had brachiocephalic fistulae placed. The following procedures were performed at mapping (pre-operative) and at fistula maturation (8–32 weeks post-operative): venogram, Doppler to measure venous blood flow velocity, and whole blood viscosity. Geometric and computational modeling was performed to determine wall shear stress and other geometric parameters. The relationship between hemodynamic parameters and clinical findings was examined using univariate analysis and linear regression. Results The percent low wall shear stress was linearly related to the increase in blood flow velocity (p < 0.01). This relationship was more significant in non-diabetic patients (p < 0.01) than diabetic patients. The change in global measures of arch curvature and asymmetry also evolve with time to maturation (p < 0.05). Conclusions The curvature and hemodynamic changes during fistula maturation increase the percentage of low wall shear stress regions within the cephalic arch. Low wall shear stress may contribute to subsequent neointimal hyperplasia and resultant cephalic arch stenosis. If this hypothesis remains tenable with further studies, ways of protecting the arch through control of blood flow velocity may need to be developed. PMID:27074019

  19. Explicit use of the Biot coefficient in predicting shear-wave velocity of water-saturated sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, M.W.

    2006-01-01

    Predicting the shear-wave (S-wave) velocity is important in seismic modelling, amplitude analysis with offset, and other exploration and engineering applications. Under the low-frequency approximation, the classical Biot-Gassmann theory relates the Biot coefficient to the bulk modulus of water-saturated sediments. If the Biot coefficient under in situ conditions can be estimated, the shear modulus or the S-wave velocity can be calculated. The Biot coefficient derived from the compressional-wave (P-wave) velocity of water-saturated sediments often differs from and is less than that estimated from the S-wave velocity, owing to the interactions between the pore fluid and the grain contacts. By correcting the Biot coefficients derived from P-wave velocities of water-saturated sediments measured at various differential pressures, an accurate method of predicting S-wave velocities is proposed. Numerical results indicate that the predicted S-wave velocities for consolidated and unconsolidated sediments agreewell with measured velocities. ?? 2006 European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers.

  20. Velocity and Surface Shear Stress Distributions Behind a Rough-to-Smooth Surface Transition: A Simple New Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamorro, Leonardo P.; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2009-01-01

    A simple new model is proposed to predict the distribution of wind velocity and surface shear stress downwind of a rough-to-smooth surface transition. The wind velocity is estimated as a weighted average between two limiting logarithmic profiles: the first log law, which is recovered above the internal boundary-layer height, corresponds to the upwind velocity profile; the second log law is adjusted to the downwind aerodynamic roughness and local surface shear stress, and it is recovered near the surface, in the equilibrium sublayer. The proposed non-linear form of the weighting factor is equal to ln( z/ z 01)/ ln( δ i / z 01), where z, δ i and z 01 are the elevation of the prediction location, the internal boundary-layer height at that downwind distance, and the upwind surface roughness, respectively. Unlike other simple analytical models, the new model does not rely on the assumption of a constant or linear distribution for the turbulent shear stress within the internal boundary layer. The performance of the new model is tested with wind-tunnel measurements and also with the field data of Bradley. Compared with other existing analytical models, the proposed model shows improved predictions of both surface shear stress and velocity distributions at different positions downwind of the transition.

  1. The uppermost mantle shear wave velocity structure of eastern Africa from Rayleigh wave tomography: constraints on rift evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donnell, J. P.; Adams, A.; Nyblade, A. A.; Mulibo, G. D.; Tugume, F.

    2013-08-01

    An expanded model of the 3-D shear wave velocity structure of the uppermost mantle beneath eastern Africa has been developed using earthquakes recorded by the AfricaArray East African Seismic Experiment in conjunction with data from permanent stations and previously deployed temporary stations. The combined data set comprises 331 earthquakes recorded on a total of 95 seismic stations spanning Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Zambia and Malawi. In this study, data from 149 earthquakes were used to determine fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave phase velocities at periods ranging from 20 to 182 s using the two-plane wave method, and then combined with the similarly processed published measurements and inverted for a 3-D shear wave velocity model of the uppermost mantle. New features in the model include (1) a low-velocity region in western Zambia, (2) a high-velocity region in eastern Zambia, (3) a low-velocity region in eastern Tanzania and (4) low-velocity regions beneath the Lake Malawi rift. When considered in conjunction with mapped seismicity, these results support a secondary western rift branch striking southwestwards from Lake Tanganyika, likely exploiting the relatively weak lithosphere of the southern Kibaran Belt between the Bangweulu Block and the Congo Craton. We estimate a lithospheric thickness of ˜150-200 km for the substantial fast shear wave anomaly imaged in eastern Zambia, which may be a southward subsurface extension of the Bangweulu Block. The low-velocity region in eastern Tanzania suggests that the eastern rift branch trends southeastwards offshore eastern Tanzania coincident with the purported location of the northern margin of the proposed Ruvuma microplate. Pronounced velocity lows along the Lake Malawi rift are found beneath the northern and southern ends of the lake, but not beneath the central portion of the lake.

  2. Time evolving bed shear stress due the passage of gravity currents estimated with ADVP velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zordan, Jessica; Schleiss, Anton J.; Franca, Mário J.

    2016-04-01

    Density or gravity currents are geophysical flows driven by density gradients between two contacting fluids. The physical trigger mechanism of these phenomena lays in the density differences which may be caused by differences in the temperature, dissolved substances or concentration of suspended sediments. Saline density currents are capable to entrain bed sediments inducing signatures in the bottom of sedimentary basins. Herein, saline density currents are reproduced in laboratory over a movable bed. The experimental channel is of the lock-exchange type, it is 7.5 m long and 0.3 m wide, divided into two sections of comparable volumes by a sliding gate. An upstream reach serves as a head tank for the dense mixture; the current propagates through a downstream reach where the main measurements are made. Downstream of the channel a tank exist to absorb the reflection of the current and thus artifacts due to the limited length of the channel. High performance thermoplastic polyurethane simulating fine sediments forms the movable bed. Measures of 3D instantaneous velocities will be made with the use of the non-intrusive technique of the ADV (Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler). With the velocity measurements, the evolution in time of the channel-bed shear stress due the passage of gravity currents is estimated. This is in turn related to the observed erosion and to such parameters determinant for the dynamics of the current as initial density difference, lock length and channel slope. This work was funded by the ITN-Programme (Marie Curie Actions) of the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme FP7-PEOPLE-2013-ITN under REA grant agreement n_607394-SEDITRANS.

  3. The mean velocity and the Reynolds shear stress in turbulent channel and pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahay, Anupam

    This thesis deals with the structure of the mean velocity (U) and the Reynolds shear stress (τ) in turbulent channel and pipe flows. Using empirical features of τ, and ideas from singular perturbation theory, we attempt to deduce the asymptotic approximation of U(y, R), where y is the wall-normal distance and R is a Reynolds number, as R/to/infty. We show that, in all likelihood, the classical 'inner' and 'outer' expansions to leading order do not overlap because of the intrusion of an intermediate layer straddling the peak position of /tau. We also present evidence suggesting that the classical semi-logarithmic law is incorrect. Even so, it is shown that the semi-logarithmic variation of U can be a useful approximation. The importance of the intermediate layer is that it provides a mechanism by which viscous effects play an important role in regions traditionally thought to be inviscid. It is argued that recently advanced power-law profiles could be good approximations to the data over an extended region, but they too are unlikely to be exact. We attempt to identify spatial modes having significant contribution to /tau, with a view to modeling turbulent momentum transport. Eigenfunctions of the Navier-Stokes operator linearized about the mean velocity, are chosen as the spatial basis. The eigenfunction expansion of τ requires the knowledge of the complete two-point correlation tensor. We have constructed an empirical model for the tensor. Using this model and a heuristic criterion for ordering the terms in the expansion, we have been able to reconstruct τ from spanwise modes and certain subsets of streamwise-dependent modes. The primary contribution of the spanwise modes is in the central part of the channel, whereas the streamwise- dependent modes are significant near the peak location of /tau. The unresolved issues regarding the significance of the reconstruction are pointed out.

  4. A comparison of four geophysical methods for determining the shear wave velocity of soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, N.; Thitimakorn, T.; Ismail, A.; Hoffman, D.

    2007-01-01

    The Missouri Department of Transportation (MoDOT) routinely acquires seismic cone penetrometer (SCPT) shear wave velocity control as part of the routine investigation of soils within the Mississippi Embayment. In an effort to ensure their geotechnical investigations are as effective and efficient as possible, the SCPT tool and several available alternatives (crosshole [CH]; multichannel analysis of surface waves [MASW]; and refraction microtremor [ReMi]) were evaluated and compared on the basis of field data acquired at two test sites in southeast Missouri. These four methods were ranked in terms of accuracy, functionality, cost, other considerations, and overall utility. It is concluded that MASW data are generally more reliable than SCPT data, comparable to quality ReMi data, and only slightly less accurate than CH data. However, the other advantages of MASW generally make it a superior choice over the CH, SCPT, and ReMi methods for general soil classification purposes to depths of 30 m. MASW data are less expensive than CH data and SCPT data and can normally be acquired in areas inaccessible to drill and SCPT rigs. In contrast to the MASW tool, quality ReMi data can be acquired only in areas where there are interpretable levels of "passive" acoustic energy and only when the geophone array is aligned with the source(s) of such energy.

  5. Shear wave velocity analysis of a deep seated gravel landslide structure using the microtremor survey method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, L.; Xu, X.; Liao, H.; Geng, X.-Y.

    2015-09-01

    The depth and geometry of potential failure surface is the fundamental for evaluating the mechanisms of a landslide. Traditional techniques to acquire information on potential sliding surface are mainly drilling, pitting, and trenching, but these techniques are time consuming and expensive. In this study, microtremor signals and the dispersion curves of surface wave are extracted from the vertical component of microtremor records using the spatial autocorrelation (SPAC) method to estimate shear wave velocity structure. The results suggest that the buried depth of phyllite bedrock is approximately 47.4m, and the thickness of weathered bedrock layer is about 9.9m at about 57.3m deep, which could be interpreted as the potential sliding surface of this landslide, in accordance with borehole data. The microtremor survey method (MSM) is flexible, non-invasive, relatively quick and deployable on the landslide. It clearly demonstrat that it is an effective tool to improve the drilling success rate, and hence allow a large scale and high density investigation of structure characteristics of a deep seated landslide.

  6. Shear Velocity Structure of the Crust and Uppermost Mantle across the Mariana Trench from Ambient Seismic Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, C.; Wiens, D. A.; Lizarralde, D.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the shear wave structure of the crust and uppermost mantle across the Northern and Central Mariana trench using ambient seismic noise recorded by land and ocean bottom seismographs (OBSs). The main goal of this study is to constrain velocity variations resulting from possible serpentinization of the incoming plate or the forearc mantle. Vertical component waveforms from 20 OBSs and 7 island stations deployed in 2012-2013 are correlated to reveal the empirical green functions. Due to the distinct structure difference across the trench, we adopt two different lithosphere models when calculating the phase velocity predictions. For each station pair, water depth estimated by averaging values along the great circle path connecting two stations is also introduced to predict the phase velocity. For each frequency, only high quality station pairs (SNR > 5) with distance larger than twice the wavelength are included. The dispersion curves are then interpolated to obtain the 2-D phase velocity map for period from 8 s to 32 s. Phase velocity maps from short periods (< 15 s) are strongly affected by the water depth. For periods between 15 s - 18 s, extremely low phase velocities near the trench result from water depth up to 9 km. Longer period results show fast phase velocity anomalies in the incoming plate and slow anomalies beneath the forearc, consistent with faster mantle velocities expected for the incoming plate. We will also show the results of inverting this phase velocity dataset for 3-D shear velocity structure. We are also investigating the use of higher mode Rayleigh waves, because in deep water regions the fundamental mode results fail to constrain the velocity structure of the shallowest part of the mantle.

  7. Accuracy of velocity and shear rate measurements using pulsed Doppler ultrasound: a comparison of signal analysis techniques.

    PubMed

    Markou, C P; Ku, D N

    1991-01-01

    An experimental investigation was instituted to evaluate the performance of Doppler ultrasound signal processing techniques for measuring fluid velocity under well-defined flow conditions using a 10-MHz multigated pulsed ultrasound instrument. Conditions of fully developed flow in a rigid, circular tube were varied over a Reynolds number range between 500 and 8000. The velocity across the tube was determined using analog and digital zero crossing detectors and three digital spectrum estimators. Determination of the Doppler frequency from analog or digital zero crossing detectors gave accurate velocity values for laminar and moderately turbulent flow away from the wall (0.969 less than or equal to r less than or equal to 0.986). Three digital spectrum estimators, Fast Fourier Transform, Burg autoregressive method, and minimum variance method, were slightly more accurate than the zero crossing detector (0.984 less than or equal to r less than or equal to 0.994), especially at points close to the walls and with higher levels of turbulence. Steep velocity gradients and transit-time-effects from high velocities produced significantly larger errors in velocity measurement. Wall shear rate estimates were most precise when calculated using the position of the wall and two velocity points. The calculated wall shears were within 20%-30% of theoretically predicted values. PMID:1808798

  8. Comparison of phase velocities from array measurements of Rayleigh waves associated with microtremor and results calculated from borehole shear-wave velocity profiles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, Hsi-Ping; Boore, David M.; Joyner, William B.; Oppenheimer, David H.; Warrick, Richard E.; Zhang, Wenbo; Hamilton, John C.; Brown, Leo T.

    2000-01-01

    Shear-wave velocities (VS) are widely used for earthquake ground-motion site characterization. VS data are now largely obtained using borehole methods. Drilling holes, however, is expensive. Nonintrusive surface methods are inexpensive for obtaining VS information, but not many comparisons with direct borehole measurements have been published. Because different assumptions are used in data interpretation of each surface method and public safety is involved in site characterization for engineering structures, it is important to validate the surface methods by additional comparisons with borehole measurements. We compare results obtained from a particular surface method (array measurement of surface waves associated with microtremor) with results obtained from borehole methods. Using a 10-element nested-triangular array of 100-m aperture, we measured surface-wave phase velocities at two California sites, Garner Valley near Hemet and Hollister Municipal Airport. The Garner Valley site is located at an ancient lake bed where water-saturated sediment overlies decomposed granite on top of granite bedrock. Our array was deployed at a location where seismic velocities had been determined to a depth of 500 m by borehole methods. At Hollister, where the near-surface sediment consists of clay, sand, and gravel, we determined phase velocities using an array located close to a 60-m deep borehole where downhole velocity logs already exist. Because we want to assess the measurements uncomplicated by uncertainties introduced by the inversion process, we compare our phase-velocity results with the borehole VS depth profile by calculating fundamental-mode Rayleigh-wave phase velocities from an earth model constructed from the borehole data. For wavelengths less than ~2 times of the array aperture at Garner Valley, phase-velocity results from array measurements agree with the calculated Rayleigh-wave velocities to better than 11%. Measurement errors become larger for wavelengths 2

  9. Wavefield polarization in seismograms of Darfield aftershocks: orthogonality relation with shear wave velocity anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pischiutta, M.; Savage, M. K.; Rovelli, A.; Holt, R. A.; Syracuse, E. M.; Thurber, C. H.

    2012-12-01

    The Greendale fault was discovered after the 7.2 magnitude earthquake that occurred on September 4, 2010 at Darfield, New Zealand. It is a right-lateral strike slip fault that released an average slip of 2.5m during the main shock. In previous works, the presence of structure/stress induced anisotropy was investigated by analyzing the aftershocks recorded by 13 stations installed around the fault in the period September 2010 - January 2011. Near-parallel fast directions were observed for split shear waves at several stations close to the fault zone, interpreting the effect as related to aligned fault fabric. In order to assess whether the anisotropy of rock properties could also affect ground motion polarization, we compute the wavefield polarization in the horizontal plane using about 40 seismic events among those recorded during the deployment. We apply an approach based on the computation of horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratios (HVSRs) and the diagonalization of the covariance matrix. The distribution of instantaneous polarization angles computed throughout the seismograms consists of narrow rose diagrams with low standard deviation at stations in the fault zone, where predominant horizontal polarization varies from N78° to N122°. In contrast, stations outside the fault zone show very scattered rose diagrams with no preferential orientation. We compare the horizontal polarization directions with fast directions. We find a near-orthogonal relation for stations in the fault zone. The same relationship between polarization and anisotropy was found in previous studies in the Parkfield area and in the Val d'Agri Basin, where polarization also forms a high-angle with the main fracture fields. The same cause of shear wave splitting is therefore also responsible for a stiffness anisotropy that produces more efficient propagation of ground motions polarized orthogonally to the fault fabric.

  10. Predicting the liquefaction phenomena from shear velocity profiling: Empirical approach to 6.3 Mw, May 2006 Yogyakarta earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartantyo, Eddy; Brotopuspito, Kirbani S.; Sismanto, Waluyo

    2015-04-01

    The liquefactions phenomena have been reported after a shocking 6.5Mw earthquake hit Yogyakarta province in the morning at 27 May 2006. Several researchers have reported the damage, casualties, and soil failure due to the quake, including the mapping and analyzing the liquefaction phenomena. Most of them based on SPT test. The study try to draw the liquefaction susceptibility by means the shear velocity profiling using modified Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW). This paper is a preliminary report by using only several measured MASW points. The study built 8-channel seismic data logger with 4.5 Hz geophones for this purpose. Several different offsets used to record the high and low frequencies of surface waves. The phase-velocity diagrams were stacked in the frequency domain rather than in time domain, for a clearer and easier dispersion curve picking. All codes are implementing in Matlab. From these procedures, shear velocity profiling was collected beneath each geophone's spread. By mapping the minimum depth of shallow water table, calculating PGA with soil classification, using empirical formula for saturated soil weight from shear velocity profile, and calculating CRR and CSR at every depth, the liquefaction characteristic can be identify in every layer. From several acquired data, a liquefiable potential at some depth below water table was obtained.

  11. Predicting the liquefaction phenomena from shear velocity profiling: Empirical approach to 6.3 Mw, May 2006 Yogyakarta earthquake

    SciTech Connect

    Hartantyo, Eddy; Brotopuspito, Kirbani S.; Sismanto; Waluyo

    2015-04-24

    The liquefactions phenomena have been reported after a shocking 6.5Mw earthquake hit Yogyakarta province in the morning at 27 May 2006. Several researchers have reported the damage, casualties, and soil failure due to the quake, including the mapping and analyzing the liquefaction phenomena. Most of them based on SPT test. The study try to draw the liquefaction susceptibility by means the shear velocity profiling using modified Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW). This paper is a preliminary report by using only several measured MASW points. The study built 8-channel seismic data logger with 4.5 Hz geophones for this purpose. Several different offsets used to record the high and low frequencies of surface waves. The phase-velocity diagrams were stacked in the frequency domain rather than in time domain, for a clearer and easier dispersion curve picking. All codes are implementing in Matlab. From these procedures, shear velocity profiling was collected beneath each geophone’s spread. By mapping the minimum depth of shallow water table, calculating PGA with soil classification, using empirical formula for saturated soil weight from shear velocity profile, and calculating CRR and CSR at every depth, the liquefaction characteristic can be identify in every layer. From several acquired data, a liquefiable potential at some depth below water table was obtained.

  12. Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity maps and three-dimensional shear velocity structure of the western US from local non-plane surface wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollitz, F. F.; Snoke, J. Arthur

    2010-03-01

    We utilize two-and-three-quarter years of vertical-component recordings made by the Transportable Array (TA) component of Earthscope to constrain three-dimensional (3-D) seismic shear wave velocity structure in the upper 200 km of the western United States. Single-taper spectral estimation is used to compile measurements of complex spectral amplitudes from 44317 seismograms generated by 123 teleseismic events. In the first step employed to determine the Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity structure, we implement a new tomographic method, which is simpler and more robust than scattering-based methods (e.g. multi-plane surface wave tomography). The TA is effectively implemented as a large number of local arrays by defining a horizontal Gaussian smoothing distance that weights observations near a given target point. The complex spectral-amplitude measurements are interpreted with the spherical Helmholtz equation using local observations about a succession of target points, resulting in Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity maps at periods over the range of 18-125 s. The derived maps depend on the form of local fits to the Helmholtz equation, which generally involve the non-plane-wave solutions of Friederich et al. In a second step, the phase-velocity maps are used to derive 3-D shear velocity structure. The 3-D velocity images confirm details witnessed in prior body-wave and surface-wave studies and reveal new structures, including a deep (>100 km deep) high-velocity lineament, of width ~200 km, stretching from the southern Great Valley to northern Utah that may be a relic of plate subduction or, alternatively, either a remnant of the Mojave Precambrian Province or a mantle downwelling. Mantle seismic velocity is highly correlated with heat flow, Holocene volcanism, elastic plate thickness and seismicity. This suggests that shallow mantle structure provides the heat source for associated magmatism, as well as thinning of the thermal lithosphere, leading to relatively high stress

  13. Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity maps and three-dimensional shear velocity structure of the western US from local non-plane surface wave tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, F.F.; Snoke, J. Arthur

    2010-01-01

    We utilize two-and-three-quarter years of vertical-component recordings made by the Transportable Array (TA) component of Earthscope to constrain three-dimensional (3-D) seismic shear wave velocity structure in the upper 200 km of the western United States. Single-taper spectral estimation is used to compile measurements of complex spectral amplitudes from 44 317 seismograms generated by 123 teleseismic events. In the first step employed to determine the Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity structure, we implement a new tomographic method, which is simpler and more robust than scattering-based methods (e.g. multi-plane surface wave tomography). The TA is effectively implemented as a large number of local arrays by defining a horizontal Gaussian smoothing distance that weights observations near a given target point. The complex spectral-amplitude measurements are interpreted with the spherical Helmholtz equation using local observations about a succession of target points, resulting in Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity maps at periods over the range of 18–125 s. The derived maps depend on the form of local fits to the Helmholtz equation, which generally involve the nonplane-wave solutions of Friederich et al. In a second step, the phase-velocity maps are used to derive 3-D shear velocity structure. The 3-D velocity images confirm details witnessed in prior body-wave and surface-wave studies and reveal new structures, including a deep (>100 km deep) high-velocity lineament, of width ∼200 km, stretching from the southern Great Valley to northern Utah that may be a relic of plate subduction or, alternatively, either a remnant of the Mojave Precambrian Province or a mantle downwelling. Mantle seismic velocity is highly correlated with heat flow, Holocene volcanism, elastic plate thickness and seismicity. This suggests that shallow mantle structure provides the heat source for associated magmatism, as well as thinning of the thermal lithosphere, leading to relatively high

  14. A parameterisation for the threshold shear velocity to initiate deflation of dry and wet sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelis, Wim M.; Gabriels, Donald; Hartmann, Roger

    2004-04-01

    A new parameterisation for the threshold shear velocity to initiate deflation of dry and wet particles is presented. It is based on the balance of moments acting on particles at the instant of particle motion. The model hence includes a term for the aerodynamic forces, including the drag force, the lift force and the aerodynamic-moment force, and a term for the interparticle forces. The effect of gravitation is incorporated in both terms. Rather than using an implicit function for the effect of the aerodynamic forces as reported earlier in literature, a constant aerodynamic coefficient was introduced. From consideration of the van der Waals force between two particles, it was further shown that the effect of the interparticle cohesion force between two dry particles on the deflation threshold should be inversely proportional to the particle diameter squared. The interparticle force was further extended to include wet bonding forces. The latter were considered as the sum of capillary forces and adhesive forces. A model that expresses the capillary force as a function of particle diameter squared and the inverse of capillary potential was deduced from consideration of the well-known model of Fisher and the Young-Laplace equation. The adhesive force was assumed to be equal to tensile strength, and a function which is proportional to particle diameter squared and the inverse of the potential due to adhesive forces was derived. By combining the capillary-force model and the adhesive force model, the interparticle force due to wet bonding was simplified and written as a function of particle diameter squared and the inverse of matric potential. The latter was loglinearly related to the gravimetric moisture content, a relationship that is valid in the low-moisture content range that is important in the light of deflation of sediment by wind. By introducing a correction to force the relationship to converge to zero moisture content at oven dryness, the matric potential

  15. Velocity measurement on Taylor Couette flow of a magnetic fluid with small aspect ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikura, Hiroshige; Aritomi, Masanori; Takeda, Yasushi

    2005-03-01

    In this paper, the application of ultrasonic velocity profile (UVP) method to investigate magnetic-fluids flow is described. The objective of the research is to measure the internal flow of a magnetic fluid on Taylor-Couette flow with small aspect ratio using the UVP method and to analyze the influence of the applied magnetic field. The flow structure of a magnetic fluid in a concentric annular geometry with a small aspect ratio of 3 and a radius ratio of 0.6 for an inner-cylinder rotation was investigated. Axial velocity distributions were measured using the UVP measurement technique. A non-uniform magnetic field was applied to the flow field using a permanent magnet, located outside of the cylinders. The results demonstrated that the UVP method was capable to provide the information on the structure of Taylor-Couette flow with small aspect ratio, in a magnetic fluid.

  16. Near Surface Shear Wave Velocity Model of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuler, S.; Craig, M. S.; Hayashi, K.; Galvin, J. L.; Deqiang, C.; Jones, M. G.

    2015-12-01

    Multichannel analysis of surface wave measurements (MASW) and microtremor array measurements (MAM) were performed at twelve sites across the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta to obtain high resolution shear wave velocity (VS) models. Deeper surveys were performed at four of the sites using the two station spatial autocorrelation (SPAC) method. For the MASW and MAM surveys, a 48-channel seismic system with 4.5 Hz geophones was used with a 10-lb sledgehammer and a metal plate as a source. Surveys were conducted at various locations on the crest of levees, the toe of the levees, and off of the levees. For MASW surveys, we used a record length of 2.048 s, a sample interval of 1 ms, and 1 m geophone spacing. For MAM, ambient noise was recorded for 65.536 s with a sampling interval of 4 ms and 1 m geophone spacing. VS was determined to depths of ~ 20 m using the MASW method and ~ 40 m using the MAM method. Maximum separation between stations in the two-station SPAC surveys was typically 1600 m to 1800 m, providing coherent signal with wavelengths in excess of 5 km and depth penetration of as much as 2000 m. Measured values of VS30 in the study area ranged from 97 m/s to 257 m/s, corresponding to NEHRP site classifications D and E. Comparison of our measured velocity profiles with available geotechnical logs, including soil type, SPT, and CPT, reveals the existence of a small number of characteristic horizons within the upper 40m in the Delta: levee fill material, peat, transitional silty sand, and eolian sand at depth. Sites with a peat layer at the surface exhibited extremely low values of VS. Based on soil borings, the thickness of peat layers were approximately 0 m to 8 m. The VS for the peat layers ranged from 42 m/s to 150 m/s while the eolian sand layer exhibited VS ranging from of 220 m/s to 370 m/s. Soft near surface soils present in the region pose an increased earthquake hazard risk due to the potential for high ground accelerations.

  17. Lateral heterogeneity scales in regional and global upper mantle shear velocity models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meschede, Matthias; Romanowicz, Barbara

    2015-02-01

    We analyse the lateral heterogeneity scales of recent upper mantle tomographic shear velocity (Vs) global and regional models. Our goal is to constrain the spherical harmonics power spectrum over the largest possible range of scales to get an estimate of the strength and statistical distribution of both long and small-scale structure. We use a spherical multitaper method to obtain high quality power spectral estimates from the regional models. After deconvolution of the employed taper functions, we combine global and regional spectral estimates from scales of 20 000 to around 200 km (degree 100). In contrast to previous studies that focus on linear power spectral densities, we interpret the logarithmic power per harmonic degree l as heterogeneity strength at a particular depth and horizontal scale. Throughout the mantle, we observe in recent global models, that their low degree spectrum is anisotropic with respect to Earth's rotation axis. We then constrain the uppermost mantle spectrum from global and regional models. Their power spectra transfer smoothly into each other in overlapping spectral bands, and model correlation is in general best in the uppermost 250 km (i.e. the `heterosphere'). In Europe, we see good correlation from the largest scales down to features of about 500 km. Detailed analysis and interpretation of spectral shape in this depth range shows that the heterosphere has several characteristic length scales and varying spectral decay rates. We interpret these as expressions of different physical processes. At larger depths, the correlation between different models drops, and the power spectrum exhibits strong small scale structure whose location and strength is not as well resolved at present. The spectrum also has bands with elevated power that likely correspond to length scales that are enhanced due to the inversion process.

  18. Vertically deflected mantle flow at the eastern edge of the African Large Low Shear Velocity Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, H. A.; Long, M. D.; He, X.; Lynner, C.

    2014-12-01

    Despite the abundantly clear evidence for the existence of two Large Low Shear Velocity Provinces (LLSVPs) in the lower mantle, the origin, composition, and dynamics are still not well understood, nor is the relationship of the LLSVPs to the greater mantle. Observations of seismic anisotropy are often used to better understand flow in the mantle, but their utility is limited in the mostly isotropic lower mantle. An exception to this is in the lowermost mantle (D") where observations of seismic anisotropy are numerous; however, the interpretation of such measurements in terms of dynamic processes remains challenging. Here we use observations of seismic anisotropy at the eastern edge of the African LLSVP beneath the Afar hotspot to 1) test the consistency of different mechanisms for D" anisotropy with observations, and 2) constrain the geometry of mantle flow at an LLSVP edge. Our observational data set consists of measurements of differential S-ScS and discrepant SKS-SKKS splitting, totaling 22 SKS, SKKS and ScS phases, corrected for upper mantle anisotropy. By utilizing different raypath combinations, we are able to sample the edge structure of the African LLSVP from five distinct raypath orientations, an improvement over previous work. Through forward modeling using mineral physics constraints, we find that our splitting observations are best fit by a model of crystallographically aligned post-perovskite, with the [100] axis oriented either vertically, or highly oblique to the horizontal plane. Such an alignment suggests that mantle flow at the eastern edge of the African LLSVP has an upward component, consistent with either the vertical deflection of material at the LLSVP or with sheet-like upwellings. Placing our preferred flow scenario(s) in context with other recent work, we propose that the edge of the African LLSVP acts as a barrier to mantle flow, ultimately deflecting flow upwards along the margins.

  19. Heat transfer, velocity-temperature correlation, and turbulent shear stress from Navier-Stokes computations of shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, C. R.; Hingst, W. R.; Porro, A. R.

    1991-01-01

    The properties of 2-D shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction flows were calculated by using a compressible turbulent Navier-Stokes numerical computational code. Interaction flows caused by oblique shock wave impingement on the turbulent boundary layer flow were considered. The oblique shock waves were induced with shock generators at angles of attack less than 10 degs in supersonic flows. The surface temperatures were kept at near-adiabatic (ratio of wall static temperature to free stream total temperature) and cold wall (ratio of wall static temperature to free stream total temperature) conditions. The computational results were studied for the surface heat transfer, velocity temperature correlation, and turbulent shear stress in the interaction flow fields. Comparisons of the computational results with existing measurements indicated that (1) the surface heat transfer rates and surface pressures could be correlated with Holden's relationship, (2) the mean flow streamwise velocity components and static temperatures could be correlated with Crocco's relationship if flow separation did not occur, and (3) the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model should be modified for turbulent shear stress computations in the interaction flows.

  20. Developments in the Use of Proximity and Ratio Cues in Velocity Judgments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shire, Beatrice; Durkin, Kevin

    Young children's responses to a velocity inference task based on static pictorial stimuli giving cues of proximity and ratio were examined. Subjects (N=65) in preschool through second grade viewed pictures of snails moving horizontally or spiders suspended vertically and were asked to estimate which competitor would reach its destination first.…

  1. Shear-viscosity-to-entropy-density ratio and phase transition in multifragmentation of quasiprojectile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fan; Li, Cheng; Wen, Pei-Wei; Liu, Hang; Zhang, Feng-Shou

    2016-09-01

    Heavy-ion collisions at relativistic energy are studied by the isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics model in the company of the GEMINI model. The present study mainly focuses on the liquid-gas phase transition in nuclear matter. We calculate the shear-viscosity-to-entropy-density ratio η /s, γ2 and the multiplicity of intermediate-mass fragment ( M_{IMF}) in finite-size nuclear sources. At excitation energy 8 MeV a minimum of η /s is found in the coexistence phase of intermediate-mass fragments and light particles. At similar excitation energy a maximum of the M_{IMF} is also observed at the same density condition which is an indication of the liquid-gas phase transition.

  2. Shear viscosity to entropy density ratio in the Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck model

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.X.; Fang, D. Q.; Ma, Y. G.; Zhou, C. L.

    2011-08-15

    The ratio of shear viscosity ({eta}) to entropy density (s) for an equilibrated system is investigated in intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions below 100A MeV within the framework of the Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck model. After the collision system almost reaches a local equilibration, the temperature, pressure and energy density are obtained from the phase-space information and {eta}/s is calculated using the Green-Kubo formulas. The results show that {eta}/s decreases with incident energy and tends toward a smaller value around 0.5, which is not so drastically different from the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider results in the present model.

  3. Shear-viscosity to entropy-density ratio of a relativistic hadron gas.

    PubMed

    Demir, Nasser; Bass, Steffen A

    2009-05-01

    Ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are thought to have produced a state of matter called the quark-gluon plasma, characterized by a very small shear-viscosity to entropy-density ratio eta/s, near the lower bound predicted for that quantity by anti-de Sitter space/conformal field theory methods. As the produced matter expands and cools, it evolves through a phase described by a hadron gas with rapidly increasing eta/s. We calculate eta/s as a function of temperature in this phase both in and out of chemical equilibrium and find that its value poses a challenge for viscous relativistic hydrodynamics, which requires small values of eta/s in order to successfully describe the collective flow observables at the RHIC. We therefore conclude that the origin of the low viscosity matter at the RHIC must be in the partonic phase of the reaction.

  4. Studies of Shear Band Velocity Using Spatially and Temporally Resolved Measurements of Strain During Quasistatic Compression of Bulk Metallic Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, W J; Samale, M; Hufnagel, T; LeBlanc, M; Florando, J

    2009-06-15

    We have made measurements of the temporal and spatial features of the evolution of strain during the serrated flow of Pd{sub 40}Ni{sub 40}P{sub 20} bulk metallic glass tested under quasistatic, room temperature, uniaxial compression. Strain and load data were acquired at rates of up to 400 kHz using strain gages affixed to all four sides of the specimen and a piezoelectric load cell located near the specimen. Calculation of the displacement rate requires an assumption about the nature of the shear displacement. If one assumes that the entire shear plane displaces simultaneously, the displacement rate is approximately 0.002 m/s. If instead one assumes that the displacement occurs as a localized propagating front, the velocity of the front is approximately 2.8 m/s. In either case, the velocity is orders of magnitude less than the shear wave speed ({approx}2000 m/s). The significance of these measurements for estimates of heating in shear bands is discussed.

  5. Reynolds shear stress near its maxima, turbulent bursting process and associated velocity profle in a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afzal, Noor

    2014-11-01

    The Reynolds shear stress around maxima, turbulent bursting process and associate velocity profile in ZGP turbulent boundary layer is considered in the intermediate layer/mesolayer proposed by Afzal (1982 Ing. Arch. 53, 355-277), in addition to inner and outer layers. The intermediate length scale δm = δRτ- 1 / 2 having velocity Um = mUe with 1 / 2 <= m <= 2 / 3 where Ue is velocity at boundary layer edge. Long & Chen (1981 JFM) intermediate layer/ mesolayer scale δm = δRτ- 1 / 2 with velocity Um the friction velocity uτ, is untenable assumption (Afzal 1984 AIAA J). For channel/pipe flow, Sreenivasan et al. (1981989, 1997, 2006a,b) proposed critical layer / mesolayer, cited/adopted work Long and Chen and McKeon, B.J. & Sharma, A. 2010 JFM 658, page 370 stated ``retaining the assumption that the critical layer occurs when U (y) = (2 / 3) UCL (i.e. that the critical layer scales with y+ ~Rτ+ 2 / 3),'' both untenable assumptions, but ignored citation of papers Afzal 1982 onwards on pipe flow. The present turbulent boundary layer work shows that Reynolds shear maxima, shape factor and turbulent bursting time scale with mesolayer variables and Taylor length/time scale. Residence, Embassy Hotel Rasal Gang Aligarh 202001 UP India.

  6. Shear-wave velocity structure of young Atlantic Lithosphere from dispersion analysis and waveform modelling of Rayleigh waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grevemeyer, Ingo; Lange, Dietrich; Schippkus, Sven

    2016-04-01

    The lithosphere is the outermost solid layer of the Earth and includes the brittle curst and brittle uppermost mantle. It is underlain by the asthenosphere, the weaker and hotter portion of the mantle. The boundary between the brittle lithosphere and the asthenosphere is call the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, or LAB. The oceanic lithosphere is created at spreading ridges and cools and thickens with age. Seismologists define the LAB by the presence of a low shear wave velocity zone beneath a high velocity lid. Surface waves from earthquakes occurring in young oceanic lithosphere should sample lithospheric structure when being recorded in the vicinity of a mid-ocean ridge. Here, we study group velocity and dispersion of Rayleigh waves caused by earthquakes occurring at transform faults in the Central Atlantic Ocean. Earthquakes were recorded either by a network of wide-band (up to 60 s) ocean-bottom seismometers (OBS) deployed at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near 15°N or at the Global Seismic Network (GSN) Station ASCN on Ascension Island. Surface waves sampling young Atlantic lithosphere indicate systematic age-dependent changes of group velocities and dispersion of Rayleigh waves. With increasing plate age maximum group velocity increases (as a function of period), indicating cooling and thickening of the lithosphere. Shear wave velocity is derived inverting the observed dispersion of Rayleigh waves. Further, models derived from the OBS records were refined using waveform modelling of vertical component broadband data at periods of 15 to 40 seconds, constraining the velocity structure of the uppermost 100 km and hence in the depth interval of the mantle where lithospheric cooling is most evident. Waveform modelling supports that the thickness of lithosphere increases with age and that velocities in the lithosphere increase, too.

  7. Shear velocity structure beneath the central United States: implications for the origin of the Illinois Basin and intraplate seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chen; Gilbert, Hersh; Andronicos, Christopher; Hamburger, Michael W.; Larson, Timothy; Marshak, Stephen; Pavlis, Gary L.; Yang, Xiaotao

    2016-03-01

    We present new estimates of lithospheric shear velocities for the intraplate seismic zones and the Illinois Basin in the U.S. midcontinent by analyzing teleseismic Rayleigh waves. We find that relatively high crustal shear velocities (VS) characterize the southern Illinois Basin, while relatively low crustal velocities characterize the middle and lower crust of the central and northern Illinois Basin. The observed high crustal velocities may correspond to high-density mafic intrusions emplaced into the crust during the development of the Reelfoot Rift, which may have contributed to the subsidence of the Illinois Basin. The low crustal VS beneath the central and northern basin follow the La Salle deformation belt. We also observe relatively low velocities in the mantle beneath the New Madrid seismic zone where VS decreases by about 7% compared to those outside of the rift. The low VS in the upper mantle also extends beneath the Wabash Valley and Ste. Genevieve seismic zones. Testing expected VS reductions based on plausible thermal heterogeneities for the midcontinent indicates that the 7% velocity reduction would not result from elevated temperatures alone. Instead this scale of anomaly requires a contribution from some combination of increased iron and water content. Both rifting and interaction with a mantle plume could introduce these compositional heterogeneities. Similar orientations for the NE-SW low-velocity zone and the Reelfoot Rift suggest a rift origin to the reduced velocities. The low VS upper mantle represents a weak region and the intraplate seismic zones would correspond to concentrated crustal deformation above weak mantle.

  8. Ultrasonic shear wave velocity in CLF/CMT graphite from room temperature to 2000/sup 0/F

    SciTech Connect

    Gieske, J.H.

    1980-11-01

    The temperature dependence of the ultrasonic shear velocity in CLF/CMT graphite was determined from room temperature to 2000/sup 0/F using a pulse-echo technique. Data are presented for five 0.75-inch-diameter specimens all machined from the same CLF/CMT billet. Plots of ultrasonic pulse-echo radial and axial scans of the billet which characterize the material property uniformity of the billet are also given.

  9. Shallow velocity structure and Poisson's ratio at the Tarzana, California, strong-motion accelerometer site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Catchings, R.D.; Lee, W.H.K.

    1996-01-01

    The 17 January 1994, Northridge, California, earthquake produced strong ground shaking at the Cedar Hills Nursery (referred to here as the Tarzana site) within the city of Tarzana, California, approximately 6 km from the epicenter of the mainshock. Although the Tarzana site is on a hill and is a rock site, accelerations of approximately 1.78 g horizontally and 1.2 g vertically at the Tarzana site are among the highest ever instrumentally recorded for an earthquake. To investigate possible site effects at the Tarzana site, we used explosive-source seismic refraction data to determine the shallow (<70 m) P- and S-wave velocity structure. Our seismic velocity models for the Tarzana site indicate that the local velocity structure may have contributed significantly to the observed shaking. P-wave velocities range from 0.9 to 1.65 km/sec, and S-wave velocities range from 0.20 and 0.6 km/sec for the upper 70 m. We also found evidence for a local S-wave low-velocity zone (LVZ) beneath the top of the hill. The LVZ underlies a CDMG strong-motion recording site at depths between 25 and 60 m below ground surface (BGS). Our velocity model is consistent with the near-surface (<30 m) P- and S-wave velocities and Poisson's ratios measured in a nearby (<30 m) borehole. High Poisson's ratios (0.477 to 0.494) and S-wave attenuation within the LVZ suggest that the LVZ may be composed of highly saturated shales of the Modelo Formation. Because the lateral dimensions of the LVZ approximately correspond to the areas of strongest shaking, we suggest that the highly saturated zone may have contributed to localized strong shaking. Rock sites are generally considered to be ideal locations for site response in urban areas; however, localized, highly saturated rock sites may be a hazard in urban areas that requires further investigation.

  10. Ratio of shear viscosity to entropy density in generalized theories of gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Brustein, Ram; Medved, A. J. M.

    2009-01-15

    Near the horizon of a black brane solution in anti-de Sitter space, the long-wavelength fluctuations of the metric exhibit hydrodynamic behavior. For Einstein's theory, the ratio of the shear viscosity of near-horizon metric fluctuations {eta} to the entropy per unit of transverse volume s is {eta}/s=1/4{pi}. We propose that, in generalized theories of gravity, this ratio is given by the ratio of two effective gravitational couplings and can be different than 1/4{pi}. Our proposal confirms that {eta}/s is equal to 1/4{pi} for any theory that can be transformed into Einstein's theory, such as F(R) gravity. Our proposal also implies that matter interactions--except those including explicit or implicit factors of the Riemann tensor--will not modify {eta}/s. The proposed formula reproduces, in a very simple manner, some recently found results for Gauss-Bonnet gravity. We also make a prediction for {eta}/s in Lovelock theories of any order or dimensionality.

  11. Shear wave velocity, seismic attenuation, and thermal structure of the continental upper mantle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Artemieva, I.M.; Billien, M.; Leveque, J.-J.; Mooney, W.D.

    2004-01-01

    Seismic velocity and attenuation anomalies in the mantle are commonly interpreted in terms of temperature variations on the basis of laboratory studies of elastic and anelastic properties of rocks. In order to evaluate the relative contributions of thermal and non-thermal effects on anomalies of attenuation of seismic shear waves, QS-1, and seismic velocity, VS, we compare global maps of the thermal structure of the continental upper mantle with global QS-1 and Vs maps as determined from Rayleigh waves at periods between 40 and 150 S. We limit the comparison to three continental mantle depths (50, 100 and 150 km), where model resolution is relatively high. The available data set does not indicate that, at a global scale, seismic anomalies in the upper mantle are controlled solely by temperature variations. Continental maps have correlation coefficients of <0.56 between VS and T and of <0.47 between QS and T at any depth. Such low correlation coefficients can partially be attributed to modelling arrefacts; however, they also suggest that not all of the VS and QS anomalies in the continental upper mantle can be explained by T variations. Global maps show that, by the sign of the anomaly, VS and QS usually inversely correlate with lithospheric temperatures: most cratonic regions show high VS and QS and low T, while most active regions have seismic and thermal anomalies of the opposite sign. The strongest inverse correlation is found at a depth of 100 km, where the attenuation model is best resolved. Significantly, at this depth, the contours of near-zero QS anomalies approximately correspond to the 1000 ??C isotherm, in agreement with laboratory measurements that show a pronounced increase in seismic attenuation in upper mantle rocks at 1000-1100 ??C. East-west profiles of VS, QS and T where continental data coverage is best (50??N latitude for North America and 60??N latitude for Eurasia) further demonstrate that temperature plays a dominant, but non-unique, role in

  12. Sediment and Crustal Shear Velocity Structure offshore New Zealand from Seafloor Compliance, Receiver Functions and Rayleigh Wave Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, J. S.; Sheehan, A. F.; Stachnik, J. C.; Lin, F.; Collins, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    We have developed a joint Monte Carlo inversion of teleseismic receiver functions, seafloor compliance, and Rayleigh wave dispersion and apply it here to ocean bottom seismic (OBS) data from offshore New Zealand. With this method we estimate sediment and crustal thickness and shear velocity structure beneath the Bounty Trough and the Tasman Sea flanking the South Island of New Zealand. Teleseismic receiver functions and surface wave dispersion measurements provide complementary constraints on shear velocity structure and interface depths beneath seismic stations. At ocean bottom seismic (OBS) stations the interpretation of these measurements is complicated by strong sediment reverberations that obscure deeper impedance contrasts such as the Moho. In principle, the seafloor's response to ocean loading from infragravity waves (seafloor compliance) can be used to determine shallow shear velocity information. This velocity information can subsequently be used to better model the receiver function reverberations, allowing deeper interfaces of tectonic interest to be resolved. Data for this study were acquired in 2009-2010 by the Marine Observations of Anisotropy Near Aotearoa (MOANA) experiment, which deployed 30 broadband OBS and differential pressure gauges (DPGs) off the South Island of New Zealand. High-frequency (5Hz) receiver functions were estimated using multitaper cross-correlation for events in a 30-90 degree epicentral distance range. Coherence-weighted stacks binned by epicentral distance were produced in the frequency domain to suppress noise. Seafloor compliance was measured using multitaper pressure and acceleration spectra averaged from 120 days of continuous data without large transient events. Seafloor compliance measurements on the order of 10-9 Pa-1 are sensitive to shear velocity structure in the uppermost 5km of the crust and sediments. Rayleigh dispersion measurements were obtained at periods of 6-27s from ambient noise cross correlation. Sediment

  13. Raindrop axis ratios, fall velocities and size distribution over Sumatra from 2D-Video Disdrometer measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzuki; Randeu, Walter L.; Kozu, Toshiaki; Shimomai, Toyoshi; Hashiguchi, Hiroyuki; Schönhuber, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Raindrop axis ratio, falling velocity and size distribution are important in broad list of applications. However, they are not frequently observed in the equatorial region. This paper elucidated the characteristics of raindrop axis ratio, falling velocity and size distribution based on 2D-Video Disdrometer (2DVD) data that have been collected in the equatorial Indonesia, particularly at Kototabang (hereafter called KT), west Sumatra, Indonesia (0.20°S, 100.32°E, 864 m above sea level). A comprehensive follow-up of the previous study on the natural variability of raindrop size distributions (DSDs) is presented. Precipitation was classified through 1.3-GHz wind profiler observation. The dependence of raindrop falling velocity and axis ratio on rainfall type was not clearly observed. Overall, measured raindrop fall velocities were in good agreement with Gunn-Kinzer's data. Raindrop axis ratio at KT was more spherical than that of artificial rain and equilibrium model, and close to the values reported in the turbulent high shear zone of surface layer which can be partially due to the effect of the instrument errors (e.g., location and container shape). Of some natural variations of DSD investigated, the dependence of DSD on rainfall rate and rainfall type as well as diurnal variation was clearly visible. A striking contrast between the stratiform and convective rains is that the size distributions from the stratiform (convective) rains tend to narrow (broaden) with increasing rainfall rates. For rainfall rate R < 10 mm/h, the size distribution of stratiform was broader than that of convective. On the other hand, at higher rainfall rate more large-sized drops were found in convective rain. During the convective rain, very large-sized drops were found mainly at the very start of rain event while for the stratiform they were found to be associated with a strong bright band. In diurnal basis, the DSDs in the morning hours were narrower than those in the evening which was

  14. Propagation of Scholte Waves in deep water in a seafloor with power-law shear velocity depth dependence.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorman, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    The seafloor plays an important role in the propagation ofseafloor noise because its low shear velocity forms a strongwaveguide and the high shear velocity gradient facilitatesconversion processes.In 2001 (JASA), O. A. Godin and D. M.F. Chapman studiedpropagation of interface (Scholte) waves in models with ashear speed profile with a power-law depth dependence.They analyzed of four datasets from shallow-watersites, which they fit well with two-parameter models.Furthermore, they show that for the exponent value of1/2, the mode wavefunctions are self-similar.Data from the deep seafloor from seafloor sources observedby Ocean-Bottom Seismographs frequently exhibit afundamental mode ending in an Airy phase with a frequencyof a few Hertz. This is, of course,, incompatiblewith self-similarity. Adjusting the power-law shear velocityprofile near the water interface, however, improvesthe fit of this simple model with a parsimoniousparameterization to data from the the deep seafloor.Approximation of a power-law model using thin layers ofuniform velocity is eased by using an editor with aninteractive graphical user interface.

  15. Performance of a transonic fan stage designed for a low meridional velocity ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. D.; Lewis, G. W., Jr.; Osborn, W. M.

    1978-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance and design parameters of a transonic fan stage are presented. The fan stage was designed for a meridional velocity ratio of 0.8 across the tip of the stage, a pressure ratio of 1.57, a flow of 29.5 kilograms per second, and a tip speed of 426 meters per second. Radial surveys were obtained over the stable operating range from 50 to 100 percent of design speed. The measured, peak efficiency (0.81) of the stage occurred at a pressure ratio of 1.58 and a flow of 28.7 kilograms per second.

  16. Simultaneous pressure and velocity measurements using multi-dye microspheres implementing an intensity-ratio method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroix, Daniel; Massing, Julian; Cierpka, Christian; Li, Guo-Shi; Dabiri, Dana; Gamal Khalil; University of Washington Team; Technische Universitaet Berlin Collaboration; Bundeswehr University Munich Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    Luminescent pressure and temperature sensitive paints have been used to quantify pressure and temperature on surfaces, but not in flow fields. By incorporating pressure-sensitive, temperature-sensitive, and reference (non-sensitive) dyes into microspheres, which are then seeded into flow and imaged using high sensitivity EMCCDs, it will be possible to obtain pressure and temperature simultaneously. The pressure and temperature measurement methodologies are coupled with existing particle image velocimetry (PIV) methods to obtain simultaneous pressure, temperature, and velocity. Current research is focused on pressure and velocity measurements of these aerosolized microspheres using multiple cameras and calculating the ratio between the imaged pressure-sensitive and reference intensities. Detailed post-processing, which shows that the standard deviation of the ratios are reduced from approximately 10% to 5-6% will be discussed. In addition, we will discuss the implementation of the intensity-ratio method as well as the calibration process for determining pressure.

  17. Shear Wave Velocity Structure of Southern African Crust: Evidence for Compositional Heterogeneity within Archaean and Proterozoic Terrains

    SciTech Connect

    Kgaswane, E M; Nyblade, A A; Julia, J; Dirks, P H H M; Durrheim, R J; Pasyanos, M E

    2008-11-11

    Crustal structure in southern Africa has been investigated by jointly inverting receiver functions and Rayleigh wave group velocities for 89 broadband seismic stations spanning much of the Precambrian shield of southern Africa. 1-D shear wave velocity profiles obtained from the inversion yield Moho depths that are similar to those reported in previous studies and show considerable variability in the shear wave velocity structure of the lower part of the crust between some terrains. For many of the Archaean and Proterozoic terrains in the shield, S velocities reach 4.0 km/s or higher over a substantial part of the lower crust. However, for most of the Kimberley terrain and adjacent parts of the Kheis Province and Witwatersrand terrain, as well as for the western part of the Tokwe terrain, mean shear wave velocities of {le} 3.9 km/s characterize the lower part of the crust along with slightly ({approx}5 km) thinner crust. These findings indicate that the lower crust across much of the shield has a predominantly mafic composition, except for the southwest portion of the Kaapvaal Craton and western portion of the Zimbabwe Craton, where the lower crust is intermediate-to-felsic in composition. The parts of the Kaapvaal Craton underlain by intermediate-to-felsic lower crust coincide with regions where Ventersdorp rocks have been preserved, and thus we suggest that the intermediate-to-felsic composition of the lower crust and the shallower Moho may have resulted from crustal melting during the Ventersdorp tectonomagmatic event at c. 2.7 Ga and concomitant crustal thinning caused by rifting.

  18. Determination of the full elastic moduli of single crystals using shear-wave velocities by Brillouin spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, D.; Mao, Z.; Lin, J.; Yang, J.

    2013-12-01

    Brillouin light scattering (BLS) is the inelastic scattering of monochromatic laser light by phonons in the GHz frequency range [1]. BLS spectroscopy can be used to measure sound velocities traveling along certain directions of a single crystal through the frequency shifts of the scattered light from the acoustic phonons [1]. Over the past few decades, BLS spectroscopy has been widely used to measure the velocities of acoustic waves for a wide range of Earth's materials, in which the full elastic constants were derived from the measured compressional (VP) and shear wave (VS) velocities. However, the VP velocities of minerals normally overlap with the shear-wave velocities of diamonds in Brillouin measurements approximately above 25 GPa [2-5] such that only VS of minerals can be measured experimentally. Theoretical models have showed that the shear-wave velocities of minerals also carry necessary information to invert the full elastic tensors [2], although previous studies at high pressures have focused on measuring velocities within the principle planes of the crystals. This leads to a strong trade-off among individual Cij, preventing the derivation of the full elastic tensors from the VS velocities alone [3-5]. In this study, we have come up with an elastic model to overcome this problem by finding a suitable crystallographic plane that has optimized VS-VP interactions in the elastic tensors. Using MgO, spinel and zoisite as test samples, we have used measured VP/VS or VS velocities of these crystals using BLS spectroscopy to derive their full elastic tensors. This new approach sheds lights on future high-pressure elasticity studies relevant to materials the Earth's deep interior. 1. Sinogeikin, S.V., Bass, J.D., Phys. Earth Planet. Inter., 120, 43 (2000). 2. Every, A. G., Phys. Rev. B., 22, 1746, (1980) 3. Marquardt, H., Speziale, S., Reichmann, H.J., Frost, D.J., and Schilling, F.R., Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 287, 345 (2009). 4. Marquardt, H., Speziale, S

  19. Lithospheric Shear Velocity Models Beneath Continental Margins in Antarctica Inferred From Genetic Algorithm Inversion for Teleseismic Receiver Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanao, M.; Shibutani, T.

    2005-12-01

    Seismic shear velocity models of the crust and the uppermost mantle were studied by teleseismic receiver function analyses beneath the permanent stations of the Federation of Digital Seismographic Networks (FDSN) at Antarctic continental margins. In order to eliminate the starting model dependency, a non-linear Genetic Algorithm (GA) was introduced in the time domain inversion of the receiver functions. A plenty of velocity models with an acceptable fit to the receiver function waveforms were generated during the inversion, and a stable model was produced by employing a weighted average of the best 1,000 models encountered in the development of the GA. The shear velocity model beneath the MAW (67.6S, 62.9E) has a sharp Moho boundary at 44 km depth that might have involved in a reworked metamorphic event of adjacent Archaean Napier Complex. A fairly sharp Moho was identified about 28 km depth beneath DRV (66.7S, 140.0E), with a middle grade variation of the crustal velocities that might have been caused by the Early Proterozoic metamorphism. A similar sharp Moho has been found at 40 km beneath SYO (69.0S, 39.6E). Thus Moho depth is consistent with that from refraction / wide-angle reflection surveys around the station. Fairly complicated velocity variations within the crust may have a relationship with lithology of granulite facies metamorphic rocks in the shallow crust associated with Pan-African events. Broadening low velocity zones about 30 km depths with transitional crust-mantle boundary at VNDA (77.5S, 161.9E), might be caused by the rift system besides the Trans Antarctic Mountains. As for the Antarctic Peninsular, very broad Moho was found around 36 km depths around PMSA (64.8S, 64.0W). The evidence of velocity variations within the crust reflects the tectonic histories of each terrain where these permanent stations are located.

  20. A 3-D shear velocity model of the southern North American and Caribbean plates from ambient noise and earthquake tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaite, B.; Villaseñor, A.; Iglesias, A.; Herraiz, M.; Jiménez-Munt, I.

    2015-02-01

    We use group velocities from earthquake tomography together with group and phase velocities from ambient noise tomography (ANT) of Rayleigh waves to invert for the 3-D shear-wave velocity structure (5-70 km) of the Caribbean (CAR) and southern North American (NAM) plates. The lithospheric model proposed offers a complete image of the crust and uppermost-mantle with imprints of the tectonic evolution. One of the most striking features inferred is the main role of the Ouachita-Marathon-Sonora orogeny front on the crustal seismic structure of the NAM plate. A new imaged feature is the low crustal velocities along the USA-Mexico border. The model also shows a break of the east-west mantle velocity dichotomy of the NAM and CAR plates beneath the Isthmus of the Tehuantepec and the Yucatan Block. High upper-mantle velocities along the Mesoamerican Subduction Zone coincide with inactive volcanic areas while the lowest velocities correspond to active volcanic arcs and thin lithospheric mantle regions.

  1. Compositional layering within the large low shear-wave velocity provinces (LLSVPs) in the lower mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballmer, Maxim; Lekic, Vedran; Schumacher, Lina; Ito, Garrett; Thomas, Christine

    2016-04-01

    Seismic tomography reveals two antipodal LLSVPs in the Earth's mantle, each extending from the core-mantle boundary (CMB) up to ~1000 km depth. The LLSVPs are thought to host primordial mantle materials that bear witness of early-Earth processes, and/or subducted basalt that has accumulated in the mantle over billions of years. A compositional distinction between the LLSVPs and the ambient mantle is supported by anti-correlation of bulk-sound and shear-wave velocity (Vs) anomalies as well as abrupt lateral gradients in Vs along LLSVP margins. Both of these observations, however, are mainly restricted to the LLSVP bottom domains (2300~2900 km depth), or hereinafter referred to as "deep distinct domains" (DDD). Seismic sensitivity calculations suggest that DDDs are more likely to be composed of primordial mantle material than of basaltic material. On the other hand, the seismic signature of LLSVP shallow domains (1000~2300 km depth) is consistent with a basaltic composition, though a purely thermal origin cannot be ruled out. Here, we explore the dynamical, seismological, and geochemical implications of the hypothesis that the LLSVPs are compositionally layered with a primordial bottom domain (or DDD) and a basaltic shallow domain. We test this hypothesis using 2D thermochemical mantle-convection models. Depending on the density difference between primordial and basaltic materials, the materials either mix or remain separate as they join to form thermochemical piles in the deep mantle. Separation of both materials within these piles provides an explanation for LLSVP seismic properties, including substantial internal vertical gradients in Vs observed at 400-700 km height above the CMB, as well as out-of-plane reflections on LLSVP sides over a range of depths. Predicted geometry of thermochemical piles is compared to LLSVP and DDD shapes as constrained by seismic cluster analysis. Geodynamic models predict short-lived "secondary" plumelets to rise from LLSVP roofs and

  2. FULLY CONVECTIVE MAGNETO-ROTATIONAL TURBULENCE IN LARGE ASPECT-RATIO SHEARING BOXES

    SciTech Connect

    Bodo, G.; Rossi, P.; Cattaneo, F.; Mignone, A.

    2015-01-20

    We present a numerical study of turbulence and dynamo action in stratified shearing boxes with both finite and zero net magnetic flux. We assume that the fluid obeys the perfect gas law and has finite thermal diffusivity. The latter is chosen to be small enough so that vigorous convective states develop. The properties of these convective solutions are analyzed as the aspect ratio of the computational domain is varied and as the value of the mean field is increased. For the cases with zero net flux, we find that a well-defined converged state is obtained for large enough aspect ratios. In the converged state, the dynamo can be extremely efficient and can generate substantial toroidal flux. We identify solutions in which the toroidal field is mostly symmetric about the mid-plane and solutions in which it is mostly anti-symmetric. The symmetric solutions are found to be more efficient at transporting angular momentum and can give rise to a luminosity that is up to an order of magnitude larger than the corresponding value for the anti-symmetric states. In the cases with a finite net flux, the system appears to spend most of the time in the symmetric states.

  3. Fully Convective Magneto-rotational Turbulence in Large Aspect-ratio Shearing Boxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodo, G.; Cattaneo, F.; Mignone, A.; Rossi, P.

    2015-01-01

    We present a numerical study of turbulence and dynamo action in stratified shearing boxes with both finite and zero net magnetic flux. We assume that the fluid obeys the perfect gas law and has finite thermal diffusivity. The latter is chosen to be small enough so that vigorous convective states develop. The properties of these convective solutions are analyzed as the aspect ratio of the computational domain is varied and as the value of the mean field is increased. For the cases with zero net flux, we find that a well-defined converged state is obtained for large enough aspect ratios. In the converged state, the dynamo can be extremely efficient and can generate substantial toroidal flux. We identify solutions in which the toroidal field is mostly symmetric about the mid-plane and solutions in which it is mostly anti-symmetric. The symmetric solutions are found to be more efficient at transporting angular momentum and can give rise to a luminosity that is up to an order of magnitude larger than the corresponding value for the anti-symmetric states. In the cases with a finite net flux, the system appears to spend most of the time in the symmetric states.

  4. Shear wave velocity structure of the lower crust in southern Africa: Evidence for compositional heterogeneity within Archaean and Proterozoic terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kgaswane, Eldridge M.; Nyblade, Andrew A.; Juliã, Jordi; Dirks, Paul H. G. M.; Durrheim, Raymond J.; Pasyanos, Michael E.

    2009-12-01

    The nature of the lower crust across the southern African shield has been investigated by jointly inverting receiver functions and Rayleigh wave group velocities for 89 broadband seismic stations located in Botswana, South Africa and Zimbabwe. For large parts of both Archaean and Proterozoic terrains, the velocity models obtained from the inversions show shear wave velocities ≥4.0 km/s below ˜20-30 km depth, indicating a predominantly mafic lower crust. However, for much of the Kimberley terrain and adjacent parts of the Kheis Province and Witwatersrand terrain in South Africa, as well as for the western part of the Tokwe terrain in Zimbabwe, shear wave velocities of ≤3.9 km/s are found below ˜20-30 km depth, indicating an intermediate-to-felsic lower crust. The areas of intermediate-to-felsic lower crust in South Africa coincide with regions where Ventersdorp rocks have been preserved, suggesting that the more evolved composition of the lower crust may have resulted from crustal reworking and extension during the Ventersdorp tectonomagmatic event at c. 2.7 Ga.

  5. First principles study of the C/Si ratio effect on the ideal shear strength of β-SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Wen; Li, Yingying; Nie, Chu; Xiao, Wei; Yan, Liqin

    2016-07-01

    The effect of the C/Si atomic ratio on the ideal shear strength of β-SiC is investigated with first principles calculations. β -SiC samples with different C/Si ratios are generated by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations with empirical inter-atomic SiC potential. Each SiC sample is sheared along the < 100> direction and the stress-strain curve is calculated from first principles. The results show that the ideal shear strength of SiC decreases with the increase of C/Si ratio. For a non-stoichiometric SiC sample, a C-C bond inside a large carbon cluster breaks first under shear strain condition due to the internal strain around the carbon clusters. Because the band gap is narrowed under shear strain conditions, a local maximum stress appears in the elastic region of the stress-strain curve for each SiC sample at certain strain condition. The yield strength may increase with the increase of C/Si ratio.

  6. Aeolian Shear Stress Ratio Measurements within Mesquite-Dominated Landscapes of the Chihuahuan Desert, New Mexico, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, James; Nickling, W. G.; Gilliles, J. A.

    2006-01-01

    A field study was conducted to ascertain the amount of protection that mesquite-dominated communities provide to the surface from wind erosion. The dynamics of the locally accelerated evolution of a mesquite/coppice dune landscape and the undetermined spatial dependence of potential erosion by wind from a shear stress partition model were investigated. Sediment transport and dust emission processes are governed by the amount of protection that can be provided by roughness elements. Although shear stress partition models exist that can describe this, their accuracy has only been tested against a limited dataset because instrumentation has previously been unable to provide the necessary measurements. This study combines the use of meteorological towers and surface shear stress measurements with Irwin sensors to measure the partition of shear stress in situ. The surface shear stress within preferentially aligned vegetation (within coppice dune development) exhibited highly skewed distributions, while a more homogenous surface stress was recorded at a site with less developed coppice dunes. Above the vegetation, the logarithmic velocity profile deduced roughness length (based on 10-min averages) exhibited a distinct correlation with compass direction for the site with vegetation preferentially aligned, while the site with more homogenously distributed vegetation showed very little variation in the roughness length. This distribution in roughness length within an area, defines a distribution of a resolved shear stress partitioning model based on these measurements, ultimately providing potential closure to a previously uncorrelated model parameter.

  7. GAS EXCITATION IN ULIRGs: MAPS OF DIAGNOSTIC EMISSION-LINE RATIOS IN SPACE AND VELOCITY

    SciTech Connect

    Soto, Kurt T.; Martin, Crystal L.

    2012-11-15

    Emission-line spectra extracted at multiple locations across 39 ultraluminous infrared galaxies have been compiled into a spectrophotometric atlas. Line profiles of H{alpha}, [N II], [S II], [O I], H{beta}, and [O III] are resolved and fit jointly with common velocity components. Diagnostic ratios of these line fluxes are presented in a series of plots, showing how the Doppler shift, line width, gas excitation, and surface brightness change with velocity at fixed position and also with distance from the nucleus. One general characteristic of these spectra is the presence of shocked gas extending many kiloparsecs from the nucleus. In some systems, the rotation curves of the emitting gas indicate motions that suggest gas disks, which are most frequent at early merger stages. At these early merger stages, the emission line ratios indicate the presence of shocked gas, which may be triggered by the merger event. We also report the general characteristics of the integrated spectra.

  8. Electrostatic drift-wave instability in a nonuniform quantum magnetoplasma with parallel velocity shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Tariq, Sabeen; Mirza, Arshad M.; Masood, W.

    2010-10-15

    The propagation of high and low frequency (in comparison with the cyclotron frequency) electrostatic drift-waves is investigated in a nonuniform, dense magnetoplasma (composed of electrons and ions), in the presence of parallel shear flow, by employing the quantum magnetohydrodynamic (QMHD) model. Using QMHD model, a new set of equations is presented in order to investigate linear properties of electrostatic drift-waves with sheared plasma flows for dense plasmas. In this regard, dispersion relations for coupled electron-thermal and drift-ion acoustic modes are derived and several interesting limiting cases are discussed. For instance, it is found that sheared ion flow parallel to the external magnetic field can drive the quantum drift-ion acoustic wave unstable, etc. The present investigation may have relevance in dense astrophysical environments where quantum effects are significant.

  9. The shear wave velocity of the upper mantle beneath the Bay of Bengal, Northeast Indian Ocean from interstation phase velocities of surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, S. N.; Mitra, Supriyo; Suresh, G.

    2013-06-01

    The Bay of Bengal evolved along the eastern margin of the Indian subcontinent about 130 Ma with the breakup of India from eastern Gondwanaland. Since then the Indian lithospheric Plate has moved northward, along with the Bay of Bengal, and eventually collided with the Eurasian Plate. The age of the lithosphere beneath the central Bay of Bengal is ˜110 Ma. We evaluate the shear wave velocity structure of the upper mantle beneath the central Bay through inversion of phase velocities of fundamental mode Rayleigh and Love waves along two wave paths: (i) between Port Blair (PBA) and VIS (Visakhapatnam) and (ii) between DGPR (Diglipur) and VIS. The seismological observatories PBA and DGPR are located on the Andaman Island and to the east of the Bay and the observatory at VIS in located on the eastern coast of India to the west of the Bay. Using broad-band records of earthquakes, which lie along the great circle arc joining each pair of observatories, we obtain phase velocities between 20 and 240 s periods for Rayleigh waves and between 23 and 170 s for Love waves. These phase velocities are inverted to find the S-wave velocity structure of the upper mantle down to 400 km. The crustal structure is based on previous studies of the Bay and kept fixed in the inversion. We obtain a radially anisotropic upper-mantle structure, where the SH-wave velocity (VSH) is greater than the SV-wave velocity (VSV) down to 400 km. The S-wave velocity decreases sharply by ˜4.5 per cent for VSV and ˜1.5 per cent for VSH at a depth 110 km, which is considered as the Lithosphere-Asthenosphere boundary (LAB), that is, the bottom of the mantle lid. Based on recent studies, such sharp fall of S-wave velocity below the mantle lid appears to indicate a partially molten thin layer (G-discontinuity) at this depth. The thickness of the mantle lid is intermediate between oceanic and continental regions. The lid is also characterized

  10. Study of the dynamic behavior of earthflows through the analysis of shear wave velocity in the landslide's body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertello, Lara

    2015-04-01

    Over the first year of my PhD, I carried out a literature search about earthflows features and dynamics and conducted periodic ReMi-MASW campaigns to assess the temporal variation of shear velocity for several landslides that were recently reactivated. Literature search was conducted to review recent works related to shear wave velocity as an indicator for rheological changes in clay materials (Mainsant et al., 2012). From January to August 2014 I carried out numerous ReMi-MASW surveys to characterize several active earthflows in the Emilia-Romagna Apennines. I did these measures both inside and outside the landslide's bodies, usually during the first ten days after the reactivation. At first, these measures indicate low shear waves velocity inside the landslide and high velocity outside. This is due to the different consistence of the materials, to the different water content and to the void index. Then I repeated the measures over time in the same places on the same landslide, in order to detect the variability of Vs over time in correlations with the landslide's movements. Periodic ReMi-MASW survey were conducted on the following landslides: • The Montevecchio (FC) earthflow was reactivated the 1th of February 2014 (estimated volume of 240.000 m³) and increased the movement's velocity around the 7th of February 2014, after intense precipitations. Analyzing the data collected inside the landslide's body, I observed an increase of Vs over time, due to the decrease of landslide velocity; • The Silla (BO) complex landslide reactivated the 10th of February 2014 (estimated volume of 900.000 m³), and moved downslope with a maximum velocity in the order of several m/hour. Studying the data, it is possible to notice how the Vs increase over time only in the lower portion of the landslide. In fact the upper portion is still active, so the Vs remained unchanged over time. • the Puzzola-Grizzana Morandi (BO) complex landslide. This landslide was reactivated the 10th

  11. Pressure tensor in the presence of velocity shear: Stationary solutions and self-consistent equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Cerri, S. S.; Pegoraro, F.; Califano, F.; Jenko, F.

    2014-11-15

    Observations and numerical simulations of laboratory and space plasmas in almost collisionless regimes reveal anisotropic and non-gyrotropic particle distribution functions. We investigate how such states can persist in the presence of a sheared flow. We focus our attention on the pressure tensor equation in a magnetized plasma and derive analytical self-consistent plasma equilibria which exhibit a novel asymmetry with respect to the magnetic field direction. These results are relevant for investigating, within fluid models that retain the full pressure tensor dynamics, plasma configurations where a background shear flow is present.

  12. Feasibility of waveform inversion of Rayleigh waves for shallow shear-wave velocity using a genetic algorithm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zeng, C.; Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Tsoflias, G.P.

    2011-01-01

    Conventional surface wave inversion for shallow shear (S)-wave velocity relies on the generation of dispersion curves of Rayleigh waves. This constrains the method to only laterally homogeneous (or very smooth laterally heterogeneous) earth models. Waveform inversion directly fits waveforms on seismograms, hence, does not have such a limitation. Waveforms of Rayleigh waves are highly related to S-wave velocities. By inverting the waveforms of Rayleigh waves on a near-surface seismogram, shallow S-wave velocities can be estimated for earth models with strong lateral heterogeneity. We employ genetic algorithm (GA) to perform waveform inversion of Rayleigh waves for S-wave velocities. The forward problem is solved by finite-difference modeling in the time domain. The model space is updated by generating offspring models using GA. Final solutions can be found through an iterative waveform-fitting scheme. Inversions based on synthetic records show that the S-wave velocities can be recovered successfully with errors no more than 10% for several typical near-surface earth models. For layered earth models, the proposed method can generate one-dimensional S-wave velocity profiles without the knowledge of initial models. For earth models containing lateral heterogeneity in which case conventional dispersion-curve-based inversion methods are challenging, it is feasible to produce high-resolution S-wave velocity sections by GA waveform inversion with appropriate priori information. The synthetic tests indicate that the GA waveform inversion of Rayleigh waves has the great potential for shallow S-wave velocity imaging with the existence of strong lateral heterogeneity. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  13. Shear flow over a porous layer: Velocity in the real proximity of the interface via rheological tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carotenuto, Claudia; Minale, Mario

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we have experimentally investigated the velocity profile of a fluid undergoing simple shear above a porous medium. To this end, we used for the first time rheological tests performed with a constant stress rheometer equipped with parallel plate geometry with a real porous medium glued on the lower plate. The velocity at the interface between the porous layer and the free fluid was inferred by extrapolating the linear velocity profile in the free fluid to the interface. These data were nicely compared with predictions obtained integrating the Brinkman extension of Darcy law in the porous medium together with Stokes equations in the free fluid coupled at the interface by the continuity of velocity and by the momentum balance suggested by Ochoa-Tapia and Whitaker [Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer 38(14), 2635 (1995)]. In the literature, the physical origin of the stress jump imposed by Ochoa-Tapia and Whitaker at the interface has been attributed to a perturbation of the velocity profile in the vicinity of the interface, both in the porous medium and in the free fluid. For the first time, the disturbance in the free fluid has been measured and quantified resulting in a satisfactory agreement with theoretical predictions.

  14. Anisotropic Shear Velocity Models of the North American Upper Mantle Based on Waveform Inversion and Numerical Wavefield Computations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre, C.; Masson, Y.; Romanowicz, B. A.; French, S. W.; Yuan, H.

    2014-12-01

    The Earthscope TA deployment across the continental US now has reached the eastern part of the United States, providing the opportunity for high-resolution 3D seismic velocity imaging of both lithosphere and asthenosphere across the entire north-American continent (NA). Previously (Yuan et al., 2014), we presented a 3D radially anisotropic shear wave model of North America (NA) lithospheric mantle based on full waveform tomography, combining teleseismic and regional distance data sampling the NA. Regional wavefield computations were performed numerically, using a regional Spectral Element code (RegSEM, Cupillard et al., 2012), while teleseismic computations were performed approximately, using non-linear asymptotic coupling theory (NACT, Li and Romanowicz, 1995). For both datasets, the inversion was performed iteratively, using a Gauss-Newton scheme, with kernels computed using either NACT or the surface wave, path average approximation (PAVA), depending on the source-station distance. Building upon our previous work, we here present a new radially anisotropic lithospheric/asthenospheric model of shear velocity for North America based entirely on regional waveforms from an augmented dataset of ~150 events contained and observed inside the study region, with forward wavefield computations performed using RegSEM down to 40s, starting from our most recent whole mantle 3D radially anisotropic shear velocity model (SEMUCB-wm1, French and Romanowicz, 2014). Several iterations of inversion are performed using a Gauss-Newton scheme. We present and compare two models obtained, on the one hand, using NACT/PAVA kernels as in our previous work, and on the other, using hybrid kernels, where the Hessian is computed using NACT/PAVA, but the gradient is computed numerically from the adjoint wavefield, providing more accurate kernels while preserving the fast convergence properties of the Gauss-Newton inversion scheme. We also present an update to our azimuthally anisotropic shear

  15. Improvement of Method for Estimation of Site Amplification Factor Based on Average Shear-wave Velocity of Ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Makoto; Midorikawa, Saburoh

    The empirical equation for estimating the site amplification factor of ground motion by the average shear-wave velocity of ground (AVS) is examined. In the existing equations, the coefficient on dependence of the amplification factor on the AVS was treated as constant. The analysis showed that the coefficient varies with change of the AVS for short periods. A new estimation equation was proposed considering the dependence on the AVS. The new equation can represent soil characteristics that the softer soil has the longer predominant period, and can make better estimations for short periods than the existing method.

  16. Competing mechanisms of plasma transport in inhomogeneous configurations with velocity shear: the solar-wind interaction with earth's magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Faganello, M; Califano, F; Pegoraro, F

    2008-01-11

    Two-dimensional simulations of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in an inhomogeneous compressible plasma with a density gradient show that, in a transverse magnetic field configuration, the vortex pairing process and the Rayleigh-Taylor secondary instability compete during the nonlinear evolution of the vortices. Two different regimes exist depending on the value of the density jump across the velocity shear layer. These regimes have different physical signatures that can be crucial for the interpretation of satellite data of the interaction of the solar wind with the magnetospheric plasma.

  17. Competing mechanisms of plasma transport in inhomogeneous configurations with velocity shear: the solar-wind interaction with earth's magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Faganello, M; Califano, F; Pegoraro, F

    2008-01-11

    Two-dimensional simulations of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in an inhomogeneous compressible plasma with a density gradient show that, in a transverse magnetic field configuration, the vortex pairing process and the Rayleigh-Taylor secondary instability compete during the nonlinear evolution of the vortices. Two different regimes exist depending on the value of the density jump across the velocity shear layer. These regimes have different physical signatures that can be crucial for the interpretation of satellite data of the interaction of the solar wind with the magnetospheric plasma. PMID:18232777

  18. The effect of shearing strain-rate on the ultimate shearing resistance of clay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, R. Y. K.

    1975-01-01

    An approach for investigating the shearing resistance of cohesive soils subjected to a high rate of shearing strain is described. A fast step-loading torque apparatus was used to induce a state of pure shear in a hollow cylindrical soil specimen. The relationship between shearing resistance and rate of shear deformation was established for various soil densities expressed in terms of initial void ratio or water content. For rate of shearing deformation studies, the shearing resistance increases initially with shearing velocity, but subsequently reaches a terminal value as the shearing velocity increases. The terminal shearing resistance is also found to increase as the density of the soil increases. The results of this investigation are useful in the rheological study of clay. It is particularly important for mobility problems of soil runways, since the soil resistance is found to be sensitive to the rate of shearing.

  19. The effect of shearing strain-rate on the ultimate shearing resistance of clay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, R. Y. K.

    1976-01-01

    The shearing resistance of cohesive soils subjected to a high rate of shearing strain was investigated. A fast step-loading torque apparatus was used to induce a state of pure shear in a hollow cylindrical soil specimen. The relationship between shearing resistance and rate of shear deformation was established for various soil densities expressed in terms of initial void ratio or water content. For rate of shearing deformation studies to date, the shearing resistance increases initially with shearing velocity but subsequently reaches a terminal value as the shearing velocity increases. The terminal shearing resistance is also found to increase as the density of the soil increases. The results are useful in the rheological study of clay. It is particularly important for mobility problems of soil runways, since the soil resistance is found to be sensitive to the rate of shearing.

  20. Shear wave velocity structure in North America from large-scale waveform inversions of surface waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alsina, D.; Woodward, R.L.; Snieder, R.K.

    1996-01-01

    A two-step nonlinear and linear inversion is carried out to map the lateral heterogeneity beneath North America using surface wave data. The lateral resolution for most areas of the model is of the order of several hundred kilometers. The most obvious feature in the tomographic images is the rapid transition between low velocities in the technically active region west of the Rocky Mountains and high velocities in the stable central and eastern shield of North America. The model also reveals smaller-scale heterogeneous velocity structures. A high-velocity anomaly is imaged beneath the state of Washington that could be explained as the subducting Juan de Fuca plate beneath the Cascades. A large low-velocity structure extends along the coast from the Mendocino to the Rivera triple junction and to the continental interior across the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico. Its shape changes notably with depth. This anomaly largely coincides with the part of the margin where no lithosphere is consumed since the subduction has been replaced by a transform fault. Evidence for a discontinuous subduction of the Cocos plate along the Middle American Trench is found. In central Mexico a transition is visible from low velocities across the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) to high velocities beneath the Yucatan Peninsula. Two elongated low-velocity anomalies beneath the Yellowstone Plateau and the eastern Snake River Plain volcanic system and beneath central Mexico and the TMVB seem to be associated with magmatism and partial melting. Another low-velocity feature is seen at depths of approximately 200 km beneath Florida and the Atlantic Coastal Plain. The inversion technique used is based on a linear surface wave scattering theory, which gives tomographic images of the relative phase velocity perturbations in four period bands ranging from 40 to 150 s. In order to find a smooth reference model a nonlinear inversion based on ray theory is first performed. After

  1. Use of a power law relation to describe field measurements of compressional and shear velocity in a sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Endo, H.

    1997-04-01

    A sediment is assumed as a percolation network described by a {open_quotes}Swiss cheese{close_quotes} continuum model. A scaling law for a sediment is applicable to describe field measurements of compressional and shear velocity with porosity. The experimental data obtained by Deep Sea Drilling Project of three sites 288, 289, and 316 on the Ontong{endash}Java Plateau in the western Pacific Ocean is available for calculations. The approximate expression of the variation of sound velocity with porosity (p) obtains when satisfied with the conditions of p{sub c}{gt}p, where p{sub c} is the critical porosity. This expression is analogous to that of the frame bulk modulus obtained by Hamilton. {copyright} {ital 1997 Acoustical Society of America.}

  2. Site response, shallow shear-wave velocity, and wave propagation at the San Jose, California, dense seismic array

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartzell, S.; Carver, D.; Williams, R.A.; Harmsen, S.; Zerva, A.

    2003-01-01

    Ground-motion records from a 52-element dense seismic array near San Jose, California, are analyzed to obtain site response, shallow shear-wave velocity, and plane-wave propagation characteristics. The array, located on the eastern side of the Santa Clara Valley south of the San Francisco Bay, is sited over the Evergreen basin, a 7-km-deep depression with Miocene and younger deposits. Site response values below 4 Hz are up to a factor of 2 greater when larger, regional records are included in the analysis, due to strong surface-wave development within the Santa Clara Valley. The pattern of site amplification is the same, however, with local or regional events. Site amplification increases away from the eastern edge of the Santa Clara Valley, reaching a maximum over the western edge of the Evergreen basin, where the pre-Cenozoic basement shallows rapidly. Amplification then decreases further to the west. This pattern may be caused by lower shallow shear-wave velocities and thicker Quaternary deposits further from the edge of the Santa Clara Valley and generation/trapping of surface waves above the shallowing basement of the western Evergreen basin. Shear-wave velocities from the inversion of site response spectra based on smaller, local earthquakes compare well with those obtained independently from our seismic reflection/refraction measurements. Velocities from the inversion of site spectra that include larger, regional records do not compare well with these measurements. A mix of local and regional events, however, is appropriate for determination of site response to be used in seismic hazard evaluation, since large damaging events would excite both body and surface waves with a wide range in ray parameters. Frequency-wavenumber, plane-wave analysis is used to determine the backazimuth and apparent velocity of coherent phases at the array. Conventional, high-resolution, and multiple signal characterization f-k power spectra and stacked slowness power spectra are

  3. Geodynamical Interpretation of Crustal and Mantle Shear-Wave Velocity Structures Beneath the Carpathian-Pannonian Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yong; Stuart, Graham; Houseman, Gregory; Grecu, Bogdan; Ionescu, Constantin; Hegedüs, Endre; Radovanović, Slavica; Shen, Yang; South Carpathian Project working Group

    2013-04-01

    The Carpathian-Pannonian system of Eastern and Central Europe represents a unique opportunity to study the interaction between surface tectonic processes involving convergence and extension, and convective processes in the upper mantle. The South Carpathian Project (SCP), a major temporary deployment (2009-2011) of seismic broadband systems extending across the eastern Pannonian Basin and the South Carpathian Mountains was set up with the purpose of bringing constraints on the geodynamical processes that have shaped the region. Imaging the seismic velocity structure of the crust and the upper mantle helps us to understand the structure and geodynamical evolution of this part of central Europe. Here, we present high-resolution images of both crustal and upper mantle shear-wave velocity structures beneath the Carpathian-Pannonian region using surface waves obtained from ambient noise tomography, and finite-frequency teleseismic tomography using S-wave arrivals, from 54 stations of the South Carpathian Project (SCP, 2009-2011), 56 stations of the Carpathian Basins Project (CBP, 2005-2007) and 131 national network broadband stations. For ambient noise tomography, we computed cross-correlations of vertical component continuous ambient seismic noise recordings for all possible pairs of stations and stacked the correlated waveforms over 1-2 years for the temporary stations and up to 5 years for permanent stations to estimate Rayleigh wave empirical Green's functions. Over 5700 final Rayleigh wave Green's functions were selected for the measurement of group velocity dispersion curves between 4s and 40s using the multiple-filter analysis technique. Group velocity maps are first computed on a grid discretized with 0.2°x0.2° steps from a non-linear 2-D tomographic inversion of measured group velocity dispersion curves. We then inverted the Rayleigh wave group velocity at each location to obtain the 3-D shear-wave velocity structure of the crust and uppermost mantle beneath

  4. Shear wave velocity profile estimation by integrated analysis of active and passive seismic data from small aperture arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lontsi, A. M.; Ohrnberger, M.; Krüger, F.

    2016-07-01

    We present an integrated approach for deriving the 1D shear wave velocity (Vs) information at few tens to hundreds of meters down to the first strong impedance contrast in typical sedimentary environments. We use multiple small aperture seismic arrays in 1D and 2D configuration to record active and passive seismic surface wave data at two selected geotechnical sites in Germany (Horstwalde & Löbnitz). Standard methods for data processing include the Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) method that exploits the high frequency content in the active data and the sliding window frequency-wavenumber (f-k) as well as the spatial autocorrelation (SPAC) methods that exploit the low frequency content in passive seismic data. Applied individually, each of the passive methods might be influenced by any source directivity in the noise wavefield. The advantages of active shot data (known source location) and passive microtremor (low frequency content) recording may be combined using a correlation based approach applied to the passive data in the so called Interferometric Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (IMASW). In this study, we apply those methods to jointly determine and interpret the dispersion characteristics of surface waves recorded at Horstwalde and Löbnitz. The reliability of the dispersion curves is controlled by applying strict limits on the interpretable range of wavelengths in the analysis and further avoiding potentially biased phase velocity estimates from the passive f-k method by comparing to those derived from the SPatial AutoCorrelation method (SPAC). From our investigation at these two sites, the joint analysis as proposed allows mode extraction in a wide frequency range (~ 0.6-35 Hz at Horstwalde and ~ 1.5-25 Hz at Löbnitz) and consequently improves the Vs profile inversion. To obtain the shear wave velocity profiles, we make use of a global inversion approach based on the neighborhood algorithm to invert the interpreted branches of the

  5. A joint inversion for shear velocity and anisotropy: the Woodlark Rift, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eilon, Zachary; Abers, Geoffrey A.; Gaherty, James B.

    2016-08-01

    Trade-offs between velocity and anisotropy heterogeneity complicate the interpretation of differential traveltime data and have the potential to bias isotropic tomographic models. By constructing a simple parametrisation to describe an elastic tensor with hexagonal symmetry, we find analytic solutions to the Christoffel equations in terms of fast and slow horizontal velocities that allow us to simultaneously invert differential traveltime data and splitting data from teleseismic S arrivals to recover 3-D velocity and anisotropy structure. This technique provides a constraint on the depth-extent of shallow anisotropy, otherwise absent from interpretations based on SKS splitting alone. This approach is well suited to the young Woodlark Rift, where previous studies have found strong velocity variation and substantial SKS splitting in a continental rift with relatively simple geometry. This study images a low-velocity rift axis with ≤4 per cent spreading-parallel anisotropy at 50-100 km depth that separates regions of pre-existing lithospheric fabric, indicating the synchronous development of extensional crystallographic preferred orientation and lithospheric thinning. A high-velocity slab fragment north of the rift axis is associated with strike-parallel anisotropic fast axes, similar to that seen in the shallow mantle of some subduction zones. In addition to the insights provided by the anisotropy structure, the improvement in fit to the differential traveltime data demonstrates the merit to a joint inversion that accounts for anisotropy.

  6. Fabric-related velocity anisotropy and shear wave splitting in rocks from the Santa Rosa Mylonite Zone, California

    SciTech Connect

    Kern, H. ); Wenk, H.R. )

    1990-07-10

    The directional dependence of P and S wave velocities have been measured at pressures (up to 600 MPa) and temperatures (up to 700C) in rocks from the Santa Rosa Mylonite Zone (southern California). During tectonism, these were progressively deformed from granodiorite protolith to mylonite and ultimately phyllonite. The mineralogical and chemical composition of protolith and mylonite is nearly identical. Thus these rocks provide excellent material for documenting the effect of microstructural and textural changes on rock anisotropy. Velocity anisotropy increases significantly with the degree of deformation, whereas average velocities and densities do not change. At low pressure (50 MPa) the velocity anisotropy ranges from 1.7% in granodiorite up to 19% in phyllonite and is due to both oriented microfractures and crystallographic preferred orientation. At high pressure (600 MPa), the residual anisotropy up to 12% is mainly due to preferred mineral orientation, in particular of biotite. Significant shear wave splitting is measured parallel to the foliation plane and shows a good correlation with the biotite texture. These observations confirm that oriented microcracks and preferred orientation of minerals should be taken into account in the interpretation of seismic reflection and refraction data in terranes with deformed rocks.

  7. Shear wave velocity estimation of the near-surface materials of Chittagong City, Bangladesh for seismic site characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Md. Zillur; Siddiqua, Sumi; Kamal, A. S. M. Maksud

    2016-11-01

    The average shear wave velocity of the near-surface materials down to a depth of 30 m (Vs30) is essential for seismic site characterization to estimate the local amplification factor of the seismic waves during an earthquake. Chittagong City is one of the highest risk cities of Bangladesh for its seismic vulnerability. In the present study, the Vs30 is estimated for Chittagong City using the multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW), small scale microtremor measurement (SSMM), downhole seismic (DS), and correlation between the shear wave velocity (Vs) and standard penetration test blow count (SPT-N). The Vs30 of the near-surface materials of the city varies from 123 m/s to 420 m/s. A Vs30 map is prepared from the Vs30 of each 30 m grid using the relationship between the Holocene soil thickness and the Vs30. Based on the Vs30, the near-surface materials of Chittagong City are classified as site classes C, D, and E according to the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP), USA and as site classes B, C, and D according to the Eurocode 8. The Vs30 map can be used for seismic microzonation, future planning, and development of the city to improve the earthquake resiliency of the city.

  8. a Global Shear Velocity Model of the Upper Mantle from New Fundamental and Higher Rayleigh Mode Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debayle, E.; Ricard, Y. R.

    2011-12-01

    We present a global SV-wave tomographic model of the upper mantle, built from a new dataset of fundamental and higher mode Rayleigh waveforms. We use an extension of the automated waveform inversion approach of Debayle (1999) designed to improve the extraction of fundamental and higher mode information from a single surface wave seismogram. The improvement is shown to be significant in the transition zone structure which is constrained by the higher modes. The new approach is fully automated and can be run on a Beowulf computer to process massive surface wave dataset. It has been used to match successfully over 350 000 fundamental and higher mode Rayleigh waveforms, corresponding to about 20 millions of new measurements extracted from the seismograms. For each seismogram, we obtain a path average shear velocity and quality factor model, and a set of fundamental and higher mode dispersion and attenuation curves compatible with the recorded waveform. The set of dispersion curves provides a global database for future finite frequency inversion. Our new 3D SV-wave tomographic model takes into account the effect of azimuthal anisotropy and is constrained with a lateral resolution of several hundred kilometers and a vertical resolution of a few tens of kilometers. In the uppermost 200 km, our model shows a very strong correlation with surface tectonics. The slow velocity signature of mid-oceanic ridges extend down to ~100 km depth while the high velocity signature of cratons vanishes below 200 km depth. At depth greater than 400 km, the pattern of seismic velocities appear relatively homogeneous at large scale, except for high velocity slabs which produce broad high velocity regions within the transition zone. Although resolution is still good, the region between 200 and 400 km is associated with a complex pattern of seismic heterogeneities showing no simple correlation with the shallower or deeper structure.

  9. Platelet to Lymphocyte Percentage Ratio Is Associated With Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity in Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Szu-Chia; Lee, Mei-Yueh; Huang, Jiun-Chi; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Mai, Hsiu-Chin; Su, Ho-Ming; Chang, Jer-Ming; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2016-02-01

    Increased arterial stiffness in patients receiving hemodialysis (HD) is highly prevalent and is associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In HD, inflammation is one of the major causes of increased arterial stiffness. Activation of platelets and decreased lymphocyte percentage (LYMPH%) may exhibit inflammation. The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between platelet to LYMPH% ratio and arterial stiffness in HD patients.A total of 220 patients receiving HD were enrolled in this study. The brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) was measured using an ankle-brachial index form device. Multivariate linear regression analysis was performed to investigate the relations of the platelet to LYMPH% ratio and baPWV. The value of the platelet to LYMPH% ratio was 59.2 ± 33.3 (10 cells/L/%). After multivariate stepwise analysis, diabetes (β: 163.973, P = 0.02), high systolic blood pressure (per 1 mm Hg, β: 9.010, P < 0.001), high platelet to LYMPH% ratio (per 10 cells/L/%, β: 3.334, P < 0.01), and low albumin (per 0.1 mg/dL, β: -55.912, P < 0.001) were independently associated with an increased baPWV. Furthermore, high white blood cells (per 10 cells/L, β: 3.941, P < 0.001), high neutrophil percentage (per 1%, β: 1.144, P < 0.001), and high CRP (per 1 mg/L, β: 9.161, P = 0.03) were independently associated with an increased platelet to LYMPH% ratio.An increased platelet to LYMPH% ratio is associated with an increased baPWV in HD patients. An easy and inexpensive laboratory measure of platelet to LYMPH% ratio may provide an important information regarding arterial stiffness in patients with HD. PMID:26871812

  10. Shear wave transmissivity measurement by color Doppler shear wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakoshi, Yoshiki; Yamazaki, Mayuko; Kasahara, Toshihiro; Sunaguchi, Naoki; Yuminaka, Yasushi

    2016-07-01

    Shear wave elastography is a useful method for evaluating tissue stiffness. We have proposed a novel shear wave imaging method (color Doppler shear wave imaging: CD SWI), which utilizes a signal processing unit in ultrasound color flow imaging in order to detect the shear wave wavefront in real time. Shear wave velocity is adopted to characterize tissue stiffness; however, it is difficult to measure tissue stiffness with high spatial resolution because of the artifact produced by shear wave diffraction. Spatial average processing in the image reconstruction method also degrades the spatial resolution. In this paper, we propose a novel measurement method for the shear wave transmissivity of a tissue boundary. Shear wave wavefront maps are acquired by changing the displacement amplitude of the shear wave and the transmissivity of the shear wave, which gives the difference in shear wave velocity between two mediums separated by the boundary, is measured from the ratio of two threshold voltages required to form the shear wave wavefronts in the two mediums. From this method, a high-resolution shear wave amplitude imaging method that reconstructs a tissue boundary is proposed.

  11. Pressure anisotropy generation in a magnetized plasma configuration with a shear flow velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Camillis, S.; Cerri, S. S.; Califano, F.; Pegoraro, F.

    2016-04-01

    The nonlinear evolution of the Kelvin Helmholtz instability in a magnetized plasma with a perpendicular flow close to, or in, the supermagnetosonic regime can produce a significant parallel-to-perpendicular pressure anisotropy. This anisotropy, localized inside the flow shear region, can make the configuration unstable either to the mirror or to the firehose instability and, in general, can affect the development of the KHI. The interface between the solar wind and the Earth’s magnetospheric plasma at the magnetospheric equatorial flanks provides a relevant setting for the development of this complex nonlinear dynamics.

  12. Generation of a pseudo-2D shear-wave velocity section by inversion of a series of 1D dispersion curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Liu, J.; Xu, Y.; Liu, Q.

    2008-01-01

    Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves utilizes a multichannel recording system to estimate near-surface shear (S)-wave velocities from high-frequency Rayleigh waves. A pseudo-2D S-wave velocity (vS) section is constructed by aligning 1D models at the midpoint of each receiver spread and using a spatial interpolation scheme. The horizontal resolution of the section is therefore most influenced by the receiver spread length and the source interval. The receiver spread length sets the theoretical lower limit and any vS structure with its lateral dimension smaller than this length will not be properly resolved in the final vS section. A source interval smaller than the spread length will not improve the horizontal resolution because spatial smearing has already been introduced by the receiver spread. In this paper, we first analyze the horizontal resolution of a pair of synthetic traces. Resolution analysis shows that (1) a pair of traces with a smaller receiver spacing achieves higher horizontal resolution of inverted S-wave velocities but results in a larger relative error; (2) the relative error of the phase velocity at a high frequency is smaller than at a low frequency; and (3) a relative error of the inverted S-wave velocity is affected by the signal-to-noise ratio of data. These results provide us with a guideline to balance the trade-off between receiver spacing (horizontal resolution) and accuracy of the inverted S-wave velocity. We then present a scheme to generate a pseudo-2D S-wave velocity section with high horizontal resolution using multichannel records by inverting high-frequency surface-wave dispersion curves calculated through cross-correlation combined with a phase-shift scanning method. This method chooses only a pair of consecutive traces within a shot gather to calculate a dispersion curve. We finally invert surface-wave dispersion curves of synthetic and real-world data. Inversion results of both synthetic and real-world data demonstrate that

  13. Gas Excitation in ULIRGs: Maps of Diagnostic Emission-line Ratios in Space and Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Kurt T.; Martin, Crystal L.

    2012-11-01

    Emission-line spectra extracted at multiple locations across 39 ultraluminous infrared galaxies have been compiled into a spectrophotometric atlas. Line profiles of Hα, [N II], [S II], [O I], Hβ, and [O III] are resolved and fit jointly with common velocity components. Diagnostic ratios of these line fluxes are presented in a series of plots, showing how the Doppler shift, line width, gas excitation, and surface brightness change with velocity at fixed position and also with distance from the nucleus. One general characteristic of these spectra is the presence of shocked gas extending many kiloparsecs from the nucleus. In some systems, the rotation curves of the emitting gas indicate motions that suggest gas disks, which are most frequent at early merger stages. At these early merger stages, the emission line ratios indicate the presence of shocked gas, which may be triggered by the merger event. We also report the general characteristics of the integrated spectra. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  14. Near-Surface Shear Wave Velocity Versus Depth Profiles, VS30, and NEHRP Classifications for 27 Sites in Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Odum, Jack K.; Williams, Robert A.; Stephenson, William J.; Worley, David M.; von Hillebrandt-Andrade, Christa; Asencio, Eugenio; Irizarry, Harold; Cameron, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    In 2004 and 2005 the Puerto Rico Seismic Network (PRSN), Puerto Rico Strong Motion Program (PRSMP) and the Geology Department at the University of Puerto Rico-Mayaguez (UPRM) collaborated with the U.S. Geological Survey to study near-surface shear-wave (Vs) and compressional-wave (Vp) velocities in and around major urban areas of Puerto Rico. Using noninvasive seismic refraction-reflection profiling techniques, we acquired velocities at 27 locations. Surveyed sites were predominantly selected on the premise that they were generally representative of near-surface materials associated with the primary geologic units located within the urbanized areas of Puerto Rico. Geologic units surveyed included Cretaceous intrusive and volcaniclastic bedrock, Tertiary sedimentary and volcanic units, and Quaternary unconsolidated eolian, fluvial, beach, and lagoon deposits. From the data we developed Vs and Vp depth versus velocity columns, calculated average Vs to 30-m depth (VS30), and derived NEHRP (National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program) site classifications for all sites except one where results did not reach 30-m depth. The distribution of estimated NEHRP classes is as follows: three class 'E' (VS30 below 180 m/s), nine class 'D' (VS30 between 180 and 360 m/s), ten class 'C' (VS30 between 360 and 760 m/s), and four class 'B' (VS30 greater than 760 m/s). Results are being used to calibrate site response at seismograph stations and in the development of regional and local shakemap models for Puerto Rico.

  15. Reynolds number dependence of velocity structure functions in turbulent shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonia, R. A.; Satyaprakash, B. R.; Chambers, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    Measurements of moments up to order eight of wind velocity changes in laboratory and atmospheric conditions are reported over a wide range of Reynolds numbers. Circular and plane jet trials were run at Re of 55,600 and 471,000, respectively, and the flows were observed to be self-preserving. Measurements of the atmospheric surface layer in Re ranging from 400-9000, and both interior and exterior measurements of the velocity fluctuations were made with a hot-wire anemometer. Fourth, sixth, and eighth order moments of delta-u were calculated to follow power-law curves over the inertial subrange, with the magnitude of the power-law exponent increasing with the order. For orders greater than three, the degree of departure of the nth order structure from that predicted by the Kolmogoroff theory decreased with increasing Reynolds numbers.

  16. Velocity field of a round jet in a cross flow for various jet injection angles and velocity ratios. [Langley V/STOL tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fearn, R. L.; Weston, R. P.

    1979-01-01

    A subsonic round jet injected from a flat plate into a subsonic crosswind of the same temperature was investigated. Velocity and pressure measurements in planes perpendicular to the path of the jet were made for nominal jet injection angles of 45 deg, 60 deg, 75 deg, 90 deg, and 105 deg and for jet/cross flow velocity ratios of four and eight. The velocity measurements were obtained to infer the properties of the vortex pair associated with a jet in a cross flow. Jet centerline and vortex trajectories were determined and fit with an empirical equation that includes the effects of jet injection angle, jet core length, and jet/cross flow velocity ratios.

  17. A preliminary study of the application of the transductal velocity ratio for assessing persistent ductus arteriosus

    PubMed Central

    Davies, M; Betheras, F; Swaminathan, M

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To compare the transductal velocity ratio (TVR) of the persistent ductus arteriosus (PDA) with other echocardiographic criteria for haemodynamic significance of a PDA.
METHODS—This was a prospective study (from January 1997 to August 1998) in the nurseries of the Royal Women's Hospital, Melbourne. Infants with a clinically suspected PDA were eligible and included if the echocardiogram showed a PDA with a structurally normal heart and the TVR had been measured. The PDA was assessed for evidence of left heart dilatation, the presence of reverse or absent diastolic flow in the descending aorta, the pattern of Doppler flow velocity waveform in the ductus arteriosus, and subjective assessment of ductal diameter on the real time image. The peak systolic velocity (PSV) was obtained from the pulmonary and aortic ends of the PDA, and the TVR calculated by dividing the PSV at the pulmonary end by the PSV at the aortic end.
RESULTS—Forty two infants had 59 echocardiographs with their TVR calculated. Mean (SD) birth weight was 1008 (362) g. Mean (SD) gestational age at birth was 27.4 (2.2) weeks with a mean (SD) corrected gestational age of 28.7 (2.7) weeks. The mean TVR was decreased in those infants with a high left atrial diameter/aortic diameter (LA/Ao) ratio (1.9 v 2.8, p = 0.0032) or reverse/absent diastolic flow in the descending aorta (2.1 v 3.0, p = 0.02). This difference was greater if those two criteria were combined (1.7 v 3.4, p = 0.0027). The mean TVR was decreased in infants with a wide open duct seen on two dimensional imaging (1.5 v 3.0, p < 0.0001) or pulsatile flow seen on pulsed Doppler in the PDA (1.9 v 3.4, p = 0.0001). The LA/Ao and left ventricle internal diameter/aortic diameter (LVIDd/Ao) ratios were higher in the group with a TVR < 1.8 than in the other two groups; these differences were statistically significant.
CONCLUSIONS—The TVR as a measure of the degree of constriction of a PDA is associated with other echocardiographic

  18. Layer Stripping Forward Tomography with S, ScS, and Sdiff phases to sharpen images of deep mantle shear velocity heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, H.; Garnero, E.; Zhao, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Earth's deep mantle has been shown to be heterogeneous at a wide spectrum of scales, from fine scale (e.g.,1-10 km) to degree 2 low velocity provinces (1000's of km lateral scale). Principle structures include large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs) beneath the Pacific Ocean and Africa and southern Atlanic Ocean, and a circum-Pacific higher velocity band. At intermediate scales, structures include D" discontinuities and details associated with LLSVPs, such as sharp sides. Shorter scales include ultra-low velocity zones (ULVZs) and regions of scattering of high frequency waves. In this study we seek to improve upon our knowledge of global intermediate and small-scale shear wave structure in the lower mantle with an iterative Layer-Stripping Forward Tomography approach. This approach iteratively updates a starting tomographic model by mapping travel time residuals (between observations and predictions) from the surface (using shallow S wave phase) down to lowermost mantle depths (using deep S waves, ScS waves, and Sdiff waves). Modifications to the uppermost mantle are primarily aimed at properly correcting deep phases for shallow heterogeneity. Relatively uniform coverage of the deepest mantle is achieved with Sdiff. The core-reflected ScS contributes most strongly to our knowledge of shorter scale heterogeneity, but coverage is more limited that with Sdiff. Deep mantle S waves provide information on the vertical extent of lowermost mantle heterogeneity (e.g., LLSVPs), but similar to ScS, coverage is limited to source-receiver pairs with the proper distance range. We collected near 1200 global earthquakes global earthquakes from the last two decades, with depths greater than 30 km, and focused on data with clear and impulsive phases. In a semi-automatic scheme, we measured all S, ScS, and Sdiff times and document waveshape stability by constructing a mean shape of each phase for each event. Cross-correlation coefficients between individual records and the

  19. Particle-in-cell simulation of two-dimensional electron velocity shear driven instability in relativistic domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Chandrasekhar; Das, Amita; Patel, Kartik

    2016-08-01

    We carry out particle-in-cell simulations to study the instabilities associated with a 2-D sheared electron flow configuration against a neutralizing background of ions. Both weak and strong relativistic flow velocities are considered. In the weakly relativistic case, we observe the development of electromagnetic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability with similar characteristics as that predicted by the electron Magnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) model. On the contrary, in a strong relativistic case, the compressibility effects of electron fluid dominate and introduce upper hybrid electrostatic oscillations transverse to the flow which are very distinct from EMHD fluid behavior. In the nonlinear regime, both weak and strong relativistic cases lead to turbulence with broad power law spectrum.

  20. Asymptotic solution of the turbulent mixing layer for velocity ratio close to unity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higuera, F. J.; Jimenez, J.; Linan, A.

    1996-01-01

    The equations describing the first two terms of an asymptotic expansion of the solution of the planar turbulent mixing layer for values of the velocity ratio close to one are obtained. The first term of this expansion is the solution of the well-known time-evolving problem and the second, which includes the effects of the increase of the turbulence scales in the stream-wise direction, obeys a linear system of equations. Numerical solutions of these equations for a two-dimensional reacting mixing layer show that the correction to the time-evolving solution may explain the asymmetry of the entrainment and the differences in product generation observed in flip experiments.

  1. Velocity and attenuation of shear waves in the phantom of a muscle-soft tissue matrix with embedded stretched fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudenko, O. V.; Tsyuryupa, S. N.; Sarvazyan, A. P.

    2016-09-01

    We develop a theory of the elasticity moduli and dissipative properties of a composite material: a phantom simulating muscle tissue anisotropy. The model used in the experiments was made of a waterlike polymer with embedded elastic filaments imitating muscle fiber. In contrast to the earlier developed phenomenological theory of the anisotropic properties of muscle tissue, here we obtain the relationship of the moduli with characteristic sizes and moduli making up the composite. We introduce the effective elasticity moduli and viscosity tensor components, which depend on stretching of the fibers. We measure the propagation velocity of shear waves and the shear viscosity of the model for regulated tension. Waves were excited by pulsed radiation pressure generated by modulated focused ultrasound. We show that with increased stretching of fibers imitating muscle contraction, an increase in both elasticity and viscosity takes place, and this effect depends on the wave propagation direction. The results of theoretical and experimental studies support our hypothesis on the protective function of stretched skeletal muscle, which protects bones and joints from trauma.

  2. Kinetic effects on the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in ion-to-magnetohydrodynamic scale transverse velocity shear layers: Particle simulations.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, T K M; Hasegawa, H; Shinohara, I

    2010-04-01

    Ion-to-magnetohydrodynamic scale physics of the transverse velocity shear layer and associated Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) in a homogeneous, collisionless plasma are investigated by means of full particle simulations. The shear layer is broadened to reach a kinetic equilibrium when its initial thickness is close to the gyrodiameter of ions crossing the layer, namely, of ion-kinetic scale. The broadened thickness is larger in B⋅Ω<0 case than in B⋅Ω>0 case, where Ω is the vorticity at the layer. This is because the convective electric field, which points out of (into) the layer for B⋅Ω<0 (B⋅Ω>0), extends (reduces) the gyrodiameters. Since the kinetic equilibrium is established before the KHI onset, the KHI growth rate depends on the broadened thickness. In the saturation phase of the KHI, the ion vortex flow is strengthened (weakened) for B⋅Ω<0 (B⋅Ω>0), due to ion centrifugal drift along the rotational plasma flow. In ion inertial scale vortices, this drift effect is crucial in altering the ion vortex size. These results indicate that the KHI at Mercury-like ion-scale magnetospheric boundaries could show clear dawn-dusk asymmetries in both its linear and nonlinear growth.

  3. VELOCITY-SHEAR-INDUCED MODE COUPLING IN THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE AND SOLAR WIND: IMPLICATIONS FOR PLASMA HEATING AND MHD TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Hollweg, Joseph V.; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.; Kaghashvili, Edisher Kh. E-mail: ekaghash@aer.com

    2013-06-01

    We analytically consider how velocity shear in the corona and solar wind can cause an initial Alfven wave to drive up other propagating signals. The process is similar to the familiar coupling into other modes induced by non-WKB refraction in an inhomogeneous plasma, except here the refraction is a consequence of velocity shear. We limit our discussion to a low-beta plasma, and ignore couplings into signals resembling the slow mode. If the initial Alfven wave is propagating nearly parallel to the background magnetic field, then the induced signals are mainly a forward-going (i.e., propagating in the same sense as the original Alfven wave) fast mode, and a driven signal propagating like a forward-going Alfven wave but polarized like the fast mode; both signals are compressive and subject to damping by the Landau resonance. For an initial Alfven wave propagating obliquely with respect to the magnetic field, the induced signals are mainly forward- and backward-going fast modes, and a driven signal propagating like a forward-going Alfven wave but polarized like the fast mode; these signals are all compressive and subject to damping by the Landau resonance. A backward-going Alfven wave, thought to be important in the development of MHD turbulence, is also produced, but it is very weak. However, we suggest that for oblique propagation of the initial Alfven wave the induced fast-polarized signal propagating like a forward-going Alfven wave may interact coherently with the initial Alfven wave and distort it at a strong-turbulence-like rate.

  4. Bending and shear stresses developed by the instantaneous arrest of the root of a cantilever beam rotating with constant angular velocity about a transverse axis through the root

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stowell, Elbridge Z; Schwartz, Edward B; Houbolt, John C

    1945-01-01

    A theoretical investigation was made of the behavior of a cantilever beam in rotational motion about a transverse axis through the root determining the stresses, the deflections, and the accelerations that occur in the beam as a result of the arrest of motion. The equations for bending and shear stress reveal that, at a given percentage of the distance from root to tip and at a given trip velocity, the bending stresses for a particular mode are independent of the length of the beam and the shear stresses vary inversely with the length. When examined with respect to a given angular velocity instead of a given tip velocity, the equations reveal that the bending stress is proportional to the length of the beam whereas the shear stress is independent of the length. Sufficient experimental verification of the theory has previously been given in connection with another problem of the same type.

  5. Micromechanical poroelastic finite element and shear-lag models of tendon predict large strain dependent Poisson's ratios and fluid expulsion under tensile loading.

    PubMed

    Ahmadzadeh, Hossein; Freedman, Benjamin R; Connizzo, Brianne K; Soslowsky, Louis J; Shenoy, Vivek B

    2015-08-01

    As tendons are loaded, they reduce in volume and exude fluid to the surrounding medium. Experimental studies have shown that tendon stretching results in a Poisson's ratio greater than 0.5, with a maximum value at small strains followed by a nonlinear decay. Here we present a computational model that attributes this macroscopic observation to the microscopic mechanism of the load transfer between fibrils under stretch. We develop a finite element model based on the mechanical role of the interfibrillar-linking elements, such as thin fibrils that bridge the aligned fibrils or macromolecules such as glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in the interfibrillar sliding and verify it with a theoretical shear-lag model. We showed the existence of a previously unappreciated structure-function mechanism whereby the Poisson's ratio in tendon is affected by the strain applied and interfibrillar-linker properties, and together these features predict tendon volume shrinkage under tensile loading. During loading, the interfibrillar-linkers pulled fibrils toward each other and squeezed the matrix, leading to the Poisson's ratio larger than 0.5 and fluid expulsion. In addition, the rotation of the interfibrillar-linkers with respect to the fibrils at large strains caused a reduction in the volume shrinkage and eventual nonlinear decay in Poisson's ratio at large strains. Our model also predicts a fluid flow that has a radial pattern toward the surrounding medium, with the larger fluid velocities in proportion to the interfibrillar sliding. PMID:25934322

  6. The mean velocity profile in a sheared and thermally stratified atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katul, G. G.; Porporato, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    A universal stability correction function φ that accounts for distortions caused by thermal stratification to the logarithmic mean velocity profile (MVP) in the lower atmosphere was proposed by Monin and Obukhov in the 1950s using dimensional analysis. However, theories that predict the canonical shape of φ currently lag behind field experiments and numerical simulation. A recently proposed phenomenological theory that links the spectrum of turbulence to the MVP is expanded here by including the effects of thermal stratification on the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate and eddy-size anisotropy. The resulting theory explains all the canonical features of φ reported in field experiments, including the onset of power-laws and their concomitant exponents reported for mildly stable, mildly unstable, and the near-convective limit.

  7. Ground-motion site effects from multimethod shear-wave velocity characterization at 16 seismograph stations deployed for aftershocks of the August 2011 Mineral, Virginia earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephenson, William J.; Odum, Jackson K.; McNamara, Daniel E.; Williams, Robert A.; Angster, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    We characterize shear-wave velocity versus depth (Vs profile) at 16 portable seismograph sites through the epicentral region of the 2011 Mw 5.8 Mineral (Virginia, USA) earthquake to investigate ground-motion site effects in the area. We used a multimethod acquisition and analysis approach, where active-source horizontal shear (SH) wave reflection and refraction as well as active-source multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) and passive-source refraction microtremor (ReMi) Rayleigh wave dispersion were interpreted separately. The time-averaged shear-wave velocity to a depth of 30 m (Vs30), interpreted bedrock depth, and site resonant frequency were estimated from the best-fit Vs profile of each method at each location for analysis. Using the median Vs30 value (270–715 m/s) as representative of a given site, we estimate that all 16 sites are National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) site class C or D. Based on a comparison of simplified mapped surface geology to median Vs30 at our sites, we do not see clear evidence for using surface geologic units as a proxy for Vs30 in the epicentral region, although this may primarily be because the units are similar in age (Paleozoic) and may have similar bulk seismic properties. We compare resonant frequencies calculated from ambient noise horizontal:vertical spectral ratios (HVSR) at available sites to predicted site frequencies (generally between 1.9 and 7.6 Hz) derived from the median bedrock depth and average Vs to bedrock. Robust linear regression of HVSR to both site frequency and Vs30 demonstrate moderate correlation to each, and thus both appear to be generally representative of site response in this region. Based on Kendall tau rank correlation testing, we find that Vs30 and the site frequency calculated from average Vs to median interpreted bedrock depth can both be considered reliable predictors of weak-motion site effects in the epicentral region.

  8. Measuring ion velocity distribution functions through high-aspect ratio holes in inductively coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunge, G.; Darnon, M.; Dubois, J.; Bezard, P.; Mourey, O.; Petit-Etienne, C.; Vallier, L.; Despiau-Pujo, E.; Sadeghi, N.

    2016-02-01

    Several issues associated with plasma etching of high aspect ratio structures originate from the ions' bombardment of the sidewalls of the feature. The off normal angle incident ions are primarily due to their temperature at the sheath edge and possibly to charging effects. We have measured the ion velocity distribution function (IVDF) at the wafer surface in an industrial inductively coupled plasma reactor by using multigrid retarding field analyzers (RFA) in front of which we place 400 μm thick capillary plates with holes of 25, 50, and 100 μm diameters. The RFA then probes IVDF at the exit of the holes with Aspect Ratios (AR) of 16, 8, and 4, respectively. The results show that the ion flux dramatically drops with the increase in AR. By comparing the measured IVDF with an analytical model, we concluded that the ion temperature is 0.27 eV in our plasma conditions. The charging effects are also observed and are shown to significantly reduce the ion energy at the bottom of the feature but only with a "minor" effect on the ion flux and the shape of the IVDF.

  9. Crustal shear wave velocity structure of the western United States inferred from ambient seismic noise and earthquake data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moschetti, M. P.; Ritzwoller, M. H.; Lin, F.-C.; Yang, Y.

    2010-10-01

    Surface wave dispersion measurements from ambient seismic noise and array-based measurements from teleseismic earthquakes observed with the EarthScope/USArray Transportable Array (TA) are inverted using a Monte Carlo method for a 3-D VS model of the crust and uppermost mantle beneath the western United States. The combination of data from these methods produces exceptionally broadband dispersion information from 6 to 100 s period, which constrains shear wave velocity structures in the crust and uppermost mantle to a depth of more than 100 km. The high lateral resolution produced by the TA network and the broadbandedness of the dispersion information motivate the question of the appropriate parameterization for a 3-D model, particularly for the crustal part of the model. We show that a relatively simple model in which VS increases monotonically with depth in the crust can fit the data well across more than 90% of the study region, except in eight discrete areas where greater crustal complexity apparently exists. The regions of greater crustal complexity are the Olympic Peninsula, the MendocinoTriple Junction, the Yakima Fold Belt, the southern Cascadia back arc, the Great Central Valley of California, the Salton Trough, the Snake River Plain, and the Wasatch Mountains. We also show that a strong Rayleigh-Love discrepancy exists across much of the western United States, which can be resolved by introducing radial anisotropy in both the mantle and notably the crust. We focus our analysis on demonstrating the existence of crustal radial anisotropy and primarily discuss the crustal part of the isotropic model that results from the radially anisotropic model by Voigt averaging. Model uncertainties from the Monte Carlo inversion are used to identify robust isotropic features in the model. The uppermost mantle beneath the western United States is principally composed of four large-scale shear wave velocity features, but lower crustal velocity structure exhibits far greater

  10. A global horizontal shear velocity model of the upper mantle from multimode Love wave measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Tak; Priestley, Keith; Debayle, Eric

    2016-10-01

    Surface wave studies in the 1960s provided the first indication that the upper mantle was radially anisotropic. Resolving the anisotropic structure is important because it may yield information on deformation and flow patterns in the upper mantle. The existing radially anisotropic models are in poor agreement. Rayleigh waves have been studied extensively and recent models show general agreement. Less work has focused on Love waves and the models that do exist are less well-constrained than are Rayleigh wave models, suggesting it is the Love wave models that are responsible for the poor agreement in the radially anisotropic structure of the upper mantle. We have adapted the waveform inversion procedure of Debayle & Ricard to extract propagation information for the fundamental mode and up to the fifth overtone from Love waveforms in the 50-250 s period range. We have tomographically inverted these results for a mantle horizontal shear wave-speed model (βh(z)) to transition zone depths. We include azimuthal anisotropy (2θ and 4θ terms) in the tomography, but in this paper we discuss only the isotropic βh(z) structure. The data set is significantly larger, almost 500 000 Love waveforms, than previously published Love wave data sets and provides ˜17 000 000 constraints on the upper-mantle βh(z) structure. Sensitivity and resolution tests show that the horizontal resolution of the model is on the order of 800-1000 km to transition zone depths. The high wave-speed roots beneath the oldest parts of the continents appear to extend deeper for βh(z) than for βv(z) as in previous βh(z) models, but the resolution tests indicate that at least parts of these features could be artefacts. The low wave speeds beneath the mid-ocean ridges fade by ˜150 km depth except for the upper mantle beneath the East Pacific Rise which remains slow to ˜250 km depth. The resolution tests suggest that the low wave speeds at deeper depths beneath the East Pacific Rise are not solely due

  11. Upper mantle shear wave velocity structure beneath northern Victoria Land, Antarctica: Volcanism and uplift in the northern Transantarctic Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graw, Jordan H.; Adams, Aubreya N.; Hansen, Samantha E.; Wiens, Douglas A.; Hackworth, Lauren; Park, Yongcheol

    2016-09-01

    The Transantarctic Mountains (TAMs) are the largest non-compressional mountain range on Earth, and while a variety of uplift mechanisms have been proposed, the origin of the TAMs is still a matter of great debate. Most previous seismic investigations of the TAMs have focused on a central portion of the mountain range, near Ross Island, providing little along-strike constraint on the upper mantle structure, which is needed to better assess competing uplift models. Using data recorded by the recently deployed Transantarctic Mountains Northern Network, as well as data from the Transantarctic Mountains Seismic Experiment and from five stations operated by the Korea Polar Research Institute, we investigate the upper mantle structure beneath a previously unexplored portion of the mountain range. Rayleigh wave phase velocities are calculated using a two-plane wave approximation and are inverted for shear wave velocity structure. Our model shows a low velocity zone (LVZ; ∼4.24 km s-1) at ∼160 km depth offshore and adjacent to Mt. Melbourne. This LVZ extends inland and vertically upwards, with more lateral coverage above ∼100 km depth beneath the northern TAMs and Victoria Land. A prominent LVZ (∼4.16-4.24 km s-1) also exists at ∼150 km depth beneath Ross Island, which agrees with previous results in the TAMs near the McMurdo Dry Valleys, and relatively slow velocities (∼4.24-4.32 km s-1) along the Terror Rift connect the low velocity anomalies. We propose that the LVZs reflect rift-related decompression melting and provide thermally buoyant support for the TAMs uplift, consistent with proposed flexural models. We also suggest that heating, and hence uplift, along the mountain front is not uniform and that the shallower LVZ beneath northern Victoria Land provides greater thermal support, leading to higher bedrock topography in the northern TAMs. Young (0-15 Ma) volcanic rocks associated with the Hallett and the Erebus Volcanic Provinces are situated directly

  12. Inversion of surface wave data for shear wave velocity profiles: Case studies of thick buried low-velocity layers in Malta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrugia, Daniela; Paolucci, Enrico; D'Amico, Sebastiano; Galea, Pauline

    2015-04-01

    The islands composing the Maltese archipelago (Central Mediterranean) are characterised by a four layer sequence of limestones and clays, with the Lower Coralline Limestone being the oldest exposed layer. The hard Globigerina Limestone (GL) overlies this layer and is found outcropping in the eastern part of Malta and western part of Gozo. The rest of the islands are characterised by Upper Coralline Limestone (UCL) plateaus and hillcaps covering a soft Blue Clay (BC) layer which can be up to 75 m thick. Thus the BC layer introduces a velocity inversion in the stratigraphy, and makes the Vs30 parameter not always suitable for seismic microzonation purposes. Such a layer may still produce amplification effects, however would not contribute to the numerical mean of Vs in the upper 30m. Moreover, buildings are being increasingly constructed on this type of geological foundation. Obtaining the shear wave (Vs) profiles of the different layers around the islands is the first step needed for a detailed study of local seismic site response. A survey of Vs in each type of lithology and around the islands has never been undertaken. Array measurements of ambient noise using vertical geophones were carried out at six sites in Malta and one in Gozo, characterised by the buried low-velocity layer. The array was set up in an L-shaped configuration and the Extended Spatial Autocorrelation (ESAC) technique was used to extract Rayleigh wave dispersion curves. The effective dispersion curve obtained at all the sites exhibited a 'normal' dispersive trend (i.e. velocity decreases with increasing frequency) at low frequencies, followed by an inverse dispersive trend at high frequencies. Such a shape can be tentatively explained in terms of the presence of higher mode Rayleigh waves, which are generally present when a stiff layer overlies a softer layer. Additionally a series of three-component ambient noise measurements were taken at each of the sites and H/V curves obtained. The

  13. Shear-wave velocity and site-amplification factors for 50 Australian sites determined by the spectral analysis of surface waves method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kayen, Robert E.; Carkin, Bradley A.; Allen, Trevor; Collins, Clive; McPherson, Andrew; Minasian, Diane L.

    2015-01-01

    One-dimensional shear-wave velocity (VS ) profiles are presented at 50 strong motion sites in New South Wales and Victoria, Australia. The VS profiles are estimated with the spectral analysis of surface waves (SASW) method. The SASW method is a noninvasive method that indirectly estimates the VS at depth from variations in the Rayleigh wave phase velocity at the surface.

  14. Three-dimensional models of P wave velocity and P-to-S velocity ratio in the southern central Andes by simultaneous inversion of local earthquake data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graeber, Frank M.; Asch, Günter

    1999-09-01

    The PISCO'94 (Proyecto de Investigatión Sismológica de la Cordillera Occidental, 1994) seismological network of 31 digital broad band and short-period three-component seismometers was deployed in northern Chile between the Coastal Cordillera and the Western Cordillera. More than 5300 local seismic events were observed in a 100 day period. A subset of high-quality P and S arrival time data was used to invert simultaneously for hypocenters and velocity structure. Additional data from two other networks in the region could be included. The velocity models show a number of prominent anomalies, outlining an extremely thickened crust (about 70 km) beneath the forearc region, an anomalous crustal structure beneath the recent magmatic arc (Western Cordillera) characterized by very low velocities, and a high-velocity slab. A region of an increased Vp/Vs ratio has been found directly above the Wadati-Benioff zone, which might be caused by hydration processes. A zone of lower than average velocities and a high Vp/Vs ratio might correspond to the asthenospheric wedge. The upper edge of the Wadati-Benioff zone is sharply defined by intermediate depth hypocenters, while evidence for a double seismic zone can hardly be seen. Crustal events between the Precordillera and the Western Cordillera have been observed for the first time and are mainly located in the vicinity of the Salar de Atacama down to depths of about 40 km.

  15. Effect of Axial Velocity Density Ratio on the Performance of a Controlled Diffusion Airfoil Compressor Cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthil Kumaran, R.; Kamble, Sachin; Swamy, K. M. M.; Nagpurwala, Q. H.; Bhat, Ananthesha

    2015-12-01

    Axial Velocity Density Ratio (AVDR) is an important parameter to check the two-dimensionality of cascade flows. It can have significant influence on the cascade performance and the secondary flow structure. In the present study, the effect of AVDR has been investigated on a highly loaded Controlled Diffusion airfoil compressor cascade. Detailed 3D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) studies were carried out with the cascade at five different AVDRs. Key aerodynamic performance parameters and flow structure through the cascade were analyzed in detail. CFD results of one AVDR were validated with the experimental cascade test data and were seen to be in good agreement. Loss characteristics of the cascade varied significantly with change in AVDR. Increase in AVDR postponed the point of separation on the suction surface, produced thinner boundary layers and caused substantial drop in the pressure loss coefficient. Strong end wall vortices were noticed at AVDR of 1.177. At higher AVDRs, the flow was well guided even close to the end wall and the secondary flows diminished. The loading initially improved with increase in AVDR. Beyond a certain limit, further increase in AVDR offered no improvements to the loading but rather resulted in drop in diffusion and deviation.

  16. Upper mantle structure of shear-waves velocities and stratification of anisotropy in the Afar Hotspot region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicilia, D.; Montagner, J.-P.; Cara, M.; Stutzmann, E.; Debayle, E.; Lépine, J.-C.; Lévêque, J.-J.; Beucler, E.; Sebai, A.; Roult, G.; Ayele, A.; Sholan, J. M.

    2008-12-01

    The Afar area is one of the biggest continental hotspots active since about 30 Ma. It may be the surface expression of a mantle "plume" related to the African Superswell. Central Africa is also characterized by extensive intraplate volcanism. Around the same time (30 Ma), volcanic activity re-started in several regions of the African plate and hotspots such as Darfur, Tibesti, Hoggar and Mount Cameroon, characterized by a significant though modest volcanic production. The interactions of mantle upwelling with asthenosphere, lithosphere and crust remain unclear and seismic anisotropy might help in investigating these complex interactions. We used data from the global seismological permanent FDSN networks (GEOSCOPE, IRIS, MedNet, GEO- FON, etc.), from the temporary PASSCAL experiments in Tanzania and Saudi Arabia and a French deployment of 5 portable broadband stations surrounding the Afar Hotspot. A classical two-step tomographic inversion from surface waves performed in the Horn of Africa with selected Rayleigh wave and Love wave seismograms leads to a 3D-model of both S V velocities and azimuthal anisotropy, as well as radial SH/ SV anisotropy, with a lateral resolution of 500 km. The region is characterized by low shear-wave velocities beneath the Afar Hotspot, the Red Sea, the Gulf of Aden and East of the Tanzania Craton to 400 km depth. High velocities are present in the Eastern Arabia and the Tanzania Craton. The results of this study enable us to rule out a possible feeding of the Central Africa hotspots from the "Afar plume" above 150-200 km. The azimuthal anisotropy displays a complex pattern near the Afar Hotspot. Radial anisotropy, although poorly resolved laterally, exhibits S H slower than S V waves down to about 150 km depth, and a reverse pattern below. Both azimuthal and radial anisotropies show a stratification of anisotropy at depth, corresponding to different physical processes. These results suggest that the Afar hotspot has a different and

  17. New Hybridized Surface Wave Approach for Geotechnical Modeling of Shear Wave Velocity at Strong Motion Recording Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayen, R.; Carkin, B.; Minasian, D.

    2006-12-01

    Strong motion recording (SMR) networks often have little or no shear wave velocity measurements at stations where characterization of site amplification and site period effects is needed. Using the active Spectral Analysis of Surface Waves (SASW) method, and passive H/V microtremor method we have investigated nearly two hundred SMR sites in California, Alaska, Japan, Australia, China and Taiwan. We are conducting these studies, in part, to develop a new hybridized method of site characterization that utilizes a parallel array of harmonic-wave sources for active-source SASW, and a single long period seismometer for passive-source microtremor measurement. Surface wave methods excel in their ability to non-invasively and rapidly characterize the variation of ground stiffness properties with depth below the surface. These methods are lightweight, inexpensive to deploy, and time-efficient. They have been shown to produce accurate and deep soil stiffness profiles. By placing and wiring shakers in a large parallel circuit, either side-by-side on the ground or in a trailer-mounted array, a strong in-phase harmonic wave can be produced. The effect of arraying many sources in parallel is to increase the amplitude of waves received at far-away spaced seismometers at low frequencies so as to extend the longest wavelengths of the captured dispersion curve. The USGS system for profiling uses this concept by arraying between two and eight electro-mechanical harmonic-wave shakers. With large parallel arrays of vibrators, a dynamic force in excess of 1000 lb can be produced to vibrate the ground and produce surface waves. We adjust the harmonic wave through a swept-sine procedure to profile surface wave dispersion down to a frequency of 1 Hz and out to surface wave-wavelengths of 200-1000 meters, depending on the site stiffness. The parallel-array SASW procedure is augmented using H/V microtremor data collected with the active source turned off. Passive array microtremor data

  18. Can Suspended Iron-Alloy Droplets Explain the Origin, Composition and Properties of Large Low Shear Velocity Provinces?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Dorfman, S. M.; Labidi, J.; Zhang, S.; Manga, M.; Stixrude, L. P.; McDonough, W. F.; Williams, Q. C.

    2014-12-01

    The enigmatic large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs) identified by seismic tomography at the base of the Earth's mantle have been proposed to be reservoirs of primordial mantle composition tapped by hot spot volcanism. The LLSVPs are characterized by anomalously low shear wave speed, VS, slightly elevated bulk sound speed, VB, and high density, ρ, in piles as thick as 1000 km above the core-mantle boundary. This combination of properties could be explained by a few percent dense melt, but the solidus of the lower mantle silicate and oxide assemblage may be too high to produce melt over the large extent of these regions. Iron-rich sulfur-bearing alloy may be molten at the conditions of the LLSVPs and ~1-2% of this component could satisfy both constraints on VS and ρ. An Fe alloy phase in the LLSVPs also has the potential to explain geochemical anomalies associated with hot spot volcanism, and its existence can be constrained by geochemical mass balance. Primordial noble gases such as 3He would be preferentially dissolved in Fe-rich melt rather than crystalline silicates. The reconstructed abundances of the moderately siderophile/chalcophile elements S, Cu and Pb in iron-alloy-bearing LLSVPs do not exceed predicted losses from volatilization, though this depends on the S-content of the alloy. The alloy phase would also be expected to incorporate W, and W isotope anomalies associated with hot spots are thus expected to have important implications for the timing of LLSVP formation. We have developed a model, via CIDER-2014, for the origin and properties of LLSVPs incorporating geochemistry, mineral physics, and fluid dynamic constraints on the generation, capture, and thermoelastic properties of Fe-rich melt droplets. The solidification of a basal magma ocean would produce both solid silicates and metallic melt. The bulk of the alloy generated by this process would sink to merge with the core. However, once the density of the remnant liquid exceeds that of the

  19. Phanerozoic within-plate magmatism of North Asia: Absolute paleogeographic reconstructions of the African large low-shear-velocity province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuz'min, M. I.; Yarmolyuk, V. V.; Kravchinsky, V. A.

    2011-11-01

    The phanerozoic within-plate magmatism of Siberia is reviewed. The large igneous provinces (LIPs) consecutively arising in the Siberian Craton are outlined: the Altai-Sayan LIP, which operated most actively 400-375 Ma ago, the Vilyui LIP, which was formed from the Middle Devonian to the Early Carboniferous, included; the Barguzin-Vitim LIP (305-275 Ma); the Late Paleozoic Rift System of Central Asia (318-250 Ma); the Siberian flood basalt (trap) province and the West Siberian rift system (250-247 Ma); and the East Mongolian-West Transbaikal LIP (230-195 Ma), as well as a number of Late-Mesozoic and Cenozoic rift zones and autonomous volcanic fields formed over the last 160 Ma. The trace-element and isotopic characteristics of the igneous rocks of the above provinces are reviewed; their mantle origin is substantiated and the prevalence of PREMA, EM2, and EM1 mantle magma sources are shown. The paleogeographic reconstructions based on paleomagnetic data assume that the Iceland hot spot was situated beneath the Siberian flood basalts 250 Ma ago and that the mantle plumes retained a relatively stable position irrespective of the movements of the lithospheric plates. At present, the Iceland hot spot occurs near the northern boundary of the African large low shear velocity province (LLSVP). It is suggested that the within-plate Phanerozoic magmatism of Siberia was related to the drift of the continent above the hot spots of the African LLSVP.

  20. Multi-channel analysis of surface waves MASW of models with high shear-wave velocity contrast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanov, J.; Miller, R.D.; Peterie, S.; Zeng, C.; Xia, J.; Schwenk, T.

    2011-01-01

    We use the multi-channel analysis of surface waves MASW method to analyze synthetic seismic data calculated using models with high shear-wave velocity Vs contrast. The MASW dispersion-curve images of the Rayleigh wave are obtained using various sets of source-offset and spread-size configurations from the synthetic seismic data and compared with the theoretically calculated fundamental- and higher-mode dispersion-curves. Such tests showed that most of the dispersion-curve images are dominated by higher-mode energy at the low frequencies, especially when analyzing data from long receiver offsets and thus significantly divert from numerically expected dispersion-curve trends, which can lead to significant Vs overestimation. Further analysis showed that using data with relatively short spread lengths and source offsets can image the desired fundamental-mode of the Rayleigh wave that matches the numerically expected dispersion-curve pattern. As a result, it was concluded that it might be possible to avoid higher-mode contamination at low frequencies at sites with high Vs contrast by appropriate selection of spread size and seismic source offset. ?? 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  1. Impact of Fibrotic Tissue on Shear Wave Velocity in Thyroid: An Ex Vivo Study with Fresh Thyroid Specimens.

    PubMed

    Fukuhara, Takahiro; Matsuda, Eriko; Endo, Yukari; Donishi, Ryohei; Izawa, Shoichiro; Fujiwara, Kazunori; Kitano, Hiroya; Takeuchi, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    We sought to elucidate the correlation between shear wave velocity (SWV) and fibrosis in thyroid by precisely assessing pathological structures inside 5 × 5 mm(2) regions of interest (ROIs) of resected specimens, under conditions that excluded physical artifacts. The materials were unselected thyroid and lymph node specimens resected during thyroid surgery. Immediately after surgery, fresh unfixed thyroid and metastatic lymph node specimens were suspended in gel phantoms, and SWV was measured. Upon pathological examination of each specimen, the extent of fibrosis was graded as none, moderate, or severe. A total of 109 specimens were evaluated: 15 normal thyroid, 16 autoimmune thyroiditis, 40 malignant nodules, 19 benign thyroid nodules, and 19 metastatic lymph nodes. When all specimens were classified according to the degree of fibrosis determined by pathological imaging, the mean SWV was 1.49 ± 0.39 m/s for no fibrosis, 2.13 ± 0.66 m/s for moderate fibrosis, and 2.68 ± 0.82 m/s for severe fibrosis. The SWVs of samples with moderate and severe fibrosis were significantly higher than those of samples without fibrosis. The results of this study demonstrate that fibrosis plays an important role in determining stiffness, as measured by SWV in thyroid. PMID:26881199

  2. Effects of ExB Velocity Shear and Magnetic Shear in the Formation of Core Transport Barriers in the DIII-D Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Burrell, K.H.; Greenfield, C.M.; Lao, L.L.; Staebler, G.M.; Austin, M.E.; Rice, B.W.; Stallard, B.W.

    1997-12-31

    Core transport barriers can be reliably formed in DIII-D by tailoring the evolution of the current density profile. This paper reports studies of the relative role of magnetic and ExB shear in creating core transport barriers in the DIII-D tokamak and considers the detailed dynamics of the barrier formation. The core barriers seen in DIII-D negative shear discharges form in a stepwise fashion during the initial current ramp. The reasons for the stepwise formation is not known; these steps do not correlate with integer values of q(O) or minimum q. The data from DIII-D is consistent with previous results that negative magnetic shear facilitates the formation of core transport barriers in the ion channel but is not necessary. However, strongly negative magnetic shear does allow formation of transport barriers in particle, electron thermal, ion thermal and angular momentum transport channels. Shots with strong negative magnetic shear have produced the steepest ion temperature and toroidal rotation profiles seen yet in DIII-D. In addition, the ExB shearing rates seen in these shots exceed the previous DIII-D record value by a factor of four.

  3. Distinct Variations in Seismic Velocity Structure of the Crust and Upper Mantle across the Ailao Shan-Red River Shear Zone in Northern Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, S.; Pan, Y.; Huang, B.; Huang, W.; Le, T.; Dinh, V.

    2011-12-01

    The tectonic evolution of the Aliao Shan-Red River shear zone (RRSZ) that runs from southeast Tibet through North Vietnam to the South China Sea and marks the boundary between the Indochina and South China blocks has been considered closely linked with the northward indention of the strong Indian plate into the Eurasian continent and the consequent uplift of the Tibetan Plateau. A variety of models have been proposed to explain the postcollisional deformation and magmatism of SE Asia and movement along the RRSZ. Since December 2005, Institute of Earth Science, Academia Sinica of Taiwan has deployed a regional broadband array with station spacing of ~50 km in Northern Vietnam for earthquake and seismic structure studies. We collect data from earthquakes with magnitude≥5.5 and epicentral distances of 30-90o between December, 2005 and June, 2008. Using this new dataset, we report 3-D variations of P- and S-wave speeds (δlnVP and δlnVS) and Poisson's ratios via δln(VP/VS) in the crust and upper mantle across the shear zone, obtained with tomographic inversion of P and S relative travel time residuals measured by inter-station cross-correlation of waveforms at both high- and low-frequencies. We employ physically realistic 3-D sensitivity kernels for frequency-dependent traveltime data and data-adaptive, multi-scale parameterization in the inversion. The resulting models reveal noticeable differences across the RRSZ, where the anomalies of distinctly low VS and VP/VS are widely-dispersed in the lower crust and uppermost mantle down to the depth of 100 km to the southwest of the RRSZ. This may indicate that ductile crustal mass has flowed out of Tibet into Indochina accompanying extrusion of relatively hot lithospheric mantle along the RRSZ related to Late Cenozoic volcanism in the region. Though less distinct in the S velocity model, an elongated fast anomaly about 60 km wide that strikes parallel to the RRSZ and subvertically extends to the depth of 60 km clearly

  4. Dependences of Ratio of the Luminosity to Ionization on Velocity and Chemical Composition of Meteors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narziev, M.

    2011-01-01

    On the bases of results simultaneous photographic and radio echo observations, the results complex radar and television observations of meteors and also results of laboratory modeling of processes of a luminescence and ionization, correlation between of luminous intensity Ip to linear electronic density q from of velocities and chemical structure are investigated. It is received that by increasing value of velocities of meteors and decrease of nuclear weight of substance of particles, lg Ip/q decreased more than one order.

  5. Estimation of Relative Amplification Effect by Shear Wave Velocity (Vs30): A Case Study from Eskisehir, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutlu, Sunay; Tün, Muammer; Güney, Yücel; Ecevitoǧlu, Berkan

    2014-05-01

    Turkey, which is one of the world's most active earthquake zones located within the Alpine-Himalayan seismic belt. The major part of the territory of the country is at risk of earthquakes that causes damage and loss of life. The important indication of this danger is the past earthquakes resulted with losses. Turkey has experienced many destructive earthquakes in the last 15 years. In 1999 Gölcük Earthquake with the magnitude of 7.4, Düzce Earthquake with the magnitude of 7.2 and in 2011 Van Earthquake with the magnitude of 7.2-Van resulted with thousands of loss of life and damage to property as billions of thousand liras. It is quite important to doing microzonation works in these areas and estimation of behaviors during the earthquake in order to prevent occurring damages in settlements and areas will be settle. Soil amplification comes from the most basic parameter used in the microzonation works. This study was made in Eskisehir urban area which is one of the most urbanized and industrialized cities of Turkey in recent years. This study aim to amplification that may occur due to the earthquake to effects of Eskisehir region. It was used that seismic refraction data in 23 different location and 96 borehole data in settlement. Local soil properties variation upon amplification influence was investigated depending on SPT-N values and wave velocity data from seismic refraction. Average shear wave velocities for each type of surface to 30 m were found that each borehole point by equations İyisan (1996), and Jafari et al. (1997) using the resulting values. In addition, relative amplifications has been calculated by Midorikawa (1987) and Borcherdt et al's (1991) approaches. Then, these parameters have been mapped spatial changes using GIS (Geographical Information Systems) techniques. Porsuk river and its surroundings might have caused a high soil amplification result due to the low speed and soft soil when analyze the results of maps. In addition, it is thought

  6. Structure of turbulent flow at a river confluence with momentum and velocity ratios close to 1: Insight provided by an eddy-resolving numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantinescu, George; Miyawaki, Shinjiro; Rhoads, Bruce; Sukhodolov, Alexander; Kirkil, Gokhan

    2011-05-01

    River confluences are complex hydrodynamic environments where convergence of incoming flows produces complicated patterns of fluid motion, including the development of large-scale turbulence structures. Accurately simulating confluence hydrodynamics represents a considerable challenge for numerical modeling of river flows. This study uses an eddy-resolving numerical model to simulate the mean flow and large-scale turbulence structure at an asymmetrical river confluence with a concordant bed when the momentum ratio between the two incoming streams is close to 1. Results of the simulation are compared with field data on mean flow and turbulence structure. The simulation shows that the mixing interface is populated by quasi-two-dimensional eddies. Successive eddies have opposing senses of rotation. The mixing layer structure resembles that of a wake behind a bluff body (wake mode). Strong streamwise-oriented vortical (SOV) cells form on both sides of the mixing layer, a finding consistent with patterns inferred from the field data. The predicted mean flow fields show that flow curvature has an important influence on streamwise variation of circulation within the cores of the two primary SOV cells. These SOV cells, along with vortices generated by flow over a submerged block of sediment at one of the banks, strongly influence distributions of the streamwise velocity and turbulent kinetic energy downstream of the junction. Comparison of the eddy-resolving simulation results with predictions from the steady Spalart-Allmaras RANS model shows that the latter fails to predict important features of the measured distributions of streamwise velocity and turbulent kinetic energy because the RANS model underpredicts the strength of the SOV cells. Analysis of instantaneous and mean bed shear stress distributions indicates that the SOV cells enhance bed shear stresses to a greater degree than the quasi-two-dimensional eddies in the mixing interface.

  7. Liver Shear-Wave Velocity and Serum Fibrosis Markers to Diagnose Hepatic Fibrosis in Patients with Chronic Viral Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianxue; Ji, Yonghao; Ai, Hong; Ning, Bo; Zhao, Junzhi; Zhang, Yaoren

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare several noninvasive indices of fibrosis in chronic viral hepatitis B, including liver shear-wave velocity (SWV), hyaluronic acid (HA), collagen type IV (CIV), procollagen type III (PCIII), and laminin (LN). Materials and Methods Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) was performed in 157 patients with chronic viral hepatitis B and in 30 healthy volunteers to measure hepatic SWV (m/s) in a prospective study. Serum markers were acquired on the morning of the same day of the ARFI evaluation. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to evaluate and compare the accuracies of SWV and serum markers using METAVIR scoring from liver biopsy as a reference standard. Results The most accurate test for diagnosing fibrosis F ≥ 1 was SWV with the area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.913, followed by LN (0.744), HA (0.701), CIV (0.690), and PCIII (0.524). The best test for diagnosing F ≥ 2 was SWV (AUC of 0.851), followed by CIV (0.671), HA (0.668), LN (0.562), and PCIII (0.550). The best test for diagnosing F ≥ 3 was SWV (0.854), followed by CIV (0.693), HA (0.675), PCIII (0.591), and LN (0.548). The best test for diagnosing F = 4 was SWV (0.965), followed by CIV (0.804), PCIII (0.752), HA (0.744), and LN (0.662). SWV combined with HA and CIV did not improve diagnostic accuracy (AUC = 0.931 for F ≥ 1, 0.863 for F ≥ 2, 0.855 for F ≥ 3, 0.960 for F = 4). Conclusion The performance of SWV in diagnosing liver fibrosis is superior to that of serum markers. However, the combination of SWV, HA, and CIV does not increase the accuracy of diagnosing liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. PMID:27134527

  8. Record of the Pacific Large Low Shear Velocity Province Upwellings Preserved in the Cretaceous Large Igneous Provinces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madrigal, P.; Gazel, E.; Flores, K. E.; Bizimis, M.; Jicha, B. R.

    2015-12-01

    As the surface expression of deep mantle dynamics, Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) are associated with the edges of large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVP) rooted at the core-mantle boundary. Instabilities in the LLSVP can cause periodic upwellings of material in the form of mantle plumes, which impact the lithosphere forming LIPs. However, the time frames of these massive lava outpourings are still uncertain. While continental LIPs are more readily accessible, oceanic LIPs have only been studied through drilling and sampling of fragments accreted to continental margins or island arcs, hence, they are relatively less understood. The impact of oceanic LIPs on oceanic biota is conspicuously recorded in global occurrences of black shale deposits that evidence episodes of anoxia and mass extinctions shortly after the formation of LIPs that ultimately can affect life on the entire planet. Our new geochemical and geochronological data of accreted Pacific LIPs found in the coasts of Nicoya Peninsula in Costa Rica record three LIP pulses possibly reflecting upwelling periods of the LLSVP at 140, 120 and 90 Ma. In order to test different models of origin of these LIPS, we created a complete reconstruction of the Pacific Plate configuration from the Mid-Jurassic to Upper-Cretaceous to show the existing correlation between upwelling pulses at edges of the Pacific LLSVP, oceanic anoxic events and the age from Pacific LIPs. We propose that since the formation of the Pacific plate at circa 175-180 Ma, a series of upwellings that interacted with mid-ocean ridge systems separated by 10-20 Ma have affected the planet periodically forming oceanic LIPs that still can be found today on the Pacific seafloor and accreted along the plate margins.

  9. Investigating the Edges of the Large Low Shear Velocity Province in the Lowermost Mantle Beneath the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, C.; Garnero, E. J.

    2008-12-01

    Whether the large low shear velocity province (LLSVP) in the lowermost mantle beneath the Pacific Ocean has a purely thermal origin (e.g., related to a superplume) or is a chemically distinct structure (e.g., a thermochemical pile) is still under active investigation. A number of seismic investigations have documented a sharp transition between the Pacific and African LLSVPs and surrounding lower mantle material, which argues for a chemically distinct origin. We previously used USArray recordings of Fiji-Tonga and Kemadec events to study the northern portion of the Pacific LLSVP, and found wave broadening consistent with multi- pathing along the LLSVP margin. In this study, we additionally compare the P-wave times to the SH times. All timing measurements were recalculated with a new travel time picking algorithm, which reduced scatter in our earlier estimates. Rapidly changing arrival times are observed, and are consistent with a sharp LLSVP boundary. We also define a waveform misfit parameter that quantifies each observation's deviation from a mean source shape on an event by event basis. Here we investigate a data set with direct S and P waves that bottom above and within the Pacific LLSVP, covering a significant portion of the central Pacific. A double array stacking method is employed to search for wave broadening as well as post-cursors associated with a possible top of the LLSVP. Some waveform complexities are observed, but vary geographically. These data will be discussed in regards to the possible nature of the LLSVP, its top, and the chemistry and dynamics of the deep mantle.

  10. [The radial velocity measurement accuracy of different spectral type low resolution stellar spectra at different signal-to-noise ratio].

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng-Fei; Luo, A-Li; Zhao, Yong-Heng

    2014-02-01

    The radial velocity of the star is very important for the study of the dynamics structure and chemistry evolution of the Milky Way, is also an useful tool for looking for variable or special objects. In the present work, we focus on calculating the radial velocity of different spectral types of low-resolution stellar spectra by adopting a template matching method, so as to provide effective and reliable reference to the different aspects of scientific research We choose high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) spectra of different spectral type stellar from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), and add different noise to simulate the stellar spectra with different SNR. Then we obtain theradial velocity measurement accuracy of different spectral type stellar spectra at different SNR by employing a template matching method. Meanwhile, the radial velocity measurement accuracy of white dwarf stars is analyzed as well. We concluded that the accuracy of radial velocity measurements of early-type stars is much higher than late-type ones. For example, the 1-sigma standard error of radial velocity measurements of A-type stars is 5-8 times as large as K-type and M-type stars. We discuss the reason and suggest that the very narrow lines of late-type stars ensure the accuracy of measurement of radial velocities, while the early-type stars with very wide Balmer lines, such as A-type stars, become sensitive to noise and obtain low accuracy of radial velocities. For the spectra of white dwarfs stars, the standard error of radial velocity measurement could be over 50 km x s(-1) because of their extremely wide Balmer lines. The above conclusion will provide a good reference for stellar scientific study. PMID:24822441

  11. [The radial velocity measurement accuracy of different spectral type low resolution stellar spectra at different signal-to-noise ratio].

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng-Fei; Luo, A-Li; Zhao, Yong-Heng

    2014-02-01

    The radial velocity of the star is very important for the study of the dynamics structure and chemistry evolution of the Milky Way, is also an useful tool for looking for variable or special objects. In the present work, we focus on calculating the radial velocity of different spectral types of low-resolution stellar spectra by adopting a template matching method, so as to provide effective and reliable reference to the different aspects of scientific research We choose high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) spectra of different spectral type stellar from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), and add different noise to simulate the stellar spectra with different SNR. Then we obtain theradial velocity measurement accuracy of different spectral type stellar spectra at different SNR by employing a template matching method. Meanwhile, the radial velocity measurement accuracy of white dwarf stars is analyzed as well. We concluded that the accuracy of radial velocity measurements of early-type stars is much higher than late-type ones. For example, the 1-sigma standard error of radial velocity measurements of A-type stars is 5-8 times as large as K-type and M-type stars. We discuss the reason and suggest that the very narrow lines of late-type stars ensure the accuracy of measurement of radial velocities, while the early-type stars with very wide Balmer lines, such as A-type stars, become sensitive to noise and obtain low accuracy of radial velocities. For the spectra of white dwarfs stars, the standard error of radial velocity measurement could be over 50 km x s(-1) because of their extremely wide Balmer lines. The above conclusion will provide a good reference for stellar scientific study.

  12. Shear Wave Velocity and Site Amplification Factors for 25 Strong-Motion Instrument Stations Affected by the M5.8 Mineral, Virginia, Earthquake of August 23, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kayen, Robert; Carkin, Bradley; Corbett, Skye; Zangwill, Aliza; Estevez, Ivan; Lai, Lena

    2015-01-01

    Vertical one-dimensional shear wave velocity (Vs) profiles are presented for 25 strong-motion instrument sites along the Mid-Atlantic eastern seaboard, Piedmont region, and Appalachian region, which surround the epicenter of the M5.8 Mineral, Virginia, Earthquake of August 23, 2011. Testing was performed at sites in Pennsylvania, Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia, the District of Columbia, North Carolina, and Tennessee. The purpose of the study is to determine the detailed site velocity profile, the average velocity in the upper 30 meters of the profile (VS,30), the average velocity for the entire profile (VS,Z), and the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) site classification. The Vs profiles are estimated using a non-invasive continuous-sine-wave method for gathering the dispersion characteristics of surface waves. A large trailer-mounted active source was used to shake the ground during the testing and produce the surface waves. Shear wave velocity profiles were inverted from the averaged dispersion curves using three independent methods for comparison, and the root-mean square combined coefficient of variation (COV) of the dispersion and inversion calculations are estimated for each site.

  13. Three-dimensional shear velocity anisotropic model of Piton de la Fournaise Volcano (La Réunion Island) from ambient seismic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordret, Aurélien; Rivet, Diane; Landès, Matthieu; Shapiro, Nikolaï M.

    2015-01-01

    We cross correlate 4 years of seismic noise from the seismic network of Piton de la Fournaise Volcano (La Réunion Island) to measure the group velocity dispersion curves of Rayleigh and Love waves. We average measurements from vertical and radial components to obtain 577 Rayleigh wave dispersion curves. The transverse components provided 395 Love wave dispersion curves. We regionalize the group velocities measurements into 2-D velocity maps between 0.4 and 8 s. Finally, we locally inverted these maps for a pseudo 3-D anisotropic shear-velocity model down to 3 km below the sea level using a Neighborhood Algorithm. The 3-D isotropic shear-wave model shows three distinct high-velocity anomalies surrounded by a low-velocity ring. The anomaly located below the present "Plaine des Sables" could be related to an old intrusive body at the location of the former volcanic center before it migrated toward its present location. The second high-velocity body located below the summit of the volcano likely corresponds to the actual preferential dyke intrusion zone as highlighted by the seismicity. The third high-velocity anomaly located below the "Grandes Pentes" and the "Grand Brûlé" areas and is an imprint of the solidified magma chamber of the dismantled "Les Alizés" Volcano. Radial anisotropy shows two main anomalies: positive anisotropy above sea level highlighting the recent edifice of Piton de la Fournaise with an accumulation of horizontal lava flows and the second one below the sea level with a negative anisotropy corresponding to the ancient edifice of Piton de la Fournaise dominated by intrusions of vertical dykes.

  14. Downhole Measurements of Shear- and Compression-Wave Velocities in Boreholes C4993, C4996, C4997 and C4998 at the Waste Treatment Plant DOE Hanford Site.

    SciTech Connect

    Redpath, Bruce B.

    2007-04-27

    This report describes the procedures and the results of a series of downhole measurements of shear- and compression-wave velocities performed as part of the Seismic Boreholes Project at the site of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The measurements were made in several stages from October 2006 through early February 2007. Although some fieldwork was carried out in conjunction with the University of Texas at Austin (UT), all data acquired by UT personnel are reported separately by that organization.

  15. Differential adhesion, activity, and carbohydrate: Protein ratios ofPseudomonas atlantica monocultures attaching to stainless steel in a linear shear gradient.

    PubMed

    Mittelman, M W; Nivens, D E; Low, C; White, D C

    1990-05-01

    Biofilm formation on metallic surfaces in marine and freshwater environments often precedes corrosion and other biofouling conditions. Attachment is mediated by such environmental factors as the presence of surface conditioning films, fluid dynamics, bulk-phase nutrient levels, and surface chemistry. In this study, we utilized a Fowler Cell Adhesion Measurement Module to demonstrate that the changes in cellular concentration and composition of a monoculture ofPseudomonas atlantica biofilms on stainless steel were a function of the applied shear force. At shear forces in the range of 3-10 dynes cm(-2) (1.0 liter min(-1)), attachment as measured by acridine orange direct microscopic counts was greatest at the higher shear forces.(14)C-Acetate uptake activity on the stainless steel surfaces increased with shear stress. Acetate incorporation ranged from 1×10(-5) to 19×10(-5) μmol cm(-2) between 0.15 and 30 dynes cm(-2) for 30 min uptake periods. On a per cell basis, however, activity decreased with shear, indicating a shift in metabolism. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed that protein and carbohydrate concentrations also increased with the applied shear. Increased biofilm C∶N ratios and total fatty acids were associated with the higher shear stresses. Neither radius of interaction nor biofilm age appeared to significantly influence the relationship between fluid shear and attachment and cellular composition ofP. atlantica biofilms in the range of 1-10 dynes cm(-2). PMID:24196364

  16. Laser induced fluorescence measurements of axial velocity, velocity shear, and parallel ion temperature profiles during the route to plasma turbulence in a linear magnetized plasma device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty Thakur, S.; Adriany, K.; Gosselin, J. J.; McKee, J.; Scime, E. E.; Sears, S. H.; Tynan, G. R.

    2016-11-01

    We report experimental measurements of the axial plasma flow and the parallel ion temperature in a magnetized linear plasma device. We used laser induced fluorescence to measure Doppler resolved ion velocity distribution functions in argon plasma to obtain spatially resolved axial velocities and parallel ion temperatures. We also show changes in the parallel velocity profiles during the transition from resistive drift wave dominated plasma to a state of weak turbulence driven by multiple plasma instabilities.

  17. Hydrodynamic interactions between pairs of capsules and drops in a simple shear: Effects of viscosity ratio and heterogeneous collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rajesh Kumar; Sarkar, Kausik

    2015-12-01

    Hydrodynamic interactions between a pair of capsules in simple shear are numerically investigated using a front-tracking finite difference method. The membrane of the capsule is modeled using different hyperelastic constitutive relations. We also compare the pair interactions between drops to those between capsules. An increased viscosity ratio leads to a reduced net cross-stream separation between capsules as well as drops after collision. At low viscosity ratios, for the same capillary number drop-pairs show higher cross-stream separation than those for capsule-pairs, while substantially large viscosity ratios result in almost the same value for both cases. We investigate pair-collisions between two heterogeneous capsules C1 and C2 with two different capillary numbers. The maximum deformation of C1 was seen to increase with increasing stiffness (decreasing capillary number) of C2, even though the stiffness of C1 was kept fixed. The findings are similar for a drop-pair, however, with a smaller maximum deformation for the same combinations of capillary numbers. The final cross-stream drift of the trajectory of C1 decreases with the increasing stiffness of C2, but the relative trajectory between the capsules remains unchanged. The maximum deformation and the cross-stream drift of the trajectory of C1 are shown to approximately vary with power-law functions of the ratio of the capillary numbers of C1 and C2. An analytical explanation of the dependence on the two capillary numbers is offered. Different membrane constitutive laws result in similar deformation and drift in trajectory.

  18. Very Broadband Rayleigh-Wave Dispersion (0.06 - 60 Hz) and Shear-Wave Velocity Structure Under Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schramm, K. A.; Bilek, S. L.; Patton, H. J.; Abbott, R. E.; Stead, R.; Pancha, A.; White, R.

    2009-12-01

    Earth structure plays an important role in the generation of seismic waves for all sources. Nowhere is this more evident than at near-surface depths where man-made sources, such as explosions, are conducted. For example, short-period Rayleigh waves (Rg) are excited and propagate in the upper 2 km of Earth's crust. The importance of Rg in the generation of S waves from explosion sources through near-source scattering depends greatly on the shear-wave velocity structure at very shallow depths. Using three distinct datasets, we present a very broadband Rayleigh-wave phase velocity dispersion curve for the Yucca Flat (YF) region of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The first dataset consists of waveforms of historic NTS explosions recorded on regional seismic networks and will provide information for the lowest frequencies (0.06-0.3 Hz). The second dataset is comprised of waveforms from a non-nuclear explosion on YF recorded at near-local distances and will be used for mid-range frequencies (0.2-1.5 Hz). The third dataset contains high-frequency waveforms recorded from refraction microtremor surveys on YF. This dataset provides information between 1.5 and 60 Hz. Initial results from the high frequency dataset indicate velocities range from 0.45-0.9 km/s at 1.5 Hz and 0.25-0.45 km/s at 60 Hz. The broadband nature of the dispersion curve will allow us to invert for the shear-wave velocity structure to 10 km depth, with focus on shallow depths where nuclear tests were conducted in the YF region. The velocity model will be used by researchers as a tool to aid the development of new explosion source models that incorporate shear wave generation. The new model can also be used to help improve regional distance yield estimation and source discrimination for small events.

  19. Crustal and upper mantle shear velocities of Iberia, the Alboran Sea, and North Africa from ambient noise and ballistic finite-frequency Rayleigh wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palomeras, I.; Villasenor, A.; Thurner, S.; Levander, A.; Gallart, J.; mimoun, H.

    2013-12-01

    The complex Mesozoic-Cenozoic Alpine deformation in the western Mediterranean extends from the Pyrenees in northern Spain to the Atlas Mountains in southern Morocco. The Iberian plate was accreted to the European plate in late Cretaceous, resulting in the formation of the Pyrenees. Cenozoic African-European convergence resulted in subduction of the Tethys oceanic plate beneath Europe. Rapid Oligocene slab rollback from eastern Iberia spread eastward and southward, with the trench breaking into three segments by the time it reached the African coast. One trench segment moved southwestward and westward creating the Alboran Sea, floored by highly extended continental crust, and building the encircling Betics Rif mountains comprising the Gibraltar arc, and the Atlas mountains, which formed as the inversion of a Jurassic rift. A number of recent experiments have instrumented this region with broad-band arrays (the US PICASSO array, Spanish IberArray and Siberia arrays, the University of Munster array), which, including the Spanish, Portuguese, and Moroccan permanent networks, provide a combined array of 350 stations having an average interstation spacing of ~60 km. Taking advantage of this dense deployment, we have calculated the Rayleigh waves phase velocities from ambient noise for short periods (4 s to 40 s) and teleseismic events for longer periods (20 s to 167 s). Approximately 50,000 stations pairs were used to measure the phase velocity from ambient noise and more than 160 teleseismic events to measure phase velocity for longer periods. The inversion of the phase velocity dispersion curves provides a 3D shear velocity for the crust and uppermost mantle. Our results show differences between the various tectonic regions that extend to upper mantle depths (~200 km). In Iberia we obtain, on average, higher upper mantle shear velocities in the western Variscan region than in the younger eastern part. We map high upper mantle velocities (>4.6 km/s) beneath the

  20. Moho Depth and Shear Velocity Structure in Northwest India and West Tibet from the Joint Inversion of Receiver Function and Surface Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilligan, A.; Priestley, K. F.; Roecker, S. W.; Levin, V. L.; Rai, S. S.

    2014-12-01

    The Tibetan Plateau is a key locality in understanding large-scale continental dynamics. A large number of investigations have examined the structure and processes in eastern Tibet, however western Tibet remains relatively understudied. The limited number of previous studies in this region indicate that the western part of the Tibetan Plateau is not a simple extension of the eastern part, despite the lack of surface features indicating differences between these two regions. In particular, wavespeeds higher than those in eastern Tibet have been observed in the upper mantle by a number of investigators. We present new, high resolution, shear velocity models for Northwest India and West Tibet from the joint inversion of P receiver functions and fundamental mode Rayleigh wave group velocities recorded at seismic stations in four arrays in this region. The areas covered by these arrays include the Karakoram and Altan-Taygh faults, major terrane boundaries in West Tibet and the Himalayas. The arrays used include broadband data collected by the West Tibet Array, a US-China deployment on the western side of the Tibetan Plateau between 2007-2011, and a French experiment in 2001. We construct group velocity tomographic maps throughout Central and Southern Asia from surface wave data between periods of 5-70s. The inclusion of Rayleigh wave dispersion measurements from ambient noise cross-correlations between stations in the West Tibet Array allow a local node spacing as fine as 0.25 degrees, meaning it is possible to resolve features as small as 1 degree at short periods in that region. These group velocity maps appears to confirm observations that group velocities at 60 and 70s group velocities are higher in West Tibet than they are in East Tibet. We use the shear wave velocity models obtained from the joint inversion to obtain estimates of Moho depth in Northwest India and West Tibet. The Moho is deep throughout Tibet in this region, increasing northwards and flattening out

  1. Late Permian Melt Percolation through the Crust of North-Central Africa and Its Possible Relationship to the African Large Low Shear Velocity Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shellnutt, J. G.; Lee, T. Y.; Yang, C. C.; Wu, J. C.; Wang, K. L.; Lo, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    The Doba gabbro was collected from an exploration well through the Cretaceous Doba Basin of Southern Chad. The gabbro is comprised mostly of plagioclase, clinopyroxene and Fe-Ti oxide minerals and displays cumulus mineral textures. Whole rock 40Ar/39Ar step-heating geochronology yielded a Late Permian plateau age of 257 ± 1 Ma. The major and trace elemental geochemistry shows that the gabbro is mildly alkalic to tholeiitic in composition and has trace element ratios (i.e. La/YbN > 7; Sm/YbPM > 3.4; Nb/Y > 1; Zr/Y > 5) indicative of a basaltic melt derived from a garnet-bearing sublithospheric mantle source. The moderately enriched Sr-Nd isotopes (i.e. ISr = 0.70495 to 0.70839; eNd(T) = -1.0 to -1.3) fall within the mantle array (i.e. OIB-like) and are similar to other Late Permian plutonic rocks of North-Central Africa (i.e. ISr = 0.7040 to 0.7070). The Late Permian plutonic igneous complexes of North-Central Africa are geologically associated with tectonic lineaments suggesting they acted as conduits for sublithospheric melts to migrate to middle/upper crustal levels. The source of the magmas may be related to the spatial-temporal association of North-Central Africa with the African large low shear velocity province (LLSVP). The African LLSVP has remained stable since the Late Carboniferous and was beneath the Doba basin during the Permian. We suggest that melts derived from deep seated sources related to the African LLSVP percolated through the North-Central African crust via older tectonic lineaments and form a discontiguous magmatic province.

  2. Shear Wave Velocity, Depth to Bedrock, and Fundamental Resonance Applied to Bedrock Mapping using MASW and H/V Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonsiewski, J.

    2015-12-01

    Mapping bedrock depth is useful for earthquake hazard analysis, subsurface water transport, and other applications. Recently, collaborative experimentation provided an opportunity to explore a mapping method. Near surface glacial till shear wave velocity (Vs) where data is available from an array of 3-component seismometers were studied for this experiment. Vs is related to depth to bedrock (h) and fundamental resonance (Fo); Fo = Vs/(4h). The H/V spectral peak frequency of recordings from a 3-component seismometer yields a fundamental resonance estimate. Where a suitable average Vs is established, the depth to bedrock can be calculated at every seismometer. 3-component seismometer data was provided by Spectraseis. Geophones, seismographs, and an extra 3-component seismometer were provided by Wright State University for this study. For Vs analysis, three MASW surveys were conducted near the seismometer array. SurfSeis3© was used for processing MASW data. Overtones from complicated bedrock structure and great bedrock depth are improved by combining overtones from multiple source offsets from each survey. From MASW Vs and depth to bedrock results, theoretical fundamental resonance (Fo) was calculated and compared with the H/V peak spectral frequency measured by a seismometer at selected sites and processed by Geopsy processing software. Calculated bedrock depths from all geophysical data were compared with measured bedrock depths at nearby water wells and oil and gas wells provided by ODNR. Vs and depth to bedrock results from MASW produced similar calculated fundamental resonances to the H/V approximations by respective seismometers. Bedrock mapping was performed upon verifying the correlation between the theoretical fundamental resonance and H/V peak frequencies. Contour maps were generated using ArcGIS®. Contour lines interpolated from local wells were compared with the depths calculated from H/V analysis. Bedrock depths calculated from the seismometer array

  3. SAVANI2: towards a waveform-based image of shear-velocity variations underneath Europe embedded in a global model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auer, Ludwig; Boschi, Lapo; van Driel, Martin; Becker, Thorsten; Nissen-Meyer, Tarje; Sigloch, Karin; Hosseini-zad, Kasra; Giardini, Domenico

    2014-05-01

    In a recent study (Auer et al. 2013, in revision) we have devised a novel tomography approach to image radially anisotropic shear-velocity variations in the Earth's mantle. By applying our tomography toolbox to a comprehensive compilation of surface-wave phase delays from fundamental modes up to the 6th overtone and cross-correlation traveltimes of major body-wave phases, we derived the multi-resolution tomography model SAVANI, which is one of the first whole-mantle models of radial S-wave anisotropy. Here we illustrate the first steps towards the second iteration of our model ("SAVANI2"), in which we define Europe and the surrounding regions as the target area for a higher-resolution regional revision of our initial model. To this end, we augment our global database with additional teleseismic and regional broadband measurements recorded within the last five years. We download raw waveforms from the Orfeus and IRIS data centers in a fully automated way with a python based toolbox and extract multiple-frequency traveltime delays in the period range between 5 and 25 s employing the method of Sigloch et al. (2006). Furthermore, we replace the crustal model CRUST2.0 with its successor CRUST1. Importantly, waveform observations will be interpreted using Fréchet sensitivity kernels computed with AxiSEM (Nissen-Meyer et al., 2007), which is an efficient visco-elastic spectral element solver for axisymmetric background models. The main idea behind SAVANI2 is to keep semi-approximate (ray) theory where appropriate (global long-wavelength structure, surface wave dispersion), but to revert to a full-waveform interpretation where necessary (regional scale, non-geometrical wave phenomena). Our hybrid approach to waveform inversion has multi-scale capabilities and is essentially equivalent to the first iteration step of a Gauss-Newton type inverse problem, thus allowing full access to the model resolution matrix. The set of algorithms we are developing represent a

  4. Anisotropic Shear Velocity Models of the North American Upper Mantle Based on Waveform Inversion and Numerical Wavefield Computations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Earthscope TA deployment across the continental United-State (US) has reached its eastern part, providing the opportunity for high-resolution 3D seismic velocity imaging of both lithosphere and asthenosphere across the entire north-American continent (NA). Previously (Yuan et al., 2014), we presented a 3D radially anisotropic shear wave (Vs) model of North America (NA) lithospheric mantle based on full waveform tomography, combining teleseismic and regional distance data sampling the NA. Regional wavefield computations were performed numerically, using a regional Spectral Element code (RegSEM, Cupillard et al., 2012), while teleseismic computations were performed approximately, using non-linear asymptotic coupling theory (NACT, Li and Romanowicz, 1995). For both datasets, the inversion was performed iteratively, using a Gauss-Newton scheme, with kernels computed using either NACT or the surface wave, path average approximation (PAVA), depending on the source-station distance. We here present a new radially anisotropic lithospheric/asthenospheric model of Vs for NA based entirely on SEM-based numerical waveforms from an augmented dataset of 155 regional events and 70 teleseismic events. The forward wavefield computations are performed using RegSEM down to 40s, starting from our most recent whole mantle 3D radially anisotropic Vs model (SEMUCB-wm1, French and Romanowicz, 2014). To model teleseismic wavefields within our regional computational domain, we developed a new modeling technique which allows us to replace a distant source by virtual sources at the boundary of the computational domain (Masson et al., 2014). Computing virtual sources requires one global simulation per teleseismic events.We then compare two models obtained: one using NACT/PAVA kernels as in our previous work, and another using hybrid kernels, where the Hessian is computed using NACT/PAVA, but the gradient is computed numerically from the adjoint wavefield, providing more accurate kernels

  5. First principles study of the C/Si ratio effect on the ideal shear strength of β–SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Wen; Li, Yingying; Nie, Chu; Xiao, Wei; Yan, Liqin

    2016-07-01

    The effect of the C/Si atomic ratio on the ideal shear strength of β-SiC is investigated with first principles calculations. β -SiC samples with different C/Si ratios are generated by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations with empirical inter-atomic SiC potential. Each SiC sample is sheared along the < 100> direction and the stress-strain curve is calculated from first principles. The results show that the ideal shear strength of SiC decreases with the increase of C/Si ratio. For a non-stoichiometric SiC sample, a C–C bond inside a large carbon cluster breaks first under shear strain condition due to the internal strain around the carbon clusters. Because the band gap is narrowed under shear strain conditions, a local maximum stress appears in the elastic region of the stress-strain curve for each SiC sample at certain strain condition. The yield strength may increase with the increase of C/Si ratio.

  6. Transverse velocity dependence of the proton-antiproton ratio as a signature of the QCD critical point.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, M; Bass, S A; Müller, B; Nonaka, C

    2008-09-19

    The presence of a critical point in the QCD phase diagram can deform the trajectories describing the evolution of the expanding fireball in the mu_B-T phase diagram. If the average emission time of hadrons is a function of transverse velocity, as microscopic simulations of the hadronic freeze-out dynamics suggest, the deformation of the hydrodynamic trajectories will change the transverse velocity (beta_T) dependence of the proton-antiproton ratio when the fireball passes in the vicinity of the critical point. An unusual beta_T dependence of the [over]p/p ratio in a narrow beam energy window would thus signal the presence of the critical point.

  7. Transverse Velocity Dependence of the Proton-Antiproton Ratio as a Signature of the QCD Critical Point

    SciTech Connect

    Asakawa, M.; Bass, S. A.; Mueller, B.; Nonaka, C.

    2008-09-19

    The presence of a critical point in the QCD phase diagram can deform the trajectories describing the evolution of the expanding fireball in the {mu}{sub B}-T phase diagram. If the average emission time of hadrons is a function of transverse velocity, as microscopic simulations of the hadronic freeze-out dynamics suggest, the deformation of the hydrodynamic trajectories will change the transverse velocity ({beta}{sub T}) dependence of the proton-antiproton ratio when the fireball passes in the vicinity of the critical point. An unusual {beta}{sub T} dependence of the p/p ratio in a narrow beam energy window would thus signal the presence of the critical point.

  8. Accurate Young's modulus measurement based on Rayleigh wave velocity and empirical Poisson's ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mingxia; Feng, Zhihua

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a method for Young's modulus measurement based on Rayleigh wave speed. The error in Poisson's ratio has weak influence on the measurement of Young's modulus based on Rayleigh wave speed, and Poisson's ratio minimally varies in a certain material; thus, we can accurately estimate Young's modulus with surface wave speed and a rough Poisson's ratio. We numerically analysed three methods using Rayleigh, longitudinal, and transversal wave speed, respectively, and the error in Poisson's ratio shows the least influence on the result in the method involving Rayleigh wave speed. An experiment was performed and has proved the feasibility of this method. Device for speed measuring could be small, and no sample pretreatment is needed. Hence, developing a portable instrument based on this method is possible. This method makes a good compromise between usability and precision.

  9. Crustal and upper mantle 3D shear wave velocity structure of the High Lava Plains, Oregon, determined from ambient noise tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson-Hedgecock, S.; Wagner, L.; Fouch, M. J.; James, D. E.

    2011-12-01

    We present the results of inversions for 3D shear velocity structure of the crust and uppermost mantle beneath the High Lava Plains, Oregon using data from ~300 broadband stations of the High Lava Plains seismic experiment and the EarthScope/USArray Transportable Array (TA). The High Lava Plains (HLP) is a WNW progressive silicic volcanism, initiated ~14.5 Ma near the Owyhee Plateau and is currently active at the Newberry caldera. The Yellowstone Snake River Plain (YSRP) volcanic track is temporally contemporaneous with the HLP, but trends to the northeast, parallel to North American plate motion. The cause of volcanism along the HLP is debated and has been variously attributed to Basin and Range extension, back-arc extension, rollback of the subducting Juan de Fuca plate, and an intra-continental hotspot/plume source. Additionally the relationship between the HLP, YSRP, and Columbia River Basalts (CRB), the three major post-17Ma intracontinental volcanic provinces of the Pacific Northwest, is not well understood. The 3D shear velocity structure of the crust and uppermost mantle to ~65km depth is determined from fundamental mode Rayleigh wave ambient noise phase velocity maps at periods up to 40s. The use of ambient noise tomography with the dense station spacing of the combined High Lava Plains seismic experiment and the EarthScope/USArray Transportable Array (TA) datasets allows the shallow structure of the High Lava Plains to be imaged in finer detail than previous ANT studies that focused on the entire western United States. In the crust, low velocities in central Oregon are observed in association with the Brothers Fault Zone, Jordan and Diamond Craters and Steens Mountain regions in addition to the strong low velocity zone associated with the Cascades to the west. To the east of the HLP, low velocities are observed to about 10km depth in the western SRP. In the eastern SRP we observe a shallow veneer of low velocities underlain by a ~10km thick high velocity

  10. Anisotropic Shear-Velocity Structure of the Lithosphere-Asthenosphere System in the Central Pacific from the NoMelt Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, P.; Gaherty, J. B.; Jin, G.; Collins, J. A.; Lizarralde, D.; Evans, R. L.; Hirth, G.

    2014-12-01

    Recent theoretical models of the seismic properties of mantle rocks predict seismic velocity profiles for mature oceanic lithosphere that are fundamentally inconsistent with the best observations of seismic velocities in two ways. Observations of strong positive velocity gradients with depth, and a very sharp and very shallow low-velocity asthenosphere boundary (LAB), both suggest that non-thermal factors such as bulk composition, mineral fabric, grain size, and dehydration play important roles in controlling the formation of the lithosphere, and thus the underlying LAB. There is little consensus on which of these factors are dominant, in part because observations of detailed lithosphere structure are limited. To address this discrepancy, we conducted the NoMelt experiment on ~70 Ma Pacific lithosphere between the Clarion & Clipperton fracture zones. The experiment consists of a 600x400 km array of broad-band ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) and magnetotelluric instruments, and an active-source reflection/refraction experiment. Here we characterize the shear-velocity structure and its seismic anisotropy across the lithosphere-asthenosphere system beneath the array using surface-wave dispersion. Of the 27 deployed instruments, 21 were recovered, all of which produced useful data on the seismometer and the differential pressure gauge in the 20-200 s period band. Energetic, high S/N Rayleigh waves and useful love waves are observed from over 21 and 8 events with Mw > 6.5 respectively. Models of shear velocity as a function of depth derived from intra-array Rayleigh-wave phase velocities are characterized by a relatively constant, high-velocity lithosphere to ~70 km depth, with a rapid drop in velocity below that depth. The combination of a high-velocity lid with an abrupt transition to the low-velocity zone cannot be explained by plate-cooling models. The Rayleigh waves display strong azimuthal anisotropy with a fast direction parallel to fossil spreading at all

  11. Detailed velocity ratio mapping during the aftershock sequence as a tool to monitor the fluid activity within the fault plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachura, Martin; Fischer, Tomáš

    2016-11-01

    The rheological properties of Earth materials are expressed by their seismic velocities and VP /VS ratio, which is easily obtained by the Wadati method. Its double-difference version based on cross-correlated waveforms enables focusing on very local structures and allows tracking, monitoring and analysing the fluid activity along faults. We applied the method to three 2014 mainshock-aftershock sequences in the West Bohemia/Vogtland (Czech Republic) earthquake swarm area and found pronounced VP /VS variations in time and space for different clusters of events located on a steeply dipping fault zone at depths ranging from 7 to 11 km. Each cluster reflects the spatial distribution of earthquakes along the fault plane but also the temporal evolution of the activity. Low values of VP /VS ratio down to 1.59 ± 0.02 were identified in the deeper part of the fault zone whereas higher values up to 1.73 ± 0.01 were estimated for clusters located on a shallower segment of the fault. Temporally the low VP /VS values are associated with the early aftershocks, while the higher VP /VS ratios are related only to later aftershocks. We interpret this behaviour as a result of saturation of the focal zone by compressible fluids: in the beginning the mainshock and early aftershocks driven by over-pressured fluids increased the porosity due to opening the fluid pathways. This process was associated with a decrease of the velocity ratio. In later stages the pressure and porosity decreased and the velocity ratio recovered to levels of 1.73, typical for a Poissonian medium and Earth's crust.

  12. Span-to-depth ratio effect on shear strength of steel fiber-reinforced high-strength concrete deep beams using ANN model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Uday; Kute, Sunil

    2013-12-01

    The paper predicts the shear strength of high-strength steel fiber-reinforced concrete deep beams. It studies the effect of clear span-to-overall depth ratio on shear capacity of steel fiber high-strength deep beams using artificial neural network (ANN8). The three-layered model has eight input nodes which represent width, effective depth, volume fraction, fiber aspect ratio and shear span-to-depth ratio, longitudinal steel, compressive strength of concrete, and clear span-to-overall depth ratio. The model predicts the shear strength of high-strength steel fiber deep beams to be reasonably good when compared with the results of proposed equations by researchers as well as the results obtained by neural network (ANN7) which is developed for seven inputs excluding span-to-depth ratio. The developed neural network ANN8 proves the versatility of artificial neural networks to establish the relations between various parameters affecting complex behavior of steel fiber-reinforced concrete deep beams and costly experimental processes.

  13. Lithospheric Shear Velocity and Discontinuity Structure of Hudson Bay from S-to-P Receiver Functions and Jointly Inverted P-to-S Receiver Functions and Rayleigh Wave Phase Velocities.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porritt, R. W.; Miller, M. S.; Darbyshire, F. A.

    2014-12-01

    Hudson Bay overlies some of the thickest Precambrian lithosphere on Earth, whose internal structures contain important clues to the earliest workings of plate formation. The Hudson Bay Lithospheric Experiment (HuBLE) has thus far constrained its seismic wavespeed, anisotropy, and discontinuity structures. However, previous work has either focused on a single imaging method or briefly compared two independent methods. In this study, we combine surface wave dispersion curves with P to S receiver functions (PRF) to jointly invert for 1D shear velocity, and also compute independent S to P receiver functions (SRF) using teleseismic earthquakes recorded at 36 broadband seismic stations from the HuBLE experiment and 9 additional regional stations. High shear velocities are observed to depths of 200-300 km in the region, indicating a thick depleted lithospheric keel, with maximum thickness in the center of Hudson Bay. The 1D shear velocity profiles typically exhibit a low-velocity zone in the lower crust, consistent with the hypothesis of post-orogenic or syn-orogenic lower crustal flow or the tectonic burial of metasediments. Observations of a flat Moho in the Rae domain of northwestern Hudson Bay are consistent with an Archean-aged crust, which has remained unaltered since formation. Structures observed within the mantle lithosphere in the depth-stacked S to P receiver functions appear to dip from the Hearne domain towards the Rae domain, suggestive of lithospheric formation through plate tectonic processes. This implies that plate tectonic processes were in action during the Archean when these provinces formed.

  14. Shear-wave Velocity Structure and Inter-Seismic Strain Accumulation in the Up-Dip Region of the Cascadia Subduction Zone: Similarities to Tohoku?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, J. A.; McGuire, J. J.; Wei, M.

    2013-12-01

    The up-dip region of subduction zone thrusts is difficult to study using land-based seismic and geodetic networks, yet documenting its ability to store and release elastic strain is critical for understanding the mechanics of great subduction earthquakes and tsunami generation. The 2011 Tohoku earthquake produced extremely large slip in the shallowest portion of the subduction zone beneath a region of the fore-arc that is comprised of extremely low-velocity, unconsolidated sediments [Tsuru et al. JGR 2012]. The influence of the sediment material properties on the co-seismic slip distribution and tsunami generation can be considerable through both the effects on the dynamic wavefield during the rupture [Kozdon and Dunham, BSSA 2012] and potentially the build up of strain during the inter-seismic period. As part of the 2010-2011 SeaJade experiment [Scherwath et al, EOS 2011], we deployed 10 ocean bottom seismographs (OBS) on the continental slope offshore of Vancouver Island in the region of the NEPTUNE Canada observatory. One goal of the experiment is to measure the shear modulus of the sediments lying above the subducting plate using the seafloor compliance technique. Using seafloor acceleration measured by broadband seismometer and seafloor pressure measured by Differential Pressure Gauge (DPG), we estimate the compliance spectrum in the infra-gravity wave band (~0.002-0.04 Hz) at 9 sites following the methodology of Crawford et al. [JGR, 1991]. We calibrated DPG sensitivities using laboratory measurements and by comparing teleseismic Rayleigh arrivals recorded on the seismometer and DPG channels [Webb, pers. comm]. We correct the vertical-component seismometer data for tilt using the procedure of Crawford and Webb [BSSA, 2000], Corrections for the gravitational attraction of the surface gravity waves [Crawford et al., JGR, 1998] are important at frequencies of 0.003-0.006 Hz only. Typically, the coherences are high (>0.7) in the 0.006 to 0.03 Hz range. We invert

  15. Transdimensional Love-wave tomography of the British Isles and shear-velocity structure of the East Irish Sea Basin from ambient-noise interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galetti, Erica; Curtis, Andrew; Baptie, Brian; Jenkins, David; Nicolson, Heather

    2016-08-01

    We present the first Love-wave group velocity and shear velocity maps of the British Isles obtained from ambient noise interferometry and fully non-linear inversion. We computed interferometric inter-station Green's functions by cross-correlating the transverse component of ambient noise records retrieved by 61 seismic stations across the UK and Ireland. Group velocity measurements along each possible inter-station path were obtained using frequency-time analysis and converted into a series of inter-station traveltime datasets between 4 and 15 seconds period. Traveltime uncertainties estimated from the standard deviation of dispersion curves constructed by stacking randomly-selected subsets of daily cross-correlations, were observed to be too low to allow reasonable data fits to be obtained during tomography. Data uncertainties were therefore estimated again during the inversion as distance-dependent functionals. We produced Love-wave group velocity maps within 8 different period bands using a fully non-linear tomography method which combines the transdimensional reversible-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (rj-McMC) algorithm with an eikonal raytracer. By modelling exact raypaths at each step of the Markov chain we ensured that the non-linear character of the inverse problem was fully and correctly accounted for. Between 4 and 10 seconds period, the group velocity maps show remarkable agreement with the known geology of the British Isles and correctly identify a number of low-velocity sedimentary basins and high-velocity features. Longer period maps, in which most sedimentary basins are not visible, are instead mainly representative of basement rocks. In a second stage of our study we used the results of tomography to produce a series of Love-wave group velocity dispersion curves across a grid of geographical points focussed around the East Irish Sea sedimentary basin. We then independently inverted each curve using a similar rj-McMC algorithm to obtain a series of

  16. P, S velocity and VP/VS ratio beneath the Toba caldera complex (Northern Sumatra) from local earthquake tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koulakov, Ivan; Yudistira, Tedi; Luehr, Birger-G.; Wandono

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate the crustal and uppermost mantle structure beneath Toba caldera, which is known as the location of one of the largest Cenozoic eruptions on Earth. The most recent event occurred 74000 yr BP, and had a significant global impact on climate and the biosphere. In this study, we revise data on local seismicity in the Toba area recorded by a temporary PASSCAL network in 1995. We applied the newest version of the LOTOS-07 algorithm, which includes absolute source location, optimization of the starting 1-D velocity model, and iterative tomographic inversion for 3-D seismic P, S (or the VP/VS ratio) and source parameters. Special attention is paid to verification of the obtained results. Beneath the Toba caldera and other volcanoes of the arc, we observe relatively moderate (for volcanic areas) negative P- and S-velocity anomalies that reach 18 per cent in the uppermost layer, 10-12 per cent in the lower crust and about 7 per cent in the uppermost mantle. Much stronger contrasts are observed for the VP/VS ratio that is a possible indicator of dominant effect of melting in origin of seismic anomalies. At a depth of 5 km beneath active volcanoes, we observe small patterns (7-15 km size) with a high VP/VS ratio that might be an image of actual magmatic chambers filled with partially molten material feeding the volcanoes. In the mantle wedge, we observe a vertical anomaly with low P and S velocities and a high VP/VS ratio that link the cluster of events at 120-140 km depth with Toba caldera. This may be an image of ascending fluids and melts released from the subducted slab due to phase transitions. However, taking into account poor vertical resolution, these results should be interpreted with prudence. Although the results show clear signatures that are quite typical for volcanic areas (low velocity and high VP/VS ratio beneath volcanoes), we do not observe any specific features in seismic structure that could characterize Toba as a super volcano.

  17. Cloud-Droplet Ingestion in Engine Inlets with Inlet Velocity Ratios of 1.0 and 0.7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brun, Rinaldo J

    1957-01-01

    The paths of cloud droplets into two engine inlets have been calculated for a wide range of meteorological and flight conditions. The amount of water in droplet form ingested by the inlets and the amount and distribution of water impinging on the inlet walls are obtained from these droplet-trajectory calculations. In both types of inlet, a prolate ellipsoid of revolution represents either part or all of the forebody at the center of an annular inlet to an engine. The configurations can also represent a fuselage of an airplane with side ram-scoop inlets. The studies were made at an angle of attack of 0 degree. The principal difference between the two inlets studied is that the inlet-air velocity of one is 0.7 that of the other. The studies of the two velocity ratios lead to some important general concepts of water ingestion in inlets.

  18. Possibility of modification of the Rayleigh line in a nonequilibrium fluid with a constant shear velocity gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Debendranath; Sood, A. K.

    1984-11-01

    We show that the recent prediction of the García-Colín and Velasco

    [Phys. Rev. A 26 2187 (1982)]
    regarding the modification of the Rayleigh line, in the scattering of light from a fluid kept under a constant shear veloity gradient, is incorrect. A correct application of fluctuating hydrodynamics is shown to predict no such change.

  19. Numerical evaluation of the effects of planform geometry and inflow conditions on flow, turbulence structure, and bed shear velocity at a stream confluence with a concordant bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantinescu, George; Miyawaki, Shinjiro; Rhoads, Bruce; Sukhodolov, Alexander

    2014-10-01

    This study numerically investigates the effects of variations in inflow conditions and planform geometry on large-scale coherent flow structures and bed friction velocities at a stream confluence with natural bathymetry and concordant bed morphology. Several numerical experiments are conducted in which either the Kelvin-Helmholtz mode or the wake mode dominates within the mixing interface (MI) between the two confluent streams as the junction angle and alignments of the tributaries are altered. In the Kelvin-Helmholtz mode, the MI contains mostly corotating vortices driven by the mean transverse shear across the MI, while in the wake mode the MI contains counterrotating vortices forming by the interaction of the separated shear layers on the two sides of a zone of stagnant fluid near the junction corner. A large angle between the two incoming streams is not necessary for the development of strongly coherent streamwise-oriented vortical (SOV) cells in the immediate vicinity of the MI. Results show that such SOV cells can develop and produce high bed friction velocities even for cases with a low angle between the two tributaries and for cases where the downstream channel is approximately aligned with the axes of the two tributaries (low-curvature cases). SOV cells tend not to develop only when the incoming streams are parallel and aligned with the downstream channel (junction angle of zero), and the incoming flows produce a strong Kelvin-Helmholtz mode. Under such conditions, quasi 2-D MI vortices play the primary role in mixing and the production of high bed shear velocities. Simulations with and without natural bed morphology/local bank line irregularities indicate that planform geometry and inflow conditions primarily govern the development of coherent flow structures, but that bathymetric and bank line effects can locally modify details of these structures.

  20. Shear layer structure of a low speed jet. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report, 28 Jun. 1974 - 31 Dec. 1975; [measurements of field pressure and turbulent velocity functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    A series of measurements of near field pressures and turbulent velocity fluctuations were made in a low speed jet with a Reynolds number near 50,000 in order to investigate more quantitatively the character and behavior of the large scale structures and their interactions with each other. The near field measurements were modelled according to the vortex pairing hypothesis to deduce the distribution of pairings along the jet axis and the variances about the mean locations. The hodograph plane description of turbulence was explored in some detail, and a complex correlation quantity was synthesized which has useful properties for turbulence in the presence of mean shear.

  1. Rayleigh-wave imaging of upper-mantle shear velocities beneath the Malawi Rift; Preliminary results from the SEGMeNT experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accardo, N. J.; Gaherty, J. B.; Shillington, D. J.; Nyblade, A.; Ebinger, C. J.; Mbogoni, G. J.; Chindandali, P. R. N.; Mulibo, G. D.; Ferdinand-Wambura, R.; Kamihanda, G.

    2015-12-01

    The Malawi Rift (MR) is an immature rift located at the southern tip of the Western branch of the East African Rift System (EARS). Pronounced border faults and tectonic segmentation are seen within the upper crust. Surface volcanism in the region is limited to the Rungwe volcanic province located north of Lake Malawi (Nyasa). However, the distribution of extension and magma at depth in the crust and mantle lithosphere is unknown. As the Western Rift of the EARS is largely magma-poor except for discrete volcanic provinces, the MR presents the ideal location to elucidate the role of magmatism in early-stage rifting and the manifestation of segmentation at depth. This study investigates the shear velocity of the crust and mantle lithosphere beneath the MR to constrain the thermal structure, the amount of total crustal and lithospheric thinning, and the presence and distribution of magmatism beneath the rift. Utilizing 55 stations from the SEGMeNT (Study of Extension and maGmatism in Malawi aNd Tanzania) passive-source seismic experiment operating in Malawi and Tanzania, we employed a multi-channel cross-correlation algorithm to obtain inter-station phase and amplitude information from Rayleigh wave observations between 20 and 80 s period. We retrieve estimates of phase velocity between 9-20 s period from ambient noise cross-correlograms in the frequency domain via Aki's formula. We invert phase velocity measurements to obtain estimates of shear velocity (Vs) between 50-200 km depth. Preliminary results reveal a striking low-velocity zone (LVZ) beneath the Rungwe volcanic province with Vs ~4.2-4.3 km/s in the uppermost mantle. Low velocities extend along the entire strike of Lake Malawi and to the west where a faster velocity lid (~4.5 km/s) is imaged. These preliminary results will be extended by incorporating broadband data from seven "lake"-bottom seismometers (LBS) to be retrieved from Lake Malawi in October of this year. The crust and mantle modeling will be

  2. Effects of Lewis number, density ratio and gravity on burning velocity and conditional statistics in stagnating turbulent premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Jaesung; Huh, Kang Y.

    2014-09-01

    DNS is performed to analyse the effects of Lewis number (Le), density ratio and gravity in stagnating turbulent premixed flames. The results show good agreement with those of Lee and Huh (Combustion and Flame, Vol. 159, 2012, pp. 1576-1591) with respect to the turbulent burning velocity, ST, in terms of turbulent diffusivity, flamelet thickness, mean curvature and displacement speed at the leading edge. In all four stagnating flames studied, a mean tangential strain rate resulting in a mean flamelet thickness smaller than the unstretched laminar flame thickness leads to an increase in ST. A flame cusp of positive curvature involves a superadiabatic burned gas temperature due to diffusive-thermal instability for an Le less than unity. Wrinkling tends to be suppressed at a larger density ratio, not enhanced by hydrodynamic instability, in the stagnating flow configuration. Turbulence is produced, resulting in highly anisotropic turbulence with heavier unburned gas accelerating through a flame brush by Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Results are also provided on brush thickness, flame surface density and conditional velocities in burned and unburned gas and on flame surfaces to represent the internal brush structures for all four test flames.

  3. A self-consistent two-dimensional resistive fluid theory of field-aligned potential structures including charge separation and magnetic and velocity shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael; Birn, Joachim; Schindler, Karl

    1990-01-01

    A self-consistent two-fluid theory that includes the magnetic field and shear patterns is developed to model stationary electrostatic structures with field-aligned potential drops. Shear flow is also included in the theory since this seems to be a prominent feature of the structures of interest. In addition, Ohmic dissipation, a Hall term, and pressure gradients in a generalized Ohm's law, modified for cases without quasi-neutrality, are included. In the analytic theory, the electrostatic force is balanced by field-aligned pressure gradients (i.e., thermal effects in the direction of the magnetic field) and by pressure gradients and magnetic stresses in the perpendicular direction. Within this theory, simple examples of applications are presented to demonstrate the kind of solutions resulting from the model. The results show how the effects of charge separation and shear in the magnetic field and the velocity can be combined to form self-consistent structures such as are found to exist above the aurora, suggested also in association with solar flares.

  4. Influences of shear in the ion parallel drift velocity and of inhomogeneous perpendicular electric field on generation of oblique ion acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyasov, Askar; Chernyshov, Alexander; Mogilevsky, Mikhail; Golovchanskaya, Irina; Kozelov, Boris

    2016-03-01

    It is well known that the broadband electrostatic turbulence observed in the topside auroral ionosphere can be identified with electrostatic ion cyclotron and/or oblique ion acoustic waves. Under certain conditions generation of the ion cyclotron modes is inhibited, so that the oblique ion acoustic waves become the prevailing part of the broadband noise. While generation of ion cyclotron waves by the inhomogeneous distribution of energy density (IEDD) instability has been actively studied in recent years, much less attention was paid to the excitation of ion acoustic waves by means of the IEDD instability. In this work, influence of shear in the ion parallel drift velocities and of inhomogeneous perpendicular electric field on generation of nonlocal oblique ion acoustic mode is studied. It is demonstrated that the shear of the ion parallel drift velocities can generate ion acoustic waves. It is shown that this mechanism of instability development provides broadband spectrum in the frequency range around 0.1 of ion gyrofrequency, and thus, this instability can be invoked to explain the observed broadband electrostatic turbulence in the auroral region. Effect of the main background plasma parameters on excitation of oblique ion acoustic waves is analyzed.

  5. Development of the mean velocity distribution in rectangular jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, G. L.; Swan, D. H.; Deotte, R. E., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The mean flowfield of 1 x 2 and 1 x 4 aspect ratio rectangular jets has been measured using a laser Doppler anemometer system. The development of the downstream velocity distribution is analyzed with respect to centerline velocity decay, shear layer growth, axis switching, and velocity profile development. Comparisons are made with axisymmetric, planar, and other rectangular jets.

  6. Optical-to-virial velocity ratios of local disc galaxies from combined kinematics and galaxy-galaxy lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, R.; Mandelbaum, R.; Gunn, J. E.; Nakajima, R.; Seljak, U.; Hirata, C. M.

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we measure the optical-to-virial velocity ratios Vopt/V200c of disc galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) at a mean redshift of = 0.07 and with stellar masses 109 < M* < 1011 M⊙. Vopt/V200c, the ratio of the circular velocity measured at the optical radius of the disc (˜10 kpc) to that at the virial radius of the dark matter halo (˜150 kpc), is a powerful observational constraint on disc galaxy formation. It links galaxies to their dark matter haloes dynamically and constrains the total mass profile of disc galaxies over an order of magnitude in length scale. For this measurement, we combine Vopt derived from the Tully-Fisher relation (TFR) from Reyes et al. with V200c derived from halo masses measured with galaxy-galaxy lensing. In anticipation of this combination, we use similarly selected galaxy samples for both the TFR and lensing analysis. For three M* bins with lensing-weighted mean stellar masses of 0.6, 2.7 and 6.5 × 1010 M⊙, we find halo-to-stellar mass ratios M200c/M* = 41, 23 and 26, with 1σ statistical uncertainties of around 0.1 dex, and Vopt/V200c = 1.27 ± 0.08, 1.39 ± 0.06 and 1.27 ± 0.08 (1σ), respectively. Our results suggest that the dark matter and baryonic contributions to the mass within the optical radius are comparable, if the dark matter halo profile has not been significantly modified by baryons. The results obtained in this work will serve as inputs to and constraints on disc galaxy formation models, which will be explored in future work. Finally, we note that this paper presents a new and improved galaxy shape catalogue for weak lensing that covers the full SDSS Data Release 7 footprint.

  7. Intraventricular Flow Velocity Vector Visualization Based on the Continuity Equation and Measurements of Vorticity and Wall Shear Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itatani, Keiichi; Okada, Takashi; Uejima, Tokuhisa; Tanaka, Tomohiko; Ono, Minoru; Miyaji, Kagami; Takenaka, Katsu

    2013-07-01

    We have developed a system to estimate velocity vector fields inside the cardiac ventricle by echocardiography and to evaluate several flow dynamical parameters to assess the pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases. A two-dimensional continuity equation was applied to color Doppler data using speckle tracking data as boundary conditions, and the velocity component perpendicular to the echo beam line was obtained. We determined the optimal smoothing method of the color Doppler data, and the 8-pixel standard deviation of the Gaussian filter provided vorticity without nonphysiological stripe shape noise. We also determined the weight function at the bilateral boundaries given by the speckle tracking data of the ventricle or vascular wall motion, and the weight function linear to the distance from the boundary provided accurate flow velocities not only inside the vortex flow but also around near-wall regions on the basis of the results of the validation of a digital phantom of a pipe flow model.

  8. C[subscript p]/C[subscript V] Ratios Measured by the Sound Velocity Method Using Calculator-Based Laboratory Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branca, Mario; Soletta, Isabella

    2007-01-01

    The velocity of sound in a gas depends on its temperature, molar mass, and [lambda] = C[subscript p]/C[subscript v], ratio (heat capacity at a constant pressure to heat capacity at constant volume). The [lambda] values for air, oxygen, nitrogen, argon, and carbon dioxide were determined by measuring the velocity of the sound through the gases at…

  9. Dependencies of pore pressure on elastic wave velocities and Vp/Vs ratio for thermally cracked gabbro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, K.; Uehara, S. I.; Mizoguchi, K.

    2015-12-01

    Marine seismic refraction have found that there are high Vp/Vs ratio regions in oceanic crusts at subducting oceanic plates (e.g, Cascadia subduction zone (2.0-2.8) (Audet et al., 2009)). Previous studies based on laboratory measurements indicated that Vp/Vs ratio is high when porosity and/or pore pressure is high (Christensen, 1984; Peacock et al., 2011). Although several studies have investigated the relationships between fracture distributions and Vp, Vs (e.g., Wang et al., 2012; Blake et al., 2013), the relationships for rocks (e.g., gabbro and basalt) composing oceanic crust are still unclear. This study reports the results of laboratory measurements of Vp, Vs (transmission method) at controlled confining and pore pressure and estimation of Vp/Vs ratio for thermally cracked gabbro which mimic highly fractured rocks in the high Vp/Vs ratio zone, in order to declare the dependence of fracture distributions on Vp/Vs. For the measurements, we prepared three type specimens; a non-heated intact specimen, specimens heated up to 500 °C and 700 °C for 24 hours. Porosities of intact, 500 °C and 700 °C specimens measured under the atmospheric pressure are 0.5, 3.4 and 3.5%, respectively. Measurements were conducted at a constant confining pressure of 50 MPa, with decreasing pore pressure from 49 to 0.1 MPa and then increasing to 49 MPa. While Vp/Vs for the intact specimen is almost constant at elevated pore pressure, the Vp/Vs values for the thermally cracked ones were 2.0~2.2 when pore pressure was larger than 30 MPa. In future, we will reveal the relationship between the measured elastic wave velocities and the characteristics of the microfracture distribution. This work was supported by JSPS Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (Grant Number 26400492).

  10. Computational solution of the velocity and wall shear stress distribution inside a left carotid artery under pulsatile flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arslan, Nurullah; Turmuş, Hakan

    2014-08-01

    Stroke is still one of the leading causes for death after heart diseases and cancer in all over the world. Strokes happen because an artery that carries blood uphill from the heart to the head is clogged. Most of the time, as with heart attacks, the problem is atherosclerosis, hardening of the arteries, calcified buildup of fatty deposits on the vessel wall. In this study, the fluid dynamic simulations were done in a left carotid bifurcation under the pulsatile flow conditions computationally. Pulsatile flow waveform is given in the paper. In vivo geometry and boundary conditions were obtained from a patient who has stenosis located at external carotid artery (ECA) and internal carotid artery (ICA) of his common carotid artery (CCA). The location of critical flow fields such as low wall shear stress (WSS), stagnation regions and separation regions were detected near the highly stenosed region and at branching region.

  11. Cross-shore velocity shear, eddies and heterogeneity in water column properties over fringing coral reefs: West Maui, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storlazzi, C.D.; McManus, M.A.; Logan, J.B.; McLaughlin, B.E.

    2006-01-01

    A multi-day hydrographic survey cruise was conducted to acquire spatially extensive, but temporally limited, high-resolution, three-dimensional measurements of currents, temperature, salinity and turbidity off West Maui in the summer of 2003 to better understand coastal dynamics along a complex island shoreline with coral reefs. These data complement long-term, high-resolution tide, wave, current, temperature, salinity and turbidity measurements made at a number of fixed locations in the study area starting in 2001. Analyses of these hydrographic data, in conjunction with numerous field observations, evoke the following conceptual model of water and turbidity flux along West Maui. Wave- and wind-driven flows appear to be the primary control on flow over shallower portions of the reefs while tidal and subtidal currents dominate flow over the outer portions of the reefs and insular shelf. When the direction of these flows counter one another, which is quite common, they cause a zone of cross-shore horizontal shear and often form a front, with turbid, lower-salinity water inshore of the front and clear, higher-salinity water offshore of the front. It is not clear whether these zones of high shear and fronts are the cause or the result of the location of the fore reef, but they appear to be correlated alongshore over relatively large horizontal distances (orders of kilometers). When two flows converge or when a single flow is bathymetrically steered, eddies can be generated that, in the absence of large ocean surface waves, tend to accumulate material. Areas of higher turbidity and lower salinity tend to correlate with regions of poor coral health or the absence of well-developed reefs, suggesting that the oceanographic processes that concentrate and/or transport nutrients, contaminants, low-salinity water or suspended sediment might strongly influence coral reef ecosystem health and sustainability.

  12. In-plane ultrasonic velocity measurement of longitudinal and shear waves in the machine direction with transducers in rotating wheels

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Maclin S.; Jackson, Theodore G.; Knerr, Christopher

    1998-02-17

    An improved system for measuring the velocity of ultrasonic signals within the plane of moving web-like materials, such as paper, paperboard and the like. In addition to velocity measurements of ultrasonic signals in the plane of the web in the MD and CD, one embodiment of the system in accordance with the present invention is also adapted to provide on-line indication of the polar specific stiffness of the moving web. In another embodiment of the invention, the velocity of ultrasonic signals in the plane of the web are measured by way of a plurality of ultrasonic transducers carried by synchronously driven wheels or cylinders, thus eliminating undue transducer wear due to any speed differences between the transducers and the web. In order to provide relatively constant contact force between the transducers and the webs, the transducers are mounted in a sensor housings which include a spring for biasing the transducer radially outwardly. The sensor housings are adapted to be easily and conveniently mounted to the carrier to provide a relatively constant contact force between the transducers and the moving web.

  13. In-plane ultrasonic velocity measurement of longitudinal and shear waves in the machine direction with transducers in rotating wheels

    DOEpatents

    Hall, M.S.; Jackson, T.G.; Knerr, C.

    1998-02-17

    An improved system for measuring the velocity of ultrasonic signals within the plane of moving web-like materials, such as paper, paperboard and the like. In addition to velocity measurements of ultrasonic signals in the plane of the web in the MD and CD, one embodiment of the system in accordance with the present invention is also adapted to provide on-line indication of the polar specific stiffness of the moving web. In another embodiment of the invention, the velocity of ultrasonic signals in the plane of the web are measured by way of a plurality of ultrasonic transducers carried by synchronously driven wheels or cylinders, thus eliminating undue transducer wear due to any speed differences between the transducers and the web. In order to provide relatively constant contact force between the transducers and the webs, the transducers are mounted in a sensor housings which include a spring for biasing the transducer radially outwardly. The sensor housings are adapted to be easily and conveniently mounted to the carrier to provide a relatively constant contact force between the transducers and the moving web. 37 figs.

  14. Use of Refraction Microtremor (ReMi) technique for the determination of 1-D shear wave velocity in a landslide area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coccia, S.; Del Gaudio, V.; Venisti, N.; Wasowski, J.

    2009-04-01

    In the context of an ongoing study on seismic response of landslide-prone hill-slopes in Central Italy (area of Caramanico Terme), we tested the applicability of the Refraction Microtremor (ReMi) analysis technique (Louie, 2001) to obtain geometrical and physical parameters needed for numerical modelling. In particular, we used this technique to determine one-dimensional shear-wave velocity profiles (Vs) at sites located on and close to a recent landslide that mobilized 30-40 m thick Quaternary colluvium overlying Pliocene mudstones. The use of this technique in unstable slope areas presents difficulties related to rough topography and lateral lithological heterogeneities, which prevent the extension of geophone array up to the minimum lengths (100 - 200 m) commonly adopted in standard applications. Moreover, sites distant from anthropic sources of microtremors can have unfavourable noise conditions in comparison with other well established cases of application. To check the stability of the ReMi data in these operative conditions and the confidence level of the results, three ReMi campaigns were conducted at different times using different acquisition parameters (seismograph channel number, geophone frequency and spacing). We also tested simultaneous noise recording along orthogonal arrays to investigate a possible presence of directional variations of soil properties. The Rayleigh wave velocity dispersion data derived from picking carried out on p (slowness)-f (frequency) matrix showed the presence in noise recordings of different Rayleigh wave vibration modes (fundamental and first two higher modes), which prevail at different frequency intervals. This indicates that it is essential to correctly identify the different vibration modes to avoid erroneous data interpretation (e.g. fictitious identification of velocity decrease with depth). An analysis of the influence of changing environmental conditions and of different acquisition parameters was conducted through

  15. Numerical Study of Velocity Shear Stabilization of 3D and Theoretical Considerations for Centrifugally Confined Plasmas and Other Interchange-Limited Fusion Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Hassam, Adil

    2015-09-21

    We studied the feasibility of resonantly driving GAMs in tokamaks. A numerical simulation was carried out and showed the essential features and limitations. It was shown further that GAMs can damp by phase-mixing, from temperature gradients, or nonlinear detuning, thus broadening the resonance. Experimental implications of this were quantified. Theoretical support was provided for the Maryland Centrifugal Experiment, funded in a separate grant by DOE. Plasma diamagnetism from supersonic rotation was established. A theoretical model was built to match the data. Additional support to the experiment in terms of numerical simulation of the interchange turbulence was provided. Spectra from residual turbulence on account of velocity shear suppression were obtained and compared favorably to experiment. A new drift wave, driven solely by the thermal force, was identified.

  16. Hepatic and Splenic Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Shear Wave Velocity Elastography in Children with Liver Disease Associated with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Cañas, Teresa; Maciá, Araceli; Muñoz-Codoceo, Rosa Ana; Fontanilla, Teresa; González-Rios, Patricia; Miralles, María; Gómez-Mardones, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Background. Liver disease associated with cystic fibrosis (CFLD) is the second cause of mortality in these patients. The diagnosis is difficult because none of the available tests are specific enough. Noninvasive elastographic techniques have been proven to be useful to diagnose hepatic fibrosis. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging is an elastography imaging system. The purpose of the work was to study the utility of liver and spleen ARFI Imaging in the detection of CFLD. Method. 72 patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) were studied and received ARFI imaging in the liver and in the spleen. SWV values were compared with the values of 60 healthy controls. Results. Comparing the SWV values of CFLD with the control healthy group, values in the right lobe were higher in patients with CFLD. We found a SWV RHL cut-off value to detect CFLD of 1.27 m/s with a sensitivity of 56.5% and a specificity of 90.5%. CF patients were found to have higher SWC spleen values than the control group. Conclusions. ARFI shear wave elastography in the right hepatic lobe is a noninvasive technique useful to detect CFLD in our sample of patients. Splenic SWV values are higher in CF patients, without any clinical consequence. PMID:26609528

  17. Evolution of a localized vortex in plane nonparallel viscous flows with constant velocity shear. I. Hyperbolic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukhman, I. G.

    2006-09-01

    The framework of the linear theory is employed to study the evolution of an initial compact vortical disturbance in unbounded plane nonparallel viscous incompressible flows with constant velocity gradients. Two types of such flows are known to be possible: hyperbolical and elliptical (as well as an intermediate case of the well-studied parallel Couette flow). The results presented here are obtained for a hyperbolical flow. (Results concerning the elliptical flow are to be issued in a separate publication.) This paper is a development of earlier work by R. R. Lagnado, N. Phan-Thien, and L. G. Leal [Phys. Fluids 27, 1094 (1984)] studying the stability of a hyperbolical flow relative to the simplest perturbations in the form of plane waves with a time-dependent wave vector. The dynamics of vortex intensity is investigated as well as the evolution of its geometrical form and orientation. The results are discussed in the context of the problem of hairpin vortex formation.

  18. Blind shear-wave velocity comparison of ReMi and MASW results with boreholes to 200 m in Santa Clara Valley: Implications for earthquake ground-motion assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephenson, W.J.; Louie, J.N.; Pullammanappallil, S.; Williams, R.A.; Odum, J.K.

    2005-01-01

    Multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) and refraction microtremor (ReMi) are two of the most recently developed surface acquisition techniques for determining shallow shear-wave velocity. We conducted a blind comparison of MASW and ReMi results with four boreholes logged to at least 260 m for shear velocity in Santa Clara Valley, California, to determine how closely these surface methods match the downhole measurements. Average shear-wave velocity estimates to depths of 30, 50, and 100 m demonstrate that the surface methods as implemented in this study can generally match borehole results to within 15% to these depths. At two of the boreholes, the average to 100 m depth was within 3%. Spectral amplifications predicted from the respective borehole velocity profiles similarly compare to within 15 % or better from 1 to 10 Hz with both the MASW and ReMi surface-method velocity profiles. Overall, neither surface method was consistently better at matching the borehole velocity profiles or amplifications. Our results suggest MASW and ReMi surface acquisition methods can both be appropriate choices for estimating shearwave velocity and can be complementary to each other in urban settings for hazards assessment.

  19. Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Nathan A. S.; Pownceby, Mark I.; Madsen, Ian C.; Studer, Andrew J.; Manuel, James R.; Kimpton, Justin A.

    2014-12-01

    Effects of basicity, B (CaO:SiO2 ratio) on the thermal range, concentration, and formation mechanisms of silico-ferrite of calcium and aluminum (SFCA) and SFCA-I iron ore sinter bonding phases have been investigated using an in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction-based methodology with subsequent Rietveld refinement-based quantitative phase analysis. SFCA and SFCA-I phases are the key bonding materials in iron ore sinter, and improved understanding of the effects of processing parameters such as basicity on their formation and decomposition may assist in improving efficiency of industrial iron ore sintering operations. Increasing basicity significantly increased the thermal range of SFCA-I, from 1363 K to 1533 K (1090 °C to 1260 °C) for a mixture with B = 2.48, to ~1339 K to 1535 K (1066 °C to 1262 °C) for a mixture with B = 3.96, and to ~1323 K to 1593 K (1050 °C to 1320 °C) at B = 4.94. Increasing basicity also increased the amount of SFCA-I formed, from 18 wt pct for the mixture with B = 2.48 to 25 wt pct for the B = 4.94 mixture. Higher basicity of the starting sinter mixture will, therefore, increase the amount of SFCA-I, considered to be more desirable of the two phases. Basicity did not appear to significantly influence the formation mechanism of SFCA-I. It did, however, affect the formation mechanism of SFCA, with the decomposition of SFCA-I coinciding with the formation of a significant amount of additional SFCA in the B = 2.48 and 3.96 mixtures but only a minor amount in the highest basicity mixture. In situ neutron diffraction enabled characterization of the behavior of magnetite after melting of SFCA produced a magnetite plus melt phase assemblage.

  20. A Global Horizontal Shear Velocity Model of the Upper Mantle from multi-mode Love Wave Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Tak; Priestley, Keith; Debayle, Eric

    2016-08-01

    Surface wave studies in the 1960s provided the first indication that the upper mantle was radially anisotropic. Resolving the anisotropic structure is important because it may yield information on deformation and flow patterns in the upper mantle. The existing radially anisotropic models are in poor agreement. Rayleigh waves have been studied extensively and recent models show general agreement. Less work has focused on Love waves and the models that do exist are less well-constrained than are Rayleigh wave models, suggesting it is the Love wave models that are responsible for the poor agreement in the radially anisotropic structure of the upper mantle. We have adapted the waveform inversion procedure of Debayle & Ricard (2012) to extract propagation information for the fundamental mode and up to the fifth overtone from Love waveforms in the 50-250 s period range. We have tomographically inverted these results for a mantle horizontal shear wavespeed model (βh(z)) to transition zone depths. We include azimuthal anisotropy (2θ and 4θ terms) in the tomography, but in this paper we discuss only the isotropic βh(z) structure. The data set is significantly larger, almost 500,000 Love waveforms, than previously published Love wave data sets and provides ˜17,000,000 constraints on the upper mantle βh(z) structure. Sensitivity and resolution tests show that the horizontal resolution of the model is on the order of 800-1000 km to transition zone depths. The high wavespeed roots beneath the oldest parts of the continents appear to extend deeper for βh(z) than for βv(z) as in previous βh(z) models, but the resolution tests indicate that at least parts of these features could be artifacts. The low wavespeeds beneath the mid-ocean ridges fade by ˜150 km depth except for the upper mantle beneath the East Pacific Rise which remains slow to ˜250 km depth. The resolution tests suggest that the low wavespeeds at deeper depths beneath the East Pacific Rise are not solely

  1. Effect of tool velocity ratio on tensile properties of friction stir processed aluminum based metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayavel, P.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2016-08-01

    In friction stir processing (FSP), tool rotational speed (TRS) and tool traverse speed (TTS) are the two important parameters, known to produce significant changes in the properties of the processed material. Increasing the TRS and TTS beyond a certain level would produce undesirable results. The heat generation will increase with an increase in the TRS and decrease in TTS. Excessive heat generation results in the formation of coarse grains exhibiting poor mechanical properties. The heat generation will decrease with decrease in the TRS and increase in TTS. Low heat generation will lead to inadequate plasticization and improper material flow. Hence a perfect combination of TRS and TTS is required to attain desirable properties in FSPed material. In this investigation FSP was carried out on aluminum based metal matrix composite (LM25AA+5%SiCp) material using five different tool velocity ratios (TVR: TRS/TTS). The FSP was subjected to microstructural characterization and tensile properties, evaluation. The results revealed that the TVR of 2.6 yielded superior tensile properties compared to other conditions.

  2. Shear punch testing of {sup 59}Ni isotopically-doped model austenitic alloys after irradiation in FFTF at different He/dpa ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Hankin, G.L.; Faulkner, R.G.; Hamilton, M.L.; Garner, F.A.

    1998-03-01

    A series of three model alloys, Fe-15Cr-25Ni, Fe-15Cr-25Ni-0.04P and Fe-15Cr45Ni were irradiated side-by-side in FFTF-MOTA in both the annealed and the cold worked condition in each of two variants, one using naturally occurring isotopic mixtures, and another doped with {sup 59}Ni to generate relatively high helium-to-dpa ratios. Previous papers in this series have addressed the influence of helium on radiation-induced evolution of microstructure, dimensional stability and mechanical properties, the latter using miniature-tensile specimens. In the final paper of this experimental series, three sets of irradiations conducted at different temperatures and displacement rates were examined by shear punch testing of standard microscopy disks. The results were used to determine the influence of helium generation rate, alloy starting condition, irradiation temperature and total neutron exposure. The results were also compared with the miniature tensile data obtained earlier. In general, all alloys approached saturation levels of strength and ductility that were relatively independent of He/dpa ratio and starting condition, but were sensitive to the irradiation temperature and total exposure. Some small influence of helium/dpa ratio on the shear strength is visible in the two series that ran at {approximately}490 C, but is not evident at 365 C.

  3. New constraints on the 3D shear wave velocity structure of the upper mantle underneath Southern Scandinavia revealed from non-linear tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawerzinek, B.; Ritter, J. R. R.; Roy, C.

    2013-08-01

    We analyse travel times of shear waves, which were recorded at the MAGNUS network, to determine the 3D shear wave velocity (vS) structure underneath Southern Scandinavia. The travel time residuals are corrected for the known crustal structure of Southern Norway and weighted to account for data quality and pick uncertainties. The resulting residual pattern of subvertically incident waves is very uniform and simple. It shows delayed arrivals underneath Southern Norway compared to fast arrivals underneath the Oslo Graben and the Baltic Shield. The 3D upper mantle vS structure underneath the station network is determined by performing non-linear travel time tomography. As expected from the residual pattern the resulting tomographic model shows a simple and continuous vS perturbation pattern: a negative vS anomaly is visible underneath Southern Norway relative to the Baltic Shield in the east with a contrast of up to 4% vS and a sharp W-E dipping transition zone. Reconstruction tests reveal besides vertical smearing a good lateral reconstruction of the dipping vS transition zone and suggest that a deep-seated anomaly at 330-410 km depth is real and not an inversion artefact. The upper part of the reduced vS anomaly underneath Southern Norway (down to 250 km depth) might be due to an increase in lithospheric thickness from the Caledonian Southern Scandes in the west towards the Proterozoic Baltic Shield in Sweden in the east. The deeper-seated negative vS anomaly (330-410 km depth) could be caused by a temperature anomaly possibly combined with effects due to fluids or hydrous minerals. The determined simple 3D vS structure underneath Southern Scandinavia indicates that mantle processes might influence and contribute to a Neogene uplift of Southern Norway.

  4. Dynamic Site Characterization and Correlation of Shear Wave Velocity with Standard Penetration Test ` N' Values for the City of Agartala, Tripura State, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sil, Arjun; Sitharam, T. G.

    2014-08-01

    Seismic site characterization is the basic requirement for seismic microzonation and site response studies of an area. Site characterization helps to gauge the average dynamic properties of soil deposits and thus helps to evaluate the surface level response. This paper presents a seismic site characterization of Agartala city, the capital of Tripura state, in the northeast of India. Seismically, Agartala city is situated in the Bengal Basin zone which is classified as a highly active seismic zone, assigned by Indian seismic code BIS-1893, Indian Standard Criteria for Earthquake Resistant Design of Structures, Part-1 General Provisions and Buildings. According to the Bureau of Indian Standards, New Delhi (2002), it is the highest seismic level (zone-V) in the country. The city is very close to the Sylhet fault (Bangladesh) where two major earthquakes ( M w > 7) have occurred in the past and affected severely this city and the whole of northeast India. In order to perform site response evaluation, a series of geophysical tests at 27 locations were conducted using the multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) technique, which is an advanced method for obtaining shear wave velocity ( V s) profiles from in situ measurements. Similarly, standard penetration test (SPT-N) bore log data sets have been obtained from the Urban Development Department, Govt. of Tripura. In the collected data sets, out of 50 bore logs, 27 were selected which are close to the MASW test locations and used for further study. Both the data sets ( V s profiles with depth and SPT-N bore log profiles) have been used to calculate the average shear wave velocity ( V s30) and average SPT-N values for the upper 30 m depth of the subsurface soil profiles. These were used for site classification of the study area recommended by the National Earthquake Hazard Reduction Program (NEHRP) manual. The average V s30 and SPT-N classified the study area as seismic site class D and E categories, indicating that

  5. d.c. electric field stabilization of plasma fluctuations due to a velocity shear in the parallel ion flow. [in ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganguli, G.; Lee, Y. C.; Palmadesso, P. J.; Ossakow, S. L.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to the suggestion by Basu and Coppi (1988, 1989) that the DE-2 observations of broadband turbulence associated with sheared ion flows can be explained by electrostatic waves driven by a sheared ion flow along the magnetic field. It is pointed out that such a theory ignores the stronger shear in the ion flow transverse to the magnetic field, and that, when this shear is taken into account, the modes described by Basu and Coppi are easily destabilized. The theory of Basu and Coppi is shown to break down even when the shear in the parallel flow exceeds the shear in the transverse flow.

  6. Amount of gas hydrate estimated from compressional- and shear-wave velocities at the JAPEX/JNOC/GSC Mallik 2L-38 gas hydrate research well

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, M.W.

    1999-01-01

    The amount of in situ gas hydrate concentrated in the sediment pore space at the JAPEX/JNOC/GSC Mallik 2L-38 gas hydrate research well was estimated by using compressional-wave (P-wave) and shear-wave (S-wave) downhole log measurements. A weighted equation developed for relating the amount of gas hydrate concentrated in the pore space of unconsolidated sediments to the increase of seismic velocities was applied to the acoustic logs with porosities derived from the formation density log. A weight of 1.56 (W=1.56) and the exponent of 1 (n=1) provided consistent estimates of gas hydrate concentration from the S-wave and the P-wave logs. Gas hydrate concentration is as much as 80% in the pore spaces, and the average gas hydrate concentration within the gas-hydrate-bearing section from 897 m to 1110 m (excluding zones where there is no gas hydrate) was calculated at 39.0% when using P-wave data and 37.8% when using S-wave data.

  7. Application of the H/V and SPAC Method to Estimate a 3D Shear Wave Velocity Model, in the City of Coatzacoalcos, Veracruz.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, L. E. A. P.; Aguirre, J.; Vazquez Rosas, R.; Suarez, G.; Contreras Ruiz-Esparza, M. G.; Farraz, I.

    2014-12-01

    Methods that use seismic noise or microtremors have become very useful tools worldwide due to its low costs, the relative simplicity in collecting data, the fact that these are non-invasive methods hence there is no need to alter or even perforate the study site, and also these methods require a relatively simple analysis procedure. Nevertheless the geological structures estimated by this methods are assumed to be parallel, isotropic and homogeneous layers. Consequently precision of the estimated structure is lower than that from conventional seismic methods. In the light of these facts this study aimed towards searching a new way to interpret the results obtained from seismic noise methods. In this study, seven triangular SPAC (Aki, 1957) arrays were performed in the city of Coatzacoalcos, Veracruz, varying in sizes from 10 to 100 meters. From the autocorrelation between the stations of each array, a Rayleigh wave phase velocity dispersion curve was calculated. Such dispersion curve was used to obtain a S wave parallel layers velocity (VS) structure for the study site. Subsequently the horizontal to vertical ratio of the spectrum of microtremors H/V (Nogoshi and Igarashi, 1971; Nakamura, 1989, 2000) was calculated for each vertex of the SPAC triangular arrays, and from the H/V spectrum the fundamental frequency was estimated for each vertex. By using the H/V spectral ratio curves interpreted as a proxy to the Rayleigh wave ellipticity curve, a series of VS structures were inverted for each vertex of the SPAC array. Lastly each VS structure was employed to calculate a 3D velocity model, in which the exploration depth was approximately 100 meters, and had a velocity range in between 206 (m/s) to 920 (m/s). The 3D model revealed a thinning of the low velocity layers. This proved to be in good agreement with the variation of the fundamental frequencies observed at each vertex. With the previous kind of analysis a preliminary model can be obtained as a first

  8. Declining rotation curves - The end of a conspiracy. [HI rotation velocity decrease of two galaxies as indication of large luminous to dark mass ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Casertano, S.; Van gorkom, J.H. Pittsburgh Univ., PA Columbia Univ., New York National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM )

    1991-04-01

    Two new H I rotation curves, observed at the Very Large Array as part of a search for galaxies with extended H I envelopes, are presented. The two curves are characterized by a large decrease in rotation velocity (more than 50 km/s, or about 25 percent of the maximum rotation velocity) between 1 and 3 optical radii. The velocity decrease is present on both sides of each galaxy and is not due to projection effects. The decrease in rotation velocity is interpreted as an indication of a large ratio of luminous to dark mass in the luminous regions of these systems. While confirming the idea that dark matter is ubiquitous, the discovery indicates that the match between the properties of luminous and dark matter required by the well-known 'conspiracy' is not perfect. 69 refs.

  9. The effective ratio of acoustic impedance in predicting stress and velocity of wave propagation in viscoelastic material (standard linear solid model)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musa, Abu Bakar

    2013-09-01

    The study is about impact of a short elastic rod(or slug) on a stationary semi-infinite viscoelastic rod. The viscoelastic materials are modeled as standard linear solid which involve three material parameters and the motion is treated as one-dimensional. We first establish the governing equations pertaining to the impact of viscoelastic materials subject to certain boundary conditions for the case when an elastic slug moving at a speed V impacts a semi-infinite stationary viscoelastic rod. The objective is to predict stresses and velocities at the interface following wave transmissions and reflections in the slug after the impact using viscoelastic discontinuity. If the stress at the interface becomes tensile and the velocity changes its sign, then the slug and the rod part company. If the stress at the interface is compressive after the impact, the slug and the rod remain in contact. In the process of predicting the stress and velocity of wave propagation using viscoelastic discontinuity, the Z-effective which is the effective ratio of acoustic impedance plays important role. It can be shown that effective ratio of acoustic impedance can help us to determine whether the slug and the rod move together or part company after the impact. After modeling the impact and solve the governing system of partial differential equations in the Laplace transform domain. We invert the Laplace transformed solution numerically to obtain the stresses and velocities at the interface for several viscosity time constants and ratios of acoustic impedances. In inverting the Laplace transformed equations, we used the complex inversion formula because there is a branch cut and infinitely many poles within the Bromwich contour. In the discontinuity analysis, we look at the moving discontinuities in stress and velocity using the impulse-momentum relation and kinematical condition of compatibility. Finally, we discussed the relationship of the stresses and velocities using numeric and the

  10. Shear-wave velocity characterization of the USGS Hawaiian strong-motion network on the Island of Hawaii and development of an NEHRP site-class map

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wong, Ivan G.; Stokoe, Kenneth; Cox, Brady R.; Yuan, Jiabei; Knudsen, Keith L.; Terra, Fabia; Okubo, Paul G.; Lin, Yin-Cheng

    2011-01-01

    To assess the level and nature of ground shaking in Hawaii for the purposes of earthquake hazard mitigation and seismic design, empirical ground-motion prediction models are desired. To develop such empirical relationships, knowledge of the subsurface site conditions beneath strong-motion stations is critical. Thus, as a first step to develop ground-motion prediction models for Hawaii, spectral-analysis-of-surface-waves (SASW) profiling was performed at the 22 free-field U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) strong-motion sites on the Big Island to obtain shear-wave velocity (VS) data. Nineteen of these stations recorded the 2006 Kiholo Bay moment magnitude (M) 6.7 earthquake, and 17 stations recorded the triggered M 6.0 Mahukona earthquake. VS profiling was performed to reach depths of more than 100 ft. Most of the USGS stations are situated on sites underlain by basalt, based on surficial geologic maps. However, the sites have varying degrees of weathering and soil development. The remaining strong-motion stations are located on alluvium or volcanic ash. VS30 (average VS in the top 30 m) values for the stations on basalt ranged from 906 to 1908 ft/s [National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) site classes C and D], because most sites were covered with soil of variable thickness. Based on these data, an NEHRP site-class map was developed for the Big Island. These new VS data will be a significant input into an update of the USGS statewide hazard maps and to the operation of ShakeMap on the island of Hawaii.

  11. Experimental Results Investigating Impact Velocity Effects on Crater Growth and the Transient Depth-to-Diameter Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnouin, O. S.; Ernst, C. M.; Heinick, J. T.; Cintala, M. J.; Crawford, D. A.; Matsui, T.

    2011-01-01

    We performed vertical hypervelocity impacts (0.5-6 km/s) at the NASA Ames Vertical Gun Range to evaluate if increasing impact velocity, which alters the coupling time between the projectile and target, might change the rates of crater growth and transient crater shape.

  12. Direct microscopic observation of striations in a fractured section of a sirolimus-eluting stent (Cypher Bx Velocity®) indicates induction of stent fracture by continuous shear stress.

    PubMed

    Endo, Akira; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Teruhiko; Kashiwagi, Yusuke; Mutoh, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    A 73-year-old woman with severe congestive heart failure was treated by implantation with a sirolimus-eluting stent (SES; Cypher Bx Velocity(®)) in the left main coronary artery (LMCA) using the staged T-stent, kissing balloon, and hugging balloon techniques. Follow-up coronary multislice computed tomography after 10 months revealed that SES was completely fractured in 2 directions; the fractured stent appeared in the shape of the letter "L" and had migrated into the aorta. An SES fragment was surgically removed and subsequent electron microscopy revealed striations (striped patterns in fractured sections) on the fracture plane, indicating continuous shear stress after SES implantation in the LMCA. This case provides direct evidence of continuous shear stress on the SES and indicates the necessity of improving the structure of the stent such that it can withstand shear stress. PMID:21828954

  13. Error in Estimates of Tissue Material Properties from Shear Wave Dispersion Ultrasound Vibrometry

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Matthew W.; Chen, Shigao; Greenleaf, James F.

    2009-01-01

    Shear wave velocity measurements are used in elasticity imaging to find the shear elasticity and viscosity of tissue. A technique called shear wave dispersion ultrasound vibrometry (SDUV) has been introduced to use the dispersive nature of shear wave velocity to locally estimate the material properties of tissue. Shear waves are created using a multifrequency ultrasound radiation force, and the propagating shear waves are measured a few millimeters away from the excitation point. The shear wave velocity is measured using a repetitive pulse-echo method and Kalman filtering to find the phase of the harmonic shear wave at 2 different locations. A viscoelastic Voigt model and the shear wave velocity measurements at different frequencies are used to find the shear elasticity (μ1) and viscosity (μ2) of the tissue. The purpose of this paper is to report the accuracy of the SDUV method over a range of different values of μ1 and μ2. A motion detection model of a vibrating scattering medium was used to analyze measurement errors of vibration phase in a scattering medium. To assess the accuracy of the SDUV method, we modeled the effects of phase errors on estimates of shear wave velocity and material properties while varying parameters such as shear stiffness and viscosity, shear wave amplitude, the distance between shear wave measurements (Δr), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the ultrasound pulse-echo method, and the frequency range of the measurements. We performed an experiment in a section of porcine muscle to evaluate variation of the aforementioned parameters on the estimated shear wave velocity and material property measurements and to validate the error prediction model. The model showed that errors in the shear wave velocity and material property estimates were minimized by maximizing shear wave amplitude, pulse-echo SNR, Δr, and the bandwidth used for shear wave measurements. The experimental model showed optimum performance could be obtained for Δr = 3-6 mm

  14. Seismic Site Classification and Correlation between Standard Penetration Test N Value and Shear Wave Velocity for Lucknow City in Indo-Gangetic Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anbazhagan, P.; Kumar, Abhishek; Sitharam, T. G.

    2013-03-01

    Subsurface lithology and seismic site classification of Lucknow urban center located in the central part of the Indo-Gangetic Basin (IGB) are presented based on detailed shallow subsurface investigations and borehole analysis. These are done by carrying out 47 seismic surface wave tests using multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) and 23 boreholes drilled up to 30 m with standard penetration test (SPT) N values. Subsurface lithology profiles drawn from the drilled boreholes show low- to medium-compressibility clay and silty to poorly graded sand available till depth of 30 m. In addition, deeper boreholes (depth >150 m) were collected from the Lucknow Jal Nigam (Water Corporation), Government of Uttar Pradesh to understand deeper subsoil stratification. Deeper boreholes in this paper refer to those with depth over 150 m. These reports show the presence of clay mix with sand and Kankar at some locations till a depth of 150 m, followed by layers of sand, clay, and Kankar up to 400 m. Based on the available details, shallow and deeper cross-sections through Lucknow are presented. Shear wave velocity (SWV) and N-SPT values were measured for the study area using MASW and SPT testing. Measured SWV and N-SPT values for the same locations were found to be comparable. These values were used to estimate 30 m average values of N-SPT ( N 30) and SWV ( V {s/30}) for seismic site classification of the study area as per the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) soil classification system. Based on the NEHRP classification, the entire study area is classified into site class C and D based on V {s/30} and site class D and E based on N 30. The issue of larger amplification during future seismic events is highlighted for a major part of the study area which comes under site class D and E. Also, the mismatch of site classes based on N 30 and V {s/30} raises the question of the suitability of the NEHRP classification system for the study region. Further, 17 sets

  15. Long-term stability of Large Low Shear Velocity Provinces (LLSVPs) at the base of the mantle and Velocity Provinces at the base of the mantle and near the equator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuchert, Marcus; Podladchikov, Yuri; Torsvik, Trond

    2010-05-01

    The observed long-term stability of Large Low Shear Velocity Provinces (LLSVPs) at the base of the mantle and near the equator raises two major questions: Even if gravitational stability can in principle be explained from intrinsically increased density of LLSVP material, (i) how can LLSVPs retain their shape and coherence within a vigorously convecting mantle over long geological times given their expectedly relatively low viscosities? We devised a numerical convection model to investigate this question of dynamical stability. Our results indicate that dense, low viscous LLSVPs can remain stable in the convecting mantle over long geological time. Yet, we observe in our numerical model that LLSVPs, whereas remaining dynamically stable, move laterally along the base of the model, thus leading to question (ii): How can we explain the stability of LLSVPs near the equator for at least the last 300 m.y. given their ability to move laterally? A common explanation for the fact that LLSVPs are situated near the equator is that true polar wander (TPW) arising from the geoid anomalies associated with LLSVPs would cause their rotation towards and subsequent stabilization at the equator. Indeed, if LLSVPs move along the base of the mantle and stay at antipodal position, TPW would reorient the Earth's rotation axis such that the anomalies remain at the equator. Yet, Steinberger and Torsvik (2008) show that TPW did not occur in a plane containing the LLSVPs during the last 320 m.y., meaning that TPW played no role in the near-equatorial stabilization of LLSVPs during that time. Consequently, the lack of latitudinal migration of LLSVPs over long geological time requires explanation. We suggest that centrifugal acceleration, even though providing only small driving forces, might be important in explaining migration of dense, low viscous LLSVPs to the equator, given the vast amount of time available in Earth history, and their subsequent stabilization near the equator. A first

  16. Quantitative estimation of fluid pressure ratio of shear vein in an on-land accretionary complex, the Yokonami mélange, the Cretaceous Shimanto Belt, Kochi, southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Yoshitaka; Eida, Mio

    2015-12-01

    The fluid pressure ratio and effective friction coefficient of shear veins in an exhumed accretionary complex in the Cretaceous Shimanto Belt, southwest Japan, were constrained by fluid inclusion and stress inversion analyses. The shear veins are considered to be developed along the decollement. Temperature and pressure conditions for shear veins were found to be in the range of 175-225°C and 143-215 MPa, respectively. Fluid pressure ranged between the lines of 70-100% lithostatic pressure, when the geothermal gradient was assumed on the basis of the slab age at the trench. The effective friction coefficient of shear veins was estimated to be 0.1-0.2 by stress inversion analysis, which corresponds to a fluid pressure ratio of 0.67-0.83. Both pressure-temperature and friction coefficient results indicate that the fluid pressure ratio is higher than about 0.7. In this paper, we propose the procedure to constrain paleo-fluid pressure ratio from natural materials. Wedge states were examined using the weak decollement friction coefficient, with shallow and steep taper angles indicating that the wedge state is stable or compressively critical, and is controlled by the fluid pressure ratio within the wedge.

  17. Shear waves in vegetal tissues at ultrasonic frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fariñas, M. D.; Sancho-Knapik, D.; Peguero-Pina, J. J.; Gil-Pelegrín, E.; Gómez Álvarez-Arenas, T. E.

    2013-03-01

    Shear waves are investigated in leaves of two plant species using air-coupled ultrasound. Magnitude and phase spectra of the transmission coefficient around the first two orders of the thickness resonances (normal and oblique incidence) have been measured. A bilayer acoustic model for plant leaves (comprising the palisade parenchyma and the spongy mesophyll) is proposed to extract, from measured spectra, properties of these tissues like: velocity and attenuation of longitudinal and shear waves and hence Young modulus, rigidity modulus, and Poisson's ratio. Elastic moduli values are typical of cellular solids and both, shear and longitudinal waves exhibit classical viscoelastic losses. Influence of leaf water content is also analyzed.

  18. Shear-induced alignment and dynamics of elongated granular particles.

    PubMed

    Börzsönyi, Tamás; Szabó, Balázs; Wegner, Sandra; Harth, Kirsten; Török, János; Somfai, Ellák; Bien, Tomasz; Stannarius, Ralf

    2012-11-01

    The alignment, ordering, and rotation of elongated granular particles was studied in shear flow. The time evolution of the orientation of a large number of particles was monitored in laboratory experiments by particle tracking using optical imaging and x-ray computed tomography. The experiments were complemented by discrete element simulations. The particles develop an orientational order. In the steady state the time- and ensemble-averaged direction of the main axis of the particles encloses a small angle with the streamlines. This shear alignment angle is independent of the applied shear rate, and it decreases with increasing grain aspect ratio. At the grain level the steady state is characterized by a net rotation of the particles, as dictated by the shear flow. The distribution of particle rotational velocities was measured both in the steady state and also during the initial transients. The average rotation speed of particles with their long axis perpendicular to the shear alignment angle is larger, while shear aligned particles rotate slower. The ratio of this fast/slow rotation increases with particle aspect ratio. During the initial transient starting from an unaligned initial condition, particles having an orientation just beyond the shear alignment angle rotate opposite to the direction dictated by the shear flow.

  19. Intra-cyclic distance per stroke phase, velocity fluctuations and acceleration time ratio of a breaststroker's hip: a comparison between elite and nonelite swimmers at different race paces.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, H; Seifert, L; Tourny-Chollet, C; Chollet, D

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the intra-cyclic velocity graphs of breaststroke swimmers at two skill levels in relation to their movement phases. Two groups of nine male swimmers were videotaped underwater at three swimming race paces corresponding to their actual competitive times for the 200-m, 100-m and 50-m breaststroke. Their forward intra-cyclic hip velocity was recorded with a velocity-meter. The breaststroke cycle was divided into four phases: leg propulsion, leg-arm lag phase, arm propulsion, and arm and leg recovery. From the velocity-time data, the following parameters were computed: an index of velocity fluctuations (IVF), the distance covered during each stroke phase, and an acceleration-deceleration time ratio (ADTR). The main results showed that in both groups of swimmers, when the race pace increased, the distance covered during the leg-arm lag phase decreased, while the other swimming phases remained stable. When expressed in relative values, the percentage of distance covered during the leg-arm lag phase decreased. In nonelite swimmers, the percentage of distance covered in the other stroke phases increased significantly, while only a tendency was noted in the elite group. Elite swimmers demonstrated a higher ADTR at the 50-m pace than at their 100-m and 200-m paces. An inter-group comparison showed that elite swimmers had higher values for the IVF and ADTR, which indicated their capacity to accelerate to boost the swim and highlighted the relevancy of these factors to discriminate skill level. PMID:16835822

  20. Shear wave velocity for the upper 30 m: Combining a 3D voxel model and seismic CPTS for the Groningen gas field, the Netherlands.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dambrink, Roula; Gunnink, Jan; Stafleu, Jan; de Lange, Ger; Kruiver, Pauline

    2016-04-01

    The Groningen gas field in the Netherlands is one of the largest gas fields of Europe and has been in production since the 1960's. Due to the progressive depletion of the reservoir, induced seismic activity has increased in recent years. In 2012, an earthquake of magnitude 3.6 initiated further research in prediction and management of risks related to man-induced earthquakes. Last year the government decided to reduce the gas extraction for this reason. One of the topics of concern is the large difference in earthquake-related damage to buildings which, in addition to the distance to the epicenter, appears to be also related to the composition of the shallow subsurface. To improve the spatial distribution of Shear Wave Velocities (Vs) in the shallow subsurface, used for hazard prediction, the Geological Survey of the Netherlands and Deltares constructed a Vs30 map of the upper 30 m of the gas field. In this map a high-resolution geological model (GeoTOP) is combined with seismic cone penetration tests (SCPT) from the area. The GeoTOP model is a 3D voxel model of the upper 50 m, in which each voxel (100x100x0.5 m) is attributed with lithostratigraphy and the most likely lithological class (peat, clay, fine sand, etc.). To obtain statistical distributions (with mean and standard deviation) of Vs for each combination of lithostratigraphical unit and lithoclass, 60 SCPTs were analyzed. In this way, it was possible to assign a specific Vs to each voxel in the model. For each voxel in the stack of voxels that covers the upper 30 m (i.e. 60 voxels), a Vs value was randomly drawn from the statistical distribution of the lithostratigraphical - lithoclass combination it belongs to. The Vs30 for each voxelstack is then calculated using the harmonic mean of the Vs of the 60 voxels. By repeating this procedure 100 times, an (average) Vs30 map and the uncertainty in Vs30 has been constructed. Using the procedure described above we were able to delineate zones with distinct Vs30

  1. Constructing a starting 3D shear velocity model with sharp interfaces for SEM-based upper mantle tomography in North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calo, M.; Bodin, T.; Yuan, H.; Romanowicz, B. A.; Larmat, C. S.; Maceira, M.

    2013-12-01

    this work we propose instead to directly tackle the non-linearity of the inverse problem by using stochastic methods to construct a 3D starting model with a good estimate of the depths of the main layering interfaces. We present preliminary results of the construction of such a starting 3D model based on: (1) Regionalizing the study area to define provinces within which lateral variations are smooth; (2) Applying trans-dimensional stochastic inversion (Bodin et al., 2012) to obtain accurate 1D models in each province as well as the corresponding error distribution, constrained by receiver function and surface wave dispersion data as well as the previously constructed 3D model (name), and (3) connecting these models laterally using data-driven smoothing operators to obtain a starting 3D model with errors. References Bodin, T.,et al. 2012, Transdimensional inversion of receiver functions and surface wave dispersion, J. Geophys. Res., 117, B02301, doi:10.1029/2011JB008560. Yuan and Romanowicz, 2013, in revison. Yuan, H., et al. 2011, 3-D shear wave radially and azimuthally anisotropic velocity model of the North American upper mantle. Geophysical Journal International, 184: 1237-1260. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-246X.2010.04901.x Yuan, H. & Romanowicz, B., 2010. Lithospheric layering in the North American Craton, Nature, 466, 1063-1068.

  2. Conductivity measurements in a shear-banding wormlike micellar system.

    PubMed

    Photinos, Panos J; López-González, M R; Hoven, Corey V; Callaghan, Paul T

    2010-07-01

    Shear banding in the cetylpyridinium chloride/sodium salicylate micellar system is investigated using electrical conductivity measurements parallel to the velocity and parallel to the vorticity in a cylindrical Couette cell. The measurements show that the conductivity parallel to the velocity (vorticity) increases (decreases) monotonically with applied shear rate. The shear-induced anisotropy is over one order of magnitude lower than the anisotropy of the N(c) nematic phase. The steady-state conductivity measurements indicate that the anisotropy of the shear induced low-viscosity (high shear rate) phase is not significantly larger than the anisotropy of the high viscosity (low shear rate) phase. We estimate that the micelles in the shear induced low viscosity band are relatively short, with a characteristic length to diameter ratio of 5-15. The relaxation behavior following the onset of shear is markedly different above and below the first critical value γ1, in agreement with results obtained by other methods. The transient measurements show that the overall anisotropy of the sample decreases as the steady state is approached, i.e., the micellar length/the degree of order decrease.

  3. Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves and Down-Hole Tests in the Archeological "Palatine Hill" Area (Rome, Italy): Evaluation and Influence of 2D Effects on the Shear Wave Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Fiore, V.; Cavuoto, G.; Tarallo, D.; Punzo, M.; Evangelista, L.

    2016-05-01

    A joint analysis of down-hole (DH) and multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) measurements offers a complete evaluation of shear wave velocity profiles, especially for sites where a strong lateral variability is expected, such as archeological sites. In this complex stratigraphic setting, the high "subsoil anisotropy" (i.e., sharp lithological changes due to the presence of anthropogenic backfill deposits and/or buried man-made structures) implies a different role for DH and MASW tests. This paper discusses some results of a broad experimental program conducted on the Palatine Hill, one of the most ancient areas of the city of Rome (Italy). The experiments were part of a project on seismic microzoning and consisted of 20 MASW and 11 DH tests. The main objective of this study was to examine the difficulties related to the interpretation of the DH and MASW tests and the reliability limits inherent in the application of the noninvasive method in complex stratigraphic settings. As is well known, DH tests provide good determinations of shear wave velocities (Vs) for different lithologies and man-made materials, whereas MASW tests provide average values for the subsoil volume investigated. The data obtained from each method with blind tests were compared and were correlated to site-specific subsurface conditions, including lateral variability. Differences between punctual (DH) and global (MASW) Vs measurements are discussed, quantifying the errors by synthetic comparison and by site response analyses. This study demonstrates that, for archeological sites, VS profiles obtained from the DH and MASW methods differ by more than 15 %. However, the local site effect showed comparable results in terms of natural frequencies, whereas the resolution of the inverted shear wave velocity was influenced by the fundamental mode of propagation.

  4. Velocity models inferred from inversion of H/V spectral ratio of ambient noise and its first application to a volcanic environment: the Ijen Caldera, Indonesia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spica, Zack J.; Caudron, Corentin; Piña-Flores, José; Perton, Mathieu; Thomas, Lecocq; Camelbeeck, Thierry; Legrand, Denis

    2015-04-01

    It is now well accepted that the average autocorrelation of seismic noise at a single station is proportional to the imaginary part of the Green's function when both source and receiver are the same. More recently, it has been established that the horizontal and vertical imaginary parts of the Green's function, i.e. the horizontal and vertical transfer functions, should be used to calculate the horizontal to vertical spectral ratio of ambient noise (HVSR). The HVSR is a popular technique that only requires a short-term (20 minutes) 3 components recording of seismic noise. Assuming an unbounded multi-layer model for the computation of the Green function, one can conduct the HVSR inversions to assess the 1D velocity structure of the subsurface. This approach was used to constrain several 1D velocity models (certain up to 3 km deep) of the Ijen caldera (Java, Indonesia) already established by the inversion of dispersion curves. Additionally, 84 HVSR measurements were also performed on Kawah Ijen volcano and allowed to provide a map of the local site effects. The velocity models obtained and the great outcrop of the crater rim allow robust and direct interpretation of the underground geology. Using a first order approximation, some mechanical proprieties of the shallower layers can be derived and the depth of an important lithological interface can be followed all around the Kawah Ijen crater.

  5. Performance of single-stage compressor designed on basis of constant total enthalpy with symmetrical velocity diagram at all radii and velocity ratio of 0.7 at rotor hub / Jack R. Burtt and Robert J. Jackson

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burtt, Jack R; Jackson, Robert J

    1951-01-01

    A typical inlet axial-flow compressor inlet stage, which was designed on the basis of constant total enthalpy with symmetrical velocity diagram at all radii, was investigated. At a tip speed of 1126 feet per second, a peak pressure ratio of 1.28 was obtained at an efficiency of 0.76. At a tip speed, the highest practical flow was 28 pounds per second per square foot frontal area with an efficiency of 0.78. Data for a rotor relative inlet Mach number range of from 0.5 to 0.875 indicates that the critical value for any stage radial element is approximately 0.80 for the stage investigated.

  6. Low shear velocity in a normal fault system imaged by ambient noise cross correlation: The case of the Irpinia fault zone, Southern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassallo, Maurizio; Festa, Gaetano; Bobbio, Antonella; Serra, Marcello

    2016-06-01

    We extracted the Green's functions from cross correlation of ambient noise recorded at broadband stations located across the Apennine belt, Southern Italy. Continuous records at 26 seismic stations acquired for 3 years were analyzed. We found the emergence of surface waves in the whole range of the investigated distances (10-140 km) with energy confined in the frequency band 0.04-0.09 Hz. This phase reproduces Rayleigh waves generated by earthquakes in the same frequency range. Arrival time of Rayleigh waves was picked at all the couples of stations to obtain the average group velocity along the path connecting the two stations. The picks were inverted in separated frequency bands to get group velocity maps then used to obtain an S wave velocity model. Penetration depth of the model ranges between 12 and 25 km, depending on the velocity values and on the depth of the interfaces, here associated to strong velocity gradients. We found a low-velocity anomaly in the region bounded by the two main faults that generated the 1980, M 6.9 Irpinia earthquake. A second anomaly was retrieved in the southeast part of the region and can be ascribed to a reminiscence of the Adria slab under the Apennine Chain.

  7. Theoretical relationship between elastic wave velocity and electrical resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-Sub; Yoon, Hyung-Koo

    2015-05-01

    Elastic wave velocity and electrical resistivity have been commonly applied to estimate stratum structures and obtain subsurface soil design parameters. Both elastic wave velocity and electrical resistivity are related to the void ratio; the objective of this study is therefore to suggest a theoretical relationship between the two physical parameters. Gassmann theory and Archie's equation are applied to propose a new theoretical equation, which relates the compressional wave velocity to shear wave velocity and electrical resistivity. The piezo disk element (PDE) and bender element (BE) are used to measure the compressional and shear wave velocities, respectively. In addition, the electrical resistivity is obtained by using the electrical resistivity probe (ERP). The elastic wave velocity and electrical resistivity are recorded in several types of soils including sand, silty sand, silty clay, silt, and clay-sand mixture. The appropriate input parameters are determined based on the error norm in order to increase the reliability of the proposed relationship. The predicted compressional wave velocities from the shear wave velocity and electrical resistivity are similar to the measured compressional velocities. This study demonstrates that the new theoretical relationship may be effectively used to predict the unknown geophysical property from the measured values.

  8. Effects of high volume upper extremity plyometric training on throwing velocity and functional strength ratios of the shoulder rotators in collegiate baseball players.

    PubMed

    Carter, Andrew B; Kaminski, Thomas W; Douex, Al T; Knight, Christopher A; Richards, James G

    2007-02-01

    To achieve maximal force output, clinicians and coaches have been experimenting with upper extremity plyometric exercises for years, without sufficient scientific validation of this training method. The goal of this study was to examine the effects of an 8-week course of high volume upper extremity plyometric training on the isokinetic strength and throwing velocity of a group of intercollegiate baseball players. Twenty-four Division I collegiate baseball players (age: 19.7 +/- 1.3 years; height: 183.9 +/- 5.9 cm; mass: 90.7 +/- 10.5 kg) were recruited to participate in this study. Throwing velocity, isokinetic peak torque, isokinetic functional strength ratios, and time to peak torque were measured pre- and posttraining. Subjects were rank-ordered according to concentric internal rotation (IR) strength and were assigned randomly to either the plyometric training group (PLY) or the control group (CON). Training consisted of 6 upper extremity plyometric exercises ("Ballistic Six") performed twice per week for 8 weeks. Subjects assigned to CON performed regular off-season strength and conditioning activities, but did not perform plyometric activities. PLY demonstrated significant increases (p < 0.05) in throwing velocity following 8 weeks of training when compared with CON (83.15 mph [pre] vs. 85.15 mph [post]). There were no statistically significant differences in any of the isokinetic strength measurements between PLY and CON groups pre- to posttraining. Statistically significant differences were seen within PLY for concentric IR and eccentric external rotation (ER) isokinetic strength at 180 degrees x s(-1) and 300 degrees x s(-1); and within CON for eccentric ER isokinetic strength at 300 degrees x s(-1) and concentric IR isokinetic strength at 180 degrees x s(-1). The Ballistic Six training protocol can be a beneficial supplement to a baseball athlete's off-season conditioning by improving functional performance and strengthening the rotator cuff musculature.

  9. Shear wave reflectivity and physical properties of the southern Appalachian Thorn Hill Paleozoic sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, J.E.; Christensen, N.I. . Dept. of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    The physical properties of a sequence of Paleozoic sedimentary rocks have been examined in detail, with an emphasis on laboratory measurements of density, shear wave velocity, shear wave splitting, and Vp/Vs ratios. Seismic properties of 147 cores from 49 rock samples collected from the thorn hill sedimentary sequence of eastern Tennessee are examined in terms of implications for future seismic studies in the southern Appalachians. The shear wave velocities of these rocks are strongly influenced by the relatively high shear wave velocity of quartz. Shear wave velocity anisotropy is present in most of the lithologic groups: it is highest in the shales while being almost insignificant in the dolostones. The related phenomenon of shear wave splitting occurs to some degree in all of the lithologies studied and at high pressures originates from mineral orientation. Compressional to shear velocity (Vp/Vs) ratios of approximately 1.82 (dolostones) and 1.95 (limestones) effectively characterize the carbonates while other lithologies display wider ranges of Vp/Vs, primarily due to the influence of accessory minerals such as quartz. Densities of the sample suite range from 2.34 g/cm[sup 3] (shale) to 2.86 g/cm[sup 3] (dolostone). Normal incidence shear and compressional wave synthetic seismograms of the entire Thorn Hill section indicate that three zones of high amplitude reflections would be seen on reflection records obtained over this 3,327 meter thick sequence. differences are seen at some interfaces in the Mississippian-Devonian interval, which are more reflective to shear waves, and in the Ordovician Martinsburg Formation, which appears more reflective to compressional waves.

  10. Averaging Horizontal-to-Vertical (H/V) Spectral Ratios of Earthquake Motions for Velocity Inversions Based on Diffuse Field Theory for Plane Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushima, S.; Sanchez-Sesma, F. J.; Kawase, H.

    2010-12-01

    ) no matter what part of the waveform is used to analyze, except for the P-wave part. We also found that their basic spectral characteristics can be well reproduced by the extracted velocity structures from the simple theory of diffuse field. Yet the matching between theory and observation is not perfect in the high frequency range, which in turn implies that the inversion of an underground 1D structure from the bedrock to the surface could be accomplished using the proposed theory for earthquake H/V ratios.

  11. Experimental and numerical study of the shear layer instability between two counter-rotating disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moisy, F.; Doaré, O.; Pasutto, T.; Daube, O.; Rabaud, M.

    2004-05-01

    The shear layer instability in the flow between two counter-rotating disks enclosed by a cylinder is investigated experimentally and numerically, for radius-to-height ratio Gamma {=} R/h between 2 and 21. For sufficiently large rotation ratio, the internal shear layer that separates two regions of opposite azimuthal velocities is prone to an azimuthal symmetry breaking, which is investigated experimentally by means of visualization and particle image velocimetry. The associated pattern is a combination of a sharp-cornered polygonal pattern, as observed by Lopez et al. (2002) for low aspect ratio, surrounded by a set of spiral arms, first described by Gauthier et al. (2002) for high aspect ratio. The spiral arms result from the interaction of the shear layer instability with the Ekman boundary layer over the faster rotating disk. Stability curves and critical modes are experimentally measured for the whole range of aspect ratios, and are found to compare well with numerical simulations of the three-dimensional time-dependent Navier Stokes equations over an extensive range of parameters. Measurements of a local Reynolds number based on the shear layer thickness confirm that a shear layer instability, with only weak curvature effect, is responsible for the observed patterns. This scenario is supported by the observed onset modes, which scale as the shear layer radius, and by the measured phase velocities.

  12. Excited waves in shear layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechert, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    The generation of instability waves in free shear layers is investigated. The model assumes an infinitesimally thin shear layer shed from a semi-infinite plate which is exposed to sound excitation. The acoustical shear layer excitation by a source further away from the plate edge in the downstream direction is very weak while upstream from the plate edge the excitation is relatively efficient. A special solution is given for the source at the plate edge. The theory is then extended to two streams on both sides of the shear layer having different velocities and densities. Furthermore, the excitation of a shear layer in a channel is calculated. A reference quantity is found for the magnitude of the excited instability waves. For a comparison with measurements, numerical computations of the velocity field outside the shear layer were carried out.

  13. Noise from Supersonic Coaxial Jets. Part 2; Normal Velocity Profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, M. D.; Morris, P. J.

    1997-01-01

    Instability waves have been established as noise generators in supersonic jets. Recent analysis of these slowly diverging jets has shown that these instability waves radiate noise to the far field when the waves have components with phase velocities that are supersonic relative to the ambient speed of sound. This instability wave noise generation model has been applied to supersonic jets with a single shear layer and is now applied to supersonic coaxial jets with two initial shear layers. In this paper the case of coaxial jets with normal velocity profiles is considered, where the inner jet stream velocity is higher than the outer jet stream velocity. To provide mean flow profiles at all axial locations, a numerical scheme is used to calculate the mean flow properties. Calculations are made for the stability characteristics in the coaxial jet shear layers and the noise radiated from the instability waves for different operating conditions with the same total thrust, mass flow and exit area as a single reference jet. The effects of changes in the velocity ratio, the density ratio and the area ratio are each considered independently.

  14. A simple method of predicting S-wave velocity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, M.W.

    2006-01-01

    Prediction of shear-wave velocity plays an important role in seismic modeling, amplitude analysis with offset, and other exploration applications. This paper presents a method for predicting S-wave velocity from the P-wave velocity on the basis of the moduli of dry rock. Elastic velocities of water-saturated sediments at low frequencies can be predicted from the moduli of dry rock by using Gassmann's equation; hence, if the moduli of dry rock can be estimated from P-wave velocities, then S-wave velocities easily can be predicted from the moduli. Dry rock bulk modulus can be related to the shear modulus through a compaction constant. The numerical results indicate that the predicted S-wave velocities for consolidated and unconsolidated sediments agree well with measured velocities if differential pressure is greater than approximately 5 MPa. An advantage of this method is that there are no adjustable parameters to be chosen, such as the pore-aspect ratios required in some other methods. The predicted S-wave velocity depends only on the measured P-wave velocity and porosity. ?? 2006 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  15. Influence of the Accuracy of Angiography-Based Reconstructions on Velocity and Wall Shear Stress Computations in Coronary Bifurcations: A Phantom Study

    PubMed Central

    Schrauwen, Jelle T. C.; Karanasos, Antonios; van Ditzhuijzen, Nienke S.; Aben, Jean-Paul; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Wall shear stress (WSS) plays a key role in the onset and progression of atherosclerosis in human coronary arteries. Especially sites with low and oscillating WSS near bifurcations have a higher propensity to develop atherosclerosis. WSS computations in coronary bifurcations can be performed in angiography-based 3D reconstructions. It is essential to evaluate how reconstruction errors influence WSS computations in mildly-diseased coronary bifurcations. In mildly-diseased lesions WSS could potentially provide more insight in plaque progression. Materials Methods Four Plexiglas phantom models of coronary bifurcations were imaged with bi-plane angiography. The lumens were segmented by two clinically experienced readers. Based on the segmentations 3D models were generated. This resulted in three models per phantom: one gold-standard from the phantom model itself, and one from each reader. Steady-state and transient simulations were performed with computational fluid dynamics to compute the WSS. A similarity index and a noninferiority test were used to compare the WSS in the phantoms and their reconstructions. The margin for this test was based on the resolution constraints of angiography. Results The reconstruction errors were similar to previously reported data; in seven out of eight reconstructions less than 0.10 mm. WSS in the regions proximal and far distal of the stenosis showed a good agreement. However, the low WSS areas directly distal of the stenosis showed some disagreement between the phantoms and the readers. This was due to small deviations in the reconstruction of the stenosis that caused differences in the resulting jet, and consequently the size and location of the low WSS area. Discussion This study showed that WSS can accurately be computed within angiography-based 3D reconstructions of coronary arteries with early stage atherosclerosis. Qualitatively, there was a good agreement between the phantoms and the readers. Quantitatively, the

  16. Effect of scale-up on average shear rates for aerated non-Newtonian liquids in external loop airlift reactors.

    PubMed

    Al-Masry

    1999-02-01

    Average shear rates have been estimated experimentally in a 700-dm3 external loop airlift reactor. Aqueous pseudoplastic carboxymethylcellulose and xanthan gum solutions were used to simulate non-Newtonian behavior of biological media. Average shear rates of non-Newtonian solutions were found by analogy with Newtonian glycerol solutions using downcomer liquid velocity as the measurable parameter. Due to the complexity of local shear rate measurement, an average shear rate was assumed to exist and is proportional to superficial gas velocity. The data from this work and those in the literature were used in producing a new correlation for estimating average shear rates as a function of superficial gas velocity, geometry, and dispersion height. Wall shear rates were found to be significant. The ratio of wall shear rates to bulk shear rates were varied from 5% to 40%. Furthermore, it has been found that shear rates generated in airlift loop reactors are lower than those generated in bubble columns. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:10099557

  17. 3-D Shear Wave Velocity Model of Mexico and South US: Bridging Seismic Networks with Ambient Noise Cross-Correlations (C1) and Correlation of Coda of Correlations (C3).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spica, Zack; Perton, Mathieu; Calò, Marco; Legrand, Denis; Córdoba Montiel, Francisco; Iglesias, Arturo

    2016-07-01

    This work presents an innovative strategy to enhance the resolution of surface wave tomography obtained from ambient noise cross-correlation (C1) by bridging asynchronous seismic networks through the correlation of coda of correlations (C3). Rayleigh wave group dispersion curves show consistent results between synchronous and asynchronous stations. Rayleigh wave group travel times are inverted to construct velocity-period maps with unprecedented resolution for a region covering Mexico and the southern United States. The resulting period maps are then used to regionalize dispersion curves in order to obtain local 1-D shear velocity models (VS) of the crust and uppermost mantle in every cell of a grid of 0.4°. The 1-D structures are obtained by iteratively adding layers until reaching a given misfit, and a global tomography model is considered as an input for depths below 150 km. Finally, a high-resolution 3-D VS model is obtained from these inversions. The major structures observed in the 3-D model are in agreement with the tectonic-geodynamic features and with previous regional and local studies. It also offers new insights to understand the present and past tectonic evolution of the region.

  18. 3-D shear wave velocity model of Mexico and South US: bridging seismic networks with ambient noise cross-correlations (C1) and correlation of coda of correlations (C3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spica, Zack; Perton, Mathieu; Calò, Marco; Legrand, Denis; Córdoba-Montiel, Francisco; Iglesias, Arturo

    2016-09-01

    This work presents an innovative strategy to enhance the resolution of surface wave tomography obtained from ambient noise cross-correlation (C1) by bridging asynchronous seismic networks through the correlation of coda of correlations (C3). Rayleigh wave group dispersion curves show consistent results between synchronous and asynchronous stations. Rayleigh wave group traveltimes are inverted to construct velocity-period maps with unprecedented resolution for a region covering Mexico and the southern United States. The resulting period maps are then used to regionalize dispersion curves in order to obtain local 1-D shear velocity models (VS) of the crust and uppermost mantle in every cell of a grid of 0.4°. The 1-D structures are obtained by iteratively adding layers until reaching a given misfit, and a global tomography model is considered as an input for depths below 150 km. Finally, a high-resolution 3-D VS model is obtained from these inversions. The major structures observed in the 3-D model are in agreement with the tectonic-geodynamic features and with previous regional and local studies. It also offers new insights to understand the present and past tectonic evolution of the region.

  19. Biot-Gassmann theory for velocities of gas hydrate-bearing sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, M.W.

    2002-01-01

    Elevated elastic velocities are a distinct physical property of gas hydrate-bearing sediments. A number of velocity models and equations (e.g., pore-filling model, cementation model, effective medium theories, weighted equations, and time-average equations) have been used to describe this effect. In particular, the weighted equation and effective medium theory predict reasonably well the elastic properties of unconsolidated gas hydrate-bearing sediments. A weakness of the weighted equation is its use of the empirical relationship of the time-average equation as one element of the equation. One drawback of the effective medium theory is its prediction of unreasonably higher shear-wave velocity at high porosities, so that the predicted velocity ratio does not agree well with the observed velocity ratio. To overcome these weaknesses, a method is proposed, based on Biot-Gassmann theories and assuming the formation velocity ratio (shear to compressional velocity) of an unconsolidated sediment is related to the velocity ratio of the matrix material of the formation and its porosity. Using the Biot coefficient calculated from either the weighted equation or from the effective medium theory, the proposed method accurately predicts the elastic properties of unconsolidated sediments with or without gas hydrate concentration. This method was applied to the observed velocities at the Mallik 2L-39 well, Mackenzie Delta, Canada.

  20. Is Fish Response related to Velocity and Turbulence Magnitudes? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, C. A.; Hockley, F. A.; Cable, J.

    2013-12-01

    Riverine fish are subject to heterogeneous velocities and turbulence, and may use this to their advantage by selecting regions which balance energy expenditure for station holding whilst maximising energy gain through feeding opportunities. This study investigated microhabitat selection by guppies (Poecilia reticulata) in terms of the three-dimensional velocity structure generated by idealised boulders in an experimental flume. Velocity and turbulence influenced intra-species variation in swimming behaviour with respect to size, sex and parasite intensity. With increasing body length, fish swam further and more frequently between boulder regions. Larger guppies spent more time in the high velocity and low turbulence region, whereas smaller guppies preferred the low velocity and high shear stress region directly behind the boulders. Male guppies selected the region of low velocity, indicating a possible reduced swimming ability due to hydrodynamic drag imposed by their fins. With increasing parasite (Gyrodactylus turnbulli) burden, fish preferentially selected the region of moderate velocity which had the lowest bulk measure of turbulence of all regions and was also the most spatially homogeneous velocity and turbulence region. Overall the least amount of time was spent in the recirculation zone which had the highest magnitude of shear stresses and mean vertical turbulent length scale to fish length ratio. Shear stresses were a factor of two greater than in the most frequented moderate velocity region, while mean vertical turbulent length scale to fish length ratio were six times greater. Indeed the mean longitudinal turbulent scale was 2-6 times greater than the fish length in all regions. While it is impossible to discriminate between these two turbulence parameters (shear stress and turbulent length to fish length ratio) in influencing the fish preference, our study infers that there is a bias towards fish spending more time in a region where both the bulk

  1. An investigation of stress wave propagation in a shear deformable nanobeam based on modified couple stress theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbarzadeh Khorshidi, Majid; Shariati, Mahmoud

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a new investigation for propagation of stress wave in a nanobeam based on modified couple stress theory. Using Euler-Bernoulli beam theory, Timoshenko beam theory, and Reddy beam theory, the effect of shear deformation is investigated. This nonclassical model contains a material length scale parameter to capture the size effect and the Poisson effect is incorporated in the current model. Governing equations of motion are obtained by Hamilton's principle and solved explicitly. This solution leads to obtain two phase velocities for shear deformable beams in different directions. Effects of shear deformation, material length scale parameter, and Poisson's ratio on the behavior of these phase velocities are investigated and discussed. The results also show a dual behavior for phase velocities against Poisson's ratio.

  2. Blind comparisons of shear-wave velocities at closely-spaced sites in San Jose, California: Proceedings of a Workshop held at the US Geological Survey, Menlo Park, May 3, 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asten, Michael W.; Boore, David M.

    2005-01-01

    Shear-wave velocities within several hundred meters of Earth's surface are important in specifying earthquake ground motions for engineering design. Not only are the shearwave velocities used in classifying sites for use of modern building codes, but they are also used in site-specific studies of particularly significant structures. Many are the methods for estimating sub-surface shear-wave velocities, but few are the blind comparisons of a number of the methods at a single site. The word 'blind' is important here and means that the measurements and interpretations are done completely independent of one another. Stephen Hartzell of the USGS office on Golden, Colorado realized that such an experiment would be very useful for assessing the strengths and weaknesses of the various methods, and he and Jack Boatwright of the USGS office in Menlo Park, California, in cooperation with Carl Wentworth of the Menlo Park USGS office found a convenient site in the city of San Jose, California. The site had good access and space for conducting experiments, and a borehole drilled to several hundred meters by the Santa Clara Valley Water District was made available for downhole logging. Jack Boatwright asked David Boore to coordinate the experiment. In turn, David Boore persuaded several teams to make measurements, helped with the local logistics, collected the results, and organized and conducted an International Workshop in May, 2004. At this meeting the participants in the experiment gathered in Menlo Park to describe their measurements and interpretations, and to see the results of the comparisons of the various methods for the first time. This Open-File Report describes the results of that workshop. One of the participants, Michael Asten, offered to help the coordinator prepare this report. Because of his lead role in pulling the report together, Dr. Asten is the lead author of the paper to follow and is also the lead Compiler for the Open-File Report. It is important to

  3. Molecularly based criteria for shear banding in transient flow of entangled polymeric fluids.

    PubMed

    Mohagheghi, Mouge; Khomami, Bamin

    2016-06-01

    Dissipative particle dynamics simulations of polymeric melts in a start-up of shear flow as a function of ramp time to its steady state value is studied. Herein, we report the molecular findings showing the effect of ramp time on the formation of shear banded structures and chain relaxation behavior. Specifically, it is shown that shear banding emerges at a rapid start-up; however, homogeneous shear prevails when the deformation rate ramp time is sufficiently slow. This finding is in full consistency with prior continuum level linear stability analysis of shear banding in start-up of shear flows as well as experimental observations of entangled DNA and polymer solutions. Further, it has been revealed that the ratio of the longest chain orientation relaxation time to that of the time for the imposed deformation rate to reach its steady state value plays a central role in determining whether local strain inhomogeneities that lead to the formation of shear banded flow structures are created. In addition, we have shown that the gradient of the number of entanglements along the velocity gradient direction should reach a critical value for the creation of localized strain inhomogeneity. Moreover, the relation between the local process leading to shear banded flows and the relaxation mechanism of the chain is discussed. Overall, a molecular picture for the interrelation between the longest chain orientation and stress relaxation time, local inhomogeneities, and shear banding has been proposed and corroborated with extensive analysis. PMID:27415319

  4. Optimization of hydraulic shear parameters and reactor configuration in the aerobic granular sludge process.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liang; Zhou, Jiaheng; Yu, Haitian; Xu, Xiangyang

    2015-01-01

    The hydraulic shear acts as an important selection pressure in aerobic sludge granulation. The effects of the hydraulic shear rate and reactor configuration on structural characteristics of aerobic granule in view of the hydromechanics. The hydraulic shear analysis was proposed to overcome the limitation of using superficial gas velocity (SGV) to express the hydraulic shear stress. Results showed that the stronger hydraulic shear stress with SGV above 2.4 cm s(-1) promoted the microbial aggregation, and favoured the structural stability of the granular sludge. According to the hydraulic shear analysis, the total shear rate reached (0.56-2.31)×10(5) s(-1) in the granular reactor with a larger ratio of height to diameter (H/D), and was higher than that in the reactor with smaller H/D, where the sequencing airlift bioreactor with smaller H/D had a high total shear rate under the same SGV. Results demonstrated that the granular reactor could provide a stronger hydraulic shear stress which promotes the formation and structural stability of aerobic granules.

  5. Molecularly based criteria for shear banding in transient flow of entangled polymeric fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohagheghi, Mouge; Khomami, Bamin

    2016-06-01

    Dissipative particle dynamics simulations of polymeric melts in a start-up of shear flow as a function of ramp time to its steady state value is studied. Herein, we report the molecular findings showing the effect of ramp time on the formation of shear banded structures and chain relaxation behavior. Specifically, it is shown that shear banding emerges at a rapid start-up; however, homogeneous shear prevails when the deformation rate ramp time is sufficiently slow. This finding is in full consistency with prior continuum level linear stability analysis of shear banding in start-up of shear flows as well as experimental observations of entangled DNA and polymer solutions. Further, it has been revealed that the ratio of the longest chain orientation relaxation time to that of the time for the imposed deformation rate to reach its steady state value plays a central role in determining whether local strain inhomogeneities that lead to the formation of shear banded flow structures are created. In addition, we have shown that the gradient of the number of entanglements along the velocity gradient direction should reach a critical value for the creation of localized strain inhomogeneity. Moreover, the relation between the local process leading to shear banded flows and the relaxation mechanism of the chain is discussed. Overall, a molecular picture for the interrelation between the longest chain orientation and stress relaxation time, local inhomogeneities, and shear banding has been proposed and corroborated with extensive analysis.

  6. True Shear Parallel Plate Viscometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethridge, Edwin; Kaukler, William

    2010-01-01

    This viscometer (which can also be used as a rheometer) is designed for use with liquids over a large temperature range. The device consists of horizontally disposed, similarly sized, parallel plates with a precisely known gap. The lower plate is driven laterally with a motor to apply shear to the liquid in the gap. The upper plate is freely suspended from a double-arm pendulum with a sufficiently long radius to reduce height variations during the swing to negligible levels. A sensitive load cell measures the shear force applied by the liquid to the upper plate. Viscosity is measured by taking the ratio of shear stress to shear rate.

  7. Electroosmotic shear flow in microchannels.

    PubMed

    Mampallil, Dileep; van den Ende, Dirk

    2013-01-15

    We generate and study electroosmotic shear flow in microchannels. By chemically or electrically modifying the surface potential of the channel walls a shear flow component with controllable velocity gradient can be added to the electroosmotic flow caused by double layer effects at the channel walls. Chemical modification is obtained by treating the channel wall with a cationic polymer. In case of electric modification, we used gate electrodes embedded in the channel wall. By applying a voltage to the gate electrode, the zeta potential can be varied and a controllable, uniform shear stress can be applied to the liquid in the channel. The strength of the shear stress depends on both the gate voltage and the applied field which drives the electroosmotic shear flow. Although the stress range is still limited, such a microchannel device can be used in principle as an in situ micro-rheometer for lab on a chip purposes. PMID:23089595

  8. The importance of shear heating for shear localization during tectonic nappe displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, Dániel; Duretz, Thibault; Podladchikov, Yuri; Schmalholz, Stefan M.

    2016-04-01

    Localization of deformation plays a major role during tectonic processes at all scale, from the formation of deformation bands within single grains up to crustal and lithospheric scale shear zones. The role of shear localization is particularly important for the formation and displacement of tectonic nappes during orogeny. It has been shown that a simple one-dimensional (1D) thermo-mechanical shear zone model, which considers a power-law flow law and temperature dependent viscosity, can to the first-order explain thrust-sheet and fold nappe formation. This 1D model could successfully reproduce the overall shear strain distribution across natural nappes and shear zones, but underestimated systematically the shear strain at the base of the nappe and shear zone. This underestimation indicates that certain processes have been ignored in the analysis. We present therefore a new 1D thermo-mechanical model which also considers shear heating and the related thermal softening of temperature-dependent viscosity to quantify the impact of shear heating on strain localization during nappe displacement. We perform a dimensional analysis of the equations which describe the 1D shear zone model to determine the dimensionless parameters which control the deformation. Three deformation modes controlled by dimensionless parameters will be distinguished: (1) shear deformation for which shear heating is negligible, (2) shear deformation for which shear heating is moderate and displacement velocities stay in the range of plate velocities, (3) shear deformation for which shear heating is significant and velocities and temperatures increase continuously (thermal runaway). The 1D shear zone model is applied to the Helvetic nappe system in general and the Morcles, Doldenhorn and Wildhorn nappes in particular. For the geological and microstructural data available for the Helvetic nappe system we determine whether shear heating was important during nappe formation or not. The 1D results are

  9. Joint Inversion of Receiver Function, Surface Wave Dispersion and ZH Ratio for Crustal Structure Based on Tikhonov Regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, H.; Zhang, P.

    2015-12-01

    We proposed a joint iterative inversion method using receiver function, surface wave dispersion and ZH ratio data to better resolve 1-D crustal shear and compressional wave speed structure simultaneously. We implement a three-stage inversion strategy, which can take advantages of each dataset due to their complementary sensitivities to crust structures, to obtain structure information step by step using iterative linearized inversion approaches based on Tikhonov regularization of model parameters. We firstly invert surface wave dispersion and ZH ratio data to get 1-D shear velocity model, then incorporate P-wave receiver function data to obtain a much finer shear velocity model considering its high sensitivity to discontinuities. For the first two steps, the compressional velocity and density parameters are obtained from the shear velocity model using some empirical relationship. Finally, three datasets are further used to jointly invert for the compressional velocity structure based on the obtained shear velocity model. Synthetic tests show the superiority of joint inversion against separate inversion using only one or two datasets. They also demonstrate that the three-stage inversion strategy can make better use of different datasets to implement inversion physically and resolve finer crustal structure with more accuracy.

  10. Shear-segregation and mixing of sheared bidisperse granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Karen; Golick, Laura; May, Lindsay; Shearer, Michael

    2009-11-01

    We perform experiments on granular size-segregation in an annular Couette apparatus in which a layer of small particles mixes with, and then resegregates from, a layer of large particles beneath it. We model this process using a modification of the Gray-Thornton model in which we impose a nonlinear shear profile typical of boundary-driven, confined flows. The experimentally-measured exponential velocity profile provides an input to this one-dimensional nonlinear PDE and the resulting solution of the initial value problem is non-standard, involving curved characteristics. We further interpret these solutions by numerically connecting the segregation process to changes in packing fraction, and find qualitative agreement with experimental results. As in the experiment, mixing times are observed to be faster than segregation times. Interestingly, while the size-segregation of granular materials has generally been thought to proceed faster the greater the size difference of the particles we observe that the segregation rate is quite sensitive to both the particle-size ratio and the confining pressure on the system. As a result, we observe that particles of both dissimilar and similar sizes segregate more slowly than intermediate particle size ratios and interpret this anomalous behavior in terms of a species-dependent distribution of forces within the system.

  11. Shear modulus estimation with vibrating needle stimulation.

    PubMed

    Orescanin, Marko; Insana, Michael

    2010-06-01

    An ultrasonic shear wave imaging technique is being developed for estimating the complex shear modulus of biphasic hydropolymers including soft biological tissues. A needle placed in the medium is vibrated along its axis to generate harmonic shear waves. Doppler pulses synchronously track particle motion to estimate shear wave propagation speed. Velocity estimation is improved by implementing a k-lag phase estimator. Fitting shear-wave speed estimates to the predicted dispersion relation curves obtained from two rheological models, we estimate the elastic and viscous components of the complex shear modulus. The dispersion equation estimated using the standard linear solid-body (Zener) model is compared with that from the Kelvin-Voigt model to estimate moduli in gelatin gels in the 50 to 450 Hz shear wave frequency bandwidth. Both models give comparable estimates that agree with independent shear rheometer measurements obtained at lower strain rates. PMID:20529711

  12. Characterization of fractures subjected to normal and shear stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Min-Kwang

    well-mated surfaces under normal compression and no shear, the theoretical ratio gave a good approximation to experiment measurements. During shear, at constant load, and for well-mated fractures with large surface roughness, the stiffness ratio strongly depended on the shear fracture specific stiffness and increased with shear up to a maximum prior to failure. The spatial variability of fracture specific stiffness along a fracture was investigated seismically on granite specimens with a single fracture. Seismic measurements on intact and fractured granite specimens were obtained as a function of stress. The granite matrix exhibited stress-sensitivity due to the existence of micro-cracks and was weakly anisotropic, with a ratio of about 0.9 for shear wave velocities in two orthogonal directions. For fractured granite specimens, transmission of P- and S- waves across a fracture significantly increased as the fracture compressed. The increase of transmission was interpreted as the increase of fracture specific stiffness. Spectral analysis on the transmitted waves showed that the transmission of high frequency components of the signals increased and the dinant frequency approached the value of the intact specimen. The heterogeneity of the granite material resulted in a +/-8˜12% variation in stiffness, which depended on the selection of an intact standard. Fracture specific stiffness was estimated at the dominant frequency of 0.3 MHz for normal specific stiffness and 0.5 MHz for shear. Fracture specific stiffness was non-uniformly distributed along the fracture plane and changed locally as a function of stress. The spatial variability of stiffness exceeded the variation of stiffness caused by the heterogeneity of granite matrix. It was found that local fracture geometry, e.g. local surface roughness distribution or local micro slope angles, influenced the magnitude of local shear fracture specific stiffness. The more uniform the asperity heights, the stiffer the fracture

  13. Experimental study of combustion in a turbulent free shear layer formed at a rearward facing step

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitz, R. W.; Daily, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    A premixed propane-air flame is stabilized in a turbulent free shear layer formed at a rearward facing step. The mean and rms averages of the turbulent velocity flow field are determined by LDV for both reacting (equivalence ratio 0.57) and nonreacting flows (Reynolds number 15,000-37,000 based on step height). The effect of combustion is to shift the layer toward the recirculation zone and reduce the flame spread. For reacting flow, the growth rate is unchanged except very near the step. The probability density function of the velocity is bimodial near the origin of the reacting layer and single-peaked but often skewed elsewhere. Large-scale structures dominate the reacting shear layer. Measurements of their passing frequency from LDV are consistent with high-speed Schlieren movies of the reacting layer and indicate that the coalescence rate of the eddies in the shear layer is reduced by combustion.

  14. Electrophysiological aspects of sensory conduction velocity in healthy adults. 2. Ratio between the amplitude of sensory evoked potentials at the wrist on stimulating different fingers in both hands.

    PubMed Central

    Cruz Martínez, A; Barrio, M; Pérez Conde, M C; Ferrer, M T

    1978-01-01

    The normal ratio between the amplitude of the sensory evoked potential (SEP) at the wrist on stimulating digits 1, 2, 3, and 5 was determined in 44 healthy adult subjects. The first digit had the larger amplitude, and the fifth digit the smallest SEP. The amplitude expresses the density of sensory innervation in each finger. The ratio between the amplitude of different fingers varied according to the age of the subject. The amplitude of the SEP from a digit innervated by the median nerve decreased in the elderly more than the SEP amplitude of the digit innervated by the ulnar nerve, probably because of a chronic compression in the carpal tunnel. The changes in the normal amplitude ratio can be applied to the topographic diagnosis of radicular and brachial plexus lesions if a fixed segmental sensory innervation of the hand is accepted. In 44 right handed subjects the amplitude of the sensory evoked potentials at the wrist was significantly larger in the left hand. This asymmetry of sensory innervation between hands could be physiological, and suggests a greater density of sensory innervation in the left hand of right handed subjects. PMID:731255

  15. Parameterization of sheared entrainment in a well-developed CBL. Part II: A simple model for predicting the growth rate of the CBL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peng; Sun, Jianning; Shen, Lidu

    2016-10-01

    Following the parameterization of sheared entrainment obtained in the companion paper, Liu et al. (2016), the present study aims to further investigate the characteristics of entrainment, and develop a simple model for predicting the growth rate of a well-developed and sheared CBL. The relative stratification, defined as the ratio of the stratification in the free atmosphere to that in the entrainment zone, is found to be a function of entrainment flux ratio ( A e). This leads to a simple expression of the entrainment rate, in which A e needs to be parameterized. According to the results in Liu et al. (2016), A e can be simply expressed as the ratio of the convective velocity scale in the sheared CBL to that in the shear-free CBL. The parameterization of the convective velocity scale in the sheared CBL is obtained by analytically solving the bulk model with several assumptions and approximations. Results indicate that the entrainment process is influenced by the dynamic effect, the interaction between mean shear and environmental stratification, and one other term that includes the Coriolis effect. These three parameterizations constitute a simple model for predicting the growth rate of a well-developed and sheared CBL. This model is validated by outputs of LESs, and the results show that it performs satisfactorily. Compared with bulk models, this model does not need to solve a set of equations for the CBL. It is more convenient to apply in numerical models.

  16. Wall Effect on the Convective-Absolute Boundary for the Compressible Shear Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinet, Jean-Christophe; Dussauge, Jean-Paul; Casalis, Grégoire

    The linear stability of inviscid compressible shear layers is studied. When the layer develops at the vicinity of a wall, the two parallel flows can have a velocity of the same sign or of opposite signs. This situation is examined in order to obtain first hints on the stability of separated flows in the compressible regime. The shear layer is described by a hyperbolic tangent profile for the velocity component and the Crocco relation for the temperature profile. Gravity effects and the superficial tension are neglected. By examining the temporal growth rate at the saddle point in the wave-number space, the flow is characterized as being either absolutely unstable or convectively unstable. This study principally shows the effect of the wall on the convective-absolute transition in compressible shear flow. Results are presented, showing the amount of the backflow necessary to have this type of transition for a range of primary flow Mach numbers M1 up to 3.0. The boundary of the convective-absolute transition is defined as a function of the velocity ratio, the temperature ratio and the Mach number. Unstable solutions are calculated for both streamwise and oblique disturbances in the shear layer.

  17. DOUBLE-DIFFUSIVE INSTABILITIES OF A SHEAR-GENERATED MAGNETIC LAYER

    SciTech Connect

    Silvers, Lara J.; Proctor, Michael R. E.; Vasil, Geoffrey M.; Brummell, Nicholas H.

    2009-09-01

    Previous theoretical work has speculated about the existence of double-diffusive magnetic buoyancy instabilities of a dynamically evolving horizontal magnetic layer generated by the interaction of forced vertically sheared velocity and a background vertical magnetic field. Here, we confirm numerically that if the ratio of the magnetic to thermal diffusivities is sufficiently low then such instabilities can indeed exist, even for high Richardson number shear flows. Magnetic buoyancy may therefore occur via this mechanism for parameters that are likely to be relevant to the solar tachocline, where regular magnetic buoyancy instabilities are unlikely.

  18. Shear Fractures of Extreme Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Boris

    2016-10-01

    Natural and laboratory observations show that shear ruptures (faults) can propagate with extreme dynamics (up to intersonic rupture velocities) through intact materials and along pre-existing faults with frictional and coherent (bonded) interfaces. The rupture propagation is accompanied by significant fault strength weakening in the rupture head. Although essential for understanding earthquakes, rock mechanics, tribology and fractures, the question of what physical processes determine how that weakening occurs is still unresolved. The general approach today to explain the fault weakening is based upon the strong velocity-weakening friction law according to which the fault strength drops rapidly with slip velocity. Different mechanisms of strength weakening caused by slip velocity have been proposed including thermal effect, high-frequency compressional waves, expansion of pore fluid, macroscopic melting and gel formation. This paper proposes that shear ruptures of extreme dynamics propagating in intact materials and in pre-existing frictional and coherent interfaces are governed by the same recently identified mechanism which is associated with an intensive microcracking process in the rupture tip observed for all types of extreme ruptures. The microcracking process creates, in certain conditions, a special fan-like microstructure shear resistance of which is extremely low (up to an order of magnitude less than the frictional strength). The fan-structure representing the rupture head provides strong interface weakening and causes high slip and rupture velocities. In contrast with the velocity-weakening dependency, this mechanism provides the opposite weakening-velocity effect. The fan-mechanism differs remarkably from all reported earlier mechanisms, and it can provide such important features observed in extreme ruptures as: extreme slip and rupture velocities, high slip velocity without heating, off-fault tensile cracking, transition from crack-like to pulse

  19. Lateral shear interferometry with holo shear lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joenathan, C.; Mohanty, R. K.; Sirohi, R. S.

    1984-12-01

    A simple method for obtaining lateral shear using holo shear lenses (HSL) has been discussed. This simple device which produces lateral shears in the orthogonal directions has been used for lens testing. The holo shear lens is placed at or near the focus of the lens to be tested. It has also been shown that HSL can be used in speckle shear interferometry as it performs both the functions of shearing and imaging.

  20. Transiently Jammed State in Shear Thickening Suspensions under Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Shomeek; Allen, Benjamin; Brown, Eric

    2014-03-01

    We examine the response of a suspension of cornstarch and water under normal impact at controlled velocities. This is a model system to understand why a person can run on the surface of a discontinuous shear thickening fluid. Using simultaneous high-speed imaging of the top and bottom surfaces along with normal force measurements allows us to investigate whether the force response is a result of system spanning structures. We observe a shear thickening transition where above a critical velocity the normal force increases by orders of magnitude. In the high force regime the force response is displacement dependent like a solid rather than velocity dependent like a liquid. The stresses are on the order of 106 Pa which is enough to hold up a person's weight. In this regime imaging shows the existence of a solid like structure that extends to the bottom interface.

  1. Iron-rich post-perovskite and the origin of ultralow-velocity zones.

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, W.L.; Mao, H.K.; Sturhahn, W.; Zhao, J.; Prakapenka, V.B.; Meng, Y.; Shu, J.; Fei, Y.; Hemley, R.J.; X-Ray Science Division

    2006-04-01

    The boundary layer between the crystalline silicate lower mantle and the liquid iron core contains regions with ultralow seismic velocities. Such low compressional and shear wave velocities and high Poisson's ratio are also observed experimentally in post-perovskite silicate phase containing up to 40 mol% FeSiO3 endmember. The iron-rich post-perovskite silicate is stable at the pressure-temperature and chemical environment of the core-mantle boundary and can be formed by core-mantle reaction. Mantle dynamics may lead to further accumulation of this material into the ultralow-velocity patches that are observable by seismology.

  2. Symmetry Breaking Drift of Particles Settling in Homogeneous Shear Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hinsberg, M. A. T.; Clercx, H. J. H.; Toschi, Federico

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the influence of shear on the gravitational settling of heavy inertial particles in homogeneous shear turbulence (HST). In addition to the well-known enhanced settling velocity, observed for heavy inertial particles in homogeneous isotropic turbulence (HIT), a horizontal drift velocity is also observed in the shearing direction due to the presence of a nonzero mean vorticity (introducing symmetry breaking due to the mean shear). This drift velocity is due to the combination of shear, gravity, and turbulence, and all three of these elements are needed for this effect to occur. We extend the mechanism responsible for the enhanced settling velocity in HIT to the case of HST. Two separate regimes are observed, characterized by positive or negative drift velocity, depending on the particle settling velocity.

  3. Symmetry Breaking Drift of Particles Settling in Homogeneous Shear Turbulence.

    PubMed

    van Hinsberg, M A T; Clercx, H J H; Toschi, Federico

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the influence of shear on the gravitational settling of heavy inertial particles in homogeneous shear turbulence (HST). In addition to the well-known enhanced settling velocity, observed for heavy inertial particles in homogeneous isotropic turbulence (HIT), a horizontal drift velocity is also observed in the shearing direction due to the presence of a nonzero mean vorticity (introducing symmetry breaking due to the mean shear). This drift velocity is due to the combination of shear, gravity, and turbulence, and all three of these elements are needed for this effect to occur. We extend the mechanism responsible for the enhanced settling velocity in HIT to the case of HST. Two separate regimes are observed, characterized by positive or negative drift velocity, depending on the particle settling velocity. PMID:27541467

  4. The role of current velocity in structuring eelgrass ( Zostera marina L.) meadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, Mark S.; Zieman, Joseph C.; Thayer, Gordon W.; Fisher, John S.

    1983-10-01

    Measurements of velocity profiles, bathymetry, and surface sediment characteristics across eelgrass ( Zostera marina L.) meadows yielded information on community development processes and functional attributes of this ecosystem. Height/length ratios of the meadows were positively correlated with tidal current velocity. Low, medium, and high current regimes were separated by surface current velocities of approximately 50 and 90 cm s -1. Z. marina can tolerate approximately 120-150 cm/sec current velocities in the areas studied. Per cent silt-clay and organic matter content of the surface sediments are negatively associated with shear velocity, suggesting that meadows in high current areas are sources while meadows in low current areas are sinks of autochthonous detritus. Current velocity maintains seagrass meadows at different equilibrium levels (relative climaxes). We theorize these different equilibrium levels provide unequal habitat utilization potentials for the associated faunal community.

  5. Preflare magnetic and velocity fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J.; Gaizauskas, V.; Chapman, G. A.; Deloach, A. C.; Gary, G. A.; Jones, H. P.; Karpen, J. T.; Martres, M.-J.; Porter, J. G.; Schmeider, B.

    1986-01-01

    A characterization is given of the preflare magnetic field, using theoretical models of force free fields together with observed field structure to determine the general morphology. Direct observational evidence for sheared magnetic fields is presented. The role of this magnetic shear in the flare process is considered within the context of a MHD model that describes the buildup of magnetic energy, and the concept of a critical value of shear is explored. The related subject of electric currents in the preflare state is discussed next, with emphasis on new insights provided by direct calculations of the vertical electric current density from vector magnetograph data and on the role of these currents in producing preflare brightenings. Results from investigations concerning velocity fields in flaring active regions, describing observations and analyses of preflare ejecta, sheared velocities, and vortical motions near flaring sites are given. This is followed by a critical review of prevalent concepts concerning the association of flux emergence with flares

  6. 3D near-surface soil response from H/V ambient-noise ratios

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wollery, E.W.; Street, R.

    2002-01-01

    The applicability of the horizontal-to-vertical (H/V) ambient-noise spectral ratio for characterizing earthquake site effects caused by nearsurface topography and velocity structures was evaluated at sites underlain by thick (i.e. >100 m) sediment deposits near the southern-end of the New Madrid seismic zone in the central United States. Three-component ambient-noise and velocity models derived from seismic (shearwave) refraction/reflection surveys showed that a relatively horizontal, sharp shear-wave velocity interface in the soil column resulted in an H/V spectral ratio with a single well-defined peak. Observations at sites with more than one sharp shear-wave velocity contrast and horizontally arranged soil layers resulted in at least two well-defined H/V spectral ratio peaks. Furthermore, at sites where there were sharp shear-wave velocity contrasts in nonhorizontal, near-surface soil layers, the H/V spectra exhibited a broad-bandwidth, relatively low amplitude signal instead of a single well-defined peak. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Experimental Reacting Hydrogen Shear Layer Data at High Subsonic Mach Number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. T.; Marek, C. J.; Wey, C.; Wey, C. C.

    1996-01-01

    The flow in a planar shear layer of hydrogen reacting with hot air was measured with a two-component laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) system, a schlieren system, and OH fluorescence imaging. It was compared with a similar air-to-air case without combustion. The high-speed stream's flow speed was about 390 m/s, or Mach 0.71, and the flow speed ratio was 0.34. The results showed that a shear layer with reaction grows faster than one without; both cases are within the range of data scatter presented by the established data base. The coupling between the streamwise and the cross-stream turbulence components inside the shear layers was low, and reaction only increased it slightly. However, the shear layer shifted laterally into the lower speed fuel stream, and a more organized pattern of Reynolds stress was present in the reaction shear layer, likely as a result of the formation of a larger scale structure associated with shear layer corrugation from heat release. Dynamic pressure measurements suggest that coherent flow perturbations existed inside the shear layer and that this flow became more chaotic as the flow advected downstream. Velocity and thermal variable values are listed in this report for a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) benchmark.

  8. Cylinders vs. spheres: biofluid shear thinning in driven nanoparticle transport.

    PubMed

    Cribb, Jeremy A; Meehan, Timothy D; Shah, Sheel M; Skinner, Kwan; Superfine, Richard

    2010-11-01

    Increasingly, the research community applies magnetophoresis to micro and nanoscale particles for drug delivery applications and the nanoscale rheological characterization of complex biological materials. Of particular interest is the design and transport of these magnetic particles through entangled polymeric fluids commonly found in biological systems. We report the magnetophoretic transport of spherical and rod-shaped particles through viscoelastic, entangled solutions using lambda-phage DNA (λ-DNA) as a model system. In order to understand and predict the observed phenomena, we fully characterize three fundamental components: the magnetic field and field gradient, the shape and magnetic properties of the probe particles, and the macroscopic rheology of the solution. Particle velocities obtained in Newtonian solutions correspond to macroscale rheology, with forces calculated via Stokes Law. In λ-DNA solutions, nanorod velocities are 100 times larger than predicted by measured zero-shear viscosity. These results are consistent with particles experiencing transport through a shear thinning fluid, indicating magnetically driven transport in shear thinning may be especially effective and favor narrow diameter, high aspect ratio particles. A complete framework for designing single-particle magnetic-based delivery systems results when we combine a quantified magnetic system with qualified particles embedded in a characterized viscoelastic medium. PMID:20571853

  9. Shear-driven Dynamo Waves in the Fully Nonlinear Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pongkitiwanichakul, P.; Nigro, G.; Cattaneo, F.; Tobias, S. M.

    2016-07-01

    Large-scale dynamo action is well understood when the magnetic Reynolds number (Rm) is small, but becomes problematic in the astrophysically relevant large Rm limit since the fluctuations may control the operation of the dynamo, obscuring the large-scale behavior. Recent works by Tobias & Cattaneo demonstrated numerically the existence of large-scale dynamo action in the form of dynamo waves driven by strongly helical turbulence and shear. Their calculations were carried out in the kinematic regime in which the back-reaction of the Lorentz force on the flow is neglected. Here, we have undertaken a systematic extension of their work to the fully nonlinear regime. Helical turbulence and large-scale shear are produced self-consistently by prescribing body forces that, in the kinematic regime, drive flows that resemble the original velocity used by Tobias & Cattaneo. We have found four different solution types in the nonlinear regime for various ratios of the fluctuating velocity to the shear and Reynolds numbers. Some of the solutions are in the form of propagating waves. Some solutions show large-scale helical magnetic structure. Both waves and structures are permanent only when the kinetic helicity is non-zero on average.

  10. Cylinders vs. Spheres: Biofluid Shear Thinning in Driven Nanoparticle Transport

    PubMed Central

    Cribb, Jeremy A.; Meehan, Timothy D.; Shah, Sheel M.; Skinner, Kwan; Superfine, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Increasingly, the research community applies magnetophoresis to micro and nanoscale particles for drug delivery applications and the nanoscale rheological characterization of complex biological materials. Of particular interest is the design and transport of these magnetic particles through entangled polymeric fluids commonly found in biological systems. We report the magnetophoretic transport of spherical and rod-shaped particles through viscoelastic, entangled solutions using lambda-phage DNA (λ-DNA) as a model system. In order to understand and predict the observed phenomena, we fully characterize three fundamental components: the magnetic field and field gradient, the shape and magnetic properties of the probe particles, and the macroscopic rheology of the solution. Particle velocities obtained in Newtonian solutions correspond to macroscale rheology, with forces calculated via Stokes Law. In λ-DNA solutions, nanorod velocities are 100 times larger than predicted by measured zero-shear viscosity. These results are consistent with particles experiencing transport through a shear thinning fluid, indicating magnetically driven transport in shear thinning may be especially effective and favor narrow diameter, high aspect ratio particles. A complete framework for designing single-particle magnetic-based delivery systems results when we combine a quantified magnetic system with qualified particles embedded in a characterized viscoelastic medium. PMID:20571853

  11. In situ Ultrasonic Velocity Measurements Across the Olivine-spinel Transformation in Fe2Si04

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Q.; Liu, W; Whitaker, M; Wang, L; Li, B

    2010-01-01

    Compressional (P) and shear (S) wave velocities across the olivine-spinel transformation in Fe{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} were investigated in situ using combined synchrotron X-ray diffraction, X-ray imaging, and ultrasonic interferometry up to 5.5 GPa along the 1173 K isotherm. The onset of the spinel to olivine transformation at 4.5 GPa and olivine to spinel transition for Fe{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} at 4.8 GPa was concurrently observed from X-ray diffraction, the amplitude of the ultrasonic signals, the calculated velocities, and the ratio of P and S wave velocities (v{sub P}/v{sub S}). No velocity softening was observed prior to the fayalite to spinel transition. The velocity contrasts across the Fe{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} spinel to fayalite phase transition are derived directly from the measured velocities, which are 13 and 12% for P and S waves, respectively, together with a density contrast of 9.4%. A comparison with literature data indicates that the changes in compressional-wave velocity and density across the olivine-spinel transformation in Fe{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} are comparable to those with different iron concentrations in the (Mg,Fe){sub 2}SiO{sub 4} solid solution, whereas the shear wave velocity contrast decreases slightly with increasing iron concentration.

  12. Velocity Dispersion Measurements in Cracked Quartzite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schijns, H. M.; Schmitt, D. R.; Jackson, I.

    2011-12-01

    Oscillating stress induced by seismic waves is expected to cause reversible fluid flow within low aspect ratio cracks, resulting in strongly frequency dependent seismic wave velocities. Laboratory measurements of seismic velocities typically made at MHz frequencies, well logging undertaken at kHz frequencies and in-situ exploration seismic (10-300 Hz) measurements are unlikely to be directly comparable as a result of this fluid flow effect. Experimental measurements over a broad range of frequencies are necessary to constrain theoretical velocity dispersion models. Here we present a preliminary comparison of ultrasonic (MHz) measurements on two cracked quartzite samples with measurements made in the mHz-Hz frequency band using forced oscillation. Quartzite samples from Cape Sorell, Australia and Alberta, Canada are cracked by thermally heating the samples to 1100 C and quenching them in liquid nitrogen and water, respectively. A relatively isotropic distribution of cracks, with average aperture of 1 μm and aspect ratio of <0.01, is induced in both samples for total porosities of ~2%. Measurements are made on the quartzite samples when they are dry, and after saturating with argon and water. The difference in viscosity between argon (0.025 mPa s at 10 MPa and 20 C) and water (1 mPa s) allow the investigation of different time scales of fluid flow. Further, measurements are made over effective pressures from 10-150 MPa, with progressive crack closure observed between 10-100 MPa. High frequency (0.64 MHz) measurements using piezoelectric transducers are used in conjunction with density measurements to calculate high frequency Young's and shear moduli. Low frequency (mHz-Hz) moduli are measured using a forced oscillation apparatus at Australian National University. The experimental assembly consists of a long cylindrical beam; the top of the beam is held fixed while the bottom is driven using time-varying electromagnetic drivers. The polarization of the applied force

  13. Squirming through shear thinning fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datt, Charu; Zhu, Lailai; Elfring, Gwynn J.; Pak, On Shun

    2015-11-01

    Many microorganisms find themselves surrounded by fluids which are non-Newtonian in nature; human spermatozoa in female reproductive tract and motile bacteria in mucosa of animals are common examples. These biological fluids can display shear-thinning rheology whose effects on the locomotion of microorganisms remain largely unexplored. Here we study the self-propulsion of a squirmer in shear-thinning fluids described by the Carreau-Yasuda model. The squirmer undergoes surface distortions and utilizes apparent slip-velocities around its surface to swim through a fluid medium. In this talk, we will discuss how the nonlinear rheological properties of a shear-thinning fluid affect the propulsion of a swimmer compared with swimming in Newtonian fluids.

  14. Effects of density, velocity gradient, and compressibility on side-jet formation in round jets with variable density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Akinori

    2013-11-01

    When a low density gas compared with the ambient gas is discharged from a round nozzle, side jets that are radial ejections of jet fluid are generated at the initial region of the jet. The density ratio between the jet fluid and the ambient fluid is a main parameter for the side-jet formation. Since the side-jet formation is also related to the instability of shear layer, it depends on the velocity gradient of the shear layer in the jet. The velocity gradient is evaluated by a ratio of the momentum thickness and the nozzle diameter at the nozzle exit. Compressibility suppresses the instability and the generation of the side jets. The compressibility is evaluated by a Mach number, which is a ratio defined by an issuing velocity of the jet and a sound velocity in the ambient fluid. Influence of these three parameters on the side-jet formation was examined experimentally. The density ratio and momentum thickness ratio were varied from 0.14 to 1.53, and from 14 to 155, respectively. The Mach number was varied to 0.7. Existence of side jets was confirmed by flow visualization using a laser sheet. Domains for the side-jet formation by the density ratio, the momentum thickness ratio, and the Mach number were determined.

  15. Vascular wall shear rate measurement using coded excitation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsou, Jean K.; Liu, Jie; Insana, Michael F.

    2005-04-01

    Wall shear rate (WSR) is the derivative of blood velocity with respect to vessel radius at the endothelial surface. The product of WSR and blood viscosity is the wall shear stress (WSS) that must remain relatively high to maintain normal endothelial cell function, arterial health and prevent plaque formation. Accurate WSR estimation requires the lowest possible variance and bias for blood velocity estimates near the wall. This situation is achieved for conditions where the echo signal-to-noise ratio (eSNR) and spatial resolution for velocity are high. We transmitted coded pulses, i.e., those with time-bandwidth product greater than 1, to increase eSNR from weak blood scatter without increasing instantaneous power or reducing spatial resolution. This paper is a summary of WSR measurements from a flow phantom where a variety of acoustic pulses were transmitted: frequencymodulated (FM) codes and phase-modulated (PM) codes were compared with uncoded broadband and narrow band pulse transmissions. Both simulation and experimental results show that coded-pulse excitation increases accuracy and precision in WSR estimation when compared to standard pulsing techniques. Additionally, PM codes can reduce WSR errors more than FM codes for equal pulse energy. This reduction in WSR error could greatly extend the application of ultrasound in the study of cardiovascular disease.

  16. Application of optical analyzer technique for measurements of sound velocities in shock-compressed Al-Mn alloy for calibration of recent elastic-viscous-plastic models

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlov, E. A.; Tarzhanov, V. I.; Pankratov, D. G.; Yakunin, A. K.; Yelkin, V. M.; Mikhailov, V. N.

    2006-08-03

    Registration results of longitudinal CL({sigma}XX) and volume CB({sigma}XX) sound velocities in shock-compressed aluminum alloy are presented. Experimental data were obtained in wide range of longitudinal stress, including the stress, corresponding to solid-liquid shock-induced transformation. By using experimentally measured values of sound velocities, the changes of Poisson ratio and shear modulus were calculated along the shock adiabat. These data are needed for calibration of resent elastic-viscous-plastic models.

  17. Spin crossover in ferropericlase and velocity heterogeneities in the lower mantle.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhongqing; Wentzcovitch, Renata M

    2014-07-22

    Deciphering the origin of seismic velocity heterogeneities in the mantle is crucial to understanding internal structures and processes at work in the Earth. The spin crossover in iron in ferropericlase (Fp), the second most abundant phase in the lower mantle, introduces unfamiliar effects on seismic velocities. First-principles calculations indicate that anticorrelation between shear velocity (VS) and bulk sound velocity (Vφ) in the mantle, usually interpreted as compositional heterogeneity, can also be produced in homogeneous aggregates containing Fp. The spin crossover also suppresses thermally induced heterogeneity in longitudinal velocity (VP) at certain depths but not in VS. This effect is observed in tomography models at conditions where the spin crossover in Fp is expected in the lower mantle. In addition, the one-of-a-kind signature of this spin crossover in the RS/P (∂ ln VS/∂ ln VP) heterogeneity ratio might be a useful fingerprint to detect the presence of Fp in the lower mantle. PMID:25002507

  18. Precessing rotating flows with additional shear: Stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salhi, A.; Cambon, C.

    2009-03-01

    We consider unbounded precessing rotating flows in which vertical or horizontal shear is induced by the interaction between the solid-body rotation (with angular velocity Ω0 ) and the additional “precessing” Coriolis force (with angular velocity -ɛΩ0 ), normal to it. A “weak” shear flow, with rate 2ɛ of the same order of the Poincaré “small” ratio ɛ , is needed for balancing the gyroscopic torque, so that the whole flow satisfies Euler’s equations in the precessing frame (the so-called admissibility conditions). The base flow case with vertical shear (its cross-gradient direction is aligned with the main angular velocity) corresponds to Mahalov’s [Phys. Fluids A 5, 891 (1993)] precessing infinite cylinder base flow (ignoring boundary conditions), while the base flow case with horizontal shear (its cross-gradient direction is normal to both main and precessing angular velocities) corresponds to the unbounded precessing rotating shear flow considered by Kerswell [Geophys. Astrophys. Fluid Dyn. 72, 107 (1993)]. We show that both these base flows satisfy the admissibility conditions and can support disturbances in terms of advected Fourier modes. Because the admissibility conditions cannot select one case with respect to the other, a more physical derivation is sought: Both flows are deduced from Poincaré’s [Bull. Astron. 27, 321 (1910)] basic state of a precessing spheroidal container, in the limit of small ɛ . A Rapid distortion theory (RDT) type of stability analysis is then performed for the previously mentioned disturbances, for both base flows. The stability analysis of the Kerswell base flow, using Floquet’s theory, is recovered, and its counterpart for the Mahalov base flow is presented. Typical growth rates are found to be the same for both flows at very small ɛ , but significant differences are obtained regarding growth rates and widths of instability bands, if larger ɛ values, up to 0.2, are considered. Finally, both flow cases

  19. Internal hydraulic jumps with large upstream shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, Kelly; Helfrich, Karl

    2015-11-01

    Internal hydraulic jumps in approximately two-layered flows with large upstream shear are investigated using numerical simulations. The simulations allow continuous density and velocity profiles, and a jump is forced to develop by downstream topography, similar to the experiments conducted by Wilkinson and Wood (1971). High shear jumps are found to exhibit significantly more entrainment than low shear jumps. Furthermore, the downstream structure of the flow has an important effect on the jump properties. Jumps with a slow upper (inactive) layer exhibit a velocity minimum downstream of the jump, resulting in a sub-critical downstream state, while flows with the same upstream vertical shear and a larger barotropic velocity remain super-critical downstream of the jump. A two-layer theory is modified to account for the vertical structure of the downstream density and velocity profiles and entrainment is allowed through a modification of the approach of Holland et al. (2002). The resulting theory can be matched reasonably well with the numerical simulations. However, the results are very sensitive to how the downstream vertical profiles of velocity and density are incorporated into the layered model, highlighting the difficulty of the two layer approximation when the shear is large.

  20. Modified Biot-Gassmann theory for calculating elastic velocities for unconsolidated and consolidated sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, M.W.

    2002-01-01

    The classical Biot-Gassmann theory (BGT) generally overestimates shear-wave velocities of water-saturated sediments. To overcome this problem, a new theory is developed based on BGT and on the velocity ratio as a function of G(1 - ??)n, where ?? is porosity and n and G are constants. Based on laboratory data measured at ultrasonic frequencies, parameters for the new formulation are derived. This new theory is extended to include the effect of differential pressure and consolidation on the velocity ratio by making n a function of differential pressure and the rate of porosity reduction with respect to differential pressure. A scale G is introduced to compensate for discrepancies between measured and predicted velocities, mainly caused by the presence of clay in the matrix. As differential pressure increases and the rate of porosity reduction with respect to differential pressure decreases, the exponent n decreases and elastic velocities increase. Because velocity dispersion is not considered, this new formula is optimum for analyzing velocities measured at ultrasonic frequencies or for sediments having low dispersion characteristics such as clean sandstone with high permeability and lack of grain-scale local flow. The new formula is applied to predict velocities from porosity or from porosity and P-wave velocity and is in good agreement with laboratory and well log data. ?? 2004 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

  1. Improved determination of vascular blood-flow shear rate using Doppler ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farison, James B.; Begeman, Garett A.; Salles-Cunha, Sergio X.; Beebe, Hugh G.

    1997-05-01

    Shear rate has been linked to endothelial and smooth muscle cell function, neointimal hyperplasia, poststenotic dilation and progression of atherosclerotic plaque. In vivo studies of shear rate have been limited in humans due to the lack of a truly accurate noninvasive method of measuring blood flow. In clinical vascular laboratories, the primary method of wall shear rate estimation is the scaled ratio between the center line systolic velocity and the local arterial radius. The present study compares this method with the shear rate calculated directly from data collected using a Doppler ultrasound scanner. Blood flow in the superficial femoral artery of 20 subjects was measured during three stages of distal resistance. Analysis and display programs were written for use with the MATLAB image processing software package. The experimental values of shear rate were calculated using the formal definition and then compared to the standard estimate. In all three states of distal resistance, the experimental values were significantly higher than the estimated values by a factor of approximately 1.57. These results led to the conclusion that the direct method of measuring shear rate is more precise and should replace the estimation model in the clinical laboratory.

  2. Velocity acceleration as a determinant of flow-mediated dilation.

    PubMed

    Stoner, Lee; McCully, Kevin K

    2012-04-01

    Shear stress is the established stimulus for flow-mediated dilation (FMD). In vivo, shear stress is typically estimated using mean blood velocity. However, mean blood velocity may not adequately characterize the shear stimulus. Pulsatile flow results in large shear gradients (velocity acceleration) at the onset of flow. The purpose of this study was to determine the importance of velocity acceleration to FMD. We define FMD as the brachial artery shear rate-diameter slope. Fourteen physically active, young (26 ± 5 years), male subjects were tested. Progressive forearm heating and handgrip exercise elicited steady-state increases in shear rate. FMD was measured prior to and following induced increases in velocity acceleration. Velocity acceleration was increased by inflating a tourniquet around the forearm to 40 mm Hg. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to estimate change in diameter with repeated measures of shear stress nested within each subject. Averaged across conditions, the 40 mm Hg cuff resulted in a 14% increase in velocity acceleration (p = 0.001). FMD was attenuated by 11.0% (p = 0.015) for the acceleration vs. control condition. However, after specifying velocity acceleration as a covariate, FMD was no longer significantly (p = 0.619) different between acceleration and control conditions. This finding suggests that mean blood velocity alone may not adequately characterize the shear stimulus.

  3. Repetitive differential finger motion increases shear strain between the flexor tendon and subsynovial connective tissue.

    PubMed

    Tat, Jimmy; Kociolek, Aaron M; Keir, Peter J

    2013-10-01

    Non-inflammatory fibrosis and thickening of the subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT) are characteristic in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) patients. These pathological changes have been linked to repetitive hand tasks that create shear forces between the flexor tendons and SSCT. We measured the relative motion of the flexor digitorum superficialis tendon and SSCT during two repetitive finger tasks using color Doppler ultrasound. Twelve participants performed flexion-extension cycles for 30 min with the long finger alone (differential movement) and with all four fingers together (concurrent movement). Shear strain index (SSI, a relative measure of excursion in flexion and extension) and maximum velocity ratio (MVR, the ratio of SSCT versus tendon during flexion and extension) were used to represent shear. A linear effect of exertion time was significant and corresponded with larger tendon shear in differential motion. The flexion SSI increased 20.4% from the first to the 30th minute, while MVR decreased 8.9% in flexion and 8.7% in extension. No significant changes were found during concurrent motion. These results suggest that exposure to repetitive differential finger tasks may increase the risk of shear injury in the carpal tunnel.

  4. Proposed moduli of dry rock and their application to predicting elastic velocities of sandstones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.

    2005-01-01

    Velocities of water-saturated isotropic sandstones under low frequency can be modeled using the Biot-Gassmann theory if the moduli of dry rocks are known. On the basis of effective medium theory by Kuster and Toksoz, bulk and shear moduli of dry sandstone are proposed. These moduli are related to each other through a consolidation parameter and provide a new way to calculate elastic velocities. Because this parameter depends on differential pressure and the degree of consolidation, the proposed moduli can be used to calculate elastic velocities of sedimentary rocks under different in-place conditions by varying the consolidation parameter. This theory predicts that the ratio of P-wave to S-wave velocity (Vp/Vs) of a dry rock decreases as differential pressure increases and porosity decreases. This pattern of behavior is similar to that of water-saturated sedimentary rocks. If microcracks are present in sandstones, the velocity ratio usually increases as differential pressure increases. This implies that this theory is optimal for sandstones having intergranular porosities. Even though the accurate behavior of the consolidation parameter with respect to differential pressure or the degree of consolidation is not known, this theory presents a new way to predict S-wave velocity from P-wave velocity and porosity and to calculate elastic velocities of gas-hydrate-bearing sediments. For given properties of sandstones such as bulk and shear moduli of matrix, only the consolidation parameter affects velocities, and this parameter can be estimated directly from the measurements; thus, the prediction of S-wave velocity is accurate, reflecting in-place conditions.

  5. Branching ratio measurements of the predissociation of {sup 12}C{sup 16}O by time-slice velocity-map ion imaging in the energy region from 108 000 to 110 500 cm{sup -1}

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Hong; Song Yu; Yang Lei; Shi Xiaoyu; Ng, C. Y.; Jackson, William M.; Yin Qingzhu

    2012-07-21

    Direct branching ratio measurements of the three lowest dissociation channels of {sup 12}C{sup 16}O that produce C({sup 3}P) + O({sup 3}P), C({sup 1}D) + O({sup 3}P), and C({sup 3}P) + O({sup 1}D) are reported in the vacuum ultraviolet region from 108 000 cm{sup -1} (92.59 nm) to 110 500 cm{sup -1} (90.50 nm) using the time-slice velocity-map ion imaging and nonlinear resonant four-wave mixing techniques. Rotationally, resolved carbon ion yield spectra for both {sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +} and {sup 1}{Pi} bands of CO in this region have been obtained. Our measurements using this technique show that the branching ratio in this energy region, especially the relative percentages of the two spin-forbidden channels, is strongly dependent on the particular electronic and vibrational energy levels of CO that are excited.

  6. Magnetized stratified rotating shear waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salhi, A.; Lehner, T.; Godeferd, F.; Cambon, C.

    2012-02-01

    We present a spectral linear analysis in terms of advected Fourier modes to describe the behavior of a fluid submitted to four constraints: shear (with rate S), rotation (with angular velocity Ω), stratification, and magnetic field within the linear spectral theory or the shearing box model in astrophysics. As a consequence of the fact that the base flow must be a solution of the Euler-Boussinesq equations, only radial and/or vertical density gradients can be taken into account. Ertel's theorem no longer is valid to show the conservation of potential vorticity, in the presence of the Lorentz force, but a similar theorem can be applied to a potential magnetic induction: The scalar product of the density gradient by the magnetic field is a Lagrangian invariant for an inviscid and nondiffusive fluid. The linear system with a minimal number of solenoidal components, two for both velocity and magnetic disturbance fields, is eventually expressed as a four-component inhomogeneous linear differential system in which the buoyancy scalar is a combination of solenoidal components (variables) and the (constant) potential magnetic induction. We study the stability of such a system for both an infinite streamwise wavelength (k1=0, axisymmetric disturbances) and a finite one (k1≠0, nonaxisymmetric disturbances). In the former case (k1=0), we recover and extend previous results characterizing the magnetorotational instability (MRI) for combined effects of radial and vertical magnetic fields and combined effects of radial and vertical density gradients. We derive an expression for the MRI growth rate in terms of the stratification strength, which indicates that purely radial stratification can inhibit the MRI instability, while purely vertical stratification cannot completely suppress the MRI instability. In the case of nonaxisymmetric disturbances (k1≠0), we only consider the effect of vertical stratification, and we use Levinson's theorem to demonstrate the stability of the

  7. Magnetized stratified rotating shear waves.

    PubMed

    Salhi, A; Lehner, T; Godeferd, F; Cambon, C

    2012-02-01

    We present a spectral linear analysis in terms of advected Fourier modes to describe the behavior of a fluid submitted to four constraints: shear (with rate S), rotation (with angular velocity Ω), stratification, and magnetic field within the linear spectral theory or the shearing box model in astrophysics. As a consequence of the fact that the base flow must be a solution of the Euler-Boussinesq equations, only radial and/or vertical density gradients can be taken into account. Ertel's theorem no longer is valid to show the conservation of potential vorticity, in the presence of the Lorentz force, but a similar theorem can be applied to a potential magnetic induction: The scalar product of the density gradient by the magnetic field is a Lagrangian invariant for an inviscid and nondiffusive fluid. The linear system with a minimal number of solenoidal components, two for both velocity and magnetic disturbance fields, is eventually expressed as a four-component inhomogeneous linear differential system in which the buoyancy scalar is a combination of solenoidal components (variables) and the (constant) potential magnetic induction. We study the stability of such a system for both an infinite streamwise wavelength (k(1) = 0, axisymmetric disturbances) and a finite one (k(1) ≠ 0, nonaxisymmetric disturbances). In the former case (k(1) = 0), we recover and extend previous results characterizing the magnetorotational instability (MRI) for combined effects of radial and vertical magnetic fields and combined effects of radial and vertical density gradients. We derive an expression for the MRI growth rate in terms of the stratification strength, which indicates that purely radial stratification can inhibit the MRI instability, while purely vertical stratification cannot completely suppress the MRI instability. In the case of nonaxisymmetric disturbances (k(1) ≠ 0), we only consider the effect of vertical stratification, and we use Levinson's theorem to demonstrate the

  8. Shearrate diffusion and constitutive relations during transients in simple shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ries, Alexander; Brendel, Lothar; Wolf, Dietrich E.

    2016-07-01

    Granular matter, consisting of hard, frictional, cohesionless spheres, sheared in a simple shear geometry with smooth walls undergoes a velocity driven transition from a jammed or creeping state (low wall velocity) to a flow state with a finite shear rate in the bulk (high wall velocity). In the flow state, the state variables volume fraction ν , inertial number I and the macroscopic friction μ of the bulk follow an exponential transient. The characteristic time of this progression grows with the wall velocity and the system size and is typically large compared to the inverse shear rate. It is shown that I, first being stationary in the shear zones, spreads diffusively into the bulk. The other state variables follow according to the constitutive laws, well known from the steady state.

  9. Momentum Transport Studies in High E x B Shear Plasmas in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, W M; Bell, R E; LeBlanc, B P; Menard, J E; Rewoldt, G; Wang, W; Levinton, F M; Yuh, H

    2008-06-26

    Experiments have been conducted on NSTX to study both steady state and perturbative mo mentum transport. These studies are unique in their parameter space under investigation, where the low aspect ratio of NSTX results in rapid plasma rotation with E x B shearing rates high enough to suppress low-k turbulence. In some cases, the ratio of momentum to energy confinement time is found to exceed five. Momentum pinch velocities of order 10-40 m/s are inferred from the measured angular momentum flux evolution after non-resonant magnetic perturbations are applied to brake the plasma.

  10. Magnetic shear. IV - Hale regions 16740, 16815, and 16850

    SciTech Connect

    Athay, R.G.; Klimchuk, J.A.; Jones, H.P.; Zirin, H.

    1986-04-01

    Dopplergrams made in C IV 1548 A are studied for evidence of velocity shear near H-alpha dark filaments and for large-scale flow convergent on active regions. The three regions studied support earlier conclusions that shear is a common property of active regions and that active regions may be the foci of converging plasma flow. Flow patterns near filaments show divergence or convergence as well as shear. Also the sense of the shear can be either cyclonic or anticyclonic. No preference is noted for convergence or divergence or for a particular sense of shear, and there appears to be no correlation between the sense of the shear and the sign of the velocity gradient normal to the filament. The close association of H-alpha dark filaments with shear lines leads to the suggestion that the filaments may arise from a cooling instability induced by the Bernoulli effect. 12 references

  11. Continuum modes in rotating plasmas: General equations and continuous spectra for large aspect ratio tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Lakhin, V. P.; Ilgisonis, V. I.

    2011-09-15

    A theory for localized low-frequency ideal magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) modes in axisymmetric toroidal systems is generalized to take into account both toroidal and poloidal equilibrium plasma flows. The general set of equations describing the coupling of shear Alfven and slow (sound) modes and defining the continuous spectrum of rotating plasmas in axisymmetric toroidal systems is derived. The equations are applied to study the continuous spectra in large aspect ratio tokamaks. The unstable continuous modes in the case of predominantly poloidal plasma rotation with the angular velocity exceeding the sound frequency are found. Their stabilization by the shear Alfven coupling effect is studied.

  12. Fragmentation of multiply charged hydrocarbon molecules C{sub n}H{sup q+} (n{<=} 4, q{<=} 9) produced in high-velocity collisions: Branching ratios and kinetic energy release of the H{sup +} fragment

    SciTech Connect

    Beroff, K.; Pino, T.; Carpentier, Y.; Van-Oanh, N. T.; Chabot, M.; Tuna, T.; Martinet, G.; Le Padellec, A.; Lavergne, L.

    2011-09-15

    Fragmentation branching ratios for channels involving H{sup +} emission and associated kinetic energy release of the H{sup +} fragment [KER(H{sup +})] have been measured for multicharged C{sub n}H{sup q+} molecules produced in high velocity (3.6 a.u.) collisions between C{sub n}H{sup +} projectiles and helium atoms. For CH{sup q+} (q{<=} 4) molecules, measured KER(H{sup +}) were found well below predictions of the simple point charge Coulomb model (PCCM) for all q values. Multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) calculations for ground as well as electronic excited states were performed which allowed a perfect interpretation of the CH{sup q+} experimental results for low charges (q = 2-3) as well as for the highest charge (q = 4). In this last case we could show, on the basis of ionization cross sections calculations and experimental measurements performed on the same systems at slightly higher velocity (4.5 a.u.), the prominent role played by inner-shell ionization followed by Auger relaxation and could extract the lifetime of this Auger relaxation giving rise to the best agreement between the experiment and the calculations. For dissociation of C{sub 2}H{sup q+} and C{sub 3}H{sup q+} with the highest charges (q{>=} 5), inner-shell ionization contributed in a prominent way to the ion production. In these two cases it was shown that measured KER(H{sup +}) were in good agreement with PCCM predictions when those were corrected for Auger relaxation with the same Auger lifetime value as in CH{sup 3+}.

  13. Hydrocarbon saturation determination using acoustic velocities obtained through casing

    DOEpatents

    Moos, Daniel

    2010-03-09

    Compressional and shear velocities of earth formations are measured through casing. The determined compressional and shear velocities are used in a two component mixing model to provides improved quantitative values for the solid, the dry frame, and the pore compressibility. These are used in determination of hydrocarbon saturation.

  14. The Radiation Hydrodynamics of Relativistic Shear Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, Eric R.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2016-07-01

    We present a method for analyzing the interaction between radiation and matter in regions of intense, relativistic shear that can arise in many astrophysical situations. We show that there is a simple velocity profile that should be manifested in regions of large shear that have “lost memory” of their boundary conditions, and we use this self-similar velocity profile to construct the surface of last scattering, or the τ ≃ 1 surface, as viewed from any comoving point within the flow. We demonstrate that a simple treatment of scattering from this τ ≃ 1 surface exactly conserves photon number, and we derive the rate at which the radiation field is heated due to the shear present in the flow. The components of the comoving radiation energy–momentum tensor are calculated, and we show that they have relatively simple, approximate forms that interpolate between the viscous (small shear) and streaming (large shear) limits. We put our expression for the energy–momentum tensor in a covariant form that does not depend on the explicit velocity profile within the fluid and, therefore, represents a natural means for analyzing general, radiation-dominated, relativistic shear flows.

  15. Parameterization of sheared entrainment in a well-developed CBL. Part I: Evaluation of the scheme through large-eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peng; Sun, Jianning; Shen, Lidu

    2016-10-01

    The entrainment flux ratio A e and the inversion layer (IL) thickness are two key parameters in a mixed layer model. A e is defined as the ratio of the entrainment heat flux at the mixed layer top to the surface heat flux. The IL is the layer between the mixed layer and the free atmosphere. In this study, a parameterization of A e is derived from the TKE budget in the firstorder model for a well-developed CBL under the condition of linearly sheared geostrophic velocity with a zero value at the surface. It is also appropriate for a CBL under the condition of geostrophic velocity remaining constant with height. LESs are conducted under the above two conditions to determine the coefficients in the parameterization scheme. Results suggest that about 43% of the shear-produced TKE in the IL is available for entrainment, while the shear-produced TKE in the mixed layer and surface layer have little effect on entrainment. Based on this scheme, a new scale of convective turbulence velocity is proposed and applied to parameterize the IL thickness. The LES outputs for the CBLs under the condition of linearly sheared geostrophic velocity with a non-zero surface value are used to verify the performance of the parameterization scheme. It is found that the parameterized A e and IL thickness agree well with the LES outputs.

  16. Profiling of K0 lateral stress coefficient in soils using paired directional G0 ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, Taeseo; Mayne, Paul W.

    2013-07-01

    Using a special database compiled from directional shear wave velocity measurements at 12 well-documented sites, the geostatic stress state and stress history are evaluated from shear stiffness ratios. At each site, a benchmark profile of lateral stress coefficient (K0) was detailed using direct in-situ methods (i.e., self-boring pressuremeter, total stress cells, and/or hydraulic fracture), and/or laboratory methods (i.e., suction, consolidometer, and/or triaxial stress path testing). Also, the yield stress ratio (YSR), or more common parameter: overconsolidation ratio (OCR), was available either from series of consolidation tests on undisturbed samples procured from various depths and/or engineering geology studies, or both. Statistical expressions are derived to relate both K0 and OCR in terms of the ratio G0,HH/G0,VH as well as other factors.

  17. Time-Resolved Particle Image Velocimetry Measurements with Wall Shear Stress and Uncertainty Quantification for the FDA Nozzle Model.

    PubMed

    Raben, Jaime S; Hariharan, Prasanna; Robinson, Ronald; Malinauskas, Richard; Vlachos, Pavlos P

    2016-03-01

    We present advanced particle image velocimetry (PIV) processing, post-processing, and uncertainty estimation techniques to support the validation of computational fluid dynamics analyses of medical devices. This work is an extension of a previous FDA-sponsored multi-laboratory study, which used a medical device mimicking geometry referred to as the FDA benchmark nozzle model. Experimental measurements were performed using time-resolved PIV at five overlapping regions of the model for Reynolds numbers in the nozzle throat of 500, 2000, 5000, and 8000. Images included a twofold increase in spatial resolution in comparison to the previous study. Data was processed using ensemble correlation, dynamic range enhancement, and phase correlations to increase signal-to-noise ratios and measurement accuracy, and to resolve flow regions with large velocity ranges and gradients, which is typical of many blood-contacting medical devices. Parameters relevant to device safety, including shear stress at the wall and in bulk flow, were computed using radial basis functions. In addition, in-field spatially resolved pressure distributions, Reynolds stresses, and energy dissipation rates were computed from PIV measurements. Velocity measurement uncertainty was estimated directly from the PIV correlation plane, and uncertainty analysis for wall shear stress at each measurement location was performed using a Monte Carlo model. Local velocity uncertainty varied greatly and depended largely on local conditions such as particle seeding, velocity gradients, and particle displacements. Uncertainty in low velocity regions in the sudden expansion section of the nozzle was greatly reduced by over an order of magnitude when dynamic range enhancement was applied. Wall shear stress uncertainty was dominated by uncertainty contributions from velocity estimations, which were shown to account for 90-99% of the total uncertainty. This study provides advancements in the PIV processing methodologies over

  18. Adaptive Estimation of Intravascular Shear Rate Based on Parameter Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, Naotaka; Takeda, Naoto

    2008-05-01

    The relationships between the intravascular wall shear stress, controlled by flow dynamics, and the progress of arteriosclerosis plaque have been clarified by various studies. Since the shear stress is determined by the viscosity coefficient and shear rate, both factors must be estimated accurately. In this paper, an adaptive method for improving the accuracy of quantitative shear rate estimation was investigated. First, the parameter dependence of the estimated shear rate was investigated in terms of the differential window width and the number of averaged velocity profiles based on simulation and experimental data, and then the shear rate calculation was optimized. The optimized result revealed that the proposed adaptive method of shear rate estimation was effective for improving the accuracy of shear rate calculation.

  19. Approximate Formula of Peak Frequency of H/V Ratio Curve in Multilayered Model and Its Use in H/V Ratio Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuan, Tran Thanh; Vinh, Pham Chi; Malischewsky, P.; Aoudia, Abdelkrim

    2016-02-01

    The main peak frequency of the Horizontal-to-Vertical (H/V) ratio curve is the key factor used in the H/V ratio technique since the resonance frequency of the transmission response of the site is estimated from this frequency. However, there has not been explicit formula of the main peak frequency of the H/V ratio curve in multilayered models. In the present study, an approximate explicit equation of the peak frequency of H/V ratio is derived for the multilayered models of high impedance contrast between the half-space and surface layers. This approximate equation is then generalized for model of an functionally graded material (FGM) layer over half-space. Then, the approximate equation is used to obtain an explicit approximate formula of the main peak frequency of H/V ratio curve. The principle formula of H/V ratio technique is used along with the obtained approximate formula of the main peak frequency to formulate a new average formula of the shear-wave velocity of a composite layer composed of an arbitrary number of horizontal, homogeneous layers. The new average formula is shown to be more suitable in the use of H/V ratio technique than the currently used ones in the sense that it takes into account the effect of the mass density and the position of sublayers. Finally, some numerical calculation to illustrate the application of the peak formula and the new average formula of shear-wave velocity is presented.

  20. Ion flow in a strongly sheared electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Y.; Conn, R.W.; Schmitz, L.; Tynan, G. )

    1993-02-01

    Ion orbits and equilibrium ion flow in crossed electric and magnetic fields are examined for the case of a strongly nonuniform electric field such as found in edge plasmas of tokamak fusion experiments and in space plasmas. It is shown that the [bold E][times][bold B] drift approximation no longer applies, either to the motion of a single ion or to the collective response of the ion species when the absolute value of the shear parameter, [vert bar][zeta][vert bar], defined as the absolute value of the ratio of the gradient of [bold E][times][bold B] speed to ion gyrofrequency, is order one. It is also found that the ion velocity is strongly dependent on the electric field geometry. The results suggest that the existence of a strongly sheared electric field does not necessarily indicate the existence of strongly sheared plasma flow, and that the spatial shape of the electric field, when [vert bar][zeta][vert bar] is order one, may be a dominant factor in determining the resulting plasma flow speed.

  1. Cirrus Crystal Terminal Velocities.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Iaquinta, Jean

    2000-04-01

    Cirrus crystal terminal velocities are of primary importance in determining the rate of transport of condensate from upper- to middle-tropospheric levels and profoundly influence the earth's radiation balance through their effect on the rate of buildup or decay of cirrus clouds. In this study, laboratory and field-based cirrus crystal drag coefficient data, as well as analytical descriptions of cirrus crystal shapes, are used to derive more physically based expressions for the velocities of cirrus crystals than have been available in the past.Polycrystals-often bullet rosettes-are shown to be the dominant crystal types in synoptically generated cirrus, with columns present in varying but relatively large percentages, depending on the cloud. The two critical parameters needed to calculate terminal velocity are the drag coefficient and the ratio of mass to cross-sectional area normal to their fall direction. Using measurements and calculations, it is shown that drag coefficients from theory and laboratory studies are applicable to crystals of the types found in cirrus. The ratio of the mass to area, which is shown to be relatively independent of the number of bullets in the rosette, is derived from an analytic model that represents bullet rosettes containing one to eight bullets in 19 primary geometric configurations. The ratio is also derived for columns. Using this information, a general set of equations is developed to calculate the terminal velocities and masses in terms of the aspect ratio (width divided by length), ice density, and rosette maximum dimension. Simple expressions for terminal velocity and mass as a function of bullet rosette maximum dimension are developed by incorporating new information on bullet aspect ratios.The general terminal velocity and mass relations are then applied to a case from the First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) Research Experiment (FIRE) 2, when size spectra from a balloon-borne ice crystal

  2. Crosswind Shear Gradient Affect on Wake Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Fred H.; Ahmad, Nashat N.

    2011-01-01

    Parametric simulations with a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model are used to explore the influence of crosswind shear on aircraft wake vortices. Previous studies based on field measurements, laboratory experiments, as well as LES, have shown that the vertical gradient of crosswind shear, i.e. the second vertical derivative of the environmental crosswind, can influence wake vortex transport. The presence of nonlinear vertical shear of the crosswind velocity can reduce the descent rate, causing a wake vortex pair to tilt and change in its lateral separation. The LES parametric studies confirm that the vertical gradient of crosswind shear does influence vortex trajectories. The parametric results also show that vortex decay from the effects of shear are complex since the crosswind shear, along with the vertical gradient of crosswind shear, can affect whether the lateral separation between wake vortices is increased or decreased. If the separation is decreased, the vortex linking time is decreased, and a more rapid decay of wake vortex circulation occurs. If the separation is increased, the time to link is increased, and at least one of the vortices of the vortex pair may have a longer life time than in the case without shear. In some cases, the wake vortices may never link.

  3. Shear alters motility of Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molaei, Mehdi; Jalali, Maryam; Sheng, Jian

    2013-11-01

    Understanding of locomotion of microorganisms in shear flows drew a wide range of interests in microbial related topics such as biological process including pathogenic infection and biophysical interactions like biofilm formation on engineering surfaces. We employed microfluidics and digital holography microscopy to study motility of E. coli in shear flows. We controlled the shear flow in three different shear rates: 0.28 s-1, 2.8 s-1, and 28 s-1 in a straight channel with the depth of 200 μm. Magnified holograms, recorded at 15 fps with a CCD camera over more than 20 minutes, are analyzed to obtain 3D swimming trajectories and subsequently used to extract shear responses of E.coli. Thousands of 3-D bacterial trajectories are tracked. The change of bacteria swimming characteristics including swimming velocity, reorientation, and dispersion coefficient are computed directly for individual trajectory and ensemble averaged over thousands of realizations. The results show that shear suppresses the bacterial dispersions in bulk but promote dispersions near the surface contrary to those in quiescent flow condition. Ongoing analyses are focusing to quantify effect of shear rates on tumbling frequency and reorientation of cell body, and its implication in locating the hydrodynamic mechanisms for shear enhanced angular scattering. NIH, NSF, GoMRI.

  4. Effect of initial stress on propagation behaviors of shear horizontal waves in piezoelectric/piezomagnetic layered cylinders.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X; Qian, Z H; Zhang, S; Liu, J X

    2015-12-01

    An analytical approach is taken to investigate shear horizontal wave (SH wave) propagation in layered cylinder with initial stress, where a piezomagnetic (PM) material thin layer is bonded to a piezoelectric (PE) cylinder. Two different material combinations are taken into account, and the phase velocities of the SH waves are numerically calculated for the magnetically open and short cases, respectively. It is found that the initial stress, the thickness ratio and the material performance have a great influence on the phase velocity. The results obtained in this paper can offer fundamental significance to the application of PE/PM composite media or structure for the acoustic wave and microwave technologies.

  5. Dual shear wave induced laser speckle contrast signal and the improvement in shear wave speed measurement

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sinan; Cheng, Yi; Eckersley, Robert J; Elson, Daniel S; Tang, Meng-Xing

    2015-01-01

    Shear wave speed is quantitatively related to tissue viscoelasticity. Previously we reported shear wave tracking at centimetre depths in a turbid optical medium using laser speckle contrast detection. Shear wave progression modulates displacement of optical scatterers and therefore modulates photon phase and changes the laser speckle patterns. Time-resolved charge-coupled device (CCD)-based speckle contrast analysis was used to track shear waves and measure the time-of-flight of shear waves for speed measurement. In this manuscript, we report a new observation of the laser speckle contrast difference signal for dual shear waves. A modulation of CCD speckle contrast difference was observed and simulation reproduces the modulation pattern, suggesting its origin. Both experimental and simulation results show that the dual shear wave approach generates an improved definition of temporal features in the time-of-flight optical signal and an improved signal to noise ratio with a standard deviation less than 50% that of individual shear waves. Results also show that dual shear waves can correct the bias of shear wave speed measurement caused by shear wave reflections from elastic boundaries. PMID:26114021

  6. Inter-laboratory comparison of wave velocity measures.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waite, William F.; Santamarina, J.C.; Rydzy, M.; Chong, S.H.; Grozic, J.L.H.; Hester, K.; Howard, J.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Lee, J.Y.; Nakagawa, S.; Priest, J.; Reese, E.; Koh, H.; Sloan, E.D.; Sultaniya, A.

    2011-01-01

     This paper presents an eight-laboratory comparison of compressional and shear wave velocities measured in F110 Ottawa sand. The study was run to quantify the physical property variations one should expect in heterogeneous, multiphase porous materials by separately quantifying the variability inherent in the measurement techniques themselves. Comparative tests were run in which the sand was dry, water-saturated, partially water-saturated, partially ice-saturated and partially hydrate-saturated. Each test illustrates a collection of effects that can be classified as inducing either specimen-based or measurement-based variability. The most significant variability is due to void ratio variations between samples. Heterogeneous pore-fill distributions and differences in measurement techniques also contribute to the observed variability, underscoring the need to provide detailed sample preparation and system calibration information when reporting wave velocities in porous media. 

  7. Annular shear of cohesionless granular materials: From the inertial to quasistatic regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koval, Georg; Roux, Jean-Noël; Corfdir, Alain; Chevoir, François

    2009-02-01

    Using discrete simulations, we investigate the behavior of a model granular material within an annular shear cell. Specifically, two-dimensional assemblies of disks are placed between two circular walls, the inner one rotating with prescribed angular velocity, while the outer one may expand or shrink and maintains a constant radial pressure. Focusing on steady state flows, we delineate in parameter space the range of applicability of the recently introduced constitutive laws for sheared granular materials (based on the inertial number). We discuss the two origins of the stronger strain rates observed near the inner boundary, the vicinity of the wall and the heteregeneous stress field in a Couette cell. Above a certain velocity, an inertial region develops near the inner wall, to which the known constitutive laws apply, with suitable corrections due to wall slip, for small enough stress gradients. Away from the inner wall, slow, apparently unbounded creep takes place in the nominally solid material, although its density and shear to normal stress ratio are on the jammed side of the critical values. In addition to rheological characterizations, our simulations provide microscopic information on the contact network and velocity fluctuations that is potentially useful to assess theoretical approaches.

  8. Percolation velocity dependence on local concentration in bidisperse granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Ryan P.; Xiao, Hongyi; Deng, Zhekai; Umbanhowar, Paul B.; Lueptow, Richard M.

    The percolation velocity, up, of granular material in size or density bidisperse mixtures depends on the local concentration, particle size ratio, particle density ratio, and shear rate, γ ˙. Discrete element method computational results were obtained for bounded heap flows with size ratios between 1 and 3 and for density ratios between 1 and 4. The results indicate that small particles percolate downward faster when surrounded by large particles than large particles percolate upward when surrounded by small particles, as was recently observed in shear-box experiments. Likewise, heavy particles percolate downward faster when surrounded by light particles than light particles percolate upward when surrounded by heavy particles. The dependence of up / γ ˙ on local concentration results in larger percolation flux magnitudes at high concentrations of large (or light) particles compared to high concentrations of small (or heavy) particles, while local volumetric flux is conserved. The dependence of up / γ ˙ on local concentration can be incorporated into a continuum model, but the impact on global segregation patterns is usually minimal. Partially funded by Dow Chemical Company and NSF Grant No. CBET-1511450.

  9. Local transport barrier formation and relaxation in reverse-shear plasmas on the TFTR tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Synakowski, E.J.; Beer, M.A.; Batha, S.H.

    1997-02-01

    The roles of turbulence stabilization by sheared E x B flow and Shafranov-shift gradients are examined for TFTR. Enhanced Reverse-Shear plasmas. Both effects in combination provide the basis of a positive-feedback model that predicts reinforced turbulence suppression with increasing pressure gradient. Local fluctuation behavior at the onset of ERS confinement is consistent with this framework. The power required for transitions into the ERS regime are lower when high power neutral beams are applied earlier in the current profile evolution, consistent with the suggestion that both effects play a role. Separation of the roles of E x B and Shafranov shift effects was performed by varying the E x B shear through changes in the toroidal velocity with nearly-steady-state pressure profiles. Transport and fluctuation levels increase only when E x B shearing rates are driven below a critical value that is comparable to the fastest linear growth rates of the dominant instabilities. While a turbulence suppression criterion that involves the ratio of shearing to linear growth rates is in accord with many of these results, the existence of hidden dependencies of the criterion is suggested in experiments where the toroidal field was varied. The forward transition into the ERS regime has also been examined in strongly rotating plasmas. The power threshold is higher with unidirectional injection than with balanced injection.

  10. The Use of Shear-Thinning Fluids as "Smart" Tracers to Infer Fracture Network Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roques, C.; Selker, J. S.; Le Borgne, T.; Meheust, Y.; Abou Najm, M.; Rochefort, W. E.; Davy, P.; Bour, O.; Loiseau, M.; Givens, S.; Herring, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    The identification of preferential flow paths, their connectivity and their hydraulic properties in fractured rocks is critical for fluid flow and solute transport. Classical hydraulic tests allow defining a mean effective aperture based on simplified fracture models. Here we study the potential of using shear-thinning fluids as "smart" tracers to infer the distribution of fracture hydraulic properties. The main hypothesis considers that the flow of a shear-thinning fluid will sample specific pathways of the network as the fluid presents more viscous-shear behaviors. The flow field distribution of shear-thinning fluids in a 2D parallel fracture is first investigated numerically by implementing a viscous-shear model on classical flow equations. The relationship between fracture aperture and the degree of the flow enhancement due to the thinning behavior is quantified - given by the ratio between the non-Newtonian fluid average velocity and its corresponding Newtonian fluid at viscosity. A dimensionless solution describing the flow enhancement with respect to fracture aperture is derived from the theory. We also examine the impact of multiple fracture setups on the flow field redistribution in radial flow condition. Two main fracture configurations that can be found in a real network are considered: fractures organized in series and in parallel. We describe different flow enhancement behaviors controlled by the power exponent of the fluid and the fracture geometry. In perspective, some first experimental results are introduced that will guide the development of an inverse modelling framework.

  11. Dynamic shear deformation in high purity Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Cerreta, Ellen K; Bingert, John F; Trujillo, Carl P; Lopez, Mike F; Gray, George T

    2009-01-01

    The forced shear test specimen, first developed by Meyer et al. [Meyer L. et al., Critical Adiabatic Shear Strength of Low Alloyed Steel Under Compressive Loading, Metallurgical Applications of Shock Wave and High Strain Rate Phenomena (Marcel Decker, 1986), 657; Hartmann K. et al., Metallurgical Effects on Impact Loaded Materials, Shock Waves and High Strain rate Phenomena in Metals (Plenum, 1981), 325-337.], has been utilized in a number of studies. While the geometry of this specimen does not allow for the microstructure to exactly define the location of shear band formation and the overall mechanical response of a specimen is highly sensitive to the geometry utilized, the forced shear specimen is useful for characterizing the influence of parameters such as strain rate, temperature, strain, and load on the microstructural evolution within a shear band. Additionally, many studies have utilized this geometry to advance the understanding of shear band development. In this study, by varying the geometry, specifically the ratio of the inner hole to the outer hat diameter, the dynamic shear localization response of high purity Fe was examined. Post mortem characterization was performed to quantify the width of the localizations and examine the microstructural and textural evolution of shear deformation in a bcc metal. Increased instability in mechanical response is strongly linked with development of enhanced intergranular misorientations, high angle boundaries, and classical shear textures characterized through orientation distribution functions.

  12. Acoustic bed velocity and bed load dynamics in a large sand bed river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaeuman, D.; Jacobson, R.B.

    2006-01-01

    Development of a practical technology for rapid quantification of bed load transport in large rivers would represent a revolutionary advance for sediment monitoring and the investigation of fluvial dynamics. Measurement of bed load motion with acoustic Doppler current profiles (ADCPs) has emerged as a promising approach for evaluating bed load transport. However, a better understanding of how ADCP data relate to conditions near the stream bed is necessary to make the method practical for quantitative applications. In this paper, we discuss the response of ADCP bed velocity measurements, defined as the near-bed sediment velocity detected by the instrument's bottom-tracking feature, to changing sediment-transporting conditions in the lower Missouri River. Bed velocity represents a weighted average of backscatter from moving bed load particles and spectral reflections from the immobile bed. The ratio of bed velocity to mean bed load particle velocity depends on the concentration of the particles moving in the bed load layer, the bed load layer thickness, and the backscatter strength from a unit area of moving particles relative to the echo strength from a unit area of unobstructed bed. A model based on existing bed load transport theory predicted measured bed velocities from hydraulic and grain size measurements with reasonable success. Bed velocities become more variable and increase more rapidly with shear stress when the transport stage, defined as the ratio of skin friction to the critical shear stress for particle entrainment, exceeds a threshold of about 17. This transition in bed velocity response appears to be associated with the appearance of longer, flatter bed forms at high transport stages.

  13. Coherent structures and turbulent molecular mixing in gaseous planar shear layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, T. R.; Dutton, J. C.; Lucht, R. P.

    2006-07-01

    Quantitative planar visualization of molecular mixing dynamics in large- and intermediate-scale coherent structures is reported for the first time in the developing and far-field regions of gaseous planar shear layers. A dual-tracer (nitric oxide and acetone) planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) technique is implemented as the gaseous analogue to acid/base chemical reactions that have previously been used to study molecular mixing in liquid shear layers. Data on low-speed, high-speed, and total molecularly mixed fluid fractions are collected for low- to high-speed velocity ratios from 0.25 to 0.44 and Reynolds numbers, Re_{delta}, from 18 600 to 103 000. Within this range of conditions, mixed-fluid probability density functions and ensemble-averaged statistics are highly influenced by the homogenizing effect of large-scale Kelvin Helmholtz rollers and the competing action of intermediate-scale secondary instabilities. Small-scale turbulence leads to near-unity mixing efficiencies and mixed-fluid probabilities within the shear layer, with subresolution stirring being detected primarily along the interface with free-stream fluid. Current molecular-mixing data compare favourably with previous time-averaged probe-based measurements while providing new insight on the effects of coherent structures, velocity ratio, downstream distance, and differences between low- and high-speed fluid entrainment.

  14. Elastic instabilities in parallel shear flows of a viscoelastic shear-thinning liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, R. J.

    2016-08-01

    We report the results of an experimental study of the fully developed flow of a viscoelastic, shear-thinning aqueous polymer solution through two large-scale parallel shear flows: a pipe and channel-flow facility. We show that, at low flow rates, the velocity profile in both geometries is steady and is in good agreement with expected analytical solutions. However, in both geometries at higher flow rates the flow becomes weakly time dependent and the mean velocity profile is radically altered, exhibiting an overshoot near the duct center, a reduced shear rate at the wall, and an inflection point (i.e., a nonmonotonic gradient). Although inertia is not completely negligible at instability onset, we speculate that the origin of these unstable flows lies in the combination of elasticity and strong shear thinning.

  15. Ultrasonic characterization of shear thickening suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Benjamin Lenihan

    This dissertation describes the characterization of an inherently inhomogeneous medium capable of shear thickening. An aqueous suspension of cornstarch represents an important exemplar of such physical systems. The physics underlying the behavior of such shear thickening suspensions is incompletely understood. Characterization of these suspensions may provide valuable clues into the underlying mechanisms that result in shear thickening behavior. The goal of this thesis is to characterize the acoustic properties of suspensions of cornstarch in density-matched cesium chloride aqueous solutions. A review of the literature indicated that almost no information concerning the ultrasonic characteristics of suspensions of starches had been reported other than studies monitoring the gelatinization of starches not relevant to the shear stiffening of ungelatinized suspensions. Each chapter began with a discussion and validation of the specific experimental techniques and methods of analysis necessary for each type of measurement. Ultrasonic measurement of the group velocity, the frequency-dependent attenuation properties, the frequency-dependent phase velocity, and the frequency-dependent backscatter properties of the suspensions of cornstarch are reported. Initially counterintuitive results including negative (phase velocity) dispersion and a decrease in the measured backscatter coefficient with increasing particle concentration are understood in terms of widely accepted physical models. In sum, these studies represent an advancement of the understanding of the physics underlying the interaction between ultrasound and suspensions and lay the groundwork for future studies probing the physics of the shear thickening.

  16. Vesicle dynamics in shear and capillary flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi; Gompper, Gerhard

    2005-11-01

    The deformation of vesicles in flow is studied by a mesoscopic simulation technique, which combines multi-particle collision dynamics for the solvent with a dynamically triangulated surface model for the membrane. Shape transitions are investigated both in simple shear flows and in cylindrical capillary flows. We focus on reduced volumes, where the discocyte shape of fluid vesicles is stable, and the prolate shape is metastable. In simple shear flow at low membrane viscosity, the shear induces a transformation from discocyte to prolate with increasing shear rate, while at high membrane viscosity, the shear induces a transformation from prolate to discocyte, or tumbling motion accompanied by oscillations between these two morphologies. In capillary flow, at small flow velocities the symmetry axis of the discocyte is found not to be oriented perpendicular to the cylinder axis. With increasing flow velocity, a transition to a prolate shape occurs for fluid vesicles, while vesicles with shear-elastic membranes (like red blood cells) transform into a coaxial parachute-like shape.

  17. Quantification of ultrasound correlation-based flow velocity mapping and edge velocity gradient measurement.

    PubMed

    Park, Dae Woo; Kruger, Grant H; Rubin, Jonathan M; Hamilton, James; Gottschalk, Paul; Dodde, Robert E; Shih, Albert J; Weitzel, William F

    2013-10-01

    This study investigated the use of ultrasound speckle decorrelation- and correlation-based lateral speckle-tracking methods for transverse and longitudinal blood velocity profile measurement, respectively. By studying the blood velocity gradient at the vessel wall, vascular wall shear stress, which is important in vascular physiology as well as the pathophysiologic mechanisms of vascular diseases, can be obtained. Decorrelation-based blood velocity profile measurement transverse to the flow direction is a novel approach, which provides advantages for vascular wall shear stress measurement over longitudinal blood velocity measurement methods. Blood flow velocity profiles are obtained from measurements of frame-to-frame decorrelation. In this research, both decorrelation and lateral speckle-tracking flow estimation methods were compared with Poiseuille theory over physiologic flows ranging from 50 to 1000 mm/s. The decorrelation flow velocity measurement method demonstrated more accurate prediction of the flow velocity gradient at the wall edge than the correlation-based lateral speckle-tracking method. The novelty of this study is that speckle decorrelation-based flow velocity measurements determine the blood velocity across a vessel. In addition, speckle decorrelation-based flow velocity measurements have higher axial spatial resolution than Doppler ultrasound measurements to enable more accurate measurement of blood velocity near a vessel wall and determine the physiologically important wall shear.

  18. Constraining density and velocity jumps across the 410 km discontinuity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saki, Morvarid; Thomas, Christine; Cobden, Laura; Abreu, Rafael

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the velocity and density structure of the olivine-to-wadsleyite transition using polarities of precursor arrivals to PP seismic waves that reflect off the 410 km discontinuity beneath the Northern Atlantic. Numerous source-receiver combinations have been used in order to collect a dataset of reflection points beneath our investigation area. We analyzed over 1700 seismograms from Mw > 5.8 using array seismology methods to enhance the signal to noise ratio. For each event the polarity of the PP phase is compared to polarity of the precursor signal and we find several events where the polarity of the precursors are opposite to that of PP. There does not seem to be any dependency of the observed polarities on the propagation direction of the seismic waves but interestingly there seems to be a dependency on the distance between source and receiver. The events with epicentral distances greater than 119 degrees mostly show opposite polarities, while for those with smaller epicentral distances the same polarity of the main phase and precursor signal is dominant. Using Zeoppritz equations, we analyzed more than 64 million combinations of density, compressional and shear wave velocities for both layers, above and below the 410 km discontinuity in order to find the best combination of those parameters that can explain the observations. The results are indicating combinations of density, P and S wave velocity exhibiting a smaller contrast compared to those from the pyrolite model (the density jump, however is still positive to provide physically meaningful results). The calculated reductions in both compressional and shear wave velocities go up to 13% but mostly fall within the range of less than 7- 8%. We interpret this reduction in elastic properties and seismic velocity of minerals as the effect of a higher than normal content of water of wadsleyite in this region, while we can exclude a reduction in iron.

  19. Development of a System to Measure Recrystallization Ratio of Plate Steel Using Laser-Based Ultrasonics

    SciTech Connect

    Nagata, Y.; Yamada, H.; Hamada, N.; Lim, C. S.; Yi, J. K.; Hong, S. T.; Choi, S. G.; Oh, K. J.

    2007-03-21

    In this study, a material property measurement system of plate steel using laser-based ultrasonics has been developed. The system consists of pulsed Nd:YAG laser for ultrasonic generation, CW single frequency laser and Fabry-Perot interferometer for ultrasonic detection. The system generates and detects shear waves and precisely calculates anisotropy parameter values of shear wave velocities of test samples. At first, the relationship between anisotropy parameter and recrystallization ratio was investigated in the laboratory experiments. Quenching the test samples just after the ultrasonic measurement, recrystallization ratio values were measured by the conventional microscopic method. According to the experimental results, the anisotropy parameter values showed a good correlation with actual recrystallization ratio values. To evaluate the applicability of the system to real steel production line, the system was installed in hot rolling pilot plant of plate steel. As the results, it was demonstrated that the system could measure the recrystallization ratio using the anisotropy parameter values of shear wave velocities, even in the environment of hot rolling pilot plant.

  20. Reduced shear power spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Dodelson, Scott; Shapiro, Charles; White, Martin J.; /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /UC, Berkeley

    2005-08-01

    Measurements of ellipticities of background galaxies are sensitive to the reduced shear, the cosmic shear divided by (1-{kappa}) where {kappa} is the projected density field. They compute the difference between shear and reduced shear both analytically and with simulations. The difference becomes more important an smaller scales, and will impact cosmological parameter estimation from upcoming experiments. A simple recipe is presented to carry out the required correction.

  1. Dynamic modes of red blood cells in oscillatory shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2010-06-01

    The dynamics of red blood cells (RBCs) in oscillatory shear flow was studied using differential equations of three variables: a shape parameter, the inclination angle θ , and phase angle ϕ of the membrane rotation. In steady shear flow, three types of dynamics occur depending on the shear rate and viscosity ratio. (i) tank-treading (TT): ϕ rotates while the shape and θ oscillate. (ii) tumbling (TB): θ rotates while the shape and ϕ oscillate. (iii) intermediate motion: both ϕ and θ rotate synchronously or intermittently. In oscillatory shear flow, RBCs show various dynamics based on these three motions. For a low shear frequency with zero mean shear rate, a limit-cycle oscillation occurs, based on the TT or TB rotation at a high or low shear amplitude, respectively. This TT-based oscillation well explains recent experiments. In the middle shear amplitude, RBCs show an intermittent or synchronized oscillation. As shear frequency increases, the vesicle oscillation becomes delayed with respect to the shear oscillation. At a high frequency, multiple limit-cycle oscillations coexist. The thermal fluctuations can induce transitions between two orbits at very low shear amplitudes. For a high mean shear rate with small shear oscillation, the shape and θ oscillate in the TT motion but only one attractor exists even at high shear frequencies. The measurement of these oscillatory modes is a promising tool for quantifying the viscoelasticity of RBCs, synthetic capsules, and lipid vesicles.

  2. Rotatable shear plate interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Duffus, Richard C.

    1988-01-01

    A rotatable shear plate interferometer comprises a transparent shear plate mounted obliquely in a tubular supporting member at 45.degree. with respect to its horizontal center axis. This tubular supporting member is supported rotatably around its center axis and a collimated laser beam is made incident on the shear plate along this center axis such that defocus in different directions can be easily measured.

  3. Forced vibrations of a layer of a viscoelastic material under the action of a convective wave of shear stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulik, V. M.

    2014-11-01

    A two-dimensional problem of deformation of a layer of a viscoelastic material glued to a solid base by a traveling wave of shear stress is solved. Analytical expressions for two shear compliance components corresponding to two surface displacement components are obtained. It is shown that the dimensionless compliance components depend only on the viscoelastic properties of the material, the ratio of the wavelength to the layer thickness λ/H, and the ratio of the wave velocity to the propagation rate of shear vibrations V/C {/t 0}. Data on the dynamic compliance in the ranges 0.2 < λ/H < 60.0 and 0.2 < V/C {/t 0} < 5.0 are given. It is established that, in the range 1.5 < λ/H < 5.0, the normal component of the shear compliance decreases sharply. Diagrams of the phase shift of the displacement components relative to the phases of the applied oscillatory shear stresses and diagrams of displacements and shifts of their phases over the thickness of the viscoelastic layer are presented.

  4. Localization of toroidal motion and shear heating in 3-D high Rayleigh number convection with temperature-dependent viscosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balachandar, S.; Yuen, D. A.; Reuteler, D. M.

    1995-01-01

    We have applied spectral-transform methods to study three-dimensional thermal convection with temperature-dependent viscosity. The viscosity varies exponentially with the form exp(-BT), where B controls the viscosity contrast and T is temperature. Solutions for high Rayleigh numbers, up to an effective Ra of 6.25 x 10(exp 6), have been obtained for an aspect-ratio of 5x5x1 and a viscosity contrast of 25. Solutions show the localization of toroidal velocity fields with increasing vigor of convection to a coherent network of shear-zones. Viscous dissipation increases with Rayleigh number and is particularly strong in regions of convergent flows and shear deformation. A time-varying depth-dependent mean-flow is generated because of the correlation between laterally varying viscosity and velocity gradients.

  5. Seismic Velocities Contain Information About Depth, Lithology, Fluid Content, and Microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Berge, P A; Bonner, B P

    2002-01-03

    Recent advances in field and laboratory methods for measuring elastic wave velocities provide incentive and opportunity for improving interpretation of geophysical data for engineering and environmental applications. Advancing the state-of-the-art of seismic imaging requires developing petrophysical relationships between measured velocities and the hydrogeology parameters and lithology. Our approach uses laboratory data and rock physics methods. Compressional (Vp) and shear (Vs) wave velocities, Vp/Vs ratios, and relative wave amplitudes show systematic changes related to composition, saturation, applied stress (analogous to depth), and distribution of clay for laboratory ultrasonic measurements on soils. The artificial soils were mixtures of Ottawa sand and a second phase, either Wyoming bentonite or peat moss used to represent clay or organic components found in natural soils. Compressional and shear wave velocities were measured for dry, saturated, and partially-saturated conditions, for applied stresses between about 7 and 100 kPa, representing approximately the top 5 m of the subsurface. Analysis of the results using rock physics methods shows the link between microstructure and wave propagation, and implications for future advances in seismic data interpretation. For example, we found that Vp in dry sand-clay mixtures initially increases as clay cements the sand grains and fills porosity, but then Vp decreases when the clay content is high enough that the clay matrix controls the elastic response of the material. Vs decreases monotonically with increasing clay content. This provides a method for using Vp/Vs ratios to estimate clay content in a dry soil.

  6. Impact response of shear thickening suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Eric; Ozgen, Oktar; Kallmann, Marcelo; Allen, Benjamin

    2013-11-01

    Dense suspensions of hard particles such as cornstarch in water exhibit shear thickening, in which the energy dissipation rate under shear dramatically increases with increasing shear rate. Recent work has established that in steady-state shear this phenomena is a result of a dynamic jamming of the particles in suspension. Several dynamic phenomena observed in such suspensions have long been assumed to be a consequence of this shear thickening; strong impact resistance, the ability of a person to run on the fluid surface, fingering and hole instabilities under vibration, and oscillations in the speed of sinking of an object in the fluid. However, I will present results of experiments consisting of an indenter impacting a dense suspension which demonstrate that the strong impact resistance cannot be explained by existing models for steady-state shear thickening. I will show these dynamic phenomena can be reproduced by graphical simulations based on a minimal phenomenological model in which the fluid has a stiffness with a dependence on velocity history. These and other recent results suggest a need for new models to understand the dynamic phenomena associated with shear thickening fluids.

  7. Velocity field of isolated turbulent puffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaem-Maghami, E.; Johari, H.

    2010-11-01

    The velocity field of isolated turbulent puffs was measured using the particle image velocimetry technique and was compared with the steady jet flow field. Puffs were generated by injecting air through a 5 mm diameter nozzle into a flow chamber with a weak coflow. Isolated puffs with a Reynolds number of 5000 were examined in the range of 40-75 diameters downstream of the nozzle. The injection time was varied in order to assess the effects of injection volume and equivalent stroke ratio on the puff structure. The results from phase-locked measurements indicate that as the injection volume increased, puffs elongated in the axial direction and became similar to starting jets in the range considered. The largest scaled fluctuating velocities and turbulent shear stress within the puffs were twice the steady jet values. Inspection of the vorticity field revealed the presence of vorticity throughout the puff volume. Entrainment takes place on the portion of the puff closest to the nozzle and the entrainment rate is greater for the puffs with the smaller injection volume. This is consistent with the observations of rapid mixing and combustion of puffs in previous studies.

  8. Spatially-resolved microstructure in shear banding wormlike micellar solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Helgeson, Matthew E.; Reichert, Matthew D.; Wagner, Norman J.; Kaler, Eric W.

    2008-07-07

    Recently proposed theories for shear banding in wormlike micellar solutions (WLMs) rely on a shear-induced isotropic-nematic (I-N) phase separation as the mechanism for banding. Critical tests of such theories require spatially-resolved measurements of flow-kinematics and local mesoscale microstructure within the shear bands. We have recently developed such capabilities using a short gap Couette cell for flow-small angle neutron scattering (flow-SANS) measurements in the 1-2 plane of shear with collaborators at the NIST Center for Neutron Research. This work combines flow-SANS measurements with rheology, rheo-optics and velocimetry measurements to present the first complete spatially-resolved study of WLMs through the shear banding transition for a model shear banding WLM solution near the I-N phase boundary. The shear rheology is well-modeled by the Giesekus constitutive equation, with incorporated stress diffusion to predict shear banding. By fitting the stress diffusivity at the onset of banding, the model enables prediction of velocity profiles in the shear banded state which are in quantitative agreement with measured flow-kinematics. Quantitative analysis of the flow-SANS measurements shows a critical segmental alignment for banding and validates the Giesekus model predictions, linking segmental orientation to shear banding and providing the first rigorous evidence for the shear-induced I-N transition mechanism for shear banding.

  9. High Poisson's ratio of Earth's inner core explained by carbon alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prescher, C.; Dubrovinsky, L.; Bykova, E.; Kupenko, I.; Glazyrin, K.; Kantor, A.; McCammon, C.; Mookherjee, M.; Nakajima, Y.; Miyajima, N.; Sinmyo, R.; Cerantola, V.; Dubrovinskaia, N.; Prakapenka, V.; Rüffer, R.; Chumakov, A.; Hanfland, M.

    2015-03-01

    Geochemical, cosmochemical, geophysical, and mineral physics data suggest that iron (or iron-nickel alloy) is the main component of the Earth’s core. The inconsistency between the density of pure iron at pressure and temperature conditions of the Earth’s core and seismological observations can be explained by the presence of light elements. However, the low shear wave velocity and high Poisson’s ratio of the Earth’s core remain enigmatic. Here we experimentally investigate the effect of carbon on the elastic properties of iron at high pressures and temperatures and report a high-pressure orthorhombic phase of iron carbide, Fe7C3. We determined the crystal structure of the material at ambient conditions and investigated its stability and behaviour at pressures up to 205 GPa and temperatures above 3,700 K using single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction, Mössbauer spectroscopy, and nuclear inelastic scattering. Estimated shear wave and compressional wave velocities show that Fe7C3 exhibits a lower shear wave velocity than pure iron and a Poisson’s ratio similar to that of the Earth’s inner core. We suggest that carbon alloying significantly modifies the properties of iron at extreme conditions to approach the elastic behaviour of rubber. Thus, the presence of carbon may explain the anomalous elastic properties of the Earth’s core.

  10. Shear viscosity from effective couplings of gravitons

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Ronggen; Nie Zhangyu; Sun Yawen

    2008-12-15

    We calculate the shear viscosity of field theories with gravity duals using Kubo formula by calculating the Green function of dual transverse gravitons and confirm that the value of the shear viscosity is fully determined by the effective coupling of transverse gravitons on the horizon. We calculate the effective coupling of transverse gravitons for Einstein and Gauss-Bonnet gravities coupled with matter fields, respectively. Then we apply the resulting formula to the case of AdS Gauss-Bonnet gravity with F{sup 4} term corrections of Maxwell field and discuss the effect of F{sup 4} terms on the ratio of the shear viscosity to entropy density.

  11. Study of a liquid-gas mixing layer: Shear instability and size of produced drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marty, Sylvain; Matas, Jean-Philippe; Cartellier, Alain

    2013-01-01

    We study experimentally the atomization of a thick liquid film by a parallel gas flow, in order to understand the conditions of destabilization of the liquid film and the conditions of drop creation. We study in particular the regimes at low M (ratio of gas/liquid dynamic pressures), to test the scaling law proposed and validated in previous studies at large M (M=16). The spatial inviscid stability analysis of the system is carried out with a new velocity profile taking into account the wake of the splitter plate (zero speed at the level of the splitter plate): the influence of liquid velocity on the shear instability frequency turns out to be significantly stronger for this type of velocity profile than for continuous profile. An asymptotic study of the dispersion relation leads to a new scaling law giving the wavenumber of the shear instability as a function of gas velocity Ug, with a corrective term in M. Frequency measurements carried out by a spectral method show a good agreement with this corrected law. We investigate by way of optical probe measurements the size distribution of produced drops downstream. The difficulty of these measurements live in the decrease of the number density flux of drops at low M. Results obtained for the mean chord are consistent with previous studies. Diameter distributions are obtained from chord distributions with a numerical conversion procedure.

  12. In vivo quantification of the shear modulus of the human Achilles tendon during passive loading using shear wave dispersion analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfenstein-Didier, C.; Andrade, R. J.; Brum, J.; Hug, F.; Tanter, M.; Nordez, A.; Gennisson, J.-L.

    2016-03-01

    The shear wave velocity dispersion was analyzed in the Achilles tendon (AT) during passive dorsiflexion using a phase velocity method in order to obtain the tendon shear modulus (C 55). Based on this analysis, the aims of the present study were (i) to assess the reproducibility of the shear modulus for different ankle angles, (ii) to assess the effect of the probe locations, and (iii) to compare results with elasticity values obtained with the supersonic shear imaging (SSI) technique. The AT shear modulus (C 55) consistently increased with the ankle dorsiflexion (N  =  10, p  <  0.05). Furthermore, the technique showed a very good reproducibility (all standard error of the mean values  <10.7 kPa and all coefficient of variation (CV) values  ⩽0.05%). In addition, independently from the ankle dorsiflexion, the shear modulus was significantly higher in the proximal location compared to the more distal one. The shear modulus provided by SSI was always lower than C55 and the difference increased with the ankle dorsiflexion. However, shear modulus values provided by both methods were highly correlated (R  =  0.84), indicating that the conventional shear wave elastography technique (SSI technique) can be used to compare tendon mechanical properties across populations. Future studies should determine the clinical relevance of the shear wave dispersion analysis, for instance in the case of tendinopathy or tendon tear.

  13. Experimental studies of combustion in a two dimensional free shear layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitz, R. W.; Daily, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of combustion on the turbulent free shear layer formed at a rearward facing step has been studied. Schlieren movies confirm the importance of large scale vortices in determining entrainment and mixing behavior. The movies, long exposure schlieren photographs, and laser anemometry velocity profiles are used to observe the spreading rate of the layer and to study the vortex formation process. It is concluded that to first order, the primary effect of combustion is felt through the change in density ratio across the layer and acceleration of the flow due to volumetric expansion of the fluid in a confined duct.

  14. Horns as particle velocity amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Donskoy, Dimitri M; Cray, Benjamin A

    2011-11-01

    Preliminary measurements and numerical predictions reveal that simple, and relatively small, horns generate remarkable amplification of acoustic particle velocity. For example, below 2 kHz, a 2.5 cm conical horn has a uniform velocity amplification ratio (throat-to-mouth) factor of approximately 3, or, in terms of a decibel level, 9.5 dB. It is shown that the velocity amplification factor depends on the horn's mouth-to-throat ratio as well as, though to a lesser degree, the horn's flare rate. A double horn configuration provides limited additional gain, approximately an increase of up to 25%.

  15. Pressure-shear experiments on granular materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhart, William Dodd; Thornhill, Tom Finley, III; Vogler, Tracy John; Alexander, C. Scott

    2011-10-01

    Pressure-shear experiments were performed on granular tungsten carbide and sand using a newly-refurbished slotted barrel gun. The sample is a thin layer of the granular material sandwiched between driver and anvil plates that remain elastic. Because of the obliquity, impact generates both a longitudinal wave, which compresses the sample, and a shear wave that probes the strength of the sample. Laser velocity interferometry is employed to measure the velocity history of the free surface of the anvil. Since the driver and anvil remain elastic, analysis of the results is, in principal, straightforward. Experiments were performed at pressures up to nearly 2 GPa using titanium plates and at higher pressure using zirconium plates. Those done with the titanium plates produced values of shear stress of 0.1-0.2 GPa, with the value increasing with pressure. On the other hand, those experiments conducted with zirconia anvils display results that may be related to slipping at an interface and shear stresses mostly at 0.1 GPa or less. Recovered samples display much greater particle fracture than is observed in planar loading, suggesting that shearing is a very effective mechanism for comminution of the grains.

  16. Characteristic modes and evolution processes of shear-layer vortices in an elevated transverse jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Rong F.; Lan, Jen

    2005-03-01

    Characteristics and evolution processes of the traveling coherent flow structure in the shear layer of an elevated round jet in crossflow are studied experimentally in an open-loop wind tunnel. Streak pictures of the smoke flow patterns illuminated by the laser-light sheet in the median and horizontal planes are recorded with a high speed digital camera. Time histories of the instantaneous velocity of the vortical flows in the shear layer are digitized by a hot-wire anemometer through a high-speed data acquisition system. By analyzing the streak pictures of the smoke flow visualization, five characteristic flow structures, mixing-layer type vortices, backward-rolling vortices, forward-rolling vortices, swing-induced mushroom vortices, and jet-type vortices, are identified in the shear layer evolving from the up-wind edge of the jet exit. The behaviors and mechanisms of the vortical flow structure in the bent shear layer are prominently distinct in different flow regimes. The frequency characteristics, Strouhal number, power-spectrum density functions, autocorrelation coefficient, as well as the time and length scales of the coherent structure and the Lagrangian integral scales are obtained by processing the measured instantaneous velocity data. The Strouhal number is found to decay exponentially with the increase of the jet-to-crossflow momentum flux ratio. The autocorrelation coefficients provide the information for calculating the statistical time scales of the coherent structure and the integral time scales of turbulence fluctuations. The corresponding length scales of the vortical structure and the integral length scales of turbulence in the shear layer are therefore obtained and discussed.

  17. Isokinetic Hamstrings: Quadriceps Ratios in Intercollegiate Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosene, John M.; Fogarty, Tracey D.; Mahaffey, Brian L.

    2001-01-01

    Compared the differences in the concentric hamstrings to quadriceps (H:Q) ratio among athletes in different sports at three velocities. Measurement of H:Q ratio of both knees among male and female college athletes indicated that the H:Q ratio increased as velocity increased. No differences existed for the H:Q ratio for sport or side of body. (SM)

  18. Comment on: ``Influence of inter-granular void ratio on monotonic and cyclic undrained shear response of sandy soils'' by M. Belkhatir, A. Arab, H. Missoum, T. Schanz [C. R. Mecanique 338 (2010) 290-303

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Md. Mizanur

    2011-01-01

    The authors should be commended for their interesting experimental work on sandy soils presented in Belkhatir et al. (2010) [1]. They used the inter-granular void ratio, e, to interpret the experimental results and developed some useful correlations with e. However, the Note fails to address the further development of e over a decade to a more generalized form of equivalent granular void ratio, e. This comment aims at adding missing literature on e and presents a re-interpretation of the experimental data based on e. The advantages of using e over e are significant and explained in subsequent sections.

  19. Brownian-dynamics simulation studies of a charge-stabilized colloidal suspension under shear flow

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, J. ); Sood, A.K.; Krishnamurthy, H.R. Jawaharlal Nehru Center for Advanced Scientific Research, Indian Institute of Science campus, Bangalore 560012 )

    1994-11-01

    We have carried out Brownian-dynamics simulations of a charged colloidal suspension under oscillatory shear flow with both Couette and Poiseuille velocity profiles. We show that in the steady-shear'' limit, for both of the velocity profiles, the enhancement of the self-diffusion coefficient in directions transverse to the flow shows a crossover from a [dot [gamma

  20. Shear wave elastography with a new reliability indicator

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive methods for liver stiffness assessment have been introduced over recent years. Of these, two main methods for estimating liver fibrosis using ultrasound elastography have become established in clinical practice: shear wave elastography and quasi-static or strain elastography. Shear waves are waves with a motion perpendicular (lateral) to the direction of the generating force. Shear waves travel relatively slowly (between 1 and 10 m/s). The stiffness of the liver tissue can be assessed based on shear wave velocity (the stiffness increases with the speed). The European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology has published Guidelines and Recommendations that describe these technologies and provide recommendations for their clinical use. Most of the data available to date has been published using the Fibroscan (Echosens, France), point shear wave speed measurement using an acoustic radiation force impulse (Siemens, Germany) and 2D shear wave elastography using the Aixplorer (SuperSonic Imagine, France). More recently, also other manufacturers have introduced shear wave elastography technology into the market. A comparison of data obtained using different techniques for shear wave propagation and velocity measurement is of key interest for future studies, recommendations and guidelines. Here, we present a recently introduced shear wave elastography technology from Hitachi and discuss its reproducibility and comparability to the already established technologies. PMID:27679731

  1. Shear wave elastography with a new reliability indicator.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Christoph F; Dong, Yi

    2016-09-01

    Non-invasive methods for liver stiffness assessment have been introduced over recent years. Of these, two main methods for estimating liver fibrosis using ultrasound elastography have become established in clinical practice: shear wave elastography and quasi-static or strain elastography. Shear waves are waves with a motion perpendicular (lateral) to the direction of the generating force. Shear waves travel relatively slowly (between 1 and 10 m/s). The stiffness of the liver tissue can be assessed based on shear wave velocity (the stiffness increases with the speed). The European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology has published Guidelines and Recommendations that describe these technologies and provide recommendations for their clinical use. Most of the data available to date has been published using the Fibroscan (Echosens, France), point shear wave speed measurement using an acoustic radiation force impulse (Siemens, Germany) and 2D shear wave elastography using the Aixplorer (SuperSonic Imagine, France). More recently, also other manufacturers have introduced shear wave elastography technology into the market. A comparison of data obtained using different techniques for shear wave propagation and velocity measurement is of key interest for future studies, recommendations and guidelines. Here, we present a recently introduced shear wave elastography technology from Hitachi and discuss its reproducibility and comparability to the already established technologies. PMID:27679731

  2. Shear wave elastography with a new reliability indicator

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive methods for liver stiffness assessment have been introduced over recent years. Of these, two main methods for estimating liver fibrosis using ultrasound elastography have become established in clinical practice: shear wave elastography and quasi-static or strain elastography. Shear waves are waves with a motion perpendicular (lateral) to the direction of the generating force. Shear waves travel relatively slowly (between 1 and 10 m/s). The stiffness of the liver tissue can be assessed based on shear wave velocity (the stiffness increases with the speed). The European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology has published Guidelines and Recommendations that describe these technologies and provide recommendations for their clinical use. Most of the data available to date has been published using the Fibroscan (Echosens, France), point shear wave speed measurement using an acoustic radiation force impulse (Siemens, Germany) and 2D shear wave elastography using the Aixplorer (SuperSonic Imagine, France). More recently, also other manufacturers have introduced shear wave elastography technology into the market. A comparison of data obtained using different techniques for shear wave propagation and velocity measurement is of key interest for future