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Sample records for shergottites dar al

  1. Exposure History of Shergottites Dar Al Gani 476/489/670/735 and Sayh Al Uhaymir 005

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiizumi, N.; Caffee, M.; Jull, A.J.T.; Klandrud, S.E.

    2001-04-01

    Four basaltic shergottites, Dar al Gani (DaG) 476, 489, 670, and 735 were found in the Libyan Sahara [1-3]; two basaltic shergottites, Sayh al Uhaymir (SaU) 005 and 008 were found in Oman [4]. Recently SaU 051 was also recognized as a possible pair of SaU 005/008. Although the collection sites were different, the texture, bulk chemical compositions, and noble gas compositions of these shergottites are similar [e.g. 4]. However, cosmic-ray-produced noble gases alone cannot unambiguously constrain the irradiation history for these objects. From a combination of cosmogenic stable- and radionuclides, exposure histories, and ejection conditions from the hypothesized Martian parent body, and genetic relationships between the Martian meteorites can be determined. In addition to those nuclides produced by galactic cosmic rays (GCR) are those produced by solar cosmic rays (SCR). Radionuclides produced by SCRs reside in the uppermost few centimeters of extraterrestrial bodies and their presence in meteorites indicates the degree to which a meteorite has been ablated. Previous work shows ablation is less than 1-2 cm in at least three shergottites, ALH 77005, Shergotty, and EETA79001 [e.g. 5] and so it is possible some SCR signal may be observed in these meteorites. This suggests that the atmospheric entry velocity and/or entry angle of these shergottites is much lower than the velocity and/or entry angle of most ordinary chondrites. We report here preliminary results of cosmogenic nuclides, {sup 14}C (half-life = 5,730 yr), {sup 36}Cl (3.01 x 10{sup 5} yr), {sup 26}Al (7.05 x 10{sup 5} yr), and {sup 10}Be(1.5 x 10{sup 6} yr).

  2. Shear-induced ringwoodite formation in the Martian shergottite Dar al Gani 670

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greshake, Ansgar; Fritz, Jörg; Böttger, Ute; Goran, Daniel

    2013-08-01

    Shock-produced melt veins in the Martian shergottite Dar al Gani 670 crosscut large olivine crystals. The upper part of one of these crystals appears to be sheared off and displaced along the shock vein. From the olivine-vein interface small lamellae of ringwoodite grow into the host crystal. The ≤1-3 μm wide and up to 20 μm long lamellae consist of small bands and blocks and are orientated along specific crystallographic orientations. Texture and composition, i.e., more Fe-rich than the host olivine, indicate that lamellae formed via incoherent diffusion-controlled growth. It is suggested that a combination of high particle velocities and shock-induced defects lead to enhanced diffusion rates. In addition, shearing caused grain size reduction allowing rapid Fe-Mg interchange and induced lattice defects serving as nucleation sites for ringwoodite. Crystallographic orientation of ringwoodite lamellae indicates that during shock deformation the [001]{hk0} slip system was activated in olivine. Natural high-pressure phases in Martian meteorite allow to constrain phase transitions taking place in the inaccessible Earth's mantle. High-pressure shear instabilities of olivine at subduction zones in 400-700 km depth are considered being responsible for deep earthquakes. At such p-T-conditions, breakdown of olivine results in formation of ringwoodite filled micro-anticracks which interact with each other finally leading to catastrophic shear failure. Our results strongly suggest that shearing itself contributes to a runaway process of enhanced ringwoodite formation and, thus, reinforces catastrophic material failure that may result in deep earthquakes.

  3. Martian meteorite Dhofar 019: A new shergottite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, L. A.; Nazarov, M. A.; Shearer, C. K.; McSween, H. Y., Jr.; Cahill, J.; Neal, C. R.; Ivanova, M. A.; Barsukova, L. D.; Lentz, R. C.; Clayton, R. N.; Mayeda, T. K.

    2002-08-01

    Dhofar 019 is a new martian meteorite found in the desert of Oman. In texture, mineralogy, and major and trace element chemistry, this meteorite is classified as a basaltic shergottite. Olivine megacrysts are set within a groundmass composed of finer grained olivine, pyroxene (pigeonite and augite), and maskelynite. Minor phases are chromite-ulvöspinel, ilmenite, silica, K-rich feldspar, merrillite, chlorapatite, and pyrrhotite. Secondary phases of terrestrial origin include calcite, gypsum, celestite, Fe hydroxides, and smectite. Dhofar 019 is most similar to the Elephant Moraine (EETA) 79001 lithology A and Dar al Gani (DaG) 476/489 shergottites. The main features that distinguish Dhofar 019 from other shergottites are lack of orthopyroxene; lower Ni contents of olivine; the heaviest oxygen-isotopic bulk composition; and larger compositional ranges for olivine, maskelynite, and spinel, as well as a wide range for pyroxenes. The large compositional ranges of the minerals are indicative of relatively rapid crystallization. Modeling of olivine chemical zonations yield minimum cooling rates of 0.5-0.8 ?C/h. Spinel chemistry suggests that crystallization took place under one of the most reduced conditions for martian meteorites, at an oxygen fugacity of 3 log units below the quartz-fayalite-magnetite (QFM) buffer. The olivine megacrysts are heterogeneously distributed in the rock. Crystal size distribution analysis suggests that they constitute a population formed under steady-state conditions of nucleation and growth, although a few grains may be cumulates. The parent melt is thought to have been derived from partial melting of a light rare earth element- and platinum group element-depleted mantle source. Shergottites, EETA79001 lithology A, DaG 476/489, and Dhofar 019, although of different ages, comprise a particular type of martian rocks. Such rocks could have formed from chemically similar source(s) and parent melt(s), with their bulk compositions affected by

  4. Crystallization kinetics of olivine-phyric shergottites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ennis, Megan E.; McSween, Harry Y.

    2014-08-01

    Crystal size distribution (CSD) and spatial distribution pattern (SDP) analyses are applied to the early crystallizing phases, olivine and pyroxene, in olivine-phyric shergottites (Elephant moraine [EET] 79001A, Dar al Gani [DaG] 476, and dhofar [Dho] 019) from each sampling locality inferred from Mars ejection ages. Trace element zonation patterns (P and Cr) in olivine are also used to characterize the crystallization history of these Martian basalts. Previously reported 2-D CSDs for these meteorites are re-evaluated using a newer stereographically corrected methodology. Kinks in the olivine CSD plots suggest several populations that crystallized under different conditions. CSDs for pyroxene in DaG 476 and EET 79001A reveal single populations that grew under steady-state conditions; pyroxenes in Dho 019 were too intergrown for CSD analysis. Magma chamber residence times of several days for small grains to several months for olivine megacrysts are calculated using the CSD slopes and growth rates inferred from previous experimental data. Phosphorus imaging in olivines in DaG 476 and Dho 019 indicate rapid growth of skeletal, sector-zoned, or patchy cores, probably in response to delayed nucleation, followed by slow growth, and finally rapid dendritic growth with back-filling to form oscillatory zoning in rims. SPD analyses indicate that olivine and pyroxene crystals grew or accumulated in clusters rather than as randomly distributed grains. These data reveal complex solidification histories for Martian basalts, and are generally consistent with the formation at depth of olivine megacryst cores, which were entrained in ascending magmas that crystallized pyroxenes, small olivines, and oscillatory rims on megacrysts.

  5. Petrology, chemistry, and isotopic compositions of the Lunar highland regolith breccia Dar AL Gani 262

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischoff, A.; Weber, D.; Clayton, R. N.; Faestermann, T.; Franchi, I. A.; Herpers, U.; Knie, K.; Korschinek, G.; Kubik, P. W.; Mayeda, T. K.; Merchel, S.; Michel, R.; Neumann, S.; Palme, H.; Pillinger, C. T.; Schultz, L.; Sexton, A. S.; Spettel, B.; Verchovsky, A. B.; Weber, H. W.; Weckwerth, G.; Wolf, D.

    1998-11-01

    Lunar meteorite Dar al Gani 262 (DG 262) found in the Libyan part of the Sahara is a mature, anorthositic regolith breccia with highland affinities. The origin from the Moon is undoubtedly indicated by its bulk chemical composition, radionuclide concentrations, noble gas, nitrogen, and oxygen isotopic compositions and petrographic features. Dar al Gani 262 is a typical anorthositic highland breccia similar in mineralogy and chemical composition to QUE93069. About 52 vol% of the studied thin sections of Dar al Gani 262 consist of fine-grained (smaller than ?100 microns) constituents, and 48 vol% is mineral and lithic clasts and impact melt veins. The most abundant clast types are feldspathic fine-grained to microporphyritic crystalline melt breccias (50.2 vol%; includes recrystallized melt breccias), whereas mafic crystalline melt breccias are extremely rare (1.4 vol%). Granulitic lithologies are 12.8 vol%, intragranularly recrystallized anorthosites and cataclastic anorthosites are 8.8 and 8.2 vol%, respectively, and (devitrified) glasses are 2.7 vol%. Impact melt veins (5.5 vol% of the whole thin sections) cutting across the entire thin section were probably formed subsequent to the lithification process of the bulk rock at pressures below 20 GPa, because the bulk rock never experienced a higher peak shock pressure. Mafic crystalline melt breccias are very rare in Dar al Gani 262 and similar in abundance to those in QUE93069. The extremely low abundance of mafic components and the bulk composition may constrain possible areas of the Moon from which the breccia was derived. The source area of Dar al Gani 262 must be a highland terrain lacking significant mafic impact melts or mare components. Based on radionuclide activities an irradiation position of DG 262 on the Moon at a depth of 55-85 g/cm3 and a maximum transit time to Earth less than 0.15 Ma is suggested. Dar al Gani 262 contains high concentrations of solar wind implanted noble gases. The isotopic abundance

  6. Cosmogenic Records in 18 Ordinary Chondrites from the Dar Al Gani Region, Libya. 1; Noble Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, L.; Franke, L.; Welten, K. C.; Nishiizumi, K.; Jull, A. J. T.

    2003-01-01

    In the last decade thousands of meteorites have been recovered from hot deserts in the Sahara and Oman. One of the main meteorite concentration surfaces in the Sahara is the Dar al Gani plateau in Libya, which covers a total area of 8000 km2. More than 1000 meteorites have been reported from this area. The geological setting, meteorite pairings and the meteorite density of the Dar al Gani (DaG) field are described in more detail in [1]. In this work we report concentrations of the noble gas isotopes of He, Ne, Ar as well as 84Kr and 132Xe in 18 DaG meteorites. In a separate paper we will report the cosmogenic radionuclides [2]. We discuss the thermal history and cosmic-ray exposure (CRE) history of these meteorites, and evaluate the effects of the hot desert environment on the noble gas record.

  7. Solubility of Sulfur in Shergottitic Silicate Melts Up to 0.8 GPA: Implications for S Contents of Shergottites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.; Pando, K.M.; Danielson, L.

    2009-01-01

    Shergottites have high S contents (1300 to 4600 ppm; [1]), but it is unclear if they are sulfide saturated or under-saturated. This issue has fundamental implications for determining the long term S budget of the martian surface and atmosphere (from mantle degassing), as well as evolution of the highly siderophile elements (HSE) Au, Pd, Pt, Re, Rh, Ru, Ir, and Os, since concentrations of the latter are controlled by sulfide stability. Resolution of sulfide saturation depends upon temperature, pressure, oxygen fugacity (and FeO), and magma composition [2]. Expressions derived from experimental studies allow prediction of S contents, though so far they are not calibrated for shergottitic liquids [3-5]. We have carried out new experiments designed to test current S saturation models, and then show that existing calibrations are not suitable for high FeO and low Al2O3 compositions characteristic of shergottitic liquids. The new results show that existing models underpredict S contents of sulfide saturated shergottitic liquids by a factor of 2.

  8. Evidence for a reduced, Fe-depleted martian mantle source region of shergottites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosal, Subhabrata; Sack, Richard O.; Ghiorso, Mark S.; Lipschutz, Michael E.

    Estimates of the oxygen fugacity of the source regions of martian shergottites are obtained from coexisting Fe-Ti oxides and from Fe3+/Fe2+ ratios in pyroxenes. These estimates are one to four log10 units lower than previously reported values, and indicate that the shergottite source region has an oxidation state about two or three orders of magnitude below the quartz-fayalite-magnetite (QFM) oxygen reference buffer. An approximation of the major element composition of the shergottite source region is obtained utilizing the MELTS petrologic modeling software. A bulk composition of the shergottite source region is derived, which is consistent with the generation of sher-gottites upon 3% partial melting at 10 kbar. This composition is decidedly less enriched in Na2O and FeOTot than previous estimates. When compared to the bulk composition of the terrestrial mantle, the source region of the shergottites is lower in CaO, Al2O3, Na2O and TiO2, and higher in MgO.

  9. Geochemical diversity of shergottite basalts: Mixing and fractionation, and their relation to Mars surface basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treiman, Allan H.; Filiberto, Justin

    2015-04-01

    The chemical compositions of shergottite meteorites, basaltic rocks from Mars, provide a broad view of the origins and differentiation of these Martian magmas. The shergottite basalts are subdivided based on their Al contents: high-Al basalts (Al > 5% wt) are distinct from low-Al basalts and olivine-phyric basalts (both with Al < 4.5% wt). Abundance ratios of highly incompatible elements (e.g., Th, La) are comparable in all the shergottites. Abundances of less incompatible elements (e.g., Ti, Lu, Hf) in olivine-phyric and low-Al basalts correlate well with each other, but the element abundance ratios are not constant; this suggests mixing between components, both depleted and enriched. High-Al shergottites deviate from these trends consistent with silicate mineral fractionation. The "depleted" component is similar to the Yamato-980459 magma; approximately, 67% crystal fractionation of this magma would yield a melt with trace element abundances like QUE 94201. The "enriched" component is like the parent magma for NWA 1068; approximately, 30% crystal fractionation from it would yield a melt with trace element abundances like the Los Angeles shergottite. This component mixing is consistent with radiogenic isotope and oxygen fugacity data. These mixing relations are consistent with the compositions of many of the Gusev crater basalts analyzed on Mars by the Spirit rover (although with only a few elements to compare). Other Mars basalts fall off the mixing relations (e.g., Wishstone at Gusev, Gale crater rocks). Their compositions imply that basalt source areas in Mars include significant complexities that are not present in the source areas for the shergottite basalts.

  10. Exposure history and terrestrial ages of ordinary chondrites from the Dar al Gani region, Libya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welten, K. C.; Nishiizumi, K.; Finkel, R. C.; Hillegonds, D. J.; Jull, A. J. T.; Franke, L.; Schultz, L.

    2004-03-01

    We measured the concentrations of noble gases in 32 ordinary chondrites from the Dar al Gani (DaG) region, Libya, as well as concentrations of the cosmogenic radionuclides 14C, 10Be, 26Al, 36Cl, and 41Ca in 18 of these samples. Although the trapped noble gases in five DaG samples show ratios typical of solar or planetary gases, in all other DaG samples, they are dominated by atmospheric contamination, which increases with the degree of weathering. Cosmic ray exposure (CRE) ages of DaG chondrites range from ~1 Myr to 53 Myr. The CRE age distribution of 10 DaG L chondrites shows a cluster around 40 Myr due to four members of a large L6 chondrite shower. The CRE age distribution of 19 DaG H chondrites shows only three ages coinciding with the main H chondrite peak at ~7 Myr, while seven ages are <5 Myr. Two of these H chondrites with short CRE ages (DaG 904 and 908) show evidence of a complex exposure history. Five of the H chondrites show evidence of high shielding conditions, including low 22Ne/21Ne ratios and large contributions of neutron-capture 36Cl and 41Ca. These samples represent fragments of two or more large pre-atmospheric objects, which supports the hypothesis that the high H/L chondrite ratio at DaG is due to one or more large unrecognized showers. The 14C concentrations correspond to terrestrial ages <35 kyr, similar to terrestrial ages of chondrites from other regions in the Sahara but younger than two DaG achondrites. Despite the loss of cosmogenic 36Cl and 41Ca during oxidation of metal and troilite, concentrations of 36Cl and 41Ca in the silicates are also consistent with 14C ages <35 kyr. The only exception is DaG 343 (H4), which has a 41Ca terrestrial age of 150 ± 40 kyr. This old age shows that not only iron meteorites and achondrites but also chondrites can survive the hot desert environment for more than 50 kyr. A possible explanation is that older meteorites were covered by soils during wetter periods and were recently exhumed by removal of

  11. Compositional Controls on the Formation of Kaersutite Amphibole in Shergottite Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitman, K. M.; Treiman, A. H.

    2004-01-01

    The shergottite basalts, meteorites of Martian origin, contain rare small grains (approx. 10-100 microns diam.) of kaersutite, a Ca-amphibole rich in Al and Ti. Kaersutites have been used to estimate the water content of shergottites and the Martian mantle; however, questions remain about the original water content of the amphiboles and if they formed from magma. We investigated the petrographic settings of amphiboles in two shergottites and confirm that these amphiboles occur only in multiphase inclusions in pyroxene. In fact, kaersutite is found only in pigeonite. This suggests that the occurrence of amphibole is controlled in part by the composition of its host phase. Crystallization of host (cognate) pigeonite from a magmatic inclusion will enrich the remaining melt in Ca, Al, and Ti, supporting formation of kaersutite.

  12. The source crater of martian shergottite meteorites.

    PubMed

    Werner, Stephanie C; Ody, Anouck; Poulet, François

    2014-03-21

    Absolute ages for planetary surfaces are often inferred by crater densities and only indirectly constrained by the ages of meteorites. We show that the <5 million-year-old and 55-km-wide Mojave Crater on Mars is the ejection source for the meteorites classified as shergottites. Shergottites and this crater are linked by their coinciding meteorite ejection ages and the crater formation age and by mineralogical constraints. Because Mojave formed on 4.3 billion-year-old terrain, the original crystallization ages of shergottites are old, as inferred by Pb-Pb isotope ratios, and the much-quoted shergottite ages of <600 million years are due to resetting. Thus, the cratering-based age determination method for Mars is now calibrated in situ, and it shifts the absolute age of the oldest terrains on Mars backward by 200 million years.

  13. The source crater of martian shergottite meteorites.

    PubMed

    Werner, Stephanie C; Ody, Anouck; Poulet, François

    2014-03-21

    Absolute ages for planetary surfaces are often inferred by crater densities and only indirectly constrained by the ages of meteorites. We show that the <5 million-year-old and 55-km-wide Mojave Crater on Mars is the ejection source for the meteorites classified as shergottites. Shergottites and this crater are linked by their coinciding meteorite ejection ages and the crater formation age and by mineralogical constraints. Because Mojave formed on 4.3 billion-year-old terrain, the original crystallization ages of shergottites are old, as inferred by Pb-Pb isotope ratios, and the much-quoted shergottite ages of <600 million years are due to resetting. Thus, the cratering-based age determination method for Mars is now calibrated in situ, and it shifts the absolute age of the oldest terrains on Mars backward by 200 million years. PMID:24603150

  14. The Martian Surface is old and so are Shergottites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouvier, A.; Blichert-Toft, J.; Vervoort, J. D.; Albarede, F.

    2005-12-01

    very old and formed mostly over the first one billion years of the planet's history, thus eliminating the above paradox. We further interpret the young shergottite Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, and Lu-Hf ages to be the result of the resetting of these isotopic systems by acidic groundwater percolation through the Martian crust, ending approximately 150-300 My ago. We argue that throughout much of Martian history, large acid lakes of regional extent collected and mixed groundwaters and redistributed 142Nd and 182W between rocks of different ages, some of them nearly as old as the planet itself and carrying strong isotopic anomalies. From an interpretation of satellite images, it has been argued (10) that over the planet's first billion years of evolution, one third of its surface was covered by bodies of standing water and ice floodwaters derived from a subpermafrost aquifer. The last pools of liquid water occupying various spots on the Martian surface may have disappeared either by evaporation or by retreating into a permafrost layer now buried beneath thick wind-blown deposits. 1. Chen and Wasserburg, GCA 50, 955 (1986). 2. Nyquist et al., Space Sci. Rev. 96, 105 (2001). 3. Clayton and Mayeda, GCA 60, 1999 (1996). 4. Franchi et al., Phil. Trans. R. Soc. London, 359, 2019 (2001). 5. Squyres et al., Science 306, 1698 (2004). 6. Gendrin et al., Science 307, 1587 (2005). 7. Fairen et al., Nature 431, 423 (2004). 8. McCoy et al., GCA 63, 1249 (1999). 9. Dreibus et al., LPS 27, 323 (1996). 10. Clifford, Icarus 154, 40 (2001).

  15. Martian meteorite Tissint records unique petrogenesis among the depleted shergottites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu Sarbadhikari, A.; Babu, E. V. S. S. K.; Vijaya Kumar, T.; Chennaoui Aoudjehane, H.

    2016-07-01

    Tissint, a new unaltered piece of Martian volcanic materials, is the most silica-poor and Mg-Fe-rich igneous rock among the "depleted" olivine-phyric shergottites. Fe-Mg zoning of olivine suggests equilibrium growth (<0.1 °C h-1) in the range of Fo80-56 and olivine overgrowth (Fo55-18) through a process of rapid disequilibrium (~1.0-5.0 °C h-1). The spatially extended (up to 600 μm) flat-top Fe-Mg profiles of olivine indicates that the early-stage cooling rate of Tissint was slower than the other shergottites. The chemically metastable outer rim of olivine (shergottites. Dominance of augite over plagioclase induced augite to control the Ca-buffer in the residual melt suppressing the plagioclase crystallization, which also caused a profound effect on the Al-content in the late-crystallized pyroxenes. Mineral chemical stability, phase-assemblage saturation, and pressure-temperature path of evolution indicates that the parent magma entered the solidus and left the liquidus field at a depth of 40-80 km in the upper mantle. Petrogenesis of Tissint appears to be similar to LAR 06319, an enriched olivine-phyric shergottite, during the early to intermediate stage of crystallization. A severe shock-induced deformation resulted in remelting (10-15 vol%), recrystallization (most Fe-rich phases), and exhumation of Tissint in a time scale of 1-8 yr. Tissint possesses some distinct characteristics, e.g., impact-induced melting and deformation, forming phosphorus-rich recrystallization rims of olivine, and shock-induced melt domains without relative enrichment of LREEs compared to the bulk; and shared characteristics, e.g., modal

  16. Martian meteorite Tissint records unique petrogenesis among the depleted shergottites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu Sarbadhikari, A.; Babu, E. V. S. S. K.; Vijaya Kumar, T.; Chennaoui Aoudjehane, H.

    2016-09-01

    Tissint, a new unaltered piece of Martian volcanic materials, is the most silica-poor and Mg-Fe-rich igneous rock among the "depleted" olivine-phyric shergottites. Fe-Mg zoning of olivine suggests equilibrium growth (<0.1 °C h-1) in the range of Fo80-56 and olivine overgrowth (Fo55-18) through a process of rapid disequilibrium (~1.0-5.0 °C h-1). The spatially extended (up to 600 μm) flat-top Fe-Mg profiles of olivine indicates that the early-stage cooling rate of Tissint was slower than the other shergottites. The chemically metastable outer rim of olivine (shergottites. Dominance of augite over plagioclase induced augite to control the Ca-buffer in the residual melt suppressing the plagioclase crystallization, which also caused a profound effect on the Al-content in the late-crystallized pyroxenes. Mineral chemical stability, phase-assemblage saturation, and pressure-temperature path of evolution indicates that the parent magma entered the solidus and left the liquidus field at a depth of 40-80 km in the upper mantle. Petrogenesis of Tissint appears to be similar to LAR 06319, an enriched olivine-phyric shergottite, during the early to intermediate stage of crystallization. A severe shock-induced deformation resulted in remelting (10-15 vol%), recrystallization (most Fe-rich phases), and exhumation of Tissint in a time scale of 1-8 yr. Tissint possesses some distinct characteristics, e.g., impact-induced melting and deformation, forming phosphorus-rich recrystallization rims of olivine, and shock-induced melt domains without relative enrichment of LREEs compared to the bulk; and shared characteristics, e.g., modal

  17. Petrology and Geochemistry of a Mg- and Al-Rich Orthopyroxenite Xenolith in the EETA79001 Shergottite: Implications for Mars Crustal Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkley, John L.

    1999-01-01

    EETA79001 is a Mars meteorite (SNC) consisting of multiple rock types, including two basalt types, olivine and pyroxene xenocrysts, and ultramafic xenoliths. This study is focused on the petrology and geochemistry of one orthopyroxenite xenolith in PTS 68, designated X-1. It consists of chemically homogeneous orthopyroxene cores with exceptionally high Mg/Fe (mg#=85) and Al. Cores are permeated by minute high-Si+Al glassy inclusions, some with augite microlites. Magnesian core areas are mantled by more Fe-rich orthopyroxene rims grading to pigeonite away from cores. The xenolith is transected by cross-cutting shear planes, some of pre-incorporation origin. Major and minor element composition and variation suggest that core areas are primarily igneous, crystallized from a high temperature mafic melt. However, nearly constant mg# across cores suggest metamorphic equilibration. Si+Al inclusions may result from, among other processes, exsolution of feldspathic material during subsolidus cooling, or may be solid materials (alkali feldspar) poikilitically enclosed by growing igneous orthopyroxene crystals. Late reaction with more fractionated melts produced Fe-rich mantles, the whole assemblage later cut by tectonic micro-shear planes. Raw electron microprobe data produced during this study are available on request from the author.

  18. Laser Argon-40-Argon-39 Age Studies of Dar Al Gani 262 Lunar Meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, V. A.; Burgess, R.; Turner, G.

    1999-01-01

    The lunar meteorite Dar al Gani 262 (DAG 262) was found in the Sahara Desert in Libya on March 23,1997. This was the first lunar meteorite found in a desert and is the thirteenth lunar meteorite discovered. DAG 262 is a polymict anorthositic lunar highland breccia. The Ar-40-Ar-39 dating technique has been applied to DAG 262 in an attempt to determine the crystallization age and shock events experienced by this meteorite. Previous studies have indicated that this meteorite may have suffered up to four shock events. Due to the brecciated nature of the rock and the likelihood of multiple shock events, a laser-probe technique has been used to analyze individual components (minerals and clasts) of the meteorite. The sample supplied to us ( about 1.5 g) shows two distinct clast types (1) feldspathic and (2) basaltic, the latter not having been previously described. Plagioclases show fractures and undulatory extinction as the result of shock events. The feldspathic clast has small, round low-Ca pyroxenes distributed within it. Electron-microprobe analyses of feldspar and pyroxene are given. The bulk composition as determined by suggests that the source of this clast is the ferroan-anorthositic suite. The basaltic clast shows a very fine intergranular texture with some larger plagioclase grains. The two clasts are separated by a melt-glass matrix that contains plagioclase with the same chemical composition as those plagioclases within the feldspathic clast. A devitrified mafic-glass spherule of - 150 mm diameter was identified within the matrix as well as other small fragments of possible glass spheres. Some dendritic veins can be observed on the outer part of the section, which formed after breccia lithification. Two laser Ar-40-Ar-39 experiments are being carried out: (1) infrared laser-stepped heating of feldspathic fragments that have been separated from the meteorite; and (2) ultraviolet laser spot fusion (50 micron) of a slice of meteorite (about 1.0 x 0.5 cm

  19. The age of the martian meteorite Northwest Africa 1195 and the differentiation history of the shergottites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symes, Steven J. K.; Borg, Lars E.; Shearer, Charles K.; Irving, Anthony J.

    2008-03-01

    Samarium-neodymium isotopic analyses of unleached and acid-leached mineral fractions from the recently identified olivine-bearing shergottite Northwest Africa 1195 yield a crystallization age of 347 ± 13 Ma and an ɛNd143 value of +40.1 ± 0.9. Maskelynite fractions do not lie on the Sm-Nd isochron and appear to contain a martian surface component with low 147Sm/ 144Nd and 143Nd/ 144Nd ratios that was added during shock. The Rb-Sr system is disturbed and does not yield an isochron. Terrestrial Sr appears to have affected all of the mineral fractions, although a maximum initial 87Sr/ 86Sr ratio of 0.7016 is estimated by passing a 347 Ma reference line through the maskelynite fraction that is least affected by contamination. The high initial ɛNd143 value and the low initial 87Sr/ 86Sr ratio, combined with the geologically young crystallization age, indicate that Northwest Africa 1195 is derived from a source region characterized by a long-term incompatible-element depletion. The age and initial Sr and Nd isotopic compositions of Northwest Africa 1195 are very similar to those of Queen Alexandra Range 94201, indicating these samples were derived from source regions with similar Sr-Nd isotopic systematics. These similarities suggest that these two meteorites share a close petrogenetic relationship and might have been erupted from a common volcano. The meteorites Yamato 980459, Dar al Gani 476, Sayh al Uhaymir 005/008, and Dhofar 019 also have relatively old ages between 474 and 575 Ma and trace element and/or isotopic systematics that are indicative of derivation from incompatible-element-depleted sources. This suggests that the oldest group of meteorites is more closely related to one another than they are to the younger meteorites that are derived from less incompatible-element-depleted sources. Closed-system fractional crystallization of this suite of meteorites is modeled with the MELTS algorithm using the bulk composition of Yamato 980459 as a parent. These

  20. The age of the martian meteorite Northwest Africa 1195 and the differentiation history of the shergottites

    SciTech Connect

    Symes, S; Borg, L; Shearer, C; Irving, A

    2007-04-05

    Samarium-neodymium isotopic analyses of unleached and acid-leached mineral fractions from the recently identified olivine-bearing shergottite Northwest Africa 1195 yield a crystallization age of 348 {+-} 19 Ma and an {var_epsilon}{sub Nd}{sup 143} value of +40.1 {+-} 1.3. Maskelynite fractions do not lie on the Sm-Nd isochron and appear to contain a martian surface component with low {sup 147}Sm/{sup 144}Nd and {sup 143}Nd/{sup 144}Nd ratios that was added during shock. The Rb-Sr system is disturbed and does not yield an isochron. Terrestrial Sr appears to have affected all of the mineral fractions, although a maximum initial {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio of 0.701614 {+-} 16 is estimated by passing a 348 Ma reference isochron through the maskelynite fraction that is least affected by contamination. The high initial {var_epsilon}{sub Nd}{sup 143} value and the low initial {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio, combined with the geologically young crystallization age, indicate that Northwest Africa 1195 is derived from a source region characterized by a long-term incompatible element depletion. The age and initial Sr and Nd isotopic compositions of Northwest Africa 1195 are very similar to those of Queen Alexandra Range 94201, indicating these samples were derived from source regions with nearly identical Sr-Nd isotopic systematics. These similarities suggest that these two meteorites share a close petrogenetic relationship and might have been erupted from a common volcano. The meteorites Yamato 980459, Dar al Gani 476, Sayh al Uhaymir 005/008, and Dhofar 019 also have relatively old ages between 474-575 Ma and trace element and/or isotopic systematics that are indicative of derivation from incompatible-element-depleted sources. This suggests that the oldest group of meteorites is more closely related to one another than they are to the younger meteorites that are derived from less incompatible-element-depleted sources. Closed-system fractional crystallization of this suite of

  1. Origins of Al-rich chondrules: Clues from a compound Al-rich chondrule in the Dar al Gani 978 carbonaceous chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ai-Cheng; Itoh, Shoichi; Sakamoto, Naoya; Wang, Ru-Cheng; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi

    2014-04-01

    Aluminum-rich chondrules are one of the most interesting components of primitive chondrites, because they have characteristics that are similar to both Ca, Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) and ferromagnesian chondrules. However, their precursor and formation history remain poorly constrained, especially with respect to their oxygen isotopic distributions. In this study, we report on the petrography, mineralogy, oxygen isotope ratios, and rare-earth-element compositions of a sapphirine-bearing Al-rich chondrule (SARC) in the ungrouped chondrite Dar al Gani (DaG) 978. The SARC has a complex core-mantle-rim texture; while both the core and the mantle are mainly composed of Al-rich enstatite and anorthite with minor amounts of mesostasis, these regions are distinguished by the presence of Fe-rich spinel and sapphirine in the core and their absence in the mantle. The rim of the SARC consists mainly of Fe-rich olivine, enstatite, and Fe-Ni metal. Spinel and some olivine grains in the SARC are 16O-rich, with Δ17O values down to -20‰ and -23‰, respectively. Enstatite, sapphirine, and most olivine grains have similar Δ17O values (∼ -7‰), which are lower than those of anorthite and the mesostasis (including augite therein) (Δ17O: ∼ -3‰). Mesostasis from both the core and mantle have Group II rare-earth-element (REE) patterns; however, the core mesostasis has higher REE concentrations than the mantle mesostasis. These observations provide a strong indication that the SARC formed by the melting and crystallization of a mixture of materials from Group II CAIs and ferromagnesian chondrules. Both spinel and olivine with 16O-rich features could be of relict origin. The 16O-poor isotopic compositions of most components in Al-rich chondrules can be explained by oxygen isotopic exchange between the melt and 16O-poor nebular gas (Δ17O: ∼ -7‰) during melting in chondrule-forming regions; whereas the anorthite and mesostasis could have experienced further oxygen isotopic

  2. An Exploration of the Viability of Partnership between "Dar Al-Ulum" and Higher Education Institutions in North West England Focusing upon Pedagogy and Relevance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geaves, Ron

    2015-01-01

    The article explores possibilities of collaboration between Muslim providers of traditional education ("dar al-ulums") and HE/FE institutions in close geographical proximity in the North West England. It reports the outcomes of a project carried out in 2011/2012 influenced by the findings of the Makadam/Scott-Baumann report in 2010, in…

  3. Solar proton produced neon in shergottite meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, D. H.; Rao, M. N.; Bogard, D. D.

    1994-01-01

    Cosmogenic radionuclides produced by near-surface, nuclear interactions of energetic solar protons (approx. 10-100 MeV) were reported in several lunar rocks and a very small meteorites. We recently documented the existence and isotopic compositions of solar-produced (SCR) Ne in two lunar rocks. Here we present the first documented evidence for SCR Ne in a meteorite, ALH77005, which was reported to contain SCR radionuclides. Examination of literature data for other shergottites suggests that they may also contain a SCR Ne component. The existence of SCR Ne in shergottites may be related to a Martian origin.

  4. Sulfur Isotopes in Gas-rich Impact-Melt Glasses in Shergottites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. N.; Hoppe, P.; Sutton, S. R.; Nyquist, Laurence E.; Huth, J.

    2010-01-01

    Large impact melt glasses in some shergottites contain huge amounts of Martian atmospheric gases and they are known as gas-rich impact-melt (GRIM) glasses. By studying the neutron-induced isotopic deficits and excesses in Sm-149 and Sm-150 isotopes resulting from Sm-149 (n,gamma) 150Sm reaction and 80Kr excesses produced by Br-79 (n,gamma) Kr-80 reaction in the GRIM glasses using mass-spectrometric techniques, it was shown that these glasses in shergottites EET79001 and Shergotty contain regolith materials irradiated by a thermal neutron fluence of approx.10(exp 15) n/sq cm near Martian surface. Also, it was shown that these glasses contain varying amounts of sulfates and sulfides based on the release patterns of SO2 (sulfate) and H2S (sulfide) using stepwise-heating mass-spectrometric techniques. Furthermore, EMPA and FE-SEM studies in basaltic-shergottite GRIM glasses EET79001, LithB (,507& ,69), Shergotty (DBS I &II), Zagami (,992 & ,994) showed positive correlation between FeO and "SO3" (sulfide + sulfate), whereas those belonging to olivine-phyric shergottites EET79001, LithA (,506, & ,77) showed positive correlation between CaO/Al2O3 and "SO3".

  5. Ree in Shergottite Augites and Whole Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musselwhite, D. S.; Wadhwa, M.

    2002-01-01

    Redox variations have been reported among the shergottites. Eu and Gd partitioning experiments designed for the LEW86010 angrite, to infer a range of fo2 for the shergottites have been used. Fo2 using equilibria between Fe-Ti oxides have been inferred. There is fairly good agreement between the Fe-Ti oxide determinations and the estimates from Eu anomalies in terms of which meteorites are more or less oxidized. The Eu anomaly technique and the Fe-Ti oxide technique both essentially show the same trend, with Shergotty and Zagami being the most oxidized and QUE94201 and DaG 476 being the most reduced. Thus, the variation in fo2 appears to be both real and substantive. However, although the redox trends indicated by the two techniques are similar, there is as much as a two log unit offset between the results. One explanation for this offset is that the Eu calibration used for the shergottites was actually designed for the LEW86010 angrite, a silica-undersaturated basalt whose pyroxene (diopside) compositions are rather extreme. To correct this, a set of experiments on the redox relationship of Eu partitioning relative to Sm and Gd for pyroxene and melt compositions more relevant to Martian meteorites were conducted. We have taken the experimentally determined relationship between D (sup Augite/melt) (Sm,Eu,Gd) and fO2 and applied it to augite Eu and Gd data for the basaltic Shergottites of as well as previously unreported augite Sm data.

  6. Basaltic Shergottite NWA 856: Differentiation of a Martian Magma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferdous, J.; Brandon, A. D.; Peslier, A. H.; Pirotte, Z.

    2016-01-01

    NWA 856 or Djel Ibone, is a basaltic shergottite discovered as a single stone of 320 g in South Morocco in April, 2001. This meteorite is fresh, i.e. shows minimal terrestrial weathering for a desert find. No shergottite discovered in North Africa can be paired with NWA 856. The purpose of this study is to constrain its crystallization history using textural observations, crystallization sequence modeling and in-situ trace element analysis in order to understand differentiation in shergottite magmatic systems.

  7. Shock Metamorphism of the Dhofar 378 Basaltic Shergottite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikouchi, T.; McKay, G.

    2006-01-01

    Shock metamorphism is one of the most fundamental processes in the history of Martian meteorites, especially shergottites, which affect their mineralogy and chronology. The formation of "maskelynite" from plagioclase and shock melts is such major mineralogical effects. Dhofar 378 is one of the recently found desert shergottites that is mainly composed of plagioclase and pyroxene. This shergottite is important because of its highly shocked nature and unique plagioclase texture, and thus has a great potential for assessing a "shock" age of shergottites. We have been working on a combined study of mineralogy and chronology of the same rock chip of Dhofar 378. This abstract reports its mineralogical part.

  8. A More Reduced Mantle Source for Enriched Shergottites; Insights from the Olivine-Phyric Shergottite Lar 06319

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peslier, A. H.; Hnatyshin, D.; Herd, C. D. K.; Walton, E. L.; Brandon, A. D.; Lapen, T. J.; Shafer, J.

    2010-01-01

    A detailed petrographic study of melt inclusions and Cr-Fe-Ti oxides of LAR 06319 leads to two main conclusions: 1) this enriched oxidized olivine- phyric shergottite represents nearly continuous crystallization of a basaltic shergottite melt, 2) the melt became more oxidized during differentiation. The first crystallized mineral assemblages record the oxygen fugacity which is closest to that of the melt s mantle source, and which is lower than generally attributed to the enriched shergottite group.

  9. Uls LiDAR Supported Analyses of Laser Beam Penetration from Different ALS Systems Into Vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieser, M.; Hollaus, M.; Mandlburger, G.; Glira, P.; Pfeifer, N.

    2016-06-01

    This study analyses the underestimation of tree and shrub heights for different airborne laser scanner systems and point cloud distribution within the vegetation column. Reference data was produced by a novel UAV-borne laser scanning (ULS) with a high point density in the complete vegetation column. With its physical parameters (e.g. footprint) and its relative accuracy within the block as stated in Section 2.2 the reference data is supposed to be highly suitable to detect the highest point of the vegetation. An airborne topographic (ALS) and topo-bathymetric (ALB) system were investigated. All data was collected in a period of one month in leaf-off condition, while the dominant tree species in the study area are deciduous trees. By robustly estimating the highest 3d vegetation point of each laser system the underestimation of the vegetation height was examined in respect to the ULS reference data. This resulted in a higher under-estimation of the airborne topographic system with 0.60 m (trees) and 0.55 m (shrubs) than for the topo-bathymetric system 0.30 m (trees) and 0.40 m (shrubs). The degree of the underestimation depends on structural characteristics of the vegetation itself and physical specification of the laser system.

  10. Northwest Africa 5298: A Basaltic Shergottite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, Hejiu; Peslier, Anne; Lapen, Thomas J.; Brandon, Alan; Shafer, John

    2009-01-01

    NWA 5298 is a single 445 g meteorite found near Bir Gandouz, Morocco in March 2008 [1]. This rock has a brown exterior weathered surface instead of a fusion crust and the interior is composed of green mineral grains with interstitial dark patches containing small vesicles and shock melts [1]. This meteorite is classified as a basaltic shergottite [2]. A petrologic study of this Martian meteorite is being carried out with electron microprobe analysis and soon trace element analyses by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Oxygen fugacity is calculated from Fe-Ti oxides pairs in the sample. The data from this study constrains the petrogenesis of basaltic shergottites.

  11. Volatile compounds in shergottite and nakhlite meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooding, James L.; Aggrey, Kwesi E.; Muenow, David W.

    1990-01-01

    Since discovery of apparent carbonate carbon in Nakhla, significant evidence has accumulated for occurrence of volatile compounds in shergotties and nakhlites. Results are presented from a study of volatile compounds in three shergottites, one nakhlite, and three eucrite control samples. Shergotties ALHA77005, EETA79001, and Shergotty, and the nakhlite Nakhla, all contain oxidized sulfur (sulfate) of preterrestrial origin; sulfur oxidation is most complete in EETA79001/Lith-C. Significant bulk carbonate was confirmed in Nakhla and trace carbonate was substantiated for EETA79001, all of which appears to be preterrestrial in origin. Chlorine covaries with oxidized sulfur, whereas carbonate and sulfate are inversely related. These volatile compounds were probably formed in a highly oxidizing, aqueous environment sometime in the late stage histories of the rocks that are now represented as meteorites. They are consistent with the hypothesis that shergottite and nakhlite meteorites originated on Mars and that Mars has supported aqueous geochemistry during its history.

  12. REE in Shergottite Augites and Whole Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musselwhite, D. S.; Wadhwa, M.

    2002-01-01

    Redox variations have been reported among the shergottites. Eu and Gd were used in partitioning experiments designed for the LEW86010 angrite, to infer a range of fO2 for the shergottites. Inferred fO2 using equilibria between Fe-Ti oxides was used. There is fairly good agreement between the Fe- Ti oxide determinations and the estimates from Eu anomalies in terms of which meteorites are more or less oxidized. The Eu anomaly technique and the Fe-Ti oxide technique both essentially show the same trend, with Shergotty and Zagami being the most oxidized and QUE94201 and DaG 476 being the most reduced. Thus, the variation in fO2 appears to be both real and substantive. However, although the redox trends indicated by the two techniques are similar, there is as much as a two log unit offset between the results of presented. One explanation for this offset is that the Eu calibration used for the shergottites was actually designed for the LEW86010 angrite, a silica-undersaturated basalt whose pyroxene (diopside) compositions are rather extreme. To correct this, a set of experiments were conducted on the redox relationship of Eu partitioning relative to Sm and Gd for pyroxene and melt compositions more relevant to Martian meteorites. We have taken the experimentally determined relationship between (Sm,Eu,Gd) and fO2 and applied it to augite Eu and Gd data for the basaltic Shergottites as well as previously unreported augite Sm data.

  13. Chemical Composition of Four Shergottites from Northwest Africa (NWA 2800, NWA, 5214, NWA 5990, NWA 6342)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, S.; Humayun, M.; Jefferson, G.; Fields, D.; Righter, K.; Irving, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Shergottites represent the majority of recovered Martian meteorites. As basic igneous rocks, they formed from magmas that were emplaced in the Martian crust [1]. Due to the low ambient pressure of the Martian atmosphere, subaerial lavas and shallow magma chambers are expected to outgas volatile metals (e.g., Cd, Te, Re, Bi) [2]. The planetary abundances of the volatile siderophile and chalcophile elements are important at establishing the depth of core formation for Mars, and must be known as a baseline for understanding volcanic outgassing on Mars, particularly the large enrichments of S and Cl observed in modern Martian soils [3]. There is little data on volatile siderophile and chalcophile elements from Martian meteorites, excluding a few well-analyzed samples [2]. Further, a large number of shergottites being recovered from North West Africa are in need of chemical analysis. All of the shergottites are in need of state-of-the art analysis for such ratios as Ge/Si and Ga/Al, which can now be accomplished by LA-ICP-MS [2].

  14. Terrestrial C-14 age of the Antarctic shergottite, EETA 79001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jull, A. J. T.; Donahue, D. J.

    1988-01-01

    The terrestrial age of the Elephant Moraine shergottite EETA 79001 (lithology A) has been determined from measurement of its cosmogenic C-14 content as 12 +/- 2 kyr. The results on saturated and blank samples of 1 g or less are also discussed. The age calculated for EETA 79001 is compared to exposure and terrestrial ages of other shergottites in the light of possible origins of these meteorites on Mars.

  15. Complex Formation History of Highly Evolved Basaltic Shergottite, Zagami

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niihara, T.; Misawa, K.; Mikouchi, T.; Nyquist, L. E.; Park, J.; Hirata, D.

    2012-01-01

    Zagami, a basaltic shergottite, contains several kinds of lithologies such as Normal Zagami consisting of Fine-grained (FG) and Coarse-grained (CG), Dark Mottled lithology (DML), and Olivine-rich late-stage melt pocket (DN). Treiman and Sutton concluded that Zagami (Normal Zagami) is a fractional crystallization product from a single magma. It has been suggested that there were two igneous stages (deep magma chamber and shallow magma chamber or surface lava flow) on the basis of chemical zoning features of pyroxenes which have homogeneous Mg-rich cores and FeO, CaO zoning at the rims. Nyquist et al. reported that FG has a different initial Sr isotopic ratio than CG and DML, and suggested the possibility of magma mixing on Mars. Here we report new results of petrology and mineralogy for DML and the Olivine-rich lithology (we do not use DN here), the most evolved lithology in this rock, to understand the relationship among lithologies and reveal Zagami s formation history

  16. Crystallization Age of NWA 1460 Shergottite: Paradox Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C-Y.; Reese, Y. D.; Irving, A. J.

    2004-01-01

    We have determined the Rb-Sr age of basaltic shergottite NWA 1460 to be 312 +/- 3 Ma, and the Sm-Nd age to be 352 +/- 30 Ma. The initial Sr and Nd isotopic compositions of NWA 1460 suggest it is an earlier melting product of a Martian mantle source region similar to those of the Iherzolitic shergottites and basaltic shergottite EETA79001, lithology B. The new ages of NWA 1460 and other recently analyzed Martian meteorites leads us to reexamine the paradox that most of the Martian meteorites appear to be younger from the majority of the Martian surface. This paradox continues to pose a challenge to determining a reliable Martian chronology.

  17. Acid-Sulfate-Weathering Activity in Shergottite Sites on Mars Recorded in Grim Glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. N.; Nyquist, L. E.; Ross, K.; Sutton, S. R.; Schwandt, C. S.

    2011-01-01

    Based on mass spectrometric studies of sulfur species in Shergotty and EET79001, [1] and [2] showed that sulfates and sulfides occur in different proportions in shergottites. Sulfur speciation studies in gas-rich impact-melt (GRIM) glasses in EET79001 by the XANES method [3] showed that S K-XANES spectra in GRIM glasses from Lith A indicate that S is associated with Ca and Al presumably as sulfides/sulfates whereas the XANES spectra of amorphous sulfide globules in GRIM glasses from Lith B indicate that S is associated with Fe as FeS. In these amorphous iron sulfide globules, [4] found no Ni using FE-SEM and suggested that the globules resulting from immiscible sulfide melt may not be related to the igneous iron sulfides having approximately 1-3% Ni. Furthermore, in the amorphous iron sulfides from 507 GRIM glass, [5] determined delta(sup 34)S values ranging from +3.5%o to -3.1%o using Nano-SIMS. These values plot between the delta(sup 34)S value of +5.25%o determined in the sulfate fraction in Shergotty [6] at one extreme and the value of -1.7%o obtained for igneous sulfides in EET79001 and Shergotty [7] at the other. These results suggest that the amorphous Fe-S globules likely originated by shock reduction of secondary iron sulfate phases occurring in the regolith precursor materials during impact [7]. Sulfates in the regolith materials near the basaltic shergottite sites on Mars owe their origin to surficial acid-sulfate interactions. We examine the nature of these reactions by studying the composition of the end products in altered regolith materials. For the parent material composition, we use that of the host shergottite material in which the impact glasses are situated.

  18. Lead Isotopes in Olivine-Phyric Shergottite Tissint: Implications for the Geochemical Evolution of the Shergottite Source Mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moriwaki, R.; Usui, T.; Simon, J. I.; Jones, J. H.; Yokoyama, T.

    2015-01-01

    Geochemically-depleted shergottites are basaltic rocks derived from a martian mantle source reservoir. Geochemical evolution of the martian mantle has been investigated mainly based on the Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, and Lu-Hf isotope systematics of the shergottites [1]. Although potentially informative, U-Th- Pb isotope systematics have been limited because of difficulties in interpreting the analyses of depleted meteorite samples that are more susceptible to the effects of near-surface processes and terrestrial contamination. This study conducts a 5-step sequential acid leaching experiment of the first witnessed fall of the geochemically-depleted olivinephyric shergottite Tissint to minimize the effect of low temperature distrubence. Trace element analyses of the Tissint acid residue (mostly pyroxene) indicate that Pb isotope compositions of the residue do not contain either a martian surface or terrestrial component, but represent the Tissint magma source [2]. The residue has relatively unradiogenic initial Pb isotopic compositions (e.g., 206Pb/204Pb = 10.8136) that fall within the Pb isotope space of other geochemically-depleted shergottites. An initial µ-value (238U/204Pb = 1.5) of Tissint at the time of crystallization (472 Ma [3]) is similar to a time-integrated mu- value (1.72 at 472 Ma) of the Tissint source mantle calculated based on the two-stage mantle evolution model [1]. On the other hand, the other geochemically-depleted shergottites (e.g., QUE 94201 [4]) have initial µ-values of their parental magmas distinctly lower than those of their modeled source mantle. These results suggest that only Tissint potentially reflects the geochemical signature of the shergottite mantle source that originated from cumulates of the martian magma ocean

  19. Provenance and Concentration of Water in the Shergottite Mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. H.; Usui, T.; Alexander, C. M. O'D.; Simon, J. I.; Wang, J.

    2012-01-01

    The water content of the martian mantle is controversial. In particular, the role of water in the petrogenesis of the shergottites has been much debated. Although the shergottites, collectively, contain very little water [e.g., 1,2], some experiments have been interpreted to show that percent levels of water are required for the petrogenesis of shergottites such as Shergotty and Zagami [3]. In this latter interpretation, the general paucity of water in the shergottites and their constituent minerals is attributed to late-stage degassing. Y980459 (Y98) is a very primitive, perhaps even parental, martian basalt, with a one-bar liquidus temperature of approx.1400 C. Olivine is the liquidus phase, and olivine core compositions are in equilibrium with the bulk rock [e.g., 4]. Petrogenetically, therefore, Y98 has had a rather simple history and can potentially help constrain the role of water in martian igneous processes. In particular, once trapped, melt inclusions should not be affected by subsequent degassing.

  20. Rare Earth elements in individual minerals in Shergottites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wadhwa, Meenakshi; Crozaz, Ghislaine

    1993-01-01

    Shergottites (i.e., Shergotty, Zagami, EETA79001, ALHA77005, and LEW88516) are an important set of achondrites because they comprise the majority of the SNC group of meteorites (nine, in total, known to us), which are likely to be samples of the planet Mars. Study of these meteorites may therefore provide valuable information about petrogenetic processes on a large planetary body other than Earth. Rare earth element (REE) distributions between various mineral phases were found to be useful in geochemically modeling the petrogenesis of various rock types (terrestrial and meteoritic). However, with the exception of a few ion microprobe studies and analyses of mineral separates, there has previously not been any comprehensive effort to characterize and directly compare REE in individual minerals in each of the five known shergottites. Ion microprobe analyses were made on thin sections of each of the shergottites. Minerals analyzed were pyroxenes (pigeonite and augite), maskelynite, and whitlockite. The REE concentrations in each mineral type in each shergottite is given.

  1. Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd Studies of Olivine-Phyric Shergottites RBT 04262 and LAR 06319: Isotopic Evidence for Relationship to Enriched Basaltic Shergottites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, L.E.; Shih, C.-Y.; Reese, Y.

    2009-01-01

    RBT 04262 and LAR 06319 are two Martian meteorites recently discovered in Antarctica. Both contain abundant olivines, and were classified as olivine-phyric shergottites. A detailed petrographic study of RBT 04262 suggested it should be reclassified as a lherzolitic shergottite. However, the moderately LREE-depleted REE distribution pattern indicated that it is closely related to enriched basaltic shergottites like Shergotty, Zagami, Los Angeles, etc. In earlier studies of a similarly olivinephyric shergottite NWA 1068 which contains 21% modal olivine, it was shown that it probably was produced from an enriched basaltic shergottite magma by olivine accumulation . As for LAR 06319, recent petrographic studies suggested that it is different from either lherzolitic shergottites or the highly LREE-depleted olivine-phyric shergottites. We performed Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotopic analyses on RBT 04262 and LAR 06319 to determine their crystallization ages and Sr and Nd isotopic signatures, and to better understand the petrogenetic relationships between them and other basaltic, lherzolitic and depleted olivine-phyric shergottites.

  2. AR-39-AR-40 "Age" of Basaltic Shergottite NWA-3171

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald D.; Park, Jisun

    2007-01-01

    North-West-Africa 3171 is a 506 g, relatively fresh appearing, basaltic shergottite with similarities to Zagami and Shergotty, but not obviously paired with any of the other known African basaltic shergottites. Its exposure age has the range of 2.5-3.1 Myr , similar to those of Zagami and Shergotty. We made AR-39-AR-40 analyses of a "plagioclase" (now shock-converted to maskelynite) separate and of a glass hand-picked from a vein connected to shock melt pockets.. Plagioclase was separated using its low magnetic susceptibility and then heavy liquid with density of <2.85 g/cm(exp 3). The AR-39-AR-40 age spectrum of NWA-317 1 plag displays a rise in age over 20-100% of the 39Ar release, from 0.24 Gyr to 0.27 Gy.

  3. An Experimental Investigation of the Shergottite NWA 6162

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, R. Gaylen; Jones, John H.; Draper, David S.; Le, Loan H.

    2012-01-01

    The Martian meteorite North West Africa 6162 (NWA 6162) is a shergottite found in Morocco in 2010. The meteorite has large olivine crystals with Mg-depleted rims as low as FO(sub 65) and Mg-rich cores of up to FO(sub 74). It is similar both in appearance and composition to another shergottite, SaU 005. Our objective is to determine if NWA 6162 represents a liquid or if it is a product of olivine accumulation. Olivine accumulation would leave the parent melt Mg-depleted and the complementary olivine cumulates would be Mg-enriched. Therefore, if NWA 6162 is a partial cumulate we would expect that liquidus olivines grown from this bulk composition would be more magnesium than olivines in the natural sample.

  4. APXS ANALYSES OF BOUNCE ROCK: THE FIRST SHERGOTTITE ON MARS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, Douglas W.; Zipfel, J.; Anderson, R.; Brueckner, J.; Clark, B. C.; Dreibus, G.; Economou, T.; Gellert, R.; Lugmair, G. W.; Klingelhoefer, G.

    2005-01-01

    During the MER Mission, an isolated rock at Meridiani Planum was analyzed by the Athena instrument suite [1]. Remote sensing instruments noticed its distinct appearance. Two areas on the untreated rock surface and one area that was abraded with the Rock Abrasion Tool were analyzed by Microscopic Imager, Mossbauer Mimos II [2], and Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS). Results of all analyses revealed a close relationship of this rock with known basaltic shergottites.

  5. Sulfur Speciation in the Martian Regolith Component in Shergottite Glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. N.; Nyquist, Laurence E.; Sutton, S.; Huth, J.

    2009-01-01

    We have shown that Gas-Rich Impact-Melt (GRIM) glasses in Shergotty, Zagami, and EET79001 (Lith A and Lith B) contain Martian regolith components that were molten during impact and quenched into glasses in voids of host rock materials based on neutron-capture isotopes, i.e., Sm-150 excesses and Sm-149 deficits in Sm, and Kr-80 excesses produced from Br [1, 2]. These GRIM glasses are rich in S-bearing secondary minerals [3.4]. Evidence for the occurrence of CaSO4 and S-rich aluminosilicates in these glasses is provided by CaO-SO3 and Al2O3-SO3 correlations, which are consistent with the finding of gypsum laths protruding from the molten glass in EET79001 (Lith A) [5]. However, in the case of GRIM glasses from EET79001 (Lith B), Shergotty and Zagami, we find a different set of secondary minerals that show a FeO-SO3 correlation (but no MgOSO3 correlation), instead of CaO-SO3 and Al2O3-SO3 correlations observed in Lith A. These results might indicate different fluidrock interactions near the shergottite source region on Mars. The speciation of sulfur in these salt assemblages was earlier studied by us using XANES techniques [6], where we found that Lith B predominantly contains Fe-sulfide globules (with some sulfate). On the other hand, Lith A showed predominantly Casulfite/ sulfate with some FeS. Furthermore, we found Fe to be present as Fe2+ indicating little oxidation, if any, in these glasses. To examine the sulfide-sulfate association in these glasses, we studied their Fe/Ni ratios with a view to find diagnostic clues for the source fluid. The Fe-sulfide mineral (Fe(0.93)Ni(0.3)S) in EET79001, Lith A is pyrrhotite [7, 8]. It yields an Fe/Ni ratio of 31. In Shergotty, pyrrhotite occurs with a molar ratio of Fe:S of 0.94 and a Ni abundance of 0.12% yielding a Fe/Ni ratio of approx.500 [8]. In this study, we determined a NiO content of approx.0.1% and FeO/NiO ratio of approx.420 in S-rich globules in #507 (EET79001, Lith B) sample using FE-SEM. In the same sample

  6. Enriched Shergottite NWA 5298 As An Evolved Parent Melt: Trace Element Inventory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, Hejiu; Peslier, Anne H.; Lapen, Thomas J.; Shafer, John; Brandon, Alan; Irving, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Martian meteorite Northwest Africa 5298 is a basaltic shergottite that was found near Bir Gandouz (Morocco). Its martian origin was confirmed by oxygen isotopes [1], as well as Mn/Fe ratios in the pyroxenes and K/anorthite ratios in the plagioclases [2]. Here we present a petrographic and geochemical study of NWA 5298. Comparison of mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of this meteorite with other Martian rocks shows that NWA 5298 is not likely paired with any other known shergottites, but it has similarities to another basaltic shergottite Dhofar 378.

  7. Rare earth patterns in shergottite phosphates and residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laul, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    Leaching experiments with 1M HCl on ALHA 77005 powder show that rare earth elements (REE) are concentrated in accessory phosphate phases (whitlockite, apatite) that govern the REE patterns of bulk shergottites. The REE patterns of whitlockite are typically light REE-depleted with a negative Eu anomaly and show a hump at the heavy REE side, while the REE pattern of apatite (in Shergotty) is light REE-enriched. Parent magmas are calculated from the modal compositions of residues of ALHA 77005, Shergotty, and EETA 79001. The parent magmas lack a Eu anomaly, indicating that plagioclase was a late-stage crystallizing phase and that it probably crystallized before the phosphates. The parent magmas of ALHA 77005 and Shergotty have similar REE patterns, with a subchondritic Nd/Sm ratio. However, the Sm/Nd isotopoics require a light REE-depleted source for ALHA 77005 (if the crystallization age is less than 600 Myr) and a light REE-enriched source for Shergotty. Distant Nd and Sr isotopic signatures may suggest different source regions for shergottites.

  8. Sm-Nd isotopic systematics of lherzolitic shergottite Yamato-793605

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Misawa, K.; Yamada, K.; Nakamura, N.; Morikawa, N.; Yamashita, K.; Premo, W.R.

    2006-01-01

    We have undertaken Sm-Nd isotopic studies on Yamato-793605 lherzolitic shergottite. The Sm-Nd internal isochron obtained for acid leachates and residues of whole-rock and separated mineral fractions yields an age of 185 ??16 Ma with an initial ??Nd value of +9.7??0.2. The obtained Sm-Nd age is, within analytical errors, identical to the Rb-Sr age of this meteorite as well as to the previous Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd ages of Allan Hills-77005 and Lewis Cliff 88516, although the ??Nd values are not identical to each other. Elemental abundances of lithophile trace elements remain nearly unaffected by aqueous alteration on the Martian surface. The isotopic systems of lherzolitic shergottites, thus, are considered to be indigenous, although disturbances by shock metamorphism are clearly observed. "Young ages of ??? 180 Ma" have been consistently obtained from this and previous Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd and U-Pb isotopic studies and appear to represent crystallization events. ?? 2006 National Institute of Polar Research.

  9. Lead Isotope Compositions of Acid Residues from Olivine-Phyric Shergottite Tissint: Implications for Heterogeneous Shergottite Source Reservoirs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moriwaki, R.; Usui, T.; Yokoyama, T.; Simon, J. I.; Jones, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    Geochemical studies of shergottites suggest that their parental magmas reflect mixtures between at least two distinct geochemical source reservoirs, producing correlations between radiogenic isotope compositions and trace element abundances. These correlations have been interpreted as indicating the presence of a reduced, incompatible element- depleted reservoir and an oxidized, incompatible- element-enriched reservoir. The former is clearly a depleted mantle source, but there is ongoing debate regarding the origin of the enriched reservoir. Two contrasting models have been proposed regarding the location and mixing process of the two geochemical source reservoirs: (1) assimilation of oxidized crust by mantle derived, reduced magmas, or (2) mixing of two distinct mantle reservoirs during melting. The former requires the ancient Martian crust to be the enriched source (crustal assimilation), whereas the latter requires isolation of a long-lived enriched mantle domain that probably originated from residual melts formed during solidification of a magma ocean (heterogeneous mantle model). This study conducts Pb isotope and trace element concentration analyses of sequential acid-leaching fractions (leachates and the final residues) from the geochemically depleted olivine-phyric shergottite Tissint. The results suggest that the Tissint magma is not isotopically uniform and sampled at least two geochemical source reservoirs, implying that either crustal assimilation or magma mixing would have played a role in the Tissint petrogenesis.

  10. Jarosite in the Shergottite Que 94201

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, D. K.; Ito, M.; Rao, M. N.; Hervig, R.; Williams, L. B.; Nyquist, Laurence E.; Peslier, A.

    2010-01-01

    Veins of the hydroxylated, potassium ferric sulfate mineral jarosite - KFe3(SO4)2(OH)6 - have been identified in the martian meteorite Queen Alexandra Range (QUE) 94201. Iron potassium sulfate had been reported in QUE 94201 by Wentworth and Gooding. Jarosite has been reported in other Martian meteorites - Roberts Massif (RBT) 04262, Miller Range (MIL) 03346, and Yamato 000593 - and it has been identified on the Martian surface by Moessbauer spectroscopy. Given the presence of jarosite on Mars, and the burgeoning interest in water-rock interactions on Mars, the question arises whether jarosite in Martian meteorites is formed by aqueous alteration on Mars, or in Antarctica. Hydrogen isotopes are potentially sensitive indicators of the site of formation or last equilibration of hydrous alteration minerals, because of the large difference between D/H ratio of the Martian atmosphere (and also presumably the cryosphere) and terrestrial hydrogen. The Martian atmospheric delta D(sub SMOW) ratio is approximately +4200%o, igneous minerals with substantial hydrogen (phosphates) have high D, +2000%o to +4700%o versus terrestrial waters with approximately 480%o to +130%o. The crystal chemistry and structure of jarosite are reviewed in Papi ke et al. Here we report hydrogen isotopes measured in jarosite in QUE 94201 by ion microprobe, and also report on the major element composition of jarosite measured by electron microprobe.

  11. Cathodoluminescence Characterization of Maskelynite and Alkali Feldspar in Shergottite (Dhofar 019)

    SciTech Connect

    Kayama, M.; Nakazato, T.; Nishido, H.; Ninagawa, K.; Gucsik, A.

    2009-08-17

    Dhofar 019 is classified as an olivine-bearing basaltic shergottite and consists of subhedral grains of pyroxene, olivine, feldspar mostly converted to maskelynite and minor alkali feldspar. The CL spectrum of its maskelynite exhibits an emission band at around 380 nm. Similar UV-blue emission has been observed in the plagioclase experimentally shocked at 30 and 40 GPa, but not in terrestrial plagioclase. This UV-blue emission is a notable characteristic of maskelynite. CL spectrum of alkali feldspar in Dhofar 019 has an emission bands at around 420 nm with no red emission. Terrestrial alkali feldspar actually consists of blue and red emission at 420 and 710 nm assigned to Al-O{sup -}-Al and Fe{sup 3+} centers, respectively. Maskelynite shows weak and broad Raman spectral peaks at around 500 and 580 cm{sup -1}. The Raman spectrum of alkali feldspar has a weak peak at 520 cm{sup -1}, whereas terrestrial counterpart shows the emission bands at 280, 400, 470, 520 and 1120 cm{sup -1}. Shock pressure on this meteorite transformed plagioclase and alkali feldspar into maskelynite and almost glass phase, respectively. It eliminates their luminescence centers, responsible for disappearance of yellow and/or red emission in CL of maskelynite and alkali feldspar. The absence of the red emission band in alkali feldspar can also be due to the lack of Fe{sup 3+} in the feldspar as it was reported for some lunar feldspars.

  12. Martian Pyroxenes in the Shergottite Meteorites; Zagami, SAU005, DAG476 and EETA79001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephen, N.; Benedix, G. K.; Bland, P.; Hamilton, V. E.

    2010-12-01

    The geology and surface mineralogy of Mars is characterised using remote sensing techniques such as thermal emission spectroscopy (TES) from instruments on a number of spacecraft currently orbiting Mars or gathered from roving missions on the Martian surface. However, the study of Martian meteorites is also important in efforts to further understand the geological history of Mars or to interpret mission data as they are believed to be the only available samples that give us direct clues as to Martian igneous processes [1]. We have recently demonstrated that the spectra of Martian-specific minerals can be determined using micro-spectroscopy [2] and that these spectra can be reliably obtained from thin sections of Martian meteorites [3]. Accurate modal mineralogy of these meteorites is also important [4]. In this study we are using a variety of techniques to build upon previous studies of these particular samples in order to fully characterise the nature of the 2 common pyroxenes found in Martian Shergottites; pigeonite and augite [5], [6]. Previous studies have shown that the Shergottite meteorites are dominated by pyroxene (pigeonite and augite in varying quantities) [4], [5], commonly but not always olivine, plagioclase or maskelynite/glass and also hydrous minerals, which separate the Martian meteorites from other achondrites [7]. Our microprobe study of meteorites Zagami, EETA79001, SAU005 and DAG476 in thin-section at the Natural History Museum, London shows a chemical variability within both the pigeonite and augite composition across individual grains in all thin sections; variation within either Mg or Ca concentration varies from core to rim within the grains. This variation can also be seen in modal mineralogy maps using SEM-derived element maps and the Photoshop® technique previously described [4], and in new micro-spectroscopy data, particularly within the Zagami meteorite. New mineral spectra have been gathered from the Shergottite thin-sections by

  13. Fe3+ partitioning during basalt differentiation on Mars: insights into the oxygen fugacity of the shergottite mantle source(s).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medard, E.; Martin, A. M.; Collinet, M.; Righter, K.; Grove, T. L.; Newville, M.; Lanzirotti, A.

    2014-12-01

    primitive shergottites record a mantle fO2 around FMQ-2.5, consistent with the lowest fO2estimated for surface basalts [5]. [1] McCanta et al. (2004) Am Min 89:1685-1693; [2] Mallmann and O'Neill (2009) J Petrol 50:1765-1794; [3] Righter et al. (2013) Am Min 98:616-628; [4] Kress and Carmichael (1991) CMP 108:82-92; [5] Schmidt ME et al. (2014) EPSL 384:198-208.

  14. Constraints on the Parental Melts of Enriched Shergottites from Image Analysis and High Pressure Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collinet, M.; Medard, E.; Devouard, B.; Peslier, A.

    2012-01-01

    Martian basalts can be classified in at least two geochemically different families: enriched and depleted shergottites. Enriched shergottites are characterized by higher incompatible element concentrations and initial Sr-87/Sr-86 and lower initial Nd-143/Nd-144 and Hf-176/Hf-177 than depleted shergottites [e.g. 1, 2]. It is now generally admitted that shergottites result from the melting of at least two distinct mantle reservoirs [e.g. 2, 3]. Some of the olivine-phyric shergottites (either depleted or enriched), the most magnesian Martian basalts, could represent primitive melts, which are of considerable interest to constrain mantle sources. Two depleted olivine-phyric shergottites, Yamato (Y) 980459 and Northwest Africa (NWA) 5789, are in equilibrium with their most magnesian olivine (Fig. 1) and their bulk rock compositions are inferred to represent primitive melts [4, 5]. Larkman Nunatak (LAR) 06319 [3, 6, 7] and NWA 1068 [8], the most magnesian enriched basalts, have bulk Mg# that are too high to be in equilibrium with their olivine megacryst cores. Parental melt compositions have been estimated by subtracting the most magnesian olivine from the bulk rock composition, assuming that olivine megacrysts have partially accumulated [3, 9]. However, because this technique does not account for the actual petrography of these meteorites, we used image analysis to study these rocks history, reconstruct their parent magma and understand the nature of olivine megacrysts.

  15. An "Andesitic" Component in Shergottites with Restored LREE Abundances?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C.-Y.; Wiesmann, H.; Barrat, J. A.

    2002-01-01

    The shergottite Martian meteorites present a variety of oft-confusing petrologic features. In particular, represented among this subgroup are basalts with very depleted LREE abundances, as well as those with nearly chondritic overall REE abundances. The LREE-depleted basalts appear to more closely record the REE and isotopic features of their mantle source legions. Those basalts with more nearly chondritic REE abundances appear to contain an extra component often referred to as a "crustal" component. The addition of the crustal component tends to restore the overall REE abundance pattern towards chondritic relative abundances. Here we suggest that the crustal component could derive from andesitic rocks observed remotely to occur on the Martian surface, and which were analysed at the Pathfinder site.

  16. An "Andestic" Component in Shergottites with Restored LREE Abundances?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C.-Y.; Wiesmann, H.; Barrat, J. A.

    2002-01-01

    The shergottite Martian meteorites present a variety of oft-confusing petrologic features. In particular, represented among this subgroup are basalts with very depleted LREE abundances, as well as those with nearly chondritic overall REE abundances. The LREE-depleted basalts appear to more closely record the REE and isotopic features of their mantle source regions. Those basalts with more nearly chondritic REE abundances appear to contain an extra component often referred to as a "crustal" component. The addition of the crustal component tends to restore the overall REE abundance pattern towards chondritic relative abundances. Here we suggest that the crustal component could derive from "andesitic" rocks observed remotely to occur on the Martian surface, and which were analysed at the Pathfinder site.

  17. Concordant Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd Ages for NWA 1460: A 340 Ma Old Basaltic Shergottite Related to Lherzolitic Shergottites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C-Y; Reese, Y. D.; Irving, A. J.

    2006-01-01

    Preliminary Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd ages reported by [1] for the NWA 1460 basaltic shergottite are refined to 336+/-14 Ma and 345+/-21 Ma, respectively. These concordant ages are interpreted as dating a lava flow on the Martian surface. The initial Sr and Nd isotopic compositions of NWA 1460 suggest it is an earlier melting product of a Martian mantle source region similar to those of the lherzolitic shergottites and basaltic shergottite EETA79001, lithology B. We also examine the suggestion that generally "young" ages for other Martian meteorites should be reinterpreted in light of Pb-207/Pb-206 - Pb-204/Pb-206 isotopic systematics [2]. Published U-Pb isotopic data for nakhlites are consistent with ages of approx.1.36 Ga. The UPb isotopic systematics of some Martian shergottites and lherzolites that have been suggested to be approx.4 Ga old [2] are complex. We nevertheless suggest the data are consistent with crystallization ages of approx.173 Ma when variations in the composition of in situ initial Pb as well as extraneous Pb components are considered.

  18. Melt Inclusion Analysis of RBT 04262 with Relationship to Shergottites and Mars Surface Compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, S. A.; Brandon, A. D.; Peslier, A. H.

    2015-01-01

    Martian meteorite RBT 04262 is in the shergottite class. It displays the two lithologies typically found in "lherzolitic shergottites": one with a poikilitic texture of large pyroxene enclosing olivine and another with non-poikilitic texture. In the case of RBT 04262, the latter strongly ressembles an olivine- phyric shergottite which led the initial classification of this meteorite in that class. RBT 04262 has been studied with regards to its petrology, geochemistry and cosmic ray exposure and belongs to the enriched oxidized end-member of the shergottites. Studies on RBT 04262 have primarily focused on the bulk rock composition or each of the lithologies independently. To further elucidate RBT 04262's petrology and use it to better understand Martian geologic history, an in-depth study of its melt inclusions (MI) is being conducted. The MI chosen for this study are found within olivine grains. MI are thought to be trapped melts of the crystallizing magma preserved by the encapsulating olivine and offer snapshots of the composition of the magma as it evolves. Some MI, in the most Mg-rich part of the olivine of olivine-pyric shergottites, may even be representative of the meteorite parent melt.

  19. Mineral chemistry of the shergottites, nakhlites, Chassigny, Brachina, pallasites and urelites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. V.; Steele, I. M.; Leitch, C. A.

    1983-11-01

    The mineral chemistry is compared for selected achondrites. Olivine in the ALHA 77005 and EETA 79001 shergottites, olivine-rich Chassigny and Brachina, and the nakhlites, contains Ni indicative of oxidizing conditions, whereas pallasitic and ureilitic olivines contain much lower Ni due to reducing conditions. The Brachina olivine and pyroxene have distinctively higher Fe/Mn than the shergottites and Chassigny, further indicating that Brachina is unique. The Chassigny and 77005 olivines contain lower Cr2O3 (0.03 wt. pct) than the Brachina and 79001 olivines. Values of Fe/Mn for cumulus augites in nakhlites are higher than for the shergottites, whereas those for ferropigeonites are not. The 77005 shergottite contains troilite FeS in contrast to 79001, Shergotty, Zagami, and Chassigny, which contain pyrrhotite. Further analyses are needed, but the present survey indicates that at least Brachina is not chemically cogenetic with the other 'oxidized achondrites', and that the Fe/Mn ratio of the cumulus augites in nakhlites is a problem for the assignment of the nakhlites, shergottites, and Chassigny to a single genetic group.

  20. Rb-Sr Isotopic Studies Of Antarctic Lherzolitic Shergottite Yamato 984028

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, C.-Y.; Nyquist, L. E.; Reese, Y.; Misawa, K.

    2009-01-01

    Yamato 984028 is a Martian meteorite found in the Yamato Mountains of Antarctica. It is classified as a lherzolitic shergottite and petrographically resembles several other lherzolitic shergottites, i.e. ALHA 77005, LEW 88516, Y-793605 and Y-000027/47/97 [e.g. 2-5]. These meteorites have similarly young crystallization ages (152-185 Ma) as enriched basaltic shergottites (157-203 Ma), but have very different ejection ages (approximately 4 Ma vs. approximately 2.5 Ma), thus they came from different martian target crater areas. Lherzolitic shergottites have mg-values approximately 0.70 and represent the most mafic olivine-pyroxene cumulates. Their parental magmas were melts derived probably from the primitive Martian mantle. Here we present Rb-Sr isotopic data for Y-984028 and compare these data with those obtained from other lherzolitic and olivine-phyric basaltic shergottites to better understand the isotopic characteristics of their primitive mantle source regions. Corresponding Sm-Nd analyses for Y-984028 are in progress.

  1. Beryllium-10 contents of shergottites, nakhlites, and Chassigny

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pal, D. K.; Tuniz, C.; Moniot, R. K.; Savin, W.; Kruse, T.

    1986-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry gives the following Be-10 contents (dpm/kg) for the SNC meteorites: Shergotty, 13.0 + or - 1.5 and 17.3 + or - 2.7; Zagami, 18.6 + or - 2.5 and 20.0 + or - 3.2; ALHA 77005, 15 + or - 3; EETA 79001A, 7.8 + or - 1.1 and 6.3 + or - 0.5; EETA 79001B, 8.5 + or - 1.1; Nakhla, 19.7 + or - 3.3; Lafayette, 18.1 + or - 2.5; Governador Valadares, 25.6 + or - 3.6; Chassigny, 20.5 + or - 3.1. The Be-10 contents of the NC meteorites indicate that significant accumulation of cosmogenic nuclides occurred in decimeter rather than planetary-size bodies. The agreement of the He-3, Ne-21, and Be-10 exposure ages of the shergottites also supports small-body irradiation. A long terrestrial age for EETA 79001 appears unlikely.

  2. The Shergottite Age Paradox and the Relative Probabilities of Ejecting Martian Meteorites of Differing Ages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borg, L. E.; Shih, C.-Y.; Nyquist, L. E.

    1998-01-01

    The apparent paradox that the majority of impacts yielding Martian meteorites appear to have taken place on only a few percent of the Martian surface can be resolved if all the shergottites were ejected in a single event rather than in multiple events as expected from variations in their cosmic ray exposure and crystallization ages. If the shergottite-ejection event is assigned to one of three craters in the vicinity of Olympus Mons that were previously identified as candidate source craters for the SNC (Shergottites, Nakhlites, Chassigny) meteorites, and the nakhlite event to another candidate crater in the vicinity of Ceraunius Tholus, the implied ages of the surrounding terranes agree well with crater density ages. EN,en for high cratering rates (minimum ages), the likely origin of the shergottites is in the Tharsis region, and the paradox of too many meteorites from too little terrane remains for multiple shergottite-ejection events. However, for high cratering rates it is possible to consider sources for the nakhlltes which are away from the Tharsis region. The meteorite-yielding impacts may have been widely dispersed with sources of the young SNC meteorites in the northern plains, and the source of the ancient orthopyroxenite, ALH84001, in the ancient southern uplands. Oblique-impact craters can be identified with the sources of the nakhlites and the orthopyroxenite,, respectively, in the nominal cratering rate model, and with the shergottites and orthopyroxenite, respectively, in the high cratering rate model. Thus, oblique impacts deserve renewed attention as an ejection mechanism for Martian meteorites.

  3. Noble gases in LEW88516 shergottite: Evidence for exposure age pairing with ALH77005

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, D. D.; Garrison, D. H.

    1993-01-01

    LEW88516 contains excess amounts of radiogenic Ar-40 and Xe-129 that are slightly greater than those observed in ALH77005, but in the same relative proportion as much larger excesses observed in EET79001. Cosmogenic He-3 and Ne-21 abundances in LEW88516 are very similar to those for ALH77005 and are consistent with a common initiation of cosmic ray exposure -2.8 Myr ago for four of the five shergottites. Exposure of these four shergottites could have been under different shielding in a common meteoroid, or in several objects.

  4. Water in Nominally Anhydrous Minerals from Nakhlites and Shergottites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peslier, Anne H.

    2013-01-01

    Estimating the amount of water in the interior of terrestrial planets has tremendous implications on our understanding of solar nebula evolution, planet formation and geological history, and extraterrestrial volcanism. Mars has been a recent focus of such enquiry with complementary datasets from spacecrafts, rovers and martian meteorite studies. In planetary interiors, water can be dissolved in fluids or melts and hydrous phases, but can also be locked as protons attached to structural oxygen in lattice defects in nominally anhydrous minerals (NAM) such as olivine, pyroxene, or feldspar [1-3]. Measuring water in Martian meteorite NAM is challenging because the minerals are fragile and riddled with fractures from impact processes that makes them break apart during sample processing. Moreover, curing the sample in epoxy causes problems for the two main water analysis techniques, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) and secondary ionization mass spectrometry (SIMS). Measurements to date have resulted in a heated debate on how much water the mantle of Mars contains. SIMS studies of NAM [4], amphiboles [5], and apatites [6-8] from Martian meteorites report finding enough water in these phases to infer that the martian mantle is as hydrous as that of the Earth. On the other hand, a SIMS study of glass in olivine melt inclusions from shergottites concludes that the Martian mantle is much drier [9]. The latter interpretation is also supported by the fact that most martian hydrous minerals generally have the relevant sites filled with Cl and F instead of H [10,11]. As for experimental results, martian basalt compositions can be reproduced using water as well as Cl in the parent melts [12,13]. Here FTIR is used to measure water in martian meteorite minerals in order to constrain the origin of the distribution of water in martian meteorite phases.

  5. Ar-Ar Age of NWA-1460 and Evidence For Young Formation Ages of the Shergottites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald D.; Park, Jisun

    2006-01-01

    Agreement of Ar-Ar, Sm-Nd, and Rb-Sr ages for NWA1460, and the inconsistency between a low shock-heating temperature for Zagami and the proposition that a 4.0 Gyr-old Zagami lost most of its Ar-40 are inconsistent with ancient formation ages for these shergottites, but are consistent with relatively young igneous formation ages.

  6. Rb-Sr And Sm-Nd Ages, and Petrogenesis of Depleted Shergottite Northwest Africa 5990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, C. Y.; Nyquist, L. E.; Reese, Y.; Irving, A. J.

    2011-01-01

    Northwest Africa (NWA) 5990 is a very fresh Martian meteorite recently found on Hamada du Draa, Morocco and was classified as an olivine-bearing diabasic igneous rock related to depleted shergottites [1]. The study of [1] also showed that NWA 5990 resembles QUE 94201 in chemical, textural and isotopic aspects, except QUE 94201 contains no olivine. The depleted shergottites are characterized by REE patterns that are highly depleted in LREE, older Sm-Nd ages of 327-575 Ma and highly LREE-depleted sources with Nd= +35+48 [2-7]. Age-dating these samples by Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr methods is very challenging because they have been strongly shocked and contain very low abundances of light rare earth elements (Sm and Nd), Rb and Sr. In addition, terrestrial contaminants which are commonly present in desert meteorites will compromise the equilibrium of isotopic systems. Since NWA 5990 is a very fresh meteorite, it probably has not been subject to significant desert weathering and thus is a good sample for isotopic studies. In this report, we present Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotopic results for NWA 5990, discuss the correlation of the determined ages with those of other depleted shergottites, especially QUE 94201, and discuss the petrogenesis of depleted shergottites.

  7. 39Ar-40Ar "ages" and origin of excess 40Ar in Martian shergottites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogard, Donald; Park, Jisun; Garrison, Daniel

    2009-06-01

    We report new 39Ar-40Ar measurements on 15 plagioclase, pyroxene, and/or whole rock samples of 8 Martian shergottites. All age spectra suggest ages older than the meteorite formation ages, as defined by Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr isochrons. Employing isochron plots, only Los Angeles plagioclase and possibly Northwest Africa (NWA) 3171 plagioclase give ages in agreement with their formation ages. Isochrons for all shergottite samples reveal the presence of trapped Martian 40Ar (40Arxs), which exists in variable amounts in different lattice locations. Some 40Arxs is uniformly distributed throughout the lattice, resulting in a positive isochron intercept, and other 40Arxs occurs in association with K-bearing minerals and increases the isochron slope. These samples demonstrate situations where linear Ar isochrons give false ages that are too old. After subtracting 40Ar*that would accumulate by 40K decay since meteorite formation and small amounts of terrestrial 40Ar, all young age samples give similar 40Arxs concentrations of ˜1-2 × 10-6cm3/g, but a variation in K content by a factor of ˜80. Previously reported NASA Johnson Space Center data for Zagami, Shergotty, Yamato (Y-) 000097, Y-793605, and Queen Alexandra Range (QUE) 94201 shergottites show similar concentrations of 40Arxs to the new meteorite data reported here. Similar 40Arxs in different minerals and meteorites cannot be explained as arising from Martian atmosphere carried in strongly shocked phases such as melt veins. We invoke the explanation given by Bogard and Park (2008) for Zagami, that this 40Arxs in shergottites was acquired from the magma. Similarity in 40Arxs among shergottites may reveal common magma sources and/or similar magma generation and emplacement processes.

  8. Petrography and geochemistry of the enriched basaltic shergottite Northwest Africa 2975

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qi; Xiao, Long; Balta, J. Brian; Baziotis, Ioannis P.; Hsu, Weibiao; Guan, Yunbin

    2015-11-01

    We present a study of the petrology and geochemistry of basaltic shergottite Northwest Africa 2975 (NWA 2975). NWA 2975 is a medium-grained basalt with subophitic to granular texture. Electron microprobe (EMP) analyses show two distinct pyroxene compositional trends and patchy compositional zoning patterns distinct from those observed in other meteorites such as Shergotty or QUE 94201. As no bulk sample was available to us for whole rock measurements, we characterized the fusion crust and its variability by secondary ion mass spectrometer (SIMS) measurements and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy (LA-ICP-MS) analyses as a best-available proxy for the bulk rock composition. The fusion crust major element composition is comparable to the bulk composition of other enriched basaltic shergottites, placing NWA 2975 within that sample group. The CI-normalized REE (rare earth element) patterns are flat and also parallel to those of other enriched basaltic shergottites. Merrillite is the major REE carrier and has a flat REE pattern with slight depletion of Eu, parallel to REE patterns of merrillites from other basaltic shergottites. The oxidation state of NWA 2975 calculated from Fe-Ti oxide pairs is NNO-1.86, close to the QFM buffer. NWA 2975 represents a sample from the oxidized and enriched shergottite group, and our measurements and constraints on its origin are consistent with the hypothesis of two distinct Martian mantle reservoirs: a reduced, LREE-depleted reservoir and an oxidized, LREE-enriched reservoir. Stishovite, possibly seifertite, and dense SiO2 glass were also identified in the meteorite, allowing us to infer that NWA 2975 experienced a realistic shock pressure of ~30 GPa.

  9. Comparing MSL ChemCam Analyses to Shergottite and Terrestrial Rock Types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridges, J.; Edwards, P.; Dyar, M. D.; Fisk, M. R.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Forni, O.; Wiens, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    The ChemCam instrument on Mars Science Laboratory determines the elemental composition of target areas at ≤6m range, and has acquired over 145000 spectra. Here we use the individual shots and averaged targets with the PLS1 dataset on both outcrops and float rocks. Various localities were sampled, including Rocknest, Sheepbed, Shaler, Cooperstown, Darwin and Kimberley. Rocknest and Sheepbed shots have quite homogeneous, basaltic compositions with Gini factors of 0.66 and 0.67 respectively (a Gini factor of 0 indicates a completely homogeneous dataset). Shaler is similarly homogeneous with a Gini factor 0.62 but is more felsic in composition. Darwin and Kimberley both follow a basaltic mixing trend between pyroxene and alkali feldspars. They have a heterogeneous spread with factors of 0.77 and 0.74. Kimberley and Darwin are the most alkaline outcrops, and then Shaler, finally Sheepbed and Rocknest are the least alkaline. The Na2O and K2O contents are controlled by variable abundances of alkaline feldspars. Many float rocks were also analysed. They include samples with mm-sized, visible feldspar grains, which are probable phenocrysts and cumulate grains. These rocks likely come from different sources as their compositions are quite heterogeneous e.g. the Gini factor for the whole set of feldspar-rich float rocks is 0.76 (using an average composition for each target). We compare these compositions with data from the MER APXS, and from this we can see that the float rocks sampled by MSL are closer to the alkaline feldspar end of the basaltic mixing trend than the more FeO+MgO-rich MER basalts (e.g. Rieder et al. 2004 10.1126/science.1104358) The basaltic shergottite meteorites also have higher FeO+MgO contents and lower Al2O3 than the MSL rocks. When compared on Al2O3-(FeOMgO)-(Na2OK2O)-CaO and other plots, the float rocks have compositions similar to a spread between terrestrial diorite and gabbro, though some have high Na2O+K2O contents.

  10. An Exploration Zone in Cerberus Containing Young and Old Terrains, Including Fossae/Faults and Shergottite Distal Ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, S. P.; Niles, P. B.; Bell, M. S.; Milbury, C.; Rice, J. W.; Burton, A. S.; Archer, P. D.; Rampe, E. B.; Piqueux, S.

    2015-10-01

    Cerberus contains Amazonian lava flows embaying a range of photogeologic units: ridged plains, heavily cratered terrain, highland knobs, and perhaps the Medusa Fossae Fm. Zunil Crater distal ejecta produced secondary crater fields (of shergottites?).

  11. Age and Petrogenesis of Picritic Shergottite NWA1068: Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr Isotopic Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, C.-Y.; Nyquist, L. E.; Wiesmann, H.; Barrat, J. A.

    2003-01-01

    NWA 1068 is a 577g picritic shergottite found in the Moroccan Sahara in 2001. The meteorite resembles several other picritic shergottites, e.g. EETA79001B, DaG476, SaU005 and Dho019, in major-element chemistry and mineralogy, but it differs significantly from these meteorites in REE distribution pattern. It has a slightly LREE-depleted pattern commonly shared by some olivine-free basaltic shergottites, e.g. Shergotty, Zagami and Los Angeles, but not QUE94201. Detailed geochemical and mineral-petrological studies were given in. We performed Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotopic analyses on this rock to determine its crystallization age and to study the petrogenetic relationship between this meteorite and other basaltic and pricritic shergottites.

  12. Gusev-Meridiani-Type Soil Component Dissolved in Some Shock Glasses in Shergottites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, D. K.; Rao, M. N.; Nyquist, L. E.; Shi, C. Y.; Sutton, S.; Harrison, D. H.

    2015-01-01

    Modal analysis, based on APXS, MiniTES and Mossbauer results obtained at Gusev and Meridiani sites on Mars, indicates that Martian soils consist predominantly of igneous minerals such as olivine, pyroxene and feldspar (approximately70 - 80%), with the balance consisting of alteration minerals such as sulfates, silica and chlorides]. These studies also showed that soil alteration did not occur in-situ and igneous and alteration components are derived from different sources. Below, we analyse the chemical abundance data obtained from shock glasses in shergottites using mass balance mixing models. In these models, the two main end members used are (a) host rock chemical composition and (b) the GM soils average composition as the second component. Here, we consider the S-bearing phases as indicators of added alteration phases in the shock glasses and GM soils. Although the S-bearing phase in shock glasses occurs as micron sized sulfide blebs, we showed in earlier abstracts that sulfur was originally present as sulfate in impact glass-precursor materials and was subsequently reduced to sulfide during shock melting. This conclusion is based on results obtained from S-K XANES studies, Fe/S atomic ratios in sulfide blebs and 34S/32S isotopic measurements in these sulfide blebs. Additionally, sulfur in several EET79001 Lith. A glasses is found to correlate positively with Al2O3 and CaO (and negatively with FeO and MgO), suggesting the presence of Al- and Ca- sul-fate-bearing phases. The distribution of the 87Sr/86Sr iso-topic ratios determined in Lith. A glasses (,27 &,188 and,54) indicate that Martian soil gypsum and host rock material were mixed with each other in the glass precursors. In some vugs in Lith A glass,27 detected gypsum laths. Furthermore, the Martian regolith-de-rived component (where sulfur typically occurs as sul-fate) is identified in these glasses by determining neutron produced isotopic excesses/deficits in 80Kr and 149Sm isotopes. Moreover, the

  13. Weathering features and secondary minerals in Antarctic Shergottites ALHA77005 and LEW88516

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentworth, Susan J.; Gooding, James L.

    1993-01-01

    Previous work has shown that all three sub-groups of the shergottite, nakhlite, and chassignite (SNC) clan of meteorites contain aqueous precipitates of probable pre-terrestrial origin. In the context of secondary minerals, the most thoroughly studied shergottite has been Elephant Moraine, Antarctica A79001 (EETA79001). The recognition of LEW88516 as the latest SNC specimen, and its close similarity with ALHA77005, invite a comparative study of the latter two meteorites, and with EETA79001, from the perspective of aqueous alteration. The fusion crusts of the two meteorites are quite similar except that ALHA77005 is more vesicular (possibly indicating a higher indigenous volatile content). Secondary aluminosilicates (and salts on LEW88516) of definite Antarctic origin partially fill vesicles and fractures on both fusion crusts. Interior samples of the two meteorites are grossly similar in that traces of secondary minerals are present in both.

  14. Correlations Between Surficial Sulfur and a REE Crustal Assimilation Signature in Martian Shergottites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. H.; Franz, H. B.

    2015-01-01

    Compared to terrestrial basalts, the Martian shergottite meteorites have an extraordinary range of Sr and Nd isotopic signatures. In addition, the S isotopic compositions of many shergottites show evidence of interaction with the Martian surface/ atmosphere through mass-independent isotopic fractionations (MIF, positive, non-zero delta(exp 33)S) that must have originated in the Martian atmosphere, yet ultimately were incorporated into igneous sulfides (AVS - acid-volatile sulfur). These positive delta(exp 33)S signatures are thought to be governed by solar UV photochemical processes. And to the extent that S is bound to Mars and not lost to space from the upper atmosphere, a positive delta(exp 33)S reservoir must be mass balanced by a complementary negative reservoir.

  15. Stabile Chlorine Isotope Study of Martian Shergottites and Nakhlites; Whole Rock and Acid Leachates and Residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, N.; Nyquist, L. E.; Reese, Y.; Shih, C-Y; Fujitani, T.; Okano, O.

    2011-01-01

    We have established a precise analytical technique for stable chlorine isotope measurements of tiny planetary materials by TIMS (Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry) [1], for which the results are basically consistent with the IRMS tech-nique (gas source mass spectrometry) [2,3,4]. We present here results for Martian shergottites and nakhlites; whole rocks, HNO3-leachates and residues, and discuss the chlorine isotope evolution of planetary Mars.

  16. Sulfide isotopic compositions in shergottites and ALH84001, and possible implications for life on Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, J.P.; McSween, H.Y. Jr.; Riciputi, L.R.

    1997-10-01

    The shergottite and ALH84001 meteorites hold keys for understanding geologic and possibly biologic processes on Mars. Recently, it has been proposed that carbonates in ALH84001, and the Fe-sulfides they contain, are products of extraterrestrial biogenic activity. Here we report ion microprobe analyses of sulfides in shergottites and ALH84001. The sulfur isotope ratios of igneous pyrrhotites in shergottites (mean {delta}{sup 34}S{sub CDT}: Shergotty = -0.4{per_thousand}, Zagami = +2.7{per_thousand}, EETA79001A = 1.9{per_thousand}, EETA79001B = -1.7{per_thousand}, LEW88516 = -1.9{per_thousand}, QUE94201 = +0.8{per_thousand}) are similar to those of terrestrial ocean-floor basalts, suggesting that the sulfur isotopic composition of the Martian mantle may be similar to that of the mantle of the Earth. The sulfur isotopic systematics of ALH84001 sulfides are distinct from the shergottites. Measured sulfur isotope ratios of eight pyrite grains ({delta}{sup 34}S{sub CDT} = +2.0 to +7.3{per_thousand}) in crushed zones confirm previously reported analyses of isotopically heavy sulfides and are indistinguishable from an Fe-sulfide zone within a carbonate globule ({delta}{sup 34}S{sub CDT} = +6.0{per_thousand}). Analyses of synthesized, fine-grained mixtures of sulfide, carbonate, and magnetite indicate than the measured sulfur isotope ratio is independent of the presence of carbonate and magnetite in the sputtered volume, confirming the accuracy of the analysis of the fine-grained sulfide in the carbonate globule. Terrestrial biogenic sulfate reduction typically results in light isotopic enrichments. The similarity of {delta}{sup 34}S values of the sulfides in ALH84001 imply that the Fe-sulfide zones within ALH84001 carbonates are probably not the result of bacterial reduction of sulfate. 38 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Tracking the Martian Mantle Signature in Olivine-Hosted Melt Inclusions of Basaltic Shergottites Yamato 980459 and Tissint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, T. J.; Simon, J. I.; Jones, J. H.; Usui, T.; Moriwaki, R.; Economos, R.; Schmitt, A.; McKeegan, K.

    2014-01-01

    The Martian shergottite meteorites are basaltic to lherzolitic igneous rocks that represent a period of relatively young mantle melting and volcanism, approximately 600-150 Ma (e.g. [1,2]). Their isotopic and elemental composition has provided important constraints on the accretion, evolution, structure and bulk composition of Mars. Measurements of the radiogenic isotope and trace element concentrations of the shergottite meteorite suite have identified two end-members; (1) incompatible trace element enriched, with radiogenic Sr and negative epsilon Nd-143, and (2) incompatible traceelement depleted, with non-radiogenic Sr and positive epsilon 143-Nd(e.g. [3-5]). The depleted component represents the shergottite martian mantle. The identity of the enriched component is subject to debate, and has been proposed to be either assimilated ancient martian crust [3] or from enriched domains in the martian mantle that may represent a late-stage magma ocean crystallization residue [4,5]. Olivine-phyric shergottites typically have the highest Mg# of the shergottite group and represent near-primitive melts having experienced minimal fractional crystallization or crystal accumulation [6]. Olivine-hosted melt inclusions (MI) in these shergottites represent the most chemically primitive components available to understand the nature of their source(s), melting processes in the martian mantle, and origin of enriched components. We present trace element compositions of olivine hosted melt inclusions in two depleted olivinephyric shergottites, Yamato 980459 (Y98) and Tissint (Fig. 1), and the mesostasis glass of Y98, using Secondary Ionization Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). We discuss our data in the context of understanding the nature and origin of the depleted martian mantle and the emergence of the enriched component.

  18. Excess Ar-40 in the Zagami Shergottite: Does It Reveal Crystallization History?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald D.; Park, Jisun

    2007-01-01

    The Zagami basaltic shergottite has fine- and coarse-grained (FG & CG) areas, which may reflect partial crystallization in a deep, slowly cooled magma chamber to form Mg-rich pyroxene cores, followed by entrainment of these crystals into a magma that rose and crystallized near the surface. Late-stage melt pockets formed mesostasis and feldspar (maskelynite) having a range of compositions, but low water abundance. Higher I(sub Sr) in the FG portion may result from the second stage having incorporated old crustal rocks that failed to reach isotopic equilibrium. Zagami, like other shergottites, contains excess Ar-40(sub xs) beyond that expected from internal decay of K-40 during its Sm-Nd age of 177 Myr. We suggest that at least a portion of this Ar-40(sub xs) in Zagami and some other shergottites was inherited from the magma, much as is the case of MORBs on Earth. We made Ar-39-Ar-40 age determinations on feldspar and pyroxene separates from both the FG and CG portions of Zagami. If Zagami experienced an evolving fractional crystallization history, including possible crustal contamination of the magma, that might be indicated in differing amounts of Ar-40(sub xs) between mineral phases and between FG and CG portions.

  19. Bounce Rock-A shergottite-like basalt encountered at Meridiani Planum, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zipfel, J.; Schroder, C.; Jolliff, B.L.; Gellert, Ralf; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Rieder, R.; Anderson, R.; Bell, J.F.; Brückner, J.; Crisp, J.A.; Christensen, P.R.; Clark, B. C.; de Souza, P.A.; Dreibus, G.; D'uston, C.; Economou, T.; Gorevan, S.P.; Hahn, B.C.; Klingelhofer, G.; McCoy, T.J.; McSween, H.Y.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R.V.; Rodionov, D.S.; Squyres, S. W.; Wanke, H.; Wright, S.P.; Wyatt, M.B.; Yen, A. S.

    2011-01-01

    The Opportunity rover of the Mars Exploration Rover mission encountered an isolated rock fragment with textural, mineralogical, and chemical properties similar to basaltic shergottites. This finding was confirmed by all rover instruments, and a comprehensive study of these results is reported here. Spectra from the miniature thermal emission spectrometer and the Panoramic Camera reveal a pyroxene-rich mineralogy, which is also evident in M??ssbauer spectra and in normative mineralogy derived from bulk chemistry measured by the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer. The correspondence of Bounce Rock's chemical composition with the composition of certain basaltic shergottites, especially Elephant Moraine (EET) 79001 lithology B and Queen Alexandra Range (QUE) 94201, is very close, with only Cl, Fe, and Ti exhibiting deviations. Chemical analyses further demonstrate characteristics typical of Mars such as the Fe/Mn ratio and P concentrations. Possible shock features support the idea that Bounce Rock was ejected from an impact crater, most likely in the Meridiani Planum region. Bopolu crater, 19.3km in diameter, located 75km to the southwest could be the source crater. To date, no other rocks of this composition have been encountered by any of the rovers on Mars. The finding of Bounce Rock by the Opportunity rover provides further direct evidence for an origin of basaltic shergottite meteorites from Mars. ?? The Meteoritical Society, 2011.

  20. Bounce Rock - A shergottite-like basalt encountered at Meridiani Planum, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zipfel, Jutta; Schräder, Christian; Jolliff, Bradley L.; Gellert, Ralf; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Rieder, Rudolf; Anderson, Robert; Bell, James F., III; Brückner, Johannes; Crisp, Joy A.; Christensen, Philip R.; Clark, Benton C.; de Souza, Paulo A., Jr.; Dreibus, Gerlind; D'Uston, Claude; Economou, Thanasis; Gorevan, Steven P.; Hahn, Brian C.; Klingelhäfer, Göstar; McCoy, Timothy J.; McSween, Harry Y., Jr.; Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, Richard V.; Rodionov, Daniel S.; Squyres, Steven W.; Wńnke, Heinrich; Wright, Shawn P.; Wyatt, Michael B.; Yen, Albert S.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract- The Opportunity rover of the Mars Exploration Rover mission encountered an isolated rock fragment with textural, mineralogical, and chemical properties similar to basaltic shergottites. This finding was confirmed by all rover instruments, and a comprehensive study of these results is reported here. Spectra from the miniature thermal emission spectrometer and the Panoramic Camera reveal a pyroxene-rich mineralogy, which is also evident in Mössbauer spectra and in normative mineralogy derived from bulk chemistry measured by the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer. The correspondence of Bounce Rock’s chemical composition with the composition of certain basaltic shergottites, especially Elephant Moraine (EET) 79001 lithology B and Queen Alexandra Range (QUE) 94201, is very close, with only Cl, Fe, and Ti exhibiting deviations. Chemical analyses further demonstrate characteristics typical of Mars such as the Fe/Mn ratio and P concentrations. Possible shock features support the idea that Bounce Rock was ejected from an impact crater, most likely in the Meridiani Planum region. Bopolu crater, 19.3 km in diameter, located 75 km to the southwest could be the source crater. To date, no other rocks of this composition have been encountered by any of the rovers on Mars. The finding of Bounce Rock by the Opportunity rover provides further direct evidence for an origin of basaltic shergottite meteorites from Mars.

  1. Trace element systematics and 147Sm- 143Nd and 176Lu- 176Hf ages of Larkman Nunatak 06319: Closed-system fractional crystallization of an enriched shergottite magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafer, J. T.; Brandon, A. D.; Lapen, T. J.; Righter, M.; Peslier, A. H.; Beard, B. L.

    2010-12-01

    Combined 147Sm- 143Nd and 176Lu- 176Hf chronology of the martian meteorite Larkman Nunatak (LAR) 06319 indicates an igneous crystallization age of 193 ± 20 Ma (2 σ weighted mean). The individual 147Sm- 143Nd and 176Lu- 176Hf internal isochron ages are 183 ± 12 Ma and 197 ± 29 Ma, respectively, and are concordant with two previously determined 147Sm- 143Nd and 87Rb- 87Sr internal isochron ages of 190 ± 26 Ma and 207 ± 14 Ma, respectively ( Shih et al., 2009). With respect to the 147Sm- 143Nd isotope systematics, maskelynite lies above the isochron defined by primary igneous phases and is therefore not in isotopic equilibrium with the other phases in the rock. Non-isochronous maskelynite is interpreted to result from shock-induced reaction between plagioclase and partial melts of pyroxene and phosphate during transformation to maskelynite, which resulted in it having unsupported 143Nd relative to its measured 147Sm/ 144Nd ratio. The rare earth element (REE) and high field strength element (HFSE) compositions of major constituent minerals can be modeled as the result of progressive crystallization of a single magma with no addition of secondary components. The concordant ages, combined with igneous textures, mineralogy, and trace element systematics indicate that the weighted average of the radiometric ages records the true crystallization age of this rock. The young igneous age for LAR 06319 and other shergottites are in conflict with models that advocate for circa 4.1 Ga crystallization ages of shergottites from Pb isotope compositions, however, they are consistent with updated crater counting statistics indicating that young volcanic activity on Mars is more widespread than previously realized ( Neukum et al., 2010).

  2. Petrology and Mineral Chemistry of New Olivine-Phyric Shergottite RBT04262

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalton, H. A.; Peslier, A. H.; Brandon, A. D.; Lee, C.-T. A.; Lapen, T. J.

    2008-01-01

    RBT04262 was found by the 2004-2005 ANSMET team at the Roberts Massif in Antarctica. It is paired with RBT04261 and is classified as an olivine-phyric shergottite. RBT04261 is 4.0 x 3.5 x 2.5 cm and 78.8 g, and RBT04262 is 6.5 x 5.5 x 3.5 cm and 204.6 g. Both were partially covered by a fusion crust [1]. Chemical analysis and mapping of this meteorite was performed using the Cameca SX100 electron microprobe at NASA Johnson Space Center.

  3. Sulfur and iron speciation in gas-rich impact-melt glasses from basaltic shergottites determined by microXANES

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, S.R.; Rao, M.N.; Nyquist, L.E.

    2008-04-28

    Sulfur and iron K XANES measurements were made on GRIM glasses from EET 79001. Iron is in the ferrous state. Sulfur speciation is predominately sulfide coordination but is Fe coordinated in Lith B and, most likely, Ca coordinated in Lith A. Sulfur is abundantly present as sulfate near Martian surface based on chemical and mineralogical investigations on soils and rocks in Viking, Pathfinder and MER missions. Jarosite is identified by Moessbauer studies on rocks at Meridian and Gusev, whereas MgSO{sub 4} is deduced from MgO-SO{sub 3} correlations in Pathfinder MER and Viking soils. Other sulfate minerals such as gypsum and alunogen/S-rich aluminosilicates and halides are detected only in martian meteorites such as shergottites and nakhlites using SEM/FE-SEM and EMPA techniques. Because sulfur has the capacity to occur in multiple valence states, determination of sulfur speciation (sulfide/sulfate) in secondary mineral assemblages in soils and rocks near Mars surface may help us understand whether the fluid-rock interactions occurred under oxidizing or reducing conditions. On Earth, volcanic rocks contain measurable quantities of sulfur present as both sulfide and sulfate. Carroll and Rutherford showed that oxidized forms of sulfur may comprise a significant fraction of total dissolved sulfur, if the oxidation state is higher than {approx}2 log fO{sub 2} units relative to the QFM buffer. Terrestrial samples containing sulfates up to {approx}25% in fresh basalts from the Galapagos Rift on one hand and high sulfide contents present in oceanic basalts on the other indicate that the relative abundance of sulfide and sulfate varies depending on the oxygen fugacity of the system. Basaltic shergottites (bulk) such as Shergotty, EET79001 and Zagami usually contain small amounts of sulfur ({approx}0.5%) as pyrrhotite. But, in isolated glass pockets containing secondary salts (known as GRIM glasses) in these meteorites, sulfur is present in high abundance ({approx}1-12%). To

  4. Nuclear tracks, Sm isotopes and neutron capture effects in the Elephant Morraine shergottite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajan, R. S.; Lugmair, G.; Tamhane, A. S.; Poupeau, G.

    1986-01-01

    Nuclear track studies, uranium concentration measurements and Sm-isotope studies have been performed on both lithologies A and B of the Elephant Morraine shergottite, EETA 79001. Track studies show that EETA 79001 was a rather small object in space with a preatmospheric radius of 12 + or - 2 cm, corresponding to a preatmospheric mass of 28 + or - 13 kg. Phosphates have U concentrations ranging from 0.3 to 1.3 ppm. There are occasional phosphates with excess fission tracks, possibly produced from neutron-induced fission of U and Th, during the regolith exposure in the shergottite parent body (SPB). Sm-isotope studies, while not showing any clear-cut excess in Sm-150, make it possible to derive meaningful upper limits to thermal neutron fluences of 2 to 3 x 10 to the 15th n/sq cm, during a possible regolith irradiation. These limits are consistent with the track data and also make it possible to derive an upper limit to the neutron exposure age of EETA 79001 of 55 Myr in the SPB regolith.

  5. The case for a Martian origin of the shergottites - Nitrogen and noble gases in EETA 79001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. H.; Pepin, R. O.

    1984-01-01

    Nitrogen and noble gases have been measured in samples of a glass inclusion and its surrounding basaltic matrix in an Antarctic shergottite meteorite (EETA 79001). The nitrogen component was found trapped in the glass, but not the matrix, having a value of delta 15-N = +190 per mil. Ratios between abundances of Ar-40 and N-14, N-15 and N-14 in the glass are consistent with the dilution of a Martian atmospheric component. The trapped noble gases in the glass are similar to elemental and isotopic compositions measured in Mars atmosphere by the Viking lander, and are in general agreement with previous measurements. It is suggested that a sample of Martian atmosphere has been caught in the EETA 79001 glass, and that other shergottite, nakhilite, and chassignite meteorites with similar features probably also originated on Mars. A table is presented which lists the abundances of nitrogen and the noble gases found in the non-glassy matrix and in the EETA 79001 glass.

  6. Thermoluminescence and the shock and reheating history of meteorites. III - The shergottites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasan, F. A.; Haq, M.; Sears, D. W. G.

    1986-01-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) measurements on Shergotty, ALHA 77005, Zagami, and EETA 79001 (lithology A) have been used to obtain further information on the shock history of these meteorites. The level of TL sensitivity in the shergottites varied by a factor of 10, but was always low, probably reflecting the amount of crystalline material in the maskelynite. There are trends in the TL peak temperature, peak width, and TL sensitivity which are believed to be associated with different proportions of feldspar in high- and low-temperature forms. This interpretation is consistent with the observed changes induced in the TL properties by annealing shergottites at 400-900 C. It is suggested that the observed trends were produced during postshock crystallization at a variety of cooling rates, the increasing order of cooling rate being EETA 79001, Zagami, ALHA 77005, and Shergotty, and that there is high-temperature feldspar present in all the samples. This implies a postshock temperature above 600 C, and a small (less than 10 m) size of the ejecta. Current theories are well able to explain how objects of this size could have been ejected from Mars.

  7. SNC meteorites - Clues to Martian petrologic evolution?. [Shergottites, Nakhlites and Chassigny

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcsween, H. Y., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Shergottites, nakhlites and the Chassigny meteorites (SNC group) may have originated on Mars. The shergottites are medium-grained basalts, the nakhlites are pyroxenites and the Chassigny is a dunite. The SNC group is petrologically diverse but differs from all other known achondrites in terms of mineral chemistry, the redox state, the oxygen isotopic composition and the radiometric ages. The SNC stones are mafic and ultramafic cumulate rocks with mineralogies that indicate rapid cooling and crystallization from tholeiitic magmas which contained water and experienced a high degree of oxidation. The characteristics suggest formation from a large parent body, i.e., a planet, but not earth. The estimated ages for the rocks match the estimated ages for several mapped Martian volcanoes in the Tharsis region. Additionally, the elemental and isotopic abundances of atmospheric gases embedded in melts in the SNC stones match Viking Lander data for the Martian atmosphere. However, reasons are cited for discounting the possibility that a large meteorite(s) collided with Mars about 180 myr ago and served as the mechanism for ejecting the SNC stones to earth.

  8. Formation and Preservation of the Depleted and Enriched Shergottite Isotopic Reservoirs in a Convecting Martian Mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, Walter S.; Jones, John H.

    2015-01-01

    There is compelling isotopic and crater density evidence for geologically recent volcanism on Mars, in the last 100-200 million years and possibly in the last 50 million years. This volcanism is due to adiabatic decompression melting and thus requires some type of present-day convective upwelling in the martian mantle. On the other hand, martian meteorites preserve evidence for at least 3 distinct radiogenic isotopic reservoirs. Anomalies in short-lived isotopic systems (Sm-146, Nd-142, Hf-182, W-182) require that these reservoirs must have developed in the first 50 to 100 million years of Solar System history. The long-term preservation of chemically distinct reservoirs has sometimes been interpreted as evidence for the absence of mantle convection and convective mixing on Mars for most of martian history, a conclusion which is at odds with the evidence for young volcanism. This apparent paradox can be resolved by recognizing that a variety of processes, including both inefficient mantle mixing and geographic separation of isotopic reservoirs, may preserve isotopic heterogeneity on Mars in an actively convecting mantle. Here, we focus on the formation and preservation of the depleted and enriched isotopic and trace element reservoirs in the shergottites. In particular, we explore the possible roles of processes such as chemical diffusion and metasomatism in dikes and magma chambers for creating the isotopically enriched shergottites. We also consider processes that may preserve the enriched reservoir against convective mixing for most of martian history.

  9. Iron Redox Systematics of Shergottites and Martian Magmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, Kevin; Danielson, L. R.; Martin, A. M.; Newville, M.; Choi, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Martian meteorites record a range of oxygen fugacities from near the IW buffer to above FMQ buffer [1]. In terrestrial magmas, Fe(3+)/ SigmaFe for this fO2 range are between 0 and 0.25 [2]. Such variation will affect the stability of oxides, pyroxenes, and how the melt equilibrates with volatile species. An understanding of the variation of Fe(3+)/SigmaFe for martian magmas is lacking, and previous work has been on FeO-poor and Al2O3-rich terrestrial basalts. We have initiated a study of the iron redox systematics of martian magmas to better understand FeO and Fe2O3 stability, the stability of magnetite, and the low Ca/high Ca pyroxene [3] ratios observed at the surface.

  10. Origin of water and mantle-crust interactions on Mars inferred from hydrogen isotopes and volatile element abundances of olivine-hosted melt inclusions of primitive shergottites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usui, Tomohiro; Alexander, Conel M. O'D.; Wang, Jianhua; Simon, Justin I.; Jones, John H.

    2012-12-01

    Volatile elements have influenced the differentiation and eruptive behavior of Martian magmas and played an important role in the evolution of Martian climate and near-surface environments. However, the abundances of volatiles, and in particular the amount of water in the Martian interior, are disputed. A record of volatile reservoirs is contained in primitive Martian basalts (shergottites). Olivine-hosted melt inclusions from a geochemically depleted shergottite (Yamato 980459, representing a very primitive Martian melt) possess undegassed water with a chondritic and Earth-like D/H ratio (δD≤275‰). Based on volatile measurements in these inclusions, the water content of the depleted shergottite mantle is calculated to be 15-47 ppm, which is consistent with the dry mantle hypothesis. In contrast to D/H in the depleted shergottite, melt from an enriched shergottite (Larkman Nunatak 06319), which either formed by melting of an enriched mantle or by assimilation of crust, exhibits an extreme δD of ˜5000‰, indicative of a surface reservoir (e.g., the Martian atmosphere or crustal hydrosphere). These data provide strong evidence that the Martian mantle had retained the primordial low-δD component until at least the time of shergottite formation, and that young Martian basalts assimilated old Martian crust.

  11. Microprobe studies of microtomed particles of white druse salts in shergottite EETA 79001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindstrom, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    The white druse material in Antarctic shergottite EETA 79001 has attracted much attention as a possible sample fo Martian aqueous deposits. Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) was used to determine trace element analyses of small particles of this material obtained by handpicking of likely grains from broken surfaces of the meteorite. Electron microprobe work was attempted on grain areas as large as 150x120 microns. Backscattered electron images show considerable variations in brightness, and botryoidal structures were observed. Microprobe analyses showed considerable variability both within single particles and between different particles. Microtomed surfaces of small selected particles were shown to be very useful in obtaining information on the texture and composition of rare lithologies like the white druse of EETA 79001. This material is clearly heterogeneous on all distance scales, so a large number of further analyses will be required to characterize it.

  12. A Younger Age for ALH84001 and Its Geochemical Link to Shergottite Sources in Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapen, T. J.; Righter, M.; Brandon, A. D.; Debaille, V.; Beard, B. L.; Shafer, J. T.; Peslier, A. H.

    2010-04-01

    Martian meteorite ALH84001 (ALH) is the oldest known igneous rock from Mars and has been used to constrain its early history. Lutetium-hafnium (Lu-Hf) isotope data for ALH indicate an igneous age of 4.091 ± 0.030 billion years, nearly coeval with an interval of heavy bombardment and cessation of the martian core dynamo and magnetic field. The calculated Lu/Hf and Sm/Nd (samarium/neodymium) ratios of the ALH parental magma source indicate that it must have undergone extensive igneous processing associated with the crystallization of a deep magma ocean. This same mantle source region also produced the shergottite magmas (dated 150 to 570 million years ago), possibly indicating uniform igneous processes in Mars for nearly 4 billion years.

  13. A younger age for ALH84001 and its geochemical link to shergottite sources in Mars.

    PubMed

    Lapen, T J; Righter, M; Brandon, A D; Debaille, V; Beard, B L; Shafer, J T; Peslier, A H

    2010-04-16

    Martian meteorite ALH84001 (ALH) is the oldest known igneous rock from Mars and has been used to constrain its early history. Lutetium-hafnium (Lu-Hf) isotope data for ALH indicate an igneous age of 4.091 +/- 0.030 billion years, nearly coeval with an interval of heavy bombardment and cessation of the martian core dynamo and magnetic field. The calculated Lu/Hf and Sm/Nd (samarium/neodymium) ratios of the ALH parental magma source indicate that it must have undergone extensive igneous processing associated with the crystallization of a deep magma ocean. This same mantle source region also produced the shergottite magmas (dated 150 to 570 million years ago), possibly indicating uniform igneous processes in Mars for nearly 4 billion years. PMID:20395507

  14. A younger age for ALH84001 and its geochemical link to shergottite sources in Mars.

    PubMed

    Lapen, T J; Righter, M; Brandon, A D; Debaille, V; Beard, B L; Shafer, J T; Peslier, A H

    2010-04-16

    Martian meteorite ALH84001 (ALH) is the oldest known igneous rock from Mars and has been used to constrain its early history. Lutetium-hafnium (Lu-Hf) isotope data for ALH indicate an igneous age of 4.091 +/- 0.030 billion years, nearly coeval with an interval of heavy bombardment and cessation of the martian core dynamo and magnetic field. The calculated Lu/Hf and Sm/Nd (samarium/neodymium) ratios of the ALH parental magma source indicate that it must have undergone extensive igneous processing associated with the crystallization of a deep magma ocean. This same mantle source region also produced the shergottite magmas (dated 150 to 570 million years ago), possibly indicating uniform igneous processes in Mars for nearly 4 billion years.

  15. Ar-Ar and Rb-Sr Ages of the Tissint Olivine-phyric Martian Shergottite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J.; Herzog, G. F.; Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C.-Y.; Turin, B.; Lindsay, F. N.; Delaney, J. S.; Swisher, C. C., III; Agee, C.

    2013-01-01

    The fifth martian meteorite fall, Tissint, is an olivine-phyric shergottite that contains olivine macrocrysts (approximately 1.5 mm) [1]. [2] reported the Sm-Nd age of Tissint as 596 plus or minus 23 Ma along with Rb-Sr data that defined no isochron. [3] reported Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd ages of 583 plus or minus 86 Ma and 616 plus or minus 67 Ma, respectively. The cosmic-ray exposure ages of Tissint are 1.10 plus or minus 0.15 Ma based on 10Be [4], and 1.0-1.1 Ma, based on 3He, 21Ne, and 38Ar [5,6].We report Ar-Ar ages and Rb-Sr data.

  16. Determining the Origin of Phosphates in Lherzolitic Shergottites Through Phosphate Saturation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvin, C.; Rutherford, M.

    2007-12-01

    Phosphorous has been correlated with sulfur and chlorine in martian soils with some soils containing several wt % P2O5 and high-P2O5 layer covers many rocks. However, using the RAT to remove the top few mm of some rocks revealed zones of low-P2O5 in the outer mm relative to the interior composition. This suggests that some igneous rocks of Mars are high in P2O5 and that over time phosphorous has been mobilized into the martian soils. In martian meteorites, phosphorous has been detected in high concentrations relative to terrestrial basalts and cumulates. High intensity x-ray maps of lherzolitic shergottite ALH 77005 reveal phosphates in olivine-hosted melt inclusions and P2O5 zoning in the host-olivine. Analyses of rehomogenized olivine-hosted melt inclusions reveal high-P2O5 glasses (>5 wt %). As phosphates are the major reservoir of REE in martian meteorites, determining if the phosphates are primary igneous or secondary sedimentary minerals may have significant consequences for use of REE as oxybarometers and radiogenic-isotopic dating systems in these meteorites. Therefore, an experimental investigation was initiated to determine whether the phosphates are primary igneous minerals or secondary weathering products. The phosphate saturation curve in SNC magmatic compositions has been studied experimentally by synthesizing the parental melt composition of lherzolitic shergottite ALH 77005 and performing anhydrous crystallization experiments in TZM pressure vessels. The parental melt composition was then doped with 5 wt % P2O5 in the form of CaHPO4 and the crystallization experiments were repeated. ALH 77005's parental melt saturated phosphate near 7 wt % at 1165°C and 5 wt % at 1150°C. These saturation values illustrate how high-P2O5 would have to build up before phosphates would nucleate and are consistent with high-2O5 content found in rehomogenized olivine-hosted melt inclusions. These saturation values are higher than the reported saturation for lunar and

  17. Preliminary Report on U-Th-Pb Isotope Systematics of the Olivine-Phyric Shergottite Tissint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moriwaki, R.; Usui, T.; Yokoyama, T.; Simon, J. I.; Jones, J. H.

    2014-01-01

    Geochemical studies of shergottites suggest that their parental magmas reflect mixtures between at least two distinct geochemical source reservoirs, producing correlations between radiogenic isotope compositions, and trace element abundances.. These correlations have been interpreted as indicating the presence of a reduced, incompatible-element- depleted reservoir and an oxidized, incompatible-element-rich reservoir. The former is clearly a depleted mantle source, but there has been a long debate regarding the origin of the enriched reservoir. Two contrasting models have been proposed regarding the location and mixing process of the two geochemical source reservoirs: (1) assimilation of oxidized crust by mantle derived, reduced magmas, or (2) mixing of two distinct mantle reservoirs during melting. The former clearly requires the ancient martian crust to be the enriched source (crustal assimilation), whereas the latter requires a long-lived enriched mantle domain that probably originated from residual melts formed during solidification of a magma ocean (heterogeneous mantle model). This study conducts Pb isotope and U-Th-Pb concentration analyses of the olivine-phyric shergottite Tissint because U-Th-Pb isotope systematics have been intensively used as a powerful radiogenic tracer to characterize old crust/sediment components in mantle- derived, terrestrial oceanic island basalts. The U-Th-Pb analyses are applied to sequential acid leaching fractions obtained from Tissint whole-rock powder in order to search for Pb isotopic source components in Tissint magma. Here we report preliminary results of the U-Th-Pb analyses of acid leachates and a residue, and propose the possibility that Tissint would have experienced minor assimilation of old martian crust.

  18. Petrogenesis of the SNC (shergottites, nakhlites, chassignites) meteorites - Implications for their origin from a large dynamic planet, possibly Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. R.; Laul, J. C.; Ma, M. S.; Huston, T.; Verkouteren, R. M.; Lipschutz, M. E.; Schmitt, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    Comprehensive chemical data are presented on the shergottites Shergotty, Zagami, Allan Hills (ALHA) 77005, and the new member Elephant Moraine (EETA) 79001 using results of sequential instrumental and radiochemical neutron activation analysis. The close relationship of the Antarctic shergotites indicates that ALHA 77005 is a residual source produced by incongruent melting of a source similar in bulk composition to EETA 79001A and that EETA 79001B and the interstitial phases in EETA 79001A are the melts produced by such melting episodes. The large ion lithophile LIL) trace element abundanced of the shergottites require variable but extensive degrees of nomodal melting of isotopically constrained parent sources. The SNG sources are consistent with their derivation by extensive fractionation of a primitive magma initially produced from a source having chondritic refractory LIL trace element abundances. Petrogenetic and age relationships among SNC meteorites suggest a single complex-provenance on a dynamic planet not unlike earth, probably Mars.

  19. Effect of chlorine on near-liquidus crystallization of olivine-phyric shergottite NWA 6234 at 1 GPa: Implication for volatile-induced melting of the Martian mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farcy, Benjamin J.; Gross, Juliane; Carpenter, Paul; Hicks, Jacob; Filiberto, Justin

    2016-05-01

    Martian magmas are thought to be rich in chlorine compared with their terrestrial counterparts. Here, we experimentally investigate the effect of chlorine on liquidus depression and near-liquidus crystallization of olivine-phyric shergottite NWA 6234 and compare these results with previous experimental results on the effect of chlorine on near-liquidus crystallization of the surface basalts Humphrey and Fastball. Previous experimental results showed that the change in liquidus temperature is dependent on the bulk composition of the basalt. The effect of chlorine on liquidus depression is greater for lower SiO2 and higher Al2O3 magmas than for higher SiO2 and lower Al2O3 magmas. The bulk composition for this study has lower Al2O3 and higher FeO contents than previous work; therefore, we provide additional constraints on the effect of the bulk composition on the influence of chlorine on near-liquidus crystallization. High pressure and temperature crystallization experiments were performed at 1 GPa on a synthetic basalt, of the bulk composition of NWA 6234, with 0-4 wt% Cl added to the sample as AgCl. The results are consistent with previous notions that with increasing wt% Cl in the melt, the crystallization temperature decreases. Importantly, our results have a liquidus depression ∆T (°C) from added chlorine that is consistent with the difference in bulk composition and suggest a dependence on both the bulk Al2O3 and FeO content. Our results suggest that the addition of chlorine to the Martian mantle may lower magma genesis temperatures and potentially aid in the petrogenesis of Martian magmas.

  20. Tracking the Depleted Mantle Signature in Melt Inclusions and Residual Glass of Basaltic Martian Shergottites using Secondary Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Timothy J.; Simon, Justin I.; Jones, John H.; Usui, Tomohiro; Economos, Rita C.; Schmitt, Axel K.; McKeegan, Kevin D.

    2013-01-01

    Trace element abundances of depleted shergottite magmas recorded by olivine-hosted melt inclusions (MI) and interstitial mesostasis glass were measured using the Cameca ims-1270 ion microprobe. Two meteorites: Tissint, an olivine-­phyric basaltic shergottite which fell over Morocco July 18th 2001; and the Antarctic meteorite Yamato 980459 (Y98), an olivine-phyric basaltic shergottite with abundant glassy mesostasis have been studied. Chondrite-­normalized REE patterns for MI in Tissint and Y98 are characteristically LREE depleted and, within analytical uncertainty, parallel those of their respective whole rock composition; supporting each meteorite to represent a melt composition that has experienced closed-­system crystallization. REE profiles for mesostasis glass in Y98 lie about an order of magnitude higher than those from the MI; with REE profiles for Tissint MI falling in between. Y98 MI have the highest average Sm/Nd and Y/Ce ratios, reflecting their LREE depletion and further supporting Y98 as one of our best samples to probe the depleted shergotitte mantle. In general, Zr/Nb ratios overlap between Y98 and Tissint MI, Ce/Nb ratios overlap between Y98 MI and mesostasis glass, and Sm/Nd ratios overlap between Y98 mesostasis glass and Tissint MI. These features support similar sources for both, but with subtle geochemical differences that may reflect different melting conditions or fractionation paths during ascent from the mantle. Interestingly, the REE patterns for both Y98 bulk and MI analyses display a flattening of the LREE that suggests a crustal contribution to the Y98 parent melt. This observation has important implications for the origins of depleted and enriched shergottites.

  1. Identification of Martian Regolith Sulfur Components in Shergottites Using Sulfur K Xanes and Fe/S Ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, S. R.; Ross, D. K.; Rao, M. N.; Nyquist, L. E.

    2014-01-01

    Based on isotopic anomalies in Kr and Sm, Sr-isotopes, S-isotopes, XANES results on S-speciation, Fe/S ratios in sulfide immiscible melts [5], and major element correlations with S determined in impact glasses in EET79001 Lith A & Lith B and Tissint, we have provided very strong evidence for the occurrence of a Martian regolith component in some impact melt glasses in shergottites. Using REE measurements by LA-ICP-MS in shergottite impact glasses, Barrat and co-workers have recently reported conflicting conclusions about the occurrence of Martian regolith components: (a) Positive evidence was reported for a Tissint impact melt, but (b) Negative evidence for impact melt in EET79001 and another impact melt in Tissint. Here, we address some specific issues related to sulfur speciation and their relevance to identifying Martian regolith components in impact glasses in EET79001 and Tissint using sulfur K XANES and Fe/S ratios in sulfide immiscible melts. XANES and FE-SEM measurements in approx. 5 micron size individual sulfur blebs in EET79001 and Tissint glasses are carried out by us using sub-micron size beams, whereas Barrat and coworkers used approx. 90 micron size laser spots for LA- ICP-MS to determine REE abundances in bulk samples of the impact melt glasses. We contend that Martian regolith components in some shergottite impact glasses are present locally, and that studying impact melts in various shergottites can give evidence both for and against regolith components because of sample heterogeneity.

  2. Mineralogical Comparison of Olivine in Shergottites and A Shocked L Chondrite: Implications for Shock Histories of Brown Olivine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takenouchi, A.; Mikouchi, T.; Yamaguchi, A.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2015-01-01

    Most Martian meteorites are heavily shocked, exhibiting numerous shock features, for example undulatory extinction of olivine and pyroxene, the presence of diaplectic glass ("maskelynite") and the formation of shock melt. Among these shock features, olivine darkening ("brown" olivine) is unique in Martian meteorites because no other meteorite group shows such a feature. Although the presence of brown olivine in shergottites was reported thirty years ago, detailed observation by TEM has not been performed until the NWA 2737 chassignite was discovered, whose olivine is darkened, being completely black in hand specimen. Fe metal nano-particles were found in NWA 2737 olivine which are considered to have been formed by olivine reduction during heavy shock. Subsequently, magnetite nano-particles were also found in other Martian meteorites and the coexistence of Fe metal and magnetite nano-particles was reported in the NWA 1950 shergottite and some Fe metal nano-particles were mantled by magnetite. Therefore, the formation process of nano-particles seems to be complex. Because "brown" olivine is unique to Martian meteorites, they have a potential to constrain their shock conditions. In order to better understand the shock history of Martian meteorites, we compared olivine in several shergottites with that in a highly-shocked L chondrite which contains ringwoodite.

  3. Nitrogen and noble gases in a glass sample from the LEW88516 shergottite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Richard H.; Pepin, Robert O.

    1993-01-01

    A glass separate from the LEW88516 shergottite was analyzed by step-wise combustion for N and noble gases to determine whether it contained trapped gas similar in composition to the martian atmosphere-like component previously observed in lithology C of EETA79001. Excesses of Ar-40 and Xe-129 were in fact observed in this glass, although the amounts of these excesses less than or = to 20% of those seen in the latter meteorite, and are comparable to the amounts seen in whole-rock analyses of LEW88516. The isotopic composition of N in LEW88516 does not show an enrichment in delta N-15 commensurate with the amount of isotopically-heavy N expected from the noble gases excesses. One must posit some extreme assumptions about the nature of the N components present in LEW88516 in order to allow the presence of the trapped nitrogen component. Alternatively, the N has somehow been decoupled from the noble gases, and was either never present of has been lost.

  4. Postcrystallization metasomatism in shergottites: Evidence from the paired meteorites LAR 06319 and LAR 12011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howarth, Geoffrey H.; Liu, Yang; Chen, Yang; Pernet-Fisher, John F.; Taylor, Lawrence A.

    2016-03-01

    Apatite is the major volatile-bearing phase in Martian meteorites, containing structurally bound fluorine, chlorine, and hydroxyl ions. In apatite, F is more compatible than Cl, which in turn is more compatible than OH. During degassing, Cl strongly partitions into the exsolved phase, whereas F remains in the melt. For these reasons, the volatile concentrations within apatite are predictable during magmatic differentiation and degassing. Here, we present compositional data for apatite and merrillite in the paired enriched, olivine-phyric shergottites LAR 12011 and LAR 06319. In addition, we calculate the relative volatile fugacities of the parental melts at the time of apatite formation. The apatites are dominantly OH-rich (calculated by stoichiometry) with variable yet high Cl contents. Although several other studies have found evidence for degassing in the late-stage mineral assemblage of LAR 06319, the apatite evolutionary trends cannot be reconciled with this interpretation. The variable Cl contents and high OH contents measured in apatites are not consistent with fractionation either. Volatile fugacity calculations indicate that water and fluorine activities remain relatively constant, whereas there is a large variation in the chlorine activity. The Martian crust is Cl-rich indicating that changes in Cl contents in the apatites may be related to an external crustal source. We suggest that the high and variable Cl contents and high OH contents of the apatite are the results of postcrystallization interaction with Cl-rich, and possibly water-rich, crustal fluids circulating in the Martian crust.

  5. Igneous cooling history of olivine-phyric shergottite Yamato 980459 constrained by dynamic crystallization experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    First, Emily; Hammer, Julia

    2016-07-01

    Dynamic crystallization experiments were performed on a liquid having the bulk composition of olivine-phyric shergottite Yamato 980459, to constrain the igneous thermal history of this meteorite. Key characteristics of the meteorite's mineralogy and texture, including several morphologically distinct olivine and pyroxene crystal populations and a glassy mesostasis devoid of plagioclase, were replicated upon cooling from 1435 to 909 °C at 1 atmosphere under reducing conditions. Three sequential cooling ramps are required to produce synthetic samples with textures and compositions matching Yamato 980459. Olivine phenocrysts formed at <1 °C h-1, presumably at depth in the Martian crust. Pyroxene phenocrysts formed mainly at ~10 °C h-1, consistent with crystallization within a lava flow at depths of 25-45 cm. Increased cooling rate (~100 °C h-1) in a third stage suppressed the formation of plagioclase and produced groundmass crystals, consistent with crystallization at lava flow depths of 5-7 cm. Although Y 980459 is unique among Martian meteorites (i.e., preserving a primary glassy mesostasis), its emplacement did not require unique physical conditions. Rather, the second and third cooling stages may reflect cooling within the core of a pāhoehoe-like flow and subsequent breakout on the surface of Mars.

  6. Lithium isotopes and light lithophile element abundances in shergottites: Evidence for both magmatic degassing and subsolidus diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udry, Arya; McSween, Harry Y.; Hervig, Richard L.; Taylor, Lawrence A.

    2016-01-01

    Degassed magmatic water was potentially the major source of surficial water on Mars. We measured Li, B, and Be abundances and Li isotope profiles in pyroxenes, olivines, and maskelynite from four compositionally different shergottites—Shergotty, QUE 94201, LAR 06319, and Tissint—using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). All three light lithophile elements (LLE) are incompatible: Li and B are soluble in H2O-rich fluids, whereas Be is insoluble. In the analyzed shergottites, Li concentration decreases and Be concentration increases from cores to rims in pyroxenes. However, B concentrations do not vary consistently with Li and Be abundances, except in QUE 94201 pyroxenes. Additionally, abundances of these three elements in olivines show a normal igneous-fractionation trend consistent with the crystallization of olivine before magma ascent and degassing. We expect that kinetic effects would lead to fractionation of 6Li in the vapor phase compared to 7Li during degassing. The Li isotope profiles, with increasing δ7Li from cores to rims, as well as Li and B profiles indicate possible degassing of hydrous fluids only for the depleted shergottite QUE 94201, as also supported by degassing models. Conversely, Shergotty, LAR 06319, and Tissint appear to have been affected by postcrystallization diffusion, based on their LLE and Li isotope profiles, accompanied by diffusion models. This process may represent an overlay on a degassing pattern. The LLE profiles and isotope profiles in QUE 94201 support the hypothesis that degassing of some basaltic shergottite magmas provided water to the Martian surface, although evidence may be obscured by subsolidus diffusion processes.

  7. Experimental Petrology of the Basaltic Shergottite Yamato 980459: Implications for the Thermal Structure of the Martian Mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalton, H. A.; Musselwhite, D. S.; Kiefer, W.; Treiman, A. H.

    2005-01-01

    Yamato 980459 (Y98) is an olivine-phyric basaltic shergottite composed of 48% pyroxene, 26% olivine, 25% mesostasis, and 1% other minerals. Unlike the other Martian basalts, it contains no plagioclase. Olivine in Y98 is the most magnesian of all Martian meteorites. Thus Y98 is believed to be the most primitive and its composition may be the closest to a primary or direct melt of the Martian mantle. As such, it provides a very useful probe of the mineralogy and depth of its mantle source region. Toward this end, we are conducting crystallization experiments on a synthetic Y98 composition at Martian mantle pressures and temperatures.

  8. Recognizing the Effects of Terrestrial Contamination on D/H Ratios in Shergottite Phosphates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, D. K.; Ito, M.; Hervig, R.; Rao, M. N.; Nyquist, L. E.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope ratios in shergottite phosphate minerals have been investigated by SIMS in the meteorites Queen Alexandra Range (QUE) 94201 and Los Angeles. We have also collected electron probe data on these phosphates in order to characterize the phosphate minerals and attempt to document any potential hydrogen isotopic differences between chlor-apatite and whitlockite. In the section of Los Angeles we studied (748), we found both chlor-apatite and whitlockite, but in the section of QUE 94201,38 studied, we found only whitlockite. In both meteorites, D/H ratios (expressed in units of delta D (sub SMOW) vary, from terrestrial values up to approximately 5400%o in QUE 94201, and to approximately 3800%o in Los Angeles. We have carefully examined the ion probed pits with high-resolution FE-SEM. In most cases where the D/H ratios are low, we have iden-tified cracks that instersect the ion probe pit. These cracks are not visible in the optical microscope attached to the SIMS instument, making them impossible to avoid during SIMS data collection. We contend that the low ratios are a function of substantial terrestrial contamination, and that similar contamination is a likely factor in previously published studies on D/H ratios in martian phosphates. Here we highlight the difficulty of attempts to constrain the martian mantle D/H ratio using phosphate data, given that both terrestrial contamination and martian mantle hydrogen will move phosphate D/H ratios in the same direction, toward lower values. We note that our data include some of the most deuterium-rich values ever reported for martian phosphates. It is clear that some of our measurements are only minimally or totally uncontaminated, but the question arises, are intermediate values diminished because of true martian variability, or do they reflect contamination?

  9. Compositions of Magmatic and Impact Melt Sulfides in Tissint And EETA79001: Precursors of Immiscible Sulfide Melt Blebs in Shergottite Impact Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, D. K.; Rao, M. N.; Nyquist, L.; Agee, C.; Sutton, S.

    2013-01-01

    Immiscible sulfide melt spherules are locally very abundant in shergottite impact melts. These melts can also contain samples of Martian atmospheric gases [1], and cosmogenic nuclides [2] that are present in impact melt, but not in the host shergottite, indicating some components in the melt resided at the Martian surface. These observations show that some regolith components are, at least locally, present in the impact melts. This view also suggests that one source of the over-abundant sulfur in these impact melts could be sulfates that are major constituents of Martian regolith, and that the sulfates were reduced during shock heating to sulfide. An alternative view is that sulfide spherules in impact melts are produced solely by melting the crystalline sulfide minerals (dominantly pyrrhotite, Fe(1-x)S) that are present in shergottites [3]. In this abstract we report new analyses of the compositions of sulfide immiscible melt spherules and pyrrhotite in the shergottites Tissint, and EETA79001,507, and we use these data to investigate the possible origins of the immiscible sulfide melt spherules. In particular, we use the metal/S ratios determined in these blebs as potential diagnostic criteria for tracking the source material from which the numerous sulfide blebs were generated by shock in these melts.

  10. An Experimental Study of Eu/Gd Partitioning Between a Shergottite Melt and Pigeonite: Implications for the Oxygen Fugacity of the Martian Interior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCanta, M. C.; Rutherford, M. J.; Jones, J. H.

    2002-01-01

    We experimentally investigated the partitioning behavior of Eu/Gd between a synthetic shergottite melt and pigeonite as a function of oxygen fugacity. This has implications for the oxidation state of the source region of the martian meteorites. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  11. Experimental study of polybaric REE partitioning between olivine, pyroxene and melt of the Yamato 980459 composition: Insights into the petrogenesis of depleted shergottites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blinova, Alexandra; Herd, Christopher D. K.

    2009-06-01

    A synthetic composition representing the Yamato 980459 martian basalt (shergottite) has been used to carry out phase relation, and rare earth element (REE) olivine and pyroxene partitioning experiments. Yamato 980459 is a sample of primitive basalt derived from a reduced end-member among martian mantle sources. Experiments carried out between 1-2 GPa and 1350-1650 °C simulate the estimated pressure-temperature conditions of basaltic melt generation in the martian mantle. Olivine-melt and orthopyroxene-melt partition coefficients for La, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd and Yb ( DREE values) were determined by LA-ICPMS, and are similar to the published values for terrestrial basaltic systems. We have not detected significant variation in D-values with pressure over the range investigated, and by comparison with previous studies carried out at lower pressure. We apply the experimentally obtained olivine-melt and orthopyroxene-melt DREE values to fractional crystallization and partial melting models to develop a three-stage geochemical model for the evolution of martian meteorites. In our model we propose two ancient (˜4.535 Ga) sources: the Nakhlite Source, located in the shallow mantle, and the Deep Mantle Source, located close to the martian core-mantle boundary. These two sources evolved distinctly on the ɛ 143Nd evolution curve due to their different Sm/Nd ratios. By partially melting the Nakhlite Source at ˜1.3 Ga, we are able to produce a slightly depleted residue (Nakhlite Residue). The Nakhlite Residue is left undisturbed until ˜500 Ma, at which point the depleted Deep Mantle Source is brought up by a plume mechanism carrying with it high heat flow, melts and isotopic signatures of the deep mantle (e.g., ɛ 182W, ɛ 142Nd, etc.). The plume-derived Deep Mantle Source combines with the Nakhlite Residue producing a mixture that becomes a mantle source (herein referred to as "the Y98 source") for Yamato 980459 and the other depleted shergottites with the characteristic range

  12. Evidence for heterogeneous enriched shergottite mantle sources in Mars from olivine-hosted melt inclusions in Larkman Nunatak 06319

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu Sarbadhikari, Amit; Goodrich, Cyrena A.; Liu, Yang; Day, James M. D.; Taylor, Lawrence A.

    2011-11-01

    Larkman Nunatak (LAR) 06319 is an olivine-phyric shergottite whose olivine crystals contain abundant crystallized melt inclusions. In this study, three types of melt inclusion were distinguished, based on their occurrence and the composition of their olivine host: Type-I inclusions occur in phenocryst cores (Fo 77-73); Type-II inclusions occur in phenocryst mantles (Fo 71-66); Type-III inclusions occur in phenocryst rims (Fo 61-51) and within groundmass olivine. The sizes of the melt inclusions decrease significantly from Type-I (˜150-250 μm diameter) to Type-II (˜100 μm diameter) to Type-III (˜25-75 μm diameter). Present bulk compositions (PBC) of the crystallized melt inclusions were calculated for each of the three melt inclusion types based on average modal abundances and analyzed compositions of constituent phases. Primary trapped liquid compositions were then reconstructed by addition of olivine and adjustment of the Fe/Mg ratio to equilibrium with the host olivine (to account for crystallization of wall olivine and the effects of Fe/Mg re-equilibration). The present bulk composition of Type-I inclusions (PBC1) plots on a tie-line that passes through olivine and the LAR 06319 whole-rock composition. The parent magma composition can be reconstructed by addition of 29 mol% olivine to PBC1, and adjustment of Fe/Mg for equilibrium with olivine of Fo 77 composition. The resulting parent magma composition has a predicted crystallization sequence that is consistent with that determined from petrographic observations, and differs significantly from the whole-rock only in an accumulated olivine component (˜10 wt%). This is consistent with a calculation indicating that ˜10 wt% magnesian (Fo 77-73) olivine must be subtracted from the whole-rock to yield a melt in equilibrium with Fo 77. Thus, two independent estimates indicate that LAR 06319 contains ˜10 wt% cumulate olivine. The rare earth element (REE) patterns of Type-I melt inclusions are similar to that of

  13. Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd Isotopic Studies of Shergottites and Nakhlites: Implications for Martian Mantle Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debaille, V.; Yin, Q.-Z.; Brandon, A. D.; Jacobsen, B.; Treiman, A. H.

    2007-01-01

    We present a new Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd isotope systematics study of four enriched shergottites (Zagami, Shergotty, NWA856 and Los Angeles), and three nakhlites (Nakhla, MIL03346 and Yamato 000593) in order to further understand processes occurring during the early differentiation of Mars and the crystallization of its magma ocean. Two fractions of the terrestrial petrological analogue of nakhlites, the Archaean Theo's flow (Ontario, Canada) were also measured. The coupling of Nd and Hf isotopes provide direct insights on the mineralogy of the melt sources. In contrast to Sm/Nd, Lu/Hf ratios can be very large in minerals such as garnet. Selective partial melting of garnet bearing mantle sources can therefore lead to characteristic Lu/Hf signatures that can be recognized with Hf-176/Hf-177Hf ratios.

  14. Rare earth elements in minerals of the ALHA77005 shergottite and implications for its parent magma and crystallization history

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundberg, Laura L.; Crozaz, Ghislaine; Mcsween, Harry Y., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Analyses of mineral REE and selected minor and trace elements were carried out on individual grains of pyroxenes, whitlockite, maskelynite, and olivine of the Antarctic shergottite ALHA77005, and the results are used to interpret its parent magma and crystallization history. The results of mineral compositions and textural observations suggest that ALHA77005 is a cumulate with about half cumulus material (olivine + chromite) and half postcumulus phases. Most of the REEs in ALHA77005 reside in whitlockite whose modal concentration is about 1 percent. Mineral REE data support previous suggestions that plagioclase and whitlockite crystallized late, and that low-Ca pyroxene initiated crystallization before high-Ca pyroxene. The REE patterns for the intercumulus liquid, calculated from distribution coefficients for ALHA77005 pyroxene, plagioclase, and whitlockite, are in very good agreement and are similar to that of Shergotty.

  15. Modelling Sensor and Target effects on LiDAR Waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosette, J.; North, P. R.; Rubio, J.; Cook, B. D.; Suárez, J.

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this research is to explore the influence of sensor characteristics and interactions with vegetation and terrain properties on the estimation of vegetation parameters from LiDAR waveforms. This is carried out using waveform simulations produced by the FLIGHT radiative transfer model which is based on Monte Carlo simulation of photon transport (North, 1996; North et al., 2010). The opportunities for vegetation analysis that are offered by LiDAR modelling are also demonstrated by other authors e.g. Sun and Ranson, 2000; Ni-Meister et al., 2001. Simulations from the FLIGHT model were driven using reflectance and transmittance properties collected from the Howland Research Forest, Maine, USA in 2003 together with a tree list for a 200m x 150m area. This was generated using field measurements of location, species and diameter at breast height. Tree height and crown dimensions of individual trees were calculated using relationships established with a competition index determined for this site. Waveforms obtained by the Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS) were used as validation of simulations. This provided a base from which factors such as slope, laser incidence angle and pulse width could be varied. This has enabled the effect of instrument design and laser interactions with different surface characteristics to be tested. As such, waveform simulation is relevant for the development of future satellite LiDAR sensors, such as NASA’s forthcoming DESDynI mission (NASA, 2010), which aim to improve capabilities of vegetation parameter estimation. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS We would like to thank scientists at the Biospheric Sciences Branch of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, in particular to Jon Ranson and Bryan Blair. This work forms part of research funded by the NASA DESDynI project and the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NE/F021437/1). REFERENCES NASA, 2010, DESDynI: Deformation, Ecosystem Structure and Dynamics of Ice. http

  16. U-Pb isotopic systematics of shock-loaded and annealed baddeleyite: Implications for crystallization ages of Martian meteorite shergottites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niihara, Takafumi; Kaiden, Hiroshi; Misawa, Keiji; Sekine, Toshimori; Mikouchi, Takashi

    2012-08-01

    Shock-recovery and annealing experiments on basalt-baddeleyite mixtures were undertaken to evaluate shock effects on U-Pb isotopic systematics of baddeleyite. Shock pressures up to 57 GPa caused fracturing of constituent phases, mosaicism of olivine, maskelynitization of plagioclase, and melting, but the phase transition from monoclinic baddeleyite structure to high-pressure/temperature polymorphs of ZrO2 was not confirmed. The U-Pb isotopic systems of the shock-loaded baddeleyite did not show a large-scale isotopic disturbance. The samples shock-recovered from 47 GPa were then employed for annealing experiments at 1000 or 1300 °C, indicating that the basalt-baddeleyite mixture was almost totally melted except olivine and baddeleyite. Fine-grained euhedral zircon crystallized from the melt was observed around the relict baddeleyite in the sample annealed at 1300 °C for 1 h. The U-Pb isotopic systems of baddeleyite showed isotopic disturbances: many data points for the samples annealed at 1000 °C plotted above the concordia. Both radiogenic lead loss/uranium gain and radiogenic lead gain/uranium loss were observed in the baddeleyite annealed at 1300 °C. Complete radiogenic lead loss due to shock metamorphism and subsequent annealing was not observed in the shock-loaded/annealed baddeleyites studied here. These results confirm that the U-Pb isotopic systematics of baddeleyite are durable for shock metamorphism. Since shergottites still preserve Fe-Mg and/or Ca zonings in major constituent phases (i.e. pyroxene and olivine), the shock effects observed in Martian baddeleyites seem to be less intense compared to that under the present experimental conditions. An implication is that the U-Pb systems of baddeleyite in shergottites will provide crystallization ages of Martian magmatic rocks.

  17. A discussion of isotopic systematics and mineral zoning in the shergottites - Evidence for a 180 m.y. igneous crystallization age

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    The chronologies of the Shergotty, Zagami, ALHA 77005, and EETA 79001 meteorites were reexamined on the basis of shergottites' petrography and mineral chemistry data. Among the various isochrons, the concordant Rb-Sr (about 180 Myr) and U-Th-Pb (about 190 Myr) internal isochrons are interpreted as representing the time of igneous crystallization, while the Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, and Pb-Pb whole-rock isochrons are interpreted as mixing lines, and are reasonably attributed to igneous processes such as wall-rock assimilation and magma mixing. If the approximated age of less than 200 Myr is correct, the shergottites represent the youngest known extraterrestrial basalts. This conclusion supports the hypothesis that the SNC meteorites are samples of Mars.

  18. Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr Isotopic Systematics of a Heavily Shocked Martian Meteorite Tissint and Petrogenesis of Depleted Shergottites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, C.-Y.; Nyquist, L. E.; Park, J.; Agee, Carl B.

    2014-01-01

    Tissint is a very fresh Martian meteorite that fell near the town of Tissint in Morocco on July 18, 2011. It contains abundant olivine megacrysts (23%) in a fine-grained matrix of pyroxene (55%), maskelynitized plagioclase (15%), opaques (4%) and melt pockets (3%) and is petrographically similar to lithologies A and C of picritic shergottite EETA 79001 [1,2]. The presence of 2 types of shock-induced glasses and all 7 high-pressure mineral phases that were ever found in melt pockets of Martian meteorites suggests it underwent an intensive shock metamorphism of 25 GPa and 2000 C localized in melt pockets [2]. Mineral textures suggest that olivines, pyroxenes and plagioclases probably did not experience such hightemperature. Earlier determinations of its age yielded 596+/-23 Ma [3] and 616+/-67 Ma [4], respectively, for the Sm-Nd system and 583+/-86 Ma for the Lu-Hf system [4], in agreement with the 575+/-18 Ma age of the oldest olivine-phyric depleted shergottite Dho 019 [5]. However, the exposure ages of Tissint (1 Ma [1, 6, 7]) and Dho 019 (20 Ma [8]) are very different requiring two separate ejection events. These previously determined Sm-Nd and Lu-Hf ages are older than the Ar-Ar maskelynite plateau age of 524+/-15 Ma [9], reversing the pattern usually observed for Martian meteorites. In order to clarify these age issues and place models for Tissint's petrogenesis on a firm basis, we present new Rb-Sr and Sm- Nd isotopic results for Tissint, and discuss (a) the shock effects on them and the Ar-Ar chronometer, (b) correlation of the determined ages with those of other depleted shergottites, and (c) the petrogenesis of depleted shergottites. Since the meteorite is a recent fall, terrestrial contamination is expected to be minimal, but, the strong shock metamorphism might be expected to compromise the equilibrium of the isotopic systems.

  19. Characterizing Lava Flows With LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deligne, N. I.; Cashman, K. V.; Deardorff, N.; Dietterich, H. R.; House, P. K.; Soule, S.

    2009-12-01

    Digital elevation models (DEMs) have been used in volcanology in predictive modeling of lava flow paths, both for assessment of potential hazards and specific predictions of lava flow paths. Topographic analysis of a lava flow is potentially useful for mapping and quantifying flow surface morphologies, which in turn can be used to determine flow emplacement conditions, such as effusion rate, steadiness of flow, and interactions with pre-existing topography and surface water. However, this has been limited in application because of the coarse resolution of most DEMs. In recent years, use of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) airborne laser altimetry, capable of producing high resolution (≤ 1 meter) DEMs, has become increasingly common in the geomorphic and mapping community. However, volcanologists have made little use of airborne LiDAR. Here we compare information obtained using field observations and standard (10 meter) DEMs against LiDAR high resolution DEMs to assess the usefulness, capabilities, and limitations of LiDAR as applicable to lava flows. We compare morphologic characteristics of five lava flows of different compositions, tectonic settings, flow extents, slopes, and eruption duration: (1) 1984 Mauna Loa lava flow, Hawaii; (2) December 1974 Kilauea lava flow, Hawaii; (3) c. 1600 ybp Collier Cone lava flow, central Oregon Cascades; (4) Holocene lava flows from the Sand Mountain volcanic chain, central Oregon Cascades; and (5) Pleistocene lava flows along the Owyhee River, eastern Oregon basin and range. These lava flows range in composition from basalt to andesite, and have eruption durations ranging from 6 hours (observed) to years (inferred). We measure channel width, levee and flow front heights, compression ridge amplitude, wavelength and tumuli dimensions, and surface roughness. For all but the smallest scale features, LiDAR is easily used to quantify these features, which often is impossible or technically challenging to do in the field, while

  20. Field and LiDAR observations of the Hector Mine California 1999 surface rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, F.; Akciz, S. O.; Harvey, J. C.; Hudnut, K. W.; Lynch, D. K.; Scharer, K. M.; Stock, J. M.; Witkosky, R.; Kendrick, K. J.; Wespestad, C.

    2014-12-01

    We report new field- and computer-based investigations of the surface rupture of the October 16, 1999 Hector Mine Earthquake. Since May 2012, in cooperation with the United States Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center (MCAGCC) at Twentynine Palms, CA, our team has been allowed ground and aerial access to the entire surface rupture. We have focused our new field-based research and imagery analysis along the ~10 kilometer-long maximum slip zone (MSZ) which roughly corresponds to the zone of >4 meter dextral horizontal offset. New data include: 1) a 1 km wide aerial LiDAR survey along the entire surface rupture (@ 10 shots/m2, May 2012, www.opentopography.org); 2) terrestrial LiDAR surveys at 5 sites within the MSZ (@ >1000 shots/m2, April 2014); 3) low altitude aerial photography and ground based photography of the entire MSZ; 4) a ground-truthed database of 87 out of the 94 imagery-based offset measurements made within the MSZ; and 5) a database of 50 new field-based offset measurements made within the MSZ by our team on the ground, 31 of which have also been made on the computer (Ladicaoz) with both the 2000 LiDAR data (@ 0.5 m DEM resolution; Chen et al, in review) and 2012 LiDAR data (@ 35 cm DEM resolution; our team). New results to date include 1) significant variability (> 2 m) in horizontal offsets measured along short distances of the surface rupture (~100 m) within segments of the surface rupture that are localized to a single fault strand; 2) strong dependence of decadal scale fault scarp preservation on local lithology (bedrock vs. alluvial fan vs. fine sediment) and geomorphology (uphill vs. downhill facing scarp); 3) newly observed offset features which were never measured during the post-event field response; 4) newly observed offset features too small to be resolved in airborne LiDAR data (< 1 m); 5) nearly 25% of LiDAR imagery-based measurements that were later ground-truthed were judged by our team to warrant removal from the database due to

  1. Evaluation of the dimensions of anger reactions-5 (DAR-5) scale in combat veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Forbes, David; Alkemade, Nathan; Hopcraft, Dale; Hawthorne, Graeme; O'Halloran, Paul; Elhai, Jon D; McHugh, Tony; Bates, Glen; Novaco, Raymond W; Bryant, Richard; Lewis, Virginia

    2014-12-01

    After a traumatic event many people experience problems with anger which not only results in significant distress, but can also impede recovery. As such, there is value to include the assessment of anger in routine post-trauma screening procedures. The Dimensions of Anger Reactions-5 (DAR-5), as a concise measure of anger, was designed to meet such a need, its brevity minimizing the burden on client and practitioner. This study examined the psychometric properties of the DAR-5 with a sample of 163 male veterans diagnosed with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. The DAR-5 demonstrated internal reliability (α=.86), along with convergent, concurrent and discriminant validity against a variety of established measures (e.g., HADS, PCL, STAXI). Support for the clinical cut-point score of 12 suggested by Forbes et al. (2014, Utility of the dimensions of anger reactions-5 (DAR-5) scale as a brief anger measure. Depression and Anxiety, 31, 166-173) was observed. The results support considering the DAR-5 as a preferred screening and assessment measure of problematic anger.

  2. Calculating LiDAR Point Cloud Uncertainty and Propagating Uncertainty to Snow-Water Equivalent Data Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadomski, P. J.; Deems, J. S.; Glennie, C. L.; Hartzell, P. J.; Butler, H.; Finnegan, D. C.

    2015-12-01

    The use of high-resolution topographic data in the form of three-dimensional point clouds obtained from laser scanning systems (LiDAR) is becoming common across scientific disciplines.However little consideration has typically been given to the accuracy and the precision of LiDAR-derived measurements at the individual point scale.Numerous disparate sources contribute to the aggregate precision of each point measurement, including uncertainties in the range measurement, measurement of the attitude and position of the LiDAR collection platform, uncertainties associated with the interaction between the laser pulse and the target surface, and more.We have implemented open-source software tools to calculate per-point stochastic measurement errors for a point cloud using the general LiDAR georeferencing equation.We demonstrate the use of these propagated uncertainties by applying our methods to data collected by the Airborne Snow Observatory ALS, a NASA JPL project using a combination of airborne hyperspectral and LiDAR data to estimate snow-water equivalent distributions over full river basins.We present basin-scale snow depth maps with associated uncertainties, and demonstrate the propagation of those uncertainties to snow volume and snow-water equivalent calculations.

  3. Approach to voxel-based carbon stock quanticiation using LiDAR data in tropical rainforest, Brunei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eunji; Piao, Dongfan; Lee, Jongyeol; Lee, Woo-Kyun; Yoon, Mihae; Moon, Jooyeon

    2016-04-01

    Forest is an important means to adapt climate change as the only carbon sink recognized by the international community (KFS 2009). According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 5th Assessment Report (AR5), Agriculture, Forestry, and Other Land Use (AFOLU) sectors including forestry contributed 24% of total anthropogenic emissions in 2010 (IPCC 2014; Tubiello et al. 2015). While all sectors excluding AFOLU have increased Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions, land use sectors including forestry remains similar level as before due to decreasing deforestation and increasing reforestation. In earlier researches, optical imagery has been applied for analysis (Jakubowski et al. 2013). Optical imagery collects spectral information in 2D. It is difficult to effectively quantify forest stocks, especially in dense forest (Cui et al. 2012). To detect individual trees information from remotely sensed data, Light detection and ranging (LiDAR) has been used (Hyyppäet al. 2001; Persson et al. 2002; Chen et al. 2006). Moreover, LiDAR has the ability to actively acquire vertical tree information such as tree height using geo-registered 3D points (Kwak et al. 2007). In general, however, geo-register 3D point was used with a raster format which contains only 2D information by missing all the 3D data. Therefore, this research aimed to use the volumetric pixel (referred as "voxel") approach using LiDAR data in tropical rainforest, Brunei. By comparing the parameters derived from voxel based LiDAR data and field measured data, we examined the relationships between them for the quantification of forest carbon. This study expects to be more helpful to take advantage of the strategic application of climate change adaption.

  4. Sulfur and Iron Speciation in Gas-rich Impact-melt Glasses from Basaltic Shergottites Determined by Microxanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, S. R.; Rao, M. N.; Nyquist, L. E.

    2008-01-01

    Sulfur is abundantly present as sulfate near Martian surface based on chemical and mineralogical investigations on soils and rocks in Viking, Pathfinder and MER missions. Jarosite is identified by Mossbauer studies on rocks at Meridian and Gusev, whereas MgSO4 is deduced from MgO - SO3 correlations in Pathfinder MER and Viking soils. Other sulfate minerals such as gypsum and alunogen/ S-rich aluminosilicates and halides are detected only in martian meteorites such as shergottites and nakhlites using SEM/FE-SEM and EMPA techniques. Because sulfur has the capacity to occur in multiple valence states, determination of sulfur speciation (sulfide/ sulfate) in secondary mineral assemblages in soils and rocks near Mars surface may help us understand whether the fluid-rock interactions occurred under oxidizing or reducing conditions. To understand the implications of these observations for the formation of the Gas-rich Impact-melt (GRIM) glasses, we determined the oxidation state of Fe in the GRIM glasses using Fe K micro-XANES techniques.

  5. Complementary rare earth element patterns in unique achondrites, such as ALHA 77005 and shergottites, and in the earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, M.-S.; Schmitt, R. A.; Laul, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    Abundances of major, minor, and trace elements are determined in the Antarctic achondrite Allan Hills (ALHA) 77005 via sequential instrumental and radiochemical neutron activation analysis. The rare earth element (REE) abundances of ALHA 77005 reveal a unique chondritic normalized pattern; that is, the REEs are nearly unfractionated from La to Pr at approximately 1.0X chondrites, monotonically increased from Pr to Gd at approximately 3.4X with no Eu anomaly, nearly unfractionated from Gd and Ho and monotonically decreased from Ho to Lu at approximately 2.2X. It is noted that this unique REE pattern of ALHA 77005 can be modeled by a melting process involving a continuous melting and progressive partial removal of melt from a light REE enriched source material. In a model of this type, ALHA 77005 could represent either a crystallized cumulate from such a melt or the residual source material. Calculations show that the parent liquids for the shergottites could also be derived from a light REE enriched source material similar to that for ALHA 77005.

  6. Using LiDAR to characterize logjams in lowland rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abalharth, Mahdi; Hassan, Marwan A.; Klinkenberg, Brian; Leung, Vivian; McCleary, Richard

    2015-10-01

    Logjams significantly influence watershed hydrology, flow regime, channel morphology and stability, and processes in lowland rivers. Consequently, logjams play a major role in the existence and conservation of the riparian and aquatic ecosystems along major waterways. In this paper, we attempt to detect and quantify logjams in river channels using LiDAR technology in conjunction with traditional fieldwork. To the best of our knowledge, LiDAR-based analysis has not been used to characterize logjams in streams. Overall, when applied in a lowland river environment, LiDAR-based analysis demonstrates a comprehensive solution for detecting logjams in relation to the fieldwork, with a low rate of omission. A filtered approach predicted the presence of 95% of fieldwork-reported logjams (a 5% rate of omission), but also identified six logjams not identified in the field (a 10% rate of commission). A nonfiltered approach identified 87% of field-reported logjams, producing a 13% rate of omission and a 6.7% rate of commission. Dimension measurements were more consistent in the filtered LiDAR approach, showing 53%, 34%, and 90% of R2 improvements for the length, width, and height, respectively, over the unfiltered LiDAR values. As vegetation cover hindered accurate delineation of logjam boundaries by LiDAR, field and LiDAR measurements of nonvegetation-obstructed logjams were more highly correlated than the field and LiDAR measurements of partially and completely vegetation-obstructed logjams.

  7. Rigorous LiDAR Strip Adjustment with Triangulated Aerial Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. J.; Xiong, X. D.; Hu, X. Y.

    2013-10-01

    This paper proposes a POS aided LiDAR strip adjustment method. Firstly, aero-triangulation of the simultaneously obtained aerial images is conducted with a few photogrammetry-specific ground control points. Secondly, LiDAR intensity images are generated from the reflectance signals of laser foot points, and conjugate points are automatically matched between the LiDAR intensity image and the aero-triangulated aerial image. Control points used in LiDAR strip adjustment are derived from these conjugate points. Finally, LiDAR strip adjustment of real data is conducted with the POS aided LiDAR strip adjustment method proposed in this paper, and comparison experiment using three-dimensional similarity transformation method is also performed. The results indicate that the POS aided LiDAR strip adjustment method can significantly correct the planimetric and vertical errors of LiDAR strips. The planimetric correction accuracy is higher than average point distance while the vertical correction accuracy is comparable to that of the result of aero-triangulation. Moreover, the proposed method is obliviously superior to the traditional three-dimensional similarity transformation method.

  8. Classification and Characterization of Neotropical Rainforest Vegetation from Hyperspectral and LiDAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, M. M.; Prasad, S.; Jung, J.; Yang, H.; Zhang, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Mapping species and forest vertical structure at regional, continental, and global scale is of increasing importance for climate science and decision support systems. Remote sensing technologies have been widely utilized to achieve this goal since they help overcome limitations of the direct and indirect measurement approaches. While the use of multi-sensor data for characterizing forest structure has gained significant attention in recent years, research on the integration of full waveform LiDAR and hyperspectral data for a) classification and b) characterization of vegetation structure has been limited. Given sufficient labeled ground reference samples, supervised learning methods have evolved to effectively classify data in a high dimensional feature space. However, it is expensive and time-consuming to obtain labeled data, although the very high dimensionality of feature spaces from hyperspectral and LiDAR inputs make it difficult to design reliable classifiers with a limited quantity of labeled data. Therefore, it is important to concentrate on developing training data sets which are the most 'informative' and 'useful' for the classification task. Active learning (AL) was developed in the machine learning community, and has been demonstrated to be useful for classification of remote sensing data. In the active learning framework, classifiers are initially trained on a very limited pool of training samples, but additional informative and representative samples are identified from the abundant unlabeled data, labeled, and then inducted into this pool, thereby growing the training dataset in a systematic way. The goal is to choose data points such that a more accurate classification boundary is learned. We propose a novel Multi-kernel Active Learning (MKL-AL) approach that incorporates features from multiple sensors with an automatically optimized kernel composite ¬function, and kernel parameters are selected intelligently during the AL learning process. The

  9. Lava flow texture LiDAR signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whelley, P.; Garry, W. B.; Scheidt, S. P.; Irwin, R. P., III; Fox, J.; Bleacher, J. E.; Hamilton, C. W.

    2014-12-01

    High-resolution point clouds and digital elevation models (DEMs) are used to investigate lava textures on the Big Island of Hawaii. An experienced geologist can distinguish fresh or degraded lava textures (e.g., blocky, a'a and pahoehoe) visually in the field. Lava texture depends significantly on eruption conditions, and it is therefore instructive, if accurately determined. In places where field investigations are prohibitive (e.g., Mercury, Venus, the Moon, Mars, Io and remote regions on Earth) lava texture must be assessed from remote sensing data. A reliable method for differentiating lava textures in remote sensing data remains elusive. We present preliminary results comparing properties of lava textures observed in airborne and terrestrial Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data. Airborne data, in this study, were collected in 2011 by Airborne 1 Corporation and have a ~1m point spacing. The authors collected the terrestrial data during a May 2014 field season. The terrestrial scans have a heterogeneous point density. Points close to the scanner are 1 mm apart while 200 m in the distance points are 10 cm apart. Both platforms offer advantages and disadvantages beyond the differences in scale. Terrestrial scans are a quantitative representation of what a geologist sees "on the ground". Airborne scans are a point of view routinely imaged by other remote sensing tools, and can therefore be quickly compared to complimentary data sets (e.g., spectral scans or image data). Preliminary results indicate that LiDAR-derived surface roughness, from both platforms, is useful for differentiating lava textures, but at different spatial scales. As all lava types are quite rough, it is not simply roughness that is the most advantageous parameter; rather patterns in surface roughness can be used to differentiate lava surfaces of varied textures. This work will lead to faster and more reliable volcanic mapping efforts for planetary exploration as well as terrestrial

  10. Using LiDAR to Estimate Total Aboveground Biomass of Redwood Stands in the Jackson Demonstration State Forest, Mendocino, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, M.; Vuong, H.

    2013-12-01

    The overall objective of this study is to develop a method for estimating total aboveground biomass of redwood stands in Jackson Demonstration State Forest, Mendocino, California using airborne LiDAR data. LiDAR data owing to its vertical and horizontal accuracy are increasingly being used to characterize landscape features including ground surface elevation and canopy height. These LiDAR-derived metrics involving structural signatures at higher precision and accuracy can help better understand ecological processes at various spatial scales. Our study is focused on two major species of the forest: redwood (Sequoia semperirens [D.Don] Engl.) and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga mensiezii [Mirb.] Franco). Specifically, the objectives included linear regression models fitting tree diameter at breast height (dbh) to LiDAR derived height for each species. From 23 random points on the study area, field measurement (dbh and tree coordinate) were collected for more than 500 trees of Redwood and Douglas-fir over 0.2 ha- plots. The USFS-FUSION application software along with its LiDAR Data Viewer (LDV) were used to to extract Canopy Height Model (CHM) from which tree heights would be derived. Based on the LiDAR derived height and ground based dbh, a linear regression model was developed to predict dbh. The predicted dbh was used to estimate the biomass at the single tree level using Jenkin's formula (Jenkin et al 2003). The linear regression models were able to explain 65% of the variability associated with Redwood's dbh and 80% of that associated with Douglas-fir's dbh.

  11. Processing LiDAR Data to Predict Natural Hazards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairweather, Ian; Crabtree, Robert; Hager, Stacey

    2008-01-01

    ELF-Base and ELF-Hazards (wherein 'ELF' signifies 'Extract LiDAR Features' and 'LiDAR' signifies 'light detection and ranging') are developmental software modules for processing remote-sensing LiDAR data to identify past natural hazards (principally, landslides) and predict future ones. ELF-Base processes raw LiDAR data, including LiDAR intensity data that are often ignored in other software, to create digital terrain models (DTMs) and digital feature models (DFMs) with sub-meter accuracy. ELF-Hazards fuses raw LiDAR data, data from multispectral and hyperspectral optical images, and DTMs and DFMs generated by ELF-Base to generate hazard risk maps. Advanced algorithms in these software modules include line-enhancement and edge-detection algorithms, surface-characterization algorithms, and algorithms that implement innovative data-fusion techniques. The line-extraction and edge-detection algorithms enable users to locate such features as faults and landslide headwall scarps. Also implemented in this software are improved methodologies for identification and mapping of past landslide events by use of (1) accurate, ELF-derived surface characterizations and (2) three LiDAR/optical-data-fusion techniques: post-classification data fusion, maximum-likelihood estimation modeling, and hierarchical within-class discrimination. This software is expected to enable faster, more accurate forecasting of natural hazards than has previously been possible.

  12. Exploring tree species signature using waveform LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, T.; Popescu, S. C.; Krause, K.

    2015-12-01

    Successful classification of tree species with waveform LiDAR data would be of considerable value to estimate the biomass stocks and changes in forests. Current approaches emphasize converting the full waveform data into discrete points to get larger amount of parameters and identify tree species using several discrete-points variables. However, ignores intensity values and waveform shapes which convey important structural characteristics. The overall goal of this study was to employ the intensity and waveform shape of individual tree as the waveform signature to detect tree species. The data was acquired by the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) within 250*250 m study area located in San Joaquin Experimental Range. Specific objectives were to: (1) segment individual trees using the smoothed canopy height model (CHM) derived from discrete LiDAR points; (2) link waveform LiDAR with above individual tree boundaries to derive sample signatures of three tree species and use these signatures to discriminate tree species in a large area; and (3) compare tree species detection results from discrete LiDAR data and waveform LiDAR data. An overall accuracy of the segmented individual tree of more than 80% was obtained. The preliminary results show that compared with the discrete LiDAR data, the waveform LiDAR signature has a higher potential for accurate tree species classification.

  13. The Mineralogy, Geochemistry, and Redox State of Multivalent Cations During the Crystallization of Primitive Shergottitic Liquids at Various (f)O2. Insights into the (f)O2 Fugacity of the Martian Mantle and Crustal Influences on Redox Conditions of Martian Magmas.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, C. K.; Bell, A. S.; Burger, P. V.; Papike, J. J.; Jones, J.; Le, L.; Muttik, N.

    2016-01-01

    The (f)O2 [oxygen fugacity] of crystallization for martian basalts has been estimated in various studies to range from IW-1 to QFM+4 [1-3]. A striking geochemical feature of the shergottites is the large range in initial Sr isotopic ratios and initial epsilon(sup Nd) values. Studies by observed that within the shergottite group the (f)O2 [oxygen fugacity] of crystallization is highly correlated with these chemical and isotopic characteristics with depleted shergottites generally crystallizing at reduced conditions and enriched shergottites crystallizing under more oxidizing conditions. More recent work has shown that (f)O2 [oxygen fugacity] changed during the crystallization of these magmas from one order of magnitude in Y980459 (Y98) to several orders of magnitude in Larkman Nunatak 06319. These real or apparent variations within single shergottitic magmas have been attributed to mixing of a xenocrystic olivine component, volatile loss-water disassociation, auto-oxidation during crystallization of mafic phases, and assimilation of an oxidizing crustal component (e.g. sulfate). In contrast to the shergottites, augite basalts such as NWA 8159 are highly depleted yet appear to be highly oxidized (e.g. QFM+4). As a first step in attempting to unravel petrologic complexities that influence (f)O2 [oxygen fugacity] in martian magmas, this study explores the effect of (f)O2 [oxygen fugacity] on the liquid line of descent (LLD) for a primitive shergottite liquid composition (Y98). The results of this study will provide a fundamental basis for reconstructing the record of (f)O2 [oxygen fugacity] in shergottites and other martian basalts, its effect on both mineral chemistries and valence state partitioning, and a means for examining the role of crystallization (and other more complex processes) on the petrologic linkages between olivine-phyric and pyroxene-plagioclase shergottites.

  14. Tensor Modeling Based for Airborne LiDAR Data Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, N.; Liu, C.; Pfeifer, N.; Yin, J. F.; Liao, Z. Y.; Zhou, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Feature selection and description is a key factor in classification of Earth observation data. In this paper a classification method based on tensor decomposition is proposed. First, multiple features are extracted from raw LiDAR point cloud, and raster LiDAR images are derived by accumulating features or the "raw" data attributes. Then, the feature rasters of LiDAR data are stored as a tensor, and tensor decomposition is used to select component features. This tensor representation could keep the initial spatial structure and insure the consideration of the neighborhood. Based on a small number of component features a k nearest neighborhood classification is applied.

  15. Automatic registration method for mobile LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruisheng; Ferrie, Frank P.

    2015-01-01

    We present an automatic mutual information (MI) registration method for mobile LiDAR and panoramas collected from a driving vehicle. The suitability of MI for registration of aerial LiDAR and aerial oblique images has been demonstrated under an assumption that minimization of joint entropy (JE) is a sufficient approximation of maximization of MI. We show that this assumption is invalid for the ground-level data. The entropy of a LiDAR image cannot be regarded as approximately constant for small perturbations. Instead of minimizing the JE, we directly maximize MI to estimate corrections of camera poses. Our method automatically registers mobile LiDAR with spherical panoramas over an approximate 4-km drive, and is the first example we are aware of that tests MI registration in a large-scale context.

  16. Constraints on Mantle Plume Melting Conditions in the Martian Mantle Based on Improved Melting Phase Relationships of Olivine-Phyric Shergottite Yamato 980459

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, Walter S.; Rapp, Jennifer F.; Usui, Tomohiro; Draper, David S.; Filiberto, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Martian meteorite Yamato 980459 (hereafter Y98) is an olivine-phyric shergottite that has been interpreted as closely approximating a martian mantle melt [1-4], making it an important constraint on adiabatic decompression melting models. It has long been recognized that low pressure melting of the Y98 composition occurs at extremely high temperatures relative to martian basalts (1430 degC at 1 bar), which caused great difficulties in a previous attempt to explain Y98 magma generation via a mantle plume model [2]. However, previous studies of the phase diagram were limited to pressures of 2 GPa and less [2, 5], whereas decompression melting in the present-day martian mantle occurs at pressures of 3-7 GPa, with the shallow boundary of the melt production zone occurring just below the base of the thermal lithosphere [6]. Recent experimental work has now extended our knowledge of the Y98 melting phase relationships to 8 GPa. In light of this improved petrological knowledge, we are therefore reassessing the constraints that Y98 imposes on melting conditions in martian mantle plumes. Two recently discovered olivine- phyric shergottites, Northwest Africa (NWA) 5789 and NWA 6234, may also be primary melts from the martian mantle [7, 8]. However, these latter meteorites have not been the subject of detailed experimental petrology studies, so we focus here on Y98.

  17. Modelling rating curves using remotely sensed LiDAR data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nathanson, Marcus; Kean, Jason W.; Grabs, Thomas J.; Seibert, Jan; Laudon, Hjalmar; Lyon, Steve W.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate stream discharge measurements are important for many hydrological studies. In remote locations, however, it is often difficult to obtain stream flow information because of the difficulty in making the discharge measurements necessary to define stage-discharge relationships (rating curves). This study investigates the feasibility of defining rating curves by using a fluid mechanics-based model constrained with topographic data from an airborne LiDAR scanning. The study was carried out for an 8m-wide channel in the boreal landscape of northern Sweden. LiDAR data were used to define channel geometry above a low flow water surface along the 90-m surveyed reach. The channel topography below the water surface was estimated using the simple assumption of a flat streambed. The roughness for the modelled reach was back calculated from a single measurment of discharge. The topographic and roughness information was then used to model a rating curve. To isolate the potential influence of the flat bed assumption, a 'hybrid model' rating curve was developed on the basis of data combined from the LiDAR scan and a detailed ground survey. Whereas this hybrid model rating curve was in agreement with the direct measurements of discharge, the LiDAR model rating curve was equally in agreement with the medium and high flow measurements based on confidence intervals calculated from the direct measurements. The discrepancy between the LiDAR model rating curve and the low flow measurements was likely due to reduced roughness associated with unresolved submerged bed topography. Scanning during periods of low flow can help minimize this deficiency. These results suggest that combined ground surveys and LiDAR scans or multifrequency LiDAR scans that see 'below' the water surface (bathymetric LiDAR) could be useful in generating data needed to run such a fluid mechanics-based model. This opens a realm of possibility to remotely sense and monitor stream flows in channels in remote

  18. Shipborne LiDAR system for coastal change monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, chang hwan; Park, chang hong; Kim, hyun wook; hyuck Kim, won; Lee, myoung hoon; Park, hyeon yeong

    2016-04-01

    Coastal areas, used as human utilization areas like leisure space, medical care, ports and power plants, etc., are regions that are continuously changing and interconnected with oceans and land and the sea level has risen by about 8cm (1.9mm / yr) due to global warming from 1964 year to 2006 year in Korea. Coastal erosion due to sea-level rise has caused the problem of marine ecosystems and loss of tourism resources, etc. Regular monitoring of coastal erosion is essential at key locations with such volatility. But the survey method of land mobile LiDAR (light detection and ranging) system has much time consuming and many restrictions. For effective monitoring beach erosion, KIOST (Korea Institute of Ocean Science & Technology) has constructed a shipborne mobile LiDAR system. The shipborne mobile LiDAR system comprised a land mobile LiDAR (RIEGL LMS-420i), an INS (inertial navigation system, MAGUS Inertial+), a RTKGPS (LEICA GS15 GS25), and a fixed platform. The shipborne mobile LiDAR system is much more effective than a land mobile LiDAR system in the measuring of fore shore areas without shadow zone. Because the vessel with the shipborne mobile LiDAR system is continuously moved along the shoreline, it is possible to efficiently survey a large area in a relatively short time. Effective monitoring of the changes using the constructed shipborne mobile LiDAR system for seriously eroded coastal areas will be able to contribute to coastal erosion management and response.

  19. Georeferenced LiDAR 3D Vine Plantation Map Generation

    PubMed Central

    Llorens, Jordi; Gil, Emilio; Llop, Jordi; Queraltó, Meritxell

    2011-01-01

    The use of electronic devices for canopy characterization has recently been widely discussed. Among such devices, LiDAR sensors appear to be the most accurate and precise. Information obtained with LiDAR sensors during reading while driving a tractor along a crop row can be managed and transformed into canopy density maps by evaluating the frequency of LiDAR returns. This paper describes a proposed methodology to obtain a georeferenced canopy map by combining the information obtained with LiDAR with that generated using a GPS receiver installed on top of a tractor. Data regarding the velocity of LiDAR measurements and UTM coordinates of each measured point on the canopy were obtained by applying the proposed transformation process. The process allows overlap of the canopy density map generated with the image of the intended measured area using Google Earth®, providing accurate information about the canopy distribution and/or location of damage along the rows. This methodology was applied and tested on different vine varieties and crop stages in two important vine production areas in Spain. The results indicate that the georeferenced information obtained with LiDAR sensors appears to be an interesting tool with the potential to improve crop management processes. PMID:22163952

  20. Georeferenced LiDAR 3D vine plantation map generation.

    PubMed

    Llorens, Jordi; Gil, Emilio; Llop, Jordi; Queraltó, Meritxell

    2011-01-01

    The use of electronic devices for canopy characterization has recently been widely discussed. Among such devices, LiDAR sensors appear to be the most accurate and precise. Information obtained with LiDAR sensors during reading while driving a tractor along a crop row can be managed and transformed into canopy density maps by evaluating the frequency of LiDAR returns. This paper describes a proposed methodology to obtain a georeferenced canopy map by combining the information obtained with LiDAR with that generated using a GPS receiver installed on top of a tractor. Data regarding the velocity of LiDAR measurements and UTM coordinates of each measured point on the canopy were obtained by applying the proposed transformation process. The process allows overlap of the canopy density map generated with the image of the intended measured area using Google Earth(®), providing accurate information about the canopy distribution and/or location of damage along the rows. This methodology was applied and tested on different vine varieties and crop stages in two important vine production areas in Spain. The results indicate that the georeferenced information obtained with LiDAR sensors appears to be an interesting tool with the potential to improve crop management processes.

  1. Georeferenced LiDAR 3D vine plantation map generation.

    PubMed

    Llorens, Jordi; Gil, Emilio; Llop, Jordi; Queraltó, Meritxell

    2011-01-01

    The use of electronic devices for canopy characterization has recently been widely discussed. Among such devices, LiDAR sensors appear to be the most accurate and precise. Information obtained with LiDAR sensors during reading while driving a tractor along a crop row can be managed and transformed into canopy density maps by evaluating the frequency of LiDAR returns. This paper describes a proposed methodology to obtain a georeferenced canopy map by combining the information obtained with LiDAR with that generated using a GPS receiver installed on top of a tractor. Data regarding the velocity of LiDAR measurements and UTM coordinates of each measured point on the canopy were obtained by applying the proposed transformation process. The process allows overlap of the canopy density map generated with the image of the intended measured area using Google Earth(®), providing accurate information about the canopy distribution and/or location of damage along the rows. This methodology was applied and tested on different vine varieties and crop stages in two important vine production areas in Spain. The results indicate that the georeferenced information obtained with LiDAR sensors appears to be an interesting tool with the potential to improve crop management processes. PMID:22163952

  2. Noble gases in 18 Martian meteorites and angrite Northwest Africa 7812—Exposure ages, trapped gases, and a re-evaluation of the evidence for solar cosmic ray-produced neon in shergottites and other achondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieler, R.; Huber, L.; Busemann, H.; Seiler, S.; Leya, I.; Maden, C.; Masarik, J.; Meier, M. M. M.; Nagao, K.; Trappitsch, R.; Irving, A. J.

    2016-02-01

    We present noble gas data for 16 shergottites, 2 nakhlites (NWA 5790, NWA 10153), and 1 angrite (NWA 7812). Noble gas exposure ages of the shergottites fall in the 1-6 Ma range found in previous studies. Three depleted olivine-phyric shergottites (Tissint, NWA 6162, NWA 7635) have exposure ages of ~1 Ma, in agreement with published data for similar specimens. The exposure age of NWA 10153 (~12.2 Ma) falls in the range of 9-13 Ma reported for other nakhlites. Our preferred age of ~7.3 Ma for NWA 5790 is lower than this range, and it is possible that NWA 5790 represents a distinct ejection event. A Tissint glass sample contains Xe from the Martian atmosphere. Several samples show a remarkably low (21Ne/22Ne)cos ratio < 0.80, as previously observed in a many shergottites and in various other rare achondrites. This was explained by solar cosmic ray-produced Ne (SCR Ne) in addition to the commonly found galactic cosmic ray-produced Ne, implying very low preatmospheric shielding and ablation loss. We revisit this by comparing measured (21Ne/22Ne)cos ratios with predictions by cosmogenic nuclide production models. Indeed, several shergottites, acalpulcoites/lodranites, angrites (including NWA 7812), and the Brachina-like meteorite LEW 88763 likely contain SCR Ne, as previously postulated for many of them. The SCR contribution may influence the calculation of exposure ages. One likely reason that SCR nuclides are predominantly detected in meteorites from rare classes is because they usually are analyzed for cosmogenic nuclides even if they had a very small (preatmospheric) mass and hence low ablation loss.

  3. Assimilation of High 18O/16O Crust by Shergottite-Nakhlite-Chassigny (SNC) Magmas on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, J. M.; Taylor, L. A.; Valley, J. W.; Spicuzza, M. J.

    2005-12-01

    There is significant geochemical evidence for assimilation of crustal material into sub-aerial, mantle-derived, terrestrial basaltic magmas. Some of the most powerful constraints on crustal assimilation come from oxygen isotope studies, because supracrustal rocks often have distinct 18O/16O ratios resulting from interaction with Earth's hydrosphere. From a planetary perspective, studies of carbonate concretions from meteorite ALH84001 have yielded evidence for low-temperature crustal interaction at or near the surface of its putative parent body, Mars. This finding raises the possibility that crustal assimilation processes may be tracked using oxygen isotopes in combination with geochemical data of other reputed martian (SNC) meteorites. The whole-rock oxygen isotope ratios (Laser fluorination δ18O = +4.21 to +5.85‰ VSMOW) of SNC meteorites, correlate with aspects of their incompatible element chemistry. Some of the oxygen isotope variability may be explained by post-magmatic alteration on Mars or Earth; however, it appears, based on petrographic and geochemical observations, that a number of SNC meteorites, especially Shergottites, retain the original whole-rock oxygen isotope values of their magmas prior to crystallisation. Correlations between oxygen isotopes and incompatible element geochemistry are consistent with assimilation of a high-18O/16O, incompatible-element rich, oxidizing crustal component by hot, mantle-derived magmas (δ18O = ~~4.2‰). A crustal component has previously been recognized from Sr-Nd-Os isotope systematics and oxygen fugacity measurements of SNC meteorites. Oxygen isotope evidence from SNC meteorites suggests high-18O/16O crustal contaminants on Mars result from low temperature (< 300°C) interaction with martian hydrosphere. The extent of apparent crustal contamination tracked by oxygen isotopes in SNC meteorites implies that the majority of martian crust may have undergone such interactions. Evidence for assimilation of

  4. Uas Topographic Mapping with Velodyne LiDAR Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jozkow, G.; Toth, C.; Grejner-Brzezinska, D.

    2016-06-01

    Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) technology is nowadays willingly used in small area topographic mapping due to low costs and good quality of derived products. Since cameras typically used with UAS have some limitations, e.g. cannot penetrate the vegetation, LiDAR sensors are increasingly getting attention in UAS mapping. Sensor developments reached the point when their costs and size suit the UAS platform, though, LiDAR UAS is still an emerging technology. One issue related to using LiDAR sensors on UAS is the limited performance of the navigation sensors used on UAS platforms. Therefore, various hardware and software solutions are investigated to increase the quality of UAS LiDAR point clouds. This work analyses several aspects of the UAS LiDAR point cloud generation performance based on UAS flights conducted with the Velodyne laser scanner and cameras. The attention was primarily paid to the trajectory reconstruction performance that is essential for accurate point cloud georeferencing. Since the navigation sensors, especially Inertial Measurement Units (IMUs), may not be of sufficient performance, the estimated camera poses could allow to increase the robustness of the estimated trajectory, and subsequently, the accuracy of the point cloud. The accuracy of the final UAS LiDAR point cloud was evaluated on the basis of the generated DSM, including comparison with point clouds obtained from dense image matching. The results showed the need for more investigation on MEMS IMU sensors used for UAS trajectory reconstruction. The accuracy of the UAS LiDAR point cloud, though lower than for point cloud obtained from images, may be still sufficient for certain mapping applications where the optical imagery is not useful.

  5. Urban flood modelling combining top-view LiDAR data with ground-view SfM observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meesuk, Vorawit; Vojinovic, Zoran; Mynett, Arthur E.; Abdullah, Ahmad F.

    2015-01-01

    Remote Sensing technologies are capable of providing high-resolution spatial data needed to set up advanced flood simulation models. Amongst them, aerial Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) surveys or Airborne Laser Scanner (ALS) systems have long been used to provide digital topographic maps. Nowadays, Remote Sensing data are commonly used to create Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) for detailed urban-flood modelling. However, the difficulty of relying on top-view LiDAR data only is that it cannot detect whether passages for floodwaters are hidden underneath vegetated areas or beneath overarching structures such as roads, railroads, and bridges. Such (hidden) small urban features can play an important role in urban flood propagation. In this paper, a complex urban area of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia was chosen as a study area to simulate the extreme flooding event that occurred in 2003. Three different DTMs were generated and used as input for a two-dimensional (2D) urban flood model. A top-view LiDAR approach was used to create two DTMs: (i) a standard LiDAR-DTM and (ii) a Filtered LiDAR-DTM taking into account specific ground-view features. In addition, a Structure from Motion (SfM) approach was used to detect hidden urban features from a sequence of ground-view images; these ground-view SfM data were then combined with top-view Filtered LiDAR data to create (iii) a novel Multidimensional Fusion of Views-Digital Terrain Model (MFV-DTM). These DTMs were then used as a basis for the 2D urban flood model. The resulting dynamic flood maps are compared with observations at six measurement locations. It was found that when applying only top-view DTMs as input data, the flood simulation results appear to have mismatches in both floodwater depths and flood propagation patterns. In contrast, when employing the top-ground-view fusion approach (MFV-DTM), the results not only show a good agreement in floodwater depth, but also simulate more correctly the floodwater dynamics around

  6. Reexamination of Faulting in the Tahoe Basin Using Airborne LiDAR Data and Seismic CHIRP Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmauder, G. C.; Kent, G.; Smith, K. D.; Driscoll, N. W.; Maloney, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Faulting across the Tahoe basin has been mapped using a combination of multibeam sonar, airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR), and high-resolution seismic CHIRP imagery. In August 2010, the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency (TRPA) collected 941 square kilometers of airborne LiDAR data in the Tahoe basin using a Leica ALS50 Phase II Laser system mounted on a Cessna Caravan 208B aircraft; our group was involved with data specification, selection of contractor and data QC. These data have a resolution of 11.82 points per square meter and a vertical accuracy of 3.5 centimeters. The high data resolution has allowed us to map with ease the many fault scarps associated with the three major active fault zones in the Tahoe basin, which include the West Tahoe-Dollar Point fault zone, the Stateline fault, and the Incline Village fault. By using the airborne LiDAR data, we were able to identify previously unmapped fault segments throughout the Tahoe basin. Future application of terrestrial LiDAR using an I-Site 4400 laser scanner at selected sites will provide better control and resolution of the fault scarp characteristics. This will allow us to not only ground truth the airborne LiDAR, but also look for subtle features that may be indicative of dextral motion on faults otherwise displaying predominantly normal displacement. Finally, to refine fault locations beneath Lake Tahoe, Fallen Leaf Lake and Cascade Lake, we collected additional CHIRP imagery using an Edgetech Subscan system, in some cases to groundtruth the new LiDAR fault data (i.e., Cascade Lake). By combining these images with the LiDAR, multibeam data and new multispectral imagery, we were able to link previously unknown segments of the faults and identify continuity in the individual fault systems. From our results, we have developed a much-improved model of the fault systems within the Lake Tahoe basin. Our model provides us with a better understanding of the tectonic environment of the basin and may help

  7. Using LiDAR technology in forestry activities.

    PubMed

    Akay, Abdullah Emin; Oğuz, Hakan; Karas, Ismail Rakip; Aruga, Kazuhiro

    2009-04-01

    Managing natural resources in wide-scale areas can be highly time and resource consuming task which requires significant amount of data collection in the field and reduction of the data in the office to provide the necessary information. High performance LiDAR remote sensing technology has recently become an effective tool for use in applications of natural resources. In the field of forestry, the LiDAR measurements of the forested areas can provide high-quality data on three-dimensional characterizations of forest structures. Besides, LiDAR data can be used to provide very high quality and accurate Digital Elevation Model (DEM) for the forested areas. This study presents the progress and opportunities of using LiDAR remote sensing technology in various forestry applications. The results indicate that LiDAR based forest structure data and high-resolution DEMs can be used in wide-scale forestry activities such as stand characterizations, forest inventory and management, fire behaviour modeling, and forest operations. PMID:18365761

  8. Biomass Estimation for Individual Trees using Waveform LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Kumar, P.; Dutta, D.

    2015-12-01

    Vegetation biomass information is important for many ecological models that include terrestrial vegetation in their simulations. Biomass has strong influences on carbon, water, and nutrient cycles. Traditionally biomass estimation requires intensive, and often destructive, field measurements. However, with advances in technology, airborne LiDAR has become a convenient tool for acquiring such information on a large scale. In this study, we use infrared full waveform LiDAR to estimate biomass information for individual trees in the Sangamon River basin in Illinois, USA. During this process, we also develop automated geolocation calibration algorithms for raw waveform LiDAR data. In the summer of 2014, discrete and waveform LiDAR data were collected over the Sangamon River basin. Field measurements commonly used in biomass equations such as diameter at breast height and total tree height were also taken for four sites across the basin. Using discrete LiDAR data, individual trees are delineated. For each tree, a voxelization methods is applied to all waveforms associated with the tree to result in a pseudo-waveform. By relating biomass extrapolated using field measurements from a training set of trees to waveform metrics for each corresponding tree, we are able to estimate biomass on an individual tree basis. The results can be especially useful as current models increase in resolution.

  9. Integrating LiDAR Data into Earth Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, S. E.; Arrowsmith, R.; de Groot, R. M.; Crosby, C. J.; Whitesides, A. S.; Colunga, J.

    2010-12-01

    The use of high-resolution topography derived from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) in the study of active tectonics is widespread and has become an indispensable tool to better understand earthquake hazards. For this reason and the spectacular representation of the phenomena the data provide, it is appropriate to integrate these data into the Earth science education curriculum. A collaboration between Arizona State University, the OpenTopography Facility, and the Southern California Earthquake Center are developing, three earth science education products to inform students and other audiences about LiDAR and its application to active tectonics research. First, a 10-minute introductory video titled LiDAR: Illuminating Earthquakes was produced and is freely available online through the OpenTopography portal and SCEC. The second product is an update and enhancement of the Wallace Creek Interpretive Trail website (www.scec.org/wallacecreek). LiDAR topography data products have been added along with the development of a virtual tour of the offset channels at Wallace Creek using the B4 LiDAR data within the Google Earth environment. The virtual tour to Wallace Creek is designed as a lab activity for introductory undergraduate geology courses to increase understanding of earthquake hazards through exploration of the dramatic offset created by the San Andreas Fault (SAF) at Wallace Creek and Global Positioning System-derived displacements spanning the SAF at Wallace Creek . This activity is currently being tested in courses at Arizona State University. The goal of the assessment is to measure student understanding of plate tectonics and earthquakes after completing the activity. Including high-resolution topography LiDAR data into the earth science education curriculum promotes understanding of plate tectonics, faults, and other topics related to earthquake hazards.

  10. Modeling loblolly pine dominant height using airborne LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maceyka, Andy

    The dominant height of 73 georeferenced field sample plots were modeled from various canopy height metrics derived by means of a small-footprint laser scanning technology, known as light detection and ranging (or just LiDAR), over young and mature forest stands using regression analysis. LiDAR plot metrics were regressed against field measured dominant height using Best Subsets Regression to reduce the number of models. From those models, regression assumptions were evaluated to determine which model was actually the best. The best model included the 1st and 90th height percentiles as predictors and explained 95% of the variance in average dominant height.

  11. Raster Vs. Point Cloud LiDAR Data Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Ashmawy, N.; Shaker, A.

    2014-09-01

    Airborne Laser Scanning systems with light detection and ranging (LiDAR) technology is one of the fast and accurate 3D point data acquisition techniques. Generating accurate digital terrain and/or surface models (DTM/DSM) is the main application of collecting LiDAR range data. Recently, LiDAR range and intensity data have been used for land cover classification applications. Data range and Intensity, (strength of the backscattered signals measured by the LiDAR systems), are affected by the flying height, the ground elevation, scanning angle and the physical characteristics of the objects surface. These effects may lead to uneven distribution of point cloud or some gaps that may affect the classification process. Researchers have investigated the conversion of LiDAR range point data to raster image for terrain modelling. Interpolation techniques have been used to achieve the best representation of surfaces, and to fill the gaps between the LiDAR footprints. Interpolation methods are also investigated to generate LiDAR range and intensity image data for land cover classification applications. In this paper, different approach has been followed to classifying the LiDAR data (range and intensity) for land cover mapping. The methodology relies on the classification of the point cloud data based on their range and intensity and then converted the classified points into raster image. The gaps in the data are filled based on the classes of the nearest neighbour. Land cover maps are produced using two approaches using: (a) the conventional raster image data based on point interpolation; and (b) the proposed point data classification. A study area covering an urban district in Burnaby, British Colombia, Canada, is selected to compare the results of the two approaches. Five different land cover classes can be distinguished in that area: buildings, roads and parking areas, trees, low vegetation (grass), and bare soil. The results show that an improvement of around 10 % in the

  12. Similarity and Complementarity of Airborne and Terrestrial LiDAR Data in High Mountain Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamp, Nicole; Glira, Philipp; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2013-04-01

    airborne to the terrestrial data (or vice versa) without introducing systematic errors caused by the above mentioned differences. A workflow for this analysis is established with command line processing of the point clouds using OPALS (Orientation and Processing of Airborne Laser Scanning data, Vienna University of Technology). For further processing of the data, it is necessary to adjust the different scans by using least squares matching of surfaces to improve the orientation of the ALS and TLS data. Handling of the terrestrial LiDAR data with its very high point density and the data filtering to minimize errors and artefacts turned out to be the biggest challenges. After a relative and absolute orientation of the TLS scans with the help of GNSS spheres (see P. Glira, ESSI1.5), the data are processed in order to make it comparable with the airborne LiDAR scans. Different ranges and consequential different footprint sizes and a big variance of the point densities have to be considered. Therefore the application of different filter and interpolation methods is important to get the best results and in further consequence to calculate an ideal Digital Terrain Model (DTM), which provides a good input dataset for future modelling of the geomorphic processes in the PROSA study area around the Gepatschferner.

  13. 47 CFR 25.401 - Satellite DARS applications subject to competitive bidding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Satellite DARS applications subject to...) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Competitive Bidding Procedures for DARS § 25.401 Satellite DARS applications subject to competitive bidding. Mutually exclusive initial applications for...

  14. 47 CFR 25.401 - Satellite DARS applications subject to competitive bidding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Satellite DARS applications subject to...) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Competitive Bidding Procedures for DARS § 25.401 Satellite DARS applications subject to competitive bidding. Mutually exclusive initial applications for...

  15. 47 CFR 25.401 - Satellite DARS applications subject to competitive bidding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Satellite DARS applications subject to...) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Competitive Bidding Procedures for DARS § 25.401 Satellite DARS applications subject to competitive bidding. Mutually exclusive initial applications for...

  16. 47 CFR 25.401 - Satellite DARS applications subject to competitive bidding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Satellite DARS applications subject to...) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Competitive Bidding Procedures for DARS § 25.401 Satellite DARS applications subject to competitive bidding. Mutually exclusive initial applications for...

  17. 47 CFR 25.401 - Satellite DARS applications subject to competitive bidding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Satellite DARS applications subject to...) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Competitive Bidding Procedures for DARS § 25.401 Satellite DARS applications subject to competitive bidding. Mutually exclusive initial applications for...

  18. Forest structures retrieval from LiDAR onboard ULA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Xiaoxia; Chazette, Patrick; Totems, Julien; Marnas, Fabien; Sanak, Joseph

    2013-04-01

    Following the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, the assessment of forest carbon stock is one of the main elements for a better understanding of the carbon cycle and its evolution following the climate change. The forests sequester 80% of the continental biospheric carbon and this efficiency is a function of the tree species and the tree health. The airborne backscatter LiDAR onboard the ultra light aircraft (ULA) can provide the key information on the forest vertical structures and evolution in the time. The most important structural parameter is the tree top height, which is directly linked to the above-ground biomass using non-linear relationships. In order to test the LiDAR capability for retrieving the tree top height, the LiDAR ULICE (Ultraviolet LIdar for Canopy Experiment) has been used over different forest types, from coniferous (maritime pins) to deciduous (oaks, hornbeams ...) trees. ULICE works at the wavelength of 355 nm with a sampling along the line-of-sight between 15 and 75 cm. According to the LiDAR signal to noise ratio (SNR), two different algorithms have been used in our study. The first algorithm is a threshold method directly based on the comparison between the LiDAR signal and the noise distributions, while the second one used a low pass filter by fitting a Gaussian curve family. In this paper, we will present these two algorithms and their evolution as a function of the SNR. The main error sources will be also discussed and assessed for each algorithm. The results show that these algorithms have great potential for ground-segment of future space borne LiDAR missions dedicated to the forest survey at the global scale. Acknowledgements: the canopy LiDAR system ULICE has been developed by CEA (Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique). It has been deployed with the support of CNES (Centre National d'Etude Spariales) and ANR (Agence Nationale de la Recherche). We acknowledge the ULA pilots Franck Toussaint for logistical help

  19. Features of Point Clouds Synthesized from Multi-View ALOS/PRISM Data and Comparisons with LiDAR Data in Forested Areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ni, Wenjian; Ranson, Kenneth Jon; Zhang, Zhiyu; Sun, Guoqing

    2014-01-01

    LiDAR waveform data from airborne LiDAR scanners (ALS) e.g. the Land Vegetation and Ice Sensor (LVIS) havebeen successfully used for estimation of forest height and biomass at local scales and have become the preferredremote sensing dataset. However, regional and global applications are limited by the cost of the airborne LiDARdata acquisition and there are no available spaceborne LiDAR systems. Some researchers have demonstrated thepotential for mapping forest height using aerial or spaceborne stereo imagery with very high spatial resolutions.For stereo imageswith global coverage but coarse resolution newanalysis methods need to be used. Unlike mostresearch based on digital surface models, this study concentrated on analyzing the features of point cloud datagenerated from stereo imagery. The synthesizing of point cloud data from multi-view stereo imagery increasedthe point density of the data. The point cloud data over forested areas were analyzed and compared to small footprintLiDAR data and large-footprint LiDAR waveform data. The results showed that the synthesized point clouddata from ALOSPRISM triplets produce vertical distributions similar to LiDAR data and detected the verticalstructure of sparse and non-closed forests at 30mresolution. For dense forest canopies, the canopy could be capturedbut the ground surface could not be seen, so surface elevations from other sourceswould be needed to calculatethe height of the canopy. A canopy height map with 30 m pixels was produced by subtracting nationalelevation dataset (NED) fromthe averaged elevation of synthesized point clouds,which exhibited spatial featuresof roads, forest edges and patches. The linear regression showed that the canopy height map had a good correlationwith RH50 of LVIS data with a slope of 1.04 and R2 of 0.74 indicating that the canopy height derived fromPRISM triplets can be used to estimate forest biomass at 30 m resolution.

  20. Utilizing terrestrial-based LiDAR to quantify erosion rates caused by ENSO at the Morro Bay Sandspit, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, J. E.; Richaud, M.

    2012-12-01

    Coastal erosion due to increased precipitation, wave energy, and sea surface elevations attributed to El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) has significant implications for the health of protected marine coastal ecosystems. Estuaries are particularly sensitive environments that provide an abundance of resources to a large variety of plant and animal species. Without proper protection from the erosive nature of the Pacific Ocean, estuaries have the potential to be damaged, destroying protected coastal habitats. The Morro Bay sandspit, located between the Morro Bay estuary and Estero Bay, California, undergoes continuous geomorphic changes. Past studies have used airborne-based LiDAR data effectively to measure shoreline change in the coastal regions of the United States in three dimensions (Sallenger et al., 2003; Young and Ashford, 2006; Quan et al., in review), but an aircraft's access, cost, poor ability to respond in short time frames, and inability to map in bad atmospheric conditions can restrict the use of the aircraft (Quan et al., in review). This study will employ terrestrial-based LiDAR to produce higher resolution images than airborne studies, to quantify and refine coastal erosion changes caused by ENSO at the Morro Bay sandspit.

  1. Variable microstructural response of baddeleyite to shock metamorphism in young basaltic shergottite NWA 5298 and improved U-Pb dating of Solar System events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darling, James R.; Moser, Desmond E.; Barker, Ivan R.; Tait, Kim T.; Chamberlain, Kevin R.; Schmitt, Axel K.; Hyde, Brendt C.

    2016-06-01

    The accurate dating of igneous and impact events is vital for the understanding of Solar System evolution, but has been hampered by limited knowledge of how shock metamorphism affects mineral and whole-rock isotopic systems used for geochronology. Baddeleyite (monoclinic ZrO2) is a refractory mineral chronometer of great potential to date these processes due to its widespread occurrence in achondrites and robust U-Pb isotopic systematics, but there is little understanding of shock-effects on this phase. Here we present new nano-structural measurements of baddeleyite grains in a thin-section of the highly-shocked basaltic shergottite Northwest Africa (NWA) 5298, using high-resolution electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) techniques, to investigate shock-effects and their linkage with U-Pb isotopic disturbance that has previously been documented by in-situ U-Pb isotopic analyses. The shock-altered state of originally igneous baddeleyite grains is highly variable across the thin-section and often within single grains. Analyzed grains range from those that preserve primary (magmatic) twinning and trace-element zonation (baddeleyite shock Group 1), to quasi-amorphous ZrO2 (Group 2) and to recrystallized micro-granular domains of baddeleyite (Group 3). These groups correlate closely with measured U-Pb isotope compositions. Primary igneous features in Group 1 baddeleyites (n = 5) are retained in high shock impedance grain environments, and an average of these grains yields a revised late-Amazonian magmatic crystallization age of 175 ± 30 Ma for this shergottite. The youngest U-Pb dates occur from Group 3 recrystallized nano- to micro-granular baddeleyite grains, indicating that it is post-shock heating and new mineral growth that drives much of the isotopic disturbance, rather than just shock deformation and phase transitions. Our data demonstrate that a systematic multi-stage microstructural evolution in

  2. High-intensity cyclotron for the IsoDAR experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo, D.; IsoDAR Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    The IsoDAR experiment is the MIT proposal to investigate about several neutrino properties, in order to explain some anomalies experimentally observed. It requires 10mA of proton beam at the energy of 60MeV to produce a high-intensity electron antineutrino flux from the production and the decay of 8Li: it is an ambitious goal for the accelerator design, due also to the fact that the machine has to be placed near a neutrino detector, like KAMLAND or WATCHMAN, located in underground sites. A compact cyclotron able to accelerate H2+ molecule beam up to energy of 60MeV/amu is under study. The critical issues of this machine concern the beam injection due to the effects of space charge, the efficiency of the beam extraction and the technical solutions needed to the machine assembly. Here, the innovative solutions and the preliminary results achieved by the IsoDAR team are discussed.

  3. Coastal and tidal landform detection from high resolution topobathymetric LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skovgaard Andersen, Mikkel; Al-Hamdani, Zyad; Steinbacher, Frank; Rolighed Larsen, Laurids; Brandbyge Ernstsen, Verner

    2016-04-01

    Coastal and tidal environments are valuable ecosystems, which, however, are under pressure in many areas around the world due to globalisation and/or climate change. Detailed mapping of these environments is required in order to manage the coastal zone in a sustainable way. However, historically these transition zones between land and water are difficult or even impossible to map and investigate in high spatial resolution due to the challenging environmental conditions. The new generation of airborne topobathymetric light detection and ranging (LiDAR) potentially enables full-coverage and high-resolution mapping of these land-water transition zones. We have carried out topobathymetric LiDAR surveys in the Knudedyb tidal inlet system, a coastal environment in the Danish Wadden Sea which is part of the Wadden Sea National Park and UNESCO World Heritage. Detailed digital elevation models (DEMs) with a grid cell size of 0.5 m x 0.5 m were generated from the LiDAR point cloud with a mean point density in the order of 20 points/m2. The DEM was analysed morphometrically using a modification of the tool Benthic Terrain Modeler (BTM) developed by Wright et al. (2005). Initially, stage (the elevation in relation to tidal range) was used to divide the area of investigation into the different tidal zones, i.e. subtidal, intertidal and supratidal. Subsequently, morphometric units were identified and characterised by a combination of statistical neighbourhood analysis with varying window sizes (using the Bathymetric Positioning Index (BPI) from the BTM, moving average and standard deviation), slope parameters and area/perimeter ratios. Finally, these morphometric units were classified into six different types of landforms based on their stage and morphometric characteristics, i.e. either subtidal channel, intertidal flat, intertidal creek, linear bar, swash bar or beach dune. We hereby demonstrate the potential of using airborne topobathymetric LiDAR for seamless mapping of land

  4. A new 500-m resolution map of canopy height for Amazon forest using spaceborne LiDAR and cloud-free MODIS imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Yoshito; Suwa, Rempei; Jindo, Keiji; Endo, Takahiro; Oki, Kazuo; Sawada, Haruo; Arai, Egidio; Shimabukuro, Yosio Edemir; Celes, Carlos Henrique Souza; Campos, Moacir Alberto Assis; Higuchi, Francisco Gasparetto; Lima, Adriano José Nogueira; Higuchi, Niro; Kajimoto, Takuya; Ishizuka, Moriyoshi

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, we aimed to map canopy heights in the Brazilian Amazon mainly on the basis of spaceborne LiDAR and cloud-free MODIS imagery with a new method (the Self-Organizing Relationships method) for spatial modeling of the LiDAR footprint. To evaluate the general versatility, we compared the created canopy height map with two different canopy height estimates on the basis of our original field study plots (799 plots located in eight study sites) and a previously developed canopy height map. The compared canopy height estimates were obtained by: (1) a stem diameter at breast height (D) - tree height (H) relationship specific to each site on the basis of our original field study, (2) a previously developed D-H model involving environmental and structural factors as explanatory variables (Feldpausch et al., 2011), and (3) a previously developed canopy height map derived from the spaceborne LiDAR data with different spatial modeling method and explanatory variables (Simard et al., 2011). As a result, our canopy height map successfully detected a spatial distribution pattern in canopy height estimates based on our original field study data (r = 0.845, p = 8.31 × 10-3) though our canopy height map showed a poor correlation (r = 0.563, p = 0.146) with the canopy height estimate based on a previously developed model by Feldpausch et al. (2011). We also confirmed that the created canopy height map showed a similar pattern with the previously developed canopy height map by Simard et al. (2011). It was concluded that the use of the spaceborne LiDAR data provides a sufficient accuracy in estimating the canopy height at regional scale.

  5. Volume component analysis for classification of LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varney, Nina M.; Asari, Vijayan K.

    2015-03-01

    One of the most difficult challenges of working with LiDAR data is the large amount of data points that are produced. Analysing these large data sets is an extremely time consuming process. For this reason, automatic perception of LiDAR scenes is a growing area of research. Currently, most LiDAR feature extraction relies on geometrical features specific to the point cloud of interest. These geometrical features are scene-specific, and often rely on the scale and orientation of the object for classification. This paper proposes a robust method for reduced dimensionality feature extraction of 3D objects using a volume component analysis (VCA) approach.1 This VCA approach is based on principal component analysis (PCA). PCA is a method of reduced feature extraction that computes a covariance matrix from the original input vector. The eigenvectors corresponding to the largest eigenvalues of the covariance matrix are used to describe an image. Block-based PCA is an adapted method for feature extraction in facial images because PCA, when performed in local areas of the image, can extract more significant features than can be extracted when the entire image is considered. The image space is split into several of these blocks, and PCA is computed individually for each block. This VCA proposes that a LiDAR point cloud can be represented as a series of voxels whose values correspond to the point density within that relative location. From this voxelized space, block-based PCA is used to analyze sections of the space where the sections, when combined, will represent features of the entire 3-D object. These features are then used as the input to a support vector machine which is trained to identify four classes of objects, vegetation, vehicles, buildings and barriers with an overall accuracy of 93.8%

  6. Compact Adaptable Mobile LiDAR System Deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glennie, C. L.; Brooks, B. A.; Ericksen, T. L.; Hudnut, K. W.; Foster, J. H.; Hauser, D.; Avery, J.

    2012-12-01

    Airborne LiDAR (LIght Detection And Ranging) systems have become a standard mechanism for acquiring dense high-precision topography, making it possible to perform large scale documentation (100's of km2) per day at spatial scales as fine as a few decimeters horizontally and a few centimeters vertically. However, current airborne and terrestrial LiDAR systems suffer from a number of drawbacks. They are expensive, bulky, require significant power supplies, and are often optimized for use in only one type of mobility platform. It would therefore be advantageous to design a lightweight, compact and relatively inexpensive multipurpose LiDAR and imagery system that could be used from a variety of mobility platforms - both terrestrial and airborne. The system should be quick and easy to deploy, and require a minimum amount of existing infrastructure for operational support. With these goals in mind, our research teams have developed a prototype field deployable compact dynamic laser scanning system that is configured for use on a variety of mobility platforms, including backpack wearable, as well as unmanned aerial vehicles (e.g. balloons & helicopters) and small off-road vehicles such as ATV's. The system is small, self-contained, relatively inexpensive, and easy to deploy. The first version of this multipurpose LiDAR system has been successfully tested in both backpack configuration and on a tethered flight attached to a helium balloon. We will present system design and development details, along with field experiences and a detailed accuracy analysis of the acquired point clouds which show that accuracy of 3-5 cm (1 sigma) vertical can be achieved in both backpack and balloon modalities.

  7. Constraints on Martian Differentiation Processes from Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd Isotopic Analyses of the Basaltic Shergottite QUE 94201

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borg, Lars E.; Nyquist, Larry E.; Taylor, Larry A.; Wiesmann, Henry; Shih, Chi-Y.

    1997-01-01

    Isotopic analyses of mineral, leachate, and whole rock fractions from the Martian shergottite meteorite QUE 94201 yield Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd crystallization ages of 327 +/- 12 and 327 +/- 19 Ma, respectively. These ages are concordant, although the isochrons are defined by different fractions within the meteorite. Comparison of isotope dilution Sm and Nd data for the various QUE 94201 fractions with in situ ion microprobe data for QUE 94201 minerals from the literature demonstrate the presence of a leachable crustal component in the meteorite. This component is likely to have been added to QUE 94201 by secondary alteration processes on Mars, and can affect the isochrons by selectively altering the isotopic systematics of the leachates and some of the mineral fractions. The absence of crustal recycling processes on Mars may preserve the geochemical evidence for early differentiation and the decoupling of the Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotopic systems, underscoring one of the fundamental differences between geologic processes on Mars and the Earth.

  8. Estimating pre-fire biomass for the 2013 California Rim Fire using airborne LiDAR and Landsat data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Alonso, M.; Casas Planes, Á.; Koltunov, A.; Ustin, S.; Falk, M.; Ramirez, C.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate knowledge of the amount and distribution of fuels is critical for appropriate fire planning and management, but also to improve carbon emissions estimates resulting from both wildland and prescribed fires. Airborne LiDAR (ALS) data has shown great capability to determine the amount of biomass in different ecosystems. Nevertheless, for most incidents a pre-fire LiDAR dataset that would enable the characterization of fuels before the incident is not available. Addressing this problem, we investigated the potential of combining a post-fire ALS dataset and a pre-fire Landsat image to model the pre-fire biomass distribution for the third-largest wildfire in California history, the Rim fire. Very high density (≈ 20 points/m2) ALS data was acquired covering the burned area plus a 2 km buffer. 500+ ALS-plots were located throughout the buffer area using a stratified random sampling scheme, with the strata defined by species group (coniferous, hardwood, and mixed forests) and diametric classes (5-9.9"; 10-19.9"; 20-29.9" and >30"). In these plots, individual tree crowns were delineated by the Watershed algorithm. Crown delineation was visually refined to avoid over- and under-segmentation errors, and the tree biomass was determined based on species-specific allometric equations. The biomass estimates for correctly delineated trees were subsequently aggregated to the plot-level. The next step is to derive a model relating the plot-level biomass to plot-level ALS-derived height and intensity metrics as explanatory variables. This model will be used to map pre-fire biomass in the buffer area outside the burn. To determine pre-fire biomass inside the fire perimeter, where ALS data are not available, we will use a statistical approach based on spectral information provided by a pre-fire Landsat image and its relationships with the 2 km buffer LiDAR-derived biomass estimates. We will validate our results with field measurements collected independently, before the fire.

  9. Surface expression of intraplate postglacial faults in Sweden: from LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abduljabbar, Mawaheb; Ask, Maria; Bauer, Tobias; Lund, Björn; Smith, Colby; Mikko, Henrik; Munier, Raymond

    2016-04-01

    Large intraplate earthquakes, up to magnitude 8.0±0.3 (Lindblom et al. 2015) are inferred to have occurred in northern Fennoscandia at the end of, or just after the Weichselian deglaciation. More than a dozen large so-called postglacial faults (PGF) have been found in the region. The present-day microseismic activity is rather high in north Sweden, and there is a correlation between microseismicity and mapped PGF scarps: 71% of the observed earthquakes north of 66°N locate within 30 km to the southeast and 10 km to the northwest of PGFs (Lindblom et al., 2015). Surface expressions of PGFs in Sweden have mainly been mapped using aerial photogrammetry and trenching (e.g. Lagerbäck & Sundh 2008). Their detailed surface geometry may be investigated using the new high-resolution elevation model of Sweden (NNH) that has a vertical- and lateral resolution of 2 m and 0.25 m, respectively. With NNH data, known PGFs have been modified, and a number of new potential PGFs have been identified (Smith et al. 2014; Mikko et al. 2015). However, the detailed variation of their surface expression remains to be determined. Our main objective is to constrain the strike and surface offset (i.e., apparent vertical throw because of soil cover overlays the bedrock) across the PGF scarps. We anticipate using the results to constrain direction of fault motion and paleomagnitudes of PGFs, and in numerical analyzes to investigate the nature of PGFs. We have developed a methodology for analyzing PGF-geomorphology from LiDAR data using two main software platforms (Ask et al. 2015): (1) Move2015 by Midland Valley has been used for constructing 3D models of the surface traces of the PGFs to determine apparent vertical throw. The apparent hanging- and footwall cut off lines are digitized, and subsequent computation of coordinates is rather time efficient and provide continuous data of fault and soil geomorphology that can be statistically analyzed; and (2) ArcGIS 10.3 by Esri has mostly been

  10. Segmenting tree crowns from terrestrial and mobile LiDAR data by exploring ecological theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Shengli; Wu, Fangfang; Guo, Qinghua; Wang, Yongcai; Li, Wenkai; Xue, Baolin; Hu, Xueyang; Li, Peng; Tian, Di; Li, Chao; Yao, Hui; Li, Yumei; Xu, Guangcai; Fang, Jingyun

    2015-12-01

    The rapid development of light detection and ranging (LiDAR) techniques is advancing ecological and forest research. During the last decade, numerous single tree segmentation techniques have been developed using airborne LiDAR data. However, accurate crown segmentation using terrestrial or mobile LiDAR data, which is an essential prerequisite for extracting branch level forest characteristics, is still challenging mainly because of the difficulties posed by tree crown intersection and irregular crown shape. In the current work, we developed a comparative shortest-path algorithm (CSP) for segmenting tree crowns scanned using terrestrial (T)-LiDAR and mobile LiDAR. The algorithm consists of two steps, namely trunk detection and subsequent crown segmentation, with the latter inspired by the well-proved metabolic ecology theory and the ecological fact that vascular plants tend to minimize the transferring distance to the root. We tested the algorithm on mobile-LiDAR-scanned roadside trees and T-LiDAR-scanned broadleaved and coniferous forests in China. Point-level quantitative assessments of the segmentation results showed that for mobile-LiDAR-scanned roadside trees, all the points were classified to their corresponding trees correctly, and for T-LiDAR-scanned broadleaved and coniferous forests, kappa coefficients ranging from 0.83 to 0.93 were obtained. We believe that our algorithm will make a contribution to solving the problem of crown segmentation in T-LiDAR scanned-forests, and might be of interest to researchers in LiDAR data processing and to forest ecologists. In addition, our research highlights the advantages of using ecological theories as guidelines for processing LiDAR data.

  11. Synergy Between LiDAR and Image Data in Context of Building Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Poz, A. P.

    2014-11-01

    This paper compares the paradigms of LiDAR and aerophotogrammetry in the context of building extraction and briefly discusses a photogrammetric strategy for refining building roof polyhedrons previously extracted from LiDAR data. In general, empirical and theoretical studies have confirmed that LiDAR-based methodologies are more suitable in extracting planar roof faces and ridges of the roof, whereas the aerophotogrammetry are more suitable in extracting building roof outlines. In order to exemplify how to explore these properties, it is presented a photogrammetric method for refining 3D building roof contours extracted from airborne LiDAR data. Examples of application are provided for this refining approach.

  12. Multispectral airborne laser scanning - a new trend in the development of LiDAR technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakuła, K.

    2015-12-01

    Airborne laser scanning (ALS) is the one of the most accurate remote sensing techniques for data acquisition where the terrain and its coverage is concerned. Modern scanners have been able to scan in two or more channels (frequencies of the laser) recently. This gives the rise to the possibility of obtaining diverse information about an area with the different spectral properties of objects. The paper presents an example of a multispectral ALS system - Titan by Optech - with the possibility of data including the analysis of digital elevation models accuracy and data density. As a result of the study, the high relative accuracy of LiDAR acquisition in three spectral bands was proven. The mean differences between digital terrain models (DTMs) were less than 0.03 m. The data density analysis showed the influence of the laser wavelength. The points clouds that were tested had average densities of 25, 23 and 20 points per square metre respectively for green (G), near-infrared (NIR) and shortwave-infrared (SWIR) lasers. In this paper, the possibility of the generation of colour composites using orthoimages of laser intensity reflectance and its classification capabilities using data from airborne multispectral laser scanning for land cover mapping are also discussed and compared with conventional photogrammetric techniques.

  13. Analysis of airborne LiDAR as a basis for digital soil mapping in Alpine areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kringer, K.; Tusch, M.; Geitner, C.; Meißl, G.; Rutzinger, M.

    2009-04-01

    Especially in mountainous regions like the Alps the formation of soil is highly influenced by relief characteristics. Among all factors included in Jenny's (1941) model for soil development, relief is the one most commonly used in approaches to create digital soil maps and to derive soil properties from secondary data sources (McBratney et al. 2003). Elevation data, first order (slope, aspect) and second order derivates (plan, profile and cross-sectional curvature) as well as complex morphometric parameters (various landform classifications, e.g., Wood 1996) and compound indices (e.g., topographic wetness indices, vertical distance to drainage network, insolation) can be calculated from digital elevation models (DEM). However, while being an important source of information for digital soil mapping on small map scales, "conventional" DEMs are of limited use for the design of large scale conceptual soil maps for small areas due to rather coarse raster resolutions with cell sizes ranging from 20 to 100 meters. Slight variations in elevation and small landform features might not be discernible even though they might have a significant effect to soil formation, e.g., regarding the influence of groundwater in alluvial soils or the extent of alluvial fans. Nowadays, Airborne LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) provides highly accurate data for the elaboration of high-resolution digital terrain models (DTM) even in forested areas. In the project LASBO (Laserscanning in der Bodenkartierung) the applicability of digital terrain models derived from LiDAR for the identification of soil-relevant geomorphometric parameter is investigated. Various algorithms which were initially designed for coarser raster data are applied on high-resolution DTMs. Test areas for LASBO are located in the region of Bruneck (Italy) and near the municipality of Kramsach in the Inn Valley (Austria). The freely available DTM for Bruneck has a raster resolution of 2.5 meters while in Kramsach a DTM with

  14. Fusion of terrestrial LiDAR and tomographic mapping data for 3D karst landform investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höfle, B.; Forbriger, M.; Siart, C.; Nowaczinski, E.

    2012-04-01

    Highly detailed topographic information has gained in importance for studying Earth surface landforms and processes. LiDAR has evolved into the state-of-the-art technology for 3D data acquisition on various scales. This multi-sensor system can be operated on several platforms such as airborne LS (ALS), mobile LS (MLS) from moving vehicles or stationary on ground (terrestrial LS, TLS). In karst research the integral investigation of surface and subsurface components of solution depressions (e.g. sediment-filled dolines) is required to gather and quantify the linked geomorphic processes such as sediment flux and limestone dissolution. To acquire the depth of the different subsurface layers, a combination of seismic refraction tomography (SRT) and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is increasingly applied. This multi-method approach allows modeling the extension of different subsurface media (i.e. colluvial fill, epikarst zone and underlying basal bedrock). Subsequent fusion of the complementary techniques - LiDAR surface and tomographic subsurface data - first-time enables 3D prospection and visualization as well as quantification of geomorphometric parameters (e.g. depth, volume, slope and aspect). This study introduces a novel GIS-based method for semi-automated fusion of TLS and geophysical data. The study area is located in the Dikti Mountains of East Crete and covers two adjacent dolines. The TLS data was acquired with a Riegl VZ-400 scanner from 12 scan positions located mainly at the doline divide. The scan positions were co-registered using the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm of RiSCAN PRO. For the digital elevation rasters a resolution of 0.5 m was defined. The digital surface model (DSM) of the study was derived by moving plane interpolation of all laser points (including objects) using the OPALS software. The digital terrain model (DTM) was generated by iteratively "eroding" objects in the DSM by minimum filter, which additionally accounts for

  15. The Daily Activity Report (DAR) a Novel Measure of Functional Outcome for Serious Mental Illness

    PubMed Central

    Velligan, Dawn I.; Mintz, Jim; Sierra, Cynthia; Martin, Mona L.; Fredrick, Megan; Maglinte, Gregory A.; Corey-Lisle, Patricia K.

    2016-01-01

    The assessment of real-world functional outcomes in clinical trials for medications targeting negative symptoms and cognitive impairment is extremely important. We tested the psychometric properties of the Daily Activity Report (DAR), a novel assessment of productive daily activity. We administered the DAR and additional assessments of functional outcome, functional capacity, cognition and symptomatology to 50 individuals with schizophrenia at 2 time points, 1 month apart and to 25 healthy controls. The DAR records a person’s daily activity for 7 consecutive days based upon phone calls made 3 times a day. A total score and scores in 3 domains; instrumental activities (ie, independent living), social and work or school related activities are generated for the DAR. Inter-item consistency was high 0.89–0.94 for each domain and 0.88 overall. Test–retest reliability across 1 month for the total DAR score was 0.67, P < .0001. The total DAR score as well as scores for social activity and nondomestic work/school differed significantly between control and patient participants (P < .0001). DAR domain scores were associated with negative symptoms and functional outcomes, but the primary score related to these measures was the work/school dimension of the DAR. DAR scores were only weakly and nonsignificantly related to positive symptoms. This study provides preliminary support for the reliability and validity of the DAR using interviewer administration. The development of a patient reported version of the DAR using smart phone technology with automatic scoring is the next step. PMID:26712856

  16. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Tetraploid Wheats (Triticum turgidum L.) Estimated by SSR, DArT and Pedigree Data

    PubMed Central

    Laidò, Giovanni; Mangini, Giacomo; Taranto, Francesca; Gadaleta, Agata; Blanco, Antonio; Cattivelli, Luigi; Marone, Daniela; Mastrangelo, Anna M.; Papa, Roberto; De Vita, Pasquale

    2013-01-01

    Levels of genetic diversity and population genetic structure of a collection of 230 accessions of seven tetraploid Triticum turgidum L. subspecies were investigated using six morphological, nine seed storage protein loci, 26 SSRs and 970 DArT markers. The genetic diversity of the morphological traits and seed storage proteins was always lower in the durum wheat compared to the wild and domesticated emmer. Using Bayesian clustering (K = 2), both of the sets of molecular markers distinguished the durum wheat cultivars from the other tetraploid subspecies, and two distinct subgroups were detected within the durum wheat subspecies, which is in agreement with their origin and year of release. The genetic diversity of morphological traits and seed storage proteins was always lower in the improved durum cultivars registered after 1990, than in the intermediate and older ones. This marked effect on diversity was not observed for molecular markers, where there was only a weak reduction. At K >2, the SSR markers showed a greater degree of resolution than for DArT, with their identification of a greater number of groups within each subspecies. Analysis of DArT marker differentiation between the wheat subspecies indicated outlier loci that are potentially linked to genes controlling some important agronomic traits. Among the 211 loci identified under selection, 109 markers were recently mapped, and some of these markers were clustered into specific regions on chromosome arms 2BL, 3BS and 4AL, where several genes/quantitative trait loci (QTLs) are involved in the domestication of tetraploid wheats, such as the tenacious glumes (Tg) and brittle rachis (Br) characteristics. On the basis of these results, it can be assumed that the population structure of the tetraploid wheat collection partially reflects the evolutionary history of Triticum turgidum L. subspecies and the genetic potential of landraces and wild accessions for the detection of unexplored alleles. PMID:23826256

  17. Magmatic history and parental melt composition of olivine-phyric shergottite LAR 06319: Importance of magmatic degassing and olivine antecrysts in Martian magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balta, J. Brian; Sanborn, Matthew; McSween, Harry Y.; Wadhwa, Meenakshi

    2013-08-01

    Several olivine-phyric shergottites contain enough olivine that they could conceivably represent the products of closed-system crystallization of primary melts derived from partial melting of the Martian mantle. Larkman Nunatak (LAR) 06319 has been suggested to represent a close approach to a Martian primary liquid composition based on approximate equilibrium between its olivine and groundmass. To better understand the olivine-melt relationship and the evolution of this meteorite, we report the results of new petrographic and chemical analyses. We find that olivine megacryst cores are generally not in equilibrium with the groundmass, but rather have been homogenized by diffusion to Mg# 72. We have identified two unique grain types: an olivine glomerocryst and an olivine grain preserving a primary magmatic boundary that constrains the time scale of eruption to be on the order of hours. We also report the presence of trace oxide phases and phosphate compositions that suggest that the melt contained approximately 1.1% H2O and lost volatiles during cooling, also associated with an increase in oxygen fugacity upon degassing. We additionally report in situ rare earth element measurements of the various mineral phases in LAR 06319. Based on these reported trace element abundances, we estimate the oxygen fugacity in the LAR 06319 parent melt early in its crystallization sequence (i.e., at the time of crystallization of the low-Ca and high-Ca pyroxenes), the rare earth element composition of the parent melt, and those of melts in equilibrium with later formed phases. We suggest that LAR 06319 represents the product of closed-system crystallization within a shallow magma chamber, with additional olivine accumulated from a cumulate pile. We infer that the olivine megacrysts are antecrysts, derived from a single magma chamber, but not directly related to the host magma, and suggest that mixing of antecrysts within magma chambers may be a common process in Martian magmatic

  18. Identifying Colluvial Slopes by Airborne LiDAR Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, M.; Marutani, T.; Yoshida, H.

    2015-12-01

    Colluvial slopes are one of major sources of landslides. Identifying the locations of the slopes will help reduce the risk of disasters, by avoiding building infrastructure and properties nearby, or if they are already there, by applying appropriate counter measures before it suddenly moves. In this study, airborne LiDAR data was analyzed to find their geomorphic characteristics to use for extracting their locations. The study site was set in the suburb of Sapporo City, Hokkaido in Japan. The area is underlain by Andesite and Tuff and prone to landslides. Slope angle and surface roughness were calculated from 5 m resolution DEM. These filters were chosen because colluvial materials deposit at around the angle of repose and accumulation of loose materials was considered to form a peculiar surface texture differentiable from other slope types. Field survey conducted together suggested that colluvial slopes could be identified by the filters with a probability of 80 percent. Repeat LiDAR monitoring of the site by an unmanned helicopter indicated that those slopes detected as colluviums appeared to be moving at a slow rate. In comparison with a similar study from the crushed zone in Japan, the range of slope angle indicative of colluviums agreed with the Sapporo site, while the texture was rougher due to larger debris composing the slopes.

  19. Performance testing of LiDAR exploitation software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela-González, M.; González-Jorge, H.; Riveiro, B.; Arias, P.

    2013-04-01

    Mobile LiDAR systems are being used widely in recent years for many applications in the field of geoscience. One of most important limitations of this technology is the large computational requirements involved in data processing. Several software solutions for data processing are available in the market, but users are often unknown about the methodologies to verify their performance accurately. In this work a methodology for LiDAR software performance testing is presented and six different suites are studied: QT Modeler, AutoCAD Civil 3D, Mars 7, Fledermaus, Carlson and TopoDOT (all of them in x64). Results depict as QTModeler, TopoDOT and AutoCAD Civil 3D allow the loading of large datasets, while Fledermaus, Mars7 and Carlson do not achieve these powerful performance. AutoCAD Civil 3D needs large loading time in comparison with the most powerful softwares such as QTModeler and TopoDOT. Carlson suite depicts the poorest results among all the softwares under study, where point clouds larger than 5 million points cannot be loaded and loading time is very large in comparison with the other suites even for the smaller datasets. AutoCAD Civil 3D, Carlson and TopoDOT show more threads than other softwares like QTModeler, Mars7 and Fledermaus.

  20. Applying the Moment Distance Framework to LiDAR Waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas, E. L.; Aguilar-Amuchastegui, N.; Henebry, G. M.

    2010-12-01

    In the past decade or so, there have only been limited approaches formulated for the analysis of waveform LiDAR data. We illustrate how the Moment Distance (MD) framework can characterize the shape of the LiDAR waveforms using simple, computationally fast, geometric operations. We assess the relationship of the MD metrics to some key waveform landmarks - such as locations of peaks, power of returns, and pseudo-heights - using LVIS datasets acquired over a tropical forest in La Selva, Costa Rica in 1998 and 2005. We also apply the MD framework to 2003 LVIS data from Howland Forest, Maine. We also explore the effects of noise on the MD Index (MDI). Our results reveal that the MDI can capture important dynamics in canopy structure. Movement in the location of the peaks is detected by shifts in the MDI. Because this new approach responds to waveform shape, it is more sensitive to changes of location of peak returns than to the power of the return. Results also suggest a positive relationship between the MDI and the canopy pseudo-height.

  1. IsoDAR - A Definitive Search for Sterile Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barletta, William

    2013-04-01

    The steady development of high power cyclotrons, mostly in industry, is making possible a definitive, highly cost effective approach to the search for sterile neutrinos. In the proposed IsoDAR experiment a 600 kW beam of protons from a 60 MeV, H2+ cyclotron will impinge on a lithium target to generate copious Li-8. The Li-8 then decays at rest to yield a powerful source of anti-neutrinos that can be located ˜20 m from a hydrogenous detector. In particular our collaboration has been designing the accelerator / target system to be consistent with installation in the Kamioka mine to use the Kamland detector to record inverse beta decay events. We show that this source / detector combination can reveal or exclude the global-fit allowed region at 5 sigma in four months and differentiate between 1 and 2 sterile neutrinos with a few years of continued running. Our studies also show that high power cyclotrons will provide the most cost effective source for such an experiment. In addition, the 60 MeV IsoDAR cyclotron would be an ideal injector for DAEdALUS, our approach to measuring CP violation in the neutrino sector with decay-at-rest experiment.

  2. 2011 Japan tsunami current and flow velocity measurements from survivor videos using LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, H. M.; Phillips, D. A.; Okayasu, A.; Shimozono, T.; Liu, H.; Mohammed, F.; Skanavis, V.; Synolakis, C.; Takahashi, T.

    2011-12-01

    On March 11, 2011, a magnitude Mw 9.0 earthquake occurred off the coast of Japan's Tohoku region causing catastrophic damage and loss of life. Numerous tsunami reconnaissance trips were conducted in Japan (Tohoku Earthquake and Tsunami Joint Survey Group). This report focuses on the surveys at 9 tsunami eyewitness video recording locations in Yoriisohama, Kesennuma, Kamaishi and Miyako along Japan's Sanriku coast and the subsequent video image calibration, processing and tsunami flow velocity analysis. Selected tsunami video recording sites were visited, eyewitnesses interviewed and some ground control points recorded during the initial tsunami reconnaissance from April 9 to 25. A follow-up survey from June 9 to 15, 2011 focused on terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) at locations with previously identified high quality eyewitness videos. We acquired precise topographic data using TLS at nine video sites with multiple scans acquired from different instrument positions at each site. These ground-based LiDAR measurements produce a 3-dimensional "point cloud" dataset. Digital photography from a scanner-mounted camera yields photorealistic 3D images. Integrated GPS measurements allow accurate georeferencing of the TLS data in an absolute reference frame such as WGS84. We deployed a Riegl VZ-400 scanner (1550 nm wavelength laser, 42,000 measurements/second, <600 meter max range) and peripheral equipment from the UNAVCO instrument pool. The original full length videos recordings were recovered from eyewitnesses and the Japanese Coast Guard (JCG). Multiple videos were synchronized and referenced in time (UTC). The analysis of the tsunami videos follows a four step procedure developed for the analysis of 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami videos at Banda Aceh, Indonesia (Fritz et al., 2006). The first step requires the calibration of the sector of view present in the eyewitness video recording based on visually identifiable ground control points measured in the LiDAR point cloud data

  3. 2011 Japan tsunami survivor video based hydrograph and flow velocity measurements using LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, H. M.; Phillips, D. A.; Okayasu, A.; Shimozono, T.; Liu, H.; Mohammed, F.; Skanavis, V.; Synolakis, C. E.; Takahashi, T.

    2012-04-01

    On March 11, 2011, a magnitude Mw 9.0 earthquake occurred off the coast of Japan's Tohoku region causing catastrophic damage and loss of life. Numerous tsunami reconnaissance trips were conducted in Japan (Tohoku Earthquake and Tsunami Joint Survey Group). This report focuses on the surveys at 9 tsunami eyewitness video recording locations in Yoriisohama, Kesennuma, Kamaishi and Miyako along Japan's Sanriku coast and the subsequent video image calibration, processing, tsunami hydrograph and flow velocity analysis. Selected tsunami video recording sites were visited, eyewitnesses interviewed and some ground control points recorded during the initial tsunami reconnaissance from April 9 to 25. A follow-up survey from June 9 to 15, 2011 focused on terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) at locations with previously identified high quality eyewitness videos. We acquired precise topographic data using TLS at nine video sites with multiple scans acquired from different instrument positions at each site. These ground-based LiDAR measurements produce a 3-dimensional "point cloud" dataset. Digital photography from a scanner-mounted camera yields photorealistic 3D images. Integrated GPS measurements allow accurate georeferencing of the TLS data in an absolute reference frame such as WGS84. We deployed a Riegl VZ-400 scanner (1550 nm wavelength laser, 42,000 measurements/second, <600 meter max range) and peripheral equipment from the UNAVCO instrument pool. The original full length videos recordings were recovered from eyewitnesses and the Japanese Coast Guard (JCG). Multiple videos were synchronized and referenced in time (UTC). The analysis of the tsunami videos follows a four step procedure developed for the analysis of 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami videos at Banda Aceh, Indonesia (Fritz et al., 2006). The first step requires the calibration of the sector of view present in the eyewitness video recording based on visually identifiable ground control points measured in the LiDAR point

  4. 4D Terrestrial LiDAR Data Collection: Geomorphic and Hydraulic Applications (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minear, J. T.; Wright, S. A.; Kinzel, P. J.; Draut, A. E.; Logan, J.

    2013-12-01

    Terrestrial LiDAR, also known as T-LiDAR, ground-based LiDAR, or Terrestrial Laser Scanning, can provide great insights into some types of geomorphic and hydraulic studies, particularly when collected repeatedly over time. Because T-LiDAR collects a large amount of data on a set grid, oftentimes processes are inadvertently captured that are not part of the initial research question but can be important factors in their own right. In addition, though T-LiDAR is most often used at relatively small sites for high-precision scanning, it also can be used for relatively rapid meso-scale site measurements, albeit typically with less precision. Using examples from the Elwha River dam removals, WA, a canal experiment in NE, and several small river restoration sites in CA, we highlight several important and innovative uses of T-LiDAR measurements, including quick temporal scale changes in water surface features and larger temporal- and spatial-scale changes in reservoir deltaic deposits and longitudinal profile features. Also discussed will be some considerations for improving T-LiDAR error estimation and a comparison to other data collection techniques, including aerial LiDAR, structure-from-motion photogrammetry, and UAV- and plane-captured photogrammetry.

  5. Wetland inundation mapping and change monitoring using landsat and airborne LiDAR data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper presents a new approach for mapping wetland inundation change using Landsat and LiDAR intensity data. In this approach, LiDAR data were used to derive highly accurate reference subpixel inundation percentage (SIP) maps at the 30-m resolution. The reference SIP maps were then used to est...

  6. Dia de Dar Gracias. Modulo Nivel Primario. (Day to Give Thanks. Module Primary Level.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espinoza, Delia; Lopez, Santiago, III

    Dia de Dar Gracias (Thanksgiving) is the subject of this primary level unit. The unit objectives are to: (1) know about El Dia de Dar Gracias as it is celebrated in the United States; (2) know how the Mayas celebrated it; (3) understand the context of the stories in the unit; (4) know about the main food used, the turkey; (5) distinguish other…

  7. Nacelle LiDAR online wind field reconstruction applied to feedforward pitch control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GUILLEMIN, F.; DOMENICO, D. DI; NGUYEN, N.; SABIRON, G.; BOQUET, M.; GIRARD, N.; COUPIAC, O.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents innovative filtering and reconstruction techniques of nacelle LiDAR data, and exploitation of obtained wind anticipation capabilities for wind turbine control strategy. The implemented algorithms are applied under industrial constraints, on a MAIA EOLIS wind turbine, equipped with a LEOSPHERE 5-beams pulsed LiDAR, during experimental campaigns of SMARTEOLE collaborative project.

  8. Remote sensing of Sonoran Desert vegetation structure and phenology with ground-based LiDAR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sankey, Joel B.; Munson, Seth M.; Webb, Robert H.; Wallace, Cynthia S.A.; Duran, Cesar M.

    2015-01-01

    Long-term vegetation monitoring efforts have become increasingly important for understanding ecosystem response to global change. Many traditional methods for monitoring can be infrequent and limited in scope. Ground-based LiDAR is one remote sensing method that offers a clear advancement to monitor vegetation dynamics at high spatial and temporal resolution. We determined the effectiveness of LiDAR to detect intra-annual variability in vegetation structure at a long-term Sonoran Desert monitoring plot dominated by cacti, deciduous and evergreen shrubs. Monthly repeat LiDAR scans of perennial plant canopies over the course of one year had high precision. LiDAR measurements of canopy height and area were accurate with respect to total station survey measurements of individual plants. We found an increase in the number of LiDAR vegetation returns following the wet North American Monsoon season. This intra-annual variability in vegetation structure detected by LiDAR was attributable to a drought deciduous shrub Ambrosia deltoidea, whereas the evergreen shrub Larrea tridentata and cactus Opuntia engelmannii had low variability. Benefits of using LiDAR over traditional methods to census desert plants are more rapid, consistent, and cost-effective data acquisition in a high-resolution, 3-dimensional context. We conclude that repeat LiDAR measurements can be an effective method for documenting ecosystem response to desert climatology and drought over short time intervals and at detailed-local spatial scale.

  9. Applicability of Aerial Green LiDAR to a Large River in the Western United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conner, J. T.; Welcker, C. W.; Cooper, C.; Faux, R.; Butler, M.; Nayegandhi, A.

    2013-12-01

    In October 2012, aerial green LiDAR data were collected in the Snake River (within Idaho and Oregon) to test this emerging technology in a large river with poor water clarity. Six study areas (total of 30 river miles spread out over 250 river miles) were chosen to represent a variety of depths, channel types, and surface conditions to test the accuracy, depth penetration, data density of aerial green LiDAR. These characteristics along with cost and speed of acquisition were compared to other bathymetric survey techniques including rod surveys (total station and RTK-GPS), single-beam sonar, and multibeam echosounder (MBES). The green LiDAR system typically measured returns from the riverbed through 1-2 meters of water, which was less than one Secchi depth. However, in areas with steep banks or aquatic macrophytes, LiDAR returns from the riverbed were less frequent or non-existent. In areas of good return density, depths measured from green LiDAR data corresponded well with previously collected data sets from traditional bathymetric survey techniques. In such areas, the green LiDAR point density was much higher than both rod and single beam sonar surveys, yet lower than MBES. The green LiDAR survey was also collected more efficiently than all other methods. In the Snake River, green LiDAR does not provide a method to map the entire riverbed as it only receives bottom returns in shallow water, typically at the channel margins. However, green LiDAR does provide survey data that is an excellent complement to MBES, which is more effective at surveying the deeper portions of the channel. In some cases, the green LiDAR was able to provide data in areas that the MBES could not, often due to issues with navigating the survey boat in shallow water. Even where both MBES and green LiDAR mapped the river bottom, green LiDAR often provides more accurate data through a better angle of incidence and less shadowing than the MBES survey. For one MBES survey in 2013, the green LiDAR

  10. Multipath Estimation in Urban Environments from Joint GNSS Receivers and LiDAR Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Khurram; Chen, Xin; Dovis, Fabio; De Castro, David; Fernández, Antonio J.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, multipath error on Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals in urban environments is characterized with the help of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) measurements. For this purpose, LiDAR equipment and Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver implementing a multipath estimating architecture were used to collect data in an urban environment. This paper demonstrates how GPS and LiDAR measurements can be jointly used to model the environment and obtain robust receivers. Multipath amplitude and delay are estimated by means of LiDAR feature extraction and multipath mitigation architecture. The results show the feasibility of integrating the information provided by LiDAR sensors and GNSS receivers for multipath mitigation. PMID:23202177

  11. Multipath estimation in urban environments from joint GNSS receivers and LiDAR sensors.

    PubMed

    Ali, Khurram; Chen, Xin; Dovis, Fabio; De Castro, David; Fernández, Antonio J

    2012-10-30

    In this paper, multipath error on Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals in urban environments is characterized with the help of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) measurements. For this purpose, LiDAR equipment and Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver implementing a multipath estimating architecture were used to collect data in an urban environment. This paper demonstrates how GPS and LiDAR measurements can be jointly used to model the environment and obtain robust receivers. Multipath amplitude and delay are estimated by means of LiDAR feature extraction and multipath mitigation architecture. The results show the feasibility of integrating the information provided by LiDAR sensors and GNSS receivers for multipath mitigation.

  12. Using a multiwavelength LiDAR for improved remote sensing of natural waters.

    PubMed

    Gray, Deric J; Anderson, John; Nelson, Jean; Edwards, Jarrod

    2015-11-01

    This paper describes research to characterize the benefits of a multiwavelength oceanographic LiDAR for various water types. Field measurements were conducted to establish endmembers representative of both typical and extremely challenging natural conditions. Laboratory tests were performed using a prototype multiwavelength LiDAR in water tanks with optical conditions simulating both sediment-laden and biologically rich water types. LiDAR models were used to simulate the LiDAR signal from both field and laboratory experiments. Our measurements and models show that using a laser wavelength of 470-490 nm in the open ocean leads to an improvement factor of 1.50-1.75 compared to a 532 nm system. In more turbid areas using a laser wavelength of 560-580 nm leads to an improvement factor of 1.25. We conclude by demonstrating how using multiple LiDAR wavelengths can help detect and characterize constituents in the water column.

  13. SM-ND Age and REE Systematics of Larkman Nunatek 06319: Closed System Fractional Crystallization of a Shergottite Magma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafer, J. T.; Brandon, A. D.; Lapen T. J.; Righter, M.; Peslier, A. H.

    2010-01-01

    Sm-Nd isotopic data were collected on mineral separates and bulk rock powders of LAR 06319, yielding an age of 180+/-13 Ma (2(sigma)). This age is concordant with the Lu-Hf age (197+/-29 Ma, [1]) determined in conjunction with these data and the Sm-Nd age (190+/-26 Ma) of Shih et al., 2009 [2]. The Sm-Nd data form at statistically significant isochron (Fig. 1) that is controlled largely by leachate-residue pairs (samples with the R suffix are residues after leaching in cold 2N HCl for 10 minutes).

  14. Dar Al Gani 872: Yet Another Eucrite, Yet Another Lesson to Learn?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patzer, A.; Hill, D. H.; Boynton, W. V.; Sipiera, P. P.; Jerman, G. A.

    2002-01-01

    We present chemical and mineralogical data on a new monomict basaltic eucrite recovered from Libya. In contrast to most other eucrites, it exhibits high shock features, unusually heterogeneous exsolution of pigeonite, and interesting melt pockets. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  15. Towards a LiDAR based geomorphological database of Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Gustaf; Smith, Colby A.

    2013-04-01

    Geomorphological maps can be important for both societal development and scientific research especially with the use of new technology and consideration for the end user's needs. Since 2009, the Swedish mapping agency (Lantmäteriet) has been using airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) to create a detailed "bare earth" digital elevation model (DEM) of Sweden. Presently, a LiDAR derived DEM with 2 m horizontal and 0.25 m vertical resolution exist for about half of the country. This data set enables viewing of the landscape in a new more detailed way; landforms never before seen can now be delineated easily in a desktop environment. We are using this DEM to map the geomorphology, bringing into existence a highly detailed, digitial, geomorphologic database and map. While prior geomorphological maps exist for Sweden, the new map being compiled by the Geological Survey of Sweden (SGU) will be the first one to be derived from and presented in an entirely digital format. With the use of GIS technology, it is possible to present a map with different layers and symbology depending on the scale of the area of interest. For example, when looking at a map at a small scale, every moraine within a moraine complex is visible, but when viewed at a larger scale the moraine complex is presented as a single object. The digital presentation allows users to select scale-appropriate geomorphological data to their needs. By coupling other SGU or external databases with the geomorphological database it is possible to produce a wide range of products suitable for a wide range of uses. For example, by adding bedrock or geochemical data to landforms indicative of ice flow direction, a product useful for mineral prospecting is created. Other derivative applications may include groundwater studies or evaluation of geoheritage areas. Regarding scientific applications, the new LiDAR data have enabled mapping of geomorphic landforms in greater detail than previous Swedish maps. In addition

  16. A comparison of the accuracy of pixel based and object based classifications of integrated optical and LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajda, Agnieszka; Wójtowicz-Nowakowska, Anna

    2013-04-01

    A comparison of the accuracy of pixel based and object based classifications of integrated optical and LiDAR data Land cover maps are generally produced on the basis of high resolution imagery. Recently, LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) data have been brought into use in diverse applications including land cover mapping. In this study we attempted to assess the accuracy of land cover classification using both high resolution aerial imagery and LiDAR data (airborne laser scanning, ALS), testing two classification approaches: a pixel-based classification and object-oriented image analysis (OBIA). The study was conducted on three test areas (3 km2 each) in the administrative area of Kraków, Poland, along the course of the Vistula River. They represent three different dominating land cover types of the Vistula River valley. Test site 1 had a semi-natural vegetation, with riparian forests and shrubs, test site 2 represented a densely built-up area, and test site 3 was an industrial site. Point clouds from ALS and ortophotomaps were both captured in November 2007. Point cloud density was on average 16 pt/m2 and it contained additional information about intensity and encoded RGB values. Ortophotomaps had a spatial resolution of 10 cm. From point clouds two raster maps were generated: intensity (1) and (2) normalised Digital Surface Model (nDSM), both with the spatial resolution of 50 cm. To classify the aerial data, a supervised classification approach was selected. Pixel based classification was carried out in ERDAS Imagine software. Ortophotomaps and intensity and nDSM rasters were used in classification. 15 homogenous training areas representing each cover class were chosen. Classified pixels were clumped to avoid salt and pepper effect. Object oriented image object classification was carried out in eCognition software, which implements both the optical and ALS data. Elevation layers (intensity, firs/last reflection, etc.) were used at segmentation stage due to

  17. Full waveform hyperspectral LiDAR for terrestrial laser scanning.

    PubMed

    Hakala, Teemu; Suomalainen, Juha; Kaasalainen, Sanna; Chen, Yuwei

    2012-03-26

    We present the design of a full waveform hyperspectral light detection and ranging (LiDAR) and the first demonstrations of its applications in remote sensing. The novel instrument produces a 3D point cloud with spectral backscattered reflectance data. This concept has a significant impact on remote sensing and other fields where target 3D detection and identification is crucial, such as civil engineering, cultural heritage, material processing, or geomorphological studies. As both the geometry and spectral information on the target are available from a single measurement, this technology will extend the scope of imaging spectroscopy into spectral 3D sensing. To demonstrate the potential of the instrument in the remote sensing of vegetation, 3D point clouds with backscattered reflectance and spectral indices are presented for a specimen of Norway spruce.

  18. Full waveform hyperspectral LiDAR for terrestrial laser scanning.

    PubMed

    Hakala, Teemu; Suomalainen, Juha; Kaasalainen, Sanna; Chen, Yuwei

    2012-03-26

    We present the design of a full waveform hyperspectral light detection and ranging (LiDAR) and the first demonstrations of its applications in remote sensing. The novel instrument produces a 3D point cloud with spectral backscattered reflectance data. This concept has a significant impact on remote sensing and other fields where target 3D detection and identification is crucial, such as civil engineering, cultural heritage, material processing, or geomorphological studies. As both the geometry and spectral information on the target are available from a single measurement, this technology will extend the scope of imaging spectroscopy into spectral 3D sensing. To demonstrate the potential of the instrument in the remote sensing of vegetation, 3D point clouds with backscattered reflectance and spectral indices are presented for a specimen of Norway spruce. PMID:22453394

  19. Dynamic LiDAR-NDVI classification of fluvial landscape units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez-Núñez, Carolina; Parrot, Jean-François

    2015-04-01

    The lower basin of the Coatzacoalcos River is a wide floodplain in which, during the wet season, local and major flooding are distinguished. Both types of floods, intermittent and regional, are important in terms of resources; the regional flood sediments enrich the soils of the plains and intermittent floods allow obtaining aquatic resources for subsistence during the heatwave. In the floodplain different abandoned meanders and intermittent streams are quickly colonized by aquatic vegetation. However, from the 1990s, the Coatzacoalcos River floodplain has important topographic changes due to mining, road and bridges construction; erosion and sedimentation requires continuous parcel boundaries along with the increasing demand of channel reparation, embankments, levees and bridges associated to tributaries. NDVI data, LiDAR point cloud and various types of flood simulations taking into account the DTM are used to classify the dynamic landscape units. These units are associated to floods in relation with water resources, agriculture and livestock. In the study area, the first returns of the point cloud allow extracting vegetation strata. The last returns correspond to the bare earth surface, especially in this area with few human settlements. The surface that is not covered by trees or by aquatic vegetation, correspond to crops, pastures and bare soils. The classification is obtained by using the NDVI index coupled with vegetation strata and water bodies. The result shows that 47.96% of the area does not present active vegetation and it includes 31.53% of bare soils. Concerning the active vegetation, pastures, bushes and trees represent respectively 25.59%, 11.14% and 13.25%. The remaining 1.25% is distributed between water bodies with aquatic vegetation, trees and shrubs. Dynamic landscape units' classification represents a tool for monitoring water resources in a fluvial plain. This approach can be also applied to forest management, environmental services and

  20. S-DARS broadcast from inclined, elliptical orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briskman, Robert D.; Prevaux, Robert J.

    2004-04-01

    The first Sirius spacecraft was launched on July 1, 2000. Exactly 5 months later, on December 1, the third spacecraft was launched, completing the three satellite S-DARS (Satellite Digital Audio Radio Service) constellation. The three satellites are deployed in inclined, elliptical, geosynchronous orbits, which allow seamless broadcast coverage to mobile users in the contiguous US. Terrestrial broadcast repeaters provide service in urban cores. The system is in operation, providing the first ever S-DARS service. The constellation design results in satellite ground tracks over North America with two satellites always above the equator. High elevation look angles from the mobile ground terminals to the satellites minimize performance degradation due to blockage, foliage attenuation and multi-path. The spacecraft were built by Space Systems/Loral using the 1300 bus modified for operation in high inclination orbits. Each spacecraft was launched using a dedicated Russian Proton booster. The satellite payload is a bent pipe repeater using 7.1 GHz for the uplink and 2.3 GHz for the broadcast transmission. The repeater high-power amplification stage consists of 32 Traveling Wave Tube Amplifiers phase combined to yield a total radio frequency output power of nearly 4 kW at saturated operation. The satellite antennas are mechanically steered to maintain the transmit beam centered on the Contiguous United States and the receive beam centered on the uplink earth station located in Vernon Valley, New Jersey. The satellite payload design and performance are described. The principal spacecraft bus systems are described with emphasis on improvements made for operation in the inclined, elliptical geosynchronous orbits.

  1. Urban agriculture and Anopheles habitats in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Dongus, Stefan; Nyika, Dickson; Kannady, Khadija; Mtasiwa, Deo; Mshinda, Hassan; Gosoniu, Laura; Drescher, Axel W; Fillinger, Ulrike; Tanner, Marcel; Killeen, Gerry F; Castro, Marcia C

    2009-05-01

    A cross-sectional survey of agricultural areas, combined with routinely monitored mosquito larval information, was conducted in urban Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, to investigate how agricultural and geographical features may influence the presence of Anopheles larvae. Data were integrated into a geographical information systems framework, and predictors of the presence of Anopheles larvae in farming areas were assessed using multivariate logistic regression with independent random effects. It was found that more than 5% of the study area (total size 16.8 km2) was used for farming in backyard gardens and larger open spaces. The proportion of habitats containing Anopheles larvae was 1.7 times higher in agricultural areas compared to other areas (95% confidence interval = 1.56-1.92). Significant geographic predictors of the presence of Anopheles larvae in gardens included location in lowland areas, proximity to river, and relatively impermeable soils. Agriculture-related predictors comprised specific seedbed types, mid-sized gardens, irrigation by wells, as well as cultivation of sugar cane or leafy vegetables. Negative predictors included small garden size, irrigation by tap water, rainfed production and cultivation of leguminous crops or fruit trees. Although there was an increased chance of finding Anopheles larvae in agricultural sites, it was found that breeding sites originated by urban agriculture account for less than a fifth of all breeding sites of malaria vectors in Dar es Salaam. It is suggested that strategies comprising an integrated malaria control effort in malaria-endemic African cities include participatory involvement of farmers by planting shade trees near larval habitats.

  2. Advances in animal ecology from 3D ecosystem mapping with LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, A.; Asner, G. P.

    2015-12-01

    The advent and recent advances of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) have enabled accurate measurement of 3D ecosystem structure. Although the use of LiDAR data is widespread in vegetation science, it has only recently (< 14 years) been applied to animal ecology. Despite such recent application, LiDAR has enabled new insights in the field and revealed the fundamental importance of 3D ecosystem structure for animals. We reviewed the studies to date that have used LiDAR in animal ecology, synthesising the insights gained. Structural heterogeneity is most conducive to increased animal richness and abundance, and increased complexity of vertical vegetation structure is more positively influential than traditionally measured canopy cover, which produces mixed results. However, different taxonomic groups interact with a variety of 3D canopy traits and some groups with 3D topography. LiDAR technology can be applied to animal ecology studies in a wide variety of environments to answer an impressive array of questions. Drawing on case studies from vastly different groups, termites and lions, we further demonstrate the applicability of LiDAR and highlight new understanding, ranging from habitat preference to predator-prey interactions, that would not have been possible from studies restricted to field based methods. We conclude with discussion of how future studies will benefit by using LiDAR to consider 3D habitat effects in a wider variety of ecosystems and with more taxa to develop a better understanding of animal dynamics.

  3. Laboratory Shock Experiments on Basalt - Iron Sulfate Mixes at Approximately 40-50 GPa and Their Relevance to the Martian Regolith Component Present in Shergottites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. N.; Nyquist, L. E.; Ross, D. K.; Asimow, P. D.; See, T.; Sutton, S.; Cardernas, F.; Montes, R.; Cintala, M.

    2012-01-01

    Basaltic shergottites such as Shergotty, Zagami and EET79001 contain impact melt glass pockets that are rich in Martian atmospheric gases [1] and are known as gas-rich impact-melt (GRIM) glasses. These glasses show evidence for the presence of a Martian regolith component based on Sm and Kr isotopic studies [2]. The GRIM glasses are sometimes embedded with clusters of innumerable micron-sized iron-sulfide blebs associated with minor amounts of iron sulfate particles [3, 4]. These sulfide blebs are secondary in origin and are not related to the primary igneous sulfides occurring in Martian meteorites. The material comprising these glasses arises from the highly oxidizing Martian surface and sulfur is unlikely to occur as sulfide in the Martian regoilith. Instead, sulfur is shown to occur as sulfate based on APXS and Mossbauer results obtained by the Opportunity and Spirit rovers at Meridiani and Gusev [5]. We have earlier suggested that the micron-sized iron sulfide globules in GRIM glasses were likely produced by shock-reduction of iron sulfate occurring in the regolith at the time when the GRIM glasses were produced by the meteoroid impact that launched the Martian meteorites into space [6]. As a result of high energy deposition by shock (approx. 40-60 GPa), the iron sulfate bearing phases are likely to melt along with other regolith components and will get reduced to immiscible sulfide fluid under reducing conditions. On quenching, this generates a dispersion of micron-scale sulfide blebs. The reducing agents in our case are likely to be H2 and CO which were shock-implanted from the Martian atmosphere into these glasses along with the noble gases. We conducted lab simulation experiments in the Lindhurst Laboratory of Experimental Geophysics at Caltech and the Experimental Impact Laboratory at JSC to test whether iron sulfide globules can be produced by impact-driven reduction of iron sulfate by subjecting Columbia River Basalt (CRB) and ferric sulfate mixtures to

  4. Automatic registration of UAV-borne sequent images and LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bisheng; Chen, Chi

    2015-03-01

    Use of direct geo-referencing data leads to registration failure between sequent images and LiDAR data captured by mini-UAV platforms because of low-cost sensors. This paper therefore proposes a novel automatic registration method for sequent images and LiDAR data captured by mini-UAVs. First, the proposed method extracts building outlines from LiDAR data and images and estimates the exterior orientation parameters (EoPs) of the images with building objects in the LiDAR data coordinate framework based on corresponding corner points derived indirectly by using linear features. Second, the EoPs of the sequent images in the image coordinate framework are recovered using a structure from motion (SfM) technique, and the transformation matrices between the LiDAR coordinate and image coordinate frameworks are calculated using corresponding EoPs, resulting in a coarse registration between the images and the LiDAR data. Finally, 3D points are generated from sequent images by multi-view stereo (MVS) algorithms. Then the EoPs of the sequent images are further refined by registering the LiDAR data and the 3D points using an iterative closest-point (ICP) algorithm with the initial results from coarse registration, resulting in a fine registration between sequent images and LiDAR data. Experiments were performed to check the validity and effectiveness of the proposed method. The results show that the proposed method achieves high-precision robust co-registration of sequent images and LiDAR data captured by mini-UAVs.

  5. Mapping Forest Carbon by Fusing Terrestrial and Airborne LiDAR Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stovall, A. E.

    2015-12-01

    The storage and flux of terrestrial carbon (C) is one of the largest and most uncertain components of the global C budget, the vast majority of which is held within the biomass of the world's forests. However, the spatial distribution and quantification of forest C remains difficult to measure on a large scale. Remote sensing of forests with airborne LiDAR has proven to be an extremely effective method of bridging the gap between data from plot-level forestry mensuration and landscape-scale C storage estimates, but the standard method of assessing forest C is typically based on national or regional-scale allometric equations that are often not representative on the local-scale. Improvement of these measurements is necessary in order for collaborative multi-national carbon monitoring programs such as REDD implemented by the UNFCCC to be successful in areas, such as tropical forests, with tree species that have insufficiently documented allometric relationships. The primary goal of this study is to set forth a pipeline for precise non-destructive monitoring of C storage by: 1) determining C storage on 15 1/10th ha plots in a 25.6 ha Virginia temperate forest using the recently updated national allometric equations from Chojnacky et. al 2014, 2) comparing these estimates to non-destructively determined individual tree biomass using several semi-automated approaches of three-dimensionally analyzing the point cloud from a high-precision Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS), and 3) creating a predictive model of forest C storage by fusing airborne LiDAR data to the plot-level TLS measurements. Our findings align with several other studies, indicating a strong relationship between allometrically-derived C estimates and TLS-derived C measurements (R2=0.93, n=30) using relatively few individuals, suggesting the potential application of these methods to species that are understudied or are without allometric relationships. Voxel based C storage was estimated on the plot level and

  6. 4D Near Real-Time Environmental Monitoring Using Highly Temporal LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höfle, Bernhard; Canli, Ekrem; Schmitz, Evelyn; Crommelinck, Sophie; Hoffmeister, Dirk; Glade, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The last decade has witnessed extensive applications of 3D environmental monitoring with the LiDAR technology, also referred to as laser scanning. Although several automatic methods were developed to extract environmental parameters from LiDAR point clouds, only little research has focused on highly multitemporal near real-time LiDAR (4D-LiDAR) for environmental monitoring. Large potential of applying 4D-LiDAR is given for landscape objects with high and varying rates of change (e.g. plant growth) and also for phenomena with sudden unpredictable changes (e.g. geomorphological processes). In this presentation we will report on the most recent findings of the research projects 4DEMON (http://uni-heidelberg.de/4demon) and NoeSLIDE (https://geomorph.univie.ac.at/forschung/projekte/aktuell/noeslide/). The method development in both projects is based on two real-world use cases: i) Surface parameter derivation of agricultural crops (e.g. crop height) and ii) change detection of landslides. Both projects exploit the "full history" contained in the LiDAR point cloud time series. One crucial initial step of 4D-LiDAR analysis is the co-registration over time, 3D-georeferencing and time-dependent quality assessment of the LiDAR point cloud time series. Due to the high amount of datasets (e.g. one full LiDAR scan per day), the procedure needs to be performed fully automatically. Furthermore, the online near real-time 4D monitoring system requires to set triggers that can detect removal or moving of tie reflectors (used for co-registration) or the scanner itself. This guarantees long-term data acquisition with high quality. We will present results from a georeferencing experiment for 4D-LiDAR monitoring, which performs benchmarking of co-registration, 3D-georeferencing and also fully automatic detection of events (e.g. removal/moving of reflectors or scanner). Secondly, we will show our empirical findings of an ongoing permanent LiDAR observation of a landslide (Gresten

  7. How Well Can We Predict Salmonid Spawning Habitat with LiDAR?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, A.; Finnegan, N. J.; Hayes, S.

    2013-12-01

    Suitable salmonid spawning habitat is, to a great extent, determined by physical, landscape driven characteristics such as channel morphology and grain size. Identifying reaches with high-quality spawning habitat is essential to restoration efforts in areas where salmonid species are endangered or threatened. While both predictions of suitable habitat and observations of utilized habitat are common in the literature, they are rarely combined. Here we exploit a unique combination of high-resolution LiDAR data and seven years of 387 individually surveyed Coho and Steelhead redds in Scott Creek, a 77 km2 un-glaciated coastal California drainage in the Santa Cruz Mountains, to both make and test predictions of spawning habitat. Using a threshold channel assumption, we predict grain size throughout Scott Creek via a shear stress model that incorporates channel width, instead of height, using Manning's equation (Snyder et al., 2013). Slope and drainage area are computed from a LiDAR-derived DEM, and channel width is calculated via hydraulic modeling. Our results for median grain size predictions closely match median grain sizes (D50) measured in the field, with the majority of sites having predicted D50's within a factor of two of the observed values, especially for reaches with D50 > 0.02m. This success suggests that the threshold model used to predict grain size is appropriate for un-glaciated alluvial channel systems. However, it appears that grain size alone is not a strong predictor of salmon spawning. Reaches with a high (>0.1m) average predicted D50 do have lower redd densities, as expected based on spawning gravel sizes in the literature. However, reaches with lower (<0.1m) predicted D50 have a wide range of redd densities, suggesting that reach-average grain size alone cannot explain spawning site selection in the finer-grained reaches of Scott Creek. We turn to analysis of bedform morphology in order to explain the variation in redd density in the low

  8. Frontiers in Using LiDAR to Analyze Urban Landscape Heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Kunwar Krishna Veer

    Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) technology has facilitated extraordinary advances in our ability to remotely sense precise details of both built and natural environments. The inherent complexity of urban landscapes and the massive data volumes produced by LiDAR require unique methodological considerations for big data remote sensing over large metropolitan regions. The heterogeneous landscapes of the rapidly urbanizing Charlotte Metropolitan Region of North Carolina provided an ideal testing ground for developing methods of analysis for urban ecosystems over large regional extents, including: (1) fusion of LiDAR digital surface models (DSMs) with Landsat TM imagery to balance spatial resolution, data volume, and mapping accuracy of urban land covers, (2) comparison of LiDAR-derived metrics to fine grain optical imagery -- and their integration -- for detecting forest understory plant invaders, and (3) data reduction techniques for computationally efficient estimation of aboveground woody biomass in urban forests. In Chapter 1, I examined tradeoffs between potential gains in mapping accuracy and computational costs by integrating DSMs (structural and intensity) extracted from LiDAR with TM imagery and evaluating the degree to which TM, LiDAR, and LiDAR-TM fusion data discriminated land covers. I used Maximum Likelihood and Classification Tree algorithms to classify TM data, LiDAR data, and LiDAR-TM fusions. I assessed the relative contributions of LiDAR DSMs to map classification accuracy and identified an optimal spatial resolution of LiDAR DSMs for large area assessments of urban land cover. In Chapter 2, I analyzed combinations of datasets developed from categorized LiDAR-derived variables (Overstory, Understory, Topography, and Overall Vegetation Characteristics) and IKONOS imagery ( Optical) to detect and map the understory plant invader, Ligustrum sinense, using Random Forest (RF) and logistic regression (LR) algorithms, and I assessed the relative

  9. ALS Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... toward a world without ALS! Walk to Defeat ALS® Walk to Defeat ALS® draws people of all ... We need your help. I Will Advocate National ALS Registry The National ALS Registry is a congressionally ...

  10. LiDAR improves fire behaviour predictions using a biophysical, mechanistic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zylstra, Philip; Horsey, Bronwyn; Yebra, Marta; Marselis, Suzanne

    2016-04-01

    Numerous studies have attempted to address the utility of LiDAR as a tool for measuring fuel inputs to fire behaviour models, however the direct effect of this approach on fire behaviour prediction requires quantification. We used a biophysical, mechanistic model validated for eucalypt forest in SE Australia to assess the improvement in prediction accuracy afforded using LiDAR-derived inputs. The accuracy of modelling with these inputs was compared to modelling using detailed site-specific field surveys of a dry sclerophyll forest to represent the highest standard of inputs, and values derived from desktop-available community-wide descriptors to represent baseline inputs. Use of LiDAR significantly improved on baseline predictions and enabled site-specific decision making across the study area. When used with an appropriate model, LiDAR can facilitate improved decision-making in regard to forest fire behaviour.

  11. Surface characteristics modeling and performance evaluation of urban building materials using LiDAR data.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaolu; Liang, Yu

    2015-05-20

    Analysis of light detection and ranging (LiDAR) intensity data to extract surface features is of great interest in remote sensing research. One potential application of LiDAR intensity data is target classification. A new bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) model is derived for target characterization of rough and smooth surfaces. Based on the geometry of our coaxial full-waveform LiDAR system, the integration method is improved through coordinate transformation to establish the relationship between the BRDF model and intensity data of LiDAR. A series of experiments using typical urban building materials are implemented to validate the proposed BRDF model and integration method. The fitting results show that three parameters extracted from the proposed BRDF model can distinguish the urban building materials from perspectives of roughness, specular reflectance, and diffuse reflectance. A comprehensive analysis of these parameters will help characterize surface features in a physically rigorous manner.

  12. Intraday monitoring of granitic exfoliation sheets with LiDAR and thermal imaging (Yosemite Valley, California, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerin, Antoine; Derron, Marc-Henri; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Abellán, Antonio; Dubas, Olivier; Collins, Brian D.; Stock, Greg M.

    2016-04-01

    Rockfall activity in Yosemite Valley is often linked to the presence of exfoliation sheets associated with other structures such as faults, joints or geological contacts. Daily and seasonal temperature variations or freeze-thaw cycles may strongly promote crack propagation along discontinuities, ultimately leading to rockfalls (Stock et al., 2013). However, little is known concerning the impact of thermal variations on rock face deformation, despite its occurrence at all times of year. To understand the influence of daily temperature fluctuations on the behavior of exfoliation joints (i.e., fractures separating exfoliation sheets), we carried out two different experiments in October 2015: (a) We first monitored a sub-vertical granodiorite flake (19 m by 4 m by 0.1 m ; Collins and Stock, 2014) for 24 consecutive hours using LiDAR and infrared thermal sensors; (b) We monitored a rock cliff (60 m by 45 m) composed of tens of exfoliation sheets located on the southeast face of El Capitan (an ~1000-m-tall cliff located in western Yosemite Valley) for several hours (from 05:30 pm to 01:30 am) to investigate the diurnal cooling effect on rocks of different lithologies. To calibrate the raw apparent temperature measured by the thermal imager (FLIR T660 infrared camera), we fixed pieces of reflective paper (aluminum foil) and black duct tape on both monitored cliffs to measure the reflected temperature and the emissivity of the different rocks. In addition, ambient temperature and relative humidity readings were performed for each acquisition. We then compared the calibrated temperatures to the values registered by resistance temperature detectors (Pt100 sensors), also attached to the rock. Finally, we compared the millimeter scale deformations observed with LiDAR to the values measured by manual crackmeters (standard analog comparators with springs) installed beforehand in the fractures. For the first experiment (24-hour monitoring), a series of measurements were carried

  13. Detecting understory plant invasion in urban forests using LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Kunwar K.; Davis, Amy J.; Meentemeyer, Ross K.

    2015-06-01

    Light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data are increasingly used to measure structural characteristics of urban forests but are rarely used to detect the growing problem of exotic understory plant invaders. We explored the merits of using LiDAR-derived metrics alone and through integration with spectral data to detect the spatial distribution of the exotic understory plant Ligustrum sinense, a rapidly spreading invader in the urbanizing region of Charlotte, North Carolina, USA. We analyzed regional-scale L. sinense occurrence data collected over the course of three years with LiDAR-derived metrics of forest structure that were categorized into the following groups: overstory, understory, topography, and overall vegetation characteristics, and IKONOS spectral features - optical. Using random forest (RF) and logistic regression (LR) classifiers, we assessed the relative contributions of LiDAR and IKONOS derived variables to the detection of L. sinense. We compared the top performing models developed for a smaller, nested experimental extent using RF and LR classifiers, and used the best overall model to produce a predictive map of the spatial distribution of L. sinense across our country-wide study extent. RF classification of LiDAR-derived topography metrics produced the highest mapping accuracy estimates, outperforming IKONOS data by 17.5% and the integration of LiDAR and IKONOS data by 5.3%. The top performing model from the RF classifier produced the highest kappa of 64.8%, improving on the parsimonious LR model kappa by 31.1% with a moderate gain of 6.2% over the county extent model. Our results demonstrate the superiority of LiDAR-derived metrics over spectral data and fusion of LiDAR and spectral data for accurately mapping the spatial distribution of the forest understory invader L. sinense.

  14. Synergy of VSWIR and LiDAR for Ecosystem Structure, Biomass, and Canopy Diversity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Bruce D.; Asner, Gregory P.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of Visible ShortWave InfraRed (VSWIR) Imaging Spectrometer and LiDAR to study ecosystem structure, biomass and canopy diversity. It is shown that the biophysical data from LiDAR and biochemical information from hyperspectral remote sensing provides complementary data for: (1) describing spatial patterns of vegetation and biodiversity, (2) characterizing relationships between ecosystem form and function, and (3) detecting natural and human induced change that affects the biogeochemical cycles.

  15. Aboveground Biomass Modeling from Field and LiDAR Data in Brazilian Amazon Tropical Rain Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, C. A.; Hudak, A. T.; Vierling, L. A.; Keller, M. M.; Klauberg Silva, C. K.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical forests are an important component of global carbon stocks, but tropical forest responses to climate change are not sufficiently studied or understood. Among remote sensing technologies, airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) may be best suited for quantifying tropical forest carbon stocks. Our objective was to estimate aboveground biomass (AGB) using airborne LiDAR and field plot data in Brazilian tropical rain forest. Forest attributes such as tree density, diameter at breast height, and heights were measured at a combination of square plots and linear transects (n=82) distributed across six different geographic zones in the Amazon. Using previously published allometric equations, tree AGB was computed and then summed to calculate total AGB at each sample plot. LiDAR-derived canopy structure metrics were also computed at each sample plot, and random forest regression modelling was applied to predict AGB from selected LiDAR metrics. The LiDAR-derived AGB model was assessed using the random forest explained variation, adjusted coefficient of determination (Adj. R²), root mean square error (RMSE, both absolute and relative) and BIAS (both absolute and relative). Our findings showed that the 99th percentile of height and height skewness were the best LiDAR metrics for AGB prediction. The AGB model using these two best predictors explained 59.59% of AGB variation, with an Adj. R² of 0.92, RMSE of 33.37 Mg/ha (20.28%), and bias of -0.69 (-0.42%). This study showed that LiDAR canopy structure metrics can be used to predict AGC stocks in Tropical Forest with acceptable precision and accuracy. Therefore, we conclude that there is good potential to monitor carbon sequestration in Brazilian Tropical Rain Forest using airborne LiDAR data, large field plots, and the random forest algorithm.

  16. Change Detection from differential airborne LiDAR using a weighted Anisotropic Iterative Closest Point Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Kusari, A.; Glennie, C. L.; Oskin, M. E.; Hinojosa-Corona, A.; Borsa, A. A.; Arrowsmith, R.

    2013-12-01

    Differential LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) from repeated surveys has recently emerged as an effective tool to measure three-dimensional (3D) change for applications such as quantifying slip and spatially distributed warping associated with earthquake ruptures, and examining the spatial distribution of beach erosion after hurricane impact. Currently, the primary method for determining 3D change is through the use of the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm and its variants. However, all current studies using ICP have assumed that all LiDAR points in the compared point clouds have uniform accuracy. This assumption is simplistic given that the error for each LiDAR point is variable, and dependent upon highly variable factors such as target range, angle of incidence, and aircraft trajectory accuracy. Therefore, to rigorously determine spatial change, it would be ideal to model the random error for every LiDAR observation in the differential point cloud, and use these error estimates as apriori weights in the ICP algorithm. To test this approach, we implemented a rigorous LiDAR observation error propagation method to generate estimated random error for each point in a LiDAR point cloud, and then determine 3D displacements between two point clouds using an anistropic weighted ICP algorithm. The algorithm was evaluated by qualitatively and quantitatively comparing post earthquake slip estimates from the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah Earthquake between a uniform weight and anistropically weighted ICP algorithm, using pre-event LiDAR collected in 2006 by Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Geografía (INEGI), and post-event LiDAR collected by The National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping (NCALM).

  17. Modeling marbled murrelet (Brachyramphus marmoratus) habitat using LiDAR-derived canopy data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hagar, Joan C.; Eskelson, Bianca N.I.; Haggerty, Patricia K.; Nelson, S. Kim; Vesely, David G.

    2014-01-01

    LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) is an emerging remote-sensing tool that can provide fine-scale data describing vertical complexity of vegetation relevant to species that are responsive to forest structure. We used LiDAR data to estimate occupancy probability for the federally threatened marbled murrelet (Brachyramphus marmoratus) in the Oregon Coast Range of the United States. Our goal was to address the need identified in the Recovery Plan for a more accurate estimate of the availability of nesting habitat by developing occupancy maps based on refined measures of nest-strand structure. We used murrelet occupancy data collected by the Bureau of Land Management Coos Bay District, and canopy metrics calculated from discrete return airborne LiDAR data, to fit a logistic regression model predicting the probability of occupancy. Our final model for stand-level occupancy included distance to coast, and 5 LiDAR-derived variables describing canopy structure. With an area under the curve value (AUC) of 0.74, this model had acceptable discrimination and fair agreement (Cohen's κ = 0.24), especially considering that all sites in our sample were regarded by managers as potential habitat. The LiDAR model provided better discrimination between occupied and unoccupied sites than did a model using variables derived from Gradient Nearest Neighbor maps that were previously reported as important predictors of murrelet occupancy (AUC = 0.64, κ = 0.12). We also evaluated LiDAR metrics at 11 known murrelet nest sites. Two LiDAR-derived variables accurately discriminated nest sites from random sites (average AUC = 0.91). LiDAR provided a means of quantifying 3-dimensional canopy structure with variables that are ecologically relevant to murrelet nesting habitat, and have not been as accurately quantified by other mensuration methods.

  18. Development of LiDAR aware allometrics for Abies grandis: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, G. A.; Tinkham, W. T.; Smith, A. M.; Hudak, A. T.; Falkowski, M. J.; Keefe, R.

    2012-12-01

    Forest managers rely increasingly on accurate allometric relationships to inform decisions regarding stand rotations, silvilcultural treatments, timber harvesting, and biometric modeling. At the same time, advances in remote sensing techniques like LiDAR (light detection and ranging) have brought about opportunities to advance how we assess forest growth, and thus are contributing to the need for more accurate allometries. Past studies have attempted to relate LiDAR data to both plot and individual tree measures of forest biomass. However, many of these studies have been limited by the accuracy of their coincident observations. In this study, 24 Abies grandis were measured, felled, and dissected for the explicit objective of developing LiDAR aware allometrics. The analysis predicts spatial variables of competition, growth potential (e.g, trees per acre, aspect, elevation, etc.) and common statistical distributional metrics (e.g., mean, mode, percentiles, variance, skewness, kurtosis, etc.) derived from LiDAR point cloud returns to coincident in situ measures of Abies grandis stem biomass. The resulting allometries exemplify a new approach for predicting structural attributes of interest (biomass, basal area, volume, etc.) directly from LiDAR point cloud data, precluding the measurement errors that are propogated by indirectly predicting these structure attributes of interest from LiDAR data using traditional plot-based measurements.

  19. On the impact of a refined stochastic model for airborne LiDAR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolkas, Dimitrios; Fotopoulos, Georgia; Glennie, Craig

    2016-09-01

    Accurate topographic information is critical for a number of applications in science and engineering. In recent years, airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) has become a standard tool for acquiring high quality topographic information. The assessment of airborne LiDAR derived DEMs is typically based on (i) independent ground control points and (ii) forward error propagation utilizing the LiDAR geo-referencing equation. The latter approach is dependent on the stochastic model information of the LiDAR observation components. In this paper, the well-known statistical tool of variance component estimation (VCE) is implemented for a dataset in Houston, Texas, in order to refine the initial stochastic information. Simulations demonstrate the impact of stochastic-model refinement for two practical applications, namely coastal inundation mapping and surface displacement estimation. Results highlight scenarios where erroneous stochastic information is detrimental. Furthermore, the refined stochastic information provides insights on the effect of each LiDAR measurement in the airborne LiDAR error budget. The latter is important for targeting future advancements in order to improve point cloud accuracy.

  20. Determination of volatile concentrations in fluorapatite of Martian shergottite NWA 2975 by combining synchrotron FTIR, Raman spectroscopy, EMPA, and TEM, and inferences on the volatile budget of the apatite host-magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SłAby, Ewa; Koch-Müller, Monika; FöRster, Hans-Jürgen; Wirth, Richard; Rhede, Dieter; Schreiber, Anja; Schade, Ulrich

    2016-02-01

    We combined the focused ion beam sample preparation technique with polarized synchrotron-based FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) spectroscopy, laser-Raman spectroscopy, electron microprobe analysis (EMPA), and transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis to identify and quantify structurally bound OH, F, Cl, and CO3 groups in fluorapatite from the Northwest Africa 2975 (NWA 2975) shergottite. In this study, the first FTIR spectra of the OH-stretching region from a Martian apatite are presented that show characteristic OH-bands of a F-rich, hydroxyl-bearing apatite. Depending on the method of apatite-formula calculation and whether charge balance is assumed or not, the FTIR-based quantification of the incorporated OH, expressed as wt% H2O, is in variably good agreement with the H2O concentration calculated from electron microprobe data. EMP analyses yielded between 0.35 and 0.54 wt% H2O, and IR data yielded an average H2O content of 0.31 ± 0.03 wt%, consistent with the lower range determined from EMP analyses. The TEM observations implied that the volatiles budget of fluorapatite is magmatic. The water content and the relative volatile ratios calculated for the NWA 2975 magma are similar to those established for other enriched or intermediate shergottites. It is difficult to define the source of enrichment: either Martian wet mantle or crustal assimilation. Comparing the environment of parental magma generation for NWA 2975 with the terrestrial mantle in terms of water content, it displays a composition intermediate between enriched and depleted MORB.

  1. Classification of LiDAR Data with Point Based Classification Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yastikli, N.; Cetin, Z.

    2016-06-01

    LiDAR is one of the most effective systems for 3 dimensional (3D) data collection in wide areas. Nowadays, airborne LiDAR data is used frequently in various applications such as object extraction, 3D modelling, change detection and revision of maps with increasing point density and accuracy. The classification of the LiDAR points is the first step of LiDAR data processing chain and should be handled in proper way since the 3D city modelling, building extraction, DEM generation, etc. applications directly use the classified point clouds. The different classification methods can be seen in recent researches and most of researches work with the gridded LiDAR point cloud. In grid based data processing of the LiDAR data, the characteristic point loss in the LiDAR point cloud especially vegetation and buildings or losing height accuracy during the interpolation stage are inevitable. In this case, the possible solution is the use of the raw point cloud data for classification to avoid data and accuracy loss in gridding process. In this study, the point based classification possibilities of the LiDAR point cloud is investigated to obtain more accurate classes. The automatic point based approaches, which are based on hierarchical rules, have been proposed to achieve ground, building and vegetation classes using the raw LiDAR point cloud data. In proposed approaches, every single LiDAR point is analyzed according to their features such as height, multi-return, etc. then automatically assigned to the class which they belong to. The use of un-gridded point cloud in proposed point based classification process helped the determination of more realistic rule sets. The detailed parameter analyses have been performed to obtain the most appropriate parameters in the rule sets to achieve accurate classes. The hierarchical rule sets were created for proposed Approach 1 (using selected spatial-based and echo-based features) and Approach 2 (using only selected spatial-based features

  2. Potential and limit of LiDAR data for earthquake recurrence characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielke, Olaf

    2013-04-01

    The characterization of earthquake (EQ) recurrence --assessing timing and size of past EQs along a given fault (section)-- has proven difficult, largely due the relatively short time span that is covered by instrumental seismic observations. While major EQs along a given fault are inferred to occur roughly on centennial to millennial time scales, seismographs to record them emerged little more than 100 years ago. Thus, recurrence of major EQs has essentially not yet been observed instrumentally. Stratigraphic and geomorphic evidence is used instead to describe and constrain recurrence of surface rupturing EQs. In the 1980s, analysis of such data sets culminated in the formulation of now classical EQ recurrence models. The debate about the correctness and thus applicability of these in part contradicting models is still ongoing. Over the last 10 years or so Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) technology became available to paleoseismic and tectono-geomorphic investigations. High spatial resolution, precision, and accuracy --the key features of LiDAR data-- revealed details in the tectono-geomorphic record that could not be resolved previously by field investigation or air photo analysis. As a result LiDAR data sets contributed and continues to contribute to improvements in the recurrence characterization of (surface rupturing) EQs. Here, I will present an overview on LiDAR data implementation in paleoseismic and tectono-geomorphic studies, including trench-based LiDAR, terrestrial LiDAR, and airborne LiDAR and I will discuss the impact of LiDAR data on constraining EQ recurrence characteristics as well as their relation to the classical EQ recurrence models. Additionally, I will discuss the intrinsic limits (that even LiDAR data cannot overcome) that arise when investigating geomorphic and stratigraphic evidence for EQ recurrence characterization. The natural complexity of the rupture process itself and its imprint on the analyzed data sets puts an unavoidable limit

  3. Retrieval of effective leaf area index (LAIe) and leaf area density (LAD) profile at individual tree level using high density multi-return airborne LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi; West, Geoff

    2016-08-01

    As an important canopy structure indicator, leaf area index (LAI) proved to be of considerable implications for forest ecosystem and ecological studies, and efficient techniques for accurate LAI acquisitions have long been highlighted. Airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR), often termed as airborne laser scanning (ALS), once was extensively investigated for this task but showed limited performance due to its low sampling density. Now, ALS systems exhibit more competing capacities such as high density and multi-return sampling, and hence, people began to ask the questions like-"can ALS now work better on the task of LAI prediction?" As a re-examination, this study investigated the feasibility of LAI retrievals at the individual tree level based on high density and multi-return ALS, by directly considering the vertical distributions of laser points lying within each tree crown instead of by proposing feature variables such as quantiles involving laser point distribution modes at the plot level. The examination was operated in the case of four tree species (i.e. Picea abies, Pinus sylvestris, Populus tremula and Quercus robur) in a mixed forest, with their LAI-related reference data collected by using static terrestrial laser scanning (TLS). In light of the differences between ALS- and TLS-based LAI characterizations, the methods of voxelization of 3D scattered laser points, effective LAI (LAIe) that does not distinguish branches from canopies and unified cumulative LAI (ucLAI) that is often used to characterize the vertical profiles of crown leaf area densities (LADs) was used; then, the relationships between the ALS- and TLS-derived LAIes were determined, and so did ucLAIs. Tests indicated that the tree-level LAIes for the four tree species can be estimated based on the used airborne LiDAR (R2 = 0.07, 0.26, 0.43 and 0.21, respectively) and their ucLAIs can also be derived. Overall, this study has validated the usage of the contemporary high density multi

  4. Quantifying Forest Carbon and Structure with Terrestrial LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stovall, A. E.; Shugart, H. H., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    Current rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations are a major concern with significant global ramifications, however, of the carbon (C) fluxes that are known to occur on Earth, the terrestrial sink has the greatest amount of uncertainty. Improved monitoring of forest cover and change is required for reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD). We determine C storage from volume measurements with a high-precision Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS), substantially improving current standard ground validation techniques. This technology is utilized on several 30 m x 30 m plots in a Virginia temperate forest. Aboveground C is calculated on each of the study sites with commonly used allometric equations to offer a realistic comparison of field-based estimations to TLS-derived methods. The TLS and aerial LiDAR point cloud data are compared via the development of canopy height models at the plot scale. The novel method of point cloud voxelization is applied to our TLS data in order to produce detailed volumetric calculations in these complex forest ecosystems. Statistical output from the TLS data allows us to resolve and compare forest structure on scales from the individual plot to the entire forest landscape. The estimates produced from this research will be used to inform more widely available remote sensing datasets provided by NASA's Landsat satellites, significantly reducing the uncertainty of the terrestrial C cycle in temperate forests. Preliminary findings corroborate previous research, suggesting the potential for highly detailed monitoring of forest C storage as defined by the REDD initiative and analysis of complex ecosystem structure.

  5. Homicide of children in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, 2005

    PubMed Central

    Outwater, Anne; Mgaya, Edward; Campbell, Jacquelyn C.; Becker, Stan; Kinabo, Linna; Menick, Daniel Mbassa

    2014-01-01

    Background Although data are sparse, it has been estimated that the highest rates of homicide death amongst children are in Africa. Little information is available on ages 0 -< 15 years. No reliable quantitative surveillance analysis of neonaticide (killed at less than one week) has been done. Methods A Violent Death Survey following WHO/CDC Guidelines was completed in Dar es Salaam region, Tanzania (DSM) (population 2.845 million) in 2005. Qualitative and quantitative data were gathered and analyzed using mixed methods techniques. Results The overall age adjusted rate of discarded and killed children in DSM was 2.05. The rate of neonaticide was 27.7 per 100,000) while the rate of homicide incidence for children > one day was Discussion The overall estimated homicide rate for Africa of children under age 15 was 4.53 per 100,000, whereas. The estimated global rate is 1.7 per 100,000 closer to DSM‘s rate. The results in DSM show that broad age groupings such as ” <1 year” or “0–4 years” or “0 – <15 years” may mask a high incidence of neonaticide and an otherwise low incidence of murdered children. The print media provided good in-depth coverage for a few cases but it is not known if the reported cases are representative. Conclusion Eighty percent of homicides of children in DSM are neonaticides. Since it is believed that the forces behind neonaticide are fundamentally different than homicides of older children, it is suggested that data of future surveys be parsed to include neonates, until the phenomenon is more clearly understood and addressed. Further understanding of the mother and father of the deceased is needed. Continued surveillance data collection is important to expand the sample size. PMID:22066333

  6. Improved estimates of forest vegetation structure and biomass with a LiDAR-optimized sampling design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawbaker, Todd J.; Keuler, Nicholas S.; Lesak, Adrian A.; Gobakken, Terje; Contrucci, Kirk; Radeloff, Volker C.

    2009-06-01

    LiDAR data are increasingly available from both airborne and spaceborne missions to map elevation and vegetation structure. Additionally, global coverage may soon become available with NASA's planned DESDynI sensor. However, substantial challenges remain to using the growing body of LiDAR data. First, the large volumes of data generated by LiDAR sensors require efficient processing methods. Second, efficient sampling methods are needed to collect the field data used to relate LiDAR data with vegetation structure. In this paper, we used low-density LiDAR data, summarized within pixels of a regular grid, to estimate forest structure and biomass across a 53,600 ha study area in northeastern Wisconsin. Additionally, we compared the predictive ability of models constructed from a random sample to a sample stratified using mean and standard deviation of LiDAR heights. Our models explained between 65 to 88% of the variability in DBH, basal area, tree height, and biomass. Prediction errors from models constructed using a random sample were up to 68% larger than those from the models built with a stratified sample. The stratified sample included a greater range of variability than the random sample. Thus, applying the random sample model to the entire population violated a tenet of regression analysis; namely, that models should not be used to extrapolate beyond the range of data from which they were constructed. Our results highlight that LiDAR data integrated with field data sampling designs can provide broad-scale assessments of vegetation structure and biomass, i.e., information crucial for carbon and biodiversity science.

  7. Estimating FPAR of maize canopy using airborne discrete-return LiDAR data.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shezhou; Wang, Cheng; Xi, Xiaohuan; Pan, Feifei

    2014-03-10

    The fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (FPAR) is a key parameter for ecosystem modeling, crop growth monitoring and yield prediction. Ground-based FPAR measurements are time consuming and labor intensive. Remote sensing provides an alternative method to obtain repeated, rapid and inexpensive estimates of FPAR over large areas. LiDAR is an active remote sensing technology and can be used to extract accurate canopy structure parameters. A method to estimating FPAR of maize from airborne discrete-return LiDAR data was developed and tested in this study. The raw LiDAR point clouds were processed to separate ground returns from vegetation returns using a filter method over a maize field in the Heihe River Basin, northwest China. The fractional cover (fCover) of maize canopy was computed using the ratio of canopy return counts or intensity sums to the total of returns or intensities. FPAR estimation models were established based on linear regression analysis between the LiDAR-derived fCover and the field-measured FPAR (R(2) = 0.90, RMSE = 0.032, p < 0.001). The reliability of the constructed regression model was assessed using the leave-one-out cross-validation procedure and results show that the regression model is not overfitting the data and has a good generalization capability. Finally, 15 independent field-measured FPARs were used to evaluate accuracy of the LiDAR-predicted FPARs and results show that the LiDAR-predicted FPAR has a high accuracy (R(2) = 0.89, RMSE = 0.034). In summary, this study suggests that the airborne discrete-return LiDAR data could be adopted to accurately estimate FPAR of maize.

  8. LiDAR Applications in Resource Geology and Benefits for Land Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikulovsky, R. P.; De La Fuente, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    The US Forest Service (US Department of Agriculture) manages a broad range of geologic resources and hazards on National Forests and Grass Lands throughout the United States. Resources include rock and earth materials, groundwater, caves and paleontological resources, minerals, energy resources, and unique geologic areas. Hazards include landslides, floods, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and naturally hazardous materials (e.g., asbestos, radon). Forest Service Geologists who address these issues are Resource Geologists. They have been exploring LiDAR as a revolutionary tool to efficiently manage all of these hazards and resources. However, most LiDAR applications for management have focused on timber and fuels management, rather than landforms. This study shows the applications and preliminary results of using LiDAR for managing geologic resources and hazards on public lands. Applications shown include calculating sediment budgets, mapping and monitoring landslides, mapping and characterizing borrow pits or mines, determining landslide potential, mapping faults, and characterizing groundwater dependent ecosystems. LiDAR can be used to model potential locations of groundwater dependent ecosystems with threatened or endangered plant species such as Howellia aquatilis. This difficult to locate species typically exists on the Mendocino National Forest within sag ponds on landslide benches. LiDAR metrics of known sites are used to model potential habitat. Thus LiDAR can link the disciplines of geology, hydrology, botany, archaeology and others for enhanced land management. As LiDAR acquisition costs decrease and it becomes more accessible, land management organizations will find a wealth of applications with potential far-reaching benefits for managing geologic resources and hazards.

  9. Using satellite and airborne LiDAR to model woodpecker habitat occupancy at the landscape scale.

    PubMed

    Vierling, Lee A; Vierling, Kerri T; Adam, Patrick; Hudak, Andrew T

    2013-01-01

    Incorporating vertical vegetation structure into models of animal distributions can improve understanding of the patterns and processes governing habitat selection. LiDAR can provide such structural information, but these data are typically collected via aircraft and thus are limited in spatial extent. Our objective was to explore the utility of satellite-based LiDAR data from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) relative to airborne-based LiDAR to model the north Idaho breeding distribution of a forest-dependent ecosystem engineer, the Red-naped sapsucker (Sphyrapicus nuchalis). GLAS data occurred within ca. 64 m diameter ellipses spaced a minimum of 172 m apart, and all occupancy analyses were confined to this grain scale. Using a hierarchical approach, we modeled Red-naped sapsucker occupancy as a function of LiDAR metrics derived from both platforms. Occupancy models based on satellite data were weak, possibly because the data within the GLAS ellipse did not fully represent habitat characteristics important for this species. The most important structural variables influencing Red-naped Sapsucker breeding site selection based on airborne LiDAR data included foliage height diversity, the distance between major strata in the canopy vertical profile, and the vegetation density near the ground. These characteristics are consistent with the diversity of foraging activities exhibited by this species. To our knowledge, this study represents the first to examine the utility of satellite-based LiDAR to model animal distributions. The large area of each GLAS ellipse and the non-contiguous nature of GLAS data may pose significant challenges for wildlife distribution modeling; nevertheless these data can provide useful information on ecosystem vertical structure, particularly in areas of gentle terrain. Additional work is thus warranted to utilize LiDAR datasets collected from both airborne and past and future satellite platforms (e.g. GLAS, and the planned IceSAT2

  10. Estimation of effective plant area index for South Korean forests using LiDAR system.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Doo-Ahn; Lee, Woo-Kyun; Kafatos, Menas; Son, Yowhan; Cho, Hyun-Kook; Lee, Seung-Ho

    2010-07-01

    Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) systems can be used to estimate both vertical and horizontal forest structure. Woody components, the leaves of trees and the understory can be described with high precision, using geo-registered 3D-points. Based on this concept, the Effective Plant Area Indices (PAI(e)) for areas of Korean Pine (Pinus koraiensis), Japanese Larch (Larix leptolepis) and Oak (Quercus spp.) were estimated by calculating the ratio of intercepted and incident LIDAR laser rays for the canopies of the three forest types. Initially, the canopy gap fraction (G ( LiDAR )) was generated by extracting the LiDAR data reflected from the canopy surface, or inner canopy area, using k-means statistics. The LiDAR-derived PAI(e) was then estimated by using G ( LIDAR ) with the Beer-Lambert law. A comparison of the LiDAR-derived and field-derived PAI(e) revealed the coefficients of determination for Korean Pine, Japanese Larch and Oak to be 0.82, 0.64 and 0.59, respectively. These differences between field-based and LIDAR-based PAI(e) for the different forest types were attributed to the amount of leaves and branches in the forest stands. The absence of leaves, in the case of both Larch and Oak, meant that the LiDAR pulses were only reflected from branches. The probability that the LiDAR pulses are reflected from bare branches is low as compared to the reflection from branches with a high leaf density. This is because the size of the branch is smaller than the resolution across and along the 1 meter LIDAR laser track. Therefore, a better predictive accuracy would be expected for the model if the study would be repeated in late spring when the shoots and leaves of the deciduous trees begin to appear.

  11. Diversity arrays technology (DArT) for high-throughput profiling of the hexaploid wheat genome.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Mona; Wenzl, Peter; Caig, Vanessa; Carling, Jason; Xia, Ling; Yang, Shiying; Uszynski, Grzegorz; Mohler, Volker; Lehmensiek, Anke; Kuchel, Haydn; Hayden, Mathew J; Howes, Neil; Sharp, Peter; Vaughan, Peter; Rathmell, Bill; Huttner, Eric; Kilian, Andrzej

    2006-11-01

    Despite a substantial investment in the development of panels of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers, the simple sequence repeat (SSR) technology with a limited multiplexing capability remains a standard, even for applications requiring whole-genome information. Diversity arrays technology (DArT) types hundreds to thousands of genomic loci in parallel, as previously demonstrated in a number diploid plant species. Here we show that DArT performs similarly well for the hexaploid genome of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). The methodology previously used to generate DArT fingerprints of barley also generated a large number of high-quality markers in wheat (99.8% allele-calling concordance and approximately 95% call rate). The genetic relationships among bread wheat cultivars revealed by DArT coincided with knowledge generated with other methods, and even closely related cultivars could be distinguished. To verify the Mendelian behaviour of DArT markers, we typed a set of 90 Cranbrook x Halberd doubled haploid lines for which a framework (FW) map comprising a total of 339 SSR, restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers was available. We added an equal number of DArT markers to this data set and also incorporated 71 sequence tagged microsatellite (STM) markers. A comparison of logarithm of the odds (LOD) scores, call rates and the degree of genome coverage indicated that the quality and information content of the DArT data set was comparable to that of the combined SSR/RFLP/AFLP data set of the FW map. PMID:17033786

  12. ALS - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - ALS ... The following organizations are good resources for information on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis : Muscular Dystrophy Association -- mda.org/disease/amyotrophic-lateral-sclerosis National Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Registry -- ...

  13. Spinning a laser web: predicting spider distributions using LiDAR.

    PubMed

    Vierling, K T; Bässler, C; Brandl, R; Vierling, L A; Weiss, I; Müller, J

    2011-03-01

    LiDAR remote sensing has been used to examine relationships between vertebrate diversity and environmental characteristics, but its application to invertebrates has been limited. Our objectives were to determine whether LiDAR-derived variables could be used to accurately describe single-species distributions and community characteristics of spiders in remote forested and mountainous terrain. We collected over 5300 spiders across multiple transects in the Bavarian National Park (Germany) using pitfall traps. We examined spider community characteristics (species richness, the Shannon index, the Simpson index, community composition, mean body size, and abundance) and single-species distribution and abundance with LiDAR variables and ground-based measurements. We used the R2 and partial R2 provided by variance partitioning to evaluate the predictive power of LiDAR-derived variables compared to ground measurements for each of the community characteristics. The total adjusted R2 for species richness, the Shannon index, community species composition, and body size had a range of 25-57%. LiDAR variables and ground measurements both contributed >80% to the total predictive power. For species composition, the explained variance was approximately 32%, which was significantly greater than expected by chance. The predictive power of LiDAR-derived variables was comparable or superior to that of the ground-based variables for examinations of single-species distributions, and it explained up to 55% of the variance. The predictability of species distributions was higher for species that had strong associations with shade in open-forest habitats, and this niche position has been well documented across the European continent for spider species. The similar statistical performance between LiDAR and ground-based measures at our field sites indicated that deriving spider community and species distribution information using LiDAR data can provide not only high predictive power at

  14. Geotechnical applications of LiDAR pertaining to geomechanical evaluation and hazard identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lato, Matthew J.

    Natural hazards related to ground movement that directly affect the safety of motorists and highway infrastructure include, but are not limited to, rockfalls, rockslides, debris flows, and landslides. This thesis specifically deals with the evaluation of rockfall hazards through the evaluation of LiDAR data. Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) is an imaging technology that can be used to delineate and evaluate geomechanically-controlled hazards. LiDAR has been adopted to conduct hazard evaluations pertaining to rockfall, rock-avalanches, debris flows, and landslides. Characteristics of LiDAR surveying, such as rapid data acquisition rates, mobile data collection, and high data densities, pose problems to traditional CAD or GIS-based mapping methods. New analyses methods, including tools specifically oriented to geomechanical analyses, are needed. The research completed in this thesis supports development of new methods, including improved survey techniques, innovative software workflows, and processing algorithms to aid in the detection and evaluation of geomechanically controlled rockfall hazards. The scientific research conducted between the years of 2006-2010, as presented in this thesis, are divided into five chapters, each of which has been published by or is under review by an international journal. The five research foci are: (i) geomechanical feature extraction and analysis using LiDAR data in active mining environments; (ii) engineered monitoring of rockfall hazards along transportation corridors: using mobile terrestrial LiDAR; (iii) optimization of LiDAR scanning and processing for automated structural evaluation of discontinuities in rockmasses; (iv) location orientation bias when using static LiDAR data for geomechanical analysis; and (v) evaluating roadside rockmasses for rockfall hazards from LiDAR data: optimizing data collection and processing protocols. The research conducted pertaining to this thesis has direct and significant implications with

  15. Spinning a laser web: predicting spider distributions using LiDAR.

    PubMed

    Vierling, K T; Bässler, C; Brandl, R; Vierling, L A; Weiss, I; Müller, J

    2011-03-01

    LiDAR remote sensing has been used to examine relationships between vertebrate diversity and environmental characteristics, but its application to invertebrates has been limited. Our objectives were to determine whether LiDAR-derived variables could be used to accurately describe single-species distributions and community characteristics of spiders in remote forested and mountainous terrain. We collected over 5300 spiders across multiple transects in the Bavarian National Park (Germany) using pitfall traps. We examined spider community characteristics (species richness, the Shannon index, the Simpson index, community composition, mean body size, and abundance) and single-species distribution and abundance with LiDAR variables and ground-based measurements. We used the R2 and partial R2 provided by variance partitioning to evaluate the predictive power of LiDAR-derived variables compared to ground measurements for each of the community characteristics. The total adjusted R2 for species richness, the Shannon index, community species composition, and body size had a range of 25-57%. LiDAR variables and ground measurements both contributed >80% to the total predictive power. For species composition, the explained variance was approximately 32%, which was significantly greater than expected by chance. The predictive power of LiDAR-derived variables was comparable or superior to that of the ground-based variables for examinations of single-species distributions, and it explained up to 55% of the variance. The predictability of species distributions was higher for species that had strong associations with shade in open-forest habitats, and this niche position has been well documented across the European continent for spider species. The similar statistical performance between LiDAR and ground-based measures at our field sites indicated that deriving spider community and species distribution information using LiDAR data can provide not only high predictive power at

  16. Automated Detection of Geomorphic Features in LiDAR Point Clouds of Various Spatial Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorninger, Peter; Székely, Balázs; Zámolyi, András.; Nothegger, Clemens

    2010-05-01

    relevant results. Consequently, it could be verified that a topographic surface can be properly represented by a set of distinct planar structures. Therefore, the subsequent interpretation of those planes with respect to geomorphic characteristics is acceptable. The additional in situ geological measurements verified some of our findings in the sense that similar primary directions could be found that were derived from the LiDAR data set and (Zámolyi et al., 2010, this volume). References: P. Dorninger, N. Pfeifer: "A Comprehensive Automated 3D Approach for Building Extraction, Reconstruction, and Regularization from Airborne Laser Scanning Point Clouds"; Sensors, 8 (2008), 11; 7323 - 7343. C. Nothegger, P. Dorninger: "3D Filtering of High-Resolution Terrestrial Laser Scanner Point Clouds for Cultural Heritage Documentation"; Photogrammetrie, Fernerkundung, Geoinformation, 1 (2009), 53 - 63. A. Zámolyi, B. Székely, G. Molnár, A. Roncat, P. Dorninger, A. Pocsai, M. Wyszyski, P. Drexel: "Comparison of LiDAR derived directional topographic features with geologic field evidence: a case study of Doren landslide (Vorarlberg, Austria)"; EGU General Assembly 2010, Vienna, Austria

  17. Specular and diffuse object extraction from a LiDAR derived Digital Surface Model (DSM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraf, N. M.; Hamid, J. R. A.; Kamaruddin, M. H.

    2014-02-01

    This paper intents to investigate the indifferent behaviour quantitatively of target objects of interest due to specular and diffuse reflectivity based on generated LiDAR DSM of the study site in Ampang, Kuala Lumpur. The LiDAR data to be used was initially checked for its reliability and accuracy. The point cloud LiDAR data was converted to raster to allow grid analysis of the next process of generating the DSM and DTM. Filtering and masking were made removing the features of interest (i.e. building and tree) and other unwanted above surface features. A normalised DSM and object segmentation approach were conducted on the trees and buildings separately. Error assessment and findings attained were highlighted and documented. The result of LiDAR verification certified that the data is reliable and useable. The RMSE obtained is within the tolerance value of horizontal and vertical accuracy (x, y, z) i.e. 0.159 m, 0.211 m 0.091 m respectively. Building extraction inclusive of roof top based on slope and contour analysis undertaken indicate the capability of the approach while single tree extraction through aspect analysis appears to preserve the accuracy of the extraction accordingly. The paper has evaluated the suitable methods of extracting non-ground features and the effective segmentation of the LiDAR data.

  18. Detection of fault structures with airborne LiDAR point-cloud data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jie; Du, Lei

    2015-08-01

    The airborne LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) technology is a new type of aerial earth observation method which can be used to produce high-precision DEM (Digital Elevation Model) quickly and reflect ground surface information directly. Fault structure is one of the key forms of crustal movement, and its quantitative description is the key to the research of crustal movement. The airborne LiDAR point-cloud data is used to detect and extract fault structures automatically based on linear extension, elevation mutation and slope abnormal characteristics. Firstly, the LiDAR point-cloud data is processed to filter out buildings, vegetation and other non-surface information with the TIN (Triangulated Irregular Network) filtering method and Burman model calibration method. TIN and DEM are made from the processed data sequentially. Secondly, linear fault structures are extracted based on dual-threshold method. Finally, high-precision DOM (Digital Orthophoto Map) and other geological knowledge are used to check the accuracy of fault structure extraction. An experiment is carried out in Beiya Village of Yunnan Province, China. With LiDAR technology, results reveal that: the airborne LiDAR point-cloud data can be utilized to extract linear fault structures accurately and automatically, measure information such as height, width and slope of fault structures with high precision, and detect faults in areas with vegetation coverage effectively.

  19. Flow Characteristics of Tidewater Glaciers in Greenland and Alaska using Ground-Based LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finnegan, D. C.; Stearns, L. A.; Hamilton, G. S.; O'Neel, S.

    2010-12-01

    LiDAR scanning systems have been employed to characterize and quantify multi-temporal glacier and ice sheet changes for nearly three decades. Until recently, LiDAR scanning systems were limited to airborne and space-based platforms which come at a significant cost to deploy and are limited in spatial and temporal sampling capabilities necessary to compare with in-situ field measurements. Portable ground-based LiDAR scanning systems are now being used as a glaciological tool. We discuss research efforts to employ ground-based near-infrared LiDAR systems at two differing tidewater glacier systems in the spring of 2009; Helheim Glacier in southeast Greenland and Columbia Glacier in southeast Alaska. Preliminary results allow us to characterize short term displacement rates and detailed observations of calving processes. These results highlight the operational limitations and capabilities of commercially available LiDAR systems, and allow us to identify optimal operating characteristics for monitoring small to large-scale tidewater glaciers in near real-time. Furthermore, by identifying the operational limitations of these sensors it allows for optimal design characteristics of new sensors necessary to meet ground-based calibration and validation requirements of ongoing scientific missions.

  20. Study of Ground Subsidence in North West Houston using GPS, LiDAR and InSAR techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karacay, A.; Khan, S. D.

    2012-12-01

    Land subsidence can be caused by natural or human activities, such as carbonate dissolution, extraction of material from mines, soil compaction and fluid withdrawal. This phenomenon affects many cities around the world, such as Nagoya-Japan, Venice-Italy, San Joaquin Valley and Long Beach in California. Recent work by Engelkemeir et al, (2010), suggested that subsidence occurred as high as 5.6 cm/year in northwest Houston. The processes that may contribute to land subsidence in the Houston-Galveston area includes faulting, soil compaction, salt tectonic, water pumping and hydrocarbon extraction. This study aims to assess the possible role of water pumping on subsidence. Northwest Houston has two aquifer systems, the Evangeline and Chicot aquifers that dip in the southeast direction. The effect of water pumping on subsidence from these two aquifers was monitored using InSAR, GPS and LiDAR data. The data from eleven GPS stations were processed using Online Positioning User Service (OPUS) of National Geodetic Survey (NGS). Three of these GPS stations are Continuously Operating Reference Stations (CORS) and eight are Port-A-Measure (PAM) sites. All the GPS data were obtained from Harris-Galveston Subsidence District (HGSD). CORS sites were used as reference stations for processing GPS data from the PAM stations. GPS data show that subsidence rate in northwest Houston decreased to approximately 2 cm/year. In addition, the surface deformation is also estimated using Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) technique. For this purpose, raw LiDAR (LAS-Long ASCII Standart) files of 2001 and 2008 were processed. The subsidence rate near the Hockley Fault was calculated by applying zonal statistics method on LiDAR data which shows about 10 cm of subsidence in nine years. This result is supported by processed GPS data from PAM site 48 that show subsidence rate of 1.3 cm/yr. For the InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) technique, an image pair of PALSAR (The Phased Array

  1. Octree-based segmentation for terrestrial LiDAR point cloud data in industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yun-Ting; Bethel, James; Hu, Shuowen

    2016-03-01

    Automated and efficient algorithms to perform segmentation of terrestrial LiDAR data is critical for exploitation of 3D point clouds, where the ultimate goal is CAD modeling of the segmented data. In this work, a novel segmentation technique is proposed, starting with octree decomposition to recursively divide the scene into octants or voxels, followed by a novel split and merge framework that uses graph theory and a series of connectivity analyses to intelligently merge components into larger connected components. The connectivity analysis, based on a combination of proximity, orientation, and curvature connectivity criteria, is designed for the segmentation of pipes, vessels, and walls from terrestrial LiDAR data of piping systems at industrial sites, such as oil refineries, chemical plants, and steel mills. The proposed segmentation method is exercised on two terrestrial LiDAR datasets of a steel mill and a chemical plant, demonstrating its ability to correctly reassemble and segregate features of interest.

  2. Automatic extraction of building boundaries using aerial LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruisheng; Hu, Yong; Wu, Huayi; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Building extraction is one of the main research topics of the photogrammetry community. This paper presents automatic algorithms for building boundary extractions from aerial LiDAR data. First, segmenting height information generated from LiDAR data, the outer boundaries of aboveground objects are expressed as closed chains of oriented edge pixels. Then, building boundaries are distinguished from nonbuilding ones by evaluating their shapes. The candidate building boundaries are reconstructed as rectangles or regular polygons by applying new algorithms, following the hypothesis verification paradigm. These algorithms include constrained searching in Hough space, enhanced Hough transformation, and the sequential linking technique. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithms successfully extract building boundaries at rates of 97%, 85%, and 92% for three LiDAR datasets with varying scene complexities.

  3. Using 3D visual tools with LiDAR for environmental outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenn, N. F.; Mannel, S.; Ehinger, S.; Moore, C.

    2009-12-01

    The project objective is to develop visualizations using light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data and other data sources to increase community understanding of remote sensing data for earth science. These data are visualized using Google Earth and other visualization methods. Final products are delivered to K-12, state, and federal agencies to share with their students and community constituents. Once our partner agencies were identified, we utilized a survey method to better understand their technological abilities and use of visualization products. The final multimedia products include a visualization of LiDAR and well data for water quality mapping in a southeastern Idaho watershed; a tour of hydrologic points of interest in southeastern Idaho visited by thousands of people each year, and post-earthquake features near Borah Peak, Idaho. In addition to the customized multimedia materials, we developed tutorials to encourage our partners to utilize these tools with their own LiDAR and other scientific data.

  4. [Analysis of an Air Pollution Process Using LiDAR in Nanjing, Spring of 2014].

    PubMed

    Bao, Qing; He, Jun-liang; Zha, Yong; Cheng, Feng; Li, Qian-nan

    2015-04-01

    Based on environmental monitoring data, meteorological data and the results of numerical simulation, a typical air pollution process in Nanjing, from 26th May to 1st June, 2014 was deeply analyzed combining aerosol extinction coefficient derived from LiDAR system. Experimental results showed that the entire pollution process was affected by both local pollution and exogenous inputs including dust and smoke. Meteorological factors played a significant role in the generation and elimination of pollutants. Low pressure and temperature inversion also hindered the diffusion of pollutants, while strong rainfall terminated the pollution process. During the pollution, the height of atmospheric boundary layer was lower than normal situation and changed little during the pollution period, which provided a poor diffusion condition for pollutants. LiDAR could accurately detect aerosol vertical structure which was able to capture the temporal and spatial variation of pollutant distributions. Therefore, LiDAR can be of great significance for the atmospheric pollution monitoring. PMID:26164889

  5. Detailed Hydrographic Feature Extraction from High-Resolution LiDAR Data

    SciTech Connect

    Danny L. Anderson

    2012-05-01

    Detailed hydrographic feature extraction from high-resolution light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data is investigated. Methods for quantitatively evaluating and comparing such extractions are presented, including the use of sinuosity and longitudinal root-mean-square-error (LRMSE). These metrics are then used to quantitatively compare stream networks in two studies. The first study examines the effect of raster cell size on watershed boundaries and stream networks delineated from LiDAR-derived digital elevation models (DEMs). The study confirmed that, with the greatly increased resolution of LiDAR data, smaller cell sizes generally yielded better stream network delineations, based on sinuosity and LRMSE. The second study demonstrates a new method of delineating a stream directly from LiDAR point clouds, without the intermediate step of deriving a DEM. Direct use of LiDAR point clouds could improve efficiency and accuracy of hydrographic feature extractions. The direct delineation method developed herein and termed “mDn”, is an extension of the D8 method that has been used for several decades with gridded raster data. The method divides the region around a starting point into sectors, using the LiDAR data points within each sector to determine an average slope, and selecting the sector with the greatest downward slope to determine the direction of flow. An mDn delineation was compared with a traditional grid-based delineation, using TauDEM, and other readily available, common stream data sets. Although, the TauDEM delineation yielded a sinuosity that more closely matches the reference, the mDn delineation yielded a sinuosity that was higher than either the TauDEM method or the existing published stream delineations. Furthermore, stream delineation using the mDn method yielded the smallest LRMSE.

  6. Estimating stem volume and biomass of Pinus koraiensis using LiDAR data.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Doo-Ahn; Lee, Woo-Kyun; Cho, Hyun-Kook; Lee, Seung-Ho; Son, Yowhan; Kafatos, Menas; Kim, So-Ra

    2010-07-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the stem volume and biomass of individual trees using the crown geometric volume (CGV), which was extracted from small-footprint light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data. Attempts were made to analyze the stem volume and biomass of Korean Pine stands (Pinus koraiensis Sieb. et Zucc.) for three classes of tree density: low (240 N/ha), medium (370 N/ha), and high (1,340 N/ha). To delineate individual trees, extended maxima transformation and watershed segmentation of image processing methods were applied, as in one of our previous studies. As the next step, the crown base height (CBH) of individual trees has to be determined; information for this was found in the LiDAR point cloud data using k-means clustering. The LiDAR-derived CGV and stem volume can be estimated on the basis of the proportional relationship between the CGV and stem volume. As a result, low tree-density plots had the best performance for LiDAR-derived CBH, CGV, and stem volume (R (2) = 0.67, 0.57, and 0.68, respectively) and accuracy was lowest for high tree-density plots (R (2) = 0.48, 0.36, and 0.44, respectively). In the case of medium tree-density plots accuracy was R (2) = 0.51, 0.52, and 0.62, respectively. The LiDAR-derived stem biomass can be predicted from the stem volume using the wood basic density of coniferous trees (0.48 g/cm(3)), and the LiDAR-derived above-ground biomass can then be estimated from the stem volume using the biomass conversion and expansion factors (BCEF, 1.29) proposed by the Korea Forest Research Institute (KFRI). PMID:20182905

  7. Reconstruction and analysis of a deciduous sapling using digital photographs or terrestrial-LiDAR technology

    PubMed Central

    Delagrange, Sylvain; Rochon, Pascal

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims To meet the increasing need for rapid and non-destructive extraction of canopy traits, two methods were used and compared with regard to their accuracy in estimatating 2-D and 3-D parameters of a hybrid poplar sapling. Methods The first method consisted of the analysis of high definition photographs in Tree Analyser (TA) software (PIAF-INRA/Kasetsart University). TA allowed the extraction of individual traits using a space carving approach. The second method utilized 3-D point clouds acquired from terrestrial light detection and ranging (T-LiDAR) scans. T-LiDAR scans were performed on trees without leaves to reconstruct the lignified structure of the sapling. From this skeleton, foliage was added using simple modelling rules extrapolated from field measurements. Validation of the estimated dimension and the accuracy of reconstruction was then achieved by comparison with an empirical data set. Key Results TA was found to be slightly less precise than T-LiDAR for estimating tree height, canopy height and mean canopy diameter, but for 2-D traits both methods were, however, fully satisfactory. TA tended to over-estimate total leaf area (error up to 50 %), but better estimates were obtained by reducing the size of the voxels used for calculations. In contrast, T-LiDAR estimated total leaf area with an error of <6 %. Finally, both methods led to an over-estimation of canopy volume. With respect to this trait, T-LiDAR (14·5 % deviation) greatly surpassed the accuracy of TA (up to 50 % deviation), even if the voxels used were reduced in size. Conclusions Taking into account their magnitude of data acquisition and analysis and their accuracy in trait estimations, both methods showed contrasting potential future uses. Specifically, T-LiDAR is a particularly promising tool for investigating the development of large perennial plants, by itself or in association with plant modelling. PMID:21515607

  8. LiDAR remote sensing observations for forest assessment and recovery responses following disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosette, J.; Suárez, J.; Fonweben, J.; North, P.

    2013-12-01

    LiDAR data covering 400 km2 in the Cowal and Trossacs Forest District, Scotland, U.K., were used to provide a low cost solution to update the database of public forests and to produce multi-scale cartographic products for supporting management decisions in the event of forest disturbance such as infestation or wind damage. All parameter estimates were directly obtained from the LiDAR data without the necessity of field calibration. This was achieved using a hybrid approach integrating current stand models for Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis bong. Carr) and LiDAR analysis. More conventional field methods offer percentage sampling, permitting only a proportion of stands to be surveyed each year and aiming to represent stand-level conditions. The use of LiDAR is advantageous in allowing a complete observation-based assessment throughout the forest and greatly-improved spatial representation of important forest parameters. Time-series analysis was performed using LiDAR data collected in the past 10 years. This analysis allowed us to establish growth trajectories in the forest stands, automatically discriminating areas of growth, those whose growth had been affected by disease and the occurrence of windthrow gaps. The results were compared to the cartography produced by the Forest District after a severe wind storm that affected the area in 2012. This analysis showed the ability of LiDAR to create a more precise location and extent of catastrophic damage and windthrow gaps. In addition, once windthrow has occurred, progression of further damage in existing canopy gaps can be observed. This approach additionally allows the impact of disease on forest growth and subsequent recovery response to be monitored.

  9. 'Dar Kenn Ghal Sahhtek'--an eating disorder and obesity service in Malta.

    PubMed

    Aquilina, Francesca Falzon; Grech, Anton; Zerafa, Darleen; Agius, Mark; Voon, Valerie

    2015-09-01

    This paper will describe the incidence of eating disorders, with particular focus on obesity and binge eating, within the Island of Malta. The development of and 'Dar Kenn Ghal Sahhtek', the first centre for eating disorders in Malta will then be recounted, and the effective therapeutic interventions provided in it will be described. One important function of this unit is the treatment of excessive obesity. Some epidemiological data on the Obese Patients in DKS, relating to the incidence of Binge Eating Disorder in the DKS patient group will be given. This data was collected during a collaboritive research project between the Psychiatry Department of Cambridge University and 'Dar Kenn Ghal Sahhtek'.

  10. Direct injection into the IsoDAR Cyclotron using a RFQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axani, Spencer; IsoDAR Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Beginning in the 1970s, the use of Radio Frequency Quadrupoles (RFQs) has been pervasive in linear accelerators in order to accelerate, bunch, and separate ion species. Current research suggests this may be an ideal way to inject a low energy H2+ beam axially into a cyclotron. The IsoDAR (Isotope Decay At Rest) experiment aims to implement this injection system in order to achieve higher Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) efficiencies and ultimately construct a novel compact neutrino factory to test the hypothesis of sterile neutrinos. This talk will focus on the research and development needed to implement a RFQ into the IsoDAR experiment.

  11. DArT markers: diversity analyses and mapping in Sorghum bicolor

    PubMed Central

    Mace, Emma S; Xia, Ling; Jordan, David R; Halloran, Kirsten; Parh, Dipal K; Huttner, Eric; Wenzl, Peter; Kilian, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    Background The sequential nature of gel-based marker systems entails low throughput and high costs per assay. Commonly used marker systems such as SSR and SNP are also dependent on sequence information. These limitations result in high cost per data point and significantly limit the capacity of breeding programs to obtain sufficient return on investment to justify the routine use of marker-assisted breeding for many traits and particularly quantitative traits. Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT™) is a cost effective hybridisation-based marker technology that offers a high multiplexing level while being independent of sequence information. This technology offers sorghum breeding programs an alternative approach to whole-genome profiling. We report on the development, application, mapping and utility of DArT™ markers for sorghum germplasm. Results A genotyping array was developed representing approximately 12,000 genomic clones using PstI+BanII complexity with a subset of clones obtained through the suppression subtractive hybridisation (SSH) method. The genotyping array was used to analyse a diverse set of sorghum genotypes and screening a Recombinant Inbred Lines (RIL) mapping population. Over 500 markers detected variation among 90 accessions used in a diversity analysis. Cluster analysis discriminated well between all 90 genotypes. To confirm that the sorghum DArT markers behave in a Mendelian manner, we constructed a genetic linkage map for a cross between R931945-2-2 and IS 8525 integrating DArT and other marker types. In total, 596 markers could be placed on the integrated linkage map, which spanned 1431.6 cM. The genetic linkage map had an average marker density of 1/2.39 cM, with an average DArT marker density of 1/3.9 cM. Conclusion We have successfully developed DArT markers for Sorghum bicolor and have demonstrated that DArT provides high quality markers that can be used for diversity analyses and to construct medium-density genetic linkage maps. The

  12. Estimating Evapotranspiration over Heterogeneously Vegetated Surfaces using Large Aperture Scintillometer, LiDAR, and Airborne Multispectral Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geli, H. M.; Neale, C. M.; Pack, R. T.; Watts, D. R.; Osterberg, J.

    2011-12-01

    Estimates of evapotranspiration (ET) over heterogeneous areas is challenging especially in water-limited sparsely vegetated environments. New techniques such as airborne full-waveform LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) and high resolution multispectral and thermal imagery can provide enough detail of sparse canopies to improve energy balance model estimations as well as footprint analysis of scintillometer data. The objectives of this study were to estimate ET over such areas and develop methodologies for the use of these airborne data technologies. Because of the associated heterogeneity, this study was conducted over the Cibola National wildlife refuge, southern California on an area dominated with tamarisk (salt cedar) forest (90%) interspersed with arrowweed and bare soil (10%). A set of two large aperture scintillometers (LASs) were deployed over the area to provide estimates of sensible heat flux (HLAS). The LASs were distributed over the area in a way that allowed capturing different surface spatial heterogeneity. Bowen ratio systems were used to provide hydrometeorological variables and surface energy balance fluxes (SEBF) (i.e. Rn, G, H, and LE) measurements. Scintillometer-based estimates of HLAS were improved by considering the effect of the corresponding 3D footprint and the associated displacement height (d) and the roughness length (z0) following Geli et al. (2011). The LiDAR data were acquired using the LASSI Lidar developed at Utah State University (USU). The data was used to obtain 1-m spatial resolution DEM's and vegetation canopy height to improve the HLAS estimates. The BR measurements of Rn and G were combined with LAS estimates, HLAS, to provide estimates of LELASas a residual of the energy balance equation. A thermal remote sensing model namely the two source energy balance (TSEB) of Norman et al. (1995) was applied to provide spatial estimates of SEBF. Four airborne images at 1-4 meter spatial resolution acquired using the USU airborne

  13. Climate change induced heat wave hazard in eastern Africa: Dar Es Salaam (Tanzania) and Addis Ababa (Ethiopia) case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capuano, Paolo; Sellerino, Mariangela; Di Ruocco, Angela; Kombe, Wilbard; Yeshitela, Kumelachew

    2013-04-01

    Last decades, new records were set in the world for tornadoes, drought, wind, floods, wildfires and hot temperatures, testifying unusual weather and climate patterns with increasing frequency and intensity of extreme weather events. Extreme heat events are natural hazards affecting many regions in the world, nevertheless limited work has been done on the analysis and effects of extreme heat events in Africa, that is considered a continent particularly vulnerable to the effects of climate change. In fact, the increase of temperature expected in the African continent during the 21st century is larger than the global mean warming, being about 3° to 4° C, about 1.5 times the global temperature increase (Christensen et al., 2007; Gualdi et al., 2012), with the subtropical regions projected to warm more than the tropical regions. Observations and downscaled model simulations (RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 IPCC scenarios) are analyzed to describe heat wave characteristics in Dar es Salaam (Tanzania) and Addis Ababa (Ethiopia), spanning the last five decades as well as that projected for the 21st century. Observed data are daily maximum and minimum temperature collected in the period 1961-2011; downscaled model simulations span up to 2050. Heat waves are defined following a peak over threshold approach by statistical comparison to historical meteorological baselines (site dependent), using a fixed absolute threshold. Projected future warming in the Dar es Salaam and Addis Ababa shows a further increase in the heat waves parameters. Heat wave duration and hot days number are strictly correlated showing that the temperature rise could generate not only an increase of heat waves number but mainly a longer average duration, that can strongly affect the resilience capacity of the population, particularly the elder people. In fact, the impacts of heat waves on the society are determined also by temporal duration (Stephenson, 2008), in addition to their frequency, in fact the capacity of

  14. Visualization of High-Resolution LiDAR Topography in Google Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosby, C. J.; Nandigam, V.; Arrowsmith, R.; Blair, J. L.

    2009-12-01

    The growing availability of high-resolution LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) topographic data has proven to be revolutionary for Earth science research. These data allow scientists to study the processes acting on the Earth’s surfaces at resolutions not previously possible yet essential for their appropriate representation. In addition to their utility for research, the data have also been recognized as powerful tools for communicating earth science concepts for education and outreach purposes. Unfortunately, the massive volume of data produced by LiDAR mapping technology can be a barrier to their use. To facilitate access to these powerful data for research and educational purposes, we have been exploring the use of Keyhole Markup Language (KML) and Google Earth to deliver LiDAR-derived visualizations. The OpenTopography Portal (http://www.opentopography.org/) is a National Science Foundation-funded facility designed to provide access to Earth science-oriented LiDAR data. OpenTopography hosts a growing collection of LiDAR data for a variety of geologic domains, including many of the active faults in the western United States. We have found that the wide spectrum of LiDAR users have variable scientific applications, computing resources, and technical experience and thus require a data distribution system that provides various levels of access to the data. For users seeking a synoptic view of the data, and for education and outreach purposes, delivering full-resolution images derived from LiDAR topography into the Google Earth virtual globe is powerful. The virtual globe environment provides a freely available and easily navigated viewer and enables quick integration of the LiDAR visualizations with imagery, geographic layers, and other relevant data available in KML format. Through region-dependant network linked KML, OpenTopography currently delivers over 20 GB of LiDAR-derived imagery to users via simple, easily downloaded KMZ files hosted at the Portal

  15. Validating LiDAR Derived Estimates of Canopy Height, Structure and Fractional Cover in Riparian Areas: A Comparison of Leaf-on and Leaf-off LiDAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasser, L. A.; Chasmer, L. E.; Taylor, A.; Day, R.

    2010-12-01

    Characterization of riparian buffers is integral to understanding the landscape scale impacts of disturbance on wildlife and aquatic ecosystems. Riparian buffers may be characterized using in situ plot sampling or via high resolution remote sensing. Field measurements are time-consuming and may not cover a broad range of ecosystem types. Further, spectral remote sensing methods introduce a compromise between spatial resolution (grain) and area extent. Airborne LiDAR can be used to continuously map and characterize riparian vegetation structure and composition due to the three-dimensional reflectance of laser pulses within and below the canopy, understory and at the ground surface. The distance between reflections (or ‘returns’) allows for detection of narrow buffer corridors at the landscape scale. There is a need to compare leaf-off and leaf-on surveyed LiDAR data with in situ measurements to assess accuracy in landscape scale analysis. These comparisons are particularly important considering increased availability of leaf-off surveyed LiDAR datasets. And given this increased availability, differences between leaf-on and leaf-off derived LiDAR metrics are largely unknown for riparian vegetation of varying composition and structure. This study compares the effectiveness of leaf-on and leaf-off LiDAR in characterizing riparian buffers of varying structure and composition as compared to field measurements. Field measurements were used to validate LiDAR derived metrics. Vegetation height, canopy cover, density and overstory and understory species composition were recorded in 80 random plots of varying vegetation type, density and structure within a Pennsylvania watershed (-77.841, 40.818). Plot data were compared with LiDAR data collected during leaf on and leaf off conditions to determine 1) accuracy of LiDAR derived metrics compared to field measures and 2) differences between leaf-on and leaf-off LiDAR metrics. Results illustrate that differences exist between

  16. Urban morphological determinants of temperature regulating ecosystem services in African cities: the case of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavan, Gina; Lindley, Sarah; Kibassa, Deusdedit; Shemdoe, Riziki; Capuano, Paolo; De Paola, Francesco; Renner, Florian; Pauleit, Stephan

    2013-04-01

    Urban green structure provides important regulating ecosystem services, such as temperature and flood regulation, and thus, has the potential to increase the resilience of African cities to climate change. Green structures within urban areas are not only limited to discrete units associated with recreational parks, agricultural areas and open spaces: they also exist within zones which have other primary functions, such as church yards, along transport routes, and within residential areas. Differing characteristics of urban areas can be conceptualised and subsequently mapped through the idea of urban morphology types. Urban morphology types are classifications which combine facets of urban form and function. When mapped, UMT units provide biophysically relevant meso-scale geographical zones which can be used as the basis for understanding climate-related impacts and adaptations. For example, they support the assessment of urban temperature patterns and the temperature regulating services provided by urban green structures. There are some examples of the use of UMTs for assessing regulating ecosystem services in European cities but little similar knowledge is available in an African context. This paper outlines the concept of urban morphology types (UMTs) and how they were applied to African case study cities (Cavan et al., 2012). It then presents the methods used to understand temperature regulating ecosystem services across an example African case study city, including (i) a GIS-based assessment of urban green structures, and (ii) applying an energy balance model to estimate current and future surface temperatures under climate change projections. The assessment is carried out for Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Existing evidence suggests increases in both mean and extreme temperatures in the city. Historical analysis of the number of hot days per year suggests a rise from a maximum of 47 days per year in the period 1961-87 to 72 days per year in 2003-2011 (Giugni et al

  17. Erosion in vineyards and LiDAR: new opportunities for anthropogenic terraced landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarolli, Paolo; Sofia, Giulia; Calligaro, Simone; Prosdocimi, Massimo; Preti, Federico; Dalla Fontana, Giancarlo

    2014-05-01

    Vineyard landscapes are a relevant part of the European cultivated land, and several authors concluded that they are the agricultural practice that causes the highest soil loss. Since grape quality depends on the availability of water for the vineyards, and since soil erosion is an important parameter dictating the sustainability of vineyards, soil and water conservation are often implemented. The most widely used measure for soil conservation for vineyards in hilly/mountainous landscapes is terracing. However, while improving vineyards stability, the same changes in hillslope hydrology caused by these anthropogenic structures to favor agricultural activities, often result in situations that may lead to local instabilities. Terraces, in fact, when not properly maintained can create hazards for people and settlements, but also for cultivations and for the related economy. Agricultural roads also serve terraced lands, and the construction of these types of anthropogenic features can have deep effects on water flows, in a way similar to the one already registered for forest roads. The goal of this research is to use LiDAR data for the high-resolution hydro-geomorphological analysis of vineyards, underlining the capability of high-resolution topography to provide new tools for a correct management of vineyards terraced landscapes. The work focus on terraced- and road-induced erosion, and it considers a methodology successfully applied to a different environmental context (the RPII index, Tarolli et al. 2013). The index is applied to two study areas, located in the center of Italy, where soil erosion and terrace failures represent a critical issue. The results highlight the effectiveness of high-resolution topography in the analysis of surface erosion, thus providing useful tool to schedule a suitable environmental planning for a sustainable development, and so, to mitigate the consequences of the anthropogenic alterations induced by the terraces structures and

  18. Airborne hyperspectral and LiDAR data integration for weed detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamás, János; Lehoczky, Éva; Fehér, János; Fórián, Tünde; Nagy, Attila; Bozsik, Éva; Gálya, Bernadett; Riczu, Péter

    2014-05-01

    Agriculture uses 70% of global available fresh water. However, ca. 50-70% of water used by cultivated plants, the rest of water transpirated by the weeds. Thus, to define the distribution of weeds is very important in precision agriculture and horticulture as well. To survey weeds on larger fields by traditional methods is often time consuming. Remote sensing instruments are useful to detect weeds in larger area. In our investigation a 3D airborne laser scanner (RIEGL LMS-Q680i) was used in agricultural field near Sopron to scouting weeds. Beside the airborne LiDAR, hyperspectral imaging system (AISA DUAL) and air photos helped to investigate weed coverage. The LiDAR survey was carried out at early April, 2012, before sprouting of cultivated plants. Thus, there could be detected emerging of weeds and direction of cultivation. However airborne LiDAR system was ideal to detect weeds, identification of weeds at species level was infeasible. Higher point density LiDAR - Terrestrial laser scanning - systems are appropriate to distinguish weed species. Based on the results, laser scanner is an effective tool to scouting of weeds. Appropriate weed detection and mapping systems could contribute to elaborate water and herbicide saving management technique. This publication was supported by the OTKA project K 105789.

  19. Hyperspectral and LiDAR remote sensing of fire fuels in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park.

    PubMed

    Varga, Timothy A; Asner, Gregory P

    2008-04-01

    Alien invasive grasses threaten to transform Hawaiian ecosystems through the alteration of ecosystem dynamics, especially the creation or intensification of a fire cycle. Across sub-montane ecosystems of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park on Hawaii Island, we quantified fine fuels and fire spread potential of invasive grasses using a combination of airborne hyperspectral and light detection and ranging (LiDAR) measurements. Across a gradient from forest to savanna to shrubland, automated mixture analysis of hyperspectral data provided spatially explicit fractional cover estimates of photosynthetic vegetation, non-photosynthetic vegetation, and bare substrate and shade. Small-footprint LiDAR provided measurements of vegetation height along this gradient of ecosystems. Through the fusion of hyperspectral and LiDAR data, a new fire fuel index (FFI) was developed to model the three-dimensional volume of grass fuels. Regionally, savanna ecosystems had the highest volumes of fire fuels, averaging 20% across the ecosystem and frequently filling all of the three-dimensional space represented by each image pixel. The forest and shrubland ecosystems had lower FFI values, averaging 4.4% and 8.4%, respectively. The results indicate that the fusion of hyperspectral and LiDAR remote sensing can provide unique information on the three-dimensional properties of ecosystems, their flammability, and the potential for fire spread.

  20. Geospatial revolution and remote sensing LiDAR in Mesoamerican archaeology

    PubMed Central

    Chase, Arlen F.; Fisher, Christopher T.; Leisz, Stephen J.; Weishampel, John F.

    2012-01-01

    The application of light detection and ranging (LiDAR), a laser-based remote-sensing technology that is capable of penetrating overlying vegetation and forest canopies, is generating a fundamental shift in Mesoamerican archaeology and has the potential to transform research in forested areas world-wide. Much as radiocarbon dating that half a century ago moved archaeology forward by grounding archaeological remains in time, LiDAR is proving to be a catalyst for an improved spatial understanding of the past. With LiDAR, ancient societies can be contextualized within a fully defined landscape. Interpretations about the scale and organization of densely forested sites no longer are constrained by sample size, as they were when mapping required laborious on-ground survey. The ability to articulate ancient landscapes fully permits a better understanding of the complexity of ancient Mesoamerican urbanism and also aids in modern conservation efforts. The importance of this geospatial innovation is demonstrated with newly acquired LiDAR data from the archaeological sites of Caracol, Cayo, Belize and Angamuco, Michoacán, Mexico. These data illustrate the potential of technology to act as a catalytic enabler of rapid transformational change in archaeological research and interpretation and also underscore the value of on-the-ground archaeological investigation in validating and contextualizing results. PMID:22802623

  1. Geospatial revolution and remote sensing LiDAR in Mesoamerican archaeology.

    PubMed

    Chase, Arlen F; Chase, Diane Z; Fisher, Christopher T; Leisz, Stephen J; Weishampel, John F

    2012-08-01

    The application of light detection and ranging (LiDAR), a laser-based remote-sensing technology that is capable of penetrating overlying vegetation and forest canopies, is generating a fundamental shift in Mesoamerican archaeology and has the potential to transform research in forested areas world-wide. Much as radiocarbon dating that half a century ago moved archaeology forward by grounding archaeological remains in time, LiDAR is proving to be a catalyst for an improved spatial understanding of the past. With LiDAR, ancient societies can be contextualized within a fully defined landscape. Interpretations about the scale and organization of densely forested sites no longer are constrained by sample size, as they were when mapping required laborious on-ground survey. The ability to articulate ancient landscapes fully permits a better understanding of the complexity of ancient Mesoamerican urbanism and also aids in modern conservation efforts. The importance of this geospatial innovation is demonstrated with newly acquired LiDAR data from the archaeological sites of Caracol, Cayo, Belize and Angamuco, Michoacán, Mexico. These data illustrate the potential of technology to act as a catalytic enabler of rapid transformational change in archaeological research and interpretation and also underscore the value of on-the-ground archaeological investigation in validating and contextualizing results.

  2. How Children Living in Poor Areas of Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania Perceive Their Own Multiple Intelligences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Pauline; Humble, Steve; Chan, David W.

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out with 1,857 poor children from 17 schools, living in low-income areas of Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania. All children took the "Student Multiple Intelligences Profile" (SMIP) questionnaire as part of a bigger project that gathered data around concepts and beliefs of talent. This paper sets out two aims, first to…

  3. Child Labour in Urban Agriculture: The Case of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mlozi, Malongo R. S.

    1995-01-01

    Urban agriculture in Dar es Salaam was found to use child labor of both children with parents of higher and lower socioeconomic status (SES). Discusses policy implications and calls for the education of parents of lower SES not to expect an economic contribution from their children's labor, and the education of children about their rights. (LZ)

  4. Registration of optical imagery and LiDAR data using an inherent geometrical constraint.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wuming; Zhao, Jing; Chen, Mei; Chen, Yiming; Yan, Kai; Li, Linyuan; Qi, Jianbo; Wang, Xiaoyan; Luo, Jinghui; Chu, Qing

    2015-03-23

    A novel method for registering imagery with Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) data is proposed. It is based on the phenomenon that the back-projection of LiDAR point cloud of an object should be located within the object boundary in the image. Using this inherent geometrical constraint, the registration parameters computation of both data sets only requires LiDAR point clouds of several objects and their corresponding boundaries in the image. The proposed registration method comprises of four steps: point clouds extraction, boundary extraction, back-projection computation and registration parameters computation. There are not any limitations on the geometrical and spectral properties of the object. So it is suitable not only for structured scenes with man-made objects but also for natural scenes. Moreover, the proposed method based on the inherent geometrical constraint can register two data sets derived from different parts of an object. It can be used to co-register TLS (Terrestrial Laser Scanning) LiDAR point cloud and UAV (Unmanned aerial vehicle) image, which are obtaining more attention in the forest survey application. Using initial registration parameters comparable to POS (position and orientation system) accuracy, the performed experiments validated the feasibility of the proposed registration method.

  5. Integrating ICT into Teaching and Learning at the University of Dar es Salaam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mtebe, Joel S.; Dachi, Hilary; Raphael, Christina

    2011-01-01

    Since 1985, Tanzania has been undergoing significant political and economic changes from a centralized to a more market-oriented and globally connected economy. The University of Dar es Salaam (UDSM) has responded to these changes by reviewing its legal status, vision, and functions, particularly those related to research, teaching, and public…

  6. a Data Driven Method for Building Reconstruction from LiDAR Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajadian, M.; Arefi, H.

    2014-10-01

    Airborne laser scanning, commonly referred to as LiDAR, is a superior technology for three-dimensional data acquisition from Earth's surface with high speed and density. Building reconstruction is one of the main applications of LiDAR system which is considered in this study. For a 3D reconstruction of the buildings, the buildings points should be first separated from the other points such as; ground and vegetation. In this paper, a multi-agent strategy has been proposed for simultaneous extraction and segmentation of buildings from LiDAR point clouds. Height values, number of returned pulse, length of triangles, direction of normal vectors, and area are five criteria which have been utilized in this step. Next, the building edge points are detected using a new method named "Grid Erosion". A RANSAC based technique has been employed for edge line extraction. Regularization constraints are performed to achieve the final lines. Finally, by modelling of the roofs and walls, 3D building model is reconstructed. The results indicate that the proposed method could successfully extract the building from LiDAR data and generate the building models automatically. A qualitative and quantitative assessment of the proposed method is then provided.

  7. Genetics and Human Agency: Comment on Dar-Nimrod and Heine (2011)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turkheimer, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Dar-Nimrod and Heine (2011) decried genetic essentialism without denying the importance of genetics in the genesis of human behavior, and although I agree on both counts, a deeper issue remains unaddressed: how should we adjust our cognitions about our own behavior in light of genetic influence, or is it perhaps not necessary to take genetics into…

  8. Genetic Essentialism, Neuroessentialism, and Stigma: Commentary on Dar-Nimrod and Heine (2011)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haslam, Nick

    2011-01-01

    Dar-Nimrod and Heine (2011) presented a masterfully broad review of the implications of genetic essentialism for understandings of human diversity. This commentary clarifies the reasons that essentialist thinking has problematic social consequences and links genetic forms of essentialism to those invoking neural essences. The mounting evidence…

  9. The Effect of Lava Texture on LiDAR Attributes and Full Waveform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, S. W.; Finnegan, D. C.; LeWinter, A.

    2013-12-01

    The distribution of glassy, vesicular, and crystalline textures on lava flow and dome surfaces provides insights regarding the physical and chemical processes occurring during emplacement. For silicic flows, these textures may reflect variations in the volatile content of lava upon eruption. To assess the efficacy of texture detection with our terrestrial full waveform LiDAR system capable of measuring ~125,000 topographic points/second, we analyzed attribute and full waveform data from a variety of lava textures displayed on recent rhyolitic obsidian flows of the Inyo Dome chain (California) and pahoehoe and aa flows at Kilauea volcano (Hawaii). We find that attributes such as intensity, amplitude and deviation of the returned 1550nm laser pulse fall into discrete ranges associated with glassy, pumiceous and crystalline textures on both the rhyolitic and basaltic surfaces. This enables detection of vesicularity at ranges in excess of 500 m, making LiDAR a useful tool for remotely determining lava texture. Scan times using our Riegl VZ1000 and VZ400 systems require only minutes, allowing for repeated scans over a short time period, and processing times are <1 hour. We have also analyzed the full digitized waveforms of LiDAR pulses returned from these surfaces, and find that they also have unique signatures related to texture. We therefore suggest that LiDAR can provide reliable information on lava texture during eruption, aiding in the interpretation of eruption hazards from increasing volatile contents.

  10. Pit latrine emptying behavior and demand for sanitation services in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Marion W; Cumming, Oliver; Cairncross, Sandy

    2015-02-27

    Pit latrines are the main form of sanitation in unplanned areas in many rapidly growing developing cities. Understanding demand for pit latrine fecal sludge management (FSM) services in these communities is important for designing demand-responsive sanitation services and policies to improve public health. We examine latrine emptying knowledge, attitudes, behavior, trends and rates of safe/unsafe emptying, and measure demand for a new hygienic latrine emptying service in unplanned communities in Dar Es Salaam (Dar), Tanzania, using data from a cross-sectional survey at 662 residential properties in 35 unplanned sub-wards across Dar, where 97% had pit latrines. A picture emerges of expensive and poor FSM service options for latrine owners, resulting in widespread fecal sludge exposure that is likely to increase unless addressed. Households delay emptying as long as possible, use full pits beyond what is safe, face high costs even for unhygienic emptying, and resort to unsafe practices like 'flooding out'. We measured strong interest in and willingness to pay (WTP) for the new pit emptying service at 96% of residences; 57% were WTP≥U.S. $17 to remove ≥200 L of sludge. Emerging policy recommendations for safe FSM in unplanned urban communities in Dar and elsewhere are discussed.

  11. Spatial Patterns of Trees from Airborne LiDAR Using a Simple Tree Segmentation Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeronimo, S.; Kane, V. R.; McGaughey, R. J.; Franklin, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    Objectives for management of forest ecosystems on public land incorporate a focus on maintenance and restoration of ecological functions through silvicultural manipulation of forest structure. The spatial pattern of residual trees - the horizontal element of structure - is a key component of ecological restoration prescriptions. We tested the ability of a simple LiDAR individual tree segmentation method - the watershed transform - to generate spatial pattern metrics similar to those obtained by the traditional method - ground-based stem mapping - on forested plots representing the structural diversity of a large wilderness area (Yosemite NP) and a large managed area (Sierra NF) in the Sierra Nevada, Calif. Most understory and intermediate-canopy trees were not detected by the LiDAR segmentation; however, LiDAR- and field-based assessments of spatial pattern in terms of tree clump size distributions largely agreed. This suggests that (1) even when individual tree segmentation is not effective for tree density estimates, it can provide a good measurement of tree spatial pattern, and (2) a simple segmentation method is adequate to measure spatial pattern of large areas with a diversity of structural characteristics. These results lay the groundwork for a LiDAR tool to assess clumping patterns across forest landscapes in support of restoration silviculture. This tool could describe spatial patterns of functionally intact reference ecosystems, measure departure from reference targets in treatment areas, and, with successive acquisitions, monitor treatment efficacy.

  12. High-throughput genotyping of hop (Humulus lupulus L.) utilising diversity arrays technology (DArT).

    PubMed

    Howard, E L; Whittock, S P; Jakše, J; Carling, J; Matthews, P D; Probasco, G; Henning, J A; Darby, P; Cerenak, A; Javornik, B; Kilian, A; Koutoulis, A

    2011-05-01

    Implementation of molecular methods in hop (Humulus lupulus L.) breeding is dependent on the availability of sizeable numbers of polymorphic markers and a comprehensive understanding of genetic variation. However, use of molecular marker technology is limited due to expense, time inefficiency, laborious methodology and dependence on DNA sequence information. Diversity arrays technology (DArT) is a high-throughput cost-effective method for the discovery of large numbers of quality polymorphic markers without reliance on DNA sequence information. This study is the first to utilise DArT for hop genotyping, identifying 730 polymorphic markers from 92 hop accessions. The marker quality was high and similar to the quality of DArT markers previously generated for other species; although percentage polymorphism and polymorphism information content (PIC) were lower than in previous studies deploying other marker systems in hop. Genetic relationships in hop illustrated by DArT in this study coincide with knowledge generated using alternate methods. Several statistical analyses separated the hop accessions into genetically differentiated North American and European groupings, with hybrids between the two groups clearly distinguishable. Levels of genetic diversity were similar in the North American and European groups, but higher in the hybrid group. The markers produced from this time and cost-efficient genotyping tool will be a valuable resource for numerous applications in hop breeding and genetics studies, such as mapping, marker-assisted selection, genetic identity testing, guidance in the maintenance of genetic diversity and the directed breeding of superior cultivars. PMID:21243330

  13. High-throughput genotyping of hop (Humulus lupulus L.) utilising diversity arrays technology (DArT)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Implementation of molecular methods in hop breeding is dependent on the availability of sizeable numbers of polymorphic markers and a comprehensive understanding of genetic variation. Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT) is a high-throughput cost-effective method for the discovery of large numbers of...

  14. Hyperspectral and LiDAR remote sensing of fire fuels in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park.

    PubMed

    Varga, Timothy A; Asner, Gregory P

    2008-04-01

    Alien invasive grasses threaten to transform Hawaiian ecosystems through the alteration of ecosystem dynamics, especially the creation or intensification of a fire cycle. Across sub-montane ecosystems of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park on Hawaii Island, we quantified fine fuels and fire spread potential of invasive grasses using a combination of airborne hyperspectral and light detection and ranging (LiDAR) measurements. Across a gradient from forest to savanna to shrubland, automated mixture analysis of hyperspectral data provided spatially explicit fractional cover estimates of photosynthetic vegetation, non-photosynthetic vegetation, and bare substrate and shade. Small-footprint LiDAR provided measurements of vegetation height along this gradient of ecosystems. Through the fusion of hyperspectral and LiDAR data, a new fire fuel index (FFI) was developed to model the three-dimensional volume of grass fuels. Regionally, savanna ecosystems had the highest volumes of fire fuels, averaging 20% across the ecosystem and frequently filling all of the three-dimensional space represented by each image pixel. The forest and shrubland ecosystems had lower FFI values, averaging 4.4% and 8.4%, respectively. The results indicate that the fusion of hyperspectral and LiDAR remote sensing can provide unique information on the three-dimensional properties of ecosystems, their flammability, and the potential for fire spread. PMID:18488621

  15. Biomass estimation of Douglas fir stands using airborne LiDAR data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biomass is an important parameter not only for carbon cycle modeling, but also for supporting land management operations (e.g. land use policy, forest fire management). Various remote sensing data have been utilized for biomass estimation, especially in forested areas. LiDAR (Light Detection And Ran...

  16. Students' Experiences and Challenges of Blended Learning at the University of Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mtebe, Joel S.; Raphael, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments in Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs), especially eLearning, have heightened the need for University of Dar es Salaam (UDSM) to supplement on-campus face-to-face delivery as well as meeting increased students' enrolments through blended distance learning. Since 2008, the University has been offering three…

  17. Pit Latrine Emptying Behavior and Demand for Sanitation Services in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Marion W.; Cumming, Oliver; Cairncross, Sandy

    2015-01-01

    Pit latrines are the main form of sanitation in unplanned areas in many rapidly growing developing cities. Understanding demand for pit latrine fecal sludge management (FSM) services in these communities is important for designing demand-responsive sanitation services and policies to improve public health. We examine latrine emptying knowledge, attitudes, behavior, trends and rates of safe/unsafe emptying, and measure demand for a new hygienic latrine emptying service in unplanned communities in Dar Es Salaam (Dar), Tanzania, using data from a cross-sectional survey at 662 residential properties in 35 unplanned sub-wards across Dar, where 97% had pit latrines. A picture emerges of expensive and poor FSM service options for latrine owners, resulting in widespread fecal sludge exposure that is likely to increase unless addressed. Households delay emptying as long as possible, use full pits beyond what is safe, face high costs even for unhygienic emptying, and resort to unsafe practices like ‘flooding out’. We measured strong interest in and willingness to pay (WTP) for the new pit emptying service at 96% of residences; 57% were WTP ≥U.S. $17 to remove ≥200 L of sludge. Emerging policy recommendations for safe FSM in unplanned urban communities in Dar and elsewhere are discussed. PMID:25734790

  18. Mapping of post-event earthquake induced landslides in Sg. Mesilou using LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanan Mat Yusoff, Habibah; Azahari Razak, Khamarrul; Yuen, Florence; Harun, Afifi; Talib, Jasmi; Mohamad, Zakaria; Ramli, Zamri; Abd Razab, Razain

    2016-06-01

    Earthquake is a common natural disaster in active tectonic regions. The disaster can induce cascading disasters such as debris flow, mudflow and reactivated old landslides. M 6.0 Ranau earthquake dated on June 05, 2015 coupling with intense and prolonged rainfall caused several mass movements such as debris flow, deep-seated and shallow landslides in Mesilou, Sabah. This study aims at providing a better insight into the use of advanced LiDAR mapping technology for recognizing landslide induced by earthquakes particularly in a vegetated terrain, assessing post event hazard and analyzing its distribution for hazard zonation. We developed the landslide inventory using LiDAR-derived visual analysis method and validated in the field. A landslide inventory map improved with the support of LiDAR derivative data. Finally, landslide inventory was analysed by emphasizing its distribution and density in such a way that it provides clues of risky zone as a result of debris flow. We recommend that mitigation action and risk reduction should be taken place at a transport zone of the channel compared to other zones. This study indicates that modern airborne LiDAR can be a good complementary tool for improving landslide inventory in a complex environment, and an effective tool for rapid regional hazard and risk assessment in the tropics.

  19. Registration of optical imagery and LiDAR data using an inherent geometrical constraint.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wuming; Zhao, Jing; Chen, Mei; Chen, Yiming; Yan, Kai; Li, Linyuan; Qi, Jianbo; Wang, Xiaoyan; Luo, Jinghui; Chu, Qing

    2015-03-23

    A novel method for registering imagery with Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) data is proposed. It is based on the phenomenon that the back-projection of LiDAR point cloud of an object should be located within the object boundary in the image. Using this inherent geometrical constraint, the registration parameters computation of both data sets only requires LiDAR point clouds of several objects and their corresponding boundaries in the image. The proposed registration method comprises of four steps: point clouds extraction, boundary extraction, back-projection computation and registration parameters computation. There are not any limitations on the geometrical and spectral properties of the object. So it is suitable not only for structured scenes with man-made objects but also for natural scenes. Moreover, the proposed method based on the inherent geometrical constraint can register two data sets derived from different parts of an object. It can be used to co-register TLS (Terrestrial Laser Scanning) LiDAR point cloud and UAV (Unmanned aerial vehicle) image, which are obtaining more attention in the forest survey application. Using initial registration parameters comparable to POS (position and orientation system) accuracy, the performed experiments validated the feasibility of the proposed registration method. PMID:25837107

  20. Clinical, Virologic, and Epidemiologic Characteristics of Dengue Outbreak, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Mboera, Leonard E.G.; De Nardo, Pasquale; Oriyo, Ndekya M.; Meschi, Silvia; Rumisha, Susan F.; Colavita, Francesca; Mhina, Athanas; Carletti, Fabrizio; Mwakapeje, Elibariki; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria; Castilletti, Concetta; Di Caro, Antonino; Nicastri, Emanuele; Malecela, Mwelecele N.; Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    We investigated a dengue outbreak in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, in 2014, that was caused by dengue virus (DENV) serotype 2. DENV infection was present in 101 (20.9%) of 483 patients. Patient age and location of residence were associated with infection. Seven (4.0%) of 176 patients were co-infected with malaria and DENV. PMID:27088845

  1. Development of DArT-based PCR markers for selecting drought-tolerant spring barley.

    PubMed

    Fiust, Anna; Rapacz, Marcin; Wójcik-Jagła, Magdalena; Tyrka, Mirosław

    2015-08-01

    The tolerance of spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) cultivars to spring drought is an important agronomic trait affecting crop yield and quality in Poland. Therefore, breeders require new molecular markers to select plants with lower spring drought susceptibility. With the advent of genomic selection technology, simple molecular tools may still be applicable to screen material for markers of the most important traits and in-depth genome scanning. In previous studies, diversity arrays technology (DArT)-based genetic maps were constructed for F2 populations of Polish fodder and malt barley elite breeding lines, and 15 and 18 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) related to spring drought tolerance were identified, respectively. In this paper, we show the results of a conversion of 30 DArT markers corresponding to 11 QTLs into simple sequence repeat (SSR) and sequence tagged site (STS) markers. Twenty-two polymorphic markers were obtained, including 13 DArT-based SSRs. Additionally, 31 SSR markers, located in close proximity to the DArT markers, were selected from the GrainGenes database and tested. Further analyses of 24 advanced breeding lines with different drought tolerances confirmed that five out of the 30 converted markers, as well as three out of the 31 additional SSR markers, were effective in marker-assisted selection for drought tolerance. The possible function of clones related to these markers in drought tolerance is discussed. PMID:25716655

  2. Using satellite and airborne LiDAR to model woodpecker habitat occupancy at the landscape scale.

    PubMed

    Vierling, Lee A; Vierling, Kerri T; Adam, Patrick; Hudak, Andrew T

    2013-01-01

    Incorporating vertical vegetation structure into models of animal distributions can improve understanding of the patterns and processes governing habitat selection. LiDAR can provide such structural information, but these data are typically collected via aircraft and thus are limited in spatial extent. Our objective was to explore the utility of satellite-based LiDAR data from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) relative to airborne-based LiDAR to model the north Idaho breeding distribution of a forest-dependent ecosystem engineer, the Red-naped sapsucker (Sphyrapicus nuchalis). GLAS data occurred within ca. 64 m diameter ellipses spaced a minimum of 172 m apart, and all occupancy analyses were confined to this grain scale. Using a hierarchical approach, we modeled Red-naped sapsucker occupancy as a function of LiDAR metrics derived from both platforms. Occupancy models based on satellite data were weak, possibly because the data within the GLAS ellipse did not fully represent habitat characteristics important for this species. The most important structural variables influencing Red-naped Sapsucker breeding site selection based on airborne LiDAR data included foliage height diversity, the distance between major strata in the canopy vertical profile, and the vegetation density near the ground. These characteristics are consistent with the diversity of foraging activities exhibited by this species. To our knowledge, this study represents the first to examine the utility of satellite-based LiDAR to model animal distributions. The large area of each GLAS ellipse and the non-contiguous nature of GLAS data may pose significant challenges for wildlife distribution modeling; nevertheless these data can provide useful information on ecosystem vertical structure, particularly in areas of gentle terrain. Additional work is thus warranted to utilize LiDAR datasets collected from both airborne and past and future satellite platforms (e.g. GLAS, and the planned IceSAT2

  3. Using Satellite and Airborne LiDAR to Model Woodpecker Habitat Occupancy at the Landscape Scale

    PubMed Central

    Vierling, Lee A.; Vierling, Kerri T.; Adam, Patrick; Hudak, Andrew T.

    2013-01-01

    Incorporating vertical vegetation structure into models of animal distributions can improve understanding of the patterns and processes governing habitat selection. LiDAR can provide such structural information, but these data are typically collected via aircraft and thus are limited in spatial extent. Our objective was to explore the utility of satellite-based LiDAR data from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) relative to airborne-based LiDAR to model the north Idaho breeding distribution of a forest-dependent ecosystem engineer, the Red-naped sapsucker (Sphyrapicus nuchalis). GLAS data occurred within ca. 64 m diameter ellipses spaced a minimum of 172 m apart, and all occupancy analyses were confined to this grain scale. Using a hierarchical approach, we modeled Red-naped sapsucker occupancy as a function of LiDAR metrics derived from both platforms. Occupancy models based on satellite data were weak, possibly because the data within the GLAS ellipse did not fully represent habitat characteristics important for this species. The most important structural variables influencing Red-naped Sapsucker breeding site selection based on airborne LiDAR data included foliage height diversity, the distance between major strata in the canopy vertical profile, and the vegetation density near the ground. These characteristics are consistent with the diversity of foraging activities exhibited by this species. To our knowledge, this study represents the first to examine the utility of satellite-based LiDAR to model animal distributions. The large area of each GLAS ellipse and the non-contiguous nature of GLAS data may pose significant challenges for wildlife distribution modeling; nevertheless these data can provide useful information on ecosystem vertical structure, particularly in areas of gentle terrain. Additional work is thus warranted to utilize LiDAR datasets collected from both airborne and past and future satellite platforms (e.g. GLAS, and the planned IceSAT2

  4. Application of LiDAR to hydrologic flux estimation in Australian eucalypt forests (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, P. N.; Mitchell, P. J.; Jaskierniak, D.; Hawthorne, S. N.; Griebel, A.

    2013-12-01

    The potential of LiDAR in ecohydrology is significant as characterising catchment vegetation is crucial to accurate estimation of evapotranspiration (ET). While this may be done at large scales for model parameterisation, stand-scale applications are equally appropriate where traditional methods of measurement of LAI or sapwood areas are time consuming and reliant on assumptions of representative sampling. This is particularly challenging in mountain forests where aspect, soil properties and energy budgets can vary significantly, reflected in the vegetation or where there are changes in the spatial distribution of structural attributes following disturbance. Recent research has investigated the spatial distribution of ET in a eucalypt forest in SE Australia using plot-scale sapflow, interception and forest floor ET measurements. LiDAR was used scale up these measurements. LiDAR (0.16 m scanner footprint) canopy indices were correlated via stepwise regression with 4 water use scalars: basal area (BA), sapwood area (SA), leaf area index (LAI) and canopy coverage (C), with Hmed, Hmean, H80, H95 the best predictors. Combining these indices with empirical relationships between SA and BA, and SA and transpiration (T), and inventory plot 'ground truthing' transpiration was estimated across the 1.3 km2 catchment. Interception was scaled via the Gash model with LiDAR derived inputs. The up-scaling showed a significant variability in the spatial distribution of ET, related to the distribution of SA. The use of LiDAR meant scaling could be achieved at an appropriate spatial scale (20 x 20 m) to the measurements. The second example is the use of airborne LiDAR in developing growth forest models for hydrologic modeling. LiDAR indices were used to stratify multilayered forests using mixed-effect models with a wide range of theoretical distribution functions. When combined with historical plot-scale inventory data we show demonstrated improved growth modeling over traditional

  5. A universal airborne LiDAR approach for tropical forest carbon mapping.

    PubMed

    Asner, Gregory P; Mascaro, Joseph; Muller-Landau, Helene C; Vieilledent, Ghislain; Vaudry, Romuald; Rasamoelina, Maminiaina; Hall, Jefferson S; van Breugel, Michiel

    2012-04-01

    Airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) is fast turning the corner from demonstration technology to a key tool for assessing carbon stocks in tropical forests. With its ability to penetrate tropical forest canopies and detect three-dimensional forest structure, LiDAR may prove to be a major component of international strategies to measure and account for carbon emissions from and uptake by tropical forests. To date, however, basic ecological information such as height-diameter allometry and stand-level wood density have not been mechanistically incorporated into methods for mapping forest carbon at regional and global scales. A better incorporation of these structural patterns in forests may reduce the considerable time needed to calibrate airborne data with ground-based forest inventory plots, which presently necessitate exhaustive measurements of tree diameters and heights, as well as tree identifications for wood density estimation. Here, we develop a new approach that can facilitate rapid LiDAR calibration with minimal field data. Throughout four tropical regions (Panama, Peru, Madagascar, and Hawaii), we were able to predict aboveground carbon density estimated in field inventory plots using a single universal LiDAR model (r ( 2 ) = 0.80, RMSE = 27.6 Mg C ha(-1)). This model is comparable in predictive power to locally calibrated models, but relies on limited inputs of basal area and wood density information for a given region, rather than on traditional plot inventories. With this approach, we propose to radically decrease the time required to calibrate airborne LiDAR data and thus increase the output of high-resolution carbon maps, supporting tropical forest conservation and climate mitigation policy.

  6. Estimating Above Ground Biomass using LiDAR in the Northcoast Redwood Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, M.; Stewart, E.

    2010-12-01

    In recent years, LiDAR (Light Intensity Detection Amplification and Ranging) is increasingly being used in estimating biophysical parameters related to forested environments. The main goal of the project is to estimate long-term biomass accumulation and carbon sequestration potential of the redwoods ecosystem. The project objectives are aimed at providing an assessment of carbon pools within the redwood ecosystem. Specifically, we intend to develop a relational model based on LiDAR-based canopy estimates and extensive ground-based measurements available for the old-growth redwood forest located within the Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park, CA. Our preliminary analysis involved developing a geospatial database, including LiDAR data collected in 2007 for the study site, and analyzing the data using USFS Fusion software. The study area comprised of a 12-acres section of coastal redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) in the Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park, located in Orick, CA. A series of analytical steps were executed using the USFS FUSION software to produce some intermediate data such as bare earth model, canopy height model, canopy coverage model, and canopy maxima treelist. Canopy maxima tree tops were compared to ground layer to determine height of tree tops. A total of over 1000 trees were estimated, and then with thinning (to eliminate errors due to low vegetation > 3 meters tall), a total of 950 trees were delineated. Ground measurements were imported as a point based shapefile and then compared to the treetop heights created from LiDAR data to the actual ground referenced data. The results were promising as most estimated treetops were within 1-3 meters of the ground measurements and generally within 3-5m of the actual tree height. Finally, we are in the process of applying some allometric equations to estimate above ground biomass using some of the LiDAR-derived canopy metrics.

  7. Water turbidity estimation from airborne hyperspectral imagery and full waveform bathymetric LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Z.; Glennie, C. L.; Fernandez-Diaz, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    The spatial and temporal variations in water turbidity are of great interest for the study of fluvial and coastal environments; and for predicting the performance of remote sensing systems that are used to map these. Conventional water turbidity estimates from remote sensing observations have normally been derived using near infrared reflectance. We have investigated the potential of determining water turbidity from additional remote sensing sources, namely airborne hyperspectral imagery and single wavelength bathymetric LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging). The confluence area of the Blue and Colorado River, CO was utilized as a study area to investigate the capabilities of both airborne bathymetric LiDAR and hyperspectral imagery for water turbidity estimation. Discrete and full waveform bathymetric data were collected using Optech's Gemini (1064 nm) and Aquarius (532 nm) LiDAR sensors. Hyperspectral imagery (1.2 m pixel resolution and 72 spectral bands) was acquired using an ITRES CASI-1500 imaging system. As an independent reference, measurements of turbidity were collected concurrent with the airborne remote sensing acquisitions, using a WET Labs EcoTriplet deployed from a kayak and turbidity was then derived from the measured backscatter. The bathymetric full waveform dataset contains a discretized sample of the full backscatter of water column and benthic layer. Therefore, the full waveform records encapsulate the water column characteristics of turbidity. A nonparametric support vector regression method is utilized to estimate water turbidity from both hyperspectral imagery and voxelized full waveform LiDAR returns, both individually and as a fused dataset. Results of all the evaluations will be presented, showing an initial turbidity prediction accuracy of approximately 1.0 NTU. We will also discuss our future strategy for enhanced fusion of the full waveform LiDAR and hyperspectral imagery for improved turbidity estimation.

  8. Applying a weighted random forests method to extract karst sinkholes from LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Junfeng; Pierskalla, William P.

    2016-02-01

    Detailed mapping of sinkholes provides critical information for mitigating sinkhole hazards and understanding groundwater and surface water interactions in karst terrains. LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) measures the earth's surface in high-resolution and high-density and has shown great potentials to drastically improve locating and delineating sinkholes. However, processing LiDAR data to extract sinkholes requires separating sinkholes from other depressions, which can be laborious because of the sheer number of the depressions commonly generated from LiDAR data. In this study, we applied the random forests, a machine learning method, to automatically separate sinkholes from other depressions in a karst region in central Kentucky. The sinkhole-extraction random forest was grown on a training dataset built from an area where LiDAR-derived depressions were manually classified through a visual inspection and field verification process. Based on the geometry of depressions, as well as natural and human factors related to sinkholes, 11 parameters were selected as predictive variables to form the dataset. Because the training dataset was imbalanced with the majority of depressions being non-sinkholes, a weighted random forests method was used to improve the accuracy of predicting sinkholes. The weighted random forest achieved an average accuracy of 89.95% for the training dataset, demonstrating that the random forest can be an effective sinkhole classifier. Testing of the random forest in another area, however, resulted in moderate success with an average accuracy rate of 73.96%. This study suggests that an automatic sinkhole extraction procedure like the random forest classifier can significantly reduce time and labor costs and makes its more tractable to map sinkholes using LiDAR data for large areas. However, the random forests method cannot totally replace manual procedures, such as visual inspection and field verification.

  9. Combined use of LiDAR data and multispectral earth observation imagery for wetland habitat mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapinel, Sébastien; Hubert-Moy, Laurence; Clément, Bernard

    2015-05-01

    Although wetlands play a key role in controlling flooding and nonpoint source pollution, sequestering carbon and providing an abundance of ecological services, the inventory and characterization of wetland habitats are most often limited to small areas. This explains why the understanding of their ecological functioning is still insufficient for a reliable functional assessment on areas larger than a few hectares. While LiDAR data and multispectral Earth Observation (EO) images are often used separately to map wetland habitats, their combined use is currently being assessed for different habitat types. The aim of this study is to evaluate the combination of multispectral and multiseasonal imagery and LiDAR data to precisely map the distribution of wetland habitats. The image classification was performed combining an object-based approach and decision-tree modeling. Four multispectral images with high (SPOT-5) and very high spatial resolution (Quickbird, KOMPSAT-2, aerial photographs) were classified separately. Another classification was then applied integrating summer and winter multispectral image data and three layers derived from LiDAR data: vegetation height, microtopography and intensity return. The comparison of classification results shows that some habitats are better identified on the winter image and others on the summer image (overall accuracies = 58.5 and 57.6%). They also point out that classification accuracy is highly improved (overall accuracy = 86.5%) when combining LiDAR data and multispectral images. Moreover, this study highlights the advantage of integrating vegetation height, microtopography and intensity parameters in the classification process. This article demonstrates that information provided by the synergetic use of multispectral images and LiDAR data can help in wetland functional assessment

  10. LiDAR Segmentation using Suitable Seed Points for 3D Building Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, S. M.; Awrangjeb, M.; Lu, G.

    2014-08-01

    Effective building detection and roof reconstruction has an influential demand over the remote sensing research community. In this paper, we present a new automatic LiDAR point cloud segmentation method using suitable seed points for building detection and roof plane extraction. Firstly, the LiDAR point cloud is separated into "ground" and "non-ground" points based on the analysis of DEM with a height threshold. Each of the non-ground point is marked as coplanar or non-coplanar based on a coplanarity analysis. Commencing from the maximum LiDAR point height towards the minimum, all the LiDAR points on each height level are extracted and separated into several groups based on 2D distance. From each group, lines are extracted and a coplanar point which is the nearest to the midpoint of each line is considered as a seed point. This seed point and its neighbouring points are utilised to generate the plane equation. The plane is grown in a region growing fashion until no new points can be added. A robust rule-based tree removal method is applied subsequently to remove planar segments on trees. Four different rules are applied in this method. Finally, the boundary of each object is extracted from the segmented LiDAR point cloud. The method is evaluated with six different data sets consisting hilly and densely vegetated areas. The experimental results indicate that the proposed method offers a high building detection and roof plane extraction rates while compared to a recently proposed method.

  11. Mapping the Risk of Forest Wind Damage Using Airborne Scanning LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saarinen, N.; Vastaranta, M.; Honkavaara, E.; Wulder, M. A.; White, J. C.; Litkey, P.; Holopainen, M.; Hyyppä, J.

    2015-03-01

    Wind damage is known for causing threats to sustainable forest management and yield value in boreal forests. Information about wind damage risk can aid forest managers in understanding and possibly mitigating damage impacts. The objective of this research was to better understand and quantify drivers of wind damage, and to map the probability of wind damage. To accomplish this, we used open-access airborne scanning light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data. The probability of wind-induced forest damage (PDAM) in southern Finland (61°N, 23°E) was modelled for a 173 km2 study area of mainly managed boreal forests (dominated by Norway spruce and Scots pine) and agricultural fields. Wind damage occurred in the study area in December 2011. LiDAR data were acquired prior to the damage in 2008. High spatial resolution aerial imagery, acquired after the damage event (January, 2012) provided a source of model calibration via expert interpretation. A systematic grid (16 m x 16 m) was established and 430 sample grid cells were identified systematically and classified as damaged or undamaged based on visual interpretation using the aerial images. Potential drivers associated with PDAM were examined using a multivariate logistic regression model. Risk model predictors were extracted from the LiDAR-derived surface models. Geographic information systems (GIS) supported spatial mapping and identification of areas of high PDAM across the study area. The risk model based on LiDAR data provided good agreement with detected risk areas (73 % with kappa-value 0,47). The strongest predictors in the risk model were mean canopy height and mean elevation. Our results indicate that open-access LiDAR data sets can be used to map the probability of wind damage risk without field data, providing valuable information for forest management planning.

  12. Building Damage Assessment after Earthquake Using Post-Event LiDAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastiveis, H.; Eslamizade, F.; Hosseini-Zirdoo, E.

    2015-12-01

    After an earthquake, damage assessment plays an important role in leading rescue team to help people and decrease the number of mortality. Damage map is a map that demonstrates collapsed buildings with their degree of damage. With this map, finding destructive buildings can be quickly possible. In this paper, we propose an algorithm for automatic damage map generation after an earthquake using post-event LiDAR Data and pre-event vector map. The framework of the proposed approach has four main steps. To find the location of all buildings on LiDAR data, in the first step, LiDAR data and vector map are registered by using a few number of ground control points. Then, building layer, selected from vector map, are mapped on the LiDAR data and all pixels which belong to the buildings are extracted. After that, through a powerful classifier all the extracted pixels are classified into three classes of "debris", "intact building" and "unclassified". Since textural information make better difference between "debris" and "intact building" classes, different textural features are applied during the classification. After that, damage degree for each candidate building is estimated based on the relation between the numbers of pixels labelled as "debris" class to the whole building area. Calculating the damage degree for each candidate building, finally, building damage map is generated. To evaluate the ability proposed method in generating damage map, a data set from Port-au-Prince, Haiti's capital after the 2010 Haiti earthquake was used. In this case, after calculating of all buildings in the test area using the proposed method, the results were compared to the damage degree which estimated through visual interpretation of post-event satellite image. Obtained results were proved the reliability of the proposed method in damage map generation using LiDAR data.

  13. Object-oriented identification of forested landslides with derivatives of single pulse LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Den Eeckhaut, Miet; Kerle, Norman; Poesen, Jean; Hervás, Javier

    2012-11-01

    In contrast to the many studies that use expert-based analysis of LiDAR derivatives for landslide mapping in forested terrain, only few studies have attempted to develop (semi-)automatic methods for extracting landslides from LiDAR derivatives. While all these studies are pixel-based, it has not yet been tested whether object-oriented analysis (OOA) could be an alternative. This study investigates the potential of OOA using only single-pulse LiDAR derivatives, such as slope gradient, roughness and curvature to map landslides. More specifically, the focus is on both LiDAR data segmentation and classification of slow-moving landslides in densely vegetated areas, where spectral data do not allow accurate landslide identification. A multistage procedure has been developed and tested in the Flemish Ardennes (Belgium). The procedure consists of (1) image binarization and multiresolution segmentation, (2) classification of landslide parts (main scarps and landslide body segments) and non-landslide features (i.e. earth banks and cropland fields) with supervised support vector machines at the appropriate scale, (3) delineation of landslide flanks, (4) growing of a landslide body starting from its main scarp, and (5) final cleaning of the inventory map. The results obtained show that OOA using LiDAR derivatives allows recognition and characterization of profound morphologic properties of forested deep-seated landslides on soil-covered hillslopes, because more than 90% of the main scarps and 70% of the landslide bodies of an expert-based inventory were accurately identified with OOA. For mountainous areas with bedrock, on the other hand, creation of a transferable model is expected to be more difficult.

  14. A DArT marker genetic map of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) integrated with detailed comparative mapping information; comparison with existing DArT marker genetic maps of Lolium perenne, L. multiflorum and Festuca pratensis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ryegrasses and fescues (genera, Lolium and Festuca) are species of forage and turf grasses which are used widely in agricultural and amenity situations. They are classified within the sub-family Pooideae and so are closely related to Brachypodium distachyon, wheat, barley, rye and oats. Recently, a DArT array has been developed which can be used in generating marker and mapping information for ryegrasses and fescues. This represents a potential common marker set for ryegrass and fescue researchers which can be linked through to comparative genomic information for the grasses. Results A F2 perennial ryegrass genetic map was developed consisting of 7 linkage groups defined by 1316 markers and deriving a total map length of 683 cM. The marker set included 866 DArT and 315 gene sequence-based markers. Comparison with previous DArT mapping studies in perennial and Italian ryegrass (L. multiflorum) identified 87 and 105 DArT markers in common, respectively, of which 94% and 87% mapped to homoeologous linkage groups. A similar comparison with meadow fescue (F. pratensis) identified only 28 DArT markers in common, of which c. 50% mapped to non-homoelogous linkage groups. In L. perenne, the genetic distance spanned by the DArT markers encompassed the majority of the regions that could be described in terms of comparative genomic relationships with rice, Brachypodium distachyon, and Sorghum bicolor. Conclusions DArT markers are likely to be a useful common marker resource for ryegrasses and fescues, though the success in aligning different populations through the mapping of common markers will be influenced by degrees of population interrelatedness. The detailed mapping of DArT and gene-based markers in this study potentially allows comparative relationships to be derived in future mapping populations characterised using solely DArT markers. PMID:23819624

  15. Development and validation of the Dimensional Anhedonia Rating Scale (DARS) in a community sample and individuals with major depression.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Sakina J; Quilty, Lena C; Sproule, Beth A; Cyriac, Anna; Michael Bagby, R; Kennedy, Sidney H

    2015-09-30

    Anhedonia, a core symptom of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD), is predictive of antidepressant non-response. In contrast to the definition of anhedonia as a "loss of pleasure", neuropsychological studies provide evidence for multiple facets of hedonic function. The aim of the current study was to develop and validate the Dimensional Anhedonia Rating Scale (DARS), a dynamic scale that measures desire, motivation, effort and consummatory pleasure across hedonic domains. Following item selection procedures and reliability testing using data from community participants (N=229) (Study 1), the 17-item scale was validated in an online study with community participants (N=150) (Study 2). The DARS was also validated in unipolar or bipolar depressed patients (n=52) and controls (n=50) (Study 3). Principal components analysis of the 17-item DARS revealed a 4-component structure mapping onto the domains of anhedonia: hobbies, food/drink, social activities, and sensory experience. Reliability of the DARS subscales was high across studies (Cronbach's α=0.75-0.92). The DARS also demonstrated good convergent and divergent validity. Hierarchical regression analysis revealed the DARS showed additional utility over the Snaith-Hamilton Pleasure Scale (SHAPS) in predicting reward function and distinguishing MDD subgroups. These studies provide support for the reliability and validity of the DARS. PMID:26250147

  16. Spatial accounting for errors in LiDAR-derived products: Snow volume and snow water equivalent estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinkham, W. T.; Hoffman, C. M.; Falkowski, M. J.; Smith, A. M.; Link, T. E.; Marshall, H.

    2011-12-01

    Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) has become one of the most effective and reliable means of characterizing surface topography and vegetation structure. Most LiDAR-derived estimates such as vegetation height, snow depth, and floodplain boundaries rely on the accurate creation of digital terrain models (DTM). As a result of the importance of an accurate DTM in using LiDAR data to estimate snow depth, it is necessary to understand the variables that influence the DTM accuracy in order to assess snow depth error. A series of 4 x 4 m plots that were surveyed at 0.5 m spacing in a semi-arid catchment were used for training the Random Forests algorithm along with a series of 35 variables in order to spatially predict vertical error within a LiDAR derived DTM. The final model was utilized to predict the combined error resulting from snow volume and snow water equivalent estimates derived from a snow-free LiDAR DTM and a snow-on LiDAR acquisition of the same site. The methodology allows for a statistical quantification of the spatially-distributed error patterns that are incorporated into the estimation of snow volume and snow water equivalents from LiDAR.

  17. Change detection of riverbed movements using river cross-sections and LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetter, Michael; Höfle, Bernhard; Mandlburger, Gottfried; Rutzinger, Martin

    2010-05-01

    Today, Airborne LiDAR derived digital terrain models (DTMs) are used for several aspects in different scientific disciplines, such as hydrology, geomorphology or archaeology. In the field of river geomorphology, LiDAR data sets can provide information on the riverine vegetation, the level and boundary of the water body, the elevation of the riparian foreland and their roughness. The LiDAR systems in use for topographic data acquisition mainly operate with wavelengths of at least 1064nm and, thus, are not able to penetrate water. LiDAR sensors with two wavelengths are available (bathymetric LiDAR), but they can only provide elevation information of riverbeds or lakes, if the water is clear and the minimum water depth exceeds 1.5m. In small and shallow rivers it is impossible to collect information of the riverbed, regardless of the used LiDAR sensor. In this article, we present a method to derive a high-resolution DTM of the riverbed and to combine it with the LiDAR DTM resulting in a watercourse DTM (DTM-W) as a basis for calculating the changes in the riverbed during several years. To obtain such a DTM-W we use river cross-sections acquired by terrestrial survey or echo-sounding. First, a differentiation between water and land has to be done. A highly accurate water surface can be derived by using a water surface delineation algorithm, which incorporates the amplitude information of the LiDAR point cloud and additional geometrical features (e.g. local surface roughness). The second step is to calculate a thalweg line, which is the lowest flow path in the riverbed. This is achieved by extracting the lowest point of each river cross section and by fitting a B-spline curve through those points. In the next step, the centerline of the river is calculated by applying a shrinking algorithm of the water boundary polygon. By averaging the thalweg line and the centerline, a main flow path line can be computed. Subsequently, a dense array of 2D-profiles perpendicular to the

  18. Capabilities of the bathymetric Hawk Eye LiDAR for coastal habitat mapping: A case study within a Basque estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chust, Guillem; Grande, Maitane; Galparsoro, Ibon; Uriarte, Adolfo; Borja, Ángel

    2010-10-01

    The bathymetric LiDAR system is an airborne laser that detects sea bottom at high vertical and horizontal resolutions in shallow coastal waters. This study assesses the capabilities of the airborne bathymetric LiDAR sensor (Hawk Eye system) for coastal habitat mapping in the Oka estuary (within the Biosphere Reserve of Urdaibai, SE Bay of Biscay, northern Spain), where water conditions are moderately turbid. Three specific objectives were addressed: 1) to assess the data quality of the Hawk Eye LiDAR, both for terrestrial and subtidal zones, in terms of height measurement density, coverage, and vertical accuracy; 2) to compare bathymetric LiDAR with a ship-borne multibeam echosounder (MBES) for different bottom types and depth ranges; and 3) to test the discrimination potential of LiDAR height and reflectance information, together with multi-spectral imagery (three visible and near infrared bands), for the classification of 22 salt marsh and rocky shore habitats, covering supralittoral, intertidal and subtidal zones. The bathymetric LiDAR Hawk Eye data enabled the generation of a digital elevation model (DEM) of the Oka estuary, at 2 m of horizontal spatial resolution in the terrestrial zone (with a vertical accuracy of 0.15 m) and at 4 m within the subtidal, extending a water depth of 21 m. Data gaps occurred in 14.4% of the area surveyed with the LiDAR (13.69 km 2). Comparison of the LiDAR system and the MBES showed no significant mean difference in depth. However, the Root Mean Square error of the former was high (0.84 m), especially concentrated upon rocky (0.55-1.77 m) rather than in sediment bottoms (0.38-0.62 m). The potential of LiDAR topographic variables and reflectance alone for discriminating 15 intertidal and submerged habitats was low (with overall classification accuracy between 52.4 and 65.4%). In particular, reflectance retrieved for this case study has been found to be not particularly useful for classification purposes. The combination of the LiDAR

  19. DArT markers: diversity analyses, genomes comparison, mapping and integration with SSR markers in Triticum monococcum

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Hai-Chun; Bayon, Carlos; Kanyuka, Kostya; Berry, Simon; Wenzl, Peter; Huttner, Eric; Kilian, Andrzej; E Hammond-Kosack, Kim

    2009-01-01

    Background Triticum monococcum (2n = 2x = 14) is an ancient diploid wheat with many useful traits and is used as a model for wheat gene discovery. DArT (Diversity Arrays Technology) employs a hybridisation-based approach to type thousands of genomic loci in parallel. DArT markers were developed for T. monococcum to assess genetic diversity, compare relationships with hexaploid genomes, and construct a genetic linkage map integrating DArT and microsatellite markers. Results A DArT array, consisting of 2304 hexaploid wheat, 1536 tetraploid wheat, 1536 T. monococcum as well as 1536 T. boeoticum representative genomic clones, was used to fingerprint 16 T. monococcum accessions of diverse geographical origins. In total, 846 polymorphic DArT markers were identified, of which 317 were of T. monococcum origin, 246 of hexaploid, 157 of tetraploid, and 126 of T. boeoticum genomes. The fingerprinting data indicated that the geographic origin of T. monococcum accessions was partially correlated with their genetic variation. DArT markers could also well distinguish the genetic differences amongst a panel of 23 hexaploid wheat and nine T. monococcum genomes. For the first time, 274 DArT markers were integrated with 82 simple sequence repeat (SSR) and two morphological trait loci in a genetic map spanning 1062.72 cM in T. monococcum. Six chromosomes were represented by single linkage groups, and chromosome 4Am was formed by three linkage groups. The DArT and SSR genetic loci tended to form independent clusters along the chromosomes. Segregation distortion was observed for one third of the DArT loci. The Ba (black awn) locus was refined to a 23.2 cM region between the DArT marker locus wPt-2584 and the microsatellite locus Xgwmd33 on 1Am; and the Hl (hairy leaf) locus to a 4.0 cM region between DArT loci 376589 and 469591 on 5Am. Conclusion DArT is a rapid and efficient approach to develop many new molecular markers for genetic studies in T. monococcum. The constructed genetic

  20. Investigating the spatial distribution of water levels in the Mackenzie Delta using airborne LiDAR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hopkinson, C.; Crasto, N.; Marsh, P.; Forbes, D.; Lesack, L.

    2011-01-01

    Airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data were used to map water level (WL) and hydraulic gradients (??H/??x) in the Mackenzie Delta. The LiDAR WL data were validated against eight independent hydrometric gauge measurements and demonstrated mean offsets from - 0??22 to + 0??04 m (??< 0??11). LiDAR-based WL gradients could be estimated with confidence over channel lengths exceeding 5-10 km where the WL change exceeded local noise levels in the LiDAR data. For the entire Delta, the LiDAR sample coverage indicated a rate of change in longitudinal gradient (??2H/??x) of 5??5 ?? 10-10 m m-2; therefore offering a potential means to estimate average flood stage hydraulic gradient for areas of the Delta not sampled or monitored. In the Outer Delta, within-channel and terrain gradient measurements all returned a consistent estimate of - 1 ?? 10-5 m m-1, suggesting that this is a typical hydraulic gradient for the downstream end of the Delta. For short reaches (<10 km) of the Peel and Middle Channels in the middle of the Delta, significant and consistent hydraulic gradient estimates of - 5 ?? 10-5 m m-1 were observed. Evidence that hydraulic gradients can vary over short distances, however, was observed in the Peel Channel immediately upstream of Aklavik. A positive elevation anomaly (bulge) of > 0??1 m was observed at a channel constriction entering a meander bend, suggesting a localized modification of the channel hydraulics. Furthermore, water levels in the anabranch channels of the Peel River were almost 1 m higher than in Middle Channel of the Mackenzie River. This suggests: (i) the channels are elevated and have shallower bank heights in this part of the delta, leading to increased cross-delta and along-channel hydraulic gradients; and/or (ii) a proportion of the Peel River flow is lost to Middle Channel due to drainage across the delta through anastamosing channels. This study has demonstrated that airborne LiDAR data contain valuable information describing

  1. Importance of High-Resolution LiDAR Data in Modeling Runoff Levels Over Impervious Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melosh, C.; Rao, M.

    2013-12-01

    Directly connected impervious areas collect and deliver unfiltered runoff to modified and impacted waterways. Modeling water flow over the landscape is an effective method of observing drainage patterns and predicting pollutant and sediment loadings. Improved models applying high-resolution elevation data can identify key areas with high pollutant output. This is a crucial issue in the Lake Tahoe Basin where lakeshore urban development has increased and lake clarity has been declining for years. This study aims to evaluate an integrated LiDAR and GIS-based modeling approach that uses a fine-scaled ground surface and impervious surface connectivity to predict the pollutant load in the Lake Tahoe Basin This study produced a fine-scaled surface model of nine subset catchments in the South Tahoe basin, including areas of low (below 20%), medium (30% to 50%) and high (above 50%) impervious surface cover. Our method integrated LiDAR, multispectral imagery, and GIS data to develop accurate terrain models, hydrologic routing, and directly connected impervious area layers for the Lake Tahoe basin. The high-density ground and object elevation data collected using Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) creates an accurate picture of water flow over the land, and obstacles to the flow such as buildings. High-resolution LiDAR data was obtained from the Round 10 Lake Tahoe Southern Nevada Public Land Management capital program from the year 2010. This data was processed to create a digital elevation model of the ground surface. Land use classification used object height information from the LiDAR cloud, NAIP 4-band images with 1-meter resolution and a normalized difference vegetation index image derived from the NAIP imagery. The US Army Core of Engineers hydrologic modeling system (HEC-HMS) will be used to model runoff. Based on long-term simulations the effect of directly connected impervious area on rainfall-runoff characteristics for the South Lake Tahoe catchments will be

  2. Advances in animal ecology from 3D-LiDAR ecosystem mapping.

    PubMed

    Davies, Andrew B; Asner, Gregory P

    2014-12-01

    The advent and recent advances of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) have enabled accurate measurement of 3D ecosystem structure. Here, we review insights gained through the application of LiDAR to animal ecology studies, revealing the fundamental importance of structure for animals. Structural heterogeneity is most conducive to increased animal richness and abundance, and increased complexity of vertical vegetation structure is more positively influential compared with traditionally measured canopy cover, which produces mixed results. However, different taxonomic groups interact with a variety of 3D canopy traits and some groups with 3D topography. To develop a better understanding of animal dynamics, future studies will benefit from considering 3D habitat effects in a wider variety of ecosystems and with more taxa.

  3. Characterization of Forest Ecosystems by combined Radiative Transfer Modeling for Imaging Spectrometer and LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koetz, B.; Sun, G.; Morsdorf, F.; Rubio, J.; Kimes, D.; Ranson, J.

    2009-04-01

    This research was motivated by the increased information dimensionality provided by current Earth Observation systems measuring the complex and dynamic medium of the vegetated surface of the Earth. Advanced and reliable algorithms that fully exploit this enhanced Earth Observation information are needed to deliver consistent data sets of the Earth vegetation condition describing its spatial distribution and change over time. Spectral observation provided by imaging spectrometers and the waveform from large-footprint LiDAR are now available from space for forest ecosystem studies. The imaging spectrometer data contains information about the biochemical composition of the canopy foliage, and is widely used to estimate biophysical canopy parameters such as LAI and fractional cover. LiDAR responds to the vertical distribution of scatters and permits inferences about the plant structures required to supply water and mechanical support to those surfaces. Various canopy height indices derived from LiDAR waveform have been successfully used to infer forest above-ground biomass and the characterization of canopy structure. The structure parameters derived from LiDAR data can improve the accuracy and robustness of canopy parameter retrieval from imaging spectrometer by reducing uncertainties related to the canopy structure. The specific information content, inherent to the observations of imaging spectrometry and LIDAR, assesses thus different but complementary characteristics of the complex vegetation canopy. The combination of these two information dimensions offers a unique and reliable canopy characterization including information relevant to different aspects of the biochemical and biophysical properties and thus understanding of processes within forest ecosystems. A comprehensive canopy characterization of a forest ecosystem is derived from the combined remote sensing signal of imaging spectrometry and large footprint LIDAR. The inversion of two linked physically based

  4. Advances in animal ecology from 3D-LiDAR ecosystem mapping.

    PubMed

    Davies, Andrew B; Asner, Gregory P

    2014-12-01

    The advent and recent advances of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) have enabled accurate measurement of 3D ecosystem structure. Here, we review insights gained through the application of LiDAR to animal ecology studies, revealing the fundamental importance of structure for animals. Structural heterogeneity is most conducive to increased animal richness and abundance, and increased complexity of vertical vegetation structure is more positively influential compared with traditionally measured canopy cover, which produces mixed results. However, different taxonomic groups interact with a variety of 3D canopy traits and some groups with 3D topography. To develop a better understanding of animal dynamics, future studies will benefit from considering 3D habitat effects in a wider variety of ecosystems and with more taxa. PMID:25457158

  5. Clustering and visualization of non-classified points from LiDAR data for helicopter navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenkeil, Ferdinand; Schafhitzel, Tobias; Kühne, Uwe; Deussen, Oliver

    2014-06-01

    In this paper we propose a dynamic DBSCAN-based method to cluster and visualize unclassified and potential dangerous obstacles in data sets recorded by a LiDAR sensor. The sensor delivers data sets in a short time interval, so a spatial superposition of multiple data sets is created. We use this superposition to create clusters incrementally. Knowledge about the position and size of each cluster is used to fuse clusters and the stabilization of clusters within multiple time frames. Cluster stability is a key feature to provide a smooth and un-distracting visualization for the pilot. Only a few lines are indicating the position of threatening unclassified points, where a hazardous situation for the helicopter could happen, if it comes too close. Clustering and visualization form a part of an entire synthetic vision processing chain, in which the LiDAR points support the generation of a real-time synthetic view of the environment.

  6. Measuring and mapping forest wildlife habitat characteristics using LiDAR remote sensing and multi-sensor function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyde, Peter

    Managing forests for multiple, often competing uses is challenging; managing Sierra National Forest's fire regime and California spotted owl habitat is difficult and compounded by lack of information about habitat quality. Consistent and accurate measurements of forest structure will reduce uncertainties regarding the amount of habitat reduction or alteration that spotted owls can tolerate. Current methods of measuring spotted owl habitat are mostly field-based and emphasize the important of canopy cover. However, this is more because of convenience than because canopy cover is a definitive predictor of owl presence or fecundity. Canopy cover is consistently and accurately measured in the field using a moosehorn densitometer; comparable measurements can be made using airphoto interpretation or from examining satellite imagery, but the results are not consistent. LiDAR remote sensing can produce consistent and accurate measurements of canopy cover, as well as other aspects of forest structure (such as canopy height and biomass) that are known or thought to be at least as predictive as canopy cover. Moreover, LiDAR can be used to produce maps of forest structure rather than the point samples available from field measurements. However, LiDAR data sets are expensive and not available everywhere. Combining LiDAR with other, remote sensing data sets with less expensive, wall-to-wall coverage will result in broader scale maps of forest structure than have heretofore been possible; these maps can then be used to analyze spotted owl habitat. My work consists of three parts: comparison of LiDAR estimates of forest structure with field measurements, statistical fusion of LiDAR and other remote sensing data sets to produce broad scale maps of forest structure, and analysis of California spotted owl presence and fecundity as a function of LiDAR-derived canopy structure. I found that LiDAR was able to replicate field measurements accurately. Additionally, I was able to

  7. Estimating Volume, Biomass, and Carbon in Hedmark County, Norway Using a Profiling LiDAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Ross; Naesset, Erik; Gobakken, T.; Gregoire, T.; Stahl, G.

    2009-01-01

    A profiling airborne LiDAR is used to estimate the forest resources of Hedmark County, Norway, a 27390 square kilometer area in southeastern Norway on the Swedish border. One hundred five profiling flight lines totaling 9166 km were flown over the entire county; east-west. The lines, spaced 3 km apart north-south, duplicate the systematic pattern of the Norwegian Forest Inventory (NFI) ground plot arrangement, enabling the profiler to transit 1290 circular, 250 square meter fixed-area NFI ground plots while collecting the systematic LiDAR sample. Seven hundred sixty-three plots of the 1290 plots were overflown within 17.8 m of plot center. Laser measurements of canopy height and crown density are extracted along fixed-length, 17.8 m segments closest to the center of the ground plot and related to basal area, timber volume and above- and belowground dry biomass. Linear, nonstratified equations that estimate ground-measured total aboveground dry biomass report an R(sup 2) = 0.63, with an regression RMSE = 35.2 t/ha. Nonstratified model results for the other biomass components, volume, and basal area are similar, with R(sup 2) values for all models ranging from 0.58 (belowground biomass, RMSE = 8.6 t/ha) to 0.63. Consistently, the most useful single profiling LiDAR variable is quadratic mean canopy height, h (sup bar)(sub qa). Two-variable models typically include h (sup bar)(sub qa) or mean canopy height, h(sup bar)(sub a), with a canopy density or a canopy height standard deviation measure. Stratification by productivity class did not improve the nonstratified models, nor did stratification by pine/spruce/hardwood. County-wide profiling LiDAR estimates are reported, by land cover type, and compared to NFI estimates.

  8. Quantitative study of tectonic geomorphology along Haiyuan fault based on airborne LiDAR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, Tao; Zhang, Pei Zhen; Liu, Jing; Li, Chuan You; Ren, Zhi Kun; Hudnut, Kenneth W.

    2014-01-01

    High-precision and high-resolution topography are the fundamental data for active fault research. Light detection and ranging (LiDAR) presents a new approach to build detailed digital elevation models effectively. We take the Haiyuan fault in Gansu Province as an example of how LiDAR data may be used to improve the study of active faults and the risk assessment of related hazards. In the eastern segment of the Haiyuan fault, the Shaomayin site has been comprehensively investigated in previous research because of its exemplary tectonic topographic features. Based on unprecedented LiDAR data, the horizontal and vertical coseismic offsets at the Shaomayin site are described. The measured horizontal value is about 8.6 m, and the vertical value is about 0.8 m. Using prior dating ages sampled from the same location, we estimate the horizontal slip rate as 4.0 ± 1.0 mm/a with high confidence and define that the lower bound of the vertical slip rate is 0.4 ± 0.1 mm/a since the Holocene. LiDAR data can repeat the measurements of field work on quantifying offsets of tectonic landform features quite well. The offset landforms are visualized on an office computer workstation easily, and specialized software may be used to obtain displacement quantitatively. By combining precious chronological results, the fundamental link between fault activity and large earthquakes is better recognized, as well as the potential risk for future earthquake hazards.

  9. Evaluation of Landslide Mapping Techniques and LiDAR-based Conditioning Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahalingam, R.; Olsen, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Landslides are a major geohazard, which result in significant human, infrastructure, and economic losses. Landslide susceptibility mapping can help communities to plan and prepare for these damaging events. Mapping landslide susceptible locations using GIS and remote sensing techniques is gaining popularity in the past three decades. These efforts use a wide variety of procedures and consider a wide range of factors. Unfortunately, each study is often completed differently and independently of others. Further, the quality of the datasets used varies in terms of source, data collection, and generation, which can propagate errors or inconsistencies into the resulting output maps. Light detection and ranging (LiDAR) has proved to have higher accuracy in representing the continuous topographic surface, which can help minimize this uncertainty. The primary objectives of this paper are to investigate the applicability and performance of terrain factors in landslide hazard mapping, determine if LiDAR-derived datasets (slope, slope roughness, terrain roughness, stream power index and compound topographic index) can be used for predictive mapping without data representing other common landslide conditioning factors, and evaluate the differences in landslide susceptibility mapping using widely-used statistical approaches. The aforementioned factors were used to produce landslide susceptibility maps for a 140 km2 study area in northwest Oregon using six representative techniques: frequency ratio, weights of evidence, logistic regression, discriminant analysis, artificial neural network, and support vector machine. Most notably, the research showed an advantage in selecting fewer critical conditioning factors. The most reliable factors all could be derived from a single LiDAR DEM, reducing the need for laborious and costly data gathering. Most of the six techniques showed similar statistical results; however, ANN showed less accuracy for predictive mapping. Keywords : LiDAR

  10. A Comparative Study between Frequency-Modulated Continous Wave LADAR and Linear LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massaro, R. D.; Anderson, J. E.; Nelson, J. D.; Edwards, J. D.

    2014-11-01

    Topographic Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) technology has advanced greatly in the past decade. Pulse repetition rates of terrestrial and airborne systems havemultiplied thus vastly increasing data acquisition rates. Geiger-mode and FLASH LiDAR have also become far more mature technologies. However, a new and relatively unknown technology is maturing rapidly: Frequency-Modulated Continuous Wave Laser Detection and Ranging (FMCW-LADAR). Possessing attributes more akin to modern radar systems, FMCWLADAR has the ability to more finely resolve objects separated by very small ranges. For tactical military applications (as described here), this can be a real advantage over single frequency, direct-detect systems. In fact, FMCW-LADAR can range resolve objects at 10-7 to 10-6 meter scales. FMCW-LADAR can also detect objects at greater range with less power. In this study, a FMCWLADAR instrument and traditional LiDAR instrument are compared. The co-located terrestrial scanning instruments were set up to perform simultaneous 3-D measurements of the given scene. Several targets were placed in the scene to expose the difference in the range resolution capabilities of the two instruments. The scans were performed at or nearly the same horizontal and vertical angular resolutions. It is demonstrated that the FMCW-LADAR surpasses the perfomance of the linear mode LiDAR scanner in terms of range resolution. Some results showing the maximum range acquisition are discussed but this was not studied in detail as the scanners' laser powers differed by a small amount. Applications and implications of this technology are also discussed.

  11. Mapping and Monitoring Delmarva Fox Squirrel Habitat Using an Airborne LiDAR Profiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Ross; Ratnaswamy, Mary; Keller, Cherry

    2004-01-01

    Twenty five hundred thirty nine kilometers of airborne laser profiling and videography data were acquired over the state of Delaware during the summer of 2000. The laser ranging measurements and video from approximately one-half of that data set (1304 km) were analyzed to identify and locate forested sites that might potentially support populations of Delmarva fox squirrel (DFS, Sciurus niger cinereus). The DFS is an endangered species previously endemic to tall, dense, mature forests with open understories on the Eastern Shore of the Chesapeake Bay. The airborne LiDAR employed in this study can measure forest canopy height and canopy closure, but cannot measure or infer understory canopy conditions. Hence the LiDAR must be viewed as a tool to map potential, not actual, habitat. Fifty-three potentially suitable DFS sites were identified in the 1304 km of flight transect data. Each of the 53 sites met the following criteria according to the LiDAR and video record: (1 ) at least 120m of contiguous forest; (2) an average canopy height greater than 20m; (3) an average canopy closure of >80%; and (4) no roofs, impervious surface (e.g., asphalt, concrete), and/or open water anywhere along the 120m length of the laser segment. Thirty-two of the 53 sites were visited on the ground and measurements taken for a DFS habitat suitability model. Seventy eight percent of the sites (25 of 32) were judged by the model to be suited to supporting a DFS population. Twenty-eight of the 32 sites visited in the field were in forest cover types (hardwood, mixed wood, conifer, wetlands) according to a land cover GIS map. Of these, 23 (82%) were suited to support DFS. The remaining 4 sites were located in nonforest cover types - agricultural or residential areas. Two of the four, or 50% were suited to the DFS. All of the LiDAR flight data, 2539 km, were analyzed to

  12. Topographic and Thermal Investigations of Active Pahoehoe Lava Flows Using Coupled LiDAR/FLIR Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crown, D. A.; Anderson, S. W.; Finnegan, D. C.; LeWinter, A. L.; Ramsey, M.

    2012-12-01

    Pahoehoe lava flows consist of multiple overlapping and interfingering lobes and exhibit morphologically diverse surfaces characterized by channels, smooth-surfaced sheets, and numerous, small networks of interconnected pahoehoe toes. In order to analyze the different pahoehoe emplacement regimes, we have acquired simultaneous high-resolution topographic and thermal measurements of advancing and inflating flow lobes at high temporal frequency. These datasets allow the creation of flow lobe maps at regular intervals during flow emplacement that document morphologic, thermal, and morphometric characteristics of individual pahoehoe elements (e.g., pahoehoe toes) as well as compound pahoehoe features (e.g., toe networks, channels with lateral levees). These datasets reveal patterns in flow behavior and provide quantitative documentation of flow emplacement processes. Field investigations were conducted in February and March, 2012 on tube-fed pahoehoe flows in the Puu Oo flow field, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii. We utilized a ground-based, full-waveform scanning LiDAR and FLIR SC645 thermal infrared camera, supplemented by high-definition video and time-lapse photography. The LiDAR scanner is capable of acquiring rapid, successive scans with reproducible 5 mm resolution data at a rate of 300 kHz. The FLIR camera acquires calibrated thermal images in the 7.5 - 13 mm range; the object temperature range is -20°C to +2000°C, with a thermal sensitivity of <0.05°C at 30°C. An RTK GPS was used to acquire precise locations of scan positions and to georeference LiDAR point cloud data to real-world coordinates. The combined LiDAR/FLIR system provides rapid acquisition of high-resolution spatial and high-precision thermal datasets for advancing pahoehoe flows.

  13. Strategies for minimizing sample size for use in airborne LiDAR-based forest inventory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Junttila, Virpi; Finley, Andrew O.; Bradford, John B.; Kauranne, Tuomo

    2013-01-01

    Recently airborne Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) has emerged as a highly accurate remote sensing modality to be used in operational scale forest inventories. Inventories conducted with the help of LiDAR are most often model-based, i.e. they use variables derived from LiDAR point clouds as the predictive variables that are to be calibrated using field plots. The measurement of the necessary field plots is a time-consuming and statistically sensitive process. Because of this, current practice often presumes hundreds of plots to be collected. But since these plots are only used to calibrate regression models, it should be possible to minimize the number of plots needed by carefully selecting the plots to be measured. In the current study, we compare several systematic and random methods for calibration plot selection, with the specific aim that they be used in LiDAR based regression models for forest parameters, especially above-ground biomass. The primary criteria compared are based on both spatial representativity as well as on their coverage of the variability of the forest features measured. In the former case, it is important also to take into account spatial auto-correlation between the plots. The results indicate that choosing the plots in a way that ensures ample coverage of both spatial and feature space variability improves the performance of the corresponding models, and that adequate coverage of the variability in the feature space is the most important condition that should be met by the set of plots collected.

  14. Abu Dhabi Basemap Update Using the LiDAR Mobile Mapping Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshaiba, Omar; Amparo Núñez-Andrés, M.; Lantada, Nieves

    2016-04-01

    Mobile LiDAR system provides a new technology which can be used to update geospatial information by direct and rapid data collection. This technology is faster than the traditional survey ways and has lower cost. Abu Dhabi Municipal System aims to update its geospatial system frequently as the government entities have invested heavily in GIS technology and geospatial data to meet the repaid growth in the infrastructure and construction projects in recent years. The Emirate of Abu Dhabi has witnessed a huge growth in infrastructure and construction projects in recent years. Therefore, it is necessary to develop and update its basemap system frequently to meet their own organizational needs. Currently, the traditional ways are used to update basemap system such as human surveyors, GPS receivers and controller (GPS assigned computer). Then the surveyed data are downloaded, edited and reviewed manually before it is merged to the basemap system. Traditional surveying ways may not be applicable in some conditions such as; bad weather, difficult topographic area and boundary area. This paper presents a proposed methodology which uses the Mobile LiDAR system to update basemap in Abu Dhabi by using daily transactions services. It aims to use and integrate the mobile LiDAR technology into the municipality's daily workflow such that it becomes the new standard cost efficiency operating procedure for updating the base-map in Abu Dhabi Municipal System. On another note, the paper will demonstrate the results of the innovated workflow for the base-map update using the mobile LiDAR point cloud and few processing algorithms.

  15. Single Pass LiDAR-derived Estimate of Site Productivity in Western Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAdam, E.; Hilker, T.; Waring, R. H.; Sousa, C. H. R. D.; Moura, Y. M.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate estimates of forest growth at different ages are essential to evaluate the effect of a changing climate and to adjust management practices accordingly. Most current approaches are spatially discrete and therefore unable to predict forest growth accurately across landscapes. While airborne LiDAR has been widely used in forestry, it can only estimate growth rates with repeated passes. In contrast, Landsat imagery records disturbances (at 30 m resolution) but is unable to measure changes in growth rates. Historical archives of Landsat imagery provided us a way of knowing when and where even-aged stands of Pseudotsuga menziesii (Douglas-fir) were cut and replanted. Since early growth rates are nearly linear with age, the height of dominant trees recorded in one pass by LiDAR yields a direct measure of growth and likely changes as stands age under recent climatic conditions. Process-based growth models are available to assess possible shifts in the growth rates of stands under a changing climate; the accuracy of such model predictions can be evaluated with additional LiDAR coverage. In this study we use the Physiological Principles Predicting Growth Model (3-PG) to estimate site index at the landscape level to predict site productivity based on the year of stand establishment obtained from Landsat, and one-pass airborne LiDAR measurement of forest height. We are monitoring forest plantations of known ages and with data on their current age we will calculate site index for 60 separate sites across western Oregon. The results of this study will allow us to create updated site index maps for the state of Oregon under varying climate scenarios.

  16. Mapping Vegetation Canopy Structure and Distribution for Great Smoky Mountains National Park Using LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiner, J.; Kumar, J.; Norman, S. P.

    2015-12-01

    A major challenge in forest management is the inaccessibility of large swaths of land, which makes accurate monitoring of forest change difficult. Remote sensing methods can help address this issue by allowing investigators to monitor remote or inaccessible regions using aerial or satellite-based platforms. However, most remote sensing methods do not provide a full three-dimensional (3D) description of the area. Rather, they return only a single elevation point or landcover description. Multiple-return LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) gathers data in a 3D point cloud, which allows forest managers to more accurately characterize and monitor changes in canopy structure and vegetation-type distribution. Our project used high-resolution aerial multiple-return LiDAR data to determine vegetation canopy structures and their spatial distribution in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. To ensure sufficient data density and to match LANDSAT resolution, we gridded the data into 30m x 30m cells. The LiDAR data points within each cell were then used to generate the vertical canopy structure for that cell. After vertical profiles had been created, we used a k-means cluster analysis algorithm to classify the landscape based on the canopy structure. The spatial distribution of distinct and unique canopy structures was mapped across the park and compared to a vegetation-type map to determine the correlation of canopy structure to vegetation types. Preliminary analysis conducted at a number of phenology sites maintained by the Great Smoky Mountains Institute at Tremont shows strong correspondence between canopy structure and vegetation type. However, more validation is needed in other regions of the park to establish this method as a reliable tool. LiDAR data has a unique ability to map full 3D structures of vegetation and the methods developed in this project offer an extensible tool for forest mapping and monitoring.

  17. Flying Under the LiDAR: Relating Forest Structure to Bat Community Diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, A. C.; Weishampel, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    Bats are important to many ecological processes such as pollination, insect (and by proxy, disease) control, and seed dispersal and can be used to monitor ecosystem health. However, they are facing unprecedented extinction risks from habitat degradation as well as pressures from pathogens (e.g., white-nose syndrome) and wind turbines. LiDAR allows ecologists to measure structural variables of forested landscapes with increased precision and accuracy at broader spatial scales than previously possible. This study used airborne LiDAR to classify forest habitat/canopy structure at the Ordway-Swisher Biological Station (OSBS) in north central Florida. LiDAR data were acquired by the NEON airborne observation platform in summer 2014. OSBS consists of open-canopy pine savannas, closed-canopy hardwood hammocks, and seasonally wet prairies. Multiple forest structural parameters (e.g., mean, maximum, and standard deviation of height returns) were derived from LiDAR point clouds using the USDA software program FUSION. K-means clustering was used to segregate each 5x5 m raster across the ~3765 ha OSBS area into six different clusters based on the derived canopy metrics. Cluster averages for maximum, mean, and standard deviation of return heights ranged from 0 to 19.4 m, 0 to 15.3 m, and 0 to 3.0 m, respectively. To determine the relationships among these landscape-canopy features and bat species diversity and abundances, AnaBat II bat detectors were deployed from May to September in 2015 stratified by these distinct clusters. Bat calls were recorded from sunset to sunrise during each sampling period. Species were identified using AnalookW. A statistical regression model selection approach was performed in order to evaluate how forest attributes such as understory clutter, open regions, open and closed canopy, etc. influence bat communities. This knowledge provides a deeper understanding of habitat-species interactions to better manage survival of these species.

  18. Road centerline extraction from airborne LiDAR point cloud based on hierarchical fusion and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Zhenyang; Hu, Youjian; Jin, Shuanggen; Yevenyo, Yao Ziggah

    2016-08-01

    Road information acquisition is an important part of city informatization construction. Airborne LiDAR provides a new means of acquiring road information. However, the existing road extraction methods using LiDAR point clouds always decide the road intensity threshold based on experience, which cannot obtain the optimal threshold to extract a road point cloud. Moreover, these existing methods are deficient in removing the interference of narrow roads and several attached areas (e.g., parking lot and bare ground) to main roads extraction, thereby imparting low completeness and correctness to the city road network extraction result. Aiming at resolving the key technical issues of road extraction from airborne LiDAR point clouds, this paper proposes a novel method to extract road centerlines from airborne LiDAR point clouds. The proposed approach is mainly composed of three key algorithms, namely, Skewness balancing, Rotating neighborhood, and Hierarchical fusion and optimization (SRH). The skewness balancing algorithm used for the filtering was adopted as a new method for obtaining an optimal intensity threshold such that the "pure" road point cloud can be obtained. The rotating neighborhood algorithm on the other hand was developed to remove narrow roads (corridors leading to parking lots or sidewalks), which are not the main roads to be extracted. The proposed hierarchical fusion and optimization algorithm caused the road centerlines to be unaffected by certain attached areas and ensured the road integrity as much as possible. The proposed method was tested using the Vaihingen dataset. The results demonstrated that the proposed method can effectively extract road centerlines in a complex urban environment with 91.4% correctness and 80.4% completeness.

  19. 3D campus modeling using LiDAR point cloud data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, Yoshiyuki; Yoshii, Satoshi; Funatsu, Yukihiro; Takemata, Kazuya

    2012-10-01

    The importance of having a 3D urban city model is recognized in many applications, such as management offices of risk and disaster, the offices for city planning and developing and others. As an example of urban model, we reconstructed 3D KIT campus manually in this study, by utilizing airborne LiDAR point cloud data. The automatic extraction of building shapes was left in future work.

  20. Urban 3D GIS From LiDAR and digital aerial images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Guoqing; Song, C.; Simmers, J.; Cheng, P.

    2004-05-01

    This paper presents a method, which integrates image knowledge and Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) point cloud data for urban digital terrain model (DTM) and digital building model (DBM) generation. The DBM is an Object-Oriented data structure, in which each building is considered as a building object, i.e., an entity of the building class. The attributes of each building include roof types, polygons of the roof surfaces, height, parameters describing the roof surfaces, and the LiDAR point array within the roof surfaces. Each polygon represents a roof surface of building. This type of data structure is flexible for adding other building attributes in future, such as texture information and wall information. Using image knowledge extracted, we developed a new method of interpolating LiDAR raw data into grid digital surface model (DSM) with considering the steep discontinuities of buildings. In this interpolation method, the LiDAR data points, which are located in the polygon of roof surfaces, first are determined, and then interpolation via planar equation is employed for grid DSM generation. The basic steps of our research are: (1) edge detection by digital image processing algorithms; (2) complete extraction of the building roof edges by digital image processing and human-computer interactive operation; (3) establishment of DBM; (4) generation of DTM by removing surface objects. Finally, we implement the above functions by MS VC++ programming. The outcome of urban 3D DSM, DTM and DBM is exported into urban database for urban 3D GIS.

  1. Characterizing active volcanic processes at Kilauea volcano using LiDAR scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeWinter, A. L.; Finnegan, D. C.; Patrick, M. R.; Anderson, S. W.; Orr, T. R.

    2012-12-01

    Active craters and lava lakes evolve in response to a variety of volcanic processes. Quantifying those changes can be difficult or even impossible, for safety reasons, due to the technical limitations of sensors that require a minimum standoff distance. In recent years, advancements in ground-based Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) scanners and accessibility to these systems have enhanced our ability to capture data in a diversity of volcanic settings at the highest spatial and temporal resolutions yet seen. Moreover, advancements in full-waveform digitization have significantly improved the ability to acquire data in environments where ash, steam, and sulfur dioxide emissions have historically hampered efforts. Kilauea's ongoing summit eruption, which began in March 2008, has been characterized in part by the evolution of its vent into a 160-meter diameter collapse crater holding an active lava lake. This process has been documented in detail by field and webcam observations, but has not been accurately quantified. Our research focuses on acquiring repeat, high-resolution full-waveform LiDAR data throughout 2012 to monitor changes in the geometry of Kilauea's active lava lake and the crater to which it is confined. We collected LiDAR data in February and July 2012, with plans for an additional survey in October 2012. Our results show changes in the shape of the vent walls and the shape and level of the confined lava lake. Specifically, the LiDAR data has revealed 1) changes in the lava lake level, corresponding to tiltmeter observations of pressure fluctuations in the summit magma reservoir, 2) enlargement of the vent cavity, due to frequent rock falls, and 3) modifications to the lake size and surrounding lava ledges due to competing processes of accretion and collapse. The rapid acquisition of repeat, high-resolution topographic data enables researchers to more accurately characterize shape and volume changes involved in a range of eruptive systems, while

  2. NASA Goddards LiDAR, Hyperspectral and Thermal (G-LiHT) Airborne Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Bruce D.; Corp, Lawrence A.; Nelson, Ross F.; Middleton, Elizabeth M.; Morton, Douglas C.; McCorkel, Joel T.; Masek, Jeffrey G.; Ranson, Kenneth J.; Ly, Vuong; Montesano, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    The combination of LiDAR and optical remotely sensed data provides unique information about ecosystem structure and function. Here, we describe the development, validation and application of a new airborne system that integrates commercial off the shelf LiDAR hyperspectral and thermal components in a compact, lightweight and portable system. Goddard's LiDAR, Hyperspectral and Thermal (G-LiHT) airborne imager is a unique system that permits simultaneous measurements of vegetation structure, foliar spectra and surface temperatures at very high spatial resolution (approximately 1 m) on a wide range of airborne platforms. The complementary nature of LiDAR, optical and thermal data provide an analytical framework for the development of new algorithms to map plant species composition, plant functional types, biodiversity, biomass and carbon stocks, and plant growth. In addition, G-LiHT data enhance our ability to validate data from existing satellite missions and support NASA Earth Science research. G-LiHT's data processing and distribution system is designed to give scientists open access to both low- and high-level data products (http://gliht.gsfc.nasa.gov), which will stimulate the community development of synergistic data fusion algorithms. G-LiHT has been used to collect more than 6,500 km2 of data for NASA-sponsored studies across a broad range of ecoregions in the USA and Mexico. In this paper, we document G-LiHT design considerations, physical specifications, instrument performance and calibration and acquisition parameters. In addition, we describe the data processing system and higher-level data products that are freely distributed under NASA's Data and Information policy.

  3. Effects of LiDAR point density, sampling size and height threshold on estimation accuracy of crop biophysical parameters.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shezhou; Chen, Jing M; Wang, Cheng; Xi, Xiaohuan; Zeng, Hongcheng; Peng, Dailiang; Li, Dong

    2016-05-30

    Vegetation leaf area index (LAI), height, and aboveground biomass are key biophysical parameters. Corn is an important and globally distributed crop, and reliable estimations of these parameters are essential for corn yield forecasting, health monitoring and ecosystem modeling. Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) is considered an effective technology for estimating vegetation biophysical parameters. However, the estimation accuracies of these parameters are affected by multiple factors. In this study, we first estimated corn LAI, height and biomass (R2 = 0.80, 0.874 and 0.838, respectively) using the original LiDAR data (7.32 points/m2), and the results showed that LiDAR data could accurately estimate these biophysical parameters. Second, comprehensive research was conducted on the effects of LiDAR point density, sampling size and height threshold on the estimation accuracy of LAI, height and biomass. Our findings indicated that LiDAR point density had an important effect on the estimation accuracy for vegetation biophysical parameters, however, high point density did not always produce highly accurate estimates, and reduced point density could deliver reasonable estimation results. Furthermore, the results showed that sampling size and height threshold were additional key factors that affect the estimation accuracy of biophysical parameters. Therefore, the optimal sampling size and the height threshold should be determined to improve the estimation accuracy of biophysical parameters. Our results also implied that a higher LiDAR point density, larger sampling size and height threshold were required to obtain accurate corn LAI estimation when compared with height and biomass estimations. In general, our results provide valuable guidance for LiDAR data acquisition and estimation of vegetation biophysical parameters using LiDAR data. PMID:27410085

  4. Effects of LiDAR point density, sampling size and height threshold on estimation accuracy of crop biophysical parameters.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shezhou; Chen, Jing M; Wang, Cheng; Xi, Xiaohuan; Zeng, Hongcheng; Peng, Dailiang; Li, Dong

    2016-05-30

    Vegetation leaf area index (LAI), height, and aboveground biomass are key biophysical parameters. Corn is an important and globally distributed crop, and reliable estimations of these parameters are essential for corn yield forecasting, health monitoring and ecosystem modeling. Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) is considered an effective technology for estimating vegetation biophysical parameters. However, the estimation accuracies of these parameters are affected by multiple factors. In this study, we first estimated corn LAI, height and biomass (R2 = 0.80, 0.874 and 0.838, respectively) using the original LiDAR data (7.32 points/m2), and the results showed that LiDAR data could accurately estimate these biophysical parameters. Second, comprehensive research was conducted on the effects of LiDAR point density, sampling size and height threshold on the estimation accuracy of LAI, height and biomass. Our findings indicated that LiDAR point density had an important effect on the estimation accuracy for vegetation biophysical parameters, however, high point density did not always produce highly accurate estimates, and reduced point density could deliver reasonable estimation results. Furthermore, the results showed that sampling size and height threshold were additional key factors that affect the estimation accuracy of biophysical parameters. Therefore, the optimal sampling size and the height threshold should be determined to improve the estimation accuracy of biophysical parameters. Our results also implied that a higher LiDAR point density, larger sampling size and height threshold were required to obtain accurate corn LAI estimation when compared with height and biomass estimations. In general, our results provide valuable guidance for LiDAR data acquisition and estimation of vegetation biophysical parameters using LiDAR data.

  5. Motion field estimation for a dynamic scene using a 3D LiDAR.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingquan; Zhang, Liang; Mao, Qingzhou; Zou, Qin; Zhang, Pin; Feng, Shaojun; Ochieng, Washington

    2014-09-09

    This paper proposes a novel motion field estimation method based on a 3D light detection and ranging (LiDAR) sensor for motion sensing for intelligent driverless vehicles and active collision avoidance systems. Unlike multiple target tracking methods, which estimate the motion state of detected targets, such as cars and pedestrians, motion field estimation regards the whole scene as a motion field in which each little element has its own motion state. Compared to multiple target tracking, segmentation errors and data association errors have much less significance in motion field estimation, making it more accurate and robust. This paper presents an intact 3D LiDAR-based motion field estimation method, including pre-processing, a theoretical framework for the motion field estimation problem and practical solutions. The 3D LiDAR measurements are first projected to small-scale polar grids, and then, after data association and Kalman filtering, the motion state of every moving grid is estimated. To reduce computing time, a fast data association algorithm is proposed. Furthermore, considering the spatial correlation of motion among neighboring grids, a novel spatial-smoothing algorithm is also presented to optimize the motion field. The experimental results using several data sets captured in different cities indicate that the proposed motion field estimation is able to run in real-time and performs robustly and effectively.

  6. Motion Field Estimation for a Dynamic Scene Using a 3D LiDAR

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingquan; Zhang, Liang; Mao, Qingzhou; Zou, Qin; Zhang, Pin; Feng, Shaojun; Ochieng, Washington

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel motion field estimation method based on a 3D light detection and ranging (LiDAR) sensor for motion sensing for intelligent driverless vehicles and active collision avoidance systems. Unlike multiple target tracking methods, which estimate the motion state of detected targets, such as cars and pedestrians, motion field estimation regards the whole scene as a motion field in which each little element has its own motion state. Compared to multiple target tracking, segmentation errors and data association errors have much less significance in motion field estimation, making it more accurate and robust. This paper presents an intact 3D LiDAR-based motion field estimation method, including pre-processing, a theoretical framework for the motion field estimation problem and practical solutions. The 3D LiDAR measurements are first projected to small-scale polar grids, and then, after data association and Kalman filtering, the motion state of every moving grid is estimated. To reduce computing time, a fast data association algorithm is proposed. Furthermore, considering the spatial correlation of motion among neighboring grids, a novel spatial-smoothing algorithm is also presented to optimize the motion field. The experimental results using several data sets captured in different cities indicate that the proposed motion field estimation is able to run in real-time and performs robustly and effectively. PMID:25207868

  7. Phylogenetic relationships between four Salix L. species based on DArT markers.

    PubMed

    Przyborowski, Jerzy A; Sulima, Paweł; Kuszewska, Anna; Załuski, Dariusz; Kilian, Andrzej

    2013-12-11

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the usefulness of DArT markers in genotypic identification of willow species and describe genetic relationships between four willow species: Salix viminalis, S. purpurea, S. alba and S. triandra. The experimental plant material comprised 53 willow genotypes of these four species, which are popularly grown in Poland. DArT markers seem to identify Salix species with a high degree of accuracy. As a result, the examined species were divided into four distinct groups which corresponded to the four analyzed species. In our study, we observed that S. triandra was very different genetically from the other species, including S. alba which is generally classified into the same subgenus of Salix. The above corroborates the findings of other authors who relied on molecular methods to reveal that the classification of S. triandra to the subgenus Salix was erroneous. The Principal Coordinate Analysis (PCoA) and the neighbor-joining dendrogram also confirmed the clear division of the studied willow genotypes into four clusters corresponding to individual species. This confirmed the usefulness of DArT markers in taxonomic analyses and identification of willow species.

  8. Assessment of human thermal perception in the hot-humid climate of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ndetto, Emmanuel L.; Matzarakis, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, is a typical African city along the Indian Ocean coast, and therefore an important urban area to examine human thermal perception in the hot-humid tropical climate. Earlier research on human bioclimate at Dar es Salaam indicated that heat stress prevails during the hot season from October to March, peaking between December and February, particularly the early afternoons. In order to assess the human thermal perception and adaptation, two popular places, one at an urban park and another at a beach environment, were selected and questionnaire surveys were conducted in August-September 2013 and January 2014, concurrently with local micro-meteorological measurements at survey locations. The thermal conditions were quantified in terms of the thermal index of the physiologically equivalent temperature (PET) using the micro-scale climate model RayMan. The thermal comfort range of human thermal comfort and the local thermal adaptive capacity were determined in respect to the thermal index by binning thermal sensation votes. The thermal comfort range was found to be well above that in temperate climates at about 23-31 °C of PET. The study could significantly contribute to urban planning in Dar es Salaam and other coastal cities in the tropics.

  9. Flood damage analysis: uncertainties for first floor elevation yielded from LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodoque, Jose Maria; Aroca-Jimenez, Estefania; Guardiola-Albert, Carolina; Eguibar, Miguel Angel

    2016-04-01

    The use of high resolution ground-base light detection and ranging (LiDAR) datasets provide the spatial density and vertical precisión to obtain Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) highly accurate. As a result, reliability of flood damage analysis has been improved significantly, as accuracy of hydrodinamic model is increased. Additionally, an important error reduction also takes place in estimating first floor elevation, which is a critical parameter to determine structural and content damages in buildings. However, justlike any discrete measurement technique, LiDAR data contain object space ambiguities, especially in urban areas where the presence of buildings and the floodplain determines a highly complex landscape that is largely corrected by using data ancillory information based on breaklines. Here, we provide an uncertainty assessment based on: a) improvement of DEMs to be used in flood damage based on adding breaklines as ancillary information; b) geostatistical estimation of errors in DEMs; c) implementing a 2D hydrodynamic model considering the 500 yr flood return period; and d) determining first floor elevation uncertainty. As main conclusion of this study, worth to outline the need of processing raw LiDAR in order to generate efficient and high-quality DEMs that minimize the uncertainty of determining first-floor elevation and, as a result, reliability of flood damage assessment is increased.

  10. Range determination for generating point clouds from airborne small footprint LiDAR waveforms.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yuchu; Vu, Tuong Thuy; Ban, Yifang; Niu, Zheng

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents a range determination approach for generating point clouds from small footprint LiDAR waveforms. Waveform deformation over complex terrain area is simulated using convolution. Drift of the peak center position is analyzed to identify the first echo returned by the illuminated objects in the LiDAR footprint. An approximate start point of peak in the waveform is estimated and adopted as the indicator of range calculation; range correction method is proposed to correct pulse widening over complex terrain surface. The experiment was carried out on small footprint LiDAR waveform data acquired by RIEGL LMS-Q560. The results suggest that the proposed approach generates more points than standard commercial products; based on field measurements, a comparative analysis between the point clouds generated by the proposed approach and the commercial software GeocodeWF indicates that: 1). the proposed approach obtained more accurate tree heights; 2). smooth surface can be achieved with low standard deviation. In summary, the proposed approach provides a satisfactory solution for range determination in estimating 3D coordinate values of point clouds, especially for correcting range information of waveforms containing deformed peaks.

  11. An Efficient Method for Automatic Road Extraction Based on Multiple Features from LiDAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Hu, X.; Guan, H.; Liu, P.

    2016-06-01

    The road extraction in urban areas is difficult task due to the complicated patterns and many contextual objects. LiDAR data directly provides three dimensional (3D) points with less occlusions and smaller shadows. The elevation information and surface roughness are distinguishing features to separate roads. However, LiDAR data has some disadvantages are not beneficial to object extraction, such as the irregular distribution of point clouds and lack of clear edges of roads. For these problems, this paper proposes an automatic road centerlines extraction method which has three major steps: (1) road center point detection based on multiple feature spatial clustering for separating road points from ground points, (2) local principal component analysis with least squares fitting for extracting the primitives of road centerlines, and (3) hierarchical grouping for connecting primitives into complete roads network. Compared with MTH (consist of Mean shift algorithm, Tensor voting, and Hough transform) proposed in our previous article, this method greatly reduced the computational cost. To evaluate the proposed method, the Vaihingen data set, a benchmark testing data provided by ISPRS for "Urban Classification and 3D Building Reconstruction" project, was selected. The experimental results show that our method achieve the same performance by less time in road extraction using LiDAR data.

  12. Geodetic imaging with airborne LiDAR: the Earth's surface revealed.

    PubMed

    Glennie, C L; Carter, W E; Shrestha, R L; Dietrich, W E

    2013-08-01

    The past decade has seen an explosive increase in the number of peer reviewed papers reporting new scientific findings in geomorphology (including fans, channels, floodplains and landscape evolution), geologic mapping, tectonics and faulting, coastal processes, lava flows, hydrology (especially snow and runoff routing), glaciers and geo-archaeology. A common genesis of such findings is often newly available decimeter resolution 'bare Earth' geodetic images, derived from airborne laser swath mapping, a.k.a. airborne LiDAR, observations. In this paper we trace nearly a half century of advances in geodetic science made possible by space age technology, such as the invention of short-pulse-length high-pulse-rate lasers, solid state inertial measurement units, chip-based high speed electronics and the GPS satellite navigation system, that today make it possible to map hundreds of square kilometers of terrain in hours, even in areas covered with dense vegetation or shallow water. To illustrate the impact of the LiDAR observations we present examples of geodetic images that are not only stunning to the eye, but help researchers to develop quantitative models explaining how terrain evolved to its present form, and how it will likely change with time. Airborne LiDAR technology continues to develop quickly, promising ever more scientific discoveries in the years ahead. PMID:23828665

  13. Geodetic imaging with airborne LiDAR: the Earth's surface revealed.

    PubMed

    Glennie, C L; Carter, W E; Shrestha, R L; Dietrich, W E

    2013-08-01

    The past decade has seen an explosive increase in the number of peer reviewed papers reporting new scientific findings in geomorphology (including fans, channels, floodplains and landscape evolution), geologic mapping, tectonics and faulting, coastal processes, lava flows, hydrology (especially snow and runoff routing), glaciers and geo-archaeology. A common genesis of such findings is often newly available decimeter resolution 'bare Earth' geodetic images, derived from airborne laser swath mapping, a.k.a. airborne LiDAR, observations. In this paper we trace nearly a half century of advances in geodetic science made possible by space age technology, such as the invention of short-pulse-length high-pulse-rate lasers, solid state inertial measurement units, chip-based high speed electronics and the GPS satellite navigation system, that today make it possible to map hundreds of square kilometers of terrain in hours, even in areas covered with dense vegetation or shallow water. To illustrate the impact of the LiDAR observations we present examples of geodetic images that are not only stunning to the eye, but help researchers to develop quantitative models explaining how terrain evolved to its present form, and how it will likely change with time. Airborne LiDAR technology continues to develop quickly, promising ever more scientific discoveries in the years ahead.

  14. Range determination for generating point clouds from airborne small footprint LiDAR waveforms.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yuchu; Vu, Tuong Thuy; Ban, Yifang; Niu, Zheng

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents a range determination approach for generating point clouds from small footprint LiDAR waveforms. Waveform deformation over complex terrain area is simulated using convolution. Drift of the peak center position is analyzed to identify the first echo returned by the illuminated objects in the LiDAR footprint. An approximate start point of peak in the waveform is estimated and adopted as the indicator of range calculation; range correction method is proposed to correct pulse widening over complex terrain surface. The experiment was carried out on small footprint LiDAR waveform data acquired by RIEGL LMS-Q560. The results suggest that the proposed approach generates more points than standard commercial products; based on field measurements, a comparative analysis between the point clouds generated by the proposed approach and the commercial software GeocodeWF indicates that: 1). the proposed approach obtained more accurate tree heights; 2). smooth surface can be achieved with low standard deviation. In summary, the proposed approach provides a satisfactory solution for range determination in estimating 3D coordinate values of point clouds, especially for correcting range information of waveforms containing deformed peaks. PMID:23187409

  15. Automatic extraction of highway light poles and towers from mobile LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wai Yeung; Morsy, Salem; Shaker, Ahmed; Tulloch, Mark

    2016-03-01

    Mobile LiDAR has been recently demonstrated as a viable technique for pole-like object detection and classification. Despite that a desirable accuracy (around 80%) has been reported in the existing studies, majority of them were presented in the street level with relatively flat ground and very few of them addressed how to extract the entire pole structure from the ground or curb surface. Therefore, this paper attempts to fill the research gap by presenting a workflow for automatic extraction of light poles and towers from mobile LiDAR data point cloud, with a particular focus on municipal highway. The data processing workflow includes (1) an automatic ground filtering mechanism to separate aboveground and ground features, (2) an unsupervised clustering algorithm to cluster the aboveground data point cloud, (3) a set of decision rules to identify and classify potential light poles and towers, and (4) a least-squares circle fitting algorithm to fit the circular pole structure so as to remove the ground points. The workflow was tested with a set of mobile LiDAR data collected for a section of highway 401 located in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The results showed that the proposed method can achieve an over 91% of detection rate for five types of light poles and towers along the study area.

  16. Sociocultural factors that reduce risks of homicide in Dar es Salaam: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    Kibusi, Stephen Matthew; Ohnishi, Mayumi; Outwater, Anne; Seino, Kaoruko; Kizuki, Masashi; Takano, Takehito

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study was performed to examine the potential contributions of sociocultural activities to reduce risks of death by homicide. Methods This study was designed as a case control study. Relatives of 90 adult homicide victims in Dar es Salaam Region, Tanzania, in 2005 were interviewed. As controls, 211 participants matched for sex and 5-year age group were randomly selected from the same region and interviewed regarding the same contents. Results Bivariate analysis revealed significant differences between victims and controls regarding educational status, occupation, family structure, frequent heavy drinking, hard drug use and religious attendance. Conditional logistic regression analysis indicated that the following factors were significantly related to not becoming victims of homicide: being in employment (unskilled labour: OR=0.04, skilled labour: OR=0.07, others: OR=0.04), higher educational status (OR=0.02), residence in Dar es Salaam after becoming an adult (compared with those who have resided in Dar es Salaam since birth: OR=3.95), living with another person (OR=0.07), not drinking alcohol frequently (OR=0.15) and frequent religious service attendance (OR=0.12). Conclusions Frequent religious service attendance, living in the same place for a long time and living with another person were shown to be factors that contribute to preventing death by homicide, regardless of place of residence and neighbourhood environment. Existing non-structural community resources and social cohesive networks strengthen individual and community resilience against violence. PMID:23322260

  17. Downstream hydraulic geometry relationships: Gathering reference reach-scale width values from LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofia, G.; Tarolli, P.; Cazorzi, F.; Dalla Fontana, G.

    2015-12-01

    This paper examines the ability of LiDAR topography to provide reach-scale width values for the analysis of downstream hydraulic geometry relationships along some streams in the Dolomites (northern Italy). Multiple reach-scale dimensions can provide representative geometries and statistics characterising the longitudinal variability in the channel, improving the understanding of geomorphic processes across networks. Starting from the minimum curvature derived from a LiDAR DTM, the proposed algorithm uses a statistical approach for the identification of the scale of analysis, and for the automatic characterisation of reach-scale bankfull widths. The downstream adjustment in channel morphology is then related to flow parameters (drainage area and stream power). With the correct planning of a LiDAR survey, uncertainties in the procedure are principally due to the resolution of the DTM. The outputs are in general comparable in quality to field survey measurements, and the procedure allows the quick comparison among different watersheds. The proposed automatic approach could improve knowledge about river systems with highly variable widths, and about systems in areas covered by vegetation or inaccessible to field surveys. With proven effectiveness, this research could offer an interesting starting point for the analysis of differences between watersheds, and to improve knowledge about downstream channel adjustment in relation, for example, to scale and landscape forcing (e.g. sediment transport, tectonics, lithology, climate, geomorphology, and anthropic pressure).

  18. Supporting Indonesia's National Forest Monitoring System with LiDAR Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    Scientists at Applied GeoSolutions, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Winrock International, and the University of New Hampshire are working with the government of Indonesia to enhance the National Forest Monitoring System in Kalimantan, Indonesia. The establishment of a reliable, transparent, and comprehensive NFMS has been limited by a dearth of relevant data that are accurate, low-cost, and spatially resolved at subnational scales. In this NASA funded project, we are developing, evaluating, and validating several critical components of a NFMS in Kalimantan, Indonesia, focusing on the use of LiDAR and radar imagery for improved carbon stock and forest degradation information. Applied GeoSolutions and the University of New Hampshire have developed an Open Source Software package to process large amounts LiDAR data quickly, easily, and accurately. The Open Source project is called lidar2dems and includes the classification of raw LAS point clouds and the creation of Digital Terrain Models (DTMs), Digital Surface Models (DSMs), and Canopy Height Models (CHMs). Preliminary estimates of forest structure and forest damage from logging from these data sets support the idea that comprehensive, well documented, freely available software for processing LiDAR data can enable countries such as Indonesia to cost effectively monitor their forests with high precision.

  19. [Estimating individual tree aboveground biomass of the mid-subtropical forest using airborne LiDAR technology].

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Tan, Chang; Lei, Pi-Feng

    2014-11-01

    Taking Wugang forest farm in Xuefeng Mountain as the research object, using the airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data under leaf-on condition and field data of concomitant plots, this paper assessed the ability of using LiDAR technology to estimate aboveground biomass of the mid-subtropical forest. A semi-automated individual tree LiDAR cloud point segmentation was obtained by using condition random fields and optimization methods. Spatial structure, waveform characteristics and topography were calculated as LiDAR metrics from the segmented objects. Then statistical models between aboveground biomass from field data and these LiDAR metrics were built. The individual tree recognition rates were 93%, 86% and 60% for coniferous, broadleaf and mixed forests, respectively. The adjusted coefficients of determination (R(2)adj) and the root mean squared errors (RMSE) for the three types of forest were 0.83, 0.81 and 0.74, and 28.22, 29.79 and 32.31 t · hm(-2), respectively. The estimation capability of model based on canopy geometric volume, tree percentile height, slope and waveform characteristics was much better than that of traditional regression model based on tree height. Therefore, LiDAR metrics from individual tree could facilitate better performance in biomass estimation.

  20. Timely binding of IHF and Fis to DARS2 regulates ATP–DnaA production and replication initiation

    PubMed Central

    Kasho, Kazutoshi; Fujimitsu, Kazuyuki; Matoba, Toshihiro; Oshima, Taku; Katayama, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the ATP-bound form of DnaA (ATP–DnaA) promotes replication initiation. During replication, the bound ATP is hydrolyzed to ADP to yield the ADP-bound form (ADP–DnaA), which is inactive for initiation. The chromosomal site DARS2 facilitates the regeneration of ATP–DnaA by catalyzing nucleotide exchange between free ATP and ADP bound to DnaA. However, the regulatory mechanisms governing this exchange reaction are unclear. Here, using in vitro reconstituted experiments, we show that two nucleoid-associated proteins, IHF and Fis, bind site-specifically to DARS2 to activate coordinately the exchange reaction. The regenerated ATP–DnaA was fully active in replication initiation and underwent DnaA–ATP hydrolysis. ADP–DnaA formed heteromultimeric complexes with IHF and Fis on DARS2, and underwent nucleotide dissociation more efficiently than ATP–DnaA. Consistently, mutant analyses demonstrated that specific binding of IHF and Fis to DARS2 stimulates the formation of ATP–DnaA production, thereby promoting timely initiation. Moreover, we show that IHF–DARS2 binding is temporally regulated during the cell cycle, whereas Fis only binds to DARS2 in exponentially growing cells. These results elucidate the regulation of ATP–DnaA and replication initiation in coordination with the cell cycle and growth phase. PMID:25378325

  1. Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd Isotope Systematics of Shergottite NWA 856: Crystallization Age and Implications for Alteration of Hot Desert SNC Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, A. D.; Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C.-Y.; Wiesmann, H.

    2004-01-01

    Nakhlite NWA 998 was discovered in Algeria in 2001, and is unique among the six known members of this group of Martian meteorites in containing significant modal orthopyroxene. Initial petrologic and isotopic data were reported by Irving et al. This 456 gram stone consists mainly of sub-calcic augite with subordinate olivine and minor orthopyroxene, titanomagnetite, pyrrhotite, chlorapatite, and intercumulus An(sub 35) plagioclase. We report here preliminary results of radiogenic isotopic analyses conducted on fragmental material from the main mass.

  2. Mobile LiDAR Measurement for Aerosol Investigation in South-Central Hebei, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    qin, kai; Wu, Lixin; Zheng, Yunhui; Wong Man, Sing; Wang, Runfeng; Hu, Mingyu; Lang, Hongmei; Wang, Luyao; Bai, Yang; Rao, Lanlan

    2016-04-01

    With the rapid industrialization and urbanization in China during the last decades, the increasing anthropogenic pollutant emissions have significantly caused serious air pollution problems which are adversely influencing public health. Hebei is one of the most air polluted provinces in China. In January 2013, an extremely severe and persistent haze episode with record-breaking PM2.5 outbreak affecting hundreds of millions of people occurred over eastern and northern China. During that haze episode, 7 of the top 10 most polluted cities in China were located in the Hebei Province according to the report of China's Ministry of Environmental Protection. To investigate and the spatial difference and to characterize the vertical distribution of aerosol in different regions of south-central Hebei, mobile measurements were carried out using a mini micro pulse LiDAR system (model: MiniMPL) in March 2014. The mobile LiDAR kit consisting of a MiniMPL, a vibration reduction mount, a power inverter, a Windows surface tablet and a GPS receiver were mounted in a car watching though the sunroof opening. For comparison, a fixed measurement using a traditional micro pulse LiDAR system (model: MPL-4B) was conducted simultaneously in Shijiazhuang, the capital of Hebei Province. The equipped car was driven from downtown Shijiazhuang by way of suburban and rural area to downtown Cangzhou, Handan, and Baoding respectively at almost stable speed around 100Km per hour along different routes which counted in total more than 1000Km. The results can be summarized as: 1) the spatial distribution of total aerosol optical depth along the measurement routes in south-central Hebei was controlled by local terrain and population in general, with high values in downtown and suburban in the plain areas, and low values in rural areas along Taihang mountain to the west and Yan mountain to the north; 2) obviously high AODs were obtained at roads crossing points, inside densely populated area and nearby

  3. Al Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandanayaka, Tharaka; Azarmi, Fardad

    2014-05-01

    In the present study, cold spraying technique was used to fabricate a metal matrix composite (MMC) that consists of Ni matrix and 20 vol.% Ni3Al particles at two different particle sizes as reinforcement. This study intends to investigate the effect of reinforcement particle size on microstructural and mechanical properties of cold sprayed MMCs. Two different Ni3Al powders with nominal particle size of -45 to +5 and +45 to 100 μm were used as reinforcement in this study. Cold sprayed Ni-Ni3Al samples were subjected to the microstructural observation and characterization prior to any mechanical testing. Then, samples were tested using nano-indentation, Knoop hardness, Vickers hardness, and Resonance frequency to evaluate their mechanical properties. No significant changes were observed in microstructural characteristics due to different particle sizes. The results obtained from a variety of mechanical testings indicated that the increasing reinforcement particle size resulted in the slight reduction of mechanical properties such as elastic modulus and hardness in cold sprayed MMCs. The mechanical interlock between deposited particles defines the bonding strength in cold sprayed samples. Small size particles have a higher velocity and impact resulting in stronger interlock between deformed particles.

  4. Buildings classification from airborne LiDAR point clouds through OBIA and ontology driven approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomljenovic, Ivan; Belgiu, Mariana; Lampoltshammer, Thomas J.

    2013-04-01

    In the last years, airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data proved to be a valuable information resource for a vast number of applications ranging from land cover mapping to individual surface feature extraction from complex urban environments. To extract information from LiDAR data, users apply prior knowledge. Unfortunately, there is no consistent initiative for structuring this knowledge into data models that can be shared and reused across different applications and domains. The absence of such models poses great challenges to data interpretation, data fusion and integration as well as information transferability. The intention of this work is to describe the design, development and deployment of an ontology-based system to classify buildings from airborne LiDAR data. The novelty of this approach consists of the development of a domain ontology that specifies explicitly the knowledge used to extract features from airborne LiDAR data. The overall goal of this approach is to investigate the possibility for classification of features of interest from LiDAR data by means of domain ontology. The proposed workflow is applied to the building extraction process for the region of "Biberach an der Riss" in South Germany. Strip-adjusted and georeferenced airborne LiDAR data is processed based on geometrical and radiometric signatures stored within the point cloud. Region-growing segmentation algorithms are applied and segmented regions are exported to the GeoJSON format. Subsequently, the data is imported into the ontology-based reasoning process used to automatically classify exported features of interest. Based on the ontology it becomes possible to define domain concepts, associated properties and relations. As a consequence, the resulting specific body of knowledge restricts possible interpretation variants. Moreover, ontologies are machinable and thus it is possible to run reasoning on top of them. Available reasoners (FACT++, JESS, Pellet) are used to check

  5. LESTO: an Open Source GIS-based toolbox for LiDAR analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franceschi, Silvia; Antonello, Andrea; Tonon, Giustino

    2015-04-01

    During the last five years different research institutes and private companies stared to implement new algorithms to analyze and extract features from LiDAR data but only a few of them also created a public available software. In the field of forestry there are different examples of software that can be used to extract the vegetation parameters from LiDAR data, unfortunately most of them are closed source (even if free), which means that the source code is not shared with the public for anyone to look at or make changes to. In 2014 we started the development of the library LESTO (LiDAR Empowered Sciences Toolbox Opensource): a set of modules for the analysis of LiDAR point cloud with an Open Source approach with the aim of improving the performance of the extraction of the volume of biomass and other vegetation parameters on large areas for mixed forest structures. LESTO contains a set of modules for data handling and analysis implemented within the JGrassTools spatial processing library. The main subsections are dedicated to 1) preprocessing of LiDAR raw data mainly in LAS format (utilities and filtering); 2) creation of raster derived products; 3) flight-lines identification and normalization of the intensity values; 4) tools for extraction of vegetation and buildings. The core of the LESTO library is the extraction of the vegetation parameters. We decided to follow the single tree based approach starting with the implementation of some of the most used algorithms in literature. These have been tweaked and applied on LiDAR derived raster datasets (DTM, DSM) as well as point clouds of raw data. The methods range between the simple extraction of tops and crowns from local maxima, the region growing method, the watershed method and individual tree segmentation on point clouds. The validation procedure consists in finding the matching between field and LiDAR-derived measurements at individual tree and plot level. An automatic validation procedure has been developed

  6. Seagrass Identification Using High-Resolution 532nm Bathymetric LiDAR and Hyperspectral Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Z.; Prasad, S.; Starek, M. J.; Fernandez Diaz, J. C.; Glennie, C. L.; Carter, W. E.; Shrestha, R. L.; Singhania, A.; Gibeaut, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    Seagrass provides vital habitat for marine fisheries and is a key indicator species of coastal ecosystem vitality. Monitoring seagrass is therefore an important environmental initiative, but measuring details of seagrass distribution over large areas via remote sensing has proved challenging. Developments in airborne bathymetric light detection and ranging (LiDAR) provide great potential in this regard. Traditional bathymetric LiDAR systems have been limited in their ability to map within the shallow water zone (< 1 m) where seagrass is typically present due to limitations in receiver response and laser pulse length. Emergent short-pulse width bathymetric LiDAR sensors and waveform processing algorithms enable depth measurements in shallow water environments previously inaccessible. This 3D information of the benthic layer can be applied to detect seagrass and characterize its distribution. Researchers with the National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping (NCALM) at the University of Houston (UH) and the Coastal and Marine Geospatial Sciences Lab (CMGL) of the Harte Research Institute at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi conducted a coordinated airborne and boat-based survey of the Redfish Bay State Scientific Area as part of a collaborative study to investigate the capabilities of bathymetric LiDAR and hyperspectral imaging for seagrass mapping. Redfish Bay, located along the middle Texas coast of the Gulf of Mexico, is a state scientific area designated for the purpose of protecting and studying native seagrasses. Redfish Bay is part of the broader Coastal Bend Bays estuary system recognized by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as a national estuary of significance. For this survey, UH acquired high-resolution discrete-return and full-waveform bathymetric data using their Optech Aquarius 532 nm green LiDAR. In a separate flight, UH collected 2 sets of hyperspectral imaging data (1.2-m pixel resolution and 72 bands, and 0.6m pixel resolution and 36

  7. Regional reconnaissance of seasonal landslide activity in the Eel River catchment, northern California, using InSAR and airborne LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handwerger, A. L.; Schmidt, D. A.; Roering, J. J.

    2010-12-01

    Remote sensing techniques have greatly improved our ability to quantify deformation of the Earth’s surface and provide reconnaissance information with high temporal and spatial resolution. We use InSAR and airborne LiDAR to examine the spatial and temporal behavior of 15 landslides located in the Eel River catchment, northern California. The Eel River catchment is well known for its large, deep seated, slow-moving landslides. This region is ideal for landslide studies using InSAR because the landslides are continuously moving at a rate fast enough to observe deformation in a short time span, yet slow enough to avoid a loss in radar coherence (Roering et al., 2009). 10 of the 15 landslides presented here have not been previously identified using InSAR and were identified using statistical analysis to discriminate consistent small-scale deformation from artifacts. We produced 30 differential interferograms between February 2007 and May 2010 using ALOS PALSAR data from tracks 223 and 224 with the ROI_PAC processing package. The 15 identified landslides move at line-of sight rates ranging from 0.1 m yr -1 to 0.45 m yr -1, and have dimensions ranging from 0.5 to 5 km long and 0.27 to 3 km wide. To explore seasonal variations in landslide velocity, we construct InSAR time series from the inversion of small-baseline interferograms. Preliminary results show that slide acceleration lags the onset of rainfall events by weeks to months. Combining InSAR and a shaded relief LiDAR image, we identify distinct kinematic zones (e.g. source, transport, toe) within most landslides. This study demonstrates the capabilities of InSAR and airborne LiDAR to explore the spatial and temporal behavior of large, slow-moving landslides in a regional context. Although InSAR analyses of landslides is successful at this field site, there exists a bias toward optimally oriented landslides in our regional reconnaissance. InSAR is blind to surface displacement that is parallel to the satellite

  8. Quantifying soil carbon loss and uncertainty from a peatland wildfire using multi-temporal LiDAR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, Ashwan D.; Hawbaker, Todd J.; Wurster, F.; Zhu, Zhiliang; Ward, S.; Newcomb, Doug; Murray, R.

    2015-01-01

    Peatlands are a major reservoir of global soil carbon, yet account for just 3% of global land cover. Human impacts like draining can hinder the ability of peatlands to sequester carbon and expose their soils to fire under dry conditions. Estimating soil carbon loss from peat fires can be challenging due to uncertainty about pre-fire surface elevations. This study uses multi-temporal LiDAR to obtain pre- and post-fire elevations and estimate soil carbon loss caused by the 2011 Lateral West fire in the Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge, VA, USA. We also determine how LiDAR elevation error affects uncertainty in our carbon loss estimate by randomly perturbing the LiDAR point elevations and recalculating elevation change and carbon loss, iterating this process 1000 times. We calculated a total loss using LiDAR of 1.10 Tg C across the 25 km2 burned area. The fire burned an average of 47 cm deep, equivalent to 44 kg C/m2, a value larger than the 1997 Indonesian peat fires (29 kg C/m2). Carbon loss via the First-Order Fire Effects Model (FOFEM) was estimated to be 0.06 Tg C. Propagating the LiDAR elevation error to the carbon loss estimates, we calculated a standard deviation of 0.00009 Tg C, equivalent to 0.008% of total carbon loss. We conclude that LiDAR elevation error is not a significant contributor to uncertainty in soil carbon loss under severe fire conditions with substantial peat consumption. However, uncertainties may be more substantial when soil elevation loss is of a similar or smaller magnitude than the reported LiDAR error.

  9. Analysis of elevation changes detected from multi-temporal LiDAR surveys in forested landslide terrain in western Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, W.J.; Coe, J.A.; Kaya, B.S.; Ma, L.

    2010-01-01

    We examined elevation changes detected from two successive sets of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data in the northern Coast Range of Oregon. The first set of LiDAR data was acquired during leafon conditions and the second set during leaf-off conditions. We were able to successfully identify and map active landslides using a differential digital elevation model (DEM) created from the two LiDAR data sets, but this required the use of thresholds (0.50 and 0.75 m) to remove noise from the differential elevation data, visual pattern recognition of landslideinduced elevation changes, and supplemental QuickBird satellite imagery. After mapping, we field-verified 88 percent of the landslides that we had mapped with high confidence, but we could not detect active landslides with elevation changes of less than 0.50 m. Volumetric calculations showed that a total of about 18,100 m3 of material was missing from landslide areas, probably as a result of systematic negative elevation errors in the differential DEM and as a result of removal of material by erosion and transport. We also examined the accuracies of 285 leaf-off LiDAR elevations at four landslide sites using Global Positioning System and total station surveys. A comparison of LiDAR and survey data indicated an overall root mean square error of 0.50 m, a maximum error of 2.21 m, and a systematic error of 0.09 m. LiDAR ground-point densities were lowest in areas with young conifer forests and deciduous vegetation, which resulted in extensive interpolations of elevations in the leaf-on, bare-earth DEM. For optimal use of multi-temporal LiDAR data in forested areas, we recommend that all data sets be flown during leaf-off seasons.

  10. Estimating Mangrove Canopy Height and Above-Ground Biomass in Everglades National Park with Airbone LiDAR and TanDEM-X Data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feliciano, E. A.; Wdowinski, S.; Potts, M. D.; Fatoyinbo, T. E.; Lee, S. K.

    2014-12-01

    The coastal mangroves forests of Everglades National Park (ENP) are well protected from development. Nevertheless, climate change, hurricanes and other anthropogenic disturbances have affected these intertidal ecosystems. Understanding and monitoring forest structural parameters such as canopy height and above-ground biomass (AGB) are important for the establishment of an historical database for past, present and future ecosystem comparison. Forest canopy height has a well understood and directly proportional correlation with AGB. It is possible to derive it using (1) airborne LiDAR/Laser Scanning (ALS) or (2) space-borne radar systems such as Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) and TanDEM-X (TDX). A previous study of the mangrove canopy height and AGB in the ENP was conducted a decade ago based on ALS data acquired in 2004 in conjunction with SRTM data, which were acquired in 2000 (Simard et al. 2006). In this study we estimated canopy height and AGB using an ALS dataset acquired in 2012 and TDX data acquired during the years 2012-2014. The ALS dataset was acquired along a 16.5 x 1.5 km swath of mangrove forest with variable canopy height. The sampled areas were representative of mangrove stature and structure in the whole ENP. Analysis of the ALS dataset showed that mangrove canopy height can reach up to ~25 meters close to the coastal ENP waters. Additionally, by comparing our ALS results with those of a previous study by Simard et al. (2006) we identified areas where mangrove height changes greater than ± 3 meters occurred. To expand the study area to the full ENP mangrove ecosystem we processed single-polarization TDX data to obtain a Digital Canopy Model (DCM) that represents the mangrove canopy height. In order to obtain the true canopy height we calibrated the TDX phase center height with ALS true canopy height. Preliminary results of a corrected single-polarized (HH) TDX scene show that mangrove canopy height can reach up to ~25 meters in the western

  11. Improving LiDAR Data Post-Processing Techniques for Archaeological Site Management and Analysis: A Case Study from Canaveral National Seashore Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griesbach, Christopher

    Methods used to process raw Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data can sometimes obscure the digital signatures indicative of an archaeological site. This thesis explains the negative effects that certain LiDAR data processing procedures can have on the preservation of an archaeological site. This thesis also presents methods for effectively integrating LiDAR with other forms of mapping data in a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) environment in order to improve LiDAR archaeological signatures by examining several pre-Columbian Native American shell middens located in Canaveral National Seashore Park (CANA).

  12. High-Resolution LiDAR Topography of the Plate-Boundary Faults in Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prentice, C. S.; Phillips, D. A.; Furlong, K. P.; Brown, A.; Crosby, C. J.; Bevis, M.; Shrestha, R.; Sartori, M.; Brocher, T. M.; Brown, J.

    2007-12-01

    GeoEarthScope acquired more than 1500 square km of airborne LiDAR data in northern California, providing high-resolution topographic data of most of the major strike-slip faults in the region. The coverage includes the San Andreas Fault from its northern end near Shelter Cove to near Parkfield, as well as the Rodgers Creek, Maacama, Calaveras, Green Valley, Paicines, and San Gregorio Faults. The Hayward fault was added with funding provided by the US Geological Survey, the City of Berkeley, and the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission. Data coverage is typically one kilometer in width, centered on the fault. In areas of particular fault complexity the swath width was increased to two kilometers, and in selected areas swath width is as wide as five kilometers. A five-km-wide swath was flown perpendicular to the plate boundary immediately south of Cape Mendocino to capture previously unidentified faults and to understand off-fault deformation associated with the transition zone between the transform margin and the Cascadia subduction zone. The data were collected in conjunction with an intensive GPS campaign designed to improve absolute data accuracy and provide quality control. Data processing to classify the LiDAR point data by return type allows users to filter out vegetation and produce high-resolution DEMs of the ground surface beneath forested regions, revealing geomorphic features along and adjacent to the faults. These data will allow more accurate mapping of fault traces in regions where the vegetation canopy has hampered this effort in the past. In addition, the data provide the opportunity to locate potential sites for detailed paleoseismic studies aimed at providing slip rates and event chronologies. The GeoEarthScope LiDAR data will be made available via an interactive data distribution and processing workflow currently under development.

  13. Investigation on the contribution of LiDAR data in 3D cadastre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannaka, Olga; Dimopoulou, Efi; Georgopoulos, Andreas

    2014-08-01

    The existing 2D cadastral systems worldwide cannot provide a proper registration and representation of the land ownership rights, restrictions and responsibilities in a 3D context, which appear in our complex urban environment. Ιn such instances, it may be necessary to consider the development of a 3D Cadastre in which proprietary rights acquire appropriate three-dimensional space both above and below conventional ground level. Such a system should contain the topology and the coordinates of the buildings' outlines and infrastructure. The augmented model can be formed as a full 3D Cadastre, a hybrid Cadastre or a 2D Cadastre with 3D tags. Each country has to contemplate which alternative is appropriate, depending on the specific situation, the legal framework and the available technical means. In order to generate a 3D model for cadastral purposes, a system is required which should be able to exploit and represent 3D data such as LiDAR, a remote sensing technology which acquires three-dimensional point clouds that describe the earth's surface and the objects on it. LiDAR gives a direct representation of objects on the ground surface and measures their coordinates by analyzing the reflecting light. Moreover, it provides very accurate position and height information, although direct information about the objects' geometrical shape is not conveyed. In this study, an experimental implementation of 3D Cadastre using LiDAR data is developed, in order to investigate if this information can satisfy the specifications that are set for the purposes of the Hellenic Cadastre. GIS tools have been used for analyzing DSM and true orthophotos of the study area. The results of this study are presented and evaluated in terms of usability and efficiency.

  14. LiDAR-based volume assessment of the origin of the Wadena drumlin field, Minnesota, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sookhan, Shane; Eyles, Nick; Putkinen, Niko

    2016-06-01

    The Wadena drumlin field (WDF; ~ 7500 km2) in west-central Minnesota, USA, is bordered along its outer extremity by the till-cored Alexandria moraine marking the furthest extent of the southwesterly-flowing Wadena ice lobe at c. 15,000 kyr BP. Newly available high-resolution Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data reveal new information regarding the number, morphology and extent of streamlined bedforms in the WDF. In addition, a newly-developed quantitative methodology based on relief curvature analysis of LiDAR elevation-based raster data is used to evaluate sediment volumes represented by the WDF and its bounding end moraine. These data are used to evaluate models for the origin of drumlins. High-resolution LiDAR-based mapping doubles the streamlined footprint of the Wadena Lobe to ~ 16,500 km2 increases the number of bedforms from ~ 2000 to ~ 6000, and most significantly, reclassifies large numbers of bedforms mapped previously as 'drumlins' as 'mega-scale glacial lineations' (MSGLs), indicating that the Wadena ice lobe experienced fast ice flow. The total volume of sediment in the Alexandria moraine is ~ 71-110 km3, that in the drumlins and MSGLs is ~ 2.83 km3, and the volume of swales between these bedforms is ~ 74.51 km3. The moraine volume is equivalent to a till layer 6.8 m thick across the entire bed of the Wadena lobe, suggesting drumlinization and moraine formation were accompanied by widespread lowering of the bed. This supports the hypothesis that drumlins and MSGLs are residual erosional features carved from a pre-existing till; swales represent 'missing sediment' that was eroded subglacially and advected downglacier to build the Alexandria Moraine during fast ice flow. Alternatively, the relatively small volume of sediment represented by subglacial bedforms indicates they could have formed rapidly by depositional processes.

  15. Fusing Hyperspectral and LiDAR data from CAO-VSWIR for Increased Data Dimensionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, D. E.; Asner, G. P.; Boardman, J. W.; Kennedy-Bowdoin, T.; Eastwood, M.; Anderson, C.; Martin, R. E.; Green, R. O.

    2012-12-01

    The use of multi-sensor platforms for scientific data collection requires precise co-location in order to gain maximum data dimensionality for Earth system research. The different types of collection mechanisms of the sensors (e.g., scanning and pushbroom) can make it difficult to precisely match data from multiple sensors, even when the sensors are flown on the same aircraft at the same time. To overcome these problems, the Carnegie Airborne Observatory (CAO) AToMS sensor suite uses a method that maximizes the match between the Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR), Visible-to-Near Infrared (VNIR), and Visible-to-Shortwave Infrared (VSWIR) sensors. This is done by generating an intensity image from the LiDAR data that serves as a base on which the spectrometers (VNIR and VSWIR) are matched using ground control points (GCPs). To do so, we employ the use of automated tie point matching in the overlap regions of the spectrometers to improve the co-location between flightlines. The combination of the GCPs and tie points produce data that is used to build camera models for the VNIR and VSWIR spectrometers such that they will match the LiDAR data. The result produces a matched hyper-dimensional data set with great scientific information content. We compare the data dimensionality of two contrasting scenes - a built environment at Stanford University and a lowland tropical forest in Amazonia. Principal components analysis revealed 336 dimensions (degrees of freedom) in the Stanford case, and 218 dimensions in the Amazon. The Amazon case presents what could be the highest level of remotely sensed data dimensionality ever reported for a forested ecosystem. Simulated misalignment of data streams reduced the effective information content by up to 48%, highlighting the critical role of achieving high precision when undertaking multi-sensor fusion. The instrumentation and methods described here are a pathfinder for future airborne applications undertaken by the National

  16. Horizontal geometrical reaction time model for two-beam nacelle LiDARs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuth, Thorsten; Fox, Maik; Stork, Wilhelm

    2015-06-01

    Wind energy is one of the leading sustainable energies. To attract further private and state investment in this technology, a broad scaled drop of the cost of energy has to be enforced. There is a trend towards using Laser Doppler Velocimetry LiDAR systems for enhancing power output and minimizing downtimes, fatigue and extreme forces. Since most used LiDARs are horizontally setup on a nacelle and work with two beams, it is important to understand the geometrical configuration which is crucial to estimate reaction times for the actuators to compensate wind gusts. In the beginning of this article, the basic operating modes of wind turbines are explained and the literature on wind behavior is analyzed to derive specific wind speed and wind angle conditions in relation to the yaw angle of the hub. A short introduction to the requirements for the reconstruction of the wind vector length and wind angle leads to the problem of wind shear detection of angled but horizontal homogeneous wind fronts due to the spatial separation of the measuring points. A distance is defined in which the wind shear of such homogeneous wind fronts is not present which is used as a base to estimate further distance calculations. The reaction time of the controller and the actuators are having a negative effect on the effective overall reaction time for wind regulation as well. In the end, exemplary calculations estimate benefits and disadvantages of system parameters for wind gust regulating LiDARs for a wind turbine of typical size. An outlook shows possible future improvements concerning the vertical wind behavior.

  17. The offshore wind resources assessment application of floating LiDAR in the Taiwan Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsuan, Chung-Yao; Wu, Yu-Ting; Lin, Ta-Hui

    2015-04-01

    Wind and wave measurements of a Floating LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) Device (FLD) are performed on the site of Fuhai Offshore Wind Farm in the Taiwan Strait. The location of the deployment is situated 10 kilometers off-coast of Changhua County, and the anchored water depth is 25 meters. It is the very first time in Asia Pacific Region to use such device for tasks of offshore wind and wave measurement. Six range gate heights were set at 55m, 71m, 90m, 110m, 150m and 200m from the FLD sensor lens. Wind speeds and wind directions were measured by a remote sensing technology. Wave heights and periods were also measured by the buoy wave sensor. A validation campaign of NCKU WindSentinel has performed by a portable LiDAR (WINDCUBE v2) at Hsing-Da Harbor in the south of Taiwan from October 16th to 26th, 2013. The results showed good agreements with 10 minute averaged data of the wind speed and wind direction measured by the two LiDARs. NCKU WindSentinel data are planning comparisons with Fuhai's offshore fixed mast data when the meteorological mast is completed. The goal is to convince the wind energy community that FLD are a reliable and cost effective way of obtaining data for resource assessment. Until this moment, The FLD are observing and measuring the offshore wind farm's meteorological and oceanographic data. In September of 2014, a mild typhoon (Fung-Wong) passed through from east of Taiwan. NCKU WindSentinel continuously measured during typhoon period in the sea. The present preliminary measurements campaign presented the convenient and more cost effective option of the FLD, which may be a key tool for assessment of offshore wind resources in the near-future offshore wind farm developments.

  18. Regional forest biomass estimation using ICESat/GLAS spaceborne LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, M.; Saigusa, N.; Habura, B.; Sawada, Y.; Yamagata, Y.; Hirano, T.; Ichii, K.

    2015-12-01

    Spaceborne LiDAR can observe vertical structure of forests and provide a means for accurate forest monitoring, therefore, it may meet the growing demand of forest resources monitoring on a large scale. This study aims to clarify the potential of ICESat/GLAS, which had been the only spaceborne LiDAR up to now, for forest resources monitoring on a regional scale. The study areas were three regions: Hokkaido Island in Japan (cool-temperate forest), Borneo Island (tropical forest) and Siberia (boreal forest). Firstly, we conducted field measurements at 106 points in Hokkaido and 37 points in Borneo to measure the average canopy height (Lorey's height) and the above-ground biomass (AGB) for each GLAS-footprint, then, we developed some models to estimate canopy height and AGB from the GLAS waveform parameters. Next, we applied the developed models to the GLAS data which were 14,000 points in Hokkaido, and 130,000 points in Borneo, to estimate canopy height and AGB on a regional scale. As a result, we clarified the forest condition concerning canopy height and AGB for each region, namely, the average value, the comparison between the average of each forest type, and the spatial distribution. Furthermore, we detected the AGB change over the years (forest degradation) and estimated the forest loss rate of 1.6% yr-1 in Borneo. Next, we applied the developed models in Hokkaido to the 1,600,000 points GLAS data observed in Siberia. As a result, we clarified that the average AGB in Siberia was a remarkable low value as compared with those in Hokkaido and Borneo, and that the AGB change over the years (forest degradation) was significant in the southern region of western Siberia. This study showed that spaceborne LiDAR had an ability of forest resources monitoring on a regional scale for various forests over the world.

  19. Structural effects of liana presence in secondary tropical dry forests using ground LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Azofeifa, A.; Portillo-Quintero, C.; Durán, S. M.

    2015-10-01

    Lianas, woody vines, are a key component of tropical forest because they may reduce carbon storage potential. Lianas are increasing in density and biomass in tropical forests, but it is unknown what the potential consequences of these increases are for forest dynamics. Lianas may proliferate in disturbed areas, such as regenerating forests, but little is known about the role of lianas in secondary succession. In this study, we evaluated the potential of the ground LiDAR to detect differences in the vertical structure of stands of different ages with and without lianas in tropical dry forests. Specifically, we used a terrestrial laser scanner called VEGNET to assess whether liana presence influences the vertical signature of stands of different ages, and whether successional trajectories as detected by the VEGNET could be altered by liana presence. We deployed the VEGNET ground LiDAR system in 15 secondary forests of different ages early (21 years old since land abandonment), intermediate (32-35 years old) and late stages (> 80 years old) with and without lianas. We compared laser-derived vegetation components such as Plant Area Index (PAI), plant area volume density (PAVD), and the radius of gyration (RG) across forest stands between liana and no-liana treatments. In general forest stands without lianas show a clearer distinction of vertical strata and the vertical height of accumulated PAVD. A significant increase of PAI was found from intermediate to late stages in stands without lianas, but in stands where lianas were present there was not a significant trend. This suggests that lianas may be influencing successional trajectories in secondary forests, and these effects can be captured by terrestrial laser scanners such as the VEGNET. This research contributes to estimate the potential effects of lianas in secondary dry forests and highlight the role of ground LiDAR to monitor structural changes in tropical forests due to liana presence.

  20. Numerical simulation of groundwater flow in Dar es Salaam Coastal Plain (Tanzania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luciani, Giulia; Sappa, Giuseppe; Cella, Antonella

    2016-04-01

    They are presented the results of a groundwater modeling study on the Coastal Aquifer of Dar es Salaam (Tanzania). Dar es Salaam is one of the fastest-growing coastal cities in Sub-Saharan Africa, with with more than 4 million of inhabitants and a population growth rate of about 8 per cent per year. The city faces periodic water shortages, due to the lack of an adequate water supply network. These two factors have determined, in the last ten years, an increasing demand of groundwater exploitation, carried on by quite a number of private wells, which have been drilled to satisfy human demand. A steady-state three dimensional groundwater model has been set up by the MODFLOW code, and calibrated with the UCODE code for inverse modeling. The aim of the model was to carry out a characterization of groundwater flow system in the Dar es Salaam Coastal Plain. The inputs applied to the model included net recharge rate, calculated from time series of precipitation data (1961-2012), estimations of average groundwater extraction, and estimations of groundwater recharge, coming from zones, outside the area under study. Parametrization of the hydraulic conductivities was realized referring to the main geological features of the study area, based on available literature data and information. Boundary conditions were assigned based on hydrogeological boundaries. The conceptual model was defined in subsequent steps, which added some hydrogeological features and excluded other ones. Calibration was performed with UCODE 2014, using 76 measures of hydraulic head, taken in 2012 referred to the same season. Data were weighted on the basis of the expected errors. Sensitivity analysis of data was performed during calibration, and permitted to identify which parameters were possible to be estimated, and which data could support parameters estimation. Calibration was evaluated based on statistical index, maps of error distribution and test of independence of residuals. Further model

  1. A High Density Consensus Map of Rye (Secale cereale L.) Based on DArT Markers

    PubMed Central

    Myśków, Beata; Stojałowski, Stefan; Heller-Uszyńska, Katarzyna; Góralska, Magdalena; Brągoszewski, Piotr; Uszyński, Grzegorz; Kilian, Andrzej; Rakoczy-Trojanowska, Monika

    2011-01-01

    Background Rye (Secale cereale L.) is an economically important crop, exhibiting unique features such as outstanding resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses and high nutrient use efficiency. This species presents a challenge to geneticists and breeders due to its large genome containing a high proportion of repetitive sequences, self incompatibility, severe inbreeding depression and tissue culture recalcitrance. The genomic resources currently available for rye are underdeveloped in comparison with other crops of similar economic importance. The aim of this study was to create a highly saturated, multilocus linkage map of rye via consensus mapping, based on Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT) markers. Methodology/Principal Findings Recombinant inbred lines (RILs) from 5 populations (564 in total) were genotyped using DArT markers and subjected to linkage analysis using Join Map 4.0 and Multipoint Consensus 2.2 software. A consensus map was constructed using a total of 9703 segregating markers. The average chromosome map length ranged from 199.9 cM (2R) to 251.4 cM (4R) and the average map density was 1.1 cM. The integrated map comprised 4048 loci with the number of markers per chromosome ranging from 454 for 7R to 805 for 4R. In comparison with previously published studies on rye, this represents an eight-fold increase in the number of loci placed on a consensus map and a more than two-fold increase in the number of genetically mapped DArT markers. Conclusions/Significance Through the careful choice of marker type, mapping populations and the use of software packages implementing powerful algorithms for map order optimization, we produced a valuable resource for rye and triticale genomics and breeding, which provides an excellent starting point for more in-depth studies on rye genome organization. PMID:22163026

  2. Comparison of remotely sensed water stages from LiDAR, topographic contours and SRTM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, G.; Matgen, P.; Cutler, M. E. J.; Black, A.; Hoffmann, L.; Pfister, L.

    Digital elevation models (DEMs) are at the core of most environmental process modelling and disaster management. In flood inundation modelling, surface elevation constitutes one of the most important model boundary conditions. With the availability of high-precision DEMs (e.g. LiDAR) and globally available DEMs (e.g. SRTM InSAR) a big step seems to have been taken in terms of hydraulic modelling application or hydraulic information retrieval from such DEMs, with high potential in particular for ungauged basins. Comparative studies exist that report on both the validation of different remotely sensed elevation sources and their use for both hydrologic and hydraulic studies. To contribute to the existing literature on DEMs and hydraulic information, this study aims at comparing water stages derived from LiDAR, topographic contours and SRTM. A flood inundation model calibrated with distributed ground-surveyed high water marks is used to evaluate the remotely sensed water stages. The results show that, as expected, LiDAR derived water stages exhibit the lowest RMSE (0.35 m), followed by the contour DEM (0.7 m). A relatively good performance of the SRTM (1.07 m), which is possibly linked to the low-lying floodplain, suggests that the SRTM is a valuable source for initial vital flood information extraction in large, homogeneous floodplains. Subsequent 3D flood mapping from remotely sensed water stages confirms this but also indicates that flood mapping with low-resolution, low-precision surface elevation data is hardly possible on the small scale, as the accuracy of the resulting map depends too much on DEM uncertainties and errors both in the horizontal and vertical directions.

  3. Quantification of uncertainty in aboveground biomass estimates derived from small-footprint LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Q.; Greenberg, J. A.; Li, B.; Ramirez, C.; Balamuta, J. J.; Evans, K.; Man, A.; Xu, Z.

    2015-12-01

    A promising approach to determining aboveground biomass (AGB) in forests comes through the use of individual tree crown delineation (ITCD) techniques applied to small-footprint LiDAR data. These techniques, when combined with allometric equations, can produce per-tree estimates of AGB. At this scale, AGB estimates can be quantified in a manner similar to how ground-based forest inventories are produced. However, these approaches have significant uncertainties that are rarely described in full. Allometric equations are often based on species-specific diameter-at-breast height (DBH) relationships, but neither DBH nor species can be reliably determined using remote sensing analysis. Furthermore, many approaches to ITCD only delineate trees appearing in the upper canopy so subcanopy trees are often missing from the inventories. In this research, we performed a propagation-of-error analysis to determine the spatially varying uncertainties in AGB estimates at the individual plant and stand level for a large collection of LiDAR acquisitions covering a large portion of California. Furthermore, we determined the relative contribution of various aspects of the analysis towards the uncertainty, including errors in the ITCD results, the allometric equations, the taxonomic designation, and the local biophysical environment. Watershed segmentation was used to obtain the preliminary crown segments. Lidar points within the preliminary segments were extracted to form profiling data of the segments, and then mode detection algorithms were applied to identify the tree number and tree heights within each segment. As part of this analysis, we derived novel "remote sensing aware" allometric equations and their uncertainties based on three-dimensional morphological metrics that can be accurately derived from LiDAR data.

  4. Residents’ perceptions of institutional performance in water supply in Dar es Salaam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mwakalila, Shadrack

    This paper addresses the performance of institutions in water supply systems for improving social and economic benefits of people living in Dar es Salaam city. The methods employed in field data and information collection included interviews, questionnaire, focus group discussions and participatory observation. Kinondoni and Ilala Districts were used as case study. The study revealed that, the main water sources in the study areas are boreholes, shallow wells, rain water and water vendors. Other minor sources are piped water and natural water sources, such as rivers and streams. The supply of piped water by Dar es Salaam Water Sewerage and Sanitation Company (DAWASA/DAWASCO) meets only 45% of the total water demands. Individuals own and sell water from boreholes, shallow wells, piped water connected to their individual houses and natural wells located in their individual plots. The price of one 20 l bucket of water from a water vendor depends on the availability of water and the distance walked from the water source to the customer. Majority of the respondents (77.5%) indicated that individual water delivery systems provide sufficient water as compared to five years ago in the study areas. Few of the respondents (6.3%) said individual water delivery systems have no capacity to provide sufficient water while 16.3% indicate that individual water delivery systems provide moderate water supply but are important in supplementing other water providers in the study areas. The study reveals that a majority of the local population are satisfied with the capacity of individual water delivery systems in providing water for household uses. This paper recommends some improvements to be done to water supply systems in the Dar es Salaam city.

  5. Classification of breaklines derived from airborne LiDAR data for geomorphological activity mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutzinger, Martin; Höfle, Bernhard; Vetter, Michael; Stötter, Johann; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2010-05-01

    Airborne LiDAR surveys provide 3D high-resolution elevation information for area-wide applications. Due to the capability of LiDAR to penetrate vegetation cover highly accurate digital terrain models (DTMs) can be derived also for forested areas. Breaklines derived from LiDAR DTMs mark regions of slope discontinuities, describing the main characteristics of a terrain surface in an efficient manner. Breaklines are often used for DTM enhancement but also for the detection and interpretation of geomorphologically relevant landforms such as landslides, torrents, erosion scraps and tectonic faults. Because of human activities geomorphologic landforms are often disturbed and reshaped i.e. by construction of roads, skiing slopes, drainage channels and surface mining. Therefore, DTMs contain both, anthropogenic and geomorphologic discontinuities. This significantly disturbs morphometric analysis and causes problems for automatic landform mapping algorithms. In this research an automatic breakline detection method is applied in an alpine region with high relief variation containing surface discontinuities such as torrents, creeping slope failure, and landslides, which are reshaped by anthropogenic activities. Regions of high curvature are classified and vectorised in order to derive 3D breaklines. These are further filtered and classified based on object-based properties such as their size, shape and slope to separate natural i.e. geomorphologic relevant and anthropogenic structures. The classification result is compared to reference map data indicating a high reliability of the classification quality. After the removal of anthropogenic breaklines the remaining natural breaklines are used to compute line density maps using a moving window approach. These density maps point out areas of different relief energy and assist to delineate areas of geomorphologic relevance. These areas are also of most interest to identify geomorphological landforms. The methodology presented

  6. LiDAR Individual Tree Detection for Assessing Structurally Diverse Forest Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeronimo, Sean

    Contemporary forest management on public land incorporates a focus on restoration and maintenance of ecological functions through silvicultural manipulation of forest structure on a landscape scale. Incorporating reference conditions into restoration treatment planning and monitoring can improve treatment efficacy, but the typical ground-based methods of quantifying reference condition data---and comparing it to pre- and post-treatment stands---are expensive, time-consuming, and limited in scale. Airborne LiDAR may be part of the solution to this problem, since LiDAR acquisitions have both broad coverage and high resolution. I evaluated the ability of LiDAR Individual Tree Detection (ITD) to describe forest structure across a structurally variable landscape in support of large-scale forest restoration. I installed nineteen 0.25 ha stem map plots across a range of structural conditions in potential reference areas (Yosemite National Park) and potential restoration treatment areas (Sierra National Forest) in the Sierra Nevada of California. I used the plots to evaluate a common ITD algorithm, the watershed transform, compare it to past uses of ITD, and determine which aspects of forest structure contributed to errors in ITD. I found that ITD across this structurally diverse landscape was generally less accurate than across the smaller and less diverse areas over which it has previously been studied. However, the pattern of tree recognition is consistent: regardless of forest structure, canopy dominants are almost always detected and relatively shorter trees are almost never detected. Correspondingly, metrics dominated by large trees, such as biomass, basal area, and spatial heterogeneity, can be measured using ITD, while metrics dominated by smaller trees, such as stand density, cannot. Bearing these limitations in mind, ITD can be a powerful tool for describing forest structure across heterogeneous landscape restoration project areas.

  7. The use of LiDAR-derived high-resolution DSM and intensity data to support modelling of urban flooding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aktaruzzaman, Md.; Schmitt, Theo G.

    2011-11-01

    This paper addresses the issue of a detailed representation of an urban catchment in terms of hydraulic and hydrologic attributes. Modelling of urban flooding requires a detailed knowledge of urban surface characteristics. The advancement in spatial data acquisition technology such as airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) has greatly facilitated the collection of high-resolution topographic information. While the use of the LiDAR-derived Digital Surface Model (DSM) has gained popularity over the last few years as input data for a flood simulation model, the use of LiDAR intensity data has remained largely unexplored in this regard. LiDAR intensity data are acquired along with elevation data during the data collection mission by an aircraft. The practice of using of just aerial images with RGB (Red, Green and Blue) wavebands is often incapable of identifying types of surface under the shadow. On the other hand, LiDAR intensity data can provide surface information independent of sunlight conditions. The focus of this study is the use of intensity data in combination with aerial images to accurately map pervious and impervious urban areas. This study presents an Object-Based Image Analysis (OBIA) framework for detecting urban land cover types, mainly pervious and impervious surfaces in order to improve the rainfall-runoff modelling. Finally, this study shows the application of highresolution DSM and land cover maps to flood simulation software in order to visualize the depth and extent of urban flooding phenomena.

  8. INS/GPS/LiDAR Integrated Navigation System for Urban and Indoor Environments Using Hybrid Scan Matching Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yanbin; Liu, Shifei; Atia, Mohamed M; Noureldin, Aboelmagd

    2015-01-01

    This paper takes advantage of the complementary characteristics of Global Positioning System (GPS) and Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) to provide periodic corrections to Inertial Navigation System (INS) alternatively in different environmental conditions. In open sky, where GPS signals are available and LiDAR measurements are sparse, GPS is integrated with INS. Meanwhile, in confined outdoor environments and indoors, where GPS is unreliable or unavailable and LiDAR measurements are rich, LiDAR replaces GPS to integrate with INS. This paper also proposes an innovative hybrid scan matching algorithm that combines the feature-based scan matching method and Iterative Closest Point (ICP) based scan matching method. The algorithm can work and transit between two modes depending on the number of matched line features over two scans, thus achieving efficiency and robustness concurrently. Two integration schemes of INS and LiDAR with hybrid scan matching algorithm are implemented and compared. Real experiments are performed on an Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) for both outdoor and indoor environments. Experimental results show that the multi-sensor integrated system can remain sub-meter navigation accuracy during the whole trajectory. PMID:26389906

  9. Unveiling topographical changes using LiDAR mapping capability: case study of Belaga in Sarawak, East-Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganendra, T. R.; Khan, N. M.; Razak, W. J.; Kouame, Y.; Mobarakeh, E. T.

    2016-06-01

    The use of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) remote sensing technology to scan and map landscapes has proven to be one of the most popular techniques to accurately map topography. Thus, LiDAR technology is the ultimate method of unveiling the surface feature under dense vegetation, and, this paper intends to emphasize the diverse techniques that can be utilized to elucidate topographical changes over the study area, using multi-temporal airborne full waveform LiDAR datasets collected in 2012 and 2014. Full waveform LiDAR data offers access to an almost unlimited number of returns per shot, which enables the user to explore in detail topographical changes, such as vegetation growth measurement. The study also found out topography changes at the study area due to earthwork activities contributing to soil consolidation, soil erosion and runoff, requiring cautious monitoring. The implications of this study not only concurs with numerous investigations undertaken by prominent researchers to improve decision making, but also corroborates once again that investigations employing multi-temporal LiDAR data to unveil topography changes in vegetated terrains, produce more detailed and accurate results than most other remote sensing data.

  10. Synergistic application of geometric and radiometric features of LiDAR data for urban land cover mapping.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yuchu; Li, Shihua; Vu, Tuong-Thuy; Niu, Zheng; Ban, Yifang

    2015-06-01

    Urban land cover map is essential for urban planning, environmental studies and management. This paper aims to demonstrate the potential of geometric and radiometric features derived from LiDAR waveform and point cloud data in urban land cover mapping with both parametric and non-parametric classification algorithms. Small footprint LiDAR waveform data acquired by RIEGL LMS-Q560 in Zhangye city, China is used in this study. A LiDAR processing chain is applied to perform waveform decomposition, range determination and radiometric characterization. With the synergic utilization of geometric and radiometric features derived from LiDAR data, urban land cover classification is then conducted using the Maximum Likelihood Classification (MLC), Support Vector Machines (SVM) and random forest algorithms. The results suggest that the random forest classifier achieved the most accurate result with overall classification accuracy of 91.82% and the kappa coefficient of 0.88. The overall accuracies of MLC and SVM are 84.02, and 88.48, respectively. The study suggest that the synergic utilization of geometric and radiometric features derived from LiDAR data can be efficiently used for urban land cover mapping, the non-parametric random forest classifier is a promising approach for the various features with different physical meanings.

  11. INS/GPS/LiDAR Integrated Navigation System for Urban and Indoor Environments Using Hybrid Scan Matching Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yanbin; Liu, Shifei; Atia, Mohamed M; Noureldin, Aboelmagd

    2015-09-15

    This paper takes advantage of the complementary characteristics of Global Positioning System (GPS) and Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) to provide periodic corrections to Inertial Navigation System (INS) alternatively in different environmental conditions. In open sky, where GPS signals are available and LiDAR measurements are sparse, GPS is integrated with INS. Meanwhile, in confined outdoor environments and indoors, where GPS is unreliable or unavailable and LiDAR measurements are rich, LiDAR replaces GPS to integrate with INS. This paper also proposes an innovative hybrid scan matching algorithm that combines the feature-based scan matching method and Iterative Closest Point (ICP) based scan matching method. The algorithm can work and transit between two modes depending on the number of matched line features over two scans, thus achieving efficiency and robustness concurrently. Two integration schemes of INS and LiDAR with hybrid scan matching algorithm are implemented and compared. Real experiments are performed on an Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) for both outdoor and indoor environments. Experimental results show that the multi-sensor integrated system can remain sub-meter navigation accuracy during the whole trajectory.

  12. INS/GPS/LiDAR Integrated Navigation System for Urban and Indoor Environments Using Hybrid Scan Matching Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yanbin; Liu, Shifei; Atia, Mohamed M.; Noureldin, Aboelmagd

    2015-01-01

    This paper takes advantage of the complementary characteristics of Global Positioning System (GPS) and Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) to provide periodic corrections to Inertial Navigation System (INS) alternatively in different environmental conditions. In open sky, where GPS signals are available and LiDAR measurements are sparse, GPS is integrated with INS. Meanwhile, in confined outdoor environments and indoors, where GPS is unreliable or unavailable and LiDAR measurements are rich, LiDAR replaces GPS to integrate with INS. This paper also proposes an innovative hybrid scan matching algorithm that combines the feature-based scan matching method and Iterative Closest Point (ICP) based scan matching method. The algorithm can work and transit between two modes depending on the number of matched line features over two scans, thus achieving efficiency and robustness concurrently. Two integration schemes of INS and LiDAR with hybrid scan matching algorithm are implemented and compared. Real experiments are performed on an Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) for both outdoor and indoor environments. Experimental results show that the multi-sensor integrated system can remain sub-meter navigation accuracy during the whole trajectory. PMID:26389906

  13. The use of 1572 nm Mie LiDAR for observation of the optical properties of aerosols over Wuhan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Wei; Ma, Xin; Dong, Yanni; Lin, Hong; Li, Jun

    2014-03-01

    CO2 is a major component of greenhouse gases. When CO2 concentration is measured by satellites, calibration of the lower atmosphere becomes an essential procedure. Since the 1572 nm infrared region is widely used in remote sensing of CO2, we constructed a Mie LiDAR system, designed to work at 1572 nm, for measuring the optical properties of aerosols in the lower troposphere. Based on the particle size distribution measured by the heliograph, the LiDAR ratio is independently determined for Wuhan, China. The LiDAR echo signal is then processed by the Fernald method to calculate the extinction coefficient on both clear and cloudy days. The maximum detection height is restricted by the low laser energy and quantum efficiency of the Photomultiplier Tube (PMT) used. Moreover, a simplified method for detecting the position of clouds is presented and this method is verified using a variety of passive radiation instruments that offer partial support for calibrating and verifying LiDAR data. The observed results indicate that this LiDAR system could be a reliable source of data support for the spaceborne remote sensing of CO2.

  14. Development of the Philippine Hydrologic Dataset (PHD) from LiDAR and other remotely-sensed data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, A. M. C.; Gaspa, M. C.; Aloc, D. S.; Mahor, M. A. P.; Gonzalez, K. A. C.; Borlongan, N. J. B.; De La Cruz, R. M.; Olfindo, N. T.; Blanco, A. C.

    2015-10-01

    Water resource monitoring and management has been an important concern in the Philippines, considering that the country is archipelagic in nature and is exposed to a lot of disasters imposed by the global effects of climate change. The design and implementation of an effective management scheme relies heavily on accurate, complete, and updated water resource inventories, usually in the form of digital maps and geodatabases. With the aim of developing a detailed and comprehensive database of all water resources in the Philippines, the 3-year project "Development of the Philippine Hydrologic Dataset (PHD) for Watersheds from LiDAR Surveys" under the Phil-LiDAR 2 Program (National Resource Inventory), has been initiated by the University of the Philippines Diliman (UPD) and the Department of Science and Technology (DOST). Various workflows has already been developed to extract inland hydrologic features in the Philippines using accurate Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) and LiDAR point cloud data obtained through other government-funded programs such as Disaster Risk and Exposure Assessment for Mitigation (DREAM) and Phil-LiDAR 1, supplemented with other remotely-sensed imageries and ancillary information from Local Government Units (LGUs) and National Government Agencies (NGAs). The methodologies implemented are mainly combinations of object-based image analysis, pixel-based image analysis, modeling, and field surveys. This paper presents the PHD project, the methodologies developed, and some sample outputs produced.

  15. Financial sustainability in municipal solid waste management--costs and revenues in Bahir Dar, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Lohri, Christian Riuji; Camenzind, Ephraim Joseph; Zurbrügg, Christian

    2014-02-01

    Providing good solid waste management (SWM) services while also ensuring financial sustainability of the system continues to be a major challenge in cities of developing countries. Bahir Dar in northwestern Ethiopia outsourced municipal waste services to a private waste company in 2008. While this institutional change has led to substantial improvement in the cleanliness of the city, its financial sustainability remains unclear. Is the private company able to generate sufficient revenues from their activities to offset the costs and generate some profit? This paper presents a cost-revenue analysis, based on data from July 2009 to June 2011. The analysis reveals that overall costs in Bahir Dar's SWM system increased significantly during this period, mainly due to rising costs related to waste transportation. On the other hand, there is only one major revenue stream in place: the waste collection fee from households, commercial enterprises and institutions. As the efficiency of fee collection from households is only around 50%, the total amount of revenues are not sufficient to cover the running costs. This results in a substantial yearly deficit. The results of the research therefore show that a more detailed cost structure and cost-revenue analysis of this waste management service is important with appropriate measures, either by the privates sector itself or with the support of the local authorities, in order to enhance cost efficiency and balance the cost-revenues towards cost recovery. Delays in mitigating the evident financial deficit could else endanger the public-private partnership (PPP) and lead to failure of this setup in the medium to long term, thus also endangering the now existing improved and currently reliable service. We present four options on how financial sustainability of the SWM system in Bahir Dar might be enhanced: (i) improved fee collection efficiency by linking the fees of solid waste collection to water supply; (ii) increasing the value

  16. Financial sustainability in municipal solid waste management--costs and revenues in Bahir Dar, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Lohri, Christian Riuji; Camenzind, Ephraim Joseph; Zurbrügg, Christian

    2014-02-01

    Providing good solid waste management (SWM) services while also ensuring financial sustainability of the system continues to be a major challenge in cities of developing countries. Bahir Dar in northwestern Ethiopia outsourced municipal waste services to a private waste company in 2008. While this institutional change has led to substantial improvement in the cleanliness of the city, its financial sustainability remains unclear. Is the private company able to generate sufficient revenues from their activities to offset the costs and generate some profit? This paper presents a cost-revenue analysis, based on data from July 2009 to June 2011. The analysis reveals that overall costs in Bahir Dar's SWM system increased significantly during this period, mainly due to rising costs related to waste transportation. On the other hand, there is only one major revenue stream in place: the waste collection fee from households, commercial enterprises and institutions. As the efficiency of fee collection from households is only around 50%, the total amount of revenues are not sufficient to cover the running costs. This results in a substantial yearly deficit. The results of the research therefore show that a more detailed cost structure and cost-revenue analysis of this waste management service is important with appropriate measures, either by the privates sector itself or with the support of the local authorities, in order to enhance cost efficiency and balance the cost-revenues towards cost recovery. Delays in mitigating the evident financial deficit could else endanger the public-private partnership (PPP) and lead to failure of this setup in the medium to long term, thus also endangering the now existing improved and currently reliable service. We present four options on how financial sustainability of the SWM system in Bahir Dar might be enhanced: (i) improved fee collection efficiency by linking the fees of solid waste collection to water supply; (ii) increasing the value

  17. Temporal Analysis and Automatic Calibration of the Velodyne HDL-32E LiDAR System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, T. O.; Lichti, D. D.; Belton, D.

    2013-10-01

    At the end of the first quarter of 2012, more than 600 Velodyne LiDAR systems had been sold worldwide for various robotic and high-accuracy survey applications. The ultra-compact Velodyne HDL-32E LiDAR has become a predominant sensor for many applications that require lower sensor size/weight and cost. For high accuracy applications, cost-effective calibration methods with minimal manual intervention are always desired by users. However, the calibrations are complicated by the Velodyne LiDAR's narrow vertical field of view and the very highly time-variant nature of its measurements. In the paper, the temporal stability of the HDL-32E is first analysed as the motivation for developing a new, automated calibration method. This is followed by a detailed description of the calibration method that is driven by a novel segmentation method for extracting vertical cylindrical features from the Velodyne point clouds. The proposed segmentation method utilizes the Velodyne point cloud's slice-like nature and first decomposes the point clouds into 2D layers. Then the layers are treated as 2D images and are processed with the Generalized Hough Transform which extracts the points distributed in circular patterns from the point cloud layers. Subsequently, the vertical cylindrical features can be readily extracted from the whole point clouds based on the previously extracted points. The points are passed to the calibration that estimates the cylinder parameters and the LiDAR's additional parameters simultaneously by constraining the segmented points to fit to the cylindrical geometric model in such a way the weighted sum of the adjustment residuals are minimized. The proposed calibration is highly automatic and this allows end users to obtain the time-variant additional parameters instantly and frequently whenever there are vertical cylindrical features presenting in scenes. The methods were verified with two different real datasets, and the results suggest that up to 78

  18. Wallace Creek Virtual Field Trip: Teaching Geoscience Concepts with LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, S. E.; Arrowsmith, R.; Crosby, C. J.

    2009-12-01

    Recently available data such as LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) high-resolution topography can assist students to better visualize and understand geosciences concepts. It is important to bring these data into geosciences curricula as teaching aids while ensuring that the visualization tools, virtual environments, etc. do not serve as barriers to student learning. As a Southern California Earthquake Center ACCESS-G intern, I am creating a “virtual field trip” to Wallace Creek along the San Andreas Fault (SAF) using Google Earth as a platform and the B4 project LiDAR data. Wallace Creek is an excellent site for understanding the centennial-to-millennial record of SAF slip because of its dramatic stream offsets. Using the LiDAR data instead of, or alongside, traditional visualizations and teaching methods enhances a student’s ability to understand plate tectonics, the earthquake cycle, strike-slip faults, and geomorphology. Viewing a high-resolution representation of the topography in Google Earth allows students to analyze the landscape and answer questions about the behavior of the San Andreas Fault. The activity guides students along the fault allowing them to measure channel offsets using the Google Earth measuring tool. Knowing the ages of channels, they calculate slip rate. They look for the smallest channel offsets around Wallace Creek in order to determine the slip per event. At both a “LiDAR and Education” workshop and the Cyberinfrastructure Summer Institute for Geoscientists (CSIG), I presented the Wallace Creek activity to high school and college earth science teachers. The teachers were positive in their responses and had numerous important suggestions including the need for a teacher’s manual for instruction and scientific background, and that the student goals and science topics should be specific and well-articulated for the sake of both the teacher and the student. The teachers also noted that the technology in classrooms varies

  19. Scan Line Based Road Marking Extraction from Mobile LiDAR Point Clouds.

    PubMed

    Yan, Li; Liu, Hua; Tan, Junxiang; Li, Zan; Xie, Hong; Chen, Changjun

    2016-06-17

    Mobile Mapping Technology (MMT) is one of the most important 3D spatial data acquisition technologies. The state-of-the-art mobile mapping systems, equipped with laser scanners and named Mobile LiDAR Scanning (MLS) systems, have been widely used in a variety of areas, especially in road mapping and road inventory. With the commercialization of Advanced Driving Assistance Systems (ADASs) and self-driving technology, there will be a great demand for lane-level detailed 3D maps, and MLS is the most promising technology to generate such lane-level detailed 3D maps. Road markings and road edges are necessary information in creating such lane-level detailed 3D maps. This paper proposes a scan line based method to extract road markings from mobile LiDAR point clouds in three steps: (1) preprocessing; (2) road points extraction; (3) road markings extraction and refinement. In preprocessing step, the isolated LiDAR points in the air are removed from the LiDAR point clouds and the point clouds are organized into scan lines. In the road points extraction step, seed road points are first extracted by Height Difference (HD) between trajectory data and road surface, then full road points are extracted from the point clouds by moving least squares line fitting. In the road markings extraction and refinement step, the intensity values of road points in a scan line are first smoothed by a dynamic window median filter to suppress intensity noises, then road markings are extracted by Edge Detection and Edge Constraint (EDEC) method, and the Fake Road Marking Points (FRMPs) are eliminated from the detected road markings by segment and dimensionality feature-based refinement. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated by three data samples and the experiment results indicate that road points are well extracted from MLS data and road markings are well extracted from road points by the applied method. A quantitative study shows that the proposed method achieves an average

  20. Scan Line Based Road Marking Extraction from Mobile LiDAR Point Clouds†

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Li; Liu, Hua; Tan, Junxiang; Li, Zan; Xie, Hong; Chen, Changjun

    2016-01-01

    Mobile Mapping Technology (MMT) is one of the most important 3D spatial data acquisition technologies. The state-of-the-art mobile mapping systems, equipped with laser scanners and named Mobile LiDAR Scanning (MLS) systems, have been widely used in a variety of areas, especially in road mapping and road inventory. With the commercialization of Advanced Driving Assistance Systems (ADASs) and self-driving technology, there will be a great demand for lane-level detailed 3D maps, and MLS is the most promising technology to generate such lane-level detailed 3D maps. Road markings and road edges are necessary information in creating such lane-level detailed 3D maps. This paper proposes a scan line based method to extract road markings from mobile LiDAR point clouds in three steps: (1) preprocessing; (2) road points extraction; (3) road markings extraction and refinement. In preprocessing step, the isolated LiDAR points in the air are removed from the LiDAR point clouds and the point clouds are organized into scan lines. In the road points extraction step, seed road points are first extracted by Height Difference (HD) between trajectory data and road surface, then full road points are extracted from the point clouds by moving least squares line fitting. In the road markings extraction and refinement step, the intensity values of road points in a scan line are first smoothed by a dynamic window median filter to suppress intensity noises, then road markings are extracted by Edge Detection and Edge Constraint (EDEC) method, and the Fake Road Marking Points (FRMPs) are eliminated from the detected road markings by segment and dimensionality feature-based refinement. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated by three data samples and the experiment results indicate that road points are well extracted from MLS data and road markings are well extracted from road points by the applied method. A quantitative study shows that the proposed method achieves an average

  1. Scan Line Based Road Marking Extraction from Mobile LiDAR Point Clouds.

    PubMed

    Yan, Li; Liu, Hua; Tan, Junxiang; Li, Zan; Xie, Hong; Chen, Changjun

    2016-01-01

    Mobile Mapping Technology (MMT) is one of the most important 3D spatial data acquisition technologies. The state-of-the-art mobile mapping systems, equipped with laser scanners and named Mobile LiDAR Scanning (MLS) systems, have been widely used in a variety of areas, especially in road mapping and road inventory. With the commercialization of Advanced Driving Assistance Systems (ADASs) and self-driving technology, there will be a great demand for lane-level detailed 3D maps, and MLS is the most promising technology to generate such lane-level detailed 3D maps. Road markings and road edges are necessary information in creating such lane-level detailed 3D maps. This paper proposes a scan line based method to extract road markings from mobile LiDAR point clouds in three steps: (1) preprocessing; (2) road points extraction; (3) road markings extraction and refinement. In preprocessing step, the isolated LiDAR points in the air are removed from the LiDAR point clouds and the point clouds are organized into scan lines. In the road points extraction step, seed road points are first extracted by Height Difference (HD) between trajectory data and road surface, then full road points are extracted from the point clouds by moving least squares line fitting. In the road markings extraction and refinement step, the intensity values of road points in a scan line are first smoothed by a dynamic window median filter to suppress intensity noises, then road markings are extracted by Edge Detection and Edge Constraint (EDEC) method, and the Fake Road Marking Points (FRMPs) are eliminated from the detected road markings by segment and dimensionality feature-based refinement. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated by three data samples and the experiment results indicate that road points are well extracted from MLS data and road markings are well extracted from road points by the applied method. A quantitative study shows that the proposed method achieves an average

  2. Landslide displacement vectors derived from multi-temporal topographic LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fey, Christine; Rutzinger, Martin; Bremer, Magnus; Prager, Christoph; Zangerl, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Information about slope geometry and kinematics of landslides is essential for hazard assessment, monitoring and planning of protection and mitigation measures. Especially for remote and inaccessible slopes, subsurface data (e.g. boreholes, tunnels, investigation adits) are often not available and thus the deformation characteristics must be derived from surface displacement data. In recent years, multi-temporal topographic LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) data became an increasingly improved tool for detecting topographic surface deformations. In this context, LiDAR-based change detection is commonly applied for quantifying surface elevation changes. Advanced change detection methods derive displacement vectors with direction and velocities of slope movements. To extract displacement vectors from LiDAR raster data (i) an approach based on feature tracking by image correlation and (ii) an approach based on feature tracking by vectors breaklines are investigated. The image correlation method is based on the IMCORR software (National Snow and Ice Data Center, University of Colorado, Boulder), implemented in a SAGA GIS module. The image correlation algorithm is based on a normalized cross-covariance method. The algorithm searches tie points in two feature rasters derived from a digital surface model acquired at different time stamps. The method assesses automatically the displacement rates and directions of distinct terrain features e.g. displaced mountain ridges or striking boulders. In contrast the vector-based breakline methods require manual selection of tie points. The breaklines are the product of vectorized curvature raster images and extracting the "upper terrain edges" (topographic ridges) and "lower terrain edges" (topographic depressions). Both methods were tested on simulated terrain with determined displacement rates in order to quantify i) the accuracy ii) the minimum detectable movement rates iii) the influence of terrain characteristics iv) the

  3. Unsupervised building detection from irregularly spaced LiDAR and aerial imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shorter, Nicholas Sven

    As more data sources containing 3-D information are becoming available, an increased interest in 3-D imaging has emerged. Among these is the 3-D reconstruction of buildings and other man-made structures. A necessary preprocessing step is the detection and isolation of individual buildings that subsequently can be reconstructed in 3-D using various methodologies. Applications for both building detection and reconstruction have commercial use for urban planning, network planning for mobile communication (cell phone tower placement), spatial analysis of air pollution and noise nuisances, microclimate investigations, geographical information systems, security services and change detection from areas affected by natural disasters. Building detection and reconstruction are also used in the military for automatic target recognition and in entertainment for virtual tourism. Previously proposed building detection and reconstruction algorithms solely utilized aerial imagery. With the advent of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) systems providing elevation data, current algorithms explore using captured LiDAR data as an additional feasible source of information. Additional sources of information can lead to automating techniques (alleviating their need for manual user intervention) as well as increasing their capabilities and accuracy. Several building detection approaches surveyed in the open literature have fundamental weaknesses that hinder their use; such as requiring multiple data sets from different sensors, mandating certain operations to be carried out manually, and limited functionality to only being able to detect certain types of buildings. In this work, a building detection system is proposed and implemented which strives to overcome the limitations seen in existing techniques. The developed framework is flexible in that it can perform building detection from just LiDAR data (first or last return), or just nadir, color aerial imagery. If data from both LiDAR and

  4. The use of local indicators of spatial association to improve LiDAR-derived predictions of potential amphibian breeding ponds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Julian, J.T.; Young, J.A.; Jones, J.W.; Snyder, C.D.; Wright, C.W.

    2009-01-01

    We examined whether spatially explicit information improved models that use LiDAR return signal intensity to discriminate in-pond habitat from terrestrial habitat at 24 amphibian breeding ponds. The addition of Local Indicators of Spatial Association (LISA) to LiDAR return intensity data significantly improved predictive models at all ponds, reduced residual error by as much as 74%, and appeared to improve models by reducing classification errors associated with types of in-pond vegetation. We conclude that LISA statistics can help maximize the information content that can be extracted from time resolved LiDAR return data in models that predict the occurrence of small, seasonal ponds. ?? Springer-Verlag 2008.

  5. Modeling right-lateral offset of a Late Pleistocene terrace riser along the Polaris fault using ground based LiDAR imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howle, J. F.; Bawden, G. W.; Hunter, L. E.; Rose, R. S.

    2009-12-01

    High resolution (centimeter level) three-dimensional point-cloud imagery of offset glacial outwash deposits were collected by using ground based tripod LiDAR (T-LiDAR) to characterize the cumulative fault slip across the recently identified Polaris fault (Hunter et al., 2009) near Truckee, California. The type-section site for the Polaris fault is located 6.5 km east of Truckee where progressive right-lateral displacement of middle to late Pleistocene deposits is evident. Glacial outwash deposits, aggraded during the Tioga glaciation, form a flat lying ‘fill’ terrace on both the north and south sides of the modern Truckee River. During the Tioga deglaciation melt water incised into the terrace producing fluvial scarps or terrace risers (Birkeland, 1964). Subsequently, the terrace risers on both banks have been right-laterally offset by the Polaris fault. By using T-LiDAR on an elevated tripod (4.25 m high), we collected 3D high-resolution (thousands of points per square meter; ± 4 mm) point-cloud imagery of the offset terrace risers. Vegetation was removed from the data using commercial software, and large protruding boulders were manually deleted to generate a bare-earth point-cloud dataset with an average data density of over 240 points per square meter. From the bare-earth point cloud we mathematically reconstructed a pristine terrace/scarp morphology on both sides of the fault, defined coupled sets of piercing points, and extracted a corresponding displacement vector. First, the Polaris fault was approximated as a vertical plane that bisects the offset terrace risers, as well as bisecting linear swales and tectonic depressions in the outwash terrace. Then, piercing points to the vertical fault plane were constructed from the geometry of the geomorphic elements on either side of the fault. On each side of the fault, the best-fit modeled outwash plane is projected laterally and the best-fit modeled terrace riser projected upward to a virtual intersection in

  6. An Airborne Scanning LiDAR System for Ocean and Coastal Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reineman, B. D.; Lenain, L.; Castel, D.; Melville, W. K.

    2008-12-01

    We have developed an airborne scanning LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) system and demonstrated its functionality for terrestrial and oceanographic measurements. Differential GPS (DGPS) and an Inertial Navigation System (INS) are synchronized with the LiDAR, providing end result vertical rms errors of approximately 6~cm. Flying 170~m above the surface, we achieve a point density of ~ 0.7 m-2 and a swath width of 90 to 120~m over ocean and 200~m over land. Georeferencing algorithms were developed in-house and earth-referenced data are available several hours after acquisition. Surveys from the system are compared with ground DGPS surveys and existing airborne surveys of fixed targets. Twelve research flights in a Piper Twin Comanche from August 2007 to July 2008 have provided topography of the Southern California coastline and sea surface wave fields in the nearshore ocean environment. Two of the flights also documented the results of the October 2007 landslide on Mt.~Soledad in La Jolla, California. Eight research flights aboard a Cessna Caravan surveyed the topography, lagoon, reef, and surrounding seas of Lady Elliot Island (LEI) in Australia's Great Barrier Reef in April 2008. We describe applications for the system, including coastal topographic surveys, wave measurements, reef research, and ship wake studies.

  7. LiDAR-Assisted identification of an active fault near Truckee, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, L.E.; Howle, J.F.; Rose, R.S.; Bawden, G.W.

    2011-01-01

    We use high-resolution (1.5-2.4 points/m2) bare-earth airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) imagery to identify, map, constrain, and visualize fault-related geomorphology in densely vegetated terrain surrounding Martis Creek Dam near Truckee, California. Bare-earth LiDAR imagery reveals a previously unrecognized and apparently youthful right-lateral strike-slip fault that exhibits laterally continuous tectonic geomorphic features over a 35-km-long zone. If these interpretations are correct, the fault, herein named the Polaris fault, may represent a significant seismic hazard to the greater Truckee-Lake Tahoe and Reno-Carson City regions. Three-dimensional modeling of an offset late Quaternary terrace riser indicates a minimum tectonic slip rate of 0.4 ?? 0.1 mm/yr.Mapped fault patterns are fairly typical of regional patterns elsewhere in the northern Walker Lane and are in strong coherence with moderate magnitude historical seismicity of the immediate area, as well as the current regional stress regime. Based on a range of surface-rupture lengths and depths to the base of the seismogenic zone, we estimate a maximum earthquake magnitude (M) for the Polaris fault to be between 6.4 and 6.9.

  8. GeoEarthScope Airborne LiDAR and Satellite InSAR Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, D. A.; Jackson, M. E.; Meertens, C.

    2008-12-01

    UNAVCO has successfully acquired a significant volume of aerial and satellite geodetic imagery as part of GeoEarthScope, a component of the EarthScope Facility project funded by the National Science Foundation. All GeoEarthScope acquisition activities are now complete. Airborne LiDAR data acquisitions took place in 2007 and 2008 and cover a total area of more than 5000 square kilometers. The primary LiDAR survey regions cover features in Northern California, Southern/Eastern California, the Pacific Northwest, the Intermountain Seismic Belt (including the Wasatch and Teton faults and Yellowstone), and Alaska. We have ordered and archived more than 28,000 scenes (more than 81,000 frames) of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data suitable for interferometric analyses covering most of the western U.S. and parts of Alaska and Hawaii from several satellite platforms, including ERS-1/2, ENVISAT and RADARSAT. In addition to ordering data from existing archives, we also tasked the ESA ENVISAT satellite to acquire new SAR data in 2007 and 2008. GeoEarthScope activities were led by UNAVCO, guided by the community and conducted in partnership with the USGS and NASA. Processed imagery products, in addition to formats intended for use in standard research software, can also be viewed using general purpose tools such as Google Earth. We present a summary of these vast geodetic imagery datasets, totaling tens of terabytes, which are freely available to the community.

  9. Tree Crown Delineation using Watershed Techniques and Forest Metrics from NEON LiDAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luong, K. Y.

    2014-12-01

    LiDAR is a powerful remote sensing tool allowing for forest metrics to be taken on varying scales, which ultimately provide important forestry variables used to calculate factors such as total biomass or leaf area index. These variables are most useful when calculated for individual trees throughout a stand, but in very dense forests, identifying single trees becomes more difficult by traditional means. Full forests can be quantified uniquely for the best understanding of ecological contributions as opposed to purely in situ tree inventories which are time consuming and extremely localized. Canopy height models (CHM) can be used to understand the forest as a whole. By inverting the CHM, the tree data becomes sinks in the ground, mimicking ponds; by applying watershed-related spatial analyst tools in ArcGIS and GrassGIS, the trees are delineated by makeshift "flooding." Within this algorithm, the crown peaks are also extracted as an intermediate step to delineation, but this is a reliable means to obtain an accurate number of trees, as well as their individual heights with high reliability (R2 = 0.87). Delineated tree polygons can be directly overlaid onto different rasters to get many forest variables. In tightly clustered and very sparse stands, this method of delineation has a high level of accuracy. Following the workflow studies conducted on NEON LiDAR data on the Soaproot Saddle site, a ground-truth comparison was made with the Teakettle Experimental Forest site due to the availability of tree inventory data.

  10. Use of Airborne LiDAR To Estimate Forest Stand Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qi; Zhou, Wei; Li, Chang

    2014-03-01

    Small-Footprint Airborne LiDAR(light detection and ranging) remote sensing is a breakthrough technology for deriving forest canopy structural characteristics. Because the technique is relatively new as applied to canopy measurement in China, there is a tremendous need for experiments that integrate field work, LiDAR remote sensing and subsequent analyses for retrieving the full complement of structural measures critical for forestry applications. Data storage capacity and high processing speed available today have made it possible to digitally sample and store the entire reflected waveform, instead of only extracting the discrete coordinates which form the so-called point clouds. Return waveforms can give more detailed insights into the vertical structure of surface objects, surface slope, roughness and reflectivity than the conventional echoes. In this paper, an improved Expectation Maximum (EM) algorithm is adopted to decompose raw waveform data. Derived forest biophysical parameters, such as vegetation height, subcanopy topography, crown volume, ground reflectivity, vegetation reflectivity and canopy closure, are able to describe the horizontal and vertical forest canopy structure.

  11. Road traffic sign detection and classification from mobile LiDAR point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Shengxia; Li, Jonathan; Chen, Yiping; Wang, Cheng

    2016-03-01

    Traffic signs are important roadway assets that provide valuable information of the road for drivers to make safer and easier driving behaviors. Due to the development of mobile mapping systems that can efficiently acquire dense point clouds along the road, automated detection and recognition of road assets has been an important research issue. This paper deals with the detection and classification of traffic signs in outdoor environments using mobile light detection and ranging (Li- DAR) and inertial navigation technologies. The proposed method contains two main steps. It starts with an initial detection of traffic signs based on the intensity attributes of point clouds, as the traffic signs are always painted with highly reflective materials. Then, the classification of traffic signs is achieved based on the geometric shape and the pairwise 3D shape context. Some results and performance analyses are provided to show the effectiveness and limits of the proposed method. The experimental results demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method in detecting and classifying traffic signs from mobile LiDAR point clouds.

  12. Estimating Water Storage in Prairie Wetlands from a LiDAR DEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westbrook, C. J.; Minke, A. G.; Pomeroy, J. W.; Guo, X.

    2010-12-01

    The Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) of North America contains millions of wetlands in shallow depressions that have potential to store a significant volume of surface water. Assessing and modeling the effect of wetland storage on streamflow requires accurate methods to quantify wetland water volume. Currently, many methods rely on utilizing the strong statistical relationships between area (A), volume (V), and depth (h) to estimate wetland storage. While V-A equations are commonly used throughout the PPR, equations that utilize the V-A-h relationship are not used extensively because detailed topographic data are required. This paper suggests a new approach for implementing V-A-h relationships to determine wetland volume from wetland characteristics extracted from a high resolution LiDAR digital elevation model. GIS analysis was used to generate elevation contours that represent potential surface areas measurements, as well as provide a measure of the change in area with depth. This data collection process was also automated to generate the necessary input for estimating volume through the V-A-h equations. These volumes were compared to estimates from two V-A equations commonly used in the PPR. Results demonstrate that the automated LiDAR V-A-h method provided a better estimate of wetland volume than the V-A equations. This new method could be useful in quantifying the capacity of prairie pothole wetlands to store water and modeling their role in attenuating streamflows at a variety of spatial scales.

  13. The use of social media among adolescents in Dar es Salaam and Mtwara, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Constanze; Kleeb, Matthis; Mbelwa, Alice; Ahorlu, Collins

    2014-05-01

    Social media form part of the rapid worldwide digital development that is re-shaping the life of many young people. While the use of social media by youths is increasingly researched in the North, studies about youth in the South are missing. It therefore remains unclear how social media can be included in interventions that aim at informing young people in many countries of the global South about sexual and reproductive health. This paper presents findings of a mixed-methods study of young people's user behaviour on the internet and specifically of social media as a platform for sexual health promotion in Tanzania. The study used questionnaires with 60 adolescents and in-depth interviews with eight students aged 15 to 19 years in Dar es Salaam, and in Mtwara, Southern Tanzania. Findings show that youth in Dar es Salaam and Mtwara access the internet mainly through mobile phones. Facebook is by far the most popular internet site. Adolescents highlighted their interest in reproductive and sexual health messages and updates being delivered through humorous posts, links and clips, as well as by youth role models like music stars and actors that are entertaining and reflect up-to-date trends of modern youth culture.

  14. LiDAR Scan Matching Aided Inertial Navigation System in GNSS-Denied Environments.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jian; Chen, Yuwei; Niu, Xiaoji; Wang, Li; Chen, Liang; Liu, Jingbin; Shi, Chuang; Hyyppä, Juha

    2015-07-10

    A new scan that matches an aided Inertial Navigation System (INS) with a low-cost LiDAR is proposed as an alternative to GNSS-based navigation systems in GNSS-degraded or -denied environments such as indoor areas, dense forests, or urban canyons. In these areas, INS-based Dead Reckoning (DR) and Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) technologies are normally used to estimate positions as separate tools. However, there are critical implementation problems with each standalone system. The drift errors of velocity, position, and heading angles in an INS will accumulate over time, and on-line calibration is a must for sustaining positioning accuracy. SLAM performance is poor in featureless environments where the matching errors can significantly increase. Each standalone positioning method cannot offer a sustainable navigation solution with acceptable accuracy. This paper integrates two complementary technologies-INS and LiDAR SLAM-into one navigation frame with a loosely coupled Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) to use the advantages and overcome the drawbacks of each system to establish a stable long-term navigation process. Static and dynamic field tests were carried out with a self-developed Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) platform-NAVIS. The results prove that the proposed approach can provide positioning accuracy at the centimetre level for long-term operations, even in a featureless indoor environment.

  15. Indirect Correspondence-Based Robust Extrinsic Calibration of LiDAR and Camera

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Sungdae; Sock, Juil; Kwak, Kiho

    2016-01-01

    LiDAR and cameras have been broadly utilized in computer vision and autonomous vehicle applications. However, in order to convert data between the local coordinate systems, we must estimate the rigid body transformation between the sensors. In this paper, we propose a robust extrinsic calibration algorithm that can be implemented easily and has small calibration error. The extrinsic calibration parameters are estimated by minimizing the distance between corresponding features projected onto the image plane. The features are edge and centerline features on a v-shaped calibration target. The proposed algorithm contributes two ways to improve the calibration accuracy. First, we use different weights to distance between a point and a line feature according to the correspondence accuracy of the features. Second, we apply a penalizing function to exclude the influence of outliers in the calibration datasets. Additionally, based on our robust calibration approach for a single LiDAR-camera pair, we introduce a joint calibration that estimates the extrinsic parameters of multiple sensors at once by minimizing one objective function with loop closing constraints. We conduct several experiments to evaluate the performance of our extrinsic calibration algorithm. The experimental results show that our calibration method has better performance than the other approaches. PMID:27338416

  16. Indirect Correspondence-Based Robust Extrinsic Calibration of LiDAR and Camera.

    PubMed

    Sim, Sungdae; Sock, Juil; Kwak, Kiho

    2016-06-22

    LiDAR and cameras have been broadly utilized in computer vision and autonomous vehicle applications. However, in order to convert data between the local coordinate systems, we must estimate the rigid body transformation between the sensors. In this paper, we propose a robust extrinsic calibration algorithm that can be implemented easily and has small calibration error. The extrinsic calibration parameters are estimated by minimizing the distance between corresponding features projected onto the image plane. The features are edge and centerline features on a v-shaped calibration target. The proposed algorithm contributes two ways to improve the calibration accuracy. First, we use different weights to distance between a point and a line feature according to the correspondence accuracy of the features. Second, we apply a penalizing function to exclude the influence of outliers in the calibration datasets. Additionally, based on our robust calibration approach for a single LiDAR-camera pair, we introduce a joint calibration that estimates the extrinsic parameters of multiple sensors at once by minimizing one objective function with loop closing constraints. We conduct several experiments to evaluate the performance of our extrinsic calibration algorithm. The experimental results show that our calibration method has better performance than the other approaches.

  17. The use of social media among adolescents in Dar es Salaam and Mtwara, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Constanze; Kleeb, Matthis; Mbelwa, Alice; Ahorlu, Collins

    2014-05-01

    Social media form part of the rapid worldwide digital development that is re-shaping the life of many young people. While the use of social media by youths is increasingly researched in the North, studies about youth in the South are missing. It therefore remains unclear how social media can be included in interventions that aim at informing young people in many countries of the global South about sexual and reproductive health. This paper presents findings of a mixed-methods study of young people's user behaviour on the internet and specifically of social media as a platform for sexual health promotion in Tanzania. The study used questionnaires with 60 adolescents and in-depth interviews with eight students aged 15 to 19 years in Dar es Salaam, and in Mtwara, Southern Tanzania. Findings show that youth in Dar es Salaam and Mtwara access the internet mainly through mobile phones. Facebook is by far the most popular internet site. Adolescents highlighted their interest in reproductive and sexual health messages and updates being delivered through humorous posts, links and clips, as well as by youth role models like music stars and actors that are entertaining and reflect up-to-date trends of modern youth culture. PMID:24908469

  18. A comprehensive framework of building model reconstruction from airborne LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Y.; Wang, C.; Xi, X. H.; Zhang, W. M.

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive framework of reconstructing 3D building models from airborne LiDAR data, which involves building extraction, roof segmentation and model generation. Firstly, building points are extracted from LiDAR point clouds by removing walls, trees, ground and noises. Walls and trees are identified by the normal and multi-return features respectively and then ground and noise are detected by the region growing algorithm which aims at extracting smooth surfaces. Then the connected component analysis is performed to extract building points. Secondly, once the building points are acquired, building roofs are separated by the region growing algorithm which employs the normal vector and curvature of points to detect planar clusters. Finally, by combining regular building outlines obtained from building points and roof intersections acquired from the roof segmentation results, 3D building models with high accuracy are derived. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is able to correctly obtain building points and reconstruct 3D building models with high accuracy.

  19. A Voxel-based Method for Forest Change Detection after Fire Using LiDAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Z.

    2015-12-01

    A Voxel-based Method for Forest Change Detection after Fire Using LiDAR DataZewei Xu and Jonathan A. Greenberg Traditional methods of forest fire modeling focus on the patterns of burning in two-dimensions at relatively coarse resolutions. However, fires spread in complex, three-dimensional patterns related to the horizontal and vertical distributions of woody fuel as well as the prevailing climate conditions, and the micro-scale patterns of fuel distributions over scales of only meters can determine the path that fire can take through a complex landscape. One challenge in understanding the full three-dimensional (3D) path that a fire takes through a landscape is a lack of data at landscape scales of these burns. Remote sensing approaches, while operating at landscape scales, typically focus on two-dimensional analyses using standard image-based change detection techniques. In this research, we develop a 3D voxel-based change detection method applied to multitemporal LiDAR data collected before and after forest fires in California to quantify the full 3D pattern of vegetation loss. By changing the size of the voxel, forest loss at different spatial scales is revealed. The 3D tunnel of fuel loss created by the fire was used to examine ground-to-crown transitions, firebreaks, and other three-dimensional aspects of a forest fire.

  20. Building Change Detection by Combining LiDAR Data and Ortho Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Daifeng; Zhang, Yongjun

    2016-06-01

    The elevation information is not considered in the traditional building change detection methods. This paper presents an algorithm of combining LiDAR data and ortho image for 3D building change detection. The advantages of the proposed approach lie in the fusion of the height and spectral information by thematic segmentation. Furthermore, the proposed method also combines the advantages of pixel-level and object-level change detection by image differencing and object analysis. Firstly, two periods of LiDAR data are filtered and interpolated to generate their corresponding DSMs. Secondly, a binary image of the changed areas is generated by means of differencing and filtering the two DSMs, and then thematic layer is generated and projected onto the DSMs and DOMs. Thirdly, geometric and spectral features of the changed area are calculated, which is followed by decision tree classification for the purpose of extracting the changed building areas. Finally, the statistics of the elevation and area change information as well as the change type of the changed buildings are done for building change analysis. Experimental results show that the completeness and correctness of building change detection are close to 81.8% and 85.7% respectively when the building area is larger than 80 m2, which are increased about 10% when compared with using ortho image alone.

  1. Indirect Correspondence-Based Robust Extrinsic Calibration of LiDAR and Camera.

    PubMed

    Sim, Sungdae; Sock, Juil; Kwak, Kiho

    2016-01-01

    LiDAR and cameras have been broadly utilized in computer vision and autonomous vehicle applications. However, in order to convert data between the local coordinate systems, we must estimate the rigid body transformation between the sensors. In this paper, we propose a robust extrinsic calibration algorithm that can be implemented easily and has small calibration error. The extrinsic calibration parameters are estimated by minimizing the distance between corresponding features projected onto the image plane. The features are edge and centerline features on a v-shaped calibration target. The proposed algorithm contributes two ways to improve the calibration accuracy. First, we use different weights to distance between a point and a line feature according to the correspondence accuracy of the features. Second, we apply a penalizing function to exclude the influence of outliers in the calibration datasets. Additionally, based on our robust calibration approach for a single LiDAR-camera pair, we introduce a joint calibration that estimates the extrinsic parameters of multiple sensors at once by minimizing one objective function with loop closing constraints. We conduct several experiments to evaluate the performance of our extrinsic calibration algorithm. The experimental results show that our calibration method has better performance than the other approaches. PMID:27338416

  2. LiDAR Scan Matching Aided Inertial Navigation System in GNSS-Denied Environments

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jian; Chen, Yuwei; Niu, Xiaoji; Wang, Li; Chen, Liang; Liu, Jingbin; Shi, Chuang; Hyyppä, Juha

    2015-01-01

    A new scan that matches an aided Inertial Navigation System (INS) with a low-cost LiDAR is proposed as an alternative to GNSS-based navigation systems in GNSS-degraded or -denied environments such as indoor areas, dense forests, or urban canyons. In these areas, INS-based Dead Reckoning (DR) and Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) technologies are normally used to estimate positions as separate tools. However, there are critical implementation problems with each standalone system. The drift errors of velocity, position, and heading angles in an INS will accumulate over time, and on-line calibration is a must for sustaining positioning accuracy. SLAM performance is poor in featureless environments where the matching errors can significantly increase. Each standalone positioning method cannot offer a sustainable navigation solution with acceptable accuracy. This paper integrates two complementary technologies—INS and LiDAR SLAM—into one navigation frame with a loosely coupled Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) to use the advantages and overcome the drawbacks of each system to establish a stable long-term navigation process. Static and dynamic field tests were carried out with a self-developed Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) platform—NAVIS. The results prove that the proposed approach can provide positioning accuracy at the centimetre level for long-term operations, even in a featureless indoor environment. PMID:26184206

  3. A comparison of waveform processing algorithms for single-wavelength LiDAR bathymetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chisheng; Li, Qingquan; Liu, Yanxiong; Wu, Guofeng; Liu, Peng; Ding, Xiaoli

    2015-03-01

    Due to the low-cost and lightweight units, single-wavelength LiDAR bathymetric systems are an ideal option for shallow-water (<12 m) bathymetry. However, one disadvantage of such systems is the lack of near-infrared and Raman channels, which results in difficulties in extracting the water surface. Therefore, the choice of a suitable waveform processing method is extremely important to guarantee the accuracy of the bathymetric retrieval. In this paper, we test six algorithms for single-wavelength bathymetric waveform processing, i.e. peak detection (PD), the average square difference function (ASDF), Gaussian decomposition (GD), quadrilateral fitting (QF), Richardson-Lucy deconvolution (RLD), and Wiener filter deconvolution (WD). To date, most of these algorithms have previously only been applied in topographic LiDAR waveforms captured over land. A simulated dataset and an Optech Aquarius dataset were used to assess the algorithms, with the focus being on their capability of extracting the depth and the bottom response. The influences of a number of water and equipment parameters were also investigated by the use of a Monte Carlo method. The results showed that the RLD method had a superior performance in terms of a high detection rate and low errors in the retrieved depth and magnitude. The attenuation coefficient, noise level, water depth, and bottom reflectance had significant influences on the measurement error of the retrieved depth, while the effects of scan angle and water surface roughness were not so obvious.

  4. Characterization of the OPAL LiDAR under controlled obscurant conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xiaoying; Church, Philip; Matheson, Justin

    2016-05-01

    Neptec Technologies' OPAL-120 3D LiDAR is optimized for obscurant penetration. The OPAL-120 uses a scanning mechanism based on the Risley prism pair. The scan patterns are created by rotating two prisms under independent motor control. The geometry and material properties of the prisms define the conical field-of-view of the sensor, which can be built to between 60 to 120 degrees. The OPAL-120 was recently evaluated using a controlled obscurant chamber capable of generating clouds of obscurants over a depth of 22m. Obscurants used in this investigation include: Arizona road dust, water fog, and fog-oil. The obscurant cloud optical densities were monitored with a transmissometer. Optical depths values ranged from an upper value of 6 and progressively decreased to 0. Targets were positioned at the back of the obscurant chamber at a distance of 60m from the LiDAR. The targets are made of a foreground array of equally spaced painted wood stripes in front of a solid background. Reflectivity contrasts were achieved with foreground/background combinations of white/white, white/black and black/white. Data analysis will be presented on the effect of optical densities on range and cross-range resolution, and accuracy. The analysis includes the combinations of all obscurant types and target reflectivity contrasts.

  5. Identifying Ancient Settlement Patterns through LiDAR in the Mosquitia Region of Honduras.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Christopher T; Fernández-Diaz, Juan Carlos; Cohen, Anna S; Neil Cruz, Oscar; Gonzáles, Alicia M; Leisz, Stephen J; Pezzutti, Florencia; Shrestha, Ramesh; Carter, William

    2016-01-01

    The Mosquitia ecosystem of Honduras occupies the fulcrum between the American continents and as such constitutes a critical region for understanding past patterns of socio-political development and interaction. Heavy vegetation, rugged topography, and remoteness have limited scientific investigation. This paper presents prehistoric patterns of settlement and landuse for a critical valley within the Mosquitia derived from airborne LiDAR scanning and field investigation. We show that (i) though today the valley is a wilderness it was densely inhabited in the past; (ii) that this population was organized into a three-tiered system composed of 19 settlements dominated by a city; and, (iii) that this occupation was embedded within a human engineered landscape. We also add to a growing body of literature that demonstrates the utility of LiDAR as means for rapid cultural assessments in undocumented regions for analysis and conservation. Our ultimate hope is for our work to promote protections to safeguard the unique and critically endangered Mosquitia ecosystem and other similar areas in need of preservation.

  6. LiDAR Scan Matching Aided Inertial Navigation System in GNSS-Denied Environments.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jian; Chen, Yuwei; Niu, Xiaoji; Wang, Li; Chen, Liang; Liu, Jingbin; Shi, Chuang; Hyyppä, Juha

    2015-01-01

    A new scan that matches an aided Inertial Navigation System (INS) with a low-cost LiDAR is proposed as an alternative to GNSS-based navigation systems in GNSS-degraded or -denied environments such as indoor areas, dense forests, or urban canyons. In these areas, INS-based Dead Reckoning (DR) and Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) technologies are normally used to estimate positions as separate tools. However, there are critical implementation problems with each standalone system. The drift errors of velocity, position, and heading angles in an INS will accumulate over time, and on-line calibration is a must for sustaining positioning accuracy. SLAM performance is poor in featureless environments where the matching errors can significantly increase. Each standalone positioning method cannot offer a sustainable navigation solution with acceptable accuracy. This paper integrates two complementary technologies-INS and LiDAR SLAM-into one navigation frame with a loosely coupled Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) to use the advantages and overcome the drawbacks of each system to establish a stable long-term navigation process. Static and dynamic field tests were carried out with a self-developed Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) platform-NAVIS. The results prove that the proposed approach can provide positioning accuracy at the centimetre level for long-term operations, even in a featureless indoor environment. PMID:26184206

  7. Genetic diversity of carotenoid-rich bananas evaluated by Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT)

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the carotenoid content and genetic variability of banana accessions from the Musa germplasm collection held at Embrapa Cassava and Tropical Fruits, Brazil. Forty-two samples were analyzed, including 21 diploids, 19 triploids and two tetraploids. The carotenoid content was analyzed spectrophotometrically and genetic variability was estimated using 653 DArT markers. The average carotenoid content was 4.73 μg.g -1 , and ranged from 1.06 μg.g -1 for the triploid Nanica (Cavendish group) to 19.24 μg.g -1 for the triploid Saney. The diploids Modok Gier and NBA-14 and the triploid Saney had a carotenoid content that was, respectively, 7-fold, 6-fold and 9-fold greater than that of cultivars from the Cavendish group (2.19 μg.g -1). The mean similarity among the 42 accessions was 0.63 (range: 0.24 to 1.00). DArT analysis revealed extensive genetic variability in accessions from the Embrapa Musa germplasm bank. PMID:21637652

  8. Genetic diversity of carotenoid-rich bananas evaluated by Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT).

    PubMed

    Amorim, Edson P; Vilarinhos, Alberto D; Cohen, Kelly O; Amorim, Vanusia B O; Dos Santos-Serejo, Janay A; Silva, Sebastião Oliveira E; Pestana, Kátia N; Dos Santos, Vânia J; Paes, Norma S; Monte, Damares C; Dos Reis, Ronaldo V

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the carotenoid content and genetic variability of banana accessions from the Musa germplasm collection held at Embrapa Cassava and Tropical Fruits, Brazil. Forty-two samples were analyzed, including 21 diploids, 19 triploids and two tetraploids. The carotenoid content was analyzed spectrophotometrically and genetic variability was estimated using 653 DArT markers. The average carotenoid content was 4.73 μg.g (-1) , and ranged from 1.06 μg.g (-1) for the triploid Nanica (Cavendish group) to 19.24 μg.g (-1) for the triploid Saney. The diploids Modok Gier and NBA-14 and the triploid Saney had a carotenoid content that was, respectively, 7-fold, 6-fold and 9-fold greater than that of cultivars from the Cavendish group (2.19 μg.g (-1)). The mean similarity among the 42 accessions was 0.63 (range: 0.24 to 1.00). DArT analysis revealed extensive genetic variability in accessions from the Embrapa Musa germplasm bank.

  9. Identifying Ancient Settlement Patterns through LiDAR in the Mosquitia Region of Honduras.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Christopher T; Fernández-Diaz, Juan Carlos; Cohen, Anna S; Neil Cruz, Oscar; Gonzáles, Alicia M; Leisz, Stephen J; Pezzutti, Florencia; Shrestha, Ramesh; Carter, William

    2016-01-01

    The Mosquitia ecosystem of Honduras occupies the fulcrum between the American continents and as such constitutes a critical region for understanding past patterns of socio-political development and interaction. Heavy vegetation, rugged topography, and remoteness have limited scientific investigation. This paper presents prehistoric patterns of settlement and landuse for a critical valley within the Mosquitia derived from airborne LiDAR scanning and field investigation. We show that (i) though today the valley is a wilderness it was densely inhabited in the past; (ii) that this population was organized into a three-tiered system composed of 19 settlements dominated by a city; and, (iii) that this occupation was embedded within a human engineered landscape. We also add to a growing body of literature that demonstrates the utility of LiDAR as means for rapid cultural assessments in undocumented regions for analysis and conservation. Our ultimate hope is for our work to promote protections to safeguard the unique and critically endangered Mosquitia ecosystem and other similar areas in need of preservation. PMID:27560962

  10. Improved progressive TIN densification filtering algorithm for airborne LiDAR data in forested areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaoqian; Guo, Qinghua; Su, Yanjun; Xue, Baolin

    2016-07-01

    Filtering of light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data into the ground and non-ground points is a fundamental step in processing raw airborne LiDAR data. This paper proposes an improved progressive triangulated irregular network (TIN) densification (IPTD) filtering algorithm that can cope with a variety of forested landscapes, particularly both topographically and environmentally complex regions. The IPTD filtering algorithm consists of three steps: (1) acquiring potential ground seed points using the morphological method; (2) obtaining accurate ground seed points; and (3) building a TIN-based model and iteratively densifying TIN. The IPTD filtering algorithm was tested in 15 forested sites with various terrains (i.e., elevation and slope) and vegetation conditions (i.e., canopy cover and tree height), and was compared with seven other commonly used filtering algorithms (including morphology-based, slope-based, and interpolation-based filtering algorithms). Results show that the IPTD achieves the highest filtering accuracy for nine of the 15 sites. In general, it outperforms the other filtering algorithms, yielding the lowest average total error of 3.15% and the highest average kappa coefficient of 89.53%.

  11. Characterizing Croatian Wheat Germplasm Diversity and Structure in a European Context by DArT Markers

    PubMed Central

    Novoselović, Dario; Bentley, Alison R.; Šimek, Ruđer; Dvojković, Krešimir; Sorrells, Mark E.; Gosman, Nicolas; Horsnell, Richard; Drezner, Georg; Šatović, Zlatko

    2016-01-01

    Narrowing the genetic base available for future genetic progress is a major concern to plant breeders. In order to avoid this, strategies to characterize and protect genetic diversity in regional breeding pools are required. In this study, 89 winter wheat cultivars released in Croatia between 1936 and 2006 were genotyped using 1,229 DArT (diversity array technology) markers to assess the diversity and population structure. In order to place Croatian breeding pool (CBP) in a European context, Croatian wheat cultivars were compared to 523 European cultivars from seven countries using a total of 166 common DArT markers. The results show higher genetic diversity in the wheat breeding pool from Central Europe (CE) as compared to that from Northern and Western European (NWE) countries. The most of the genetic diversity was attributable to the differences among cultivars within countries. When the geographical criterion (CE vs. NWE) was applied, highly significant difference between regions was obtained that accounted for 16.19% of the total variance, revealing that the CBP represents genetic variation not currently captured in elite European wheat. The current study emphasizes the important contribution made by plant breeders to maintaining wheat genetic diversity and suggests that regional breeding is essential to the maintenance of this diversity. The usefulness of open-access wheat datasets is also highlighted. PMID:26941756

  12. Identifying Ancient Settlement Patterns through LiDAR in the Mosquitia Region of Honduras

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Diaz, Juan Carlos; Cohen, Anna S.; Neil Cruz, Oscar; Gonzáles, Alicia M.; Leisz, Stephen J.; Pezzutti, Florencia; Shrestha, Ramesh; Carter, William

    2016-01-01

    The Mosquitia ecosystem of Honduras occupies the fulcrum between the American continents and as such constitutes a critical region for understanding past patterns of socio-political development and interaction. Heavy vegetation, rugged topography, and remoteness have limited scientific investigation. This paper presents prehistoric patterns of settlement and landuse for a critical valley within the Mosquitia derived from airborne LiDAR scanning and field investigation. We show that (i) though today the valley is a wilderness it was densely inhabited in the past; (ii) that this population was organized into a three-tiered system composed of 19 settlements dominated by a city; and, (iii) that this occupation was embedded within a human engineered landscape. We also add to a growing body of literature that demonstrates the utility of LiDAR as means for rapid cultural assessments in undocumented regions for analysis and conservation. Our ultimate hope is for our work to promote protections to safeguard the unique and critically endangered Mosquitia ecosystem and other similar areas in need of preservation. PMID:27560962

  13. Invasive Shrub Mapping in an Urban Environment from Hyperspectral and LiDAR-Derived Attributes

    PubMed Central

    Chance, Curtis M.; Coops, Nicholas C.; Plowright, Andrew A.; Tooke, Thoreau R.; Christen, Andreas; Aven, Neal

    2016-01-01

    Proactive management of invasive species in urban areas is critical to restricting their overall distribution. The objective of this work is to determine whether advanced remote sensing technologies can help to detect invasions effectively and efficiently in complex urban ecosystems such as parks. In Surrey, BC, Canada, Himalayan blackberry (Rubus armeniacus) and English ivy (Hedera helix) are two invasive shrub species that can negatively affect native ecosystems in cities and managed urban parks. Random forest (RF) models were created to detect these two species using a combination of hyperspectral imagery, and light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data. LiDAR-derived predictor variables included irradiance models, canopy structural characteristics, and orographic variables. RF detection accuracy ranged from 77.8 to 87.8% for Himalayan blackberry and 81.9 to 82.1% for English ivy, with open areas classified more accurately than areas under canopy cover. English ivy was predicted to occur across a greater area than Himalayan blackberry both within parks and across the entire city. Both Himalayan blackberry and English ivy were mostly located in clusters according to a Local Moran’s I analysis. The occurrence of both species decreased as the distance from roads increased. This study shows the feasibility of producing highly accurate detection maps of plant invasions in urban environments using a fusion of remotely sensed data, as well as the ability to use these products to guide management decisions.

  14. Basic analysis of climate and urban bioclimate of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ndetto, Emmanuel L.; Matzarakis, Andreas

    2013-10-01

    Better understanding of urban microclimate and bioclimate of any city is imperative today when the world is constrained by both urbanisation and global climate change. Urbanisation generally triggers changes in land cover and hence influencing the urban local climate. Dar es Salaam city in Tanzania is one of the fast growing cities. Assessment of its urban climate and the human biometeorological conditions was done using the easily available synoptic meteorological data covering the period 2001-2011. In particular, the physiologically equivalent temperature (PET) was calculated using the RayMan software and results reveal that the afternoon period from December to February (DJF season) is relatively the most thermal stressful period to human beings in Dar es Salaam where PET values of above 35 °C were found. Additionally, the diurnal cycle of the individual meteorological elements that influence the PET index were analysed and found that air temperature of 30-35 °C dominate the afternoon period from 12:00 to 15:00 hours local standard time at about 60 % of occurrence. The current results, though considered as preliminary to the ongoing urban climate study in the city, provide an insight on how urban climate research is of significant importance in providing useful climatic information for ensuring quality of life and wellbeing of city dwellers.

  15. Detection of large above-ground biomass variability in lowland forest ecosystems by airborne LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jubanski, J.; Ballhorn, U.; Kronseder, K.; Franke, J.; Siegert, F.

    2013-06-01

    Quantification of tropical forest above-ground biomass (AGB) over large areas as input for Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation (REDD+) projects and climate change models is challenging. This is the first study which attempts to estimate AGB and its variability across large areas of tropical lowland forests in Central Kalimantan (Indonesia) through correlating airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) to forest inventory data. Two LiDAR height metrics were analysed, and regression models could be improved through the use of LiDAR point densities as input (R2 = 0.88; n = 52). Surveying with a LiDAR point density per square metre of about 4 resulted in the best cost / benefit ratio. We estimated AGB for 600 km of LiDAR tracks and showed that there exists a considerable variability of up to 140% within the same forest type due to varying environmental conditions. Impact from logging operations and the associated AGB losses dating back more than 10 yr could be assessed by LiDAR but not by multispectral satellite imagery. Comparison with a Landsat classification for a 1 million ha study area where AGB values were based on site-specific field inventory data, regional literature estimates, and default values by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) showed an overestimation of 43%, 102%, and 137%, respectively. The results show that AGB overestimation may lead to wrong greenhouse gas (GHG) emission estimates due to deforestation in climate models. For REDD+ projects this leads to inaccurate carbon stock estimates and consequently to significantly wrong REDD+ based compensation payments.

  16. 3-D earthquake surface displacements from differencing pre- and post-event LiDAR point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, A. K.; Nissen, E.; Arrowsmith, R.; Saripalli, S.

    2012-12-01

    The explosion in aerial LiDAR surveying along active faults across the western United States and elsewhere provides a high-resolution topographic baseline against which to compare repeat LiDAR datasets collected after future earthquakes. We present a new method for determining 3-D coseismic surface displacements and rotations by differencing pre- and post-earthquake LiDAR point clouds using an adaptation of the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm, a point set registration technique widely used in medical imaging, computer vision and graphics. There is no need for any gridding or smoothing of the LiDAR data and the method works well even with large mismatches in the density of the two point clouds. To explore the method's performance, we simulate pre- and post-event point clouds using real ("B4") LiDAR data on the southern San Andreas Fault perturbed with displacements of known magnitude. For input point clouds with ~2 points per square meter, we are able to reproduce displacements with a 50 m grid spacing and with horizontal and vertical accuracies of ~20 cm and ~4 cm. In the future, finer grids and improved precisions should be possible with higher shot densities and better survey geo-referencing. By capturing near-fault deformation in 3-D, LiDAR differencing with ICP will complement satellite-based techniques such as InSAR which map only certain components of the surface deformation and which often break down close to surface faulting or in areas of dense vegetation. It will be especially useful for mapping shallow fault slip and rupture zone deformation, helping inform paleoseismic studies and better constrain fault zone rheology. Because ICP can image rotations directly, the technique will also help resolve the detailed kinematics of distributed zones of faulting where block rotations may be common.

  17. Modeling Urban Growth Spatial Dynamics: Case studies of Addis Ababa and Dar es Salaam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchta, Katja; Abo El Wafa, Hany; Printz, Andreas; Pauleit, Stephan

    2013-04-01

    Rapid urbanization, and consequently, the dramatic spatial expansion of mostly informal urban areas increases the vulnerability of African cities to the effects of climate change such as sea level rise, more frequent flooding, droughts and heat waves. The EU FP 7 funded project CLUVA (Climate Change and Urban Vulnerability in Africa, www.cluva.eu) aims to develop strategies for minimizing the risks of natural hazards caused by climate change and to improve the coping capacity of African cities. Green infrastructure may play a particular role in climate change adaptation by providing ecosystem services for flood protection, stormwater retention, heat island moderation and provision of food and fuel wood. In this context, a major challenge is to gain a better understanding of the spatial and temporal dynamics of the cities and how these impact on green infrastructure and hence their vulnerability. Urban growth scenarios for two African cities, namely Addis Ababa, Ethiopia and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, were developed based on a characterization of their urban morphology. A population growth driven - GIS based - disaggregation modeling approach was applied. Major impact factors influencing the urban dynamics were identified both from literature and interviews with local experts. Location based factors including proximity to road infrastructure and accessibility, and environmental factors including slope, surface and flood risk areas showed a particular impact on urban growth patterns. In Addis Ababa and Dar es Salaam, population density scenarios were modeled comparing two housing development strategies. Results showed that a densification scenario significantly decreases the loss of agricultural and green areas such as forests, bushland and sports grounds. In Dar es Salaam, the scenario of planned new settlements with a population density of max. 350 persons per hectare would lead until 2025 to a loss of agricultural land (-10.1%) and green areas (-6.6%). On the other

  18. Measuring the effects of morphological changes to sea turtle nesting beaches over time with LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kristina H.; Anderson, Sharolyn J.; Sutton, Paul C.

    2015-10-01

    Sea turtle nesting beaches in southeastern Florida were evaluated for changes from 1999 to 2005 using LiDAR datasets. Changes to beach volume were correlated with changes in several elevation-derived characteristics, such as elevation and slope. In addition, these changes to beach geomorphology were correlated to changes in nest success, illustrating that beach alterations may affect sea turtle nesting behavior. The ability to use LiDAR datasets to quickly and efficiently conduct beach comparisons for habitat use represents another benefit to this high spatial resolution data.

  19. Quantification of LiDAR measurement uncertainty through propagation of errors due to sensor sub-systems and terrain morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulden, T.; Hopkinson, C.

    2013-12-01

    The quantification of LiDAR sensor measurement uncertainty is important for evaluating the quality of derived DEM products, compiling risk assessment of management decisions based from LiDAR information, and enhancing LiDAR mission planning capabilities. Current quality assurance estimates of LiDAR measurement uncertainty are limited to post-survey empirical assessments or vendor estimates from commercial literature. Empirical evidence can provide valuable information for the performance of the sensor in validated areas; however, it cannot characterize the spatial distribution of measurement uncertainty throughout the extensive coverage of typical LiDAR surveys. Vendor advertised error estimates are often restricted to strict and optimal survey conditions, resulting in idealized values. Numerical modeling of individual pulse uncertainty provides an alternative method for estimating LiDAR measurement uncertainty. LiDAR measurement uncertainty is theoretically assumed to fall into three distinct categories, 1) sensor sub-system errors, 2) terrain influences, and 3) vegetative influences. This research details the procedures for numerical modeling of measurement uncertainty from the sensor sub-system (GPS, IMU, laser scanner, laser ranger) and terrain influences. Results show that errors tend to increase as the laser scan angle, altitude or laser beam incidence angle increase. An experimental survey over a flat and paved runway site, performed with an Optech ALTM 3100 sensor, showed an increase in modeled vertical errors of 5 cm, at a nadir scan orientation, to 8 cm at scan edges; for an aircraft altitude of 1200 m and half scan angle of 15°. In a survey with the same sensor, at a highly sloped glacial basin site absent of vegetation, modeled vertical errors reached over 2 m. Validation of error models within the glacial environment, over three separate flight lines, respectively showed 100%, 85%, and 75% of elevation residuals fell below error predictions. Future

  20. Three-dimensional building roof boundary extraction using high-resolution aerial image and LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Poz, A. P.; Fazan, Antonio J.

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a semiautomatic method for rectilinear building roof boundary extraction, based on the integration of high-resolution aerial image and LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) data. The proposed method is formulated as an optimization problem, in which a snakes-based objective function is developed to represent the building roof boundaries in an object-space coordinate system. Three-dimensional polylines representing building roof boundaries are obtained by optimizing the objective function using the dynamic programming optimization technique. The results of our experiments showed that the proposed method satisfactorily performed the task of extracting different building roof boundaries from aerial image and LiDAR data.

  1. Object-Based Integration of Photogrammetric and LiDAR Data for Automated Generation of Complex Polyhedral Building Models

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Changjae; Habib, Ayman

    2009-01-01

    This research is concerned with a methodology for automated generation of polyhedral building models for complex structures, whose rooftops are bounded by straight lines. The process starts by utilizing LiDAR data for building hypothesis generation and derivation of individual planar patches constituting building rooftops. Initial boundaries of these patches are then refined through the integration of LiDAR and photogrammetric data and hierarchical processing of the planar patches. Building models for complex structures are finally produced using the refined boundaries. The performance of the developed methodology is evaluated through qualitative and quantitative analysis of the generated building models from real data. PMID:22346722

  2. Quantification of L-band InSAR decorrelation in volcanic terrains using airborne LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedze, M.; Heggy, E.; Jacquemoud, S.; Bretar, F.

    2011-12-01

    Repeat-pass InSAR LOS measurements of the Piton de La Fournaise (La Reunion Island, France) suffer from substantial phase decorrelation due to the occurrence of vegetation and ash deposits on the caldera and slopes of the edifice. To correct this deficiency, we combine normalized airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) intensity data with spaceborne InSAR coherence images from ALOS PALSAR L-band acquired over the volcano in 2008 and 2009, following the 2007 major eruption. The fusion of the two data sets improves the calculation of coherence and the textural classification of different volcanic surfaces. For future missions considering both InSAR and/or LiDAR such as DESDynI (Deformation, Ecosystem Structure and Dynamics of Ice), such data fusion studies can provide a better analysis of the spatiotemporal variations in InSAR coherence in order to enhance the monitoring of pre-eruptive ground displacements. The airborne surveys conducted in 2008 and 2009, cover different types of vegetation and terrain roughness on the central and western parts of the volcano. The topographic data are first processed to generate a high-resolution digital terrain model (DTM) of the volcanic edifice with elevation accuracy better than 1 m. For our purposes, the phase variations caused by the surface relief can be eliminated using the LiDAR-derived DTM. Then normalized LiDAR intensities are correlated to the L-band polarimetric coherence for different zones of the volcano to assess the LiDAR-InSAR statistical behavior of different lava flows, pyroclastics, and vegetated surfaces. Results suggest that each volcanic terrain type is characterized by a unique LiDAR-InSAR histogram pattern. We identified four LiDAR-InSAR distinguished relations: (1) pahoehoe lava flow surfaces show an agglomerate histogram pattern which may be explained by low surface scattering and low wave penetration into the geological medium; (2) eroded a'a lava surfaces is characterized by high standard deviation

  3. Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR): What We Can and Cannot See in the Forest for the Trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edson, Curtis B.

    Recently concerns over anthropogenic carbon pollution have received increased global attention and research in forest biomass and carbon sequestration has gained momentum. Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) remote sensing has in the last decade demonstrated forest measurement and biomass estimation potential. The project objective was to compare LiDAR forest biomass estimates to traditional field biomass estimates in a conifer predominant forest located in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. Chapter 2 of this dissertation investigated mapping-grade GPS accuracy in determining tree locations. Results indicated that post processing of coded pseudorange satellite signals is the most accurate of those we tested for GPS surveying under a conifer dominant forest canopy. Chapter 3 compared LiDAR, total station, and GPS receiver discrete point elevations and DEMs across a range of forest settings. Average total station plot elevation differences ranged from -0.06 m (SD 0.40) to -0.59 m (SD 0.23) indicating that LiDAR elevations are higher than actual elevations. Average plot GPS elevation differences ranged from 0.24 (SD 1.55) to 2.82 m (SD 4.58), and from 0.27 (SD 2.33) to 2.69 m (SD 5.06) for LiDAR DEMs. Chapter 4 assessed LiDAR's ability to measure three-dimensional forest structure and estimate biomass using single stem (trees and shrubs) remote sensing. The LiDAR data tree extraction computer software programs FUSION, TreeVaW, and watershed segmentation were compared. LiDAR spatial accuracy assessment resulted in overall average error and standard deviation (SD) for FUSION, TreeVaW, and watershed segmentation of 2.05 m (SD 1.67 m), 2.19 m (SD 1.83 m), and 2.31 m (SD 1.94 m) respectively. Overall average LiDAR tree height error and standard deviations (SD) respectively for FUSION, TreeVaW and watershed segmentation were -0.09 m (SD 2.43 m), 0.28 m (SD 1.86 m), and 0.22 m (2.45 m) in even-age, uneven-age, and old growth plots combined; and for one

  4. A Bayesian Hierarchical Model for Spatio-Temporal Prediction and Uncertainty Assessment Using Repeat LiDAR Acquisitions for the Kenai Peninsula, AK, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babcock, C. R.; Andersen, H. E.; Finley, A. O.; Cook, B.; Morton, D. C.

    2015-12-01

    Models using repeat LiDAR and field campaigns may be one mechanism to monitor carbon storage and flux in forested regions. Considering the ability of multi-temporal LiDAR to estimate growth, it is not surprising that there is great interest in developing forest carbon monitoring strategies that rely on repeated LiDAR acquisitions. Allowing for sparser field campaigns, LiDAR stands to make monitoring forest carbon cheaper and more efficient than field-only sampling procedures. Here, we look to the spatio-temporally data-rich Kenai Peninsula in Alaska to examine the potential for Bayesian spatio-temporal mapping of forest carbon storage and uncertainty. The framework explored here can predict forest carbon through space and time, while formally propagating uncertainty through to prediction. Bayesian spatio-temporal models are flexible frameworks allowing for forest growth processes to be formally integrated into the model. By incorporating a mechanism for growth---using temporally repeated field and LiDAR data---we can more fully exploit the information-rich inventory network to improve prediction accuracy. LiDAR data for the Kenai Peninsula has been collected on four different occasions---spatially coincident LiDAR strip samples in 2004, 09 and 14, along with a wall-to-wall collection in 2008. There were 436 plots measured twice between 2002 and 2014. LiDAR was acquired at least once over most inventory plots with many having LiDAR collected during 2, 3 or 4 different campaigns. Results from this research will impact how forests are inventoried. It is too expensive to monitor terrestrial carbon using field-only sampling strategies and currently proposed LiDAR model-based techniques lack the ability to properly utilize temporally repeated and misaligned data. Bayesian hierarchical spatio-temporal models offer a solution to these shortcomings and allow for formal predictive error assessment, which is useful for policy development and decision making.

  5. Beyond Cross Sections; LiDAR in Support of Sprague River geomorphology Studies, Klamath Basin, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, J. E.; McDowell, P. F.; Lind, P.; Haluska, T.; Jackson, K.

    2007-12-01

    LiDAR terrain data was collected in November 2004 for 750 square kilometers of the Sprague River valley, Oregon, by Watershed Sciences, Inc., under contract with the Klamath Tribes. This coverage, obtained to support multiple ecologic analysis and restoration activities in the Klamath Basin, encompasses about 90 km of valley- bottom corridor for the main Sprague River as well as downstream alluvial sections of principal tributaries, including 15 km of the Sycan River, 15 km of the South Fork Sprague River, and 10 km of the North Fork Sprague River. Acquisition conditions were leaf-off at normal fall low flow. Assessment of the vertical divergence between 967 surveyed points and the laser points gave a RMSE of 0.052 m with a standard deviation of 0.051 m. The resulting bare-earth 1-m grid has been used for geomorphic mapping, paleo- and historical-channel mapping, qualitative and quantitative analysis of floodplain morphology, and assessment of channel incision over various timescales.4 Using the high resolution topography in combination with floodplain stratigraphy, we delineated the late Holocene (post 7.7 ka Mazama eruption) active floodplain. The morphology of this floodplain reveals processes locally important in forming the Sprague and Sycan river floodplains, including avulsion, meander abandonment and filling, lateral bar building, deposition by crevasses, and lateral migration. Mapping present and paleo-channel positions determined from historic photos and maps onto the LiDAR digital terrain model, coupled with augering to determine channel gravel depths, has allowed local assessment of long term channel incision and aggradation over the last several thousand years. Reaches of possible historic incision have also been delineated by comparing floodplain elevation to channel elevation in an essentially continuous manner along the valley corridor. This analysis reveals multiple reaches where the 1940 channel, as depicted on aerial photographs, is apparently

  6. LiDAR Acquisition for the GeoEarthScope Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, D. A.; Furlong, K.; Bruhn, R.; Dolan, J.; Oldow, J.; Prentice, C.; Rubin, C.; Burbank, D.; Wernicke, B.; Wesnousky, S.

    2007-12-01

    LiDAR acquisition is a key component of the GeoEarthScope Initiative. LiDAR provides data with a broad range of applicability to many of the EarthScope goals. A working group was convened to identify primary targets for data acquisition, rank these targets, and propose a data acquisition scheme to effectively acquire these data within the GeoEarthScope funding time frame. The Regional Targets are: a.) Northern California - including the San Andreas Fault north of Parkfield, and other major strands of the San Andreas Fault system; b.) Southern California - including the Garlock Fault, Eastern California Shear zone south of the Garlock, and the Elsinore Fault; c.) Eastern California, Walker Lane, and Basin and Range fault systems - including faults of the Eastern California Shear Zone north of the Garlock Fault; d.) Intermountain Seismic Belt - including the Wasatch Fault, Teton Fault, and Yellowstone Park area; e.) Alaska - including the Castle Mountain and Denali Faults; f.) Cascadia - including the Little Salmon fault zone in southern Cascadia, the Calawah Fault in the Washington forearc, and imagery in the Yakima Fold belt termination. The Working Group recognized that available funding would likely preclude obtaining data from all high priority sites The Working Group wrestled with several important issues that affect the data acquisition plan and the prioritization of sites. The WG tried to develop a plan that honored the primary EarthScope goals, recognizing the limited funding available. In particular, in order to maximize the coverage obtained and serve the broadest community, the WG elected to utilize relatively narrow swath widths (typically 1 km, widened to 2+km in key regions), which allowed more line-kilometers of data to be obtained. The unavoidable consequences of this choice are that areas away from the main fault strands will be unsampled. Data acquisition is underway. The Northern California acquisition (supplemented by financial support from state

  7. Building a LiDAR point cloud simulator: Testing algorithms for high resolution topographic change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrea, Dario; Abellán, Antonio; Derron, Marc-Henri; Jaboyedoff, Michel

    2014-05-01

    Terrestrial laser technique (TLS) is becoming a common tool in Geosciences, with clear applications ranging from the generation of a high resolution 3D models to the monitoring of unstable slopes and the quantification of morphological changes. Nevertheless, like every measurement techniques, TLS still has some limitations that are not clearly understood and affect the accuracy of the dataset (point cloud). A challenge in LiDAR research is to understand the influence of instrumental parameters on measurement errors during LiDAR acquisition. Indeed, different critical parameters interact with the scans quality at different ranges: the existence of shadow areas, the spatial resolution (point density), and the diameter of the laser beam, the incidence angle and the single point accuracy. The objective of this study is to test the main limitations of different algorithms usually applied on point cloud data treatment, from alignment to monitoring. To this end, we built in MATLAB(c) environment a LiDAR point cloud simulator able to recreate the multiple sources of errors related to instrumental settings that we normally observe in real datasets. In a first step we characterized the error from single laser pulse by modelling the influence of range and incidence angle on single point data accuracy. In a second step, we simulated the scanning part of the system in order to analyze the shifting and angular error effects. Other parameters have been added to the point cloud simulator, such as point spacing, acquisition window, etc., in order to create point clouds of simple and/or complex geometries. We tested the influence of point density and vitiating point of view on the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) alignment and also in some deformation tracking algorithm with same point cloud geometry, in order to determine alignment and deformation detection threshold. We also generated a series of high resolution point clouds in order to model small changes on different environments

  8. Applying modified high resolution airborne LiDAR DTM for floodplain mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetter, M.; Jochem, A.; Franke, M.; Schöberl, F.; Stötter, J.; Werthmann, M.

    2009-04-01

    Today, airborne LiDAR derived digital terrain models (DTM) are used in the research context and various scientific disciplines. In hydrology such high resolution DTMs are used for computing flood simulations, calculating roughness maps, floodplain mapping, etc. The presented approach outlines the strength of a LiDAR derived DTM (1m) in comparison to a photogrammetric derived DTM (10m). By implementing an interpolated river bed model, which is derived by using terrestrial measured river cross sections and hence modifying the high resolution DTM for hydraulic task floodplain mapping and modeling routines, could be improved. The river bed interpolation routine includes an automatic bridge detection algorithm to delete bridge pillars in the relevant river cross sections. Furthermore, the position of riverbanks, which are a contributing factor in the field of hydraulic modeling and influence the results of the hydraulic simulations, can be detected. Once the DTM is modified, river cross profiles can be extracted directly on each position along the river axis and can be used as input for hydraulic models. In this study the software HEC-RAS is used to calculate different floodplain areas on the basis of the HQ30, HQ100 and HQ200 flood scenarios, which are calibrated on key data of the flood in August 2005. The comparison of the floodplain area in the city of Innsbruck (Tyrol, Austria), modeled on the basis of a modified LiDAR derived DTM, with those from the HORA study (Hochwasserrisikozonierung Austria), shows remarkable differences. These differences result from (i) the different hydraulic modeling methods and (ii) the used DTMs, which HORA does not consider flood protection measures. The results show that the resolution of the used DTM is the determining factor for modeling adequate floodplain areas whereas the applied hydraulic model has secondary effects. The grade of accuracy attained by this approach is reflected by the numbers ,of flooding affected buildings (e

  9. Long-term persistence of throughfall yield assessed by small footprint LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischoff, Sebastian; Levia, Delphis F.; Nieschulze, Jens; Schulz, Florian; Michalzik, Beate

    2016-04-01

    Throughfall (TF) represents an important relocation mechanism for the spatial distribution of intercepted precipitation and hence associated nutrients in wooded ecosystems. To date, a broad range of studies showed that the spatial patterns of TF distribution exhibit a pronounced temporal stability. These studies, however, have examined TF temporal stability at the tree scale or they were computed from event-based data. Here, we seek to evaluate the utility of temporally aggregated TF data at one, three, and six year intervals to determine whether such long-term TF monitoring data could serve as the basis for TF temporal persistence measurements for both beech and spruce forests. In addition, we examine the temporal persistence of TF in relation to small footprint LiDAR data. In context of the German Science Foundation (DFG) founded "Biodiversity Exploratories" (www.biodiversity-exploratories.de) we studied water-bound nutrient fluxes on a set of three differently managed forest plots (spruce plantation, age class forest beech, unmanaged beech) in central Germany throughout the vegetation periods of 2010 - 2015. For long-term monitoring purposes, TF samples were collected in biweekly routine sampling intervals using X-shaped transects of 20 bulk samplers (axis length 32 m) per experimental plot. In this study, we aim to identify canopy structural parameters explaining the temporal patterns observed. We therefore used small footprint LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) data to calculate several canopy structural parameters on base of a gridded canopy model (grid cell resolution = 0.75 m). As LiDAR allows a three-dimensional description of the complex forest canopy structure it might help to extend our understanding of complex canopy processes influencing the spatial dispersal of precipitation water, and hence associated nutrient fluxes, in wooded ecosystems. Preliminary data analysis reveals that normalized TF values identify a number of TF collectors on each of the

  10. Elemental and ionic components of atmospheric aerosols and associated gaseous pollutants in and near Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mmari, Albert G.; Potgieter-Vermaak, Sanja S.; Bencs, László; McCrindle, Robert I.; Van Grieken, René

    2013-10-01

    Elemental and water-soluble ionic compounds (WSICs) of atmospheric aerosols (total suspended particulate - TSP) and some gaseous pollutants (SO2, NO2 and O3) from a coastal, semi-urban and rural site in and near Dar es Salaam, Tanzania were investigated during dry and wet seasons of January 2005-November 2007. Na+, Ca2+, SO42-, NO3- and Cl- made up the dominant fraction of WSICs during the dry season with average concentrations ranging from non-detectable (n.d.)-5.4, 0.26-2.6, 0.74-14.7, 0.4-1.5 and 1.1-3.4 μg m-3, respectively, while in the wet season, from n.d. up to 1.7, 1.2, 4.4, 2.1 and 3.0 μg m-3, respectively. The total air concentrations of the detected elements (Al, Si, S, Cl, K, Ca, Fe and Zn) showed seasonal and site-specific variation in the range of 7.5-26.6 with an average of 14.5 μg m-3. Most of the air concentrations of pollutants were observed to decrease with increasing distance from the coastal site, which is under urban and industrial pollutant emissions. Sulphur and nitrogen oxidation ratios during the dry season ranged from 0.08 to 0.91 and 0.013 to 0.049, respectively, while they were between 0.09-0.65 and 0.002-0.095, respectively, in the wet season. These values indicate the photochemical oxidation of SO2 and a high extent of NO3-formation in the atmosphere. Neutralization ratios revealed the presence of acidic SO42- and NO3- aerosols. Principal component analysis identified sea spray, local combustion, vehicular traffic, biomass burning and re-suspended road dust as dominant sources of aerosols at the studied coastal and semi-urban sites. However, at the rural site, besides sea spray, crustal sources, soil dust re-suspension and long-range transport are the possible origins of suspended particulates.

  11. Geometric Calibration and Radiometric Correction of LiDAR Data and Their Impact on the Quality of Derived Products

    PubMed Central

    Habib, Ayman F.; Kersting, Ana P.; Shaker, Ahmed; Yan, Wai-Yeung

    2011-01-01

    LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) systems are capable of providing 3D positional and spectral information (in the utilized spectrum range) of the mapped surface. Due to systematic errors in the system parameters and measurements, LiDAR systems require geometric calibration and radiometric correction of the intensity data in order to maximize the benefit from the collected positional and spectral information. This paper presents a practical approach for the geometric calibration of LiDAR systems and radiometric correction of collected intensity data while investigating their impact on the quality of the derived products. The proposed approach includes the use of a quasi-rigorous geometric calibration and the radar equation for the radiometric correction of intensity data. The proposed quasi-rigorous calibration procedure requires time-tagged point cloud and trajectory position data, which are available to most of the data users. The paper presents a methodology for evaluating the impact of the geometric calibration on the relative and absolute accuracy of the LiDAR point cloud. Furthermore, the impact of the geometric calibration and radiometric correction on land cover classification accuracy is investigated. The feasibility of the proposed methods and their impact on the derived products are demonstrated through experimental results using real data. PMID:22164121

  12. National and Global: A History of Scholars' Experiences with Research at the University of Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania (1961-Present)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jamison, Amy J.

    2010-01-01

    In this dissertation, I draw on research carried out at the University of Dar es Salaam (UDSM), Tanzania in 2008 to examine Tanzanian academics' experience with research throughout the history of this institution. This dissertation is designed as an historical case study and investigates how economic and political changes in Tanzania's…

  13. Intimate Partner Violence and the Association with HIV Risk Behaviors among Young Men in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maman, Suzanne; Yamanis, Thespina; Kouyoumdjian, Fiona; Watt, Melissa; Mbwambo, Jessie

    2010-01-01

    There is growing evidence of the association between gender-based violence and HIV from the perspective and experiences of women. The purpose of this study is to examine these associations from the perspective of young men living in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. A community-based sample of 951 men were interviewed, of whom 360 had sex in the past 6…

  14. Assessing Surface Fuel Hazard in Coastal Conifer Forests through the Use of LiDAR Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koulas, Christos

    The research problem that this thesis seeks to examine is a method of predicting conventional fire hazards using data drawn from specific regions, namely the Sooke and Goldstream watershed regions in coastal British Columbia. This thesis investigates whether LiDAR data can be used to describe conventional forest stand fire hazard classes. Three objectives guided this thesis: to discuss the variables associated with fire hazard, specifically the distribution and makeup of fuel; to examine the relationship between derived LiDAR biometrics and forest attributes related to hazard assessment factors defined by the Capitol Regional District (CRD); and to assess the viability of the LiDAR biometric decision tree in the CRD based on current frameworks for use. The research method uses quantitative datasets to assess the optimal generalization of these types of fire hazard data through discriminant analysis. Findings illustrate significant LiDAR-derived data limitations, and reflect the literature in that flawed field application of data modelling techniques has led to a disconnect between the ways in which fire hazard models have been intended to be used by scholars and the ways in which they are used by those tasked with prevention of forest fires. It can be concluded that a significant trade-off exists between computational requirements for wildfire simulation models and the algorithms commonly used by field teams to apply these models with remote sensing data, and that CRD forest management practices would need to change to incorporate a decision tree model in order to decrease risk.

  15. 3D modeling of light interception in heterogeneous forest canopies using ground-based LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van der Zande, Dimitry; Stuckens, Jan; Verstraeten, Willem W.; Mereu, Simone; Muys, Bart; Coppin, Pol

    2011-10-01

    A methodology is presented that describes the direct interaction of a forest canopy with incoming radiation using terrestrial LiDAR based vegetation structure in a radiative transfer model. The proposed 'Voxel-based Light Interception Model' (VLIM) is designed to estimate the Percentage of Above Canopy Light (PACL) at any given point of the forest scene. First a voxel-based representation of trees is derived from terrestrial LiDAR data as structural input to model and analyze the light interception of canopies at near leaf level scale. Nine virtual forest stands of three species (beech, poplar, plantain) were generated by means of stochastic L-systems as tree descriptors. Using ray tracer technology hemispherical LiDAR measurements were simulated inside these virtual forests. The leaf area density (LAD) estimates derived from the LiDAR datasets resulted in a mean absolute error of 32.57% without correction and 16.31% when leaf/beam interactions were taken into account. Next, comparison of PACL estimates, computed with VLIM with fully rendered light distributions throughout the canopy based on the L-systems, yielded a mean absolute error of 5.78%. This work shows the potential of the VLIM to model both instantaneous light interception by a canopy as well as average light distributions for entire seasons.

  16. Fine-spatial scale predictions of understory species using climate- and LiDAR-derived terrain and canopy metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nijland, Wiebe; Nielsen, Scott E.; Coops, Nicholas C.; Wulder, Michael A.; Stenhouse, Gordon B.

    2014-01-01

    Food and habitat resources are critical components of wildlife management and conservation efforts. The grizzly bear (Ursus arctos) has diverse diets and habitat requirements particularly for understory plant species, which are impacted by human developments and forest management activities. We use light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data to predict the occurrence of 14 understory plant species relevant to bear forage and compare our predictions with more conventional climate- and land cover-based models. We use boosted regression trees to model each of the 14 understory species across 4435 km2 using occurrence (presence-absence) data from 1941 field plots. Three sets of models were fitted: climate only, climate and basic land and forest covers from Landsat 30-m imagery, and a climate- and LiDAR-derived model describing both the terrain and forest canopy. Resulting model accuracies varied widely among species. Overall, 8 of 14 species models were improved by including the LiDAR-derived variables. For climate-only models, mean annual precipitation and frost-free periods were the most important variables. With inclusion of LiDAR-derived attributes, depth-to-water table, terrain-intercepted annual radiation, and elevation were most often selected. This suggests that fine-scale terrain conditions affect the distribution of the studied species more than canopy conditions.

  17. Approaching a more Complete Picture of Rockfall Activity: Seismic and LiDAR Detection, Loaction and Volume Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietze, Michael; Mohadjer, Solmaz; Turowski, Jens; Ehlers, Todd; Hovius, Niels

    2016-04-01

    Rockfall activity in steep alpine landscapes is often difficult to survey due to its infrequent nature. Classic approaches are limited by temporal and spatial resolution. In contrast, seismic monitoring provides access to catchment-wide analysis of activity patterns in rockfall-dominated environments. The deglaciated U-shaped Lauterbrunnen Valley in the Bernese Oberland, Switzerland, is a perfect example of such landscapes. It was instrumented with up to six broadband seismometers and repeatedly surveyed by terrestrial LiDAR to provide independent validation data. During August-October 2014 and April-June 2015 more than 23 (LiDAR) to hundred (seismic) events were detected. Their volumes range from < 0.01 to 5.80 cubic metres as detected by LiDAR. The evolution of individual events (i.e., precursor activity, detachment, falling phase, impact, talus cone activity) can be quantified in terms of location and duration. For events that consist of single detachments rather than a series of releases, volume scaling relationships are possible. Seismic monitoring approaches are well-suited for studying not only the rockfall process but also for understanding the geomorphic framework and boundary conditions that control such processes in a comprehensive way. Taken together, the combined LiDAR and seismic monitoring approach provides high fidelity spatial and temporal resolution of individual events.

  18. Testing the Suitability of a Terrestrial 2D LiDAR Scanner for Canopy Characterization of Greenhouse Tomato Crops.

    PubMed

    Llop, Jordi; Gil, Emilio; Llorens, Jordi; Miranda-Fuentes, Antonio; Gallart, Montserrat

    2016-09-06

    Canopy characterization is essential for pesticide dosage adjustment according to vegetation volume and density. It is especially important for fresh exportable vegetables like greenhouse tomatoes. These plants are thin and tall and are planted in pairs, which makes their characterization with electronic methods difficult. Therefore, the accuracy of the terrestrial 2D LiDAR sensor is evaluated for determining canopy parameters related to volume and density and established useful correlations between manual and electronic parameters for leaf area estimation. Experiments were performed in three commercial tomato greenhouses with a paired plantation system. In the electronic characterization, a LiDAR sensor scanned the plant pairs from both sides. The canopy height, canopy width, canopy volume, and leaf area were obtained. From these, other important parameters were calculated, like the tree row volume, leaf wall area, leaf area index, and leaf area density. Manual measurements were found to overestimate the parameters compared with the LiDAR sensor. The canopy volume estimated with the scanner was found to be reliable for estimating the canopy height, volume, and density. Moreover, the LiDAR scanner could assess the high variability in canopy density along rows and hence is an important tool for generating canopy maps.

  19. Testing the Suitability of a Terrestrial 2D LiDAR Scanner for Canopy Characterization of Greenhouse Tomato Crops

    PubMed Central

    Llop, Jordi; Gil, Emilio; Llorens, Jordi; Miranda-Fuentes, Antonio; Gallart, Montserrat

    2016-01-01

    Canopy characterization is essential for pesticide dosage adjustment according to vegetation volume and density. It is especially important for fresh exportable vegetables like greenhouse tomatoes. These plants are thin and tall and are planted in pairs, which makes their characterization with electronic methods difficult. Therefore, the accuracy of the terrestrial 2D LiDAR sensor is evaluated for determining canopy parameters related to volume and density and established useful correlations between manual and electronic parameters for leaf area estimation. Experiments were performed in three commercial tomato greenhouses with a paired plantation system. In the electronic characterization, a LiDAR sensor scanned the plant pairs from both sides. The canopy height, canopy width, canopy volume, and leaf area were obtained. From these, other important parameters were calculated, like the tree row volume, leaf wall area, leaf area index, and leaf area density. Manual measurements were found to overestimate the parameters compared with the LiDAR sensor. The canopy volume estimated with the scanner was found to be reliable for estimating the canopy height, volume, and density. Moreover, the LiDAR scanner could assess the high variability in canopy density along rows and hence is an important tool for generating canopy maps. PMID:27608025

  20. Automatic construction of aerial corridor for navigation of unmanned aircraft systems in class G airspace using LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Dengchao; Yuan, Xiaohui

    2016-05-01

    According to the airspace classification by the Federal Aviation Agency, Class G airspace is the airspace at 1,200 feet or less to the ground, which is beneath class E airspace and between classes B-D cylinders around towered airstrips. However, the lack of flight supervision mechanism in this airspace, unmanned aerial system (UAS) missions pose many safety issues. Collision avoidance and route planning for UASs in class G airspace is critical for broad deployment of UASs in commercial and security applications. Yet, unlike road network, there is no stationary marker in airspace to identify corridors that are available and safe for UASs to navigate. In this paper, we present an automatic LiDAR-based airspace corridor construction method for navigation in class G airspace and a method for route planning to minimize collision and intrusion. Our idea is to combine LiDAR to automatically identify ground objects that pose navigation restrictions such as airports and high-rises. Digital terrain model (DTM) is derived from LiDAR point cloud to provide an altitude-based class G airspace description. Following the FAA Aeronautical Information Manual, the ground objects that define the restricted airspaces are used together with digital surface model derived from LiDAR data to construct the aerial corridor for navigation of UASs. Preliminary results demonstrate competitive performance and the construction of aerial corridor can be automated with much great efficiency.

  1. Geometric calibration and radiometric correction of LiDAR data and their impact on the quality of derived products.

    PubMed

    Habib, Ayman F; Kersting, Ana P; Shaker, Ahmed; Yan, Wai-Yeung

    2011-01-01

    LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) systems are capable of providing 3D positional and spectral information (in the utilized spectrum range) of the mapped surface. Due to systematic errors in the system parameters and measurements, LiDAR systems require geometric calibration and radiometric correction of the intensity data in order to maximize the benefit from the collected positional and spectral information. This paper presents a practical approach for the geometric calibration of LiDAR systems and radiometric correction of collected intensity data while investigating their impact on the quality of the derived products. The proposed approach includes the use of a quasi-rigorous geometric calibration and the radar equation for the radiometric correction of intensity data. The proposed quasi-rigorous calibration procedure requires time-tagged point cloud and trajectory position data, which are available to most of the data users. The paper presents a methodology for evaluating the impact of the geometric calibration on the relative and absolute accuracy of the LiDAR point cloud. Furthermore, the impact of the geometric calibration and radiometric correction on land cover classification accuracy is investigated. The feasibility of the proposed methods and their impact on the derived products are demonstrated through experimental results using real data.

  2. Calculating the ecosystem service of water storage in isolated wetlands using LiDAR in north central Florida, USA (presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study used remotely-sensed Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data to estimate potential water storage capacity of isolated wetlands in north central Florida. The data were used to calculate the water storage potential of >8500 polygons identified as isolated wetlands. We f...

  3. Provision of Vocational Skills Education to Orphans: Lessons from Orphanage Centres in Dar es Salaam City, Tanzania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meli, Benjamin Mbeba

    2015-01-01

    This paper utilises data from a study that investigated the efficacy of vocational skills training provided to orphans from three orphanages in Temeke District, Dar es Salaam. The three orphanage centres that were studied are Kurasini National Children Home, Saudia and Don Bosco Vocational Centre. The sample comprised of 45 orphans, an official…

  4. Characterization and classification of vegetation canopy structure and distribution within the Great Smoky Mountains National Park using LiDAR

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Jitendra; HargroveJr., William Walter; Norman, Steven P; Hoffman, Forrest M; Newcomb, Doug

    2015-01-01

    Vegetation canopy structure is a critically important habit characteristic for many threatened and endangered birds and other animal species, and it is key information needed by forest and wildlife managers for monitoring and managing forest resources, conservation planning and fostering biodiversity. Advances in Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) technologies have enabled remote sensing-based studies of vegetation canopies by capturing three-dimensional structures, yielding information not available in two-dimensional images of the landscape pro- vided by traditional multi-spectral remote sensing platforms. However, the large volume data sets produced by airborne LiDAR instruments pose a significant computational challenge, requiring algorithms to identify and analyze patterns of interest buried within LiDAR point clouds in a computationally efficient manner, utilizing state-of-art computing infrastructure. We developed and applied a computationally efficient approach to analyze a large volume of LiDAR data and to characterize and map the vegetation canopy structures for 139,859 hectares (540 sq. miles) in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. This study helps improve our understanding of the distribution of vegetation and animal habitats in this extremely diverse ecosystem.

  5. Testing the Suitability of a Terrestrial 2D LiDAR Scanner for Canopy Characterization of Greenhouse Tomato Crops.

    PubMed

    Llop, Jordi; Gil, Emilio; Llorens, Jordi; Miranda-Fuentes, Antonio; Gallart, Montserrat

    2016-01-01

    Canopy characterization is essential for pesticide dosage adjustment according to vegetation volume and density. It is especially important for fresh exportable vegetables like greenhouse tomatoes. These plants are thin and tall and are planted in pairs, which makes their characterization with electronic methods difficult. Therefore, the accuracy of the terrestrial 2D LiDAR sensor is evaluated for determining canopy parameters related to volume and density and established useful correlations between manual and electronic parameters for leaf area estimation. Experiments were performed in three commercial tomato greenhouses with a paired plantation system. In the electronic characterization, a LiDAR sensor scanned the plant pairs from both sides. The canopy height, canopy width, canopy volume, and leaf area were obtained. From these, other important parameters were calculated, like the tree row volume, leaf wall area, leaf area index, and leaf area density. Manual measurements were found to overestimate the parameters compared with the LiDAR sensor. The canopy volume estimated with the scanner was found to be reliable for estimating the canopy height, volume, and density. Moreover, the LiDAR scanner could assess the high variability in canopy density along rows and hence is an important tool for generating canopy maps. PMID:27608025

  6. Ecosystem Mapping Approaches Based on Vegetation Structure Using NEON Prototype Airborne LiDAR and Field Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, K.; Emery, W. J.; Barnett, D.; Petroy, S. B.; Meier, C. L.; Wessman, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    Remote sensing is a powerful tool for measuring the current state of vegetation and monitoring changes over time with repeated data collections. Airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data is especially well suited for mapping 3D vegetation structure. In 2010, the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) contracted LiDAR and hyperspectral airborne data collections over the Ordway-Swisher Biological Station (OSBS). Ground truth campaigns were also conducted in 2010, 2011, and 2014 including structural measurements and generation of species lists for a set of ground validation plots. The vegetation communities at OSBS can be characterized by the Florida Natural Areas Inventory (FNAI) classification system, with a large area of the property belonging to the Sandhill community. For this study, classification algorithm training locations are hand selected for each FNAI community type using photo-interpretation. A series of LiDAR metrics are calculated on the discrete return point clouds and derived digital elevation (DEM) and canopy height models (CHM). A decision tree classification algorithm is run using R package "rpart". A main goal of the project is to relate the LiDAR metrics used by the decision tree to direct canopy structural quantities. For instance, the canopy 75th minus the 50th percentile height in the LiDAR point clouds are related to the uniformity and light penetration in the upper canopy. A prototype of the decision tree achieved a classification accuracy of 89% on the training data itself, suggesting that some locations in different FNAI vegetation communities have similar structure and could not be distinguished in the LiDAR metrics used. An improved decision tree is currently under development which will include more training locations and more LiDAR metrics as input features. Results from this improved model will be presenting using the NEON ground truth locations as an independent and quantitative validation measure of the decision tree

  7. Application of High-resolution Aerial LiDAR Data in Calibration of a Two-dimensional Urban Flood Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowski, J.; Goska, R.; Chen, B.; Krajewski, W. F.; Young, N.; Weber, L.

    2009-12-01

    In June 2008, the state of Iowa experienced an unprecedented flood event which resulted in an economic loss of approximately $2.88 billion. Flooding in the Iowa River corridor, which exceeded the previous flood of record by 3 feet, devastated several communities, including Coralville and Iowa City, home to the University of Iowa. Recognizing an opportunity to capture a unique dataset detailing the impacts of the historic flood, the investigators contacted the National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping (NCALM), which performed an aerial Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) survey along the Iowa River. The survey, conducted immediately following the flood peak, provided coverage of a 60-mile reach. The goal of the present research is to develop a process by which flood extents and water surface elevations can be accurately extracted from the LiDAR data set and to evaluate the benefit of such data in calibrating one- and two-dimensional hydraulic models. Whereas data typically available for model calibration include sparsely distributed point observations and high water marks, the LiDAR data used in the present study provide broad-scale, detailed, and continuous information describing the spatial extent and depth of flooding. Initial efforts were focused on a 10-mile, primarily urban reach of the Iowa River extending from Coralville Reservoir, a United States Army Corps of Engineers flood control project, downstream through the Coralville and Iowa City. Spatial extent and depth of flooding were estimated from the LiDAR data. At a given cross-sectional location, river channel and floodplain measurements were compared. When differences between floodplain and river channel measurements were less than a standard deviation of the vertical uncertainty in the LiDAR survey, floodplain measurements were classified as flooded. A flood water surface DEM was created using measurements classified as flooded. A two-dimensional, depth-averaged numerical model of a 10-mile reach of

  8. A gradient-constrained morphological filtering algorithm for airborne LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Wu, Huayi; Xu, Hanwei; An, Ru; Xu, Jia; He, Qisheng

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a novel gradient-constrained morphological filtering algorithm for bare-earth extraction from light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data. Based on the gradient feature points determined by morphological half-gradients, the potential object points are located prior to filtering. Innovative gradient-constrained morphological operations are created, which are executed only for the potential object points. Compared with the traditional morphological operations, the new operations reduce many meaningless operations for object removal and consequently decrease the possibility of losing terrain to a great extent. The applicability and reliability of this algorithm are demonstrated by evaluating the filtering performance for fifteen sample datasets in various complex scenes. The proposed algorithm is found to achieve a high level of accuracy compared with eight other filtering algorithms tested by the International Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing. Moreover, the proposed algorithm has minimal error oscillation for different landscapes, which is important for quality control of digital terrain model generation.

  9. G-LiHT: Goddard's LiDAR, Hyperspectral and Thermal Airborne Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Bruce; Corp, Lawrence; Nelson, Ross; Morton, Douglas; Ranson, Kenneth J.; Masek, Jeffrey; Middleton, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Scientists at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center have developed an ultra-portable, low-cost, multi-sensor remote sensing system for studying the form and function of terrestrial ecosystems. G-LiHT integrates two LIDARs, a 905 nanometer single beam profiler and 1550 nm scanner, with a narrowband (1.5 nanometers) VNIR imaging spectrometer and a broadband (8-14 micrometers) thermal imager. The small footprint (approximately 12 centimeters) LIDAR data and approximately 1 meter ground resolution imagery are advantageous for high resolution applications such as the delineation of canopy crowns, characterization of canopy gaps, and the identification of sparse, low-stature vegetation, which is difficult to detect from space-based instruments and large-footprint LiDAR. The hyperspectral and thermal imagery can be used to characterize species composition, variations in biophysical variables (e.g., photosynthetic pigments), surface temperature, and responses to environmental stressors (e.g., heat, moisture loss). Additionally, the combination of LIDAR optical, and thermal data from G-LiHT is being used to assess forest health by sensing differences in foliage density, photosynthetic pigments, and transpiration. Low operating costs (approximately $1 ha) have allowed us to evaluate seasonal differences in LiDAR, passive optical and thermal data, which provides insight into year-round observations from space. Canopy characteristics and tree allometry (e.g., crown height:width, canopy:ground reflectance) derived from G-LiHT data are being used to generate realistic scenes for radiative transfer models, which in turn are being used to improve instrument design and ensure continuity between LiDAR instruments. G-LiHT has been installed and tested in aircraft with fuselage viewports and in a custom wing-mounted pod that allows G-LiHT to be flown on any Cessna 206, a common aircraft in use throughout the world. G-LiHT is currently being used for forest biomass and growth estimation

  10. Urban mosquitoes, situational publics, and the pursuit of interspecies separation in Dar es Salaam

    PubMed Central

    KELLY, ANN H.; LEZAUN, JAVIER

    2014-01-01

    Recent work in anthropology points to the recognition of multispecies entanglements as the grounds for a more ethical politics. In this article, we examine efforts to control mosquitoes in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, as an example of the laborious tasks of disentanglement that characterize public health interventions. The mosquito surveillance and larval elimination practices of an urban malaria control program offer an opportunity to observe how efforts to create distance between species relate to the physical and civic textures of the city. Seen in the particular context of the contemporary African metropolis, the work of public health appears less a matter of control than a commitment to constant urban maintenance and political mobilization. PMID:25429167

  11. Tropical Airborne LiDAR for Landslide Assessment in Malaysia: a technical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd Manap, Mohamad; Azhari Razak, Khamarrul; Mohamad, Zakaria; Ahmad, Azhari; Ahmad, Ferdaus; Mohamad Zin, Mazlan; A'zad Rosle, Qalam

    2015-04-01

    Malaysia has faced a substantial number of landslide events every year. Cameron Highlands, Pahang is one of the badly areas affected by slope failures characterized by extreme climate, rugged topographic and weathered geological structures in a tropical environment. A high frequency of landslide occurrence in the hilly areas is predominantly due to the geological materials, tropical monsoon seasons and uncontrolled agricultural activities. Therefore the Government of Malaysia through the Prime Minister Department has allocated a special budget to conduct national level hazard and risk mapping project through Minerals and Geoscience Department Malaysia, the Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment. The primary aim of this project is to provide slope hazard risk information for a better slope management in Malaysia. In addition this project will establish national infrastructure for geospatial information on the geological terrain and slope by emphasizing the disaster risk throughout the country. The areas of interest are located in the three different selected areas i.e. Cameron Highlands (275 square kilometers), Ipoh (200 square kilometers) and Cheras Kajang -- Batang kali (650 square kilometers). These areas are selected based on National Slope Master Plan (2009 -- 2023) that endorsed by Malaysia Government Cabinet. The national hazard and risk mapping project includes six parts of major tasks: (1) desk study and mobilization, (2) airborne LiDAR data acquisition and analysis, (3) field data acquisition and verification, (4) hazard and risk for natural terrain, (5) hazard and risk analysis for man-made slope and (6) Man-made slope mitigation/preventive measures. The project was authorized in September, 2014 and will be ended in March, 2016. In this paper, the main focus is to evaluate the suitability of integrated capability of airborne- and terrestrial LiDAR data acquisition and analysis, and also digital photography for regional landslide assessment. The

  12. Automated extraction of urban trees from mobile LiDAR point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, W.; Chenglu, W.; Jonathan, L.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents an automatic algorithm to localize and extract urban trees from mobile LiDAR point clouds. First, in order to reduce the number of points to be processed, the ground points are filtered out from the raw point clouds, and the un-ground points are segmented into supervoxels. Then, a novel localization method is proposed to locate the urban trees accurately. Next, a segmentation method by localization is proposed to achieve objects. Finally, the features of objects are extracted, and the feature vectors are classified by random forests trained on manually labeled objects. The proposed method has been tested on a point cloud dataset. The results prove that our algorithm efficiently extracts the urban trees.

  13. Subtropical Forest Biomass Estimation Using Airborne LiDAR and Hyperspectral Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Yong; Li, Zengyuan

    2016-06-01

    Forests have complex vertical structure and spatial mosaic pattern. Subtropical forest ecosystem consists of vast vegetation species and these species are always in a dynamic succession stages. It is very challenging to characterize the complexity of subtropical forest ecosystem. In this paper, CAF's (The Chinese Academy of Forestry) LiCHy (LiDAR, CCD and Hyperspectral) Airborne Observation System was used to collect waveform Lidar and hyperspectral data in Puer forest region, Yunnan province in the Southwest of China. The study site contains typical subtropical species of coniferous forest, evergreen broadleaf forest, and some other mixed forests. The hypersectral images were orthorectified and corrected into surface reflectance with support of Lidar DTM product. The fusion of Lidar and hyperspectral can classify dominate forest types. The lidar metrics improved the classification accuracy. Then forest biomass estimation was carried out for each dominate forest types using waveform Lidar data, which get improved than single Lidar data source.

  14. Understanding Household Behavioral Risk Factors for Diarrheal Disease in Dar es Salaam: A Photovoice Community Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Badowski, Natalie; Castro, Cynthia M.; Montgomery, Maggie; Pickering, Amy J.; Mamuya, Simon; Davis, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Whereas Tanzania has seen considerable improvements in water and sanitation infrastructure over the past 20 years, the country still faces high rates of childhood morbidity from diarrheal diseases. This study utilized a qualitative, cross-sectional, modified Photovoice method to capture daily activities of Dar es Salaam mothers. A total of 127 photographs from 13 households were examined, and 13 interviews were conducted with household mothers. The photographs and interviews revealed insufficient hand washing procedures, unsafe disposal of wastewater, uncovered household drinking water containers, a lack of water treatment prior to consumption, and inappropriate toilets for use by small children. The interviews revealed that mothers were aware and knowledgeable of the risks of certain household practices and understood safer alternatives, yet were restricted by the perceived impracticality and financial constraints to make changes. The results draw attention to the real economic and behavioral challenges faced in reducing the spread of disease. PMID:21969836

  15. Joint Temperature-Lasing Mode Compensation for Time-of-Flight LiDAR Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Alhashimi, Anas; Varagnolo, Damiano; Gustafsson, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We propose an expectation maximization (EM) strategy for improving the precision of time of flight (ToF) light detection and ranging (LiDAR) scanners. The novel algorithm statistically accounts not only for the bias induced by temperature changes in the laser diode, but also for the multi-modality of the measurement noises that is induced by mode-hopping effects. Instrumental to the proposed EM algorithm, we also describe a general thermal dynamics model that can be learned either from just input-output data or from a combination of simple temperature experiments and information from the laser’s datasheet. We test the strategy on a SICK LMS 200 device and improve its average absolute error by a factor of three. PMID:26690445

  16. Climate change induced risk analysis of Dar es Salaam city (Tanzania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topa, Maria Elena; Herslund, Lise; Cavan, Gina; Printz, Andreas; Simonis, Ingo; Bucchignani, Edoardo; Jean-Baptiste, Nathalie; Hellevik, Siri; Johns, Regina; Kibassa, Deusdedit; Kweka, Clara; Magina, Fredrick; Mangula, Alpha; Mbuya, Elinorata; Uhinga, Guido; Kassenga, Gabriel; Kyessi, Alphonce; Shemdoe, Riziki; Kombe, Wilbard

    2013-04-01

    CLUVA (CLimate change and Urban Vulnerability in Africa; http://www.cluva.eu/) is a 3 years project, funded by the European Commission in 2010. The main objective of CLUVA is to develop context-centered methods and knowledge to be applied to African cities to assess vulnerabilities and increase knowledge on managing climate related risks. The project estimates the impacts of climate changes in the next 40 years at urban scale and downscales IPCC climate projections to evaluate specific threats to selected African test cities. These are mainly from floods, sea-level rise, droughts, heat waves, and desertification. The project evaluates and links: social vulnerability; urban green structures and ecosystem services; urban-rural interfaces; vulnerability of urban built environment and lifelines; and related institutional and governance dimensions of adaptation. The multi-scale and multi-disciplinary qualitative, quantitative and probabilistic approach of CLUVA is currently being applied to selected African test cities (Addis Ababa - Ethiopia; Dar es Salaam - Tanzania; Douala - Cameroun; Ouagadougou - Burkina Faso; St. Louis - Senegal). In particular, the poster will present preliminary findings for the Dar es Salaam case study. Dar es Salaam, which is Tanzania's largest coastal city, is exposed to floods, coastal erosion, droughts and heat waves, and highly vulnerable to impacts as a result of ineffective urban planning (about 70% unplanned settlements), poverty and lack of basic infrastructure (e.g. lack of or poor quality storm water drainage systems). Climate change could exacerbate the current situation increasing hazard-exposure alongside the impacts of development pressures which act to increase urban vulnerability for example because of informal (unregulated) urbanization. The CLUVA research team - composed of climate and environmental scientists, risk management experts, urban planners and social scientists from both European and African institutions - has

  17. Joint Temperature-Lasing Mode Compensation for Time-of-Flight LiDAR Sensors.

    PubMed

    Alhashimi, Anas; Varagnolo, Damiano; Gustafsson, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We propose an expectation maximization (EM) strategy for improving the precision of time of flight (ToF) light detection and ranging (LiDAR) scanners. The novel algorithm statistically accounts not only for the bias induced by temperature changes in the laser diode, but also for the multi-modality of the measurement noises that is induced by mode-hopping effects. Instrumental to the proposed EM algorithm, we also describe a general thermal dynamics model that can be learned either from just input-output data or from a combination of simple temperature experiments and information from the laser's datasheet. We test the strategy on a SICK LMS 200 device and improve its average absolute error by a factor of three. PMID:26690445

  18. How integrating 3D LiDAR data in the dike surveillance protocol: The French case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretar, F.; Mériaux, P.; Fauchard, C.

    2012-04-01

    carried out. A LiDAR system is able to acquire data on a dike structure of up to 80 km per day, which makes the use of this technique also valuable in case of emergency situations. It provides additional valuable products like precious information on dike slopes and crest or their near environment (river banks, etc.). Moreover, in case of vegetation, LiDAR data makes possible to study hidden structures or defaults from images like the erosion of riverbanks under forestry vegetation. The possibility of studying the vegetation is also of high importance: the development of woody vegetation near or onto the dike is a major risk factor. Surface singularities are often signs of disorder or suspected disorder in the dike itself: for example a subsidence or a sinkhole on a ridge may result from internal erosion collapse. Finally, high resolution topographic data contribute to build specific geomechanical model of the dike that, after incorporating data provided by geophysical and geotechnical surveys, are integrated in the calculations of the structure stability. Integrating the regular use of LiDAR data in the dike surveillance protocol is not yet operational in France. However, the high number of French stakeholders at the national level (on average, there is one stakeholder for only 8-9km of dike !) and the real added value of LiDAR data makes a spatial data infrastructure valuable (webservices for processing the data, consulting and filling the database on the field when performing the local diagnosis)

  19. Assessing the potential for leaf-off LiDAR data to model canopy closure in temperate deciduous forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parent, Jason R.; Volin, John C.

    2014-09-01

    Estimates of canopy closure have many important uses in forest management and ecological research. Field measurements, however, are typically not practical to acquire over expansive areas or for large numbers of locations. This problem has been addressed, in recent years, through the use of airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) technology which has proven effective in modeling canopy closure remotely. The techniques developed to use LiDAR for this purpose have been designed and evaluated for datasets acquired during leaf-on conditions. However, a large number of LiDAR datasets are acquired during leaf-off conditions since their primary purpose is to generate bare-earth Digital Elevation Models. In this paper, we develop and evaluate techniques for leveraging small-footprint leaf-off LiDAR data to model leaf-on canopy closure in temperate deciduous forests. We evaluate three techniques for modeling canopy closure: (1) the canopy-to-total-return-ratio (CTRR), (2) the canopy-to-total-pixel-ratio (CTPR), and (3) the hemispherical-viewshed (HV). The first technique has been used widely, in various forms, and has been shown to be effective with leaf-on LiDAR datasets. The CTRR technique that we tested uses the first-return LiDAR data only. The latter two techniques are new contributions that we develop and present in this paper. These techniques use Canopy Height Models (CHM) to detect significant gaps in the forest canopy which are of primary importance in estimating closure. The techniques we tested each showed good promise for predicting canopy closure using leaf-off LiDAR data with the CTPR and HV models having particularly high correlations with closure estimates from hemispherical photographs. The CTRR model had performance on par with results from previous studies that used leaf-on LiDAR, although, with leaf-off data the model tended to be negatively biased with respect to species having simple and compound leaf types and positively biased for coniferous

  20. Multispectral, hyperspectral, and LiDAR remote sensing and geographic information fusion for improved earthquake response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, F. A.; Kim, A. M.; Runyon, S. C.; Carlisle, Sarah C.; Clasen, C. C.; Esterline, C. H.; Jalobeanu, A.; Metcalf, J. P.; Basgall, P. L.; Trask, D. M.; Olsen, R. C.

    2014-06-01

    The Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) Remote Sensing Center (RSC) and research partners have completed a remote sensing pilot project in support of California post-earthquake-event emergency response. The project goals were to dovetail emergency management requirements with remote sensing capabilities to develop prototype map products for improved earthquake response. NPS coordinated with emergency management services and first responders to compile information about essential elements of information (EEI) requirements. A wide variety of remote sensing datasets including multispectral imagery (MSI), hyperspectral imagery (HSI), and LiDAR were assembled by NPS for the purpose of building imagery baseline data; and to demonstrate the use of remote sensing to derive ground surface information for use in planning, conducting, and monitoring post-earthquake emergency response. Worldview-2 data were converted to reflectance, orthorectified, and mosaicked for most of Monterey County; CA. Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data acquired at two spatial resolutions were atmospherically corrected and analyzed in conjunction with the MSI data. LiDAR data at point densities from 1.4 pts/m2 to over 40 points/ m2 were analyzed to determine digital surface models. The multimodal data were then used to develop change detection approaches and products and other supporting information. Analysis results from these data along with other geographic information were used to identify and generate multi-tiered products tied to the level of post-event communications infrastructure (internet access + cell, cell only, no internet/cell). Technology transfer of these capabilities to local and state emergency response organizations gives emergency responders new tools in support of post-disaster operational scenarios.

  1. Tracking geomorphic signatures of watershed suburbanization with multitemporal LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Daniel K.; Baker, Matthew E.; Miller, Andrew J.; Jarnagin, S. Taylor; Hogan, Dianna M.

    2014-08-01

    Urban development practices redistribute surface materials through filling, grading, and terracing, causing drastic changes to the geomorphic organization of the landscape. Many studies document the hydrologic, biologic, or geomorphic consequences of urbanization using space-for-time comparisons of disparate urban and rural landscapes. However, no previous studies have documented geomorphic changes from development using multiple dates of high-resolution topographic data at the watershed scale. This study utilized a time series of five sequential light detection and ranging (LiDAR) derived digital elevation models (DEMs) to track watershed geomorphic changes within two watersheds throughout development (2002-2008) and across multiple spatial scales (0.01-1 km2). Development-induced changes were compared against an undeveloped forested watershed during the same time period. Changes in elevations, slopes, hypsometry, and surface flow pathways were tracked throughout the development process to assess watershed geomorphic alterations. Results suggest that development produced an increase in sharp topographic breaks between relatively flat surfaces and steep slopes, replacing smoothly varying hillslopes and leading to greater variation in slopes. Examinations of flowpath distributions highlight systematic modifications that favor rapid convergence in unchanneled upland areas. Evidence of channel additions in the form of engineered surface conduits is apparent in comparisons of pre- and post-development stream maps. These results suggest that topographic modification, in addition to impervious surfaces, contributes to altered hydrologic dynamics observed in urban systems. This work highlights important considerations for the use of repeat LiDAR flights in analyzing watershed change through time. Novel methods introduced here may allow improved understanding and targeted mitigation of the processes driving geomorphic changes during development and help guide future

  2. Comparison of Morphometry of Active Landslides in Differing Geological Settings Using LiDAR-derived DEMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, M.; Kuda, T.; Okuda, S.; Fujisawa, K.; Asahina, T.; Matsuda, M.

    2008-12-01

    Deep seated landslides develop fine-scale geomorphic forms such as cracks and internal scars, forming rough surfaces as they move. Because the data density of LiDAR measurement is of sufficient detail to extract these forms, DEM-derived surface fabric filters can be used to estimate their recent activity. To utilize LiDAR data for this purpose, it is first necessary to establish the relationships that exist between filter values and actual surface features, and slide activities. These relationships are expected to differ between sites, reflecting the local geological and topographic characteristics, and the resolution and grid size of DEMs. In this presentation, these relationships are investigated at three study sites in Japan. The major geologies were Tertiary Tuff at two sites and sheared Mesozoic sedimentary rocks at the other. DEM cell sizes ranged from 1 to 5 m. The eigenvalue ratio, which represents the 3-dimensional surface roughness, was calculated from the DEMs. The spatial pattern of cell values within landslide blocks was compared with local surface features and slide conditions observed in the field. Results suggest that similar surface features were likely to be expressed in a higher and wider range of eigenvalue ratios as DEM grid size increased. Change in grid size, however, did not greatly alter their spatial distribution patterns. Consequently, the different major hillslope processes could be highlighted by comparing the patterns of recently active blocks from each site. In the Mesozoic sedimentary rock site, active slides contained steep slope parts which were characterized by a higher proportion of cells with an eigenvalue ratio < 2.5, when compared with surrounding areas. These low values mostly represent cracks in bedrock outcrops and scars. In contrast, the softer underlying rocks at the Tuff sites, has allowed landslides to evolve with gentle slopes, while maintaining a slow but consistent downslope motion. Here, there were a high proportion

  3. Quantifying Urban Forest Structure Using Crown-Level Fusion of Imaging Spectroscopy and LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonzo, M.; Bookhagen, B.; McFadden, J. P.; Roberts, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    The magnitude and distribution of ecosystem services provided by urban trees depend largely on canopy fractional cover, leaf area index, and species. Most efforts to quantify the structure and function of urban forests have been limited to measuring canopy extent or extrapolation of forest structure and function from plot sample inventories. Hyperspectral remote sensing has shown promise as a means for discriminating tree species. However, in many urban settings, tree species diversity and within-class spectral variability are both high, resulting in low classification accuracies. Canopy structural variables derived from LiDAR can provide additional information, such as tree height and crown width, that do not duplicate the information contained in the spectral variables. In this research we use crown-level fusion of hyperspectral and airborne LiDAR data to map 29 common tree species in Santa Barbara, California. From a discretized, full-waveform lidar dataset, we isolate canopy and, using watershed segmentation, delineate individual crowns. The crown segments are overlaid on Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data and all suitable vegetation spectra are extracted. These same segments are used to extract lidar variables. The two datasets are fused at the crown-object level and classified using canonical discriminant analysis. Overall accuracy for the 29 species, based on correctly classified canopy area, is 83%. When including species outside of the training set, the overall classification accuracy to the tree type level was 90%. At the pixel level, using only spectral data, the classification accuracy of the trained species was 68%. These results indicate the potential for wall-to-wall mapping of an urban forest to the species or tree type level, depending on species diversity and availability of training data. Further, we find that imperfect segmentation is not an insurmountable obstacle to crown-level analysis.

  4. Quantifying landscape change in an arctic coastal lowland using repeat airborne LiDAR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Benjamin M.; Stoker, Jason M.; Gibbs, Ann E.; Grosse, Guido; Romanovsky, Vladimir E.; Douglas, Thomas A.; Kinsman, Nichole E.M.; Richmond, Bruce M.

    2013-01-01

    Increases in air, permafrost, and sea surface temperature, loss of sea ice, the potential for increased wave energy, and higher river discharge may all be interacting to escalate erosion of arctic coastal lowland landscapes. Here we use airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data acquired in 2006 and 2010 to detect landscape change in a 100 km2 study area on the Beaufort Sea coastal plain of northern Alaska. We detected statistically significant change (99% confidence interval), defined as contiguous areas (>10 m2) that had changed in height by at least 0.55 m, in 0.3% of the study region. Erosional features indicative of ice-rich permafrost degradation were associated with ice-bonded coastal, river, and lake bluffs, frost mounds, ice wedges, and thermo-erosional gullies. These features accounted for about half of the area where vertical change was detected. Inferred thermo-denudation and thermo-abrasion of coastal and river bluffs likely accounted for the dominant permafrost-related degradational processes with respect to area (42%) and volume (51%). More than 300 thermokarst pits significantly subsided during the study period, likely as a result of storm surge flooding of low-lying tundra (<1.4 m asl) as well as the lasting impact of warm summers in the late-1980s and mid-1990s. Our results indicate that repeat airborne LiDAR can be used to detect landscape change in arctic coastal lowland regions at large spatial scales over sub-decadal time periods.

  5. Genetic Map of Triticale Integrating Microsatellite, DArT and SNP Markers

    PubMed Central

    Tyrka, Mirosław; Tyrka, Dorota; Wędzony, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Triticale (×Triticosecale Wittm) is an economically important crop for fodder and biomass production. To facilitate the identification of markers for agronomically important traits and for genetic and genomic characteristics of this species, a new high-density genetic linkage map of triticale was constructed using doubled haploi