Science.gov

Sample records for shielding analysis methods

  1. Shielding analysis methods available in the scale computational system

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, C.V.; Tang, J.S.; Hermann, O.W.; Bucholz, J.A.; Emmett, M.B.

    1986-01-01

    Computational tools have been included in the SCALE system to allow shielding analysis to be performed using both discrete-ordinates and Monte Carlo techniques. One-dimensional discrete ordinates analyses are performed with the XSDRNPM-S module, and point dose rates outside the shield are calculated with the XSDOSE module. Multidimensional analyses are performed with the MORSE-SGC/S Monte Carlo module. This paper will review the above modules and the four Shielding Analysis Sequences (SAS) developed for the SCALE system. 7 refs., 8 figs.

  2. Assessment of shielding analysis methods, codes, and data for spent fuel transport/storage applications. [Radiation dose rates from shielded spent fuels and high-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, C.V.; Broadhead, B.L.; Hermann, O.W.; Tang, J.S.; Cramer, S.N.; Gauthey, J.C.; Kirk, B.L.; Roussin, R.W.

    1988-07-01

    This report provides a preliminary assessment of the computational tools and existing methods used to obtain radiation dose rates from shielded spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). Particular emphasis is placed on analysis tools and techniques applicable to facilities/equipment designed for the transport or storage of spent nuclear fuel or HLW. Applications to cask transport, storage, and facility handling are considered. The report reviews the analytic techniques for generating appropriate radiation sources, evaluating the radiation transport through the shield, and calculating the dose at a desired point or surface exterior to the shield. Discrete ordinates, Monte Carlo, and point kernel methods for evaluating radiation transport are reviewed, along with existing codes and data that utilize these methods. A literature survey was employed to select a cadre of codes and data libraries to be reviewed. The selection process was based on specific criteria presented in the report. Separate summaries were written for several codes (or family of codes) that provided information on the method of solution, limitations and advantages, availability, data access, ease of use, and known accuracy. For each data library, the summary covers the source of the data, applicability of these data, and known verification efforts. Finally, the report discusses the overall status of spent fuel shielding analysis techniques and attempts to illustrate areas where inaccuracy and/or uncertainty exist. The report notes the advantages and limitations of several analysis procedures and illustrates the importance of using adequate cross-section data sets. Additional work is recommended to enable final selection/validation of analysis tools that will best meet the US Department of Energy's requirements for use in developing a viable HLW management system. 188 refs., 16 figs., 27 tabs.

  3. Synthesis of calculational methods for design and analysis of radiation shields for nuclear rocket systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capo, M. A.; Disney, R. K.; Jordan, T. A.; Soltesz, R. G.; Woodsum, H. C.

    1969-01-01

    Eight computer programs make up a nine volume synthesis containing two design methods for nuclear rocket radiation shields. The first design method is appropriate for parametric and preliminary studies, while the second accomplishes the verification of a final nuclear rocket reactor design.

  4. Thermal neutron shield and method of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Metzger, Bert Clayton; Brindza, Paul Daniel

    2014-03-04

    A thermal neutron shield comprising boron shielding panels with a high percentage of the element Boron. The panel is least 46% Boron by weight which maximizes the effectiveness of the shielding against thermal neutrons. The accompanying method discloses the manufacture of boron shielding panels which includes enriching the pre-cursor mixture with varying grit sizes of Boron Carbide.

  5. Static Structural Analysis for a Neutron Shielding Block in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Junchuan; Song, Yuntao; Wang, Xiaoyu; Ioki, K.; Du, Shuangsong; Ji, Xiang; Feng, Changle; Xu, Yang

    2013-02-01

    The ITER neutron shielding blocks are located between the outer shell and the inner shell of the vacuum vessel to provide neutron shielding. Considering the combined loads acting on the shielding blocks during ITER plasma operation, the structure of the shielding blocks must be evaluated. Using the finite element method with ANSYS analysis software, static structural analysis is performed, including elastic analysis and limit analysis for one typical shielding block. The evaluated results based on RCC-MR code show that the structure of this shielding block can meet the design requirement.

  6. Shielding current analysis by current-vector-potential method: Application to HTS film with multiply-connected structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamitani, A.; Takayama, T.; Ikuno, S.

    2013-11-01

    The performance of the virtual voltage method is compared with that of the conventional method in which integral forms of Faraday’s law along crack surfaces are treated as natural boundary conditions. As a result, it is found that there is a significant difference between numerical solutions by the two methods. In this sense, not the conventional method but the virtual voltage method should be employed to the shielding current analysis in a high-temperature superconducting film with cracks. By means of the virtual voltage method, the influence of a crack on the inductive method is investigated numerically. The results of computations show that, if the threshold current changes remarkably from its ambient value, a part of a crack is contained in the projection of the field-generating coil onto the film surface. Furthermore, the applicability of the inductive method to the crack detection is investigated numerically.

  7. Thermal neutron shield and method of manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    Brindza, Paul Daniel; Metzger, Bert Clayton

    2013-05-28

    A thermal neutron shield comprising concrete with a high percentage of the element Boron. The concrete is least 54% Boron by weight which maximizes the effectiveness of the shielding against thermal neutrons. The accompanying method discloses the manufacture of Boron loaded concrete which includes enriching the concrete mixture with varying grit sizes of Boron Carbide.

  8. Analysis and Evaluation of Suppressive Shields

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-06-01

    resistance of the shield to fragment penetration, and 7. attenuation of thermal effects by the shield . Other aspects of the design include problems of entry...propellant, 2. methods to predict the thermal environment outside of a suppressive shield , 3. comparisons between measured and predicted pressures... SHIELDS by P. A. Co- x P. S. Westine CD J. J. Kulesz L.LJ E. D. Espurza c-.- January 1978 SOUTHWEST RESEARCH INSTITUTE Post Office Drawer 28510, 6220

  9. Reliability Methods for Shield Design Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, R. K.; Wilson, J. W.

    2002-01-01

    Providing protection against the hazards of space radiation is a major challenge to the exploration and development of space. The great cost of added radiation shielding is a potential limiting factor in deep space operations. In this enabling technology, we have developed methods for optimized shield design over multi-segmented missions involving multiple work and living areas in the transport and duty phase of space missions. The total shield mass over all pieces of equipment and habitats is optimized subject to career dose and dose rate constraints. An important component of this technology is the estimation of two most commonly identified uncertainties in radiation shield design, the shielding properties of materials used and the understanding of the biological response of the astronaut to the radiation leaking through the materials into the living space. The largest uncertainty, of course, is in the biological response to especially high charge and energy (HZE) ions of the galactic cosmic rays. These uncertainties are blended with the optimization design procedure to formulate reliability-based methods for shield design processes. The details of the methods will be discussed.

  10. Spacesuit Radiation Shield Design Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Anderson, Brooke M.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Ware, J.; Zeitlin, Cary J.

    2006-01-01

    Meeting radiation protection requirements during EVA is predominantly an operational issue with some potential considerations for temporary shelter. The issue of spacesuit shielding is mainly guided by the potential of accidental exposure when operational and temporary shelter considerations fail to maintain exposures within operational limits. In this case, very high exposure levels are possible which could result in observable health effects and even be life threatening. Under these assumptions, potential spacesuit radiation exposures have been studied using known historical solar particle events to gain insight on the usefulness of modification of spacesuit design in which the control of skin exposure is a critical design issue and reduction of blood forming organ exposure is desirable. Transition to a new spacesuit design including soft upper-torso and reconfigured life support hardware gives an opportunity to optimize the next generation spacesuit for reduced potential health effects during an accidental exposure.

  11. Mars Exploration Rover Heat Shield Recontact Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raiszadeh, Behzad; Desai, Prasun N.; Michelltree, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The twin Mars Exploration Rover missions landed successfully on Mars surface in January of 2004. Both missions used a parachute system to slow the rover s descent rate from supersonic to subsonic speeds. Shortly after parachute deployment, the heat shield, which protected the rover during the hypersonic entry phase of the mission, was jettisoned using push-off springs. Mission designers were concerned about the heat shield recontacting the lander after separation, so a separation analysis was conducted to quantify risks. This analysis was used to choose a proper heat shield ballast mass to ensure successful separation with low probability of recontact. This paper presents the details of such an analysis, its assumptions, and the results. During both landings, the radar was able to lock on to the heat shield, measuring its distance, as it descended away from the lander. This data is presented and is used to validate the heat shield separation/recontact analysis.

  12. Comparison of deterministic and Monte Carlo methods in shielding design.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, A D; Oliveira, C

    2005-01-01

    In shielding calculation, deterministic methods have some advantages and also some disadvantages relative to other kind of codes, such as Monte Carlo. The main advantage is the short computer time needed to find solutions while the disadvantages are related to the often-used build-up factor that is extrapolated from high to low energies or with unknown geometrical conditions, which can lead to significant errors in shielding results. The aim of this work is to investigate how good are some deterministic methods to calculating low-energy shielding, using attenuation coefficients and build-up factor corrections. Commercial software MicroShield 5.05 has been used as the deterministic code while MCNP has been used as the Monte Carlo code. Point and cylindrical sources with slab shield have been defined allowing comparison between the capability of both Monte Carlo and deterministic methods in a day-by-day shielding calculation using sensitivity analysis of significant parameters, such as energy and geometrical conditions.

  13. Methods of Making Z-Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomsen, III, Donald Laurence (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Hales, Stephen J. (Inventor); Alexa, Joel A. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Methods of building Z-graded radiation shielding and covers. In one aspect, the method includes: providing a substrate surface having about medium Z-grade; plasma spraying a first metal having higher Z-grade than the substrate surface; and infusing a polymer layer to form a laminate. In another aspect, the method includes electro/electroless plating a first metal having higher Z-grade than the substrate surface. In other aspects, the methods include improving an existing electronics enclosure to build a Z-graded radiation shield by applying a temperature controller to at least part of the enclosure and affixing at least one layer of a first metal having higher Z-grade from the enclosure.

  14. DARHT : integration of shielding design and analysis with facility design /

    SciTech Connect

    Boudrie, R. L.; Brown, T. H.; Gilmore, W. E.; Downing, J. N. , Jr.; Hack, Alan; McClure, D. A.; Nelson, C. A.; Wadlinger, E. Alan; Zumbro, M. V.

    2002-01-01

    The design of the interior portions of the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) Facility incorporated shielding and controls from the beginning of the installation of the Accelerators. The purpose of the design and analysis was to demonstrate the adequacy of shielding or to determine the need for additional shielding or controls. Two classes of events were considered: (1) routine operation defined as the annual production of 10,000 2000-ns pulses of electrons at a nominal energy of 20 MeV, some of which are converted to the x-ray imaging beam consisting of four nominal 60-ns pulses over the 2000-ns time frame, and (2) accident case defined as up to 100 2000-ns pulses of electrons accidentally impinging on some metallic surface, thereby producing x rays. Several locations for both classes of events were considered inside and outside of the accelerator hall buildings. The analysis method consisted of the definition of a source term for each case studied and the definition of a model of the shielding and equipment present between the source and the dose areas. A minimal model of the fixed existing or proposed shielding and equipment structures was used for a first approximation. If the resulting dose from the first approximation was below the design goal (1 rem/yr for routine operations, 5 rem for accident cases), then no further investigations were performed. If the result of the first approximation was above our design goals, the model was refined to include existing or proposed shielding and equipment. In some cases existing shielding and equipment were adequate to meet our goals and in some cases additional shielding was added or administrative controls were imposed to protect the workers. It is expected that the radiation shielding design, exclusion area designations, and access control features, will result in low doses to personnel at the DARHT Facility.

  15. Scale-PC shielding analysis sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, S.M.

    1996-05-01

    The SCALE computational system is a modular code system for analyses of nuclear fuel facility and package designs. With the release of SCALE-PC Version 4.3, the radiation shielding analysis community now has the capability to execute the SCALE shielding analysis sequences contained in the control modules SAS1, SAS2, SAS3, and SAS4 on a MS- DOS personal computer (PC). In addition, SCALE-PC includes two new sequences, QADS and ORIGEN-ARP. The capabilities of each sequence are presented, along with example applications.

  16. Standardized Radiation Shield Design Methods: 2005 HZETRN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Tripathi, Ram K.; Badavi, Francis F.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2006-01-01

    Research committed by the Langley Research Center through 1995 resulting in the HZETRN code provides the current basis for shield design methods according to NASA STD-3000 (2005). With this new prominence, the database, basic numerical procedures, and algorithms are being re-examined with new methods of verification and validation being implemented to capture a well defined algorithm for engineering design processes to be used in this early development phase of the Bush initiative. This process provides the methodology to transform the 1995 HZETRN research code into the 2005 HZETRN engineering code to be available for these early design processes. In this paper, we will review the basic derivations including new corrections to the codes to insure improved numerical stability and provide benchmarks for code verification.

  17. Superconducting magnetic shielding apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Clem, J.R.; Clem, J.R.

    1983-10-11

    Disclosed are a method and apparatus for providing magnetic shielding around a working volume. The apparatus includes a hollow elongated superconducting shell or cylinder having an elongated low magnetic pinning central portion, and two high magnetic pinning end regions. Transition portions of varying magnetic pinning properties are interposed between the central and end portions. The apparatus further includes a solenoid substantially coextensive with and overlying the superconducting cylinder, so as to be magnetically coupled therewith. The method includes the steps passing a longitudinally directed current through the superconducting cylinder so as to depin magnetic reservoirs trapped in the cylinder. Next, a circumferentially directed current is passed through the cylinder, while a longitudinally directed current is maintained. Depinned magnetic reservoirs are moved to the end portions of the cylinder, where they are trapped. 5 figs.

  18. Superconducting magnetic shielding apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Clem, J.R.

    1982-07-09

    Disclosed is a method and apparatus for providing magnetic shielding around a working volume. The apparatus includes a hollow elongated superconducting shell or cylinder having an elongated low magnetic pinning central portion, and two high magnetic pinning end regions. Transition portions of varying magnetic pinning properties are interposed between the central and end portions. The apparatus further includes a solenoid substantially coextensive with and overlying the superconducting cylinder, so as to be magnetically coupled therewith. The method includes the steps passing a longitudinally directed current through the superconducting cylinder so as to depin magnetic reservoirs trapped in the cylinder. Next, a circumferentially directed current is passed through the cylinder, while a longitudinally directed current is maintained. Depinned magnetic reservoirs are moved to the end portions of the cylinder, where they are trapped.

  19. Superconducting magnetic shielding apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Clem, John R.; Clem, John R.

    1983-01-01

    Disclosed is a method and apparatus for providing magnetic shielding around a working volume. The apparatus includes a hollow elongated superconducting shell or cylinder having an elongated low magnetic pinning central portion, and two high magnetic pinning end regions. Transition portions of varying magnetic pinning properties are interposed between the central and end portions. The apparatus further includes a solenoid substantially coextensive with and overlying the superconducting cylinder, so as to be magnetically coupled therewith. The method includes the steps passing a longitudinally directed current through the superconducting cylinder so as to depin magnetic reservoirs trapped in the cylinder. Next, a circumferentially directed current is passed through the cylinder, while a longitudinally directed current is maintained. Depinned magnetic reservoirs are moved to the end portions of the cylinder, where they are trapped.

  20. Application of MCBEND to PBMR shielding analysis.

    PubMed

    Wright, G A; Wall, S J

    2005-01-01

    Shielding analysis of an early design of Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) has been carried out by using the Monte Carlo code MCBEND. The issues of concern were damage to the core barrel and the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), activation of the core barrel, RPV, top plate and bottom plate, and also burn-up of boron in the control layer underneath the core. The analysis below the core was complicated due to the presence of the de-fuelling chute, which meant that multiplication had to be taken into account. The analysis of boron burn-up was particularly challenging and was tackled using a combination of MCBEND and the criticality code MONK in the depletion mode. The application of MCBEND to the shielding analysis of the PBMR is described, with particular attention being paid to the regions below the core.

  1. Shielded beam delivery apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, Ady; Montano, Rory Dominick

    2006-07-11

    An apparatus includes a plasma generator aligned with a beam generator for producing a plasma to shield an energized beam. An electrode is coaxially aligned with the plasma generator and followed in turn by a vortex generator coaxially aligned with the electrode. A target is spaced from the vortex generator inside a fluid environment. The electrode is electrically biased relative to the electrically grounded target for driving the plasma toward the target inside a vortex shield.

  2. Improved analysis of electron penetration and numerical procedures for space radiation shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Denn, F. M.

    1977-01-01

    Electron penetration calculational techniques are reviewed with regard to their suitability for shield analysis in future space operations. Methods based on the transmission factors of Mar are discussed and a correction term for low-energy electrons, which results in slightly conservative shield estimates, is derived. This modified Mar's method provides estimates of the dose for electrons that penetrate through shields of arbitrary elemental material with an atomic number greater than four. A complete computer algorithm is included.

  3. WAPDEG Analysis of Waste Package and Drip shield Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    K. Mon

    2004-09-29

    [DIRS 170024]) and uses standard mathematical methods to enable easier implementation. The IWPD analysis also provides guidance on implementation of early failures (importance sampling and multinomial distribution usage). These manipulations are evident from standard scientific practices, approaches, or methods and do not require changes to the previously validated models. The IWPD analysis itself (Section 6.4), not the resultant curves from executing the IWPD analysis presented in Section 6.5 (which are for illustrative purposes), is used directly in total system performance assessment (TSPA). The IWPD analysis simulates general corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of the waste package outer barrier and general corrosion of the drip shield. The effects of igneous and seismic events and localized corrosion on drip shield and waste package performance are not evaluated in this report. The outputs of this report are inputs and methodologies used by TSPA to evaluate waste package and drip shield degradation as a function of exposure time under exposure conditions anticipated in the repository. The analyses presented in this report are for the current repository design (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]).

  4. Method for expanding the uniformly shielded area in a short-length open-ended cylindrical magnetic shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshita, K.; Sasada, I.; Naka, H.; Paperno, E.

    1999-04-01

    A compensation method is proposed by which the uniformly shielded area of the axial magnetic field in a relatively short, open-structure axial magnetic shield can be extended. An open-ended cylindrical magnetic shield of 120 cm in length, 52 cm inner diameter, and a ˜0.5 mm total thickness of the shielding material is used to demonstrate the idea. The shield axis is oriented along the horizontal component (˜320 mG) of the Earth's magnetic field. A simple way to increase the axial shielding factor is to use a pair of compensating coaxial ring coils set at both open ends of the shield. This increases, however, the radial gradient of the shielded field since the axial compensation field is stronger towards the shield axis. In order to decrease the radial gradient, an additional ring coil is wound around the middle part of the outer surface of the shield. The compensating field generated by this central ring coil is stronger towards the inner surface of the shield, and it helps, therefore, to unify the axial resultant field over a wider area inside the shield. The axial shielding factor obtained with this compensation according to the proposed method is 128, in contrast to only 16.4 obtained with compensation by a set of two ring coils. The field gradients observed are 1.2 μG/cm along the length direction and 2.7 μG/cm along the radial direction, in contrast to the 14 μG/cm axial and 78 μG/cm radial gradients obtained with compensation by a set of two ring coils.

  5. Including shielding effects in application of the TPCA method for detection of embedded radiation sources.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, William C.; Shokair, Isaac R.

    2011-12-01

    Conventional full spectrum gamma spectroscopic analysis has the objective of quantitative identification of all the radionuclides present in a measurement. For low-energy resolution detectors such as NaI, when photopeaks alone are not sufficient for complete isotopic identification, such analysis requires template spectra for all the radionuclides present in the measurement. When many radionuclides are present it is difficult to make the correct identification and this process often requires many attempts to obtain a statistically valid solution by highly skilled spectroscopists. A previous report investigated using the targeted principal component analysis method (TPCA) for detection of embedded sources for RPM applications. This method uses spatial/temporal information from multiple spectral measurements to test the hypothesis of the presence of a target spectrum of interest in these measurements without the need to identify all the other radionuclides present. The previous analysis showed that the TPCA method has significant potential for automated detection of target radionuclides of interest, but did not include the effects of shielding. This report complements the previous analysis by including the effects of spectral distortion due to shielding effects for the same problem of detection of embedded sources. Two examples, one with one target radionuclide and the other with two, show that the TPCA method can successfully detect shielded targets in the presence of many other radionuclides. The shielding parameters are determined as part of the optimization process using interpolation of library spectra that are defined on a 2D grid of atomic numbers and areal densities.

  6. Shape Effect Analysis of Aluminum Projectile Impact on Whipple Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrasquilla, Maria J.; Miller, Joshua E.

    2017-01-01

    The informed design with respect to hypervelocity collisions involving micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) is influential to the success of space missions. For an orbit comparable to that of the International Space Station, velocities for MMOD can range from 1 to 15 km/s, with an average velocity around 10 km/cu s. The high energy released during collisions at these speeds can result in damage to a spacecraft, or worst-case, loss of the spacecraft, thus outlining the importance of methods to predict the likelihood and extent of damage due to an impact. Through experimental testing and numerical simulations, substantial work has been conducted to better understand the effects of hypervelocity impacts (HVI) on spacecraft systems and shields; however, much of the work has been focused on spherical impacting particles. To improve environment models for the analysis of MMOD, a large-scale satellite break-up test was performed at the Arnold Engineering and Development Complex to better understand the varied impactor geometries that could be generated from a large impact. As a part of the post-experiment analysis, an undertaking to characterize the irregular fragments generated is currently being performed by the University of Florida under the management of NASA's Orbital Debris Program Office at Johnson Space Center (JSC). DebriSat was a representative, modern LEO satellite that was catastrophically broken up in a HVI test. The test chamber was lined with a soft-catch system of foam panels that captured the fragments after impact. Initial predictions put the number of fragments larger than 2mm generated from the HVI at roughly 85,000. The number of fragments thus far extracted from the foam panels has exceeded 100,000, with that number continuously increasing. The shapes of the fragments vary dependent upon the material. Carbon-fiber reinforced polymer pieces, for instance, are abundantly found as thin, flat slivers. The characterization of these fragments with

  7. Neutron streaming analysis for shield design of FMIT Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, L.L.

    1980-12-01

    Applications of the Monte Carlo method have been summarized relevant to neutron streaming problems of interest in the shield design for the FMIT Facility. An improved angular biasing method has been implemented to further optimize the calculation of streaming and this method has been applied to calculate streaming within a double bend pipe.

  8. A novel shielding scheme studied by the Monte Carlo method for electron beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yue, Kun; Yao, Yuan; Dong, Xiaoqing; Luo, Wenyun

    2013-03-01

    Lead that has been employed widely for shielding in electron beam radiotherapy can produce bremsstrahlung photons during the shielding process. A novel shielding scheme with a two-layer structure has been studied using a Monte Carlo method in order to reduce this bremsstrahlung effect. Compared with the conventional lead, the novel shielding scheme, comprised of a Styrene-Ethylene-Butylene-Styrene Block Co-polymer (SEBS) above and lead below, can efficiently reduce the generation of bremsstrahlung while providing better shielding for incident electrons. Therefore, this novel shielding scheme may play an important role in future applications.

  9. Shielding effectiveness of multiple-shield cables with arbitrary terminations via transmission line analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Campione, Salvatore; Basilio, Lorena I.; Warne, Larry Kevin; ...

    2016-06-25

    Our paper reports on a transmission-line model for calculating the shielding effectiveness of multiple-shield cables with arbitrary terminations. Since the shields are not perfect conductors and apertures in the shields permit external magnetic and electric fields to penetrate into the interior regions of the cable, we use this model to estimate the effects of the outer shield current and voltage (associated with the external excitation and boundary conditions associated with the external conductor) on the inner conductor current and voltage. It is commonly believed that increasing the number of shields of a cable will improve the shielding performance. But thismore » is not always the case, and a cable with multiple shields may perform similar to or worse than a cable with a single shield. Furthermore, we want to shed more light on these situations, which represent the main focus of this paper.« less

  10. Shielding effectiveness of multiple-shield cables with arbitrary terminations via transmission line analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Campione, Salvatore; Basilio, Lorena I.; Warne, Larry Kevin; Hudson, Howard Gerald; Langston, William L.

    2016-06-25

    Our paper reports on a transmission-line model for calculating the shielding effectiveness of multiple-shield cables with arbitrary terminations. Since the shields are not perfect conductors and apertures in the shields permit external magnetic and electric fields to penetrate into the interior regions of the cable, we use this model to estimate the effects of the outer shield current and voltage (associated with the external excitation and boundary conditions associated with the external conductor) on the inner conductor current and voltage. It is commonly believed that increasing the number of shields of a cable will improve the shielding performance. But this is not always the case, and a cable with multiple shields may perform similar to or worse than a cable with a single shield. Furthermore, we want to shed more light on these situations, which represent the main focus of this paper.

  11. Early test facilities and analytic methods for radiation shielding: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Ingersoll, D T; Ingersoll, J K

    1992-11-01

    This report represents a compilation of eight papers presented at the 1992 American Nuclear Society/European Nuclear Society International Meeting. The meeting is of special significance since it commemorates the fiftieth anniversary of the first controlled nuclear chain reaction. The papers contained in this report were presented in a special session organized by the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division in keeping with the historical theme of the meeting. The paper titles are good indicators of their content and are: (1) The origin of radiation shielding research: The Oak Ridge experience, (2) Shielding research at the hanford site, (3) Aircraft shielding experiments at General Dynamics Fort Worth, 1950-1962, (4) Where have the neutrons gone , a history of the tower shielding facility, (5) History and evolution of buildup factors, (6) Early shielding research at Bettis atomic power laboratory, (7) UK reactor shielding: then and now, (8) A very personal view of the development of radiation shielding theory.

  12. Weight optimization methods in space radiation shield design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    An empirical relation between proton range and material density is used to examine relations between shield weight, geometry, and material composition for shielding against a space proton environment. The optimum material resulting in minimum shield weight usually lies at the extremes of either the lightest or heaviest materials. Aluminum, which has special prominence in the space program, appears universally suboptimal as a radiation shielding material. Assuming square-box geometry (rectangular prisms with two square faces), the optimum shape for the shielded objects is found to be a cube, although moderate deviations from a cube result in only a small weight penalty.

  13. Theoretical analysis of infrared radiation shields of spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shealy, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    For a system of N diffuse, gray body radiation shields which view only adjacent surfaces and space, the net radiation method for enclosures has been used to formulate a system of linear, nonhomogeneous equations in terms of the temperatures to the fourth power of each surface in the coupled system of enclosures. The coefficients of the unknown temperatures in the system of equations are expressed in terms of configuration factors between adjacent surfaces and the emissivities. As an application, a system of four conical radiation shields for a spin stabilized STARPROBE spacecraft has been designed and analyzed with respect to variations of the cone half angles, the intershield spacings, and emissivities.

  14. Analysis of a Lunar Base Electrostatic Radiation Shield Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buhler, Charles R.

    2004-01-01

    Space weather can be defined as the total ensemble of radiation in space, as well as on the surface of moons and asteroids. It consists of electromagnetic, charged-particle, and neutral particle radiation. The fundamental goal behind this NIAC Phase I research is to investigate methods of generating a static electric-field potential phi(x, y, z) in the volume above and around a "safe" or protected area on the lunar surface so that trajectories of harmful charged particle radiation are modified (deflected or reflected), thus creating a shadow over that region. Since the charged particles are not neutralized but merely redirected, there will be areas outside of the shadowed protected region that will have a higher flux concentration of radiation. One of the fundamental limitations of the static electric (electrostatic)-field approach to radiation shielding is that complete shadowing is accomplished only by complete reflection, which can only occur for shield voltages greater than or equal to the kinetic energy (in electron volts) of the incoming charged particles. Just as habitats on Earth are protected from severe weather events and conditions, such as extreme temperatures, high winds, and UV radiation, using multiple methods of shielding protection from severe space weather will undoubtedly require multiple strategies. The electrostatic shield concept may be one of many methods employed to protect astronaut habitats on the lunar surface from some of the harmful effects of space weather.

  15. NMR Shielding in Metals Using the Augmented Plane Wave Method

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present calculations of solid state NMR magnetic shielding in metals, which includes both the orbital and the complete spin response of the system in a consistent way. The latter contains an induced spin-polarization of the core states and needs an all-electron self-consistent treatment. In particular, for transition metals, the spin hyperfine field originates not only from the polarization of the valence s-electrons, but the induced magnetic moment of the d-electrons polarizes the core s-states in opposite direction. The method is based on DFT and the augmented plane wave approach as implemented in the WIEN2k code. A comparison between calculated and measured NMR shifts indicates that first-principle calculations can obtain converged results and are more reliable than initially concluded based on previous publications. Nevertheless large k-meshes (up to 2 000 000 k-points in the full Brillouin-zone) and some Fermi-broadening are necessary. Our results show that, in general, both spin and orbital components of the NMR shielding must be evaluated in order to reproduce experimental shifts, because the orbital part cancels the shift of the usually highly ionic reference compound only for simple sp-elements but not for transition metals. This development paves the way for routine NMR calculations of metallic systems. PMID:26322148

  16. FDTD Analysis of Effectiveness of Shielding Clothes in Suppressing Electromagnetic Field in Phantom Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Yoshiyuki; Nagano, Isamu; Yagitani, Satoshi; Ueno, Tomohiko; Nakayabu, Toshihiro

    In order to prevent cardiac pacemakers from malfunctioning caused by electromagnetic (EM) wave, as one of the solutions to the problem of pacemaker malfunctioning, we can use a shielding material to decrease the EM wave intensity. For the effective suppression of the EM wave including a complicated enclosure or a human body, it is desirable to solve for the EM wave propagation by using numerical analysis. We introduce the transmission coefficient when an EM wave is incident into a multi-layered material with an arbitrary direction into the FDTD method. This realizes three-dimensional numerical analysis of a thin shielding material as a method to solve the EM wave transmission problem, which has been conventionally considered difficult. We use a phantom model, a dummy model of a cardiac pacemaker wearer, to analyze the EM wave shielding effectiveness of the shielding clothes. The analytical result agrees fairly well with the experimental result, which verifies the validity of the developed method. As for the effect of the aperture of the shielding clothes, the EM wave coming around from the apertures is found to be larger in amount than the EM wave transmitted through the clothes, which suggests that the aperture causes the SE to decrease largely.

  17. Graphene shield enhanced photocathodes and methods for making the same

    DOEpatents

    Moody, Nathan Andrew

    2014-09-02

    Disclosed are graphene shield enhanced photocathodes, such as high QE photocathodes. In certain embodiments, a monolayer graphene shield membrane ruggedizes a high quantum efficiency photoemission electron source by protecting a photosensitive film of the photocathode, extending operational lifetime and simplifying its integration in practical electron sources. In certain embodiments of the disclosed graphene shield enhanced photocathodes, the graphene serves as a transparent shield that does not inhibit photon or electron transmission but isolates the photosensitive film of the photocathode from reactive gas species, preventing contamination and yielding longer lifetime.

  18. Analysis of the JASPER Program Radial Shield Attenuation Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, C.O.

    1993-01-01

    The results of the analysis of the JASPER Program Radial Shield Attenuation Experiment are presented. The experiment was performed in 1986 at the ORNL Tower Shielding Facility. It is the first of six experiments in this cooperative Japanese and American program in support of shielding designs for advanced sodium-cooled reactors. Six different shielding configurations and subconfigurations thereof were studied. The configurations were calculated with the DOT-IV two-dimensional discrete ordinates radiation transport computer code using the R-Z geometry option, a symmetric S{sub 12} quadrature (96 directions), and cross sections from ENDF/B versions IV and V in either a 51- or 61-group structure. Auxiliary codes were used to compute detector responses and prepare cross sections and source input for the DOT-IV calculations. Calculated detector responses were compared with measured responses and the agreement was good to excellent in many cases. However, the agreement for configurations having thick steel or B{sub 4}C regions or for some very large configurations was fair to poor. The disagreement was attributed to cross-section data, broad-group structure, or high background in the measurements. In particular, it is shown that two cross-section sets for ``B give very different results for neutron transmission through the thick B{sub 4}C regions used in one set of experimental configurations. Implications for design calculations are given.

  19. Micrometeoroid and Orbital Debris (MMOD) Shield Ballistic Limit Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Shannon

    2013-01-01

    This software implements penetration limit equations for common micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) shield configurations, windows, and thermal protection systems. Allowable MMOD risk is formulated in terms of the probability of penetration (PNP) of the spacecraft pressure hull. For calculating the risk, spacecraft geometry models, mission profiles, debris environment models, and penetration limit equations for installed shielding configurations are required. Risk assessment software such as NASA's BUMPERII is used to calculate mission PNP; however, they are unsuitable for use in shield design and preliminary analysis studies. The software defines a single equation for the design and performance evaluation of common MMOD shielding configurations, windows, and thermal protection systems, along with a description of their validity range and guidelines for their application. Recommendations are based on preliminary reviews of fundamental assumptions, and accuracy in predicting experimental impact test results. The software is programmed in Visual Basic for Applications for installation as a simple add-in for Microsoft Excel. The user is directed to a graphical user interface (GUI) that requires user inputs and provides solutions directly in Microsoft Excel workbooks.

  20. Precambrian shield and basement tectonics in sedimentary basin analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Touborg, J.F.

    1984-04-01

    This study focused on the use of (1) regional structural analysis of basement and Precambrian rocks surrounding a sedimentary basin, and (2) tracing basement structures into the sedimentary basin. The structural analysis of the Precambrian shield has a fundamental bearing on interpretation of overlying sedimentary cover rocks. This is expressed in the southern part of the Hudson's Bay basin and its southeastern arm, the Moose River basin. For instance, the rims of both basins are controlled by faults or graben structures. Approximately 13 major fault systems with strike lengths of 200-300 km (125-186 mi) or more can be traced from the exposed Precambrian shield into the basin in terms of lineament arrays and/or aeromagnetic and/or gravity signature. The data suggest reactivation of faults during basin sedimentation. This type of basement structural analysis in areas adjacent to sedimentary basins can provide a valuable interpretation base for subsequent seismic surveys and basin evaluation.

  1. Hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic methods for radiation shielding problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Troy L.

    For the past few decades, the most common type of deep-penetration (shielding) problem simulated using Monte Carlo methods has been the source-detector problem, in which a response is calculated at a single location in space. Traditionally, the nonanalog Monte Carlo methods used to solve these problems have required significant user input to generate and sufficiently optimize the biasing parameters necessary to obtain a statistically reliable solution. It has been demonstrated that this laborious task can be replaced by automated processes that rely on a deterministic adjoint solution to set the biasing parameters---the so-called hybrid methods. The increase in computational power over recent years has also led to interest in obtaining the solution in a region of space much larger than a point detector. In this thesis, we propose two methods for solving problems ranging from source-detector problems to more global calculations---weight windows and the Transform approach. These techniques employ sonic of the same biasing elements that have been used previously; however, the fundamental difference is that here the biasing techniques are used as elements of a comprehensive tool set to distribute Monte Carlo particles in a user-specified way. The weight window achieves the user-specified Monte Carlo particle distribution by imposing a particular weight window on the system, without altering the particle physics. The Transform approach introduces a transform into the neutron transport equation, which results in a complete modification of the particle physics to produce the user-specified Monte Carlo distribution. These methods are tested in a three-dimensional multigroup Monte Carlo code. For a basic shielding problem and a more realistic one, these methods adequately solved source-detector problems and more global calculations. Furthermore, they confirmed that theoretical Monte Carlo particle distributions correspond to the simulated ones, implying that these methods

  2. Loss of coolant analysis for the tower shielding reactor 2

    SciTech Connect

    Radcliff, T.D.; Williams, P.T.

    1990-06-01

    The operational limits of the Tower Shielding Reactor-2 (TSR-2) have been revised to account for placing the reactor in a beam shield, which reduces convection cooling during a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). A detailed heat transfer analysis was performed to set operating time limits which preclude fuel damage during a LOCA. Since a LOCA is survivable, the pressure boundary need not be safety related, minimizing seismic and inspection requirements. Measurements of reactor component emittance for this analysis revealed that aluminum oxidized in water may have emittance much higher than accepted values, allowing higher operating limits than were originally expected. These limits could be increased further with analytical or hardware improvements. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  3. Radiation Exposure Effects and Shielding Analysis of Carbon Nanotube Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, Richard; Armendariz, Lupita (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Carbon nanotube materials promise to be the basis for a variety of emerging technologies with aerospace applications. Potential applications to human space flight include spacecraft shielding, hydrogen storage, structures and fixtures and nano-electronics. Appropriate risk analysis on the properties of nanotube materials is essential for future mission safety. Along with other environmental hazards, materials used in space flight encounter a hostile radiation environment for all mission profiles, from low earth orbit to interplanetary space.

  4. Experimental nuclear cross sections for spacecraft shield analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peelle, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Experiments have been performed to validate and to supplement the intranuclear cascade model as a method for estimating cross sections of importance to spacecraft shield design. The experimental situation is inconclusive particularly for neutron-producing reactions, but is relatively sound for reaction cross sections and for proton spectra at several hundred MeV at medium forward angles. Secondary photon contributions are imprecisely known.

  5. DataSHIELD: taking the analysis to the data, not the data to the analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gaye, Amadou; Marcon, Yannick; Isaeva, Julia; LaFlamme, Philippe; Turner, Andrew; Jones, Elinor M; Minion, Joel; Boyd, Andrew W; Newby, Christopher J; Nuotio, Marja-Liisa; Wilson, Rebecca; Butters, Oliver; Murtagh, Barnaby; Demir, Ipek; Doiron, Dany; Giepmans, Lisette; Wallace, Susan E; Budin-Ljøsne, Isabelle; Oliver Schmidt, Carsten; Boffetta, Paolo; Boniol, Mathieu; Bota, Maria; Carter, Kim W; deKlerk, Nick; Dibben, Chris; Francis, Richard W; Hiekkalinna, Tero; Hveem, Kristian; Kvaløy, Kirsti; Millar, Sean; Perry, Ivan J; Peters, Annette; Phillips, Catherine M; Popham, Frank; Raab, Gillian; Reischl, Eva; Sheehan, Nuala; Waldenberger, Melanie; Perola, Markus; van den Heuvel, Edwin; Macleod, John; Knoppers, Bartha M; Stolk, Ronald P; Fortier, Isabel; Harris, Jennifer R; Woffenbuttel, Bruce HR; Murtagh, Madeleine J; Ferretti, Vincent; Burton, Paul R

    2014-01-01

    Background: Research in modern biomedicine and social science requires sample sizes so large that they can often only be achieved through a pooled co-analysis of data from several studies. But the pooling of information from individuals in a central database that may be queried by researchers raises important ethico-legal questions and can be controversial. In the UK this has been highlighted by recent debate and controversy relating to the UK’s proposed ‘care.data’ initiative, and these issues reflect important societal and professional concerns about privacy, confidentiality and intellectual property. DataSHIELD provides a novel technological solution that can circumvent some of the most basic challenges in facilitating the access of researchers and other healthcare professionals to individual-level data. Methods: Commands are sent from a central analysis computer (AC) to several data computers (DCs) storing the data to be co-analysed. The data sets are analysed simultaneously but in parallel. The separate parallelized analyses are linked by non-disclosive summary statistics and commands transmitted back and forth between the DCs and the AC. This paper describes the technical implementation of DataSHIELD using a modified R statistical environment linked to an Opal database deployed behind the computer firewall of each DC. Analysis is controlled through a standard R environment at the AC. Results: Based on this Opal/R implementation, DataSHIELD is currently used by the Healthy Obese Project and the Environmental Core Project (BioSHaRE-EU) for the federated analysis of 10 data sets across eight European countries, and this illustrates the opportunities and challenges presented by the DataSHIELD approach. Conclusions: DataSHIELD facilitates important research in settings where: (i) a co-analysis of individual-level data from several studies is scientifically necessary but governance restrictions prohibit the release or sharing of some of the required data, and

  6. Overview of active methods for shielding spacecraft from energetic space radiation.

    PubMed

    Townsend, L W

    2001-01-01

    During the 1960's and into the early 1970's, investigations were conducted related to the feasibility of using active radiation shielding methods, such as afforded by electromagnetic fields, as alternatives to passive, bulk material shielding to attenuate space radiations. These active concepts fall into four categories: (1) electrostatic fields; (2) plasma shields; (3) confined magnetic fields; and (4) unconfined magnetic fields. In nearly all of these investigations, consideration was given only to shielding against protons or electrons, or both. During the 1980's and 1990's there were additional studies related to proton shielding and some new studies regarding the efficacy of using active methods to shield from the high energy heavy ion (HZE particle) component of the galactic cosmic ray spectrum. In this overview, each concept category is reviewed and its applicability and limitations for the various types of space radiations are described. Recommendations for future research on this topic are made.

  7. Space mapping method for the design of passive shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeant, Peter; Dupré, Luc; Melkebeek, Jan

    2006-04-01

    The aim of the paper is to find the optimal geometry of a passive shield for the reduction of the magnetic stray field of an axisymmetric induction heater. For the optimization, a space mapping algorithm is used that requires two models. The first is an accurate model with a high computational effort as it contains finite element models. The second is less accurate, but it has a low computational effort as it uses an analytical model: the shield is replaced by a number of mutually coupled coils. The currents in the shield are found by solving an electrical circuit. Space mapping combines both models to obtain the optimal passive shield fast and accurately. The presented optimization technique is compared with gradient, simplex, and genetic algorithms.

  8. Shielding of substations against direct lightning strokes by shield wires

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhuri, P. )

    1994-01-01

    A new analysis for shielding outdoor substations against direct lightning strokes by shield wires is proposed. The basic assumption of this proposed method is that any lightning stroke which penetrates the shields will cause damage. The second assumption is that a certain level of risk of failure must be accepted, such as one or two failures per 100 years. The proposed method, using electrogeometric model, was applied to design shield wires for two outdoor substations: (1) 161-kV/69-kV station, and (2) 500-kV/161-kV station. The results of the proposed method were also compared with the shielding data of two other substations.

  9. Application of the method of steepest descent to laminated shield weight optimization with several constraints: Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lahti, G. P.

    1971-01-01

    The method of steepest descent used in optimizing one-dimensional layered radiation shields is extended to multidimensional, multiconstraint situations. The multidimensional optimization algorithm and equations are developed for the case of a dose constraint in any one direction being dependent only on the shield thicknesses in that direction and independent of shield thicknesses in other directions. Expressions are derived for one-, two-, and three-dimensional cases (one, two, and three constraints). The precedure is applicable to the optimization of shields where there are different dose constraints and layering arrangements in the principal directions.

  10. Numerical computation of lightning transfer functions for layered, anisotropically conducting shielding structures by the method of moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Happ, Fabian; Brüns, Heinz-D.; Mavraj, Gazmend; Gronwald, Frank

    2016-09-01

    A formalism for the computation of lightning transfer functions by the method of moments, which involves shielding structures that may consist of layered, anisotropically conducting composite materials, is presented in this contribution. The composite materials, being of a type that is widely used in space- and aircraft design, are electrically characterized by an equivalent conductivity. As basis for the quantitative analysis the method of moments is used where shielding surfaces can be treated by a thin layer technique which utilizes analytical solutions inside the layer. Also the effect of an extended lightning channel can be taken into account. The method is applied to geometries that resemble an actual airplane fuselage.

  11. Numerical Analysis on Neutron Shielding Structure of ITER Vacuum Vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Changle; Wu, Songtao; Yu, Jie; Sheng, Daolin

    2008-06-01

    The neutron shielding component of ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) vacuum vessel is a kind of structure resembling a wall in appearance. A FE (finite element) model is set up by using ANSYS code in terms of its structural features. Static analysis, thermal expansion analysis and dynamic analysis are performed. The static results show that the stress and displacement distribution are allowable, but the high stress appears in the junction between the upper and lower parts. The modal analysis indicates that the biggest deformation exists in the port area. Through modal superposition, the single-point response has been found with the lower rank frequency of the acceleration seismic response spectrum. But the deformation and the stress values are within the permissible limit. The analysis results would benefit the work in the next step and provide some reference for the implementation of the engineering plan in the future.

  12. Summary of Prometheus Radiation Shielding Nuclear Design Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    J. Stephens

    2006-01-13

    This report transmits a summary of radiation shielding nuclear design studies performed to support the Prometheus project. Together, the enclosures and references associated with this document describe NRPCT (KAPL & Bettis) shielding nuclear design analyses done for the project.

  13. Designing dual-plate meteoroid shields: A new analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, H. F.; Bamford, R.; Chen, R.

    1982-01-01

    Physics governing ultrahigh velocity impacts onto dual-plate meteor armor is discussed. Meteoroid shield design methodologies are considered: failure mechanisms, qualitative features of effective meteoroid shield designs, evaluating/processing meteoroid threat models, and quantitative techniques for optimizing effective meteoroid shield designs. Related investigations are included: use of Kevlar cloth/epoxy panels in meteoroid shields for the Halley's Comet intercept vehicle, mirror exposure dynamics, and evaluation of ion fields produced around the Halley Intercept Mission vehicle by meteoroid impacts.

  14. Preliminary Analysis of a Water Shield for a Surface Power Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, J. Boise

    2006-01-01

    A water based shielding system is being investigated for use on initial lunar surface power systems. The use of water may lower overall cost (as compared to development cost for other materials) and simplify operations in the setup and handling. The thermal hydraulic performance of the shield is of significant interest. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection. A simple 1-D thermal model indicates the necessity of natural convection to maintain acceptable temperatures and pressures in the water shield. CFD analysis is done to quantify the natural convection in the shield, and predicts sufficient natural convection to transfer heat through the shield with small temperature gradients. A test program will he designed to experimentally verify the thermal hydraulic performance of the shield, and to anchor the CFD models to experimental results.

  15. SINEX: SCALE shielding analysis GUI for X-Windows

    SciTech Connect

    Browman, S.M.; Barnett, D.L.

    1997-12-01

    SINEX (SCALE Interface Environment for X-windows) is an X-Windows graphical user interface (GUI), that is being developed for performing SCALE radiation shielding analyses. SINEX enables the user to generate input for the SAS4/MORSE and QADS/QAD-CGGP shielding analysis sequences in SCALE. The code features will facilitate the use of both analytical sequences with a minimum of additional user input. Included in SINEX is the capability to check the geometry model by generating two-dimensional (2-D) color plots of the geometry model using a new version of the SCALE module, PICTURE. The most sophisticated feature, however, is the 2-D visualization display that provides a graphical representation on screen as the user builds a geometry model. This capability to interactively build a model will significantly increase user productivity and reduce user errors. SINEX will perform extensive error checking and will allow users to execute SCALE directly from the GUI. The interface will also provide direct on-line access to the SCALE manual.

  16. Extensive Radiation Shielding Analysis for Different Spacecraft Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çay, Yiǧit; Kaymaz, Zerefsan

    2016-07-01

    Radiation environment around Earth poses a great danger for spacecraft and causes immature de-orbiting or loss of the spacecraft in near Earth space environment. In this study, a student project has been designed to build a CubeSat, PolarBeeSail (PBS), with an orbit having inclination of 80°, 4 Re in perigee and 20 Re in apogee to study the polar magnetospheric environment. An extensive radiation dose analyses were carried out for PBS orbit, and integral and differential fluxes were calculated using SPENVIS tools. A shielding analysis was performed and an optimum Aluminum thickness, 3 mm, was obtained. These results for PBS were then compared for other orbits at different altitudes both for polar and equatorial orbits. For this purpose, orbital characteristics of POES-19 and GOES-15 were used. The resulting proton flux analyses, TID analyses, and further shielding studies were conducted; comparisons and recommendations were made for future design of spacecraft that will use these environments.

  17. Analysis and improvement of cyclotron thallium target room shield.

    PubMed

    Hajiloo, N; Raisali, G; Aslani, G

    2008-01-01

    Because of high neutron and gamma-ray intensities generated during bombardment of a thallium-203 target, a thallium target-room shield and different ways of improving it have been investigated. Leakage of neutron and gamma ray dose rates at various points behind the shield are calculated by simulating the transport of neutrons and photons using the Monte Carlo N Particle transport computer code. By considering target-room geometry, its associated shield and neutron and gamma ray source strengths and spectra, three designs for enhancing shield performance have been analysed: a shielding door at the maze entrance, covering maze walls with layers of some effective materials and adding a shadow-shield in the target room in front of the radiation source. Dose calculations were carried out separately for different materials and dimensions for all the shielding scenarios considered. The shadow-shield has been demonstrated to be one suitable for neutron and gamma dose equivalent reduction. A 7.5-cm thick polyethylene shadow-shield reduces both dose equivalent rate at maze entrance door and leakage from the shield by a factor of 3.

  18. Evaluation of approximate methods for the prediction of noise shielding by airframe components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahtye, W. F.; Mcculley, G.

    1980-01-01

    An evaluation of some approximate methods for the prediction of shielding of monochromatic sound and broadband noise by aircraft components is reported. Anechoic-chamber measurements of the shielding of a point source by various simple geometric shapes were made and the measured values compared with those calculated by the superposition of asymptotic closed-form solutions for the shielding by a semi-infinite plane barrier. The shields used in the measurements consisted of rectangular plates, a circular cylinder, and a rectangular plate attached to the cylinder to simulate a wing-body combination. The normalized frequency, defined as a product of the acoustic wave number and either the plate width or cylinder diameter, ranged from 4.6 to 114. Microphone traverses in front of the rectangular plates and cylinders generally showed a series of diffraction bands that matched those predicted by the approximate methods, except for differences in the magnitudes of the attenuation minima which can be attributed to experimental inaccuracies. The shielding of wing-body combinations was predicted by modifications of the approximations used for rectangular and cylindrical shielding. Although the approximations failed to predict diffraction patterns in certain regions, they did predict the average level of wing-body shielding with an average deviation of less than 3 dB.

  19. Methods for shielding a flexible, PCB-made eddy current array probe against edge effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepage, B.

    2012-05-01

    Probe shielding has been used in combination with eddy current and eddy current array sensors for quite some time to improve detection of defects located near component edges. Conventional methods of providing such shielding are not suitable for coils etched on printed circuit board. This paper describes an innovative shielded coil design suitable for highly flexible, printed circuit board eddy current array probes. The benefits of the new design will be demonstrated for the inspection of dovetails, where detection of defects along the edge is critical.

  20. Spectral analysis of shielded gamma ray sources using precalculated library data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Thomas Wesley; Gardner, Robin P.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, an approach has been developed for determining the intensity of a shielded source by first determining the thicknesses of three different shielding materials from a passively collected gamma-ray spectrum by making comparisons with predetermined shielded spectra. These evaluations are dependent on the accuracy and validity of the predetermined library spectra which were created by changing the thicknesses of the three chosen materials lead, aluminum and wood that are used to simulate any actual shielding. Each of the spectra produced was generated using MCNP5 with a sufficiently large number of histories to ensure a low relative error at each channel. The materials were held in the same respective order from source to detector, where each material consisted of three individual thicknesses and a null condition. This then produced two separate data sets of 27 total shielding material situations and subsequent predetermined libraries that were created for each radionuclide source used. The technique used to calculate the thicknesses of the materials implements a Levenberg-Marquardt nonlinear search that employs a tri-linear interpolation with the respective predetermined libraries within each channel for the supplied input unknown spectrum. Given that the nonlinear parameters require an initial guess for the calculations, the approach demonstrates first that when the correct values are input, the correct thicknesses are found. It then demonstrates that when multiple trials of random values are input for each of the nonlinear parameters, the average of the calculated solutions that successfully converges also produced the correct thicknesses. Under situations with sufficient information known about the detection situation at hand, the method was shown to behave in a manner that produces reasonable results and can serve as a good preliminary solution. This technique has the capability to be used in a variety of full spectrum inverse analysis problems

  1. Nuclei-selected NMR shielding calculations: a sublinear-scaling quantum-chemical method.

    PubMed

    Beer, Matthias; Kussmann, Jörg; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2011-02-21

    An ab initio method for the direct calculation of NMR shieldings for selected nuclei at the Hartree-Fock and density-functional theory level is presented. Our method shows a computational effort scaling only sublinearly with molecular size, as it is motivated by the physical consideration that the chemical shielding is dominated by its local environment. The key feature of our method is to avoid the conventionally performed calculation of all NMR shieldings but instead to solve directly for specific nuclear shieldings. This has important implications not only for the study of large molecules, but also for the simulation of solvent effects and molecular dynamics, since often just a few shieldings are of interest. Our theory relies on two major aspects both necessary to provide a sublinear scaling behavior: First, an alternative expression for the shielding tensor is derived, which involves the response density matrix with respect to the nuclear magnetic moment instead of the response to the external magnetic field. Second, as unphysical long-range contributions occur within the description of distributed gauge origin methods that do not influence the final expectation value, we present a screening procedure to truncate the B-field dependent basis set, which is crucial in order to ensure an early onset of the sublinear scaling. The screening is in line with the r(-2) distance decay of Biot-Savarts law for induced magnetic fields. Our present truncation relies on the introduced concept of "individual gauge shielding contributions" applied to a reformulated shielding tensor, the latter consisting of gauge-invariant terms. The presented method is generally applicable and shows typical speed-ups of about one order of magnitude; moreover, due to the reduced scaling behavior of O(1) as compared to O(N), the wins become larger with increasing system size. We illustrate the validity of our method for several test systems, including ring-current dominated systems and

  2. Limit Analysis for the Mechanical Structure of the ITER Neutron Shielding Block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Junchuan; Song, Yuntao; Du, Shuangsong; Wang, Zhongwei; Xu, Yang; Feng, Changle

    2013-04-01

    The ITER neutron shielding blocks are located between the inner shell and the outer shell of the vacuum vessel (VV) with the main function of providing neutron shielding. Considering the combined loads of the shielding blocks during the plasma operation of the ITER, limit analysis for one typical ferromagnetic (FM) shielding block has been performed and the structural design has been evaluated based on the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) criterion and European standards. Results show that the collapse load of this shielding block is three times the specified load, which is much higher than the design requirement of 1.25. The structure of this neutron shielding block has a sufficient safety margin.

  3. Use of Existing CAD Models for Radiation Shielding Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K. T.; Barzilla, J. E.; Wilson, P.; Davis, A.; Zachman, J.

    2015-01-01

    The utility of a radiation exposure analysis depends not only on the accuracy of the underlying particle transport code, but also on the accuracy of the geometric representations of both the vehicle used as radiation shielding mass and the phantom representation of the human form. The current NASA/Space Radiation Analysis Group (SRAG) process to determine crew radiation exposure in a vehicle design incorporates both output from an analytic High Z and Energy Particle Transport (HZETRN) code and the properties (i.e., material thicknesses) of a previously processed drawing. This geometry pre-process can be time-consuming, and the results are less accurate than those determined using a Monte Carlo-based particle transport code. The current work aims to improve this process. Although several Monte Carlo programs (FLUKA, Geant4) are readily available, most use an internal geometry engine. The lack of an interface with the standard CAD formats used by the vehicle designers limits the ability of the user to communicate complex geometries. Translation of native CAD drawings into a format readable by these transport programs is time consuming and prone to error. The Direct Accelerated Geometry -United (DAGU) project is intended to provide an interface between the native vehicle or phantom CAD geometry and multiple particle transport codes to minimize problem setup, computing time and analysis error.

  4. Three-dimensional analysis of AP600 standard plant shield building roof

    SciTech Connect

    Greimann, L.; Fanous, F.; Safar, S.; Khalil, A.; Bluhm, D.

    1999-06-01

    The AP600 passive containment vessel is surrounded by a concrete cylindrical shell covered with a truncated conical roof. This roof supports the passive containment cooling system (PCS) annular tank, shield plate and other nonstructural attachments. When the shield building is subjected to different loading combinations as defined in the Standard Review Plan (SRP), some of the sections in the shield building could experience forces in excess of their design values. This report summarized the three-dimensional finite element analysis that was conducted to review the adequacy of the proposed Westinghouse shield building design. The ANSYS finite element software was utilized to analyze the Shield Building Roof (SBR) under dead, snow, wind, thermal and seismic loadings. A three-dimensional model that included a portion of the shield building cylindrical shell, the conical roof and its attachments, the eccentricities at the cone-cylinder connection and at the compression ring and the PCS tank was developed. Mesh sensitivity studies were conducted to select appropriate element size in the cylinder, cone, near air intakes and in the vicinity of the eccentricities. Also, a study was carried out to correctly idealize the water-structure interaction in the PCS tank. Response spectrum analysis was used to calculate the internal forces at different sections in the SBR under Safe Shutdown Earthquake (SSE). Forty-nine structural modes and twenty sloshing modes were used. Two horizontal components of the SSE together with a vertical component were used. Modal stress resultants were combined taking into account the effects of closely spaced modes. The three earthquake directions were combined by the Square Root of the Sum Squares method. Two load combinations were studied. The load combination that included dead, snow, fluid, thermal and seismic loads was selected to be the most critical. Interaction diagrams for critical sections were developed and used to check the design

  5. Efficient time-independent method for conceptual design optimization of the national ignition facility primary shield

    SciTech Connect

    Greenspan, E.; Annese, C.E.; Miller, W.F. Jr.; Watkins, E.F.; Tobin, M.L.; Latkowski, J.F.; Lee, J.D.; Soran, P.

    1995-07-01

    Minimum-cost design concepts of the primary shield for the National (laser fusion) Ignition Facility are sought with the help of the SWAN optimization code. The computational method developed for this search involves incorporating the time dependence of the delayed photon field within effective delayed photon production cross sections. This method enables the time-dependent problem to be addressed using time-independent transport calculations, thus significantly simplifying and accelerating the design process. The search for constituents that will minimize the shield cost is guided by the newly defined equal cost replacement effectiveness functions. The minimum-cost shield design concept consists of a mixture of polyethylene and low-cost, low-activation materials, such as CaCO{sub 3} or silicon carbide, with boron added near the shield boundaries. An alternative approach to the target chamber design is analyzed. It involves placing the shield interior, rather than exterior to the main aluminum structural wall of the target chamber. The resulting inner shield design approach was found to be more expensive but inherently safer; the overall inventory of radioactive activation product it contains is one to two orders of magnitude lower than in the conventional design approach. 21 refs., 16 figs., 15 tabs.

  6. Method for fabricating fan-fold shielded electrical leads

    DOEpatents

    Rohatgi, Rajeev R.; Cowan, Thomas E.

    1994-01-01

    Fan-folded electrical leads made from copper cladded Kapton, for example, with the copper cladding on one side serving as a ground plane and the copper cladding on the other side being etched to form the leads. The Kapton is fan folded with the leads located at the bottom of the fan-folds. Electrical connections are made by partially opening the folds of the fan and soldering, for example, the connections directly to the ground plane and/or the lead. The fan folded arrangement produces a number of advantages, such as electrically shielding the leads from the environment, is totally non-magnetic, and has a very low thermal conductivity, while being easy to fabricate.

  7. Method of shielding a liquid-metal-cooled reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sayre, Robert K.

    1978-01-01

    The primary heat transport system of a nuclear reactor -- particularly for a liquid-metal-cooled fast-breeder reactor -- is shielded and protected from leakage by establishing and maintaining a bed of a powdered oxide closely and completely surrounding all components thereof by passing a gas upwardly therethrough at such a rate as to slightly expand the bed to the extent that the components of the system are able to expand without damage and yet the particles of the bed remain close enough so that the bed acts as a guard vessel for the system. Preferably the gas contains 1 to 10% oxygen and the gas is passed upwardly through the bed at such a rate that the lower portion of the bed is a fixed bed while the upper portion is a fluidized bed, the line of demarcation therebetween being high enough that the fixed bed portion of the bed serves as guard vessel for the system.

  8. An improved method for correction of air temperature measured using different radiation shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xinghong; Su, Debin; Li, Deping; Chen, Lu; Xu, Wenjing; Yang, Meilin; Li, Yongcheng; Yue, Zhizhong; Wang, Zijing

    2014-11-01

    The variation of air temperature measurement errors using two different radiation shields (DTR502B Vaisala, Finland, and HYTFZ01, Huayun Tongda Satcom, China) was studied. Datasets were collected in the field at the Daxing weather station in Beijing from June 2011 to May 2012. Most air temperature values obtained with these two commonly used radiation shields were lower than the reference records obtained with the new Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRP) Stevenson screen. In most cases, the air temperature errors when using the two devices were smaller on overcast and rainy days than on sunny days; and smaller when using the imported rather than the Chinese shield. The measured errors changed sharply at sunrise and sunset, and reached maxima at noon. Their diurnal variation characteristics were, naturally, related to changes in solar radiation. The relationships between the record errors, global radiation, and wind speed were nonlinear. An improved correction method was proposed based on the approach described by Nakamura and Mahrt (2005) (NM05), in which the impact of the solar zenith angle (SZA) on the temperature error is considered and extreme errors due to changes in SZA can be corrected effectively. Measurement errors were reduced significantly after correction by either method for both shields. The error reduction rate using the improved correction method for the Chinese and imported shields were 3.3% and 40.4% higher than those using the NM05 method, respectively.

  9. Non-contact radio frequency shielding and wave guiding by multi-folded transformation optics method.

    PubMed

    Madni, Hamza Ahmad; Zheng, Bin; Yang, Yihao; Wang, Huaping; Zhang, Xianmin; Yin, Wenyan; Li, Erping; Chen, Hongsheng

    2016-11-14

    Compared with conventional radio frequency (RF) shielding methods in which the conductive coating material encloses the circuits design and the leakage problem occurs due to the gap in such conductive material, non-contact RF shielding at a distance is very promising but still impossible to achieve so far. In this paper, a multi-folded transformation optics method is proposed to design a non-contact device for RF shielding. This "open-shielded" device can shield any object at a distance from the electromagnetic waves at the operating frequency, while the object is still physically open to the outer space. Based on this, an open-carpet cloak is proposed and the functionality of the open-carpet cloak is demonstrated. Furthermore, we investigate a scheme of non-contact wave guiding to remotely control the propagation of surface waves over any obstacles. The flexibilities of such multi-folded transformation optics method demonstrate the powerfulness of the method in the design of novel remote devices with impressive new functionalities.

  10. Validation of source biasing method for its use in CSNS beamline shielding calculation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Tai-ran; Shen, Fei; Liang, Tian-jiao; Yin, Wen; Yu, Quan-zhi; Yu, Chun-xu

    2014-12-01

    The Chinese spallation neutron source (CSNS) is a high-performance pulsed neutron source, having 20 neutron beamlines for neutron scattering instruments. The shielding design of these beamlines is usually needed for Monte Carlo (MC) calculation, and the use of variance reduction methods is critical to carrying out an efficient, reliable MC shielding calculation. This paper discusses the source biasing method based on actual source term and geometry model of a CSNS neutron beamline. Dose distribution throughout the geometry model was calculated with the FLUKA MC code. Full analogue calculation and biased calculation were compared, and it was validated that the source biasing method can effectively promote the calculation efficiency.

  11. Shielding analysis of proton therapy accelerators: a demonstration using Monte Carlo-generated source terms and attenuation lengths.

    PubMed

    Lai, Bo-Lun; Sheu, Rong-Jiun; Lin, Uei-Tyng

    2015-05-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are generally considered the most accurate method for complex accelerator shielding analysis. Simplified models based on point-source line-of-sight approximation are often preferable in practice because they are intuitive and easy to use. A set of shielding data, including source terms and attenuation lengths for several common targets (iron, graphite, tissue, and copper) and shielding materials (concrete, iron, and lead) were generated by performing Monte Carlo simulations for 100-300 MeV protons. Possible applications and a proper use of the data set were demonstrated through a practical case study, in which shielding analysis on a typical proton treatment room was conducted. A thorough and consistent comparison between the predictions of our point-source line-of-sight model and those obtained by Monte Carlo simulations for a 360° dose distribution around the room perimeter showed that the data set can yield fairly accurate or conservative estimates for the transmitted doses, except for those near the maze exit. In addition, this study demonstrated that appropriate coupling between the generated source term and empirical formulae for radiation streaming can be used to predict a reasonable dose distribution along the maze. This case study proved the effectiveness and advantage of applying the data set to a quick shielding design and dose evaluation for proton therapy accelerators.

  12. A Ballistic Limit Analysis Program for Shielding Against Micrometeoroids and Orbital Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Shannon; Christiansen, Erie

    2010-01-01

    A software program has been developed that enables the user to quickly and simply perform ballistic limit calculations for common spacecraft structures that are subject to hypervelocity impact of micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) projectiles. This analysis program consists of two core modules: design, and; performance. The design module enables a user to calculate preliminary dimensions of a shield configuration (e.g., thicknesses/areal densities, spacing, etc.) for a ?design? particle (diameter, density, impact velocity, incidence). The performance module enables a more detailed shielding analysis, providing the performance of a user-defined shielding configuration over the range of relevant in-orbit impact conditions.

  13. Analysis of grid-assembly shielding of EBR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Meneghetti, D.; Franklin, F.C.; Kucera, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    Differing neutron exposure rates to the EBR-II lower grid plenum assembly resulting from the historical changes in reactor configuration and shielding are analyzed to obtain the fluences and the steel displacements-per-atom values in this irreplaceable component.

  14. Morphometry and Cluster Analysis of Low Shield Volcanoes on Earth and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, A.; Christiansen, E. H.; Radebaugh, J.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanoes are common on all terrestrial planets and their morphology is influenced by eruption mechanisms, volumes, and compositions and temperatures of the magmas; these are in turn influenced by the tectonic setting. In an attempt to better understand the relationship between morphometry and volcanic processes, we compared low-shield volcanoes on Syria Planum, Mars, with basaltic shields of the eastern Snake River Plain (eSRP).We used 133 volcanoes on Syria Planum that are covered by MOLA and HRSC elevation data and 246 eSRP shields covered by the NED. Shields on Syria Planum average 191 +/- 88 m tall, 12 +/- 6 km in diameter, 16 +/- 28 km3 in volume, and have 1.7° +/- 0.8 flank slopes. eSRP shields average 83 +/- 44 m tall, 4 +/- 3 km in diameter, 0.8 +/- 2 km3 in volume, and have 2.5° +/- 1 flank slopes. Bivariate plots of morphometric characteristics show that Syria Planum and eSRP low shields form the extremes of the same morphospace shared with some Icelandic olivine tholeiite shields, but is generally distinct from other terrestrial volcanoes. Cluster analysis of SP and eSRP shields with other terrestrial volcanoes separates these volcanoes into one cluster and the majority of them into the same sub-cluster that is distinct from other terrestrial volcanoes. Principal component and cluster analysis of Syria Planum and eSRP shields using height, area, volume, slope, and eccentricity shows that Syria Planum and eSRP low-shields are similar in shape (slope and eccentricity). Apparently, these low shields formed by similar processes involving Hawaiian-type eruptions of low viscosity (mafic) lavas with fissure controlled eruptions, narrowing to central vents. Initially high eruption rates and long, tube-fed lava flows shifted to the development of small lava lakes that repeatedly overflowed, and on some with late fountaining to form steeper spatter ramparts. However, Syria Planum shields are systematically larger than those on the eastern Snake River Plain. The

  15. Non-contact radio frequency shielding and wave guiding by multi-folded transformation optics method

    PubMed Central

    Madni, Hamza Ahmad; Zheng, Bin; Yang, Yihao; Wang, Huaping; Zhang, Xianmin; Yin, Wenyan; Li, Erping; Chen, Hongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Compared with conventional radio frequency (RF) shielding methods in which the conductive coating material encloses the circuits design and the leakage problem occurs due to the gap in such conductive material, non-contact RF shielding at a distance is very promising but still impossible to achieve so far. In this paper, a multi-folded transformation optics method is proposed to design a non-contact device for RF shielding. This “open-shielded” device can shield any object at a distance from the electromagnetic waves at the operating frequency, while the object is still physically open to the outer space. Based on this, an open-carpet cloak is proposed and the functionality of the open-carpet cloak is demonstrated. Furthermore, we investigate a scheme of non-contact wave guiding to remotely control the propagation of surface waves over any obstacles. The flexibilities of such multi-folded transformation optics method demonstrate the powerfulness of the method in the design of novel remote devices with impressive new functionalities. PMID:27841358

  16. Analysis and Testing of a Composite Fuselage Shield for Open Rotor Engine Blade-Out Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Emmerling, William; Seng, Silvia; Frankenberger, Charles; Ruggeri, Charles R.; Revilock, Duane M.; Carney, Kelly S.

    2016-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration is working with the European Aviation Safety Agency to determine the certification base for proposed new engines that would not have a containment structure on large commercial aircraft. Equivalent safety to the current fleet is desired by the regulators, which means that loss of a single fan blade will not cause hazard to the Aircraft. The NASA Glenn Research Center and The Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), China Lake, collaborated with the FAA Aircraft Catastrophic Failure Prevention Program to design and test lightweight composite shields for protection of the aircraft passengers and critical systems from a released blade that could impact the fuselage. LS-DYNA® was used to predict the thickness of the composite shield required to prevent blade penetration. In the test, two composite blades were pyrotechnically released from a running engine, each impacting a composite shield with a different thickness. The thinner shield was penetrated by the blade and the thicker shield prevented penetration. This was consistent with pre-test LS-DYNA predictions. This paper documents the analysis conducted to predict the required thickness of a composite shield, the live fire test from the full scale rig at NAWC China Lake and describes the damage to the shields as well as instrumentation results.

  17. Active magnetic radiation shielding system analysis and key technologies.

    PubMed

    Washburn, S A; Blattnig, S R; Singleterry, R C; Westover, S C

    2015-01-01

    Many active magnetic shielding designs have been proposed in order to reduce the radiation exposure received by astronauts on long duration, deep space missions. While these designs are promising, they pose significant engineering challenges. This work presents a survey of the major systems required for such unconfined magnetic field design, allowing the identification of key technologies for future development. Basic mass calculations are developed for each system and are used to determine the resulting galactic cosmic radiation exposure for a generic solenoid design, using a range of magnetic field strength and thickness values, allowing some of the basic characteristics of such a design to be observed. This study focuses on a solenoid shaped, active magnetic shield design; however, many of the principles discussed are applicable regardless of the exact design configuration, particularly the key technologies cited.

  18. Thermal Analysis of a SHIELD Electromigration Test Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, David A.; Bowman, Duane J.; Mitchell, Robert T.

    1999-05-01

    The steady state and transient thermal behavior of an electromigration test structure was analyzed. The test structure was a Sandia SHIELD (Self-stressing HIgh fregquency rELiability Device) electromigration test device manufactured by an outside vendor. This device has a high frequency oscillator circuit, a buffer circuit to isolate and drive the metal line to the tested (DUT), the DUT to be electromigrated itself, a metal resistance thermometry monitor, and a heater elment to temperature accelerate the electromigration effect.

  19. Shielding analysis for a heavy ion beam chamber with plasma channels for ion transport

    SciTech Connect

    Sawan, M.E.; Peterson, R.R.; Yu, S.

    2000-06-28

    Neutronics analysis has been performed to assess the shielding requirements for the insulators and final focusing magnets in a modified HYLIFE-II target chamber that utilizes pre-formed plasma channels for heavy ion beam transport. Using 65 cm thick Flibe jet assemblies provides adequate shielding for the electrical insulator units. Additional shielding is needed in front of the final focusing superconducting quadrupole magnets. A shield with a thickness varying between 45 and 90 cm needs to be provided in front of the quadrupole unit. The final laser mirrors located along the channel axis are in the direct line-of-sight of source neutrons. Neutronics calculations were performed to determine the constraints on the placement of these mirrors to be lifetime components.

  20. Application of transport techniques to the analysis of NERVA shadow shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capo, M. A.; Anderson, S. L.

    1972-01-01

    A radiation shield internal to the NERVA nuclear rocket reactor required to limit the neutron and photon radiation levels at critical components located external to the reactor was evaluated. Two significantly different shield mockups were analyzed: BATH, a composite mixture of boron carbide, aluminum and titanium hydride, and a borated steel-liquid hydrogen system. Based on the comparisons between experimental and calculated neutron and photon radiation levels, the following conclusions were noted: (1) The ability of two-dimensional discrete ordinates code to predict the radiation levels internal to and at the surface of the shield mockups was clearly demonstrated. (2) Internal to the BATH shield mockups, the one-dimensional technique predicted the axial variation of neutron fluxes and photon dose rates; however, the magnitude of the neutron fluxes was about a factor of 1.8 lower than the two-dimensional analysis and the photon dose rate was a factor of 1.3 lower.

  1. A temperature error correction method for a naturally ventilated radiation shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie; Liu, Qingquan; Dai, Wei; Ding, Rrenhui

    2016-11-01

    Due to solar radiation exposure, air flowing inside a naturally ventilated radiation shield may produce a measurement error of 0.8 °C or higher. To improve the air temperature observation accuracy, a temperature error correction method is proposed. The correction method is based on a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method and a Genetic Algorithm (GA) method. The CFD method is implemented to analyze and calculate the temperature errors of a naturally ventilated radiation shield under various environmental conditions. Then, a temperature error correction equation is obtained by fitting the CFD results using the GA method. To verify the performance of the correction equation, the naturally ventilated radiation shield and an aspirated temperature measurement platform are characterized in the same environment to conduct the intercomparison. The aspirated temperature measurement platform serves as an air temperature reference. The mean temperature error given by measurements is 0.36 °C, and the mean temperature error given by correction equation is 0.34 °C. This correction equation allows the temperature error to be reduced by approximately 95%. The mean absolute error (MAE) and the root mean square error (RMSE) between the temperature errors given by the correction equation and the temperature errors given by the measurements are 0.07 °C and 0.08 °C, respectively.

  2. Shielded resistive electromagnets of arbitrary surface geometry using the boundary element method and a minimum energy constraint.

    PubMed

    Harris, Chad T; Haw, Dustin W; Handler, William B; Chronik, Blaine A

    2013-09-01

    Eddy currents are generated in MR by the use of rapidly switched electromagnets, resulting in time varying and spatially varying magnetic fields that must be either minimized or corrected. This problem is further complicated when non-cylindrical insert magnets are used for specialized applications. Interruption of the coupling between an insert coil and the MR system is typically accomplished using active magnetic shielding. A new method of actively shielding insert gradient and shim coils of any surface geometry by use of the boundary element method for coil design with a minimum energy constraint is presented. This method was applied to shield x- and z-gradient coils for two separate cases: a traditional cylindrical primary gradient with cylindrical shield and, to demonstrate its versatility in surface geometry, the same cylindrical primary gradients with a rectangular box-shaped shield. For the cylindrical case this method produced shields that agreed with analytic solutions. For the second case, the rectangular box-shaped shields demonstrated very good shielding characteristics despite having a different geometry than the primary coils.

  3. Gamma radiation shielding analysis of lead-flyash concretes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kanwaldeep; Singh, Sukhpal; Dhaliwal, A S; Singh, Gurmel

    2014-11-04

    Six samples of lead-flyash concrete were prepared with lead as an admixture and by varying flyash content - 0%, 20%, 30%, 40%, 50% and 60% (by weight) by replacing cement and keeping constant w/c ratio. Different gamma radiation interaction parameters used for radiation shielding design were computed theoretically and measured experimentally at 662keV, 1173keV and 1332keV gamma radiation energy using narrow transmission geometry. The obtained results were compared with ordinary-flyash concretes. The radiation exposure rate of gamma radiation sources used was determined with and without lead-flyash concretes.

  4. Modeling resonance interference by 0-D slowing-down solution with embedded self-shielding method

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Martin, W.; Kim, K. S.; Williams, M.

    2013-07-01

    The resonance integral table based methods employing conventional multigroup structure for the resonance self-shielding calculation have a common difficulty on treating the resonance interference. The problem arises due to the lack of sufficient energy dependence of the resonance cross sections when the calculation is performed in the multigroup structure. To address this, a resonance interference factor model has been proposed to account for the interference effect by comparing the interfered and non-interfered effective cross sections obtained from 0-D homogeneous slowing-down solutions by continuous-energy cross sections. A rigorous homogeneous slowing-down solver is developed with two important features for reducing the calculation time and memory requirement for practical applications. The embedded self-shielding method (ESSM) is chosen as the multigroup resonance self-shielding solver as an integral component of the interference method. The interference method is implemented in the DeCART transport code. Verification results show that the code system provides more accurate effective cross sections and multiplication factors than the conventional interference method for UO{sub 2} and MOX fuel cases. The additional computing time and memory for the interference correction is acceptable for the test problems including a depletion case with 87 isotopes in the fuel region. (authors)

  5. Radiation shielding analysis of a special linear accelerator for electron beam and X-ray.

    PubMed

    Kang, W G; Pyo, S H; Alkhuraiji, T S; Han, B S; Kang, C M

    2017-01-31

    The King AbdulAziz City for Science & Technology in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia plans to build a 10 MeV, 15 kW linear accelerator (LINAC) for electron beam and X-ray. The accelerator will be supplied by EB Tech, Republic of Korea, and the design and construction of the accelerator building will be conducted in the cooperation with EB Tech. This report presents the shielding analysis of the accelerator building using the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP). In order to improve the accuracy in estimating deep radiation penetration and to reduce computation time, various variance reduction techniques, including the weight window (WW) method, the deterministic transport (DXTRAN) spheres were considered. Radiation levels were estimated at selected locations in the shielding facility running MCNP6 for particle histories up to 1.0×10+8. The final results indicated that the calculated doses at all selected detector locations met the dose requirement of 50 mSv/yr, which is the United State Nuclear Regulatory Commission (U.S. NRC) requirement.

  6. Shielding analysis of the IEM cell offset adapter plate

    SciTech Connect

    Simons, R.L.

    1995-01-13

    The adapter plate for the Interim Examination and Maintenance (IEM) cell ten foot ceiling valve was modified so that the penetration through the valve is offset to the north side of the steel plate. The modifications required that the shielding effectiveness be evaluated for several operating conditions. The highest gamma ray dose rate (51 mrem/hr) occurs when a Core Component Container (CCC) with six high burn-up driver fuel assemblies is transferred into or out of Solid Waste Cask (SWC). The neutron dose rate at the same source location is 2.5 mrem/hr. The total dose rate during the transfer is less than the 200 mrem/hr limit. If the ten foot ceiling valve is closed, the dose rate with twelve DFA in the cell will be less than 0.1 mrem/hr. However, with the ceiling valve open the dose rate will be as high as 12 mrem/hr. The latter condition will require controlled access to the area around the offset adapter plate when the ceiling valve is open. It was found that gaps in the shield block around the SWC floor valve will allow contact dose rates as high as 350 mrem/hr during the transfer of a fully loaded CCC. Although this situation does not pertain to the offset adapter plate, it will require controlled access around the SWC valve during the transfer of a fully loaded CCC.

  7. Evaluation of shielding effectiveness of composite wall with a time domain discontinuous Galerkin method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameni Ntichi, Abelin; Modave, Axel; Boubekeur, Mohamed; Preault, Valentin; Pichon, Lionel; Geuzaine, Christophe

    2013-11-01

    This article presents a time domain discontinuous Galerkin method applied for solving the con-servative form of Maxwells' equations and computing the radiated fields in electromagnetic compatibility problems. The results obtained in homogeneous media for the transverse magnetic waves are validated in two cases. We compare our solution to an analytical solution of Maxwells' equations based on characteristic method. Our results on shielding effectiveness of a conducting wall are same as those obtained from analytical expression in frequency domain. The propagation in heterogeneous medium is explored. The shielding effectiveness of a composite wall partially filled by circular conductives inclusions is computed. The proposed results are in conformity with the classical predictive homogenization rules. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Numelec 2012", Edited by Adel Razek.

  8. Development and verification of design methods for ducts in a space nuclear shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cerbone, R. J.; Selph, W. E.; Read, P. A.

    1972-01-01

    A practical method for computing the effectiveness of a space nuclear shield perforated by small tubing and cavities is reported. Performed calculations use solutions for a two dimensional transport code and evaluate perturbations of that solution using last flight estimates and other kernel integration techniques. In general, perturbations are viewed as a change in source strength of scattered radiation and a change in attenuation properties of the region.

  9. Exterior spacecraft subsystem protective shielding analysis and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonberg, William P.; Taylor, Roy A.

    1990-01-01

    All spacecraft are susceptible to impacts by meteoroids and pieces of orbiting space debris. An effective mechanism is developed to protect external spacecraft subsystems against damage by ricochet particles formed during such impacts. Equations and design procedures for protective shield panels are developed based on observed ricochet phenomena and calculated ricochet particle sizes and speeds. It is found that the diameter of the most damaging ricochet debris particle can be as large as 40 percent of the original project tile diameter, and can travel at speeds between 24 and 36 percent of the original projectile impact velocity. Panel dimensions are shown to be strongly dependent on their inclination to the impact velocity vector and on their distribution around a spacecraft module. It is concluded that obliquity effects of high-speed impacts must be considered in the design of any structure exposed to the meteoroid and space debris environment.

  10. Shielding calculation and criticality safety analysis of spent fuel transportation cask in research reactors.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, A; Hassanzadeh, M; Gharib, M

    2016-02-01

    In this study, shielding calculation and criticality safety analysis were carried out for general material testing reactor (MTR) research reactors interim storage and relevant transportation cask. During these processes, three major terms were considered: source term, shielding, and criticality calculations. The Monte Carlo transport code MCNP5 was used for shielding calculation and criticality safety analysis and ORIGEN2.1 code for source term calculation. According to the results obtained, a cylindrical cask with body, top, and bottom thicknesses of 18, 13, and 13 cm, respectively, was accepted as the dual-purpose cask. Furthermore, it is shown that the total dose rates are below the normal transport criteria that meet the standards specified.

  11. Neutronics and shielding analysis of the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Latkowski, J.F.; Tobin, M.T.; Singh, M.S.

    1994-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to construct the National Ignition Facility (NIF) by the year 2001 to embark on a program to achieve ignition and modest gain in the laboratory. The NIF will use 1.8 MJ of 0.35 {mu}m laser light, nearly a fifty-fold increase in energy over the Nova laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). A 5-m radius spherical aluminum chamber will contain the target experiments and allow access to diagnostics for data collection. Based on a projected maximum annual yield of 385 MJ (1.4 {times} 10{sup 20} 14 MeV neutrons), prompt annual doses will be < 1.2 {mu}Sv at the nearest site boundary, < 0.43 mSv immediately outside the Target Area, and < 30 {mu}Sv in the war-room and control room. The target chamber material has been selected in a trade-off between its mechanical properties and its neutron activation qualities. External target chamber shielding has been selected such that the total annual occupational dose to Target Area workers will be {le} 5 mSv. Finally, some Target Area systems have been redesigned based on their neutron activation and residual dose rates. The operation of the NIF will have an insignificant impact to workers and the general population.

  12. Development of deterministic transport methods for low energy neutrons for shielding in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganapol, Barry

    1993-09-01

    Transport of low energy neutrons associated with the galactic cosmic ray cascade is analyzed in this dissertation. A benchmark quality analytical algorithm is demonstrated for use with BRYNTRN, a computer program written by the High Energy Physics Division of NASA Langley Research Center, which is used to design and analyze shielding against the radiation created by the cascade. BRYNTRN uses numerical methods to solve the integral transport equations for baryons with the straight-ahead approximation, and numerical and empirical methods to generate the interaction probabilities. The straight-ahead approximation is adequate for charged particles, but not for neutrons. As NASA Langley improves BRYNTRN to include low energy neutrons, a benchmark quality solution is needed for comparison. The neutron transport algorithm demonstrated in this dissertation uses the closed-form Green's function solution to the galactic cosmic ray cascade transport equations to generate a source of neutrons. A basis function expansion for finite heterogeneous and semi-infinite homogeneous slabs with multiple energy groups and isotropic scattering is used to generate neutron fluxes resulting from the cascade. This method, called the FN method, is used to solve the neutral particle linear Boltzmann transport equation. As a demonstration of the algorithm coded in the programs MGSLAB and MGSEMI, neutron and ion fluxes are shown for a beam of fluorine ions at 1000 MeV per nucleon incident on semi-infinite and finite aluminum slabs. Also, to demonstrate that the shielding effectiveness against the radiation from the galactic cosmic ray cascade is not directly proportional to shield thickness, a graph of transmitted total neutron scalar flux versus slab thickness is shown. A simple model based on the nuclear liquid drop assumption is used to generate cross sections for the galactic cosmic ray cascade. The ENDF/B V database is used to generate the total and scattering cross sections for neutrons in

  13. Development of deterministic transport methods for low energy neutrons for shielding in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganapol, Barry

    1993-01-01

    Transport of low energy neutrons associated with the galactic cosmic ray cascade is analyzed in this dissertation. A benchmark quality analytical algorithm is demonstrated for use with BRYNTRN, a computer program written by the High Energy Physics Division of NASA Langley Research Center, which is used to design and analyze shielding against the radiation created by the cascade. BRYNTRN uses numerical methods to solve the integral transport equations for baryons with the straight-ahead approximation, and numerical and empirical methods to generate the interaction probabilities. The straight-ahead approximation is adequate for charged particles, but not for neutrons. As NASA Langley improves BRYNTRN to include low energy neutrons, a benchmark quality solution is needed for comparison. The neutron transport algorithm demonstrated in this dissertation uses the closed-form Green's function solution to the galactic cosmic ray cascade transport equations to generate a source of neutrons. A basis function expansion for finite heterogeneous and semi-infinite homogeneous slabs with multiple energy groups and isotropic scattering is used to generate neutron fluxes resulting from the cascade. This method, called the FN method, is used to solve the neutral particle linear Boltzmann transport equation. As a demonstration of the algorithm coded in the programs MGSLAB and MGSEMI, neutron and ion fluxes are shown for a beam of fluorine ions at 1000 MeV per nucleon incident on semi-infinite and finite aluminum slabs. Also, to demonstrate that the shielding effectiveness against the radiation from the galactic cosmic ray cascade is not directly proportional to shield thickness, a graph of transmitted total neutron scalar flux versus slab thickness is shown. A simple model based on the nuclear liquid drop assumption is used to generate cross sections for the galactic cosmic ray cascade. The ENDF/B V database is used to generate the total and scattering cross sections for neutrons in

  14. Physical analysis of the shielding capacity for a lightweight apron designed for shielding low intensity scattering X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seon Chil; Choi, Jeong Ryeol; Jeon, Byeong Kyou

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a lightweight apron that will be used for shielding low intensity radiation in medical imaging radiography room and to apply it to a custom-made effective shielding. The quality of existing aprons made for protecting our bodies from direct radiation are improved so that they are suitable for scattered X-rays. Textiles that prevent bodies from radiation are made by combining barium sulfate and liquid silicon. These materials have the function of shielding radiation in a manner like lead. Three kinds of textiles are produced. The thicknesses of each textile are 0.15 mm, 0.21 mm, and 0.29 mm and the corresponding lead equivalents are 0.039 mmPb, 0.095 mmPb, 0.22 mmPb for each. The rate of shielding space scattering rays are 80% from the distance of 0.5 m, 86% from 1.0 m, and 97% from 1.5 m. If we intend to approach with the purpose of shielding scattering X-rays and low intensity radiations, it is possible to reduce the weight of the apron to be 1/5 compared to that of the existing lead aprons whose weight is typically more than 4 kg. We confirm, therefore, that it is possible to produce lightweight aprons that are used for the purpose of shielding low dose radiations.

  15. Physical analysis of the shielding capacity for a lightweight apron designed for shielding low intensity scattering X-rays

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seon Chil; Choi, Jeong Ryeol; Jeon, Byeong Kyou

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a lightweight apron that will be used for shielding low intensity radiation in medical imaging radiography room and to apply it to a custom-made effective shielding. The quality of existing aprons made for protecting our bodies from direct radiation are improved so that they are suitable for scattered X-rays. Textiles that prevent bodies from radiation are made by combining barium sulfate and liquid silicon. These materials have the function of shielding radiation in a manner like lead. Three kinds of textiles are produced. The thicknesses of each textile are 0.15 mm, 0.21 mm, and 0.29 mm and the corresponding lead equivalents are 0.039 mmPb, 0.095 mmPb, 0.22 mmPb for each. The rate of shielding space scattering rays are 80% from the distance of 0.5 m, 86% from 1.0 m, and 97% from 1.5 m. If we intend to approach with the purpose of shielding scattering X-rays and low intensity radiations, it is possible to reduce the weight of the apron to be 1/5 compared to that of the existing lead aprons whose weight is typically more than 4 kg. We confirm, therefore, that it is possible to produce lightweight aprons that are used for the purpose of shielding low dose radiations. PMID:27461510

  16. Physical analysis of the shielding capacity for a lightweight apron designed for shielding low intensity scattering X-rays.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seon Chil; Choi, Jeong Ryeol; Jeon, Byeong Kyou

    2016-07-27

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a lightweight apron that will be used for shielding low intensity radiation in medical imaging radiography room and to apply it to a custom-made effective shielding. The quality of existing aprons made for protecting our bodies from direct radiation are improved so that they are suitable for scattered X-rays. Textiles that prevent bodies from radiation are made by combining barium sulfate and liquid silicon. These materials have the function of shielding radiation in a manner like lead. Three kinds of textiles are produced. The thicknesses of each textile are 0.15 mm, 0.21 mm, and 0.29 mm and the corresponding lead equivalents are 0.039 mmPb, 0.095 mmPb, 0.22 mmPb for each. The rate of shielding space scattering rays are 80% from the distance of 0.5 m, 86% from 1.0 m, and 97% from 1.5 m. If we intend to approach with the purpose of shielding scattering X-rays and low intensity radiations, it is possible to reduce the weight of the apron to be 1/5 compared to that of the existing lead aprons whose weight is typically more than 4 kg. We confirm, therefore, that it is possible to produce lightweight aprons that are used for the purpose of shielding low dose radiations.

  17. Optimization of custom cementless stem using finite element analysis and elastic modulus distribution for reducing stress-shielding effect.

    PubMed

    Saravana Kumar, Gurunathan; George, Subin Philip

    2017-02-01

    This work proposes a methodology involving stiffness optimization for subject-specific cementless hip implant design based on finite element analysis for reducing stress-shielding effect. To assess the change in the stress-strain state of the femur and the resulting stress-shielding effect due to insertion of the implant, a finite element analysis of the resected femur with implant assembly is carried out for a clinically relevant loading condition. Selecting the von Mises stress as the criterion for discriminating regions for elastic modulus difference, a stiffness minimization method was employed by varying the elastic modulus distribution in custom implant stem. The stiffness minimization problem is formulated as material distribution problem without explicitly penalizing partial volume elements. This formulation enables designs that could be fabricated using additive manufacturing to make porous implant with varying levels of porosity. Stress-shielding effect, measured as difference between the von Mises stress in the intact and implanted femur, decreased as the elastic modulus distribution is optimized.

  18. U.S ITER : electromagnetic analysis of transient forces due to disrupted plasma currents on the ITER shield modules.

    SciTech Connect

    Kotulski, Joseph Daniel; Coats, Rebecca Sue; Pasik, Michael Francis

    2007-06-01

    This paper describes the electromagnetic analysis that has been completed using the OPERA-3d product to characterize the forces on the ITER shield modules as part of the conceptual design. These forces exist due to the interaction of the eddy currents induced in the shield modules and the large magnetic fields present in the tokamak.

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF SOLID COLLECTION DIAGNOSTICS ON NIF THROUGH BLAST SHIELD ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Gostic, J M; Shaughnessy, D A; Grant, P M; Hutcheon, I D; Lewis, L A; Moody, K J

    2011-12-15

    Radiochemical analysis of post-shot debris inside the National Ignition Facility (NIF) target chamber can help determine various diagnostic parameters associated with the implosion efficiency of the fusion capsule. This capability is limited by the amount of target isotope that can be loaded inside the capsule ablator without affecting performance and the collection efficiency of the capsule debris after implosion. Prior to designing a collection system, the chemical nature and distribution of the debris inside the chamber must be determined and analysis methods developed. The focus of our current work has been on determining the elemental composition and distribution of debris on various blast shields and witness plates that were exposed to the chamber during ignition shots that occurred in 2009. These passive collection plates were used to develop both non-destructive and chemical analysis techniques to determine debris composition and melt depth at various shot energy profiles. A summary of these data will be presented along with our current strategy for the 2011 campaign.

  20. Enhanced Whipple Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crews, Jeanne L. (Inventor); Christiansen, Eric L. (Inventor); Williamsen, Joel E. (Inventor); Robinson, Jennifer R. (Inventor); Nolen, Angela M. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A hypervelocity impact (HVI) Whipple Shield and a method for shielding a wall from penetration by high velocity particle impacts where the Whipple Shield is comprised of spaced apart inner and outer metal sheets or walls with an intermediate cloth barrier arrangement comprised of ceramic cloth and high strength cloth which are interrelated by ballistic formulae.

  1. The DOPEX code: An application of the method of steepest descent to laminated-shield-weight optimization with several constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lahti, G. P.

    1972-01-01

    A two- or three-constraint, two-dimensional radiation shield weight optimization procedure and a computer program, DOPEX, is described. The DOPEX code uses the steepest descent method to alter a set of initial (input) thicknesses for a shield configuration to achieve a minimum weight while simultaneously satisfying dose constaints. The code assumes an exponential dose-shield thickness relation with parameters specified by the user. The code also assumes that dose rates in each principal direction are dependent only on thicknesses in that direction. Code input instructions, FORTRAN 4 listing, and a sample problem are given. Typical computer time required to optimize a seven-layer shield is about 0.1 minute on an IBM 7094-2.

  2. Shielding analysis at the upper section of the accelerator-driven system.

    PubMed

    Sasa, Toshinobu; Yang, Jin An; Oigawa, Hiroyuki

    2005-01-01

    The proton beam duct of the accelerator-driven system (ADS) acts as a streaming path for spallation neutrons and photons and causes the activation of the magnets and other devices above the subcritical core. We have performed a streaming analysis at the upper section of the lead-bismuth target/cooled ADS (800 MWth). MCNPX was used to calculate the radiation dose from streamed neutrons and photons through the beam duct. For the secondary photon production calculation, cross sections for several actinides were substituted with plutonium because of the lack of gamma production cross section. From the results of this analysis, the neutron dose from the beam duct is seen to be about 20 orders higher than that of the bulk shield. The magnets and shield plug are heavily irradiated by streaming neutrons according to the DCHAIN-SP analysis.

  3. Open Rotor Tone Shielding Methods for System Noise Assessments Using Multiple Databases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahr, Christopher J.; Thomas, Russell H.; Lopes, Leonard V.; Burley, Casey L.; Van Zante, Dale E.

    2014-01-01

    Advanced aircraft designs such as the hybrid wing body, in conjunction with open rotor engines, may allow for significant improvements in the environmental impact of aviation. System noise assessments allow for the prediction of the aircraft noise of such designs while they are still in the conceptual phase. Due to significant requirements of computational methods, these predictions still rely on experimental data to account for the interaction of the open rotor tones with the hybrid wing body airframe. Recently, multiple aircraft system noise assessments have been conducted for hybrid wing body designs with open rotor engines. These assessments utilized measured benchmark data from a Propulsion Airframe Aeroacoustic interaction effects test. The measured data demonstrated airframe shielding of open rotor tonal and broadband noise with legacy F7/A7 open rotor blades. Two methods are proposed for improving the use of these data on general open rotor designs in a system noise assessment. The first, direct difference, is a simple octave band subtraction which does not account for tone distribution within the rotor acoustic signal. The second, tone matching, is a higher-fidelity process incorporating additional physical aspects of the problem, where isolated rotor tones are matched by their directivity to determine tone-by-tone shielding. A case study is conducted with the two methods to assess how well each reproduces the measured data and identify the merits of each. Both methods perform similarly for system level results and successfully approach the experimental data for the case study. The tone matching method provides additional tools for assessing the quality of the match to the data set. Additionally, a potential path to improve the tone matching method is provided.

  4. Recommended Design and Analysis Procedures for Suppressive Shield Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-03-16

    By use of Green’s theorem (reference 12), Equations (83) and T84) can be written N = f9R axdz M = faR uxzdz 12. Courant, R. and Hilbert, D., Methods of Mathematical Physics , Volume...R. and Hilbert, D., Methods of Mathematical Physics , Volume 1, Interscience Publishers, Inc., (1966). 13. Symonds, P. S. and Mentel, T. S

  5. Design and Analysis of the Aperture Shield Assembly for a Space Solar Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strumpf, Hal J.; Trinh, Tuan; Westelaken, William; Krystkowiak, Christopher; Avanessian, Vahe; Kerslake, Thomas W.

    1997-01-01

    A joint U.S./Russia program has been conducted to design, develop, fabricate, launch, and operate the world's first space solar dynamic power system on the Russian Space Station Mir. The goal of the program was to demonstrate and confirm that solar dynamic power systems are viable for future space applications such as the International Space Station (ISS). The major components of the system include a solar receiver, a closed Brayton cycle power conversion unit, a power conditioning and control unit, a solar concentrator, a radiator, a thermal control system, and a Space Shuttle carrier. Unfortunately, the mission was demanifested from the ISS Phase 1 Space Shuttle Program in 1996. However, NASA Lewis is proposing to use the fabricated flight hardware as part of an all-American flight demonstration on the ISS in 2002. The present paper concerns the design and analysis of the solar receiver aperture shield assembly. The aperture shield assembly comprises the front face of the cylindrical receiver and is located at the focal plane of the solar concentrator. The aperture shield assembly is a critical component that protects the solar receiver structure from highly concentrated solar fluxes during concentrator off-pointing events. A full-size aperture shield assembly was fabricated. This unit was essentially identical to the flight configuration, with the exception of materials substitution. In addition, a thermal shock test aperture shield assembly was fabricated. This test article utilized the flight materials and was used for high-flux testing in the solar simulator test rig at NASA Lewis. This testing is described in a companion paper.

  6. A coupled radiation transport-thermal analysis of the radiation shield for an SP-100 type reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barattino, William J.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.; McDaniel, Patrick J.

    A coupled radiation transport-thermal analysis of the radiation shield for an SP-100 reactor was performed using finite element codes developed at the University of New Mexico and Sandia National Laboratories. For a fast reactor operating at 1.66 MWt, the energy deposited and resulting temperature distribution were determined for a shield consisting of tungsten and lithium hydride pressed into a stainless steel honeycomb matrix. While temperature feedback was shown to have a minor effect on energy deposition, the shielding configuration was found to have a major influence in meeting thermal requirements of the lithium hydride. It was shown that a shield optimized only for radiation protection will fail because of LiH melting. However, with minor modifications in the shield layering and material selection, the thermal integrity of the shield can be preserved. A shield design of graphite, depleted lithium hydride, tungsten, and natural lithium hydride was shown to satisfy neutron and gamma fluence requirements, and maximum temperature limits, and to minimize cracking in the LiH portion of the shield.

  7. Theoretical analysis of the density within an orbiting molecular shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hueser, J. E.; Brock, F. J.

    1976-01-01

    An analytical model based on the kinetic theory of a drifting Maxwellian gas is used to determine the nonequilibrium molecular density distribution within a hemispherical shell open aft with its axis parallel to its velocity. Separate numerical results are presented for the primary and secondary density distribution components due to the drifting Maxwellian gas for speed ratios between 2.5 and 10. An analysis is also made of the density component due to gas desorbed from the wall of the hemisphere, and numerical results are presented for the density distribution. It is shown that the adsorption process may be completely ignored. The results are applicable to orbital trajectories in any planet-atmosphere system and interplanetary transfer trajectories. Application to the earth's atmosphere is mentioned briefly.

  8. N-SAP and G-SAP neutron and gamma ray albedo model scatter shield analysis program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sapovchak, B. J.; Stephenson, L. D.

    1967-01-01

    Computer program calculates neutron or gamma ray first order scattering from a plane or cylindrical surface to a detector point. The SAP Codes, G-SAP and N-SAP, constitute a multiple scatter albedo model shield analysis.

  9. JASPER [Japanese-American Shielding Program of Experimental Research], USDOE/PNC shielding research program: Analysis of the JASPER fission gas plenum experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, C.O.

    1990-05-01

    The results of the analysis of the Fission Gas Plenum Experiment are presented. This experiment is the second in a series of several experiments comprising a joint US DOE-Japan PNC Shielding Research Program (JASPER). The four Fission Gas Plenum Experiment configurations, designed for the measurement of neutron streaming through the fission gas plenum region, were analyzed using Monte Carlo and two-dimensional discrete ordinated methods. Calculated results compared well with measured results in many cases, although results were consistently underpredicted for the shorter plenum configurations. Like the measured data, the calculated results indicated no significant streaming when results from the heterogeneous mockups were compared to those from the homogeneous mockups. An explanation is given as to why little streaming was observed. The Hornyak button dose rates were overpredicted because of a normalization problem with the response function but yielded horizontal traverse curves whose shapes agreed well with the measured shapes to the same extent as did those for the other integral detectors. 16 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. A radiation emission shielding method for high intensity focus ultrasound probes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Shen, Guofeng; Chen, Yazhu

    2015-01-01

    Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) is a key issue in the design and development of safe and effective medical instruments. The treatment probes of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) systems not only receive and transmit electromagnetic waves, but also radiate ultrasound waves, resulting in electromagnetic coupling. In this paper, an electromagnetic shielding method involving the enclosure of the probe in a copper wire mesh was introduced. First, sound pressure distribution simulations and measurements were performed using a hydrophone in order to evaluate the effects of the wire mesh on the acoustic performance of the HIFU system. The results indicated that the wire mesh did not disturb the normalized sound pressure field. In addition, the attenuation of the maximum pressure in the focal plane was equal to 6.2%. Then, the electronic emission level was tested in a chamber. After the implementation of the wire mesh, the 10-100 MHz frequency band radiation was suppressed, and the HIFU system satisfied the national EMC standards.

  11. Influence of PEEK Coating on Hip Implant Stress Shielding: A Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Anguiano-Sanchez, Jesica; Martinez-Romero, Oscar; Siller, Hector R.; Diaz-Elizondo, Jose A.; Flores-Villalba, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Stress shielding is a well-known failure factor in hip implants. This work proposes a design concept for hip implants, using a combination of metallic stem with a polymer coating (polyether ether ketone (PEEK)). The proposed design concept is simulated using titanium alloy stems and PEEK coatings with thicknesses varying from 100 to 400 μm. The Finite Element analysis of the cancellous bone surrounding the implant shows promising results. The effective von Mises stress increases between 81 and 92% for the complete volume of cancellous bone. When focusing on the proximal zone of the implant, the increased stress transmission to the cancellous bone reaches between 47 and 60%. This increment in load transferred to the bone can influence mineral bone loss due to stress shielding, minimizing such effect, and thus prolonging implant lifespan. PMID:27051460

  12. Thermal and stress analysis of the Faraday shield for the ORNL/TFTR rf antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Hammonds, C.J.; Nelson, B.E.; Walls, J.C.; Hoffman, D.J.; Baity, F.W.

    1989-01-01

    The rf antenna designed and built by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is an ion cyclotron resonance heating antenna operating in the 40- to 80-MHz frequency range with a power output of 4 MW for a 2-s pulse. The antenna was delivered to Princeton in November 1987. A review of the antenna design began in early 1988 to ensure compatibility with D-T operation of TFTR. Owing to the serious consequences of a water leak during D-T operation and to other concerns, it was concluded that the Faraday shield of the antenna should be rebuilt. In addition, because of increased heat loads and more stringent acceptance criteria, a new thermal and stress analysis of the shield was authorized. 1 ref., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Tests of a novel method to assay SNM using polarized photofission and its sensitivity in the presence of shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, J. M.; Ahmed, M. W.; Kafkarkou, A.; Kendellen, D. P.; Sikora, M. H.; Spraker, M. C.; Weller, H. R.; Zimmerman, W. R.

    2015-03-01

    A novel method to identify Special Nuclear Material was recently developed (Mueller et al., 2014) [1]. This method relies upon using a linearly polarized γ-ray beam to induce photofission of a sample and then comparing the prompt fission neutron yields in and out of the plane of beam polarization. The present paper will describe experimental tests of this new technique and assess its sensitivity in the presence of shielding. The capability of this technique to measure the enrichment of uranium was tested by using combinations of thin 235U and 238U foils of known enrichments. The sensitivity of this assay to shielding by lead, steel, and polyethylene was experimentally measured and simulated using GEANT4. These tests show that the measured asymmetry can indeed be used to determine the enrichment of materials composed of an admixture of 235U and 238U, and this asymmetry is relatively insensitive to moderate amounts of shielding.

  14. Structural Analysis of Thermal Shields During a Quench of a Torus Magnet for the 12 GeV Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Pastor, Orlando; Willard, Thomas; Ghoshal, Probir K.; Kashy, David H.; Wiseman, Mark A.; Kashikhin, V.; Young, Glenn R.; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Rode, Claus H.

    2015-06-01

    A toroidal magnet system consisting of six superconducting coils is being built for the Jefferson Lab 12- GeV accelerator upgrade project. This paper details the analysis of eddy current effects during a quench event on the aluminum thermal shield. The shield has been analyzed for mechanical stresses induced as a result of a coil quench as well as a fast discharge of the complete magnet system. The shield has been designed to reduce the eddy current effects and result in stresses within allowable limits.

  15. Thermal neutron self-shielding correction factors for large sample instrumental neutron activation analysis using the MCNP code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzika, F.; Stamatelatos, I. E.

    2004-01-01

    Thermal neutron self-shielding within large samples was studied using the Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNP. The code enabled a three-dimensional modeling of the actual source and geometry configuration including reactor core, graphite pile and sample. Neutron flux self-shielding correction factors derived for a set of materials of interest for large sample neutron activation analysis are presented and evaluated. Simulations were experimentally verified by measurements performed using activation foils. The results of this study can be applied in order to determine neutron self-shielding factors of unknown samples from the thermal neutron fluxes measured at the surface of the sample.

  16. Design and analysis of a personnel blast shield for different explosives applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano, Eduardo

    The use of explosives brings countless benefits to our everyday lives in areas such as mining, oil and gas exploration, demolition, and avalanche control. However, because of the potential destructive power of explosives, strict safety procedures must be an integral part of any explosives operation. The goal of this work is to provide a solution to protect against the hazards that accompany the general use of explosives, specifically in avalanche control. For this reason, a blast shield was designed and tested to protect the Colorado Department of Transportation personnel against these unpredictable effects. This document will develop a complete analysis to answer the following questions: what are the potential hazards from the detonation of high explosives, what are their effects, and how can we protect ourselves against them. To answer these questions theoretical, analytical, and numerical calculations were performed. Finally, a full blast shield prototype was tested under different simulated operational environments proving its effectiveness as safety device. The Colorado Department of Transportation currently owns more than fifteen shields that are used during every operation involving explosive materials.

  17. Measuring edge importance: a quantitative analysis of the stochastic shielding approximation for random processes on graphs.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Deena R; Thomas, Peter J

    2014-04-17

    Mathematical models of cellular physiological mechanisms often involve random walks on graphs representing transitions within networks of functional states. Schmandt and Galán recently introduced a novel stochastic shielding approximation as a fast, accurate method for generating approximate sample paths from a finite state Markov process in which only a subset of states are observable. For example, in ion-channel models, such as the Hodgkin-Huxley or other conductance-based neural models, a nerve cell has a population of ion channels whose states comprise the nodes of a graph, only some of which allow a transmembrane current to pass. The stochastic shielding approximation consists of neglecting fluctuations in the dynamics associated with edges in the graph not directly affecting the observable states. We consider the problem of finding the optimal complexity reducing mapping from a stochastic process on a graph to an approximate process on a smaller sample space, as determined by the choice of a particular linear measurement functional on the graph. The partitioning of ion-channel states into conducting versus nonconducting states provides a case in point. In addition to establishing that Schmandt and Galán's approximation is in fact optimal in a specific sense, we use recent results from random matrix theory to provide heuristic error estimates for the accuracy of the stochastic shielding approximation for an ensemble of random graphs. Moreover, we provide a novel quantitative measure of the contribution of individual transitions within the reaction graph to the accuracy of the approximate process.

  18. An anticoincidence-shielded gamma-ray spectrometer for analysis of low level environmental radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Byun, Jong In; Choi, Yun Ho; Kwak, Seung Im; Hwang, Han-Yull; Chung, Kun-Ho; Choi, Geun Sik; Park, Doo-Won; Lee, Chang Woo

    2003-05-01

    We developed an ultralow-level background gamma-ray spectrometer, using active and passive shield devices at the same time. Cosmic-ray-induced background is suppressed by means of active shield devices consisting of plastic scintillating plates of 50mm thick and anti-coincidence electronic system. The observed background rate was 0.34 s(-1) (=0.12s(-1) per 100 cm(3) Ge volume) for energy regions between 50 and 3000 ke V. The detection efficiency curve for 10(3)ml Marinelli beaker samples is obtained over all the energy regions. The advantages of the method are demonstrated by measuring the activity of 137Cs in powdered milk sample prepared without taking any chemical procedure. The MDA for 137Cs is estimated to be (17+/-1.7)mBq at a confidence level of 95% and it is about a factor of 10 lower than the MDA obtained from the previous cryostat assembly with 10-cm thick lead shielding.

  19. Double-layer rotor magnetic shield performance analysis in high temperature superconducting synchronous generators under short circuit fault conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hekmati, Arsalan; Aliahmadi, Mehdi

    2016-12-01

    High temperature superconducting, HTS, synchronous machines benefit from a rotor magnetic shield in order to protect superconducting coils against asynchronous magnetic fields. This magnetic shield, however, suffers from exerted Lorentz forces generated in light of induced eddy currents during transient conditions, e.g. stator windings short-circuit fault. In addition, to the exerted electromagnetic forces, eddy current losses and the associated effects on the cryogenic system are the other consequences of shielding HTS coils. This study aims at investigating the Rotor Magnetic Shield, RMS, performance in HTS synchronous generators under stator winding short-circuit fault conditions. The induced eddy currents in different circumferential positions of the rotor magnetic shield along with associated Joule heating losses would be studied using 2-D time-stepping Finite Element Analysis, FEA. The investigation of Lorentz forces exerted on the magnetic shield during transient conditions has also been performed in this paper. The obtained results show that double line-to-ground fault is of the most importance among different types of short-circuit faults. It was revealed that when it comes to the design of the rotor magnetic shields, in addition to the eddy current distribution and the associated ohmic losses, two phase-to-ground fault should be taken into account since the produced electromagnetic forces in the time of fault conditions are more severe during double line-to-ground fault.

  20. Evaluation of a method to shield a welding electron beam from magnetic interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    It is known that electron beams are easily deflected by magnetic and electrostatic fields. Therefore, to prevent weld defects, stray electromagnetic fields are avoided in electron beam welding chambers if at all possible. The successful results of tests conducted at MSFC to evaluate a simple magnetic shield made from steel tubing are reported. Tests indicate that this shield was up to 85 percent effective in reducing magnetic effects on the electron beam of a welding machine. In addition, residual magnetic fields within the shield were so nearly uniform that the net effect on the beam alignment was negligible. It is concluded that the shield, with the addition of a tungsten liner, could be used in production welding.

  1. Radiation Shielding for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caffrey, Jarvis A.

    2016-01-01

    Design and analysis of radiation shielding for nuclear thermal propulsion has continued at Marshall Space Flight Center. A set of optimization tools are in development, and strategies for shielding optimization will be discussed. Considerations for the concurrent design of internal and external shielding are likely required for a mass optimal shield design. The task of reducing radiation dose to crew from a nuclear engine is considered to be less challenging than the task of thermal mitigation for cryogenic propellant, especially considering the likely implementation of additional crew shielding for protection from solar particles and cosmic rays. Further consideration is thus made for the thermal effects of radiation absorption in cryogenic propellant. Materials challenges and possible methods of manufacturing are also discussed.

  2. Analysis of Doppler Lidar Data Acquired During the Pentagon Shield Field Campaign

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    two coherent Doppler lidars deployed during the Pentagon Shield field campaign are analyzed in conjunction with other sensors to characterize the...Observations from two coherent Doppler lidars deployed during the Pentagon Shield field campaign are analyzed in conjunction with other sensors to... coherent Doppler lidars deployed during the Pentagon Shield field campaign are analyzed in conjunction with other sensors to characterize the overall

  3. Measuring Edge Importance: A Quantitative Analysis of the Stochastic Shielding Approximation for Random Processes on Graphs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical models of cellular physiological mechanisms often involve random walks on graphs representing transitions within networks of functional states. Schmandt and Galán recently introduced a novel stochastic shielding approximation as a fast, accurate method for generating approximate sample paths from a finite state Markov process in which only a subset of states are observable. For example, in ion-channel models, such as the Hodgkin–Huxley or other conductance-based neural models, a nerve cell has a population of ion channels whose states comprise the nodes of a graph, only some of which allow a transmembrane current to pass. The stochastic shielding approximation consists of neglecting fluctuations in the dynamics associated with edges in the graph not directly affecting the observable states. We consider the problem of finding the optimal complexity reducing mapping from a stochastic process on a graph to an approximate process on a smaller sample space, as determined by the choice of a particular linear measurement functional on the graph. The partitioning of ion-channel states into conducting versus nonconducting states provides a case in point. In addition to establishing that Schmandt and Galán’s approximation is in fact optimal in a specific sense, we use recent results from random matrix theory to provide heuristic error estimates for the accuracy of the stochastic shielding approximation for an ensemble of random graphs. Moreover, we provide a novel quantitative measure of the contribution of individual transitions within the reaction graph to the accuracy of the approximate process. PMID:24742077

  4. Analysis for Radiation and Shielding Dose in Plasma Focus Neutron Source Using FLUKA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemati, M. J.; Amrollahi, R.; Habibi, M.

    2012-06-01

    Monte Carlo simulations have been performed for the attenuation of neutron radiation produced at Plasma focus (PF) devices through various shielding design. At the test site it will be fired with deuterium and tritium (D-T) fusion resulting in a yield of about 1013 fusion neutrons of 14 MeV. This poses a radiological hazard to scientists and personnel operating the device. The goal of this paper was to evaluate various shielding options under consideration for the PF operating with D-T fusion. Shields of varying neutrons-shielding effectiveness were investigated using concrete, polyethylene, paraffin and borated materials. The most effective shield, a labyrinth structure, allowed almost 1,176 shots per year while keeping personnel under 20 mSV of dose. The most expensive shield that used, square shield with 100 cm concrete thickness on the walls and Borated paraffin along with borated polyethylene added outside the concrete allowed almost 15,000 shot per year.

  5. Heat Shielding: A Novel Method of Colonial Thermoregulation in Honey Bees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starks, Philip T.; Gilley, David C.

    Honey bees, Apis mellifera, maintain constant colony temperatures throughout the year. Honey bees fan their wings to cool the colony, and often spread fluid in conjunction with this behavior to induce evaporative cooling. We present an additional, previously undescribed mechanism used by the honey bee to maintain constant colony temperature in response to localized temperature increases. Worker bees shield the comb from external heat sources by positioning themselves on hot interior regions of the hive's walls. Although honey comb and brood comb were both shielded, the temperature-sensitive brood received a greater number of heat shielders and was thus better protected from overheating. Heat shielding appears to be a context-dependent adaptive behavior performed by worker bees who would previously have been considered "unemployed."

  6. SU-E-T-569: Neutron Shielding Calculation Using Analytical and Multi-Monte Carlo Method for Proton Therapy Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, S; Shin, E H; Kim, J; Ahn, S H; Chung, K; Kim, D-H; Han, Y; Choi, D H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the shielding wall design to protect patients, staff and member of the general public for secondary neutron using a simply analytic solution, multi-Monte Carlo code MCNPX, ANISN and FLUKA. Methods: An analytical and multi-Monte Carlo method were calculated for proton facility (Sumitomo Heavy Industry Ltd.) at Samsung Medical Center in Korea. The NCRP-144 analytical evaluation methods, which produced conservative estimates on the dose equivalent values for the shielding, were used for analytical evaluations. Then, the radiation transport was simulated with the multi-Monte Carlo code. The neutron dose at evaluation point is got by the value using the production of the simulation value and the neutron dose coefficient introduced in ICRP-74. Results: The evaluation points of accelerator control room and control room entrance are mainly influenced by the point of the proton beam loss. So the neutron dose equivalent of accelerator control room for evaluation point is 0.651, 1.530, 0.912, 0.943 mSv/yr and the entrance of cyclotron room is 0.465, 0.790, 0.522, 0.453 mSv/yr with calculation by the method of NCRP-144 formalism, ANISN, FLUKA and MCNP, respectively. The most of Result of MCNPX and FLUKA using the complicated geometry showed smaller values than Result of ANISN. Conclusion: The neutron shielding for a proton therapy facility has been evaluated by the analytic model and multi-Monte Carlo methods. We confirmed that the setting of shielding was located in well accessible area to people when the proton facility is operated.

  7. Flexible Multi-Shock Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L. (Inventor); Crews, Jeanne L. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Flexible multi-shock shield system and method are disclosed for defending against hypervelocity particles. The flexible multi-shock shield system and method may include a number of flexible bumpers or shield layers spaced apart by one or more resilient support layers, all of which may be encapsulated in a protective cover. Fasteners associated with the protective cover allow the flexible multi-shock shield to be secured to the surface of a structure to be protected.

  8. Preparation of flower-like CuS by solvothermal method for photocatalytic, UV protection and EMI shielding applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiao-Sai; Shen, Yong; Xu, Li-Hui; Wang, Li-Ming; Lu, Li-sha; Zhang, Ya-ting

    2016-11-01

    The flower-like CuS hierarchical structures were synthesized by solvothermal method. The as-prepared products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared(FTIR) spectroscopy, UV-vis optical absorption spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The results demonstrated that the as-prepared flower-like CuS with the diameter of 1-5 um was pure hexagonal phase CuS and had well-defined flower-like structures. (1) The as-prepared CuS was proved to possess high photocatalytic performance with band gap of 1.45 eV. The degradation rate of Methylene blue (MB) was up to, 98.26%, 100% after 30 min under UV and visible irradiation. (2)The UPF of cotton fabric treated with CuS reached up to 174 compared with the original untreated fabric with the UPF 20.62. (3) The electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness (EMI SE) of CuS coating was up to 27-31 dB when the content of CuS increased to 28.6%wt in the frequency of 300 KHz-3 GHz. Furthermore, the influence of reaction conditions on the morphology of the as-prepared CuS was investigated systematically and the possible formation mechanism of the CuS hierarchical structure was also proposed.

  9. Radiation engineering analysis of shielding materials to assess their ability to protect astronauts in deep space from energetic particle radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singleterry, R. C.

    2013-10-01

    An analysis is performed on four typical materials (aluminum, liquid hydrogen, polyethylene, and water) to assess their impact on the length of time an astronaut can stay in deep space and not exceed a design basis radiation exposure of 150 mSv. A large number of heavy lift launches of pure shielding mass are needed to enable long duration, deep space missions to keep astronauts at or below the exposure value with shielding provided by the vehicle. Therefore, vehicle mass using the assumptions in the paper cannot be the sole shielding mechanism for long duration, deep space missions. As an example, to enable the Mars Design Reference Mission 5.0 with a 400 day transit to and from Mars, not including the 500 day stay on the surface, a minimum of 24 heavy lift launches of polyethylene at 89,375 lbm (40.54 tonnes) each are needed for the 1977 galactic cosmic ray environment. With the assumptions used in this paper, a single heavy lift launch of water or polyethylene can protect astronauts for a 130 day mission before exceeding the exposure value. Liquid hydrogen can only protect the astronauts for 160 days. Even a single launch of pure shielding material cannot protect an astronaut in deep space for more than 180 days using the assumptions adopted in the analysis. It is shown that liquid hydrogen is not the best shielding material for the same mass as polyethylene for missions that last longer than 225 days.

  10. Flow distribution analysis on the cooling tube network of ITER thermal shield

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Kwanwoo; Chung, Wooho; Noh, Chang Hyun; Kang, Dong Kwon; Kang, Kyoung-O; Ahn, Hee Jae; Lee, Hyeon Gon

    2014-01-29

    Thermal shield (TS) is to be installed between the vacuum vessel or the cryostat and the magnets in ITER tokamak to reduce the thermal radiation load to the magnets operating at 4.2K. The TS is cooled by pressurized helium gas at the inlet temperature of 80K. The cooling tube is welded on the TS panel surface and the composed flow network of the TS cooling tubes is complex. The flow rate in each panel should be matched to the thermal design value for effective radiation shielding. This paper presents one dimensional analysis on the flow distribution of cooling tube network for the ITER TS. The hydraulic cooling tube network is modeled by an electrical analogy. Only the cooling tube on the TS surface and its connecting pipe from the manifold are considered in the analysis model. Considering the frictional factor and the local loss in the cooling tube, the hydraulic resistance is expressed as a linear function with respect to mass flow rate. Sub-circuits in the TS are analyzed separately because each circuit is controlled by its own control valve independently. It is found that flow rates in some panels are insufficient compared with the design values. In order to improve the flow distribution, two kinds of design modifications are proposed. The first one is to connect the tubes of the adjacent panels. This will increase the resistance of the tube on the panel where the flow rate is excessive. The other design suggestion is that an orifice is installed at the exit of tube routing where the flow rate is to be reduced. The analysis for the design suggestions shows that the flow mal-distribution is improved significantly.

  11. Hypervelocity Impact Analysis of International Space Station Whipple and Enhanced Stuffed Whipple Shields

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) must be able to withstand the hypervelocity impacts of micrometeoroids and orbital debris that strike its many... orbital debris and micrometeoroid environment. Based upon this environment, special multi-stage shields called Whipple and Enhanced Stuffed Whipple Shields...thesis is to provide the Department of Defense a background in satellite shield theory and design in order to improve protection against micrometeoroid and orbital debris impacts on future space-based national systems.

  12. Structural Design and Thermal Analysis for Thermal Shields of the MICE Coupling Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.; Pan, Heng; Liu, X. K.; Wang, Li; Wu, Hong; Chen, A. B.; Guo, X.L.

    2009-07-01

    A superconducting coupling magnet made from copper matrix NbTi conductors operating at 4 K will be used in the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) to produce up to 2.6 T on the magnet centerline to keep the muon beam within the thin RF cavity indows. The coupling magnet is to be cooled by two cryocoolers with a total cooling capacity of 3 W at 4.2 K. In order to keep a certain operating temperature margin, the most important is to reduce the heat leakage imposed on cold surfaces of coil cold mass assembly. An ntermediate temperature shield system placed between the coupling coil and warm vacuum chamber is adopted. The shield system consists of upper neck shield, main shields, flexible connections and eight supports, which is to be cooled by the first stage cold heads of two ryocoolers with cooling capacity of 55 W at 60 K each. The maximum temperature difference on the shields should be less than 20 K, so the thermal analyses for the shields with different thicknesses, materials, flexible connections for shields' cooling and structure design for heir supports were carried out. 1100 Al is finally adopted and the maximum temperature difference is around 15 K with 4 mm shield thickness. The paper is to present detailed analyses on the shield system design.

  13. Structural Design and Thermal Analysis for Thermal Shields of the Mice Coupling Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, H.; Liu, X. K.; Wang, L.; Guo, X. L.; Wu, H.; Chen, A. B.; Green, M. A.

    2010-04-01

    A superconducting coupling magnet made from copper matrix NbTi conductors operating at 4 K will be used in the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) to produce up to 2.6 T on the magnet centerline to keep the muon beam within the thin RF cavity windows. The coupling magnet is to be cooled by two cryocoolers with a total cooling capacity of 3 W at 4.2 K. In order to keep a certain operating temperature margin, the most important is to reduce the heat leakage imposed on cold surfaces of coil cold mass assembly. An intermediate temperature shield system placed between the coupling coil and warm vacuum chamber is adopted. The shield system consists of upper neck shield, main shields, flexible connections and eight supports, which is to be cooled by the first stage cold heads of two cryocoolers with cooling capacity of 55 W at 60 K each. The maximum temperature difference on the shields should be less than 20 K, so the thermal analyses for the shields with different thicknesses, materials, flexible connections for shields' cooling and structure design for their supports were carried out. 1100 Al is finally adopted and the maximum temperature difference is around 15 K with 4 mm shield thickness. The paper is to present detailed analyses on the shield system design.

  14. Crustal properties in the continuum Baltic Shield-Scandinavian Mountains from seismic ambient noise and magnetotelluric analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Mansour, Walid; England, Richard W.; Fishwick, Stewart; Köhler, Andreas; Moorkamp, Max; Ottemøller, Lars; Smirnov, Maxim

    2016-04-01

    The Scandinavian passive margin is a good example of a region where a Precambrian shield is directly in contact with a younger mountain belt. Located along the Atlantic coast, the Scandinavian mountains, formed 440 Ma ago, show high peaks (> 1 km from the sea level) due to an uplift event 12 Ma ago. This topography contrasts strongly with the low topography of the Baltic shield (around 500 m from the sea level). If the mountain shows high topography compared to the shield, P-receiver functions analysis indicates that the Moho is deeper beneath the shield than beneath the orogenic belt. This result is surprising, as simple crustal isostasy would produce the opposite result. It is therefore likely that there is further variation in crustal and lithospheric properties between the shield and the mountain belt. In this perspective, several geophysical experiments (SCANLIPS2, POLENET-LAPNET, SCANLIPS3D, Norwegian National Seismic Network) have been deployed in the region in order to better understand the lateral variation in the crustal properties. From these different seismic arrays, we used the technique of ambient noise cross correlation in order to reconstruct the Rayleigh wave Green's function (R-R and Z-Z components) and produced a new Vs model of the upper crust in the transition between the Scandinavian mountains and Baltic Shield. In addition of this study, a magnetotelluric survey was done in the framework of MaSCa (MAgnetotellurics in the SCandes) project between 2011 and 2013 in the same area of broadband seismic network (Northern Scandinavia Mountains and the Baltic Shield). This project shows higher resistivity in the crust beneath the Baltic shield than beneath the orogenic belt. The results of this study are used in a joint inversion with seismic ambient noise in order to improve existing models. We used the multi objective genetic algorithms (GA) to inverse in the same time seismological data (receiver functions and dispersion curves from seismic ambient

  15. Shielding analysis of the TRUPACT-series casks for transportation of Hanford HLW

    SciTech Connect

    Banjac, V.; Sanchez, P.E.; Hills, C.R.; Heger, A.S. )

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, the authors propose the possibility of utilizing the TRUPACT-series casks for the transportation of high-level waste (HLW) from the Hanford reservation. The configurations of the TRUPACT series are a rectangular parallelepiped and a right circular cylinder, which are the TRUPACT-1 and -11, respectively. The TRUPACT series was designed as a type B contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste transportation system for use in Waste Isolation Pilot Plant-related operations and was subjected to type B container accident tests, which it successfully passed. Thus from a safety standpoint, the TRUPACT series is provided with double containment, impact limitation, and fire-retardant capabilities. However, the shielding analysis has shown the major modifications are required to allow for the transport of even a reasonable fraction of Hanford HLW.

  16. UCF WASTE PACKAGE SHIELDING ANALYSIS/2-D DORT (SCPB: N/A)

    SciTech Connect

    D.J. Skulina

    1996-01-18

    This analysis is prepared by the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) Waste Package Development Department (WPDD) to determine the dose rates from the UCF waste packages to be used by the EBS and other repository systems to incorporate ALARA practices in the overall repository design in compliance with the goals of the Waste Package Implementation Plan for conceptual design. These design calculations are performed in sufficient detail to provide a comprehensive comparison base with other design alternatives. The objectives of this evaluation are (1) to show the dose rate as a function of distance from the waste package surface and (2) to provide the shielding thicknesses required for the waste package transporter to meet a 10 mr/hr target dose rate at 2 meters from the transporter surface.

  17. Self-shielding flex-circuit drift tube, drift tube assembly and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Jones, David Alexander

    2016-04-26

    The present disclosure is directed to an ion mobility drift tube fabricated using flex-circuit technology in which every other drift electrode is on a different layer of the flex-circuit and each drift electrode partially overlaps the adjacent electrodes on the other layer. This results in a self-shielding effect where the drift electrodes themselves shield the interior of the drift tube from unwanted electro-magnetic noise. In addition, this drift tube can be manufactured with an integral flex-heater for temperature control. This design will significantly improve the noise immunity, size, weight, and power requirements of hand-held ion mobility systems such as those used for explosive detection.

  18. Calculations of atomic magnetic nuclear shielding constants based on the two-component normalized elimination of the small component method.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Terutaka; Zou, Wenli; Cremer, Dieter

    2017-04-07

    A new method for calculating nuclear magnetic resonance shielding constants of relativistic atoms based on the two-component (2c), spin-orbit coupling including Dirac-exact NESC (Normalized Elimination of the Small Component) approach is developed where each term of the diamagnetic and paramagnetic contribution to the isotropic shielding constant σiso is expressed in terms of analytical energy derivatives with regard to the magnetic field B and the nuclear magnetic moment . The picture change caused by renormalization of the wave function is correctly described. 2c-NESC/HF (Hartree-Fock) results for the σiso values of 13 atoms with a closed shell ground state reveal a deviation from 4c-DHF (Dirac-HF) values by 0.01%-0.76%. Since the 2-electron part is effectively calculated using a modified screened nuclear shielding approach, the calculation is efficient and based on a series of matrix manipulations scaling with (2M)(3) (M: number of basis functions).

  19. An Analysis of Ablation-Shield Requirements for Manned Reentry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Leonard

    1960-01-01

    The problem of sublimation of material and accumulation of heat in an ablation shield is analyzed and the results are applied to the reentry of manned vehicles into the earth's atmosphere. The parameters which control the amount of sublimation and the temperature distribution within the ablation shield are determined and presented in a manner useful for engineering calculation. It is shown that the total mass loss from the shield during reentry and the insulation requirements may be given very simply in terms of the maximum deceleration of the vehicle or the total reentry time.

  20. Dual Optimization Method of RF and Quasi-Static Field Simulations for Reduction of Eddy Currents Generated on 7T RF Coil Shielding

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yujuan; Zhao, Tiejun; Raval, Shailesh B.; Krishnamurthy, Narayanan; Zheng, Hai; Harris, Chad T.; Handler, William B.; Chronik, Blaine A.; Ibrahim, Tamer S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To optimize the design of radiofrequency (RF) shielding of transmit coils at 7T and reduce eddy currents generated on the RF shielding when imaging with rapid gradient waveforms. Methods One set of a four-element, 2×2 Tic-Tac-Toe (TTT) head coil structure is selected and constructed to study eddy currents on the RF coil shielding. The generated eddy currents are quantitatively studied in the time and frequency domains. The RF characteristics are studied using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. Five different kinds of RF shielding were tested on a 7T MRI scanner with phantoms and in-vivo human subjects. Results The eddy current simulation method is verified by the measurement results. Eddy currents induced by solid/intact and simple-structured slotted RF shielding can significantly distort the gradient fields. EPI images, B1+ maps and S matrix measurements verified that the proposed slot pattern can suppress the eddy currents while maintaining the RF characteristics of the transmit coil. Conclusion The presented dual-optimization method could be used to design the RF shielding and reduce the gradient field-induced eddy currents while maintaining the RF characteristics of the transmit coil. PMID:25367703

  1. Modular shield

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Keith W.

    2002-01-01

    A modular system for containing projectiles has a sheet of material including at least a polycarbonate layer held by a metal frame having a straight frame member corresponding to each straight edge of the sheet. Each frame member has a U-shaped shield channel covering and holding a straight edge of the sheet and an adjacent U-shaped clamp channel rigidly held against the shield channel. A flexible gasket separates each sheet edge from its respective shield channel; and each frame member is fastened to each adjacent frame member only by clamps extending between adjacent clamp channels.

  2. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of N Reactor graphite and shield cooling system performance

    SciTech Connect

    Low, J.O.; Schmitt, B.E.

    1988-02-01

    A series of bounding (worst-case) calculations were performed using a detailed hydrodynamic RELAP5 model of the N Reactor graphite and shield cooling system (GSCS). These calculations were specifically aimed to answer issues raised by the Westinghouse Independent Safety Review (WISR) committee. These questions address the operability of the GSCS during a worst-case degraded-core accident that requires the GDCS to mitigate the consequences of the accident. An accident scenario previously developed was designed as the hydrogen-mitigation design-basis accident (HMDBA). Previous HMDBA heat transfer analysis,, using the TRUMP-BD code, was used to define the thermal boundary conditions that the GSDS may be exposed to. These TRUMP/HMDBA analysis results were used to define the bounding operating conditions of the GSCS during the course of an HMDBA transient. Nominal and degraded GSCS scenarios were investigated using RELAP5 within or at the bounds of the HMDBA transient. 10 refs., 42 figs., 10 tabs.

  3. Magnetic Shield for Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chui, Talso C.; Haddad, Nicolas E.

    2013-01-01

    A new method was developed for creating a less expensive shield for ADRs using 1018 carbon steel. This shield has been designed to have similar performance to the expensive vanadium permendur shields, but the cost is 30 to 50% less. Also, these shields can be stocked in a variety of sizes, eliminating the need for special forgings, which also greatly reduces cost.

  4. Analysis of Shuttle Multispecral Infrared Radiometer measurements of the western Saudi Arabian shield.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowan, L.C.; Goetz, A.F.H.; Abbott, E.

    1987-01-01

    During the November 12-14, 1981 mission of the space shuttle Columbia, the Shuttle Multispectral Infrared Radiometer (SMIRR) recorded radiances in 10 channels along a 100m wide groundtrack across the western Saudi Arabian shield.-from Authors

  5. Analysis of low-dose radiation shield effectiveness of multi-gate polymeric sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. C.; Lee, H. K.; Cho, J. H.

    2014-07-01

    Computed tomography (CT) uses a high dose of radiation to create images of the body. As patients are exposed to radiation during a CT scan, the use of shielding materials becomes essential in CT scanning. This study was focused on the radiation shielding materials used for patients during a CT scan. In this study, sheets were manufactured to shield the eyes and the thyroid, the most sensitive parts of the body, against radiation exposure during a CT scan. These sheets are manufactured using silicone polymers, barium sulfate (BaSO4) and tungsten, with the aim of making these sheets equally or more effective in radiation shielding and more cost-effective than lead sheets. The use of barium sulfate drew more attention than tungsten due to its higher cost-effectiveness. The barium sulfate sheets were coated to form a multigate structure by applying the maximum charge rate during the agitator and subsequent mixing processes and creating multilayered structures on the surface. To measure radiation shielding effectiveness, the radiation dose was measured around both eyes and the thyroid gland using sheets in three different thicknesses (1, 2 and 3 mm). Among the 1 and 2 mm sheets, the Pb sheets exhibited greater effectiveness in radiation shielding around both eyes, but the W sheets were more effective in radiation shielding around the thyroid gland. In the 3 mm sheets, the Pb sheet also attenuated a higher amount of radiation around both eyes while the W sheet was more effective around the thyroid gland. In conclusion, the sheets made from barium sulfate and tungsten proved highly effective in shielding against low-dose radiation in CT scans without causing ill-health effects, unlike lead.

  6. REACTOR SHIELD

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.E.; Young, G.J.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1959-02-17

    Radiation shield construction is described for a nuclear reactor. The shield is comprised of a plurality of steel plates arranged in parallel spaced relationship within a peripheral shell. Reactor coolant inlet tubes extend at right angles through the plates and baffles are arranged between the plates at right angles thereto and extend between the tubes to create a series of zigzag channels between the plates for the circulation of coolant fluid through the shield. The shield may be divided into two main sections; an inner section adjacent the reactor container and an outer section spaced therefrom. Coolant through the first section may be circulated at a faster rate than coolant circulated through the outer section since the area closest to the reactor container is at a higher temperature and is more radioactive. The two sections may have separate cooling systems to prevent the coolant in the outer section from mixing with the more contaminated coolant in the inner section.

  7. Isotherm Sensor Calibration Program for Mars Science Laboratory Heat Shield Flight Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santos, Jose A.; Oishi, Tomo; Martinez, Ed R.

    2011-01-01

    Seven instrumented sensor plugs were installed on the Mars Science Laboratory heat shield in December 2008 as part of the Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent, and Landing Instrumentation (MEDLI) project. These sensor plugs contain four in-depth thermocouples and one Hollow aErothermal Ablation and Temperature (HEAT) sensor. The HEAT sensor follows the time progression of a 700 C isotherm through the thickness of a thermal protection system (TPS) material. The data can be used to infer char depth and, when analyzed in conjunction with the thermocouple data, the thermal gradient through the TPS material can also be determined. However, the uncertainty on the isotherm value is not well defined. To address this uncertainty, a team at NASA Ames Research Center is carrying out a HEAT sensor calibration test program. The scope of this test program is described, and initial results from experiments conducted in the laboratory to study the isotherm temperature of the HEAT sensor are presented. Data from the laboratory tests indicate an isotherm temperature of 720 C 60 C. An overview of near term arc jet testing is also given, including preliminary data from 30.48cm 30.48cm PICA panels instrumented with two MEDLI sensor plugs and tested in the NASA Ames Panel Test Facility. Forward work includes analysis of the arc jet test data, including an evaluation of the isotherm value based on the instant in time when it reaches a thermocouple depth.

  8. Analysis of a shield design for a DT neutron generator test facility.

    PubMed

    Chichester, D L; Pierce, G D

    2007-10-01

    Independent numerical simulations have been performed using the MCNP5 and SCALE5 radiation transport codes to evaluate the effectiveness of a concrete facility designed to shield personnel from neutron radiation emitted from DT neutron generators. The analysis considered radiation source terms of 14.1 MeV monoenergetic neutrons located at three discrete locations within the two test vaults in the facility, calculating neutron and photon dose rates at 44 locations around the facility using both codes. In addition, dose rate contours were established throughout the facility using the MCNP5 mesh tally feature. Neutron dose rates calculated outside of the facility are predicted to be below 0.01 mrem/h at all locations when all neutron generator source terms are operating within the facility. Similarly, the neutron dose rate in one empty test vault when the adjacent test vault is being utilized is also less then 0.01 mrem/h. For most calculation locations outside the facility the photon dose rates were less then the neutron dose rates by a factor of 10 or more.

  9. ADVANTG Shielding Analysis for Closure Operations in an Open-Mode Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Bevill, Aaron M; Radulescu, Georgeta; Scaglione, John M; Howard, Rob L

    2013-01-01

    en-mode repository concepts could require worker entry into access drifts after placement of fuel casks in order to perform activities related to backfill, plug emplacement, routine maintenance, or performance confirmation. An ideal emplacement-drift shielding configuration would minimize dose to workers while maximizing airflow through the emplacement drifts. This paper presents a preliminary investigation of the feasibility and effectiveness of radiation shielding concepts that could be employed to facilitate worker operations in an open-mode repository. The repository model for this study includes pressurized-water reactor fuel assemblies (60 GWd/MTU burnup, 40 year post-irradiation cooldown) in packages of 32 assemblies. The closest fuel packages are 5 meters from dosimetry voxels in the access drift. The unshielded dose to workers in the access drift is 73.7 rem/hour. Prior work suggests that open-mode repository concepts similar to this one would require 15 m3/s of ventilation airflow. Shielding concepts considered here include partial concrete plugs, labyrinthine shields, and stainless steel photon attenuator grids. Maximum dose to workers in the access drift was estimated for each shielding concept using MCNP5 with variance reduction parameters generated by ADVANTG. Because airflow through the shielding is important for open-mode repositories, a semi-empirical estimate of the head loss due to each shielding configuration was also calculated. Airflow and shielding performance vary widely among the proposed shielding configurations. Although the partial plug configuration had the best airflow performance, it allowed dose rates 1500 greater than the specified target. Labyrinthine shielding concepts yield doses on the order of 1 mrem/hour with configurations that impose 3 to 11 J/kg head loss. Adding 1 cm lead lining to the airflow channels of labyrinthine designs further reduces the worker dose by 65% to 95%. Photon-attenuator concepts may reduce worker dose

  10. The heterogeneous anti-radiation shield for spacecraft*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telegin, S. V.; Draganyuk, O. N.

    2016-04-01

    The paper deals with modeling of elemental composition and properties of heterogeneous layers in multilayered shields to protect spacecraft onboard equipment from radiation emitted by the natural Earth’s radiation belt. This radiation causes malfunctioning of semiconductor elements in electronic equipment and may result in a failure of the spacecraft as a whole. We consider four different shield designs and compare them to the most conventional radiation-protective material for spacecraft - aluminum. Out of light and heavy chemical elements we chose the materials with high reaction cross sections and low density. The mass attenuation coefficient of boron- containing compounds is 20% higher than that of aluminum. Heterogeneous shields consist of three layers: a glass cloth, borated material, and nickel. With a protective shield containing heavy metal the output bremsstrahlung can be reduced. The amount of gamma rays that succeed to penetrate the shield is 4 times less compared to aluminum. The shields under study have the thicknesses of 5.95 and 6.2 mm. A comparative analysis of homogeneous and multilayered protective coatings of the same chemical composition has been performed. A heterogeneous protective shield has been found to be advantageous in weight and shielding properties over its homogeneous counterparts and aluminum. The dose characteristics and transmittance were calculated by the Monte Carlo method. The results of our study lead us to conclude that a three-layer boron carbide shield provides the most effective protection from radiation. This shield ensures twice as low absorbed dose and 4 times less the number of penetrated gamma-ray photons compared to its aluminum analogue. Moreover, a heterogeneous shield will have a weight 10% lighter than aluminum, with the same attenuation coefficient of the electron flux. Such heterogeneous shields can be used to protect spacecraft launched to geostationary orbit. Furthermore, a protective boron-containing and

  11. An inverse method for flue gas shielded metal surface temperature measurement based on infrared radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B.; Xu, C. L.; Wang, S. M.

    2016-07-01

    The infrared temperature measurement technique has been applied in various fields, such as thermal efficiency analysis, environmental monitoring, industrial facility inspections, and remote temperature sensing. In the problem of infrared measurement of the metal surface temperature of superheater surfaces, the outer wall of the metal pipe is covered by radiative participating flue gas. This means that the traditional infrared measurement technique will lead to intolerable measurement errors due to the absorption and scattering of the flue gas. In this paper, an infrared measurement method for a metal surface in flue gas is investigated theoretically and experimentally. The spectral emissivity of the metal surface, and the spectral absorption and scattering coefficients of the radiative participating flue gas are retrieved simultaneously using an inverse method called quantum particle swarm optimization. Meanwhile, the detected radiation energy simulated using a forward simulation method (named the source multi-flux method) is set as the input of the retrieval. Then, the temperature of the metal surface detected by an infrared CCD camera is modified using the source multi-flux method in combination with these retrieved physical properties. Finally, an infrared measurement system for metal surface temperature is built to assess the proposed method. Experimental results show that the modified temperature is closer to the true value than that of the direct measured temperature.

  12. DataSHIELD: resolving a conflict in contemporary bioscience—performing a pooled analysis of individual-level data without sharing the data

    PubMed Central

    Wolfson, Michael; Wallace, Susan E; Masca, Nicholas; Rowe, Geoff; Sheehan, Nuala A; Ferretti, Vincent; LaFlamme, Philippe; Tobin, Martin D; Macleod, John; Little, Julian; Fortier, Isabel; Knoppers, Bartha M; Burton, Paul R

    2010-01-01

    Background Contemporary bioscience sometimes demands vast sample sizes and there is often then no choice but to synthesize data across several studies and to undertake an appropriate pooled analysis. This same need is also faced in health-services and socio-economic research. When a pooled analysis is required, analytic efficiency and flexibility are often best served by combining the individual-level data from all sources and analysing them as a single large data set. But ethico-legal constraints, including the wording of consent forms and privacy legislation, often prohibit or discourage the sharing of individual-level data, particularly across national or other jurisdictional boundaries. This leads to a fundamental conflict in competing public goods: individual-level analysis is desirable from a scientific perspective, but is prevented by ethico-legal considerations that are entirely valid. Methods Data aggregation through anonymous summary-statistics from harmonized individual-level databases (DataSHIELD), provides a simple approach to analysing pooled data that circumvents this conflict. This is achieved via parallelized analysis and modern distributed computing and, in one key setting, takes advantage of the properties of the updating algorithm for generalized linear models (GLMs). Results The conceptual use of DataSHIELD is illustrated in two different settings. Conclusions As the study of the aetiological architecture of chronic diseases advances to encompass more complex causal pathways—e.g. to include the joint effects of genes, lifestyle and environment—sample size requirements will increase further and the analysis of pooled individual-level data will become ever more important. An aim of this conceptual article is to encourage others to address the challenges and opportunities that DataSHIELD presents, and to explore potential extensions, for example to its use when different data sources hold different data on the same individuals. PMID:20630989

  13. GCFR radial blanket and shield experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Muckenthaler, F.J.; Hull, J.L.; Manning, J.J.

    1980-12-01

    This report presents integral neutron flux, energy spectra, and gamma-ray heating measurements made for the Radial Blanket and Shield Experiment at the ORNL Tower Shielding Facility as part of a continuing Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor program. The experimental configurations were divided into four basic segments: a spectrum modifier inserted into the Tower Shielding Reactor II beam; blanket slabs consisting of either ThO/sub 2/ or UO/sub 2/ placed directly behind the spectrum modifier; an inner radial shield behind the blankets; and an outer radial shield to complete the mockup. The segments were added in sequence, with selected measurements made within and beyond each segment. The integral experiment was performed to provide verification of calculational methods and nuclear data used in designing a radial shield for the GCFR and determining the effectiveness of the design. The ThO/sub 2/ blanket measurements were needed to bracket the uncertainties in the nuclear cross sections for calculating both the neutron transmission through the blanket and the gamma-ray heating rates within the blanket. Measurements with a UO/sub 2/ blanket were included both as a reference for the ThO/sub 2/ analysis, neutron transmission through UO/sub 2/ having been successfully calculated in previous experiments, and to provide comparison information for other breeder reactor designs.

  14. Advances in space radiation shielding codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Tripathi, Ram K.; Qualls, Garry D.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Prael, Richard E.; Norbury, John W.; Heinbockel, John H.; Tweed, John; De Angelis, Giovanni

    2002-01-01

    Early space radiation shield code development relied on Monte Carlo methods and made important contributions to the space program. Monte Carlo methods have resorted to restricted one-dimensional problems leading to imperfect representation of appropriate boundary conditions. Even so, intensive computational requirements resulted and shield evaluation was made near the end of the design process. Resolving shielding issues usually had a negative impact on the design. Improved spacecraft shield design requires early entry of radiation constraints into the design process to maximize performance and minimize costs. As a result, we have been investigating high-speed computational procedures to allow shield analysis from the preliminary concept to the final design. For the last few decades, we have pursued deterministic solutions of the Boltzmann equation allowing field mapping within the International Space Station (ISS) in tens of minutes using standard Finite Element Method (FEM) geometry common to engineering design methods. A single ray trace in such geometry requires 14 milliseconds and limits application of Monte Carlo methods to such engineering models. A potential means of improving the Monte Carlo efficiency in coupling to spacecraft geometry is given.

  15. Analysis and Testing of a Composite Fuselage Shield for Open Rotor Engine Blade-Out Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Emmerling, William; Seng, Silvia; Frankenberger, Charles; Ruggeri, Charles R.; Revilock, Duane M.; Carney, Kelly S.

    2015-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration is working with the European Aviation Safety Agency to determine the certification base for proposed new engines that would not have a containment structure on large commercial aircraft. Equivalent safety to the current fleet is desired by the regulators, which means that loss of a single fan blade will not cause hazard to the Aircraft. The NASA Glenn Research Center and The Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), China Lake, collaborated with the FAA Aircraft Catastrophic Failure Prevention Program to design and test lightweight composite shields for protection of the aircraft passengers and critical systems from a released blade that could impact the fuselage. In the test, two composite blades were pyrotechnically released from a running engine, each impacting a composite shield with a different thickness. The thinner shield was penetrated by the blade and the thicker shield prevented penetration. This was consistent with pre-test predictions. This paper documents the live fire test from the full scale rig at NAWC China Lake and describes the damage to the shields as well as instrumentation results.

  16. A coupled numerical analysis of shield temperatures, heat losses and residual gas pressures in an evacuated super-insulation using thermal and fluid networks - Part I: Stationary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, H.

    2004-04-01

    This paper describes numerical simulations, using thermal networks, of shield temperatures and radiative and conductive heat losses of a super-insulated cryogenic storage tank operating at 77 K. Interactions between radiation and conductive heat transfer modes in the shields are investigated, by calculation of local shield temperatures. As a new method, fluid networks are introduced for calculation of stationary residual gas pressure distribution in the evacuated multilayer super-insulation. Output from the fluid network is coupled to the iterative thermal network calculations. Parameter tests concern thickness and emissivity of shields, degree of perforation, residual gas sources like desorption from radiation shields, spacers and container walls, and permeation from the inner container to the evacuated insulation space. Variations of either a conductive (thickness of Al-film on Mylar) or a radiative parameter (thermal emissivity) exert crosswise influences on the radiative or conductive heat losses of the tank, respectively.

  17. Size Effects on the Efficiency of Neutron Shielding in Nanocomposites — a Full-Range Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrempp-Koops, Lily

    2013-08-01

    Multiphase composites composed of a continuous hydrogenous (polymeric) phase and of neutron absorbing filler particles are attractive candidate materials for the design of light-weight neutron shields. While the characteristic size of the inclusions is traditionally in the micrometer range, we argue that the shielding performance of the composite is significantly enhanced for decreasing filler particle size. Within a semiclassical approximation scheme we analytically determine the corresponding scaling law valid for inclusions from the nanometer scale up to macroscopic sizes and recover meaningful limiting cases. We find that amongst polymer composites, the physical benchmark for optimized shielding at minimal weight penalty is essentially reached, as soon as the size of the filler particles drops within the nanometer range. We demonstrate that our results are in agreement with recent experimental findings and comment on the emerging potential for aeronautic and aerospace applications.

  18. SHIELDS: A battlespace Fraunhofer line discriminator for real-time aerosol cloud analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watchorn, S.; Noto, J.; Anderson, J.; Sioris, C. S.; Migliozzi, M. A.

    2007-09-01

    Fraunhofer Line Discrimination (FLD) is a passive optical spectroscopy technique with potential for battlefield remote sensing of aerosol targets, as well as other military and academic applications. The Spatial Heterodyne Interferometer for Emergent Line Discrimination Spectroscopy (SHIELDS) will provide real-time remote sensing using FLD. The unit will be contained in a man-portable box to provide heads-up detection of dangerous chemicals in target clouds. The spectrometer employed will be the monolithic Spatial Heterodyne Spectrometer (SHS). One SHIELDS unit will feature a monolithic SHS to look at the 589-nm Solar Fraunhofer doublet. A second monolith will be built, using novel designs, to look at several different Fraunhofer lines of interest, all in the visible (H-b, Mg, H-a). The finished monoliths will be tested on laboratory targets, and the final complete SHIELDS unit will be further tested in the field.

  19. Open Rotor Noise Shielding by Blended-Wing-Body Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Yueping; Czech, Michael J.; Thomas, Russell H.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of open rotor noise shielding by Blended Wing Body (BWB) aircraft by using model scale test data acquired in the Boeing Low Speed Aeroacoustic Facility (LSAF) with a legacy F7/A7 rotor model and a simplified BWB platform. The objective of the analysis is the understanding of the shielding features of the BWB and the method of application of the shielding data for noise studies of BWB aircraft with open rotor propulsion. By studying the directivity patterns of individual tones, it is shown that though the tonal energy distribution and the spectral content of the wind tunnel test model, and thus its total noise, may differ from those of more advanced rotor designs, the individual tones follow directivity patterns that characterize far field radiations of modern open rotors, ensuring the validity of the use of this shielding data. Thus, open rotor tonal noise shielding should be categorized into front rotor tones, aft rotor tones and interaction tones, not only because of the different directivities of the three groups of tones, but also due to the differences in their source locations and coherence features, which make the respective shielding characteristics of the three groups of tones distinctly different from each other. To reveal the parametric trends of the BWB shielding effects, results are presented with variations in frequency, far field emission angle, rotor operational condition, engine installation geometry, and local airframe features. These results prepare the way for the development of parametric models for the shielding effects in prediction tools.

  20. Multidimensional shielding analysis of the JASPER in-vessel fuel storage experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bucholz, J.A.

    1993-03-01

    The In-Vessel Fuel Storage (IVFS) experiments analyzed in this report were conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Tower Shielding Reactor (TSR) as part of the Japanese-American Shielding Program for Experimental Research (JASPER). These IVFS experiments were designed to study source multiplication and three-dimensional effects related to in-vessel storage of spent fuel elements in liquid metal reactor (LMR) systems. The present report describes the 2-D and 3-D models, analyses, and calculated results corresponding to a limited subset of those IVFS experiments in which the US LMR program has a particular interest.

  1. Safety analysis report for packaging: the ORNL gas-cylinder fire and impact shield

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.H.; Levine, D.L.; Eversole, R.E.; Mouring, R.W.

    1983-04-01

    The ORNL gas-cylinder fire and impact shield was designed and fabricated at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant for the transport of cylinders filled with radioactive gases. The shield was evaluated analytically and experimentally to determine its compliance with the applicable regulations governing containers in which radioactive and fissile materials are transported, and the results are reported herein. Computational and test procedures were used to determine the structural integrity and thermal behavior of the cask relative to the general standards for normal conditions of transport and the standards for hypothetical accident conditions. Results of the evaluation demonstrate that the container is in compliance with the applicable regulations.

  2. BUMPERII - DESIGN ANALYSIS CODE FOR OPTIMIZING SPACECRAFT SHIELDING AND WALL CONFIGURATION FOR ORBITAL DEBRIS AND METEOROID IMPACTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, S. A.

    1994-01-01

    BUMPERII is a modular program package employing a numerical solution technique to calculate a spacecraft's probability of no penetration (PNP) from man-made orbital debris or meteoroid impacts. The solution equation used to calculate the PNP is based on the Poisson distribution model for similar analysis of smaller craft, but reflects the more rigorous mathematical modeling of spacecraft geometry, orientation, and impact characteristics necessary for treatment of larger structures such as space station components. The technique considers the spacecraft surface in terms of a series of flat plate elements. It divides the threat environment into a number of finite cases, then evaluates each element of each threat. The code allows for impact shielding (shadowing) of one element by another in various configurations over the spacecraft exterior, and also allows for the effects of changing spacecraft flight orientation and attitude. Four main modules comprise the overall BUMPERII package: GEOMETRY, RESPONSE, SHIELD, and CONTOUR. The GEOMETRY module accepts user-generated finite element model (FEM) representations of the spacecraft geometry and creates geometry databases for both meteoroid and debris analysis. The GEOMETRY module expects input to be in either SUPERTAB Universal File Format or PATRAN Neutral File Format. The RESPONSE module creates wall penetration response databases, one for meteoroid analysis and one for debris analysis, for up to 100 unique wall configurations. This module also creates a file containing critical diameter as a function of impact velocity and impact angle for each wall configuration. The SHIELD module calculates the PNP for the modeled structure given exposure time, operating altitude, element ID ranges, and the data from the RESPONSE and GEOMETRY databases. The results appear in a summary file. SHIELD will also determine the effective area of the components and the overall model, and it can produce a data file containing the probability

  3. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis for the chemical impact of solvent addition rate on electromagnetic shielding effectiveness of HCl-doped polyaniline nanopowders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tantawy, Hesham Ramzy; Kengne, Blaise-Alexis F.; McIlroy, David N.; Nguyen, Tai; Heo, Deukhyoun; Qiang, You; Aston, D. Eric

    2015-11-01

    An in-depth analysis of the chemical functionality in HCl-doped polyaniline (PANI) nanopowders is discussed through interpretations of x-ray photoelectron spectra. The distinctions between three PANI sample types, produced under varied synthesis conditions, are compared on the basis correlations between newly collected electron spectra for chemical analysis (or also x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) and electromagnetic (EM) shielding effectiveness (SE) within two frequency bands (100-1500 MHz and ˜2-14 GHz). The findings are discussed with reference to previous data analysis of electrical conductivities and Raman and UV-vis spectra analyzed from replicates of the same PANI nanopowders, where only the 8-12 GHz range for SE was tested. They further corroborate previous results for limited-solvent conditions that enhance EM shielding. The three nanopowder types show distinctive differences in polaron, bipolaron, and polar lattice contributions. The collective findings describe the chemical connections between controlling and, most importantly, limiting the available solvent for polymerization with simultaneously doping and how it is that the newly developed solvent-limited approach for HCl-PANI nanopowders provides better shielding than traditionally solvent-rich methods by having more extended and perhaps even faster polaron delocalization than other PANI-based products. The maximum oxidation (50%) and doping (49%) levels obtained in the solvent-free nanopowders also produced the highest SE values of 37.3 ± 3.7 dB (MHz band) and 68.6 ± 4.6 dB (GHz band).

  4. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis for the chemical impact of solvent addition rate on electromagnetic shielding effectiveness of HCl-doped polyaniline nanopowders

    SciTech Connect

    Tantawy, Hesham Ramzy; Aston, D. Eric; Kengne, Blaise-Alexis F.; McIlroy, David N.; Qiang, You; Nguyen, Tai; Heo, Deukhyoun

    2015-11-07

    An in-depth analysis of the chemical functionality in HCl-doped polyaniline (PANI) nanopowders is discussed through interpretations of x-ray photoelectron spectra. The distinctions between three PANI sample types, produced under varied synthesis conditions, are compared on the basis correlations between newly collected electron spectra for chemical analysis (or also x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) and electromagnetic (EM) shielding effectiveness (SE) within two frequency bands (100–1500 MHz and ∼2–14 GHz). The findings are discussed with reference to previous data analysis of electrical conductivities and Raman and UV-vis spectra analyzed from replicates of the same PANI nanopowders, where only the 8–12 GHz range for SE was tested. They further corroborate previous results for limited-solvent conditions that enhance EM shielding. The three nanopowder types show distinctive differences in polaron, bipolaron, and polar lattice contributions. The collective findings describe the chemical connections between controlling and, most importantly, limiting the available solvent for polymerization with simultaneously doping and how it is that the newly developed solvent-limited approach for HCl-PANI nanopowders provides better shielding than traditionally solvent-rich methods by having more extended and perhaps even faster polaron delocalization than other PANI-based products. The maximum oxidation (50%) and doping (49%) levels obtained in the solvent-free nanopowders also produced the highest SE values of 37.3 ± 3.7 dB (MHz band) and 68.6 ± 4.6 dB (GHz band)

  5. Critical Analysis of Cluster Models and Exchange-Correlation Functionals for Calculating Magnetic Shielding in Molecular Solids.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Sean T; Iuliucci, Robbie J; Mueller, Karl T; Dybowski, Cecil

    2015-11-10

    Calculations of the principal components of magnetic-shielding tensors in crystalline solids require the inclusion of the effects of lattice structure on the local electronic environment to obtain significant agreement with experimental NMR measurements. We assess periodic (GIPAW) and GIAO/symmetry-adapted cluster (SAC) models for computing magnetic-shielding tensors by calculations on a test set containing 72 insulating molecular solids, with a total of 393 principal components of chemical-shift tensors from 13C, 15N, 19F, and 31P sites. When clusters are carefully designed to represent the local solid-state environment and when periodic calculations include sufficient variability, both methods predict magnetic-shielding tensors that agree well with experimental chemical-shift values, demonstrating the correspondence of the two computational techniques. At the basis-set limit, we find that the small differences in the computed values have no statistical significance for three of the four nuclides considered. Subsequently, we explore the effects of additional DFT methods available only with the GIAO/cluster approach, particularly the use of hybrid-GGA functionals, meta-GGA functionals, and hybrid meta-GGA functionals that demonstrate improved agreement in calculations on symmetry-adapted clusters. We demonstrate that meta-GGA functionals improve computed NMR parameters over those obtained by GGA functionals in all cases, and that hybrid functionals improve computed results over the respective pure DFT functional for all nuclides except 15N.

  6. Fuel Burnup and Fuel Pool Shielding Analysis for Bushehr Nuclear Reactor VVER-1000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadad, Kamal; Ayobian, Navid

    Bushehr Nuclear power plant (BNPP) is currently under construction. The VVER-1000 reactor will be loaded with 126 tons of about 4% enriched fuel having 3-years life cycle. The spent fuel (SF) will be transferred into the spent fuel pool (SPF), where it stays for 8 years before being transferred to Russia. The SPF plays a crucial role during 8 years when the SP resides in there. This paper investigates the shielding of this structure as it is designed to shield the SF radiation. In this study, the SF isotope inventory, for different cycles and with different burnups, was calculated using WIMS/4D transport code. Using MCNP4C nuclear code, the intensity of γ rays was obtained in different layers of SFP shields. These layers include the water above fuel assemblies (FA) in pool, concrete wall of the pool and water laid above transferring fuels. Results show that γ rays leakage from the shield in the mentioned layers are in agreement with the plant's PSAR data. Finally we analyzed an accident were the water height above the FA in the pool drops to 47 cm. In this case it was observed that exposure dose above pool, 10 and 30 days from the accident, are still high and in the levels of 1000 and 758 R/hr.

  7. Thermocouple shield

    DOEpatents

    Ripley, Edward B.

    2009-11-24

    A thermocouple shield for use in radio frequency fields. In some embodiments the shield includes an electrically conductive tube that houses a standard thermocouple having a thermocouple junction. The electrically conductive tube protects the thermocouple from damage by an RF (including microwave) field and mitigates erroneous temperature readings due to the microwave or RF field. The thermocouple may be surrounded by a ceramic sheath to further protect the thermocouple. The ceramic sheath is generally formed from a material that is transparent to the wavelength of the microwave or RF energy. The microwave transparency property precludes heating of the ceramic sheath due to microwave coupling, which could affect the accuracy of temperature measurements. The ceramic sheath material is typically an electrically insulating material. The electrically insulative properties of the ceramic sheath help avert electrical arcing, which could damage the thermocouple junction. The electrically conductive tube is generally disposed around the thermocouple junction and disposed around at least a portion of the ceramic sheath. The concepts of the thermocouple shield may be incorporated into an integrated shielded thermocouple assembly.

  8. Analysis of Doppler Lidar Data Acquired During the Pentagon Shield Field Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Newsom, Rob K.

    2011-04-14

    Observations from two coherent Doppler lidars deployed during the Pentagon Shield field campaign are analyzed in conjunction with other sensors to characterize the overall boundary-layer structure, and identify the dominant flow characteristics during the entire two-week field campaign. Convective boundary layer (CBL) heights and cloud base heights (CBH) are estimated from an analysis of the lidar signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR), and mean wind profiles are computed using a modified velocity-azimuth-display (VAD) algorithm. Three-dimensional wind field retrievals are computed from coordinated overlapping volume scans, and the results are analyzed by visualizing the flow in horizontal and vertical cross sections. The VAD winds show that southerly flows dominate during the two-week field campaign. Low-level jets (LLJ) were evident on all but two of the nights during the field campaign. The LLJs tended to form a couple hours after sunset and reach maximum strength between 03 and 07 UTC. The surface friction velocities show distinct local maxima during four nights when strong LLJs formed. Estimates of the convective boundary layer height and residual layer height are obtained through an analysis of the vertical gradient of the lidar signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR). Strong minimum in the SNR gradient often develops just above the surface after sunrise. This minimum is associated with the developing CBL, and increases rapidly during the early portion of the daytime period. On several days, this minimum continues to increase until about sunset. Secondary minima in the SNR gradient were also observed at higher altitudes, and are believed to be remnants of the CBL height from previous days, i.e. the residual layer height. The dual-Doppler analysis technique used in this study makes use of hourly averaged radial velocity data to produce three-dimensional grids of the horizontal velocity components, and the horizontal velocity variance. Visualization of horizontal and vertical cross

  9. Fused slurry silicide coatings for columbium alloys reentry heat shields. Volume 1: Evaluation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, B.

    1973-01-01

    The R-512E (Si-20Cr-20Fe) fused slurry silicide coating process was optimized to coat full size (20in x 20in) single face rib and corrugation stiffened panels fabricated from FS-85 columbium alloy for 100 mission space shuttle heat shield applications. Structural life under simulated space shuttle lift-off stresses and reentry conditions demonstrated reuse capability well beyond 100 flights for R-512E coated FS-85 columbium heat shield panels. Demonstrated coating damage tolerance showed no immediate structural failure on exposure. The FS-85 columbium alloy was selected from five candidate alloys (Cb-752, C-129Y, WC-3015, B-66 and FS-85) based on the evaluation tests which have designed to determine: (1) change in material properties due to coating and reuse; (2) alloy tolerance to coating damage; (3) coating emittance characteristics under reuse conditions; and (4) new coating chemistries for improved coating life.

  10. Radiation shielding materials and containers incorporating same

    DOEpatents

    Mirsky, Steven M.; Krill, Stephen J.; Murray, Alexander P.

    2005-11-01

    An improved radiation shielding material and storage systems for radioactive materials incorporating the same. The PYRolytic Uranium Compound ("PYRUC") shielding material is preferably formed by heat and/or pressure treatment of a precursor material comprising microspheres of a uranium compound, such as uranium dioxide or uranium carbide, and a suitable binder. The PYRUC shielding material provides improved radiation shielding, thermal characteristic, cost and ease of use in comparison with other shielding materials. The shielding material can be used to form containment systems, container vessels, shielding structures, and containment storage areas, all of which can be used to house radioactive waste. The preferred shielding system is in the form of a container for storage, transportation, and disposal of radioactive waste. In addition, improved methods for preparing uranium dioxide and uranium carbide microspheres for use in the radiation shielding materials are also provided.

  11. Radiation Shielding Materials and Containers Incorporating Same

    DOEpatents

    Mirsky, Steven M.; Krill, Stephen J.; and Murray, Alexander P.

    2005-11-01

    An improved radiation shielding material and storage systems for radioactive materials incorporating the same. The PYRolytic Uranium Compound (''PYRUC'') shielding material is preferably formed by heat and/or pressure treatment of a precursor material comprising microspheres of a uranium compound, such as uranium dioxide or uranium carbide, and a suitable binder. The PYRUC shielding material provides improved radiation shielding, thermal characteristic, cost and ease of use in comparison with other shielding materials. The shielding material can be used to form containment systems, container vessels, shielding structures, and containment storage areas, all of which can be used to house radioactive waste. The preferred shielding system is in the form of a container for storage, transportation, and disposal of radioactive waste. In addition, improved methods for preparing uranium dioxide and uranium carbide microspheres for use in the radiation shielding materials are also provided.

  12. Reliability-Based Electronics Shielding Design Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; O'Neill, P. J.; Zang, T. A.; Pandolf, J. E.; Tripathi, R. K.; Koontz, Steven L.; Boeder, P.; Reddell, B.; Pankop, C.

    2007-01-01

    Shielding design on large human-rated systems allows minimization of radiation impact on electronic systems. Shielding design tools require adequate methods for evaluation of design layouts, guiding qualification testing, and adequate follow-up on final design evaluation.

  13. Impact and structural analysis of the INEL 55 gallon recycled shielded storage container

    SciTech Connect

    Richins, W.D.

    1996-07-01

    The INEL Recycled Shielded Storage Containers (RSSC) are designed primarily for the transportation and storage of mixed RH-TRU solid waste using recycled, potentially contaminated lead and stainless steel construction materials. Two versions of the RSSC have been developed accommodating either 30 or 55 gallon drums. This report addresses the structural qualification of the 55 gallon version of the RSSC to DOT 7A Type A requirements. The controlling qualification test is a 4 ft drop onto a rigid surface. During and after this test, the container contents must remain within the container and shielding must not be reduced. The container is also designed to withstand stacking, internal pressure, lifting loads, tiedown failure, penetration, and a range of temperatures. Nonlinear dynamic finite element analyses were performed using a range of material properties. Loads in the major connections and strains in the stainless steel and lead were monitored as a function of time during impact analyses for three simulated drop orientations. Initial results were used to develop the final design. For the final design, the stainless steel and lead have maximum strains well below ultimate levels except at an impact corner where additional deformation is acceptable. The predicted loads in the connections indicate that some yielding will occur but the containment and shielding will remain intact. The results presented here provide assurance that the container will pass the DOT 7A Type A drop tests as well as the other structural requirements.

  14. Thermal history of Michigan Basin and southern Canadian Shield from apatite fission track analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Crowley, K.D. )

    1991-01-10

    Apatite fission track ages and confined-length distributions were collected from 38 basement outcrop and 5 basement drillcore samples in order to reconstruct the Phanerozoic thermal history of the Michigan Basin and southern Canadian Shield. The apatite data indicate two periods of thermal activity in the region: Triassic heating/cooling that affected the basin and adjacent shield and Cretaceous or post-Cretaceous heating/cooling that primarily affected the basin. The magnitude, timing, and cause of Cretaceous thermal activity cannot be identified with the present data. Model calculations suggest that some of the shield samples and probably all of the basin samples were heated to temperatures of at least 90C just prior to relatively rapid cooling in the Triassic. Available stratigraphic and geochemical constraints suggest that these elevated temperatures were the result of burial by an additional 2-5 km of late Paleozoic (probably Pennsylvanian and Permian) sediments. It is likely that the basin was buried during the Alleghenian Orogeny as observed for the adjacent Appalachian Basin.

  15. Summary of Disposable Debris Shields (DDS) Analysis for Development of Solid Debris Collection at NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Shaughnessy, D A; Moody, K J; Grant, P M; Lewis, L A; Hutcheon, I D; Lindvall, R; Gostic, J M

    2011-11-20

    Collection of solid debris from the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is being developed both as a diagnostic tool and as a means for measuring nuclear reaction cross sections relevant to the Stockpile Stewardship Program and nuclear astrophysics. The concept is straightforward; following a NIF shot, the debris that is produced as a result of the capsule and hohlraum explosion would be collected and subsequently extracted from the chamber. The number of nuclear activations that occurred in the capsule would then be measured through a combination of radiation detection and radiochemical processing followed by mass spectrometry. Development of the catcher is challenging due to the complex environment of the NIF target chamber. The collector surface is first exposed to a large photon flux, followed by the debris wind that is produced. The material used in the catcher must be mechanically strong in order to withstand the large amount of energy it is exposed to, as well as be chemically compatible with the form and composition of the debris. In addition, the location of the catcher is equally important. If it is positioned too close to the center of the target chamber, it will be significantly ablated, which could interfere with the ability of the debris to reach the surface and stick. If it is too far away, the fraction of the debris cloud collected will be too small to result in a statistically significant measurement. Material, geometric configuration, and location must all be tested in order to design the optimal debris collection system for NIF. One of the first ideas regarding solid debris collection at NIF was to use the disposable debris shields (DDS), which are fielded over the final optics assemblies (FOA) 7 m away from the center of the target chamber. The DDS are meant to be replaced after a certain number of shots, and if the shields could be subsequently analyzed after removal, it would serve as a mechanism for fielding a relatively large collection area

  16. Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, R.A.; Cron, J.

    2000-03-29

    This design analysis has shown that, on a conceptual level, the emplacement of drip shields is feasible with current technology and equipment. A plan for drip shield emplacement was presented using a Drip Shield Transporter, a Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry, a locomotive, and a Drip Shield Gantry Carrier. The use of a Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry as an emplacement concept results in a system that is simple, reliable, and interfaces with the numerous other exising repository systems. Using the Waste Emplacement/Retrieval System design as a basis for the drip shield emplacement concept proved to simplify the system by using existing equipment, such as the gantry carrier, locomotive, Electrical and Control systems, and many other systems, structures, and components. Restricted working envelopes for the Drip Shield Emplacement System require further consideration and must be addressed to show that the emplacement operations can be performed as the repository design evolves. Section 6.1 describes how the Drip Shield Emplacement System may use existing equipment. Depending on the length of time between the conclusion of waste emplacement and the commencement of drip shield emplacement, this equipment could include the locomotives, the gantry carrier, and the electrical, control, and rail systems. If the exisiting equipment is selected for use in the Drip Shield Emplacement System, then the length of time after the final stages of waste emplacement and start of drip shield emplacement may pose a concern for the life cycle of the system (e.g., reliability, maintainability, availability, etc.). Further investigation should be performed to consider the use of existing equipment for drip shield emplacement operations. Further investigation will also be needed regarding the interfaces and heat transfer and thermal effects aspects. The conceptual design also requires further design development. Although the findings of this analysis are accurate for the assumptions made

  17. Evaluation Of Methods To Measure Hydrogen Generation Rate In A Shielded Cell Environment And A Method Recommendation

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M. E.

    2012-11-07

    The purpose of this document is to describe the current state of the art for determination of hydrogen generation rates of radioactive slurries and solutions to provide a basis for design, fabrication, testing, and implementation of a measurement method for Hydrogen Generation Rate (HGR) during qualification of waste feeds for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The HGR measurement will be performed on samples of the Low Activity Waste (LAW) and High Level Waste (HLW) staged waste feeds for the WTP as well as on samples from selected unit operations testing during the qualification program. SRNL has performed a review of techniques utilized to measure HGR of high level radioactive waste slurries, evaluated the Hanford 222-S Laboratory method for measurement of hydrogen, and reviewed the hydrogen generation rate models for Hanford waste.Based on the literature review, method evaluation, and SRNL experience with measuring hydrogen generation rate, SRNL recommends that a continuous flow system with online gas analysis be used as the HGR measurement method during waste qualification.

  18. A multi-locus analysis of phylogenetic relationships within cheilostome bryozoans supports multiple origins of ascophoran frontal shields.

    PubMed

    Knight, Sarah; Gordon, Dennis P; Lavery, Shane D

    2011-11-01

    Phylogenetic relationships within the bryozoan order Cheilostomata are currently uncertain, with many morphological hypotheses proposed but scarcely tested by independent means of molecular analysis. This research uses DNA sequence data across five loci of both mitochondrial and nuclear origin from 91 species of cheilostome Bryozoa (34 species newly sequenced). This vastly improved the taxonomic coverage and number of loci used in a molecular analysis of this order and allowed a more in-depth look into the evolutionary history of Cheilostomata. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian analyses of individual loci were carried out along with a partitioned multi-locus approach, plus a range of topology tests based on morphological hypotheses. Together, these provide a comprehensive set of phylogenetic analyses of the order Cheilostomata. From these results inferences are made about the evolutionary history of this order and proposed morphological hypotheses are discussed in light of the independent evidence gained from the molecular data. Infraorder Ascophorina was demonstrated to be non-monophyletic, and there appears to be multiple origins of the ascus and associated structures involved in lophophore extension. This was further supported by the lack of monophyly within each of the four ascophoran grades (acanthostegomorph/spinocystal, hippothoomorph/gymnocystal, umbonulomorph/umbonuloid, lepraliomorph/lepralioid) defined by frontal-shield morphology. Chorizopora, currently classified in the ascophoran grade Hippothoomorpha, is phylogenetically distinct from Hippothoidae, providing strong evidence for multiple origins of the gymnocystal frontal shield type. Further evidence is produced to support the morphological hypothesis of multiple umbonuloid origins of lepralioid frontal shields, using a step-wise set of topological hypothesis tests combined with examination of multi-locus phylogenies.

  19. Topical safety analysis report for the transportation of the NUHOMS{reg_sign} dry shielded canister. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1993-08-01

    This Topical Safety Analysis Report (SAR) describes the design and the generic transportation licensing basis for utilizing the NUTECH HORIZONTAL MODULAR STORAGE (NUHOMS{reg_sign}) system dry shielded canister (DSC) containing twenty-four pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel assemblies (SFA) in conjunction with a conceptually designed Transportation Cask. This SAR documents the design qualification of the NUHOMS{reg_sign} DSC as an integral part of a 10CFR71 Fissile Material Class III, Type B(M) Transportation Package. The package consists of the canister and a conceptual transportation cask (NUHOMS{reg_sign} Transportation Cask) with impact limiters. Engineering analysis is performed for the canister to confirm that the existing canister design complies with 10CFR71 transportation requirements. Evaluations and/or analyses is performed for criticality safety, shielding, structural, and thermal performance. Detailed engineering analysis for the transportation cask will be submitted in a future SAR requesting 10CFR71 certification of the complete waste package. Transportation operational considerations describe various operational aspects of the canister/transportation cask system. operational sequences are developed for canister transfer from storage to the transportation cask and interfaces with the cask auxiliary equipment for on- and off-site transport.

  20. Active shield technology for space craft protection revisited in new laboratory results and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamford, R.; Gibson, K. J.; Thornton, A. T.; Bradford, J.; Bingham, R.; Gargate, L.; Silva, L. O.; Fonseca, R. A.; Hapgood, M.; Norberg, C.; Todd, T.; Stamper, R.

    2009-04-01

    Energetic ions in the solar wind plasma are a known hazard to both spacecraft electronics and to astronaut's health. Of primary concern is the exposure to keV--MeV protons on manned space flights to the Moon and Mars that extend over long periods of time. Attempts to protect the spacecraft include active shields that are reminiscent of Star Trek "deflector" shields. Here we describe a new experiment to test the shielding concept of a dipole-like magnetic field and plasma, surrounding the spacecraft forming a "mini magnetosphere". Initial laboratory experiments have been conducted to determine the effectiveness of a magnetized plasma barrier to be able to expel an impacting, low beta, supersonic flowing energetic plasma representing the Solar Wind. Optical and Langmuir probe data of the plasma density, the plasma flow velocity, and the intensity of the dipole field clearly show the creation of a narrow transport barrier region and diamagnetic cavity virtually devoid of energetic plasma particles. This demonstrates the potential viability of being able to create a small "hole" in a Solar Wind plasma, of the order of the ion Larmor orbit width, in which an inhabited spacecraft could reside in relative safety. The experimental results have been quantitatively compared to a 3D particle-in-cell ‘hybrid' code simulation that uses kinetic ions and fluid electrons, showing good qualitative agreement and excellent quantitative agreement. Together the results demonstrate the pivotal role of particle kinetics in determining generic plasma transport barriers. [1] [1] R Bamford et al., "The interaction of a flowing plasma with a dipole magnetic field: measurements and modelling of a diamagnetic cavity relevant to spacecraft protection." 2008 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 50 124025 (11pp) doi: 10.1088/0741-3335/50/12/124025

  1. Filling the gap in central shielding: three-dimensional analysis of the EQD2 dose in radiotherapy for cervical cancer with the central shielding technique

    PubMed Central

    Tamaki, Tomoaki; Ohno, Tatsuya; Noda, Shin-ei; Kato, Shingo; Nakano, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to provide accurate dose distribution profiles of radiotherapy for cervical cancer when treated with the central shielding technique by analysing the composite 3D EQD2 dose distribution of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) plus intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT). On a phantom, four patterns of the combinations of whole pelvis irradiation (WP) (4 fields), pelvis irradiation with central shielding technique (CS) [anterior–posterior/posterior–anterior (AP-PA fields), shielding width of 3 or 4 cm] and ICBT using Point-A prescription were created: 30 Gy/15 fractions + 20 Gy/10 fractions + 24 Gy/4 fractions [Plan (30 + 20 + 24)], 40 Gy/20 fractions + 10 Gy/5 fractions + 18 Gy/3 fractions [Plan (40 + 10 + 18)], 40 Gy/20 fractions + 10 Gy/5 fractions + 24 Gy/4 fractions [Plan (40 + 10 + 24)] and 45 Gy/25 fractions + 0 Gy + 28 Gy/4 fractions [Plan (45 + 0 + 28)]. The composite EQD2 dose distributions of the complete treatment were analysed. The Point-A dose of Plan (30 + 20 + 24), Plan (40 + 10 + 18), Plan (40 + 10 + 24) and Plan (45 + 0 + 28) were 78.0 Gy (CS 3 cm)/71.8 Gy (CS 4 cm), 72.1 Gy (CS 3 cm)/69.0 Gy (CS 4 cm), 80.1 Gy (CS 3 cm)/77.0 Gy (CS 4 cm) and 84.1 Gy, whereas it has been previously reported to be 62 Gy, 64 Gy, 72 Gy and 84 Gy, respectively. For all the treatment plans with CS, equivalent or wider coverage of 60 Gy (EQD2) was achieved in the right–left direction, while coverage in the anterior–posterior direction decreased in plans with CS. There were no irregularly ‘cold’ regions around the central target. The use of CS in radiotherapy for cervical cancer resulted in tumor coverage in the lateral direction with doses higher than the previously reported Point-A doses. PMID:26062811

  2. Filling the gap in central shielding: three-dimensional analysis of the EQD2 dose in radiotherapy for cervical cancer with the central shielding technique.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Tomoaki; Ohno, Tatsuya; Noda, Shin-ei; Kato, Shingo; Nakano, Takashi

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to provide accurate dose distribution profiles of radiotherapy for cervical cancer when treated with the central shielding technique by analysing the composite 3D EQD2 dose distribution of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) plus intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT). On a phantom, four patterns of the combinations of whole pelvis irradiation (WP) (4 fields), pelvis irradiation with central shielding technique (CS) [anterior-posterior/posterior-anterior (AP-PA fields), shielding width of 3 or 4 cm] and ICBT using Point-A prescription were created: 30 Gy/15 fractions + 20 Gy/10 fractions + 24 Gy/4 fractions [Plan (30 + 20 + 24)], 40 Gy/20 fractions + 10 Gy/5 fractions + 18 Gy/3 fractions [Plan (40 + 10 + 18)], 40 Gy/20 fractions + 10 Gy/5 fractions + 24 Gy/4 fractions [Plan (40 + 10 + 24)] and 45 Gy/25 fractions + 0 Gy + 28 Gy/4 fractions [Plan (45 + 0 + 28)]. The composite EQD2 dose distributions of the complete treatment were analysed. The Point-A dose of Plan (30 + 20 + 24), Plan (40 + 10 + 18), Plan (40 + 10 + 24) and Plan (45 + 0 + 28) were 78.0 Gy (CS 3 cm)/71.8 Gy (CS 4 cm), 72.1 Gy (CS 3 cm)/69.0 Gy (CS 4 cm), 80.1 Gy (CS 3 cm)/77.0 Gy (CS 4 cm) and 84.1 Gy, whereas it has been previously reported to be 62 Gy, 64 Gy, 72 Gy and 84 Gy, respectively. For all the treatment plans with CS, equivalent or wider coverage of 60 Gy (EQD2) was achieved in the right-left direction, while coverage in the anterior-posterior direction decreased in plans with CS. There were no irregularly 'cold' regions around the central target. The use of CS in radiotherapy for cervical cancer resulted in tumor coverage in the lateral direction with doses higher than the previously reported Point-A doses.

  3. Comparison of four methods used in determination of secondary shielding requirements for a teletherapy facility: a case study of 137Cs room in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Muhogora, W E; Nyanda, A M; Ngoye, W M

    2004-12-01

    The performance of four methods often used to calculate the secondary barrier requirements is evaluated for a typical 137Cs-therapy room as a case study. The first two methods are provided by the NCRP49 and IAEA and both consider the influence of the primary, leakage and scattered radiation at a point as corrected for the workload, use and occupancy factors. A different shielding model encompasses the third method, which determines the doses as corrected for build-up effects assuming the narrow beam geometry. The fourth method is based on the calculation of the dose rates from the source activity with a relevant gamma constant. In all four methods, an appropriate transmission factor for the protective barrier in question is applied. The results show that for controlled area, the similarity in the calculated thicknesses using all four methods was nearly within 50%. For uncontrolled areas, a significant difference of magnitude up to a factor of 2.4 was found, which is mainly attributed to the non-consideration of occupancy factors in the latter two methods. Nevertheless, the non-agreement is useful to validate the specific assumptions taken for the employed shielding method. Despite being slightly high, it is concluded that the current shielding methods based on NCRP fundamentals are satisfactorily optimal in planning new therapy facilities. However for existing facilities, such as those undesigned according to the standard requirements, the combination of the four different methods with the dose rate measurements tend to offer a better cost effective shielding option. Retrospectively, additional 41-cm thick concrete is recommended for the unshielded southern barrier of the 137Cs room. Interestingly, the recommended thickness agrees to within +/-5% with that estimated by using the recently recommended method by IAEA.

  4. Unified aeroacoustics analysis for high speed turboprop aerodynamics and noise. Volume 2: Development of theory for wing shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amiet, R. K.

    1991-01-01

    A unified theory for aerodynamics and noise of advanced turboprops is presented. The theory and a computer code developed for evaluation at the shielding benefits that might be expected by an aircraft wing in a wing-mounted propeller installation are presented. Several computed directivity patterns are presented to demonstrate the theory. Recently with the advent of the concept of using the wing of an aircraft for noise shielding, the case of diffraction by a surface in a flow has been given attention. The present analysis is based on the case of diffraction of no flow. By combining a Galilean and a Lorentz transform, the wave equation with a mean flow can be reduced to the ordinary equation. Allowance is also made in the analysis for the case of a swept wing. The same combination of Galilean and Lorentz transforms lead to a problem with no flow but a different sweep. The solution procedures for the cases of leading and trailing edges are basically the same. Two normalizations of the solution are given by the computer program. FORTRAN computer programs are presented with detailed documentation. The output from these programs compares favorably with the results of other investigators.

  5. Tank Car Head Shield Fatigue Evaluation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    shields and to record measurements which reflect the dynamic response of the head shield (and its attachments) and then to devise a method for...areas were instrumented for measuring strains. Other positions were also instrumented to obtain a breader understanding of the response of the shield ...center sill of four feet six inches, measured in a straight line between extreme edges; (ii) A minimum width at the top of shield of nine feet

  6. Shielding and activity estimator for template-based nuclide identification methods

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Karl Einar

    2013-04-09

    According to one embodiment, a method for estimating an activity of one or more radio-nuclides includes receiving one or more templates, the one or more templates corresponding to one or more radio-nuclides which contribute to a probable solution, receiving one or more weighting factors, each weighting factor representing a contribution of one radio-nuclide to the probable solution, computing an effective areal density for each of the one more radio-nuclides, computing an effective atomic number (Z) for each of the one more radio-nuclides, computing an effective metric for each of the one or more radio-nuclides, and computing an estimated activity for each of the one or more radio-nuclides. In other embodiments, computer program products, systems, and other methods are presented for estimating an activity of one or more radio-nuclides.

  7. Dosimetric analysis of isocentrically shielded volumetric modulated arc therapy for locally recurrent nasopharyngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jia-Yang; Huang, Bao-Tian; Xing, Lei; Chang, Daniel T.; Peng, Xun; Xie, Liang-Xi; Lin, Zhi-Xiong; Li, Mei

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the dosimetric characteristics of an isocentrically shielded RapidArc (IS-RA) technique for treatment of locally recurrent nasopharyngeal cancer (lrNPC). In IS-RA, the isocenter was placed at the center of the pre-irradiated brainstem (BS)/spinal cord (SC) and the jaws were set to shield the BS/SC while ensuring the target coverage during the whole gantry rotation. For fifteen patients, the IS-RA plans were compared with the conventional RapidArc (C-RA) regarding target coverage, organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing and monitor units (MUs). The relationship between the dose reduction of BS/SC and some geometric parameters including the angle extended by the target with respect to the axis of BS/SC (Ang_BSSC), the minimum distance between the target and BS/SC (Dist_Min) and the target volume were evaluated. The IS-RA reduced the BS/SC doses by approximately 1–4 Gy on average over the C-RA, with more MUs. The IS-RA demonstrated similar target coverage and sparing of other OARs except for slightly improved sparing of optic structures. More dose reduction in the isocentric region was observed in the cases with larger Ang_BSSC or smaller Dist_Min. Our results indicated that the IS-RA significantly improves the sparing of BS/SC without compromising dosimetric requirements of other involved structures for lrNPC. PMID:27173670

  8. Numerical analysis of Hall effect on the performance of magnetohydrodynamic heat shield system based on nonequilibrium Hall parameter model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kai; Liu, Jun; Liu, Weiqiang

    2017-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) heat shield system, a novel thermal protection technique in the hypersonic field, has been paid much attention in recent years. In the real flight condition, not only the Lorentz force but also the Hall electric field is induced by the interaction between ionized air post shock and magnetic field. In order to analyze the action mechanisms of the Hall effect, numerical methods of coupling thermochemical nonequilibrium flow field with externally applied magnetic field as well as the induced electric field are constructed and validated. Based on the nonequilibrium model of Hall parameter, numerical simulations of the MHD heat shield system is conducted under two different magnetic induction strengths (B0=0.2 T, 0.5 T) on a reentry capsule forebody. Results show that, the Hall effect is the same under the two magnetic induction strengths when the wall is assumed to be conductive. For this case, with the Hall effect taken into account, the Lorentz force counter stream diminishes a lot and the circumferential component dominates, resulting that the heat flux and shock-off distance approach the case without MHD control. However, for the insulating wall, the Hall effect acts in different ways under these two magnetic induction strengths. For this case, with the Hall effect taken into account, the performance of MHD heat shield system approaches the case neglecting the Hall effect when B0 equals 0.2 T. Such performance becomes worse when B0 equals 0.5 T and the aerothermal environment on the capsule shoulder is even worse than the case without MHD control.

  9. Welding shield for coupling heaters

    DOEpatents

    Menotti, James Louis

    2010-03-09

    Systems for coupling end portions of two elongated heater portions and methods of using such systems to treat a subsurface formation are described herein. A system may include a holding system configured to hold end portions of the two elongated heater portions so that the end portions are abutted together or located near each other; a shield for enclosing the end portions, and one or more inert gas inlets configured to provide at least one inert gas to flush the system with inert gas during welding of the end portions. The shield may be configured to inhibit oxidation during welding that joins the end portions together. The shield may include a hinged door that, when closed, is configured to at least partially isolate the interior of the shield from the atmosphere. The hinged door, when open, is configured to allow access to the interior of the shield.

  10. RSMASS-D models: An improved method for estimating reactor and shield mass for space reactor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, A.C.

    1997-10-01

    Three relatively simple mathematical models have been developed to estimate minimum reactor and radiation shield masses for liquid-metal-cooled reactors (LMRs), in-core thermionic fuel element (TFE) reactors, and out-of-core thermionic reactors (OTRs). The approach was based on much of the methodology developed for the Reactor/Shield Mass (RSMASS) model. Like the original RSMASS models, the new RSMASS-derivative (RSMASS-D) models use a combination of simple equations derived from reactor physics and other fundamental considerations, along with tabulations of data from more detailed neutron and gamma transport theory computations. All three models vary basic design parameters within a range specified by the user to achieve a parameter choice that yields a minimum mass for the power level and operational time of interest. The impact of critical mass, fuel damage, and thermal limitations are accounted for to determine the required fuel mass. The effect of thermionic limitations are also taken into account for the thermionic reactor models. All major reactor component masses are estimated, as well as instrumentation and control (I&C), boom, and safety system masses. A new shield model was developed and incorporated into all three reactor concept models. The new shield model is more accurate and simpler to use than the approach used in the original RSMASS model. The estimated reactor and shield masses agree with the mass predictions from separate detailed calculations within 15 percent for all three models.

  11. Raman analysis of complex pigment mixtures in 20th century metal knight shields of the Order of the Elephant.

    PubMed

    Lauridsen, Clara Bratt; Sanyova, Jana; Simonsen, Kim Pilkjær

    2015-11-05

    The pigment composition of six painted metal knight shields of the Order of the Elephant dating from the second half of the 20th century belonging to the Danish royal collection were studied using Raman microscopy. By focusing a 785 nm laser with a 50× objective on particles in paint cross sections, it was possible to identify the following 20 compounds: hematite, goethite, chrome red/orange, chrome yellow, zinc chrome yellow, carbon black, toluidine red PR3, chlorinated para red PR4, dinitroaniline orange PO5, phthalocyanine blue PB15, indanthrone blue PB60, ultramarine, Prussian blue, lead white, anatase, rutile, calcium carbonate, barium sulphate, gypsum and dolomite. The components were frequently present in complex pigment mixtures. Additional information was obtained by elemental analysis with scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) to identify cobalt blue, zinc white and cadmium red, as well as to indicate the presence of zinc white in some pigment mixtures. The study allowed a comparison between the industrially applied preparation layers and the artistic paint layers applied by the heraldic painter. Differences in the choice of paint and pigment types were observed on the earliest knight shields, demonstrating a general delay of industrial materials into artist paints.

  12. James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Integrated Science Instruments Module (ISIM) Electronics Compartment (IEC) Conformal Shields Composite Bond Structure Qualification Test Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yew, Calinda; Stephens, Matt

    2015-01-01

    The JWST IEC conformal shields are mounted onto a composite frame structure that must undergo qualification testing to satisfy mission assurance requirements. The composite frame segments are bonded together at the joints using epoxy, EA 9394. The development of a test method to verify the integrity of the bonded structure at its operating environment introduces challenges in terms of requirements definition and the attainment of success criteria. Even though protoflight thermal requirements were not achieved, the first attempt in exposing the structure to cryogenic operating conditions in a thermal vacuum environment resulted in approximately 1 bonded joints failure during mechanical pull tests performed at 1.25 times the flight loads. Failure analysis concluded that the failure mode was due to adhesive cracks that formed and propagated along stress concentrated fillets as a result of poor bond squeeze-out control during fabrication. Bond repairs were made and the structures successfully re-tested with an improved LN2 immersion test method to achieve protoflight thermal requirements.

  13. Advanced Multifunctional MMOD Shield: Radiation Shielding Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Christiansen, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Deep space missions must contend with a harsh radiation environment Impacts to crew and electronics. Need to invest in multifunctionality for spacecraft optimization. MMOD shield. Goals: Increase radiation mitigation potential. Retain overall MMOD shielding performance.

  14. Spacecraft Electrostatic Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This project analyzed the feasibility of placing an electrostatic field around a spacecraft to provide a shield against radiation. The concept was originally proposed in the 1960s and tested on a spacecraft by the Soviet Union in the 1970s. Such tests and analyses showed that this concept is not only feasible but operational. The problem though is that most of this work was aimed at protection from 10- to 100-MeV radiation. We now appreciate that the real problem is 1- to 2-GeV radiation. So, the question is one of scaling, in both energy and size. Can electrostatic shielding be made to work at these high energy levels and can it protect an entire vehicle? After significant analysis and consideration, an electrostatic shield configuration was proposed. The selected architecture was a torus, charged to a high negative voltage, surrounding the vehicle, and a set of positively charged spheres. Van de Graaff generators were proposed as the mechanism to move charge from the vehicle to the torus to generate the fields necessary to protect the spacecraft. This design minimized complexity, residual charge, and structural forces and resolved several concerns raised during the internal critical review. But, it still is not clear if such a system is costeffective or feasible, even though several studies have indicated usefulness for radiation protection at energies lower than that of the galactic cosmic rays. Constructing such a system will require power supplies that can generate voltages 10 times that of the state of the art. Of more concern is the difficulty of maintaining the proper net charge on the entire structure and ensuring that its interaction with solar wind will not cause rapid discharge. Yet, if these concerns can be resolved, such a scheme may provide significant radiation shielding to future vehicles, without the excessive weight or complexity of other active shielding techniques.

  15. Safety analysis report for the National Low-Temperature Neutron Irradiation Facility (NLTNIF) at the ORNL Bulk Shielding Reactor (BSR)

    SciTech Connect

    Coltman, R.R. Jr.; Kerchner, H.R.; Klabunde, C.E.; Richardson, S.A.

    1986-06-01

    This report provides information concerning: the experiment facility; experiment assembly; instrumentation and controls; materials; radioactivity; shielding; thermodynamics; estimated or measured reactivity effects; procedures; hazards; and quality assurance. (JDB)

  16. Analysis of damaging effects of laser-plasma accelerated shrapnels on protecting glass shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinkova, Michaela; Kalal, Milan; Shmatov, Mikhail L.

    2013-11-01

    Analysis of the damage caused by laser plasma accelerated fragments of metal target was performed. Measured as well as calculated parameters of craters and shrapnel found in BK7 glass blastshield are presented. Method applied for the measurement of parameters of craters is described. Potential damage of optical elements by the so-called striking cores (high-velocity stable objects arising due to collapse of cones or some other target parts toward their axes) that can be generated in IFE related experiments is evaluated.

  17. Analysis of MIR-18 results for physical and biological dosimetry: radiation shielding effectiveness in LEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Williams, J. R.; Dicello, J. F.

    2000-01-01

    We compare models of radiation transport and biological response to physical and biological dosimetry results from astronauts on the Mir space station. Transport models are shown to be in good agreement with physical measurements and indicate that the ratio of equivalent dose from the Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) to protons is about 3/2:1 and that this ratio will increase for exposures to internal organs. Two biological response models are used to compare to the Mir biodosimetry for chromosome aberration in lymphocyte cells; a track-structure model and the linear-quadratic model with linear energy transfer (LET) dependent weighting coefficients. These models are fit to in vitro data for aberration formation in human lymphocytes by photons and charged particles. Both models are found to be in reasonable agreement with data for aberrations in lymphocytes of Mir crew members: however there are differences between the use of LET dependent weighting factors and track structure models for assigning radiation quality factors. The major difference in the models is the increased effectiveness predicted by the track model for low charge and energy ions with LET near 10 keV/micrometers. The results of our calculations indicate that aluminum shielding, although providing important mitigation of the effects of trapped radiation, provides no protective effect from the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) in low-earth orbit (LEO) using either equivalent dose or the number of chromosome aberrations as a measure until about 100 g/cm 2 of material is used.

  18. Mechanism analysis of Magnetohydrodynamic heat shield system and optimization of externally applied magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kai; Liu, Jun; Liu, Weiqiang

    2017-04-01

    As a novel thermal protection technique for hypersonic vehicles, Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) heat shield system has been proved to be of great intrinsic value in the hypersonic field. In order to analyze the thermal protection mechanisms of such a system, a physical model is constructed for analyzing the effect of the Lorentz force components in the counter and normal directions. With a series of numerical simulations, the dominating Lorentz force components are analyzed for the MHD heat flux mitigation in different regions of a typical reentry vehicle. Then, a novel magnetic field with variable included angle between magnetic induction line and streamline is designed, which significantly improves the performance of MHD thermal protection in the stagnation and shoulder areas. After that, the relationships between MHD shock control and MHD thermal protection are investigated, based on which the magnetic field above is secondarily optimized obtaining better performances of both shock control and thermal protection. Results show that the MHD thermal protection is mainly determined by the Lorentz force's effect on the boundary layer. From the stagnation to the shoulder region, the flow deceleration effect of the counter-flow component is weakened while the flow deflection effect of the normal component is enhanced. Moreover, there is no obviously positive correlation between the MHD shock control and thermal protection. But once a good Lorentz force's effect on the boundary layer is guaranteed, the thermal protection performance can be further improved with an enlarged shock stand-off distance by strengthening the counter-flow Lorentz force right after shock.

  19. Calculation of thermal neutron self-shielding correction factors for aqueous bulk sample prompt gamma neutron activation analysis using the MCNP code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasrabadi, M. N.; Jalali, M.; Mohammadi, A.

    2007-10-01

    In this work thermal neutron self-shielding in aqueous bulk samples containing neutron absorbing materials is studied using bulk sample prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (BSPGNAA) with the MCNP code. The code was used to perform three dimensional simulations of a neutron source, neutron detector and sample of various material compositions. The MCNP model was validated against experimental measurements of the neutron flux performed using a BF 3 detector. Simulations were performed to predict thermal neutron self-shielding in aqueous bulk samples containing neutron absorbing solutes. In practice, the MCNP calculations are combined with experimental measurements of the relative thermal neutron flux over the sample's surface, with respect to a reference water sample, to derive the thermal neutron self-shielding within the sample. The proposed methodology can be used for the determination of the elemental concentration of unknown aqueous samples by BSPGNAA where knowledge of the average thermal neutron flux within the sample volume is required.

  20. Magnetic shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, J.A.; Stone, R.R.; Fabyan, J.

    1987-10-06

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient magnetic field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines. 3 figs.

  1. Magnetic shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, J.A.; Stone, R.R.; Fabyan, J.

    1985-02-12

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines.

  2. Magnetic shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, John A.; Stone, Roger R.; Fabyan, Joseph

    1987-01-01

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient magnetic field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines.

  3. US INTOR radiation-shield design

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, Y.; Abdou, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    The US analysis for the INTOR radiation-shield design focused on three areas. First, a careful optimization process for the inboard shield composition and material arrangement within the allowable radial shield thickness was performed to minimize the radiation effects in the toroidal field (TF) coils. The TF coils are designed to last the lifetime of the reactor without change in performance. Second, the outboard bulk shield composition and material arrangement were optimized to achieve a dose equivalent outside the bulk shield of less than or equal to 2.5 mrem/h within one day after shutdown to permit personnel access to the reactor hall. Third, the penetration shields were designed to satisfy the same requirements as the outboard bulk shield.

  4. Advanced Multifunctional MMOD Shield: Radiation Shielding Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Christiansen, Eric

    2011-01-01

    As NASA is looking to explore further into deep space, multifunctional materials are a necessity for decreasing complexity and mass. One area where multifunctional materials could be extremely beneficial is in the micrometeoroid orbital debris (MMOD) shield. A typical MMOD shield on the International Space Station (ISS) is a stuffed whipple shield consisting of multiple layers. One of those layers is the thermal blanket, or multi-layer insulation (MLI). By increasing the MMOD effectiveness of MLI blankets, while still preserving their thermal capabilities, could allow for a less massive MMOD shield. Thus, a study was conducted to evaluate concept MLI blankets for MMOD shields. In conjunction, these MLI blankets and the subsequent MMOD shields were also evaluated for their radiation shielding effectiveness towards protecting crew. These concepts were evaluated against the ISS MLI blankets and the ISS MMOD shield, which acted as the baseline. These radiation shielding assessments were performed using the high charge and energy transport software (HZETRN). This software is based on a one-dimensional formula of the Boltzmann transport equation with a straight-ahead approximation. Each configuration was evaluated against the following environments to provide a diverse view of radiation shielding effectiveness in most space environments within the heliosphere: August 1972 solar particle event, October 1989 solar particle event, 1982 galactic cosmic ray environment (during solar maximum), 1987 galactic cosmic ray environment (during solar minimum), and a low earth orbit environment in 1970 that corresponded to an altitude of 400 km and inclination of 51.6 . Both the absorbed dose and the dose equivalent were analyzed, but the focus of the discussion was on the dose equivalent since the data is most concerned with radiation shielding of the crew. The following paper outlines the evaluations performed and discusses the results and conclusions of this evaluation for

  5. Space reactor shielding fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, F. H.

    1972-01-01

    The fabrication of space reactor neutron shielding by a melting and casting process utilizing lithium hydride is described. The first neutron shield fabricated is a large pancake shape 86 inches in diameter, containing about 1700 pounds of lithium hydride. This shield, fabricated by the unique melting and casting process, is the largest lithium hydride shield ever built.

  6. Analytic Shielding Optimization to Reduce Crew Exposure to Ionizing Radiation Inside Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaza, Razvan; Cooper, Tim P.; Hanzo, Arthur; Hussein, Hesham; Jarvis, Kandy S.; Kimble, Ryan; Lee, Kerry T.; Patel, Chirag; Reddell, Brandon D.; Stoffle, Nicholas; Zapp, E. Neal; Shelfer, Tad D.

    2009-01-01

    A sustainable lunar architecture provides capabilities for leveraging out-of-service components for alternate uses. Discarded architecture elements may be used to provide ionizing radiation shielding to the crew habitat in case of a Solar Particle Event. The specific location relative to the vehicle where the additional shielding mass is placed, as corroborated with particularities of the vehicle design, has a large influence on protection gain. This effect is caused by the exponential- like decrease of radiation exposure with shielding mass thickness, which in turn determines that the most benefit from a given amount of shielding mass is obtained by placing it so that it preferentially augments protection in under-shielded areas of the vehicle exposed to the radiation environment. A novel analytic technique to derive an optimal shielding configuration was developed by Lockheed Martin during Design Analysis Cycle 3 (DAC-3) of the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). [1] Based on a detailed Computer Aided Design (CAD) model of the vehicle including a specific crew positioning scenario, a set of under-shielded vehicle regions can be identified as candidates for placement of additional shielding. Analytic tools are available to allow capturing an idealized supplemental shielding distribution in the CAD environment, which in turn is used as a reference for deriving a realistic shielding configuration from available vehicle components. While the analysis referenced in this communication applies particularly to the Orion vehicle, the general method can be applied to a large range of space exploration vehicles, including but not limited to lunar and Mars architecture components. In addition, the method can be immediately applied for optimization of radiation shielding provided to sensitive electronic components.

  7. Estimation of the Performance of Multiple Active Neutron Interrogation Signatures for Detecting Shielded HEU

    SciTech Connect

    David L. Chichester; Scott J. Thompson; Scott M. Watson; James T. Johnson; Edward H. Seabury

    2012-10-01

    A comprehensive modeling study has been carried out to evaluate the utility of multiple active neutron interrogation signatures for detecting shielded highly enriched uranium (HEU). The modeling effort focused on varying HEU masses from 1 kg to 20 kg; varying types of shields including wood, steel, cement, polyethylene, and borated polyethylene; varying depths of the HEU in the shields, and varying engineered shields immediately surrounding the HEU including steel, tungsten, and cadmium. Neutron and gamma-ray signatures were the focus of the study and false negative detection probabilities versus measurement time were used as a performance metric. To facilitate comparisons among different approaches an automated method was developed to generate receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves for different sets of model variables for multiple background count rate conditions. This paper summarizes results or the analysis, including laboratory benchmark comparisons between simulations and experiments. The important impact engineered shields can play towards degrading detectability and methods for mitigating this will be discussed.

  8. Shielding of manned space vehicles against protons and alpha particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alsmiller, R. G., Jr.; Santoro, R. T.; Barish, J.; Claiborne, H. C.

    1972-01-01

    The available information on the shielding of manned space vehicles against protons and alpha particles is summarized. The emphasis is placed on shielding against Van Allen belt protons and against solar-flare protons and alpha particles, but information on shielding against galactic cosmic rays is also presented. The approximation methods for use by nonexperts in the space shielding field are those that are standard in the space shielding literature.

  9. Comprehensive rotorcraft analysis methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Wendell B.; Austin, Edward E.

    1988-01-01

    The development and application of comprehensive rotorcraft analysis methods in the field of rotorcraft technology are described. These large scale analyses and the resulting computer programs are intended to treat the complex aeromechanical phenomena that describe the behavior of rotorcraft. They may be used to predict rotor aerodynamics, acoustic, performance, stability and control, handling qualities, loads and vibrations, structures, dynamics, and aeroelastic stability characteristics for a variety of applications including research, preliminary and detail design, and evaluation and treatment of field problems. The principal comprehensive methods developed or under development in recent years and generally available to the rotorcraft community because of US Army Aviation Research and Technology Activity (ARTA) sponsorship of all or part of the software systems are the Rotorcraft Flight Simulation (C81), Dynamic System Coupler (DYSCO), Coupled Rotor/Airframe Vibration Analysis Program (SIMVIB), Comprehensive Analytical Model of Rotorcraft Aerodynamics and Dynamics (CAMRAD), General Rotorcraft Aeromechanical Stability Program (GRASP), and Second Generation Comprehensive Helicopter Analysis System (2GCHAS).

  10. Multiphysics Engineering Analysis for an Integrated Design of ITER Diagnostic First Wall and Diagnostic Shield Module Design

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai, Y.; Loesser, G.; Smith, M.; Udintsev, V.; Giacomin, T., T.; Khodak, A.; Johnson, D,; Feder, R,

    2015-07-01

    ITER diagnostic first walls (DFWs) and diagnostic shield modules (DSMs) inside the port plugs (PPs) are designed to protect diagnostic instrument and components from a harsh plasma environment and provide structural support while allowing for diagnostic access to the plasma. The design of DFWs and DSMs are driven by 1) plasma radiation and nuclear heating during normal operation 2) electromagnetic loads during plasma events and associate component structural responses. A multi-physics engineering analysis protocol for the design has been established at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and it was used for the design of ITER DFWs and DSMs. The analyses were performed to address challenging design issues based on resultant stresses and deflections of the DFW-DSM-PP assembly for the main load cases. ITER Structural Design Criteria for In-Vessel Components (SDC-IC) required for design by analysis and three major issues driving the mechanical design of ITER DFWs are discussed. The general guidelines for the DSM design have been established as a result of design parametric studies.

  11. Shielding requirements in helical tomotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baechler, S.; Bochud, F. O.; Verellen, D.; Moeckli, R.

    2007-08-01

    Helical tomotherapy is a relatively new intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment for which room shielding has to be reassessed for the following reasons. The beam-on-time needed to deliver a given target dose is increased and leads to a weekly workload of typically one order of magnitude higher than that for conventional radiation therapy. The special configuration of tomotherapy units does not allow the use of standard shielding calculation methods. A conventional linear accelerator must be shielded for primary, leakage and scatter photon radiations. For tomotherapy, primary radiation is no longer the main shielding issue since a beam stop is mounted on the gantry directly opposite the source. On the other hand, due to the longer irradiation time, the accelerator head leakage becomes a major concern. An analytical model based on geometric considerations has been developed to determine leakage radiation levels throughout the room for continuous gantry rotation. Compared to leakage radiation, scatter radiation is a minor contribution. Since tomotherapy units operate at a nominal energy of 6 MV, neutron production is negligible. This work proposes a synthetic and conservative model for calculating shielding requirements for the Hi-Art II TomoTherapy unit. Finally, the required concrete shielding thickness is given for different positions of interest.

  12. Shielding requirements in helical tomotherapy.

    PubMed

    Baechler, S; Bochud, F O; Verellen, D; Moeckli, R

    2007-08-21

    Helical tomotherapy is a relatively new intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment for which room shielding has to be reassessed for the following reasons. The beam-on-time needed to deliver a given target dose is increased and leads to a weekly workload of typically one order of magnitude higher than that for conventional radiation therapy. The special configuration of tomotherapy units does not allow the use of standard shielding calculation methods. A conventional linear accelerator must be shielded for primary, leakage and scatter photon radiations. For tomotherapy, primary radiation is no longer the main shielding issue since a beam stop is mounted on the gantry directly opposite the source. On the other hand, due to the longer irradiation time, the accelerator head leakage becomes a major concern. An analytical model based on geometric considerations has been developed to determine leakage radiation levels throughout the room for continuous gantry rotation. Compared to leakage radiation, scatter radiation is a minor contribution. Since tomotherapy units operate at a nominal energy of 6 MV, neutron production is negligible. This work proposes a synthetic and conservative model for calculating shielding requirements for the Hi-Art II TomoTherapy unit. Finally, the required concrete shielding thickness is given for different positions of interest.

  13. Behavior analysis in consumer affairs: encouraging dental professionals to provide consumers with shielding from unnecessary X-ray exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Greene, B F; Neistat, M D

    1983-01-01

    An unobtrusive observation system was developed to determine the extent to which dental professionals in two communities provided lead shielding to patients during X-ray exams. A lengthy baseline revealed low and irregular provision of shielding among half of these professionals. Subsequently, a program was undertaken by a consumer's group in which these professionals were requested to provide shielding and were given confidential feedback regarding its use during the baseline period. The provision of shielding dramatically increased at all offices and was maintained throughout a follow-up period extending to more than 9 months after the program's implementation. Little or no generalized effect was observed in the occurrence of three collateral behaviors that were also assessed throughout the study. PMID:6833165

  14. Meteoroid/Debris Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L.

    2003-01-01

    This report provides innovative, low-weight shielding solutions for spacecraft and the ballistic limit equations that define the shield's performance in the meteoroid/debris environment. Analyses and hypervelocity impact testing results are described that have been used in developing the shields and equations. Spacecraft shielding design and operational practices described in this report are used to provide effective spacecraft protection from meteoroid and debris impacts. Specific shield applications for the International Space Station (ISS), Space Shuttle Orbiter and the CONTOUR (Comet Nucleus Tour) space probe are provided. Whipple, Multi-Shock and Stuffed Whipple shield applications are described.

  15. Determination of near-surface, crustal and lithospheric structures in the Canadian Precambrian Shield using time-domain electromagnetic and magnetotelluric methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xianghong

    Two electromagnetic methods were used to analyse the geoelectric structure of the subsurface of regions of the Precambrian Shield in Canada: the magnetotelluric (MT) and time-domain electromagnetic (TEM) methods. Magnetotelluric soundings were made at 60 sites in the southwestern Northwest Territories, Canada, along the LITHOPROBE SNORCLE Transect Corridor 1 and 1A, in the summer of 1996. The sites are located in southwestern Northwest Territories, Canada, between latitudes 60°--65°N and longitudes 110°--125°W, and cross the Archean Slave Province, the Proterozoic Buffalo Head, Great Bear Magmatic Arc, Hottah, Fort Simpson and Nahanni terranes, and the Great Slave Lake Shear Zone. Phanerozoic sedimentary rocks overlie the Proterozoic terranes. The main object of this project is to map the fracture zones and fresh/saline water interface in Precambrian granitic rocks using the surface TEM method. The TEM surveys were completed at Sites B, D, URL and A. A GEONICS PROTEM47 system with a 100 m transmitter loop was used. The data were collected for receiver offsets ranging from 0--280 m on four sides of transmitter loop. Analysis of the TEM and borehole log data indicates a basic three-layer structure: a thin conductive surface layer, a thick resistive second layer with an embedded conductive layer at some stations, and a conductive bottom layer. The results of this study show the TEM method can be used to investigate the fracture zones and groundwater salinity distribution in the Precambrian granitic rocks and contribute to site investigations for nuclear waste deposit. The TEM study in the Lac du Bonnet Batholith was successful in demonstrating the potential of the TEM methods in mapping groundwater salinity in granitic batholith. The PROTEM47 instrument, in combination with a 100 m transmitter loop, provides a suitable TEM system for mapping the resistivity structure of the Lac du Bonnet batholith down to a depth of 300--400 m. For deeper penetration and more

  16. VELM61 and VELM22: Multigroup cross-section libraries for sodium-cooled reactor shield analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, C.Y.; Ingersoll, D.T.

    1987-04-01

    Two coupled neutron and photon multigroup cross-section libraries, derived from ENDF/B-V nuclear data, are described. The energy group structures, 61n/23..gamma.. and 22n/10..gamma.., are subsets of the Vitamin-E 174n/38..gamma.. group structure, and are tailored to the iron and sodium resonances, windows, and capture gamma-ray spectra. Each of the two libraries are available in two formats, the AMPX master format and the ANISN format. Cross sections for all materials in the Vitamin-E library were collapsed using a standard energy weighting function, and in addition, several cross-section sets for each of the major constituents of commercial grade sodium, stainless steel (types 304 and 316), and carbon steel were derived using several problem-dependent weighting functions for averaging the fine groups. Effects of various group structures and weighting functions on the accuracy of the broad group libraries are studied by ANISN analysis of a typical sodium-iron shield configuration.

  17. Fabrication of nano-Fe3O4 3D structure on carbon fibers as a microwave absorber and EMI shielding composite by modified EPD method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholampoor, Mahdi; Movassagh-Alanagh, Farid; Salimkhani, Hamed

    2017-02-01

    Recently, electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding materials have absorbed a lot of attention due to a growing need for application in the area of electronic and wireless devices. In this study, a carbon-based EMI shielding composite was fabricated by electrophoretic deposition of Fe3O4 nano-particles on carbon fibers (CFs) as a 3D structure incorporated with an epoxy resin. Co-precipitation method was employed to synthesize Fe3O4 nano-particles. This as-synthesized Fe3O4 nano-powder was then successfully deposited on CFs using a modified multi-step electrophoretic deposition (EPD) method. The results of structural studies showed that the Fe3O4 nano-particles (25 nm) were successfully and uniformly deposited on CFs. The measured magnetic properties of as-synthesized Fe3O4 nano-powder and nano-Fe3O4/CFs composite showed that the saturation magnetization of bare Fe3O4 was decreased from Ms = 72.3 emu/g to Ms = 33.1 emu/g for nano-Fe3O4/CFs composite and also corecivity of Fe3O4 was increased from Hc = 4.9 Oe to Hc = 168 Oe for composite. The results of microwave absorption tests revealed that the reflection loss (RL) of an epoxy-based nano-Fe3O4/CFs composite are significantly influenced by layer thickness. The maximum RL value of -10.21 dB at 10.12 GHz with an effective absorption bandwidth about 2 GHz was obtained for the sample with the thickness of 2 mm. It also exhibited an EMI shielding performance of -23 dB for whole the frequency range of 8.2-12.4 GHz.

  18. Watching a disappearing shield

    SciTech Connect

    Stolarski, R.S.

    1988-10-01

    The remote-sensing techniques used to monitor atmospheric ozone levels are reviewed, and recent results are discussed. The importance of the ozone layer as a shield for UV radiation is stressed, and the impact of human activities generating ozone-destroying compounds is considered. Ground-based, airborne, balloon-borne, and satellite remote-sensing methods are shown to complement each other to provide both global coverage and detailed structural information. Data obtained with the Nimbus-7 TOMS and solar-backscatter UV instruments are presented in graphs and briefly characterized.

  19. Spacecraft ceramic protective shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larriva, Rene F. (Inventor); Nelson, Anne (M.); Czechanski, James G. (Inventor); Poff, Ray E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A low areal density protective shield apparatus, and method for making same, for protecting spacecraft structures from impact with hypervelocity objects, including a bumper member comprising a bumper ceramic layer, a bumper shock attenuator layer, and a bumper confining layer. The bumper ceramic layer can be SiC or B.sub.4 C; the bumper shock attenuator layer can be zirconia felt; and the bumper confining layer can be aluminum. A base armor member can be spaced from the bumper member and a ceramic fiber-based curtain can be positioned between the bumper and base armor members.

  20. Jet shielding of jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Amiet, R. K.; Schlinker, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was conducted to develop a validated first principle analysis for predicting the jet noise reduction achieved by shielding one jet exhaust flow with a second, closely spaced, identical jet flow. A generalized fuel jet noise analytical model was formulated in which the acoustic radiation from a source jet propagates through the velocity and temperature discontinuity of the adjacent shielding jet. Input variables to the prediction procedure include jet Mach number, spacing, temperature, diameter, and source frequency. Refraction, diffraction, and reflection effects, which control the dual jet directivity pattern, are incorporated in the theory. The analysis calculates the difference in sound pressure level between the dual jet configuration and the radiation field based on superimposing two independent jet noise directivity patterns. Jet shielding was found experimentally to reduce noise levels in the common plane of the dual jet system relative to the noise generated by two independent jets.

  1. NEUTRONIC REACTOR SHIELD

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.; Zinn, W.H.

    1957-09-24

    The reactor radiation shield material is comprised of alternate layers of iron-containing material and compressed cellulosic material, such as masonite. The shielding material may be prefabricated in the form of blocks, which can be stacked together in ary desired fashion to form an effective shield.

  2. Application of DOT-MORSE coupling to the analysis of three-dimensional SNAP shielding problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straker, E. A.; Childs, R. L.; Emmett, M. B.

    1972-01-01

    The use of discrete ordinates and Monte Carlo techniques to solve radiation transport problems is discussed. A general discussion of two possible coupling schemes is given for the two methods. The calculation of the reactor radiation scattered from a docked service and command module is used as an example of coupling discrete ordinates (DOT) and Monte Carlo (MORSE) calculations.

  3. Space reactor shielding: an assessment of the technology

    SciTech Connect

    Bartine, D.E.; Engle, W.W. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Space power reactor systems require shielding to protect payload and reactor shielding components, and also maintenance and operating personnel. Shield composition, size, and shape are important design considerations, since the shield can dominate the overall weight of the system. Techniques for space reactor shield design analysis and optimization and experimental test facilities are available for design verification. With these tools, a shielding technology in support of current and future space power reactor systems can be developed. Efforts in this direction should begin with a generic shielding program to provide information on materials properties and geometric effects and should be followed by project-specific shielding programs to provide design optimization and prototype shield verification.

  4. Coupled Radiation Transport/Thermal Analysis of the Radiation Shield for a Space Nuclear Reactor.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-07-01

    all material properties . The effect of the aluminum on the stiffness of the unit cell can be examined with CCM results. At elevated temperatures...CL 9/ [19p Eu I;fL 4- 1’ U - (0 I b * e4/ a 0 115I VI While the material properties of aluminum are known with a fair degree of certainty even at... Properties Used in Composite Cylinders Model Analysis Room Temperature, T = 293 K LiH: E a 72.4 GPa G a 27.8 GPa V M .3-.2 Aluminum 1100 E - 69.0 GPa G a 26.0

  5. Ion beam thruster shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Power, J. L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An ion thruster beam shield is provided that comprises a cylindrical housing that extends downstream from the ion thruster and a plurality of annular vanes which are spaced along the length of the housing, and extend inwardly from the interior wall of the housing. The shield intercepts and stops all charge exchange and beam ions, neutral propellant, and sputter products formed due to the interaction of beam and shield emanating from the ion thruster outside of a fixed conical angle from the thruster axis. Further, the shield prevents the sputter products formed during the operation of the engine from escaping the interior volume of the shield.

  6. Shielding for beta-gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, J J

    1993-06-01

    The build-up factor, B, for lead was expressed as a polynominal cubic function of the relaxation length, mu x, and incorporated in a "general beta-gamma shielding equation." A computer program was written to determine shielding thickness for polyenergetic beta-gamma sources without resorting to the conventional "add-one-HVL" method.

  7. A novel self-shielding permanent-magnet rotor assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potenziani, E., II; Leupold, H. A.; Basarab, D. J.

    1988-11-01

    The use of permanent magnets in brushless motors and generators is highly desirable in that they have great potential for reducing weight and increasing efficiency. A self-shielding cylindrical permanent-magnet assembly has been designed and was found to produce high fields at the outer magnet surface and very little flux leakage into the interior rotor space. Construction of this assembly is simplified because it is composed of magnets of simple triangular cross sections, which have only four distinct orientations. The self-shielding nature of the design obviates any need for ferromagnetic material for flux shaping or shielding, thus simplifying greatly the mathematical analysis of the design and reducing its weight and bulk. Finite element methods are used to analyze a hypothetical permanent-magnet rotor assembly with regard to various design parameters.

  8. Anisotropy in the flexural response of the Indian Shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Rajesh R.; Singh, Yudhvir; Trivedi, Deshraj; Kandpal, Suresh Ch.

    2012-04-01

    We seek to determine the strain field which has accumulated in the Indian Shield due to the continental drift of Gondwanaland. We have used a method which involves the calculation of the 2D isostatic coherence response function between Bouguer gravity and topography as a function of azimuth by way of multispectrogram analysis. The average coherence is maximum consistently in the Indian Shield in a direction, which is at an angle of 45° to the major trend of suture zones within the shield, a result which is in good agreement with the strain inferred from absolute plate motion (APM) in a hot spot reference frame. This directionality of mechanical plate weakness suggests that all paleostress fields were erased due to the movement of the Indian plate during the Himalayan orogeny.

  9. OPTIMAL BETA-RAY SHIELDING THICKNESSES FOR DIFFERENT THERAPEUTIC RADIONUCLIDES AND SHIELDING MATERIALS.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yong In; Kim, Ja Mee; Kim, Jung Hoon

    2016-04-06

    To better understand the distribution of deposited energy of beta and gamma rays according to changes in shielding materials and thicknesses when radionuclides are used for therapeutic nuclear medicine, a simulation was conducted. The results showed that due to the physical characteristics of each therapeutic radionuclide, the thicknesses of shielding materials at which beta-ray shielding takes place varied. Additional analysis of the shielding of gamma ray was conducted for radionuclides that emit both beta and gamma rays simultaneously with results showing shielding effects proportional to the atomic number and density of the shielding materials. Also, analysis of bremsstrahlung emission after beta-ray interactions in the simulation revealed that the occurrence of bremsstrahlung was relatively lower than theoretically calculated and varied depending on different radionuclides.

  10. A model for the rapid evaluation of active magnetic shielding designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washburn, Scott Allen

    The use of active magnetic radiation shielding designs has the potential to reduce the radiation exposure received by astronauts on deep-space missions at a significantly lower mass penalty than designs that utilize only passive shielding. One of the common techniques for assessing the effectiveness of active or passive shielding designs is the use of Monte Carlo analysis to determine crew radiation exposure. Unfortunately, Monte Carlo analysis is a lengthy and computationally intensive process, and the associated time requirements to generate results make a broad analysis of the active magnetic shield design trade space impractical using this method. The ability to conduct a broad analysis of system design variables would allow the selection of configurations suited to specific mission goals, including mission radiation exposure limits, duration, and destination. Therefore, a rapid analysis method is required in order to effectively assess active shielding design parameters, and this body of work was developed in order to address this need. Any shielding analysis should also use complete representations of the radiation environment and detailed transport analyses to account for secondary particle production mechanisms. This body of work addresses both of these issues by utilizing the full Galactic Cosmic Radiation GCR flux spectrum and a detailed transport analysis to account for secondary particle effects due to mass interactions. Additionally, there is a complex relationship between the size and strength of an active shielding design and the amount and type of mass required to create it. This mass can significantly impact the resulting flux and radiation exposures inside the active shield, and any shielding analysis should not only include passive mass, but should attempt to provide a reasonable estimate of the actual mass associated with a given design. Therefore, a survey of active shielding systems is presented so that reasonable mass quantity and composition

  11. Hypervelocity impact shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cour-Palais, Burton G. (Inventor); Crews, Jeanne Lee (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A hypervelocity impact shield and method for protecting a wall structure, such as a spacecraft wall, from impact with particles of debris having densities of about 2.7 g/cu cm and impact velocities up to 16 km/s are disclosed. The shield comprises a stack of ultra thin sheets of impactor disrupting material supported and arranged by support means in spaced relationship to one another and mounted to cover the wall in a position for intercepting the particles. The sheets are of a number and spacing such that the impacting particle and the resulting particulates of the impacting particle and sheet material are successively impact-shocked to a thermal state of total melt and/or vaporization to a degree as precludes perforation of the wall. The ratio of individual sheet thickness to the theoretical diameter of particles of debris which may be of spherical form is in the range of 0.03 to 0.05. The spacing between adjacent sheets is such that the debris cloud plume of liquid and vapor resulting from an impacting particle penetrating a sheet does not puncture the next adjacent sheet prior to the arrival thereat of fragment particulates of sheet material and the debris particle produced by a previous impact.

  12. Cable shield connecting device

    DOEpatents

    Silva, Frank A.

    1979-01-01

    A cable shield connecting device for installation on a high voltage cable of the type having a metallic shield, the device including a relatively conformable, looped metal bar for placement around a bared portion of the metallic shield to extend circumferentially around a major portion of the circumference of the metallic shield while being spaced radially therefrom, a plurality of relatively flexible metallic fingers affixed to the bar, projecting from the bar in an axial direction and spaced circumferentially along the bar, each finger being attached to the metallic shield at a portion located remote from the bar to make electrical contact with the metallic shield, and a connecting conductor integral with the bar.

  13. Speciation Analysis of Arsenic by Selective Hydride Generation-Cryotrapping-Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry with Flame-in-Gas-Shield Atomizer: Achieving Extremely Low Detection Limits with Inexpensive Instrumentation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This work describes the method of a selective hydride generation-cryotrapping (HG-CT) coupled to an extremely sensitive but simple in-house assembled and designed atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) instrument for determination of toxicologically important As species. Here, an advanced flame-in-gas-shield atomizer (FIGS) was interfaced to HG-CT and its performance was compared to a standard miniature diffusion flame (MDF) atomizer. A significant improvement both in sensitivity and baseline noise was found that was reflected in improved (4 times) limits of detection (LODs). The yielded LODs with the FIGS atomizer were 0.44, 0.74, 0.15, 0.17 and 0.67 ng L–1 for arsenite, total inorganic, mono-, dimethylated As and trimethylarsine oxide, respectively. Moreover, the sensitivities with FIGS and MDF were equal for all As species, allowing for the possibility of single species standardization with arsenate standard for accurate quantification of all other As species. The accuracy of HG-CT-AFS with FIGS was verified by speciation analysis in two samples of bottled drinking water and certified reference materials, NRC CASS-5 (nearshore seawater) and SLRS-5 (river water) that contain traces of methylated As species. As speciation was in agreement with results previously reported and sums of all quantified species corresponded with the certified total As. The feasibility of HG-CT-AFS with FIGS was also demonstrated by the speciation analysis in microsamples of exfoliated bladder epithelial cells isolated from human urine. The results for the sums of trivalent and pentavalent As species corresponded well with the reference results obtained by HG-CT-ICPMS (inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry). PMID:25300934

  14. The Copper Sulfide Coating on Polyacrylonitrile with Chelating Agents by an Electroless Deposition Method and its EMI Shielding Effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Roan, M.-L.; Chen, Y.-H.; Huang, C.-Y.

    2008-08-28

    In this study, a variety of concentrations of chelating agents were added to obtain the anchoring effect and chelating effect in the electroless plating bath. The mechanism of the Cu{sub x(x=1,2)}S growth and the electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness (EMI SE) of the composite were studied. It was found that the vinyl acetate residued in PAN substrate would be purged due to the swelling effect by chelating agents solution. And then, the anchoring effect occurred due to the hydrogen bonding between the pits of PAN substrate and the chelating agent. Consequently, the copper sulfide layer deposited by the electroless plating reaction with EDTA and TEA. The swelling degree (S{sub d}) was proposed and evaluated from the FT-IR spectra. The relationship between swelling degree of the PAN films and EDTA (C) is expressed as: S{sub d} = 0.13+0.90xe and (-15.15C). And TEA series is expressed as: S{sub d} = 0.07+1.00xe and (-15.15C). On the other hand, the FESEM micrograph showed that the average thickness of copper sulfide increased from 76 nm to 383 nm when the concentration of EDTA increased from 0.00M to 0.20M. Consequently, the EMI SE of the composites increased from 10{approx}12 dB to 25{approx}27 dB. The GIA-XRD analyze indicated that the deposited layer consisted of CuS and Cu{sub 2}S.

  15. RADIATION SHIELDING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.

    1958-09-23

    ABS>A radiation shield that is suitable for the protection of personnel from both gamma rays and nentrons is described. The shield is comprised of a hollow wall and an aggregate consisting of iron and water in approximately equal amounts by volume substantially filling the wall. A means is provided to circulate the water through the wall to cool the shield when in use.

  16. A linear- and sublinear-scaling method for calculating NMR shieldings in atomic orbital-based second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Marina; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2013-05-07

    An atomic-orbital (AO) based formulation for calculating nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shieldings at the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory level is introduced, which provides a basis for reducing the scaling of the computational effort with the molecular size from the fifth power to linear and for a specific nucleus to sublinear. The latter sublinear scaling in the rate-determining steps becomes possible by avoiding global perturbations with respect to the magnetic field and by solving for quantities that involve the local nuclear magnetic spin perturbation instead. For avoiding the calculation of the second-order perturbed density matrix, we extend our AO-based reformulation of the Z-vector method within a density matrix-based scheme. Our pilot implementation illustrates the fast convergence with respect to the required number of Laplace points and the asymptotic scaling behavior in the rate-determining steps.

  17. The Unified-FFT Method for Fast Solution of Integral Equations as Applied to Shielded-Domain Electromagnetic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rautio, Brian

    Electromagnetic (EM) solvers are widely used within computer-aided design (CAD) to improve and ensure success of circuit designs. Unfortunately, due to the complexity of Maxwell's equations, they are often computationally expensive. While considerable progress has been made in the realm of speed-enhanced EM solvers, these fast solvers generally achieve their results through methods that introduce additional error components by way of geometric approximations, sparse-matrix approximations, multilevel decomposition of interactions, and more. This work introduces the new method, Unified-FFT (UFFT). A derivative of method of moments, UFFT scales as O(N log N), and achieves fast analysis by the unique combination of FFT-enhanced matrix fill operations (MFO) with FFT-enhanced matrix solve operations (MSO). In this work, two versions of UFFT are developed, UFFT-Precorrected (UFFT-P) and UFFT-Grid Totalizing (UFFT-GT). UFFT-P uses precorrected FFT for MSO and allows the use of basis functions that do not conform to a regular grid. UFFT-GT uses conjugate gradient FFT for MSO and features the capability of reducing the error of the solution down to machine precision. The main contribution of UFFT-P is a fast solver, which utilizes FFT for both MFO and MSO. It is demonstrated in this work to not only provide simulation results for large problems considerably faster than state of the art commercial tools, but also to be capable of simulating geometries which are too complex for conventional simulation. In UFFT-P these benefits come at the expense of a minor penalty to accuracy. UFFT-GT contains further contributions as it demonstrates that such a fast solver can be accurate to numerical precision as compared to a full, direct analysis. It is shown to provide even more algorithmic efficiency and faster performance than UFFT-P. UFFT-GT makes an additional contribution in that it is developed not only for planar geometries, but also for the case of multilayered dielectrics and

  18. The design of asymmetric 4 pi shields for space reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engle, W. W., Jr.; Childs, R. L.; Mynatt, F. R.

    1972-01-01

    A one dimensional shield optimization program based on the method of discrete ordinates has been developed and is used to determine material thicknesses used in asymmetric 4 pion shields for space power reactors. The two dimensional discrete ordinates program DOT is used to check the design, and the information generated in the DOT calculation is used as a guide in shaping the shield which may be considered a first step in two dimensional shield optimization.

  19. 3D Space Radiation Transport in a Shielded ICRU Tissue Sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Slaba, Tony C.; Badavi, Francis F.; Reddell, Brandon D.; Bahadori, Amir A.

    2014-01-01

    A computationally efficient 3DHZETRN code capable of simulating High Charge (Z) and Energy (HZE) and light ions (including neutrons) under space-like boundary conditions with enhanced neutron and light ion propagation was recently developed for a simple homogeneous shield object. Monte Carlo benchmarks were used to verify the methodology in slab and spherical geometry, and the 3D corrections were shown to provide significant improvement over the straight-ahead approximation in some cases. In the present report, the new algorithms with well-defined convergence criteria are extended to inhomogeneous media within a shielded tissue slab and a shielded tissue sphere and tested against Monte Carlo simulation to verify the solution methods. The 3D corrections are again found to more accurately describe the neutron and light ion fluence spectra as compared to the straight-ahead approximation. These computationally efficient methods provide a basis for software capable of space shield analysis and optimization.

  20. A basic study of the effect of the shielding method with polyglycolic acid fabric and fibrin glue after endoscopic submucosal dissection.

    PubMed

    Hiroyuki, Tsujimoto; Kohki, Yamanaka; Hiroe, Miyamoto; Tsunehito, Horii; Rie, Abe; Shota, Tanaka; Hiroko, Torii; Yuki, Ozamoto; Takagi, Toshitaka; Kengo, Takimoto; Takashi, Torii; Hideyuki, Konishi; Hideki, Takamori; Akeo, Hagiwara

    2016-12-01

    Background and study aims: Recently, the shielding method with polyglycolic acid (PGA) fabric and fibrin glue (P-F method) has been reported to prevent serious complications after endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). However, the effectiveness and mechanism to prevent complications by this method remain unclear and the corresponding basic research has not been fully conducted. Methods and results: We examined the effectiveness and mechanism of the P-F method, using a surgical ESD model of canine stomach and in vitro experiments. In the model experiment treated by P-F method or no treatment (control), ulcer perforation or penetration occurred only in the control group, but not in the P-F group. Microscopically, the P-F group showed less damages of the ulcer lesion than that of the control group, showing thicker granulation tissues including PGA fibers on the third day and excellent mucosal regeneration on the fourteenth day. In vitro culture experiments showed that fibroblasts proliferated at a significantly higher rate on PGA than on fibrin or a complex thereof. However, under hydrochloric acid treatment, fibroblasts were protected by fibrin, followed by the complex of both, and PGA. Conclusion: The P-F method exhibited a protective effect against gastric juice by fibrin glue to reduce tissue damages and a scaffold function of PGA fabric to induce better granulation formation at the earlier phase, resulting in excellent long-term tissue repair, on ulcer lesion following ESD, although the results were based on basic experiments.

  1. A basic study of the effect of the shielding method with polyglycolic acid fabric and fibrin glue after endoscopic submucosal dissection

    PubMed Central

    Hiroyuki, Tsujimoto; Kohki, Yamanaka; Hiroe, Miyamoto; Tsunehito, Horii; Rie, Abe; Shota, Tanaka; Hiroko, Torii; Yuki, Ozamoto; Takagi, Toshitaka; Kengo, Takimoto; Takashi, Torii; Hideyuki, Konishi; Hideki, Takamori; Akeo, Hagiwara

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Recently, the shielding method with polyglycolic acid (PGA) fabric and fibrin glue (P-F method) has been reported to prevent serious complications after endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). However, the effectiveness and mechanism to prevent complications by this method remain unclear and the corresponding basic research has not been fully conducted. Methods and results: We examined the effectiveness and mechanism of the P-F method, using a surgical ESD model of canine stomach and in vitro experiments. In the model experiment treated by P-F method or no treatment (control), ulcer perforation or penetration occurred only in the control group, but not in the P-F group. Microscopically, the P-F group showed less damages of the ulcer lesion than that of the control group, showing thicker granulation tissues including PGA fibers on the third day and excellent mucosal regeneration on the fourteenth day. In vitro culture experiments showed that fibroblasts proliferated at a significantly higher rate on PGA than on fibrin or a complex thereof. However, under hydrochloric acid treatment, fibroblasts were protected by fibrin, followed by the complex of both, and PGA. Conclusion: The P-F method exhibited a protective effect against gastric juice by fibrin glue to reduce tissue damages and a scaffold function of PGA fabric to induce better granulation formation at the earlier phase, resulting in excellent long-term tissue repair, on ulcer lesion following ESD, although the results were based on basic experiments. PMID:27995192

  2. On the morphometry of terrestrial shield volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosse, Pablo; Kervyn, Matthieu

    2016-04-01

    Shield volcanoes are described as low angle edifices that have convex up topographic profiles and are built primarily by the accumulation of lava flows. This generic view of shields' morphology is based on a limited number of monogenetic shields from Iceland and Mexico, and a small set of large oceanic islands (Hawaii, Galapagos). Here, the morphometry of over 150 monogenetic and polygenetic shield volcanoes, identified inthe Global Volcanism Network database, are analysed quantitatively from 90-meter resolution DEMs using the MORVOLC algorithm. An additional set of 20 volcanoes identified as stratovolcanoes but having low slopes and being dominantly built up by accumulation of lava flows are documented for comparison. Results show that there is a large variation in shield size (volumes range from 0.1 to >1000 km3), profile shape (height/basal width ratios range from 0.01 to 0.1), flank slope gradients, elongation and summit truncation. Correlation and principal component analysis of the obtained quantitative database enables to identify 4 key morphometric descriptors: size, steepness, plan shape and truncation. Using these descriptors through clustering analysis, a new classification scheme is proposed. It highlights the control of the magma feeding system - either central, along a linear structure, or spatially diffuse - on the resulting shield volcano morphology. Genetic relationships and evolutionary trends between contrasted morphological end-members can be highlighted within this new scheme. Additional findings are that the Galapagos-type morphology with a central deep caldera and steep upper flanks are characteristic of other shields. A series of large oceanic shields have slopes systematically much steeper than the low gradients (<4-8°) generally attributed to large Hawaiian-type shields. Finally, the continuum of morphologies from flat shields to steeper complex volcanic constructs considered as stratovolcanoes calls for a revision of this oversimplified

  3. Resonance self-shielding methodology in MPACT

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Collins, B.; Kochunas, B.; Martin, W.; Kim, K. S.; Williams, M.

    2013-07-01

    The resonance self-shielding methods of the neutron transport code Michigan Parallel Characteristics based Transport (MPACT) are described in this paper. Two resonance-integral table based methods are utilized to resolve the resonance self-shielding effect. The subgroup method is a mature approach used in MPACT as the basic functionality for the resonance calculation. Another new iterative method, named the embedded self-shielding method is also implemented in MPACT. Comparisons of the two methods as well as their numerical verifications are presented. The results show that MPACT is capable of modeling the resonance self-shielding in a variety of PWR benchmarking cases, including difficult fuel lattice cases with poison, control rods or mixed gadolinia fuel rods. (authors)

  4. Prediction of melanoma metastasis by the Shields index based on lymphatic vessel density

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Melanoma usually presents as an initial skin lesion without evidence of metastasis. A significant proportion of patients develop subsequent local, regional or distant metastasis, sometimes many years after the initial lesion was removed. The current most effective staging method to identify early regional metastasis is sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB), which is invasive, not without morbidity and, while improving staging, may not improve overall survival. Lymphatic density, Breslow's thickness and the presence or absence of lymphatic invasion combined has been proposed to be a prognostic index of metastasis, by Shields et al in a patient group. Methods Here we undertook a retrospective analysis of 102 malignant melanomas from patients with more than five years follow-up to evaluate the Shields' index and compare with existing indicators. Results The Shields' index accurately predicted outcome in 90% of patients with metastases and 84% without metastases. For these, the Shields index was more predictive than thickness or lymphatic density. Alternate lymphatic measurement (hot spot analysis) was also effective when combined into the Shields index in a cohort of 24 patients. Conclusions These results show the Shields index, a non-invasive analysis based on immunohistochemistry of lymphatics surrounding primary lesions that can accurately predict outcome, is a simple, useful prognostic tool in malignant melanoma. PMID:20478045

  5. INTOR radiation shielding for personnel access

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, Y.; Abdou, M.

    1981-01-01

    The INTOR reactor shield system consists of the blanket, bulk shield, penetration shield, component shield, and biological shield. The bulk shield consists of two parts: (a) the inboard shield; and (b) the outboard shield. The distinction between the different components of the shield system is essential to satisfy the different design constraints and achieve various objectives.

  6. A survey of industry practices regarding shielding of substations against direct lightning strokes

    SciTech Connect

    Mousa, A.M. ); Wehling, R.J. )

    1993-01-01

    A survey of industry practices regarding shielding of substations against direct lightning strokes is presented and analyzed. The survey is based on responses from 114 companies including consultants and utilities both from within and from outside North America. The survey identifies the shielding design methods in use, the factors affecting the selection of a shielding method, the shielding design criteria and the governing factors, the performance of the different shielding methods and miscellaneous related aspects. The survey revealed a large number (35) of shielding failure incidents; 34 of which occurred in systems designed using either the fixed shielding angle method or Wagner's 1942 method.

  7. SIR-B analysis of the Precambrian shield of Sudan and Egypt: Penetration studies and subsurface mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, T. H.; Roth, L.; Stern, R. J.; Almond, D. C.; Kroner, A.; Elshazly, E. M.

    1984-01-01

    A shuttle imaging radar-B (SIR-B) study is proposed for the Precambrian shield in southeast Egypt and northeast Sudan in an area east of the Nile. The phenomenon of radar penetration of thin, dry eolian/alluvial cover is to be confirmed and quantified. The penetration phenomenon is to be used to map structural and lithologic features. Field work to be done in conjunction with image acquisition is discussed.

  8. Dielectric flashover with triple point shielding in a coaxial geometry.

    PubMed

    Benwell, A; Kovaleski, S D; Gahl, J

    2007-11-01

    Increasing performance of vacuum insulator barriers is a common goal in pulsed power. Insulating performance is continually being improved while new methods are developed. Triple point shielding techniques have been shown to increase flashover voltage, but the role of cathode versus anode shielding is still not fully understood. Open circuit flashover characteristics were obtained for a coaxial geometry to view the effects of triple point shielding for this geometry. The tests included applying various combinations of triple point shields on zero and +45 degrees insulators. Shielding was tested at the cathode triple point outside of the dielectric and at the anode triple point inside the dielectric. The role of anode versus cathode triple point shielding was examined. Flashover voltage was observed to increase when either a cathode or anode triple point shield was applied; however, adding a shield to both regions lowered the flashover threshold. Both triple point regions were found to be important and dependent on each other for some coaxial geometries.

  9. NEUTRONIC REACTOR SHIELDING

    DOEpatents

    Borst, L.B.

    1961-07-11

    A special hydrogenous concrete shielding for reactors is described. In addition to Portland cement and water, the concrete essentially comprises 30 to 60% by weight barytes aggregate for enhanced attenuation of fast neutrons. The biological shields of AEC's Oak Ridge Graphite Reactor and Materials Testing Reactor are particular embodiments.

  10. Shielding for thermal neutrons.

    PubMed

    McCall, R C

    1997-01-01

    The problem of calculating the neutron capture gamma-ray dose rate due to thermal neutron capture in a boron or cadmium rectangular shield is considered. An example is given for shielding for a door at the exit of medical accelerator room maze in order to determine the optimum location of lead relative to the borated polyethylene.

  11. TFCX shielding optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, S.; Gohar, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Design analyses and tradeoff studies for the bulk shield of the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) were performed. Several shielding options were considered to lower the capital cost of the shielding system. Optimization analyses were carried out to reduce the nuclear responses in the TF coils and the dose equivalent in the reactor hall one day after shutdown. Two TFCX designs with different toroidal field (TF) coil configurations were considered during this work. The materials for the shield were selected based upon tradeoff studies and the results from the previous design studies. The main shielding materials are water, concrete, and steel balls (Fe1422 or Nitronic 33). Small amounts of boron carbide and lead are employed to reduce activation, nuclear heating in the TF coils, and dose equivalent after shutdown.

  12. Graphitic heat shields for solar probe missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundell, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of using a graphitic heat-shield system on a solar probe going to within 4 solar radii of the center of the sun is investigated. An analysis of graphite vaporization, with commonly used vaporization coefficients, indicates that the maximum mass-loss rate from a conical shield as large as 4 m in diameter can be kept low enough to avoid interference with measurements of the solar environment. In addition to the mass-loss problem, the problem of protecting the payload from the high-temperature (up to 2300 K) primary shield must be solved. An analysis of radiation exchange between concentric disks provides a technique for designing the intermediate shielding. The technique is applied to the design of a system for the Starprobe spacecraft, and it is found that a system with 10 shields and a payload surface temperature of 600 K will have a payload diameter of 2.45 m. Since this is 61% of the 4-m diameter of the primary shield, it is concluded that a graphitic heat-shield system is feasible for the Starprobe mission.

  13. Complementing Gender Analysis Methods.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anant

    2016-01-01

    The existing gender analysis frameworks start with a premise that men and women are equal and should be treated equally. These frameworks give emphasis on equal distribution of resources between men and women and believe that this will bring equality which is not always true. Despite equal distribution of resources, women tend to suffer and experience discrimination in many areas of their lives such as the power to control resources within social relationships, and the need for emotional security and reproductive rights within interpersonal relationships. These frameworks believe that patriarchy as an institution plays an important role in women's oppression, exploitation, and it is a barrier in their empowerment and rights. Thus, some think that by ensuring equal distribution of resources and empowering women economically, institutions like patriarchy can be challenged. These frameworks are based on proposed equality principle which puts men and women in competing roles. Thus, the real equality will never be achieved. Contrary to the existing gender analysis frameworks, the Complementing Gender Analysis framework proposed by the author provides a new approach toward gender analysis which not only recognizes the role of economic empowerment and equal distribution of resources but suggests to incorporate the concept and role of social capital, equity, and doing gender in gender analysis which is based on perceived equity principle, putting men and women in complementing roles that may lead to equality. In this article the author reviews the mainstream gender theories in development from the viewpoint of the complementary roles of gender. This alternative view is argued based on existing literature and an anecdote of observations made by the author. While criticizing the equality theory, the author offers equity theory in resolving the gender conflict by using the concept of social and psychological capital.

  14. Dynamic Open-Rotor Composite Shield Impact Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seng, Silvia; Frankenberger, Charles; Ruggeri, Charles R.; Revilock, Duane M.; Pereira, J. Michael; Carney, Kelly S.; Emmerling, William C.

    2015-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is working with the European Aviation Safety Agency to determine the certification base for proposed new engines that would not have a containment structure on large commercial aircraft. Equivalent safety to the current fleet is desired by the regulators, which means that loss of a single fan blade will not cause hazard to the aircraft. NASA Glenn and Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) China Lake collaborated with the FAA Aircraft Catastrophic Failure Prevention Program to design and test a shield that would protect the aircraft passengers and critical systems from a released blade that could impact the fuselage. This report documents the live-fire test from a full-scale rig at NAWC China Lake. NASA provided manpower and photogrammetry expertise to document the impact and damage to the shields. The test was successful: the blade was stopped from penetrating the shield, which validates the design analysis method and the parameters used in the analysis. Additional work is required to implement the shielding into the aircraft.

  15. MicroShield/ISOCS gamma modeling comparison.

    SciTech Connect

    Sansone, Kenneth R

    2013-08-01

    Quantitative radiological analysis attempts to determine the quantity of activity or concentration of specific radionuclide(s) in a sample. Based upon the certified standards that are used to calibrate gamma spectral detectors, geometric similarities between sample shape and the calibration standards determine if the analysis results developed are qualitative or quantitative. A sample analyzed that does not mimic a calibrated sample geometry must be reported as a non-standard geometry and thus the results are considered qualitative and not quantitative. MicroShieldR or ISOCSR calibration software can be used to model non-standard geometric sample shapes in an effort to obtain a quantitative analytical result. MicroShieldR and Canberras ISOCSR software contain several geometry templates that can provide accurate quantitative modeling for a variety of sample configurations. Included in the software are computational algorithms that are used to develop and calculate energy efficiency values for the modeled sample geometry which can then be used with conventional analysis methodology to calculate the result. The response of the analytical method and the sensitivity of the mechanical and electronic equipment to the radionuclide of interest must be calibrated, or standardized, using a calibrated radiological source that contains a known and certified amount of activity.

  16. DNA DSB induced by iron ions in human fibroblasts: LET dependence and shielding efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonelli, F.; Belli, M.; Campa, A.; Dini, V.; Esposito, G.; Furusawa, Y.; Rydberg, B.; Simone, G.; Sorrentino, E.; Tabocchini, M. A.

    Galactic Cosmic Rays represent one of the main sources of charged particle radiation outside the magnetic field of the Earth, containing particles of all charges, in a wide energy range. As HZE particles interact with a shield, they fragment and deposit energy at rates depending on the nature and energy of the incident particles, and on the nature and thickness of the shield. We have studied the DNA DSB induction in human fibroblasts by iron ions of different energies (5 GeV/u, 1 GeV/u, 500 MeV/u and 200 MeV) in the absence or presence of different shields (PMMA, Al and Pb). Measure of DNA DSB was performed by gel electrophoresis and .fragmentation analysis. The RBE for unshielded and shielded beams has been plotted as a function of the dose average LET, and the relationship shows a maximum of 1.7 at about 140 keV/μ m (5 GeV/u iron ions). The dose average LET seems to adequately describe the effectiveness of degraded beams since their RBEs fall roughly on the same relationship of the unshielded beams. The cross section for unshielded beams increases with LET. The shielding efficiency has been evaluated by the ratio between the cross sections for unshielded and shielded beams (SPF, shielding protection factor). When this ratio is plotted as a function of the shield thickness (g/cm2), different relationships were found for beams with different energy. For 500 MeV/u iron ions, the presence of the shields gives SPF lower than unity, independently of thickness and material. For 1 GeV/u iron beams, SPF values are always higher than unity. Moreover, PMMA shield gives a higher SPF than Al or Pb shields having the same residual range but different thickness. The higher SPF of PMMA has been confirmed in experiments performed with 5 GeV/u iron beams and different shields having the same thickness. The SPF found for 1 and 5 GeV/u iron ions remain constant also when the fragmentation analysis used for evaluating DNA DSB is extended to fragments of smaller size. The fragment

  17. Heat Shield in Pieces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This image from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the remains of the rover's heat shield, broken into two key pieces, the main piece on the left side and a broken-off flank piece near the middle of the image. The heat shield impact site is identified by the circle of red dust on the right side of the picture. In this view, Opportunity is approximately 20 meters (66 feet) away from the heat shield, which protected it while hurtling through the martian atmosphere.

    In the far left of the image, a meteorite called 'Heat Shield Rock,' sits nearby, The Sun is reflecting off the silver-colored underside of the internal thermal blankets of the heat shield.

    The rover spent 36 sols investigating how the severe heating during entry through the atmosphere affected the heat shield. The most obvious is the fact that the heat shield inverted upon impact.

    This is an approximately true-color rendering of the scene acquired around 1:22 p.m. local solar time on Opportunity sol 324 (Dec. 21, 2004) in an image mosaic using panoramic filters at wavelengths of 750, 530, and 430 nanometers.

  18. A coupled numerical analysis of shield temperatures, heat losses and residual gas pressures in an evacuated super-insulation using thermal and fluid networks. Part III: Unsteady-state conditions (evacuation period)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, H.

    2006-12-01

    This paper analyses the evacuation period of a 300 L super-insulated cryogenic storage tank for liquid nitrogen. Storage tank and radiation shields are the same as in part I of this paper. The present analysis extends application of stationary fluid networks to unsteady-states to determine local, residual gas pressures between shields and the evacuation time of a multilayer super-insulation. Parameter tests comprise magnitude of desorption from radiation shields, spacers and container walls and their influence on length of the evacuation period. Calculation of the integrals over time-dependent desorption rates roughly confirms weight losses of radiation shields obtained after heating and out-gassing the materials, as reported in the literature. After flooding the insulation space with dry N 2-gas, the evacuation time can enormously be reduced, from 72 to 4 h, to obtain a residual gas pressure of 0.01 Pa in-between shields of this storage tank. Permeation of nitrogen through container walls is of no importance for residual gas pressures. The simulations finally compare freezing H 2O-layers adsorbed on shields, spacers and container walls with flooding of the materials.

  19. Shielding against galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schimmerling, W.; Wilson, J. W.; Nealy, J. E.; Thibeault, S. A.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Shinn, J. L.; Kim, M.; Kiefer, R.

    1996-01-01

    Ions of galactic origin are modified but not attenuated by the presence of shielding materials. Indeed, the number of particles and the absorbed energy behind most shield materials increases as a function of shield thickness. The modification of the galactic cosmic ray composition upon interaction with shielding is the only effective means of providing astronaut protection. This modification is intimately conntected with the shield transport porperties and is a strong function of shield composition. The systematic behavior of the shield properites in terms of microscopic energy absorption events will be discussed. The shield effectiveness is examined with respect to convectional protection practice and in terms of a biological endpoint: the efficiency for reduction of the probability of transformation of shielded C3H1OT1/2 mouse cells. The relative advantage of developing new shielding technologies is discussed in terms of a shield performance as related to biological effect and the resulting uncertainty in estimating astronaut risk.

  20. The radiation field measurement and analysis outside the shielding of A 10 MeV electron irradiation accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Jing; Li, Juexin; Xu, Bing; Li, Yuxiong

    2011-10-01

    Electron accelerators are employed widely for diverse purposes in the irradiation-processing industry, from sterilizing medical products to treating gemstones. Because accelerators offer high efficiency, high power, and require little preventative maintenance, they are becoming more and more popular than using the 60Co isotope approach. However, the electron accelerator exposes potential radiation hazards. To protect workers and the public from exposure to radiation, the radiation field around the electronic accelerator must be assessed, especially that outside the shielding. Thus, we measured the radiation dose at different positions outside the shielding of a 10-MeV electron accelerator using a new data-acquisition unit named Mini-DDL (Mini-Digital Data Logging). The measurements accurately reflect the accelerator's radiation status. In this paper, we present our findings, results and compare them with our theoretical calculations. We conclude that the measurements taken outside the irradiation hall are consistent with the findings from our calculations, except in the maze outside the door of the accelerator room. We discuss the reason for this discrepancy.

  1. Methods of Cosmochemical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiri, S.; Maiti, M.

    Some radionuclides, like 10Be (T 1/2 = 1.5 Ma), 14C (T 1/2 = 5,730 years), 26Al (T 1/2 = 0.716 Ma), 53Mn (T 1/2 = 3.7 Ma), and 60Fe (T 1/2 = 1.5 Ma), 146Sm (T 1/2 = 103 Ma), 182Hf (T 1/2 = 9 Ma), 244Pu (T 1/2 = 80 Ma) are either being produced continuously by the interaction of cosmic rays (CR) or might have been produced in supernovae millions of years ago. Analysis of these radionuclides in ultratrace scale has strong influence in almost all branches of sciences, starting from archaeology to biology, nuclear physics to astrophysics. However, measurement of these radionuclides appeared as a borderline problem exploiting their decay properties because of scarcity in natural archives and long half-life. The one and only way seemed to be that of mass measurement. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is the best suited for this purpose. Apart from AMS, other mass measurement techniques like inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), resonant laser ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS), secondary ionization mass spectrometry (SIMS) have also been used with limited sensitivity and approach.

  2. Radiation shielding of the main injector

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C.M.; Martin, P.S.

    1995-05-01

    The radiation shielding in the Fermilab Main Injector (FMI) complex has been carried out by adopting a number of prescribed stringent guidelines established by a previous safety analysis. Determination of the required amount of radiation shielding at various locations of the FMI has been done using Monte Carlo computations. A three dimensional ray tracing code as well as a code based upon empirical observations have been employed in certain cases.

  3. Extraterrestrial Regolith Derived Atmospheric Entry Heat Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogue, Michael D.; Mueller, Robert P.; Sibille, Laurent; Hintze, Paul E.; Rasky, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    High-mass planetary surface access is one of NASAs technical challenges involving entry, descent and landing (EDL). During the entry and descent phase, frictional interaction with the planetary atmosphere causes a heat build-up to occur on the spacecraft, which will rapidly destroy it if a heat shield is not used. However, the heat shield incurs a mass penalty because it must be launched from Earth with the spacecraft, thus consuming a lot of precious propellant. This NASA Innovative Advanced Concept (NIAC) project investigated an approach to provide heat shield protection to spacecraft after launch and prior to each EDL thus potentially realizing significant launch mass savings. Heat shields fabricated in situ can provide a thermal-protection system for spacecraft that routinely enter a planetary atmosphere. By fabricating the heat shield with space resources from materials available on moons and asteroids, it is possible to avoid launching the heat-shield mass from Earth. Regolith has extremely good insulating properties and the silicates it contains can be used in the fabrication and molding of thermal-protection materials. In this paper, we will describe three types of in situ fabrication methods for heat shields and the testing performed to determine feasibility of this approach.

  4. Shielding of the Hip Prosthesis During Radiation Therapy for Heterotopic Ossification is Associated with Increased Failure of Prophylaxis

    SciTech Connect

    Balboni, Tracy A.; Gaccione, Peter; Gobezie, Reuben; Mamon, Harvey J. . E-mail: hmamon@partners.org

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy (RT) is frequently administered to prevent heterotopic ossification (HO) after total hip arthroplasty (THA). The purpose of this study was to determine if there is an increased risk of HO after RT prophylaxis with shielding of the THA components. Methods and Materials: This is a retrospective analysis of THA patients undergoing RT prophylaxis of HO at Brigham and Women's Hospital between June 1994 and February 2004. Univariate and multivariate logistic regressions were used to assess the relationships of all variables to failure of RT prophylaxis. Results: A total of 137 patients were identified and 84 were eligible for analysis (61%). The median RT dose was 750 cGy in one fraction, and the median follow-up was 24 months. Eight of 40 unshielded patients (20%) developed any progression of HO compared with 21 of 44 shielded patients (48%) (p = 0.009). Brooker Grade III-IV HO developed in 5% of unshielded and 18% of shielded patients (p 0.08). Multivariate analysis revealed shielding (p = 0.02) and THA for prosthesis infection (p = 0.03) to be significant predictors of RT failure, with a trend toward an increasing risk of HO progression with age (p = 0.07). There was no significant difference in the prosthesis failure rates between shielded and unshielded patients. Conclusions: A significantly increased risk of failure of RT prophylaxis for HO was noted in those receiving shielding of the hip prosthesis. Shielding did not appear to reduce the risk of prosthesis failure.

  5. What Is Radiation Shielding?

    NASA Video Gallery

    Kerry Lee, NASA Orion radiation system manager, explains how radiation shielding is used to block harmful particles coming into the spacecraft without producing secondary particles that can cause e...

  6. Adhesive particle shielding

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rader, Daniel John; Walton, Christopher; Folta, James

    2009-01-06

    An efficient device for capturing fast moving particles has an adhesive particle shield that includes (i) a mounting panel and (ii) a film that is attached to the mounting panel wherein the outer surface of the film has an adhesive coating disposed thereon to capture particles contacting the outer surface. The shield can be employed to maintain a substantially particle free environment such as in photolithographic systems having critical surfaces, such as wafers, masks, and optics and in the tools used to make these components, that are sensitive to particle contamination. The shield can be portable to be positioned in hard-to-reach areas of a photolithography machine. The adhesive particle shield can incorporate cooling means to attract particles via the thermophoresis effect.

  7. Crash-Resistant Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bixler, Charles H.

    1990-01-01

    Impact-resistant shield designed to consist of aluminum honeycomb structure sandwiched between inner and outer aluminum skins. Intended to protect radioisotope thermoelectric generator of spacecraft from impact with ground or water after free fall from upper atmosphere. Designed to absorb impact energy by buckling, while inner and outer skins designed to protect against shrapnel, overpressure, and impact loads. Concept of shield applicable to crashproof compartments for ground vehicles and aircraft.

  8. Traditional Methods for Mineral Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Robert E.; Carpenter, Charles E.

    This chapter describes traditional methods for analysis of minerals involving titrimetric and colorimetric procedures, and the use of ion selective electrodes. Other traditional methods of mineral analysis include gravimetric titration (i.e., insoluble forms of minerals are precipitated, rinse, dried, and weighed) and redox reactions (i.e., mineral is part of an oxidation-reduction reaction, and product is quantitated). However, these latter two methods will not be covered because they currently are used little in the food industry. The traditional methods that will be described have maintained widespread usage in the food industry despite the development of more modern instrumentation such as atomic absorption spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (Chap. 24). Traditional methods generally require chemicals and equipment that are routinely available in an analytical laboratory and are within the experience of most laboratory technicians. Additionally, traditional methods often form the basis for rapid analysis kits (e.g., Quantab®; for salt determination) that are increasingly in demand. Procedures for analysis of minerals of major nutritional or food processing concern are used for illustrative purposes. For additional examples of traditional methods refer to references (1-6). Slight modifications of these traditional methods are often needed for specific foodstuffs to minimize interferences or to be in the range of analytical performance. For analytical requirements for specific foods see the Official Methods of Analysis of AOAC International (5) and related official methods (6).

  9. Analysis of the effect of different absorber materials and loading on the shielding effectiveness of a metallic enclosure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parr, S.; Karcoon, H.; Dickmann, S.; Rambousky, R.

    2015-11-01

    Metallic rooms as part of a complex system, like a ship, are necessarily connected electromagnetically via apertures and cables to the outside. Therefore, their electromagnetic shielding effectiveness (SE) is limited by ventilation openings, cable feed-throughs and door gaps. Thus, electronic equipment inside these rooms is susceptible to outer electromagnetic threats like IEM (Intentional Electromagnetic Interference). Dielectric or magnetic absorber inside such a screened room can be used in order to prevent the SE from collapsing at the resonant frequencies. In this contribution, the effect of different available absorber materials is compared, as well as other properties like weight and workability. Furthermore, parameter variations of the absorber as well as the effect of loading in form of metallic and dielectric structures on the SE are analyzed.

  10. Probabilistic methods for rotordynamics analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Y.-T.; Torng, T. Y.; Millwater, H. R.; Fossum, A. F.; Rheinfurth, M. H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper summarizes the development of the methods and a computer program to compute the probability of instability of dynamic systems that can be represented by a system of second-order ordinary linear differential equations. Two instability criteria based upon the eigenvalues or Routh-Hurwitz test functions are investigated. Computational methods based on a fast probability integration concept and an efficient adaptive importance sampling method are proposed to perform efficient probabilistic analysis. A numerical example is provided to demonstrate the methods.

  11. Electromagnetic and Stress Analyses of the ITER Equatorial Thermal Shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Mingzhun; Song, Yuntao; Wang, Songke; Wang, Xianwei

    2013-08-01

    The ITER equatorial thermal shield is located inside the cryostat and outside the vacuum vessel, and its purpose is to provide a thermal shield from hot components to the superconducting magnets. Electromagnetic analysis of the equatorial thermal shield was performed using the ANSYS code, because electromagnetic load was one of the main loads. The 40° sector finite element model was established including the vacuum vessel, equatorial thermal shield, and superconducting magnets. The main purpose of this analysis was to investigate the eddy current and electromagnetic force in the equatorial thermal shield during plasma disruption. Stress analysis was implemented under the electromagnetic load. The results show that the equatorial thermal shield can accommodate the calculated electromagnetic loads.

  12. Radiation Exposure Analyses Supporting the Development of Solar Particle Event Shielding Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Steven A.; Clowdsley, Martha S.; Abston, H. Lee; Simon, Hatthew A.; Gallegos, Adam M.

    2013-01-01

    NASA has plans for long duration missions beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). Outside of LEO, large solar particle events (SPEs), which occur sporadically, can deliver a very large dose in a short amount of time. The relatively low proton energies make SPE shielding practical, and the possibility of the occurrence of a large event drives the need for SPE shielding for all deep space missions. The Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) RadWorks Storm Shelter Team was charged with developing minimal mass SPE storm shelter concepts for missions beyond LEO. The concepts developed included "wearable" shields, shelters that could be deployed at the onset of an event, and augmentations to the crew quarters. The radiation transport codes, human body models, and vehicle geometry tools contained in the On-Line Tool for the Assessment of Radiation In Space (OLTARIS) were used to evaluate the protection provided by each concept within a realistic space habitat and provide the concept designers with shield thickness requirements. Several different SPE models were utilized to examine the dependence of the shield requirements on the event spectrum. This paper describes the radiation analysis methods and the results of these analyses for several of the shielding concepts.

  13. Comparison of Hartmann analysis methods.

    PubMed

    Canovas, Carmen; Ribak, Erez N

    2007-04-01

    Analysis of Hartmann-Shack wavefront sensors for the eye is traditionally performed by locating and centroiding the sensor spots. These centroids provide the gradient, which is integrated to yield the ocular aberration. Fourier methods can replace the centroid stage, and Fourier integration can replace the direct integration. The two--demodulation and integration--can be combined to directly retrieve the wavefront, all in the Fourier domain. Now we applied this full Fourier analysis to circular apertures and real images. We performed a comparison between it and previous methods of convolution, interpolation, and Fourier demodulation. We also compared it with a centroid method, which yields the Zernike coefficients of the wavefront. The best performance was achieved for ocular pupils with a small boundary slope or far from the boundary and acceptable results for images missing part of the pupil. The other Fourier analysis methods had much higher tolerance to noncentrosymmetric apertures.

  14. Shields-1, A SmallSat Radiation Shielding Technology Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomsen, D. Laurence, III; Kim, Wousik; Cutler, James W.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center Shields CubeSat initiative is to develop a configurable platform that would allow lower cost access to Space for materials durability experiments, and to foster a pathway for both emerging and commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) radiation shielding technologies to gain spaceflight heritage in a relevant environment. The Shields-1 will be Langleys' first CubeSat platform to carry out this mission. Radiation shielding tests on Shields-1 are planned for the expected severe radiation environment in a geotransfer orbit (GTO), where advertised commercial rideshare opportunities and CubeSat missions exist, such as Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1). To meet this objective, atomic number (Z) graded radiation shields (Zshields) have been developed. The Z-shield properties have been estimated, using the Space Environment Information System (SPENVIS) radiation shielding computational modeling, to have 30% increased shielding effectiveness of electrons, at half the thickness of a corresponding single layer of aluminum. The Shields-1 research payload will be made with the Z-graded radiation shields of varying thicknesses to create dose-depth curves to be compared with baseline materials. Additionally, Shields-1 demonstrates an engineered Z-grade radiation shielding vault protecting the systems' electronic boards. The radiation shielding materials' performances will be characterized using total ionizing dose sensors. Completion of these experiments is expected to raise the technology readiness levels (TRLs) of the tested atomic number (Z) graded materials. The most significant contribution of the Z-shields for the SmallSat community will be that it enables cost effective shielding for small satellite systems, with significant volume constraints, while increasing the operational lifetime of ionizing radiation sensitive components. These results are anticipated to increase the development of CubeSat hardware design for increased mission lifetimes, and enable

  15. Undulator Beam Pipe Magnetic Shielding Effect Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Andrew; Wolf, Zachary; /SLAC

    2010-11-23

    The proposed stainless steel beampipe for the LCLS undulator has a measurable shielding effect on the magnetic field of the LCLS undulators. This note describes the tests used to determine the magnitude of the shielding effect, as well as deviations in the shielding effect caused by placing different phase shims in the undulator gap. The effect of the proposed Steel strongback which will be used to support the beam pipe, was also studied. A hall probe on a 3 axis movement system was set up to measure the main component of the magnetic field in the Prototype Undulator. To account for temperature variations of the magnetic field of the undulator for successive tests, a correction is applied which is described in this technical note. Using this method, we found the shielding effect, the amount which the field inside the gap was reduced due to the placement of the beampipe, to be {approx}10 Gauss. A series of tests was also performed to determine the effect of phase shims and X and Y correction shims on the shielding. The largest effect on shielding was found for the .3 mm phase shims. The effect of the .3 mm phase shims was to increase the shielding effect {approx}4 Gauss. The tolerance for the shielding effect of the phase shims is less than 1 gauss. The effect of the strongback was seen in its permanent magnetic field. It introduced a dipole field across the measured section of the undulator of {approx}3 gauss. This note documents the tests performed to determine these effects, as well as the results of those tests.

  16. Shielded, Automated Umbilical Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barron, Daniel R.; Morrill, Brion F.; Jasulaitis, Vytas

    1995-01-01

    Umbilical mechanism automatically connects and disconnects various fluid couplings and/or electrical contacts while shielding mating parts from debris. Reacts mating and demating loads internally, without additional supporting structures. All functions - extension of plug, mating, and movement of debris shields - actuated by single motor. If mechanism jams or fails at any point in sequence, override feature in drive train allows manual operation. Designed for service in outer space, where its shields protect against micrometeoroids, debris, ultraviolet radiation, and atomic oxygen. Used on Earth to connect or disconnect fluid or electrical utilities in harsh environments like those of nuclear powerplants or undersea construction sites, or in presence of radioactive, chemical, or biological hazards, for example.

  17. Radiation shielding composition

    DOEpatents

    Quapp, W.J.; Lessing, P.A.

    1998-07-28

    A composition is disclosed for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm{sup 3} and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile. 5 figs.

  18. Radiation shielding composition

    DOEpatents

    Quapp, William J.; Lessing, Paul A.

    2000-12-26

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm.sup.3 and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile.

  19. Radiation shielding composition

    DOEpatents

    Quapp, William J.; Lessing, Paul A.

    1998-01-01

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm.sup.3 and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile.

  20. Space station MMOD shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, Eric L.; Nagy, Kornel; Lear, Dana M.; Prior, Thomas G.

    2009-10-01

    This paper describes the International Space Station (ISS) micro-meteoroid orbital debris (MMOD) impact shielding including the requirements for protection as well as technical approaches to meeting the requirements. Current activities in providing MMOD protection for ISS are described, including efforts to augment MMOD protection by adding shields on-orbit. Another activity is to observe MMOD impact damage on ISS elements and returned hardware, and to compare the observed damage with predicted damage using Bumper code risk assessment software. A conclusion of this paper is that ISS will be protected adequately from MMOD impact after completing augmentation of ISS shielding for service module, and after improving MMOD protection for Soyuz and Progress vehicles. Another conclusion is that impact damage observed to the ISS mini-pressurized logistics module matches the distribution of impacts predicted by Bumper code.

  1. Opportunity's Heat Shield Scene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This image from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity reveals the scene of the rover's heat shield impact. In this view, Opportunity is approximately 130 meters (427 feet) away from the device that protected it while hurtling through the martian atmosphere.

    The rover spent 36 sols investigating how the severe heating during entry through the atmosphere affected the heat shield. The most obvious is the fact that the heat shield inverted upon impact.

    This is the panoramic camera team's best current attempt at generating a true-color view of what this scene would look like if viewed by a human on Mars. It was generated from a mathematical combination of six calibrated, left-eye panoramic camera images acquired around 1:50 p.m. local solar time on Opportunity's sol 322 (Dec. 19, 2004) using filters ranging in wavelengths from 430 to 750 nanometers.

  2. Waterway Shielding System and Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-04-30

    for 14 monitoring waterways and, more specifically, to a system 15 comprising a plurality of underwater communication networks and 16 sensors linked to...and Southern European markets . 4 Only one-half mile wide at the narrowest point, the Turkish 5 straits offer another terrorist opportunity to have a...communications research and development with unmanned undersea 25 vehicles (UUV). As well, a variety of sensors monitor .5 1 environmental conditions in

  3. Glove box shield

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, Larry W.; Hoenes, Glenn R.

    1981-01-01

    According to the present invention, a shield for a glove box housing radioactive material is comprised of spaced apart clamping members which maintain three overlapping flaps in place therebetween. There is a central flap and two side flaps, the side flaps overlapping at the interior edges thereof and the central flap extending past the intersection of the side flaps in order to insure that the shield is always closed when the user withdraws his hand from the glove box. Lead loaded neoprene rubber is the preferred material for the three flaps, the extent of lead loading depending upon the radiation levels within the glove box.

  4. Glove box shield

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Hoenes, G.R.

    A shield for a glove box housing radioactive material is comprised of spaced apart clamping members which maintain three overlapping flaps in place therebetween. There is a central flap and two side flaps, the side flaps overlapping at the interior edges thereof and the central flap extending past the intersection of the side flaps in order to insure that the shield is always closed when the user wthdraws his hand from the glove box. Lead loaded neoprene rubber is the preferred material for the three flaps, the extent of lead loading depending upon the radiation levels within the glove box.

  5. Composition for radiation shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1994-01-01

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield has a depleted urum core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container.

  6. Induced Magnetic Field Due to Reaction Wheel Shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudney, M. A.; Kapfunde, G.; Trougnou, L.

    2016-05-01

    In situ magnetic field measurements are of critical importance to unanswered questions on the inner heliosphere, such as: how the corona and solar wind are accelerated and heated; how the solar magnetic field evolves over a solar cycle; and how this field links into space. However, accurate spacecraft magnetometer measurements require reliable in-flight calibration. The magnetic interference caused by reaction wheels on magnetometer measurements in space is well known, and a common mitigation method is to use magnetic shielding. However, the presence of high-permeability material in-flight has the side-effect of distorting the true ambient field. We present a theoretical analysis of this distortion, and suggest a transfer function that can be used to recover the ambient field from the distorted dataset. Experimental measurements on a shield prototype for the Solar Orbiter mission agree with predictions to within an order of magnitude, demonstrating a distortion of approximately 1 part in 104.

  7. Optimal Shielding for Minimum Materials Cost of Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Woolley, Robert D.

    2014-08-01

    Material costs dominate some shielding design problems. This is certainly the case for manned nuclear power space applications for which shielding is essential and the cost of launching by rocket from earth is high. In such situations or in those where shielding volume or mass is constrained, it is important to optimize the design. Although trial and error synthesis methods may succeed a more systematic approach is warranted. Design automation may also potentially reduce engineering costs.

  8. Further analysis and evaluation of the results of the NATO common shield-DAT#7 experiment: defence against terrorism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dill, Stephan; Peichl, Markus; Jirousek, Matthias; Süß, Helmut

    2009-09-01

    The contactless control of persons and the remote surveillance of sensitive infrastructures are important tasks in order to provide the required security measures to protect the human population against the threads of international terrorism. Passive microwave imaging allows a daytime independent observation and examination of objects and persons under nearly all adverse ambient conditions without artificial exposure, hence fully avoiding health risks. The penetration capability of microwaves provides the detection of objects through atmospheric obstacles like bad weather, fog or dust, vapour and smoke, as well as through thin non-metallic materials and clothing. For the latter the detection of hidden objects like weapons, explosives, and contraband is possible by monitoring dielectric anomalies. The experiment "Common Shield" is part of a perennial investigation series leaded by the "Center for Transformation of the German armed forces (Bundeswehr)". In 2008 the protection of soldiers and facilities was experimentally investigated under the aspect of a networked operational leadership. In this context as well a harbour protection trial was carried out in August/September 2008 at the naval base Eckernfoerde in Germany. This trial was part of the NATO CNADs program of work for "Defence Against Terrorism (DAT)" starting in 2003, and Germany is the lead nation for item 7 on "Technology for Intelligence, Surveillance, Reconnaissance & Target Acquisition of Terrorists (ISRTA)". One main activity in the Eckernfoerde trial was the simulation of a military entrance control facility by a tent including various imaging and a chemical sensor suite in order to provide security for a military camp. Besides commercial optical and infrared cameras various passive millimeter-wave imagers have been used from different German research institutions. The DLR Microwaves and Radar Institute, Department for Reconnaissance and Security (HR-AS), provided an imaging radiometer scanner

  9. Diffraction analysis of a double-shielded antenna in theFraunhofer and Fresnel regimes: Model predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Tello, C.; Villela, T.; Wuensche, C.A.; Figueiredo, N.; Torres,S.; Bersanelli, M.; Bensadoun, M.; De Amici, G.; Smoot, G.F.

    1999-01-01

    We analytically investigate the use of a wire mesh ground screen (fence) and a halo of extension panels around a helically fed parabolic reflector in order to estimate the ground contribution to the antenna noise temperature in an experiment aimed at surveying the sky at decimeter wavelengths. We use geometric diffraction theory to model the effect of these screening and blocking shields when scanning in azimu that tilt angles from zenith in the range 0 degrees greater than or equal to Z greater than or equal to 45 degrees. We report estimates based on existing formulas for monofilar axial-mode helical antennas with expected low-level sidelobes in the direction of the halo region. As long as there is no significant coupling between the near-field patterns of both the feed and the diffracting halo, estimates using the Fraunhofer approximation agree with those calculated with the Fresnel approach at a tilt angle Z(eq), which increases with the proximity of the diffracting edge from the near-/far-field boundary of the feed pattern. Our estimates show that for a fence of some IO-dB attenuation and high enough to level out the horizon profile at the prime focus of the antenna, the diffracted components dominate the contribution for tilt angles Z less than or similar to 35 degrees. The fence is the main diffractor when Z greater than or similar to 20 degrees, but for Z greater than or similar to 25 degrees its contribution becomes insensitive to the presence of the halo. On the other hand, if the attenuation is low (<1dB), the increase in ground solid angle with tilt angle makes the contribution due to transmission and ground exposure the dominant one.

  10. Seismic Velocity Structure and Depth-Dependence of Anisotropy in the Red Sea and Arabian Shield from Surface Wave Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, S; Gaherty, J; Schwartz, S; Rodgers, A; Al-Amri, A

    2007-07-25

    We investigate the lithospheric and upper mantle structure as well as the depth-dependence of anisotropy along the Red Sea and beneath the Arabian Peninsula using receiver function constraints and phase velocities of surface waves traversing two transects of stations from the Saudi Arabian National Digital Seismic Network. Frequency-dependent phase delays of fundamental-mode Love and Rayleigh waves, measured using a cross-correlation procedure, require very slow shear velocities and the presence of anisotropy throughout the upper mantle. Linearized inversion of these data produce path-averaged 1D radially anisotropic models with about 4% anisotropy in the lithosphere, increasing to about 4.8% anisotropy across the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB). Models with reasonable crustal velocities in which the mantle lithosphere is isotropic cannot satisfy the data. The lithospheric lid, which ranges in thickness from about 70 km near the Red Sea coast to about 90 km beneath the Arabian Shield, is underlain by a pronounced low-velocity zone with shear velocities as low as 4.1 km/s. Forward models, which are constructed from previously determined shear-wave splitting estimates, can reconcile surface and body wave observations of anisotropy. The low shear velocity values are similar to many other continental rift and oceanic ridge environments. These low velocities combined with the sharp velocity contrast across the LAB may indicate the presence of partial melt beneath Arabia. The anisotropic signature primarily reflects a combination of plate- and density-driven flow associated with active rifting processes in the Red Sea.

  11. Hinged Shields for Machine Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lallande, J. B.; Poland, W. W.; Tull, S.

    1985-01-01

    Flaps guard against flying chips, but fold away for tool setup. Clear plastic shield in position to intercept flying chips from machine tool and retracted to give operator access to workpiece. Machine shops readily make such shields for own use.

  12. Efficacy of Cosmic Ray Shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Nicholas

    2015-10-01

    This research involved testing various types of shielding with a self-constructed Berkeley style cosmic ray detector, in order to evaluate the materials of each type of shielding's effectiveness at blocking cosmic rays and the cost- and size-efficiency of the shields as well. The detector was constructed, then tested for functionality and reliability. Following confirmation, the detector was then used at three different locations to observe it altitude or atmospheric conditions had any effect on the effectiveness of certain shields. Multiple types of shielding were tested with the detector, including combinations of several shields, primarily aluminum, high-iron steel, polyethylene plastic, water, lead, and a lead-alternative radiation shield utilized in radiology. These tests regarding both the base effectiveness and the overall efficiency of shields is designed to support future space exploratory missions where the risk of exposure to possibly lethal amounts of cosmic rays for crew and the damage caused to unshielded electronics are of serious concern.

  13. Lightweight Shield Against Space Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmon, John W., Jr.; Lawson, Bobby E.; Miller, Andre E.; Cobb, W. E.

    1992-01-01

    Report presents concept for lightweight, deployable shield protecting orbiting spacecraft against meteoroids and debris, and functions as barrier to conductive and radiative losses of heat. Shield made in four segments providing 360 degree coverage of cylindrical space-station module.

  14. Optimal shield mass distribution for space radiation protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, M. P.

    1972-01-01

    Computational methods have been developed and successfully used for determining the optimum distribution of space radiation shielding on geometrically complex space vehicles. These methods have been incorporated in computer program SWORD for dose evaluation in complex geometry, and iteratively calculating the optimum distribution for (minimum) shield mass satisfying multiple acute and protected dose constraints associated with each of several body organs.

  15. Magsat investigation. [Canadian shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, D. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    A computer program was prepared for modeling segments of the Earth's crust allowing for heterogeneity in magnetization in calculating the Earth's field at Magsat heights. This permits investigation of a large number of possible models in assessing the magnetic signatures of subprovinces of the Canadian shield. The fit between the model field and observed fields is optimized in a semi-automatic procedure.

  16. Lightweight blast shield

    SciTech Connect

    Mixon, Larry C.; Snyder, George W.; Hill, Scott D.; Johnson, Gregory L.; Wlodarski, J. Frank; von Spakovsky, Alexis P.; Emerson, John D.; Cole, James M.; Tipton, John P.

    1991-01-01

    A tandem warhead missile arrangement that has a composite material housing structure with a first warhead mounted at one end and a second warhead mounted near another end of the composite structure with a dome shaped composite material blast shield mounted between the warheads to protect the second warhead from the blast of the first warhead.

  17. Electrostatic space radiation shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Ram K.; Wilson, John W.; Youngquist, Robert C.

    2008-09-01

    For the success of NASA’s new vision for space exploration to Moon, Mars and beyond, exposures from the hazards of severe space radiation in deep space long duration missions is ‘a must solve’ problem. The payload penalty demands a very stringent requirement on the design of the spacecrafts for human deep space missions. The exploration beyond low Earth orbit (LEO) to enable routine access of space will require protection from the hazards of the accumulated exposures of space radiation, Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) and Solar Particle Events (SPE), and minimizing the production of secondary radiation is a great advantage. There is a need to look to new horizons for newer technologies. The present investigation revisits electrostatic active radiation shielding and explores the feasibility of using the electrostatic shielding in concert with the state-of-the-art materials shielding and protection technologies. The full space radiation environment has been used, for the first time, to explore the feasibility of electrostatic shielding. The goal is to repel enough positive charge ions so that they miss the spacecraft without attracting thermal electrons. Conclusions are drawn for the future directions of space radiation protection.

  18. Method of multivariate spectral analysis

    DOEpatents

    Keenan, Michael R.; Kotula, Paul G.

    2004-01-06

    A method of determining the properties of a sample from measured spectral data collected from the sample by performing a multivariate spectral analysis. The method can include: generating a two-dimensional matrix A containing measured spectral data; providing a weighted spectral data matrix D by performing a weighting operation on matrix A; factoring D into the product of two matrices, C and S.sup.T, by performing a constrained alternating least-squares analysis of D=CS.sup.T, where C is a concentration intensity matrix and S is a spectral shapes matrix; unweighting C and S by applying the inverse of the weighting used previously; and determining the properties of the sample by inspecting C and S. This method can be used to analyze X-ray spectral data generated by operating a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with an attached Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS).

  19. SSC environmental radiation shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J.D.

    1987-07-01

    The environmental radiation shielding requirements of the SSC have been evaluated using currently available computational tools that incorporate the well known processes of energy loss and degradation of high energy particles into Monte Carlo computer codes. These tools permit determination of isodose contours in the matter surrounding a source point and therefore the specification of minimum thicknesses or extents of shielding in order to assure annual dose equivalents less than some specified design amount. For the general public the annual dose equivalent specified in the design is 10 millirem, small compared to the dose from naturally occurring radiation. The types of radiation fall into two classes for the purposes of shielding determinations-hadrons and muons. The sources of radiation at the SSC of concern for the surrounding environment are the interaction regions, the specially designed beam dumps into which the beams are dumped from time to time, and beam clean-up regions where stops remove the beam halo in order to reduce experimental backgrounds. A final, unlikely source of radiation considered is the accidental loss of the full beam at some point around the ring. Conservative choices of a luminosity of 10{sup 34} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} and a beam current three times design have been made in calculating the required shielding and boundaries of the facility. In addition to determination of minimum distances for the annual dose equivalents, the question of possible radioactivity produced in nearby wells or in municipal water supplies is addressed. The designed shielding distances and beam dumps are such that the induced radioactivity in ground water is safely smaller than the levels permitted by EPA and international agencies.

  20. Broadband vertical interconnects using slot-coupled shielded microstrip lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenberg, Norman L.; Katehi, Linda P. B.

    1992-01-01

    A full-wave space-domain integral equation analysis of aperture coupled shielded microstrip lines is presented based on the Equivalence Principle. The formulation includes the capability to model multilayered substrates through the derivation of the associated dyadic Green's functions which represent the layers through impedance boundary conditions. The method of moments is used to solve for the line currents and slot voltage with even and odd mode excitations which are then interpreted through transmission line analysis to determine the two-port scattering parameters. A parametric study together with experimental data is presented which demonstrates the behavior of the coupler and the accuracy of the technique.

  1. Method of photon spectral analysis

    DOEpatents

    Gehrke, R.J.; Putnam, M.H.; Killian, E.W.; Helmer, R.G.; Kynaston, R.L.; Goodwin, S.G.; Johnson, L.O.

    1993-04-27

    A spectroscopic method to rapidly measure the presence of plutonium in soils, filters, smears, and glass waste forms by measuring the uranium L-shell x-ray emissions associated with the decay of plutonium. In addition, the technique can simultaneously acquire spectra of samples and automatically analyze them for the amount of americium and [gamma]-ray emitting activation and fission products present. The samples are counted with a large area, thin-window, n-type germanium spectrometer which is equally efficient for the detection of low-energy x-rays (10-2,000 keV), as well as high-energy [gamma] rays (>1 MeV). A 8,192- or 16,384 channel analyzer is used to acquire the entire photon spectrum at one time. A dual-energy, time-tagged pulser, that is injected into the test input of the preamplifier to monitor the energy scale, and detector resolution. The L x-ray portion of each spectrum is analyzed by a linear-least-squares spectral fitting technique. The [gamma]-ray portion of each spectrum is analyzed by a standard Ge [gamma]-ray analysis program. This method can be applied to any analysis involving x- and [gamma]-ray analysis in one spectrum and is especially useful when interferences in the x-ray region can be identified from the [gamma]-ray analysis and accommodated during the x-ray analysis.

  2. Method of photon spectral analysis

    DOEpatents

    Gehrke, Robert J.; Putnam, Marie H.; Killian, E. Wayne; Helmer, Richard G.; Kynaston, Ronnie L.; Goodwin, Scott G.; Johnson, Larry O.

    1993-01-01

    A spectroscopic method to rapidly measure the presence of plutonium in soils, filters, smears, and glass waste forms by measuring the uranium L-shell x-ray emissions associated with the decay of plutonium. In addition, the technique can simultaneously acquire spectra of samples and automatically analyze them for the amount of americium and .gamma.-ray emitting activation and fission products present. The samples are counted with a large area, thin-window, n-type germanium spectrometer which is equally efficient for the detection of low-energy x-rays (10-2000 keV), as well as high-energy .gamma. rays (>1 MeV). A 8192- or 16,384 channel analyzer is used to acquire the entire photon spectrum at one time. A dual-energy, time-tagged pulser, that is injected into the test input of the preamplifier to monitor the energy scale, and detector resolution. The L x-ray portion of each spectrum is analyzed by a linear-least-squares spectral fitting technique. The .gamma.-ray portion of each spectrum is analyzed by a standard Ge .gamma.-ray analysis program. This method can be applied to any analysis involving x- and .gamma.-ray analysis in one spectrum and is especially useful when interferences in the x-ray region can be identified from the .gamma.-ray analysis and accommodated during the x-ray analysis.

  3. High purity silica reflective heat shield development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nachtscheim, P. R.; Blome, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    A hyperpure vitreous silica material is being developed for use as a reflective and ablative heat shield for planetary entry. Various purity grades and forms of raw materials were evaluated along with various processing methods. Slip casting of high purity grain was selected as the best processing method, resulting in a highly reflective material in the wavelength bands of interest (the visible and ultraviolet regions). The selected material was characterized with respect to optical, mechanical and physical properties using a limited number of specimens. The process has been scaled up to produce a one-half scale heat shield (18 in. dia.) (45.72 cm) for a Jupiter entry vehicle. This work is now being extended to improve the structural safety factor of the heat shield by making hyperpure silica material tougher through the addition of silica fibers.

  4. Dose-to-water conversion for the backscatter-shielded EPID: A frame-based method to correct for EPID energy response to MLC transmitted radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zwan, Benjamin J. O’Connor, Daryl J.; King, Brian W.; Greer, Peter B.

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To develop a frame-by-frame correction for the energy response of amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging devices (a-Si EPIDs) to radiation that has transmitted through the multileaf collimator (MLC) and to integrate this correction into the backscatter shielded EPID (BSS-EPID) dose-to-water conversion model. Methods: Individual EPID frames were acquired using a Varian frame grabber and iTools acquisition software then processed using in-house software developed inMATLAB. For each EPID image frame, the region below the MLC leaves was identified and all pixels in this region were multiplied by a factor of 1.3 to correct for the under-response of the imager to MLC transmitted radiation. The corrected frames were then summed to form a corrected integrated EPID image. This correction was implemented as an initial step in the BSS-EPID dose-to-water conversion model which was then used to compute dose planes in a water phantom for 35 IMRT fields. The calculated dose planes, with and without the proposed MLC transmission correction, were compared to measurements in solid water using a two-dimensional diode array. Results: It was observed that the integration of the MLC transmission correction into the BSS-EPID dose model improved agreement between modeled and measured dose planes. In particular, the MLC correction produced higher pass rates for almost all Head and Neck fields tested, yielding an average pass rate of 99.8% for 2%/2 mm criteria. A two-sample independentt-test and fisher F-test were used to show that the MLC transmission correction resulted in a statistically significant reduction in the mean and the standard deviation of the gamma values, respectively, to give a more accurate and consistent dose-to-water conversion. Conclusions: The frame-by-frame MLC transmission response correction was shown to improve the accuracy and reduce the variability of the BSS-EPID dose-to-water conversion model. The correction may be applied as a preprocessing step

  5. Roof Shield for Advance and Retreat Mining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, E. V.

    1985-01-01

    Shield sections change their configuration to suit mining mode. Articulation cylinders raise rear shield to advance position, and locking cylinders hold it there. To change to retreat position articulation cylinders lower shield. Locking pins at edge of outermost shield plate latch shield to chock base. Shield accommodates roof heights ranging from 36 to 60 inches (0.9 to 1.52 meters).

  6. Shielding Development for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caffrey, Jarvis A.; Gomez, Carlos F.; Scharber, Luke L.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation shielding analysis and development for the Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) effort is currently in progress and preliminary results have enabled consideration for critical interfaces in the reactor and propulsion stage systems. Early analyses have highlighted a number of engineering constraints, challenges, and possible mitigating solutions. Performance constraints include permissible crew dose rates (shared with expected cosmic ray dose), radiation heating flux into cryogenic propellant, and material radiation damage in critical components. Design strategies in staging can serve to reduce radiation scatter and enhance the effectiveness of inherent shielding within the spacecraft while minimizing the required mass of shielding in the reactor system. Within the reactor system, shield design is further constrained by the need for active cooling with minimal radiation streaming through flow channels. Material selection and thermal design must maximize the reliability of the shield to survive the extreme environment through a long duration mission with multiple engine restarts. A discussion of these challenges and relevant design strategies are provided for the mitigation of radiation in nuclear thermal propulsion.

  7. Gravity Scaling of a Power Reactor Water Shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Robert S.; Pearson, J. Boise

    2008-01-01

    Water based reactor shielding is being considered as an affordable option for potential use on initial lunar surface reactor power systems. Heat dissipation in the shield from nuclear sources must be rejected by an auxillary thermal hydraulic cooling system. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection between the core surface and an array of thermosyphon radiator elements. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design has been previously evaluated at lower power levels (Pearson, 2006). The current baseline assumes that 5.5 kW are dissipated in the water shield, the preponderance on the core surface, but with some volumetric heating in the naturally circulating water as well. This power is rejected by a radiator located above the shield with a surface temperature of 370 K. A similarity analysis on a water-based reactor shield is presented examining the effect of gravity on free convection between a radiation shield inner vessel and a radiation shield outer vessel boundaries. Two approaches established similarity: 1) direct scaling of Rayleigh number equates gravity-surface heat flux products, 2) temperature difference between the wall and thermal boundary layer held constant on Earth and the Moon. Nussult number for natural convection (laminar and turbulent) is assumed of form Nu = CRan. These combined results estimate similarity conditions under Earth and Lunar gravities. The influence of reduced gravity on the performance of thermosyphon heat pipes is also examined.

  8. Gravity Scaling of a Power Reactor Water Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Robert S.; Pearson, J. Boise

    2008-01-01

    Water based reactor shielding is being considered as an affordable option for use on initial lunar surface power systems. Heat dissipation in the shield from nuclear sources must be rejected by an auxiliary thermal hydraulic cooling system. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection between the core surface and an array of thermosyphon radiator elements. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design has been previously evaluated at lower power levels (Pearson, 2007). The current baseline assumes that 5.5 kW are dissipated in the water shield, the preponderance on the core surface, but with some volumetric heating in the naturally circulating water as well. This power is rejected by a radiator located above the shield with a surface temperature of 370 K. A similarity analysis on a water-based reactor shield is presented examining the effect of gravity on free convection between a radiation shield inner vessel and a radiation shield outer vessel boundaries. Two approaches established similarity: 1) direct scaling of Rayleigh number equates gravity-surface heat flux products, 2) temperature difference between the wall and thermal boundary layer held constant on Earth and the Moon. Nussult number for natural convection (laminar and turbulent) is assumed of form Nu = CRa(sup n). These combined results estimate similarity conditions under Earth and Lunar gravities. The influence of reduced gravity on the performance of thermosyphon heat pipes is also examined.

  9. Gravity Scaling of a Power Reactor Water Shield

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, Robert S.; Pearson, J. Boise

    2008-01-21

    Water based reactor shielding is being considered as an affordable option for potential use on initial lunar surface reactor power systems. Heat dissipation in the shield from nuclear sources must be rejected by an auxillary thermal hydraulic cooling system. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection between the core surface and an array of thermosyphon radiator elements. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design has been previously evaluated at lower power levels (Pearson, 2006). The current baseline assumes that 5.5 kW are dissipated in the water shield, the preponderance on the core surface, but with some volumetric heating in the naturally circulating water as well. This power is rejected by a radiator located above the shield with a surface temperature of 370 K. A similarity analysis on a water-based reactor shield is presented examining the effect of gravity on free convection between a radiation shield inner vessel and a radiation shield outer vessel boundaries. Two approaches established similarity: 1) direct scaling of Rayleigh number equates gravity-surface heat flux products, 2) temperature difference between the wall and thermal boundary layer held constant on Earth and the Moon. Nussult number for natural convection (laminar and turbulent) is assumed of form Nu = CRa{sup n}. These combined results estimate similarity conditions under Earth and Lunar gravities. The influence of reduced gravity on the performance of thermosyphon heat pipes is also examined.

  10. Multivariate analysis methods for spectroscopic blood analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Michael F. G.; Rohani, Arash; Ghazalah, Rashid; Vitkin, I. Alex; Pawluczyk, Romuald

    2012-01-01

    Blood tests are an essential tool in clinical medicine with the ability diagnosis or monitor various diseases and conditions; however, the complexities of these measurements currently restrict them to a laboratory setting. P&P Optica has developed and currently produces patented high performance spectrometers and is developing a spectrometer-based system for rapid reagent-free blood analysis. An important aspect of this analysis is the need to extract the analyte specific information from the measured signal such that the analyte concentrations can be determined. To this end, advanced chemometric methods are currently being investigated and have been tested using simulated spectra. A blood plasma model was used to generate Raman, near infrared, and optical rotatory dispersion spectra with glucose as the target analyte. The potential of combined chemometric techniques, where multiple spectroscopy modalities are used in a single regression model to improve the prediction ability was investigated using unfold partial least squares and multiblock partial least squares. Results show improvement in the predictions of glucose levels using the combined methods and demonstrate potential for multiblock chemometrics in spectroscopic blood analysis.

  11. Investigation of Acoustical Shielding by a Wedge-Shaped Airframe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Clark, Lorenzo R.; Dunn, Mark H.; Tweed, John

    2006-01-01

    Experiments on a scale model of an advanced unconventional subsonic transport concept, the Blended Wing Body (BWB), have demonstrated significant shielding of inlet-radiated noise. A computational model of the shielding mechanism has been developed using a combination of boundary integral equation method (BIEM) and equivalent source method (ESM). The computation models the incident sound from a point source in a nacelle and determines the scattered sound field. In this way the sound fields with and without the airfoil can be estimated for comparison to experiment. An experimental test bed using a simplified wedge-shape airfoil and a broadband point noise source in a simulated nacelle has been developed for the purposes of verifying the analytical model and also to study the effect of engine nacelle placement on shielding. The experimental study is conducted in the Anechoic Noise Research Facility at NASA Langley Research Center. The analytic and experimental results are compared at 6300 and 8000 Hz. These frequencies correspond to approximately 150 Hz on the full scale aircraft. Comparison between the experimental and analytic results is quite good, not only for the noise scattering by the airframe, but also for the total sound pressure in the far field. Many of the details of the sound field that the analytic model predicts are seen or indicated in the experiment, within the spatial resolution limitations of the experiment. Changing nacelle location produces comparable changes in noise shielding contours evaluated analytically and experimentally. Future work in the project will be enhancement of the analytic model to extend the analysis to higher frequencies corresponding to the blade passage frequency of the high bypass ratio ducted fan engines that are expected to power the BWB.

  12. Investigation of Acoustical Shielding by a Wedge-Shaped Airframe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Clark, Lorenzo R.; Dunn, Mark H.; Tweed, John

    2004-01-01

    Experiments on a scale model of an advanced unconventional subsonic transport concept, the Blended Wing Body (BWB), have demonstrated significant shielding of inlet-radiated noise. A computational model of the shielding mechanism has been developed using a combination of boundary integral equation method (BIEM) and equivalent source method (ESM). The computation models the incident sound from a point source in a nacelle and determines the scattered sound field. In this way the sound fields with and without the airfoil can be estimated for comparison to experiment. An experimental test bed using a simplified wedge-shape airfoil and a broadband point noise source in a simulated nacelle has been developed for the purposes of verifying the analytical model and also to study the effect of engine nacelle placement on shielding. The experimental study is conducted in the Anechoic Noise Research Facility at NASA Langley Research Center. The analytic and experimental results are compared at 6300 and 8000 Hz. These frequencies correspond to approximately 150 Hz on the full scale aircraft. Comparison between the experimental and analytic results is quite good, not only for the noise scattering by the airframe, but also for the total sound pressure in the far field. Many of the details of the sound field that the analytic model predicts are seen or indicated in the experiment, within the spatial resolution limitations of the experiment. Changing nacelle location produces comparable changes in noise shielding contours evaluated analytically and experimentally. Future work in the project will be enhancement of the analytic model to extend the analysis to higher frequencies corresponding to the blade passage frequency of the high bypass ratio ducted fan engines that are expected to power the BWB.

  13. Clinical uses of collagen shields.

    PubMed

    Poland, D E; Kaufman, H E

    1988-09-01

    Collagen shields immersed in tobramycin solution for one minute were applied to one eye each of 60 patients who had had cataract extraction, penetrating keratoplasty, or epikeratophakia or who had nonsurgical epithelial healing problems. The shields were well tolerated; one patient had the shield removed and one patient lost the shield in the early postoperative period. The surgical patients showed more rapid healing of epithelial defects after surgery with the use of the collagen shield. Patients with acute nonsurgical epithelial problems, such as contact lens abrasions and recurrent erosion, responded to the use of the collagen shield with improved healing. Patients with chronic epithelial defects responded poorly, presumably because underlying abnormalities in Bowman's layer prevented epithelial growth in the area of the defect. No infections were noted in any of the patients. The collagen shields appear to promote enhanced healing in patients with postsurgical and acute epithelial defects and to provide adequate antibiotic prophylaxis against infection in these vulnerable eyes.

  14. Composition for radiation shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-08-02

    A composition for use as a radiation shield is disclosed. The shield has a depleted uranium core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container. 2 figs.

  15. Gas shielding apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brandt, D.

    1984-06-05

    An apparatus for preventing oxidation by uniformly distributing inert shielding gas over the weld area of workpieces such as pipes being welded together. The apparatus comprises a chamber and a gas introduction element. The chamber has an annular top wall, an annular bottom wall, an inner side wall and an outer side wall connecting the top and bottom walls. One side wall is a screen and the other has a portion defining an orifice. The gas introduction element has a portion which encloses the orifice and can be one or more pipes. The gas introduction element is in fluid communication with the chamber and introduces inert shielding gas into the chamber. The inert gas leaves the chamber through the screen side wall and is dispersed evenly over the weld area.

  16. Gas shielding apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brandt, Daniel

    1985-01-01

    An apparatus for preventing oxidation by uniformly distributing inert shielding gas over the weld area of workpieces such as pipes being welded together. The apparatus comprises a chamber and a gas introduction element. The chamber has an annular top wall, an annular bottom wall, an inner side wall and an outer side wall connecting the top and bottom walls. One side wall is a screen and the other has a portion defining an orifice. The gas introduction element has a portion which encloses the orifice and can be one or more pipes. The gas introduction element is in fluid communication with the chamber and introduces inert shielding gas into the chamber. The inert gas leaves the chamber through the screen side wall and is dispersed evenly over the weld area.

  17. Gas shielding apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brandt, D.

    1985-12-31

    An apparatus is disclosed for preventing oxidation by uniformly distributing inert shielding gas over the weld area of workpieces such as pipes being welded together. The apparatus comprises a chamber and a gas introduction element. The chamber has an annular top wall, an annular bottom wall, an inner side wall and an outer side wall connecting the top and bottom walls. One side wall is a screen and the other has a portion defining an orifice. The gas introduction element has a portion which encloses the orifice and can be one or more pipes. The gas introduction element is in fluid communication with the chamber and introduces inert shielding gas into the chamber. The inert gas leaves the chamber through the screen side wall and is dispersed evenly over the weld area. 3 figs.

  18. Project BioShield

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-10

    to Congress. Expedited Peer Review . The Project BioShield Act of 2004 authorizes the HHS Secretary to use an expedited award process, rather than the...normal peer review process, for grants, contracts, and cooperative agreements related to biomedical countermeasure R&D activity, if the Secretary... peer review process will reduce the quality of the research.6 Peer review is designed to maximize the chances that only proposals with the greatest

  19. Project BioShield

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-27

    Expedited Peer Review . The Project BioShield Act of 2004 authorizes the HHS Secretary to use an expedited award process, rather than the normal peer ...such awards, or to many, will depend on what needs the Secretary deems pressing. Some scientists have expressed concerns that an expedited peer review process...will reduce the quality of the research.6 Peer review is designed to maximize the chances that only proposals with the greatest scientific

  20. Correlated Uncertainties in Radiation Shielding Effectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werneth, Charles M.; Maung, Khin Maung; Blattnig, Steve R.; Clowdsley, Martha S.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    2013-01-01

    The space radiation environment is composed of energetic particles which can deliver harmful doses of radiation that may lead to acute radiation sickness, cancer, and even death for insufficiently shielded crew members. Spacecraft shielding must provide structural integrity and minimize the risk associated with radiation exposure. The risk of radiation exposure induced death (REID) is a measure of the risk of dying from cancer induced by radiation exposure. Uncertainties in the risk projection model, quality factor, and spectral fluence are folded into the calculation of the REID by sampling from probability distribution functions. Consequently, determining optimal shielding materials that reduce the REID in a statistically significant manner has been found to be difficult. In this work, the difference of the REID distributions for different materials is used to study the effect of composition on shielding effectiveness. It is shown that the use of correlated uncertainties allows for the determination of statistically significant differences between materials despite the large uncertainties in the quality factor. This is in contrast to previous methods where uncertainties have been generally treated as uncorrelated. It is concluded that the use of correlated quality factor uncertainties greatly reduces the uncertainty in the assessment of shielding effectiveness for the mitigation of radiation exposure.

  1. Shielding Structures for Interplanetary Human Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracino, Emanuele; Lobascio, Cesare

    2012-07-01

    radiation shielding power of the interplanetary habitat structures, like the spacecraft shell, minimizing the amount of mass used. From the radiation protection point of view the spacecraft shell is an interesting spacecraft system because it surrounds almost homogeneously all the habitat and it is typically composed by the Micrometeorites and Debris Protection Systems (MDPS), the Multilayer Insulation (MLI) for thermal control purposes, and the primary structure that offers the pressure containment functionality. Nevertheless, the spacecraft internal outfitting is important to evaluate the different shielded areas in the habitat. Using Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations toolkit through GRAS (Geant4 Radiation Analysis for Space) tool, different spacecraft structures will be analyzed for their shielding behavior in terms of fluxes, dose reduction and radiation quality, and for their implementation in a real pressurized module. Effects on astronauts and electronic equipments will be also assessed with respect to the standard aluminum structures.

  2. Skylab Solar Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A sail like sunshade for possible use as a sunscreen for the Skylab Orbital Workshop (OWS) is shown being fabricated in the GE Building across the street from Johnson Space Center, Houston Texas. Three people help the steamstress feed the material through the sewing machine. The three-layered sunshade will be composed of a top layer of aluminized mylar, a middle layer of laminated nylon ripstop, and a bottom layer of thin nylon. Working on the sunshade are from left to right: Dale Gentry, Elizabeth Gauldin, Alyene Baker, and James H. Barnett Jr. Mrs. Baker, a GE employee, operates the double needle Singer sewing machine. Barnett is head of the Crew Equipment Development Section of JSC Crew Systems Division. Mrs. Gauldin is also with the Crew Systems Division. Gentry works for GE. The work shown here is part of the crash program underway to prepare a sunshield for Skylab to replace the orginal shield which was lost when Skylab 1 was launched on May 14, 1973. The improvised solar shield selected to be used will be carried to Earth orbit by the Skylab 2 crewman who will then deploy the reflective parasol to shade part of the OWS from the hot rays of the sun. Loss of the orginal sun shield has caused an overheating problem. in the Orbital Work Shop.

  3. Crumpled Heat Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager took this image of the spacecraft's crumpled heat shield on Sept. 16, 2008, the 111th Martian day of the mission.

    The 2-1/2 meter (about 8-1/2 feet) heat shield landed southeast of Phoenix, about halfway between the spacecraft and its backshell/parachute. The backshell/parachute touched ground 300 meters (1,000 ft) to the south of the lander.

    The dark area to the right of the heat shield is the 'bounce mark' it made on impact with the Red Planet. This image is the highest-resolution image that will likely be taken by the lander, and is part of the 1,500-image 'Happily Ever After' panorama.

    The Phoenix mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is led by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  4. The Interaction Between Shield, Ground and Tunnel Support in TBM Tunnelling Through Squeezing Ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramoni, M.; Anagnostou, G.

    2011-01-01

    When planning a TBM drive in squeezing ground, the tunnelling engineer faces a complex problem involving a number of conflicting factors. In this respect, numerical analyses represent a helpful decision aid as they provide a quantitative assessment of the effects of key parameters. The present paper investigates the interaction between the shield, ground and tunnel support by means of computational analysis. Emphasis is placed on the boundary condition, which is applied to model the interface between the ground and the shield or tunnel support. The paper also discusses two cases, which illustrate different methodical approaches applied to the assessment of a TBM drive in squeezing ground. The first case history—the Uluabat Tunnel (Turkey)—mainly involves the investigation of TBM design measures aimed at reducing the risk of shield jamming. The second case history—the Faido Section of the Gotthard Base Tunnel (Switzerland)—deals with different types of tunnel support installed behind a gripper TBM.

  5. Dynamic rotating-shield brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yunlong; Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung; Yang, Wenjun; Wu, Xiaodong

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To present dynamic rotating shield brachytherapy (D-RSBT), a novel form of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with electronic brachytherapy source, where the radiation shield is capable of changing emission angles during the radiation delivery process.Methods: A D-RSBT system uses two layers of independently rotating tungsten alloy shields, each with a 180° azimuthal emission angle. The D-RSBT planning is separated into two stages: anchor plan optimization and optimal sequencing. In the anchor plan optimization, anchor plans are generated by maximizing the D{sub 90} for the high-risk clinical-tumor-volume (HR-CTV) assuming a fixed azimuthal emission angle of 11.25°. In the optimal sequencing, treatment plans that most closely approximate the anchor plans under the delivery-time constraint will be efficiently computed. Treatment plans for five cervical cancer patients were generated for D-RSBT, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT), and {sup 192}Ir-based intracavitary brachytherapy with supplementary interstitial brachytherapy (IS + ICBT) assuming five treatment fractions. External beam radiotherapy doses of 45 Gy in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy each were accounted for. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated such that the D{sub 2cc} of the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached its tolerance equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α/β= 3 Gy) of 75 Gy, 75 Gy, or 90 Gy, respectively.Results: For the patients considered, IS + ICBT had an average total dwell time of 5.7 minutes/fraction (min/fx) assuming a 10 Ci{sup 192}Ir source, and the average HR-CTV D{sub 90} was 78.9 Gy. In order to match the HR-CTV D{sub 90} of IS + ICBT, D-RSBT required an average of 10.1 min/fx more delivery time, and S-RSBT required 6.7 min/fx more. If an additional 20 min/fx of delivery time is allowed beyond that of the IS + ICBT case, D-RSBT and S-RSBT increased the HR-CTV D{sub 90} above IS + ICBT by an average of 16.3 Gy and 9.1 Gy, respectively

  6. Electronics Shielding and Reliability Design Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; ONeill, P. M.; Zang, Thomas A., Jr.; Pandolf, John E.; Koontz, Steven L.; Boeder, P.; Reddell, B.; Pankop, C.

    2006-01-01

    It is well known that electronics placement in large-scale human-rated systems provides opportunity to optimize electronics shielding through materials choice and geometric arrangement. For example, several hundred single event upsets (SEUs) occur within the Shuttle avionic computers during a typical mission. An order of magnitude larger SEU rate would occur without careful placement in the Shuttle design. These results used basic physics models (linear energy transfer (LET), track structure, Auger recombination) combined with limited SEU cross section measurements allowing accurate evaluation of target fragment contributions to Shuttle avionics memory upsets. Electronics shielding design on human-rated systems provides opportunity to minimize radiation impact on critical and non-critical electronic systems. Implementation of shielding design tools requires adequate methods for evaluation of design layouts, guiding qualification testing, and an adequate follow-up on final design evaluation including results from a systems/device testing program tailored to meet design requirements.

  7. Radiation shielding effectiveness of newly developed superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vishwanath P.; Medhat, M. E.; Badiger, N. M.; Saliqur Rahman, Abu Zayed Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Gamma ray shielding effectiveness of superconductors with a high mass density has been investigated. We calculated the mass attenuation coefficients, the mean free path (mfp) and the exposure buildup factor (EBF). The gamma ray EBF was computed using the Geometric Progression (G-P) fitting method at energies 0.015-15 MeV, and for penetration depths up to 40 mfp. The fast-neutron shielding effectiveness has been characterized by the effective neutron removal cross-section of the superconductors. It is shown that CaPtSi3, CaIrSi3, and Bi2Sr2Ca1Cu2O8.2 are superior shielding materials for gamma rays and Tl0.6Rb0.4Fe1.67Se2 for fast neutrons. The present work should be useful in various applications of superconductors in fusion engineering and design.

  8. Analysis of the accuracy and precision of the Axis-Shield Afinion hemoglobin A1c measurement device.

    PubMed

    Little, Randie R

    2012-03-01

    Point-of-care (POC) hemoglobin A1c measurement is now used by many physicians to make more timely decisions on therapy changes. A few studies have highlighted the drawbacks of some POC methods, e.g., poor precision and lot-to-lot variability. Evaluating performance in the clinical setting is difficult because there is minimal proficiency testing data on POC methods. In this issue of Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, Wood and colleagues describe their experience with the Afinion method in a pediatric clinic network, comparing these results to another POC method as well as to a laboratory high-performance liquid chromatography method. Although they conclude that the Afinion exhibits adequate performance, they do not evaluate lot-to-lot variability. As with laboratory methods, potential assay interferences must also be considered.

  9. Flow methods in chiral analysis.

    PubMed

    Trojanowicz, Marek; Kaniewska, Marzena

    2013-11-01

    The methods used for the separation and analytical determination of individual isomers are based on interactions with substances exhibiting optical activity. The currently used methods for the analysis of optically active compounds are primarily high-performance separation methods, such as gas and liquid chromatography using chiral stationary phases or chiral selectors in the mobile phase, and highly efficient electromigration techniques, such as capillary electrophoresis using chiral selectors. Chemical sensors and biosensors may also be designed for the analysis of optically active compounds. As enantiomers of the same compound are characterised by almost identical physico-chemical properties, their differentiation/separation in one-step unit operation in steady-state or dynamic flow systems requires the use of highly effective chiral selectors. Examples of such determinations are reviewed in this paper, based on 105 references. The greatest successes for isomer determination involve immunochemical interactions, enantioselectivity of the enzymatic biocatalytic processes, and interactions with ion-channel receptors or molecularly imprinted polymers. Conducting such processes under dynamic flow conditions may significantly enhance the differences in the kinetics of such processes, leading to greater differences in the signals recorded for enantiomers. Such determinations in flow conditions are effectively performed using surface-plasmon resonance and piezoelectric detections, as well as using common spectroscopic and electrochemical detections.

  10. Biomechanical analysis of a new carbon fiber/flax/epoxy bone fracture plate shows less stress shielding compared to a standard clinical metal plate.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Zahra S; Tavakkoli Avval, Pouria; Bougherara, Habiba; Aziz, Mina S R; Schemitsch, Emil H; Zdero, Radovan

    2014-09-01

    Femur fracture at the tip of a total hip replacement (THR), commonly known as Vancouver B1 fracture, is mainly treated using rigid metallic bone plates which may result in "stress shielding" leading to bone resorption and implant loosening. To minimize stress shielding, a new carbon fiber (CF)/Flax/Epoxy composite plate has been developed and biomechanically compared to a standard clinical metal plate. For fatigue tests, experiments were done using six artificial femurs cyclically loaded through the femoral head in axial compression for four stages: Stage 1 (intact), stage 2 (after THR insertion), stage 3 (after plate fixation of a simulated Vancouver B1 femoral midshaft fracture gap), and stage 4 (after fracture gap healing). For fracture fixation, one group was fitted with the new CF/Flax/Epoxy plate (n = 3), whereas another group was repaired with a standard clinical metal plate (Zimmer, Warsaw, IN) (n = 3). In addition to axial stiffness measurements, infrared thermography technique was used to capture the femur and plate surface stresses during the testing. Moreover, finite element analysis (FEA) was performed to evaluate the composite plate's axial stiffness and surface stress field. Experimental results showed that the CF/Flax/Epoxy plated femur had comparable axial stiffness (fractured = 645 ± 67 N/mm; healed = 1731 ± 109 N/mm) to the metal-plated femur (fractured = 658 ± 69 N/mm; healed = 1751 ± 39 N/mm) (p = 1.00). However, the bone beneath the CF/Flax/Epoxy plate was the only area that had a significantly higher average surface stress (fractured = 2.10 ± 0.66 MPa; healed = 1.89 ± 0.39 MPa) compared to bone beneath the metal plate (fractured = 1.18 ± 0.93 MPa; healed = 0.71 ± 0.24 MPa) (p < 0.05). FEA bone surface stresses yielded peak of 13 MPa at distal epiphysis (stage 1), 16 MPa at distal epiphysis (stage 2), 85 MPa for composite and 129

  11. Voltametric analysis apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Almon, Amy C.

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus and method for electrochemical analysis of elements in solution. An auxiliary electrode 14, a reference electrode 18, and five working electrodes 20, 22, 26, 28, and 30 are positioned in a container 12 containing a sample solution 34. The working electrodes are spaced apart evenly from each other and auxiliary electrode 14 to minimize any inter-electrode interference that may occur during analysis. An electric potential is applied between auxiliary electrode 14 and each of the working electrodes 20, 22, 26, 28, and 30. Simultaneous measurements taken of the current flow through each of the working electrodes for each given potential in a potential range are used for identifying chemical elements present in sample solution 34 and their respective concentrations. Multiple working electrodes enable a more positive identification to be made by providing unique data characteristic of chemical elements present in the sample solution.

  12. Voltametric analysis apparatus and method

    SciTech Connect

    Almon, A.C.

    1991-12-31

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for electrochemical analysis of elements in solution. An auxiliary electrode a reference electrode and five working electrodes are positioned in a container containing a sample solution. The working electrodes are spaced apart evenly from each other and auxiliary electrode to minimize any inter-electrode interference that may occur during analysis. An electric potential is applied between auxiliary electrode and each of the working electrodes. Simultaneous measurements taken of the current flow through each of the working electrodes for each given potential in a potential range are used for identifying chemical elements present in sample solution and their respective concentrations. Multiple working electrodes enable a more positive identification to be made by providing unique data characteristic of chemical elements present in the sample solution.

  13. Voltammetric analysis apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Almon, A.C.

    1993-06-08

    An apparatus and method is described for electrochemical analysis of elements in solution. An auxiliary electrode, a reference electrode, and five working electrodes are positioned in a container containing a sample solution. The working electrodes are spaced apart evenly from each other and the auxiliary electrode to minimize any inter-electrode interference that may occur during analysis. An electric potential is applied between the auxiliary electrode and each of the working electrodes. Simultaneous measurements taken of the current flow through each of the working electrodes for each given potential in a potential range are used for identifying chemical elements present in the sample solution and their respective concentrations. Multiple working electrodes enable a more positive identification to be made by providing unique data characteristic of chemical elements present in the sample solution.

  14. Shielding of elastic nonstationary waves by interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulyaev, V. I.; Lugovoi, P. Z.; Zayets, Yu. A.

    2012-07-01

    The ray method is used to solve the problem of the propagation of discontinuous (weak shock) waves in inhomogeneous elastic media. A procedure for drawing the fronts of reflected and refracted waves at interfaces and calculating their intensities is proposed. The effect of shielding discontinuous waves by one or two interfaces is studied. The cases of slipping and non-slipping contact are examined

  15. Justification for Shielded Receiver Tube Additional Lead Shielding

    SciTech Connect

    BOGER, R.M.

    2000-04-11

    In order to reduce high radiation dose rates encountered when core sampling some radioactive waste tanks the addition of 240 lbs. of lead shielding is being considered to the shielded receiver tube on core sample trucks No.1, No.3 and No.4. The lead shielding is 4 inch diameter x 1/2 inch thick half rounds that have been installed around the SR tube over its' full length. Using three unreleased but independently reviewed structural analyses HNF-6018 justifies the addition of the lead shielding.

  16. Correlating the EMC analysis and testing methods for space systems in MIL-STD-1541A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, Reinaldo J.

    1990-01-01

    A study was conducted to improve the correlation between the electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) analysis models stated in MIL-STD-1541A and the suggested testing methods used for space systems. The test and analysis methods outlined in MIL-STD-1541A are described, and a comparative assessment of testing and analysis techniques as they relate to several EMC areas is presented. Suggestions on present analysis and test methods are introduced to harmonize and bring the analysis and testing tools in MIL-STD-1541A into closer agreement. It is suggested that test procedures in MIL-STD-1541A must be improved by providing alternatives to the present use of shielded enclosures as the primary site for such tests. In addition, the alternate use of anechoic chambers and open field test sites must be considered.

  17. A Shield of Blows or Rubber Dagger: An Analysis of an Operational Concept for NATO after Forward Defense.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-12

    issues within the comparative analysis of this monograph are in transition. Events in eastern Europe and the Soviet Union, as well a- within NATO countrL...to compare the forward defense and resiliant defense operational concepts, and to analyze the latter. Certain theoretical constructs transcend the...accommodate the changes in the ends and means without incurring unacceptable risk while presenting a nonprovocative immage . In addition, the shift from a linear

  18. Desert Shield/Storm Logistics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-15

    Wc This document may not be retee for open publiarion until it has bm deaed by the Vproprnite military service or gmeanen agency. DESERT SHIELD /STORM...capture what had occurred during Operations DESERT SHIELD and STORM, the commanders of the Division Support Command of the 24th Infantry Division...Mechanized) held a ful. day of discussion centering on what occurted during Operation DESERT STORM and its preceding operation, DESERT SHIELD . The entire

  19. Balloonlike Shields Against Fast Projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A.

    1993-01-01

    Report proposes use of flexible gas-filled or liquid-filled pouches to shield spacecraft against impacts by small meteoroids and orbiting debris traveling at speeds approximately greater than 2 km/s. Shields made in various forms reminiscent of balloons, pillows, air mattresses, or sealed-air-bubble packing material. Serve as lightweight, easily installed alternatives to heavier, rigid shields made of space aluminum sheets custom-designed and attached to spacecraft only with great difficulty and expense.

  20. Passive magnetic shielding in static gradient fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidinosti, C. P.; Martin, J. W.

    2014-04-01

    The effect of passive magnetic shielding on dc magnetic field gradients imposed by both external and internal sources is studied for two idealized shield models: concentric spherical and infinitely-long cylindrical shells of linear material. It is found that higher-order multipoles of an externally applied magnetic field are always shielded progressively better for either geometry by a factor related to the order of the multipole. In regard to the design of internal coil systems, we determine reaction factors for the general multipole field and provide examples of how one can take advantage of the coupling of the coils to the innermost shell to optimize the uniformity of the field. Furthermore, we provide formulae relevant to active magnetic compensation systems which attempt to stabilize the interior fields by sensing and cancelling the exterior fields close to the outermost shell. Overall this work provides a comprehensive framework that is useful for the analysis and optimization of dc magnetic shields, serving as a theoretical and conceptual design guide as well as a starting point and benchmark for finite-element analysis.

  1. Actively driven thermal radiation shield

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Norman W.; Cork, Christopher P.; Becker, John A.; Knapp, David A.

    2002-01-01

    A thermal radiation shield for cooled portable gamma-ray spectrometers. The thermal radiation shield is located intermediate the vacuum enclosure and detector enclosure, is actively driven, and is useful in reducing the heat load to mechanical cooler and additionally extends the lifetime of the mechanical cooler. The thermal shield is electrically-powered and is particularly useful for portable solid-state gamma-ray detectors or spectrometers that dramatically reduces the cooling power requirements. For example, the operating shield at 260K (40K below room temperature) will decrease the thermal radiation load to the detector by 50%, which makes possible portable battery operation for a mechanically cooled Ge spectrometer.

  2. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of the Drip Shield

    SciTech Connect

    F. Hua

    2004-09-16

    The repository design includes a drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]) that provides protection for the waste package both as a barrier to seepage water contact and a physical barrier to potential rockfall. The purpose of the process-level models developed in this report is to model dry oxidation, general corrosion, and localized corrosion of the drip shield plate material, which is made of Ti Grade 7. This document is prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan For: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The models developed in this report are used by the waste package degradation analyses for TSPA-LA and serve as a basis to determine the performance of the drip shield. The drip shield may suffer from other forms of failure such as the hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) or stress corrosion cracking (SCC), or both. Stress corrosion cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]). Hydrogen induced cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Hydrogen Induced Cracking of Drip Shield'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169847]).

  3. Hypervelocity impact on shielded plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James P.

    1993-01-01

    A ballistic limit equation for hypervelocity impact on thin plates is derived analytically. This equation applies to cases of impulsive impact on a plate that is protected by a multi-shock shield, and it is valid in the range of velocity above 6 km/s. Experimental tests were conducted at the NASA Johnson Space Center on square aluminum plates. Comparing the center deflections of these plates with the theoretical deflections of a rigid-plastic plate subjected to a blast load, one determines the dynamic yield strength of the plate material. The analysis is based on a theory for the expansion of the fragmented projectile and on a simple failure criterion. Curves are presented for the critical projectile radius versus the projectile velocity, and for the critical plate thickness versus the velocity. These curves are in good agreement with curves that have been generated empirically.

  4. Aircraft accidents : method of analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1929-01-01

    This report on a method of analysis of aircraft accidents has been prepared by a special committee on the nomenclature, subdivision, and classification of aircraft accidents organized by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics in response to a request dated February 18, 1928, from the Air Coordination Committee consisting of the Assistant Secretaries for Aeronautics in the Departments of War, Navy, and Commerce. The work was undertaken in recognition of the difficulty of drawing correct conclusions from efforts to analyze and compare reports of aircraft accidents prepared by different organizations using different classifications and definitions. The air coordination committee's request was made "in order that practices used may henceforth conform to a standard and be universally comparable." the purpose of the special committee therefore was to prepare a basis for the classification and comparison of aircraft accidents, both civil and military. (author)

  5. Flow analysis system and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Wayne S. (Inventor); Barck, Bruce N. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A non-invasive flow analysis system and method wherein a sensor, such as an acoustic sensor, is coupled to a conduit for transmitting a signal which varies depending on the characteristics of the flow in the conduit. The signal is amplified and there is a filter, responsive to the sensor signal, and tuned to pass a narrow band of frequencies proximate the resonant frequency of the sensor. A demodulator generates an amplitude envelope of the filtered signal and a number of flow indicator quantities are calculated based on variations in amplitude of the amplitude envelope. A neural network, or its equivalent, is then used to determine the flow rate of the flow in the conduit based on the flow indicator quantities.

  6. Hybrid methods for rotordynamic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noah, Sherif T.

    1986-01-01

    Effective procedures are presented for the response analysis of the Space Shuttle Main Engine turbopumps under transient loading conditions. Of particular concern is the determination of the nonlinear response of the systems to rotor imbalance in presence of bearing clearances. The proposed procedures take advantage of the nonlinearities involved being localized at only a few rotor/housing coupling joints. The methods include those based on integral formulations for the incremental solutions involving the transition matrices of the rotor and housing. Alternatively, a convolutional representation of the housing displacements at the coupling points is proposed which would allow performing the transient analysis on a reduced model of the housing. The integral approach is applied to small dynamical models to demonstrate the efficiency of the approach. For purposes of assessing the numerical integration results for the nonlinear rotor/housing systems, a numerical harmonic balance procedure is developed to enable determining all possible harmonic, subharmonic, and nonperiodic solutions of the systems. A brief account of the Fourier approach is presented as applied to a two degree of freedon rotor-support system.

  7. Computational methods for global/local analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransom, Jonathan B.; Mccleary, Susan L.; Aminpour, Mohammad A.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Computational methods for global/local analysis of structures which include both uncoupled and coupled methods are described. In addition, global/local analysis methodology for automatic refinement of incompatible global and local finite element models is developed. Representative structural analysis problems are presented to demonstrate the global/local analysis methods.

  8. Analysis of the radiation shielding of the bunker of a 230MeV proton cyclotron therapy facility; comparison of analytical and Monte Carlo techniques.

    PubMed

    Sunil, C

    2016-04-01

    The neutron ambient dose equivalent outside the radiation shield of a proton therapy cyclotron vault is estimated using the unshielded dose equivalent rates and the attenuation lengths obtained from the literature and by simulations carried out with the FLUKA Monte Carlo radiation transport code. The source terms derived from the literature and that obtained from the FLUKA calculations differ by a factor of 2-3, while the attenuation lengths obtained from the literature differ by 20-40%. The instantaneous dose equivalent rates outside the shield differ by a few orders of magnitude, not only in comparison with the Monte Carlo simulation results, but also with the results obtained by line of sight attenuation calculations with the different parameters obtained from the literature. The attenuation of neutrons caused by the presence of bulk iron, such as magnet yokes is expected to reduce the dose equivalent by as much as a couple of orders of magnitude outside the shield walls.

  9. Heat shield characterization: Outer planet atmospheric entry probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mezines, S. A.; Rusert, E. L.; Disser, E. F.

    1976-01-01

    A full scale carbon phenolic heat shield was fabricated for the Outer Planet Probe in order to demonstrate the feasibility of molding large carbon phenolic parts with a new fabrication processing method (multistep). The sphere-cone heat shield was molded as an integral unit with the nose cap plies configured into a double inverse chevron shape to achieve the desired ply orientation. The fabrication activity was successful and the feasibility of the multistep processing technology was established. Delaminations or unbonded plies were visible on the heat shield and resulted from excessive loss of resin and lack of sufficient pressure applied on the part during the curing cycle. A comprehensive heat shield characterization test program was conducted, including: nondestructive tests with the full scale heat shield and thermal and mechanical property tests with small test specimen.

  10. Reliability and cost analysis methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suich, Ronald C.

    1991-01-01

    In the design phase of a system, how does a design engineer or manager choose between a subsystem with .990 reliability and a more costly subsystem with .995 reliability? When is the increased cost justified? High reliability is not necessarily an end in itself but may be desirable in order to reduce the expected cost due to subsystem failure. However, this may not be the wisest use of funds since the expected cost due to subsystem failure is not the only cost involved. The subsystem itself may be very costly. We should not consider either the cost of the subsystem or the expected cost due to subsystem failure separately but should minimize the total of the two costs, i.e., the total of the cost of the subsystem plus the expected cost due to subsystem failure. This final report discusses the Combined Analysis of Reliability, Redundancy, and Cost (CARRAC) methods which were developed under Grant Number NAG 3-1100 from the NASA Lewis Research Center. CARRAC methods and a CARRAC computer program employ five models which can be used to cover a wide range of problems. The models contain an option which can include repair of failed modules.

  11. Analysis Methods of Magnesium Chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmann, Sven; Ditze, André; Scharf, Christiane

    2015-11-01

    The quality of recycled magnesium from chips depends strongly on their exposure to inorganic and organic impurities that are added during the production processes. Different kinds of magnesium chips from these processes were analyzed by several methods. In addition, the accuracy and effectiveness of the methods are discussed. The results show that the chips belong either to the AZ91, AZ31, AM50/60, or AJ62 alloy. Some kinds of chips show deviations from the above-mentioned normations. Different impurities result mainly from transition metals and lime. The water and oil content does not exceed 25%, and the chip size is not more than 4 mm in the diameter. The sieve analysis shows good results for oily and wet chips. The determination of oil and water shows better results for the application of a Soxhlet compared with the addition of lime and vacuum distillation. The most accurate values for the determination of water and oil are obtained by drying at 110°C (for water) and washing with acetone (for oil) by hand.

  12. PBF Cubicle 13. Shield wall details illustrate shielding technique of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PBF Cubicle 13. Shield wall details illustrate shielding technique of stepped penetrations and brick layout scheme for valve stem extension sleeve. Aerojet Nuclear Company. Date: May 1976. INEEL index no. 761-0620-00-400-195280 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  13. Background simulations and shielding calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, Vitaly A.

    2011-04-01

    Key improvements in the sensitivity of the underground particle astrophysics experiments can only be achieved if the radiation causing background events in detectors is well understood and proper measures are taken to suppress it. The background radiation arising from radioactivity and cosmic-ray muons is discussed here together with the methods of its suppression. Different shielding designs are considered to attenuate gamma-rays and neutrons coming from radioactivity in rock and lab walls. Purity of materials used in detector construction is analysed and the background event rates due to the presence of radioactive isotopes in detector components are discussed. Event rates in detectors caused by muon-induced neutrons with and without active veto systems are presented leading to the requirements for the depth of an underground laboratory and the efficiency of the veto system.

  14. Analysis of tenth-value-layers for common shielding materials for a robotically mounted stereotactic radiosurgery machine.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, James E

    2007-04-01

    Tenth-value-layers (TVLs) for a 6 MV stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) x-ray beam have been computed using Monte Carlo methods for radiation transport simulation. The first and equilibrium TVLs were determined in the three most common building materials used in radiation therapy vault construction: ordinary concrete, lead, and steel (iron). In contrast to broad-beam 6 MV TVL data found in the literature, the SRS TVLs can change rapidly with the size of the radiation field incident on the barrier. This research has investigated characteristics of TVLs as a function of field size (diameter) at the barrier for all materials, with special attention given to the TVL properties in iron. The x-ray spectrum used to perform these simulations was generated for the CyberKnife accelerator with the BEAMnrc Monte Carlo code. Using this spectrum as input to the MCNP5 Monte Carlo code, predicted tissue-maximum-ratio (TMR) values for a 6-cm-diameter field (at 80 cm from the target) were benchmarked against measured TMR data. The MCNP5 code was used to simulate all barrier transmissions, keeping the standard error of each data point below 1% of the mean. Results compare very well with previous measured concrete TVLs and also with published broad-beam 6 MV TVL data for all three barrier materials.

  15. NMR chemical shielding and spin-spin coupling constants of liquid NH3: a systematic investigation using the sequential QM/MM method.

    PubMed

    Gester, Rodrigo M; Georg, Herbert C; Canuto, Sylvio; Caputo, M Cristina; Provasi, Patricio F

    2009-12-31

    The NMR spin coupling parameters, (1)J(N,H) and (2)J(H,H), and the chemical shielding, sigma((15)N), of liquid ammonia are studied from a combined and sequential QM/MM methodology. Monte Carlo simulations are performed to generate statistically uncorrelated configurations that are submitted to density functional theory calculations. Two different Lennard-Jones potentials are used in the liquid simulations. Electronic polarization is included in these two potentials via an iterative procedure with and without geometry relaxation, and the influence on the calculated properties are analyzed. B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ-J calculations were used to compute the (1)J(N,H) constants in the interval of -67.8 to -63.9 Hz, depending on the theoretical model used. These can be compared with the experimental results of -61.6 Hz. For the (2)J(H,H) coupling the theoretical results vary between -10.6 to -13.01 Hz. The indirect experimental result derived from partially deuterated liquid is -11.1 Hz. Inclusion of explicit hydrogen bonded molecules gives a small but important contribution. The vapor-to-liquid shifts are also considered. This shift is calculated to be negligible for (1)J(N,H) in agreement with experiment. This is rationalized as a cancellation of the geometry relaxation and pure solvent effects. For the chemical shielding, sigma((15)N) calculations at the B3LYP/aug-pcS-3 show that the vapor-to-liquid chemical shift requires the explicit use of solvent molecules. Considering only one ammonia molecule in an electrostatic embedding gives a wrong sign for the chemical shift that is corrected only with the use of explicit additional molecules. The best result calculated for the vapor to liquid chemical shift Delta sigma((15)N) is -25.2 ppm, in good agreement with the experimental value of -22.6 ppm.

  16. NMR Chemical Shielding and Spin-Spin Coupling Constants of Liquid NH3: A Systematic Investigation using the Sequential QM/MM Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gester, Rodrigo M.; Georg, Herbert C.; Canuto, Sylvio; Caputo, M. Cristina; Provasi, Patricio F.

    2009-09-01

    The NMR spin coupling parameters, 1J(N,H) and 2J(H,H), and the chemical shielding, σ(15N), of liquid ammonia are studied from a combined and sequential QM/MM methodology. Monte Carlo simulations are performed to generate statistically uncorrelated configurations that are submitted to density functional theory calculations. Two different Lennard-Jones potentials are used in the liquid simulations. Electronic polarization is included in these two potentials via an iterative procedure with and without geometry relaxation, and the influence on the calculated properties are analyzed. B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ-J calculations were used to compute the 1J(N,H) constants in the interval of -67.8 to -63.9 Hz, depending on the theoretical model used. These can be compared with the experimental results of -61.6 Hz. For the 2J(H,H) coupling the theoretical results vary between -10.6 to -13.01 Hz. The indirect experimental result derived from partially deuterated liquid is -11.1 Hz. Inclusion of explicit hydrogen bonded molecules gives a small but important contribution. The vapor-to-liquid shifts are also considered. This shift is calculated to be negligible for 1J(N,H) in agreement with experiment. This is rationalized as a cancellation of the geometry relaxation and pure solvent effects. For the chemical shielding, σ(15N) calculations at the B3LYP/aug-pcS-3 show that the vapor-to-liquid chemical shift requires the explicit use of solvent molecules. Considering only one ammonia molecule in an electrostatic embedding gives a wrong sign for the chemical shift that is corrected only with the use of explicit additional molecules. The best result calculated for the vapor to liquid chemical shift Δσ(15N) is -25.2 ppm, in good agreement with the experimental value of -22.6 ppm.

  17. Testicular shielding in penile brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bindal, Arpita; Tambe, Chandrashekhar M.; Ghadi, Yogesh; Murthy, Vedang; Shrivastava, Shyam Kishore

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Penile cancer, although rare, is one of the common genitourinary cancers in India affecting mostly aged uncircumcised males. For patients presenting with small superficial lesions < 3 cm restricted to glans, surgery, radical external radiation or brachytherapy may be offered, the latter being preferred as it allows organ and function preservation. In patients receiving brachytherapy, testicular morbidity is not commonly addressed. With an aim to minimize and document the doses to testis after adequate shielding during radical interstitial brachytherapy for penile cancers, we undertook this study in 2 patients undergoing brachytherapy and forms the basis of this report. Material and methods Two patients with early stage penile cancer limited to the glans were treated with radical high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy using interstitial implant. A total of 7-8 tubes were implanted in two planes, parallel to the penile shaft. A total dose of 44-48 Gy (55-60 Gy EQD2 doses with α/β = 10) was delivered in 11-12 fractions of 4 Gy each delivered twice daily. Lead sheets adding to 11 mm (4-5 half value layer) were interposed between the penile shaft and scrotum. The testicular dose was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters. For each patient, dosimetry was done for 3 fractions and mean calculated. Results The cumulative testicular dose to left and right testis was 31.68 cGy and 42.79 cGy for patient A, and 21.96 cGy and 23.28 cGy for patient B. For the same patients, the mean cumulative dose measured at the posterior aspect of penile shaft was 722.15 cGy and 807.72 cGy, amounting to 16.4% and 16.8% of the prescribed dose. Hence, the application of lead shield 11 mm thick reduced testicular dose from 722-808 cGy to 21.96-42.57 cGy, an “absolute reduction” of 95.99 ± 1.5%. Conclusions With the use of a simple lead shield as described, we were able to effectively reduce testicular dose from “spermicidal” range to “oligospermic” range with possible

  18. Radiation Shielding Optimization on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Mertens, Chris J.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2013-01-01

    Future space missions to Mars will require radiation shielding to be optimized for deep space transit and an extended stay on the surface. In deep space, increased shielding levels and material optimization will reduce the exposure from most solar particle events (SPE) but are less effective at shielding against galactic cosmic rays (GCR). On the surface, the shielding provided by the Martian atmosphere greatly reduces the exposure from most SPE, and long-term GCR exposure is a primary concern. Previous work has shown that in deep space, additional shielding of common materials such as aluminum or polyethylene does not significantly reduce the GCR exposure. In this work, it is shown that on the Martian surface, almost any amount of aluminum shielding increases exposure levels for humans. The increased exposure levels are attributed to neutron production in the shield and Martian regolith as well as the electromagnetic cascade induced in the Martian atmosphere. This result is significant for optimization of vehicle and shield designs intended for the surface of Mars.

  19. Reflective Shields for Artificial Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, F. L.

    1986-01-01

    Report proposes reflective shield that protects spacecraft from radiant energy. Also gives some protection against particle beams and cosmic rays. Conceptual shield essentially advanced version of decorative multifaceted mirror balls often hung over dance floors. Mirror facets disperse radiant energy in many directions.

  20. Shielding design for a laser-accelerated proton therapy system.

    PubMed

    Fan, J; Luo, W; Fourkal, E; Lin, T; Li, J; Veltchev, I; Ma, C-M

    2007-07-07

    In this paper, we present the shielding analysis to determine the necessary neutron and photon shielding for a laser-accelerated proton therapy system. Laser-accelerated protons coming out of a solid high-density target have broad energy and angular spectra leading to dose distributions that cannot be directly used for therapeutic applications. A special particle selection and collimation device is needed to generate desired proton beams for energy- and intensity-modulated proton therapy. A great number of unwanted protons and even more electrons as a side-product of laser acceleration have to be stopped by collimation devices and shielding walls, posing a challenge in radiation shielding. Parameters of primary particles resulting from the laser-target interaction have been investigated by particle-in-cell simulations, which predicted energy spectra with 300 MeV maximum energy for protons and 270 MeV for electrons at a laser intensity of 2 x 10(21) W cm(-2). Monte Carlo simulations using FLUKA have been performed to design the collimators and shielding walls inside the treatment gantry, which consist of stainless steel, tungsten, polyethylene and lead. A composite primary collimator was designed to effectively reduce high-energy neutron production since their highly penetrating nature makes shielding very difficult. The necessary shielding for the treatment gantry was carefully studied to meet the criteria of head leakage <0.1% of therapeutic absorbed dose. A layer of polyethylene enclosing the whole particle selection and collimation device was used to shield neutrons and an outer layer of lead was used to reduce photon dose from neutron capture and electron bremsstrahlung. It is shown that the two-layer shielding design with 10-12 cm thick polyethylene and 4 cm thick lead can effectively absorb the unwanted particles to meet the shielding requirements.

  1. Shielding design for a laser-accelerated proton therapy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, J.; Luo, W.; Fourkal, E.; Lin, T.; Li, J.; Veltchev, I.; Ma, C.-M.

    2007-07-01

    In this paper, we present the shielding analysis to determine the necessary neutron and photon shielding for a laser-accelerated proton therapy system. Laser-accelerated protons coming out of a solid high-density target have broad energy and angular spectra leading to dose distributions that cannot be directly used for therapeutic applications. A special particle selection and collimation device is needed to generate desired proton beams for energy- and intensity-modulated proton therapy. A great number of unwanted protons and even more electrons as a side-product of laser acceleration have to be stopped by collimation devices and shielding walls, posing a challenge in radiation shielding. Parameters of primary particles resulting from the laser-target interaction have been investigated by particle-in-cell simulations, which predicted energy spectra with 300 MeV maximum energy for protons and 270 MeV for electrons at a laser intensity of 2 × 1021 W cm-2. Monte Carlo simulations using FLUKA have been performed to design the collimators and shielding walls inside the treatment gantry, which consist of stainless steel, tungsten, polyethylene and lead. A composite primary collimator was designed to effectively reduce high-energy neutron production since their highly penetrating nature makes shielding very difficult. The necessary shielding for the treatment gantry was carefully studied to meet the criteria of head leakage <0.1% of therapeutic absorbed dose. A layer of polyethylene enclosing the whole particle selection and collimation device was used to shield neutrons and an outer layer of lead was used to reduce photon dose from neutron capture and electron bremsstrahlung. It is shown that the two-layer shielding design with 10-12 cm thick polyethylene and 4 cm thick lead can effectively absorb the unwanted particles to meet the shielding requirements.

  2. Beta radiation shielding with lead and plastic: effect on bremsstrahlung radiation when switching the shielding order.

    PubMed

    Van Pelt, Wesley R; Drzyzga, Michael

    2007-02-01

    Lead and plastic are commonly used to shield beta radiation. Radiation protection literature is ubiquitous in advising the placement of plastic first to absorb all the beta particles before any lead shielding is used. This advice is based on the well established theory that radiative losses (bremsstrahlung production) are more prevalent in higher atomic number (Z) materials than in low Z materials. Using 32P beta radiation, we measured bremsstrahlung photons transmitted through lead and plastic (Lucite) shielding in different test configurations to determine the relative efficacy of lead alone, plastic alone, and the positional order of lead and plastic. With the source (32P) and detector held at a constant separation distance, we inserted lead and/or plastic absorbers and measured the reduction in bremsstrahlung radiation level measured by the detector. With these test conditions, analysis of measured bremsstrahlung radiation in various thicknesses and configurations of lead and plastic shielding shows the following: placing plastic first vs. lead first reduces the transmitted radiation level only marginally (10% to 40%); 2 mm of additional lead is sufficient to correct the "mistake" of placing the lead first; and for equal thicknesses or weights of lead and plastic, lead is a more efficient radiation shield than plastic.

  3. A coupled numerical analysis of shield temperatures, heat losses and residual gas pressures in an evacuated super-insulation using thermal and fluid networks. Part II: Unsteady-state conditions (cool-down period)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, H.

    2006-12-01

    This paper analyses the cool-down period of a 300 L super-insulated cryogenic storage tank for liquid nitrogen. Storage tank and evacuated shields are the same as described in part I of this paper where stationary states were investigated. The aim of the present paper is to introduce thermal resistance networks as a tool to quantitatively understand and control also unsteady-states like cool-down of super-insulations. Numerical simulations using thermal resistance networks have been performed to determine time dependence of local shield temperatures and heat loss components. Coupling between radiation and solid conduction is investigated under these conditions. Using the numerical results, we have checked an experimental method suggested in the literature to separate heat losses through the insulation from losses through thermal bridges by measurement of unsteady-state evaporation rates. The results of the simulations confirm that it takes the outer shields much longer to reach stationary temperature; cool-down does not proceed uniformly in the super-insulation. Coupling between different heat transfer modes again is obvious. Thermal emissivity is important also during the early phase of cool-down. Using the obtained numerical results, the experimental method to separate heat loss components could only roughly been confirmed for thick metallic foils.

  4. Lunar Surface Reactor Shielding Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Shawn; Lipinksi, Ronald; McAlpine, William

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear reactor system could provide power to support a long term human exploration to the moon. Such a system would require shielding to protect astronauts from its emitted radiations. Shielding studies have been performed for a Gas Cooled Reactor (GCR) system because it is considered to be the most suitable nuclear reactor system available for lunar exploration, based on its tolerance of oxidizing lunar regolith and its good conversion efficiency (Wright, 2003). The goals of the shielding studies were to provide optimal material shielding configuration that reduces the dose (rem) to the required level in order to protect astronauts, and to estimate the mass of regolith that would provide an equivalent protective effect if it were used as the shielding material. All calculations were performed using MCNPX code, a Monte Carlo transport code.

  5. Portable convertible blast effects shield

    DOEpatents

    Pastrnak, John W.; Hollaway, Rocky; Henning, Carl D.; Deteresa, Steve; Grundler, Walter; Hagler, Lisle B.; Kokko, Edwin; Switzer, Vernon A.

    2011-03-15

    A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more frusto-conically-tapered telescoping rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration by the friction fit of adjacent pairs of frusto-conically-tapered rings to each other.

  6. Portable convertible blast effects shield

    DOEpatents

    Pastrnak, John W.; Hollaway, Rocky; Henning, Carl D.; Deteresa, Steve; Grundler, Walter; Hagler, Lisle B.; Kokko, Edwin; Switzer, Vernon A

    2007-05-22

    A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more telescoping cylindrical rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration, such as by click locks.

  7. Charge shielding in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Shaojie; Stroth, Ulrich; Van Oost, Guido

    2010-11-15

    The shielding of a charge sheet in a magnetized plasma is investigated by taking account of the diamagnetic drift start-up current in addition to the polarization current. For a charge sheet with an infinitesimal width, the shielding is the same as the conventional Debye shielding if the charge sheet is perpendicular to the magnetic field; the shielding length is {radical}(2) times larger than the conventional one if the charge sheet is parallel to the magnetic field. When the scale length of the charge sheet is comparable or smaller than the ion Larmor radius, the electric field is significantly enhanced within the charge sheet, while far away from the charge sheet, the electric field is shielded to the usual 1/{epsilon}{sub r} level (where {epsilon}{sub r} is the diamagnetic coefficient of the magnetized plasma).

  8. Portable convertible blast effects shield

    SciTech Connect

    Pastrnak, John W.; Hollaway, Rocky; Henning, Carl D.; Deteresa, Steve; Grundler, Walter; Hagler,; Lisle B.; Kokko, Edwin; Switzer, Vernon A

    2010-10-26

    A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more telescoping cylindrical rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration, such as by click locks.

  9. Silica heat shield sizing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebbesmeyer, L. H.; Christensen, H. E.

    1975-01-01

    The sensitivity of silica heat shield requirements to gap width, tile edge radius, and heat transfer distribution within tile gaps was investigated. A two-dimensional thermal model was modified and used to determine the effect of two dimensional heat transfer distributions at high temperature reusable surface insulation edges on shuttle thermal protection system (TPS) requirements. The sensitivity of TPS requirements to coating thickness, emissivity, substructure thickness, and changes in gap heating for several locations on shuttle was also studied. An inverse solution technique was applied to temperature data obtained in the Ames 20 MW turbulent duct in order to examine the effect of tile edge radius on TPS requirements. The derived heating values were then used to predict TPS requirements. Results show that increasing tile radius reduces TPS requirements.

  10. NEUTRON SHIELDING STRUCTURE

    DOEpatents

    Mattingly, J.T.

    1962-09-25

    A lightweight neutron shielding structure comprises a honeycomb core which is filled with a neutron absorbing powder. The honeycomb core is faced with parallel planar facing sheets to form a lightweight rigid unit. Suitable absorber powders are selected from among the following: B, B/sub 4/C, B/sub 2/O/ sub 3/, CaB/sub 6/, Li/sub 2/CO3, LiOH, LiBO/sub 2/, Li/s ub 2/O. The facing sheets are constructed of a neutron moderating material, so that fast neutrons will be moderated while traversing the facing sheets, and ultimately be absorbed by the absorber powder in the honeycomb. Beryllium is a preferred moderator material for use in the facing sheets. The advantage of the structure is that it combines the rigidity and light weight of a honeycomb construction with the neutron absorption properties of boron and lithium. (AEC)

  11. CONCEPTS FOR CAPACITIVELY RF-SHIELDED BELLOWS IN CRYOGENIC STRUCTURES.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHAO,Y.HAHN,H.

    2004-03-24

    Bellows are frequently required in accelerators and colliders. Usually RF-shields with spring fingers are employed to screen the bellows. The lack of accessibility in cryogenic systems can be a problem and asks for alternate solutions to eliminate possible overheating, sparking, etc that occurred in intensive beams. This note addresses an alternate kind of RF shield, which uses capacitive contact instead of mechanical contact. The analysis, as well as numerical example of a superconducting cavity structure, shows that the capacitive RF shield satisfies the impedance requirements of both beam and HOMs. The capability of thermal isolation is also analyzed.

  12. Inhibited Shaped Charge Launcher Testing of Spacecraft Shield Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosch, Donald J.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes a test program in which several orbital debris shield designs were impact tested using the inhibited shaped charge launcher facility at Southwest Research Institute. This facility enables researchers to study the impact of one-gram aluminum projectiles on various shielding designs at velocities above 11 km/s. A total of twenty tests were conducted on targets provided by NASA-MSFC. This report discusses in detail the shield design, the projectile parameters and the test configuration used for each test. A brief discussion of the target damage is provided, as the detailed analysis of the target response will be done by NASA-MSFC.

  13. An analytical and experimental evaluation of shadow shields and their support members

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stochl, R. J.; Boyle, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental tests were performed on a model shadow shield thermal protection system to examine the effect of certain configuration variables. The experimental results were used to verify the ability of an analytical program to predict the shadow shield performance including the shield-support interaction. In general, the analysis (assuming diffuse surfaces) agreed well with the experimental support temperature profiles. The agreement for the shield profiles was not as good. The results demonstrated: (1) shadow shields can be effective in reducing the heat transfer into cryogenic propellant tanks, and (2) the conductive heat transfer through supports can be reduced by selective surface coatings.

  14. High purity silica reflective heat shield development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blome, J. C.; Drennan, D. N.; Schmitt, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Measurements were made of reflectance in the vacuum ultraviolet down to 0.15 micron. Scattering coefficients (S) and absorption coefficients (K) were also measured. These coefficients express the optical properties and are used directly in a thermodynamic analysis for sizing a heat shield. The effect of the thin silica melt layer formed during entry was also studied from the standpoint of trapped radiant energy.

  15. Saturated High Permeability Magnetic Shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenkel, Christian

    2016-05-01

    High permeability magnetic shields can be used in space to mitigate the effect of magnetic sources by several orders of magnitude. Nevertheless, the presence of significant amounts of ferromagnetic material on-board a spacecraft carries, by itself, a certain risk in terms of meeting magnetic cleanliness requirements. One possibility is that the shield is accidentally magnetised irreversibly, either by a strong external field, or mechanical shock. A second possibility is that the shield will acquire an induced moment in the presence of external fields (DC or AC), and could potentially amplify them.Here, we propose the use of high permeability shields which are driven into their fully saturated state - by the source that is being shielded. This approach limits the shielding effect to perhaps one or two orders of magnitude, but is expected to mitigate the above risks substantially. We present extensive numerical simulations describing the design principle behind optimised, fully saturated shields, as well as some results to substantiate the above claims.

  16. Lunar Surface Reactor Shielding Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Shawn; McAlpine, William; Lipinski, Ronald

    2006-01-20

    A nuclear reactor system could provide power to support long term human exploration of the moon. Such a system would require shielding to protect astronauts from its emitted radiations. Shielding studies have been performed for a Gas Cooled Reactor system because it is considered to be the most suitable nuclear reactor system available for lunar exploration, based on its tolerance of oxidizing lunar regolith and its good conversion efficiency. The goals of the shielding studies were to determine a material shielding configuration that reduces the dose (rem) to the required level in order to protect astronauts, and to estimate the mass of regolith that would provide an equivalent protective effect if it were used as the shielding material. All calculations were performed using MCNPX, a Monte Carlo transport code. Lithium hydride must be kept between 600 K and 700 K to prevent excessive swelling from large amounts of gamma or neutron irradiation. The issue is that radiation damage causes separation of the lithium and the hydrogen, resulting in lithium metal and hydrogen gas. The proposed design uses a layer of B4C to reduce the combined neutron and gamma dose to below 0.5Grads before the LiH is introduced. Below 0.5Grads the swelling in LiH is small (less than about 1%) for all temperatures. This approach causes the shield to be heavier than if the B4C were replaced by LiH, but it makes the shield much more robust and reliable.

  17. Galactic heavy-ion shielding using electrostatic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.

    1984-01-01

    The shielding of spacecraft against galactic heavy ions, particularly high-energy Fe(56) nuclei, by electrostatic fields is analyzed for an arrangement of spherical concentric shells. Vacuum breakdown considerations are found to limit the minimum radii of the spheres to over 100 m. This limitation makes it impractical to use the fields for shielding small spacecraft. The voltages necessary to repel these Fe(56) nuclei exceed present electrostatic generating capabilities by over 2 orders of magnitude and render the concept useless as an alternative to traditional bulk-material shielding methods.

  18. Magnetic shielding for a spaceborne adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Brent A.; Shirron, Peter J.; Castles, Stephen H.; Serlemitsos, Aristides T.

    1991-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center has studied magnetic shielding for an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator. Four types of shielding were studied: active coils, passive ferromagnetic shells, passive superconducting coils, and passive superconducting shells. The passive superconducting shells failed by allowing flux penetration. The other three methods were successful, singly or together. Experimental studies of passive ferromagnetic shielding are compared with calculations made using the Poisson Group of programs, distributed by the Los Alamos Accelerator Code Group of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Agreement between calculation and experiment is good. The ferromagnetic material is a silicon iron alloy.

  19. Exploring Chemical Bonds through Variations in Magnetic Shielding.

    PubMed

    Karadakov, Peter B; Horner, Kate E

    2016-02-09

    Differences in nuclear isotropic magnetic shieldings give rise to the chemical shifts measured in NMR experiments. In contrast to existing NMR experimental techniques, quantum chemical methods are capable of calculating isotropic magnetic shieldings not just at nuclei, but also at any point in the space surrounding a molecule. Using s-trans-1,3-butadiene, ethane, ethene, and ethyne as examples, we show that the variations in isotropic magnetic shielding around a molecule, represented as isosurfaces and contour plots, provide an unexpectedly clear picture of chemical bonding, which is much more detailed than the traditional description in terms of the total electron density.

  20. Methods of Building Cost Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Building Research Inst., Inc., Washington, DC.

    Presentation of symposium papers includes--(1) a study describing techniques for economic analysis of building designs, (2) three case studies of analysis techniques, (3) procedures for measuring the area and volume of buildings, and (4) an open forum discussion. Case studies evaluate--(1) the thermal economics of building enclosures, (2) an…

  1. Multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dadkhah, Hossein; Kim, Yusung; Flynn, Ryan T.; Wu, Xiaodong

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To present a novel brachytherapy technique, called multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy (H-RSBT), for the precise angular and linear positioning of a partial shield in a curved applicator. H-RSBT mechanically enables the dose delivery using only linear translational motion of the radiation source/shield combination. The previously proposed approach of serial rotating shield brachytherapy (S-RSBT), in which the partial shield is rotated to several angular positions at each source dwell position [W. Yang et al., “Rotating-shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer,” Phys. Med. Biol. 58, 3931–3941 (2013)], is mechanically challenging to implement in a curved applicator, and H-RSBT is proposed as a feasible solution. Methods: A Henschke-type applicator, designed for an electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™) and a 0.5 mm thick tungsten partial shield with 180° or 45° azimuthal emission angles and 116° asymmetric zenith angle, is proposed. The interior wall of the applicator contains six evenly spaced helical keyways that rigidly define the emission direction of the partial radiation shield as a function of depth in the applicator. The shield contains three uniformly distributed protruding keys on its exterior wall and is attached to the source such that it rotates freely, thus longitudinal translational motion of the source is transferred to rotational motion of the shield. S-RSBT and H-RSBT treatment plans with 180° and 45° azimuthal emission angles were generated for five cervical cancer patients with a diverse range of high-risk target volume (HR-CTV) shapes and applicator positions. For each patient, the total number of emission angles was held nearly constant for S-RSBT and H-RSBT by using dwell positions separated by 5 and 1.7 mm, respectively, and emission directions separated by 22.5° and 60°, respectively. Treatment delivery time and tumor coverage (D{sub 90} of HR-CTV) were the two metrics used as the basis for evaluation and

  2. Multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dadkhah, Hossein; Kim, Yusung; Wu, Xiaodong; Flynn, Ryan T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To present a novel brachytherapy technique, called multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy (H-RSBT), for the precise angular and linear positioning of a partial shield in a curved applicator. H-RSBT mechanically enables the dose delivery using only linear translational motion of the radiation source/shield combination. The previously proposed approach of serial rotating shield brachytherapy (S-RSBT), in which the partial shield is rotated to several angular positions at each source dwell position [W. Yang et al., “Rotating-shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer,” Phys. Med. Biol. 58, 3931–3941 (2013)], is mechanically challenging to implement in a curved applicator, and H-RSBT is proposed as a feasible solution. Methods: A Henschke-type applicator, designed for an electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™) and a 0.5 mm thick tungsten partial shield with 180° or 45° azimuthal emission angles and 116° asymmetric zenith angle, is proposed. The interior wall of the applicator contains six evenly spaced helical keyways that rigidly define the emission direction of the partial radiation shield as a function of depth in the applicator. The shield contains three uniformly distributed protruding keys on its exterior wall and is attached to the source such that it rotates freely, thus longitudinal translational motion of the source is transferred to rotational motion of the shield. S-RSBT and H-RSBT treatment plans with 180° and 45° azimuthal emission angles were generated for five cervical cancer patients with a diverse range of high-risk target volume (HR-CTV) shapes and applicator positions. For each patient, the total number of emission angles was held nearly constant for S-RSBT and H-RSBT by using dwell positions separated by 5 and 1.7 mm, respectively, and emission directions separated by 22.5° and 60°, respectively. Treatment delivery time and tumor coverage (D90 of HR-CTV) were the two metrics used as the basis for evaluation and

  3. Flexible Cable Providing EMI Shielding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-06-07

    shielding the electronic 25 equipment by enclosing it in shielded rooms and cabinets, filling 1 any gaps therein with conductive gaskets, and also by...are found in U.S. 15 Patent Nos. 4,948,922 and 4,93 7,128 which disclose conductive 16 elastic gaskets used to fill gaps between openings in shielded...matrix binder which is filled with 5 particles of a high permeability iron-based alloy. The 6 conductive property of the matrix binder provides

  4. New Materials for EMI Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Graphite fibers intercalated with bromine or similar mixed halogen compounds have substantially lower resistivity than their pristine counterparts, and thus should exhibit higher shielding effectiveness against electromagnetic interference. The mechanical and thermal properties are nearly unaffected, and the shielding of high energy x-rays and gamma rays is substantially increased. Characterization of the resistivity of the composite materials is subtle, but it is clear that the composite resistivity is substantially lowered. Shielding effectiveness calculations utilizing a simple rule of mixtures model yields results that are consistent with available data on these materials.

  5. NEUTRON ABSORPTION AND SHIELDING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Axelrad, I.R.

    1960-06-21

    A neutron absorption and shielding device is described which is adapted for mounting in a radiation shielding wall surrounding a radioactive area through which instrumentation leads and the like may safely pass without permitting gamma or neutron radiation to pass to the exterior. The shielding device comprises a container having at least one nonrectilinear tube or passageway means extending therethrough, which is adapted to contain instrumentation leads or the like, a layer of a substance capable of absorbing gamma rays, and a solid resinous composition adapted to attenuate fast-moving neutrons and capture slow- moving or thermal neutrons.

  6. Efficacy of face shields against cough aerosol droplets from a cough simulator.

    PubMed

    Lindsley, William G; Noti, John D; Blachere, Francoise M; Szalajda, Jonathan V; Beezhold, Donald H

    2014-01-01

    available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene for the following free supplemental resource: tables of the experiments performed, more detailed information about the aerosol measurement methods, photographs of the experimental setup, and summaries of the experimental data from the aerosol measurement devices, the qPCR analysis, and the VPA.].

  7. Shielding synchrotron light sources: Advantages of circular shield walls tunnels

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, S. L.; Ghosh, V. J.; Breitfeller, M.

    2016-04-26

    Third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produce significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than lower energy injection and ramped operations. High energy neutrons produced in the forward direction from thin target beam losses are a major component of the dose rate outside the shield walls of the tunnel. The convention has been to provide thicker 90° ratchet walls to reduce this dose to the beam line users. We present an alternate circular shield wall design, which naturally and cost effectively increases the path length for this forward radiation in the shield wall and thereby substantially decreasing the dose rate for these beam losses. Here, this shield wall design will greatly reduce the dose rate to the users working near the front end optical components but will challenge the beam line designers to effectively utilize the longer length of beam line penetration in the shield wall. Additional advantages of the circular shield wall tunnel are that it's simpler to construct, allows greater access to the insertion devices and the upstream in tunnel beam line components, as well as reducing the volume of concrete and therefore the cost of the shield wall.

  8. Shielding synchrotron light sources: Advantages of circular shield walls tunnels

    DOE PAGES

    Kramer, S. L.; Ghosh, V. J.; Breitfeller, M.

    2016-04-26

    Third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produce significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than lower energy injection and ramped operations. High energy neutrons producedmore » in the forward direction from thin target beam losses are a major component of the dose rate outside the shield walls of the tunnel. The convention has been to provide thicker 90° ratchet walls to reduce this dose to the beam line users. We present an alternate circular shield wall design, which naturally and cost effectively increases the path length for this forward radiation in the shield wall and thereby substantially decreasing the dose rate for these beam losses. Here, this shield wall design will greatly reduce the dose rate to the users working near the front end optical components but will challenge the beam line designers to effectively utilize the longer length of beam line penetration in the shield wall. Additional advantages of the circular shield wall tunnel are that it's simpler to construct, allows greater access to the insertion devices and the upstream in tunnel beam line components, as well as reducing the volume of concrete and therefore the cost of the shield wall.« less

  9. Shielding synchrotron light sources: Advantages of circular shield walls tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, S. L.; Ghosh, V. J.; Breitfeller, M.

    2016-08-01

    Third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produce significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than lower energy injection and ramped operations. High energy neutrons produced in the forward direction from thin target beam losses are a major component of the dose rate outside the shield walls of the tunnel. The convention has been to provide thicker 90° ratchet walls to reduce this dose to the beam line users. We present an alternate circular shield wall design, which naturally and cost effectively increases the path length for this forward radiation in the shield wall and thereby substantially decreasing the dose rate for these beam losses. This shield wall design will greatly reduce the dose rate to the users working near the front end optical components but will challenge the beam line designers to effectively utilize the longer length of beam line penetration in the shield wall. Additional advantages of the circular shield wall tunnel are that it's simpler to construct, allows greater access to the insertion devices and the upstream in tunnel beam line components, as well as reducing the volume of concrete and therefore the cost of the shield wall.

  10. A shielding application of perturbation theory to determine changes in neutron and gamma doses due to changes in shield layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fieno, D.

    1972-01-01

    The perturbation theory for fixed sources was applied to radiation shielding problems to determine changes in neutron and gamma ray doses due to changes in various shield layers. For a given source and detector position the perturbation method enables dose derivatives due to all layer changes to be determined from one forward and one inhomogeneous adjoint calculation. The direct approach requires two forward calculations for the derivative due to a single layer change. Hence, the perturbation method for obtaining dose derivatives permits an appreciable savings in computation for a multilayered shield. For an illustrative problem, a comparison was made of the fractional change in the dose per unit change in the thickness of each shield layer as calculated by perturbation theory and by successive direct calculations; excellent agreement was obtained between the two methods.

  11. Gravity Scaling of a Power Reactor Water Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Robert S.; Pearson, J. Boise

    2007-01-01

    A similarity analysis on a water-based reactor shield examined the effect of gravity on free convection between a reactor shield inner and outer vessel boundaries. Two approaches established similarity between operation on the Earth and the Moon: 1) direct scaling of Rayleigh number equating gravity-surface heat flux products, 2) temperature difference between the wall and thermal boundary layer held constant. Nusselt number for natural convection (laminar and turbulent) is assumed of form Nu = CRa(sup n).

  12. Thick Galactic Cosmic Radiation Shielding Using Atmospheric Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C.; Nurge, Mark A.; Starr, Stanley O.; Koontz, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    NASA is concerned with protecting astronauts from the effects of galactic cosmic radiation and has expended substantial effort in the development of computer models to predict the shielding obtained from various materials. However, these models were only developed for shields up to about 120 g!cm2 in thickness and have predicted that shields of this thickness are insufficient to provide adequate protection for extended deep space flights. Consequently, effort is underway to extend the range of these models to thicker shields and experimental data is required to help confirm the resulting code. In this paper empirically obtained effective dose measurements from aircraft flights in the atmosphere are used to obtain the radiation shielding function of the earth's atmosphere, a very thick shield. Obtaining this result required solving an inverse problem and the method for solving it is presented. The results are shown to be in agreement with current code in the ranges where they overlap. These results are then checked and used to predict the radiation dosage under thick shields such as planetary regolith and the atmosphere of Venus.

  13. NASA's Aeroacoustic Tools and Methods for Analysis of Aircraft Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Lopes, Leonard V.; Burley, Casey L.

    2015-01-01

    Aircraft community noise is a significant concern due to continued growth in air traffic, increasingly stringent environmental goals, and operational limitations imposed by airport authorities. The ability to quantify aircraft noise at the source and ultimately at observers is required to develop low noise aircraft designs and flight procedures. Predicting noise at the source, accounting for scattering and propagation through the atmosphere to the observer, and assessing the perception and impact on a community requires physics-based aeroacoustics tools. Along with the analyses for aero-performance, weights and fuel burn, these tools can provide the acoustic component for aircraft MDAO (Multidisciplinary Design Analysis and Optimization). Over the last decade significant progress has been made in advancing the aeroacoustic tools such that acoustic analyses can now be performed during the design process. One major and enabling advance has been the development of the system noise framework known as Aircraft NOise Prediction Program2 (ANOPP2). ANOPP2 is NASA's aeroacoustic toolset and is designed to facilitate the combination of acoustic approaches of varying fidelity for the analysis of noise from conventional and unconventional aircraft. The toolset includes a framework that integrates noise prediction and propagation methods into a unified system for use within general aircraft analysis software. This includes acoustic analyses, signal processing and interfaces that allow for the assessment of perception of noise on a community. ANOPP2's capability to incorporate medium fidelity shielding predictions and wind tunnel experiments into a design environment is presented. An assessment of noise from a conventional and Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) aircraft using medium fidelity scattering methods combined with noise measurements from a model-scale HWB recently placed in NASA's 14x22 wind tunnel are presented. The results are in the form of community noise metrics and

  14. Evolution of large shield volcanoes on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrick, Robert R.; Dufek, Josef; McGovern, Patrick J.

    2005-01-01

    We studied the geologic history, topographic expression, and gravity signature of 29 large Venusian shield volcanoes with similar morphologies in Magellan synthetic aperture radar imagery. While they appear similar in imagery, 16 have a domical topographic expression and 13 have a central depression. Typical dimensions for the central depression are 150 km wide and 500 m deep. The central depressions are probably not calderas resulting from collapse of a shallow magma chamber but instead are the result of a corona-like sagging of a previously domical volcano. The depressions all have some later volcanic filling. All but one of the central depression volcanoes have been post-dated by geologic features unrelated to the volcano, while most of the domical volcanoes are at the top of the stratigraphic column. Analysis of the gravity signatures in the spatial and spectral domains shows a strong correlation between the absence of post-dating features and the presence of dynamic support by an underlying plume. We infer that the formation of the central depressions occurred as a result of cessation of dynamic support. However, there are some domical volcanoes whose geologic histories and gravity signatures also indicate that they are extinct, so sagging of the central region apparently does not always occur when dynamic support is removed. We suggest that the thickness of the elastic lithosphere may be a factor in determining whether a central depression forms when dynamic support is removed, but the gravity data are of insufficient resolution to test this hypothesis with admittance methods.

  15. Grounding and shielding in the accelerator environment

    SciTech Connect

    Kerns, Q.

    1991-01-01

    Everyday features of the accelerator environment include long cable runs, high power and low level equipment sharing building space, stray electromagnetic fields and ground voltage differences between the sending and receiving ends of an installation. This paper pictures some Fermilab installations chosen to highlight significant features and presents practices, test methods and equipment that have been helpful in achieving successful shielding. Throughout the report are numbered statements aimed at summarizing good practices and avoiding pitfalls.

  16. Grounding and shielding in the accelerator environment

    SciTech Connect

    Kerns, Q.

    1991-12-31

    Everyday features of the accelerator environment include long cable runs, high power and low level equipment sharing building space, stray electromagnetic fields and ground voltage differences between the sending and receiving ends of an installation. This paper pictures some Fermilab installations chosen to highlight significant features and presents practices, test methods and equipment that have been helpful in achieving successful shielding. Throughout the report are numbered statements aimed at summarizing good practices and avoiding pitfalls.

  17. Shielding analyses: the rabbit vs the turtle?

    SciTech Connect

    Broadhead, B.L.

    1996-12-31

    This paper compares solutions using Monte Carlo and discrete- ordinates methods applied to two actual shielding situations in order to make some general observations concerning the efficiency and advantages/disadvantages of the two approaches. The discrete- ordinates solutions are performed using two-dimensional geometries, while the Monte Carlo approaches utilize three-dimensional geometries with both multigroup and point cross-section data.

  18. Prognostic Analysis System and Methods of Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacKey, Ryan M. E. (Inventor); Sneddon, Robert (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A prognostic analysis system and methods of operating the system are provided. In particular, a prognostic analysis system for the analysis of physical system health applicable to mechanical, electrical, chemical and optical systems and methods of operating the system are described herein.

  19. Graphite/Ultra-High Modulus Polyethylene Hybrid Fiber Composites with Epoxy and Polyethylene Matrices for Cosmic Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    One of the most significant technical challenges in long-duration space missions is that of protecting the crew from harmful radiation. Protection against such radiation on a manned Mars mission will be of vital importance both during transit and while on the surface of the planet. The development of multifunctional materials that serve as integral structural members of the space vehicle and provide the necessary radiation shielding for the crew would be both mission enabling and cost effective. Additionally, combining shielding and structure could reduce total vehicle mass. Hybrid laminated composite materials having both ultramodulus polyethylene (PE) and graphite fibers in epoxy and PE matrices could meet such mission requirements. PE fibers have excellent physical properties, including the highest specific strength of any known fiber. Moreover, the high hydrogen (H) content of polyethylene makes the material an excellent shielding material for cosmic radiation. When such materials are incorporated into an epoxy or PE matrix a very effective shielding material is expected. Boron (B) may be added to the matrix resin or used as a coating to further increase the shielding effectiveness due to B s ability to slow thermal neutrons. These materials may also serve as micrometeorites shields due to PE s high impact energy absorption properties. It should be noted that such materials can be fabricated by existing equipment and methods. It is the objective of this work therefore to: (a) perform preliminary analysis of the radiation transport within these materials; (b) fabricate panels for mechanical property testing before and after radiation exposure. Preliminary determination on the effectiveness of the combinations of material components on both shielding and structural efficiency will be made.

  20. Unified aeroacoustics analysis for high speed turboprop aerodynamics and noise. Volume 3: Application of theory for blade loading, wakes, noise, and wing shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, D. B.; Mccolgan, C. J.; Ladden, R. M.; Klatte, R. J.

    1991-01-01

    Results of the program for the generation of a computer prediction code for noise of advanced single rotation, turboprops (prop-fans) such as the SR3 model are presented. The code is based on a linearized theory developed at Hamilton Standard in which aerodynamics and acoustics are treated as a unified process. Both steady and unsteady blade loading are treated. Capabilities include prediction of steady airload distributions and associated aerodynamic performance, unsteady blade pressure response to gust interaction or blade vibration, noise fields associated with thickness and steady and unsteady loading, and wake velocity fields associated with steady loading. The code was developed on the Hamilton Standard IBM computer and has now been installed on the Cray XMP at NASA-Lewis. The work had its genesis in the frequency domain acoustic theory developed at Hamilton Standard in the late 1970s. It was found that the method used for near field noise predictions could be adapted as a lifting surface theory for aerodynamic work via the pressure potential technique that was used for both wings and ducted turbomachinery. In the first realization of the theory for propellers, the blade loading was represented in a quasi-vortex lattice form. This was upgraded to true lifting surface loading. Originally, it was believed that a purely linear approach for both aerodynamics and noise would be adequate. However, two sources of nonlinearity in the steady aerodynamics became apparent and were found to be a significant factor at takeoff conditions. The first is related to the fact that the steady axial induced velocity may be of the same order of magnitude as the flight speed and the second is the formation of leading edge vortices which increases lift and redistribute loading. Discovery and properties of prop-fan leading edge vortices were reported in two papers. The Unified AeroAcoustic Program (UAAP) capabilites are demonstrated and the theory verified by comparison with the

  1. Fabrication of reactor shields at the Y-12 plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asbury, W. L.; Kosinski, F. E.; Royer, L. T.

    The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant is the lead DOE facility for the large scale synthesis, manufacture, and fabrication of lithium hydride/deuteride (LiH/D) materials. Fabrication of large crack free LiH/D parts of uniform density and strength is best achieved by isostatic pressing, using powder metallurgy methods. The highly reactive and moisture sensitive nature of LiH/D has required a number of unique facilities and processing methods at Y-12 to process LiH/D in a safe manner and to maintain high quality products. The history of the fabrication of neutron shields for the SNAP 10A reactor is discussed. Powder metallurgical techniques were used to fabricate that shielding system at Y-12, and the units were tested for shielding efficiency at the Tower Shielding Facility at ORNL.

  2. Optimization of the National Ignition Facility primary shield design

    SciTech Connect

    Annese, C.E.; Watkins, E.F.; Greenspan, E.; Miller, W.F.; Latkowski, J.; Lee, J.D.; Soran, P.; Tobin, M.L.

    1993-10-01

    Minimum cost design concepts of the primary shield for the National Ignition laser fusion experimental Facility (NIF) are searched with the help of the optimization code SWAN. The computational method developed for this search involves incorporating the time dependence of the delayed photon field within effective delayed photon production cross sections. This method enables one to address the time-dependent problem using relatively simple, time-independent transport calculations, thus significantly simplifying the design process. A novel approach was used for the identification of the optimal combination of constituents that will minimize the shield cost; it involves the generation, with SWAN, of effectiveness functions for replacing materials on an equal cost basis. The minimum cost shield design concept was found to consist of a mixture of polyethylene and low cost, low activation materials such as SiC, with boron added near the shield boundaries.

  3. Preliminary assessment of the geochemistry and mineral favorability of the postorogenic granites of the southeastern Arabian Shield, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuckless, John S.; VanTrump, G.; Christiansen, E.H.; Bush, C.A.; Bunker, C.M.; Bartel, A.J.

    1983-01-01

    Further quantitative analysis is recommended to verify and accurately delineate anomalous concentrations of trace elements. Trend surface analysis of all available data for postorogenic granites from the eastern Arabian Shield is suggested as a method for testing regional variations in the protolith that might control locations of highly favorable areas of ore deposition.

  4. Convergence analysis of combinations of different methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y.

    1994-12-31

    This paper provides a convergence analysis for combinations of different numerical methods for solving systems of differential equations. The author proves that combinations of two convergent linear multistep methods or Runge-Kutta methods produce a new convergent method of which the order is equal to the smaller order of the two original methods.

  5. Trial Sequential Methods for Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulinskaya, Elena; Wood, John

    2014-01-01

    Statistical methods for sequential meta-analysis have applications also for the design of new trials. Existing methods are based on group sequential methods developed for single trials and start with the calculation of a required information size. This works satisfactorily within the framework of fixed effects meta-analysis, but conceptual…

  6. Radiation shielding for neutron guides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ersez, T.; Braoudakis, G.; Osborn, J. C.

    2006-11-01

    Models of the neutron guide shielding for the out of bunker guides on the thermal and cold neutron beam lines of the OPAL Reactor (ANSTO) were constructed using the Monte Carlo code MCNP 4B. The neutrons that were not reflected inside the guides but were absorbed by the supermirror (SM) layers were noted to be a significant source of gammas. Gammas also arise from neutrons absorbed by the B, Si, Na and K contained in the glass. The proposed shielding design has produced compact shielding assemblies. These arrangements are consistent with safety requirements, floor load limits, and cost constraints. To verify the design a prototype was assembled consisting of 120 mm thick Pb(96%)Sb(4%) walls resting on a concrete block. There was good agreement between experimental measurements and calculated dose rates for bulk shield regions.

  7. Structural/Radiation-Shielding Epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W.; Smith, Joseph G.; Hinkley, Jeffrey; Blattnig, Steve; Delozier, Donavon M.; Watson, Kent A.; Ghose, Sayata

    2009-01-01

    A development effort was directed toward formulating epoxy resins that are useful both as structural materials and as shielding against heavy-ion radiation. Hydrogen is recognized as the best element for absorbing heavy-ion radiation, and high-hydrogen-content polymers are now in use as shielding materials. However, high-hydrogen-content polymers (e.g. polyethylene) are typically not good structural materials. In contrast, aromatic polymers, which contain smaller amounts of hydrogen, often have the strength necessary for structural materials. Accordingly, the present development effort is based on the concept that an ideal structural/ heavy-ion-radiation-shielding material would be a polymer that contains sufficient hydrogen (e.g., in the form of aliphatic molecular groups) for radiation shielding and has sufficient aromatic content for structural integrity.

  8. Heat Shield Flank Close Up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This image from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity features an up-close view of the flank piece of the rover's broken heat shield.

    The rover spent 36 sols investigating how the severe heating during entry through the atmosphere affected the heat shield. The most obvious is the fact that the heat shield inverted upon impact. Overall, engineers were interested in evaluating the performance of the heat shield's thermal protection system.

    This is the the panormamic camera team's best current attempt at generating a 'true color' view of what this scene would look like if viewed by a human on Mars. It was generated from a mathematical combination of six calibrated, left-eye panoramic camera images acquired around 3:07 p.m. local solar time on Opportunity's sol 331 (Dec. 28, 2004) using filters ranging in wavelengths from 430 to 750 nanometers.

  9. Hybrid Shielding for Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullins, David; Royal, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Precision symmetry measurements such as the search for the electric dipole moment of the neutron require magnetic shielding rooms to reduce the ambient field to the pT scale. The massive mu-metal sheets and large separation between layers make these shield rooms bulky and expensive. Active field cancellation systems used to reduce the surrounding field are limited in uniformity of cancellation. A novel approach to reducing the space between shield layers and increasing the effectiveness of active cancellation is to combine the two systems into a hybrid system, with active and passive layers interspersed. We demonstrate this idea in a prototype with an active layer sandwiched between two passive layers of shielding.

  10. Verification of Small Hole Theory for Application to Wire Chaffing Resulting in Shield Faults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuet, Stefan R.; Timucin, Dogan A.; Wheeler, Kevin R.

    2011-01-01

    Our work is focused upon developing methods for wire chafe fault detection through the use of reflectometry to assess shield integrity. When shielded electrical aircraft wiring first begins to chafe typically the resulting evidence is small hole(s) in the shielding. We are focused upon developing algorithms and the signal processing necessary to first detect these small holes prior to incurring damage to the inner conductors. Our approach has been to develop a first principles physics model combined with probabilistic inference, and to verify this model with laboratory experiments as well as through simulation. Previously we have presented the electromagnetic small-hole theory and how it might be applied to coaxial cable. In this presentation, we present our efforts to verify this theoretical approach with high-fidelity electromagnetic simulations (COMSOL). Laboratory observations are used to parameterize the computationally efficient theoretical model with probabilistic inference resulting in quantification of hole size and location. Our efforts in characterizing faults in coaxial cable are subsequently leading to fault detection in shielded twisted pair as well as analysis of intermittent faulty connectors using similar techniques.

  11. Composite Aerogel Multifoil Protective Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    New technologies are needed to survive the temperatures, radiation, and hypervelocity particles that exploration spacecraft encounter. Multilayer insulations (MLIs) have been used on many spacecraft as thermal insulation. Other materials and composites have been used as micrometeorite shielding or radiation shielding. However, no material composite has been developed and employed as a combined thermal insulation, micrometeorite, and radiation shielding. By replacing the scrims that have been used to separate the foil layers in MLIs with various aerogels, and by using a variety of different metal foils, the overall protective performance of MLIs can be greatly expanded to act as thermal insulation, radiation shielding, and hypervelocity particle shielding. Aerogels are highly porous, low-density solids that are produced by the gelation of metal alkoxides and supercritical drying. Aerogels have been flown in NASA missions as a hypervelocity particle capture medium (Stardust) and as thermal insulation (2003 MER). Composite aerogel multifoil protective shielding would be used to provide thermal insulation, while also shielding spacecraft or components from radiation and hypervelocity particle impacts. Multiple layers of foil separated by aerogel would act as a thermal barrier by preventing the transport of heat energy through the composite. The silica aerogel would act as a convective and conductive thermal barrier, while the titania powder and metal foils would absorb and reflect the radiative heat. It would also capture small hypervelocity particles, such as micrometeorites, since it would be a stuffed, multi-shock Whipple shield. The metal foil layers would slow and break up the impacting particles, while the aerogel layers would convert the kinetic energy of the particles to thermal and mechanical energy and stop the particles.

  12. Methods of DNA methylation analysis.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this review was to provide guidance for investigators who are new to the field of DNA methylation analysis. Epigenetics is the study of mitotically heritable alterations in gene expression potential that are not mediated by changes in DNA sequence. Recently, it has become clear that n...

  13. Inspecting for Corrosion of Shipboard Conduits and Shield-to-Ground Adapters with Low-Bandwidth Pulsed-Current Injection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-12-01

    defects. Low values of shield path resistance have been measured where shield -to- ground adapters have been “floating” or ungrounded. This type of fault can...tests aboard USNS Mohawk ........................................................ 2 Figures 1. Measurement of cable shield resistance , disconnection not...5 3. Measurement of total cable shield path resistance in a system, disconnection not required ... 5 4. Method 1 (L/R method

  14. Simulation of reflected and scattered laser radiation for designing laser shields.

    PubMed

    Konieczny, Piotr; Wolska, Agnieszka; Swiderski, Jacek; Zajac, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a computer simulation of reflected and scattered laser radiation for calculating the angle of laser shields performed with the Laser Shield Solver computer program. The authors describe a method of calculating the shield angle for laser shields which protect workers against reflected and scattered laser radiation and which are made from different materials. The main assumptions of the program, which calculates and simulates reflected laser radiation from any material and which can be used for designing shield angles, are presented. Calculations are compared with measurements of reflected laser radiation. The results for one type of laser and different materials which interacted with a laser beam showed that the Laser Shield Solver was an appropriate tool for designing laser shields and its simulations of reflected laser radiation distribution have practical use.

  15. Building A New Kind of Graded-Z Shield for Swift's Burst Alert Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, David W.

    2002-01-01

    The Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on Swift has a graded-Z Shield that closes out the volume between the coded aperture mask and the Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) detector array. The purpose of the 37 kilogram shield is to attenuate gamma rays that have not penetrated the coded aperture mask of the BAT instrument and are therefore a major source of noise on the detector array. Unlike previous shields made from plates and panels, this shield consists of multiple layers of thin metal foils (lead, tantalum, tin, and copper) that are stitched together much like standard multi-layer insulation blankets. The shield sections are fastened around BAT, forming a curtain around the instrument aperture. Strength tests were performed to validate and improve the design, and the shield will be vibration tested along with BAT in late 2002. Practical aspects such as the layup design, methods of manufacture, and testing of this new kind of graded-Z Shield are presented.

  16. Hybrid methods for cybersecurity analysis :

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Warren Leon,; Dunlavy, Daniel M.

    2014-01-01

    Early 2010 saw a signi cant change in adversarial techniques aimed at network intrusion: a shift from malware delivered via email attachments toward the use of hidden, embedded hyperlinks to initiate sequences of downloads and interactions with web sites and network servers containing malicious software. Enterprise security groups were well poised and experienced in defending the former attacks, but the new types of attacks were larger in number, more challenging to detect, dynamic in nature, and required the development of new technologies and analytic capabilities. The Hybrid LDRD project was aimed at delivering new capabilities in large-scale data modeling and analysis to enterprise security operators and analysts and understanding the challenges of detection and prevention of emerging cybersecurity threats. Leveraging previous LDRD research e orts and capabilities in large-scale relational data analysis, large-scale discrete data analysis and visualization, and streaming data analysis, new modeling and analysis capabilities were quickly brought to bear on the problems in email phishing and spear phishing attacks in the Sandia enterprise security operational groups at the onset of the Hybrid project. As part of this project, a software development and deployment framework was created within the security analyst work ow tool sets to facilitate the delivery and testing of new capabilities as they became available, and machine learning algorithms were developed to address the challenge of dynamic threats. Furthermore, researchers from the Hybrid project were embedded in the security analyst groups for almost a full year, engaged in daily operational activities and routines, creating an atmosphere of trust and collaboration between the researchers and security personnel. The Hybrid project has altered the way that research ideas can be incorporated into the production environments of Sandias enterprise security groups, reducing time to deployment from months and

  17. Effect of Alternate Supply of Shielding Gases of Tungsten Inert Gas Welding on Mechanical Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinde, Neelam Vilas; Telsang, Martand Tamanacharya

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, an attempt is made to study the effect of alternate supply of the shielding gas in comparison with the conventional method of TIG welding with pure argon gas. The two sets of combination are used as 10-10 and 40-20 s for alternate supply of the Argon and Helium shielding gas respectively. The effect of alternate supply of shielding gas is studied on the mechanical properties like bend test, tensile test and impact test. The full factorial experimental design is applied for three set of combinations. The ANOVA is used to find significant parameters for the process and regression analysis used to develop the mathematical model. The result shows that the alternate supply of the shielding gas for 10-10 s provides better result for the bend, tensile and impact test as compared with the conventional argon gas and the alternate supply of 40-20 s argon and helium gas respectively. Welding speed can be increased for alternate supply of the shielding gas that can reduce the total welding cost.

  18. Supplemental heating of deposition tooling shields

    DOEpatents

    Ohlhausen, James A.; Peebles, Diane E.; Hunter, John A.; Eckelmeyer, Kenneth H.

    2000-01-01

    A method of reducing particle generation from the thin coating deposited on the internal surfaces of a deposition chamber which undergoes temperature variation greater than 100.degree. C. comprising maintaining the temperature variation of the internal surfaces low enough during the process cycle to keep thermal expansion stresses between the coating and the surfaces under 500 MPa. For titanium nitride deposited on stainless steel, this means keeping temperature variations under approximately 70.degree. C. in a chamber that may be heated to over 350.degree. C. during a typical processing operation. Preferably, a supplemental heater is mounted behind the upper shield and controlled by a temperature sensitive element which provides feedback control based on the temperature of the upper shield.

  19. EMC Test Report Electrodynamic Dust Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmody, Lynne M.; Boyette, Carl B.

    2014-01-01

    This report documents the Electromagnetic Interference E M I evaluation performed on the Electrodynamic Dust Shield (EDS) which is part of the MISSE-X System under the Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center. Measurements are performed to document the emissions environment associated with the EDS units. The purpose of this report is to collect all information needed to reproduce the testing performed on the Electrodynamic Dust Shield units, document data gathered during testing, and present the results. This document presents information unique to the measurements performed on the Bioculture Express Rack payload; using test methods prepared to meet SSP 30238 requirements. It includes the information necessary to satisfy the needs of the customer per work order number 1037104. The information presented herein should only be used to meet the requirements for which it was prepared.

  20. Neutronic reactor thermal shield

    DOEpatents

    Lowe, Paul E.

    1976-06-15

    1. The combination with a plurality of parallel horizontal members arranged in horizontal and vertical rows, the spacing of the members in all horizontal rows being equal throughout, the spacing of the members in all vertical rows being equal throughout; of a shield for a nuclear reactor comprising two layers of rectangular blocks through which the members pass generally perpendicularly to the layers, each block in each layer having for one of the members an opening equally spaced from vertical sides of the block and located closer to the top of the block than the bottom thereof, whereby gravity tends to make each block rotate about the associated member to a position in which the vertical sides of the block are truly vertical, the openings in all the blocks of one layer having one equal spacing from the tops of the blocks, the openings in all the blocks of the other layer having one equal spacing from the tops of the blocks, which spacing is different from the corresponding spacing in the said one layer, all the blocks of both layers having the same vertical dimension or length, the blocks of both layers consisting of relatively wide blocks and relatively narrow blocks, all the narrow blocks having the same horizontal dimension or width which is less than the horizontal dimension or width of the wide blocks, which is the same throughout, each layer consisting of vertical rows of narrow blocks and wide blocks alternating with one another, each vertical row of narrow blocks of each layer being covered by a vertical row of wide blocks of the other layer which wide blocks receive the same vertical row of members as the said each vertical row of narrow blocks, whereby the rectangular perimeters of each block of each layer is completely out of register with that of each block in the other layer.

  1. Microparticle analysis system and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A device for analyzing microparticles is provided which includes a chamber with an inlet and an outlet for respectively introducing and dispensing a flowing fluid comprising microparticles, a light source for providing light through the chamber and a photometer for measuring the intensity of light transmitted through individual microparticles. The device further includes an imaging system for acquiring images of the fluid. In some cases, the device may be configured to identify and determine a quantity of the microparticles within the fluid. Consequently, a method for identifying and tracking microparticles in motion is contemplated herein. The method involves flowing a fluid comprising microparticles in laminar motion through a chamber, transmitting light through the fluid, measuring the intensities of the light transmitted through the microparticles, imaging the fluid a plurality of times and comparing at least some of the intensities of light between different images of the fluid.

  2. Aircraft accidents : method of analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    The revised report includes the chart for the analysis of aircraft accidents, combining consideration of the immediate causes, underlying causes, and results of accidents, as prepared by the special committee, with a number of the definitions clarified. A brief statement of the organization and work of the special committee and of the Committee on Aircraft Accidents; and statistical tables giving a comparison of the types of accidents and causes of accidents in the military services on the one hand and in civil aviation on the other, together with explanations of some of the important differences noted in these tables.

  3. Determination of dosimetric parameters for shielded 153Gd source in prostate cancer brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ghorbani, Mahdi; Ghatei, Najmeh; Mehrpouyan, Mohammad; Meigooni, Ali S.; Shahraini, Ramin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Interstitial rotating shield brachytherapy (I-RSBT) is a recently developed method for treatment of prostate cancer. In the present study TG-43 dosimetric parameters of a 153Gd source were obtained for use in I-RSBT. Materials and methods A 153Gd source located inside a needle including a Pt shield and an aluminum window was simulated using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. Dosimetric parameters of this source model, including air kerma strength, dose rate constant, radial dose function and 2D anisotropy function, with and without the shields were calculated according to the TG-43 report. Results The air kerma strength was found to be 6.71 U for the non-shielded source with 1 GBq activity. This value was found to be 0.04 U and 6.19 U for the Pt shield and Al window cases, respectively. Dose rate constant for the non-shielded source was found to be 1.20 cGy/(hU). However, for a shielded source with Pt and aluminum window, dose rate constants were found to be 0.07 cGy/(hU) and 0.96 cGy/(hU), on the shielded and window sides, respectively. The values of radial dose function and anisotropy function were tabulated for these sources. Additionally, isodose curves were drawn for sources with and without shield, in order to evaluate the effect of shield on dose distribution. Conclusions Existence of the Pt shield may greatly reduce the dose to organs at risk and normal tissues which are located toward the shielded side. The calculated air kerma strength, dose rate constant, radial dose function and 2D anisotropy function data for the 153Gd source for the non-shielded and the shielded sources can be used in the treatment planning system (TPS). PMID:28265239

  4. Shielding design for multiple-energy linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Barish, Robert J

    2014-05-01

    The introduction of medical linear accelerators (linacs) capable of producing three different x-ray energies has complicated the process of designing shielding for these units. The conventional approach for the previous generation of dual-energy linacs relied on the addition of some amount of supplementary shielding to that calculated for the higher-energy beam, where the amount of that supplement followed the historical "two-source" rule, also known as the "add one HVL rule," a practice derived from other two-source shielding considerations. The author describes an iterative approach that calculates shielding requirements accurately for any number of multiple beam energies assuming the workload at each energy can be specified at the outset. This method is particularly useful when considering the requirements for possible modifications to an existing vault when new equipment is to be installed as a replacement for a previous unit.

  5. Merits of partial shielding in dumping sediment spoils.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jacob Hjelmager; Saremi, Sina; Jimenez, Carlos; Hadjioannou, Louis

    2015-12-15

    The commonly adopted method of dumping dredge spoil at sea using split-hull barges leads to considerable sediment loss to the water column and a subsequent dispersion of fine material that can pose a risk to sensitive "downstream" habitats such as coral reefs. Containing sediment loads using stitched closed geotextile bags is practiced for minimizing loss of contaminated sediment, but is expensive in terms of operational efficiency. Following promising observations from initial laboratory trials, the plunging of partially shielded sediment loads, released on open sea, was studied. The partial shielding was achieved with rigid, open containers as well as flexible, open bags. The loss of sediment from these modes of shielding was measured, and it was observed that even limited and unstitched shielding can be effective in debilitating the entrainment of water into the descending load. In particular, long-sleeved flexible bags practically self-eliminated the exposure of the load and thus losses.

  6. Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    West, Phillip B.; Novascone, Stephen R.; Wright, Jerry P.

    2011-09-27

    Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture are described. According to one embodiment, an earth analysis method includes engaging a device with the earth, analyzing the earth in a single substantially lineal direction using the device during the engaging, and providing information regarding a subsurface feature of the earth using the analysis.

  7. Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    West, Phillip B [Idaho Falls, ID; Novascone, Stephen R [Idaho Falls, ID; Wright, Jerry P [Idaho Falls, ID

    2012-05-29

    Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture are described. According to one embodiment, an earth analysis method includes engaging a device with the earth, analyzing the earth in a single substantially lineal direction using the device during the engaging, and providing information regarding a subsurface feature of the earth using the analysis.

  8. SHIELD: Neutral Gas Kinematics and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNichols, Andrew T.; Teich, Yaron G.; Nims, Elise; Cannon, John M.; Adams, Elizabeth A. K.; Bernstein-Cooper, Elijah Z.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.; Józsa, Gyula I. G.; McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Salzer, John J.; Skillman, Evan D.; Warren, Steven R.; Dolphin, Andrew; Elson, E. C.; Haurberg, Nathalie; Ott, Jürgen; Saintonge, Amelie; Cave, Ian; Hagen, Cedric; Huang, Shan; Janowiecki, Steven; Marshall, Melissa V.; Thomann, Clara M.; Van Sistine, Angela

    2016-11-01

    We present kinematic analyses of the 12 galaxies in the “Survey of H i in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs” (SHIELD). We use multi-configuration interferometric observations of the H i 21 cm emission line from the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA)22 to produce image cubes at a variety of spatial and spectral resolutions. Both two- and three-dimensional fitting techniques are employed in an attempt to derive inclination-corrected rotation curves for each galaxy. In most cases, the comparable magnitudes of velocity dispersion and projected rotation result in degeneracies that prohibit unambiguous circular velocity solutions. We thus make spatially resolved position-velocity cuts, corrected for inclination using the stellar components, to estimate the circular rotation velocities. We find {v}{circ} ≤slant 30 km s-1 for the entire survey population. Baryonic masses are calculated using single-dish H i fluxes from Arecibo and stellar masses derived from HST and Spitzer imaging. Comparison is made with total dynamical masses estimated from the position-velocity analysis. The SHIELD galaxies are then placed on the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation. There exists an empirical threshold rotational velocity, V {}{rot} < 15 km s-1, below which current observations cannot differentiate coherent rotation from pressure support. The SHIELD galaxies are representative of an important population of galaxies whose properties cannot be described by current models of rotationally dominated galaxy dynamics.

  9. Analytic Ballistic Performance Model of Whipple Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. E.; Bjorkman, M. D.; Christiansen, E. L.; Ryan, S. J.

    2014-01-01

    with a mass and speed equal to or less than the original impactor. center dot Intermediate (shatter) velocity: impact velocities are sufficient to induce projectile fragmentation upon impact with the bumper plate, resulting in a coarse debris cloud with large solid fragments. Increasing velocity within the shatter regime results in increased fragmentation, and eventually melting, of the projectile and bumper fragments, generating a finer and more evenly dispersed debris cloud. Failure of the rear wall is a complicated combination of modes observed at low- and hypervelocity. center dot Hypervelocity: the projectile and holed-out bumper material is completely, or nearly completely, melted and/or vaporized by the initial impact. The resultant debris cloud impacts over a dispersed area of the rear wall, loading it impulsively and inducing failure through rupture or petalling. While each of these regimes are well observed with extensive empirical methods to describe these regions, differences in impactor materials, configurations of shields and questions about the limitations of the attainable impact speeds have left questions that are difficult to answer from completely empirical methods.

  10. Component outage data analysis methods. Volume 2: Basic statistical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J. A.; Mazumdar, M.; McCutchan, D. A.

    1981-08-01

    Statistical methods for analyzing outage data on major power system components such as generating units, transmission lines, and transformers are identified. The analysis methods produce outage statistics from component failure and repair data that help in understanding the failure causes and failure modes of various types of components. Methods for forecasting outage statistics for those components used in the evaluation of system reliability are emphasized.

  11. Electrodynamic Dust Shield Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stankie, Charles G.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the project was to design and manufacture a device to demonstrate a new technology developed by NASA's Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory. The technology itself is a system which uses magnetic principles to remove regolith dust from its surface. This project was to create an enclosure that will be used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the invention to The Office of the Chief Technologist. ONE of the most important challenges of space exploration is actually caused by something very small and seemingly insignificant. Dust in space, most notably on the moon and Mars, has caused many unforeseen issues. Dirt and dust on Earth, while a nuisance, can be easily cleaned and kept at bay. However, there is considerably less weathering and erosion in space. As a result, the microscopic particles are extremely rough and abrasive. They are also electrostatically charged, so they cling to everything they make contact with. This was first noted to be a major problem during the Apollo missions. Dust would stick to the spacesuits, and could not be wiped off as predicted. Dust was brought back into the spacecraft, and was even inhaled by astronauts. This is a major health hazard. Atmospheric storms and other events can also cause dust to coat surfaces of spacecraft. This can cause abrasive damage to the craft. The coating can also reduce the effectiveness of thermal insulation and solar panels.' A group of engineers at Kennedy Space Center's Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory have developed a new technology, called the Electrodynamic Dust Shield, to help alleviate these problems. It is based off of the electric curtain concept developed at NASA in 1967. "The EDS is an active dust mitigation technology that uses traveling electric fields to transport electrostatically charged dust particles along surfaces. To generate the traveling electric fields, the EDS consists of a multilayer dielectric coating with an embedded thin electrode grid

  12. InfuShield: a shielded enclosure for administering therapeutic radioisotope treatments using standard syringe pumps.

    PubMed

    Rushforth, Dominic P; Pratt, Brenda E; Chittenden, Sarah J; Murray, Iain S; Causer, Louise; Grey, Matthew J; Gear, Jonathan I; Du, Yong; Flux, Glenn D

    2017-03-01

    The administration of radionuclide therapies presents significant radiation protection challenges. The aim of this work was to develop a delivery system for intravenous radioisotope therapies to substantially moderate radiation exposures to staff and operators. A novel device (InfuShield) was designed and tested before being used clinically. The device consists of a shielded enclosure which contains the therapeutic activity and, through the hydraulic action of back-to-back syringes, allows the activity to be administered using a syringe pump external to the enclosure. This enables full access to the pump controls while simultaneously reducing dose to the operator. The system is suitable for use with all commercially available syringe pumps and does not require specific consumables, maximising both the flexibility and economy of the system. Dose rate measurements showed that at key stages in an I mIBG treatment procedure, InfuShield can reduce dose to operators by several orders of magnitude. Tests using typical syringes and infusion speeds show no significant alteration in administered flow rates (maximum of 1.2%). The InfuShield system provides a simple, safe and low cost method of radioisotope administration.

  13. InfuShield: a shielded enclosure for administering therapeutic radioisotope treatments using standard syringe pumps

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, Brenda E.; Chittenden, Sarah J.; Murray, Iain S.; Causer, Louise; Grey, Matthew J.; Gear, Jonathan I.; Du, Yong; Flux, Glenn D.

    2017-01-01

    The administration of radionuclide therapies presents significant radiation protection challenges. The aim of this work was to develop a delivery system for intravenous radioisotope therapies to substantially moderate radiation exposures to staff and operators. A novel device (InfuShield) was designed and tested before being used clinically. The device consists of a shielded enclosure which contains the therapeutic activity and, through the hydraulic action of back-to-back syringes, allows the activity to be administered using a syringe pump external to the enclosure. This enables full access to the pump controls while simultaneously reducing dose to the operator. The system is suitable for use with all commercially available syringe pumps and does not require specific consumables, maximising both the flexibility and economy of the system. Dose rate measurements showed that at key stages in an 131I mIBG treatment procedure, InfuShield can reduce dose to operators by several orders of magnitude. Tests using typical syringes and infusion speeds show no significant alteration in administered flow rates (maximum of 1.2%). The InfuShield system provides a simple, safe and low cost method of radioisotope administration. PMID:28187040

  14. Beta Bremsstrahlung dose in concrete shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjunatha, H. C.; Chandrika, B. M.; Rudraswamy, B.; Sankarshan, B. M.

    2012-05-01

    In a nuclear reactor, beta nuclides are released during nuclear reactions. These betas interact with shielding concrete and produces external Bremsstrahlung (EB) radiation. To estimate Bremsstrahlung dose and shield efficiency in concrete, it is essential to know Bremsstrahlung distribution or spectra. The present work formulated a new method to evaluate the EB spectrum and hence Bremsstrahlung dose of beta nuclides (32P, 89Sr, 90Sr-90Y, 90Y, 91Y, 208Tl, 210Bi, 234Pa and 40K) in concrete. The Bremsstrahlung yield of these beta nuclides in concrete is also estimated. The Bremsstrahlung yield in concrete due to 90Sr-90Y is higher than those of other given nuclides. This estimated spectrum is accurate because it is based on more accurate modified atomic number (Zmod) and Seltzer's data, where an electron-electron interaction is also included. Presented data in concrete provide a quick and convenient reference for radiation protection. The present methodology can be used to calculate the Bremsstrahlung dose in nuclear shielding materials. It can be quickly employed to give a first pass dose estimate prior to a more detailed experimental study.

  15. Ore genesis dating: implication of Sm-Nd method using sulfide minerals for mafic-ultramafic layered intrusions of Fennoscandian Shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serov, Pavel; Bayanova, Tamara; Steshenko, Ekaterina; Ekimova, Nadezhda

    2015-04-01

    The main method of dating the ore process was the Re-Os method of sulfides (Luck, Allegre, 1983; Walker et. al., 1991). However, studies of Re-Os systematics of sulfide minerals do not always give the correct ages and showing the disturbances of the Re-Os systematics. At the same time, Sm-Nd age of sulfides in good agreement with the U-Pb dating on zircon and baddeleyite and suggests that the Sm-Nd system of sulfides is more resistant to secondary alteration processes. Our studies have shown that along with rock-forming, ore minerals (sulfides) can be used to determine the ore genesis time of industrially important geological sites, since exactly with the sulfides the industry Pt-Pd mineralization is closely connected. In to Sm-Nd measurements steadily introduce new minerals-geochronometers (i.e. titanite, burbancite, eudialite etc.). Of these, sulfides of PGE-bearing layered intrusions are quite important in terms of dating the process of ore origin. Studying the REE distribution in the sulfides of MOR hydrothermal sources has shown possible REE presence in the sulfide lattice (Rimskaya-Korsakova et. al., 2003). These are difficult to carry out because the concentrations of Sm and Nd isotopes in sulfides are much lower than those in chondrites (Rimskaya-Korsakova et. al., 2003). In (Kong et. al., 2000) sulfides from two metamorphosed chondrites were studied by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and ion probe. As shown, the level of REE in the sulfide phase determined by the ion probe is quite similar to that obtained by INAA. Although the concentrations of REE in the enstatite and the Fe, Si, Cr-rich inclusions are comparable to those in sulfide, estimates based on mass balance calculations show that the silicate inclusions would not noticeably contribute to the REE budget in sulfides (Kong et. al., 2000). For the first time in Russian geochemistry laboratories using sulfide and rock-forming minerals and WR in Sm-Nd method have been dated impregnated

  16. Regolith-Derived Heat Shield for Planetary Body Entry and Descent System with In-Situ Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogue, Michael D.; Mueller, Robert P.; Sibille, Laurent; Hintze, Paul E.; Rasky, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    High-mass planetary surface access is one of NASA's Grand Challenges involving entry, descent, and landing (EDL). Heat shields fabricated in-situ can provide a thermal protection system for spacecraft that routinely enter a planetary atmosphere. Fabricating the heat shield from extraterrestrial regolith will avoid the costs of launching the heat shield mass from Earth. This project will investigate three methods to fabricate heat shield using extraterrestrial regolith.

  17. Regolith-Derived Heat Shield for Planetary Body Entry and Descent System with In-Situ Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogue, Michael D.; Mueller, Robert P.; Sibille, Laurent; Hintze, Paul E.; Rasky, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    High-mass planetary surface access is one of NASA's Grand Challenges involving entry, descent, and landing (EDL). Heat shields fabricated in-situ can provide a thermal protection system for spacecraft that routinely enter a planetary atmosphere. Fabricating the heat shield from extraterrestrial regolith will avoid the costs of launching the heat shield mass from Earth. This project investigated three methods to fabricate heat shield using extraterrestrial regolith and performed preliminary work on mission architectures.

  18. Potential Use of In Situ Material Composites such as Regolith/Polyethylene for Shielding Space Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theriot, Corey A.; Gersey, Buddy; Bacon, Eugene; Johnson, Quincy; Zhang, Ye; Norman, Jullian; Foley, Ijette; Wilkins, Rick; Zhou, Jianren; Wu, Honglu

    2010-01-01

    NASA has an extensive program for studying materials and methods for the shielding of astronauts to reduce the effects of space radiation when on the surfaces of the Moon and Mars, especially in the use of in situ materials native to the destination reducing the expense of materials transport. The most studied material from the Moon is Lunar regolith and has been shown to be as efficient as aluminum for shielding purposes (1). The addition of hydrogenous materials such as polyethylene should increase shielding effectiveness and provide mechanical properties necessary of structural materials (2). The neutron radiation shielding effectiveness of polyethylene/regolith stimulant (JSC-1A) composites were studied using confluent human fibroblast cell cultures exposed to a beam of high-energy spallation neutrons at the 30deg-left beam line (ICE house) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. At this angle, the radiation spectrum mimics the energy spectrum of secondary neutrons generated in the upper atmosphere and encountered when aboard spacecraft and high-altitude aircraft. Cell samples were exposed in series either directly to the neutron beam, within a habitat created using regolith composite blocks, or behind 25 g/sq cm of loose regolith bulk material. In another experiment, cells were also exposed in series directly to the neutron beam in T-25 flasks completely filled with either media or water up to a depth of 20 cm to test shielding effectiveness versus depth and investigate the possible influence of secondary particle generation. All samples were sent directly back to JSC for sub-culturing and micronucleus analysis. This presentation is of work performed in collaboration with the NASA sponsored Center for Radiation Engineering and Science for Space Exploration (CRESSE) at Prairie View A&M.

  19. SWECS tower dynamics analysis methods and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, A. D.; Sexton, J. H.; Butterfield, C. P.; Thresher, R. M.

    1981-01-01

    Several different tower dynamics analysis methods and computer codes were used to determine the natural frequencies and mode shapes of both guyed and freestanding wind turbine towers. These analysis methods are described and the results for two types of towers, a guyed tower and a freestanding tower, are shown. The advantages and disadvantages in the use of and the accuracy of each method are also described.

  20. Trailer shield assembly for a welding torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyer, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    This invention relates generally to trailer shields for gas shielded arc welding torches, and more particularly to a trailer shield assembly provided with a shield gas manifold for providing an even dispersion of shield gas to the interior of the shield assembly, which generally encloses a joint being welded and a welding trailing portion of hot welded metal. The novelty of the invention lies in providing trailer shield with a manifold tube having a plurality of openings from which shield gas is distributed. A gas manifold region ahead of the torch is also provided with shield gas from a tube to protect metal preheated by the torch. Further novelty lies in constructing portions of sides and housing and portions of side walls of the guide of stainless steel screen having a tight mesh.

  1. Magnetic shielding for superconducting RF cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuzawa, M.; Terashima, A.; Tsuchiya, K.; Ueki, R.

    2017-03-01

    Magnetic shielding is a key technology for superconducting radio frequency (RF) cavities. There are basically two approaches for shielding: (1) surround the cavity of interest with high permeability material and divert magnetic flux around it (passive shielding); and (2) create a magnetic field using coils that cancels the ambient magnetic field in the area of interest (active shielding). The choice of approach depends on the magnitude of the ambient magnetic field, residual magnetic field tolerance, shape of the magnetic shield, usage, cost, etc. However, passive shielding is more commonly used for superconducting RF cavities. The issue with passive shielding is that as the volume to be shielded increases, the size of the shielding material increases, thereby leading to cost increase. A recent trend is to place a magnetic shield in a cryogenic environment inside a cryostat, very close to the cavities, reducing the size and volume of the magnetic shield. In this case, the shielding effectiveness at cryogenic temperatures becomes important. We measured the permeabilities of various shielding materials at both room temperature and cryogenic temperature (4 K) and studied shielding degradation at that cryogenic temperature.

  2. Text analysis methods, text analysis apparatuses, and articles of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Whitney, Paul D; Willse, Alan R; Lopresti, Charles A; White, Amanda M

    2014-10-28

    Text analysis methods, text analysis apparatuses, and articles of manufacture are described according to some aspects. In one aspect, a text analysis method includes accessing information indicative of data content of a collection of text comprising a plurality of different topics, using a computing device, analyzing the information indicative of the data content, and using results of the analysis, identifying a presence of a new topic in the collection of text.

  3. Measurements for the JASPER Program radial shield attenuation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Mukenthaler, F.J.

    1987-05-01

    The Radial Shield Attenuation Experiment was conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Tower Shielding Facility during FY 1986 to: provide data for calculating the shielding effectiveness of combinations of stainless steel, graphite, and boron carbide shield designs; verify the accuracy of related radiation transport methods and nuclear data; and substantiate the effectiveness of shield designs currently proposed by advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) designers in Japan and the United States. The Tower Shielding Reactor source was modified to represent neutron spectra at a specified location near the core and in the sodium pool of a typical liquid-metal-cooled reactor. The experimental configurations resulted from successive additions of the various layers of material as specified in the program plan. Integral neutron fluxes were measured behind each of the configurations at specified locations, and neutron spectra were obtained for selected mockups. The experimental data are presented in both tabular and graphical form. This experiment is the first in a series of six experiments to be performed as part of a cooperative effort between the United States Department of Energy and the Japan Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. The research program is intended to provide support for the development of advanced sodium-cooled reactors.

  4. Parameterizations for shielding electron accelerators based on Monte Carlo studies

    SciTech Connect

    P. Degtyarenko; G. Stapleton

    1996-10-01

    Numerous recipes for designing lateral slab neutron shielding for electron accelerators are available and each generally produces rather similar results for shield thicknesses of about 2 m of concrete and for electron beams with energy in the 1 to 10 GeV region. For thinner or much thicker shielding the results tend to diverge and the standard recipes require modification. Likewise for geometries other than lateral to the beam direction further corrections are required so that calculated results are less reliable and hence additional and costly conservatism is needed. With the adoption of Monte Carlo (MC) methods of transporting particles a much more powerful way of calculating radiation dose rates outside shielding becomes available. This method is not constrained by geometry, although deep penetration problems need special statistical treatment, and is an excellent approach to solving any radiation transport problem providing the method has been properly checked against measurements and is free from the well known errors common to such computer methods. This present paper utilizes the results of MC calculations based on a nuclear fragmentation model named DINREG using the MC transport code GEANT and models them with the normal two parameter shielding expressions. Because the parameters can change with electron beam energy, angle to the electron beam direction and target material, the parameters are expressed as functions of some of these variables to provide a universal equations for shielding electron beams which can used rather simply for deep penetration problems in simple geometry without the time consuming computations needed in the original MC programs. A particular problem with using simple parameterizations based on the uncollided flux is that approximations based on spherical geometry might not apply to the more common cylindrical cases used for accelerator shielding. This source of error has been discussed at length by Stevenson and others. To study

  5. An evaluation of fracture analysis methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The results of an experimental and predictive round robin on the applications of fracture analysis methods are presented. The objective of the round robin was to verify whether fracture analysis methods currently in use can or cannot predict failure loads on complex structural components containing cracks. Fracture results from tests on a number of compact specimens were used to make the predictions. The accuracy of the prediction methods was evaluated in terms of the variation in the ratio of predicted to experimental failure loads, and the predictions methods are ranked in order of minimum standard error. A range of applicability of the different methods was also considered in assessing their usefulness. For 7075-T651 aluminum alloy, the best methods were: the effective K sub R curve; the critical crack-tip opening displacement (CTOD) criterion using a finite element analysis; and the K sub R curve with the Dugdale model. For the 2024-T351 aluminum alloy, the best methods included: the two-parameter fracture criterion (TPFC); the CTOD parameter using finite element analysis; the K-curve with the Dugdale model; the deformation plasticity failure assessment diagram (DPFAD); and the effective K sub R curve with a limit load condition. For 304 stainless steel, the best methods were the limit load analysis; the CTOD criterion using finite-element analysis TPFC and DPFAD. Some sample experimental results are given in an appendix.

  6. Survival after total-body irradiation. I. Effects of partial small bowel shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Vigneulle, R.M.; Vriesendorp, H.M.; Taylor, P.; Burns, W.; Pelkey, T. )

    1989-08-01

    The small intestine of the rat was shielded during total-body irradiation (TBI) to evaluate the effects of radiation dose and length of intestine shielded on survival. Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized in groups of 10. Using aseptic surgical procedures 80, 40, 20, or 10 cm, or none of the proximal or distal small intestine were temporarily exteriorized and shielded during irradiation with photons from an 18 MeV linear accelerator. Less than 17% of the dose was delivered to the shielded intestines. In unshielded animals deaths occurred from Days 4 to 6 with 13, 15, or 17 Gy and from Days 8 to 30 with 9, 11, and 12 Gy. However, in all animals exposed to 15 Gy with all or part of the small intestine shielded, survival was increased to between 5 and 9 days. Shielding of the distal small intestine was more effective in prolonging survival than shielding of the proximal small intestine. The previously identified target of radiation damage in the small intestine is the crypt stem cell. In this study, the analysis of histological specimens of shielded and irradiated small intestine suggested that humoral factors also influence intestinal histology and survival after irradiation. These humoral factors are thought to originate from the irradiated body tissues, the shielded proximal intestine, and the shielded distal intestine. Further studies are required to identify these factors and to determine their mode of action and their therapeutic potential after radiation damage to the small intestine.

  7. A Micro-Method of Protein Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The determination of protein by means of Weichselbaum’s (1) biuret method is too inexact when dealing with small quantities of protein (less than 200...microgram/ml initial reactant), owing to the low sensitivity of the color reaction . Although we have used this method for protein analysis of...have searched for a more sensitive colorimetric method. Nielsen (3) recently reported on a method in which the Cu bound by protein in the biuret

  8. RZ calculations for self shielded multigroup cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Li, M.; Sanchez, R.; Zmijarevic, I.; Stankovski, Z.

    2006-07-01

    A collision probability method has been implemented for RZ geometries. The method accounts for white albedo, specular and translation boundary condition on the top and bottom surfaces of the geometry and for a white albedo condition on the outer radial surface. We have applied the RZ CP method to the calculation of multigroup self shielded cross sections for Gadolinia absorbers in BWRs. (authors)

  9. [Framework analysis method in qualitative research].

    PubMed

    Liao, Xing; Liu, Jian-ping; Robison, Nicola; Xie, Ya-ming

    2014-05-01

    In recent years a number of qualitative research methods have gained popularity within the health care arena. Despite this popularity, different qualitative analysis methods pose many challenges to most researchers. The present paper responds to the needs expressed by recent Chinese medicine researches. The present paper is mainly focused on the concepts, nature, application of framework analysis, especially on how to use it, in such a way to assist the newcomer of Chinese medicine researchers to engage with the methodology.

  10. Airbreathing hypersonic vehicle design and analysis methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, Mary Kae; Petley, Dennis H.; Hunt, James L.; Martin, John G.

    1996-01-01

    The design, analysis, and optimization of airbreathing hypersonic vehicles requires analyses involving many highly coupled disciplines at levels of accuracy exceeding those traditionally considered in a conceptual or preliminary-level design. Discipline analysis methods including propulsion, structures, thermal management, geometry, aerodynamics, performance, synthesis, sizing, closure, and cost are discussed. Also, the on-going integration of these methods into a working environment, known as HOLIST, is described.

  11. Hypothesis analysis methods, hypothesis analysis devices, and articles of manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P; Cowell, Andrew J; Gregory, Michelle L; Baddeley, Robert L; Paulson, Patrick R; Tratz, Stephen C; Hohimer, Ryan E

    2012-03-20

    Hypothesis analysis methods, hypothesis analysis devices, and articles of manufacture are described according to some aspects. In one aspect, a hypothesis analysis method includes providing a hypothesis, providing an indicator which at least one of supports and refutes the hypothesis, using the indicator, associating evidence with the hypothesis, weighting the association of the evidence with the hypothesis, and using the weighting, providing information regarding the accuracy of the hypothesis.

  12. Microstructural finite strain analysis and 40Ar/39Ar evidence for the origin of the Mizil gneiss dome, eastern Arabian Shield, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Saleh, Ahmad M.; Kassem, Osama M. K.

    2012-07-01

    The Mizil antiform is a gneiss-cored culmination situated near the northern end of the Ar Rayn island arc terrane, which is the easternmost exposed tectonic unit of the Arabian Shield. This domal structure has a mantle of metamorphosed volcanosedimentary rocks belonging to the Al-Amar Group, and an igneous interior made up of foliated granodiorite-tonalite with adakitic affinity. The gneissic core has a SHRIMP U-Pb zircon age of 689 ± 10 Ma making it the oldest rock unit in the Ar Rayn terrane. An adakite diapir, formed by the melting of the subducted crust of a young marginal basin, and rising through the volcanosedimentary succession of the Ar Rayn island arc is thought to have caused the observed doming. Relatively uniform strain throughout the dome combined with strong vertical shortening and the roughly radial pattern of stretching lineation is consistent with diapirism; the absence of strain localization rules out detachment faulting as a causative mechanism. Amphibolites from the metamorphic envelope have an 40Ar/39Ar age of 615 ± 2 Ma; the age gap between core and cover is thought to reflect the resetting of metamorphic ages during the final suturing event, a phenomenon that is often observed throughout the eastern shield. Aeromagnetic anomalies beneath the Phanerozoic sedimentary cover indicate the presence of a collage of accreted terranes east of the Ar Rayn terrane that were probably amalgamated onto the Arabian margin during the latest stages of the closure of the Mozambique ocean; culminant orogeny is believed to have taken place between 620 and 600 Ma as these terrane collided with a major continental mass to the east referred to here as the eastern Arabian block (EAB). The Mizil gneiss dome is therefore considered to have formed in a convergent contractional setting rather than being the outcome of extensional post-orogenic collapse.

  13. Thermodynamic and kinetic analysis of the isolated FAD domain of rat neuronal nitric oxide synthase altered in the region of the FAD shielding residue Phe1395.

    PubMed

    Dunford, Adrian J; Marshall, Ker R; Munro, Andrew W; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2004-06-01

    In rat neuronal nitric oxide synthase, Phe1395 is positioned over the FAD isoalloxazine ring. This is replaced by Trp676 in human cytochrome P450 reductase, a tryptophan in related diflavin reductases (e.g. methionine synthase reductase and novel reductase 1), and tyrosine in plant ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase. Trp676 in human cytochrome P450 reductase is conformationally mobile, and plays a key role in enzyme reduction. Mutagenesis of Trp676 to alanine results in a functional NADH-dependent reductase. Herein, we describe studies of rat neuronal nitric oxide synthase FAD domains, in which the aromatic shielding residue Phe1395 is replaced by tryptophan, alanine and serine. In steady-state assays the F1395A and F1395S domains have a greater preference for NADH compared with F1395W and wild-type. Stopped-flow studies indicate flavin reduction by NADH is significantly faster with F1395S and F1395A domains, suggesting that this contributes to altered preference in coenzyme specificity. Unlike cytochrome P450 reductase, the switch in coenzyme specificity is not attributed to differential binding of NADPH and NADH, but probably results from improved geometry for hydride transfer in the F1395S- and F1395A-NADH complexes. Potentiometry indicates that the substitutions do not significantly perturb thermodynamic properties of the FAD, although considerable changes in electronic absorption properties are observed in oxidized F1395A and F1395S, consistent with changes in hydrophobicity of the flavin environment. In wild-type and F1395W FAD domains, prolonged incubation with NADPH results in development of the neutral blue semiquinone FAD species. This reaction is suppressed in the mutant FAD domains lacking the shielding aromatic residue.

  14. Laboratory theory and methods for sediment analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guy, Harold P.

    1969-01-01

    The diverse character of fluvial sediments makes the choice of laboratory analysis somewhat arbitrary and the pressing of sediment samples difficult. This report presents some theories and methods used by the Water Resources Division for analysis of fluvial sediments to determine the concentration of suspended-sediment samples and the particle-size distribution of both suspended-sediment and bed-material samples. Other analyses related to these determinations may include particle shape, mineral content, and specific gravity, the organic matter and dissolved solids of samples, and the specific weight of soils. The merits and techniques of both the evaporation and filtration methods for concentration analysis are discussed. Methods used for particle-size analysis of suspended-sediment samples may include the sieve pipet, the VA tube-pipet, or the BW tube-VA tube depending on the equipment available, the concentration and approximate size of sediment in the sample, and the settling medium used. The choice of method for most bed-material samples is usually limited to procedures suitable for sand or to some type of visual analysis for large sizes. Several tested forms are presented to help insure a well-ordered system in the laboratory to handle the samples, to help determine the kind of analysis required for each, to conduct the required processes, and to assist in the required computations. Use of the manual should further 'standardize' methods of fluvial sediment analysis among the many laboratories and thereby help to achieve uniformity and precision of the data.

  15. Two MIS Analysis Methods: An Experimental Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Shouhong

    1996-01-01

    In China, 24 undergraduate business students applied data flow diagrams (DFD) to a mini-case, and 20 used object-oriented analysis (OOA). DFD seemed easier to learn, but after training, those using the OOA method for systems analysis made fewer errors. (SK)

  16. Rotary stripper for shielded and unshielded FCC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angele, W.; Chambers, C. M.

    1971-01-01

    Rotary stripper removes narrow strips of insulation and shielding to any desired depth. Unshielded cables are stripped on both sides with one stroke, shielded cables are stripped in steps of different depths.

  17. A Dynamic Discrete Dislocation Plasticity study of elastodynamic shielding of stationary cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurrutxaga-Lerma, B.; Balint, D. S.; Dini, D.; Sutton, A. P.

    2017-01-01

    Employing Dynamic Discrete Dislocation Plasticity (D3P), an elastodynamic analysis of the shielding of a stationary crack tip by dislocations is studied. Dislocations are generated via Frank-Read sources, and make a negligible contribution to the shielding of the crack tip, whereas dislocations generated at the crack tip via homogeneous nucleation dominate the shielding. Their effect is found to be highly localised around the crack, leading to a magnification of the shielding when compared to time-independent, elastostatic predictions. The resulting attenuation of KI(t) is computed, and is found to be directly proportional to the applied load and to √{ t }.

  18. Numerical Simulation of Earth Pressure on Head Chamber of Shield Machine with FEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shouju; Kang, Chengang; Sun, Wei; shangguan, Zichang

    2010-05-01

    Model parameters of conditioned soils in head chamber of shield machine are determined based on tree-axial compression tests in laboratory. The loads acting on tunneling face are estimated according to static earth pressure principle. Based on Duncan-Chang nonlinear elastic constitutive model, the earth pressures on head chamber of shield machine are simulated in different aperture ratio cases for rotating cutterhead of shield machine. Relationship between pressure transportation factor and aperture ratio of shield machine is proposed by using aggression analysis.

  19. Radiation shielding for future space exploration missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeWitt, Joel Michael

    Scope and Method of Study. The risk to space crew health and safety posed by exposure to space radiation is regarded as a significant obstacle to future human space exploration. To countermand this risk, engineers and designers in today's aerospace community will require detailed knowledge of a broad range of possible materials suitable for the construction of future spacecraft or planetary surface habitats that provide adequate protection from a harmful space radiation environment. This knowledge base can be supplied by developing an experimental method that provides quantitative information about a candidate material's space radiation shielding efficacy with the understanding that (1) shielding is currently the only practical countermeasure to mitigate the effects of space radiation on human interplanetary missions, (2) any mass of a spacecraft or planetary surface habitat necessarily alters the incident flux of ionizing radiation on it, and (3) the delivery of mass into LEO and beyond is expensive and therefore may benefit from the possible use of novel multifunctional materials that could in principle reduce cost as well as ionizing radiation exposure. The developed method has an experimental component using CR-39 PNTD and Al2O3:C OSLD that exposes candidate space radiation shielding materials of varying composition and depth to a representative sample of the GCR spectrum that includes 1 GeV 1H and 1 GeV/n 16O, 28Si, and 56Fe heavy ion beams at the BNL NSRL. The computer modeling component of the method used the Monte Carlo radiation transport code FLUKA to account for secondary neutrons that were not easily measured in the laboratory. Findings and Conclusions. This study developed a method that quantifies the efficacy of a candidate space radiation shielding material relative to the standard of polyethylene using a combination of experimental and computer modeling techniques. The study used established radiation dosimetry techniques to present an empirical

  20. Segmented contracted basis sets optimized for nuclear magnetic shielding.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Frank

    2015-01-13

    A family of segmented contracted basis sets is proposed, denoted pcSseg-n, which are optimized for calculating nuclear magnetic shielding constants. For the elements H-Ar, these are computationally more efficient than the previously proposed general contracted pcS-n basis sets, and the new basis sets are extended to also include the elements K-Kr. The pcSseg-n basis sets are optimized at the density functional level of theory, but it has been shown previously that these property-optimized basis sets are also suitable for calculating shielding constants with correlated wave function methods. The pcSseg-n basis sets are available in qualities ranging from (unpolarized) double-ζ to pentuple-ζ quality and should be suitable for both routine and benchmark calculations of nuclear magnetic shielding constants. The ability to rigorously separate basis set and method errors should aid in developing more accurate methods.

  1. Predictions for Radiation Shielding Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, Richard L.

    2002-01-01

    Radiation from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE) is a serious hazard to humans and electronic instruments during space travel, particularly on prolonged missions outside the Earth s magnetic fields. Galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) is composed of approx. 98% nucleons and approx. 2% electrons and positrons. Although cosmic ray heavy ions are 1-2% of the fluence, these energetic heavy nuclei (HZE) contribute 50% of the long-term dose. These unusually high specific ionizations pose a significant health hazard acting as carcinogens and also causing microelectronics damage inside spacecraft and high-flying aircraft. These HZE ions are of concern for radiation protection and radiation shielding technology, because gross rearrangements and mutations and deletions in DNA are expected. Calculations have shown that HZE particles have a strong preference for interaction with light nuclei. The best shield for this radiation would be liquid hydrogen, which is totally impractical. For this reason, hydrogen-containing polymers make the most effective practical shields. Shielding is required during missions in Earth orbit and possibly for frequent flying at high altitude because of the broad GCR spectrum and during a passage into deep space and LunarMars habitation because of the protracted exposure encountered on a long space mission. An additional hazard comes from solar particle events (SPEs) which are mostly energetic protons that can produce heavy ion secondaries as well as neutrons in materials. These events occur at unpredictable times and can deliver a potentially lethal dose within several hours to an unshielded human. Radiation protection for humans requires safety in short-term missions and maintaining career exposure limits within acceptable levels on future long-term exploration missions. The selection of shield materials can alter the protection of humans by an order of magnitude. If improperly selected, shielding materials can actually

  2. Geomorphometirc Segmentation of Shield Deserts by Self-Organizing Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foroutan, M.; Kompanizare, M.; Ehsani, A. H.

    2015-12-01

    Shield deserts have developed on ancient crystalline bedrocks and mainly composed of folded and faulted rocks hardened by heat and pressure over millions of years. They were unearthed by erosion and form steep-sided hills and basins filled with sediments. The Sahara, Arabian, southern African, central Kavir and Australian deserts are in this group. Their ranges usually supply groundwater resources or in some regions contain huge oil reservoirs. Geomorphological segmentation of shield deserts is one of the fundamental tools in their land use or site investigation planning as well as in their surface water and groundwater management. In many studies the morphology of shield deserts has been investigated by limited qualitative and subjective methods using limited number of simple parameters such as surface elevation and slope. However the importance of these regions supports the need for their accurate and quantitative morphologic classification. The present study attempts to implement a quantitative method, Self-Organizing Map (SOM), for geomorphological classification of a typical shield desert within Kavir Desert, Iran. The area is tectonically stable and characterized by flat clay pans, playas, well-developed pediments around scattered and low elevation ranges. Twenty-two multi-scale morphometric parameters were derived from the first- to third-orders partial derivatives of the surface elevation. Seven optimized parameters with their proper scales were selected by Artificial Neural Networks, Optimum Index Factor, Davies-Bouldin Index and statistic models. Finally, the area was segmented to seven homogeneous areas by SOM algorithm. The results revealed the most distinguishing parameter set (MDPS) for morphologic segmentation of shield deserts. The same segmentation results through using MDPS for another shield deserts in Australia proves the applicability of MDPS for shield deserts segmentation.

  3. Shielding and grounding in large detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Radeka, V.

    1998-09-01

    Prevention of electromagnetic interference (EMI), or ``noise pickup,`` is an important design aspect in large detectors in accelerator environments. Shielding effectiveness as a function of shield thickness and conductivity vs the type and frequency of the interference field is described. Noise induced in transmission lines by ground loop driven currents in the shield is evaluated and the importance of low shield resistance is emphasized. Some measures for prevention of ground loops and isolation of detector-readout systems are discussed.

  4. Causal Moderation Analysis Using Propensity Score Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dong, Nianbo

    2012-01-01

    This paper is based on previous studies in applying propensity score methods to study multiple treatment variables to examine the causal moderator effect. The propensity score methods will be demonstrated in a case study to examine the causal moderator effect, where the moderators are categorical and continuous variables. Moderation analysis is an…

  5. Hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, David M.

    2002-01-01

    A set of hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods in which spectral shapes of components or effects not present in the original calibration step are added in a following estimation or calibration step to improve the accuracy of the estimation of the amount of the original components in the sampled mixture. The "hybrid" method herein means a combination of an initial classical least squares analysis calibration step with subsequent analysis by an inverse multivariate analysis method. A "spectral shape" herein means normally the spectral shape of a non-calibrated chemical component in the sample mixture but can also mean the spectral shapes of other sources of spectral variation, including temperature drift, shifts between spectrometers, spectrometer drift, etc. The "shape" can be continuous, discontinuous, or even discrete points illustrative of the particular effect.

  6. 21 CFR 880.5630 - Nipple shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nipple shield. 880.5630 Section 880.5630 Food and... Nipple shield. (a) Identification. A nipple shield is a device consisting of a cover used to protect the nipple of a nursing woman. This generic device does not include nursing pads intended solely to...

  7. 21 CFR 880.5630 - Nipple shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nipple shield. 880.5630 Section 880.5630 Food and... Nipple shield. (a) Identification. A nipple shield is a device consisting of a cover used to protect the nipple of a nursing woman. This generic device does not include nursing pads intended solely to...

  8. 21 CFR 880.5630 - Nipple shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nipple shield. 880.5630 Section 880.5630 Food and... Nipple shield. (a) Identification. A nipple shield is a device consisting of a cover used to protect the nipple of a nursing woman. This generic device does not include nursing pads intended solely to...

  9. 21 CFR 880.5630 - Nipple shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nipple shield. 880.5630 Section 880.5630 Food and... Nipple shield. (a) Identification. A nipple shield is a device consisting of a cover used to protect the nipple of a nursing woman. This generic device does not include nursing pads intended solely to...

  10. 21 CFR 880.5630 - Nipple shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nipple shield. 880.5630 Section 880.5630 Food and... Nipple shield. (a) Identification. A nipple shield is a device consisting of a cover used to protect the nipple of a nursing woman. This generic device does not include nursing pads intended solely to...

  11. WAVS radiation shielding references and assumptions

    SciTech Connect

    McLean, Adam

    2015-10-07

    At ITER, the confluence of a high radiation environment and the requirement for high performance imaging for plasma and plasma-facing surface diagnosis will necessitate extensive application of radiation shielding. Recommended here is a dual-layer shield design composed of lead for gamma attenuation, surrounded by a fire-resistant polyehtylene doped with a thermal neutron absorber for neutron shielding.

  12. Hydrogen-Induced Cracking of the Drip Shield

    SciTech Connect

    F. Hua

    2004-09-07

    Hydrogen-induced cracking is characterized by the decreased ductility and fracture toughness of a material due to the absorption of atomic hydrogen in the metal crystal lattice. Corrosion is the source of hydrogen generation. For the current design of the engineered barrier without backfill, hydrogen-induced cracking may be a concern because the titanium drip shield can be galvanically coupled to rock bolts (or wire mesh), which may fall onto the drip shield, thereby creating conditions for hydrogen production by electrochemical reaction. The purpose of this report is to analyze whether the drip shield will fail by hydrogen-induced cracking under repository conditions within 10,000 years after emplacement. Hydrogen-induced cracking is a scenario of premature failure of the drip shield. This report develops a realistic model to assess the form of hydrogen-induced cracking degradation of the drip shield under the hydrogen-induced cracking. The scope of this work covers the evaluation of hydrogen absorbed due to general corrosion and galvanic coupling to less noble metals (e.g., Stainless Steel Type 316 and carbon steels) under the repository conditions during the 10,000-year regulatory period after emplacement and whether the absorbed hydrogen content will exceed the critical hydrogen concentration value, above which the hydrogen-induced cracking is assumed to occur. This report also provides the basis for excluding the features, events, and processes (FEPs) related to hydrogen-induced cracking of the drip shield with particular emphasis on FEP 2.1.03.04.OB, hydride cracking of drip shields (DTN: M00407SEPFEPLA.000 [DIRS 170760]). This report is prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169944]).

  13. Shielding application of perturbation theory to determine changes in neutron and gamma doses due to changes in shield layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fieno, D.

    1972-01-01

    Perturbation theory formulas were derived and applied to determine changes in neutron and gamma-ray doses due to changes in various radiation shield layers for fixed sources. For a given source and detector position, the perturbation method enables dose derivatives with respect to density, or equivalently thickness, for every layer to be determined from one forward and one inhomogeneous adjoint calculation. A direct determination without the perturbation approach would require two forward calculations to evaluate the dose derivative due to a change in a single layer. Hence, the perturbation method for obtaining dose derivatives requires fewer computations for design studies of multilayer shields. For an illustrative problem, a comparison was made of the fractional change in the dose per unit change in the thickness of each shield layer in a two-layer spherical configuration as calculated by perturbation theory and by successive direct calculations; excellent agreement was obtained between the two methods.

  14. Design, fabrication, and structural testing of a lightweight shadow shield for deep-space application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miao, D.; Barber, J. R.; Dewitt, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    Two full-scale, lightweight, double-sheeted shadow shields were developed as the primary element of a deep-space thermal protection system for liquid-hydrogen propellant tankage. The thermal and mechanical considerations used in s, the method of fabrication, and the environmental testing results on a prototype shield are discussed. Testing consisted of a transient cooldown period, a prolonged cold soak, and a transient warmup. The mechanical and thermal analyses used in the shield design are sufficient to produce a lightweight rugged shadow shield assembly that is structurally adequate for its intended application.

  15. MCNPX vs. DORT for SNS shielding design studies.

    PubMed

    Popova, Irina I

    2005-01-01

    Radiation transport occurs through the 18 m long access way adjacent to the Spallation Neutron Source accelerator tunnel and the 2.2 m thick massive shielding door which closes the access way. A variety of typical materials for accelerator shielding, such as concrete and steel, were used for construction of the door to study radiation penetration. A comparison was carried out using both Monte Carlo (code MCNPX) and discrete ordinates (code DORT) methods. The beam losses during the accelerator operation are the sources for the radiation calculations. Analyses show that the results from the two methods are in good agreement.

  16. Comparison between Clinically Used Irregular Fields Shielded by Cerrobend and Standard Lead Blocks

    PubMed Central

    Farajollahi, A. R.; Bouzarjomehri, F.; Kiani, M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In radiation therapy centers across Iran, protection of normal tissues is usually accomplished by either Cerrobend or lead block shielding. In this study, the influence of these two shielding methods on central axis dose distribution of photon beam a Cobalt unit was investigated in clinical conditions. Materials and Methods All measurements were performed for 60Co γ-ray beams and the Cerrobend blocks were fabricated by commercial Cerrobend materials. Standard lead block shields belonged to Cobalt unit. Data was collected through a calibrated ionization chamber, relative dosimetry systems and a TLD dosimetery. Results Results of the percent depth dose (PDD) measurements at depths of 0.5, 1, 5, 10, 15 and 20 cm for 23 different field sizes of patients with head and neck cancer showed no significant differences between lead and Cerrobend shielding methods. Measurement results of absolute dosimetry in depths of 1.5, 3, 5, 7, 10 and 12 cm also showed no significant differences between these two shielding methods. The same results were obtained by TLD dosimetry on patient skin. Conclusion Use of melt shielding methods is a very easy and fast shield-making technique with no differences in PDD, absolute and skin dose between lead and Cerrobend block shielding methods. PMID:26157733

  17. Shielding techniques tackle EMI excesses. V - EMI shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, P.

    1982-10-01

    The utilization of shielding gaskets in EMI design is presented in terms of seam design, gasket design, groove design, and fastener spacing. The main function of seam design is to minimize the coupling efficiency of a seam, and for effective shielding, seam design should include mating surfaces which are as flat as possible, and a flange width at least five times the maximum anticipated separation between mating surfaces. Seam surface contact with a gasket should be firm, continuous, and uniform. Gasket height, closure pressure, and compression set as a function of the applied pressure parameters are determined using compression/deflection curves. Environmental seal requirements are given and the most common materials used are neoprene, silicone, butadiene-acrylonitrile, and natural rubber. Groove design is also discussed, considering gasket heights and cross-sectional areas. Finally, fastener spacing is considered, by examining deflection as a percentage of gasket height.

  18. Method and apparatus for ceramic analysis

    DOEpatents

    Jankowiak, Ryszard J.; Schilling, Chris; Small, Gerald J.; Tomasik, Piotr

    2003-04-01

    The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for ceramic analysis, in particular, a method for analyzing density, density gradients and/or microcracks, including an apparatus with optical instrumentation for analysis of density, density gradients and/or microcracks in ceramics. The method provides analyzing density of a ceramic comprising exciting a component on a surface/subsurface of the ceramic by exposing the material to excitation energy. The method may further include the step of obtaining a measurement of an emitted energy from the component. The method may additionally include comparing the measurement of the emitted energy from the component with a predetermined reference measurement so as to obtain a density for said ceramic.

  19. Bioanalytical methods for food contaminant analysis.

    PubMed

    Van Emon, Jeanette M

    2010-01-01

    Foods are complex mixtures of lipids, carbohydrates, proteins, vitamins, organic compounds, and other naturally occurring substances. Sometimes added to this mixture are residues of pesticides, veterinary and human drugs, microbial toxins, preservatives, contaminants from food processing and packaging, and other residues. This milieu of compounds can pose difficulties in the analysis of food contaminants. There is an expanding need for rapid and cost-effective residue methods for difficult food matrixes to safeguard our food supply. Bioanalytical methods are established for many food contaminants such as mycotoxins and are the method of choice for many food allergens. Bioanalytical methods are often more cost-effective and sensitive than instrumental procedures. Recent developments in bioanalytical methods may provide more applications for their use in food analysis.

  20. Evaluation of coated columbium alloy heat shields for space shuttle thermal protection system application. Volume 3, phase 3: Full size TPS evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baer, J. W.; Black, W. E.

    1974-01-01

    The thermal protection system (TPS), designed for incorporation with space shuttle orbiter systems, consists of one primary heat shield thermally and structurally isolated from the test fixture by eight peripheral guard panels, all encompassing an area of approximately 12 sq ft. TPS components include tee-stiffened Cb 752/R-512E heat shields, bi-metallic support posts, panel retainers, and high temperature insulation blankets. The vehicle primary structure was simulated by a titanium skin, frames, and stiffeners. Test procedures, manufacturing processes, and methods of analysis are fully documented. For Vol. 1, see N72-30948; for Vol. 2, see N74-15660.

  1. Neutronic reactor thermal shield

    DOEpatents

    Wende, Charles W. J.

    1976-06-15

    1. The method of operating a water-cooled neutronic reactor having a graphite moderator which comprises flowing a gaseous mixture of carbon dioxide and helium, in which the helium comprises 40-60 volume percent of the mixture, in contact with the graphite moderator.

  2. Analysis of the characteristics appearing in LANDSAT multispectral images in the geological structural mapping of the midwestern portion of the Rio Grande do Sul shield. M.S. Thesis - 25 Mar. 1982; [Brazil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parada, N. D. J. (Principal Investigator); Ohara, T.

    1982-01-01

    The central-western part of Rio Grande do Sul Shield was geologically mapped to test the use of MSS-LANDSAT data in the study of mineralized regions. Visual interpretation of the images a the scale of 1:500,000 consisted, in the identification and analysis of the different tonal and textural patterns in each spectral band. After the structural geologic mapping of the area, using visual interpretation techniques, the statistical data obtained were evaluated, specially data concerning size and direction of fractures. The IMAGE-100 system was used to enlarge and enhance certain imagery. The LANDSAT MSS data offer several advantages over conventional white and black aerial photographs for geological studies. Its multispectral characteristic (band 6 and false color composition of bands 4, 5 and 7 were best suitable for the study). Coverage of a large imaging area of about 35,000 sq km, giving a synoptical view, is very useful for perceiving the regional geological setting.

  3. Large scale mechanical metamaterials as seismic shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miniaci, Marco; Krushynska, Anastasiia; Bosia, Federico; Pugno, Nicola M.

    2016-08-01

    Earthquakes represent one of the most catastrophic natural events affecting mankind. At present, a universally accepted risk mitigation strategy for seismic events remains to be proposed. Most approaches are based on vibration isolation of structures rather than on the remote shielding of incoming waves. In this work, we propose a novel approach to the problem and discuss the feasibility of a passive isolation strategy for seismic waves based on large-scale mechanical metamaterials, including for the first time numerical analysis of both surface and guided waves, soil dissipation effects, and adopting a full 3D simulations. The study focuses on realistic structures that can be effective in frequency ranges of interest for seismic waves, and optimal design criteria are provided, exploring different metamaterial configurations, combining phononic crystals and locally resonant structures and different ranges of mechanical properties. Dispersion analysis and full-scale 3D transient wave transmission simulations are carried out on finite size systems to assess the seismic wave amplitude attenuation in realistic conditions. Results reveal that both surface and bulk seismic waves can be considerably attenuated, making this strategy viable for the protection of civil structures against seismic risk. The proposed remote shielding approach could open up new perspectives in the field of seismology and in related areas of low-frequency vibration damping or blast protection.

  4. Hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, David M.

    2004-03-23

    A set of hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods in which spectral shapes of components or effects not present in the original calibration step are added in a following prediction or calibration step to improve the accuracy of the estimation of the amount of the original components in the sampled mixture. The hybrid method herein means a combination of an initial calibration step with subsequent analysis by an inverse multivariate analysis method. A spectral shape herein means normally the spectral shape of a non-calibrated chemical component in the sample mixture but can also mean the spectral shapes of other sources of spectral variation, including temperature drift, shifts between spectrometers, spectrometer drift, etc. The shape can be continuous, discontinuous, or even discrete points illustrative of the particular effect.

  5. Spectroscopic chemical analysis methods and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hug, William F. (Inventor); Reid, Ray D. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Spectroscopic chemical analysis methods and apparatus are disclosed which employ deep ultraviolet (e.g. in the 200 nm to 300 nm spectral range) electron beam pumped wide bandgap semiconductor lasers, incoherent wide bandgap semiconductor light emitting devices, and hollow cathode metal ion lasers to perform non-contact, non-invasive detection of unknown chemical analytes. These deep ultraviolet sources enable dramatic size, weight and power consumption reductions of chemical analysis instruments. Chemical analysis instruments employed in some embodiments include capillary and gel plane electrophoresis, capillary electrochromatography, high performance liquid chromatography, flow cytometry, flow cells for liquids and aerosols, and surface detection instruments. In some embodiments, Raman spectroscopic detection methods and apparatus use ultra-narrow-band angle tuning filters, acousto-optic tuning filters, and temperature tuned filters to enable ultra-miniature analyzers for chemical identification. In some embodiments Raman analysis is conducted simultaneously with native fluorescence spectroscopy to provide high levels of sensitivity and specificity in the same instrument.

  6. Spectroscopic chemical analysis methods and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hug, William F. (Inventor); Reid, Ray D. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Spectroscopic chemical analysis methods and apparatus are disclosed which employ deep ultraviolet (e.g. in the 200 nm to 300 nm spectral range) electron beam pumped wide bandgap semiconductor lasers, incoherent wide bandgap semiconductor light emitting devices, and hollow cathode metal ion lasers to perform non-contact, non-invasive detection of unknown chemical analytes. These deep ultraviolet sources enable dramatic size, weight and power consumption reductions of chemical analysis instruments. Chemical analysis instruments employed in some embodiments include capillary and gel plane electrophoresis, capillary electrochromatography, high performance liquid chromatography, flow cytometry, flow cells for liquids and aerosols, and surface detection instruments. In some embodiments, Raman spectroscopic detection methods and apparatus use ultra-narrow-band angle tuning filters, acousto-optic tuning filters, and temperature tuned filters to enable ultra-miniature analyzers for chemical identification. In some embodiments Raman analysis is conducted simultaneously with native fluorescence spectroscopy to provide high levels of sensitivity and specificity in the same instrument.

  7. Advanced analysis methods in particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, Pushpalatha C.; /Fermilab

    2010-10-01

    Each generation of high energy physics experiments is grander in scale than the previous - more powerful, more complex and more demanding in terms of data handling and analysis. The spectacular performance of the Tevatron and the beginning of operations of the Large Hadron Collider, have placed us at the threshold of a new era in particle physics. The discovery of the Higgs boson or another agent of electroweak symmetry breaking and evidence of new physics may be just around the corner. The greatest challenge in these pursuits is to extract the extremely rare signals, if any, from huge backgrounds arising from known physics processes. The use of advanced analysis techniques is crucial in achieving this goal. In this review, I discuss the concepts of optimal analysis, some important advanced analysis methods and a few examples. The judicious use of these advanced methods should enable new discoveries and produce results with better precision, robustness and clarity.

  8. Survival after total-body irradiation. 1. Effects of partial small bowel shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Vigneulle, R.M.; Vriesendorp, H.M.; Taylor, P.; Burns, W.; Pelkey, T.

    1989-01-01

    The small intestine of the rat was shielded during total-body irradiation (TBI) to evaluate the effects of radiation dose and length of intestine shielded on survival. Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized in groups of 10. Using aseptic surgical procedures 80, 40, 20, or 10 cm, or none of the proximal or distal small intestine were temporarily exteriorized and shielded during irradiation with photons from an 18-MeV linear accelerator. Less than 17% of the dose was delivered to the shielded intestines. In unshielded animals deaths occurred from Days 4 to 6 with 13, 15, or 17 Gy and from Days 8 to 30 with 9, 11, and 12 Gy. However, in all animals exposed to 15 Gy with all or part of the small intestine shielded, survival was increased to between 5 and 9 days. Shielding of the distal small intestine. The previously identified target of radiation damage in the small intestine is the crypt stem cell. In this study, the analysis of histological specimens of shielded and irradiated small intestine suggested that humoral factors also influence intestinal histology and survival after irradiation. These humoral factors are thought to originate from the irradiated body tissues, the shielded proximal intestine, and the shielded distal intestine. Further studies are required to identify these factors and to determine their mode of action and their therapeutic potential after radiation damage to the small intestine.

  9. Experimental analysis of the magnetic field shielding and trapping properties of bulk melt-processed YBa 2Cu 3O 7-δ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, X. H.; Astill, D. M.; Lo, W.; Cardwell, D. A.; Coombs, T. A.; Campbell, A. M.; Larsen, J. G.

    1995-02-01

    A scanning Hall probe has been used to map the distributions of magnetic field in melt-processed YBa 2Cu 3O 7-δ (YBCO) discs prepared by seeded and controlled molten-zone techniques. Both shielded and trapped fields were studied as a function of applied magnetic field for each speciment. A clear four-fold symmetry has been observed in the field distribution of the seeded melt-processed sample, suggesting that there are two planes in the disc which exhibit a weak response to an applied field. Similar magnetic properties were observed for the molten-zone processed sample and attributed to the presence of cracks in the specimen. It was found that the applied field required to saturate each sample was much higher than the maximum observed trapped field, in contradiction to the Bean model for a slab geometry. This effect, which is probably due to the plate geometry of the specimens and the variation of critical current density with magnetic field, has implications for practical applications of bulk melt-processed YBCO.

  10. NOA: a novel Network Ontology Analysis method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiguang; Huang, Qiang; Liu, Zhi-Ping; Wang, Yong; Wu, Ling-Yun; Chen, Luonan; Zhang, Xiang-Sun

    2011-07-01

    Gene ontology analysis has become a popular and important tool in bioinformatics study, and current ontology analyses are mainly conducted in individual gene or a gene list. However, recent molecular network analysis reveals that the same list of genes with different interactions may perform different functions. Therefore, it is necessary to consider molecular interactions to correctly and specifically annotate biological networks. Here, we propose a novel Network Ontology Analysis (NOA) method to perform gene ontology enrichment analysis on biological networks. Specifically, NOA first defines link ontology that assigns functions to interactions based on the known annotations of joint genes via optimizing two novel indexes 'Coverage' and 'Diversity'. Then, NOA generates two alternative reference sets to statistically rank the enriched functional terms for a given biological network. We compare NOA with traditional enrichment analysis methods in several biological networks, and find that: (i) NOA can capture the change of functions not only in dynamic transcription regulatory networks but also in rewiring protein interaction networks while the traditional methods cannot and (ii) NOA can find more relevant and specific functions than traditional methods in different types of static networks. Furthermore, a freely accessible web server for NOA has been developed at http://www.aporc.org/noa/.

  11. Thermally isolated deployable shield for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmon, John W., Jr. (Inventor); Miller, Andre E. (Inventor); Lawson, Bobby E. (Inventor); Cobb, William E. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A thermally isolated deployable shield for spacecraft is provided utilizing a plurality of lattice panels stowable generally against the craft and deployable to some fixed distance from the craft. The lattice panels are formed from replaceable shield panels affixed to lattice structures. The lattice panels generally encircle the craft providing 360 degree coverage therearound. Actuation means are provided from translating the shield radially outward from the craft and thermally isolating the shield from the craft. The lattice panels are relatively flexible, allowing the shield to deploy to variable diameters while retaining uniform curvature thereof. Restraining means are provided for holding the shield relatively tight in its stowed configuration. Close-out assemblies provide light sealing and protection of the annular spaces between the deployed shield and the crafts end structure.

  12. Chromatographic methods for analysis of triazine herbicides.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Hana Hassan; Elbashir, Abdalla A; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2015-01-01

    Gas chromatography (GC) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to different detectors, and in combination with different sample extraction methods, are most widely used for analysis of triazine herbicides in different environmental samples. Nowadays, many variations and modifications of extraction and sample preparation methods such as solid-phase microextraction (SPME), hollow fiber-liquid phase microextraction (HF-LPME), stir bar sportive extraction (SBSE), headspace-solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME), dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME), dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic droplet (DLLME-SFO), ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction (USAEME), and others have been introduced and developed to obtain sensitive and accurate methods for the analysis of these hazardous compounds. In this review, several analytical properties such as linearity, sensitivity, repeatability, and accuracy for each developed method are discussed, and excellent results were obtained for the most of developed methods combined with GC and HPLC techniques for the analysis of triazine herbicides. This review gives an overview of recent publications of the application of GC and HPLC for analysis of triazine herbicides residues in various samples.

  13. Upper mantle structure under western Saudi Arabia from Rayleigh wave tomography and the origin of Cenozoic uplift and volcanism on the Arabian Shield

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y; Nyblade, A; Rodgers, A; Al-Amri, A

    2007-11-09

    The shear velocity structure of the shallow upper mantle beneath the Arabian Shield has been modeled by inverting new Rayleigh wave phase velocity measurements between 45 and 140 s together with previously published Rayleigh wave group velocity measurement between 10 and 45 s. For measuring phase velocities, we applied a modified array method that minimizes the distortion of raypaths by lateral heterogeneity. The new shear velocity model shows a broad low velocity region in the lithospheric mantle across the Shield and a low velocity region at depths {ge} 150 km localized along the Red Sea coast and Makkah-Madinah-Nafud (MMN) volcanic line. The velocity reduction in the upper mantle corresponds to a temperature anomaly of {approx}250-330 K. These finding, in particular the region of continuous low velocities along the Red Sea and MMN volcanic line, do not support interpretations for the origin of the Cenozoic plateau uplift and volcanism on the Shield invoking two separate plumes. When combined with images of the 410 and 660 km discontinuities beneath the southern part of the Arabian Shield, body wave tomographic models, a S-wave polarization analysis, and SKS splitting results, our new model supports an interpretation invoking a thermal upwelling of warm mantle rock originating in the lower mantle under Africa that crosses through the transition zone beneath Ethiopia and moves to the north and northwest under the eastern margin of the Red Sea and the Arabian Shield. In this interpretation, the difference in mean elevation between the Platform and Shield can be attributed to isostatic uplift caused by heating of the lithospheric mantle under the Shield, with significantly higher region along the Red Sea possibly resulting from a combination of lithosphere thinning and dynamic uplift.

  14. Ab initio calculation of the NMR shielding constants for histamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazurek, A. P.; Dobrowolski, J. Cz.; Sadlej, J.

    1997-12-01

    The gage-independent atomic orbital (GIAO) approach is used within the coupled Hartree-Fock approximation to compute the 1H, 13C and 15N NMR shielding constants in two tautomeric forms of both the histamine molecule and its protonated form. An analysis of the results shows that the protonation on the end of the chain changes its nitrogen shielding constants of the pyridine and pyrrole type. These changes are much higher for the N(3)-H than for the N(1)-H tautomer.

  15. Facility target insert shielding assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Mocko, Michal

    2015-10-06

    Main objective of this report is to assess the basic shielding requirements for the vertical target insert and retrieval port. We used the baseline design for the vertical target insert in our calculations. The insert sits in the 12”-diameter cylindrical shaft extending from the service alley in the top floor of the facility all the way down to the target location. The target retrieval mechanism is a long rod with the target assembly attached and running the entire length of the vertical shaft. The insert also houses the helium cooling supply and return lines each with 2” diameter. In the present study we focused on calculating the neutron and photon dose rate fields on top of the target insert/retrieval mechanism in the service alley. Additionally, we studied a few prototypical configurations of the shielding layers in the vertical insert as well as on the top.

  16. INERT GAS SHIELD FOR WELDING

    DOEpatents

    Jones, S.O.; Daly, F.V.

    1958-10-14

    S>An inert gas shield is presented for arc-welding materials such as zirconium that tend to oxidize rapidly in air. The device comprises a rectangular metal box into which the welding electrode is introduced through a rubber diaphragm to provide flexibility. The front of the box is provided with a wlndow having a small hole through which flller metal is introduced. The box is supplied with an inert gas to exclude the atmosphere, and with cooling water to promote the solidification of the weld while in tbe inert atmosphere. A separate water-cooled copper backing bar is provided underneath the joint to be welded to contain the melt-through at the root of the joint, shielding the root of the joint with its own supply of inert gas and cooling the deposited weld metal. This device facilitates the welding of large workpieces of zirconium frequently encountered in reactor construction.

  17. X-Ray Computed Tomography Inspection of the Stardust Heat Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNamara, Karen M.; Schneberk, Daniel J.; Empey, Daniel M.; Koshti, Ajay; Pugel, D. Elizabeth; Cozmuta, Ioana; Stackpoole, Mairead; Ruffino, Norman P.; Pompa, Eddie C.; Oliveras, Ovidio; Kontinos, Dean A.

    2010-01-01

    The "Stardust" heat shield, composed of a PICA (Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator) Thermal Protection System (TPS), bonded to a composite aeroshell, contains important features which chronicle its time in space as well as re-entry. To guide the further study of the Stardust heat shield, NASA reviewed a number of techniques for inspection of the article. The goals of the inspection were: 1) to establish the material characteristics of the shield and shield components, 2) record the dimensions of shield components and assembly as compared with the pre-flight condition, 3) provide flight infonnation for validation and verification of the FIAT ablation code and PICA material property model and 4) through the evaluation of the shield material provide input to future missions which employ similar materials. Industrial X-Ray Computed Tomography (CT) is a 3D inspection technology which can provide infonnation on material integrity, material properties (density) and dimensional measurements of the heat shield components. Computed tomographic volumetric inspections can generate a dimensionally correct, quantitatively accurate volume of the shield assembly. Because of the capabilities offered by X-ray CT, NASA chose to use this method to evaluate the Stardust heat shield. Personnel at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) and Lawrence Livermore National Labs (LLNL) recently performed a full scan of the Stardust heat shield using a newly installed X-ray CT system at JSC. This paper briefly discusses the technology used and then presents the following results: 1. CT scans derived dimensions and their comparisons with as-built dimensions anchored with data obtained from samples cut from the heat shield; 2. Measured density variation, char layer thickness, recession and bond line (the adhesive layer between the PICA and the aeroshell) integrity; 3. FIAT predicted recession, density and char layer profiles as well as bondline temperatures Finally suggestions are made as to future uses

  18. Design analysis, robust methods, and stress classification

    SciTech Connect

    Bees, W.J.

    1993-01-01

    This special edition publication volume is comprised of papers presented at the 1993 ASME Pressure Vessels and Piping Conference, July 25--29, 1993 in Denver, Colorado. The papers were prepared for presentations in technical sessions developed under the auspices of the PVPD Committees on Computer Technology, Design and Analysis, Operations Applications and Components. The topics included are: Analysis of Pressure Vessels and Components; Expansion Joints; Robust Methods; Stress Classification; and Non-Linear Analysis. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  19. Simplified method for nonlinear structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.

    1983-01-01

    A simplified inelastic analysis computer program was developed for predicting the stress-strain history of a thermomechanically cycled structure from an elastic solution. The program uses an iterative and incremental procedure to estimate the plastic strains from the material stress-strain properties and a simulated plasticity hardening model. The simplified method was exercised on a number of problems involving uniaxial and multiaxial loading, isothermal and nonisothermal conditions, and different materials and plasticity models. Good agreement was found between these analytical results and nonlinear finite element solutions for these problems. The simplified analysis program used less than 1 percent of the CPU time required for a nonlinear finite element analysis.

  20. Electrodynamic Dust Shield for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, Paul J.; Johansen, Michael R.; Olsen, Robert C.; Raines, Matthew G.; Phillips, James R., III; Cox, Rachel E.; Hogue, Michael D.; Calle, Carlos I.; Pollard, Jacob R. S.

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) has chosen dust mitigation technology as a Global Exploration Roadmap (GER) critical technology need in order to reduce life cycle cost and risk, and increase the probability of mission success. NASA has also included Particulate Contamination Prevention and Mitigation as a cross-cutting technology to be developed for contamination prevention, cleaning and protection. This technology has been highlighted due to the detrimental effect of dust on both human and robotic missions. During manned Apollo missions, dust caused issues with both equipment and crew. Contamination of equipment caused many issues including incorrect instrument readings and increased temperatures due to masking of thermal radiators. The astronauts were directly affected by dust that covered space suits, obscured face shields and later propagated to the cabin and into the crew's eyes and lungs. Robotic missions on Mars were affected when solar panels were obscured by dust thereby reducing the effectiveness of the solar panels. The Electrostatics and Surface Physics Lab in Swamp Works at the Kennedy Space Center has been developing an Electrodynamic Dust Shield (EDS) to remove dust from multiple surfaces, including glass shields and thermal radiators. This technology has been tested in lab environments and has evolved over several years. Tests of the technology include reduced gravity flights (6g) in which Apollo Lunar dust samples were successfully removed from glass shields while under vacuum (1 millipascal). Further development of the technology is underway to reduce the size of the EDS as well as to perform material and component testing outside of the International Space Station (ISS) on the Materials on International Space Station Experiment X (MISSE-X). This experiment is designed to verify that the EDS can withstand the harsh environment of space and will look to closely replicate the solar environment experienced on the moon